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Sample records for respiratory correlated image

  1. Carbon nanotube based respiratory gated micro-CT imaging of a murine model of lung tumors with optical imaging correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burk, Laurel M.; Lee, Yueh Z.; Heathcote, Samuel; Wang, Ko-han; Kim, William Y.; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto

    2011-03-01

    Current optical imaging techniques can successfully measure tumor load in murine models of lung carcinoma but lack structural detail. We demonstrate that respiratory gated micro-CT imaging of such models gives information about structure and correlates with tumor load measurements by optical methods. Four mice with multifocal, Kras-induced tumors expressing firefly luciferase were imaged against four controls using both optical imaging and respiratory gated micro-CT. CT images of anesthetized animals were acquired with a custom CNT-based system using 30 ms x-ray pulses during peak inspiration; respiration motion was tracked with a pressure sensor beneath each animal's abdomen. Optical imaging based on the Luc+ signal correlating with tumor load was performed on a Xenogen IVIS Kinetix. Micro-CT images were post-processed using Osirix, measuring lung volume with region growing. Diameters of the largest three tumors were measured. Relationships between tumor size, lung volumes, and optical signal were compared. CT images and optical signals were obtained for all animals at two time points. In all lobes of the Kras+ mice in all images, tumors were visible; the smallest to be readily identified measured approximately 300 microns diameter. CT-derived tumor volumes and optical signals related linearly, with r=0.94 for all animals. When derived for only tumor bearing animals, r=0.3. The trend of each individual animal's optical signal tracked correctly based on the CT volumes. Interestingly, lung volumes also correlated positively with optical imaging data and tumor volume burden, suggesting active remodeling.

  2. SU-E-J-226: Propagation of Pancreas Target Contours On Respiratory Correlated CT Images Using Deformable Image Registration

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, F

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Respiratory Correlated CT (RCCT) scans to assess intra-fraction motion among pancreatic cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy allow for dose sparing of normal tissues, in particular for the duodenum. Contour propagation of the gross tumor volume (GTV) from one reference respiratory phase to 9 other phases is time consuming. Deformable image registration (DIR) has been successfully used for high contrast disease sites but lower contrast for pancreatic tumors may compromise accuracy. This study evaluates the accuracy of Fast Free Form (FFF) registration-based contour propagation of the GTV on RCCT scans of pancreas cancer patients. Methods: Twenty-four pancreatic cancer patients were retrospectively studied; 20 had tumors in the pancreatic head/neck, 4 in the body/tail. Patients were simulated with RCCT and images were sorted into 10 respiratory phases. A radiation oncologist manually delineated the GTV for 5 phases (0%, 30%, 50%, 70% and 90%). The FFF algorithm was used to map deformations between the EE (50%) phase and each of the other 4 phases. The resultant deformation fields served to propagate GTV contours from EE to the other phases. The Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC), which measures agreement between the DIR-propagated and manually-delineated GTVs, was used to quantitatively examine DIR accuracy. Results: Average DSC over all scans and patients is 0.82 and standard deviation is 0.09 (DSC range 0.97–0.57). For GTV volumes above and below the median volume of 20.2 cc, a Wilcoxon rank-sum test shows significantly different DSC (p=0.0000002). For the GTVs above the median volume, average +/− SD is 0.85 +/− 0.07; and for the GTVs below, the average +/− SD is 0.75 +/−0.08. Conclusion: For pancreatic tumors, the FFF DIR algorithm accurately propagated the GTV between the images in different phases of RCCT, with improved performance for larger tumors.

  3. Impact of CT attenuation correction method on quantitative respiratory-correlated (4D) PET/CT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Nyflot, Matthew J.; Lee, Tzu-Cheng; Alessio, Adam M.; Kinahan, Paul E.; Wollenweber, Scott D.; Stearns, Charles W.; Bowen, Stephen R.

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: Respiratory-correlated positron emission tomography (PET/CT) 4D PET/CT is used to mitigate errors from respiratory motion; however, the optimal CT attenuation correction (CTAC) method for 4D PET/CT is unknown. The authors performed a phantom study to evaluate the quantitative performance of CTAC methods for 4D PET/CT in the ground truth setting. Methods: A programmable respiratory motion phantom with a custom movable insert designed to emulate a lung lesion and lung tissue was used for this study. The insert was driven by one of five waveforms: two sinusoidal waveforms or three patient-specific respiratory waveforms. 3DPET and 4DPET images of the phantom under motion were acquired and reconstructed with six CTAC methods: helical breath-hold (3DHEL), helical free-breathing (3DMOT), 4D phase-averaged (4DAVG), 4D maximum intensity projection (4DMIP), 4D phase-matched (4DMATCH), and 4D end-exhale (4DEXH) CTAC. Recovery of SUV{sub max}, SUV{sub mean}, SUV{sub peak}, and segmented tumor volume was evaluated as RC{sub max}, RC{sub mean}, RC{sub peak}, and RC{sub vol}, representing percent difference relative to the static ground truth case. Paired Wilcoxon tests and Kruskal–Wallis ANOVA were used to test for significant differences. Results: For 4DPET imaging, the maximum intensity projection CTAC produced significantly more accurate recovery coefficients than all other CTAC methods (p < 0.0001 over all metrics). Over all motion waveforms, ratios of 4DMIP CTAC recovery were 0.2 ± 5.4, −1.8 ± 6.5, −3.2 ± 5.0, and 3.0 ± 5.9 for RC{sub max}, RC{sub peak}, RC{sub mean}, and RC{sub vol}. In comparison, recovery coefficients for phase-matched CTAC were −8.4 ± 5.3, −10.5 ± 6.2, −7.6 ± 5.0, and −13.0 ± 7.7 for RC{sub max}, RC{sub peak}, RC{sub mean}, and RC{sub vol}. When testing differences between phases over all CTAC methods and waveforms, end-exhale phases were significantly more accurate (p = 0.005). However, these differences were driven by

  4. Image-Guided Radiotherapy for Liver Cancer Using Respiratory-Correlated Computed Tomography and Cone-Beam Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Guckenberger, Matthias Sweeney, Reinhart A.; Wilbert, Juergen; Krieger, Thomas; Richter, Anne; Baier, Kurt; Mueller, Gerd; Sauer, Otto; Flentje, Michael

    2008-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate a novel four-dimensional (4D) image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) technique in stereotactic body RT for liver tumors. Methods and Materials: For 11 patients with 13 intrahepatic tumors, a respiratory-correlated 4D computed tomography (CT) scan was acquired at treatment planning. The target was defined using CT series reconstructed at end-inhalation and end-exhalation. The liver was delineated on these two CT series and served as a reference for image guidance. A cone-beam CT scan was acquired after patient positioning; the blurred diaphragm dome was interpreted as a probability density function showing the motion range of the liver. Manual contour matching of the liver structures from the planning 4D CT scan with the cone-beam CT scan was performed. Inter- and intrafractional uncertainties of target position and motion range were evaluated, and interobserver variability of the 4D-IGRT technique was tested. Results: The workflow of 4D-IGRT was successfully practiced in all patients. The absolute error in the liver position and error in relation to the bony anatomy was 8 {+-} 4 mm and 5 {+-} 2 mm (three-dimensional vector), respectively. Margins of 4-6 mm were calculated for compensation of the intrafractional drifts of the liver. The motion range of the diaphragm dome was reproducible within 5 mm for 11 of 13 lesions, and the interobserver variability of the 4D-IGRT technique was small (standard deviation, 1.5 mm). In 4 patients, the position of the intrahepatic lesion was directly verified using a mobile in-room CT scanner after application of intravenous contrast. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that 4D image guidance using liver contour matching between respiratory-correlated CT and cone-beam CT scans increased the accuracy compared with stereotactic positioning and compared with IGRT without consideration of breathing motion.

  5. Ultrasound image-based respiratory motion tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Youngkyoo; Kim, Jung-Bae; Kim, Yong Sun; Bang, Won-Chul; Kim, James D. K.; Kim, ChangYeong

    2012-03-01

    Respiratory motion tracking has been issues for MR/CT imaging and noninvasive surgery such as HIFU and radiotherapy treatment when we apply these imaging or therapy technologies to moving organs such as liver, kidney or pancreas. Currently, some bulky and burdensome devices are placed externally on skin to estimate respiratory motion of an organ. It estimates organ motion indirectly using skin motion, not directly using organ itself. In this paper, we propose a system that measures directly the motion of organ itself only using ultrasound image. Our system has automatically selected a window in image sequences, called feature window, which is able to measure respiratory motion robustly even to noisy ultrasound images. The organ's displacement on each ultrasound image has been directly calculated through the feature window. It is very convenient to use since it exploits a conventional ultrasound probe. In this paper, we show that our proposed method can robustly extract respiratory motion signal with regardless of reference frame. It is superior to other image based method such as Mutual Information (MI) or Correlation Coefficient (CC). They are sensitive to what the reference frame is selected. Furthermore, our proposed method gives us clear information of the phase of respiratory cycle such as during inspiration or expiration and so on since it calculate not similarity measurement like MI or CC but actual organ's displacement.

  6. A comparison of lung motion measured using implanted electromagnetic transponders and motion algorithmically predicted using external surrogates as an alternative to respiratory correlated CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lechleiter, Kristen M.; Low, Daniel A.; Chaudhari, Amir; Lu, Wei; Hubenschmidt, James P.; Mayse, Martin L.; Dimmer, Steven C.; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Parikh, Parag J.

    2007-03-01

    Three-dimensional volumetric imaging correlated with respiration (4DCT) typically utilizes external breathing surrogates and phase-based models to determine lung tissue motion. However, 4DCT requires time consuming post-processing and the relationship between external breathing surrogates and lung tissue motion is not clearly defined. This study compares algorithms using external respiratory motion surrogates as predictors of internal lung motion tracked in real-time by electromagnetic transponders (Calypso® Medical Technologies) implanted in a canine model. Simultaneous spirometry, bellows, and transponder positions measurements were acquired during free breathing and variable ventilation respiratory patterns. Functions of phase, amplitude, tidal volume, and airflow were examined by least-squares regression analysis to determine which algorithm provided the best estimate of internal motion. The cosine phase model performed the worst of all models analyzed (R2 = 31.6%, free breathing, and R2 = 14.9%, variable ventilation). All algorithms performed better during free breathing than during variable ventilation measurements. The 5D model of tidal volume and airflow predicted transponder location better than amplitude or either of the two phasebased models analyzed, with correlation coefficients of 66.1% and 64.4% for free breathing and variable ventilation respectively. Real-time implanted transponder based measurements provide a direct method for determining lung tissue location. Current phase-based or amplitude-based respiratory motion algorithms cannot as accurately predict lung tissue motion in an irregularly breathing subject as a model including tidal volume and airflow. Further work is necessary to quantify the long term stability of prediction capabilities using amplitude and phase based algorithms for multiple lung tumor positions over time.

  7. Respiratory motion correction in emission tomography image reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Mauricio; Malandain, Grégoire; Koulibaly, Pierre Malick; González Ballester, Miguel A; Darcourt, Jacques

    2005-01-01

    In Emission Tomography imaging, respiratory motion causes artifacts in lungs and cardiac reconstructed images, which lead to misinterpretations and imprecise diagnosis. Solutions like respiratory gating, correlated dynamic PET techniques, list-mode data based techniques and others have been tested with improvements over the spatial activity distribution in lungs lesions, but with the disadvantages of requiring additional instrumentation or discarding part of the projection data used for reconstruction. The objective of this study is to incorporate respiratory motion correction directly into the image reconstruction process, without any additional acquisition protocol consideration. To this end, we propose an extension to the Maximum Likelihood Expectation Maximization (MLEM) algorithm that includes a respiratory motion model, which takes into account the displacements and volume deformations produced by the respiratory motion during the data acquisition process. We present results from synthetic simulations incorporating real respiratory motion as well as from phantom and patient data.

  8. SU-E-J-253: Evaluation of 4DCT Images with Correlation of RPM Signals to Tumor Motion for Respiratory-Gated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, TK; Ewald, A; Schultz, T; Park, SY

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The amplitudes of lung tumor target motion and RPM signals are different from each other. Also, RPM system does not have in-depth RPM signal analysis tool. We have developed an algorithm that analyzes RPM signals for its stability as well as correlativity to the tumor motion. Methods: We used a Philips Big Bore CT scanner with a Varian Real-Time Position Management™ (RPM) system attached. 4DCT images were reviewed and tumor motion amplitudes of full breathing in superior-inferior, anterior-posterior, and left-right directions were measured. RPM signals were analyzed with the algorithm developed with Matlab. Average signal period, amplitude and statistical stability of the full breathing pattern as well as the pattern around full expiration were calculated. RPM signal amplitudes were normalized to measured tumor motion amplitudes so that selected gating phases (30%–70% or 40%–60%) allow tumor motion under 5.0mm. Results: Twelve patient cases were analyzed in this study with GTV sizes ranged from 1.0cm to 3.0cm diameter. The periods and amplitudes of RPM signal ranged from 3.1seconds to 6.5seconds and from 0.2cm to 1.7cm, respectively. RPM signals were most stable at full expiration. The standard deviation of the RPM signal peaks at full expiration was <0.11cm, and that of gated amplitudes was <0.25cm. Tumor motion amplitudes were primary in superior-inferior direction and minor (<=0.2cm) in other directions on all analyzed cases, ranged from 0.2cm to 2.5cm. The amplitudes increases with the tumor located toward the diaphragm. The gated phases were selected so that the average gated tumor motion amplitude as well as that plus deviation became under 0.5cm in superior-inferior direction. Conclusion: We were able to determine the respiratory-gated phases in RPM signals employing measured tumor motion amplitudes as well as developed RPM signal analyzer through correlation process. The RPM signal amplitudes do not represent tumor motion because of its

  9. Correlation Plenoptic Imaging.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, Milena; Pepe, Francesco V; Garuccio, Augusto; Scarcelli, Giuliano

    2016-06-01

    Plenoptic imaging is a promising optical modality that simultaneously captures the location and the propagation direction of light in order to enable three-dimensional imaging in a single shot. However, in standard plenoptic imaging systems, the maximum spatial and angular resolutions are fundamentally linked; thereby, the maximum achievable depth of field is inversely proportional to the spatial resolution. We propose to take advantage of the second-order correlation properties of light to overcome this fundamental limitation. In this Letter, we demonstrate that the correlation in both momentum and position of chaotic light leads to the enhanced refocusing power of correlation plenoptic imaging with respect to standard plenoptic imaging. PMID:27314718

  10. Correlation Plenoptic Imaging.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, Milena; Pepe, Francesco V; Garuccio, Augusto; Scarcelli, Giuliano

    2016-06-01

    Plenoptic imaging is a promising optical modality that simultaneously captures the location and the propagation direction of light in order to enable three-dimensional imaging in a single shot. However, in standard plenoptic imaging systems, the maximum spatial and angular resolutions are fundamentally linked; thereby, the maximum achievable depth of field is inversely proportional to the spatial resolution. We propose to take advantage of the second-order correlation properties of light to overcome this fundamental limitation. In this Letter, we demonstrate that the correlation in both momentum and position of chaotic light leads to the enhanced refocusing power of correlation plenoptic imaging with respect to standard plenoptic imaging.

  11. Strong correlation between lung ultrasound and chest computerized tomography imaging for the detection of acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome in rats

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Huan; Huang, Daozheng; Guo, Liheng; Chen, Quanfu; Zhong, Wenzhao

    2016-01-01

    Background Lung ultrasound (LUS) is a clinical imaging technique for diagnosing acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). In humans and several large animals, LUS demonstrates similar specificity and sensitivity to computerized tomography (CT) scanning. Current study evaluated the degree of agreement between LUS and CT imaging in characterizing ALI/ARDS in rats. Methods Thirty male Sprague-Dawley rats were imaged by LUS before randomization into three groups to receive intratracheal saline, 3 or 6 mg/kg LPS respectively (n=10). LUS and CT imaging was conducted 2 hours after instillation. Cross table analyses and kappa statistics were used to determine agreement levels between LUS and CT assessments of lung condition. Results Before instillation, rats presented with a largely A-pattern in LUS images, however, a significantly increase B-lines were observed in all groups after instillation and showed dose response to LPS or to saline. One rat treated with 6 mg/kg lipopolysaccharide (LPS) presented with lung consolidation. The agreement between the LUS and the CT in detecting the main characteristics of ALI/ARDS in rat was strong (r=0.758, P<0.01, k=0.737). Conclusions In conclusion, LUS detects ALI/ARDS with high agreement with micro PET/CT scanning in a rat model, suggesting that LUS represents a positive refinement in rat ALI/ARDS disease models. PMID:27499930

  12. Correlation-Peak Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, A.; Metzler, A.; Köckenberger, W.; Izquierdo, M.; Komor, E.; Haase, A.; Décorps, M.; von Kienlin, M.

    1996-08-01

    Identification and quantitation in conventional1H spectroscopic imagingin vivois often hampered by the small chemical-shift range. To improve the spectral resolution of spectroscopic imaging, homonuclear two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy has been combined with phase encoding of the spatial dimensions. From the theoretical description of the coherence-transfer signal in the Fourier-transform domain, a comprehensive acquisition and processing strategy is presented that includes optimization of the width and the position of the acquisition windows, matched filtering of the signal envelope, and graphical presentation of the cross peak of interest. The procedure has been applied to image the spatial distribution of the correlation peaks from specific spin systems in the hypocotyl of castor bean (Ricinus communis) seedlings. Despite the overlap of many resonances, correlation-peak imaging made it possible to observe a number of proton resonances, such as those of sucrose, β-glucose, glutamine/glutamate, lysine, and arginine.

  13. Shape-correlated deformation statistics for respiratory motion prediction in 4D lung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaoxiao; Oguz, Ipek; Pizer, Stephen M.; Mageras, Gig S.

    2010-02-01

    4D image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) for free-breathing lungs is challenging due to the complicated respiratory dynamics. Effective modeling of respiratory motion is crucial to account for the motion affects on the dose to tumors. We propose a shape-correlated statistical model on dense image deformations for patient-specic respiratory motion estimation in 4D lung IGRT. Using the shape deformations of the high-contrast lungs as the surrogate, the statistical model trained from the planning CTs can be used to predict the image deformation during delivery verication time, with the assumption that the respiratory motion at both times are similar for the same patient. Dense image deformation fields obtained by diffeomorphic image registrations characterize the respiratory motion within one breathing cycle. A point-based particle optimization algorithm is used to obtain the shape models of lungs with group-wise surface correspondences. Canonical correlation analysis (CCA) is adopted in training to maximize the linear correlation between the shape variations of the lungs and the corresponding dense image deformations. Both intra- and inter-session CT studies are carried out on a small group of lung cancer patients and evaluated in terms of the tumor location accuracies. The results suggest potential applications using the proposed method.

  14. Digital Image Correlation Engine

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, Dan; Crozier, Paul; Reu, Phil

    2015-10-06

    DICe is an open source digital image correlation (DIC) tool intended for use as a module in an external application or as a standalone analysis code. It's primary capability is computing full –field displacements and strains from sequences of digital These images are typically of a material sample undergoing a materials characterization experiment, but DICe is also useful for other applications (for example, trajectory tracking). DICe is machine portable (Windows, Linux and Mac) and can be effectively deployed on a high performance computing platform. Capabilities from DICe can be invoked through a library interface, via source code integration of DICe classes or through a graphical user interface.

  15. Image correlation and sampling study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popp, D. J.; Mccormack, D. S.; Sedwick, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    The development of analytical approaches for solving image correlation and image sampling of multispectral data is discussed. Relevant multispectral image statistics which are applicable to image correlation and sampling are identified. The general image statistics include intensity mean, variance, amplitude histogram, power spectral density function, and autocorrelation function. The translation problem associated with digital image registration and the analytical means for comparing commonly used correlation techniques are considered. General expressions for determining the reconstruction error for specific image sampling strategies are developed.

  16. Digital Image Correlation Engine

    2015-10-06

    DICe is an open source digital image correlation (DIC) tool intended for use as a module in an external application or as a standalone analysis code. It's primary capability is computing full –field displacements and strains from sequences of digital These images are typically of a material sample undergoing a materials characterization experiment, but DICe is also useful for other applications (for example, trajectory tracking). DICe is machine portable (Windows, Linux and Mac) and canmore » be effectively deployed on a high performance computing platform. Capabilities from DICe can be invoked through a library interface, via source code integration of DICe classes or through a graphical user interface.« less

  17. Assessment of patient selection criteria for quantitative imaging with respiratory-gated positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Stephen R; Pierce, Larry A; Alessio, Adam M; Liu, Chi; Wollenweber, Scott D; Stearns, Charles W; Kinahan, Paul E

    2014-07-01

    The objective of this investigation was to propose techniques for determining which patients are likely to benefit from quantitative respiratory-gated imaging by correlating respiratory patterns to changes in positron emission tomography (PET) metrics. Twenty-six lung and liver cancer patients underwent PET/computed tomography exams with recorded chest/abdominal displacements. Static and adaptive amplitude-gated [[Formula: see text

  18. Model-based respiratory motion compensation for emission tomography image reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Reyes, M; Malandain, G; Koulibaly, P M; González-Ballester, M A; Darcourt, J

    2007-06-21

    In emission tomography imaging, respiratory motion causes artifacts in lungs and cardiac reconstructed images, which lead to misinterpretations, imprecise diagnosis, impairing of fusion with other modalities, etc. Solutions like respiratory gating, correlated dynamic PET techniques, list-mode data based techniques and others have been tested, which lead to improvements over the spatial activity distribution in lungs lesions, but which have the disadvantages of requiring additional instrumentation or the need of discarding part of the projection data used for reconstruction. The objective of this study is to incorporate respiratory motion compensation directly into the image reconstruction process, without any additional acquisition protocol consideration. To this end, we propose an extension to the maximum likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM) algorithm that includes a respiratory motion model, which takes into account the displacements and volume deformations produced by the respiratory motion during the data acquisition process. We present results from synthetic simulations incorporating real respiratory motion as well as from phantom and patient data.

  19. SU-E-J-235: Audiovisual Biofeedback Improves the Correlation Between Internal and External Respiratory Motion

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, D; Pollock, S; Keall, P; Greer, P; Ludbrook, J; Paganelli, C; Kim, T

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: External respiratory surrogates are often used to predict internal lung tumor motion for beam gating but the assumption of correlation between external and internal surrogates is not always verified resulting in amplitude mismatch and time shift. To test the hypothesis that audiovisual (AV) biofeedback improves the correlation between internal and external respiratory motion, in order to improve the accuracy of respiratory-gated treatments for lung cancer radiotherapy. Methods: In nine lung cancer patients, 2D coronal and sagittal cine-MR images were acquired across two MRI sessions (pre- and mid-treatment) with (1) free breathing (FB) and (2) AV biofeedback. External anterior-posterior (AP) respiratory motions of (a) chest and (b) abdomen were simultaneously acquired with physiological measurement unit (PMU, 3T Skyra, Siemens Healthcare Erlangen, Germany) and real-time position management (RPM) system (Varian, Palo Alto, USA), respectively. Internal superior-inferior (SI) respiratory motions of (c) lung tumor (i.e. centroid of auto-segmented lung tumor) and (d) diaphragm (i.e. upper liver dome) were measured from individual cine-MR images across 32 dataset. The four respiratory motions were then synchronized with the cine-MR image acquisition time. Correlation coefficients were calculated in the time variation of two nominated respiratory motions: (1) chest-abdomen, (2) abdomen-diaphragm and (3) diaphragm-lung tumor. The three combinations were compared between FB and AV biofeedback. Results: Compared to FB, AV biofeedback improved chest-abdomen correlation by 17% (p=0.005) from 0.75±0.23 to 0.90±0.05 and abdomen-diaphragm correlation by 4% (p=0.058) from 0.91±0.11 to 0.95±0.05. Compared to FB, AV biofeedback improved diaphragm-lung tumor correlation by 12% (p=0.023) from 0.65±0.21 to 0.74±0.16. Conclusions: Our results demonstrated that AV biofeedback significantly improved the correlation of internal and external respiratory motion, thus

  20. Correlated imaging through atmospheric turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Pengli; Gong Wenlin; Shen Xia; Han Shensheng

    2010-09-15

    Correlated imaging through atmospheric turbulence is studied, and the analytical expressions describing turbulence effects on image resolution are derived. Compared with direct imaging, correlated imaging can reduce the influence of turbulence to a certain extent and reconstruct high-resolution images. The result is backed up by numerical simulations, in which turbulence-induced phase perturbations are simulated by random-phase screens inserted into propagation paths.

  1. A simple method for labeling CT images with respiratory states

    SciTech Connect

    Berlinger, Kajetan; Sauer, Otto; Vences, Lucia; Roth, Michael

    2006-09-15

    A method is described for labeling CT images with their respiratory state by a needle, connected to the patient's chest/abdomen. By means of a leverage the needle follows the abdominal respiratory motion. The needle is visible as a blurred spot in every CT slice. The method was tested with nine patients. A series of volume scans during free breathing was performed. The detected positions of the moving needle in every single slice were compared to each other thus enabling respiratory state assignment. The tool is an inexpensive alternative to complex respiratory measuring tools for four dimensional (4D) CT and was greatly accepted in the clinic due to its simplicity.

  2. Respiratory Amplitude Guided 4-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Yanle; Caruthers, Shelton D.; Low, Daniel A.; Parikh, Parag J.; Mutic, Sasa

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of prospectively guiding 4-dimensional (4D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) image acquisition using triggers at preselected respiratory amplitudes to achieve T{sub 2} weighting for abdominal motion tracking. Methods and Materials: A respiratory amplitude-based triggering system was developed and integrated into a commercial turbo spin echo MRI sequence. Initial feasibility tests were performed on healthy human study participants. Four respiratory states, the middle and the end of inhalation and exhalation, were used to trigger 4D MRI image acquisition of the liver. To achieve T{sub 2} weighting, the echo time and repetition time were set to 75 milliseconds and 4108 milliseconds, respectively. Single-shot acquisition, together with parallel imaging and partial k-space imaging techniques, was used to improve image acquisition efficiency. 4D MRI image sets composed of axial or sagittal slices were acquired. Results: Respiratory data measured and logged by the MRI scanner showed that the triggers occurred at the appropriate respiratory levels. Liver motion could be easily observed on both 4D MRI image datasets by sensing either the change of liver in size and shape (axial) or diaphragm motion (sagittal). Both 4D MRI image datasets were T{sub 2}-weighted as expected. Conclusions: This study demonstrated the feasibility of achieving T{sub 2}-weighted 4D MRI images using amplitude-based respiratory triggers. With the aid of the respiratory amplitude-based triggering system, the proposed method is compatible with most MRI sequences and therefore has the potential to improve tumor-tissue contrast in abdominal tumor motion imaging.

  3. Fiducial marker for correlating images

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Lisa Marie; Smith, Randy J.; Warren, John B.; Elliott, Donald

    2011-06-21

    The invention relates to a fiducial marker having a marking grid that is used to correlate and view images produced by different imaging modalities or different imaging and viewing modalities. More specifically, the invention relates to the fiducial marking grid that has a grid pattern for producing either a viewing image and/or a first analytical image that can be overlaid with at least one other second analytical image in order to view a light path or to image different imaging modalities. Depending on the analysis, the grid pattern has a single layer of a certain thickness or at least two layers of certain thicknesses. In either case, the grid pattern is imageable by each imaging or viewing modality used in the analysis. Further, when viewing a light path, the light path of the analytical modality cannot be visualized by viewing modality (e.g., a light microscope objective). By correlating these images, the ability to analyze a thin sample that is, for example, biological in nature but yet contains trace metal ions is enhanced. Specifically, it is desired to analyze both the organic matter of the biological sample and the trace metal ions contained within the biological sample without adding or using extrinsic labels or stains.

  4. Technical note: Correlation of respiratory motion between external patient surface and internal anatomical landmarks

    PubMed Central

    Fayad, Hadi; Pan, Tinsu; Clément, Jean-François; Visvikis, Dimitris

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Current respiratory motion monitoring devices used for motion synchronization in medical imaging and radiotherapy provide either 1D respiratory signals over a specific region or 3D information based on few external or internal markers. On the other hand, newer technology may offer the potential to monitor the entire patient external surface in real time. The main objective of this study was to assess the motion correlation between such an external patient surface and internal anatomical landmarks motion. Methods Four dimensional Computed Tomography (4D CT) volumes for ten patients were used in this study. Anatomical landmarks were manually selected in the thoracic region across the 4D CT datasets by two experts. The landmarks included normal structures as well as the tumour location. In addition, a distance map representing the entire external patient surface, which corresponds to surfaces acquired by a Time of Flight (ToF) camera or similar devices, was created by segmenting the skin of all 4D CT volumes using a thresholding algorithm. Finally, the correlation between the internal landmarks and external surface motion was evaluated for different regions (placement and size) throughout a patient’s surface. Results Significant variability was observed in the motion of the different parts of the external patient surface. The larger motion magnitude was consistently measured in the central regions of the abdominal and the thoracic areas for the different patient datasets considered. The highest correlation coefficients were observed between the motion of these external surface areas and internal landmarks such as the diaphragm and mediastinum structures as well as the tumour location landmarks (0.8 ± 0.18 and 0.72 ± 0.12 for the abdominal and the thoracic regions respectively). Worse correlation was observed when one considered landmarks not significantly influenced by respiratory motion such as the apex and the sternum. Discussion and conclusions There

  5. 4D MR imaging using robust internal respiratory signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, CheukKai; Wen, Zhifei; Stemkens, Bjorn; Tijssen, R. H. N.; van den Berg, C. A. T.; Hwang, Ken-Pin; Beddar, Sam

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility of using internal respiratory (IR) surrogates to sort four-dimensional (4D) magnetic resonance (MR) images. The 4D MR images were constructed by acquiring fast 2D cine MR images sequentially, with each slice scanned for more than one breathing cycle. The 4D volume was then sorted retrospectively using the IR signal. In this study, we propose to use multiple low-frequency components in the Fourier space as well as the anterior body boundary as potential IR surrogates. From these potential IR surrogates, we used a clustering algorithm to identify those that best represented the respiratory pattern to derive the IR signal. A study with healthy volunteers was performed to assess the feasibility of the proposed IR signal. We compared this proposed IR signal with the respiratory signal obtained using respiratory bellows. Overall, 99% of the IR signals matched the bellows signals. The average difference between the end inspiration times in the IR signal and bellows signal was 0.18 s in this cohort of matching signals. For the acquired images corresponding to the other 1% of non-matching signal pairs, the respiratory motion shown in the images was coherent with the respiratory phases determined by the IR signal, but not the bellows signal. This suggested that the IR signal determined by the proposed method could potentially correct the faulty bellows signal. The sorted 4D images showed minimal mismatched artefacts and potential clinical applicability. The proposed IR signal therefore provides a feasible alternative to effectively sort MR images in 4D.

  6. Edge-based correlation image registration for multispectral imaging

    DOEpatents

    Nandy, Prabal

    2009-11-17

    Registration information for images of a common target obtained from a plurality of different spectral bands can be obtained by combining edge detection and phase correlation. The images are edge-filtered, and pairs of the edge-filtered images are then phase correlated to produce phase correlation images. The registration information can be determined based on these phase correlation images.

  7. Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy Imaging during Respiratory Burst in Human Cell

    PubMed Central

    Kikuchi, Hiroyuki; Prasad, Ankush; Matsuoka, Ryo; Aoyagi, Shigeo; Matsue, Tomokazu; Kasai, Shigenobu

    2016-01-01

    Phagocytic cells, such as neutrophils and monocytes, consume oxygen and generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) in response to external stimuli. Among the various ROS, the superoxide anion radical is known to be primarily produced by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate hydrogen (NADPH) oxidase. In the current study, we attempt to evaluate the respiratory burst by monitoring the rapid consumption of oxygen by using scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) imaging. The respiratory burst was measured in a human monocytic cell line (THP-1 cells) derived from an acute monocytic leukemia patient under the effect of the exogenous addition of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, which acts as a differentiation inducer. SECM imaging composed of a microelectrode was used to compare oxygen consumption between normal cellular respiration and during respiratory burst in THP-1 cells. Two-dimensional respiratory activity imaging was performed using XY-scan. In addition, the quantitative evaluation of oxygen consumption in THP-1 cells was performed using a Z-scan. The results obtained show higher consumption of oxygen in cells undergoing respiratory burst. SECM imaging is thus claimed to be a highly sensitive and appropriate technique compared to other existing techniques available for evaluating oxidative stress in human cells, making it potentially useful for widespread applications in biomedical research and clinical trials. PMID:26903876

  8. Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy Imaging during Respiratory Burst in Human Cell.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Hiroyuki; Prasad, Ankush; Matsuoka, Ryo; Aoyagi, Shigeo; Matsue, Tomokazu; Kasai, Shigenobu

    2016-01-01

    Phagocytic cells, such as neutrophils and monocytes, consume oxygen and generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) in response to external stimuli. Among the various ROS, the superoxide anion radical is known to be primarily produced by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate hydrogen (NADPH) oxidase. In the current study, we attempt to evaluate the respiratory burst by monitoring the rapid consumption of oxygen by using scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) imaging. The respiratory burst was measured in a human monocytic cell line (THP-1 cells) derived from an acute monocytic leukemia patient under the effect of the exogenous addition of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, which acts as a differentiation inducer. SECM imaging composed of a microelectrode was used to compare oxygen consumption between normal cellular respiration and during respiratory burst in THP-1 cells. Two-dimensional respiratory activity imaging was performed using XY-scan. In addition, the quantitative evaluation of oxygen consumption in THP-1 cells was performed using a Z-scan. The results obtained show higher consumption of oxygen in cells undergoing respiratory burst. SECM imaging is thus claimed to be a highly sensitive and appropriate technique compared to other existing techniques available for evaluating oxidative stress in human cells, making it potentially useful for widespread applications in biomedical research and clinical trials.

  9. The correlation between internal and external markers for abdominal tumors: Implications for respiratory gating

    SciTech Connect

    Gierga, David P. . E-mail: dgierga@partners.org; Brewer, Johanna; Sharp, Gregory C.; Betke, Margrit; Willett, Christopher G.; Chen, George T.Y.

    2005-04-01

    Purpose: The correlation of the respiratory motion of external patient markers and abdominal tumors was examined. Data of this type are important for image-guided therapy techniques, such as respiratory gating, that monitor the movement of external fiducials. Methods and Materials: Fluoroscopy sessions for 4 patients with internal, radiopaque tumor fiducial clips were analyzed by computer vision techniques. The motion of the internal clips and the external markers placed on the patient's abdominal skin surface were quantified and correlated. Results: In general, the motion of the tumor and external markers were well correlated. The maximum amount of peak-to-peak craniocaudal tumor motion was 2.5 cm. The ratio of tumor motion to external-marker motion ranged from 0.85 to 7.1. The variation in tumor position for a given external-marker position ranged from 2 to 9 mm. The period of the breathing cycle ranged from 2.7 to 4.5 seconds, and the frequency patterns for both the tumor and the external markers were similar. Conclusions: Although tumor motion generally correlated well with external fiducial marker motion, relatively large underlying tumor motion can occur compared with external-marker motion and variations in the tumor position for a given marker position. Treatment margins should be determined on the basis of a detailed understanding of tumor motion, as opposed to relying only on external-marker information.

  10. Image-based respiratory motion compensation for fluoroscopic coronary roadmapping.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ying; Tsin, Yanghai; Sundar, Hari; Sauer, Frank

    2010-01-01

    We present a new image-based respiratory motion compensation method for coronary roadmapping in fluoroscopic images. A temporal analysis scheme is proposed to identify static structures in the image gradient domain. An extended Lucas-Kanade algorithm involving a weighted sum-of-squared-difference (WSSD) measure is proposed to estimate the soft tissue motion in the presence of static structures. A temporally compositional motion model is used to deal with large image motion incurred by deep breathing. Promising results have been shown in the experiments conducted on clinical data. PMID:20879411

  11. Image-based respiratory motion compensation for fluoroscopic coronary roadmapping.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ying; Tsin, Yanghai; Sundar, Hari; Sauer, Frank

    2010-01-01

    We present a new image-based respiratory motion compensation method for coronary roadmapping in fluoroscopic images. A temporal analysis scheme is proposed to identify static structures in the image gradient domain. An extended Lucas-Kanade algorithm involving a weighted sum-of-squared-difference (WSSD) measure is proposed to estimate the soft tissue motion in the presence of static structures. A temporally compositional motion model is used to deal with large image motion incurred by deep breathing. Promising results have been shown in the experiments conducted on clinical data.

  12. The influence of respiratory motion on CT image volume definition

    SciTech Connect

    Rodríguez-Romero, Ruth Castro-Tejero, Pablo

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: Radiotherapy treatments are based on geometric and density information acquired from patient CT scans. It is well established that breathing motion during scan acquisition induces motion artifacts in CT images, which can alter the size, shape, and density of a patient's anatomy. The aim of this work is to examine and evaluate the impact of breathing motion on multislice CT imaging with respiratory synchronization (4DCT) and without it (3DCT). Methods: A specific phantom with a movable insert was used. Static and dynamic phantom acquisitions were obtained with a multislice CT. Four sinusoidal breath patterns were simulated to move known geometric structures longitudinally. Respiratory synchronized acquisitions (4DCT) were performed to generate images during inhale, intermediate, and exhale phases using prospective and retrospective techniques. Static phantom data were acquired in helical and sequential mode to define a baseline for each type of respiratory 4DCT technique. Taking into account the fact that respiratory 4DCT is not always available, 3DCT helical image studies were also acquired for several CT rotation periods. To study breath and acquisition coupling when respiratory 4DCT was not performed, the beginning of the CT image acquisition was matched with inhale, intermediate, or exhale respiratory phases, for each breath pattern. Other coupling scenarios were evaluated by simulating different phantom and CT acquisition parameters. Motion induced variations in shape and density were quantified by automatic threshold volume generation and Dice similarity coefficient calculation. The structure mass center positions were also determined to make a comparison with their theoretical expected position. Results: 4DCT acquisitions provided volume and position accuracies within ±3% and ±2 mm for structure dimensions >2 cm, breath amplitude ≤15 mm, and breath period ≥3 s. The smallest object (1 cm diameter) exceeded 5% volume variation for the breath

  13. SU-E-J-48: Development of An Abdominal Compression Device for Respiratory Correlated Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, T; Kang, S; Kim, D; Suh, T; Kim, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to develop the abdominal compression device which could control pressure level according to the abdominal respiratory motion and evaluate its feasibility. Methods: In this study, we focused on developing the abdominal compression device which could control pressure level at any point of time so the developed device is possible to use a variety of purpose (gating technique or respiratory training system) while maintaining the merit of the existing commercial device. The compression device (air pad form) was designed to be able to compress the front and side of abdomen and the pressure level of the abdomen is controlled by air flow. Pressure level of abdomen (air flow) was determined using correlation data between external abdominal motion and respiratory volume signal measured by spirometer. In order to verify the feasibility of the device, it was necessary to confirm the correlation between the abdominal respiratory motion and respiratory volume signal and cooperation with respiratory training system also checked. Results: In the previous study, we could find that the correlation coefficient ratio between diaphragm and respiratory volume signal measured by spirometer was 0.95. In this study, we confirmed the correlation between the respiratory volume signal and the external abdominal motion measured by belt-transducer (correlation coefficient ratio was 0.92) and used the correlated respiratory volume data as an abdominal pressure level. It was possible to control the pressure level with negligible time delay and respiratory volume data based guiding waveforms could be properly inserted into the respiratory training system. Conclusion: Through this feasibility study, we confirmed the correlation between the respiratory volume signal and the external abdominal motion. Also initial assessment of the device and its compatibility with the respiratory training system were verified. Further study on application in respiratory gated

  14. Human torso phantom for imaging of heart with realistic modes of cardiac and respiratory motion

    DOEpatents

    Boutchko, Rostyslav; Balakrishnan, Karthikayan; Gullberg, Grant T; O& #x27; Neil, James P

    2013-09-17

    A human torso phantom and its construction, wherein the phantom mimics respiratory and cardiac cycles in a human allowing acquisition of medical imaging data under conditions simulating patient cardiac and respiratory motion.

  15. Dynamic volume vs respiratory correlated 4DCT for motion assessment in radiation therapy simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Coolens, Catherine; Bracken, John; Driscoll, Brandon; Hope, Andrew; Jaffray, David

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: Conventional (i.e., respiratory-correlated) 4DCT exploits the repetitive nature of breathing to provide an estimate of motion; however, it has limitations due to binning artifacts and irregular breathing in actual patient breathing patterns. The aim of this work was to evaluate the accuracy and image quality of a dynamic volume, CT approach (4D{sub vol}) using a 320-slice CT scanner to minimize these limitations, wherein entire image volumes are acquired dynamically without couch movement. This will be compared to the conventional respiratory-correlated 4DCT approach (RCCT). Methods: 4D{sub vol} CT was performed and characterized on an in-house, programmable respiratory motion phantom containing multiple geometric and morphological ''tumor'' objects over a range of regular and irregular patient breathing traces obtained from 3D fluoroscopy and compared to RCCT. The accuracy of volumetric capture and breathing displacement were evaluated and compared with the ground truth values and with the results reported using RCCT. A motion model was investigated to validate the number of motion samples needed to obtain accurate motion probability density functions (PDF). The impact of 4D image quality on this accuracy was then investigated. Dose measurements using volumetric and conventional scan techniques were also performed and compared. Results: Both conventional and dynamic volume 4DCT methods were capable of estimating the programmed displacement of sinusoidal motion, but patient breathing is known to not be regular, and obvious differences were seen for realistic, irregular motion. The mean RCCT amplitude error averaged at 4 mm (max. 7.8 mm) whereas the 4D{sub vol} CT error stayed below 0.5 mm. Similarly, the average absolute volume error was lower with 4D{sub vol} CT. Under irregular breathing, the 4D{sub vol} CT method provides a close description of the motion PDF (cross-correlation 0.99) and is able to track each object, whereas the RCCT method results in a

  16. Pulmonary imaging using respiratory motion compensated simultaneous PET/MR

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Joyita; Huang, Chuan; Li, Quanzheng; El Fakhri, Georges

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Pulmonary positron emission tomography (PET) imaging is confounded by blurring artifacts caused by respiratory motion. These artifacts degrade both image quality and quantitative accuracy. In this paper, the authors present a complete data acquisition and processing framework for respiratory motion compensated image reconstruction (MCIR) using simultaneous whole body PET/magnetic resonance (MR) and validate it through simulation and clinical patient studies. Methods: The authors have developed an MCIR framework based on maximum a posteriori or MAP estimation. For fast acquisition of high quality 4D MR images, the authors developed a novel Golden-angle RAdial Navigated Gradient Echo (GRANGE) pulse sequence and used it in conjunction with sparsity-enforcing k-t FOCUSS reconstruction. The authors use a 1D slice-projection navigator signal encapsulated within this pulse sequence along with a histogram-based gate assignment technique to retrospectively sort the MR and PET data into individual gates. The authors compute deformation fields for each gate via nonrigid registration. The deformation fields are incorporated into the PET data model as well as utilized for generating dynamic attenuation maps. The framework was validated using simulation studies on the 4D XCAT phantom and three clinical patient studies that were performed on the Biograph mMR, a simultaneous whole body PET/MR scanner. Results: The authors compared MCIR (MC) results with ungated (UG) and one-gate (OG) reconstruction results. The XCAT study revealed contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) improvements for MC relative to UG in the range of 21%–107% for 14 mm diameter lung lesions and 39%–120% for 10 mm diameter lung lesions. A strategy for regularization parameter selection was proposed, validated using XCAT simulations, and applied to the clinical studies. The authors’ results show that the MC image yields 19%–190% increase in the CNR of high-intensity features of interest affected by

  17. Automatic image-based cardiac and respiratory cycle synchronization and gating of image sequences.

    PubMed

    Sundar, Hari; Khamene, Ali; Yatziv, Liron; Xu, Chenyang

    2009-01-01

    We propose a novel method to detect the current state of the quasi-periodic system from image sequences which in turn will enable us to synchronize/gate the image sequences to obtain images of the organ system at similar configurations. The method uses the cumulated phase shift in the spectral domain of successive image frames as a measure of the net motion of objects in the scene. The proposed method is applicable to 2D and 3D time varying sequences and is not specific to the imaging modality. We demonstrate its effectiveness on X-Ray Angiographic and Cardiac and Liver Ultrasound sequences. Knowledge of the current (cardiac or respiratory) phase of the system, opens up the possibility for a purely image based cardiac and respiratory gating scheme for interventional and radiotherapy procedures.

  18. Monotonic correlation analysis of image quality measures for image fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Lance M.; Burks, Stephen D.; Moore, Richard K.; Nguyen, Quang

    2008-04-01

    The next generation of night vision goggles will fuse image intensified and long wave infra-red to create a hybrid image that will enable soldiers to better interpret their surroundings during nighttime missions. Paramount to the development of such goggles is the exploitation of image quality (IQ) measures to automatically determine the best image fusion algorithm for a particular task. This work introduces a novel monotonic correlation coefficient to investigate how well possible IQ features correlate to actual human performance, which is measured by a perception study. The paper will demonstrate how monotonic correlation can identify worthy features that could be overlooked by traditional correlation values.

  19. Trigeminal nerve: Anatomic correlation with MR imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, D.L.; Pech, P.; Pojunas, K.W.; Kilgore, D.P.; Williams, A.L.; Haughton, V.M.

    1986-06-01

    Through correlation with cryomicrotic sections, the appearance of the trigeminal nerve and its branches on magnetic resonance images is described in healthy individuals and in patients with tumors involving this nerve. Coronal images are best for defining the different parts of the nerve and for making a side-to-side comparison. Sagittal images are useful to demonstrate tumors involving the Gasserian ganglion.

  20. Spatial Correlation Analysis between Particulate Matter 10 (PM10) Hazard and Respiratory Diseases in Chiang Mai Province, Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trang, N. Ha; Tripathi, N. K.

    2014-11-01

    Every year, during dry season, Chiang Mai and other northern provinces of Thailand face the problem of haze which is mainly generated by the burning of agricultural waste and forest fire, contained high percentage of particulate matter. Particulate matter 10 (PM10), being very small in size, can be inhaled easily to the deepest parts of the human lung and throat respiratory functions. Due to this, it increases the risk of respiratory diseases mainly in the case of continuous exposure to this seasonal smog. MODIS aerosol images (MOD04) have been used for four weeks in March 2007 for generating the hazard map by linking to in-situ values of PM10. Simple linear regression model between PM10 and AOD got fair correlation with R2 = 0.7 and was applied to transform PM10 pattern. The hazard maps showed the dominance of PM10 in northern part of Chiang Mai, especially in second week of March when PM10 level was three to four times higher than standard. The respiratory disease records and public health station of each village were collected from Provincial Public Health Department in Chiang Mai province. There are about 300 public health stations out of 2070 villages; hence thiessen polygon was created to determine the representative area of each public health station. Within each thiessen polygon, respiratory disease incident rate (RDIR) was calculated based on the number of patients and population. Global Moran's I was computed for RDIR to explore spatial pattern of diseases through four weeks of March. Moran's I index depicted a cluster pattern of respiratory diseases in 2nd week than other weeks. That made sense for a relationship between PM10 and respiratory diseases infections. In order to examine how PM10 affect the human respiratory system, geographically weighted regression model was used to observe local correlation coefficient between RDIR and PM10 across study area. The result captured a high correlation between respiratory diseases and high level of PM10 in

  1. Variability of Image Features Computed from Conventional and Respiratory-Gated PET/CT Images of Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, Jasmine A.; Budzevich, Mikalai; Zhang, Geoffrey G.; Dilling, Thomas J.; Latifi, Kujtim; Moros, Eduardo G.

    2015-01-01

    Radiomics is being explored for potential applications in radiation therapy. How various imaging protocols affect quantitative image features is currently a highly active area of research. To assess the variability of image features derived from conventional [three-dimensional (3D)] and respiratory-gated (RG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) images of lung cancer patients, image features were computed from 23 lung cancer patients. Both protocols for each patient were acquired during the same imaging session. PET tumor volumes were segmented using an adaptive technique which accounted for background. CT tumor volumes were delineated with a commercial segmentation tool. Using RG PET images, the tumor center of mass motion, length, and rotation were calculated. Fifty-six image features were extracted from all images consisting of shape descriptors, first-order features, and second-order texture features. Overall, 26.6% and 26.2% of total features demonstrated less than 5% difference between 3D and RG protocols for CT and PET, respectively. Between 10 RG phases in PET, 53.4% of features demonstrated percent differences less than 5%. The features with least variability for PET were sphericity, spherical disproportion, entropy (first and second order), sum entropy, information measure of correlation 2, Short Run Emphasis (SRE), Long Run Emphasis (LRE), and Run Percentage (RPC); and those for CT were minimum intensity, mean intensity, Root Mean Square (RMS), Short Run Emphasis (SRE), and RPC. Quantitative analysis using a 3D acquisition versus RG acquisition (to reduce the effects of motion) provided notably different image feature values. This study suggests that the variability between 3D and RG features is mainly due to the impact of respiratory motion. PMID:26692535

  2. Correlative imaging in gallbladder carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Willekens, I; Goethals, L R; Brussaard, C; Verdries, D; de Mey, J

    2014-01-01

    Gallbladder carcinoma is a relatively rare malignant epithelial neoplasm, arising from gallbladder mucosa. It is the fifth most common gastrointestinal malignancy and the most common biliary tract cancer. Early diagnosis remains difficult, because clinical symptoms are sparse and non-specific, often resulting in advanced stage disease at the time of diagnosis. The most common feature of gallbladder carcinoma on different imaging modalities is focal wall thickening, associated with a large eccentric tumor mass. In this case we report the imaging characteristics of gallbladder carcinoma on ultrasound, MDCT and 18F-FDG PET/CT.

  3. Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) RNA loads in peripheral blood correlates with disease severity in mice

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) infection is usually restricted to the respiratory epithelium. Few studies have documented the presence of RSV in the systemic circulation, however there is no consistent information whether virus detection in the blood correlates with disease severity. Methods Balb/c mice were inoculated with live RSV, heat-inactivated RSV or medium. A subset of RSV-infected mice was treated with anti-RSV antibody 72 h post-inoculation. RSV RNA loads were measured by PCR in peripheral blood from day 1-21 post-inoculation and were correlated with upper and lower respiratory tract viral loads, the systemic cytokine response, lung inflammation and pulmonary function. Immunohistochemical staining was used to define the localization of RSV antigens in the respiratory tract and peripheral blood. Results RSV RNA loads were detected in peripheral blood from day 1 to 14 post-inoculation, peaked on day 5 and significantly correlated with nasal and lung RSV loads, airway obstruction, and blood CCL2 and CXCL1 expression. Treatment with anti-RSV antibody reduced blood RSV RNA loads and improved airway obstruction. Immunostaining identified RSV antigens in alveolar macrophages and peripheral blood monocytes. Conclusions RSV RNA was detected in peripheral blood upon infection with live RSV, followed a time-course parallel to viral loads assessed in the respiratory tract and was significantly correlated with RSV-induced airway disease. PMID:20843364

  4. Factor Analysis of the Image Correlation Matrix.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaiser, Henry F.; Cerny, Barbara A.

    1979-01-01

    Whether to factor the image correlation matrix or to use a new model with an alpha factor analysis of it is mentioned, with particular reference to the determinacy problem. It is pointed out that the distribution of the images is sensibly multivariate normal, making for "better" factor analyses. (Author/CTM)

  5. Quantum Image Encryption Algorithm Based on Image Correlation Decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Tianxiang; Chen, Jiamin; Pei, Dongju; Zhang, Wenquan; Zhou, Nanrun

    2015-02-01

    A novel quantum gray-level image encryption and decryption algorithm based on image correlation decomposition is proposed. The correlation among image pixels is established by utilizing the superposition and measurement principle of quantum states. And a whole quantum image is divided into a series of sub-images. These sub-images are stored into a complete binary tree array constructed previously and then randomly performed by one of the operations of quantum random-phase gate, quantum revolving gate and Hadamard transform. The encrypted image can be obtained by superimposing the resulting sub-images with the superposition principle of quantum states. For the encryption algorithm, the keys are the parameters of random phase gate, rotation angle, binary sequence and orthonormal basis states. The security and the computational complexity of the proposed algorithm are analyzed. The proposed encryption algorithm can resist brute force attack due to its very large key space and has lower computational complexity than its classical counterparts.

  6. Physiological Correlation of Airway Pressure and Transpulmonary Pressure Stress Index on Respiratory Mechanics in Acute Respiratory Failure

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Chun; Chen, Lu; Zhang, Yun-Hang; Liu, Wei; Urbino, Rosario; Ranieri, V Marco; Qiu, Hai-Bo; Yang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Stress index at post-recruitment maneuvers could be a method of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) titration in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) patients. However, airway pressure (Paw) stress index may not reflect lung mechanics in the patients with high chest wall elastance. This study was to evaluate the Paw stress index on lung mechanics and the correlation between Paw stress index and transpulmonary pressure (PL) stress index in acute respiratory failure (ARF) patients. Methods: Twenty-four ARF patients with mechanical ventilation (MV) were consecutively recruited from July 2011 to April 2013 in Zhongda Hospital, Nanjing, China and Ospedale S. Giovanni Battista-Molinette Hospital, Turin, Italy. All patients underwent MV with volume control (tidal volume 6 ml/kg) for 20 min. PEEP was set according to the ARDSnet study protocol. The patients were divided into two groups according to the chest wall elastance/respiratory system elastance ratio. The high elastance group (H group, n = 14) had a ratio ≥30%, and the low elastance group (L group, n = 10) had a ratio <30%. Respiratory elastance, gas-exchange, Paw stress index, and PL stress index were measured. Student's t-test, regression analysis, and Bland–Altman analysis were used for statistical analysis. Results: Pneumonia was the major cause of respiratory failure (71.0%). Compared with the L group, PEEP was lower in the H group (5.7 ± 1.7 cmH2O vs. 9.0 ± 2.3 cmH2O, P < 0.01). Compared with the H group, lung elastance was higher (20.0 ± 7.8 cmH2O/L vs. 11.6 ± 3.6 cmH2O/L, P < 0.01), and stress was higher in the L group (7.0 ± 1.9 vs. 4.9 ± 1.9, P = 0.02). A linear relationship was observed between the Paw stress index and the PL stress index in H group (R2= 0.56, P < 0.01) and L group (R2= 0.85, P < 0.01). Conclusion: In the ARF patients with MV, Paw stress index can substitute for PL to guide ventilator settings. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02196870 (https

  7. MR-Based Cardiac and Respiratory Motion-Compensation Techniques for PET-MR Imaging.

    PubMed

    Munoz, Camila; Kolbitsch, Christoph; Reader, Andrew J; Marsden, Paul; Schaeffter, Tobias; Prieto, Claudia

    2016-04-01

    Cardiac and respiratory motion cause image quality degradation in PET imaging, affecting diagnostic accuracy of the images. Whole-body simultaneous PET-MR scanners allow for using motion information estimated from MR images to correct PET data and produce motion-compensated PET images. This article reviews methods that have been proposed to estimate motion from MR images and different techniques to include this information in PET reconstruction, in order to overcome the problem of cardiac and respiratory motion in PET-MR imaging. MR-based motion correction techniques significantly increase lesion detectability and contrast, and also improve accuracy of uptake values in PET images.

  8. Four-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (4D-MRI) using image-based respiratory surrogate: A feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Jing; Chang, Zheng; Wang, Zhiheng; Paul Segars, William; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) has been widely used in radiation therapy to assess patient-specific breathing motion for determining individual safety margins. However, it has two major drawbacks: low soft-tissue contrast and an excessive imaging dose to the patient. This research aimed to develop a clinically feasible four-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (4D-MRI) technique to overcome these limitations. Methods: The proposed 4D-MRI technique was achieved by continuously acquiring axial images throughout the breathing cycle using fast 2D cine-MR imaging, and then retrospectively sorting the images by respiratory phase. The key component of the technique was the use of body area (BA) of the axial MR images as an internal respiratory surrogate to extract the breathing signal. The validation of the BA surrogate was performed using 4D-CT images of 12 cancer patients by comparing the respiratory phases determined using the BA method to those determined clinically using the Real-time position management (RPM) system. The feasibility of the 4D-MRI technique was tested on a dynamic motion phantom, the 4D extended Cardiac Torso (XCAT) digital phantom, and two healthy human subjects. Results: Respiratory phases determined from the BA matched closely to those determined from the RPM: mean (±SD) difference in phase: −3.9% (±6.4%); mean (±SD) absolute difference in phase: 10.40% (±3.3%); mean (±SD) correlation coefficient: 0.93 (±0.04). In the motion phantom study, 4D-MRI clearly showed the sinusoidal motion of the phantom; image artifacts observed were minimal to none. Motion trajectories measured from 4D-MRI and 2D cine-MRI (used as a reference) matched excellently: the mean (±SD) absolute difference in motion amplitude: −0.3 (±0.5) mm. In the 4D-XCAT phantom study, the simulated “4D-MRI” images showed good consistency with the original 4D-XCAT phantom images. The motion trajectory of the hypothesized “tumor” matched

  9. Respiratory insufficiency correlated strongly with mortality of rodents infected with West Nile virus.

    PubMed

    Morrey, John D; Siddharthan, Venkatraman; Wang, Hong; Hall, Jeffery O

    2012-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) disease can be fatal for high-risk patients. Since WNV or its antigens have been identified in multiple anatomical locations of the central nervous system of persons or rodent models, one cannot know where to investigate the actual mechanism of mortality without careful studies in animal models. In this study, depressed respiratory functions measured by plethysmography correlated strongly with mortality. This respiratory distress, as well as reduced oxygen saturation, occurred beginning as early as 4 days before mortality. Affected medullary respiratory control cells may have contributed to the animals' respiratory insufficiency, because WNV antigen staining was present in neurons located in the ventrolateral medulla. Starvation or dehydration would be irrelevant in people, but could cause death in rodents due to lethargy or loss of appetite. Animal experiments were performed to exclude this possibility. Plasma ketones were increased in moribund infected hamsters, but late-stage starvation markers were not apparent. Moreover, daily subcutaneous administration of 5% dextrose in physiological saline solution did not improve survival or other disease signs. Therefore, infected hamsters did not die from starvation or dehydration. No cerebral edema was apparent in WNV- or sham-infected hamsters as determined by comparing wet-to-total weight ratios of brains, or by evaluating blood-brain-barrier permeability using Evans blue dye penetration into brains. Limited vasculitis was present in the right atrium of the heart of infected hamsters, but abnormal electrocardiograms for several days leading up to mortality did not occur. Since respiratory insufficiency was strongly correlated with mortality more than any other pathological parameter, it is the likely cause of death in rodents. These animal data and a poor prognosis for persons with respiratory insufficiency support the hypothesis that neurological lesions affecting respiratory function may be the

  10. Ghost imaging with thermal light by third-order correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Bai Yanfeng; Han Shensheng

    2007-10-15

    Ghost imaging with classical incoherent light by third-order correlation is investigated. We discuss the similarities and the differences between ghost imaging by third-order correlation and by second-order correlation, and analyze the effect from each correlation part of the third-order correlation function on the imaging process. It is shown that the third-order correlated imaging includes richer correlated imaging effects than the second-order correlated one, while the imaging information originates mainly from the correlation of the intensity fluctuations between the test detector and each reference detector, as does ghost imaging by second-order correlation.

  11. 4D-CT imaging of a volume influenced by respiratory motion on multi-slice CT.

    PubMed

    Pan, Tinsu; Lee, Ting-Yim; Rietzel, Eike; Chen, George T Y

    2004-02-01

    We propose a new scanning protocol for generating 4D-CT image data sets influenced by respiratory motion. A cine scanning protocol is used during data acquisition, and two registration methods are used to sort images into temporal phases. A volume is imaged in multiple acquisitions of 1 or 2 cm length along the cranial-caudal direction. In each acquisition, the scans are continuously acquired for a time interval greater than or equal to the average respiratory cycle plus the duration of the data for an image reconstruction. The x ray is turned off during CT table translation and the acquisition is repeated until the prescribed volume is completely scanned. The scanning for 20 cm coverage takes about 1 min with an eight-slice CT or 2 mins with a four-slice CT. After data acquisition, the CT data are registered into respiratory phases based on either an internal anatomical match or an external respiratory signal. The internal approach registers the data according to correlation of anatomy in the CT images between two adjacent locations in consecutive respiratory cycles. We have demonstrated the technique with ROIs placed in the region of diaphragm. The external approach registers the image data according to an externally recorded respiratory signal generated by the Real-Time Position Management (RPM) Respiratory Gating System (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). Compared with previously reported prospective or retrospective imaging of the respiratory motion with a single-slice or multi-slice CT, the 4D-CT method proposed here provides (1) a shorter scan time of three to six times faster than the single-slice CT with prospective gating; (2) a shorter scan time of two to four times improvement over a previously reported multi-slice CT implementation, and (3) images over all phases of a breathing cycle. We have applied the scanning and registration methods on phantom, animal and patients, and initial results suggest the applicability of both the scanning and the

  12. SU-E-J-159: Analysis of Total Imaging Uncertainty in Respiratory-Gated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, J; Okuda, T; Sakaino, S; Yokota, N

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In respiratory-gated radiotherapy, the gating phase during treatment delivery needs to coincide with the corresponding phase determined during the treatment plan. However, because radiotherapy is performed based on the image obtained for the treatment plan, the time delay, motion artifact, volume effect, and resolution in the images are uncertain. Thus, imaging uncertainty is the most basic factor that affects the localization accuracy. Therefore, these uncertainties should be analyzed. This study aims to analyze the total imaging uncertainty in respiratory-gated radiotherapy. Methods: Two factors of imaging uncertainties related to respiratory-gated radiotherapy were analyzed. First, CT image was used to determine the target volume and 4D treatment planning for the Varian Realtime Position Management (RPM) system. Second, an X-ray image was acquired for image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) for the BrainLAB ExacTrac system. These factors were measured using a respiratory gating phantom. The conditions applied during phantom operation were as follows: respiratory wave form, sine curve; respiratory cycle, 4 s; phantom target motion amplitude, 10, 20, and 29 mm (which is maximum phantom longitudinal motion). The target and cylindrical marker implanted in the phantom coverage of the CT images was measured and compared with the theoretically calculated coverage from the phantom motion. The theoretical position of the cylindrical marker implanted in the phantom was compared with that acquired from the X-ray image. The total imaging uncertainty was analyzed from these two factors. Results: In the CT image, the uncertainty between the target and cylindrical marker’s actual coverage and the coverage of CT images was 1.19 mm and 2.50mm, respectively. In the Xray image, the uncertainty was 0.39 mm. The total imaging uncertainty from the two factors was 1.62mm. Conclusion: The total imaging uncertainty in respiratory-gated radiotherapy was clinically acceptable. However

  13. Respiratory syncytial virus infection in infants and correlation with meteorological factors and air pollutants

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) is the most important cause of severe respiratory infections in infants with seasonal epidemics. Environmental factors (temperature, humidity, air pollution) could influence RSV epidemics through their effects on virus activity and diffusion. Methods We conducted a retrospective study on a paediatric population who referred to our Paediatric Emergency Unit in order to analyze the correlation between weekly incidence of RSV positive cases during winter season in Bologna and meteorological factors and air pollutants concentration. Results We observed a significant correlation between the incidence of RSV infections and the mean minimum temperature registered during the same week and the previous weeks. The weekly number of RSV positive cases was also correlated to the mean PM10 concentration of the week before. Conclusions RSV epidemic trend in Bologna (Italy) is related to the mean minimum temperature, and the mean PM10 concentration. PMID:23311474

  14. Respiratory triggered 4D cone-beam computed tomography: A novel method to reduce imaging dose

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Benjamin J.; O’Brien, Ricky T.; Balik, Salim; Hugo, Geoffrey D.; Keall, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: A novel method called respiratory triggered 4D cone-beam computed tomography (RT 4D CBCT) is described whereby imaging dose can be reduced without degrading image quality. RT 4D CBCT utilizes a respiratory signal to trigger projections such that only a single projection is assigned to a given respiratory bin for each breathing cycle. In contrast, commercial 4D CBCT does not actively use the respiratory signal to minimize image dose. Methods: To compare RT 4D CBCT with conventional 4D CBCT, 3600 CBCT projections of a thorax phantom were gathered and reconstructed to generate a ground truth CBCT dataset. Simulation pairs of conventional 4D CBCT acquisitions and RT 4D CBCT acquisitions were developed assuming a sinusoidal respiratory signal which governs the selection of projections from the pool of 3600 original projections. The RT 4D CBCT acquisition triggers a single projection when the respiratory signal enters a desired acquisition bin; the conventional acquisition does not use a respiratory trigger and projections are acquired at a constant frequency. Acquisition parameters studied were breathing period, acquisition time, and imager frequency. The performance of RT 4D CBCT using phase based and displacement based sorting was also studied. Image quality was quantified by calculating difference images of the test dataset from the ground truth dataset. Imaging dose was calculated by counting projections. Results: Using phase based sorting RT 4D CBCT results in 47% less imaging dose on average compared to conventional 4D CBCT. Image quality differences were less than 4% at worst. Using displacement based sorting RT 4D CBCT results in 57% less imaging dose on average, than conventional 4D CBCT methods; however, image quality was 26% worse with RT 4D CBCT. Conclusions: Simulation studies have shown that RT 4D CBCT reduces imaging dose while maintaining comparable image quality for phase based 4D CBCT; image quality is degraded for displacement based RT 4D

  15. Reliability-guided digital image correlation for image deformation measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Pan Bing

    2009-03-10

    A universally applicable reliability-guided digital image correlation (DIC) method is proposed for reliable image deformation measurement. The zero-mean normalized cross correlation (ZNCC) coefficient is used to identify the reliability of the point computed. The correlation calculation begins with a seed point and is then guided by the ZNCC coefficient. That means the neighbors of the point with the highest ZNCC coefficient in a queue for computed points will be processed first. Thus the calculation path is always along the most reliable direction, and possible error propagation of the conventional DIC method can be avoided. The proposed novel DIC method is universally applicable to the images with shadows, discontinuous areas, and deformation discontinuity. Two image pairs were used to evaluate the performance of the proposed technique, and the successful results clearly demonstrate its robustness and effectiveness.

  16. Respiratory correlated cone-beam computed tomography on an isocentric C-arm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriminski, Sergey; Mitschke, Matthias; Sorensen, Stephen; Wink, Nicole M.; Chow, Phillip E.; Tenn, Steven; Solberg, Timothy D.

    2005-11-01

    A methodology for 3D image reconstruction from retrospectively gated cone-beam CT projection data has been developed. A mobile x-ray cone-beam device consisting of an isocentric C-arm equipped with a flat panel detector was used to image a moving phantom. Frames for reconstruction were retrospectively selected from complete datasets based on the known rotation of the C-arm and a signal from a respiratory monitor. Different sizes of gating windows were tested. A numerical criterion for blur on the reconstructed image was suggested. The criterion is based on minimization of an Ising energy function, similar to approaches used in image segmentation or restoration. It is shown that this criterion can be used for the determination of the optimal gating window size. Images reconstructed from the retrospectively gated projection sequences using the optimal gating window data showed a significant improvement compared to images reconstructed from the complete projection datasets.

  17. Verification and compensation of respiratory motion using an ultrasound imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, Ho-Chiao Hsu, Hsiao-Yu; Chiu, Wei-Hung; Tien, Der-Chi; Wu, Ren-Hong; Hsu, Chung-Hsien

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine if it is feasible to use ultrasound imaging as an aid for moving the treatment couch during diagnosis and treatment procedures associated with radiation therapy, in order to offset organ displacement caused by respiratory motion. A noninvasive ultrasound system was used to replace the C-arm device during diagnosis and treatment with the aims of reducing the x-ray radiation dose on the human body while simultaneously being able to monitor organ displacements. Methods: This study used a proposed respiratory compensating system combined with an ultrasound imaging system to monitor the compensation effect of respiratory motion. The accuracy of the compensation effect was verified by fluoroscopy, which means that fluoroscopy could be replaced so as to reduce unnecessary radiation dose on patients. A respiratory simulation system was used to simulate the respiratory motion of the human abdomen and a strain gauge (respiratory signal acquisition device) was used to capture the simulated respiratory signals. The target displacements could be detected by an ultrasound probe and used as a reference for adjusting the gain value of the respiratory signal used by the respiratory compensating system. This ensured that the amplitude of the respiratory compensation signal was a faithful representation of the target displacement. Results: The results show that performing respiratory compensation with the assistance of the ultrasound images reduced the compensation error of the respiratory compensating system to 0.81–2.92 mm, both for sine-wave input signals with amplitudes of 5, 10, and 15 mm, and human respiratory signals; this represented compensation of the respiratory motion by up to 92.48%. In addition, the respiratory signals of 10 patients were captured in clinical trials, while their diaphragm displacements were observed simultaneously using ultrasound. Using the respiratory compensating system to offset, the diaphragm

  18. Hierarchical Image Segmentation Using Correlation Clustering.

    PubMed

    Alush, Amir; Goldberger, Jacob

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we apply efficient implementations of integer linear programming to the problem of image segmentation. The image is first grouped into superpixels and then local information is extracted for each pair of spatially adjacent superpixels. Given local scores on a map of several hundred superpixels, we use correlation clustering to find the global segmentation that is most consistent with the local evidence. We show that, although correlation clustering is known to be NP-hard, finding the exact global solution is still feasible by breaking the segmentation problem down into subproblems. Each such sub-problem can be viewed as an automatically detected image part. We can further accelerate the process by using the cutting-plane method, which provides a hierarchical structure of the segmentations. The efficiency and improved performance of the proposed method is compared to several state-of-the-art methods and demonstrated on several standard segmentation data sets.

  19. Digital Image Correlation with Dynamic Subset Selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Ghulam Mubashar; MacNish, Cara; Dyskin, Arcady; Shufrin, Igor

    2016-09-01

    The quality of the surface pattern and selection of subset size play a critical role in achieving high accuracy in Digital Image Correlation (DIC). The subset size in DIC is normally selected by testing different subset sizes across the entire image, which is a laborious procedure. This also leads to the problem that the worst region of the surface pattern influences the performance of DIC across the entire image. In order to avoid these limitations, a Dynamic Subset Selection (DSS) algorithm is proposed in this paper to optimize the subset size for each point in an image before optimizing the correlation parameters. The proposed DSS algorithm uses the local pattern around the point of interest to calculate a parameter called the Intensity Variation Ratio (Λ), which is used to optimize the subset size. The performance of the DSS algorithm is analyzed using numerically generated images and is compared with the results of traditional DIC. Images obtained from laboratory experiments are also used to demonstrate the utility of the DSS algorithm. Results illustrate that the DSS algorithm provides a better alternative to subset size "guessing" and finds an appropriate subset size for each point of interest according to the local pattern.

  20. Respiratory disease in systemic lupus erythematosus: correlation with results of laboratory tests and histological appearance of muscle biopsy specimens.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, S A; Hopkinson, N D; Kinnear, W J; Watson, L; Powell, R J; Johnston, I D

    1992-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In systemic lupus erythematosus, certain laboratory tests and evidence from muscle biopsy specimens of lymphocytic vasculitis reflect disease activity. A study was designed to determine if such indices predict respiratory lesions, and in particular whether the presence of vasculitis in quadriceps muscle reflects respiratory muscle function. METHODS: Twenty seven 27 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus were studied, ten of whom were consecutive untreated patients and 17 having clinically active disease and being treated. They were prospectively evaluated on the basis of erythrocyte sedimentation rate, lymphocyte count, C3 degradation products, quadriceps muscle biopsy, spirometry, lung volumes, carbon monoxide transfer factor, and mouth pressure during a maximal sniff. RESULTS: Lung function test results were abnormal in 12 patients. Vital capacity was reduced in seven, carbon monoxide transfer factor capacity in five, and mouth pressure was low (< 70% predicted) in ten. Lymphocytic vasculitis was seen in the muscle biopsy specimens of ten patients. No correlation was found between laboratory tests and lung function or mouth pressure, or between the presence of lymphocytic vasculitis and mouth pressure. In untreated patients, those with lymphocytic vasculitis had lower spirometric values. CONCLUSIONS: In systemic lupus erythematosus, evidence from muscle biopsy specimens of lymphocytic vasculitis is not predictive of impaired inspiratory muscle function as measured by mouth pressure. In untreated patients there were relationships between some laboratory test results and respiratory function, but this was not the case for the whole group. In systemic lupus erythematosus, laboratory tests and evidence from muscle biopsy specimens of lymphocytic vasculitis are therefore unlikely to be helpful in the assessment of respiratory disease. Images PMID:1465755

  1. Subclinical respiratory dysfunction in chronic cervical cord compression: a pulmonary function test correlation.

    PubMed

    Bhagavatula, Indira Devi; Bhat, Dhananjaya I; Sasidharan, Gopalakrishnan M; Mishra, Rakesh Kumar; Maste, Praful Suresh; Vilanilam, George C; Sathyaprabha, Talakkad N

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE Respiratory abnormalities are well documented in acute spinal cord injury; however, the literature available for respiratory dysfunction in chronic compressive myelopathy (CCM) is limited. Respiratory dysfunction in CCM is often subtle and subclinical. The authors studied the pattern of respiratory dysfunction in patients with chronic cord compression by using spirometry, and the clinical and surgical implications of this dysfunction. In this study they also attempted to address the postoperative respiratory function in these patients. METHODS A prospective study was done in 30 patients in whom cervical CCM due to either cervical spondylosis or ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) was diagnosed. Thirty age-matched healthy volunteers were recruited as controls. None of the patients included in the study had any symptoms or signs of respiratory dysfunction. After clinical and radiological diagnosis, all patients underwent pulmonary function tests (PFTs) performed using a standardized Spirometry Kit Micro before and after surgery. The data were analyzed using Statistical Software SPSS version 13.0. Comparison between the 2 groups was done using the Student t-test. The Pearson correlation coefficient was used for PFT results and Nurick classification scores. A p value < 0.05 was considered significant. RESULTS Cervical spondylotic myelopathy (prolapsed intervertebral disc) was the predominant cause of compression (n = 21, 70%) followed by OPLL (n = 9, 30%). The average patient age was 45.06 years. Degenerative cervical spine disease has a relatively younger onset in the Indian population. The majority of the patients (n = 28, 93.3%) had compression at or above the C-5 level. Ten patients (33.3%) underwent an anterior approach and discectomy, 11 patients (36.7%) underwent decompressive laminectomy, and the remaining 9 underwent either corpectomy with fusion or laminoplasty. The mean preoperative forced vital capacity (FVC) (65%) of the

  2. Subclinical respiratory dysfunction in chronic cervical cord compression: a pulmonary function test correlation.

    PubMed

    Bhagavatula, Indira Devi; Bhat, Dhananjaya I; Sasidharan, Gopalakrishnan M; Mishra, Rakesh Kumar; Maste, Praful Suresh; Vilanilam, George C; Sathyaprabha, Talakkad N

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE Respiratory abnormalities are well documented in acute spinal cord injury; however, the literature available for respiratory dysfunction in chronic compressive myelopathy (CCM) is limited. Respiratory dysfunction in CCM is often subtle and subclinical. The authors studied the pattern of respiratory dysfunction in patients with chronic cord compression by using spirometry, and the clinical and surgical implications of this dysfunction. In this study they also attempted to address the postoperative respiratory function in these patients. METHODS A prospective study was done in 30 patients in whom cervical CCM due to either cervical spondylosis or ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) was diagnosed. Thirty age-matched healthy volunteers were recruited as controls. None of the patients included in the study had any symptoms or signs of respiratory dysfunction. After clinical and radiological diagnosis, all patients underwent pulmonary function tests (PFTs) performed using a standardized Spirometry Kit Micro before and after surgery. The data were analyzed using Statistical Software SPSS version 13.0. Comparison between the 2 groups was done using the Student t-test. The Pearson correlation coefficient was used for PFT results and Nurick classification scores. A p value < 0.05 was considered significant. RESULTS Cervical spondylotic myelopathy (prolapsed intervertebral disc) was the predominant cause of compression (n = 21, 70%) followed by OPLL (n = 9, 30%). The average patient age was 45.06 years. Degenerative cervical spine disease has a relatively younger onset in the Indian population. The majority of the patients (n = 28, 93.3%) had compression at or above the C-5 level. Ten patients (33.3%) underwent an anterior approach and discectomy, 11 patients (36.7%) underwent decompressive laminectomy, and the remaining 9 underwent either corpectomy with fusion or laminoplasty. The mean preoperative forced vital capacity (FVC) (65%) of the

  3. Evaluation of Tumor Position and PTV Margins Using Image Guidance and Respiratory Gating

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Christopher; Balter, Peter; Morice, Rodolfo C.; Bucci, Kara; Dong Lei; Tucker, Susan; Vedam, Sastry; Chang, Joe Y.; Starkschall, George

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the margins currently used to generate the planning target volume for lung tumors and to determine whether image-guided patient setup or respiratory gating is more effective in reducing uncertainties in tumor position. Methods and Materials: Lung tumors in 7 patients were contoured on serial four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) data sets (4-8 4DCTs/patient; 50 total) obtained throughout the course of treatment. Simulations were performed to determine the tumor position when the patient was aligned using skin marks, image-guided setup based on vertebral bodies, fiducials implanted near the tumor, and the actual tumor volume under various scenarios of respiratory gating. Results: Because of the presence of setup uncertainties, the reduction in overall margin needed to completely encompass the tumor was observed to be larger for imaged-guided patient setup than for a simple respiratory-gated treatment. Without respiratory gating and image-guided patient setup, margins ranged from 0.9 cm to 3.1 cm to completely encompass the tumor. These were reduced to 0.7-1.7 cm when image-guided patient setup was simulated and further reduced with respiratory gating. Conclusions: Our results indicate that if respiratory motion management is used, it should be used in conjunction with image-guided patient setup in order to reduce the overall treatment margin effectively.

  4. Use of Respiratory-Correlated Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography to Determine Acceptable Treatment Margins for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, Seth D.; Ford, Eric C.; Duhon, Mario; McNutt, Todd; Wong, John; Herman, Joseph M.

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: Respiratory-induced excursions of locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma could affect dose delivery. This study quantified tumor motion and evaluated standard treatment margins. Methods and Materials: Respiratory-correlated four-dimensional computed tomography images were obtained on 30 patients with locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma; 15 of whom underwent repeat scanning before cone-down treatment. Treatment planning software was used to contour the gross tumor volume (GTV), bilateral kidneys, and biliary stent. Excursions were calculated according to the centroid of the contoured volumes. Results: The mean +- standard deviation GTV excursion in the superoinferior (SI) direction was 0.55 +- 0.23 cm; an expansion of 1.0 cm adequately accounted for the GTV motion in 97% of locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma patients. Motion GTVs were generated and resulted in a 25% average volume increase compared with the static GTV. Of the 30 patients, 17 had biliary stents. The mean SI stent excursion was 0.84 +- 0.32 cm, significantly greater than the GTV motion. The xiphoid process moved an average of 0.35 +- 0.12 cm, significantly less than the GTV. The mean SI motion of the left and right kidneys was 0.65 +- 0.27 cm and 0.77 +- 0.30 cm, respectively. At repeat scanning, no significant changes were seen in the mean GTV size (p = .8) or excursion (p = .3). Conclusion: These data suggest that an asymmetric expansion of 1.0, 0.7, and 0.6 cm along the respective SI, anteroposterior, and medial-lateral directions is recommended if a respiratory-correlated four-dimensional computed tomography scan is not available to evaluate the tumor motion during treatment planning. Surrogates of tumor motion, such as biliary stents or external markers, should be used with caution.

  5. Demosaicing images from colour cameras for digital image correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forsey, A.; Gungor, S.

    2016-11-01

    Digital image correlation is not the intended use for consumer colour cameras, but with care they can be successfully employed in such a role. The main obstacle is the sparsely sampled colour data caused by the use of a colour filter array (CFA) to separate the colour channels. It is shown that the method used to convert consumer camera raw files into a monochrome image suitable for digital image correlation (DIC) can have a significant effect on the DIC output. A number of widely available software packages and two in-house methods are evaluated in terms of their performance when used with DIC. Using an in-plane rotating disc to produce a highly constrained displacement field, it was found that the bicubic spline based in-house demosaicing method outperformed the other methods in terms of accuracy and aliasing suppression.

  6. Image correlates of crowding in natural scenes.

    PubMed

    Wallis, Thomas S A; Bex, Peter J

    2012-07-13

    Visual crowding is the inability to identify visible features when they are surrounded by other structure in the peripheral field. Since natural environments are replete with structure and most of our visual field is peripheral, crowding represents the primary limit on vision in the real world. However, little is known about the characteristics of crowding under natural conditions. Here we examine where crowding occurs in natural images. Observers were required to identify which of four locations contained a patch of "dead leaves'' (synthetic, naturalistic contour structure) embedded into natural images. Threshold size for the dead leaves patch scaled with eccentricity in a manner consistent with crowding. Reverse correlation at multiple scales was used to determine local image statistics that correlated with task performance. Stepwise model selection revealed that local RMS contrast and edge density at the site of the dead leaves patch were of primary importance in predicting the occurrence of crowding once patch size and eccentricity had been considered. The absolute magnitudes of the regression weights for RMS contrast at different spatial scales varied in a manner consistent with receptive field sizes measured in striate cortex of primate brains. Our results are consistent with crowding models that are based on spatial averaging of features in the early stages of the visual system, and allow the prediction of where crowding is likely to occur in natural images.

  7. A miniature acousto-optic image correlator

    SciTech Connect

    Molley, P.A.; Sweatt, W.C.; Strong, D.S.

    1991-01-01

    An acousto-optic (AO) image correlator architecture will be presented that minimizes the overall system size while maintaining excellent image quality for large input scenes. The correlator can accommodate grayscale input scenes with dimensions of 512 {times} 244 pixels and grayscale reference templates of size 64 {times} 64 pixels. The size of the optical system, however is less than ten cubic inches, 1in. {times} 1in. {times} 9in. This design incorporates a surface emitting laser diode array that has a center-to-center spacing of the laser elements matched to the row spacing on the CCD. Furthermore, the space-bandwidth and center frequency of the AO cell are chosen to match the length of the input image information in the cell to the width of the CCD. These two design decisions allow close to one-to-one imaging through the entire optical system producing the shortest possible path length. The optics were then designed with a goal of producing nearly diffraction-limited quality. 8 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Initial experience and clinical comparison of two image guidance methods for SBRT treatment: 4DCT versus respiratory-triggered imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Brian; Rassiah-Szegedi, Prema; Zhao, Hui; Huang, Y Jessica; Sarkar, Vikren; Szegedi, Martin; Kokeny, Kristine E; Anker, Christopher J; Shrieve, Dennis C; Salter, Bill J

    2011-01-31

    For Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) treatment of lung and liver, we quantified the differences between two image guidance methods: 4DCT and ExacTrac respiratory-triggered imaging. Five different patients with five liver lesions and one lung lesion for a total of 19 SBRT delivered fractions were studied. For the 4DCT method, a manual registration process was used between the 4DCT image sets from initial simulation and treatment day to determine the required daily image-guided corrections. We also used the ExacTrac respiratory-triggered imaging capability to verify the target positioning, and calculated the differences in image guidance shifts between these two methods. The mean (standard deviation) of the observed differences in image-guided shifts between 4DCT and ExacTrac respiratory-triggered image guidance was left/right (L/R) = 0.4 (2.0) mm, anterior/posterior (A/P) = 1.4 (1.7) mm, superior/inferior (S/I) = 2.2 (2.0) mm, with no difference larger than 5.0 mm in any given direction for any individual case. The largest error occurred in the S/I direction, with a mean of 2.2 mm for the six lesions. This seems reasonable, because respiratory motion and the resulting imaging uncertainties are most pronounced in this S/I direction. Image guidance shifts derived from ExacTrac triggered imaging at two extreme breathing phases (i.e., full exhale vs. full inhale), agreed well (less than 2.0 mm) with each other. In summary, two very promising image guidance methods of 4DCT and ExacTrac respiratory-triggered imaging were presented and the image guidance shifts were comparable for the patients evaluated in this study.

  9. Imaging the D″ reflector with noise correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poli, Piero; Thomas, Christine; Campillo, Michel; Pedersen, Helle A.

    2015-01-01

    lowermost mantle of the Earth is characterized by seismic structures that range from a few tens to thousands of kilometers. At present, it is difficult to test hypotheses put forward to explain seismic observations due to poor seismic coverage, as particular earthquake-station geometries are needed. We demonstrate here that seismic noise correlations can be used to robustly image deep-mantle reflections with larger stacked amplitudes of reflected waves compared with earthquake data. In a comparison between noise and earthquake data, we find that the arrival times and the slowness of reflected waves, both sampling a region beneath Siberia, agree with those for a reflector at 2530 km depth, and the small amplitude reflections are sufficiently clear in the noise correlations to compare them reliably with synthetic data. Our data open exciting prospects for illuminating new target zones in the deep mantle to further constrain the dynamics and mineralogy of the deep Earth.

  10. Correlation-Based Image Reconstruction Methods for Magnetic Particle Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, Yasutoshi; Kuwabara, Tsuyoshi; Honma, Takumi; Nakagawa, Yohei

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI), in which the nonlinear interaction between internally administered magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and electromagnetic waves irradiated from outside of the body is utilized, has attracted attention for its potential to achieve early diagnosis of diseases such as cancer. In MPI, the local magnetic field distribution is scanned, and the magnetization signal from MNPs within a selected region is detected. However, the signal sensitivity and image resolution are degraded by interference from magnetization signals generated by MNPs outside of the selected region, mainly because of imperfections (limited gradients) in the local magnetic field distribution. Here, we propose new methods based on correlation information between the observed signal and the system function—defined as the interaction between the magnetic field distribution and the magnetizing properties of MNPs. We performed numerical analyses and found that, although the images were somewhat blurred, image artifacts could be significantly reduced and accurate images could be reconstructed without the inverse-matrix operation used in conventional image reconstruction methods.

  11. SU-E-J-73: Generation of Volumetric Images with a Respiratory Motion Model Based On An External Surrogate Signal

    SciTech Connect

    Hurwitz, M; Williams, C; Mishra, P; Dhou, S; Lewis, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Respiratory motion during radiotherapy treatment can differ significantly from motion observed during imaging for treatment planning. Our goal is to use an initial 4DCT scan and the trace of an external surrogate marker to generate 3D images of patient anatomy during treatment. Methods: Deformable image registration is performed on images from an initial 4DCT scan. The deformation vectors are used to develop a patient-specific linear relationship between the motion of each voxel and the trajectory of an external surrogate signal. Correlations in motion are taken into account with principal component analysis, reducing the number of free parameters. This model is tested with digital phantoms reproducing the breathing patterns of ten measured patient tumor trajectories, using five seconds of data to develop the model and the subsequent thirty seconds to test its predictions. The model is also tested with a breathing physical anthropomorphic phantom programmed to reproduce a patient breathing pattern. Results: The error (mean absolute, 95th percentile) over 30 seconds in the predicted tumor centroid position ranged from (0.8, 1.3) mm to (2.2, 4.3) mm for the ten patient breathing patterns. The model reproduced changes in both phase and amplitude of the breathing pattern. Agreement between prediction and truth over the entire image was confirmed by assessing the global voxel intensity RMS error. In the physical phantom, the error in the tumor centroid position was less than 1 mm for all images. Conclusion: We are able to reconstruct 3D images of patient anatomy with a model correlating internal respiratory motion with motion of an external surrogate marker, reproducing the expected tumor centroid position with an average accuracy of 1.4 mm. The images generated by this model could be used to improve dose calculations for treatment planning and delivered dose estimates. This work was partially funded by a research grant from Varian Medical Systems.

  12. Phase correlation imaging of unlabeled cell dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Lihong; Rajshekhar, Gannavarpu; Wang, Ru; Bhaduri, Basanta; Sridharan, Shamira; Mir, Mustafa; Chakraborty, Arindam; Iyer, Rajashekar; Prasanth, Supriya; Millet, Larry; Gillette, Martha U.; Popescu, Gabriel

    2016-09-01

    We present phase correlation imaging (PCI) as a novel approach to study cell dynamics in a spatially-resolved manner. PCI relies on quantitative phase imaging time-lapse data and, as such, functions in label-free mode, without the limitations associated with exogenous markers. The correlation time map outputted in PCI informs on the dynamics of the intracellular mass transport. Specifically, we show that PCI can extract quantitatively the diffusion coefficient map associated with live cells, as well as standard Brownian particles. Due to its high sensitivity to mass transport, PCI can be applied to studying the integrity of actin polymerization dynamics. Our results indicate that the cyto-D treatment blocking the actin polymerization has a dominant effect at the large spatial scales, in the region surrounding the cell. We found that PCI can distinguish between senescent and quiescent cells, which is extremely difficult without using specific markers currently. We anticipate that PCI will be used alongside established, fluorescence-based techniques to enable valuable new studies of cell function.

  13. Phase correlation imaging of unlabeled cell dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lihong; Rajshekhar, Gannavarpu; Wang, Ru; Bhaduri, Basanta; Sridharan, Shamira; Mir, Mustafa; Chakraborty, Arindam; Iyer, Rajashekar; Prasanth, Supriya; Millet, Larry; Gillette, Martha U; Popescu, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    We present phase correlation imaging (PCI) as a novel approach to study cell dynamics in a spatially-resolved manner. PCI relies on quantitative phase imaging time-lapse data and, as such, functions in label-free mode, without the limitations associated with exogenous markers. The correlation time map outputted in PCI informs on the dynamics of the intracellular mass transport. Specifically, we show that PCI can extract quantitatively the diffusion coefficient map associated with live cells, as well as standard Brownian particles. Due to its high sensitivity to mass transport, PCI can be applied to studying the integrity of actin polymerization dynamics. Our results indicate that the cyto-D treatment blocking the actin polymerization has a dominant effect at the large spatial scales, in the region surrounding the cell. We found that PCI can distinguish between senescent and quiescent cells, which is extremely difficult without using specific markers currently. We anticipate that PCI will be used alongside established, fluorescence-based techniques to enable valuable new studies of cell function. PMID:27615512

  14. Phase correlation imaging of unlabeled cell dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Lihong; Rajshekhar, Gannavarpu; Wang, Ru; Bhaduri, Basanta; Sridharan, Shamira; Mir, Mustafa; Chakraborty, Arindam; Iyer, Rajashekar; Prasanth, Supriya; Millet, Larry; Gillette, Martha U.; Popescu, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    We present phase correlation imaging (PCI) as a novel approach to study cell dynamics in a spatially-resolved manner. PCI relies on quantitative phase imaging time-lapse data and, as such, functions in label-free mode, without the limitations associated with exogenous markers. The correlation time map outputted in PCI informs on the dynamics of the intracellular mass transport. Specifically, we show that PCI can extract quantitatively the diffusion coefficient map associated with live cells, as well as standard Brownian particles. Due to its high sensitivity to mass transport, PCI can be applied to studying the integrity of actin polymerization dynamics. Our results indicate that the cyto-D treatment blocking the actin polymerization has a dominant effect at the large spatial scales, in the region surrounding the cell. We found that PCI can distinguish between senescent and quiescent cells, which is extremely difficult without using specific markers currently. We anticipate that PCI will be used alongside established, fluorescence-based techniques to enable valuable new studies of cell function. PMID:27615512

  15. Audiovisual biofeedback improves image quality and reduces scan time for respiratory-gated 3D MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, D.; Greer, P. B.; Arm, J.; Keall, P.; Kim, T.

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that audiovisual (AV) biofeedback can improve image quality and reduce scan time for respiratory-gated 3D thoracic MRI. For five healthy human subjects respiratory motion guidance in MR scans was provided using an AV biofeedback system, utilizing real-time respiratory motion signals. To investigate the improvement of respiratory-gated 3D MR images between free breathing (FB) and AV biofeedback (AV), each subject underwent two imaging sessions. Respiratory-related motion artifacts and imaging time were qualitatively evaluated in addition to the reproducibility of external (abdominal) motion. In the results, 3D MR images in AV biofeedback showed more anatomic information such as a clear distinction of diaphragm, lung lobes and sharper organ boundaries. The scan time was reduced from 401±215 s in FB to 334±94 s in AV (p-value 0.36). The root mean square variation of the displacement and period of the abdominal motion was reduced from 0.4±0.22 cm and 2.8±2.5 s in FB to 0.1±0.15 cm and 0.9±1.3 s in AV (p-value of displacement <0.01 and p-value of period 0.12). This study demonstrated that audiovisual biofeedback improves image quality and reduces scan time for respiratory-gated 3D MRI. These results suggest that AV biofeedback has the potential to be a useful motion management tool in medical imaging and radiation therapy procedures.

  16. The use of a generalized reconstruction by inversion of coupled systems (GRICS) approach for generic respiratory motion correction in PET/MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Fayad, Hadi; Odille, Freddy; Schmidt, Holger; Würslin, Christian; Küstner, Thomas; Feblinger, Jacques; Visvikis, Dimitris

    2015-03-21

    Respiratory motion is a source of artifacts in multimodality imaging such as PET/MR. Solutions include retrospective or prospective gating. They have however found limited use in clinical practice, since their increased overall acquisition duration to maintain overall image quality. More elaborate methods consist of using 4D MR datasets to extract spatial deformations in order to correct for the respiratory motion in PET. The main drawbacks of such approaches is the relatively long acquisition times associated with 4D MR imaging which is often incompatible with clinical PET/MR protocols. The objective of this work was to overcome these limitations by exploiting a generalized reconstruction by inversion of coupled systems (GRICS) approach. The methodology is based on a joint estimation of motion during the MR image reconstruction process, providing internal structure motion and associated deformation matrices for retrospective use in PET respiratory motion correction. This method was first validated on four MR volunteers and two PET/MR patient datasets by comparing GRICS generated MR images to 4D MR series obtained by retrospective gating. In a second step 4D PET datasets corresponding to acquired 4D MR images were simulated using the GATE Monte Carlo simulation platform. GRICS generated deformation matrices were subsequently used to correct respiratory motion in comparison to the 4D MR image based deformations both for the simulated and the two 4D PET/MR patient datasets. Results confirm that GRICS synchronized MR images correlate well with the acquired 4D MR series. Similarly, the use of GRICS for respiratory motion correction allows an equivalent percentage improvement on lesion contrast, position and size, considering the PET simulated tumors as well as PET real tumors. This work demonstrates the potential interest of using GRICS for PET respiratory motion correction in combined PET/MR using shorter duration acquisitions without the need for 4D MRI and

  17. The use of a generalized reconstruction by inversion of coupled systems (GRICS) approach for generic respiratory motion correction in PET/MR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fayad, Hadi; Odille, Freddy; Schmidt, Holger; Würslin, Christian; Küstner, Thomas; Feblinger, Jacques; Visvikis, Dimitris

    2015-03-01

    Respiratory motion is a source of artifacts in multimodality imaging such as PET/MR. Solutions include retrospective or prospective gating. They have however found limited use in clinical practice, since their increased overall acquisition duration to maintain overall image quality. More elaborate methods consist of using 4D MR datasets to extract spatial deformations in order to correct for the respiratory motion in PET. The main drawbacks of such approaches is the relatively long acquisition times associated with 4D MR imaging which is often incompatible with clinical PET/MR protocols. The objective of this work was to overcome these limitations by exploiting a generalized reconstruction by inversion of coupled systems (GRICS) approach. The methodology is based on a joint estimation of motion during the MR image reconstruction process, providing internal structure motion and associated deformation matrices for retrospective use in PET respiratory motion correction. This method was first validated on four MR volunteers and two PET/MR patient datasets by comparing GRICS generated MR images to 4D MR series obtained by retrospective gating. In a second step 4D PET datasets corresponding to acquired 4D MR images were simulated using the GATE Monte Carlo simulation platform. GRICS generated deformation matrices were subsequently used to correct respiratory motion in comparison to the 4D MR image based deformations both for the simulated and the two 4D PET/MR patient datasets. Results confirm that GRICS synchronized MR images correlate well with the acquired 4D MR series. Similarly, the use of GRICS for respiratory motion correction allows an equivalent percentage improvement on lesion contrast, position and size, considering the PET simulated tumors as well as PET real tumors. This work demonstrates the potential interest of using GRICS for PET respiratory motion correction in combined PET/MR using shorter duration acquisitions without the need for 4D MRI and

  18. Generation of fluoroscopic 3D images with a respiratory motion model based on an external surrogate signal.

    PubMed

    Hurwitz, Martina; Williams, Christopher L; Mishra, Pankaj; Rottmann, Joerg; Dhou, Salam; Wagar, Matthew; Mannarino, Edward G; Mak, Raymond H; Lewis, John H

    2015-01-21

    Respiratory motion during radiotherapy can cause uncertainties in definition of the target volume and in estimation of the dose delivered to the target and healthy tissue. In this paper, we generate volumetric images of the internal patient anatomy during treatment using only the motion of a surrogate signal. Pre-treatment four-dimensional CT imaging is used to create a patient-specific model correlating internal respiratory motion with the trajectory of an external surrogate placed on the chest. The performance of this model is assessed with digital and physical phantoms reproducing measured irregular patient breathing patterns. Ten patient breathing patterns are incorporated in a digital phantom. For each patient breathing pattern, the model is used to generate images over the course of thirty seconds. The tumor position predicted by the model is compared to ground truth information from the digital phantom. Over the ten patient breathing patterns, the average absolute error in the tumor centroid position predicted by the motion model is 1.4 mm. The corresponding error for one patient breathing pattern implemented in an anthropomorphic physical phantom was 0.6 mm. The global voxel intensity error was used to compare the full image to the ground truth and demonstrates good agreement between predicted and true images. The model also generates accurate predictions for breathing patterns with irregular phases or amplitudes.

  19. Histologic and Molecular Correlation in Shelter Cats with Acute Upper Respiratory Infection ▿

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Rachel E.; Wagner, Denae C.; Leutenegger, Christian M.; Pesavento, Patricia A.

    2011-01-01

    This is a descriptive study designed to correlate diagnostic real-time PCR results with histopathologic lesions in cats with clinical signs of upper respiratory infection (URI). The study occurred over a 9-month period in a single open-intake animal shelter. Cats that were selected for euthanasia by the shelter staff and additionally had URI were included in the study, for a total of 22 study cats. Combined conjunctival and oropharyngeal swab specimens were tested by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) for feline herpesvirus type 1 (FHV-1), feline calicivirus (FCV), Mycoplasma felis, Chlamydophila felis, and Bordetella bronchiseptica. Necropsy was performed on all cats, and a complete set of respiratory tract tissues was examined by histopathology. Among 22 cats, 20 were qPCR positive for FHV-1, 7 for M. felis, 5 for FCV, 1 for C. felis, and 0 for B. bronchiseptica. Nine cats were positive for two or more pathogens. Histopathologic lesions were present in all cats, with consistent lesions in the nasal cavity, including acute necroulcerative rhinitis in 16 cats. Histologic or antigenic detection of FHV-1 was seen in 18 of 20 cats positive for FHV-1 by qPCR. No lesions that could be specifically attributed to FCV, M. felis, or C. felis were seen, although interpretation in this cohort could be confounded by coinfection with FHV-1. A significant agreement was found between the amount of FHV-1 DNA determined by qPCR and the presence of specific histopathologic lesions for FHV-1 but not for the other respiratory pathogens. PMID:21562109

  20. High correlation of Middle East respiratory syndrome spread with Google search and Twitter trends in Korea.

    PubMed

    Shin, Soo-Yong; Seo, Dong-Woo; An, Jisun; Kwak, Haewoon; Kim, Sung-Han; Gwack, Jin; Jo, Min-Woo

    2016-09-06

    The Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) was exported to Korea in 2015, resulting in a threat to neighboring nations. We evaluated the possibility of using a digital surveillance system based on web searches and social media data to monitor this MERS outbreak. We collected the number of daily laboratory-confirmed MERS cases and quarantined cases from May 11, 2015 to June 26, 2015 using the Korean government MERS portal. The daily trends observed via Google search and Twitter during the same time period were also ascertained using Google Trends and Topsy. Correlations among the data were then examined using Spearman correlation analysis. We found high correlations (>0.7) between Google search and Twitter results and the number of confirmed MERS cases for the previous three days using only four simple keywords: "MERS", " ("MERS (in Korean)"), " ("MERS symptoms (in Korean)"), and " ("MERS hospital (in Korean)"). Additionally, we found high correlations between the Google search and Twitter results and the number of quarantined cases using the above keywords. This study demonstrates the possibility of using a digital surveillance system to monitor the outbreak of MERS.

  1. High correlation of Middle East respiratory syndrome spread with Google search and Twitter trends in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Soo-Yong; Seo, Dong-Woo; An, Jisun; Kwak, Haewoon; Kim, Sung-Han; Gwack, Jin; Jo, Min-Woo

    2016-09-01

    The Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) was exported to Korea in 2015, resulting in a threat to neighboring nations. We evaluated the possibility of using a digital surveillance system based on web searches and social media data to monitor this MERS outbreak. We collected the number of daily laboratory-confirmed MERS cases and quarantined cases from May 11, 2015 to June 26, 2015 using the Korean government MERS portal. The daily trends observed via Google search and Twitter during the same time period were also ascertained using Google Trends and Topsy. Correlations among the data were then examined using Spearman correlation analysis. We found high correlations (>0.7) between Google search and Twitter results and the number of confirmed MERS cases for the previous three days using only four simple keywords: “MERS”, “” (“MERS (in Korean)”), “” (“MERS symptoms (in Korean)”), and “” (“MERS hospital (in Korean)”). Additionally, we found high correlations between the Google search and Twitter results and the number of quarantined cases using the above keywords. This study demonstrates the possibility of using a digital surveillance system to monitor the outbreak of MERS.

  2. High correlation of Middle East respiratory syndrome spread with Google search and Twitter trends in Korea.

    PubMed

    Shin, Soo-Yong; Seo, Dong-Woo; An, Jisun; Kwak, Haewoon; Kim, Sung-Han; Gwack, Jin; Jo, Min-Woo

    2016-01-01

    The Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) was exported to Korea in 2015, resulting in a threat to neighboring nations. We evaluated the possibility of using a digital surveillance system based on web searches and social media data to monitor this MERS outbreak. We collected the number of daily laboratory-confirmed MERS cases and quarantined cases from May 11, 2015 to June 26, 2015 using the Korean government MERS portal. The daily trends observed via Google search and Twitter during the same time period were also ascertained using Google Trends and Topsy. Correlations among the data were then examined using Spearman correlation analysis. We found high correlations (>0.7) between Google search and Twitter results and the number of confirmed MERS cases for the previous three days using only four simple keywords: "MERS", " ("MERS (in Korean)"), " ("MERS symptoms (in Korean)"), and " ("MERS hospital (in Korean)"). Additionally, we found high correlations between the Google search and Twitter results and the number of quarantined cases using the above keywords. This study demonstrates the possibility of using a digital surveillance system to monitor the outbreak of MERS. PMID:27595921

  3. High correlation of Middle East respiratory syndrome spread with Google search and Twitter trends in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Soo-Yong; Seo, Dong-Woo; An, Jisun; Kwak, Haewoon; Kim, Sung-Han; Gwack, Jin; Jo, Min-Woo

    2016-01-01

    The Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) was exported to Korea in 2015, resulting in a threat to neighboring nations. We evaluated the possibility of using a digital surveillance system based on web searches and social media data to monitor this MERS outbreak. We collected the number of daily laboratory-confirmed MERS cases and quarantined cases from May 11, 2015 to June 26, 2015 using the Korean government MERS portal. The daily trends observed via Google search and Twitter during the same time period were also ascertained using Google Trends and Topsy. Correlations among the data were then examined using Spearman correlation analysis. We found high correlations (>0.7) between Google search and Twitter results and the number of confirmed MERS cases for the previous three days using only four simple keywords: “MERS”, “” (“MERS (in Korean)”), “” (“MERS symptoms (in Korean)”), and “” (“MERS hospital (in Korean)”). Additionally, we found high correlations between the Google search and Twitter results and the number of quarantined cases using the above keywords. This study demonstrates the possibility of using a digital surveillance system to monitor the outbreak of MERS. PMID:27595921

  4. Functional respiratory imaging to assess the interaction between systemic roflumilast and inhaled ICS/LABA/LAMA

    PubMed Central

    Vos, Wim; Hajian, Bita; De Backer, Jan; Van Holsbeke, Cedric; Vinchurkar, Samir; Claes, Rita; Hufkens, Annemie; Parizel, Paul M; Bedert, Lieven; De Backer, Wilfried

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with COPD show a significant reduction of the lobar hyperinflation at the functional residual capacity level in the patients who improved >120 mL in forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) after 6 months of treatment with roflumilast in addition to inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs)/long-acting beta-2 agonists (LABAs)/long-acting muscarinic antagonists (LAMAs). Methods Functional respiratory imaging was used to quantify lobar hyperinflation, blood vessel density, ventilation, aerosol deposition, and bronchodilation. To investigate the exact mode of action of roflumilast, correlations between lobar and global measures have been tested using a mixed-model approach with nested random factors and Pearson correlation, respectively. Results The reduction in lobar hyperinflation appears to be associated with a larger blood vessel density in the respective lobes (t=−2.154, P=0.040); lobes with a higher percentage of blood vessels reduce more in hyperinflation in the responder group. Subsequently, it can be observed that lobes that reduce in hyperinflation after treatment are better ventilated (t=−5.368, P<0.001). Functional respiratory imaging (FRI)-based aerosol deposition showed that enhanced ventilation leads to more peripheral particle deposition of ICS/LABA/LAMA in the better-ventilated areas (t=2.407, P=0.024). Finally, the study showed that areas receiving more particles have increased FRI-based bronchodilation (t=2.564, P=0.017), leading to an increase in FEV1 (R=0.348, P=0.029). Conclusion The study demonstrated that orally administered roflumilast supports the reduction of regional hyperinflation in areas previously undertreated by inhalation medication. The local reduction in hyperinflation induces a redistribution of ventilation and aerosol deposition, leading to enhanced efficacy of the concomitant ICS/LABA/LAMA therapy. FRI appears to be a sensitive tool to describe the mode of action of novel compounds in chronic obstructive pulmonary

  5. Evaluation of respiratory and cardiac motion correction schemes in dual gated PET/CT cardiac imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Lamare, F. Fernandez, P.; Le Maitre, A.; Visvikis, D.; Dawood, M.; Schäfers, K. P.; Rimoldi, O. E.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Cardiac imaging suffers from both respiratory and cardiac motion. One of the proposed solutions involves double gated acquisitions. Although such an approach may lead to both respiratory and cardiac motion compensation there are issues associated with (a) the combination of data from cardiac and respiratory motion bins, and (b) poor statistical quality images as a result of using only part of the acquired data. The main objective of this work was to evaluate different schemes of combining binned data in order to identify the best strategy to reconstruct motion free cardiac images from dual gated positron emission tomography (PET) acquisitions. Methods: A digital phantom study as well as seven human studies were used in this evaluation. PET data were acquired in list mode (LM). A real-time position management system and an electrocardiogram device were used to provide the respiratory and cardiac motion triggers registered within the LM file. Acquired data were subsequently binned considering four and six cardiac gates, or the diastole only in combination with eight respiratory amplitude gates. PET images were corrected for attenuation, but no randoms nor scatter corrections were included. Reconstructed images from each of the bins considered above were subsequently used in combination with an affine or an elastic registration algorithm to derive transformation parameters allowing the combination of all acquired data in a particular position in the cardiac and respiratory cycles. Images were assessed in terms of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast, image profile, coefficient-of-variation (COV), and relative difference of the recovered activity concentration. Results: Regardless of the considered motion compensation strategy, the nonrigid motion model performed better than the affine model, leading to higher SNR and contrast combined with a lower COV. Nevertheless, when compensating for respiration only, no statistically significant differences were

  6. Correlation between respiratory function tests and evolution time in asthmatic patients.

    PubMed

    López Campos, C; Martínez Ordaz, V A

    2001-01-01

    A transversal and prospective study was performed to demonstrate a relationship between the evolution time of asthma episodes and alterations observed in the respiratory function tests (RFT) during asymptomatic periods. Asthmatic patients (n = 80) of both sexes, were studied, we investigated the evolution time of the asthmatic episodes and performed RFTs in the patients during their asymptomatic periods. Respiratory patterns were classified as normal, obstructive, or mixed (obstructive-restrictive), and a Spearman correlation test was performed. Twenty nine patients were male and fifty one female. All were between 5 and 49 years of age. Of the total number of patients, 13.7% fell into a normal pattern, 57.5% into an obstructive pattern and 28.7% in a mixed pattern. In the groups showing the shortest evolution time, the obstructive pattern was more common (75% of patients with less than 5 years of evolution time and 53.8% with an evolution time between five and ten years). The mixed pattern was more common in patients with more years suffering asthma (16.6% in the group of patients having 5 or less years of evolution and 50% in the group with more than 20 years). We found a Spearman value of 0.7, and we can conclude that there is more pulmonary damage associated to a longer evolution period of bronchial asthma.

  7. Optimal control problem in correlation between smoking and epidemic of respiratory diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldila, D.; Apri, M.

    2014-02-01

    Smoking appears to be a risk factor that may increase the number of different pulmonary infections. This link is likely to be mediated by smoking adverse effects on the respiratory defenses. A mathematical model to describe correlation between the number of smokers and its effect on the number of infected people suffer from respiratory disease like influenza is constructed in this paper. Promotion of healthy life is accounted in the model as an optimal control problem to reduce the number of smokers. In this work, the transition rates from smokers to non-smokers and from non-smokers to smokers are regarded as the control variables. Assuming the control variables are constant, equilibrium points of the model can be obtained analytically. The basic reproductive ratio as the endemic threshold is taken from the spectral radius of the next-generation matrix. Using numerical simulation, we show that the healthy life promotion can reduce the number of infected person significantly by reducing the number of smokers. Furthermore, different initial conditions to show different situations in the field are also simulated. It is shown that a large effort to increase the transition rate from smokers to non-smokers and to reduce the transition from non-smokers to smokers should be applied in the endemic reduction scenario.

  8. Use of magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of upper respiratory obstruction in a calf

    PubMed Central

    Buczinski, Sébastien; Fecteau, Gilles; Alexander, Kate; Norman-Carmel, Eric

    2008-01-01

    In a calf with dyspnea, a mass located dorsal to the pharynx was visualized by ultrasonography. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a severe enlargement of the left medial retropharyngeal lymph node, compatible with an abscess. This is the first reported case of MRI use in bovine upper respiratory disease. PMID:18390100

  9. Correlation of the gallbladder stone and tissue fluorescent images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokaj, Jahja O.; Marafi, Mustafa A.; Makdisi, Yacob; Bhatia, Kuldip S.

    2001-11-01

    Fluorescent images of gallbladder stones, tissue and bile are obtained using a streak camera. A Match Spatial Filer (MSF) is made using a stone fluorescent image. The MSF is used to perform correlations with fluorescent tissue and bile image. A method for recognition of the stone and rejection of the tissue during the laser lithotripsy is proposed using the correlation outputs.

  10. Fast CT-CT fluoroscopy registration with respiratory motion compensation for image-guided lung intervention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Po; Xue, Zhong; Lu, Kongkuo; Yang, Jianhua; Wong, Stephen T.

    2012-02-01

    CT-fluoroscopy (CTF) is an efficient imaging method for guiding percutaneous lung interventions such as biopsy. During CTF-guided biopsy procedure, four to ten axial sectional images are captured in a very short time period to provide nearly real-time feedback to physicians, so that they can adjust the needle as it is advanced toward the target lesion. Although popularly used in clinics, this traditional CTF-guided intervention procedure may require frequent scans and cause unnecessary radiation exposure to clinicians and patients. In addition, CTF only generates limited slices of images and provides limited anatomical information. It also has limited response to respiratory movements and has narrow local anatomical dynamics. To better utilize CTF guidance, we propose a fast CT-CTF registration algorithm with respiratory motion estimation for image-guided lung intervention using electromagnetic (EM) guidance. With the pre-procedural exhale and inhale CT scans, it would be possible to estimate a series of CT images of the same patient at different respiratory phases. Then, once a CTF image is captured during the intervention, our algorithm can pick the best respiratory phase-matched 3D CT image and performs a fast deformable registration to warp the 3D CT toward the CTF. The new 3D CT image can be used to guide the intervention by superimposing the EM-guided needle location on it. Compared to the traditional repetitive CTF guidance, the registered CT integrates both 3D volumetric patient data and nearly real-time local anatomy for more effective and efficient guidance. In this new system, CTF is used as a nearly real-time sensor to overcome the discrepancies between static pre-procedural CT and the patient's anatomy, so as to provide global guidance that may be supplemented with electromagnetic (EM) tracking and to reduce the number of CTF scans needed. In the experiments, the comparative results showed that our fast CT-CTF algorithm can achieve better registration

  11. Automated lung tumor detection and quantification for respiratory gated PET/CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiali; del Valle, Misael; Franquiz, Juan; McGoron, Anthony

    2008-03-01

    Purpose: To develop and validate an automatic algorithm for the detection and functional assessment of lung tumors on three-dimensional respiratory gated PET/CT images. Method and Materials: First the algorithm will automatically segment lung regions in CT images, then identify and localize focal increases of activity in lung regions of PET images at each gated bin. Once the tumor voxels have been determined, an integration algorithm will include all the tumor counts collected at different bins within the respiratory cycle into one reference bin. Then the total activity (Bq), concentration (Bq/ml), functional volume (ml) and standard uptake values (SUV) are calculated for each tumor on PET images. Validation of the automatic algorithm was demonstrated by conducting experiments with the computerized 4D NCAT phantom and with a dynamic lung-chest phantom imaged using a GE PET/CT System at Baptist Hospital of Miami. Tumor variables to be controlled were: volume, total number of counts (activity), maximum and average number of counts. These values were the gold standard to which the results of the algorithm were compared. The tumor's motion was also controlled with different respiratory periods and amplitudes. Results: Validation, feasibility and robustness of the algorithm were demonstrated. With the algorithm, the best compromise between short PET scan time and reduced image noise can be achieved, while quantification and clinical analysis become faster and more precise.

  12. Digital Image Correlation for Performance Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaviccini, Miguel; Turner, Dan; Herzberg, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Evaluating the health of a mechanism requires more than just a binary evaluation of whether an operation was completed. It requires analyzing more comprehensive, full-field data. Health monitoring is a process of non-destructively identifying characteristics that indicate the fitness of an engineered component. In order to monitor unit health in a production setting, an automated test system must be created to capture the motion of mechanism parts in a real-time and non-intrusive manner. One way to accomplish this is by using high-speed video and Digital Image Correlation (DIC). In this approach, individual frames of the video are analyzed to track the motion of mechanism components. The derived performance metrics allow for state-of-health monitoring and improved fidelity of mechanism modeling. The results are in-situ state-of-health identification and performance prediction. This paper introduces basic concepts of this test method, and discusses two main themes: the use of laser marking to add fiducial patterns to mechanism components, and new software developed to track objects with complex shapes, even as they move behind obstructions. Finally, the implementation of these tests into an automated tester is discussed.

  13. Temporal correlation of optical coherence tomography in-vivo images of rabbit airway for the diagnosis of edema

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, DongYel; Wang, Alex; Tjoa, Tjoson; Volgger, Veronika; Hamamoto, Ashley; Su, Erica; Jing, Joseph; Chen, Zhongping; Wong, Brian J. F.

    2014-03-01

    Recently, full-range optical coherence tomography (OCT) systems have been developed to image the human airway. These novel systems utilize a fiber-based OCT probe which acquires three-dimensional (3-D) images with micrometer resolution. Following an airway injury, mucosal edema is the first step in the body's inflammatory response, which occasionally leads to airway stenosis, a life-threatening condition for critically ill newborns. Therefore, early detection of edema is vital for airway management and prevention of stenosis. In order to examine the potential of the full-range OCT to diagnose edema, we investigated temporal correlation of OCT images obtained from the subglottic airway of live rabbits. Temporally correlated OCT images were acquired at fixed locations in the rabbit subglottis of either artificially induced edema or normal tissues. Edematous tissue was experimentally modeled by injecting saline beneath the epithelial layer of the subglottic mucosa. The calculated cross temporal correlations between OCT images of normal airway regions show periodicity that correlates with the respiratory motion of the airway. However, the temporal correlation functions calculated from OCT images of the edematous regions show randomness without the periodic characteristic. These in-vivo experimental results of temporal correlations between OCT images show the potential of a computer-based or -aided diagnosis of edema in the human respiratory mucosa with a full-range OCT system.

  14. Imaging and dosimetric errors in 4D PET/CT-guided radiotherapy from patient-specific respiratory patterns: a dynamic motion phantom end-to-end study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, S. R.; Nyflot, M. J.; Herrmann, C.; Groh, C. M.; Meyer, J.; Wollenweber, S. D.; Stearns, C. W.; Kinahan, P. E.; Sandison, G. A.

    2015-05-01

    Effective positron emission tomography / computed tomography (PET/CT) guidance in radiotherapy of lung cancer requires estimation and mitigation of errors due to respiratory motion. An end-to-end workflow was developed to measure patient-specific motion-induced uncertainties in imaging, treatment planning, and radiation delivery with respiratory motion phantoms and dosimeters. A custom torso phantom with inserts mimicking normal lung tissue and lung lesion was filled with [18F]FDG. The lung lesion insert was driven by six different patient-specific respiratory patterns or kept stationary. PET/CT images were acquired under motionless ground truth, tidal breathing motion-averaged (3D), and respiratory phase-correlated (4D) conditions. Target volumes were estimated by standardized uptake value (SUV) thresholds that accurately defined the ground-truth lesion volume. Non-uniform dose-painting plans using volumetrically modulated arc therapy were optimized for fixed normal lung and spinal cord objectives and variable PET-based target objectives. Resulting plans were delivered to a cylindrical diode array at rest, in motion on a platform driven by the same respiratory patterns (3D), or motion-compensated by a robotic couch with an infrared camera tracking system (4D). Errors were estimated relative to the static ground truth condition for mean target-to-background (T/Bmean) ratios, target volumes, planned equivalent uniform target doses, and 2%-2 mm gamma delivery passing rates. Relative to motionless ground truth conditions, PET/CT imaging errors were on the order of 10-20%, treatment planning errors were 5-10%, and treatment delivery errors were 5-30% without motion compensation. Errors from residual motion following compensation methods were reduced to 5-10% in PET/CT imaging, <5% in treatment planning, and <2% in treatment delivery. We have demonstrated that estimation of respiratory motion uncertainty and its propagation from PET/CT imaging to RT planning, and RT

  15. Imaging and dosimetric errors in 4D PET/CT-guided radiotherapy from patient-specific respiratory patterns: a dynamic motion phantom end-to-end study

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, S R; Nyflot, M J; Hermann, C; Groh, C; Meyer, J; Wollenweber, S D; Stearns, C W; Kinahan, P E; Sandison, G A

    2015-01-01

    Effective positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) guidance in radiotherapy of lung cancer requires estimation and mitigation of errors due to respiratory motion. An end-to-end workflow was developed to measure patient-specific motion-induced uncertainties in imaging, treatment planning, and radiation delivery with respiratory motion phantoms and dosimeters. A custom torso phantom with inserts mimicking normal lung tissue and lung lesion was filled with [18F]FDG. The lung lesion insert was driven by 6 different patient-specific respiratory patterns or kept stationary. PET/CT images were acquired under motionless ground truth, tidal breathing motion-averaged (3D), and respiratory phase-correlated (4D) conditions. Target volumes were estimated by standardized uptake value (SUV) thresholds that accurately defined the ground-truth lesion volume. Non-uniform dose-painting plans using volumetrically modulated arc therapy (VMAT) were optimized for fixed normal lung and spinal cord objectives and variable PET-based target objectives. Resulting plans were delivered to a cylindrical diode array at rest, in motion on a platform driven by the same respiratory patterns (3D), or motion-compensated by a robotic couch with an infrared camera tracking system (4D). Errors were estimated relative to the static ground truth condition for mean target-to-background (T/Bmean) ratios, target volumes, planned equivalent uniform target doses (EUD), and 2%-2mm gamma delivery passing rates. Relative to motionless ground truth conditions, PET/CT imaging errors were on the order of 10–20%, treatment planning errors were 5–10%, and treatment delivery errors were 5–30% without motion compensation. Errors from residual motion following compensation methods were reduced to 5–10% in PET/CT imaging, < 5% in treatment planning, and < 2% in treatment delivery. We have demonstrated that estimation of respiratory motion uncertainty and its propagation from PET/CT imaging to RT

  16. Mucosal IgG Levels Correlate Better with Respiratory Syncytial Virus Load and Inflammation than Plasma IgG Levels

    PubMed Central

    Vissers, Marloes; Ahout, Inge M. L.; de Jonge, Marien I.

    2015-01-01

    Maternal vaccination is currently considered a strategy against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections. In RSV-infected infants, high mucosal IgG levels correlated better with reduced RSV load and lower mucosal CXCL10 levels than plasma IgG levels. For future vaccination strategies against RSV, more focus should be on the mucosal humoral immune response. PMID:26656116

  17. Four-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Using Axial Body Area as Respiratory Surrogate: Initial Patient Results

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Juan; Cai, Jing; Wang, Hongjun; Chang, Zheng; Czito, Brian G.; Bashir, Mustafa R.; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of a retrospective binning technique for 4-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (4D-MRI) using body area (BA) as a respiratory surrogate. Methods and Materials: Seven patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (4 of 7) or liver metastases (3 of 7) were enrolled in an institutional review board-approved prospective study. All patients were simulated with both computed tomography (CT) and MRI to acquire 3-dimensinal and 4D images for treatment planning. Multiple-slice multiple-phase cine-MR images were acquired in the axial plane for 4D-MRI reconstruction. Image acquisition time per slice was set to 10-15 seconds. Single-slice 2-dimensinal cine-MR images were also acquired across the center of the tumor in orthogonal planes. Tumor motion trajectories from 4D-MRI, cine-MRI, and 4D-CT were analyzed in the superior–inferior (SI), anterior–posterior (AP), and medial–lateral (ML) directions, respectively. Their correlation coefficients (CC) and differences in tumor motion amplitude were determined. Tumor-to-liver contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was measured and compared between 4D-CT, 4D-MRI, and conventional T2-weighted fast spin echo MRI. Results: The means (±standard deviations) of CC comparing 4D-MRI with cine-MRI were 0.97 ± 0.03, 0.97 ± 0.02, and 0.99 ± 0.04 in SI, AP, and ML directions, respectively. The mean differences were 0.61 ± 0.17 mm, 0.32 ± 0.17 mm, and 0.14 ± 0.06 mm in SI, AP, and ML directions, respectively. The means of CC comparing 4D-MRI and 4D-CT were 0.95 ± 0.02, 0.94 ± 0.02, and 0.96 ± 0.02 in SI, AP, and ML directions, respectively. The mean differences were 0.74 ± 0.02 mm, 0.33 ± 0.13 mm, and 0.18 ± 0.07 mm in SI, AP, and ML directions, respectively. The mean tumor-to-tissue CNRs were 2.94 ± 1.51, 19.44 ± 14.63, and 39.47 ± 20.81 in 4D-CT, 4D-MRI, and T2-weighted MRI, respectively. Conclusions: The preliminary evaluation of our 4D-MRI technique results in oncologic patients demonstrates its

  18. A finite state model for respiratory motion analysis in image guided radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Huanmei; Sharp, Gregory C.; Salzberg, Betty; Kaeli, David; Shirato, Hiroki; Jiang, Steve B.

    2004-12-01

    Effective image guided radiation treatment of a moving tumour requires adequate information on respiratory motion characteristics. For margin expansion, beam tracking and respiratory gating, the tumour motion must be quantified for pretreatment planning and monitored on-line. We propose a finite state model for respiratory motion analysis that captures our natural understanding of breathing stages. In this model, a regular breathing cycle is represented by three line segments, exhale, end-of-exhale and inhale, while abnormal breathing is represented by an irregular breathing state. In addition, we describe an on-line implementation of this model in one dimension. We found this model can accurately characterize a wide variety of patient breathing patterns. This model was used to describe the respiratory motion for 23 patients with peak-to-peak motion greater than 7 mm. The average root mean square error over all patients was less than 1 mm and no patient has an error worse than 1.5 mm. Our model provides a convenient tool to quantify respiratory motion characteristics, such as patterns of frequency changes and amplitude changes, and can be applied to internal or external motion, including internal tumour position, abdominal surface, diaphragm, spirometry and other surrogates.

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Cerebral Aspergillosis: Imaging and Pathological Correlations

    PubMed Central

    Sabou, Marcela; Lannes, Béatrice; Cotton, François; Meyronet, David; Galanaud, Damien; Cottier, Jean-Philippe; Grand, Sylvie; Desal, Hubert; Kreutz, Julie; Schenck, Maleka; Meyer, Nicolas; Schneider, Francis; Dietemann, Jean-Louis; Koob, Meriam

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral aspergillosis is associated with a significant morbidity and mortality rate. The imaging data present different patterns and no full consensus exists on typical imaging characteristics of the cerebral lesions. We reviewed MRI findings in 21 patients with cerebral aspergillosis and correlated them to the immune status of the patients and to neuropathological findings when tissue was available. The lesions were characterized by their number, topography, and MRI signal. Dissemination to the brain resulted from direct spread from paranasal sinuses in 8 patients, 6 of them being immunocompetent. Hematogenous dissemination was observed in 13 patients, all were immunosuppressed. In this later group we identified a total of 329 parenchymal abscesses involving the whole brain with a predilection for the corticomedullary junction. More than half the patients had a corpus callosum lesion. Hemorrhagic lesions accounted for 13% and contrast enhancement was observed in 61% of the lesions. Patients with hematogenous dissemination were younger (p = 0.003), had more intracranial lesions (p = 0.0004) and had a higher 12-week mortality rate (p = 0.046) than patients with direct spread from paranasal sinuses. Analysis of 12 aneurysms allowed us to highlight two distinct situations. In case of direct spread from the paranasal sinuses, aneurysms are saccular and located on the proximal artery portions, while the hematogenous dissemination in immunocompromised patients is more frequently associated with distal and fusiform aneurysms. MRI is the exam of choice for cerebral aspergillosis. Number and type of lesions are different according to the mode of dissemination of the infection. PMID:27097323

  20. Real-Time Target Position Estimation Using Stereoscopic Kilovoltage/Megavoltage Imaging and External Respiratory Monitoring for Dynamic Multileaf Collimator Tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Byungchul; Poulsen, Per Rugaard; Sawant, Amit; Ruan, Dan; Keall, Paul J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a real-time target position estimation method using stereoscopic kilovoltage (kV)/megavoltage (MV) imaging and external respiratory monitoring, and to investigate the performance of a dynamic multileaf collimator tracking system using this method. Methods and Materials: The real-time three-dimensional internal target position estimation was established by creating a time-varying correlation model that connected the external respiratory signals with the internal target motion measured intermittently using kV/MV imaging. The method was integrated into a dynamic multileaf collimator tracking system. Tracking experiments were performed for 10 thoracic/abdominal traces. A three-dimensional motion platform carrying a gold marker and a separate one-dimensional motion platform were used to reproduce the target and external respiratory motion, respectively. The target positions were detected by kV (1 Hz) and MV (5.2 Hz) imaging, and external respiratory motion was captured by an optical system (30 Hz). The beam-target alignment error was quantified as the positional difference between the target and circular beam center on the MV images acquired during tracking. The correlation model error was quantified by comparing a model estimate and measured target positions. Results: The root-mean-square errors in the beam-target alignment that had ranged from 3.1 to 7.6 mm without tracking were reduced to <1.5 mm with tracking, except during the model building period (6 s). The root-mean-square error in the correlation model was submillimeters in all directions. Conclusion: A novel real-time target position estimation method was developed and integrated into a dynamic multileaf collimator tracking system and demonstrated an average submillimeter geometric accuracy after initializing the internal/external correlation model. The method used hardware tools available on linear accelerators and therefore shows promise for clinical implementation.

  1. The feasibility of the auto tuning respiratory compensation system with ultrasonic image tracking technique.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Ho-Chiao; Hsu, Hsiao-Yu; Nieh, Shu-Kan; Tien, Der-Chi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the feasibility of using the analytical technique of ultrasound images in combination with an auto tumor localization system. During respiration, the activity of breathing in and out causes organs displacement at the lower lobe of the lung, and the maximum displacement range happens in the Superior-Inferior (SI) direction. Therefore, in this study all the tumor positioning is in SI direction under respiratory compensation, in which the compensations are carried out to the organs at the lower lobe and adjacent to the lower lobe of lung.In this research, due to the processes of ultrasound imaging generation, image analysis and signal transmission, when the captured respiratory signals are sent to auto tumor localization system, there was a signal time delay. The total delay time of the entire signal transmission process was 0.254 ± 0.023 seconds (with the lowest standard deviation) after implementing a series of analyses. To compensate for this signal delay time (0.254 ± 0.023 sec), a phase lead compensator (PLC) was designed and built into the auto tumor localization system. By analyzing the impact of the delay time and the respiratory waveforms under different frequencies on the phase lead compensator, an overall system delay time can be configured. Results showed as the respiratory frequency increased, variable value ``a'' and the subsequent gain ``k'' in the controller becomes larger. Moreover, value ``a'' and ``k'' increased as the system delay time increased when the respiratory frequency was fixed. The relationship of value ``a'' and ``k'' to the respiratory frequency can be obtained by using the curve fitting method to compensate for the respiratory motion for tumor localization. Through the comparison of the uncompensated signal and the compensated signal performed by the auto tumor localization system on the simulated respiratory signal, the feasibility of using ultrasound image analysis technology combined with the

  2. The feasibility of the auto tuning respiratory compensation system with ultrasonic image tracking technique.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Ho-Chiao; Hsu, Hsiao-Yu; Nieh, Shu-Kan; Tien, Der-Chi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the feasibility of using the analytical technique of ultrasound images in combination with an auto tumor localization system. During respiration, the activity of breathing in and out causes organs displacement at the lower lobe of the lung, and the maximum displacement range happens in the Superior-Inferior (SI) direction. Therefore, in this study all the tumor positioning is in SI direction under respiratory compensation, in which the compensations are carried out to the organs at the lower lobe and adjacent to the lower lobe of lung.In this research, due to the processes of ultrasound imaging generation, image analysis and signal transmission, when the captured respiratory signals are sent to auto tumor localization system, there was a signal time delay. The total delay time of the entire signal transmission process was 0.254 ± 0.023 seconds (with the lowest standard deviation) after implementing a series of analyses. To compensate for this signal delay time (0.254 ± 0.023 sec), a phase lead compensator (PLC) was designed and built into the auto tumor localization system. By analyzing the impact of the delay time and the respiratory waveforms under different frequencies on the phase lead compensator, an overall system delay time can be configured. Results showed as the respiratory frequency increased, variable value ``a'' and the subsequent gain ``k'' in the controller becomes larger. Moreover, value ``a'' and ``k'' increased as the system delay time increased when the respiratory frequency was fixed. The relationship of value ``a'' and ``k'' to the respiratory frequency can be obtained by using the curve fitting method to compensate for the respiratory motion for tumor localization. Through the comparison of the uncompensated signal and the compensated signal performed by the auto tumor localization system on the simulated respiratory signal, the feasibility of using ultrasound image analysis technology combined with the

  3. Free-breathing 3D cardiac MRI using iterative image-based respiratory motion correction.

    PubMed

    Moghari, Mehdi H; Roujol, Sébastien; Chan, Raymond H; Hong, Susie N; Bello, Natalie; Henningsson, Markus; Ngo, Long H; Goddu, Beth; Goepfert, Lois; Kissinger, Kraig V; Manning, Warren J; Nezafat, Reza

    2013-10-01

    Respiratory motion compensation using diaphragmatic navigator gating with a 5 mm gating window is conventionally used for free-breathing cardiac MRI. Because of the narrow gating window, scan efficiency is low resulting in long scan times, especially for patients with irregular breathing patterns. In this work, a new retrospective motion compensation algorithm is presented to reduce the scan time for free-breathing cardiac MRI that increasing the gating window to 15 mm without compromising image quality. The proposed algorithm iteratively corrects for respiratory-induced cardiac motion by optimizing the sharpness of the heart. To evaluate this technique, two coronary MRI datasets with 1.3 mm(3) resolution were acquired from 11 healthy subjects (seven females, 25 ± 9 years); one using a navigator with a 5 mm gating window acquired in 12.0 ± 2.0 min and one with a 15 mm gating window acquired in 7.1 ± 1.0 min. The images acquired with a 15 mm gating window were corrected using the proposed algorithm and compared to the uncorrected images acquired with the 5 and 15 mm gating windows. The image quality score, sharpness, and length of the three major coronary arteries were equivalent between the corrected images and the images acquired with a 5 mm gating window (P-value > 0.05), while the scan time was reduced by a factor of 1.7. PMID:23132549

  4. MRI-based measurements of respiratory motion variability and assessment of imaging strategies for radiotherapy planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackall, J. M.; Ahmad, S.; Miquel, M. E.; McClelland, J. R.; Landau, D. B.; Hawkes, D. J.

    2006-09-01

    Respiratory organ motion has a significant impact on the planning and delivery of radiotherapy (RT) treatment for lung cancer. Currently widespread techniques, such as 4D-computed tomography (4DCT), cannot be used to measure variability of this motion from one cycle to the next. In this paper, we describe the use of fast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques to investigate the intra- and inter-cycle reproducibility of respiratory motion and also to estimate the level of errors that may be introduced into treatment delivery by using various breath-hold imaging strategies during lung RT planning. A reference model of respiratory motion is formed to enable comparison of different breathing cycles at any arbitrary position in the respiratory cycle. This is constructed by using free-breathing images from the inhale phase of a single breathing cycle, then co-registering the images, and thereby tracking landmarks. This reference model is then compared to alternative models constructed from images acquired during the exhale phase of the same cycle and the inhale phase of a subsequent cycle, to assess intra- and inter-cycle variability ('hysteresis' and 'reproducibility') of organ motion. The reference model is also compared to a series of models formed from breath-hold data at exhale and inhale. Evaluation of these models is carried out on data from ten healthy volunteers and five lung cancer patients. Free-breathing models show good levels of intra- and inter-cycle reproducibility across the tidal breathing range. Mean intra-cycle errors in the position of organ surface landmarks of 1.5(1.4)-3.5(3.3) mm for volunteers and 2.8(1.8)-5.2(5.2) mm for patients. Equivalent measures of inter-cycle variability across this range are 1.7(1.0)-3.9(3.3) mm for volunteers and 2.8(1.8)-3.3(2.2) mm for patients. As expected, models based on breath-hold sequences do not represent normal tidal motion as well as those based on free-breathing data, with mean errors of 4

  5. Severe bronchospasm followed by respiratory arrest during thallium-dipyridamole imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Lette, J.; Cerino, M.; Laverdiere, M.; Tremblay, J.; Prenovault, J.

    1989-06-01

    We describe the occurrence of sudden severe bronchospasm and respiratory arrest following dipyridamole infusion in a patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease predominantly of the emphysematous type. The severe reaction was unexpected because the patient had tolerated well withdrawal of aminophylline derivatives for 48 hours and was receiving chronic prednisone 20 mg qd. Although the diagnostic and prognostic gains from dipyridamole imaging far outweigh the small risk associated with the test, patients with chronic pulmonary obstructive disease must be closely monitored during thallium-dipyridamole imaging.

  6. Comparison of different algorithms for evaluation of respiratory sinus arrhytmia: cross-correlation function histogram analysis and regression analysis.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, J M; Claus, D; Neundörfer, B; Handwerker, H O

    1995-01-01

    Three algorithms for assessment of respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) have been evaluated: cross-correlation function, histogram analysis and regression plot. The algorithms were tested experimentally in a group of 11 subjects. A cross-correlation function with a high time resolution (1 ms) was used for investigation of the time lag between instantaneous heart rate and respiration (CTL). This time lag was not affected by the breathing rate in a range of 8 to 29 breaths per minute. A mathematical model of CTL compared with experimental results indicates that respiratory sinus arrhythmia is probably modulated directly by the respiratory network in the brainstem rather than by a baroreflex in the range of breathing rate investigated. Histogram analysis reflects the impact of inspiration and expiration on respiratory sinus arrhythmia. For this purpose heart rate changes were separated into two distributions (inspiration-expiration). The result value (U-VAL) of the Mann-Whitney U-test reflects the impact of respiration on heart rate variability. Regression analysis of heart rate versus respiration shows that the heart rate increase is more closely coupled to inspiration than the heart rate decrease to expiration. Both, CTL and U-VAL are thought to be useful parameters for clinical investigation of RSA.

  7. Clinical review: Lung imaging in acute respiratory distress syndrome patients - an update

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Over the past 30 years lung imaging has greatly contributed to the current understanding of the pathophysiology and the management of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). In the past few years, in addition to chest X-ray and lung computed tomography, newer functional lung imaging techniques, such as lung ultrasound, positron emission tomography, electrical impedance tomography and magnetic resonance, have been gaining a role as diagnostic tools to optimize lung assessment and ventilator management in ARDS patients. Here we provide an updated clinical review of lung imaging in ARDS over the past few years to offer an overview of the literature on the available imaging techniques from a clinical perspective. PMID:24238477

  8. Changing image of correlation optics: introduction.

    PubMed

    Angelsky, Oleg V; Desyatnikov, Anton S; Gbur, Gregory J; Hanson, Steen G; Lee, Tim; Miyamoto, Yoko; Schneckenburger, Herbert; Wyant, James C

    2016-04-20

    This feature issue of Applied Optics contains a series of selected papers reflecting recent progress of correlation optics and illustrating current trends in vector singular optics, internal energy flows at light fields, optical science of materials, and new biomedical applications of lasers.

  9. Two-Photon Imaging within the Murine Thorax without Respiratory and Cardiac Motion Artifact

    PubMed Central

    Presson, Robert G.; Brown, Mary Beth; Fisher, Amanda J.; Sandoval, Ruben M.; Dunn, Kenneth W.; Lorenz, Kevin S.; Delp, Edward J.; Salama, Paul; Molitoris, Bruce A.; Petrache, Irina

    2011-01-01

    Intravital microscopy has been recognized for its ability to make physiological measurements at cellular and subcellular levels while maintaining the complex natural microenvironment. Two-photon microscopy (TPM), using longer wavelengths than single-photon excitation, has extended intravital imaging deeper into tissues, with minimal phototoxicity. However, due to a relatively slow acquisition rate, TPM is especially sensitive to motion artifact, which presents a challenge when imaging tissues subject to respiratory and cardiac movement. Thoracoabdominal organs that cannot be exteriorized or immobilized during TPM have generally required the use of isolated, pump-perfused preparations. However, this approach entails significant alteration of normal physiology, such as a lack of neural inputs, increased vascular resistance, and leukocyte activation. We adapted techniques of intravital microscopy that permitted TPM of organs maintained within the thoracoabdominal cavity of living, breathing rats or mice. We obtained extended intravital TPM imaging of the intact lung, arguably the organ most susceptible to both respiratory and cardiac motion. Intravital TPM detected the development of lung microvascular endothelial activation manifested as increased leukocyte adhesion and plasma extravasation in response to oxidative stress inducers PMA or soluble cigarette smoke extract. The pulmonary microvasculature and alveoli in the intact animal were imaged with comparable detail and fidelity to those in pump-perfused animals, opening the possibility for TPM of other thoracoabdominal organs under physiological and pathophysiological conditions. PMID:21703395

  10. Optimization of the x-ray monitoring angle for creating a correlation model between internal and external respiratory signals

    SciTech Connect

    Akimoto, Mami; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Mukumoto, Nobutaka; Yamada, Masahiro; Ueki, Nami; Matsuo, Yukinori; Sawada, Akira; Mizowaki, Takashi; Kokubo, Masaki; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To perform dynamic tumor tracking irradiation with the Vero4DRT (MHI-TM2000), a correlation model [four dimensional (4D) model] between the displacement of infrared markers on the abdominal wall and the three-dimensional position of a tumor indicated by a minimum of three implanted gold markers is required. However, the gold markers cannot be detected successfully on fluoroscopic images under the following situations: (1) overlapping of the gold markers; and (2) a low intensity ratio of the gold marker to its surroundings. In the present study, the authors proposed a method to readily determine the optimal x-ray monitoring angle for creating a 4D model utilizing computed tomography (CT) images. Methods: The Vero4DRT mounting two orthogonal kV x-ray imaging subsystems can separately rotate the gantry along an O-shaped guide-lane and the O-ring along its vertical axis. The optimal x-ray monitoring angle was determined on CT images by minimizing the root-sum-square of water equivalent path lengths (WEPLs) on the orthogonal lines passing all of the gold markers while rotating the O-ring and the gantry. The x-ray monitoring angles at which the distances between the gold markers were within 5 mm at the isocenter level were excluded to prevent false detection of the gold markers in consideration of respiratory motions. First, the relationship between the WEPLs (unit: mm) and the intensity ratios of the gold markers was examined to assess the validity of our proposed method. Second, our proposed method was applied to the 4D-CT images at the end-expiration phase for 11 lung cancer patients who had four to five gold markers. To prove the necessity of the x-ray monitoring angle optimization, the intensity ratios of the least visible markers (minimum intensity ratios) that were estimated from the WEPLs were compared under the following conditions: the optimal x-ray monitoring angle and the angles used for setup verification. Additionally, the intra- and

  11. Correlation of images: technique for mandible biomechanics analysis.

    PubMed

    Yachouh, Jacques; Domergue, Sophie; Loosli, Yannick; Goudot, Patrick

    2011-09-01

    Various experimental or physicomathematical methods can be used to calculate the biomechanical behavior of the mandible. In this study, we tested a new tool for the analysis of mandibular surface strain based on the correlation of images. Five fresh explanted human mandibles were placed in a loading device allowing replication of a physiologic biting exercise. Surfaces of the mandibles were prepared with white and black lacquer. Images were recorded by 2 cameras and analyzed with an algorithm to correlate those images. With the Limess Measurement & Software system and VIC 3D software, we obtained data output concerning deformations, strains, and principal strains. This allowed us to confirm strain distribution on the mandibular corpus and to focus on weak points. Image correlation is a new technique to study mandible biomechanics, which provides accurate measurements on a wide bone surface, with high-definition images and without modification of the structure.

  12. Cartridge case image matching using effective correlation area based method.

    PubMed

    Yammen, S; Muneesawang, P

    2013-06-10

    A firearm leaves a unique impression on fired cartridge cases. The cross-correlation function plays an important role in matching the characteristic features on the cartridge case found at the crime scene with a specific firearm, for accurate firearm identification. This paper proposes that the computational forensic techniques of alignment and effective correlation area-based approaches to image matching are essential to firearm identification. Specifically, the reference and the corresponding cartridge cases are aligned according to the phase-correlation criterion on the transform domain. The informative segments of the breech face marks are identified by a cross-covariance coefficient using the coefficient value in a window located locally in the image space. The segments are then passed to the measurement of edge density for computing effective correlation areas. Experimental results on a new dataset show that the correlation system can make use of the best properties of alignment and effective correlation area-based approaches, and can attain significant improvement of image-correlation results, compared with the traditional image-matching methods for firearm identification, which employ cartridge-case samples. An analysis of image-alignment score matrices suggests that all translation and scaling parameters are estimated correctly, and contribute to the successful extraction of effective correlation areas. It was found that the proposed method has a high discriminant power, compared with the conventional correlator. This paper advocates that this method will enable forensic science to compile a large-scale image database to perform correlation of cartridge case bases, in order to identify firearms that involve pairwise alignments and comparisons.

  13. Severity Quantification of Pediatric Viral Respiratory Illnesses in Chest X-ray Images

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Kazunori; Golbaz, Marzieh; Mansoor, Awais; Perez, Geovanny F; Pancham, Krishna; Khan, Abia; Nino, Gustavo; Linguraru, Marius George

    2015-01-01

    Accurate assessment of severity of viral respiratory illnesses (VRIs) allows early interventions to prevent morbidity and mortality in young children. This paper proposes a novel imaging biomarker framework with chest X-ray image for assessing VRI’s severity in infants, developed specifically to meet the distinct challenges for pediatric population. The proposed framework integrates three novel technical contributions: a) lung segmentation using weighted partitioned active shape model, b) obtrusive object removal using graph cut segmentation with asymmetry constraint, and c) severity quantification using information-theoretic heterogeneity measures. This paper presents our pilot experimental results with a dataset of 148 images and the ground-truth severity scores given by a board-certified pediatric pulmonologist, demonstrating the effectiveness and clinical relevance of the presented framework. PMID:26736226

  14. Asthma and infectious respiratory disease in children--correlation to residence near hazardous waste sites.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jing; Kouznetsova, Maria; Lessner, Lawrence; Carpenter, David O

    2007-12-01

    Rates of hospitalization for asthma and respiratory infectious disease in children were modeled as a function of residence: (1) in a zip code containing a hazardous waste site with persistent organic pollutants ('POPs'); (2) in a zip code with a waste site that did not contain POPs ('other'); or (3) in a zip code without any identified waste site ('clean'), as well as other demographic covariates. After adjustment, living in a zip code containing a POPs waste site significantly increased the frequency of hospitalization for asthma and infectious respiratory disease. Living in a zip code with an 'other' waste site also increased hospitalization frequencies for both diseases. The association was strongest for zip codes whose residents were in the lowest quartile of medium family income. This evidence supports the hypothesis that living near a hazardous waste site increases risk of respiratory disease in children.

  15. Baseline oxygenation in the brain: Correlation between respiratory-calibration and susceptibility methods.

    PubMed

    Fan, Audrey P; Schäfer, Andreas; Huber, Laurentius; Lampe, Leonie; von Smuda, Steffen; Möller, Harald E; Villringer, Arno; Gauthier, Claudine J

    2016-01-15

    New MRI methods for noninvasive imaging of baseline oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) in the brain show great promise. Quantitative O2 imaging (QUO2) applies a biophysical model to measure OEF in tissue from BOLD, cerebral blood flow (CBF), and end-tidal O2 (ETO2) signals acquired during two or more gas manipulations. Alternatively, quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) maps baseline OEF along cerebral vessels based on the deoxyhemoblogin (dHb) susceptibility shift between veins and water. However, these approaches have not been carefully compared to each other or to known physiological signals. The aims of this study were to compare OEF values by QUO2 and QSM; and to see if baseline OEF relates to BOLD and CBF changes during a visual task. Simultaneous BOLD and arterial spin labeling (ASL) scans were acquired at 7T in 11 healthy subjects continuously during hypercapnia (5% CO2, 21% O2), hyperoxia (100% O2), and carbogen (5% CO2, 95% O2) for QUO2 analysis. Separate BOLD-ASL scans were acquired during a checkerboard stimulus to identify functional changes in the visual cortex. Gradient echo phase images were also collected at rest for QSM reconstruction of OEF along cerebral veins draining the visual cortex. Mean baseline OEF was (43.5±14)% for QUO2 with two gases, (42.3±17)% for QUO2 with three gases, and (29.4±3)% for QSM across volunteers. Three-gas QUO2 values of OEF correlated with QSM values of OEF (P=0.03). However, Bland-Altman analysis revealed that QUO2 tended to measure higher baseline OEF with respect to QSM, which likely results from underestimation of the hyperoxic BOLD signal and low signal-to-noise ratio of the ASL acquisitions. Across subjects, the percent CBF change during the visual task correlated with OEF measured by 3-gas QUO2 (P<0.04); and by QSM (P=0.035), providing evidence that the new methods measure true variations in brain physiology across subjects.

  16. Optical correlation of spatial-frequency-shifted images in a photorefractive BSO correlator.

    PubMed

    Tavassoli, Abtine; Becker, Michael F

    2004-03-10

    The optical cross correlation of an image with another image that was spatial-frequency shifted in one dimension was demonstrated in a photorefractive VanderLugt correlator. The first image was stored as a Fourier-transform hologram in a photorefractive Bi12SiO20 crystal (BSO) and was successively correlated with different spatial-frequency-shifted versions of a second image. We implemented the spatial-frequency shift by rotating a galvanometer mirror in an image plane, causing the Fourier transform to be shifted laterally in the BSO. We verified that the resulting operation in the BSO was an accurate complex multiplication of the shifted and the stored Fourier transforms. As many as 20 successive readouts were conducted without measurable erasure of the stored hologram. The dynamic range, saturation behavior, and other performance parameters were measured and are discussed. PMID:15046173

  17. Development of system using beam's eye view images to measure respiratory motion tracking errors in image-guided robotic radiosurgery system.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Mitsuhiro; Shiomi, Hiroya; Iwata, Hiromitsu; Taguchi, Junichi; Okawa, Kohei; Kikuchi, Chie; Inada, Kosaku; Iwabuchi, Michio; Murai, Taro; Koike, Izumi; Tatewaki, Koshi; Ohta, Seiji; Inoue, Tomio

    2015-01-08

    The accuracy of the CyberKnife Synchrony Respiratory Tracking System (SRTS) is considered to be patient-dependent because the SRTS relies on an individual correlation between the internal tumor position (ITP) and the external marker position (EMP), as well as a prediction method to compensate for the delay incurred to adjust the position of the linear accelerator (linac). We aimed to develop a system for obtaining pretreatment statistical measurements of the SRTS tracking error by using beam's eye view (BEV) images, to enable the prediction of the patient-specific accuracy. The respiratory motion data for the ITP and the EMP were derived from cine MR images obtained from 23 patients. The dynamic motion phantom was used to reproduce both the ITP and EMP motions. The CyberKnife was subsequently operated with the SRTS, with a CCD camera mounted on the head of the linac. BEV images from the CCD camera were recorded during the tracking of a ball target by the linac. The tracking error was measured at 15 Hz using in-house software. To assess the precision of the position detection using an MR image, the positions of test tubes (determined from MR images) were compared with their actual positions. To assess the precision of the position detection of the ball, ball positions measured from BEV images were compared with values measured using a Vernier caliper. The SRTS accuracy was evaluated by determining the tracking error that could be identified with a probability of more than 95% (Ep95). The detection precision of the tumor position (determined from cine MR images) was < 0.2 mm. The detection precision of the tracking error when using the BEV images was < 0.2mm. These two detection precisions were derived from our measurement system and were not obtained from the SRTS. The median of Ep95 was found to be 1.5 (range, 1.0-3.5) mm. The difference between the minimum and maximum Ep95 was 2.5mm, indicating that this provides a better means of evaluating patient-specific SRTS

  18. Image quality in thoracic 4D cone-beam CT: A sensitivity analysis of respiratory signal, binning method, reconstruction algorithm, and projection angular spacing

    SciTech Connect

    Shieh, Chun-Chien; Kipritidis, John; O’Brien, Ricky T.; Keall, Paul J.; Kuncic, Zdenka

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: Respiratory signal, binning method, and reconstruction algorithm are three major controllable factors affecting image quality in thoracic 4D cone-beam CT (4D-CBCT), which is widely used in image guided radiotherapy (IGRT). Previous studies have investigated each of these factors individually, but no integrated sensitivity analysis has been performed. In addition, projection angular spacing is also a key factor in reconstruction, but how it affects image quality is not obvious. An investigation of the impacts of these four factors on image quality can help determine the most effective strategy in improving 4D-CBCT for IGRT. Methods: Fourteen 4D-CBCT patient projection datasets with various respiratory motion features were reconstructed with the following controllable factors: (i) respiratory signal (real-time position management, projection image intensity analysis, or fiducial marker tracking), (ii) binning method (phase, displacement, or equal-projection-density displacement binning), and (iii) reconstruction algorithm [Feldkamp–Davis–Kress (FDK), McKinnon–Bates (MKB), or adaptive-steepest-descent projection-onto-convex-sets (ASD-POCS)]. The image quality was quantified using signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio, and edge-response width in order to assess noise/streaking and blur. The SNR values were also analyzed with respect to the maximum, mean, and root-mean-squared-error (RMSE) projection angular spacing to investigate how projection angular spacing affects image quality. Results: The choice of respiratory signals was found to have no significant impact on image quality. Displacement-based binning was found to be less prone to motion artifacts compared to phase binning in more than half of the cases, but was shown to suffer from large interbin image quality variation and large projection angular gaps. Both MKB and ASD-POCS resulted in noticeably improved image quality almost 100% of the time relative to FDK. In addition, SNR

  19. Optimizing 4-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Data Sampling for Respiratory Motion Analysis of Pancreatic Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Stemkens, Bjorn; Tijssen, Rob H.N.; Senneville, Baudouin D. de

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: To determine the optimum sampling strategy for retrospective reconstruction of 4-dimensional (4D) MR data for nonrigid motion characterization of tumor and organs at risk for radiation therapy purposes. Methods and Materials: For optimization, we compared 2 surrogate signals (external respiratory bellows and internal MRI navigators) and 2 MR sampling strategies (Cartesian and radial) in terms of image quality and robustness. Using the optimized protocol, 6 pancreatic cancer patients were scanned to calculate the 4D motion. Region of interest analysis was performed to characterize the respiratory-induced motion of the tumor and organs at risk simultaneously. Results: The MRI navigator was found to be a more reliable surrogate for pancreatic motion than the respiratory bellows signal. Radial sampling is most benign for undersampling artifacts and intraview motion. Motion characterization revealed interorgan and interpatient variation, as well as heterogeneity within the tumor. Conclusions: A robust 4D-MRI method, based on clinically available protocols, is presented and successfully applied to characterize the abdominal motion in a small number of pancreatic cancer patients.

  20. Phase correlation imaging (PCI) for cell dynamics investigation (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Lihong; Gannavarpu, Rajshekhar; Wang, Ru; Bhaduri, Basanta; Sridharan, Shamira; Mir, Mustafa A.; Chakraborty, Arindam; Prasanth, Supriya G.; Millet, Larry; Gillette, Martha U.; Popescu, Gabriel

    2016-03-01

    We present a new method, referred to as phase correlation imaging (PCI), to study cell dynamics and function through temporal phase correlation analysis. PCI offers label-free, high-performance, simple-design, as well as suitability for operation in a conventional microscopy setting. PCI works without the need for controlled or synchronized photoactivation and sophisticated acquisition schemes, and only involves taking a sequence of phase images. The PCI image incorporates information on the phase fluctuations induced by both Brownian motion and deterministic motion of intracellular transport across large scales. We employed spatial light interference microscopy (SLIM) recently developed in our laboratory to experimentally measure quantitative phase information which renders the thickness and refractive index of cellular components without adding contrast agents. The acquisition process is repeated to obtain time-lapse phase images. We calculate the correlation time at each pixel for acquired time-lapse phase images and obtain the correlation time map in space. By temporal correlation analysis, PCI reveals cell dynamics information, which is complementary to quantitative phase imaging itself.

  1. Software for Verifying Image-Correlation Tie Points

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimeck, Gerhard; Yagi, Gary

    2008-01-01

    A computer program enables assessment of the quality of tie points in the image-correlation processes of the software described in the immediately preceding article. Tie points are computed in mappings between corresponding pixels in the left and right images of a stereoscopic pair. The mappings are sometimes not perfect because image data can be noisy and parallax can cause some points to appear in one image but not the other. The present computer program relies on the availability of a left- right correlation map in addition to the usual right left correlation map. The additional map must be generated, which doubles the processing time. Such increased time can now be afforded in the data-processing pipeline, since the time for map generation is now reduced from about 60 to 3 minutes by the parallelization discussed in the previous article. Parallel cluster processing time, therefore, enabled this better science result. The first mapping is typically from a point (denoted by coordinates x,y) in the left image to a point (x',y') in the right image. The second mapping is from (x',y') in the right image to some point (x",y") in the left image. If (x,y) and(x",y") are identical, then the mapping is considered perfect. The perfect-match criterion can be relaxed by introducing an error window that admits of round-off error and a small amount of noise. The mapping procedure can be repeated until all points in each image not connected to points in the other image are eliminated, so that what remains are verified correlation data.

  2. Respiratory kinematics by optoelectronic analysis of chest-wall motion and ultrasonic imaging of the diaphragm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliverti, Andrea; Pedotti, Antonio; Ferrigno, Giancarlo; Macklem, P. T.

    1998-07-01

    Although from a respiratory point of view, compartmental volume change or lack of it is the most crucial variable, it has not been possible to measure the volume of chest wall compartments directly. Recently we developed a new method based on a optoelectronic motion analyzer that can give the three-dimensional location of many markers with the temporal and spatial accuracy required for respiratory measurements. Marker's configuration has been designed specifically to measure the volume of three chest wall compartments, the pulmonary and abdominal rib cage compartments and the abdomen, directly. However, it can not track the exact border between the two rib cage compartments (pulmonary and abdominal) which is determined by the cephalic extremity of the area of apposition of the diaphragm to the inner surface of the rib cage, and which can change systematically as a result of disease processes. The diaphragm displacement can be detected by ultrasonography. In the present study, we propose an integrated system able to investigate the relationships between external (chest wall) and internal (diaphragm) movements of the different respiratory structures by simultaneous external imaging with the optoelectronic system combined with internal kinematic imaging using ultrasounds. 2D digitized points belonging to the lower lung margin, taken from ultrasonographic views, are mapped into the 3D space, where chest wall markers are acquired. Results are shown in terms of accuracy of 3D probe location, relative movement between the probe and the body landmarks, dynamic relationships between chest wall volume and position of the diaphragm during quiet breathing, slow inspirations, relaxations and exercise.

  3. Quantifying the impact of respiratory-gated 4D CT acquisition on thoracic image quality: A digital phantom study

    SciTech Connect

    Bernatowicz, K. Knopf, A.; Lomax, A.; Keall, P.; Kipritidis, J.; Mishra, P.

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: Prospective respiratory-gated 4D CT has been shown to reduce tumor image artifacts by up to 50% compared to conventional 4D CT. However, to date no studies have quantified the impact of gated 4D CT on normal lung tissue imaging, which is important in performing dose calculations based on accurate estimates of lung volume and structure. To determine the impact of gated 4D CT on thoracic image quality, the authors developed a novel simulation framework incorporating a realistic deformable digital phantom driven by patient tumor motion patterns. Based on this framework, the authors test the hypothesis that respiratory-gated 4D CT can significantly reduce lung imaging artifacts. Methods: Our simulation framework synchronizes the 4D extended cardiac torso (XCAT) phantom with tumor motion data in a quasi real-time fashion, allowing simulation of three 4D CT acquisition modes featuring different levels of respiratory feedback: (i) “conventional” 4D CT that uses a constant imaging and couch-shift frequency, (ii) “beam paused” 4D CT that interrupts imaging to avoid oversampling at a given couch position and respiratory phase, and (iii) “respiratory-gated” 4D CT that triggers acquisition only when the respiratory motion fulfills phase-specific displacement gating windows based on prescan breathing data. Our framework generates a set of ground truth comparators, representing the average XCAT anatomy during beam-on for each of ten respiratory phase bins. Based on this framework, the authors simulated conventional, beam-paused, and respiratory-gated 4D CT images using tumor motion patterns from seven lung cancer patients across 13 treatment fractions, with a simulated 5.5 cm{sup 3} spherical lesion. Normal lung tissue image quality was quantified by comparing simulated and ground truth images in terms of overall mean square error (MSE) intensity difference, threshold-based lung volume error, and fractional false positive/false negative rates. Results

  4. Tissue-specific mtDNA abundance from exome data and its correlation with mitochondrial transcription, mass and respiratory activity.

    PubMed

    D'Erchia, Anna Maria; Atlante, Anna; Gadaleta, Gemma; Pavesi, Giulio; Chiara, Matteo; De Virgilio, Caterina; Manzari, Caterina; Mastropasqua, Francesca; Prazzoli, Gian Marco; Picardi, Ernesto; Gissi, Carmela; Horner, David; Reyes, Aurelio; Sbisà, Elisabetta; Tullo, Apollonia; Pesole, Graziano

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells contain a population of mitochondria, variable in number and shape, which in turn contain multiple copies of a tiny compact genome (mtDNA) whose expression and function is strictly coordinated with the nuclear one. mtDNA copy number varies between different cell or tissues types, both in response to overall metabolic and bioenergetics demands and as a consequence or cause of specific pathological conditions. Here we present a novel and reliable methodology to assess the effective mtDNA copy number per diploid genome by investigating off-target reads obtained by whole-exome sequencing (WES) experiments. We also investigate whether and how mtDNA copy number correlates with mitochondrial mass, respiratory activity and expression levels. Analyzing six different tissues from three age- and sex-matched human individuals, we found a highly significant linear correlation between mtDNA copy number estimated by qPCR and the frequency of mtDNA off target WES reads. Furthermore, mtDNA copy number showed highly significant correlation with mitochondrial gene expression levels as measured by RNA-Seq as well as with mitochondrial mass and respiratory activity. Our methodology makes thus feasible, at a large scale, the investigation of mtDNA copy number in diverse cell-types, tissues and pathological conditions or in response to specific treatments. PMID:25446395

  5. Correlative morphologic and functional imaging for diagnosis, staging and follow up in AIDS: an overview.

    PubMed

    Brunetti, A; Soricelli, A; Rotondo, A; Alfano, B; Raman, R; Celentano, L; Di Chiro, G; Salvatore, M

    1995-09-01

    The immunocompromised patient can be affected by different opportunistic infections and tumors, that can involve all organ systems, and particularly, the central nervous system, the respiratory system, the gastrointestinal tract. The extreme variability of AIDS presentations requires a specific preparation and cooperation between the different diagnostic imaging specialists and a close collaboration with the clinicians. With AIDS, different morphologic and functional imaging techniques can be used for detection of disease sites, assessment of the extent of the disease and monitoring of disease changes over time and response to treatment. The complexity of AIDS presentations is such that full integration of the complementary information obtained with different techniques could be most useful. Image registration (coregistration, fusion) indicates approaches where precise spatial cross-references are obtained, in order to combine the information acquired with different imaging modalities, in particular by blending morphologic CT/MRI data with functional SPET/PET data. In this paper, an overview of the developments in the field of "image fusion" follows some comments on the results of morphologic and functional assessment of brain, chest and abdominal diseases in the course of AIDS, as illustrative examples of the potential benefits of multimodality image correlation.

  6. Widefield lensless imaging through a fiber bundle via speckle correlations.

    PubMed

    Porat, Amir; Andresen, Esben Ravn; Rigneault, Hervé; Oron, Dan; Gigan, Sylvain; Katz, Ori

    2016-07-25

    Flexible fiber-optic endoscopes provide a solution for imaging at depths beyond the reach of conventional microscopes. Current endoscopes require focusing and/or scanning mechanisms at the distal end, which limit miniaturization, frame-rate, and field of view. Alternative wavefront-shaping based lensless solutions are extremely sensitive to fiber-bending. We present a lensless, bend-insensitive, single-shot imaging approach based on speckle-correlations in fiber bundles that does not require wavefront shaping. Our approach computationally retrieves the target image by analyzing a single camera frame, exploiting phase information that is inherently preserved in propagation through convnetional fiber bundles. Unlike conventional fiber-based imaging, planar objects can be imaged at variable working distances, the resulting image is unpixelated and diffraction-limited, and miniaturization is limited only by the fiber diameter. PMID:27464136

  7. Local respiratory motion correction for PET/CT imaging: Application to lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lamare, F. Fernandez, P.; Fayad, H.; Visvikis, D.

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: Despite multiple methodologies already proposed to correct respiratory motion in the whole PET imaging field of view (FOV), such approaches have not found wide acceptance in clinical routine. An alternative can be the local respiratory motion correction (LRMC) of data corresponding to a given volume of interest (VOI: organ or tumor). Advantages of LRMC include the use of a simple motion model, faster execution times, and organ specific motion correction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of LMRC using various motion models for oncology (lung lesion) applications. Methods: Both simulated (NURBS based 4D cardiac-torso phantom) and clinical studies (six patients) were used in the evaluation of the proposed LRMC approach. PET data were acquired in list-mode and synchronized with respiration. The implemented approach consists first in defining a VOI on the reconstructed motion average image. Gated PET images of the VOI are subsequently reconstructed using only lines of response passing through the selected VOI and are used in combination with a center of gravity or an affine/elastic registration algorithm to derive the transformation maps corresponding to the respiration effects. Those are finally integrated in the reconstruction process to produce a motion free image over the lesion regions. Results: Although the center of gravity or affine algorithm achieved similar performance for individual lesion motion correction, the elastic model, applied either locally or to the whole FOV, led to an overall superior performance. The spatial tumor location was altered by 89% and 81% for the elastic model applied locally or to the whole FOV, respectively (compared to 44% and 39% for the center of gravity and affine models, respectively). This resulted in similar associated overall tumor volume changes of 84% and 80%, respectively (compared to 75% and 71% for the center of gravity and affine models, respectively). The application of the nonrigid

  8. Cross Correlation versus Normalized Mutual Information on Image Registration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tan, Bin; Tilton, James C.; Lin, Guoqing

    2016-01-01

    This is the first study to quantitatively assess and compare cross correlation and normalized mutual information methods used to register images in subpixel scale. The study shows that the normalized mutual information method is less sensitive to unaligned edges due to the spectral response differences than is cross correlation. This characteristic makes the normalized image resolution a better candidate for band to band registration. Improved band-to-band registration in the data from satellite-borne instruments will result in improved retrievals of key science measurements such as cloud properties, vegetation, snow and fire.

  9. Correlated Statistical Uncertainties in Coded-Aperture Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Fleenor, Matthew C; Blackston, Matthew A; Ziock, Klaus-Peter

    2014-01-01

    In nuclear security applications, coded-aperture imagers provide the opportu- nity for a wealth of information regarding the attributes of both the radioac- tive and non-radioactive components of the objects being imaged. However, for optimum benefit to the community, spatial attributes need to be deter- mined in a quantitative and statistically meaningful manner. To address the deficiency of quantifiable errors in coded-aperture imaging, we present uncer- tainty matrices containing covariance terms between image pixels for MURA mask patterns. We calculated these correlated uncertainties as functions of variation in mask rank, mask pattern over-sampling, and whether or not anti- mask data are included. Utilizing simulated point source data, we found that correlations (and inverse correlations) arose when two or more image pixels were summed. Furthermore, we found that the presence of correlations (and their inverses) was heightened by the process of over-sampling, while correla- tions were suppressed by the inclusion of anti-mask data and with increased mask rank. As an application of this result, we explore how statistics-based alarming in nuclear security is impacted.

  10. 3D cine magnetic resonance imaging of rat lung ARDS using gradient-modulated SWIFT with retrospective respiratory gating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Naoharu; Lei, Jianxun; Utecht, Lynn; Garwood, Michael; Ingbar, David H.; Bhargava, Maneesh

    2015-03-01

    SWeep Imaging with Fourier Transformation (SWIFT) with gradient modulation and DC navigator retrospective gating is introduced as a 3D cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) method for the lung. In anesthetized normal rats, the quasi-simultaneous excitation and acquisition in SWIFT enabled extremely high sensitivity to the fast-decaying parenchymal signals (TE=~4 μs), which are invisible with conventional MRI techniques. Respiratory motion information was extracted from DC navigator signals and the SWIFT data were reconstructed to 3D cine images with 16 respiratory phases. To test this technique's capabilities, rats exposed to > 95% O2 for 60 hours for induction of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), were imaged and compared with normal rat lungs (N=7 and 5 for ARDS and normal groups, respectively). SWIFT images showed lung tissue density differences along the gravity direction. In the cine SWIFT images, a parenchymal signal drop at the inhalation phase was consistently observed for both normal and ARDS rats due to lung inflation (i.e. decrease of the proton density), but the drop was less for ARDS rats. Depending on the respiratory phase and lung region, the lungs from the ARDS rats showed 1-24% higher parenchymal signal intensities relative to the normal rat lungs, likely due to accumulated extravascular water (EVLW). Those results demonstrate that SWIFT has high enough sensitivity for detecting the lung proton density changes due to gravity, different phases of respiration and accumulation of EVLW in the rat ARDS lungs.

  11. Dynamic keyhole: A novel method to improve MR images in the presence of respiratory motion for real-time MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Danny; Pollock, Sean; Whelan, Brendan; Keall, Paul; Kim, Taeho

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: In this work, the authors present a novel magnetic resonance imaging reconstruction method to improve the quality of MR images in the presence of respiratory motion for real-time thoracic image-guided radiotherapy. Methods: This new reconstruction method is called dynamic keyhole and utilizes a library of previously acquired, peripheral k-space datasets from the same (or similar) respiratory state in conjunction with central k-space datasets acquired in real-time. Internal or external respiratory signals are utilized to sort, match, and combine the two separate peripheral and central k-space datasets with respect to respiratory displacement, thereby reducing acquisition time and improving image quality without respiratory-related artifacts. In this study, the dynamic keyhole, conventional keyhole, and zero-filling methods were compared to full k-space acquisition (ground truth) for 60 coronal datasets acquired from 15 healthy human subjects. Results: For the same image-quality difference from the ground-truth image, the dynamic keyhole method reused 79% of the prior peripheral phase-encoding lines, while the conventional keyhole reused 73% and zero-filling 63% (p-value < 0.0001), corresponding to faster acquisition speed of dynamic keyhole for real-time imaging applications. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that the dynamic keyhole method is a promising technique for clinical applications such as image-guided radiotherapy requiring real-time MR monitoring of the thoracic region. Based on the results from this study, the dynamic keyhole method could increase the temporal resolution by a factor of five compared with full k-space methods.

  12. Preliminary study of digital image correlation based optical coherence elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Cuiru; Vuong, Barry; Wen, Xiao-Yan; Yang, Victor

    2013-06-01

    Optical coherence elastography (OCE) provides deformation or material properties mapping of soft tissue, which is important for morphological and pathological studies of the tissue. An OCE technique is developed based on digital image correlation. System calibration and measurement error evaluation are performed. The displacement measurement of 0.6 μm to over 100 μm was obtained through a phantom experiment. The capability of this OCE technique for differentiation of stiffness was evaluated by imaging a two-components phantom. OCE imaging of an aneurysm sample shows promising results for characterization of composites of aneurismal wall in the future.

  13. Cross-correlation imaging of ambient noise sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermert, Laura; Villaseñor, Antonio; Fichtner, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    We develop and apply a novel technique to image ambient seismic noise sources. It is based on measurements of cross-correlation asymmetry defined as the logarithmic energy ratio of the causal and anticausal branches of the cross-correlation function. A possible application of this technique is to account for the distribution of noise sources, a problem which currently poses obstacles to noise-based surface wave dispersion analysis and waveform inversion. The particular asymmetry measurement used is independent of absolute noise correlation amplitudes. It is shown how it can be forward-modelled and related to the noise source power-spectral density using adjoint methods. Simplified sensitivity kernels allow us to rapidly image variations in the power-spectral density of noise sources. This imaging method correctly accounts for viscoelastic attenuation and is to first order insensitive to unmodelled Earth structure. Furthermore, it operates directly on noise correlation data sets. No additional processing is required, which makes the method fast and computationally inexpensive. We apply the method to three vertical-component cross-correlation data sets of different spatial and temporal scales. Processing is deliberately minimal so as to keep observations consistent with the imaging concept. In accord with previous studies, we image seasonally changing sources of the Earth's hum in the Atlantic, Pacific and the Southern Ocean. The sources of noise in the microseismic band recorded at stations in Switzerland are predominantly located in the Atlantic and show a clear dependence on both season and frequency. Our developments are intended as a step towards full 3-D inversions for the sources of ambient noise in various frequency bands, which may ultimately lead to improvements of noise-based structural imaging.

  14. High-speed image matching with coaxial holographic optical correlator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Kanami; Watanabe, Eriko

    2016-09-01

    A computation speed of more than 100 Gbps is experimentally demonstrated using our developed ultrahigh-speed optical correlator. To verify this high computation speed practically, the computation speeds of our optical correlator and conventional digital image matching are quantitatively compared. We use a population count function that achieves the fastest calculation speed when calculating binary matching by a central processing unit (CPU). The calculation speed of the optical correlator is dramatically faster than that using a CPU (2.40 GHz × 4) and 16 GB of random access memory, especially when the calculation data are large-scale.

  15. Imaged Document Optical Correlation and Conversion System (IDOCCS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stalcup, Bruce W.; Dennis, Phillip W.; Dydyk, Robert B.

    1999-03-01

    Today, the paper document is fast becoming a thing of the past. With the rapid development of fast, inexpensive computing and storage devices, many government and private organizations are archiving their documents in electronic form (e.g., personnel records, medical records, patents, etc.). In addition, many organizations are converting their paper archives to electronic images, which are stored in a computer database. Because of this, there is a need to efficiently organize this data into comprehensive and accessible information resources. The Imaged Document Optical Correlation and Conversion System (IDOCCS) provides a total solution to the problem of managing and retrieving textual and graphic information from imaged document archives. At the heart of IDOCCS, optical correlation technology provides the search and retrieval capability of document images. The IDOCCS can be used to rapidly search for key words or phrases within the imaged document archives and can even determine the types of languages contained within a document. In addition, IDOCCS can automatically compare an input document with the archived database to determine if it is a duplicate, thereby reducing the overall resources required to maintain and access the document database. Embedded graphics on imaged pages can also be exploited, e.g., imaged documents containing an agency's seal or logo, or documents with a particular individual's signature block, can be singled out. With this dual capability, IDOCCS outperforms systems that rely on optical character recognition as a basis for indexing and storing only the textual content of documents for later retrieval.

  16. Pin-Hole Array Correlation Imaging: Highly Parallel Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Needleman, Daniel J.; Xu, Yangqing; Mitchison, Timothy J.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract In this work, we describe pin-hole array correlation imaging, a multipoint version of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, based upon a stationary Nipkow disk and a high-speed electron multiplying charged coupled detector. We characterize the system and test its performance on a variety of samples, including 40 nm colloids, a fluorescent protein complex, a membrane dye, and a fluorescence fusion protein. Our results demonstrate that pin-hole array correlation imaging is capable of simultaneously performing tens or hundreds of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy-style measurements in cells, with sufficient sensitivity and temporal resolution to study the behaviors of membrane-bound and soluble molecules labeled with conventional chemical dyes or fluorescent proteins. PMID:19527665

  17. Composite pseudocolor images: a technique to enhance the visual correlation between ventilation-perfusion lung images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaz de Carvalho, Carlos; Costa, Antonio A.; Seixas, M.; Ferreira, F. N.; Guedes, M. A.; Amaral, I.

    1993-07-01

    Lung ventilation and perfusion raw nuclear medicine images obtained from a gamma camera can be difficult to analyze on a per si basis. A method to optimize the visual correlation between these images was established through the use of new combination images: Composite Pseudo-Color (CPC) images. The major topic of this study is the assessment of the usefulness of this method in the detection of lung malfunction.

  18. Gallium scintigraphy in bone infarction. Correlation with bone imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Armas, R.R.; Goldsmith, S.J.

    1984-01-01

    The appearance of gallium-67 images in bone infarction was studied in nine patients with sickle cell disease and correlated with the bone scan findings. Gallium uptake in acute infarction was decreased or absent with a variable bone scan uptake, and normal in healing infarcts, which showed increased uptake on bone scan. The significance of these findings is discussed.

  19. Population calcium imaging of spontaneous respiratory and novel motor activity in the facial nucleus and ventral brainstem in newborn mice.

    PubMed

    Persson, Karin; Rekling, Jens C

    2011-05-15

    The brainstem contains rhythm and pattern forming circuits, which drive cranial and spinal motor pools to produce respiratory and other motor patterns. Here we used calcium imaging combined with nerve recordings in newborn mice to reveal spontaneous population activity in the ventral brainstem and in the facial nucleus. In Fluo-8AM loaded brainstem-spinal cord preparations, respiratory activity on cervical nerves was synchronized with calcium signals at the ventrolateral brainstem surface. Individual ventrolateral neurons at the level of the parafacial respiratory group showed perfect or partial synchrony with respiratory nerve bursts. In brainstem-spinal cord preparations, cut at the level of the mid-facial nucleus, calcium signals were recorded in the dorsal, lateral and medial facial subnuclei during respiratory activity. Strong activity initiated in the dorsal subnucleus, followed by activity in lateral and medial subnuclei. Whole-cell recordings from facial motoneurons showed weak respiratory drives, and electrical field potential recordings confirmed respiratory drive to particularly the dorsal and lateral subnuclei. Putative facial premotoneurons showed respiratory-related calcium signals, and were predominantly located dorsomedial to the facial nucleus. A novel motor activity on facial, cervical and thoracic nerves was synchronized with calcium signals at the ventromedial brainstem extending from the level of the facial nucleus to the medulla–spinal cord border. Cervical dorsal root stimulation induced similar ventromedial activity. The medial facial subnucleus showed calcium signals synchronized with this novel motor activity on cervical nerves, and cervical dorsal root stimulation induced similar medial facial subnucleus activity. In conclusion, the dorsal and lateral facial subnuclei are strongly respiratory-modulated, and the brainstem contains a novel pattern forming circuit that drives the medial facial subnucleus and cervical motor pools.

  20. Relationships among Dissemination of Primary Parainfluenza Virus Infection in the Respiratory Tract, Mucosal and Peripheral Immune Responses, and Protection from Reinfection: a Noninvasive Bioluminescence-Imaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Crystal W.; Li, Mei; Hurwitz, Julia L.; Vogel, Peter

    2015-01-01

    , resulting in subsequent reinfections even in the absence of antigenic drift. Here, we used noninvasive bioluminescence imaging in a mouse model to dissect relationships among (i) the mode of inoculation, (ii) the dynamics of primary infection, (iii) consequent immune responses, and (iv) protection from high-dose, high-volume lethal challenge and contact transmission, which we find here to be similar to that of a mild low-dose, low-volume upper respiratory tract (URT)-biased infection. Our studies demonstrate the superiority of i.n. versus i.m. vaccination in protection against both lethal challenge and contact transmission. In addition to providing correlates of protection that will assist respiratory virus vaccine development, these studies extend the development of an increasingly used technique for the study of viral infection and immunity, noninvasive bioluminescence imaging. PMID:25589649

  1. SU-E-P-41: Imaging Coordination of Cone Beam CT, On-Board Image Conjunction with Optical Image Guidance for SBRT Treatment with Respiratory Motion Management

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y; Campbell, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To spare normal tissue for SBRT lung/liver patients, especially for patients with significant tumor motion, image guided respiratory motion management has been widely implemented in clinical practice. The purpose of this study was to evaluate imaging coordination of cone beam CT, on-board X-ray image conjunction with optical image guidance for SBRT treatment with motion management. Methods: Currently in our clinic a Varian Novlis Tx was utilized for treating SBRT patients implementing CBCT. A BrainLAB X-ray ExacTrac imaging system in conjunction with optical guidance was primarily used for SRS patients. CBCT and X-ray imaging system were independently calibrated with 1.0 mm tolerance. For SBRT lung/liver patients, the magnitude of tumor motion was measured based-on 4DCT and the measurement was analyzed to determine if patients would be beneficial with respiratory motion management. For patients eligible for motion management, an additional CT with breath holding would be scanned and used as primary planning CT and as reference images for Cone beam CT. During the SBRT treatment, a CBCT with pause and continuing technology would be performed with patients holding breath, which may require 3–4 partially scanned CBCT to combine as a whole CBCT depending on how long patients capable of holding breath. After patients being setup by CBCT images, the ExactTrac X-ray imaging system was implemented with patients’ on-board X-ray images compared to breath holding CT-based DRR. Results: For breath holding patients SBRT treatment, after initially localizing patients with CBCT, we then position patients with ExacTrac X-ray and optical imaging system. The observed deviations of real-time optical guided position average at 3.0, 2.5 and 1.5 mm in longitudinal, vertical and lateral respectively based on 35 treatments. Conclusion: The respiratory motion management clinical practice improved our physician confidence level to give tighter tumor margin for sparing normal

  2. Adaptive codebook selection schemes for image classification in correlated channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chia Chang; Liu, Xiang Lian; Liu, Kuan-Fu

    2015-09-01

    The multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) system with the use of transmit and receive antenna arrays achieves diversity and array gains via transmit beamforming. Due to the absence of full channel state information (CSI) at the transmitter, the transmit beamforming vector can be quantized at the receiver and sent back to the transmitter by a low-rate feedback channel, called limited feedback beamforming. One of the key roles of Vector Quantization (VQ) is how to generate a good codebook such that the distortion between the original image and the reconstructed image is the minimized. In this paper, a novel adaptive codebook selection scheme for image classification is proposed with taking both spatial and temporal correlation inherent in the channel into consideration. The new codebook selection algorithm is developed to select two codebooks from the discrete Fourier transform (DFT) codebook, the generalized Lloyd algorithm (GLA) codebook and the Grassmannian codebook to be combined and used as candidates of the original image and the reconstructed image for image transmission. The channel is estimated and divided into four regions based on the spatial and temporal correlation of the channel and an appropriate codebook is assigned to each region. The proposed method can efficiently reduce the required information of feedback under the spatially and temporally correlated channels, where each region is adaptively. Simulation results show that in the case of temporally and spatially correlated channels, the bit-error-rate (BER) performance can be improved substantially by the proposed algorithm compared to the one with only single codebook.

  3. Pulmonary CT image registration and warping for tracking tissue deformation during the respiratory cycle through 3D consistent image registration

    PubMed Central

    Li, Baojun; Christensen, Gary E.; Hoffman, Eric A.; McLennan, Geoffrey; Reinhardt, Joseph M.

    2008-01-01

    Tracking lung tissues during the respiratory cycle has been a challenging task for diagnostic CT and CT-guided radiotherapy. We propose an intensity- and landmark-based image registration algorithm to perform image registration and warping of 3D pulmonary CT image data sets, based on consistency constraints and matching corresponding airway branchpoints. In this paper, we demonstrate the effectivenss and accuracy of this algorithm in tracking lung tissues by both animal and human data sets. In the animal study, the result showed a tracking accuracy of 1.9 mm between 50% functional residual capacity (FRC) and 85% total lung capacity (TLC) for 12 metal seeds implanted in the lungs of a breathing sheep under precise volume control using a pulmonary ventilator. Visual inspection of the human subject results revealed the algorithm’s potential not only in matching the global shapes, but also in registering the internal structures (e.g., oblique lobe fissures, pulmonary artery branches, etc.). These results suggest that our algorithm has significant potential for warping and tracking lung tissue deformation with applications in diagnostic CT, CT-guided radiotherapy treatment planning, and therapeutic effect evaluation. PMID:19175115

  4. Pulmonary CT image registration and warping for tracking tissue deformation during the respiratory cycle through 3D consistent image registration.

    PubMed

    Li, Baojun; Christensen, Gary E; Hoffman, Eric A; McLennan, Geoffrey; Reinhardt, Joseph M

    2008-12-01

    Tracking lung tissues during the respiratory cycle has been a challenging task for diagnostic CT and CT-guided radiotherapy. We propose an intensity- and landmark-based image registration algorithm to perform image registration and warping of 3D pulmonary CT image data sets, based on consistency constraints and matching corresponding airway branchpoints. In this paper, we demonstrate the effectivenss and accuracy of this algorithm in tracking lung tissues by both animal and human data sets. In the animal study, the result showed a tracking accuracy of 1.9 mm between 50% functional residual capacity (FRC) and 85% total lung capacity (TLC) for 12 metal seeds implanted in the lungs of a breathing sheep under precise volume control using a pulmonary ventilator. Visual inspection of the human subject results revealed the algorithm's potential not only in matching the global shapes, but also in registering the internal structures (e.g., oblique lobe fissures, pulmonary artery branches, etc.). These results suggest that our algorithm has significant potential for warping and tracking lung tissue deformation with applications in diagnostic CT, CT-guided radiotherapy treatment planning, and therapeutic effect evaluation.

  5. Correlation and image compression for limited-bandwidth CCD.

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Douglas G.

    2005-07-01

    As radars move to Unmanned Aerial Vehicles with limited-bandwidth data downlinks, the amount of data stored and transmitted with each image becomes more significant. This document gives the results of a study to determine the effect of lossy compression in the image magnitude and phase on Coherent Change Detection (CCD). We examine 44 lossy compression types, plus lossless zlib compression, and test each compression method with over 600 CCD image pairs. We also derive theoretical predictions for the correlation for most of these compression schemes, which compare favorably with the experimental results. We recommend image transmission formats for limited-bandwidth programs having various requirements for CCD, including programs which cannot allow performance degradation and those which have stricter bandwidth requirements at the expense of CCD performance.

  6. Imaged document information location and extraction using an optical correlator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stalcup, Bruce W.; Dennis, Phillip W.; Dydyk, Robert B.

    1999-12-01

    Today, the paper document is fast becoming a thing of the past. With the rapid development of fast, inexpensive computing and storage devices, many government and private organizations are archiving their documents in electronic form (e.g., personnel records, medical records, patents, etc.). Many of these organizations are converting their paper archives to electronic images, which are then stored in a computer database. Because of this, there is a need to efficiently organize this data into comprehensive and accessible information resources and provide for rapid access to the information contained within these imaged documents. To meet this need, Litton PRC and Litton Data Systems Division are developing a system, the Imaged Document Optical Correlation and Conversion System (IDOCCS), to provide a total solution to the problem of managing and retrieving textual and graphic information from imaged document archives. At the heart of IDOCCS, optical correlation technology provide a means for the search and retrieval of information from imaged documents. IDOCCS can be used to rapidly search for key words or phrases within the imaged document archives and has the potential to determine the types of languages contained within a document. In addition, IDOCCS can automatically compare an input document with the archived database to determine if it is a duplicate, thereby reducing the overall resources required to maintain and access the document database. Embedded graphics on imaged pages can also be exploited, e.g., imaged documents containing an agency's seal or logo can be singled out. In this paper, we present a description of IDOCCS as well as preliminary performance results and theoretical projections.

  7. [Imaging protocols for the management of respiratory motions in the radiotherapy planning for early stage lung cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Pócza, Tamás; Pesznyák, Csilla; Lövey, József; Bajcsay, András; Szilágyi, András; Almády, Balázs; Major, Tibor; Polgár, Csaba

    2015-06-01

    The aim of our work is to present the imaging techniques used at the National Institute of Oncology for taking into consideration the breathing motion at radiation therapy treatment planning. Internationally recommended imaging techniques, such as 4D CT, respiratory gating and ITV (Internal Target Volume) definition were examined. The different imaging techniques were analysed regarding the delivered dose during imaging, the required time to adapt the technique, and the necessary equipment. The differences in size of PTVs (Planning Target Volume) due to diverse volume defining methods were compared in 5 cases. For 4D CT breath monitoring is crucial, which requires special equipment. To decrease the relatively high exposure of 4D CT it is possible to scan only a few predefined breathing phases. The possible positions of the tumour can be well approximated with CT scans taken in the inhale maximum, the exhale maximum and in intermediate phase. The intermediate phase can be exchanged with an ordinary CT image set, and the extreme phase CT images can be ensured by given verbal instructions for the patient. This way special gating equipment is not required. Based on these 3 breathing phases an ITV can be defined. Using this ITV definition method the margin between the CTV (Clinical Target Volume) and the PTV can be reduced by 1 cm. Using this imaging protocol PTV can be reduced by 30%. A further 10% PTV reduction can be achieved with respiratory gating. In the routine clinical practice respiratory motion management with a 3-phase CT-imaging protocol the PTV for early-stage lung cancer can be significantly reduced without the use of 4D CT and/or respiratory gating. For special, high precision treatment techniques 4D CT is recommended.

  8. Correlation of breast image alignment using biomechanical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Angela; Rajagopal, Vijay; Bier, Peter; Nielsen, Poul M. F.; Nash, Martyn P.

    2009-02-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common causes of cancer death among women around the world. Researchers have found that a combination of imaging modalities (such as x-ray mammography, magnetic resonance, and ultrasound) leads to more effective diagnosis and management of breast cancers because each imaging modality displays different information about the breast tissues. In order to aid clinicians in interpreting the breast images from different modalities, we have developed a computational framework for generating individual-specific, 3D, finite element (FE) models of the breast. Medical images are embedded into this model, which is subsequently used to simulate the large deformations that the breasts undergo during different imaging procedures, thus warping the medical images to the deformed views of the breast in the different modalities. In this way, medical images of the breast taken in different geometric configurations (compression, gravity, etc.) can be aligned according to physically feasible transformations. In order to analyse the accuracy of the biomechanical model predictions, squared normalised cross correlation (NCC2) was used to provide both local and global comparisons of the model-warped images with clinical images of the breast subject to different gravity loaded states. The local comparison results were helpful in indicating the areas for improvement in the biomechanical model. To improve the modelling accuracy, we will need to investigate the incorporation of breast tissue heterogeneity into the model and altering the boundary conditions for the breast model. A biomechanical image registration tool of this kind will help radiologists to provide more reliable diagnosis and localisation of breast cancer.

  9. Extracting flat-field images from scene-based image sequences using phase correlation.

    PubMed

    Caron, James N; Montes, Marcos J; Obermark, Jerome L

    2016-06-01

    Flat-field image processing is an essential step in producing high-quality and radiometrically calibrated images. Flat-fielding corrects for variations in the gain of focal plane array electronics and unequal illumination from the system optics. Typically, a flat-field image is captured by imaging a radiometrically uniform surface. The flat-field image is normalized and removed from the images. There are circumstances, such as with remote sensing, where a flat-field image cannot be acquired in this manner. For these cases, we developed a phase-correlation method that allows the extraction of an effective flat-field image from a sequence of scene-based displaced images. The method uses sub-pixel phase correlation image registration to align the sequence to estimate the static scene. The scene is removed from sequence producing a sequence of misaligned flat-field images. An average flat-field image is derived from the realigned flat-field sequence.

  10. Extracting flat-field images from scene-based image sequences using phase correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caron, James N.; Montes, Marcos J.; Obermark, Jerome L.

    2016-06-01

    Flat-field image processing is an essential step in producing high-quality and radiometrically calibrated images. Flat-fielding corrects for variations in the gain of focal plane array electronics and unequal illumination from the system optics. Typically, a flat-field image is captured by imaging a radiometrically uniform surface. The flat-field image is normalized and removed from the images. There are circumstances, such as with remote sensing, where a flat-field image cannot be acquired in this manner. For these cases, we developed a phase-correlation method that allows the extraction of an effective flat-field image from a sequence of scene-based displaced images. The method uses sub-pixel phase correlation image registration to align the sequence to estimate the static scene. The scene is removed from sequence producing a sequence of misaligned flat-field images. An average flat-field image is derived from the realigned flat-field sequence.

  11. Prevalence and correlates of body image dissatisfaction in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Ginsberg, Rebecca L; Tinker, Lesley; Liu, Jingmin; Gray, James; Sangi-Haghpeykar, Haleh; Manson, JoAnn E; Margolis, Karen L

    2016-01-01

    Dissatisfaction with one's body image is widespread and can have serious health consequences; however, research about its prevalence and correlates in older women is limited. We analyzed data from 75,256 women participating in the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study, a longitudinal study of postmenopausal women's health. Measures used in the study were collected at baseline and/or the third year of follow-up between 1993 and 2002. The majority of participants (83%) in this study were dissatisfied with their bodies because they perceived themselves as heavier than their ideal. Overall, the multiple and significant correlates of body image dissatisfaction explained 36.2% of the variance in the body image dissatisfaction score, with body mass index (BMI) and change in BMI being the two most important contributors to explaining the variance. The results of this study suggest future research should focus on the utility of interventions to reduce dissatisfaction with body image in postmenopausal women that target either maintenance of a lower BMI through diet and exercise, and/or body acceptance. Further, future research should aim to identify factors in addition to body size that drive body image dissatisfaction. PMID:26219698

  12. Image Segmentation Using Higher-Order Correlation Clustering.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sungwoong; Yoo, Chang D; Nowozin, Sebastian; Kohli, Pushmeet

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, a hypergraph-based image segmentation framework is formulated in a supervised manner for many high-level computer vision tasks. To consider short- and long-range dependency among various regions of an image and also to incorporate wider selection of features, a higher-order correlation clustering (HO-CC) is incorporated in the framework. Correlation clustering (CC), which is a graph-partitioning algorithm, was recently shown to be effective in a number of applications such as natural language processing, document clustering, and image segmentation. It derives its partitioning result from a pairwise graph by optimizing a global objective function such that it simultaneously maximizes both intra-cluster similarity and inter-cluster dissimilarity. In the HO-CC, the pairwise graph which is used in the CC is generalized to a hypergraph which can alleviate local boundary ambiguities that can occur in the CC. Fast inference is possible by linear programming relaxation, and effective parameter learning by structured support vector machine is also possible by incorporating a decomposable structured loss function. Experimental results on various data sets show that the proposed HO-CC outperforms other state-of-the-art image segmentation algorithms. The HO-CC framework is therefore an efficient and flexible image segmentation framework. PMID:26352230

  13. Image Cross-Correlation Analysis of Time Varying Flows.

    PubMed

    Marquezin, Cassia A; Ceffa, Nicolò G; Cotelli, Franco; Collini, Maddalena; Sironi, Laura; Chirico, Giuseppe

    2016-07-19

    In vivo studies of blood circulation pathologies have great medical relevance and need methods for the characterization of time varying flows at high spatial and time resolution in small animal models. We test here the efficacy of the combination of image correlation techniques and single plane illumination microscopy (SPIM) in characterizing time varying flows in vitro and in vivo. As indicated by numerical simulations and by in vitro experiments on straight capillaries, the complex analytical form of the cross-correlation function for SPIM detection can be simplified, in conditions of interest for hemodynamics, to a superposition of Gaussian components, easily amenable to the analysis of variable flows. The possibility to select a wide field of view with a good spatial resolution along the collection optical axis and to compute the cross-correlation between regions of interest at varying distances on a single time stack of images allows one to single out periodic flow components from spurious peaks on the cross-correlation functions and to infer the duration of each flow component. We apply this cross-correlation analysis to the blood flow in Zebrafish embryos at 4 days after fertilization, measuring the average speed and the duration of the systolic and diastolic phases.

  14. Research on respiratory motion correction method based on liver contrast-enhanced ultrasound images of single mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ji; Li, Tao; Zheng, Shiqiang; Li, Yiyong

    2015-03-01

    To reduce the effects of respiratory motion in the quantitative analysis based on liver contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) image sequencesof single mode. The image gating method and the iterative registration method using model image were adopted to register liver contrast-enhanced ultrasound image sequences of single mode. The feasibility of the proposed respiratory motion correction method was explored preliminarily using 10 hepatocellular carcinomas CEUS cases. The positions of the lesions in the time series of 2D ultrasound images after correction were visually evaluated. Before and after correction, the quality of the weighted sum of transit time (WSTT) parametric images were also compared, in terms of the accuracy and spatial resolution. For the corrected and uncorrected sequences, their mean deviation values (mDVs) of time-intensity curve (TIC) fitting derived from CEUS sequences were measured. After the correction, the positions of the lesions in the time series of 2D ultrasound images were almost invariant. In contrast, the lesions in the uncorrected images all shifted noticeably. The quality of the WSTT parametric maps derived from liver CEUS image sequences were improved more greatly. Moreover, the mDVs of TIC fitting derived from CEUS sequences after the correction decreased by an average of 48.48+/-42.15. The proposed correction method could improve the accuracy of quantitative analysis based on liver CEUS image sequences of single mode, which would help in enhancing the differential diagnosis efficiency of liver tumors.

  15. Evaluation method based on the image correlation for laser jamming image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Che, Jinxi; Li, Zhongmin; Gao, Bo

    2013-09-01

    The jamming effectiveness evaluation of infrared imaging system is an important part of electro-optical countermeasure. The infrared imaging devices in the military are widely used in the searching, tracking and guidance and so many other fields. At the same time, with the continuous development of laser technology, research of laser interference and damage effect developed continuously, laser has been used to disturbing the infrared imaging device. Therefore, the effect evaluation of the infrared imaging system by laser has become a meaningful problem to be solved. The information that the infrared imaging system ultimately present to the user is an image, so the evaluation on jamming effect can be made from the point of assessment of image quality. The image contains two aspects of the information, the light amplitude and light phase, so the image correlation can accurately perform the difference between the original image and disturbed image. In the paper, the evaluation method of digital image correlation, the assessment method of image quality based on Fourier transform, the estimate method of image quality based on error statistic and the evaluation method of based on peak signal noise ratio are analysed. In addition, the advantages and disadvantages of these methods are analysed. Moreover, the infrared disturbing images of the experiment result, in which the thermal infrared imager was interfered by laser, were analysed by using these methods. The results show that the methods can better reflect the jamming effects of the infrared imaging system by laser. Furthermore, there is good consistence between evaluation results by using the methods and the results of subjective visual evaluation. And it also provides well repeatability and convenient quantitative analysis. The feasibility of the methods to evaluate the jamming effect was proved. It has some extent reference value for the studying and developing on electro-optical countermeasures equipments and

  16. Imaging spatial correlations of Rydberg excitations in cold atom clouds.

    PubMed

    Schwarzkopf, A; Sapiro, R E; Raithel, G

    2011-09-01

    We use direct spatial imaging of cold 85Rb Rydberg atom clouds to measure the Rydberg-Rydberg correlation function. The results are in qualitative agreement with theoretical predictions [F. Robicheaux and J. V. Hernández, Phys. Rev. A 72, 063403 (2005)]. We determine the blockade radius for states 44D(5/2), 60D(5/2), and 70D(5/2) and investigate the dependence of the correlation behavior on excitation conditions and detection delay. Experimental data hint at the existence of long-range order.

  17. Imaging Spatial Correlations of Rydberg Excitations in Cold Atom Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarzkopf, A.; Sapiro, R. E.; Raithel, G.

    2011-09-02

    We use direct spatial imaging of cold {sup 85}Rb Rydberg atom clouds to measure the Rydberg-Rydberg correlation function. The results are in qualitative agreement with theoretical predictions [F. Robicheaux and J. V. Hernandez, Phys. Rev. A 72, 063403 (2005)]. We determine the blockade radius for states 44D{sub 5/2}, 60D{sub 5/2}, and 70D{sub 5/2} and investigate the dependence of the correlation behavior on excitation conditions and detection delay. Experimental data hint at the existence of long-range order.

  18. Reducing respiratory effect in motion correction for EPI images with sequential slice acquisition order.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hu; Puce, Aina

    2014-04-30

    Motion correction is critical for data analysis of fMRI time series. Most motion correction algorithms treat the head as a rigid body. Respiration of the subject, however, can alter the static magnetic field in the head and result in motion-like slice shifts for echo planar imaging (EPI). The delay of acquisition between slices causes a phase difference in respiration so that the shifts vary with slice positions. To characterize the effect of respiration on motion correction, we acquired fast sampled fMRI data using multi-band EPI and then simulated different acquisition schemes. Our results indicated that respiration introduces additional noise after motion correction. The signal variation between volumes after motion correction increases when the effective TR increases from 675ms to 2025ms. This problem can be corrected if slices are acquired sequentially. For EPI with a sequential acquisition scheme, we propose to divide the image volumes into several segments so that slices within each segment are acquired close in time and then perform motion correction on these segments separately. We demonstrated that the temporal signal-to-noise ratio (TSNR) was increased when the motion correction was performed on the segments separately rather than on the whole image. This enhancement of TSNR was not evenly distributed across the segments and was not observed for interleaved acquisition. The level of increase was higher for superior slices. On superior slices the percentage of TSNR gain was comparable to that using image based retrospective correction for respiratory noise. Our results suggest that separate motion correction on segments is highly recommended for sequential acquisition schemes, at least for slices distal to the chest.

  19. Development and validation of real-time simulation of X-ray imaging with respiratory motion.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Franck P; Villard, Pierre-Frédéric

    2016-04-01

    We present a framework that combines evolutionary optimisation, soft tissue modelling and ray tracing on GPU to simultaneously compute the respiratory motion and X-ray imaging in real-time. Our aim is to provide validated building blocks with high fidelity to closely match both the human physiology and the physics of X-rays. A CPU-based set of algorithms is presented to model organ behaviours during respiration. Soft tissue deformation is computed with an extension of the Chain Mail method. Rigid elements move according to kinematic laws. A GPU-based surface rendering method is proposed to compute the X-ray image using the Beer-Lambert law. It is provided as an open-source library. A quantitative validation study is provided to objectively assess the accuracy of both components: (i) the respiration against anatomical data, and (ii) the X-ray against the Beer-Lambert law and the results of Monte Carlo simulations. Our implementation can be used in various applications, such as interactive medical virtual environment to train percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography in interventional radiology, 2D/3D registration, computation of digitally reconstructed radiograph, simulation of 4D sinograms to test tomography reconstruction tools. PMID:26773644

  20. Development and validation of real-time simulation of X-ray imaging with respiratory motion.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Franck P; Villard, Pierre-Frédéric

    2016-04-01

    We present a framework that combines evolutionary optimisation, soft tissue modelling and ray tracing on GPU to simultaneously compute the respiratory motion and X-ray imaging in real-time. Our aim is to provide validated building blocks with high fidelity to closely match both the human physiology and the physics of X-rays. A CPU-based set of algorithms is presented to model organ behaviours during respiration. Soft tissue deformation is computed with an extension of the Chain Mail method. Rigid elements move according to kinematic laws. A GPU-based surface rendering method is proposed to compute the X-ray image using the Beer-Lambert law. It is provided as an open-source library. A quantitative validation study is provided to objectively assess the accuracy of both components: (i) the respiration against anatomical data, and (ii) the X-ray against the Beer-Lambert law and the results of Monte Carlo simulations. Our implementation can be used in various applications, such as interactive medical virtual environment to train percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography in interventional radiology, 2D/3D registration, computation of digitally reconstructed radiograph, simulation of 4D sinograms to test tomography reconstruction tools.

  1. Characterization of lead zirconate titanate microwires using digital image correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malakooti, Mohammad H.; Miller, Alexander T.; Sodano, Henry A.

    2015-04-01

    Lead zirconate titanate (PZT) microwires with applications in sensors, actuators, and energy harvesters are produced using hydrothermal synthesis. The synthesized microwires are relatively large with an average length of about 450 microns and an average width of 4 microns. Each of these individual PZT microwires can be integrated in smart systems as an active phase or be used as an independent smart material. In this paper, the synthesis procedure and characterization of these large microwires is demonstrated. The converse piezoelectric properties of the microwires are measured using digital image correlation after clamping and adding electrodes at each end of the microwire. It has been shown in the literature that digital image correlation can be used as a precise tool for rapid characterization of piezoelectric materials. Here, it is demonstrated that this technique can be applied to characterize the actual response of piezoelectric materials at the micron scale.

  2. Middle cerebellar peduncles: Magnetic resonance imaging and pathophysiologic correlate

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Humberto; Tomsick, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    We describe common and less common diseases that can cause magnetic resonance signal abnormalities of middle cerebellar peduncles (MCP), offering a systematic approach correlating imaging findings with clinical clues and pathologic mechanisms. Myelin abnormalities, different types of edema or neurodegenerative processes, can cause areas of abnormal T2 signal, variable enhancement, and patterns of diffusivity of MCP. Pathologies such as demyelinating disorders or certain neurodegenerative entities (e.g., multiple system atrophy or fragile X-associated tremor-ataxia syndrome) appear to have predilection for MCP. Careful evaluation of concomitant imaging findings in the brain or brainstem; and focused correlation with key clinical findings such as immunosuppression for progressive multifocal leukoencephalopahty; hypertension, post-transplant status or high dose chemotherapy for posterior reversible encephalopathy; electrolyte disorders for myelinolysis or suspected toxic-drug related encephalopathy; would yield an appropriate and accurate differential diagnosis in the majority of cases. PMID:26751508

  3. Correlative infrared nanospectroscopic and nanomechanical imaging of block copolymer microdomains.

    PubMed

    Pollard, Benjamin; Raschke, Markus B

    2016-01-01

    Intermolecular interactions and nanoscale phase separation govern the properties of many molecular soft-matter systems. Here, we combine infrared vibrational scattering scanning near-field optical microscopy (IR s-SNOM) with force-distance spectroscopy for simultaneous characterization of both nanoscale optical and nanomechanical molecular properties through hybrid imaging. The resulting multichannel images and correlative analysis of chemical composition, spectral IR line shape, modulus, adhesion, deformation, and dissipation acquired for a thin film of a nanophase separated block copolymer (PS-b-PMMA) reveal complex structural variations, in particular at domain interfaces, not resolved in any individual signal channel alone. These variations suggest that regions of multicomponent chemical composition, such as the interfacial mixing regions between microdomains, are correlated with high spatial heterogeneity in nanoscale material properties. PMID:27335750

  4. Correlative infrared nanospectroscopic and nanomechanical imaging of block copolymer microdomains.

    PubMed

    Pollard, Benjamin; Raschke, Markus B

    2016-01-01

    Intermolecular interactions and nanoscale phase separation govern the properties of many molecular soft-matter systems. Here, we combine infrared vibrational scattering scanning near-field optical microscopy (IR s-SNOM) with force-distance spectroscopy for simultaneous characterization of both nanoscale optical and nanomechanical molecular properties through hybrid imaging. The resulting multichannel images and correlative analysis of chemical composition, spectral IR line shape, modulus, adhesion, deformation, and dissipation acquired for a thin film of a nanophase separated block copolymer (PS-b-PMMA) reveal complex structural variations, in particular at domain interfaces, not resolved in any individual signal channel alone. These variations suggest that regions of multicomponent chemical composition, such as the interfacial mixing regions between microdomains, are correlated with high spatial heterogeneity in nanoscale material properties.

  5. Correlative infrared nanospectroscopic and nanomechanical imaging of block copolymer microdomains

    PubMed Central

    Pollard, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Summary Intermolecular interactions and nanoscale phase separation govern the properties of many molecular soft-matter systems. Here, we combine infrared vibrational scattering scanning near-field optical microscopy (IR s-SNOM) with force–distance spectroscopy for simultaneous characterization of both nanoscale optical and nanomechanical molecular properties through hybrid imaging. The resulting multichannel images and correlative analysis of chemical composition, spectral IR line shape, modulus, adhesion, deformation, and dissipation acquired for a thin film of a nanophase separated block copolymer (PS-b-PMMA) reveal complex structural variations, in particular at domain interfaces, not resolved in any individual signal channel alone. These variations suggest that regions of multicomponent chemical composition, such as the interfacial mixing regions between microdomains, are correlated with high spatial heterogeneity in nanoscale material properties. PMID:27335750

  6. Parallel-Processing Software for Correlating Stereo Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimeck, Gerhard; Deen, Robert; Mcauley, Michael; DeJong, Eric

    2007-01-01

    A computer program implements parallel- processing algorithms for cor relating images of terrain acquired by stereoscopic pairs of digital stereo cameras on an exploratory robotic vehicle (e.g., a Mars rove r). Such correlations are used to create three-dimensional computatio nal models of the terrain for navigation. In this program, the scene viewed by the cameras is segmented into subimages. Each subimage is assigned to one of a number of central processing units (CPUs) opera ting simultaneously.

  7. Resolving Fast, Confined Diffusion in Bacteria with Image Correlation Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rowland, David J; Tuson, Hannah H; Biteen, Julie S

    2016-05-24

    By following single fluorescent molecules in a microscope, single-particle tracking (SPT) can measure diffusion and binding on the nanometer and millisecond scales. Still, although SPT can at its limits characterize the fastest biomolecules as they interact with subcellular environments, this measurement may require advanced illumination techniques such as stroboscopic illumination. Here, we address the challenge of measuring fast subcellular motion by instead analyzing single-molecule data with spatiotemporal image correlation spectroscopy (STICS) with a focus on measurements of confined motion. Our SPT and STICS analysis of simulations of the fast diffusion of confined molecules shows that image blur affects both STICS and SPT, and we find biased diffusion rate measurements for STICS analysis in the limits of fast diffusion and tight confinement due to fitting STICS correlation functions to a Gaussian approximation. However, we determine that with STICS, it is possible to correctly interpret the motion that blurs single-molecule images without advanced illumination techniques or fast cameras. In particular, we present a method to overcome the bias due to image blur by properly estimating the width of the correlation function by directly calculating the correlation function variance instead of using the typical Gaussian fitting procedure. Our simulation results are validated by applying the STICS method to experimental measurements of fast, confined motion: we measure the diffusion of cytosolic mMaple3 in living Escherichia coli cells at 25 frames/s under continuous illumination to illustrate the utility of STICS in an experimental parameter regime for which in-frame motion prevents SPT and tight confinement of fast diffusion precludes stroboscopic illumination. Overall, our application of STICS to freely diffusing cytosolic protein in small cells extends the utility of single-molecule experiments to the regime of fast confined diffusion without requiring advanced

  8. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate phosphodiesterase activity in peripheral blood mononuclear leucocytes from patients with atopic dermatitis: correlation with respiratory atopy.

    PubMed

    Sawai, T; Ikai, K; Uehara, M

    1998-05-01

    We determined the cyclic adenosine monophosphate phosphodiesterase (cAMP-PDE) activity in peripheral blood mononuclear leucocytes from 100 patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) aged 13-57 years (mean +/- SD, 29.8 +/- 17.7 years). The correlation between cAMP-PDE activity and clinical parameters such as the severity of eczema and a personal or family predisposition to atopic respiratory diseases (ARD) (asthma or allergic rhinitis) was examined. Although the enzymic activity varied from normal to very high in the AD patients, cAMP-PDE activity was significantly (P < 0.005) elevated in AD patients (42.1 +/- 22.0 units) as compared with the normal controls (12.4 +/- 5.6) and clinical control subjects (13.4 +/- 9.5). In contrast, we found no correlation between cAMP-PDE activity and the severity of eczema when AD patients were classified into four categories (remission, mild, moderate and severe) according to the extent of their skin involvement. Furthermore, we found that systemic corticosteroid therapy in severe AD patients did not alter the cAMP-PDE activity. cAMP-PDE activity was significantly (P < 0.01) higher in those AD patients who had a personal history of ARD (47.2 +/- 11.2) than in AD patients with a family history of ARD (37.2 +/- 17.4) and those without a personal or family history ('pure' AD) (34.4 +/- 19.8). Nevertheless, the cAMP-PDE activity was significantly higher even in 'pure' AD patients than in the controls. These results suggest that an elevation of cAMP-PDE activity is closely related to a predisposition to respiratory atopy, and does not follow inflammation in AD patients. PMID:9666832

  9. Biomechanics of the weakened mandible: use of image correlation analysis.

    PubMed

    Yachouh, J; Domergue, S; Hoarau, R; Loosli, Y; Goudot, P

    2013-10-01

    Uninterrupted resection of mandibular bone is often necessary during maxillofacial operations for cancer. This weakens the mandible, and increases the risk of fracture. To our knowledge no biomechanical analysis has been made of deformations and strains that occur during chewing if this happens, so we have made such an analysis of the weakened mandible using a new technique: image correlation. Five fresh explanted human mandibles were prepared with black and white lacquer, and placed in a loading device that allowed replication of a physiological biting exercise. Calibrated pieces of bone were resected from the right body of each mandible. Images of the mandibular surface were recorded by 2 cameras and analysed with an algorithm to correlate them, which allowed us to confirm the distribution of strain on the body of the mandible, and to focus on the weak points. Before the bone was resected, we noted tensile strains on the alveolar border of the body, and compressive strains on the basilar border. The intensity of the strains in the posterior angle of the resected bony area then increased, with reduction in the height of the bone until fracture. The orientation of the fracture line started at the lower posterior angle of the resection area and spread in a lower posterior direction until it reached the basilar border of the mandible. Image correlation is a new technique for the study of mandibular biomechanics that provides accurate measurements on a wide bony surface with high definition images and without modification of the structure. Its application to weakened mandible provided reliable images of modifications to strains during simulated biting exercises.

  10. Camera system resolution and its influence on digital image correlation

    DOE PAGES

    Reu, Phillip L.; Sweatt, William; Miller, Timothy; Fleming, Darryn

    2014-09-21

    Digital image correlation (DIC) uses images from a camera and lens system to make quantitative measurements of the shape, displacement, and strain of test objects. This increasingly popular method has had little research on the influence of the imaging system resolution on the DIC results. This paper investigates the entire imaging system and studies how both the camera and lens resolution influence the DIC results as a function of the system Modulation Transfer Function (MTF). It will show that when making spatial resolution decisions (including speckle size) the resolution limiting component should be considered. A consequence of the loss ofmore » spatial resolution is that the DIC uncertainties will be increased. This is demonstrated using both synthetic and experimental images with varying resolution. The loss of image resolution and DIC accuracy can be compensated for by increasing the subset size, or better, by increasing the speckle size. The speckle-size and spatial resolution are now a function of the lens resolution rather than the more typical assumption of the pixel size. The study will demonstrate the tradeoffs associated with limited lens resolution.« less

  11. Camera system resolution and its influence on digital image correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Reu, Phillip L.; Sweatt, William; Miller, Timothy; Fleming, Darryn

    2014-09-21

    Digital image correlation (DIC) uses images from a camera and lens system to make quantitative measurements of the shape, displacement, and strain of test objects. This increasingly popular method has had little research on the influence of the imaging system resolution on the DIC results. This paper investigates the entire imaging system and studies how both the camera and lens resolution influence the DIC results as a function of the system Modulation Transfer Function (MTF). It will show that when making spatial resolution decisions (including speckle size) the resolution limiting component should be considered. A consequence of the loss of spatial resolution is that the DIC uncertainties will be increased. This is demonstrated using both synthetic and experimental images with varying resolution. The loss of image resolution and DIC accuracy can be compensated for by increasing the subset size, or better, by increasing the speckle size. The speckle-size and spatial resolution are now a function of the lens resolution rather than the more typical assumption of the pixel size. The study will demonstrate the tradeoffs associated with limited lens resolution.

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Adhesive Capsulitis: Correlation with Clinical Staging

    PubMed Central

    Ciavarra, Gina A.; Hannafin, Jo A.; Cordasco, Frank A.; Potter, Hollis G.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate non-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of adhesive capsulitis and correlate them with clinical stages of adhesive capsulitis. This will hopefully define a role for shoulder MR imaging in the diagnosis of adhesive capsulitis as well as in potentially directing appropriate treatment. Forty-seven consecutive non-contrast magnetic resonance imaging examinations of 46 patients with a clinical diagnosis of adhesive capsulitis were retrospectively reviewed and correlated with clinical staging. Specific MRI criteria correlated with the clinical stage of adhesive capsulitis, including the thickness and signal intensity of the joint capsule and synovium as well as the presence and severity of scarring in the rotator interval. Routine MRI of the shoulder without intraarticular administration of gadolinium can be used to diagnose all stages of adhesive capsulitis, including stage 1, where findings may be subtle on clinical examination. We believe that future studies assessing the role of MRI in guiding the initiation of appropriate treatment should be undertaken. PMID:18815860

  13. Salivary gland anlage tumor in a neonate presenting with respiratory distress: radiographic and pathologic correlation.

    PubMed

    Mogensen, M A; Lin, A C; Chang, K W; Berry, G J; Barnes, P D; Fischbein, N J

    2009-05-01

    We present a case of congenital salivary gland anlage tumor (SGAT) of the nasal septum in a 2-week-old infant who had difficulty breathing through her nose since birth. CT and MR imaging demonstrated a circumscribed mass within the nasal cavity that did not communicate with the intracranial compartment. Differential diagnosis and clinical significance of recognizing this rare lesion are reviewed.

  14. Imaging of cardiac perfusion of free-breathing small animals using dynamic phase-correlated micro-CT

    SciTech Connect

    Sawall, Stefan; Kuntz, Jan; Socher, Michaela; Knaup, Michael; Hess, Andreas; Bartling, Soenke; Kachelriess, Marc

    2012-12-15

    Purpose:Mouse models of cardiac diseases have proven to be a valuable tool in preclinical research. The high cardiac and respiratory rates of free breathing mice prohibit conventional in vivo cardiac perfusion studies using computed tomography even if gating methods are applied. This makes a sacrification of the animals unavoidable and only allows for the application of ex vivo methods. Methods: To overcome this issue the authors propose a low dose scan protocol and an associated reconstruction algorithm that allows for in vivo imaging of cardiac perfusion and associated processes that are retrospectively synchronized to the respiratory and cardiac motion of the animal. The scan protocol consists of repetitive injections of contrast media within several consecutive scans while the ECG, respiratory motion, and timestamp of contrast injection are recorded and synchronized to the acquired projections. The iterative reconstruction algorithm employs a six-dimensional edge-preserving filter to provide low-noise, motion artifact-free images of the animal examined using the authors' low dose scan protocol. Results: The reconstructions obtained show that the complete temporal bolus evolution can be visualized and quantified in any desired combination of cardiac and respiratory phase including reperfusion phases. The proposed reconstruction method thereby keeps the administered radiation dose at a minimum and thus reduces metabolic inference to the animal allowing for longitudinal studies. Conclusions: The authors' low dose scan protocol and phase-correlated dynamic reconstruction algorithm allow for an easy and effective way to visualize phase-correlated perfusion processes in routine laboratory studies using free-breathing mice.

  15. 3D robust digital image correlation for vibration measurement.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhong; Zhang, Xianmin; Fatikow, Sergej

    2016-03-01

    Discrepancies of speckle images under dynamic measurement due to the different viewing angles will deteriorate the correspondence in 3D digital image correlation (3D-DIC) for vibration measurement. Facing this kind of bottleneck, this paper presents two types of robust 3D-DIC methods for vibration measurement, SSD-robust and SWD-robust, which use a sum of square difference (SSD) estimator plus a Geman-McClure regulating term and a Welch estimator plus a Geman-McClure regulating term, respectively. Because the regulating term with an adaptive rejecting bound can lessen the influence of the abnormal pixel data in the dynamical measuring process, the robustness of the algorithm is enhanced. The robustness and precision evaluation experiments using a dual-frequency laser interferometer are implemented. The experimental results indicate that the two presented robust estimators can suppress the effects of the abnormality in the speckle images and, meanwhile, keep higher precision in vibration measurement in contrast with the traditional SSD method; thus, the SWD-robust and SSD-robust methods are suitable for weak image noise and strong image noise, respectively. PMID:26974624

  16. Image processing of correlated data by experimental design techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, D.

    1987-01-01

    New classes of algorithms are developed for processing of two-dimensional image data imbedded in correlated noise. The algorithms are based on modifications of standard analysis of variance (ANOVA) techniques ensuring their proper operation in dependent noise. The approach taken in the development of procedures is deductive. First, the theory of modified ANOVA (MANOVA) techniques involving one- and two-way layouts are considered for noise models with autocorrelation matrix (ACM) formed by direct multiplication of rows and columns or tensored correlation matrices (TCM) stressing the special case of the first-order Markov process. Next, the techniques are generalized to include arbitrary, wide-sense stationary (WSS) processes. This permits dealing with diagonal masks which have ACM of a general form even for TCM. As further extension, the theory of Latin square (LS) masks is generalized to include dependent noise with TCM. This permits dealing with three different effects of m levels using only m{sup 2} observations rather than m{sup 3}. Since in many image-processing problems, replication of data is possible, the masking techniques are generalized to replicated data for which the replication is TCM dependent. For all procedures developed, algorithms are implemented which ensure real-time processing of images.

  17. Dynamic Approaches for Facial Recognition Using Digital Image Speckle Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafailovich-Sokolov, Sara; Guan, E.; Afriat, Isablle; Rafailovich, Miriam; Sokolov, Jonathan; Clark, Richard

    2004-03-01

    Digital image analysis techniques have been extensively used in facial recognition. To date, most static facial characterization techniques, which are usually based on Fourier transform techniques, are sensitive to lighting, shadows, or modification of appearance by makeup, natural aging or surgery. In this study we have demonstrated that it is possible to uniquely identify faces by analyzing the natural motion of facial features with Digital Image Speckle Correlation (DISC). Human skin has a natural pattern produced by the texture of the skin pores, which is easily visible with conventional digital cameras of resolution greater than 4 mega pixels. Hence the application of the DISC method to the analysis of facial motion appears to be very straightforward. Here we demonstrate that the vector diagrams produced by this method for facial images are directly correlated to the underlying muscle structure which is unique for an individual and is not affected by lighting or make-up. Furthermore, we will show that this method can also be used for medical diagnosis in early detection of facial paralysis and other forms of skin disorders.

  18. Differential induction of mitochondrial machinery by light intensity correlates with changes in respiratory metabolism and photorespiration in rice leaves.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shaobai; Jacoby, Richard P; Shingaki-Wells, Rachel N; Li, Lei; Millar, A Harvey

    2013-04-01

    The light responsiveness of mitochondrial function was investigated through changes in mitochondrial composition and metabolism in rice (Oryza sativa) shoots. The mitochondrial proteome and metabolite abundances under low light, (LL, 100 μmol m(-2) s(-1) ), and high light (HL, 700 μmol m(-2) s(-1) ) were measured along with information on shoot photosynthetic, respiratory and photorespiratory activity. Specific steps in mitochondrial tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle metabolism were decreased under HL, correlating with lower respiration rate under HL. The abundance of mitochondrial enzymes in branch chain metabolism was reduced under HL/LL, and correlated with a decrease in the abundance of a range of amino acids in the HL/LL. Mitochondrial nucleoside diphosphate kinase was increased under LL/HL treatments. Significant accumulation of glycine decarboxylase P, T subunits and serine hydroxymethyltransferase occurred in response to light. The abundance of the glycine decarboxylase (GDC) H subunit proteins was not changed by HL/LL treatments, and the abundance of GDC L subunit protein was halved under HL, indicating a change in the stoichiometry of GDC subunits, while photorespiration was fourfold higher in LL- than in HL-treated plants. Insights into these light-dependent phenomena and their importance for understanding the initiation of photorespiration in rice and adaptation of mitochondria to function in photosynthetic cells are discussed.

  19. Digital Tomosynthesis for Respiratory Gated Liver Treatment: Clinical Feasibility for Daily Image Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Q. Jackie; Meyer, Jeffrey; Fuller, Jessica; Godfrey, Devon; Wang Zhiheng; Zhang Junan; Yin Fangfang

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Breath-hold (BH) treatment minimizes internal target volumes (ITV) when treating sites prone to motion. Digital tomosynthesis (DTS) imaging has advantages over cone-beam CT (CBCT) for BH imaging: BH-DTS scan can be completed during a single breath-hold, whereas BH-CBCT is usually acquired by parsing the gantry rotation into multiple BH segments. This study evaluates the localization accuracy of DTS for BH treatment of liver tumors. Methods: Both planning CT and on-board DTS/CBCT images were acquired under BH, using the planning CT BH window as reference. Onboard imaging data sets included two independent DTS orientations (coronal and sagittal), and CBCT images. Soft tissue target positioning was measured by each imaging modality and translated into couch shifts. Performance of the two DTS orientations was evaluated by comparing target positioning with the CBCT benchmark, determined by two observers. Results: Image data sets were collected from thirty-eight treatment fractions (14 patients). Mean differences between the two DTS methods and the CBCT method were <1 mm in all directions (except the lateral direction with sagittal-DTS: 1.2 mm); the standard deviation was in the range of 2.1-3.5 mm for all techniques. The Pearson correlation showed good interobserver agreement for the coronal-DTS (0.72-0.78). The interobserver agreement for the sagittal-DTS was good for the in-plane directions (0.70-0.82), but poor in the out-of-plane direction (lateral, 0.26). Conclusions: BH-DTS may be a simpler alternative to BH-CBCT for onboard soft tissue localization of the liver, although the precision of DTS localization appears to be somewhat lower because of the presence of subtle out-of-plane blur.

  20. Precision Improvement of Photogrammetry by Digital Image Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Ming-Hsiang; Sung, Wen-Pei; Tung, Shih-Heng; Hsiao, Hanwei

    2016-04-01

    The combination of aerial triangulation technology and unmanned aerial vehicle greatly reduces the cost and application threshold of the digital surface model technique. Based on the report in the literatures, the measurement error in the x-y coordinate and in the elevation lies between 8cm~15cm and 10cm~20cm respectively. The measurement accuracy for the geological structure survey already has sufficient value, but for the slope and structures in terms of deformation monitoring is inadequate. The main factors affecting the accuracy of the aerial triangulation are image quality, measurement accuracy of control point and image matching accuracy. In terms of image matching, the commonly used techniques are Harris Corner Detection and Scale Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT). Their pairing error is in scale of pixels, usually lies between 1 to 2 pixels. This study suggests that the error on the pairing is the main factor causing the aerial triangulation errors. Therefore, this study proposes the application of Digital Image Correlation (DIC) method instead of the pairing method mentioned above. DIC method can provide a pairing accuracy of less than 0.01 pixel, indeed can greatly enhance the accuracy of the aerial triangulation, to have sub-centimeter level accuracy. In this study, the effects of image pairing error on the measurement error of the 3-dimensional coordinate of the ground points are explored by numerical simulation method. It was confirmed that when the image matching error is reduced to 0.01 pixels, the ground three-dimensional coordinate measurement error can be controlled in mm level. A combination of DIC technique and the traditional aerial triangulation provides the potential of application on the deformation monitoring of slope and structures, and achieve an early warning of natural disaster.

  1. Digital image correlation-based optical coherence elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Cuiru; Standish, Beau; Vuong, Barry; Wen, Xiao-Yan; Yang, Victor

    2013-12-01

    Optical coherence elastography (OCE) provides deformation or material properties, mapping of soft tissue. We aim to develop a robust speckle tracking OCE technique with improved resolution and accuracy. A digital image correlation (DIC)-based OCE technique was developed by combining an advanced DIC algorithm with optical coherence tomography (OCT). System calibration and measurement error evaluation demonstrated that this DIC-based OCE technique had a resolution of ˜0.6 μm displacement and <0.5% strain measurement in the axial scan direction. The measured displacement ranged from 0.6 to 150 μm, obtained via phantom imaging. The capability of the DIC-based OCE technique, for differentiation of stiffness, was evaluated by imaging a candle gel phantom with an irregularly shaped stiff inclusion. OCE imaging of a chicken breast sample differentiated the fat, membrane, and muscle layers. Strain elastograms of an aneurysm sample showed heterogeneity of the tissue and clear contrast between the adventitia and media. These promising results demonstrated the capability of the DIC-based OCE for the characterization of the various components of the tissue sample. Further improvement of the system will be conducted to make this OCE technique a practical tool for measuring and differentiating material properties of soft tissue.

  2. Digital image correlation-based optical coherence elastography.

    PubMed

    Sun, Cuiru; Standish, Beau; Vuong, Barry; Wen, Xiao-Yan; Yang, Victor

    2013-12-01

    Optical coherence elastography (OCE) provides deformation or material properties, mapping of soft tissue. We aim to develop a robust speckle tracking OCE technique with improved resolution and accuracy. A digital image correlation (DIC)-based OCE technique was developed by combining an advanced DIC algorithm with optical coherence tomography (OCT). System calibration and measurement error evaluation demonstrated that this DIC-based OCE technique had a resolution of ~0.6 μm displacement and <0.5% strain measurement in the axial scan direction. The measured displacement ranged from 0.6 to 150 μm, obtained via phantom imaging. The capability of the DIC-based OCE technique, for differentiation of stiffness, was evaluated by imaging a candle gel phantom with an irregularly shaped stiff inclusion. OCE imaging of a chicken breast sample differentiated the fat, membrane, and muscle layers. Strain elastograms of an aneurysm sample showed heterogeneity of the tissue and clear contrast between the adventitia and media. These promising results demonstrated the capability of the DIC-based OCE for the characterization of the various components of the tissue sample. Further improvement of the system will be conducted to make this OCE technique a practical tool for measuring and differentiating material properties of soft tissue. PMID:24346855

  3. A Review of Digital Image Correlation Applied to Structura Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niezrecki, Christopher; Avitabile, Peter; Warren, Christopher; Pingle, Pawan; Helfrick, Mark

    2010-05-01

    A significant amount of interest exists in performing non-contacting, full-field surface velocity measurement. For many years traditional non-contacting surface velocity measurements have been made by using scanning Doppler laser vibrometry, shearography, pulsed laser interferometry, pulsed holography, or an electronic speckle pattern interferometer (ESPI). Three dimensional (3D) digital image correlation (DIC) methods utilize the alignment of a stereo pair of images to obtain full-field geometry data, in three dimensions. Information about the change in geometry of an object over time can be found by comparing a sequence of images and virtual strain gages (or position sensors) can be created over the entire visible surface of the object of interest. Digital imaging techniques were first developed in the 1980s but the technology has only recently been exploited in industry and research due to the advances of digital cameras and personal computers. The use of DIC for structural dynamic measurement has only very recently been investigated. Within this paper, the advantages and limits of using DIC for dynamic measurement are reviewed. Several examples of using DIC for dynamic measurement are presented on several vibrating and rotating structures.

  4. Optimal Correlation Filters for Images with Signal-Dependent Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downie, John D.; Walkup, John F.

    1994-01-01

    We address the design of optimal correlation filters for pattern detection and recognition in the presence of signal-dependent image noise sources. The particular examples considered are film-grain noise and speckle. Two basic approaches are investigated: (1) deriving the optimal matched filters for the signal-dependent noise models and comparing their performances with those derived for traditional signal-independent noise models and (2) first nonlinearly transforming the signal-dependent noise to signal-independent noise followed by the use of a classical filter matched to the transformed signal. We present both theoretical and computer simulation results that demonstrate the generally superior performance of the second approach in terms of the correlation peak signal-to-noise ratio.

  5. Evaluation of Fiber Reinforced Cement Using Digital Image Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Melenka, Garrett W.; Carey, Jason P.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of short fiber reinforcements on the mechanical properties of cement has been examined using a splitting tensile – digital image correlation (DIC) measurement method. Three short fiber reinforcement materials have been used in this study: fiberglass, nylon, and polypropylene. The method outlined provides a simple experimental setup that can be used to evaluate the ultimate tensile strength of brittle materials as well as measure the full field strain across the surface of the splitting tensile test cylindrical specimen. Since the DIC measurement technique is a contact free measurement this method can be used to assess sample failure. PMID:26039590

  6. 5D respiratory motion model based image reconstruction algorithm for 4D cone-beam computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiulong; Zhang, Xue; Zhang, Xiaoqun; Zhao, Hongkai; Gao, Yu; Thomas, David; Low, Daniel A.; Gao, Hao

    2015-11-01

    4D cone-beam computed tomography (4DCBCT) reconstructs a temporal sequence of CBCT images for the purpose of motion management or 4D treatment in radiotherapy. However the image reconstruction often involves the binning of projection data to each temporal phase, and therefore suffers from deteriorated image quality due to inaccurate or uneven binning in phase, e.g., under the non-periodic breathing. A 5D model has been developed as an accurate model of (periodic and non-periodic) respiratory motion. That is, given the measurements of breathing amplitude and its time derivative, the 5D model parametrizes the respiratory motion by three time-independent variables, i.e., one reference image and two vector fields. In this work we aim to develop a new 4DCBCT reconstruction method based on 5D model. Instead of reconstructing a temporal sequence of images after the projection binning, the new method reconstructs time-independent reference image and vector fields with no requirement of binning. The image reconstruction is formulated as a optimization problem with total-variation regularization on both reference image and vector fields, and the problem is solved by the proximal alternating minimization algorithm, during which the split Bregman method is used to reconstruct the reference image, and the Chambolle's duality-based algorithm is used to reconstruct the vector fields. The convergence analysis of the proposed algorithm is provided for this nonconvex problem. Validated by the simulation studies, the new method has significantly improved image reconstruction accuracy due to no binning and reduced number of unknowns via the use of the 5D model.

  7. Correlation among genetic, Euclidean, temporal, and herd ownership distances of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus strains in Quebec, Canada

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) is a viral disease that has a major economic impact for the swine industry. Its control is mostly directed towards preventing its spread which requires a better understanding of the mechanisms of transmission of the virus between herds. The objectives of this study were to describe the genetic diversity and to assess the correlation among genetic, Euclidean and temporal distances and ownership to better understand pathways of transmission. Results A cross-sectional study was conducted on sites located in a high density area of swine production in Quebec. Geographical coordinates (longitude/latitude), date of submission and ownership were obtained for each site. ORF5 sequencing was attempted on PRRSV positive sites. Proportion of pairwise combinations of strains having ≥98% genetic homology were analysed according to Euclidean distances and ownership. Correlations between genetic, Euclidean and temporal distances and ownership were assessed using Mantel tests on continuous and binary matrices. Sensitivity of the correlations between genetic and Euclidean as well as temporal distances was evaluated for different Euclidean and temporal distance thresholds. An ORF5 sequence was identified for 132 of the 176 (75%) PRRSV positive sites; 122 were wild-type strains. The mean (min-max) genetic, Euclidean and temporal pairwise distances were 11.6% (0–18.7), 15.0 km (0.04-45.7) and 218 days (0–852), respectively. Significant positive correlations were observed between genetic and ownership, genetic and Euclidean and between genetic and temporal binary distances. The relationship between genetic and ownership suggests either common sources of animals or semen, employees, technical services or vehicles, whereas that between genetic and Euclidean binary distances is compatible with area spread of the virus. The latter correlation was observed only up to 5 km. Conclusions This study suggests that

  8. Correlation of proton MR spectroscopy and diffusion tensor imaging.

    PubMed

    Irwan, Roy; Sijens, Paul E; Potze, Jan-Hendrik; Oudkerk, Matthijs

    2005-10-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) provides indices of neuronal damage. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) relates to water diffusivity and fiber tract orientation. A method to compare (1)H-MRS and DTI findings was developed, tested on phantom and applied on normal brain. Point-resolved spectroscopy (T(R)/T(E)=1500/135) was used for chemical shift imaging of a supraventricular volume of interest of 8 x 8 x 2 cm(3) (64 voxels). In DTI, a segmental spin-echo sequence (T(R)/T(E)=5500/91) was used and slices were stacked to reproduce the slab used in MRS. The spatial distributions of choline and N-acetylaspartate (NAA) correlated to mean fractional anisotropy and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) for the inner 6 x 6=36 voxels defined in MRS, most notably NAA and ADC value (r=-.70, P<.00001; correlation across four subjects, 144 data pairs). This is the first association of neuron metabolite contents in volunteers with structure as indicated by DTI.

  9. Design and performance of a respiratory amplitude gating device for PET/CT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Guoping; Chang Tingting; Clark, John W. Jr.; Mawlawi, Osama R.

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: Recently, the authors proposed a free-breathing amplitude gating (FBAG) technique for PET/CT scanners. The implementation of this technique required specialized hardware and software components that were specifically designed to interface with commercial respiratory gating devices to generate the necessary triggers required for the FBAG technique. The objective of this technical note is to introduce an in-house device that integrates all the necessary hardware and software components as well as tracks the patient's respiratory motion to realize amplitude gating on PET/CT scanners. Methods: The in-house device is composed of a piezoelectric transducer coupled to a data-acquisition system in order to monitor the respiratory waveform. A LABVIEW program was designed to control the data-acquisition device and inject triggers into the PET list stream whenever the detected respiratory amplitude crossed a predetermined amplitude range. A timer was also programmed to stop the scan when the accumulated time within the selected amplitude range reached a user-set interval. This device was tested using a volunteer and a phantom study. Results: The results from the volunteer and phantom studies showed that the in-house device can detect similar respiratory signals as commercially available respiratory gating systems and is able to generate the necessary triggers to suppress respiratory motion artifacts. Conclusions: The proposed in-house device can be used to implement the FBAG technique in current PET/CT scanners.

  10. Experimental analysis of image noise and interpolation bias in digital image correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zeren; Xu, Xiaohai; Su, Yong; Zhang, Qingchuan

    2016-06-01

    The popularization of the digital image correlation (DIC) method has raised urgent needs to evaluate the accuracy of this method. However, there are still some problems to be solved. Among the problems, the effects of various factors, such as the image noise caused by the camera sensors, the employed interpolation algorithm, and the structure of the speckle patterns, have become a major concern. To experimentally measure the position-dependent systematic error (i.e. interpolation bias) caused by non-ideal interpolation algorithm is an important way to evaluate the quality of the speckle patterns in the correlation method, and remains unsolved. In this work, a novel, simple and convenient method is proposed to measure the interpolation bias. In the new method which can avoid the out-of-plane displacements and the mechanical errors of translation stages, integral-pixel shifts are applied to the image shown on the screen so that sub-pixel displacements can be realized in the images captured by the camera via proper experimental settings. Besides, the fluctuations of the image noise and the sub-pixel displacement errors caused by the image noise are experimentally analyzed by employing three types of cameras commonly used in the DIC measurements. Experimental results indicate that the fluctuations of the image noise are not only proportional to the image gray value, but also dependent on the type of the employed camera. On the basis of eliminating the image noise via the image averaging technique, high-precision interpolation bias curves more than one period are experimentally obtained by the proposed method.

  11. Correlation and prediction uncertainties in the CyberKnife Synchrony respiratory tracking system

    SciTech Connect

    Pepin, Eric W.; Wu, Huanmei; Zhang, Yuenian; Lord, Bryce

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: The CyberKnife uses an online prediction model to improve radiation delivery when treating lung tumors. This study evaluates the prediction model used by the CyberKnife radiation therapy system in terms of treatment margins about the gross tumor volume (GTV). Methods: From the data log files produced by the CyberKnife synchrony model, the uncertainty in radiation delivery can be calculated. Modeler points indicate the tracked position of the tumor and Predictor points predict the position about 115 ms in the future. The discrepancy between Predictor points and their corresponding Modeler points was analyzed for 100 treatment model data sets from 23 de-identified lung patients. The treatment margins were determined in each anatomic direction to cover an arbitrary volume of the GTV, derived from the Modeler points, when the radiation is targeted at the Predictor points. Each treatment model had about 30 min of motion data, of which about 10 min constituted treatment time; only these 10 min were used in the analysis. The frequencies of margin sizes were analyzed and truncated Gaussian normal functions were fit to each direction's distribution. The standard deviation of each Gaussian distribution was then used to describe the necessary margin expansions in each signed dimension in order to achieve the desired coverage. In this study, 95% modeler point coverage was compared to 99% modeler coverage. Two other error sources were investigated: the correlation error and the targeting error. These were added to the prediction error to give an aggregate error for the CyberKnife during treatment of lung tumors. Results: Considering the magnitude of 2{sigma} from the mean of the Gaussian in each signed dimension, the margin expansions needed for 95% modeler point coverage were 1.2 mm in the lateral (LAT) direction and 1.7 mm in the anterior-posterior (AP) direction. For the superior-inferior (SI) direction, the fit was poor; but empirically, the expansions were 3.5 mm

  12. Correlation Between UpToDate Searches and Reported Cases of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome During Outbreaks in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Thorner, Anna R; Cao, Bin; Jiang, Terrence; Warner, Amy J; Bonis, Peter A

    2016-01-01

    Background.  UpToDate is an online clinical decision support resource that is used extensively by clinicians around the world. Digital surveillance techniques have shown promise to aid with the detection and monitoring of infectious disease outbreaks. We sought to determine whether UpToDate searches for Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) could be used to detect and monitor MERS outbreaks in Saudi Arabia. Methods.  We analyzed daily searches related to MERS in Jeddah and Riyadh, Saudi Arabia during 3 outbreaks in these cities in 2014 and 2015 and compared them with reported cases during the same periods. We also compared UpToDate MERS searches in the affected cities to those in a composite of 4 negative control cities for the 2 outbreaks in 2014. Results.  UpToDate MERS searches during all 3 MERS outbreaks in Saudi Arabia showed a correlation to reported cases. In addition, UpToDate MERS search volume in Jeddah and Riyadh during the outbreak periods in 2014 was significantly higher than the concurrent search volume in the 4 negative control cities. In contrast, during the baseline periods, there was no difference between UpToDate searches for MERS in the affected cities compared with the negative control cities. Conclusions.  UpToDate search activity seems to be useful for detecting and monitoring outbreaks of MERS in Saudi Arabia.

  13. Theoretical scheme of thermal-light many-ghost imaging by Nth-order intensity correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Yingchuan; Kuang Leman

    2011-05-15

    In this paper, we propose a theoretical scheme of many-ghost imaging in terms of Nth-order correlated thermal light. We obtain the Gaussian thin lens equations in the many-ghost imaging protocol. We show that it is possible to produce N-1 ghost images of an object at different places in a nonlocal fashion by means of a higher order correlated imaging process with an Nth-order correlated thermal source and correlation measurements. We investigate the visibility of the ghost images in the scheme and obtain the upper bounds of the visibility for the Nth-order correlated thermal-light ghost imaging. It is found that the visibility of the ghost images can be dramatically enhanced when the order of correlation becomes larger. It is pointed out that the many-ghost imaging phenomenon is an observable physical effect induced by higher order coherence or higher order correlations of optical fields.

  14. Underwater depth imaging using time-correlated single photon counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maccarone, Aurora; McCarthy, Aongus; Ren, Ximing; Warburton, Ryan E.; Wallace, Andy M.; Moffat, James; Petillot, Yvan; Buller, Gerald S.

    2015-05-01

    We investigate the potential of a depth imaging system for underwater environments. This system is based on the timeof- flight approach and the time correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC) technique. We report laboratory-based measurements and explore the potential of achieving sub-centimeter xyz resolution at 10's meters stand-off distances. Initial laboratory-based experiments demonstrate depth imaging performed over distances of up to 1.8 meters and under a variety of scattering conditions. The system comprised a monostatic transceiver unit, a fiber-coupled supercontinuum laser with a wavelength tunable acousto-optic filter, and a fiber-coupled individual silicon single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD). The scanning in xy was performed using a pair of galvonometer mirrors directing both illumination and scattered returns via a coaxial optical configuration. Target objects were placed in a 110 liter capacity tank and depth images were acquired through approximately 1.7 meters of water containing different concentrations of scattering agent. Depth images were acquired in clear and highly scattering water using per-pixel acquisition times in the range 0.5-100 ms at average optical powers in the range 0.8 nW to 120 μW. Based on the laboratory measurements, estimations of potential performance, including maximum range possible, were performed with a model based on the LIDAR equation. These predictions will be presented for different levels of scattering agent concentration, optical powers, wavelengths and comparisons made with naturally occurring environments. The experimental and theoretical results indicate that the TCSPC technique has potential for highresolution underwater depth profile measurements.

  15. SU-E-J-74: Impact of Respiration-Correlated Image Quality On Tumor Motion Reconstruction in 4D-CBCT: A Phantom Study

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S; Lu, B; Samant, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effects of scanning parameters and respiratory patterns on the image quality for 4-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography(4D-CBCT) imaging, and assess the accuracy of computed tumor trajectory for lung imaging using registration of phased 4D-CBCT imaging with treatment planning-CT. Methods: We simulated a periodic and non-sinusoidal respirations with various breathing periods and amplitudes using a respiratory phantom(Quasar, Modus Medical Devices Inc) to acquire respiration-correlated 4D-CBCT images. 4D-CBCT scans(Elekta Oncology Systems Ltd) were performed with different scanning parameters for collimation size(e.g., small and medium field-of-views) and scanning speed(e.g., slow 50°·min{sup −1}, fast 100°·min{sup −1}). Using a standard CBCT-QA phantom(Catphan500, The Phantom Laboratory), the image qualities of all phases in 4D-CBCT were evaluated with contrast-to-noise ratio(CNR) for lung tissue and uniformity in each module. Using a respiratory phantom, the target imaging in 4D-CBCT was compared to 3D-CBCT target image. The target trajectory from 10-respiratory phases in 4D-CBCT was extracted using an automatic image registration and subsequently assessed the accuracy by comparing with actual motion of the target. Results: Image analysis indicated that a short respiration with a small amplitude resulted in superior CNR and uniformity. Smaller variation of CNR and uniformity was present amongst different respiratory phases. The small field-of-view with a partial scan using slow scan can improve CNR, but degraded uniformity. Large amplitude of respiration can degrade image quality. RMS of voxel densities in tumor area of 4D-CBCT images between sinusoidal and non-sinusoidal motion exhibited no significant difference. The maximum displacement errors of motion trajectories were less than 1.0 mm and 13.5 mm, for sinusoidal and non-sinusoidal breathings, respectively. The accuracy of motion reconstruction showed good overall

  16. SU-E-J-238: First-Order Approximation of Time-Resolved 4DMRI From Cine 2DMRI and Respiratory-Correlated 4DMRI

    SciTech Connect

    Li, G; Tyagi, N; Deasy, J; Wei, J; Hunt, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Cine 2DMRI is useful in MR-guided radiotherapy but it lacks volumetric information. We explore the feasibility of estimating timeresolved (TR) 4DMRI based on cine 2DMRI and respiratory-correlated (RC) 4DMRI though simulation. Methods: We hypothesize that a volumetric image during free breathing can be approximated by interpolation among 3DMRI image sets generated from a RC-4DMRI. Two patients’ RC-4DMRI with 4 or 5 phases were used to generate additional 3DMRI by interpolation. For each patient, six libraries were created to have total 5-to-35 3DMRI images by 0–6 equi-spaced tri-linear interpolation between adjacent and full-inhalation/full-exhalation phases. Sagittal cine 2DMRI were generated from reference 3DMRIs created from separate, unique interpolations from the original RC-4DMRI. To test if accurate 3DMRI could be generated through rigid registration of the cine 2DMRI to the 3DMRI libraries, each sagittal 2DMRI was registered to sagittal cuts in the same location in the 3DMRI within each library to identify the two best matches: one with greater lung volume and one with smaller. A final interpolation between the corresponding 3DMRI was then performed to produce the first-order-approximation (FOA) 3DMRI. The quality and performance of the FOA as a function of library size was assessed using both the difference in lung volume and average voxel intensity between the FOA and the reference 3DMRI. Results: The discrepancy between the FOA and reference 3DMRI decreases as the library size increases. The 3D lung volume difference decreases from 5–15% to 1–2% as the library size increases from 5 to 35 image sets. The average difference in lung voxel intensity decreases from 7–8 to 5–6 with the lung intensity being 0–135. Conclusion: This study indicates that the quality of FOA 3DMRI improves with increasing 3DMRI library size. On-going investigations will test this approach using actual cine 2DMRI and introduce a higher order approximation for

  17. FDG PET of the brain in pediatric patients: imaging spectrum with MR imaging correlation.

    PubMed

    Stanescu, Luana; Ishak, Gisele E; Khanna, Paritosh C; Biyyam, Deepa R; Shaw, Dennis W; Parisi, Marguerite T

    2013-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) of the brain is an important problem-solving tool in pediatric neuroimaging, neurology, and neurosurgery. Fluorine 18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET or dual-modality PET and computed tomographic (CT) imaging (PET/CT), with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging correlation, can be used to evaluate childhood epilepsy and pediatric brain tumors, areas in which PET adds value in patient management. FDG PET has been widely used in pediatric temporal lobe epilepsy, most commonly manifesting as mesial temporal sclerosis, which demonstrates hypometabolism at interictal PET and hypermetabolism during seizures. Recently, FDG PET has shown added value for patients with extratemporal epilepsy, in whom FDG PET can help identify cortical foci of interictal hypometabolism that are undetectable or difficult to detect with MR imaging. These findings can then guide additional investigations and surgery. FDG PET also enhances medical decision making in children with brain tumors, in whom FDG PET can be used to (a) improve the diagnostic yield of stereotactic biopsies by detecting metabolically active areas of tumor, (b) help guide the surgeon in achieving total tumor resection, and (c) increase detection of residual or recurrent tumor. Technologic advances in the past decade have allowed fusion of PET and MR images, combining the high resolution of MR imaging with the low-resolution functional capability of PET. As dual-modality integrated PET/MR imaging systems become available, CT coregistration for PET can be eliminated, thus reducing patient radiation exposure. Increasing familiarity with normal and abnormal appearances of FDG PET brain images correlated with MR images can enhance diagnostic yield and improve the care of children with epilepsy and brain tumors.

  18. A low-cost digital image correlation based constitutive sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Gun-Jin; Shang, Shen; Kunchum, Shilpa; Carletta, Joan; Nam, Si-Byung

    2010-03-01

    In this paper, a low-cost digital image correlation-based constitutive sensor with a novel identification algorithm that is deployable and scalable in the field is proposed. The term 'constitutive sensor' is coined herein to describe a sensor that is capable of determining the target material constitutive parameters. The proposed method is different from existing identification methods in that it does not need to solve boundary value problems of the target materials using updated parameters. Since the development of the digital image correlation (DIC) technique in the 1980s, the DIC technique has been broadly evaluated and improved for measuring full-field displacements of test specimens, mainly in laboratory settings. Although its potential in damage and mechanical identification is immense, the high cost of current commercial DIC systems makes it difficult to apply the DIC technique to in-field health monitoring of structures. To realize a first ever application of DIC in the field, a prototypical low-cost sensing unit consisting of a high performance embedded microprocessor board, a low-cost web camera, and a communication module is suggested. In the proposed constitutive sensor, DIC displacement fields considered as true values are used in computing stress fields satisfying the equilibrium condition and strain fields using finite element concepts. The unknown constitutive law is initially assumed to be fully anisotropic and linear elastic. A steady state genetic algorithm is utilized to search for the material parameters by minimizing a cost function that measures energy residuals. The main features that allow the sensor to be deployable in the field are introduced, and a validation of the proposed constitutive sensor concept using synthetic data is presented.

  19. Use of the temporal median and trimmed mean mitigates effects of respiratory motion in multiple-acquisition abdominal diffusion imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerome, N. P.; Orton, M. R.; d'Arcy, J. A.; Feiweier, T.; Tunariu, N.; Koh, D.-M.; Leach, M. O.; Collins, D. J.

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory motion commonly confounds abdominal diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, where averaging of successive samples at different parts of the respiratory cycle, performed in the scanner, manifests the motion as blurring of tissue boundaries and structural features and can introduce bias into calculated diffusion metrics. Storing multiple averages separately allows processing using metrics other than the mean; in this prospective volunteer study, median and trimmed mean values of signal intensity for each voxel over repeated averages and diffusion-weighting directions are shown to give images with sharper tissue boundaries and structural features for moving tissues, while not compromising non-moving structures. Expert visual scoring of derived diffusion maps is significantly higher for the median than for the mean, with modest improvement from the trimmed mean. Diffusion metrics derived from mono- and bi-exponential diffusion models are comparable for non-moving structures, demonstrating a lack of introduced bias from using the median. The use of the median is a simple and computationally inexpensive alternative to complex and expensive registration algorithms, requiring only additional data storage (and no additional scanning time) while returning visually superior images that will facilitate the appropriate placement of regions-of-interest when analysing abdominal diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance images, for assessment of disease characteristics and treatment response.

  20. Four-dimensional (4D) Motion Detection to Correct Respiratory Effects in Treatment Response Assessment Using Molecular Imaging Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Schreibmann, Eduard; Crocker, Ian; Schuster, David M.; Curran, Walter J.; Fox, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Observing early metabolic changes in positron emission tomography (PET) is an essential tool to assess treatment efficiency in radiotherapy. However, for thoracic regions, the use of three-dimensional (3D) PET imaging is unfeasible because the radiotracer activity is smeared by the respiratory motion and averaged during the imaging acquisition process. This motion-induced degradation is similar in magnitude with the treatment-induced changes, and the two occurrences become indiscernible. We present a customized temporal-spatial deformable registration method for quantifying respiratory motion in a four-dimensional (4D) PET dataset. Once the motion is quantified, a motion-corrected (MC) dataset is created by tracking voxels to eliminate breathing-induced changes in the 4D imaging scan. The 4D voxel-tracking data is then summed to yield a 3D MC-PET scan containing only treatment-induced changes. This proof of concept is exemplified on both phantom and clinical data, where the proposed algorithm tracked the trajectories of individual points through the 4D datasets reducing motion to less than 4 mm in all phases. This correction approach using deformable registration can discern motion blurring from treatment-induced changes in treatment response assessment using PET imaging. PMID:24000982

  1. Digital Anthropomorphic Phantoms of Non-Rigid Human Respiratory and Voluntary Body Motion for Investigating Motion Correction in Emission Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Könik, Arda; Connolly, Caitlin M; Johnson, Karen L; Dasari, Paul; Segars, Paul W; Pretorius, P H; Lindsay, Clifford; Dey, Joyoni; King, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    The development of methods for correcting patient motion in emission tomography has been receiving increased attention. Often performance of these methods is evaluated through simulations using digital anthropomorphic phantoms, such as the commonly used XCAT phantom, which models both respiratory and cardiac motion based on human studies. However, non-rigid body motion, which is frequently seen in clinical studies, is not present in the standard XCAT phantom. In addition, respiratory motion in the standard phantom is limited to a single generic trend. In this work, to obtain more realistic representation of motion, we developed a series of individual-specific XCAT phantoms modeling non-rigid respiratory and non-rigid body motions derived from the MRI acquisitions of volunteers. Acquisitions were performed in the sagittal orientation using the Navigator methodology. Baseline (no motion) acquisitions at end-expiration were obtained at the beginning of each imaging session for each volunteer. For the body motion studies, MRI was again acquired only at end-expiration for five body motion poses (shoulder stretch, shoulder twist, lateral bend, side roll, and axial slide). For the respiratory motion studies, MRI was acquired during free/regular breathing. The MR slices were then retrospectively sorted into 14 amplitude-binned respiratory states, end-expiration, end-inspiration, six intermediary states during inspiration, and six during expiration using the recorded Navigator signal. XCAT phantoms were then generated based on these MRI data by interactive alignment of the organ contours of the XCAT with the MRI slices using a GUI. Thus far we have created 5 body motion and 5 respiratory motion XCAT phantoms from MRI acquisitions of 6 healthy volunteers (3 males and 3 females). Non-rigid motion exhibited by the volunteers was reflected in both respiratory and body motion phantoms with a varying extent and character for each individual. In addition to these phantoms, we

  2. Aggregation Distributions on Cells Determined by Photobleaching Image Correlation Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ciccotosto, Giuseppe D.; Kozer, Noga; Chow, Timothy T.Y.; Chon, James W.M.; Clayton, Andrew H.A.

    2013-01-01

    The organization of molecules into macromolecular (nanometer scale), supramolecular complexes (submicron-to-micron scale), and within subcellular domains, is an important architectural principle of cellular biology and biochemistry. Determining the precise nature and distribution of complexes within the cellular milieu is a challenging biophysical problem. Time-series analysis of laser scanning confocal microscopy images by image correlation spectroscopy (ICS) or fluctuation moments methods provides information on aggregation, flow, and dynamics of fluorescently tagged macromolecules. All the methods to date require a brightness standard to relate the experimental data to absolute aggregation. In this article, we show that ICS as a function of gradual photobleaching is a sensitive indicator of aggregation distribution on the submicron scale. Specifically, in photobleaching ICS, the extent of nonlinearity of the apparent cluster density as a function of bleaching is related to the size of clusters. The analysis is tested using computer simulations on model aggregate systems and then applied to an experimental determination of Aβ peptide aggregation on nerve cells. The analysis reveals time-dependent increases in Aβ1-42 peptide aggregation. Globally, the datasets could be described by a monomer-dimer-tetramer-hexamer or a monomer-dimer-trimer-pentamer model. The results demonstrate the utility of photobleaching with ICS for determining aggregation states on the supramolecular scale in intact cells without the requirement for a brightness standard. PMID:23473488

  3. Fourier-based interpolation bias prediction in digital image correlation.

    PubMed

    Su, Yong; Zhang, Qingchuan; Gao, Zeren; Xu, Xiaohai; Wu, Xiaoping

    2015-07-27

    Based on the Fourier method, this paper deduces analytic formulae for interpolation bias in digital image correlation, explains the well-known sinusoidal-shaped curves of interpolation bias, and introduces the concept of interpolation bias kernel, which characterizes the frequency response of the interpolation bias and thus provides a measure of the subset matching quality of the interpolation algorithm. The interpolation bias kernel attributes the interpolation bias to aliasing effect of interpolation and indicates that high-frequency components are the major source of interpolation bias. Based on our theoretical results, a simple and effective interpolation bias prediction approach, which exploits the speckle spectrum and the interpolation transfer function, is proposed. Significant acceleration is attained, the effect of subset size is analyzed, and both numerical simulations and experimental results are found to agree with theoretical predictions. During the experiment, a novel experimental translation technique was developed that implements subpixel translation of a captured image through integer pixel translation on a computer screen. Owing to this remarkable technique, the influences of mechanical error and out-of-plane motion are eliminated, and complete interpolation bias curves as accurate as 0.01 pixel are attained by subpixel translation experiments.

  4. A breath of fresh air: images of respiratory illness in novels, poems, films, music, and paintings.

    PubMed

    Kaptein, Ad A; Meulenberg, Frans; Smyth, Joshua M

    2015-03-01

    The nature and severity of respiratory disease are typically expressed with biomedical measures such as pulmonary function, X-rays, blood tests, and other physiological characteristics. The impact of respiratory illness on the sufferer, however, is reflected in the stories patients tell: to themselves, their social environment, and their health care providers. Behavioral research often applies standardized questionnaires to assess this subjective impact. Additional approaches to sampling patients' experience of respiratory illness may, however, provide important and clinically useful information that is not captured by other methods. Herein, we assert that novels, poems, movies, music, and paintings may represent a rich, experiential understanding of the patient's point of view of asthma, cystic fibrosis, lung cancer, and tuberculosis. Examination of these works illustrates the broad range and major impact of respiratory illness on patients' quality of life. We suggest that examining how illness is represented in various art forms may help patients, their social environment, and their health care providers in coping with the illness and in humanizing medical care. Medical students' clinical skills may benefit when illness experiences as expressed in art are incorporated in the medical curriculum. More generally, Narrative Health Psychology, Narrative Medicine, and Medical Humanities deserve more attention in education, training, and clinical care of (respiratory) physicians, medical students, and other health care professionals.

  5. Cardiac Mitochondrial Respiratory Dysfunction and Tissue Damage in Chronic Hyperglycemia Correlate with Reduced Aldehyde Dehydrogenase-2 Activity

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Mandar; Thandavarayan, Rajarajan A.; Xu, Jiang; Yang, Xiao-Ping; Palaniyandi, Suresh S.

    2016-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) 2 is a mitochondrial isozyme of the heart involved in the metabolism of toxic aldehydes produced from oxidative stress. We hypothesized that hyperglycemia-mediated decrease in ALDH2 activity may impair mitochondrial respiration and ultimately result in cardiac damage. A single dose (65 mg/kg; i.p.) streptozotocin injection to rats resulted in hyperglycemia with blood glucose levels of 443 ± 9 mg/dl versus 121 ± 7 mg/dl in control animals, p<0.0001, N = 7–11. After 6 months of diabetes mellitus (DM) induction, the rats were sacrificed after recording the functionality of their hearts. Increase in the cardiomyocyte cross sectional area (446 ± 32 μm2 Vs 221 ± 10 μm2; p<0.0001) indicated cardiac hypertrophy in DM rats. Both diastolic and systolic dysfunctions were observed with DM rats compared to controls. Most importantly, myocardial ALDH2 activity and levels were reduced, and immunostaining for 4HNE protein adducts was increased in DM hearts compared to controls. The mitochondrial oxygen consumption rate (OCR), an index of mitochondrial respiration, was decreased in mitochondria isolated from DM hearts compared to controls (p<0.0001). Furthermore, the rate of mitochondrial respiration and the increase in carbonyl cyanide-p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone (FCCP)-induced maximal respiration were also decreased with chronic hyperglycemia. Chronic hyperglycemia reduced mitochondrial OXPHOS proteins. Reduced ALDH2 activity was correlated with mitochondrial dysfunction, pathological remodeling and cardiac dysfunction, respectively. Our results suggest that chronic hyperglycemia reduces ALDH2 activity, leading to mitochondrial respiratory dysfunction and consequently cardiac damage and dysfunction. PMID:27736868

  6. Bovine coronavirus antibody titers at weaning negatively correlate with incidence of bovine respiratory disease in the feed yard

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC) is a multifactorial disease caused by complex interactions among viral and bacterial pathogens, stressful management practices and host genetic variability. Although vaccines and antibiotic treatments are readily available to prevent and treat infection caus...

  7. Imaging Phenotypes of Major Depressive Disorder: Genetic Correlates

    PubMed Central

    Savitz, Jonathan B; Drevets, Wayne C

    2009-01-01

    Imaging techniques are a potentially powerful method of identifying phenotypes that are associated with, or are indicative of a vulnerability to developing major depressive disorder (MDD). Here we identify seven promising MDD-associated traits identified by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or positron emission tomography (PET). We evaluate whether these traits are state-independent, heritable endophenotypes, or state-dependent phenotypes that may be useful markers of treatment efficacy. In MDD, increased activity of the amygdala in response to negative stimuli appears to be a mood-congruent phenomenon, and is likely moderated by the serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4) promoter polymorphism (5-HTTLPR). Hippocampal volume loss is characteristic of elderly or chronically-ill samples and may be impacted by the val66met brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene variant and the 5-HTTLPR SLC6A4 polymorphism. White matter pathology is salient in elderly MDD cohorts but is associated with cerebrovascular disease, and is unlikely to be a useful marker of a latent MDD diathesis. Increased blood flow or metabolism of the subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (sgACC), together with gray matter volume loss in this region, is a well-replicated finding in MDD. An attenuation of the usual pattern of fronto-limbic connectivity, particularly a decreased temporal correlation in amygdala-anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) activity, is another MDD-associated trait. Concerning neuroreceptor PET imaging, decreased 5-HT1A binding potential in the raphe, medial temporal lobe, and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) has been strongly associated with MDD, and may be impacted by a functional single nucleotide polymorphism in the promoter region of the 5-HT1A gene (HTR1A: –1019C/G; rs6295). Potentially indicative of inter-study variation in MDD etiology or mood state, both increased and decreased binding potential of the serotonin transporter has been reported. Challenges facing the field include

  8. Mycological Profile of Sputum of HIV Positive Patients with Lower Respiratory Tract Infection and its Correlation with CD4+ T Lymphocyte Count

    PubMed Central

    Chandwani, Jyotsna; Vyas, Nitya; Hooja, Saroj; Maheshwari, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Fungal respiratory infections are important cause of mortality and morbidity among HIV positive individuals. They account for up to 70% of illness in Acquired Immunodeficiency Disease Syndrome cases (AIDS). The range of illness varies from asymptomatic mucosal candidiasis to overwhelming disseminated infections. In these patients dissemination of fungus leads to very serious outcomes hence, it is important to have the knowledge of prevailing profile of fungus causing infections, so that it can be treated at the onset. Low CD4+ T lymphocyte count is an excellent indicator of decreased immunity and can also be helpful to predict opportunistic fungal respiratory infections and other complications. Aim To define the fungal aetiology of lower respiratory tract infections in HIV positive patients and to correlate the occurrence of different fungi with CD4+ T lymphocyte count. Materials and Methods This was a cross sectional study conducted between May 2014 to April 2015, on 180 treatment naive HIV seropositive patients with lower respiratory tract infections attending the Integrated Counselling and Testing Centre, SMS Medical College, Jaipur, Rajasthan. Early morning expectorated and induced sputum samples were collected and processed for isolation and identification of fungal species. CD4+ T lymphocyte count estimation was done by BD FACS Calibur. Results Fungal species were isolated from 155 (86.1%) patients. The most common isolate was Candida albicans (31.7%), followed by Aspergillus niger (17.7%) and Aspergillus flavus (10%). The fungal species were most commonly isolated from patients with CD4+ T lymphocyte cell less than 200 cells/μl. Conclusion Fungal infections were seen in 86.1% of HIV positive patients with lower respiratory tract infections hence, high level of clinical suspicion for fungal aetiology of respiratory infections in HIV positive patients should be kept in mind. PMID:27790435

  9. TH-C-12A-11: Target Correlation of a 3D Surface Surrogate for Left Breast Irradiation Using the Respiratory-Gated Deep-Inspiration Breath-Hold Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Rong, Y; Walston, S

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the use of 3D optical surface imaging as a new surrogate for respiratory motion gated deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) technique for left breast cancer patients. Methods: Patients with left-sided breast cancer after lumpectomy or mastectomy were selected as candidates for DIBH technique for their external beam radiation therapy. Treatment plans were created on both free breathing (FB) and DIBH CTs to determine whether DIBH was beneficial in reducing heart doses. The Real-time Position Management (RPM) system was used to acquire patient's breathing trace during DIBH CT acquisition and treatment delivery. The reference 3D surface models from FB and DIBH CTs were generated and transferred to the “AlignRT” system for patient positioning and real-time treatment monitoring. MV Cine images were acquired for each beam as quality assurance for intra-fractional position verification. The chest wall excursions measured on these images were used to define the actual target position during treatment, and to investigate the accuracy and reproducibility of RPM and AlignRT. Results: Reduction in heart dose can be achieved for left-sided breast patients using DIBH. Results showed that RPM has poor correlation with target position, as determined by the MV Cine imaging. This indicates that RPM may not be an adequate surrogate in defining the breath-hold level when used alone. Alternatively, the AlignRT surface imaging demonstrated a better correlation with the actual CW excursion during DIBH. Both the vertical and magnitude real-time deltas (RTDs) reported by AlignRT can be used as the gating parameter, with a recommend threshold of ±3 mm and 5 mm, respectively. Conclusion: 3D optical surface imaging serves as a superior target surrogate for the left breast treatment when compared to RPM. Working together with the realtime MV Cine imaging, they ensure accurate patient setup and dose delivery, while minimizing the imaging dose to patients.

  10. Fetal Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings In Congenital Cytomegalovirus Infection With Postnatal Imaging Correlation.

    PubMed

    Averill, Lauren W; Kandula, Vinay V R; Akyol, Yakup; Epelman, Monica

    2015-12-01

    Fetal brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a powerful tool in the diagnosis of symptomatic congenital cytomegalovirus infection, requiring a detailed search for specific features. A combination of anterior temporal lobe abnormalities, white matter lesions, and polymicrogyria is especially predictive. Fetal MRI may provide a unique opportunity to detect anterior temporal cysts and occipital horn septations, as dilation of these areas may decrease later in development. Cortical migration abnormalities, white matter abnormalities, cerebellar dysplasia, and periventricular calcifications are often better depicted on postnatal imaging but can also be detected on fetal MRI. We present the prenatal brain MRI findings seen in congenital cytomegalovirus infection and provide postnatal imaging correlation, highlighting the evolution of findings at different times in prenatal and postnatal developments. PMID:26614131

  11. Correlation of Magnetic Resonance Imaging With Knee Anterolateral Ligament Anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Helito, Camilo Partezani; Helito, Paulo Victor Partezani; Bonadio, Marcelo Batista; Pécora, José Ricardo; Bordalo-Rodrigues, Marcelo; Camanho, Gilberto Luis; Demange, Marco Kawamura

    2015-01-01

    Background: Anatomic and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies have recently characterized the knee anterolateral ligament (ALL). So far, no study has focused on confirming whether the evaluated MRI parameters truly correspond with ALL anatomy. Purpose: To assess the validity of MRI in detecting the ALL using an anatomic evaluation as reference. Study Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Methods: A total of 13 cadaveric knees were subjected to MRI and then to anatomic dissection. Dissection was performed according to previous anatomic study methodology. MRIs were performed with a 0.6- to 1.5-mm slice thickness and prior saline injection. The following variables were analyzed: distance from the origin of the ALL to the origin of the lateral collateral ligament (LCL), distance from the origin of the ALL to its bifurcation point, maximum length of the ALL, distance from the tibial insertion of the ALL to the articular surface of the tibia, ALL thickness, and ALL width. The 2 sets of measurements were analyzed using the Spearman correlation coefficient (ρ) and Bland-Altman plots. Results: The ALL was clearly observed in all dissected knees and MRI scans. It originated anterior and distal to the LCL, close to the lateral epycondile center, and showed an anteroinferior path toward the tibia, inserting between the Gerdy tubercle and the fibular head, around 5 mm under the lateral plateau. The ρ values tended to increase together for all studied variables between the 2 methods, and all were statistically significant, except for thickness (P = .077). Bland-Altman plots showed a tendency toward a reduction of ALL thickness and width by MRI compared with anatomic dissection. Conclusion: MRI scanning as described can accurately assess the ALL and demonstrates characteristics similar to those seen under anatomic dissection. Clinical Relevance: MRI can accurately characterize the ALL in the anterolateral region of the knee, despite the presence of structures that might

  12. Damage Assessment of Composite Structures Using Digital Image Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caminero, M. A.; Lopez-Pedrosa, M.; Pinna, C.; Soutis, C.

    2014-02-01

    The steady increase of Carbon-Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) Structures in modern aircraft will reach a new dimension with the entry into service of the Boeing 787 and Airbus 350. Replacement of damaged parts will not be a preferable solution due to the high level of integration and the large size of the components involved. Consequently the need to develop repair techniques and processes for composite components is readily apparent. Bonded patch repair technologies provide an alternative to mechanically fastened repairs with significantly higher performance, especially for relatively thin skins. Carefully designed adhesively bonded patches can lead to cost effective and highly efficient repairs in comparison with conventional riveted patch repairs that cut fibers and introduce highly strained regions. In this work, the assessment of the damage process taking place in notched (open-hole) specimens under uniaxial tensile loading was studied. Two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) Digital Image Correlation (DIC) techniques were employed to obtain full-field surface strain measurements in carbon-fiber/epoxy T700/M21 composite plates with different stacking sequences in the presence of an open circular hole. Penetrant enhanced X-ray radiographs were taken to identify damage location and extent after loading around the hole. DIC strain fields were compared to finite element predictions. In addition, DIC techniques were used to characterise damage and performance of adhesively bonded patch repairs in composite panels under tensile loading. This part of work relates to strength/stiffness restoration of damaged composite aircraft that becomes more important as composites are used more extensively in the construction of modern jet airliners. The behaviour of bonded patches under loading was monitored using DIC full-field strain measurements. Location and extent of damage identified by X-ray radiography correlates well with DIC strain results giving confidence to

  13. Acquisition and automated 3-D segmentation of respiratory/cardiac-gated PET transmission images

    SciTech Connect

    Reutter, B.W.; Klein, G.J.; Brennan, K.M.; Huesman, R.H. |

    1996-12-31

    To evaluate the impact of respiratory motion on attenuation correction of cardiac PET data, we acquired and automatically segmented gated transmission data for a dog breathing on its own under gas anesthesia. Data were acquired for 20 min on a CTI/Siemens ECAT EXACT HR (47-slice) scanner configured for 12 gates in a static study, Two respiratory gates were obtained using data from a pneumatic bellows placed around the dog`s chest, in conjunction with 6 cardiac gates from standard EKG gating. Both signals were directed to a LabVIEW-controlled Macintosh, which translated them into one of 12 gate addresses. The respiratory gating threshold was placed near end-expiration to acquire 6 cardiac-gated datasets at end-expiration and 6 cardiac-gated datasets during breaths. Breaths occurred about once every 10 sec and lasted about 1-1.5 sec. For each respiratory gate, data were summed over cardiac gates and torso and lung surfaces were segmented automatically using a differential 3-D edge detection algorithm. Three-dimensional visualizations showed that lung surfaces adjacent to the heart translated 9 mm inferiorly during breaths. Our results suggest that respiration-compensated attenuation correction is feasible with a modest amount of gated transmission data and is necessary for accurate quantitation of high-resolution gated cardiac PET data.

  14. First images of respiratory system in ancient Egypt: Trachea, bronchi and pulmonary lobes.

    PubMed

    Kwiecinski, Jakub

    2012-01-01

    Examination of ancient Egyptians' depictions of the respiratory tract, dating back to the 30th century BC, reveals their awareness of the pulmonary anatomy: reinforced with cartilaginous rings, the trachea is split into two main bronchi, which then enter the lungs (lungs being divided into pulmonary lobes).

  15. A study of the x-ray image quality improvement in the examination of the respiratory system based on the new image processing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagai, Yuichi; Kitagawa, Mayumi; Torii, Jun; Iwase, Takumi; Aso, Tomohiko; Ihara, Kanyu; Fujikawa, Mari; Takeuchi, Yumiko; Suzuki, Katsumi; Ishiguro, Takashi; Hara, Akio

    2014-03-01

    Recently, the double contrast technique in a gastrointestinal examination and the transbronchial lung biopsy in an examination for the respiratory system [1-3] have made a remarkable progress. Especially in the transbronchial lung biopsy, better quality of x-ray fluoroscopic images is requested because this examination is performed under a guidance of x-ray fluoroscopic images. On the other hand, various image processing methods [4] for x-ray fluoroscopic images have been developed as an x-ray system with a flat panel detector [5-7] is widely used. A recursive filtering is an effective method to reduce a random noise in x-ray fluoroscopic images. However it has a limitation for its effectiveness of a noise reduction in case of a moving object exists in x-ray fluoroscopic images because the recursive filtering is a noise reduction method by adding last few images. After recursive filtering a residual signal was produced if a moving object existed in x-ray images, and this residual signal disturbed a smooth procedure of the examinations. To improve this situation, new noise reduction method has been developed. The Adaptive Noise Reduction [ANR] is the brand-new noise reduction technique which can be reduced only a noise regardless of the moving object in x-ray fluoroscopic images. Therefore the ANR is a very suitable noise reduction method for the transbronchial lung biopsy under a guidance of x-ray fluoroscopic images because the residual signal caused of the moving object in x-ray fluoroscopic images is never produced after the ANR. In this paper, we will explain an advantage of the ANR by comparing of a performance between the ANR images and the conventional recursive filtering images.

  16. Stereo digital image correlation for characterization of fresh biomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bland, Megan E.; Cortes, Marisol; Solt, Kristin J.; Siadat, Mohammad; Yang, Lianxiang

    2010-02-01

    In this study a whole field, non-contact optical method, Stereo Digital Image Correlation (SDIC), was used to determine the strain distribution and mechanical properties of fresh bone in Phosphate Buffered Saline (PBS) solution. Knowing the whole-surface strain distribution of bone is useful for understanding the effects of normal physiological loading, disease, drugs and aging. In addition, knowing the mechanical properties of bone will aid in the design of new biomaterials. Although there currently are methods for measuring the mechanical properties of bone, these methods have some limitations. Many miss areas of strain concentration, especially because of the inhomogeneous nature of bone. SDIC overcomes these limitations by being able to precisely measure whole-surface 3D contour and strain of samples in solution over a wide range of deformations. In this study, SDIC was used to measure the axial strain of fresh chicken tibia. A setup which has the capability to apply force axially was designed. This paper describes the methodology of SDIC for measuring fresh bone in a PBS solution. The effect of drying time on strain distribution was investigated. The usefulness of the SDIC system is demonstrated by examples of deformation and strain measurements for different chicken tibia in PBS solution.

  17. A method to transfer speckle patterns for digital image correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhenning; Quan, Chenggen; Zhu, Feipeng; He, Xiaoyuan

    2015-09-01

    A simple and repeatable speckle creation method based on water transfer printing (WTP) is proposed to reduce artificial measurement error for digital image correlation (DIC). This technique requires water, brush, and a piece of transfer paper that is made of prefabricated decal paper, a protected sheet, and printed speckle patterns. The speckle patterns are generated and optimized via computer simulations, and then printed on the decal paper. During the experiments, operators can moisten the basement with water and the brush, so that digital patterns can be simply transferred to the carriers’ surfaces. Tensile experiments with an extended three-dimensional (3D) DIC system are performed to test and verify the validity of WTP patterns. It is shown that by comparing with a strain gage, the strain error is less than 50με in a uniform tensile test. From five carbon steel tensile experiments, Lüders bands in both WTP patterns and spray paint patterns are demonstrated to propagate symmetrically. In the necking part where the strain is up to 66%, WTP patterns are proved to adhere to the specimens well. Hence, WTP patterns are capable of maintaining coherence and adherence to the specimen surface. The transfer paper, working as the role of strain gage in the electrometric method, will contribute to speckle creation.

  18. Atlas-based diffusion tensor imaging correlates of executive function

    PubMed Central

    Nowrangi, Milap A.; Okonkwo, Ozioma; Lyketsos, Constantine; Oishi, Kenichi; Mori, Susumu; Albert, Marilyn; Mielke, Michelle M.

    2015-01-01

    Impairment in executive function (EF) is commonly found in Alzheimer’s Dementia (AD) and Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI). Atlas-based Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) methods may be useful in relating regional integrity to EF measures in MCI and AD. 66 participants (25 NC, 22 MCI, and 19 AD) received DTI scans and clinical evaluation. DTI scans were applied to a pre-segmented atlas and fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) were calculated. ANOVA was used to assess group differences in frontal, parietal, and cerebellar regions. For regions differing between groups (p<0.01), linear regression examined the relationship between EF scores and regional FA and MD. Anisotropy and diffusivity in frontal and parietal lobe white matter (WM) structures were associated with EF scores in MCI and only frontal lobe structures in AD. EF was more strongly associated with FA than MD. The relationship between EF and anisotropy and diffusivity was strongest in MCI. These results suggest that regional WM integrity is compromised in MCI and AD and that FA may be a better correlate of EF than MD. PMID:25318544

  19. Cross-correlation and image alignment for multi-band IR sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Thomas; Chao, Tien-Hsin; Chen, Kang (Frank); Luong, Andrew; Dewees, Mallory; Yan, Xinyi; Chow, Edward; Torres, Gilbert

    2016-04-01

    We present the development of a cross-correlation algorithm for correlating objects in the long wave, mid wave and short wave Infrared sensor arrays. The goal is to align the images in the multisensor suite by correlating multiple key features in the images. Due to the wavelength differences, the object appears very differently in the sensor images even the sensors focus on the same object. In order to perform accurate correlation of the same object in the multi-band images, we perform image processing on the images so that the features of the object become similar to each other. Fourier domain band pass filters are used to enhance the images. Mexican Hat and Gaussian Derivative Wavelets are used to further enhance the features of the object. A Python based QT graphical user interface has been implemented to carry out the process. We show reliable results of the cross-correlation of the objects in multiple band videos.

  20. Quantifying the image quality and dose reduction of respiratory triggered 4D cone-beam computed tomography with patient-measured breathing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Benjamin J.; O'Brien, Ricky T.; Kipritidis, John; Shieh, Chun-Chien; Keall, Paul J.

    2015-12-01

    Respiratory triggered four dimensional cone-beam computed tomography (RT 4D CBCT) is a novel technique that uses a patient’s respiratory signal to drive the image acquisition with the goal of imaging dose reduction without degrading image quality. This work investigates image quality and dose using patient-measured respiratory signals for RT 4D CBCT simulations. Studies were performed that simulate a 4D CBCT image acquisition using both the novel RT 4D CBCT technique and a conventional 4D CBCT technique. A set containing 111 free breathing lung cancer patient respiratory signal files was used to create 111 pairs of RT 4D CBCT and conventional 4D CBCT image sets from realistic simulations of a 4D CBCT system using a Rando phantom and the digital phantom, XCAT. Each of these image sets were compared to a ground truth dataset from which a mean absolute pixel difference (MAPD) metric was calculated to quantify the degradation of image quality. The number of projections used in each simulation was counted and was assumed as a surrogate for imaging dose. Based on 111 breathing traces, when comparing RT 4D CBCT with conventional 4D CBCT, the average image quality was reduced by 7.6% (Rando study) and 11.1% (XCAT study). However, the average imaging dose reduction was 53% based on needing fewer projections (617 on average) than conventional 4D CBCT (1320 projections). The simulation studies have demonstrated that the RT 4D CBCT method can potentially offer a 53% saving in imaging dose on average compared to conventional 4D CBCT in simulation studies using a wide range of patient-measured breathing traces with a minimal impact on image quality.

  1. SU-E-J-183: Quantifying the Image Quality and Dose Reduction of Respiratory Triggered 4D Cone-Beam Computed Tomography with Patient- Measured Breathing

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, B; OBrien, R; Kipritidis, J; Keall, P

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Respiratory triggered four dimensional cone-beam computed tomography (RT 4D CBCT) is a novel technique that uses a patient's respiratory signal to drive the image acquisition with the goal of imaging dose reduction without degrading image quality. This work investigates image quality and dose using patient-measured respiratory signals for RT 4D CBCT simulations instead of synthetic sinusoidal signals used in previous work. Methods: Studies were performed that simulate a 4D CBCT image acquisition using both the novel RT 4D CBCT technique and a conventional 4D CBCT technique from a database of oversampled Rando phantom CBCT projections. A database containing 111 free breathing lung cancer patient respiratory signal files was used to create 111 RT 4D CBCT and 111 conventional 4D CBCT image datasets from realistic simulations of a 4D RT CBCT system. Each of these image datasets were compared to a ground truth dataset from which a root mean square error (RMSE) metric was calculated to quantify the degradation of image quality. The number of projections used in each simulation is counted and was assumed as a surrogate for imaging dose. Results: Based on 111 breathing traces, when comparing RT 4D CBCT with conventional 4D CBCT the average image quality was reduced by 7.6%. However, the average imaging dose reduction was 53% based on needing fewer projections (617 on average) than conventional 4D CBCT (1320 projections). Conclusion: The simulation studies using a wide range of patient breathing traces have demonstrated that the RT 4D CBCT method can potentially offer a substantial saving of imaging dose of 53% on average compared to conventional 4D CBCT in simulation studies with a minimal impact on image quality. A patent application (PCT/US2012/048693) has been filed which is related to this work.

  2. Imaging Imageability: Behavioral Effects and Neural Correlates of Its Interaction with Affect and Context.

    PubMed

    Westbury, Chris F; Cribben, Ivor; Cummine, Jacqueline

    2016-01-01

    The construct of imageability refers to the extent to which a word evokes a tangible sensation. Previous research (Westbury et al., 2013) suggests that the behavioral effects attributed to a word's imageability can be largely or wholly explained by two objective constructs, contextual density and estimated affect. Here, we extend these previous findings in two ways. First, we show that closely matched stimuli on the three measures of contextual density, estimated affect, and human-judged imageability show a three-way interaction in explaining variance in LD RTs, but that imagebility accounts for no additional variance after contextual density and estimated affect are entered first. Secondly, we demonstrate that the loci and functional connectivity (via graphical models) of the brain regions implicated in processing the three variables during that task are largely over-lapping and similar. These two lines of evidence support the conclusion that the effect usually attributed to human-judged imageability is largely or entirely due to the effects of other correlated measures that are directly computable. PMID:27471455

  3. Imaging Imageability: Behavioral Effects and Neural Correlates of Its Interaction with Affect and Context

    PubMed Central

    Westbury, Chris F.; Cribben, Ivor; Cummine, Jacqueline

    2016-01-01

    The construct of imageability refers to the extent to which a word evokes a tangible sensation. Previous research (Westbury et al., 2013) suggests that the behavioral effects attributed to a word's imageability can be largely or wholly explained by two objective constructs, contextual density and estimated affect. Here, we extend these previous findings in two ways. First, we show that closely matched stimuli on the three measures of contextual density, estimated affect, and human-judged imageability show a three-way interaction in explaining variance in LD RTs, but that imagebility accounts for no additional variance after contextual density and estimated affect are entered first. Secondly, we demonstrate that the loci and functional connectivity (via graphical models) of the brain regions implicated in processing the three variables during that task are largely over-lapping and similar. These two lines of evidence support the conclusion that the effect usually attributed to human-judged imageability is largely or entirely due to the effects of other correlated measures that are directly computable. PMID:27471455

  4. Experiential, autonomic, and respiratory correlates of CO2 reactivity in individuals with high and low anxiety sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Blechert, Jens; Wilhelm, Frank H; Meuret, Alicia E; Wilhelm, Eva M; Roth, Walton T

    2013-10-30

    Psychometric studies indicate that anxiety sensitivity (AS) is a risk factor for anxiety disorders such as panic disorder (PD). To better understand the psychophysiological basis of AS and its relation to clinical anxiety, we examined whether high-AS individuals show similarly elevated reactivity to inhalations of carbon dioxide (CO2) as previously reported for PD and social phobia in this task. Healthy individuals with high and low AS were exposed to eight standardized inhalations of 20% CO2-enriched air, preceded and followed by inhalations of room air. Anxiety and dyspnea, in addition to autonomic and respiratory responses were measured every 15 s. Throughout the task, high AS participants showed a respiratory pattern of faster, shallower breathing and reduced inhalation of CO2 indicative of anticipatory or contextual anxiety. In addition, they showed elevated dyspnea responses to the second set of air inhalations accompanied by elevated heart rate, which could be due to sensitization or conditioning. Respiratory abnormalities seem to be common to high AS individuals and PD patients when considering previous findings with this task. Similarly, sensitization or conditioning of anxious and dyspneic symptoms might be common to high AS and clinical anxiety. Respiratory conditionability deserves greater attention in anxiety disorder research. PMID:23489596

  5. Experiential, autonomic, and respiratory correlates of CO2 reactivity in individuals with high and low anxiety sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Blechert, Jens; Wilhelm, Frank H; Meuret, Alicia E; Wilhelm, Eva M; Roth, Walton T

    2013-10-30

    Psychometric studies indicate that anxiety sensitivity (AS) is a risk factor for anxiety disorders such as panic disorder (PD). To better understand the psychophysiological basis of AS and its relation to clinical anxiety, we examined whether high-AS individuals show similarly elevated reactivity to inhalations of carbon dioxide (CO2) as previously reported for PD and social phobia in this task. Healthy individuals with high and low AS were exposed to eight standardized inhalations of 20% CO2-enriched air, preceded and followed by inhalations of room air. Anxiety and dyspnea, in addition to autonomic and respiratory responses were measured every 15 s. Throughout the task, high AS participants showed a respiratory pattern of faster, shallower breathing and reduced inhalation of CO2 indicative of anticipatory or contextual anxiety. In addition, they showed elevated dyspnea responses to the second set of air inhalations accompanied by elevated heart rate, which could be due to sensitization or conditioning. Respiratory abnormalities seem to be common to high AS individuals and PD patients when considering previous findings with this task. Similarly, sensitization or conditioning of anxious and dyspneic symptoms might be common to high AS and clinical anxiety. Respiratory conditionability deserves greater attention in anxiety disorder research.

  6. Snapping Sharks, Maddening Mindreaders, and Interactive Images: Teaching Correlation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Mark L.

    Understanding correlation coefficients is difficult for students. A free computer program that helps introductory psychology students distinguish between positive and negative correlation, and which also teaches them to understand the differences between correlation coefficients of different size is described in this paper. The program is…

  7. Large range rotation distortion measurement for remote sensing images based on volume holographic optical correlator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Tianxiang; Cao, Liangcai; Zhao, Tian; He, Qingsheng; Jin, Guofan

    2012-10-01

    Volume holographic optical correlator can compute the correlation results between images at a super-high speed. In the application of remote imaging processing such as scene matching, 6,000 template images have been angularly multiplexed in the photorefractive crystal and the 6,000 parallel processing channels are achieved. In order to detect the correlation pattern of images precisely and distinguishingly, an on-off pixel inverted technology of images is proposed. It can fully use the CCD's linear range for detection and expand the normalized correlation value differences as the target image rotates. Due to the natural characteristics of the remote sensing images, the statistical formulas between the rotation distortions and the correlation results can be estimated. The rotation distortion components can be estimated by curve fitting method with the data of correlation results. The intensities of the correlation spots are related to the distortion between the two images. The rotation distortion could be derived from the intensities in the post processing procedure. With 18 rotations of the input image and sending them into the volume holographic system, the detection of the rotation variation in the range of 180° can be fulfilled. So the large range rotation distortion detection is firstly realized. It offers a fast, large range rotation measurement method for image distortions.

  8. A radial sampling strategy for uniform k-space coverage with retrospective respiratory gating in 3D ultrashort-echo-time lung imaging.

    PubMed

    Park, Jinil; Shin, Taehoon; Yoon, Soon Ho; Goo, Jin Mo; Park, Jang-Yeon

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this work was to develop a 3D radial-sampling strategy which maintains uniform k-space sample density after retrospective respiratory gating, and demonstrate its feasibility in free-breathing ultrashort-echo-time lung MRI. A multi-shot, interleaved 3D radial sampling function was designed by segmenting a single-shot trajectory of projection views such that each interleaf samples k-space in an incoherent fashion. An optimal segmentation factor for the interleaved acquisition was derived based on an approximate model of respiratory patterns such that radial interleaves are evenly accepted during the retrospective gating. The optimality of the proposed sampling scheme was tested by numerical simulations and phantom experiments using human respiratory waveforms. Retrospectively, respiratory-gated, free-breathing lung MRI with the proposed sampling strategy was performed in healthy subjects. The simulation yielded the most uniform k-space sample density with the optimal segmentation factor, as evidenced by the smallest standard deviation of the number of neighboring samples as well as minimal side-lobe energy in the point spread function. The optimality of the proposed scheme was also confirmed by minimal image artifacts in phantom images. Human lung images showed that the proposed sampling scheme significantly reduced streak and ring artifacts compared with the conventional retrospective respiratory gating while suppressing motion-related blurring compared with full sampling without respiratory gating. In conclusion, the proposed 3D radial-sampling scheme can effectively suppress the image artifacts due to non-uniform k-space sample density in retrospectively respiratory-gated lung MRI by uniformly distributing gated radial views across the k-space.

  9. Automated method and system for the alignment and correlation of images from two different modalities

    DOEpatents

    Giger, Maryellen L.; Chen, Chin-Tu; Armato, Samuel; Doi, Kunio

    1999-10-26

    A method and system for the computerized registration of radionuclide images with radiographic images, including generating image data from radiographic and radionuclide images of the thorax. Techniques include contouring the lung regions in each type of chest image, scaling and registration of the contours based on location of lung apices, and superimposition after appropriate shifting of the images. Specific applications are given for the automated registration of radionuclide lungs scans with chest radiographs. The method in the example given yields a system that spatially registers and correlates digitized chest radiographs with V/Q scans in order to correlate V/Q functional information with the greater structural detail of chest radiographs. Final output could be the computer-determined contours from each type of image superimposed on any of the original images, or superimposition of the radionuclide image data, which contains high activity, onto the radiographic chest image.

  10. Multimodal Correlative Preclinical Whole Body Imaging and Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Akselrod-Ballin, Ayelet; Dafni, Hagit; Addadi, Yoseph; Biton, Inbal; Avni, Reut; Brenner, Yafit; Neeman, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Segmentation of anatomical structures and particularly abdominal organs is a fundamental problem for quantitative image analysis in preclinical research. This paper presents a novel approach for whole body segmentation of small animals in a multimodal setting of MR, CT and optical imaging. The algorithm integrates multiple imaging sequences into a machine learning framework, which generates supervoxels by an efficient hierarchical agglomerative strategy and utilizes multiple SVM-kNN classifiers each constrained by a heatmap prior region to compose the segmentation. We demonstrate results showing segmentation of mice images into several structures including the heart, lungs, liver, kidneys, stomach, vena cava, bladder, tumor, and skeleton structures. Experimental validation on a large set of mice and organs, indicated that our system outperforms alternative state of the art approaches. The system proposed can be generalized to various tissues and imaging modalities to produce automatic atlas-free segmentation, thereby enabling a wide range of applications in preclinical studies of small animal imaging. PMID:27325178

  11. Multimodal Correlative Preclinical Whole Body Imaging and Segmentation.

    PubMed

    Akselrod-Ballin, Ayelet; Dafni, Hagit; Addadi, Yoseph; Biton, Inbal; Avni, Reut; Brenner, Yafit; Neeman, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Segmentation of anatomical structures and particularly abdominal organs is a fundamental problem for quantitative image analysis in preclinical research. This paper presents a novel approach for whole body segmentation of small animals in a multimodal setting of MR, CT and optical imaging. The algorithm integrates multiple imaging sequences into a machine learning framework, which generates supervoxels by an efficient hierarchical agglomerative strategy and utilizes multiple SVM-kNN classifiers each constrained by a heatmap prior region to compose the segmentation. We demonstrate results showing segmentation of mice images into several structures including the heart, lungs, liver, kidneys, stomach, vena cava, bladder, tumor, and skeleton structures. Experimental validation on a large set of mice and organs, indicated that our system outperforms alternative state of the art approaches. The system proposed can be generalized to various tissues and imaging modalities to produce automatic atlas-free segmentation, thereby enabling a wide range of applications in preclinical studies of small animal imaging. PMID:27325178

  12. MR imaging findings of uterine pyomyoma: radiologic-pathologic correlation.

    PubMed

    Ono, Hiromi; Kanematsu, Masayuki; Kato, Hiroki; Toyoki, Hiroshi; Hayasaki, Yoh; Furui, Tatsuro; Morishige, Ken-ichirou; Hatano, Yuichiro

    2014-08-01

    A 69-year-old postmenopausal female with a spontaneously occurring uterine pyomyoma was described with emphasis on the MR imaging findings. On unenhanced T1- and T2-weighted MR images, a huge mottled mass suspected to contain blood products, necrotic tissue, or purulent or viscous fluid was demonstrated within anterior myometrial wall of uterine body. The mass was surrounded by a peripheral rim that was hyperintense on T1-weighted images and hypointense on T2-weighted images. On gadolinium-enhanced MR images, most of the mass was unenhanced, but the peripheral rim was equally enhanced with the surrounding myometrium. Pathological examination revealed an intramural uterine pyomyoma surrounded by fibrous capsules with abundant lymphocytes and neutrophils. Our findings indicate that pyomyoma should be considered when MR images demonstrate a myometrial cystic lesion accompanied by a peripheral rim. PMID:24615512

  13. PHASE CORRELATION METHOD FOR THE ALIGNMENT OF TOTAL SOLAR ECLIPSE IMAGES

    SciTech Connect

    Druckmueller, M.

    2009-12-01

    A modified phase correlation method, based on Fourier transform, which enables the alignment of solar coronal images taken during the total solar eclipses, is presented. The method enables the measurement of translation, rotation, and scaling factor between two images. With the application of this technique, pairs of images with different exposure times, different brightness scale, such as linear for CCD and nonlinear for images taken with photographic film, and even images from different emission lines can be aligned with sub-pixel precision.

  14. A 360-deg Digital Image Correlation system for materials testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genovese, K.; Cortese, L.; Rossi, M.; Amodio, D.

    2016-07-01

    The increasing research interest toward natural and advanced engineered materials demands new experimental protocols capable of retrieving highly dense sets of experimental data on the full-surface of samples under multiple loading conditions. Such information, in fact, would allow to capture the possible heterogeneity and anisotropy of the material by using up-to-date inverse characterization methods. Although the development of object-specific test protocols could represent the optimal choice to address this need, it is unquestionable that universal testing machines (UTM) remain the most widespread and versatile option to test materials and components in both academic and industrial contexts. A major limitation of performing standard material tests with UTM, however, consists in the scarce information obtainable with the commonly associated sensors since they provide only global (LVDTs, extensometers, 2D-video analyzers) or local (strain gages) measures of displacement and strain. This paper presents a 3D Digital Image Correlation (DIC) system developed to perform highly accurate full-surface 360-deg measurements on either standard or custom-shaped samples under complex loading within universal testing machines. To this aim, a low cost and easy to setup video rig was specifically designed to overcome the practical limitations entailed with the integration of a multi-camera system within an already existing loading frame. In particular, the proposed system features a single SLR digital camera moved through multiple positions around the specimen by means of a large rotation stage. A proper calibration and data-processing procedure allows to automatically merge the experimental data obtained from the multiple views with an accuracy of 10-2 m m . The results of a full benchmarking of the metrological performances of the system are here reported and discussed together with illustrative examples of full-360-deg shape and deformation measurements on a Grade X65 steel

  15. Photofragment imaging of HNCO decomposition: Angular anisotropy and correlated distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Sanov, A.; Droz-Georget, T.; Zyrianov, M.; Reisler, H.

    1997-05-01

    Photodissociation of jet-cooled isocyanic acid has been examined by photofragment ion imaging of H(D) from H(D)NCO and CO from HNCO, and by laser induced fluorescence (LIF) of NH(a{sup 1}{Delta}) from HNCO. Only modest recoil anisotropy is observed in the H+NCO channel at 243.1 nm ({beta}={minus}0.13{plus_minus}0.05), while the D+NCO channel at approximately the same wavelength reveals no anisotropy ({beta}=0.00{plus_minus}0.05), confirming that the dissociation of H(D)NCO from the opening of the H(D) channel proceeds via vibrational predissociation on the S{sub 0}({sup 1}A) surface. In contrast, substantial anisotropy ({beta}={minus}0.66{plus_minus}0.08) is observed in the NH(a{sup 1}{Delta})+CO channel at 230.1 nm, but this value can correspond to dissociation on either S{sub 0} or S{sub 1}. The photolysis region between 243 and 230 nm thus appears important in providing clues to the dissociation mechanism and the competition between different potential energy surfaces. At 217.6 nm, product state distributions exhibit clear dynamical biases. CO is produced in both {nu}=0 and {nu}=1, while NH(a{sup 1}{Delta}) distributions correlated with different rovibrational levels of CO, although different in shape, are always cold, consistent with the global NH distribution measured by LIF. The NH distributions indicate dissociation on S{sub 1}({sup 1}A{sup {prime}{prime}}), and can be described by Franck{endash}Condon mapping of transition state wave functions in the HNC bending coordinate without additional torque, implying little anisotropy in the potential along that coordinate. On the other hand, a larger torque is manifest in the CO rotational distribution. Although at 217.6 nm the dissociation is likely to be dominated by decomposition on S{sub 1}, competition with radiationless decay is still manifest. The NH(a{sup 1}{Delta})+CO dissociation threshold is determined at 42765{plus_minus}25cm{sup {minus}1}. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. Investigation of MINACE composite filter capabilities for multicolor images correlation recognition purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evtikhiev, N. N.; Zlokazov, E. Yu; Petrova, E. K.; Starikov, R. S.; Shaulskiy, D. V.

    2016-08-01

    Article represents the results of investigations in the area of distortion invariant images recognition using composite correlation filters. One of the most successive for application is a filter known as MINACE (minimum noise and average correlation energy). The capabilities of MINACE filter synthesis for multicolor image recognition problem are discussed.

  17. On the possible high +Gz tolerance increase by multimodal brain imaging controlled respiratory AFTE biofeedback training exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smietanowski, Maciej; Achimowicz, Jerzy; Lorenc, Kamil; Nowicki, Grzegorz; Zalewska, Ewa; Truszczynski, Olaf

    The experimental data related to Valsalva manouvers and short term voluntary apnea, available in the literature, suggest that the cerebral blood flow increase and reduction of the peripheral one may be expected if the specific AFTE based respiratory training is performed. The authors had verified this hypothesis by studying the relations between EEG measured subject relaxation combined with voluntary apnea by multimodal brain imaging technique (EEG mapping, Neuroscan and fMRI) in a group of healthy volunteers. The SPM analysis of respiratory related changes in cortical and subcortical BOLD signal has partially confirmed the hypothesis. The mechanism of this effect is probably based on the simultaneous blood pressure increase and total peripheral resistance increase. However the question is still open for further experimental verification if AFTE can be treated as the tool which can increase pilot/astronaut situation awareness in the extreme environment typical for aerospace operations where highly variable accelerations due to liftoff, rapid maneuvers, and vibrations can be expected in the critical phases of the mission.

  18. Geographical correlation of TV and IR images obtained from weather satellites. [cloud cover photography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziman, Y. L.; Nepoklonov, B. N.; Rodionov, B. N.

    1974-01-01

    The requirements on the accuracy of geographical correlation of TV and IR cloud cover images are determined by the objective of the analysis of the weather information contained in these images. In the operational analysis case, the correlation accuracy need not be high. Errors of several tens of kilometers in determining the location of the cloud formation contours are considered acceptable in this case. Such correlation must be provided in real image reception time. Scientific studies require accurate correlation of the cloud formation contours. The errors in determining their position should be commensurate with the imaging system resolution. The geometric aspects of developing methods and equipment for geographical correlation of television and infrared images of cloud cover taken from Meteor satellites are discussed.

  19. Correlative neuroanatomy of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Groot, J.

    1984-01-01

    Since the development of computed tomography (CT) more than a decade ago, still another form of imaging has become available that provides displays of normal and abnormal human structures. Magnetic resonance imaging is given complete coverage in this book. It describes both CT and MR anatomy that explains basic principles and the current status of imaging the brain and spine. The author uses three-dimensional concepts to provide the reader with a simple means to compare the main structures of the brain, skull and spine. Combining normal, gross neuroanatomic illustrations with CT and MR images of normal and abnormal conditions, the book provides diagnostic guidance. Drawings, photographs and radiologic images are used to help.

  20. Elevated plasma-soluble CD16 levels in porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus-infected pigs: correlation with ADAM17-mediated shedding.

    PubMed

    Gu, Weihong; Guo, Longjun; Li, Ren; Niu, Junwei; Luo, Xiaolei; Zhang, Jian; Xu, Yunfei; Tian, Zhijun; Feng, Li; Wang, Yue

    2016-03-01

    Soluble CD16 (sCD16) is closely correlated with chronic diseases in humans. Here, plasma sCD16 levels in pigs were increased by infection with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) but not with porcine epidemic diarrhea virus, porcine circovirus type 2 and pseudorabies virus. Of interest, PRRSV attached to blood neutrophils and reduced surface CD16 expression on neutrophils. In vitro data confirmed that PRRSV caused CD16 shedding in neutrophils. Further analyses revealed that ADAM17 was involved in porcine CD16 shedding. Thus, our findings suggest that increase in sCD16 levels may be an indicator of PRRSV infection. PMID:26653711

  1. Kernel-aligned multi-view canonical correlation analysis for image recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Shuzhi; Ge, Hongwei; Yuan, Yun-Hao

    2016-09-01

    Existing kernel-based correlation analysis methods mainly adopt a single kernel in each view. However, only a single kernel is usually insufficient to characterize nonlinear distribution information of a view. To solve the problem, we transform each original feature vector into a 2-dimensional feature matrix by means of kernel alignment, and then propose a novel kernel-aligned multi-view canonical correlation analysis (KAMCCA) method on the basis of the feature matrices. Our proposed method can simultaneously employ multiple kernels to better capture the nonlinear distribution information of each view, so that correlation features learned by KAMCCA can have well discriminating power in real-world image recognition. Extensive experiments are designed on five real-world image datasets, including NIR face images, thermal face images, visible face images, handwritten digit images, and object images. Promising experimental results on the datasets have manifested the effectiveness of our proposed method.

  2. Multispectral image sharpening using wavelet transform techniques and spatial correlation of edges

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lemeshewsky, George P.; Schowengerdt, Robert A.

    2000-01-01

    Several reported image fusion or sharpening techniques are based on the discrete wavelet transform (DWT). The technique described here uses a pixel-based maximum selection rule to combine respective transform coefficients of lower spatial resolution near-infrared (NIR) and higher spatial resolution panchromatic (pan) imagery to produce a sharpened NIR image. Sharpening assumes a radiometric correlation between the spectral band images. However, there can be poor correlation, including edge contrast reversals (e.g., at soil-vegetation boundaries), between the fused images and, consequently, degraded performance. To improve sharpening, a local area-based correlation technique originally reported for edge comparison with image pyramid fusion is modified for application with the DWT process. Further improvements are obtained by using redundant, shift-invariant implementation of the DWT. Example images demonstrate the improvements in NIR image sharpening with higher resolution pan imagery.

  3. The pulsatility volume index: an indicator of cerebrovascular compliance based on fast magnetic resonance imaging of cardiac and respiratory pulsatility.

    PubMed

    Bianciardi, Marta; Toschi, Nicola; Polimeni, Jonathan R; Evans, Karleyton C; Bhat, Himanshu; Keil, Boris; Rosen, Bruce R; Boas, David A; Wald, Lawrence L

    2016-05-13

    The influence of cardiac activity on the viscoelastic properties of intracranial tissue is one of the mechanisms through which brain-heart interactions take place, and is implicated in cerebrovascular disease. Cerebrovascular disease risk is not fully explained by current risk factors, including arterial compliance. Cerebrovascular compliance is currently estimated indirectly through Doppler sonography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measures of blood velocity changes. In order to meet the need for novel cerebrovascular disease risk factors, we aimed to design and validate an MRI indicator of cerebrovascular compliance based on direct endogenous measures of blood volume changes. We implemented a fast non-gated two-dimensional MRI pulse sequence based on echo-planar imaging (EPI) with ultra-short repetition time (approx. 30-50 ms), which stepped through slices every approximately 20 s. We constrained the solution of the Bloch equations for spins moving faster than a critical speed to produce an endogenous contrast primarily dependent on spin volume changes, and an approximately sixfold signal gain compared with Ernst angle acquisitions achieved by the use of a 90° flip angle. Using cardiac and respiratory peaks detected on physiological recordings, average cardiac and respiratory MRI pulse waveforms in several brain compartments were obtained at 7 Tesla, and used to derive a compliance indicator, the pulsatility volume index (pVI). The pVI, evaluated in larger cerebral arteries, displayed significant variation within and across vessels. Multi-echo EPI showed the presence of significant pulsatility effects in both S0 and [Formula: see text] signals, compatible with blood volume changes. Lastly, the pVI dynamically varied during breath-holding compared with normal breathing, as expected for a compliance indicator. In summary, we characterized and performed an initial validation of a novel MRI indicator of cerebrovascular compliance, which might prove useful

  4. The pulsatility volume index: an indicator of cerebrovascular compliance based on fast magnetic resonance imaging of cardiac and respiratory pulsatility.

    PubMed

    Bianciardi, Marta; Toschi, Nicola; Polimeni, Jonathan R; Evans, Karleyton C; Bhat, Himanshu; Keil, Boris; Rosen, Bruce R; Boas, David A; Wald, Lawrence L

    2016-05-13

    The influence of cardiac activity on the viscoelastic properties of intracranial tissue is one of the mechanisms through which brain-heart interactions take place, and is implicated in cerebrovascular disease. Cerebrovascular disease risk is not fully explained by current risk factors, including arterial compliance. Cerebrovascular compliance is currently estimated indirectly through Doppler sonography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measures of blood velocity changes. In order to meet the need for novel cerebrovascular disease risk factors, we aimed to design and validate an MRI indicator of cerebrovascular compliance based on direct endogenous measures of blood volume changes. We implemented a fast non-gated two-dimensional MRI pulse sequence based on echo-planar imaging (EPI) with ultra-short repetition time (approx. 30-50 ms), which stepped through slices every approximately 20 s. We constrained the solution of the Bloch equations for spins moving faster than a critical speed to produce an endogenous contrast primarily dependent on spin volume changes, and an approximately sixfold signal gain compared with Ernst angle acquisitions achieved by the use of a 90° flip angle. Using cardiac and respiratory peaks detected on physiological recordings, average cardiac and respiratory MRI pulse waveforms in several brain compartments were obtained at 7 Tesla, and used to derive a compliance indicator, the pulsatility volume index (pVI). The pVI, evaluated in larger cerebral arteries, displayed significant variation within and across vessels. Multi-echo EPI showed the presence of significant pulsatility effects in both S0 and [Formula: see text] signals, compatible with blood volume changes. Lastly, the pVI dynamically varied during breath-holding compared with normal breathing, as expected for a compliance indicator. In summary, we characterized and performed an initial validation of a novel MRI indicator of cerebrovascular compliance, which might prove useful

  5. Intraclass and between-class training-image registration for correlation-filter synthesis.

    PubMed

    Mahalanobis, A; Vijaya Kumar, B V; Frankot, R T

    2000-06-10

    Correlation filters have traditionally been designed without much attention given to the issue of the training images within a class or the relative spatial position between classes. We examine the impact of training-set registration on correlation-filter performance and develop techniques for centering the training images from a class that result in improved performance. We also show that it is beneficial to adjust the spatial position of the classes relative to one another. Although the proposed techniques are relevant for many types of correlation filter, we limit our discussion to algorithms for the maximum average correlation height filter and the distance classifier correlation filter. PMID:18345217

  6. Improved DMD configurations for image correlation. [deformable mirror devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Florence, James M.; Lin, Tsen-Hwang; Wu, Wen-Rong; Juday, Richard D.

    1990-01-01

    Two novel deformable mirror structures have been developed for spatial light modulators: an 'AM torsion beam' and a 'phase-mostly single-quadrant cantilever' beam. Both devices are well-suited to optical correlator input and filtering functions. Which the optical modulation characteristic of the torsion-beam modulator is essential amplitude only, which is well suited for use as the input modulator of the optical correlator, the characteristic of the one-quadrant modulator is a phase-mostly modulation whose amplitude changes are coupled to the phase changes; this renders it operable in the Fourier plane of the optical correlator as the filtering device.

  7. Method and apparatus for the simultaneous display and correlation of independently generated images

    DOEpatents

    Vaitekunas, Jeffrey J.; Roberts, Ronald A.

    1991-01-01

    An apparatus and method for location by location correlation of multiple images from Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) and other sources. Multiple images of a material specimen are displayed on one or more monitors of an interactive graphics system. Specimen landmarks are located in each image and mapping functions from a reference image to each other image are calcuated using the landmark locations. A location selected by positioning a cursor in the reference image is mapped to the other images and location identifiers are simultaneously displayed in those images. Movement of the cursor in the reference image causes simultaneous movement of the location identifiers in the other images to positions corresponding to the location of the reference image cursor.

  8. Correlation between subjective and objective assessment of magnetic resonance (MR) images.

    PubMed

    Chow, Li Sze; Rajagopal, Heshalini; Paramesran, Raveendran

    2016-07-01

    Medical Image Quality Assessment (IQA) plays an important role in assisting and evaluating the development of any new hardware, imaging sequences, pre-processing or post-processing algorithms. We have performed a quantitative analysis of the correlation between subjective and objective Full Reference - IQA (FR-IQA) on Magnetic Resonance (MR) images of the human brain, spine, knee and abdomen. We have created a MR image database that consists of 25 original reference images and 750 distorted images. The reference images were distorted with six types of distortions: Rician Noise, Gaussian White Noise, Gaussian Blur, DCT compression, JPEG compression and JPEG2000 compression, at various levels of distortion. Twenty eight subjects were chosen to evaluate the images resulting in a total of 21,700 human evaluations. The raw scores were then converted to Difference Mean Opinion Score (DMOS). Thirteen objective FR-IQA metrics were used to determine the validity of the subjective DMOS. The results indicate a high correlation between the subjective and objective assessment of the MR images. The Noise Quality Measurement (NQM) has the highest correlation with DMOS, where the mean Pearson Linear Correlation Coefficient (PLCC) and Spearman Rank Order Correlation Coefficient (SROCC) are 0.936 and 0.938 respectively. The Universal Quality Index (UQI) has the lowest correlation with DMOS, where the mean PLCC and SROCC are 0.807 and 0.815 respectively. Student's T-test was used to find the difference in performance of FR-IQA across different types of distortion. The superior IQAs tested statistically are UQI for Rician noise images, Visual Information Fidelity (VIF) for Gaussian blur images, NQM for both DCT and JPEG compressed images, Peak Signal-to-Noise Ratio (PSNR) for JPEG2000 compressed images. PMID:26969762

  9. Correlation between subjective and objective assessment of magnetic resonance (MR) images.

    PubMed

    Chow, Li Sze; Rajagopal, Heshalini; Paramesran, Raveendran

    2016-07-01

    Medical Image Quality Assessment (IQA) plays an important role in assisting and evaluating the development of any new hardware, imaging sequences, pre-processing or post-processing algorithms. We have performed a quantitative analysis of the correlation between subjective and objective Full Reference - IQA (FR-IQA) on Magnetic Resonance (MR) images of the human brain, spine, knee and abdomen. We have created a MR image database that consists of 25 original reference images and 750 distorted images. The reference images were distorted with six types of distortions: Rician Noise, Gaussian White Noise, Gaussian Blur, DCT compression, JPEG compression and JPEG2000 compression, at various levels of distortion. Twenty eight subjects were chosen to evaluate the images resulting in a total of 21,700 human evaluations. The raw scores were then converted to Difference Mean Opinion Score (DMOS). Thirteen objective FR-IQA metrics were used to determine the validity of the subjective DMOS. The results indicate a high correlation between the subjective and objective assessment of the MR images. The Noise Quality Measurement (NQM) has the highest correlation with DMOS, where the mean Pearson Linear Correlation Coefficient (PLCC) and Spearman Rank Order Correlation Coefficient (SROCC) are 0.936 and 0.938 respectively. The Universal Quality Index (UQI) has the lowest correlation with DMOS, where the mean PLCC and SROCC are 0.807 and 0.815 respectively. Student's T-test was used to find the difference in performance of FR-IQA across different types of distortion. The superior IQAs tested statistically are UQI for Rician noise images, Visual Information Fidelity (VIF) for Gaussian blur images, NQM for both DCT and JPEG compressed images, Peak Signal-to-Noise Ratio (PSNR) for JPEG2000 compressed images.

  10. SU-D-9A-01: Listmode-Driven Optimal Gating (OG) Respiratory Motion Management: Potential Impact On Quantitative PET Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K; Hristov, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the potential impact of listmode-driven amplitude based optimal gating (OG) respiratory motion management technique on quantitative PET imaging. Methods: During the PET acquisitions, an optical camera tracked and recorded the motion of a tool placed on top of patients' torso. PET event data were utilized to detect and derive a motion signal that is directly coupled with a specific internal organ. A radioactivity-trace was generated from listmode data by accumulating all prompt counts in temporal bins matching the sampling rate of the external tracking device. Decay correction for 18F was performed. The image reconstructions using OG respiratory motion management technique that uses 35% of total radioactivity counts within limited motion amplitudes were performed with external motion and radioactivity traces separately with ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM) with 2 iterations and 21 subsets. Standard uptake values (SUVs) in a tumor region were calculated to measure the effect of using radioactivity trace for motion compensation. Motion-blurred 3D static PET image was also reconstructed with all counts and the SUVs derived from OG images were compared with SUVs from 3D images. Results: A 5.7 % increase of the maximum SUV in the lesion was found for optimal gating image reconstruction with radioactivity trace when compared to a static 3D image. The mean and maximum SUVs on the image that was reconstructed with radioactivity trace were found comparable (0.4 % and 4.5 % increase, respectively) to the values derived from the image that was reconstructed with external trace. Conclusion: The image reconstructed using radioactivity trace showed that the blurring due to the motion was reduced with impact on derived SUVs. The resolution and contrast of the images reconstructed with radioactivity trace were comparable to the resolution and contrast of the images reconstructed with external respiratory traces. Research supported by Siemens.

  11. Correlation Analysis of TEM Images of Nanocrystal Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Micheel, Christine; Zanchet, Daniele; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2008-05-21

    Quantitative characterizataion of images of naocrystals and nanostructures is a challenging but important task. The development and optimization of methods for the construction of complex nanostructures rely on imaging techniques. Computer programs were developed to quantify TEM images of nanocrystal/DNA nanostructures, and results are presented for heterodimers annd trimers of gold nanocrystals. The programs presented here have also been used to analyze more complex trimers and tetramers linked by branched DNA, as well as for structures made from attaching gold nanocrystals to CdSe/ZnS core-shell quantum dots. This work has the additional goal of enabling others to quickly and easily adapt the methods for their own use.

  12. Respiratory motion correction in 4D-PET by simultaneous motion estimation and image reconstruction (SMEIR).

    PubMed

    Kalantari, Faraz; Li, Tianfang; Jin, Mingwu; Wang, Jing

    2016-08-01

    In conventional 4D positron emission tomography (4D-PET), images from different frames are reconstructed individually and aligned by registration methods. Two issues that arise with this approach are as follows: (1) the reconstruction algorithms do not make full use of projection statistics; and (2) the registration between noisy images can result in poor alignment. In this study, we investigated the use of simultaneous motion estimation and image reconstruction (SMEIR) methods for motion estimation/correction in 4D-PET. A modified ordered-subset expectation maximization algorithm coupled with total variation minimization (OSEM-TV) was used to obtain a primary motion-compensated PET (pmc-PET) from all projection data, using Demons derived deformation vector fields (DVFs) as initial motion vectors. A motion model update was performed to obtain an optimal set of DVFs in the pmc-PET and other phases, by matching the forward projection of the deformed pmc-PET with measured projections from other phases. The OSEM-TV image reconstruction was repeated using updated DVFs, and new DVFs were estimated based on updated images. A 4D-XCAT phantom with typical FDG biodistribution was generated to evaluate the performance of the SMEIR algorithm in lung and liver tumors with different contrasts and different diameters (10-40 mm). The image quality of the 4D-PET was greatly improved by the SMEIR algorithm. When all projections were used to reconstruct 3D-PET without motion compensation, motion blurring artifacts were present, leading up to 150% tumor size overestimation and significant quantitative errors, including 50% underestimation of tumor contrast and 59% underestimation of tumor uptake. Errors were reduced to less than 10% in most images by using the SMEIR algorithm, showing its potential in motion estimation/correction in 4D-PET. PMID:27385378

  13. Respiratory motion correction in 4D-PET by simultaneous motion estimation and image reconstruction (SMEIR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalantari, Faraz; Li, Tianfang; Jin, Mingwu; Wang, Jing

    2016-08-01

    In conventional 4D positron emission tomography (4D-PET), images from different frames are reconstructed individually and aligned by registration methods. Two issues that arise with this approach are as follows: (1) the reconstruction algorithms do not make full use of projection statistics; and (2) the registration between noisy images can result in poor alignment. In this study, we investigated the use of simultaneous motion estimation and image reconstruction (SMEIR) methods for motion estimation/correction in 4D-PET. A modified ordered-subset expectation maximization algorithm coupled with total variation minimization (OSEM-TV) was used to obtain a primary motion-compensated PET (pmc-PET) from all projection data, using Demons derived deformation vector fields (DVFs) as initial motion vectors. A motion model update was performed to obtain an optimal set of DVFs in the pmc-PET and other phases, by matching the forward projection of the deformed pmc-PET with measured projections from other phases. The OSEM-TV image reconstruction was repeated using updated DVFs, and new DVFs were estimated based on updated images. A 4D-XCAT phantom with typical FDG biodistribution was generated to evaluate the performance of the SMEIR algorithm in lung and liver tumors with different contrasts and different diameters (10-40 mm). The image quality of the 4D-PET was greatly improved by the SMEIR algorithm. When all projections were used to reconstruct 3D-PET without motion compensation, motion blurring artifacts were present, leading up to 150% tumor size overestimation and significant quantitative errors, including 50% underestimation of tumor contrast and 59% underestimation of tumor uptake. Errors were reduced to less than 10% in most images by using the SMEIR algorithm, showing its potential in motion estimation/correction in 4D-PET.

  14. Respiratory motion correction in 4D-PET by simultaneous motion estimation and image reconstruction (SMEIR).

    PubMed

    Kalantari, Faraz; Li, Tianfang; Jin, Mingwu; Wang, Jing

    2016-08-01

    In conventional 4D positron emission tomography (4D-PET), images from different frames are reconstructed individually and aligned by registration methods. Two issues that arise with this approach are as follows: (1) the reconstruction algorithms do not make full use of projection statistics; and (2) the registration between noisy images can result in poor alignment. In this study, we investigated the use of simultaneous motion estimation and image reconstruction (SMEIR) methods for motion estimation/correction in 4D-PET. A modified ordered-subset expectation maximization algorithm coupled with total variation minimization (OSEM-TV) was used to obtain a primary motion-compensated PET (pmc-PET) from all projection data, using Demons derived deformation vector fields (DVFs) as initial motion vectors. A motion model update was performed to obtain an optimal set of DVFs in the pmc-PET and other phases, by matching the forward projection of the deformed pmc-PET with measured projections from other phases. The OSEM-TV image reconstruction was repeated using updated DVFs, and new DVFs were estimated based on updated images. A 4D-XCAT phantom with typical FDG biodistribution was generated to evaluate the performance of the SMEIR algorithm in lung and liver tumors with different contrasts and different diameters (10-40 mm). The image quality of the 4D-PET was greatly improved by the SMEIR algorithm. When all projections were used to reconstruct 3D-PET without motion compensation, motion blurring artifacts were present, leading up to 150% tumor size overestimation and significant quantitative errors, including 50% underestimation of tumor contrast and 59% underestimation of tumor uptake. Errors were reduced to less than 10% in most images by using the SMEIR algorithm, showing its potential in motion estimation/correction in 4D-PET.

  15. Respiratory motion correction in 4D-PET by simultaneous motion estimation and image reconstruction (SMEIR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalantari, Faraz; Li, Tianfang; Jin, Mingwu; Wang, Jing

    2016-08-01

    In conventional 4D positron emission tomography (4D-PET), images from different frames are reconstructed individually and aligned by registration methods. Two issues that arise with this approach are as follows: (1) the reconstruction algorithms do not make full use of projection statistics; and (2) the registration between noisy images can result in poor alignment. In this study, we investigated the use of simultaneous motion estimation and image reconstruction (SMEIR) methods for motion estimation/correction in 4D-PET. A modified ordered-subset expectation maximization algorithm coupled with total variation minimization (OSEM-TV) was used to obtain a primary motion-compensated PET (pmc-PET) from all projection data, using Demons derived deformation vector fields (DVFs) as initial motion vectors. A motion model update was performed to obtain an optimal set of DVFs in the pmc-PET and other phases, by matching the forward projection of the deformed pmc-PET with measured projections from other phases. The OSEM-TV image reconstruction was repeated using updated DVFs, and new DVFs were estimated based on updated images. A 4D-XCAT phantom with typical FDG biodistribution was generated to evaluate the performance of the SMEIR algorithm in lung and liver tumors with different contrasts and different diameters (10–40 mm). The image quality of the 4D-PET was greatly improved by the SMEIR algorithm. When all projections were used to reconstruct 3D-PET without motion compensation, motion blurring artifacts were present, leading up to 150% tumor size overestimation and significant quantitative errors, including 50% underestimation of tumor contrast and 59% underestimation of tumor uptake. Errors were reduced to less than 10% in most images by using the SMEIR algorithm, showing its potential in motion estimation/correction in 4D-PET.

  16. Impact of CT CORRELATE ScoutView images on radiation therapy planning

    SciTech Connect

    Shuman, W.P.; Griffin, B.R.; Yoshy, C.S.; Listerud, J.A.; Mack, L.A.; Rowberg, A.H.; Moss, A.A.

    1985-09-01

    CORRELATE is a new computer software program for CT that enables a radiologist to mark tumor margins on traditional CT cross-sectional images and then display the outline of that same tumor on CT ScoutView images. This function is particularly useful for radiation therapy planning because CORRELATE ScoutView images are in the same longitudinal plane as simulation radiographs used for tumor localization in radiation therapy. The impact of CORRELATE on the radiation therapy planning process was measured in 83 patients with various tumors. Therapy planning was performed before and after CORRELATE information was made available to the radiation therapist. CORRELATE information caused a change in the therapy plan in 77% of the cases and increased confidence in the therapy plan in an additional 22%. CORRELATE provides a useful and accurate tool for tumor localization.

  17. Mechanical assessment of bovine pericardium using Müeller matrix imaging, enhanced backscattering and digital image correlation analysis.

    PubMed

    Cuando-Espitia, Natanael; Sánchez-Arévalo, Francisco; Hernández-Cordero, Juan

    2015-08-01

    Mechanical characterization of tissue is an important but complex task. We demonstrate the simultaneous use of Mueller matrix imaging (MMI), enhanced backscattering (EBS) and digital image correlation (DIC) in a bovine pericardium (BP) tensile test. The interest in BP relies on its wide use as valve replacement and biological patch. We show that the mean free path (MFP), obtained through EBS measurements, can be used as an indicator of the anisotropy of the fiber ensemble. Our results further show a good correlation between retardance images and displacement vector fields, which are intrinsically related with the fiber interaction within the tissue. PMID:26309759

  18. Dynamics of respiratory and cardiac CSF motion revealed with real-time simultaneous multi-slice EPI velocity phase contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liyong; Beckett, Alexander; Verma, Ajay; Feinberg, David A

    2015-11-15

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dynamics have been mostly studied with cardiac-gated phase contrast MRI combining signal from many cardiac cycles to create cine-phase sampling of one time-averaged cardiac cycle. The relative effects of cardiac and respiratory changes on CSF movement are not well understood. There is possible respiration-driven movement of CSF in ventricles, cisterns, and subarachnoid spaces which has not been characterized with velocity measurements. To date, commonly used cine-phase contrast techniques of velocity imaging inherently cannot detect respiratory velocity changes since cardiac-gated data acquired over several minutes randomizes respiratory phase contributions. We have developed an extremely fast, real-time, and quantitative MRI technique to image CSF velocity in simultaneous multi-slice (SMS) echo planar imaging (EPI) acquisitions of 3 or 6 slice levels simultaneously over 30s and observe 3D spatial distributions of CSF velocity. Measurements were made in 10 subjects utilizing a respiratory belt to record respiratory phases and visual cues to instruct subjects on breathing rates. A protocol is able to measure velocity within regions of brain and basal cisterns covered with 24 axial slices in 4 minutes, repeated for 3 velocity directions. These measurements were performed throughout the whole brain, rather than in selected line regions so that a global view of CSF dynamics could be visualized. Observations of cardiac and breathing-driven CSF dynamics show bidirectional respiratory motion occurs primarily along the central axis through the basal cisterns and intraventricular passageways and to a lesser extent in the peripheral Sylvian fissure with little CSF motion present in subarachnoid spaces. During inspiration phase, there is upward (inferior to superior) CSF movement into the cranial cavity and lateral ventricles and a reversal of direction in expiration phase.

  19. Optical authentication via photon-synthesized ghost imaging using optical nonlinear correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wen; Chen, Xudong

    2015-10-01

    We present a method for optical authentication via photon-synthesized ghost imaging using optical nonlinear correlation. In ghost imaging, multiple series of photons recorded at the object beam arm can be arbitrarily controlled for the generation of synthesized objects. Ghost imaging with sparse reference intensity patterns provides a channel to effectively modulate the noise-like synthesized objects during the recovery, and the reconstructed (noise-like) objects, i.e., added or subtracted information, can be further authenticated by optical nonlinear correlation algorithm. It is expected that the proposed method can provide an effective and promising alternative for ghost-imaging-based optical processing.

  20. Imaging Hidden Objects with Spatial Speckle Intensity Correlations over Object Position

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Jason A.; Luo, Qiaoen; Webb, Kevin J.

    2016-02-01

    We present a coherent optical method for wavelength-resolution imaging of moving objects hidden within thick randomly scattering media. Spatial speckle intensity correlations as a function of object position are shown to provide access to the spatially dependent dielectric constant of the moving object. This speckle correlation imaging method yields field-based information previously inaccessible in heavily scattering environments. Proof of concept experimental results show excellent agreement with the theory. This new imaging approach will be valuable in high resolution imaging in tissue and other scattering environments where natural motion occurs or the object position can be controlled.

  1. Nanoparticle flow velocimetry with image phase correlation for confocal laser scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, Brian H.; Giarra, Matthew; Yang, Haisheng; Main, Russell; Vlachos, Pavlos P.

    2016-10-01

    We present a new particle image correlation technique for resolving nanoparticle flow velocity using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The two primary issues that complicate nanoparticle scanning laser image correlation (SLIC)-based velocimetry are (1) the use of diffusion-dominated nanoparticles as flow tracers, which introduce a random decorrelating error into the velocity estimate, and (2) the effects of the scanning laser image acquisition, which introduces a bias error. To date, no study has quantified these errors or demonstrated a means to deal with them in SLIC velocimetry. In this work, we build upon the robust phase correlation (RPC) and existing methods of SLIC to quantify and mitigate these errors. First, we implement an ensemble RPC instead of using an ensemble standard cross-correlation, and develop a SLIC optimal filter that maximizes the correlation strength in order to reliably and accurately detect the correlation peak representing the most probable average displacement of the nanoparticles. Secondly, we developed an analytical model of the SLIC measurement bias error due to image scanning of diffusion-dominated tracer particles. We show that the bias error depends only on the ratio of the mean velocity of the tracer particles to that of the laser scanner and we use this model to correct the induced errors. We validated our technique using synthetic images and experimentally obtained SLIC images of nanoparticle flow through a micro-channel. Our technique reduced the error by up to a factor of ten compared to other SLIC algorithms for the images tested in this study. Moreover, our optimized RPC filter reduces the number of image pairs required for the convergence of the ensemble correlation by two orders of magnitude compared to the standard cross correlation. This feature has broader implications to ensemble correlation methods and should be further explored in depth in the future.

  2. Detection and correction of blinking bias in image correlation transport measurements of quantum dot tagged macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Durisic, Nela; Bachir, Alexia I; Kolin, David L; Hebert, Benedict; Lagerholm, B Christoffer; Grutter, Peter; Wiseman, Paul W

    2007-08-15

    Semiconductor nanocrystals or quantum dots (QDs) are becoming widely used as fluorescent labels for biological applications. Here we demonstrate that fluorescence fluctuation analysis of their diffusional mobility using temporal image correlation spectroscopy is highly susceptible to systematic errors caused by fluorescence blinking of the nanoparticles. Temporal correlation analysis of fluorescence microscopy image time series of streptavidin-functionalized (CdSe)ZnS QDs freely diffusing in two dimensions shows that the correlation functions are fit well to a commonly used diffusion decay model, but the transport coefficients can have significant systematic errors in the measurements due to blinking. Image correlation measurements of the diffusing QD samples measured at different laser excitation powers and analysis of computer simulated image time series verified that the effect we observe is caused by fluorescence intermittency. We show that reciprocal space image correlation analysis can be used for mobility measurements in the presence of blinking emission because it separates the contributions of fluctuations due to photophysics from those due to transport. We also demonstrate application of the image correlation methods for measurement of the diffusion coefficient of glycosyl phosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins tagged with QDs as imaged on living fibroblasts.

  3. Detection of correlated fragments in a sequence of images by superimposed Fourier holograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, A. V.

    2016-08-01

    The problem of detecting correlated fragments in a sequence of images recorded by the superimposing holograms within the Fourier holography scheme with angular multiplication of a spatially modulated reference beam is considered. The approach to the solution of this problem is based on the properties of the variance of the image sum. It is shown that this problem can be solved by providing a constant distance between the signal and reference images when recording superimposed holograms and a partial mutual correlatedness of reference images. The detection efficiency is analysed from the point of view of estimated image data capacity, the degree of mutual correlation of reference images, and the hologram recording conditions. The results of a numerical experiment under the most complicated conditions (representation of images by realisations of homogeneous random fields) confirm the theoretical conclusions.

  4. Implementation of a direct-imaging and FX correlator for the BEST-2 array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, G.; Hickish, J.; Magro, A.; Price, D.; Zarb Adami, K.

    2014-04-01

    A new digital backend has been developed for the Basic Element for SKA Training II (BEST-2) array at Radiotelescopi di Medicina, INAF-IRA, Italy, which allows concurrent operation of an FX correlator, and a direct-imaging correlator and beamformer. This backend serves as a platform for testing some of the spatial Fourier transform concepts which have been proposed for use in computing correlations on regularly gridded arrays. While spatial Fourier transform-based beamformers have been implemented previously, this is, to our knowledge, the first time a direct-imaging correlator has been deployed on a radio astronomy array. Concurrent observations with the FX and direct-imaging correlator allow for direct comparison between the two architectures. Additionally, we show the potential of the direct-imaging correlator for time-domain astronomy, by passing a subset of beams though a pulsar and transient detection pipeline. These results provide a timely verification for spatial Fourier transform-based instruments that are currently in commissioning. These instruments aim to detect highly redshifted hydrogen from the epoch of reionization and/or to perform wide-field surveys for time-domain studies of the radio sky. We experimentally show the direct-imaging correlator architecture to be a viable solution for correlation and beamforming.

  5. Correlated atomic force microscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging of live bacterial cells.

    PubMed

    Micic, Miodrag; Hu, Dehong; Suh, Yung Doug; Newton, Greg; Romine, Margaret; Lu, H Peter

    2004-04-15

    We report on imaging living bacterial cells by using a correlated tapping-mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) and confocal fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). For optimal imaging of Gram-negative Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 cells, we explored different methods of bacterial sample preparation, such as spreading the cells on poly-L-lysine coated surfaces or agarose gel coated surfaces. We have found that the agarose gel containing 99% ammonium acetate buffer can provide sufficient local aqueous environment for single bacterial cells. Furthermore, the cell surface topography can be characterized by tapping-mode in-air AFM imaging for the single bacterial cells that are partially embedded. Using in-air rather than under-water AFM imaging of the living cells significantly enhanced the contrast and signal-to-noise ratio of the AFM images. Near-field AFM-tip-enhanced fluorescence lifetime imaging (AFM-FLIM) holds high promise on obtaining fluorescence images beyond optical diffraction limited spatial resolution. We have previously demonstrated near-field AFM-FLIM imaging of polymer beads beyond diffraction limited spatial resolution. Here, as the first step of applying AFM-FLIM on imaging bacterial living cells, we demonstrated a correlated and consecutive AFM topographic imaging, fluorescence intensity imaging, and FLIM imaging of living bacterial cells to characterize cell polarity.

  6. Correlated Atomic Force Microscopy and Flourescence Lifetime Imaging of Live Bacterial Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Micic, Miodrag; Hu, Dehong; Suh, Yung D.; Newton, Greg J.; Romine, Margaret F.; Lu, H PETER.

    2004-04-01

    We report on the imaging of living bacterial cells by using a new correlated tapping-mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) and confocal al fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). Different methods of preparing the bacterial sample were explored for optimal imaging of Gram-negative Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 cells on poly-1-lysine coated surfaces and agarose gel coated surfaces. We have found that the agarose gel containing 99% buffer can provide a local aqueous environment for single bacterial cells. Furthermore, the cell surface topography can be characterized by tapping-mode in-air AFM imaging for the single bacterial cells that are partially embedded. Using in-air rather than under-water AFM imaging of the living cells significantly enhanced the contrast and single-to-noise ration of the AFM images. Near-field AFM-tip enhanced fluorescence lifetime imaging (AFM-FLIM) holds great promise for obtaining fluorescence images beyond the optical diffraction limited spatial resolution. We have previously demonstrated near-field AFM-FLIM imaging of polymer beads beyond the diffraction limited spatial resolution. Here, as the first step of applying AFM-FLIM on imaging living bacterial cells, we demonstrate a correlated and consecutive AFM topographic imaging, fluorescence intensity imaging, and FLIM imaging to characterize cell polarity.

  7. On the loss-of-correlation due to PIV image noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharnowski, Sven; Kähler, Christian J.

    2016-07-01

    The effect of image noise on the uncertainty of velocity fields measured with particle image velocimetry (PIV) is still an unsolved problem. Image noise reduces the correlation signal and thus affects the estimation of the particle image displacement. However, a systematic quantification of the effect of the noise level on the loss-of-correlation is missing. In this work, a new method is proposed to estimate the loss-of-correlation due to image noise F_{σ } from the autocorrelation function of PIV images. Furthermore, a new definition of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for PIV images is suggested, which results in a bijective relation between F_{σ } and SNR. Based on the newly defined SNR, it becomes possible to estimate the signal level and the noise level itself. The presented method is very general because the estimation of F_{σ } and SNR works independently of various parameters, including the particle image intensity, the particle image density, the particle image size, the image noise distributions and the laser light-sheet profile. The findings lead to an extension of the fundamental PIV equation N=NI FI FO F_{Δ } and enable PIV users to optimize their measurement setup with respect to the image noise and not only based on the loss-of-correlation due to in-plane motion, out-of-plane motion and displacement gradients. Furthermore, the new definition of SNR allows for a characterization and comparison of PIV images. The new approaches are validated by using synthetic images, and the predictions are confirmed by using experimental data.

  8. Renal cell carcinoma: histological classification and correlation with imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Muglia, Valdair F; Prando, Adilson

    2015-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the seventh most common histological type of cancer in the Western world and has shown a sustained increase in its prevalence. The histological classification of RCCs is of utmost importance, considering the significant prognostic and therapeutic implications of its histological subtypes. Imaging methods play an outstanding role in the diagnosis, staging and follow-up of RCC. Clear cell, papillary and chromophobe are the most common histological subtypes of RCC, and their preoperative radiological characterization, either followed or not by confirmatory percutaneous biopsy, may be particularly useful in cases of poor surgical condition, metastatic disease, central mass in a solitary kidney, and in patients eligible for molecular targeted therapy. New strategies recently developed for treating renal cancer, such as cryo and radiofrequency ablation, molecularly targeted therapy and active surveillance also require appropriate preoperative characterization of renal masses. Less common histological types, although sharing nonspecific imaging features, may be suspected on the basis of clinical and epidemiological data. The present study is aimed at reviewing the main clinical and imaging findings of histological RCC subtypes.

  9. Optical correlator method and apparatus for particle image velocimetry processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrell, Patrick V. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Young's fringes are produced from a double exposure image of particles in a flowing fluid by passing laser light through the film and projecting the light onto a screen. A video camera receives the image from the screen and controls a spatial light modulator. The spatial modulator has a two dimensional array of cells the transmissiveness of which are controlled in relation to the brightness of the corresponding pixel of the video camera image of the screen. A collimated beam of laser light is passed through the spatial light modulator to produce a diffraction pattern which is focused onto another video camera, with the output of the camera being digitized and provided to a microcomputer. The diffraction pattern formed when the laser light is passed through the spatial light modulator and is focused to a point corresponds to the two dimensional Fourier transform of the Young's fringe pattern projected onto the screen. The data obtained fro This invention was made with U.S. Government support awarded by the Department of the Army (DOD) and NASA grand number(s): DOD #DAAL03-86-K0174 and NASA #NAG3-718. The U.S. Government has certain rights in this invention.

  10. Field methods to measure surface displacement and strain with the Video Image Correlation method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddux, Gary A.; Horton, Charles M.; Mcneill, Stephen R.; Lansing, Matthew D.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this project was to develop methods and application procedures to measure displacement and strain fields during the structural testing of aerospace components using paint speckle in conjunction with the Video Image Correlation (VIC) system.

  11. Application of Digital Image Correlation Method to Improve the Accuracy of Aerial Photo Stitching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, Shih-Heng; Jhou, You-Liang; Shih, Ming-Hsiang; Hsiao, Han-Wei; Sung, Wen-Pei

    2016-04-01

    Satellite images and traditional aerial photos have been used in remote sensing for a long time. However, there are some problems with these images. For example, the resolution of satellite image is insufficient, the cost to obtain traditional images is relatively high and there is also human safety risk in traditional flight. These result in the application limitation of these images. In recent years, the control technology of unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) is rapidly developed. This makes unmanned aerial vehicle widely used in obtaining aerial photos. Compared to satellite images and traditional aerial photos, these aerial photos obtained using UAV have the advantages of higher resolution, low cost. Because there is no crew in UAV, it is still possible to take aerial photos using UAV under unstable weather conditions. Images have to be orthorectified and their distortion must be corrected at first. Then, with the help of image matching technique and control points, these images can be stitched or used to establish DEM of ground surface. These images or DEM data can be used to monitor the landslide or estimate the volume of landslide. For the image matching, we can use such as Harris corner method, SIFT or SURF to extract and match feature points. However, the accuracy of these methods for matching is about pixel or sub-pixel level. The accuracy of digital image correlation method (DIC) during image matching can reach about 0.01pixel. Therefore, this study applies digital image correlation method to match extracted feature points. Then the stitched images are observed to judge the improvement situation. This study takes the aerial photos of a reservoir area. These images are stitched under the situations with and without the help of DIC. The results show that the misplacement situation in the stitched image using DIC to match feature points has been significantly improved. This shows that the use of DIC to match feature points can actually improve the accuracy of

  12. In Vivo Flow Mapping in Complex Vessel Networks by Single Image Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Sironi, Laura; Bouzin, Margaux; Inverso, Donato; D'Alfonso, Laura; Pozzi, Paolo; Cotelli, Franco; Guidotti, Luca G.; Iannacone, Matteo; Collini, Maddalena; Chirico, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    We describe a novel method (FLICS, FLow Image Correlation Spectroscopy) to extract flow speeds in complex vessel networks from a single raster-scanned optical xy-image, acquired in vivo by confocal or two-photon excitation microscopy. Fluorescent flowing objects produce diagonal lines in the raster-scanned image superimposed to static morphological details. The flow velocity is obtained by computing the Cross Correlation Function (CCF) of the intensity fluctuations detected in pairs of columns of the image. The analytical expression of the CCF has been derived by applying scanning fluorescence correlation concepts to drifting optically resolved objects and the theoretical framework has been validated in systems of increasing complexity. The power of the technique is revealed by its application to the intricate murine hepatic microcirculatory system where blood flow speed has been mapped simultaneously in several capillaries from a single xy-image and followed in time at high spatial and temporal resolution. PMID:25475129

  13. Submaximal delayed-onset muscle soreness: correlations between MR imaging findings and clinical measures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, G. F.; Haller, R. G.; Wyrick, P. S.; Parkey, R. W.; Fleckenstein, J. L.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess correlations between muscle edema on magnetic resonance (MR) images and clinical indexes of muscle injury in delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) produced by submaximal exercise protocols. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Sixteen subjects performed 36 elbow flexions ("biceps curls") at one of two submaximal workloads that emphasized eccentric contractions. Changes in MR imaging findings, plasma levels of creatine kinase, and pain scores were correlated. RESULTS: Both exercise protocols produced DOMS in all subjects. The best correlation was between change in creatine kinase level and volume of muscle edema on MR images, regardless of the workload. Correlations tended to be better with the easier exercise protocol. CONCLUSION: Whereas many previous studies of DOMS focused on intense exercise protocols to ensure positive results, the present investigation showed that submaximal workloads are adequate to produce DOMS and that correlations between conventionally measured indexes of injury may be enhanced at lighter exercise intensities.

  14. Imaging Three Dimensional Two-Particle Correlations for Heavy-Ion Reaction Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D; Enokizono, A; Heffner, M; Soltz, R; Danielewicz, P; Pratt, S

    2005-06-27

    The authors report an extension of the source imaging method for analyzing three-dimensional sources from three-dimensional correlations. The technique consists of expanding the correlation data and the underlying source function in spherical harmonics and inverting the resulting system of one-dimensional integral equations. With this strategy, they can image the source function quickly, even with the extremely large data sets common in three-dimensional analyses.

  15. Improving signal-to-noise ratio performance of compressive imaging based on spatial correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Tianyi; Chen, Qian; He, Weiji; Zou, Yunhao; Dai, Huidong; Gu, Guohua

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, compressive imaging based on spatial correlation (CISC), which uses second-order correlation with the measurement matrix, is introduced to improve the signal-to-noise ratio performance of compressive imaging (CI). Numerical simulations and experiments are performed as well. Referred to the results, it can be seen that CISC performs much better than CI in three common noise environments. This provides the great opportunity to pave the way for real applications.

  16. Color night vision method based on the correlation between natural color and dual band night image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yi; Bai, Lian-fa; Zhang, Chuang; Chen, Qian; Gu, Guo-hua

    2009-07-01

    Color night vision technology can effectively improve the detection and identification probability. Current color night vision method based on gray scale modulation fusion, spectrum field fusion, special component fusion and world famous NRL method, TNO method will bring about serious color distortion, and the observers will be visual tired after long time observation. Alexander Toet of TNO Human Factors presents a method to fuse multiband night image a natural day time color appearance, but it need the true color image of the scene to be observed. In this paper we put forward a color night vision method based on the correlation between natural color image and dual band night image. Color display is attained through dual-band low light level images and their fusion image. Actual color image of the similar scene is needed to obtain color night vision image, the actual color image is decomposed to three gray-scale images of RGB color module, and the short wave LLL image, long wave LLL image and their fusion image are compared to them through gray-scale spatial correlation method, and the color space mapping scheme is confirmed by correlation. Gray-scale LLL images and their fusion image are adjusted through the variation of HSI color space coefficient, and the coefficient matrix is built. Color display coefficient matrix of LLL night vision system is obtained by multiplying the above coefficient matrix and RGB color space mapping matrix. Emulation experiments on general scene dual-band color night vision indicate that the color display effect is approving. This method was experimented on dual channel dual spectrum LLL color night vision experimental apparatus based on Texas Instruments digital video processing device DM642.

  17. Imaging of spatial correlations of two-photon states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobrov, Ivan B.; Kalashnikov, Dmitry A.; Krivitsky, Leonid A.

    2014-04-01

    We use a fiber-based double-slit Young interferometer for studying the far-field spatial distribution of the two-photon coincidence rate (coincidence pattern) for various quantum states with different degree of spatial entanglement. The realized experimental approach allows us to characterize coincidence patterns for different states without any modifications of the setup. Measurements were carried out with path-entangled and separable states. The dependence of the coincidence pattern on the phase of the interferometer for superposition and separable states was studied. The results have implications for using of nonclassical light in multiphoton imaging, quantum lithography, and studies of phase decoherence.

  18. Characterization of serum platelet-activating factor (PAF) acetylhydrolase. Correlation between deficiency of serum PAF acetylhydrolase and respiratory symptoms in asthmatic children.

    PubMed Central

    Miwa, M; Miyake, T; Yamanaka, T; Sugatani, J; Suzuki, Y; Sakata, S; Araki, Y; Matsumoto, M

    1988-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) acetylhydrolase has been recognized as an enzyme that inactivates PAF. We developed a convenient and reproducible method for determining human serum PAF acetylhydrolase activity. The assay was based on measurement of [14C]acetate produced from 1-O-alkyl-2-[14C]-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine upon precipitation of the complex of radioactive substrate and albumin with TCA. The apparent Km value of PAF acetylhydrolase (near the physiological concentration of serum protein) was 1.5 X 10(-4) M PAF. 32 subjects with serum PAF acetylhydrolase deficiency were found among 816 healthy Japanese adults. The low PAF acetylhydrolase activity in the deficient serum might not be due to the presence of enzyme inhibitor. Both the sensitivity to PAF and the metabolism of PAF in platelets from PAF acetylhydrolase-deficient subjects were almost the same as those of normal subjects. Deficiency in serum PAF acetylhydrolase appeared to be transmitted by autosomal recessive heredity among five Japanese families. Among healthy adults, healthy children, and asthmatic children, who were grouped into five classes on the basis of respiratory symptoms (remission, wheezy, mild, moderate, and severe groups), the probability of PAF acetylhydrolase deficiency was significantly higher in groups with severe symptoms (moderate and severe) (P less than 0.01). These results suggest that deficiency of serum PAF acetylhydrolase might be one of the factors leading to severe respiratory symptoms in asthmatic children. Images PMID:3198761

  19. A vehicle threat detection system using correlation analysis and synthesized x-ray images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yufeng; Elmaghraby, Adel

    2013-06-01

    The goal of the proposed research is to automate the vehicle threat detection with X-ray images when a vehicle crosses the country border or the gateway of a secured facility (military base). The proposed detection system requires two inputs: probe images (from X-ray machine) and gallery images (from database). For each vehicle, the gallery images include the X-ray images of fully-loaded (with typical cargo) and unloaded (empty) vehicle. The proposed system produces two types of outputs for threat detection: the detected anomalies and the synthesized images (e.g., grayscale fusion, color fusion, and differential images). The anomalies are automatically detected with the block-wise correlation analysis between two temporally aligned images (probe versus gallery). The locations of detected anomalies can be marked with small rectangles on the probe X-ray images. The several side-view images can be combined into one fused image in gray scale and in colors (color fusion) that provides more comprehensive information to the operator. The fused images are suitable for human analysis and decision. We analyzed a set of vehicle X-ray images, which consists of 4 images generated from AS and E OmniView Gantry™. The preliminary results of detected anomalies and synthesized images are very promising; meanwhile the processing speed is very fast.

  20. Correlation of diagnostic ultrasound and radionuclide imaging in scrotal disease

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, D.C.P.; Holder, L.E.; Kaplan, G.N.

    1984-01-01

    A retrospective study was performed to evaluate the usefulness of scrotal ultrasound imaging (SU) and radionuclide scrotal imaging (RSI) in 43 patients (pts), age: 16-75. Twenty-two of them complained of scrotal pain; 18 had a scrotal mass; and 4 had a history of trauma. The final diagnoses were conformed by surgery (n = 21) and long-term follow-up (n = 22) and included 4 late phase and 1 early testicular torsion (TT), 11 acute epididymitis (AE), 4 subacute epididymitis (SE), 5 malignant tumors, 3 testicular atrophy, 2 intratesticular hematomas, 10 hydroceles or other cystic lesions, and miscellaneous. In pts with scrotal pain, 3/4 with late phase TT were correctly diagnosed, while one pt with early TT and 11/15 with AE or SE were not diagnosed by SU. All of them were correctly diagnosed with RSI except one with scrotal cyst. SU was able to separate cystic masses (n = 10) from solid masses (n = 6), but cannot separate malignant from benign lesions. SU was excellent in detecting 19 hydroceles and 2 intratesticular hematomas, while 3 lesions < 1 cm. were not seen in RSI. The authors concluded that SU is useful in pts with scrotal mass to separate solid from cystic lesions. However, SU is unable to differentiate the acute epididymitis from early testicular torsion. In pts with acute scrotal pain, SU is not helpful and RSI should still be the first study performed.

  1. Correlative nanoscale imaging of actin filaments and their complexes

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Huanqi; Grintsevich, Elena E.; Reisler, Emil

    2014-01-01

    Actin remodeling is an area of interest in biology in which correlative microscopy can bring a new way to analyze protein complexes at the nanoscale. Advances in EM, X-ray diffraction, fluorescence, and single molecule techniques have provided a wealth of information about the modulation of the F-actin structure and its regulation by actin binding proteins (ABPs). Yet, there are technological limitations of these approaches to achieving quantitative molecular level information on the structural and biophysical changes resulting from ABPs interaction with F-actin. Fundamental questions about the actin structure and dynamics and how these determine the function of ABPs remain unanswered. Specifically, how local and long-range structural and conformational changes result in ABPs induced remodeling of F-actin needs to be addressed at the single filament level. Advanced, sensitive and accurate experimental tools for detailed understanding of ABP–actin interactions are much needed. This article discusses the current understanding of nanoscale structural and mechanical modulation of F-actin by ABPs at the single filament level using several correlative microscopic techniques, focusing mainly on results obtained by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) analysis of ABP–actin complexes. PMID:23727693

  2. Correlative nanoscale imaging of actin filaments and their complexes.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Shivani; Zhu, Huanqi; Grintsevich, Elena E; Reisler, Emil; Gimzewski, James K

    2013-07-01

    Actin remodeling is an area of interest in biology in which correlative microscopy can bring a new way to analyze protein complexes at the nanoscale. Advances in EM, X-ray diffraction, fluorescence, and single molecule techniques have provided a wealth of information about the modulation of the F-actin structure and its regulation by actin binding proteins (ABPs). Yet, there are technological limitations of these approaches to achieving quantitative molecular level information on the structural and biophysical changes resulting from ABPs interaction with F-actin. Fundamental questions about the actin structure and dynamics and how these determine the function of ABPs remain unanswered. Specifically, how local and long-range structural and conformational changes result in ABPs induced remodeling of F-actin needs to be addressed at the single filament level. Advanced, sensitive and accurate experimental tools for detailed understanding of ABP-actin interactions are much needed. This article discusses the current understanding of nanoscale structural and mechanical modulation of F-actin by ABPs at the single filament level using several correlative microscopic techniques, focusing mainly on results obtained by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) analysis of ABP-actin complexes.

  3. Parameters of nasal airway anatomy on magnetic resonance imaging correlate poorly with subjective symptoms of nasal patency.

    PubMed

    Saunders, M W; Jones, N S; Kabala, J E

    1999-09-01

    Forty-four patients undergoing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) head scans for non-nasal disease were asked to complete a questionnaire immediately after the scan. Subjective patency was scored for each nasal airway, patients were also asked about other nasal symptoms, hay fever, upper respiratory tract infections, medication and any history of nasal surgery or trauma. The following measurements from MRI scans were made: the cross-sectional area of the nasal airway at the anterior end of the middle turbinate, the horizontal width of the inferior turbinate and maximum septal mucosal thickness. In addition the presence of any septal deviation and the thickness or the mucosa of the paranasal sinuses was assessed. Correlation between subjective airway patency and the anatomical parameters studied was generally very weak. However, patients with sinus mucosal thickening on MRI scanning had significantly lower subjective patency scores (left P = 0.003, right P = 0.029) for both nasal airways. Assessment of the nasal airway on MRI correlates poorly with symptoms of nasal obstruction. However, patients with sinus mucosal thickening (> 5 mm) had significantly more symptoms of nasal obstruction on both sides.

  4. Onboard utilization of ground control points for image correction. Volume 4: Correlation analysis software design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The software utilized for image correction accuracy measurement is described. The correlation analysis program is written to allow the user various tools to analyze different correlation algorithms. The algorithms were tested using LANDSAT imagery in two different spectral bands. Three classification algorithms are implemented.

  5. Fatigue Crack Closure Analysis Using Digital Image Correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leser, William P.; Newman, John A.; Johnston, William M.

    2010-01-01

    Fatigue crack closure during crack growth testing is analyzed in order to evaluate the critieria of ASTM Standard E647 for measurement of fatigue crack growth rates. Of specific concern is remote closure, which occurs away from the crack tip and is a product of the load history during crack-driving-force-reduction fatigue crack growth testing. Crack closure behavior is characterized using relative displacements determined from a series of high-magnification digital images acquired as the crack is loaded. Changes in the relative displacements of features on opposite sides of the crack are used to generate crack closure data as a function of crack wake position. For the results presented in this paper, remote closure did not affect fatigue crack growth rate measurements when ASTM Standard E647 was strictly followed and only became a problem when testing parameters (e.g., load shed rate, initial crack driving force, etc.) greatly exceeded the guidelines of the accepted standard.

  6. Personality and individual difference correlates of positive body image.

    PubMed

    Swami, Viren; Hadji-Michael, Maria; Furnham, Adrian

    2008-09-01

    In the present study, 101 women and 106 men from a community sample of British adults completed the Body Appreciation Scale (BAS), along with a battery of individual difference measures and demographics. Contrary to previous findings, there were no sex differences in BAS scores, either before or after controlling for individual differences in other measures. The results also showed that, moderating for participants' sex, self-assessed attractiveness, educational qualifications, neuroticism, extraversion, and BMI were all significant predictors of body appreciation. In addition, higher media consumption and higher (male-stereotypic) instrumentality were associated with, but did not predict, higher body appreciation. These results are discussed in relation to the extant work on body image.

  7. Disorders of Microtubule Function in Neurons: Imaging Correlates

    PubMed Central

    Mutch, Christopher A.; Poduri, Annapurdi; Sahin, Mustafa; Barry, Brenda; Walsh, Christopher A.; Barkovich, A. James

    2015-01-01

    Background and Significance A number of recent studies have described malformations of cortical development with mutations of components of microtubules and microtubule-associated proteins. Despite examinations of large numbers of MRIs, good phenotype-genotype correlations have been elusive. Additionally, most of these studies focused exclusively on cerebral cortical findings. Materials and Methods MRIs from18 patients with confirmed tubulin mutations (8 TUBA1A, 5 TUBB2B, and 5 TUBB3) and 15 patients with known mutations of the genes encoding microtubule-associated proteins (5 LIS1, 4 DCX, and 6 DYNC1H1) were carefully visually analyzed and compared. Specific note was made of cortical gyral pattern, basal ganglia and white matter to assess internal capsular size, cortical thickness, ventricular and cisternal size, and size and contours of the brain stem, cerebellar hemispheres and vermis, and the corpus callosum of patients with tubulin and microtubule-associated protein gene mutations. Results were determined by unanimous consensus of the authors. Results All patients had abnormal MRI scans. Large proportions of patients with tubulin gene mutations were found to have multiple cortical and subcortical abnormalities including microcephaly, ventriculomegaly, abnormal gyral and sulcal patterns (termed dysgyria), small or absent corpus callosum and small pons. All patients with microtubule-associated proteins mutations also had abnormal cerebral cortices (predominantly pachygyria and agyria), but fewer subcortical abnormalities were noted. Conclusion Comparison of MRIs from patients with known mutations of tubulin genes and microtubule-associated proteins allows for the establishment of some early correlations of phenotype with genotype and may assist in identification and diagnosis of these rare disorders. PMID:26564436

  8. Respiratory Motion Changes of Lung Tumors Over the Course of Radiation Therapy Based on Respiration-Correlated Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography Scans

    SciTech Connect

    Redmond, Kristin J.; Song, Danny Y.; Fox, Jana L.; Zhou, Jessica; Rosenzweig, C. Nicole; Ford, Eric

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: To determine whether lung tumor respiratory excursion at simulation is predictive of excursion during radiation and whether phase offsets between tumor and surrogate markers are constant throughout treatment. Methods and Materials: Respiration-correlated CT scans and two rescans (using a Brilliance Big Bore spiral CT simulator; Philips, Inc.) were obtained from 20 patients at simulation. Gross tumor volume (GTV) was contoured on 10 phases of the respiratory cycle, and excursions were calculated. Diaphragm and xyphoid motion were quantified. Phase offsets, DELTAPHI, were calculated for patients with a GTV motion of >3 mm. Interfraction differences in excursions between simulation and rescans and magnitudes of variation in phase offset between fractions were evaluated. Results: Mean GTV excursions at simulation in superior-inferior, anterior-posterior, and medial-lateral directions were 0.67, 0.29, and 0.21 cm, respectively. The magnitude of superior-inferior GTV excursion correlated with tumor location (upper vs. lower lobe, p = 0.011). GTV excursions between simulation and rescan 1 (p = 0.115) and between simulation and rescan 2 (p = 0.071) were stable. Fourteen patients were analyzed for variations in phase offsets. GTV-xyphoid phase offset changed significantly between simulation and rescan 1 (p = 0.007) and simulation and rescan 2 (p = 0.008), with mean DELTAPHI values of 13.2% (rescan 1) and 14.3% (rescan 2). Xyphoid-diaphragm offset changed between simulation and rescan 1 (p = 0.004) and between simulation and rescan 2 (p = 0.012), with mean DELTAPHI values of 14.5% (rescan 1) and 7.6% (rescan 2). Conclusions: Interfraction consistency in tumor excursion suggests tumor excursion at simulation may direct therapy. Significant variations in phase lag between GTV and other anatomic structures throughout treatment have important implications for techniques that rely on surrogate structures to predict tumor motion

  9. Hybrid MV-kV 3D respiratory motion tracking during radiation therapy with low imaging dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Huagang; Li, Haiyun; Liu, Zhixiang; Nath, Ravinder; Liu, Wu

    2012-12-01

    A novel real-time adaptive MV-kV imaging framework for image-guided radiation therapy is developed to reduce the thoracic and abdominal tumor targeting uncertainty caused by respiration-induced intrafraction motion with ultra-low patient imaging dose. In our method, continuous stereoscopic MV-kV imaging is used at the beginning of a radiation therapy delivery for several seconds to measure the implanted marker positions. After this stereoscopic imaging period, the kV imager is switched off except for the times when no fiducial marker is detected in the cine-MV images. The 3D time-varying marker positions are estimated by combining the MV 2D projection data and the motion correlations between directional components of marker motion established from the stereoscopic imaging period and updated afterwards; in particular, the most likely position is assumed to be the position on the projection line that has the shortest distance to the first principal component line segment constructed from previous trajectory points. An adaptive windowed auto-regressive prediction is utilized to predict the marker position a short time later (310 ms and 460 ms in this study) to allow for tracking system latency. To demonstrate the feasibility and evaluate the accuracy of the proposed method, computer simulations were performed for both arc and fixed-gantry deliveries using 66 h of retrospective tumor motion data from 42 patients treated for thoracic or abdominal cancers. The simulations reveal that using our hybrid approach, a smaller than 1.2 mm or 1.5 mm root-mean-square tracking error can be achieved at a system latency of 310 ms or 460 ms, respectively. Because the kV imaging is only used for a short period of time in our method, extra patient imaging dose can be reduced by an order of magnitude compared to continuous MV-kV imaging, while the clinical tumor targeting accuracy for thoracic or abdominal cancers is maintained. Furthermore, no additional hardware is required with the

  10. OFSETH: optical technologies embedded in smart medical textile for continuous monitoring of respiratory motions under magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narbonneau, F.; De Jonckheere, J.; Jeanne, M.; Kinet, D.; Witt, J.; Krebber, K.; Paquet, B.; Depré, A.; D'Angelo, L. T.; Thiel, T.; Logier, R.

    2010-04-01

    The potential impact of optical fiber sensors embedded into medical textiles for the continuous monitoring of the patient during Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is now proved. We report how two pure optical technologies can successfully sense textile elongation between, 0% and 3%, while maintaining the stretching properties of the textile substrates for a good comfort of the patient. Investigating influence of different patients' morphology as well as textile integration issues to let free all vitals organs for medical staff actions, the OFSETH harness allows a continuous measurement of respiration movements. For example, anaesthesia for MRI examination uses the same drugs as for any surgical procedure. Even if spontaneous respiration can be preserved most of the time, spontaneous respiration is constantly at risk of being impaired by anaesthetic drugs or by upper airway obstruction. Monitoring of the breathing activity is needed to assess adequate ventilation or to detect specific obstruction patterns. Moreover artefacts due to physiological motions induce a blooming effect on the MRI result. The use of synchronisation devices allows reducing these effects. Positioned at certain strategic places according to the investigated organ, the presented sensors could constitute an efficient and adapted solution for respiratory synchronisation of the MRI acquisition.

  11. Optical Correlation of Images With Signal-Dependent Noise Using Constrained-Modulation Filter Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downie, John D.

    1995-01-01

    Images with signal-dependent noise present challenges beyond those of images with additive white or colored signal-independent noise in terms of designing the optimal 4-f correlation filter that maximizes correlation-peak signal-to-noise ratio, or combinations of correlation-peak metrics. Determining the proper design becomes more difficult when the filter is to be implemented on a constrained-modulation spatial light modulator device. The design issues involved for updatable optical filters for images with signal-dependent film-grain noise and speckle noise are examined. It is shown that although design of the optimal linear filter in the Fourier domain is impossible for images with signal-dependent noise, proper nonlinear preprocessing of the images allows the application of previously developed design rules for optimal filters to be implemented on constrained-modulation devices. Thus the nonlinear preprocessing becomes necessary for correlation in optical systems with current spatial light modulator technology. These results are illustrated with computer simulations of images with signal-dependent noise correlated with binary-phase-only filters and ternary-phase-amplitude filters.

  12. OPTICAL correlation identification technology applied in underwater laser imaging target identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Guang-tao; Zhang, Xiao-hui; Ge, Wei-long

    2012-01-01

    The underwater laser imaging detection is an effective method of detecting short distance target underwater as an important complement of sonar detection. With the development of underwater laser imaging technology and underwater vehicle technology, the underwater automatic target identification has gotten more and more attention, and is a research difficulty in the area of underwater optical imaging information processing. Today, underwater automatic target identification based on optical imaging is usually realized with the method of digital circuit software programming. The algorithm realization and control of this method is very flexible. However, the optical imaging information is 2D image even 3D image, the amount of imaging processing information is abundant, so the electronic hardware with pure digital algorithm will need long identification time and is hard to meet the demands of real-time identification. If adopt computer parallel processing, the identification speed can be improved, but it will increase complexity, size and power consumption. This paper attempts to apply optical correlation identification technology to realize underwater automatic target identification. The optics correlation identification technology utilizes the Fourier transform characteristic of Fourier lens which can accomplish Fourier transform of image information in the level of nanosecond, and optical space interconnection calculation has the features of parallel, high speed, large capacity and high resolution, combines the flexibility of calculation and control of digital circuit method to realize optoelectronic hybrid identification mode. We reduce theoretical formulation of correlation identification and analyze the principle of optical correlation identification, and write MATLAB simulation program. We adopt single frame image obtained in underwater range gating laser imaging to identify, and through identifying and locating the different positions of target, we can improve

  13. OPTICAL correlation identification technology applied in underwater laser imaging target identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Guang-Tao; Zhang, Xiao-Hui; Ge, Wei-Long

    2011-11-01

    The underwater laser imaging detection is an effective method of detecting short distance target underwater as an important complement of sonar detection. With the development of underwater laser imaging technology and underwater vehicle technology, the underwater automatic target identification has gotten more and more attention, and is a research difficulty in the area of underwater optical imaging information processing. Today, underwater automatic target identification based on optical imaging is usually realized with the method of digital circuit software programming. The algorithm realization and control of this method is very flexible. However, the optical imaging information is 2D image even 3D image, the amount of imaging processing information is abundant, so the electronic hardware with pure digital algorithm will need long identification time and is hard to meet the demands of real-time identification. If adopt computer parallel processing, the identification speed can be improved, but it will increase complexity, size and power consumption. This paper attempts to apply optical correlation identification technology to realize underwater automatic target identification. The optics correlation identification technology utilizes the Fourier transform characteristic of Fourier lens which can accomplish Fourier transform of image information in the level of nanosecond, and optical space interconnection calculation has the features of parallel, high speed, large capacity and high resolution, combines the flexibility of calculation and control of digital circuit method to realize optoelectronic hybrid identification mode. We reduce theoretical formulation of correlation identification and analyze the principle of optical correlation identification, and write MATLAB simulation program. We adopt single frame image obtained in underwater range gating laser imaging to identify, and through identifying and locating the different positions of target, we can improve

  14. A combined method for correlative 3D imaging of biological samples from macro to nano scale

    PubMed Central

    Kellner, Manuela; Heidrich, Marko; Lorbeer, Raoul-Amadeus; Antonopoulos, Georgios C.; Knudsen, Lars; Wrede, Christoph; Izykowski, Nicole; Grothausmann, Roman; Jonigk, Danny; Ochs, Matthias; Ripken, Tammo; Kühnel, Mark P.; Meyer, Heiko

    2016-01-01

    Correlative analysis requires examination of a specimen from macro to nano scale as well as applicability of analytical methods ranging from morphological to molecular. Accomplishing this with one and the same sample is laborious at best, due to deformation and biodegradation during measurements or intermediary preparation steps. Furthermore, data alignment using differing imaging techniques turns out to be a complex task, which considerably complicates the interconnection of results. We present correlative imaging of the accessory rat lung lobe by combining a modified Scanning Laser Optical Tomography (SLOT) setup with a specially developed sample preparation method (CRISTAL). CRISTAL is a resin-based embedding method that optically clears the specimen while allowing sectioning and preventing degradation. We applied and correlated SLOT with Multi Photon Microscopy, histological and immunofluorescence analysis as well as Transmission Electron Microscopy, all in the same sample. Thus, combining CRISTAL with SLOT enables the correlative utilization of a vast variety of imaging techniques. PMID:27759114

  15. Optical joint correlator for real-time image tracking and retinal surgery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juday, Richard D. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A method for tracking an object in a sequence of images is described. Such sequence of images may, for example, be a sequence of television frames. The object in the current frame is correlated with the object in the previous frame to obtain the relative location of the object in the two frames. An optical joint transform correlator apparatus is provided to carry out the process. Such joint transform correlator apparatus forms the basis for laser eye surgical apparatus where an image of the fundus of an eyeball is stabilized and forms the basis for the correlator apparatus to track the position of the eyeball caused by involuntary movement. With knowledge of the eyeball position, a surgical laser can be precisely pointed toward a position on the retina.

  16. Raster image cross-correlation analysis for spatiotemporal visualization of intracellular degradation activities against exogenous DNAs.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Akira; Yamamoto, Johtaro; Jin, Takashi; Kinjo, Masataka

    2015-09-24

    Reducing intracellular DNA degradation is critical to enhance the efficiency of gene therapy. Exogenous DNA incorporation into cells is strictly blocked by the defense machinery of intracellular nuclease activity. Raster image correlation spectroscopy (RICS) and raster image cross-correlation spectroscopy (cross-correlation RICS; ccRICS) are image-based correlation methods. These powerful tools allow the study of spatiotemporal molecular dynamics. Here we performed spatiotemporal ccRICS analyses of fluorescent DNA and directly monitored the process of exogenous DNA degradation in living cell cytoplasm. Such direct monitors of DNA degradation allow us to determine the fate of the exogenous DNA in living cells. On comparing the process in living cells, our study shows that cytoplasmic nuclease activity differs between cell lines; therefore, we propose that the difference of nuclease activity in cytoplasm dictates a different resistance to exogenous DNA incorporation. New insight on efficient gene delivery can be provided with our study.

  17. Raster image cross-correlation analysis for spatiotemporal visualization of intracellular degradation activities against exogenous DNAs.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Akira; Yamamoto, Johtaro; Jin, Takashi; Kinjo, Masataka

    2015-01-01

    Reducing intracellular DNA degradation is critical to enhance the efficiency of gene therapy. Exogenous DNA incorporation into cells is strictly blocked by the defense machinery of intracellular nuclease activity. Raster image correlation spectroscopy (RICS) and raster image cross-correlation spectroscopy (cross-correlation RICS; ccRICS) are image-based correlation methods. These powerful tools allow the study of spatiotemporal molecular dynamics. Here we performed spatiotemporal ccRICS analyses of fluorescent DNA and directly monitored the process of exogenous DNA degradation in living cell cytoplasm. Such direct monitors of DNA degradation allow us to determine the fate of the exogenous DNA in living cells. On comparing the process in living cells, our study shows that cytoplasmic nuclease activity differs between cell lines; therefore, we propose that the difference of nuclease activity in cytoplasm dictates a different resistance to exogenous DNA incorporation. New insight on efficient gene delivery can be provided with our study. PMID:26400011

  18. Metabolic brain imaging correlated with clinical features of brain tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Alavi, J.; Alavi, A.; Dann, R.; Kushner, M.; Chawluk, J.; Powlis, W.; Reivich, M.

    1985-05-01

    Nineteen adults with brain tumors have been studied with positron emission tomography utilizing FDG. Fourteen had biopsy proven cerebral malignant glioma, one each had meningioma, hemangiopericytoma, primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET), two had unbiopsied lesions, and one patient had an area of biopsy proven radiation necrosis. Three different patterns of glucose metabolism are observed: marked increase in metabolism at the site of the known tumor in (10 high grade gliomas and the PNET), lower than normal metabolism at the tumor (in 1 grade II glioma, 3 grade III gliomas, 2 unbiopsied low density nonenhancing lesions, and the meningioma), no abnormality (1 enhancing glioma, the hemangiopericytoma and the radiation necrosis.) The metabolic rate of the tumor or the surrounding brain did not appear to be correlated with the history of previous irradiation or chemotherapy. Decreased metabolism was frequently observed in the rest of the affected hemisphere and in the contralateral cerebellum. Tumors of high grade or with enhancing CT characteristics were more likely to show increased metabolism. Among the patients with proven gliomas, survival after PETT scan tended to be longer for those with low metabolic activity tumors than for those with highly active tumors. The authors conclude that PETT may help to predict the malignant potential of tumors, and may add useful clinical information to the CT scan.

  19. The human respiratory gate

    PubMed Central

    Eckberg, Dwain L

    2003-01-01

    Respiratory activity phasically alters membrane potentials of preganglionic vagal and sympathetic motoneurones and continuously modulates their responsiveness to stimulatory inputs. The most obvious manifestation of this ‘respiratory gating’ is respiratory sinus arrhythmia, the rhythmic fluctuations of electrocardiographic R–R intervals observed in healthy resting humans. Phasic autonomic motoneurone firing, reflecting the throughput of the system, depends importantly on the intensity of stimulatory inputs, such that when levels of stimulation are low (as with high arterial pressure and sympathetic activity, or low arterial pressure and vagal activity), respiratory fluctuations of sympathetic or vagal firing are also low. The respiratory gate has a finite capacity, and high levels of stimulation override the ability of respiration to gate autonomic responsiveness. Autonomic throughput also depends importantly on other factors, including especially, the frequency of breathing, the rate at which the gate opens and closes. Respiratory sinus arrhythmia is small at rapid, and large at slow breathing rates. The strong correlation between systolic pressure and R–R intervals at respiratory frequencies reflects the influence of respiration on these two measures, rather than arterial baroreflex physiology. A wide range of evidence suggests that respiratory activity gates the timing of autonomic motoneurone firing, but does not influence its tonic level. I propose that the most enduring significance of respiratory gating is its use as a precisely controlled experimental tool to tease out and better understand otherwise inaccessible human autonomic neurophysiological mechanisms. PMID:12626671

  20. The human respiratory gate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckberg, Dwain L.

    2003-01-01

    Respiratory activity phasically alters membrane potentials of preganglionic vagal and sympathetic motoneurones and continuously modulates their responsiveness to stimulatory inputs. The most obvious manifestation of this 'respiratory gating' is respiratory sinus arrhythmia, the rhythmic fluctuations of electrocardiographic R-R intervals observed in healthy resting humans. Phasic autonomic motoneurone firing, reflecting the throughput of the system, depends importantly on the intensity of stimulatory inputs, such that when levels of stimulation are low (as with high arterial pressure and sympathetic activity, or low arterial pressure and vagal activity), respiratory fluctuations of sympathetic or vagal firing are also low. The respiratory gate has a finite capacity, and high levels of stimulation override the ability of respiration to gate autonomic responsiveness. Autonomic throughput also depends importantly on other factors, including especially, the frequency of breathing, the rate at which the gate opens and closes. Respiratory sinus arrhythmia is small at rapid, and large at slow breathing rates. The strong correlation between systolic pressure and R-R intervals at respiratory frequencies reflects the influence of respiration on these two measures, rather than arterial baroreflex physiology. A wide range of evidence suggests that respiratory activity gates the timing of autonomic motoneurone firing, but does not influence its tonic level. I propose that the most enduring significance of respiratory gating is its use as a precisely controlled experimental tool to tease out and better understand otherwise inaccessible human autonomic neurophysiological mechanisms.

  1. Correlates of Obesity and Body Image in Colombian Women

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert-Diamond, Diane; Baylin, Ana; Mora-Plazas, Mercedes

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Objective To examine the sociodemographic correlates of overweight and obesity as well as body shape perception in women from Bogotá, Colombia. Methods The sample (n = 671) represented low-income and middle-income women, aged 21–55 years, living in Bogotá, who had children in the public school system. We measured height and weight to calculate body mass index (BMI, kg/m2) and defined two dichotomous outcomes: overweight/obesity (BMI ≥25) and obesity (BMI ≥30). Women reported sociodemographic information and used the Stunkard Figure Rating Scale to identify the silhouette that most closely resembled their body shape (current), what they would like to look like (ideal), and what they considered healthiest (healthiest). We estimated body dissatisfaction by subtracting the ideal from the current scores. Results The prevalences of overweight/obesity and obesity, based on measured height and weight, were 41.9% and 11.6%, respectively. Age, being married, and being born in Bogotá were positively associated with overweight/obesity but not with obesity alone, whereas the number of household assets and parity were both positively related to obesity. Women with higher education or who lived in wealthier neighborhoods identified ideal shapes that were thinner than those identified by their less educated or poorer counterparts (p = 0.03 and p = 0.004, respectively). Higher education was also associated with the selection of thinner body shapes as healthiest (p = 0.02). BMI and education were both positively related to body dissatisfaction (p < 0.0001 and p = 0.04, respectively). Conclusions Indicators of higher socioeconomic status (SES) (e.g., having more household assets) are associated with obesity. Perception of slimmer body shapes as ideal and healthiest and higher body dissatisfaction are associated with higher education. PMID:19630551

  2. On transcending the impasse of respiratory motion correction applications in routine clinical imaging - a consideration of a fully automated data driven motion control framework.

    PubMed

    Kesner, Adam L; Schleyer, Paul J; Büther, Florian; Walter, Martin A; Schäfers, Klaus P; Koo, Phillip J

    2014-12-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is increasingly used for the detection, characterization, and follow-up of tumors located in the thorax. However, patient respiratory motion presents a unique limitation that hinders the application of high-resolution PET technology for this type of imaging. Efforts to transcend this limitation have been underway for more than a decade, yet PET remains for practical considerations a modality vulnerable to motion-induced image degradation. Respiratory motion control is not employed in routine clinical operations. In this article, we take an opportunity to highlight some of the recent advancements in data-driven motion control strategies and how they may form an underpinning for what we are presenting as a fully automated data-driven motion control framework. This framework represents an alternative direction for future endeavors in motion control and can conceptually connect individual focused studies with a strategy for addressing big picture challenges and goals. PMID:26501450

  3. Correlated imaging for a reflective target with a smooth or rough surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Wenlin

    2016-08-01

    Correlated imaging for a reflective target with a smooth or rough surface is investigated. Our analytical results, which are backed up by numerical simulations, demonstrate that for a reflective target with a smooth surface, the quality of ghost imaging is related with the transverse sizes of both the source and the detector in the object path, and the target’s information can also be obtained by the technique of Fourier-transform ghost diffraction. However, for a reflective target with a rough surface, the target’s whole image can be reconstructed by ghost imaging even using a single point-like detector but Fourier-transform ghost diffraction is invalid. The application of correlated imaging in remote sensing is also discussed based on the above results.

  4. High-speed template matching with point correlation in image pyramids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penz, Harald; Bajla, Ivan; Mayer, Konrad; Krattenthaler, Werner

    1999-09-01

    Matching of a reference template with an image is a computationally expensive job. Particularly in fast real-time applications, large images and search ranges led to serious implementation problems. Therefore a reduction of the template size achieved by the selection of an appropriate subtemplate which is used for point correlation (subtemplate matching) may significantly decrease computational cost. In this paper a modified algorithm of the subtemplate point selection is proposed and explored. With the additional use of image pyramids, we can reduce the computational costs even further. The algorithm starts with a coarse search grid in the top level of the image pyramid generated for the full intended resolution. The procedure continues until the lowest level of the pyramid, the original image, is reached. The computational costs of this algorithm part satisfy the requirement for on- line processing. The preparation of the subtemplate for the point correlation is carried out in off-line mode, i.e., there is no rigorous limit of computational costs. The technique that applies the point correlation to image template matching within the image pyramid concept is proposed and the results obtained are discussed. It is especially useful for fast real- time system implementation when a large number of template matchings are needed in the same image.

  5. SU-E-T-582: On-Line Dosimetric Verification of Respiratory Gated Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Using the Electronic Portal Imaging Device

    SciTech Connect

    Schaly, B; Gaede, S; Xhaferllari, I

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the clinical utility of on-line verification of respiratory gated VMAT dosimetry during treatment. Methods: Portal dose images were acquired during treatment in integrated mode on a Varian TrueBeam (v. 1.6) linear accelerator for gated lung and liver patients that used flattening filtered beams. The source to imager distance (SID) was set to 160 cm to ensure imager clearance in case the isocenter was off midline. Note that acquisition of integrated images resulted in no extra dose to the patient. Fraction 1 was taken as baseline and all portal dose images were compared to that of the baseline, where the gamma comparison and dose difference were used to measure day-to-day exit dose variation. All images were analyzed in the Portal Dosimetry module of Aria (v. 10). The portal imager on the TrueBeam was calibrated by following the instructions for dosimetry calibration in service mode, where we define 1 calibrated unit (CU) equal to 1 Gy for 10×10 cm field size at 100 cm SID. This reference condition was measured frequently to verify imager calibration. Results: The gamma value (3%, 3 mm, 5% threshold) ranged between 92% and 100% for the lung and liver cases studied. The exit dose can vary by as much as 10% of the maximum dose for an individual fraction. The integrated images combined with the information given by the corresponding on-line soft tissue matched cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images were useful in explaining dose variation. For gated lung treatment, dose variation was mainly due to the diaphragm position. For gated liver treatment, the dose variation was due to both diaphragm position and weight loss. Conclusion: Integrated images can be useful in verifying dose delivery consistency during respiratory gated VMAT, although the CBCT information is needed to explain dose differences due to anatomical changes.

  6. Quantifying the reliability of image replication studies: the image intra-class correlation coefficient (I2C2)

    PubMed Central

    Shou, H.; Eloyan, A.; Lee, S.; Zipunnikov, V.; Crainiceanu, A.N.; Nebel, M.B.; Caffo, B.; Lindquist, M.A.; Crainiceanu, C.M.

    2013-01-01

    This manuscript proposes the image intra-class correlation (I2C2) coefficient as a global measure of reliability for imaging studies. The I2C2 generalizes the classic intra-class correlation (ICC) coefficient to the case when the data of interest are images, thereby providing a measure that is both intuitive and convenient. Drawing a connection with classical measurement error models for replication experiments, the I2C2 can be computed quickly, even in high-dimensional imaging studies. A nonparametric bootstrap procedure is introduced to quantify the variability of the I2C2 estimator. Furthermore, a Monte Carlo permutation is utilized to test reproducibility versus a zero I2C2, representing complete lack of reproducibility. Methodologies are applied to three replication studies arising from different brain imaging modalities and settings: Regional Analysis of VolumEs in Normalized Space (RAVENS) imaging for characterizing brain morphology, seed-voxel brain activation maps based on resting state functional MRI (fMRI), and fractional anisotropy (FA) in an area surrounding the corpus callosum via diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Software and data are provided to ensure rapid dissemination of methods. Resting state functional MRI (fMRI) brain activation maps are found to have low reliability ranging between 0.2 to 0.4. PMID:24022791

  7. Predictive Classification of Correlated Targets with Application to Detection of Metastatic Cancer using Functional CT Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuan; Hobbs, Brian P.; Hu, Jianhua; Ng, Chaan S.; Do, Kim-Anh

    2015-01-01

    Summary Perfusion computed tomography (CTp) is an emerging functional imaging modality that uses physiological models to quantify characteristics pertaining to the passage of fluid through blood vessels. Perfusion characteristics provide physiological correlates for neovascularization induced by tumor angiogenesis. Thus CTp offers promise as a non-invasive quantitative functional imaging tool for cancer detection, prognostication, and treatment monitoring. In this paper, we develop a Bayesian probabilistic framework for simultaneous supervised classification of multivariate correlated objects using separable covariance. The classification approach is applied to discriminate between regions of liver that contain pathologically verified metastases from normal liver tissue using five perfusion characteristics. The hepatic regions tend to be highly correlated due to common vasculature. We demonstrate that simultaneous Bayesian classification yields dramatic improvements in performance in the presence of strong correlation among intra-subject units, yet remains competitive with classical methods in the presence of weak or no correlation. PMID:25851056

  8. A New Measure of Imagination Ability: Anatomical Brain Imaging Correlates

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Rex E.; Flores, Ranee A.; Hunter, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Imagination involves episodic memory retrieval, visualization, mental simulation, spatial navigation, and future thinking, making it a complex cognitive construct. Prior studies of imagination have attempted to study various elements of imagination (e.g., visualization), but none have attempted to capture the entirety of imagination ability in a single instrument. Here we describe the Hunter Imagination Questionnaire (HIQ), an instrument designed to assess imagination over an extended period of time, in a naturalistic manner. We hypothesized that the HIQ would be related to measures of creative achievement and to a network of brain regions previously identified to be important to imagination/creative abilities. Eighty subjects were administered the HIQ in an online format; all subjects were administered a broad battery of tests including measures of intelligence, personality, and aptitude, as well as structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging (sMRI). Responses of the HIQ were found to be normally distributed, and exploratory factor analysis yielded four factors. Internal consistency of the HIQ ranged from 0.76 to 0.79, and two factors (“Implementation” and “Learning”) were significantly related to measures of Creative Achievement (Scientific—r = 0.26 and Writing—r = 0.31, respectively), suggesting concurrent validity. We found that the HIQ and its factors were related to a broad network of brain volumes including increased bilateral hippocampi, lingual gyrus, and caudal/rostral middle frontal lobe, and decreased volumes within the nucleus accumbens and regions within the default mode network (e.g., precuneus, posterior cingulate, transverse temporal lobe). The HIQ was found to be a reliable and valid measure of imagination in a cohort of normal human subjects, and was related to brain volumes previously identified as central to imagination including episodic memory retrieval (e.g., hippocampus). We also identified compelling evidence suggesting imagination

  9. A New Measure of Imagination Ability: Anatomical Brain Imaging Correlates.

    PubMed

    Jung, Rex E; Flores, Ranee A; Hunter, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Imagination involves episodic memory retrieval, visualization, mental simulation, spatial navigation, and future thinking, making it a complex cognitive construct. Prior studies of imagination have attempted to study various elements of imagination (e.g., visualization), but none have attempted to capture the entirety of imagination ability in a single instrument. Here we describe the Hunter Imagination Questionnaire (HIQ), an instrument designed to assess imagination over an extended period of time, in a naturalistic manner. We hypothesized that the HIQ would be related to measures of creative achievement and to a network of brain regions previously identified to be important to imagination/creative abilities. Eighty subjects were administered the HIQ in an online format; all subjects were administered a broad battery of tests including measures of intelligence, personality, and aptitude, as well as structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging (sMRI). Responses of the HIQ were found to be normally distributed, and exploratory factor analysis yielded four factors. Internal consistency of the HIQ ranged from 0.76 to 0.79, and two factors ("Implementation" and "Learning") were significantly related to measures of Creative Achievement (Scientific-r = 0.26 and Writing-r = 0.31, respectively), suggesting concurrent validity. We found that the HIQ and its factors were related to a broad network of brain volumes including increased bilateral hippocampi, lingual gyrus, and caudal/rostral middle frontal lobe, and decreased volumes within the nucleus accumbens and regions within the default mode network (e.g., precuneus, posterior cingulate, transverse temporal lobe). The HIQ was found to be a reliable and valid measure of imagination in a cohort of normal human subjects, and was related to brain volumes previously identified as central to imagination including episodic memory retrieval (e.g., hippocampus). We also identified compelling evidence suggesting imagination ability

  10. Brain responses strongly correlate with Weibull image statistics when processing natural images.

    PubMed

    Scholte, H Steven; Ghebreab, Sennay; Waldorp, Lourens; Smeulders, Arnold W M; Lamme, Victor A F

    2009-01-01

    The visual appearance of natural scenes is governed by a surprisingly simple hidden structure. The distributions of contrast values in natural images generally follow a Weibull distribution, with beta and gamma as free parameters. Beta and gamma seem to structure the space of natural images in an ecologically meaningful way, in particular with respect to the fragmentation and texture similarity within an image. Since it is often assumed that the brain exploits structural regularities in natural image statistics to efficiently encode and analyze visual input, we here ask ourselves whether the brain approximates the beta and gamma values underlying the contrast distributions of natural images. We present a model that shows that beta and gamma can be easily estimated from the outputs of X-cells and Y-cells. In addition, we covaried the EEG responses of subjects viewing natural images with the beta and gamma values of those images. We show that beta and gamma explain up to 71% of the variance of the early ERP signal, substantially outperforming other tested contrast measurements. This suggests that the brain is strongly tuned to the image's beta and gamma values, potentially providing the visual system with an efficient way to rapidly classify incoming images on the basis of omnipresent low-level natural image statistics. PMID:19757938

  11. Respiratory papillomas

    PubMed Central

    Alagusundaramoorthy, Sayee Sundar; Agrawal, Abhinav

    2016-01-01

    Papillomas are known to occur in the lower respiratory tract. They are however, rare compared to their occurrence in the upper respiratory tract. These are generally exophytic tumors in the more proximal upper airways however cases with more distal location with an inverted growth pattern have also been described in the literature. These can be solitary or multiple and multifocality associated with multiple papillomas in the upper respiratory/aerodigestive tract. The four major types of respiratory papillomas are (1) Recurrent respiratory papillomas, (2) solitary squamous papillomas, (3) solitary glandular papillomas, (4) mixed papillomas. We review the incidence, etiopathology, diagnosis, and possible treatment modalities and algorithms for these respiratory papillomas.

  12. Respiratory papillomas.

    PubMed

    Alagusundaramoorthy, Sayee Sundar; Agrawal, Abhinav

    2016-01-01

    Papillomas are known to occur in the lower respiratory tract. They are however, rare compared to their occurrence in the upper respiratory tract. These are generally exophytic tumors in the more proximal upper airways however cases with more distal location with an inverted growth pattern have also been described in the literature. These can be solitary or multiple and multifocality associated with multiple papillomas in the upper respiratory/aerodigestive tract. The four major types of respiratory papillomas are (1) Recurrent respiratory papillomas, (2) solitary squamous papillomas, (3) solitary glandular papillomas, (4) mixed papillomas. We review the incidence, etiopathology, diagnosis, and possible treatment modalities and algorithms for these respiratory papillomas.

  13. Respiratory papillomas

    PubMed Central

    Alagusundaramoorthy, Sayee Sundar; Agrawal, Abhinav

    2016-01-01

    Papillomas are known to occur in the lower respiratory tract. They are however, rare compared to their occurrence in the upper respiratory tract. These are generally exophytic tumors in the more proximal upper airways however cases with more distal location with an inverted growth pattern have also been described in the literature. These can be solitary or multiple and multifocality associated with multiple papillomas in the upper respiratory/aerodigestive tract. The four major types of respiratory papillomas are (1) Recurrent respiratory papillomas, (2) solitary squamous papillomas, (3) solitary glandular papillomas, (4) mixed papillomas. We review the incidence, etiopathology, diagnosis, and possible treatment modalities and algorithms for these respiratory papillomas. PMID:27625447

  14. The Anatomy of Fourier-Based Correlation Image Velocimetry and Sources of Decorrelating Errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giarra, Matthew; Vlachos, Pavlos

    2015-11-01

    Particle image velocimetry (PIV) algorithms have recently been applied to photographs captured using a variety of techniques including schlieren, synchrotron x-ray, and microscope imaging. While the characteristics of these types of images differ greatly from those of particle images, virtually no analysis has been done to determine how these differences affect the performance of Fourier-based cross correlation (CC) algorithms. Here, we analyze schlieren, x-ray, and traditional PIV images to show that the signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) of their CCs vary across spectral wavenumbers, and that the assignment of a single SNR to the CC is an oversimplification that obfuscates the underlying source of the decorrelating errors. We will show that the failure of traditional algorithms to distinguish correlated from uncorrelated wavenumbers introduces secondary CC peaks that increase measurement uncertainty by decreasing the correlation peak-height ratio, and can cause the measurement to fail by overtaking the true peak. Finally, we introduce a new algorithm that mitigates these issues and increases measurement accuracy by automatically discriminating correlated wavenumbers with no a priori information about the images' contents.

  15. Quality assessment of remote sensing image fusion using feature-based fourth-order correlation coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Dan; Liu, Jun; Chen, Kai; Li, Huali; Liu, Ping; Chen, Huijuan; Qian, Jing

    2016-04-01

    In remote sensing fusion, the spatial details of a panchromatic (PAN) image and the spectrum information of multispectral (MS) images will be transferred into fused images according to the characteristics of the human visual system. Thus, a remote sensing image fusion quality assessment called feature-based fourth-order correlation coefficient (FFOCC) is proposed. FFOCC is based on the feature-based coefficient concept. Spatial features related to spatial details of the PAN image and spectral features related to the spectrum information of MS images are first extracted from the fused image. Then, the fourth-order correlation coefficient between the spatial and spectral features is calculated and treated as the assessment result. FFOCC was then compared with existing widely used indices, such as Erreur Relative Globale Adimensionnelle de Synthese, and quality assessed with no reference. Results of the fusion and distortion experiments indicate that the FFOCC is consistent with subjective evaluation. FFOCC significantly outperforms the other indices in evaluating fusion images that are produced by different fusion methods and that are distorted in spatial and spectral features by blurring, adding noise, and changing intensity. All the findings indicate that the proposed method is an objective and effective quality assessment for remote sensing image fusion.

  16. Respiration-Correlated Image Guidance Is the Most Important Radiotherapy Motion Management Strategy for Most Lung Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Korreman, Stine; Persson, Gitte; Nygaard, Ditte; Brink, Carsten; Juhler-Nottrup, Trine

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to quantify the effects of four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT), 4D image guidance (4D-IG), and beam gating on calculated treatment field margins in a lung cancer patient population. Materials and Methods: Images were acquired from 46 lung cancer patients participating in four separate protocols at three institutions in Europe and the United States. Seven patients were imaged using fluoroscopy, and 39 patients were imaged using 4DCT. The magnitude of respiratory tumor motion was measured. The required treatment field margins were calculated using a statistical recipe (van Herk M, et al. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 2000;474:1121-1135), with magnitudes of all uncertainties, except respiratory peak-to-peak displacement, the same for all patients, taken from literature. Required margins for respiratory motion management were calculated using the residual respiratory tumor motion for each patient for various motion management strategies. Margin reductions for respiration management were calculated using 4DCT, 4D-IG, and gated beam delivery. Results: The median tumor motion magnitude was 4.4 mm for the 46 patients (range 0-29.3 mm). This value corresponded to required treatment field margins of 13.7 to 36.3 mm (median 14.4 mm). The use of 4DCT, 4D-IG, and beam gating required margins that were reduced by 0 to 13.9 mm (median 0.5 mm), 3 to 5.2 mm (median 5.1 mm), and 0 to 7 mm (median 0.2 mm), respectively, to a total of 8.5 to 12.4 mm (median 8.6 mm). Conclusion: A respiratory management strategy for lung cancer radiotherapy including planning on 4DCT scans and daily image guidance provides a potential reduction of 37% to 47% in treatment field margins. The 4D image guidance strategy was the most effective strategy for >85% of the patients.

  17. Fast nosological imaging using canonical correlation analysis of brain data obtained by two-dimensional turbo spectroscopic imaging.

    PubMed

    Laudadio, Teresa; Martínez-Bisbal, M Carmen; Celda, Bernardo; Van Huffel, Sabine

    2008-05-01

    A new fast and accurate tissue typing technique has recently been successfully applied to prostate MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) data. This technique is based on canonical correlation analysis (CCA), a statistical method able to simultaneously exploit the spectral and spatial information characterizing the MRSI data. Here, the performance of CCA is further investigated by using brain data obtained by two-dimensional turbo spectroscopic imaging (2DTSI) from patients affected by glioblastoma. The purpose of this study is to investigate the applicability of CCA when typing tissues of heterogeneous tumors. The performance of CCA is also compared with that of ordinary correlation analysis on simulated as well as in vivo data. The results show that CCA outperforms ordinary correlation analysis in terms of robustness and accuracy.

  18. Color enhancement of highly correlated images. I - Decorrelation and HSI contrast stretches. [hue saturation intensity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillespie, Alan R.; Kahle, Anne B.; Walker, Richard E.

    1986-01-01

    Conventional enhancements for the color display of multispectral images are based on independent contrast modifications or 'stretches' of three input images. This approach is not effective if the image channels are highly correlated or if the image histograms are strongly bimodal or more complex. Any of several procedures that tend to 'stretch' color saturation while leaving hue unchanged may better utilize the full range of colors for the display of image information. Two conceptually different enhancements are discussed: the 'decorrelation stretch', based on principal-component (PC) analysis, and the 'stretch' of 'hue' - 'saturation' - intensity (HSI) transformed data. The PC transformation in scene-dependent, but the HSI transformation is invariant. Examples of images enhanced by conventional linear stretches, decorrelation stretch, and by stretches of HSI transformed data are compared. Schematic variation diagrams or two- and three-dimensional histograms are used to illustrate the 'decorrelation stretch' method and the effect of the different enhancements.

  19. A correlative imaging based methodology for accurate quantitative assessment of bone formation in additive manufactured implants.

    PubMed

    Geng, Hua; Todd, Naomi M; Devlin-Mullin, Aine; Poologasundarampillai, Gowsihan; Kim, Taek Bo; Madi, Kamel; Cartmell, Sarah; Mitchell, Christopher A; Jones, Julian R; Lee, Peter D

    2016-06-01

    A correlative imaging methodology was developed to accurately quantify bone formation in the complex lattice structure of additive manufactured implants. Micro computed tomography (μCT) and histomorphometry were combined, integrating the best features from both, while demonstrating the limitations of each imaging modality. This semi-automatic methodology registered each modality using a coarse graining technique to speed the registration of 2D histology sections to high resolution 3D μCT datasets. Once registered, histomorphometric qualitative and quantitative bone descriptors were directly correlated to 3D quantitative bone descriptors, such as bone ingrowth and bone contact. The correlative imaging allowed the significant volumetric shrinkage of histology sections to be quantified for the first time (~15 %). This technique demonstrated the importance of location of the histological section, demonstrating that up to a 30 % offset can be introduced. The results were used to quantitatively demonstrate the effectiveness of 3D printed titanium lattice implants.

  20. Optical Measurement Techniques for Rocket Engine Testing and Component Applications: Digital Image Correlation and Dynamic Photogrammetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gradl, Paul

    2016-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has been advancing dynamic optical measurement systems, primarily Digital Image Correlation, for extreme environment rocket engine test applications. The Digital Image Correlation (DIC) technology is used to track local and full field deformations, displacement vectors and local and global strain measurements. This technology has been evaluated at MSFC through lab testing to full scale hotfire engine testing of the J-2X Upper Stage engine at Stennis Space Center. It has been shown to provide reliable measurement data and has replaced many traditional measurement techniques for NASA applications. NASA and AMRDEC have recently signed agreements for NASA to train and transition the technology to applications for missile and helicopter testing. This presentation will provide an overview and progression of the technology, various testing applications at NASA MSFC, overview of Army-NASA test collaborations and application lessons learned about Digital Image Correlation.

  1. Digital image correlation involves an inverse problem: A regularization scheme based on subset size constraint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Qin; Yuan, Yuan; Fan, Xiangtao; Huang, Jianyong; Xiong, Chunyang; Yuan, Fan

    2016-06-01

    Digital image correlation (DIC) is essentially implicated in a class of inverse problem. Here, a regularization scheme is developed for the subset-based DIC technique to effectively inhibit potential ill-posedness that likely arises in actual deformation calculations and hence enhance numerical stability, accuracy and precision of correlation measurement. With the aid of a parameterized two-dimensional Butterworth window, a regularized subpixel registration strategy is established, in which the amount of speckle information introduced to correlation calculations may be weighted through equivalent subset size constraint. The optimal regularization parameter associated with each individual sampling point is determined in a self-adaptive way by numerically investigating the curve of 2-norm condition number of coefficient matrix versus the corresponding equivalent subset size, based on which the regularized solution can eventually be obtained. Numerical results deriving from both synthetic speckle images and actual experimental images demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the set of newly-proposed regularized DIC algorithms.

  2. Respiratory Failure

    MedlinePlus

    Respiratory failure happens when not enough oxygen passes from your lungs into your blood. Your body's organs, ... brain, need oxygen-rich blood to work well. Respiratory failure also can happen if your lungs can' ...

  3. Respiratory system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartlett, R. G., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The general anatomy and function of the human respiratory system is summarized. Breathing movements, control of breathing, lung volumes and capacities, mechanical relations, and factors relevant to respiratory support and equipment design are discussed.

  4. Validating and improving CT ventilation imaging by correlating with ventilation 4D-PET/CT using {sup 68}Ga-labeled nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Kipritidis, John Keall, Paul J.; Siva, Shankar; Hofman, Michael S.; Callahan, Jason; Hicks, Rodney J.

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: CT ventilation imaging is a novel functional lung imaging modality based on deformable image registration. The authors present the first validation study of CT ventilation using positron emission tomography with{sup 68}Ga-labeled nanoparticles (PET-Galligas). The authors quantify this agreement for different CT ventilation metrics and PET reconstruction parameters. Methods: PET-Galligas ventilation scans were acquired for 12 lung cancer patients using a four-dimensional (4D) PET/CT scanner. CT ventilation images were then produced by applying B-spline deformable image registration between the respiratory correlated phases of the 4D-CT. The authors test four ventilation metrics, two existing and two modified. The two existing metrics model mechanical ventilation (alveolar air-flow) based on Hounsfield unit (HU) change (V{sub HU}) or Jacobian determinant of deformation (V{sub Jac}). The two modified metrics incorporate a voxel-wise tissue-density scaling (ρV{sub HU} and ρV{sub Jac}) and were hypothesized to better model the physiological ventilation. In order to assess the impact of PET image quality, comparisons were performed using both standard and respiratory-gated PET images with the former exhibiting better signal. Different median filtering kernels (σ{sub m} = 0 or 3 mm) were also applied to all images. As in previous studies, similarity metrics included the Spearman correlation coefficient r within the segmented lung volumes, and Dice coefficient d{sub 20} for the (0 − 20)th functional percentile volumes. Results: The best agreement between CT and PET ventilation was obtained comparing standard PET images to the density-scaled HU metric (ρV{sub HU}) with σ{sub m} = 3 mm. This leads to correlation values in the ranges 0.22 ⩽ r ⩽ 0.76 and 0.38 ⩽ d{sub 20} ⩽ 0.68, with r{sup ¯}=0.42±0.16 and d{sup ¯}{sub 20}=0.52±0.09 averaged over the 12 patients. Compared to Jacobian-based metrics, HU-based metrics lead to statistically significant

  5. Unstructured finite element-based digital image correlation with enhanced management of quadrature and lens distortions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierré, J.-E.; Passieux, J.-C.; Périé, J.-N.; Bugarin, F.; Robert, L.

    2016-02-01

    Like subset-based methods, the very first finite element versions of digital image correlation were closely related to the regular structure of images, as they were based on regular quadrilateral elements corresponding to an integer number of pixels. The use of unstructured meshes, to exploit the full potential of FE-DIC in structural mechanics, is now widespread. Most of the time, the formulation, the quadrature and the definition of the region of interest still rely on the pixels grid. In this paper, a formulation in the physical coordinate system and not in the image frame is proposed for 2D digital image correlation. In addition to a more precise definition of the region of interest, it allows the use of a more accurate quadrature rule. It is also shown that lens distortions can be successfully taken into account directly with such a formalism.

  6. Optical imaging through turbid media with a degenerate four-wave mixing correlation time gate

    DOEpatents

    Sappey, Andrew D.

    1998-04-14

    Optical imaging through turbid media is demonstrated using a degenerate four-wave mixing correlation time gate. An apparatus and method for detecting ballistic and/or snake light while rejecting unwanted diffusive light for imaging structures within highly scattering media are described. Degenerate four-wave mixing (DFWM) of a doubled YAG laser in rhodamine 590 is used to provide an ultrafast correlation time gate to discriminate against light that has undergone multiple scattering and therefore has lost memory of the structures within the scattering medium. Images have been obtained of a test cross-hair pattern through highly turbid suspensions of whole milk in water that are opaque to the naked eye, which demonstrates the utility of DFWM for imaging through turbid media. Use of DFWM as an ultrafast time gate for the detection of ballistic and/or snake light in optical mammography is discussed.

  7. Orthographic Stereo Correlator on the Terrain Model for Apollo Metric Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Taemin; Husmann, Kyle; Moratto, Zachary; Nefian, Ara V.

    2011-01-01

    A stereo correlation method on the object domain is proposed to generate the accurate and dense Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) from lunar orbital imagery. The NASA Ames Intelligent Robotics Group (IRG) aims to produce high-quality terrain reconstructions of the Moon from Apollo Metric Camera (AMC) data. In particular, IRG makes use of a stereo vision process, the Ames Stereo Pipeline (ASP), to automatically generate DEMs from consecutive AMC image pairs. Given camera parameters of an image pair from bundle adjustment in ASP, a correlation window is defined on the terrain with the predefined surface normal of a post rather than image domain. The squared error of back-projected images on the local terrain is minimized with respect to the post elevation. This single dimensional optimization is solved efficiently and improves the accuracy of the elevation estimate.

  8. Resolution of ghost imaging with entangled photons for different types of momentum correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, MaLin; Xu, Ping; Lu, LiangLiang; Zhu, ShiNing

    2016-07-01

    We present an analytical analysis of the spatial resolution of quantum ghost imaging implemented by entangled photons from a general, spontaneously parametric, down-conversion process. We find that the resolution is affected by both the pump beam waist and the nonlinear crystal length. Hence, we determined a method to improve the resolution for a certain imaging setup. It should be noted that the resolution is not uniquely related to the degree of entanglement of the photon pair since the resolution can be optimized for a certain degree of entanglement. For certain types of Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) states——namely the momentum-correlated or momentum-positively correlated states——the resolution exhibits a simpler relationship with the pump beam waist and crystal length. Further, a vivid numerical simulation of ghost imaging is presented for different types of EPR states, which supports our analysis. This work discusses applicable references to the applications of quantum ghost imaging.

  9. Multiple template-based image matching using alpha-rooted quaternion phase correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DelMarco, Stephen

    2010-04-01

    In computer vision applications, image matching performed on quality-degraded imagery is difficult due to image content distortion and noise effects. State-of-the art keypoint based matchers, such as SURF and SIFT, work very well on clean imagery. However, performance can degrade significantly in the presence of high noise and clutter levels. Noise and clutter cause the formation of false features which can degrade recognition performance. To address this problem, previously we developed an extension to the classical amplitude and phase correlation forms, which provides improved robustness and tolerance to image geometric misalignments and noise. This extension, called Alpha-Rooted Phase Correlation (ARPC), combines Fourier domain-based alpha-rooting enhancement with classical phase correlation. ARPC provides tunable parameters to control the alpha-rooting enhancement. These parameter values can be optimized to tradeoff between high narrow correlation peaks, and more robust wider, but smaller peaks. Previously, we applied ARPC in the radon transform domain for logo image recognition in the presence of rotational image misalignments. In this paper, we extend ARPC to incorporate quaternion Fourier transforms, thereby creating Alpha-Rooted Quaternion Phase Correlation (ARQPC). We apply ARQPC to the logo image recognition problem. We use ARQPC to perform multiple-reference logo template matching by representing multiple same-class reference templates as quaternion-valued images. We generate recognition performance results on publicly-available logo imagery, and compare recognition results to results generated from standard approaches. We show that small deviations in reference templates of sameclass logos can lead to improved recognition performance using the joint matching inherent in ARQPC.

  10. Use of digital image correlation and ultrasound: analysis of thigh muscle displacement fields.

    PubMed

    Affagard, Jean-Sébastien; Feissel, Pierre; Bensamoun, Sabine F

    2015-08-01

    The understanding of the mechanical behavior of the muscle tissue is an important field of investigation with different applications in medicine, car crash and sport. Currently, few in vivo imaging techniques are able to characterize the mechanical properties of muscle. Thus, the development of an in vivo identification method is a current thematic where the displacement field measurements could be used for further interpretations. This study aims at presenting the displacement fields measured in the anterior, posterior, lateral and medial parts of the thigh muscles using ultrasound and Digital Image Correlation (DIC) techniques. The results of the displacement field measurements confirmed and are correlated with the ultrasound observations.

  11. Spectral analysis of pair-correlation bandwidth: application to cell biology images

    PubMed Central

    Binder, Benjamin J.; Simpson, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    Images from cell biology experiments often indicate the presence of cell clustering, which can provide insight into the mechanisms driving the collective cell behaviour. Pair-correlation functions provide quantitative information about the presence, or absence, of clustering in a spatial distribution of cells. This is because the pair-correlation function describes the ratio of the abundance of pairs of cells, separated by a particular distance, relative to a randomly distributed reference population. Pair-correlation functions are often presented as a kernel density estimate where the frequency of pairs of objects are grouped using a particular bandwidth (or bin width), Δ>0. The choice of bandwidth has a dramatic impact: choosing Δ too large produces a pair-correlation function that contains insufficient information, whereas choosing Δ too small produces a pair-correlation signal dominated by fluctuations. Presently, there is little guidance available regarding how to make an objective choice of Δ. We present a new technique to choose Δ by analysing the power spectrum of the discrete Fourier transform of the pair-correlation function. Using synthetic simulation data, we confirm that our approach allows us to objectively choose Δ such that the appropriately binned pair-correlation function captures known features in uniform and clustered synthetic images. We also apply our technique to images from two different cell biology assays. The first assay corresponds to an approximately uniform distribution of cells, while the second assay involves a time series of images of a cell population which forms aggregates over time. The appropriately binned pair-correlation function allows us to make quantitative inferences about the average aggregate size, as well as quantifying how the average aggregate size changes with time. PMID:26064605

  12. Photothermal raster image correlation spectroscopy of gold nanoparticles in solution and on live cells

    PubMed Central

    Nieves, D. J.; Li, Y.; Fernig, D. G.; Lévy, R.

    2015-01-01

    Raster image correlation spectroscopy (RICS) measures the diffusion of fluorescently labelled molecules from stacks of confocal microscopy images by analysing correlations within the image. RICS enables the observation of a greater and, thus, more representative area of a biological system as compared to other single molecule approaches. Photothermal microscopy of gold nanoparticles allows long-term imaging of the same labelled molecules without photobleaching. Here, we implement RICS analysis on a photothermal microscope. The imaging of single gold nanoparticles at pixel dwell times short enough for RICS (60 μs) with a piezo-driven photothermal heterodyne microscope is demonstrated (photothermal raster image correlation spectroscopy, PhRICS). As a proof of principle, PhRICS is used to measure the diffusion coefficient of gold nanoparticles in glycerol : water solutions. The diffusion coefficients of the nanoparticles measured by PhRICS are consistent with their size, determined by transmission electron microscopy. PhRICS was then used to probe the diffusion speed of gold nanoparticle-labelled fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) bound to heparan sulfate in the pericellular matrix of live fibroblast cells. The data are consistent with previous single nanoparticle tracking studies of the diffusion of FGF2 on these cells. Importantly, the data reveal faster FGF2 movement, previously inaccessible by photothermal tracking, and suggest that inhomogeneity in the distribution of bound FGF2 is dynamic. PMID:26543570

  13. MO-G-BRF-01: BEST IN PHYSICS (JOINT IMAGING-THERAPY) - Sensitivity of PET-Based Texture Features to Respiratory Motion in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)

    SciTech Connect

    Yip, S; Aerts, H; Berbeco, R; McCall, K; Aristophanous, M; Chen, A

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: PET-based texture features are used to quantify tumor heterogeneity due to their predictive power in treatment outcome. We investigated the sensitivity of texture features to tumor motion by comparing whole body (3D) and respiratory-gated (4D) PET imaging. Methods: Twenty-six patients (34 lesions) received 3D and 4D [F-18]FDG-PET scans before chemo-radiotherapy. The acquired 4D data were retrospectively binned into five breathing phases to create the 4D image sequence. Four texture features (Coarseness, Contrast, Busyness, and Complexity) were computed within the the physician-defined tumor volume. The relative difference (δ) in each measure between the 3D- and 4D-PET imaging was calculated. Wilcoxon signed-rank test (p<0.01) was used to determine if δ was significantly different from zero. Coefficient of variation (CV) was used to determine the variability in the texture features between all 4D-PET phases. Pearson correlation coefficient was used to investigate the impact of tumor size and motion amplitude on δ. Results: Significant differences (p<<0.01) between 3D and 4D imaging were found for Coarseness, Busyness, and Complexity. The difference for Contrast was not significant (p>0.24). 4D-PET increased Busyness (∼20%) and Complexity (∼20%), and decreased Coarseness (∼10%) and Contrast (∼5%) compared to 3D-PET. Nearly negligible variability (CV=3.9%) was found between the 4D phase bins for Coarseness and Complexity. Moderate variability was found for Contrast and Busyness (CV∼10%). Poor correlation was found between the tumor volume and δ for the texture features (R=−0.34−0.34). Motion amplitude had moderate impact on δ for Contrast and Busyness (R=−0.64− 0.54) and no impact for Coarseness and Complexity (R=−0.29−0.17). Conclusion: Substantial differences in textures were found between 3D and 4D-PET imaging. Moreover, the variability between phase bins for Coarseness and Complexity was negligible, suggesting that similar

  14. Fast method of constructing image correlations to build a free network based on image multivocabulary trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Zongqian; Wang, Xin; Wei, Minglu

    2015-05-01

    In image-based three-dimensional (3-D) reconstruction, one topic of growing importance is how to quickly obtain a 3-D model from a large number of images. The retrieval of the correct and relevant images for the model poses a considerable technological challenge. The "image vocabulary tree" has been proposed as a method to search for similar images. However, a significant drawback of this approach is identified in its low time efficiency and barely satisfactory classification result. The method proposed is inspired by, and improves upon, some recent methods. Specifically, vocabulary quality is considered and multivocabulary trees are designed to improve the classification result. A marked improvement was, indeed, observed in our evaluation of the proposed method. To improve time efficiency, graphics processing unit (GPU) computer unified device architecture parallel computation is applied in the multivocabulary trees. The results of the experiments showed that the GPU was three to four times more efficient than the enumeration matching and CPU methods when the number of images is large. This paper presents a reliable reference method for the rapid construction of a free network to be used for the computing of 3-D information.

  15. Spatio-temporal image correlation (STIC): new technology for evaluation of the fetal heart.

    PubMed

    DeVore, G R; Falkensammer, P; Sklansky, M S; Platt, L D

    2003-10-01

    Spatio-temporal image correlation (STIC) is a new approach for clinical assessment of the fetal heart. It offers an easy to use technique to acquire data from the fetal heart and to aid in visualization with both two-dimensional and three-dimensional (3D) cine sequences. The acquisition is performed in two steps: first, images are acquired by a single, automatic volume sweep. Second, the system analyzes the image data according to their spatial and temporal domain and processes an online dynamic 3D image sequence that is displayed in a multiplanar reformatted cross-sectional display and/or a surface rendered display. The examiner can navigate within the heart, re-slice, and produce all of the standard image planes necessary for a comprehensive diagnosis. The advantages of STIC for use in evaluation of the fetal heart are as follows: the technique delivers a temporal resolution which corresponds to a B-mode frame rate of approximately 80 frames/s; it provides the examiner with an unlimited number of images for review; it allows for correlation between image planes that are perpendicular to the main image acquisition plane; it may shorten the evaluation time when complex heart defects are suspected; it enables the reconstruction of a 3D rendered image that contains depth and volume which may provide additional information that is not available from the thin multiplanar image slices (e.g. for pulmonary veins, septal thickness); it lends itself to storage and review of volume data by the examiner or by experts at a remote site; it provides the examiner with the ability to review all images in a looped cine sequence. PMID:14528474

  16. Image motion compensation by area correlation and centroid tracking of solar surface features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nein, M. E.; Mcintosh, W. R.; Cumings, N. P.

    1983-01-01

    An experimental solar correlation tracker was tested and evaluated on a ground-based solar magnetograph. Using sunspots as fixed targets, tracking error signals were derived by which the telescope image was stabilized against wind induced perturbations. Two methods of stabilization were investigated; mechanical stabilization of the image by controlled two-axes motion of an active optical element in the telescope beam, and electronic stabilization by biasing of the electron scan in the recording camera. Both approaches have demonstrated telescope stability of about 0.6 arc sec under random perturbations which can cause the unstabilized image to move up to 120 arc sec at frequencies up to 30 Hz.

  17. Diffractive-optical correlators: chances to make optical image preprocessing as intelligent as human vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauinger, Norbert

    2004-10-01

    The human eye is a good model for the engineering of optical correlators. Three prominent intelligent functionalities in human vision could in the near future become realized by a new diffractive-optical hardware design of optical imaging sensors: (1) Illuminant-adaptive RGB-based color Vision, (2) Monocular 3D Vision based on RGB data processing, (3) Patchwise fourier-optical Object-Classification and Identification. The hardware design of the human eye has specific diffractive-optical elements (DOE's) in aperture and in image space and seems to execute the three jobs at -- or not far behind -- the loci of the images of objects.

  18. Discriminative learning and recognition of image set classes using canonical correlations.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Kyun; Kittler, Josef; Cipolla, Roberto

    2007-06-01

    We address the problem of comparing sets of images for object recognition, where the sets may represent variations in an object's appearance due to changing camera pose and lighting conditions. Canonical Correlations (also known as principal or canonical angles), which can be thought of as the angles between two d-dimensional subspaces, have recently attracted attention for image set matching. Canonical correlations offer many benefits in accuracy, efficiency, and robustness compared to the two main classical methods: parametric distribution-based and nonparametric sample-based matching of sets. Here, this is first demonstrated experimentally for reasonably sized data sets using existing methods exploiting canonical correlations. Motivated by their proven effectiveness, a novel discriminative learning method over sets is proposed for set classification. Specifically, inspired by classical Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA), we develop a linear discriminant function that maximizes the canonical correlations of within-class sets and minimizes the canonical correlations of between-class sets. Image sets transformed by the discriminant function are then compared by the canonical correlations. Classical orthogonal subspace method (OSM) is also investigated for the similar purpose and compared with the proposed method. The proposed method is evaluated on various object recognition problems using face image sets with arbitrary motion captured under different illuminations and image sets of 500 general objects taken at different views. The method is also applied to object category recognition using ETH-80 database. The proposed method is shown to outperform the state-of-the-art methods in terms of accuracy and efficiency. PMID:17431299

  19. NCI Workshop Report: Clinical and Computational Requirements for Correlating Imaging Phenotypes with Genomics Signatures

    PubMed Central

    Colen, Rivka; Foster, Ian; Gatenby, Robert; Giger, Mary Ellen; Gillies, Robert; Gutman, David; Heller, Matthew; Jain, Rajan; Madabhushi, Anant; Madhavan, Subha; Napel, Sandy; Rao, Arvind; Saltz, Joel; Tatum, James; Verhaak, Roeland; Whitman, Gary

    2014-01-01

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Cancer Imaging Program organized two related workshops on June 26–27, 2013, entitled “Correlating Imaging Phenotypes with Genomics Signatures Research” and “Scalable Computational Resources as Required for Imaging-Genomics Decision Support Systems.” The first workshop focused on clinical and scientific requirements, exploring our knowledge of phenotypic characteristics of cancer biological properties to determine whether the field is sufficiently advanced to correlate with imaging phenotypes that underpin genomics and clinical outcomes, and exploring new scientific methods to extract phenotypic features from medical images and relate them to genomics analyses. The second workshop focused on computational methods that explore informatics and computational requirements to extract phenotypic features from medical images and relate them to genomics analyses and improve the accessibility and speed of dissemination of existing NIH resources. These workshops linked clinical and scientific requirements of currently known phenotypic and genotypic cancer biology characteristics with imaging phenotypes that underpin genomics and clinical outcomes. The group generated a set of recommendations to NCI leadership and the research community that encourage and support development of the emerging radiogenomics research field to address short-and longer-term goals in cancer research. PMID:25389451

  20. Correlating objective and subjective evaluation of texture appearance with applications to camera phone imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Jonathan B.; Coppola, Stephen M.; Jin, Elaine W.; Chen, Ying; Clark, James H.; Mauer, Timothy A.

    2009-01-01

    Texture appearance is an important component of photographic image quality as well as object recognition. Noise cleaning algorithms are used to decrease sensor noise of digital images, but can hinder texture elements in the process. The Camera Phone Image Quality (CPIQ) initiative of the International Imaging Industry Association (I3A) is developing metrics to quantify texture appearance. Objective and subjective experimental results of the texture metric development are presented in this paper. Eight levels of noise cleaning were applied to ten photographic scenes that included texture elements such as faces, landscapes, architecture, and foliage. Four companies (Aptina Imaging, LLC, Hewlett-Packard, Eastman Kodak Company, and Vista Point Technologies) have performed psychophysical evaluations of overall image quality using one of two methods of evaluation. Both methods presented paired comparisons of images on thin film transistor liquid crystal displays (TFT-LCD), but the display pixel pitch and viewing distance differed. CPIQ has also been developing objective texture metrics and targets that were used to analyze the same eight levels of noise cleaning. The correlation of the subjective and objective test results indicates that texture perception can be modeled with an objective metric. The two methods of psychophysical evaluation exhibited high correlation despite the differences in methodology.

  1. NCI Workshop Report: Clinical and Computational Requirements for Correlating Imaging Phenotypes with Genomics Signatures.

    PubMed

    Colen, Rivka; Foster, Ian; Gatenby, Robert; Giger, Mary Ellen; Gillies, Robert; Gutman, David; Heller, Matthew; Jain, Rajan; Madabhushi, Anant; Madhavan, Subha; Napel, Sandy; Rao, Arvind; Saltz, Joel; Tatum, James; Verhaak, Roeland; Whitman, Gary

    2014-10-01

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Cancer Imaging Program organized two related workshops on June 26-27, 2013, entitled "Correlating Imaging Phenotypes with Genomics Signatures Research" and "Scalable Computational Resources as Required for Imaging-Genomics Decision Support Systems." The first workshop focused on clinical and scientific requirements, exploring our knowledge of phenotypic characteristics of cancer biological properties to determine whether the field is sufficiently advanced to correlate with imaging phenotypes that underpin genomics and clinical outcomes, and exploring new scientific methods to extract phenotypic features from medical images and relate them to genomics analyses. The second workshop focused on computational methods that explore informatics and computational requirements to extract phenotypic features from medical images and relate them to genomics analyses and improve the accessibility and speed of dissemination of existing NIH resources. These workshops linked clinical and scientific requirements of currently known phenotypic and genotypic cancer biology characteristics with imaging phenotypes that underpin genomics and clinical outcomes. The group generated a set of recommendations to NCI leadership and the research community that encourage and support development of the emerging radiogenomics research field to address short-and longer-term goals in cancer research.

  2. High contrast photoacoustic imaging with dual apodization with cross-correlation: ex-vivo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Chi Hyung; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2011-03-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) images generally suffer from high clutter levels since only one-way acoustic beam forming is used to reconstruct an image. Several methods have been presented in the ultrasound (US) literature to suppress sidelobes and reduce artifacts due to phase aberrations. Notable is a class of methods using the dual apodization with cross-correlation (DAX) method. Although a very powerful tool, DAX weighting can create artifacts in complex source environments, generally underestimating the strength of weak point scatterers and speckle regions while overestimating noise signals. This fact can work to our advantage, however, in visualizing microvessels or locating regions with a significant concentration of contrast agents using PA imaging. We examined the use of PA imaging combined with DAX processing to obtain high-contrast images of a black dye inclusion placed ex vivo into fresh bovine tissue. The tissue sample was imaged with an interleaved, real-time US/PA system including a pulse laser source operating at 20 Hz. A 5MHz linear array transducer was used both for conventional US imaging and to detect the PA signal at 720 nm wavelength. Results suggest that PA imaging with DAX combined with ultrasound imaging can produce high-contrast and high-spatial-resolution visualization of particle inclusions.

  3. Optimal estimation in polarimetric imaging in the presence of correlated noise fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Fade, Julien; Panigrahi, Swapnesh; Alouini, Mehdi

    2014-03-10

    We quantitatively analyze how a polarization-sensitive imager can overcome the precision of a standard intensity camera when estimating a parameter on a polarized source over an intense background. We show that the gain is maximized when the two polarimetric channels are perturbed with significantly correlated noise fluctuations. An optimal estimator is derived and compared to standard intensity and polarimetric estimators.

  4. Correlation of cytotoxic activity in lungs to recovery of normal and gamma-irradiated cotton rats from respiratory syncytial virus infection

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, C.S.; Wyde, P.R.; Knight, V.

    1983-10-01

    Cotton rats (Sigmodon hispidus) that were exposed to 300, 600, or 900 rads of gamma irradiation and inoculated intranasally 2 days later with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) exhibited prolonged virus shedding and delayed humoral and cytotoxic immune responses compared with comparably inoculated nonirradiated control rats. In nonirradiated animals and in animals exposed to 300 and 600 rads, levels of virus declined and then disappeared from the lungs during the period in which cytotoxic activity was maximal in the lungs of these animals. In contrast, in the group of cotton rats exposed to 900 rads of irradiation, local cytotoxic activity remained low throughout the 11-day observation period, and virus was not eliminated from the lungs. Although virus-neutralizing antibodies in serum and lavage fluids from these animals may have been involved, correlation of antibody concentrations with virus clearance from lungs was not as evident. These data suggest that cytotoxic effector cells have a positive role in eliminating RSV from the lungs of unprimed cotton rats.

  5. k-Space Image Correlation Spectroscopy: A Method for Accurate Transport Measurements Independent of Fluorophore Photophysics

    PubMed Central

    Kolin, David L.; Ronis, David; Wiseman, Paul W.

    2006-01-01

    We present the theory and application of reciprocal space image correlation spectroscopy (kICS). This technique measures the number density, diffusion coefficient, and velocity of fluorescently labeled macromolecules in a cell membrane imaged on a confocal, two-photon, or total internal reflection fluorescence microscope. In contrast to r-space correlation techniques, we show kICS can recover accurate dynamics even in the presence of complex fluorophore photobleaching and/or “blinking”. Furthermore, these quantities can be calculated without nonlinear curve fitting, or any knowledge of the beam radius of the exciting laser. The number densities calculated by kICS are less sensitive to spatial inhomogeneity of the fluorophore distribution than densities measured using image correlation spectroscopy. We use simulations as a proof-of-principle to show that number densities and transport coefficients can be extracted using this technique. We present calibration measurements with fluorescent microspheres imaged on a confocal microscope, which recover Stokes-Einstein diffusion coefficients, and flow velocities that agree with single particle tracking measurements. We also show the application of kICS to measurements of the transport dynamics of α5-integrin/enhanced green fluorescent protein constructs in a transfected CHO cell imaged on a total internal reflection fluorescence microscope using charge-coupled device area detection. PMID:16861272

  6. The impact of angular separation on the performance of biplane correlation imaging for lung nodule detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasab, Nariman Majdi; Samei, Ehsan

    2006-03-01

    In this paper, we evaluate the performance of biplane correlation imaging (BCI) using a set of off-angle projections acquired from an anthropomorphic chest phantom. BCI reduces the effect of anatomical noise, which would otherwise impact the detection subtle lesions in planar images. BCI also minimizes the number of false positives (FPs) when used in conjunction with computer aided diagnosis (CAD) applied to a set of coronal chest x-ray projections by eliminating non-correlated nodule candidates. In BCI, two digital images of the chest are acquired within a short time interval from two slightly different posterior projections. The image data are then incorporated into the CAD algorithm in which nodules are detected by examining the geometrical correlation of the detected signals in the two views, thus largely "canceling" the impact of anatomical noise. Seventy-one low exposure posterior projections were acquired of an anthropomorphic chest phantom containing tissue equivalent lesions with small angular separations (0.32 degree) over a range of 20 degrees, [-10°, +10°], along the vertical axis. The data were analyzed to determine the accuracy of the technique as a function of angular separation. The results indicated that the best performance was obtained when the angular separation of the projection pair was greater than 6 degrees. Within the range of optimum angular separation, the number of FPs per image, FPpI, was ~1.1 with average sensitivity around 75% (supported by a grant from the NIH R01CA109074).

  7. Anatomy-Correlated Breast Imaging and Visual Grading Analysis Using Quantitative Transmission Ultrasound™

    PubMed Central

    Iuanow, Elaine; Malik, Bilal; Obuchowski, Nancy A.; Wiskin, James

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. This study presents correlations between cross-sectional anatomy of human female breasts and Quantitative Transmission (QT) Ultrasound, does discriminate classifier analysis to validate the speed of sound correlations, and does a visual grading analysis comparing QT Ultrasound with mammography. Materials and Methods. Human cadaver breasts were imaged using QT Ultrasound, sectioned, and photographed. Biopsies confirmed microanatomy and areas were correlated with QT Ultrasound images. Measurements were taken in live subjects from QT Ultrasound images and values of speed of sound for each identified anatomical structure were plotted. Finally, a visual grading analysis was performed on images to determine whether radiologists' confidence in identifying breast structures with mammography (XRM) is comparable to QT Ultrasound. Results. QT Ultrasound identified all major anatomical features of the breast, and speed of sound calculations showed specific values for different breast tissues. Using linear discriminant analysis overall accuracy is 91.4%. Using visual grading analysis readers scored the image quality on QT Ultrasound as better than on XRM in 69%–90% of breasts for specific tissues. Conclusions. QT Ultrasound provides accurate anatomic information and high tissue specificity using speed of sound information. Quantitative Transmission Ultrasound can distinguish different types of breast tissue with high resolution and accuracy. PMID:27752261

  8. Brca1/p53 deficient mouse breast tumor hemodynamics during hyperoxic respiratory challenge monitored by a novel wide-field functional imaging (WiFI) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moy, Austin; Kim, Jae G.; Lee, Eva Y. H. P.; Tromberg, Bruce; Cerussi, Albert; Choi, Bernard

    2009-02-01

    Current imaging modalities allow precise visualization of tumors but do not enable quantitative characterization of the tumor metabolic state. Such quantitative information would enhance our understanding of tumor progression and response to treatment, and to our overall understanding of tumor biology. To address this problem, we have developed a wide-field functional imaging (WiFI) instrument which combines two optical imaging modalities, spatially modulated imaging (MI) and laser speckle imaging (LSI). Our current WiFI imaging protocol consists of multispectral imaging in the near infrared (650-980 nm) spectrum, over a wide (7 cm × 5 cm) field of view. Using MI, the spatially-resolved reflectance of sinusoidal patterns projected onto the tissue is assessed, and optical properties of the tissue are estimated using a Monte Carlo model. From the spatial maps of local absorption and reduced scattering coefficients, tissue composition information is extracted in the form of oxy-, deoxy-, and total hemoglobin concentrations, and percentage of lipid and water. Using LSI, the reflectance of a 785 nm laser speckle pattern on the tissue is acquired and analyzed to compute maps of blood perfusion in the tissue. Tissue metabolism state is estimated from the values of blood perfusion, volume and oxygenation state. We currently are employing the WiFI instrument to study tumor development in a BRCA1/p53 deficient mice breast tumor model. The animals are monitored with WiFI during hyperoxic respiratory challenge. At present, four tumors have been measured with WiFI, and preliminary data suggest that tumor metabolic changes during hyperoxic respiratory challenge can be determined.

  9. Visualizing Functional Pathways in the Human Brain Using Correlation Tensors and Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Zhaohua; Xu, Ran; Bailey, Stephen K.; Wu, Tung-Lin; Morgan, Victoria L.; Cutting, Laurie E.; Anderson, Adam W.; Gore, John C.

    2016-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging usually detects changes in blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signals from T2*-sensitive acquisitions, and is most effective in detecting activity in brain cortex which is irrigated by rich vasculature to meet high metabolic demands. We recently demonstrated that MRI signals from T2*-sensitive acquisitions in a resting state exhibit structure-specific temporal correlations along white matter tracts. In this report we validate our preliminary findings and introduce spatio-temporal functional correlation tensors to characterize the directional preferences of temporal correlations in MRI signals acquired at rest. The results bear a remarkable similarity to data obtained by diffusion tensor imaging but without any diffusion-encoding gradients. Just as in gray matter, temporal correlations in resting state signals may reflect intrinsic synchronizations of neural activity in white matter. Here we demonstrate that functional correlation tensors are able to visualize long range white matter tracts as well as short range sub-cortical fibers imaged at rest, and that evoked functional activities alter these structures and enhance the visualization of relevant neural circuitry. Furthermore, we explore the biophysical mechanisms underlying these phenomena by comparing pulse sequences, which suggest that white matter signal variations are consistent with hemodynamic (BOLD) changes associated with neural activity. These results suggest new ways to evaluate MRI signal changes within white matter. PMID:26477562

  10. Quantification of melanin and iron content in uveal malignant melanomas and correlation with magnetic resonance image.

    PubMed Central

    Ferris, J D; Bloom, P A; Goddard, P R; Collins, C

    1993-01-01

    Eleven patients with uveal malignant melanomas (MM) were studied by magnetic resonance (MR) imaging before enucleation. The MR appearances varied, but often were different from those previously reported to be characteristic of these tumours. Using an image analyser to assess quantitatively the melanin and iron content of each tumour, a wide range of tumour melanin concentrations was found, but universally low tumour iron concentrations. These values were compared with MR appearances that were quantified and expressed as contrast to noise ratios. The correlation between T1 and T2 shortening and increasing melanin content did not reach statistical significance. There was no correlation between MR appearances and iron content. The theories postulated to explain the diverse MR appearances of uveal MMs are discussed and variations in tumour melanin content and differences in scanner strengths are suggested as the most likely explanations. Images PMID:8318467

  11. Computational assessment of mammography accreditation phantom images and correlation with human observer analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barufaldi, Bruno; Lau, Kristen C.; Schiabel, Homero; Maidment, D. A.

    2015-03-01

    Routine performance of basic test procedures and dose measurements are essential for assuring high quality of mammograms. International guidelines recommend that breast care providers ascertain that mammography systems produce a constant high quality image, using as low a radiation dose as is reasonably achievable. The main purpose of this research is to develop a framework to monitor radiation dose and image quality in a mixed breast screening and diagnostic imaging environment using an automated tracking system. This study presents a module of this framework, consisting of a computerized system to measure the image quality of the American College of Radiology mammography accreditation phantom. The methods developed combine correlation approaches, matched filters, and data mining techniques. These methods have been used to analyze radiological images of the accreditation phantom. The classification of structures of interest is based upon reports produced by four trained readers. As previously reported, human observers demonstrate great variation in their analysis due to the subjectivity of human visual inspection. The software tool was trained with three sets of 60 phantom images in order to generate decision trees using the software WEKA (Waikato Environment for Knowledge Analysis). When tested with 240 images during the classification step, the tool correctly classified 88%, 99%, and 98%, of fibers, speck groups and masses, respectively. The variation between the computer classification and human reading was comparable to the variation between human readers. This computerized system not only automates the quality control procedure in mammography, but also decreases the subjectivity in the expert evaluation of the phantom images.

  12. Preliminary evaluation of biplane correlation (BCI) stereographic imaging for lung nodule detection.

    PubMed

    Boyce, Sarah J; McAdams, H Page; Ravin, Carl E; Patz, Edward F; Washington, Lacey; Martinez, Santiago; Koweek, Lynne; Samei, Ehsan

    2013-02-01

    A biplane correlation (BCI) imaging system obtains images that can be viewed in stereo, thereby minimizing overlapping structures. This study investigated whether using stereoscopic visualization provides superior lung nodule detection compared to standard postero-anterior (PA) image display. Images were acquired at two oblique views of ±3° as well as at a standard PA position from 60 patients. Images were processed using optimal parameters and displayed on a stereoscopic display. The PA image was viewed in the standard format, while the oblique views were paired to provide a stereoscopic view of the subject. A preliminary observer study was performed with four radiologists who viewed and scored the PA image then viewed and scored the BCI stereoscopic image. The BCI stereoscopic viewing of lung nodules resulted in 71 % sensitivity and 0.31 positive predictive value (PPV) index compared to PA results of 86 % sensitivity and 0.26 PPV index. The sensitivity for lung nodule detection with the BCI stereoscopic system was reduced by 15 %; however, the total number of false positives reported was reduced by 35 % resulting in an improved PPV index of 20 %. The preliminary results indicate observer dependency in terms of relative advantage of either system in the detection of lung nodules, but overall equivalency of the two methods with promising potential for BCI as an adjunct diagnostic technique.

  13. An acousto-optic image correlator with a throughput rate of 1000 templates per second

    SciTech Connect

    Molley, P.A.

    1990-03-28

    A two dimensional image correlator based on acousto-optic (AO) and charge-coupled devices (CCDs) is described that can be built with existing technology to provide 1000 frames per second operation. In recent years, architectures have been developed that perform the two dimensional correlation utilizing one dimensional input devices. The input scene is loaded into the acousto-optic device (AOD) one line at time. This line is then correlated against all of the rows of a reference template introduced into the optical system using a one dimensional array of LEDs or laser diodes. However, it generally takes a much greater time to load the AO cell than it does to process the information. this latency time severely limits the maximum throughput rate of the processor. This paper introduces a new acousto-optic correlator implementation that overcomes this bottleneck so that processing can occur close to 100% of the time. A grayscale image correlator is proposed that can be built using present technology that can realistically achieve throughput rates on the order of 10{sup 12} operations per second. This translates to over 1000 correlations per second for input scenes with dimensions of 512 {times} 512 pixels and reference templates of size 64 {times} 64 pixels. 10 refs., 4 figs.

  14. Prostate Cancer: Value of Multiparametric MR Imaging at 3 T for Detection—Histopathologic Correlation1

    PubMed Central

    Turkbey, Baris; Pinto, Peter A.; Mani, Haresh; Bernardo, Marcelino; Pang, Yuxi; McKinney, Yolanda L.; Khurana, Kiranpreet; Ravizzini, Gregory C.; Albert, Paul S.; Merino, Maria J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To determine utility of multiparametric imaging performed at 3 T for detection of prostate cancer by using T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, MR spectroscopy, and dynamic contrast material–enhanced MR imaging, with whole-mount pathologic findings as reference standard. Materials and Methods: This prospectively designed, HIPAA-compliant, single-institution study was approved by the local institutional review board. Seventy consecutive patients (mean age, 60.4 years; mean prostate-specific antigen level, 5.47 ng/mL [5.47 μg/L]; range, 1–19.9 ng/mL [1–19.9 μg/L]) were included; informed consent was obtained from each patient. All patients had biopsy-proved prostate cancer, with a median Gleason score of 7 (range, 6–9). Images were obtained by using a combination of six-channel cardiac and endorectal coils. MR imaging and pathologic findings were evaluated independently and blinded and then correlated with histopathologic findings by using side-by-side comparison. Analyses were conducted with a raw stringent approach and an alternative neighboring method, which accounted for surgical deformation, shrinkage, and nonuniform slicing factors in pathologic specimens. Generalized estimating equations (GEEs) were used to estimate the predictive value of region-specific, pathologically determined cancer for all three modalities. This approach accounts for the correlation among multiple regions in the same individual. Results: For T2-weighted MR imaging, sensitivity and specificity values obtained with stringent approach were 0.42 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.36, 0.47) and 0.83 (95% CI: 0.81, 0.86), and for the alternative neighboring approach, sensitivity and specificity values were 0.73 (95% CI: 0.67, 0.78) and 0.89 (95% CI: 0.85, 0.93), respectively. The combined diagnostic accuracy of T2-weighted MR imaging, dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging, and MR spectroscopy for peripheral zone tumors was examined by calculating their predictive value

  15. Functional Image-Guided Radiotherapy Planning in Respiratory-Gated Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Tomoki; Nishibuchi, Ikuno; Murakami, Yuji; Kenjo, Masahiro; Kaneyasu, Yuko; Nagata, Yasushi

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the incorporation of functional lung image-derived low attenuation area (LAA) based on four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) into respiratory-gated intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in treatment planning for lung cancer patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Methods and Materials: Eight lung cancer patients with COPD were the subjects of this study. LAA was generated from 4D-CT data sets according to CT values of less than than -860 Hounsfield units (HU) as a threshold. The functional lung image was defined as the area where LAA was excluded from the image of the total lung. Two respiratory-gated radiotherapy plans (70 Gy/35 fractions) were designed and compared in each patient as follows: Plan A was an anatomical IMRT or VMAT plan based on the total lung; Plan F was a functional IMRT or VMAT plan based on the functional lung. Dosimetric parameters (percentage of total lung volume irradiated with {>=}20 Gy [V20], and mean dose of total lung [MLD]) of the two plans were compared. Results: V20 was lower in Plan F than in Plan A (mean 1.5%, p = 0.025 in IMRT, mean 1.6%, p = 0.044 in VMAT) achieved by a reduction in MLD (mean 0.23 Gy, p = 0.083 in IMRT, mean 0.5 Gy, p = 0.042 in VMAT). No differences were noted in target volume coverage and organ-at-risk doses. Conclusions: Functional IGRT planning based on LAA in respiratory-guided IMRT or VMAT appears to be effective in preserving a functional lung in lung cancer patients with COPD.

  16. Application of linear-scale differential analysis in phase correlation method of image stitching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezzubik, Vitalii V.; Belashenkov, Nickolai R.; Losev, Sergei V.

    2016-03-01

    A robust method of creation of panoramic images which does not consume much processing resources is proposed and investigated. The phase correlation (PC) method is taken as a basic one because of simplicity of its algorithm and low computing time due to application of FFT technique. Standard PC procedure is modified by preprocessing of source frames of panoramic images in spatial domain. Preprocessing comprises Linear-Scale Differential Analysis (LSDA) with sequent content-dependent thresholding of intensity gradients. Method is proved for artificially blurred and noise corrupted images. It is shown that new robust algorithm allows to increase the productivity of creation of panoramic images keeping the probability of successive stitching close to maximum even for low-quality source frames.

  17. RASL: robust alignment by sparse and low-rank decomposition for linearly correlated images.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yigang; Ganesh, Arvind; Wright, John; Xu, Wenli; Ma, Yi

    2012-11-01

    This paper studies the problem of simultaneously aligning a batch of linearly correlated images despite gross corruption (such as occlusion). Our method seeks an optimal set of image domain transformations such that the matrix of transformed images can be decomposed as the sum of a sparse matrix of errors and a low-rank matrix of recovered aligned images. We reduce this extremely challenging optimization problem to a sequence of convex programs that minimize the sum of l1-norm and nuclear norm of the two component matrices, which can be efficiently solved by scalable convex optimization techniques. We verify the efficacy of the proposed robust alignment algorithm with extensive experiments on both controlled and uncontrolled real data, demonstrating higher accuracy and efficiency than existing methods over a wide range of realistic misalignments and corruptions.

  18. Multi-modal contrast of tissue anatomy enables correlative biomarker imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garsha, Karl; Ventura, Franklin; Pestano, Gary; Otter, Michael; Nagy, Dea; Nagle, Ray B.; Roberts, Esteban; Barnes, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Optical imaging techniques are being developed that promise to increase the information content related to specific molecular reporters. Such modalities do not produce contrast in the structural context of the surrounding tissue, making it difficult to reconcile molecular information with morphological context. We report a solution that enables visualization of the tissue morphology on formalin-fixed, paraffin embedded sections prepared for analytical biomarker imaging. Our approach combines modes of transmitted darkfield and fluorescence contrast and computer visualization to produce 2-component image data analogous to the classical hematoxylin and eosin histological stain. An interferometric hyperspectral image capture mode enables measurement of multiplexed biomarkers in annotated anatomic regions. The system enables practical correlative analysis of molecular changes within areas of anatomic pathology.

  19. Correlation between model observer and human observer performance in CT imaging when lesion location is uncertain

    SciTech Connect

    Leng, Shuai; Yu, Lifeng; Zhang, Yi; McCollough, Cynthia H.; Carter, Rickey; Toledano, Alicia Y.

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the correlation between model observer and human observer performance in CT imaging for the task of lesion detection and localization when the lesion location is uncertain.Methods: Two cylindrical rods (3-mm and 5-mm diameters) were placed in a 35 × 26 cm torso-shaped water phantom to simulate lesions with −15 HU contrast at 120 kV. The phantom was scanned 100 times on a 128-slice CT scanner at each of four dose levels (CTDIvol = 5.7, 11.4, 17.1, and 22.8 mGy). Regions of interest (ROIs) around each lesion were extracted to generate images with signal-present, with each ROI containing 128 × 128 pixels. Corresponding ROIs of signal-absent images were generated from images without lesion mimicking rods. The location of the lesion (rod) in each ROI was randomly distributed by moving the ROIs around each lesion. Human observer studies were performed by having three trained observers identify the presence or absence of lesions, indicating the lesion location in each image and scoring confidence for the detection task on a 6-point scale. The same image data were analyzed using a channelized Hotelling model observer (CHO) with Gabor channels. Internal noise was added to the decision variables for the model observer study. Area under the curve (AUC) of ROC and localization ROC (LROC) curves were calculated using a nonparametric approach. The Spearman's rank order correlation between the average performance of the human observers and the model observer performance was calculated for the AUC of both ROC and LROC curves for both the 3- and 5-mm diameter lesions.Results: In both ROC and LROC analyses, AUC values for the model observer agreed well with the average values across the three human observers. The Spearman's rank order correlation values for both ROC and LROC analyses for both the 3- and 5-mm diameter lesions were all 1.0, indicating perfect rank ordering agreement of the figures of merit (AUC) between the

  20. Disease activity in Graves' ophthalmopathy: diagnosis with orbital MR imaging and correlation with clinical score.

    PubMed

    Tortora, Fabio; Cirillo, Mario; Ferrara, Marco; Belfiore, Maria Paola; Carella, Carlo; Caranci, Ferdinando; Cirillo, Sossio

    2013-10-01

    In Graves' ophthalmopathy (GO) it is important to distinguish acute inflammation at an early stage, responsive to immunosuppressive treatment, from inactive fibrotic end stage disease, unresponsive to the same treatment. The purpose of this study was to identify the most relevant signal intensities on orbital MR imaging with contrast administration both to classify patients according to their clinical activity score (defined by a cut-off value of 3) and to make a prediction of patient's CAS. Such threshold was considered as widely used in literature. Sixteen consecutive patients with a diagnosis of GO in different phases of thyroid disease based on clinical and orbital MR imaging signs, and six normal volunteers were examined. Orbital MR imaging was performed on a 1.5 Tesla MR Unit. MR scans were assessed by an experienced neuroradiologist, blinded to the clinical examinations. We found a statistical correlation between CAS and both STIR and contrast enhanced T1-weighted sequences. There was also a statistically significant correlation between STIR and contrast-enhanced T1 images disclosing the possibility of avoiding the injection of contrast medium. Our study proved that signal intensity values on STIR sequence increase in the inflammatory oedematous phase of disease. We confirmed the correlation between signal intensities on this sequence and CAS, showing an increase in signal intensity proportional to the CAS value. So we validated MRI use to establish the activity phase of disease more sensitively than CAS alone.

  1. Marking-dots digital image correlation and application to studies of spinal biomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jinlong; Sun, Cuiru; Qin, Yuwen; Ji, Xinhua

    2005-04-01

    A method of marking-dots digital image correlation is developed to measure the biomechanics behavior of cattle spine. In the system, a video camera and personal computer are used to acquire digitized images of a random speckle pattern on the surface of a marking-dot before and after deformation. The method of making-dots digital image correlation can immediately measure the transformation by tracking the gray value pattern in small local neighborhoods commonly referred to as subsets. In the experiment, a specimen was selected from the cattle's spine that was covered with some muscles and tissues. It is apparent that the covering muscles and tissues cannot be treated as the information carrier, for they must be kept active and moist curing by the physiological brine in the course of the experiment. In order to solve the problem, the marking-dots were fixed into the vertebrae, and the front surface of a marking-dot was coated with a thin layer of white paint and splattered with black spot so as to create a random black-on-white speckle pattern. Experimental results have shown that the marking-dots digital image correlation method can be applied to the measurement of the biomechanical behavior of cattle spine, and offer an effective measurement tool to research the range of motion of the adjacent segment in spine under intervertebral fusion.

  2. Disease Activity in Graves' Ophthalmopathy: Diagnosis with Orbital MR Imaging and Correlation with Clinical Score

    PubMed Central

    Tortora, Fabio; Cirillo, Mario; Ferrara, Marco; Belfiore, Maria Paola; Carella, Carlo; Caranci, Ferdinando; Cirillo, Sossio

    2013-01-01

    Summary In Graves' ophthalmopathy (GO) it is important to distinguish acute inflammation at an early stage, responsive to immunosuppressive treatment, from inactive fibrotic end stage disease, unresponsive to the same treatment. The purpose of this study was to identify the most relevant signal intensities on orbital MR imaging with contrast administration both to classify patients according to their clinical activity score (defined by a cut-off value of 3) and to make a prediction of patient's CAS. Such threshold was considered as widely used in literature. Sixteen consecutive patients with a diagnosis of GO in different phases of thyroid disease based on clinical and orbital MR imaging signs, and six normal volunteers were examined. Orbital MR imaging was performed on a 1.5 Tesla MR Unit. MR scans were assessed by an experienced neuroradiologist, blinded to the clinical examinations. We found a statistical correlation between CAS and both STIR and contrast enhanced T1-weighted sequences. There was also a statistically significant correlation between STIR and contrast-enhanced T1 images disclosing the possibility of avoiding the injection of contrast medium. Our study proved that signal intensity values on STIR sequence increase in the inflammatory oedematous phase of disease. We confirmed the correlation between signal intensities on this sequence and CAS, showing an increase in signal intensity proportional to the CAS value. So we validated MRI use to establish the activity phase of disease more sensitively than CAS alone. PMID:24199816

  3. Spatial correlation of confocal Raman scattering and secondary ion mass spectrometric molecular images of lignocellulosic materials.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen; Chu, Li-Qiang; Sweedler, Jonathan V; Bohn, Paul W

    2010-04-01

    A detailed chemical and structural understanding of pre-enzymatic processing of lignocellulosic materials (LCMs) is a key objective in the development of renewable energy. Efficient rendering of biomass components into fermentable substrates for conversion into biofuel feedstocks would benefit greatly from the development of new technologies to provide high-quality, spatially resolved chemical information about LCMs during the various processing states. In an effort to realize this important goal, spatially correlated confocal Raman and mass spectrometric images allow the extraction of three-dimensional information from the perennial grass, Miscanthus x giganteus. An optical microscopy-based landmark registry scheme was developed that allows samples to be transferred between laboratories at different institutions, while retaining the capability to access the same physical regions of the samples. Subsequent to higher resolution imaging via confocal Raman microscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), laser desorption-ionization mass spectrometry was used to place these regions within the overall sample architecture. Excellent sample registry was evident in the highly correlated Raman and SIMS images. In addition, the correlation of vibrational Raman scattering with mass spectra from specific spatial locations allowed confirmation of the assignment of intracellular globular structures to hemicellulose-rich lignin complexes, an assignment which could only be made tentatively from either image alone. PMID:20205411

  4. Nonequilibrium fluctuations in metaphase spindles: polarized light microscopy, image registration, and correlation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brugués, Jan; Needleman, Daniel J.

    2010-02-01

    Metaphase spindles are highly dynamic, nonequilibrium, steady-state structures. We study the internal fluctuations of spindles by computing spatio-temporal correlation functions of movies obtained from quantitative polarized light microscopy. These correlation functions are only physically meaningful if corrections are made for the net motion of the spindle. We describe our image registration algorithm in detail and we explore its robustness. Finally, we discuss the expression used for the estimation of the correlation function in terms of the nematic order of the microtubules which make up the spindle. Ultimately, studying the form of these correlation functions will provide a quantitative test of the validity of coarse-grained models of spindle structure inspired from liquid crystal physics.

  5. Single image correlation for blood flow mapping in complex vessel networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chirico, Giuseppe; Sironi, Laura; Bouzin, Margaux; D'Alfonso, Laura; Collini, Maddalena; Ceffa, Nicolo'G.; Marquezin, Cassia

    2015-05-01

    Microcirculation plays a key role in the maintenance and hemodynamics of tissues and organs also due to its extensive interaction with the immune system. A critical limitation of state-of-the-art clinical techniques to characterize the blood flow is their lack of the spatial resolution required to scale down to individual capillaries. On the other hand the study of the blood flow through auto- or cross-correlation methods fail to correlate the flow speed values with the morphological details required to describe an intricate network of capillaries. Here we propose to use a newly developed technique (FLICS, FLow Image Correlation Spectroscopy) that, by employing a single raster-scanned xy-image acquired in vivo by confocal or multi-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy, allows the quantitative measurement of the blood flow velocity in the whole vessel pattern within the field of view, while simultaneously maintaining the morphological information on the immobile structures of the explored circulatory system. Fluorescent flowing objects produce diagonal lines in the raster-scanned image superimposed to static morphological details. The flow velocity is obtained by computing the Cross Correlation Function (CCF) of the intensity fluctuations detected in pairs of columns of the image. The whole analytical dependence of the CCFs on the flow speed amplitude and the flow direction has been reported recently. We report here the derivation of approximated analytical relations that allows to use the CCF peak lag time and the corresponding CCF value, to directly estimate the flow speed amplitude and the flow direction. The validation has been performed on Zebrafish embryos for which the flow direction was changed systematically by rotating the embryos on the microscope stage. The results indicate that also from the CCF peak lag time it is possible to recover the flow speed amplitude within 13% of uncertainty (overestimation) in a wide range of angles between the flow and

  6. Partial correlation analyses of global diffusion tensor imaging-derived metrics in glioblastoma multiforme: Pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Cortez-Conradis, David; Rios, Camilo; Moreno-Jimenez, Sergio; Roldan-Valadez, Ernesto

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine existing correlates among diffusion tensor imaging (DTI)-derived metrics in healthy brains and brains with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). METHODS: Case-control study using DTI data from brain magnetic resonance imaging of 34 controls (mean, 41.47; SD, ± 21.94 years; range, 21-80 years) and 27 patients with GBM (mean, SD; 48.41 ± 15.18 years; range, 18-78 years). Image postprocessing using FSL software calculated eleven tensor metrics: fractional (FA) and relative anisotropy; pure isotropic (p) and anisotropic diffusions (q), total magnitude of diffusion (L); linear (Cl), planar (Cp) and spherical tensors (Cs); mean (MD), axial (AD) and radial diffusivities (RD). Partial correlation analyses (controlling the effect of age and gender) and multivariate Mancova were performed. RESULTS: There was a normal distribution for all metrics. Comparing healthy brains vs brains with GBM, there were significant very strong bivariate correlations only depicted in GBM: [FA↔Cl (+)], [FA↔q (+)], [p↔AD (+)], [AD↔MD (+)], and [MD↔RD (+)]. Among 56 pairs of bivariate correlations, only seven were significantly different. The diagnosis variable depicted a main effect [F-value (11, 23) = 11.842, P ≤ 0.001], with partial eta squared = 0.850, meaning a large effect size; age showed a similar result. The age also had a significant influence as a covariate [F (11, 23) = 10.523, P < 0.001], with a large effect size (partial eta squared = 0.834). CONCLUSION: DTI-derived metrics depict significant differences between healthy brains and brains with GBM, with specific magnitudes and correlations. This study provides reference data and makes a contribution to decrease the underlying empiricism in the use of DTI parameters in brain imaging. PMID:26644826

  7. Intravoxel Incoherent Motion MR Imaging in the Head and Neck: Correlation with Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MR Imaging and Diffusion-Weighted Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiao Quan; Choi, Young Jun; Sung, Yu Sub; Yoon, Ra Gyoung; Jang, Seung Won; Park, Ji Eun; Heo, Young Jin; Baek, Jung Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the correlation between perfusion- and diffusion-related parameters from intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) and those from dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging (DCE-MRI) and diffusion-weighted imaging in tumors and normal muscles of the head and neck. Materials and Methods We retrospectively enrolled 20 consecutive patients with head and neck tumors with MR imaging performed using a 3T MR scanner. Tissue diffusivity (D), pseudo-diffusion coefficient (D*), and perfusion fraction (f) were derived from bi-exponential fitting of IVIM data obtained with 14 different b-values in three orthogonal directions. We investigated the correlation between D, f, and D* and model-free parameters from the DCE-MRI (wash-in, Tmax, Emax, initial AUC60, whole AUC) and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value in the tumor and normal masseter muscle using a whole volume-of-interest approach. Pearson's correlation test was used for statistical analysis. Results No correlation was found between f or D* and any of the parameters from the DCE-MRI in all patients or in patients with squamous cell carcinoma (p > 0.05). The ADC was significantly correlated with D values in the tumors (p < 0.001, r = 0.980) and muscles (p = 0.013, r = 0.542), despite its significantly higher value than D. The difference between ADC and D showed significant correlation with f values in the tumors (p = 0.017, r = 0.528) and muscles (p = 0.003, r = 0.630), but no correlation with D* (p > 0.05, respectively). Conclusion Intravoxel incoherent motion shows no significant correlation with model-free perfusion parameters derived from the DCE-MRI but is feasible for the analysis of diffusivity in both tumors and normal muscles of the head and neck. PMID:27587952

  8. Prospective respiratory-gated micro-CT of free breathing rodents.

    PubMed

    Ford, Nancy L; Nikolov, Hristo N; Norley, Chris J D; Thornton, Michael M; Foster, Paula J; Drangova, Maria; Holdsworth, David W

    2005-09-01

    Microcomputed tomography (Micro-CT) has the potential to noninvasively image the structure of organs in rodent models with high spatial resolution and relatively short image acquisition times. However, motion artifacts associated with the normal respiratory motion of the animal may arise when imaging the abdomen or thorax. To reduce these artifacts and the accompanying loss of spatial resolution, we propose a prospective respiratory gating technique for use with anaesthetized, free-breathing rodents. A custom-made bed with an embedded pressure chamber was connected to a pressure transducer. Anaesthetized animals were placed in the prone position on the bed with their abdomens located over the chamber. During inspiration, the motion of the diaphragm caused an increase in the chamber pressure, which was converted into a voltage signal by the transducer. An output voltage was used to trigger image acquisition at any desired time point in the respiratory cycle. Digital radiographic images were acquired of anaesthetized, free-breathing rats with a digital radiographic system to correlate the respiratory wave form with respiration-induced organ motion. The respiratory wave form was monitored and recorded simultaneously with the x-ray radiation pulses, and an imaging window was defined, beginning at end expiration. Phantom experiments were performed to verify that the respiratory gating apparatus was triggering the micro-CT system. Attached to the distensible phantom were 100 microm diameter copper wires and the measured full width at half maximum was used to assess differences in image quality between respiratory-gated and ungated imaging protocols. This experiment allowed us to quantify the improvement in the spatial resolution, and the reduction of motion artifacts caused by moving structures, in the images resulting from respiratory-gated image acquisitions. The measured wire diameters were 0.135 mm for the stationary phantom image, 0.137 mm for the image gated at end

  9. Three-dimensional correlation of MR images to muscle tissue response for interventional MRI thermal ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breen, Michael S.; Lazebnik, Roee S.; Lewin, Jonathan S.; Wilson, David L.

    2003-05-01

    Solid tumors and other pathologies are being treated using radio-frequency (RF) ablation under interventional magnetic resonance imaging (iMRI) guidance. In animal experiments, we are investigating the ability of MR to monitor ablation treatments by comparing MR images of thermal lesions to histologically assayed cellular damage. We developed a new methodology using three-dimensional registration for making spatial correlations. A low-field, open MRI system was used to guide an ablation probe into the thigh muscle of 10 rabbits and acquire MR volumes post ablation. After the in vivo MR and histology images were aligned with a registration accuracy of 1.32 +/- 0.39 mm (mean +/- SD), a boundary of necrosis identified in histology images was compared with manually segmented boundaries of the elliptical hyperintense region in MR images. For 14 MR images, we determined that the outer boundary of the hyperintense region in MR closely corresponds to the region of cell death, with a mean absolute distance between boundaries of 0.97 mm. Since this distance may be less than our ability to measure such differences, boundaries may match perfectly. This is good evidence that MR lesion images can localize the region of cell death during RF ablation treatments.

  10. Characterization of Porous Materials by Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy Super-resolution Optical Fluctuation Imaging.

    PubMed

    Kisley, Lydia; Brunetti, Rachel; Tauzin, Lawrence J; Shuang, Bo; Yi, Xiyu; Kirkeminde, Alec W; Higgins, Daniel A; Weiss, Shimon; Landes, Christy F

    2015-09-22

    Porous materials such as cellular cytosol, hydrogels, and block copolymers have nanoscale features that determine macroscale properties. Characterizing the structure of nanopores is difficult with current techniques due to imaging, sample preparation, and computational challenges. We produce a super-resolution optical image that simultaneously characterizes the nanometer dimensions of and diffusion dynamics within porous structures by correlating stochastic fluctuations from diffusing fluorescent probes in the pores of the sample, dubbed here as "fluorescence correlation spectroscopy super-resolution optical fluctuation imaging" or "fcsSOFI". Simulations demonstrate that structural features and diffusion properties can be accurately obtained at sub-diffraction-limited resolution. We apply our technique to image agarose hydrogels and aqueous lyotropic liquid crystal gels. The heterogeneous pore resolution is improved by up to a factor of 2, and diffusion coefficients are accurately obtained through our method compared to diffraction-limited fluorescence imaging and single-particle tracking. Moreover, fcsSOFI allows for rapid and high-throughput characterization of porous materials. fcsSOFI could be applied to soft porous environments such hydrogels, polymers, and membranes in addition to hard materials such as zeolites and mesoporous silica.

  11. Correlative Electron and Fluorescence Microscopy of Magnetotactic Bacteria in Liquid: Toward In Vivo Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Woehl, Taylor J.; Kashyap, Sanjay; Firlar, Emre; Perez-Gonzalez, Teresa; Faivre, Damien; Trubitsyn, Denis; Bazylinski, Dennis A.; Prozorov, Tanya

    2014-10-31

    Magnetotactic bacteria biomineralize ordered chains of uniform, membrane-bound magnetite or greigite nanocrystals that exhibit nearly perfect crystal structures and species-specific morphologies. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a critical technique for providing information regarding the organization of cellular and magnetite structures in these microorganisms. However, conventional TEM can only be used to image air-dried or vitrified bacteria removed from their natural environment. Here we present a correlative scanning TEM (STEM) and fluorescence microscopy technique for imaging viable cells of Magnetospirillum magneticum strain AMB-1 in liquid using an in situ fluid cell TEM holder. Fluorescently labeled cells were immobilized on microchip window surfaces and visualized in a fluid cell with STEM, followed by correlative fluorescence imaging to verify their membrane integrity. Notably, the post-STEM fluorescence imaging indicated that the bacterial cell wall membrane did not sustain radiation damage during STEM imaging at low electron dose conditions. We investigated the effects of radiation damage and sample preparation on the bacteria viability and found that approximately 50% of the bacterial membranes remained intact after an hour in the fluid cell, decreasing to ~30% after two hours. These results represent a first step toward in vivo studies of magnetite biomineralization in magnetotactic bacteria.

  12. Correlative Electron and Fluorescence Microscopy of Magnetotactic Bacteria in Liquid: Toward In Vivo Imaging

    DOE PAGES

    Woehl, Taylor J.; Kashyap, Sanjay; Firlar, Emre; Perez-Gonzalez, Teresa; Faivre, Damien; Trubitsyn, Denis; Bazylinski, Dennis A.; Prozorov, Tanya

    2014-10-31

    Magnetotactic bacteria biomineralize ordered chains of uniform, membrane-bound magnetite or greigite nanocrystals that exhibit nearly perfect crystal structures and species-specific morphologies. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a critical technique for providing information regarding the organization of cellular and magnetite structures in these microorganisms. However, conventional TEM can only be used to image air-dried or vitrified bacteria removed from their natural environment. Here we present a correlative scanning TEM (STEM) and fluorescence microscopy technique for imaging viable cells of Magnetospirillum magneticum strain AMB-1 in liquid using an in situ fluid cell TEM holder. Fluorescently labeled cells were immobilized on microchip windowmore » surfaces and visualized in a fluid cell with STEM, followed by correlative fluorescence imaging to verify their membrane integrity. Notably, the post-STEM fluorescence imaging indicated that the bacterial cell wall membrane did not sustain radiation damage during STEM imaging at low electron dose conditions. We investigated the effects of radiation damage and sample preparation on the bacteria viability and found that approximately 50% of the bacterial membranes remained intact after an hour in the fluid cell, decreasing to ~30% after two hours. These results represent a first step toward in vivo studies of magnetite biomineralization in magnetotactic bacteria.« less

  13. Correlative Electron and Fluorescence Microscopy of Magnetotactic Bacteria in Liquid: Toward In Vivo Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Woehl, Taylor J.; Kashyap, Sanjay; Firlar, Emre; Perez-Gonzalez, Teresa; Faivre, Damien; Trubitsyn, Denis; Bazylinski, Dennis A.; Prozorov, Tanya

    2014-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria biomineralize ordered chains of uniform, membrane-bound magnetite or greigite nanocrystals that exhibit nearly perfect crystal structures and species-specific morphologies. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a critical technique for providing information regarding the organization of cellular and magnetite structures in these microorganisms. However, conventional TEM can only be used to image air-dried or vitrified bacteria removed from their natural environment. Here we present a correlative scanning TEM (STEM) and fluorescence microscopy technique for imaging viable cells of Magnetospirillum magneticum strain AMB-1 in liquid using an in situ fluid cell TEM holder. Fluorescently labeled cells were immobilized on microchip window surfaces and visualized in a fluid cell with STEM, followed by correlative fluorescence imaging to verify their membrane integrity. Notably, the post-STEM fluorescence imaging indicated that the bacterial cell wall membrane did not sustain radiation damage during STEM imaging at low electron dose conditions. We investigated the effects of radiation damage and sample preparation on the bacteria viability and found that approximately 50% of the bacterial membranes remained intact after an hour in the fluid cell, decreasing to ~30% after two hours. These results represent a first step toward in vivo studies of magnetite biomineralization in magnetotactic bacteria. PMID:25358460

  14. Correlative imaging of fluorescent proteins in resin-embedded plant material.

    PubMed

    Bell, Karen; Mitchell, Steve; Paultre, Danae; Posch, Markus; Oparka, Karl

    2013-04-01

    Fluorescent proteins (FPs) were developed for live-cell imaging and have revolutionized cell biology. However, not all plant tissues are accessible to live imaging using confocal microscopy, necessitating alternative approaches for protein localization. An example is the phloem, a tissue embedded deep within plant organs and sensitive to damage. To facilitate accurate localization of FPs within recalcitrant tissues, we developed a simple method for retaining FPs after resin embedding. This method is based on low-temperature fixation and dehydration, followed by embedding in London Resin White, and avoids the need for cryosections. We show that a palette of FPs can be localized in plant tissues while retaining good structural cell preservation, and that the polymerized block face can be counterstained with cell wall probes. Using this method we have been able to image green fluorescent protein-labeled plasmodesmata to a depth of more than 40 μm beneath the resin surface. Using correlative light and electron microscopy of the phloem, we were able to locate the same FP-labeled sieve elements in semithin and ultrathin sections. Sections were amenable to antibody labeling, and allowed a combination of confocal and superresolution imaging (three-dimensional-structured illumination microscopy) on the same cells. These correlative imaging methods should find several uses in plant cell biology.

  15. Correlative Electron and Fluorescence Microscopy of Magnetotactic Bacteria in Liquid: Toward In Vivo Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woehl, Taylor J.; Kashyap, Sanjay; Firlar, Emre; Perez-Gonzalez, Teresa; Faivre, Damien; Trubitsyn, Denis; Bazylinski, Dennis A.; Prozorov, Tanya

    2014-10-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria biomineralize ordered chains of uniform, membrane-bound magnetite or greigite nanocrystals that exhibit nearly perfect crystal structures and species-specific morphologies. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a critical technique for providing information regarding the organization of cellular and magnetite structures in these microorganisms. However, conventional TEM can only be used to image air-dried or vitrified bacteria removed from their natural environment. Here we present a correlative scanning TEM (STEM) and fluorescence microscopy technique for imaging viable cells of Magnetospirillum magneticum strain AMB-1 in liquid using an in situ fluid cell TEM holder. Fluorescently labeled cells were immobilized on microchip window surfaces and visualized in a fluid cell with STEM, followed by correlative fluorescence imaging to verify their membrane integrity. Notably, the post-STEM fluorescence imaging indicated that the bacterial cell wall membrane did not sustain radiation damage during STEM imaging at low electron dose conditions. We investigated the effects of radiation damage and sample preparation on the bacteria viability and found that approximately 50% of the bacterial membranes remained intact after an hour in the fluid cell, decreasing to ~30% after two hours. These results represent a first step toward in vivo studies of magnetite biomineralization in magnetotactic bacteria.

  16. Correlative imaging of fluorescent proteins in resin-embedded plant material.

    PubMed

    Bell, Karen; Mitchell, Steve; Paultre, Danae; Posch, Markus; Oparka, Karl

    2013-04-01

    Fluorescent proteins (FPs) were developed for live-cell imaging and have revolutionized cell biology. However, not all plant tissues are accessible to live imaging using confocal microscopy, necessitating alternative approaches for protein localization. An example is the phloem, a tissue embedded deep within plant organs and sensitive to damage. To facilitate accurate localization of FPs within recalcitrant tissues, we developed a simple method for retaining FPs after resin embedding. This method is based on low-temperature fixation and dehydration, followed by embedding in London Resin White, and avoids the need for cryosections. We show that a palette of FPs can be localized in plant tissues while retaining good structural cell preservation, and that the polymerized block face can be counterstained with cell wall probes. Using this method we have been able to image green fluorescent protein-labeled plasmodesmata to a depth of more than 40 μm beneath the resin surface. Using correlative light and electron microscopy of the phloem, we were able to locate the same FP-labeled sieve elements in semithin and ultrathin sections. Sections were amenable to antibody labeling, and allowed a combination of confocal and superresolution imaging (three-dimensional-structured illumination microscopy) on the same cells. These correlative imaging methods should find several uses in plant cell biology. PMID:23457228

  17. Image patch analysis of sunspots and active regions. I. Intrinsic dimension and correlation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Kevin R.; Li, Jimmy J.; Delouille, Véronique; De Visscher, Ruben; Watson, Fraser; Hero, Alfred O.

    2016-01-01

    Context. The flare productivity of an active region is observed to be related to its spatial complexity. Mount Wilson or McIntosh sunspot classifications measure such complexity but in a categorical way, and may therefore not use all the information present in the observations. Moreover, such categorical schemes hinder a systematic study of an active region's evolution for example. Aims: We propose fine-scale quantitative descriptors for an active region's complexity and relate them to the Mount Wilson classification. We analyze the local correlation structure within continuum and magnetogram data, as well as the cross-correlation between continuum and magnetogram data. Methods: We compute the intrinsic dimension, partial correlation, and canonical correlation analysis (CCA) of image patches of continuum and magnetogram active region images taken from the SOHO-MDI instrument. We use masks of sunspots derived from continuum as well as larger masks of magnetic active regions derived from magnetogram to analyze separately the core part of an active region from its surrounding part. Results: We find relationships between the complexity of an active region as measured by its Mount Wilson classification and the intrinsic dimension of its image patches. Partial correlation patterns exhibit approximately a third-order Markov structure. CCA reveals different patterns of correlation between continuum and magnetogram within the sunspots and in the region surrounding the sunspots. Conclusions: Intrinsic dimension has the potential to distinguish simple from complex active regions. These results also pave the way for patch-based dictionary learning with a view toward automatic clustering of active regions.

  18. Correlation of diffusion tensor imaging parameters with neural status in Pott’s spine

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Nikhil; Saini, Namita Singh; Kumar, Sudhir; Rajagopalan, Mukunth; Chakraborti, Kanti Lal; Jain, Anil Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has been used in cervical trauma and spondylotic myelopathy, and it has been found to correlate with neural deficit and prognosticate neural recovery. Such a correlation has not been studied in Pott’s spine with paraplegia. Hence, this prospective study has been used to find correlation of DTI parameters with neural deficit in these patients. Methods: Thirty-four patients of spinal TB were enrolled and DTI was performed before the start of treatment and after six months. Fractional anisotropy (FA), Mean diffusivity (MD), and Tractography were studied. Neurological deficit was graded by the Jain and Sinha scoring. Changes in FA and MD at and below the site of lesion (SOL) were compared to above the SOL (control) using the unpaired t-test. Pre-treatment and post-treatment values were also compared using the paired t-test. Correlation of DTI parameters with neurological score was done by Pearson’s correlation. Subjective assessment of Tractography images was done. Results: Mean average FA was not significantly decreased at the SOL in patients with paraplegia as compared to control. After six months of treatment, a significant decrease (p = 0.02) in mean average FA at the SOL compared to pre-treatment was seen. Moderate positive correlation (r = 0.49) between mean average FA and neural score after six months of treatment was found. Tractography images were not consistent with severity of paraplegia. Conclusion: Unlike spondylotic myelopathy and trauma, epidural collection and its organized inflammatory tissue in Pott’s spine precludes accurate assessment of diffusion characteristics of the compressed cord. PMID:27163110

  19. Morphological characterization of keratoconus-affected human corneas by SHG imaging and correlation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercatelli, R.; Ratto, F.; Tatini, F.; Rossi, F.; Menabuoni, L.; Nicoletti, R.; Pini, R.; Pavone, Frederick; Cicchi, R.

    2016-03-01

    Keratoconus is an ophthalmic disease in which the cornea acquires an abnormal conical shape that prevents the correct focusing on the retina, causing visual impairment. The late diagnosis of keratoconus is among the principal causes of corneal transplantation surgery. In this study, we characterize the morphology of keratoconic corneas by means of the correlation of SHG images, finding that keratoconus can be diagnosed by analyzing the inclination of lamellae below Bowman's membrane. In addition, imaging performed with both sagittal and "en face" geometry demonstrated that this morphological features can be highlighted both ex vivo and in vivo.

  20. Fish body surface data measurement based on 3D digital image correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Ming; Qian, Chen; Yang, Wenkai

    2016-01-01

    To film the moving fish in the glass tank, light will be bent at the interface of air and glass, glass and water. Based on binocular stereo vision and refraction principle, we establish a mathematical model of 3D image correlation to reconstruct the 3D coordinates of samples in the water. Marking speckle in fish surface, a series of real-time speckle images of swimming fish will be obtained by two high-speed cameras, and instantaneous 3D shape, strain, displacement etc. of fish will be reconstructed.

  1. Diffusion tensor imaging and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in brain tumor: Correlation between structure and metabolism☆

    PubMed Central

    Min, Zhigang; Niu, Chen; Rana, Netra; Ji, Huanmei; Zhang, Ming

    2013-01-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and diffusion tensor imaging are non-invasive techniques used to detect metabolites and water diffusion in vivo. Previous studies have confirmed a positive correlation of individual fractional anisotropy values with N-acetylaspartate/creatine and N-acetylaspartate/choline ratios in tumors, edema, and normal white matter. This study divided the brain parenchyma into tumor, peritumoral edema, and normal-appearing white matter according to MRI data, and analyzed the correlation of metabolites with water molecular diffusion. Results demonstrated that in normal-appearing white matter, N-acetylaspartate/creatine ratios were positively correlated with fractional anisotropy values, negatively correlated with radial diffusivities, and positively correlated with maximum eigenvalues. Maximum eigenvalues and radial diffusivities in peritumoral edema showed a negative correlation with choline, N-acetylaspartate, and creatine. Radial diffusivities in tumor demonstrated a negative correlation with choline. These data suggest that the relationship between metabolism and structure is markedly changed from normal white matter to peritumoral edema and tumor. Neural metabolism in the peritumoral edema area decreased with expanding extracellular space. The normal relationship of neural function and microstructure disappeared in the tumor region. PMID:25206385

  2. The influence of the property of random coded patterns on fluctuation-correlation ghost imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chenglong; Gong, Wenlin; Shao, Xuehui; Han, Shensheng

    2016-06-01

    According to the reconstruction feature of fluctuation-correlation ghost imaging (GI), we define a normalized characteristic matrix and the influence of the property of random coded patterns on GI is investigated based on the theory of matrix analysis. Both simulative and experimental results demonstrate that for different random coded patterns, the quality of fluctuation-correlation GI can be predicted by some parameters extracted from the normalized characteristic matrix, which suggests its potential application in the optimization of random coded patterns for GI system.

  3. Non-rigid dual respiratory and cardiac motion correction methods after, during, and before image reconstruction for 4D cardiac PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Tao; Wang, Jizhe; Fung, George; Tsui, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory motion (RM) and cardiac motion (CM) degrade the quality and resolution in cardiac PET scans. We have developed non-rigid motion estimation methods to estimate both RM and CM based on 4D cardiac gated PET data alone, and compensate the dual respiratory and cardiac (R&C) motions after (MCAR), during (MCDR), and before (MCBR) image reconstruction. In all three R&C motion correction methods, attenuation-activity mismatch effect was modeled by using transformed attenuation maps using the estimated RM. The difference of using activity preserving and non-activity preserving models in R&C correction was also studied. Realistic Monte Carlo simulated 4D cardiac PET data using the 4D XCAT phantom and accurate models of the scanner design parameters and performance characteristics at different noise levels were employed as the known truth and for method development and evaluation. Results from the simulation study suggested that all three dual R&C motion correction methods provide substantial improvement in the quality of 4D cardiac gated PET images as compared with no motion correction. Specifically, the MCDR method yields the best performance for all different noise levels compared with the MCAR and MCBR methods. While MCBR reduces computational time dramatically but the resultant 4D cardiac gated PET images has overall inferior image quality when compared to that from the MCAR and MCDR approaches in the ‘almost’ noise free case. Also, the MCBR method has better noise handling properties when compared with MCAR and provides better quantitative results in high noise cases. When the goal is to reduce scan time or patient radiation dose, MCDR and MCBR provide a good compromise between image quality and computational times.

  4. Non-rigid dual respiratory and cardiac motion correction methods after, during, and before image reconstruction for 4D cardiac PET.

    PubMed

    Feng, Tao; Wang, Jizhe; Fung, George; Tsui, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory motion (RM) and cardiac motion (CM) degrade the quality and resolution in cardiac PET scans. We have developed non-rigid motion estimation methods to estimate both RM and CM based on 4D cardiac gated PET data alone, and compensate the dual respiratory and cardiac (R&C) motions after (MCAR), during (MCDR), and before (MCBR) image reconstruction. In all three R&C motion correction methods, attenuation-activity mismatch effect was modeled by using transformed attenuation maps using the estimated RM. The difference of using activity preserving and non-activity preserving models in R&C correction was also studied. Realistic Monte Carlo simulated 4D cardiac PET data using the 4D XCAT phantom and accurate models of the scanner design parameters and performance characteristics at different noise levels were employed as the known truth and for method development and evaluation. Results from the simulation study suggested that all three dual R&C motion correction methods provide substantial improvement in the quality of 4D cardiac gated PET images as compared with no motion correction. Specifically, the MCDR method yields the best performance for all different noise levels compared with the MCAR and MCBR methods. While MCBR reduces computational time dramatically but the resultant 4D cardiac gated PET images has overall inferior image quality when compared to that from the MCAR and MCDR approaches in the 'almost' noise free case. Also, the MCBR method has better noise handling properties when compared with MCAR and provides better quantitative results in high noise cases. When the goal is to reduce scan time or patient radiation dose, MCDR and MCBR provide a good compromise between image quality and computational times.

  5. SU-D-17A-07: Development and Evaluation of a Prototype Ultrasonography Respiratory Monitoring System for 4DCT Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, P; Cheng, S; Chao, C; Jain, A

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Respiratory motion artifacts are commonly seen in the abdominal and thoracic CT images. A Real-time Position Management (RPM) system is integrated with CT simulator using abdominal surface as a surrogate for tracking the patient respiratory motion. The respiratory-correlated four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) is then reconstructed by GE advantage software. However, there are still artifacts due to inaccurate respiratory motion detecting and sorting methods. We developed an Ultrasonography Respiration Monitoring (URM) system which can directly monitor diaphragm motion to detect respiratory cycles. We also developed a new 4DCT sorting and motion estimation method to reduce the respiratory motion artifacts. The new 4DCT system was compared with RPM and the GE 4DCT system. Methods: Imaging from a GE CT scanner was simultaneously correlated with both the RPM and URM to detect respiratory motion. A radiation detector, Blackcat GM-10, recorded the X-ray on/off and synchronized with URM. The diaphragm images were acquired with Ultrasonix RP system. The respiratory wave was derived from diaphragm images and synchronized with CT scanner. A more precise peaks and valleys detection tool was developed and compared with RPM. The motion is estimated for the slices which are not in the predefined respiratory phases by using block matching and optical flow method. The CT slices were then sorted into different phases and reconstructed, compared with the images reconstructed from GE Advantage software using respiratory wave produced from RPM system. Results: The 4DCT images were reconstructed for eight patients. The discontinuity at the diaphragm level due to an inaccurate identification of phases by the RPM was significantly improved by URM system. Conclusion: Our URM 4DCT system was evaluated and compared with RPM and GE 4DCT system. The new system is user friendly and able to reduce motion artifacts. It also has the potential to monitor organ motion during

  6. Diffusion tensor imaging correlates of reading ability in dysfluent and non-impaired readers.

    PubMed

    Lebel, Catherine; Shaywitz, Bennett; Holahan, John; Shaywitz, Sally; Marchione, Karen; Beaulieu, Christian

    2013-05-01

    Many children and adults have specific reading disabilities; insight into the brain structure underlying these difficulties is evolving from imaging. Previous research highlights the left temporal-parietal white matter as important in reading, yet the degree of involvement of other areas remains unclear. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and voxel-based analysis were used to examine correlations between reading ability and tissue structure in healthy adolescents and young adults (n=136) with a range of reading ability. Three complementary reading scores (word reading, decoding, and reading fluency) yielded positive correlations with fractional anisotropy (FA) that spanned bilateral brain regions, particularly in the frontal lobes, but also included the thalamus and parietal and temporal areas. An analysis of the unique effects of each reading assessment revealed that most of the variance in FA values could be attributed to sight word reading ability. PMID:23290366

  7. Sidelobe suppression in ultrasound imaging using dual apodization with cross-correlation.

    PubMed

    Seo, Chi Hyung; Yen, Jesse T

    2008-10-01

    This paper introduces a novel sidelobe and clutter suppression method in ultrasound imaging called dual apodization with cross-correlation or DAX. DAX dramatically improves the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) allowing for easier visualization of anechoic cysts and blood vessels. This technique uses dual apodization or weighting strategies that are effective in removing or minimizing clutter and efficient in terms of computational load and hardware/software needs. This dual apodization allows us to determine the amount of mainlobe versus clutter contribution in a signal by cross-correlating RF data acquired from 2 apodization functions. Simulation results using a 128 element 5 MHz linear array show an improvement in CNR of 139% compared with standard beamformed data with uniform apodization in a 3 mm diameter anechoic cylindrical cyst. Experimental CNR using a tissue-mimicking phantom with the same sized cyst shows an improvement of 123% in a DAX processed image. PMID:18986868

  8. Phase conjugation, isotropic and anisotropic higher order diffraction generation, and image correlation using photorefractive barium titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buranasiri, Prathan

    2005-04-01

    Using barium titanate as the photorefractive material, we demonstrate phase conjugation, beam coupling, higher diffraction order generation. At small incident angles less than 0.015 radian, both codirectional isotropic self-diffraction (CODIS) and contradirectional isotropic self-diffraction (CONDIS) are generated simultaneously. At bigger incident angles approximately more than 0.2094 radian, only codirectional anisotropic-self diffraction (CODAS) are generated. On going imaging correlation is also showing.

  9. An Intermittent Model for Intracellular Motions of Gold Nanostars by k-Space Scattering Image Correlation.

    PubMed

    Bouzin, Margaux; Sironi, Laura; Chirico, Giuseppe; D'Alfonso, Laura; Inverso, Donato; Pallavicini, Piersandro; Collini, Maddalena

    2015-12-01

    Anisotropic metallic nanoparticles have been devised as powerful potential tools for in vivo imaging, photothermal therapy, and drug delivery thanks to plasmon-enhanced absorption and scattering cross sections, ease in synthesis and functionalization, and controlled cytotoxicity. The rational design of all these applications requires the characterization of the nanoparticles intracellular trafficking pathways. In this work, we exploit live-cell time-lapse confocal reflectance microscopy and image correlation in both direct and reciprocal space to investigate the intracellular transport of branched gold nanostars (GNSs). Different transport mechanisms, spanning from pure Brownian diffusion to (sub-)ballistic superdiffusion, are revealed by temporal and spatio-temporal image correlation spectroscopy on the tens-of-seconds timescale. According to these findings, combined with numerical simulations and with a Bayesian (hidden Markov model-based) analysis of single particle tracking data, we ascribe the superdiffusive, subballistic behavior characterizing the GNSs dynamics to a two-state switching between Brownian diffusion in the cytoplasm and molecular motor-mediated active transport. For the investigation of intermittent-type transport phenomena, we derive an analytical theoretical framework for Fourier-space image correlation spectroscopy (kICS). At first, we evaluate the influence of all the dynamic and kinetic parameters (the diffusion coefficient, the drift velocity, and the transition rates between the diffusive and the active transport regimes) on simulated kICS correlation functions. Then we outline a protocol for data analysis and employ it to derive whole-cell maps for each parameter underlying the GNSs intracellular dynamics. Capable of identifying even simpler transport phenomena, whether purely diffusive or ballistic, our intermittent kICS approach allows an exhaustive investigation of the dynamics of GNSs and biological macromolecules.

  10. Biplane correlation imaging for lung nodule detection: initial human subject results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majdi Nasab, Nariman; Samei, Ehsan; Dobbins, James T., III

    2006-03-01

    In this paper, we present performance of biplane correlation imaging (BCI) on set of chest x-ray projections of human data. BCI significantly minimizes the number of false positives (FPs) when used in conjunction with computer aided detection (CAD) by eliminating non-correlated nodule candidates. Sixty-one low exposure posterior projections were acquired from more than 20 human subjects with small angular separations (0.32 degree) over a range of 20 degrees along the vertical axis. All patients were previously diagnosed for the presence of lung nodules based on computed tomography (CT) examination. Images were processed following two steps. First, all images were analyzed using our CAD routine for chest radiography. This process proceeded with a BCI processing in which the results of CAD on each single projection were examined in terms of their geometrical correlation with those found in the other 60 projections based on the predetermined shift of possible nodule locations in each projection. The suspect entities with a geometrical correlation that coincided with the known location of the lesions were selected as nodules; otherwise they were ignored. An expert radiologist with reference to the associated CT dataset determined the truth regarding nodule location and sizes, which were then used to determine if the found nodules are true positive or false positive. The preliminary results indicated that the best performance was obtained when the angular separation of the projection pair was greater than about 6.7 degrees. Within the range of optimum angular separation, the number of FPs per image was 0-1 without impacting the number of true positives (TPs), averaged around 92%.

  11. A new simultaneous compression and encryption method for images suitable to recognize form by optical correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfalou, Ayman; Elbouz, Marwa; Jridi, Maher; Loussert, Alain

    2009-09-01

    In some recognition form applications (which require multiple images: facial identification or sign-language), many images should be transmitted or stored. This requires the use of communication systems with a good security level (encryption) and an acceptable transmission rate (compression rate). In the literature, several encryption and compression techniques can be found. In order to use optical correlation, encryption and compression techniques cannot be deployed independently and in a cascade manner. Otherwise, our system will suffer from two major problems. In fact, we cannot simply use these techniques in a cascade manner without considering the impact of one technique over another. Secondly, a standard compression can affect the correlation decision, because the correlation is sensitive to the loss of information. To solve both problems, we developed a new technique to simultaneously compress & encrypt multiple images using a BPOF optimized filter. The main idea of our approach consists in multiplexing the spectrums of different transformed images by a Discrete Cosine Transform (DCT). To this end, the spectral plane should be divided into several areas and each of them corresponds to the spectrum of one image. On the other hand, Encryption is achieved using the multiplexing, a specific rotation functions, biometric encryption keys and random phase keys. A random phase key is widely used in optical encryption approaches. Finally, many simulations have been conducted. Obtained results corroborate the good performance of our approach. We should also mention that the recording of the multiplexed and encrypted spectra is optimized using an adapted quantification technique to improve the overall compression rate.

  12. Intra-field CDU map correlation between SEMs and aerial image characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Guoxiang; Philipp, Peter; Litt, Lloyd C.; Meusemann, Stefan; Thaler, Thomas; Schulz, Kristian; Tschinkl, Martin; Ackmann, Paul

    2014-09-01

    Reticle critical dimension uniformity (CDU) is one of the major sources of wafer CD variations which include both inter-field variations and intra-field variations. Generally, wafer critical dimension (CD) measurement sample size interfield is much less than intra-field. Intra-field CDU correction requires time-consumption of metrology. In order to improve wafer intra-field CDU, several methods can be applied such as intra-field dose correction to improve wafer intra-field CDU. Corrections can be based on CD(SEM) or aerial image metrology data from the reticle. Reticle CDU and wafer CDU maps are based on scanning electron microscope (SEM) metrology, while reticle inspection intensity mapping (NuFLare 6000) and wafer level critical dimension (WLCD) utilize aerial images or optical techniques. Reticle inspecton tools such as those from KLA and NuFlare, offer the ability to collect optical measurement data to produce an optical CDU map. WLCD of Zeiss has the advantage of using the same illumination condition as the scanner to measure the aerial images or optical CD. In this study, the intra-field wafer CDU map correlation between SEMs and aerial images are characterized. The layout of metrology structures is very important for the correlation between wafer intra-field CDU, measured by SEM, and the CDU determined by aerial images. The selection of metrology structures effects on the correlation to SEM CD to wafer is also demonstrated. Both reticle CDU, intensity CDU and WLCD are candidates for intra-field wafer CDU characterization and the advantages and limitations of each approach are discussed.

  13. Future Applications Using Return-Pulse Correlation from Imaging Laser Altimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blair, J. Bryan; Hofton, Michelle A.; Rabine, David L.

    2000-01-01

    The Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor (LVIS) is an airborne, wide-swath, digitization-only laser altimeter capable of collecting full return waveforms (i.e. echoes) from laser footprints ranging in diameter from 1 to 80 m across up to a 1 km wide data swath. The return waveform can be used to enhance the accuracy of laser ranging and to provide information about the vertical structure of vegetation and topography within each laser footprint. Although extremely small laser footprints (< 1 0 cm diameter) generally return simple, impulse responses to their target surface, larger footprints typically exhibit complex returns representing the diverse vertical distributions of surfaces contained in each footprint. Only a handful of airborne and spaceborne laser altimeters record the return echo or return pulse that is reflected from the Earth's surface (i.e. NASA's LVIS, SLA, VCL, and GLAS laser altimeters). Waveforms are currently interpreted to extract a timing or ranging point or points to represent the mean ground elevation or the vertical height of vegetation. But, recent progress using pulse shape correlation techniques shows promise for a variety of science applications involving change detection of surface topography and vegetation as well as potential for improving data processing by correlating images or crossovers to solve systematic biases. We show example correlation images from LVIS and discuss instrument design implications and potential science applications.

  14. A high dynamic range acousto-optic image correlator for real-time pattern recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Molley, P.A.; Stalker, K.T.

    1988-01-01

    The architecture and experimental results for an incoherent acousto-optic image correlator suitable for real-time applications are presented. In the basic architecture, each time a line of the raster scanned input image is fed into the acousto-optic device (AOD), all rows of a digitally stored reference image are read into the system using an array of light emitting diodes (LED's). Thus, the required two-dimensional correltaion is performed as a series of multi-channel 1-D time-integrations in x (performed in the AOD) combined with a multi-channel correlation in y (perpendicular to the AOD axis) using a modified CCD. The LED array and detector modifications which markedly increase the dynamic range are discussed as well as correlator design. Further, a novel memory for storing the reference object is described for rapidly changing templates. Experimental results indicate the architecture is useful for applications in the areas of character recognition and target identification. 8 refs., 8 figs.

  15. Three-dimensional flow contrast imaging of deep tissue using noncontact diffuse correlation tomography

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yu; Huang, Chong; Irwin, Daniel; He, Lian; Shang, Yu; Yu, Guoqiang

    2014-01-01

    This study extended our recently developed noncontact diffuse correlation spectroscopy flowmetry system into noncontact diffuse correlation tomography (ncDCT) for three-dimensional (3-D) flow imaging of deep tissue. A linear array of 15 photodetectors and two laser sources connected to a mobile lens-focusing system enabled automatic and noncontact scanning of flow in a region of interest. These boundary measurements were combined with a finite element framework for DCT image reconstruction implemented into an existing software package. This technique was tested in computer simulations and using a tissue-like phantom with anomaly flow contrast design. The cylindrical tube-shaped anomaly was clearly reconstructed in both simulation and phantom. Recovered and assigned flow contrast changes in anomaly were found to be highly correlated: regression slope = 1.00, R2 = 1.00, and p < 10−5 in simulation and regression slope ≥ 0.97, R2 ≥ 0.96, and p < 10−3 in phantom. These results exhibit promise of our ncDCT technique for 3-D imaging of deep tissue blood flow heterogeneities. PMID:24737919

  16. Three-dimensional flow contrast imaging of deep tissue using noncontact diffuse correlation tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Yu; Huang, Chong; Irwin, Daniel; He, Lian; Shang, Yu; Yu, Guoqiang

    2014-03-24

    This study extended our recently developed noncontact diffuse correlation spectroscopy flowmetry system into noncontact diffuse correlation tomography (ncDCT) for three-dimensional (3-D) flow imaging of deep tissue. A linear array of 15 photodetectors and two laser sources connected to a mobile lens-focusing system enabled automatic and noncontact scanning of flow in a region of interest. These boundary measurements were combined with a finite element framework for DCT image reconstruction implemented into an existing software package. This technique was tested in computer simulations and using a tissue-like phantom with anomaly flow contrast design. The cylindrical tube-shaped anomaly was clearly reconstructed in both simulation and phantom. Recovered and assigned flow contrast changes in anomaly were found to be highly correlated: regression slope = 1.00, R{sup 2} = 1.00, and p < 10{sup −5} in simulation and regression slope ≥ 0.97, R{sup 2} ≥ 0.96, and p < 10{sup −3} in phantom. These results exhibit promise of our ncDCT technique for 3-D imaging of deep tissue blood flow heterogeneities.

  17. Real-time heterodyne speckle pattern interferometry using the correlation image sensor.

    PubMed

    Kimachi, Akira

    2010-12-10

    A real-time method for heterodyne speckle pattern interferometry using the correlation image sensor (CIS) is proposed. The CIS demodulates the interference phase of heterodyned speckle wavefronts pixelwise at an ordinary video frame rate. The proposed method neither suffers loss of spatial resolution nor requires a high frame rate. Interferometers for out-of-plane and in-plane deformation are developed with a 200 × 200 pixel CIS camera. Experimental results confirm that the proposed method realizes real-time imaging of a rough-surfaced object under deformation. The average standard deviations of demodulated phase-difference images for the out-of-plane and in-plane interferometers are 0.33 and 0.13 rad, respectively.

  18. Nanoscale deformation analysis with high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and digital image correlation

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Xueju; Pan, Zhipeng; Fan, Feifei; Wang, Jiangwei; Liu, Yang; Mao, Scott X.; Zhu, Ting; Xia, Shuman

    2015-09-10

    We present an application of the digital image correlation (DIC) method to high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images for nanoscale deformation analysis. The combination of DIC and HRTEM offers both the ultrahigh spatial resolution and high displacement detection sensitivity that are not possible with other microscope-based DIC techniques. We demonstrate the accuracy and utility of the HRTEM-DIC technique through displacement and strain analysis on amorphous silicon. Two types of error sources resulting from the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) image noise and electromagnetic-lens distortions are quantitatively investigated via rigid-body translation experiments. The local and global DIC approaches are applied for themore » analysis of diffusion- and reaction-induced deformation fields in electrochemically lithiated amorphous silicon. As a result, the DIC technique coupled with HRTEM provides a new avenue for the deformation analysis of materials at the nanometer length scales.« less

  19. Nanoscale deformation analysis with high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and digital image correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xueju; Pan, Zhipeng; Fan, Feifei; Wang, Jiangwei; Liu, Yang; Mao, Scott X.; Zhu, Ting; Xia, Shuman

    2015-09-10

    We present an application of the digital image correlation (DIC) method to high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images for nanoscale deformation analysis. The combination of DIC and HRTEM offers both the ultrahigh spatial resolution and high displacement detection sensitivity that are not possible with other microscope-based DIC techniques. We demonstrate the accuracy and utility of the HRTEM-DIC technique through displacement and strain analysis on amorphous silicon. Two types of error sources resulting from the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) image noise and electromagnetic-lens distortions are quantitatively investigated via rigid-body translation experiments. The local and global DIC approaches are applied for the analysis of diffusion- and reaction-induced deformation fields in electrochemically lithiated amorphous silicon. As a result, the DIC technique coupled with HRTEM provides a new avenue for the deformation analysis of materials at the nanometer length scales.

  20. Note: Dynamic strain field mapping with synchrotron X-ray digital image correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, L.; Fan, D.; Luo, S. N.; Bie, B. X.; Ran, X. X.; Qi, M. L.; Parab, N.; Sun, J. Z.; Liao, H. J.; Hudspeth, M. C.; Claus, B.; Fezzaa, K.; Sun, T.; Chen, W.; Gong, X. L.

    2014-07-15

    We present a dynamic strain field mapping method based on synchrotron X-ray digital image correlation (XDIC). Synchrotron X-ray sources are advantageous for imaging with exceptional spatial and temporal resolutions, and X-ray speckles can be produced either from surface roughness or internal inhomogeneities. Combining speckled X-ray imaging with DIC allows one to map strain fields with high resolutions. Based on experiments on void growth in Al and deformation of a granular material during Kolsky bar/gas gun loading at the Advanced Photon Source beamline 32ID, we demonstrate the feasibility of dynamic XDIC. XDIC is particularly useful for dynamic, in-volume, measurements on opaque materials under high strain-rate, large, deformation.

  1. Towards quantum imaging with multi-spatial mode quantum-correlated twin-beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Jeremy; Lance, Andrew; Corzo, Neil; Marino, Alberto; Jones, Kevin; Lett, Paul

    2010-03-01

    Quantum optical properties of multi-spatial mode light fields allow for a variety of multichannel quantum information applications including quantum imaging. We have constructed a new apparatus capable of generating pulsed quantum correlated twin-beams via a four-wave mixing process in a hot rubidium vapor. We report temporal intensity-difference squeezing in both the continuous-wave and pulsed regimes with pulse durations as short as one microsecond. Such temporal squeezing measurements, however, typically involve focusing the entirety of each beam onto a pair of balanced photodetectors and therefore fail to resolve spatial characteristics of the light. We aim to extend the analysis of our system into the spatial domain by imaging these bright twin-beams onto a CCD camera and performing image registration in order to demonstrate sub-shot-noise spatial correlations over the ensemble of corresponding coherence areas in each beam. Ultimately, our objective is to use such an apparatus to demonstrate quantum-enhanced imaging techniques that benefit from the use of several spatial modes.

  2. A method for correlating in vivo prostate magnetic resonance imaging and histopathology using individualized magnetic resonance -based molds

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Vijay; Pohida, Thomas; Turkbey, Baris; Mani, Haresh; Merino, Maria; Pinto, Peter A.; Choyke, Peter; Bernardo, Marcelino

    2009-01-01

    A method for the design and rapid manufacture of a patient specific tissue slicing device based on in vivo images in order to facilitate the process of correlating the images with histopathology is presented. The method is applied to radical prostatectomy specimens where the customized mold is designed using magnetic resonance (MR) images of each patient obtained prior to surgery. In this case, the mold holds the prostate in place while a knife with a single blade or multiple blades is inserted in slots which are positioned to obtain tissue blocks corresponding to the slices in the MR images. The resulting histological specimens demonstrate good anatomical correlation with the MR images. PMID:19895076

  3. A method for correlating in vivo prostate magnetic resonance imaging and histopathology using individualized magnetic resonance -based molds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Vijay; Pohida, Thomas; Turkbey, Baris; Mani, Haresh; Merino, Maria; Pinto, Peter A.; Choyke, Peter; Bernardo, Marcelino

    2009-10-01

    A method for the design and rapid manufacture of a patient specific tissue slicing device based on in vivo images in order to facilitate the process of correlating the images with histopathology is presented. The method is applied to radical prostatectomy specimens where the customized mold is designed using magnetic resonance (MR) images of each patient obtained prior to surgery. In this case, the mold holds the prostate in place while a knife with a single blade or multiple blades is inserted in slots which are positioned to obtain tissue blocks corresponding to the slices in the MR images. The resulting histological specimens demonstrate good anatomical correlation with the MR images.

  4. High-resolution imaging by scanning electron microscopy of semithin sections in correlation with light microscopy.

    PubMed

    Koga, Daisuke; Kusumi, Satoshi; Shodo, Ryusuke; Dan, Yukari; Ushiki, Tatsuo

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we introduce scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of semithin resin sections. In this technique, semithin sections were adhered on glass slides, stained with both uranyl acetate and lead citrate, and observed with a backscattered electron detector at a low accelerating voltage. As the specimens are stained in the same manner as conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM), the contrast of SEM images of semithin sections was similar to TEM images of ultrathin sections. Using this technique, wide areas of semithin sections were also observed by SEM, without the obstruction of grids, which was inevitable for traditional TEM. This study also applied semithin section SEM to correlative light and electron microscopy. Correlative immunofluorescence microscopy and immune-SEM were performed in semithin sections of LR white resin-embedded specimens using a FluoroNanogold-labeled secondary antibody. Because LR white resin is hydrophilic and electron stable, this resin is suitable for immunostaining and SEM observation. Using correlative microscopy, the precise localization of the primary antibody was demonstrated by fluorescence microscopy and SEM. This method has great potential for studies examining the precise localization of molecules, including Golgi- and ER-associated proteins, in correlation with LM and SEM.

  5. Neural correlates underlying mental calculation in abacus experts: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Hanakawa, Takashi; Honda, Manabu; Okada, Tomohisa; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Shibasaki, Hiroshi

    2003-06-01

    Experts of abacus operation demonstrate extraordinary ability in mental calculation. There is psychological evidence that abacus experts utilize a mental image of an abacus to remember and manipulate large numbers in solving problems; however, the neural correlates underlying this expertise are unknown. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we compared the neural correlates associated with three mental-operation tasks (numeral, spatial, verbal) among six experts in abacus operations and eight nonexperts. In general, there was more involvement of neural correlates for visuospatial processing (e.g., right premotor and parietal areas) for abacus experts during the numeral mental-operation task. Activity of these areas and the fusiform cortex was correlated with the size of numerals used in the numeral mental-operation task. Particularly, the posterior superior parietal cortex revealed significantly enhanced activity for experts compared with controls during the numeral mental-operation task. Comparison with the other mental-operation tasks indicated that activity in the posterior superior parietal cortex was relatively specific to computation in 2-dimensional space. In conclusion, mental calculation of abacus experts is likely associated with enhanced involvement of the neural resources for visuospatial information processing in 2-dimensional space.

  6. Automatic target recognition and tracking using an acousto-optic image correlator

    SciTech Connect

    Molley, P.A.; Kast, B.A. )

    1992-05-01

    This paper discusses a hybrid electro-optic image processor, developed for automatic target recognition and tracking using an acousto-optic correlator and digital electronics. The optical system performs the computationally intensive correlation operation on the large 2-D input scenes. The electronics provide the decision-making capability and also perform part of the postprocessing needed for increasing the peak-to-clutter ratio in cluttered scenes. The system is able to analyze each correlation plane and apply a real-time template selection algorithm to accommodate scale or rotation changes of the target. A demonstration of the current system capabilities is presented using a terrain board with several different types of stationary and moving model vehicles.

  7. Imaging features of primary anorectal gastrointestinal stromal tumors with clinical and pathologic correlation

    PubMed Central

    Koch, M.R.; Jagannathan, J.P.; Krajewski, K.M.; Raut, C.P.; Hornick, J.L.; Ramaiya, N.H.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: To evaluate the imaging features of anorectal gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) with clinical and histopathologic correlation. Materials and methods: In this Institutional Review Board-approved, Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-compliant retrospective study, 16 patients (12 men; mean age 66 years (30–89 years)) with pathologically proven anorectal GISTs seen at our institution from January 2001 to July 2011 were identified. Electronic medical records were reviewed to obtain clinical data. Pretreatment imaging studies (computed tomography (CT) in 16 patients, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in 9 patients and fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET)/CT in 8 patients) were evaluated by 2 radiologists until consensus. The location, size and imaging features of the primary tumor and metastases at presentation, if any, were recorded, and correlated with clinical data and pathologic features (histologic type, presence of necrosis, mitotic activity, risk category, immunohistochemical profile). Results: The mean tumor size was 6.9 × 6.0 cm. Of the 16 tumors, 11 (68.7%) were infralevator, 4 (25%) supra and infralevator and 1 (6.3%) supralevator; 9 (56.2%) were exophytic, 6 (37.5%) both exophytic and intraluminal, and 1 (6.3%) was intraluminal. The tumors were iso- to minimally hypoattenuating to muscle on CT, iso- to minimally hypointense on T1-weighted images, hyperintense on T2-weighted images and showed variable enhancement. Necrosis was seen in 4 (25%), and hemorrhage and calcification in 2 (12.5%) patients each. The tumors were FDG avid with a mean maximum standardized uptake value of 11 (8.4–16.8). All tumors were positive for KIT and CD34. Distant metastasis to liver was seen in 1 patient (6.3%) at presentation. Conclusion: Anorectal GISTs are well-circumscribed, non-circumferential, predominantly infralevator, intramural or exophytic, FDG-avid, hypoattenuating masses, and present without

  8. Speckle correlation resolution enhancement of wide-field fluorescence imaging (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmaz, Hasan

    2016-03-01

    Structured illumination enables high-resolution fluorescence imaging of nanostructures [1]. We demonstrate a new high-resolution fluorescence imaging method that uses a scattering layer with a high-index substrate as a solid immersion lens [2]. Random scattering of coherent light enables a speckle pattern with a very fine structure that illuminates the fluorescent nanospheres on the back surface of the high-index substrate. The speckle pattern is raster-scanned over the fluorescent nanospheres using a speckle correlation effect known as the optical memory effect. A series of standard-resolution fluorescence images per each speckle pattern displacement are recorded by an electron-multiplying CCD camera using a commercial microscope objective. We have developed a new phase-retrieval algorithm to reconstruct a high-resolution, wide-field image from several standard-resolution wide-field images. We have introduced phase information of Fourier components of standard-resolution images as a new constraint in our algorithm which discards ambiguities therefore ensures convergence to a unique solution. We demonstrate two-dimensional fluorescence images of a collection of nanospheres with a deconvolved Abbe resolution of 116 nm and a field of view of 10 µm × 10 µm. Our method is robust against optical aberrations and stage drifts, therefore excellent for imaging nanostructures under ambient conditions. [1] M. G. L. Gustafsson, J. Microsc. 198, 82-87 (2000). [2] H. Yilmaz, E. G. van Putten, J. Bertolotti, A. Lagendijk, W. L. Vos, and A. P. Mosk, Optica 2, 424-429 (2015).

  9. Detection of Prostate Cancer: Quantitative Multiparametric MR Imaging Models Developed Using Registered Correlative Histopathology.

    PubMed

    Metzger, Gregory J; Kalavagunta, Chaitanya; Spilseth, Benjamin; Bolan, Patrick J; Li, Xiufeng; Hutter, Diane; Nam, Jung W; Johnson, Andrew D; Henriksen, Jonathan C; Moench, Laura; Konety, Badrinath; Warlick, Christopher A; Schmechel, Stephen C; Koopmeiners, Joseph S

    2016-06-01

    Purpose To develop multiparametric magnetic resonance (MR) imaging models to generate a quantitative, user-independent, voxel-wise composite biomarker score (CBS) for detection of prostate cancer by using coregistered correlative histopathologic results, and to compare performance of CBS-based detection with that of single quantitative MR imaging parameters. Materials and Methods Institutional review board approval and informed consent were obtained. Patients with a diagnosis of prostate cancer underwent multiparametric MR imaging before surgery for treatment. All MR imaging voxels in the prostate were classified as cancer or noncancer on the basis of coregistered histopathologic data. Predictive models were developed by using more than one quantitative MR imaging parameter to generate CBS maps. Model development and evaluation of quantitative MR imaging parameters and CBS were performed separately for the peripheral zone and the whole gland. Model accuracy was evaluated by using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC), and confidence intervals were calculated with the bootstrap procedure. The improvement in classification accuracy was evaluated by comparing the AUC for the multiparametric model and the single best-performing quantitative MR imaging parameter at the individual level and in aggregate. Results Quantitative T2, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), volume transfer constant (K(trans)), reflux rate constant (kep), and area under the gadolinium concentration curve at 90 seconds (AUGC90) were significantly different between cancer and noncancer voxels (P < .001), with ADC showing the best accuracy (peripheral zone AUC, 0.82; whole gland AUC, 0.74). Four-parameter models demonstrated the best performance in both the peripheral zone (AUC, 0.85; P = .010 vs ADC alone) and whole gland (AUC, 0.77; P = .043 vs ADC alone). Individual-level analysis showed statistically significant improvement in AUC in 82% (23 of 28) and 71% (24 of 34

  10. Measuring water velocity using DIDSON and image cross-correlation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Zhiqun; Mueller, Robert P.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2009-08-01

    To design or operate hydroelectric facilities for maximum power generation and minimum ecological impact, it is critical to understand the biological responses of fish to different flow structures. However, information is still lacking on the relationship between fish behavior and flow structures despite many years of research. Existing field characterization approaches conduct fish behavior studies and flow measurements separately and coupled later using statistical analysis. These types of studies, however, lack a way to determine the specific hydraulic conditions or the specific causes of the biological response. The Dual-Frequency Identification Sonar (DIDSON) has been in wide use for fish behavior studies since 1999. The DIDSON can detect acoustic targets at long ranges in dark or turbid dark water. PIV is a state-of-the-art, non-intrusive, whole-flow-field technique, providing instantaneous velocity vector measurements in a whole plane using image cross-correlating techniques. There has been considerable research in the development of image processing techniques associated with PIV. This existing body of knowledge is applicable and can be used to process the images taken by the DIDSON. This study was conducted in a water flume which is 9 m long, 1.2 m wide, and 1.2 m deep when filled with water. A lab jet flow was setup as the benchmark flow to calibrate DIDSON images. The jet nozzle was 6.35 cm in diameter and core jet velocity was 1.52 m/s. Different particles were used to seed the flow. The flow was characterized based on the results using Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV). A DIDSON was mounted about 5 meters away from the jet nozzle. Consecutive DIDSON images with known time delay were divided into small interrogation spots after background was subtracted. Across-correlation was then performed to estimate the velocity vector for each interrogation spot. The estimated average velocity in the core zone was comparable to that obtained using a LDV. This proof

  11. Statistical correlation of low-altitude ENA emissions with geomagnetic activity from IMAGE/MENA observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackler, D. A.; Jahn, J.-M.; Perez, J. D.; Pollock, C. J.; Valek, P. W.

    2016-03-01

    Plasma sheet particles transported Earthward during times of active magnetospheric convection can interact with exospheric/thermospheric neutrals through charge exchange. The resulting Energetic Neutral Atoms (ENAs) are free to leave the influence of the magnetosphere and can be remotely detected. ENAs associated with low-altitude (300-800 km) ion precipitation in the high-latitude atmosphere/ionosphere are termed low-altitude emissions (LAEs). Remotely observed LAEs are highly nonisotropic in velocity space such that the pitch angle distribution at the time of charge exchange is near 90°. The Geomagnetic Emission Cone of LAEs can be mapped spatially, showing where proton energy is deposited during times of varying geomagnetic activity. In this study we present a statistical look at the correlation between LAE flux (intensity and location) and geomagnetic activity. The LAE data are from the MENA imager on the IMAGE satellite over the declining phase of solar cycle 23 (2000-2005). The SYM-H, AE, and Kp indices are used to describe geomagnetic activity. The goal of the study is to evaluate properties of LAEs in ENA images and determine if those images can be used to infer properties of ion precipitation. Results indicate a general positive correlation to LAE flux for all three indices, with the SYM-H showing the greatest sensitivity. The magnetic local time distribution of LAEs is centered about midnight and spreads with increasing activity. The invariant latitude for all indices has a slightly negative correlation. The combined results indicate LAE behavior similar to that of ion precipitation.

  12. Intravascular lymphoma: magnetic resonance imaging correlates of disease dynamics within the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Baehring, J; Henchcliffe, C; Ledezma, C; Fulbright, R; Hochberg, F

    2005-01-01

    Background: Intravascular lymphoma (IVL) is a rare non-Hodgkin's lymphoma with relative predilection for the central nervous system. In the absence of extraneural manifestations, the disease is not recognised until autopsy in the majority of cases underlining the need for new clinical markers. Methods: This is a retrospective series of five patients with IVL seen at a single institution over three years. An advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol was performed at various time points prior to diagnosis and during treatment. Results: MRI revealed multiple lesions scattered throughout the cerebral hemispheres; the brainstem, cerebellum, and spinal cord were less frequently involved. On initial presentation, hyperintense lesions were seen on diffusion weighted images suggestive of ischaemia in three of four patients in whom the images were obtained at that time point. In four patients lesions were also identifiable as hyperintense areas on fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequences. Initial contrast enhancement was encountered in three cases. Diffusion weighted imaging lesions either vanished or followed the typical pattern of an ischaemic small vessel stroke with evolution of abnormal FLAIR signal followed by enhancement with gadolinium in the subacute stage and tissue loss in the chronic stage. Diffusion weighted imaging and FLAIR abnormalities proved to be partially reversible, correlating with the response to chemotherapy. Conclusion: We provide the first detailed description of the dynamic pattern of diffusion weighted MRI in IVL. These patterns in combination with systemic findings may facilitate early diagnosis and serve as a new tool to monitor treatment response. PMID:15774442

  13. Correlation map analysis between appearances of Japanese facial images and amount of melanin and hemoglobin components in the skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsumura, Norimichi; Uetsuki, Keiji; Ojima, Nobutoshi; Miyake, Yoichi

    2001-06-01

    Skin color reproduction becomes increasingly important with the recent progress in various imaging systems. In this paper, based on subjective experiments, correlation maps are analyzed between appearance of Japanese facial images and amount of melanin and hemoglobin components in the facial skin. Facial color images were taken by digital still camera. The spatial distributions of melanin and hemoglobin components in the facial color image were separated by independent component analysis of skin colors. The separated components were synthesized to simulate the various facial color images by changing the quantities of the two separated pigments. The synthesized images were evaluated subjectively by comparing with the original facial images. From the analysis of correlation map, we could find the visual or psychological terms that are well related to melanin components influence the appearance of facial color image.

  14. Interferences, ghost images and other quantum correlations according to stochastic optics

    SciTech Connect

    Fonseca da Silva, Luciano; Dechoum, Kaled

    2012-09-15

    There are an extensive variety of experiments in quantum optics that emphasize the non-local character of the coincidence measurements recorded by spatially separated photocounters. These are the cases of ghost image and other interference experiments based on correlated photons produced in, for instance, the process of parametric down-conversion or photon cascades. We propose to analyse some of these correlations in the light of stochastic optics, a local formalism based on classical electrodynamics with added background fluctuations that simulate the vacuum field of quantum electrodynamics, and raise the following question: can these experiments be used to distinguish between quantum entanglement and classical correlations? - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We analyse some quantum correlations in the light of stochastic optics. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We study how vacuum fluctuations can rule quantum correlations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Many criteria cannot be considered a boundary between quantum and classical theories. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Non-locality is a misused term in relation to many observed experiments.

  15. Skin surface and sub-surface strain and deformation imaging using optical coherence tomography and digital image correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, X.; Maiti, R.; Liu, X.; Gerhardt, L. C.; Lee, Z. S.; Byers, R.; Franklin, S. E.; Lewis, R.; Matcher, S. J.; Carré, M. J.

    2016-03-01

    Bio-mechanical properties of the human skin deformed by external forces at difference skin/material interfaces attract much attention in medical research. For instance, such properties are important design factors when one designs a healthcare device, i.e., the device might be applied directly at skin/device interfaces. In this paper, we investigated the bio-mechanical properties, i.e., surface strain, morphological changes of the skin layers, etc., of the human finger-pad and forearm skin as a function of applied pressure by utilizing two non-invasive techniques, i.e., optical coherence tomography (OCT) and digital image correlation (DIC). Skin deformation results of the human finger-pad and forearm skin were obtained while pressed against a transparent optical glass plate under the action of 0.5-24 N force and stretching naturally from 90° flexion to 180° full extension respectively. The obtained OCT images showed the deformation results beneath the skin surface, however, DIC images gave overall information of strain at the surface.

  16. Correlative Imaging in a Patient with Cystic Thymoma: CT, MR and PET/CT Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Romeo, Valeria; Esposito, Alfredo; Maurea, Simone; Camera, Luigi; Mainenti, Pier Paolo; Palmieri, Giovannella; Buonerba, Carlo; Salvatore, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Cystic thymoma is a rare variant of thymic neoplasm characterized by almost complete cystic degeneration with mixed internal structure. We describe a case of a 60 year-old woman with a cystic thymoma studied with advanced tomographic imaging stydies. CT, MRI and PET/CT with 18F-FDG were performed; volumetric CT and MRI images provided better anatomic evaluation for pre-operative assessment, while PET/CT was helpful for lesion characterization based on 18F-FDG uptake. Although imaging studies are mandatory for pre-operative evaluation of cystic thymoma, final diagnosis still remains surgical. Case Report A 60-year-old woman with recent chest pain and no history of previous disease was admitted to our departement to investigate the result of a previous chest X-ray that showed bilateral mediastinal enlargement; for this purpose, enhanced chest CT scan was performed using a 64-rows scanner (Toshiba, Aquilion 64, Japan) before and after intravenous bolus administration of iodinated non ionic contrast agent; CT images demonstrated the presence of a large mediastinal mass (11×8 cm) located in the anterior mediastinum who extended from the anonymous vein to the cardio-phrenic space, compressing the left atrium and causing medium lobe atelectasis; bilateral pleural effusion was also present. Conclusions In conclusion, correlative imaging plays a foundamental role for the diagnostic evaluation of patient with cystic thymoma. In particular, volumetric CT and MRI studies can provide better anatomic informations regarding internal structure and local tumor spread for pre-operative assessment. Conversely, metabolic imaging using 18F-FDG PET/CT is helpful for lesion characterization differentiating benign from malignant lesion on the basis of intense tracer uptake. The role of PET/MRI is still under investigation. However, final diagnosis still remains surgical even though imaging studies are mandatory for pre-operative patient management. PMID:25593635

  17. Correlative intravital imaging of cGMP signals and vasodilation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Thunemann, Martin; Schmidt, Kjestine; de Wit, Cor; Han, Xiaoxing; Jain, Rakesh K.; Fukumura, Dai; Feil, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) is an important signaling molecule and drug target in the cardiovascular system. It is well known that stimulation of the vascular nitric oxide (NO)-cGMP pathway results in vasodilation. However, the spatiotemporal dynamics of cGMP signals themselves and the cGMP concentrations within specific cardiovascular cell types in health, disease, and during pharmacotherapy with cGMP-elevating drugs are largely unknown. To facilitate the analysis of cGMP signaling in vivo, we have generated transgenic mice that express fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based cGMP sensor proteins. Here, we describe two models of intravital FRET/cGMP imaging in the vasculature of cGMP sensor mice: (1) epifluorescence-based ratio imaging in resistance-type vessels of the cremaster muscle and (2) ratio imaging by multiphoton microscopy within the walls of subcutaneous blood vessels accessed through a dorsal skinfold chamber. Both methods allow simultaneous monitoring of NO-induced cGMP transients and vasodilation in living mice. Detailed protocols of all steps necessary to perform and evaluate intravital imaging experiments of the vasculature of anesthetized mice including surgery, imaging, and data evaluation are provided. An image segmentation approach is described to estimate FRET/cGMP changes within moving structures such as the vessel wall during vasodilation. The methods presented herein should be useful to visualize cGMP or other biochemical signals that are detectable with FRET-based biosensors, such as cyclic adenosine monophosphate or Ca2+, and to correlate them with respective vascular responses. With further refinement and combination of transgenic mouse models and intravital imaging technologies, we envision an exciting future, in which we are able to “watch” biochemistry, (patho-)physiology, and pharmacotherapy in the context of a living mammalian organism. PMID:25352809

  18. Correlation between optical and topographical images from an external reflection near-field microscope with shear force feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Smolyaninov, Igor I.; Keller, Ole

    1995-07-01

    An external reflection scanning near-field optical microscope with shear force regulation of the tip-surface distance is described. Near-field optical and shear force topographical images are compared for various samples. It is shown that the most important correlative relationships between these images can be deduced from symmetry considerations. The possibility of extracting additional information from the optical images is demonstrated on images of human blood cells.

  19. Respiratory acidosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... obesity, which restricts how much the lungs can expand Obstructive sleep apnea Chronic respiratory acidosis occurs over ... Tests that may be done include: Arterial blood gas , which measures oxygen and carbon dioxide levels in ...

  20. Structural Imaging Changes and Behavioral Correlates in Patients with Crohn’s Disease in Remission

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Veena A.; Beniwal-Patel, Poonam; Mbah, Ifeanyi; Young, Brittany M.; Prabhakaran, Vivek; Saha, Sumona

    2016-01-01

    Background: Crohn’s disease (CD) is a subtype of inflammatory bowel disease caused by immune-mediated inflammation in the gastrointestinal tract. The extent of morphologic brain alterations and their associated cognitive and affective impairments remain poorly characterized. Aims: We used magnetic resonance imaging to identify structural brain differences between patients with Crohn’s disease in remission compared to age-matched healthy controls and evaluated for structural-behavioral correlates. Methods: Nineteen patients and 20 healthy, age-matched controls were recruited in the study. Group differences in brain morphometric measures and correlations between brain measures and performance on a cognitive task, the verbal fluency (VF) task, were examined. Correlations between brain measures and cognitive measures as well as self-reported measures of depression, personality, and affective scales were examined. Results: Patients showed significant cortical thickening in the left superior frontal region compared to controls. Significant group differences were observed in sub-cortical volume measures in both hemispheres. Investigation of brain-behavior correlations revealed significant group differences in the correlation between cortical surface area and VF performance, although behavioral performance was equivalent between the two groups. The left middle temporal surface area was a significant predictor of VF performance with controls showing a significant positive correlation between these measures, and patients showing the opposite effect. Conclusion: Our results indicate key differences in structural brain measures in patients with CD compared to controls. Additionally, correlation between brain measures and behavioral responses suggest there may be a neural basis to the alterations in patients’ cognitive and affective responses. PMID:27695405

  1. Structural Imaging Changes and Behavioral Correlates in Patients with Crohn’s Disease in Remission

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Veena A.; Beniwal-Patel, Poonam; Mbah, Ifeanyi; Young, Brittany M.; Prabhakaran, Vivek; Saha, Sumona

    2016-01-01

    Background: Crohn’s disease (CD) is a subtype of inflammatory bowel disease caused by immune-mediated inflammation in the gastrointestinal tract. The extent of morphologic brain alterations and their associated cognitive and affective impairments remain poorly characterized. Aims: We used magnetic resonance imaging to identify structural brain differences between patients with Crohn’s disease in remission compared to age-matched healthy controls and evaluated for structural-behavioral correlates. Methods: Nineteen patients and 20 healthy, age-matched controls were recruited in the study. Group differences in brain morphometric measures and correlations between brain measures and performance on a cognitive task, the verbal fluency (VF) task, were examined. Correlations between brain measures and cognitive measures as well as self-reported measures of depression, personality, and affective scales were examined. Results: Patients showed significant cortical thickening in the left superior frontal region compared to controls. Significant group differences were observed in sub-cortical volume measures in both hemispheres. Investigation of brain-behavior correlations revealed significant group differences in the correlation between cortical surface area and VF performance, although behavioral performance was equivalent between the two groups. The left middle temporal surface area was a significant predictor of VF performance with controls showing a significant positive correlation between these measures, and patients showing the opposite effect. Conclusion: Our results indicate key differences in structural brain measures in patients with CD compared to controls. Additionally, correlation between brain measures and behavioral responses suggest there may be a neural basis to the alterations in patients’ cognitive and affective responses.

  2. Maximum-Likelihood Joint Image Reconstruction/Motion Estimation in Attenuation-Corrected Respiratory Gated PET/CT Using a Single Attenuation Map.

    PubMed

    Bousse, Alexandre; Bertolli, Ottavia; Atkinson, David; Arridge, Simon; Ourselin, Sébastien; Hutton, Brian F; Thielemans, Kris

    2016-01-01

    This work provides an insight into positron emission tomography (PET) joint image reconstruction/motion estimation (JRM) by maximization of the likelihood, where the probabilistic model accounts for warped attenuation. Our analysis shows that maximum-likelihood (ML) JRM returns the same reconstructed gates for any attenuation map (μ-map) that is a deformation of a given μ-map, regardless of its alignment with the PET gates. We derived a joint optimization algorithm accordingly, and applied it to simulated and patient gated PET data. We first evaluated the proposed algorithm on simulations of respiratory gated PET/CT data based on the XCAT phantom. Our results show that independently of which μ-map is used as input to JRM: (i) the warped μ-maps correspond to the gated μ-maps, (ii) JRM outperforms the traditional post-registration reconstruction and consolidation (PRRC) for hot lesion quantification and (iii) reconstructed gated PET images are similar to those obtained with gated μ-maps. This suggests that a breath-held μ-map can be used. We then applied JRM on patient data with a μ-map derived from a breath-held high resolution CT (HRCT), and compared the results with PRRC, where each reconstructed PET image was obtained with a corresponding cine-CT gated μ-map. Results show that JRM with breath-held HRCT achieves similar reconstruction to that using PRRC with cine-CT. This suggests a practical low-dose solution for implementation of motion-corrected respiratory gated PET/CT.

  3. Diffusion, transport, and cell membrane organization investigated by imaging fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sankaran, Jagadish; Manna, Manoj; Guo, Lin; Kraut, Rachel; Wohland, Thorsten

    2009-11-01

    Cell membrane organization is dynamic and is assumed to have different characteristic length scales. These length scales, which are influenced by lipid and protein composition as well as by the cytoskeleton, can range from below the optical resolution limit (as with rafts or microdomains) to far above the resolution limit (as with capping phenomena or the formation of lipid "platforms"). The measurement of these membrane features poses a significant problem because membrane dynamics are on the millisecond timescale and are thus beyond the time resolution of conventional imaging approaches. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), a widely used spectroscopic technique to measure membrane dynamics, has the required time resolution but lacks imaging capabilities. A promising solution is the recently introduced method known as imaging total internal reflection (ITIR)-FCS, which can probe diffusion phenomena in lipid membranes with good temporal and spatial resolution. In this work, we extend ITIR-FCS to perform ITIR fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy (ITIR-FCCS) between pixel areas of arbitrary shape and derive a generalized expression that is applicable to active transport and diffusion. ITIR-FCCS is applied to model systems exhibiting diffusion, active transport, or a combination of the two. To demonstrate its applicability to live cells, we observe the diffusion of a marker, the sphingolipid-binding domain (SBD) derived from the amyloid peptide Abeta, on live neuroblastoma cells. We investigate the organization and dynamics of SBD-bound lipid microdomains under the conditions of cholesterol removal and cytoskeleton disruption. PMID:19883607

  4. Infrared thermography coupled with digital image correlation in studying plastic deformation on the mesoscale level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaogang; Witz, Jean-François; El Bartali, Ahmed; Jiang, Chao

    2016-11-01

    This paper focuses on a study of plastic deformation on the mesoscale level by infrared thermography coupled with digital image correlation. First, a novel technique for fully-coupled thermal and kinematic measurements was developed, and the common problem of spatial coupling in the multifield measurement was solved successfully using an image registration method. Then the developed technique was applied to investigate the plastic deformation of a pure aluminium oligocrystal specimen in a tensile test. The deformed specimen manifested high strains of type out-of-plane, which were found closely associated with the crystallographic structure. From a metrological point of view, the out-of-plane effect on the thermographic measurement was analyzed, and the pertinent radiometric artifacts were estimated. The source of errors was verified through a correlation analysis between the estimated artifacts and specimen surface profile. Moreover, the out-of-plane effect on the kinematic measurement was investigated, and the relevant errors were analyzed via the correlation residual. The analysis highlighted the role of the microstructure that played in the plastic deformation and showed that grain boundary was crucial in shaping the heterogeneous deformation patterns for aluminium oligocrystals.

  5. Correlation analysis between pulmonary function test parameters and CT image parameters of emphysema

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Cheng-Pei; Li, Chia-Chen; Yu, Chong-Jen; Chang, Yeun-Chung; Wang, Cheng-Yi; Yu, Wen-Kuang; Chen, Chung-Ming

    2016-03-01

    Conventionally, diagnosis and severity classification of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) are usually based on the pulmonary function tests (PFTs). To reduce the need of PFT for the diagnosis of COPD, this paper proposes a correlation model between the lung CT images and the crucial index of the PFT, FEV1/FVC, a severity index of COPD distinguishing a normal subject from a COPD patient. A new lung CT image index, Mirage Index (MI), has been developed to describe the severity of COPD primarily with emphysema disease. Unlike conventional Pixel Index (PI) which takes into account all voxels with HU values less than -950, the proposed approach modeled these voxels by different sizes of bullae balls and defines MI as a weighted sum of the percentages of the bullae balls of different size classes and locations in a lung. For evaluation of the efficacy of the proposed model, 45 emphysema subjects of different severity were involved in this study. In comparison with the conventional index, PI, the correlation between MI and FEV1/FVC is -0.75+/-0.08, which substantially outperforms the correlation between PI and FEV1/FVC, i.e., -0.63+/-0.11. Moreover, we have shown that the emphysematous lesion areas constituted by small bullae balls are basically irrelevant to FEV1/FVC. The statistical analysis and special case study results show that MI can offer better assessment in different analyses.

  6. Study of the deformation characteristics of window security film by digital image correlation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Paepegem, Wim; Shulev, Assen A.; Roussev, Ilia R.; De Pauw, Stijn; Degrieck, Joris; Sainov, Ventseslav C.

    2009-03-01

    This paper presents a speckle-displacement measurement technique based on the digital image correlation to study the notch sensitivity and crack bridging of window security film. It is used to protect existing glazing against hurricanes, blast and terrorist explosions. The window security film is laminated to the interior side of the glass window by means of a special adhesive. When the glass is breaking, the window film keeps all glass fragments together. The proposed sub-pixel registration of the displacement field is achieved using a calculation technique based on the centre of mass localization of the complex spectrum. This approach increases the computational efficiency for displacements smaller than one pixel and performs with high precision when optimal values of the input correlation parameters are used. In order to achieve a high accuracy of the algorithm, optimization of these input image correlation parameters is offered. For larger displacements an iterative procedure which preserves the precision is successfully implemented. The speckle pattern is created by small white dots sprayed on the previously black painted film surface. As a result, white light illumination can be used which significantly simplifies the experiments.

  7. Equine respiratory pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Foreman, J H

    1999-12-01

    Differentiation of diseases of the equine respiratory tract is based on history, clinical signs, auscultation, endoscopy, imaging, and sampling of airway exudate. Upper respiratory therapies include surgical correction of airway obstructions; flushing of localized abscesses (strangles), guttural pouch disease, or sinusitis; and oral or parenteral antibiotic and anti-inflammatory therapy if deemed necessary. Pneumonia usually is treated with antimicrobials, anti-inflammatories, and bronchodilators. Pleural drainage is indicated if significant pleural effusion is present. The most commonly used therapies for early inflammatory and chronic allergic obstructive conditions include bronchodilators and anti-inflammatories. Acute respiratory distress, particularly acute pulmonary edema, is treated with diuretics (usually furosemide), intranasal oxygen, bronchodilators, corticosteroids, and alleviation of the underlying cause. Furosemide also had been used in North America as a race-day preventative for exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage (EIPH), but recent data have shown that furosemide may be a performance-enhancing agent itself.

  8. Equine respiratory pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Foreman, J H

    1999-12-01

    Differentiation of diseases of the equine respiratory tract is based on history, clinical signs, auscultation, endoscopy, imaging, and sampling of airway exudate. Upper respiratory therapies include surgical correction of airway obstructions; flushing of localized abscesses (strangles), guttural pouch disease, or sinusitis; and oral or parenteral antibiotic and anti-inflammatory therapy if deemed necessary. Pneumonia usually is treated with antimicrobials, anti-inflammatories, and bronchodilators. Pleural drainage is indicated if significant pleural effusion is present. The most commonly used therapies for early inflammatory and chronic allergic obstructive conditions include bronchodilators and anti-inflammatories. Acute respiratory distress, particularly acute pulmonary edema, is treated with diuretics (usually furosemide), intranasal oxygen, bronchodilators, corticosteroids, and alleviation of the underlying cause. Furosemide also had been used in North America as a race-day preventative for exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage (EIPH), but recent data have shown that furosemide may be a performance-enhancing agent itself. PMID:10589473

  9. k-space image correlation to probe the intracellular dynamics of gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouzin, M.; Sironi, L.; Chirico, G.; D'Alfonso, L.; Inverso, D.; Pallavicini, P.; Collini, M.

    2016-04-01

    The collective action of dynein, kinesin and myosin molecular motors is responsible for the intracellular active transport of cargoes, vesicles and organelles along the semi-flexible oriented filaments of the cytoskeleton. The overall mobility of the cargoes upon binding and unbinding to motor proteins can be modeled as an intermittency between Brownian diffusion in the cell cytoplasm and active ballistic excursions along actin filaments or microtubules. Such an intermittent intracellular active transport, exhibited by star-shaped gold nanoparticles (GNSs, Gold Nanostars) upon internalization in HeLa cancer cells, is investigated here by combining live-cell time-lapse confocal reflectance microscopy and the spatio-temporal correlation, in the reciprocal Fourier space, of the acquired image sequences. At first, the analytical theoretical framework for the investigation of a two-state intermittent dynamics is presented for Fourier-space Image Correlation Spectroscopy (kICS). Then simulated kICS correlation functions are employed to evaluate the influence of, and sensitivity to, all the kinetic and dynamic parameters the model involves (the transition rates between the diffusive and the active transport states, the diffusion coefficient and drift velocity of the imaged particles). The optimal procedure for the analysis of the experimental data is outlined and finally exploited to derive whole-cell maps for the parameters underlying the GNSs super-diffusive dynamics. Applied here to the GNSs subcellular trafficking, the proposed kICS analysis can be adopted for the characterization of the intracellular (super-) diffusive dynamics of any fluorescent or scattering biological macromolecule.

  10. Noise-immune complex correlation for vasculature imaging based on standard and Jones-matrix optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makita, Shuichi; Kurokawa, Kazuhiro; Hong, Young-Joo; Li, En; Miura, Masahiro; Yasuno, Yoshiaki

    2016-03-01

    A new optical coherence angiography (OCA) method, called correlation mapping OCA (cmOCA), is presented by using the SNR-corrected complex correlation. An SNR-correction theory for the complex correlation calculation is presented. The method also integrates a motion-artifact-removal method for the sample motion induced decorrelation artifact. The theory is further extended to compute more reliable correlation by using multi- channel OCT systems, such as Jones-matrix OCT. The high contrast vasculature imaging of in vivo human posterior eye has been obtained. Composite imaging of cmOCA and degree of polarization uniformity indicates abnormalities of vasculature and pigmented tissues simultaneously.

  11. Pitch evaluation of gratings based on a digital image correlation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yancong; Jia, Wei; Wei, Chunlong; Yu, Junjie; Li, Shubin; Li, Yanyang; Li, Minkang; Qiu, Jucheng; Wang, Shaoqing; Zhou, Changhe

    2016-04-01

    The digital image correlation (DIC) technique used for metrological grating evaluation is presented in this paper. A CCD camera is used to acquire the grating image, and the DIC technique together with the peak-position detection method is used to evaluate the grating pitches. The theoretical analysis and simulations are performed to confirm that the performance of our technique is as accurate as the Fourier transform (FT) technique, and is capable of noise resistance. As an example, the uniformity of the grating fabricated in our laboratory is measured using this method. The experimental results show that this grating has a peak-to-valley uniformity of 48 nm during a long range of 35 mm, and our technique has a higher repeatability than the FT technique in our measurement strategy. This work should be of great significance for the evaluation of metrological grating for optical encoders.

  12. Comparisons of neural networks to standard techniques for image classification and correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paola, Justin D.; Schowengerdt, Robert A.

    1994-01-01

    Neural network techniques for multispectral image classification and spatial pattern detection are compared to the standard techniques of maximum-likelihood classification and spatial correlation. The neural network produced a more accurate classification than maximum-likelihood of a Landsat scene of Tucson, Arizona. Some of the errors in the maximum-likelihood classification are illustrated using decision region and class probability density plots. As expected, the main drawback to the neural network method is the long time required for the training stage. The network was trained using several different hidden layer sizes to optimize both the classification accuracy and training speed, and it was found that one node per class was optimal. The performance improved when 3x3 local windows of image data were entered into the net. This modification introduces texture into the classification without explicit calculation of a texture measure. Larger windows were successfully used for the detection of spatial features in Landsat and Magellan synthetic aperture radar imagery.

  13. Shear strain determination of the polymer polydimethysiloxane (PMDS) using digital image correlation in different temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira, G. N.; Nunes, L. C. S.; dos Santos, P. A. M.

    2011-01-01

    In the present work a digital image correlation (DIC) method is used in order to analyze the adhesive shear modulus of poly-dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) submitted to different loads and temperatures. This is an optical-numerical full-field surface displacement measurement method. It is based on a comparison between two images of a specimen coated by a random speckled pattern in the undeformed and in the deformed states. A single lap joint testing is performed. This is a standard test specimen for characterizing adhesive properties and it is considered the simplest form of adhesive joints. For the single lap joint specimen, steel adherends are bonded using a flexible rubber elastic polymer (PDMS), which is a commercially available silicone elastic rubber

  14. Structure and dynamics of fluorescently labeled complex fluids by fourier imaging correlation spectroscopy

    PubMed

    Grassman; Knowles; Marcus

    2000-12-01

    We present a method of Fourier imaging correlation spectroscopy (FICS) that performs phase-sensitive measurements of modulated optical signals from fluorescently labeled complex fluids. FICS experiments probe the time-dependent trajectory of a spatial Fourier component of the fluid particle density at a specified wave number k, and provide a direct route to the intermediate scattering function. The FICS approach overcomes signal sensitivity problems associated with dynamic light scattering, while offering a means to acquire time-dependent information about spatial distributions of fluorescent particles, superior in efficiency to direct imaging methods. We describe the instrumental setup necessary to perform FICS experiments, and outline the theory that establishes the connection between FICS observables and statistical mechanical quantities describing liquid state dynamics. Test measurements on monolayer suspensions of rhodamine labeled polystyrene spheres are detailed.

  15. Resonant waveguide sensing made robust by on-chip peak tracking through image correlation

    PubMed Central

    Bougot-Robin, K.; Wen, W.; Benisty, H.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate a solution to make resonant-waveguide-grating sensing both robust and simpler to optically assess, in the spirit of biochips. Instead of varying wavelength or angle to track the resonant condition, the grating itself has a step-wise variation with typically few tens of neighboring “micropads.” An image capture with incoherent monochromatic light delivers spatial intensity sequences from these micropads. Sensitivity and robustness are discussed using correlation techniques on a realistic model (Fano shapes with noise and local distortion contributions). We confirm through fluid refractive index sensing experiments an improvement over the step-wise maximum position tracking by more than 2 orders of magnitude, demonstrating sensitivity down to 2 × 10−5 RIU, giving high potential development for bioarray imaging. PMID:23082286

  16. Intracellular kinetics of the androgen receptor shown by multimodal Image Correlation Spectroscopy (mICS)

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Chi-Li; Patsch, Katherin; Cutrale, Francesco; Soundararajan, Anjana; Agus, David B.; Fraser, Scott E.; Ruderman, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) pathway plays a central role in prostate cancer (PCa) growth and progression and is a validated therapeutic target. In response to ligand binding AR translocates to the nucleus, though the molecular mechanism is not well understood. We therefore developed multimodal Image Correlation Spectroscopy (mICS) to measure anisotropic molecular motion across a live cell. We applied mICS to AR translocation dynamics to reveal its multimodal motion. By integrating fluorescence imaging methods we observed evidence for diffusion, confined movement, and binding of AR within both the cytoplasm and nucleus of PCa cells. Our findings suggest that in presence of cytoplasmic diffusion, the probability of AR crossing the nuclear membrane is an important factor in determining the AR distribution between cytoplasm and the nucleus, independent of functional microtubule transport. These findings may have implications for the future design of novel therapeutics targeting the AR pathway in PCa. PMID:26936218

  17. GN-SCCA: GraphNet based Sparse Canonical Correlation Analysis for Brain Imaging Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Du, Lei; Yan, Jingwen; Kim, Sungeun; Risacher, Shannon L.; Huang, Heng; Inlow, Mark; Moore, Jason H.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Shen, Li

    2015-01-01

    Identifying associations between genetic variants and neuroimaging quantitative traits (QTs) is a popular research topic in brain imaging genetics. Sparse canonical correlation analysis (SCCA) has been widely used to reveal complex multi-SNP-multi-QT associations. Several SCCA methods explicitly incorporate prior knowledge into the model and intend to uncover the hidden structure informed by the prior knowledge. We propose a novel structured SCCA method using Graph constrained Elastic-Net (GraphNet) regularizer to not only discover important associations, but also induce smoothness between coefficients that are adjacent in the graph. In addition, the proposed method incorporates the covariance structure information usually ignored by most SCCA methods. Experiments on simulated and real imaging genetic data show that, the proposed method not only outperforms a widely used SCCA method but also yields an easy-to-interpret biological findings. PMID:26636135

  18. Automatic detection and classification of damage zone(s) for incorporating in digital image correlation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharjee, Sudipta; Deb, Debasis

    2016-07-01

    Digital image correlation (DIC) is a technique developed for monitoring surface deformation/displacement of an object under loading conditions. This method is further refined to make it capable of handling discontinuities on the surface of the sample. A damage zone is referred to a surface area fractured and opened in due course of loading. In this study, an algorithm is presented to automatically detect multiple damage zones in deformed image. The algorithm identifies the pixels located inside these zones and eliminate them from FEM-DIC processes. The proposed algorithm is successfully implemented on several damaged samples to estimate displacement fields of an object under loading conditions. This study shows that displacement fields represent the damage conditions reasonably well as compared to regular FEM-DIC technique without considering the damage zones.

  19. Underwater depth imaging using time-correlated single-photon counting.

    PubMed

    Maccarone, Aurora; McCarthy, Aongus; Ren, Ximing; Warburton, Ryan E; Wallace, Andy M; Moffat, James; Petillot, Yvan; Buller, Gerald S

    2015-12-28

    A depth imaging system, based on the time-of-flight approach and the time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC) technique, was investigated for use in highly scattering underwater environments. The system comprised a pulsed supercontinuum laser source, a monostatic scanning transceiver, with a silicon single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD) used for detection of the returned optical signal. Depth images were acquired in the laboratory at stand-off distances of up to 8 attenuation lengths, using per-pixel acquisition times in the range 0.5 to 100 ms, at average optical powers in the range 0.8 nW to 950 μW. In parallel, a LiDAR model was developed and validated using experimental data. The model can be used to estimate the performance of the system under a variety of scattering conditions and system parameters. PMID:26832050

  20. Characterization of dynamic microgyroscopes by use of temporal digital image correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Fujun; He Xiaoyuan; Quan Chenggen

    2006-10-20

    The advanced mechanical testing of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) is necessary to provide feedback of measurements that can help the designer optimize MEMS structures and improve the reliability and stability of MEMS. We describe a digital image correlation (DIC) method for dynamic characterization of MEMS using an optical microscope with a high-speed complementary metal oxide semiconductor-based camera. The mechanical performance of a series of microgyroscopesis tested. The DIC method is employed to measure the microgyroscope in-plane displacement with subpixel accuracy. Use of the DIC method is less restrictive on the surface quality of the specimen and simplifies the measurement system. On the basis of a series of temporal digital images grabbed by a high-speed camera, the stability characteristic of the microgyroscopes is analyzed. In addition, the quality factors of the microgyroscopes are determined and agree well with other experimental methods.

  1. Multifocal multiphoton excitation and time correlated single photon counting detection for 3-D fluorescence lifetime imaging.

    PubMed

    Kumar, S; Dunsby, C; De Beule, P A A; Owen, D M; Anand, U; Lanigan, P M P; Benninger, R K P; Davis, D M; Neil, M A A; Anand, P; Benham, C; Naylor, A; French, P M W

    2007-10-01

    We report a multifocal multiphoton time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) microscope system that uses a 16 channel multi-anode PMT detector. Multiphoton excitation minimizes out-of-focus photobleaching, multifocal excitation reduces non-linear in-plane photobleaching effects and TCSPC electronics provide photon-efficient detection of the fluorescence decay profile. TCSPC detection is less prone to bleaching- and movement-induced artefacts compared to wide-field time-gated or frequency-domain FLIM. This microscope is therefore capable of acquiring 3-D FLIM images at significantly increased speeds compared to single beam multiphoton microscopy and we demonstrate this with live cells expressing a GFP tagged protein. We also apply this system to time-lapse FLIM of NAD(P)H autofluorescence in single live cells and report measurements on the change in the fluorescence decay profile following the application of a known metabolic inhibitor. PMID:19550524

  2. Pelvic Inflammatory Disease: Multimodality Imaging Approach with Clinical-Pathologic Correlation.

    PubMed

    Revzin, Margarita V; Mathur, Mahan; Dave, Haatal B; Macer, Matthew L; Spektor, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) is a common medical problem, with almost 1 million cases diagnosed annually. Historically, PID has been a clinical diagnosis supplemented with the findings from ultrasonography (US) or magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. However, the diagnosis of PID can be challenging because the clinical manifestations may mimic those of other pelvic and abdominal processes. Given the nonspecific clinical manifestations, computed tomography (CT) is commonly the first imaging examination performed. General CT findings of early- and late-stage PID include thickening of the uterosacral ligaments, pelvic fat stranding with obscuration of fascial planes, reactive lymphadenopathy, and pelvic free fluid. Recognition of these findings, as well as those seen with cervicitis, endometritis, acute salpingitis, oophoritis, pyosalpinx, hydrosalpinx, tubo-ovarian abscess, and pyometra, is crucial in allowing prompt and accurate diagnosis. Late complications of PID include tubal damage resulting in infertility and ectopic pregnancy, peritonitis caused by uterine and/or tubo-ovarian abscess rupture, development of peritoneal adhesions resulting in bowel obstruction and/or hydroureteronephrosis, right upper abdominal inflammation (Fitz-Hugh-Curtis syndrome), and septic thrombophlebitis. Recognition of these late manifestations at CT can also aid in proper patient management. At CT, careful assessment of common PID mimics, such as endometriosis, adnexal torsion, ruptured hemorrhagic ovarian cyst, adnexal neoplasms, appendicitis, and diverticulitis, is important to avoid misinterpretation, delay in management, and unnecessary surgery. Correlation with the findings from complementary imaging examinations, such as US and MR imaging, is useful for establishing a definitive diagnosis. (©)RSNA, 2016. PMID:27618331

  3. Optical imaging through turbid media with a degenerate four wave mixing correlation time gate

    SciTech Connect

    Sappey, A.D. )

    1994-12-20

    A novel method for detection of ballistic light and rejection of unwanted diffusive light to image structures inside highly scattering media is demonstrated. Degenerate four wave mixing (DFWM) of a doubled YAG laser in Rhodamine 6G is used to provide an ultrafast correlation time gate to discriminate against light that has undergone multiple scattering and therefore lost memory of the structures inside the scattering medium. We present preliminary results that determine the nature of the DFWM grating, confirm the coherence time of the laser, prove the phase-conjugate nature of the signal beam, and determine the dependence of the signal (reflectivity) on dye concentration and laser intensity. Finally, we have obtained images of a test cross-hair pattern through highly turbid suspensions of whole milk in water that are opaque to the naked eye. These imaging experiments demonstrate the utility of DFWM for imaging through turbid media. Based on our results, the use of DFWM as an ultrafast time gate for the detection of ballistic light in optical mammography appears to hold great promise for improving the current state of the art.

  4. Modified Multilook Cross Correlation technique for Doppler centroid estimation in SAR image signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bee Cheng, Sew

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is one of the widely used remote sensing sensors which produces high resolution image by using advance signal processing technique. SAR managed to operate in all sorts of weather and cover wide range of area. To produce a high-quality image, accurate parameters such as Doppler centroid are required for precise SAR signal processing. In the azimuth matched filtering of SAR signal processing, Doppler centroid is an important azimuth parameter that helps to focus the image pixels. Doppler centroid has always been overlooked during SAR signal processing. It is due to the fact that estimation of Doppler centroid involved complicated calculation and increased computational load. Therefore, researcher used to apply only the approximate Doppler value which is not precise and cause defocus effort in the generated SAR image. In this study, several conventional Doppler centroid estimation algorithms are reviewed and developed using Matlab software program to extract the Doppler parameter from received SAR data, namely Spectrum Fit Algorithm, Wavelength Diversity Algorithm (WDA), Multilook Cross Correlation Algorithm (MLCC), and Multilook Beat Frequency Algorithm (MLBF). Two sets of SAR data are employed to evaluate the performance of each estimator, i.e. simulated point target data and RADARSAT-1 Vancouver scene raw data. These experiments gave a sense of accuracy for the estimated results together with computational time consumption. Point target is simulated to generate ideal case SAR data with pre-defined SAR system parameters.

  5. Three-dimensional correlation of MR images to muscle tissue response for interventional MRI thermal ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breen, Michael S.; Lancaster, Tanya L.; Lazebnik, Roee S.; Ashcroft, Andrik J.; Gamal Nour, Sherif; Lewin, Jonathan S.; Wilson, David L.

    2001-05-01

    We are treating tumors using radiofrequency (RF) ablation under interventional MRI (iMRI) guidance. We investigated the ability of MR to monitor the treated region by comparing MR thermal lesion images to cellular damage as seen histologically. Our new methodology allows 3D registration that should enable more accurate correlation than previous 2D methods. Using a low-field (0.2T) open magnet iMRI system for probe guidance, we applied RF ablation to the thigh muscle of four New Zealand White rabbits. To relate in vivo MR and histology images, we obtained intermediate ex vivo MR images and pictures of thick tissue slices obtained using a specially designed apparatus. Registration was done with a computer algorithm that matches tracks of needle fiducials placed near the tissue of interest. After registration, we determined the region inside the circular, hyperintense rim in MR closely corresponds to the region of necrosis as determined by histology on animals sacrificed 30 minutes after ablation. This is good evidence that iMRI images can be used for real-time feedback during thermal RF ablation treatments.

  6. Multiplane transesophageal echocardiography: image orientation, examination technique, anatomic correlations, and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Seward, J B; Khandheria, B K; Freeman, W K; Oh, J K; Enriquez-Sarano, M; Miller, F A; Edwards, W D; Tajik, A J

    1993-06-01

    Multiplane transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) consists of a single ultrasound array or imaging sector that can be rotated around the long axis of the ultrasound beam typically in a 180 degrees arc. This capability produces a circular (conical) continuum of tomographic two-dimensional images. The principal advantage of multiple TEE is that the transducer can be rotated to an image-specific orientation and critically optimized. Thus, manipulation of the transducer is less complex than with the biplane technique, and user adaptation is considerably enhanced. The logical image notation (that is, degrees of rotation) and orientation are described in this report. A step-by-step approach to the multiplane TEE examination, which evolved from our initial experience with 400 consecutive patients, is correlated with accompanying tomographic anatomic corroboration. The unique clinical applications are discussed and related to the amplification of diagnostic information. Although the multiplanar TEE transducer is relatively large, all adult patients who weigh 40 kg or more can be examined. No major complications occurred in our initial experience with this promising new technology. PMID:8497131

  7. In-vivo imaging of the photoreceptor mosaic in retinal dystrophies and correlations with visual function

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, S; Doble, N; Hardy, J; Jones, S; Keltner, J; Olivier, S; Werner, J S

    2005-10-26

    To relate in-vivo microscopic retinal changes to visual function assessed with clinical tests in patients with various forms of retinal dystrophies. The UC Davis Adaptive Optics (AO) Fundus Camera was used to acquire in-vivo retinal images at the cellular level. Visual function tests, consisting of visual field analysis, multifocal electroretinography (mfERG), contrast sensitivity and color vision measures, were performed on all subjects. Five patients with different forms of retinal dystrophies and three control subjects were recruited. Cone densities were quantified for all retinal images. In all images of diseased retinas, there were extensive areas of dark space between groups of photoreceptors, where no cone photoreceptors were evident. These irregular features were not seen in healthy retinas, but were characteristic features in fundi with retinal dystrophies. There was a correlation between functional vision loss and the extent to which the irregularities occurred in retinal images. Cone densities were found to decrease with an associated decrease in retinal function. AO fundus photography is a reliable technique for assessing and quantifying the changes in the photoreceptor layer as disease progresses. Furthermore, this technique can be useful in cases where visual function tests give borderline or ambiguous results, as it allows visualization of individual photoreceptors.

  8. Image interpolation for division of focal plane polarimeters with intensity correlation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junchao; Luo, Haibo; Hui, Bin; Chang, Zheng

    2016-09-01

    Division of focal plane (DoFP) polarimeters operate by integrating micro-polarizer elements with a focal plane. These polarization imaging sensors reduce spatial resolution output and each pixel has a varying instantaneous field of view (IFoV). These drawbacks can be mitigated by applying proper interpolation methods. In this paper, we present a new interpolation method for DoFP polarimeters by using intensity correlation. We employ the correlation of intensity measurements in different orientations to detect edges and then implement interpolation along edges. The performance of the proposed method is compared with several previous methods by using root mean square error (RMSE) comparison and visual comparison. Experimental results showed that our proposed method can achieve better visual effects and a lower RMSE than other methods. PMID:27607683

  9. Three-Dimensional Digital Image Correlation of a Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel During Hydrostatic Pressure Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Revilock, Duane M., Jr.; Thesken, John C.; Schmidt, Timothy E.

    2007-01-01

    Ambient temperature hydrostatic pressurization tests were conducted on a composite overwrapped pressure vessel (COPV) to understand the fiber stresses in COPV components. Two three-dimensional digital image correlation systems with high speed cameras were used in the evaluation to provide full field displacement and strain data for each pressurization test. A few of the key findings will be discussed including how the principal strains provided better insight into system behavior than traditional gauges, a high localized strain that was measured where gages were not present and the challenges of measuring curved surfaces with the use of a 1.25 in. thick layered polycarbonate panel that protected the cameras.

  10. Pollution detection by digital correlation of multispectral, stero-image pairs.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krause, F. R.; Betz, H. T.; Lysobey, D. H.

    1971-01-01

    Remote detection of air pollution circulation patterns is proposed to eventually predict the accumulation of hazardous surface concentrations in time for preventive emission control operations. Earth observations from space platforms will contain information on the height, mean velocity and lateral mixing scales of inversion layers and pollution plumes. Although this information is often not visible on photographs, it could conceivably be retrieved through a digital cross-correlation of multispectral stereo image pairs. Laboratory and field test results are used to illustrate the detection of non-visual inversion layers, the reduction of dominant signal interference, and the spectroscopic identification of combustion products.

  11. A comparison of strain calculation using digital image correlation and finite element software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iadicola, M.; Banerjee, D.

    2016-08-01

    Digital image correlation (DIC) data are being extensively used for many forming applications and for comparisons with finite element analysis (FEA) simulated results. The most challenging comparisons are often in the area of strain localizations just prior to material failure. While qualitative comparisons can be misleading, quantitative comparisons are difficult because of insufficient information about the type of strain output. In this work, strains computed from DIC displacements from a forming limit test are compared to those from three commercial FEA software. Quantitative differences in calculated strains are assessed to determine if the scale of variations seen between FEA and DIC calculated strains constitute real behavior or just calculation differences.

  12. A methodology for high resolution digital image correlation in high temperature experiments.

    PubMed

    Blaber, Justin; Adair, Benjamin S; Antoniou, Antonia

    2015-03-01

    We propose a methodology for performing high resolution Digital Image Correlation (DIC) analysis during high-temperature mechanical tests. Specifically, we describe a technique for producing a stable, high-quality pattern on metal surfaces along with a simple optical system that uses a visible-range camera and a long-range microscope. The results are analyzed with a high-quality open-source DIC software developed by us. Using the proposed technique, we successfully acquired high-resolution strain maps of the crack tip field in a nickel superalloy sample at 1000 °C. PMID:25832279

  13. Measuring stress intensity factors with a camera: Integrated digital image correlation (I-DIC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hild, François; Roux, Stéphane

    2006-01-01

    A novel 'integrated' approach coupling image correlation and elastic displacement field identification provides a powerful and accurate tool to evaluate mode I and II stress intensity factors. This technique is applied to silicon carbide subjected to a sandwiched three-point bend test, using digital pictures obtained in optical microscopy where the pixel physical scale is about 2 μm. A crack whose maximum opening is 500 nm can be detected and its geometry identified. The toughness is determined well within a 10%uncertainty. To cite this article: F. Hild, S. Roux, C. R. Mecanique 334 (2006).

  14. Image Correlation Pattern Optimization for Micro-Scale In-Situ Strain Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bomarito, G. F.; Hochhalter, J. D.; Cannon, A. H.

    2016-01-01

    The accuracy and precision of digital image correlation (DIC) is a function of three primary ingredients: image acquisition, image analysis, and the subject of the image. Development of the first two (i.e. image acquisition techniques and image correlation algorithms) has led to widespread use of DIC; however, fewer developments have been focused on the third ingredient. Typically, subjects of DIC images are mechanical specimens with either a natural surface pattern or a pattern applied to the surface. Research in the area of DIC patterns has primarily been aimed at identifying which surface patterns are best suited for DIC, by comparing patterns to each other. Because the easiest and most widespread methods of applying patterns have a high degree of randomness associated with them (e.g., airbrush, spray paint, particle decoration, etc.), less effort has been spent on exact construction of ideal patterns. With the development of patterning techniques such as microstamping and lithography, patterns can be applied to a specimen pixel by pixel from a patterned image. In these cases, especially because the patterns are reused many times, an optimal pattern is sought such that error introduced into DIC from the pattern is minimized. DIC consists of tracking the motion of an array of nodes from a reference image to a deformed image. Every pixel in the images has an associated intensity (grayscale) value, with discretization depending on the bit depth of the image. Because individual pixel matching by intensity value yields a non-unique scale-dependent problem, subsets around each node are used for identification. A correlation criteria is used to find the best match of a particular subset of a reference image within a deformed image. The reader is referred to references for enumerations of typical correlation criteria. As illustrated by Schreier and Sutton and Lu and Cary systematic errors can be introduced by representing the underlying deformation with under

  15. The change in differing leukocyte populations during vaccination to bovine respiratory disease and their correlations with lung scores, health records, and average daily gain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine Respiratory Disease (BRD) is the most economically important disease in U.S. feedlots. Infection can result in morbidity, mortality, and reduced average daily gain. Cheap and reliable genetic methods of prediction and (or) protection from BRD would be highly advantageous to the industry. T...

  16. The kinetics of white blood cell counts during vaccination against bovine respiratory disease pathogens and their correlations with lung lesions, diagnosis and average daily gain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine Respiratory Disease (BRD) is the most common disease within US feedlots. Infection can result in morbidity, mortality and reduced average daily gain. The discovery of cheap and reliable methods of prediction and/or protection would be highly advantageous to both breeders and farmers. Cattle (...

  17. Radioiodinated DPA-713 imaging correlates with bactericidal activity of tuberculosis treatments in mice.

    PubMed

    Ordonez, Alvaro A; Pokkali, Supriya; DeMarco, Vincent P; Klunk, Mariah; Mease, Ronnie C; Foss, Catherine A; Pomper, Martin G; Jain, Sanjay K

    2015-01-01

    Current tools for monitoring response to tuberculosis treatments have several limitations. Noninvasive biomarkers could accelerate tuberculosis drug development and clinical studies, but to date little progress has been made in developing new imaging technologies for this application. In this study, we developed pulmonary single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) using radioiodinated DPA-713 to serially monitor the activity of tuberculosis treatments in live mice, which develop necrotic granulomas and cavitary lesions. C3HeB/FeJ mice were aerosol infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and administered either a standard or a highly active bedaquiline-containing drug regimen. Serial (125)I-DPA-713 SPECT imaging was compared with (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) and standard microbiology. Ex vivo studies were performed to characterize and correlate DPA-713 imaging with cellular and cytokine responses. Pulmonary (125)I-DPA-713 SPECT, but not (18)F-FDG PET, was able to correctly identify the bactericidal activities of the two tuberculosis treatments as early as 4 weeks after the start of treatment (P < 0.03). DPA-713 readily penetrated the fibrotic rims of necrotic and cavitary lesions. A time-dependent decrease in both tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interferon gamma (IFN-γ) levels was observed with treatments, with (125)I-DPA-713 SPECT correlating best with tissue TNF-α levels (ρ = 0.94; P < 0.01). (124)I-DPA-713 was also evaluated as a PET probe and demonstrated a 4.0-fold-higher signal intensity in the infected tuberculous lesions than uninfected controls (P = 0.03). These studies provide proof of concept for application of a novel noninvasive imaging biomarker to monitor tuberculosis treatments, with the potential for application for humans. PMID:25403669

  18. Correlated biofilm imaging, transport and metabolism measurements via combined nuclear magnetic resonance and confocal microscopy

    PubMed Central

    McLean, Jeffrey S; Ona, Ositadinma N; Majors, Paul D

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are complex, three-dimensional communities found nearly everywhere in nature and are also associated with many human diseases. Detailed metabolic information is critical to understand and exploit beneficial biofilms as well as combat antibiotic-resistant, disease-associated forms. However, most current techniques used to measure temporal and spatial metabolite profiles in these delicate structures are invasive or destructive. Here, we describe imaging, transport and metabolite measurement methods and their correlation for live, non-invasive monitoring of biofilm processes. This novel combination of measurements is enabled by the use of an integrated nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM). NMR methods provide macroscopic structure, metabolic pathway and rate data, spatially resolved metabolite concentrations and water diffusion profiles within the biofilm. In particular, current depth-resolved spectroscopy methods are applied to detect metabolites in 140–190 nl volumes within biofilms of the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 and the oral bacterium implicated in caries disease, Streptococcus mutans strain UA159. The perfused sample chamber also contains a transparent optical window allowing for the collection of complementary fluorescence information using a unique, in-magnet CLSM. In this example, the entire three-dimensional biofilm structure was imaged using magnetic resonance imaging. This was then correlated to a fluorescent CLSM image by employing a green fluorescent protein reporter construct of S. oneidensis. Non-invasive techniques such as described here, which enable measurements of dynamic metabolic processes, especially in a depth-resolved fashion, are expected to advance our understanding of processes occurring within biofilm communities. PMID:18253132

  19. Radioiodinated DPA-713 Imaging Correlates with Bactericidal Activity of Tuberculosis Treatments in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ordonez, Alvaro A.; Pokkali, Supriya; DeMarco, Vincent P.; Klunk, Mariah; Mease, Ronnie C.; Foss, Catherine A.; Pomper, Martin G.

    2014-01-01

    Current tools for monitoring response to tuberculosis treatments have several limitations. Noninvasive biomarkers could accelerate tuberculosis drug development and clinical studies, but to date little progress has been made in developing new imaging technologies for this application. In this study, we developed pulmonary single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) using radioiodinated DPA-713 to serially monitor the activity of tuberculosis treatments in live mice, which develop necrotic granulomas and cavitary lesions. C3HeB/FeJ mice were aerosol infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and administered either a standard or a highly active bedaquiline-containing drug regimen. Serial 125I-DPA-713 SPECT imaging was compared with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) and standard microbiology. Ex vivo studies were performed to characterize and correlate DPA-713 imaging with cellular and cytokine responses. Pulmonary 125I-DPA-713 SPECT, but not 18F-FDG PET, was able to correctly identify the bactericidal activities of the two tuberculosis treatments as early as 4 weeks after the start of treatment (P < 0.03). DPA-713 readily penetrated the fibrotic rims of necrotic and cavitary lesions. A time-dependent decrease in both tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interferon gamma (IFN-γ) levels was observed with treatments, with 125I-DPA-713 SPECT correlating best with tissue TNF-α levels (ρ = 0.94; P < 0.01). 124I-DPA-713 was also evaluated as a PET probe and demonstrated a 4.0-fold-higher signal intensity in the infected tuberculous lesions than uninfected controls (P = 0.03). These studies provide proof of concept for application of a novel noninvasive imaging biomarker to monitor tuberculosis treatments, with the potential for application for humans. PMID:25403669

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Evaluation of Perianal Fistulae with Surgical Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Navdeep; Thukral, CL; Singh, Kunwar Pal; Bhalla, Varun

    2014-01-01

    Aims: The purpose of the study was to evaluate the role of Magnetic Resonance Imaging in detection and characterization of perianal fistulae and correlating it with surgical findings. Methods: Fifty consecutive patients with suspected perianal fistulae having one or more external openings were prospectively selected for MRI evaluation. Previously operated or patients with recurrent perianal disease were excluded from the study. MRI findings were recorded according to “St. James’s University Hospital MR Imaging Classification of Perianal Fistulae” and correlated with surgical observations. Finally, comparison between T2-weighted fat saturated and postcontrast T1-weighted fat saturated sequences was done. Results: Amongst the total of 50 patients, per-operative findings confirmed perianal fistulae in 45 patients. The sensitivity and specificity of MRI in correctly detecting and grading the primary tract was found to be 95.56% and 80% respectively; for abscess, it was 87.50% and 95.24% respectively. High sensitivity was also discerned in identification of secondary tract (93.75%), correct localization of internal opening (95.83%) and for correctly detecting the horse-shoeing (87.50%). Our assumption of null hypothesis was accepted on comparing results of T2-weighted fat saturated sequences and postcontrast T1-weighted fat saturated sequences. Conclusion: Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) was highly accurate in assessment of surgically important parameters (primary tract and its grading, internal opening, secondary tract, abscess, horseshoeing) of perianal fistulae. Comparison of results of imaging findings on T2-weighted and postcontrast T1-weighted fat saturated sequences were statistically similar, so contrast study can be omitted, particularly while evaluating primary / previously unoperated perianal fistulae. PMID:25121040

  1. Correlation between ciliary beat frequency and metachronal wave disorder using image analysis method.

    PubMed

    Yi, W J; Park, K S; Lee, C H; Rhee, C S

    2003-07-01

    Ciliary beating and metachronal waves are fundamental to effective mucociliary transport. The ciliary beat frequencies (CBFs) and metachronal wave directions of multiple cilia beating in culture media were measured simultaneously using digital microscopic images. The degree of synchronisation between ciliary beats was determined by the correlation between ciliary signals at two different locations. The wave propagation directions of cilia were determined from a two-dimensional correlation map by a principal axis method. The standard deviation of measured wave directions in a region of interest was defined as a measure of metachronal wave disorder (MWD). Considerable variation was found in the beat frequencies and metachronal wave directions of cilia beating on epithelium. The pooled mean of MWDs was 23.4 +/- 8.8 degrees, and the pooled mean of CBFs was 10.1 +/- 1.9 Hz on 120 cells from five healthy subjects. The means of the MWD and the CBF from subjects were highly correlated (correlation = -0.83). The higher the CBF, the lower the level of the MWD.

  2. Correlation between the signal-to-noise ratio improvement factor (KSNR) and clinical image quality for chest imaging with a computed radiography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, C. S.; Wood, T. J.; Saunderson, J. R.; Beavis, A. W.

    2015-12-01

    This work assessed the appropriateness of the signal-to-noise ratio improvement factor (KSNR) as a metric for the optimisation of computed radiography (CR) of the chest. The results of a previous study in which four experienced image evaluators graded computer simulated chest images using a visual grading analysis scoring (VGAS) scheme to quantify the benefit of using an anti-scatter grid were used for the clinical image quality measurement (number of simulated patients  =  80). The KSNR was used to calculate the improvement in physical image quality measured in a physical chest phantom. KSNR correlation with VGAS was assessed as a function of chest region (lung, spine and diaphragm/retrodiaphragm), and as a function of x-ray tube voltage in a given chest region. The correlation of the latter was determined by the Pearson correlation coefficient. VGAS and KSNR image quality metrics demonstrated no correlation in the lung region but did show correlation in the spine and diaphragm/retrodiaphragmatic regions. However, there was no correlation as a function of tube voltage in any region; a Pearson correlation coefficient (R) of  -0.93 (p  =  0.015) was found for lung, a coefficient (R) of  -0.95 (p  =  0.46) was found for spine, and a coefficient (R) of  -0.85 (p  =  0.015) was found for diaphragm. All demonstrate strong negative correlations indicating conflicting results, i.e. KSNR increases with tube voltage but VGAS decreases. Medical physicists should use the KSNR metric with caution when assessing any potential improvement in clinical chest image quality when introducing an anti-scatter grid for CR imaging, especially in the lung region. This metric may also be a limited descriptor of clinical chest image quality as a function of tube voltage when a grid is used routinely.

  3. Digital Particle Image Velocimetry (DPIV) Used for Space-Time Correlations in Nozzle Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wernet, Mark P.; Bridges, James E.

    2003-01-01

    An optical measurement technique known as Digital Particle Image Velocimetry (DPIV) was used previously to characterize the first- and second-order statistical properties of both cold and hot jet flows from externally mixed nozzles in NASA Glenn Research Center's Nozzle Acoustic Test Rig. In this technique, an electronic camera records particles entrained in a flow as a laser light sheet is pulsed at two instances in time. Correlation processing of the recorded particle image pairs yields the two-component velocity field across the imaged plane of the flow. The information acquired using DPIV is being used to improve our understanding of the decay of turbulence in jet flows-a critical element for understanding the acoustic properties of the flow. Recently, two independent DPIV systems were installed in Glenn's Small Hot Jet Acoustic Rig, enabling multiplane correlations in time and space. The data were collected over a range of different Mach numbers and temperature ratios. DPIV system 1 was fixed to a large traverse rig, and DPIV system 2 was mounted on a small traverse system mounted on the large traverse frame. The light sheets from the two DPIV systems were aligned to lie in the same axial plane, with DPIV system 2 being independently traversed downstream along the flow direction. For each measurement condition, the DPIV systems were started at a fully overlapping orientation. A polarization separation technique was used to avoid cross-talk between the two systems. Then, the DPIV systems fields were shifted axially apart, in successively increasing steps. The downstream DPIV system 2 was triggered at a short time delay after the upstream DPIV system 1, where the time delay was proportional to the convective flow velocity in the shear layer of the jet flow and the axial separation of the two DPIV systems. The acquired data were processed to obtain the instantaneous velocity vector maps over a range of time delays and spatial separations. The velocity fields from

  4. Video image-based analysis of single human induced pluripotent stem cell derived cardiomyocyte beating dynamics using digital image correlation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The functionality of a cardiomyocyte is primarily measured by analyzing the electrophysiological properties of the cell. The analysis of the beating behavior of single cardiomyocytes, especially ones derived from stem cells, is challenging but well warranted. In this study, a video-based method that is non-invasive and label-free is introduced and applied for the study of single human cardiomyocytes derived from induced pluripotent stem cells. Methods The beating of dissociated stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes was visualized with a microscope and the motion was video-recorded. Minimum quadratic difference, a digital image correlation method, was used for beating analysis with geometrical sectorial cell division and radial/tangential directions. The time series of the temporal displacement vector fields of a single cardiomyocyte was computed from video data. The vector field data was processed to obtain cell-specific, contraction-relaxation dynamics signals. Simulated cardiomyocyte beating was used as a reference and the current clamp of real cardiomyocytes was used to analyze the electrical functionality of the beating cardiomyocytes. Results Our results demonstrate that our sectorized image correlation method is capable of extracting single cell beating characteristics from the video data of induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes that have no clear movement axis, and that the method can accurately identify beating phases and time parameters. Conclusion Our video analysis of the beating motion of single human cardiomyocytes provides a robust, non-invasive and label-free method to analyze the mechanobiological functionality of cardiomyocytes derived from induced pluripotent stem cells. Thus, our method has potential for the high-throughput analysis of cardiomyocyte functions. PMID:24708714

  5. A model for the dynamic nuclear/nucleolar/cytoplasmic trafficking of the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) nucleocapsid protein based on live cell imaging

    SciTech Connect

    You, Jae-Hwan; Howell, Gareth; Pattnaik, Asit K.; Osorio, Fernando A.; Hiscox, Julian A.

    2008-08-15

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), an arterivirus, in common with many other positive strand RNA viruses, encodes a nucleocapsid (N) protein which can localise not only to the cytoplasm but also to the nucleolus in virus-infected cells and cells over-expressing N protein. The dynamic trafficking of positive strand RNA virus nucleocapsid proteins and PRRSV N protein in particular between the cytoplasm and nucleolus is unknown. In this study live imaging of permissive and non-permissive cell lines, in conjunction with photo-bleaching (FRAP and FLIP), was used to investigate the trafficking of fluorescent labeled (EGFP) PRRSV-N protein. The data indicated that EGFP-PRRSV-N protein was not permanently sequestered to the nucleolus and had equivalent mobility to cellular nucleolar proteins. Further the nuclear import of N protein appeared to occur faster than nuclear export, which may account for the observed relative distribution of N protein between the cytoplasm and the nucleolus.

  6. Feasibility of 68Ga-labeled Siglec-9 peptide for the imaging of acute lung inflammation: a pilot study in a porcine model of acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Retamal, Jaime; Sörensen, Jens; Lubberink, Mark; Suarez-Sipmann, Fernando; Borges, João Batista; Feinstein, Ricardo; Jalkanen, Sirpa; Antoni, Gunnar; Hedenstierna, Göran; Roivainen, Anne; Larsson, Anders; Velikyan, Irina

    2016-01-01

    There is an unmet need for noninvasive, specific and quantitative imaging of inherent inflammatory activity. Vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) translocates to the luminal surface of endothelial cells upon inflammatory challenge. We hypothesized that in a porcine model of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), positron emission tomography (PET) with sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectin 9 (Siglec-9) based imaging agent targeting VAP-1 would allow quantification of regional pulmonary inflammation. ARDS was induced by lung lavages and injurious mechanical ventilation. Hemodynamics, respiratory system compliance (Crs) and blood gases were monitored. Dynamic examination using [15O]water PET-CT (10 min) was followed by dynamic (90 min) and whole-body examination using VAP-1 targeting 68Ga-labeled 1,4,7,10-tetraaza cyclododecane-1,4,7-tris-acetic acid-10-ethylene glycol-conjugated Siglec-9 motif peptide ([68Ga]Ga-DOTA-Siglec-9). The animals received an anti-VAP-1 antibody for post-mortem immunohistochemistry assay of VAP-1 receptors. Tissue samples were collected post-mortem for the radioactivity uptake, histology and immunohistochemistry assessment. Marked reduction of oxygenation and Crs, and higher degree of inflammation were observed in ARDS animals. [68Ga]Ga-DOTA-Siglec-9 PET showed significant uptake in lungs, kidneys and urinary bladder. Normalization of the net uptake rate (Ki) for the tissue perfusion resulted in 4-fold higher uptake rate of [68Ga]Ga-DOTA-Siglec-9 in the ARDS lungs. Immunohistochemistry showed positive VAP-1 signal in the injured lungs. Detection of pulmonary inflammation associated with a porcine model of ARDS was possible with [68Ga]Ga-DOTA-Siglec-9 PET when using kinetic modeling and normalization for tissue perfusion. PMID:27069763