Science.gov

Sample records for respiratory correlated image

  1. Carbon nanotube based respiratory gated micro-CT imaging of a murine model of lung tumors with optical imaging correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burk, Laurel M.; Lee, Yueh Z.; Heathcote, Samuel; Wang, Ko-han; Kim, William Y.; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto

    2011-03-01

    Current optical imaging techniques can successfully measure tumor load in murine models of lung carcinoma but lack structural detail. We demonstrate that respiratory gated micro-CT imaging of such models gives information about structure and correlates with tumor load measurements by optical methods. Four mice with multifocal, Kras-induced tumors expressing firefly luciferase were imaged against four controls using both optical imaging and respiratory gated micro-CT. CT images of anesthetized animals were acquired with a custom CNT-based system using 30 ms x-ray pulses during peak inspiration; respiration motion was tracked with a pressure sensor beneath each animal's abdomen. Optical imaging based on the Luc+ signal correlating with tumor load was performed on a Xenogen IVIS Kinetix. Micro-CT images were post-processed using Osirix, measuring lung volume with region growing. Diameters of the largest three tumors were measured. Relationships between tumor size, lung volumes, and optical signal were compared. CT images and optical signals were obtained for all animals at two time points. In all lobes of the Kras+ mice in all images, tumors were visible; the smallest to be readily identified measured approximately 300 microns diameter. CT-derived tumor volumes and optical signals related linearly, with r=0.94 for all animals. When derived for only tumor bearing animals, r=0.3. The trend of each individual animal's optical signal tracked correctly based on the CT volumes. Interestingly, lung volumes also correlated positively with optical imaging data and tumor volume burden, suggesting active remodeling.

  2. SU-E-J-226: Propagation of Pancreas Target Contours On Respiratory Correlated CT Images Using Deformable Image Registration

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, F

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Respiratory Correlated CT (RCCT) scans to assess intra-fraction motion among pancreatic cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy allow for dose sparing of normal tissues, in particular for the duodenum. Contour propagation of the gross tumor volume (GTV) from one reference respiratory phase to 9 other phases is time consuming. Deformable image registration (DIR) has been successfully used for high contrast disease sites but lower contrast for pancreatic tumors may compromise accuracy. This study evaluates the accuracy of Fast Free Form (FFF) registration-based contour propagation of the GTV on RCCT scans of pancreas cancer patients. Methods: Twenty-four pancreatic cancer patients were retrospectively studied; 20 had tumors in the pancreatic head/neck, 4 in the body/tail. Patients were simulated with RCCT and images were sorted into 10 respiratory phases. A radiation oncologist manually delineated the GTV for 5 phases (0%, 30%, 50%, 70% and 90%). The FFF algorithm was used to map deformations between the EE (50%) phase and each of the other 4 phases. The resultant deformation fields served to propagate GTV contours from EE to the other phases. The Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC), which measures agreement between the DIR-propagated and manually-delineated GTVs, was used to quantitatively examine DIR accuracy. Results: Average DSC over all scans and patients is 0.82 and standard deviation is 0.09 (DSC range 0.97–0.57). For GTV volumes above and below the median volume of 20.2 cc, a Wilcoxon rank-sum test shows significantly different DSC (p=0.0000002). For the GTVs above the median volume, average +/− SD is 0.85 +/− 0.07; and for the GTVs below, the average +/− SD is 0.75 +/−0.08. Conclusion: For pancreatic tumors, the FFF DIR algorithm accurately propagated the GTV between the images in different phases of RCCT, with improved performance for larger tumors.

  3. Impact of CT attenuation correction method on quantitative respiratory-correlated (4D) PET/CT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Nyflot, Matthew J.; Lee, Tzu-Cheng; Alessio, Adam M.; Kinahan, Paul E.; Wollenweber, Scott D.; Stearns, Charles W.; Bowen, Stephen R.

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: Respiratory-correlated positron emission tomography (PET/CT) 4D PET/CT is used to mitigate errors from respiratory motion; however, the optimal CT attenuation correction (CTAC) method for 4D PET/CT is unknown. The authors performed a phantom study to evaluate the quantitative performance of CTAC methods for 4D PET/CT in the ground truth setting. Methods: A programmable respiratory motion phantom with a custom movable insert designed to emulate a lung lesion and lung tissue was used for this study. The insert was driven by one of five waveforms: two sinusoidal waveforms or three patient-specific respiratory waveforms. 3DPET and 4DPET images of the phantom under motion were acquired and reconstructed with six CTAC methods: helical breath-hold (3DHEL), helical free-breathing (3DMOT), 4D phase-averaged (4DAVG), 4D maximum intensity projection (4DMIP), 4D phase-matched (4DMATCH), and 4D end-exhale (4DEXH) CTAC. Recovery of SUV{sub max}, SUV{sub mean}, SUV{sub peak}, and segmented tumor volume was evaluated as RC{sub max}, RC{sub mean}, RC{sub peak}, and RC{sub vol}, representing percent difference relative to the static ground truth case. Paired Wilcoxon tests and Kruskal–Wallis ANOVA were used to test for significant differences. Results: For 4DPET imaging, the maximum intensity projection CTAC produced significantly more accurate recovery coefficients than all other CTAC methods (p < 0.0001 over all metrics). Over all motion waveforms, ratios of 4DMIP CTAC recovery were 0.2 ± 5.4, −1.8 ± 6.5, −3.2 ± 5.0, and 3.0 ± 5.9 for RC{sub max}, RC{sub peak}, RC{sub mean}, and RC{sub vol}. In comparison, recovery coefficients for phase-matched CTAC were −8.4 ± 5.3, −10.5 ± 6.2, −7.6 ± 5.0, and −13.0 ± 7.7 for RC{sub max}, RC{sub peak}, RC{sub mean}, and RC{sub vol}. When testing differences between phases over all CTAC methods and waveforms, end-exhale phases were significantly more accurate (p = 0.005). However, these differences were driven by

  4. Impact of CT attenuation correction method on quantitative respiratory-correlated (4D) PET/CT imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tzu-Cheng; Alessio, Adam M.; Wollenweber, Scott D.; Stearns, Charles W.; Bowen, Stephen R.; Kinahan, Paul E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Respiratory-correlated positron emission tomography (PET/CT) 4D PET/CT is used to mitigate errors from respiratory motion; however, the optimal CT attenuation correction (CTAC) method for 4D PET/CT is unknown. The authors performed a phantom study to evaluate the quantitative performance of CTAC methods for 4D PET/CT in the ground truth setting. Methods: A programmable respiratory motion phantom with a custom movable insert designed to emulate a lung lesion and lung tissue was used for this study. The insert was driven by one of five waveforms: two sinusoidal waveforms or three patient-specific respiratory waveforms. 3DPET and 4DPET images of the phantom under motion were acquired and reconstructed with six CTAC methods: helical breath-hold (3DHEL), helical free-breathing (3DMOT), 4D phase-averaged (4DAVG), 4D maximum intensity projection (4DMIP), 4D phase-matched (4DMATCH), and 4D end-exhale (4DEXH) CTAC. Recovery of SUVmax, SUVmean, SUVpeak, and segmented tumor volume was evaluated as RCmax, RCmean, RCpeak, and RCvol, representing percent difference relative to the static ground truth case. Paired Wilcoxon tests and Kruskal–Wallis ANOVA were used to test for significant differences. Results: For 4DPET imaging, the maximum intensity projection CTAC produced significantly more accurate recovery coefficients than all other CTAC methods (p < 0.0001 over all metrics). Over all motion waveforms, ratios of 4DMIP CTAC recovery were 0.2 ± 5.4, −1.8 ± 6.5, −3.2 ± 5.0, and 3.0 ± 5.9 for RCmax, RCpeak, RCmean, and RCvol. In comparison, recovery coefficients for phase-matched CTAC were −8.4 ± 5.3, −10.5 ± 6.2, −7.6 ± 5.0, and −13.0 ± 7.7 for RCmax, RCpeak, RCmean, and RCvol. When testing differences between phases over all CTAC methods and waveforms, end-exhale phases were significantly more accurate (p = 0.005). However, these differences were driven by the patient-specific respiratory waveforms; when testing patient and sinusoidal waveforms

  5. Impact of CT attenuation correction method on quantitative respiratory-correlated (4D) PET/CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Nyflot, Matthew J; Lee, Tzu-Cheng; Alessio, Adam M; Wollenweber, Scott D; Stearns, Charles W; Bowen, Stephen R; Kinahan, Paul E

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory-correlated positron emission tomography (PET/CT) 4D PET/CT is used to mitigate errors from respiratory motion; however, the optimal CT attenuation correction (CTAC) method for 4D PET/CT is unknown. The authors performed a phantom study to evaluate the quantitative performance of CTAC methods for 4D PET/CT in the ground truth setting. A programmable respiratory motion phantom with a custom movable insert designed to emulate a lung lesion and lung tissue was used for this study. The insert was driven by one of five waveforms: two sinusoidal waveforms or three patient-specific respiratory waveforms. 3DPET and 4DPET images of the phantom under motion were acquired and reconstructed with six CTAC methods: helical breath-hold (3DHEL), helical free-breathing (3DMOT), 4D phase-averaged (4DAVG), 4D maximum intensity projection (4DMIP), 4D phase-matched (4DMATCH), and 4D end-exhale (4DEXH) CTAC. Recovery of SUV(max), SUV(mean), SUV(peak), and segmented tumor volume was evaluated as RC(max), RC(mean), RC(peak), and RC(vol), representing percent difference relative to the static ground truth case. Paired Wilcoxon tests and Kruskal-Wallis ANOVA were used to test for significant differences. For 4DPET imaging, the maximum intensity projection CTAC produced significantly more accurate recovery coefficients than all other CTAC methods (p < 0.0001 over all metrics). Over all motion waveforms, ratios of 4DMIP CTAC recovery were 0.2 ± 5.4, -1.8 ± 6.5, -3.2 ± 5.0, and 3.0 ± 5.9 for RC(max), RC(peak), RC(mean), and RC(vol). In comparison, recovery coefficients for phase-matched CTAC were -8.4 ± 5.3, -10.5 ± 6.2, -7.6 ± 5.0, and -13.0 ± 7.7 for RC(max), RC(peak), RC(mean), and RC(vol). When testing differences between phases over all CTAC methods and waveforms, end-exhale phases were significantly more accurate (p = 0.005). However, these differences were driven by the patient-specific respiratory waveforms; when testing patient and sinusoidal waveforms separately

  6. A comparison of lung motion measured using implanted electromagnetic transponders and motion algorithmically predicted using external surrogates as an alternative to respiratory correlated CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lechleiter, Kristen M.; Low, Daniel A.; Chaudhari, Amir; Lu, Wei; Hubenschmidt, James P.; Mayse, Martin L.; Dimmer, Steven C.; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Parikh, Parag J.

    2007-03-01

    Three-dimensional volumetric imaging correlated with respiration (4DCT) typically utilizes external breathing surrogates and phase-based models to determine lung tissue motion. However, 4DCT requires time consuming post-processing and the relationship between external breathing surrogates and lung tissue motion is not clearly defined. This study compares algorithms using external respiratory motion surrogates as predictors of internal lung motion tracked in real-time by electromagnetic transponders (Calypso® Medical Technologies) implanted in a canine model. Simultaneous spirometry, bellows, and transponder positions measurements were acquired during free breathing and variable ventilation respiratory patterns. Functions of phase, amplitude, tidal volume, and airflow were examined by least-squares regression analysis to determine which algorithm provided the best estimate of internal motion. The cosine phase model performed the worst of all models analyzed (R2 = 31.6%, free breathing, and R2 = 14.9%, variable ventilation). All algorithms performed better during free breathing than during variable ventilation measurements. The 5D model of tidal volume and airflow predicted transponder location better than amplitude or either of the two phasebased models analyzed, with correlation coefficients of 66.1% and 64.4% for free breathing and variable ventilation respectively. Real-time implanted transponder based measurements provide a direct method for determining lung tissue location. Current phase-based or amplitude-based respiratory motion algorithms cannot as accurately predict lung tissue motion in an irregularly breathing subject as a model including tidal volume and airflow. Further work is necessary to quantify the long term stability of prediction capabilities using amplitude and phase based algorithms for multiple lung tumor positions over time.

  7. Correlation between thoracolumbar curvatures and respiratory function in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Nor Najwatul Akmal Ab; Singh, Devinder Kaur Ajit; Lee, Raymond

    2017-01-01

    Aging is associated with alterations in thoracolumbar curvatures and respiratory function. Research information regarding the correlation between thoracolumbar curvatures and a comprehensive examination of respiratory function parameters in older adults is limited. The aim of the present study was to examine the correlation between thoracolumbar curvatures and respiratory function in community-dwelling older adults. Thoracolumbar curvatures (thoracic and lumbar) were measured using a motion tracker. Respiratory function parameters such as lung function, respiratory rate, respiratory muscle strength and respiratory muscle thickness (diaphragm and intercostal) were measured using a spirometer, triaxial accelerometer, respiratory pressure meter and ultrasound imaging, respectively. Sixty-eight community-dwelling older males and females from Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, with mean (standard deviation) age of 66.63 (5.16) years participated in this cross-sectional study. The results showed that mean (standard deviation) thoracic curvature angle and lumbar curvature angles were −46.30° (14.66°) and 14.10° (10.58°), respectively. There was a significant negative correlation between thoracic curvature angle and lung function (forced expiratory volume in 1 second: r=−0.23, P<0.05; forced vital capacity: r=−0.32, P<0.05), quiet expiration intercostal thickness (r=−0.22, P<0.05) and deep expiration diaphragm muscle thickness (r=−0.21, P<0.05). The lumbar curvature angle had a significant negative correlation with respiratory muscle strength (r=−0.29, P<0.05) and diaphragm muscle thickness at deep inspiration (r=−0.22, P<0.05). However, respiratory rate was correlated neither with thoracic nor with lumbar curvatures. The findings of this study suggest that increase in both thoracic and lumbar curvatures is correlated with decrease in respiratory muscle strength, respiratory muscle thickness and some parameters of lung function. Clinically, both thoracic and lumbar

  8. Correlation between thoracolumbar curvatures and respiratory function in older adults.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Nor Najwatul Akmal Ab; Singh, Devinder Kaur Ajit; Lee, Raymond

    2017-01-01

    Aging is associated with alterations in thoracolumbar curvatures and respiratory function. Research information regarding the correlation between thoracolumbar curvatures and a comprehensive examination of respiratory function parameters in older adults is limited. The aim of the present study was to examine the correlation between thoracolumbar curvatures and respiratory function in community-dwelling older adults. Thoracolumbar curvatures (thoracic and lumbar) were measured using a motion tracker. Respiratory function parameters such as lung function, respiratory rate, respiratory muscle strength and respiratory muscle thickness (diaphragm and intercostal) were measured using a spirometer, triaxial accelerometer, respiratory pressure meter and ultrasound imaging, respectively. Sixty-eight community-dwelling older males and females from Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, with mean (standard deviation) age of 66.63 (5.16) years participated in this cross-sectional study. The results showed that mean (standard deviation) thoracic curvature angle and lumbar curvature angles were -46.30° (14.66°) and 14.10° (10.58°), respectively. There was a significant negative correlation between thoracic curvature angle and lung function (forced expiratory volume in 1 second: r=-0.23, P<0.05; forced vital capacity: r=-0.32, P<0.05), quiet expiration intercostal thickness (r=-0.22, P<0.05) and deep expiration diaphragm muscle thickness (r=-0.21, P<0.05). The lumbar curvature angle had a significant negative correlation with respiratory muscle strength (r=-0.29, P<0.05) and diaphragm muscle thickness at deep inspiration (r=-0.22, P<0.05). However, respiratory rate was correlated neither with thoracic nor with lumbar curvatures. The findings of this study suggest that increase in both thoracic and lumbar curvatures is correlated with decrease in respiratory muscle strength, respiratory muscle thickness and some parameters of lung function. Clinically, both thoracic and lumbar curvatures

  9. Respiratory motion correction in emission tomography image reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Mauricio; Malandain, Grégoire; Koulibaly, Pierre Malick; González Ballester, Miguel A; Darcourt, Jacques

    2005-01-01

    In Emission Tomography imaging, respiratory motion causes artifacts in lungs and cardiac reconstructed images, which lead to misinterpretations and imprecise diagnosis. Solutions like respiratory gating, correlated dynamic PET techniques, list-mode data based techniques and others have been tested with improvements over the spatial activity distribution in lungs lesions, but with the disadvantages of requiring additional instrumentation or discarding part of the projection data used for reconstruction. The objective of this study is to incorporate respiratory motion correction directly into the image reconstruction process, without any additional acquisition protocol consideration. To this end, we propose an extension to the Maximum Likelihood Expectation Maximization (MLEM) algorithm that includes a respiratory motion model, which takes into account the displacements and volume deformations produced by the respiratory motion during the data acquisition process. We present results from synthetic simulations incorporating real respiratory motion as well as from phantom and patient data.

  10. Correlation Plenoptic Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Angelo, Milena; Pepe, Francesco V.; Garuccio, Augusto; Scarcelli, Giuliano

    2016-06-01

    Plenoptic imaging is a promising optical modality that simultaneously captures the location and the propagation direction of light in order to enable three-dimensional imaging in a single shot. However, in standard plenoptic imaging systems, the maximum spatial and angular resolutions are fundamentally linked; thereby, the maximum achievable depth of field is inversely proportional to the spatial resolution. We propose to take advantage of the second-order correlation properties of light to overcome this fundamental limitation. In this Letter, we demonstrate that the correlation in both momentum and position of chaotic light leads to the enhanced refocusing power of correlation plenoptic imaging with respect to standard plenoptic imaging.

  11. SU-E-J-253: Evaluation of 4DCT Images with Correlation of RPM Signals to Tumor Motion for Respiratory-Gated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, TK; Ewald, A; Schultz, T; Park, SY

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The amplitudes of lung tumor target motion and RPM signals are different from each other. Also, RPM system does not have in-depth RPM signal analysis tool. We have developed an algorithm that analyzes RPM signals for its stability as well as correlativity to the tumor motion. Methods: We used a Philips Big Bore CT scanner with a Varian Real-Time Position Management™ (RPM) system attached. 4DCT images were reviewed and tumor motion amplitudes of full breathing in superior-inferior, anterior-posterior, and left-right directions were measured. RPM signals were analyzed with the algorithm developed with Matlab. Average signal period, amplitude and statistical stability of the full breathing pattern as well as the pattern around full expiration were calculated. RPM signal amplitudes were normalized to measured tumor motion amplitudes so that selected gating phases (30%–70% or 40%–60%) allow tumor motion under 5.0mm. Results: Twelve patient cases were analyzed in this study with GTV sizes ranged from 1.0cm to 3.0cm diameter. The periods and amplitudes of RPM signal ranged from 3.1seconds to 6.5seconds and from 0.2cm to 1.7cm, respectively. RPM signals were most stable at full expiration. The standard deviation of the RPM signal peaks at full expiration was <0.11cm, and that of gated amplitudes was <0.25cm. Tumor motion amplitudes were primary in superior-inferior direction and minor (<=0.2cm) in other directions on all analyzed cases, ranged from 0.2cm to 2.5cm. The amplitudes increases with the tumor located toward the diaphragm. The gated phases were selected so that the average gated tumor motion amplitude as well as that plus deviation became under 0.5cm in superior-inferior direction. Conclusion: We were able to determine the respiratory-gated phases in RPM signals employing measured tumor motion amplitudes as well as developed RPM signal analyzer through correlation process. The RPM signal amplitudes do not represent tumor motion because of its

  12. Respiratory rate assessment from photoplethysmographic imaging.

    PubMed

    Karlen, Walter; Garde, Ainara; Myers, Dorothy; Scheffer, Cornie; Ansermino, J Mark; Dumont, Guy A

    2014-01-01

    We present a study investigating the suitability of a respiratory rate estimation algorithm applied to photoplethysmographic imaging on a mobile phone. The algorithm consists of a cascade of previously developed signal processing methods to detect features and extract respiratory induced variations in photoplethysmogram signals to estimate respiratory rate. With custom-built software on an Android phone (Camera Oximeter), contact photoplethysmographic imaging videos were recorded using the integrated camera from 19 healthy adults breathing spontaneously at respiratory rates between 6 and 40 breaths/min. Capnometry was simultaneously recorded to obtain reference respiratory rates. Two hundred and ninety-eight Camera Oximeter recordings were available for analysis. The algorithm detected 22 recordings with poor photoplethysmogram quality and 46 recordings with insufficient respiratory information. Of the 232 remaining recordings, a root mean square error of 5.9 breaths/min and a median absolute error of 2.3 breaths/min was obtained. The study showed that it is feasible to estimate respiratory rates by placing a finger on a mobile phone camera, but that it becomes increasingly challenging at respiratory rates higher than 20 breaths/min.

  13. Correlated diffusion imaging

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Prostate cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer death in the male population. Fortunately, the prognosis is excellent if detected at an early stage. Hence, the detection and localization of prostate cancer is crucial for diagnosis, as well as treatment via targeted focal therapy. New imaging techniques can potentially be invaluable tools for improving prostate cancer detection and localization. Methods In this study, we introduce a new form of diffusion magnetic resonance imaging called correlated diffusion imaging, where the tissue being imaged is characterized by the joint correlation of diffusion signal attenuation across multiple gradient pulse strengths and timings. By taking into account signal attenuation at different water diffusion motion sensitivities, correlated diffusion imaging can provide improved delineation between cancerous tissue and healthy tissue when compared to existing diffusion imaging modalities. Results Quantitative evaluation using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis, tissue class separability analysis, and visual assessment by an expert radiologist were performed to study correlated diffusion imaging for the task of prostate cancer diagnosis. These results are compared with that obtained using T2-weighted imaging and standard diffusion imaging (via the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC)). Experimental results suggest that correlated diffusion imaging provide improved delineation between healthy and cancerous tissue and may have potential as a diagnostic tool for cancer detection and localization in the prostate gland. Conclusions A new form of diffusion magnetic resonance imaging called correlated diffusion imaging (CDI) was developed for the purpose of aiding radiologists in cancer detection and localization in the prostate gland. Preliminary results show CDI shows considerable promise as a diagnostic aid for radiologists in the detection and localization of prostate cancer. PMID:23924150

  14. Correlation-Peak Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, A.; Metzler, A.; Köckenberger, W.; Izquierdo, M.; Komor, E.; Haase, A.; Décorps, M.; von Kienlin, M.

    1996-08-01

    Identification and quantitation in conventional1H spectroscopic imagingin vivois often hampered by the small chemical-shift range. To improve the spectral resolution of spectroscopic imaging, homonuclear two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy has been combined with phase encoding of the spatial dimensions. From the theoretical description of the coherence-transfer signal in the Fourier-transform domain, a comprehensive acquisition and processing strategy is presented that includes optimization of the width and the position of the acquisition windows, matched filtering of the signal envelope, and graphical presentation of the cross peak of interest. The procedure has been applied to image the spatial distribution of the correlation peaks from specific spin systems in the hypocotyl of castor bean (Ricinus communis) seedlings. Despite the overlap of many resonances, correlation-peak imaging made it possible to observe a number of proton resonances, such as those of sucrose, β-glucose, glutamine/glutamate, lysine, and arginine.

  15. Digital Image Correlation Engine

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, Dan; Crozier, Paul; Reu, Phil

    2015-10-06

    DICe is an open source digital image correlation (DIC) tool intended for use as a module in an external application or as a standalone analysis code. It's primary capability is computing full –field displacements and strains from sequences of digital These images are typically of a material sample undergoing a materials characterization experiment, but DICe is also useful for other applications (for example, trajectory tracking). DICe is machine portable (Windows, Linux and Mac) and can be effectively deployed on a high performance computing platform. Capabilities from DICe can be invoked through a library interface, via source code integration of DICe classes or through a graphical user interface.

  16. Image correlation and sampling study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popp, D. J.; Mccormack, D. S.; Sedwick, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    The development of analytical approaches for solving image correlation and image sampling of multispectral data is discussed. Relevant multispectral image statistics which are applicable to image correlation and sampling are identified. The general image statistics include intensity mean, variance, amplitude histogram, power spectral density function, and autocorrelation function. The translation problem associated with digital image registration and the analytical means for comparing commonly used correlation techniques are considered. General expressions for determining the reconstruction error for specific image sampling strategies are developed.

  17. Imaging in acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pesenti, Antonio; Musch, Guido; Lichtenstein, Daniel; Mojoli, Francesco; Amato, Marcelo B P; Cinnella, Gilda; Gattinoni, Luciano; Quintel, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Imaging has become increasingly important across medical specialties for diagnostic, monitoring, and investigative purposes in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). This review addresses the use of imaging techniques for the diagnosis and management of ARDS as well as gaining knowledge about its pathogenesis and pathophysiology. The techniques described in this article are computed tomography, positron emission tomography, and two easily accessible imaging techniques available at the bedside-ultrasound and electrical impedance tomography (EIT). The use of computed tomography has provided new insights into ARDS pathophysiology, demonstrating that ARDS does not homogeneously affect the lung parenchyma and that lung injury severity is widely distributed in the ARDS population. Positron emission tomography is a functional imaging technique whose value resides in adding incremental insights to morphological imaging. It can quantify regional perfusion, ventilation, aeration, lung vascular permeability, edema, and inflammation. Lung ultrasound and EIT are radiation-free, noninvasive tools available at the bedside. Lung ultrasound can provide useful information on ARDS diagnosis when x-rays or CT scan are not available. EIT is a useful tool to monitor lung ventilation and to assess the regional distribution of perfusion. The future of imaging in critical care will probably develop in two main directions: easily accessible imaging techniques that can be used at the bedside and sophisticated imaging methods that will be used to aid in difficult diagnostic cases or to advance our understanding of the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of an array of critical illnesses.

  18. Multiple window correlation analysis of HRV power and respiratory frequency.

    PubMed

    Hansson-Sandsten, Maria; Jönsson, Peter

    2007-10-01

    In this paper, we evaluate the correlation estimate, based on multiple window spectrum analysis, between the respiratory center frequency and the high-frequency band of the heartrate variability (HRV) power. One aim is to examine whether a more restricted frequency range would better capture respiratory related HR variation, especially when the HR variation is changing rapidly. The respiratory peak is detected and a narrow-banded measure of the high-frequency (HF) band of the HRV is defined as the respiratory frequency +/-0.05 Hz. We compare the mean square error of the correlation estimate between the frequency of the respiratory peak and the power of the HRV with the power in the usual 0.12-0.4 Hz frequency band. Different multiple window spectrum techniques are used for the estimation of the respiratory frequency as well as for the power of the HRV. We compare the peak-matched multiple windows with the Welch method while evaluating the two different HF-power estimates mentioned above. The results show that using a more narrow band for the power estimation gives stronger correlation which indicates that the estimate of the power is more robust.

  19. Model-based respiratory motion compensation for emission tomography image reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Reyes, M; Malandain, G; Koulibaly, P M; González-Ballester, M A; Darcourt, J

    2007-06-21

    In emission tomography imaging, respiratory motion causes artifacts in lungs and cardiac reconstructed images, which lead to misinterpretations, imprecise diagnosis, impairing of fusion with other modalities, etc. Solutions like respiratory gating, correlated dynamic PET techniques, list-mode data based techniques and others have been tested, which lead to improvements over the spatial activity distribution in lungs lesions, but which have the disadvantages of requiring additional instrumentation or the need of discarding part of the projection data used for reconstruction. The objective of this study is to incorporate respiratory motion compensation directly into the image reconstruction process, without any additional acquisition protocol consideration. To this end, we propose an extension to the maximum likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM) algorithm that includes a respiratory motion model, which takes into account the displacements and volume deformations produced by the respiratory motion during the data acquisition process. We present results from synthetic simulations incorporating real respiratory motion as well as from phantom and patient data.

  20. SU-E-J-235: Audiovisual Biofeedback Improves the Correlation Between Internal and External Respiratory Motion

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, D; Pollock, S; Keall, P; Greer, P; Ludbrook, J; Paganelli, C; Kim, T

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: External respiratory surrogates are often used to predict internal lung tumor motion for beam gating but the assumption of correlation between external and internal surrogates is not always verified resulting in amplitude mismatch and time shift. To test the hypothesis that audiovisual (AV) biofeedback improves the correlation between internal and external respiratory motion, in order to improve the accuracy of respiratory-gated treatments for lung cancer radiotherapy. Methods: In nine lung cancer patients, 2D coronal and sagittal cine-MR images were acquired across two MRI sessions (pre- and mid-treatment) with (1) free breathing (FB) and (2) AV biofeedback. External anterior-posterior (AP) respiratory motions of (a) chest and (b) abdomen were simultaneously acquired with physiological measurement unit (PMU, 3T Skyra, Siemens Healthcare Erlangen, Germany) and real-time position management (RPM) system (Varian, Palo Alto, USA), respectively. Internal superior-inferior (SI) respiratory motions of (c) lung tumor (i.e. centroid of auto-segmented lung tumor) and (d) diaphragm (i.e. upper liver dome) were measured from individual cine-MR images across 32 dataset. The four respiratory motions were then synchronized with the cine-MR image acquisition time. Correlation coefficients were calculated in the time variation of two nominated respiratory motions: (1) chest-abdomen, (2) abdomen-diaphragm and (3) diaphragm-lung tumor. The three combinations were compared between FB and AV biofeedback. Results: Compared to FB, AV biofeedback improved chest-abdomen correlation by 17% (p=0.005) from 0.75±0.23 to 0.90±0.05 and abdomen-diaphragm correlation by 4% (p=0.058) from 0.91±0.11 to 0.95±0.05. Compared to FB, AV biofeedback improved diaphragm-lung tumor correlation by 12% (p=0.023) from 0.65±0.21 to 0.74±0.16. Conclusions: Our results demonstrated that AV biofeedback significantly improved the correlation of internal and external respiratory motion, thus

  1. Functional brain imaging in respiratory medicine.

    PubMed

    Pattinson, Kyle

    2015-06-01

    Discordance of clinical symptoms with markers of disease severity remains a conundrum in a variety of respiratory conditions. The breathlessness of chronic lung disease correlates poorly with spirometry, yet is a better predictor of mortality. In chronic cough, symptoms are often evident without clear physical cause. In asthma, the terms 'over perceivers' and 'under perceivers' are common parlance. In all these examples, aberrant brain mechanisms may explain the mismatch between symptoms and pathology. Functional MRI is a non-invasive method of measuring brain function. It has recently become significantly advanced enough to be useful in clinical research and to address these potential mechanisms. This article explains how FMRI works, current understanding from FMRI in breathlessness, cough and asthma and suggests possibilities for future research.

  2. A manifold learning method to detect respiratory signal from liver ultrasound images.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiaze; Gogna, Apoorva; Tan, Bien Soo; Ooi, London Lucien; Tian, Qi; Liu, Feng; Liu, Jimin

    2015-03-01

    Respiratory gating has been widely applied for respiratory correction or compensation in image acquisition and image-guided interventions. A novel image-based method is proposed to extract respiratory signal directly from 2D ultrasound liver images. The proposed method utilizes a typical manifold learning method, based on local tangent space alignment based technique, to detect principal respiratory motion from a sequence of ultrasound images. This technique assumes all the images lying on a low-dimensional manifold embedding into the high-dimensional image space, constructs an approximate tangent space of each point to represent its local geometry on the manifold, and then aligns the local tangent spaces to form the global coordinate system, where the respiratory signal is extracted. The experimental results show that the proposed method can detect relatively accurate respiratory signal with high correlation coefficient (0.9775) with respect to the ground-truth signal by tracking external markers, and achieve satisfactory computing performance (2.3s for an image sequence of 256 frames). The proposed method is also used to create breathing-corrected 3D ultrasound images to demonstrate its potential application values.

  3. Correlation between forward head posture, respiratory functions, and respiratory accessory muscles in young adults.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi-Sun; Cha, Yong-Jun; Choi, Jong-Duk

    2017-08-03

    Forward head posture (FHP) causes changes in the strengths and rigidities of cervical muscles. The aim of this study was to investigate correlations between FHP and respiratory functions and the muscle activities of respiratory accessory muscles in young adults in their 20s. A volunteer sample of 33 healthy young adults participated in this study. Craniovertebral angle (CVA), cranial rotational angle (CRA), vital capacity (VC), forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume at 1 second (FEV1), peak expiratory flow (PEF), maximal voluntary ventilation (MVV), and sternocleidomastoid (SCM) and upper trapezius activity ratios were measured. Significant positive correlations were found between CVA and VC, FVC, FEV1, PEF, and MVV, and a significant negative correlation was found between CVA and SCM activity ratio. Significant negative correlations existed between CRA and VC and FVC, and significant positive correlations between CRA and SCM and upper trapezius activity ratios. FHP may act to lower respiratory functions, and thus, the maintenance of correct head posture is required to prevent such functional reductions.

  4. Improved Digital Image Correlation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudassar, Asloob Ahmad; Butt, Saira

    2016-12-01

    Digital Image Correlation (DIC) is a powerful technique which is used to correlate two image segments to determine the similarity between them. A correlation image is formed which gives a peak known as correlation peak. If the two image segments are identical the peak is known as auto-correlation peak otherwise it is known as cross correlation peak. The location of the peak in a correlation image gives the relative displacement between the two image segments. Use of DIC for in-plane displacement and deformation measurements in Electronic Speckle Photography (ESP) is well known. In ESP two speckle images are correlated using DIC and relative displacement is measured. We are presenting background review of ESP and disclosing a technique based on DIC for improved relative measurements which we regard as the improved DIC method. Simulation and experimental results reveal that the proposed improved-DIC method is superior to the conventional DIC method in two aspects, in resolution and in the availability of reference position in displacement measurements.

  5. Respiratory blur in 3D coronary MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Grist, T M; Korosec, F R; Christy, P S; Alley, M T; Polzin, J A; Mistretta, C A

    1995-04-01

    3D MR imaging of coronary arteries has the potential to provide both high resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio, but it is very susceptible to respiratory artifacts, especially respiratory blurring. Resolution loss caused by respiratory blurring in 3D coronary imaging is analyzed theoretically and verified experimentally. Under normal respiration, the width for any Gaussian point spread function is increased to a new value that is at least several millimeters (about 3-4 mm). In vivo studies were performed to compare respiratory pseudo-gated 3D acquisition with breath-hold 2D acquisition. On average, the overall quality of a pseudo-gated 3D image is worse than that of the corresponding breath-hold 2D image (P = 0.005). In most cases, respiratory blur caused coronary arteries in pseudo-gated 3D data to have lower resolution than in breath-hold 2D data.

  6. Vocalization-correlated respiratory movements in the squirrel monkey.

    PubMed

    Häusler, U

    2000-10-01

    Respiratory abdominal movements associated with vocalization were recorded in awake squirrel monkeys. Several call types, such as peeping, trilling, cackling, and err-chucks, were accompanied by large vocalization-correlated respiratory movements (VCRM) that started before vocalization. During purring, in contrast, only small VCRM were recorded that started later after vocal onset. VCRM during trill calls, a vocalization type with repetitive frequency modulation, showed a modulation in the rhythm of the frequency changes. A correlation with amplitude modulation was also present, but more variable. As high frequencies need a higher lung pressure for production than low frequencies, the modulation of VCRM seems to serve to optimize the lung pressure in relation to the vocalization frequency. The modulation, furthermore, may act as a mechanism to produce different trill variants. During err-chucks and staccato peeps, which show a large amplitude modulation, a nonmodulated VCRM occurred. This indicates the existence of a laryngeal amplitude-controlling mechanism that is independent from respiration.

  7. Fiducial marker for correlating images

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Lisa Marie [Rocky Point, NY; Smith, Randy J [Wading River, NY; Warren, John B [Port Jefferson, NY; Elliott, Donald [Hampton Bays, NY

    2011-06-21

    The invention relates to a fiducial marker having a marking grid that is used to correlate and view images produced by different imaging modalities or different imaging and viewing modalities. More specifically, the invention relates to the fiducial marking grid that has a grid pattern for producing either a viewing image and/or a first analytical image that can be overlaid with at least one other second analytical image in order to view a light path or to image different imaging modalities. Depending on the analysis, the grid pattern has a single layer of a certain thickness or at least two layers of certain thicknesses. In either case, the grid pattern is imageable by each imaging or viewing modality used in the analysis. Further, when viewing a light path, the light path of the analytical modality cannot be visualized by viewing modality (e.g., a light microscope objective). By correlating these images, the ability to analyze a thin sample that is, for example, biological in nature but yet contains trace metal ions is enhanced. Specifically, it is desired to analyze both the organic matter of the biological sample and the trace metal ions contained within the biological sample without adding or using extrinsic labels or stains.

  8. A simple method for labeling CT images with respiratory states

    SciTech Connect

    Berlinger, Kajetan; Sauer, Otto; Vences, Lucia; Roth, Michael

    2006-09-15

    A method is described for labeling CT images with their respiratory state by a needle, connected to the patient's chest/abdomen. By means of a leverage the needle follows the abdominal respiratory motion. The needle is visible as a blurred spot in every CT slice. The method was tested with nine patients. A series of volume scans during free breathing was performed. The detected positions of the moving needle in every single slice were compared to each other thus enabling respiratory state assignment. The tool is an inexpensive alternative to complex respiratory measuring tools for four dimensional (4D) CT and was greatly accepted in the clinic due to its simplicity.

  9. Respiratory Amplitude Guided 4-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Yanle; Caruthers, Shelton D.; Low, Daniel A.; Parikh, Parag J.; Mutic, Sasa

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of prospectively guiding 4-dimensional (4D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) image acquisition using triggers at preselected respiratory amplitudes to achieve T{sub 2} weighting for abdominal motion tracking. Methods and Materials: A respiratory amplitude-based triggering system was developed and integrated into a commercial turbo spin echo MRI sequence. Initial feasibility tests were performed on healthy human study participants. Four respiratory states, the middle and the end of inhalation and exhalation, were used to trigger 4D MRI image acquisition of the liver. To achieve T{sub 2} weighting, the echo time and repetition time were set to 75 milliseconds and 4108 milliseconds, respectively. Single-shot acquisition, together with parallel imaging and partial k-space imaging techniques, was used to improve image acquisition efficiency. 4D MRI image sets composed of axial or sagittal slices were acquired. Results: Respiratory data measured and logged by the MRI scanner showed that the triggers occurred at the appropriate respiratory levels. Liver motion could be easily observed on both 4D MRI image datasets by sensing either the change of liver in size and shape (axial) or diaphragm motion (sagittal). Both 4D MRI image datasets were T{sub 2}-weighted as expected. Conclusions: This study demonstrated the feasibility of achieving T{sub 2}-weighted 4D MRI images using amplitude-based respiratory triggers. With the aid of the respiratory amplitude-based triggering system, the proposed method is compatible with most MRI sequences and therefore has the potential to improve tumor-tissue contrast in abdominal tumor motion imaging.

  10. Suppression of respiratory motion artifacts in magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Wood, M L; Henkelman, R M

    1986-01-01

    Anatomical structures that are displaced periodically during respiration are repeated as ghosts in magnetic resonance (MR) images. These ghosts can be suppressed in many ways: the averaging of multiple sets of data, respiratory gating, deliberate positioning of ghosts, and respiratory ordering of phase encoding. Each method has a unique mechanism, which is described in detail. A theoretical investigation has been conducted into the effects that the methods have on the point spread function of a moving point. Data acquired in Fourier imaging are actually in the spatial frequency domain, so that respiratory motion can be regarded as a function of spatial frequency. The four methods above modify this functional dependence in different ways, allowing a unified comparison. Motion artifact suppression imposes additional constraints on image acquisition, which can prolong the imaging time. A technique has been developed that keeps the imaging time short by using the configuration of the subject to regulate the timing of image acquisition.

  11. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome: Clinical Outcome and Prognostic Correlates1

    PubMed Central

    Kwok, Man Leung; Yuen, Hon; Lai, Sik To

    2003-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) poses a major threat to the health of people worldwide. We performed a retrospective case series analysis to assess clinical outcome and identify pretreatment prognostic correlates of SARS, managed under a standardized treatment protocol. We studied 127 male and 196 female patients with a mean age of 41±14 (range 18–83). All patients, except two, received ribavirin and steroid combination therapy. In 115 (36%) patients, the course of disease was limited. Pneumonitis progressed rapidly in the remaining patients. Sixty-seven (21%) patients required intensive care, and 42 (13%) required ventilator support. Advanced age, high admission neutrophil count, and high initial lactate dehydrogenase level were independent correlates of an adverse clinical outcome. SARS-associated coronavirus caused severe illnesses in most patients, despite early treatment with ribavirin and steroid. This study has identified three independent pretreatment prognostic correlates. PMID:14519241

  12. Correlation between the respiratory waveform measured using a respiratory sensor and 3D tumor motion in gated radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Tsunashima, Yoshikazu . E-mail: tsunashima@pmrc.tsukuba.ac.jp; Sakae, Takeji; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Kagei, Kenji; Terunuma, Toshiyuki; Nohtomi, Akihiro; Akine, Yasuyuki

    2004-11-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the correlation between the respiratory waveform measured using a respiratory sensor and three-dimensional (3D) tumor motion. Methods and materials: A laser displacement sensor (LDS: KEYENCE LB-300) that measures distance using infrared light was used as the respiratory sensor. This was placed such that the focus was in an area around the patient's navel. When the distance from the LDS to the body surface changes as the patient breathes, the displacement is detected as a respiratory waveform. To obtain the 3D tumor motion, a biplane digital radiography unit was used. For the tumor in the lung, liver, and esophagus of 26 patients, the waveform was compared with the 3D tumor motion. The relationship between the respiratory waveform and the 3D tumor motion was analyzed by means of the Fourier transform and a cross-correlation function. Results: The respiratory waveform cycle agreed with that of the cranial-caudal and dorsal-ventral tumor motion. A phase shift observed between the respiratory waveform and the 3D tumor motion was principally in the range 0.0 to 0.3 s, regardless of the organ being measured, which means that the respiratory waveform does not always express the 3D tumor motion with fidelity. For this reason, the standard deviation of the tumor position in the expiration phase, as indicated by the respiratory waveform, was derived, which should be helpful in suggesting the internal margin required in the case of respiratory gated radiotherapy. Conclusion: Although obtained from only a few breathing cycles for each patient, the correlation between the respiratory waveform and the 3D tumor motion was evident in this study. If this relationship is analyzed carefully and an internal margin is applied, the accuracy and convenience of respiratory gated radiotherapy could be improved by use of the respiratory sensor.Thus, it is expected that this procedure will come into wider use.

  13. Image Alignment and Correlation System.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-07-01

    RESOLUTION TEST CHART NATIONAL BUREAU Of STANDARDS-1963-A 07- 0r MA4 ETL 237 IMAGE ALIGNMENT AND CORRELATION SYSTEM (J[ Y Samuel E./Craig Alan L./Moyer...respect to the reference image. The images are transparencies mounted on light boxes. iii/ . . . . .. , , I Ii / An x- y plotter and a graphics terminal were...terminal which has a storage cathode- ray tube (CRT) or an x- y recorder for "hard copy." The sensor output is scanned in the spatial frequency domain under

  14. Edge-based correlation image registration for multispectral imaging

    DOEpatents

    Nandy, Prabal

    2009-11-17

    Registration information for images of a common target obtained from a plurality of different spectral bands can be obtained by combining edge detection and phase correlation. The images are edge-filtered, and pairs of the edge-filtered images are then phase correlated to produce phase correlation images. The registration information can be determined based on these phase correlation images.

  15. 4D MR imaging using robust internal respiratory signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, CheukKai; Wen, Zhifei; Stemkens, Bjorn; Tijssen, R. H. N.; van den Berg, C. A. T.; Hwang, Ken-Pin; Beddar, Sam

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility of using internal respiratory (IR) surrogates to sort four-dimensional (4D) magnetic resonance (MR) images. The 4D MR images were constructed by acquiring fast 2D cine MR images sequentially, with each slice scanned for more than one breathing cycle. The 4D volume was then sorted retrospectively using the IR signal. In this study, we propose to use multiple low-frequency components in the Fourier space as well as the anterior body boundary as potential IR surrogates. From these potential IR surrogates, we used a clustering algorithm to identify those that best represented the respiratory pattern to derive the IR signal. A study with healthy volunteers was performed to assess the feasibility of the proposed IR signal. We compared this proposed IR signal with the respiratory signal obtained using respiratory bellows. Overall, 99% of the IR signals matched the bellows signals. The average difference between the end inspiration times in the IR signal and bellows signal was 0.18 s in this cohort of matching signals. For the acquired images corresponding to the other 1% of non-matching signal pairs, the respiratory motion shown in the images was coherent with the respiratory phases determined by the IR signal, but not the bellows signal. This suggested that the IR signal determined by the proposed method could potentially correct the faulty bellows signal. The sorted 4D images showed minimal mismatched artefacts and potential clinical applicability. The proposed IR signal therefore provides a feasible alternative to effectively sort MR images in 4D.

  16. Minimum Bayes risk image correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minter, T. C., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    In this paper, the problem of designing a matched filter for image correlation will be treated as a statistical pattern recognition problem. It is shown that, by minimizing a suitable criterion, a matched filter can be estimated which approximates the optimum Bayes discriminant function in a least-squares sense. It is well known that the use of the Bayes discriminant function in target classification minimizes the Bayes risk, which in turn directly minimizes the probability of a false fix. A fast Fourier implementation of the minimum Bayes risk correlation procedure is described.

  17. Minimum Bayes risk image correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minter, T. C., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    In this paper, the problem of designing a matched filter for image correlation will be treated as a statistical pattern recognition problem. It is shown that, by minimizing a suitable criterion, a matched filter can be estimated which approximates the optimum Bayes discriminant function in a least-squares sense. It is well known that the use of the Bayes discriminant function in target classification minimizes the Bayes risk, which in turn directly minimizes the probability of a false fix. A fast Fourier implementation of the minimum Bayes risk correlation procedure is described.

  18. Prevalence and correlates of respiratory and non-respiratory panic attacks in the general population.

    PubMed

    Fullana, M A; Vilagut, G; Ortega, N; Bruffaerts, R; de Girolamo, G; de Graaf, R; Haro, J M; Kovess, V; Matschinger, H; Bulbena, A; Alonso, J

    2011-06-01

    Panic attacks are heterogeneous with regards to symptom profile. Subtypes of panic attacks have been proposed, of which the most investigated is respiratory panic attacks (RPA). Limited information exists about RPA in the general population. The prevalence and correlates of RPA and non-respiratory panic attacks (NRPA) were examined in a subsample (n=8.796) of individuals participating in a cross-sectional survey of the adult general population of six European countries. Panic attacks, mental disorders, and chronic physical conditions were assessed with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI) 3.0. Data on use of health services and disability were obtained. The lifetime prevalence of RPA was 6.77 and the 12-month prevalence was 2.26. No robust associations of RPA with sociodemographic characteristics, mental disorders or physical conditions were found as compared to NRPA. RPA were associated with increased use of health services but similar disability in comparison to NRPA. Few direct data are available on the validity of the CIDI to assess RPA. Other definitions of RPA exist in the literature. Our findings suggest that there are very few differences between RPA and NRPA and do not support the need of subtyping panic attacks in current classification systems. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Molecular Imaging of Influenza and Other Emerging Respiratory Viral Infections

    PubMed Central

    Lawler, James; Paragas, Jason; Jahrling, Peter B.; Mollura, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    Research on the pathogenesis and therapy of influenza and other emerging respiratory viral infections would be aided by methods that directly visualize pathophysiologic processes in patients and laboratory animals. At present, imaging of diseases, such as swine-origin H1N1 influenza, is largely restricted to chest radiograph and computed tomography (CT), which can detect pulmonary structural changes in severely ill patients but are more limited in characterizing the early stages of illness, differentiating inflammation from infection or tracking immune responses. In contrast, imaging modalities, such as positron emission tomography, single photon emission CT, magnetic resonance imaging, and bioluminescence imaging, which have become useful tools for investigating the pathogenesis of a range of disease processes, could be used to advance in vivo studies of respiratory viral infections in patients and animals. Molecular techniques might also be used to identify novel biomarkers of disease progression and to evaluate new therapies. PMID:21422476

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography of respiratory mechanics.

    PubMed

    Biederer, Jürgen; Hintze, Christian; Fabel, Michael; Dinkel, Julien

    2010-12-01

    Radiotherapy for organs with respiratory motion has motivated the development of dynamic volume lung imaging with computed tomography (4D-CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (4D-MRI). 4D-CT can be realized in helical (continuous couch translation during image acquisition) or cine mode (translation step-by-step), either acquired prospectively or reconstructed retrospectively with temporal resolutions of up to 250 msec. Long exposure times result in high radiation dose and restrict 4D-CT to specific indications (ie, radiotherapy planning). Dynamic MRI accelerated by parallel imaging and echo sharing reaches temporal resolutions of up to 10 images/sec (2D+t) or 1 volume/s (3D+t) that allow analyzing respiratory motion of the lung and its tumors. Near isotropic 4D-MRI can be used to assess tumor displacement, chest wall invasion, and segmental respiratory mechanics. Limited temporal resolution of dynamic volume acquisitions (in their current implementation) may lead to an overestimation of tumor size, as the mass is volume averaged into many voxels during motion. Nevertheless, 4D-MRI allows for repeated and prolonged measurements without radiation exposure and therefore appears to be appropriate for patient selection in motion-adapted radiotherapy as well as for a broad spectrum of scientific applications.

  1. Spatial correlation coefficient images for ultrasonic detection.

    PubMed

    Cepel, Raina; Ho, K C; Rinker, Brett A; Palmer, Donald D; Lerch, Terrence P; Neal, Steven P

    2007-09-01

    In ultrasonics, image formation and detection are generally based on signal amplitude. In this paper, we introduce correlation coefficient images as a signal-amplitude independent approach for image formation. The correlation coefficients are calculated between A-scans digitized at adjacent measurement positions. In these images, defects are revealed as regions of high or low correlation relative to the background correlations associated with noise. Correlation coefficient and C-scan images are shown to demonstrate flat-bottom-hole detection in a stainless steel annular ring and crack detection in an aluminum aircraft structure.

  2. The influence of respiratory motion on CT image volume definition

    SciTech Connect

    Rodríguez-Romero, Ruth Castro-Tejero, Pablo

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: Radiotherapy treatments are based on geometric and density information acquired from patient CT scans. It is well established that breathing motion during scan acquisition induces motion artifacts in CT images, which can alter the size, shape, and density of a patient's anatomy. The aim of this work is to examine and evaluate the impact of breathing motion on multislice CT imaging with respiratory synchronization (4DCT) and without it (3DCT). Methods: A specific phantom with a movable insert was used. Static and dynamic phantom acquisitions were obtained with a multislice CT. Four sinusoidal breath patterns were simulated to move known geometric structures longitudinally. Respiratory synchronized acquisitions (4DCT) were performed to generate images during inhale, intermediate, and exhale phases using prospective and retrospective techniques. Static phantom data were acquired in helical and sequential mode to define a baseline for each type of respiratory 4DCT technique. Taking into account the fact that respiratory 4DCT is not always available, 3DCT helical image studies were also acquired for several CT rotation periods. To study breath and acquisition coupling when respiratory 4DCT was not performed, the beginning of the CT image acquisition was matched with inhale, intermediate, or exhale respiratory phases, for each breath pattern. Other coupling scenarios were evaluated by simulating different phantom and CT acquisition parameters. Motion induced variations in shape and density were quantified by automatic threshold volume generation and Dice similarity coefficient calculation. The structure mass center positions were also determined to make a comparison with their theoretical expected position. Results: 4DCT acquisitions provided volume and position accuracies within ±3% and ±2 mm for structure dimensions >2 cm, breath amplitude ≤15 mm, and breath period ≥3 s. The smallest object (1 cm diameter) exceeded 5% volume variation for the breath

  3. The influence of respiratory motion on CT image volume definition.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Romero, Ruth; Castro-Tejero, Pablo

    2014-04-01

    Radiotherapy treatments are based on geometric and density information acquired from patient CT scans. It is well established that breathing motion during scan acquisition induces motion artifacts in CT images, which can alter the size, shape, and density of a patient's anatomy. The aim of this work is to examine and evaluate the impact of breathing motion on multislice CT imaging with respiratory synchronization (4DCT) and without it (3DCT). A specific phantom with a movable insert was used. Static and dynamic phantom acquisitions were obtained with a multislice CT. Four sinusoidal breath patterns were simulated to move known geometric structures longitudinally. Respiratory synchronized acquisitions (4DCT) were performed to generate images during inhale, intermediate, and exhale phases using prospective and retrospective techniques. Static phantom data were acquired in helical and sequential mode to define a baseline for each type of respiratory 4DCT technique. Taking into account the fact that respiratory 4DCT is not always available, 3DCT helical image studies were also acquired for several CT rotation periods. To study breath and acquisition coupling when respiratory 4DCT was not performed, the beginning of the CT image acquisition was matched with inhale, intermediate, or exhale respiratory phases, for each breath pattern. Other coupling scenarios were evaluated by simulating different phantom and CT acquisition parameters. Motion induced variations in shape and density were quantified by automatic threshold volume generation and Dice similarity coefficient calculation. The structure mass center positions were also determined to make a comparison with their theoretical expected position. 4DCT acquisitions provided volume and position accuracies within ± 3% and ± 2 mm for structure dimensions >2 cm, breath amplitude ≤ 15 mm, and breath period ≥ 3 s. The smallest object (1 cm diameter) exceeded 5% volume variation for the breath patterns of higher

  4. Respiratory motion correction of liver contrast-enhanced ultrasound sequences by selecting reference image automatically

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ji; Zhang, Yan-Rong; Chen, Juan; Chen, Xiao-Hui; Zhong, Xiao-Li

    2017-03-01

    Objective: Respiratory motion correction is necessary to quantitative analysis of liver contrast-enhance ultrasound (CEUS) image sequences. However, traditionally manual selecting reference image would affect the accuracy of the respiratory motion correction. Methods First, the original high-dimensional ultrasound gray-level image data was mapped into a two-dimensional space by using Laplacian Eigenmaps (LE). Then, the cluster analysis was adopted using K-means, and the optimal ultrasound reference image could be gotten for respiratory motion correction. Finally, this proposed method was validated on 18 CEUS cases of VX2 tumor in rabbit liver, and the effectiveness of this method was demonstrated. Results After correction, the time-intensity curves extracted from the region of interest of CEUS image sequences became smoother. Before correction, the average of total mean structural similarity (TMSSIM) and the average of mean correlation coefficient (MCC) from image sequences were 0.45+/-0.11 and 0.67+/-0.16, respectively. After correction, the two parameters were increased obviously P<0.001), and were 0.59+/-0.11 and 0.81+/-0.11, respectively. The average of deviation valve (DV) from image sequences before correction was 92.16+/-18.12. After correction, the average was reduced to one-third of the original value. Conclusions: The proposed respiratory motion method could improve the accuracy of the quantitative analysis of CEUS by using the reference image based on the traditionally manual selection. This method is operated simply and has a potential in clinical application.

  5. Overview of current lung imaging in acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zompatori, Maurizio; Ciccarese, Federica; Fasano, Luca

    2014-12-01

    Imaging plays a key role in the diagnosis and follow-up of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Chest radiography, bedside lung ultrasonography and computed tomography scans can provide useful information for the management of patients and detection of prognostic factors. However, imaging findings are not specific and several possible differential diagnoses should be taken into account. Herein we will review the role of radiological techniques in ARDS, highlight the plain radiological and computed tomography findings according to the pathological stage of the disease (exudative, inflammatory and fibroproliferative), and summarise the main points for the differential diagnosis with cardiogenic oedema, which is still challenging in the acute stage.

  6. SU-E-J-48: Development of An Abdominal Compression Device for Respiratory Correlated Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, T; Kang, S; Kim, D; Suh, T; Kim, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to develop the abdominal compression device which could control pressure level according to the abdominal respiratory motion and evaluate its feasibility. Methods: In this study, we focused on developing the abdominal compression device which could control pressure level at any point of time so the developed device is possible to use a variety of purpose (gating technique or respiratory training system) while maintaining the merit of the existing commercial device. The compression device (air pad form) was designed to be able to compress the front and side of abdomen and the pressure level of the abdomen is controlled by air flow. Pressure level of abdomen (air flow) was determined using correlation data between external abdominal motion and respiratory volume signal measured by spirometer. In order to verify the feasibility of the device, it was necessary to confirm the correlation between the abdominal respiratory motion and respiratory volume signal and cooperation with respiratory training system also checked. Results: In the previous study, we could find that the correlation coefficient ratio between diaphragm and respiratory volume signal measured by spirometer was 0.95. In this study, we confirmed the correlation between the respiratory volume signal and the external abdominal motion measured by belt-transducer (correlation coefficient ratio was 0.92) and used the correlated respiratory volume data as an abdominal pressure level. It was possible to control the pressure level with negligible time delay and respiratory volume data based guiding waveforms could be properly inserted into the respiratory training system. Conclusion: Through this feasibility study, we confirmed the correlation between the respiratory volume signal and the external abdominal motion. Also initial assessment of the device and its compatibility with the respiratory training system were verified. Further study on application in respiratory gated

  7. Ultrasonic Detection Using Correlation Images (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    for imaging and detection based on the similarity of adjacent signals, quantified by the correlation coefficient calculated between A-scans... Correlation coefficient images are introduced and shown with C-scan images to demonstrate flat-bottom-hole and crack detection in experimental data and planar

  8. Human torso phantom for imaging of heart with realistic modes of cardiac and respiratory motion

    DOEpatents

    Boutchko, Rostyslav; Balakrishnan, Karthikayan; Gullberg, Grant T; O& #x27; Neil, James P

    2013-09-17

    A human torso phantom and its construction, wherein the phantom mimics respiratory and cardiac cycles in a human allowing acquisition of medical imaging data under conditions simulating patient cardiac and respiratory motion.

  9. Assessing the variability in respiratory acoustic thoracic imaging (RATHI).

    PubMed

    Charleston-Villalobos, S; Torres-Jiménez, A; González-Camarena, R; Chi-Lem, G; Aljama-Corrales, T

    2014-02-01

    Multichannel analysis of lung sounds (LSs) has enabled the generation of a functional image for the temporal and spatial study of LS intensities in healthy and diseased subjects; this method is known as respiratory acoustic thoracic imaging (RATHI). This acoustic imaging technique has been applied to diverse pulmonary conditions, but it is important to contribute to the understanding of RATHI characteristics, such as acoustic spatial distribution, dependence on airflow and variability. The purpose of the current study is to assess the intra-subject and inter-subject RATHI variabilities in a cohort of 12 healthy male subjects (24.3±1.5 years) using diverse quantitative indices. The indices were obtained directly from the acoustic image and did not require scores from human raters, which helps to prevent inter-observer variability. To generate the acoustic image, LSs were acquired at 25 positions on the posterior thoracic surface by means of airborne sound sensors with a wide frequency band from 75 up to 1000 Hz under controlled airflow conditions at 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 L/s. To assess intra-subject variability, the degree of similitude between inspiratory acoustic images was evaluated through quadratic mutual information based on the Cauchy-Schwartz inequality (I(CS)). The inter-subject variability was assessed by an image registration procedure between RATHIs and X-ray images to allow the computation of average and variance acoustic image in the same coordinate space. The results indicated that intra-subject RATHI similitude, reflected by I(CS-global), averaged 0.960±0.008, 0.958±0.008 and 0.960±0.007 for airflows of 1.0, 1.5, and 2L/s, respectively. As for the inter-subject variability, the variance image values for three airflow conditions indicated low image variability as they ranged from 0.01 to 0.04. In conclusion, the assessment of intra-subject and inter-subject variability by similitude indices indicated that the acoustic image pattern is repeatable along

  10. Image correlation spectroscopy to define membrane dynamics.

    PubMed

    Bonor, Jeremy; Nohe, Anja

    2010-01-01

    Fluorescent imaging techniques are powerful tools that aid in studying protein dynamics and membrane domains and allow for the visualization and data collection of such structures as caveolae and clathrin-coated pits, key players in the regulation of cell communication and signaling. The family of image correlation spectroscopy (FICS) provides a unique way to determine details about aggregation, clustering, and dynamics of proteins on the plasma membrane. FICS consists of many imaging techniques which we will focus on including image correlation spectroscopy, image cross-correlation spectroscopy and dynamic image correlation spectroscopy. Image correlation spectroscopy is a tool used to calculate the cluster density, which is the average number of clusters per unit area along with data to determine the degree of aggregation of plasma membrane proteins. Image cross-correlation spectroscopy measures the colocalization of proteins of interest. Dynamic image correlation spectroscopy can be used to analyze protein aggregate dynamics on the cell surface during live-cell imaging in the millisecond to second range.

  11. Dynamic volume vs respiratory correlated 4DCT for motion assessment in radiation therapy simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Coolens, Catherine; Bracken, John; Driscoll, Brandon; Hope, Andrew; Jaffray, David

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: Conventional (i.e., respiratory-correlated) 4DCT exploits the repetitive nature of breathing to provide an estimate of motion; however, it has limitations due to binning artifacts and irregular breathing in actual patient breathing patterns. The aim of this work was to evaluate the accuracy and image quality of a dynamic volume, CT approach (4D{sub vol}) using a 320-slice CT scanner to minimize these limitations, wherein entire image volumes are acquired dynamically without couch movement. This will be compared to the conventional respiratory-correlated 4DCT approach (RCCT). Methods: 4D{sub vol} CT was performed and characterized on an in-house, programmable respiratory motion phantom containing multiple geometric and morphological ''tumor'' objects over a range of regular and irregular patient breathing traces obtained from 3D fluoroscopy and compared to RCCT. The accuracy of volumetric capture and breathing displacement were evaluated and compared with the ground truth values and with the results reported using RCCT. A motion model was investigated to validate the number of motion samples needed to obtain accurate motion probability density functions (PDF). The impact of 4D image quality on this accuracy was then investigated. Dose measurements using volumetric and conventional scan techniques were also performed and compared. Results: Both conventional and dynamic volume 4DCT methods were capable of estimating the programmed displacement of sinusoidal motion, but patient breathing is known to not be regular, and obvious differences were seen for realistic, irregular motion. The mean RCCT amplitude error averaged at 4 mm (max. 7.8 mm) whereas the 4D{sub vol} CT error stayed below 0.5 mm. Similarly, the average absolute volume error was lower with 4D{sub vol} CT. Under irregular breathing, the 4D{sub vol} CT method provides a close description of the motion PDF (cross-correlation 0.99) and is able to track each object, whereas the RCCT method results in a

  12. Pulmonary imaging using respiratory motion compensated simultaneous PET/MR

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Joyita; Huang, Chuan; Li, Quanzheng; El Fakhri, Georges

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Pulmonary positron emission tomography (PET) imaging is confounded by blurring artifacts caused by respiratory motion. These artifacts degrade both image quality and quantitative accuracy. In this paper, the authors present a complete data acquisition and processing framework for respiratory motion compensated image reconstruction (MCIR) using simultaneous whole body PET/magnetic resonance (MR) and validate it through simulation and clinical patient studies. Methods: The authors have developed an MCIR framework based on maximum a posteriori or MAP estimation. For fast acquisition of high quality 4D MR images, the authors developed a novel Golden-angle RAdial Navigated Gradient Echo (GRANGE) pulse sequence and used it in conjunction with sparsity-enforcing k-t FOCUSS reconstruction. The authors use a 1D slice-projection navigator signal encapsulated within this pulse sequence along with a histogram-based gate assignment technique to retrospectively sort the MR and PET data into individual gates. The authors compute deformation fields for each gate via nonrigid registration. The deformation fields are incorporated into the PET data model as well as utilized for generating dynamic attenuation maps. The framework was validated using simulation studies on the 4D XCAT phantom and three clinical patient studies that were performed on the Biograph mMR, a simultaneous whole body PET/MR scanner. Results: The authors compared MCIR (MC) results with ungated (UG) and one-gate (OG) reconstruction results. The XCAT study revealed contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) improvements for MC relative to UG in the range of 21%–107% for 14 mm diameter lung lesions and 39%–120% for 10 mm diameter lung lesions. A strategy for regularization parameter selection was proposed, validated using XCAT simulations, and applied to the clinical studies. The authors’ results show that the MC image yields 19%–190% increase in the CNR of high-intensity features of interest affected by

  13. Correlation Imaging with Arbitrary Sampling Trajectories

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yu

    2014-01-01

    The presented work aims to develop a generalized linear approach to image reconstruction with arbitrary sampling trajectories for high-speed MRI. This approach is based on a previously developed image reconstruction framework, "correlation imaging" (1). In the presented work, correlation imaging with arbitrary sampling trajectories is implemented in a multi-dimensional hybrid space that is formed from the physical sampling space and a virtually defined space. By introducing an undersampling trajectory with both uniformity and randomness in the hybrid space, correlation imaging may take advantage of multiple image reconstruction mechanisms including coil sensitivity encoding, data sparsity and information sharing. This hybrid-space implementation is demonstrated in multi-slice 2D imaging, multi-scan imaging, and radial dynamic imaging. Since more information is used in image reconstruction, it is found that hybrid-space correlation imaging outperforms several conventional techniques. The presented approach will benefit clinical MRI by enabling correlation imaging to be used to accelerate multi-scan clinical protocols that need different sampling trajectories in different scans. PMID:24629517

  14. Multichannel correlation recognition method of optical images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongxia; He, Junfa; Sun, Honghui

    2000-10-01

    In this paper a multi-channel real-time hybrid joint transform correlator is proposed. In this correlator, the computer control is used to divide the screen into several equal size windows, reference images of the windows are all the same one and object images are adopted from different frames of image sequences by CCD, twice Fourier transforms of every channel images are realized by using hololens array. Areas of LCLV and the output light energy can be used effectively. The correlation performance can be improved.

  15. Monotonic correlation analysis of image quality measures for image fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Lance M.; Burks, Stephen D.; Moore, Richard K.; Nguyen, Quang

    2008-04-01

    The next generation of night vision goggles will fuse image intensified and long wave infra-red to create a hybrid image that will enable soldiers to better interpret their surroundings during nighttime missions. Paramount to the development of such goggles is the exploitation of image quality (IQ) measures to automatically determine the best image fusion algorithm for a particular task. This work introduces a novel monotonic correlation coefficient to investigate how well possible IQ features correlate to actual human performance, which is measured by a perception study. The paper will demonstrate how monotonic correlation can identify worthy features that could be overlooked by traditional correlation values.

  16. Trigeminal nerve: Anatomic correlation with MR imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, D.L.; Pech, P.; Pojunas, K.W.; Kilgore, D.P.; Williams, A.L.; Haughton, V.M.

    1986-06-01

    Through correlation with cryomicrotic sections, the appearance of the trigeminal nerve and its branches on magnetic resonance images is described in healthy individuals and in patients with tumors involving this nerve. Coronal images are best for defining the different parts of the nerve and for making a side-to-side comparison. Sagittal images are useful to demonstrate tumors involving the Gasserian ganglion.

  17. Comparison of magnetic resonance imaging of inhaled SF6 with respiratory gas analysis.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Alexander-Wigbert; Wolf, Ursula; Fabel, Michael; Weiler, Norbert; Heussel, Claus P; Eberle, Balthasar; David, Matthias; Schreiber, Wolfgang G

    2009-05-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging of inhaled fluorinated inert gases ((19)F-MRI) such as sulfur hexafluoride (SF(6)) allows for analysis of ventilated air spaces. In this study, the possibility of using this technique to image lung function was assessed. For this, (19)F-MRI of inhaled SF(6) was compared with respiratory gas analysis, which is a global but reliable measure of alveolar gas fraction. Five anesthetized pigs underwent multiple-breath wash-in procedures with a gas mixture of 70% SF(6) and 30% oxygen. Two-dimensional (19)F-MRI and end-expiratory gas fraction analysis were performed after 4 to 24 inhaled breaths. Signal intensity of (19)F-MRI and end-expiratory SF(6) fraction were evaluated with respect to linear correlation and reproducibility. Time constants were estimated by both MRI and respiratory gas analysis data and compared for agreement. A good linear correlation between signal intensity and end-expiratory gas fraction was found (correlation coefficient 0.99+/-0.01). The data were reproducible (standard error of signal intensity 8% vs. that of gas fraction 5%) and the comparison of time constants yielded a sufficient agreement. According to the good linear correlation and the acceptable reproducibility, we suggest the (19)F-MRI to be a valuable tool for quantification of intrapulmonary SF(6) and hence lung function.

  18. Image correlation method for DNA sequence alignment.

    PubMed

    Curilem Saldías, Millaray; Villarroel Sassarini, Felipe; Muñoz Poblete, Carlos; Vargas Vásquez, Asticio; Maureira Butler, Iván

    2012-01-01

    The complexity of searches and the volume of genomic data make sequence alignment one of bioinformatics most active research areas. New alignment approaches have incorporated digital signal processing techniques. Among these, correlation methods are highly sensitive. This paper proposes a novel sequence alignment method based on 2-dimensional images, where each nucleic acid base is represented as a fixed gray intensity pixel. Query and known database sequences are coded to their pixel representation and sequence alignment is handled as object recognition in a scene problem. Query and database become object and scene, respectively. An image correlation process is carried out in order to search for the best match between them. Given that this procedure can be implemented in an optical correlator, the correlation could eventually be accomplished at light speed. This paper shows an initial research stage where results were "digitally" obtained by simulating an optical correlation of DNA sequences represented as images. A total of 303 queries (variable lengths from 50 to 4500 base pairs) and 100 scenes represented by 100 x 100 images each (in total, one million base pair database) were considered for the image correlation analysis. The results showed that correlations reached very high sensitivity (99.01%), specificity (98.99%) and outperformed BLAST when mutation numbers increased. However, digital correlation processes were hundred times slower than BLAST. We are currently starting an initiative to evaluate the correlation speed process of a real experimental optical correlator. By doing this, we expect to fully exploit optical correlation light properties. As the optical correlator works jointly with the computer, digital algorithms should also be optimized. The results presented in this paper are encouraging and support the study of image correlation methods on sequence alignment.

  19. Image Correlation Method for DNA Sequence Alignment

    PubMed Central

    Curilem Saldías, Millaray; Villarroel Sassarini, Felipe; Muñoz Poblete, Carlos; Vargas Vásquez, Asticio; Maureira Butler, Iván

    2012-01-01

    The complexity of searches and the volume of genomic data make sequence alignment one of bioinformatics most active research areas. New alignment approaches have incorporated digital signal processing techniques. Among these, correlation methods are highly sensitive. This paper proposes a novel sequence alignment method based on 2-dimensional images, where each nucleic acid base is represented as a fixed gray intensity pixel. Query and known database sequences are coded to their pixel representation and sequence alignment is handled as object recognition in a scene problem. Query and database become object and scene, respectively. An image correlation process is carried out in order to search for the best match between them. Given that this procedure can be implemented in an optical correlator, the correlation could eventually be accomplished at light speed. This paper shows an initial research stage where results were “digitally” obtained by simulating an optical correlation of DNA sequences represented as images. A total of 303 queries (variable lengths from 50 to 4500 base pairs) and 100 scenes represented by 100 x 100 images each (in total, one million base pair database) were considered for the image correlation analysis. The results showed that correlations reached very high sensitivity (99.01%), specificity (98.99%) and outperformed BLAST when mutation numbers increased. However, digital correlation processes were hundred times slower than BLAST. We are currently starting an initiative to evaluate the correlation speed process of a real experimental optical correlator. By doing this, we expect to fully exploit optical correlation light properties. As the optical correlator works jointly with the computer, digital algorithms should also be optimized. The results presented in this paper are encouraging and support the study of image correlation methods on sequence alignment. PMID:22761742

  20. Variability of Image Features Computed from Conventional and Respiratory-Gated PET/CT Images of Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, Jasmine A.; Budzevich, Mikalai; Zhang, Geoffrey G.; Dilling, Thomas J.; Latifi, Kujtim; Moros, Eduardo G.

    2015-01-01

    Radiomics is being explored for potential applications in radiation therapy. How various imaging protocols affect quantitative image features is currently a highly active area of research. To assess the variability of image features derived from conventional [three-dimensional (3D)] and respiratory-gated (RG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) images of lung cancer patients, image features were computed from 23 lung cancer patients. Both protocols for each patient were acquired during the same imaging session. PET tumor volumes were segmented using an adaptive technique which accounted for background. CT tumor volumes were delineated with a commercial segmentation tool. Using RG PET images, the tumor center of mass motion, length, and rotation were calculated. Fifty-six image features were extracted from all images consisting of shape descriptors, first-order features, and second-order texture features. Overall, 26.6% and 26.2% of total features demonstrated less than 5% difference between 3D and RG protocols for CT and PET, respectively. Between 10 RG phases in PET, 53.4% of features demonstrated percent differences less than 5%. The features with least variability for PET were sphericity, spherical disproportion, entropy (first and second order), sum entropy, information measure of correlation 2, Short Run Emphasis (SRE), Long Run Emphasis (LRE), and Run Percentage (RPC); and those for CT were minimum intensity, mean intensity, Root Mean Square (RMS), Short Run Emphasis (SRE), and RPC. Quantitative analysis using a 3D acquisition versus RG acquisition (to reduce the effects of motion) provided notably different image feature values. This study suggests that the variability between 3D and RG features is mainly due to the impact of respiratory motion. PMID:26692535

  1. Dynamic joint transform correlator of images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angervaks, A. E.; Malyi, A. F.; Fedorov, I. U.; Shcheulin, A. S.

    2008-03-01

    In this article principles of operation of a coherent optical image correlator based on a well know optical joint transform correlator are examined. Theoretical predictions and experimental data for of the optical image correlator with a holographic filter recorded on a thin holographic photographic plates PFG - 01 are analyzed. Results of the operation of the dynamic joint transform correlator on the basis of cadmium fluoride crystal, CdF2, with bistable impurity centers are demonstrated. Calculated and experimental correlation peak intensity dependencies with the scale and angular mismatch between an observed and reference objects for static and dynamic joint transform correlators are compared. Tangram figures were used as a test images. In the paper all computations were performed by use of MATLAB 7.0.1 mathematical program.

  2. Rainbow correlation imaging with macroscopic twin beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allevi, Alessia; Bondani, Maria

    2017-06-01

    We present the implementation of a correlation-imaging protocol that exploits both the spatial and spectral correlations of macroscopic twin-beam states generated by parametric downconversion. In particular, the spectral resolution of an imaging spectrometer coupled to an EMCCD camera is used in a proof-of-principle experiment to encrypt and decrypt a simple code to be transmitted between two parties. In order to optimize the trade-off between visibility and resolution, we provide the characterization of the correlation images as a function of the spatio-spectral properties of twin beams generated at different pump power values.

  3. Spatial Correlation Analysis between Particulate Matter 10 (PM10) Hazard and Respiratory Diseases in Chiang Mai Province, Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trang, N. Ha; Tripathi, N. K.

    2014-11-01

    Every year, during dry season, Chiang Mai and other northern provinces of Thailand face the problem of haze which is mainly generated by the burning of agricultural waste and forest fire, contained high percentage of particulate matter. Particulate matter 10 (PM10), being very small in size, can be inhaled easily to the deepest parts of the human lung and throat respiratory functions. Due to this, it increases the risk of respiratory diseases mainly in the case of continuous exposure to this seasonal smog. MODIS aerosol images (MOD04) have been used for four weeks in March 2007 for generating the hazard map by linking to in-situ values of PM10. Simple linear regression model between PM10 and AOD got fair correlation with R2 = 0.7 and was applied to transform PM10 pattern. The hazard maps showed the dominance of PM10 in northern part of Chiang Mai, especially in second week of March when PM10 level was three to four times higher than standard. The respiratory disease records and public health station of each village were collected from Provincial Public Health Department in Chiang Mai province. There are about 300 public health stations out of 2070 villages; hence thiessen polygon was created to determine the representative area of each public health station. Within each thiessen polygon, respiratory disease incident rate (RDIR) was calculated based on the number of patients and population. Global Moran's I was computed for RDIR to explore spatial pattern of diseases through four weeks of March. Moran's I index depicted a cluster pattern of respiratory diseases in 2nd week than other weeks. That made sense for a relationship between PM10 and respiratory diseases infections. In order to examine how PM10 affect the human respiratory system, geographically weighted regression model was used to observe local correlation coefficient between RDIR and PM10 across study area. The result captured a high correlation between respiratory diseases and high level of PM10 in

  4. Reproducibility and Respiratory Function Correlates of Exhaled Breath Fingerprint in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Incalzi, Raffaele Antonelli; Pennazza, Giorgio; Scarlata, Simone; Santonico, Marco; Petriaggi, Massimo; Chiurco, Domenica; Pedone, Claudio; Arnaldo; D'Amico

    2012-01-01

    Background The electronic nose (e nose) provides distinctive breath fingerprints for selected respiratory diseases. Both reproducibility and respiratory function correlates of breath fingerprint are poorly known. Objectives To measure reproducibility of breath fingerprints and to assess their correlates among respiratory function indexes in elderly healthy and COPD subjects. Method 25 subjects (5 COPD patients for each GOLD stage and 5 healthy controls) over 65 years underwent e-nose study through a seven sensor system and respiratory function tests at times 0, 7, and 15 days. Reproducibility of the e nose pattern was computed. The correlation between volatile organic compound (VOC) pattern and respiratory function/clinical parameters was assessed by the Spearman's rho. Measurements and Main Results VOC patterns were highly reproducible within healthy and GOLD 4 COPD subjects, less among GOLD 1–3 patients.VOC patterns significantly correlated with expiratory flows (Spearman's rho ranging from 0.36 for MEF25% and sensor Co-Buti-TPP, to 0.81 for FEV1% and sensor Cu-Buti-TPP p<0.001)), but not with residual volume and total lung capacity. Conclusions VOC patterns strictly correlated with expiratory flows. Thus, e nose might conveniently be used to assess COPD severity and, likely, to study phenotypic variability. However, the suboptimal reproducibility within GOLD 1–3 patients should stimulate further research to identify more reproducible breath print patterns. PMID:23077492

  5. Reproducibility and respiratory function correlates of exhaled breath fingerprint in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Incalzi, Raffaele Antonelli; Pennazza, Giorgio; Scarlata, Simone; Santonico, Marco; Petriaggi, Massimo; Chiurco, Domenica; Pedone, Claudio; D'Amico, Arnaldo

    2012-01-01

    The electronic nose (e nose) provides distinctive breath fingerprints for selected respiratory diseases. Both reproducibility and respiratory function correlates of breath fingerprint are poorly known. To measure reproducibility of breath fingerprints and to assess their correlates among respiratory function indexes in elderly healthy and COPD subjects. 25 subjects (5 COPD patients for each GOLD stage and 5 healthy controls) over 65 years underwent e-nose study through a seven sensor system and respiratory function tests at times 0, 7, and 15 days. Reproducibility of the e nose pattern was computed. The correlation between volatile organic compound (VOC) pattern and respiratory function/clinical parameters was assessed by the Spearman's rho. VOC patterns were highly reproducible within healthy and GOLD 4 COPD subjects, less among GOLD 1-3 patients.VOC patterns significantly correlated with expiratory flows (Spearman's rho ranging from 0.36 for MEF25% and sensor Co-Buti-TPP, to 0.81 for FEV1% and sensor Cu-Buti-TPP p<0.001)), but not with residual volume and total lung capacity. VOC patterns strictly correlated with expiratory flows. Thus, e nose might conveniently be used to assess COPD severity and, likely, to study phenotypic variability. However, the suboptimal reproducibility within GOLD 1-3 patients should stimulate further research to identify more reproducible breath print patterns.

  6. Event-by-Event Continuous Respiratory Motion Correction for Dynamic PET Imaging.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yunhan; Chan, Chung; Ma, Tianyu; Liu, Yaqiang; Gallezot, Jean-Dominique; Naganawa, Mika; Kelada, Olivia J; Germino, Mary; Sinusas, Albert J; Carson, Richard E; Liu, Chi

    2016-07-01

    Existing respiratory motion-correction methods are applied only to static PET imaging. We have previously developed an event-by-event respiratory motion-correction method with correlations between internal organ motion and external respiratory signals (INTEX). This method is uniquely appropriate for dynamic imaging because it corrects motion for each time point. In this study, we applied INTEX to human dynamic PET studies with various tracers and investigated the impact on kinetic parameter estimation. The use of 3 tracers-a myocardial perfusion tracer, (82)Rb (n = 7); a pancreatic β-cell tracer, (18)F-FP(+)DTBZ (n = 4); and a tumor hypoxia tracer, (18)F-fluoromisonidazole ((18)F-FMISO) (n = 1)-was investigated in a study of 12 human subjects. Both rest and stress studies were performed for (82)Rb. The Anzai belt system was used to record respiratory motion. Three-dimensional internal organ motion in high temporal resolution was calculated by INTEX to guide event-by-event respiratory motion correction of target organs in each dynamic frame. Time-activity curves of regions of interest drawn based on end-expiration PET images were obtained. For (82)Rb studies, K1 was obtained with a 1-tissue model using a left-ventricle input function. Rest-stress myocardial blood flow (MBF) and coronary flow reserve (CFR) were determined. For (18)F-FP(+)DTBZ studies, the total volume of distribution was estimated with arterial input functions using the multilinear analysis 1 method. For the (18)F-FMISO study, the net uptake rate Ki was obtained with a 2-tissue irreversible model using a left-ventricle input function. All parameters were compared with the values derived without motion correction. With INTEX, K1 and MBF increased by 10% ± 12% and 15% ± 19%, respectively, for (82)Rb stress studies. CFR increased by 19% ± 21%. For studies with motion amplitudes greater than 8 mm (n = 3), K1, MBF, and CFR increased by 20% ± 12%, 30% ± 20%, and 34% ± 23%, respectively. For (82)Rb

  7. The correlation of respiratory muscle strength and cough capacity in stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Jo, Myeong-Rae; Kim, Nan-Soo

    2016-10-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the correlation between respiratory muscle strength and cough capacity in stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Forty-two stroke patients were assigned to 2 different groups (intervention group=21, control group=21). Both groups participated in a conventional stroke rehabilitation program, with the intervention group also receiving respiratory muscle training for 20 to 30 minutes a day, 3 times a week for 8 weeks. Respiratory muscle strength (maximal inspiratory pressure, maximal expiratory pressure), forced vital capacity, and cough capacity were measured. [Results] The intervention group showed significant increases in maximal inspiratory pressure, maximal expiratory pressure, forced vital capacity, and cough capacity. The change in maximal inspiratory pressure, maximal expiratory pressure, and forced vital capacity showed a significant correlation with cough capacity, with maximal expiratory pressure showing the highest correlation. [Conclusion] The present study showed that the increase in maximal expiratory pressure plays an important role in improving the cough capacity of stroke patients.

  8. Quantum Image Encryption Algorithm Based on Image Correlation Decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Tianxiang; Chen, Jiamin; Pei, Dongju; Zhang, Wenquan; Zhou, Nanrun

    2015-02-01

    A novel quantum gray-level image encryption and decryption algorithm based on image correlation decomposition is proposed. The correlation among image pixels is established by utilizing the superposition and measurement principle of quantum states. And a whole quantum image is divided into a series of sub-images. These sub-images are stored into a complete binary tree array constructed previously and then randomly performed by one of the operations of quantum random-phase gate, quantum revolving gate and Hadamard transform. The encrypted image can be obtained by superimposing the resulting sub-images with the superposition principle of quantum states. For the encryption algorithm, the keys are the parameters of random phase gate, rotation angle, binary sequence and orthonormal basis states. The security and the computational complexity of the proposed algorithm are analyzed. The proposed encryption algorithm can resist brute force attack due to its very large key space and has lower computational complexity than its classical counterparts.

  9. Digital image registration by correlation techniques.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popp, D. J.; Mccormack, D. S.; Lee, G. M.

    1972-01-01

    This study considers the translation problem associated with digital image registration and develops a means for comparing commonly used correlation techniques. Using suitably defined constraints, an optimum and four suboptimum registration techniques are defined and evaluated. A computational comparison is made and Gaussian image statistics are used to compare the selected techniques in terms of radial position location error.

  10. Rotationally invariant correlation filtering for multiple images

    SciTech Connect

    Schils, G.F.; Sweeney, D.W.

    1986-07-01

    A method is presented for designing translation-invariant optical correlation filters that have a specified rotational response for each of several input images. The correlation filter is postulated to have the form of an infinite linear combination of the angular Fourier harmonics of the input images. The corresponding response of the optical system too rotations of the multiple input images is described by a vector-matrix convolution equation. The solution of this equation for the unknown correlation filter is presented in terms of Fourier series. Use of one term in the Fourier series gives the multiple circular-harmonic filter that provides a specified rotationally invariant response for each of the multiple input images. Applications to rotationally invariant discrimination are described, and examples are given.

  11. Coherent photoacoustic-ultrasound correlation and imaging.

    PubMed

    Gao, Fei; Feng, Xiaohua; Zheng, Yuanjin

    2014-09-01

    Both photoacoustics and ultrasound have been researched extensively but separately. In this letter, we report an initial study on the coherent correlation between pulsed photoacoustic wave and pulse-echo ultrasound wave. By illuminating an object with a pulsed laser and external ultrasound sequentially, both the endogenous photoacoustic wave and pulse-echo ultrasound wave are received and coherently correlated, demonstrating enhanced signal-to-noise ratio. Image contrast of the proposed coherent photoacoustic-ultrasound imaging is also demonstrated to be improved significantly on vessel-mimicking phantom, due to fusion of the optical absorption and ultrasound reflection contrasts by coherent correlation of either conventional laser-induced photoacoustic imaging or pulse-echo ultrasound imaging separately.

  12. Hepatic Arterial Phase in Gadoxetic Acid-Enhanced Liver Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Analysis of Respiratory Patterns and Their Effect on Image Quality.

    PubMed

    Park, Yang Shin; Lee, Chang Hee; Yoo, Jung Lim; Kim, In Seong; Kiefer, Berthold; Woo, Seung Tae; Kim, Kyeong Ah; Park, Cheol Min

    2016-02-01

    The aims of this study were to objectively evaluate patient respiration and breathing change after contrast injection and to assess its potential impact on image quality for the hepatic arterial phase in gadoxetic acid-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. This retrospective study was approved by the institutional review board, and the requirement for informed consent was waived. One hundred fifty-four patients underwent gadoxetic acid-enhanced liver magnetic resonance imaging with a 13-second breath-hold hepatic arterial phase. During the acquisition of precontrast and hepatic arterial phases, the respiratory motion signal was acquired and graded on a 4-point scale based on the SD of the respiratory waveform, with the highest grade indicating the worst breath-hold. Breath-holding grades 3 and 4 for the hepatic arterial phases were considered as breath-holding difficulty during the hepatic arterial phase. Gadoxetic acid-related dyspnea was defined as when the SD value of respiratory waveform during the hepatic arterial phase was 200 greater than that of the precontrast image. Then, the precontrast and hepatic arterial phase images were evaluated with respect to overall image quality and motion artifact using a 5-point scale, with the highest score indicating the worst image quality. In the hepatic arterial phase, the correlation between breath-holding degree and image quality parameters was evaluated using Pearson correlation. The differences in mean image quality scores between patients with and without gadoxetic acid-related dyspnea were evaluated using Student t test. Based on the analysis of the respiratory waveforms, the incidence of breath-holding difficulty during the hepatic arterial phase was 23.4% (33/154), and the incidence of gadoxetic acid-related dyspnea was 6.5% (10/154). By image analysis, the incidence of a degraded hepatic arterial phase (overall image quality score ≥4) was 5.2% (8/154). During the hepatic arterial phase, the breath

  13. MR-Based Cardiac and Respiratory Motion-Compensation Techniques for PET-MR Imaging.

    PubMed

    Munoz, Camila; Kolbitsch, Christoph; Reader, Andrew J; Marsden, Paul; Schaeffter, Tobias; Prieto, Claudia

    2016-04-01

    Cardiac and respiratory motion cause image quality degradation in PET imaging, affecting diagnostic accuracy of the images. Whole-body simultaneous PET-MR scanners allow for using motion information estimated from MR images to correct PET data and produce motion-compensated PET images. This article reviews methods that have been proposed to estimate motion from MR images and different techniques to include this information in PET reconstruction, in order to overcome the problem of cardiac and respiratory motion in PET-MR imaging. MR-based motion correction techniques significantly increase lesion detectability and contrast, and also improve accuracy of uptake values in PET images.

  14. Image Correlation Microscopy for Uniform Illumination

    PubMed Central

    Gaborski, Thomas R.; Sealander, Michael N.; Ehrenberg, Morton; Waugh, Richard E.; McGrath, James L.

    2011-01-01

    Image cross-correlation microscopy (ICM) is a technique that quantifies the motion of fluorescent features in an image by measuring the temporal autocorrelation function decay in a time-lapse image sequence. ICM has traditionally employed laser-scanning microscopes because the technique emerged as an extension of laser-based fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). In this work, we show that image correlation can also be used to measure fluorescence dynamics in uniform illumination or wide-field imaging systems and we call our new approach uniform illumination image correlation microscopy (UI-ICM). Wide-field microscopy is not only a simpler, less expensive imaging modality, but it offers the capability of greater temporal resolution over laser-scanning systems. In traditional laser-scanning ICM, lateral mobility is calculated from the temporal de-correlation of an image, where the characteristic length is the illuminating laser beam width. In wide-field microscopy, the diffusion length is defined by the feature size using the spatial autocorrelation function (SACF). Correlation function decay in time occurs as an object diffuses from its original position. We show that theoretical and simulated comparisons between Gaussian and uniform features indicate the temporal autocorrelation function (TACF) depends strongly on particle size and not particle shape. In this report, we establish the relationships between the SACF feature size, TACF characteristic time and the diffusion coefficient for UI-ICM using analytical, Monte-Carlo and experimental validation with particle tracking algorithms. Additionally, we demonstrate UI-ICM analysis of adhesion molecule domain aggregation and diffusion on the surface of human neutrophils. PMID:20055917

  15. Four-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (4D-MRI) using image-based respiratory surrogate: A feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Jing; Chang, Zheng; Wang, Zhiheng; Paul Segars, William; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) has been widely used in radiation therapy to assess patient-specific breathing motion for determining individual safety margins. However, it has two major drawbacks: low soft-tissue contrast and an excessive imaging dose to the patient. This research aimed to develop a clinically feasible four-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (4D-MRI) technique to overcome these limitations. Methods: The proposed 4D-MRI technique was achieved by continuously acquiring axial images throughout the breathing cycle using fast 2D cine-MR imaging, and then retrospectively sorting the images by respiratory phase. The key component of the technique was the use of body area (BA) of the axial MR images as an internal respiratory surrogate to extract the breathing signal. The validation of the BA surrogate was performed using 4D-CT images of 12 cancer patients by comparing the respiratory phases determined using the BA method to those determined clinically using the Real-time position management (RPM) system. The feasibility of the 4D-MRI technique was tested on a dynamic motion phantom, the 4D extended Cardiac Torso (XCAT) digital phantom, and two healthy human subjects. Results: Respiratory phases determined from the BA matched closely to those determined from the RPM: mean (±SD) difference in phase: −3.9% (±6.4%); mean (±SD) absolute difference in phase: 10.40% (±3.3%); mean (±SD) correlation coefficient: 0.93 (±0.04). In the motion phantom study, 4D-MRI clearly showed the sinusoidal motion of the phantom; image artifacts observed were minimal to none. Motion trajectories measured from 4D-MRI and 2D cine-MRI (used as a reference) matched excellently: the mean (±SD) absolute difference in motion amplitude: −0.3 (±0.5) mm. In the 4D-XCAT phantom study, the simulated “4D-MRI” images showed good consistency with the original 4D-XCAT phantom images. The motion trajectory of the hypothesized “tumor” matched

  16. In-treatment 4D cone-beam CT with image-based respiratory phase recognition.

    PubMed

    Kida, Satoshi; Masutani, Yoshitaka; Yamashita, Hideomi; Imae, Toshikazu; Matsuura, Taeko; Saotome, Naoya; Ohtomo, Kuni; Nakagawa, Keiichi; Haga, Akihiro

    2012-07-01

    The use of respiration-correlated cone-beam computed tomography (4D-CBCT) appears to be crucial for implementing precise radiation therapy of lung cancer patients. The reconstruction of 4D-CBCT images requires a respiratory phase. In this paper, we propose a novel method based on an image-based phase recognition technique using normalized cross correlation (NCC). We constructed the respiratory phase by searching for a region in an adjacent projection that achieves the maximum correlation with a region in a reference projection along the cranio-caudal direction. The data on 12 lung cancer patients acquired just prior to treatment and on 3 lung cancer patients acquired during volumetric modulated arc therapy treatment were analyzed in the search for the effective area of cone-beam projection images for performing NCC with 12 combinations of registration area and segment size. The evaluation was done by a "recognition rate" defined as the ratio of the number of peak inhales detected with our method to that detected by eye (manual tracking). The average recognition rate of peak inhale with the most efficient area in the present method was 96.4%. The present method was feasible even when the diaphragm was outside the field of view. With the most efficient area, we reconstructed in-treatment 4D-CBCT by dividing the breathing signal into four phase bins; peak exhale, peak inhale, and two intermediate phases. With in-treatment 4D-CBCT images, it was possible to identify the tumor position and the tumor size in moments of inspiration and expiration, in contrast to in-treatment CBCT reconstructed with all projections.

  17. The internal-external respiratory motion correlation is unaffected by audiovisual biofeedback.

    PubMed

    Steel, Harry; Pollock, Sean; Lee, Danny; Keall, Paul; Kim, Taeho

    2014-03-01

    This study evaluated if an audiovisual (AV) biofeedback causes variation in the level of external and internal correlation due to its interactive intervention in natural breathing. The internal (diaphragm) and external (abdominal wall) respiratory motion signals of 15 healthy human subjects under AV biofeedback and free breathing (FB) were analyzed and measures of correlation and regularity taken. Regularity metrics (root mean square error and spectral power dispersion metric) were obtained and the correlation between these metrics and the internal and external correlation was investigated. For FB and AV biofeedback assisted breathing the mean correlations found between internal and external respiratory motion were 0.96±0.02 and 0.96±0.03, respectively. This means there is no evidence to suggest (p-value=0.88) any difference in the correlation between internal and external respiratory motion with the use of AV biofeedback. Our results confirmed the hypothesis that the internal-external correlation with AV biofeedback is the same as for free breathing. Should this correlation be maintained for patients, AV biofeedback can be implemented in the clinic with confidence as regularity improvements using AV biofeedback with an external signal will be reflected in increased internal motion regularity.

  18. Respiratory acoustic thoracic imaging (RATHI): assessing intrasubject variability.

    PubMed

    Torres-Jimenez, A; Charleston-Villalobos, S; Gonzalez-Camarena, R; Chi-Lem, G; Aljama-Corrales, T

    2008-01-01

    Respiratory acoustic thoracic imaging (RATHI) permits analysing lung sounds (LS) temporal and spatial distribution, however, a deep understanding of RATHI repeatability associated with the pulmonary function is necessary. As a consequence, in the current work intrasubject variability of RATHI is evaluated at different airflows. For generating RATHIs, LS were acquired at the posterior thoracic surface. The associated image was computed at the inspiratory phases by interpolation through a Hermite function. The acoustic information of eleven subjects was considered at airflows of 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 L/s. Several RATHIs were generated for each subject according to the number of acquired inspiratory phases. Quadratic mutual information based on Cauchy-Schwartz inequality (I(CS)) was used to evaluate the degree of similitude between intrasubject RATHIs. The results indicated that, for the same subject, I(CS) averaged 0.893, 0.897, and 0.902, for airflows of 1.0, 1.5, and 2 L/s, respectively. In addition, when the airflow was increased, increments in intensity values and in the dispersion of the spatial distribution reflected in RATHI were observed. In conclusion, since the intrasubject variability of RATHI was low for airflows between 1.0 and 2.0 L/s, the pattern of sound distribution during airflow variations is repeatable but differences in sound intensity should be considered.

  19. Physiological Correlation of Airway Pressure and Transpulmonary Pressure Stress Index on Respiratory Mechanics in Acute Respiratory Failure

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Chun; Chen, Lu; Zhang, Yun-Hang; Liu, Wei; Urbino, Rosario; Ranieri, V Marco; Qiu, Hai-Bo; Yang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Stress index at post-recruitment maneuvers could be a method of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) titration in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) patients. However, airway pressure (Paw) stress index may not reflect lung mechanics in the patients with high chest wall elastance. This study was to evaluate the Paw stress index on lung mechanics and the correlation between Paw stress index and transpulmonary pressure (PL) stress index in acute respiratory failure (ARF) patients. Methods: Twenty-four ARF patients with mechanical ventilation (MV) were consecutively recruited from July 2011 to April 2013 in Zhongda Hospital, Nanjing, China and Ospedale S. Giovanni Battista-Molinette Hospital, Turin, Italy. All patients underwent MV with volume control (tidal volume 6 ml/kg) for 20 min. PEEP was set according to the ARDSnet study protocol. The patients were divided into two groups according to the chest wall elastance/respiratory system elastance ratio. The high elastance group (H group, n = 14) had a ratio ≥30%, and the low elastance group (L group, n = 10) had a ratio <30%. Respiratory elastance, gas-exchange, Paw stress index, and PL stress index were measured. Student's t-test, regression analysis, and Bland–Altman analysis were used for statistical analysis. Results: Pneumonia was the major cause of respiratory failure (71.0%). Compared with the L group, PEEP was lower in the H group (5.7 ± 1.7 cmH2O vs. 9.0 ± 2.3 cmH2O, P < 0.01). Compared with the H group, lung elastance was higher (20.0 ± 7.8 cmH2O/L vs. 11.6 ± 3.6 cmH2O/L, P < 0.01), and stress was higher in the L group (7.0 ± 1.9 vs. 4.9 ± 1.9, P = 0.02). A linear relationship was observed between the Paw stress index and the PL stress index in H group (R2= 0.56, P < 0.01) and L group (R2= 0.85, P < 0.01). Conclusion: In the ARF patients with MV, Paw stress index can substitute for PL to guide ventilator settings. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02196870 (https

  20. Respiratory-gated KES imaging of a rat model of acute lung injury at the Canadian Light Source.

    PubMed

    Deman, P; Tan, S; Belev, G; Samadi, N; Martinson, M; Chapman, D; Ford, N L

    2017-05-01

    In this study, contrast-enhanced X-ray tomographic imaging for monitoring and quantifying respiratory disease in preclinical rodent models is proposed. A K-edge imaging method has been developed at the Canadian Light Source to very accurately obtain measurements of the concentration of iodinated contrast agent in the pulmonary vasculature and inhaled xenon in the airspaces of rats. To compare the iodine and xenon concentration maps, a scout projection image was acquired to define the region of interest within the thorax for imaging and to ensure the same locations were imaged in each K-edge subtraction (KES) acquisition. A method for triggering image acquisition based on the real-time measurements of respiration was also developed to obtain images during end expiration when the lungs are stationary, in contrast to other previously published studies that alter the respiration to accommodate the image acquisition. In this study, images were obtained in mechanically ventilated animals using physiological parameters at the iodine K-edge in vivo and at the xenon K-edge post mortem (but still under mechanical ventilation). The imaging techniques were performed in healthy Brown Norway rats and in age-matched littermates that had an induced lung injury to demonstrate feasibility of the imaging procedures and the ability to correlate the lung injury and the quantitative measurements of contrast agent concentrations between the two KES images. The respiratory-gated KES imaging protocol can be easily adapted to image during any respiratory phase and is feasible for imaging disease models with compromised lung function.

  1. SU-E-J-159: Analysis of Total Imaging Uncertainty in Respiratory-Gated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, J; Okuda, T; Sakaino, S; Yokota, N

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In respiratory-gated radiotherapy, the gating phase during treatment delivery needs to coincide with the corresponding phase determined during the treatment plan. However, because radiotherapy is performed based on the image obtained for the treatment plan, the time delay, motion artifact, volume effect, and resolution in the images are uncertain. Thus, imaging uncertainty is the most basic factor that affects the localization accuracy. Therefore, these uncertainties should be analyzed. This study aims to analyze the total imaging uncertainty in respiratory-gated radiotherapy. Methods: Two factors of imaging uncertainties related to respiratory-gated radiotherapy were analyzed. First, CT image was used to determine the target volume and 4D treatment planning for the Varian Realtime Position Management (RPM) system. Second, an X-ray image was acquired for image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) for the BrainLAB ExacTrac system. These factors were measured using a respiratory gating phantom. The conditions applied during phantom operation were as follows: respiratory wave form, sine curve; respiratory cycle, 4 s; phantom target motion amplitude, 10, 20, and 29 mm (which is maximum phantom longitudinal motion). The target and cylindrical marker implanted in the phantom coverage of the CT images was measured and compared with the theoretically calculated coverage from the phantom motion. The theoretical position of the cylindrical marker implanted in the phantom was compared with that acquired from the X-ray image. The total imaging uncertainty was analyzed from these two factors. Results: In the CT image, the uncertainty between the target and cylindrical marker’s actual coverage and the coverage of CT images was 1.19 mm and 2.50mm, respectively. In the Xray image, the uncertainty was 0.39 mm. The total imaging uncertainty from the two factors was 1.62mm. Conclusion: The total imaging uncertainty in respiratory-gated radiotherapy was clinically acceptable. However

  2. Diagnostic Imaging of the Lower Respiratory Tract in Neonatal Foals: Radiography and Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Lascola, Kara M; Joslyn, Stephen

    2015-12-01

    Diagnostic imaging plays an essential role in the diagnosis and monitoring of lower respiratory disease in neonatal foals. Radiography is most widely available to equine practitioners and is the primary modality that has been used for the characterization of respiratory disease in foals. Computed tomography imaging, although still limited in availability to the general practitioner, offers advantages over radiography and has been used diagnostically in neonatal foals with respiratory disease. Recognition of appropriate imaging protocols and patient-associated artifacts is critical for accurate image interpretation regardless of the modality used. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Combined Electrocardiography- and Respiratory-Triggered CT of the Lung to Reduce Respiratory Misregistration Artifacts between Imaging Slabs in Free-Breathing Children: Initial Experience

    PubMed Central

    Allmendinger, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Objective Cardiac and respiratory motion artifacts degrade the image quality of lung CT in free-breathing children. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of combined electrocardiography (ECG) and respiratory triggering on respiratory misregistration artifacts on lung CT in free-breathing children. Materials and Methods In total, 15 children (median age 19 months, range 6 months–8 years; 7 boys), who underwent free-breathing ECG-triggered lung CT with and without respiratory-triggering were included. A pressure-sensing belt of a respiratory gating system was used to obtain the respiratory signal. The degree of respiratory misregistration artifacts between imaging slabs was graded on a 4-point scale (1, excellent image quality) on coronal and sagittal images and compared between ECG-triggered lung CT studies with and without respiratory triggering. A p value < 0.05 was considered significant. Results Lung CT with combined ECG and respiratory triggering showed significantly less respiratory misregistration artifacts than lung CT with ECG triggering only (1.1 ± 0.4 vs. 2.2 ± 1.0, p = 0.003). Conclusion Additional respiratory-triggering reduces respiratory misregistration artifacts on ECG-triggered lung CT in free-breathing children. PMID:28860904

  4. Combined Electrocardiography- and Respiratory-Triggered CT of the Lung to Reduce Respiratory Misregistration Artifacts between Imaging Slabs in Free-Breathing Children: Initial Experience.

    PubMed

    Goo, Hyun Woo; Allmendinger, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Cardiac and respiratory motion artifacts degrade the image quality of lung CT in free-breathing children. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of combined electrocardiography (ECG) and respiratory triggering on respiratory misregistration artifacts on lung CT in free-breathing children. In total, 15 children (median age 19 months, range 6 months-8 years; 7 boys), who underwent free-breathing ECG-triggered lung CT with and without respiratory-triggering were included. A pressure-sensing belt of a respiratory gating system was used to obtain the respiratory signal. The degree of respiratory misregistration artifacts between imaging slabs was graded on a 4-point scale (1, excellent image quality) on coronal and sagittal images and compared between ECG-triggered lung CT studies with and without respiratory triggering. A p value < 0.05 was considered significant. Lung CT with combined ECG and respiratory triggering showed significantly less respiratory misregistration artifacts than lung CT with ECG triggering only (1.1 ± 0.4 vs. 2.2 ± 1.0, p = 0.003). Additional respiratory-triggering reduces respiratory misregistration artifacts on ECG-triggered lung CT in free-breathing children.

  5. Reliability-guided digital image correlation for image deformation measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Pan Bing

    2009-03-10

    A universally applicable reliability-guided digital image correlation (DIC) method is proposed for reliable image deformation measurement. The zero-mean normalized cross correlation (ZNCC) coefficient is used to identify the reliability of the point computed. The correlation calculation begins with a seed point and is then guided by the ZNCC coefficient. That means the neighbors of the point with the highest ZNCC coefficient in a queue for computed points will be processed first. Thus the calculation path is always along the most reliable direction, and possible error propagation of the conventional DIC method can be avoided. The proposed novel DIC method is universally applicable to the images with shadows, discontinuous areas, and deformation discontinuity. Two image pairs were used to evaluate the performance of the proposed technique, and the successful results clearly demonstrate its robustness and effectiveness.

  6. Real-time tumor tracking using sequential kV imaging combined with respiratory monitoring: a general framework applicable to commonly used IGRT systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Byungchul; Rugaard Poulsen, Per; Keall, Paul J.

    2010-06-01

    Clinical image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) systems have kV imagers and respiratory monitors, the combination of which provides an 'internal-external' correlation for respiratory-induced tumor motion tracking. We developed a general framework of correlation-based position estimation that is applicable to various imaging configurations, particularly alternate stereoscopic (ExacTrac) or rotational monoscopic (linacs) imaging, where instant 3D target positions cannot be measured. By reformulating the least-squares estimation equation for the correlation model, the necessity to measure 3D target positions from synchronous stereoscopic images can be avoided. The performance of this sequential image-based estimation was evaluated in comparison with a synchronous image-based estimation. Both methods were tested in simulation studies using 160 abdominal/thoracic tumor trajectories and an external respiratory signal dataset. The sequential image-based estimation method (1) had mean 3D errors less than 1 mm at all the imaging intervals studied (0.2, 1, 2, 5 and 10 s), (2) showed minimal dependencies of the accuracy on the geometry and (3) was equal in accuracy to the synchronous image-based estimation method when using the same image input. In conclusion, the sequential image-based estimation method can achieve sub-mm accuracy for commonly used IGRT systems, and is equally accurate and more broadly applicable than the synchronous image-based estimation method.

  7. Real-time tumor tracking using sequential kV imaging combined with respiratory monitoring: a general framework applicable to commonly used IGRT systems.

    PubMed

    Cho, Byungchul; Poulsen, Per Rugaard; Keall, Paul J

    2010-06-21

    Clinical image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) systems have kV imagers and respiratory monitors, the combination of which provides an 'internal-external' correlation for respiratory-induced tumor motion tracking. We developed a general framework of correlation-based position estimation that is applicable to various imaging configurations, particularly alternate stereoscopic (ExacTrac) or rotational monoscopic (linacs) imaging, where instant 3D target positions cannot be measured. By reformulating the least-squares estimation equation for the correlation model, the necessity to measure 3D target positions from synchronous stereoscopic images can be avoided. The performance of this sequential image-based estimation was evaluated in comparison with a synchronous image-based estimation. Both methods were tested in simulation studies using 160 abdominal/thoracic tumor trajectories and an external respiratory signal dataset. The sequential image-based estimation method (1) had mean 3D errors less than 1 mm at all the imaging intervals studied (0.2, 1, 2, 5 and 10 s), (2) showed minimal dependencies of the accuracy on the geometry and (3) was equal in accuracy to the synchronous image-based estimation method when using the same image input. In conclusion, the sequential image-based estimation method can achieve sub-mm accuracy for commonly used IGRT systems, and is equally accurate and more broadly applicable than the synchronous image-based estimation method.

  8. Real-time tumor tracking using sequential kV imaging combined with respiratory monitoring: a general framework applicable to commonly used IGRT systems

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Byungchul; Poulsen, Per Rugaard; Keall, Paul J

    2010-01-01

    Clinical image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) systems have kV imagers and respiratory monitors, the combination of which provides an ‘internal–external’ correlation for respiratory-induced tumor motion tracking. We developed a general framework of correlation-based position estimation that is applicable to various imaging configurations, particularly alternate stereoscopic (ExacTrac) or rotational monoscopic (linacs) imaging, where instant 3D target positions cannot be measured. By reformulating the least-squares estimation equation for the correlation model, the necessity to measure 3D target positions from synchronous stereoscopic images can be avoided. The performance of this sequential image-based estimation was evaluated in comparison with a synchronous image-based estimation. Both methods were tested in simulation studies using 160 abdominal/thoracic tumor trajectories and an external respiratory signal dataset. The sequential image-based estimation method (1) had mean 3D errors less than 1 mm at all the imaging intervals studied (0.2, 1, 2, 5 and 10 s), (2) showed minimal dependencies of the accuracy on the geometry and (3) was equal in accuracy to the synchronous image-based estimation method when using the same image input. In conclusion, the sequential image-based estimation method can achieve sub-mm accuracy for commonly used IGRT systems, and is equally accurate and more broadly applicable than the synchronous image-based estimation method. PMID:20484777

  9. Digital image correlation through a rigid borescope.

    SciTech Connect

    Reu, Phillip L.

    2010-10-01

    There occasionally occur situations in field measurements where direct optical access to the area of interest is not possible. In these cases the borescope is the standard method of imaging. Furthermore, if shape, displacement, or strain are desired in these hidden locations, it would be advantageous to be able to do digital image correlation (DIC) through the borescope. This paper will present the added complexities and errors associated with imaging through a borescope for DIC. Discussion of non-radial distortions and their effects on the measurements, along with a possible correction scheme will be discussed.

  10. Respiratory triggered 4D cone-beam computed tomography: A novel method to reduce imaging dose

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Benjamin J.; O'Brien, Ricky T.; Keall, Paul J.; Balik, Salim; Hugo, Geoffrey D.

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: A novel method called respiratory triggered 4D cone-beam computed tomography (RT 4D CBCT) is described whereby imaging dose can be reduced without degrading image quality. RT 4D CBCT utilizes a respiratory signal to trigger projections such that only a single projection is assigned to a given respiratory bin for each breathing cycle. In contrast, commercial 4D CBCT does not actively use the respiratory signal to minimize image dose. Methods: To compare RT 4D CBCT with conventional 4D CBCT, 3600 CBCT projections of a thorax phantom were gathered and reconstructed to generate a ground truth CBCT dataset. Simulation pairs of conventional 4D CBCT acquisitions and RT 4D CBCT acquisitions were developed assuming a sinusoidal respiratory signal which governs the selection of projections from the pool of 3600 original projections. The RT 4D CBCT acquisition triggers a single projection when the respiratory signal enters a desired acquisition bin; the conventional acquisition does not use a respiratory trigger and projections are acquired at a constant frequency. Acquisition parameters studied were breathing period, acquisition time, and imager frequency. The performance of RT 4D CBCT using phase based and displacement based sorting was also studied. Image quality was quantified by calculating difference images of the test dataset from the ground truth dataset. Imaging dose was calculated by counting projections. Results: Using phase based sorting RT 4D CBCT results in 47% less imaging dose on average compared to conventional 4D CBCT. Image quality differences were less than 4% at worst. Using displacement based sorting RT 4D CBCT results in 57% less imaging dose on average, than conventional 4D CBCT methods; however, image quality was 26% worse with RT 4D CBCT. Conclusions: Simulation studies have shown that RT 4D CBCT reduces imaging dose while maintaining comparable image quality for phase based 4D CBCT; image quality is degraded for displacement based RT 4D

  11. Respiratory syncytial virus infection in infants and correlation with meteorological factors and air pollutants

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) is the most important cause of severe respiratory infections in infants with seasonal epidemics. Environmental factors (temperature, humidity, air pollution) could influence RSV epidemics through their effects on virus activity and diffusion. Methods We conducted a retrospective study on a paediatric population who referred to our Paediatric Emergency Unit in order to analyze the correlation between weekly incidence of RSV positive cases during winter season in Bologna and meteorological factors and air pollutants concentration. Results We observed a significant correlation between the incidence of RSV infections and the mean minimum temperature registered during the same week and the previous weeks. The weekly number of RSV positive cases was also correlated to the mean PM10 concentration of the week before. Conclusions RSV epidemic trend in Bologna (Italy) is related to the mean minimum temperature, and the mean PM10 concentration. PMID:23311474

  12. The effects of low tidal ventilation on lung strain correlate with respiratory system compliance.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jianfeng; Jin, Fang; Pan, Chun; Liu, Songqiao; Liu, Ling; Xu, Jingyuan; Yang, Yi; Qiu, Haibo

    2017-02-03

    The effect of alterations in tidal volume on mortality of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is determined by respiratory system compliance. We aimed to investigate the effects of different tidal volumes on lung strain in ARDS patients who had various levels of respiratory system compliance. Nineteen patients were divided into high (Chigh group) and low (Clow group) respiratory system compliance groups based on their respiratory system compliance values. We defined compliance ≥0.6 ml/(cmH2O/kg) as Chigh and compliance <0.6 ml/(cmH2O/kg) as Clow. End-expiratory lung volumes (EELV) at various tidal volumes were measured by nitrogen wash-in/washout. Lung strain was calculated as the ratio between tidal volume and EELV. The primary outcome was that lung strain is a function of tidal volume in patients with various levels of respiratory system compliance. The mean baseline EELV, strain and respiratory system compliance values were 1873 ml, 0.31 and 0.65 ml/(cmH2O/kg), respectively; differences in all of these parameters were statistically significant between the two groups. For all participants, a positive correlation was found between the respiratory system compliance and EELV (R = 0.488, p = 0.034). Driving pressure and strain increased together as the tidal volume increased from 6 ml/kg predicted body weight (PBW) to 12 ml/kg PBW. Compared to the Chigh ARDS patients, the driving pressure was significantly higher in the Clow patients at each tidal volume. Similar effects of lung strain were found for tidal volumes of 6 and 8 ml/kg PBW. The "lung injury" limits for driving pressure and lung strain were much easier to exceed with increases in the tidal volume in Clow patients. Respiratory system compliance affected the relationships between tidal volume and driving pressure and lung strain in ARDS patients. These results showed that increasing tidal volume induced lung injury more easily in patients with low respiratory system compliance

  13. A monoscopic method for real-time tumour tracking using combined occasional x-ray imaging and continuous respiratory monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Byungchul; Suh, Yelin; Dieterich, Sonja; Keall, Paul J.

    2008-06-01

    Three major linear accelerator vendors offer gantry-mounted single (monoscopic) x-ray imagers. The use of monoscopic imaging to estimate three-dimensional (3D) target positions has not been fully explored. The purpose of this work is to develop and investigate a robust monoscopic method for real-time tumour tracking, combining occasional x-ray imaging and continuous external respiratory monitoring, and compare this with an established stereoscopic method. Monoscopic estimation of 3D target positions is a two-step procedure. Step (1) is similar to the stereoscopic approach using combined occasional x-ray imaging and real-time external respiratory monitoring, i.e. to establish the correlation between the target coordinates T(x, y, z) and the external respiratory signal (R) (sECM: stereoscopic external correlation model). However, in monoscopic estimation, the correlation between the two coordinates (xp, yp) projected on the imager plane and the external respiratory signal (mECM: monoscopic external correlation model) is established. With only a single projection, the component of the 3D target position, which is along the x-ray imaging direction, is unresolved. Therefore, step (2) is used to estimate the unresolved component (zpar) by building a correlation model between the unresolved component and the two other components projected on the imager (ICM: internal correlation model) with a prior 3D target trajectory that may be obtained by 4DCT, MV/kV imaging or 4DCBCT. At the time of prediction, (xp, yp) are estimated from (R) using the correlation model in step (1), and then zpar is estimated from the estimated (xp, yp) using the correlation model in step (2). The performance of the proposed method was evaluated under various model update intervals and compared with the stereoscopic estimation method using 160 tumour trajectory and external respiratory motion data recorded at 25 Hz from 46 thoracic and abdominal cancer patients who underwent hypofractionated

  14. Verification and compensation of respiratory motion using an ultrasound imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, Ho-Chiao Hsu, Hsiao-Yu; Chiu, Wei-Hung; Tien, Der-Chi; Wu, Ren-Hong; Hsu, Chung-Hsien

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine if it is feasible to use ultrasound imaging as an aid for moving the treatment couch during diagnosis and treatment procedures associated with radiation therapy, in order to offset organ displacement caused by respiratory motion. A noninvasive ultrasound system was used to replace the C-arm device during diagnosis and treatment with the aims of reducing the x-ray radiation dose on the human body while simultaneously being able to monitor organ displacements. Methods: This study used a proposed respiratory compensating system combined with an ultrasound imaging system to monitor the compensation effect of respiratory motion. The accuracy of the compensation effect was verified by fluoroscopy, which means that fluoroscopy could be replaced so as to reduce unnecessary radiation dose on patients. A respiratory simulation system was used to simulate the respiratory motion of the human abdomen and a strain gauge (respiratory signal acquisition device) was used to capture the simulated respiratory signals. The target displacements could be detected by an ultrasound probe and used as a reference for adjusting the gain value of the respiratory signal used by the respiratory compensating system. This ensured that the amplitude of the respiratory compensation signal was a faithful representation of the target displacement. Results: The results show that performing respiratory compensation with the assistance of the ultrasound images reduced the compensation error of the respiratory compensating system to 0.81–2.92 mm, both for sine-wave input signals with amplitudes of 5, 10, and 15 mm, and human respiratory signals; this represented compensation of the respiratory motion by up to 92.48%. In addition, the respiratory signals of 10 patients were captured in clinical trials, while their diaphragm displacements were observed simultaneously using ultrasound. Using the respiratory compensating system to offset, the diaphragm

  15. Verification and compensation of respiratory motion using an ultrasound imaging system.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Ho-Chiao; Hsu, Hsiao-Yu; Chiu, Wei-Hung; Tien, Der-Chi; Wu, Ren-Hong; Hsu, Chung-Hsien

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if it is feasible to use ultrasound imaging as an aid for moving the treatment couch during diagnosis and treatment procedures associated with radiation therapy, in order to offset organ displacement caused by respiratory motion. A noninvasive ultrasound system was used to replace the C-arm device during diagnosis and treatment with the aims of reducing the x-ray radiation dose on the human body while simultaneously being able to monitor organ displacements. This study used a proposed respiratory compensating system combined with an ultrasound imaging system to monitor the compensation effect of respiratory motion. The accuracy of the compensation effect was verified by fluoroscopy, which means that fluoroscopy could be replaced so as to reduce unnecessary radiation dose on patients. A respiratory simulation system was used to simulate the respiratory motion of the human abdomen and a strain gauge (respiratory signal acquisition device) was used to capture the simulated respiratory signals. The target displacements could be detected by an ultrasound probe and used as a reference for adjusting the gain value of the respiratory signal used by the respiratory compensating system. This ensured that the amplitude of the respiratory compensation signal was a faithful representation of the target displacement. The results show that performing respiratory compensation with the assistance of the ultrasound images reduced the compensation error of the respiratory compensating system to 0.81-2.92 mm, both for sine-wave input signals with amplitudes of 5, 10, and 15 mm, and human respiratory signals; this represented compensation of the respiratory motion by up to 92.48%. In addition, the respiratory signals of 10 patients were captured in clinical trials, while their diaphragm displacements were observed simultaneously using ultrasound. Using the respiratory compensating system to offset, the diaphragm displacement resulted in

  16. Spectroscopic Imaging of Strongly Correlated Electronic States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdani, Ali; da Silva Neto, Eduardo H.; Aynajian, Pegor

    2016-03-01

    The study of correlated electronic systems from high-Tc cuprates to heavy-fermion systems continues to motivate the development of experimental tools to probe electronic phenomena in new ways and with increasing precision. In the past two decades, spectroscopic imaging with scanning tunneling microscopy has emerged as a powerful experimental technique. The combination of high energy and spatial resolutions provided by this technique reveals unprecedented detail of the electronic properties of strongly correlated metals and superconductors. This review examines specific experiments, theoretical concepts, and measurement methods that have established the application of these techniques to correlated materials. A wide range of applications, such as the study of collective responses to single atomic impurities, the characterization of quasiparticle-like excitations through their interference, and the identification of competing electronic phases using spectroscopic imaging, are discussed.

  17. Multi-dimensional respiratory motion tracking from markerless optical surface imaging based on deformable mesh registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaerer, Joël; Fassi, Aurora; Riboldi, Marco; Cerveri, Pietro; Baroni, Guido; Sarrut, David

    2012-01-01

    Real-time optical surface imaging systems offer a non-invasive way to monitor intra-fraction motion of a patient's thorax surface during radiotherapy treatments. Due to lack of point correspondence in dynamic surface acquisition, such systems cannot currently provide 3D motion tracking at specific surface landmarks, as available in optical technologies based on passive markers. We propose to apply deformable mesh registration to extract surface point trajectories from markerless optical imaging, thus yielding multi-dimensional breathing traces. The investigated approach is based on a non-rigid extension of the iterative closest point algorithm, using a locally affine regularization. The accuracy in tracking breathing motion was quantified in a group of healthy volunteers, by pair-wise registering the thoraco-abdominal surfaces acquired at three different respiratory phases using a clinically available optical system. The motion tracking accuracy proved to be maximal in the abdominal region, where breathing motion mostly occurs, with average errors of 1.09 mm. The results demonstrate the feasibility of recovering multi-dimensional breathing motion from markerless optical surface acquisitions by using the implemented deformable registration algorithm. The approach can potentially improve respiratory motion management in radiation therapy, including motion artefact reduction or tumour motion compensation by means of internal/external correlation models.

  18. Digital Image Correlation with Dynamic Subset Selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Ghulam Mubashar; MacNish, Cara; Dyskin, Arcady; Shufrin, Igor

    2016-09-01

    The quality of the surface pattern and selection of subset size play a critical role in achieving high accuracy in Digital Image Correlation (DIC). The subset size in DIC is normally selected by testing different subset sizes across the entire image, which is a laborious procedure. This also leads to the problem that the worst region of the surface pattern influences the performance of DIC across the entire image. In order to avoid these limitations, a Dynamic Subset Selection (DSS) algorithm is proposed in this paper to optimize the subset size for each point in an image before optimizing the correlation parameters. The proposed DSS algorithm uses the local pattern around the point of interest to calculate a parameter called the Intensity Variation Ratio (Λ), which is used to optimize the subset size. The performance of the DSS algorithm is analyzed using numerically generated images and is compared with the results of traditional DIC. Images obtained from laboratory experiments are also used to demonstrate the utility of the DSS algorithm. Results illustrate that the DSS algorithm provides a better alternative to subset size "guessing" and finds an appropriate subset size for each point of interest according to the local pattern.

  19. An improved image reconstruction method for optical intensity correlation Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xin; Feng, Lingjie; Li, Xiyu

    2016-12-01

    The intensity correlation imaging method is a novel kind of interference imaging and it has favorable prospects in deep space recognition. However, restricted by the low detecting signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), it's usually very difficult to obtain high-quality image of deep space object like high-Earth-orbit (HEO) satellite with existing phase retrieval methods. In this paper, based on the priori intensity statistical distribution model of the object and characteristics of measurement noise distribution, an improved method of Prior Information Optimization (PIO) is proposed to reduce the ambiguous images and accelerate the phase retrieval procedure thus realizing fine image reconstruction. As the simulations and experiments show, compared to previous methods, our method could acquire higher-resolution images with less error in low SNR condition.

  20. Event-by-event respiratory motion correction for PET with 3D internal-1D external motion correlation.

    PubMed

    Chan, Chung; Jin, Xiao; Fung, Edward K; Naganawa, Mika; Mulnix, Tim; Carson, Richard E; Liu, Chi

    2013-11-01

    Respiratory motion during PET∕CT imaging can cause substantial image blurring and underestimation of tracer concentration for both static and dynamic studies. In this study, the authors developed an event-by-event respiratory motion correction method that used three-dimensional internal-one-dimensional external motion correlation (INTEX3D) in listmode reconstruction. The authors aim to fully correct for organ/tumor-specific rigid motion caused by respiration using all detected events to eliminate both intraframe and interframe motion, and investigate the quantitative improvement in static and dynamic imaging. The positional translation of an internal organ or tumor during respiration was first determined from the reconstructions of multiple phase-gated images. A level set (active contour) method was used to segment the targeted internal organs/tumors whose centroids were determined. The mean displacement of the external respiratory signal acquired by the Anzai system that corresponded to each phase-gated frame was determined. Three linear correlations between the 1D Anzai mean displacements and the 3D centroids of the internal organ/tumor were established. The 3D internal motion signal with high temporal resolution was then generated by applying each of the three correlation functions to the entire Anzai trace (40 Hz) to guide event-by-event motion correction in listmode reconstruction. The reference location was determined as the location where CT images were acquired to facilitate phase-matched attenuation correction and anatomical-based postfiltering. The proposed method was evaluated with a NEMA phantom driven by a QUASAR respiratory motion platform, and human studies with two tracers: pancreatic beta cell tracer [(18)F]FP(+)DTBZ and tumor hypoxia tracer [(18)F]fluoromisonidazole (FMISO). An anatomical-based postreconstruction filter was applied to the motion-corrected images to reduce noise while preserving quantitative accuracy and organ boundaries in the

  1. Enhancing ejection fraction measurement through 4D respiratory motion compensation in cardiac PET imaging.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jing; Wang, Xinhui; Gao, Xiangzhen; Segars, Paul; Lodge, Martin; Rahmim, Arman

    2017-03-02

    ECG gated cardiac PET imaging measures functional parameters such as left ventricle (LV) ejection fraction (EF), providing diagnostic and prognostic information for management of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Respiratory motion degrades spatial resolution and affects the accuracy in measuring the LV volumes for EF calculation. The goal of this study is to systematically investigate the effect of respiratory motion correction on the estimation of end-diastolic volume (EDV), end-systolic volume (ESV), and EF, especially on the separation of normal and abnormal EFs. We developed a respiratory motion incorporated 4D PET image reconstruction technique which uses all gated-frame data to acquire a motion-suppressed image. Using the standard XCAT phantom and two individual-specific volunteer XCAT phantoms, we simulated dual-gated myocardial perfusion imaging data for normally and abnormally beating hearts. With and without respiratory motion correction, we measured the EDV, ESV, and EF from the cardiac gated reconstructed images. For all the phantoms, the estimated volumes increased and the biases significantly reduced with motion correction compared with those without. Furthermore, the improvement of ESV measurement in the abnormally beating heart led to better separation of normal and abnormal EFs. The simulation study demonstrated the significant effect of respiratory motion correction on cardiac imaging data with motion amplitude as small as 0.7 cm. The larger the motion amplitude the more improvement respiratory motion correction brought about on the measurement of EF. Using data-driven respiratory gating, we also demonstrated the effect of respiratory motion correction on estimation of the above functional parameters from list mode patient data. Respiratory motion correction is shown to improve the accuracy of EF measurement in clinical cardiac PET imaging.

  2. Enhancing ejection fraction measurement through 4D respiratory motion compensation in cardiac PET imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jing; Wang, Xinhui; Gao, Xiangzhen; Segars, W. Paul; Lodge, Martin A.; Rahmim, Arman

    2017-06-01

    ECG gated cardiac PET imaging measures functional parameters such as left ventricle (LV) ejection fraction (EF), providing diagnostic and prognostic information for management of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Respiratory motion degrades spatial resolution and affects the accuracy in measuring the LV volumes for EF calculation. The goal of this study is to systematically investigate the effect of respiratory motion correction on the estimation of end-diastolic volume (EDV), end-systolic volume (ESV), and EF, especially on the separation of normal and abnormal EFs. We developed a respiratory motion incorporated 4D PET image reconstruction technique which uses all gated-frame data to acquire a motion-suppressed image. Using the standard XCAT phantom and two individual-specific volunteer XCAT phantoms, we simulated dual-gated myocardial perfusion imaging data for normally and abnormally beating hearts. With and without respiratory motion correction, we measured the EDV, ESV, and EF from the cardiac-gated reconstructed images. For all the phantoms, the estimated volumes increased and the biases significantly reduced with motion correction compared with those without. Furthermore, the improvement of ESV measurement in the abnormally beating heart led to better separation of normal and abnormal EFs. The simulation study demonstrated the significant effect of respiratory motion correction on cardiac imaging data with motion amplitude as small as 0.7 cm. The larger the motion amplitude the more improvement respiratory motion correction brought about on the EF measurement. Using data-driven respiratory gating, we also demonstrated the effect of respiratory motion correction on estimating the above functional parameters from list mode patient data. Respiratory motion correction has been shown to improve the accuracy of EF measurement in clinical cardiac PET imaging.

  3. Computing dynamic classification images from correlation maps.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hongjing; Liu, Zili

    2006-05-22

    We used Pearson's correlation to compute dynamic classification images of biological motion in a point-light display. Observers discriminated whether a human figure that was embedded in dynamic white Gaussian noise was walking forward or backward. Their responses were correlated with the Gaussian noise fields frame by frame, across trials. The resultant correlation map gave rise to a sequence of dynamic classification images that were clearer than either the standard method of A. J. Ahumada and J. Lovell (1971) or the optimal weighting method of R. F. Murray, P. J. Bennett, and A. B. Sekuler (2002). Further, the correlation coefficients of all the point lights were similar to each other when overlapping pixels between forward and backward walkers were excluded. This pattern is consistent with the hypothesis that the point-light walker is represented in a global manner, as opposed to a fixed subset of point lights being more important than others. We conjecture that the superior performance of the correlation map may reflect inherent nonlinearities in processing biological motion, which are incompatible with the assumptions underlying the previous methods.

  4. Pixel-level robust digital image correlation.

    PubMed

    Cofaru, Corneliu; Philips, Wilfried; Van Paepegem, Wim

    2013-12-02

    Digital Image Correlation (DIC) is a well-established non-contact optical metrology method. It employs digital image analysis to extract the full-field displacements and strains that occur in objects subjected to external stresses. Despite recent DIC progress, many problematic areas which greatly affect accuracy and that can seldomly be avoided, received very little attention. Problems posed by the presence of sharp displacement discontinuities, reflections, object borders or edges can be linked to the analysed object's properties and deformation. Other problematic areas, such as image noise, localized reflections or shadows are related more to the image acquisition process. This paper proposes a new subset-based pixel-level robust DIC method for in-plane displacement measurement which addresses all of these problems in a straightforward and unified approach, significantly improving DIC measurement accuracy compared to classic approaches. The proposed approach minimizes a robust energy functional which adaptively weighs pixel differences in the motion estimation process. The aim is to limit the negative influence of pixels that present erroneous or inconsistent motions by enforcing local motion consistency. The proposed method is compared to the classic Newton-Raphson DIC method in terms of displacement accuracy in three experiments. The first experiment is numerical and presents three combined problems: sharp displacement discontinuities, missing image information and image noise. The second experiment is a real experiment in which a plastic specimen is developing a lateral crack due to the application of uniaxial stress. The region around the crack presents both reflections that saturate the image intensity levels leading to missing image information, as well as sharp motion discontinuities due to the plastic film rupturing. The third experiment compares the proposed and classic DIC approaches with generic computer vision optical flow methods using images from

  5. Fatigue Crack Detection Using Digital Image Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cawley, P.; Hutt, T. D.

    2009-03-01

    At present, detecting structural defects such as cracking and corrosion before they become critical is largely achieved by time consuming techniques such as eddy current and ultrasonic testing. These techniques require point-by-point scanning over the area to be tested. Digital Image Correlation could provide a cheaper and quicker testing technique. It works by correlating images of the structure surface in unloaded and loaded states taken with a standard digital camera, giving the displacement and strain fields. The specific case of a crack at a hole in an aluminium plate was investigated. It was found that the strain concentration around the crack tip is too localised to detect; however the displacement jump across the crack could be seen. This technique allows the cracks to be detected and would allow rapid testing of a structure if it can easily be loaded.

  6. Evaluation of Tumor Position and PTV Margins Using Image Guidance and Respiratory Gating

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Christopher; Balter, Peter; Morice, Rodolfo C.; Bucci, Kara; Dong Lei; Tucker, Susan; Vedam, Sastry; Chang, Joe Y.; Starkschall, George

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the margins currently used to generate the planning target volume for lung tumors and to determine whether image-guided patient setup or respiratory gating is more effective in reducing uncertainties in tumor position. Methods and Materials: Lung tumors in 7 patients were contoured on serial four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) data sets (4-8 4DCTs/patient; 50 total) obtained throughout the course of treatment. Simulations were performed to determine the tumor position when the patient was aligned using skin marks, image-guided setup based on vertebral bodies, fiducials implanted near the tumor, and the actual tumor volume under various scenarios of respiratory gating. Results: Because of the presence of setup uncertainties, the reduction in overall margin needed to completely encompass the tumor was observed to be larger for imaged-guided patient setup than for a simple respiratory-gated treatment. Without respiratory gating and image-guided patient setup, margins ranged from 0.9 cm to 3.1 cm to completely encompass the tumor. These were reduced to 0.7-1.7 cm when image-guided patient setup was simulated and further reduced with respiratory gating. Conclusions: Our results indicate that if respiratory motion management is used, it should be used in conjunction with image-guided patient setup in order to reduce the overall treatment margin effectively.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging predictors for respiratory failure after cervical spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Hua; Ou, Chien-Yu

    2014-11-01

    Patients after cervical spinal cord injury (CSCI) may experience ventilator-dependent respiratory failure during the acute hospitalization period. The aim of the study is to identify imaging factors that predict respiratory failure after acute CSCI. We enrolled 108 patients diagnosed with CSCI in 4 years. The definition of respiratory failure consisted of the requirement of a definitive airway and the assistance of mechanical ventilation. Objective neurological function was determined using the classification of the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA). We evaluated the characteristics of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the cervical spine. Respiratory failure occurred in 8 (7.40%) of 108 CSCI patients. The ASIA classification of the 108 patients were A (6), B (3), C (60), D (27), and E (12), and the 8 respiratory failure patients were A (3), B (1), and C (4). Seven of 8 patients with respiratory failure and 78 of 100 patients without respiratory failure had a neurological level of C5 or above by the ASIA standards (p=1.000). The imaging level of injury at C3 by MRI was identified in 5 of 8 patients that developed respiratory failure and more frequent than injury at the lower cervical levels (p<0.001). The presence of spinal cord edema was another predictor of respiratory failure (p=0.009). MRI can accurately localize CSCI and identify those patients at risk of respiratory failure. Imaging level of injury at C3 and presence of spinal cord edema are both predictors. To prevent secondary cord injury from prolonged hypoxia and facilitate pulmonary care, definitive airways should be established early in high risk patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Demosaicing images from colour cameras for digital image correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forsey, A.; Gungor, S.

    2016-11-01

    Digital image correlation is not the intended use for consumer colour cameras, but with care they can be successfully employed in such a role. The main obstacle is the sparsely sampled colour data caused by the use of a colour filter array (CFA) to separate the colour channels. It is shown that the method used to convert consumer camera raw files into a monochrome image suitable for digital image correlation (DIC) can have a significant effect on the DIC output. A number of widely available software packages and two in-house methods are evaluated in terms of their performance when used with DIC. Using an in-plane rotating disc to produce a highly constrained displacement field, it was found that the bicubic spline based in-house demosaicing method outperformed the other methods in terms of accuracy and aliasing suppression.

  9. Initial experience and clinical comparison of two image guidance methods for SBRT treatment: 4DCT versus respiratory-triggered imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Brian; Rassiah-Szegedi, Prema; Zhao, Hui; Huang, Y Jessica; Sarkar, Vikren; Szegedi, Martin; Kokeny, Kristine E; Anker, Christopher J; Shrieve, Dennis C; Salter, Bill J

    2011-01-31

    For Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) treatment of lung and liver, we quantified the differences between two image guidance methods: 4DCT and ExacTrac respiratory-triggered imaging. Five different patients with five liver lesions and one lung lesion for a total of 19 SBRT delivered fractions were studied. For the 4DCT method, a manual registration process was used between the 4DCT image sets from initial simulation and treatment day to determine the required daily image-guided corrections. We also used the ExacTrac respiratory-triggered imaging capability to verify the target positioning, and calculated the differences in image guidance shifts between these two methods. The mean (standard deviation) of the observed differences in image-guided shifts between 4DCT and ExacTrac respiratory-triggered image guidance was left/right (L/R) = 0.4 (2.0) mm, anterior/posterior (A/P) = 1.4 (1.7) mm, superior/inferior (S/I) = 2.2 (2.0) mm, with no difference larger than 5.0 mm in any given direction for any individual case. The largest error occurred in the S/I direction, with a mean of 2.2 mm for the six lesions. This seems reasonable, because respiratory motion and the resulting imaging uncertainties are most pronounced in this S/I direction. Image guidance shifts derived from ExacTrac triggered imaging at two extreme breathing phases (i.e., full exhale vs. full inhale), agreed well (less than 2.0 mm) with each other. In summary, two very promising image guidance methods of 4DCT and ExacTrac respiratory-triggered imaging were presented and the image guidance shifts were comparable for the patients evaluated in this study.

  10. Estimation of respiratory rate from photoplethysmographic imaging videos compared to pulse oximetry.

    PubMed

    Karlen, Walter; Garde, Ainara; Myers, Dorothy; Scheffer, Cornie; Ansermino, J Mark; Dumont, Guy A

    2015-07-01

    We present a study evaluating two respiratory rate estimation algorithms using videos obtained from placing a finger on the camera lens of a mobile phone. The two algorithms, based on Smart Fusion and empirical mode decomposition (EMD), consist of previously developed signal processing methods to detect features and extract respiratory induced variations in photoplethysmographic signals to estimate respiratory rate. With custom-built software on an Android phone, photoplethysmographic imaging videos were recorded from 19 healthy adults while breathing spontaneously at respiratory rates between 6 to 32 breaths/min. Signals from two pulse oximeters were simultaneously recorded to compare the algorithms' performance using mobile phone data and clinical data. Capnometry was recorded to obtain reference respiratory rates. Two hundred seventy-two recordings were analyzed. The Smart Fusion algorithm reported 39 recordings with insufficient respiratory information from the photoplethysmographic imaging data. Of the 232 remaining recordings, a root mean square error (RMSE) of 6 breaths/min was obtained. The RMSE for the pulse oximeter data was lower at 2.3 breaths/min. RMSE for the EMD method was higher throughout all data sources as, unlike the Smart Fusion, the EMD method did not screen for inconsistent results. The study showed that it is feasible to estimate respiratory rates by placing a finger on a mobile phone camera, but that it becomes increasingly challenging at respiratory rates greater than 20 breaths/min, independent of data source or algorithm tested.

  11. Use of Respiratory-Correlated Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography to Determine Acceptable Treatment Margins for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, Seth D.; Ford, Eric C.; Duhon, Mario; McNutt, Todd; Wong, John; Herman, Joseph M.

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: Respiratory-induced excursions of locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma could affect dose delivery. This study quantified tumor motion and evaluated standard treatment margins. Methods and Materials: Respiratory-correlated four-dimensional computed tomography images were obtained on 30 patients with locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma; 15 of whom underwent repeat scanning before cone-down treatment. Treatment planning software was used to contour the gross tumor volume (GTV), bilateral kidneys, and biliary stent. Excursions were calculated according to the centroid of the contoured volumes. Results: The mean +- standard deviation GTV excursion in the superoinferior (SI) direction was 0.55 +- 0.23 cm; an expansion of 1.0 cm adequately accounted for the GTV motion in 97% of locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma patients. Motion GTVs were generated and resulted in a 25% average volume increase compared with the static GTV. Of the 30 patients, 17 had biliary stents. The mean SI stent excursion was 0.84 +- 0.32 cm, significantly greater than the GTV motion. The xiphoid process moved an average of 0.35 +- 0.12 cm, significantly less than the GTV. The mean SI motion of the left and right kidneys was 0.65 +- 0.27 cm and 0.77 +- 0.30 cm, respectively. At repeat scanning, no significant changes were seen in the mean GTV size (p = .8) or excursion (p = .3). Conclusion: These data suggest that an asymmetric expansion of 1.0, 0.7, and 0.6 cm along the respective SI, anteroposterior, and medial-lateral directions is recommended if a respiratory-correlated four-dimensional computed tomography scan is not available to evaluate the tumor motion during treatment planning. Surrogates of tumor motion, such as biliary stents or external markers, should be used with caution.

  12. Neurochemical and physiological correlates of a critical period of respiratory development in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Wong-Riley, Margaret T.T.; Liu, Qiuli

    2008-01-01

    Despite its vital importance to life, respiration is not mature at birth in mammals, but rather, it undergoes a great deal of growth, refinement, and adjustments postnatally. Many adjustments do not follow smooth paths, but assume abrupt changes during certain postnatal periods that may render the animal less capable of responding to respiratory stressors. The present review focuses on neurochemical and physiological correlates of a critical period of respiratory development in the rat. In addition to an imbalanced expression of reduced excitatory and enhanced inhibitory neurotransmitters, a switch in the expressions of GABAA receptor subunits from α3 to α1 occurs around postnatal day (P)12 in the Pre-Bötzinger nucleus and the ventrolateral subnucleus of the solitary tract nucleus. Possible subunit switches in a number of other neurotransmitter receptors are discussed. These neurochemical changes are paralleled by ventilatory adjustments at the end of the second postnatal week. At P13 and under normoxia, respiratory frequency reaches its peak before assuming a gradual fall, and both tidal volume and minute ventilation exhibit a significant rise prior to a plateau or a gradual decline until P21. The response to acute hypoxia is markedly reduced between P12 and P16, being lowest at P13. Thus, the end of the second postnatal week can be considered as a critical period of respiratory development, during which multiple neurochemical and physiological adjustments and switches are orchestrated at the same time, rendering the system extremely dynamic but, at the same time, vulnerable to externally imposed perturbations and insults. The critical period embodies a time of multi-system, multifaceted growth and adjustments. It is a plastic, transitional period that is also a part of the normal development of the respiratory system. PMID:18524695

  13. Enteral nutrition volume is not correlated with lower respiratory tract infection in patients on mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Colomar, A; Guardiola, B; Llompart-Pou, J A; Ayestarán, I; Rodríguez-Pilar, J; Ferreruela, M; Raurich, J M

    To evaluate the effect of enteral nutrition volume, gastrointestinal function and the type of acid suppressive drug upon the incidence of lower respiratory tract infections in critically ill patients on mechanical ventilation (MV). A retrospective secondary analysis was carried out. The Intensive Care Unit of a University Hospital. Patients≥18-years-old expected to need MV for more than four days, and receiving enteral nutrition by nasogastric tube within 24h of starting MV. We correlated enteral nutrition volume administered during the first 10 days, gastrointestinal function and the type of acid suppressive therapy with the episodes of lower respiratory tract infection up until day 28. Cox proportional hazards ratios in univariate and adjusted multivariate models were used. Statistical significance was considered for p<0.05. Lower respiratory tract infection episodes. Sixty-six out of 185 patients (35.7%) had infection; 27 patients had ventilator-associated pneumonia; and 39 presented ventilator-associated tracheobronchitis. Uninfected and infected groups were similar in terms of enteral nutrition volume (54±12 and 54±9mL/h; p=0.94) and caloric intake (19.4±4.9 and 19.6±5.2kcal/kg/d; p=0.81). The Cox proportional hazards model showed neurological indication of MV to be the only independent variable related to infection (p=0.001). Enteral nutrition volume, the type of acid suppressive therapy, and the use of prokinetic agents were not significantly correlated to infection. Enteral nutrition volume and caloric intake, gastrointestinal dysfunction and the type of acid suppressive therapy used were not associated to lower respiratory tract infection in patients on MV. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  14. Image Correlation: Part 1. Simulation and Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-11-01

    prepared for UNITED STATES AIR FORCE PROJECT RAND D D Or,• Illnel lSANT Dr-- CA. 90 ft M A R . . . . . -- a .02 .0. The research described In this...Analysis, Deputy Chief of Staff, Research and Development, Hq USAF. Reports of The Rand Corporation do not necessarily reflect the opinions or policies of...the sponsors of Rand research , 4. . . , * R-2057/1-PR Novem-ber 1976 Image Correlation: Part I Simulation and Analysis H. H. Bailey, F. W. Blackwell

  15. Spontaneous physical activity in a respiratory chamber is correlated to habitual physical activity.

    PubMed

    Snitker, S; Tataranni, P A; Ravussin, E

    2001-10-01

    During a stay in a respiratory chamber without an exercise protocol, physical activity is limited to activities of daily living, change of posture and 'fidgeting,' collectively referred to as spontaneous physical activity (SPA). SPA is quite variable among individuals and is a heritable trait. A low SPA during a chamber stay is a predictor of weight gain in men. However, it remains to be established whether physical activity in a respiratory chamber relates to physical activity under habitual, free-living conditions. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether physical activity in a chamber is correlated to habitual, free-living physical activity. Fifty healthy, non-diabetic Pima Indians (30 M/20 F, 30+/-6 y; 37+/-10% body fat; means+/-s.d.) completed a 24 h stay in the respiratory chamber followed by a 7 day measurement of habitual, free-living energy expenditure by doubly labeled water. Free-living physical activity was expressed as activity energy expenditure (AEE(FL); daily energy expenditure-(sleeping metabolic rate+thermic effect of food)), physical activity level (PAL(FL); daily energy expenditure/sleeping metabolic rate) and body-size independent activity units. Activity during the chamber stay was expressed as PAL(Ch), AEE(Ch), and based on radar sensor measurements, as percentage of time with activity (SPA(Radar)). AEE(FL) (averaging 930+/-310 kcal/day (3.89+/-1.30 MJ/day)) was correlated to AEE(CH) (averaging 440+/-160 kcal/day (1.84+/-0.67 MJ/day)) and higher in men than in women (r=0.53, P=0.003) and r=0.53, P=0.02, respectively). Likewise, PAL(FL) (averaging 1.75+/-0.21) was correlated to PAL(Ch) (averaging 1.42+/-0.10) and higher in men than in women (r=0.49, P=0.006 and r=0.42, P=0.02, respectively). Free-living activity expressed in body-size independent activity units (averaging 17.8+/-7.0) was correlated to SPA(Radar) (averaging 6.4+/-1.7) with no effect of sex (r=0.30, P=0.03). Physical activity in a respiratory chamber was

  16. Dynamic CT imaging of volumetric changes in pulmonary nodules correlates with physical measurements of stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Lartey, Frederick M.; Rafat, Marjan; Negahdar, Mohammadreza; Malkovskiy, Andrey V.; Dong, Xinzhe; Sun, Xiaoli; Li, Mei; Doyle, Timothy; Rajadas, Jayakumar; Graves, Edward E.; Loo, Billy W.; Maxim, Peter G.

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose A major challenge in CT screening for lung cancer is limited specificity when distinguishing between malignant and non-malignant pulmonary nodules (PN). Malignant nodules have different mechanical properties and tissue characteristics (‘stiffness’) from non-malignant nodules. This study seeks to improve CT specificity by demonstrating in rats that measurements of volumetric ratios in PNs with varying composition can be determined by respiratory-gated dynamic CT imaging and that these ratios correlate with direct physical measurements of PN stiffness. Methods and materials Respiratory-gated MicroCT images acquired at extreme tidal volumes of 9 rats with PNs from talc, matrigel and A549 human lung carcinoma were analyzed and their volumetric ratios (δ) derived. PN stiffness was determined by measuring the Young’s modulus using atomic force microscopy (AFM) for each nodule excised immediately after MicroCT imaging. Results There was significant correlation (p = 0.0002) between PN volumetric ratios determined by respiratory-gated CT imaging and the physical stiffness of the PNs determined from AFM measurements. Conclusion We demonstrated proof of concept that PN volume changes measured non-invasively correlate with direct physical measurements of stiffness. These results may translate clinically into a means of improving the specificity of CT screening for lung cancer and/or improving individual prognostic assessments based on lung tumor stiffness. PMID:27989402

  17. Phase correlation imaging of unlabeled cell dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Lihong; Rajshekhar, Gannavarpu; Wang, Ru; Bhaduri, Basanta; Sridharan, Shamira; Mir, Mustafa; Chakraborty, Arindam; Iyer, Rajashekar; Prasanth, Supriya; Millet, Larry; Gillette, Martha U.; Popescu, Gabriel

    2016-09-01

    We present phase correlation imaging (PCI) as a novel approach to study cell dynamics in a spatially-resolved manner. PCI relies on quantitative phase imaging time-lapse data and, as such, functions in label-free mode, without the limitations associated with exogenous markers. The correlation time map outputted in PCI informs on the dynamics of the intracellular mass transport. Specifically, we show that PCI can extract quantitatively the diffusion coefficient map associated with live cells, as well as standard Brownian particles. Due to its high sensitivity to mass transport, PCI can be applied to studying the integrity of actin polymerization dynamics. Our results indicate that the cyto-D treatment blocking the actin polymerization has a dominant effect at the large spatial scales, in the region surrounding the cell. We found that PCI can distinguish between senescent and quiescent cells, which is extremely difficult without using specific markers currently. We anticipate that PCI will be used alongside established, fluorescence-based techniques to enable valuable new studies of cell function.

  18. Phase correlation imaging of unlabeled cell dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Lihong; Rajshekhar, Gannavarpu; Wang, Ru; Bhaduri, Basanta; Sridharan, Shamira; Mir, Mustafa; Chakraborty, Arindam; Iyer, Rajashekar; Prasanth, Supriya; Millet, Larry; Gillette, Martha U.; Popescu, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    We present phase correlation imaging (PCI) as a novel approach to study cell dynamics in a spatially-resolved manner. PCI relies on quantitative phase imaging time-lapse data and, as such, functions in label-free mode, without the limitations associated with exogenous markers. The correlation time map outputted in PCI informs on the dynamics of the intracellular mass transport. Specifically, we show that PCI can extract quantitatively the diffusion coefficient map associated with live cells, as well as standard Brownian particles. Due to its high sensitivity to mass transport, PCI can be applied to studying the integrity of actin polymerization dynamics. Our results indicate that the cyto-D treatment blocking the actin polymerization has a dominant effect at the large spatial scales, in the region surrounding the cell. We found that PCI can distinguish between senescent and quiescent cells, which is extremely difficult without using specific markers currently. We anticipate that PCI will be used alongside established, fluorescence-based techniques to enable valuable new studies of cell function. PMID:27615512

  19. [Peripheral muscle strength in stable COPD patients: correlation with respiratory function variables and quality of life].

    PubMed

    Toral Marín, J; Ortega, F; Cejudo, P; Elías, T; Sánchez, H; Montemayor, T

    1999-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess peripheral muscle strength in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) using a simple test and to look for correlation with function variables, physiological strength variables and quality of life parameters. Twenty-three COPD patients with moderate to severe air-flow limitation (FEV1 = 39 +/- 12%) in stable phase but displaying inability to carry out daily tasks were enrolled. Peripheral muscle strength was assessed in all patients by measuring the maximum load in a single repetition of five simple upper and lower extremity exercises performed at a multi-gymnastics station. Results were compared to respiratory function variables (FVC, FEV1, FEV1/FVC and gasometry), to results of an exercise test on a cycle ergometer with monitoring of respiratory gases (VEmax, VO2max and Wmax), to endurance (minutes) to dyspnea (Mahler's scale) and to quality of life (Chronic Respiratory Disease Questionnaire-CRDQ). No relation between functional parameters and endurance in minutes was found. Minute ventilation (VE) proved to be significantly related to oxygen intake (VO) and maximum work in the stress test. Dyspnea on Mahler's scale was unrelated, but fatigue variables and emotional function variables on the CRDQ were related. We conclude that peripheral muscle strength is unrelated to level of flow limitation or exercise tolerance in COPD patients. Peripheral muscle strength is related, however, to maximum work load and some aspects of quality of life.

  20. Audiovisual biofeedback improves image quality and reduces scan time for respiratory-gated 3D MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, D.; Greer, P. B.; Arm, J.; Keall, P.; Kim, T.

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that audiovisual (AV) biofeedback can improve image quality and reduce scan time for respiratory-gated 3D thoracic MRI. For five healthy human subjects respiratory motion guidance in MR scans was provided using an AV biofeedback system, utilizing real-time respiratory motion signals. To investigate the improvement of respiratory-gated 3D MR images between free breathing (FB) and AV biofeedback (AV), each subject underwent two imaging sessions. Respiratory-related motion artifacts and imaging time were qualitatively evaluated in addition to the reproducibility of external (abdominal) motion. In the results, 3D MR images in AV biofeedback showed more anatomic information such as a clear distinction of diaphragm, lung lobes and sharper organ boundaries. The scan time was reduced from 401±215 s in FB to 334±94 s in AV (p-value 0.36). The root mean square variation of the displacement and period of the abdominal motion was reduced from 0.4±0.22 cm and 2.8±2.5 s in FB to 0.1±0.15 cm and 0.9±1.3 s in AV (p-value of displacement <0.01 and p-value of period 0.12). This study demonstrated that audiovisual biofeedback improves image quality and reduces scan time for respiratory-gated 3D MRI. These results suggest that AV biofeedback has the potential to be a useful motion management tool in medical imaging and radiation therapy procedures.

  1. SU-E-J-73: Generation of Volumetric Images with a Respiratory Motion Model Based On An External Surrogate Signal

    SciTech Connect

    Hurwitz, M; Williams, C; Mishra, P; Dhou, S; Lewis, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Respiratory motion during radiotherapy treatment can differ significantly from motion observed during imaging for treatment planning. Our goal is to use an initial 4DCT scan and the trace of an external surrogate marker to generate 3D images of patient anatomy during treatment. Methods: Deformable image registration is performed on images from an initial 4DCT scan. The deformation vectors are used to develop a patient-specific linear relationship between the motion of each voxel and the trajectory of an external surrogate signal. Correlations in motion are taken into account with principal component analysis, reducing the number of free parameters. This model is tested with digital phantoms reproducing the breathing patterns of ten measured patient tumor trajectories, using five seconds of data to develop the model and the subsequent thirty seconds to test its predictions. The model is also tested with a breathing physical anthropomorphic phantom programmed to reproduce a patient breathing pattern. Results: The error (mean absolute, 95th percentile) over 30 seconds in the predicted tumor centroid position ranged from (0.8, 1.3) mm to (2.2, 4.3) mm for the ten patient breathing patterns. The model reproduced changes in both phase and amplitude of the breathing pattern. Agreement between prediction and truth over the entire image was confirmed by assessing the global voxel intensity RMS error. In the physical phantom, the error in the tumor centroid position was less than 1 mm for all images. Conclusion: We are able to reconstruct 3D images of patient anatomy with a model correlating internal respiratory motion with motion of an external surrogate marker, reproducing the expected tumor centroid position with an average accuracy of 1.4 mm. The images generated by this model could be used to improve dose calculations for treatment planning and delivered dose estimates. This work was partially funded by a research grant from Varian Medical Systems.

  2. Respiratory bronchiolitis-associated interstitial lung disease: radiologic features with clinical and pathologic correlation.

    PubMed

    Park, Jai Soung; Brown, Kevin K; Tuder, Rubin M; Hale, Valerie A E; King Jr, Talmadge E; Lynch, David A

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to describe the radiographic and CT findings in patients with respiratory bronchiolitis-associated interstitial lung disease (RB-ILD) and to correlate them with clinical, physiologic, and pathologic features. RB-ILD was proved pathologically in all 21 patients. Sixteen (76%) patients were current smokers, and five (24%) patients were ex-smokers. The mean cigarette consumption was 38.7 pack-years. Chest radiographs and CT scans were semiquantitatively analyzed and correlated with clinical findings, physiologic measures, and a pathologic score of disease extent. The major radiographic findings were bronchial wall thickening in 16 patients (76%) and ground-glass opacity in 12 patients (57%). The predominant initial CT findings were central bronchial wall thickening (proximal to subsegmental bronchi) in 19 patients (90%), peripheral bronchial wall thickening (distal to subsegmental bronchi) in 18 patients (86%), centrilobular nodules in 15 patients (71%), and ground-glass opacity in 14 patients (67%), None of these CT findings had a significant zonal predominance. Other findings were upper lung predominant centrilobular emphysema (57%) and patchy areas of hypoattenuation (38%) with a lower lung predominance. Radiologic findings were similar in both current and ex-smokers. The amount of ground-glass opacity correlated inversely with arterial oxygen saturation ( r = -0.67, p = 0.04), and the areas of hypoattenuation correlated with alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient ( r = 0.56, p = 0.04). The extent of centrilobular nodules correlated with the extent of macrophages in respiratory bronchioles ( r = 0.53, p = 0.03) and with chronic inflammation of respiratory bronchioles ( r = 0.57, p = 0.02). The extent of ground-glass opacity correlated with the amount of macrophage accumulation in the alveoli and alveolar ducts ( r = 0.56, p < 0.01 and r = 0.54, p = 0.04, respectively). At follow-up CT after steroid treatment and smoking cessation, in nine

  3. MO-F-CAMPUS-J-03: Sorting 2D Dynamic MR Images Using Internal Respiratory Signal for 4D MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, Z; Hui, C; Beddar, S; Stemkens, B; Tijssen, R; Berg, C van den

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a novel algorithm to extract internal respiratory signal (IRS) for sorting dynamic magnetic resonance (MR) images in order to achieve four-dimensional (4D) MR imaging. Methods: Dynamic MR images were obtained with the balanced steady state free precession by acquiring each two-dimensional sagittal slice repeatedly for more than one breathing cycle. To generate a robust IRS, we used 5 different representative internal respiratory surrogates in both the image space (body area) and the Fourier space (the first two low-frequency phase components in the anterior-posterior direction, and the first two low-frequency phase components in the superior-inferior direction). A clustering algorithm was then used to search for a group of similar individual internal signals, which was then used to formulate the final IRS. A phantom study and a volunteer study were performed to demonstrate the effectiveness of this algorithm. The IRS was compared to the signal from the respiratory bellows. Results: The IRS computed by our algorithm matched well with the bellows signal in both the phantom and the volunteer studies. On average, the normalized cross correlation between the IRS and the bellows signal was 0.97 in the phantom study and 0.87 in the volunteer study, respectively. The average difference between the end inspiration times in the IRS and bellows signal was 0.18 s in the phantom study and 0.14 s in the volunteer study, respectively. 4D images sorted based on the IRS showed minimal mismatched artifacts, and the motion of the anatomy was coherent with the respiratory phases. Conclusion: A novel algorithm was developed to generate IRS from dynamic MR images to achieve 4D MR imaging. The performance of the IRS was comparable to that of the bellows signal. It can be easily implemented into the clinic and potentially could replace the use of external respiratory surrogates. This research was partially funded by the the Center for Radiation Oncology Research from

  4. Self-calibrated correlation imaging with k-space variant correlation functions.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu; Edalati, Masoud; Du, Xingfu; Wang, Hui; Cao, Jie J

    2017-07-07

    Correlation imaging is a previously developed high-speed MRI framework that converts parallel imaging reconstruction into the estimate of correlation functions. The presented work aims to demonstrate this framework can provide a speed gain over parallel imaging by estimating k-space variant correlation functions. Because of Fourier encoding with gradients, outer k-space data contain higher spatial-frequency image components arising primarily from tissue boundaries. As a result of tissue-boundary sparsity in the human anatomy, neighboring k-space data correlation varies from the central to the outer k-space. By estimating k-space variant correlation functions with an iterative self-calibration method, correlation imaging can benefit from neighboring k-space data correlation associated with both coil sensitivity encoding and tissue-boundary sparsity, thereby providing a speed gain over parallel imaging that relies only on coil sensitivity encoding. This new approach is investigated in brain imaging and free-breathing neonatal cardiac imaging. Correlation imaging performs better than existing parallel imaging techniques in simulated brain imaging acceleration experiments. The higher speed enables real-time data acquisition for neonatal cardiac imaging in which physiological motion is fast and non-periodic. With k-space variant correlation functions, correlation imaging gives a higher speed than parallel imaging and offers the potential to image physiological motion in real-time. Magn Reson Med, 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  5. Respiratory impedance is correlated with morphological changes in the lungs on three-dimensional CT in patients with COPD

    PubMed Central

    Karayama, Masato; Inui, Naoki; Mori, Kazutaka; Kono, Masato; Hozumi, Hironao; Suzuki, Yuzo; Furuhashi, Kazuki; Hashimoto, Dai; Enomoto, Noriyuki; Fujisawa, Tomoyuki; Nakamura, Yutaro; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Suda, Takafumi

    2017-01-01

    The forced oscillation technique provides information concerning respiratory impedance, which comprises resistance and reactance of the respiratory system. However, its relationship with morphological changes of the lungs in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) remains unclear. Respiratory impedance and spirometric data were evaluated in 98 patients with COPD and 49 reference subjects. Wall thickness (WT) and airway intraluminal area (Ai) of third- to sixth-generation bronchi, and percentage low-attenuation area with less than −950 HU (%LAA) of lungs were measured using three-dimensional computed tomography. COPD patients had higher respiratory impedance, decreased Ai, and increased %LAA compared with reference subjects. Indices of respiratory resistance and reactance and forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) were correlated with Ai, and the association between percent predicted FEV1 and Ai was predominant in distal bronchi. The difference in respiratory resistance between 5 Hz and 20 Hz (R5–R20) and FEV1/forced vital capacity ratio (FEV1/FVC) were correlated with WT. The %LAA was correlated with the FEV1/FVC ratio and respiratory reactance. Airway function measurements with the forced oscillation technique provide complementary information to spirometry in COPD. PMID:28176815

  6. Generation of fluoroscopic 3D images with a respiratory motion model based on an external surrogate signal.

    PubMed

    Hurwitz, Martina; Williams, Christopher L; Mishra, Pankaj; Rottmann, Joerg; Dhou, Salam; Wagar, Matthew; Mannarino, Edward G; Mak, Raymond H; Lewis, John H

    2015-01-21

    Respiratory motion during radiotherapy can cause uncertainties in definition of the target volume and in estimation of the dose delivered to the target and healthy tissue. In this paper, we generate volumetric images of the internal patient anatomy during treatment using only the motion of a surrogate signal. Pre-treatment four-dimensional CT imaging is used to create a patient-specific model correlating internal respiratory motion with the trajectory of an external surrogate placed on the chest. The performance of this model is assessed with digital and physical phantoms reproducing measured irregular patient breathing patterns. Ten patient breathing patterns are incorporated in a digital phantom. For each patient breathing pattern, the model is used to generate images over the course of thirty seconds. The tumor position predicted by the model is compared to ground truth information from the digital phantom. Over the ten patient breathing patterns, the average absolute error in the tumor centroid position predicted by the motion model is 1.4 mm. The corresponding error for one patient breathing pattern implemented in an anthropomorphic physical phantom was 0.6 mm. The global voxel intensity error was used to compare the full image to the ground truth and demonstrates good agreement between predicted and true images. The model also generates accurate predictions for breathing patterns with irregular phases or amplitudes.

  7. Generation of fluoroscopic 3D images with a respiratory motion model based on an external surrogate signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurwitz, Martina; Williams, Christopher L.; Mishra, Pankaj; Rottmann, Joerg; Dhou, Salam; Wagar, Matthew; Mannarino, Edward G.; Mak, Raymond H.; Lewis, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory motion during radiotherapy can cause uncertainties in definition of the target volume and in estimation of the dose delivered to the target and healthy tissue. In this paper, we generate volumetric images of the internal patient anatomy during treatment using only the motion of a surrogate signal. Pre-treatment four-dimensional CT imaging is used to create a patient-specific model correlating internal respiratory motion with the trajectory of an external surrogate placed on the chest. The performance of this model is assessed with digital and physical phantoms reproducing measured irregular patient breathing patterns. Ten patient breathing patterns are incorporated in a digital phantom. For each patient breathing pattern, the model is used to generate images over the course of thirty seconds. The tumor position predicted by the model is compared to ground truth information from the digital phantom. Over the ten patient breathing patterns, the average absolute error in the tumor centroid position predicted by the motion model is 1.4 mm. The corresponding error for one patient breathing pattern implemented in an anthropomorphic physical phantom was 0.6 mm. The global voxel intensity error was used to compare the full image to the ground truth and demonstrates good agreement between predicted and true images. The model also generates accurate predictions for breathing patterns with irregular phases or amplitudes.

  8. The use of a generalized reconstruction by inversion of coupled systems (GRICS) approach for generic respiratory motion correction in PET/MR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fayad, Hadi; Odille, Freddy; Schmidt, Holger; Würslin, Christian; Küstner, Thomas; Feblinger, Jacques; Visvikis, Dimitris

    2015-03-01

    Respiratory motion is a source of artifacts in multimodality imaging such as PET/MR. Solutions include retrospective or prospective gating. They have however found limited use in clinical practice, since their increased overall acquisition duration to maintain overall image quality. More elaborate methods consist of using 4D MR datasets to extract spatial deformations in order to correct for the respiratory motion in PET. The main drawbacks of such approaches is the relatively long acquisition times associated with 4D MR imaging which is often incompatible with clinical PET/MR protocols. The objective of this work was to overcome these limitations by exploiting a generalized reconstruction by inversion of coupled systems (GRICS) approach. The methodology is based on a joint estimation of motion during the MR image reconstruction process, providing internal structure motion and associated deformation matrices for retrospective use in PET respiratory motion correction. This method was first validated on four MR volunteers and two PET/MR patient datasets by comparing GRICS generated MR images to 4D MR series obtained by retrospective gating. In a second step 4D PET datasets corresponding to acquired 4D MR images were simulated using the GATE Monte Carlo simulation platform. GRICS generated deformation matrices were subsequently used to correct respiratory motion in comparison to the 4D MR image based deformations both for the simulated and the two 4D PET/MR patient datasets. Results confirm that GRICS synchronized MR images correlate well with the acquired 4D MR series. Similarly, the use of GRICS for respiratory motion correction allows an equivalent percentage improvement on lesion contrast, position and size, considering the PET simulated tumors as well as PET real tumors. This work demonstrates the potential interest of using GRICS for PET respiratory motion correction in combined PET/MR using shorter duration acquisitions without the need for 4D MRI and

  9. The use of a generalized reconstruction by inversion of coupled systems (GRICS) approach for generic respiratory motion correction in PET/MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Fayad, Hadi; Odille, Freddy; Schmidt, Holger; Würslin, Christian; Küstner, Thomas; Feblinger, Jacques; Visvikis, Dimitris

    2015-03-21

    Respiratory motion is a source of artifacts in multimodality imaging such as PET/MR. Solutions include retrospective or prospective gating. They have however found limited use in clinical practice, since their increased overall acquisition duration to maintain overall image quality. More elaborate methods consist of using 4D MR datasets to extract spatial deformations in order to correct for the respiratory motion in PET. The main drawbacks of such approaches is the relatively long acquisition times associated with 4D MR imaging which is often incompatible with clinical PET/MR protocols. The objective of this work was to overcome these limitations by exploiting a generalized reconstruction by inversion of coupled systems (GRICS) approach. The methodology is based on a joint estimation of motion during the MR image reconstruction process, providing internal structure motion and associated deformation matrices for retrospective use in PET respiratory motion correction. This method was first validated on four MR volunteers and two PET/MR patient datasets by comparing GRICS generated MR images to 4D MR series obtained by retrospective gating. In a second step 4D PET datasets corresponding to acquired 4D MR images were simulated using the GATE Monte Carlo simulation platform. GRICS generated deformation matrices were subsequently used to correct respiratory motion in comparison to the 4D MR image based deformations both for the simulated and the two 4D PET/MR patient datasets. Results confirm that GRICS synchronized MR images correlate well with the acquired 4D MR series. Similarly, the use of GRICS for respiratory motion correction allows an equivalent percentage improvement on lesion contrast, position and size, considering the PET simulated tumors as well as PET real tumors. This work demonstrates the potential interest of using GRICS for PET respiratory motion correction in combined PET/MR using shorter duration acquisitions without the need for 4D MRI and

  10. Respiratory Disease in Kennelled Dogs: Serological Responses to Bordetella bronchiseptica Lipopolysaccharide Do Not Correlate with Bacterial Isolation or Clinical Respiratory Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Chalker, Victoria J.; Toomey, Crista; Opperman, Shaun; Brooks, Harriet W.; Ibuoye, Michael A.; Brownlie, Joe; Rycroft, Andrew N.

    2003-01-01

    The role of Bordetella bronchiseptica in a natural outbreak of canine infectious respiratory disease was investigated both by culture and serological analysis. B. bronchiseptica was found in the lungs of a large proportion of clinically healthy dogs and in a greater proportion of dogs with respiratory disease. Using a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) antigen-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, we analyzed the serological responses of a large number of dogs. Dogs with high antibody levels showed no protection from disease, and there was no correlation between the development of disease and rising antibody titer. Similarly, there was no difference in antibody levels in dogs with and without B. bronchiseptica in the lungs. Antibodies to LPS have no predictive value in determining which animals will contract respiratory disease, how severe the disease will be, or which dogs will have B. bronchiseptica colonizing the lungs. PMID:12738630

  11. Functional respiratory imaging to assess the interaction between systemic roflumilast and inhaled ICS/LABA/LAMA

    PubMed Central

    Vos, Wim; Hajian, Bita; De Backer, Jan; Van Holsbeke, Cedric; Vinchurkar, Samir; Claes, Rita; Hufkens, Annemie; Parizel, Paul M; Bedert, Lieven; De Backer, Wilfried

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with COPD show a significant reduction of the lobar hyperinflation at the functional residual capacity level in the patients who improved >120 mL in forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) after 6 months of treatment with roflumilast in addition to inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs)/long-acting beta-2 agonists (LABAs)/long-acting muscarinic antagonists (LAMAs). Methods Functional respiratory imaging was used to quantify lobar hyperinflation, blood vessel density, ventilation, aerosol deposition, and bronchodilation. To investigate the exact mode of action of roflumilast, correlations between lobar and global measures have been tested using a mixed-model approach with nested random factors and Pearson correlation, respectively. Results The reduction in lobar hyperinflation appears to be associated with a larger blood vessel density in the respective lobes (t=−2.154, P=0.040); lobes with a higher percentage of blood vessels reduce more in hyperinflation in the responder group. Subsequently, it can be observed that lobes that reduce in hyperinflation after treatment are better ventilated (t=−5.368, P<0.001). Functional respiratory imaging (FRI)-based aerosol deposition showed that enhanced ventilation leads to more peripheral particle deposition of ICS/LABA/LAMA in the better-ventilated areas (t=2.407, P=0.024). Finally, the study showed that areas receiving more particles have increased FRI-based bronchodilation (t=2.564, P=0.017), leading to an increase in FEV1 (R=0.348, P=0.029). Conclusion The study demonstrated that orally administered roflumilast supports the reduction of regional hyperinflation in areas previously undertreated by inhalation medication. The local reduction in hyperinflation induces a redistribution of ventilation and aerosol deposition, leading to enhanced efficacy of the concomitant ICS/LABA/LAMA therapy. FRI appears to be a sensitive tool to describe the mode of action of novel compounds in chronic obstructive pulmonary

  12. Evaluation of respiratory and cardiac motion correction schemes in dual gated PET/CT cardiac imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Lamare, F. Fernandez, P.; Le Maitre, A.; Visvikis, D.; Dawood, M.; Schäfers, K. P.; Rimoldi, O. E.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Cardiac imaging suffers from both respiratory and cardiac motion. One of the proposed solutions involves double gated acquisitions. Although such an approach may lead to both respiratory and cardiac motion compensation there are issues associated with (a) the combination of data from cardiac and respiratory motion bins, and (b) poor statistical quality images as a result of using only part of the acquired data. The main objective of this work was to evaluate different schemes of combining binned data in order to identify the best strategy to reconstruct motion free cardiac images from dual gated positron emission tomography (PET) acquisitions. Methods: A digital phantom study as well as seven human studies were used in this evaluation. PET data were acquired in list mode (LM). A real-time position management system and an electrocardiogram device were used to provide the respiratory and cardiac motion triggers registered within the LM file. Acquired data were subsequently binned considering four and six cardiac gates, or the diastole only in combination with eight respiratory amplitude gates. PET images were corrected for attenuation, but no randoms nor scatter corrections were included. Reconstructed images from each of the bins considered above were subsequently used in combination with an affine or an elastic registration algorithm to derive transformation parameters allowing the combination of all acquired data in a particular position in the cardiac and respiratory cycles. Images were assessed in terms of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast, image profile, coefficient-of-variation (COV), and relative difference of the recovered activity concentration. Results: Regardless of the considered motion compensation strategy, the nonrigid motion model performed better than the affine model, leading to higher SNR and contrast combined with a lower COV. Nevertheless, when compensating for respiration only, no statistically significant differences were

  13. Respiratory failure in a mouse model of myotonic dystrophy does not correlate with the CTG repeat length.

    PubMed

    Panaite, Petrica-Adrian; Kuntzer, Thierry; Gourdon, Geneviève; Barakat-Walter, Ibtissam

    2013-10-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM1) is a multisystemic disease caused by an expansion of CTG repeats in the region of DMPK, the gene encoding DM protein kinase. The severity of muscle disability in DM1 correlates with the size of CTG expansion. As respiratory failure is one of the main causes of death in DM1, we investigated the correlation between respiratory impairment and size of the (CTG)n repeat in DM1 animal models. Using pressure plethysmography the respiratory function was assessed in control and transgenic mice carrying either 600 (DM600) or >1300 CTG repeats (DMSXL). The statistical analysis of respiratory parameters revealed that both DM1 transgenic mice sub-lines show respiratory impairment compared to control mice. In addition, there is no significant difference in breathing functions between the DM600 and DMSXL mice. In conclusion, these results indicate that respiratory impairment is present in both transgenic mice sub-lines, but the severity of respiratory failure is not related to the size of the (CTG)n expansion.

  14. High correlation of Middle East respiratory syndrome spread with Google search and Twitter trends in Korea.

    PubMed

    Shin, Soo-Yong; Seo, Dong-Woo; An, Jisun; Kwak, Haewoon; Kim, Sung-Han; Gwack, Jin; Jo, Min-Woo

    2016-09-06

    The Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) was exported to Korea in 2015, resulting in a threat to neighboring nations. We evaluated the possibility of using a digital surveillance system based on web searches and social media data to monitor this MERS outbreak. We collected the number of daily laboratory-confirmed MERS cases and quarantined cases from May 11, 2015 to June 26, 2015 using the Korean government MERS portal. The daily trends observed via Google search and Twitter during the same time period were also ascertained using Google Trends and Topsy. Correlations among the data were then examined using Spearman correlation analysis. We found high correlations (>0.7) between Google search and Twitter results and the number of confirmed MERS cases for the previous three days using only four simple keywords: "MERS", " ("MERS (in Korean)"), " ("MERS symptoms (in Korean)"), and " ("MERS hospital (in Korean)"). Additionally, we found high correlations between the Google search and Twitter results and the number of quarantined cases using the above keywords. This study demonstrates the possibility of using a digital surveillance system to monitor the outbreak of MERS.

  15. High correlation of Middle East respiratory syndrome spread with Google search and Twitter trends in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Soo-Yong; Seo, Dong-Woo; An, Jisun; Kwak, Haewoon; Kim, Sung-Han; Gwack, Jin; Jo, Min-Woo

    2016-01-01

    The Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) was exported to Korea in 2015, resulting in a threat to neighboring nations. We evaluated the possibility of using a digital surveillance system based on web searches and social media data to monitor this MERS outbreak. We collected the number of daily laboratory-confirmed MERS cases and quarantined cases from May 11, 2015 to June 26, 2015 using the Korean government MERS portal. The daily trends observed via Google search and Twitter during the same time period were also ascertained using Google Trends and Topsy. Correlations among the data were then examined using Spearman correlation analysis. We found high correlations (>0.7) between Google search and Twitter results and the number of confirmed MERS cases for the previous three days using only four simple keywords: “MERS”, “” (“MERS (in Korean)”), “” (“MERS symptoms (in Korean)”), and “” (“MERS hospital (in Korean)”). Additionally, we found high correlations between the Google search and Twitter results and the number of quarantined cases using the above keywords. This study demonstrates the possibility of using a digital surveillance system to monitor the outbreak of MERS. PMID:27595921

  16. Optimal control problem in correlation between smoking and epidemic of respiratory diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldila, D.; Apri, M.

    2014-02-01

    Smoking appears to be a risk factor that may increase the number of different pulmonary infections. This link is likely to be mediated by smoking adverse effects on the respiratory defenses. A mathematical model to describe correlation between the number of smokers and its effect on the number of infected people suffer from respiratory disease like influenza is constructed in this paper. Promotion of healthy life is accounted in the model as an optimal control problem to reduce the number of smokers. In this work, the transition rates from smokers to non-smokers and from non-smokers to smokers are regarded as the control variables. Assuming the control variables are constant, equilibrium points of the model can be obtained analytically. The basic reproductive ratio as the endemic threshold is taken from the spectral radius of the next-generation matrix. Using numerical simulation, we show that the healthy life promotion can reduce the number of infected person significantly by reducing the number of smokers. Furthermore, different initial conditions to show different situations in the field are also simulated. It is shown that a large effort to increase the transition rate from smokers to non-smokers and to reduce the transition from non-smokers to smokers should be applied in the endemic reduction scenario.

  17. Supine changes in lung function correlate with chronic respiratory failure in myotonic dystrophy patients.

    PubMed

    Poussel, Mathias; Kaminsky, Pierre; Renaud, Pierre; Laroppe, Julien; Pruna, Lelia; Chenuel, Bruno

    2014-03-01

    Quality of life and prognosis of patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1 (MD1) often depend on the degree of lung function impairment. This study was designed to assess the respective prevalence of ventilatory restriction, hypoxaemia and hypercapnia in MD1 patients and to determine whether postural changes in lung function could contribute to the early diagnosis of poor respiratory outcome. Fifty-eight patients (42.6±12.9 years) with MD1 were prospectively evaluated from April 2008 to June 2010 to determine their supine and upright lung function and arterial blood gases. The prevalence of ventilatory restriction was 36% and increased with the severity of muscular disability (from 7.7% to 70.6%). The prevalence of hypoxaemia and hypercapnia was 37.9% and 25.9%, respectively. Multiple regression analysis showed that the supine fall in FEV1 was the only variable associated with ventilatory restriction, hypoxaemia and hypercapnia. Our data indicate that supine evaluation of lung function could be helpful to predict poor respiratory outcome, which is closely correlated with hypoxaemia and/or hypercapnia.

  18. Geometrical Correlation and Matching of 2d Image Shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vizilter, Y. V.; Zheltov, S. Y.

    2012-07-01

    The problem of image correspondence measure selection for image comparison and matching is addressed. Many practical applications require image matching "just by shape" with no dependence on the concrete intensity or color values. Most popular technique for image shape comparison utilizes the mutual information measure based on probabilistic reasoning and information theory background. Another approach was proposed by Pytiev (so called "Pytiev morphology") based on geometrical and algebraic reasoning. In this framework images are considered as piecewise-constant 2D functions, tessellation of image frame by the set of non-intersected connected regions determines the "shape" of image and the projection of image onto the shape of other image is determined. Morphological image comparison is performed using the normalized morphological correlation coefficients. These coefficients estimate the closeness of one image to the shape of other image. Such image analysis technique can be characterized as an ""ntensity-to-geometry" matching. This paper generalizes the Pytiev morphological approach for obtaining the pure "geometry-to-geometry" matching techniques. The generalized intensity-geometrical correlation coefficient is proposed including the linear correlation coefficient and the square of Pytiev correlation coefficient as its partial cases. The morphological shape correlation coefficient is proposed based on the statistical averaging of images with the same shape. Centered morphological correlation coefficient is obtained under the condition of intensity centering of averaged images. Two types of symmetric geometrical normalized correlation coefficients are proposed for comparison of shape-tessellations. The technique for correlation and matching of shapes with ordered intensities is proposed with correlation measures invariant to monotonous intensity transformations. The quality of proposed geometrical correlation measures is experimentally estimated in the task of

  19. Effect of magnetic resonance imaging on human respiratory burst of neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Heine, J; Scheinichen, D; Jaeger, K; Herzog, T; Sümpelmann, R; Leuwer, M

    1999-03-05

    It is known that low intensity magnetic fields increase superoxide anion production during the respiratory burst of rat peritoneal neutrophils in vitro. We investigated whether the high intensity magnetic fields (1.5 T) during magnetic resonance imaging can influence the human neutrophil function under in vivo conditions. Blood samples were obtained from 12 patients immediately before and after magnetic resonance imaging (mean time 27.6(+/-11.4 min)). The induced respiratory burst was investigated by the intracellular oxidative transformation of dihydrorhodamine 123 to the fluorescent dye rhodamine 123 via flow cytometry. The respiratory burst was induced either with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, Escherichia coli, N-formyl-methionyl-leucylphenylalanine or priming with tumor necrosis factor followed by FMLP stimulation. There was no significant difference between the respiratory burst before and after magnetic resonance imaging, irrespective of the stimulating agent. Short time exposure to a high intensity magnetic field during magnetic resonance imaging seems not to influence the production of radical species in living neutrophils.

  20. Fast CT-CT fluoroscopy registration with respiratory motion compensation for image-guided lung intervention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Po; Xue, Zhong; Lu, Kongkuo; Yang, Jianhua; Wong, Stephen T.

    2012-02-01

    CT-fluoroscopy (CTF) is an efficient imaging method for guiding percutaneous lung interventions such as biopsy. During CTF-guided biopsy procedure, four to ten axial sectional images are captured in a very short time period to provide nearly real-time feedback to physicians, so that they can adjust the needle as it is advanced toward the target lesion. Although popularly used in clinics, this traditional CTF-guided intervention procedure may require frequent scans and cause unnecessary radiation exposure to clinicians and patients. In addition, CTF only generates limited slices of images and provides limited anatomical information. It also has limited response to respiratory movements and has narrow local anatomical dynamics. To better utilize CTF guidance, we propose a fast CT-CTF registration algorithm with respiratory motion estimation for image-guided lung intervention using electromagnetic (EM) guidance. With the pre-procedural exhale and inhale CT scans, it would be possible to estimate a series of CT images of the same patient at different respiratory phases. Then, once a CTF image is captured during the intervention, our algorithm can pick the best respiratory phase-matched 3D CT image and performs a fast deformable registration to warp the 3D CT toward the CTF. The new 3D CT image can be used to guide the intervention by superimposing the EM-guided needle location on it. Compared to the traditional repetitive CTF guidance, the registered CT integrates both 3D volumetric patient data and nearly real-time local anatomy for more effective and efficient guidance. In this new system, CTF is used as a nearly real-time sensor to overcome the discrepancies between static pre-procedural CT and the patient's anatomy, so as to provide global guidance that may be supplemented with electromagnetic (EM) tracking and to reduce the number of CTF scans needed. In the experiments, the comparative results showed that our fast CT-CTF algorithm can achieve better registration

  1. Digital Image Correlation for Performance Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaviccini, Miguel; Turner, Dan; Herzberg, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Evaluating the health of a mechanism requires more than just a binary evaluation of whether an operation was completed. It requires analyzing more comprehensive, full-field data. Health monitoring is a process of non-destructively identifying characteristics that indicate the fitness of an engineered component. In order to monitor unit health in a production setting, an automated test system must be created to capture the motion of mechanism parts in a real-time and non-intrusive manner. One way to accomplish this is by using high-speed video and Digital Image Correlation (DIC). In this approach, individual frames of the video are analyzed to track the motion of mechanism components. The derived performance metrics allow for state-of-health monitoring and improved fidelity of mechanism modeling. The results are in-situ state-of-health identification and performance prediction. This paper introduces basic concepts of this test method, and discusses two main themes: the use of laser marking to add fiducial patterns to mechanism components, and new software developed to track objects with complex shapes, even as they move behind obstructions. Finally, the implementation of these tests into an automated tester is discussed.

  2. Digital Image Correlation for Performance Monitoring.

    SciTech Connect

    Palaviccini, Miguel; Turner, Daniel Z.; Herzberg, Michael

    2016-02-01

    Evaluating the health of a mechanism requires more than just a binary evaluation of whether an operation was completed. It requires analyzing more comprehensive, full-field data. Health monitoring is a process of nondestructively identifying characteristics that indicate the fitness of an engineered component. In order to monitor unit health in a production setting, an automated test system must be created to capture the motion of mechanism parts in a real-time and non-intrusive manner. One way to accomplish this is by using high-speed video (HSV) and Digital Image Correlation (DIC). In this approach, individual frames of the video are analyzed to track the motion of mechanism components. The derived performance metrics allow for state-of-health monitoring and improved fidelity of mechanism modeling. The results are in-situ state-of-health identification and performance prediction. This paper introduces basic concepts of this test method, and discusses two main themes: the use of laser marking to add fiducial patterns to mechanism components, and new software developed to track objects with complex shapes, even as they move behind obstructions. Finally, the implementation of these tests into an automated tester is discussed.

  3. High speed image correlation for vibration analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebert, T.; Wood, R.; Splitthof, K.

    2009-08-01

    Digital speckle correlation techniques have already been successfully proven to be an accurate displacement analysis tool for a wide range of applications. With the use of two cameras, three dimensional measurements of contours and displacements can be carried out. With a simple setup it opens a wide range of applications. Rapid new developments in the field of digital imaging and computer technology opens further applications for these measurement methods to high speed deformation and strain analysis, e.g. in the fields of material testing, fracture mechanics, advanced materials and component testing. The high resolution of the deformation measurements in space and time opens a wide range of applications for vibration analysis of objects. Since the system determines the absolute position and displacements of the object in space, it is capable of measuring high amplitudes and even objects with rigid body movements. The absolute resolution depends on the field of view and is scalable. Calibration of the optical setup is a crucial point which will be discussed in detail. Examples of the analysis of harmonic vibration and transient events from material research and industrial applications are presented. The results show typical features of the system.

  4. Reconstruction-Incorporated Respiratory Motion Correction in Clinical Simultaneous PET/MR Imaging for Oncology Applications.

    PubMed

    Fayad, Hadi; Schmidt, Holger; Wuerslin, Christian; Visvikis, Dimitris

    2015-06-01

    Simultaneous PET and MR imaging is a promising new technique allowing the fusion of functional (PET) and anatomic/functional (MR) information. In the thoracic-abdominal regions, respiratory motion is a major challenge leading to reduced quantitative and qualitative image accuracy. Correction methodologies include the use of gated frames that lead to low signal-to-noise ratio considering the associated low statistics. More advanced correction approaches, previously developed for PET/CT imaging, consist of either registering all the reconstructed gated frames to the reference frame or incorporating motion parameters into the iterative reconstruction process to produce a single motion-compensated PET image. The goal of this work was to compare these two—previously implemented in PET/CT—correction approaches within the context of PET/MR motion correction for oncology applications using clinical 4-dimensional PET/MR acquisitions. Two different correction approaches were evaluated comparing the incorporation of elastic transformations extracted from 4-dimensional MR imaging datasets during PET list-mode image reconstruction to a postreconstruction image-based approach. Eleven patient datasets acquired on a PET/MR system were used. T1-weighted 4D MR images were registered to the end-expiration image using a nonrigid B-spline registration algorithm to derive deformation matrices accounting for respiratory motion. The derived matrices were subsequently incorporated within a PET image reconstruction of the original emission list-mode data (reconstruction space [RS] method). The corrected images were compared with those produced by applying the deformation matrices in the image space (IS method) followed by summing the realigned gated frames, as well as with uncorrected motion-averaged images. Both correction techniques led to significant improvement in accounting for respiratory motion artifacts when compared with uncorrected motion-averaged images. These improvements

  5. Spatial Correlation Coefficient Images for Ultrasonic Detection (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-01

    for image formation and detection based on the similarity of adjacent signals. Signal similarity is quantified in terms of the correlation coefficient calculated...between A-scans digitized at adjacent measurement positions. Correlation coefficient images are introduced for visualizing the similarity...beam field with the defect. Correlation coefficient and C-scan images are shown to demonstrate flat-bottom-hole detection in a stainless steel annular

  6. Investigation of undersampling and reconstruction algorithm dependence on respiratory correlated 4D-MRI for online MR-guided radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickevicius, Nikolai J.; Paulson, Eric S.

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this work is to investigate the effects of undersampling and reconstruction algorithm on the total processing time and image quality of respiratory phase-resolved 4D MRI data. Specifically, the goal is to obtain quality 4D-MRI data with a combined acquisition and reconstruction time of five minutes or less, which we reasoned would be satisfactory for pre-treatment 4D-MRI in online MRI-gRT. A 3D stack-of-stars, self-navigated, 4D-MRI acquisition was used to scan three healthy volunteers at three image resolutions and two scan durations. The NUFFT, CG-SENSE, SPIRiT, and XD-GRASP reconstruction algorithms were used to reconstruct each dataset on a high performance reconstruction computer. The overall image quality, reconstruction time, artifact prevalence, and motion estimates were compared. The CG-SENSE and XD-GRASP reconstructions provided superior image quality over the other algorithms. The combination of a 3D SoS sequence and parallelized reconstruction algorithms using computing hardware more advanced than those typically seen on product MRI scanners, can result in acquisition and reconstruction of high quality respiratory correlated 4D-MRI images in less than five minutes.

  7. Temporal correlation of optical coherence tomography in-vivo images of rabbit airway for the diagnosis of edema

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, DongYel; Wang, Alex; Tjoa, Tjoson; Volgger, Veronika; Hamamoto, Ashley; Su, Erica; Jing, Joseph; Chen, Zhongping; Wong, Brian J. F.

    2014-03-01

    Recently, full-range optical coherence tomography (OCT) systems have been developed to image the human airway. These novel systems utilize a fiber-based OCT probe which acquires three-dimensional (3-D) images with micrometer resolution. Following an airway injury, mucosal edema is the first step in the body's inflammatory response, which occasionally leads to airway stenosis, a life-threatening condition for critically ill newborns. Therefore, early detection of edema is vital for airway management and prevention of stenosis. In order to examine the potential of the full-range OCT to diagnose edema, we investigated temporal correlation of OCT images obtained from the subglottic airway of live rabbits. Temporally correlated OCT images were acquired at fixed locations in the rabbit subglottis of either artificially induced edema or normal tissues. Edematous tissue was experimentally modeled by injecting saline beneath the epithelial layer of the subglottic mucosa. The calculated cross temporal correlations between OCT images of normal airway regions show periodicity that correlates with the respiratory motion of the airway. However, the temporal correlation functions calculated from OCT images of the edematous regions show randomness without the periodic characteristic. These in-vivo experimental results of temporal correlations between OCT images show the potential of a computer-based or -aided diagnosis of edema in the human respiratory mucosa with a full-range OCT system.

  8. Calcium imaging of neuronal activity in the most rostral parafacial respiratory group of the newborn rat.

    PubMed

    Onimaru, Hiroshi; Dutschmann, Mathias

    2012-01-01

    The parafacial respiratory group (pFRG) is thought to be involved in respiratory rhythm generation in neonates. This subgroup expresses the transcription factor, Phox2b, and contains intrinsically CO(2) sensitive neurons. Calcium imaging has been widely used for analysis of neuronal activity at the cellular and network level. In the present study, we applied calcium imaging to analyze neuronal activity of the most-rostral pFRG in an in vitro brainstem-spinal cord preparation from neonatal rats. We detected strong pre-inspiratory neuron activity in the most rostral pFRG, suggesting that significant numbers of pre-inspiratory neurons are localized in the ventrolateral medulla near the rostral end of the medulla. We show that usage of calcium imaging would be very useful for analysis of neuronal activity over different time scales, and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of this method.

  9. Imaging and dosimetric errors in 4D PET/CT-guided radiotherapy from patient-specific respiratory patterns: a dynamic motion phantom end-to-end study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, S. R.; Nyflot, M. J.; Herrmann, C.; Groh, C. M.; Meyer, J.; Wollenweber, S. D.; Stearns, C. W.; Kinahan, P. E.; Sandison, G. A.

    2015-05-01

    Effective positron emission tomography / computed tomography (PET/CT) guidance in radiotherapy of lung cancer requires estimation and mitigation of errors due to respiratory motion. An end-to-end workflow was developed to measure patient-specific motion-induced uncertainties in imaging, treatment planning, and radiation delivery with respiratory motion phantoms and dosimeters. A custom torso phantom with inserts mimicking normal lung tissue and lung lesion was filled with [18F]FDG. The lung lesion insert was driven by six different patient-specific respiratory patterns or kept stationary. PET/CT images were acquired under motionless ground truth, tidal breathing motion-averaged (3D), and respiratory phase-correlated (4D) conditions. Target volumes were estimated by standardized uptake value (SUV) thresholds that accurately defined the ground-truth lesion volume. Non-uniform dose-painting plans using volumetrically modulated arc therapy were optimized for fixed normal lung and spinal cord objectives and variable PET-based target objectives. Resulting plans were delivered to a cylindrical diode array at rest, in motion on a platform driven by the same respiratory patterns (3D), or motion-compensated by a robotic couch with an infrared camera tracking system (4D). Errors were estimated relative to the static ground truth condition for mean target-to-background (T/Bmean) ratios, target volumes, planned equivalent uniform target doses, and 2%-2 mm gamma delivery passing rates. Relative to motionless ground truth conditions, PET/CT imaging errors were on the order of 10-20%, treatment planning errors were 5-10%, and treatment delivery errors were 5-30% without motion compensation. Errors from residual motion following compensation methods were reduced to 5-10% in PET/CT imaging, <5% in treatment planning, and <2% in treatment delivery. We have demonstrated that estimation of respiratory motion uncertainty and its propagation from PET/CT imaging to RT planning, and RT

  10. Imaging and dosimetric errors in 4D PET/CT-guided radiotherapy from patient-specific respiratory patterns: a dynamic motion phantom end-to-end study.

    PubMed

    Bowen, S R; Nyflot, M J; Herrmann, C; Groh, C M; Meyer, J; Wollenweber, S D; Stearns, C W; Kinahan, P E; Sandison, G A

    2015-05-07

    Effective positron emission tomography / computed tomography (PET/CT) guidance in radiotherapy of lung cancer requires estimation and mitigation of errors due to respiratory motion. An end-to-end workflow was developed to measure patient-specific motion-induced uncertainties in imaging, treatment planning, and radiation delivery with respiratory motion phantoms and dosimeters. A custom torso phantom with inserts mimicking normal lung tissue and lung lesion was filled with [(18)F]FDG. The lung lesion insert was driven by six different patient-specific respiratory patterns or kept stationary. PET/CT images were acquired under motionless ground truth, tidal breathing motion-averaged (3D), and respiratory phase-correlated (4D) conditions. Target volumes were estimated by standardized uptake value (SUV) thresholds that accurately defined the ground-truth lesion volume. Non-uniform dose-painting plans using volumetrically modulated arc therapy were optimized for fixed normal lung and spinal cord objectives and variable PET-based target objectives. Resulting plans were delivered to a cylindrical diode array at rest, in motion on a platform driven by the same respiratory patterns (3D), or motion-compensated by a robotic couch with an infrared camera tracking system (4D). Errors were estimated relative to the static ground truth condition for mean target-to-background (T/Bmean) ratios, target volumes, planned equivalent uniform target doses, and 2%-2 mm gamma delivery passing rates. Relative to motionless ground truth conditions, PET/CT imaging errors were on the order of 10-20%, treatment planning errors were 5-10%, and treatment delivery errors were 5-30% without motion compensation. Errors from residual motion following compensation methods were reduced to 5-10% in PET/CT imaging, <5% in treatment planning, and <2% in treatment delivery. We have demonstrated that estimation of respiratory motion uncertainty and its propagation from PET/CT imaging to RT planning, and

  11. Imaging and dosimetric errors in 4D PET/CT-guided radiotherapy from patient-specific respiratory patterns: a dynamic motion phantom end-to-end study

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, S R; Nyflot, M J; Hermann, C; Groh, C; Meyer, J; Wollenweber, S D; Stearns, C W; Kinahan, P E; Sandison, G A

    2015-01-01

    Effective positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) guidance in radiotherapy of lung cancer requires estimation and mitigation of errors due to respiratory motion. An end-to-end workflow was developed to measure patient-specific motion-induced uncertainties in imaging, treatment planning, and radiation delivery with respiratory motion phantoms and dosimeters. A custom torso phantom with inserts mimicking normal lung tissue and lung lesion was filled with [18F]FDG. The lung lesion insert was driven by 6 different patient-specific respiratory patterns or kept stationary. PET/CT images were acquired under motionless ground truth, tidal breathing motion-averaged (3D), and respiratory phase-correlated (4D) conditions. Target volumes were estimated by standardized uptake value (SUV) thresholds that accurately defined the ground-truth lesion volume. Non-uniform dose-painting plans using volumetrically modulated arc therapy (VMAT) were optimized for fixed normal lung and spinal cord objectives and variable PET-based target objectives. Resulting plans were delivered to a cylindrical diode array at rest, in motion on a platform driven by the same respiratory patterns (3D), or motion-compensated by a robotic couch with an infrared camera tracking system (4D). Errors were estimated relative to the static ground truth condition for mean target-to-background (T/Bmean) ratios, target volumes, planned equivalent uniform target doses (EUD), and 2%-2mm gamma delivery passing rates. Relative to motionless ground truth conditions, PET/CT imaging errors were on the order of 10–20%, treatment planning errors were 5–10%, and treatment delivery errors were 5–30% without motion compensation. Errors from residual motion following compensation methods were reduced to 5–10% in PET/CT imaging, < 5% in treatment planning, and < 2% in treatment delivery. We have demonstrated that estimation of respiratory motion uncertainty and its propagation from PET/CT imaging to RT

  12. Gravity correlation imaging with a moving data window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Feng

    2015-01-01

    As a kind of imaging technique, correlation imaging of potential data can be used to determine the shape and position of sources approximately. In order to improve the resolution of correlation imaging results, I adopted a strategy similar to Euler deconvolution method. This method includes three steps. First, calculate the vertical gradient of gravity anomaly. Then add a moving data window to the correlation imaging procedure. At last, search the local maximum or minimum of the results and output the extreme points that meet the acceptance criterion. In the synthetic model tests, the resolution of correlation imaging is improved. Compared with the Euler deconvolution, the results are closer to the centers of the models. In a case study of a sylvite mine gravity survey in Yunnan Province, China, the positions of extreme points of correlation imaging are in the range of the ore zone defined by drills.

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Cerebral Aspergillosis: Imaging and Pathological Correlations

    PubMed Central

    Sabou, Marcela; Lannes, Béatrice; Cotton, François; Meyronet, David; Galanaud, Damien; Cottier, Jean-Philippe; Grand, Sylvie; Desal, Hubert; Kreutz, Julie; Schenck, Maleka; Meyer, Nicolas; Schneider, Francis; Dietemann, Jean-Louis; Koob, Meriam

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral aspergillosis is associated with a significant morbidity and mortality rate. The imaging data present different patterns and no full consensus exists on typical imaging characteristics of the cerebral lesions. We reviewed MRI findings in 21 patients with cerebral aspergillosis and correlated them to the immune status of the patients and to neuropathological findings when tissue was available. The lesions were characterized by their number, topography, and MRI signal. Dissemination to the brain resulted from direct spread from paranasal sinuses in 8 patients, 6 of them being immunocompetent. Hematogenous dissemination was observed in 13 patients, all were immunosuppressed. In this later group we identified a total of 329 parenchymal abscesses involving the whole brain with a predilection for the corticomedullary junction. More than half the patients had a corpus callosum lesion. Hemorrhagic lesions accounted for 13% and contrast enhancement was observed in 61% of the lesions. Patients with hematogenous dissemination were younger (p = 0.003), had more intracranial lesions (p = 0.0004) and had a higher 12-week mortality rate (p = 0.046) than patients with direct spread from paranasal sinuses. Analysis of 12 aneurysms allowed us to highlight two distinct situations. In case of direct spread from the paranasal sinuses, aneurysms are saccular and located on the proximal artery portions, while the hematogenous dissemination in immunocompromised patients is more frequently associated with distal and fusiform aneurysms. MRI is the exam of choice for cerebral aspergillosis. Number and type of lesions are different according to the mode of dissemination of the infection. PMID:27097323

  14. A generalized framework unifying image registration and respiratory motion models and incorporating image reconstruction, for partial image data or full images.

    PubMed

    McClelland, Jamie R; Modat, Marc; Arridge, Simon; Grimes, Helen; D'Souza, Derek; Thomas, David; O'Connell, Dylan; Low, Daniel; Kaza, Evangelia; Collins, David; Leach, Martin; Hawkes, David

    2017-02-14

    Surrogate-driven respiratory motion models relate the motion of the internal anatomy to easily acquired respiratory surrogate signals, such as the motion of the skin surface. They are usually built by first using image registration to determine the motion from a number of dynamic images, and then fitting a correspondence model relating the motion to the surrogate signals. In this paper we present a generalized framework that unifies the image registration and correspondence model fitting into a single optimization. This allows the use of 'partial' imaging data, such as individual slices, projections, or k-space data, where it would not be possible to determine the motion from an individual frame of data. Motion compensated image reconstruction can also be incorporated using an iterative approach, so that both the motion and a motion-free image can be estimated from the partial image data. The framework has been applied to real 4DCT, Cine CT, multi-slice CT, and multi-slice MR data, as well as simulated datasets from a computer phantom. This includes the use of a super-resolution reconstruction method for the multi-slice MR data. Good results were obtained for all datasets, including quantitative results for the 4DCT and phantom datasets where the ground truth motion was known or could be estimated.

  15. A generalized framework unifying image registration and respiratory motion models and incorporating image reconstruction, for partial image data or full images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClelland, Jamie R.; Modat, Marc; Arridge, Simon; Grimes, Helen; D'Souza, Derek; Thomas, David; O' Connell, Dylan; Low, Daniel A.; Kaza, Evangelia; Collins, David J.; Leach, Martin O.; Hawkes, David J.

    2017-06-01

    Surrogate-driven respiratory motion models relate the motion of the internal anatomy to easily acquired respiratory surrogate signals, such as the motion of the skin surface. They are usually built by first using image registration to determine the motion from a number of dynamic images, and then fitting a correspondence model relating the motion to the surrogate signals. In this paper we present a generalized framework that unifies the image registration and correspondence model fitting into a single optimization. This allows the use of ‘partial’ imaging data, such as individual slices, projections, or k-space data, where it would not be possible to determine the motion from an individual frame of data. Motion compensated image reconstruction can also be incorporated using an iterative approach, so that both the motion and a motion-free image can be estimated from the partial image data. The framework has been applied to real 4DCT, Cine CT, multi-slice CT, and multi-slice MR data, as well as simulated datasets from a computer phantom. This includes the use of a super-resolution reconstruction method for the multi-slice MR data. Good results were obtained for all datasets, including quantitative results for the 4DCT and phantom datasets where the ground truth motion was known or could be estimated.

  16. Correlated Imaging – A Grand Challenge in Chemical Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Masyuko, Rachel; Lanni, Eric; Sweedler, Jonathan V.; Bohn, Paul W.

    2013-01-01

    Correlated chemical imaging is an emerging strategy for acquisition of images by combining information from multiplexed measurement platforms to track, visualize, and interpret in situ changes in the structure, organization, and activities of interesting chemical systems, frequently spanning multiple decades in space and time. Acquiring and correlating information from complementary imaging experiments has the potential to expose complex chemical behavior in ways that are simply not available from single methods applied in isolation, thereby greatly amplifying the information gathering power of imaging experiments. However, in order to correlate image information across platforms, a number of issues must be addressed. First, signals are obtained from disparate experiments with fundamentally different figures of merit, including pixel size, spatial resolution, dynamic range, and acquisition rates. In addition, images are often acquired on different instruments in different locations, so the sample must be registered spatially so that the same area of the sample landscape is addressed. The signals acquired must be correlated in both spatial and temporal domains, and the resulting information has to be presented in a way that is readily understood. These requirements pose special challenges for image cross-correlation that go well beyond those posed in single technique imaging approaches. The special opportunities and challenges that attend correlated imaging are explored by specific reference to correlated mass spectrometric and Raman imaging, a topic of substantial and growing interest. PMID:23431559

  17. CT correlation with outcomes in 15 patients with acute Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus.

    PubMed

    Das, Karuna M; Lee, Edward Y; Enani, Mushira A; AlJawder, Suhaila E; Singh, Rajvir; Bashir, Salman; Al-Nakshbandi, Nizar; AlDossari, Khalid; Larsson, Sven G

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this article is to retrospectively analyze chest CT findings for 15 patients with Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus and to identify features associated with survival. Patients were assigned to group 1 if they died (n=9) and to group 2 if they made a full recovery (n=6). Two reviewers scored chest radiographs and CT examinations for segmental involvement, ground-glass opacities, consolidation, and interstitial thickening. Eight patients had ground-glass opacity (53%), five had ground-glass and consolidation in combination (33%), five had pleural effusion (33%), and four patients had interlobular thickening (27%). Of 281 CT findings, 151 (54%) were peripheral, 68 (24%) were central, and 62 (22%) had a mixed location. The number of involved lung segments was higher in group 1. The lower lobe was more commonly involved (mean, 12.2 segments) than in the upper and middle lobes combined (mean, 6.3 segments). The mean number of lung segments involved was 12.3 segments in group 1 and 3.4 segments in group 2. The CT lung score (mean±SD, 15.78±7.9 vs 7.3±5.7, p=0.003), chest radiographic score (20.8±1.7 vs 5.6±5.4; p=0.001), and mechanical ventilation duration (13.11±8.3 vs 0.5±1.2 days; p=0.002) were higher in group 1. All nine group 1 patients and three of six group 2 patients had pleural effusion (p=0.52). CT of patients with Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus predominantly showed ground-glass opacities, with peripheral lower lobe preference. Pleural effusion and higher CT lung and chest radiographic scores correlate with poor prognosis and short-term mortality.

  18. Four-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Using Axial Body Area as Respiratory Surrogate: Initial Patient Results

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Juan; Cai, Jing; Wang, Hongjun; Chang, Zheng; Czito, Brian G.; Bashir, Mustafa R.; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of a retrospective binning technique for 4-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (4D-MRI) using body area (BA) as a respiratory surrogate. Methods and Materials: Seven patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (4 of 7) or liver metastases (3 of 7) were enrolled in an institutional review board-approved prospective study. All patients were simulated with both computed tomography (CT) and MRI to acquire 3-dimensinal and 4D images for treatment planning. Multiple-slice multiple-phase cine-MR images were acquired in the axial plane for 4D-MRI reconstruction. Image acquisition time per slice was set to 10-15 seconds. Single-slice 2-dimensinal cine-MR images were also acquired across the center of the tumor in orthogonal planes. Tumor motion trajectories from 4D-MRI, cine-MRI, and 4D-CT were analyzed in the superior–inferior (SI), anterior–posterior (AP), and medial–lateral (ML) directions, respectively. Their correlation coefficients (CC) and differences in tumor motion amplitude were determined. Tumor-to-liver contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was measured and compared between 4D-CT, 4D-MRI, and conventional T2-weighted fast spin echo MRI. Results: The means (±standard deviations) of CC comparing 4D-MRI with cine-MRI were 0.97 ± 0.03, 0.97 ± 0.02, and 0.99 ± 0.04 in SI, AP, and ML directions, respectively. The mean differences were 0.61 ± 0.17 mm, 0.32 ± 0.17 mm, and 0.14 ± 0.06 mm in SI, AP, and ML directions, respectively. The means of CC comparing 4D-MRI and 4D-CT were 0.95 ± 0.02, 0.94 ± 0.02, and 0.96 ± 0.02 in SI, AP, and ML directions, respectively. The mean differences were 0.74 ± 0.02 mm, 0.33 ± 0.13 mm, and 0.18 ± 0.07 mm in SI, AP, and ML directions, respectively. The mean tumor-to-tissue CNRs were 2.94 ± 1.51, 19.44 ± 14.63, and 39.47 ± 20.81 in 4D-CT, 4D-MRI, and T2-weighted MRI, respectively. Conclusions: The preliminary evaluation of our 4D-MRI technique results in oncologic patients demonstrates its

  19. A finite state model for respiratory motion analysis in image guided radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Huanmei; Sharp, Gregory C.; Salzberg, Betty; Kaeli, David; Shirato, Hiroki; Jiang, Steve B.

    2004-12-01

    Effective image guided radiation treatment of a moving tumour requires adequate information on respiratory motion characteristics. For margin expansion, beam tracking and respiratory gating, the tumour motion must be quantified for pretreatment planning and monitored on-line. We propose a finite state model for respiratory motion analysis that captures our natural understanding of breathing stages. In this model, a regular breathing cycle is represented by three line segments, exhale, end-of-exhale and inhale, while abnormal breathing is represented by an irregular breathing state. In addition, we describe an on-line implementation of this model in one dimension. We found this model can accurately characterize a wide variety of patient breathing patterns. This model was used to describe the respiratory motion for 23 patients with peak-to-peak motion greater than 7 mm. The average root mean square error over all patients was less than 1 mm and no patient has an error worse than 1.5 mm. Our model provides a convenient tool to quantify respiratory motion characteristics, such as patterns of frequency changes and amplitude changes, and can be applied to internal or external motion, including internal tumour position, abdominal surface, diaphragm, spirometry and other surrogates.

  20. Patient specific respiratory motion modeling using a limited number of 3D lung CT images.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xueli; Gao, Xin; Xia, Wei; Liu, Yangchuan; Liang, Zhiyuan

    2014-01-01

    To build a patient specific respiratory motion model with a low dose, a novel method was proposed that uses a limited number of 3D lung CT volumes with an external respiratory signal. 4D lung CT volumes were acquired for patients with in vitro labeling on the upper abdominal surface. Meanwhile, 3D coordinates of in vitro labeling were measured as external respiratory signals. A sequential correspondence between the 4D lung CT and the external respiratory signal was built using the distance correlation method, and a 3D displacement for every registration control point in the CT volumes with respect to time can be obtained by the 4D lung CT deformable registration. A temporal fitting was performed for every registration control point displacements and an external respiratory signal in the anterior-posterior direction respectively to draw their fitting curves. Finally, a linear regression was used to fit the corresponding samples of the control point displacement fitting curves and the external respiratory signal fitting curve to finish the pulmonary respiration modeling. Compared to a B-spline-based method using the respiratory signal phase, the proposed method is highly advantageous as it offers comparable modeling accuracy and target modeling error (TME); while at the same time, the proposed method requires 70% less 3D lung CTs. When using a similar amount of 3D lung CT data, the mean of the proposed method's TME is smaller than the mean of the PCA (principle component analysis)-based methods' TMEs. The results indicate that the proposed method is successful in striking a balance between modeling accuracy and number of 3D lung CT volumes.

  1. The feasibility of the auto tuning respiratory compensation system with ultrasonic image tracking technique.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Ho-Chiao; Hsu, Hsiao-Yu; Nieh, Shu-Kan; Tien, Der-Chi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the feasibility of using the analytical technique of ultrasound images in combination with an auto tumor localization system. During respiration, the activity of breathing in and out causes organs displacement at the lower lobe of the lung, and the maximum displacement range happens in the Superior-Inferior (SI) direction. Therefore, in this study all the tumor positioning is in SI direction under respiratory compensation, in which the compensations are carried out to the organs at the lower lobe and adjacent to the lower lobe of lung.In this research, due to the processes of ultrasound imaging generation, image analysis and signal transmission, when the captured respiratory signals are sent to auto tumor localization system, there was a signal time delay. The total delay time of the entire signal transmission process was 0.254 ± 0.023 seconds (with the lowest standard deviation) after implementing a series of analyses. To compensate for this signal delay time (0.254 ± 0.023 sec), a phase lead compensator (PLC) was designed and built into the auto tumor localization system. By analyzing the impact of the delay time and the respiratory waveforms under different frequencies on the phase lead compensator, an overall system delay time can be configured. Results showed as the respiratory frequency increased, variable value ``a'' and the subsequent gain ``k'' in the controller becomes larger. Moreover, value ``a'' and ``k'' increased as the system delay time increased when the respiratory frequency was fixed. The relationship of value ``a'' and ``k'' to the respiratory frequency can be obtained by using the curve fitting method to compensate for the respiratory motion for tumor localization. Through the comparison of the uncompensated signal and the compensated signal performed by the auto tumor localization system on the simulated respiratory signal, the feasibility of using ultrasound image analysis technology combined with the

  2. Real-Time Target Position Estimation Using Stereoscopic Kilovoltage/Megavoltage Imaging and External Respiratory Monitoring for Dynamic Multileaf Collimator Tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Byungchul; Poulsen, Per Rugaard; Sawant, Amit; Ruan, Dan; Keall, Paul J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a real-time target position estimation method using stereoscopic kilovoltage (kV)/megavoltage (MV) imaging and external respiratory monitoring, and to investigate the performance of a dynamic multileaf collimator tracking system using this method. Methods and Materials: The real-time three-dimensional internal target position estimation was established by creating a time-varying correlation model that connected the external respiratory signals with the internal target motion measured intermittently using kV/MV imaging. The method was integrated into a dynamic multileaf collimator tracking system. Tracking experiments were performed for 10 thoracic/abdominal traces. A three-dimensional motion platform carrying a gold marker and a separate one-dimensional motion platform were used to reproduce the target and external respiratory motion, respectively. The target positions were detected by kV (1 Hz) and MV (5.2 Hz) imaging, and external respiratory motion was captured by an optical system (30 Hz). The beam-target alignment error was quantified as the positional difference between the target and circular beam center on the MV images acquired during tracking. The correlation model error was quantified by comparing a model estimate and measured target positions. Results: The root-mean-square errors in the beam-target alignment that had ranged from 3.1 to 7.6 mm without tracking were reduced to <1.5 mm with tracking, except during the model building period (6 s). The root-mean-square error in the correlation model was submillimeters in all directions. Conclusion: A novel real-time target position estimation method was developed and integrated into a dynamic multileaf collimator tracking system and demonstrated an average submillimeter geometric accuracy after initializing the internal/external correlation model. The method used hardware tools available on linear accelerators and therefore shows promise for clinical implementation.

  3. Reconstruction of implanted marker trajectories from cone-beam CT projection images using interdimensional correlation modeling.

    PubMed

    Chung, Hyekyun; Poulsen, Per Rugaard; Keall, Paul J; Cho, Seungryong; Cho, Byungchul

    2016-08-01

    Cone-beam CT (CBCT) is a widely used imaging modality for image-guided radiotherapy. Most vendors provide CBCT systems that are mounted on a linac gantry. Thus, CBCT can be used to estimate the actual 3-dimensional (3D) position of moving respiratory targets in the thoracic/abdominal region using 2D projection images. The authors have developed a method for estimating the 3D trajectory of respiratory-induced target motion from CBCT projection images using interdimensional correlation modeling. Because the superior-inferior (SI) motion of a target can be easily analyzed on projection images of a gantry-mounted CBCT system, the authors investigated the interdimensional correlation of the SI motion with left-right and anterior-posterior (AP) movements while the gantry is rotating. A simple linear model and a state-augmented model were implemented and applied to the interdimensional correlation analysis, and their performance was compared. The parameters of the interdimensional correlation models were determined by least-square estimation of the 2D error between the actual and estimated projected target position. The method was validated using 160 3D tumor trajectories from 46 thoracic/abdominal cancer patients obtained during CyberKnife treatment. The authors' simulations assumed two application scenarios: (1) retrospective estimation for the purpose of moving tumor setup used just after volumetric matching with CBCT; and (2) on-the-fly estimation for the purpose of real-time target position estimation during gating or tracking delivery, either for full-rotation volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in 60 s or a stationary six-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with a beam delivery time of 20 s. For the retrospective CBCT simulations, the mean 3D root-mean-square error (RMSE) for all 4893 trajectory segments was 0.41 mm (simple linear model) and 0.35 mm (state-augmented model). In the on-the-fly simulations, prior projections over more than 60

  4. Algorithm for image fusion via gradient correlation and difference statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jing; Wang, Li-juan; Zhang, Yi; Bai, Lian-fa; Mao, Ningjie

    2016-10-01

    In order to overcome the shortcoming of traditional image fusion based on discrete wavelet transform (DWT), a novel image fusion algorithm based on gradient correlation and difference statistics is proposed in this paper. The source images are decomposed into low-frequency coefficients and high-frequency coefficients by DWT: the former are fused by a local gradient correlation based scheme to extract the local feature information in source images; the latter are fused by a neighbor difference statistics based scheme to reserve the conspicuous edge information. Finally, the fused image is reconstructed by inverse DWT. Experimental results show that the proposed method performs better than other methods in reserving details.

  5. Characterization of SEM speckle pattern marking and imaging distortion by digital image correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guery, Adrien; Latourte, Félix; Hild, François; Roux, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    Surface patterning by e-beam lithography and scanning electron microscope (SEM) imaging distortions are studied via digital image correlation. The global distortions from the reference pattern, which has been numerically generated, are first quantified from a digital image correlation procedure between the (virtual) reference pattern and the actual SEM image both in secondary and backscattered electron imaging modes. These distortions result from both patterning and imaging techniques. These two contributions can be separated (without resorting to an external caliper) based on the images of the same patterned surface acquired at different orientations. Patterning distortions are much smaller than those due to imaging on wide field images.

  6. Free-breathing 3D cardiac MRI using iterative image-based respiratory motion correction.

    PubMed

    Moghari, Mehdi H; Roujol, Sébastien; Chan, Raymond H; Hong, Susie N; Bello, Natalie; Henningsson, Markus; Ngo, Long H; Goddu, Beth; Goepfert, Lois; Kissinger, Kraig V; Manning, Warren J; Nezafat, Reza

    2013-10-01

    Respiratory motion compensation using diaphragmatic navigator gating with a 5 mm gating window is conventionally used for free-breathing cardiac MRI. Because of the narrow gating window, scan efficiency is low resulting in long scan times, especially for patients with irregular breathing patterns. In this work, a new retrospective motion compensation algorithm is presented to reduce the scan time for free-breathing cardiac MRI that increasing the gating window to 15 mm without compromising image quality. The proposed algorithm iteratively corrects for respiratory-induced cardiac motion by optimizing the sharpness of the heart. To evaluate this technique, two coronary MRI datasets with 1.3 mm(3) resolution were acquired from 11 healthy subjects (seven females, 25 ± 9 years); one using a navigator with a 5 mm gating window acquired in 12.0 ± 2.0 min and one with a 15 mm gating window acquired in 7.1 ± 1.0 min. The images acquired with a 15 mm gating window were corrected using the proposed algorithm and compared to the uncorrected images acquired with the 5 and 15 mm gating windows. The image quality score, sharpness, and length of the three major coronary arteries were equivalent between the corrected images and the images acquired with a 5 mm gating window (P-value > 0.05), while the scan time was reduced by a factor of 1.7. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Free-breathing 3D Cardiac MRI Using Iterative Image-Based Respiratory Motion Correction

    PubMed Central

    Moghari, Mehdi H.; Roujol, Sébastien; Chan, Raymond H.; Hong, Susie N.; Bello, Natalie; Henningsson, Markus; Ngo, Long H.; Goddu, Beth; Goepfert, Lois; Kissinger, Kraig V.; Manning, Warren J.; Nezafat, Reza

    2012-01-01

    Respiratory motion compensation using diaphragmatic navigator (NAV) gating with a 5 mm gating window is conventionally used for free-breathing cardiac MRI. Due to the narrow gating window, scan efficiency is low resulting in long scan times, especially for patients with irregular breathing patterns. In this work, a new retrospective motion compensation algorithm is presented to reduce the scan time for free-breathing cardiac MRI that increasing the gating window to 15 mm without compromising image quality. The proposed algorithm iteratively corrects for respiratory-induced cardiac motion by optimizing the sharpness of the heart. To evaluate this technique, two coronary MRI datasets with 1.3 mm3 resolution were acquired from 11 healthy subjects (7 females, 25±9 years); one using a NAV with a 5 mm gating window acquired in 12.0±2.0 minutes and one with a 15 mm gating window acquired in 7.1±1.0 minutes. The images acquired with a 15 mm gating window were corrected using the proposed algorithm and compared to the uncorrected images acquired with the 5 mm and 15 mm gating windows. The image quality score, sharpness, and length of the three major coronary arteries were equivalent between the corrected images and the images acquired with a 5 mm gating window (p-value>0.05), while the scan time was reduced by a factor of 1.7. PMID:23132549

  8. MRI-based measurements of respiratory motion variability and assessment of imaging strategies for radiotherapy planning.

    PubMed

    Blackall, J M; Ahmad, S; Miquel, M E; McClelland, J R; Landau, D B; Hawkes, D J

    2006-09-07

    Respiratory organ motion has a significant impact on the planning and delivery of radiotherapy (RT) treatment for lung cancer. Currently widespread techniques, such as 4D-computed tomography (4DCT), cannot be used to measure variability of this motion from one cycle to the next. In this paper, we describe the use of fast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques to investigate the intra- and inter-cycle reproducibility of respiratory motion and also to estimate the level of errors that may be introduced into treatment delivery by using various breath-hold imaging strategies during lung RT planning. A reference model of respiratory motion is formed to enable comparison of different breathing cycles at any arbitrary position in the respiratory cycle. This is constructed by using free-breathing images from the inhale phase of a single breathing cycle, then co-registering the images, and thereby tracking landmarks. This reference model is then compared to alternative models constructed from images acquired during the exhale phase of the same cycle and the inhale phase of a subsequent cycle, to assess intra- and inter-cycle variability ('hysteresis' and 'reproducibility') of organ motion. The reference model is also compared to a series of models formed from breath-hold data at exhale and inhale. Evaluation of these models is carried out on data from ten healthy volunteers and five lung cancer patients. Free-breathing models show good levels of intra- and inter-cycle reproducibility across the tidal breathing range. Mean intra-cycle errors in the position of organ surface landmarks of 1.5(1.4)-3.5(3.3) mm for volunteers and 2.8(1.8)-5.2(5.2) mm for patients. Equivalent measures of inter-cycle variability across this range are 1.7(1.0)-3.9(3.3) mm for volunteers and 2.8(1.8)-3.3(2.2) mm for patients. As expected, models based on breath-hold sequences do not represent normal tidal motion as well as those based on free-breathing data, with mean errors of 4

  9. Compressive optical image watermarking using joint Fresnel transform correlator architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jun; Zhong, Ting; Dai, Xiaofang; Yang, Chanxia; Li, Rong; Tang, Zhilie

    2017-02-01

    A new optical image watermarking technique based on compressive sensing using joint Fresnel transform correlator architecture has been presented. A secret scene or image is first embedded into a host image to perform optical image watermarking by use of joint Fresnel transform correlator architecture. Then, the watermarked image is compressed to much smaller signal data using single-pixel compressive holographic imaging in optical domain. At the received terminal, the watermarked image is reconstructed well via compressive sensing theory and a specified holographic reconstruction algorithm. The preliminary numerical simulations show that it is effective and suitable for optical image security transmission in the coming absolutely optical network for the reason of the completely optical implementation and largely decreased holograms data volume.

  10. Characterization of optical-surface-imaging-based spirometry for respiratory surrogating in radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Guang; Wei, Jie; Huang, Hailiang; Chen, Qing; Gaebler, Carl P; Lin, Tiffany; Yuan, Amy; Rimner, Andreas; Mechalakos, James

    2016-03-01

    To provide a comprehensive characterization of a novel respiratory surrogate that uses optical surface imaging (OSI) for accurate tidal volume (TV) measurement, dynamic airflow (TV') calculation, and quantitative breathing pattern (BP) estimation during free breathing (FB), belly breathing (BB), chest breathing (CB), and breath hold (BH). Optical surface imaging, which captures all respiration-induced torso surface motion, was applied to measure respiratory TV, TV', and BP in three common breathing patterns. Eleven healthy volunteers participated in breathing experiments with concurrent OSI-based and conventional spirometric measurements under an institutional review board approved protocol. This OSI-based technique measures dynamic TV from torso volume change (ΔVtorso = TV) in reference to full exhalation and airflow (TV' = dTV/dt). Volume conservation, excluding exchanging air, was applied for OSI-based measurements under negligible pleural pressure variation in FB, BB, and CB. To demonstrate volume conservation, a constant TV was measured during BH while the chest and belly are moving ("pretended" respiration). To assess the accuracy of OSI-based spirometry, a conventional spirometer was used as the standard for both TV and TV'. Using OSI, BP was measured as BP(OSI) = ΔVchest/ΔVtorso and BP can be visualized using BP(SHI) = SHIchest/(SHIchest + SHIbelly), where surface height index (SHI) is defined as the mean vertical distance within a region of interest on the torso surface. A software tool was developed for OSI image processing, volume calculation, and BP visualization, and another tool was implemented for data acquisition using a Bernoulli-type spirometer. The accuracy of the OSI-based spirometry is -21 ± 33 cm(3) or -3.5% ± 6.3% averaged from 11 volunteers with 76 ± 28 breathing cycles on average in FB. Breathing variations between two separate acquisitions with approximate 30-min intervals are substantial: -1% ± 34% (ranging from -64% to 40%) in TV

  11. Characterization of optical-surface-imaging-based spirometry for respiratory surrogating in radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guang; Huang, Hailiang; Chen, Qing; Gaebler, Carl P.; Lin, Tiffany; Yuan, Amy; Rimner, Andreas; Mechalakos, James

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a comprehensive characterization of a novel respiratory surrogate that uses optical surface imaging (OSI) for accurate tidal volume (TV) measurement, dynamic airflow (TV′) calculation, and quantitative breathing pattern (BP) estimation during free breathing (FB), belly breathing (BB), chest breathing (CB), and breath hold (BH). Methods: Optical surface imaging, which captures all respiration-induced torso surface motion, was applied to measure respiratory TV, TV′, and BP in three common breathing patterns. Eleven healthy volunteers participated in breathing experiments with concurrent OSI-based and conventional spirometric measurements under an institutional review board approved protocol. This OSI-based technique measures dynamic TV from torso volume change (ΔVtorso = TV) in reference to full exhalation and airflow (TV′ = dTV/dt). Volume conservation, excluding exchanging air, was applied for OSI-based measurements under negligible pleural pressure variation in FB, BB, and CB. To demonstrate volume conservation, a constant TV was measured during BH while the chest and belly are moving (“pretended” respiration). To assess the accuracy of OSI-based spirometry, a conventional spirometer was used as the standard for both TV and TV′. Using OSI, BP was measured as BPOSI = ΔVchest/ΔVtorso and BP can be visualized using BPSHI = SHIchest/(SHIchest + SHIbelly), where surface height index (SHI) is defined as the mean vertical distance within a region of interest on the torso surface. A software tool was developed for OSI image processing, volume calculation, and BP visualization, and another tool was implemented for data acquisition using a Bernoulli-type spirometer. Results: The accuracy of the OSI-based spirometry is −21 ± 33 cm3 or −3.5% ± 6.3% averaged from 11 volunteers with 76 ± 28 breathing cycles on average in FB. Breathing variations between two separate acquisitions with approximate 30-min intervals are substantial: −1%

  12. Disease severity and viral load are correlated in infants with primary respiratory syncytial virus infection in the community.

    PubMed

    Houben, M L; Coenjaerts, F E J; Rossen, J W A; Belderbos, M E; Hofland, R W; Kimpen, J L L; Bont, L

    2010-07-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of respiratory tract infections in infants, with remarkable variability in disease severity. Factors determining severity of disease in previously healthy infants are still unclear. It was hypothesized that disease severity is correlated with viral load in primary RSV infection. Infants of a healthy birth cohort were included at signs of their first respiratory tract infection. Nasopharyngeal aspirate was obtained within 48-96 hr and disease severity was assessed with a previously published severity scoring model. PCR was applied to test the aspirates in a semi-quantitative way for the presence of 10 respiratory pathogens. In case of multiple infection, the pathogen with the highest load was defined as the primary pathogen. The correlation between disease severity and viral load was analyzed. A total of 82 infants were included over a period of 2 years. Median age at first respiratory tract infection was 3 months. Pathogens were detected in 77 (94%) infants; more than one pathogen was detected in 35 (43%) infants. RSV was present in aspirates of 30 infants; in 16 aspirates RSV was the primary pathogen. A negative correlation between RSV CT-value and disease severity was found in all RSV cases (rho = -0.52, P = 0.003) and in cases with RSV as the primary pathogen (rho = -0.54, P = 0.03). In conclusion, this is the first report on viral loads in previously healthy infants with RSV infection in the community. Disease severity correlated positively with viral load during primary RSV infection.

  13. Automatic tracking of the respiratory motion of lung parenchyma on dynamic magnetic resonance imaging: comparison with pulmonary function tests in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Hirofumi; Iwasawa, Tae; Gotoh, Toshiyuki; Kagei, Seiichiro; Shinohara, Takeshi; Ogura, Takashi; Hagiwara, Hiroaki; Tateishi, Ukihide; Inoue, Tomio

    2012-11-01

    This study evaluated the respiratory motion of the lung parenchyma using dynamic magnetic resonance imaging and clarified differences between healthy individuals and patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The study comprised 6 healthy volunteers and 42 patients diagnosed with smoking-related COPD. We captured 80 sequential frames from the mid-sagittal portion of the right lung while repeating forced deep breathing using a balanced fast-field echo sequence (repetition time, 2.2 ms; echo time, 1.1 ms; slice thickness, 10 mm; field of view, 450 mm; matrix size, 128 × 256; and acquisition time, 0.28 s/frame). We traced 15 points on pulmonary vessels using a computer-aided system and measured the maximal motion distance of each tracked point. Movement of these points was then compared with spirometric data using the Pearson correlation coefficient. Patients with COPD showed reduced respiratory motion compared with healthy volunteers. Respiratory motion and spirometric data such as forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) and FEV1/forced vital capacity showed highly significant positive correlations (correlation between normalized motion distance for the whole lung and FEV1, r = 0.75; P < 0.01). The respiratory motion of the pulmonary vessels reflects expansion and deflation of the lung parenchyma, and such motion is restricted in patients with COPD due to airflow limitation.

  14. Effect of respiratory and cardiac gating on the major diffusion-imaging metrics.

    PubMed

    Hamaguchi, Hiroyuki; Tha, Khin Khin; Sugimori, Hiroyuki; Nakanishi, Mitsuhiro; Nakagawa, Shin; Fujiwara, Taro; Yoshida, Hirokazu; Takamori, Sayaka; Shirato, Hiroki

    2016-08-01

    The effect of respiratory gating on the major diffusion-imaging metrics and that of cardiac gating on mean kurtosis (MK) are not known. For evaluation of whether the major diffusion-imaging metrics-MK, fractional anisotropy (FA), and mean diffusivity (MD) of the brain-varied between gated and non-gated acquisitions, respiratory-gated, cardiac-gated, and non-gated diffusion-imaging of the brain were performed in 10 healthy volunteers. MK, FA, and MD maps were constructed for all acquisitions, and the histograms were constructed. The normalized peak height and location of the histograms were compared among the acquisitions by use of Friedman and post hoc Wilcoxon tests. The effect of the repetition time (TR) on the diffusion-imaging metrics was also tested, and we corrected for its variation among acquisitions, if necessary. The results showed a shift in the peak location of the MK and MD histograms to the right with an increase in TR (p ≤ 0.01). The corrected peak location of the MK histograms, the normalized peak height of the FA histograms, the normalized peak height and the corrected peak location of the MD histograms varied significantly between the gated and non-gated acquisitions (p < 0.05). These results imply an influence of respiration and cardiac pulsation on the major diffusion-imaging metrics. The gating conditions must be kept identical if reproducible results are to be achieved.

  15. Respiratory motion of adrenal gland metastases: Analyses using four-dimensional computed tomography images.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bing; Hu, Yong; Liu, Jin; Cao, An-Ning; Ye, Lu-Xi; Zeng, Zhao-Chong

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the respiratory motion of adrenal gland metastases in three-dimensional directions using four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) images. From January 2013 to May 2016, 12 patients with adrenal gland metastases were included in this study. They all underwent 4DCT scans to assess respiratory motion of adrenal gland metastases in free breathing state. The 4DCT images were sorted into 10 image series according to the respiratory phase from the end inspiration to the end expiration, and then transferred to FocalSim workstation. All gross tumor volumes (GTVs) of adrenal gland metastases were drawn by a single physician and confirmed by a second. Relative coordinates of adrenal gland metastases were automatically generated to calculate adrenal gland metastases motion in different axial directions. The average respiratory motion of adrenal gland metastases in left-right (LR), cranial-caudal (CC), anterior-posterior (AP), 3-dimensional (3D) vector directions was 3.4±2.2mm, 9.5±5.5mm, 3.8±2.0mm and 11.3±5.3mm, respectively. The ratios were 58.6%±11.4% and 63.2%±12.5% when the volumes of GTVIn0% and GTV In100% were compared with volume of IGTV10phase. The volume ratio of IGTV10phase to GTV3D was 1.73±0.48. Adrenal gland metastasis is a respiration-induced moving target, and an internal target volume boundary should be provided when designing the treatment plan. The CC motion of adrenal gland metastasis is predominant and >5mm, thus motion management strategies are recommended for patients undergoing external radiotherapy for adrenal gland metastasis. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A technique for respiratory motion correction in image guided cardiac catheterisation procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, A. P.; Boubertakh, R.; Ng, K. L.; Ma, Y. L.; Chinchapatnam, P.; Gao, G.; Schaeffter, T.; Hawkes, D. J.; Razavi, R.; Rhode, K. S.

    2008-03-01

    This paper presents a technique for compensating for respiratory motion and deformation in an augmented reality system for cardiac catheterisation procedures. The technique uses a subject-specific affine model of cardiac motion which is quickly constructed from a pre-procedure magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan. Respiratory phase information is acquired during the procedure by tracking the motion of the diaphragm in real-time X-ray images. This information is used as input to the model which uses it to predict the position of structures of interest during respiration. 3-D validation is performed on 4 volunteers and 4 patients using a leave-one-out test on manually identified anatomical landmarks in the MRI scan, and 2-D validation is performed by using the model to predict the respiratory motion of structures of the heart which contain catheters that are visible in X-ray images. The technique is shown to reduce 3-D registration errors due to respiratory motion from up to 15mm down to less than 5mm, which is within clinical requirements for many procedures. 2-D validation showed that accuracy improved from 14mm to 2mm. In addition, we use the model to analyse the effects of different types of breathing on the motion and deformation of the heart, specifically increasing the breathing rate and depth of breathing. Our findings suggest that the accuracy of the model is reduced if the subject breathes in a different way during model construction and application. However, models formed during deep breathing may be accurate enough to be applied to other types of breathing.

  17. Extraction of Respiratory Signal Based on Image Clustering and Intensity Parameters at Radiotherapy with External Beam: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Samadi Miandoab, P.; Esmaili Torshabi, A.; Nankali, S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Since tumors located in thorax region of body mainly move due to respiration, in the modern radiotherapy, there have been many attempts such as; external markers, strain gage and spirometer represent for monitoring patients’ breathing signal. With the advent of fluoroscopy technique, indirect methods were proposed as an alternative approach to extract patients’ breathing signals. Materials and Methods: The purpose of this study is to extract respiratory signals using two available methods based on clustering and intensity strategies on medical image dataset of XCAT phantom. Results: For testing and evaluation methods, correlation coefficient, standard division, amplitude ratio and different phases are utilized. Phantom study showed excellent match between correlation coefficient, standard division, amplitude ratio and different phase. Both techniques segmenting medical images are robust due to their inherent mathematical properties. Using clustering strategy, lung region borders are remarkably extracted regarding intensity-based method. This may also affect the amount of amplitude signal. Conclusion: To evaluate the performance of these methods, results are compared with slice body volume (SBV) method. Moreover, all methods have shown the same correlation coefficient of 99%, but at different amplitude ratio and different phase. In SBV method, standard division and different phase are better than clustering and intensity methods with SDR=4.71 mm, and SDL=4.12 mm and average different phase 1.47 %, but amplitude ration of clustering method is significantly more remarkable than SBV and intensity methods. PMID:28144595

  18. WE-D-303-02: Applications of Volumetric Images Generated with a Respiratory Motion Model Based On An External Surrogate Signal

    SciTech Connect

    Hurwitz, M; Williams, C; Dhou, S; Lewis, J; Mishra, P

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Respiratory motion can vary significantly over the course of simulation and treatment. Our goal is to use volumetric images generated with a respiratory motion model to improve the definition of the internal target volume (ITV) and the estimate of delivered dose. Methods: Ten irregular patient breathing patterns spanning 35 seconds each were incorporated into a digital phantom. Ten images over the first five seconds of breathing were used to emulate a 4DCT scan, build the ITV, and generate a patient-specific respiratory motion model which correlated the measured trajectories of markers placed on the patients’ chests with the motion of the internal anatomy. This model was used to generate volumetric images over the subsequent thirty seconds of breathing. The increase in the ITV taking into account the full 35 seconds of breathing was assessed with ground-truth and model-generated images. For one patient, a treatment plan based on the initial ITV was created and the delivered dose was estimated using images from the first five seconds as well as ground-truth and model-generated images from the next 30 seconds. Results: The increase in the ITV ranged from 0.2 cc to 6.9 cc for the ten patients based on ground-truth information. The model predicted this increase in the ITV with an average error of 0.8 cc. The delivered dose to the tumor (D95) changed significantly from 57 Gy to 41 Gy when estimated using 5 seconds and 30 seconds, respectively. The model captured this effect, giving an estimated D95 of 44 Gy. Conclusion: A respiratory motion model generating volumetric images of the internal patient anatomy could be useful in estimating the increase in the ITV due to irregular breathing during simulation and in assessing delivered dose during treatment. This project was supported, in part, through a Master Research Agreement with Varian Medical Systems, Inc. and Radiological Society of North America Research Scholar Grant #RSCH1206.

  19. Correlation mapping: rapid method for retrieving microcirculation morphology from optical coherence tomography intensity images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonathan, E.; Enfield, J.; Leahy, M. J.

    2011-03-01

    The microcirculation plays a critical role is maintaining organ health and function by serving as a vascular are where trophic metabolism exchanges between blood and tissue takes place. To facilitate regular assessment in vivo, noninvasive microcirculation imagers are required in clinics. Among this group of clinical devices, are those that render microcirculation morphology such as nailfold capillaroscopy, a common device for early diagnosis and monitoring of microangiopathies. However, depth ambiguity disqualify this and other similar techniques in medical tomography where due to the 3-D nature of biological organs, imagers that support depth-resolved 2-D imaging and 3-D image reconstruction are required. Here, we introduce correlation map OCT (cmOCT), a promising technique for microcirculation morphology imaging that combines standard optical coherence tomography and an agile imaging analysis software based on correlation statistic. Promising results are presented of the microcirculation morphology images of the brain region of a small animal model as well as measurements of vessel geometry at bifurcations, such as vessel diameters, branch angles. These data will be useful for obtaining cardiovascular related characteristics such as volumetric flow, velocity profile and vessel-wall shear stress for circulatory and respiratory system.

  20. Comparison of Texture Features Derived from Static and Respiratory-Gated PET Images in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yip, Stephen; McCall, Keisha; Aristophanous, Michalis; Chen, Aileen B.

    2014-01-01

    Background PET-based texture features have been used to quantify tumor heterogeneity due to their predictive power in treatment outcome. We investigated the sensitivity of texture features to tumor motion by comparing static (3D) and respiratory-gated (4D) PET imaging. Methods Twenty-six patients (34 lesions) received 3D and 4D [18F]FDG-PET scans before the chemo-radiotherapy. The acquired 4D data were retrospectively binned into five breathing phases to create the 4D image sequence. Texture features, including Maximal correlation coefficient (MCC), Long run low gray (LRLG), Coarseness, Contrast, and Busyness, were computed within the physician-defined tumor volume. The relative difference (δ3D-4D) in each texture between the 3D- and 4D-PET imaging was calculated. Coefficient of variation (CV) was used to determine the variability in the textures between all 4D-PET phases. Correlations between tumor volume, motion amplitude, and δ3D-4D were also assessed. Results 4D-PET increased LRLG ( = 1%–2%, p<0.02), Busyness ( = 7%–19%, p<0.01), and decreased MCC ( = 1%–2%, p<7.5×10−3), Coarseness ( = 5%–10%, p<0.05) and Contrast ( = 4%–6%, p>0.08) compared to 3D-PET. Nearly negligible variability was found between the 4D phase bins with CV<5% for MCC, LRLG, and Coarseness. For Contrast and Busyness, moderate variability was found with CV = 9% and 10%, respectively. No strong correlation was found between the tumor volume and δ3D-4D for the texture features. Motion amplitude had moderate impact on δ for MCC and Busyness and no impact for LRLG, Coarseness, and Contrast. Conclusions Significant differences were found in MCC, LRLG, Coarseness, and Busyness between 3D and 4D PET imaging. The variability between phase bins for MCC, LRLG, and Coarseness was negligible, suggesting that similar quantification can be obtained from all phases. Texture features, blurred out by respiratory motion during 3D-PET acquisition, can be better resolved by

  1. Incoherent acousto-optic image correlator with the kinoform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starikov, Sergey N.; Rodin, Vladislav G.; Solyakin, Ivan V.; Shapkarina, Ekaterina A.; Chervonkin, Alexander P.

    2004-04-01

    Fourier holograms are commonly used for reference images storing in diffraction correlators with spatially coherent or spatially incoherent illumination. Kinoforms can be a real alternative to Fourier holograms in the correlators. The kinoform represents a computer-synthesized optical element which performs only a phase modulation of a light wave. The kinoform restores true intensity of the recorded image and random distribution of phase. Therefore, it can be utilized for storing reference images, first of all, in correlators with spatially incoherent illumination. The absence of carrier frequency reduces demanded number of pixels of the spatial light modulator being used. Since the kinoform provides reconstruction of reference image in zero diffraction order, requirement on monochromaticity of illumination are decreased as well. The diffraction correlator with the kinoform used as spatial frequency filter is considered. The 2-D acoustooptic deflector was employed to form input images in real time by monochromatic spatially incoherent light. The reference images were recorded on the commercially available kinoforms. The input and reference images were of 256×256 pixels and 200×200 pixels respectively. Since input images were consisted of approximately 400 pixels with non-zero brightness, the image update frequency was gained at 200 Hz. The experimental setup and experimental results on images recognition are presented.

  2. Changing image of correlation optics: introduction.

    PubMed

    Angelsky, Oleg V; Desyatnikov, Anton S; Gbur, Gregory J; Hanson, Steen G; Lee, Tim; Miyamoto, Yoko; Schneckenburger, Herbert; Wyant, James C

    2016-04-20

    This feature issue of Applied Optics contains a series of selected papers reflecting recent progress of correlation optics and illustrating current trends in vector singular optics, internal energy flows at light fields, optical science of materials, and new biomedical applications of lasers.

  3. Evaluation of the clinical efficacy of the PeTrack motion tracking system for respiratory gating in cardiac PET imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manwell, Spencer; Chamberland, Marc J. P.; Klein, Ran; Xu, Tong; deKemp, Robert

    2017-03-01

    Respiratory gating is a common technique used to compensate for patient breathing motion and decrease the prevalence of image artifacts that can impact diagnoses. In this study a new data-driven respiratory gating method (PeTrack) was compared with a conventional optical tracking system. The performance of respiratory gating of the two systems was evaluated by comparing the number of respiratory triggers, patient breathing intervals and gross heart motion as measured in the respiratory-gated image reconstructions of rubidium-82 cardiac PET scans in test and control groups consisting of 15 and 8 scans, respectively. We found evidence suggesting that PeTrack is a robust patient motion tracking system that can be used to retrospectively assess patient motion in the event of failure of the conventional optical tracking system.

  4. Clinical review: Lung imaging in acute respiratory distress syndrome patients - an update

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Over the past 30 years lung imaging has greatly contributed to the current understanding of the pathophysiology and the management of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). In the past few years, in addition to chest X-ray and lung computed tomography, newer functional lung imaging techniques, such as lung ultrasound, positron emission tomography, electrical impedance tomography and magnetic resonance, have been gaining a role as diagnostic tools to optimize lung assessment and ventilator management in ARDS patients. Here we provide an updated clinical review of lung imaging in ARDS over the past few years to offer an overview of the literature on the available imaging techniques from a clinical perspective. PMID:24238477

  5. Exploring underwater target detection by imaging polarimetry and correlation techniques.

    PubMed

    Dubreuil, M; Delrot, P; Leonard, I; Alfalou, A; Brosseau, C; Dogariu, A

    2013-02-10

    Underwater target detection is investigated by combining active polarization imaging and optical correlation-based approaches. Experiments were conducted in a glass tank filled with tap water with diluted milk or seawater and containing targets of arbitrary polarimetric responses. We found that target estimation obtained by imaging with two orthogonal polarization states always improves detection performances when correlation is used as detection criterion. This experimental study illustrates the potential of polarization imaging for underwater target detection and opens interesting perspectives for the development of underwater imaging systems.

  6. Modeling the respiratory motion of solitary pulmonary nodules and determining the impact of respiratory motion on their detection in SPECT imaging

    PubMed Central

    Smyczynski, Mark S.; Gifford, Howard C.; Lehovich, Andre; McNamara, Joseph E.; Segars, W. Paul; Hoffman, Eric A.; Tsui, Benjamin M. W.; King, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this investigation were to model the respiratory motion of solitary pulmonary nodules (SPN) and then use this model to determine the impact of respiratory motion on the localization and detection of small SPN in SPECT imaging for four reconstruction strategies. The respiratory motion of SPN was based on that of normal anatomic structures in the lungs determined from breath-held CT images of a volunteer acquired at two different stages of respiration. End-expiration (EE) and time-averaged (Frame Av) non-uniform-B-spline cardiac torso (NCAT) digital-anthropomorphic phantoms were created using this information for respiratory motion within the lungs. SPN were represented as 1 cm diameter spheres which underwent linear motion during respiration between the EE and end-inspiration (EI) time points. The SIMIND Monte Carlo program was used to produce SPECT projection data simulating Tc-99m depreotide (NeoTect) imaging. The projections were reconstructed using 1) no correction (NC), 2) attenuation correction (AC), 3) resolution compensation (RC), and 4) attenuation correction, scatter correction, and resolution compensation (AC_SC_RC). A human-observer localization receiver operating characteristics (LROC) study was then performed to determine the difference in localization and detection accuracy with and without the presence of respiratory motion. The LROC comparison determined that respiratory motion degrades tumor detection for all four reconstruction strategies, thus correction for SPN motion would be expected to improve detection accuracy. The inclusion of RC in reconstruction improved detection accuracy for both EE and Frame Av over NC and AC. Also the magnitude of the impact of motion was least for AC_SC_RC. PMID:27182079

  7. Modeling the Respiratory Motion of Solitary Pulmonary Nodules and Determining the Impact of Respiratory Motion on Their Detection in SPECT Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smyczynski, Mark S.; Gifford, Howard C.; Lehovich, Andre; McNamara, Joseph E.; Segars, W. Paul; Hoffman, Eric A.; Tsui, Benjamin M. W.; King, Michael A.

    2016-02-01

    The objectives of this investigation were to model the respiratory motion of solitary pulmonary nodules (SPN) and then use this model to determine the impact of respiratory motion on the localization and detection of small SPN in SPECT imaging for four reconstruction strategies. The respiratory motion of SPN was based on that of normal anatomic structures in the lungs determined from breath-held CT images of a volunteer acquired at two different stages of respiration. End-expiration (EE) and time-averaged (Frame Av) non-uniform-B-spline cardiac torso (NCAT) digital-anthropomorphic phantoms were created using this information for respiratory motion within the lungs. SPN were represented as 1 cm diameter spheres which underwent linear motion during respiration between the EE and end-inspiration (EI) time points. The SIMIND Monte Carlo program was used to produce SPECT projection data simulating Tc-99 m depreotide (NeoTect) imaging. The projections were reconstructed using 1) no correction (NC), 2) attenuation correction (AC), 3) resolution compensation (RC), and 4) attenuation correction, scatter correction, and resolution compensation (AC_SC_RC). A human-observer localization receiver operating characteristics (LROC) study was then performed to determine the difference in localization and detection accuracy with and without the presence of respiratory motion. The LROC comparison determined that respiratory motion degrades tumor detection for all four reconstruction strategies, thus correction for SPN motion would be expected to improve detection accuracy. The inclusion of RC in reconstruction improved detection accuracy for both EE and Frame Av over NC and AC. Also the magnitude of the impact of motion was least for AC_SC_RC.

  8. Correlative feature analysis of FFDM images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Yading; Giger, Maryellen L.; Li, Hui; Sennett, Charlene

    2008-03-01

    Identifying the corresponding image pair of a lesion is an essential step for combining information from different views of the lesion to improve the diagnostic ability of both radiologists and CAD systems. Because of the non-rigidity of the breasts and the 2D projective property of mammograms, this task is not trivial. In this study, we present a computerized framework that differentiates the corresponding images from different views of a lesion from non-corresponding ones. A dual-stage segmentation method, which employs an initial radial gradient index(RGI) based segmentation and an active contour model, was initially applied to extract mass lesions from the surrounding tissues. Then various lesion features were automatically extracted from each of the two views of each lesion to quantify the characteristics of margin, shape, size, texture and context of the lesion, as well as its distance to nipple. We employed a two-step method to select an effective subset of features, and combined it with a BANN to obtain a discriminant score, which yielded an estimate of the probability that the two images are of the same physical lesion. ROC analysis was used to evaluate the performance of the individual features and the selected feature subset in the task of distinguishing between corresponding and non-corresponding pairs. By using a FFDM database with 124 corresponding image pairs and 35 non-corresponding pairs, the distance feature yielded an AUC (area under the ROC curve) of 0.8 with leave-one-out evaluation by lesion, and the feature subset, which includes distance feature, lesion size and lesion contrast, yielded an AUC of 0.86. The improvement by using multiple features was statistically significant as compared to single feature performance. (p<0.001)

  9. Alpha trimmed correlation for touchless finger image mosaicing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Shishir P.; Rajendran, Rahul; Agaian, Sos S.; Mulawka, Marzena Mary Ann

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, a novel technique to mosaic multiview contactless finger images is presented. This technique makes use of different correlation methods, such as, the Alpha-trimmed correlation, Pearson's correlation [1], Kendall's correlation [2], and Spearman's correlation [2], to combine multiple views of the finger. The key contributions of the algorithm are: 1) stitches images more accurately, 2) provides better image fusion effects, 3) has better visual effect on the overall image, and 4) is more reliable. The extensive computer simulations show that the proposed method produces better or comparable stitched images than several state-of-the-art methods, such as those presented by Feng Liu [3], K Choi [4], H Choi [5], and G Parziale [6]. In addition, we also compare various correlation techniques with the correlation method mentioned in [3] and analyze the output. In the future, this method can be extended to obtain a 3D model of the finger using multiple views of the finger, and help in generating scenic panoramic images and underwater 360-degree panoramas.

  10. Two-Photon Imaging within the Murine Thorax without Respiratory and Cardiac Motion Artifact

    PubMed Central

    Presson, Robert G.; Brown, Mary Beth; Fisher, Amanda J.; Sandoval, Ruben M.; Dunn, Kenneth W.; Lorenz, Kevin S.; Delp, Edward J.; Salama, Paul; Molitoris, Bruce A.; Petrache, Irina

    2011-01-01

    Intravital microscopy has been recognized for its ability to make physiological measurements at cellular and subcellular levels while maintaining the complex natural microenvironment. Two-photon microscopy (TPM), using longer wavelengths than single-photon excitation, has extended intravital imaging deeper into tissues, with minimal phototoxicity. However, due to a relatively slow acquisition rate, TPM is especially sensitive to motion artifact, which presents a challenge when imaging tissues subject to respiratory and cardiac movement. Thoracoabdominal organs that cannot be exteriorized or immobilized during TPM have generally required the use of isolated, pump-perfused preparations. However, this approach entails significant alteration of normal physiology, such as a lack of neural inputs, increased vascular resistance, and leukocyte activation. We adapted techniques of intravital microscopy that permitted TPM of organs maintained within the thoracoabdominal cavity of living, breathing rats or mice. We obtained extended intravital TPM imaging of the intact lung, arguably the organ most susceptible to both respiratory and cardiac motion. Intravital TPM detected the development of lung microvascular endothelial activation manifested as increased leukocyte adhesion and plasma extravasation in response to oxidative stress inducers PMA or soluble cigarette smoke extract. The pulmonary microvasculature and alveoli in the intact animal were imaged with comparable detail and fidelity to those in pump-perfused animals, opening the possibility for TPM of other thoracoabdominal organs under physiological and pathophysiological conditions. PMID:21703395

  11. Passive imaging with cross correlations in a discrete random medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moscoso, M.; Papanicolaou, G.; Sun, R.-H.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to study the potential and limitations of cross-correlation techniques using numerical simulations, and in particular, we intend to show (i) an estimate of the Green's function in different configurations and (ii) results for passive imaging. This problem seems especially interesting in seismology, nondestructive testing, structure health monitoring, and wireless sensor networks. To compute cross correlations of the impulse signals collected by the receivers, we consider scattering by discrete scatterers to generate impluse responses with targets and without targets. We compute the difference of the cross correlations with targets and the cross correlations without targets to estimate the backpropagator (Green's function) in the Kirchhoff migration functional. The migration functional is essential to compute images of targets. We run numerical simulations for different configurations to explore the limitations of this cross correlation methodology from the results of passive imaging.

  12. Motion-compensated PET image reconstruction with respiratory-matched attenuation correction using two low-dose inhale and exhale CT images.

    PubMed

    Nam, Woo Hyun; Ahn, Il Jun; Kim, Kyeong Min; Kim, Byung Il; Ra, Jong Beom

    2013-10-21

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is widely used for diagnosis and follow up assessment of radiotherapy. However, thoracic and abdominal PET suffers from false staging and incorrect quantification of the radioactive uptake of lesion(s) due to respiratory motion. Furthermore, respiratory motion-induced mismatch between a computed tomography (CT) attenuation map and PET data often leads to significant artifacts in the reconstructed PET image. To solve these problems, we propose a unified framework for respiratory-matched attenuation correction and motion compensation of respiratory-gated PET. For the attenuation correction, the proposed algorithm manipulates a 4D CT image virtually generated from two low-dose inhale and exhale CT images, rather than a real 4D CT image which significantly increases the radiation burden on a patient. It also utilizes CT-driven motion fields for motion compensation. To realize the proposed algorithm, we propose an improved region-based approach for non-rigid registration between body CT images, and we suggest a selection scheme of 3D CT images that are respiratory-matched to each respiratory-gated sinogram. In this work, the proposed algorithm was evaluated qualitatively and quantitatively by using patient datasets including lung and/or liver lesion(s). Experimental results show that the method can provide much clearer organ boundaries and more accurate lesion information than existing algorithms by utilizing two low-dose CT images.

  13. Motion-compensated PET image reconstruction with respiratory-matched attenuation correction using two low-dose inhale and exhale CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Woo Hyun; Ahn, Il Jun; Kim, Kyeong Min; Kim, Byung Il; Ra, Jong Beom

    2013-10-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is widely used for diagnosis and follow up assessment of radiotherapy. However, thoracic and abdominal PET suffers from false staging and incorrect quantification of the radioactive uptake of lesion(s) due to respiratory motion. Furthermore, respiratory motion-induced mismatch between a computed tomography (CT) attenuation map and PET data often leads to significant artifacts in the reconstructed PET image. To solve these problems, we propose a unified framework for respiratory-matched attenuation correction and motion compensation of respiratory-gated PET. For the attenuation correction, the proposed algorithm manipulates a 4D CT image virtually generated from two low-dose inhale and exhale CT images, rather than a real 4D CT image which significantly increases the radiation burden on a patient. It also utilizes CT-driven motion fields for motion compensation. To realize the proposed algorithm, we propose an improved region-based approach for non-rigid registration between body CT images, and we suggest a selection scheme of 3D CT images that are respiratory-matched to each respiratory-gated sinogram. In this work, the proposed algorithm was evaluated qualitatively and quantitatively by using patient datasets including lung and/or liver lesion(s). Experimental results show that the method can provide much clearer organ boundaries and more accurate lesion information than existing algorithms by utilizing two low-dose CT images.

  14. Four dimensional digital tomosynthesis using on-board imager for the verification of respiratory motion.

    PubMed

    Park, Justin C; Kim, Jin Sung; Park, Sung Ho; Webster, Matthew J; Lee, Soyoung; Song, William Y; Han, Youngyih

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate respiratory motion of a patient by generating four-dimensional digital tomosynthesis (4D DTS), extracting respiratory signal from patients' on-board projection data, and ensuring the feasibility of 4D DTS as a localization tool for the targets which have respiratory movement. Four patients with lung and liver cancer were included to verify the feasibility of 4D-DTS with an on-board imager. CBCT acquisition (650-670 projections) was used to reconstruct 4D DTS images and the breath signal of the patients was generated by extracting the motion of diaphragm during data acquisition. Based on the extracted signal, the projection data was divided into four phases: peak-exhale phase, mid-inhale phase, peak-inhale phase, and mid-exhale phase. The binned projection data was then used to generate 4D DTS, where the total scan angle was assigned as ±22.5° from rotation center, centered on 0° and 180° for coronal "half-fan" 4D DTS, and 90° and 270° for sagittal "half-fan" 4D DTS. The result was then compared with 4D CBCT which we have also generated with the same phase distribution. The motion of the diaphragm was evident from the 4D DTS results for peak-exhale, mid-inhale, peak-inhale and mid-exhale phase assignment which was absent in 3D DTS. Compared to the result of 4D CBCT, the view aliasing effect due to arbitrary angle reconstruction was less severe. In addition, the severity of metal artifacts, the image distortion due to presence of metal, was less than that of the 4D CBCT results. We have implemented on-board 4D DTS on patients data to visualize the movement of anatomy due to respiratory motion. The results indicate that 4D-DTS could be a promising alternative to 4D CBCT for acquiring the respiratory motion of internal organs just prior to radiotherapy treatment.

  15. Four Dimensional Digital Tomosynthesis Using on-Board Imager for the Verification of Respiratory Motion

    PubMed Central

    Park, Justin C.; Kim, Jin Sung; Park, Sung Ho; Webster, Matthew J.; Lee, Soyoung; Song, William Y.; Han, Youngyih

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate respiratory motion of a patient by generating four-dimensional digital tomosynthesis (4D DTS), extracting respiratory signal from patients' on-board projection data, and ensuring the feasibility of 4D DTS as a localization tool for the targets which have respiratory movement. Methods and Materials Four patients with lung and liver cancer were included to verify the feasibility of 4D-DTS with an on-board imager. CBCT acquisition (650–670 projections) was used to reconstruct 4D DTS images and the breath signal of the patients was generated by extracting the motion of diaphragm during data acquisition. Based on the extracted signal, the projection data was divided into four phases: peak-exhale phase, mid-inhale phase, peak-inhale phase, and mid-exhale phase. The binned projection data was then used to generate 4D DTS, where the total scan angle was assigned as ±22.5° from rotation center, centered on 0° and 180° for coronal “half-fan” 4D DTS, and 90° and 270° for sagittal “half-fan” 4D DTS. The result was then compared with 4D CBCT which we have also generated with the same phase distribution. Results The motion of the diaphragm was evident from the 4D DTS results for peak-exhale, mid-inhale, peak-inhale and mid-exhale phase assignment which was absent in 3D DTS. Compared to the result of 4D CBCT, the view aliasing effect due to arbitrary angle reconstruction was less severe. In addition, the severity of metal artifacts, the image distortion due to presence of metal, was less than that of the 4D CBCT results. Conclusion We have implemented on-board 4D DTS on patients data to visualize the movement of anatomy due to respiratory motion. The results indicate that 4D-DTS could be a promising alternative to 4D CBCT for acquiring the respiratory motion of internal organs just prior to radiotherapy treatment. PMID:25541710

  16. Joint transform correlator using JPEG-compressed reference images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widjaja, Joewono

    2013-06-01

    Pattern recognition by using joint transform correlator with JPEG-compressed reference images is studied. Human face and fingerprint images are used as test scenes with different spatial frequency contents. Recognition performance is quantitatively measured by taking into account effect of imbalance illumination and noise presence. The feasibility of implementing the proposed JTC is verified by using computer simulations and experiments.

  17. Axial asymmetry in holographic and incoherent correlation imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Běhal, Jaromír.; Bouchal, Petr; Schovánek, Petr; Fordey, Tomáš; Bouchal, Zdeněk

    2016-12-01

    In optical lens imaging, the main attention has traditionally been paid to the lateral resolution roughly estimated by a two-dimensional point spread function (PSF) describing sharp image of a point object. In three-dimensional (3D) imaging and methods based on depth information, an axial profile of the PSF becomes of particular importance. In studies on the 3D PSF, the axial image asymmetry and shift of the intensity maximum out of the focal plane were revealed for optical systems characterized by low Fresnel numbers. In this paper, the 3D PSF is examined in terms of digital imaging, where a point object is recorded optically and its image reconstructed numerically. The analysis includes methods of digital holography, in which the axial image asymmetry is examined in relation to different geometries of coherent recording waves. Attention is also devoted to the Fresnel incoherent correlation imaging that enables recording of 3D objects in spatially incoherent light.

  18. Optimization of the x-ray monitoring angle for creating a correlation model between internal and external respiratory signals.

    PubMed

    Akimoto, Mami; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Mukumoto, Nobutaka; Yamada, Masahiro; Ueki, Nami; Matsuo, Yukinori; Sawada, Akira; Mizowaki, Takashi; Kokubo, Masaki; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2012-10-01

    To perform dynamic tumor tracking irradiation with the Vero4DRT (MHI-TM2000), a correlation model [four dimensional (4D) model] between the displacement of infrared markers on the abdominal wall and the three-dimensional position of a tumor indicated by a minimum of three implanted gold markers is required. However, the gold markers cannot be detected successfully on fluoroscopic images under the following situations: (1) overlapping of the gold markers; and (2) a low intensity ratio of the gold marker to its surroundings. In the present study, the authors proposed a method to readily determine the optimal x-ray monitoring angle for creating a 4D model utilizing computed tomography (CT) images. The Vero4DRT mounting two orthogonal kV x-ray imaging subsystems can separately rotate the gantry along an O-shaped guide-lane and the O-ring along its vertical axis. The optimal x-ray monitoring angle was determined on CT images by minimizing the root-sum-square of water equivalent path lengths (WEPLs) on the orthogonal lines passing all of the gold markers while rotating the O-ring and the gantry. The x-ray monitoring angles at which the distances between the gold markers were within 5 mm at the isocenter level were excluded to prevent false detection of the gold markers in consideration of respiratory motions. First, the relationship between the WEPLs (unit: mm) and the intensity ratios of the gold markers was examined to assess the validity of our proposed method. Second, our proposed method was applied to the 4D-CT images at the end-expiration phase for 11 lung cancer patients who had four to five gold markers. To prove the necessity of the x-ray monitoring angle optimization, the intensity ratios of the least visible markers (minimum intensity ratios) that were estimated from the WEPLs were compared under the following conditions: the optimal x-ray monitoring angle and the angles used for setup verification. Additionally, the intra- and interfractional variations in

  19. Optimization of the x-ray monitoring angle for creating a correlation model between internal and external respiratory signals

    SciTech Connect

    Akimoto, Mami; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Mukumoto, Nobutaka; Yamada, Masahiro; Ueki, Nami; Matsuo, Yukinori; Sawada, Akira; Mizowaki, Takashi; Kokubo, Masaki; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To perform dynamic tumor tracking irradiation with the Vero4DRT (MHI-TM2000), a correlation model [four dimensional (4D) model] between the displacement of infrared markers on the abdominal wall and the three-dimensional position of a tumor indicated by a minimum of three implanted gold markers is required. However, the gold markers cannot be detected successfully on fluoroscopic images under the following situations: (1) overlapping of the gold markers; and (2) a low intensity ratio of the gold marker to its surroundings. In the present study, the authors proposed a method to readily determine the optimal x-ray monitoring angle for creating a 4D model utilizing computed tomography (CT) images. Methods: The Vero4DRT mounting two orthogonal kV x-ray imaging subsystems can separately rotate the gantry along an O-shaped guide-lane and the O-ring along its vertical axis. The optimal x-ray monitoring angle was determined on CT images by minimizing the root-sum-square of water equivalent path lengths (WEPLs) on the orthogonal lines passing all of the gold markers while rotating the O-ring and the gantry. The x-ray monitoring angles at which the distances between the gold markers were within 5 mm at the isocenter level were excluded to prevent false detection of the gold markers in consideration of respiratory motions. First, the relationship between the WEPLs (unit: mm) and the intensity ratios of the gold markers was examined to assess the validity of our proposed method. Second, our proposed method was applied to the 4D-CT images at the end-expiration phase for 11 lung cancer patients who had four to five gold markers. To prove the necessity of the x-ray monitoring angle optimization, the intensity ratios of the least visible markers (minimum intensity ratios) that were estimated from the WEPLs were compared under the following conditions: the optimal x-ray monitoring angle and the angles used for setup verification. Additionally, the intra- and

  20. Severity Quantification of Pediatric Viral Respiratory Illnesses in Chest X-ray Images

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Kazunori; Golbaz, Marzieh; Mansoor, Awais; Perez, Geovanny F; Pancham, Krishna; Khan, Abia; Nino, Gustavo; Linguraru, Marius George

    2015-01-01

    Accurate assessment of severity of viral respiratory illnesses (VRIs) allows early interventions to prevent morbidity and mortality in young children. This paper proposes a novel imaging biomarker framework with chest X-ray image for assessing VRI’s severity in infants, developed specifically to meet the distinct challenges for pediatric population. The proposed framework integrates three novel technical contributions: a) lung segmentation using weighted partitioned active shape model, b) obtrusive object removal using graph cut segmentation with asymmetry constraint, and c) severity quantification using information-theoretic heterogeneity measures. This paper presents our pilot experimental results with a dataset of 148 images and the ground-truth severity scores given by a board-certified pediatric pulmonologist, demonstrating the effectiveness and clinical relevance of the presented framework. PMID:26736226

  1. Multi-modal registration for correlative microscopy using image analogies.

    PubMed

    Cao, Tian; Zach, Christopher; Modla, Shannon; Powell, Debbie; Czymmek, Kirk; Niethammer, Marc

    2014-08-01

    Correlative microscopy is a methodology combining the functionality of light microscopy with the high resolution of electron microscopy and other microscopy technologies for the same biological specimen. In this paper, we propose an image registration method for correlative microscopy, which is challenging due to the distinct appearance of biological structures when imaged with different modalities. Our method is based on image analogies and allows to transform images of a given modality into the appearance-space of another modality. Hence, the registration between two different types of microscopy images can be transformed to a mono-modality image registration. We use a sparse representation model to obtain image analogies. The method makes use of corresponding image training patches of two different imaging modalities to learn a dictionary capturing appearance relations. We test our approach on backscattered electron (BSE) scanning electron microscopy (SEM)/confocal and transmission electron microscopy (TEM)/confocal images. We perform rigid, affine, and deformable registration via B-splines and show improvements over direct registration using both mutual information and sum of squared differences similarity measures to account for differences in image appearance. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Multi-modal Registration for Correlative Microscopy using Image Analogies

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Tian; Zach, Christopher; Modla, Shannon; Powell, Debbie; Czymmek, Kirk; Niethammer, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Correlative microscopy is a methodology combining the functionality of light microscopy with the high resolution of electron microscopy and other microscopy technologies for the same biological specimen. In this paper, we propose an image registration method for correlative microscopy, which is challenging due to the distinct appearance of biological structures when imaged with different modalities. Our method is based on image analogies and allows to transform images of a given modality into the appearance-space of another modality. Hence, the registration between two different types of microscopy images can be transformed to a mono-modality image registration. We use a sparse representation model to obtain image analogies. The method makes use of corresponding image training patches of two different imaging modalities to learn a dictionary capturing appearance relations. We test our approach on backscattered electron (BSE) scanning electron microscopy (SEM)/confocal and transmission electron microscopy (TEM)/confocal images. We perform rigid, affine, and deformable registration via B-splines and show improvements over direct registration using both mutual information and sum of squared differences similarity measures to account for differences in image appearance. PMID:24387943

  3. Visualization of biological texture using correlation coefficient images.

    PubMed

    Sviridov, Alexander P; Ulissi, Zachary; Chernomordik, Victor; Hassan, Moinuddin; Gandjbakhche, Amir H

    2006-01-01

    Subsurface structural features of biological tissue are visualized using polarized light images. The technique of Pearson correlation coefficient analysis is used to reduce blurring of these features by unpolarized backscattered light and to visualize the regions of high statistical similarities within the noisy tissue images. It is shown that under certain conditions, such correlation coefficient maps are determined by the textural character of tissues and not by the chosen region of interest, providing information on tissue structure. As an example, the subsurface texture of a demineralized tooth sample is enhanced from a noisy polarized light image.

  4. Vascular Risk Factors: Imaging and Neuropathologic Correlates

    PubMed Central

    Knopman, David S.; Roberts, Rosebud

    2010-01-01

    Cerebrovascular disease plays an important role in cognitive disorders in the elderly. Cerebrovascular disease and Alzheimer’s disease interact on several levels, one important level being the overlap in risk factors. The major vascular risk factors such as diabetes and impaired glycemic control, hypertension, obesity and hyper- or dyslipidemia have been associated both with Alzheimer’s disease and vascular dementia. The purpose of this review is to consider the context in which vascular dementia is diagnosed, place the pathophysiological consequences of cerebrovascular disease on cognition in the context of clinical and pathological Alzheimer’s disease, and then to consider the evidence for the role of major vascular risk factors in late-life cognitive impairment, changes in brain imaging and neuropathological changes. Midlife diabetes mellitus, hypertension and obesity are established risk factors for clinically defined Alzheimer’s disease as well as vascular dementia. The basis for these relationships could either be that the risk factors lead to microvascular brain disease, promote Alzheimer pathology or both. The associations of late-life onset diabetes mellitus, hypertension and obesity with cognitive impairment are either attenuated or reversed. The role of vascular risk factors in midlife should be the focus of public health efforts to reduce the burden of late-life cognitive impairment. PMID:20182020

  5. [Correlation study between respiratory death and airborne particles in Beijing: Spatiotemporal analysis based on satellite remote sensing data].

    PubMed

    Wu, X Y; Li, G X; Wang, X Y; Liang, F C; Pan, X C

    2017-06-18

    To use vertical and humidity correcting method to calibrate aerosol optical depth (AOD), and to explore the feasibility of calibrated-AOD as exposure index to measure the level of air pollutants from the ground and to establish the exposure-response relationship between calibrated-AOD and people's health outcomes. First of all, we interpolated AOD, PM2.5, relative humidity and planetary boundary layer height using Kriging method to obtain data at different locations and matched different data with respiratory death in Beijing by geographical coordinates. Then, the planetary boundary layer height and aerosol hygroscopic growth factor calculated based on relative humidity was used to calbrate the AOD. To compare the effects of calibrated-AOD and PM2.5, we used standardization method to get non dimensionless calibrated-AOD and PM2.5. At last, we used the generalized additive mixed model (GAMM) to estimate the acute effects of calibrated-AOD and PM2.5 on respiratory death and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) death, after controlling the time trend, temperature and humidity effects, days of the week effect and holiday effects. The correlation coefficient between calibrated-AOD and PM2.5 was 0.72. The effects of calibrated-AOD on respiratory death and COPD death was the strongest at lag 0-3, one unit of calibrated-AOD increases was associated with 3.64% (95%CI: 0.58%-6.78%) increase of respiratory death and 4.92% (95%CI: 1.81%-8.14%) increase of COPD death. As for PM2.5, the strongest effects appeared at lag 0-1, one unit of PM2.5 (about 155 μg/m(3)) increases was associated with excess risks of 3.96% (95%CI: 0.82%-7.19%) and 6.12% (95%CI: 1.44%-11.02%) for respiratory death and COPD death respectively. Compared with PM2.5, the effects of calibrated-AOD on respiratory death and COPD death had narrower confidence intervals. The calibrated-AOD was sensitive to capture the lag effects, and the cumulative lag effects of calibrated-AOD were all significant on

  6. Development of system using beam's eye view images to measure respiratory motion tracking errors in image-guided robotic radiosurgery system.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Mitsuhiro; Shiomi, Hiroya; Iwata, Hiromitsu; Taguchi, Junichi; Okawa, Kohei; Kikuchi, Chie; Inada, Kosaku; Iwabuchi, Michio; Murai, Taro; Koike, Izumi; Tatewaki, Koshi; Ohta, Seiji; Inoue, Tomio

    2015-01-08

    The accuracy of the CyberKnife Synchrony Respiratory Tracking System (SRTS) is considered to be patient-dependent because the SRTS relies on an individual correlation between the internal tumor position (ITP) and the external marker position (EMP), as well as a prediction method to compensate for the delay incurred to adjust the position of the linear accelerator (linac). We aimed to develop a system for obtaining pretreatment statistical measurements of the SRTS tracking error by using beam's eye view (BEV) images, to enable the prediction of the patient-specific accuracy. The respiratory motion data for the ITP and the EMP were derived from cine MR images obtained from 23 patients. The dynamic motion phantom was used to reproduce both the ITP and EMP motions. The CyberKnife was subsequently operated with the SRTS, with a CCD camera mounted on the head of the linac. BEV images from the CCD camera were recorded during the tracking of a ball target by the linac. The tracking error was measured at 15 Hz using in-house software. To assess the precision of the position detection using an MR image, the positions of test tubes (determined from MR images) were compared with their actual positions. To assess the precision of the position detection of the ball, ball positions measured from BEV images were compared with values measured using a Vernier caliper. The SRTS accuracy was evaluated by determining the tracking error that could be identified with a probability of more than 95% (Ep95). The detection precision of the tumor position (determined from cine MR images) was < 0.2 mm. The detection precision of the tracking error when using the BEV images was < 0.2mm. These two detection precisions were derived from our measurement system and were not obtained from the SRTS. The median of Ep95 was found to be 1.5 (range, 1.0-3.5) mm. The difference between the minimum and maximum Ep95 was 2.5mm, indicating that this provides a better means of evaluating patient

  7. Correlation of rhinovirus load in the respiratory tract and clinical symptoms in hospitalized immunocompetent and immunocompromised patients.

    PubMed

    Gerna, G; Piralla, A; Rovida, F; Rognoni, V; Marchi, A; Locatelli, F; Meloni, F

    2009-08-01

    While human rhinoviruses (HRVs) are well accepted as a major cause of common cold syndromes (rhinitis), their role in the etiology of lower respiratory tract infections is still controversial, and their detection in asymptomatic patients is relatively common. The HRV pathogenic role in four groups of hospitalized patients (pediatric immunocompetent and immunocompromised patients, and adult immunocompetent and immunocompromised patients) was investigated by quantifying HRV load in nasopharyngeal aspirates or bronchoalveolar lavage samples by real-time reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR). Real-time RT-PCR was performed in duplicate on all respiratory samples resulting positive by qualitative RT-PCR. In addition, molecular typing allowed detection of all known HRV species (A, B, and C). In immunocompetent pediatric patients HRVs were mostly associated with lower respiratory tract infections (in the absence of other viral agents) and wheezing, when viral load was > or =10(6) RNA copies/ml. In young immunocompromised patients (stem cell transplantation recipients), an inverse correlation between HRV persistence over time and time at which the infection occurred after transplantation was observed, whereas in adult immunocompromised patients (lung transplant recipients) HRVs could be detected at a medium-low level (<10(5) RNA copies/ml) in bronchoalveolar lavage samples taken routinely from asymptomatic patients. In conclusion, when detected at high viral load, HRVs may cause severe upper and lower respiratory tract infections, whereas when detected at a medium-low viral load, an event more frequent in immunocompromised subjects, they may represent only bystander viruses.

  8. OFSETH: smart medical textile for continuous monitoring of respiratory motions under magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    De Jonckheere, J; Narbonneau, F; Jeanne, M; Kinet, D; Witt, J; Krebber, K; Paquet, B; Depre, A; Logier, R

    2009-01-01

    The potential impact of optical fiber sensors embedded into medical textiles for the continuous monitoring of the patient during Magnetic Resonance Imaging is presented. We report on two pure optical sensing technologies for respiratory movements monitoring - a macro bending sensor and a Bragg grating sensor, designed to measure the elongation due to abdominal and thoracic motions during breathing. We demonstrate that the two sensors can successfully sense textile elongation between, 0% and 3%, while maintaining the stretching properties of the textile substrates for a good comfort of the patient.

  9. Optimizing 4-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Data Sampling for Respiratory Motion Analysis of Pancreatic Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Stemkens, Bjorn; Tijssen, Rob H.N.; Senneville, Baudouin D. de

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: To determine the optimum sampling strategy for retrospective reconstruction of 4-dimensional (4D) MR data for nonrigid motion characterization of tumor and organs at risk for radiation therapy purposes. Methods and Materials: For optimization, we compared 2 surrogate signals (external respiratory bellows and internal MRI navigators) and 2 MR sampling strategies (Cartesian and radial) in terms of image quality and robustness. Using the optimized protocol, 6 pancreatic cancer patients were scanned to calculate the 4D motion. Region of interest analysis was performed to characterize the respiratory-induced motion of the tumor and organs at risk simultaneously. Results: The MRI navigator was found to be a more reliable surrogate for pancreatic motion than the respiratory bellows signal. Radial sampling is most benign for undersampling artifacts and intraview motion. Motion characterization revealed interorgan and interpatient variation, as well as heterogeneity within the tumor. Conclusions: A robust 4D-MRI method, based on clinically available protocols, is presented and successfully applied to characterize the abdominal motion in a small number of pancreatic cancer patients.

  10. Effects of Incentive Spirometry on Respiratory Motion in Healthy Subjects Using Cine Breathing Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Akazawa, Tsutomu; Sakuma, Tsuyoshi; Nagaya, Shigeyuki; Sonoda, Masaru; Tanaka, Yuji; Katogi, Takehide; Nemoto, Tetsuharu; Minami, Shohei

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effectiveness of incentive spirometry on respiratory motion in healthy subjects using cine breathing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods Ten non-smoking healthy subjects without any history of respiratory disease were studied. Subjects were asked to perform pulmonary training using incentive spirometry every day for two weeks. To assess the effectiveness of this training, pulmonary function tests and cine breathing MRI were performed before starting pulmonary training and two weeks after its completion. Results After training, there were significant improvements in vital capacity (VC) from 3.58±0.8 L to 3.74±0.8 L and in %VC from 107.4±10.8 to 112.1±8.2. Significant changes were observed in the right diaphragm motion, right chest wall motion, and left chest wall motion, which were increased from 55.7±9.6 mm to 63.4±10.2 mm, from 15.6±6.1 mm to 23.4±10.4 mm, and from 16.3±7.6 mm to 22.0±9.8 mm, respectively. Conclusion Two weeks of training using incentive spirometry provided improvements in pulmonary function and respiratory motion, which suggested that incentive spirometry may be a useful preoperative modality for improving pulmonary function during the perioperative period. PMID:26161341

  11. Image quality in thoracic 4D cone-beam CT: A sensitivity analysis of respiratory signal, binning method, reconstruction algorithm, and projection angular spacing

    PubMed Central

    Shieh, Chun-Chien; Kipritidis, John; O’Brien, Ricky T.; Kuncic, Zdenka; Keall, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Respiratory signal, binning method, and reconstruction algorithm are three major controllable factors affecting image quality in thoracic 4D cone-beam CT (4D-CBCT), which is widely used in image guided radiotherapy (IGRT). Previous studies have investigated each of these factors individually, but no integrated sensitivity analysis has been performed. In addition, projection angular spacing is also a key factor in reconstruction, but how it affects image quality is not obvious. An investigation of the impacts of these four factors on image quality can help determine the most effective strategy in improving 4D-CBCT for IGRT. Methods: Fourteen 4D-CBCT patient projection datasets with various respiratory motion features were reconstructed with the following controllable factors: (i) respiratory signal (real-time position management, projection image intensity analysis, or fiducial marker tracking), (ii) binning method (phase, displacement, or equal-projection-density displacement binning), and (iii) reconstruction algorithm [Feldkamp–Davis–Kress (FDK), McKinnon–Bates (MKB), or adaptive-steepest-descent projection-onto-convex-sets (ASD-POCS)]. The image quality was quantified using signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio, and edge-response width in order to assess noise/streaking and blur. The SNR values were also analyzed with respect to the maximum, mean, and root-mean-squared-error (RMSE) projection angular spacing to investigate how projection angular spacing affects image quality. Results: The choice of respiratory signals was found to have no significant impact on image quality. Displacement-based binning was found to be less prone to motion artifacts compared to phase binning in more than half of the cases, but was shown to suffer from large interbin image quality variation and large projection angular gaps. Both MKB and ASD-POCS resulted in noticeably improved image quality almost 100% of the time relative to FDK. In addition, SNR

  12. Image quality in thoracic 4D cone-beam CT: A sensitivity analysis of respiratory signal, binning method, reconstruction algorithm, and projection angular spacing

    SciTech Connect

    Shieh, Chun-Chien; Kipritidis, John; O’Brien, Ricky T.; Keall, Paul J.; Kuncic, Zdenka

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: Respiratory signal, binning method, and reconstruction algorithm are three major controllable factors affecting image quality in thoracic 4D cone-beam CT (4D-CBCT), which is widely used in image guided radiotherapy (IGRT). Previous studies have investigated each of these factors individually, but no integrated sensitivity analysis has been performed. In addition, projection angular spacing is also a key factor in reconstruction, but how it affects image quality is not obvious. An investigation of the impacts of these four factors on image quality can help determine the most effective strategy in improving 4D-CBCT for IGRT. Methods: Fourteen 4D-CBCT patient projection datasets with various respiratory motion features were reconstructed with the following controllable factors: (i) respiratory signal (real-time position management, projection image intensity analysis, or fiducial marker tracking), (ii) binning method (phase, displacement, or equal-projection-density displacement binning), and (iii) reconstruction algorithm [Feldkamp–Davis–Kress (FDK), McKinnon–Bates (MKB), or adaptive-steepest-descent projection-onto-convex-sets (ASD-POCS)]. The image quality was quantified using signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio, and edge-response width in order to assess noise/streaking and blur. The SNR values were also analyzed with respect to the maximum, mean, and root-mean-squared-error (RMSE) projection angular spacing to investigate how projection angular spacing affects image quality. Results: The choice of respiratory signals was found to have no significant impact on image quality. Displacement-based binning was found to be less prone to motion artifacts compared to phase binning in more than half of the cases, but was shown to suffer from large interbin image quality variation and large projection angular gaps. Both MKB and ASD-POCS resulted in noticeably improved image quality almost 100% of the time relative to FDK. In addition, SNR

  13. Asthma and infectious respiratory disease in children--correlation to residence near hazardous waste sites.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jing; Kouznetsova, Maria; Lessner, Lawrence; Carpenter, David O

    2007-12-01

    Rates of hospitalization for asthma and respiratory infectious disease in children were modeled as a function of residence: (1) in a zip code containing a hazardous waste site with persistent organic pollutants ('POPs'); (2) in a zip code with a waste site that did not contain POPs ('other'); or (3) in a zip code without any identified waste site ('clean'), as well as other demographic covariates. After adjustment, living in a zip code containing a POPs waste site significantly increased the frequency of hospitalization for asthma and infectious respiratory disease. Living in a zip code with an 'other' waste site also increased hospitalization frequencies for both diseases. The association was strongest for zip codes whose residents were in the lowest quartile of medium family income. This evidence supports the hypothesis that living near a hazardous waste site increases risk of respiratory disease in children.

  14. Peripheral vascular disease: correlation of MR imaging and angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Wesbey, G.E.; Higgins, C.B.; Amparo, E.G.; Hale, J.D.; Kaufman, L.; Pogany, A.C.

    1985-09-01

    The capability of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging for detecting aortic, iliac, and femoral stenoses and occlusions was evaluated. Multisection spin-echo studies at 0.35 tesla were obtained of the infrarenal aorta to the femoral bifurcation in 24 patients, all of whom had undergone intraarterial angiography within 14 days of imaging. Transaxial MR images were compared with the angiograms. Arterial stenoses and occlusions in these vessels detected by MR imaging correlated with angiographic findings in 91% of the instances. Due to the limited spatial resolution, MR images failed to demonstrate some femoral stenoses. MR imaging may be used for evaluation of aortoiliac vascular disease and for follow-up study after surgical revascularization. However, the limited spatial resolution, noncomposite display of the aortoiliofemoral circulation, and lack of evaluation of peripheral runoff provided by current MR imaging techniques militate against its replacing angiography prior to vascular intervention.

  15. Quantum Multi-Image Encryption Based on Iteration Arnold Transform with Parameters and Image Correlation Decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yiqun; Xie, Xinwen; Liu, Xingbin; Zhou, Nanrun

    2017-07-01

    A novel quantum multi-image encryption algorithm based on iteration Arnold transform with parameters and image correlation decomposition is proposed, and a quantum realization of the iteration Arnold transform with parameters is designed. The corresponding low frequency images are obtained by performing 2-D discrete wavelet transform on each image respectively, and then the corresponding low frequency images are spliced randomly to one image. The new image is scrambled by the iteration Arnold transform with parameters, and the gray-level information of the scrambled image is encoded by quantum image correlation decomposition. For the encryption algorithm, the keys are iterative times, added parameters, classical binary and orthonormal basis states. The key space, the security and the computational complexity are analyzed, and all of the analyses show that the proposed encryption algorithm could encrypt multiple images simultaneously with lower computational complexity compared with its classical counterparts.

  16. Multispectral Image Out-of-Focus Deblurring Using Interchannel Correlation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shu-Jie; Shen, Hui-Liang

    2015-11-01

    Out-of-focus blur occurs frequently in multispectral imaging systems when the camera is well focused at a specific (reference) imaging channel. As the effective focal lengths of the lens are wavelength dependent, the blurriness levels of the images at individual channels are different. This paper proposes a multispectral image deblurring framework to restore out-of-focus spectral images based on the characteristic of interchannel correlation (ICC). The ICC is investigated based on the fact that a high-dimensional color spectrum can be linearly approximated using rather a few number of intrinsic spectra. In the method, the spectral images are classified into an out-of-focus set and a well-focused set via blurriness computation. For each out-of-focus image, a guiding image is derived from the well-focused spectral images and is used as the image prior in the deblurring framework. The out-of-focus blur is modeled as a Gaussian point spread function, which is further employed as the blur kernel prior. The regularization parameters in the image deblurring framework are determined using generalized cross validation, and thus the proposed method does not need any parameter tuning. The experimental results validate that the method performs well on multispectral image deblurring and outperforms the state of the arts.

  17. Statistical modeling of 4D respiratory lung motion using diffeomorphic image registration.

    PubMed

    Ehrhardt, Jan; Werner, René; Schmidt-Richberg, Alexander; Handels, Heinz

    2011-02-01

    Modeling of respiratory motion has become increasingly important in various applications of medical imaging (e.g., radiation therapy of lung cancer). Current modeling approaches are usually confined to intra-patient registration of 3D image data representing the individual patient's anatomy at different breathing phases. We propose an approach to generate a mean motion model of the lung based on thoracic 4D computed tomography (CT) data of different patients to extend the motion modeling capabilities. Our modeling process consists of three steps: an intra-subject registration to generate subject-specific motion models, the generation of an average shape and intensity atlas of the lung as anatomical reference frame, and the registration of the subject-specific motion models to the atlas in order to build a statistical 4D mean motion model (4D-MMM). Furthermore, we present methods to adapt the 4D mean motion model to a patient-specific lung geometry. In all steps, a symmetric diffeomorphic nonlinear intensity-based registration method was employed. The Log-Euclidean framework was used to compute statistics on the diffeomorphic transformations. The presented methods are then used to build a mean motion model of respiratory lung motion using thoracic 4D CT data sets of 17 patients. We evaluate the model by applying it for estimating respiratory motion of ten lung cancer patients. The prediction is evaluated with respect to landmark and tumor motion, and the quantitative analysis results in a mean target registration error (TRE) of 3.3 ±1.6 mm if lung dynamics are not impaired by large lung tumors or other lung disorders (e.g., emphysema). With regard to lung tumor motion, we show that prediction accuracy is independent of tumor size and tumor motion amplitude in the considered data set. However, tumors adhering to non-lung structures degrade local lung dynamics significantly and the model-based prediction accuracy is lower in these cases. The statistical respiratory

  18. Respiratory kinematics by optoelectronic analysis of chest-wall motion and ultrasonic imaging of the diaphragm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliverti, Andrea; Pedotti, Antonio; Ferrigno, Giancarlo; Macklem, P. T.

    1998-07-01

    Although from a respiratory point of view, compartmental volume change or lack of it is the most crucial variable, it has not been possible to measure the volume of chest wall compartments directly. Recently we developed a new method based on a optoelectronic motion analyzer that can give the three-dimensional location of many markers with the temporal and spatial accuracy required for respiratory measurements. Marker's configuration has been designed specifically to measure the volume of three chest wall compartments, the pulmonary and abdominal rib cage compartments and the abdomen, directly. However, it can not track the exact border between the two rib cage compartments (pulmonary and abdominal) which is determined by the cephalic extremity of the area of apposition of the diaphragm to the inner surface of the rib cage, and which can change systematically as a result of disease processes. The diaphragm displacement can be detected by ultrasonography. In the present study, we propose an integrated system able to investigate the relationships between external (chest wall) and internal (diaphragm) movements of the different respiratory structures by simultaneous external imaging with the optoelectronic system combined with internal kinematic imaging using ultrasounds. 2D digitized points belonging to the lower lung margin, taken from ultrasonographic views, are mapped into the 3D space, where chest wall markers are acquired. Results are shown in terms of accuracy of 3D probe location, relative movement between the probe and the body landmarks, dynamic relationships between chest wall volume and position of the diaphragm during quiet breathing, slow inspirations, relaxations and exercise.

  19. High pneumococcal density correlates with more mucosal inflammation and reduced respiratory syncytial virus disease severity in infants.

    PubMed

    Vissers, Marloes; Ahout, Inge M; van den Kieboom, Corné H; van der Gaast-de Jongh, Christa E; Groh, Laszlo; Cremers, Amelieke J; de Groot, Ronald; de Jonge, Marien I; Ferwerda, Gerben

    2016-03-17

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is an important cause of lower respiratory tract infections in infants. A small percentage of the infected infants develops a severe infection, while most of these severely ill patients were previously healthy. It remains unclear why these children develop severe RSV infections. In this study, we investigate whether pneumococcal nasopharyngeal carriage patterns correlate with mucosal inflammation and severity of disease. In total, 105 infants hospitalized with RSV infection were included and recovery samples were taken from 42 patients. The presence and density of Streptococcus pneumoniae was determined by RT qPCR to study its relation to viral load, inflammation (MMP-9 and IL-6) and severity of RSV disease. We show that pneumococcal presence or absence in the nasopharynx does not correlate with viral load, inflammation or severity of disease. However, when pneumococcus is present in patients, a higher nasopharyngeal pneumococcal density was correlated with a higher RSV load, higher MMP-9 levels and a less severe course of disease. Our results show correlations between S. pneumoniae density and viral load, inflammation and disease severity, suggesting that pneumococcal density may be an indicator for severity in paediatric RSV disease.

  20. Correction of hysteretic respiratory motion in SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging: Simulation and patient studies.

    PubMed

    Dasari, Paul K R; Könik, Arda; Pretorius, P Hendrik; Johnson, Karen L; Segars, William P; Shazeeb, Mohammed S; King, Michael A

    2017-02-01

    Amplitude-based respiratory gating is known to capture the extent of respiratory motion (RM) accurately but results in residual motion in the presence of respiratory hysteresis. In our previous study, we proposed and developed a novel approach to account for respiratory hysteresis by applying the Bouc-Wen (BW) model of hysteresis to external surrogate signals of anterior/posterior motion of the abdomen and chest with respiration. In this work, using simulated and clinical SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) studies, we investigate the effects of respiratory hysteresis and evaluate the benefit of correcting it using the proposed BW model in comparison with the abdomen signal typically employed clinically. The MRI navigator data acquired in free-breathing human volunteers were used in the specially modified 4D NCAT phantoms to allow simulating three types of respiratory patterns: monotonic, mild hysteresis, and strong hysteresis with normal myocardial uptake, and perfusion defects in the anterior, lateral, inferior, and septal locations of the mid-ventricular wall. Clinical scans were performed using a Tc-99m sestamibi MPI protocol while recording respiratory signals from thoracic and abdomen regions using a visual tracking system (VTS). The performance of the correction using the respiratory signals was assessed through polar map analysis in phantom and 10 clinical studies selected on the basis of having substantial RM. In phantom studies, simulations illustrating normal myocardial uptake showed significant differences (P < 0.001) in the uniformity of the polar maps between the RM uncorrected and corrected. No significant differences were seen in the polar map uniformity across the RM corrections. Studies simulating perfusion defects showed significantly decreased errors (P < 0.001) in defect severity and extent for the RM corrected compared to the uncorrected. Only for the strong hysteretic pattern, there was a significant difference (P < 0.001) among

  1. Estimation of myocardial deformation using correlation image velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Athira; Krishnamurthi, Ganapathy; Mathur, Manikandan

    2017-04-05

    Tagged Magnetic Resonance (tMR) imaging is a powerful technique for determining cardiovascular abnormalities. One of the reasons for tMR not being used in routine clinical practice is the lack of easy-to-use tools for image analysis and strain mapping. In this paper, we introduce a novel interdisciplinary method based on correlation image velocimetry (CIV) to estimate cardiac deformation and strain maps from tMR images. CIV, a cross-correlation based pattern matching algorithm, analyses a pair of images to obtain the displacement field at sub-pixel accuracy with any desired spatial resolution. This first time application of CIV to tMR image analysis is implemented using an existing open source Matlab-based software called UVMAT. The method, which requires two main input parameters namely correlation box size (C B ) and search box size (S B ), is first validated using a synthetic grid image with grid sizes representative of typical tMR images. Phantom and patient images obtained from a Medical Imaging grand challenge dataset ( http://stacom.cardiacatlas.org/motion-tracking-challenge/ ) were then analysed to obtain cardiac displacement fields and strain maps. The results were then compared with estimates from Harmonic Phase analysis (HARP) technique. For a known displacement field imposed on both the synthetic grid image and the phantom image, CIV is accurate for 3-pixel and larger displacements on a 512 × 512 image with (C B ,S B )=(25,55) pixels. Further validation of our method is achieved by showing that our estimated landmark positions on patient images fall within the inter-observer variability in the ground truth. The effectiveness of our approach to analyse patient images is then established by calculating dense displacement fields throughout a cardiac cycle, and were found to be physiologically consistent. Circumferential strains were estimated at the apical, mid and basal slices of the heart, and were shown to compare favorably with those of HARP over the

  2. Looking closer at acute respiratory distress syndrome: the role of advanced imaging techniques.

    PubMed

    Bellani, Giacomo; Rouby, Jean-Jaques; Constantin, Jean-Michel; Pesenti, Antonio

    2017-02-01

    Advanced imaging techniques have provided invaluable insights in understanding of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and the effect of therapeutic strategies, thanks to the possibility of gaining regional information and moving from simple 'anatomical' information to in-vivo functional imaging. Computed tomography (CT) led to the understanding of several ARDS mechanisms and interaction with mechanical ventilation. It is nowadays frequently part of routine diagnostic workup, often leading to treatment changes. Moreover, CT is a reference for novel techniques both in clinical and preclinical studies. Bedside transthoracic lung ultrasound allows semiquantitative regional analysis of lung aeration, identifies ARDS lung morphology and response to therapeutic maneuvers. Electrical impedance tomography is a radiation-free, functional, bedside, imaging modality which allows a real-time monitoring of regional ventilation. Finally, positron emission tomography (PET) is a functional imaging technique that allows to trace physiologic processes, by administration of a radioactive molecule. PET with FDG has been applied to patients with ARDS, thanks to its ability to track the inflammatory cells activity. Progresses in lung imaging are key to individualize therapy, diagnosis, and pathophysiological mechanism at play in any patient at any specified time, helping to move toward personalized medicine for ARDS.

  3. Quantifying the impact of respiratory-gated 4D CT acquisition on thoracic image quality: a digital phantom study.

    PubMed

    Bernatowicz, K; Keall, P; Mishra, P; Knopf, A; Lomax, A; Kipritidis, J

    2015-01-01

    Prospective respiratory-gated 4D CT has been shown to reduce tumor image artifacts by up to 50% compared to conventional 4D CT. However, to date no studies have quantified the impact of gated 4D CT on normal lung tissue imaging, which is important in performing dose calculations based on accurate estimates of lung volume and structure. To determine the impact of gated 4D CT on thoracic image quality, the authors developed a novel simulation framework incorporating a realistic deformable digital phantom driven by patient tumor motion patterns. Based on this framework, the authors test the hypothesis that respiratory-gated 4D CT can significantly reduce lung imaging artifacts. Our simulation framework synchronizes the 4D extended cardiac torso (XCAT) phantom with tumor motion data in a quasi real-time fashion, allowing simulation of three 4D CT acquisition modes featuring different levels of respiratory feedback: (i) "conventional" 4D CT that uses a constant imaging and couch-shift frequency, (ii) "beam paused" 4D CT that interrupts imaging to avoid oversampling at a given couch position and respiratory phase, and (iii) "respiratory-gated" 4D CT that triggers acquisition only when the respiratory motion fulfills phase-specific displacement gating windows based on prescan breathing data. Our framework generates a set of ground truth comparators, representing the average XCAT anatomy during beam-on for each of ten respiratory phase bins. Based on this framework, the authors simulated conventional, beam-paused, and respiratory-gated 4D CT images using tumor motion patterns from seven lung cancer patients across 13 treatment fractions, with a simulated 5.5 cm(3) spherical lesion. Normal lung tissue image quality was quantified by comparing simulated and ground truth images in terms of overall mean square error (MSE) intensity difference, threshold-based lung volume error, and fractional false positive/false negative rates. Averaged across all simulations and phase bins

  4. Quantifying the impact of respiratory-gated 4D CT acquisition on thoracic image quality: A digital phantom study

    SciTech Connect

    Bernatowicz, K. Knopf, A.; Lomax, A.; Keall, P.; Kipritidis, J.; Mishra, P.

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: Prospective respiratory-gated 4D CT has been shown to reduce tumor image artifacts by up to 50% compared to conventional 4D CT. However, to date no studies have quantified the impact of gated 4D CT on normal lung tissue imaging, which is important in performing dose calculations based on accurate estimates of lung volume and structure. To determine the impact of gated 4D CT on thoracic image quality, the authors developed a novel simulation framework incorporating a realistic deformable digital phantom driven by patient tumor motion patterns. Based on this framework, the authors test the hypothesis that respiratory-gated 4D CT can significantly reduce lung imaging artifacts. Methods: Our simulation framework synchronizes the 4D extended cardiac torso (XCAT) phantom with tumor motion data in a quasi real-time fashion, allowing simulation of three 4D CT acquisition modes featuring different levels of respiratory feedback: (i) “conventional” 4D CT that uses a constant imaging and couch-shift frequency, (ii) “beam paused” 4D CT that interrupts imaging to avoid oversampling at a given couch position and respiratory phase, and (iii) “respiratory-gated” 4D CT that triggers acquisition only when the respiratory motion fulfills phase-specific displacement gating windows based on prescan breathing data. Our framework generates a set of ground truth comparators, representing the average XCAT anatomy during beam-on for each of ten respiratory phase bins. Based on this framework, the authors simulated conventional, beam-paused, and respiratory-gated 4D CT images using tumor motion patterns from seven lung cancer patients across 13 treatment fractions, with a simulated 5.5 cm{sup 3} spherical lesion. Normal lung tissue image quality was quantified by comparing simulated and ground truth images in terms of overall mean square error (MSE) intensity difference, threshold-based lung volume error, and fractional false positive/false negative rates. Results

  5. Image correlation techniques in radiation therapy treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Chen, G T; Pelizzari, C A

    1989-01-01

    A technique to spatially correlate multi-modality or serial imaging studies of the head is described. Surface fitting of a well defined structure in different imaging studies is used to determine the optimal three dimensional transformation between the coordinate systems. The transformation is then used to map volumes of interest between studies or to reslice the studies along comparable planes. The approach is feasible in the presence of variations in slice thickness, pixel size, imaging plane, or head position, and for correlations between different modalities. Correlations have been performed between serial CT, CT/MRI, and PET/CT/MRI studies. Phantom studies and clinical cases are presented. Accuracy is typically on the order of the sum of the pixel sizes between studies. Applications in radiation therapy treatment planning are described.

  6. Correlation estimation and performance optimization for distributed image compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhihai; Cao, Lei; Cheng, Hui

    2006-01-01

    Correlation estimation plays a critical role in resource allocation and rate control for distributed data compression. A Wyner-Ziv encoder for distributed image compression is often considered as a lossy source encoder followed by a lossless Slepian-Wolf encoder. The source encoder consists of spatial transform, quantization, and bit plane extraction. In this work, we find that Gray code, which has been extensively used in digital modulation, is able to significantly improve the correlation between the source data and its side information. Theoretically, we analyze the behavior of Gray code within the context of distributed image compression. Using this theoretical model, we are able to efficiently allocate the bit budget and determine the code rate of the Slepian-Wolf encoder. Our experimental results demonstrate that the Gray code, coupled with accurate correlation estimation and rate control, significantly improves the picture quality, by up to 4 dB, over the existing methods for distributed image compression.

  7. Respiratory-gated PET/CT versus delayed images for the quantitative evaluation of lower pulmonary and hepatic lesions.

    PubMed

    Tahari, Abdel K; Lodge, Martin A; Wahl, Richard L

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory motion degrades fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) images of the lower chest and upper abdomen, as the blur introduced by breathing motion increases the apparent size of the moving tumour lesions and decreases their apparent uptake, reducing the sensitivity of PET in detection of small lesions. We assessed the role of delayed and respiratory-gated PET acquisition in the quantitative evaluation of lung and liver lesions. A retrospective analysis of 64 lesions was performed. After initial non-gated whole-body PET/CT, respiratory gating was performed with 15 min in list mode. Non-gated delayed images were obtained by summing all list mode data. SUV(max) adjusted for lean body mass (SUL(max)) was measured in the initial whole-body scan, the delayed non-gated scans and the individual gated bins for each lesion. The axial z-position of SUL(max) for each lesion in five respiratory-gated bins was determined. The mean SUL of the non-pathological liver parenchyma was also recorded for each patient. Tumour lesion SUL(max) increased by an average of 34% in the delayed non-gated scan as compared with the whole-body initial scan and further by an additional 17.2% in respiratory-gated images. The maximum lesion displacement was 6.2 ± 5.0 mm. Delayed imaging alone substantially increases the magnitude of the SUL of liver and lung lesions as compared with standard whole-body images and may allow for a more accurate definition of the lesion's volume and localisation and improve tracer quantitation in malignant lesions in the lungs or upper abdomen. While respiratory gating provides more optimal imaging with greatest increase in SUL(max), the benefit is small, and delayed imaging appears sufficient in most cases. © 2014 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  8. Shape determination of unidimensional objects: the virtual image correlation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francois, M.; Semin, B.; Auradou, H.; Vatteville, J.

    2010-06-01

    The proposed method, named Virtual Image Correlation, allows one to identify an analytical expression of the shape of a curvilinear object from its image. It uses a virtual beam, whose curvature field is expressed as a truncated mathematical series. The virtual beam width only needs to be close to the physical one; its gray level (in the transverse direction) is bell-shaped. The method consists in finding the coefficients of the series for which the correlation between physical and virtual beams is the best. The accuracy and the robustness of the method is shown by the mean of two examples. The first details a Young’s modulus identification from a cantilever beam image. The second is relative to a thermal plume image, that have a weak contrast and a lot of noise.

  9. Quantum ghost image identification with correlated photon pairs.

    PubMed

    Malik, Mehul; Shin, Heedeuk; O'Sullivan, Malcolm; Zerom, Petros; Boyd, Robert W

    2010-04-23

    Ghost imaging can be performed using either quantum or classical states of light that possess strong spatial correlations. In both cases, the image is formed by averaging over many optical events. Here we show that it is possible to distinguish an object from a preestablished basis set of objects by using a small number of position-correlated photon pairs produced by spontaneous parametric down-conversion. The signal photon is incident on one member of a set of spatially nonoverlapping objects. The "ghost" image information is impressed upon the spatially separated idler photon and is extracted by means of holographic filtering and coincidence detection. We were able to distinguish among sets of two and four spatially nonoverlapping objects with confidence levels higher than 87% and 81%, respectively. This method of ghost imaging can be performed in situations requiring extremely low light levels.

  10. Quantum Ghost Image Identification with Correlated Photon Pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, Mehul; Shin, Heedeuk; O'Sullivan, Malcolm; Zerom, Petros; Boyd, Robert W.

    2010-04-01

    Ghost imaging can be performed using either quantum or classical states of light that possess strong spatial correlations. In both cases, the image is formed by averaging over many optical events. Here we show that it is possible to distinguish an object from a preestablished basis set of objects by using a small number of position-correlated photon pairs produced by spontaneous parametric down-conversion. The signal photon is incident on one member of a set of spatially nonoverlapping objects. The “ghost” image information is impressed upon the spatially separated idler photon and is extracted by means of holographic filtering and coincidence detection. We were able to distinguish among sets of two and four spatially nonoverlapping objects with confidence levels higher than 87% and 81%, respectively. This method of ghost imaging can be performed in situations requiring extremely low light levels.

  11. Elongation measurement using 1-dimensional image correlation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phongwisit, Phachara; Kamoldilok, Surachart; Buranasiri, Prathan

    2016-11-01

    Aim of this paper was to study, setup, and calibrate an elongation measurement by using 1- Dimensional Image Correlation method (1-DIC). To confirm our method and setup correctness, we need calibration with other methods. In this paper, we used a small spring as a sample to find a result in terms of spring constant. With a fundamental of Image Correlation method, images of formed and deformed samples were compared to understand the difference between deformed process. By comparing the location of reference point on both image's pixel, the spring's elongation were calculated. Then, the results have been compared with the spring constants, which were found from Hooke's law. The percentage of 5 percent error has been found. This DIC method, then, would be applied to measure the elongation of some different kinds of small fiber samples.

  12. Real-time respiratory phase matching between 2D fluoroscopic images and 3D CT images for precise percutaneous lung biopsy.

    PubMed

    Weon, Chijun; Kim, Mina; Park, Chang Min; Ra, Jong Beom

    2017-08-20

    A 3D CT image is used along with real-time 2D fluoroscopic images in the state-of-the-art cone-beam CT system to guide percutaneous lung biopsy (PLB). To improve the guiding accuracy by compensating for respiratory motion, we propose an algorithm for real-time matching of 2D fluoroscopic images to multiple 3D CT images of different respiratory phases that is robust to the small movement and deformation due to cardiac motion. Based on the transformations obtained from non-rigid registration between two 3D CT images acquired at expiratory and inspiratory phases, we first generate sequential 3D CT images (or a 4D CT image) and the corresponding 2D digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) of vessels. We then determine 3D CT images corresponding to each real-time 2D fluoroscopic image, by matching the 2D fluoroscopic image to a 2D DRR. Quantitative evaluations performed with 20 clinical datasets show that registration errors of anatomical features between a 2D fluoroscopic image and its matched 2D DRR are less than 3mm on average. Registration errors of a target lesion are determined to be roughly 3mm on average for 10 datasets. We propose a real-time matching algorithm to compensate for respiratory motion between a 2D fluoroscopic image and 3D CT images of the lung, regardless of cardiac motion, based on a newly improved matching measure. The proposed algorithm can improve the accuracy of a guiding system for the PLB by providing 3D images precisely registered to 2D fluoroscopic images in real-time, without time-consuming respiratory gated or cardiac gated CT images. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. Cross Correlation versus Normalized Mutual Information on Image Registration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tan, Bin; Tilton, James C.; Lin, Guoqing

    2016-01-01

    This is the first study to quantitatively assess and compare cross correlation and normalized mutual information methods used to register images in subpixel scale. The study shows that the normalized mutual information method is less sensitive to unaligned edges due to the spectral response differences than is cross correlation. This characteristic makes the normalized image resolution a better candidate for band to band registration. Improved band-to-band registration in the data from satellite-borne instruments will result in improved retrievals of key science measurements such as cloud properties, vegetation, snow and fire.

  14. In Situ Correlated Molecular Imaging of Chemically Communicating Microbial Communities

    SciTech Connect

    Bohn, Paul W.; Shrout, J. D.; Sweedler, J. V.; Farrand, S.

    2016-01-25

    This document constitutes the final technical report for DE-SC0006642, In Situ Correlated Molecular Imaging of Chemically Communicating Microbial Communities, a project carried out collaboratively by investigators at Notre Dame and UIUC. The work carried out under DOE support in this project produced advances in two areas: development of new highly sophisticated correlated imaging approaches and the application of these new tools to the growth and differentiation of microbial communities under a variety of environmental conditions. A significant effort involved the creation of technical enhancements and sampling approaches to allow us to advance heterocorrelated mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) and correlated Raman microscopy (CRM) from bacterial cultures and biofilms. We then exploited these measurement advances in heterocorrelated MS/CRM imaging to determine relationship of signaling molecules and excreted signaling molecules produced by P. aeruginosa to conditions relevant to the rhizosphere. In particular, we: (1) developed a laboratory testbed mimic for the rhizosphere to enable microbial growth on slides under controlled conditions; (2) integrated specific measurements of (a) rhamnolipids, (b) quinolone/quinolones, and (c) phenazines specific to P. aeruginosa; and (3) utilized the imaging tools to probe how messenger secretion, quorum sensing and swarming behavior are correlated with behavior.

  15. Correlated Statistical Uncertainties in Coded-Aperture Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Fleenor, Matthew C; Blackston, Matthew A; Ziock, Klaus-Peter

    2014-01-01

    In nuclear security applications, coded-aperture imagers provide the opportu- nity for a wealth of information regarding the attributes of both the radioac- tive and non-radioactive components of the objects being imaged. However, for optimum benefit to the community, spatial attributes need to be deter- mined in a quantitative and statistically meaningful manner. To address the deficiency of quantifiable errors in coded-aperture imaging, we present uncer- tainty matrices containing covariance terms between image pixels for MURA mask patterns. We calculated these correlated uncertainties as functions of variation in mask rank, mask pattern over-sampling, and whether or not anti- mask data are included. Utilizing simulated point source data, we found that correlations (and inverse correlations) arose when two or more image pixels were summed. Furthermore, we found that the presence of correlations (and their inverses) was heightened by the process of over-sampling, while correla- tions were suppressed by the inclusion of anti-mask data and with increased mask rank. As an application of this result, we explore how statistics-based alarming in nuclear security is impacted.

  16. Local respiratory motion correction for PET/CT imaging: Application to lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lamare, F. Fernandez, P.; Fayad, H.; Visvikis, D.

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: Despite multiple methodologies already proposed to correct respiratory motion in the whole PET imaging field of view (FOV), such approaches have not found wide acceptance in clinical routine. An alternative can be the local respiratory motion correction (LRMC) of data corresponding to a given volume of interest (VOI: organ or tumor). Advantages of LRMC include the use of a simple motion model, faster execution times, and organ specific motion correction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of LMRC using various motion models for oncology (lung lesion) applications. Methods: Both simulated (NURBS based 4D cardiac-torso phantom) and clinical studies (six patients) were used in the evaluation of the proposed LRMC approach. PET data were acquired in list-mode and synchronized with respiration. The implemented approach consists first in defining a VOI on the reconstructed motion average image. Gated PET images of the VOI are subsequently reconstructed using only lines of response passing through the selected VOI and are used in combination with a center of gravity or an affine/elastic registration algorithm to derive the transformation maps corresponding to the respiration effects. Those are finally integrated in the reconstruction process to produce a motion free image over the lesion regions. Results: Although the center of gravity or affine algorithm achieved similar performance for individual lesion motion correction, the elastic model, applied either locally or to the whole FOV, led to an overall superior performance. The spatial tumor location was altered by 89% and 81% for the elastic model applied locally or to the whole FOV, respectively (compared to 44% and 39% for the center of gravity and affine models, respectively). This resulted in similar associated overall tumor volume changes of 84% and 80%, respectively (compared to 75% and 71% for the center of gravity and affine models, respectively). The application of the nonrigid

  17. Correlation between transition percentage of minute volume (TMV%) and outcome of patients with acute respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Peng, Chung-Kan; Wu, Shu-Fen; Yang, Shih-Hsing; Hsieh, Chuan-Fa; Huang, Chung-Chih; Huang, Yuh-Chin T; Wu, Chin-Pyng

    2017-06-01

    We have previously shown in patients receiving adaptive support ventilation (ASV) that there existed a Transition %MinVol (TMV%) where the patient's work of breathing began to reduce. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that higher TMV% would be associated with poorer outcome in patients with acute respiratory failure. In this prospective observational study, we recruited patients with acute respiratory failure on ASV between December 2012 and September 2013 in a mixed ICU. The TMV% was determined by adjusting % MinVol until mandatory respiratory frequency was between 0 and 1breath/min. TMV% was measured on the first two days of mechanical ventilation. A total of 337 patients (age: 70±16years) were recruited. In patients whose TMV% increased between Day 1 and Day 2, aOR for mortality was 7.0 (95%CI=2.7-18.3, p<0.001) compared to patients whose TMV% decreased. In patients whose TMV% was unchanged between Day 1 and Day2, aOR for mortality was 3.91 (95%CI=1.80-8.22, p<0.01). An increase, or lack of decrease, of TMV% from Day 1 to Day 2 was associated with higher risk of in-hospital death. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Tissue-specific mtDNA abundance from exome data and its correlation with mitochondrial transcription, mass and respiratory activity.

    PubMed

    D'Erchia, Anna Maria; Atlante, Anna; Gadaleta, Gemma; Pavesi, Giulio; Chiara, Matteo; De Virgilio, Caterina; Manzari, Caterina; Mastropasqua, Francesca; Prazzoli, Gian Marco; Picardi, Ernesto; Gissi, Carmela; Horner, David; Reyes, Aurelio; Sbisà, Elisabetta; Tullo, Apollonia; Pesole, Graziano

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells contain a population of mitochondria, variable in number and shape, which in turn contain multiple copies of a tiny compact genome (mtDNA) whose expression and function is strictly coordinated with the nuclear one. mtDNA copy number varies between different cell or tissues types, both in response to overall metabolic and bioenergetics demands and as a consequence or cause of specific pathological conditions. Here we present a novel and reliable methodology to assess the effective mtDNA copy number per diploid genome by investigating off-target reads obtained by whole-exome sequencing (WES) experiments. We also investigate whether and how mtDNA copy number correlates with mitochondrial mass, respiratory activity and expression levels. Analyzing six different tissues from three age- and sex-matched human individuals, we found a highly significant linear correlation between mtDNA copy number estimated by qPCR and the frequency of mtDNA off target WES reads. Furthermore, mtDNA copy number showed highly significant correlation with mitochondrial gene expression levels as measured by RNA-Seq as well as with mitochondrial mass and respiratory activity. Our methodology makes thus feasible, at a large scale, the investigation of mtDNA copy number in diverse cell-types, tissues and pathological conditions or in response to specific treatments. Copyright © 2014 © Elsevier B.V. and Mitochondria Research Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. 3D cine magnetic resonance imaging of rat lung ARDS using gradient-modulated SWIFT with retrospective respiratory gating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Naoharu; Lei, Jianxun; Utecht, Lynn; Garwood, Michael; Ingbar, David H.; Bhargava, Maneesh

    2015-03-01

    SWeep Imaging with Fourier Transformation (SWIFT) with gradient modulation and DC navigator retrospective gating is introduced as a 3D cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) method for the lung. In anesthetized normal rats, the quasi-simultaneous excitation and acquisition in SWIFT enabled extremely high sensitivity to the fast-decaying parenchymal signals (TE=~4 μs), which are invisible with conventional MRI techniques. Respiratory motion information was extracted from DC navigator signals and the SWIFT data were reconstructed to 3D cine images with 16 respiratory phases. To test this technique's capabilities, rats exposed to > 95% O2 for 60 hours for induction of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), were imaged and compared with normal rat lungs (N=7 and 5 for ARDS and normal groups, respectively). SWIFT images showed lung tissue density differences along the gravity direction. In the cine SWIFT images, a parenchymal signal drop at the inhalation phase was consistently observed for both normal and ARDS rats due to lung inflation (i.e. decrease of the proton density), but the drop was less for ARDS rats. Depending on the respiratory phase and lung region, the lungs from the ARDS rats showed 1-24% higher parenchymal signal intensities relative to the normal rat lungs, likely due to accumulated extravascular water (EVLW). Those results demonstrate that SWIFT has high enough sensitivity for detecting the lung proton density changes due to gravity, different phases of respiration and accumulation of EVLW in the rat ARDS lungs.

  20. Subject-specific real-time respiratory liver motion compensation method for ultrasound-MRI/CT fusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Yang, Minglei; Ding, Hui; Kang, Jingang; Zhu, Lei; Wang, Guangzhi

    2015-05-01

    Ultrasound-MRI/CT fusion imaging is widely used in minimal invasive surgeries, such as liver biopsy and tumor ablation. However, respiration-induced quasi-periodic liver motion and deformation cause unacceptable misalignment of the fusion images (i.e., fusion error). A subject-specific liver motion model based on skin-mounted position sensor and corresponding ultrasound liver image sequence was developed to compensate for liver motion. External surrogate respiratory motion signal is used to predict internal liver motion. An electromagnetic position sensor fixed on abdominal skin is introduced to track the respiratory motion, and 2D ultrasound images are used to track the liver motion synchronously. Based on these measurements, a subject-specific model describing the relationship of respiratory skin motion and internal liver motion is built and applied in real time (ultrasound-MRI/CT fusion imaging system) to predict and to compensate for the liver motion due to respiratory movement. Feasibility experiments and clinical trials were carried out on a phantom and eight volunteers. Qualitative and quantitative analyses and visual inspections performed by experienced clinicians show that the proposed model could effectively compensate for the liver motion, and the ratio of motion-compensated fusion error to the original varied from 10 % (0.96/9.40 mm) to 28 % (2.90/10.22 mm). An online liver motion modeling and compensation method was developed that provides surgeons with stable and accurate multimodality fusion images in real time.

  1. Holographic security system based on image domain joint transform correlator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, Michael; Odinokov, Sergey B.; Bondarev, Leonid A.; Kurakin, Sergey V.; Matveyev, Sergey V.; Belyaev, V. S.

    2002-04-01

    We describe holographic security system providing machine reading of the holographic information and matching it with the reference one by optical means. The security holographic mark includes several test holograms and should be applied to a carrier: ID-card, paper seal etc. Each of the holograms stores a part of entire image, stored in the reference hologram. Image domain JTC is used to match the images retrieved from the holograms. Being recorded and retrieved, the images provides correlation peaks with special positions, with a strict dependence on the tested and reference holograms mutual shifts. The system proposed works like usual JTC with a few useful differences. The image domain recognizing is a result of Fresnel holographic technique of the images recording. It provides more effective usage of the light addressed SLM (LASLM) work pupil and resolution in more simple and compact device. Few correlation peaks enhances the device recognizing probability. We describe the real-time experimental arrangement based on LASLM. The experimental results are in a good correspondence with computer simulations. We also show in practice that good results may be obtained while using the image domain JTC technique in despite of the low LASLM resolution and the device compact size.

  2. Imaging features of breast malignancy: breast ultrasound and MR imaging correlation.

    PubMed

    Giuliano, Vincenzo; Giuliano, Concetta

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in breast imaging, including volumetric breast ultrasound and breast magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, now provide multiplanar capability for detailed morphologic assessment of breast malignancies. This article describes the imaging findings of common breast cancers, utilizing volumetric breast ultrasound with MR imaging correlation. Knowledge of the characteristic appearances of breast malignancy can facilitate the diagnosis and management of breast masses, particularly when obscured by excessive breast density on mammography examinations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Dynamic keyhole: A novel method to improve MR images in the presence of respiratory motion for real-time MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Danny; Pollock, Sean; Whelan, Brendan; Keall, Paul; Kim, Taeho

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: In this work, the authors present a novel magnetic resonance imaging reconstruction method to improve the quality of MR images in the presence of respiratory motion for real-time thoracic image-guided radiotherapy. Methods: This new reconstruction method is called dynamic keyhole and utilizes a library of previously acquired, peripheral k-space datasets from the same (or similar) respiratory state in conjunction with central k-space datasets acquired in real-time. Internal or external respiratory signals are utilized to sort, match, and combine the two separate peripheral and central k-space datasets with respect to respiratory displacement, thereby reducing acquisition time and improving image quality without respiratory-related artifacts. In this study, the dynamic keyhole, conventional keyhole, and zero-filling methods were compared to full k-space acquisition (ground truth) for 60 coronal datasets acquired from 15 healthy human subjects. Results: For the same image-quality difference from the ground-truth image, the dynamic keyhole method reused 79% of the prior peripheral phase-encoding lines, while the conventional keyhole reused 73% and zero-filling 63% (p-value < 0.0001), corresponding to faster acquisition speed of dynamic keyhole for real-time imaging applications. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that the dynamic keyhole method is a promising technique for clinical applications such as image-guided radiotherapy requiring real-time MR monitoring of the thoracic region. Based on the results from this study, the dynamic keyhole method could increase the temporal resolution by a factor of five compared with full k-space methods.

  4. Gallium scintigraphy in bone infarction. Correlation with bone imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Armas, R.R.; Goldsmith, S.J.

    1984-01-01

    The appearance of gallium-67 images in bone infarction was studied in nine patients with sickle cell disease and correlated with the bone scan findings. Gallium uptake in acute infarction was decreased or absent with a variable bone scan uptake, and normal in healing infarcts, which showed increased uptake on bone scan. The significance of these findings is discussed.

  5. SU-E-P-41: Imaging Coordination of Cone Beam CT, On-Board Image Conjunction with Optical Image Guidance for SBRT Treatment with Respiratory Motion Management

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y; Campbell, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To spare normal tissue for SBRT lung/liver patients, especially for patients with significant tumor motion, image guided respiratory motion management has been widely implemented in clinical practice. The purpose of this study was to evaluate imaging coordination of cone beam CT, on-board X-ray image conjunction with optical image guidance for SBRT treatment with motion management. Methods: Currently in our clinic a Varian Novlis Tx was utilized for treating SBRT patients implementing CBCT. A BrainLAB X-ray ExacTrac imaging system in conjunction with optical guidance was primarily used for SRS patients. CBCT and X-ray imaging system were independently calibrated with 1.0 mm tolerance. For SBRT lung/liver patients, the magnitude of tumor motion was measured based-on 4DCT and the measurement was analyzed to determine if patients would be beneficial with respiratory motion management. For patients eligible for motion management, an additional CT with breath holding would be scanned and used as primary planning CT and as reference images for Cone beam CT. During the SBRT treatment, a CBCT with pause and continuing technology would be performed with patients holding breath, which may require 3–4 partially scanned CBCT to combine as a whole CBCT depending on how long patients capable of holding breath. After patients being setup by CBCT images, the ExactTrac X-ray imaging system was implemented with patients’ on-board X-ray images compared to breath holding CT-based DRR. Results: For breath holding patients SBRT treatment, after initially localizing patients with CBCT, we then position patients with ExacTrac X-ray and optical imaging system. The observed deviations of real-time optical guided position average at 3.0, 2.5 and 1.5 mm in longitudinal, vertical and lateral respectively based on 35 treatments. Conclusion: The respiratory motion management clinical practice improved our physician confidence level to give tighter tumor margin for sparing normal

  6. A Random Motility Assay Based on Image Correlation Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Prummer, Michael; Kling, Dorothee; Trefzer, Vanessa; Enderle, Thilo; Zoffmann, Sannah; Prunotto, Marco

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate the random motility (RAMOT) assay based on image correlation spectroscopy for the automated, label-free, high-throughput characterization of random cell migration. The approach is complementary to traditional migration assays, which determine only the collective net motility in a particular direction. The RAMOT assay is less demanding on image quality compared to single-cell tracking, does not require cell identification or trajectory reconstruction, and performs well on live-cell, time-lapse, phase contrast video microscopy of hundreds of cells in parallel. Effective diffusion coefficients derived from the RAMOT analysis are in quantitative agreement with Monte Carlo simulations and allowed for the detection of pharmacological effects on macrophage-like cells migrating on a planar collagen matrix. These results expand the application range of image correlation spectroscopy to multicellular systems and demonstrate a novel, to our knowledge, migration assay with little preparative effort. PMID:23746508

  7. Usefulness of abdominal belt for restricting respiratory cardiac motion and improving image quality in myocardial perfusion PET.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Yasutaka; Tomita, Yoya; Ishida, Masaki; Kobayashi, Shigeki; Takeda, Kan; Sakuma, Hajime

    2016-08-17

    The current study evaluated the usefulness of a belt technique for restricting respiratory motion of the heart and for improving image quality of (13)N-ammonia myocardial PET/CT, and it assessed the tolerability of the belt technique in the clinical setting. Myocardial (13)N-ammonia PET/CT scanning was performed in 8 volunteers on Discovery PET/CT 690 with an optical respiratory motion tracking system. Emission scans were performed with and without an abdominal belt. The amplitude of left ventricular (LV) respiratory motion was measured on respiratory-gated PET images. The degree of erroneous decreases in regional myocardial uptake was visually assessed on ungated PET images using a 5-point scale (0 = normal, 1/2/3 = mild/moderate/severe decrease, 4 = defect). The tolerability of the belt technique was evaluated in 53 patients. All subjects tolerated the belt procedure. The amplitude of the LV respiratory motion decreased significantly with the belt (8.1 ± 7.1 vs 12.1 ± 6.1 mm, P = .0078). The belt significantly improved the image quality scores in the anterior (0.29 ± 0.81 vs 0.71 ± 1.04, P = .015) and inferior (0.33 ± 0.92 vs 1.04 ± 1.04, P < .0001) wall. No adverse events related to the belt technique were observed. The belt technique restricts LV respiratory motion and improves the image quality of myocardial PET/CT, and it is well tolerated by patients.

  8. Adaptive codebook selection schemes for image classification in correlated channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chia Chang; Liu, Xiang Lian; Liu, Kuan-Fu

    2015-09-01

    The multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) system with the use of transmit and receive antenna arrays achieves diversity and array gains via transmit beamforming. Due to the absence of full channel state information (CSI) at the transmitter, the transmit beamforming vector can be quantized at the receiver and sent back to the transmitter by a low-rate feedback channel, called limited feedback beamforming. One of the key roles of Vector Quantization (VQ) is how to generate a good codebook such that the distortion between the original image and the reconstructed image is the minimized. In this paper, a novel adaptive codebook selection scheme for image classification is proposed with taking both spatial and temporal correlation inherent in the channel into consideration. The new codebook selection algorithm is developed to select two codebooks from the discrete Fourier transform (DFT) codebook, the generalized Lloyd algorithm (GLA) codebook and the Grassmannian codebook to be combined and used as candidates of the original image and the reconstructed image for image transmission. The channel is estimated and divided into four regions based on the spatial and temporal correlation of the channel and an appropriate codebook is assigned to each region. The proposed method can efficiently reduce the required information of feedback under the spatially and temporally correlated channels, where each region is adaptively. Simulation results show that in the case of temporally and spatially correlated channels, the bit-error-rate (BER) performance can be improved substantially by the proposed algorithm compared to the one with only single codebook.

  9. Population calcium imaging of spontaneous respiratory and novel motor activity in the facial nucleus and ventral brainstem in newborn mice

    PubMed Central

    Persson, Karin; Rekling, Jens C

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The brainstem contains rhythm and pattern forming circuits, which drive cranial and spinal motor pools to produce respiratory and other motor patterns. Here we used calcium imaging combined with nerve recordings in newborn mice to reveal spontaneous population activity in the ventral brainstem and in the facial nucleus. In Fluo-8 AM loaded brainstem–spinal cord preparations, respiratory activity on cervical nerves was synchronized with calcium signals at the ventrolateral brainstem surface. Individual ventrolateral neurons at the level of the parafacial respiratory group showed perfect or partial synchrony with respiratory nerve bursts. In brainstem–spinal cord preparations, cut at the level of the mid-facial nucleus, calcium signals were recorded in the dorsal, lateral and medial facial subnuclei during respiratory activity. Strong activity initiated in the dorsal subnucleus, followed by activity in lateral and medial subnuclei. Whole-cell recordings from facial motoneurons showed weak respiratory drives, and electrical field potential recordings confirmed respiratory drive to particularly the dorsal and lateral subnuclei. Putative facial premotoneurons showed respiratory-related calcium signals, and were predominantly located dorsomedial to the facial nucleus. A novel motor activity on facial, cervical and thoracic nerves was synchronized with calcium signals at the ventromedial brainstem extending from the level of the facial nucleus to the medulla–spinal cord border. Cervical dorsal root stimulation induced similar ventromedial activity. The medial facial subnucleus showed calcium signals synchronized with this novel motor activity on cervical nerves, and cervical dorsal root stimulation induced similar medial facial subnucleus activity. In conclusion, the dorsal and lateral facial subnuclei are strongly respiratory-modulated, and the brainstem contains a novel pattern forming circuit that drives the medial facial subnucleus and cervical motor

  10. The relative importance of respiratory water loss in scorpions is correlated with species habitat type and activity pattern.

    PubMed

    Gefen, Eran

    2011-01-01

    Scorpions exhibit some of the lowest recorded water loss rates compared with those of other terrestrial arthropods of similar body size. Evaporative water loss (EWL) includes cuticular transpiration and respiratory water loss (RWL) from gas exchange surfaces, that is, book lung lamellae. Estimated fractions of cuticular and respiratory losses currently available from the literature show considerable variation, at least partly as a result of differences in methodology. This study reports RWL rates and their relative importance in scorpions from two families (Buthidae and Scorpionidae), including both xeric and mesic species (or subspecies). Two of the included Buthidae were surface-dwelling species, and another inhabits empty burrows of other terrestrial arthropods. This experimental design enabled correlating RWL importance with scorpion phylogeny, habitat type, and/or homing behavior. Buthidae species exhibited significantly lower EWL rates compared with those of Scorpionidae, whereas effects of habitat type and homing behavior were not significant. Resting RWL rates were not significantly affected by scorpion phylogeny, but rates for the xeric species (totaling ~10% of EWL rates at 30°C) were significantly lower compared with those of mesic species. These lower RWL values were correlated with significantly lower H(2)O/CO(2) emission rates in xeric species. The experimental setup and ~24-h duration of each individual recording allowed estimating the effect of interspecific variation in activity on RWL proportions. The high respiratory losses in active hydrated Scorpio maurus fuscus, totaling 30% of EWL, suggest that behavioral discretion in this species is a more likely mechanism for body water conservation under stressful conditions when compared with the responses of other studied species.

  11. Relationships among Dissemination of Primary Parainfluenza Virus Infection in the Respiratory Tract, Mucosal and Peripheral Immune Responses, and Protection from Reinfection: a Noninvasive Bioluminescence-Imaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Crystal W.; Li, Mei; Hurwitz, Julia L.; Vogel, Peter

    2015-01-01

    , resulting in subsequent reinfections even in the absence of antigenic drift. Here, we used noninvasive bioluminescence imaging in a mouse model to dissect relationships among (i) the mode of inoculation, (ii) the dynamics of primary infection, (iii) consequent immune responses, and (iv) protection from high-dose, high-volume lethal challenge and contact transmission, which we find here to be similar to that of a mild low-dose, low-volume upper respiratory tract (URT)-biased infection. Our studies demonstrate the superiority of i.n. versus i.m. vaccination in protection against both lethal challenge and contact transmission. In addition to providing correlates of protection that will assist respiratory virus vaccine development, these studies extend the development of an increasingly used technique for the study of viral infection and immunity, noninvasive bioluminescence imaging. PMID:25589649

  12. Correlation of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Tumor Volume with Histopathology

    PubMed Central

    Turkbey, Baris; Mani, Haresh; Aras, Omer; Rastinehad, Ardeshir R.; Shah, Vijay; Bernardo, Marcelino; Pohida, Thomas; Daar, Dagane; Benjamin, Compton; McKinney, Yolanda L.; Linehan, W. Marston; Wood, Bradford J.; Merino, Maria J.; Choyke, Peter L.; Pinto, Peter A.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The biology of prostate cancer may be influenced by the index lesion. The definition of index lesion volume is important for appropriate decision making, especially for image guided focal treatment. We determined the accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging for determining index tumor volume compared with volumes derived from histopathology. Materials and Methods We evaluated 135 patients (mean age 59.3 years) with a mean prostate specific antigen of 6.74 ng/dl who underwent multiparametric 3T endorectal coil magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate and subsequent radical prostatectomy. Index tumor volume was determined prospectively and independently by magnetic resonance imaging and histopathology. The ellipsoid formula was applied to determine histopathology tumor volume, whereas manual tumor segmentation was used to determine magnetic resonance tumor volume. Histopathology tumor volume was correlated with age and prostate specific antigen whereas magnetic resonance tumor volume involved Pearson correlation and linear regression methods. In addition, the predictive power of magnetic resonance tumor volume, prostate specific antigen and age for estimating histopathology tumor volume (greater than 0.5 cm3) was assessed by ROC analysis. The same analysis was also conducted for the 1.15 shrinkage factor corrected histopathology data set. Results There was a positive correlation between histopathology tumor volume and magnetic resonance tumor volume (Pearson coefficient 0.633, p <0.0001), but a weak correlation between prostate specific antigen and histopathology tumor volume (Pearson coefficient 0.237, p=0.003). On linear regression analysis histopathology tumor volume and magnetic resonance tumor volume were correlated (r2=0.401, p <0.00001). On ROC analysis AUC values for magnetic resonance tumor volume, prostate specific antigen and age in estimating tumors larger than 0.5 cm3 at histopathology were 0.949 (p <0.0000001), 0.685 (p=0.001) and 0.627 (p=0

  13. Correlation of magnetic resonance imaging tumor volume with histopathology.

    PubMed

    Turkbey, Baris; Mani, Haresh; Aras, Omer; Rastinehad, Ardeshir R; Shah, Vijay; Bernardo, Marcelino; Pohida, Thomas; Daar, Dagane; Benjamin, Compton; McKinney, Yolanda L; Linehan, W Marston; Wood, Bradford J; Merino, Maria J; Choyke, Peter L; Pinto, Peter A

    2012-10-01

    The biology of prostate cancer may be influenced by the index lesion. The definition of index lesion volume is important for appropriate decision making, especially for image guided focal treatment. We determined the accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging for determining index tumor volume compared with volumes derived from histopathology. We evaluated 135 patients (mean age 59.3 years) with a mean prostate specific antigen of 6.74 ng/dl who underwent multiparametric 3T endorectal coil magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate and subsequent radical prostatectomy. Index tumor volume was determined prospectively and independently by magnetic resonance imaging and histopathology. The ellipsoid formula was applied to determine histopathology tumor volume, whereas manual tumor segmentation was used to determine magnetic resonance tumor volume. Histopathology tumor volume was correlated with age and prostate specific antigen whereas magnetic resonance tumor volume involved Pearson correlation and linear regression methods. In addition, the predictive power of magnetic resonance tumor volume, prostate specific antigen and age for estimating histopathology tumor volume (greater than 0.5 cm(3)) was assessed by ROC analysis. The same analysis was also conducted for the 1.15 shrinkage factor corrected histopathology data set. There was a positive correlation between histopathology tumor volume and magnetic resonance tumor volume (Pearson coefficient 0.633, p <0.0001), but a weak correlation between prostate specific antigen and histopathology tumor volume (Pearson coefficient 0.237, p = 0.003). On linear regression analysis histopathology tumor volume and magnetic resonance tumor volume were correlated (r(2) = 0.401, p <0.00001). On ROC analysis AUC values for magnetic resonance tumor volume, prostate specific antigen and age in estimating tumors larger than 0.5 cm(3) at histopathology were 0.949 (p <0.0000001), 0.685 (p = 0.001) and 0.627 (p = 0.02), respectively. Similar

  14. Correlation and image compression for limited-bandwidth CCD.

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Douglas G.

    2005-07-01

    As radars move to Unmanned Aerial Vehicles with limited-bandwidth data downlinks, the amount of data stored and transmitted with each image becomes more significant. This document gives the results of a study to determine the effect of lossy compression in the image magnitude and phase on Coherent Change Detection (CCD). We examine 44 lossy compression types, plus lossless zlib compression, and test each compression method with over 600 CCD image pairs. We also derive theoretical predictions for the correlation for most of these compression schemes, which compare favorably with the experimental results. We recommend image transmission formats for limited-bandwidth programs having various requirements for CCD, including programs which cannot allow performance degradation and those which have stricter bandwidth requirements at the expense of CCD performance.

  15. Imaging pediatric magnet ingestion with surgical-pathological correlation.

    PubMed

    Otjen, Jeffrey P; Rohrmann, Charles A; Iyer, Ramesh S

    2013-07-01

    Foreign body ingestion is a common problem in the pediatric population and a frequent cause for emergency room visits. Magnets are common household objects that when ingested can bring about severe, possibly fatal gastrointestinal complications. Radiography is an integral component of the management of these children. Pediatric and emergency radiologists alike must be aware of imaging manifestations of magnet ingestion, as their identification drives decision-making for consulting surgeons and gastroenterologists. Radiology can thus substantially augment the clinical history and physical exam, facilitating appropriate management. This manuscript sequentially presents cases of magnet ingestion featuring imaging findings coupled with surgical and pathological correlation. Each case is presented to highlight ways in which the radiologist can make impactful contributions to diagnosis and management. Clinical overview with pitfalls of magnet ingestion imaging and an imaging decision tree will also be presented.

  16. Incoherent Diffractive Imaging via Intensity Correlations of Hard X Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Classen, Anton; Ayyer, Kartik; Chapman, Henry N.; Röhlsberger, Ralf; von Zanthier, Joachim

    2017-08-01

    Established x-ray diffraction methods allow for high-resolution structure determination of crystals, crystallized protein structures, or even single molecules. While these techniques rely on coherent scattering, incoherent processes like fluorescence emission—often the predominant scattering mechanism—are generally considered detrimental for imaging applications. Here, we show that intensity correlations of incoherently scattered x-ray radiation can be used to image the full 3D arrangement of the scattering atoms with significantly higher resolution compared to conventional coherent diffraction imaging and crystallography, including additional three-dimensional information in Fourier space for a single sample orientation. We present a number of properties of incoherent diffractive imaging that are conceptually superior to those of coherent methods.

  17. Color image enhancement using correlated intensity and saturation adjustments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwok, Ngaiming; Shi, Haiyan; Fang, Gu; Ha, Quang; Yu, Ying-Hao; Wu, Tonghai; Li, Huaizhong; Nguyen, Thai

    2015-07-01

    The enhancement of digital color images needs to be performed in accordance with human perception in terms of hue, saturation, and intensity attributes instead of improving only the contrast. Two approaches were developed in this work, which use a correlated adjustment mechanism incorporating intensity and saturation attributes and provide contrast and saturation enhancements together with brightness consistency. In these algorithms, object edges are emphasized for contrast, and image saturation is increased by boosting the salient regions. Furthermore, intensity and saturation enhancements are carried out in a lattice structure where adjustments are made inter-related for better performance. Experiments were conducted with benchmark and real-world images. Results had shown improvements in image qualities both qualitatively and quantitatively.

  18. Correlation of lesions from multiple images for CAD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Hui-Hua; Giger, Maryellen L.; Horsch, Karla; Hendrick, R. Edward; Vyborny, Carl J.; Lan, Li

    2004-05-01

    The object of this research is to investigate a method for determining whether two different imaged presentations of a lesion actually represent the same abnormality. Tasks of this kind are expected to arise in numerous applications, including when interpreting multi-view mammograms or multi-modal images for breast cancer diagnosis and when comparing breast images in longitudinal studies for evaluation of disease prognosis or treatment outcome. Currently, we consider the above-stated discrimination task in two-view breast sonography. We are studying image-based feature(s) and are developing general correlation formulation that uses the identified feature(s). By using a database of 262 actual breast lesions we have obtained promising initial results that yield an Az value of 0.82 in the task of distinguishing between corresponding lesion pairs and non-corresponding lesion pairs.

  19. Image correlation spectroscopy for measurements of particle densities and colocalization.

    PubMed

    Rappaz, Benjamin; Wiseman, Paul W

    2013-06-01

    Cells interact with their environment through receptor proteins expressed at their plasma membrane, and protein-protein interactions govern the transduction of signals across the membrane into the cell. Therefore, the ability to measure receptor densities and protein colocalization within the membrane of intact cells is of paramount importance. This unit describes a technique to extract these parameters from fluorescence microscopy images obtained using a commercial confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) and other similar types of microscopes. It is based on the analysis of spatial fluorescence intensity fluctuations in the images, which can then be related to particle density and aggregation state via calculation of a spatial autocorrelation function, or used to measure particle colocalization via calculation of a spatial cross-correlation function from dual-color images of proteins tagged with two different fluorophores and imaged in two detection channels. These parameters offer key insights on the interaction of the cell with its environment. © 2013 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  20. Photon-number correlation for quantum enhanced imaging and sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meda, A.; Losero, E.; Samantaray, N.; Scafirimuto, F.; Pradyumna, S.; Avella, A.; Ruo-Berchera, I.; Genovese, M.

    2017-09-01

    In this review we present the potentialities and the achievements of the use of non-classical photon-number correlations in twin-beam states for many applications, ranging from imaging to metrology. Photon-number correlations in the quantum regime are easily produced and are rather robust against unavoidable experimental losses, and noise in some cases, if compared to the entanglement, where losing one photon can completely compromise the state and its exploitable advantages. Here, we will focus on quantum enhanced protocols in which only phase-insensitive intensity measurements (photon-number counting) are performed, which allow probing the transmission/absorption properties of a system, leading, for example, to innovative target detection schemes in a strong background. In this framework, one of the advantages is that the sources experimentally available emit a wide number of pair-wise correlated modes, which can be intercepted and exploited separately, for example by many pixels of a camera, providing a parallelism, essential in several applications, such as wide-field sub-shot-noise imaging and quantum enhanced ghost imaging. Finally, non-classical correlation enables new possibilities in quantum radiometry, e.g. the possibility of absolute calibration of a spatial resolving detector from the on-off single-photon regime to the linear regime in the same setup.

  1. GPU-based image registration in aperture correlation microscopy, and reflection mode correlation microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fafchamps, Lionel J.; Neil, Mark A. A.; Juskaitis, Rimas

    2013-02-01

    Aperture Correlation Microscopy (ACM) is a fluorescence microscopy technique capable of depth resolved imaging and enhanced lateral resolution at real-time acquisition rates. It relies on the subtraction of 2 separate images from different cameras which must be registered to the sub-pixel level. In order to achieve real-time registration and subtraction, the graphics processing unit (GPU) is used to apply a transformation from one frame to the other, resulting in a system capable of processing over 200 frames per second on modest hardware (GeForce 330M). Currently, this rate is limited by camera acquision to 16fps. Additionally, a novel reflection mode correlation microscope is introduced which functions on similar principles as the fluorescent system but can be used to examine reflective samples. Images and z-stacks taken with this system are presented here.

  2. Extracting flat-field images from scene-based image sequences using phase correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Caron, James N.; Montes, Marcos J.; Obermark, Jerome L.

    2016-06-15

    Flat-field image processing is an essential step in producing high-quality and radiometrically calibrated images. Flat-fielding corrects for variations in the gain of focal plane array electronics and unequal illumination from the system optics. Typically, a flat-field image is captured by imaging a radiometrically uniform surface. The flat-field image is normalized and removed from the images. There are circumstances, such as with remote sensing, where a flat-field image cannot be acquired in this manner. For these cases, we developed a phase-correlation method that allows the extraction of an effective flat-field image from a sequence of scene-based displaced images. The method uses sub-pixel phase correlation image registration to align the sequence to estimate the static scene. The scene is removed from sequence producing a sequence of misaligned flat-field images. An average flat-field image is derived from the realigned flat-field sequence.

  3. Cell recognition by image processing and nonlinear cross correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Careta, E.; Torres-Cisneros, M.; Sánchez-Mondragón, J. J.; Vázquez Buenos Aires, O.; Ibarra Manzano, O. G.; Aguilera-Cortés, L. A.

    2009-06-01

    This work implements a novel hybrid method for detection and tracking of biological cells of "in vitro" samples (Goobic,1 2005). The method is able to detect and track cells based on image processing, nonlinear filters and normalized cross correlation (ncc) and it is tested on a full sequence of 1080 images of cell cultures. In addition of the cell speed, Cell tracking differentiate itself from tracking other kinds of tracking because cells show: mitosis, apthosis, overlapping and migration (Liao,2 1995). Image processing provides an excellent tool to improve cell recognition and background elimination, set as a priori task on this work and conveniently implemented by a Fourier analysis. The normal cross correlation was developed in the Fourier space to reduce time processing. The problem of the target detection was formulated as a nonlinear joint detection/estimation problem on the position parameters. A bank of spatially and temporally localized nonlinear filters is used to estimate the a posteriori likelihood of the existence of the target in a given space-time resolution cell. The shapes of the targets are random and according to the sequence, the targets change of shape almost every frame. However, the cross correlation result is based on the target shape matching, not in the position; and the system is invariant to rotation. Nonlinear filter makes a robust cell tracking method by producing a sharper correlation peak and reducing the false positives in the correlation. These false positives may also be reduced by using image preprocessing. Fourier and nonlinear filtering implementation showed the best results for the proposed cell tracking method presenting the best time consumption and the best cell localization.

  4. Correlation of breast image alignment using biomechanical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Angela; Rajagopal, Vijay; Bier, Peter; Nielsen, Poul M. F.; Nash, Martyn P.

    2009-02-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common causes of cancer death among women around the world. Researchers have found that a combination of imaging modalities (such as x-ray mammography, magnetic resonance, and ultrasound) leads to more effective diagnosis and management of breast cancers because each imaging modality displays different information about the breast tissues. In order to aid clinicians in interpreting the breast images from different modalities, we have developed a computational framework for generating individual-specific, 3D, finite element (FE) models of the breast. Medical images are embedded into this model, which is subsequently used to simulate the large deformations that the breasts undergo during different imaging procedures, thus warping the medical images to the deformed views of the breast in the different modalities. In this way, medical images of the breast taken in different geometric configurations (compression, gravity, etc.) can be aligned according to physically feasible transformations. In order to analyse the accuracy of the biomechanical model predictions, squared normalised cross correlation (NCC2) was used to provide both local and global comparisons of the model-warped images with clinical images of the breast subject to different gravity loaded states. The local comparison results were helpful in indicating the areas for improvement in the biomechanical model. To improve the modelling accuracy, we will need to investigate the incorporation of breast tissue heterogeneity into the model and altering the boundary conditions for the breast model. A biomechanical image registration tool of this kind will help radiologists to provide more reliable diagnosis and localisation of breast cancer.

  5. Experimental investigation of a general real-time 3D target localization method using sequential kV imaging combined with respiratory monitoring.

    PubMed

    Cho, Byungchul; Poulsen, Per; Ruan, Dan; Sawant, Amit; Keall, Paul J

    2012-11-21

    The goal of this work was to experimentally quantify the geometric accuracy of a novel real-time 3D target localization method using sequential kV imaging combined with respiratory monitoring for clinically realistic arc and static field treatment delivery and target motion conditions. A general method for real-time target localization using kV imaging and respiratory monitoring was developed. Each dimension of internal target motion T(x, y, z; t) was estimated from the external respiratory signal R(t) through the correlation between R(t(i)) and the projected marker positions p(x(p), y(p); t(i)) on kV images by a state-augmented linear model: T(x, y, z; t) = aR(t) + bR(t - τ) + c. The model parameters, a, b, c, were determined by minimizing the squared fitting error ∑‖p(x(p), y(p); t(i)) - P(θ(i)) · (aR(t(i)) + bR(t(i) - τ) + c)‖(2) with the projection operator P(θ(i)). The model parameters were first initialized based on acquired kV arc images prior to MV beam delivery. This method was implemented on a trilogy linear accelerator consisting of an OBI x-ray imager (operating at 1 Hz) and real-time position monitoring (RPM) system (30 Hz). Arc and static field plans were delivered to a moving phantom programmed with measured lung tumour motion from ten patients. During delivery, the localization method determined the target position and the beam was adjusted in real time via dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC) adaptation. The beam-target alignment error was quantified by segmenting the beam aperture and a phantom-embedded fiducial marker on MV images and analysing their relative position. With the localization method, the root-mean-squared errors of the ten lung tumour traces ranged from 0.7-1.3 mm and 0.8-1.4 mm during the single arc and five-field static beam delivery, respectively. Without the localization method, these errors ranged from 3.1-7.3 mm. In summary, a general method for real-time target localization using kV imaging and respiratory

  6. Fresnel incoherent correlation holography and its imaging properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhipeng; Ma, Haotong; Ren, Ge; Xie, Zongliang; Yu, Huan

    2016-09-01

    The incoherent digital holography makes it possible to record holograms under incoherent illumination, which lowers requirement for the coherence of light sources and results in expanding its application to white-light and fluorescence illuminating circumstances. The Fresnel Incoherent Correlation Holography (FINCH) technology achieves diverging the incident beam and shifting phase by mounting phase masks on the phase modulator. Then it obtains holograms with phase difference and reconstructs the image. In this paper, we explain the principles of the FINCH technology, and introduce the n-step phase-shifting method which is utilized to eliminate the twin image and bias term in holograms. During the research, we studied what impact the term n may have on imaging performance, compared imaging performances when different phase masks are mounted on SLM, and established simulation system on imaging with which imaging performances are deeply inspected. At last, it is shown in the research that the FINCH technology could record holograms of objects, from which clear images could be reconstructed digitally.

  7. An extension of digital volume correlation for multimodality image registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tudisco, E.; Jailin, C.; Mendoza, A.; Tengattini, A.; Andò, E.; Hall, Stephen A.; Viggiani, Gioacchino; Hild, F.; Roux, S.

    2017-09-01

    The question of registering two images (or image volumes) acquired with different modalities, and thus exhibiting different contrast, at different positions is addressed based on an extension of global digital image (or volume) correlation. A specific comparison metric is introduced allowing the signature of the different phases to be related. A first solution consists of a Gaussian mixture to describe the joint distribution of gray levels, which not only provides a matching of both images, but also offers a natural segmentation indicator. A second ‘self-adapting’ solution does not include any postulated a priori model for the joint histogram and leads to a registration of the images based on their initial histograms. The algorithm is implemented with a pyramidal multiscale framework for the sake of robustness. The proposed multiscale technique is tested on two 3D images obtained from x-ray and neutron tomography respectively. The proposed approach brings the two images to coincidence with a sub-pixel accuracy and allows for a ‘natural’ segmentation of the different phases.

  8. Accurate measurement of curvilinear shapes by Virtual Image Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semin, B.; Auradou, H.; François, M. L. M.

    2011-10-01

    The proposed method allows the detection and the measurement, in the sense of metrology, of smooth elongated curvilinear shapes. Such measurements are required in many fields of physics, for example: mechanical engineering, biology or medicine (deflection of beams, fibers or filaments), fluid mechanics or chemistry (detection of fronts). Contrary to actual methods, the result is given in an analytical form of class C∞ (and not a finite set of locations or pixels) thus curvatures and slopes, often of great interest in science, are given with good confidence. The proposed Virtual Image Correlation (VIC) method uses a virtual beam, an image which consists in a lateral expansion of the curve with a bell-shaped gray level. This figure is deformed until it fits the best the physical image with a method issued from the Digital Image Correlation method in use in solid mechanics. The precision of the identification is studied in a benchmark and successfully compared to two state-of-the-art methods. Three practical examples are given: a bar bending under its own weight, a thin fiber transported by a flow within a fracture and a thermal front. The first allows a comparison with theoretical solution, the second shows the ability of the method to deal with complex shapes and crossings and the third deals with ill-defined image.

  9. Prevalence and correlates of body image dissatisfaction in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Ginsberg, Rebecca L; Tinker, Lesley; Liu, Jingmin; Gray, James; Sangi-Haghpeykar, Haleh; Manson, JoAnn E; Margolis, Karen L

    2016-01-01

    Dissatisfaction with one's body image is widespread and can have serious health consequences; however, research about its prevalence and correlates in older women is limited. We analyzed data from 75,256 women participating in the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study, a longitudinal study of postmenopausal women's health. Measures used in the study were collected at baseline and/or the third year of follow-up between 1993 and 2002. The majority of participants (83%) in this study were dissatisfied with their bodies because they perceived themselves as heavier than their ideal. Overall, the multiple and significant correlates of body image dissatisfaction explained 36.2% of the variance in the body image dissatisfaction score, with body mass index (BMI) and change in BMI being the two most important contributors to explaining the variance. The results of this study suggest future research should focus on the utility of interventions to reduce dissatisfaction with body image in postmenopausal women that target either maintenance of a lower BMI through diet and exercise, and/or body acceptance. Further, future research should aim to identify factors in addition to body size that drive body image dissatisfaction.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of the coronary arteries: clinical results from three dimensional evaluation of a respiratory gated technique

    PubMed Central

    van Geuns, R J M; de Bruin, H G; Rensing, B; Wielopolski, P; Hulshoff, M; van Ooijen, P M A; Oudkerk, M; de Feyter, P J

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Magnetic resonance coronary angiography is challenging because of the motion of the vessels during cardiac contraction and respiration. Additional challenges are the small calibre of the arteries and their complex three dimensional course. Respiratory gating, turboflash acquisition, and volume rendering techniques may meet the necessary requirements for appropriate visualisation.
OBJECTIVE—To determine the diagnostic accuracy of respiratory gated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the detection of significant coronary artery stenoses evaluated with three dimensional postprocessing software.
METHODS—32 patients referred for elective coronary angiography were studied with a retrospective respiratory gated three dimensional gradient echo MRI technique. Resolution was 1.9 × 1.25 × 2 mm. After manual segmentation three dimensional evaluation was performed with a volume rendering technique.
RESULTS—Overall 74% (range 50% to 90%) of the proximal and mid coronary artery segments were visualised with an image quality suitable for further analysis. Sensitivity and specificity for the detection of significant stenoses were 50% and 91%, respectively.
CONCLUSIONS—Volume rendering of respiratory gated MRI techniques allows adequate visualisation of the coronary arteries in patients with a regular breathing pattern. Significant lesions in the major coronary artery branches can be identified with a moderate sensitivity and a high specificity.


Keywords: magnetic resonance imaging; coronary artery disease; coronary angiography; computer assisted image processing PMID:10490571

  11. Digital Image Correlation: Metrological Characterization in Mechanical Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrella, Orsola; Signore, Davide; Caramuta, Pietro; Toscano, Cinzia; Ferraiuolo, Michele

    2017-04-01

    The Digital Image Correlation (DIC) is a newly developed optical technique that is spreading in all engineering sectors because it allows the non-destructive estimation of the entire surface deformation without any contact with the component under analysis. These characteristics make the DIC very appealing in all the cases the global deformation state is to be known without using strain gages, which are the most used measuring device. The DIC is applicable to any material subjected to distortion caused by either thermal or mechanical load, allowing to obtain high-definition mapping of displacements and deformations. That is why in the civil and the transportation industry, DIC is very useful for studying the behavior of metallic materials as well as of composite materials. DIC is also used in the medical field for the characterization of the local strain field of the vascular tissues surface subjected to uniaxial tensile loading. DIC can be carried out in the two dimension mode (2D DIC) if a single camera is used or in a three dimension mode (3D DIC) if two cameras are involved. Each point of the test surface framed by the cameras can be associated with a specific pixel of the image and the coordinates of each point are calculated knowing the relative distance between the two cameras together with their orientation. In both arrangements, when a component is subjected to a load, several images related to different deformation states can be are acquired through the cameras. A specific software analyzes the images via the mutual correlation between the reference image (obtained without any applied load) and those acquired during the deformation giving the relative displacements. In this paper, a Metrological Characterization of the Digital Image Correlation is performed on aluminum and composite targets both in static and dynamic loading conditions by comparison between DIC and strain gauges measures. In the static test, interesting results have been obtained thanks

  12. Digital image correlation techniques applied to LANDSAT multispectral imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonrud, L. O. (Principal Investigator); Miller, W. J.

    1976-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Automatic image registration and resampling techniques applied to LANDSAT data achieved accuracies, resulting in mean radial displacement errors of less than 0.2 pixel. The process method utilized recursive computational techniques and line-by-line updating on the basis of feedback error signals. Goodness of local feature matching was evaluated through the implementation of a correlation algorithm. An automatic restart allowed the system to derive control point coordinates over a portion of the image and to restart the process, utilizing this new control point information as initial estimates.

  13. Correlation of Klebsiella pneumoniae Comparative Genetic Analyses with Virulence Profiles in a Murine Respiratory Disease Model

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Hok-Hei; Yan, Pearlly; Pfeffer, Tia L.; Bundschuh, Ralf; Warawa, Jonathan M.

    2014-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is a bacterial pathogen of worldwide importance and a significant contributor to multiple disease presentations associated with both nosocomial and community acquired disease. ATCC 43816 is a well-studied K. pneumoniae strain which is capable of causing an acute respiratory disease in surrogate animal models. In this study, we performed sequencing of the ATCC 43816 genome to support future efforts characterizing genetic elements required for disease. Furthermore, we performed comparative genetic analyses to the previously sequenced genomes from NTUH-K2044 and MGH 78578 to gain an understanding of the conservation of known virulence determinants amongst the three strains. We found that ATCC 43816 and NTUH-K2044 both possess the known virulence determinant for yersiniabactin, as well as a Type 4 secretion system (T4SS), CRISPR system, and an acetonin catabolism locus, all absent from MGH 78578. While both NTUH-K2044 and MGH 78578 are clinical isolates, little is known about the disease potential of these strains in cell culture and animal models. Thus, we also performed functional analyses in the murine macrophage cell lines RAW264.7 and J774A.1 and found that MGH 78578 (K52 serotype) was internalized at higher levels than ATCC 43816 (K2) and NTUH-K2044 (K1), consistent with previous characterization of the antiphagocytic properties of K1 and K2 serotype capsules. We also examined the three K. pneumoniae strains in a novel BALB/c respiratory disease model and found that ATCC 43816 and NTUH-K2044 are highly virulent (LD50<100 CFU) while MGH 78578 is relatively avirulent. PMID:25203254

  14. Analysis of correlation coefficient filtering in elasticity imaging.

    PubMed

    Huang, Sheng-Wen; Rubin, Jonathan M; Xie, Hua; Witte, Russell S; Jia, Congxian; Olafsson, Ragnar; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2008-11-01

    Correlation-based speckle tracking methods are commonly used in elasticity imaging to estimate displacements. In the presence of local strain, a larger window size results in larger displacement error. To reduce tracking error, we proposed a short correlation window followed by a correlation coefficient filter. Although simulation and experimental results demonstrated the efficacy of the method, it was not clear why correlation coefficient filtering reduces tracking error since tracking error increases if normalization before filtering is not applied. In this paper, we analyzed tracking errors by estimating phase variances of the cross-correlation function and the correlation coefficient at the true time lag based on statistical properties of these functions' real and imaginary parts. The role of normalization is clarified by identifying the effect of the cross-correlation function's amplitude fluctuation on the function's imaginary part. Furthermore, we present analytic forms for predicting axial displacement error as a function of strain, system parameters (signal-to-noise ratio, center frequency, and signal and noise bandwidths), and tracking parameters (window and filter sizes) for cases with and without normalization before filtering. Simulation results correspond to theory well for both noise-free cases and general cases with an empirical correction term included for strains up to 4%.

  15. Correlative magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of aortic and pulmonary artery abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    Risius, B.; O'Donnell, J.K.; Geisinger, M.A.; Zelch, M.G.; George, C.R.; Graor, R.A.; Moodie, D.S.

    1985-05-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) yields excellent quality images of the cardiovascular system utilizing the inherent natural contrast between flowing blood and the surrounding anatomic structures. To evaluate the clinical usefulness of MRI in the noninvasive diagnosis of large vessel disorders, the authors have performed MRI on 40 pts with either aortic or pulmonary artery abnormalities (18 thoracic or abdominal aortic aneurysms, 8 aorto-occlusive disease, 6 dissecting aneurysms, 4 Marfan's syndrome, 2 pulmonary artery aneurysms 1 pulmonary artery occlusion, 1 aortic coarctation). Images were obtained in the transverse, coronal and sagital body planes utilizing a 0.6T superconductive magnet. Cardiac and/or respiratory gating was employed in most cases. Correlation was made for all studies with conventional or digital subtraction angiography, computed tomography, and/or ultrasound. The diagnostic information obtained by MRI equaled or exceeded that obtained by other imaging techniques except for the few cases where cardiac arrhythmias precluded adequate gated acquisition. All aneurysms and their relationships to adjacent structures were readily demonstrated as were the presence or absence of mural thrombi and dissecting intimal flaps. Angiographically demonstrated atherosclerotic plaques and luminal stenoses were seen by MRI in all patients without arrhythmias. The authors concluded that MRI is a powerful noninvasive diagnostic aid in the delineation of large vessel disorders, especially where knowledge of anatomic interrelationships can guide surgical or other interventional planning.

  16. Research on respiratory motion correction method based on liver contrast-enhanced ultrasound images of single mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ji; Li, Tao; Zheng, Shiqiang; Li, Yiyong

    2015-03-01

    To reduce the effects of respiratory motion in the quantitative analysis based on liver contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) image sequencesof single mode. The image gating method and the iterative registration method using model image were adopted to register liver contrast-enhanced ultrasound image sequences of single mode. The feasibility of the proposed respiratory motion correction method was explored preliminarily using 10 hepatocellular carcinomas CEUS cases. The positions of the lesions in the time series of 2D ultrasound images after correction were visually evaluated. Before and after correction, the quality of the weighted sum of transit time (WSTT) parametric images were also compared, in terms of the accuracy and spatial resolution. For the corrected and uncorrected sequences, their mean deviation values (mDVs) of time-intensity curve (TIC) fitting derived from CEUS sequences were measured. After the correction, the positions of the lesions in the time series of 2D ultrasound images were almost invariant. In contrast, the lesions in the uncorrected images all shifted noticeably. The quality of the WSTT parametric maps derived from liver CEUS image sequences were improved more greatly. Moreover, the mDVs of TIC fitting derived from CEUS sequences after the correction decreased by an average of 48.48+/-42.15. The proposed correction method could improve the accuracy of quantitative analysis based on liver CEUS image sequences of single mode, which would help in enhancing the differential diagnosis efficiency of liver tumors.

  17. Reducing respiratory effect in motion correction for EPI images with sequential slice acquisition order.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hu; Puce, Aina

    2014-04-30

    Motion correction is critical for data analysis of fMRI time series. Most motion correction algorithms treat the head as a rigid body. Respiration of the subject, however, can alter the static magnetic field in the head and result in motion-like slice shifts for echo planar imaging (EPI). The delay of acquisition between slices causes a phase difference in respiration so that the shifts vary with slice positions. To characterize the effect of respiration on motion correction, we acquired fast sampled fMRI data using multi-band EPI and then simulated different acquisition schemes. Our results indicated that respiration introduces additional noise after motion correction. The signal variation between volumes after motion correction increases when the effective TR increases from 675ms to 2025ms. This problem can be corrected if slices are acquired sequentially. For EPI with a sequential acquisition scheme, we propose to divide the image volumes into several segments so that slices within each segment are acquired close in time and then perform motion correction on these segments separately. We demonstrated that the temporal signal-to-noise ratio (TSNR) was increased when the motion correction was performed on the segments separately rather than on the whole image. This enhancement of TSNR was not evenly distributed across the segments and was not observed for interleaved acquisition. The level of increase was higher for superior slices. On superior slices the percentage of TSNR gain was comparable to that using image based retrospective correction for respiratory noise. Our results suggest that separate motion correction on segments is highly recommended for sequential acquisition schemes, at least for slices distal to the chest. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Prenatal diagnosis of fetal respiratory function: evaluation of fetal lung maturity using lung-to-liver signal intensity ratio at magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Oka, Yasuko; Rahman, Mosfequr; Sasakura, Chihaya; Waseda, Tomoo; Watanabe, Yukio; Fujii, Ryota; Makinoda, Satoru

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study is to determine the fetal lung-to-liver signal intensity ratio (LLSIR) on T2-weighted images for the prediction of neonatal respiratory outcome. One hundred ten fetuses who underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination for various indications after 22 weeks of gestation participated in this study. LLSIR was measured as the ratio of signal intensities of the fetal lung and liver on T2-weighted images at MRI. We examined the changes of the ratio with advancing gestation and the relations between LLSIR and the presence of the severe respiratory disorder (SRD) after birth. The best cut-off value of the LLSIR to predict respiratory outcome after birth was calculated using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Lung-to-liver signal intensity ratio correlated significantly with advancing gestational age (R = 0.35, p < 0.001). The non-SRD group had higher LLSIR compared with the SRD group (2.15 ± 0.30 vs. 1.53 ± 0.40, p < 0.001). ROC curve analysis showed that fetuses with an LLSIR < 2.00 were more likely to develop SRD [sensitivity: 100%, 95% confidence interval (CI): 52-100%; specificity: 73%, 95% CI 54-88%]. The fetal LLSIR on T2-weighted images is an accurate marker to diagnose the fetal lung maturity. © 2014 The Authors. Prenatal Diagnosis published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. 3D Cine Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Rat Lung ARDS using Gradient-modulated SWIFT with Retrospective Respiratory Gating.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Naoharu; Lei, Jianxun; Utecht, Lynn; Garwood, Michael; Ingbar, David; Bhargava, Maneesh

    2015-02-21

    SWeep Imaging with Fourier Transformation (SWIFT) with gradient modulation and DC navigator retrospective gating is introduced as a 3D cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) method for the lung. The quasi-simultaneous excitation and acquisition in SWIFT enabled extremely high sensitivity to the fast-decaying parenchymal signals (TE=~4 μs), which are invisible with conventional MRI techniques. Based on respiratory motion information extracted from DC navigator signals, the SWIFT data were reconstructed to 3D cine images with 16 respiratory phases. To test the capability of the proposed technique, rats exposed to > 95% O2 for 60 hours for induction of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), were imaged and compared with normal rat lungs (N=7 and 5 for ARDS and normal group, respectively). SWIFT images showed lung tissue density difference along the gravity direction. In the cine SWIFT images, parenchymal signal drop at the inhalation phase was consistently observed for both normal and ARDS rats due to inflation of the lung (i.e. decrease of the proton density), but the drop was less for ARDS rats. Depending on the respiration phase and lung region, the lungs from the ARDS rats showed 1-24% higher parenchymal signal intensities relative to the normal rat lungs, which would be mainly from accumulation of extravascular water (EVLW). Those results demonstrate that SWIFT has high enough sensitivity for detecting the lung proton density changes due to gravity, different respiration phases and accumulation of EVLW in the rat ARDS lungs.

  20. Middle cerebellar peduncles: Magnetic resonance imaging and pathophysiologic correlate

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Humberto; Tomsick, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    We describe common and less common diseases that can cause magnetic resonance signal abnormalities of middle cerebellar peduncles (MCP), offering a systematic approach correlating imaging findings with clinical clues and pathologic mechanisms. Myelin abnormalities, different types of edema or neurodegenerative processes, can cause areas of abnormal T2 signal, variable enhancement, and patterns of diffusivity of MCP. Pathologies such as demyelinating disorders or certain neurodegenerative entities (e.g., multiple system atrophy or fragile X-associated tremor-ataxia syndrome) appear to have predilection for MCP. Careful evaluation of concomitant imaging findings in the brain or brainstem; and focused correlation with key clinical findings such as immunosuppression for progressive multifocal leukoencephalopahty; hypertension, post-transplant status or high dose chemotherapy for posterior reversible encephalopathy; electrolyte disorders for myelinolysis or suspected toxic-drug related encephalopathy; would yield an appropriate and accurate differential diagnosis in the majority of cases. PMID:26751508

  1. Correlative infrared nanospectroscopic and nanomechanical imaging of block copolymer microdomains

    PubMed Central

    Pollard, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Summary Intermolecular interactions and nanoscale phase separation govern the properties of many molecular soft-matter systems. Here, we combine infrared vibrational scattering scanning near-field optical microscopy (IR s-SNOM) with force–distance spectroscopy for simultaneous characterization of both nanoscale optical and nanomechanical molecular properties through hybrid imaging. The resulting multichannel images and correlative analysis of chemical composition, spectral IR line shape, modulus, adhesion, deformation, and dissipation acquired for a thin film of a nanophase separated block copolymer (PS-b-PMMA) reveal complex structural variations, in particular at domain interfaces, not resolved in any individual signal channel alone. These variations suggest that regions of multicomponent chemical composition, such as the interfacial mixing regions between microdomains, are correlated with high spatial heterogeneity in nanoscale material properties. PMID:27335750

  2. Mental tasks classification for BCI using image correlation.

    PubMed

    Úbeda, Andrés; Iáñez, Eduardo; Azorin, José M

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a classifier based on image correlation of EEG maps to distinguish between three mental tasks in a Brain-Computer Interface (BCI). The data set V of BCI Competition 2003 has been used to test the classifier. To that end, the EEG maps obtained from this data set have been studied to find the ideal parameters of processing time and frequency. The classifier designed is based on a normalized cross-correlation of images which makes possible to obtain a proper similarity index to perform the classification. The success percentage of the classifier has been shown for different combinations of data. The results obtained are very successful, showing that this kind of techniques may be able to classify between three mental tasks with good results in a future online testing.

  3. Resolving Fast, Confined Diffusion in Bacteria with Image Correlation Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rowland, David J; Tuson, Hannah H; Biteen, Julie S

    2016-05-24

    By following single fluorescent molecules in a microscope, single-particle tracking (SPT) can measure diffusion and binding on the nanometer and millisecond scales. Still, although SPT can at its limits characterize the fastest biomolecules as they interact with subcellular environments, this measurement may require advanced illumination techniques such as stroboscopic illumination. Here, we address the challenge of measuring fast subcellular motion by instead analyzing single-molecule data with spatiotemporal image correlation spectroscopy (STICS) with a focus on measurements of confined motion. Our SPT and STICS analysis of simulations of the fast diffusion of confined molecules shows that image blur affects both STICS and SPT, and we find biased diffusion rate measurements for STICS analysis in the limits of fast diffusion and tight confinement due to fitting STICS correlation functions to a Gaussian approximation. However, we determine that with STICS, it is possible to correctly interpret the motion that blurs single-molecule images without advanced illumination techniques or fast cameras. In particular, we present a method to overcome the bias due to image blur by properly estimating the width of the correlation function by directly calculating the correlation function variance instead of using the typical Gaussian fitting procedure. Our simulation results are validated by applying the STICS method to experimental measurements of fast, confined motion: we measure the diffusion of cytosolic mMaple3 in living Escherichia coli cells at 25 frames/s under continuous illumination to illustrate the utility of STICS in an experimental parameter regime for which in-frame motion prevents SPT and tight confinement of fast diffusion precludes stroboscopic illumination. Overall, our application of STICS to freely diffusing cytosolic protein in small cells extends the utility of single-molecule experiments to the regime of fast confined diffusion without requiring advanced

  4. Parallel-Processing Software for Correlating Stereo Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimeck, Gerhard; Deen, Robert; Mcauley, Michael; DeJong, Eric

    2007-01-01

    A computer program implements parallel- processing algorithms for cor relating images of terrain acquired by stereoscopic pairs of digital stereo cameras on an exploratory robotic vehicle (e.g., a Mars rove r). Such correlations are used to create three-dimensional computatio nal models of the terrain for navigation. In this program, the scene viewed by the cameras is segmented into subimages. Each subimage is assigned to one of a number of central processing units (CPUs) opera ting simultaneously.

  5. Development and validation of real-time simulation of X-ray imaging with respiratory motion.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Franck P; Villard, Pierre-Frédéric

    2016-04-01

    We present a framework that combines evolutionary optimisation, soft tissue modelling and ray tracing on GPU to simultaneously compute the respiratory motion and X-ray imaging in real-time. Our aim is to provide validated building blocks with high fidelity to closely match both the human physiology and the physics of X-rays. A CPU-based set of algorithms is presented to model organ behaviours during respiration. Soft tissue deformation is computed with an extension of the Chain Mail method. Rigid elements move according to kinematic laws. A GPU-based surface rendering method is proposed to compute the X-ray image using the Beer-Lambert law. It is provided as an open-source library. A quantitative validation study is provided to objectively assess the accuracy of both components: (i) the respiration against anatomical data, and (ii) the X-ray against the Beer-Lambert law and the results of Monte Carlo simulations. Our implementation can be used in various applications, such as interactive medical virtual environment to train percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography in interventional radiology, 2D/3D registration, computation of digitally reconstructed radiograph, simulation of 4D sinograms to test tomography reconstruction tools.

  6. Camera system resolution and its influence on digital image correlation

    DOE PAGES

    Reu, Phillip L.; Sweatt, William; Miller, Timothy; ...

    2014-09-21

    Digital image correlation (DIC) uses images from a camera and lens system to make quantitative measurements of the shape, displacement, and strain of test objects. This increasingly popular method has had little research on the influence of the imaging system resolution on the DIC results. This paper investigates the entire imaging system and studies how both the camera and lens resolution influence the DIC results as a function of the system Modulation Transfer Function (MTF). It will show that when making spatial resolution decisions (including speckle size) the resolution limiting component should be considered. A consequence of the loss ofmore » spatial resolution is that the DIC uncertainties will be increased. This is demonstrated using both synthetic and experimental images with varying resolution. The loss of image resolution and DIC accuracy can be compensated for by increasing the subset size, or better, by increasing the speckle size. The speckle-size and spatial resolution are now a function of the lens resolution rather than the more typical assumption of the pixel size. The study will demonstrate the tradeoffs associated with limited lens resolution.« less

  7. Camera system resolution and its influence on digital image correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Reu, Phillip L.; Sweatt, William; Miller, Timothy; Fleming, Darryn

    2014-09-21

    Digital image correlation (DIC) uses images from a camera and lens system to make quantitative measurements of the shape, displacement, and strain of test objects. This increasingly popular method has had little research on the influence of the imaging system resolution on the DIC results. This paper investigates the entire imaging system and studies how both the camera and lens resolution influence the DIC results as a function of the system Modulation Transfer Function (MTF). It will show that when making spatial resolution decisions (including speckle size) the resolution limiting component should be considered. A consequence of the loss of spatial resolution is that the DIC uncertainties will be increased. This is demonstrated using both synthetic and experimental images with varying resolution. The loss of image resolution and DIC accuracy can be compensated for by increasing the subset size, or better, by increasing the speckle size. The speckle-size and spatial resolution are now a function of the lens resolution rather than the more typical assumption of the pixel size. The study will demonstrate the tradeoffs associated with limited lens resolution.

  8. Image denoising by exploring external and internal correlations.

    PubMed

    Yue, Huanjing; Sun, Xiaoyan; Yang, Jingyu; Wu, Feng

    2015-06-01

    Single image denoising suffers from limited data collection within a noisy image. In this paper, we propose a novel image denoising scheme, which explores both internal and external correlations with the help of web images. For each noisy patch, we build internal and external data cubes by finding similar patches from the noisy and web images, respectively. We then propose reducing noise by a two-stage strategy using different filtering approaches. In the first stage, since the noisy patch may lead to inaccurate patch selection, we propose a graph based optimization method to improve patch matching accuracy in external denoising. The internal denoising is frequency truncation on internal cubes. By combining the internal and external denoising patches, we obtain a preliminary denoising result. In the second stage, we propose reducing noise by filtering of external and internal cubes, respectively, on transform domain. In this stage, the preliminary denoising result not only enhances the patch matching accuracy but also provides reliable estimates of filtering parameters. The final denoising image is obtained by fusing the external and internal filtering results. Experimental results show that our method constantly outperforms state-of-the-art denoising schemes in both subjective and objective quality measurements, e.g., it achieves >2 dB gain compared with BM3D at a wide range of noise levels.

  9. Biomechanics of the weakened mandible: use of image correlation analysis.

    PubMed

    Yachouh, J; Domergue, S; Hoarau, R; Loosli, Y; Goudot, P

    2013-10-01

    Uninterrupted resection of mandibular bone is often necessary during maxillofacial operations for cancer. This weakens the mandible, and increases the risk of fracture. To our knowledge no biomechanical analysis has been made of deformations and strains that occur during chewing if this happens, so we have made such an analysis of the weakened mandible using a new technique: image correlation. Five fresh explanted human mandibles were prepared with black and white lacquer, and placed in a loading device that allowed replication of a physiological biting exercise. Calibrated pieces of bone were resected from the right body of each mandible. Images of the mandibular surface were recorded by 2 cameras and analysed with an algorithm to correlate them, which allowed us to confirm the distribution of strain on the body of the mandible, and to focus on the weak points. Before the bone was resected, we noted tensile strains on the alveolar border of the body, and compressive strains on the basilar border. The intensity of the strains in the posterior angle of the resected bony area then increased, with reduction in the height of the bone until fracture. The orientation of the fracture line started at the lower posterior angle of the resection area and spread in a lower posterior direction until it reached the basilar border of the mandible. Image correlation is a new technique for the study of mandibular biomechanics that provides accurate measurements on a wide bony surface with high definition images and without modification of the structure. Its application to weakened mandible provided reliable images of modifications to strains during simulated biting exercises.

  10. The application of high-speed digital image correlation.

    SciTech Connect

    Reu, Phillip L.; Miller, Timothy J.

    2008-02-01

    Digital image correlation (DIC) is a method of using digital images to calculate two-dimensional displacement and deformation or for stereo systems three-dimensional shape, displacement, and deformation. While almost any imaging system can be used with DIC, there are some important challenges when working with the technique in high- and ultra-high-speed applications. This article discusses three of these challenges: camera sensor technology, camera frame rate, and camera motion mitigation. Potential solutions are treated via three demonstration experiments showing the successful application of high-speed DIC for dynamic events. The application and practice of DIC at high speeds, rather than the experimental results themselves, provide the main thrust of the discussion.

  11. Application of optical correlation techniques to particle imaging velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wernet, Mark P.; Edwards, Robert V.

    1988-01-01

    Pulsed laser sheet velocimetry yields nonintrusive measurements of velocity vectors across an extended 2-dimensional region of the flow field. The application of optical correlation techniques to the analysis of multiple exposure laser light sheet photographs can reduce and/or simplify the data reduction time and hardware. Here, Matched Spatial Filters (MSF) are used in a pattern recognition system. Usually MSFs are used to identify the assembly line parts. In this application, the MSFs are used to identify the iso-velocity vector contours in the flow. The patterns to be recognized are the recorded particle images in a pulsed laser light sheet photograph. Measurement of the direction of the partical image displacements between exposures yields the velocity vector. The particle image exposure sequence is designed such that the velocity vector direction is determined unambiguously. A global analysis technique is used in comparison to the more common particle tracking algorithms and Young's fringe analysis technique.

  12. CHAOS: Prenatal imaging findings with post mortem contrast radiographic correlation.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Kanika; Venkatesan, Bhuvaneswari; Manoharan, Kiruba Shankar; Rajalakshmi, Vaithianathan; Menon, Maya

    2016-08-01

    Congenital high airway obstruction syndrome is a rare fetal anomaly with characteristic constellation of prenatal findings on ultrasound and MRI. The typical triad of imaging features are enlarged and echogenic lungs, flattening or inversion of diaphragm and fetal hydrops. Early prenatal recognition of congenital high airway obstruction syndrome by ultrasound and/or MRI is mandatory for the appropriate perinatal management. We report a case of a male fetus with typical imaging findings of congenital high airway obstruction syndrome on ultrasound and MRI at 19 weeks of gestation. The role of contrast radiographs of fetal airways, including retrograde laryngogram, in confirming the postnatal diagnosis of this fetal condition is demonstrated. The prenatal imaging findings were correlated with contrast radiographs of upper airways, sonography of aborted fetus and fetal autopsy findings.

  13. CHAOS: Prenatal imaging findings with post mortem contrast radiographic correlation

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Kanika; Venkatesan, Bhuvaneswari; Manoharan, Kiruba Shankar; Rajalakshmi, Vaithianathan; Menon, Maya

    2016-01-01

    Congenital high airway obstruction syndrome is a rare fetal anomaly with characteristic constellation of prenatal findings on ultrasound and MRI. The typical triad of imaging features are enlarged and echogenic lungs, flattening or inversion of diaphragm and fetal hydrops. Early prenatal recognition of congenital high airway obstruction syndrome by ultrasound and/or MRI is mandatory for the appropriate perinatal management. We report a case of a male fetus with typical imaging findings of congenital high airway obstruction syndrome on ultrasound and MRI at 19 weeks of gestation. The role of contrast radiographs of fetal airways, including retrograde laryngogram, in confirming the postnatal diagnosis of this fetal condition is demonstrated. The prenatal imaging findings were correlated with contrast radiographs of upper airways, sonography of aborted fetus and fetal autopsy findings. PMID:27761192

  14. Longitudinal changes in the diameter of the ductus arteriosus in ventilated preterm infants: correlation with respiratory outcomes.

    PubMed

    Evans, N; Iyer, P

    1995-05-01

    This study aimed to examine the early natural history of ductal shunting in ventilated preterm infants (< 1500 g) and to document the association between this shunting and respiratory outcomes. The size of the ductal shunt was assessed in 48 infants using serial echocardiographic measurement of colour Doppler internal ductal diameter and pulsed Doppler postductal aortic diastolic flow (PADF). At all postnatal ages, normal antegrade PADF was invariably seen when the ductal diameter was 1.5 mm or less, and was usually abnormal (absent or retrograde) when more than 1.5 mm. Longitudinal progress of ductal diameter fell into three groups: (i) asymptomatic spontaneous closure (n = 31)--in 20 of these infants closure occurred within 48 hours; (ii) symptomatic PDA which enlarged after a postnatal constriction (n = 9); and (iii) symptomatic PDA that showed minimal postnatal constriction (n = 8). Infants in group 2 were significantly less mature and had PDAs which became symptomatic significantly later than those in group 3. Logistic regression showed that ductal shunting had a significant correlation with mean oxygenation index over the first five days but not with ventilator or oxygen days. Gestation had the most significant association with the latter two variables, with atrial shunting also being related to days in oxygen. The preterm duct displays a wide spectrum of postnatal constrictive activity. Symptomatic PDAs usually showed slower early postnatal constriction. Ductal shunting independently related to short term but not long term respiratory outcomes.

  15. Investigation of Optimal Digital Image Correlation Patterns for Deformation Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bomarito, G. F.; Ruggles, T. J.; Hochhalter, J. D.; Cannon, A. H.

    2016-01-01

    Digital image correlation (DIC) relies on the surface texture of a specimen to measure deformation. When the specimen itself has little or no texture, a pattern is applied to the surface which deforms with the specimen and acts as an artificial surface texture. Because the applied pattern has an effect on the accuracy of DIC, an ideal pattern is sought for which the error introduced into DIC measurements is minimal. In this work, a study is performed in which several DIC pattern quality metrics from the literature are correlated to DIC measurement error. The resulting correlations give insight on the optimality of DIC patterns in general. Optimizations are then performed to produce patterns which are well suited for DIC. These patterns are tested to show their relative benefits. Chief among these benefits are a reduction in error of approximately 30 with respect to a randomly generated pattern.

  16. Dense transcript profiling in single cells by image correlation decoding

    PubMed Central

    Coskun, Ahmet F.; Cai, Long

    2016-01-01

    Recent work in sequential fluorescent in-situ hybridization (FISH) has demonstrated the ability to uniquely encode a large number of molecular species in single cells. However, the multiplexing capacity is practically limited by the density of the barcoded objects in the cell. Here, we present a general method using image correlation to resolve the temporal barcodes in sequential hybridization experiments, allowing high density objects to be decoded. Using this correlation FISH (corrFISH) approach, we profiled the gene expression of ribosomal proteins in single cells in cell cultures and in mouse thymus tissue sections. In tissues, corrFISH revealed cell type specific gene expression of ribosomal proteins. The combination of sequential barcoding FISH and correlation analyses provides a general strategy for multiplexing a large number of RNA molecules and potentially other high copy number molecules in single cells. PMID:27271198

  17. Lesion area detection using source image correlation coefficient for CT perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Fan Zhu; Rodriguez Gonzalez, David; Carpenter, Trevor; Atkinson, Malcolm; Wardlaw, Joanna

    2013-09-01

    Computer tomography (CT) perfusion imaging is widely used to calculate brain hemodynamic quantities such as cerebral blood flow, cerebral blood volume, and mean transit time that aid the diagnosis of acute stroke. Since perfusion source images contain more information than hemodynamic maps, good utilization of the source images can lead to better understanding than the hemodynamic maps alone. Correlation-coefficient tests are used in our approach to measure the similarity between healthy tissue time-concentration curves and unknown curves. This information is then used to differentiate penumbra and dead tissues from healthy tissues. The goal of the segmentation is to fully utilize information in the perfusion source images. Our method directly identifies suspected abnormal areas from perfusion source images and then delivers a suggested segmentation of healthy, penumbra, and dead tissue. This approach is designed to handle CT perfusion images, but it can also be used to detect lesion areas in magnetic resonance perfusion images.

  18. Correlation of magnetic resonance imaging with digital histopathology in prostate.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Jin Tae; Sankineni, Sandeep; Xu, Sheng; Turkbey, Baris; Choyke, Peter L; Pinto, Peter A; Merino, Maria; Wood, Bradford J

    2016-04-01

    We propose a systematic approach to correlate MRI and digital histopathology in prostate. T2-weighted (T2W) MRI and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) are acquired, and a patient-specific mold (PSM) is designed from the MRI. Following prostatectomy, a whole mount tissue specimen is placed in the PSM and sectioned, ensuring that tissue blocks roughly correspond to MRI slices. Rigid body and thin plate spline deformable registration attempt to correct deformation during image acquisition and tissue preparation and achieve a more complete one-to-one correspondence between MRIs and tissue sections. Each tissue section is stained with hematoxylin and eosin and segmented by adopting a machine learning approach. Utilizing this tissue segmentation and image registration, the density of cellular and tissue components (lumen, nucleus, epithelium, and stroma) is estimated per MR voxel, generating density maps for the whole prostate. This study was approved by the local IRB, and informed consent was obtained from all patients. Registration of tissue specimens and MRIs was aided by the PSM and subsequent image registration. Tissue segmentation was performed using a machine learning approach, achieving ≥0.98 AUCs for lumen, nucleus, epithelium, and stroma. Examining the density map of tissue components, significant differences were observed between cancer, benign peripheral zone, and benign prostatic hyperplasia (p value <5e−2). Similarly, the signal intensity of the corresponding areas in both T2W MRI and DWI was significantly different (p value <1e−10). The proposed approach is able to correlate MRI and digital histopathology of the prostate and is promising as a potential tool to facilitate a more cellular and zonal tissue-based analysis of prostate MRI, based upon a correlative histopathology perspective.

  19. MILLISECOND IMAGING OF RADIO TRANSIENTS WITH THE POCKET CORRELATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Law, C. J.; Backer, D. C.; Bower, G. C.; Gutierrez-Kraybill, C.; Williams, P. K. G.; Jones, G.; Barott, W. C.; Werthimer, D. E-mail: jones_gl@caltech.edu

    2011-11-20

    We demonstrate a signal-processing concept for imaging the sky at millisecond rates with radio interferometers. The 'Pocket Correlator' (PoCo) correlates the signals from multiple elements of a radio interferometer fast enough to image brief, dispersed pulses. By the nature of interferometry, a millisecond correlator functions like a large, single-dish telescope, but with improved survey speed, spatial localization, calibration, and interference rejection. To test the concept, we installed PoCo at the Allen Telescope Array (ATA) to search for dispersed pulses from the Crab pulsar, B0329+54, and M31 using total-power, visibility-based, and image-plane techniques. In 1.7 hr of observing, PoCo detected 191 giant pulses from the Crab pulsar brighter than a typical 5{sigma} sensitivity limit of 60 Jy over pulse widths of 3 ms. Roughly 40% of pulses from pulsar B0329+54 were detected by using novel visibility-based techniques. Observations of M31 constrain the rate of pulses brighter than 190 Jy in a three-degree region surrounding the galaxy to <4.3 hr{sup -1}. We calculate the computational demand of various visibility-based pulse search algorithms and demonstrate how compute clusters can help meet this demand. Larger implementations of the fast imaging concept will conduct blind searches for millisecond pulses in our Galaxy and beyond, providing a valuable probe of the interstellar/intergalactic media, discovering new kinds of radio transients, and localizing them to constrain models of their origin.

  20. Digital image correlation based on a fast convolution strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Yuan; Zhan, Qin; Xiong, Chunyang; Huang, Jianyong

    2017-10-01

    In recent years, the efficiency of digital image correlation (DIC) methods has attracted increasing attention because of its increasing importance for many engineering applications. Based on the classical affine optical flow (AOF) algorithm and the well-established inverse compositional Gauss-Newton algorithm, which is essentially a natural extension of the AOF algorithm under a nonlinear iterative framework, this paper develops a set of fast convolution-based DIC algorithms for high-efficiency subpixel image registration. Using a well-developed fast convolution technique, the set of algorithms establishes a series of global data tables (GDTs) over the digital images, which allows the reduction of the computational complexity of DIC significantly. Using the pre-calculated GDTs, the subpixel registration calculations can be implemented efficiently in a look-up-table fashion. Both numerical simulation and experimental verification indicate that the set of algorithms significantly enhances the computational efficiency of DIC, especially in the case of a dense data sampling for the digital images. Because the GDTs need to be computed only once, the algorithms are also suitable for efficiently coping with image sequences that record the time-varying dynamics of specimen deformations.

  1. Uremic Encephalopathy: MR Imaging Findings and Clinical Correlation.

    PubMed

    Kim, D M; Lee, I H; Song, C J

    2016-09-01

    Uremic encephalopathy is a metabolic disorder in patients with renal failure. The purpose of this study was to describe the MR imaging findings of uremic encephalopathy. This study retrospectively reviewed MR imaging findings in 10 patients with clinically proved uremic encephalopathy between May 2005 and December 2014. Parameters evaluated were lesion location and appearance; MR signal intensity of the lesions on T1WI, T2WI, and T2 fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images; the presence or absence of restricted diffusion on diffusion-weighted images and apparent diffusion coefficient maps; and the reversibility of documented signal-intensity abnormalities on follow-up MR imaging. MR imaging abnormalities accompanying marked elevation of serum creatinine (range, 4.3-11.7 mg/dL) were evident in the 10 patients. Nine patients had a history of chronic renal failure with expansile bilateral basal ganglia lesions, and 1 patient with acute renal failure had reversible largely cortical lesions. Two of 6 patients with available arterial blood gas results had metabolic acidosis. All basal ganglia lesions showed expansile high signal intensity (lentiform fork sign) on T2WI. Varied levels of restricted diffusion and a range of signal intensities on DWI were evident and were not correlated with serum Cr levels. All cortical lesions demonstrated high signal intensity on T2WI. Four patients with follow-up MR imaging after hemodialysis showed complete resolution of all lesions. The lentiform fork sign is reliable in the early diagnosis of uremic encephalopathy, regardless of the presence of metabolic acidosis. Cytotoxic edema and/or vasogenic edema on DWI/ADC maps may be associated with uremic encephalopathy. © 2016 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  2. Effects of image noise, respiratory motion, and motion compensation on 3D activity quantification in count-limited PET images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siman, W.; Mawlawi, O. R.; Mikell, J. K.; Mourtada, F.; Kappadath, S. C.

    2017-01-01

    . However, caution needs to be exercised when using ACVH in post-therapy 90Y imaging because of its susceptibility to image degradation from both image noise and respiratory motion.

  3. Correlated responses of respiratory disease and immune capacity traits of Landrace pigs selected for Mycoplasmal pneumonia of swine (MPS) lesion.

    PubMed

    Okamura, Toshihiro; Maeda, Kouki; Onodera, Wataru; Kadowaki, Hiroshi; Kojima-Shibata, Chihiro; Suzuki, Eisaku; Uenishi, Hirohide; Satoh, Masahiro; Suzuki, Keiichi

    2016-09-01

    Five generations of Landrace pigs selected for average daily gain, backfat thickness, Mycoplasmal pneumonia of swine (MPS) lesion score, and plasma cortisol levels, was executed to decrease the MPS lesion score. Genetic parameters and correlated genetic responses for respiratory disease and peripheral blood immune traits were estimated in 1395 Landrace pigs. We estimated the negative genetic correlation of MPS lesion score with phagocytic activity (PA) at 7 weeks of age (-0.67). The breeding values of PA at 7 weeks of age and 105 kg body weight and the correlated selection response of the ratio of granular leukocytes to lymphocytes at 105 kg body weight were significantly increased, and sheep red blood cell-specific antibody production (AP) was significantly decreased in a selection-dependent manner. Increasing of natural immunological indicators (e.g. PA) and decreasing of humoral immunological indicator (e.g. AP) were observed due to genetically decreasing MPS lesion score. © 2015 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  4. Correlation of Respiratory Activity of Contralateral Diaphragm Muscles for Evaluation of Recovery Following Hemiparesis

    PubMed Central

    Dow, Douglas E.; Zhan, Wen-Zhi; Sieck, Gary C.; Mantilla, Carlos B.

    2014-01-01

    Respiration is impaired by disruption of the central drive for inspiration to the diaphragm muscle (DIAm). Some function may recover involving nerve regeneration, reinnervation or neuroplasticity. A research animal model involves inducing hemiparesis of the DIAm and monitoring any recovery under different conditions. Methods to accurately track the level of functional recovery are needed. In this study, an algorithm was developed and tested to quantify the relative amount of electromyogram (EMG) activity that temporally correlated for an experimental (EXP) hemi-DIAm with its intact contralateral hemi-DIAm. An average rectified value (ARV) trace was calculated. A template was formed of the ARV trace of the intact hemi-DIAm, with higher positive values corresponding with periods of inspirations and lower negative values corresponding with quiet periods. This template was multiplied by the EXP ARV trace to reward (more positive) periods of correlating activity, and punish (more negative) periods of high activity on the EXP side that corresponded with quiet periods on the intact side. The average integrated value was the index of correlating contralateral activity (ICCA). A negative ICCA value indicated no net correlation of activity, and a positive value indicated a net correlation of activity. The algorithm was tested on rats having the conditions of control or hemi-paresis induced by denervatation (DNV), tetrodotoxin administration (TTX) or cervical spinal hemi-section (SH). Control had high positive ICCA values, and DNV had negative values. TTX maintained negative ICCA values at 3, 7 and 14 days, indicating a lack of functional recovery. SH maintained negative values at 3 and 7 days, but a subset had positive values at 14 days indicating some functional recovery. PMID:19965125

  5. Evaluation of an automated deformable image matching method for quantifying lung motion in respiration-correlated CT images.

    PubMed

    Pevsner, A; Davis, B; Joshi, S; Hertanto, A; Mechalakos, J; Yorke, E; Rosenzweig, K; Nehmeh, S; Erdi, Y E; Humm, J L; Larson, S; Ling, C C; Mageras, G S

    2006-02-01

    We have evaluated an automated registration procedure for predicting tumor and lung deformation based on CT images of the thorax obtained at different respiration phases. The method uses a viscous fluid model of tissue deformation to map voxels from one CT dataset to another. To validate the deformable matching algorithm we used a respiration-correlated CT protocol to acquire images at different phases of the respiratory cycle for six patients with nonsmall cell lung carcinoma. The position and shape of the deformable gross tumor volumes (GTV) at the end-inhale (EI) phase predicted by the algorithm was compared to those drawn by four observers. To minimize interobserver differences, all observers used the contours drawn by a single observer at end-exhale (EE) phase as a guideline to outline GTV contours at EI. The differences between model-predicted and observer-drawn GTV surfaces at EI, as well as differences between structures delineated by observers at EI (interobserver variations) were evaluated using a contour comparison algorithm written for this purpose, which determined the distance between the two surfaces along different directions. The mean and 90% confidence interval for model-predicted versus observer-drawn GTV surface differences over all patients and all directions were 2.6 and 5.1 mm, respectively, whereas the mean and 90% confidence interval for interobserver differences were 2.1 and 3.7 mm. We have also evaluated the algorithm's ability to predict normal tissue deformations by examining the three-dimensional (3-D) vector displacement of 41 landmarks placed by each observer at bronchial and vascular branch points in the lung between the EE and EI image sets (mean and 90% confidence interval displacements of 11.7 and 25.1 mm, respectively). The mean and 90% confidence interval discrepancy between model-predicted and observer-determined landmark displacements over all patients were 2.9 and 7.3 mm, whereas interobserver discrepancies were 2.8 and 6

  6. Sensitivity of Image Features to Noise in Conventional and Respiratory-Gated PET/CT Images of Lung Cancer: Uncorrelated Noise Effects.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Jasmine A; Budzevich, Mikalai; Hunt, Dylan; Moros, Eduardo G; Latifi, Kujtim; Dilling, Thomas J; Feygelman, Vladimir; Zhang, Geoffrey

    2016-08-08

    The effect of noise on image features has yet to be studied in depth. Our objective was to explore how significantly image features are affected by the addition of uncorrelated noise to an image. The signal-to-noise ratio and noise power spectrum were calculated for a positron emission tomography/computed tomography scanner using a Ge-68 phantom. The conventional and respiratory-gated positron emission tomography/computed tomography images of 31 patients with lung cancer were retrospectively examined. Multiple sets of noise images were created for each original image by adding Gaussian noise of varying standard deviation equal to 2.5%, 4.0%, and 6.0% of the maximum intensity for positron emission tomography images and 10, 20, 50, 80, and 120 Hounsfield units for computed tomography images. Image features were extracted from all images, and percentage differences between the original image and the noise image feature values were calculated. These features were then categorized according to the noise sensitivity. The contour-dependent shape descriptors averaged below 4% difference in positron emission tomography and below 13% difference in computed tomography between noise and original images. Gray level size zone matrix features were the most sensitive to uncorrelated noise exhibiting average differences >200% for conventional and respiratory-gated images in computed tomography and 90% in positron emission tomography. Image feature differences increased as the noise level increased for shape, intensity, and gray-level co-occurrence matrix features in positron emission tomography and for gray-level co-occurrence matrix and gray-level size zone matrix features in conventional computed tomography. Investigators should be aware of the noise effects on image features.

  7. Image processing of correlated data by experimental design techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, D.

    1987-01-01

    New classes of algorithms are developed for processing of two-dimensional image data imbedded in correlated noise. The algorithms are based on modifications of standard analysis of variance (ANOVA) techniques ensuring their proper operation in dependent noise. The approach taken in the development of procedures is deductive. First, the theory of modified ANOVA (MANOVA) techniques involving one- and two-way layouts are considered for noise models with autocorrelation matrix (ACM) formed by direct multiplication of rows and columns or tensored correlation matrices (TCM) stressing the special case of the first-order Markov process. Next, the techniques are generalized to include arbitrary, wide-sense stationary (WSS) processes. This permits dealing with diagonal masks which have ACM of a general form even for TCM. As further extension, the theory of Latin square (LS) masks is generalized to include dependent noise with TCM. This permits dealing with three different effects of m levels using only m{sup 2} observations rather than m{sup 3}. Since in many image-processing problems, replication of data is possible, the masking techniques are generalized to replicated data for which the replication is TCM dependent. For all procedures developed, algorithms are implemented which ensure real-time processing of images.

  8. Dynamic Approaches for Facial Recognition Using Digital Image Speckle Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafailovich-Sokolov, Sara; Guan, E.; Afriat, Isablle; Rafailovich, Miriam; Sokolov, Jonathan; Clark, Richard

    2004-03-01

    Digital image analysis techniques have been extensively used in facial recognition. To date, most static facial characterization techniques, which are usually based on Fourier transform techniques, are sensitive to lighting, shadows, or modification of appearance by makeup, natural aging or surgery. In this study we have demonstrated that it is possible to uniquely identify faces by analyzing the natural motion of facial features with Digital Image Speckle Correlation (DISC). Human skin has a natural pattern produced by the texture of the skin pores, which is easily visible with conventional digital cameras of resolution greater than 4 mega pixels. Hence the application of the DISC method to the analysis of facial motion appears to be very straightforward. Here we demonstrate that the vector diagrams produced by this method for facial images are directly correlated to the underlying muscle structure which is unique for an individual and is not affected by lighting or make-up. Furthermore, we will show that this method can also be used for medical diagnosis in early detection of facial paralysis and other forms of skin disorders.

  9. State-correlated DC slice imaging of formaldehyde photodissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suits, Arthur G.; Chambreau, Steven D.; Lahankar, Sridhar A.

    High-resolution slice imaging methods allow for detection of single product quantum states with sufficient velocity resolution to infer the full correlated product state distribution of the undetected fragment. This is a level of detail not available in previous studies of formaldehyde photodissociation, and in this application it reveals startling new aspects of unimolecular decomposition. The CO rotational distributions from near ultraviolet dissociation of formaldehyde are bimodal, and the imaging experiments allow us to decompose these into two dynamically distinct components: the conventional molecular dissociation over a high exit barrier, and a novel `roaming atom' reaction in which frustrated radical dissociation events lead to intramolecular H abstraction, bypassing the transition state entirely. In probing the dynamics of the conventional molecular dissociation over the barrier, we use the complete vH2-jCO correlation to model the exit channel dynamics in new detail. Furthermore, these state-correlated measurements provide insight into radical-radical reactions and the underlying dynamics and energy dependence of the roaming pathway.

  10. Imaging of cardiac perfusion of free-breathing small animals using dynamic phase-correlated micro-CT

    SciTech Connect

    Sawall, Stefan; Kuntz, Jan; Socher, Michaela; Knaup, Michael; Hess, Andreas; Bartling, Soenke; Kachelriess, Marc

    2012-12-15

    Purpose:Mouse models of cardiac diseases have proven to be a valuable tool in preclinical research. The high cardiac and respiratory rates of free breathing mice prohibit conventional in vivo cardiac perfusion studies using computed tomography even if gating methods are applied. This makes a sacrification of the animals unavoidable and only allows for the application of ex vivo methods. Methods: To overcome this issue the authors propose a low dose scan protocol and an associated reconstruction algorithm that allows for in vivo imaging of cardiac perfusion and associated processes that are retrospectively synchronized to the respiratory and cardiac motion of the animal. The scan protocol consists of repetitive injections of contrast media within several consecutive scans while the ECG, respiratory motion, and timestamp of contrast injection are recorded and synchronized to the acquired projections. The iterative reconstruction algorithm employs a six-dimensional edge-preserving filter to provide low-noise, motion artifact-free images of the animal examined using the authors' low dose scan protocol. Results: The reconstructions obtained show that the complete temporal bolus evolution can be visualized and quantified in any desired combination of cardiac and respiratory phase including reperfusion phases. The proposed reconstruction method thereby keeps the administered radiation dose at a minimum and thus reduces metabolic inference to the animal allowing for longitudinal studies. Conclusions: The authors' low dose scan protocol and phase-correlated dynamic reconstruction algorithm allow for an easy and effective way to visualize phase-correlated perfusion processes in routine laboratory studies using free-breathing mice.

  11. Quantifying the reliability of image replication studies: the image intraclass correlation coefficient (I2C2).

    PubMed

    Shou, H; Eloyan, A; Lee, S; Zipunnikov, V; Crainiceanu, A N; Nebel, N B; Caffo, B; Lindquist, M A; Crainiceanu, C M

    2013-12-01

    This article proposes the image intraclass correlation (I2C2) coefficient as a global measure of reliability for imaging studies. The I2C2 generalizes the classic intraclass correlation (ICC) coefficient to the case when the data of interest are images, thereby providing a measure that is both intuitive and convenient. Drawing a connection with classical measurement error models for replication experiments, the I2C2 can be computed quickly, even in high-dimensional imaging studies. A nonparametric bootstrap procedure is introduced to quantify the variability of the I2C2 estimator. Furthermore, a Monte Carlo permutation is utilized to test reproducibility versus a zero I2C2, representing complete lack of reproducibility. Methodologies are applied to three replication studies arising from different brain imaging modalities and settings: regional analysis of volumes in normalized space imaging for characterizing brain morphology, seed-voxel brain activation maps based on resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), and fractional anisotropy in an area surrounding the corpus callosum via diffusion tensor imaging. Notably, resting-state fMRI brain activation maps are found to have low reliability, ranging from .2 to .4. Software and data are available to provide easy access to the proposed methods.

  12. Precision Improvement of Photogrammetry by Digital Image Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Ming-Hsiang; Sung, Wen-Pei; Tung, Shih-Heng; Hsiao, Hanwei

    2016-04-01

    The combination of aerial triangulation technology and unmanned aerial vehicle greatly reduces the cost and application threshold of the digital surface model technique. Based on the report in the literatures, the measurement error in the x-y coordinate and in the elevation lies between 8cm~15cm and 10cm~20cm respectively. The measurement accuracy for the geological structure survey already has sufficient value, but for the slope and structures in terms of deformation monitoring is inadequate. The main factors affecting the accuracy of the aerial triangulation are image quality, measurement accuracy of control point and image matching accuracy. In terms of image matching, the commonly used techniques are Harris Corner Detection and Scale Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT). Their pairing error is in scale of pixels, usually lies between 1 to 2 pixels. This study suggests that the error on the pairing is the main factor causing the aerial triangulation errors. Therefore, this study proposes the application of Digital Image Correlation (DIC) method instead of the pairing method mentioned above. DIC method can provide a pairing accuracy of less than 0.01 pixel, indeed can greatly enhance the accuracy of the aerial triangulation, to have sub-centimeter level accuracy. In this study, the effects of image pairing error on the measurement error of the 3-dimensional coordinate of the ground points are explored by numerical simulation method. It was confirmed that when the image matching error is reduced to 0.01 pixels, the ground three-dimensional coordinate measurement error can be controlled in mm level. A combination of DIC technique and the traditional aerial triangulation provides the potential of application on the deformation monitoring of slope and structures, and achieve an early warning of natural disaster.

  13. Plasmacytoid urothelial carcinoma (PUC): Imaging features with histopathological correlation

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Andrew D.; Schieda, Nicola; Flood, Trevor A.; Cagiannos, Ilias; Mai, Kien T.; Malone, Shawn; Morash, Christopher; Hakim, Shaheed W.; Breau, Rodney H.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Plasmacytoid urothelial carcinoma (PUC) is a high-grade variant of conventional urothelial cell carcinoma. This study is the first to describe the imaging findings of PUC, which are previously unreported, using clinical and histopathological correlation. Methods: With internal review board approval, we identified 22 consecutive patients with PUC from 2007–2014. Clinical parameters, including age, gender, therapy, surgical margins, and long-term outcome, were recorded. Baseline imaging was reviewed by an abdominal radiologist who evaluated for tumour detectability/location/morphology, local staging, and presence/location of metastases. Pelvic peritoneal spread of tumour (defined as >5mm thick soft tissue spreading along fascial planes) was also evaluated. Followup imaging was reviewed for presence of local recurrence or metastases. Results: Median age at presentation was 74 years (range 51–86), with only three female patients. Imaging features of the primary tumour in this study were not unique for PUC. Muscle-invasive disease was present on pathology in 19/22 (86%) of tumours, with distant metastases in 2/22 (9%) at baseline imaging. Pelvic peritoneal spread of tumour was radiologically present in 4/20 (20%) at baseline. During followup, recurrent/residual tumour was documented in 16/22 (73%) patients and 7/16 (44%) patients eventually developed distant metastases. Median time to disease recurrence in patients who underwent curative surgery was three months (range 0–19). Conclusions: PUC is an aggressive variant of urothelial carcinoma with poor prognosis. Pelvic peritoneal spread of tumour as thick sheets extending along fascial planes may represent a characteristic imaging finding of locally advanced PUC. PMID:28163816

  14. Improvement of heterogeneous deformation measurement in digital image correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Huan; Liang, Zhonghan; Cheng, Baishun

    2017-07-01

    Heterogeneous deformation measurement using traditional digital image correlation (DIC) has times error of homogeneous deformation due to localized complexity. In case of small strain window, displacement field error will substantially corrupt the derived strain. On the contrary, large strain window will induce a reasonable information reduction in particular of heterogeneous deformation. In this paper, a novel parameter was put forward to correct displacement field and select strain subset size dynamically. This parameter was determined by localized displacement field that is called the localized displacement non-uniform intensity (λ). In addition, there is a simple and effective method to eliminate the rigid body rotation impact on strain measurement. A series of speckle images containing different heterogeneous deformation are simulated finally. Results show that the accuracy on the displacement and strain field can be substantially improved especially in heterogeneous deformation fields.

  15. A Comparative Study of Random Patterns for Digital Image Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoilov, G.; Kavardzhikov, V.; Pashkouleva, D.

    2012-06-01

    Digital Image Correlation (DIC) is a computer based image analysis technique utilizing random patterns, which finds applications in experimental mechanics of solids and structures. In this paper a comparative study of three simulated random patterns is done. One of them is generated according to a new algorithm, introduced by the authors. A criterion for quantitative evaluation of random patterns after the calculation of their autocorrelation functions is introduced. The patterns' deformations are simulated numerically and realized experimentally. The displacements are measured by using the DIC method. Tensile tests are performed after printing the generated random patterns on surfaces of standard iron sheet specimens. It is found that the new designed random pattern keeps relatively good quality until reaching 20% deformation.

  16. Digital image correlation-based optical coherence elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Cuiru; Standish, Beau; Vuong, Barry; Wen, Xiao-Yan; Yang, Victor

    2013-12-01

    Optical coherence elastography (OCE) provides deformation or material properties, mapping of soft tissue. We aim to develop a robust speckle tracking OCE technique with improved resolution and accuracy. A digital image correlation (DIC)-based OCE technique was developed by combining an advanced DIC algorithm with optical coherence tomography (OCT). System calibration and measurement error evaluation demonstrated that this DIC-based OCE technique had a resolution of ˜0.6 μm displacement and <0.5% strain measurement in the axial scan direction. The measured displacement ranged from 0.6 to 150 μm, obtained via phantom imaging. The capability of the DIC-based OCE technique, for differentiation of stiffness, was evaluated by imaging a candle gel phantom with an irregularly shaped stiff inclusion. OCE imaging of a chicken breast sample differentiated the fat, membrane, and muscle layers. Strain elastograms of an aneurysm sample showed heterogeneity of the tissue and clear contrast between the adventitia and media. These promising results demonstrated the capability of the DIC-based OCE for the characterization of the various components of the tissue sample. Further improvement of the system will be conducted to make this OCE technique a practical tool for measuring and differentiating material properties of soft tissue.

  17. A Review of Digital Image Correlation Applied to Structura Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niezrecki, Christopher; Avitabile, Peter; Warren, Christopher; Pingle, Pawan; Helfrick, Mark

    2010-05-01

    A significant amount of interest exists in performing non-contacting, full-field surface velocity measurement. For many years traditional non-contacting surface velocity measurements have been made by using scanning Doppler laser vibrometry, shearography, pulsed laser interferometry, pulsed holography, or an electronic speckle pattern interferometer (ESPI). Three dimensional (3D) digital image correlation (DIC) methods utilize the alignment of a stereo pair of images to obtain full-field geometry data, in three dimensions. Information about the change in geometry of an object over time can be found by comparing a sequence of images and virtual strain gages (or position sensors) can be created over the entire visible surface of the object of interest. Digital imaging techniques were first developed in the 1980s but the technology has only recently been exploited in industry and research due to the advances of digital cameras and personal computers. The use of DIC for structural dynamic measurement has only very recently been investigated. Within this paper, the advantages and limits of using DIC for dynamic measurement are reviewed. Several examples of using DIC for dynamic measurement are presented on several vibrating and rotating structures.

  18. Digital image correlation-based optical coherence elastography.

    PubMed

    Sun, Cuiru; Standish, Beau; Vuong, Barry; Wen, Xiao-Yan; Yang, Victor

    2013-12-01

    Optical coherence elastography (OCE) provides deformation or material properties, mapping of soft tissue. We aim to develop a robust speckle tracking OCE technique with improved resolution and accuracy. A digital image correlation (DIC)-based OCE technique was developed by combining an advanced DIC algorithm with optical coherence tomography (OCT). System calibration and measurement error evaluation demonstrated that this DIC-based OCE technique had a resolution of ~0.6 μm displacement and <0.5% strain measurement in the axial scan direction. The measured displacement ranged from 0.6 to 150 μm, obtained via phantom imaging. The capability of the DIC-based OCE technique, for differentiation of stiffness, was evaluated by imaging a candle gel phantom with an irregularly shaped stiff inclusion. OCE imaging of a chicken breast sample differentiated the fat, membrane, and muscle layers. Strain elastograms of an aneurysm sample showed heterogeneity of the tissue and clear contrast between the adventitia and media. These promising results demonstrated the capability of the DIC-based OCE for the characterization of the various components of the tissue sample. Further improvement of the system will be conducted to make this OCE technique a practical tool for measuring and differentiating material properties of soft tissue.

  19. Full-field digital image correlation with Kriging regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dezhi; DiazDelaO, F. A.; Wang, Weizhuo; Mottershead, John E.

    2015-04-01

    A full-field Digital Image Correlation (DIC) method with integrated Kriging regression is presented in this article. The displacement field is formulated as a best linear unbiased model that includes the correlations between all the locations in the Region of Interest (RoI). A global error factor is employed to extend conventional Kriging interpolation to quantify displacement errors of the control points. An updating strategy for the self-adaptive control grid is developed on the basis of the Mean Squared Error (MSE) determined from the Kriging model. Kriging DIC is shown to outperform several other full-field DIC methods when using open-access experimental data. Numerical examples are used to demonstrate the robustness of Kriging DIC to different choices of initial control points and to speckle pattern variability. Finally Kriging DIC is tested on an experimental example.

  20. Novel rangefinding system using a correlation image sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimachi, Akira; Kurihara, Toru; Takamoto, Masao; Ando, Shigeru

    2000-12-01

    This paper proposes a 3D measurement principle for the correlation image sensor (CIS), which generates temporal correlation between light intensity and an external reference signal at each pixel. Another key of our system besides the CIS is amplitude-modulation of the scanning sheet beam, the phase of which relative to a reference signal is varied according to the scanning angle. After a scan within a frame, the phase is demodulated with a quadrature pair of reference signals and output by the CIS to compute the individual angle of the sheet bam at each pixel. By virtue of lock-in detection principle, the effects of background illumination and/or surface reflectance nonuniformity of the object are thoroughly removed. We implemented this system using our CMOS 64 by 64 pixel CIS, and successfully reconstructed a depth map under its frame rate.

  1. Poisson’s Ratio Extrapolation from Digital Image Correlation Experiments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER Q16H 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NO. Air Force Research Laboratory...ACRONYM(S) Air Force Research Laboratory (AFMC) AFRL/RQR 5 Pollux Drive 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT Edwards AFB CA 93524-7048 NUMBER(S) AFRL-RQ-ED-TP...Affairs Clearance Number XXXXX.    POISSON’S RATIO EXTRAPOLATION FROM DIGITAL IMAGE CORRELATION EXPERIMENTS Timothy C. Miller Air Force Research

  2. Evaluation of Fiber Reinforced Cement Using Digital Image Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Melenka, Garrett W.; Carey, Jason P.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of short fiber reinforcements on the mechanical properties of cement has been examined using a splitting tensile – digital image correlation (DIC) measurement method. Three short fiber reinforcement materials have been used in this study: fiberglass, nylon, and polypropylene. The method outlined provides a simple experimental setup that can be used to evaluate the ultimate tensile strength of brittle materials as well as measure the full field strain across the surface of the splitting tensile test cylindrical specimen. Since the DIC measurement technique is a contact free measurement this method can be used to assess sample failure. PMID:26039590

  3. Evaluation of fiber reinforced cement using digital image correlation.

    PubMed

    Melenka, Garrett W; Carey, Jason P

    2015-01-01

    The effect of short fiber reinforcements on the mechanical properties of cement has been examined using a splitting tensile - digital image correlation (DIC) measurement method. Three short fiber reinforcement materials have been used in this study: fiberglass, nylon, and polypropylene. The method outlined provides a simple experimental setup that can be used to evaluate the ultimate tensile strength of brittle materials as well as measure the full field strain across the surface of the splitting tensile test cylindrical specimen. Since the DIC measurement technique is a contact free measurement this method can be used to assess sample failure.

  4. [Correlation between the magnitude of skin prick test reactivity and pollen-specific serum IgE levels in patients with respiratory allergy].

    PubMed

    Tlachi-Corona, Laura; Caballero-López, Chrystopherson Gengyny; López-García, Aída Inés; Papaqui-Tapia, Sergio; Arana-Muñoz, Oswaldo; Carcaño-Pérez, María Socorro Yolanda; Marín-Marín, Araceli; Garrido-Priego, Fabiola

    2014-01-01

    For the etiological diagnosis of allergic respiratory diseases skin tests or specific serum IgE determination are used. To determine the correlation between the extent of reactivity to cutaneous prick tests and the levels of pollen specific serum IgE in patients with respiratory allergy. A prolective, descriptive and transversal study was done with patients of both genders, aged 2 to 60 years, who attended for the first time at the service of Allergy and Clinical Immunology of University Hospital of Puebla, Mexico, with presumptive diagnosis of respiratory allergy. All patients underwent clinical history, skin prick tests with standardized allergenic extracts and quantification of pollen specific serum IgE by chemiluminescence method. We estimated the correlation index r using the statistical method Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient; a value r equal to or higher than 0.70 was considered a significant relationship or a high correlation. Nine-one patients were included, of whom 58.2% were female. The diagnoses were: allergic rhinitis (79.1%), asthma and allergic rhinitis (16.5%) and only asthma (4.4%). Only significant correlation was found in patients with allergic rhinitis for Rumex crispus (r = 0.702) and in patients with asthma and rhinitis for Ambrosia trifida (r = 1). Only for Rumex crispus and Ambrosia trifida, the skin prick tests or the determination of specific serum IgE levels are comparable diagnostic methods of allergic respiratory diseases.

  5. Superfast robust digital image correlation analysis with parallel computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Bing; Tian, Long

    2015-03-01

    Existing digital image correlation (DIC) using the robust reliability-guided displacement tracking (RGDT) strategy for full-field displacement measurement is a path-dependent process that can only be executed sequentially. This path-dependent tracking strategy not only limits the potential of DIC for further improvement of its computational efficiency but also wastes the parallel computing power of modern computers with multicore processors. To maintain the robustness of the existing RGDT strategy and to overcome its deficiency, an improved RGDT strategy using a two-section tracking scheme is proposed. In the improved RGDT strategy, the calculated points with correlation coefficients higher than a preset threshold are all taken as reliably computed points and given the same priority to extend the correlation analysis to their neighbors. Thus, DIC calculation is first executed in parallel at multiple points by separate independent threads. Then for the few calculated points with correlation coefficients smaller than the threshold, DIC analysis using existing RGDT strategy is adopted. Benefiting from the improved RGDT strategy and the multithread computing, superfast DIC analysis can be accomplished without sacrificing its robustness and accuracy. Experimental results show that the presented parallel DIC method performed on a common eight-core laptop can achieve about a 7 times speedup.

  6. Differential induction of mitochondrial machinery by light intensity correlates with changes in respiratory metabolism and photorespiration in rice leaves.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shaobai; Jacoby, Richard P; Shingaki-Wells, Rachel N; Li, Lei; Millar, A Harvey

    2013-04-01

    The light responsiveness of mitochondrial function was investigated through changes in mitochondrial composition and metabolism in rice (Oryza sativa) shoots. The mitochondrial proteome and metabolite abundances under low light, (LL, 100 μmol m(-2) s(-1) ), and high light (HL, 700 μmol m(-2) s(-1) ) were measured along with information on shoot photosynthetic, respiratory and photorespiratory activity. Specific steps in mitochondrial tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle metabolism were decreased under HL, correlating with lower respiration rate under HL. The abundance of mitochondrial enzymes in branch chain metabolism was reduced under HL/LL, and correlated with a decrease in the abundance of a range of amino acids in the HL/LL. Mitochondrial nucleoside diphosphate kinase was increased under LL/HL treatments. Significant accumulation of glycine decarboxylase P, T subunits and serine hydroxymethyltransferase occurred in response to light. The abundance of the glycine decarboxylase (GDC) H subunit proteins was not changed by HL/LL treatments, and the abundance of GDC L subunit protein was halved under HL, indicating a change in the stoichiometry of GDC subunits, while photorespiration was fourfold higher in LL- than in HL-treated plants. Insights into these light-dependent phenomena and their importance for understanding the initiation of photorespiration in rice and adaptation of mitochondria to function in photosynthetic cells are discussed.

  7. Correlating Function and Imaging Measures of the Medial Longitudinal Fasciculus

    PubMed Central

    Sakaie, Ken; Takahashi, Masaya; Remington, Gina; Wang, Xiaofeng; Conger, Amy; Conger, Darrel; Dimitrov, Ivan; Jones, Stephen; Frohman, Ashley; Frohman, Teresa; Sagiyama, Koji; Togao, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    Objective To test the validity of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) measures of tissue injury by examining such measures in a white matter structure with well-defined function, the medial longitudinal fasciculus (MLF). Injury to the MLF underlies internuclear ophthalmoparesis (INO). Methods 40 MS patients with chronic INO and 15 healthy controls were examined under an IRB-approved protocol. Tissue integrity of the MLF was characterized by DTI parameters: longitudinal diffusivity (LD), transverse diffusivity (TD), mean diffusivity (MD) and fractional anisotropy (FA). Severity of INO was quantified by infrared oculography to measure versional disconjugacy index (VDI). Results LD was significantly lower in patients than in controls in the medulla-pons region of the MLF (p < 0.03). FA was also lower in patients in the same region (p < 0.0004). LD of the medulla-pons region correlated with VDI (R = -0.28, p < 0.05) as did FA in the midbrain section (R = 0.31, p < 0.02). Conclusions This study demonstrates that DTI measures of brain tissue injury can detect injury to a functionally relevant white matter pathway, and that such measures correlate with clinically accepted evaluation indices for INO. The results validate DTI as a useful imaging measure of tissue integrity. PMID:26800522

  8. Experimental analysis of image noise and interpolation bias in digital image correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zeren; Xu, Xiaohai; Su, Yong; Zhang, Qingchuan

    2016-06-01

    The popularization of the digital image correlation (DIC) method has raised urgent needs to evaluate the accuracy of this method. However, there are still some problems to be solved. Among the problems, the effects of various factors, such as the image noise caused by the camera sensors, the employed interpolation algorithm, and the structure of the speckle patterns, have become a major concern. To experimentally measure the position-dependent systematic error (i.e. interpolation bias) caused by non-ideal interpolation algorithm is an important way to evaluate the quality of the speckle patterns in the correlation method, and remains unsolved. In this work, a novel, simple and convenient method is proposed to measure the interpolation bias. In the new method which can avoid the out-of-plane displacements and the mechanical errors of translation stages, integral-pixel shifts are applied to the image shown on the screen so that sub-pixel displacements can be realized in the images captured by the camera via proper experimental settings. Besides, the fluctuations of the image noise and the sub-pixel displacement errors caused by the image noise are experimentally analyzed by employing three types of cameras commonly used in the DIC measurements. Experimental results indicate that the fluctuations of the image noise are not only proportional to the image gray value, but also dependent on the type of the employed camera. On the basis of eliminating the image noise via the image averaging technique, high-precision interpolation bias curves more than one period are experimentally obtained by the proposed method.

  9. Target localization accuracy in a respiratory phantom using BrainLAB ExacTrac and 4DCT imaging.

    PubMed

    Matney, Jason E; Parker, Brent C; Neck, Daniel W; Henkelmann, Greg; Rosen, Isaac I

    2011-03-08

    This study evaluated the accuracy of measuring the motion of an internal target using four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) scanning and the BrainLAB ExacTrac X-ray imaging system. Displacements of a metal coil implanted in a commercial respiratory phantom were measured in each system and compared to the known motion. A commercial respiratory motion phantom containing a metal coil as a surrogate target was used. Phantom longitudinal motions were sinusoidal with a 4.0 second period and amplitudes ranging from 5-25 mm. We acquired 4DCT and ExacTrac images of the coil at specified respiratory phases and recorded the coordinates of the coil ends. Coil displacement relative to the 0% phase (full-inhale) position were computed for the ExacTrac and 4DCT imaging systems. Coil displacements were compared to known displacements based on the phantom's sinusoidal motion. Coil length distortion due to 4DCT phase binning was compared to the known physical length of the coil (31 mm). The maximum localization error for both coil endpoints for all motion settings was 3.5 mm for the 4DCT and 0.8 mm for the ExacTrac gating system. Coil length errors measured on the 4DCT were less than 0.8 mm at end inhale/exhale phases, but up to 8.3 mm at mid-inhalation phases at the largest motion amplitude (25 mm). Due to the fast image acquisition time (100 ms), no coil distortion was observable in the ExacTrac system. 4DCT showed problems imaging the coil during mid-respiratory phases of higher velocity (phases 20%-30% and 70%-80%) due to distortion caused by residual motion within the 4DCT phase bin. The ExacTrac imaging system was able to accurately localize the coil in the respiratory phantom over all phases of respiration. For our clinic, where end-respiration phases from 4DCT may be used for treatment planning calculations, the ExacTrac system is used to measure internal target motion. With the ExacTrac system, planning target size and motion uncertainties are minimized, potentially

  10. 5D respiratory motion model based image reconstruction algorithm for 4D cone-beam computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiulong; Zhang, Xue; Zhang, Xiaoqun; Zhao, Hongkai; Gao, Yu; Thomas, David; Low, Daniel A.; Gao, Hao

    2015-11-01

    4D cone-beam computed tomography (4DCBCT) reconstructs a temporal sequence of CBCT images for the purpose of motion management or 4D treatment in radiotherapy. However the image reconstruction often involves the binning of projection data to each temporal phase, and therefore suffers from deteriorated image quality due to inaccurate or uneven binning in phase, e.g., under the non-periodic breathing. A 5D model has been developed as an accurate model of (periodic and non-periodic) respiratory motion. That is, given the measurements of breathing amplitude and its time derivative, the 5D model parametrizes the respiratory motion by three time-independent variables, i.e., one reference image and two vector fields. In this work we aim to develop a new 4DCBCT reconstruction method based on 5D model. Instead of reconstructing a temporal sequence of images after the projection binning, the new method reconstructs time-independent reference image and vector fields with no requirement of binning. The image reconstruction is formulated as a optimization problem with total-variation regularization on both reference image and vector fields, and the problem is solved by the proximal alternating minimization algorithm, during which the split Bregman method is used to reconstruct the reference image, and the Chambolle's duality-based algorithm is used to reconstruct the vector fields. The convergence analysis of the proposed algorithm is provided for this nonconvex problem. Validated by the simulation studies, the new method has significantly improved image reconstruction accuracy due to no binning and reduced number of unknowns via the use of the 5D model.

  11. Imaging fluorescence (cross-) correlation spectroscopy in live cells and organisms.

    PubMed

    Krieger, Jan W; Singh, Anand P; Bag, Nirmalya; Garbe, Christoph S; Saunders, Timothy E; Langowski, Jörg; Wohland, Thorsten

    2015-12-01

    Single-plane illumination (SPIM) or total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopes can be combined with fast and single-molecule-sensitive cameras to allow spatially resolved fluorescence (cross-) correlation spectroscopy (FCS or FCCS, hereafter referred to FCS/FCCS). This creates a powerful quantitative bioimaging tool that can generate spatially resolved mobility and interaction maps with hundreds to thousands of pixels per sample. These massively parallel imaging schemes also cause less photodamage than conventional single-point confocal microscopy-based FCS/FCCS. Here we provide guidelines for imaging FCS/FCCS measurements on commercial and custom-built microscopes (including sample preparation, setup calibration, data acquisition and evaluation), as well as anticipated results for a variety of in vitro and in vivo samples. For a skilled user of an available SPIM or TIRF setup, sample preparation, microscope alignment, data acquisition and data fitting, as described in this protocol, will take ∼1 d, depending on the sample and the mode of imaging.

  12. Correlative confocal Raman Imaging for 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jianyong; Liu, Wei; Dieing, Thomas; Fischer, Harald; Henrich, Marius; Hollricher, Olaf

    2015-03-01

    Graphene was one of the first two-dimensional materials which soon after its first mono-layer production received much attention by many researchers worldwide. Its properties vastly differ from bulk graphite and its potential for applications ranges from transistors to transparent conducting electrodes and solar cell applications. While Graphene is arguably the most prominent two-dimensional material there are to this date many more that are subject to current research such as MoS2, WS2 or MoSe2. Graphene has been already and still is extensively studied using a variety of characterization techniques. Raman spectroscopy and more importantly still, Raman imaging proved to be of great value due to the clearly different spectra obtained from single, double, triple and multi-layered Graphene. This and more information that can be extracted from Raman spectroscopy and imaging can well be complemented with other techniques such as various forms of atomic force microscopy (AFM), Scanning Nearfield Optical Microscopy (SNOM), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In this contribution we illustrate the benefit of correlating said techniques with confocal Raman imaging in order to deepen the understanding of the samples in question.

  13. Design and performance of a respiratory amplitude gating device for PET/CT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Guoping; Chang Tingting; Clark, John W. Jr.; Mawlawi, Osama R.

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: Recently, the authors proposed a free-breathing amplitude gating (FBAG) technique for PET/CT scanners. The implementation of this technique required specialized hardware and software components that were specifically designed to interface with commercial respiratory gating devices to generate the necessary triggers required for the FBAG technique. The objective of this technical note is to introduce an in-house device that integrates all the necessary hardware and software components as well as tracks the patient's respiratory motion to realize amplitude gating on PET/CT scanners. Methods: The in-house device is composed of a piezoelectric transducer coupled to a data-acquisition system in order to monitor the respiratory waveform. A LABVIEW program was designed to control the data-acquisition device and inject triggers into the PET list stream whenever the detected respiratory amplitude crossed a predetermined amplitude range. A timer was also programmed to stop the scan when the accumulated time within the selected amplitude range reached a user-set interval. This device was tested using a volunteer and a phantom study. Results: The results from the volunteer and phantom studies showed that the in-house device can detect similar respiratory signals as commercially available respiratory gating systems and is able to generate the necessary triggers to suppress respiratory motion artifacts. Conclusions: The proposed in-house device can be used to implement the FBAG technique in current PET/CT scanners.

  14. Patellar tilt: the physical examination correlates with MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Grelsamer, Ronald P; Weinstein, Craig H; Gould, Jason; Dubey, Ashok

    2008-01-01

    Patella malalignment is a recognized cause of knee pain, tilt being one of its more common forms. Although patellar tilt has been described both on the physical examination and on computerized imaging, to date the correlation between the two has not been established. A strong correlation would strengthen the value of each. Moreover, in situations where tilt cannot be clinically assessed (e.g. obesity), CT or MR imaging could be an adequate substitute for the clinical determination of tilt. We propose to correlate the physical examination with the magnetic resonance examination by way of an MR Tilt Angle. This angle is measured in a manner similar to the assessment of tilt on the physical examination, in that a line is drawn across the medial and lateral borders of the patella and referenced off the posterior femoral condyles. Most tilt angles use the slope of the lateral facet as a measure of tilt. These tilt angles paradoxically diminish as patellar tilt increases, a potential source of confusion. In this study, we use an MRI tilt angle that increases in the same direction as the actual tilt, which is more intuitive. We examined 30 patients with tilt and 51 patients without tilt. Patients with significant tilt on the physical examination can be expected to have an MRI Tilt Angle that is 10 degrees or greater whereas an angle of less than 10 degrees is associated with the absence of significant tilt on the physical examination. This MRI Tilt Angle fills the need for an easy, objective, intuitive measure of tilt and is an excellent adjunct to the physical examination.

  15. Role of tomographic ultrasound imaging with spatiotemporal image correlation for identifying fetal ventricular septal defects.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Giuseppe; Capponi, Alessandra; Vendola, Marianne; Pietrolucci, Maria Elena; Arduini, Domenico

    2008-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the possibility of diagnosing ventricular septal defects (VSDs) by using tomographic ultrasound imaging (TUI) on 4-dimensional volumes of the fetal chest obtained with spatiotemporal image correlation and the color Doppler function. We retrospectively evaluated the 4-dimensional spatiotemporal image correlation volumes of 8 fetuses with VSDs (single in 7 and double in 1) between 20 and 33 weeks' gestation. The data were analyzed to determine whether VSDs were correctly identified in at least 1 of 7 automatically generated TUI displays. All of the included VSDs were correctly identified with the use of an interslice distance in the TUI function ranging from 0.8 to 2 mm without the need to further manipulate the volume. This automatic approach shows good retrieval of diagnostic cardiac planes in fetuses with VSDs, which may improve the diagnostic accuracy for this disease.

  16. Digital anthropomorphic phantoms of non-rigid human respiratory and voluntary body motion for investigating motion correction in emission imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Könik, Arda; Connolly, Caitlin M.; Johnson, Karen L.; Dasari, Paul; Segars, Paul W.; Pretorius, P. H.; Lindsay, Clifford; Dey, Joyoni; King, Michael A.

    2014-07-01

    The development of methods for correcting patient motion in emission tomography has been receiving increased attention. Often the performance of these methods is evaluated through simulations using digital anthropomorphic phantoms, such as the commonly used extended cardiac torso (XCAT) phantom, which models both respiratory and cardiac motion based on human studies. However, non-rigid body motion, which is frequently seen in clinical studies, is not present in the standard XCAT phantom. In addition, respiratory motion in the standard phantom is limited to a single generic trend. In this work, to obtain a more realistic representation of motion, we developed a series of individual-specific XCAT phantoms, modeling non-rigid respiratory and non-rigid body motions derived from the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) acquisitions of volunteers. Acquisitions were performed in the sagittal orientation using the Navigator methodology. Baseline (no motion) acquisitions at end-expiration were obtained at the beginning of each imaging session for each volunteer. For the body motion studies, MRI was again acquired only at end-expiration for five body motion poses (shoulder stretch, shoulder twist, lateral bend, side roll, and axial slide). For the respiratory motion studies, an MRI was acquired during free/regular breathing. The magnetic resonance slices were then retrospectively sorted into 14 amplitude-binned respiratory states, end-expiration, end-inspiration, six intermediary states during inspiration, and six during expiration using the recorded Navigator signal. XCAT phantoms were then generated based on these MRI data by interactive alignment of the organ contours of the XCAT with the MRI slices using a graphical user interface. Thus far we have created five body motion and five respiratory motion XCAT phantoms from the MRI acquisitions of six healthy volunteers (three males and three females). Non-rigid motion exhibited by the volunteers was reflected in both respiratory

  17. Digital anthropomorphic phantoms of non-rigid human respiratory and voluntary body motion for investigating motion correction in emission imaging.

    PubMed

    Könik, Arda; Connolly, Caitlin M; Johnson, Karen L; Dasari, Paul; Segars, Paul W; Pretorius, P H; Lindsay, Clifford; Dey, Joyoni; King, Michael A

    2014-07-21

    The development of methods for correcting patient motion in emission tomography has been receiving increased attention. Often the performance of these methods is evaluated through simulations using digital anthropomorphic phantoms, such as the commonly used extended cardiac torso (XCAT) phantom, which models both respiratory and cardiac motion based on human studies. However, non-rigid body motion, which is frequently seen in clinical studies, is not present in the standard XCAT phantom. In addition, respiratory motion in the standard phantom is limited to a single generic trend. In this work, to obtain a more realistic representation of motion, we developed a series of individual-specific XCAT phantoms, modeling non-rigid respiratory and non-rigid body motions derived from the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) acquisitions of volunteers. Acquisitions were performed in the sagittal orientation using the Navigator methodology. Baseline (no motion) acquisitions at end-expiration were obtained at the beginning of each imaging session for each volunteer. For the body motion studies, MRI was again acquired only at end-expiration for five body motion poses (shoulder stretch, shoulder twist, lateral bend, side roll, and axial slide). For the respiratory motion studies, an MRI was acquired during free/regular breathing. The magnetic resonance slices were then retrospectively sorted into 14 amplitude-binned respiratory states, end-expiration, end-inspiration, six intermediary states during inspiration, and six during expiration using the recorded Navigator signal. XCAT phantoms were then generated based on these MRI data by interactive alignment of the organ contours of the XCAT with the MRI slices using a graphical user interface. Thus far we have created five body motion and five respiratory motion XCAT phantoms from the MRI acquisitions of six healthy volunteers (three males and three females). Non-rigid motion exhibited by the volunteers was reflected in both respiratory

  18. Theoretical scheme of thermal-light many-ghost imaging by Nth-order intensity correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Yingchuan; Kuang Leman

    2011-05-15

    In this paper, we propose a theoretical scheme of many-ghost imaging in terms of Nth-order correlated thermal light. We obtain the Gaussian thin lens equations in the many-ghost imaging protocol. We show that it is possible to produce N-1 ghost images of an object at different places in a nonlocal fashion by means of a higher order correlated imaging process with an Nth-order correlated thermal source and correlation measurements. We investigate the visibility of the ghost images in the scheme and obtain the upper bounds of the visibility for the Nth-order correlated thermal-light ghost imaging. It is found that the visibility of the ghost images can be dramatically enhanced when the order of correlation becomes larger. It is pointed out that the many-ghost imaging phenomenon is an observable physical effect induced by higher order coherence or higher order correlations of optical fields.

  19. Imaging biomarker correlates with oxidative stress in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Naduthota, Rajini M; Bharath, Rose D; Jhunjhunwala, Ketan; Yadav, Ravi; Saini, Jitender; Christopher, Rita; Pal, Pramod Kumar

    2017-01-01

    While oxidative stress (OS) may be one of the crucial factors determining the initiation and progression of Parkinson's disease (PD), its correlation with gray matter (GM) atrophy is not known. To determine the GM volume (GMV) changes using voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and correlation with OS marker serum malondialdehyde (MDA) in PD. Seventy-two patients with PD were clinically evaluated and underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on a 3T MRI scanner using a 32-channel head coil. Lipid peroxidation product MDA levels were measured by spectrophotometry. MDA levels and regional GM differences using VBM were compared with 72 healthy controls. The mean age of the patients was 51.3 ± 10.6 years and that of controls was 50.8 ± 10.4 years. The mean age of onset of symptoms in PD was 45.2 ± 11.3 years. In PD, serum MDA level was significantly higher than that in controls (0.592 ± 0.89 μmol/l vs. 0.427 ± 0.055 μmol/l; P < 0.0001). Compared to controls, patients had greater regional GM atrophy in all the brain lobes (P < 0.001, uncorrected). A significant positive correlation was found between GMV and MDA in the caudate nucleus (CN) and posterior cingulate gyrus (PC) in the patient group (P < 0.001, uncorrected). We observed GM atrophy in all major brain lobes of patients when compared to controls. Only in the patient group, a significant positive correlation was observed in CN and PC with MDA. These findings suggest that, even though the whole brain is affected in PD, some of the non-substantia nigra regions of the brain, such as CN, may have some differential compensatory mechanism, which are preserved from oxidative damage.

  20. Cognitive impairment and magnetic resonance imaging correlations in Wilson's disease.

    PubMed

    Frota, N A F; Barbosa, E R; Porto, C S; Lucato, L T; Ono, C R; Buchpiguel, C A; Caramelli, P

    2013-06-01

    To evaluate the cognitive performance of a group of patients with Wilson's disease (WD) and to correlate the cognitive findings with changes in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). All patients with WD consecutively attended in a Movement Disorders Clinic between September 2006 and October 2007 were invited to participate in the study, together with a group of matched healthy controls. Patients and controls were submitted to comprehensive neuropsychological assessment. MRI was performed in all patients, and abnormalities (high-intensity signal, low-intensity signal and atrophy) were semi-quantitatively rated. Performance of patients and controls in each cognitive test was compared, and correlations between cognitive scores and MRI changes were investigated within the patients' group. Twenty patients with WD (11 men) and 20 controls (nine men) were evaluated. Mean age in the WD and control groups was 30.05 ± 7.25 and 32.15 ± 5.37 years, respectively. Mean schooling years were 11.15 ± 3.73 among WD cases and 10.08 ± 2.62 among controls. Patients with WD performed significantly worse than controls in the Mini-Mental State Examination, Dementia Rating Scale, phonemic verbal fluency (FAS), verb generation, digit span forward, Stroop test, Frontal Assessment Battery and in the Brief Cognitive Screening Battery. A significant correlation emerged between global cognitive impairment and MRI scale (r = 0.535), being higher for high-intensity signal plus atrophy (r = 0.718). Patients with WD presented cognitive impairment, especially in executive functions, with good correlation between cognitive abnormalities and MRI changes. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  1. Correlation and prediction uncertainties in the CyberKnife Synchrony respiratory tracking system

    SciTech Connect

    Pepin, Eric W.; Wu, Huanmei; Zhang, Yuenian; Lord, Bryce

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: The CyberKnife uses an online prediction model to improve radiation delivery when treating lung tumors. This study evaluates the prediction model used by the CyberKnife radiation therapy system in terms of treatment margins about the gross tumor volume (GTV). Methods: From the data log files produced by the CyberKnife synchrony model, the uncertainty in radiation delivery can be calculated. Modeler points indicate the tracked position of the tumor and Predictor points predict the position about 115 ms in the future. The discrepancy between Predictor points and their corresponding Modeler points was analyzed for 100 treatment model data sets from 23 de-identified lung patients. The treatment margins were determined in each anatomic direction to cover an arbitrary volume of the GTV, derived from the Modeler points, when the radiation is targeted at the Predictor points. Each treatment model had about 30 min of motion data, of which about 10 min constituted treatment time; only these 10 min were used in the analysis. The frequencies of margin sizes were analyzed and truncated Gaussian normal functions were fit to each direction's distribution. The standard deviation of each Gaussian distribution was then used to describe the necessary margin expansions in each signed dimension in order to achieve the desired coverage. In this study, 95% modeler point coverage was compared to 99% modeler coverage. Two other error sources were investigated: the correlation error and the targeting error. These were added to the prediction error to give an aggregate error for the CyberKnife during treatment of lung tumors. Results: Considering the magnitude of 2{sigma} from the mean of the Gaussian in each signed dimension, the margin expansions needed for 95% modeler point coverage were 1.2 mm in the lateral (LAT) direction and 1.7 mm in the anterior-posterior (AP) direction. For the superior-inferior (SI) direction, the fit was poor; but empirically, the expansions were 3.5 mm

  2. Monitoring and imaging the atmosphere with infrasonic ambient noise correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haney, Matthew; Evers, Laslo

    2010-05-01

    The existence of widespread infrasonic ambient noise (e.g., microbaroms) opens up the possibility of investigating atmospheric acoustic structure with new techniques designed for continuous stochastic signals. This is in contrast to classical approaches that use deterministic signals (e.g., explosions) with clear phase arrivals. Here, we review some recent advances in the monitoring and imaging of the atmosphere derived from analysis of continuous infrasound noise. From two microbarometers located at Fourpeaked Volcano in Alaska, we observe coherent arrivals in cross-correlations of ambient noise in the microbarom band (0.2-0.5 Hz) at time lags that agree well with speeds expected for a direct infrasound wave in the atmosphere (300-340 m/s). A striking example of the dependence of the ambient noise correlations on atmospheric conditions is evident from a comparison with temperature and wind data measured on nearby ocean buoys. Application of the multiple-filter technique reveals that the group velocity of the infrasound wave is dispersive, with higher group velocities at lower frequencies. This supports the existence of a low-level atmospheric waveguide at Fourpeaked Volcano during the time period under study. We invert the observed time-dependent group velocity dispersion curves for average sound speed profiles as a function of time. The inverted sound speed profiles show that a time-dependent, surface-based inversion layer became stronger over a period of 24 hours, with a colder, denser, and lower sound speed layer moving between the stations. This layer is imaged in the lower 2 km of the atmosphere and demonstrates the sensitivity of ambient noise correlations to the atmospheric boundary layer. Independent analysis of meteorological data in and around Fourpeaked volcano from the same time period supports the results derived from the infrasound ambient noise correlations. We also show examples of ambient noise correlations from time periods of normal temperature

  3. Correlation Between UpToDate Searches and Reported Cases of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome During Outbreaks in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Thorner, Anna R; Cao, Bin; Jiang, Terrence; Warner, Amy J; Bonis, Peter A

    2016-01-01

    Background.  UpToDate is an online clinical decision support resource that is used extensively by clinicians around the world. Digital surveillance techniques have shown promise to aid with the detection and monitoring of infectious disease outbreaks. We sought to determine whether UpToDate searches for Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) could be used to detect and monitor MERS outbreaks in Saudi Arabia. Methods.  We analyzed daily searches related to MERS in Jeddah and Riyadh, Saudi Arabia during 3 outbreaks in these cities in 2014 and 2015 and compared them with reported cases during the same periods. We also compared UpToDate MERS searches in the affected cities to those in a composite of 4 negative control cities for the 2 outbreaks in 2014. Results.  UpToDate MERS searches during all 3 MERS outbreaks in Saudi Arabia showed a correlation to reported cases. In addition, UpToDate MERS search volume in Jeddah and Riyadh during the outbreak periods in 2014 was significantly higher than the concurrent search volume in the 4 negative control cities. In contrast, during the baseline periods, there was no difference between UpToDate searches for MERS in the affected cities compared with the negative control cities. Conclusions.  UpToDate search activity seems to be useful for detecting and monitoring outbreaks of MERS in Saudi Arabia.

  4. Cortisol Correlates with Severity of Illness and Poorly Reflects Adrenal Function in Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yehya, Nadir; Vogiatzi, Maria G; Thomas, Neal J; Srinivasan, Vijay

    2016-10-01

    To test the association between random cortisol and severity of illness in a "real-world" application of current guidelines. We performed a secondary analysis of a prospective observational cohort of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Children with ARDS and vasopressor-dependent shock were identified and random cortisol levels before potential hydrocortisone initiation recorded. The cohort was dichotomized to cortisol < 18 and ≥ 18 μg/dL, and hydrocortisone use and outcomes compared. Of 357 children with ARDS, 155 (15 nonsurvivors; 10%) had vasopressors initiated with cortisol drawn before possible hydrocortisone use. Patients with cortisol < 18 μg/dL had lower severity of illness scores, fewer organ failures, and lower vasopressor scores (all rank-sum P < .05). No benefit was seen with hydrocortisone in either the entire cohort, or when dichotomized by a cortisol cutoff of 18 μg/dL. In patients with cortisol ≥ 18 μg/dL, hydrocortisone was associated with increased mortality after adjustment for either organ dysfunction or vasopressor score. In children with ARDS with vasopressor-dependent shock, low cortisol correlated with lower severity of illness. Random cortisol was a poor method of diagnosing adrenal insufficiency, and a strategy of hydrocortisone replacement for cortisol < 18 μg/dL did not target a population likely to benefit from hydrocortisone. Future guidelines should reconsider using random cortisol levels alone for assessing adrenal function. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A study on quality improvement of x-ray imaging of the respiratory-system based on a new image processing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torii, Jun; Nagai, Yuichi; Horita, Tatsuya; Matsumoto, Yuuji; Izumo, Takehiro; Kitagawa, Mayumi; Ihara, Kanyu; Nakamura, Tadashi; Mukoyoshi, Wataru; Tennmei, Kounosuke; Suzuki, Katsumi; Hara, Akio; Sasada, Shinji; Aso, Tomohiko

    2015-03-01

    Recently, the double contrast technique in a gastrointestinal examination and the transbronchial lung biopsy in an examination for the respiratory system [1-3] have made a remarkable progress. Especially in the transbronchial lung biopsy, better quality of x-ray fluoroscopic images is requested because this examination is performed under a guidance of x-ray fluoroscopic images. On the other hand, various image processing methods [4] for x-ray fluoroscopic images have been developed as an x-ray system with a flat panel detector [5-7] is widely used. New noise reduction processing, Adaptive Noise Reduction [ANR], was announced in SPIE last year.[8] ANR is a new image processing technique which is capable of extracting and reducing noise components regardless of moving objects in fluoroscopy images. However, for further enhancement of noise reduction effect in clinical use, it was used in combination with a recursive filter, which is a time axis direction filter. Due to this, the recursive filter generated image lags when there are moving objects in the fluoroscopic images, and these image lags sometimes became hindrance in performing smooth bronchoscopy. This is because recursive filters reduce noise by adding multiple fluoroscopy images. Therefore, we have developed new image processing technique, Motion Tracking Noise Reduction [MTNR] for decreasing image lags as well as noise. This ground-breaking image processing technique detects global motion in images with high accuracy, determines the pixels to track the motion, and applies a motion tracking-type time filter. With this, image lags are removed remarkably while realizing the effective noise reduction. In this report, we will explain the effect of MTNR by comparing the performance of MTNR images [MTNR] and ANR + Recursive filter-applied images [ANR + Recursive filter].

  6. SU-E-J-74: Impact of Respiration-Correlated Image Quality On Tumor Motion Reconstruction in 4D-CBCT: A Phantom Study

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S; Lu, B; Samant, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effects of scanning parameters and respiratory patterns on the image quality for 4-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography(4D-CBCT) imaging, and assess the accuracy of computed tumor trajectory for lung imaging using registration of phased 4D-CBCT imaging with treatment planning-CT. Methods: We simulated a periodic and non-sinusoidal respirations with various breathing periods and amplitudes using a respiratory phantom(Quasar, Modus Medical Devices Inc) to acquire respiration-correlated 4D-CBCT images. 4D-CBCT scans(Elekta Oncology Systems Ltd) were performed with different scanning parameters for collimation size(e.g., small and medium field-of-views) and scanning speed(e.g., slow 50°·min{sup −1}, fast 100°·min{sup −1}). Using a standard CBCT-QA phantom(Catphan500, The Phantom Laboratory), the image qualities of all phases in 4D-CBCT were evaluated with contrast-to-noise ratio(CNR) for lung tissue and uniformity in each module. Using a respiratory phantom, the target imaging in 4D-CBCT was compared to 3D-CBCT target image. The target trajectory from 10-respiratory phases in 4D-CBCT was extracted using an automatic image registration and subsequently assessed the accuracy by comparing with actual motion of the target. Results: Image analysis indicated that a short respiration with a small amplitude resulted in superior CNR and uniformity. Smaller variation of CNR and uniformity was present amongst different respiratory phases. The small field-of-view with a partial scan using slow scan can improve CNR, but degraded uniformity. Large amplitude of respiration can degrade image quality. RMS of voxel densities in tumor area of 4D-CBCT images between sinusoidal and non-sinusoidal motion exhibited no significant difference. The maximum displacement errors of motion trajectories were less than 1.0 mm and 13.5 mm, for sinusoidal and non-sinusoidal breathings, respectively. The accuracy of motion reconstruction showed good overall

  7. Registration and Summation of Respiratory-Gated or Breath-Hold PET Images Based on Deformation Estimation of Lung from CT Image

    PubMed Central

    Kanai, Masayuki; Tamai, Yoshitaka; Sakohira, Atsushi; Suga, Kazuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Lung motion due to respiration causes image degradation in medical imaging, especially in nuclear medicine which requires long acquisition times. We have developed a method for image correction between the respiratory-gated (RG) PET images in different respiration phases or breath-hold (BH) PET images in an inconsistent respiration phase. In the method, the RG or BH-PET images in different respiration phases are deformed under two criteria: similarity of the image intensity distribution and smoothness of the estimated motion vector field (MVF). However, only these criteria may cause unnatural motion estimation of lung. In this paper, assuming the use of a PET-CT scanner, we add another criterion that is the similarity for the motion direction estimated from inhalation and exhalation CT images. The proposed method was first applied to a numerical phantom XCAT with tumors and then applied to BH-PET image data for seven patients. The resultant tumor contrasts and the estimated motion vector fields were compared with those obtained by our previous method. Through those experiments we confirmed that the proposed method can provide an improved and more stable image quality for both RG and BH-PET images. PMID:28096896

  8. A fast digital image correlation method for deformation measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Bing; Li, Kai

    2011-07-01

    Fast and high-accuracy deformation analysis using digital image correlation (DIC) has been increasingly important and highly demanded in recent years. In literature, the DIC method using the Newton-Rapshon (NR) algorithm has been considered as a gold standard for accurate sub-pixel displacement tracking, as it is insensitive to the relative deformation and rotation of the target subset and thus provides highest sub-pixel registration accuracy and widest applicability. A significant drawback of conventional NR-algorithm-based DIC method, however, is its extremely huge computational expense. In this paper, a fast DIC method is proposed deformation measurement by effectively eliminating the repeating redundant calculations involved in the conventional NR-algorithm-based DIC method. Specifically, a reliability-guided displacement scanning strategy is employed to avoid time-consuming integer-pixel displacement searching for each calculation point, and a pre-computed global interpolation coefficient look-up table is utilized to entirely eliminate repetitive interpolation calculation at sub-pixel locations. With these two approaches, the proposed fast DIC method substantially increases the calculation efficiency of the traditional NR-algorithm-based DIC method. The performance of proposed fast DIC method is carefully tested on real experimental images using various calculation parameters. Results reveal that the computational speed of the present fast DIC is about 120-200 times faster than that of the traditional method, without any loss of its measurement accuracy

  9. Imaging correlates of neural control of ocular movements.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Mohit; Ulmer, John L; Chandra, Tushar; Klein, Andrew P; Mark, Leighton P; Mohan, Suyash

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of oculomotor movements is maintenance of clear images on the retina. Beyond this oversimplification, it requires several different types of ocular movements and reflexes to focus objects of interest to the fovea-the only portion of retina capable of sharp and clear vision. The different movements and reflexes that execute this task are the saccades, smooth pursuit movements, fixation, accommodation, and the optokinetic and vestibulo-ocular reflexes. Many different centres in the cerebrum, cerebellum, brainstem and thalami, control these movements via different pathways. At the outset, these mechanisms appear dauntingly complex to a radiologist. However, only a little effort could make it possible to understand these neural controls and empower the reading session. The following review on ocular movements and their neural control will enable radiologists and clinicians to correlate lesions with clinical deficits effectively without being swamped by exhaustive detail. Key Points • Knowledge of cortical and subcortical areas controlling ocular movements is important. • Understanding of neural control of ocular movements makes a good foundation. • Awareness of anatomic areas controlling ocular movements helps in clinico-radiologic correlation.

  10. Human identification using correlation metrics of iris images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celenk, Mehmet; Brown, Michael; Luo, Yi; Kaufman, Jason; Ma, Limin; Zhou, Qiang

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents work done based on second order statistical features including cross- and auto-correlations as well as co-occurrence matrices of iris images in an attempt to extract a simple, yet powerful, set of features of an iris as a biometric. Prior to our work, the most prevalent methods for iris identification include the frontier work based on the use of quadrature 2-D Gabor wavelets with the Hamming Distance-based classification [1,2], circular Gabor filters with a nearest feature line (NFL) classifier [3], dyadic wavelet transform with the zero-cross detectors [4], texture analysis [9] and transient signal [11], and independent component analysis (ICA) [7], and boundary localization [10]. Our method differs significantly from the earlier approaches to iris recognition in that it relies on the wide-sense stationary approximation to the texture and gray-level characteristics of irises, and aims to lend itself for a single-chip hardware implementation. Our preliminary results show that cross- and auto-correlators along with co-occurrence matrix features are highly likely to be prominent iris discriminators.

  11. Human identification using correlation metrics of iris images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celenk, Mehmet; Brown, Michael; Luo, Yi; Kaufman, Jason; Ma, Limin; Zhou, Qiang

    2004-12-01

    This paper presents work done based on second order statistical features including cross- and auto-correlations as well as co-occurrence matrices of iris images in an attempt to extract a simple, yet powerful, set of features of an iris as a biometric. Prior to our work, the most prevalent methods for iris identification include the frontier work based on the use of quadrature 2-D Gabor wavelets with the Hamming Distance-based classification [1,2], circular Gabor filters with a nearest feature line (NFL) classifier [3], dyadic wavelet transform with the zero-cross detectors [4], texture analysis [9] and transient signal [11], and independent component analysis (ICA) [7], and boundary localization [10]. Our method differs significantly from the earlier approaches to iris recognition in that it relies on the wide-sense stationary approximation to the texture and gray-level characteristics of irises, and aims to lend itself for a single-chip hardware implementation. Our preliminary results show that cross- and auto-correlators along with co-occurrence matrix features are highly likely to be prominent iris discriminators.

  12. Wavelet-space correlation imaging for high-speed MRI without motion monitoring or data segmentation.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu; Wang, Hui; Tkach, Jean; Roach, David; Woods, Jason; Dumoulin, Charles

    2015-12-01

    This study aims to (i) develop a new high-speed MRI approach by implementing correlation imaging in wavelet-space, and (ii) demonstrate the ability of wavelet-space correlation imaging to image human anatomy with involuntary or physiological motion. Correlation imaging is a high-speed MRI framework in which image reconstruction relies on quantification of data correlation. The presented work integrates correlation imaging with a wavelet transform technique developed originally in the field of signal and image processing. This provides a new high-speed MRI approach to motion-free data collection without motion monitoring or data segmentation. The new approach, called "wavelet-space correlation imaging", is investigated in brain imaging with involuntary motion and chest imaging with free-breathing. Wavelet-space correlation imaging can exceed the speed limit of conventional parallel imaging methods. Using this approach with high acceleration factors (6 for brain MRI, 16 for cardiac MRI, and 8 for lung MRI), motion-free images can be generated in static brain MRI with involuntary motion and nonsegmented dynamic cardiac/lung MRI with free-breathing. Wavelet-space correlation imaging enables high-speed MRI in the presence of involuntary motion or physiological dynamics without motion monitoring or data segmentation. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Image guided respiratory gated hypofractionated Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (H-SBRT) for liver and lung tumors: Initial experience.

    PubMed

    Wurm, R E; Gum, F; Erbel, S; Schlenger, L; Scheffler, D; Agaoglu, D; Schild, R; Gebauer, B; Rogalla, P; Plotkin, M; Ocran, K; Budach, V

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate our initial experience with image guided respiratory gated H-SBRT for liver and lung tumors. The system combines a stereoscopic x-ray imaging system (ExacTrac X-Ray 6D) with a dedicated conformal stereotactic radiosurgery and radiotherapy linear accelerator (Novalis) and ExacTrac Adaptive Gating for dynamic adaptive treatment. Moving targets are located and tracked by x-ray imaging of implanted fiducial markers defined in the treatment planning computed tomography (CT). The marker position is compared with the position in verification stereoscopic x-ray images, using fully automated marker detection software. The required shift for a correct, gated set-up is calculated and automatically applied. We present our acceptance testing and initial experience in patients with liver and lung tumors. For treatment planning CT and Fluorodeoxyglucose-Positron Emission Tomography (FDG-PET) as well as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) taken at free breathing and expiration breath hold with internal and external fiducials present were used. Patients were treated with 8-11 consecutive fractions to a dose of 74.8-79.2 Gy. Phantom tests demonstrated targeting accuracy with a moving target to within +/-1 mm. Inter- and intrafractional patient set-up displacements, as corrected by the gated set-up and not detectable by a conventional set-up, were up to 30 mm. Verification imaging to determine target location during treatment showed an average marker position deviation from the expected position of up to 4 mm on real patients. This initial evaluation shows the accuracy of the system and feasibility of image guided real-time respiratory gated H-SBRT for liver and lung tumors.

  14. A breath of fresh air: images of respiratory illness in novels, poems, films, music, and paintings.

    PubMed

    Kaptein, Ad A; Meulenberg, Frans; Smyth, Joshua M

    2015-03-01

    The nature and severity of respiratory disease are typically expressed with biomedical measures such as pulmonary function, X-rays, blood tests, and other physiological characteristics. The impact of respiratory illness on the sufferer, however, is reflected in the stories patients tell: to themselves, their social environment, and their health care providers. Behavioral research often applies standardized questionnaires to assess this subjective impact. Additional approaches to sampling patients' experience of respiratory illness may, however, provide important and clinically useful information that is not captured by other methods. Herein, we assert that novels, poems, movies, music, and paintings may represent a rich, experiential understanding of the patient's point of view of asthma, cystic fibrosis, lung cancer, and tuberculosis. Examination of these works illustrates the broad range and major impact of respiratory illness on patients' quality of life. We suggest that examining how illness is represented in various art forms may help patients, their social environment, and their health care providers in coping with the illness and in humanizing medical care. Medical students' clinical skills may benefit when illness experiences as expressed in art are incorporated in the medical curriculum. More generally, Narrative Health Psychology, Narrative Medicine, and Medical Humanities deserve more attention in education, training, and clinical care of (respiratory) physicians, medical students, and other health care professionals.

  15. Correlation between Forced Vital Capacity and Slow Vital Capacity for the assessment of respiratory involvement in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Susana; de Carvalho, Mamede

    2017-02-01

    Slow vital capacity (SVC) and forced vital capacity (FVC) are the most frequent used tests evaluating respiratory function in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). No previous study has determined their interchangeability. To evaluate SVC-FVC correlation in ALS. Consecutive definite/probable ALS and primary lateral sclerosis (PLS) patients (2000-2014) in whom respiratory tests were performed at baseline/4-6months later were included. All were evaluated with revised ALS functional rating scale, the ALSFRS respiratory (R-subscore) and bulbar subscores, SVC, FVC, maximal inspiratory (MIP) and expiratory (MEP) pressures. SVC-FVC correlation was analysed by Pearson product-moment correlation test. Paired t-test compared baseline/follow-up values. Multilinear regression analysis modelled the relationship between tested variables. We included 592 ALS (332 men, mean onset age 62.6 ± 11.8 years, mean disease duration 15.4 ± 15 months) and 19 PLS (11 men, median age 54 years, median disease duration 5.5 years) patients. SVC and FVC predicted values decreased 2.15%/month and 2.08%/month, respectively. FVC and SVC were strongly correlated. Both were strongly correlated with MIP and MEP and moderately correlated with R-subscore for the all population and spinal-onset patients, but weakly correlated for bulbar-onset patients. FVC and SVC were strongly correlated and declined similarly. This correlation was preserved in bulbar-onset ALS and in spastic PLS patients.

  16. SU-E-J-238: First-Order Approximation of Time-Resolved 4DMRI From Cine 2DMRI and Respiratory-Correlated 4DMRI

    SciTech Connect

    Li, G; Tyagi, N; Deasy, J; Wei, J; Hunt, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Cine 2DMRI is useful in MR-guided radiotherapy but it lacks volumetric information. We explore the feasibility of estimating timeresolved (TR) 4DMRI based on cine 2DMRI and respiratory-correlated (RC) 4DMRI though simulation. Methods: We hypothesize that a volumetric image during free breathing can be approximated by interpolation among 3DMRI image sets generated from a RC-4DMRI. Two patients’ RC-4DMRI with 4 or 5 phases were used to generate additional 3DMRI by interpolation. For each patient, six libraries were created to have total 5-to-35 3DMRI images by 0–6 equi-spaced tri-linear interpolation between adjacent and full-inhalation/full-exhalation phases. Sagittal cine 2DMRI were generated from reference 3DMRIs created from separate, unique interpolations from the original RC-4DMRI. To test if accurate 3DMRI could be generated through rigid registration of the cine 2DMRI to the 3DMRI libraries, each sagittal 2DMRI was registered to sagittal cuts in the same location in the 3DMRI within each library to identify the two best matches: one with greater lung volume and one with smaller. A final interpolation between the corresponding 3DMRI was then performed to produce the first-order-approximation (FOA) 3DMRI. The quality and performance of the FOA as a function of library size was assessed using both the difference in lung volume and average voxel intensity between the FOA and the reference 3DMRI. Results: The discrepancy between the FOA and reference 3DMRI decreases as the library size increases. The 3D lung volume difference decreases from 5–15% to 1–2% as the library size increases from 5 to 35 image sets. The average difference in lung voxel intensity decreases from 7–8 to 5–6 with the lung intensity being 0–135. Conclusion: This study indicates that the quality of FOA 3DMRI improves with increasing 3DMRI library size. On-going investigations will test this approach using actual cine 2DMRI and introduce a higher order approximation for

  17. Critical-thinking ability in respiratory care students and its correlation with age, educational background, and performance on national board examinations.

    PubMed

    Wettstein, Richard B; Wilkins, Robert L; Gardner, Donna D; Restrepo, Ruben D

    2011-03-01

    Critical thinking is an important characteristic to develop in respiratory care students. We used the short-form Watson-Glaser Critical Thinking Appraisal instrument to measure critical-thinking ability in 55 senior respiratory care students in a baccalaureate respiratory care program. We calculated the Pearson correlation coefficient to assess the relationships between critical-thinking score, age, and student performance on the clinical-simulation component of the national respiratory care boards examination. We used chi-square analysis to assess the association between critical-thinking score and educational background. There was no significant relationship between critical-thinking score and age, or between critical-thinking score and student performance on the clinical-simulation component. There was a significant (P = .04) positive association between a strong science-course background and critical-thinking score, which might be useful in predicting a student's ability to perform in areas where critical thinking is of paramount importance, such as clinical competencies, and to guide candidate-selection for respiratory care programs.

  18. Application of image cross-correlation to the measurement of glacier velocity using satellite image data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scambos, Theodore A.; Dutkiewicz, Melanie J.; Wison, Jeremy C.; Bindschadler, Robert A.

    1992-01-01

    A high-resolution map of the velocity field of the central portion of Ice Stream E in West Antarctica, generated by the displacement-measuring technique, is presented. The use of cross-correlation software is found to be a significant improvement over previous manually based photogrammetric methods for velocity measurement, and is far more cost-effective than in situ methods in remote polar areas. A hue-intensity-saturation image of Ice Stream E and its velocity field is shown.

  19. Imaging Phenotypes of Major Depressive Disorder: Genetic Correlates

    PubMed Central

    Savitz, Jonathan B; Drevets, Wayne C

    2009-01-01

    Imaging techniques are a potentially powerful method of identifying phenotypes that are associated with, or are indicative of a vulnerability to developing major depressive disorder (MDD). Here we identify seven promising MDD-associated traits identified by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or positron emission tomography (PET). We evaluate whether these traits are state-independent, heritable endophenotypes, or state-dependent phenotypes that may be useful markers of treatment efficacy. In MDD, increased activity of the amygdala in response to negative stimuli appears to be a mood-congruent phenomenon, and is likely moderated by the serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4) promoter polymorphism (5-HTTLPR). Hippocampal volume loss is characteristic of elderly or chronically-ill samples and may be impacted by the val66met brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene variant and the 5-HTTLPR SLC6A4 polymorphism. White matter pathology is salient in elderly MDD cohorts but is associated with cerebrovascular disease, and is unlikely to be a useful marker of a latent MDD diathesis. Increased blood flow or metabolism of the subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (sgACC), together with gray matter volume loss in this region, is a well-replicated finding in MDD. An attenuation of the usual pattern of fronto-limbic connectivity, particularly a decreased temporal correlation in amygdala-anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) activity, is another MDD-associated trait. Concerning neuroreceptor PET imaging, decreased 5-HT1A binding potential in the raphe, medial temporal lobe, and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) has been strongly associated with MDD, and may be impacted by a functional single nucleotide polymorphism in the promoter region of the 5-HT1A gene (HTR1A: –1019C/G; rs6295). Potentially indicative of inter-study variation in MDD etiology or mood state, both increased and decreased binding potential of the serotonin transporter has been reported. Challenges facing the field include

  20. Super-resolution imaging using the spatial-frequency filtered intensity fluctuation correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprigg, Jane; Peng, Tao; Shih, Yanhua

    2016-12-01

    We report an experimental demonstration of a nonclassical imaging mechanism with super-resolving power beyond the Rayleigh limit. When the classical image is completely blurred out due to the use of a small imaging lens, by taking advantage of the intensity fluctuation correlation of thermal light, the demonstrated camera recovered the image of the resolution testing gauge. This method could be adapted to long distance imaging, such as satellite imaging, which requires large diameter camera lenses to achieve high image resolution.

  1. Wavelet-space Correlation Imaging for High-speed MRI without Motion Monitoring or Data Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yu; Wang, Hui; Tkach, Jean; Roach, David; Woods, Jason; Dumoulin, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This study aims to 1) develop a new high-speed MRI approach by implementing correlation imaging in wavelet-space, and 2) demonstrate the ability of wavelet-space correlation imaging to image human anatomy with involuntary or physiological motion. Methods Correlation imaging is a high-speed MRI framework in which image reconstruction relies on quantification of data correlation. The presented work integrates correlation imaging with a wavelet transform technique developed originally in the field of signal and image processing. This provides a new high-speed MRI approach to motion-free data collection without motion monitoring or data segmentation. The new approach, called “wavelet-space correlation imaging”, is investigated in brain imaging with involuntary motion and chest imaging with free-breathing. Results Wavelet-space correlation imaging can exceed the speed limit of conventional parallel imaging methods. Using this approach with high acceleration factors (6 for brain MRI, 16 for cardiac MRI and 8 for lung MRI), motion-free images can be generated in static brain MRI with involuntary motion and nonsegmented dynamic cardiac/lung MRI with free-breathing. Conclusion Wavelet-space correlation imaging enables high-speed MRI in the presence of involuntary motion or physiological dynamics without motion monitoring or data segmentation. PMID:25470230

  2. Minimally invasive imaging method based on second harmonic generation and multiphoton excitation fluorescence in translational respiratory research.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Thomas; Wadsworth, Samuel; Carthy, Jon M; Pechkovsky, Dmitri V; McManus, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    For translational respiratory research including in the development of clinical diagnostic tools, a minimally invasive imaging method, which can provide both cellular and extracellular structural details with sufficient specificity, sensitivity and spatial resolution, is particularly useful. Multiphoton microscopy causes excitation of endogenously fluorescent macromolecular systems and induces highly specific second harmonic generation signals from non-centrosymmetric macromolecules such as fibrillar collagens. Both these signals can be captured simultaneously to provide spatially resolved 3D structural organization of extracellular matrix as well as the cellular morphologies in their native states. Besides briefly discussing the fundamentals of multiphoton excitation fluorescence and harmonic generation signals and the instrumentation details, this review focuses on the specific applications of these imaging modalities in lung structural imaging, particularly morphological features of alveolar structures, visualizing and quantifying extracellular matrix remodelling accompanying emphysematous destructions as well as the IPF, detecting lung cancers and the potential use in the tissue engineering applications.

  3. Signal-to-noise ratio limitations for intensity correlation imaging.

    PubMed

    Fried, David L; Riker, Jim; Agrawal, Brij

    2014-07-01

    Intensity correlation imaging (ICI) is a concept which has been considered for the task of providing images of satellites in geosynchronous orbit using ground-based equipment. This concept is based on the intensity interferometer principle first developed by Hanbury Brown and Twiss. It is the objective of this paper to establish that a sun-lit geosynchronous satellite is too faint a target object to allow intensity interferometry to be used in developing image information about it-at least not in a reasonable time and with a reasonable amount of equipment. An analytic treatment of the basic phenomena is presented. This is an analysis of one aspect of the statistics of the very high frequency random variations of a very narrow portion of the optical spectra of the incoherent (black-body like-actually reflected sunlight) radiation from the satellite, an analysis showing that the covariance of this radiation as measured by a pair of ground-based telescopes is directly proportional to the square of the magnitude of one component of the Fourier transform of the image of the satellite-the component being the one for a spatial frequency whose value is determined by the separation of the two telescopes. This analysis establishes the magnitude of the covariance. A second portion of the analysis considers shot-noise effects. It is shown that even with much less than one photodetection event (pde) per signal integration time an unbiased estimate of the covariance of the optical field's random variations can be developed. Also, a result is developed for the standard deviation to be associated with the estimated value of the covariance. From these results an expression is developed for what may be called the signal-to-noise ratio to be associated with an estimate of the covariance. This signal-to-noise ratio, it turns out, does not depend on the measurement's integration time, Δt (in seconds), or on the optical spectral bandwidth, Δν (in Hertz), utilized-so long as

  4. Correlation of Magnetic Resonance Imaging With Knee Anterolateral Ligament Anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Helito, Camilo Partezani; Helito, Paulo Victor Partezani; Bonadio, Marcelo Batista; Pécora, José Ricardo; Bordalo-Rodrigues, Marcelo; Camanho, Gilberto Luis; Demange, Marco Kawamura

    2015-01-01

    Background: Anatomic and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies have recently characterized the knee anterolateral ligament (ALL). So far, no study has focused on confirming whether the evaluated MRI parameters truly correspond with ALL anatomy. Purpose: To assess the validity of MRI in detecting the ALL using an anatomic evaluation as reference. Study Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Methods: A total of 13 cadaveric knees were subjected to MRI and then to anatomic dissection. Dissection was performed according to previous anatomic study methodology. MRIs were performed with a 0.6- to 1.5-mm slice thickness and prior saline injection. The following variables were analyzed: distance from the origin of the ALL to the origin of the lateral collateral ligament (LCL), distance from the origin of the ALL to its bifurcation point, maximum length of the ALL, distance from the tibial insertion of the ALL to the articular surface of the tibia, ALL thickness, and ALL width. The 2 sets of measurements were analyzed using the Spearman correlation coefficient (ρ) and Bland-Altman plots. Results: The ALL was clearly observed in all dissected knees and MRI scans. It originated anterior and distal to the LCL, close to the lateral epycondile center, and showed an anteroinferior path toward the tibia, inserting between the Gerdy tubercle and the fibular head, around 5 mm under the lateral plateau. The ρ values tended to increase together for all studied variables between the 2 methods, and all were statistically significant, except for thickness (P = .077). Bland-Altman plots showed a tendency toward a reduction of ALL thickness and width by MRI compared with anatomic dissection. Conclusion: MRI scanning as described can accurately assess the ALL and demonstrates characteristics similar to those seen under anatomic dissection. Clinical Relevance: MRI can accurately characterize the ALL in the anterolateral region of the knee, despite the presence of structures that might

  5. Cardiac Mitochondrial Respiratory Dysfunction and Tissue Damage in Chronic Hyperglycemia Correlate with Reduced Aldehyde Dehydrogenase-2 Activity

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Mandar; Thandavarayan, Rajarajan A.; Xu, Jiang; Yang, Xiao-Ping; Palaniyandi, Suresh S.

    2016-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) 2 is a mitochondrial isozyme of the heart involved in the metabolism of toxic aldehydes produced from oxidative stress. We hypothesized that hyperglycemia-mediated decrease in ALDH2 activity may impair mitochondrial respiration and ultimately result in cardiac damage. A single dose (65 mg/kg; i.p.) streptozotocin injection to rats resulted in hyperglycemia with blood glucose levels of 443 ± 9 mg/dl versus 121 ± 7 mg/dl in control animals, p<0.0001, N = 7–11. After 6 months of diabetes mellitus (DM) induction, the rats were sacrificed after recording the functionality of their hearts. Increase in the cardiomyocyte cross sectional area (446 ± 32 μm2 Vs 221 ± 10 μm2; p<0.0001) indicated cardiac hypertrophy in DM rats. Both diastolic and systolic dysfunctions were observed with DM rats compared to controls. Most importantly, myocardial ALDH2 activity and levels were reduced, and immunostaining for 4HNE protein adducts was increased in DM hearts compared to controls. The mitochondrial oxygen consumption rate (OCR), an index of mitochondrial respiration, was decreased in mitochondria isolated from DM hearts compared to controls (p<0.0001). Furthermore, the rate of mitochondrial respiration and the increase in carbonyl cyanide-p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone (FCCP)-induced maximal respiration were also decreased with chronic hyperglycemia. Chronic hyperglycemia reduced mitochondrial OXPHOS proteins. Reduced ALDH2 activity was correlated with mitochondrial dysfunction, pathological remodeling and cardiac dysfunction, respectively. Our results suggest that chronic hyperglycemia reduces ALDH2 activity, leading to mitochondrial respiratory dysfunction and consequently cardiac damage and dysfunction. PMID:27736868

  6. Damage Assessment of Composite Structures Using Digital Image Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caminero, M. A.; Lopez-Pedrosa, M.; Pinna, C.; Soutis, C.

    2014-02-01

    The steady increase of Carbon-Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) Structures in modern aircraft will reach a new dimension with the entry into service of the Boeing 787 and Airbus 350. Replacement of damaged parts will not be a preferable solution due to the high level of integration and the large size of the components involved. Consequently the need to develop repair techniques and processes for composite components is readily apparent. Bonded patch repair technologies provide an alternative to mechanically fastened repairs with significantly higher performance, especially for relatively thin skins. Carefully designed adhesively bonded patches can lead to cost effective and highly efficient repairs in comparison with conventional riveted patch repairs that cut fibers and introduce highly strained regions. In this work, the assessment of the damage process taking place in notched (open-hole) specimens under uniaxial tensile loading was studied. Two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) Digital Image Correlation (DIC) techniques were employed to obtain full-field surface strain measurements in carbon-fiber/epoxy T700/M21 composite plates with different stacking sequences in the presence of an open circular hole. Penetrant enhanced X-ray radiographs were taken to identify damage location and extent after loading around the hole. DIC strain fields were compared to finite element predictions. In addition, DIC techniques were used to characterise damage and performance of adhesively bonded patch repairs in composite panels under tensile loading. This part of work relates to strength/stiffness restoration of damaged composite aircraft that becomes more important as composites are used more extensively in the construction of modern jet airliners. The behaviour of bonded patches under loading was monitored using DIC full-field strain measurements. Location and extent of damage identified by X-ray radiography correlates well with DIC strain results giving confidence to

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging and histology correlation in Cushing's disease.

    PubMed

    Masopust, Václav; Netuka, David; Beneš, Vladimír; Májovský, Martin; Belšán, Tomáš; Bradáč, Ondřej; Hořínek, Daniel; Kosák, Mikuláš; Hána, Václav; Kršek, Michal

    We continuously look for new techniques to improve the radicality of resection and to eliminate the negative effects of surgery. One of the methods that has been implemented in the perioperative management of Cushing's disease was the combination of three magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences: SE, SPGR and fSPGR. We enrolled 41 patients (11 males, 30 females) diagnosed with Cushing's disease. A 3D tumour model with a navigation console was developed using each SPGR, fSPGR and SE sequence. The largest model was then used. In all cases, a standard four-handed, bi-nostril endoscopic endonasal technique was used. Endocrinological follow-up evaluation using morning cortisol sampling was performed for 6-34 months in our study. In total, 36 patients (88%) were disease-free following surgery. Our results indicate we achieved 100% sensitivity of MR. Overall, the conformity of at least one donor site, as compared with the places designated on MR, was in 78% of patients. We searched the place of compliance in individual locations. There is a consensus in individual locations in 63 of the 123 cases (or 56%). The correlation gamma function at a 5% significance level was then 0.27. The combination of MR sequences (SE, SPGR, fSPGR), neuronavigation system and iMRI led to increased sensitivity of up to 100%. Specificity reached 56% in our study. We found a high success rate in surgical procedure in terms of the correlation between MR findings and histology, which leads to remission of Cushing's disease. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o.

  8. Bovine coronavirus antibody titers at weaning negatively correlate with incidence of bovine respiratory disease in the feed yard

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC) is a multifactorial disease caused by complex interactions among viral and bacterial pathogens, stressful management practices and host genetic variability. Although vaccines and antibiotic treatments are readily available to prevent and treat infection caus...

  9. Measurement of skin stretch using digital image speckle correlation.

    PubMed

    Staloff, Isabelle Afriat; Rafailovitch, Miriam

    2008-08-01

    The surface of the skin is covered by intersecting grooves and ridges which produce characteristic skin surface patterns. It has been suggested that these folds provide a reserve of tissue, allowing the skin to stretch during normal muscle movements. More so, skin is anisotropic and under constant tension. Therefore, to characterize skin displacement following stretch, a discrete, description of the in-plane skin displacement during stretch is of interest. We introduce the use of digital image speckle correlation (DISC), a non-contact technique, to map, in two dimensions, the surface deformation patterns resulting from skin stretching. We analyze skin stretch under the mechanical action of a film former applied on a defined square surface on the back of the hand. This is achieved by taking a series of images, during the drying process of the film former. The images are then analyzed with DISC to create vector diagram and projection maps, from which we can obtain spatially resolved information regarding the skin displacement. We first show that DISC can provide spatially resolved information at any time point during the drying process: areas of de-wetting, wetting were identified using projection maps; we then extracted the value of the drying time. Finally using a vector map, we show the orientation of the skin displacement during stretching and calculated the magnitude of the total stretch. We have shown previously that DISC can be used to determine skin mechanical properties and muscular activity. We show here that DISC, as a non-contact technique, can map, in two dimensions, the surface deformation patterns of a polymer solution on a substrate at any time point during the drying process. DISC analysis generates for each speckle of the sample analyzed, the orientation and magnitude of displacement of the polymer solution. DISC can map in two dimensions the deformation undergone by the substrate and skin stretch is measured in this particular case. We therefore

  10. Acquisition and automated 3-D segmentation of respiratory/cardiac-gated PET transmission images

    SciTech Connect

    Reutter, B.W.; Klein, G.J.; Brennan, K.M.; Huesman, R.H. |

    1996-12-31

    To evaluate the impact of respiratory motion on attenuation correction of cardiac PET data, we acquired and automatically segmented gated transmission data for a dog breathing on its own under gas anesthesia. Data were acquired for 20 min on a CTI/Siemens ECAT EXACT HR (47-slice) scanner configured for 12 gates in a static study, Two respiratory gates were obtained using data from a pneumatic bellows placed around the dog`s chest, in conjunction with 6 cardiac gates from standard EKG gating. Both signals were directed to a LabVIEW-controlled Macintosh, which translated them into one of 12 gate addresses. The respiratory gating threshold was placed near end-expiration to acquire 6 cardiac-gated datasets at end-expiration and 6 cardiac-gated datasets during breaths. Breaths occurred about once every 10 sec and lasted about 1-1.5 sec. For each respiratory gate, data were summed over cardiac gates and torso and lung surfaces were segmented automatically using a differential 3-D edge detection algorithm. Three-dimensional visualizations showed that lung surfaces adjacent to the heart translated 9 mm inferiorly during breaths. Our results suggest that respiration-compensated attenuation correction is feasible with a modest amount of gated transmission data and is necessary for accurate quantitation of high-resolution gated cardiac PET data.

  11. First images of respiratory system in ancient Egypt: Trachea, bronchi and pulmonary lobes.

    PubMed

    Kwiecinski, Jakub

    2012-01-01

    Examination of ancient Egyptians' depictions of the respiratory tract, dating back to the 30th century BC, reveals their awareness of the pulmonary anatomy: reinforced with cartilaginous rings, the trachea is split into two main bronchi, which then enter the lungs (lungs being divided into pulmonary lobes).

  12. Implementation of 1-bit Image Correlator on the Space Solar Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhao; Jin, Sheng-Zhen; Jiang, Ai-Min

    2007-06-01

    2-D image correlation tracking is a key factor for the Main Optical Telescope on the Space Solar Telescope to reach its 0.1" spatial resolution. In order to realize fast image correlation, 1-bit correlation arithmetic is proposed, and the hardware design of 1-bit correlator based on DSP and FPGA is given. Only 0.33 ms is needed to realize a 32 × 32 image correlation algorithm on XCV800 FPGA chip with 20 MHz clock. The FPGA resource consumption is only 1/9 that of FFT - based (12-bit data) correlator.

  13. 3D radial sampling and 3D affine transform-based respiratory motion correction technique for free-breathing whole-heart coronary MRA with 100% imaging efficiency.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Himanshu; Ge, Lan; Nielles-Vallespin, Sonia; Zuehlsdorff, Sven; Li, Debiao

    2011-05-01

    The navigator gating and slice tracking approach currently used for respiratory motion compensation during free-breathing coronary magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) has low imaging efficiency (typically 30-50%), resulting in long imaging times. In this work, a novel respiratory motion correction technique with 100% scan efficiency was developed for free-breathing whole-heart coronary MRA. The navigator signal was used as a reference respiratory signal to segment the data into six bins. 3D projection reconstruction k-space sampling was used for data acquisition and enabled reconstruction of low resolution images within each respiratory bin. The motion between bins was estimated by image registration with a 3D affine transform. The data from the different respiratory bins was retrospectively combined after motion correction to produce the final image. The proposed method was compared with a traditional navigator gating approach in nine healthy subjects. The proposed technique acquired whole-heart coronary MRA with 1.0 mm(3) isotropic spatial resolution in a scan time of 6.8 ± 0.9 min, compared with 16.2 ± 2.8 min for the navigator gating approach. The image quality scores, and length, diameter and sharpness of the right coronary artery (RCA), left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD), and left circumflex coronary artery (LCX) were similar for both approaches (P > 0.05 for all), but the proposed technique reduced scan time by a factor of 2.5. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. A study of the x-ray image quality improvement in the examination of the respiratory system based on the new image processing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagai, Yuichi; Kitagawa, Mayumi; Torii, Jun; Iwase, Takumi; Aso, Tomohiko; Ihara, Kanyu; Fujikawa, Mari; Takeuchi, Yumiko; Suzuki, Katsumi; Ishiguro, Takashi; Hara, Akio

    2014-03-01

    Recently, the double contrast technique in a gastrointestinal examination and the transbronchial lung biopsy in an examination for the respiratory system [1-3] have made a remarkable progress. Especially in the transbronchial lung biopsy, better quality of x-ray fluoroscopic images is requested because this examination is performed under a guidance of x-ray fluoroscopic images. On the other hand, various image processing methods [4] for x-ray fluoroscopic images have been developed as an x-ray system with a flat panel detector [5-7] is widely used. A recursive filtering is an effective method to reduce a random noise in x-ray fluoroscopic images. However it has a limitation for its effectiveness of a noise reduction in case of a moving object exists in x-ray fluoroscopic images because the recursive filtering is a noise reduction method by adding last few images. After recursive filtering a residual signal was produced if a moving object existed in x-ray images, and this residual signal disturbed a smooth procedure of the examinations. To improve this situation, new noise reduction method has been developed. The Adaptive Noise Reduction [ANR] is the brand-new noise reduction technique which can be reduced only a noise regardless of the moving object in x-ray fluoroscopic images. Therefore the ANR is a very suitable noise reduction method for the transbronchial lung biopsy under a guidance of x-ray fluoroscopic images because the residual signal caused of the moving object in x-ray fluoroscopic images is never produced after the ANR. In this paper, we will explain an advantage of the ANR by comparing of a performance between the ANR images and the conventional recursive filtering images.

  15. Evaluation of composite adhesive bonds using digital image correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Shashi Shekhar

    Advanced composite materials are widely used for many structural applications in the aerospace/aircraft industries today. Joining of composite structures using adhesive bonding offers several advantages over traditional fastening methods. However, this technique is not yet employed for fastening the primary structures of aircrafts or space vehicles. There are several reasons for this: There are not any reliable non-destructive evaluation (NDE) methods that can quantify the strength of the bonds, and there are no certifications of quality assurance for inspecting the bond quality. Therefore, there is a significant need for an effective, reliable, easy to use NDE method for the analysis of composite adhesive joints. This research aimed to investigate an adhesively bonded composite-aluminum joints of variable bond strength using digital image correlation (DIC). There are many future possibilities in continuing this research work. As the application of composite materials and adhesive bond are increasing rapidly, the reliability of the composite structures using adhesive bond should quantified. Hence a lot of similar research using various adhesive bonds and materials can be conducted for characterizing the behavior of adhesive bond. The results obtained from this research will set the foundation for the development of ultrasonic DIC as a nondestructive approach for the evaluation of adhesive bond line.

  16. Parametric image alignment using enhanced correlation coefficient maximization.

    PubMed

    Evangelidis, Georgios D; Psarakis, Emmanouil Z

    2008-10-01

    In this work we propose the use of a modified version of the correlation coefficient as a performance criterion for the image alignment problem. The proposed modification has the desirable characteristic of being invariant with respect to photometric distortions. Since the resulting similarity measure is a nonlinear function of the warp parameters, we develop two iterative schemes for its maximization, one based on the forward additive approach and the second on the inverse compositional method. As it is customary in iterative optimization, in each iteration, the nonlinear objective function is approximated by an alternative expression for which the corresponding optimization is simple. In our case we propose an efficient approximation that leads to a closed-form solution (per iteration) which is of low computational complexity, the latter property being particularly strong in our inverse version. The proposed schemes are tested against the Forward Additive Lucas-Kanade and the Simultaneous Inverse Compositional (SIC) algorithm through simulations. Under noisy conditions and photometric distortions, our forward version achieves more accurate alignments and exhibits faster convergence whereas our inverse version has similar performance as the SIC algorithm but at a lower computational complexity.

  17. Stereo digital image correlation for characterization of fresh biomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bland, Megan E.; Cortes, Marisol; Solt, Kristin J.; Siadat, Mohammad; Yang, Lianxiang

    2010-02-01

    In this study a whole field, non-contact optical method, Stereo Digital Image Correlation (SDIC), was used to determine the strain distribution and mechanical properties of fresh bone in Phosphate Buffered Saline (PBS) solution. Knowing the whole-surface strain distribution of bone is useful for understanding the effects of normal physiological loading, disease, drugs and aging. In addition, knowing the mechanical properties of bone will aid in the design of new biomaterials. Although there currently are methods for measuring the mechanical properties of bone, these methods have some limitations. Many miss areas of strain concentration, especially because of the inhomogeneous nature of bone. SDIC overcomes these limitations by being able to precisely measure whole-surface 3D contour and strain of samples in solution over a wide range of deformations. In this study, SDIC was used to measure the axial strain of fresh chicken tibia. A setup which has the capability to apply force axially was designed. This paper describes the methodology of SDIC for measuring fresh bone in a PBS solution. The effect of drying time on strain distribution was investigated. The usefulness of the SDIC system is demonstrated by examples of deformation and strain measurements for different chicken tibia in PBS solution.

  18. Vibration Analysis using 3D Image Correlation Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebert, T.; Splitthof, K.

    2010-06-01

    Digital speckle correlation techniques have already been successfully proven to be an accurate displacement analysis tool for a wide range of applications. With the use of two cameras, three dimensional measurements of contours and displacements can be carried out. With a simple setup it opens a wide range of applications. Rapid new developments in the field of digital imaging and computer technology opens further applications for these measurement methods to high speed deformation and strain analysis, e.g. in the fields of material testing, fracture mechanics, advanced materials and component testing. The high resolution of the deformation measurements in space and time opens a wide range of applications for vibration analysis of objects. Since the system determines the absolute position and displacements of the object in space, it is capable of measuring high amplitudes and even objects with rigid body movements. The absolute resolution depends on the field of view and is scalable. Calibration of the optical setup is a crucial point which will be discussed in detail. Examples of the analysis of harmonic vibration and transient events from material research and industrial applications are presented. The results show typical features of the system.

  19. TH-C-12A-11: Target Correlation of a 3D Surface Surrogate for Left Breast Irradiation Using the Respiratory-Gated Deep-Inspiration Breath-Hold Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Rong, Y; Walston, S

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the use of 3D optical surface imaging as a new surrogate for respiratory motion gated deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) technique for left breast cancer patients. Methods: Patients with left-sided breast cancer after lumpectomy or mastectomy were selected as candidates for DIBH technique for their external beam radiation therapy. Treatment plans were created on both free breathing (FB) and DIBH CTs to determine whether DIBH was beneficial in reducing heart doses. The Real-time Position Management (RPM) system was used to acquire patient's breathing trace during DIBH CT acquisition and treatment delivery. The reference 3D surface models from FB and DIBH CTs were generated and transferred to the “AlignRT” system for patient positioning and real-time treatment monitoring. MV Cine images were acquired for each beam as quality assurance for intra-fractional position verification. The chest wall excursions measured on these images were used to define the actual target position during treatment, and to investigate the accuracy and reproducibility of RPM and AlignRT. Results: Reduction in heart dose can be achieved for left-sided breast patients using DIBH. Results showed that RPM has poor correlation with target position, as determined by the MV Cine imaging. This indicates that RPM may not be an adequate surrogate in defining the breath-hold level when used alone. Alternatively, the AlignRT surface imaging demonstrated a better correlation with the actual CW excursion during DIBH. Both the vertical and magnitude real-time deltas (RTDs) reported by AlignRT can be used as the gating parameter, with a recommend threshold of ±3 mm and 5 mm, respectively. Conclusion: 3D optical surface imaging serves as a superior target surrogate for the left breast treatment when compared to RPM. Working together with the realtime MV Cine imaging, they ensure accurate patient setup and dose delivery, while minimizing the imaging dose to patients.

  20. Mycological Profile of Sputum of HIV Positive Patients with Lower Respiratory Tract Infection and its Correlation with CD4+ T Lymphocyte Count

    PubMed Central

    Chandwani, Jyotsna; Vyas, Nitya; Hooja, Saroj; Maheshwari, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Fungal respiratory infections are important cause of mortality and morbidity among HIV positive individuals. They account for up to 70% of illness in Acquired Immunodeficiency Disease Syndrome cases (AIDS). The range of illness varies from asymptomatic mucosal candidiasis to overwhelming disseminated infections. In these patients dissemination of fungus leads to very serious outcomes hence, it is important to have the knowledge of prevailing profile of fungus causing infections, so that it can be treated at the onset. Low CD4+ T lymphocyte count is an excellent indicator of decreased immunity and can also be helpful to predict opportunistic fungal respiratory infections and other complications. Aim To define the fungal aetiology of lower respiratory tract infections in HIV positive patients and to correlate the occurrence of different fungi with CD4+ T lymphocyte count. Materials and Methods This was a cross sectional study conducted between May 2014 to April 2015, on 180 treatment naive HIV seropositive patients with lower respiratory tract infections attending the Integrated Counselling and Testing Centre, SMS Medical College, Jaipur, Rajasthan. Early morning expectorated and induced sputum samples were collected and processed for isolation and identification of fungal species. CD4+ T lymphocyte count estimation was done by BD FACS Calibur. Results Fungal species were isolated from 155 (86.1%) patients. The most common isolate was Candida albicans (31.7%), followed by Aspergillus niger (17.7%) and Aspergillus flavus (10%). The fungal species were most commonly isolated from patients with CD4+ T lymphocyte cell less than 200 cells/μl. Conclusion Fungal infections were seen in 86.1% of HIV positive patients with lower respiratory tract infections hence, high level of clinical suspicion for fungal aetiology of respiratory infections in HIV positive patients should be kept in mind. PMID:27790435

  1. Pump-probe microscopy of respiratory chain pigments: towards non-fluorescent label-free metabolic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domingue, Scott R.; Chicco, Adam J.; Bartels, Randy A.; Wilson, Jesse W.

    2017-02-01

    Current label-free metabolic microscopy techniques are limited to obtaining contrast from fluorescent molecules NAD(P)H and FAD+, and are unable to determine redox state along the mitochondrial respiratory chain itself. The respiratory chain electron carriers do not fluoresce, but some are heme proteins that have redox-dependent absorption spectra. The most prominent of these, cytochrome c, has been extensively characterized by transient absorption spectroscopy, which suggests that pump-probe measurements in the vicinity of 450 - 600 nm can provide strong contrast between its redox states. Motivated by the success of pump-probe microscopy targeting another heme protein, hemoglobin, we seek to extend the technique to the cytochromes, with the ultimate goal of dissecting respiratory chain function of individual cells in live tissue. To that end, we have developed a new optical system producing ultrafast, visible, independently-tunable pulse pairs via sum-frequency generation of nonlinearly broadened pulses in periodically-poled lithium niobate. The system is pumped by a homebuilt fiber-based oscillator/amplifier emitting 1060 nm pulses at 1.3 W (63 MHz repetition rate), and produces tunable pulses in the vicinity of 488 and 532 nm. Pump-probe spectroscopy of cytochrome c with this source reveals differences in excited-state absorption relaxation times between redox states. Though redox contrast is weak with this setup, we argue that this can be improved with a resonant galvo-scanning microscope. Moreover, pump-probe images were acquired of brown adipose tissue (which contains dense mitochondria), demonstrating label-free contrast from excited-state absorption in respiratory chain hemes.

  2. Abdominal parametric perfusion imaging with respiratory motion-compensation based on contrast-enhanced ultrasound: In-vivo validation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Diya; Xiao, Mengnan; Zhang, Yu; Wan, Mingxi

    2017-06-22

    Parametric perfusion imaging (PPI) based on dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound (DCEUS) is a multi-parametric functional method that is increasingly used to characterize the hemodynamic features of abdominal tumors. Periodic respiratory kinetics adversely affects the signal-to-clutter ratio (SCR) and accuracy of abdominal PPI. This study proposed respiratory motion-compensation (rMoCo) employing non-negative matrix factorization combined with fast block matching algorithm to effectively remove these disturbances on abdominal PPI, which was validated through in-vivo perfusion experiments. The mean calculation efficiency of rMoCo was improved by 83.6% when the algorithm was accelerated in a unique matching sequence, which was formed from dozens of DCEUS subsequences at the same respiratory phase. The horizontal and vertical displacements induced by respiratory kinetics were estimated to correct the extraction of time-intensity curves and the peak SNR remained at 22.58±2.90dB. Finally, the abdominal PPIs of four perfusion parameters were formed with non-negative rMoCo, and their SCR was improved by 3.99±0.49dB (p<0.05). Compared with the results without rMoCo, the continuity and visualization of abdominal arterioles were clearly enhanced, and their perfusion details were accurately characterized by PPIs with non-negative rMoCo. The proposed method benefits clinicians in providing accurate diagnoses and in developing appropriate therapeutic strategies for abdominal diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. [Air pollutants and their correlation with medical visits for acute respiratory infections in children less than five years of age in urban Guadalajara, Mexico].

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Sánchez, Hermes Ulises; Andrade-García, María Dolores; González-Castañeda, Miguel Ernesto; Celis-de la Rosa, Alfredo de Jesús

    2006-01-01

    To describe the correlation between the concentration levels of atmospheric air pollutants and the number of medical visits to IMSS, ISSSTE and of SSJ healthcare facilities of the Urban Area of Guadalajara between 2000-2002 by children under five years suffering from acute respiratory infections. An ecological study was performed to describe the correlation between the interpolated monthly average modes, monthly mobile average of air pollutants: carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, ozone, and particles with an aerodynamic diameter of less than 10 microns (PM10) and sulfur dioxide,and the number of medical visits per month due to acute respiratory infections in children under five years. The air pollutants: carbon monoxide and nitrogen dioxide show a significant correlation with the incidence of acute respiratory infections in children less than five years of age in the Urban Area of Guadalajara. The correlation coefficients were: CO (r= 0.05) and NO2 (r= 0.09). Although the concentrations of air pollutants stay below the official limit, carbon monoxide and nitrogen dioxide affect the health of the child population of the Urban Area of Guadalajara. Although the monthly average mode and monthly mobile average does not exceed the established legislation,the registered maximums do exceed it; this indicates that although throughout most of the day there is no latent risk of population exposure to the air pollutants, during some hours of certain days there is a risk for the population of breathing air contaminated with concentrations higher than the limit, which can cause the development of acute respiratory infections.

  4. Digital image correlation with gray gradient constraints: Application to spatially variant speckle images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Yuan; Zhan, Qin; Huang, Jianyong; Fang, Jing; Xiong, Chunyang

    2016-02-01

    As a carrier of local deformation information, speckle pattern inside a subset is usually crucial for surface displacement acquisition based upon a digital image correlation (DIC) method, since both accuracy and precision of DIC method are closely related to the amount of speckle information in a subset. Although some comprehensive theoretical frameworks have been developed to estimate the quality of local speckle patterns, it is still a great challenge how to effectively integrate the subset speckle information into the well-developed correlation criteria used for DIC. By means of a well-designed square window function, we here propose the concept of continuous subset in order to modulate subset size in a continuously derivable manner. Afterwards, we further develop a new constrained zero-normalized sum-of-squared differences (CZNSSD) criterion and construct the corresponding iterative algorithm, based on which the subset size involved can be automatically determined according to the necessary amount of speckle information. Numerical results of synthetic speckle images indicate that the set of algorithm can enhance the accuracy and precision of displacement measurement, especially for spatially variant speckle images.

  5. Cross-correlation and image alignment for multi-band IR sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Thomas; Chao, Tien-Hsin; Chen, Kang (Frank); Luong, Andrew; Dewees, Mallory; Yan, Xinyi; Chow, Edward; Torres, Gilbert

    2016-04-01

    We present the development of a cross-correlation algorithm for correlating objects in the long wave, mid wave and short wave Infrared sensor arrays. The goal is to align the images in the multisensor suite by correlating multiple key features in the images. Due to the wavelength differences, the object appears very differently in the sensor images even the sensors focus on the same object. In order to perform accurate correlation of the same object in the multi-band images, we perform image processing on the images so that the features of the object become similar to each other. Fourier domain band pass filters are used to enhance the images. Mexican Hat and Gaussian Derivative Wavelets are used to further enhance the features of the object. A Python based QT graphical user interface has been implemented to carry out the process. We show reliable results of the cross-correlation of the objects in multiple band videos.

  6. Image Identification Based on Color and Luminance Information by Using an Optical Correlator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuboyama, H.; Moriyama, K.; Arai, S.; Fukuda, M.; Kato, M.; Kawaguchi, T.; Yamamoto, S.; Inoue, M.

    2012-03-01

    A technique for distinguishing real-world images has been developed using a joint transform correlator. The real-world images, taken with a digital camera, are converted into luminance-intensity histograms and x-y chromaticity diagrams in the correlator system. These two-dimensional patterns are displayed on a spatial light modulator and are distinguished using the correlator system. The proposed identification techniques could distinguish an object image similar to the reference image of an apple among various fruits and vegetables, and could also distinguish tumor cell images from other cell images using the correlator system. These experimental results demonstrate the feasibility of using an optical correlator for the identification of complex real-world images containing large volumes of information.

  7. High-resolution 3D coronary vessel wall imaging with near 100% respiratory efficiency using epicardial fat tracking: reproducibility and comparison with standard methods.

    PubMed

    Scott, Andrew D; Keegan, Jennifer; Firmin, David N

    2011-01-01

    To quantitatively assess the performance and reproducibility of 3D spiral coronary artery wall imaging with beat-to-beat respiratory-motion-correction (B2B-RMC) compared to navigator gated 2D spiral and turbo-spin-echo (TSE) acquisitions. High-resolution (0.7 × 0.7 mm) cross-sectional right coronary wall acquisitions were performed in 10 subjects using four techniques (B2B-RMC 3D spiral with alternate (2RR) and single (1RR) R-wave gating, navigator-gated 2D spiral (2RR) and navigator-gated 2D TSE (2RR)) on two occasions. Wall thickness measurements were compared with repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA). Reproducibility was assessed with the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). In all, 91% (73/80) of acquisitions were successful (failures: four TSE, two 3D spiral (1RR) and one 3D spiral (2RR)). Respiratory efficiency of the B2B-RMC was less variable and substantially higher than for navigator gating (99.6 ± 1.2% vs. 39.0 ± 7.5%, P < 0.0001). Coronary wall thicknesses (± standard deviation [SD]) were not significantly different: 1.10 ± 0.14 mm (3D spiral (2RR)), 1.20 ± 0.16 mm (3D spiral (1RR)), 1.14 ± 0.15 mm (2D spiral), and 1.21 ± 0.17 mm (TSE). Wall thickness reproducibility ranged from good (ICC = 0.65, 3D spiral (1RR)) to excellent (ICC = 0.87, 3D spiral (2RR)). High-resolution 3D spiral imaging with B2B-RMC permits coronary vessel wall assessment over multiple thin contiguous slices in a clinically feasible duration. Excellent reproducibility of the technique potentially enables studies of disease progression/regression. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. The Development of Technology for Effective Respiratory-Gated Irradiation Using an Image-Guided Small Animal Irradiator.

    PubMed

    Hill, M A; Thompson, J M; Kavanagh, A; Tullis, I D C; Newman, R G; Prentice, J; Beech, J; Gilchrist, S; Smart, S; Fokas, E; Vojnovic, B

    2017-09-01

    The development of image-guided small animal irradiators represents a significant improvement over standard irradiators by enabling preclinical studies to mimic radiotherapy in humans. The ability to deliver tightly collimated targeted beams, in conjunction with gantry or animal couch rotation, has the potential to maximize tumor dose while sparing normal tissues. However, the current commercial platforms do not incorporate respiratory gating, which is required for accurate and precise targeting in organs subject to respiration related motions that may be up to the order of 5 mm in mice. Therefore, a new treatment head assembly for the Xstrahl Small Animal Radiation Research Platform (SARRP) has been designed. This includes a fast X-ray shutter subsystem, a motorized beam hardening filter assembly, an integrated transmission ionization chamber to monitor beam delivery, a kinematically positioned removable beam collimator and a targeting laser exiting the center of the beam collimator. The X-ray shutter not only minimizes timing errors but also allows beam gating during imaging and treatment, with irradiation only taking place during the breathing cycle when tissue movement is minimal. The breathing related movement is monitored by measuring, using a synchronous detector/lock-in amplifier that processes diffuse reflectance light from a modulated light source. After thresholding of the resulting signal, delays are added around the inhalation/exhalation phases, enabling the "no movement" period to be isolated and to open the X-ray shutter. Irradiation can either be performed for a predetermined time of X-ray exposure, or through integration of a current from the transmission monitor ionization chamber (corrected locally for air density variations). The ability to successfully deliver respiratory-gated X-ray irradiations has been demonstrated by comparing movies obtained using planar X-ray imaging with and without respiratory gating, in addition to comparing dose

  9. Imaging Imageability: Behavioral Effects and Neural Correlates of Its Interaction with Affect and Context

    PubMed Central

    Westbury, Chris F.; Cribben, Ivor; Cummine, Jacqueline

    2016-01-01

    The construct of imageability refers to the extent to which a word evokes a tangible sensation. Previous research (Westbury et al., 2013) suggests that the behavioral effects attributed to a word's imageability can be largely or wholly explained by two objective constructs, contextual density and estimated affect. Here, we extend these previous findings in two ways. First, we show that closely matched stimuli on the three measures of contextual density, estimated affect, and human-judged imageability show a three-way interaction in explaining variance in LD RTs, but that imagebility accounts for no additional variance after contextual density and estimated affect are entered first. Secondly, we demonstrate that the loci and functional connectivity (via graphical models) of the brain regions implicated in processing the three variables during that task are largely over-lapping and similar. These two lines of evidence support the conclusion that the effect usually attributed to human-judged imageability is largely or entirely due to the effects of other correlated measures that are directly computable. PMID:27471455

  10. MR Imaging of Rotator Cuff Tears: Correlation with Arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bhandary, Sudarshan; Khandige, Ganesh; Kabra, Utkarsh

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Rotator cuff tears are quite common and can cause significant disability. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has now emerged as the modality of choice in the preoperative evaluation of patients with rotator cuff injuries, in view of its improved inherent soft tissue contrast and resolution. Aim To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of routine MRI in the detection and characterisation of rotator cuff tears, by correlating the findings with arthroscopy. Materials and Methods This prospective study was carried out between July 2014 and August 2016 at the AJ Institute of Medical Sciences, Mangalore, Karnataka, India. A total of 82 patients were diagnosed with rotator cuff injury on MRI during this period, out of which 45 patients who underwent further evaluation with arthroscopy were included in this study. The data collected was analysed for significant correlation between MRI diagnosis and arthroscopic findings using kappa statistics. The sensitivity, specificity, predictive value and accuracy of MRI for the diagnosis of full and partial thickness tears were calculated using arthroscopic findings as the reference standard. Results There were 27 males and 18 females in this study. The youngest patient was 22 years and the oldest was 74 years. Majority of rotator cuff tears (78%) were seen in patients above the age of 40 years. MRI showed a sensitivity of 89.6%, specificity of 100%, positive predictive value of 100% and negative predictive value of 83.3% for the diagnosis of full thickness rotator cuff tears. For partial thickness tears, MRI showed a sensitivity of 100%, specificity of 86.6%, positive predictive value of 78.9% and negative predictive value of 100%. The accuracy was 93.1% for full thickness tears and 91.1% for partial thickness tears. The p-value was less than 0.01 for both full and partial thickness tears. There was good agreement between the MRI and arthroscopic findings, with kappa value of 0.85 for full thickness tears and 0.81 for partial

  11. Full-Field Indentation Damage Measurement Using Digital Image Correlation.

    PubMed

    López-Alba, Elías; Díaz-Garrido, Francisco A

    2017-07-10

    A novel approach based on full-field indentation measurements to characterize and quantify the effect of contact in thin plates is presented. The proposed method has been employed to evaluate the indentation damage generated in the presence of bending deformation, resulting from the contact between a thin plate and a rigid sphere. For this purpose, the 3D Digital Image Correlation (3D-DIC) technique has been adopted to quantify the out of plane displacements at the back face of the plate. Tests were conducted using aluminum thin plates and a rigid bearing sphere to evaluate the influence of the thickness and the material behavior during contact. Information provided by the 3D-DIC technique has been employed to perform an indirect measurement of the contact area during the loading and unloading path of the test. A symmetrical distribution in the contact damage region due to the symmetry of the indenter was always observed. In the case of aluminum plates, the presence of a high level of plasticity caused shearing deformation as the load increased. Results show the full-field contact damage area for different plates' thicknesses at different loads. The contact damage region was bigger when the thickness of the specimen increased, and therefore, bending deformation was reduced. With the proposed approach, the elastic recovery at the contact location was quantified during the unloading, as well as the remaining permanent indentation damage after releasing the load. Results show the information obtained by full-field measurements at the contact location during the test, which implies a substantial improvement compared with pointwise techniques.

  12. Snapping Sharks, Maddening Mindreaders, and Interactive Images: Teaching Correlation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Mark L.

    Understanding correlation coefficients is difficult for students. A free computer program that helps introductory psychology students distinguish between positive and negative correlation, and which also teaches them to understand the differences between correlation coefficients of different size is described in this paper. The program is…

  13. SU-E-J-183: Quantifying the Image Quality and Dose Reduction of Respiratory Triggered 4D Cone-Beam Computed Tomography with Patient- Measured Breathing

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, B; OBrien, R; Kipritidis, J; Keall, P

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Respiratory triggered four dimensional cone-beam computed tomography (RT 4D CBCT) is a novel technique that uses a patient's respiratory signal to drive the image acquisition with the goal of imaging dose reduction without degrading image quality. This work investigates image quality and dose using patient-measured respiratory signals for RT 4D CBCT simulations instead of synthetic sinusoidal signals used in previous work. Methods: Studies were performed that simulate a 4D CBCT image acquisition using both the novel RT 4D CBCT technique and a conventional 4D CBCT technique from a database of oversampled Rando phantom CBCT projections. A database containing 111 free breathing lung cancer patient respiratory signal files was used to create 111 RT 4D CBCT and 111 conventional 4D CBCT image datasets from realistic simulations of a 4D RT CBCT system. Each of these image datasets were compared to a ground truth dataset from which a root mean square error (RMSE) metric was calculated to quantify the degradation of image quality. The number of projections used in each simulation is counted and was assumed as a surrogate for imaging dose. Results: Based on 111 breathing traces, when comparing RT 4D CBCT with conventional 4D CBCT the average image quality was reduced by 7.6%. However, the average imaging dose reduction was 53% based on needing fewer projections (617 on average) than conventional 4D CBCT (1320 projections). Conclusion: The simulation studies using a wide range of patient breathing traces have demonstrated that the RT 4D CBCT method can potentially offer a substantial saving of imaging dose of 53% on average compared to conventional 4D CBCT in simulation studies with a minimal impact on image quality. A patent application (PCT/US2012/048693) has been filed which is related to this work.

  14. Quantifying the image quality and dose reduction of respiratory triggered 4D cone-beam computed tomography with patient-measured breathing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Benjamin J.; O'Brien, Ricky T.; Kipritidis, John; Shieh, Chun-Chien; Keall, Paul J.

    2015-12-01

    Respiratory triggered four dimensional cone-beam computed tomography (RT 4D CBCT) is a novel technique that uses a patient’s respiratory signal to drive the image acquisition with the goal of imaging dose reduction without degrading image quality. This work investigates image quality and dose using patient-measured respiratory signals for RT 4D CBCT simulations. Studies were performed that simulate a 4D CBCT image acquisition using both the novel RT 4D CBCT technique and a conventional 4D CBCT technique. A set containing 111 free breathing lung cancer patient respiratory signal files was used to create 111 pairs of RT 4D CBCT and conventional 4D CBCT image sets from realistic simulations of a 4D CBCT system using a Rando phantom and the digital phantom, XCAT. Each of these image sets were compared to a ground truth dataset from which a mean absolute pixel difference (MAPD) metric was calculated to quantify the degradation of image quality. The number of projections used in each simulation was counted and was assumed as a surrogate for imaging dose. Based on 111 breathing traces, when comparing RT 4D CBCT with conventional 4D CBCT, the average image quality was reduced by 7.6% (Rando study) and 11.1% (XCAT study). However, the average imaging dose reduction was 53% based on needing fewer projections (617 on average) than conventional 4D CBCT (1320 projections). The simulation studies have demonstrated that the RT 4D CBCT method can potentially offer a 53% saving in imaging dose on average compared to conventional 4D CBCT in simulation studies using a wide range of patient-measured breathing traces with a minimal impact on image quality.

  15. Multimodal Correlative Preclinical Whole Body Imaging and Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Akselrod-Ballin, Ayelet; Dafni, Hagit; Addadi, Yoseph; Biton, Inbal; Avni, Reut; Brenner, Yafit; Neeman, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Segmentation of anatomical structures and particularly abdominal organs is a fundamental problem for quantitative image analysis in preclinical research. This paper presents a novel approach for whole body segmentation of small animals in a multimodal setting of MR, CT and optical imaging. The algorithm integrates multiple imaging sequences into a machine learning framework, which generates supervoxels by an efficient hierarchical agglomerative strategy and utilizes multiple SVM-kNN classifiers each constrained by a heatmap prior region to compose the segmentation. We demonstrate results showing segmentation of mice images into several structures including the heart, lungs, liver, kidneys, stomach, vena cava, bladder, tumor, and skeleton structures. Experimental validation on a large set of mice and organs, indicated that our system outperforms alternative state of the art approaches. The system proposed can be generalized to various tissues and imaging modalities to produce automatic atlas-free segmentation, thereby enabling a wide range of applications in preclinical studies of small animal imaging. PMID:27325178

  16. Automated method and system for the alignment and correlation of images from two different modalities

    DOEpatents

    Giger, Maryellen L.; Chen, Chin-Tu; Armato, Samuel; Doi, Kunio

    1999-10-26

    A method and system for the computerized registration of radionuclide images with radiographic images, including generating image data from radiographic and radionuclide images of the thorax. Techniques include contouring the lung regions in each type of chest image, scaling and registration of the contours based on location of lung apices, and superimposition after appropriate shifting of the images. Specific applications are given for the automated registration of radionuclide lungs scans with chest radiographs. The method in the example given yields a system that spatially registers and correlates digitized chest radiographs with V/Q scans in order to correlate V/Q functional information with the greater structural detail of chest radiographs. Final output could be the computer-determined contours from each type of image superimposed on any of the original images, or superimposition of the radionuclide image data, which contains high activity, onto the radiographic chest image.

  17. Correlation of the clinical and physical image quality in chest radiography for average adults with a computed radiography imaging system

    PubMed Central

    Wood, T J; Beavis, A W; Saunderson, J R

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine the correlation between the quality of visually graded patient (clinical) chest images and a quantitative assessment of chest phantom (physical) images acquired with a computed radiography (CR) imaging system. Methods: The results of a previously published study, in which four experienced image evaluators graded computer-simulated postero-anterior chest images using a visual grading analysis scoring (VGAS) scheme, were used for the clinical image quality measurement. Contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and effective dose efficiency (eDE) were used as physical image quality metrics measured in a uniform chest phantom. Although optimal values of these physical metrics for chest radiography were not derived in this work, their correlation with VGAS in images acquired without an antiscatter grid across the diagnostic range of X-ray tube voltages was determined using Pearson’s correlation coefficient. Results: Clinical and physical image quality metrics increased with decreasing tube voltage. Statistically significant correlations between VGAS and CNR (R=0.87, p<0.033) and eDE (R=0.77, p<0.008) were observed. Conclusion: Medical physics experts may use the physical image quality metrics described here in quality assurance programmes and optimisation studies with a degree of confidence that they reflect the clinical image quality in chest CR images acquired without an antiscatter grid. Advances in knowledge: A statistically significant correlation has been found between the clinical and physical image quality in CR chest imaging. The results support the value of using CNR and eDE in the evaluation of quality in clinical thorax radiography. PMID:23568362

  18. Experiential, autonomic, and respiratory correlates of CO2 reactivity in individuals with high and low anxiety sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Blechert, Jens; Wilhelm, Frank H; Meuret, Alicia E; Wilhelm, Eva M; Roth, Walton T

    2013-10-30

    Psychometric studies indicate that anxiety sensitivity (AS) is a risk factor for anxiety disorders such as panic disorder (PD). To better understand the psychophysiological basis of AS and its relation to clinical anxiety, we examined whether high-AS individuals show similarly elevated reactivity to inhalations of carbon dioxide (CO2) as previously reported for PD and social phobia in this task. Healthy individuals with high and low AS were exposed to eight standardized inhalations of 20% CO2-enriched air, preceded and followed by inhalations of room air. Anxiety and dyspnea, in addition to autonomic and respiratory responses were measured every 15 s. Throughout the task, high AS participants showed a respiratory pattern of faster, shallower breathing and reduced inhalation of CO2 indicative of anticipatory or contextual anxiety. In addition, they showed elevated dyspnea responses to the second set of air inhalations accompanied by elevated heart rate, which could be due to sensitization or conditioning. Respiratory abnormalities seem to be common to high AS individuals and PD patients when considering previous findings with this task. Similarly, sensitization or conditioning of anxious and dyspneic symptoms might be common to high AS and clinical anxiety. Respiratory conditionability deserves greater attention in anxiety disorder research. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A retrospective analysis of factors correlated to chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii) respiratory health at Gombe National Park, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Lonsdorf, Elizabeth V; Murray, Carson M; Lonsdorf, Eric V; Travis, Dominic A; Gilby, Ian C; Chosy, Julia; Goodall, Jane; Pusey, Anne E

    2011-03-01

    Infectious disease and other health hazards have been hypothesized to pose serious threats to the persistence of wild ape populations. Respiratory disease outbreaks have been shown to be of particular concern for several wild chimpanzee study sites, leading managers, and researchers to hypothesize that diseases originating from and/or spread by humans pose a substantial risk to the long-term survival of chimpanzee populations. The total chimpanzee population in Gombe National Park, Tanzania, has declined from 120-150 in the 1960s to about 100 by the end of 2007, with death associated with observable signs of disease as the leading cause of mortality. We used a historical data set collected from 1979 to 1987 to investigate the baseline rates of respiratory illness in chimpanzees at Gombe National Park, Tanzania, and to analyze the impact of human-related factors (e.g., banana feeding, visits to staff quarters) and non-human-related factors (e.g., sociality, season) on chimpanzee respiratory illness rates. We found that season and banana feeding were the most significant predictors of respiratory health clinical signs during this time period. We discuss these results in the context of management options for the reduction of disease risk and the importance of long-term observational data for conservation.

  20. PHASE CORRELATION METHOD FOR THE ALIGNMENT OF TOTAL SOLAR ECLIPSE IMAGES

    SciTech Connect

    Druckmueller, M.

    2009-12-01

    A modified phase correlation method, based on Fourier transform, which enables the alignment of solar coronal images taken during the total solar eclipses, is presented. The method enables the measurement of translation, rotation, and scaling factor between two images. With the application of this technique, pairs of images with different exposure times, different brightness scale, such as linear for CCD and nonlinear for images taken with photographic film, and even images from different emission lines can be aligned with sub-pixel precision.

  1. Theory and practical recommendations for autocorrelation-based image correlation spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    George, Steven C.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. Image correlation spectroscopy (ICS) is a powerful technique for detecting arrangement of fluorophores in images. This tutorial gives background into the mathematical underpinnings of ICS, specifically image autocorrelation. The effects of various artifacts and image processing steps, including background subtraction, noise, and image morphology were examined analytically and their effects on ICS analysis modeled. A series of recommendations was built based on this analysis. PMID:23224160

  2. A 360-deg Digital Image Correlation system for materials testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genovese, K.; Cortese, L.; Rossi, M.; Amodio, D.

    2016-07-01

    The increasing research interest toward natural and advanced engineered materials demands new experimental protocols capable of retrieving highly dense sets of experimental data on the full-surface of samples under multiple loading conditions. Such information, in fact, would allow to capture the possible heterogeneity and anisotropy of the material by using up-to-date inverse characterization methods. Although the development of object-specific test protocols could represent the optimal choice to address this need, it is unquestionable that universal testing machines (UTM) remain the most widespread and versatile option to test materials and components in both academic and industrial contexts. A major limitation of performing standard material tests with UTM, however, consists in the scarce information obtainable with the commonly associated sensors since they provide only global (LVDTs, extensometers, 2D-video analyzers) or local (strain gages) measures of displacement and strain. This paper presents a 3D Digital Image Correlation (DIC) system developed to perform highly accurate full-surface 360-deg measurements on either standard or custom-shaped samples under complex loading within universal testing machines. To this aim, a low cost and easy to setup video rig was specifically designed to overcome the practical limitations entailed with the integration of a multi-camera system within an already existing loading frame. In particular, the proposed system features a single SLR digital camera moved through multiple positions around the specimen by means of a large rotation stage. A proper calibration and data-processing procedure allows to automatically merge the experimental data obtained from the multiple views with an accuracy of 10-2 m m . The results of a full benchmarking of the metrological performances of the system are here reported and discussed together with illustrative examples of full-360-deg shape and deformation measurements on a Grade X65 steel

  3. A radial sampling strategy for uniform k-space coverage with retrospective respiratory gating in 3D ultrashort-echo-time lung imaging.

    PubMed

    Park, Jinil; Shin, Taehoon; Yoon, Soon Ho; Goo, Jin Mo; Park, Jang-Yeon

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this work was to develop a 3D radial-sampling strategy which maintains uniform k-space sample density after retrospective respiratory gating, and demonstrate its feasibility in free-breathing ultrashort-echo-time lung MRI. A multi-shot, interleaved 3D radial sampling function was designed by segmenting a single-shot trajectory of projection views such that each interleaf samples k-space in an incoherent fashion. An optimal segmentation factor for the interleaved acquisition was derived based on an approximate model of respiratory patterns such that radial interleaves are evenly accepted during the retrospective gating. The optimality of the proposed sampling scheme was tested by numerical simulations and phantom experiments using human respiratory waveforms. Retrospectively, respiratory-gated, free-breathing lung MRI with the proposed sampling strategy was performed in healthy subjects. The simulation yielded the most uniform k-space sample density with the optimal segmentation factor, as evidenced by the smallest standard deviation of the number of neighboring samples as well as minimal side-lobe energy in the point spread function. The optimality of the proposed scheme was also confirmed by minimal image artifacts in phantom images. Human lung images showed that the proposed sampling scheme significantly reduced streak and ring artifacts compared with the conventional retrospective respiratory gating while suppressing motion-related blurring compared with full sampling without respiratory gating. In conclusion, the proposed 3D radial-sampling scheme can effectively suppress the image artifacts due to non-uniform k-space sample density in retrospectively respiratory-gated lung MRI by uniformly distributing gated radial views across the k-space. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. A radial sampling strategy for uniform k-space coverage with retrospective respiratory gating in 3D ultrashort-echo-time lung imaging

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jinil; Shin, Taehoon; Yoon, Soon Ho; Goo, Jin Mo; Park, Jang-Yeon

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to develop a 3D radial-sampling strategy which maintains uniform k-space sample density after retrospective respiratory gating, and demonstrate its feasibility in free-breathing ultrashort-echo-time lung MRI. A multi-shot, interleaved 3D radial sampling function was designed by segmenting a single-shot trajectory of projection views such that each interleaf samples k-space in an incoherent fashion. An optimal segmentation factor for the interleaved acquisition was derived based on an approximate model of respiratory patterns such that radial interleaves are evenly accepted during the retrospective gating. The optimality of the proposed sampling scheme was tested by numerical simulations and phantom experiments using human respiratory waveforms. Retrospectively, respiratory-gated, free-breathing lung MRI with the proposed sampling strategy was performed in healthy subjects. The simulation yielded the most uniform k-space sample density with the optimal segmentation factor, as evidenced by the smallest standard deviation of the number of neighboring samples as well as minimal side-lobe energy in the point spread function. The optimality of the proposed scheme was also confirmed by minimal image artifacts in phantom images. Human lung images showed that the proposed sampling scheme significantly reduced streak and ring artifacts compared with the conventional retrospective respiratory gating while suppressing motion-related blurring compared with full sampling without respiratory gating. In conclusion, the proposed 3D radial-sampling scheme can effectively suppress the image artifacts due to non-uniform k-space sample density in retrospectively respiratory-gated lung MRI by uniformly distributing gated radial views across the k-space. PMID:26891126

  5. Development of bioluminescence imaging of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in virus-infected live mice and its use for evaluation of therapeutics and vaccines.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Sandra; Arenas, Diego; Moore, Martin M; Golding, Hana; Khurana, Surender

    2017-01-23

    Respiratory Syncytial virus (RSV) is one of the leading causes of pneumonia among infants with no human vaccine or efficient curative treatments. Efforts are underway to develop new RSV vaccines and therapeutics. There is a dire need for animal models for preclinical evaluation and selection of products against RSV. Herein, we developed a whole body bioluminescence imaging to follow replication of RSV A2 virus strain expressing firefly luciferase (RSVA2-line19-FFL) in live BALB/c mice that can be used as an extremely sensitive readout for studying effects of antiviral and vaccines in living mice. Strong bioluminescence signal was detected in the nasal cavity and in the lungs following intranasal infection of mice with RSVA2-line19-FFL. The kinetics of viral replication in lungs quantified by daily live imaging strongly correlated with viral titers measured by ex-vivo plaque assay and by assessing viral RNA by qRT-PCR. Vaccination of mice with a pre-fusion F protein elicited high neutralizing antibody titers conferring strong protective immunity against virus replication in the nasal cavity and lungs. In contrast, post-challenge treatment of mice with the monoclonal antibody Palivizumab two days after infection reduced viral replication in the nasal cavity at day 4, but only modestly reduced virus loads in the lungs by day 5. In contrast to RSV bioluminescence, plaque assay did not detect viral titers in lungs on day 5 in Palivizumab-treated animals. This difference between viral loads measured by the two assays was found to be due to coating of virions with the Palivizumab that blocked infection of target cells in vitro and shows importance of live imaging in evaluation of RSV therapeutics. This recombinant RSV based live imaging animal model is convenient and valuable tool that can be used to study host dissemination of RSV and evaluation of antiviral compounds and vaccines against RSV.

  6. Lifetime imaging of GFP at CoxVIIIa reports respiratory supercomplex assembly in live cells

    PubMed Central

    Rieger, Bettina; Shalaeva, Daria N.; Söhnel, Anna-Carina; Kohl, Wladislaw; Duwe, Patrick; Mulkidjanian, Armen Y.; Busch, Karin B.

    2017-01-01

    The assembly of respiratory complexes into macromolecular supercomplexes is currently a hot topic, especially in the context of newly available structural details. However, most work to date has been done with purified detergent-solubilized material and in situ confirmation is absent. We here set out to enable the recording of respiratory supercomplex formation in living cells. Fluorescent sensor proteins were placed at specific positions at cytochrome c oxidase suspected to either be at the surface of a CI1CIII2CIV1 supercomplex or buried within this supercomplex. In contrast to other loci, sensors at subunits CoxVIIIa and CoxVIIc reported a dense protein environment, as detected by significantly shortened fluorescence lifetimes. According to 3D modelling CoxVIIIa and CoxVIIc are buried in the CI1CIII2CIV1 supercomplex. Suppression of supercomplex scaffold proteins HIGD2A and CoxVIIa2l was accompanied by an increase in the lifetime of the CoxVIIIa-sensor in line with release of CIV from supercomplexes. Strikingly, our data provide strong evidence for defined stable supercomplex configuration in situ. PMID:28383048

  7. On the possible high +Gz tolerance increase by multimodal brain imaging controlled respiratory AFTE biofeedback training exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smietanowski, Maciej; Achimowicz, Jerzy; Lorenc, Kamil; Nowicki, Grzegorz; Zalewska, Ewa; Truszczynski, Olaf

    The experimental data related to Valsalva manouvers and short term voluntary apnea, available in the literature, suggest that the cerebral blood flow increase and reduction of the peripheral one may be expected if the specific AFTE based respiratory training is performed. The authors had verified this hypothesis by studying the relations between EEG measured subject relaxation combined with voluntary apnea by multimodal brain imaging technique (EEG mapping, Neuroscan and fMRI) in a group of healthy volunteers. The SPM analysis of respiratory related changes in cortical and subcortical BOLD signal has partially confirmed the hypothesis. The mechanism of this effect is probably based on the simultaneous blood pressure increase and total peripheral resistance increase. However the question is still open for further experimental verification if AFTE can be treated as the tool which can increase pilot/astronaut situation awareness in the extreme environment typical for aerospace operations where highly variable accelerations due to liftoff, rapid maneuvers, and vibrations can be expected in the critical phases of the mission.

  8. Implications of respiratory motion for the quantification of 2D MR spectroscopic imaging data in the abdomen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, A. J.; Leach, M. O.

    2000-08-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) studies in the abdomen or breast are acquired in the presence of respiratory motion. This modifies the point spread function (PSF) and hence the reconstructed spectra. We evaluated the quantitative effects of both periodic and aperiodic motion on spectra localized by MRSI. Artefactual signal changes, both the modification of native to a voxel and spurious signals arising elsewhere, depend primarily upon the motion amplitude relative to the voxel dimension. A similar dependence on motion amplitude was observed for simple harmonic motion (SHM), quasi-periodic motion and random displacements. No systematic dependence upon the period or initial phase of SHM or on the array size was found. There was also no significant variation with motion direction relative to the internal and external phase-encoding directions. In measured excursion ranges of 20 breast and abdominal tumours, 70% moved ≤ 5 mm, while 30% moved 6-23 mm. The diaphragm and fatty tissues in the gut typically moved ~ 15-20 mm. While tumour/organ excursions less than half the voxel dimension do not substantially affect native signals, the bleeding in of strong lipid signals will be problematic in 1H studies. MRSI studies in the abdomen, even of relatively well-anchored tumours, are thus likely to benefit from the addition of respiratory triggering or other motion compensation strategies.

  9. Image pre-filtering for measurement error reduction in digital image correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yihao; Sun, Chen; Song, Yuntao; Chen, Jubing

    2015-02-01

    In digital image correlation, the sub-pixel intensity interpolation causes a systematic error in the measured displacements. The error increases toward high-frequency component of the speckle pattern. In practice, a captured image is usually corrupted by additive white noise. The noise introduces additional energy in the high frequencies and therefore raises the systematic error. Meanwhile, the noise also elevates the random error which increases with the noise power. In order to reduce the systematic error and the random error of the measurements, we apply a pre-filtering to the images prior to the correlation so that the high-frequency contents are suppressed. Two spatial-domain filters (binomial and Gaussian) and two frequency-domain filters (Butterworth and Wiener) are tested on speckle images undergoing both simulated and real-world translations. By evaluating the errors of the various combinations of speckle patterns, interpolators, noise levels, and filter configurations, we come to the following conclusions. All the four filters are able to reduce the systematic error. Meanwhile, the random error can also be reduced if the signal power is mainly distributed around DC. For high-frequency speckle patterns, the low-pass filters (binomial, Gaussian and Butterworth) slightly increase the random error and Butterworth filter produces the lowest random error among them. By using Wiener filter with over-estimated noise power, the random error can be reduced but the resultant systematic error is higher than that of low-pass filters. In general, Butterworth filter is recommended for error reduction due to its flexibility of passband selection and maximal preservation of the allowed frequencies. Binomial filter enables efficient implementation and thus becomes a good option if computational cost is a critical issue. While used together with pre-filtering, B-spline interpolator produces lower systematic error than bicubic interpolator and similar level of the random

  10. Longitudinal imaging of cancer cell metastases in two preclinical models: a correlation of noninvasive imaging to histopathology.

    PubMed

    Adiseshaiah, Pavan P; Patel, Nimit L; Ileva, Lilia V; Kalen, Joseph D; Haines, Diana C; McNeil, Scott E

    2014-01-01

    Metastatic spread is the leading cause of death from cancer. Early detection of cancer at primary and metastatic sites by noninvasive imaging modalities would be beneficial for both therapeutic intervention and disease management. Noninvasive imaging modalities such as bioluminescence (optical), positron emission tomography (PET)/X-ray computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can provide complementary information and accurately measure tumor growth as confirmed by histopathology. Methods. We validated two metastatic tumor models, MDA-MD-231-Luc and B16-F10-Luc intravenously injected, and 4T1-Luc cells orthotopically implanted into the mammary fat pad. Longitudinal whole body bioluminescence imaging (BLI) evaluated metastasis, and tumor burden of the melanoma cell line (B16-F10-Luc) was correlated with (PET)/CT and MRI. In addition, ex vivo imaging evaluated metastasis in relevant organs and histopathological analysis was used to confirm imaging. Results. BLI revealed successful colonization of cancer cells in both metastatic tumor models over a 4-week period. Furthermore, lung metastasis of B16-F10-Luc cells imaged by PET/CT at week four showed a strong correlation (R (2) = 0.9) with histopathology. The presence and degree of metastasis as determined by imaging correlated (R (2) = 0.7) well with histopathology findings. Conclusions. We validated two metastatic tumor models by longitudinal noninvasive imaging with good histopathology correlation.

  11. Super-resolution imaging using the spatial-frequency filtered intensity fluctuation correlation

    PubMed Central

    Sprigg, Jane; Peng, Tao; Shih, Yanhua

    2016-01-01

    We report an experimental demonstration of a nonclassical imaging mechanism with super-resolving power beyond the Rayleigh limit. When the classical image is completely blurred out due to the use of a small imaging lens, by taking advantage of the intensity fluctuation correlation of thermal light, the demonstrated camera recovered the image of the resolution testing gauge. This method could be adapted to long distance imaging, such as satellite imaging, which requires large diameter camera lenses to achieve high image resolution. PMID:27905498

  12. Multispectral image sharpening using wavelet transform techniques and spatial correlation of edges

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lemeshewsky, George P.; Schowengerdt, Robert A.

    2000-01-01

    Several reported image fusion or sharpening techniques are based on the discrete wavelet transform (DWT). The technique described here uses a pixel-based maximum selection rule to combine respective transform coefficients of lower spatial resolution near-infrared (NIR) and higher spatial resolution panchromatic (pan) imagery to produce a sharpened NIR image. Sharpening assumes a radiometric correlation between the spectral band images. However, there can be poor correlation, including edge contrast reversals (e.g., at soil-vegetation boundaries), between the fused images and, consequently, degraded performance. To improve sharpening, a local area-based correlation technique originally reported for edge comparison with image pyramid fusion is modified for application with the DWT process. Further improvements are obtained by using redundant, shift-invariant implementation of the DWT. Example images demonstrate the improvements in NIR image sharpening with higher resolution pan imagery.

  13. Kernel-aligned multi-view canonical correlation analysis for image recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Shuzhi; Ge, Hongwei; Yuan, Yun-Hao

    2016-09-01

    Existing kernel-based correlation analysis methods mainly adopt a single kernel in each view. However, only a single kernel is usually insufficient to characterize nonlinear distribution information of a view. To solve the problem, we transform each original feature vector into a 2-dimensional feature matrix by means of kernel alignment, and then propose a novel kernel-aligned multi-view canonical correlation analysis (KAMCCA) method on the basis of the feature matrices. Our proposed method can simultaneously employ multiple kernels to better capture the nonlinear distribution information of each view, so that correlation features learned by KAMCCA can have well discriminating power in real-world image recognition. Extensive experiments are designed on five real-world image datasets, including NIR face images, thermal face images, visible face images, handwritten digit images, and object images. Promising experimental results on the datasets have manifested the effectiveness of our proposed method.

  14. Neural correlates of maintaining generated images in visual working memory.

    PubMed

    Ewerdwalbesloh, Julia A; Palva, Satu; Rösler, Frank; Khader, Patrick H

    2016-12-01

    How are images that have been assembled from their constituting elements maintained as a coherent representation in visual working memory (vWM)? Here, we compared two conditions of vWM maintenance that only differed in how vWM contents had been created. Participants maintained images that they either had to assemble from single features or that they had perceived as complete objects. Object complexity varied between two and four features. We analyzed electroencephalogram phase coupling as a measure of cortical connectivity in a time interval immediately before a probe stimulus appeared. We assumed that during this time both groups maintained essentially the same images, but that images constructed from their elements would require more neural coupling than images based on a complete percept. Increased coupling between frontal and parietal-to-occipital cortical sources was found for the maintenance of constructed in comparison to nonconstructed objects in the theta, alpha, beta, and gamma frequency bands. A similar pattern was found for an increase in vWM load (2 vs. 4 features) for nonconstructed objects. Under increased construction load (2 vs. 4 features for constructed images), the pattern was restricted to fronto-parietal couplings, suggesting that the fronto-parietal attention network is coping with the higher attentional demands involved in maintaining constructed images, but without increasing the communication with the occipital visual buffer in which the visual representations are assumed to be stored. We conclude from these findings that the maintenance of constructed images in vWM requires additional attentional processes to keep object elements together as a coherent representation. Hum Brain Mapp 37:4349-4362, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. SAR image enhancement via post-correlation signal processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthews, N. D.; Kaupp, V. H.; Waite, W. P.; Macdonald, H. C.

    1984-01-01

    Seventeen interpreters ranked sets of computer-generated radar imagery to assess the value of post-correlation processing on the interpretability of SAR (synthetic aperture radar) imagery. The post-correlation processing evaluated amounts to a nonlinear mapping of the signal exiting a digital correlator and allows full use of signal bandwidth for improving the spatial resolution or for noise reduction. The results indicate that it is reasonable to hypothesize an optimal SAR presentation format for specific applications even though this study was too limited to be specific.

  16. Method and apparatus for the simultaneous display and correlation of independently generated images

    DOEpatents

    Vaitekunas, Jeffrey J.; Roberts, Ronald A.

    1991-01-01

    An apparatus and method for location by location correlation of multiple images from Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) and other sources. Multiple images of a material specimen are displayed on one or more monitors of an interactive graphics system. Specimen landmarks are located in each image and mapping functions from a reference image to each other image are calcuated using the landmark locations. A location selected by positioning a cursor in the reference image is mapped to the other images and location identifiers are simultaneously displayed in those images. Movement of the cursor in the reference image causes simultaneous movement of the location identifiers in the other images to positions corresponding to the location of the reference image cursor.

  17. CAT correlates positively with respiratory rate and is a significant predictor of the impact of COPD on daily life of patients: a cross sectional study.

    PubMed

    Becker, Cíntia; Schäfer, Janaína; Carvalho, Lisiane L; Vitiello, Isabel P; da Silva, Andréa Lg

    2014-01-01

    The pathophysiological changes of COPD tend to worsen with progression, triggering limiting symptoms and implying the decrease in the activities of daily living and quality of life. The COPD Assessment Test (CAT) is a questionnaire designed to measure the impact of COPD on the health status. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of the disease through the CAT in a Brazilian sample of COPD patients and to correlate symptoms at rest with the CAT score in these patients. Study of cases with COPD patients was conducted by pulmonary rehabilitation program (RP). Respiratory rate (RR) and symptoms (dyspnea by Modified Borg Scale Dyspnea Index; symptoms by CAT) were analyzed at the beginning of the RP. The study analyzed 28 COPD patients, both genders, age 65.93 ± 7.84 years and many patients ranging from severe and very severe disease. The majority of patients were rated by CAT with low impact-disease (n = 13/46, 4%);medium (n = 11/39, 3%) and the high impact-diseases were observed in a few subjects (n = 4/14.3%). The difference between all CAT scores was significant, p = 0.000. There was a positive correlation between respiratory rate and CAT scores impact-level (r = 0.585, p = 0.001). The results obtained by the Borg Scale revealed a high presence of symptoms in these COPD patients but no association with CAT. The CAT is a sensitive tool to assess the current health status of COPD patients, and in Southern Brazil it is positively correlated with respiratory rate.

  18. The pulsatility volume index: an indicator of cerebrovascular compliance based on fast magnetic resonance imaging of cardiac and respiratory pulsatility.

    PubMed

    Bianciardi, Marta; Toschi, Nicola; Polimeni, Jonathan R; Evans, Karleyton C; Bhat, Himanshu; Keil, Boris; Rosen, Bruce R; Boas, David A; Wald, Lawrence L

    2016-05-13

    The influence of cardiac activity on the viscoelastic properties of intracranial tissue is one of the mechanisms through which brain-heart interactions take place, and is implicated in cerebrovascular disease. Cerebrovascular disease risk is not fully explained by current risk factors, including arterial compliance. Cerebrovascular compliance is currently estimated indirectly through Doppler sonography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measures of blood velocity changes. In order to meet the need for novel cerebrovascular disease risk factors, we aimed to design and validate an MRI indicator of cerebrovascular compliance based on direct endogenous measures of blood volume changes. We implemented a fast non-gated two-dimensional MRI pulse sequence based on echo-planar imaging (EPI) with ultra-short repetition time (approx. 30-50 ms), which stepped through slices every approximately 20 s. We constrained the solution of the Bloch equations for spins moving faster than a critical speed to produce an endogenous contrast primarily dependent on spin volume changes, and an approximately sixfold signal gain compared with Ernst angle acquisitions achieved by the use of a 90° flip angle. Using cardiac and respiratory peaks detected on physiological recordings, average cardiac and respiratory MRI pulse waveforms in several brain compartments were obtained at 7 Tesla, and used to derive a compliance indicator, the pulsatility volume index (pVI). The pVI, evaluated in larger cerebral arteries, displayed significant variation within and across vessels. Multi-echo EPI showed the presence of significant pulsatility effects in both S0 and [Formula: see text] signals, compatible with blood volume changes. Lastly, the pVI dynamically varied during breath-holding compared with normal breathing, as expected for a compliance indicator. In summary, we characterized and performed an initial validation of a novel MRI indicator of cerebrovascular compliance, which might prove useful

  19. The pulsatility volume index: an indicator of cerebrovascular compliance based on fast magnetic resonance imaging of cardiac and respiratory pulsatility

    PubMed Central

    Toschi, Nicola; Polimeni, Jonathan R.; Evans, Karleyton C.; Bhat, Himanshu; Keil, Boris; Rosen, Bruce R.; Boas, David A.; Wald, Lawrence L.

    2016-01-01

    The influence of cardiac activity on the viscoelastic properties of intracranial tissue is one of the mechanisms through which brain–heart interactions take place, and is implicated in cerebrovascular disease. Cerebrovascular disease risk is not fully explained by current risk factors, including arterial compliance. Cerebrovascular compliance is currently estimated indirectly through Doppler sonography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measures of blood velocity changes. In order to meet the need for novel cerebrovascular disease risk factors, we aimed to design and validate an MRI indicator of cerebrovascular compliance based on direct endogenous measures of blood volume changes. We implemented a fast non-gated two-dimensional MRI pulse sequence based on echo-planar imaging (EPI) with ultra-short repetition time (approx. 30–50 ms), which stepped through slices every approximately 20 s. We constrained the solution of the Bloch equations for spins moving faster than a critical speed to produce an endogenous contrast primarily dependent on spin volume changes, and an approximately sixfold signal gain compared with Ernst angle acquisitions achieved by the use of a 90° flip angle. Using cardiac and respiratory peaks detected on physiological recordings, average cardiac and respiratory MRI pulse waveforms in several brain compartments were obtained at 7 Tesla, and used to derive a compliance indicator, the pulsatility volume index (pVI). The pVI, evaluated in larger cerebral arteries, displayed significant variation within and across vessels. Multi-echo EPI showed the presence of significant pulsatility effects in both S0 and signals, compatible with blood volume changes. Lastly, the pVI dynamically varied during breath-holding compared with normal breathing, as expected for a compliance indicator. In summary, we characterized and performed an initial validation of a novel MRI indicator of cerebrovascular compliance, which might prove useful to investigate

  20. Respiratory compliance but not gas exchange correlates with changes in lung aeration after a recruitment maneuver: an experimental study in pigs with saline lavage lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Henzler, Dietrich; Pelosi, Paolo; Dembinski, Rolf; Ullmann, Annette; Mahnken, Andreas H; Rossaint, Rolf; Kuhlen, Ralf

    2005-01-01

    Introduction Atelectasis is a common finding in acute lung injury, leading to increased shunt and hypoxemia. Current treatment strategies aim to recruit alveoli for gas exchange. Improvement in oxygenation is commonly used to detect recruitment, although the assumption that gas exchange parameters adequately represent the mechanical process of alveolar opening has not been proven so far. The aim of this study was to investigate whether commonly used measures of lung mechanics better detect lung tissue collapse and changes in lung aeration after a recruitment maneuver as compared to measures of gas exchange Methods In eight anesthetized and mechanically ventilated pigs, acute lung injury was induced by saline lavage and a recruitment maneuver was performed by inflating the lungs three times with a pressure of 45 cmH2O for 40 s with a constant positive end-expiratory pressure of 10 cmH2O. The association of gas exchange and lung mechanics parameters with the amount and the changes in aerated and nonaerated lung volumes induced by this specific recruitment maneuver was investigated by multi slice CT scan analysis of the whole lung. Results Nonaerated lung correlated with shunt fraction (r = 0.68) and respiratory system compliance (r = 0.59). The arterial partial oxygen pressure (PaO2) and the respiratory system compliance correlated with poorly aerated lung volume (r = 0.57 and 0.72, respectively). The recruitment maneuver caused a decrease in nonaerated lung volume, an increase in normally and poorly aerated lung, but no change in the distribution of a tidal breath to differently aerated lung volumes. The fractional changes in PaO2, arterial partial carbon dioxide pressure (PaCO2) and venous admixture after the recruitment maneuver did not correlate with the changes in lung volumes. Alveolar recruitment correlated only with changes in the plateau pressure (r = 0.89), respiratory system compliance (r = 0.82) and parameters obtained from the pressure-volume curve

  1. Correlation of the same fields imaged in the TEM, confocal, LM, and microCT by image registration: from specimen preparation to displaying a final composite image.

    PubMed

    Keene, Douglas R; Tufa, Sara F; Wong, Melissa H; Smith, Nicholas R; Sakai, Lynn Y; Horton, William A

    2014-01-01

    Correlated imaging is the process of imaging a specimen with two complementary modalities and then registering and overlaying the fields obtained in each modality to create a composite view. One of the images is made somewhat transparent, allowing detail in the underlying image to be visible and assisting in the registration of the two images. As an example, an image localizing a specific tissue component by fluorescence may be overlaid atop a TEM image of the same field. The resulting composite image would demonstrate specific ultrastructural features in the high-resolution TEM field, which are colorized in the overlay. Other examples include composites from MicroCT or soft X-ray images overlaid atop light microscopy or TEM images. Automated image registration may be facilitated by a variety of sophisticated computer programs utilized by high-throughput laboratories. This chapter is meant for the more occasional user wishing to align images manually. ImageJ is a public domain, image processing program developed at the National Institutes of Health and is available to anyone as a free download. ImageJ performs marvelously well for the purpose of image registration; therefore, step-by-step instructions are included here. Specimen handling, including fixation and choice of embedding media, is not straightforward for correlative imaging. A step-by-step description of the protocols which work in our laboratory is included for simultaneous localization in LM, EM and micro-CT, as well as maintaining GFP emission in tissue embedded for TEM.

  2. Correlation between subjective and objective assessment of magnetic resonance (MR) images.

    PubMed

    Chow, Li Sze; Rajagopal, Heshalini; Paramesran, Raveendran

    2016-07-01

    Medical Image Quality Assessment (IQA) plays an important role in assisting and evaluating the development of any new hardware, imaging sequences, pre-processing or post-processing algorithms. We have performed a quantitative analysis of the correlation between subjective and objective Full Reference - IQA (FR-IQA) on Magnetic Resonance (MR) images of the human brain, spine, knee and abdomen. We have created a MR image database that consists of 25 original reference images and 750 distorted images. The reference images were distorted with six types of distortions: Rician Noise, Gaussian White Noise, Gaussian Blur, DCT compression, JPEG compression and JPEG2000 compression, at various levels of distortion. Twenty eight subjects were chosen to evaluate the images resulting in a total of 21,700 human evaluations. The raw scores were then converted to Difference Mean Opinion Score (DMOS). Thirteen objective FR-IQA metrics were used to determine the validity of the subjective DMOS. The results indicate a high correlation between the subjective and objective assessment of the MR images. The Noise Quality Measurement (NQM) has the highest correlation with DMOS, where the mean Pearson Linear Correlation Coefficient (PLCC) and Spearman Rank Order Correlation Coefficient (SROCC) are 0.936 and 0.938 respectively. The Universal Quality Index (UQI) has the lowest correlation with DMOS, where the mean PLCC and SROCC are 0.807 and 0.815 respectively. Student's T-test was used to find the difference in performance of FR-IQA across different types of distortion. The superior IQAs tested statistically are UQI for Rician noise images, Visual Information Fidelity (VIF) for Gaussian blur images, NQM for both DCT and JPEG compressed images, Peak Signal-to-Noise Ratio (PSNR) for JPEG2000 compressed images.

  3. Correlation Analysis of TEM Images of Nanocrystal Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Micheel, Christine; Zanchet, Daniele; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2008-05-21

    Quantitative characterizataion of images of naocrystals and nanostructures is a challenging but important task. The development and optimization of methods for the construction of complex nanostructures rely on imaging techniques. Computer programs were developed to quantify TEM images of nanocrystal/DNA nanostructures, and results are presented for heterodimers annd trimers of gold nanocrystals. The programs presented here have also been used to analyze more complex trimers and tetramers linked by branched DNA, as well as for structures made from attaching gold nanocrystals to CdSe/ZnS core-shell quantum dots. This work has the additional goal of enabling others to quickly and easily adapt the methods for their own use.

  4. CT imaging correlates of genomic expression for oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Pickering, C R; Shah, K; Ahmed, S; Rao, A; Frederick, M J; Zhang, J; Unruh, A K; Wang, J; Ginsberg, L E; Kumar, A J; Myers, J N; Hamilton, J D

    2013-09-01

    Imaging correlates of genetic expression have been found for prognostic and predictive biomarkers of some malignant diseases, including breast and brain tumors. This study tests the hypothesis that imaging findings correlate with relevant genomic biomarkers in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma. Surplus frozen tissue from 27 untreated patients with oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma who underwent preoperative CT imaging was analyzed for gene expression. A team of neuroradiologists blinded to the genomic analysis results reviewed an extensive list of CT findings. The imaging correlated with genomic expression for cyclin D1, angiogenesis-related genes (vascular endothelial growth factor receptors and ligands), which relate to enhancement on the basis of other tumor types; and epidermal growth factor receptor, which may relate to proliferation and mass effect. Expression of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors 1 and 2 correlated with the enhancement of the primary tumor (P = .018 and P = .025, respectively), whereas the epidermal growth factor receptor correlated with mass effect (P = .03). Other exploratory correlations included epidermal growth factor receptor to perineural invasion (P = .05), and certain vascular endothelial growth factor receptors and ligands to mass effect (P = .03) and increased (P = .01) or decreased (P = .02) primary tumor size. We report that CT imaging correlates with gene expression in untreated oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma. Enhancement of the primary tumor and degree of mass effect correlate with relevant genomic biomarkers, which are also potential drug targets. Eventually, treatment decisions may be aided by combining imaging findings into meaningful phenotypes that relate directly to genomic biomarkers.

  5. Respiratory motion correction in 4D-PET by simultaneous motion estimation and image reconstruction (SMEIR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalantari, Faraz; Li, Tianfang; Jin, Mingwu; Wang, Jing

    2016-08-01

    In conventional 4D positron emission tomography (4D-PET), images from different frames are reconstructed individually and aligned by registration methods. Two issues that arise with this approach are as follows: (1) the reconstruction algorithms do not make full use of projection statistics; and (2) the registration between noisy images can result in poor alignment. In this study, we investigated the use of simultaneous motion estimation and image reconstruction (SMEIR) methods for motion estimation/correction in 4D-PET. A modified ordered-subset expectation maximization algorithm coupled with total variation minimization (OSEM-TV) was used to obtain a primary motion-compensated PET (pmc-PET) from all projection data, using Demons derived deformation vector fields (DVFs) as initial motion vectors. A motion model update was performed to obtain an optimal set of DVFs in the pmc-PET and other phases, by matching the forward projection of the deformed pmc-PET with measured projections from other phases. The OSEM-TV image reconstruction was repeated using updated DVFs, and new DVFs were estimated based on updated images. A 4D-XCAT phantom with typical FDG biodistribution was generated to evaluate the performance of the SMEIR algorithm in lung and liver tumors with different contrasts and different diameters (10-40 mm). The image quality of the 4D-PET was greatly improved by the SMEIR algorithm. When all projections were used to reconstruct 3D-PET without motion compensation, motion blurring artifacts were present, leading up to 150% tumor size overestimation and significant quantitative errors, including 50% underestimation of tumor contrast and 59% underestimation of tumor uptake. Errors were reduced to less than 10% in most images by using the SMEIR algorithm, showing its potential in motion estimation/correction in 4D-PET.

  6. SU-D-9A-01: Listmode-Driven Optimal Gating (OG) Respiratory Motion Management: Potential Impact On Quantitative PET Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K; Hristov, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the potential impact of listmode-driven amplitude based optimal gating (OG) respiratory motion management technique on quantitative PET imaging. Methods: During the PET acquisitions, an optical camera tracked and recorded the motion of a tool placed on top of patients' torso. PET event data were utilized to detect and derive a motion signal that is directly coupled with a specific internal organ. A radioactivity-trace was generated from listmode data by accumulating all prompt counts in temporal bins matching the sampling rate of the external tracking device. Decay correction for 18F was performed. The image reconstructions using OG respiratory motion management technique that uses 35% of total radioactivity counts within limited motion amplitudes were performed with external motion and radioactivity traces separately with ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM) with 2 iterations and 21 subsets. Standard uptake values (SUVs) in a tumor region were calculated to measure the effect of using radioactivity trace for motion compensation. Motion-blurred 3D static PET image was also reconstructed with all counts and the SUVs derived from OG images were compared with SUVs from 3D images. Results: A 5.7 % increase of the maximum SUV in the lesion was found for optimal gating image reconstruction with radioactivity trace when compared to a static 3D image. The mean and maximum SUVs on the image that was reconstructed with radioactivity trace were found comparable (0.4 % and 4.5 % increase, respectively) to the values derived from the image that was reconstructed with external trace. Conclusion: The image reconstructed using radioactivity trace showed that the blurring due to the motion was reduced with impact on derived SUVs. The resolution and contrast of the images reconstructed with radioactivity trace were comparable to the resolution and contrast of the images reconstructed with external respiratory traces. Research supported by Siemens.

  7. Renal Tubular Mitochondrial Abnormalities in Complex II/III Respiratory Chain Deficiency.

    PubMed

    France, Joel; Ashoor, Isa; Craver, Randall

    2017-06-01

    Defects in the respiratory chain may present with a wide spectrum of clinical signs and symptoms. In this "Images in Pathology" discussion we correlate the clinical, histologic, and ultrastructural findings in a 12-year-old male with a complex II/III respiratory chain deficiency and kidney dysfunction.

  8. Mechanical assessment of bovine pericardium using Müeller matrix imaging, enhanced backscattering and digital image correlation analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cuando-Espitia, Natanael; Sánchez-Arévalo, Francisco; Hernández-Cordero, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical characterization of tissue is an important but complex task. We demonstrate the simultaneous use of Mueller matrix imaging (MMI), enhanced backscattering (EBS) and digital image correlation (DIC) in a bovine pericardium (BP) tensile test. The interest in BP relies on its wide use as valve replacement and biological patch. We show that the mean free path (MFP), obtained through EBS measurements, can be used as an indicator of the anisotropy of the fiber ensemble. Our results further show a good correlation between retardance images and displacement vector fields, which are intrinsically related with the fiber interaction within the tissue. PMID:26309759

  9. Correlation of early-phase 18F-florbetapir (AV-45/Amyvid) PET images to FDG images: preliminary studies.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Ing-Tsung; Huang, Chin-Chang; Hsieh, Chia-Ju; Hsu, Wen-Chun; Wey, Shiaw-Pyng; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Kung, Mei-Ping; Lin, Kun-Ju

    2012-04-01

    (18)F-Florbetapir (AV-45/Amyvid) is a novel positron emission tomography (PET) tracer for imaging plaque pathology in Alzheimer's disease (AD), while PET images of fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) for cerebral glucose metabolism can provide complementary information to amyloid plaque images for diagnosis of AD. The goal of this preliminary study was to investigate the perfusion-like property of relative cerebral blood flow estimates (R(1)) and summed early-phase AV-45 images [perfusion AV-45 (pAV-45)] and optimize the early time frame for pAV-45. Dynamic AV-45 PET scans (0-180 min) were performed in seven subjects. pAV-45, late-phase AV-45, and FDG images were spatially normalized to the Montreal Neurological Institute template aided by individual MRI images, and the corresponding standardized uptake value ratio (SUVR) was computed. The R(1) images were derived from a simplified reference tissue model. Correlations