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Sample records for respiratory failure caused

  1. What Causes Respiratory Failure?

    MedlinePlus

    ... easily move oxygen into your blood and remove carbon dioxide from your blood (gas exchange). This can cause a low oxygen level or high carbon dioxide level, or both, in your blood. Respiratory failure ...

  2. Rare Presentation of Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis Causing Acute Respiratory Failure.

    PubMed

    Kroll, Ryan R; Kumar, Sameer; Grossman, Ronald F; Price, Charles; Srigley, John R

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a rare condition characterized by dysfunctional alveolar macrophages, which ineffectively clear surfactant and typically cause mild hypoxemia. Characteristic Computed Tomography findings are septal reticulations superimposed on ground-glass opacities in a crazy paving pattern, with a clear juxtaposition between affected and unaffected parenchyma. While traditionally PAP was diagnosed via biopsy, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) is usually sufficient; the fluid appears milky, and on microscopic examination there are foamy macrophages with eosinophilic granules and extracellular hyaline material that is Periodic Acid-Schiff positive. Standard therapy is whole lung lavage (WLL), although novel treatments are under development. The case presented is a 55-year-old woman with six months of progressive dyspnea, who developed hypoxemic respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation; she had typical findings of PAP on imaging and BAL. WLL was ultimately successful in restoring adequate oxygenation. Respiratory failure of this magnitude is a rare finding in PAP. PMID:27445536

  3. Respiratory Failure

    MedlinePlus

    Respiratory failure happens when not enough oxygen passes from your lungs into your blood. Your body's organs, ... brain, need oxygen-rich blood to work well. Respiratory failure also can happen if your lungs can' ...

  4. Pancreaticopleural Fistula Causing Massive Right Hydrothorax and Respiratory Failure

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Esther Ern-Hwei

    2016-01-01

    Hydrothorax secondary to a pancreaticopleural fistula (PPF) is a rare complication of acute pancreatitis. In patients with a history of pancreatitis, diagnosis is made by detection of amylase in the pleural exudate. Imaging, particularly magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography, aids in the detection of pancreatic ductal disruption. Management includes thoracocentesis and pancreatic duct drainage or pancreatic resection procedures. We present a case of massive right hydrothorax secondary to a PPF due to recurrent acute pancreatitis. Due to respiratory failure, urgent thoracocentesis was done. Distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy and cholecystectomy was performed. The patient remains well at one-year follow-up. PMID:27747128

  5. Acute respiratory failure caused by organizing pneumonia secondary to antineoplastic therapy for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Santana, Adriell Ramalho; Amorim, Fábio Ferreira; Soares, Paulo Henrique Alves; de Moura, Edmilson Bastos; Maia, Marcelo de Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    Interstitial lung diseases belong to a group of diseases that typically exhibit a subacute or chronic progression but that may cause acute respiratory failure. The male patient, who was 37 years of age and undergoing therapy for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, was admitted with cough, fever, dyspnea and acute hypoxemic respiratory failure. Mechanical ventilation and antibiotic therapy were initiated but were associated with unfavorable progression. Thoracic computed tomography showed bilateral pulmonary "ground glass" opacities. Methylprednisolone pulse therapy was initiated with satisfactory response because the patient had used three drugs related to organizing pneumonia (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin and rituximab), and the clinical and radiological symptoms were suggestive. Organizing pneumonia may be idiopathic or linked to collagen diseases, drugs and cancer and usually responds to corticosteroid therapy. The diagnosis was anatomopathological, but the patient's clinical condition precluded performing a lung biopsy. Organizing pneumonia should be a differential diagnosis in patients with apparent pneumonia and a progression that is unfavorable to antimicrobial treatment. PMID:23917942

  6. Respiratory failure in diabetic ketoacidosis

    PubMed Central

    Konstantinov, Nikifor K; Rohrscheib, Mark; Agaba, Emmanuel I; Dorin, Richard I; Murata, Glen H; Tzamaloukas, Antonios H

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory failure complicating the course of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a source of increased morbidity and mortality. Detection of respiratory failure in DKA requires focused clinical monitoring, careful interpretation of arterial blood gases, and investigation for conditions that can affect adversely the respiration. Conditions that compromise respiratory function caused by DKA can be detected at presentation but are usually more prevalent during treatment. These conditions include deficits of potassium, magnesium and phosphate and hydrostatic or non-hydrostatic pulmonary edema. Conditions not caused by DKA that can worsen respiratory function under the added stress of DKA include infections of the respiratory system, pre-existing respiratory or neuromuscular disease and miscellaneous other conditions. Prompt recognition and management of the conditions that can lead to respiratory failure in DKA may prevent respiratory failure and improve mortality from DKA. PMID:26240698

  7. How Is Respiratory Failure Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Once your doctor figures out what's causing your respiratory failure, he or she will plan how to treat that disease or condition. Treatments may include medicines, procedures, and other therapies. Rate This Content: NEXT >> Updated: December 19, 2011 Twitter ...

  8. East coast fever caused by Theileria parva is characterized by macrophage activation associated with vasculitis and respiratory failure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Respiratory failure and death in East Coast Fever (ECF), a clinical syndrome of African cattle caused by the apicomplexan parasite Theileria parva, has historically been attributed to pulmonary infiltration by infected lymphocytes. However, immunohistochemical staining of tissue from T. parva infect...

  9. The role of invasive ventilation in exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease causing respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Kosky, Christopher; Turton, Charles

    2006-01-01

    Acute hypercapnic respiratory failure in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease can usually be managed initially with medical treatment and non- invasive ventilation. In circumstances where non- invasive ventilation cannot be used or has failed, intubation and invasive ventilation may be lifesaving. The outcome of patients with an exacerbation of COPD requiring invasive ventilation is better than often thought, with a hospital survival of 70-89%. Decisions regarding invasive ventilation made by physicians and patients with COPD are unpredictable and vary with the individual. This article reviews the role of invasive ventilation in exacerbations of COPD to assist decision making.

  10. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation treatment of a H7N9-caused respiratory failure patient with mechanical valves replacement history

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Linfeng; Zheng, Junnan; Xu, Hongfei; Shi, Liping; Li, Lanjuan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Patients with respiratory failure caused by H7N9 may benefit from veno-venous, veno-arterial, and veno-veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) support. Case summary: A 55-year-old male patient was suffering from H7N9-caused acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). He had a mechanical mitral and aortic valve replacement surgery and was using warfarin for anticoagulation. After prolonged mechanical ventilation, oxygen saturation was not improved. Veno-veno ECMO was then applied. After 16 days of extracorporeal life support, the patient successfully weaned from ECMO, with relatively good pulmonary recovery. Conclusion: This report demonstrates that ECMO support can help treating life-threatening diseases such as H7N9-associated ARDS. Because of his special mitral and aortic valve replacement surgery history and long duration of mechanical ventilation before ECMO, we report it as a separate case, hoping to provide some reference for ECMO treatment. PMID:27749569

  11. Exome sequencing identifies titin mutations causing hereditary myopathy with early respiratory failure (HMERF) in families of diverse ethnic origins

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hereditary myopathy with early respiratory failure (HMERF) was described in several North European families and recently linked to a titin gene (TTN) mutation. We independently studied HMERF-like diseases with the purpose to identify the cause, refine diagnostic criteria, and estimate the frequency of this disease among myopathy patients of various ethnic origins. Methods Whole exome sequencing analysis was carried out in a large U.S. family that included seven members suffering from skeletal muscle weakness and respiratory failure. Subsequent mutation screening was performed in further 45 unrelated probands with similar phenotypes. Studies included muscle strength evaluation, nerve conduction studies and concentric needle EMG, respiratory function test, cardiologic examination, and muscle biopsy. Results A novel TTN p.Gly30150Asp mutation was identified in the highly conserved A-band of titin that co-segregated with the disease in the U.S. family. Screening of 45 probands initially diagnosed as myofibrillar myopathy (MFM) but excluded based on molecular screening for the known MFM genes led to the identification of a previously reported TTN p.Cys30071Arg mutation in one patient. This same mutation was also identified in a patient with suspected HMERF. The p.Gly30150Asp and p.Cys30071Arg mutations are localized to a side chain of fibronectin type III element A150 of the 10th C-zone super-repeat of titin. Conclusions Missense mutations in TTN are the cause of HMERF in families of diverse origins. A comparison of phenotypic features of HMERF caused by the three known TTN mutations in various populations allowed to emphasize distinct clinical/pathological features that can serve as the basis for diagnosis. The newly identified p.Gly30150Asp and the p.Cys30071Arg mutation are localized to a side chain of fibronectin type III element A150 of the 10th C-zone super-repeat of titin. PMID:23514108

  12. East Coast Fever Caused by Theileria parva Is Characterized by Macrophage Activation Associated with Vasculitis and Respiratory Failure

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, David A.; Frevert, Charles W.; Nelson, Danielle D.; Morrison, W. Ivan; Knowles, Donald P.

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory failure and death in East Coast Fever (ECF), a clinical syndrome of African cattle caused by the apicomplexan parasite Theileria parva, has historically been attributed to pulmonary infiltration by infected lymphocytes. However, immunohistochemical staining of tissue from T. parva infected cattle revealed large numbers of CD3- and CD20-negative intralesional mononuclear cells. Due to this finding, we hypothesized that macrophages play an important role in Theileria parva disease pathogenesis. Data presented here demonstrates that terminal ECF in both Holstein and Boran cattle is largely due to multisystemic histiocytic responses and resultant tissue damage. Furthermore, the combination of these histologic changes with the clinical findings, including lymphadenopathy, prolonged pyrexia, multi-lineage leukopenia, and thrombocytopenia is consistent with macrophage activation syndrome. All animals that succumbed to infection exhibited lymphohistiocytic vasculitis of small to medium caliber blood and lymphatic vessels. In pulmonary, lymphoid, splenic and hepatic tissues from Holstein cattle, the majority of intralesional macrophages were positive for CD163, and often expressed large amounts of IL-17. These data define a terminal ECF pathogenesis in which parasite-driven lymphoproliferation leads to secondary systemic macrophage activation syndrome, mononuclear vasculitis, pulmonary edema, respiratory failure and death. The accompanying macrophage phenotype defined by CD163 and IL-17 is presented in the context of this pathogenesis. PMID:27195791

  13. East Coast Fever Caused by Theileria parva Is Characterized by Macrophage Activation Associated with Vasculitis and Respiratory Failure.

    PubMed

    Fry, Lindsay M; Schneider, David A; Frevert, Charles W; Nelson, Danielle D; Morrison, W Ivan; Knowles, Donald P

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory failure and death in East Coast Fever (ECF), a clinical syndrome of African cattle caused by the apicomplexan parasite Theileria parva, has historically been attributed to pulmonary infiltration by infected lymphocytes. However, immunohistochemical staining of tissue from T. parva infected cattle revealed large numbers of CD3- and CD20-negative intralesional mononuclear cells. Due to this finding, we hypothesized that macrophages play an important role in Theileria parva disease pathogenesis. Data presented here demonstrates that terminal ECF in both Holstein and Boran cattle is largely due to multisystemic histiocytic responses and resultant tissue damage. Furthermore, the combination of these histologic changes with the clinical findings, including lymphadenopathy, prolonged pyrexia, multi-lineage leukopenia, and thrombocytopenia is consistent with macrophage activation syndrome. All animals that succumbed to infection exhibited lymphohistiocytic vasculitis of small to medium caliber blood and lymphatic vessels. In pulmonary, lymphoid, splenic and hepatic tissues from Holstein cattle, the majority of intralesional macrophages were positive for CD163, and often expressed large amounts of IL-17. These data define a terminal ECF pathogenesis in which parasite-driven lymphoproliferation leads to secondary systemic macrophage activation syndrome, mononuclear vasculitis, pulmonary edema, respiratory failure and death. The accompanying macrophage phenotype defined by CD163 and IL-17 is presented in the context of this pathogenesis. PMID:27195791

  14. Adiaspiromycosis Causing Respiratory Failure and a Review of Human Infections Due to Emmonsia and Chrysosporium spp.

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, Deanna A.; Graybill, John R.

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of a 27-year-old male who presented with respiratory distress that required mechanical ventilation. Transbronchial biopsy revealed adiaspores of the fungus Emmonsia crescens within granulomata, a condition known as adiaspiromycosis. The patient received amphotericin products and corticosteroids, followed by itraconazole, and made a full recovery. Emmonsia crescens is a saprobe with a wide distribution that is primarily a rodent pathogen. The clinical characteristics of the 20 cases of human pulmonary adiaspiromycosis reported since the last comprehensive case review in 1993 are described here, as well as other infections recently reported for the genus Emmonsia. Pulmonary adiaspiromycosis has been reported primarily in persons without underlying host factors and has a mild to severe course. It remains uncertain if the optimal management of severe pulmonary adiaspiromycosis is supportive or if should consist of antifungal treatment, corticosteroids, or a combination of the latter two. The classification of fungi currently in the genus Emmonsia has undergone considerable revision since their original description, including being grouped with the genus Chrysosporium at one time. Molecular genetics has clearly differentiated the genus Emmonsia from the Chrysosporium species. Nevertheless, there has been a persistent confusion in the literature regarding the clinical presentation of infection with fungi of these two genera; to clarify this matter, the reported cases of invasive Chrysosporium infections were reviewed. Invasive Chrysosporium infections typically occur in impaired hosts and can have a fatal course. Based on limited in vitro susceptibility data for Chrysosporium zonatum, amphotericin B is the most active drug, itraconazole susceptibility is strain-dependent, and fluconazole and 5-fluorocytosine are not active. PMID:22259200

  15. Common Cause Failure Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hark, Frank; Britton, Paul; Ring, Robert; Novack, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Space Launch System (SLS) Agenda: Objective; Key Definitions; Calculating Common Cause; Examples; Defense against Common Cause; Impact of varied Common Cause Failure (CCF) and abortability; Response Surface for various CCF Beta; Takeaways.

  16. A new disease allele for the p.C30071R mutation in titin causing hereditary myopathy with early respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Pfeffer, Gerald; Sambuughin, Nyamkhishig; Olivé, Montse; Tyndel, Felix; Toro, Camilo; Goldfarb, Lev G; Chinnery, Patrick F

    2014-03-01

    Hereditary myopathy with early respiratory failure is an autosomal dominant myopathy caused by mutations in the 119th fibronectin-3 domain of titin. To date all reported patients with the most common mutation in this domain (p.C30071R) appear to share ancestral disease alleles. We undertook this study of two families with the p.C30071R mutation to determine whether they share the same haplotype as previously reported British families or whether the mutation arose as a de novo event. We sequenced the 119th fibronectin-3 domain in these two probands and flanking polymorphisms associated with the British haplotype in hereditary myopathy with early respiratory failure. A family of Indian descent had a haplotype that was not compatible with the British shared haplotype. Cloning of the 119th fibronectin-3 domain in this patient demonstrated polymorphisms rs191484894 and novel noncoding variant c.90225C>T on the same allele as the mutation, which is distinct from previously reported British families. This proves that the p.C30071R mutation itself (rather than the haplotype containing this mutation) causes hereditary myopathy with early respiratory failure and suggests its independent origin in different ethnic groups.

  17. Common Cause Failure Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hark, Frank; Britton, Paul; Ring, Rob; Novack, Steven D.

    2015-01-01

    Common Cause Failures (CCFs) are a known and documented phenomenon that defeats system redundancy. CCFS are a set of dependent type of failures that can be caused by: system environments; manufacturing; transportation; storage; maintenance; and assembly, as examples. Since there are many factors that contribute to CCFs, the effects can be reduced, but they are difficult to eliminate entirely. Furthermore, failure databases sometimes fail to differentiate between independent and CCF (dependent) failure and data is limited, especially for launch vehicles. The Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) of NASA's Safety and Mission Assurance Directorate at Marshall Space Flight Center (MFSC) is using generic data from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's database of common cause failures at nuclear power plants to estimate CCF due to the lack of a more appropriate data source. There remains uncertainty in the actual magnitude of the common cause risk estimates for different systems at this stage of the design. Given the limited data about launch vehicle CCF and that launch vehicles are a highly redundant system by design, it is important to make design decisions to account for a range of values for independent and CCFs. When investigating the design of the one-out-of-two component redundant system for launch vehicles, a response surface was constructed to represent the impact of the independent failure rate versus a common cause beta factor effect on a system's failure probability. This presentation will define a CCF and review estimation calculations. It gives a summary of reduction methodologies and a review of examples of historical CCFs. Finally, it presents the response surface and discusses the results of the different CCFs on the reliability of a one-out-of-two system.

  18. Common Cause Failure Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hark, Frank; Britton, Paul; Ring, Rob; Novack, Steven D.

    2016-01-01

    Common Cause Failures (CCFs) are a known and documented phenomenon that defeats system redundancy. CCFS are a set of dependent type of failures that can be caused by: system environments; manufacturing; transportation; storage; maintenance; and assembly, as examples. Since there are many factors that contribute to CCFs, the effects can be reduced, but they are difficult to eliminate entirely. Furthermore, failure databases sometimes fail to differentiate between independent and CCF (dependent) failure and data is limited, especially for launch vehicles. The Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) of NASA's Safety and Mission Assurance Directorate at Marshal Space Flight Center (MFSC) is using generic data from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's database of common cause failures at nuclear power plants to estimate CCF due to the lack of a more appropriate data source. There remains uncertainty in the actual magnitude of the common cause risk estimates for different systems at this stage of the design. Given the limited data about launch vehicle CCF and that launch vehicles are a highly redundant system by design, it is important to make design decisions to account for a range of values for independent and CCFs. When investigating the design of the one-out-of-two component redundant system for launch vehicles, a response surface was constructed to represent the impact of the independent failure rate versus a common cause beta factor effect on a system's failure probability. This presentation will define a CCF and review estimation calculations. It gives a summary of reduction methodologies and a review of examples of historical CCFs. Finally, it presents the response surface and discusses the results of the different CCFs on the reliability of a one-out-of-two system.

  19. Common Cause Failure Modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wetherholt, Jon; Heimann, Timothy J.; Anderson, Brenda

    2011-01-01

    High technology industries with high failure costs commonly use redundancy as a means to reduce risk. Redundant systems, whether similar or dissimilar, are susceptible to Common Cause Failures (CCF). CCF is not always considered in the design effort and, therefore, can be a major threat to success. There are several aspects to CCF which must be understood to perform an analysis which will find hidden issues that may negate redundancy. This paper will provide definition, types, a list of possible causes and some examples of CCF. Requirements and designs from NASA projects will be used in the paper as examples.

  20. "Smoking wet": respiratory failure related to smoking tainted marijuana cigarettes.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Christopher R; Baram, Michael; Cavarocchi, Nicholas C

    2013-01-01

    Reports have suggested that the use of a dangerously tainted form of marijuana, referred to in the vernacular as "wet" or "fry," has increased. Marijuana cigarettes are dipped into or laced with other substances, typically formaldehyde, phencyclidine, or both. Inhaling smoke from these cigarettes can cause lung injuries. We report the cases of 2 young adults who presented at our hospital with respiratory failure soon after they had smoked "wet" marijuana cigarettes. In both patients, progressive hypoxemic respiratory failure necessitated rescue therapy with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. After lengthy hospitalizations, both patients recovered with only mild pulmonary function abnormalities. To our knowledge, this is the first 2-patient report of severe respiratory failure and rescue therapy with extracorporeal oxygenation after the smoking of marijuana cigarettes thus tainted. We believe that, in young adults with an unexplained presentation of severe respiratory failure, the possibility of exposure to tainted marijuana cigarettes should be considered. PMID:23466531

  1. Acute respiratory failure in scrub typhus patients

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Jyoti Narayan; Gurjar, Mohan; Harde, Yogesh

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory failure is a serious complication of scrub typhus. In this prospective study, all patients with a diagnosis of scrub typhus were included from a single center Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Demographic, clinical characteristics, laboratory, and imaging parameters of these patients at the time of ICU admission were compared. Of the 55 scrub typhus patients, 27 (49%) had an acute respiratory failure. Seventeen patients had acute respiratory distress syndrome, and ten had cardiogenic pulmonary edema. Respiratory supported patients were older had significant chronic lungs disease and high severity illness scores (Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation-II and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score). At ICU admission, these patients presented with more deranged laboratory markers, including high bilirubin, high creatine kinase, high lactate, metabolic acidosis, low serum albumin, and presence of ascites. The average ICU and hospital stay were 4.27 ± 2.74 and 6.53 ± 3.52 days, respectively, in the respiratory supported group. Three patients died in respiratory failure group, while only one patient died in nonrespiratory failure group.

  2. Acute respiratory failure in scrub typhus patients.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Jyoti Narayan; Gurjar, Mohan; Harde, Yogesh

    2016-08-01

    Respiratory failure is a serious complication of scrub typhus. In this prospective study, all patients with a diagnosis of scrub typhus were included from a single center Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Demographic, clinical characteristics, laboratory, and imaging parameters of these patients at the time of ICU admission were compared. Of the 55 scrub typhus patients, 27 (49%) had an acute respiratory failure. Seventeen patients had acute respiratory distress syndrome, and ten had cardiogenic pulmonary edema. Respiratory supported patients were older had significant chronic lungs disease and high severity illness scores (Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation-II and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score). At ICU admission, these patients presented with more deranged laboratory markers, including high bilirubin, high creatine kinase, high lactate, metabolic acidosis, low serum albumin, and presence of ascites. The average ICU and hospital stay were 4.27 ± 2.74 and 6.53 ± 3.52 days, respectively, in the respiratory supported group. Three patients died in respiratory failure group, while only one patient died in nonrespiratory failure group. PMID:27630462

  3. Acute respiratory failure in scrub typhus patients

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Jyoti Narayan; Gurjar, Mohan; Harde, Yogesh

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory failure is a serious complication of scrub typhus. In this prospective study, all patients with a diagnosis of scrub typhus were included from a single center Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Demographic, clinical characteristics, laboratory, and imaging parameters of these patients at the time of ICU admission were compared. Of the 55 scrub typhus patients, 27 (49%) had an acute respiratory failure. Seventeen patients had acute respiratory distress syndrome, and ten had cardiogenic pulmonary edema. Respiratory supported patients were older had significant chronic lungs disease and high severity illness scores (Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation-II and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score). At ICU admission, these patients presented with more deranged laboratory markers, including high bilirubin, high creatine kinase, high lactate, metabolic acidosis, low serum albumin, and presence of ascites. The average ICU and hospital stay were 4.27 ± 2.74 and 6.53 ± 3.52 days, respectively, in the respiratory supported group. Three patients died in respiratory failure group, while only one patient died in nonrespiratory failure group. PMID:27630462

  4. Acute respiratory failure in scrub typhus patients.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Jyoti Narayan; Gurjar, Mohan; Harde, Yogesh

    2016-08-01

    Respiratory failure is a serious complication of scrub typhus. In this prospective study, all patients with a diagnosis of scrub typhus were included from a single center Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Demographic, clinical characteristics, laboratory, and imaging parameters of these patients at the time of ICU admission were compared. Of the 55 scrub typhus patients, 27 (49%) had an acute respiratory failure. Seventeen patients had acute respiratory distress syndrome, and ten had cardiogenic pulmonary edema. Respiratory supported patients were older had significant chronic lungs disease and high severity illness scores (Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation-II and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score). At ICU admission, these patients presented with more deranged laboratory markers, including high bilirubin, high creatine kinase, high lactate, metabolic acidosis, low serum albumin, and presence of ascites. The average ICU and hospital stay were 4.27 ± 2.74 and 6.53 ± 3.52 days, respectively, in the respiratory supported group. Three patients died in respiratory failure group, while only one patient died in nonrespiratory failure group.

  5. Acute kidney injury with hypoxic respiratory failure

    PubMed Central

    Neubert, Zachary; Hoffmann, Paul; Owshalimpur, David

    2014-01-01

    A 27-year-old Caucasian man was transferred from a remote clinic with acute kidney injury for the prior 7–10 days preceded by gastroenteritis. His kidney biopsy showed non-specific mesangiopathic glomerular changes, minimal tubulointerstitial disease without sclerosis, crescents, nor evidence of vasculitis. On his third hospital day, he developed acute hypoxic respiratory failure requiring intubation and mechanical ventilation. Pulmonary renal syndromes ranked highest on his differential diagnosis. He was extubated after 2 days of mechanical ventilation and after pulse dose steroids. His lung biopsy showed pulmonary capillaritis. Our case describes a patient with clinically appearing renopulmonary syndrome, but found to have pulmonary capillaritis, a rare form of lung disease that may also cause acute kidney injury. PMID:25246473

  6. What Causes Heart Failure?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the heart, leading to heart failure. High Blood Pressure Blood pressure is the force of blood pushing against the ... weaken your heart and lead to plaque buildup. Blood pressure is considered high if it stays at or ...

  7. Relapsing acute respiratory failure induced by minocycline.

    PubMed

    Oddo, Mauro; Liaudet, Lucas; Lepori, Mattia; Broccard, Alain F; Schaller, Marie-Denise

    2003-06-01

    The antibiotic minocycline, which is used in the treatment of acne, has been associated with various pulmonary complications such as pulmonary lupus and hypersensitivity pneumonitis. We now report a particularly severe case of minocycline-related pulmonary toxicity that was characterized by a relapsing form of hypersensitivity eosinophilic pneumonia complicated by acute respiratory failure.

  8. Respiratory failure due to expiratory central airway collapse.

    PubMed

    Murgu, Septimiu D; Cherrison, Lawrence J; Colt, Henri G

    2007-06-01

    We report a patient with respiratory failure due to expiratory central airway collapse successfully treated with airway stents. A 74-year-old male with obesity and obstructive sleep apnea had recurrent episodes of acute respiratory failure. Noninvasive positive-pressure ventilation failed because of patient intolerance and lack of improvement, and soon after he stopped using the noninvasive ventilator he developed severe respiratory failure that required a tracheostomy. He was transferred to our institution one month later. Fiberoptic bronchoscopy revealed diffuse expiratory central airway collapse of both main bronchi and the lower two thirds of the trachea, caused by bulging of the posterior airway membrane. During rigid bronchoscopy we inserted studded silicone stents in the right and left mainstem bronchi and in the distal trachea. The patient was weaned from mechanical ventilation 72 hours later and discharged to a long-term care facility. Expiratory central airway collapse should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with respiratory failure, especially when weaning from mechanical ventilation is difficult. PMID:17521465

  9. Respiratory sleep disorders in patients with congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Naughton, Matthew T

    2015-08-01

    Respiratory sleep disorders (RSD) occur in about 40-50% of patients with symptomatic congestive heart failure (CHF). Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is considered a cause of CHF, whereas central sleep apnea (CSA) is considered a response to heart failure, perhaps even compensatory. In the setting of heart failure, continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) has a definite role in treating OSA with improvements in cardiac parameters expected. However in CSA, CPAP is an adjunctive therapy to other standard therapies directed towards the heart failure (pharmacological, device and surgical options). Whether adaptive servo controlled ventilatory support, a variant of CPAP, is beneficial is yet to be proven. Supplemental oxygen therapy should be used with caution in heart failure, in particular, by avoiding hyperoxia as indicated by SpO2 values >95%.

  10. Respiratory sleep disorders in patients with congestive heart failure

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory sleep disorders (RSD) occur in about 40-50% of patients with symptomatic congestive heart failure (CHF). Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is considered a cause of CHF, whereas central sleep apnea (CSA) is considered a response to heart failure, perhaps even compensatory. In the setting of heart failure, continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) has a definite role in treating OSA with improvements in cardiac parameters expected. However in CSA, CPAP is an adjunctive therapy to other standard therapies directed towards the heart failure (pharmacological, device and surgical options). Whether adaptive servo controlled ventilatory support, a variant of CPAP, is beneficial is yet to be proven. Supplemental oxygen therapy should be used with caution in heart failure, in particular, by avoiding hyperoxia as indicated by SpO2 values >95%. PMID:26380758

  11. Acute respiratory failure due to thyroid storm developing immediately after delivery.

    PubMed

    Kitazawa, Chie; Aoki, Shigeru; Takahashi, Tsuneo; Hirahara, Fumiki

    2015-12-01

    Acute respiratory failure occurs in less than 0.1% of pregnancies. Thyroid storm should be included in the differential diagnosis of possible causes of acute respiratory failure occurring immediately after delivery, and delivery is a high risk factor for thyroid storm in pregnant women with thyrotoxicosis.

  12. Acute respiratory failure following severe arsenic poisoning.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, C; Davies, S; McGowan, T; Schorer, A; Drage, C

    1979-11-01

    A 47-year-old man had an episode of severe respiratory failure after acute intoxication with arsenic. Features of the initial clinical presentation included nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea, acute psychosis, diffuse skin rash, and marked pancytopenia. A peripheral neuropathy then developed which resulted in severe weakness of all muscles of the limbs, the shoulder and pelvis girdles, and the trunk. The neuropathy continued to progress despite treatment with dimercaprol (BAL in oil). Five weeks after the initial exposure, the patient was no longer able to maintain adquate ventilation and required mechanical ventilatory support. Improvement in the patient's neuromuscular status permitted successful weaning from the ventilator after one month of mechanical ventilation. Long-term follow-up revealed no further respiratory difficulty and slow improvement in the strength of the peripheral muscles.

  13. Noninvasive ventilation in acute respiratory failure

    PubMed Central

    Mas, Arantxa; Masip, Josep

    2014-01-01

    After the institution of positive-pressure ventilation, the use of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) through an interface substantially increased. The first technique was continuous positive airway pressure; but, after the introduction of pressure support ventilation at the end of the 20th century, this became the main modality. Both techniques, and some others that have been recently introduced and which integrate some technological innovations, have extensively demonstrated a faster improvement of acute respiratory failure in different patient populations, avoiding endotracheal intubation and facilitating the release of conventional invasive mechanical ventilation. In acute settings, NIV is currently the first-line treatment for moderate-to-severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation as well as for acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema and should be considered in immunocompromised patients with acute respiratory insufficiency, in difficult weaning, and in the prevention of postextubation failure. Alternatively, it can also be used in the postoperative period and in cases of pneumonia and asthma or as a palliative treatment. NIV is currently used in a wide range of acute settings, such as critical care and emergency departments, hospital wards, palliative or pediatric units, and in pre-hospital care. It is also used as a home care therapy in patients with chronic pulmonary or sleep disorders. The appropriate selection of patients and the adaptation to the technique are the keys to success. This review essentially analyzes the evidence of benefits of NIV in different populations with acute respiratory failure and describes the main modalities, new devices, and some practical aspects of the use of this technique. PMID:25143721

  14. Diagnosis of muscle diseases presenting with early respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Pfeffer, Gerald; Povitz, Marcus; Gibson, G John; Chinnery, Patrick F

    2015-05-01

    Here we describe a clinical approach and differential diagnosis for chronic muscle diseases which include early respiratory failure as a prominent feature in their presentation (i.e. respiratory failure whilst still ambulant). These patients typically present to neurology or respiratory medicine out-patient clinics and a distinct differential diagnosis of neuromuscular aetiologies should be considered. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and myasthenia gravis are the important non-muscle diseases to consider, but once these have been excluded there remains a challenging differential diagnosis of muscle conditions, which will be the focus of this review. The key points in the diagnosis of these disorders are being aware of relevant symptoms, which are initially caused by nocturnal hypoventilation or diaphragmatic weakness; and identifying other features which direct further investigation. Important muscle diseases to identify, because their diagnosis has disease-specific management implications, include adult-onset Pompe disease, inflammatory myopathy, and sporadic adult-onset nemaline myopathy. Cases which are due to metabolic myopathy or muscular dystrophy are important to diagnose because of their implications for genetic counselling. Myopathy from sarcoidosis and colchicine each has a single reported case with this presentation, but should be considered because they are treatable. Disorders which have recently had their genetic aetiologies identified include hereditary myopathy with early respiratory failure (due to TTN mutations), the FHL1-related syndromes, and myofibrillar myopathy due to BAG3 mutation. Recently described syndromes include oculopharyngodistal muscular dystrophy that awaits genetic characterisation. PMID:25377282

  15. Critical care ultrasonography in acute respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Vignon, Philippe; Repessé, Xavier; Vieillard-Baron, Antoine; Maury, Eric

    2016-08-15

    Acute respiratory failure (ARF) is a leading indication for performing critical care ultrasonography (CCUS) which, in these patients, combines critical care echocardiography (CCE) and chest ultrasonography. CCE is ideally suited to guide the diagnostic work-up in patients presenting with ARF since it allows the assessment of left ventricular filling pressure and pulmonary artery pressure, and the identification of a potential underlying cardiopathy. In addition, CCE precisely depicts the consequences of pulmonary vascular lesions on right ventricular function and helps in adjusting the ventilator settings in patients sustaining moderate-to-severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. Similarly, CCE helps in identifying patients at high risk of ventilator weaning failure, depicts the mechanisms of weaning pulmonary edema in those patients who fail a spontaneous breathing trial, and guides tailored therapeutic strategy. In all these clinical settings, CCE provides unparalleled information on both the efficacy and tolerance of therapeutic changes. Chest ultrasonography provides further insights into pleural and lung abnormalities associated with ARF, irrespective of its origin. It also allows the assessment of the effects of treatment on lung aeration or pleural effusions. The major limitation of lung ultrasonography is that it is currently based on a qualitative approach in the absence of standardized quantification parameters. CCE combined with chest ultrasonography rapidly provides highly relevant information in patients sustaining ARF. A pragmatic strategy based on the serial use of CCUS for the management of patients presenting with ARF of various origins is detailed in the present manuscript.

  16. Critical care ultrasonography in acute respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Vignon, Philippe; Repessé, Xavier; Vieillard-Baron, Antoine; Maury, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory failure (ARF) is a leading indication for performing critical care ultrasonography (CCUS) which, in these patients, combines critical care echocardiography (CCE) and chest ultrasonography. CCE is ideally suited to guide the diagnostic work-up in patients presenting with ARF since it allows the assessment of left ventricular filling pressure and pulmonary artery pressure, and the identification of a potential underlying cardiopathy. In addition, CCE precisely depicts the consequences of pulmonary vascular lesions on right ventricular function and helps in adjusting the ventilator settings in patients sustaining moderate-to-severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. Similarly, CCE helps in identifying patients at high risk of ventilator weaning failure, depicts the mechanisms of weaning pulmonary edema in those patients who fail a spontaneous breathing trial, and guides tailored therapeutic strategy. In all these clinical settings, CCE provides unparalleled information on both the efficacy and tolerance of therapeutic changes. Chest ultrasonography provides further insights into pleural and lung abnormalities associated with ARF, irrespective of its origin. It also allows the assessment of the effects of treatment on lung aeration or pleural effusions. The major limitation of lung ultrasonography is that it is currently based on a qualitative approach in the absence of standardized quantification parameters. CCE combined with chest ultrasonography rapidly provides highly relevant information in patients sustaining ARF. A pragmatic strategy based on the serial use of CCUS for the management of patients presenting with ARF of various origins is detailed in the present manuscript. PMID:27524204

  17. The successful treatment of hypercapnic respiratory failure with oral modafinil

    PubMed Central

    Parnell, Helen; Quirke, Ginny; Farmer, Sally; Adeyemo, Sumbo; Varney, Veronica

    2014-01-01

    Hypercapnic respiratory failure is common in advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and is usually treated by nasal ventilation. Not all patients requiring such ventilation can tolerate it, with anxiety and phobia influencing their reaction, along with treatment failure. We report the case histories of six patients with hypercapnic respiratory failure who were at risk of death due to refusal of nasal ventilation or its failure despite ongoing treatment. We report their improvement with oral modafinil 200 mg tablets used as a respiratory stimulant, which led to discharge, improved arterial blood gases, and offset further admissions with hypercapnic respiratory failure. This drug is licensed for narcolepsy and is said to stimulate the respiratory system via the central nervous system. Its use in respiratory failure is an unlicensed indication, and there are no case reports or studies of such use in the literature. Its respiratory stimulant effects appear better than those with protriptyline, which was a drug previously used until its production was discontinued. Our findings suggest that a study of modafinil in hypercapnic respiratory failure would be warranted, especially for patients with treatment failure or intolerance to nasal ventilation. This may offer a way of shortening hospital stay, improving outcome and quality of life, and reducing death and readmissions. PMID:24812505

  18. Common Cause Failures and Ultra Reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Harry W.

    2012-01-01

    A common cause failure occurs when several failures have the same origin. Common cause failures are either common event failures, where the cause is a single external event, or common mode failures, where two systems fail in the same way for the same reason. Common mode failures can occur at different times because of a design defect or a repeated external event. Common event failures reduce the reliability of on-line redundant systems but not of systems using off-line spare parts. Common mode failures reduce the dependability of systems using off-line spare parts and on-line redundancy.

  19. Respiratory Failure in Acute Organophosphorus Pesticide Self-Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Eddleston, Michael; Mohamed, Fahim; Davies, James OJ; Eyer, Peter; Worek, Franz; Sheriff, MH Rezvi; Buckley, Nick A

    2006-01-01

    Background: Acute organophosphorus (OP) pesticide poisoning is a major clinical problem in the developing world. Textbooks ascribe most deaths to respiratory failure occurring in one of two distinct clinical syndromes - acute cholinergic respiratory failure or the intermediate syndrome. The delayed failure appears to be due to respiratory muscle weakness, but its pathophysiology is not yet clear. Aim: To describe the clinical patterns of OP-induced respiratory failure and to determine whether the two syndromes are clinically distinct. Design: Prospective cohort study of 376 patients with confirmed OP poisoning. Methods: Patients were observed throughout their admission to three Sri Lankan hospitals. Exposure was confirmed by butyrylcholinesterase and blood OP assays. Results: Ninety of 376 patients (24%) required intubation, 52 (58%) within 2 hrs of admission while unconscious with cholinergic features. Twenty-nine (32%) were well on admission but then required intubation after 24 hrs while conscious and without cholinergic features. These two syndromes were not clinically distinct and had much overlap. In particular, some patients who required intubation on arrival subsequently recovered conscious but could not be extubated, requiring ventilation for up to 6 days. Discussion: Respiratory failure did not occur as two discrete clinical syndromes within distinct time frames. Instead, the pattern of failure was variable and overlapped in some patients. There seemed to be two underlying mechanisms - an early acute mixed central and peripheral respiratory failure, and a late peripheral respiratory failure - rather than two defined clinical syndromes. PMID:16861715

  20. Venovenous Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation in Pediatric Respiratory Failure.

    PubMed

    Ham, P Benson; Hwang, Brice; Wise, Linda J; Walters, K Christian; Pipkin, Walter L; Howell, Charles G; Bhatia, Jatinder; Hatley, Robyn

    2016-09-01

    Conventional treatment of respiratory failure involves positive pressure ventilation that can worsen lung damage. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is typically used when conventional therapy fails. In this study, we evaluated the use of venovenous (VV)-ECMO for the treatment of severe pediatric respiratory failure at our institution. A retrospective analysis of pediatric patients (age 1-18) placed on ECMO in the last 15 years (1999-2014) by the pediatric surgery team for respiratory failure was performed. Five pediatric patients underwent ECMO (mean age 10 years; range, 2-16). All underwent VV-ECMO. Diagnoses were status asthmaticus (2), acute respiratory distress syndrome due to septic shock (1), aspergillus pneumonia (1), and respiratory failure due to parainfluenza (1). Two patients had severe barotrauma prior to ECMO initiation. Average oxygenation index (OI) prior to cannulation was 74 (range 23-122). No patients required conversion to VA-ECMO. The average ECMO run time was 4.4 days (range 2-6). The average number of days on the ventilator was 15 (range 4-27). There were no major complications due to the procedure. Survival to discharge was 100%. Average follow up is 4.4 years (range 1-15). A short run of VV-ECMO can be lifesaving for pediatric patients in respiratory failure. Survival is excellent despite severely elevated oxygen indices. VV-ECMO may be well tolerated and can be considered for severe pediatric respiratory failure. PMID:27670564

  1. Predictors for mortality from respiratory failure in a general population

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Maki; Shibata, Yoko; Inoue, Sumito; Igarashi, Akira; Sato, Kento; Sato, Masamichi; Nemoto, Takako; Abe, Yuki; Nunomiya, Keiko; Nishiwaki, Michiko; Tokairin, Yoshikane; Kimura, Tomomi; Daimon, Makoto; Makino, Naohiko; Watanabe, Tetsu; Konta, Tsuneo; Ueno, Yoshiyuki; Kato, Takeo; Kayama, Takamasa; Kubota, Isao

    2016-01-01

    Risk factors for death from respiratory failure in the general population are not established. The aim of this study was to determine the characteristics of individuals who die of respiratory failure in a Japanese general population. In total, 3253 adults aged 40 years or older participated in annual health check in Takahata, Yamagata, Japan from 2004 to 2006. Subject deaths through the end of 2010 were reviewed; 27 subjects died of respiratory failure (pneumonia, n = 22; COPD, n = 1; pulmonary fibrosis, n = 3; and bronchial asthma, n = 1). Cox proportional hazard analysis revealed that male sex; higher age, high levels of D-dimer and fibrinogen; lower body mass index (BMI) and total cholesterol; and history of stroke and gastric ulcer were independent risk factors for respiratory death. On analysis with C-statistics, net reclassification improvement, and integrated discrimination improvement, addition of the disease history and laboratory data significantly improved the model prediction for respiratory death using age and BMI. In conclusion, we identified risk factors for mortality from respiratory failure in a prospective cohort of a Japanese general population. Men who were older, underweight, hypocholesterolemic, hypercoagulo-fibrinolytic, and had a history of stroke or gastric ulcer had a higher risk of mortality due to respiratory failure. PMID:27180927

  2. Predictors for mortality from respiratory failure in a general population.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Maki; Shibata, Yoko; Inoue, Sumito; Igarashi, Akira; Sato, Kento; Sato, Masamichi; Nemoto, Takako; Abe, Yuki; Nunomiya, Keiko; Nishiwaki, Michiko; Tokairin, Yoshikane; Kimura, Tomomi; Daimon, Makoto; Makino, Naohiko; Watanabe, Tetsu; Konta, Tsuneo; Ueno, Yoshiyuki; Kato, Takeo; Kayama, Takamasa; Kubota, Isao

    2016-01-01

    Risk factors for death from respiratory failure in the general population are not established. The aim of this study was to determine the characteristics of individuals who die of respiratory failure in a Japanese general population. In total, 3253 adults aged 40 years or older participated in annual health check in Takahata, Yamagata, Japan from 2004 to 2006. Subject deaths through the end of 2010 were reviewed; 27 subjects died of respiratory failure (pneumonia, n = 22; COPD, n = 1; pulmonary fibrosis, n = 3; and bronchial asthma, n = 1). Cox proportional hazard analysis revealed that male sex; higher age, high levels of D-dimer and fibrinogen; lower body mass index (BMI) and total cholesterol; and history of stroke and gastric ulcer were independent risk factors for respiratory death. On analysis with C-statistics, net reclassification improvement, and integrated discrimination improvement, addition of the disease history and laboratory data significantly improved the model prediction for respiratory death using age and BMI. In conclusion, we identified risk factors for mortality from respiratory failure in a prospective cohort of a Japanese general population. Men who were older, underweight, hypocholesterolemic, hypercoagulo-fibrinolytic, and had a history of stroke or gastric ulcer had a higher risk of mortality due to respiratory failure. PMID:27180927

  3. Management of post traumatic respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Michaels, Andrew J

    2004-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a severe and common complication of major trauma. The most important early management principle is to identify the inciting event and remove the ongoing insult aggressively. It is important to immediately resuscitate the patients and prepare them for a complex and difficult hospitalization. Avoiding secondary insults is the cornerstone of supportive care, and this is based primarily on aggressive immune surveillance, full nutrition, and unrelenting oxygen delivery. The use of aggressive immune surveillance, nutritional support, and fluid management is critical to support ventilator management for oxygenation and ventilation. In general, although essential, the ventilator has great potential for harm in patients who are compromised seriously with ARDS. Physicians must establish reasonable therapeutic goals based on oxygen delivery rather than arbitrary normal values of blood gas measurement. The impact of the ventilator should be limited with regard to aspiratory pressure, tidal volume, inspired oxygen, and levels of expiratory end expiratory pressure. Use of pulmonary toilet, including therapeutic bronchoscopy; patient positioning, including intermittent prone positioning, and recruitment maneuvers are useful therapeutic complements for maintaining functional residual capacity and decreasing shunt. Overall, ARDS represents a clear indication that the patient is failing to meet the demands of their stress and without prompt attention likely will die. It is a challenge and an opportunity to identify the underlying situation and to manage the patient while not causing additional harm as the patient's intrinsic resources can bring about the healing necessary to recover from the situation of extremis. PMID:14979331

  4. Structural failures: Causes, prevention, and misinterpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Barsom, J.M. )

    1993-07-01

    This article presents a few observations on causes and prevention of failures in structural and equipment components that are related to the initiation and propagation of fatigue cracks. Some of these observations are illustrated by using actual failures. Also, the article presents a discussion of some common misconceptions and misinterpretations that have led to incorrect conclusions in failure investigations.

  5. Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy and respiratory failure; what about the diaphragm?

    PubMed Central

    Hazenberg, A.; van Alfen, N.; Voet, N.B.M.; Kerstjens, H.A.M.; Wijkstra, P.J.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction We present a case of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) with a diaphragm paralysis as the primary cause of ventilatory failure. FSHD is an autosomal dominant inherited disorder with a restricted pattern of weakness. Although respiratory weakness is a relatively unknown in FSHD, it is not uncommon. Methods We report on the clinical findings of a 68-year old male who presented with severe dyspnea while supine. Results Supplementing our clinical findings with laboratory, electrophysiological and radiological performances led to the diagnosis of diaphragm paralysis. Arterial blood gas in sitting position without supplemental oxygen showed a mild hypercapnia. His sleep improved after starting non-invasive ventilation and his daytime sleepiness disappeared. Discussion We conclude that in patients with FSHD who have symptoms of nocturnal hypoventilation, an adequate assessment of the diaphragm is recommended. This is of great importance as we know that nocturnal hypoventilation can be treated effectively by non-invasive ventilation. PMID:26029575

  6. Extranodal NK/T Cell Lymphoma Causing Cardiorespiratory Failure

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma is an uncommon malignancy usually involving the sinonasal area. We report an unusual case of extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma diagnosed in a 62-year-old Caucasian male who died of progressive cardiorespiratory failure but had no clinically detectable upper respiratory system lesions. The initial diagnosis was made cytologically on a sample of pericardial fluid that contained neoplastic lymphoid cells. These cells were positive for CD2, cytoplasmic CD3, and Epstein-Barr virus and negative for CD56. The diagnosis was confirmed at the autopsy, which disclosed lymphoma infiltrates in the myocardium, lungs, stomach, and pancreas. The death was caused by heart and lung failure due to uncontrollable arrhythmia and respiratory insufficiency due to the lymphoma infiltrates. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma presenting with cardiopulmonary failure. PMID:27493813

  7. Extranodal NK/T Cell Lymphoma Causing Cardiorespiratory Failure.

    PubMed

    Li, Yiting; Damjanov, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma is an uncommon malignancy usually involving the sinonasal area. We report an unusual case of extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma diagnosed in a 62-year-old Caucasian male who died of progressive cardiorespiratory failure but had no clinically detectable upper respiratory system lesions. The initial diagnosis was made cytologically on a sample of pericardial fluid that contained neoplastic lymphoid cells. These cells were positive for CD2, cytoplasmic CD3, and Epstein-Barr virus and negative for CD56. The diagnosis was confirmed at the autopsy, which disclosed lymphoma infiltrates in the myocardium, lungs, stomach, and pancreas. The death was caused by heart and lung failure due to uncontrollable arrhythmia and respiratory insufficiency due to the lymphoma infiltrates. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma presenting with cardiopulmonary failure. PMID:27493813

  8. [Infantile meningitis caused by respiratory syncytial virus].

    PubMed

    Shirota, Go; Morozumi, Miyuki; Ubukata, Kimiko; Shiro, Hiroyuki

    2011-11-01

    Respiratory syncytial (RS) virus commonly causes infantile respiratory tract infection causing significant morbidity and mortality, but rarely meningitis. We report a case of meningitis caused by RS virus subgroup B in a 56-day-old boy admitted for high fever who underwent blood examination and lumbar puncture. Empirical chemotherapy was started with intravenous ampicillin, gentamicin, and cefotaxime based on laboratory data on CSF cells (84/microL) and serum CRP (13.8mg/dL) data. RS virus subgroup B was only detected using real-time PCR comprehensive reverse transcription from the first CSF, but no bacterial gene was detected. No bacteria grew from his CSF, urine, or blood. Fever and serum CRP dropped in a few days. He had neither seizures nor disturbance of consciousness and was discharged on day 11 after admission. No evidence of encephalopathy was detected in brain MRI or electroencephalography. RS virus rarely causes meningitis, but a percentage of RS-virus-infected infants exhibit symptoms such as seizure and disturbance of consciousness. We should recognize that the RS virus may cause neurological complications associated with high morbidity and mortality.

  9. Neglected Respiratory Toxicity Caused by Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Domingo, Christian; Roig, Jorge

    2007-01-01

    When a patient with lung cancer presents non-specific respiratory symptoms there are many diagnostic options. Chemotherapy is the cornerstone of treatment in many stages of lung cancer and its toxicity is well known. The main priority is to prevent life-threatening diseases such as lung infection, which can be treated successfully if a prompt, accurate diagnosis is given. Drug-induced pulmonary disease must be avoided at all costs but it is also important to avoid side-effects of drugs which do not directly interfere with respiratory physiology but may impair gas exchange. This review highlights the risks and characteristics of non-cytostatic-induced lung toxicity caused by agents that have been commonly used to treat cancer in recent decades. Physicians should be alert to the possibility of this neglected non-chemotherapy-induced lung toxicity in cancer patients, since early withdrawal of the offending drug is mandatory. PMID:19340316

  10. [The challenge of home care for respiratory failure].

    PubMed

    Huchon, G

    2001-05-31

    In France, 65,000 patients with chronic respiratory failure are managed at home. This is made possible by the collaboration between prescribing physicians and other medical and social agents in the community. It consists in various medical, technical and social interventions, all aimed at improving both survival and quality of life. Patient and family education is a key-factor to increase the success of the various therapeutic interventions that are rehabilitation, long term oxygen therapy and home mechanical ventilation. Rehabilitation programmes include optimisation of pharmacological treatments, help in smoking cessation, social and psychological support, and exercise training. National alert procedure for medical devices, and evaluation of medical devices is part of the management of respiratory failure at home. Care networks facilitate the various interventions necessary to maintain the patient with chronic respiratory failure at home. PMID:11468910

  11. Common Cause Failure Modeling: Aerospace Versus Nuclear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stott, James E.; Britton, Paul; Ring, Robert W.; Hark, Frank; Hatfield, G. Spencer

    2010-01-01

    Aggregate nuclear plant failure data is used to produce generic common-cause factors that are specifically for use in the common-cause failure models of NUREG/CR-5485. Furthermore, the models presented in NUREG/CR-5485 are specifically designed to incorporate two significantly distinct assumptions about the methods of surveillance testing from whence this aggregate failure data came. What are the implications of using these NUREG generic factors to model the common-cause failures of aerospace systems? Herein, the implications of using the NUREG generic factors in the modeling of aerospace systems are investigated in detail and strong recommendations for modeling the common-cause failures of aerospace systems are given.

  12. Risk factors for nosocomial nontraumatic coma: sepsis and respiratory failure

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ye-Ting; Wang, Shao-Dan; Wang, Guang-Sheng; Chen, Xiao-Dong; Tong, Dao-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Background Coma’s are a major cause of clinical deterioration or death. Identification of risks that predispose to coma are important in managing patients; however, the risk factors for nosocomial nontraumatic coma (NNC) are not well known. Our aim was to investigate the risk factors in patients with NNC. Methods A retrospective case–control design was used to compare patients with NNC and a control group of patients without coma in a population-based cohort of 263 participants from the neurological intensive care unit in Shuyang County People’s Hospital of Northern China. Coma was diagnosed by a Glasgow Coma Scale score ≤8. Adjusted odds ratios for patients with NNC were derived from multivariate logistic regression analyses. Results A total of 96 subjects had NNC. The prevalence of NNC was 36.5% among the subjects. Among these, 82% had acute cerebrovascular etiology. Most of the NNC usually occurred at day 3 after admission to the neurological intensive care unit. Patients with NNC had higher hospital mortality rates (67.7% vs 3%, P<0.0001) and were more likely to have a central herniation (47.9% vs 0%, P<0.001) or uncal herniation (11.5% vs 0%, P<0.001) than those without NNC. Multiple logistic regression showed that systemic inflammatory response syndrome-positive sepsis (odds ratio =4, 95% confidence interval =1.875−8.567, P<0.001) and acute respiratory failure (odds ratio =3.275, 95% confidence interval =1.014−10.573, P<0.05) were the factors independently associated with a higher risk of NNC. Conclusion Systemic inflammatory response syndrome-positive sepsis and acute respiratory failure are independently associated with an increased risk of NNC. This information may be important for patients with NNC.

  13. Technological advances in extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Rehder, Kyle J; Turner, David A; Bonadonna, Desiree; Walczak, Richard J; Rudder, Robert J; Cheifetz, Ira M

    2012-08-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) for neonatal and pediatric cardiac and/or respiratory failure is well established, and its use for adult respiratory failure is rapidly increasing. Management strategies developed over the past 30 years coupled with significant recent technological advances have led to improved ECMO survival. These new technologies are expanding the potential applications for ECMO in exciting ways, including new patient populations and the ability to make ECMO mobile for both intra- and inter-hospital transport. In this article, we highlight some of the recent technological advances and their impact on the utilization of ECMO in increasingly diverse patient populations.

  14. Volumetric diffusive respirator use in neonatal respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Campbell, P J; Chilton, H W; Garvey, P A; Gupta, J M

    1991-02-01

    Six very low birthweight neonates with terminal respiratory failure due to severe hyaline membrane disease who failed to respond to conventional ventilation were offered a trial of high frequency jet ventilation using the volumetric diffusive respirator (VDR). All neonates showed improvement in pulmonary function. Two neonates were weaned successfully from high frequency ventilation. The results of this initial trial suggest that the volumetric diffusive respirator is a safe and effective method of ventilation in neonates with respiratory failure and that the survival rate in such neonates might be enhanced if treatment is introduced earlier in the disease.

  15. [Ventilation strategies in the child with severe hypoxemic respiratory failure].

    PubMed

    Donoso F, Alejandro; Arriagada S, Daniela; Díaz R, Franco; Cruces R, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    In this review, we assemble the fundamental concepts of the use of mechanical ventilation (MV) in children with acute respiratory failure (ARDS) and refractory hypoxemia. We also discusses topics of protective ventilation and recruitment potential, and specifically examine the options of ventilation and/or maneuvers designed to optimize the non-aerated lung tissue: alveolar recruitment maneuvers, positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) titulation, high frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV), airway pressure release ventilation (APRV), aimed at correcting the mismatch ventilation/perfusion (V/Q): use of prone position. The only pharmacological intervention analyzed is the use of neuromuscular blockers. In clinical practice, the protective MV concept involves using an individual adjustment of the PEEP and volume tidal (V(T)). Use of recruitment maneuvers and PEEP downward titration can improve lung function in patients with ARDS and severe hypoxemia. We must keep in mind HFOV instauration as early as possible in response to failure of MV. The use of early and prolonged prone can improve gas exchange in hopes of a better control of what caused the use of MV. PMID:25739487

  16. Respiratory Diseases Caused by Coal Mine Dust

    PubMed Central

    Laney, A. Scott; Weissman, David N.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To provide an update on respiratory diseases caused by coal mine dust. Methods This article presents the results of a literature review initially performed for an International Conference on Occupational and Environmental Lung Disease held in summer 2013. Results Coal mine dust causes a spectrum of lung diseases collectively termed coal mine dust lung disease (CMDLD). These include Coal Workers’ Pneumoconiosis, silicosis, mixed dust pneumoconiosis, dust-related diffuse fibrosis (which can be mistaken for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis), and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. CMDLD continues to be a problem in the United States, particularly in the central Appalachian region. Treatment of CMDLD is symptomatic. Those with end-stage disease are candidates for lung transplantation. Because CMDLD cannot be cured, prevention is critical. Conclusions Coal mine dust remains a relevant occupational hazard and miners remain at risk for CMDLD. PMID:25285970

  17. Risk factors for hypoxemia and respiratory failure in respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis.

    PubMed

    Chan, P W K; Lok, F Y L; Khatijah, S B

    2002-12-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) bronchiolitis is a common infection in young children and may result in hospitalization. We examined the incidence of, and risk factors associated with, hypoxemia and respiratory failure in 216 children aged < 24 months admitted consecutively for proven RSV bronchiolitis. Hypoxemia was defined as SpO2 < 90% in room air and severe RSV bronchiolitis requiring intubation and ventilation was categorized as respiratory failure. Corrected age at admission was used for premature children (gestation < 37 weeks). Hypoxemia was suffered by 31 (14.3%) children. It was more likely to occur in children who were Malay (OR 2.56, 95%CI 1.05-6.23, p=0.03) or premature (OR 6.72, 95%CI 2.69-16.78, p<0.01). Hypoxemia was also more likely to develop in children with failure to thrive (OR 2.96, 95%CI 1.28-6.82, p<0.01). The seven (3.2%) children who were both premature (OR 11.94, 95%CI 2.50-56.99, p<0.01) and failure to thrive (OR 6.41, 95%CI 1.37-29.87, p=0.02) were more likely to develop respiratory failure. Prematurity was the only significant risk factor for hypoxemia and respiratory failure by logistic regression analysis (OR 1.17, 95%CI 1.06-1.55, p<0.01 and OR 1.14 95%CI 1.02-2.07, p=0.02 respectively). Prematurity was the single most important risk factor for both hypoxemia and respiratory failure in RSV bronchiolitis. PMID:12757230

  18. Immunoadjuvant Therapy and Noninvasive Ventilation for Acute Respiratory Failure in Lung Tuberculosis: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Flores-Franco, René Agustín; Olivas-Medina, Dahyr Alberto; Pacheco-Tena, Cesar Francisco; Duque-Rodríguez, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Acute respiratory failure caused by pulmonary tuberculosis is a rare event but with a high mortality even while receiving mechanical ventilatory support. We report the case of a young man with severe pulmonary tuberculosis refractory to conventional therapy who successfully overcame the critical period of his condition using noninvasive ventilation and immunoadjuvant therapy that included three doses of etanercept 25 mg subcutaneously. We conclude that the use of etanercept along with antituberculosis treatment appears to be safe and effective in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis presenting with acute respiratory failure. PMID:26273486

  19. [Bowel obstruction-induced cholinergic crisis with progressive respiratory failure following distigmine bromide treatment].

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Kazuki; Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Sato, Nobuhiro; Hirose, Yasuo

    2016-03-01

    A 54-year-old female experienced rapid respiratory failure while being transported in an ambulance to our emergency department for evaluation and management of constipation and abdominal pain. The patient was on treatment with distigmine bromide for postoperative urination disorder and magnesium oxide for constipation. Increased salivary secretions, diminished respiratory excursion, type 2 respiratory failure (PaCO2 : 65 mmHg), low serum cholinesterase, and hypermagnesemia were detected. Imaging studies revealed that the patient had bilateral aspiration pneumonia, fecal impaction in the rectum, and a distended colon causing ileus. The patient was mechanically ventilated and was weaned off the ventilator on day 3. Therapeutic drug monitoring after discharge revealed that the serum level of distigmine bromide on admission was markedly elevated (377.8 ng/mL vs. the normal therapeutic level of 5-10 ng/mL). Distigmine bromide induced a cholinergic crisis with a resultant increase in airway secretions and respiratory failure. In this particular case, orally administered distigmine bromide was excessively absorbed because of prolonged intestinal transit time secondary to fecal impaction and sluggish bowel movement; this caused a cholinergic crisis and hypermagnesemia contributing to respiratory failure. Clinicians should be aware that bowel obstruction in a patient treated with distigmine bromide can increase the risk of a cholinergic crisis. PMID:27255021

  20. [A toxicometric assessment of pneumonias and acute respiratory failure in poisonings].

    PubMed

    Iskandarov, A I

    1993-01-01

    The author analyzes clinical and morphologic manifestations of pneumonia and the conditions under which acute respiratory failure formed in 572 subjects who suffered poisoning with psychotropic and soporific drugs, chlorinated hydrocarbons, organophosphorus insecticides, caustic poisons, alcohol and its surrogates. Toxicometric (quantitative) assessment of the toxic effects and measurement of the toxins concentrations under which respiratory failure developed helped detect new mechanisms in the patho- and thanatogenesis of pneumonias and acute respiratory failure in poisonings. These data are of great interest for practical forensic medicine, since they permit substantiating the causes of death in various types of poisonings. The diagram proposed by the author permits assessment of the initial chemical trauma from the clinical and morphologic picture of poisoning.

  1. Risk Factors for Respiratory Failure Associated with Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Coley B.; Walsh, Edward E.; Peterson, Derick R.; Lee, F.Eun-Hyung; Falsey, Ann R.

    2010-01-01

    Risk factors associated with respiratory failure during respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection have not been assessed in adults. We identified RSV by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction in 58 adults during the 2007–2008 winter. Clinical variables and respiratory secretion viral loads were compared in 26 outpatients and 32 inpatients. Cardiopulmonary diseases were more common among inpatients than outpatients (91% vs 31%, P = .0001), whereas mean RSV load was similar. Nasal viral load was higher in ventilated vs nonventilated hospitalized patients (log10 3.7 ± 1.7 plaque-forming units (PFUs)/mL vs 2.4 ± 1.1 PFUs/mL, P = .02), and high viral load was independently associated with respiratory failure. PMID:19758094

  2. [Pain, agitation and delirium in acute respiratory failure].

    PubMed

    Funk, G-C

    2016-02-01

    Avoiding pain, agitation and delirium as well as avoiding unnecessary deep sedation is a powerful yet challenging strategy in critical care medicine. A number of interactions between cerebral function and respiratory function should be regarded in patients with respiratory failure and mechanical ventilation. A cooperative sedation strategy (i.e. patient is awake and free of pain and delirium) is feasible in many patients requiring invasive mechanical ventilation. Especially patients with mild acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) seem to benefit from preserved spontaneous breathing. While completely disabling spontaneous ventilation with or without neuromuscular blockade is not a standard strategy in ARDS, it might be temporarily required in patients with severe ARDS, who have substantial dyssynchrony or persistent hypoxaemia. Since pain, agitation and delirium compromise respiratory function they should also be regarded during noninvasive ventilation and during ventilator weaning. Pharmacological sedation can have favourable effects in these situations, but should not be given routinely or uncritically. PMID:26817653

  3. Respiratory Failure Associated with Ascariasis in a Patient with Immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Aleksandra, Lanocha; Barbara, Zdziarska; Natalia, Lanocha-Arendarczyk; Danuta, Kosik-Bogacka; Renata, Guzicka-Kazimierczak; Ewa, Marzec-Lewenstein

    2016-01-01

    In industrialized countries, risk groups for parasitic diseases include travelers, recent immigrants, and patients with immunodeficiency following chemotherapy and radiotherapy and AIDS. A 66-year-old Polish male was admitted in December 2012 to the Department of Haematology in a fairly good general condition. On the basis of cytological, cytochemical, immunophenotypic, and cytogenetic analysis of bone marrow, the patient was diagnosed with acute myeloblastic leukemia. On the 7th day of hospitalization in the Department of Haematology, patient was moved to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) due to acute respiratory and circulatory failure. In March 2013, 3 months after the onset of respiratory failures, a mature form of Ascaris spp. appeared in the patient's mouth. This report highlights the importance of considering an Ascaris infection in patients with low immunity presenting no eosinophilia but pulmonary failure in the central countries of Europe. PMID:27313919

  4. Respiratory Failure Associated with Ascariasis in a Patient with Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Aleksandra, Lanocha; Barbara, Zdziarska; Natalia, Lanocha-Arendarczyk; Danuta, Kosik-Bogacka; Renata, Guzicka-Kazimierczak; Ewa, Marzec-Lewenstein

    2016-01-01

    In industrialized countries, risk groups for parasitic diseases include travelers, recent immigrants, and patients with immunodeficiency following chemotherapy and radiotherapy and AIDS. A 66-year-old Polish male was admitted in December 2012 to the Department of Haematology in a fairly good general condition. On the basis of cytological, cytochemical, immunophenotypic, and cytogenetic analysis of bone marrow, the patient was diagnosed with acute myeloblastic leukemia. On the 7th day of hospitalization in the Department of Haematology, patient was moved to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) due to acute respiratory and circulatory failure. In March 2013, 3 months after the onset of respiratory failures, a mature form of Ascaris spp. appeared in the patient's mouth. This report highlights the importance of considering an Ascaris infection in patients with low immunity presenting no eosinophilia but pulmonary failure in the central countries of Europe. PMID:27313919

  5. Efficacy of idebenone for respiratory failure in a patient with Leigh syndrome: a long-term follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Haginoya, Kazuhiro; Miyabayashi, Shigeaki; Kikuchi, Masahiro; Kojima, Akira; Yamamoto, Katsuya; Omura, Kiyoshi; Uematsu, Mitsugu; Hino-Fukuyo, Naomi; Tanaka, Soichiro; Tsuchiya, Shigeru

    2009-03-15

    Respiratory failure can be the direct cause of death in patients with Leigh syndrome. Unfortunately, no effective treatment strategy is available. Here, we report successful treatment of a patient with Leigh syndrome using idebenone, a derivative of coenzyme Q-10. The patient's brainstem function, especially respiratory function, improved after idebenone treatment. Idebenone may be worth trying in patients with Leigh syndrome. PMID:19101701

  6. Leptospirosis: an ignored cause of acute renal failure in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Yang, C W; Pan, M J; Wu, M S; Chen, Y M; Tsen, Y T; Lin, C L; Wu, C H; Huang, C C

    1997-12-01

    Leptospirosis, caused by a spirochete, is the most common zoonosis in domestic or wild animals. Animals excrete infected urine in soil or water and may cause human infections through abrased wound, mucosa, conjunctiva, or by swallowing contaminated water. Clinical presentations of leptospirosis are mostly subclinical. Five to ten percent of leptospirosis are fatal, causing fever, hemorrhage, jaundice, and acute renal failure (Weil's syndrome). Leptospirosis has been ignored as a cause of acute renal failure in Taiwan. We report two patients with leptospirosis who presented with high fever, abdominal pain, jaundice, and acute renal failure. Patient 1 died on day 12 of admission of multiple organ failure associated with pancytopenia, hypogammaglobulinemia, and reactive hemophagocytosis. Leptospirosis was recognized after death. Patient 2 was admitted with similar presentations 2 weeks later. Penicillin and doxycycline were given early in the course, and azotemia, jaundice, respiratory failure, and aseptic meningitis gradually improved. Renal biopsy showed interstitial nephritis. Several tubular clearance tests showed proximal tubular defect with severe bicarbonate wasting (FeHCO3- 20.9%) and incomplete type II renal tubular acidosis without affecting the distal nephron. After 80 days of treatment, this patient was discharged with recovery of conscious level and renal function. This is the first leptospirosis patient with detailed tubular functional and morphological studies of the kidney. Diagnosis of leptospirosis was made by microscopic agglutination test (MAT) for antibody to leptospira and by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for leptospira DNA in blood and urine (interrogans serogroup australis in case 1 and Leptospira borgpetersenii serogroup ballum in case 2). Because active surveillance has resulted in 13 cases diagnosed as leptospirosis islandwide thereafter, underestimation and ignorance of leptospirosis as a cause of acute renal failure may occur in Taiwan

  7. Respiratory failure of acute organophosphate and carbamate poisoning.

    PubMed

    Tsao, T C; Juang, Y C; Lan, R S; Shieh, W B; Lee, C H

    1990-09-01

    Respiratory failure (RF) developed in 43 (40.2 percent) of 107 patients with acute organophosphate or carbamate poisoning; 22 (51.2 percent) died. The 64 patients who did not develop RF survived. All cases of RF developed within 96 hours after poisoning: within 24 hours in 35 patients (acute onset) and between 24 and 96 hours in eight patients (subacute onset). Severity of poisoning was the primary determinating factor for RF. Cardiovascular collapse and pneumonia were also associated with RF. In 19 patients with cardiovascular collapse, 17 had acute onset of RF and two had subacute onset. In 28 patients with pneumonia, 17 developed acute onset of RF and eight developed subacute onset. No organophosphorus compound caused RF more frequently than another. The duration of ventilator support for subacute RF was significantly longer than for acute RF (287 +/- 186 vs 115 +/- 103 hours, p = 0.02). The use of pralidoxime did not reduce the incidence of RF. We found that severity of poisoning, cardiovascular collapse, and pneumonia were the predisposing factors to RF. The golden time for treatment of acute organophosphate or carbamate poisoning was the initial 96 hours. No RF occurred after this time. Aggressive treatment and prevention of the above three factors will reduce the incidence of RF, or in other words, reduce the mortality.

  8. Severe febrile respiratory illnesses as a cause of mass critical care.

    PubMed

    Sandrock, Christian E

    2008-01-01

    Febrile respiratory illnesses with respiratory failure are one of the most common reasons for admission to the intensive care unit. Most causes of febrile respiratory illness are bacterial and viral agents of community-acquired pneumonia. However, a small number of rare and highly contagious agents can initially present as febrile respiratory illnesses, which can lead to an epidemic that can greatly impact the health care system. This impact includes sustained mass critical care, with potential scarcity of critical resources (eg, positive-pressure ventilators), spread of disease to health care workers, sustained spread within the community, and extensive morbidity and mortality. The main agents of febrile respiratory illness that would lead to an epidemic include influenza, the coronavirus that causes severe acute respiratory syndrome, smallpox, viral hemorrhagic fever, plague, tularemia, and anthrax. Recognition of these agents occurs largely based on epidemiological clues, and management consists of antibiotics, antivirals, supportive care, and positive-pressure ventilation. Acute respiratory failure and acute respiratory distress syndrome occur with these agents, so a lung-protective (low tidal volume) ventilation strategy is indicated. Additional respiratory care measures, such as nebulized medications, bronchoscopy, humidified oxygen, and airway suctioning, potentiate aerosolization of the virus or bacteria and increase the risk of transmission to health care workers and patients. Thus, appropriate personal protective equipment, including an N95 mask or powered air-purifying respirator, is indicated. A basic understanding of the epidemiology, clinical findings, diagnosis, and treatment of these agents will provide a foundation for early isolation, evaluation, infection control, and public health involvement and response in cases of a febrile respiratory illness that causes respiratory failure. PMID:18173859

  9. Diagnosing vascular causes of renal failure.

    PubMed

    Abuelo, J G

    1995-10-15

    The incidence of renal failure due to vascular diseases is increasing. Two reasons for this are the epidemic of atherosclerotic vascular disease in the aging population and the widespread use of vasoactive drugs that can adversely affect renal function. These vascular causes of renal failure include vasomotor disorders such as that associated with nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, small-vessel diseases such as cholesterol crystal embolization, and large-vessel diseases such as renal artery stenosis. These causes of azotemia are less familiar to physicians than more classic causes, such as acute tubular necrosis, and are less likely to be recognized in their early stages. This article describes the various vascular diseases that impair renal function and outlines the steps necessary to identify them. Although some of these conditions, such as renal artery stenosis, can gradually impair function, the vascular causes of acute renal failure are emphasized in this article. Because the vasculitides primarily cause renal failure through secondary glomerulonephritis, they are mentioned only briefly. Extensive testing is rarely necessary because the cause is usually suspected through syndrome recognition. The diagnosis can then be confirmed by the results of one or two additional tests or by improved renal function after treatment.

  10. Venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in adult respiratory failure

    PubMed Central

    Hsin, Chun-Hsien; Wu, Meng-Yu; Huang, Chung-Chi; Kao, Kuo-Chin; Lin, Pyng-Jing

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Despite a potentially effective therapy for adult respiratory failure, a general agreement on venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VV-ECMO) has not been reached among institutions due to its invasiveness and high resource usage. To establish consensus on the timing of intervention, large ECMO organizations have published the respiratory extracorporeal membrane oxygenation survival prediction (RESP) score and the ECMOnet score, which allow users to predict hospital mortality for candidates with their pre-ECMO presentations. This study was aimed to test the predictive powers of these published scores in a medium-sized cohort enrolling adults treated with VV-ECMO for acute respiratory failure, and develop an institutional prediction model under the framework of the 3 scores if a superior predictive power could be achieved. This retrospective study included 107 adults who received VV-ECMO for severe acute respiratory failure (a PaO2/FiO2 ratio <70 mm Hg) in a tertiary referral center from 2007 to 2015. Essential demographic and clinical data were collected to calculate the RESP score, the ECMOnet score, and the sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score before VV-ECMO. The predictive power of hospital mortality of each score was presented as the area under receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUROC). The multivariate logistic regression was used to develop an institutional prediction model. The surviving to discharge rate was 55% (n = 59). All of the 3 published scores had a real but poor predictive power of hospital mortality in this study. The AUROCs of RESP score, ECMOnet score, and SOFA score were 0.662 (P = 0.004), 0.616 (P = 0.04), and 0.667 (P = 0.003), respectively. An institutional prediction model was established from these score parameters and presented as follows: hospital mortality (Y) = −3.173 + 0.208 × (pre-ECMO SOFA score) + 0.148 × (pre-ECMO mechanical ventilation day) + 1.021

  11. Sedation in Critically Ill Children with Respiratory Failure

    PubMed Central

    Vet, Nienke J.; Kleiber, Niina; Ista, Erwin; de Hoog, Matthijs; de Wildt, Saskia N.

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses the rationale of sedation in respiratory failure, sedation goals, how to assess the need for sedation as well as effectiveness of interventions in critically ill children, with validated observational sedation scales. The drugs and non-pharmacological approaches used for optimal sedation in ventilated children are reviewed, and specifically the rationale for drug selection, including short- and long-term efficacy and safety aspects of the selected drugs. The specific pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic aspects of sedative drugs in the critically ill child and consequences for dosing are presented. Furthermore, we discuss different sedation strategies and their adverse events, such as iatrogenic withdrawal syndrome and delirium. These principles can guide clinicians in the choice of sedative drugs in pediatric respiratory failure.

  12. Sedation in Critically Ill Children with Respiratory Failure

    PubMed Central

    Vet, Nienke J.; Kleiber, Niina; Ista, Erwin; de Hoog, Matthijs; de Wildt, Saskia N.

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses the rationale of sedation in respiratory failure, sedation goals, how to assess the need for sedation as well as effectiveness of interventions in critically ill children, with validated observational sedation scales. The drugs and non-pharmacological approaches used for optimal sedation in ventilated children are reviewed, and specifically the rationale for drug selection, including short- and long-term efficacy and safety aspects of the selected drugs. The specific pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic aspects of sedative drugs in the critically ill child and consequences for dosing are presented. Furthermore, we discuss different sedation strategies and their adverse events, such as iatrogenic withdrawal syndrome and delirium. These principles can guide clinicians in the choice of sedative drugs in pediatric respiratory failure. PMID:27606309

  13. Non-invasive ventilation in acute respiratory failure in children

    PubMed Central

    Abadesso, Clara; Nunes, Pedro; Silvestre, Catarina; Matias, Ester; Loureiro, Helena; Almeida, Helena

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to assess the clinical efficacy of non-invasive ventilation (NIV) in avoiding endotracheal intubation (ETI), to demonstrate clinical and gasometric improvement and to identify predictive risk factors associated with NIV failure. An observational prospective clinical study was carried out. Included Patients with acute respiratory disease (ARD) treated with NIV, from November 2006 to January 2010 in a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU). NIV was used in 151 patients with acute respiratory failure (ARF). Patients were divided in two groups: NIV success and NIV failure, if ETI was required. Mean age was 7.2±20.3 months (median: 1 min: 0,3 max.: 156). Main diagnoses were bronchiolitis in 102 (67.5%), and pneumonia in 44 (29%) patients. There was a significant improvement in respiratory rate (RR), heart rate (HR), pH, and pCO2 at 2, 6, 12 and 24 hours after NIV onset (P<0.05) in both groups. Improvement in pulse oximetric saturation/fraction of inspired oxygen (SpO2/FiO2) was verified at 2, 4, 6, 12 and 24 hours after NIV onset in the success group (P<0.001). In the failure group, significant SpO2/FiO2 improvement was only observed in the first 4 hours. NIV failure occurred in 34 patients (22.5%). Risk factors for NIV failure were apnea, prematurity, pneumonia, and bacterial co-infection (P<0.05). Independent risk factors for NIV failure were apneia (P<0.001; odds ratio 15.8; 95% confidence interval: 3.42–71.4) and pneumonia (P<0.001, odds ratio 31.25; 95% confidence interval: 8.33–111.11). There were no major complications related with NIV. In conclusion this study demonstrates the efficacy of NIV as a form of respiratory support for children and infants with ARF, preventing clinical deterioration and avoiding ETI in most of the patients. Risk factors for failure were related with immaturity and severe infection. PMID:22802994

  14. Chronic sublethal stress causes bee colony failure.

    PubMed

    Bryden, John; Gill, Richard J; Mitton, Robert A A; Raine, Nigel E; Jansen, Vincent A A

    2013-12-01

    Current bee population declines and colony failures are well documented yet poorly understood and no single factor has been identified as a leading cause. The evidence is equivocal and puzzling: for instance, many pathogens and parasites can be found in both failing and surviving colonies and field pesticide exposure is typically sublethal. Here, we investigate how these results can be due to sublethal stress impairing colony function. We mathematically modelled stress on individual bees which impairs colony function and found how positive density dependence can cause multiple dynamic outcomes: some colonies fail while others thrive. We then exposed bumblebee colonies to sublethal levels of a neonicotinoid pesticide. The dynamics of colony failure, which we observed, were most accurately described by our model. We argue that our model can explain the enigmatic aspects of bee colony failures, highlighting an important role for sublethal stress in colony declines.

  15. Chronic sublethal stress causes bee colony failure.

    PubMed

    Bryden, John; Gill, Richard J; Mitton, Robert A A; Raine, Nigel E; Jansen, Vincent A A

    2013-12-01

    Current bee population declines and colony failures are well documented yet poorly understood and no single factor has been identified as a leading cause. The evidence is equivocal and puzzling: for instance, many pathogens and parasites can be found in both failing and surviving colonies and field pesticide exposure is typically sublethal. Here, we investigate how these results can be due to sublethal stress impairing colony function. We mathematically modelled stress on individual bees which impairs colony function and found how positive density dependence can cause multiple dynamic outcomes: some colonies fail while others thrive. We then exposed bumblebee colonies to sublethal levels of a neonicotinoid pesticide. The dynamics of colony failure, which we observed, were most accurately described by our model. We argue that our model can explain the enigmatic aspects of bee colony failures, highlighting an important role for sublethal stress in colony declines. PMID:24112478

  16. Chronic sublethal stress causes bee colony failure

    PubMed Central

    Bryden, John; Gill, Richard J; Mitton, Robert A A; Raine, Nigel E; Jansen, Vincent A A; Hodgson, David

    2013-01-01

    Current bee population declines and colony failures are well documented yet poorly understood and no single factor has been identified as a leading cause. The evidence is equivocal and puzzling: for instance, many pathogens and parasites can be found in both failing and surviving colonies and field pesticide exposure is typically sublethal. Here, we investigate how these results can be due to sublethal stress impairing colony function. We mathematically modelled stress on individual bees which impairs colony function and found how positive density dependence can cause multiple dynamic outcomes: some colonies fail while others thrive. We then exposed bumblebee colonies to sublethal levels of a neonicotinoid pesticide. The dynamics of colony failure, which we observed, were most accurately described by our model. We argue that our model can explain the enigmatic aspects of bee colony failures, highlighting an important role for sublethal stress in colony declines. PMID:24112478

  17. Successful management of acute respiratory failure with noninvasive mechanical ventilation after drowning, in an epileptic-patient

    PubMed Central

    Ruggeri, Paolo; Calcaterra, Salvatore; Bottari, Antonio; Girbino, Giuseppe; Fodale, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Sea drowning is a common cause of accidental death worldwide. Respiratory complications such as acute pulmonary oedema, which is often complicated by acute respiratory distress syndrome, is often seen. Noninvasive ventilation is already widely used as a first approach to treat acute respiratory failure resulting from multiple diseases. We report a case of a 45 year old man with a history of epilepsy, motor and mental handicap who developed acute respiratory failure secondary to sea water drowning after an epileptic crisis. We illustrate successful and rapid management of this case with noninvasive ventilation. We emphasize the advantages and limitations of using noninvasive ventilation to treat acute respiratory failure due to sea water drowning syndrome. PMID:27222793

  18. Successful management of acute respiratory failure with noninvasive mechanical ventilation after drowning, in an epileptic-patient.

    PubMed

    Ruggeri, Paolo; Calcaterra, Salvatore; Bottari, Antonio; Girbino, Giuseppe; Fodale, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Sea drowning is a common cause of accidental death worldwide. Respiratory complications such as acute pulmonary oedema, which is often complicated by acute respiratory distress syndrome, is often seen. Noninvasive ventilation is already widely used as a first approach to treat acute respiratory failure resulting from multiple diseases. We report a case of a 45 year old man with a history of epilepsy, motor and mental handicap who developed acute respiratory failure secondary to sea water drowning after an epileptic crisis. We illustrate successful and rapid management of this case with noninvasive ventilation. We emphasize the advantages and limitations of using noninvasive ventilation to treat acute respiratory failure due to sea water drowning syndrome.

  19. Successful management of acute respiratory failure with noninvasive mechanical ventilation after drowning, in an epileptic-patient.

    PubMed

    Ruggeri, Paolo; Calcaterra, Salvatore; Bottari, Antonio; Girbino, Giuseppe; Fodale, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Sea drowning is a common cause of accidental death worldwide. Respiratory complications such as acute pulmonary oedema, which is often complicated by acute respiratory distress syndrome, is often seen. Noninvasive ventilation is already widely used as a first approach to treat acute respiratory failure resulting from multiple diseases. We report a case of a 45 year old man with a history of epilepsy, motor and mental handicap who developed acute respiratory failure secondary to sea water drowning after an epileptic crisis. We illustrate successful and rapid management of this case with noninvasive ventilation. We emphasize the advantages and limitations of using noninvasive ventilation to treat acute respiratory failure due to sea water drowning syndrome. PMID:27222793

  20. Noninvasive Mechanical Ventilation in Acute Respiratory Failure Patients: A Respiratory Therapist Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Hidalgo, V; Giugliano-Jaramillo, C; Pérez, R; Cerpa, F; Budini, H; Cáceres, D; Gutiérrez, T; Molina, J; Keymer, J; Romero-Dapueto, C

    2015-01-01

    Physiotherapist in Chile and Respiratory Therapist worldwide are the professionals who are experts in respiratory care, in mechanical ventilation (MV), pathophysiology and connection and disconnection criteria. They should be experts in every aspect of the acute respiratory failure and its management, they and are the ones who in medical units are able to resolve doubts about ventilation and the setting of the ventilator. Noninvasive mechanical ventilation should be the first-line of treatment in acute respiratory failure, and the standard of care in severe exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema, and in immunosuppressed patients with high levels of evidence that support the work of physiotherapist. Exist other considerations where most of the time, physicians and other professionals in the critical units do not take into account when checking the patient ventilator synchrony, such as the appropriate patient selection, ventilator selection, mask selection, mode selection, and the selection of a trained team in NIMV. The physiotherapist needs to evaluate bedside; if patients are properly connected to the ventilator and in a synchronously manner. In Chile, since 2004, the physioterapist are included in the guidelines as a professional resource in the ICU organization, with the same skills and obligations as those described in the literature for respiratory therapists. PMID:26312104

  1. Noninvasive Mechanical Ventilation in Acute Respiratory Failure Patients: A Respiratory Therapist Perspective.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, V; Giugliano-Jaramillo, C; Pérez, R; Cerpa, F; Budini, H; Cáceres, D; Gutiérrez, T; Molina, J; Keymer, J; Romero-Dapueto, C

    2015-01-01

    Physiotherapist in Chile and Respiratory Therapist worldwide are the professionals who are experts in respiratory care, in mechanical ventilation (MV), pathophysiology and connection and disconnection criteria. They should be experts in every aspect of the acute respiratory failure and its management, they and are the ones who in medical units are able to resolve doubts about ventilation and the setting of the ventilator. Noninvasive mechanical ventilation should be the first-line of treatment in acute respiratory failure, and the standard of care in severe exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema, and in immunosuppressed patients with high levels of evidence that support the work of physiotherapist. Exist other considerations where most of the time, physicians and other professionals in the critical units do not take into account when checking the patient ventilator synchrony, such as the appropriate patient selection, ventilator selection, mask selection, mode selection, and the selection of a trained team in NIMV. The physiotherapist needs to evaluate bedside; if patients are properly connected to the ventilator and in a synchronously manner. In Chile, since 2004, the physioterapist are included in the guidelines as a professional resource in the ICU organization, with the same skills and obligations as those described in the literature for respiratory therapists.

  2. The role of high flow oxygen therapy in acute respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Masclans, J R; Pérez-Terán, P; Roca, O

    2015-11-01

    Acute respiratory failure represents one of the most common causes of intensive care unit admission and oxygen therapy remains the first-line therapy in the management of these patients. In recent years, high-flow oxygen via nasal cannula has been described as a useful alternative to conventional oxygen therapy in patients with acute respiratory failure. High-flow oxygen via nasal cannula rapidly alleviates symptoms of acute respiratory failure and improves oxygenation by several mechanisms, including dead space washout, reduction in oxygen dilution and inspiratory nasopharyngeal resistance, a moderate positive airway pressure effect that may generate alveolar recruitment and an overall greater tolerance and comfort with the interface and the heated and humidified inspired gases. However, the experience in adults is still limited and there are no clinical guidelines to establish recommendations for their use. This article aims to review the existing evidence on the use of high-flow oxygen via nasal cannula in adults with acute respiratory failure and its possible applications, advantages and limitations.

  3. The role of high flow oxygen therapy in acute respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Masclans, J R; Pérez-Terán, P; Roca, O

    2015-11-01

    Acute respiratory failure represents one of the most common causes of intensive care unit admission and oxygen therapy remains the first-line therapy in the management of these patients. In recent years, high-flow oxygen via nasal cannula has been described as a useful alternative to conventional oxygen therapy in patients with acute respiratory failure. High-flow oxygen via nasal cannula rapidly alleviates symptoms of acute respiratory failure and improves oxygenation by several mechanisms, including dead space washout, reduction in oxygen dilution and inspiratory nasopharyngeal resistance, a moderate positive airway pressure effect that may generate alveolar recruitment and an overall greater tolerance and comfort with the interface and the heated and humidified inspired gases. However, the experience in adults is still limited and there are no clinical guidelines to establish recommendations for their use. This article aims to review the existing evidence on the use of high-flow oxygen via nasal cannula in adults with acute respiratory failure and its possible applications, advantages and limitations. PMID:26429697

  4. Causes of catastrophic failure in complex systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, David A.

    2010-08-01

    Root causes of mission critical failures and major cost and schedule overruns in complex systems and programs are studied through the post-mortem analyses compiled for several examples, including the Hubble Space Telescope, the Challenger and Columbia Shuttle accidents, and the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant accident. The roles of organizational complexity, cognitive biases in decision making, the display of quantitative data, and cost and schedule pressure are all considered. Recommendations for mitigating the risk of similar failures in future programs are also provided.

  5. Always Consider the Possibility of Opioid Induced Respiratory Depression in Patients Presenting with Hypercapnic Respiratory Failure Who Fail to Improve as Expected with Appropriate Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Steynor, Martin; MacDuff, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Hypercapnic respiratory failure is a frequently encountered medical emergency. Two common causes are acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and as a side effect of opioids. The two causes may coexist leading to diagnostic confusion and consequent delay in optimal management. We report a case of what was initially thought to be an exacerbation of COPD. The patient failed to improve with treatment as expected which led to the empirical administration of naloxone resulting in a dramatic reversal of her respiratory failure. The patient was subsequently discovered to be taking regular dihydrocodeine for chronic back pain. PMID:25893118

  6. NIV-Helmet in Severe Hypoxemic Acute Respiratory Failure

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Joana; Nunes, P.; Silvestre, C.; Abadesso, C.; Loureiro, H.; Almeida, H.

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive ventilation (NIV) is a method to be applied in acute respiratory failure, given the possibility of avoiding tracheal intubation and conventional ventilation. A previous healthy 5-month-old boy developed low-grade intermittent fever, flu-like symptoms, and dry cough for 3 days. On admission, he showed severe respiratory distress with SpO2/FiO2 ratio of 94. Subsequent evaluation identified an RSV infection complicated with an increase of inflammatory parameters (reactive C protein 15 mg/dL). Within the first hour after NIV-helmet CPAP SpO2/FiO2 ratio increased to 157. This sustained improvement allowed the continuing of this strategy. After 102 h, he was disconnected from the helmet CPAP device. The NIV use in severe hypoxemic acute respiratory failure should be carefully monitored as the absence of clinical improvement has a predictive value in the need to resume to intubation and mechanical ventilation. We emphasize that SpO2/FiO2 ratio is a valuable monitoring instrument. Helmet interface use represents a more comfortable alternative for providing ventilatory support, particularly to small infants, which constitute a sensitive group within pediatric patients. PMID:26000189

  7. Pyrotechnic system failures: Causes and prevention

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, Laurence J.

    1988-01-01

    Although pyrotechnics have successfully accomplished many critical mechanical spacecraft functions, such as ignition, severance, jettisoning and valving (excluding propulsion), failures continue to occur. Provided is a listing of 84 failures of pyrotechnic hardware with completed design over a 23-year period, compiled informally by experts from every NASA Center, as well as the Air Force Space Division and the Naval Surface Warfare Center. Analyses are presented as to when and where these failures occurred, their technical source or cause, followed by the reasons why and how these kinds of failures persist. The major contributor is a fundamental lack of understanding of the functional mechanisms of pyrotechnic devices and systems, followed by not recognizing pyrotechnics as an engineering technology, insufficient manpower with hands-on experience, too few test facilities, and inadequate guidelines and specifications for design, development, qualification and acceptance. Recommendations are made on both a managerial and technical basis to prevent failures, increase reliability, improve existing and future designs, and develop the technology to meet future requirements.

  8. Cuirass respirator treatment of chronic respiratory failure in scoliotic patients.

    PubMed Central

    Wiers, P W; Le Coultre, R; Dallinga, O T; van Dijl, W; Meinesz, A F; Sluiter, H J

    1977-01-01

    The results are reported of domiciliary cuirass respirator treatment, using tailor-made shells, in four patients with severe thoracic scoliosis. Three of the patients had suffered from poliomyelitis. All complained of increasing dyspnoea on exertion, ultimately interfering with almost every activity of daily life; three patients had severe acute respiratory failure necessitating urgent admission to the Respiratory Care Unit. Right heart failure was present in two. Two patients required mechanical treatment via an endotracheal tube. All the patients were discharged home with a cuirass respirator. Standard type shells were used initially with low efficiency due to the poor fit of the cuirass shell to the deformed thoracic cage. Tailor-made shells were constructed from polyester reinforced with glass fibre, modelled on plaster casts of the thoracic cage. Subjectively the patients improved greatly and were able to resume and increase many activities. One patient committed suicide for reasons unconnected with treatment but the other three patients have been doing well from the time the cuirass respirator treatment was started, respectively, 3, 6, and 10 years ago. This treatment seems particularly effective in younger patients with severe paralytic scoliosis and cardiorespiratory failure, although the possibility of using it in older patients suffering from scoliosis of other aetiology should certainly be explored. Images PMID:266763

  9. Cuirass respirator treatment of chronic respiratory failure in scoliotic patients.

    PubMed

    Wiers, P W; Le Coultre, R; Dallinga, O T; van Dijl, W; Meinesz, A F; Sluiter, H J

    1977-04-01

    The results are reported of domiciliary cuirass respirator treatment, using tailor-made shells, in four patients with severe thoracic scoliosis. Three of the patients had suffered from poliomyelitis. All complained of increasing dyspnoea on exertion, ultimately interfering with almost every activity of daily life; three patients had severe acute respiratory failure necessitating urgent admission to the Respiratory Care Unit. Right heart failure was present in two. Two patients required mechanical treatment via an endotracheal tube. All the patients were discharged home with a cuirass respirator. Standard type shells were used initially with low efficiency due to the poor fit of the cuirass shell to the deformed thoracic cage. Tailor-made shells were constructed from polyester reinforced with glass fibre, modelled on plaster casts of the thoracic cage. Subjectively the patients improved greatly and were able to resume and increase many activities. One patient committed suicide for reasons unconnected with treatment but the other three patients have been doing well from the time the cuirass respirator treatment was started, respectively, 3, 6, and 10 years ago. This treatment seems particularly effective in younger patients with severe paralytic scoliosis and cardiorespiratory failure, although the possibility of using it in older patients suffering from scoliosis of other aetiology should certainly be explored.

  10. Acute respiratory distress caused by Neosartorya udagawae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We describe the first reported case of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) attributed to Neosartorya infection. The mold grew rapidly in culture of both sputum and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid from a previously healthy 43-year-old woman with ARDS, which developed as the culmination of a...

  11. Shunt failure caused by valve collapse.

    PubMed

    Lundar, T; Langmoen, I A; Hovind, K H

    1991-06-01

    Shunt failure due to collapse of the Mini-Holter valve was observed 13 times in 11 out of 179 children with an implanted Mini-Holter ventriculo-peritoneal (VP) or ventriculo-atrial (VA) shunt during a 10 year period. Intussusception of the proximal or distal end of the valve thus caused a shunt failure rate of 6% of the children in this series. Two children experienced this complication twice. All collapsed valves were part of a VP shunt system. Because of this experience use of the mini valve was abandoned and an adult Holter valve was implanted in children over the age of one month. Breakdown of this particular valve has not occurred in 102 children and two hundred adults with the adult Holter shunt system.

  12. Causes of hatching failure in endangered birds

    PubMed Central

    Hemmings, N.; West, M.; Birkhead, T. R.

    2012-01-01

    About 10 per cent of birds' eggs fail to hatch, but the incidence of failure can be much higher in endangered species. Most studies fail to distinguish between infertility (due to a lack of sperm) and embryo mortality as the cause of hatching failure, yet doing so is crucial in order to understand the underlying problem. Using newly validated techniques to visualize sperm and embryonic tissue, we assessed the fertility status of unhatched eggs of five endangered species, including both wild and captive birds. All eggs were classified as ‘infertile’ when collected, but most were actually fertile with numerous sperm on the ovum. Eggs of captive birds had fewer sperm and were more likely to be infertile than those of wild birds. Our findings raise important questions regarding the management of captive breeding programmes. PMID:22977070

  13. Noninvasive ventilation in acute respiratory failure from respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis

    PubMed Central

    Nizarali, Zahara; Cabral, Marta; Silvestre, Catarina; Abadesso, Clara; Nunes, Pedro; Loureiro, Helena; Almeida, Helena

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The present study focused on respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis with respiratory failure. The aim of the study was to determine whether noninvasive ventilation reduces the need for endotracheal intubation or slows the clinical progression of acute respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis by reducing the incidence of infectious complications. Methods The present study was a retrospective cohort study. Cohort A was comprised of children who were admitted to the pediatric intensive and special care unit from 2003-2005 before starting noninvasive ventilation; cohort B was comprised of children who were admitted to the pediatric intensive and special care unit from 2006-2008 after starting noninvasive ventilation. With the exception of noninvasive ventilation, the therapeutic support was the same for the two groups. All children who were diagnosed with respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis and respiratory failure between November 2003 and March 2008 were included in the cohort. Demographic, clinical and blood gas variables were analyzed. Results A total of 162 children were included; 75% of the subjects were less than 3 months old. Group A included 64 children, and group B included 98 children. In group B, 34 of the children required noninvasive ventilation. The distributions of the variables age, preterm birth, congenital heart disease, cerebral palsy and chronic lung disease were similar between the two groups. On admission, the data for blood gas analysis and the number of apneas were not significantly different between the groups. In group B, fewer children required invasive ventilation (group A: 12/64 versus group B: 7/98; p=0.02), and there was a reduction in the number of cases of bacterial pneumonia (group A: 19/64 versus group B: 12/98; p=0.008). There was no record of mortality in either of the groups. Conclusion By comparing children with the same disease both before and after noninvasive ventilation was used for ventilation support, we

  14. Emergency treatment and nursing of children with severe pneumonia complicated by heart failure and respiratory failure: 10 case reports

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wanli; An, Xinjiang; Fu, Mingyu; Li, Chunli

    2016-01-01

    Pneumonia refers to lung inflammation caused by different pathogens or other factors, and is a common pediatric disease occurring in infants and young children. It is closely related to the anatomical and physiological characteristics of infants and young children and is more frequent during winter and spring, or sudden changes in temperature. Pneumonia is a serious disease that poses a threat to children's health and its morbidity and mortality rank first, accounting for 24.5–65.2% of pediatric inpatients. Due to juvenile age, severe illness and rapid changes, children often suffer acute heart failure, respiratory failure and even toxic encephalopathy at the same time. The concurrence in different stages of the process of emergency treatment tends to relapse, which directly places the lives of these children at risk. Severe pneumonia constitutes one of the main causes of infant mortality. In the process of nursing children with severe pneumonia, intensive care was provided, including condition assessment and diagnosis, close observation of disease, keeping the airway unblocked, rational oxygen therapy, prevention and treatment of respiratory and circulatory failure, support of vital organs, complications, and health education. The inflammatory response was proactively controlled, to prevent suffocation and reduce mortality. In summary, positive and effective nursing can promote the rehabilitation of children patients, which can be reinforced with adequate communication with the parents and/or caretakers. PMID:27698703

  15. Emergency treatment and nursing of children with severe pneumonia complicated by heart failure and respiratory failure: 10 case reports

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wanli; An, Xinjiang; Fu, Mingyu; Li, Chunli

    2016-01-01

    Pneumonia refers to lung inflammation caused by different pathogens or other factors, and is a common pediatric disease occurring in infants and young children. It is closely related to the anatomical and physiological characteristics of infants and young children and is more frequent during winter and spring, or sudden changes in temperature. Pneumonia is a serious disease that poses a threat to children's health and its morbidity and mortality rank first, accounting for 24.5–65.2% of pediatric inpatients. Due to juvenile age, severe illness and rapid changes, children often suffer acute heart failure, respiratory failure and even toxic encephalopathy at the same time. The concurrence in different stages of the process of emergency treatment tends to relapse, which directly places the lives of these children at risk. Severe pneumonia constitutes one of the main causes of infant mortality. In the process of nursing children with severe pneumonia, intensive care was provided, including condition assessment and diagnosis, close observation of disease, keeping the airway unblocked, rational oxygen therapy, prevention and treatment of respiratory and circulatory failure, support of vital organs, complications, and health education. The inflammatory response was proactively controlled, to prevent suffocation and reduce mortality. In summary, positive and effective nursing can promote the rehabilitation of children patients, which can be reinforced with adequate communication with the parents and/or caretakers.

  16. Vocal Cord Paralysis and Hypercapnic Respiratory Failure in a Patient with Familial Amyloidotic Polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Pıhtılı, Aylin; Bingol, Züleyha; Durmuş, Hacer; Parman, Yeşim; Kıyan, Esen

    2016-01-01

    We herein report a patient case with familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy (FAP) who presented with vocal cord paralysis (VCP). A 60-year-old man with FAP (Gly89Gln) presented with hoarseness and snoring for the previous two years. A chest X-ray demonstrated cardiomegaly and bilateral diaphragmatic elevation. The findings of a restrictive pattern on spirometry and daytime hypercapnia were consistent with respiratory muscle weakness related to neuropathy [forced expiratory volume (FEV1): 38%, forced vital capacity (FVC): 39%, FEV1/FVC: 77, partial pressure of arterial oxygen (PaO2): 80 mmHg, partial pressure of carbon dioxide in arterial blood (PaCO2): 52 mmHg]. An ear-nose-throat examination showed VCP. Polysomnography revealed severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). FAP may cause OSA by VCP and hypercapnic respiratory failure by respiratory muscle weakness. Therefore, an ear-nose-throat examination, spirometry, arterial blood gases analysis and polysomnography are important for these patients.

  17. [Assessment of chronic glucose metabolism disorders coexisting with respiratory failure in non-critical ill patients hospitalized with lower respiratory tract infections].

    PubMed

    Sobocińska, Magdalena Barbara; Loba, Jerzy

    2015-01-01

    Lungs are the target organ in chronic hyperglycemia, but its large reserves causes a subclinical course of these changes. Given the results of other researchers indicating reduced active surface of gas exchange and pulmonary capillary damage, it can be assumed that diabetes and other hyperglycemic states diminish these reserves and impair effectiveness of respiratory gas exchange during pneumonia. So it is plausible to observe coexistence of glucose metabolism disorders and respiratory failure in patients hospitalized with lower respiratory tract infection. An observational study was conducted on 130 patients hospitalized with bacteriologically confirmed pneumonia. 63 patients suffering from chronic glucose metabolism disorders (A) and 67 randomly selected patients in control group (B) were observed on laboratory and clinical findings. There was no significant difference in prevalence of acute respiratory failure, although in the study group a slightly greater number of patients diagnosed with acute respiratory failure was observed. There was a significantly greater number of patients with previously confirmed chronic respiratory failure using long-term oxygen theraphy in A group (p = 0.029). The B patients with average blood glucose level > 108 mg/dl had significantly lower partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2)(gIc ≤ 108: 58.6 +/- 9.8; glc > 108: 51.7 +/- 11.1; p = 0.042). There was a statistically significant negative correlation of the average blood glucose level and PaO2 in the control group (p = 0.0152) and a significant inverse association between the average blood glucose level and the partial pressure of oxygen in patients without COPD belonging to the control group (p = 0.049). Respiratory failure is frequent in patients hospitalized with pneumonia. In patients without chronic glucose metabolism disorders with blood glucose level rising the oxygen tension decreases The association is stronger in patients without COPD.

  18. Chronic respiratory failure in patients with neuromuscular diseases: diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Paschoal, Ilma Aparecida; Villalba, Wander de Oliveira; Pereira, Mônica Corso

    2007-01-01

    Neuromuscular diseases affect alveolar air exchange and therefore cause chronic respiratory failure. The onset of respiratory failure can be acute, as in traumas, or progressive (slow or rapid), as in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, muscular dystrophies, diseases of the myoneural junction, etc. Respiratory muscle impairment also affects cough efficiency and, according to the current knowledge regarding the type of treatment available in Brazil to these patients, it can be said that the high rates of morbidity and mortality in these individuals are more often related to the fact that they cough inefficiently rather than to the fact that they ventilate poorly. In this review, with the objective of presenting the options of devices available to support and substitute for natural ventilation in patients with neuromuscular diseases, we have compiled a brief history of the evolution of orthopedic braces and prostheses used to aid respiration since the end of the 19th century. In addition, we highlight the elements that are fundamental to the diagnosis of alveolar hypoventilation and of failure of the protective cough mechanism: taking of a clinical history; determination of peak cough flow; measurement of maximal inspiratory and expiratory pressures; spirometry in two positions (sitting and supine); pulse oximetry; capnography; and polysomnography. Furthermore, the threshold values available in the literature for the use of nocturnal ventilatory support and for the extension of this support through the daytime period are presented. Moreover, the maneuvers used to increase cough efficiency, as well as the proper timing of their introduction, are discussed.

  19. Metallic stent and flexible bronchoscopy without fluoroscopy for acute respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Lin, S-M; Lin, T-Y; Chou, C-L; Chen, H-C; Liu, C-Y; Wang, C-H; Lin, H-C; Yu, C-T; Lee, K-Y; Kuo, H-P

    2008-05-01

    Stent implantation has been reported to facilitate liberation from mechanical ventilation in patients with respiratory failure due to central airway disease. The present retrospective cohort study sought to evaluate the risk and benefit of stent implantation via bronchoscopy without fluoroscopic guidance in mechanically ventilated patients. From July 2001 to September 2006, 26 patients with acute respiratory failure were recruited. A bronchoscope was inserted through a mouth guard into the space between the tracheal wall and the endotracheal tube. A guide wire was inserted via the flexible bronchoscope to the lesion site. The bronchoscope was reintroduced through the endotracheal tube. Under bronchoscopic visualisation, the delivery catheter was advanced over the guide wire to deploy the stent. These procedures were successfully performed in 26 patients, with 22 stents placed in the trachea and seven in the main bronchus. Of the 26 patients, 14 (53.8%) became ventilator independent during their stay in the intensive care unit. Severe pneumonia was the most common cause, in seven (58.3%) out of 12 patients, for continued ventilator dependence after stenting. Granulation tissue formation was found in seven patients during the follow-up period. It is concluded that metallic stents can be safely implanted without fluoroscopic guidance in patients with respiratory failure, to facilitate ventilator independence.

  20. Radiation necrosis causing failure of automatic ventilation during sleep with central sleep apnea

    SciTech Connect

    Udwadia, Z.F.; Athale, S.; Misra, V.P.; Wadia, N.H.

    1987-09-01

    A patient operated upon for a midline cerebellar hemangioblastoma developed failure of automatic respiration during sleep, together with central sleep apnea syndrome, approximately two years after receiving radiation therapy to the brain. Clinical and CT scan findings were compatible with a diagnosis of radiation necrosis as the cause of his abnormal respiratory control.

  1. Physiological Correlation of Airway Pressure and Transpulmonary Pressure Stress Index on Respiratory Mechanics in Acute Respiratory Failure

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Chun; Chen, Lu; Zhang, Yun-Hang; Liu, Wei; Urbino, Rosario; Ranieri, V Marco; Qiu, Hai-Bo; Yang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Stress index at post-recruitment maneuvers could be a method of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) titration in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) patients. However, airway pressure (Paw) stress index may not reflect lung mechanics in the patients with high chest wall elastance. This study was to evaluate the Paw stress index on lung mechanics and the correlation between Paw stress index and transpulmonary pressure (PL) stress index in acute respiratory failure (ARF) patients. Methods: Twenty-four ARF patients with mechanical ventilation (MV) were consecutively recruited from July 2011 to April 2013 in Zhongda Hospital, Nanjing, China and Ospedale S. Giovanni Battista-Molinette Hospital, Turin, Italy. All patients underwent MV with volume control (tidal volume 6 ml/kg) for 20 min. PEEP was set according to the ARDSnet study protocol. The patients were divided into two groups according to the chest wall elastance/respiratory system elastance ratio. The high elastance group (H group, n = 14) had a ratio ≥30%, and the low elastance group (L group, n = 10) had a ratio <30%. Respiratory elastance, gas-exchange, Paw stress index, and PL stress index were measured. Student's t-test, regression analysis, and Bland–Altman analysis were used for statistical analysis. Results: Pneumonia was the major cause of respiratory failure (71.0%). Compared with the L group, PEEP was lower in the H group (5.7 ± 1.7 cmH2O vs. 9.0 ± 2.3 cmH2O, P < 0.01). Compared with the H group, lung elastance was higher (20.0 ± 7.8 cmH2O/L vs. 11.6 ± 3.6 cmH2O/L, P < 0.01), and stress was higher in the L group (7.0 ± 1.9 vs. 4.9 ± 1.9, P = 0.02). A linear relationship was observed between the Paw stress index and the PL stress index in H group (R2= 0.56, P < 0.01) and L group (R2= 0.85, P < 0.01). Conclusion: In the ARF patients with MV, Paw stress index can substitute for PL to guide ventilator settings. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02196870 (https

  2. The use of noninvasive ventilation in acute respiratory failure associated with oral contrast aspiration pneumonitis.

    PubMed

    Keddissi, J I; Metcalf, J P

    2000-05-01

    Noninvasive ventilation (NIV) has been used to treat patients with acute respiratory failure, including cases of pneumonia. We used this technique in the management of an 83-year-old patient with acute respiratory failure secondary to inadvertent administration of oral contrast material into the lung, and who did not want to be intubated. NIV resulted in immediate improvement of respiratory status. The patient was weaned from NIV over the next 24 hours and eventually discharged from the hospital.

  3. [Acute renal failure caused by phenazopyridine].

    PubMed

    Vega, Jorge

    2003-05-01

    A 27 years old woman was admitted due to abdominal cramps, jaundice and oligoanuria, starting 48 hours after eating Chinese food. Hepatic biochemical tests, abdominal ultrasound and retrograde pyelography were normal. The urine was intensely orange colored and microscopic analysis was normal. The serum creatinine and urea nitrogen on admission were 4.59 and 42.5 mg/dl and rose to 13.5 and 72.4 mg/dl, respectively, at the 6th hospital day. Oliguria lasted only 48 hours. Dialysis was not used, since the patient was in good general condition and uremic symptoms were absent. On the 7th day, azotemia began to subside and at the 14th day, serum creatinine was 1.0 mg/dl. Before hospital discharge, she confessed the ingestion of 2.000 mg of phenazopyridine, during a nervous breakdown, aiming to sleep deeply. Remarkable was the persistence of the orange color of her urine during several days and the dissociation between the rate of increase of serum creatinine with respect to urea nitrogen. This is an unusual case of acute renal failure caused by an overdose of a drug, commonly prescribed for urinary tract infections.

  4. Respirator management of sepsis-related respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Chiumello, Davide; Cressoni, Massimo

    2009-09-01

    The first description of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in adults appeared in 1967 and was characterized by dyspnea, hypoxemia, diffuse alveolar infiltrates, and reduced respiratory system compliance. ARDS and acute lung injury (ALI) syndrome have no specific treatment, only supportive care: treating the underlying cause, when possible, and using mechanical ventilation. Historically, mechanical ventilation applied normal/large tidal volumes and low levels of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP). Experimental data showed that a high-volume, high-pressure ventilation strategy may lead to lung lesions indistinguishable from ARDS. Subsequent randomized clinical trials showed improved survival using low tidal volumes (6 vs 12 mL/kg ideal body weight) and limiting plateau pressure to 30 cm H(2)O, although the optimal level of PEEP remains controversial. Prone positioning should be reserved for severely ill patients. Inhaled nitric oxide, which is a pulmonary vasodilator with anti-inflammatory properties, is associated with limited improvement in oxygenation without improvement in survival.

  5. Cardiac involvement in hereditary myopathy with early respiratory failure

    PubMed Central

    Steele, Hannah E.; Harris, Elizabeth; Barresi, Rita; Marsh, Julie; Beattie, Anna; Bourke, John P.; Straub, Volker

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess whether hereditary myopathy with early respiratory failure (HMERF) due to the c.951434T>C; (p.Cys31712Arg) TTN missense mutation also includes a cardiac phenotype. Method: Clinical cohort study of our HMERF cohort using ECG, 2D echocardiogram, and cross-sectional cardiac imaging with MRI or CT. Results: We studied 22 participants with the c.951434T>C; (p.Cys31712Arg) TTN missense mutation. Three were deceased. Cardiac conduction abnormalities were identified in 7/22 (32%): sustained atrioventricular tachycardia (n = 2), atrial fibrillation (n = 2), nonsustained atrial tachycardia (n = 1), premature supraventricular complexes (n = 1), and unexplained sinus bradycardia (n = 1). In addition, 4/22 (18%) had imaging evidence of otherwise unexplained cardiomyopathy. These findings are supported by histopathologic correlation suggestive of myocardial cytoskeletal remodeling. Conclusions: Coexisting cardiac and skeletal muscle involvement is not uncommon in patients with HMERF arising due to the c.951434T>C; (p.Cys31712Arg) TTN mutation. All patients with pathogenic or putative pathogenic TTN mutations should be offered periodic cardiac surveillance. PMID:27511179

  6. Severe hypoxemic respiratory failure: part 2--nonventilatory strategies.

    PubMed

    Raoof, Suhail; Goulet, Keith; Esan, Adebayo; Hess, Dean R; Sessler, Curtis N

    2010-06-01

    ARDS is characterized by hypoxemic respiratory failure, which can be refractory and life-threatening. Modifications to traditional mechanical ventilation and nontraditional modes of ventilation are discussed in Part 1 of this two-part series. In this second article, we examine nonventilatory strategies that can influence oxygenation, with particular emphasis on their role in rescue from severe hypoxemia. A literature search was conducted and a narrative review written to summarize the use of adjunctive, nonventilatory interventions intended to improve oxygenation in ARDS. Several adjunctive interventions have been demonstrated to rapidly ameliorate severe hypoxemia in many patients with severe ARDS and therefore may be suitable as rescue therapy for hypoxemia that is refractory to prior optimization of mechanical ventilation. These include neuromuscular blockade, inhaled vasoactive agents, prone positioning, and extracorporeal life support. Although these interventions have been linked to physiologic improvement, including relief from severe hypoxemia, and some are associated with outcome benefits, such as shorter duration of mechanical ventilation, demonstration of survival benefit has been rare in clinical trials. Furthermore, some of these nonventilatory interventions carry additional risks and/or high cost; thus, when used as rescue therapy for hypoxemia, it is important that they be demonstrated to yield clinically significant improvement in gas exchange, which should be periodically reassessed. Additionally, various management strategies can produce a more gradual improvement in oxygenation in ARDS, such as conservative fluid management, intravenous corticosteroids, and nutritional modification. Although improvement in oxygenation has been reported with such strategies, demonstration of additional beneficial outcomes, such as reduced duration of mechanical ventilation or ICU length of stay, or improved survival in randomized controlled trials, as well as

  7. Bench-to-bedside review: weaning failure--should we rest the respiratory muscles with controlled mechanical ventilation?

    PubMed

    Vassilakopoulos, Theodoros; Zakynthinos, Spyros; Roussos, Charis

    2006-02-01

    The use of controlled mechanical ventilation (CMV) in patients who experience weaning failure after a spontaneous breathing trial or after extubation is a strategy based on the premise that respiratory muscle fatigue (requiring rest to recover) is the cause of weaning failure. Recent evidence, however, does not support the existence of low frequency fatigue (the type of fatigue that is long-lasting) in patients who fail to wean despite the excessive respiratory muscle load. This is because physicians have adopted criteria for the definition of spontaneous breathing trial failure and thus termination of unassisted breathing, which lead them to put patients back on the ventilator before the development of low frequency respiratory muscle fatigue. Thus, no reason exists to completely unload the respiratory muscles with CMV for low frequency fatigue reversal if weaning is terminated based on widely accepted predefined criteria. This is important, since experimental evidence suggests that CMV can induce dysfunction of the diaphragm, resulting in decreased diaphragmatic force generating capacity, which has been called ventilator-induced diaphragmatic dysfunction (VIDD). The mechanisms of VIDD are not fully elucidated, but include muscle atrophy, oxidative stress and structural injury. Partial modes of ventilatory support should be used whenever possible, since these modes attenuate the deleterious effects of mechanical ventilation on respiratory muscles. When CMV is used, concurrent administration of antioxidants (which decrease oxidative stress and thus attenuate VIDD) seems justified, since antioxidants may be beneficial (and are certainly not harmful) in critical care patients.

  8. Postmortem diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction in patients with acute respiratory failure - demographics, etiologic and pulmonary histologic analysis

    PubMed Central

    de Matos Soeiro, Alexandre; Ruppert, Aline D; Canzian, Mauro; Capelozzi, Vera L; Serrano, Carlos V

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Acute respiratory failure is present in 5% of patients with acute myocardial infarction and is responsible for 20% to 30% of the fatal post-acute myocardial infarction. The role of inflammation associated with pulmonary edema as a cause of acute respiratory failure post-acute myocardial infarction remains to be determined. We aimed to describe the demographics, etiologic data and histological pulmonary findings obtained through autopsies of patients who died during the period from 1990 to 2008 due to acute respiratory failure with no diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction during life. METHODS: This study considers 4,223 autopsies of patients who died of acute respiratory failure that was not preceded by any particular diagnosis while they were alive. The diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction was given in 218 (4.63%) patients. The age, sex and major associated diseases were recorded for each patient. Pulmonary histopathology was categorized as follows: diffuse alveolar damage, pulmonary edema, alveolar hemorrhage and lymphoplasmacytic interstitial pneumonia. The odds ratio of acute myocardial infarction associated with specific histopathology was determined by logistic regression. RESULTS: In total, 147 men were included in the study. The mean age at the time of death was 64 years. Pulmonary histopathology revealed pulmonary edema as well as the presence of diffuse alveolar damage in 72.9% of patients. Bacterial bronchopneumonia was present in 11.9% of patients, systemic arterial hypertension in 10.1% and dilated cardiomyopathy in 6.9%. A multivariate analysis demonstrated a significant positive association between acute myocardial infarction with diffuse alveolar damage and pulmonary edema. CONCLUSIONS: For the first time, we demonstrated that in autopsies of patients with acute respiratory failure as the cause of death, 5% were diagnosed with acute myocardial infarction. Pulmonary histology revealed a significant inflammatory response, which has

  9. Respiratory muscle function and exercise intolerance in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Jorge P; Chiappa, Gaspar R; Neder, J Alberto; Frankenstein, Lutz

    2009-06-01

    Inspiratory muscle weakness (IMW) is prevalent in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) caused by left ventricular systolic dysfunction, which contributes to reduced exercise capacity and the presence of dyspnea during daily activities. Inspiratory muscle strength (estimated by maximal inspiratory pressure) has independent prognostic value in CHF. Overall, the results of trials with inspiratory muscle training (IMT) indicate that this intervention improves exercise capacity and quality of life, particularly in patients with CHF and IMW. Some benefit from IMT may be accounted for by the attenuation of the inspiratory muscle metaboreflex. Moreover, IMT results in improved cardiovascular responses to exercise and to those obtained with standard aerobic training. These findings suggest that routine screening for IMW is advisable in patients with CHF, and specific IMT and/or aerobic training are of practical value in the management of these patients. PMID:19486593

  10. Respiratory muscle function and exercise intolerance in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Jorge P; Chiappa, Gaspar R; Neder, J Alberto; Frankenstein, Lutz

    2009-06-01

    Inspiratory muscle weakness (IMW) is prevalent in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) caused by left ventricular systolic dysfunction, which contributes to reduced exercise capacity and the presence of dyspnea during daily activities. Inspiratory muscle strength (estimated by maximal inspiratory pressure) has independent prognostic value in CHF. Overall, the results of trials with inspiratory muscle training (IMT) indicate that this intervention improves exercise capacity and quality of life, particularly in patients with CHF and IMW. Some benefit from IMT may be accounted for by the attenuation of the inspiratory muscle metaboreflex. Moreover, IMT results in improved cardiovascular responses to exercise and to those obtained with standard aerobic training. These findings suggest that routine screening for IMW is advisable in patients with CHF, and specific IMT and/or aerobic training are of practical value in the management of these patients.

  11. Vocal Cord Paralysis and Hypercapnic Respiratory Failure in a Patient with Familial Amyloidotic Polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Pıhtılı, Aylin; Bingol, Züleyha; Durmuş, Hacer; Parman, Yeşim; Kıyan, Esen

    2016-01-01

    We herein report a patient case with familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy (FAP) who presented with vocal cord paralysis (VCP). A 60-year-old man with FAP (Gly89Gln) presented with hoarseness and snoring for the previous two years. A chest X-ray demonstrated cardiomegaly and bilateral diaphragmatic elevation. The findings of a restrictive pattern on spirometry and daytime hypercapnia were consistent with respiratory muscle weakness related to neuropathy [forced expiratory volume (FEV1): 38%, forced vital capacity (FVC): 39%, FEV1/FVC: 77, partial pressure of arterial oxygen (PaO2): 80 mmHg, partial pressure of carbon dioxide in arterial blood (PaCO2): 52 mmHg]. An ear-nose-throat examination showed VCP. Polysomnography revealed severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). FAP may cause OSA by VCP and hypercapnic respiratory failure by respiratory muscle weakness. Therefore, an ear-nose-throat examination, spirometry, arterial blood gases analysis and polysomnography are important for these patients. PMID:27374684

  12. Efficacy of emergent percutaneous cardiopulmonary support in cardiac or respiratory failure: fight or flight?

    PubMed

    Shinn, Sung Ho; Lee, Young Tak; Sung, Kiick; Min, Sunkyung; Kim, Wook Sung; Park, Pyo Won; Ha, Yi-Kyung

    2009-08-01

    We retrospectively evaluated early outcome and conducted this study to determine the predictive factors for percutaneous cardiopulmonary support (PCPS) weaning and hospital discharge. From January 2004 to December 2006, 92 patients diagnosed as cardiac or respiratory failure underwent PCPS using the Capiox emergent bypass system (Terumo, Tokyo, Japan). The mean+/-S.D. age was 56+/-18 (range, 14-85) years and 59 (64%) were male. The mean duration of PCPS was 90.9+/-126.0 h and that of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was 51.1+/-27.8 min. The rate of weaning was 59/92 (64%) and the rate of survival to discharge was 39/92 (42%). The results indicated that the etiologic disease (myocarditis) and the cause of PCPS (cardiopulmonary arrest) are significantly correlated with weaning, whereas cardiopulmonary arrest and a shorter CPR duration (<60 min) are considerably correlated with survival. On the contrary, elderly patients (>75 years) have similar rates of weaning and survival compared with younger patients. PCPS provides an acceptable survival rate and outcome in patients with cardiac or respiratory failure. Prompt application and selection of patients with a specific disease (myocarditis) provides good results. It is also effective in elderly patients, providing hospital survival similar to that for younger patients.

  13. Telemedicine system for the care of patients with neuromuscular disease and chronic respiratory failure

    PubMed Central

    Morete, Emilio; González, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Neuromuscular diseases cause a number of limitations which may be improved by using a telemedicine system. These include functional impairment and dependence associated with muscle weakness, the insidious development of respiratory failure and episodes of exacerbation. Material and methods The present study involved three patients with severe neuromuscular disease, chronic respiratory failure and long-term mechanical ventilation, who were followed up using a telemedicine platform. The telemedicine system is based on videoconferencing and telemonitoring of cardiorespiratory variables (oxygen saturation, heart rate, blood pressure and electrocardiogram). Two different protocols were followed depending on whether the patient condition was stable or unstable. Results Over a period of 5 years, we analyzed a series of variables including use of the system, patient satisfaction and clinical impact. Overall we performed 290 videoconference sessions, 269 short monitoring oximetry measurements and 110 blood pressure measurements. With respect to the clinical impact, after enrolment in the telemedicine program, the total number of hospital admissions fell from 18 to 3. Conclusions Our findings indicate that the system was user friendly for patients and care givers. Patient satisfaction scores were acceptable. The telemedicine system was effective for the home treatment of three patients with severe neuromuscular diseases and reduced the need for hospital admissions. PMID:25395959

  14. Common-Cause Failure Analysis in Event Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Dana L. Kelly; Dale M. Rasmuson

    2008-09-01

    This paper describes the approach taken by the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission to the treatment of common-cause failure in probabilistic risk assessment of operational events. The approach is based upon the Basic Parameter Model for common-cause failure, and examples are illustrated using the alpha-factor parameterization, the approach adopted by the NRC in their Standardized Plant Analysis Risk (SPAR) models. The cases of a failed component (with and without shared common-cause failure potential) and a component being unavailable due to preventive maintenance or testing are addressed. The treatment of two related failure modes (e.g., failure to start and failure to run) is a new feature of this paper. These methods are being applied by the NRC in assessing the risk significance of operational events for the Significance Determination Process (SDP) and the Accident Sequence Precursor (ASP) program.

  15. A case of acute respiratory failure in a rheumatoid arthritis patient after the administration of abatacept

    PubMed Central

    Doğu, Birsen; Atilla, Nurhan; Çetin, Gözde Yıldırım; Yılmaz, Nezir; Öksüz, Hafize

    2016-01-01

    Drug-induced pulmonary disease is an important consideration in the differential diagnosis of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) who present with respiratory symptoms. We report a patient with RA who developed acute respiratory failure two weeks after the administration of abatacept. The clinical findings were consistent with drug-induced acute respiratory failure, most likely acute eosinophilic pneumonia. Pulse steroid was administered at 1000 mg/kg/day in the emergency department. Chest X-ray and arterial blood gas values revealed significant improvement on the second day of hospitalization. However, in the second week, the patient’s fever rose up to 40°C, procalcitonin level increased to 15 ng/mL (<0.5 ng/mL is normal), and the patient died because of sepsis in the fourth week. This is the second report of respiratory failure, after the abatacept administration in the literature. We have reported an acute respiratory failure that occurred after use of the biological agent abatacept. With the increasing use of novel immunomodulatory agents, it is important for clinicians and pathologists to add the possibility of a drug reaction to the traditional differentials of acute respiratory failures occurring in these settings. PMID:27733944

  16. Chronic respiratory failure due to toxic epidermal necrosis in a 10 year old girl.

    PubMed

    Thimmesch, M; Gilbert, A; Tuerlinckx, D; Bodart, E

    2015-02-01

    Toxic epidermal necrosis is a severe mucocutaneous disease with a high mortality rate. A third of the patients surviving the acute phase will develop pulmonary complications. The most frequent complication is bronchiolitis obliterans. Despite well-conducted treatment, in most cases, lung injury often leads to chronic respiratory failure. We describe here the case of a young patient that presented a toxic epidermal necrosis at the age of 3 years. Poor therapeutic compliance result in chronic respiratory failure and after 7 years of follow-up, pulmonary transplant remains the only long-term alternative. Close monitoring of respiratory symptoms in the course of toxic epidermal necrosis, intense treatment as soon as they appear and a long-term follow-up are essential to postpone chronic respiratory failure. PMID:25324191

  17. [Effect of aminophylline on respiratory function in patients with chronic renal failure treated by peritoneal dialysis].

    PubMed

    Wanic-Kossowska, M; Chmara, E; Banaszak, F

    1993-01-01

    In 8 patients with chronic renal failure aminophylline influence was studied on respiratory function. No changes were seen in lung volumes after 30 minutes of intravenous aminophylline infusion. After 2 weeks of intraperitoneal infusion of aminophylline, maximal ventilation, vital capacity, forced vital capacity and inspiratory residual volume rose significantly. Residual volume and the ratio residual volume/total lung capacity, decreased. This changes may indicate an improved contractility of the respiratory muscles. A rise in the concentration of oxypurines after peritoneal dialysis and a significant improvement in the arterial oxygen tension indicate that aminophylline influences the respiratory function by bronchodilatation and by contractility improvement of the respiratory muscles. PMID:8479940

  18. Randomized comparison of oxygen mask treatment vs. nasal continuous positive airway pressure in dengue shock syndrome with acute respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Cam, B V; Tuan, D T; Fonsmark, L; Poulsen, A; Tien, N M; Tuan, H M; Heegaard, E D

    2002-12-01

    Dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) is caused by dengue virus. Patients with DHF grade 3-4, termed Dengue Shock Syndrome (DSS), may develop acute respiratory failure after initial fluid resuscitation. Previously, these patients were treated with oxygen on a nasal cannula, or if necessary with tracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation. In the present prospective randomized study, we compared the effectiveness of oxygen treatment administered by a face mask vs. nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP). Morbidity, mortality, and supportive treatment was evaluated. Thirty-seven patients with DSS complicated by respiratory failure were enrolled. On admission and after 30 min of treatment, clinical and paraclinical data were obtained. Chest X-ray revealed pleural effusion in 92 per cent and showed interstitial oedema in 33 per cent. After 30 min of treatment the respiratory rate decreased significantly in the NCPAP group (p < 0.05), while SaO2 and PaO2 increased in both groups (p < 0.01). However, subsequently a significant difference of unresponsiveness to treatment between the oxygen mask group and the NCPAP group (13/19 vs. 4/18,p < 0.01) was noted. Complications of NCPAP or oxygen mask treatment were not documented. We conclude that NCPAP is useful in improving the management of acute respiratory failure in children with DHF/DSS in dengue-endemic areas.

  19. Telomere dysfunction causes alveolar stem cell failure.

    PubMed

    Alder, Jonathan K; Barkauskas, Christina E; Limjunyawong, Nathachit; Stanley, Susan E; Kembou, Frant; Tuder, Rubin M; Hogan, Brigid L M; Mitzner, Wayne; Armanios, Mary

    2015-04-21

    Telomere syndromes have their most common manifestation in lung disease that is recognized as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema. In both conditions, there is loss of alveolar integrity, but the underlying mechanisms are not known. We tested the capacity of alveolar epithelial and stromal cells from mice with short telomeres to support alveolar organoid colony formation and found that type 2 alveolar epithelial cells (AEC2s), the stem cell-containing population, were limiting. When telomere dysfunction was induced in adult AEC2s by conditional deletion of the shelterin component telomeric repeat-binding factor 2, cells survived but remained dormant and showed all the hallmarks of cellular senescence. Telomere dysfunction in AEC2s triggered an immune response, and this was associated with AEC2-derived up-regulation of cytokine signaling pathways that are known to provoke inflammation in the lung. Mice uniformly died after challenge with bleomycin, underscoring an essential role for telomere function in AEC2s for alveolar repair. Our data show that alveoloar progenitor senescence is sufficient to recapitulate the regenerative defects, inflammatory responses, and susceptibility to injury that are characteristic of telomere-mediated lung disease. They suggest alveolar stem cell failure is a driver of telomere-mediated lung disease and that efforts to reverse it may be clinically beneficial. PMID:25840590

  20. The root causes of pharmacodynamic assay failure.

    PubMed

    Ferry-Galow, Katherine V; Makhlouf, Hala R; Wilsker, Deborah F; Lawrence, Scott M; Pfister, Thomas D; Marrero, Allison M; Bigelow, Kristina M; Yutzy, William H; Ji, Jiuping J; Butcher, Donna O; Gouker, Brad A; Kummar, Shivaani; Chen, Alice P; Kinders, Robert J; Parchment, Ralph E; Doroshow, James H

    2016-08-01

    Robust pharmacodynamic assay results are valuable for informing go/no-go decisions about continued development of new anti-cancer agents and for identifying combinations of targeted agents, but often pharmacodynamic results are too incomplete or variable to fulfill this role. Our experience suggests that variable reagent and specimen quality are two major contributors to this problem. Minimizing all potential sources of variability in procedures for specimen collection, processing, and assay measurements is essential for meaningful comparison of pharmacodynamic biomarkers across sample time points. This is especially true in the evaluation of pre- and post-dose tumor biopsies, which suffer from high levels of tumor insufficiency due to variations in biopsy collection techniques and significant specimen heterogeneity within and across patients. Developing methods to assess heterogeneous biopsies is necessary in order to evaluate a majority of tumor biopsies collected for pharmacodynamic biomarker studies. Improved collection devices and standardization of methods are being sought in order to improve the tumor content and quality of tumor biopsies. In terms of reagent variability, we have found that stringent initial reagent qualification and quality control of R&D-grade reagents is critical to minimize lot-to-lot variability and prevent assay failures, especially for clinical pharmacodynamic questions, which often demand assay performance that meets or exceeds clinical diagnostic assay standards. Rigorous reagent specifications and use of appropriate assay quality control methodologies help to ensure consistency between assay runs, laboratories and trials to provide much needed pharmacodynamic insights into the activity of investigational agents. PMID:27663480

  1. Extracorporeal life support for adults with severe acute respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Del Sorbo, Lorenzo; Cypel, Marcelo; Fan, Eddy

    2014-02-01

    Extracorporeal life support (ECLS) is an artificial means of maintaining adequate oxygenation and carbon dioxide elimination to enable injured lungs to recover from underlying disease. Technological advances have made ECLS devices smaller, less invasive, and easier to use. ECLS might, therefore, represent an important step towards improved management and outcomes of patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome. Nevertheless, rigorous evidence of the ability of ECLS to improve short-term and long-term outcomes is needed before it can be widely implemented. Moreover, how to select patients and the timing and indications for ECLS in severe acute respiratory distress syndrome remain unclear. We describe the physiological principles, the putative risks and benefits, and the clinical evidence supporting the use of ECLS in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome. Additionally, we discuss controversies and future directions, such as novel technologies and indications, mechanical ventilation of the native lung during ECLS, and ethics considerations. PMID:24503270

  2. Acute respiratory distress syndrome and acute renal failure from Plasmodium ovale infection with fatal outcome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Plasmodium ovale is one of the causative agents of human malaria. Plasmodium ovale infection has long been thought to be non-fatal. Due to its lower morbidity, P. ovale receives little attention in malaria research. Methods Two Malaysians went to Nigeria for two weeks. After returning to Malaysia, they fell sick and were admitted to different hospitals. Plasmodium ovale parasites were identified from blood smears of these patients. The species identification was further confirmed with nested PCR. One of them was successfully treated with no incident of relapse within 12-month medical follow-up. The other patient came down with malaria-induced respiratory complication during the course of treatment. Although parasites were cleared off the circulation, the patient’s condition worsened. He succumbed to multiple complications including acute respiratory distress syndrome and acute renal failure. Results Sequencing of the malaria parasite DNA from both cases, followed by multiple sequence alignment and phylogenetic tree construction suggested that the causative agent for both malaria cases was P. ovale curtisi. Discussion In this report, the differences between both cases were discussed, and the potential capability of P. ovale in causing severe complications and death as seen in this case report was highlighted. Conclusion Plasmodium ovale is potentially capable of causing severe complications, if not death. Complete travel and clinical history of malaria patient are vital for successful diagnoses and treatment. Monitoring of respiratory and renal function of malaria patients, regardless of the species of malaria parasites involved is crucial during the course of hospital admission. PMID:24180319

  3. Respiratory virus infection as a cause of prolonged symptoms in acute otitis media.

    PubMed

    Arola, M; Ziegler, T; Ruuskanen, O

    1990-05-01

    We studied respiratory viruses in 22 children with acute otitis media who had failed to improve after at least 48 hours of antimicrobial therapy. The mean duration of preenrollment antimicrobial therapy was 4.8 days. For comparison we studied 66 children with newly diagnosed acute otitis media. Respiratory viruses were isolated from middle ear fluid or from the nasopharynx, or both, significantly more often in the patients unresponsive to initial antimicrobial therapy than in the comparison patients (68% vs 41%, p less than 0.05). Viruses were recovered from the middle ear fluid in 32% of the study patients and from 15% of the comparison group. Bacteria were isolated from the middle ear fluid of four (18%) children in the study group; one child had an isolate resistant to initial antimicrobial therapy. All four children with bacteria in the middle ear fluid had evidence of concomitant respiratory virus infection. Our results indicate that respiratory virus infection is often present in patients with acute otitis media unresponsive to initial antimicrobial therapy, and may explain the prolongation of symptoms of infection. Resistant bacteria seem to be a less common cause of failure of the initial treatment.

  4. Acute respiratory failure due to refeeding syndrome and hypophosphatemia induced by hypocaloric enteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Patel, Utpal; Sriram, Krishnan

    2009-03-01

    We report a case of acute respiratory failure due to refeeding syndrome caused by hypocaloric enteral tube feeds. A 60-y-old obese man, with a diagnosis of esophageal carcinoma with local metastases, underwent feeding jejunostomy tube insertion. Enteral tube feeding was initiated at small volumes providing 4.4 kcal x kg(-1) x d(-1) and gradually increased over 48 h to 29 kcal x kg(-1) x d(-1) (based on adjusted body weight). The patient then developed acute respiratory distress requiring intubation and ventilatory support. Serum phosphorus (P) level was extremely low at <0.7 mg/dL. Serum potassium (K) and magnesium (Mg) levels were also low. It took >4 d to adequately correct the electrolyte derangements. Successful liberation from mechanical ventilation was then possible. In chronically malnourished patients undergoing nutritional support, even hypocaloric feeding should be considered a risk factor for developing refeeding syndrome leading to severe and acute electrolyte fluid-balance and metabolic abnormalities.

  5. Coexistence of Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Superior Vena Cava Syndromes Due to Substernal Goitre in a Patient With Respiratory Failure: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Tunc, Mehtap; Sazak, Hilal; Karlilar, Bulent; Ulus, Fatma; Tastepe, Irfan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Substernal goiter may rarely cause superior vena cava syndrome (SVCS) owing to venous compression, and cause acute respiratory failure due to tracheal compression. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) may rarely occur when there is a narrowing of upper airway by edema and vascular congestion resulting from SVCS. Case Presentation: We presented the clinical course and treatment of acute respiratory failure (ARF) developed in a patient with SVCS and OSAS due to substernal goiter. After treatment of ARF with invasive mechanical ventilation, weaning and total thyroidectomy were successfully performed through collar incision and median sternotomy without complications. Conclusions: Our case showed that if the respiratory failure occurred due to substernal goiter and SVCS, we would need to investigate the coexistence of OSAS and SVCS. PMID:26082848

  6. [A case of Ramsey Hunt syndrome with multiple cranial nerve paralysis and acute respiratory failure].

    PubMed

    Sato, K; Nakamura, S; Koseki, T; Yamauchi, F; Baba, M; Mikami, M; Kobayashi, R; Fujikawa, T; Nagaoka, S

    1991-08-01

    The authors report a 56-year-old woman with Ramsey Hunt syndrome with multiple cranial nerve paralysis and acute respiratory failure. Five days before admission, she experienced right otalgia and right facial pain and consulted an otolaryngologist of our hospital, who diagnosed the illness as acute parotitis and laryngopharyngitis. One day before admission, she experienced mild dyspnea and general fatigue and came to our hospital emergency room. A chest X-ray film revealed no abnormalities but some blisters were observed around her right ear. The next day, her dyspnea became more severe and she was admitted. A chest X-ray film on admission revealed right lower lobe consolidation, and neurological examination disclosed multiple cranial nerve paralysis, i.e., paralysis of the right fifth, seventh, eighth, ninth, tenth, eleventh, twelfth and left tenth cranial nerve. The serum titer of anti-herpes zoster antibody was elevated to 1,024, and the patient was diagnosed as having Ramsey Hunt syndrome with multiple cranial nerve paralysis. Arterial blood gas analysis revealed hypoxemia with hypercapnea, which was considered to be due to aspiration pneumonia and central airway obstruction caused by vocal cord paralysis. Mechanical ventilation was soon instituted and several antibiotics and acyclovir were administered intravenously, with marked effects. Three months after admission, the patient was discharged with no sequelae except mild hoarseness. Patients with herpes zoster oticus, facial nerve paralysis and auditory symptoms are diagnosed as having Ramsey Hunt syndrome. This case was complicated by lower cranial nerve paralysis and acute respiratory failure, which is very rare.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Multifactorial Risk Index for Predicting Postoperative Respiratory Failure in Men After Major Noncardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Arozullah, Ahsan M.; Daley, Jennifer; Henderson, William G.; Khuri, Shukri F.

    2000-01-01

    Objective To develop and validate a preoperative risk index for predicting postoperative respiratory failure (PRF). Summary Background Data Respiratory failure is an important postoperative complication. Method Based on a prospective cohort study, cases from 44 Veterans Affairs Medical Centers (n = 81,719) were used to develop the models. Cases from 132 Veterans Affairs Medical Centers (n = 99,390) were used as a validation sample. PRF was defined as mechanical ventilation for more than 48 hours after surgery or reintubation and mechanical ventilation after postoperative extubation. Ventilator-dependent, comatose, do not resuscitate, and female patients were excluded. Results PRF developed in 2,746 patients (3.4%). The respiratory failure risk index was developed from a simplified logistic regression model and included abdominal aortic aneurysm repair, thoracic surgery, neurosurgery, upper abdominal surgery, peripheral vascular surgery, neck surgery, emergency surgery, albumin level less than 30 g/L, blood urea nitrogen level more than 30 mg/dL, dependent functional status, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and age. Conclusions The respiratory failure risk index is a validated model for identifying patients at risk for developing PRF and may be useful for guiding perioperative respiratory care. PMID:10903604

  8. Respiratory failure after superior-based pharyngeal flap for velopharyngeal insufficiency: A rare complication.

    PubMed

    Lawlor, Claire M; Riley, Charles A; Hildrew, Douglas M; Guarisco, J Lindhe

    2015-07-01

    Velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI) is an uncommon pediatric disorder often associated with congenital syndromes. After speech therapy, surgery is the standard management. Many surgical approaches to VPI repair have been reported and the complications of these procedures are well documented. To date, there have been no published cases of respiratory failure secondary to pneumomediastinum, pneumopericardium, and bilateral pneumothoraces with associated subcutaneous emphysema after superior-based pharyngeal flap. We present the first case in the literature. Our proposed etiology for the respiratory failure is air tracking from the flap donor site to the pleural spaces of the thoracic cavity via the visceral or prevertebral fascia following positive pressure ventilation.

  9. [Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for treatment of acute respiratory failure in adults].

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Charles Marinus; Jensen, Reinhold; Lindskov, Christian

    2016-09-19

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) can support gas exchange independently of mechanical ventilation in patients with severe acute respiratory failure. Veno-venous ECMO is a temporary technique for providing life support by pulmonary dysfunction. ECMO should be considered for patients with respiratory failure when they cannot survive with conventional therapy. ECMO may be used either as a rescue therapy or to prevent ventilator-associated lung injury. Exact criteria for ECMO are not available. Transportation while using ECMO is safe when a team from the management centre provides it. PMID:27649710

  10. Effect of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus on the Risk of Incident Respiratory Failure: A National Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Jun-Jun; Wang, Yu-Chiao; Chen, Jiunn-Horng; Hsu, Wu-Huei

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We conducted a nationwide cohort study to investigate the relationship between systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and the risk of incident respiratory failure. Methods From the National Health Insurance Research Database, we identified 11 533 patients newly diagnosed with SLE and 46 132 controls without SLE who were randomly selected through frequency-matching according to age, sex, and index year. Both cohorts were followed until the end of 2011 to measure the incidence of incident respiratory failure, which was compared between the 2 cohorts through a Cox proportional hazards regression analysis. Results The adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) of incident respiratory failure was 5.80 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 5.15–6.52) for the SLE cohort after we adjusted for sex, age, and comorbidities. Both men (aHR = 3.44, 95% CI = 2.67–4.43) and women (aHR = 6.79, 95% CI = 5.93–7.77) had a significantly higher rate of incident respiratory failure in the SLE cohort than in the non-SLE cohort. Both men and women aged <35 years (aHR = 31.2, 95% CI = 21.6–45.2), 35–65 years; (aHR = 6.19, 95% CI = 5.09–7.54) and ≥65 years (aHR = 2.35, 95% CI = 1.92–2.87) had a higher risk of incident respiratory failure in the SLE cohort. Moreover, the risk of incident respiratory failure was higher in the SLE cohort than the non-SLE cohort, for subjects with (aHR = 2.65, 95% CI = 2.22–3.15) or without (aHR = 9.08, 95% CI = 7.72–10.7) pre-existing comorbidities. In the SLE cohort, subjects with >24 outpatient visits and hospitalizations per year had a higher incident respiratory failure risk (aHR = 21.7, 95% CI = 18.0–26.1) compared with the non-SLE cohort. Conclusion Patients with SLE are associated with an increased risk of incident respiratory failure, regardless of their age, sex, and pre-existing comorbidities; especially medical services with higher frequency. PMID:27654828

  11. Diaphragmatic pacing to facilitate ventilator weaning in neuromyelitis optica-associated respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Rahmlow, Megan R; Boylan, Kevin; Freeman, William D

    2012-07-01

    Patients with neuromyelitis optica may develop neurogenic respiratory failure in the context of severe upper cervical myelitis, which can require prolonged or indefinite mechanical ventilation. Diaphragmatic pacing has FDA approval under a humanitarian device exemption (HDE) to facilitate weaning from mechanical ventilation in the context of cervical spinal cord injury. We describe the use of diaphragmatic pacing in a patient with acute respiratory failure due to a severe attack of neuromyelitis optica on the cervical spinal cord. The device resulted in successful early ventilator weaning. PMID:25877081

  12. [ACUTE RESPIRATORY DISTRESS SYNDROME CAUSED BY BETA-LACTAM ANTIBIOTICS].

    PubMed

    Skipskiy, I M; Efimov, N W; Remizov, A S; Miroshnikov, B I

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of iatrogenic lesion of the lungs in a 61 year old patient following simultaneous subtotal resection and plastic surgery of esophagus using a gastric stem with the removed cardial portion along with subtotal mediastinal lympho-dissection for the treatment of 2 x 1 cm T2NoMO tumour in the middle third of esophagus. The patient's medical history contained no evidence of previous pulmonary pathology, preoperative chest X-ray study revealed neither focal nor infiltrative changes in the lungs. On day 5 after extensive surgical intervention with the use of a parenteral beta-lactam antibiotic, the patient developed acute respiratory distress the symptoms of which increased wavelike during the next 4.5 weeks in association with subfebrility, leukocytosis, enhanced ESR and large shaded areas in the lungs. These conditions were regarded as signs of pneumonia that required the application of increasingly more powerful beta-lactam antibiotics. All these symptoms became less apparent and completely disappeared within 2 days and 1 week respectively after withdrawal of the antibiotics and prescription of parenteral prednisolone. It confirmed the iatrogenic origin of lung lesions regarded by the authors as recurring acute respiratory distress syndrome caused by beta-lactam antibiotics.

  13. Airborne chemicals cause respiratory symptoms in individuals with contact allergy.

    PubMed

    Elberling, J; Linneberg, A; Mosbech, H; Dirksen, A; Menné, T; Nielsen, N H; Madsen, F; Frølund, L; Johansen, J Duus

    2005-02-01

    Exposure to fragrance chemicals causes various eye and airway symptoms. Individuals with perfume contact allergy report these symptoms more frequently than individuals with nickel allergy or no contact allergies. However, the associations between contact allergy and respiratory symptoms elicited by airborne chemicals other than perfumes are unclear. The study aimed to investigate the association between eye and airway symptoms elicited by airborne chemicals (other than perfumes) and contact allergy in a population-based sample. A questionnaire on respiratory symptoms was posted, in 2002, to 1189 individuals who participated in 1997/1998 in a Danish population-based study of allergic diseases. Questions about eye and airway symptoms elicited by different airborne chemicals and airborne proteins were included in the questionnaire. Data from the questionnaire were compared with data on patch testing and prick testing. Having at least 1 positive patch test (adjusted odds ratio 1.7, 95% CI 1.2-2.5) was associated with the symptoms, and the odds ratio increased with the number of positive patch tests (P-value for test for trend <0.05). Bronchial hyperreactivity, female sex and psychological vulnerability were independently associated with symptoms, but no association was found between prick test reactivity to proteins and the symptoms elicited by airborne chemicals.

  14. A case of nemaline myopathy with associated dilated cardiomyopathy and respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Rihito; Kamimura, Daisuke; Suzuki, Yoji; Saito, Toshihiko; Toyama, Hideshi; Dejima, Tohru; Inada, Haruhiko; Miwa, Yoshiyuki; Uchino, Kazuaki; Umemura, Satoshi; Shimizu, Makoto

    2011-01-01

    Nemaline myopathy is a representative form of congenital myopathy, and is characterized by nemaline bodies in muscle fibers. Here we report a 47-year-old man with congenital nemaline myopathy complicated with dilated cardiomyopathy-related heart failure, and restrictive respiratory failure. The complication of dilated cardiomyopathy in nemaline myopathy has rarely been reported. In this case, nemaline bodies were detected in the cardiac muscle fibers, demonstrating the presence of underlying disease-related myocardial degeneration. The patient responded to the combination of conventional therapy for heart failure including β-blocker and noninvasive continuous positive-pressure ventilation for respiratory failure. His general condition has been stable during a 10-month follow up period. PMID:22188717

  15. Demographic, etiological, and histological pulmonary analysis of patients with acute respiratory failure: a study of 19 years of autopsies

    PubMed Central

    de Matos Soeiro, Alexandre; Ruppert, Aline D; Canzian, Mauro; Parra, Edwin R; Farhat, Cecília; Capelozzi, Vera L

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Acute respiratory failure has been one of the most important causes of death in intensive care units, and certain aspects of its pulmonary pathology are currently unknown. OBJECTIVES: The objective was to describe the demographic data, etiology, and pulmonary histopathological findings of different diseases in the autopsies of patients with acute respiratory failure. METHOD: Autopsies of 4,710 patients with acute respiratory failure from 1990 to 2008 were reviewed, and the following data were obtained: age, sex, and major associated diseases. The pulmonary histopathology was categorized as diffuse alveolar damage, pulmonary edema, alveolar hemorrhage, and lymphoplasmacytic interstitial pneumonia. The odds ratio of the concordance between the major associated diseases and specific autopsy findings was calculated using logistic regression. RESULTS: Bacterial bronchopneumonia was present in 33.9% of the cases and cancer in 28.1%. The pulmonary histopathology showed diffuse alveolar damage in 40.7% (1,917) of the cases. A multivariate analysis showed a significant and powerful association between diffuse alveolar damage and bronchopneumonia, HIV/AIDS, sepsis, and septic shock, between liver cirrhosis and pulmonary embolism, between pulmonary edema and acute myocardial infarction, between dilated cardiomyopathy and cancer, between alveolar hemorrhage and bronchopneumonia and pulmonary embolism, and between lymphoplasmacytic interstitial pneumonia and HIV/AIDS and liver cirrhosis. CONCLUSIONS: Bronchopneumonia was the most common diagnosis in these cases. The most prevalent pulmonary histopathological pattern was diffuse alveolar damage, which was associated with different inflammatory conditions. Further studies are necessary to elucidate the complete pathophysiological mechanisms involved with each disease and the development of acute respiratory failure. PMID:21876973

  16. A traffic accident caused by fatigue failure of axle.

    PubMed

    Park, Chan-Seong; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Lee, Kyu-Jung

    2007-09-01

    An investigation of a traffic accident involving a tractor-trailer and a passenger car that were traveling at high speed is presented. The cause was the fracture of a trailer axle. The investigation showed that the fracture was because of the fatigue failure. In addition, cracks were found in the remaining three trailer wheels. Hardness measurements showed that, because of inadequate heat treatment of the metal, they were prone to failure.

  17. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Respiratory Failure?

    MedlinePlus

    ... underlying cause and the levels of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the blood. A low oxygen level in ... on the skin, lips, and fingernails. A high carbon dioxide level can cause rapid breathing and confusion. Some ...

  18. The use of high-flow nasal oxygen therapy in the management of hypercarbic respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Millar, Jonathan; Lutton, Stuart; O'Connor, Philip

    2014-04-01

    Hypercarbic respiratory failure, occurring secondary to chronic lung disease, is a frequently encountered problem. These patients present a significant challenge to respiratory and critical care services, as many are unsuitable for mechanical ventilation and most have multiple comorbidities. Recently, noninvasive ventilation (NIV) has become established as the primary modality for respiratory support in this group of patients. Several factors limit patient compliance with NIV, not least comfort and tolerability. A recent innovation in adult critical care is the use of high-flow nasal oxygen (HFNO) devices. These systems are capable of delivering high gas flows via nasal cannulae, with the ability to blend air and oxygen to give a controlled FiO2. Few clinical studies have been conducted in adults, although several are planned. To date the majority of available evidence addresses the use of HFNO in hypoxemic respiratory failure. Here we present a case in which a HFNO system was used to successfully manage hypercarbic respiratory failure in a patient unable to tolerate conventional NIV.

  19. Respiratory failure following anti-lung serum: study on mechanisms associated with surfactant system damage

    SciTech Connect

    Lachmann, B.; Hallman, M.; Bergmann, K.C.

    1987-01-01

    Within 2 minutes intravenous anti-lung serum (ALS) into guinea pig induces a respiratory failure that is fatal within 30 min. The relationship between surfactant, alveolar-capillary permeability and respiratory failure was studied. Within two minutes ALS induced a leak in the alveolar-capillary barrier. Within 30 minutes 28.3% (controls, given normal rabbit serum: 0.7%) of iv /sup 131/I-albumin, and 0.5% (controls 0.02%) of iv surfactant phospholipid tracer were recovered in bronchoalveolar lavage. Furthermore, 57% (controls 32%) of the endotracheally administered surfactant phospholipid became associated with lung tissue and only less than 0.5% left the lung. The distribution of proteins and phospholipids between the in vivo small volume bronchoalveolar lavages and the ex vivo bronchoalveolar lavages were dissimilar: 84% (controls 20%) of intravenously injected, lavageable /sup 131/I-albumin and 23% (controls 18%) of total lavageable phospholipid were recovered in the in vivo small volume bronchoalveolar lavages. ALS also decreased lavageable surfactant phospholipid by 41%. After ALS the minimum surface tension increased. The supernatant of the lavage increased the minimum surface tension of normal surfactant. In addition, the sediment fraction of the lavage had slow surface adsorption, and a marked reduction in 35,000 and 10,000 MW peptides. Exogenous surfactant ameliorated the ALS-induced respiratory failure. We propose that inhibition, altered intrapulmonary distribution, and dissociation of protein and phospholipid components of surfactant are important in early pathogenesis of acute respiratory failure.

  20. Early exercise rehabilitation of muscle weakness in acute respiratory failure patients.

    PubMed

    Berry, Michael J; Morris, Peter E

    2013-10-01

    Acute respiratory failure patients experience significant muscle weakness, which contributes to prolonged hospitalization and functional impairments after hospital discharge. Based on our previous work, we hypothesize that an exercise intervention initiated early in the intensive care unit aimed at improving skeletal muscle strength could decrease hospital stay and attenuate the deconditioning and skeletal muscle weakness experienced by these patients.

  1. Porcine surfactant (Curosurf) for acute respiratory failure after near-drowning in 12 year old.

    PubMed

    Onarheim, H; Vik, V

    2004-07-01

    This case report describes rapid and persistent improvement after one single dose of porcine surfactant (Curosurf) 0.5 ml/kg(-1) (40 mg/kg) intratracheally for adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) with severe oxygenation failure 8 h after freshwater near-drowning in a 12-year-old girl.

  2. A case of split notochord syndrome: Presenting with respiratory failure in the neonatal period

    PubMed Central

    Coskun, Yesim; Akman, Ipek; Demir, Mustafa Kemal; Yapicier, Ozlem; Somuncu, Salih

    2016-01-01

    Summary Split notochord syndrome (SNS) is a very rare congenital anomaly. This report describes a male newborn with a neuroenteric cyst in the posterior mediastinum and multiple vertebrae anomalies presenting with respiratory failure and pulmonary hypertension. This report also discusses the embryological development and the etiologic theories of SNS. PMID:27195197

  3. Central nervous system alterations caused by infection with the human respiratory syncytial virus.

    PubMed

    Bohmwald, Karen; Espinoza, Janyra A; González, Pablo A; Bueno, Susan M; Riedel, Claudia A; Kalergis, Alexis M

    2014-11-01

    Worldwide, the human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) is the leading cause of infant hospitalization because of acute respiratory tract infections, including severe bronchiolitis and pneumonia. Despite intense research, to date there is neither vaccine nor treatment available to control hRSV disease burden globally. After infection, an incubation period of 3-5 days is usually followed by symptoms, such as cough and low-grade fever. However, hRSV infection can also produce a larger variety of symptoms, some of which relate to the individual's age at infection. Indeed, infants can display severe symptoms, such as dyspnea and chest wall retractions. Upon examination, crackles and wheezes are also common features that suggest infection by hRSV. Additionally, infection in infants younger than 1 year is associated with several non-specific symptoms, such as failure to thrive, periodic breathing or apnea, and feeding difficulties that usually require hospitalization. Recently, neurological symptoms have also been associated with hRSV respiratory infection and include seizures, central apnea, lethargy, feeding or swallowing difficulties, abnormalities in muscle tone, strabismus, abnormalities in the CSF, and encephalopathy. Here, we discuss recent findings linking the neurological, extrapulmonary effects of hRSV with infection and functional impairment of the CNS.

  4. Treatment Failure and Mortality amongst Children with Severe Acute Malnutrition Presenting with Cough or Respiratory Difficulty and Radiological Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Chisti, Mohammod Jobayer; Salam, Mohammed Abdus; Bardhan, Pradip Kumar; Faruque, Abu S. G.; Shahid, Abu S. M. S. B.; Shahunja, K. M.; Das, Sumon Kumar; Hossain, Md Iqbal; Ahmed, Tahmeed

    2015-01-01

    respiratory difficulty and radiologic pneumonia who had WHO-defined danger signs of severe pneumonia more often had treatment failure and fatal outcome compared to those without the danger signs. In addition to danger signs of severe pneumonia, other common causes of both treatment failure and deaths were dehydration, hypocalcaemia, and bacteraemia on admission. The result underscores the importance for further research especially a randomized, controlled clinical trial to validate standard WHO therapy in SAM children with pneumonia especially with danger signs of severe pneumonia to reduce treatment failures and deaths. PMID:26451603

  5. Postinfarct Left Ventricular Remodelling: A Prevailing Cause of Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Galli, Alessio; Lombardi, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure is a chronic disease with high morbidity and mortality, which represents a growing challenge in medicine. A major risk factor for heart failure with reduced ejection fraction is a history of myocardial infarction. The expansion of a large infarct scar and subsequent regional ventricular dilatation can cause postinfarct remodelling, leading to significant enlargement of the left ventricular chamber. It has a negative prognostic value, because it precedes the clinical manifestations of heart failure. The characteristics of the infarcted myocardium predicting postinfarct remodelling can be studied with cardiac magnetic resonance and experimental imaging modalities such as diffusion tensor imaging can identify the changes in the architecture of myocardial fibers. This review discusses all the aspects related to postinfarct left ventricular remodelling: definition, pathogenesis, diagnosis, consequences, and available therapies, together with experimental interventions that show promising results against postinfarct remodelling and heart failure. PMID:26989555

  6. Noninvasive Positive Pressure Ventilation for Acute Respiratory Failure Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)

    PubMed Central

    McCurdy, BR

    2012-01-01

    ); and prevention of or treatment of recurrent respiratory failure in COPD patients after extubation from IMV. Clinical Need and Target Population Acute Hypercapnic Respiratory Failure Respiratory failure occurs when the respiratory system cannot oxygenate the blood and/or remove carbon dioxide from the blood. It can be either acute or chronic and is classified as either hypoxemic (type I) or hypercapnic (type II) respiratory failure. Acute hypercapnic respiratory failure frequently occurs in COPD patients experiencing acute exacerbations of COPD, so this is the focus of this evidence-based analysis. Hypercapnic respiratory failure occurs due to a decrease in the drive to breathe, typically due to increased work to breathe in COPD patients. Technology There are several treatment options for ARF. Usual medical care (UMC) attempts to facilitate adequate oxygenation and treat the cause of the exacerbation, and typically consists of supplemental oxygen, and a variety of medications such as bronchodilators, corticosteroids, and antibiotics. The failure rate of UMC is high and has been estimated to occur in 10% to 50% of cases. The alternative is mechanical ventilation, either invasive or noninvasive. Invasive mechanical ventilation involves sedating the patient, creating an artificial airway through endotracheal intubation, and attaching the patient to a ventilator. While this provides airway protection and direct access to drain sputum, it can lead to substantial morbidity, including tracheal injuries and ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). While both positive and negative pressure noninvasive ventilation exists, noninvasive negative pressure ventilation such as the iron lung is no longer in use in Ontario. Noninvasive positive pressure ventilation provides ventilatory support through a facial or nasal mask and reduces inspiratory work. Noninvasive positive pressure ventilation can often be used intermittently for short periods of time to treat respiratory failure, which

  7. [Learning from failure - implications for respiratory and intensive care medicine: a conceptual review].

    PubMed

    Kabitz, H-J

    2013-08-01

    The clinical, social and economical impact of failure in medicine [i. e., adverse health care events (AHCE)] is overwhelming. Respiratory and intensive care medicine are strongly relevant to AHCE, particularly in cases associated with respiratory failure, mechanical ventilation and pharmacotherapy. In spite of the obvious necessity to learn from AHCE, its realisation in health-care organisations is still rare. This conceptual review therefore aims to (i) clarify the most relevant terminology, (ii) identify obstacles related to this health-care topic, and (iii) present possible strategies for solving the problems, thereby enabling respiratory and intensive care medicine to systematically and effectively learn from failure. A review of the literature (effective as of June 2013) derived from the electronic databases Medline via PubMed, EMBASE, ERIC and Google Scholar identified the following relevant obstacles (ii): a so-called blame culture associated with concealing failure, missing system analyses (vs. individual breakdown), and (economically) misdirected incentives. Possible strategies to overcome these obstacles (iii) include acknowledging the importance of leadership, a safe environment, open reporting, an effective feedback culture, and detection (e. g., trigger-tools), analysis and discussion (e. g., double loop learning) of failure. The underlying reasons for the occurrence of AHCE are based on structural, organisational and human shortcomings, and affect all categories of caregivers. Approaches to solving the problem should therefore focus primarily on the entire system, rather than on the individual alone. PMID:23846430

  8. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary myopathy with early respiratory failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... to provide structure, flexibility, and stability to these cell structures. Titin also plays a role in chemical signaling and in assembling new sarcomeres. The TTN gene mutation responsible for HMERF leads ... to cause the disorder. Related Information ...

  9. Common Cause Failure Modeling in Space Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hark, Frank; Ring, Rob; Novack, Steven D.; Britton, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Common Cause Failures (CCFs) are a known and documented phenomenon that defeats system redundancy. CCFs are a set of dependent type of failures that can be caused for example by system environments, manufacturing, transportation, storage, maintenance, and assembly. Since there are many factors that contribute to CCFs, they can be reduced, but are difficult to eliminate entirely. Furthermore, failure databases sometimes fail to differentiate between independent and dependent CCF. Because common cause failure data is limited in the aerospace industry, the Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) Team at Bastion Technology Inc. is estimating CCF risk using generic data collected by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Consequently, common cause risk estimates based on this database, when applied to other industry applications, are highly uncertain. Therefore, it is important to account for a range of values for independent and CCF risk and to communicate the uncertainty to decision makers. There is an existing methodology for reducing CCF risk during design, which includes a checklist of 40+ factors grouped into eight categories. Using this checklist, an approach to produce a beta factor estimate is being investigated that quantitatively relates these factors. In this example, the checklist will be tailored to space launch vehicles, a quantitative approach will be described, and an example of the method will be presented.

  10. Causes of death in asthma, COPD and non-respiratory hospitalized patients: a multicentric study”

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There is limited information on the causes of death in asthma patients. To determine the causes of death in hospitalized asthmatic patients and to compare with those observed in COPD patients and non-respiratory individuals, with a particular interest in associations with previous cardiovascular disease. Methods Retrospective case–control study which analyzed the deaths of all hospitalized patients admitted for any reason during January, April, July and October of 2008 in 13 Spanish centers. Medical records of deceased patients were reviewed, and demographic and clinical data were collected. Results A total of 2,826 deaths (mean age 75 years, 56% men) were included in the analysis, of which 82 (2.9%) were of patients with asthma and 283 (10%) with COPD. The most common causes of death in asthma patients were cardiovascular diseases (29.3%), malignancies (20.7%) and infections (14.6%); in COPD patients they were malignancies (26.5%), acute respiratory failure (25.8%) and cardiovascular diseases (21.6%). Asthma, compared to COPD patients, died significantly less frequently from acute respiratory failure and lung cancer. A multivariate logistic regression analysis failed to associate asthma with cardiovascular deaths. Conclusions Cardiovascular disease is the most frequent cause of death among hospitalized asthma patients. The specific causes of death differ between asthma and COPD patients. PMID:24321217

  11. Adult venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for severe respiratory failure: Current status and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Sen, Ayan; Callisen, Hannelisa E; Alwardt, Cory M; Larson, Joel S; Lowell, Amelia A; Libricz, Stacy L; Tarwade, Pritee; Patel, Bhavesh M; Ramakrishna, Harish

    2016-01-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) for severe acute respiratory failure was proposed more than 40 years ago. Despite the publication of the ARDSNet study and adoption of lung protective ventilation, the mortality for acute respiratory failure due to acute respiratory distress syndrome has continued to remain high. This technology has evolved over the past couple of decades and has been noted to be safe and successful, especially during the worldwide H1N1 influenza pandemic with good survival rates. The primary indications for ECMO in acute respiratory failure include severe refractory hypoxemic and hypercarbic respiratory failure in spite of maximum lung protective ventilatory support. Various triage criteria have been described and published. Contraindications exist when application of ECMO may be futile or technically impossible. Knowledge and appreciation of the circuit, cannulae, and the physiology of gas exchange with ECMO are necessary to ensure lung rest, efficiency of oxygenation, and ventilation as well as troubleshooting problems. Anticoagulation is a major concern with ECMO, and the evidence is evolving with respect to diagnostic testing and use of anticoagulants. Clinical management of the patient includes comprehensive critical care addressing sedation and neurologic issues, ensuring lung recruitment, diuresis, early enteral nutrition, treatment and surveillance of infections, and multisystem organ support. Newer technology that delinks oxygenation and ventilation by extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal may lead to ultra-lung protective ventilation, avoidance of endotracheal intubation in some situations, and ambulatory therapies as a bridge to lung transplantation. Risks, complications, and long-term outcomes and resources need to be considered and weighed in before widespread application. Ethical challenges are a reality and a multidisciplinary approach that should be adopted for every case in consideration. PMID:26750681

  12. Adult venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for severe respiratory failure: Current status and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Ayan; Callisen, Hannelisa E.; Alwardt, Cory M.; Larson, Joel S.; Lowell, Amelia A.; Libricz, Stacy L.; Tarwade, Pritee; Patel, Bhavesh M.; Ramakrishna, Harish

    2016-01-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) for severe acute respiratory failure was proposed more than 40 years ago. Despite the publication of the ARDSNet study and adoption of lung protective ventilation, the mortality for acute respiratory failure due to acute respiratory distress syndrome has continued to remain high. This technology has evolved over the past couple of decades and has been noted to be safe and successful, especially during the worldwide H1N1 influenza pandemic with good survival rates. The primary indications for ECMO in acute respiratory failure include severe refractory hypoxemic and hypercarbic respiratory failure in spite of maximum lung protective ventilatory support. Various triage criteria have been described and published. Contraindications exist when application of ECMO may be futile or technically impossible. Knowledge and appreciation of the circuit, cannulae, and the physiology of gas exchange with ECMO are necessary to ensure lung rest, efficiency of oxygenation, and ventilation as well as troubleshooting problems. Anticoagulation is a major concern with ECMO, and the evidence is evolving with respect to diagnostic testing and use of anticoagulants. Clinical management of the patient includes comprehensive critical care addressing sedation and neurologic issues, ensuring lung recruitment, diuresis, early enteral nutrition, treatment and surveillance of infections, and multisystem organ support. Newer technology that delinks oxygenation and ventilation by extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal may lead to ultra-lung protective ventilation, avoidance of endotracheal intubation in some situations, and ambulatory therapies as a bridge to lung transplantation. Risks, complications, and long-term outcomes and resources need to be considered and weighed in before widespread application. Ethical challenges are a reality and a multidisciplinary approach that should be adopted for every case in consideration. PMID:26750681

  13. Nitrogen mustard hydrochloride-induced acute respiratory failure and myelosuppression: A case report

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, XIAOJUAN; ZHANG, ZHIDAN; CHEN, SONG; ZHAO, DONGMEI; ZHANG, FANGXIAO; HU, ZIWEI; XIAO, FENG; MA, XIAOCHUN

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogen mustards are chemical agents that are similar to sulfur mustards, with similar toxicities. The present study describes a case of nitrogen mustard-induced acute respiratory failure and myelosuppression in a 33-year-old man. The patient, who was accidentally exposed to nitrogen mustard hydrochloride in a pharmaceutical factory, exhibited severe inhalation injury and respiratory symptoms. Laboratory tests revealed reduced white blood cell counts and lowered platelet levels during the first 6 days after the skin exposure to nitrogen mustard. Following treatment with mechanical ventilation, immunity-enhancing agents and nutritional supplements for 1 month, the patient successfully recovered and was released from hospital. PMID:26622480

  14. Failure-dependent test, repair, and shutdown strategies: Reducing the impact of common-cause failures

    SciTech Connect

    Uryasev, S.P.; Samanta, P.K.

    1996-11-01

    Failure-dependent testing implies a test of redundant components (or trains) when the failure of one component has been detected. The purpose of such testing is to detect any common-cause failures (CCFs) of multiple components so that a corrective action, such as repair or plant shutdown, can be taken to reduce the residence time of multiple failures. This type of testing focuses on reducing the conditional risk of CCFs. Formulas are developed for calculating the conditional failure probability of a two-train system with different test, repair, and shutdown strategies. A methodology is presented, with an example calculation, showing the risk effectiveness of failure-dependent strategies for emergency diesel generators in nuclear power plants. Four alternative actions after the identification of a failure of one component are analyzed: (a) not carrying out any additional testing, (b) testing the redundant components and shutting down the plant if a CCF is present, (c) emergency repair of the failed component in a given time (less than the allowed outage time), and (d) additional testing of redundant components after the repair of the failed component.

  15. REPRESENTING COMMON-CAUSE FAILURES IN THE SAPHIRE SOFTWARE

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis L. Smith

    2008-11-01

    Currently, the risk analysis software SAPHIRE has implemented a common-cause failure (CCF) module to represent standard CCF methods such as alpha-factor and multiple Greek letter approaches. However, changes to SAPHIRE are required to support the Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s 2007 “Risk Assessment Standardization Project” CCF analysis guidance for events assessment. This guidance provides an outline of how both the nominal CCF probabilities and conditional (e.g., after a redundant component has failed) CCF probabilities should be calculated. Based upon user-provided input and extending the limitations in the current version of SAPHIRE, the CCF module calculations will be made consistent with the new guidance. The CCF modifications will involve changes to (1) the SAPHIRE graphical user interface directing how end-users and modelers interface with PRA models and (2) algorithmic changes as required. Included in the modifications will be the possibility to treat CCF probability adjustments based upon failure types (e.g., independent versus dependent) and failure modes (e.g., failure-to-run versus failure-to-start). In general, SAPHIRE is being modified to allow the risk analyst to define a CCF object. This object is defined in terms of a basic event. For the CCF object, the analyst would need to specify a minimal set of information, including: - The number of redundant components - The failure criteria (how many component have to fail) - The CCF model type (alpha-factor, MGL, or beta-factor) - The parameters (e.g., the alpha-factors) associated with the model - Staggered or non-staggered testing assumption - Default level of detail (expanded, showing all of the specific failure combinations, or not) This paper will outline both the theory behind the probabilistic calculations and the resulting implementation in the SAPHIRE software.

  16. Complete Genome Sequences of Four Different Bordetella sp. Isolates Causing Human Respiratory Infections

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yanhui; Loparev, Vladimir; Batra, Dhwani; Bowden, Katherine E.; Cassiday, Pamela K.; Davis, Jamie K.; Johnson, Taccara; Juieng, Phalasy; Miner, Christine E.; Rowe, Lori; Sheth, Mili; Tondella, M. Lucia; Williams, Margaret M.

    2016-01-01

    Species of the genus Bordetella associate with various animal hosts, frequently causing respiratory disease. Bordetella pertussis is the primary agent of whooping cough and other Bordetella species can cause similar cough illness. Here, we report four complete genome sequences from isolates of different Bordetella species recovered from human respiratory infections. PMID:27795250

  17. Venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in adult respiratory failure: Scores for mortality prediction.

    PubMed

    Hsin, Chun-Hsien; Wu, Meng-Yu; Huang, Chung-Chi; Kao, Kuo-Chin; Lin, Pyng-Jing

    2016-06-01

    Despite a potentially effective therapy for adult respiratory failure, a general agreement on venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VV-ECMO) has not been reached among institutions due to its invasiveness and high resource usage. To establish consensus on the timing of intervention, large ECMO organizations have published the respiratory extracorporeal membrane oxygenation survival prediction (RESP) score and the ECMOnet score, which allow users to predict hospital mortality for candidates with their pre-ECMO presentations. This study was aimed to test the predictive powers of these published scores in a medium-sized cohort enrolling adults treated with VV-ECMO for acute respiratory failure, and develop an institutional prediction model under the framework of the 3 scores if a superior predictive power could be achieved. This retrospective study included 107 adults who received VV-ECMO for severe acute respiratory failure (a PaO2/FiO2 ratio <70 mm Hg) in a tertiary referral center from 2007 to 2015. Essential demographic and clinical data were collected to calculate the RESP score, the ECMOnet score, and the sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score before VV-ECMO. The predictive power of hospital mortality of each score was presented as the area under receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUROC). The multivariate logistic regression was used to develop an institutional prediction model. The surviving to discharge rate was 55% (n = 59). All of the 3 published scores had a real but poor predictive power of hospital mortality in this study. The AUROCs of RESP score, ECMOnet score, and SOFA score were 0.662 (P = 0.004), 0.616 (P = 0.04), and 0.667 (P = 0.003), respectively. An institutional prediction model was established from these score parameters and presented as follows: hospital mortality (Y) = -3.173 + 0.208 × (pre-ECMO SOFA score) + 0.148 × (pre-ECMO mechanical ventilation day) + 1.021

  18. Guillain-Barre syndrome masquerading as acute respiratory failure in an infant.

    PubMed

    Kishore, Praveen; Sharma, Pradeep Kumar; Saikia, Bhaskar; Khilnani, Praveen

    2015-01-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) is a rare entity in infants. We report a case of GBS in a 5-month-old girl. The child presented with cough, loose stools, breathing difficulty, and listlessness. The child was treated as pneumonia with respiratory failure. Due to difficulty in weaning from ventilation with areflexia, marked hypotonia, and reduced power in all four limbs; possibilities of spinal muscular atrophy, poliomyelitis, and myopathies were kept. Nerve conduction velocity study was suggestive of mixed sensory-motor, severe axonal, and demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy. Cerebrospinal fluid study revealed albuminocytological dissociation. Child was diagnosed as GBS and treated with intravenous immunoglobulin. Child recovered completely on follow-up. GBS should be considered as a differential diagnosis in acute onset respiratory failure with neuromuscular weakness in infants. PMID:26962356

  19. Hypoxic and hypercapnic response in asthmatic subjects with previous respiratory failure.

    PubMed Central

    Hutchison, A A; Olinsky, A

    1981-01-01

    Three children and two young adults with severe asthma who had frequent episodes of respiratory failure were studied. Isocapnic hypoxia and hyperoxic hypercapnia were produced separately using a rebreathing apparatus. Alveolar carbon dioxide tension and oxygen tension were estimated by continuously sampling expired gases. The three young children had a diminished response to hypoxia but a normal response to hypercapnia when compared to control asthmatic children (p less than 0.05) or healthy children (p less than 0.05). The two young adult patients had a normal response to hypoxia but one had a low response to hypercapnia. Studies of parents of these patients suggested that the chance combination of a possibly familial, inappropriate response to hypoxia with severe asthma would lead to a risk of respiratory failure. PMID:7330794

  20. [Nasal Highflow (NHF): A New Therapeutic Option for the Treatment of Respiratory Failure].

    PubMed

    Bräunlich, J; Nilius, G

    2016-01-01

    The therapy of choice in hypoxemic respiratory failure (type 1) is the application of supplemental oxygen at flow rates of 1 to 15 l/min via nasal prongs or mask. Non-invasive or invasive positive pressure ventilation will be initiated when the oxygen therapy effects are not sufficient or if hypercapnic respiratory failure (type 2) is the underlying problem. Recently, an alternative therapy option is available, from the pathophysiology it can be classified between oxygen therapy and positive pressure ventilation. The therapy called Nasal High Flow (NHF) is based on the nasal application of a heated and humidified air oxygen mixture with a flow range of up to 60 l/min. The precise pathophysiological principles of NHF are only partly understood, yet various aspects are well studied already: it is possible to deliver high oxygen concentrations, airway dryness can be avoided, dead space ventilation reduced and clearance of nasal dead space is achieved. Additionally, an end expiratory positive pressure is built up, which helps to prevent airway collapse, thus resulting in an improvement of respiratory efficiency and reduction of breathing work. Current studies demonstrate improvement in gas exchange and reduction of reintubation rate when applying the NHF treatment in acute respiratory failure. Thus the NHF therapy attracts attention in intensive care medicine. The application in other fields like chronic respiratory insufficiency is less well clarified. The objectives of this review are to present the pathophysiological effects and mechanisms of NHF, as far as understood, and to give an overview over the current state of relevant studies. PMID:26789432

  1. [Nemaline rod myopathy revealed by acute respiratory failure after an outpatient cataract surgery].

    PubMed

    Raveau, T; Lassalle, V; Dubourg, O; Legout, A; Tirot, P

    2012-01-01

    We report the case of a 63-year-old patient admitted to the ICU for an acute respiratory failure one week after an outpatient cataract surgery that revealed a nemaline rod myopathy. We present this rare myopathy whose particularities are its aetiology, which can be inherited, mostly with a congenital onset, or sporadic, and the variability of the age at presentation. We discuss the exceptional onset of severe unknown underlying diseases in the context of outpatient surgery. PMID:22749553

  2. A Case of Biotinidase Deficiency in an Adult with Respiratory Failure in the Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Demirtürk, Zerrin; Şentürk, Evren; Köse, Abbas; Özcan, Perihan Ergin; Telci, Lütfi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Biotinidase deficiency (BD) is a rare, inherited autosomal recessive disorder that is treatable within childhood. We present a patient with pneumonia and respiratory acidosis who was not diagnosed with any systemic disorders; the patient was finally diagnosed as BD. Case Report: A thirty-year-old woman was admitted to the emergency department with respiratory failure that had persisted for a few days and progressively weakening over the previous six months. Then, the patient was admitted to the intensive care unit with marked respiratory acidosis, respiratory failure and alterations in consciousness. At the follow-up, the patient was not diagnosed with a systematic disorder. Rather, the patient’s historical clinical findings suggested a metabolic disorder. Finally, the patient was diagnosed with biotinidase deficiency. Conclusion: Even though biotinidase deficiency is not frequently seen in the intensive care unit, metabolic syndromes such as biotinidase deficiency should be considered. Patients should be evaluated holistically with attention to medical history, family history and clinical findings. PMID:27761288

  3. Farmer's Lung: Causes and Symptoms of Mold and Dust Induced Respiratory Illness

    MedlinePlus

    ... Educational Resources Farmer's Lung: Causes and Symptoms of Mold and Dust Induced Respiratory Illness ID 442-602 ( ... noninfectious allergic disease that is caused by inhaling mold spores in the dust from moldy hay, straw, ...

  4. Spinal Fusion for Scoliosis in Rett Syndrome With an Emphasis on Respiratory Failure and Opioid Usage.

    PubMed

    Rumbak, Dania M; Mowrey, Wenzhu; W Schwartz, Skai; Sarwahi, Vishal; Djukic, Aleksandra; Killinger, James S; Katyal, Chhavi

    2016-02-01

    Our objective was to characterize our experience with 8 patients with Rett syndrome undergoing scoliosis surgery in regard to rates of respiratory failure and rates of ventilator-acquired pneumonia in comparison to patients with neurologic scoliosis and adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. This study was a retrospective chart review of patients undergoing scoliosis surgery at a tertiary children's hospital. Patients were divided into 3 groups: (1) adolescent idiopathic scoliosis, (2) neurologic scoliosis, and (3) Rett syndrome. There were 133 patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis, 48 patients with neurologic scoliosis, and 8 patients with Rett syndrome. We found that patients with Rett syndrome undergoing scoliosis surgery have higher rates of respiratory failure and longer ventilation times in the postoperative period when compared with both adolescent idiopathic scoliosis and neurologic scoliosis patients. There is insufficient evidence to suggest a difference in the incidence of ventilator-acquired pneumonia between the Rett syndrome and the neurologic scoliosis group. We believe our findings are the first in the literature to show a statistically significant difference between these 3 groups in regard to incidence of respiratory failure. PMID:25991642

  5. Management of Patients with Gastroschisis Requiring Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation for Concurrent Respiratory Failure.

    PubMed

    Lalani, Alykhan; Benson Ham, P; Wise, Linda J; Daniel, John M; Walters, K Christian; Pipkin, Walter L; Stansfield, Brian; Hatley, Robyn M; Bhatia, Jatinder

    2016-09-01

    Treatment of gastroschisis often requires multiple surgical procedures to re-establish abdominal domain, reduce abdominal contents, and eventually close the abdominal wall. In patients who have concomitant respiratory failure requiring extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), this process becomes further complicated. This situation is rare and only five such cases have been reported in the ECMO registry database. Management of three of the five patients along with results and implications for future care of similar patients is discussed here. Two patients had respiratory failure due to meconium aspiration syndrome and one patient had persistent acidosis as well as worsening pulmonary hypertension leading to the decision of ECMO. The abdominal contents were placed in a spring-loaded silastic silo while on ECMO and primary closure was performed three to six days after the decannulation. All three patients survived and are developmentally appropriate. We recommend avoiding aggressively reducing the abdominal contents and using a silo to conservatively reducing the gastroschisis while the patient is on ECMO therapy. Keeping the intra-abdominal pressure below 20 mm Hg can possibly reduce ECMO days and ventilator time and has been shown to decrease morbidity and mortality. Patients with gastroschisis and respiratory failure requiring ECMO can have good outcomes despite the complexity of required care. PMID:27670556

  6. Spinal Fusion for Scoliosis in Rett Syndrome With an Emphasis on Respiratory Failure and Opioid Usage.

    PubMed

    Rumbak, Dania M; Mowrey, Wenzhu; W Schwartz, Skai; Sarwahi, Vishal; Djukic, Aleksandra; Killinger, James S; Katyal, Chhavi

    2016-02-01

    Our objective was to characterize our experience with 8 patients with Rett syndrome undergoing scoliosis surgery in regard to rates of respiratory failure and rates of ventilator-acquired pneumonia in comparison to patients with neurologic scoliosis and adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. This study was a retrospective chart review of patients undergoing scoliosis surgery at a tertiary children's hospital. Patients were divided into 3 groups: (1) adolescent idiopathic scoliosis, (2) neurologic scoliosis, and (3) Rett syndrome. There were 133 patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis, 48 patients with neurologic scoliosis, and 8 patients with Rett syndrome. We found that patients with Rett syndrome undergoing scoliosis surgery have higher rates of respiratory failure and longer ventilation times in the postoperative period when compared with both adolescent idiopathic scoliosis and neurologic scoliosis patients. There is insufficient evidence to suggest a difference in the incidence of ventilator-acquired pneumonia between the Rett syndrome and the neurologic scoliosis group. We believe our findings are the first in the literature to show a statistically significant difference between these 3 groups in regard to incidence of respiratory failure.

  7. Progression from respiratory dysfunction to failure in late-onset Pompe disease.

    PubMed

    Berger, Kenneth I; Chan, Yinny; Rom, William N; Oppenheimer, Beno W; Goldring, Roberta M

    2016-08-01

    To identify determinants of respiratory disease progression in late-onset Pompe disease (LOPD), we studied relationships between pulmonary function, respiratory muscle strength, gas exchange, and respiratory control. Longitudinal evaluation of 22 LOPD patients (mean age 38 years) was performed at 6-month intervals for 6-24 months. Measurements included vital capacity (VC), maximum inspiratory pressure (MIP), maximum expiratory pressure (MEP), tidal volume (VT), dead space (VD), and ventilatory response to CO2. Although reduction in VC correlated with MIP and MEP (p < 0.0001), some patients had normal VC despite reduced MIP and MEP (5 [23%] and 9 [41%] patients, respectively). Daytime hypercapnia was associated with reduced VC (<60% predicted) and MIP (<40% predicted). Moreover, chronic hypercapnia was associated with elevated VD/VT (≥0.44) due to falling VT (≈300 ml), compatible with reduced efficiency of CO2 clearance. The presence of hypercapnia and/or ventilatory support was associated with reduced ventilatory responsiveness to CO2 (≤0.7 l/min/mmHg). We conclude that daytime hypercapnia, an indicator of chronic respiratory failure, is tightly linked to the degree of respiratory muscle weakness and severity of pulmonary dysfunction in LOPD patients. Reductions in CO2 clearance efficiency and ventilatory responsiveness may contribute to the development of chronic daytime hypercapnia. PMID:27297666

  8. Progression from respiratory dysfunction to failure in late-onset Pompe disease.

    PubMed

    Berger, Kenneth I; Chan, Yinny; Rom, William N; Oppenheimer, Beno W; Goldring, Roberta M

    2016-08-01

    To identify determinants of respiratory disease progression in late-onset Pompe disease (LOPD), we studied relationships between pulmonary function, respiratory muscle strength, gas exchange, and respiratory control. Longitudinal evaluation of 22 LOPD patients (mean age 38 years) was performed at 6-month intervals for 6-24 months. Measurements included vital capacity (VC), maximum inspiratory pressure (MIP), maximum expiratory pressure (MEP), tidal volume (VT), dead space (VD), and ventilatory response to CO2. Although reduction in VC correlated with MIP and MEP (p < 0.0001), some patients had normal VC despite reduced MIP and MEP (5 [23%] and 9 [41%] patients, respectively). Daytime hypercapnia was associated with reduced VC (<60% predicted) and MIP (<40% predicted). Moreover, chronic hypercapnia was associated with elevated VD/VT (≥0.44) due to falling VT (≈300 ml), compatible with reduced efficiency of CO2 clearance. The presence of hypercapnia and/or ventilatory support was associated with reduced ventilatory responsiveness to CO2 (≤0.7 l/min/mmHg). We conclude that daytime hypercapnia, an indicator of chronic respiratory failure, is tightly linked to the degree of respiratory muscle weakness and severity of pulmonary dysfunction in LOPD patients. Reductions in CO2 clearance efficiency and ventilatory responsiveness may contribute to the development of chronic daytime hypercapnia.

  9. ISS Fiber Optic Failure Investigation Root Cause Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leidecker, Henning; Plante, Jeannette

    2000-01-01

    In August of 1999, Boeing Corporation (Boeing) engineers began investigating failures of optical fiber being used on International Space Station flight hardware. Catastrophic failures of the fiber were linked to a defect in the glass fiber. Following several meetings of Boeing and NASA engineers and managers, Boeing created and led an investigation team, which examined the reliability of the cable installed in the U.S. Lab. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's Components Technologies and Radiation Effects Branch (GSFC) led a team investigating the root cause of the failures. Information was gathered from: regular telecons and other communications with the investigation team, investigative trips to the cable distributor's plant, the cable manufacturing plant and the fiber manufacturing plant (including a review of build records), destructive and non-destructive testing, and expertise supplied by scientists from Dupont, and Lucent-Bell Laboratories. Several theories were established early on which were not able to completely address the destructive physical analysis and experiential evidence. Lucent suggested hydrofluoric acid (HF) etching of the glass and successfully duplicated the "rocket engine" defect. Strength testing coupled with examination of the low strength break sites linked features in the polyimide coating with latent defect sites. The information provided below explains what was learned about the susceptibility of the pre-cabled fiber to failure when cabled as it was for Space Station and the nature of the latent defects.

  10. Respiratory Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... occur if your lungs can't properly remove carbon dioxide (a waste gas) from your blood. Too much carbon dioxide in your blood can harm your body's ... problems—a low oxygen level and a high carbon dioxide level in the blood—can occur at ...

  11. Non-invasive ventilation in immunocompromised patients with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Del Sorbo, Lorenzo; Jerath, Angela; Dres, Martin; Parotto, Matteo

    2016-03-01

    The survival rate of immunocompromised patients has improved over the past decades in light of remarkable progress in diagnostic and therapeutic options. Simultaneously, there has been an increase in the number of immunocompromised patients with life threatening complications requiring intensive care unit (ICU) treatment. ICU admission is necessary in up to 15% of patients with acute leukemia and 20% of bone marrow transplantation recipients, and the main reason for ICU referral in this patient population is acute hypoxemic respiratory failure, which is associated with a high mortality rate, particularly in patients requiring endotracheal intubation. The application of non-invasive ventilation (NIV), and thus the avoidance of endotracheal intubation and invasive mechanical ventilation with its side effects, appears therefore of great importance in this patient population. Early trials supported the benefits of NIV in these settings, and the 2011 Canadian guidelines for the use of NIV in critical care settings suggest the use of NIV in immune-compromised patients with a grade 2B recommendation. However, the very encouraging results from initial seminal trials were not confirmed in subsequent observational and randomized clinical studies, questioning the beneficial effect of NIV in immune-compromised patients. Based on these observations, a French group led by Azoulay decided to assess whether early intermittent respiratory support with NIV had a role in reducing the mortality rate of immune-compromised patients with non-hypercapnic hypoxemic respiratory failure developed in less than 72 h, and hence conducted a multicenter randomized controlled trial (RCT) in experienced ICUs in France. This perspective reviews the findings from their RCT in the context of the current critical care landscape, and in light of recent results from other trials focused on the early management of acute hypoxemic respiratory failure. PMID:27076972

  12. Noninvasive ventilation for acute respiratory failure: a prospective randomised placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Thys, F; Roeseler, J; Reynaert, M; Liistro, G; Rodenstein, D O

    2002-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to clarify whether the known effects of noninvasive positive-pressure ventilation (NPPV) in patients with respiratory failure are real or due to placebo effects and whether early application of NPPV in the emergency department leads to rapid improvement of the patients condition and outcome. A prospective randomised placebo-controlled study was conducted in 20 patients with severe acute respiratory failure (ARF) secondary to an acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or acute pulmonary oedema, not improving under conventional medical therapy and on the edge of intubation. Patients received either conventional medical therapy plus two-level NPPV (hi-level NPPV) or conventional medical therapy plus "placebo" NPPV. The main outcome measures involved the need for endotracheal intubation in the bi-level NPPV arm and in the placebo arm after crossing over to active NPPV. Morbidity, length of stay, mortality and the effect of the ventilatory mode on clinical, arterial-blood gas parameters, and the sternocleidomastoid muscles electromyogram (EMG) activity were also measured. The 10 patients in the active NPPV group rapidly improved and none needed intubation. Placebo NPPV resulted in no change in the clinical condition of patients that continued to worsen and the 10 patients were crossed over to active NPPV. Three patients were intubated. No differences in terms of morbidity, length of stay or mortality between the two groups were observed. Active NPPV (but not placebo NPPV) led to a rapid and significant improvement in the clinical parameters, pH and the carbon dioxide tension in arterial blood and to a decrease in respiratory frequency and sternocleidomastoid EMG activity. Early application of bi-level noninvasive positive-pressure ventilation in patients with severe acute respiratory failure, due to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and acute pulmonary oedema, leads to a rapid improvement in clinical status

  13. Age-associated mosaic respiratory chain deficiency causes trans-neuronal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Dufour, Eric; Terzioglu, Mügen; Sterky, Fredrik Hansson; Sörensen, Lene; Galter, Dagmar; Olson, Lars; Wilbertz, Johannes; Larsson, Nils-Göran

    2008-05-15

    Heteroplasmic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations (mutations present only in a subset of cellular mtDNA copies) arise de novo during the normal ageing process or may be maternally inherited in pedigrees with mitochondrial disease syndromes. A pathogenic mtDNA mutation causes respiratory chain deficiency only if the fraction of mutated mtDNA exceeds a certain threshold level. These mutations often undergo apparently random mitotic segregation and the levels of normal and mutated mtDNA can vary considerably between cells of the same tissue. In human ageing, segregation of somatic mtDNA mutations leads to mosaic respiratory chain deficiency in a variety of tissues, such as brain, heart and skeletal muscle. A similar pattern of mutation segregation with mosaic respiratory chain deficiency is seen in patients with mitochondrial disease syndromes caused by inherited pathogenic mtDNA mutations. We have experimentally addressed the role of mosaic respiratory chain deficiency in ageing and mitochondrial disease by creating mouse chimeras with a mixture of normal and respiratory chain-deficient neurons in cerebral cortex. We report here that a low proportion (>20%) of respiratory chain-deficient neurons in the forebrain are sufficient to cause symptoms, whereas premature death of the animal occurs only if the proportion is high (>60-80%). The presence of neurons with normal respiratory chain function does not only prevent mortality but also delays the age at which onset of disease symptoms occur. Unexpectedly, respiratory chain-deficient neurons have adverse effect on normal adjacent neurons and induce trans-neuronal degeneration. In summary, our study defines the minimal threshold level of respiratory chain-deficient neurons needed to cause symptoms and also demonstrate that neurons with normal respiratory chain function ameliorate disease progression. Finally, we show that respiratory chain-deficient neurons induce death of normal neurons by a trans-neuronal degeneration

  14. Exertional dyspnoea in chronic heart failure: the role of the lung and respiratory mechanical factors.

    PubMed

    Dubé, Bruno-Pierre; Agostoni, Piergiuseppe; Laveneziana, Pierantonio

    2016-09-01

    Exertional dyspnoea is among the dominant symptoms in patients with chronic heart failure and progresses relentlessly as the disease advances, leading to reduced ability to function and engage in activities of daily living. Effective management of this disabling symptom awaits a better understanding of its underlying physiology.Cardiovascular factors are believed to play a major role in dyspnoea in heart failure patients. However, despite pharmacological interventions, such as vasodilators or inotropes that improve central haemodynamics, patients with heart failure still complain of exertional dyspnoea. Clearly, dyspnoea is not determined by cardiac factors alone, but likely depends on complex, integrated cardio-pulmonary interactions.A growing body of evidence suggests that excessively increased ventilatory demand and abnormal "restrictive" constraints on tidal volume expansion with development of critical mechanical limitation of ventilation, contribute to exertional dyspnoea in heart failure. This article will offer new insights into the pathophysiological mechanisms of exertional dyspnoea in patients with chronic heart failure by exploring the potential role of the various constituents of the physiological response to exercise and particularly the role of abnormal ventilatory and respiratory mechanics responses to exercise in the perception of dyspnoea in patients with heart failure. PMID:27581831

  15. Hypercalcemia as a Cause of Kidney Failure: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Stojceva-Taneva, Olivera; Taneva, Borjanka; Selim, Gjulsen

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hypercalcemia is a common manifestation in clinical practice and occurs as a result of primary hyperparathyroidism, malignancy, milk-alkali syndrome, hyper or hypothyroidism, sarcoidosis and other known and unknown causes. Patients with milk-alkali syndrome typically are presented with renal failure, hypercalcemia, and metabolic alkalosis caused by the ingestion of calcium and absorbable alkali. This syndrome is caused by high intake of milk and sodium bicarbonate. CASE PRESENTATION: We present a 28-year old male admitted to hospital with a one-month history of nausea, vomiting, epigastric pain, increased blood pressure and worsening of renal function with hypercalcemia. His serum PTH level was almost undetectable; he had mild alkalosis, renal failure with eGFR of 42 ml/min, anemia, hypertension and abnormal ECG with shortened QT interval and ST elevation in V1-V4. He had a positive medical history for calcium-containing antacids intake and after ruling out primary hyperparathyroidism, malignancy, multiple myelomas, sarcoidosis, and thyroid dysfunction, it seemed plausible to diagnose him as having the milk-alkali syndrome. CONCLUSION: Although milk-alkali syndrome currently may be more probably a result of calcium and vitamin D intake in postmenopausal women, or in elderly men with reduced kidney function taking calcium-containing medications, one should not exclude the possibility of its appearance in younger patients taking calcium-containing medications and consider it a serious condition taking into account its possibility of inducing renal insufficiency. PMID:27335601

  16. CubeSats failures caused by space environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lourencena Caldas Franke, Lucas; Schuch, Nelson Jorge; Santos Cupertino Durao, Otavio; Lopes Costa, Lucas; Escobar Burger, Eduardo; Zolar Gehlen Bohrer, Rubens; Ronan Coelho Stekel, Tardelli

    When a satellite is in orbit, it remains in direct contact with a hostile environment. An analyzes of possible failures that have occurred with CubeSat class satellites due to this exposure is presented. These small satellites have 10cm cubic form and about 1.33 kilograms, they have all subsystems integrated on a single module that fits in the available intern volume, using high technology of miniaturization. Generally, this satellites are launched at a 650km (LEO) altitude orbits. At this range, one of the biggest problems that may affect satellites is the precipitation of charged particles, and this may cause the failure of subsystems and magnetic interference in equipments, with emphasis to natural causes as the impact of solar activity (the solar cycle, solar flares, coronal mass ejection, etc.) and the interference of the South Atlantic Magnetic Anomaly, knowing that the majority of CubeSat's orbits intersect at some point the acting anomaly region. The analysis consist of a statistical survey of thirty nine CubeSats already launched, taking into account their actual conditions, giving results of the most common causes and issues that have occurred with them, including the relationship with larger satellites of all kinds, thus contributing for the success and optimization of future CubeSats missions.

  17. [Surgical treatment of respiratory failure in young patients with diffuse lung emphysema].

    PubMed

    Gorbunkov, S D; Chernyĭ, S M; Akopov, A L; Varlamov, V V; Lukina, O V; Kiriukhina, L D; Agishev, A S; Gembitskaia, T E

    2012-01-01

    An analysis of results of examination and treatment of 8 young patients (from 25 to 17 years of age) with generalized emphysema of the lungs, pulmonary failure of the II and III degrees was made. The functional examination of the patients before operation has revealed changed respiration by obstructive type. Symptoms of dysplasia of the connective tissue were found in 4 patients. Surgical reduction of the lung volume was performed in 5 patients for correction of respiratory failure. There were neither serious complications nor lethality. Dyspnea by MMRC scale decreased in all the patients at minimum by 1 point during the first months after operation. Three years later 4 out of the operated patients (80%) had retained positive effect of operation. In patients who had no operative treatment the frequency of infectious complications, level of dyspnea during three years of follow-up remained at the same level, while functional indices continued worsening. The surgical method of treatment of severe respiratory failure allowed tolerance of physical exercise to be increased and quality of life of patients with diffuse lung emphysema to be improved. PMID:23488258

  18. Pathogenesis of apical periodontitis and the causes of endodontic failures.

    PubMed

    Nair, P N R

    2004-01-01

    Apical periodontitis is a sequel to endodontic infection and manifests itself as the host defense response to microbial challenge emanating from the root canal system. It is viewed as a dynamic encounter between microbial factors and host defenses at the interface between infected radicular pulp and periodontal ligament that results in local inflammation, resorption of hard tissues, destruction of other periapical tissues, and eventual formation of various histopathological categories of apical periodontitis, commonly referred to as periapical lesions. The treatment of apical periodontitis, as a disease of root canal infection, consists of eradicating microbes or substantially reducing the microbial load from the root canal and preventing re-infection by orthograde root filling. The treatment has a remarkably high degree of success. Nevertheless, endodontic treatment can fail. Most failures occur when treatment procedures, mostly of a technical nature, have not reached a satisfactory standard for the control and elimination of infection. Even when the highest standards and the most careful procedures are followed, failures still occur. This is because there are root canal regions that cannot be cleaned and obturated with existing equipments, materials, and techniques, and thus, infection can persist. In very rare cases, there are also factors located within the inflamed periapical tissue that can interfere with post-treatment healing of the lesion. The data on the biological causes of endodontic failures are recent and scattered in various journals. This communication is meant to provide a comprehensive overview of the etio-pathogenesis of apical periodontitis and the causes of failed endodontic treatments that can be visualized in radiographs as asymptomatic post-treatment periapical radiolucencies. PMID:15574679

  19. Intralipid Fat Emulsion Decreases Respiratory Failure in a Rat Model of Parathion Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Courtney; Bird, Steven B.; Gaspari, Romolo

    2012-01-01

    Background Therapies exist for acute organophosphate (OP) exposure but mortality rates remain high (10% to 20%). Currently, treatment focuses on reversing the resultant cholinergic excess effects through the use of atropine. Intralipid fat emulsion (IFE) has been used to treat lipophilic drug ingestions and theoretically would be beneficial for some OP agents. Objectives The hypothesis was that IFE would decrease the acute respiratory depressant effects following lethal OP exposure using a lipophilic OP agent (parathion). Methods The authors used a previously validated animal model of OP poisoning with detailed physiologic respiratory recordings. The model consisted of Wistar rats anesthetized but spontaneously breathing 100% oxygen. Airflow, respiratory rate, tidal volume, mean arterial pressure, and pulse rate were digitally recorded for 120 minutes following OP exposure or until respiratory failure. Three study groups included parathion alone (n = 6), parathion and IFE 5 minutes after poisoning (n = 6), and parathion and IFE 20 minutes after poisoning (n = 6). In all groups, parathion was given as a single oral dose of 54 mg/kg (4 times the rat oral 50% population lethal dose [LD50]). Three boluses of IFE (15 mg/kg/min) were given over 3 minutes, 20 minutes apart, starting either 5 or 20 minutes after poisoning. Timing of IFE was based on parathion kinetics. In one study group IFE was initiated 5 minutes after poisoning to coincide with initial absorption of parathion. In another study group IFE was given at 20 minutes to coincide with peak intravenous parathion concentration. Primary outcome was percent of animals with apnea. Secondary outcome was time to apnea. Results Animals exposed to parathion alone demonstrated a steady decline in respiratory rate and tidal volume post-exposure, with apnea occurring a mean of 51.6 minutes after poisoning (95% CI = 35.8 min to 53.2 min). Animals treated with IFE 5 minutes post-exposuredemonstrated no difference in mean

  20. On a case of respiratory failure due to diaphragmatic paralysis and dilated cardiomyopathy in a patient with nemaline myopathy.

    PubMed

    Taglia, Antonella; D'Ambrosio, Paola; Palladino, Alberto; Politano, Luisa

    2012-12-01

    Nemaline myopathy is a rare congenital disease that generally occurs in childhood. We report a case of a 50-year-old man who presented with severe heart failure as the initial manifestation of nemaline myopathy. Soon after he developed acute restrictive respiratory failure due to the diaphragmatic paralysis. The diagnosis of "nemaline myopathy" was obtained on muscle biopsy performed one year later. After starting appropriate cardiological treatment and non-invasive ventilation, his cardiac and pulmonary functions improved substantially, remaining stable for over the 10 years since diagnosis. In the last two years the patient had a progressive deterioration of respiratory function, enabling him to attend daily activities. Few cases of respiratory failure in patients with adult-onset nemaline myopathy are reported, but the insidious onset in this case is even more unusual. This case highlights the wide spectrum of presenting features of adult-onset nemaline myopathy and the temporary efficacy of non invasive ventilation on respiratory function. PMID:23620652

  1. Geographic Access to High Capability Severe Acute Respiratory Failure Centers in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, David J.; Angus, Derek C.; Seymour, Christopher W.; Yealy, Donald M.; Carr, Brendan G.; Kurland, Kristen; Boujoukos, Arthur; Kahn, Jeremy M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Optimal care of adults with severe acute respiratory failure requires specific resources and expertise. We sought to measure geographic access to these centers in the United States. Design Cross-sectional analysis of geographic access to high capability severe acute respiratory failure centers in the United States. We defined high capability centers using two criteria: (1) provision of adult extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), based on either 2008–2013 Extracorporeal Life Support Organization reporting or provision of ECMO to 2010 Medicare beneficiaries; or (2) high annual hospital mechanical ventilation volume, based 2010 Medicare claims. Setting Nonfederal acute care hospitals in the United States. Measurements and Main Results We defined geographic access as the percentage of the state, region and national population with either direct or hospital-transferred access within one or two hours by air or ground transport. Of 4,822 acute care hospitals, 148 hospitals met our ECMO criteria and 447 hospitals met our mechanical ventilation criteria. Geographic access varied substantially across states and regions in the United States, depending on center criteria. Without interhospital transfer, an estimated 58.5% of the national adult population had geographic access to hospitals performing ECMO and 79.0% had geographic access to hospitals performing a high annual volume of mechanical ventilation. With interhospital transfer and under ideal circumstances, an estimated 96.4% of the national adult population had geographic access to hospitals performing ECMO and 98.6% had geographic access to hospitals performing a high annual volume of mechanical ventilation. However, this degree of geographic access required substantial interhospital transfer of patients, including up to two hours by air. Conclusions Geographic access to high capability severe acute respiratory failure centers varies widely across states and regions in the United States. Adequate

  2. Juvenile dermatomyositis with respiratory failure and peripheral nerve paralyses. A case report.

    PubMed

    Hussein, A

    1987-01-01

    A 9.5 years old girl suffering from an acute dermatomyositis, developed a respiratory failure, which was successfully managed with mechanical ventilation for 6 days. Paralysis of the right radial and the left peroneus nerves were recognized early in the disease course and were confirmed later by electrophysiologic examinations. A complete remission of the dermatomyositis and the paralysis of the radial nerve were achieved within months with prednisolone medication and physiotherapy; the peroneus nerve paralysis improved only slightly. Further uncommon manifestations were thrombocytopenia, retinitis and cerebral convulsions.

  3. Anesthetic Challenges in an Adult with Pierre Robin Sequence, Severe Juvenile Scoliosis, and Respiratory Failure.

    PubMed

    Rymer, Alyse N; Porteous, Grete H; Neal, Joseph M

    2015-09-15

    Anesthesiologists have the privilege and challenge of providing care for an extremely diverse population of patients, at times in urgent or emergent situations. We present a case of a 31-year-old woman with Pierre Robin sequence, severe juvenile scoliosis, and respiratory failure who underwent successful awake nasal fiberoptic intubation for tracheostomy at an adult tertiary care medical center. Familiarity with patient conditions infrequently encountered within our practice, as well as adherence to practice guidelines, proved essential to providing our patient with the safest care possible.

  4. Multiple organ failure with the adult respiratory distress syndrome in homicidal arsenic poisoning.

    PubMed

    Bolliger, C T; van Zijl, P; Louw, J A

    1992-01-01

    A 30-year-old man and a 39-year-old woman, who was 28 weeks pregnant, were simultaneously poisoned by eating chocolate containing arsenic trioxide. They developed a picture of multiple organ failure peaking around the 8th to 10th day after ingestion, with the development of life-threatening adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in both patients. This rarely reported complication of arsenic poisoning was managed successfully by intubation and mechanical ventilation with positive end expiratory pressure in both patients. Hemodynamic and laboratory data are presented supporting the clinical course. Arsenic toxicity further resulted in intrauterine fetal death. The effects of severe arsenic poisoning leading to early multiple organ failure with ARDS as well as to protracted, debilitating polyneuropathy are discussed.

  5. Outcome of Severe Dengue Viral Infection-caused Acute Liver Failure in Thai Children.

    PubMed

    Laoprasopwattana, Kamolwish; Jundee, Puthachat; Pruekprasert, Pornpimol; Geater, Alan

    2016-06-01

    To determine clinical course and outcomes of liver functions in children with dengue viral infection-caused acute liver failure (ALF), the records of patients aged <15 years attending our institution during 1989-2011 were reviewed. Of the 41 ALF patients, 2, 6 and 33 patients had dengue hemorrhagic fever grade II, III and IV, respectively. Multiorgan failure including respiratory failure, massive bleeding and acute kidney injury occurred in 80.0%, 96.0% and 84.0% of the ALF cases, respectively, with an overall fatality rate of 68.3%. Aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels were highest on the day that the patient developed ALF. Lactate dehydrogenase levels had positive correlations with AST (r = 0.95) and ALT (r = 0.87) (all p < 0.01). The median (interquartile range) days before the AST and ALT levels returned to lower than 200 U/L after the ALF were 10.5 (8.8, 12.8) and 10.5 (7.8, 14.0) days, respectively.

  6. The respiratory system.

    PubMed

    Zifko, U; Chen, R

    1996-10-01

    Neurological disorders frequently contribute to respiratory failure in critically ill patients. They may be the primary reason for the initiation of mechanical ventilation, or may develop later as a secondary complication. Disorders of the central nervous system leading to respiratory failure include metabolic encephalopathies, acute stroke, lesions of the motor cortex and brain-stem respiratory centres, and their descending pathways. Guillan-Barré syndrome, critical illness polyneuropathy and acute quadriplegic myopathy are the more common neuromuscular causes of respiratory failure. Clinical observations and pulmonary function tests are important in monitoring respiratory function. Respiratory electrophysiological studies are useful in the investigation and monitoring of respiratory failure. Transcortical and cervical magnetic stimulation can assess the central respiratory drive, and may be useful in determining the prognosis in ventilated patients, with cervical cord dysfunction. It is also helpful in the assessment of failure to wean, which is often caused by a combination of central and peripheral nervous system disorders. Phrenic nerve conduction studies and needle electromyography of the diaphragm and chest wall muscles are useful to characterize neuropathies and myopathies affecting the diaphragm. Repetitive phrenic nerve stimulation can assess neuromuscular transmission defects. It is important to identify patients at risk of respiratory failure. They should be carefully monitored and mechanical ventilation should be initiated before the development of severe hypoxaemia.

  7. Severe acute respiratory failure secondary to acute fibrinous and organizing pneumonia requiring mechanical ventilation: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    López-Cuenca, Sonia; Morales-García, Silvia; Martín-Hita, Ana; Frutos-Vivar, Fernando; Fernández-Segoviano, Pilar; Esteban, Andrés

    2012-08-01

    A 27-year-old woman was admitted to our ICU with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure and criteria for ARDS. Despite an F(IO(2)) of 1.0 and a lung protective strategy, the patient died on day 15 without any improvement. The relatives gave consent for post-mortem analysis. The histopathologic study of the lung showed findings typical of an acute fibrinous and organizing pneumonia. Apropos of this case we performed a PubMed search. We found 13 articles, including a total of 29 patients. Acute fibrinous and organizing pneumonia is an unusual cause of acute lung injury. The diagnostic criterion is histopathologic. There is little information regarding the pathophysiology of this illness. Important questions remain regarding this disease, including predisposing factors and management. Patients who require mechanical ventilation have poor outcomes.

  8. Clinical review: Early treatment of acute lung injury - paradigm shift toward prevention and treatment prior to respiratory failure

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients. Despite improved understanding of the pathogenesis of ALI, supportive care with a lung protective strategy of mechanical ventilation remains the only treatment with a proven survival advantage. Most clinical trials in ALI have targeted mechanically ventilated patients. Past trials of pharmacologic agents may have failed to demonstrate efficacy in part due to the resultant delay in initiation of therapy until several days after the onset of lung injury. Improved early identification of at-risk patients provides new opportunities for risk factor modification to prevent the development of ALI and novel patient groups to target for early treatment of ALI before progression to the need for mechanical ventilation. This review will discuss current strategies that target prevention of ALI and some of the most promising pharmacologic agents for early treatment of ALI prior to the onset of respiratory failure that requires mechanical ventilation. PMID:22713281

  9. Gradual versus abrupt weaning from respiratory support in acute respiratory failure and advanced chronic obstructive lung disease.

    PubMed

    Ashutosh, K

    1983-10-01

    Two methods of weaning from mechanical ventilation were compared in 18 instances of acute respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation for more than 30 days in patients with advanced chronic obstructive lung disease. All patients were ventilated using intermittent mandatory ventilation. Abrupt weaning (AW) consisted of abruptly discontinuing mechanical ventilation when the patients were considered ready for unassisted breathing. Gradual weaning (GW) involved a gradual reduction in the rate of intermittent mandatory ventilation before starting unassisted breathing. Gradual or abrupt weaning alone was used for weaning in five and four instances, respectively. Both methods were used in nine other instances. In the 14 instances when GW was tried, weaning was successful in three. In the 13 instances when AW was tried, weaning was successful in nine. The time in which mechanical ventilation was required was 64 +/- 31 (SD) days with GW and 42 +/- 12 (SD) days with AW. There was no difference in age, pulmonary function, or arterial blood gas results between the patients being weaned by the different methods. I conclude that GW offers no advantage over AW in weaning patients with advanced chronic obstructive lung disease requiring prolonged mechanical ventilation.

  10. Diversity Strategies to Mitigate Postulated Common Cause Failure Vulnerabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Richard Thomas

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes an approach to establish effective mitigating strategies that can resolve potential common-cause failure (CCF) vulnerabilities in instrumentation and control (I&C) systems at nuclear power plants. A particular objective in the development of these strategies, which consist of combinations of diversity attributes and their associated criteria, is to address the unique characteristics of digital technology that can contribute to CCF concerns. The research approach employed to establish diversity strategies involves investigation of available documentation on diversity usage and experience from nuclear power and non-nuclear industries, capture of expert knowledge and lessons learned, determination of common practices, and assessment of the nature of CCFs and compensating diversity attributes. The resulting diversity strategies address considerations such as the effect of technology choices, the nature of CCF vulnerabilities, and the prospective impact of each diversity type. In particular, the impact of each attribute and criterion on the purpose, process, product, and performance aspects of diverse systems are considered.

  11. Causes and treatment of oedema in patients with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Clark, Andrew L; Cleland, John G F

    2013-03-01

    Oedema is one of the fundamental features of heart failure, but the pathophysiology of oedema varies. Patients present along a spectrum ranging from acute pulmonary oedema to gross fluid retention and peripheral oedema (anasarca). In patients with pure pulmonary oedema, the problem is one of acute haemodynamic derangement; the patient does not have excess fluid, but pulmonary venous pressure rises such that the rate of fluid transudation into the interstitium of the lung exceeds the capacity of the pulmonary lymphatics to drain away the fluid. Conversely, in patients with peripheral oedema, the problem is one of fluid retention. Understanding the causes of oedema will enable straightforward, correct management of the condition. For patients with acute pulmonary oedema, vasodilatation is important to reduce cardiac filling pressures. For patients with fluid retention, removing the fluid, using either diuretics or mechanical means, is the most important consideration.

  12. Management of hypoxemic respiratory failure and pulmonary hypertension in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Ambalavanan, N; Aschner, J L

    2016-06-01

    While diagnoses of hypoxemic respiratory failure (HRF) and pulmonary hypertension (PH) in preterm infants may be based on criteria similar to those in term infants, management approaches often differ. In preterm infants, HRF can be classified as 'early' or 'late' based on an arbitrary threshold of 28 postnatal days. Among preterm infants with late HRF, the pulmonary vascular abnormalities associated with bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) represent a therapeutic challenge for clinicians. Surfactant, inhaled nitric oxide (iNO), sildenafil, prostacyclin and endothelin receptor blockers have been used to manage infants with both early and late HRF. However, evidence is lacking for most therapies currently in use. Chronic oral sildenafil therapy for BPD-associated PH has demonstrated some preliminary efficacy. A favorable response to iNO has been documented in some preterm infants with early PH following premature prolonged rupture of membranes and oligohydramnios. Management is complicated by a lack of clear demarcation between interventions designed to manage respiratory distress syndrome, prevent BPD and treat HRF. Heterogeneity in clinical phenotype, pathobiology and genomic underpinnings of BPD pose challenges for evidence-based management recommendations. Greater insight into the spectrum of disease phenotypes represented by BPD can optimize existing therapies and promote development of new treatments. In addition, better understanding of an individual's phenotype, genotype and biomarkers may suggest targeted personalized interventions. Initiatives such as the Prematurity and Respiratory Outcomes Program provide a framework to address these challenges using genetic, environmental, physiological and clinical data as well as large repositories of patient samples. PMID:27225961

  13. Applying a low-flow CO2 removal device in severe acute hypercapnic respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ajay S; Weerwind, Patrick W; Strauch, Uli; van Belle, Arne; Maessen, Jos G; Wouters, Emiel F M

    2016-03-01

    A novel and portable extracorporeal CO2-removal device was evaluated to provide additional gas transfer, auxiliary to standard therapy in severe acute hypercapnic respiratory failure. A dual-lumen catheter was inserted percutaneously in five subjects (mean age 55 ± 0.4 years) and, subsequently, connected to the CO2-removal device. The median duration on support was 45 hours (interquartile range 26-156), with a blood flow rate of approximately 500 mL/min. The mean PaCO2 decreased from 95.8 ± 21.9 mmHg to 63.9 ± 19.6 mmHg with the pH improving from 7.11 ± 0.1 to 7.26 ± 0.1 in the initial 4 hours of support. Three subjects were directly weaned from the CO2-removal device and mechanical ventilation, one subject was converted to ECMO and one subject died following withdrawal of support. No systemic bleeding or device complications were observed. Low-flow CO2 removal adjuvant to standard therapy was effective in steadily removing CO2, limiting the progression of acidosis in subjects with severe acute hypercapnic respiratory failure.

  14. Pathophysiological Basis of Acute Respiratory Failure on Non-Invasive Mechanical Ventilation.

    PubMed

    Romero-Dapueto, C; Budini, H; Cerpa, F; Caceres, D; Hidalgo, V; Gutiérrez, T; Keymer, J; Pérez, R; Molina, J; Giugliano-Jaramillo, C

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive mechanical ventilation (NIMV) was created for patients who needed noninvasive ventilator support, this procedure decreases the complications associated with the use of endotracheal intubation (ETT). The application of NIMV has acquired major relevance in the last few years in the management of acute respiratory failure (ARF), in patients with hypoxemic and hypercapnic failure. The main advantage of NIMV as compared to invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV) is that it can be used earlier outside intensive care units (ICUs). The evidence strongly supports its use in patients with COPD exacerbation, support in weaning process in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients, patients with acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema (ACPE), and Immunosuppressed patients. On the other hand, there is poor evidence that supports the use of NIMV in other pathologies such as pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), and during procedures as bronchoscopy, where its use is still controversial because the results of these studies are inconclusive against the decrease in the rate of intubation or mortality.

  15. Pathophysiological Basis of Acute Respiratory Failure on Non-Invasive Mechanical Ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Dapueto, C; Budini, H; Cerpa, F; Caceres, D; Hidalgo, V; Gutiérrez, T; Keymer, J; Pérez, R; Molina, J; Giugliano-Jaramillo, C

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive mechanical ventilation (NIMV) was created for patients who needed noninvasive ventilator support, this procedure decreases the complications associated with the use of endotracheal intubation (ETT). The application of NIMV has acquired major relevance in the last few years in the management of acute respiratory failure (ARF), in patients with hypoxemic and hypercapnic failure. The main advantage of NIMV as compared to invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV) is that it can be used earlier outside intensive care units (ICUs). The evidence strongly supports its use in patients with COPD exacerbation, support in weaning process in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients, patients with acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema (ACPE), and Immunosuppressed patients. On the other hand, there is poor evidence that supports the use of NIMV in other pathologies such as pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), and during procedures as bronchoscopy, where its use is still controversial because the results of these studies are inconclusive against the decrease in the rate of intubation or mortality. PMID:26312101

  16. Liquid ventilation improves pulmonary function, gas exchange, and lung injury in a model of respiratory failure.

    PubMed Central

    Hirschl, R B; Parent, A; Tooley, R; McCracken, M; Johnson, K; Shaffer, T H; Wolfson, M R; Bartlett, R H

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors evaluated gas exchange, pulmonary function, and lung histology during perfluorocarbon liquid ventilation (LV) when compared with gas ventilation (GV) in the setting of severe respiratory failure. BACKGROUND: The efficacy of LV in the setting of respiratory failure has been evaluated in premature animals with surfactant deficiency. However, very little work has been performed in evaluating the efficacy of LV in older animal models of the adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). METHODS: A stable model of lung injury was induced in 12 young sheep weighing 16.4 +/- 3.0 kg using right atrial injection of 0.07 mL/kg of oleic acid followed by saline pulmonary lavage and bijugular venovenous extracorporeal life support (ECLS). For the first 30 minutes on ECLS, all animals were ventilated with gas. Animals were then ventilated with either 15 mL/kg gas (GV, n = 6) or perflubron ([PFC], LV, n = 6) over the ensuing 2.5 hours. Subsequently, ECLS was discontinued in five of the GV animals and five of the LV animals, and GV or LV continued for 1 hour or until death. MAIN FINDINGS: Physiologic shunt (Qps/Qt) was significantly reduced in the LV animals when compared with the GV animals (LV = 31 +/- 10%; GV = 93 +/- 4%; p < 0.001) after 3 hours of ECLS. At the same time point, pulmonary compliance (CT) was significantly increased in the LV group when compared with the GV group (LV = 1.04 +/- 0.19 mL/cm H2O/kg; GV = 0.41 +/- 0.02 mL/cm H2O/kg; p < 0.001). In addition, the ECLS flow rate required to maintain the PaO2 in the 50- to 80-mm Hg range was substantially and significantly lower in the LV group when compared with that of the GV group (LV = 14 +/- 5 mL/kg/min; GV = 87 +/- 15 mL/kg/min; p < 0.001). All of the GV animals died after discontinuation of ECLS, whereas all the LV animals demonstrated effective gas exchange without extracorporeal support for 1 hour (p < 0.01). Lung biopsy light microscopy demonstrated a marked reduction in alveolar hemorrhage

  17. Chronic heart failure modifies respiratory mechanics in rats: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Pacheco, Deise M.; Silveira, Viviane D.; Thomaz, Alex; Nunes, Ramiro B.; Elsner, Viviane R.; Dal Lago, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To analyze respiratory mechanics and hemodynamic alterations in an experimental model of chronic heart failure (CHF) following myocardial infarction. Method Twenty-seven male adult Wistar rats were randomized to CHF group (n=12) or Sham group (n=15). Ten weeks after coronary ligation or sham surgery, the animals were anesthetized and submitted to respiratory mechanics and hemodynamic measurements. Pulmonary edema as well as cardiac remodeling were measured. Results The CHF rats showed pulmonary edema 26% higher than the Sham group. The respiratory system compliance (Crs) and the total lung capacity (TLC) were lower (40% and 27%, respectively) in the CHF rats when compared to the Sham group (P<0.01). There was also an increase in tissue resistance (Gti) and elastance (Hti) (28% and 45%, respectively) in the CHF group. Moreover, left ventricular end-diastolic pressure was higher (32 mmHg vs 4 mmHg, P<0.01), while the left ventricular systolic pressure was lower (118 mmHg vs 130 mmHg, P=0.02) in the CHF group when compared to the control. Pearson’s correlation coefficient showed a negative association between pulmonary edema and Crs (r=–0.70, P=0.0001) and between pulmonary edema and TLC (r=–0.67, P=0.0034). Pulmonary edema correlated positively with Gti (r=0.68, P=0.001) and Hti (r=0.68, P=0.001). Finally, there was a strong positive relationship between pulmonary edema and heart weight (r=0.80, P=0.001). Conclusion Rats with CHF present important changes in hemodynamic and respiratory mechanics, which may be associated with alterations in cardiopulmonary interactions. PMID:27556388

  18. Extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal for patients with acute respiratory failure secondary to the acute respiratory distress syndrome: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Marianne; Millar, Jonathan; Blackwood, Bronagh; Davies, Andrew; Brett, Stephen J; McAuley, Daniel F; McNamee, James J

    2014-05-15

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) continues to have significant mortality and morbidity. The only intervention proven to reduce mortality is the use of lung-protective mechanical ventilation strategies, although such a strategy may lead to problematic hypercapnia. Extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal (ECCO₂R) devices allow uncoupling of ventilation from oxygenation, thereby removing carbon dioxide and facilitating lower tidal volume ventilation. We performed a systematic review to assess efficacy, complication rates, and utility of ECCO₂R devices. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs), case-control studies and case series with 10 or more patients. We searched MEDLINE, Embase, LILACS (Literatura Latino Americana em Ciências da Saúde), and ISI Web of Science, in addition to grey literature and clinical trials registries. Data were independently extracted by two reviewers against predefined criteria and agreement was reached by consensus. Outcomes of interest included mortality, intensive care and hospital lengths of stay, respiratory parameters and complications. The review included 14 studies with 495 patients (two RCTs and 12 observational studies). Arteriovenous ECCO₂R was used in seven studies, and venovenous ECCO₂R in seven studies. Available evidence suggests no mortality benefit to ECCO₂R, although post hoc analysis of data from the most recent RCT showed an improvement in ventilator-free days in more severe ARDS. Organ failure-free days or ICU stay have not been shown to decrease with ECCOvR. Carbon dioxide removal was widely demonstrated as feasible, facilitating the use of lower tidal volume ventilation. Complication rates varied greatly across the included studies, representing technological advances. There was a general paucity of high-quality data and significant variation in both practice and technology used among studies, which confounded analysis. ECCO₂R is a rapidly evolving technology and is an efficacious treatment

  19. CSB-PGBD3 Mutations Cause Premature Ovarian Failure

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guangyu; Tang, Tie-Shan; Zhao, Shidou; Jiao, Xue; Gong, Juanjuan; Gao, Fei; Guo, Caixia; Simpson, Joe Leigh; Chen, Zi-Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Premature ovarian failure (POF) is a rare, heterogeneous disorder characterized by cessation of menstruation occurring before the age of 40 years. Genetic etiology is responsible for perhaps 25% of cases, but most cases are sporadic and unexplained. In this study, through whole exome sequencing in a non-consanguineous family having four affected members with POF and Sanger sequencing in 432 sporadic cases, we identified three novel mutations in the fusion gene CSB-PGBD3. Subsequently functional studies suggest that mutated CSB-PGBD3 fusion protein was impaired in response to DNA damage, as indicated by delayed or absent recruitment to damaged sites. Our data provide the first evidence that mutations in the CSB-PGBD3 fusion protein can cause human disease, even in the presence of functional CSB, thus potentially explaining conservation of the fusion protein for 43 My since marmoset. The localization of the CSB-PGBD3 fusion protein to UVA-induced nuclear DNA repair foci further suggests that the CSB-PGBD3 fusion protein, like many other proteins that can cause POF, modulates or participates in DNA repair. PMID:26218421

  20. CSB-PGBD3 Mutations Cause Premature Ovarian Failure.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yingying; Guo, Ting; Li, Guangyu; Tang, Tie-Shan; Zhao, Shidou; Jiao, Xue; Gong, Juanjuan; Gao, Fei; Guo, Caixia; Simpson, Joe Leigh; Chen, Zi-Jiang

    2015-07-01

    Premature ovarian failure (POF) is a rare, heterogeneous disorder characterized by cessation of menstruation occurring before the age of 40 years. Genetic etiology is responsible for perhaps 25% of cases, but most cases are sporadic and unexplained. In this study, through whole exome sequencing in a non-consanguineous family having four affected members with POF and Sanger sequencing in 432 sporadic cases, we identified three novel mutations in the fusion gene CSB-PGBD3. Subsequently functional studies suggest that mutated CSB-PGBD3 fusion protein was impaired in response to DNA damage, as indicated by delayed or absent recruitment to damaged sites. Our data provide the first evidence that mutations in the CSB-PGBD3 fusion protein can cause human disease, even in the presence of functional CSB, thus potentially explaining conservation of the fusion protein for 43 My since marmoset. The localization of the CSB-PGBD3 fusion protein to UVA-induced nuclear DNA repair foci further suggests that the CSB-PGBD3 fusion protein, like many other proteins that can cause POF, modulates or participates in DNA repair. PMID:26218421

  1. Mitigation of Manhole Events Caused by Secondary Cable Failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lili

    "Manhole event" refers to a range of phenomena, such as smokers, fires and explosions which occur on underground electrical infrastructure, primarily in major cities. The most common cause of manhole events is decomposition of secondary cable initiated by an electric fault. The work presented in this thesis addresses various aspects related to the evolution and mitigation of the manhole events caused by secondary cable insulation failure. Manhole events develop as a result of thermal decomposition of organic materials present in the cable duct and manholes. Polymer characterization techniques are applied to intensively study the materials properties as related to manhole events, mainly the thermal decomposition behaviors of the polymers present in the cable duct. Though evolved gas analysis, the combustible gases have been quantitatively identified. Based on analysis and knowledge of field conditions, manhole events is divided into at least two classes, those in which exothermic chemical reactions dominate and those in which electrical energy dominates. The more common form of manhole event is driven by air flow down the duct. Numerical modeling of smolder propagation in the cable duct demonstrated that limiting air flow is effective in reducing the generation rate of combustible gas, in other words, limiting manhole events to relatively minor "smokers". Besides manhole events, another by-product of secondary cable insulation breakdown is stray voltage. The danger to personnel due to stray voltage is mostly caused by the 'step potential'. The amplitude of step potential as a result of various types of insulation defects is calculated using Finite Element Analysis (FEA) program.

  2. Cheyne-Stokes respiration in patients with heart failure: prevalence, causes, consequences and treatments.

    PubMed

    Brack, Thomas; Randerath, Winfried; Bloch, Konrad E

    2012-01-01

    Cheyne-Stokes respiration (CSR) is characterized by a pattern of cyclic oscillations of tidal volume and respiratory rate with periods of hyperpnea alternating with hypopnea or apnea in patients with heart failure. CSR harms the failing heart through intermittent hypoxia brought about by apnea and hypopnea and recurrent sympathetic surges. CSR impairs the quality of life and increases cardiac mortality in patients with heart failure. Thus, CSR should actively be pursued in patients with severe heart failure. When CSR persists despite optimal therapy of heart failure, noninvasive adaptive servoventilation is currently the most promising treatment.

  3. [Role of biomarkers in the differential diagnosis of acute respiratory failure in the immediate postoperative period of lung transplantation].

    PubMed

    Ruano, L; Sacanell, J; Roman, A; Rello, J

    2013-01-01

    Lung transplant recipients are at high risk of suffering many complications during the immediate postoperative period, such as primary graft dysfunction, acute graft rejection or infection. The most common symptom is the presence of acute respiratory failure, and the use of biomarkers could be useful for establishing an early diagnosis of these conditions. Different biomarkers have been studied, but none have proven to be the gold standard in the differential diagnosis of acute respiratory failure. This paper offers a review of the different biomarkers that have been studied in this field.

  4. [Role of biomarkers in the differential diagnosis of acute respiratory failure in the immediate postoperative period of lung transplantation].

    PubMed

    Ruano, L; Sacanell, J; Roman, A; Rello, J

    2013-01-01

    Lung transplant recipients are at high risk of suffering many complications during the immediate postoperative period, such as primary graft dysfunction, acute graft rejection or infection. The most common symptom is the presence of acute respiratory failure, and the use of biomarkers could be useful for establishing an early diagnosis of these conditions. Different biomarkers have been studied, but none have proven to be the gold standard in the differential diagnosis of acute respiratory failure. This paper offers a review of the different biomarkers that have been studied in this field. PMID:23462428

  5. New Pneumococcal Carriage Acquired in Association with Acute Respiratory Infection Is Prone to Cause Otitis Media

    PubMed Central

    Leino, Tuija; Kilpi, Terhi

    2016-01-01

    For considering vaccine-prevention of pneumococcal acute otitis media (PncAOM), relationships between pneumococcal carriage, respiratory infection and PncAOM need to be understood. We analyzed nasopharyngeal samples collected from 329 unvaccinated Finnish children aged 2–24 months at scheduled visits and at visits during respiratory infection in 1994–97. We assessed temporal associations of respiratory infection with pneumococcal acquisition and whether PncAOM hazard depends on the relative timing of acquisition and the infection onset. The data comprised 607 person-years of risk-time for acquisition, 245 person-months of concurrent respiratory infection and carriage, and 119 episodes of PncAOM. The acquisition hazard was 3-fold in the month preceding respiratory sickness (hazard ratio, HR 3.5, 90% credible interval CI 2.9, 4.1) as compared to acquisition in healthy children. Moreover, the PncAOM hazard was markedly higher (HR 3.7, 90% CI 2.4, 5.3) during the first month of carriage acquired around the acute phase of respiratory infection (between 1 month before and 1 week after the sickness onset), as compared to carriage acquired later during sickness. The high proportion (76%) of PncAOM events occurring within 1 month of acquisition was due to frequent acquisition being associated with respiratory infection as well as the susceptibility of such acquisition to cause otitis media. PMID:27257789

  6. A systems engineering approach to automated failure cause diagnosis in space power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolce, James L.; Faymon, Karl A.

    1987-01-01

    Automatic failure-cause diagnosis is a key element in autonomous operation of space power systems such as Space Station's. A rule-based diagnostic system has been developed for determining the cause of degraded performance. The knowledge required for such diagnosis is elicited from the system engineering process by using traditional failure analysis techniques. Symptoms, failures, causes, and detector information are represented with structured data; and diagnostic procedural knowledge is represented with rules. Detected symptoms instantiate failure modes and possible causes consistent with currently held beliefs about the likelihood of the cause. A diagnosis concludes with an explanation of the observed symptoms in terms of a chain of possible causes and subcauses.

  7. Osteomalacia, severe thoracic deformities and respiratory failure in a young woman with anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Daisuke; Hotta, Mari; Ichihara, Atsuhiro

    2015-01-01

    The recent trends in avoiding sunbathing and eating fewer fish products have resulted in a high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in the general Japanese population. We herein report the case of a young woman with enduring anorexia nervosa (AN) who suffered from osteomalacia, thoracic deformities and respiratory failure. Her vitamin D deficiency had been overlooked for years. Although the serum 25-hyroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] level is a marker of vitamin D stores, it is not routinely examined because the cost is not covered by the national health insurance program. However, measuring the serum 25(OH)D levels in AN patients with hypocalcemia is recommended to prevent osteomalacia and osteoporosis.

  8. Noninvasive assessment of right and left ventricular function in acute and chronic respiratory failure

    SciTech Connect

    Matthay, R.A.; Berger, H.J.

    1983-05-01

    This review evaluates noninvasive techniques for assessing cardiovascular performance in acute and chronic respiratory failure. Radiographic, radionuclide, and echocardiographic methods for determining ventricular volumes, right (RV) and left ventricular (LV) ejection fractions, and pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) are emphasized. These methods include plain chest radiography, radionuclide angiocardiography, thallium-201 myocardial imaging, and M mode and 2-dimensional echocardiography, which have recently been applied in patients to detect pulmonary artery hypertension (PAH), right ventricular enlargement, and occult ventricular performance abnormalities at rest or exercise. Moreover, radionuclide angiocardiography has proven useful in combination with hemodynamic measurements, for evaluating the short-and long-term cardiovascular effects of therapeutic agents, such as oxygen, digitalis, theophylline, beta-adrenergic agents, and vasodilators.

  9. Taxonomy for Common-Cause Failure Vulnerability and Mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Richard Thomas; Korsah, Kofi; Mullens, James Allen; Pullum, Laura L.

    2015-09-01

    Applying current guidance and practices for common-cause failure (CCF) mitigation to digital instrumentation and control (I&C) systems has proven problematic, and the regulatory environment has been unpredictable. The potential for CCF vulnerability inhibits I&C modernization, thereby challenging the long-term sustainability of existing plants. For new plants and advanced reactor concepts, concern about CCF vulnerability in highly integrated digital I&C systems imposes a design burden that results in higher costs and increased complexity. The regulatory uncertainty in determining which mitigation strategies will be acceptable (e.g., what diversity is needed and how much is sufficient) drives designers to adopt complicated, costly solutions devised for existing plants. To address the conditions that constrain the transition to digital I&C technology by the US nuclear industry, crosscutting research is needed to resolve uncertainty, demonstrate necessary characteristics, and establish an objective basis for qualification of digital technology for nuclear power plant (NPP) I&C applications. To fulfill this research need, Oak Ridge National Laboratory is investigating mitigation of CCF vulnerability for nuclear-qualified applications. The outcome of this research is expected to contribute to a fundamentally sound, comprehensive basis to qualify digital technology for nuclear power applications. This report documents the development of a CCF taxonomy. The basis for the CCF taxonomy was generated by determining consistent terminology and establishing a classification approach. The terminology is based on definitions from standards, guides, and relevant nuclear power industry technical reports. The classification approach is derived from identified classification schemes focused on I&C systems and key characteristics, including failure modes. The CCF taxonomy provides the basis for a systematic organization of key systems aspects relevant to analyzing the potential for

  10. Influenza A (H10N7) Virus Causes Respiratory Tract Disease in Harbor Seals and Ferrets

    PubMed Central

    Herfst, Sander; Bodewes, Rogier; Pfankuche, Vanessa M.; van de Bildt, Marco W. G.; Seehusen, Frauke; Puff, Christina; Richard, Mathilde; Siebert, Ursula; Lehnert, Kristina; Bestebroer, Theo; Lexmond, Pascal; Fouchier, Ron A. M.; Prenger-Berninghoff, Ellen; Herbst, Werner; Koopmans, Marion; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.

    2016-01-01

    Avian influenza viruses sporadically cross the species barrier to mammals, including humans, in which they may cause epidemic disease. Recently such an epidemic occurred due to the emergence of avian influenza virus of the subtype H10N7 (Seal/H10N7) in harbor seals (Phoca vitulina). This epidemic caused high mortality in seals along the north-west coast of Europe and represented a potential risk for human health. To characterize the spectrum of lesions and to identify the target cells and viral distribution, findings in 16 harbor seals spontaneously infected with Seal/H10N7 are described. The seals had respiratory tract inflammation extending from the nasal cavity to bronchi associated with intralesional virus antigen in respiratory epithelial cells. Virus infection was restricted to the respiratory tract. The fatal outcome of the viral infection in seals was most likely caused by secondary bacterial infections. To investigate the pathogenic potential of H10N7 infection for humans, we inoculated the seal virus intratracheally into six ferrets and performed pathological and virological analyses at 3 and 7 days post inoculation. These experimentally inoculated ferrets displayed mild clinical signs, virus excretion from the pharynx and respiratory tract inflammation extending from bronchi to alveoli that was associated with virus antigen expression exclusively in the respiratory epithelium. Virus was isolated only from the respiratory tract. In conclusion, Seal/H10N7 infection in naturally infected harbor seals and experimentally infected ferrets shows that respiratory epithelial cells are the permissive cells for viral replication. Fatal outcome in seals was caused by secondary bacterial pneumonia similar to that in fatal human cases during influenza pandemics. Productive infection of ferrets indicates that seal/H10N7 may possess a zoonotic potential. This outbreak of LPAI from wild birds to seals demonstrates the risk of such occasions for mammals and thus humans

  11. Influenza A (H10N7) Virus Causes Respiratory Tract Disease in Harbor Seals and Ferrets.

    PubMed

    van den Brand, Judith M A; Wohlsein, Peter; Herfst, Sander; Bodewes, Rogier; Pfankuche, Vanessa M; van de Bildt, Marco W G; Seehusen, Frauke; Puff, Christina; Richard, Mathilde; Siebert, Ursula; Lehnert, Kristina; Bestebroer, Theo; Lexmond, Pascal; Fouchier, Ron A M; Prenger-Berninghoff, Ellen; Herbst, Werner; Koopmans, Marion; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Kuiken, Thijs; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Avian influenza viruses sporadically cross the species barrier to mammals, including humans, in which they may cause epidemic disease. Recently such an epidemic occurred due to the emergence of avian influenza virus of the subtype H10N7 (Seal/H10N7) in harbor seals (Phoca vitulina). This epidemic caused high mortality in seals along the north-west coast of Europe and represented a potential risk for human health. To characterize the spectrum of lesions and to identify the target cells and viral distribution, findings in 16 harbor seals spontaneously infected with Seal/H10N7 are described. The seals had respiratory tract inflammation extending from the nasal cavity to bronchi associated with intralesional virus antigen in respiratory epithelial cells. Virus infection was restricted to the respiratory tract. The fatal outcome of the viral infection in seals was most likely caused by secondary bacterial infections. To investigate the pathogenic potential of H10N7 infection for humans, we inoculated the seal virus intratracheally into six ferrets and performed pathological and virological analyses at 3 and 7 days post inoculation. These experimentally inoculated ferrets displayed mild clinical signs, virus excretion from the pharynx and respiratory tract inflammation extending from bronchi to alveoli that was associated with virus antigen expression exclusively in the respiratory epithelium. Virus was isolated only from the respiratory tract. In conclusion, Seal/H10N7 infection in naturally infected harbor seals and experimentally infected ferrets shows that respiratory epithelial cells are the permissive cells for viral replication. Fatal outcome in seals was caused by secondary bacterial pneumonia similar to that in fatal human cases during influenza pandemics. Productive infection of ferrets indicates that seal/H10N7 may possess a zoonotic potential. This outbreak of LPAI from wild birds to seals demonstrates the risk of such occasions for mammals and thus humans

  12. Episodic hypoxemia in an airline passenger with chronic respiratory failure on supplemental oxygen.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Paul T; Hlavac, Michael; Beckert, Lutz E

    2007-07-01

    Assessing the requirements for in-flight oxygen in passengers with pulmonary limitations can be a challenging task for clinicians. Aeromedical guidelines are available to help identify passengers that may require oxygen in flight. However, little is known about the actual in-flight response to passengers on oxygen. We measured the oxygen response (pulse oximetry) of a 67-yr-old female patient with chronic respiratory failure during a trans-Tasman flight (duration 170 min). This patient was assessed at the respiratory clinic before her journey and resting PaO2 (57 mmHg) indicated the requirement for in-flight oxygen. Bottled oxygen delivered at 2 L x min(-1) via nasal cannula was prescribed for her journey. Preflight SpO2 without supplemental oxygen was 92%. Mean in-flight SpO2 was well maintained at 93% while on oxygen at rest. There were four significant hypoxic events, which included light physical activity while on oxygen (three events; SpO2 to 84%) and a visit to the lavatory (off oxygen; SpO2 to 70%). Dyspnea and dizziness were reported during the lavatory visit. This case illustrates the importance of a preflight medical screening for passengers considered at risk during air travel and provides insight into the response of oxygen supplementation during flight.

  13. Role of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in adult respiratory failure: an overview.

    PubMed

    Anand, Suneesh; Jayakumar, Divya; Aronow, Wilbert S; Chandy, Dipak

    2016-01-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) provides complete or partial support of the heart and lungs. Ever since its inception in the 1960s, it has been used across all age groups in the management of refractory respiratory failure and cardiogenic shock. While it has gained widespread acceptance in the neonatal and pediatric physician community, ECMO remains a controversial therapy for Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) in adults. Its popularity was revived during the swine flu (H1N1) pandemic and advancements in technology have contributed to its increasing usage. ARDS continues to be a potentially devastating condition with significant mortality rates. Despite gaining more insights into this entity over the years, mechanical ventilation remains the only life-saving, yet potentially harmful intervention available for ARDS. ECMO shows promise in this regard by offering less dependence on mechanical ventilation, thereby potentially reducing ventilator-induced injury. However, the lack of rigorous clinical data has prevented ECMO from becoming the standard of care in the management of ARDS. Therefore, the results of two large ongoing randomized trials, which will hopefully throw more light on the role of ECMO in the management of this disease entity, are keenly awaited. In this article we will provide a basic overview of the development of ECMO, the types of ECMO, the pathogenesis of ARDS, different ventilation strategies for ARDS, the role of ECMO in ARDS and the role of ECMO as a bridge to lung transplantation. PMID:26848884

  14. [Prognostic factors for COPD patients with chronic hypercapnic respiratory failure and home ventilation].

    PubMed

    Budweiser, S; Jörres, R A; Heinemann, F; Pfeifer, M

    2009-09-01

    The prevalence of patients with severe COPD and chronic hypercapnic respiratory failure (CHRF) receiving non-invasive home ventilation has greatly increased. With regard to disease severity, a multidimensional assessment seems indicated. Base excess (BE), in particular, reflects the long-term metabolic response to chronic hypercapnia and thus constitutes a promising, easily accessible, integrative marker of CHRF. Infact, BE as well as nutritional status and lung hyperinflation have been identified as independent predictors of long-term survival. In addition and in a review with the literature, a broad panel of indices including frequent comorbidities are helpful for assessment and monitoring purposes of patients with CHRF. Accordingly, in view of the patients' individual risk profile, the decision about the initiation of NIV should probably not rely solely on symptoms and chronic persistent hypercapnia but include a spectrum of factors that specifically reflect disease severity. Owing to the physiologically positive effects of NIV and according to retrospective data, patients with COPD and recurrent hypercapnic respiratory decompensation and patients with prolonged mechanical ventilation and/or difficult weaning could also be considered for long-term non-invasive ventilation. This, however, has to be corroborated in future prospective trials. PMID:19750411

  15. Nocturnal nasal ventilation for treatment of patients with hypercapnic respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Gay, P C; Patel, A M; Viggiano, R W; Hubmayr, R D

    1991-07-01

    We reviewed the Mayo Clinic experience with nocturnal nasal ventilation (NNV) and retrospectively assessed the clinical benefits, patient compliance, and complications. NNV had been instituted in 26 patients with daytime hypercapnia and nocturnal hypoventilation due to neuromuscular diseases or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. After initiation of NNV, 21 of 26 patients continued to use this treatment regularly (81% compliance rate) and considered their life-style improved. In this subset of patients, the arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide during unassisted breathing decreased from 64 +/- 13 to 51 +/- 7 mm Hg, and the arterial partial pressure of oxygen increased from 58 +/- 12 to 68 +/- 8 mm Hg. No significant change was noted in the forced vital capacity or maximal respiratory pressures. Four of the five patients in whom NNV had been discontinued cited discomfort related to the mask or severity and poor prognosis of the underlying illness as reasons for cessation of treatment. We conclude that NNV is well tolerated by most patients and may improve alveolar ventilation and arterial oxygenation in patients with chronic respiratory failure.

  16. CT findings in viral lower respiratory tract infections caused by parainfluenza virus, influenza virus and respiratory syncytial virus

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min-Chul; Kim, Mi Young; Lee, Hyun Joo; Lee, Sang-Oh; Choi, Sang-Ho; Kim, Yang Soo; Woo, Jun Hee; Kim, Sung-Han

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Viral lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) can present with a variety of computed tomography (CT) findings. However, identifying the contribution of a particular virus to CT findings is challenging due to concomitant infections and the limited data on the CT findings in viral LRTIs. We therefore investigate the CT findings in different pure viral LRTIs. All patients who underwent bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and were diagnosed with LRTIs caused by parainfluenza virus (PIV), influenza virus, or respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) between 1998 and 2014 were enrolled in a tertiary hospital in Seoul, South Korea. A pure viral LRTI was defined as a positive viral culture from BAL without any positive evidence from respiratory or blood cultures, or from polymerase chain reaction (PCR), or from serologic tests for bacteria, fungi, mycobacteria, or other viruses. CT images of 40 patients with viral LRTIs were analyzed: 14 with PIV, 14 with influenza virus, and 12 with RSV. Patch consolidation (≥1 cm or more than 1 segmental level) was found only in PIV (29%) (P = 0.03), by which CT findings caused by PIV could resemble those seen in bacterial LRTIs. Ground-glass opacities were seen in all cases of influenza virus and were more frequent than in PIV (71%) and RSV (67%) (P = 0.05). Bronchial wall thickening was more common in influenza virus (71%) and RSV (67%) LRTIs than PIV LRTIs (21%) (P = 0.02). With respect to anatomical distribution, PIV infections generally affected the lower lobes (69%), while influenza virus mostly caused diffuse changes throughout the lungs (57%), and RSV frequently formed localized patterns in the upper and mid lobes (44%). The CT findings in LRTIs of PIV, influenza virus, and RSV can be distinguished by certain characteristics. These differences could be useful for early differentiation of these viral LRTIs, and empirical use of appropriate antiviral agents. PMID:27368011

  17. CT findings in viral lower respiratory tract infections caused by parainfluenza virus, influenza virus and respiratory syncytial virus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Chul; Kim, Mi Young; Lee, Hyun Joo; Lee, Sang-Oh; Choi, Sang-Ho; Kim, Yang Soo; Woo, Jun Hee; Kim, Sung-Han

    2016-06-01

    Viral lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) can present with a variety of computed tomography (CT) findings. However, identifying the contribution of a particular virus to CT findings is challenging due to concomitant infections and the limited data on the CT findings in viral LRTIs. We therefore investigate the CT findings in different pure viral LRTIs.All patients who underwent bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and were diagnosed with LRTIs caused by parainfluenza virus (PIV), influenza virus, or respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) between 1998 and 2014 were enrolled in a tertiary hospital in Seoul, South Korea. A pure viral LRTI was defined as a positive viral culture from BAL without any positive evidence from respiratory or blood cultures, or from polymerase chain reaction (PCR), or from serologic tests for bacteria, fungi, mycobacteria, or other viruses.CT images of 40 patients with viral LRTIs were analyzed: 14 with PIV, 14 with influenza virus, and 12 with RSV. Patch consolidation (≥1 cm or more than 1 segmental level) was found only in PIV (29%) (P = 0.03), by which CT findings caused by PIV could resemble those seen in bacterial LRTIs. Ground-glass opacities were seen in all cases of influenza virus and were more frequent than in PIV (71%) and RSV (67%) (P = 0.05). Bronchial wall thickening was more common in influenza virus (71%) and RSV (67%) LRTIs than PIV LRTIs (21%) (P = 0.02). With respect to anatomical distribution, PIV infections generally affected the lower lobes (69%), while influenza virus mostly caused diffuse changes throughout the lungs (57%), and RSV frequently formed localized patterns in the upper and mid lobes (44%).The CT findings in LRTIs of PIV, influenza virus, and RSV can be distinguished by certain characteristics. These differences could be useful for early differentiation of these viral LRTIs, and empirical use of appropriate antiviral agents. PMID:27368011

  18. Renal failure caused by chemicals, foods, plants, animal venoms, and misuse of drugs. An overview.

    PubMed

    Abuelo, J G

    1990-03-01

    Nephrotoxicity caused by contrast media and drugs is a frequent cause of renal failure in medical practice. However, there are only sporadic cases of renal failure caused by chemicals, foods, plants, animal venoms, and misused or illegal drugs, and standard medical textbooks are limited in the coverage given to the subject. This review provides a referenced compilation of these lesser-known nephrotoxins and gives an overview of renal failure caused by substances other than properly used medications.

  19. [An unusual cause of acute respiratory distress: obstructive bronchial aspergillosis].

    PubMed

    Margery, J; Perez, J-P; Vaylet, F; Bordier, E; Dot, J-M; Saint-Blancard, P; Bonnichon, A; Guigay, J; Pats, B; L'Her, P

    2004-06-01

    We report the case of a 77-Year-old immunocompetent woman who required intensive care for acute dyspnea revealing complete atelectasia of the left lung related to an aspergillus mycelium plug blocking the principal bronchus. The clinical course was favorable after deobstruction by thermocoagulation and oral itraconazole given for six Months. The patient was free of parenchymatous or endobronchial sequelae. Adjuvant oral corticoid therapy was given temporarily during the second Month of treatment when signs of transition towards allergic aspergillosis developed. Four Months after discontinuing the antifungal treatment, the patient developed a new episode of acute dyspnea caused by atelectasia limited to the right lower lobe. Treatment by itraconazole was resumed and continued as long-term therapy. No recurrence has been observed for eighteen Months. The diagnostic and therapeutic problems raised by Aspergillus fumigatus are well known in the immunocompromised subject, but can also be encountered in the immunocompetent subject. PMID:15292826

  20. Artificial placenta--lung assist devices for term and preterm newborns with respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Rochow, Niels; Chan, Emily C; Wu, Wen-I; Selvaganapathy, Ponnambalam R; Fusch, Gerhard; Berry, Leslie; Brash, John; Chan, Anthony K; Fusch, Christoph

    2013-06-25

    Respiratory insufficiency is a major cause of neonatal mortality and long-term morbidity, especially in very low birth weight infants. Today, non-invasive and mechanical ventilation are commonly accepted procedures to provide respiratory support to newborns, but they can reach their limit of efficacy. To overcome this technological plateau and further reduce mortality rates, the technology of an "artificial placenta", which is a pumpless lung assist device connected to the umbilical vessels, would serve to expand the therapeutic spectrum when mechanical ventilation becomes inadequate to treat neonates with severe respiratory insufficiency.
The first attempts to create such an artificial placenta took place more than 60 years ago. However, there has been a recent renaissance of this concept, including developments of its major components like the oxygenator, vascular access via umbilical vessels, flow control, as well as methods to achieve hemocompatibility in extracorporeal circuits. This paper gives a review of past and current development, animal experiments and human case studies of artificial placenta technology.

  1. High Prevalence of Respiratory Muscle Weakness in Hospitalized Acute Heart Failure Elderly Patients

    PubMed Central

    Verissimo, Pedro; Timenetsky, Karina T.; Casalaspo, Thaisa Juliana André; Gonçalves, Louise Helena Rodrigues; Yang, Angela Shu Yun; Eid, Raquel Caserta

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Respiratory Muscle Weakness (RMW) has been defined when the maximum inspiratory pressure (MIP) is lower than 70% of the predictive value. The prevalence of RMW in chronic heart failure patients is 30 to 50%. So far there are no studies on the prevalence of RMW in acute heart failure (AHF) patients. Objectives Evaluate the prevalence of RMW in patients admitted because of AHF and the condition of respiratory muscle strength on discharge from the hospital. Methods Sixty-three patients had their MIP measured on two occasions: at the beginning of the hospital stay, after they had reached respiratory, hemodynamic and clinical stability and before discharge from the hospital. The apparatus and technique to measure MIP were adapted because of age-related limitations of the patients. Data on cardiac ejection fraction, ECG, brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels and on the use of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) were collected. Results The mean age of the 63 patients under study was 75 years. On admission the mean ejection fraction was 33% (95% CI: 31–35) and the BNP hormone median value was 726.5 pg/ml (range: 217 to 2283 pg/ml); 65% of the patients used NIV. The median value of MIP measured after clinical stabilization was -52.7 cmH2O (range: -20 to -120 cmH2O); 76% of the patients had MIP values below 70% of the predictive value. On discharge, after a median hospital stay of 11 days, the median MIP was -53.5 cmH2O (range:-20 to -150 cmH2O); 71% of the patients maintained their MIP values below 70% of the predictive value. The differences found were not statistically significant. Conclusion Elderly patients admitted with AHF may present a high prevalence of RMW on admission; this condition may be maintained at similar levels on discharge in a large percentage of these patients, even after clinical stabilization of the heart condition. PMID:25671566

  2. Update on Common-Cause Failure Experience and Mitigation Practices

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Richard Thomas; Muhlheim, Michael David; Pullum, Laura L; Smith, Cyrus M; Holcomb, David Eugene; Korsah, Kofi

    2014-04-01

    Experience in other industries has shown that digital technology can provide substantial benefits in terms of performance and reliability. However, the U.S. nuclear power industry has been slow to adopt the technology extensively in its instrumentation and control (I&C) applications because of inhibiting factors such as regulatory uncertainty, insufficient technological experience base, implementation complexity, limited availability of nuclear-qualified products and vendors, and inadequate definition of modernization cost recapture. Although there have been examples of digital technology usage in the nuclear power industry, challenges to the qualification of digital technology for high-integrity nuclear power plant (NPP) applications have severely constrained more widespread progress in achieving the benefits that are possible through the transition to digital. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) established the Advanced Sensors and Instrumentation (ASI) technology area under the Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) Program to coordinate the instrumentation and controls (I&C) research across DOE NE and to identify and lead efforts to address common needs. As part of the NEET ASI research program, the Digital Technology Qualification project was established. Under this project, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is leading the investigation into mitigation of digital common-cause failure (CCF) vulnerabilities for nuclear-qualified applications. This technical report documents updated and expanded findings from research activities by ORNL. Specifically, the report describes CCF experience in the nuclear and nonnuclear industries, identifies the state of the practice for CCF mitigation through key examples, and presents conclusions from the determination of knowledge gaps.

  3. A 42-year-old farmer from Bangladesh with respiratory failure, septic arthritis, and multiple cavitating consolidations.

    PubMed

    AlShati, Mohammed H; Joshi, Rajinder M

    2014-08-01

    A 42-year-old man was directly admitted to the ICU with respiratory failure and hypotension. Two weeks prior and just after returning from Bangladesh, he presented to a polyclinic with fever, right knee pain, and generalized aches, for which he received oral antibiotics. He was a farmer, had diabetes, never smoked, and consumed alcohol occasionally.

  4. [Developmental radicular groove as a cause of endodontic failure].

    PubMed

    Fabra Campos, H; Millet Part, J

    1989-01-01

    A clinical case of apical injury on an upper lateral incisor with endodontical and surgical failures in its treatment is presented. Extraction of the incisor and its study at the stereoscopic microscope showed the existence of a developmental groove running from the cingulum to the end of the root, establishing a communication between the crevice and the apical part of the tooth. Bacterial infection through the groove could provide an explanation for treatment failure.

  5. [Developmental radicular groove as a cause of endodontic failure].

    PubMed

    Fabra Campos, H; Millet Part, J

    1989-01-01

    A clinical case of apical injury on an upper lateral incisor with endodontical and surgical failures in its treatment is presented. Extraction of the incisor and its study at the stereoscopic microscope showed the existence of a developmental groove running from the cingulum to the end of the root, establishing a communication between the crevice and the apical part of the tooth. Bacterial infection through the groove could provide an explanation for treatment failure. PMID:2640035

  6. Isolated supra-cardiac partial anomalous pulmonary venous connection causing right heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Sogomonian, Robert; Alkhawam, Hassan; Zaiem, Feras; Vyas, Neil; Jolly, JoshPaul; Nguyen, James; Haftevani, Emma A. Moradoghli; Dijanic, Christopher; Lieber, Joseph J.

    2016-01-01

    Right heart failure (RHF) has been overlooked as left heart failure has predominated. One of the many causes of RHF is partial anomalous pulmonary venous connection (PAPVC), an extremely rare entity in nature. Physicians should consider the unusual causes of RHF after ruling out the common causes. PMID:27124165

  7. Pill Properties that Cause Dysphagia and Treatment Failure

    PubMed Central

    Fields, Jeremy; Go, Jorge T.; Schulze, Konrad S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Pills (tablets and capsules) are widely used to administer prescription drugs or to take supplements such as vitamins. Unfortunately, little is known about how much effort it takes Americans to swallow these various pills. More specifically, it is not known to what extent hard-to-swallow pills might affect treatment outcomes (eg, interfering with adherence to prescribed medications or causing clinical complications). It is also unclear which properties (eg, size, shape, or surface texture) Americans prefer or reject for their pills. To learn more about these issues, we interviewed a small group of individuals. Methods We invited individuals in waiting rooms of our tertiary health care center to participate in structured interviews about their pill-taking habits and any problems they have swallowing pills. We inquired which pill properties they believed caused swallowing problems. Participants scored capsules and pills of representative size, shape, and texture for swallowing effort and reported their personal preferences. Results Of 100 successive individuals, 99 participants completed the interview (65% women, mean age = 41 years, range = 23-77 years). Eighty-three percent took pills daily (mean 4 pills/d; 56% of those pills were prescribed by providers). Fifty-four percent of participants replied yes to the question, "Did you ever have to swallow a solid medication that was too difficult?" Four percent recounted serious complications: 1% pill esophagitis, 1% pill impaction, and 2% stopped treatments (antibiotic and prenatal supplement) because they could not swallow the prescribed pills. Half of all participants routinely resorted to special techniques (eg, plenty of liquids or repeated or forceful swallows). Sixty-one percent of those having difficulties cited specific pill properties: 27% blamed size (20% of problems were caused by pills that were too large whereas 7% complained about pills that were too small to sense); 12% faulted rough surface

  8. Technical-Induced Hemolysis in Patients with Respiratory Failure Supported with Veno-Venous ECMO – Prevalence and Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Lehle, Karla; Philipp, Alois; Zeman, Florian; Lunz, Dirk; Lubnow, Matthias; Wendel, Hans-Peter; Göbölös, Laszlo; Schmid, Christof; Müller, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to explore the prevalence and risk factors for technical-induced hemolysis in adults supported with veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (vvECMO) and to analyze the effect of hemolytic episodes on outcome. This was a retrospective, single-center study that included 318 adult patients (Regensburg ECMO Registry, 2009–2014) with acute respiratory failure treated with different modern miniaturized ECMO systems. Free plasma hemoglobin (fHb) was used as indicator for hemolysis. Throughout a cumulative support duration of 4,142 days on ECMO only 1.7% of the fHb levels were above a critical value of 500 mg/l. A grave rise in fHb indicated pumphead thrombosis (n = 8), while acute oxygenator thrombosis (n = 15) did not affect fHb. Replacement of the pumphead normalized fHb within two days. Neither pump or cannula type nor duration on the first system was associated with hemolysis. Multiple trauma, need for kidney replacement therapy, increased daily red blood cell transfusion requirements, and high blood flow (3.0–4.5 L/min) through small-sized cannulas significantly resulted in augmented blood cell trauma. Survivors were characterized by lower peak levels of fHb [90 (60, 142) mg/l] in comparison to non-survivors [148 (91, 256) mg/l, p≤0.001]. In conclusion, marked hemolysis is not common in vvECMO with modern devices. Clinically obvious hemolysis often is caused by pumphead thrombosis. High flow velocity through small cannulas may also cause technical-induced hemolysis. In patients who developed lung failure due to trauma, fHb was elevated independantly of ECMO. In our cohort, the occurance of hemolysis was associated with increased mortality. PMID:26606144

  9. WORLD TRADE CENTER FINE PARTICULATE MATTER CAUSES RESPIRATORY TRACT HYPERRESPONSIVENESS IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    World Trade Center Fine Particulate Matter Causes Respiratory Tract Hyperresponsiveness in Mice

    Stephen H. Gavett1, Najwa Haykal-Coates1, Jerry W. Highfill1, Allen D. Ledbetter1, Lung Chi Chen2, Mitchell D. Cohen2, Jack R. Harkema3, James G. Wagner3, and Daniel L. Costa1.<...

  10. [Acute respiratory distress syndrome caused by tropical eosinophilic lung disease: a case in Gabon].

    PubMed

    Chani, M; Iken, M; Eljahiri, Y; Nzenze, J R; Mion, G

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the case of a 28-year-old woman in whom acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) following cholecystectomy led to the discovery of eosinophilic lung disease. Outcome was favorable after oxygenotherapy and medical treatment using ivermectin and corticosteroids. The case shows that hypereosinophilic syndrome can be the underlying cause of ARDS. PMID:21695880

  11. Constipation as a reversible cause of ventriculoperitoneal shunt failure. Report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Powers, Ciaran J; George, Timothy; Fuchs, Herbert E

    2006-09-01

    Ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt failure is a common problem encountered by pediatric neurosurgeons. The majority of such failures are due to obstruction of the device. Conditions in which intraabdominal pressure is chronically elevated, such as pregnancy, have been associated with shunt failure. Chronic constipation may also result in abnormally elevated intraabdominal pressure and may be an underrecognized cause of distal VP shunt failure. The authors describe the cases of two children who presented with clinical and imaging evidence of VP shunt failure and who were also severely constipated. Treatment of their constipation resulted in both clinical and imaging-documented resolution of their shunt failure.

  12. Cost-effectiveness of Out-of-Hospital Continuous Positive Airway Pressure for Acute Respiratory Failure

    PubMed Central

    Thokala, Praveen; Goodacre, Steve; Ward, Matt; Penn-Ashman, Jerry; Perkins, Gavin D.

    2015-01-01

    Study objective We determine the cost-effectiveness of out-of-hospital continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) compared with standard care for adults presenting to emergency medical services with acute respiratory failure. Methods We developed an economic model using a United Kingdom health care system perspective to compare the costs and health outcomes of out-of-hospital CPAP to standard care (inhospital noninvasive ventilation) when applied to a hypothetical cohort of patients with acute respiratory failure. The model assigned each patient a probability of intubation or death, depending on the patient’s characteristics and whether he or she had out-of-hospital CPAP or standard care. The patients who survived accrued lifetime quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) and health care costs according to their age and sex. Costs were accrued through intervention and hospital treatment costs, which depended on patient outcomes. All results were converted into US dollars, using the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development purchasing power parities rates. Results Out-of-hospital CPAP was more effective than standard care but was also more expensive, with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of £20,514 per QALY ($29,720/QALY) and a 49.5% probability of being cost-effective at the £20,000 per QALY ($29,000/QALY) threshold. The probability of out-of-hospital CPAP’s being cost-effective at the £20,000 per QALY ($29,000/QALY) threshold depended on the incidence of eligible patients and varied from 35.4% when a low estimate of incidence was used to 93.8% with a high estimate. Variation in the incidence of eligible patients also had a marked influence on the expected value of sample information for a future randomized trial. Conclusion The cost-effectiveness of out-of-hospital CPAP is uncertain. The incidence of patients eligible for out-of-hospital CPAP appears to be the key determinant of cost-effectiveness. PMID:25737210

  13. Giant pulmonary hamartoma causing acute right heart failure.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Heman M N; Page, Richard D

    2014-01-01

    Giant pulmonary hamartomas are rare. We describe a case of a 59-year-old female patient with a giant chondroid hamartoma in the lower lobe of the right lung presenting with acute right heart failure. To the best of our knowledge such a unique presentation has not been previously described in the literature. PMID:24384217

  14. [Isolated left ventricular noncompaction causing refractory heart failure].

    PubMed

    Meneguz-Moreno, Rafael Alexandre; Rodrigues da Costa Teixeira, Felipe; Rossi Neto, João Manoel; Finger, Marco Aurélio; Casadei, Carolina; Castillo, Maria Teresa; Sanchez de Almeida, Antonio Flávio

    2016-03-01

    Left ventricular noncompaction is a rare congenital anomaly characterized by excessive left ventricular trabeculation, deep intertrabecular recesses and a thin compacted layer due to the arrest of compaction of myocardial fibers during embryonic development. We report the case of a young patient with isolated left ventricular noncompaction, leading to refractory heart failure that required extracorporeal membrane oxygenation followed by emergency heart transplantation. PMID:26928017

  15. Systemic sclerosis: a rare cause of heart failure?

    PubMed

    González-Cambeiro, María Cristina; Abu-Assi, Emad; Abumuaileq, Rami Riziq-Yousef; Raposeiras-Roubín, Sergio; Rigueiro-Veloso, Pedro; Virgós-Lamela, Alejandro; Díaz-Castro, Oscar; González-Juanatey, José Ramón

    2015-10-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SS) is a chronic disease in which there may be multisystem involvement. It is rare (estimated prevalence: 0.5-2/10000) with high morbidity and mortality, and there is as yet no curative treatment. We report the case of a young woman newly diagnosed with SS, in whom decompensated heart failure was the main manifestation.

  16. Flight crews with upper respiratory tract infections: epidemiology and failure to seek aeromedical attention.

    PubMed

    Ungs, T J; Sangal, S P

    1990-10-01

    A voluntary questionnaire was used to determine the epidemiology of upper respiratory infections (URI), and whether aeromedical attention was sought. Questionnaires completed by 256 of 276 eligible flight crewmembers revealed that over half, 61.7% (158), reported having greater than or equal to 1 URI during a 6-month period, for a total of 272 URIs. No statistically significant associations, p greater than 0.05, were noted between the occurrence of URI and sex, age, pilot vs. enlisted, or smoking status. Subjects with children living at home with them were more likely to report having URIs than those with no children, p less than 0.10. Aeromedical attention was not sought in 55.5% (151/272) of the URI episodes. An Aeromedical Concern (AMC) was determined to occur in 69.5% (105/151) of these representing 38.6% (105/272) of all URIs. The most common reason for AMC was taking self-prescribed medications. AMCs were more frequent among enlisted personnel than officers (pilots), p less than 0.05. Possible reasons why AMCs may occur are discussed. In summary, URIs are common in aircrews, as is the failure to seek aeromedical attention.

  17. Body position changes redistribute lung computed-tomographic density in patients with acute respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Gattinoni, L; Pelosi, P; Vitale, G; Pesenti, A; D'Andrea, L; Mascheroni, D

    1991-01-01

    Ten patients with parenchymal acute respiratory failure (ARF) underwent computed tomography (CT) scans while in the supine and prone positions. At equal levels of positive end-expiratory pressure, the authors measured the changes of CT density in dorsal and ventral basilar lung regions induced by the change of position as well as alterations of gas exchange. The level of venous admixture did not change with body position. The CT scan image of each lung was fractionated into ten levels from dorsal to ventral, each constituting 10% of the lung height. After measuring each lung fraction, the volume, the average CT number, its frequency distribution, and the expected normal value, we computed the lung tissue mass, the excess tissue mass, and the fraction of normally inflated tissue (excess tissue mass = amount of "tissue," which includes edema, cells, and blood in excess of the expected normal value). We also estimated the superimposed hydrostatic pressure on each lung region. We found that the excess lung tissue mass is independent of position. However, in patients in the supine position, lung CT density increased and regional inflation decreased from ventral to dorsal, suggesting progressive deflation of gas-containing alveoli along the gravity gradient. A similar ventral-dorsal deflation pattern occurred within 10 min in patients in the prone position. We conclude that the lung in patients with ARF behaves like an elastic body with a diffusely increased mass; dependent lung regions are compressed by the pressure of overlying structures.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Noninvasive ventilation in severe hypoxemic respiratory failure: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, Miquel; Esquinas, Antonio; Leon, Miguel; Gonzalez, Gumersindo; Alarcon, Antonio; Torres, Antoni

    2003-12-15

    The efficacy of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) to avoid intubation and improve survival was assessed in 105 patients with severe acute hypoxemic respiratory failure (arterial O2 tension or saturation persistently 60 mm Hg or less or 90% or less, respectively; breathing conventional Venturi oxygen at a maximal concentration [50%]), excluding hypercapnia, admitted into intensive care units of three hospitals. Patients were randomly allocated within 24 hours of fulfilling inclusion criteria to receive NIV (n=51) or high-concentration oxygen therapy (n=54). The primary end-point variable was the decrease in the intubation rate. Both groups had similar characteristics. Compared with oxygen therapy, NIV decreased the need for intubation (13, 25% vs. 28, 52%, p=0.010), the incidence of septic shock (6, 12% vs. 17, 31%, p=0.028), and the intensive care unit mortality (9, 18% vs. 21, 39%, p=0.028) and increased the cumulative 90-day survival (p=0.025). The improvement of arterial hypoxemia and tachypnea was higher in the noninvasive ventilation group with time (p=0.029 each). Multivariate analyses showed NIV to be independently associated with decreased risks of intubation (odds ratio, 0.20; p=0.003) and 90-day mortality (odds ratio, 0.39; p=0.017). The use of noninvasive ventilation prevented intubation, reduced the incidence of septic shock, and improved survival in these patients compared with high-concentration oxygen therapy. PMID:14500259

  19. 26 CFR 301.7432-1 - Civil cause of action for failure to release a lien.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Civil cause of action for failure to release a... TREASURY (CONTINUED) PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION Judicial Proceedings Civil Actions by the United States § 301.7432-1 Civil cause of action for failure to release a lien. (a)...

  20. 26 CFR 301.7432-1 - Civil cause of action for failure to release a lien.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Civil cause of action for failure to release a... TREASURY (CONTINUED) PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION Judicial Proceedings Civil Actions by the United States § 301.7432-1 Civil cause of action for failure to release a lien. (a)...

  1. 26 CFR 301.7432-1 - Civil cause of action for failure to release a lien.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Civil cause of action for failure to release a... TREASURY (CONTINUED) PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION Judicial Proceedings Civil Actions by the United States § 301.7432-1 Civil cause of action for failure to release a lien. (a)...

  2. 26 CFR 301.7432-1 - Civil cause of action for failure to release a lien.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Civil cause of action for failure to release a... TREASURY (CONTINUED) PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION Judicial Proceedings Civil Actions by the United States § 301.7432-1 Civil cause of action for failure to release a lien. (a)...

  3. 26 CFR 301.7432-1 - Civil cause of action for failure to release a lien.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Civil cause of action for failure to release a... TREASURY (CONTINUED) PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION Judicial Proceedings Civil Actions by the United States § 301.7432-1 Civil cause of action for failure to release a lien. (a)...

  4. Data on respiratory variables in critically ill patients with acute respiratory failure placed on proportional assist ventilation with load adjustable gain factors (PAV+).

    PubMed

    Georgopoulos, Dimitris; Xirouchaki, Nectaria; Tzanakis, Nikolaos; Younes, Magdy

    2016-09-01

    The data show respiratory variables in 108 critically ill patients with acute respiratory failure placed on proportional assist ventilation with load adjustable gain factors (PAV+) after at least 36 h on passive mechanical ventilation. PAV+ was continued for 48 h until the patients met pre-defined criteria either for switching to controlled modes or for breathing without ventilator assistance. Data during passive mechanical ventilation and during PAV+ are reported. Data are acquired from the whole population, as well as from patients with and without acute respiratory distress syndrome. The reported variables are tidal volume, driving pressure (ΔP, the difference between static end-inspiratory plateau pressure and positive end-expiratory airway pressure), respiratory system compliance and resistance, and arterial blood gasses. The data are supplemental to our original research article, which described individual ΔP in these patients and examined how it related to ΔP when the same patients were ventilated with passive mechanical ventilation using the currently accepted lung-protective strategy "Driving pressure during assisted mechanical ventilation. Is it controlled by patient brain?" [1].

  5. Acute respiratory distress syndrome caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae without elevated pulmonary vascular permeability: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Naoki; Oi, Rie; Ota, Muneyuki; Toriumi, Shinichi; Ogushi, Fumitaka

    2016-01-01

    Sporadic patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae have been reported. However, knowledge about the pathophysiology and pharmacological treatment of this condition is insufficient. Moreover, the pulmonary vascular permeability in ARDS related to M. pneumoniae infection has not been reported. We report a case of ARDS caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae without elevated pulmonary vascular permeability, which was successfully treated using low-dose short-term hydrocortisone, suggesting that pulmonary infiltration in ARDS caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae does not match the criteria of permeability edema observed in typical ARDS. PMID:27162691

  6. Veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support during lung volume reduction surgery for a severe respiratory failure patient with emphysema

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xuyan; He, Hangyong

    2016-01-01

    The use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) in adults has increased in popularity and importance for the support of patients with cardiac or pulmonary failure, but rarely been described as a means of support during anaesthesia and surgery. We report the case of a patient who required lung volume reduction because of emphysema where veno-venous ECMO was required both during surgery and for the first four days postoperatively. We describe the anaesthetic management of this patient who had severe respiratory failure, review other alternatives and discuss why ECMO was particularly suited to this case. PMID:27076979

  7. Root Causes of Component Failures Program: Methods and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Satterwhite, D G; Cadwallader, L C; Vesely, W E; Meale, B M

    1986-12-01

    This report contains information pertaining to definitions, methodologies, and applications of root cause analysis. Of specific interest, and highlighted throughout the discussion, are applications pertaining to current and future Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) light water reactor safety programs. These applications are discussed in view of addressing specific program issues under NRC consideration and reflect current root cause analysis capabilities.

  8. Isocyanate asthma: respiratory symptoms caused by diphenyl-methane di-isocyanate

    PubMed Central

    Tanser, A. R.; Bourke, M. P.; Blandford, A. G.

    1973-01-01

    Tanser, A. R., Bourke, M. P., and Blandford, A. G. (1973).Thorax, 28, 596-600. Isocyanate asthma: respiratory symptoms caused by diphenyl-methane di-isocyanate. We investigated 57 employees of a factory where diphenyl-methane di-isocyanate (MDI) was used to prepare the materials for making rigid polyurethane foam. Four employees had developed hypersensitivity to MDI. Two had severe, and one moderate asthma, while the fourth had symptoms resembling the delayed hypersensitivity type of reaction. Ten other employees had experienced unpleasant, mainly respiratory, irritant effects from MDI vapour. A past history of bronchitis or of allergy was found more commonly in those with symptoms from MDI than in those without symptoms. It is not known if MDI causes permanent damage to the respiratory tract. The most severely affected cases in the present series had normal spirometric values after recovery, and no persisting symptoms. MDI is safer than other isocyanates used in industry but may cause both major and minor illness. It should be handled with the same precautions as those used with the more toxic compounds. PMID:4784381

  9. Probable chronic renal failure caused by Lonomia caterpillar envenomation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Erucism is a skin reaction to envenomation from certain poisonous caterpillar bristles. In Brazil, most reports of erucism provoked by Lonomia caterpillars are from the southern region. Most manifestations of erucism are local and include burning pain, itching, local hyperthermia and, rarely, blisters (benign symptoms with spontaneous regression in a few hours). General symptoms such as nausea and vomiting, headache, fever, myalgia, abdominal pain and conjunctivitis may also occur. Uncommon symptoms include arthritis, coagulation disorders (manifested as bruising and bleeding), intracerebral hemorrhage and acute renal failure, which comprise serious complications. The present study reports the case of 60-year-old patient from Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil, who came into contact with a caterpillar and developed, a few days later, chronic renal disease. PMID:23849585

  10. Synchronization failure caused by interplay between noise and network heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Y.; Kori, H.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate synchronization in complex networks of noisy phase oscillators. We find that, while too weak a coupling is not sufficient for the whole system to synchronize, too strong a coupling induces a nontrivial type of phase slip among oscillators, resulting in synchronization failure. Thus, an intermediate coupling range for synchronization exists, which becomes narrower when the network is more heterogeneous. Analyses of two noisy oscillators reveal that nontrivial phase slip is a generic phenomenon when noise is present and coupling is strong. Therefore, the low synchronizability of heterogeneous networks can be understood as a result of the difference in effective coupling strength among oscillators with different degrees; oscillators with high degrees tend to undergo phase slip while those with low degrees have weak coupling strengths that are insufficient for synchronization.

  11. Considerations in the management of hypoxemic respiratory failure and persistent pulmonary hypertension in term and late preterm neonates.

    PubMed

    Lakshminrusimha, S; Konduri, G G; Steinhorn, R H

    2016-06-01

    Recent advances in our understanding of neonatal pulmonary circulation and the underlying pathophysiology of hypoxemic respiratory failure (HRF)/persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN) have resulted in more effective management strategies. Results from animal studies demonstrate that low alveolar oxygen tension (PAO2) causes hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction, whereas an increase in oxygen tension to normoxic levels (preductal arterial partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2) between 60 and 80 mm Hg and/or preductal peripheral capillary oxygen saturation between 90% and 97%) results in effective pulmonary vasodilation. Hyperoxia (preductal PaO2 >80 mm Hg) does not cause further pulmonary vasodilation, and oxygen toxicity may occur when high concentrations of inspired oxygen are used. It is therefore important to avoid both hypoxemia and hyperoxemia in the management of PPHN. In addition to oxygen supplementation, therapeutic strategies used to manage HRF/PPHN in term and late preterm neonates may include lung recruitment with optimal mean airway pressure and surfactant, inhaled and intravenous vasodilators and 'inodilators'. Clinical evidence suggests that administration of surfactant or inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) therapy at a lower acuity of illness can decrease the risk of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation/death, progression of HRF and duration of hospital stay. Milrinone may be beneficial as an inodilator and may have specific benefits following prolonged exposure to iNO plus oxygen owing to inhibition of phosphodiesterase (PDE)-3A. Additionally, sildenafil, and, in selected cases, hydrocortisone may be appropriate options after hyperoxia and oxidative stress owing to their effects on PDE-5 activity and expression. Continued investigation into these and other interventions is needed to optimize treatment and improve outcomes. PMID:27225960

  12. Bilevel ventilation during exercise in acute on chronic respiratory failure: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Menadue, Collette; Alison, J A; Piper, A J; Flunt, D; Ellis, E R

    2010-02-01

    To determine the immediate effects of bilevel non-invasive ventilation plus oxygen (NIV+O(2)) during exercise compared to exercise with O(2) alone in people recovering from acute on chronic hypercapnic respiratory failure (HRF), a randomised crossover study with repeated measures was performed. Eighteen participants performed six minute walk tests (6MWT) and 16 participants performed unsupported arm exercise (UAE) tests with NIV+O(2) and with O(2) alone in random order. Distance walked increased by a mean of 43.4m (95% CI 14.1 to 72.8, p=0.006) with NIV+O(2) compared to exercise with O(2) alone. In addition, isotime oxygen saturation increased by a mean of 5% (95% CI 2-7, p=0.001) and isotime dyspnoea was reduced [median 2 (interquartile range (IQR) 1-4) versus 4 (3-5), p=0.028] with NIV+O(2). A statistically significant increase was also observed in UAE endurance time with NIV+O(2) [median 201s (IQR 93-414) versus 157 (90-342), p=0.033], and isotime perceived exertion (arm muscle fatigue) was reduced by a mean of 1.0 on the Borg scale (95% CI -1.9 to -0.1, p=0.037) compared with O(2) alone. Non-invasive ventilation plus O(2) during walking resulted in an immediate improvement in distance walked and oxygen saturation, and a reduction in dyspnoea compared to exercise with O(2) alone in people recovering from acute on chronic HRF. The reduction of dyspnoea during walking and arm muscle fatigue during UAE observed with NIV+O(2) may allow patients to better tolerate exercise early in the recovery period. PMID:19804963

  13. Phenotyping community-acquired pneumonia according to the presence of acute respiratory failure and severe sepsis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute respiratory failure (ARF) and severe sepsis (SS) are possible complications in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). The aim of the study was to evaluate prevalence, characteristics, risk factors and impact on mortality of hospitalized patients with CAP according to the presence of ARF and SS on admission. Methods This was a multicenter, observational, prospective study of consecutive CAP patients admitted to three hospitals in Italy, Spain, and Scotland between 2008 and 2010. Three groups of patients were identified: those with neither ARF nor SS (Group A), those with only ARF (Group B) and those with both ARF and SS (Group C) on admission. Results Among the 2,145 patients enrolled, 45% belonged to Group A, 36% to Group B and 20% to Group C. Patients in Group C were more severe than patients in Group B. Isolated ARF was correlated with age (p < 0.001), COPD (p < 0.001) and multilobar infiltrates (p < 0.001). The contemporary occurrence of ARF and SS was associated with age (p = 0.002), residency in nursing home (p = 0.007), COPD (p < 0.001), multilobar involvement (p < 0.001) and renal disease (p < 0.001). 4.2% of patients in Group A died, 9.3% in Group B and 26% in Group C, p < 0.001. After adjustment, the presence of only ARF had an OR for in-hospital mortality of 1.85 (p = 0.011) and the presence of both ARF and SS had an OR of 6.32 (p < 0.001). Conclusions The identification of ARF and SS on hospital admission can help physicians in classifying CAP patients into three different clinical phenotypes. PMID:24593040

  14. High Resource Utilization Does Not Affect Mortality in Acute Respiratory Failure Patients Managed With Tracheostomy

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Bradley D; Stwalley, Dustin; Lambert, Dennis; Edler, Joshua; Morris, Peter E; Medvedev, Sofia; Hohmann, Samuel F; Kymes, Steven M

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Tracheostomy practice in patients with acute respiratory failure (ARF) varies greatly among institutions. This variability has the potential to be reflected in the resources expended providing care. In various healthcare environments, increased resource expenditure has been associated with a favorable effect on outcome. OBJECTIVE To examine the association between institutional resource expenditure and mortality in ARF patients managed with tracheostomy. METHODS We developed analytic models employing the University Health Systems Consortium (Oakbrook, Illinois) database. Administrative coding data were used to identify patients with the principal diagnosis of ARF, procedures, complications, post-discharge destination, and survival. Mean resource intensity of participating academic medical centers was determined using risk-adjusted estimates of costs. Mortality risk was determined using a multivariable approach that incorporated patient-level demographic and clinical variables and institution-level resource intensity. RESULTS We analyzed data from 44,124 ARF subjects, 4,776 (10.8%) of whom underwent tracheostomy. Compared to low-resource-intensity settings, treatment in high-resource-intensity academic medical centers was associated with increased risk of mortality (odds ratio 1.11, 95% CI 1.05–1.76), including those managed with tracheostomy (odds ratio high-resource-intensity academic medical center with tracheostomy 1.10, 95% CI 1.04 –1.17). We examined the relationship between complication development and outcome. While neither the profile nor number of complications accumulated differed comparing treatment environments (P > .05 for both), mortality for tracheostomy patients experiencing complications was greater in high-resource-intensity (95/313, 30.3%) versus low-resource-intensity (552/2,587, 21.3%) academic medical centers (P < .001). CONCLUSIONS We were unable to demonstrate a positive relationship between resource expenditure and outcome in

  15. Low-intensity noninvasive ventilation: Lower pressure, more exacerbations of chronic respiratory failure

    PubMed Central

    Kadowaki, Toru; Wakabayashi, Kiryo; Kimura, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Kanako; Ikeda, Toshikazu; Yano, Shuichi

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: For patients with chronic respiratory failure (CRF) who are treated with noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NPPV), a little is known regarding the effects of low-intensity NPPV (LI-NPPV) on the clinical course of CRF and the frequency of adjustments in these patients. OBJECTIVES: This study investigated the effects of LI-NPPV on the clinical course of patients with CRF as compared with patients who were treated with conventional NPPV (C-NPPV) and determined how frequently NPPV was adjusted during therapy. METHODS: Clinical data from 21 patients who received long-term NPPV were retrospectively analyzed. Patients were categorized into two groups based on the level of initial pressure support (PS): C-NPPV group (PS ≥ 10 cm H2O) and LI-NPPV group (PS < 10 cm H2O). RESULTS: Patients in the LI-NPPV group had significantly more exacerbations of CRF (P < 0.05). There was no significant difference in the number of patients who required adjustments of NPPV settings between the two groups. There was no significant difference in PaCO2 levels 1 month after the start of NPPV between the two groups; however, PaCO2 levels were significantly lower after 1 year in the C-group (P < 0.001). Seventy-one percent of LI-NPPV patients and 43% of C-NPPV patients needed NPPV adjustments. CONCLUSIONS: Attention should be paid to CRF patients who are initially administered LI-NPPV; they should be carefully observed because they can develop more exacerbations of CRF than patients undergoing C-NPPV. If possible, higher initial PS should be administered to prevent CRF exacerbations. PMID:27168863

  16. Total Liquid Ventilation Provides Superior Respiratory Support to Conventional Mechanical Ventilation in a Large Animal Model of Severe Respiratory Failure

    PubMed Central

    Pohlmann, Joshua R; Brant, David O; Daul, Morgan A; Reoma, Junewai L; Kim, Anne C; Osterholzer, Kathryn R; Johnson, Kent J; Bartlett, Robert H; Cook, Keith E; Hirschl, Ronald B

    2011-01-01

    Total liquid ventilation (TLV) has the potential to provide respiratory support superior to conventional mechanical ventilation (CMV) in the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). However, laboratory studies are limited to trials in small animals for no longer than 4 hours. The objective of this study was to compare TLV and CMV in a large animal model of ARDS for 24 hours. Ten sheep weighing 53 ± 4 (SD) kg were anesthetized and ventilated with 100% oxygen. Oleic acid was injected into the pulmonary circulation until PaO2:FiO2 ≥ 60 mmHg, followed by transition to a protective CMV protocol (n=5) or TLV (n=5) for 24 hours. Pathophysiology was recorded and the lungs were harvested for histological analysis. Animals treated with CMV became progressively hypoxic and hypercarbic despite maximum ventilatory support. Sheep treated with TLV maintained normal blood gases with statistically greater PO2 (p<10−9) and lower PCO2 (p < 10−3) than the CMV group. Survival at 24 hours in the TLV and CMV groups were 100% and 40% respectively (p< 0.05). Thus, TLV provided gas exchange superior to CMV in this laboratory model of severe ARDS. PMID:21084968

  17. A general cause based methodology for analysis of dependent failures in system risk and reliability assessments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, Andrew N.

    Traditional parametric Common Cause Failure (CCF) models quantify the soft dependencies between component failures through the use of empirical ratio relationships. Furthermore CCF modeling has been essentially restricted to identical components in redundant formations. While this has been advantageous in allowing the prediction of system reliability with little or no data, it has been prohibitive in other applications such as modeling the characteristics of a system design or including the characteristics of failure when assessing the risk significance of a failure or degraded performance event (known as an event assessment). This dissertation extends the traditional definition of CCF to model soft dependencies between like and non-like components. It does this through the explicit modeling of soft dependencies between systems (coupling factors) such as sharing a maintenance team or sharing a manufacturer. By modeling the soft dependencies explicitly these relationships can be individually quantified based on the specific design of the system and allows for more accurate event assessment given knowledge of the failure cause. Since the most data informed model in use is the Alpha Factor Model (AFM), it has been used as the baseline for the proposed solutions. This dissertation analyzes the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Common Cause Failure Database event data to determine the suitability of the data and failure taxonomy for use in the proposed cause-based models. Recognizing that CCF events are characterized by full or partial presence of "root cause" and "coupling factor" a refined failure taxonomy is proposed which provides a direct link between the failure cause category and the coupling factors. This dissertation proposes two CCF models (a) Partial Alpha Factor Model (PAFM) that accounts for the relevant coupling factors based on system design and provide event assessment with knowledge of the failure cause, and (b)General Dependency Model (GDM),which uses

  18. Green tea extract: A potential cause of acute liver failure

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Shreena S; Beer, Stacey; Kearney, Debra L; Phillips, Garrett; Carter, Beth A

    2013-01-01

    The use of herbal products has increased significantly in recent years. Because these products are not subject to regulation by the Food and Drug Administration and are often used without supervision by a healthcare provider, the indication for and consumption of these supplements is quite variable. Moreover, their use is generally regarded as safe and natural by the lay-public. Unfortunately, there has been an increase in the number of reported adverse events occurring with the use of herbal products. We present a case of acute impending liver failure in an adolescent male using a weight-loss product containing green tea extract. Our case adds to the growing concern surrounding the ingestion of green tea extract and serves to heighten healthcare provider awareness of a potential green tea extract hepatotoxicity. Despite the generally touted benefits of green tea as a whole, clinical concern regarding its use is emerging and has been linked to its concentration in multiple herbal supplements. Interestingly, the suspected harmful compounds are those previously proposed to be advantageous for weight-loss, cancer remedy, and anti-inflammatory purposes. Yet, we emphasize the need to be aware of not just green tea extract, but the importance of monitoring patient use of all dietary supplements and herbal products. PMID:23964154

  19. Does metabolic failure at the synapse cause Alzheimer's disease?

    PubMed

    Engel, Peter A

    2014-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) a neurodegenerative disorder of widely distributed cortical networks evolves over years while A beta (Aβ) oligomer neurotoxicity occurs within seconds to minutes. This disparity combined with disappointing outcomes of anti-amyloid clinical trials challenges the centrality of Aβ as principal mediator of neurodegeneration. Reconsideration of late life AD as the end-product of intermittent regional failure of the neuronal support system to meet the needs of vulnerable brain areas offers an alternative point of view. This model introduces four ideas: (1) That Aβ is a synaptic signaling peptide that becomes toxic in circumstances of metabolic stress. (2) That intense synaptic energy and maintenance requirements of cortical hubs may exceed resources during peak demand initiating a neurotoxic cascade in these selectively vulnerable regions. (3) That axonal transport to and from neuron soma cannot account fully for high mitochondrial densities and other requirements of distant terminal axons. (4) That neurons as specialists in information management, delegate generic support functions to astrocytes and other cell types. Astrocytes use intercellular transport by exosomes and tunneling nanotubes (TNTs) to deliver mitochondria, substrates and protein reprocessing services to axonal sites distant from neuronal soma. This viewpoint implicates the brain's support system and its disruption by various age and disease-related insults as significant mediators of neurodegenerative disease. A better understanding of this system should broaden concepts of neurodegeneration and facilitate development of effective treatments.

  20. Neural dysfunction following respiratory viral infection as a cause of chronic cough hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Zaccone, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory viral infections are a common cause of acute coughing, an irritating symptom for the patient and an important mechanism of transmission for the virus. Although poorly described, the inflammatory consequences of infection likely induce coughing by chemical (inflammatory mediator) or mechanical (mucous) activation of the cough-evoking sensory nerves that innervate the airway wall. For some individuals, acute cough can evolve into a chronic condition, in which cough and aberrant airway sensations long outlast the initial viral infection. This suggests that some viruses have the capacity to induce persistent plasticity in the neural pathways mediating cough. In this brief review we present the clinical evidence of acute and chronic neural dysfunction following viral respiratory tract infections and explore possible mechanisms by which the nervous system may undergo activation, sensitization and plasticity. PMID:26141017

  1. Effect of selected antiasthmatic plant constituents against micro organism causing upper respiratory tract infection.

    PubMed

    Nilani, P; Duraisamy, B; Dhamodaran, P; Ravichandran, S; Elango, K

    2010-01-01

    Most exacerbations of asthma can be proven to be associated with bacterial infections and there is scientific evidence that frequent respiratory infections particularly bacterial infections provoke asthma attack. Considering these facts different plant extracts and phytoconstituents with proven anti asthmatic property had been selected for screening anti microbial activity in in-vitro models. In the present study, Coleus forskohlii Willd. extract (10% Forskolin), Piper Longum L. Extract (20% Piperine), Adathoda vasica Nees. extract (30% Vasicinone), Curcuma longa L. extract (60% Curcumin) were screened for the antibacterial activity against human pathogens causing upper respiratory infection namely Haemophilus influenzae , Streptococcus pneumoniae , Streptococcus pyrogene and Staphylococcus aureus, by taking Gentamycin, Optochin, Bacitracin and Amoxicillin as reference standards. Except for Adathoda vasica Nees. extract, all the other selected plant extracts exhibited a moderate activity antibacterial activity against selected strains.

  2. Star fruit (Averrhoa carambola) intoxication: an important cause of consciousness disturbance in patients with renal failure.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chin-Tung; Chen, Yung-Chang; Fang, Ji-Tseng; Huang, Chiu-Ching

    2002-05-01

    Star fruit intoxication is a rare cause of consciousness disturbance in patients with renal failure. Most cases in the literature are uremic patients on maintenance dialysis. We present a patient with chronic renal failure, who was not on dialysis program yet, suffered from star fruit intoxication with presentation of consciousness disturbance and successfully managed by a session of hemodialysis.

  3. Distal ventriculoperitoneal shunt failure caused by silicone allergy. Case report.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Namath S; Wang, Paul P; James, Carol; Carson, Benjamin S; Avellino, Anthony M

    2005-03-01

    The placement of a ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt is the most common form of treatment for hydrocephalus. Although allergic reactions to the silicone in shunt hardware are very rare, the authors describe a case of silicone allergy causing multiple ventricular shunt revisions. A 24-year-old man, who had undergone multiple VP shunt revisions, presented with shunt malfunction caused by allergic reaction of the tissues surrounding the shunt tubing. The patient's existing silicone-based shunt was replaced with a new polyurethane system, including the proximal and distal catheters as well as the valve mechanism. Contrary to recommendations in previous studies of silicone shunt allergies, long-term immunosuppression was not initiated. The patient was followed up for more than 8 years without recurrence of an allergic reaction to the shunt. This outcome indicates that replacing the original silicone-based shunt system with a polyurethane-based system alone is sufficient in the treatment of a silicone shunt allergy.

  4. A comparison of synchronized intermittent mandatory ventilation and pressure-regulated volume control ventilation in elderly patients with acute exacerbations of COPD and respiratory failure

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Suchi; Shi, Jindong; Fu, Cuiping; Wu, Xu; Li, Shanqun

    2016-01-01

    Background COPD is the third leading cause of death worldwide. Acute exacerbations of COPD may cause respiratory failure, requiring intensive care unit admission and mechanical ventilation. Intensive care unit patients with acute exacerbations of COPD requiring mechanical ventilation have higher mortality rates than other hospitalized patients. Although mechanical ventilation is the most effective intervention for these conditions, invasive ventilation techniques have yielded variable effects. Objective We evaluated pressure-regulated volume control (PRVC) ventilation treatment efficacy and preventive effects on pulmonary barotrauma in elderly COPD patients with respiratory failure. Patients and methods Thirty-nine intubated patients were divided into experimental and control groups and treated with the PRVC and synchronized intermittent mandatory ventilation – volume control methods, respectively. Vital signs, respiratory mechanics, and arterial blood gas analyses were monitored for 2–4 hours and 48 hours. Results Both groups showed rapidly improved pH, partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2), and PaO2 per fraction of inspired O2 levels and lower partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PaCO2) levels. The pH and PaCO2 levels at 2–4 hours were lower and higher, respectively, in the test group than those in the control group (P<0.05 for both); after 48 hours, blood gas analyses showed no statistical difference in any marker (P>0.05). Vital signs during 2–4 hours and 48 hours of treatment showed no statistical difference in either group (P>0.05). The level of peak inspiratory pressure in the experimental group after mechanical ventilation for 2–4 hours and 48 hours was significantly lower than that in the control group (P<0.05), while other variables were not significantly different between groups (P>0.05). Conclusion Among elderly COPD patients with respiratory failure, application of PRVC resulted in rapid improvement in arterial blood gas analyses while maintaining

  5. What Causes Failure and Success? Students' Perceptions of Their Academic Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forsyth, Donelson R.; Story, Paul A.; Kelley, Karl N.; McMillan, James H.

    2009-01-01

    How do students' conceptualize the causes of their own academic successes and failures? Taking a phenomenological approach, students identified the causes of their performance immediately following return of a graded examination. We then used factor and item analyses to organize causes that were identified by a substantial number of students into…

  6. 20 CFR 404.454 - Good cause for failure to make required reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... timely report was due to good cause. Before making any penalty determination as described in §§ 404.451 and 404.453, the individual shall be advised of the penalty and good cause provisions and afforded an... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Good cause for failure to make...

  7. 20 CFR 404.454 - Good cause for failure to make required reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... timely report was due to good cause. Before making any penalty determination as described in §§ 404.451 and 404.453, the individual shall be advised of the penalty and good cause provisions and afforded an... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Good cause for failure to make...

  8. 20 CFR 404.454 - Good cause for failure to make required reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... timely report was due to good cause. Before making any penalty determination as described in §§ 404.451 and 404.453, the individual shall be advised of the penalty and good cause provisions and afforded an... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Good cause for failure to make...

  9. 20 CFR 404.454 - Good cause for failure to make required reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... timely report was due to good cause. Before making any penalty determination as described in §§ 404.451 and 404.453, the individual shall be advised of the penalty and good cause provisions and afforded an... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Good cause for failure to make...

  10. First Neisseria gonorrhoeae strain with resistance to cefixime causing gonorrhoea treatment failure in Austria, 2011.

    PubMed

    Unemo, M; Golparian, D; Stary, A; Eigentler, A

    2011-10-27

    We describe the first cefixime-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae strain in Austria that caused treatment failure.It follows the first five cases in Europe of cefixime treatment failure, reported in Norway in 2010 and the United Kingdom in 2011. Effective treatment of gonorrhoea is crucial for public health control and, at present, requires substantially enhanced awareness, more frequent test-of-cure, interaction with experts after therapeutic failure, tracing and therapy of contacts, and surveillance of gonococcal antimicrobial resistance and treatment failures worldwide.

  11. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus: Another Zoonotic Betacoronavirus Causing SARS-Like Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Jasper F. W.; Lau, Susanna K. P.; To, Kelvin K. W.; Cheng, Vincent C. C.; Woo, Patrick C. Y.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The source of the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic was traced to wildlife market civets and ultimately to bats. Subsequent hunting for novel coronaviruses (CoVs) led to the discovery of two additional human and over 40 animal CoVs, including the prototype lineage C betacoronaviruses, Tylonycteris bat CoV HKU4 and Pipistrellus bat CoV HKU5; these are phylogenetically closely related to the Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) CoV, which has affected more than 1,000 patients with over 35% fatality since its emergence in 2012. All primary cases of MERS are epidemiologically linked to the Middle East. Some of these patients had contacted camels which shed virus and/or had positive serology. Most secondary cases are related to health care-associated clusters. The disease is especially severe in elderly men with comorbidities. Clinical severity may be related to MERS-CoV's ability to infect a broad range of cells with DPP4 expression, evade the host innate immune response, and induce cytokine dysregulation. Reverse transcription-PCR on respiratory and/or extrapulmonary specimens rapidly establishes diagnosis. Supportive treatment with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and dialysis is often required in patients with organ failure. Antivirals with potent in vitro activities include neutralizing monoclonal antibodies, antiviral peptides, interferons, mycophenolic acid, and lopinavir. They should be evaluated in suitable animal models before clinical trials. Developing an effective camel MERS-CoV vaccine and implementing appropriate infection control measures may control the continuing epidemic. PMID:25810418

  12. Tombs of Aspergillus: A missed cause of recurrent respiratory infections in allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    Jha, Onkar Kumar; Khanna, Arjun; Dabral, Charul; Talwar, Deepak

    2016-07-01

    Broncholithiasis is an often overlooked condition and has been associated with symptoms such as cough, hemoptysis, and recurrent respiratory infections. The most common mechanism of a broncholith formation is the enlargement and subsequent erosion of a lymph node into an adjacent airway. Here, we describe this entity in a patient with advanced allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, with chronic hypercapnic respiratory failure, and with frequent infective exacerbations. These frequent exacerbations were initially attributed to the poor lung function of the patient and the inability to cough out the secretions. The diagnosis of broncholithiasis was eventually established on bronchoscopy, when the patient was intubated and mechanically ventilated. In this patient, the mixed broncholiths were not associated with mediastinal lymphadenopathy and with biopsy showing Aspergillus with no lymph node tissue indicating its bronchial origin. A high index of suspicion should be kept in patients with recurrent infective exacerbations of pulmonary diseases, especially when computed tomography images show calcifications in the vicinity of airways even in the absence of lymphadenopathy, as most of these can be treated with routine bronchoscopic interventions. PMID:27555698

  13. Tombs of Aspergillus: A missed cause of recurrent respiratory infections in allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Onkar Kumar; Khanna, Arjun; Dabral, Charul; Talwar, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Broncholithiasis is an often overlooked condition and has been associated with symptoms such as cough, hemoptysis, and recurrent respiratory infections. The most common mechanism of a broncholith formation is the enlargement and subsequent erosion of a lymph node into an adjacent airway. Here, we describe this entity in a patient with advanced allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, with chronic hypercapnic respiratory failure, and with frequent infective exacerbations. These frequent exacerbations were initially attributed to the poor lung function of the patient and the inability to cough out the secretions. The diagnosis of broncholithiasis was eventually established on bronchoscopy, when the patient was intubated and mechanically ventilated. In this patient, the mixed broncholiths were not associated with mediastinal lymphadenopathy and with biopsy showing Aspergillus with no lymph node tissue indicating its bronchial origin. A high index of suspicion should be kept in patients with recurrent infective exacerbations of pulmonary diseases, especially when computed tomography images show calcifications in the vicinity of airways even in the absence of lymphadenopathy, as most of these can be treated with routine bronchoscopic interventions. PMID:27555698

  14. World Trade Center fine particulate matter causes respiratory tract hyperresponsiveness in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Gavett, Stephen H; Haykal-Coates, Najwa; Highfill, Jerry W; Ledbetter, Allen D; Chen, Lung Chi; Cohen, Mitchell D; Harkema, Jack R; Wagner, James G; Costa, Daniel L

    2003-01-01

    Pollutants originating from the destruction of the World Trade Center (WTC) in New York City on 11 September 2001 have been reported to cause adverse respiratory responses in rescue workers and nearby residents. We examined whether WTC-derived fine particulate matter [particulate matter with a mass median aerodynamic diameter < 2.5 microm (PM2.5)] has detrimental respiratory effects in mice to contribute to the risk assessment of WTC-derived pollutants. Samples of WTC PM2.5 were derived from settled dust collected at several locations around Ground Zero on 12 and 13 September 2001. Aspirated samples of WTC PM2.5 induced mild to moderate degrees of pulmonary inflammation 1 day after exposure but only at a relatively high dose (100 microg). This response was not as great as that caused by 100 microg PM2.5 derived from residual oil fly ash (ROFA) or Washington, DC, ambient air PM [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Standard Reference Material (SRM) 1649a]. However, this same dose of WTC PM2.5 caused airway hyperresponsiveness to methacholine aerosol comparable to that from SRM 1649a and to a greater degree than that from ROFA. Mice exposed to lower doses by aspiration or inhalation exposure did not develop significant inflammation or hyperresponsiveness. These results show that exposure to high levels of WTC PM2.5 can promote mechanisms of airflow obstruction in mice. Airborne concentrations of WTC PM2.5 that would cause comparable doses in people are high (approximately 425 microg/m3 for 8 hr) but conceivable in the aftermath of the collapse of the towers when rescue and salvage efforts were in effect. We conclude that a high-level exposure to WTC PM2.5 could cause pulmonary inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness in people. The effects of chronic exposures to lower levels of WTC PM2.5, the persistence of any respiratory effects, and the effects of coarser WTC PM are unknown and were not examined in these studies. Degree of exposure and respiratory

  15. Severe Acute Infection Due to Serratia marcescens Causing Respiratory Distress in An Immunocompetent Adult.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Sada, Pablo; Escalante, Mikel; Lizarralde, Eva

    2016-01-01

    The role of Serratia marcescens changed from a harmless saprophytic microorganism to an important opportunistic human pathogen. It often causes nosocomial device-associated outbreaks and rarely serious invasive community acquired infections. We present a case of a community-acquired Serratia marcescens bacteremia leading to Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a previously healthy 51-year-old man without identifiable risk factors. Full recovery was achieved with solely medical treatment and observation in ICU during three days. To our knowledge it is an extremely uncommon presentation and just few cases have been previously reported in the literature.

  16. Common-Cause Failure Treatment in Event Assessment: Basis for a Proposed New Model

    SciTech Connect

    Dana Kelly; Song-Hua Shen; Gary DeMoss; Kevin Coyne; Don Marksberry

    2010-06-01

    Event assessment is an application of probabilistic risk assessment in which observed equipment failures and outages are mapped into the risk model to obtain a numerical estimate of the event’s risk significance. In this paper, we focus on retrospective assessments to estimate the risk significance of degraded conditions such as equipment failure accompanied by a deficiency in a process such as maintenance practices. In modeling such events, the basic events in the risk model that are associated with observed failures and other off-normal situations are typically configured to be failed, while those associated with observed successes and unchallenged components are assumed capable of failing, typically with their baseline probabilities. This is referred to as the failure memory approach to event assessment. The conditioning of common-cause failure probabilities for the common cause component group associated with the observed component failure is particularly important, as it is insufficient to simply leave these probabilities at their baseline values, and doing so may result in a significant underestimate of risk significance for the event. Past work in this area has focused on the mathematics of the adjustment. In this paper, we review the Basic Parameter Model for common-cause failure, which underlies most current risk modelling, discuss the limitations of this model with respect to event assessment, and introduce a proposed new framework for common-cause failure, which uses a Bayesian network to model underlying causes of failure, and which has the potential to overcome the limitations of the Basic Parameter Model with respect to event assessment.

  17. Causes of dysregulation of lipid metabolism in chronic renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Vaziri, Nosratola D.

    2010-01-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) is associated with accelerated atherosclerosis and premature death from cardiovascular disease. These events are driven by oxidative stress inflammation and lipid disorders. ESRD-induced lipid abnormalities primarily stem from dysregulation of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and triglyceride-rich lipoprotein metabolism and oxidative modification of lipoproteins. In this context, production and plasma concentration of Apo-I and Apo-II are reduced, HDL maturation is impaired, HDL composition is altered, HDL anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory functions are depressed, clearance of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins and their atherogenic remnants is impaired, their composition is altered, and their plasma concentration is elevated in ESRD. The associated defect in HDL maturation is largely caused by acquired lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) deficiency while its triglyceride enrichment is due to hepatic lipase deficiency. Hyper-triglyceridemia, abnormal composition, and impaired clearance of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins and their remnants are mediated by down-regulation of lipoprotein lipase, hepatic lipase, VLDL receptor, and LDL receptor-related protein (LRP), relative reduction of ApoC-II/ApoC-III ratio, upregulation of acyl-CoA cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) and elevated plasma level of cholesterol ester-poor pre-beta HDL. Impaired clearance and accumulation of oxidation- prone VLDL and chylomicron remnants and abnormal LDL composition in the face of oxidative stress and inflammation favors their uptake by macrophages and resident cells in the artery wall. The effect of heightened influx of lipids is compounded by impaired HDL-mediated reverse cholesterol transport leading to foam cell formation which is the central event in atherosclerosis plaque formation and subsequent plaque rupture, thrombosis and tissue damage. PMID:20017835

  18. A cohort study to identify simple clinical tests for chronic respiratory failure in obese patients with sleep-disordered breathing

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, S; Suh, E S; Boleat, E; Asher, W; Kamalanathan, M; Lee, K; Douiri, A; Murphy, P B; Steier, J; Hart, N

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic respiratory failure complicating sleep-disordered breathing in obese patients has important adverse clinical implications in terms of morbidity, mortality and healthcare utilisation. Screening strategies are essential to identify obese patients with chronic respiratory failure. Method Prospective data were collected from patients with obesity-related sleep-disordered breathing admitted for respiratory assessment at a UK national sleep and ventilation centre. Hypercapnia was defined as an arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide of >6kPa. Results 245 obese patients (56±13 years) with a body mass index of 48±12 kg/m2, forced vital capacity (FVC) of 2.1±1.1 L, daytime oximetry (SpO2) of 91±6% and abnormal overnight oximetry were included in the analysis. Receiver operator curve analysis for the whole group showed that an FVC ≤3 L had a sensitivity of 90% and a specificity of 41% in predicting hypercapnia, and an SpO2 ≤95% had a sensitivity of 83% and a specificity of 63% in predicting hypercapnia. Gender differences were observed and receiver operator curve analysis demonstrated ‘cut-offs’ for (1) SpO2 of ≤95% for men and ≤93% for women and (2) FVC of ≤3.5 L for men and ≤2.3 L for women, in predicting hypercapnia. Conclusions The measurement of FVC and clinic SpO2 in obese patients with abnormal overnight limited respiratory studies predicted hypercapnia. This may have clinical utility in stratifying patients attending sleep clinics. PMID:25478174

  19. Successful management of acute respiratory failure in an Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis patient using an extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal system.

    PubMed

    Vianello, Andrea; Arcaro, Giovanna; Paladini, Luciana; Iovino, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Patients with Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF) requiring Invasive Mechanical Ventilation (IMV) following unsuccessful treatment with Non-Invasive Ventilation (NIV) have a high mortality rate. IMV is, moreover, an independent predictor of poor outcome during the post-transplantation period in patients on waiting lists for Lung Transplantation (LT). Here we describe the successful management of an IPF patient with acute respiratory failure (ARF) using a pump-assisted veno-venous system for extracorporeal CO2 removal (ECCO2R) (ProLUNG® system) as an alternative to endotracheal intubation (ETI) following NIV failure. Given this positive experience, further studies are warranted focusing on the ECCO2R system's tolerability, safety, and efficacy in patients with IPF and severe ARF in whom NIV alone is ineffective. PMID:27537725

  20. Successful management of acute respiratory failure in an Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis patient using an extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal system.

    PubMed

    Vianello, Andrea; Arcaro, Giovanna; Paladini, Luciana; Iovino, Silvia

    2016-08-01

    Patients with Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF) requiring Invasive Mechanical Ventilation (IMV) following unsuccessful treatment with Non-Invasive Ventilation (NIV) have a high mortality rate. IMV is, moreover, an independent predictor of poor outcome during the post-transplantation period in patients on waiting lists for Lung Transplantation (LT). Here we describe the successful management of an IPF patient with acute respiratory failure (ARF) using a pump-assisted veno-venous system for extracorporeal CO2 removal (ECCO2R) (ProLUNG® system) as an alternative to endotracheal intubation (ETI) following NIV failure. Given this positive experience, further studies are warranted focusing on the ECCO2R system's tolerability, safety, and efficacy in patients with IPF and severe ARF in whom NIV alone is ineffective.

  1. Investigation into Cause of High Temperature Failure of Boiler Superheater Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, D.; Ray, S.; Roy, H.; Shukla, A. K.

    2015-04-01

    The failure of the boiler tubes occur due to various reasons like creep, fatigue, corrosion and erosion. This paper highlights a case study of typical premature failure of a final superheater tube of 210 MW thermal power plant boiler. Visual examination, dimensional measurement, chemical analysis, oxide scale thickness measurement, microstructural examination are conducted as part of the investigations. Apart from these investigations, sulfur print, Energy Dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X ray diffraction analysis (XRD) are also conducted to ascertain the probable cause of failure of final super heater tube. Finally it has been concluded that the premature failure of the super heater tube can be attributed to the combination of localized high tube metal temperature and loss of metal from the outer surface due to high temperature corrosion. The corrective actions have also been suggested to avoid this type of failure in near future.

  2. Recurrent Acute Decompensated Heart Failure Owing to Severe Iron Deficiency Anemia Caused by Inappropriate Habitual Bloodletting

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Woo-Hyun; Kim, Hack-Lyoung; Kim, Ki-Hwan; Na, Sang Hoon; Lee, Hyun-Jung; Kang, Eun Gyu; Seo, Jae-Bin; Chung, Woo-Young; Zo, Joo-Hee; Hong, Jung Ae; Kim, Kwangyoun; Kim, Myung-A

    2015-01-01

    A 68-year-old woman visited the emergency department twice with symptoms of acute heart failure including shortness of breath, general weakness, and abdominal distension. Laboratory findings showed extremely low level of serum hemoglobin at 1.4 g/dL. Echocardiographic examination demonstrated dilated left ventricular cavity with systolic dysfunction and moderate amount of pericardial effusion. In this patient, acute heart failure due to severe iron deficiency anemia was caused by inappropriate habitual bloodletting. PMID:26755934

  3. Drugs That May Cause or Exacerbate Heart Failure: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association.

    PubMed

    Page, Robert L; O'Bryant, Cindy L; Cheng, Davy; Dow, Tristan J; Ky, Bonnie; Stein, C Michael; Spencer, Anne P; Trupp, Robin J; Lindenfeld, JoAnn

    2016-08-01

    Heart failure is a common, costly, and debilitating syndrome that is associated with a highly complex drug regimen, a large number of comorbidities, and a large and often disparate number of healthcare providers. All of these factors conspire to increase the risk of heart failure exacerbation by direct myocardial toxicity, drug-drug interactions, or both. This scientific statement is designed to serve as a comprehensive and accessible source of drugs that may cause or exacerbate heart failure to assist healthcare providers in improving the quality of care for these patients.

  4. Non-invasive ventilation for children with acute respiratory failure in the developing world: literature review and an implementation example.

    PubMed

    Balfour-Lynn, R E; Marsh, G; Gorayi, D; Elahi, E; LaRovere, J

    2014-06-01

    Over 2 million children die of acute respiratory infection every year, with around 98% of these deaths occurring in developing countries. Depending upon the clinical status of the patient, supplemental oxygen is usually the first line therapy. However this often proves inadequate for acute respiratory failure (ARF), in which case intubation and mechanical positive pressure ventilation are required. Adult intensive care successfully introduced non-invasive positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV) to treat ARF over a decade ago. This experience, coupled with the use of NIPPV in children with chronic respiratory insufficiency, has led to increasing use of NIPPV to treat ARF in paediatric populations. NIPPV can have similar or improved outcomes to IPPV, but with fewer complications. However there are no controlled trials of its use in children, and most data come from observational studies and retrospective reviews. In a developing world setting, where mortality from ARF is high and the risks of intubation are great and often not feasible, NIPPV can be a simple and cost-effective way to treat these patients. Its implementation in rural Northern Ghana shows NIPPV for ARF can be delivered safely with minimal training, and appears to impact significantly on mortality in those under 5 years.

  5. The Role of Open Lung Biopsy in Critically Ill Patients with Hypoxic Respiratory Failure: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Almotairi, Abdullah; Biswas, Sharmistha; Shahin, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to assess the utility of open lung biopsy in patients with hypoxic respiratory failure of unknown etiology admitted to an ICU and to examine the use of steroid therapy in this patient population. Methods. A retrospective cohort study was performed of all consecutive patients admitted to three tertiary care, university-affiliated, ICUs during the period from January 2000 to January 2012 with the principal diagnosis of hypoxic respiratory failure and who underwent an open lung biopsy. Results. Open lung biopsy resulted in a diagnostic yield of 68% and in a 67% change of management in patients. A multivariable analysis of clinical variables associated with acute hospital mortality demonstrated that postbiopsy systemic steroid therapy (OR 0.24, 95% C.I 0.06–0.96) was significantly associated with improved survival. Complications arising from the biopsy occurred in 30% of patients. Conclusion. Open lung biopsy had significant diagnostic yield and led to major changes in management and aided in end-of-life decision-making in the ICU. Systemic steroid therapy was associated with improved survival. The risk-benefit ratio of open lung biopsy is still unclear, especially given the availability of newer diagnostic tests and possible empirical therapy with steroids. PMID:27445567

  6. Recessive Mutations in TRMT10C Cause Defects in Mitochondrial RNA Processing and Multiple Respiratory Chain Deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Metodiev, Metodi D; Thompson, Kyle; Alston, Charlotte L; Morris, Andrew A M; He, Langping; Assouline, Zarah; Rio, Marlène; Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Pyle, Angela; Griffin, Helen; Siira, Stefan; Filipovska, Aleksandra; Munnich, Arnold; Chinnery, Patrick F; McFarland, Robert; Rötig, Agnès; Taylor, Robert W

    2016-05-01

    Mitochondrial disorders are clinically and genetically diverse, with mutations in mitochondrial or nuclear genes able to cause defects in mitochondrial gene expression. Recently, mutations in several genes encoding factors involved in mt-tRNA processing have been identified to cause mitochondrial disease. Using whole-exome sequencing, we identified mutations in TRMT10C (encoding the mitochondrial RNase P protein 1 [MRPP1]) in two unrelated individuals who presented at birth with lactic acidosis, hypotonia, feeding difficulties, and deafness. Both individuals died at 5 months after respiratory failure. MRPP1, along with MRPP2 and MRPP3, form the mitochondrial ribonuclease P (mt-RNase P) complex that cleaves the 5' ends of mt-tRNAs from polycistronic precursor transcripts. Additionally, a stable complex of MRPP1 and MRPP2 has m(1)R9 methyltransferase activity, which methylates mt-tRNAs at position 9 and is vital for folding mt-tRNAs into their correct tertiary structures. Analyses of fibroblasts from affected individuals harboring TRMT10C missense variants revealed decreased protein levels of MRPP1 and an increase in mt-RNA precursors indicative of impaired mt-RNA processing and defective mitochondrial protein synthesis. The pathogenicity of the detected variants-compound heterozygous c.542G>T (p.Arg181Leu) and c.814A>G (p.Thr272Ala) changes in subject 1 and a homozygous c.542G>T (p.Arg181Leu) variant in subject 2-was validated by the functional rescue of mt-RNA processing and mitochondrial protein synthesis defects after lentiviral transduction of wild-type TRMT10C. Our study suggests that these variants affect MRPP1 protein stability and mt-tRNA processing without affecting m(1)R9 methyltransferase activity, identifying mutations in TRMT10C as a cause of mitochondrial disease and highlighting the importance of RNA processing for correct mitochondrial function.

  7. Severe respiratory distress at birth caused by a hairy polyp of the Eustachian tube: Transoral endoscopy-guided treatment.

    PubMed

    Cantarella, Giovanna; Gaffuri, Michele; Pugni, Lorenza; Pignataro, Lorenzo; Mosca, Fabio

    2015-08-01

    Hairy polyps are rare developmental lesions, which present as masses mainly consisting of fatty tissue covered by skin, seldom localized in the nasopharynx, causing respiratory obstruction. We describe the case of a female newborn affected by a hairy polyp arising from the left Eustachian tube, who presented severe respiratory distress soon after birth. The polyp was successfully removed transorally under videoendoscopic guidance. This case highlights the importance of including hairy polyp in the differential diagnosis of respiratory distress at birth because this type of tumor can be lethal and requires prompt treatment. A transoral endoscopy-guided approach can allow successful and minimally invasive excision even in a newborn.

  8. Lipoblastoma of the neck: a rare cause of respiratory problems in children.

    PubMed

    Lorenzen, Jacob C; Godballe, Christian; Kerndrup, Gitte B

    2005-06-01

    Lipoblastomatous tumours are rare, and they occur primarily in children younger than 3 years of age. They are benign and may be divided in lipoblastomas and lipoblastomatosis. A case with cervical lipoblastoma causing respiratory difficulty is reported, and a clinical characterisation of patients with lipoblastomatous tumours in the neck is presented. A 6-year-old boy with complains of stridorous respiration and significant reduction in physical capacity was referred to the ENT Department, Odense University Hospital, Denmark. He was treated with total surgical resection of a soft and slowly growing tumour in the left side of the neck, extending from the base of the skull to the upper part of the mediastinum. The histological examination showed a lipoblastoma. After surgery all symptoms disappeared, and the patient was without any operative sequelae. Including the actual case, a review of English literature resulted in the identification of 37 patients with cervical lipoblastoma or lipoblastomatosis. However, in most cases the information was sparse, and only 13 patients were eligible for an analysis of basic clinical and demographic data. The median age was 25 months (range: 7-75 months), and the median tumour size 9 cm (range: 3-18 cm). No difference in sex distribution was found. Lipoblastomas (85%) seemed more frequent than lipoblastomatosis (15%). Stridorous respiration was present in 31%. It is concluded that a considerable part of lipoblastomatous tumours in the neck are combined with respiratory difficulties (31%), and that complete but gentle surgical treatment in most cases will restore normal physiological conditions. PMID:15917175

  9. Respiratory epithelial cytotoxicity and membrane damage (holes) caused by amine-modified nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ruenraroengsak, Pakatip; Novak, Pavel; Berhanu, Deborah; Thorley, Andrew J; Valsami-Jones, Eugenia; Gorelik, Julia; Korchev, Yuri E; Tetley, Teresa D

    2012-02-01

    The respiratory epithelium is a significant target of inhaled, nano-sized particles, the biological reactivity of which will depend on its physicochemical properties. Surface-modified, 50 and 100 nm, polystyrene latex nanoparticles (NPs) were used as model particles to examine the effect of particle size and surface chemistry on transformed human alveolar epithelial type 1-like cells (TT1). Live images of TT1 exposed to amine-modified NPs taken by hopping probe ion conductance microscopy revealed severe damage and holes on cell membranes that were not observed with other types of NPs. This paralleled induction of cell detachment, cytotoxicity and apoptotic (caspase-3/7 and caspase-9) cell death, and increased release of CXCL8 (IL-8). In contrast, unmodified, carboxyl-modified 50 nm NPs and the 100 nm NPs did not cause membrane damage, and were less reactive. Thus, the susceptibility and membrane damage to respiratory epithelium following inhalation of NPs will depend on both surface chemistry (e.g., cationic) and nano-size. PMID:21352086

  10. Oscillatory behavior of ventricular action potential duration in heart failure patients at respiratory rate and low frequency

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Ben; Child, Nick; Van Duijvenboden, Stefan; Orini, Michele; Chen, Zhong; Coronel, Ruben; Rinaldi, Christopher A.; Gill, Jaspal S.; Gill, Jaswinder S.; Taggart, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Oscillations of arterial pressure occur spontaneously at a frequency of approximately 0.1 Hz coupled with synchronous oscillations of sympathetic nerve activity (“Mayer waves”). This study investigated the extent to which corresponding oscillations may occur in ventricular action potential duration (APD). Fourteen ambulatory (outpatient) heart failure patients with biventricular pacing devices were studied while seated upright watching movie clips to maintain arousal. Activation recovery intervals (ARI) as a measure of ventricular APD were obtained from unipolar electrograms recorded from the LV epicardial pacing lead during steady state RV pacing from the device. Arterial blood pressure was measured non-invasively (Finapress) and respiration monitored. Oscillations were quantified using time frequency and coherence analysis. Oscillatory behavior of ARI at the respiratory frequency was observed in all subjects. The magnitude of the ARI variation ranged from 2.2 to 6.9 ms (mean 5.0 ms). Coherence analysis showed a correlation with respiratory oscillation for an average of 43% of the recording time at a significance level of p < 0.05. Oscillations in systolic blood pressure in the Mayer wave frequency range were observed in all subjects for whom blood pressure was recorded (n = 13). ARI oscillation in the Mayer wave frequency range was observed in 6/13 subjects (46%) over a range of 2.9 to 9.2 ms. Coherence with Mayer waves at the p < 0.05 significance level was present for an average of 29% of the recording time. In ambulatory patients with heart failure during enhanced mental arousal, left ventricular epicardial APD (ARI) oscillated at the respiratory frequency (approximately 0.25 Hz). In 6 patients (46%) APD oscillated at the slower Mayer wave frequency (approximately 0.1 Hz). These findings may be important in understanding sympathetic activity-related arrhythmogenesis. PMID:25389408

  11. Respiratory failure and lethal hypotension due to blue-ringed octopus and tetrodotoxin envenomation observed and counteracted in animal models.

    PubMed

    Flachsenberger, W A

    The effects of crude blue-ringed octopus venom gland extract and tetrodotoxin (TTX) on anaesthetised rats and rabbits were studied. Paralysis of the respiratory musculature causing anoxia and cyanosis was overcome with positive, artificial respiration. The second lethal mechanism of the toxins: rapid and severe hypotension, had to be counteracted peripherally, since neural transmission had been drastically reduced by the toxins. Noradrenaline, d-amphetamine, phenylephrine and methoxamine, agonists acting on vascular adrenergic a-receptors, were tested. PMID:3573123

  12. Multiple imputation methods for nonparametric inference on cumulative incidence with missing cause of failure

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Minjung; Dignam, James J.; Han, Junhee

    2014-01-01

    We propose a nonparametric approach for cumulative incidence estimation when causes of failure are unknown or missing for some subjects. Under the missing at random assumption, we estimate the cumulative incidence function using multiple imputation methods. We develop asymptotic theory for the cumulative incidence estimators obtained from multiple imputation methods. We also discuss how to construct confidence intervals for the cumulative incidence function and perform a test for comparing the cumulative incidence functions in two samples with missing cause of failure. Through simulation studies, we show that the proposed methods perform well. The methods are illustrated with data from a randomized clinical trial in early stage breast cancer. PMID:25043107

  13. Pediatric Respiratory Emergencies.

    PubMed

    Richards, Amber M

    2016-02-01

    Respiratory emergencies are 1 of the most common reasons parents seek evaluation for the their children in the emergency department (ED) each year, and respiratory failure is the most common cause of cardiopulmonary arrest in pediatric patients. Whereas many respiratory illnesses are mild and self-limiting, others are life threatening and require prompt diagnosis and management. Therefore, it is imperative that emergency clinicians be able to promptly recognize and manage these illnesses. This article reviews ED diagnosis and management of foreign body aspiration, asthma exacerbation, epiglottitis, bronchiolitis, community-acquired pneumonia, and pertussis. PMID:26614243

  14. Finite Element Creep-Fatigue Analysis of a Welded Furnace Roll for Identifying Failure Root Cause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y. P.; Mohr, W. C.

    2015-11-01

    Creep-fatigue induced failures are often observed in engineering components operating under high temperature and cyclic loading. Understanding the creep-fatigue damage process and identifying failure root cause are very important for preventing such failures and improving the lifetime of engineering components. Finite element analyses including a heat transfer analysis and a creep-fatigue analysis were conducted to model the cyclic thermal and mechanical process of a furnace roll in a continuous hot-dip coating line. Typically, the roll has a short life, <1 year, which has been a problem for a long time. The failure occurred in the weld joining an end bell to a roll shell and resulted in the complete 360° separation of the end bell from the roll shell. The heat transfer analysis was conducted to predict the temperature history of the roll by modeling heat convection from hot air inside the furnace. The creep-fatigue analysis was performed by inputting the predicted temperature history and applying mechanical loads. The analysis results showed that the failure was resulted from a creep-fatigue mechanism rather than a creep mechanism. The difference of material properties between the filler metal and the base metal is the root cause for the roll failure, which induces higher creep strain and stress in the interface between the weld and the HAZ.

  15. An analysis of the causes of failure in high chrome oxide refractory materials from slagging gasifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, James P.; Kwong, Kyei-Sing; Powell, Cynthia A.; Thomas, Hugh; Krabbe, Rick

    2006-01-01

    High Cr2O3 refractory materials are used to line the hot face of slagging gasifiers. Gasifiers are reaction chambers that convert water, oxygen, and a carbon feedstock into CO, H2, and methane at temperatures as high as 1575DGC and pressures up to 1000 psi. Ash in the carbon feedstock liquefies, erodes and corrodes the gasifier's refractory liner, contributing to liner failure within a few months to two years. The failure of a refractory liner decreases a gasifier's on-line availability and causes costly system downtime and repairs. Many factors contribute to refractory lining failure, including slag penetration and corrosion, thermal cycling, gasifier environment, and mechanical loads. The results of refractory post-mortem failure analysis and how observations relate to gasifier service life will be discussed.

  16. Analysis of the causes of failure in high chrome oxide refractory materials from slagging gasifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, J.P.; Kwong, K.-S.; Powell, C.A.; Thomas, H.; Krabbe, R.A.

    2006-03-01

    High Cr2O3 refractory materials are used to line the hot face of slagging gasifiers. Gasifiers are reaction chambers that convert water, oxygen, and a carbon feedstock into CO, H2, and methane at temperatures as high as 1575oC and pressures up to 1000 psi. Ash in the carbon feedstock liquefies, erodes and corrodes the gasifier’s refractory liner, contributing to liner failure within a few months to two years. The failure of a refractory liner decreases a gasifier’s on-line availability and causes costly system downtime and repairs. Many factors contribute to refractory lining failure, including slag penetration and corrosion, thermal cycling, gasifier environment, and mechanical loads. The results of refractory post-mortem failure analysis and how observations relate to gasifier service life will be discussed.

  17. Biallelic Mutations in NBAS Cause Recurrent Acute Liver Failure with Onset in Infancy

    PubMed Central

    Haack, Tobias B.; Staufner, Christian; Köpke, Marlies G.; Straub, Beate K.; Kölker, Stefan; Thiel, Christian; Freisinger, Peter; Baric, Ivo; McKiernan, Patrick J.; Dikow, Nicola; Harting, Inga; Beisse, Flemming; Burgard, Peter; Kotzaeridou, Urania; Kühr, Joachim; Himbert, Urban; Taylor, Robert W.; Distelmaier, Felix; Vockley, Jerry; Ghaloul-Gonzalez, Lina; Zschocke, Johannes; Kremer, Laura S.; Graf, Elisabeth; Schwarzmayr, Thomas; Bader, Daniel M.; Gagneur, Julien; Wieland, Thomas; Terrile, Caterina; Strom, Tim M.; Meitinger, Thomas; Hoffmann, Georg F.; Prokisch, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Acute liver failure (ALF) in infancy and childhood is a life-threatening emergency. Few conditions are known to cause recurrent acute liver failure (RALF), and in about 50% of cases, the underlying molecular cause remains unresolved. Exome sequencing in five unrelated individuals with fever-dependent RALF revealed biallelic mutations in NBAS. Subsequent Sanger sequencing of NBAS in 15 additional unrelated individuals with RALF or ALF identified compound heterozygous mutations in an additional six individuals from five families. Immunoblot analysis of mutant fibroblasts showed reduced protein levels of NBAS and its proposed interaction partner p31, both involved in retrograde transport between endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi. We recommend NBAS analysis in individuals with acute infantile liver failure, especially if triggered by fever. PMID:26073778

  18. Acute forearm compressive myopathy syndrome secondary to upper limb entrapment: an unusual cause of renal failure.

    PubMed

    Tachtsi, Maria D; Kalogirou, Thomas E; Atmatzidis, Stefanos K; Papadimitriou, Dimitrios K; Atmatzidis, Konstantinos S

    2011-05-01

    Compressive myopathy syndrome (SCM) is a syndrome characterized by the lesion of skeletal muscle resulting in subsequent release of intracellular contents (myoglobin, creatine phosphokinase, potassium, etc.) into the circulatory system, which can cause potentially lethal complications. There are numerous causes that can lead to SCM resulting to acute rhabdomyolysis, and many patients present with multiple causes. The most common potentially lethal complication is acute renal failure. The occurrence of acute rhabdomyolysis should be considered as a possibility in any patient who can remain stationary for long periods, or is in a coma, or is intoxicated in any form. We report the rare case of a 26-year-old patient who developed SCM caused by ischemia reperfusion, with subsequent acute rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure after prolonged compression of the right upper extremity. PMID:21549937

  19. Acute forearm compressive myopathy syndrome secondary to upper limb entrapment: an unusual cause of renal failure.

    PubMed

    Tachtsi, Maria D; Kalogirou, Thomas E; Atmatzidis, Stefanos K; Papadimitriou, Dimitrios K; Atmatzidis, Konstantinos S

    2011-05-01

    Compressive myopathy syndrome (SCM) is a syndrome characterized by the lesion of skeletal muscle resulting in subsequent release of intracellular contents (myoglobin, creatine phosphokinase, potassium, etc.) into the circulatory system, which can cause potentially lethal complications. There are numerous causes that can lead to SCM resulting to acute rhabdomyolysis, and many patients present with multiple causes. The most common potentially lethal complication is acute renal failure. The occurrence of acute rhabdomyolysis should be considered as a possibility in any patient who can remain stationary for long periods, or is in a coma, or is intoxicated in any form. We report the rare case of a 26-year-old patient who developed SCM caused by ischemia reperfusion, with subsequent acute rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure after prolonged compression of the right upper extremity.

  20. Induction of protective effector immunity to prevent pathogenesis caused by the respiratory syncytial virus. Implications on therapy and vaccine design

    PubMed Central

    Espinoza, Janyra A; Bueno, Susan M; Riedel, Claudia A; Kalergis, Alexis M

    2014-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) is the leading cause of respiratory illness in infants and young children around the globe. This pathogen, which was discovered in 1956, continues to cause a huge number of hospitalizations due to respiratory disease and it is considered a health and economic burden worldwide, especially in developing countries. The immune response elicited by hRSV infection leads to lung and systemic inflammation, which results in lung damage but is not efficient at preventing viral replication. Indeed, natural hRSV infection induces a poor immune memory that allows recurrent infections. Here, we review the most recent knowledge about the lifecycle of hRSV, the immune response elicited by this virus and the subsequent pathology induced in response to infection in the airways. Novel findings about the alterations that this virus causes in the central nervous system and potential therapies and vaccines designed to treat or prevent hRSV infection are discussed. PMID:24801878

  1. An evaluation of the safety and efficacy of an anti-inflammatory, pulmonary enteral formula in the treatment of pediatric burn patients with respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Mayes, Theresa; Gottschlich, Michele M; Kagan, Richard J

    2008-01-01

    Respiratory failure is associated with a high mortality rate in burned children. Recently, a specialized pulmonary enteral formula (SPEF) was commercially introduced as an adjunct intervention in acute lung injury management. SPEF contains condition-specific nutrients to modulate the inflammatory response. The study examined SPEF impact in critically ill, pediatric burn patients with respiratory failure. Medical records of acute burn patients admitted December 1997 to October 2006 were reviewed for SPEF treatment. Respiratory and renal indices were compared on the first and final days of SPEF use. Nineteen patients with respiratory failure received SPEF for a mean of 10.8 +/- 0.9 days during their acute burn course. Mean age was 5.3 +/- 1.5 years. Mean total body surface area burn was 44.3 +/- 5.4% with 32.5 +/- 6.4% full thickness. Patients were admitted 2.3 +/- 0.9 days postburn. Significant improvements in peak pressure, PEEP, FiO2, P:F ratio, Pco2, Po2, and ETco2 were noted. Seventeen of the 19 patients survived despite the fact that 9 of the 19 patients developed severe barotrauma requiring multiple tube thoracotomies, and all 19 had extremely poor prognoses at SPEF initiation. Adult SPEF formula for critically ill, pediatric burn patients with respiratory failure is safe and well tolerated. SPEF seems to facilitate recovery from acute lung injury as evidenced by improvements in oxygenation and pulmonary compliance.

  2. Vertical modelling: Analysis of competing risks data with missing causes of failure.

    PubMed

    Nicolaie, M A; van Houwelingen, H C; Putter, H

    2015-12-01

    We propose vertical modelling as a natural approach to the problem of analysis of competing risks data when failure types are missing for some individuals. Under a natural missing-at-random assumption for these missing failure types, we use the observed data likelihood to estimate its parameters and show that the all-cause hazard and the relative hazards appearing in vertical modelling are indeed key quantities of this likelihood. This fact has practical implications in that it suggests vertical modelling as a simple and attractive method of analysis in competing risks with missing causes of failure; all individuals are used in estimating the all-cause hazard and only those with non-missing cause of failure for relative hazards. The relative hazards also appear in a multiple imputation approach to the same problem proposed by Lu and Tsiatis and in the EM algorithm. We compare the vertical modelling approach with the method of Goetghebeur and Ryan for a breast cancer data set, highlighting the different aspects they contribute to the data analysis. PMID:22179822

  3. Direct likelihood inference and sensitivity analysis for competing risks regression with missing causes of failure.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Betancur, Margarita; Rey, Grégoire; Latouche, Aurélien

    2015-06-01

    Competing risks arise in the analysis of failure times when there is a distinction between different causes of failure. In many studies, it is difficult to obtain complete cause of failure information for all individuals. Thus, several authors have proposed strategies for semi-parametric modeling of competing risks when some causes of failure are missing under the missing at random (MAR) assumption. As many authors have stressed, while semi-parametric models are convenient, fully-parametric regression modeling of the cause-specific hazards (CSH) and cumulative incidence functions (CIF) may be of interest for prediction and is likely to contribute towards a fuller understanding of the time-dynamics of the competing risks mechanism. We propose a so-called "direct likelihood" approach for fitting fully-parametric regression models for these two functionals under MAR. The MAR assumption not being verifiable from the observed data, we propose an approach for performing sensitivity analyses to assess the robustness of inferences to departures from this assumption. The method relies on so-called "pattern-mixture models" from the missing data literature and was evaluated in a simulation study. This sensitivity analysis approach is applicable to various competing risks regression models (fully-parametric or semi-parametric, for the CSH or the CIF). We illustrate the proposed methods with the analysis of a breast cancer clinical trial, including suggestions for ad hoc graphical goodness-of-fit assessments under MAR.

  4. [Vesico-ureteral reflux in patients with terminal renal failure. II. Causes of reflux (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Huland, H; Busch, R; Wahls, W

    1982-05-01

    The causes of the high incidence of vesicoureteral reflux in 161 patients with end stage renal disease was studied. In about half of these patients with pyelonephritis, reflux in combination with urinary tract infections is the cause of renal failure. Reflux is therefore found more often in this specific group. The incidence of reflux correlates with the duration of uremia. Reflux also is more common in patients with little or no diuresis. Theories of reflux into the "unused ureter" are discussed. PMID:7201702

  5. Ocular Tropism of Respiratory Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Rota, Paul A.; Tumpey, Terrence M.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Respiratory viruses (including adenovirus, influenza virus, respiratory syncytial virus, coronavirus, and rhinovirus) cause a broad spectrum of disease in humans, ranging from mild influenza-like symptoms to acute respiratory failure. While species D adenoviruses and subtype H7 influenza viruses are known to possess an ocular tropism, documented human ocular disease has been reported following infection with all principal respiratory viruses. In this review, we describe the anatomical proximity and cellular receptor distribution between ocular and respiratory tissues. All major respiratory viruses and their association with human ocular disease are discussed. Research utilizing in vitro and in vivo models to study the ability of respiratory viruses to use the eye as a portal of entry as well as a primary site of virus replication is highlighted. Identification of shared receptor-binding preferences, host responses, and laboratory modeling protocols among these viruses provides a needed bridge between clinical and laboratory studies of virus tropism. PMID:23471620

  6. Cryptic sperm defects may be the cause for total fertilization failure in oocyte donor cycles.

    PubMed

    Goudakou, Maria; Kalogeraki, Alexandra; Matalliotakis, Ioannis; Panagiotidis, Yannis; Gullo, Giuseppe; Prapas, Yannis

    2012-02-01

    In conventional IVF cycles with total fertilization failure, rescue intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) performed 24h after insemination has yielded poor results. However, when ICSI is used, total fertilization failure is a rare event. The aim of the present study is to investigate the degree of sperm contribution to fertilization failures using the egg-sharing model in oocyte donor cycles. The study included only the oocyte donor cycles of sibling oocytes with total fertilization failure in at least one of the matched recipients. Oocytes from 49 oocyte donor cycles were equally shared among 98 recipients undergoing conventional IVF. Due to total fertilization failure in half of the recipients, rescue ICSI was carried out. Compared with the conventional IVF only group, the rescue ICSI group had a lower pregnancy rate (30.61% versus 71.43%), clinical pregnancy rate (28.57% versus 67.35%) and ongoing pregnancy rate (28.57% versus 63.27%) (all P<0.01). Cryptic sperm defects in apparently normal spermatozoa may be the cause of total fertilization failure, indicating the need for simple routine tests to detect them.

  7. Venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for acute respiratory failure : A clinical review from an international group of experts.

    PubMed

    Fan, Eddy; Gattinoni, Luciano; Combes, Alain; Schmidt, Matthieu; Peek, Giles; Brodie, Dan; Muller, Thomas; Morelli, Andrea; Ranieri, V Marco; Pesenti, Antonio; Brochard, Laurent; Hodgson, Carol; Van Kiersbilck, Cecile; Roch, Antoine; Quintel, Michael; Papazian, Laurent

    2016-05-01

    Despite expensive life-sustaining interventions delivered in the ICU, mortality and morbidity in patients with acute respiratory failure (ARF) remain unacceptably high. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) has emerged as a promising intervention that may provide more efficacious supportive care to these patients. Improvements in technology have made ECMO safer and easier to use, allowing for the potential of more widespread application in patients with ARF. A greater appreciation of the complications associated with the placement of an artificial airway and mechanical ventilation has led clinicians and researchers to seek viable alternatives to providing supportive care in these patients. Thus, this review will summarize the current knowledge regarding the use of venovenous (VV)-ECMO for ARF and describe some of the recent controversies in the field, such as mechanical ventilation, anticoagulation and transfusion therapy, and ethical concerns in patients supported with VV-ECMO. PMID:27007108

  8. Severe respiratory failure as a presenting feature of an interstitial lung disease associated with anti-synthetase syndrome (ASS).

    PubMed

    Piroddi, Ines Maria Grazia; Ferraioli, Gianluca; Barlascini, Cornelius; Castagneto, Corrado; Nicolini, Antonello

    2016-07-01

    Anti-synthetase syndrome (ASS) is defined as a heterogeneous connective tissue disorder characterized by the association of an interstitial lung disease (ILD) with or without inflammatory myositis with the presence of anti-aminoacyl-tRNA-synthetase antibodies. ILD is one of the major extra-muscular manifestations of polymyositis and dermatomyositis. We report a case of a patient with dyspnea, cough, and intermittent fever as well as ILD associated ASS in the absence of muscular involvement. This patient was admitted to the emergency department with severe respiratory failure requiring non-invasive ventilation. Our patient's case demonstrates that the diagnosis of ASS may not be obvious. However, its diagnosis leads to appropriate and potentially life-saving treatment.

  9. Acute Respiratory Failure Induced by Magnesium Replacement in a 62-Year-Old Woman with Myasthenia Gravis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Paramveer; Idowu, Olakunle; Malik, Imrana; Nates, Joseph L

    2015-10-01

    Magnesium is known to act at the neuromuscular junction by inhibiting the presynaptic release of acetylcholine and desensitizing the postsynaptic membrane. Because of these effects, magnesium has been postulated to potentiate neuromuscular weakness. We describe the case of a 62-year-old woman with myasthenia gravis and a metastatic thymoma who was admitted to our intensive care unit for management of a myasthenic crisis. The patient's neuromuscular weakness worsened in association with standard intravenous magnesium replacement, and the exacerbated respiratory failure necessitated intubation, mechanical ventilation, and an extended stay in the intensive care unit. The effect of magnesium replacement on myasthenia gravis patients has not been well documented, and we present this case to increase awareness and stimulate research. In addition, we discuss the relevant medical literature.

  10. Severe respiratory failure as a presenting feature of an interstitial lung disease associated with anti-synthetase syndrome (ASS).

    PubMed

    Piroddi, Ines Maria Grazia; Ferraioli, Gianluca; Barlascini, Cornelius; Castagneto, Corrado; Nicolini, Antonello

    2016-07-01

    Anti-synthetase syndrome (ASS) is defined as a heterogeneous connective tissue disorder characterized by the association of an interstitial lung disease (ILD) with or without inflammatory myositis with the presence of anti-aminoacyl-tRNA-synthetase antibodies. ILD is one of the major extra-muscular manifestations of polymyositis and dermatomyositis. We report a case of a patient with dyspnea, cough, and intermittent fever as well as ILD associated ASS in the absence of muscular involvement. This patient was admitted to the emergency department with severe respiratory failure requiring non-invasive ventilation. Our patient's case demonstrates that the diagnosis of ASS may not be obvious. However, its diagnosis leads to appropriate and potentially life-saving treatment. PMID:27424829

  11. Extreme windkessel effect can cause right heart failure early after truncus repair

    PubMed Central

    Vanagt, Ward Y.; Famaey, Nele; Rega, Filip; Gewillig, Marc

    2012-01-01

    An infant developed severe right heart failure early after truncal repair with a pulmonary homograft. A mechanical obstruction by narrowing could not be identified at the homograft or pulmonary arteries. However, functional obstruction was caused by an extreme windkessel effect in a massively dilated homograft that absorbed rather than transmitted the pulse wave. Effective treatment consisted of replacing the dilated homograft by a rigid aortic homograft of equal size as the initial homograft. When confronted with circulatory failure after allograft placement, the clinician should not only look for obstruction by narrowing, but also consider the windkessel phenomenon. PMID:22467005

  12. The fetal circulation, pathophysiology of hypoxemic respiratory failure and pulmonary hypertension in neonates, and the role of oxygen therapy.

    PubMed

    Lakshminrusimha, S; Saugstad, O D

    2016-06-01

    Neonatal hypoxemic respiratory failure (HRF), a deficiency of oxygenation associated with insufficient ventilation, can occur due to a variety of etiologies. HRF can result when pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) fails to decrease at birth, leading to persistent pulmonary hypertension of newborn (PPHN), or as a result of various lung disorders including congenital abnormalities such as diaphragmatic hernia, and disorders of transition such as respiratory distress syndrome, transient tachypnea of newborn and perinatal asphyxia. PVR changes throughout fetal life, evident by the dynamic changes in pulmonary blood flow at different gestational ages. Pulmonary vascular transition at birth requires an interplay between multiple vasoactive mediators such as nitric oxide, which can be potentially inactivated by superoxide anions. Superoxide anions have a key role in the pathophysiology of HRF. Oxygen (O2) therapy, used in newborns long before our knowledge of the complex nature of HRF and PPHN, has continued to evolve. Over time has come the discovery that too much O2 can be toxic. Recommendations on the optimal inspired O2 levels to initiate resuscitation in term newborns have ranged from 100% (pre 1998) to the currently recommended use of room air (21%). Questions remain about the most effective levels, particularly in preterm and low birth weight newborns. Attaining the appropriate balance between hypoxemia and hyperoxemia, and targeting treatments to the pathophysiology of HRF in each individual newborn are critical factors in the development of improved therapies to optimize outcomes. PMID:27225963

  13. SIMVASTATIN TREATMENT ATTENUATES INCREASED RESPIRATORY VARIABILITY AND APNEA/HYPOPNEA INDEX IN RATS WITH CHRONIC HEART FAILURE RR

    PubMed Central

    Haack, Karla K.V.; Marcus, Noah J.; Rio, Rodrigo Del; Zucker, Irving H.; Schultz, Harold D.

    2014-01-01

    Cheyne-Stokes respiration (CSR) and cardiac arrhythmias are associated with increased morbidity and mortality in patients with congestive heart failure (CHF). Enhanced carotid body chemoreflex (CBC) sensitivity is associated with these abnormalities in CHF. Reduced carotid body nitric oxide and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) levels play an important role in the enhanced CBC. In other disease models, Simvastatin (statin) treatment increases endothelial NOS (eNOS) in part by increasing Kruppel like Factor 2 (KLF2) expression. We hypothesized that statin treatment would ameliorate enhanced CBC sensitivity as well as increased respiratory variability (RV), apnea/hypopnea index (AHI), and arrhythmia index (AI), in a rodent model of CHF. Resting breathing pattern, cardiac rhythm, and the ventilatory and carotid body (CB) chemoreceptor afferent responses to hypoxia (CBC) were assessed in rats with CHF induced by coronary ligation. CHF was associated with enhanced ventilatory and CB afferent responses to hypoxia as well as increased RV, AHI, and AI. Statin treatment prevented the increases in CBC sensitivity and the concomitant increases in RV, AHI, and AI. KLF2 and eNOS protein were decreased in the CB and nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) of CHF animals and statin treatment increased the expression of these proteins. Our findings demonstrate that the increased CBC sensitivity, respiratory instability and cardiac arrhythmias observed in CHF are ameliorated by statin treatment and suggest that statins may be an effective treatment for CSR and arrhythmias in patient populations with high chemoreflex sensitivity. PMID:24516105

  14. A Retrospective Observational Case Series of Low-Flow Venovenous Extracorporeal Carbon Dioxide Removal Use in Patients with Respiratory Failure.

    PubMed

    Moss, Caroline E; Galtrey, Eleanor J; Camporota, Luigi; Meadows, Chris; Gillon, Stuart; Ioannou, Nicholas; Barrett, Nicholas A

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to describe the use of venovenous extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal (ECCO2R) in patients with hypercapnic respiratory failure. We performed a retrospective case note review of patients admitted to our tertiary regional intensive care unit and commenced on ECCO2R from August 2013 to February 2015. Fourteen patients received ECCO2R. Demographic data, physiologic data (including pH and partial pressure of carbon dioxide in arterial blood [PaCO2]) when starting ECCO2R (t = 0), at 4 hourly intervals for the first 24 hours, then at 24 hour intervals until cessation of ECCO2R, and overall outcome were recorded. Patients are reported separately depending on whether the indication for ECCO2R was an exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD; n = 5), or acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and persisting hypercapnoea (n = 9). Patients were managed with ECCO2R (Hemolung, ALung Inc, Pittsburgh, PA). Median duration of ECCO2R was 5 days. Four complications related to ECCO2R were reported, none resulting in serious adverse outcomes. Ten patients were discharged from intensive care unit (ICU) alive. A statistically significant improvement in pH (p = 0.012) was demonstrated. Our observational series of ECCO2R shows that this technique can be safely used to achieve therapeutic goals in patients requiring lung protection, and in COPD, in line with current publications in this area.

  15. Giant Unruptured Sinus of Valsalva Aneurysm: An Unusual Cause of Right Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Jugpal, Tejeshwar Singh; Dixit, Rashmi; Lohchab, Samta; Garg, Anju

    2015-01-01

    Aneurysm of sinus of Valsalva is a rare cardiac abnormality. Unruptured aneurysm of sinus of Valsalva is usually asymptomatic and often discovered incidentally. However, a large aneurysm can, in rare cases, cause compression of the ventricular outflow tract. We report a case of 17-year-old male with congestive right heart failure with a large, partially thrombosed unruptured aneurysm of the right sinus of Valsalva. The aneurysmal sac was compressing the right ventricular outflow tract causing marked dilatation of the right ventricle and atrium that was confirmed on contrast-enhanced computed tomography imaging. Unruptured sinus of Valsalva aneurysm causing right heart failure in adolescence has been rarely reported in literature. PMID:26713180

  16. Lifesaving liver transplantation for multi-organ failure caused by Bacillus cereus food poisoning.

    PubMed

    Tschiedel, Eva; Rath, Peter-Michael; Steinmann, Jörg; Becker, Heinz; Dietrich, Rudolf; Paul, Andreas; Felderhoff-Müser, Ursula; Dohna-Schwake, Christian

    2015-02-01

    Bacillus cereus is a spore-forming, gram-positive bacterium that causes food poisoning presenting with either emesis or diarrhea. Diarrhea is caused by proteinaceous enterotoxin complexes, mainly hemolysin BL, non-hemolytic enterotoxin (NHE), and cytotoxin K. In contrast, emesis is caused by the ingestion of the depsipeptide toxin cereulide, which is produced in B. cereus contaminated food, particularly in pasta or rice. In general, the illness is mild and self-limiting. However, due to cereulide intoxication, nine severe cases with rhabdomyolysis and/or liver failure, five of them lethal, are reported in literature. Here we report the first case of life-threatening liver failure and severe rhabdomyolysis in this context that could not be survived without emergency hepatectomy and consecutive liver transplantation.

  17. A robust Bayesian approach to modeling epistemic uncertainty in common-cause failure models

    SciTech Connect

    Matthias C. M. Troffaes; Gero Walter; Dana Kelly

    2014-05-01

    In a standard Bayesian approach to the alpha-factor model for common-cause failure, a precise Dirichlet prior distribution models epistemic uncertainty in the alpha-factors. This Dirichlet prior is then updated with observed data to obtain a posterior distribution, which forms the basis for further inferences. In this paper, we adapt the imprecise Dirichlet model of Walley to represent epistemic uncertainty in the alpha-factors. In this approach, epistemic uncertainty is expressed more cautiously via lower and upper expectations for each alpha-factor, along with a learning parameter which determines how quickly the model learns from observed data. For this application, we focus on elicitation of the learning parameter, and find that values in the range of 1 to 10 seem reasonable. The approach is compared with Kelly and Atwood's minimally informative Dirichlet prior for the alpha-factor model, which incorporated precise mean values for the alpha-factors, but which was otherwise quite diffuse. Next, we explore the use of a set of Gamma priors to model epistemic uncertainty in the marginal failure rate, expressed via a lower and upper expectation for this rate, again along with a learning parameter. As zero counts are generally less of an issue here, we find that the choice of this learning parameter is less crucial. Finally, we demonstrate how both epistemic uncertainty models can be combined to arrive at lower and upper expectations for all common-cause failure rates. Thereby, we effectively provide a full sensitivity analysis of common-cause failure rates, properly reflecting epistemic uncertainty of the analyst on all levels of the common-cause failure model.

  18. "Functional" Respiratory Muscle Training During Endurance Exercise Causes Modest Hypoxemia but Overall is Well Tolerated.

    PubMed

    Granados, Jorge; Gillum, Trevor L; Castillo, Weston; Christmas, Kevin M; Kuennen, Matthew R

    2016-03-01

    A novel commercial training mask purportedly allows for combined respiratory muscle training and altitude exposure during exercise. We examined the mask's ability to deliver on this claim. Ten men completed three bouts of treadmill exercise at a matched workload (60%VO2peak) in a controlled laboratory environment. During exercise, the mask was worn in 2 manufacturer-defined settings (9,000 ft [9K] and 15,000 ft [15K]) and a Sham configuration (∼3,500 ft). Ventilation (V(E)), tidal volume (V(T)), respiratory rate (R(R)), expired oxygen (F(E)O2) and carbon dioxide (F(E)CO2), peripheral oxygen saturation (S(P)O2), heart rate, and RPE were measured each minute during exercise, and subjects completed the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) immediately after. The mask caused a reduction in V(E) of ∼20 L/min in both the 9K and 15K configurations (p < 0.001). This was due to a reduction in R(R) of ∼10 b·min, but not V(T), which was elevated by ∼250 ml (p < 0.001). F(E)O2 was reduced and F(E)CO2 was elevated above Sham in both 9K and 15K (p < 0.001). VO2 was not different across conditions (p = 0.210), but VCO2 trended lower at 9K (p = 0.093) and was reduced at 15K (p = 0.016). V(E)/VO2 was 18.3% lower than Sham at 9K and 19.2% lower at 15K. V(E)/VCO2 was 16.2% lower than Sham at 9K and 18.8% lower at 15K (all p < 0.001). Heart rate increased with exercise (p < 0.001) but was not different among conditions (p = 0.285). S(P)O2 averaged 94% in Sham, 91% at 9K, and 89% at 15K (p < 0.001). RPE and BAI were also higher in 9K and 15K (p < 0.010), but there was no difference among mask conditions. The training mask caused inadequate hyperventilation that led to arterial hypoxemia and psychological discomfort, but the magnitude of these responses were small and they did not vary across mask configurations.

  19. Deteriorated portal flow may cause liver failure in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma being treated with sorafenib

    PubMed Central

    Yamasaki, Akihiro; Umeno, Narihiro; Harada, Shigeru; Tanaka, Kosuke; Kato, Masaki

    2016-01-01

    We encountered two patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) who showed rapid progression of liver failure during sorafenib treatment. One had portal vein tumor thrombus (PVTT) and the other developed portal vein thrombosis (PVT) during the treatment, and both of them experienced the elevation of serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) concentration during the administration of sorafenib. Their clinical courses indicate that the liver failure might have been caused by sorafenib-induced liver hypoxia, being amplified in the circumstances with reduced portal flow. To our best knowledge, all the reported patients who achieved complete remission (CR) during sorafenib monotherapy had a condition that could decrease portal blood flow. We hypothesized that pathogenesis of disease may be similar in HCC patients who achieve CR and those who experience liver failure while on sorafenib. Sorafenib treatment of patients with HCC and deteriorated portal flow may be a double-edged sword. PMID:27284486

  20. A Curious Case of Acute Respiratory Failure: Is It Antisynthetase Syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Serafin; Iliescu, Mira

    2016-01-01

    Antisynthetase (AS) syndrome is a major subgroup of inflammatory myopathies seen in a minority of patients with dermatomyositis and polymyositis. Although it is usually associated with elevated creatine phosphokinase level, some patients may have amyopathic dermatomyositis (ADM) like presentation with predominant skin involvement. Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is the main pulmonary manifestation and may be severe thereby determining the prognosis. It may rarely present with a very aggressive course resulting in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We report a case of a 43-year-old male who presented with nonresolving pneumonia who was eventually diagnosed to have ADM through a skin biopsy without any muscle weakness. ADM may be associated with rapidly progressive course of interstitial lung disease (ADM-ILD) which is associated with high mortality. Differentiation between ADM-ILD and AS syndrome may be difficult in the absence of positive serology and clinical presentation may help in clinching the diagnosis. PMID:27433359

  1. Redistribution of heart failure as the cause of death: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Heart failure is sometimes incorrectly listed as the underlying cause of death (UCD) on death certificates, thus compromising the accuracy and comparability of mortality statistics. Statistical redistribution of the UCD has been used to examine the effect of misclassification of the UCD attributed to heart failure, but sex- and race-specific redistribution of deaths on coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality in the United States has not been examined. Methods We used coarsened exact matching to infer the UCD of vital records with heart failure as the UCD from 1999 to 2010 for decedents 55 years old and older from states encompassing regions under surveillance by the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study (Maryland, Minnesota, Mississippi, and North Carolina). Records with heart failure as the UCD were matched on decedent characteristics (five-year age groups, sex, race, education, year of death, and state) to records with heart failure listed among the multiple causes of death. Each heart failure death was then redistributed to plausible UCDs proportional to the frequency among matched records. Results After redistribution the proportion of deaths increased for CHD, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes, hypertensive heart disease, and cardiomyopathy, P < 0.001. The percent increase in CHD mortality after redistribution was the highest in Mississippi (12%) and lowest in Maryland (1.6%), with variations by year, race, and sex. Redistribution proportions for CHD were similar to CHD death classification by a panel of expert reviewers in the ARIC study. Conclusions Redistribution of ill-defined UCD would improve the accuracy and comparability of mortality statistics used to allocate public health resources and monitor mortality trends. PMID:24716810

  2. An unknown second tracheoesophageal fistula: a rare cause of postoperative respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Hack, Henrik; Raj, Naveen

    2006-04-01

    The case of a 6-year-old boy who developed complications following gastric interposition surgery for severe, recurrent esophageal stricture is reported. Investigation of his pleural effusion revealed a rare and unexpected complication.

  3. Spontaneous Bacterial Peritonitis and Anasarca in a Female Patient with Ovarian Hyperstimulation Syndrome Complicated by Respiratory and Kidney Failure

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Muhammad Abdul Mabood; Ghazni, Muhammad Salman; Tan, Jackson; Naseer, Nazish; Khalil, Muhammad Ashhad Ullah

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) was first described in 1960. It may occur as a complication of gonadotropin hormone therapy during assisted pregnancy or for primary infertility. A 26-year-old female patient with polycystic ovarian syndrome and primary infertility was treated to conceive. She received intravenous gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) along with follicle-stimulating hormone in an outside private clinic. She presented to the emergency department with abdominal and chest pain, loose stool, vomiting, shortness of breath and decreasing urine output. She was found to have edema, ascites, effusion and acute kidney injury (AKI). Considering the symptoms preceding the drug history and anasarca, a diagnosis of severe OHSS was made. Ascites was further complicated by spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP), which had already been reported before. We speculate that low immunity due to decreased immunoglobulin in patients with OHSS makes them prone to SBP. In our case, septicemia secondary to SBP and fluid loss due to capillary leakage from OHSS resulted in AKI and respiratory failure. This critically ill patient was treated in a special care unit, and she fully recovered with supportive measures. Severe OHSS may present as anasarca including ascites which can develop SBP leading to sepsis and multiorgan failure. PMID:27721728

  4. NASA's Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) Power Processing Unit (PPU) Capacitor Failure Root Cause Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soeder, James F.; Pinero, Luis; Schneidegger, Robert; Dunning, John; Birchenough, Art

    2012-01-01

    The NASA's Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) project is developing an advanced ion propulsion system for future NASA missions for solar system exploration. A critical element of the propulsion system is the Power Processing Unit (PPU) which supplies regulated power to the key components of the thruster. The PPU contains six different power supplies including the beam, discharge, discharge heater, neutralizer, neutralizer heater, and accelerator supplies. The beam supply is the largest and processes up to 93+% of the power. The NEXT PPU had been operated for approximately 200+ hours and has experienced a series of three capacitor failures in the beam supply. The capacitors are in the same, nominally non-critical location the input filter capacitor to a full wave switching inverter. The three failures occurred after about 20, 30, and 135 hours of operation. This paper provides background on the NEXT PPU and the capacitor failures. It discusses the failure investigation approach, the beam supply power switching topology and its operating modes, capacitor characteristics and circuit testing. Finally, it identifies root cause of the failures to be the unusual confluence of circuit switching frequency, the physical layout of the power circuits, and the characteristics of the capacitor.

  5. NASA's Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) Power Processing Unit (PPU) Capacitor Failure Root Cause Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soeder, James F.; Scheidegger, Robert J.; Pinero, Luis R.; Birchenough, Arthur J.; Dunning, John W.

    2012-01-01

    The NASA s Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) project is developing an advanced ion propulsion system for future NASA missions for solar system exploration. A critical element of the propulsion system is the Power Processing Unit (PPU) which supplies regulated power to the key components of the thruster. The PPU contains six different power supplies including the beam, discharge, discharge heater, neutralizer, neutralizer heater, and accelerator supplies. The beam supply is the largest and processes up to 93+% of the power. The NEXT PPU had been operated for approximately 200+ hr and has experienced a series of three capacitor failures in the beam supply. The capacitors are in the same, nominally non-critical location-the input filter capacitor to a full wave switching inverter. The three failures occurred after about 20, 30, and 135 hr of operation. This paper provides background on the NEXT PPU and the capacitor failures. It discusses the failure investigation approach, the beam supply power switching topology and its operating modes, capacitor characteristics and circuit testing. Finally, it identifies root cause of the failures to be the unusual confluence of circuit switching frequency, the physical layout of the power circuits, and the characteristics of the capacitor.

  6. Premature Ovarian Failure: A Critical Condition in The Reproductive Potential with Various Genetic Causes

    PubMed Central

    Pouresmaeili, Farkhondeh; Fazeli, Zahra

    2014-01-01

    Premature ovarian failure (POF) is identified as a heterogeneous disorder leading to amenorrhea and ovarian failure before the age of 40 years. The first known symptom of the disease is having irregular menstrual periods. The phenotype appearance of POF depends significantly on the variations in hormones. Low levels of gonadal hormones (estrogens and inhibins) and increased level of gonadotropins [luteinizing hormone (LH) and Follicle stimulating hormone (FSH)] (hypergonadotropic amenorrhea) are well documented as causes of POF. There is an association between the failure of germ cell development and complete ovarian failure, and consistently decreased number of germ cells is more likely associated with partial ovarian failure resulting in secondary amenorrhea. A literature review on recent findings about POF and its association with genomic alterations in terms of genes and chromosomes. POF is a complex heterogeneous disorder. Some of POF cases are carriers of a single gene mutation inherited in an autosomal or X-linked manner while a number of patients suffer from a chromosome abnormality like Turner syndrome in mosaic form and manifest secondary amenorrhea associated with ovarian dysgenesis. Among many of the known involved genes in POF development, several are prove to be positively associated to the disease development in different populations. While there is a promising association between X chromosome anomalies and specific gene mutations with POF, genome-wide analysis could prove a powerful tool for identifying the most important candidate genes that influence POF manifestation. PMID:24696764

  7. Delta 4-3-oxosteroid 5 beta-reductase deficiency causing neonatal liver failure and hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Shneider, B L; Setchell, K D; Whitington, P F; Neilson, K A; Suchy, F J

    1994-02-01

    Neonatal liver failure was evaluated in two infants. Neither infant had evidence of congenital infection, galactosemia, alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency, tyrosinemia, Zellweger syndrome, or hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis. Abnormal levels of iron were detected in the minor salivary glands of the first infant and in the explanted liver of the second. Analyses of urinary bile salts by fast-atom bombardment ionization mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry revealed a paucity of primary bile acids and a predominance of 7 alpha-hydroxy-3-oxo-4-cholenoic and 7 alpha,12 alpha-dihydroxy-3-oxo-4-cholenoic acids. These findings are consistent with delta 4-3-oxosteroid 5 beta-reductase deficiency, a primary genetic defect in bile acid synthesis. Postmortem evaluation of the first infant revealed significant iron deposition in the liver, pancreas, thyroid, adrenal glands, myocardium, stomach, and submucosal glands of the respiratory tract. In both infants examination of the liver revealed extensive loss of hepatic parenchyma. These cases expand the clinical spectrum of bile acid metabolism defects to include neonatal liver failure with associated hemochromatosis. PMID:8301429

  8. Research on curative effect of traditional Chinese medicine treating low-grade fever of children caused by respiratory system infection.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiangyun

    2015-07-01

    This study aims to explore the curative effect of traditional Chinese medicine treating low-grade fever of children caused by respiratory system infection. Sixty children who suffered low-grade fever caused by respiratory system infection were selected and divided into treatment group and control group randomly, each with 30 cases. Control group was treated with conventional methods including oxygen uptake, nebulization and anti-infection, etc, while treatment group was given boil-free granules of traditional Chinese medicine besides the treatment which control group received. Then clinical curative effect of two groups was compared. Results showed that 28 cases (93.3%) were cured in treatment group; while 21 cases (70.0%) were cured in control group. Compared with control group, the treatment group showed up better treatment efficiency and the difference between groups was of statistical significance (P<0.05). Comparison of results of two groups suggested that, traditional Chinese medicine granules has satisfactory curative effect in the treatment of low-grade fever of children caused by respiratory system infection; characterized by short treatment cycle and effective treatment effect, Chinese medicine granules in the combination with oxygen atomization inhalation is proved to be able to efficiently remit symptoms such as coughing, gasp and labored breathing, with outstanding curative effect in the treatment of low-grade fever of children caused by respiratory system infection, thus it is worthy of popularization and application clinically. PMID:26431646

  9. Research on curative effect of traditional Chinese medicine treating low-grade fever of children caused by respiratory system infection.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiangyun

    2015-07-01

    This study aims to explore the curative effect of traditional Chinese medicine treating low-grade fever of children caused by respiratory system infection. Sixty children who suffered low-grade fever caused by respiratory system infection were selected and divided into treatment group and control group randomly, each with 30 cases. Control group was treated with conventional methods including oxygen uptake, nebulization and anti-infection, etc, while treatment group was given boil-free granules of traditional Chinese medicine besides the treatment which control group received. Then clinical curative effect of two groups was compared. Results showed that 28 cases (93.3%) were cured in treatment group; while 21 cases (70.0%) were cured in control group. Compared with control group, the treatment group showed up better treatment efficiency and the difference between groups was of statistical significance (P<0.05). Comparison of results of two groups suggested that, traditional Chinese medicine granules has satisfactory curative effect in the treatment of low-grade fever of children caused by respiratory system infection; characterized by short treatment cycle and effective treatment effect, Chinese medicine granules in the combination with oxygen atomization inhalation is proved to be able to efficiently remit symptoms such as coughing, gasp and labored breathing, with outstanding curative effect in the treatment of low-grade fever of children caused by respiratory system infection, thus it is worthy of popularization and application clinically.

  10. Causes of the failure and the revision methods for congenital scoliosis due to hemivertebra.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhicai; Li, Quan; Cai, Bin; Yu, Baoqing; Feng, Yuan; Wu, Jibin; Li, Ming; Ran, Bo

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to retrospectively investigate the causes of failure in the first operation and the revision procedure for patients with congenital scoliosis due to hemivertebra. Nineteen patients who underwent the revision operations because of failure in the first operation were included in this study. All the malformations were identified as fully segmented hemivertebra, including 16 cases in thoracolumbar vertebra (T10: three patients; T12: seven patients; L1: six patients), and three cases in thoracic vertebra (T8). The causes of failure in the first operation and the outcome of revision procedure for patients were retrospectively analyzed. All patients were successfully performed the personalized revision surgeries. The failure reasons of the first operation included limitations of the first operation procedure, no or incomplete resection of the malformed hemivertebra, improper operation during surgery, improper internal fixation material, and improper internal fixation scope. The average postoperative scoliosis Cobb's angle and kyphosis Cobb's angle were corrected from 54.1° preoperatively to 23.1° postoperatively, and 59.3° preoperatively to 25.8° postoperatively, respectively. The average postoperative distance between the C7 plumb line and the center sacral vertical line was decreased from 2.5 cm preoperatively to 1.5 cm postoperatively. The average follow-up period was 2.2 years. No serious complication was observed. The cause of the failure of the first operations for the congenital scoliosis due to hemivertebra is verified. Our study may provide a basis for the treatment of congenital scoliosis due to hemivertebra.

  11. Causes of two slope-failure types in continental-shelf sediment, northeastern Gulf of Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schwab, William C.; Lee, Homa J.

    1988-01-01

    Slumps and sediment-gravity flows have been identified in Holocene glaciomarine sediment on declivities less than 1.3 degrees on the Gulf of Alaska continental shelf. Geologic and geotechnical investigation suggest that the processes responsible for these slope failures are earthquake and storm-wave loading, coupled with cyclic degradation of the sediment-shear strength. We propose that the failure type is related to the nature of the failure load. For example, a slump that occurs approximately 30 km seaward of Icy Bay in water depth of 70 to 150 m was most likely caused by earthquake loading, whereas sediment-gravity flows on the Alsek prodelta, which occur in water depths of 35 to 80 m, probably were caused primarily by storm-wave loading. Sediment remolding and redistribution and incorporation of water, which occurs more readily during wave loading from a long storm than during the limited number of loading cycles generated by an earthquake, reduces the shear strength and increases the fluidity of the failed sediment mass. Wave-induced slope failures thereby tend to transform into sediment-gravity flows.

  12. Respiratory allergy caused by house dust mites: What do we really know?

    PubMed

    Calderón, Moisés A; Linneberg, Allan; Kleine-Tebbe, Jörg; De Blay, Frédéric; Hernandez Fernandez de Rojas, Dolores; Virchow, Johann Christian; Demoly, Pascal

    2015-07-01

    The house dust mite (HDM) is a major perennial allergen source and a significant cause of allergic rhinitis and allergic asthma. However, awareness of the condition remains generally low. This review assesses the links between exposure to HDM, development of the allergic response, and pathologic consequences in patients with respiratory allergic diseases. We investigate the epidemiology of HDM allergy to explore the interaction between mites and human subjects at the population, individual, and molecular levels. Core and recent publications were identified by using "house dust mite" as a key search term to evaluate the current knowledge of HDM epidemiology and pathophysiology. Prevalence data for HDM allergen sensitization vary from 65 to 130 million persons in the general population worldwide to as many as 50% among asthmatic patients. Heterogeneity of populations, terminology, and end points in the literature confound estimates, indicating the need for greater standardization in epidemiologic research. Exposure to allergens depends on multiple ecological strata, including climate and mite microhabitats within the domestic environment, with the latter providing opportunity for intervention measures to reduce allergen load. Inhaled mite aeroallergens are unusually virulent: they are able to activate both the adaptive and innate immune responses, potentially offering new avenues for intervention. The role of HDM allergens is crucial in the development of allergic rhinitis and asthma, but the translation of silent sensitization into symptomatic disease is still incompletely understood. Improved understanding of HDMs, their allergens, and their microhabitats will enable development of more effective outcomes for patients with HDM allergy.

  13. Association between NOx exposure and deaths caused by respiratory diseases in a medium-sized Brazilian city.

    PubMed

    César, A C G; Carvalho, J A; Nascimento, L F C

    2015-12-01

    Exposure to nitrogen oxides (NOx) emitted by burning fossil fuels has been associated with respiratory diseases. We aimed to estimate the effects of NOx exposure on mortality owing to respiratory diseases in residents of Taubaté, São Paulo, Brazil, of all ages and both sexes. This time-series ecological study from August 1, 2011 to July 31, 2012 used information on deaths caused by respiratory diseases obtained from the Health Department of Taubaté. Estimated daily levels of pollutants (NOx, particulate matter, ozone, carbon monoxide) were obtained from the Centro de Previsão de Tempo e Estudos Climáticos Coupled Aerosol and Tracer Transport model to the Brazilian developments on the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System. These environmental variables were used to adjust the multipollutant model for apparent temperature. To estimate association between hospitalizations owing to asthma and air pollutants, generalized additive Poisson regression models were developed, with lags as much as 5 days. There were 385 deaths with a daily mean (±SD) of 1.05±1.03 (range: 0-5). Exposure to NOx was significantly associated with mortality owing to respiratory diseases: relative risk (RR)=1.035 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.008-1.063) for lag 2, RR=1.064 (95%CI: 1.017-1.112) lag 3, RR=1.055 (95%CI: 1.025-1.085) lag 4, and RR=1.042 (95%CI: 1.010-1.076) lag 5. A 3 µg/m3 reduction in NOx concentration resulted in a decrease of 10-18 percentage points in risk of death caused by respiratory diseases. Even at NOx concentrations below the acceptable standard, there is association with deaths caused by respiratory diseases.

  14. Association between NOx exposure and deaths caused by respiratory diseases in a medium-sized Brazilian city

    PubMed Central

    César, A. C. G.; Carvalho, J. A.; Nascimento, L. F. C.

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to nitrogen oxides (NOx) emitted by burning fossil fuels has been associated with respiratory diseases. We aimed to estimate the effects of NOx exposure on mortality owing to respiratory diseases in residents of Taubaté, São Paulo, Brazil, of all ages and both sexes. This time-series ecological study from August 1, 2011 to July 31, 2012 used information on deaths caused by respiratory diseases obtained from the Health Department of Taubaté. Estimated daily levels of pollutants (NOx, particulate matter, ozone, carbon monoxide) were obtained from the Centro de Previsão de Tempo e Estudos Climáticos Coupled Aerosol and Tracer Transport model to the Brazilian developments on the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System. These environmental variables were used to adjust the multipollutant model for apparent temperature. To estimate association between hospitalizations owing to asthma and air pollutants, generalized additive Poisson regression models were developed, with lags as much as 5 days. There were 385 deaths with a daily mean (±SD) of 1.05±1.03 (range: 0-5). Exposure to NOx was significantly associated with mortality owing to respiratory diseases: relative risk (RR)=1.035 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.008-1.063) for lag 2, RR=1.064 (95%CI: 1.017-1.112) lag 3, RR=1.055 (95%CI: 1.025-1.085) lag 4, and RR=1.042 (95%CI: 1.010-1.076) lag 5. A 3 µg/m3 reduction in NOx concentration resulted in a decrease of 10-18 percentage points in risk of death caused by respiratory diseases. Even at NOx concentrations below the acceptable standard, there is association with deaths caused by respiratory diseases. PMID:26421866

  15. Association between NOx exposure and deaths caused by respiratory diseases in a medium-sized Brazilian city.

    PubMed

    César, A C G; Carvalho, J A; Nascimento, L F C

    2015-12-01

    Exposure to nitrogen oxides (NOx) emitted by burning fossil fuels has been associated with respiratory diseases. We aimed to estimate the effects of NOx exposure on mortality owing to respiratory diseases in residents of Taubaté, São Paulo, Brazil, of all ages and both sexes. This time-series ecological study from August 1, 2011 to July 31, 2012 used information on deaths caused by respiratory diseases obtained from the Health Department of Taubaté. Estimated daily levels of pollutants (NOx, particulate matter, ozone, carbon monoxide) were obtained from the Centro de Previsão de Tempo e Estudos Climáticos Coupled Aerosol and Tracer Transport model to the Brazilian developments on the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System. These environmental variables were used to adjust the multipollutant model for apparent temperature. To estimate association between hospitalizations owing to asthma and air pollutants, generalized additive Poisson regression models were developed, with lags as much as 5 days. There were 385 deaths with a daily mean (±SD) of 1.05±1.03 (range: 0-5). Exposure to NOx was significantly associated with mortality owing to respiratory diseases: relative risk (RR)=1.035 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.008-1.063) for lag 2, RR=1.064 (95%CI: 1.017-1.112) lag 3, RR=1.055 (95%CI: 1.025-1.085) lag 4, and RR=1.042 (95%CI: 1.010-1.076) lag 5. A 3 µg/m3 reduction in NOx concentration resulted in a decrease of 10-18 percentage points in risk of death caused by respiratory diseases. Even at NOx concentrations below the acceptable standard, there is association with deaths caused by respiratory diseases. PMID:26421866

  16. Questioning the Role of Requirements Engineering in the Causes of Safety-Critical Software Failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C. W.; Holloway, C. M.

    2006-01-01

    Many software failures stem from inadequate requirements engineering. This view has been supported both by detailed accident investigations and by a number of empirical studies; however, such investigations can be misleading. It is often difficult to distinguish between failures in requirements engineering and problems elsewhere in the software development lifecycle. Further pitfalls arise from the assumption that inadequate requirements engineering is a cause of all software related accidents for which the system fails to meet its requirements. This paper identifies some of the problems that have arisen from an undue focus on the role of requirements engineering in the causes of major accidents. The intention is to provoke further debate within the emerging field of forensic software engineering.

  17. Resistance of ferroportin to hepcidin binding causes exocrine pancreatic failure and fatal iron overload.

    PubMed

    Altamura, Sandro; Kessler, Regina; Gröne, Hermann-Josef; Gretz, Norbert; Hentze, Matthias W; Galy, Bruno; Muckenthaler, Martina U

    2014-08-01

    The regulatory axis between the iron hormone hepcidin and its receptor, the iron exporter ferroportin (FPN), is central to iron homeostasis. Mutations preventing hepcidin-mediated degradation of FPN cause systemic iron overload. We have introduced a point mutation (C326S) into the murine Fpn locus, resembling human hereditary hemochromatosis type 4, including elevated plasma iron and ferritin levels, high transferrin saturation, hepatic iron overload, and iron depletion of duodenal enterocytes and reticuloendothelial macrophages. Unlike other mouse models of iron overload, homozygous C326S mice die between 7 and 14 months of age. Pancreatic acinar cells display marked iron accumulation, oxidative damage and degeneration, associated with failure of the exocrine pancreas and severe body weight loss. Rescue experiments reveal iron overload and exocrine pancreatic failure as leading causes of death. This work uncovers the critical importance of the hepcidin-ferroportin regulatory axis for life and unveils the sensitivity of the exocrine pancreas to iron overload.

  18. Causes of instability at LaSalle and consequences from postulated scram failure

    SciTech Connect

    Wulff, W.; Cheng, H.S.; Mallen, A.N.

    1990-01-01

    The March 9, 1988 instability event at the LaSalle County-2 BWR power plant was simulated on the BNL Engineering Plant Analyzer (EPA) in order to assess its ability to simulate oscillatory transients, to identify the causes of the instability, to determine the maximum power amplitude of limit-cycle oscillations after postulated scram failure and to rank leading modeling parameters which affect instability. The EPA was found capable of simulating the LaSalle instability, which was found to have been caused by the combination of low core flow, moderately high power, low feedwater temperature and strong bottom power peaking. After postulated scram failure, the power was found to peak at 1300% of normal full power. Void reactivity, power peaking and core exit flow impedance were found to be the leading phenomena affecting thermohydraulic instability. 3 refs. 17 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Repeated exposure to isoprene oxidation products causes enhanced respiratory tract effects in multiple murine strains.

    PubMed

    Rohr, Annette C; Shore, Stephanie A; Spengler, John D

    2003-10-01

    Ozone reacts with terpenes, common hydrocarbons in cleaning and consumer products as well as the ambient environment, to form particle- and gas-phase products; these have been shown to cause sensory irritation and airflow limitation in mice during single exposures. Isoprene, a hemiterpene emitted from both plants and animals as a bioeffluent, induces the largest effects. This study evaluated the effects of repeated exposures to isoprene oxidation products (OPs) on airway irritation, airflow limitation, and airway responsiveness. A secondary objective was to evaluate a genetic influence by examining multiple murine strains. Six strains (A/J, AKR/J, BALB/c, Swiss Webster, C57Bl/6, and C3H/HeN; total n = 35) were exposed to isoprene oxidation products (1080 +/- 155 ppb isoprene + 3227 +/- 157 ppb ozone at admixing) for 3 h/day for 4 consecutive days. Respiratory parameters were monitored on days 1 and 4 via head-out plethysmography, and airway responsiveness to aerosolized methacholine was evaluated 24 h before the first exposure and immediately after the fourth exposure. Sensory irritation was observed during exposure, as evidenced by a reduction in respiratory frequency (f). A reduction in peak expiratory flow normalized for tidal volume (PEF/VT) also occurred, indicating an airflow limitation effect. Marked enhancement of the effects on f and PEF/VT was observed with repeated exposures, suggesting a cumulative effect. Frequency was reduced from 46.0 +/- 2.3% of baseline during exposure 1 to 34.2 +/- 2.1% during exposure 4 (p =.00002; pooled values for all strains). Similarly, PEF/VT decreased from 75.6 +/- 3.9% of baseline during exposure 1 to 53.1 +/- 3.7% during exposure 4 (p <.00001). A significant reduction in airway responsiveness was observed following repeated exposures in most strains. Interstrain differences in responses were noted, indicating a genetic component. These findings have important implications for indoor environments, where isoprene

  20. Failure of zinc gluconate in treatment of acute upper respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, D S; Helzner, E C; Nuttall, C E; Collins, M; Rofman, B A; Ginsberg, D; Goswick, C B; Magner, A

    1989-01-01

    Zinc is a trace metal with in vitro activity against rhinovirus, the major etiologic agent in acute upper respiratory tract infections (URIs). A previous trial of zinc gluconate supported its efficacy in treating URIs, but the effectiveness of blinding was uncertain. We conducted a prospective randomized trial of zinc gluconate versus a taste-matched placebo of sucrose octaacetate. Lozenges containing either 23 mg of elemental zinc or placebo were taken every 2 h. Eleven URI symptoms were rated daily on a scale of 0 (not present) to 3 (severe). Duration of illness, reflected in the proportion of subjects remaining symptomatic on each day, was not significantly reduced (maximum difference of 12.6% on day 7, P = 0.09; 95% confidence interval, -6 to 31%) by either treatment. Severity of illness, assessed by using a summed severity score, was reduced incrementally by 7 to 8% on days 5 to 7 (P = 0.02) in subjects taking zinc. Adverse effects, mostly nausea and altered taste, were reported by 50% of subjects taking zinc. We conclude that while zinc gluconate may produce a small reduction in overall severity of symptoms, this is not clinically significant. Given the additional high incidence of adverse effects, zinc gluconate cannot be recommended for use in the treatment of acute URIs. PMID:2665639

  1. Transthyretin cardiac amyloidosis: an under-diagnosed cause of heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Molina O, Gabriela; Judge, Daniel; Campbell, Wayne; Chahal, Harjit; Mugmon, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Cardiac amyloidosis is the most common cause of infiltrative cardiomyopathy and is associated with a poor prognosis. Transthyretin cardiac amyloidosis, particularly the type caused by the mutation that replaces the amino acid valine with the amino acid isoleucine at position 122 (Val122Ile), is most common among African- Americans above 65 years of age. Evidence suggests that this mutation is an important, though under-diagnosed, cause of heart failure in this population. Case presentation A 74-year-old African American male with a diagnosis of non-ischemic cardiomyopathy for several years, presented with gradually worsening dyspnea on exertion and lower extremity edema. There is no known cardiac disease in his family. An echocardiogram was done showing a decrease in ejection fraction to 30% from 45% in the span of a year. An endomyocardial biopsy analysis identified transthyretin amyloid with the Val122Ile mutation, confirming the diagnosis of familial transthyretin cardiomyopathy. Discussion Systemic amyloidosis is a group of diseases caused by the deposition of an abnormally folded, insoluble protein that can accumulate in multiple organs causing progressive and irreversible dysfunction. The mutations that most commonly induce variant transthyretin cardiac amyloidosis are Val122Ile, Val30Met and Thr60Ala. The Val122Ile mutation has been found to be present in 3–4% of the African American/Caribbean population. Conclusions Familial amyloid cardiomyopathy is an uncommonly recognized cause of heart failure in the population, and patients may wait several years before accurate diagnosis, risking additional significant irreversible deterioration. Patients that meet the high-risk profile criteria – male gender, age 65 years and older, heart failure symptoms, symmetric left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy, and moderately depressed LV function – should likely undergo additional testing for cardiac amyloidosis. PMID:25432650

  2. Effects of mechanical insufflation-exsufflation in preventing respiratory failure after extubation: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Weaning protocols that include noninvasive ventilation (NIV) decrease re-intubation rates and ICU length of stay. However, impaired airway clearance is associated with NIV failure. Mechanical insufflation-exsufflation (MI-E) has been proven to be very effective in patients receiving NIV. We aimed to assess the efficacy of MI-E as part of an extubation protocol. Method Patients with mechanical ventilation (MV) for more than 48 hours with specific inclusion criteria, who successfully tolerated a spontaneous breathing trial (SBT), were randomly allocated before extubation, either for (A) a conventional extubation protocol (control group), or (B) the MI-E extubation protocol (study group). During the postextubation period (48 hours), group A patients received standard medical treatment (SMT), including NIV in case of specific indications, whereas group B received the same postextubation approach plus three daily sessions of mechanical in-exsufflation (MI-E). Reintubation rates, ICU length of stay, and NIV failure rates were analyzed. Results Seventy-five patients (26 women) with a mean age of 61.8 ± 17.3 years were randomized to a control group (n = 40; mean SAPS II, 47.8 ± 17.7) and to a study group (n = 35; mean SAPS II, 45.0 ± 15.0). MV time before enrollment was 9.4 ± 4.8 and 10.5 ± 4.1 days for the control and the study group, respectively. In the 48 hours after extubation, 20 control patients (50%) and 14 study patients (40%) used NIV. Study group patients had a significant lower reintubation rate than did controls; six patients (17%) versus 19 patients (48%), P < 0.05; respectively, and a significantly lower time under MV; 17.8 ± 6.4 versus 11.7 ± 3.5 days; P < 0.05; respectively. Considering only the subgroup of patients that used NIV, the reintubation rates related to NIV failure were significantly lower in the study group when compared with controls; two patients (6%) versus 13 (33%); P < 0.05, respectively. Mean ICU length of stay after

  3. Spatiotemporal analysis for the effect of ambient particulate matter on cause-specific respiratory mortality in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuying; Guo, Yuming; Li, Guoxing; Zhang, Yajuan; Westerdahl, Dane; Jin, Xiaobin; Pan, Xiaochuan; Chen, Liangfu

    2016-06-01

    This study explored the association between particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter of less than 10 μm (PM10) and the cause-specific respiratory mortality. We used the ordinary kriging method to estimate the spatial characteristics of ambient PM10 at 1-km × 1-km resolution across Beijing during 2008-2009 and subsequently fit the exposure-response relationship between the estimated PM10 and the mortality due to total respiratory disease, chronic lower respiratory disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and pneumonia at the street or township area levels using the generalized additive mixed model (GAMM). We also examined the effects of age, gender, and season in the stratified analysis. The effects of ambient PM10 on the cause-specific respiratory mortality were the strongest at lag0-5 except for pneumonia, and an inter-quantile range increase in PM10 was associated with an 8.04 % (95 % CI 4.00, 12.63) increase in mortality for total respiratory disease, a 6.63 % (95 % CI 1.65, 11.86) increase for chronic lower respiratory disease, and a 5.68 % (95 % CI 0.54, 11.09) increase for COPD, respectively. Higher risks due to the PM10 exposure were observed for females and elderly individuals. Seasonal stratification analysis showed that the effects of PM10 on mortality due to pneumonia were stronger during spring and autumn. While for COPD, the effect of PM10 in winter was statistically significant (15.54 %, 95 % CI 5.64, 26.35) and the greatest among the seasons. The GAMM model evaluated stronger associations between concentration of PM10. There were significant associations between PM10 and mortality due to respiratory disease at the street or township area levels. The GAMM model using high-resolution PM10 could better capture the association between PM10 and respiratory mortality. Gender, age, and season also acted as effect modifiers for the relationship between PM10 and respiratory mortality.

  4. Identification of Modeling Approaches To Support Common-Cause Failure Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Korsah, Kofi; Wood, Richard Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Experience with applying current guidance and practices for common-cause failure (CCF) mitigation to digital instrumentation and control (I&C) systems has proven problematic, and the regulatory environment has been unpredictable. The impact of CCF vulnerability is to inhibit I&C modernization and, thereby, challenge the long-term sustainability of existing plants. For new plants and advanced reactor concepts, the issue of CCF vulnerability for highly integrated digital I&C systems imposes a design burden resulting in higher costs and increased complexity. The regulatory uncertainty regarding which mitigation strategies are acceptable (e.g., what diversity is needed and how much is sufficient) drives designers to adopt complicated, costly solutions devised for existing plants. The conditions that constrain the transition to digital I&C technology by the U.S. nuclear industry require crosscutting research to resolve uncertainty, demonstrate necessary characteristics, and establish an objective basis for qualification of digital technology for usage in Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) I&C applications. To fulfill this research need, Oak Ridge National Laboratory is conducting an investigation into mitigation of CCF vulnerability for nuclear-qualified applications. The outcome of this research is expected to contribute to a fundamentally sound, comprehensive technical basis for establishing the qualification of digital technology for nuclear power applications. This report documents the investigation of modeling approaches for representing failure of I&C systems. Failure models are used when there is a need to analyze how the probability of success (or failure) of a system depends on the success (or failure) of individual elements. If these failure models are extensible to represent CCF, then they can be employed to support analysis of CCF vulnerabilities and mitigation strategies. Specifically, the research findings documented in this report identify modeling approaches that

  5. Angiosarcoma of the liver as a cause of fulminant liver failure

    PubMed Central

    Montell García, Marco; Romero Cabello, Raúl; Romero Feregrino, Raul; Atri Moises, Mercado; Trejo Estrada, Rafael; Alvaro, Padilla-Rodríguez; Moreno Manlio Gerardo, Gama; Feregrino Rodrigo, Romero

    2012-01-01

    Primary liver sarcomas make up 2% of all malignant neoplasms of the liver; of these, angiosarcoma is the most common type. Primary liver tumours rarely cause fulminant hepatic failure (FHF), which is most frequently caused by non-neoplasmic pathologies. In the case of neoplasms, the most frequent are lymphoma and metastatic carcinomas. We describe the case of a 76-year-old man who suffered from FHF as a result of a liver angiosarcoma and we present a review of the medical literature in which we found only two cases of liver angiosarcomas linked to FHF. PMID:22865805

  6. Unusual cause for ventriculoperitoneal shunt failure: carcinoma breast compressing distal catheter.

    PubMed

    Roka, Yam B; Gupta, R; Bajracharya, A

    2010-01-01

    Insertion of a ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt is one of the most common surgical procedures in any neurosurgery unit worldwide. Distal catheter obstruction outside the peritoneum is a rare cause of shunt failure. We report the first case of distal obstruction in a 70-year old female by carcinoma breast engulfing the catheter and causing kinking. Intraoperatively, the catheter was intratumoral with no flow of cerebrospinal fluid distally. She underwent relocation of a new catheter to the opposite side of the abdomen and modified mastectomy with resolution of the hydrocephalus. The postoperative course has been uneventful.

  7. Proportional hazards model for competing risks data with missing cause of failure.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Seunggeun; Lee, Jimin; Sun, Yanqing

    2012-07-01

    We consider the semiparametric proportional hazards model for the cause-specific hazard function in analysis of competing risks data with missing cause of failure. The inverse probability weighted equation and augmented inverse probability weighted equation are proposed for estimating the regression parameters in the model, and their theoretical properties are established for inference. Simulation studies demonstrate that the augmented inverse probability weighted estimator is doubly robust and the proposed method is appropriate for practical use. The simulations also compare the proposed estimators with the multiple imputation estimator of Lu and Tsiatis (2001). The application of the proposed method is illustrated using data from a bone marrow transplant study. PMID:22468017

  8. 77 FR 5857 - Common-Cause Failure Analysis in Event and Condition Assessment: Guidance and Research, Draft...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-06

    ... COMMISSION Common-Cause Failure Analysis in Event and Condition Assessment: Guidance and Research, Draft...: On November 2, 2011 (76 FR 67764), the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) published for public comment Draft NUREG, ``Common- Cause Failure Analysis in Event and Condition Assessment: Guidance...

  9. 76 FR 67764 - Common-Cause Failure Analysis in Event and Condition Assessment: Guidance and Research, Draft...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-02

    ... COMMISSION Common-Cause Failure Analysis in Event and Condition Assessment: Guidance and Research, Draft...-xxxx, Revision 0, ``Common-Cause Failure Analysis in Event and Condition Assessment: Guidance and...-0254 in the subject line of your comments. For additional instructions on submitting comments...

  10. [Hairdressers live dangerously. Daily exposure to chemicals can cause respiratory tract problems].

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Thomas; Tondel, Martin

    2002-05-01

    Hairdressers are regularly exposed to toxic chemicals contained in bleach, hair spray, permanent wave solutions and hair dyes. Adequate ventilation and appropriate working procedures can reduce exposure, but never completely eliminate the risk for respiratory disease.

  11. [Hairdressers live dangerously. Daily exposure to chemicals can cause respiratory tract problems].

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Thomas; Tondel, Martin

    2002-05-01

    Hairdressers are regularly exposed to toxic chemicals contained in bleach, hair spray, permanent wave solutions and hair dyes. Adequate ventilation and appropriate working procedures can reduce exposure, but never completely eliminate the risk for respiratory disease. PMID:12082780

  12. Intrapleural steroid instillation for multiple organ failure with acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Huang, Pei-Ming; Lin, Tzu-Hsin; Tsai, Pi-Ru; Ko, Wen-Je

    2013-11-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) increases mortality in patients with multiorgan dysfunction syndrome (MODS). This study evaluates the feasibility of intrapleural steroid instillation (IPSI) in patients with ARDS and MODS unresponsive to conventional extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). Ninety-two of 467 patients who underwent ECMO between 2005 and 2009 had ARDS, and 30 consecutive adult patients of these 92 patients with severe ARDS and MODS were retrospectively analyzed in this study. Nine of these 30 patients, who did not respond to therapy and whose condition deteriorated, were managed with IPSI. All patients met the inclusion criteria of hemodynamic instability with high catecholamine infusion requirement and 100% oxygen demand in ventilation and ECMO flow. On initial diagnosis of ARDS, no differences in prognostic scorings were observed in patients who underwent conventional treatment (n = 21) and those who underwent IPSI (n = 9). Blood oxygenation, tidal volume, changing in chest radiographic findings, and survival rates were analyzed. The primary outcome was survival until discharge from the hospital. Pulmonary radiographic appearance improved after 3 days of IPSI treatment (P = 0.008); the ratio of arterial partial pressure of oxygen to fraction of inspired oxygen also increased significantly after 5 days of IPSI treatment (P = 0.028). Moreover, the 28-day mortality rate (P = 0.017), 60-day mortality rate (P = 0.003), and survival rate (78% vs. 19%; P = 0.003) significantly improved in patients undergoing IPSI, which therefore appears to be an easily implemented and highly effective treatment for patients with severe ARDS in combination with MODS, particularly in patients who fail to respond to conventional treatment.

  13. [A case of acute chronic respiratory failure due to fat embolism syndrome after the left femoral neck fracture].

    PubMed

    Oda, Keishi; Kawanami, Toshinori; Yatera, Kazuhiro; Ogoshi, Takaaki; Kozaki, Minako; Nagata, Shuya; Nishida, Chinatsu; Yamasaki, Kei; Ishimoto, Hiroshi; Mukae, Hiroshi

    2011-09-01

    A 78 year old Japanese woman was transferred to our hospital for the treatment of a fracture of the left femoral neck in April, 2010. She had been taking oral corticosteroid (prednisolone 5 mg/day) for the treatment of idiopathic interstitial pneumonia since 2003, and had been treated by home oxygen therapy since 2007. She fell in the restroom at home and hurt herself, and was transferred to our hospital for treatment of a left femoral neck fracture in April, 2010. Her respiratory status was stable just after the transfer; however, she was transferred to the intensive care unit and started to receive mechanical ventilation due to rapidly progressive respiratory failure on the fourth day after admission. Chest X-ray and computed tomography revealed rapid progression of bilateral ground-glass attenuations, and acute exacerbation of interstitial pneumonia was clinically suspected. However, the elevation of D-dimer over time and characteristic findings of petechial hemorrhagic lesions on her palpebral conjunctivae and neck with microscopic findings of phagocytized lipid in alveolar macrophages in her endobronchial secretion led to the diagnosis of fat embolism syndrome. She was successfully treated with high-dose corticosteroid and sivelestat sodium, and she was discharged on the 21st day after admission. Although a differential diagnosis of acute exacerbation of interstitial pneumonia and fat embolism syndrome was necessary and difficult in the present case, characteristic findings of petechial hemorrhagic lesions of skin, palpebral conjunctiva and lipid-laden alveolar macrophages in endotracheal aspirate were useful for the accurate and prompt diagnosis of fat embolism syndrome.

  14. Designed for workarounds: a qualitative study of the causes of operational failures in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Anita L; Heisler, W Scott; Janisse, Laura D

    2014-01-01

    Frontline care clinicians and staff in hospitals spend at least 10% of their time working around operational failures: situations in which information, supplies, or equipment needed for patient care are insufficient. However, little is known about underlying causes of operational failures and what hospitals can do to reduce their occurrence. To address this gap, we examined the internal supply chains at 2 hospitals with the aim of discovering organizational factors that contribute to operational failures. We conducted in-depth qualitative research, including observations and interviews of more than 80 individuals from 4 nursing units and the ancillary support departments that provide equipment and supplies needed for patient care. We found that a lack of interconnectedness among interdependent departments' routines was a major source of operational failures. The low levels of interconnectedness occurred because of how the internal supply chains were designed and managed rather than because of employee error or a shortfall in training. Thus, we propose that the time that hospital staff members spend on workarounds can be reduced through deliberate efforts to increase interconnectedness among hospitals' internal supply departments. Four dimensions of interconnectedness include: 1) hospital-level-rather than department-level-performance measures; 2) internal supply department routines that respond to specific patients' needs rather than to predetermined stocking routines; 3) knowledge that is necessary for efficient handoffs of materials that is translated across departmental boundaries; and 4) cross-departmental collaboration mechanisms that enable improvement in the flow of materials across departmental boundaries. PMID:25102517

  15. Creep-fatigue as a possible cause of dental amalgam margin failure.

    PubMed

    Williams, P T; Hedge, G L

    1985-03-01

    Fracture of the margins is the most common cause of failure of dental amalgam restorations. Both corrosion and creep have been identified as possible contributors to this type of failure. The stresses that induce creep may arise from the continued setting expansion of the amalgam, the formation of corrosion products, mastication, or from the thermal expansion of the amalgam during ingestion of hot foods. The latter two are low-frequency cyclic stresses. The amalgams used in dentistry have fusion temperatures only about 40 degrees C above mouth temperature, and they experience grain boundary sliding during creep deformation. Since grain boundary sliding, low-frequency cyclic stresses, and a temperature near the fusion temperature of the alloy are prerequisites for so-called "creep-fatigue fracture", this type of fracture may contribute to amalgam margin failure. Amalgam made from seven different alloys was condensed into stainless steel dies. After being allowed to set for seven days, the specimens were thermally cycled between 4 degrees C and 50 degrees C for 500 and 1000 cycles. Amalgam margin integrity was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy both before and after each cycling period. The amount of margin fracture was calculated after 1000 cycles. Thermal cycling of amalgam restorations placed in stainless steel dies resulted in predominantly intergranular fracturing of the amalgam margins, indicating that creep-fatigue failure may be a significant contributor to in vivo margin fracturing. PMID:3855901

  16. Interleukin-6 and Lung Inflammation: Evidences of A Causing Role in Inducing Respiratory System Resistance Increments.

    PubMed

    Rubini, Alessandro

    2013-07-10

    Interleukin-6 has been shown to be increased in various pathological conditions involving the lungs, both experimentally induced in animals, or spontaneously occurring in humans. Experimental data demonstrating a significant role of interleukin-6 in commonly occurring respiratory system inflammatory diseases are reviewed. These diseases, i.e. asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, are characterised by respiratory system mechanical derangement, most of all because increased elastance and airway resistance. Recent findings showing a causative role of interleukin-6 in determining an airway resistance increment are reviewed. By applying the end-inflation occlusion method to study respiratory system mechanical properties before and after interleukin-6 administration, it was shown that this cytokine induced significant increments in both the resistive pressure dissipation due to frictional forces opposing the airflow in the airway (ohmic resistance), and in the additional resistive pressure dissipation due to the visco-elastic properties of the system, i.e. stress relaxation (visco-elastic resistance). A dose-dependent effect was also demonstrated. No effects were instead detected on respiratory system elastance. Even solely administrated in healthy mammals, interleukin-6 exhibits a significant effect on respiratory system resistances, leading to increased inspiratory muscle mechanical work of breathing. Thus, IL-6 may play an active role in the pathogenesis of respiratory system diseases. The possible involved mechanisms are discussed.

  17. Early intervention of patients at risk for acute respiratory failure and prolonged mechanical ventilation with a checklist aimed at the prevention of organ failure: protocol for a pragmatic stepped-wedged cluster trial of PROOFCheck

    PubMed Central

    Gong, M N; Schenk, L; Gajic, O; Mirhaji, P; Sloan, J; Dong, Y; Festic, E; Herasevich, V

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Acute respiratory failure (ARF) often presents and progresses outside of the intensive care unit. However, recognition and treatment of acute critical illness is often delayed with inconsistent adherence to evidence-based care known to decrease the duration of mechanical ventilation (MV) and complications of critical illness. The goal of this trial is to determine whether the implementation of an electronic medical record-based early alert for progressive respiratory failure coupled with a checklist to promote early compliance to best practice in respiratory failure can improve the outcomes of patients at risk for prolonged respiratory failure and death. Methods and analysis A pragmatic stepped-wedged cluster clinical trial involving 6 hospitals is planned. The study will include adult hospitalised patients identified as high risk for MV >48 hours or death because they were mechanically ventilated outside of the operating room or they were identified as high risk for ARF on the Accurate Prediction of PROlonged VEntilation (APPROVE) score. Patients with advanced directives limiting intubation will be excluded. The intervention will consist of (1) automated identification and notification of clinician of high-risk patients by APPROVE or by invasive MV and (2) checklist of evidence-based practices in ARF (Prevention of Organ Failure Checklist—PROOFCheck). APPROVE and PROOFCheck will be developed in the pretrial period. Primary outcome is hospital mortality. Secondary outcomes include length of stay, ventilator and organ failure-free days and 6-month and 12-month mortality. Predefined subgroup analysis of patients with limitation of aggressive care after study entry is planned. Generalised estimating equations will be used to compare patients in the intervention phase with the control phase, adjusting for clustering within hospitals and time. Ethics and dissemination The study was approved by the institutional review boards. Results will be published

  18. [Unexpected cause of acute renal failure in an 85-year-old woman].

    PubMed

    Fabbian, F; Stabellini, N; Catizone, L

    2008-01-01

    Acute postinfectious glomerulonephritis (APIGN) is usually diagnosed in young people, while in elderly people rapidly progressive forms appear to be the most important glomerular disease causing acute renal failure. We report on a 85-year-old woman with acute renal failure due to APIGN. An 85-year-old woman with a history of hypertension and cerebrovascular disease was hospitalized because of diarrhea and syncope associated with atrial fibrillation. She was found to have left lower lobe pneumonia. Serum creatinine was over 2 mg/dL. Fluids were given, without improvement in renal function but leading to volume overload instead. Within a few days serum creatinine reached a level of 5.4 mg/dL with reduction of urine output despite administration of diuretics. The patient developed hematuria and purpura of the feet. Serum IgA was high and the urine sediment showed casts. Methylprednisolone 125 mg i.v. was given for three days followed by prednisone 50 mg daily. The patient's clinical condition gradually improved and serum creatinine decreased to 1.9 mg/dL. Renal biopsy showed APIGN. During hospitalization, three major complications occurred: hemodynamic instability due to atrial fibrillation, Clostridium difficile colitis and urinary tract infections due to Enterococcus faecalis and Candida tropicans, all successfully treated. APIGN should be taken into account as a cause of acute renal failure in hospitalized elderly patients with many comorbidities. PMID:19048577

  19. Effects of adaptive support ventilation and synchronized intermittent mandatory ventilation on peripheral circulation and blood gas markers of COPD patients with respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Han, Ling; Wang, Yingxiao; Gan, Yonghua; Xu, Lijun

    2014-09-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the effects of adaptive support ventilation (ASV) and synchronized intermittent mandatory ventilation (SIMV) on peripheral circulation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients with respiratory failure. 86 COPD patients with respiratory failure were recruited in this study. Self-control method was used to compare the effect of ASV and SIMV on the parameters of ventilation machine, heart rate, blood pressure, central venous pressure (CVP), and blood gas markers. When the patients in ASV and SIMV groups were compared, respiratory rate, tidal volume, and peak airway pressure (PIP) showed significant difference. When minute ventilation (MV) was compared, no significant difference was shown. When peripheral circulation parameters were compared, peripheral circulation heart rate, SBP, DBP, and CVP showed significant difference. Compared with SIMV group, PaO2, pH, and SaO2 values were remarkably increased (P < 0.01) while no significant difference was found for partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2) when two groups were compared. In conclusion, when mechanical ventilation was used in COPD patients with respiratory failure, ASV can significantly improve clinical outcomes.

  20. Use of noninvasive ventilation at the pulmonary infection control window for acute respiratory failure in AECOPD patients

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Le; Ren, Peng-Wei; Liu, Xue-Ting; Zhang, Chao; Zuo, Hong-Xia; Kang, De-Ying; Niu, Yu-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study was to comprehensively examine the efficacy and safety of noninvasive ventilation used at the pulmonary infection control (PIC) window for acute respiratory failure (ARF) in patients with acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD). Seven electronic databases and relevant resources were searched to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing patients using noninvasive ventilation at PIC window with those continuing receiving invasive ventilation. Retrieved citations were screened, risk of bias was assessed, and data were extracted by 2 independent review authors. Overall effect sizes were synthesized by using meta-analyses. Quality of evidence was rated by using Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation approach. A total of 17 trials involving 959 participants were included for this review. Compared with continuous invasive ventilation, noninvasive ventilation used at PIC window significantly reduced mortality, ventilator-associated pneumonia, weaning failures, reintubations, duration of invasive ventilation, total duration of mechanical ventilation, length of stay (LOS) in intensive care unit, and LOS in hospital as well as hospital costs. Of these, mortality significantly decreased (risk ratio = 0.27, 95% confidence interval: 0.17–0.42, P < 0.001) without significant heterogeneity (I2 = 0%, P = 0.99). Quality of evidence regarding the 9 outcomes across the included studies was rated from moderate to low. Use of noninvasive ventilation at PIC window showed beneficial effects across identified trials for ARF in AECOPD patients. Considering the absence of high quality of available evidence and the uncertainty of long-term effect of this intervention, a weak recommendation for clinical practice was generated, and further well-designed and adequately powered RCTs are required to validate this conclusion. PMID:27310978

  1. Whole-thorax irradiation induces hypoxic respiratory failure, pleural effusions and cardiac remodeling.

    PubMed

    Medhora, Meetha; Gao, Feng; Glisch, Chad; Narayanan, Jayashree; Sharma, Ashish; Harmann, Leanne M; Lawlor, Michael W; Snyder, Laura A; Fish, Brian L; Down, Julian D; Moulder, John E; Strande, Jennifer L; Jacobs, Elizabeth R

    2015-03-01

    To study the mechanisms of death following a single lethal dose of thoracic radiation, WAG/RijCmcr (Wistar) rats were treated with 15 Gy to the whole thorax and followed until they were morbid or sacrificed for invasive assays at 6 weeks. Lung function was assessed by breathing rate and arterial oxygen saturation. Lung structure was evaluated histologically. Cardiac structure and function were examined by echocardiography. The frequency and characteristics of pleural effusions were determined. Morbidity from 15 Gy radiation occurred in all rats 5 to 8 weeks after exposure, coincident with histological pneumonitis. Increases in breathing frequencies peaked at 6 weeks, when profound arterial hypoxia was also recorded. Echocardiography analysis at 6 weeks showed pulmonary hypertension and severe right ventricular enlargement with impaired left ventricular function and cardiac output. Histologic sections of the heart revealed only rare foci of lymphocytic infiltration. Total lung weight more than doubled. Pleural effusions were present in the majority of the irradiated rats and contained elevated protein, but low lactate dehydrogenase, when compared with serum from the same animal. Pleural effusions had a higher percentage of macrophages and large monocytes than neutrophils and contained mast cells that are rarely present in other pathological states. Lethal irradiation to rat lungs leads to hypoxia with infiltration of immune cells, edema and pleural effusion. These changes may contribute to pulmonary vascular and parenchymal injury that result in secondary changes in heart structure and function. We report that conditions resembling congestive heart failure contribute to death during radiation pneumonitis, which indicates new targets for therapy.

  2. Anesthesiology Devices; Reclassification of Membrane Lung for Long-Term Pulmonary Support; Redesignation as Extracorporeal Circuit and Accessories for Long-Term Respiratory/Cardiopulmonary Failure. Final order.

    PubMed

    2016-02-12

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing a final order to redesignate membrane lung devices for long-term pulmonary support, a preamendments class III device, as extracorporeal circuit and accessories for long-term respiratory/cardiopulmonary failure, and to reclassify the device to class II (special controls) in patients with acute respiratory failure or acute cardiopulmonary failure where other available treatment options have failed, and continued clinical deterioration is expected or the risk of death is imminent. A membrane lung device for long-term pulmonary support (>6 hours) refers to the oxygenator in an extracorporeal circuit used during long-term procedures, commonly referred to as extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). Because a number of other devices and accessories are used with the oxygenator in the circuit, the title and identification of the regulation are revised to include extracorporeal circuit and accessories for long-term respiratory/cardiopulmonary failure. Although an individual device or accessory used in an ECMO circuit may already have its own classification regulation when the device or accessory is intended for short-term use (<=6 hours), such device or accessory will be subject to the same regulatory controls applied to the oxygenator (i.e., class II, special controls) when evaluated as part of the ECMO circuit for long-term use (>6 hours). On its own initiative, based on new information, FDA is revising the classification of the membrane lung device for long-term pulmonary support.

  3. Mechanical failures as a contributing cause to motor vehicle accidents South Africa.

    PubMed

    van Schoor, O; van Niekerk, J L; Grobbelaar, B

    2001-11-01

    Over the past decades motor vehicles became the primary mode of transportation in developing countries. At the same time an improvement in automotive engineering and manufacturing as well as the phenomena of urbanisation have resulted in more vehicles spending more time on the road at higher speeds. Invariably this leads to driving scenarios where safety critical manoeuvres have to be performed that rely on the mechanical condition of the vehicles. In developing countries, where economic realities force the population to make use of older and less reliable vehicles, the risk of accidents caused by some sort of mechanical failure increases. The casualty rate (events causing death and/or serious injuries) for road traffic accidents in South Africa is amongst the highest in the world. This trend has persisted with little variation over the years, despite the efforts of local road safety organisations and research institutes to decrease them. The main goal of this study was to establish the contribution of mechanical failures to motor vehicle accidents, and furthermore, to compare it with international trends. Data obtained from accident response units (ARU) indicate that tyres and brakes were the main contributors to mechanical failures resulting in accidents in the Pretoria region (Gauteng Province). However, the reported percentage of approximately 3% is comparable to similar statistics from developed countries. Detailed information on the condition of road-going vehicles was then collected in this area. The roadside survey (potential mechanical defect tests (PMDT)) indicated that 40% of the vehicles surveyed on the suburban road and 29% of the vehicles surveyed on the highway had mechanical defects that contravened current road and traffic regulations in South Africa and may, therefore, be at risk of causing an accident due to a mechanical failure. In the Minibus (taxi) survey, large irregularities in tyre inflation pressure were identified as a cause of concern

  4. Rocking bed and prolonged independence from nocturnal non-invasive ventilation in neurogenic respiratory failure associated with limb weakness

    PubMed Central

    Cormican, L; Higgins, S; Davidson, A; Howard, R; Williams, A

    2004-01-01

    A 40 year old mother of three with autosomal dominant scapuloperoneal muscular dystrophy presented with severe neurogenic respiratory failure requiring nocturnal non-invasive ventilation (NIV). Because of the development of profound proximal muscular weakness as a consequence of the progressive nature of her neurological disease, she eventually was unable to apply and remove the facial interface to set up her NIV circuit. She therefore became dependent on her children and carers to start and stop NIV during the night. A rocking bed was successfully employed as an alternative to nocturnal NIV. Ventilation was facilitated by the passive movement of the diaphragm as a consequence of the movement of the abdominal contents under the effect of gravity. Benefit was demonstrated objectively by pulse oximetry and subjectively by the improvement in the patient's symptomatology and continued independence at night. The ease of use of a rocking bed should be borne in mind when the necessity for nocturnal ventilatory support in neuromuscular disease results in the potential loss of independence for a patient. PMID:15192173

  5. Specific Metabolome Profile of Exhaled Breath Condensate in Patients with Shock and Respiratory Failure: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Fermier, Brice; Blasco, Hélène; Godat, Emmanuel; Bocca, Cinzia; Moënne-Loccoz, Joseph; Emond, Patrick; Andres, Christian R.; Laffon, Marc; Ferrandière, Martine

    2016-01-01

    Background: Shock includes different pathophysiological mechanisms not fully understood and remains a challenge to manage. Exhaled breath condensate (EBC) may contain relevant biomarkers that could help us make an early diagnosis or better understand the metabolic perturbations resulting from this pathological situation. Objective: we aimed to establish the metabolomics signature of EBC from patients in shock with acute respiratory failure in a pilot study. Material and methods: We explored the metabolic signature of EBC in 12 patients with shock compared to 14 controls using LC-HRMS. We used a non-targeted approach, and we performed a multivariate analysis based on Orthogonal Partial Least Square-Discriminant Analysis (OPLS-DA) to differentiate between the two groups of patients. Results: We optimized the procedure of EBC collection and LC-HRMS detected more than 1000 ions in this fluid. The optimization of multivariate models led to an excellent model of differentiation for both groups (Q2 > 0.4) after inclusion of only 6 ions. Discussion and conclusion: We validated the procedure of EBC collection and we showed that the metabolome profile of EBC may be relevant in characterizing patients with shock. We performed well in distinguishing these patients from controls, and the identification of relevant compounds may be promising for ICC patients. PMID:27598216

  6. Capabilities of a mobile extracorporeal membrane oxygenation service for severe respiratory failure delivered by intensive care specialists.

    PubMed

    Sherren, P B; Shepherd, S J; Glover, G W; Meadows, C I S; Langrish, C; Ioannou, N; Wyncoll, D; Daly, K; Gooby, N; Agnew, N; Barrett, N A

    2015-06-01

    We conducted a single-centre observational study of retrievals for severe respiratory failure over 12 months. Our intensivist-delivered retrieval service has mobile extracorporeal membrane oxygenation capabilities. Sixty patients were analysed: 34 (57%) were female and the mean (SD) age was 44.1 (13.6) years. The mean (SD) PaO2 /FI O2 ratio at referral was 10.2 (4.1) kPa and median (IQR [range]) Murray score was 3.25 (3.0-3.5 [1.5-4.0]). Forty-eight patients (80%) required veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation at the referring centre. There were no cannulation or extracorporeal membrane oxygenation-related complications. The median (IQR [range]) retrieval distance was 47.2 (14.9-77.0 [2.3-342.0]) miles. There were no major adverse events during retrieval. Thirty-seven patients (77%) who received extracorporeal membrane oxygenation survived to discharge from the intensive care unit and 36 patients (75%) were alive after six months. Senior intensivist-initiated and delivered mobile extracorporeal membrane oxygenation is safe and associated with a high incidence of survival.

  7. Position paper for the organization of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation programs for acute respiratory failure in adult patients.

    PubMed

    Combes, Alain; Brodie, Daniel; Bartlett, Robert; Brochard, Laurent; Brower, Roy; Conrad, Steve; De Backer, Daniel; Fan, Eddy; Ferguson, Niall; Fortenberry, James; Fraser, John; Gattinoni, Luciano; Lynch, William; MacLaren, Graeme; Mercat, Alain; Mueller, Thomas; Ogino, Mark; Peek, Giles; Pellegrino, Vince; Pesenti, Antonio; Ranieri, Marco; Slutsky, Arthur; Vuylsteke, Alain

    2014-09-01

    The use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) for severe acute respiratory failure (ARF) in adults is growing rapidly given recent advances in technology, even though there is controversy regarding the evidence justifying its use. Because ECMO is a complex, high-risk, and costly modality, at present it should be conducted in centers with sufficient experience, volume, and expertise to ensure it is used safely. This position paper represents the consensus opinion of an international group of physicians and associated health-care workers who have expertise in therapeutic modalities used in the treatment of patients with severe ARF, with a focus on ECMO. The aim of this paper is to provide physicians, ECMO center directors and coordinators, hospital directors, health-care organizations, and regional, national, and international policy makers a description of the optimal approach to organizing ECMO programs for ARF in adult patients. Importantly, this will help ensure that ECMO is delivered safely and proficiently, such that future observational and randomized clinical trials assessing this technique may be performed by experienced centers under homogeneous and optimal conditions. Given the need for further evidence, we encourage restraint in the widespread use of ECMO until we have a better appreciation for both the potential clinical applications and the optimal techniques for performing ECMO.

  8. Mutation of kri1l causes definitive hematopoiesis failure via PERK-dependent excessive autophagy induction

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Xiao-E; Ma, Ke; Xu, Tao; Gao, Lei; Wu, Shuang; Fu, Cong; Zhang, Wenjuan; Wang, Zhizhang; Liu, Kaiyu; Dong, Mei; Jing, Changbin; Ren, Chunguang; Dong, Zhiwei; Chen, Yi; Jin, Yi; Huang, Qiuhua; Chang, Xing; Deng, Min; Li, Li; Luo, Lingfei; Zhu, Jun; Dang, Yongjun; Chang, Hung-Chun; Zon, Leonard I; Zhou, Yi; Chen, Saijuan; Pan, Weijun

    2015-01-01

    Dysregulation of ribosome biogenesis causes human diseases, such as Diamond-Blackfan anemia, del (5q-) syndrome and bone marrow failure. However, the mechanisms of blood disorders in these diseases remain elusive. Through genetic mapping, molecular cloning and mechanism characterization of the zebrafish mutant cas002, we reveal a novel connection between ribosomal dysfunction and excessive autophagy in the regulation of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs). cas002 carries a recessive lethal mutation in kri1l gene that encodes an essential component of rRNA small subunit processome. We show that Kri1l is required for normal ribosome biogenesis, expansion of definitive HSPCs and subsequent lineage differentiation. Through live imaging and biochemical studies, we find that loss of Kri1l causes the accumulation of misfolded proteins and excessive PERK activation-dependent autophagy in HSPCs. Blocking autophagy but not inhibiting apoptosis by Bcl2 overexpression can fully rescue hematopoietic defects, but not the lethality of kri1lcas002 embryos. Treatment with autophagy inhibitors (3-MA and Baf A1) or PERK inhibitor (GSK2656157), or knockdown of beclin1 or perk can markedly restore HSPC proliferation and definitive hematopoietic cell differentiation. These results may provide leads for effective therapeutics that benefit patients with anemia or bone marrow failure caused by ribosome disorders. PMID:26138676

  9. Mutation of kri1l causes definitive hematopoiesis failure via PERK-dependent excessive autophagy induction.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xiao-E; Ma, Ke; Xu, Tao; Gao, Lei; Wu, Shuang; Fu, Cong; Zhang, Wenjuan; Wang, Zhizhang; Liu, Kaiyu; Dong, Mei; Jing, Changbin; Ren, Chunguang; Dong, Zhiwei; Chen, Yi; Jin, Yi; Huang, Qiuhua; Chang, Xing; Deng, Min; Li, Li; Luo, Lingfei; Zhu, Jun; Dang, Yongjun; Chang, Hung-Chun; Zon, Leonard I; Zhou, Yi; Chen, Saijuan; Pan, Weijun

    2015-08-01

    Dysregulation of ribosome biogenesis causes human diseases, such as Diamond-Blackfan anemia, del (5q-) syndrome and bone marrow failure. However, the mechanisms of blood disorders in these diseases remain elusive. Through genetic mapping, molecular cloning and mechanism characterization of the zebrafish mutant cas002, we reveal a novel connection between ribosomal dysfunction and excessive autophagy in the regulation of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs). cas002 carries a recessive lethal mutation in kri1l gene that encodes an essential component of rRNA small subunit processome. We show that Kri1l is required for normal ribosome biogenesis, expansion of definitive HSPCs and subsequent lineage differentiation. Through live imaging and biochemical studies, we find that loss of Kri1l causes the accumulation of misfolded proteins and excessive PERK activation-dependent autophagy in HSPCs. Blocking autophagy but not inhibiting apoptosis by Bcl2 overexpression can fully rescue hematopoietic defects, but not the lethality of kri1l(cas002) embryos. Treatment with autophagy inhibitors (3-MA and Baf A1) or PERK inhibitor (GSK2656157), or knockdown of beclin1 or perk can markedly restore HSPC proliferation and definitive hematopoietic cell differentiation. These results may provide leads for effective therapeutics that benefit patients with anemia or bone marrow failure caused by ribosome disorders.

  10. Mutation of kri1l causes definitive hematopoiesis failure via PERK-dependent excessive autophagy induction.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xiao-E; Ma, Ke; Xu, Tao; Gao, Lei; Wu, Shuang; Fu, Cong; Zhang, Wenjuan; Wang, Zhizhang; Liu, Kaiyu; Dong, Mei; Jing, Changbin; Ren, Chunguang; Dong, Zhiwei; Chen, Yi; Jin, Yi; Huang, Qiuhua; Chang, Xing; Deng, Min; Li, Li; Luo, Lingfei; Zhu, Jun; Dang, Yongjun; Chang, Hung-Chun; Zon, Leonard I; Zhou, Yi; Chen, Saijuan; Pan, Weijun

    2015-08-01

    Dysregulation of ribosome biogenesis causes human diseases, such as Diamond-Blackfan anemia, del (5q-) syndrome and bone marrow failure. However, the mechanisms of blood disorders in these diseases remain elusive. Through genetic mapping, molecular cloning and mechanism characterization of the zebrafish mutant cas002, we reveal a novel connection between ribosomal dysfunction and excessive autophagy in the regulation of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs). cas002 carries a recessive lethal mutation in kri1l gene that encodes an essential component of rRNA small subunit processome. We show that Kri1l is required for normal ribosome biogenesis, expansion of definitive HSPCs and subsequent lineage differentiation. Through live imaging and biochemical studies, we find that loss of Kri1l causes the accumulation of misfolded proteins and excessive PERK activation-dependent autophagy in HSPCs. Blocking autophagy but not inhibiting apoptosis by Bcl2 overexpression can fully rescue hematopoietic defects, but not the lethality of kri1l(cas002) embryos. Treatment with autophagy inhibitors (3-MA and Baf A1) or PERK inhibitor (GSK2656157), or knockdown of beclin1 or perk can markedly restore HSPC proliferation and definitive hematopoietic cell differentiation. These results may provide leads for effective therapeutics that benefit patients with anemia or bone marrow failure caused by ribosome disorders. PMID:26138676

  11. The causes, consequences, and treatment of left or right heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Pazos-López, Pablo; Peteiro-Vázquez, Jesús; Carcía-Campos, Ana; García-Bueno, Lourdes; de Torres, Juan Pablo Abugattas; Castro-Beiras, Alfonso

    2011-01-01

    Chronic heart failure (HF) is a cardiovascular disease of cardinal importance because of several factors: a) an increasing occurrence due to the aging of the population, primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular events, and modern advances in therapy, b) a bad prognosis: around 65% of patients are dead within 5 years of diagnosis, c) a high economic cost: HF accounts for 1% to 2% of total health care expenditure. This review focuses on the main causes, consequences in terms of morbidity, mortality and costs and treatment of HF. PMID:21603593

  12. Upper Respiratory Tract Disease in the Gopher Tortoise Is Caused by Mycoplasma agassizii†

    PubMed Central

    Brown, M. B.; McLaughlin, G. S.; Klein, P. A.; Crenshaw, B. C.; Schumacher, I. M.; Brown, D. R.; Jacobson, E. R.

    1999-01-01

    Upper respiratory tract disease (URTD) has been observed in a number of tortoise species, including the desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) and the gopher tortoise (Gopherus polyphemus). Clinical signs of URTD in gopher tortoises are similar to those in desert tortoises and include serous, mucoid, or purulent discharge from the nares, excessive tearing to purulent ocular discharge, conjunctivitis, and edema of the eyelids and ocular glands. The objectives of the present study were to determine if Mycoplasma agassizii was an etiologic agent of URTD in the gopher tortoise and to determine the clinical course of the experimental infection in a dose-response infection study. Tortoises were inoculated intranasally with 0.5 ml (0.25 ml/nostril) of either sterile SP4 broth (control group; n = 10) or 108 color-changing units (CCU) (total dose) of M. agassizii 723 (experimental infection group; n = 9). M. agassizii caused clinical signs compatible with those observed in tortoises with natural infections. Clinical signs of URTD were evident in seven of nine experimentally infected tortoises by 4 weeks postinfection (p.i.) and in eight of nine experimentally infected tortoises by 8 weeks p.i. In the dose-response experiments, tortoises were inoculated intranasally with a low (101 CCU; n = 6), medium (103 CCU; n = 6), or high (105 CCU; n = 5) dose of M. agassizii 723 or with sterile SP4 broth (n = 10). At all time points p.i. in both experiments, M. agassizii could be isolated from the nares of at least 50% of the tortoises. All of the experimentally infected tortoises seroconverted, and levels of antibody were statistically higher in infected animals than in control animals for all time points of >4 weeks p.i. (P < 0.0001). Control tortoises in both experiments did not show clinical signs, did not seroconvert, and did not have detectable M. agassizii by either culture or PCR at any point in the study. Histological lesions were compatible with those observed in tortoises with

  13. (m, M) Machining system with two unreliable servers, mixed spares and common-cause failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Madhu; Mittal, Ragini; Kumari, Rekha

    2015-04-01

    This paper deals with multi-component machine repair model having provision of warm standby units and repair facility consisting of two heterogeneous servers (primary and secondary) to provide repair to the failed units. The failure of operating and standby units may occur individually or due to some common cause. The primary server may fail partially following full failure whereas secondary server faces complete failure only. The life times of servers and operating/standby units and their repair times follow exponential distribution. The successive over relaxation (SOR) technique has been used to obtain the steady state queue size distribution of the number of failed units in the system. To explore the system characteristics, various performance indices such as expected number of failed units in the queue, throughput, etc. have been obtained. Numerical results have been provided to illustrate the computational tractability of the proposed SOR technique. To examine the effect of system descriptors on the performance indices, the sensitivity analysis is also performed.

  14. A nonsense mutation in the DNA repair factor Hebo causes mild bone marrow failure and microcephaly.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shu; Pondarre, Corinne; Pennarun, Gaelle; Labussiere-Wallet, Helene; Vera, Gabriella; France, Benoit; Chansel, Marie; Rouvet, Isabelle; Revy, Patrick; Lopez, Bernard; Soulier, Jean; Bertrand, Pascale; Callebaut, Isabelle; de Villartay, Jean-Pierre

    2016-05-30

    Inherited bone marrow failure syndromes are human conditions in which one or several cell lineages of the hemopoietic system are affected. They are present at birth or may develop progressively. They are sometimes accompanied by other developmental anomalies. Three main molecular causes have been recognized to result in bone marrow failure syndromes: (1) defects in the Fanconi anemia (FA)/BRCA DNA repair pathway, (2) defects in telomere maintenance, and (3) abnormal ribosome biogenesis. We analyzed a patient with mild bone marrow failure and microcephaly who did not present with the typical FA phenotype. Cells from this patient showed increased sensitivity to ionizing radiations and phleomycin, attesting to a probable DNA double strand break (dsb) repair defect. Linkage analysis and whole exome sequencing revealed a homozygous nonsense mutation in the ERCC6L2 gene. We identified a new ERCC6L2 alternative transcript encoding the DNA repair factor Hebo, which is critical for complementation of the patient's DNAdsb repair defect. Sequence analysis revealed three structured regions within Hebo: a TUDOR domain, an adenosine triphosphatase domain, and a new domain, HEBO, specifically present in Hebo direct orthologues. Hebo is ubiquitously expressed, localized in the nucleus, and rapidly recruited to DNAdsb's in an NBS1-dependent manner.

  15. Identification of a mannheimia haemolytica genetic subtype that causes bovine respiratory disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC) is a serious health and economic problem that costs the United States cattle industry over a billion dollars annually. Mannheimia haemolytica is a major bacterial component of BRDC. An opportunistic pathogen, M. haemolytica resides within the upper respira...

  16. Understanding the causes of kidney transplant failure: the dominant role of antibody-mediated rejection and nonadherence.

    PubMed

    Sellarés, J; de Freitas, D G; Mengel, M; Reeve, J; Einecke, G; Sis, B; Hidalgo, L G; Famulski, K; Matas, A; Halloran, P F

    2012-02-01

    We prospectively studied kidney transplants that progressed to failure after a biopsy for clinical indications, aiming to assign a cause to every failure. We followed 315 allograft recipients who underwent indication biopsies at 6 days to 32 years posttransplant. Sixty kidneys progressed to failure in the follow-up period (median 31.4 months). Failure was rare after T-cell-mediated rejection and acute kidney injury and common after antibody-mediated rejection or glomerulonephritis. We developed rules for using biopsy diagnoses, HLA antibody and clinical data to explain each failure. Excluding four with missing information, 56 failures were attributed to four causes: rejection 36 (64%), glomerulonephritis 10 (18%), polyoma virus nephropathy 4 (7%) and intercurrent events 6 (11%). Every rejection loss had evidence of antibody-mediated rejection by the time of failure. Among rejection losses, 17 of 36 (47%) had been independently identified as nonadherent by attending clinicians. Nonadherence was more frequent in patients who progressed to failure (32%) versus those who survived (3%). Pure T-cell-mediated rejection, acute kidney injury, drug toxicity and unexplained progressive fibrosis were not causes of loss. This prospective cohort indicates that many actual failures after indication biopsies manifest phenotypic features of antibody-mediated or mixed rejection and also underscores the major role of nonadherence.

  17. Mitochondrial DNA that escapes from autophagy causes inflammation and heart failure.

    PubMed

    Oka, Takafumi; Hikoso, Shungo; Yamaguchi, Osamu; Taneike, Manabu; Takeda, Toshihiro; Tamai, Takahito; Oyabu, Jota; Murakawa, Tomokazu; Nakayama, Hiroyuki; Nishida, Kazuhiko; Akira, Shizuo; Yamamoto, Akitsugu; Komuro, Issei; Otsu, Kinya

    2012-05-10

    Heart failure is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in industrialized countries. Although infection with microorganisms is not involved in the development of heart failure in most cases, inflammation has been implicated in the pathogenesis of heart failure. However, the mechanisms responsible for initiating and integrating inflammatory responses within the heart remain poorly defined. Mitochondria are evolutionary endosymbionts derived from bacteria and contain DNA similar to bacterial DNA. Mitochondria damaged by external haemodynamic stress are degraded by the autophagy/lysosome system in cardiomyocytes. Here we show that mitochondrial DNA that escapes from autophagy cell-autonomously leads to Toll-like receptor (TLR) 9-mediated inflammatory responses in cardiomyocytes and is capable of inducing myocarditis and dilated cardiomyopathy. Cardiac-specific deletion of lysosomal deoxyribonuclease (DNase) II showed no cardiac phenotypes under baseline conditions, but increased mortality and caused severe myocarditis and dilated cardiomyopathy 10 days after treatment with pressure overload. Early in the pathogenesis, DNase II-deficient hearts showed infiltration of inflammatory cells and increased messenger RNA expression of inflammatory cytokines, with accumulation of mitochondrial DNA deposits in autolysosomes in the myocardium. Administration of inhibitory oligodeoxynucleotides against TLR9, which is known to be activated by bacterial DNA, or ablation of Tlr9 attenuated the development of cardiomyopathy in DNase II-deficient mice. Furthermore, Tlr9 ablation improved pressure overload-induced cardiac dysfunction and inflammation even in mice with wild-type Dnase2a alleles. These data provide new perspectives on the mechanism of genesis of chronic inflammation in failing hearts.

  18. Current evidence for the effectiveness of heated and humidified high flow nasal cannula supportive therapy in adult patients with respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Roca, Oriol; Hernández, Gonzalo; Díaz-Lobato, Salvador; Carratalá, José M; Gutiérrez, Rosa M; Masclans, Joan R

    2016-01-01

    High flow nasal cannula (HFNC) supportive therapy has emerged as a safe, useful therapy in patients with respiratory failure, improving oxygenation and comfort. Recently several clinical trials have analyzed the effectiveness of HFNC therapy in different clinical situations and have reported promising results. Here we review the current knowledge about HFNC therapy, from its mechanisms of action to its effects on outcomes in different clinical situations. PMID:27121707

  19. Doxapram hydrochloride in the treatment of acute exacerbation of chronic respiratory failure. A patient with four episodes treated without use of a respirator.

    PubMed

    Ohi, M; Nakashima, M; Heki, S; Kato, M; Sagawa, Y

    1978-10-01

    A 51-year-old woman with chronic respiratory failure (status after tuberculosis) was given an infusion of doxapram hydrochloride (1 to 2 mg/kg of body weight per hour) for four episodes of acute exacerbation of her condition. Treatment with the drug prevented worsening of hypercapnia in the four episodes, when administration of 24 percent oxygen had occasioned rises in the arterial carbon dioxide tension of 23, 10, 9, and 7 mm Hg.

  20. [Impact of acute respiratory failure on survival of COPD patients managed with long-term non-invasive ventilation and oxygen therapy].

    PubMed

    Perrin, C; Vandenbos, F; Tamisier, R; Lemoigne, F; Blaive, B

    2000-02-01

    Our study aimed to assess the impact of acute respiratory failure (ARF) on survival of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) receiving long-term oxygen therapy (LTOT) plus nasal intermittent positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV). Survival was analysed retrospectively in 24 patients with severe COPD initiated to NIPPV in addition to LTOT. Fourteen patients were established on NIPPV following exacerbation of acute respiratory failure which has required mechanical ventilation (group 1). Ten patients (group 2) have never been hospitalized for ARF. Comparison of clinical details at baseline, 6 months, 1, 2, and 3 years for the two groups failed to reveal any difference with the exception of prior episodes of ARF. The probability of survival at 3 years was 65% (95% confidence interval [CI] 43-86) for the overall population, 46% (95% CI 15-77) in group 1, and 74% (95% CI 42-105) in group 2. The difference between the two groups was statistically significant. We show that ARF requiring mechanical ventilation appears to be a factor that is negatively correlated with survival for patients treated by LTOT plus NIPPV. This data suggests that NIPPV should be tried before ARF arising in COPD patients who present a deterioration in chronic respiratory failure with hypercapnia. PMID:10756560

  1. Sleeping and resting respiratory rates in dogs and cats with medically-controlled left-sided congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Porciello, F; Rishniw, M; Ljungvall, I; Ferasin, L; Haggstrom, J; Ohad, D G

    2016-01-01

    Sleeping and resting respiratory rates (SRR and RRR, respectively) are commonly used to monitor dogs and cats with left-sided cardiac disease and to identify animals with left-sided congestive heart failure (L-CHF). Dogs and cats with subclinical heart disease have SRRmean values <30 breaths/min. However, little is known about SRR and RRR in dogs and cats with CHF that is well controlled with medical therapy. In this study, SRR and RRR were measured by the owners of 51 dogs and 22 cats with stable, well-controlled CHF. Median canine SRRmean was 20 breaths/min (7-39 breaths/min); eight dogs were ≥25 breaths/min and one dog only was ≥30 breaths/min. Canine SRRmean was unrelated to pulmonary hypertension or diuretic dose. Median feline SRRmean was 20 breaths/min (13-31 breaths/min); four cats were ≥25 breaths/min and only one cat was ≥30 breaths/min. Feline SRRmean was unrelated to diuretic dose. SRR remained stable during collection in both species with little day-to-day variability. The median canine RRRmean was 24 breaths/min (12-44 breaths/min), 17 were ≥25 breaths/min, seven were ≥30 breaths/min, two were >40 breaths/min. Median feline RRRmean was 24 breaths/min (15-45 breaths/min); five cats had RRRmean ≥25 breaths/min; one had ≥30 breaths/min, and two had ≥40 breaths/min. These data suggest that most dogs and cats with CHF that is medically well-controlled and stable have SRRmean and RRRmean <30 breaths/min at home. Clinicians can use these data to help determine how best to control CHF in dogs and cats.

  2. Helmet CPAP versus Oxygen Therapy in Hypoxemic Acute Respiratory Failure: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yuwen; Luo, Yan; Li, Yun; Zhou, Luqian; Zhu, Zhe; Chen, Yitai; Huang, Yuxia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The efficacy of helmet continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in hypoxemic acute respiratory failure (hARF) remains unclear. The aim of this meta-analysis was to critically review studies that investigated the effect of helmet CPAP on gas exchange, mortality, and intubation rate in comparison with standard oxygen therapy. Materials and Methods We performed a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) by searching the PubMed, Embase, Cochrane library, OVID, and CBM databases, and the bibliographies of the retrieved articles. Studies that enrolled adults with hARF who were treated with helmet CPAP and measured at least one of the following parameters were included: gas exchange, intubation rate, in-hospital mortality rate. Results Four studies with 377 subjects met the inclusion criteria and were analyzed. Compared to the standard oxygen therapy, helmet CPAP significantly increased the PaO2/FiO2 [weighted mean difference (WMD)=73.40, 95% confidence interval (95% CI): 43.92 to 102.87, p<0.00001], and decreased the arterial carbon dioxide levels (WMD=-1.92, 95% CI: -3.21 to -0.63, p=0.003), intubation rate [relative risk (RR)=0.21, 95% CI: 0.11 to 0.40, p<0.00001], and in-hospital mortality rate (RR=0.22, 95% CI: 0.09 to 0.50, p=0.0004). Conclusion The results of this meta-analysis suggest that helmet CPAP improves oxygenation and reduces mortality and intubation rates in hARF. However, the significant clinical and statistical heterogeneity of the literature implies that large RCTs are needed to determine the role of helmet CPAP in different hypoxemic ARF populations. PMID:27189288

  3. Can patients with moderate to severe acute respiratory failure from COPD be treated safely with noninvasive mechanical ventilation on the ward?

    PubMed Central

    Yalcinsoy, Murat; Salturk, Cuneyt; Oztas, Selahattin; Gungor, Sinem; Ozmen, Ipek; Kabadayi, Feyyaz; Oztim, Aysem Askim; Aksoy, Emine; Adıguzel, Nalan; Oruc, Ozlem; Karakurt, Zuhal

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Noninvasive mechanical ventilation (NIMV) usage outside of intensive care unit is not recommended in patients with COPD for severe acute respiratory failure (ARF). We assessed the factors associated with failure of NIMV in patients with ARF and severe acidosis admitted to the emergency department and followed on respiratory ward. Patients and methods This is a retrospective observational cohort study conducted in a tertiary teaching hospital specialized in chest diseases and thoracic surgery between June 1, 2013 and May 31, 2014. COPD patients who were admitted to our emergency department due to ARF were included. Patients were grouped according to the severity of acidosis into two groups: group 1 (pH=7.20–7.25) and group 2 (pH=7.26–7.30). Results Group 1 included 59 patients (mean age: 70±10 years, 30.5% female) and group 2 included 171 patients (mean age: 67±11 years, 28.7% female). On multivariable analysis, partial arterial oxygen pressure to the inspired fractionated oxygen (PaO2/FiO2) ratio <200, delta pH value <0.30, and pH value <7.31 on control arterial blood gas after NIMV in the emergency room and peak C-reactive protein were found to be the risk factors for NIMV failure in COPD patients with ARF in the ward. Conclusion NIMV is effective not only in mild respiratory failure but also with severe forms of COPD patients presenting with severe exacerbation. The determination of the failure criteria of NIMV and the expertise of the team is critical for treatment success. PMID:27330283

  4. Fast detection of manufacturing systematic design pattern failures causing device yield loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Denmat, Jean-Christophe; Feldman, Nelly; Riewer, Olivia; Yesilada, Emek; Vallet, Michel; Suzor, Christophe; Talluto, Salvatore

    2015-03-01

    Starting from the 45nm technology node, systematic defectivity has a significant impact on device yield loss with each new technology node. The effort required to achieve patterning maturity with zero yield detractor is also significantly increasing with technology nodes. Within the manufacturing environment, new in-line wafer inspection methods have been developed to identify device systematic defects, including the process window qualification (PWQ) methodology used to characterize process robustness. Although patterning is characterized with PWQ methodology, some questions remain: How can we demonstrate that the measured process window is large enough to avoid design-based defects which will impact the device yield? Can we monitor the systematic yield loss on nominal wafers? From device test engineering point of view, systematic yield detractors are expected to be identified by Automated Test Pattern Generator (ATPG) test results diagnostics performed after electrical wafer sort (EWS). Test diagnostics can identify failed nets or cells causing systematic yield loss [1],[2]. Convergence from device failed nets and cells to failed manufacturing design pattern are usually based on assumptions that should be confirmed by an electrical failure analysis (EFA). However, many EFA investigations are required before the design pattern failures are found, and thus design pattern failure identification was costly in time and resources. With this situation, an opportunity to share knowledge exists between device test engineering and manufacturing environments to help with device yield improvement. This paper presents a new yield diagnostics flow dedicated to correlation of critical design patterns detected within manufacturing environment, with the observed device yield loss. The results obtained with this new flow on a 28nm technology device are described, with the defects of interest and the device yield impact for each design pattern. The EFA done to validate the design

  5. Living with Respiratory Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Intramural Research Research Resources Research Meeting Summaries Technology Transfer Clinical Trials What Are Clinical Trials? Children & Clinical ... gas comes in can explode when exposed to heat. For more information about how to quit smoking, ...

  6. Fhf2 gene deletion causes temperature-sensitive cardiac conduction failure

    PubMed Central

    Park, David S.; Shekhar, Akshay; Marra, Christopher; Lin, Xianming; Vasquez, Carolina; Solinas, Sergio; Kelley, Kevin; Morley, Gregory; Goldfarb, Mitchell; Fishman, Glenn I.

    2016-01-01

    Fever is a highly conserved systemic response to infection dating back over 600 million years. Although conferring a survival benefit, fever can negatively impact the function of excitable tissues, such as the heart, producing cardiac arrhythmias. Here we show that mice lacking fibroblast growth factor homologous factor 2 (FHF2) have normal cardiac rhythm at baseline, but increasing core body temperature by as little as 3 °C causes coved-type ST elevations and progressive conduction failure that is fully reversible upon return to normothermia. FHF2-deficient cardiomyocytes generate action potentials upon current injection at 25 °C but are unexcitable at 40 °C. The absence of FHF2 accelerates the rate of closed-state and open-state sodium channel inactivation, which synergizes with temperature-dependent enhancement of inactivation rate to severely suppress cardiac sodium currents at elevated temperatures. Our experimental and computational results identify an essential role for FHF2 in dictating myocardial excitability and conduction that safeguards against temperature-sensitive conduction failure. PMID:27701382

  7. Telomere diminution as a cause of immune failure in old age: an unfashionable demurral.

    PubMed

    Miller, R A

    2000-02-01

    The hypothesis that cellular proliferation leads to telomere shortening, which in turn leads to replicative failure, which in turn leads to a failure of immune function in aged individuals, is here evaluated against the published evidence about the nature and pace of immune decline in animals and humans. Although the evidence is strong that telomere shortening in late-passage human lymphocyte and non-lymphocytic cell lines induces a state in which the cells can no longer divide, there is no compelling evidence to suggest that replicative senescence of this kind is an important contributor to immune deficiency in old age. On the contrary, the accelerated pace of immune decline in mice and rats, whose telomeres are much longer than those of humans, argues strongly that the factors that pace age-dependent immune decline do not include telomere shortening. In addition, three subsidiary arguments - (a) the decline with age in naive T cell proliferation despite their relatively long telomeres; (b) the preservation of T cell proliferation in Werner's syndrome patients despite their cell lines' proclivity to replicative senescence in vitro; and (c) the ability of PMA and ionomycin to stimulate proliferation in T cells from old donors, but not in late-passage T celt lines - all support the conclusion that aging of the immune system in living animals is not a consequence of the kind of replicative senescence typically caused by short telomeres in vitro.

  8. Virological failure of intralesional cidofovir therapy in recurrent respiratory papillomatosis is not associated with genetic or epigenetic changes of HPV11: complete genome comparison of sequential isolates.

    PubMed

    Gáll, Tamás; Kis, Andrea; Fehér, Eniko; Gergely, Lajos; Szarka, Krisztina

    2011-11-01

    Five sequential human papillomavirus type 11 (HPV11) positive samples collected from an aggressive juvenile onset recurrent respiratory papillomatosis before, during and after intralesional cidofovir therapy leading to virological failure after initial response were analyzed. Sequencing of the complete genome as well as methylation analysis by bisulfate modification and sequencing of the long control region (LCR) were performed to seek for genetic and epigenetic changes as a possible background for therapy failure. Single-strand conformation polymorphism of E1, E2, E6, E7 and LCR was used to exclude the presence of multiple HPV11 infection. All five complete genomes were identical and all four E2 binding sites in the LCR were uniformly unmethylated in all five genomes. Thus the virological failure was not due to virological factors suggesting that cidofovir action may depend more heavily on the host. PMID:21945249

  9. Stratgies for Diversity Usage to Mitigate Postulated Common Cause Failure Vulnerabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Richard Thomas; Waterman, Michael E.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes an approach to establish effective mitigating strategies that can resolve potential common-cause failure (CCF) vulnerabilities in instrumentation and control systems at nuclear power plants. A particular objective in the development of these strategies, which consist of combinations of diversity attributes and their associated criteria, is to address the unique characteristics of digital technology that can contribute to CCF concerns. The research approach employed to establish diversity strategies involves investigation of available documentation on diversity usage and experience from nuclear power and non-nuclear industries, capture of expert knowledge and lessons learned, determination of common practices, and assessment of the nature of CCFs and compensating diversity attributes. The resulting diversity strategies address considerations such as the effect of technology choices, the nature of CCF vulnerabilities, and the prospective impact of each diversity type. In particular, the impact of each attribute and criterion on the purpose, process, product, and performance aspects of diverse systems are considered.

  10. Analysis of ammonium sulfate circulation tank failure -- Possible causes and their remediation

    SciTech Connect

    O`Hearn, R.J.

    1997-12-31

    Acme steel manufactures a liquid solution of ammonium sulphate by scrubbing the coke oven gas with a dilute solution of sulphuric acid. When the bath reaches a predetermined specific gravity, it is isolated from the system, neutralized with aqua ammonia, pumped to the shipping tanks, re-charged with water and acid, then placed back in service. To improve the ammonia removal efficiency, three circulation tanks are used in this system. In June 1996, the volume of two of the sulfate solution tanks in the ammonia removal plant were increased by two different pressure events. The first tank was damaged by pressure that was not relieved due to a plugged vent line. The second tank was damaged by a pressure event generated during the process of making ammonium sulfate. This paper will discuss the cause of the second tank`s failure, and the design solution to restart the operation of the plant.

  11. Assessment of filter dust characteristics that cause filter failure during hot-gas filtration

    SciTech Connect

    John P. Hurley; Biplab Mukherjee; Michael D. Mann

    2006-08-15

    The high-temperature filtration of particulates from gases is greatly limited because of the development of dust cakes that are difficult to remove and can bridge between candle filters, causing them to break. Understanding the conditions leading to the formation of cohesive dust can prevent costly filter failures and ensure higher efficiency of solid fuel, direct-fired turbine power generation systems. The University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center is working with the New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization and the U.S. Department of Energy to perform research to characterize and determine the factors that cause the development of such dust cakes. Changes in the tensile strength, bridging propensity, and plasticity of filter dust cakes were measured as a function of the temperature and a filter pressure drop for a coal and a biomass filter dust. The biomass filter dust indicated that potential filtering problems can exist at temperatures as low as 400{sup o}C, while the coal filter dust showed good filtering characteristics up to 750{sup o}C. A statistically valid model that can indicate the propensity of filters to fail with system operating conditions was developed. A detailed analysis of the chemical aspect of dusts is also presented in order to explore the causes of such stickiness. 16 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Respiratory Viral Infection in Neonatal Piglets Causes Marked Microglia Activation in the Hippocampus and Deficits in Spatial Learning

    PubMed Central

    Elmore, Monica R. P.; Burton, Michael D.; Conrad, Matthew S.; Rytych, Jennifer L.; Van Alstine, William G.

    2014-01-01

    Environmental insults during sensitive periods can affect hippocampal development and function, but little is known about peripheral infection, especially in humans and other animals whose brain is gyrencephalic and experiences major perinatal growth. Using a piglet model, the present study showed that inoculation on postnatal day 7 with the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) caused microglial activation within the hippocampus with 82% and 43% of isolated microglia being MHC II+ 13 and 20 d after inoculation, respectively. In control piglets, <5% of microglia isolated from the hippocampus were MHC II+. PRRSV piglets were febrile (p < 0.0001), anorectic (p < 0.0001), and weighed less at the end of the study (p = 0.002) compared with control piglets. Increased inflammatory gene expression (e.g., IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, and IFN-γ) was seen across multiple brain regions, including the hippocampus, whereas reductions in CD200, NGF, and MBP were evident. In a test of spatial learning, PRRSV piglets took longer to acquire the task, had a longer latency to choice, and had a higher total distance moved. Overall, these data demonstrate that viral respiratory infection is associated with a marked increase in activated microglia in the hippocampus, neuroinflammation, and impaired performance in a spatial cognitive task. As respiratory infections are common in human neonates and infants, approaches to regulate microglial cell activity are likely to be important. PMID:24501353

  13. Progressive troponin I loss impairs cardiac relaxation and causes heart failure in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Du, Jianfeng; Zhang, Chi; Walker, Jeffery W; Huang, Xupei

    2007-08-01

    Cardiac troponin I (TnI) knockout mice exhibit a phenotype of sudden death at 17-18 days after birth due to a progressive loss of TnI. The objective of this study was to gain insight into the physiological consequences of TnI depletion and the cause of death in these mice. Cardiac function was monitored serially between 12 and 17 days of age by using high-resolution ultrasonic imaging and Doppler echocardiography. Two-dimensional B-mode and anatomical M-mode imaging and Doppler echocardiography were performed using a high-frequency ( approximately 20-45 MHz) ultrasound imaging system on homozygous cardiac TnI mutant mice (cTnI(-/-)) and wild-type littermates. On day 12, cTnI(-/-) mice were indistinguishable from wild-type mice in terms of heart rate, atrial and LV (LV) chamber dimensions, LV posterior wall thickness, and body weight. By days 16 through 17, wild-type mice showed up to a 40% increase in chamber dimensions due to normal growth, whereas cTnI(-/-) mice showed increases in atrial dimensions of up to 97% but decreases in ventricular dimensions of up to 70%. Mitral Doppler analysis revealed prolonged isovolumic relaxation time and pronounced inversion of the mitral E/A ratio (early ventricular filling wave-to-late atrial contraction filling wave) only in cTnI(-/-) mice indicative of impaired LV relaxation. cTnI(-/-) mouse hearts showed clear signs of failure on day 17, characterized by >50% declines in cardiac output, ejection fraction, and fractional shortening. B-mode echocardiography showed a profoundly narrowed tube-like LV and enlarged atria at this time. Our data are consistent with TnI deficiency causing impaired LV relaxation, which leads to diastolic heart failure in this model.

  14. [Fractured tracheostomy tube: a rare cause of respiratory distress in the tracheotomized child. Case report].

    PubMed

    Cuestas, Giselle; Martínez, Juan C; Pena, Roberto; Razetti, Juan

    2015-12-01

    Fracture and migration of the tracheotomy tube in the tracheobronchial tree is an uncommon complication of tracheotomy. Early diagnosis and proper treatment are essential because of the potential risk of fatal respiratory obstruction. Diagnosis should be suspected in all tracheotomized children undergoing breathing difficulties. It is confirmed by chest x-ray and endoscopic examination. The recommended treatment includes the endoscopic removal of the aspirated cannula through the tracheal stoma. We describe the clinical presentation and the management of a broken tracheotomy tube which was presented as a foreign body in the airway of a 18-month-old child. Recommendations for tracheostomy care are listed.

  15. [Fractured tracheostomy tube: a rare cause of respiratory distress in the tracheotomized child. Case report].

    PubMed

    Cuestas, Giselle; Martínez, Juan C; Pena, Roberto; Razetti, Juan

    2015-12-01

    Fracture and migration of the tracheotomy tube in the tracheobronchial tree is an uncommon complication of tracheotomy. Early diagnosis and proper treatment are essential because of the potential risk of fatal respiratory obstruction. Diagnosis should be suspected in all tracheotomized children undergoing breathing difficulties. It is confirmed by chest x-ray and endoscopic examination. The recommended treatment includes the endoscopic removal of the aspirated cannula through the tracheal stoma. We describe the clinical presentation and the management of a broken tracheotomy tube which was presented as a foreign body in the airway of a 18-month-old child. Recommendations for tracheostomy care are listed. PMID:26593816

  16. Management of obese patients with respiratory failure - A practical approach to a health care issue of increasing significance.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Alicia Jeanette; Kaese, Sven; Lebiedz, Pia

    2016-08-01

    In the general population, prevalence of obesity is increasing continuously. Concomitantly, a growing number of obese patients with severe illnesses presents at intensive care units (ICU). Particularly respiratory management of this patient group poses a challenge to intensive care physicians because of differences in respiratory anatomy and physiology in obese compared to non-obese individuals. Aim of this review is to present treatment options for critically ill obese patients requiring mechanical ventilation based on current studies concerning patient positioning, ventilatory regimen as well as extended therapy with veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). The ideal concept for respiratory management depends on multiple aspects and has to be determined individually. Knowledge of altered respiratory anatomy and physiology in obese patients and possible treatment options may facilitate respiratory management in this patient group.

  17. [Nitrogen oxide (nitrogen monoxide) administered via respirator. A new therapeutic alternative in acute respiratory failure and shock lung].

    PubMed

    Aardal, S; Flaatten, H

    1996-04-20

    Adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) still has a high rate of mortality. It is usually necessary to treat these patients with a respirator using a high inspiratory fraction of oxygen. The condition is often associated with pulmonary hypertension and increased pulmonary vascular resistance. Nitric oxide (NO) has been shown to be a potent endogenous vasodilator. It is a gas and can thus be delivered to the lungs of intubated patients by means of a respirator. Because of its very short halflife, the effect of inhaled nitric oxide is limited to the pulmonary vasculature and it has no systemic effects. The local vasodilatation caused by nitric oxide leads to improved oxygenation, primarily because of reduced intrapulmonary shunting of blood. From April 1993 to July 1995 we treated 14 patients with severe ARDS with inhaled nitric oxide. All patients were critically ill, with a mean APACHE II score of 24.5. Oxygenation was increased in all patients after treatment with nitric oxide, but in spite of this eight patients (56%) died. There were no significant differences between survivors and non-survivors as regards age or severity of the disease.

  18. Pulmonary fibrosis secondary to siderosis causing symptomatic respiratory disease: a case report

    PubMed Central

    McCormick, Liam M; Goddard, Martin; Mahadeva, Ravi

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Pulmonary siderosis secondary to the inhalation of iron compounds is a rare condition which, despite striking radiological and histopathological features, has not traditionally been associated with symptoms or functional impairment. Although not the first of its kind, we present an unusual case of pulmonary siderosis with symptomatic respiratory disease, most likely secondary to associated fibrosis. Case presentation A 66-year-old Caucasian man was referred to the outpatient clinic with a 2-year history of exertional breathlessness. He had worked as an engineer for 20 years where he did a significant amount of welding but always wore a face shield. Clinical, radiological and histological features were consistent with a diagnosis of pulmonary siderosis, with associated fibrosis, most likely related to his occupational welding history. Conclusion Our report illustrates that symptomatic respiratory disease due to mild peribronchiolar fibrosis can occur with pulmonary siderosis despite wearing a mask. Furthermore, it reinforces the need for all clinicians to compile a detailed occupational history in individuals presenting with breathlessness. PMID:18681950

  19. Impact of severe disease caused by respiratory syncytial virus in children living in developed countries.

    PubMed

    Simoes, Eric A; Carbonell-Estrany, Xavier

    2003-02-01

    Among industrialized nations, the rate of rehospitalization in the United States for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is approximately 30 per 1000, exceptions being noted for American Indians and Alaskan natives, two ethnic groups who tend toward higher rates of RSV hospitalization. In distinction Japan reports an admission rate of 60 per 1000 for RSV disease. Yet Japan ranks considerably lower than many of its western counterparts in premature births. Whether an RSV subtype, a new viral genotype or some other unifying characteristic exists that might explain the severity of adenovirus, parainfluenza and RSV infections in this region of Asia remains to be determined. Outcomes trials in the United States, Canada, United Kingdom, Denmark and Japan all identified crowding and exposure to tobacco smoke as significant and independent risk factors for disease severity of RSV. The epidemiology of RSV is largely consistent throughout Europe, with peak outbreaks occurring in December and January. In Europe RSV accounts for 42 to 45% of hospital admissions for lower respiratory tract infections in children younger than 2 years of age, and inpatient populations tend to be younger and to experience greater disease severity. For RSV bronchiolitis lengths of stay in European hospitals range from a low of 4 days to a high of 10 days. The Infección Respiratoria Infantil por Virus Respiratorio Sincitial Study Group in Spain conducted 2 prospective observational studies in 14 and 26 neonatal units, respectively, on nonprophylaxed neonates to determine hospitalization rates for respiratory syncytial viral illness during 2 consecutive RSV seasons. Throughout each respiratory season the study group followed premature infants of < or =32 weeks gestational age at birth, representing an annual birth cohort of approximately 100 000 infants. A total of 584 infants who were < or =32 weeks gestational age in the first season and 999 in the second season were followed at monthly intervals

  20. Heated, Humidified High-Flow Nasal Cannulae as a Form of Noninvasive Respiratory Support for Preterm Infants and Children with Acute Respiratory Failure.

    PubMed

    Mardegan, Veronica; Priante, Elena; Lolli, Elisabetta; Lago, Paola; Baraldi, Eugenio

    2016-09-01

    Heated, humidified high-flow delivered by nasal cannulae (HHHFNC) is increasingly used for noninvasive respiratory support in preterm infants and critically ill children due to its perceived effectiveness and ease of use. Evidence from randomized controlled trials suggests that HHHFNC and continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) are equally effective as postextubation support in preterm infants. HHHFNC is also used for weaning preterm infants from CPAP. Data on HHHFNC used as the primary support for treating respiratory distress syndrome are conflicting. HHHFNC use in preterm infants is associated with reduced nasal trauma. Inability to measure the pressure generated by HHHFNC systems is a concern because overexpansion can lead to an air leak and lung injury. Great caution is warranted when HHHFNC is used in extremely low-birth-weight infants (who were rarely included in these randomized controlled trials) because a recent retrospective study found its use is associated with a higher likelihood of bronchopulmonary dysplasia or death in this population. HHHFNC has also become popular in pediatric intensive care units and pediatric wards as a method for delivering oxygen and noninvasive respiratory support. Most published studies were conducted on infants and young children with bronchiolitis. The results of a few observational studies and two randomized trials suggest that HHHFNC therapy is effective in the treatment of bronchiolitis. This review discusses the proposed mechanisms of action behind HHHFNC, the results of observational studies, and the evidence emerging from clinical trials on the use of HHHFNC in preterm infants and children critically ill with bronchiolitis. PMID:27603535

  1. Serum activin A and B levels predict outcome in patients with acute respiratory failure: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction 30 day mortality in patients with Acute Respiratory Failure (ARF) is approximately 30%, defined as patients requiring ventilator support for more than 6 hours. Novel biomarkers are needed to predict patient outcomes and to guide potential future therapies. The activins A and B, members of the Transforming Growth Factor β family of proteins, and their binding protein, follistatin, have recently been shown to be important regulators of inflammation and fibrosis but no substantial data are available concerning their roles in ARF. Our objectives were to evaluate whether the serum levels of activin A, B and follistatin are elevated in 518 patients with ARF from the FINNALI study compared the concentrations in 138 normal subjects that form a reference range. Methods Specific assays for activin A, B and follistatin were used and the results analyzed according to diagnostic groups as well as according to standard measures in intensive care. Multivariable logistic regression was used to create a model to predict death at 90 days and 12 months from the onset of the ARF. Results Serum activin A and B were significantly elevated in most patients and in most of the diagnostic groups. Patients who had activin A and/or B concentrations above the reference maximum were significantly more likely to die in the 12 months following admission [either activin A or B above reference maximum: Positive Likelihood Ratio [LR+] 1.65 [95% CI 1.28-2.12, P = 0.00013]; both activin A and B above reference maximum: LR + 2.78 [95% CI 1.96-3.95, P < 0.00001]. The predictive model at 12 months had an overall accuracy of 80.2% [95% CI 76.6-83.3%]. Conclusions The measurement of activin A and B levels in these patients with ARF would have assisted in predicting those at greatest risk of death. Given the existing data from animal studies linking high activin A levels to significant inflammatory challenges, the results from this study suggest that approaches to modulate

  2. Acute liver failure caused by 'fat burners' and dietary supplements: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Yellapu, Radha K; Mittal, Vivek; Grewal, Priya; Fiel, Mariaisabel; Schiano, Thomas

    2011-03-01

    Globally, people are struggling with obesity. Many effective, nonconventional methods of weight reduction, such as herbal and natural dietary supplements, are increasingly being sought. Fat burners are believed to raise metabolism, burn more calories and hasten fat loss. Despite patient perceptions that herbal remedies are free of adverse effects, some supplements are associated with severe hepatotoxicity. The present report describes a young healthy woman who presented with fulminant hepatic failure requiring emergent liver transplantation caused by a dietary supplement and fat burner containing usnic acid, green tea and guggul tree extracts. Thorough investigation, including histopathological examination, revealed no other cause of hepatotoxicity. The present case adds to the increasing number of reports of hepatotoxicity associated with dietary supplements containing usnic acid, and highlights that herbal extracts from green tea or guggul tree may not be free of adverse effects. Until these products are more closely regulated and their advertising better scrutinized, physicians and patients should become more familiar with herbal products that are commonly used as weight loss supplements and recognize those that are potentially harmful.

  3. Heart failure causes cholinergic transdifferentiation of cardiac sympathetic nerves via gp130-signaling cytokines in rodents.

    PubMed

    Kanazawa, Hideaki; Ieda, Masaki; Kimura, Kensuke; Arai, Takahide; Kawaguchi-Manabe, Haruko; Matsuhashi, Tomohiro; Endo, Jin; Sano, Motoaki; Kawakami, Takashi; Kimura, Tokuhiro; Monkawa, Toshiaki; Hayashi, Matsuhiko; Iwanami, Akio; Okano, Hideyuki; Okada, Yasunori; Ishibashi-Ueda, Hatsue; Ogawa, Satoshi; Fukuda, Keiichi

    2010-02-01

    Although several cytokines and neurotrophic factors induce sympathetic neurons to transdifferentiate into cholinergic neurons in vitro, the physiological and pathophysiological roles of this remain unknown. During congestive heart failure (CHF), sympathetic neural tone is upregulated, but there is a paradoxical reduction in norepinephrine synthesis and reuptake in the cardiac sympathetic nervous system (SNS). Here we examined whether cholinergic transdifferentiation can occur in the cardiac SNS in rodent models of CHF and investigated the underlying molecular mechanism(s) using genetically modified mice. We used Dahl salt-sensitive rats to model CHF and found that, upon CHF induction, the cardiac SNS clearly acquired cholinergic characteristics. Of the various cholinergic differentiation factors, leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) and cardiotrophin-1 were strongly upregulated in the ventricles of rats with CHF. Further, LIF and cardiotrophin-1 secreted from cultured failing rat cardiomyocytes induced cholinergic transdifferentiation in cultured sympathetic neurons, and this process was reversed by siRNAs targeting Lif and cardiotrophin-1. Consistent with the data in rats, heart-specific overexpression of LIF in mice caused cholinergic transdifferentiation in the cardiac SNS. Further, SNS-specific targeting of the gene encoding the gp130 subunit of the receptor for LIF and cardiotrophin-1 in mice prevented CHF-induced cholinergic transdifferentiation. Cholinergic transdifferentiation was also observed in the cardiac SNS of autopsied patients with CHF. Thus, CHF causes target-dependent cholinergic transdifferentiation of the cardiac SNS via gp130-signaling cytokines secreted from the failing myocardium.

  4. TRMT5 Mutations Cause a Defect in Post-transcriptional Modification of Mitochondrial tRNA Associated with Multiple Respiratory-Chain Deficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Christopher A.; Kopajtich, Robert; D’Souza, Aaron R.; Rorbach, Joanna; Kremer, Laura S.; Husain, Ralf A.; Dallabona, Cristina; Donnini, Claudia; Alston, Charlotte L.; Griffin, Helen; Pyle, Angela; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Strom, Tim M.; Meitinger, Thomas; Rodenburg, Richard J.; Schottmann, Gudrun; Schuelke, Markus; Romain, Nadine; Haller, Ronald G.; Ferrero, Ileana; Haack, Tobias B.; Taylor, Robert W.; Prokisch, Holger; Minczuk, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Deficiencies in respiratory-chain complexes lead to a variety of clinical phenotypes resulting from inadequate energy production by the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation system. Defective expression of mtDNA-encoded genes, caused by mutations in either the mitochondrial or nuclear genome, represents a rapidly growing group of human disorders. By whole-exome sequencing, we identified two unrelated individuals carrying compound heterozygous variants in TRMT5 (tRNA methyltransferase 5). TRMT5 encodes a mitochondrial protein with strong homology to members of the class I-like methyltransferase superfamily. Both affected individuals presented with lactic acidosis and evidence of multiple mitochondrial respiratory-chain-complex deficiencies in skeletal muscle, although the clinical presentation of the two affected subjects was remarkably different; one presented in childhood with failure to thrive and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and the other was an adult with a life-long history of exercise intolerance. Mutations in TRMT5 were associated with the hypomodification of a guanosine residue at position 37 (G37) of mitochondrial tRNA; this hypomodification was particularly prominent in skeletal muscle. Deficiency of the G37 modification was also detected in human cells subjected to TRMT5 RNAi. The pathogenicity of the detected variants was further confirmed in a heterologous yeast model and by the rescue of the molecular phenotype after re-expression of wild-type TRMT5 cDNA in cells derived from the affected individuals. Our study highlights the importance of post-transcriptional modification of mitochondrial tRNAs for faithful mitochondrial function. PMID:26189817

  5. Failure of the crossover pipes used in the PK-39-IIM boiler middle radiant part and a numerical analysis of the factors caused this failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranov, V. N.; Gorb, A. A.; Nikolaev, S. F.

    2013-06-01

    The consequences resulting from an emergency failure of one subflow in the middle radiant part of a modernized PK-39-IIM boiler occurred during one of its first startups after the erection are presented. A numerical analysis of the factors that caused this failure is carried out. The calculation was carried out in accordance with the recommendations suggested in the standard method of hydraulic design. It is shown that at a load equal to 40% of its nominal value, increment of heat absorption in the subflow equal to 586 kJ/kg (140 kcal/kg), and heat absorption nonuniformity coefficient in the misaligned element equal to 1.5, the temperature of medium downstream of the subflow is equal to 670°C (operating conditions close to those under which the failure occurred).

  6. Predictive Factors for the Effect of Treatment by Noninvasive Ventilation in Patients with Respiratory Failure as a Result of Acute Exacerbation of the Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pejkovska, Sava; Kaeva, Biserka Jovkovska; Goseva, Zlatica; Arsovski, Zoran; Janeva, Jelena Jovanovska; Zeynel, Sead

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Noninvasive mechanical ventilation (NIV) applies ventilator support through the patient’s upper airway using a mask. AIM: The aim of the study is to define factors that will point out an increased risk of NIV failure in patients with exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients over the age of 40, treated with NIV, were prospectively recruited. After data processing, the patients were divided into two groups: 1) successful NIV treatment group; 2) failed NIV treatment group. RESULTS: On admission arterial pH and Glasgow coma scale (GCS) levels were lower (pH: p < 0.05, GCS: p < 0.05), and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE) score and PaCO2 were higher (p < 0.05) in the NIV failure group. Arterial pH was lower (p < 0.05) and PaCO2 and respiratory rate were higher (p < 0.05) after 1h, and arterial pH was lower (p < 0.05) and PaCO2 (p < 0.05), respiratory and heart rate were higher (p < 0.05) after 4h in the NIV failure group. CONCLUSION: Measurement and monitoring of certain parameters may be of value in terms of predicting the effectiveness of NIV treatment. PMID:27275303

  7. Perry syndrome due to the DCTN1 G71R mutation: a distinctive levodopa responsive disorder with behavioral syndrome, vertical gaze palsy, and respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Newsway, Victoria; Fish, Mark; Rohrer, Jonathan D; Majounie, Elisa; Williams, Nigel; Hack, Melissa; Warren, Jason D; Morris, Huw R

    2010-04-30

    Perry syndrome is a rare form of autosomal dominant Parkinsonism with respiratory failure recently defined as being due to mutations in the DCTN1 gene. We describe a new family carrying a G71R mutation in the DCTN1 gene. The proband displayed a series of distinctive features not previously described in Perry syndrome: a disorder of vertical downward saccades accompanied by progressive midbrain atrophy, predominant nonmotor symptoms responsive to levodopa, distinctive craniocervical levodopa induced dyskinesias, and a good response to high-dose levodopa therapy and respiratory support. The family was initially thought to have autosomal dominant behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia with Parkinsonism. This report expands the clinical definition of this distinctive syndrome.

  8. Cost-effectiveness of noninvasive ventilation for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease-related respiratory failure in Indian hospitals without ICU facilities

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Shraddha P; Pena, Margarita E; Babcock, Charlene Irvin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The majority of Indian hospitals do not provide intensive care unit (ICU) care or ward-based noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NIV). Because no mechanical ventilation or NIV is available in these hospitals, the majority of patients suffering from respiratory failure die. Objective: To perform a cost-effective analysis of two strategies (ward-based NIV with concurrent standard treatment vs standard treatment alone) in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) respiratory failure patients treated in Indian hospitals without ICU care. Materials and Methods: A decision-analytical model was created to compare the cost-effectiveness for the two strategies. Estimates from the literature were used for parameters in the model. Future costs were discounted at 3%. All costs were reported in USD (2012). One-way, two-way, and probabilistic sensitivity analysis were performed. The time horizon was lifetime and perspective was societal. Results: The NIV strategy resulted in 17.7% more survival and was slightly more costly (increased cost of $101 (USD 2012) but resulted in increased quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) (1.67 QALY). The cost-effectiveness (2012 USD)/QALY in the standard and NIV groups was $78/QALY ($535.02/6.82) and $75/QALY ($636.33/8.49), respectively. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was only $61 USD/QALY. This was substantially lower than the gross domestic product (GDP) per capita for India (1489 USD), suggesting the NIV strategy was very cost effective. Using a 5% discount rate resulted in only minimally different results. Probabilistic analysis suggests that NIV strategy was preferred 100% of the time when willingness to pay was >$250 2012 USD. Conclusion: Ward-based NIV treatment is cost-effective in India, and may increase survival of patients with COPD respiratory failure when ICU is not available. PMID:26664158

  9. Tracheal diverticulum: an unusual cause of chronic cough and recurrent respiratory infections.

    PubMed

    Takhar, Rajendra Prasad; Bunkar, Motilal; Jain, Shubhra; Ghabale, Sanjay

    2016-03-01

    Tracheal diverticulum (TD) defined as a typical benign out-pouching of the tracheal wall due to structural weakness, congenital or acquired in origin, resulting in paratracheal air cysts. It is rarely diagnosed in clinical practice with only limited reports in the literature. Most cases found incidentally in the postmortem examination and located on the right side. Uncomplicated TDs are usually asymptomatic and when symptoms have occurred, they usually present with non-specific symptoms like pharyngeal discomfort, cough, dyspnea, and recurrent respiratory infection due to either the compression of adjacent organs or secondary bacterial infection. Imaging techniques like thoraco-cervical multi-slice spiral computed tomography (CT) and fiber-optic bronchoscopy are important diagnostic tools for this entity. Asymptomatic TDs usually require no treatment and managed conservatively while surgical excision is indicated in cases of compression of adjacent organs and recurrent infections. Here we report a case of tracheal diverticulum on the left side, which was diagnosed as part of a work-up for chronic cough and recurrent chest infection in a 40 year old female who was already on bronchodilator without any relief. Diagnosis of TD was based on findings of computed tomography, revealing small bud like projection on left para tracheal region and further confirmed by fiber-optic bronchoscopy while the barium contrast study showed no esophageal communication. She was managed conservatively and referred for surgical excision. PMID:27266290

  10. Gunshot wounds: causing myocardial infarction, delayed ventricular septal defect, and congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sudeep; Moorthy, Nagaraja; Kapoor, Aditya; Sinha, Nakul

    2012-01-01

    Penetrating chest trauma can cause a wide variety of cardiac injuries, including myocardial contusion, damage to the interventricular septum, laceration of the coronary arteries, and free-wall rupture. Herein, we describe the case of a 21-year-old man who presented with congestive heart failure, which was secondary to an old myocardial infarction and complicated by the delayed formation of a ventricular septal defect. All of these conditions were attributable to multiple gunshot wounds that the patient had sustained 6 months earlier. Left ventricular angiography showed an apical aneurysm; a large, muscular, ventricular septal defect; and 19 gunshot pellets in the chest wall. Three months after aneurysmectomy and surgical closure of the septal defect, the patient had recovered fully and was asymptomatic.This case reaffirms the fact that substantial cardiac injuries can appear months after chest trauma. The possibility of traumatic ventricular septal defect should be considered in all multiple-trauma patients who develop a new heart murmur, even when overt chest-wall injury is absent.

  11. Reliability enhancement of APR + diverse protection system regarding common cause failures

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Y. G.; Kim, Y. M.; Yim, H. S.; Lee, S. J.

    2012-07-01

    The Advanced Power Reactor Plus (APR +) nuclear power plant design has been developed on the basis of the APR1400 (Advanced Power Reactor 1400 MWe) to further enhance safety and economics. For the mitigation of Anticipated Transients Without Scram (ATWS) as well as Common Cause Failures (CCF) within the Plant Protection System (PPS) and the Emergency Safety Feature - Component Control System (ESF-CCS), several design improvement features have been implemented for the Diverse Protection System (DPS) of the APR + plant. As compared to the APR1400 DPS design, the APR + DPS has been designed to provide the Safety Injection Actuation Signal (SIAS) considering a large break LOCA accident concurrent with the CCF. Additionally several design improvement features, such as channel structure with redundant processing modules, and changes of system communication methods and auto-system test methods, are introduced to enhance the functional reliability of the DPS. Therefore, it is expected that the APR + DPS can provide an enhanced safety and reliability regarding possible CCF in the safety-grade I and C systems as well as the DPS itself. (authors)

  12. Dysautonomia due to reduced cholinergic neurotransmission causes cardiac remodeling and heart failure.

    PubMed

    Lara, Aline; Damasceno, Denis D; Pires, Rita; Gros, Robert; Gomes, Enéas R; Gavioli, Mariana; Lima, Ricardo F; Guimarães, Diogo; Lima, Patricia; Bueno, Carlos Roberto; Vasconcelos, Anilton; Roman-Campos, Danilo; Menezes, Cristiane A S; Sirvente, Raquel A; Salemi, Vera M; Mady, Charles; Caron, Marc G; Ferreira, Anderson J; Brum, Patricia C; Resende, Rodrigo R; Cruz, Jader S; Gomez, Marcus Vinicius; Prado, Vania F; de Almeida, Alvair P; Prado, Marco A M; Guatimosim, Silvia

    2010-04-01

    Overwhelming evidence supports the importance of the sympathetic nervous system in heart failure. In contrast, much less is known about the role of failing cholinergic neurotransmission in cardiac disease. By using a unique genetically modified mouse line with reduced expression of the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) and consequently decreased release of acetylcholine, we investigated the consequences of altered cholinergic tone for cardiac function. M-mode echocardiography, hemodynamic experiments, analysis of isolated perfused hearts, and measurements of cardiomyocyte contraction indicated that VAChT mutant mice have decreased left ventricle function associated with altered calcium handling. Gene expression was analyzed by quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR and Western blotting, and the results indicated that VAChT mutant mice have profound cardiac remodeling and reactivation of the fetal gene program. This phenotype was attributable to reduced cholinergic tone, since administration of the cholinesterase inhibitor pyridostigmine for 2 weeks reversed the cardiac phenotype in mutant mice. Our findings provide direct evidence that decreased cholinergic neurotransmission and underlying autonomic imbalance cause plastic alterations that contribute to heart dysfunction.

  13. Anastomoses of the Ovarian and Uterine Arteries: A Potential Pitfall and Cause of Failure of Uterine Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Matson, Matthew; Nicholson, Anthony; Belli, Anna-Maria

    2000-09-15

    Four women with symptomatic uterine fibroids were treated by uterine artery embolization (UAE). In all cases both uterine arteries were embolized via a single femoral puncture with polyvinyl alcohol using a selective catheter technique. In three cases, the ovarian artery was not visible on the initial angiogram before embolization, but appeared after the second uterine artery had been treated. In one case of clinical failure following UAE, a repeat angiogram demonstrated filling of the fibroids from the ovarian artery. Anastomoses between uterine and ovarian arteries may cause problems for radiologists performing UAE and are a potential cause of treatment failure.

  14. Mutation in mitochondrial ribosomal protein S7 (MRPS7) causes congenital sensorineural deafness, progressive hepatic and renal failure and lactic acidemia.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Minal J; Guo, Yiran; Zhang, Jianguo; Riley, Lisa G; Cooper, Sandra T; Thorburn, David R; Li, Jiankang; Dong, Daoyuan; Li, Zhijun; Glessner, Joseph; Davis, Ryan L; Sue, Carolyn M; Alexander, Stephen I; Arbuckle, Susan; Kirwan, Paul; Keating, Brendan J; Xu, Xun; Hakonarson, Hakon; Christodoulou, John

    2015-04-15

    Functional defects of the mitochondrial translation machinery, as a result of mutations in nuclear-encoded genes, have been associated with combined oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) deficiencies. We report siblings with congenital sensorineural deafness and lactic acidemia in association with combined respiratory chain (RC) deficiencies of complexes I, III and IV observed in fibroblasts and liver. One of the siblings had a more severe phenotype showing progressive hepatic and renal failure. Whole-exome sequencing revealed a homozygous mutation in the gene encoding mitochondrial ribosomal protein S7 (MRPS7), a c.550A>G transition that encodes a substitution of valine for a highly conserved methionine (p.Met184Val) in both affected siblings. MRPS7 is a 12S ribosomal RNA-binding subunit of the small mitochondrial ribosomal subunit, and is required for the assembly of the small ribosomal subunit. Pulse labeling of mitochondrial protein synthesis products revealed impaired mitochondrial protein synthesis in patient fibroblasts. Exogenous expression of wild-type MRPS7 in patient fibroblasts rescued complexes I and IV activities, demonstrating the deleterious effect of the mutation on RC function. Moreover, reduced 12S rRNA transcript levels observed in the patient's fibroblasts were also restored to normal levels by exogenous expression of wild-type MRPS7. Our data demonstrate the pathogenicity of the identified MRPS7 mutation as a novel cause of mitochondrial RC dysfunction, congenital sensorineural deafness and progressive hepatic and renal failure.

  15. Diabetes treatments and risk of heart failure, cardiovascular disease, and all cause mortality: cohort study in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Coupland, Carol

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess associations between risks of cardiovascular disease, heart failure, and all cause mortality and different diabetes drugs in people with type 2 diabetes, particularly newer agents, including gliptins and thiazolidinediones (glitazones). Design Open cohort study. Setting 1243 general practices contributing data to the QResearch database in England. Participants 469 688 people with type 2 diabetes aged 25-84 years between 1 April 2007 and 31 January 2015. Exposures Diabetes drugs (glitazones, gliptins, metformin, sulphonylureas, insulin, other) alone and in combination. Main outcome measure First recorded diagnoses of cardiovascular disease, heart failure, and all cause mortality recorded on the patients’ primary care, mortality, or hospital record. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate hazard ratios for diabetes treatments, adjusting for potential confounders. Results During follow-up, 21 308 patients (4.5%) received prescriptions for glitazones and 32 533 (6.9%) received prescriptions for gliptins. Compared with non-use, gliptins were significantly associated with an 18% decreased risk of all cause mortality, a 14% decreased risk of heart failure, and no significant change in risk of cardiovascular disease; corresponding values for glitazones were significantly decreased risks of 23% for all cause mortality, 26% for heart failure, and 25% for cardiovascular disease. Compared with no current treatment, there were no significant associations between monotherapy with gliptins and risk of any complications. Dual treatment with gliptins and metformin was associated with a decreased risk of all three outcomes (reductions of 38% for heart failure, 33% for cardiovascular disease, and 48% for all cause mortality). Triple treatment with metformin, sulphonylureas, and gliptins was associated with a decreased risk of all three outcomes (reductions of 40% for heart failure, 30% for cardiovascular disease, and 51% for all cause

  16. [Prolonged exposure to atmospheric air pollution and mortality from respiratory causes].

    PubMed

    Eilstein, D

    2009-12-01

    Different designs can be used to analyze the relationships between respiratory mortality and long term exposure to atmospheric pollution: epidemiological studies (cohort, prevalence study) demonstrate the reality of the relationship and toxicological studies explain it. Cohort studies have the advantage of being able to take into account many confounding factors and thus avoid biases (which is not the case with prevalence studies), but require significant human and financial resources. They were first adopted in the US, but are now more often applied in Europe. The results are relatively consistent, as they all show a statistically significant association between an increase in particulate pollution and cardiopulmonary mortality. Mortality from lung cancer is also associated with long term exposition to particles and sometimes to ozone or nitrogen oxides. Cerebrovascular diseases and sudden death of young children have also been associated with particulate pollution. The relationships are more powerful for long term than short term exposure but are also linear and without threshold. In order to explain these effects (today the causality of the relationship is certain) there are many possible factors, particularly regarding particulate exposures: an increase in cardiovascular risk biomarkers (fibrinogen, white blood cells, and platelets), atherosclerosis, chronic inflammation of lung tissues increased by acute exposure, etc. More and more studies address the interaction between gene and environment and even epigenetic phenomena which could be responsible of these effects. Public Health impact could be quantified. The European E&H surveillance program Apheis, for example, estimated that if PM2.5 levels remained below 15 microg/m(3), a 30 year old person could see his life expectancy increased by 1 month to 2 years, depending on the studied city. Finally, mortality is not the only relevant indicator for health effects of air pollution. ISAAC studies address asthma

  17. Upper respiratory tract infection caused by Cryptosporidium baileyi in three mixed-bred falcons (Falco rusticolus x Falco cherrug).

    PubMed

    van Zeeland, Y R A; Schoemaker, N J; Kik, M J L; van der Giessend, J W B

    2008-06-01

    Three mixed-bred raptors (Falco rusticolus x Falco cherrug) from a German falcon breeder were presented with a history of respiratory distress. In one bird a laryngeal stridor was noted, and oral examination revealed an epiglottal swelling. In the other two birds, nasal discharge and sneezing were the main clinical symptoms. Nasal flushing samples and biopsies were collected for pathologic, bacteriologic, and parasitologic examination. Results confirmed a cryptosporidial infection. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA analysis identified the causative agent to be Cryptosporidium baileyi. No cryptosporidia were detected in fecal samples, indicating the infection was confined to the respiratory system. Analysis of prey animals (pigeons, quail) failed to identify the source of infection. Treatment was initiated with paromomycin in all three birds, whereas in two birds an additional therapy with azithromycin was given. However, no clinical improvement was seen after several weeks of treatment, and the birds either died or were euthanatized. To the authors' knowledge, these are the first confirmed cases of disease caused by cryptosporidia in the order of Falconiformes.

  18. Aberrant sialylation causes dilated cardiomyopathy and stress-induced heart failure.

    PubMed

    Deng, Wei; Ednie, Andrew R; Qi, Jianyong; Bennett, Eric S

    2016-09-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), the third most common cause of heart failure, is often associated with arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death if not controlled. The majority of DCM is of unknown etiology. Protein sialylation is altered in human DCM, with responsible mechanisms not yet described. Here we sought to investigate the impact of clinically relevant changes in sialylation on cardiac function using a novel model for altered glycoprotein sialylation that leads to DCM and to chronic stress-induced heart failure (HF), deletion of the sialyltransferase, ST3Gal4. We previously reported that 12- to 20-week-old ST3Gal4 (-/-) mice showed aberrant cardiac voltage-gated ion channel sialylation and gating that contribute to a pro-arrhythmogenic phenotype. Here, echocardiography supported by histology revealed modest dilated and thinner-walled left ventricles without increased fibrosis in ST3Gal4 (-/-) mice starting at 1 year of age. Cardiac calcineurin expression in younger (16-20 weeks old) ST3Gal4 (-/-) hearts was significantly reduced compared to WT. Transverse aortic constriction (TAC) was used as a chronic stressor on the younger mice to determine whether the ability to compensate against a pathologic insult is compromised in the ST3Gal4 (-/-) heart, as suggested by previous reports describing the functional implications of reduced cardiac calcineurin levels. TAC'd ST3Gal4 (-/-) mice presented with significantly reduced systolic function and ventricular dilation that deteriorated into congestive HF within 6 weeks post-surgery, while constricted WT hearts remained well-adapted throughout (ejection fraction, ST3Gal4 (-/-) = 34 ± 5.2 %; WT = 53.8 ± 7.4 %; p < 0.05). Thus, a novel, sialo-dependent model for DCM/HF is described in which clinically relevant reduced sialylation results in increased arrhythmogenicity and reduced cardiac calcineurin levels that precede cardiomyopathy and TAC-induced HF, suggesting a causal link among aberrant sialylation

  19. Compensation for occupational disease with multiple causes: the case of coal miners respiratory diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Weeks, J.L.; Wagner, G.R.

    1986-01-01

    Many diseases associated with occupational exposures are clinically indistinguishable from diseases with non-occupational causes. Given this, how are fair decisions made about eligibility for compensation. This problem is discussed in relation to the federal black lung program. Conflicting definitions of terms--coal workers pneumoconiosis as defined by the medical profession, pneumoconiosis as defined by the United States Congress, and the popular term, black lung--are important considerations in this discussion. Each is embedded in different logical interpretations of the causes of occupational disease and of disability. Alternative views are presented and critically discussed.

  20. Compensation for occupational disease with multiple causes: the case of coal miners' respiratory diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Weeks, J L; Wagner, G R

    1986-01-01

    Many diseases associated with occupational exposures are clinically indistinguishable from diseases with non-occupational causes. Given this, how are fair decisions made about eligibility for compensation? This problem is discussed in relation to the federal black lung program. Conflicting definitions of terms--coal workers' pneumoconiosis as defined by the medical profession, pneumoconiosis as defined by the United States Congress, and the popular term, black lung--are important considerations in this discussion. Each is embedded in different logical interpretations of the causes of occupational disease and of disability. Alternative views are presented and critically discussed. PMID:2933965

  1. Determining the Cause of a Header Failure in a Natural Gas Production Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Matthes, S.A.; Covino, B.S., Jr.; Bullard, S.J.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Holcomb, G.R.

    2007-03-01

    An investigation was made into the premature failure of a gas-header at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) natural gas production facility. A wide variety of possible failure mechanisms were considered: design of the header, deviation from normal pipe alloy composition, physical orientation of the header, gas composition and flow rate, type of corrosion, protectiveness of the interior oxide film, time of wetness, and erosion-corrosion. The failed header was examined using metallographic techniques, scanning electron microscopy, and microanalysis. A comparison of the failure site and an analogous site that had not failed, but exhibited similar metal thinning was also performed. From these studies it was concluded that failure resulted from erosion-corrosion, and that design elements of the header and orientation with respect to gas flow contributed to the mass loss at the failure point.

  2. Why do organizations not learn from incidents? Bottlenecks, causes and conditions for a failure to effectively learn.

    PubMed

    Drupsteen, Linda; Hasle, Peter

    2014-11-01

    If organizations would be able to learn more effectively from incidents that occurred in the past, future incidents and consequential injury or damage can be prevented. To improve learning from incidents, this study aimed to identify limiting factors, i.e. the causes of the failure to effectively learn. In seven organizations focus groups were held to discuss factors that according to employees contributed to the failure to learn. By use of a model of the learning from incidents process, the steps, where difficulties for learning arose, became visible, and the causes for these difficulties could be studied. Difficulties were identified in multiple steps of the learning process, but most difficulties became visible when planning actions, which is the phase that bridges the gap from incident investigation to actions for improvement. The main causes for learning difficulties, which were identified by the participants in this study, were tightly related to the learning process, but some indirect causes - or conditions - such as lack of ownership and limitations in expertise were also mentioned. The results illustrate that there are two types of causes for the failure to effectively learn: direct causes and indirect causes, here called conditions. By actively and systematically studying learning, more conditions might be identified and indicators for a successful learning process may be determined. Studying the learning process does, however, require a shift from learning from incidents to learning to learn.

  3. Why do organizations not learn from incidents? Bottlenecks, causes and conditions for a failure to effectively learn.

    PubMed

    Drupsteen, Linda; Hasle, Peter

    2014-11-01

    If organizations would be able to learn more effectively from incidents that occurred in the past, future incidents and consequential injury or damage can be prevented. To improve learning from incidents, this study aimed to identify limiting factors, i.e. the causes of the failure to effectively learn. In seven organizations focus groups were held to discuss factors that according to employees contributed to the failure to learn. By use of a model of the learning from incidents process, the steps, where difficulties for learning arose, became visible, and the causes for these difficulties could be studied. Difficulties were identified in multiple steps of the learning process, but most difficulties became visible when planning actions, which is the phase that bridges the gap from incident investigation to actions for improvement. The main causes for learning difficulties, which were identified by the participants in this study, were tightly related to the learning process, but some indirect causes - or conditions - such as lack of ownership and limitations in expertise were also mentioned. The results illustrate that there are two types of causes for the failure to effectively learn: direct causes and indirect causes, here called conditions. By actively and systematically studying learning, more conditions might be identified and indicators for a successful learning process may be determined. Studying the learning process does, however, require a shift from learning from incidents to learning to learn. PMID:25118127

  4. Recurrent respiratory infection caused by Bordetella bronchiseptica in an immunocompetent infant.

    PubMed

    de la Torre, María José Lozano; de la Fuente, Celia García; de Alegría, Carlos Ruiz; Del Molino, Concepción Pérez; Agüero, Jesús; Martínez-Martínez, Luis

    2012-09-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica rarely infects immunocompetent humans. We report an unusual case of recurrent pertussis-like syndrome caused by B. bronchiseptica in a 7-month-old immunocompetent boy. Molecular analysis demonstrated that the isolates from the child and mother were identical.

  5. 76 FR 70768 - Common-Cause Failure Analysis in Event and Condition Assessment: Guidance and Research, Draft...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Common-Cause Failure Analysis in Event and Condition Assessment: Guidance and Research, Draft... November 2, 2011 (76 FR 67764). This action is necessary to correct an erroneous date for submission...

  6. Peritonitis and technique failure caused by Roseomonas mucosa in an adolescent infected with HIV on continuous cycling peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Mary Adetinuke; Laurens, Matthew B; Fiorella, Paul D; Mendley, Susan R

    2012-11-01

    We report the first case of peritonitis caused by Roseomonas mucosa which led to technique failure in an adolescent patient with HIV receiving peritoneal dialysis. Identification of the causative organism by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and phylogenetic analysis is described.

  7. Short-term reversibility of ultrastructural changes in pulmonary capillaries caused by stress failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, A. R.; Fu, Z.; Tsukimoto, K.; Prediletto, R.; Mathieu-Costello, O.; West, J. B.

    1992-01-01

    We previously showed that when the pulmonary capillaries in anesthetized rabbits are exposed to a transmural pressure (Ptm) of approximately 40 mmHg, stress failure of the walls occurs with disruption of the capillary endothelium, alveolar epithelium, or sometimes all layers. The present study was designed to determine whether some of the ultrastructural changes are rapidly reversible when the capillary pressure is reduced. To test this, the Ptm was raised to 52.5 cmH2O for 1 min of blood perfusion and then reduced to 12.5 cmH2O for 3 min of saline-dextran perfusion, followed by intravascular fixation at the same pressure. In another group of animals, the pressure was elevated for 1 min of blood and 3 min of saline-dextran before being reduced. The results were compared with previous studies in which the capillary pressures were maintained elevated at 52.5 cmH2O during the entire procedure. Control studies were also done at sustained low pressures. The results showed that the number of endothelial and epithelial breaks per millimeter and the total fraction area of the breaks were reduced when the pressure was lowered. For example, the number of endothelial breaks per millimeter decreased from 7.1 +/- 2.1 to 2.4 +/- 0.7, and the number of epithelial breaks per millimeter fell from 11.4 +/- 3.7 to 3.4 +/- 0.7. There was evidence that the breaks that closed were those that were initially small and were associated with an intact basement membrane. The results suggest that cells can move along their underlying matrix by rapid disengagement and reattachment of cell adhesion molecules, causing breaks to open or close within minutes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  8. Failure to remove true sentinel nodes can cause failure of the sentinel node biopsy technique: evidence from antimony concentrations in false-negative sentinel nodes from melanoma patients.

    PubMed

    Scolyer, Richard A; Thompson, John F; Li, Ling-Xi L; Beavis, Alison; Dawson, Michael; Doble, Phillip; Ka, Vivian S K; McKinnon, J Gregory; Soper, Robyne; Uren, Roger F; Shaw, Helen M; Stretch, Jonathan R; McCarthy, Stanley W

    2004-03-01

    We have recently found that antimony (originating from the technetium 99m antimony trisulfide colloid, used for preoperative lymphoscintigraphy) can be measured in tissue sections from archival paraffin blocks of sentinel nodes (SNs) by means of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) to confirm that removed nodes are true SNs. We performed a retrospective analysis of antimony concentrations in all our false-negative (FN) SNs to determine whether errors in lymphadenectomy (i.e., failure to remove true SNs) may be a cause of FN SN biopsies (SNBs). Among 27 patients with an FN SNB, metastases were found on histopathologic review of the original slides or additional sections in 7 of 23 patients for which they were available; however, antimony concentrations were low in 5 of 20 presumptive SNs. Our results suggest that an FN SNB can occur because of failure to remove the true SN as well as histopathologic misdiagnosis.

  9. Evidence of an emerging levee failure mechanism causing disastrous floods in Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlandini, Stefano; Moretti, Giovanni; Albertson, John D.

    2015-10-01

    A levee failure occurred along the Secchia River, Northern Italy, on 19 January 2014, resulting in flood damage in excess of $500 million. In response to this failure, immediate surveillance of other levees in the region led to the identification of a second breach developing on the neighboring Panaro River, where rapid mitigation efforts were successful in averting a full levee failure. The paired breach events that occurred along the Secchia and Panaro Rivers provided an excellent window on an emerging levee failure mechanism. In the Secchia River, by combining the information content of photographs taken from helicopters in the early stage of breach development and 10 cm resolution aerial photographs taken in 2010 and 2012, animal burrows were found to exist in the precise levee location where the breach originated. In the Panaro River, internal erosion was observed to occur at a location where a crested porcupine den was known to exist and this erosion led to the collapse of the levee top. This paper uses detailed numerical modeling of rainfall, river flow, and variably saturated flow in the levee to explore the hydraulic and geotechnical mechanisms that were triggered along the Secchia and Panaro Rivers by activities of burrowing animals leading to levee failures. As habitats become more fragmented and constrained along river corridors, it is possible that this failure mechanism could become more prevalent and, therefore, will demand greater attention in both the design and maintenance of earthen hydraulic structures as well as in wildlife management.

  10. [Non-invasive and invasive mechanical ventilation for treatment of chronic respiratory failure. S2-Guidelines published by the German Medical Association of Pneumology and Ventilatory Support].

    PubMed

    Windisch, W; Brambring, J; Budweiser, S; Dellweg, D; Geiseler, J; Gerhard, F; Köhnlein, T; Mellies, U; Schönhofer, B; Schucher, B; Siemon, K; Walterspacher, S; Winterholler, M; Sitter, H

    2010-04-01

    The field of mechanical ventilation is highly important in pulmonary medicine. The German Medical Association of Pneumology and Ventilatory Support ["Deutsche Gesellschaft für Pneumologie und Beatmungsmedizin e. V. (DGP)"] therefore has formulated these guidelines for home mechanical non-invasive and invasive ventilation. Non-invasive home mechanical ventilation can be administered using various facial masks; invasive home mechanical ventilation is performed via a tracheostomy. Home mechanical ventilation is widely and increasingly accepted as a treatment option for chronic ventilatory failure which most often occurs in COPD, restrictive lung diseases, obesity-hypoventilation syndrome and neuromuscular disorders. Essential for the initiation of home mechanical ventilation are the presence of symptoms of ventilatory failure and the detection of hypoventilation, most importantly hypercapnia. These guidelines comprise general indication criteria along with disease-specific criteria summarised by treatment algorithms. In addition, the management of bronchial secretions and care of paediatric patients are addressed. Home mechanical ventilation must be organised around a specialised respiratory care centre with expertise in patient selection, the initiation and the control of home mechanical ventilation. In this regard, the guidelines provide detailed information about technical requirements (equipment), control and settings of mechanical ventilation as well as organisation of patient care. A key requirement for home mechanical ventilation is the qualification of specialised home-care services, which is addressed in detail. Independent living and the quality of respiratory care are of highest priority in patients receiving home mechanical ventilation, since home mechanical ventilation can interfere with the integrity of a patient and often marks a life-sustaining therapy. Home mechanical ventilation has been shown to improve health-related quality of life of patients

  11. G-scores: a method for identifying disease-causing pathogens with application to lower respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Peng, Peichao; Wang, Lu; Kang, Yu

    2014-07-20

    Lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) are well known for the lack of a good diagnostic method. The main difficulty lies in the fact that there are a variety of pathogens causing LRTIs, and their management and treatment are quite different. The development of quantitative real-time loop-mediated isothermal amplification (qrt-LAMP) made it possible to rapidly amplify and quantify multiple pathogens simultaneously. The question that remains to be answered is how accurate and reliable is this method? More importantly, how are qrt-LAMP measurements utilized to inform/suggest medical decisions? When does a pathogen start to grow out of control and cause infection? Answers to these questions are crucial to advise treatment guidance for LRTIs and also helpful to design phase I/II trials or adaptive treatment strategies. In this article, our main contributions include the following two aspects. First, we utilize zero-inflated mixture models to provide statistical evidence for the validity of qrt-LAMP being used in detecting pathogens for LRTIs without the presence of a gold standard test. Our results on qrt-LAMP suggest that it provides reliable measurements on pathogens of interest. Second, we propose a novel statistical approach to identify disease-causing pathogens, that is, distinguish the pathogens that colonize without causing problems from those that rapidly grow and cause infection. We achieve this by combining information from absolute quantities of pathogens and their symbiosis information to form G-scores. Change-point detection methods are utilized on these G-scores to detect the three phases of bacterial growth-lag phase, log phase, and stationary phase. PMID:24599506

  12. [Respiratory tract diseases caused by chemically irritating or toxic pollutants at the work site].

    PubMed

    Baur, X

    1995-05-01

    Update statistics of job-related diseases show there is still a high level in reported and also in recognised and financially compensated airway diseases caused by the action of chemically irritating or toxic substances during work. Most reported cases occur in the chemical and metal processing industries. Main triggering substances are said to be isocyanates, aerosols of pollutants produced during welding, cutting, casting or moulding (smoke), by solvents and hair dyes. Experiments prove that a variety of these noxious substances produce dose-dependent hypersensitivity of the bronchial system. Long-term monitoring of granary workers clearly points to both the possibility of and the need for early diagnosis followed by mandatory and immediate abstention from further exposure to avoid occurrence of irreversible disease patterns. Work-related health risks over and above job-conditioned diseases must be generally included in the protective measures in accordance with the new EC guidelines.

  13. Hyperbilirubinemia and rapid fatal hepatic failure in severe combined immunodeficiency caused by adenosine deaminase deficiency (ADA-SCID).

    PubMed

    Kühl, J S; Schwarz, K; Münch, A; Schmugge, M; Pekrun, A; Meisel, C; Wahn, V; Ebell, W; von Bernuth, H

    2011-03-01

    Adenosin deaminase (ADA) deficiency is the cause for Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID) in about 15% of patients with SCID, often presenting as T (-)B (-)NK (-)SCID. Treatment options for ADA-SCID are enzyme replacement, bone marrow transplantation or gene therapy. We here describe the first patient with ADA-SCID and fatal hepatic failure despite bone marrow transplantation from a 10/10 HLA identical related donor. As patients with ADA-SCID may be at yet underestimated increased risk for rapid hepatic failure we speculate whether hepatitis in ADA-SCID should lead to the immediate treatment with enzyme replacement by pegylated ADA.

  14. Diuretics induced uremia and nonrecovery of renal function in a patient with acute renal failure caused by sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, P. K.; Pal, A.; Panda, J.; Patnaik, S.

    2011-01-01

    Sepsis is a clinical syndrome related to severe infection and is characterized by systemic inflammation and injury to multiple organs and functional systems. Sepsis is one of the main causes of acute renal failure (ARF). Diuretics are frequently administered during ARF. However, there is scant evidence that diuretics provide any benefit to the patients with ARF. This case report highlights the occurrence of uremia and nonrecovery of renal function after administration of diuretics in a patient with ARF caused by sepsis. It is suggested that physicians should be cautious in prescribing diuretics to patients with ARF due to septicemia. Diuretics cause uremia and may lead to false diagnosis of chronic renal failure and nonrecovery of renal function. The patient may unnecessarily require prolonged dialysis. PMID:22022011

  15. Bactericidal Immunity to Salmonella in Africans and Mechanisms Causing Its Failure in HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Yun Shan; Necchi, Francesca; O’Shaughnessy, Colette M.; Micoli, Francesca; Gavini, Massimiliano; Young, Stephen P.; Msefula, Chisomo L.; Gondwe, Esther N.; Mandala, Wilson L.; Gordon, Melita A.; Saul, Allan J.; MacLennan, Calman A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Nontyphoidal strains of Salmonella are a leading cause of death among HIV-infected Africans. Antibody-induced complement-mediated killing protects healthy Africans against Salmonella, but increased levels of anti-lipopolysaccharide (LPS) antibodies in some HIV-infected African adults block this killing. The objective was to understand how these high levels of anti-LPS antibodies interfere with the killing of Salmonella. Methodology/Principal Findings Sera and affinity-purified antibodies from African HIV-infected adults that failed to kill invasive S. Typhimurium D23580 were compared to sera from HIV-uninfected and HIV-infected subjects with bactericidal activity. The failure of sera from certain HIV-infected subjects to kill Salmonella was found to be due to an inherent inhibitory effect of anti-LPS antibodies. This inhibition was concentration-dependent and strongly associated with IgA and IgG2 anti-LPS antibodies (p<0.0001 for both). IgG anti-LPS antibodies, from sera of HIV-infected individuals that inhibit killing at high concentration, induced killing when diluted. Conversely, IgG, from sera of HIV-uninfected adults that induce killing, inhibited killing when concentrated. IgM anti-LPS antibodies from all subjects also induced Salmonella killing. Finally, the inhibitory effect of high concentrations of anti-LPS antibodies is seen with IgM as well as IgG and IgA. No correlation was found between affinity or avidity, or complement deposition or consumption, and inhibition of killing. Conclusion/Significance IgG and IgM classes of anti-S. Typhimurium LPS antibodies from HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected individuals are bactericidal, while at very high concentrations, anti-LPS antibodies of all classes inhibit in vitro killing of Salmonella. This could be due to a variety of mechanisms relating to the poor ability of IgA and IgG2 to activate complement, and deposition of complement at sites where it cannot insert in the bacterial membrane. Vaccine trials

  16. Norepinephrine-induced nerve growth factor depletion causes cardiac sympathetic denervation in severe heart failure.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Kensuke; Kanazawa, Hideaki; Ieda, Masaki; Kawaguchi-Manabe, Haruko; Miyake, Yoshiko; Yagi, Takashi; Arai, Takahide; Sano, Motoaki; Fukuda, Keiichi

    2010-08-25

    In severe congestive heart failure (CHF), sympathetic overactivity correlates with the exacerbation of cardiac performance. To test the hypothesis that the cardiac sympathetic nerve density dramatically changes with the acceleration of circulating norepinephrine (NE) concentration, we investigated the temporal association of nerve growth factor (NGF) expression in the heart and cardiac sympathetic nerve density during the development of CHF in the continuous NE-infused rats. The animals were analyzed at 0-, 1-, 3-, 7-, 14-, and 28-day after implantation of osmotic pump at a rate of 0.05 mg/kg/hr. The cardiac performance was temporally facilitated in NE-exposed rats at 3-day in accordance with the sympathetic hyper-innervation induced by the augmentation of NGF mRNA expression in the heart. In NE-treated rats, left ventricular end-diastolic pressure was significantly increased after 7-day and marked left ventricular hypertrophy and systemic fluid retention were observed at 28-day. CHF-induced sympathetic overactivity further increased plasma NE concentration in NE-treated rats and finally reached to 16.1+/-5.6 ng/ml at 28-day (control level was 0.39+/-0.1 ng/ml, p<0.01). In the decompensated CHF rats at 28-day, the NGF mRNA expression was conspicuously reduced concomitant with the obvious nerve fiber loss confirmed by the immunostaining of nerve axonal marker, PGP9.5 and sympathetic neuron marker, tyrosine hydroxylase. This resulted in the attenuated tissue NE contents and the exacerbating cardiac performance. The cardiac sympathetic fiber loss was also confirmed in NE-exposed DBH (dopamine beta-hydroxylase)-Cre/Floxed-EGFP (enhanced green fluorescent protein) mice with severe CHF, in which sympathetic nerve could be traced by EGFP. Our results suggest that the cardiac sympathetic nerve density is strictly regulated by the NGF expression in the heart and long-exposure of high plasma NE concentration caused myocardial NGF reduction, following sympathetic fiber loss

  17. Delayed Recognition of Deterioration of Patients in General Wards Is Mostly Caused by Human Related Monitoring Failures: A Root Cause Analysis of Unplanned ICU Admissions

    PubMed Central

    Driesen, Babiche E. J. M.; Merten, Hanneke; Ludikhuize, Jeroen; van der Spoel, Johannes I.; Kramer, Mark H. H.; Nanayakkara, Prabath W. B.

    2016-01-01

    Background An unplanned ICU admission of an inpatient is a serious adverse event (SAE). So far, no in depth-study has been performed to systematically analyse the root causes of unplanned ICU-admissions. The primary aim of this study was to identify the healthcare worker-, organisational-, technical,- disease- and patient- related causes that contribute to acute unplanned ICU admissions from general wards using a Root-Cause Analysis Tool called PRISMA-medical. Although a Track and Trigger System (MEWS) was introduced in our hospital a few years ago, it was implemented without a clear protocol. Therefore, the secondary aim was to assess the adherence to a Track and Trigger system to identify deterioration on general hospital wards in patients eventually transferred to the ICU. Methods Retrospective observational study in 49 consecutive adult patients acutely admitted to the Intensive Care Unit from a general nursing ward. 1. PRISMA-analysis on root causes of unplanned ICU admissions 2. Assessment of protocol adherence to the early warning score system. Results Out of 49 cases, 156 root causes were identified. The most frequent root causes were healthcare worker related (46%), which were mainly failures in monitoring the patient. They were followed by disease-related (45%), patient-related causes (7, 5%), and organisational root causes (3%). In only 40% of the patients vital parameters were monitored as was instructed by the doctor. 477 vital parameter sets were found in the 48 hours before ICU admission, in only 1% a correct MEWS was explicitly documented in the record. Conclusions This in-depth analysis demonstrates that almost half of the unplanned ICU admissions from the general ward had healthcare worker related root causes, mostly due to monitoring failures in clinically deteriorating patients. In order to reduce unplanned ICU admissions, improving the monitoring of patients is therefore warranted. PMID:27537689

  18. Djenkol bean poisoning (djenkolism): an unusual cause of acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Segasothy, M; Swaminathan, M; Kong, N C; Bennett, W M

    1995-01-01

    This report describes a patient with acute renal failure that resulted from the ingestion of djenkol beans. Features of acute djenkolism include nausea, vomiting, bilateral loin pain, gross hematuria, and oliguria. The blood urea level was 16.2 mmol/L and the serum creatinine was 460 mumol/L. Phase contrast microscopy of the urinary sediment indicated that the hematuria was nonglomerular. Ultrasound of the kidneys showed slightly enlarged kidneys with no features of obstruction. Renal biopsy showed acute tubular necrosis similar to the single animal study reported in the literature. With conservative therapy, which included rehydration with normal saline and alkalinization of the urine with sodium bicarbonate, the acute renal failure resolved. Based on its chemistry, djenkol bean-associated acute renal failure may be analogous to acute uric acid nephropathy. PMID:7810535

  19. Djenkol bean poisoning (djenkolism): an unusual cause of acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Segasothy, M; Swaminathan, M; Kong, N C; Bennett, W M

    1995-01-01

    This report describes a patient with acute renal failure that resulted from the ingestion of djenkol beans. Features of acute djenkolism include nausea, vomiting, bilateral loin pain, gross hematuria, and oliguria. The blood urea level was 16.2 mmol/L and the serum creatinine was 460 mumol/L. Phase contrast microscopy of the urinary sediment indicated that the hematuria was nonglomerular. Ultrasound of the kidneys showed slightly enlarged kidneys with no features of obstruction. Renal biopsy showed acute tubular necrosis similar to the single animal study reported in the literature. With conservative therapy, which included rehydration with normal saline and alkalinization of the urine with sodium bicarbonate, the acute renal failure resolved. Based on its chemistry, djenkol bean-associated acute renal failure may be analogous to acute uric acid nephropathy.

  20. A Case of Neonatal Heart Failure Caused by Left Ventricular Diverticulum: Successful ECMO Support Application.

    PubMed

    Gocen, Ugur; Atalay, Atakan; Salih, Orhan Kemal

    2016-01-01

    Congenital left ventricular diverticulum is a rare cardiac anomaly. During the newborn period, symptomatic patients are diagnosed with heart failure findings. We present a 23-day-old male newborn with congenital left ventricular diverticulum diagnosed during fetal echocardiographic examination. After the birth, the patient had heart failure symptoms and his echocardiographic examination showed low cardiac ejection fraction. Diverticulum was operated with endoventricular circular patch plasty (DOR) technique, and after, cardiopulmonary bypass venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) support was performed because of low cardiac output syndrome. On postoperative day 17, he was discharged with no problem. PMID:27585200

  1. Combination of angiotensin II and l-NG-nitroarginine methyl ester exacerbates mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress to cause heart failure.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Dale J; Zhang, Aijun; Li, Shumin; Cao, Tram N; Smith, Jessie A; Vedula, Indira; Cordero-Reyes, Andrea M; Youker, Keith A; Torre-Amione, Guillermo; Gupte, Anisha A

    2016-03-15

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated as a cause of energy deprivation in heart failure (HF). Herein, we tested individual and combined effects of two pathogenic factors of nonischemic HF, inhibition of nitric oxide synthesis [with l-N(G)-nitroarginine methyl ester (l-NAME)] and hypertension [with angiotensin II (AngII)], on myocardial mitochondrial function, oxidative stress, and metabolic gene expression. l-NAME and AngII were administered individually and in combination to mice for 5 wk. Although all treatments increased blood pressure and reduced cardiac contractile function, the l-NAME + AngII group was associated with the most severe HF, as characterized by edema, hypertrophy, oxidative stress, increased expression of Nppa and Nppb, and decreased expression of Atp2a2 and Camk2b. l-NAME + AngII-treated mice exhibited robust deterioration of cardiac mitochondrial function, as observed by reduced respiratory control ratios in subsarcolemmal mitochondria and reduced state 3 levels in interfibrillar mitochondria for complex I but not for complex II substrates. Cardiac myofibrils showed reduced ADP-supported and oligomycin-inhibited oxygen consumption. Mitochondrial functional impairment was accompanied by reduced mitochondrial DNA content and activities of pyruvate dehydrogenase and complex I but increased H2O2 production and tissue protein carbonyls in hearts from AngII and l-NAME + AngII groups. Microarray analyses revealed the majority of the gene changes attributed to the l-NAME + AngII group. Pathway analyses indicated significant changes in metabolic pathways, such as oxidative phosphorylation, mitochondrial function, cardiac hypertrophy, and fatty acid metabolism in l-NAME + AngII hearts. We conclude that l-NAME + AngII is associated with impaired mitochondrial respiratory function and increased oxidative stress compared with either l-NAME or AngII alone, resulting in nonischemic HF.

  2. Genetic disorders of neonatal respiratory function.

    PubMed

    Cole, F S; Hamvas, A; Nogee, L M

    2001-08-01

    Genetic risk for respiratory distress in infancy has been recognized with increasing frequency in neonatal intensive care units. Reports of family clusters of affected infants and of ethnic- and gender-based respiratory phenotypes point to the contribution of inheritance. Similarly, different outcomes among gestationally matched infants with comparable exposures to oxygen, mechanical ventilation, or nutritional deficiency also suggest a genetic risk for respiratory distress. Examples of inherited deficiency of surfactant protein B in both humans and genetically engineered murine lineages illustrate the importance of identifying markers of genetic risk. In contrast to developmental, inflammatory, or nutritional causes of respiratory distress that may resolve as infants mature, genetic causes result in both acute and chronic (and potentially irreversible) respiratory failure. The availability of clinically useful genetic markers of risk for respiratory distress in infancy will permit development of rational strategies for treatment of genetic lung disorders of infancy and more accurate counseling of families whose infants are at genetic risk for development of respiratory distress at birth or during early childhood. We review examples of genetic variations known to be associated with or cause respiratory distress in infancy. PMID:11477198

  3. Outcomes of a Telehealth Intervention for Homebound Older Adults with Heart or Chronic Respiratory Failure: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gellis, Zvi D.; Kenaley, Bonnie; McGinty, Jean; Bardelli, Ellen; Davitt, Joan; Ten Have, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Telehealth care is emerging as a viable intervention model to treat complex chronic conditions, such as heart failure (HF) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and to engage older adults in self-care disease management. Design and Methods: We report on a randomized controlled trial examining the impact of a multifaceted…

  4. [Effects of typhoon-caused power failure on medical care facilities].

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, S; Isibasi, M; Moriyama, M; Kobayasi, H; Ogino, K; Hobara, T; Tanaka, K

    1993-02-01

    In the evening of September 27, Typhoon 19 passed Yamaguchi prefecture. The wind velocity exceeded anything that the local meteorological observatory has ever recorded so far in this area. When the typhoon was off shore near Yamaguchi prefecture, the gale brought down many electric-light poles around Hofu city with power failure in Hofu city continuing for more than a week. At the same time the total number of emergency patients in Hofu area was the most in the prefecture. Because the power failure continued for many days, there was more indirect damage attributable to this power failure than the damage related directly to the typhoon. The capacity of the emergency electric power generator equipment installed in the Central prefectural hospital in Hofu city is the largest in Yamaguchi prefecture. Even while electric power failed completely in the Hofu city area, treatment of most of the emergency patients at this hospital was possible. There is no hospital that has as large an electric generator as the Central hospital has. Had this typhoon hit in another area, the ensuring confusion which might have occurred at hospitals in that area would have put many patients in danger with the power failure in many hospitals. Power consumption needs in hospitals have increased over that expected on the time the hospital was built. Therefore, the electric power generators installed in hospitals are of the times very small and unable to cope with massive electrical outage.

  5. Examining the Causes of Memory Strength Variability: Recollection, Attention Failure, or Encoding Variability?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koen, Joshua D.; Aly, Mariam; Wang, Wei-Chun; Yonelinas, Andrew P.

    2013-01-01

    A prominent finding in recognition memory is that studied items are associated with more variability in memory strength than new items. Here, we test 3 competing theories for why this occurs--the "encoding variability," "attention failure", and "recollection" accounts. Distinguishing among these theories is critical…

  6. Comparative Treatment Failure Rates of Respiratory Fluoroquinolones or β-Lactam + Macrolide Versus β-Lactam Alone in the Treatment for Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Adult Outpatients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Meng-Tse Gabriel; Lee, Shih-Hao; Chang, Shy-Shin; Chan, Ya-Lan; Pang, Laura; Hsu, Sue-Ming; Lee, Chien-Chang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract No comparative effectiveness study has been conducted for the following 3 antibiotics: respiratory fluoroquinolone, β-lactam, and β-lactam + advanced macrolide. To gain insights into the real-world clinical effectiveness of these antibiotics for community-acquired pneumonia in adult outpatients, our study investigated the treatment failure rates in 2 million representative participants from the National Health Informatics Project (NHIP) of Taiwan. A new-user cohort design was used to follow NHIP participants from January 2000 until December 2009. Treatment failure was defined by either one of the following events: a second antibiotic prescription, hospitalization due to CAP, an emergency department visit with a diagnosis of CAP, or 30-day nonaccident-related mortality. From 2006 to 2009, we identified 9256 newly diagnosed CAP outpatients, 1602 of whom were prescribed levofloxacin, 2100 were prescribed moxifloxacin, 5049 were prescribed β-lactam alone, and 505 were prescribed advanced macrolide + β-lactam. Compared with the β-lactam-based regimen, the propensity score-matched odds ratio for composite treatment failure was 0.81 (95% CI, 0.67–0.97) for moxifloxacin, 1.10 (95% CI, 0.90–1.35) for levofloxacin, and 0.95 (95% CI, 0.67–1.35) for macrolide +β-lactam. Moxifloxacin was associated with lower treatment failure rates compared with β-lactam alone, or levofloxacin in Taiwanese CAP outpatients. However, due to inherent limitations in our claims database, more randomized controlled trials are required before coming to a conclusion on which antibiotic is more effective for Taiwanese CAP outpatients. More population-based comparative effectiveness studies are also encouraged and should be considered as an integral piece of evidence in local CAP treatment guidelines. PMID:26426664

  7. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) following a H3N3 parainfluenza virus infection in a pregnant asthmatic woman with respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Zeb, Qaiser; Alegria, Ana

    2014-01-01

    This case report relates to a 31-year-old pregnant woman, asthmatic, admitted to the intensive care unit with respiratory failure, secondary to a viral community-acquired pneumonia. A type 3 (H3N3) parainfluenza virus RNA was isolated in her throat swab. The patient developed neurological symptoms (behavioural changes, irritability, agitation and impaired consciousness) while being weaned off sedation and ventilatory support. Cerebrospinal fluid was clear with an opening pressure of 26 cm H2O. Brain MRI showed features compatible with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis. Immune screen and EEG were normal. She was treated with intravenous methylprednisolone followed by oral prednisolone. The patient made an almost full neurological recovery within 4 weeks after starting on steroids. The patient delivered a healthy baby at 38 weeks gestation. This case highlights the importance to keep in mind rare conditions that need early recognition and prompt treatment. Brain MRI is the key to early diagnosis and treatment. PMID:25281245

  8. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) following a H3N3 parainfluenza virus infection in a pregnant asthmatic woman with respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Zeb, Qaiser; Alegria, Ana

    2014-01-01

    This case report relates to a 31-year-old pregnant woman, asthmatic, admitted to the intensive care unit with respiratory failure, secondary to a viral community-acquired pneumonia. A type 3 (H3N3) parainfluenza virus RNA was isolated in her throat swab. The patient developed neurological symptoms (behavioural changes, irritability, agitation and impaired consciousness) while being weaned off sedation and ventilatory support. Cerebrospinal fluid was clear with an opening pressure of 26 cm H2O. Brain MRI showed features compatible with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis. Immune screen and EEG were normal. She was treated with intravenous methylprednisolone followed by oral prednisolone. The patient made an almost full neurological recovery within 4 weeks after starting on steroids. The patient delivered a healthy baby at 38 weeks gestation. This case highlights the importance to keep in mind rare conditions that need early recognition and prompt treatment. Brain MRI is the key to early diagnosis and treatment.

  9. Particulate air pollution and health effects for cardiovascular and respiratory causes in Temuco, Chile: a wood-smoke-polluted urban area.

    PubMed

    Sanhueza, Pedro A; Torreblanca, Monica A; Diaz-Robles, Luis A; Schiappacasse, L Nicolas; Silva, Maria P; Astete, Teresa D

    2009-12-01

    Temuco is one of the most highly wood-smoke-polluted cities in the world. Its population in 2004 was 340,000 inhabitants with 1587 annual deaths, of which 24% were due to cardiovascular and 11% to respiratory causes. For hospital admissions, cardiovascular diseases represented 6% and respiratory diseases 13%. Emergency room visits for acute respiratory infections represented 28%. The objective of the study presented here was to determine the relationship between air pollution from particulate matter less than or equal to 10 microm in aerodynamic diameter (PM10; mostly PM2.5, or particulate matter <2.5 microm in aerodynamic diameter) and health effects measured as the daily number of deaths, hospital admissions, and emergency room visits for cardiovascular, respiratory, and acute respiratory infection (ARI) diseases. The Air Pollution Health Effects European Approach (APHEA2) protocol was followed, and a multivariate Poisson regression model was fitted, controlling for trend, seasonality, and confounders for Temuco during 1998-2006. The results show that PM10 had a significant association with daily mortality and morbidity, with the elderly (population >65 yr of age) being the group that presented the greatest risk. The relative risk for respiratory causes, with an increase of 100 microg/m3 of PM10, was 1.163 with a 95% confidence interval (CI) of 1.057-1.279 for mortality, 1.137 (CI 1.096-1.178) for hospital admissions, and 1.162 for ARI (CI 1.144-1.181). There is evidence in Temuco of positive relationships between ambient particulate levels and mortality, hospital admissions, and ARI for cardiovascular and respiratory diseases. These results are consistent with those of comparable studies in other similar cities where wood smoke is the most important air pollution problem.

  10. Ventriculoperitoneal shunt failure causing myelopathy in a patient with bilateral jugular vein occlusion. Case report.

    PubMed

    Humphries, William E; Grossi, Peter M; Liethe, Linda G; George, Timothy M

    2007-01-01

    The authors describe the case of a 36-year-old woman with bilateral internal jugular vein occlusion, hydrocephalus, and Dandy-Walker variant who presented with myelopathy that was ultimately attributed to ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt failure. Computed tomography (CT) angiography of the head and neck revealed epidural venous engorgement within the cervical spine, greater that 50% narrowing of the C2-5 spinal canal, and compression of the cervical spinal cord. After successful shunt revision, postoperative CT angiography revealed decreased venous engorgement as well as decompression of the cervical spinal cord, and the patient's myelopathy improved. This case represents a fascinating clinical presentation of VP shunt failure, highlighting the physiological importance of the external jugular pathways involved in cerebral venous drainage.

  11. Aorto-left atrial fistula: Rare cause of acute cardiac failure in a previously healthy individual.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Yashwant; Konda, Monoj; Kalavakunta, Jagadeesh K

    2016-10-01

    Complications of valvular infective endocarditis involving the peri-annular region puts the patient at a significantly high risk of adverse outcomes including heart failure and death. The "mitral-aortic intervalvular fibrosa" is relatively avascular and offers little resistance to the spread of abscesses, aneurysm, and fistula formation. Aorto-cavitary fistulous tract formation in the setting of native valve infective endocarditis is associated with higher rates of heart failure, ventricular septal defect, and atrioventricular block than nonruptured abscesses. Thus, a high index of suspicion is needed for rapid and accurate diagnosis, which can guide further management. A transesophageal echocardiogram is the preferred modality of investigation in such cases. Staphylococci are reported to be the most common pathogen involved. In addition to early antibiotic therapy, prompt surgical intervention might save lives in these scenarios. PMID:27688677

  12. Modified Stumper technique for acute postoperative bifurcation stenosis causing right ventricular failure after Ross procedure

    PubMed Central

    Divekar, Abhay A

    2016-01-01

    In this report, we describe a 15-year-old patient who underwent a Ross procedure for a regurgitant bicuspid aortic valve and ascending aortic dilation. After the operation was over, he could not be separated from cardiopulmonary bypass and was noted to have isolated right ventricular failure. This report takes the reader through the diagnostic evaluation, highlights the importance of invasive assessment in the immediate postoperative period, and discusses successful transcatheter intervention in the acute postoperative setting.

  13. Modified Stumper technique for acute postoperative bifurcation stenosis causing right ventricular failure after Ross procedure

    PubMed Central

    Divekar, Abhay A

    2016-01-01

    In this report, we describe a 15-year-old patient who underwent a Ross procedure for a regurgitant bicuspid aortic valve and ascending aortic dilation. After the operation was over, he could not be separated from cardiopulmonary bypass and was noted to have isolated right ventricular failure. This report takes the reader through the diagnostic evaluation, highlights the importance of invasive assessment in the immediate postoperative period, and discusses successful transcatheter intervention in the acute postoperative setting. PMID:27625524

  14. Middle East respiratory syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zumla, Alimuddin; Hui, David S; Perlman, Stanley

    2015-09-01

    Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) is a highly lethal respiratory disease caused by a novel single-stranded, positive-sense RNA betacoronavirus (MERS-CoV). Dromedary camels, hosts for MERS-CoV, are implicated in direct or indirect transmission to human beings, although the exact mode of transmission is unknown. The virus was first isolated from a patient who died from a severe respiratory illness in June, 2012, in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. As of May 31, 2015, 1180 laboratory-confirmed cases (483 deaths; 40% mortality) have been reported to WHO. Both community-acquired and hospital-acquired cases have been reported with little human-to-human transmission reported in the community. Although most cases of MERS have occurred in Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates, cases have been reported in Europe, the USA, and Asia in people who travelled from the Middle East or their contacts. Clinical features of MERS range from asymptomatic or mild disease to acute respiratory distress syndrome and multiorgan failure resulting in death, especially in individuals with underlying comorbidities. No specific drug treatment exists for MERS and infection prevention and control measures are crucial to prevent spread in health-care facilities. MERS-CoV continues to be an endemic, low-level public health threat. However, the virus could mutate to have increased interhuman transmissibility, increasing its pandemic potential.

  15. Middle East respiratory syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zumla, Alimuddin; Hui, David S; Perlman, Stanley

    2015-09-01

    Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) is a highly lethal respiratory disease caused by a novel single-stranded, positive-sense RNA betacoronavirus (MERS-CoV). Dromedary camels, hosts for MERS-CoV, are implicated in direct or indirect transmission to human beings, although the exact mode of transmission is unknown. The virus was first isolated from a patient who died from a severe respiratory illness in June, 2012, in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. As of May 31, 2015, 1180 laboratory-confirmed cases (483 deaths; 40% mortality) have been reported to WHO. Both community-acquired and hospital-acquired cases have been reported with little human-to-human transmission reported in the community. Although most cases of MERS have occurred in Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates, cases have been reported in Europe, the USA, and Asia in people who travelled from the Middle East or their contacts. Clinical features of MERS range from asymptomatic or mild disease to acute respiratory distress syndrome and multiorgan failure resulting in death, especially in individuals with underlying comorbidities. No specific drug treatment exists for MERS and infection prevention and control measures are crucial to prevent spread in health-care facilities. MERS-CoV continues to be an endemic, low-level public health threat. However, the virus could mutate to have increased interhuman transmissibility, increasing its pandemic potential. PMID:26049252

  16. Compounds from multilayer plastic bags cause reproductive failures in artificial insemination.

    PubMed

    Nerin, C; Ubeda, J L; Alfaro, P; Dahmani, Y; Aznar, M; Canellas, E; Ausejo, R

    2014-05-09

    High levels of reproductive failure were detected in some Spanish sow farms in the Spring of 2010. Regular returns to estrus and variable reductions in litter size were observed. The problem started suddenly and did not appear to be related to the quality of the ejaculates, disease, alterations of body condition or any other apparent reasons. Subsequent studies determined that the problem was the origin of the plastic bags used for semen storage. Chemical analysis of the suspicious bags identified unexpected compounds such as BADGE, a cyclic lactone and an unknown phthalate that leached into the semen at concentrations of 0.2 to 2.5 mg/L. Spermatozoa preserved in these bags passed all of the routine quality control tests, and no differences were observed between storage in the control and suspicious bags (p > 0.05). In vitro fecundation tests and endocrine profiler panel analysis (EPP) did not show any alterations, whereas the in vivo tests confirmed the described failure. This is the first described relationship between reproductive failure and toxic compounds released from plastic bags.

  17. Compounds from multilayer plastic bags cause reproductive failures in artificial insemination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nerin, C.; Ubeda, J. L.; Alfaro, P.; Dahmani, Y.; Aznar, M.; Canellas, E.; Ausejo, R.

    2014-05-01

    High levels of reproductive failure were detected in some Spanish sow farms in the Spring of 2010. Regular returns to estrus and variable reductions in litter size were observed. The problem started suddenly and did not appear to be related to the quality of the ejaculates, disease, alterations of body condition or any other apparent reasons. Subsequent studies determined that the problem was the origin of the plastic bags used for semen storage. Chemical analysis of the suspicious bags identified unexpected compounds such as BADGE, a cyclic lactone and an unknown phthalate that leached into the semen at concentrations of 0.2 to 2.5 mg/L. Spermatozoa preserved in these bags passed all of the routine quality control tests, and no differences were observed between storage in the control and suspicious bags (p > 0.05). In vitro fecundation tests and endocrine profiler panel analysis (EPP) did not show any alterations, whereas the in vivo tests confirmed the described failure. This is the first described relationship between reproductive failure and toxic compounds released from plastic bags.

  18. Compounds from multilayer plastic bags cause reproductive failures in artificial insemination.

    PubMed

    Nerin, C; Ubeda, J L; Alfaro, P; Dahmani, Y; Aznar, M; Canellas, E; Ausejo, R

    2014-01-01

    High levels of reproductive failure were detected in some Spanish sow farms in the Spring of 2010. Regular returns to estrus and variable reductions in litter size were observed. The problem started suddenly and did not appear to be related to the quality of the ejaculates, disease, alterations of body condition or any other apparent reasons. Subsequent studies determined that the problem was the origin of the plastic bags used for semen storage. Chemical analysis of the suspicious bags identified unexpected compounds such as BADGE, a cyclic lactone and an unknown phthalate that leached into the semen at concentrations of 0.2 to 2.5 mg/L. Spermatozoa preserved in these bags passed all of the routine quality control tests, and no differences were observed between storage in the control and suspicious bags (p > 0.05). In vitro fecundation tests and endocrine profiler panel analysis (EPP) did not show any alterations, whereas the in vivo tests confirmed the described failure. This is the first described relationship between reproductive failure and toxic compounds released from plastic bags. PMID:24810330

  19. Compounds from multilayer plastic bags cause reproductive failures in artificial insemination

    PubMed Central

    Nerin, C.; Ubeda, J. L.; Alfaro, P.; Dahmani, Y.; Aznar, M.; Canellas, E.; Ausejo, R.

    2014-01-01

    High levels of reproductive failure were detected in some Spanish sow farms in the Spring of 2010. Regular returns to estrus and variable reductions in litter size were observed. The problem started suddenly and did not appear to be related to the quality of the ejaculates, disease, alterations of body condition or any other apparent reasons. Subsequent studies determined that the problem was the origin of the plastic bags used for semen storage. Chemical analysis of the suspicious bags identified unexpected compounds such as BADGE, a cyclic lactone and an unknown phthalate that leached into the semen at concentrations of 0.2 to 2.5 mg/L. Spermatozoa preserved in these bags passed all of the routine quality control tests, and no differences were observed between storage in the control and suspicious bags (p > 0.05). In vitro fecundation tests and endocrine profiler panel analysis (EPP) did not show any alterations, whereas the in vivo tests confirmed the described failure. This is the first described relationship between reproductive failure and toxic compounds released from plastic bags. PMID:24810330

  20. Understanding the failure mechanisms of microwave bipolar transistors caused by electrostatic discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Liu; Yongguang, Chen; Zhiliang, Tan; Jie, Yang; Xijun, Zhang; Zhenxing, Wang

    2011-10-01

    Electrostatic discharge (ESD) phenomena involve both electrical and thermal effects, and a direct electrostatic discharge to an electronic device is one of the most severe threats to component reliability. Therefore, the electrical and thermal stability of multifinger microwave bipolar transistors (BJTs) under ESD conditions has been investigated theoretically and experimentally. 100 samples have been tested for multiple pulses until a failure occurred. Meanwhile, the distributions of electric field, current density and lattice temperature have also been analyzed by use of the two-dimensional device simulation tool Medici. There is a good agreement between the simulated results and failure analysis. In the case of a thermal couple, the avalanche current distribution in the fingers is in general spatially unstable and results in the formation of current crowding effects and crystal defects. The experimental results indicate that a collector-base junction is more sensitive to ESD than an emitter-base junction based on the special device structure. When the ESD level increased to 1.3 kV, the collector-base junction has been burnt out first. The analysis has also demonstrated that ESD failures occur generally by upsetting the breakdown voltage of the dielectric or overheating of the aluminum-silicon eutectic. In addition, fatigue phenomena are observed during ESD testing, with devices that still function after repeated low-intensity ESDs but whose performances have been severely degraded.

  1. Methods for predicting peak discharge of floods caused by failure of natural and constructed earthen dams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walder, J.S.; O'Connor, J. E.

    1997-01-01

    Floods from failures of natural and constructed dams constitute a widespread hazard to people and property. Expeditious means of assessing flood hazards are necessary, particularly in the case of natural dams, which may form suddenly and unexpectedly. We revise statistical relations (derived from data for past constructed and natural dam failures) between peak discharge (Q(p)) and water volume released (V(0)) or drop in lake level (d) but assert that such relations, even when cast into a dimensionless form, are of limited utility because they fail to portray the effect of breach-formation rate. We then analyze a simple, physically based model of dam-breach formation to show that the hydrograph at the breach depends primarily on a dimensionless parameter ?? = kV0/g1/2d7/2, where k is the mean erosion rate of the breach and g is acceleration due to gravity. The functional relationship between Q(p) and ?? takes asymptotically distinct forms depending on whether ?? << 1 (relatively slow breach formation or small lake volume) or ?? >> 1 (relatively fast breach formation or large lake volume). Theoretical predictions agree well with data from dam failures for which k, and thus ??, can be estimated. The theory thus provides a rapid means of predicting the plausible range of values of peak discharge at the breach in an earthen dam as long as the impounded water volume and the water depth at the dam face can be estimated.

  2. A shortage of males causes female reproductive failure in yellow ground squirrels

    PubMed Central

    Vasilieva, Nina; Tchabovsky, Andrey

    2015-01-01

    Sexual conflict theory suggests that female breeding success is strongly influenced by individual life history and environmental conditions and is much less affected by mate availability. Female mating failure due to a shortage of males remains poorly studied and understood. We present data on the effects of male availability on female breeding success in a wild colony of yellow ground squirrels (Spermophilus fulvus). A female’s probability of breeding increased with the local density of males and was higher with higher male-biased operational sex ratio (OSR) but was independent of local female density, female age, and body condition, which are factors commonly assumed to influence female reproduction. The positive effect of male availability (as measured by OSR) on female breeding success was consistent across the years, and we conclude that male limitation contributes to female mating failure. This pattern, which is not commonly recorded in species with conventional sex roles, can be explained by a combination of sociodemographic and life history traits (sex differences in age of maturation, female-skewed adult sex ratio and seasonally varying OSR, solitary living at low population density, and low mobility of females combined with mate-searching tactics of males) that are not confined to S. fulvus. Our findings indicate that the role of female mating failure (due to a shortage of males) in shaping mammalian life history may be underestimated. PMID:26601284

  3. [Syndrome of multiple organ failure].

    PubMed

    Charbonneau, P; Suisse, A

    1990-11-01

    The multiple organ failure syndrome (MOF) is a relatively new entity defined as the successive occurrence of respiratory (ARDS), hepatic, renal, myocardial, gastro-intestinal or neurological failure in patients with hyperkinetic haemodynamic and hypermetabolic states. The etiologies are: infection, septic and non-septic shock, burns and multiple injuries. The MOF syndrome is considered to be a generalised "inflammatory reaction" to tissue aggression involving a cascade of mediatory factors (TNF, interleukines...) of macrophagic, lymphocytic origin, causing multiple organ failure. The treatment depends on early correction of cellular hypoxia related to circulatory disturbances, nutritional support, anti-infective therapy and, in the near future, "control of mediator activity" (immunotherapy).

  4. Respiratory system involvement in Costello syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Ospina, Natalia; Kuo, Christin; Ananth, Amitha Lakshmi; Myers, Angela; Brennan, Marie-Luise; Stevenson, David A; Bernstein, Jonathan A; Hudgins, Louanne

    2016-07-01

    Costello syndrome (CS) is a multisystem disorder caused by heterozygous germline mutations in the HRAS proto-oncogene. Respiratory system complications have been reported in individuals with CS, but a comprehensive description of the full spectrum and incidence of respiratory symptoms in these patients is not available. Here, we report the clinical course of four CS patients with respiratory complications as a major cause of morbidity. Review of the literature identified 56 CS patients with descriptions of their neonatal course and 17 patients in childhood/adulthood. We found that in the neonatal period, respiratory complications are seen in approximately 78% of patients with transient respiratory distress reported in 45% of neonates. Other more specific respiratory diagnoses were reported in 62% of patients, the majority of which comprised disorders of the upper and lower respiratory tract. Symptoms of upper airway obstruction were reported in CS neonates but were more commonly diagnosed in childhood/adulthood (71%). Analysis of HRAS mutations and their respiratory phenotype revealed that the common p.Gly12Ser mutation is more often associated with transient respiratory distress and other respiratory diagnoses. Respiratory failure and dependence on mechanical ventilation occurs almost exclusively with rare mutations. In cases of prenatally diagnosed CS, the high incidence of respiratory complications in the neonatal period should prompt anticipatory guidance and development of a postnatal management plan. This may be important in cases involving rarer mutations. Furthermore, the high frequency of airway obstruction in CS patients suggests that otorhinolaryngological evaluation and sleep studies should be considered. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. [Acute respiratory failure (ARDS) in a young child after drowning accident: therapy with exogenous surfactant and high frequency oscillatory ventilation].

    PubMed

    Marx, M; Golej, J; Fürst, G; Hermon, M; Trittenwein, G

    1995-01-01

    The adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in children has a very poor prognosis with a mortality risk of between 55 and 85%, in spite of improvements due to the introduction of positive endexpiratory pressure ventilation. We describe the clinical course of a not yet 3 year-old boy with severe ARDS following near-drowing. Treatment with exogenous surfactant and high frequency oscillatory ventilation, a well-established procedure in neonatology, was responsible for the favorable outcome. The high cost of surfactant therapy, however, is the main limiting factor for this kind of treatment in children beyond the neonatal period, but it may be the last therapeutic resort in the management of severe ARDS.

  6. Cardiomyocyte-specific deletion of leptin receptors causes lethal heart failure in Cre-recombinase-mediated cardiotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Hall, Michael E; Smith, Grant; Hall, John E; Stec, David E

    2012-12-15

    Although disruption of leptin signaling is associated with obesity as well as cardiac lipid accumulation and dysfunction, it has been difficult to separate the direct effects of leptin on the heart from those associated with the effects of leptin on body weight and fat mass. Using Cre-loxP recombinase technology, we developed tamoxifen-inducible, cardiomyocyte-specific leptin receptor-deficient mice to assess the role of leptin in regulating cardiac function. Cre recombinase activation in the heart resulted in transient reduction in left ventricular systolic function which recovered to normal levels by day 10. However, when cardiomyocyte leptin receptors were deleted in the setting of Cre recombinase-induced left ventricular dysfunction, irreversible lethal heart failure was observed in less than 10 days in all mice. Heart failure after leptin receptor deletion was associated with marked decreases of cardiac mitochondrial ATP, phosphorylated mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), and AMP-activated kinase (pAMPK). Our results demonstrate that specific deletion of cardiomyocyte leptin receptors, in the presence of increased Cre recombinase expression, causes lethal heart failure associated with decreased cardiac energy production. These observations indicate that leptin plays an important role in regulating cardiac function in the setting of cardiac stress caused by Cre-recombinase expression, likely through actions on cardiomyocyte energy metabolism.

  7. White-Etching Matter in Bearing Steel. Part II: Distinguishing Cause and Effect in Bearing Steel Failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solano-Alvarez, W.; Bhadeshia, H. K. D. H.

    2014-10-01

    The premature failure of large bearings of the type used in wind turbines, possibly through a mechanism called "white-structure flaking", has triggered many studies of microstructural damage associated with "white-etching areas" created during rolling contact fatigue, although whether they are symptoms or causes of failure is less clear. Therefore, some special experiments have been conducted to prove that white-etching areas are the consequence, and not the cause, of damage. By artificially introducing a fine dispersion of microcracks in the steel through heat treatment and then subjecting the sample to rolling contact fatigue, manifestations of hard white-etching matter have been created to a much greater extent than samples similarly tested without initial cracks. A wide variety of characterization tools has been used to corroborate that the white areas thus created have the same properties as reported observations on real bearings. Evidence suggests that the formation mechanism of the white-etching regions involves the rubbing and beating of the free surfaces of cracks, debonded inclusions, and voids under repeated rolling contact. It follows that the focus in avoiding early failure should be in enhancing the toughness of the bearing steel in order to avoid the initial microscopic feature event.

  8. “Knot Stent”: An Unusual Cause of Acute Renal Failure in Solitary Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Moufid, Kamal; Touiti, Driss; Mohamed, Lezrek

    2012-01-01

    The insertion of indwelling ureteric stents is a routine procedure in urology practice. Complications secondary to the insertion of these stents have also increased, such as stent encrustation, stent fragmentation, stone formation, and recurrent urinary tract infections. Knot formation within the renal pelvis or in the coiled portion of the ureteral stent is an extremely rare condition, with less than 15 cases reported in literature. The authors report a rare case of knotted stent, complicated by an obstructive acute renal failure and urosepsis, in a patient with a solitary functioning kidney. PMID:22919550

  9. SERCA2 Haploinsufficiency in a Mouse Model of Darier Disease Causes a Selective Predisposition to Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Vikram; Lorenz, John N.; Lasko, Valerie M.; Nieman, Michelle L.; Huang, Wei; Wang, Yigang; Wieczorek, David W.; Shull, Gary E.

    2015-01-01

    Null mutations in one copy of ATP2A2, the gene encoding sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase isoform 2 (SERCA2), cause Darier disease in humans, a skin condition involving keratinocytes. Cardiac function appears to be unimpaired in Darier disease patients, with no evidence that SERCA2 haploinsufficiency itself causes heart disease. However, SERCA2 deficiency is widely considered a contributing factor in heart failure. We therefore analyzed Atp2a2 heterozygous mice to determine whether SERCA2 haploinsufficiency can exacerbate specific heart disease conditions. Despite reduced SERCA2a levels in heart, Atp2a2 heterozygous mice resembled humans in exhibiting normal cardiac physiology. When subjected to hypothyroidism or crossed with a transgenic model of reduced myofibrillar Ca2+-sensitivity, SERCA2 deficiency caused no enhancement of the disease state. However, when combined with a transgenic model of increased myofibrillar Ca2+-sensitivity, SERCA2 haploinsufficiency caused rapid onset of hypertrophy, decompensation, and death. These effects were associated with reduced expression of the antiapoptotic Hax1, increased levels of the proapoptotic genes Chop and Casp12, and evidence of perturbations in energy metabolism. These data reveal myofibrillar Ca2+-sensitivity to be an important determinant of the cardiac effects of SERCA2 haploinsufficiency and raise the possibility that Darier disease patients are more susceptible to heart failure under certain conditions. PMID:26064889

  10. SERCA2 Haploinsufficiency in a Mouse Model of Darier Disease Causes a Selective Predisposition to Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Vikram; Lorenz, John N; Lasko, Valerie M; Nieman, Michelle L; Huang, Wei; Wang, Yigang; Wieczorek, David W; Shull, Gary E

    2015-01-01

    Null mutations in one copy of ATP2A2, the gene encoding sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase isoform 2 (SERCA2), cause Darier disease in humans, a skin condition involving keratinocytes. Cardiac function appears to be unimpaired in Darier disease patients, with no evidence that SERCA2 haploinsufficiency itself causes heart disease. However, SERCA2 deficiency is widely considered a contributing factor in heart failure. We therefore analyzed Atp2a2 heterozygous mice to determine whether SERCA2 haploinsufficiency can exacerbate specific heart disease conditions. Despite reduced SERCA2a levels in heart, Atp2a2 heterozygous mice resembled humans in exhibiting normal cardiac physiology. When subjected to hypothyroidism or crossed with a transgenic model of reduced myofibrillar Ca(2+)-sensitivity, SERCA2 deficiency caused no enhancement of the disease state. However, when combined with a transgenic model of increased myofibrillar Ca(2+)-sensitivity, SERCA2 haploinsufficiency caused rapid onset of hypertrophy, decompensation, and death. These effects were associated with reduced expression of the antiapoptotic Hax1, increased levels of the proapoptotic genes Chop and Casp12, and evidence of perturbations in energy metabolism. These data reveal myofibrillar Ca(2+)-sensitivity to be an important determinant of the cardiac effects of SERCA2 haploinsufficiency and raise the possibility that Darier disease patients are more susceptible to heart failure under certain conditions.

  11. Traumatic Tension Pneumothorax as a Cause of ICD Failure: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background. Tension pneumothorax can infrequently cause ventricular arrhythmias and increase the threshold of defibrillation. It should be suspected whenever there is difficulty in defibrillation for a ventricular arrhythmia. Purpose. To report a case of traumatic tension pneumothorax leading to ventricular tachycardia and causing defibrillator failure. Case. A 65-year-old African-American female was brought in to our emergency department complaining of dyspnea after being forced down by cops. She had history of mitral valve replacement for severe mitral regurgitation and biventricular implantable cardioverter defibrillator inserted for nonischemic cardiomyopathy. Shortly after arrival, she developed sustained ventricular tachycardia, causing repetitive unsuccessful ICD shocks. She was intubated and ventricular tachycardia resolved with amiodarone. Chest radiograph revealed large left sided tension pneumothorax which was promptly drained. The patient was treated for congestive heart failure; she was extubated on the third day of admission, and the chest tube was removed. Conclusion. Prompt recognition of tension pneumothorax is essential, by maintaining a high index of suspicion in patients with an increased defibrillation threshold causing ineffective defibrillations. PMID:25400953

  12. Traumatic Tension Pneumothorax as a Cause of ICD Failure: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Ul Haq, Ehtesham; Omar, Bassam

    2014-01-01

    Background. Tension pneumothorax can infrequently cause ventricular arrhythmias and increase the threshold of defibrillation. It should be suspected whenever there is difficulty in defibrillation for a ventricular arrhythmia. Purpose. To report a case of traumatic tension pneumothorax leading to ventricular tachycardia and causing defibrillator failure. Case. A 65-year-old African-American female was brought in to our emergency department complaining of dyspnea after being forced down by cops. She had history of mitral valve replacement for severe mitral regurgitation and biventricular implantable cardioverter defibrillator inserted for nonischemic cardiomyopathy. Shortly after arrival, she developed sustained ventricular tachycardia, causing repetitive unsuccessful ICD shocks. She was intubated and ventricular tachycardia resolved with amiodarone. Chest radiograph revealed large left sided tension pneumothorax which was promptly drained. The patient was treated for congestive heart failure; she was extubated on the third day of admission, and the chest tube was removed. Conclusion. Prompt recognition of tension pneumothorax is essential, by maintaining a high index of suspicion in patients with an increased defibrillation threshold causing ineffective defibrillations. PMID:25400953

  13. [Respiratory symptoms caused by the use of electrocautery in physicians being trained in surgery in a Mexican hospital].

    PubMed

    Navarro-Meza, María Cristina; González-Baltazar, Raquel; Aldrete-Rodríguez, María Guadalupe; Carmona-Navarro, David Enrique; López-Cardona, María Guadalupe

    2013-03-01

    In order to determine the frequency of respiratory symptoms among residents from surgical specialties dures exposed to the electrocautery smoke, a cross-sectional study was conducted in February 2012. 50 third-year residents from different surgical specialties coming from a third-level hospital belonging to the Institute of Security and Social Services of the State Workers in Jalisco, Mexico, were included. The subject selection was non-probabilistic. A questionnaire on respiratory symptoms developed in Cuba was used for data collection. The most common symptoms were sensation of a lump in the throat (58%), and a sore throat (22%). The specialty with the highest rate of exposure was neurosurgery (24.1 min/surgical procedure). All, the physicians from this specialty had respiratory symptoms. We conclude that the cauterization smoke may be considered a risk for developing respiratory symptoms among physicians with surgical specialties. PMID:23612810

  14. 20 CFR 404.454 - Good cause for failure to make required reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... timely report under the provisions described in §§ 404.450 and 404.452 will not result in a penalty... timely report was due to good cause. Before making any penalty determination as described in §§ 404.451 and 404.453, the individual shall be advised of the penalty and good cause provisions and afforded...

  15. Failure in generating hemopoietic stem cells is the primary cause of death from cytomegalovirus disease in the immunocompromised host

    SciTech Connect

    Mutter, W.; Reddehase, M.J.; Busch, F.W.; Buehring, H.J.K.; Koszinowski, U.H.

    1988-05-01

    We have shown in a murine model system for cytomegalovirus (CMV) disease in the immunocompromised host that CMV infection interferes with the earliest detectable step in hemopoiesis, the generation of the stem cell CFU-S-I, and thereby prevents the autoreconstitution of bone marrow after sublethal irradiation. The antihemopoietic effect could not be ascribed to a direct infection of stem cells. The failure in hemopoiesis was prevented by adoptive transfer of antiviral CD8+ T lymphocytes and could be overcome by syngeneic bone marrow transplantation. CD8+ T lymphocytes and bone marrow cells both mediated survival, although only CD8+ T lymphocytes were able to limit virus multiplication in host tissues. We concluded that not the cytopathic effect of virus replication in host tissues, but the failure in hemopoiesis, is the primary cause of death in murine CMV disease.

  16. A review of poisonous plants that cause reproductive failure and malformations in the ruminants of Brazil.

    PubMed

    Riet-Correa, Franklin; Medeiros, Rosane M T; Schild, Ana Lucia

    2012-04-01

    The objective of this review is to provide a report on toxic plants causing reproductive problems in ruminants in Brazil. Aspidosperma pyrifolium causes abortion or stillbirth in goats, as well as most likely in sheep and cattle, in the semiarid regions of Northeastern Brazil. Intoxications by Ateleia glazioveana, Tetrapterys acutifolia and T. multiglandulosa result in abortion and neonatal mortality in cattle and sheep, and the same signs have been experimentally observed in goats. These three plants can also cause cardiac fibrosis and a nervous disease with spongiosis of the central nervous system. Other plants known to cause abortion include Enterolobium contortisiliquum, E. gummiferum, Stryphnodendron coriaceum, S. obovatum and S. fissuratum. These plants can also cause digestive signs and photosensitization. Abortions have been reported in animals intoxicated by nitrates and nitrites as well. Infertility, abortions and the birth of weak offspring have been reported in animals intoxicated by plants containing swainsonine, including Ipomoea spp., Turbina cordata and Sida carpinifolia. Trifolium subterraneum causes estrogenism in cattle. Mimosa tenuiflora and, most likely, M. ophthalmocentra cause malformations and embryonic mortality in goats, sheep and cattle in the semiarid regions of Northeastern Brazil.

  17. A Rare Case of Fatal Endocarditis and Sepsis Caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a Patient with Chronic Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Vijan, Vikrant; Vupputuri, Anjith; Nandakumar, Sandya; Mathew, Navin

    2016-01-01

    Nosocomial catheter-related and Arteriovenous fistula (AV)-related infections are significant concern in patients undergoing haemodialysis. These infections are associated with multiple complications as well as mortality and demands immediate and appropriate management. While coagulase-negative staphylococci, S.aureus, and Escherichia coli are the most common causes of catheter-related infections in haemodialysis patients, such infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa are relatively rare. Here, we present an unusual case of 36-year-old male patient with chronic renal failure, who developed endocarditis and sepsis from Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection of the left hand arteriovenous fistula. The bacteraemia in the present case caused multiple complications including dry gangrene of bilateral lower limbs, stroke, endophthalmitis, left brachial artery thrombosis and vegetations on the interventricular septum and aortic wall. Despite antibiotic treatment, the patient suffered a cardiac arrest and could not be revived. PMID:27630891

  18. A Rare Case of Fatal Endocarditis and Sepsis Caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a Patient with Chronic Renal Failure.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Manav; Vijan, Vikrant; Vupputuri, Anjith; Nandakumar, Sandya; Mathew, Navin

    2016-07-01

    Nosocomial catheter-related and Arteriovenous fistula (AV)-related infections are significant concern in patients undergoing haemodialysis. These infections are associated with multiple complications as well as mortality and demands immediate and appropriate management. While coagulase-negative staphylococci, S.aureus, and Escherichia coli are the most common causes of catheter-related infections in haemodialysis patients, such infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa are relatively rare. Here, we present an unusual case of 36-year-old male patient with chronic renal failure, who developed endocarditis and sepsis from Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection of the left hand arteriovenous fistula. The bacteraemia in the present case caused multiple complications including dry gangrene of bilateral lower limbs, stroke, endophthalmitis, left brachial artery thrombosis and vegetations on the interventricular septum and aortic wall. Despite antibiotic treatment, the patient suffered a cardiac arrest and could not be revived. PMID:27630891

  19. Regulated cell death and inflammation: an auto-amplification loop causes organ failure.

    PubMed

    Linkermann, Andreas; Stockwell, Brent R; Krautwald, Stefan; Anders, Hans-Joachim

    2014-11-01

    Regulated cell death (RCD) is either immunologically silent or immunogenic. RCD in parenchymal cells may lead to the release of damage- associated molecular patterns that drive both tissue inflammation and the activation of further pathways of RCD. Following an initial event of regulated necrosis, RCD and inflammation can induce each other and drive a local auto-amplification loop that leads to exaggerated cell death and inflammation. In this Opinion article, we propose that such crosstalk between pro-inflammatory and RCD pathways has pathophysiological relevance in solid organ failure, transplantation and cancer. In our opinion, clinicians should not only prescribe immunosuppressive treatments to disrupt this circuit, but also implement the neglected therapeutic option of adding compounds that interfere with RCD. PMID:25324125

  20. Loss of motoneuron-specific microRNA-218 causes systemic neuromuscular failure.

    PubMed

    Amin, Neal D; Bai, Ge; Klug, Jason R; Bonanomi, Dario; Pankratz, Matthew T; Gifford, Wesley D; Hinckley, Christopher A; Sternfeld, Matthew J; Driscoll, Shawn P; Dominguez, Bertha; Lee, Kuo-Fen; Jin, Xin; Pfaff, Samuel L

    2015-12-18

    Dysfunction of microRNA (miRNA) metabolism is thought to underlie diseases affecting motoneurons. One miRNA, miR-218, is abundantly and selectively expressed by developing and mature motoneurons. Here we show that mutant mice lacking miR-218 die neonatally and exhibit neuromuscular junction defects, motoneuron hyperexcitability, and progressive motoneuron cell loss, all of which are hallmarks of motoneuron diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and spinal muscular atrophy. Gene profiling reveals that miR-218 modestly represses a cohort of hundreds of genes that are neuronally enriched but are not specific to a single neuron subpopulation. Thus, the set of messenger RNAs targeted by miR-218, designated TARGET(218), defines a neuronal gene network that is selectively tuned down in motoneurons to prevent neuromuscular failure and neurodegeneration.

  1. Venous Congestion, Endothelial and Neurohormonal Activation in Acute Decompensated Heart Failure: Cause or Effect?

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, Paolo C.; Doran, Amanda C.; Onat, Duygu; Wong, Ka Yuk; Ahmad, Myra; Sabbah, Hani N.; Demmer, Ryan T.

    2015-01-01

    Venous congestion and endothelial and neurohormonal activation are known to occur in acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF), yet the temporal role of these processes in the pathophysiology of decompensation is not fully understood. Conventional wisdom presumes congestion to be a consequence of worsening cardiovascular function; however, the biomechanically driven effects of venous congestion are biologically plausible contributors to ADHF that remain largely unexplored in vivo. Recent experimental evidence from human models suggests that fluid accumulation and venous congestion are not simply consequences of poor cardiovascular function, but rather are fundamental pro-oxidant, pro-inflammatory, and hemodynamic stimuli that contribute to acute decompensation. The latest advances in the monitoring of volume status using implantable devices allow for the detection of venous congestion before symptoms arise. This may ultimately lead to improved treatment strategies including not only diuretics, but also specific, adjuvant interventions to counteract endothelial and neurohormonal activation during early preclinical decompensation. PMID:25740404

  2. Alteration of Bile Canalicular Enzymes in Cholestasis. A POSSIBLE CAUSE OF BILE SECRETORY FAILURE

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Francis R.; Arias, Irwin M.

    1973-01-01

    Bile secretory failure (cholestasis) may result from several possible mechanisms involved in bile secretion. We have examined the possibility that abnormalities in enzyme content, composition, and turnover of liver plasma membrane constituents are altered in cholestasis. Severe and mild cholestasis were produced by 5 days of bile duct ligation and ethinyl estradiol administration, respectively. Bile duct ligation but not ethinyl estradiol treatments was associated with elevations of the serum bilirubin level and 5′-nucleotidase activity. However, basal bile flow and bilirubin transport maximum (Tm) were significantly reduced after ethinyl estradiol treatment. Liver plasma membrane fractions rich in canalicular membranes were prepared from groups of rats in each of three categories; normal, after bile duct ligation, or ethinyl estradiol administration, and their respective controls. Electron microscopy and enzyme marker studies demonstrated plasma membrane fractions free of significant contamination. Plasma membrane fractions prepared from mild as well as severe cholestasis had increased alkaline phosphatase activity, and reduced 5′-nucleotidase and Mg2+-ATPase activities. Co2+-CMPase activity was unchanged. Kinetic analysis of 5′-nucleotidase and Mg2+-ATPase activities in plasma membrane fractions demonstrated reduced Vmaz (but unaltered Km). Reducted Vmaz was unrelated to addition in vitro of di-or trihydroxy bile salts or ethinyl estradiol and, therefore, suggests that reduced activities in cholestasis are due to decreased enzyme content. Cholestasis was not associated with changes in the synthesis or degradation rate of pulse-labeled plasma membrane proteins or alterations in the major protein bands separated on sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Plasma membrane cholesterol, phospholipid, and neutral sugar content was unaltered, but sialic acid content was significantly increased in both forms of cholestasis. Alterations in

  3. Oxalate Nephropathy Complicating Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass: An Underrecognized Cause of Irreversible Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Nasr, Samih H.; D’Agati, Vivette D.; Said, Samar M.; Stokes, Michael B.; Largoza, Maria V.; Radhakrishnan, Jai; Markowitz, Glen S.

    2008-01-01

    Background and objectives: The most common bariatric surgery is Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB), which has been associated with hyperoxaluria and nephrolithiasis. We report a novel association of RYGB with renal insufficiency as a result of oxalate nephropathy. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: Eleven cases of oxalate nephropathy after RYGB were identified from the Renal Pathology Laboratory of Columbia University. The clinical features, pathologic findings, and outcomes are described. Results: Patients were predominantly white (72.7%) with a mean age of 61.3 yr. Indications for RYGB included morbid obesity (eight patients) and reconstruction after total gastrectomy for gastric cancer (three patients). All 11 patients had a history of hypertension, and 9 were diabetic. Patients presented with acute renal failure, often superimposed on mild chronic renal insufficiency (n = 7), at a median of 12 mo after RYGB. The mean creatinine at baseline, at discovery of acute renal failure, and at biopsy was 1.5, 5.0, and 6.5 mg/dl, respectively. Renal biopsies revealed diffuse tubular degenerative changes, abundant tubular calcium oxalate deposits, and varying degrees of tubulointerstitial scarring. In addition, seven biopsies had underlying diabetic glomerulosclerosis and two had glomerulosclerosis attributable to obesity and hypertension. Eight of 11 patients rapidly progressed to ESRD and required hemodialysis at a mean of 3.2 wk after renal biopsy. The remaining three patients were left with significant chronic kidney disease. Conclusions: Oxalate nephropathy is an underrecognized complication of RYGB and typically results in rapid progression to ESRD. Patients with pre-existing renal disease may be at higher risk for this complication. PMID:18701613

  4. Refractory Hypertension: Evidence of Heightened Sympathetic Activity as a Cause of Antihypertensive Treatment Failure.

    PubMed

    Dudenbostel, Tanja; Acelajado, Maria C; Pisoni, Roberto; Li, Peng; Oparil, Suzanne; Calhoun, David A

    2015-07-01

    Refractory hypertension is an extreme phenotype of treatment failure defined as uncontrolled blood pressure in spite of ≥5 classes of antihypertensive agents, including chlorthalidone and a mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist. A prospective evaluation of possible mechanisms of refractory hypertension has not been done. The goal of this study was to test for evidence of heightened sympathetic tone as indicated by 24-hour urinary normetanephrine levels, clinic and ambulatory heart rate (HR), HR variability, arterial stiffness as indexed by pulse wave velocity, and systemic vascular resistance compared with patients with controlled resistant hypertension. Forty-four consecutive patients, 15 with refractory and 29 with controlled resistant hypertension, were evaluated prospectively. Refractory hypertensive patients were younger (48±13.3 versus 56.5±14.1 years; P=0.038) and more likely women (80.0 versus 51.9%; P=0.047) compared with patients with controlled resistant hypertension. They also had higher urinary normetanephrine levels (464.4±250.2 versus 309.8±147.6 µg per 24 hours; P=0.03), higher clinic HR (77.8±7.7 versus 68.8±7.6 bpm; P=0.001) and 24-hour ambulatory HR (77.8±7.7 versus 68.8±7.6; P=0.0018), higher pulse wave velocity (11.8±2.2 versus 9.4±1.5 m/s; P=0.009), reduced HR variability (4.48 versus 6.11; P=0.03), and higher systemic vascular resistance (3795±1753 versus 2382±349 dyne·s·cm(5)·m(2); P=0.008). These findings are consistent with heightened sympathetic tone being a major contributor to antihypertensive treatment failure and highlight the need for effective sympatholytic therapies in patients with refractory hypertension.

  5. Road failure caused by landslide in north Ethiopia: A case study from Dedebit - Adi-Remets road segment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisseha, Shimeles; Mewa, Getnet

    2016-06-01

    Landslide represents one of the main constraints for the development of road infrastructures in many parts of Ethiopia. While rugged topography, intra-sedimentary clay horizons, thick talus deposits at the foot of hills and wide spread tectonic fissures and faults account for the prominent inducing factors, heavy monsoon rainfall is the most common triggering factor for the majority of road failures caused by landslides. We present the results of geoelectrical investigation of a landslide that caused a severe damage to the Dedebit-Adi-Remets segment of the recently built highway that transects the high relief and mountainous region of Tigray, northern Ethiopia. Vertical Electrical Sounding (VES) measurements were taken at twelve points, systematically distributed to cover the affected area. The resulting geo-electric sections revealed that the shallow subsurface is composed of four distinct geo-electric layers. The corresponding major lithological successions, from top to bottom, are: unconsolidated conglomeratic layer, moist silty clay, moderately weathered and fractured basaltic rock and a possibly saturated portion of the basalt. Major discontinuities, indications of structural weak zones, have also been inferred based on abrupt vertical shift in geo-electrical layer boundaries between neighboring soundings. Based on the main findings, the road failure in the study area appears to be caused by a downslope movement of the subgrade composed of top unconsolidated sediment soaked with water from heavy rain. The location of the probable slip plane could be the inclined interface between the conductive clayey soil and the underlying resistive weathered basalt.

  6. The economic effect of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation to support adults with severe respiratory failure in Brazil: a hypothetical analysis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Marcelo; Mendes, Pedro Vitale; Zampieri, Fernando Godinho; Azevedo, Luciano Cesar Pontes; Costa, Eduardo Leite Vieira; Antoniali, Fernando; Ribeiro, Gustavo Calado de Aguiar; Caneo, Luiz Fernando; da Cruz Neto, Luiz Monteiro; Carvalho, Carlos Roberto Ribeiro; Trindade, Evelinda Marramon

    2014-01-01

    Objective To analyze the cost-utility of using extracorporeal oxygenation for patients with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome in Brazil. Methods A decision tree was constructed using databases from previously published studies. Costs were taken from the average price paid by the Brazilian Unified Health System (Sistema Único de Saúde; SUS) over three months in 2011. Using the data of 10,000,000 simulated patients with predetermined outcomes and costs, an analysis was performed of the ratio between cost increase and years of life gained, adjusted for quality (cost-utility), with survival rates of 40 and 60% for patients using extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. Results The decision tree resulted in 16 outcomes with different life support techniques. With survival rates of 40 and 60%, respectively, the increased costs were R$=-301.00/-14.00, with a cost of R$=-30,913.00/-1,752.00 paid per six-month quality-adjusted life-year gained and R$=-2,386.00/-90.00 per quality-adjusted life-year gained until the end of life, when all patients with severe ARDS were analyzed. Analyzing only patients with severe hypoxemia (i.e., a ratio of partial oxygen pressure in the blood to the fraction of inspired oxygen <100mmHg), the increased cost was R$=-5,714.00/272.00, with a cost per six-month quality-adjusted life-year gained of R$=-9,521.00/293.00 and a cost of R$=-280.00/7.00 per quality-adjusted life-year gained. Conclusion The cost-utility ratio associated with the use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in Brazil is potentially acceptable according to this hypothetical study. PMID:25295819

  7. Neonatal respiratory distress syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Hyaline membrane disease (HMD); Infant respiratory distress syndrome; Respiratory distress syndrome in infants; RDS - infants ... Neonatal RDS occurs in infants whose lungs have not yet fully ... disease is mainly caused by a lack of a slippery substance in ...

  8. Non catheter-related bacteremia caused by Pseudomonas oryzihabitans in an adolescent with chronic renal failure undergoing peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Karampatakis, T; Sevastidou, A; Argyropoulou, E; Printza, N; Tsivitanidou, M; Siaka, E

    2012-01-01

    A Pseudomonas oryzihabitans clinical isolate was recovered from a blood sample. The patient, a 14-year-old-adolescent underwent parathyroidectomy due to secondary hyperparathyroidism. The patient had been going peritoneal dialysis because of chronic renal failure. According to the susceptibility testing conducted with phenotypic methods the microorganism was sensitive to the vast majority of the antibiotics. The isolation of this rare species of Pseudomonas combined with the patient's medical history stimulated as to focus on the causes of the bacteremia, which was non catheter-related.

  9. Non catheter-related bacteremia caused by Pseudomonas oryzihabitans in an adolescent with chronic renal failure undergoing peritoneal dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Karampatakis, T; Sevastidou, A; Argyropoulou, E; Printza, N; Tsivitanidou, M; Siaka, E

    2012-01-01

    A Pseudomonas oryzihabitans clinical isolate was recovered from a blood sample. The patient, a 14-year-old-adolescent underwent parathyroidectomy due to secondary hyperparathyroidism. The patient had been going peritoneal dialysis because of chronic renal failure. According to the susceptibility testing conducted with phenotypic methods the microorganism was sensitive to the vast majority of the antibiotics. The isolation of this rare species of Pseudomonas combined with the patient's medical history stimulated as to focus on the causes of the bacteremia, which was non catheter-related. PMID:23930068

  10. TOR1AIP1 as a cause of cardiac failure and recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Ghaoui, Roula; Benavides, Tatiana; Lek, Monkol; Waddell, Leigh B; Kaur, Simranpreet; North, Kathryn N; MacArthur, Daniel G; Clarke, Nigel F; Cooper, Sandra T

    2016-08-01

    TorsinA-interacting protein 1 (TOR1AIP1) gene is a novel gene that has recently been described to cause limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) with mild dilated cardiomyopathy. We report a family with mutations in TOR1AIP1 where the striking clinical feature is severe cardiac failure requiring cardiac transplant in two siblings, in addition to musculoskeletal weakness and muscular dystrophy. We demonstrate an absence of TOR1AIP1 protein expression in cardiac and skeletal muscles of affected siblings. We expand the phenotype of this gene to demonstrate the cardiac involvement and the importance of cardiac surveillance in patients with mutations in TOR1AIP1.

  11. Non catheter-related bacteremia caused by Pseudomonas oryzihabitans in an adolescent with chronic renal failure undergoing peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Karampatakis, T; Sevastidou, A; Argyropoulou, E; Printza, N; Tsivitanidou, M; Siaka, E

    2012-01-01

    A Pseudomonas oryzihabitans clinical isolate was recovered from a blood sample. The patient, a 14-year-old-adolescent underwent parathyroidectomy due to secondary hyperparathyroidism. The patient had been going peritoneal dialysis because of chronic renal failure. According to the susceptibility testing conducted with phenotypic methods the microorganism was sensitive to the vast majority of the antibiotics. The isolation of this rare species of Pseudomonas combined with the patient's medical history stimulated as to focus on the causes of the bacteremia, which was non catheter-related. PMID:23930068

  12. Autoimmune pernicious anaemia as a cause of collapse, heart failure and marked panyctopaenia in a young patient.

    PubMed

    Carey, Justin; Hack, Ebru

    2012-05-08

    A 35-year-old woman with a history of vitiligo, hypothyroidism and amenorrhoea presented with collapse and clinical features of cardiac failure. Laboratory investigations revealed pancytopaenia, the cause of which was found to be vitamin B12 deficiency due to pernicious anaemia. Treatment with intramuscular hydroxycobalamin was commenced and the patient improved steadily with concomitant improvement in her haematological indices. Clinical features of pernicious anaemia which can include marked pancytopaenia, diagnostic approach, associated conditions and approach to treatment are discussed. The importance of surveillance for gastrointestinal malignancy is emphasised.

  13. A Multiple Indicators Multiple Cause (MIMIC) model of respiratory health and household factors in Chinese children: the seven Northeastern cities (SNEC) study.

    PubMed

    Dong, Guang-Hui; Qian, Zhengmin; Fu, Qiang; Wang, Jing; Trevathan, Edwin; Ma, Wenjun; Liu, Miao-Miao; Wang, Da; Ren, Wan-Hui; Ong, Kee-Hean; Ferguson, Tekeda Freeman; Riley, Erin; Simckes, Maayan

    2014-01-01

    In China, with the rapid economic development and improvement of living standards over the past few decades, the household living environment has shifted dramatically. The aim of the present study is to assess the impact of home environment factors on respiratory symptoms and asthma in Chinese children. Investigators analyzed data collected in the 25 districts from the seven Northeastern cities to examine health effects on respiratory symptoms and asthma in 31,049 children aged 2-14 years. Factor analysis was used to reduce 33 children's lifestyle and household variables to six new 'factor' variables. The multiple indicators multiple causes approach was used to examine the relationship between indoor air pollution and respiratory health status, controlling for covariates. Factor analyses generated six factor variables of potential household risk factors from an original list of 33 variables. The respiratory symptoms and asthma were significantly associated with the recent home renovation factor (estimate = 0.076, p < 0.001), pet ownership factor (estimate = 0.095, p < 0.001), environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure factor (estimate = 0.181, p < 0.001) and PVC-flooring factor (estimate = 0.031, p = 0.007). Home ventilation factor was not related to any respiratory condition (estimate = 0.028, p = 0.074). Independent respiratory health effects existed for multiple household environmental factors recent home renovation, pet ownership, ETS, and PVC-flooring. PMID:23440490

  14. Kisspeptin Receptor Haplo-insufficiency Causes Premature Ovarian Failure Despite Preserved Gonadotropin Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Gaytan, Francisco; Garcia-Galiano, David; Dorfman, Mauricio D.; Manfredi-Lozano, Maria; Castellano, Juan M.; Dissen, Gregory A.

    2014-01-01

    Premature ovarian failure (POF) affects 1% of women in reproductive age, but its etiology remains uncertain. Whereas kisspeptins, the products of Kiss1 that act via Kiss1r (aka, Gpr54), are known to operate at the hypothalamus to control GnRH/gonadotropin secretion, additional actions at other reproductive organs, including the ovary, have been proposed. Yet, their physiological relevance is still unclear. We present here a series of studies in Kiss1r haplo-insufficient and null mice suggesting a direct role of kisspeptin signaling in the ovary, the defect of which precipitates a state of primary POF. Kiss1r hypomorph mice displayed a premature decline in ovulatory rate, followed by progressive loss of antral follicles, oocyte loss, and a reduction in all categories of preantral follicles. These alterations were accompanied by reduced fertility. Because of this precocious ovarian ageing, mice more than 48 weeks of age showed atrophic ovaries, lacking growing follicles and corpora lutea. This phenomenon was associated with a drop in ovarian Kiss1r mRNA expression, but took place in the absence of a decrease in circulating gonadotropins. In fact, FSH levels increased in aged hypomorph animals, reflecting loss of follicular function. In turn, Kiss1r-null mice, which do not spontaneously ovulate and have arrested follicular development, failed to show normal ovulatory responses to standard gonadotropin priming and required GnRH prestimulation during 1 week in order to display gonadotropin-induced ovulation. Yet, the magnitude of such ovulatory responses was approximately half of that seen in control immature wild-type animals. Altogether, our data are the first to demonstrate that Kiss1r haplo-insufficiency induces a state of POF, which is not attributable to defective gonadotropin secretion. We also show that the failure of follicular development and ovulation linked to the absence of Kiss1r cannot be fully rescued by (even extended) gonadotropin replacement. These

  15. Destructive Interactions Between Mitigation Strategies and the Causes of Unexpected Failures in Natural Hazard Mitigation Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, S. J.; Fearnley, C. J.

    2013-12-01

    Large investments in the mitigation of natural hazards, using a variety of technology-based mitigation strategies, have proven to be surprisingly ineffective in some recent natural disasters. These failures reveal a need for a systematic classification of mitigation strategies; an understanding of the scientific uncertainties that affect the effectiveness of such strategies; and an understanding of how the different types of strategy within an overall mitigation system interact destructively to reduce the effectiveness of the overall mitigation system. We classify mitigation strategies into permanent, responsive and anticipatory. Permanent mitigation strategies such as flood and tsunami defenses or land use restrictions, are both costly and 'brittle': when they malfunction they can increase mortality. Such strategies critically depend on the accuracy of the estimates of expected hazard intensity in the hazard assessments that underpin their design. Responsive mitigation strategies such as tsunami and lahar warning systems rely on capacities to detect and quantify the hazard source events and to transmit warnings fast enough to enable at risk populations to decide and act effectively. Self-warning and voluntary evacuation is also usually a responsive mitigation strategy. Uncertainty in the nature and magnitude of the detected hazard source event is often the key scientific obstacle to responsive mitigation; public understanding of both the hazard and the warnings, to enable decision making, can also be a critical obstacle. Anticipatory mitigation strategies use interpretation of precursors to hazard source events and are used widely in mitigation of volcanic hazards. Their critical limitations are due to uncertainties in time, space and magnitude relationships between precursors and hazard events. Examples of destructive interaction between different mitigation strategies are provided by the Tohoku 2011 earthquake and tsunami; recent earthquakes that have impacted

  16. The Failure of Our Public Schools: The Causes and a Solution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Policy Analysis, Dallas, TX.

    While the report of the National Commission on Excellence in Education identified reasons for decline in students' academic achievement, it did not offer any explanation of how the "tide of mediocrity" developed. An investigation of causes of the situation the Commission described produced four principal findings: (1) Since World War II, an…

  17. Stingray barb injury: a cause of late coronary occlusion and stent failure.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Craig R; Saro, Enrique; Patel, Parag; Swidryk, John; Bacani, Victor O; Russo, Mark J; Stone, Jay H

    2013-11-01

    Stingray injuries to the heart are rare, and survivors of this injury are even rarer. To date, there are only three reported survivors of this mode of penetrating cardiac injury, all inflicted by the living animal itself. The following is a report of a stingray injury, inflicted by a human, causing coronary complications 17 years after the injury was sustained. PMID:24182483

  18. The NO/ONOO-Cycle as the Central Cause of Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Pall, Martin L.

    2013-01-01

    The NO/ONOO-cycle is a primarily local, biochemical vicious cycle mechanism, centered on elevated peroxynitrite and oxidative stress, but also involving 10 additional elements: NF-κB, inflammatory cytokines, iNOS, nitric oxide (NO), superoxide, mitochondrial dysfunction (lowered energy charge, ATP), NMDA activity, intracellular Ca2+, TRP receptors and tetrahydrobiopterin depletion. All 12 of these elements have causal roles in heart failure (HF) and each is linked through a total of 87 studies to specific correlates of HF. Two apparent causal factors of HF, RhoA and endothelin-1, each act as tissue-limited cycle elements. Nineteen stressors that initiate cases of HF, each act to raise multiple cycle elements, potentially initiating the cycle in this way. Different types of HF, left vs. right ventricular HF, with or without arrhythmia, etc., may differ from one another in the regions of the myocardium most impacted by the cycle. None of the elements of the cycle or the mechanisms linking them are original, but they collectively produce the robust nature of the NO/ONOO-cycle which creates a major challenge for treatment of HF or other proposed NO/ONOO-cycle diseases. Elevated peroxynitrite/NO ratio and consequent oxidative stress are essential to both HF and the NO/ONOO-cycle. PMID:24232452

  19. [Anesthetic circle system failure caused by a plastic film--a case report].

    PubMed

    Hara, Naoki; Tanaka, Tomohiro; Minami, Toshiaki

    2006-02-01

    A 44-year-old woman, ASA I, with breast cancer was scheduled for mastectomy. The anesthetic induction was performed by inhalation of 5% sevoflurane and 66% nitrous oxide in oxygen. After the loss of eyelash reflex assisted ventilation was initiated. At this point, the capnograph indicated inspired carbon dioxide tension of 18mmHg. Anesthetic machine check was soon carried out again. A visual check of non-return valves detected a plastic film, 18 x 21mm large, caught in the expiratory valve. This plastic film impaired complete occlusion of the orifice for the expiratory gas flow. As a result, the patient was rebreathing carbon dioxide. After removing it, the wave form of the capnograph was normalized and end-tidal carbon dioxide tension decreased immediately from 45mmHg to 33mmHg. As we did not detect any foreign matters at the non-return valves on anesthetic machine check before use, the plastic film might have already existed in the disposable corrugated tube before use. The capnograph is a useful device for detecting anesthetic circle system failure in such a case. It is important that the patients' airway is separated from the anesthetic circle system through the use of a filter to prevent foreign matter from being inhaled. PMID:16491902

  20. [Pain perception, mechanisms of action of local anesthetics and possible causes of failure].

    PubMed

    Vandermeulen, E

    2000-01-01

    First, the fundamentals of impulse transmission and pain perception are revised. The role of the primary afferent nociceptors is explained. Dental pain is described as a form of acute pain and the mechanism of nociception is fundamental. Peripheral and central sensitization can evolve. The second part covers the pharmacological aspects. Local anesthetics reduce impulse transmission by interfering with the mechanism of normal depolarisation. Binding to specific receptors located at the nerve membrane, more specifically on the sodium channel, results in decreased or eliminated permeability to sodium ions and leads to interruption of nerve conduction. The different types of local anesthetics used in dentistry are discussed in more detail with respect to their physico-chemical characteristics and analgetic properties. The importance of factors such as lipophilicity, degree of protein binding and dissociation constant pKa are explained together with the clinical implications of pH and possible toxic effects. Failure of local anesthesia can be the result of problems with the administration of the product or can have a pharmacological basis. Injection of the anesthetic should take place in amounts large enough, with suitable volume and as close as possible to the nerve. When infection and inflammation are present, the intravascular resorption of the anesthetic will accelerate and the lowered pH influences diffusion negatively. Repetitive administration can induce the phenomenon of tachyfylaxis (decreased anesthetic effect).