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  1. What Causes Respiratory Failure?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions Causing Respiratory Failure Figure A shows the location of the lungs, airways, diaphragm, rib cage, pulmonary arteries, brain, and spinal cord ... STATEMENT FOIA NO FEAR ACT OIG CONTACT US ...

  2. An Unusual Suspect Causing Hypoxemic Respiratory Failure

    PubMed Central

    Aqeel, Masooma; Batdorf, Bjorn; Olteanu, Horatiu; Patel, Jayshil J.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Antisynthetase syndrome (ASS) is characterized by the presence of anti-Jo-1 antibodies in conjunction with clinical findings of fever, polymyositis-dermatomyositis, and interstitial lung disease (ILD). Inflammatory myopathies carry a high risk of malignancy, but this association is less well outlined in ASS. We present the case of a patient with ASS who developed non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure. Case Presentation: A 44-year-old female with ASS presented with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure. She was empirically treated with broad-spectrum antibiotics for a health care–associated pneumonia; however, she failed to improve. Chest computed tomography revealed extensive bilateral ground glass opacities as well as extensive mediastinal and axillary lymphadenopathy. Infectious workup was negative. A surgical lung biopsy revealed peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL). The patient was started on chemotherapy with complete resolution of hypoxemic respiratory failure. Conclusions: Malignancy is very rare in the setting of ASS; and our case illustrates the unique presentation of PTCL in ASS. In addition, lung involvement in PTCL is variable (incidence ranging from 8% to 20%); and in this case, bilateral multifocal consolidation was biopsied and proven to be PTCL involving the lungs. This case highlights the rare noninfectious conditions that can present as acute hypoxemic respiratory failure in the setting of ASS. PMID:28210638

  3. An Unusual Suspect Causing Hypoxemic Respiratory Failure.

    PubMed

    Aqeel, Masooma; Batdorf, Bjorn; Olteanu, Horatiu; Patel, Jayshil J

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Antisynthetase syndrome (ASS) is characterized by the presence of anti-Jo-1 antibodies in conjunction with clinical findings of fever, polymyositis-dermatomyositis, and interstitial lung disease (ILD). Inflammatory myopathies carry a high risk of malignancy, but this association is less well outlined in ASS. We present the case of a patient with ASS who developed non-Hodgkin's lymphoma with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure. Case Presentation: A 44-year-old female with ASS presented with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure. She was empirically treated with broad-spectrum antibiotics for a health care-associated pneumonia; however, she failed to improve. Chest computed tomography revealed extensive bilateral ground glass opacities as well as extensive mediastinal and axillary lymphadenopathy. Infectious workup was negative. A surgical lung biopsy revealed peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL). The patient was started on chemotherapy with complete resolution of hypoxemic respiratory failure. Conclusions: Malignancy is very rare in the setting of ASS; and our case illustrates the unique presentation of PTCL in ASS. In addition, lung involvement in PTCL is variable (incidence ranging from 8% to 20%); and in this case, bilateral multifocal consolidation was biopsied and proven to be PTCL involving the lungs. This case highlights the rare noninfectious conditions that can present as acute hypoxemic respiratory failure in the setting of ASS.

  4. Respiratory Failure

    MedlinePlus

    Respiratory failure happens when not enough oxygen passes from your lungs into your blood. Your body's organs, ... brain, need oxygen-rich blood to work well. Respiratory failure also can happen if your lungs can' ...

  5. Pancreaticopleural Fistula Causing Massive Right Hydrothorax and Respiratory Failure

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Esther Ern-Hwei

    2016-01-01

    Hydrothorax secondary to a pancreaticopleural fistula (PPF) is a rare complication of acute pancreatitis. In patients with a history of pancreatitis, diagnosis is made by detection of amylase in the pleural exudate. Imaging, particularly magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography, aids in the detection of pancreatic ductal disruption. Management includes thoracocentesis and pancreatic duct drainage or pancreatic resection procedures. We present a case of massive right hydrothorax secondary to a PPF due to recurrent acute pancreatitis. Due to respiratory failure, urgent thoracocentesis was done. Distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy and cholecystectomy was performed. The patient remains well at one-year follow-up. PMID:27747128

  6. Early complications. Respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Zwischenberger, J B; Alpard, S K; Bidani, A

    1999-08-01

    Pulmonary complications following thoracic surgery are common and associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Respiratory failure after pneumonectomy occurs in approximately 5% to 15% of cases and significantly increases patient mortality. Strategies for ventilator support are based on the nature of the underlying complication and the pathophysiology of respiratory failure. This article describes the cause and pathophysiology of respiratory failure and pulmonary embolus postpneumonectomy. Diagnosis, management, and innovative therapies are also reviewed.

  7. Living with Respiratory Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... smoking. Emotional Issues and Support Living with respiratory failure may cause fear, anxiety, depression, and stress. Talk about how you feel with your health care team. Talking to a professional counselor also can ... to living with respiratory failure. You can see how other people who have ...

  8. An incorrect diagnosis and an unexpected cause of respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Jandrin, Melanie; Breunig, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Thoracic aortic aneurysms often are asymptomatic or cause nonspecific symptoms such as cough, dyspnea, wheezing, or dysphagia. Acute onset of severe chest, neck, back, or abdominal pain may indicate an aortic rupture or dissection. Early identification and treatment, including optimized medical management and evaluation for surgical intervention, are necessary to improve patient outcomes.

  9. Determinants of Noninvasive Ventilation Outcomes during an Episode of Acute Hypercapnic Respiratory Failure in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: The Effects of Comorbidities and Causes of Respiratory Failure

    PubMed Central

    Pacilli, Angela Maria Grazia; Valentini, Ilaria; Carbonara, Paolo; Marchetti, Antonio; Nava, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To investigate the effect of the cause of acute respiratory failure and the role of comorbidities both acute and chronic on the outcome of COPD patients admitted to Respiratory Intensive Care Unit (RICU) with acute respiratory failure and treated with NIV. Design. Observational prospective study. Patients and Methods. 176 COPD patients consecutively admitted to our RICU over a period of 3 years and treated with NIV were evaluated. In all patients demographic, clinical, and functional parameters were recorded including the cause of acute respiratory failure, SAPS II score, Charlson comorbidity index, and further comorbidities not listed in the Charlson index. NIV success was defined as clinical improvement leading to discharge to regular ward, while exitus or need for endotracheal intubation was considered failure. Results. NIV outcome was successful in 134 patients while 42 underwent failure. Univariate analysis showed significantly higher SAP II score, Charlson index, prevalence of pneumonia, and lower serum albumin level in the failure group. Multivariate analysis confirmed a significant predictive value for pneumonia and albumin. Conclusions. The most important determinants of NIV outcome in COPD patients are the presence of pneumonia and the level of serum albumin as an indicator of the patient nutritional status. PMID:24563868

  10. East coast fever caused by Theileria parva is characterized by macrophage activation associated with vasculitis and respiratory failure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Respiratory failure and death in East Coast Fever (ECF), a clinical syndrome of African cattle caused by the apicomplexan parasite Theileria parva, has historically been attributed to pulmonary infiltration by infected lymphocytes. However, immunohistochemical staining of tissue from T. parva infect...

  11. Paraneoplastic pemphigus caused by an epithelioid leiomyosarcoma and associated with fatal respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    van der Waal, R I; Pas, H H; Nousari, H C; Schulten, E A; Jonkman, M F; Nieboer, C; Stoof, T J; Starink, T M; Anhalt, G J

    2000-07-01

    A patient is described who initially presented with pemphigus vulgaris, limited to the oral cavity, and weight loss. Although the various laboratory studies pointed to the diagnosis of paraneoplastic pemphigus (PNP), the underlying neoplasm was not detected until 6 months later, when the patient developed shortness of breath and routine physical examination on admission revealed an abdominal mass, which eventually was proven to be an epithelioid leiomyosarcoma. In spite of radical excision of the tumour and intensive treatment of the dyspnoea, the patient died of respiratory failure 19 months after the PNP had been diagnosed. Early diagnosis of PNP is stressed to possibly prevent fatal pulmonary involvement.

  12. Acute Respiratory Failure Caused by Hepatopulmonary Fistula in a Patient with Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jungsil; Kim, Yoon Jun; Kim, Hyung-Jun; Kim, Jee-Min; Kim, Young-Chan

    2016-01-01

    A 59-year-old man presented with acute dyspnea following sudden productive cough and expectoration of a full cup of "blood-tinged" sputum. He had been diagnosed with hepatitis B virus–related hepatocellular carcinoma and had received transarterial chemoembolization 5 years ago for a 20-cm hepatic mass; he denied any history of hematemesis and the last esophagogastroduodenoscopy from a year ago showed absence of varix. Chest computed tomography (CT) with angiography showed new appearance of right basal lung consolidation but no bleeding focus. Despite the use of systemic antibiotics, the patient developed respiratory failure on day 7 of hospitalization. After intubation, a massive amount of brown sputum with anchovy-paste-like consistency was suctioned via the endotracheal tube. Bronchoscopic toileting was performed and the patient was extubated. In the ward, he continued to expectorate the brown sputum. On day 25 of hospitalization, a repeat CT scan showed simultaneous disappearance of the pneumonic consolidation and the necrotic fluid within the hepatic mass, suggesting the presence of a fistula. He has continued to receive systemic antibiotics, sorafenib, and entecavir, and follow up by respiratory and hepato-oncology specialists. PMID:27433178

  13. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation treatment of a H7N9-caused respiratory failure patient with mechanical valves replacement history

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Linfeng; Zheng, Junnan; Xu, Hongfei; Shi, Liping; Li, Lanjuan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Patients with respiratory failure caused by H7N9 may benefit from veno-venous, veno-arterial, and veno-veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) support. Case summary: A 55-year-old male patient was suffering from H7N9-caused acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). He had a mechanical mitral and aortic valve replacement surgery and was using warfarin for anticoagulation. After prolonged mechanical ventilation, oxygen saturation was not improved. Veno-veno ECMO was then applied. After 16 days of extracorporeal life support, the patient successfully weaned from ECMO, with relatively good pulmonary recovery. Conclusion: This report demonstrates that ECMO support can help treating life-threatening diseases such as H7N9-associated ARDS. Because of his special mitral and aortic valve replacement surgery history and long duration of mechanical ventilation before ECMO, we report it as a separate case, hoping to provide some reference for ECMO treatment. PMID:27749569

  14. East Coast Fever Caused by Theileria parva Is Characterized by Macrophage Activation Associated with Vasculitis and Respiratory Failure

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, David A.; Frevert, Charles W.; Nelson, Danielle D.; Morrison, W. Ivan; Knowles, Donald P.

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory failure and death in East Coast Fever (ECF), a clinical syndrome of African cattle caused by the apicomplexan parasite Theileria parva, has historically been attributed to pulmonary infiltration by infected lymphocytes. However, immunohistochemical staining of tissue from T. parva infected cattle revealed large numbers of CD3- and CD20-negative intralesional mononuclear cells. Due to this finding, we hypothesized that macrophages play an important role in Theileria parva disease pathogenesis. Data presented here demonstrates that terminal ECF in both Holstein and Boran cattle is largely due to multisystemic histiocytic responses and resultant tissue damage. Furthermore, the combination of these histologic changes with the clinical findings, including lymphadenopathy, prolonged pyrexia, multi-lineage leukopenia, and thrombocytopenia is consistent with macrophage activation syndrome. All animals that succumbed to infection exhibited lymphohistiocytic vasculitis of small to medium caliber blood and lymphatic vessels. In pulmonary, lymphoid, splenic and hepatic tissues from Holstein cattle, the majority of intralesional macrophages were positive for CD163, and often expressed large amounts of IL-17. These data define a terminal ECF pathogenesis in which parasite-driven lymphoproliferation leads to secondary systemic macrophage activation syndrome, mononuclear vasculitis, pulmonary edema, respiratory failure and death. The accompanying macrophage phenotype defined by CD163 and IL-17 is presented in the context of this pathogenesis. PMID:27195791

  15. Adiaspiromycosis Causing Respiratory Failure and a Review of Human Infections Due to Emmonsia and Chrysosporium spp.

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, Deanna A.; Graybill, John R.

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of a 27-year-old male who presented with respiratory distress that required mechanical ventilation. Transbronchial biopsy revealed adiaspores of the fungus Emmonsia crescens within granulomata, a condition known as adiaspiromycosis. The patient received amphotericin products and corticosteroids, followed by itraconazole, and made a full recovery. Emmonsia crescens is a saprobe with a wide distribution that is primarily a rodent pathogen. The clinical characteristics of the 20 cases of human pulmonary adiaspiromycosis reported since the last comprehensive case review in 1993 are described here, as well as other infections recently reported for the genus Emmonsia. Pulmonary adiaspiromycosis has been reported primarily in persons without underlying host factors and has a mild to severe course. It remains uncertain if the optimal management of severe pulmonary adiaspiromycosis is supportive or if should consist of antifungal treatment, corticosteroids, or a combination of the latter two. The classification of fungi currently in the genus Emmonsia has undergone considerable revision since their original description, including being grouped with the genus Chrysosporium at one time. Molecular genetics has clearly differentiated the genus Emmonsia from the Chrysosporium species. Nevertheless, there has been a persistent confusion in the literature regarding the clinical presentation of infection with fungi of these two genera; to clarify this matter, the reported cases of invasive Chrysosporium infections were reviewed. Invasive Chrysosporium infections typically occur in impaired hosts and can have a fatal course. Based on limited in vitro susceptibility data for Chrysosporium zonatum, amphotericin B is the most active drug, itraconazole susceptibility is strain-dependent, and fluconazole and 5-fluorocytosine are not active. PMID:22259200

  16. Case Report of a Child after Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation with Acute Aspergillus Tracheobronchitis as a Cause for Respiratory Failure

    PubMed Central

    Madden, Kate; Wu, Jennifer; Duncan, Christine; Lee, Gi Soo; Miller, Tonya; Klingensmith, William C.; Burchett, Sandra K.; van der Velden, Meredith

    2016-01-01

    Rapid respiratory failure due to invasive mycosis of the airways is an uncommon presentation of Aspergillus infection, even in immunocompromised patients, and very few pediatric cases have been reported. Patients with Aspergillus tracheobronchitis present with nonspecific symptoms, and radiologic studies are often noninformative, leading to a delay in diagnosis. Prompt initiation of adequate antifungal therapies is of utmost importance to improve outcome. We report the case of a 9-year-old girl with chronic myelogenous leukemia who developed respiratory distress 41 days after hematopoietic cell transplantation and rapidly deteriorated despite multiple interventions and treatment modalities. PMID:27957376

  17. Novel One Lung Ventilation Strategy (OLV) for a Patient with Complete Unilateral Endobronchial Obstruction Causing Hypoxic Respiratory Failure

    PubMed Central

    Kanitkar, Amaraja; Lee, Sarah J.

    2017-01-01

    Patient: Male, 67 Final Diagnosis: Lung cancer Symptoms: Short of breath Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Mechanical ventilation Specialty: Critical Care Medicine Objective: Unusual setting of medical care Background: Mechanical ventilation strategies for one lung ventilation (OLV) differ from conventional modalities in that it can adapt to greater degrees of ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) mismatch. We present a case of cancer causing complete unilateral endobronchial obstruction with refractory hypoxia that improved with OLV strategy. Case Report: Our patient was an elderly male, admitted to our intensive care unit (ICU) on mechanical ventilation with worsening hypoxic respiratory failure secondary to lung mass and post-obstructive atelectasis. The patient developed refractory hypoxia on high conventional ventilator settings. Chest x-ray (CXR) showed opacification on left lung with ipsilateral mediastinal shift. Bronchoscopy revealed complete obstruction of the left main stem bronchus by a fungating mass. OLV strategy was then implemented. The patient had improved hypoxia despite unchanged CXR. Conclusions: We propose that ventilating a patient with a complete unilateral endobronchial obstruction is physiologically similar to ventilating a patient with OLV. In such cases, OLV strategies may improve refractory hypoxia by minimizing V/Q mismatch and should be considered. PMID:28126982

  18. Novel One Lung Ventilation Strategy (OLV) for a Patient with Complete Unilateral Endobronchial Obstruction Causing Hypoxic Respiratory Failure.

    PubMed

    Kanitkar, Amaraja; Lee, Sarah J

    2017-01-27

    BACKGROUND Mechanical ventilation strategies for one lung ventilation (OLV) differ from conventional modalities in that it can adapt to greater degrees of ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) mismatch. We present a case of cancer causing complete unilateral endobronchial obstruction with refractory hypoxia that improved with OLV strategy. CASE REPORT Our patient was an elderly male, admitted to our intensive care unit (ICU) on mechanical ventilation with worsening hypoxic respiratory failure secondary to lung mass and post-obstructive atelectasis. The patient developed refractory hypoxia on high conventional ventilator settings. Chest x-ray (CXR) showed opacification on left lung with ipsilateral mediastinal shift. Bronchoscopy revealed complete obstruction of the left main stem bronchus by a fungating mass. OLV strategy was then implemented. The patient had improved hypoxia despite unchanged CXR. CONCLUSIONS We propose that ventilating a patient with a complete unilateral endobronchial obstruction is physiologically similar to ventilating a patient with OLV. In such cases, OLV strategies may improve refractory hypoxia by minimizing V/Q mismatch and should be considered.

  19. How Is Respiratory Failure Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... to treat the underlying cause of the condition. Oxygen Therapy and Ventilator Support If you have respiratory ... mask that fits over your nose and mouth. Oxygen Therapy The image shows how a nasal cannula ...

  20. Common Cause Failure Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hark, Frank; Britton, Paul; Ring, Robert; Novack, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Space Launch System (SLS) Agenda: Objective; Key Definitions; Calculating Common Cause; Examples; Defense against Common Cause; Impact of varied Common Cause Failure (CCF) and abortability; Response Surface for various CCF Beta; Takeaways.

  1. Burden of respiratory viruses in patients with acute respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Schnell, David; Gits-Muselli, Maud; Canet, Emmanuel; Lemiale, Virginie; Schlemmer, Benoît; Simon, François; Azoulay, Elie; Legoff, Jérôme

    2014-07-01

    Respiratory viruses (RVs) are ubiquitous pathogens that represent a major cause of community-acquired pneumonia and chronic pulmonary diseases exacerbations. However, their contribution to acute respiratory failure events requiring intensive care unit admission in the era of rapid multiplex molecular assay deserves further evaluation. This study investigated the burden of viral infections in non immunocompromised patients admitted to the intensive care unit for acute respiratory failure using a multiplex molecular assay. Patients were investigated for RVs using immunofluoresence testing and a commercial multiplex molecular assay, and for bacteria using conventional culture. Half the patients (34/70, 49%) had a documented RVs infection. No other pathogen was found in 24 (71%) patients. Viral infection was detected more frequently in patients with obstructive respiratory diseases (64% vs. 29%; P = 0.0075). Multiplex molecular assay should be considered as an usefull diagnostic tool in patients admitted to the intensive care unit with acute respiratory failure, especially those with acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma.

  2. Intensive care adult patients with severe respiratory failure caused by Influenza A (H1N1)v in Spain

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Patients with influenza A (H1N1)v infection have developed rapidly progressive lower respiratory tract disease resulting in respiratory failure. We describe the clinical and epidemiologic characteristics of the first 32 persons reported to be admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) due to influenza A (H1N1)v infection in Spain. Methods We used medical chart reviews to collect data on ICU adult patients reported in a standardized form. Influenza A (H1N1)v infection was confirmed in specimens using real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase-chain-reaction (RT PCR) assay. Results Illness onset of the 32 patients occurred between 23 June and 31 July, 2009. The median age was 36 years (IQR = 31 - 52). Ten (31.2%) were obese, 2 (6.3%) pregnant and 16 (50%) had pre-existing medical complications. Twenty-nine (90.6%) had primary viral pneumonitis, 2 (6.3%) exacerbation of structural respiratory disease and 1 (3.1%) secondary bacterial pneumonia. Twenty-four patients (75.0%) developed multiorgan dysfunction, 7 (21.9%) received renal replacement techniques and 24 (75.0%) required mechanical ventilation. Six patients died within 28 days, with two additional late deaths. Oseltamivir administration delay ranged from 2 to 8 days after illness onset, 31.2% received high-dose (300 mg/day), and treatment duration ranged from 5 to 10 days (mean 8.0 ± 3.3). Conclusions Over a 5-week period, influenza A (H1N1)v infection led to ICU admission in 32 adult patients, with frequently observed severe hypoxemia and a relatively high case-fatality rate. Clinicians should be aware of pulmonary complications of influenza A (H1N1)v infection, particularly in pregnant and young obese but previously healthy persons. PMID:19747383

  3. Compression of the medulla oblongata and acute respiratory failure caused by rupture of a thrombosed large aneurysm of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery.

    PubMed

    Oyama, Hirofumi; Kito, Akira; Maki, Hideki; Hattori, Kenichi; Tanahashi, Kuniaki

    2010-01-01

    A 65-year-old female presented with an extremely rare case of a ruptured thrombosed large aneurysm of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) in which a local hematoma compressed the medulla oblongata and caused acute respiratory failure. She first presented with dizziness, general fatigue, and nausea 2 months before admission. She was hospitalized for intense general fatigue, nausea, and occipitalgia. Computed tomography and T(1)-weighted magnetic resonance imaging showed a heterogeneous lesion around the right cerebello-medullary cistern. Angiography revealed a fusiform aneurysm of the right AICA. Asphyxia occurred 4 days after admission and the patient underwent an emergency operation. No subarachnoid hematoma was present, but a hematoma around the ruptured portion markedly compressed the medulla oblongata. The medulla oblongata was adequately decompressed after subtotal removal of the aneurysm. The patient's respiratory status and consciousness level recovered after the operation.

  4. Common Cause Failure Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hark, Frank; Britton, Paul; Ring, Rob; Novack, Steven D.

    2015-01-01

    Common Cause Failures (CCFs) are a known and documented phenomenon that defeats system redundancy. CCFS are a set of dependent type of failures that can be caused by: system environments; manufacturing; transportation; storage; maintenance; and assembly, as examples. Since there are many factors that contribute to CCFs, the effects can be reduced, but they are difficult to eliminate entirely. Furthermore, failure databases sometimes fail to differentiate between independent and CCF (dependent) failure and data is limited, especially for launch vehicles. The Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) of NASA's Safety and Mission Assurance Directorate at Marshall Space Flight Center (MFSC) is using generic data from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's database of common cause failures at nuclear power plants to estimate CCF due to the lack of a more appropriate data source. There remains uncertainty in the actual magnitude of the common cause risk estimates for different systems at this stage of the design. Given the limited data about launch vehicle CCF and that launch vehicles are a highly redundant system by design, it is important to make design decisions to account for a range of values for independent and CCFs. When investigating the design of the one-out-of-two component redundant system for launch vehicles, a response surface was constructed to represent the impact of the independent failure rate versus a common cause beta factor effect on a system's failure probability. This presentation will define a CCF and review estimation calculations. It gives a summary of reduction methodologies and a review of examples of historical CCFs. Finally, it presents the response surface and discusses the results of the different CCFs on the reliability of a one-out-of-two system.

  5. Common Cause Failure Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hark, Frank; Britton, Paul; Ring, Rob; Novack, Steven D.

    2016-01-01

    Common Cause Failures (CCFs) are a known and documented phenomenon that defeats system redundancy. CCFS are a set of dependent type of failures that can be caused by: system environments; manufacturing; transportation; storage; maintenance; and assembly, as examples. Since there are many factors that contribute to CCFs, the effects can be reduced, but they are difficult to eliminate entirely. Furthermore, failure databases sometimes fail to differentiate between independent and CCF (dependent) failure and data is limited, especially for launch vehicles. The Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) of NASA's Safety and Mission Assurance Directorate at Marshal Space Flight Center (MFSC) is using generic data from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's database of common cause failures at nuclear power plants to estimate CCF due to the lack of a more appropriate data source. There remains uncertainty in the actual magnitude of the common cause risk estimates for different systems at this stage of the design. Given the limited data about launch vehicle CCF and that launch vehicles are a highly redundant system by design, it is important to make design decisions to account for a range of values for independent and CCFs. When investigating the design of the one-out-of-two component redundant system for launch vehicles, a response surface was constructed to represent the impact of the independent failure rate versus a common cause beta factor effect on a system's failure probability. This presentation will define a CCF and review estimation calculations. It gives a summary of reduction methodologies and a review of examples of historical CCFs. Finally, it presents the response surface and discusses the results of the different CCFs on the reliability of a one-out-of-two system.

  6. Common Cause Failure Modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wetherholt, Jon; Heimann, Timothy J.; Anderson, Brenda

    2011-01-01

    High technology industries with high failure costs commonly use redundancy as a means to reduce risk. Redundant systems, whether similar or dissimilar, are susceptible to Common Cause Failures (CCF). CCF is not always considered in the design effort and, therefore, can be a major threat to success. There are several aspects to CCF which must be understood to perform an analysis which will find hidden issues that may negate redundancy. This paper will provide definition, types, a list of possible causes and some examples of CCF. Requirements and designs from NASA projects will be used in the paper as examples.

  7. Ventilatory support in critically ill hematology patients with respiratory failure

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Hematology patients admitted to the ICU frequently experience respiratory failure and require mechanical ventilation. Noninvasive mechanical ventilation (NIMV) may decrease the risk of intubation, but NIMV failure poses its own risks. Methods To establish the impact of ventilatory management and NIMV failure on outcome, data from a prospective, multicenter, observational study were analyzed. All hematology patients admitted to one of the 34 participating ICUs in a 17-month period were followed up. Data on demographics, diagnosis, severity, organ failure, and supportive therapies were recorded. A logistic regression analysis was done to evaluate the risk factors associated with death and NIVM failure. Results Of 450 patients, 300 required ventilatory support. A diagnosis of congestive heart failure and the initial use of NIMV significantly improved survival, whereas APACHE II score, allogeneic transplantation, and NIMV failure increased the risk of death. The risk factors associated with NIMV success were age, congestive heart failure, and bacteremia. Patients with NIMV failure experienced a more severe respiratory impairment than did those electively intubated. Conclusions NIMV improves the outcome of hematology patients with respiratory insufficiency, but NIMV failure may have the opposite effect. A careful selection of patients with rapidly reversible causes of respiratory failure may increase NIMV success. PMID:22827955

  8. "Smoking wet": respiratory failure related to smoking tainted marijuana cigarettes.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Christopher R; Baram, Michael; Cavarocchi, Nicholas C

    2013-01-01

    Reports have suggested that the use of a dangerously tainted form of marijuana, referred to in the vernacular as "wet" or "fry," has increased. Marijuana cigarettes are dipped into or laced with other substances, typically formaldehyde, phencyclidine, or both. Inhaling smoke from these cigarettes can cause lung injuries. We report the cases of 2 young adults who presented at our hospital with respiratory failure soon after they had smoked "wet" marijuana cigarettes. In both patients, progressive hypoxemic respiratory failure necessitated rescue therapy with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. After lengthy hospitalizations, both patients recovered with only mild pulmonary function abnormalities. To our knowledge, this is the first 2-patient report of severe respiratory failure and rescue therapy with extracorporeal oxygenation after the smoking of marijuana cigarettes thus tainted. We believe that, in young adults with an unexplained presentation of severe respiratory failure, the possibility of exposure to tainted marijuana cigarettes should be considered.

  9. High flow nasal oxygen in acute respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Ricard, J-D

    2012-07-01

    Use of high flow nasal cannula oxygen (HFNC) is increasingly popular in adult ICUs for patients with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure. This is the result of the successful long-term use of HFNC in the neonatal field and recent clinical data in adults indicating beneficial effects of HFNC over conventional facemask oxygen therapy. HFNC rapidly alleviates symptoms of respiratory distress and improves oxygenation by several mechanisms, including deadspace washout, reduction in oxygen dilution and in inspiratory nasopharyngeal resistance, a moderate positive airway pressure effect that may generate alveolar recruitment and an overall greater tolerance and comfort with the interface and the heated and humidified inspired gases. Indications of HFNC are broad, encompassing most if not all causes of acute hypoxemic respiratory failure. HFNC can also provide oxygen during invasive procedures, and be used to prevent or treat post-extubation respiratory failure. HFNC may also alleviate respiratory distress in patients at a palliative stage. Although observational studies suggest that HFNC might reduce the need for intubation in acute hypoxemic respiratory failure; such a reduction has not yet been demonstrated. Beyond this potential additional effect on outcome, the evidence already published argues in favor of the large use of HFNC as first line therapy for acute respiratory failure.

  10. Treatment of respiratory failure in COPD

    PubMed Central

    Budweiser, Stephan; Jörres, Rudolf A; Pfeifer, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Patients with advanced COPD and acute or chronic respiratory failure are at high risk for death. Beyond pharmacological treatment, supplemental oxygen and mechanical ventilation are major treatment options. This review describes the physiological concepts underlying respiratory failure and its therapy, as well as important treatment outcomes. The rationale for the controlled supply of oxygen in acute hypoxic respiratory failure is undisputed. There is also a clear survival benefit from long-term oxygen therapy in patients with chronic hypoxia, while in mild, nocturnal, or exercise-induced hypoxemia such long-term benefits appear questionable. Furthermore, much evidence supports the use of non-invasive positive pressure ventilation in acute hypercapnic respiratory failure. It application reduces intubation and mortality rates, and the duration of intensive care unit or hospital stays, particularly in the presence of mild to moderate respiratory acidosis. COPD with chronic hypercapnic respiratory failure became a major indication for domiciliary mechanical ventilation, based on pathophysiological reasoning and on data regarding symptoms and quality of life. Still, however, its relevance for long-term survival has to be substantiated in prospective controlled studies. Such studies might preferentially recruit patients with repeated hypercapnic decompensation or a high risk for death, while ensuring effective ventilation and the patients’ adherence to therapy. PMID:19281077

  11. Pulmonary Kaposi Sarcoma: An Uncommon Cause of Respiratory Failure in the Era of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy—Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Hemmings, Stefan; Paul, Yonette; Habtegebriel, Yordanis; Polk, Octavius

    2016-01-01

    Kaposi Sarcoma (KS) is the most common malignancy associated with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and is caused by Human Herpesvirus 8 (HHV 8) or Kaposi Sarcoma Herpesvirus (KSHV). In about 90% of cases Kaposi Sarcoma is associated with cutaneous lesions; however visceral disease can occur in the absence of cutaneous involvement. In the era of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART), the incidence of KS has declined. Clinical features of pulmonary KS might be difficult to distinguish from pneumonia in the immunocompromised patients and could lead to diagnostic challenges. First-line treatment of KS is with HAART and the incidence has declined with its use. Systemic chemotherapy may play a role depending on the extent of the disease. We report the case of a young man who presented with pulmonary symptoms and was later found to have pulmonary KS. Interestingly this diagnosis was made in the absence of the classic skin lesions. His disease was complicated by progressive respiratory failure and he eventually died. PMID:27872774

  12. Treatment of respiratory failure in COPD.

    PubMed

    Budweiser, Stephan; Jörres, Rudolf A; Pfeifer, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Patients with advanced COPD and acute or chronic respiratory failure are at high risk for death. Beyond pharmacological treatment, supplemental oxygen and mechanical ventilation are major treatment options. This review describes the physiological concepts underlying respiratory failure and its therapy, as well as important treatment outcomes. The rationale for the controlled supply of oxygen in acute hypoxic respiratory failure is undisputed. There is also a clear survival benefit from long-term oxygen therapy in patients withchronic hypoxia, while in mild, nocturnal, or exercise-induced hypoxemia such long-term benefits appear questionable. Furthermore, much evidence supports the use of non-invasive positivepressure ventilation in acute hypercapnic respiratory failure. It application reduces intubation and mortality rates, and the duration of intensive care unit or hospital stays, particularly in the presence of mild to moderate respiratory acidosis. COPD with chronic hypercapnic respiratory failurebecame a major indication for domiciliary mechanical ventilation, based on pathophysiological reasoning and on data regarding symptoms and quality of life. Still, however, its relevance for long-term survival has to be substantiated in prospective controlled studies. Such studies might preferentially recruit patients with repeated hypercapnic decompensation or a high risk for death, while ensuring effective ventilation and the patients' adherence to therapy.

  13. Acute respiratory failure mimicking acute respiratory distress syndrome due to parenchymal infiltration by metastatic melanoma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Malignant melanoma is the most aggressive form of skin cancer and carries a predisposition for metastasis to many different organs. Pulmonary dissemination is common, most often presenting as multiple discrete pulmonary nodules. While a variety of other intrathoracic patterns can occur, diffuse parenchymal infiltration causing acute respiratory failure is an extremely rare manifestation of metastatic disease. We present a case of an otherwise healthy man who developed rapidly progressive respiratory failure mimicking acute respiratory distress syndrome due to melanomatous infiltration of the lung parenchyma and airways. PMID:25006412

  14. Noninvasive ventilation for acute respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Hess, Dean R

    2013-06-01

    Noninvasive ventilation (NIV) for acute respiratory failure has gained much academic and clinical interest. Despite this, NIV is underutilized. The evidence strongly supports its use in patients presenting with an exacerbation of COPD and in patients with acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema. As reviewed in this paper, there is now evidence supporting or not supporting the use of NIV in various other presentations of acute respiratory failure. It is important not only to know when to initiate NIV, but also when this therapy is failing. Whether NIV in the setting of acute respiratory failure can be managed appropriately outside the ICU setting is controversial. Although a variety of interfaces are available, the oronasal mask is the best initial interface in terms of leak prevention and patient comfort. Some critical care ventilators have NIV modes that compensate well for leaks, but as a group the ventilators that are designed specifically for NIV have better leak compensation. NIV should be part of the armamentarium of all clinicians caring from patients with acute respiratory failure.

  15. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for adult respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Turner, David A; Cheifetz, Ira M

    2013-06-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is a form of cardiopulmonary bypass that is a mainstay of therapy in neonatal and pediatric patients with life threatening respiratory and/or cardiac failure. Historically, the use of ECMO in adults has been limited, but recent reports and technological advances have increased utilization and interest in this technology in adult patients with severe respiratory failure. As ECMO is considered in this critically ill population, patient selection, indications, contraindications, comorbidities, and pre-ECMO support are all important considerations. Once the decision is made to cannulate a patient for ECMO, meticulous multi-organ-system management is required, with a priority being placed on lung rest and minimization of ventilator-induced lung injury. Close monitoring is also necessary for complications, some of which are related to ECMO and others secondary to the patient's underlying degree of illness. Despite the risks, reports demonstrate survival > 70% in some circumstances for patients requiring ECMO for refractory respiratory failure. As the utilization of ECMO in adult patients with respiratory failure continues to expand, ongoing discussion and investigation are needed to determine whether ECMO should remain a "rescue" therapy or if earlier ECMO may be beneficial as a lung-protective strategy.

  16. Pulmonary agenesis and respiratory failure in childhood.

    PubMed

    Dinamarco, Paula Vanessa Valverde; Ponce, Cesar Cilento

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary agenesis (PA) is a rare congenital anomaly, which may be unilateral or bilateral. Unilateral PA may be associated with nonspecific respiratory symptoms. We report the case of 5-month-old infant who presented a normal development until the age of 4 months when a respiratory infection caused an acute respiratory distress syndrome with a fatal outcome. The autopsy findings depicted the right lung agenesis without any other concomitant malformation. Although respiratory symptoms represent frequent complaints in pediatrics, the aim of this study is not only to draw attention to the unilateral pulmonary agenesis as a possible underlying malformation in children who present recurrent and severe respiratory symptoms, but also to report a case diagnosed at autopsy.

  17. Acute respiratory failure due to Nicotiana glauca ingestion

    PubMed Central

    Ntelios, D; Kargakis, M; Topalis, T; Drouzas, A; Potolidis, E

    2013-01-01

    Background: A variety of organisms produce potent toxins that impact human health through compromising respiratory function. Case report: We describe a rare case of abrupt respiratory failure afterNicotiana glaucaingestion in a previously healthy sixty years old female patient. She presented complaining for gait instability and malaise after ingestion of cooked leaves of the wild plant and two hours after the onset she developed respiratory failurefor which she was intubated and mechanically ventilated for two days. The patient fully recovered and was discharged from the hospital. Conclusion: Anabasine, the plant’s main active ingredient, can cause severe systemic intoxication due to its nicotinic receptor agonist action with respiratory muscle paralysis being the main effect. PMID:24376330

  18. Respiratory sleep disorders in patients with congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Naughton, Matthew T

    2015-08-01

    Respiratory sleep disorders (RSD) occur in about 40-50% of patients with symptomatic congestive heart failure (CHF). Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is considered a cause of CHF, whereas central sleep apnea (CSA) is considered a response to heart failure, perhaps even compensatory. In the setting of heart failure, continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) has a definite role in treating OSA with improvements in cardiac parameters expected. However in CSA, CPAP is an adjunctive therapy to other standard therapies directed towards the heart failure (pharmacological, device and surgical options). Whether adaptive servo controlled ventilatory support, a variant of CPAP, is beneficial is yet to be proven. Supplemental oxygen therapy should be used with caution in heart failure, in particular, by avoiding hyperoxia as indicated by SpO2 values >95%.

  19. Postoperative Respiratory Failure in a Patient with Undiagnosed Myastenia Gravis

    PubMed Central

    Özel, Funda; Altunkan, Ali Aydın; Azizoğlu, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disease caused by the development of antibodies against the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. There is hypersensitivity against non-depolarizing muscle relaxants in these patients. Sugammadex eliminates the effects of steroid non-depolarizing muscle relaxants, such as rocuronium and vecuronium, by selectively encapsulating their molecules. In this case report, we present a case of recurarization and respiratory failure after the use of sugammadex and rocuronium in a patient with preoperatively undiagnosed myasthenia gravis. PMID:27366570

  20. Noninvasive ventilation in acute respiratory failure

    PubMed Central

    Mas, Arantxa; Masip, Josep

    2014-01-01

    After the institution of positive-pressure ventilation, the use of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) through an interface substantially increased. The first technique was continuous positive airway pressure; but, after the introduction of pressure support ventilation at the end of the 20th century, this became the main modality. Both techniques, and some others that have been recently introduced and which integrate some technological innovations, have extensively demonstrated a faster improvement of acute respiratory failure in different patient populations, avoiding endotracheal intubation and facilitating the release of conventional invasive mechanical ventilation. In acute settings, NIV is currently the first-line treatment for moderate-to-severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation as well as for acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema and should be considered in immunocompromised patients with acute respiratory insufficiency, in difficult weaning, and in the prevention of postextubation failure. Alternatively, it can also be used in the postoperative period and in cases of pneumonia and asthma or as a palliative treatment. NIV is currently used in a wide range of acute settings, such as critical care and emergency departments, hospital wards, palliative or pediatric units, and in pre-hospital care. It is also used as a home care therapy in patients with chronic pulmonary or sleep disorders. The appropriate selection of patients and the adaptation to the technique are the keys to success. This review essentially analyzes the evidence of benefits of NIV in different populations with acute respiratory failure and describes the main modalities, new devices, and some practical aspects of the use of this technique. PMID:25143721

  1. Economics of mechanical ventilation and respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Colin R

    2012-01-01

    For patients with acute respiratory failure, mechanical ventilation provides the most definitive life-sustaining therapy. Because of the intense resources required to care for these patients, its use accounts for considerable costs. There is great societal need to ensure that use of mechanical ventilation maximizes societal benefits while minimizing costs, and that mechanical ventilation, and ventilator support in general, is delivered in the most efficient and cost-effective manner. This review summarizes the economic aspects of mechanical ventilation and summarizes the existing literature that examines its economic impact cost effectiveness.

  2. Coma blisters with hypoxemic respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Abhishek; Bansal, Meghana; Conner, Kelly

    2012-03-15

    A 24-year-old woman with quadriplegia was admitted with respiratory failure because of pneumonia. She was on multiple medications including diazepam, oxycodone, and amitriptyline, known to be associated with coma blisters, though she did not overdose on any of them. On hospital day 2, she developed multiple blisters on both sides of her right forearm and hand. Skin biopsy showed eccrine gland degeneration consistent with coma blisters. It was felt that hypoxemia from her pneumonia contributed to the development of these blisters, which occurred on both pressure and non-pressure bearing areas of the arm. Coma blisters are self-limited skin lesions that occur at sites of maximal pressure, mostly in the setting of drug overdose. However, coma blisters may occur with metabolic and neurological conditions resulting in coma.

  3. The successful treatment of hypercapnic respiratory failure with oral modafinil

    PubMed Central

    Parnell, Helen; Quirke, Ginny; Farmer, Sally; Adeyemo, Sumbo; Varney, Veronica

    2014-01-01

    Hypercapnic respiratory failure is common in advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and is usually treated by nasal ventilation. Not all patients requiring such ventilation can tolerate it, with anxiety and phobia influencing their reaction, along with treatment failure. We report the case histories of six patients with hypercapnic respiratory failure who were at risk of death due to refusal of nasal ventilation or its failure despite ongoing treatment. We report their improvement with oral modafinil 200 mg tablets used as a respiratory stimulant, which led to discharge, improved arterial blood gases, and offset further admissions with hypercapnic respiratory failure. This drug is licensed for narcolepsy and is said to stimulate the respiratory system via the central nervous system. Its use in respiratory failure is an unlicensed indication, and there are no case reports or studies of such use in the literature. Its respiratory stimulant effects appear better than those with protriptyline, which was a drug previously used until its production was discontinued. Our findings suggest that a study of modafinil in hypercapnic respiratory failure would be warranted, especially for patients with treatment failure or intolerance to nasal ventilation. This may offer a way of shortening hospital stay, improving outcome and quality of life, and reducing death and readmissions. PMID:24812505

  4. The successful treatment of hypercapnic respiratory failure with oral modafinil.

    PubMed

    Parnell, Helen; Quirke, Ginny; Farmer, Sally; Adeyemo, Sumbo; Varney, Veronica

    2014-01-01

    Hypercapnic respiratory failure is common in advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and is usually treated by nasal ventilation. Not all patients requiring such ventilation can tolerate it, with anxiety and phobia influencing their reaction, along with treatment failure. We report the case histories of six patients with hypercapnic respiratory failure who were at risk of death due to refusal of nasal ventilation or its failure despite ongoing treatment. We report their improvement with oral modafinil 200 mg tablets used as a respiratory stimulant, which led to discharge, improved arterial blood gases, and offset further admissions with hypercapnic respiratory failure. This drug is licensed for narcolepsy and is said to stimulate the respiratory system via the central nervous system. Its use in respiratory failure is an unlicensed indication, and there are no case reports or studies of such use in the literature. Its respiratory stimulant effects appear better than those with protriptyline, which was a drug previously used until its production was discontinued. Our findings suggest that a study of modafinil in hypercapnic respiratory failure would be warranted, especially for patients with treatment failure or intolerance to nasal ventilation. This may offer a way of shortening hospital stay, improving outcome and quality of life, and reducing death and readmissions.

  5. Respiratory failure as initial symptom of acid maltase deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Keunen, R W; Lambregts, P C; Op de Coul, A A; Joosten, E M

    1984-01-01

    Nine patients with adult onset acid maltase deficiency were seen at the Nijmegen University Hospital and the St Elisabeth Hospital, Tilburg , during the period 1970-1982. Five of these patients developed respiratory failure, and in four this was the initial symptom. The occurrence of respiratory failure as an early symptom of this muscular disease is discussed. Images PMID:6429285

  6. Respiratory failure as initial symptom of acid maltase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Keunen, R W; Lambregts, P C; Op de Coul, A A; Joosten, E M

    1984-05-01

    Nine patients with adult onset acid maltase deficiency were seen at the Nijmegen University Hospital and the St Elisabeth Hospital, Tilburg , during the period 1970-1982. Five of these patients developed respiratory failure, and in four this was the initial symptom. The occurrence of respiratory failure as an early symptom of this muscular disease is discussed.

  7. Common Cause Failures and Ultra Reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Harry W.

    2012-01-01

    A common cause failure occurs when several failures have the same origin. Common cause failures are either common event failures, where the cause is a single external event, or common mode failures, where two systems fail in the same way for the same reason. Common mode failures can occur at different times because of a design defect or a repeated external event. Common event failures reduce the reliability of on-line redundant systems but not of systems using off-line spare parts. Common mode failures reduce the dependability of systems using off-line spare parts and on-line redundancy.

  8. Acute respiratory failure and pulmonary thrombosis in leukemic children.

    PubMed

    Marraro, G; Uderzo, C; Marchi, P; Castagnini, G; Vaj, P L; Masera, G

    1991-02-01

    Acute respiratory failure (ARF) in an 11-year-old child with pre-T acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) at the beginning of induction therapy was observed, connected with a pulmonary thrombosis and not with an infective origin. A systematic search for this pathology identified six other children with the same pulmonary complication, five of whom where in the early phase of acute nonlymphoblastic leukemia (ANLL) and one in induction therapy for ALL in marrow relapse. At the beginning of the symptomatology, all children presented severe hypoxia and hypercapnia, with no or minimal chest radiograph abnormalities and no clear hemodynamic involvement. In all patients the arteriography and nuclear imaging studies confirmed the diagnosis. The causes of the thrombi could be connected with neoplastic emboli after cell lysis and/or with the vascular damage resulting from antiblastic therapy. Intravenous urokinase treatment and respiratory assistance had been successfully carried out in six of seven children.

  9. Intercostal and forearm muscle deoxygenation during respiratory fatigue in patients with heart failure: potential role of a respiratory muscle metaboreflex.

    PubMed

    Moreno, A M; Castro, R R T; Silva, B M; Villacorta, H; Sant'Anna Junior, M; Nóbrega, A C L

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of respiratory muscle fatigue on intercostal and forearm muscle perfusion and oxygenation in patients with heart failure. Five clinically stable heart failure patients with respiratory muscle weakness (age, 66 ± 12 years; left ventricle ejection fraction, 34 ± 3%) and nine matched healthy controls underwent a respiratory muscle fatigue protocol, breathing against a fixed resistance at 60% of their maximal inspiratory pressure for as long as they could sustain the predetermined inspiratory pressure. Intercostal and forearm muscle blood volume and oxygenation were continuously monitored by near-infrared spectroscopy with transducers placed on the seventh left intercostal space and the left forearm. Data were compared by two-way ANOVA and Bonferroni correction. Respiratory fatigue occurred at 5.1 ± 1.3 min in heart failure patients and at 9.3 ± 1.4 min in controls (P<0.05), but perceived effort, changes in heart rate, and in systolic blood pressure were similar between groups (P>0.05). Respiratory fatigue in heart failure reduced intercostal and forearm muscle blood volume (P<0.05) along with decreased tissue oxygenation both in intercostal (heart failure, -2.6 ± 1.6%; controls, +1.6 ± 0.5%; P<0.05) and in forearm muscles (heart failure, -4.5 ± 0.5%; controls, +0.5 ± 0.8%; P<0.05). These results suggest that respiratory fatigue in patients with heart failure causes an oxygen demand/delivery mismatch in respiratory muscles, probably leading to a reflex reduction in peripheral limb muscle perfusion, featuring a respiratory metaboreflex.

  10. [A case of bladder cancer producing granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and interleukin-6 causing respiratory failure treated with neoadjuvant systemic chemotherapy along with sivelestat].

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, Kyosuke; Okumi, Masayoshi; Kishimoto, Nozomu; Yazawa, Koji; Miyagawa, Yasushi; Uchida, Kinya; Nonomura, Norio

    2013-07-01

    A 67-year-old man visited an urological clinic with a chief complaint of urination pain. Cystourethroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination revealed a bladder tumor (cT3bN0M0). Marked leukocytosis and respiratory distress with pleural effusion appeared. Pulse steroid therapy improved the general condition partially. The patient was sent to our hospital for further examination. Serum granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were high and the pathological findings of bladder tumor obtained by transurethral resection (TUR) revealed an urothelial carcinoma that produced G-CSF and IL-6. Neoadjuvant systemic chemotherapy was performed along with use of steroid and sivelestat, which ameliorated the respiratory distress. After three courses of systemic chemotherapy, serum G-CSF and IL-6 normalized and cystoprostatectomy was performed. The patient has been in good health at 20 months after the surgery with no evidence of recurrence.

  11. Venovenous Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation in Pediatric Respiratory Failure.

    PubMed

    Ham, P Benson; Hwang, Brice; Wise, Linda J; Walters, K Christian; Pipkin, Walter L; Howell, Charles G; Bhatia, Jatinder; Hatley, Robyn

    2016-09-01

    Conventional treatment of respiratory failure involves positive pressure ventilation that can worsen lung damage. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is typically used when conventional therapy fails. In this study, we evaluated the use of venovenous (VV)-ECMO for the treatment of severe pediatric respiratory failure at our institution. A retrospective analysis of pediatric patients (age 1-18) placed on ECMO in the last 15 years (1999-2014) by the pediatric surgery team for respiratory failure was performed. Five pediatric patients underwent ECMO (mean age 10 years; range, 2-16). All underwent VV-ECMO. Diagnoses were status asthmaticus (2), acute respiratory distress syndrome due to septic shock (1), aspergillus pneumonia (1), and respiratory failure due to parainfluenza (1). Two patients had severe barotrauma prior to ECMO initiation. Average oxygenation index (OI) prior to cannulation was 74 (range 23-122). No patients required conversion to VA-ECMO. The average ECMO run time was 4.4 days (range 2-6). The average number of days on the ventilator was 15 (range 4-27). There were no major complications due to the procedure. Survival to discharge was 100%. Average follow up is 4.4 years (range 1-15). A short run of VV-ECMO can be lifesaving for pediatric patients in respiratory failure. Survival is excellent despite severely elevated oxygen indices. VV-ECMO may be well tolerated and can be considered for severe pediatric respiratory failure.

  12. [Two cases with unilateral lateral medullary infarction associated with central respiratory failure].

    PubMed

    Arai, Noritoshi; Obuchi, Maiko; Matsuhisa, Akiyuki; Takahashi, Yuji; Takatsu, Masami

    2008-05-01

    We reported two patients with unilateral lateral medullary infarction involving severe, long-term respiratory failure. The first patient is an 86-year-old man presenting with gait disturbance, hoarseness and dysphagia. A right lateral medullary infarction was revealed by brain MRI. On the fifth hospitalized day, acute respiratory failure occurred. His condition failed to recover, and he was still attached to a ventilator 10 months after the onset. The second patient is an 83-year-old woman mainly presenting with dysphagia. A tiny infarction in the right lateral medulla was revealed by brain MRI. On the third day after the onset, acute respiratory failure occurred, which was not changed even at 8 months later. Although the symptoms and the lesion in the medulla were quite different between two patients, dysphagia and respiratory failure occurred in both patients. Therefore, it is postulated that the lesion that causes dyspnea may be approximate to the lesion that causes dysphagia. Many previously reported cases presenting respiratory failure seemed to suffer swallowing difficulty as well. We conclude that elderly patients suffering from unilateral lateral medullary infarction with dysphagia can present respiratory failure a few days after the onset, demonstrating the need to observe them under intensive attention.

  13. Respiratory failure due to a massive rheumatoid pleural effusion.

    PubMed

    Pritikin, J D; Jensen, W A; Yenokida, G G; Kirsch, C M; Fainstat, M

    1990-05-01

    A patient with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and chronic obstructive lung disease was admitted with respiratory failure due to a massive pleural effusion. An extensive evaluation proved the effusion to be of rheumatoid origin. The effusion resolved with prednisone and penicillamine therapy. Although pleural effusions associated with RA are common, massive effusions are rare and respiratory failure from a rheumatoid pleural effusion has not been reported.

  14. Severe ARDS may cause right heart failure with extreme hepatomegaly but without hepatic failure.

    PubMed

    Søreide, E; Harboe, S; Søndenaa, K

    2002-08-01

    A young trauma patient developed severe adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), right heart failure, hepatic congestion and an extreme hepatomegaly but no hepatic failure. The patient needed 100% oxygen during ventilatory support for 80 days and was weaned from the ventilator after more than 100 days. The hepatomegaly gradually disappeared. Four months after the injury, the anatomical shape of the lungs, heart and liver were normalized. This case illustrates that severe ARDS may cause right heart failure and extreme hepatomegaly due to venous congestion in the liver and spleen, but without hepatic failure.

  15. Predictors for mortality from respiratory failure in a general population

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Maki; Shibata, Yoko; Inoue, Sumito; Igarashi, Akira; Sato, Kento; Sato, Masamichi; Nemoto, Takako; Abe, Yuki; Nunomiya, Keiko; Nishiwaki, Michiko; Tokairin, Yoshikane; Kimura, Tomomi; Daimon, Makoto; Makino, Naohiko; Watanabe, Tetsu; Konta, Tsuneo; Ueno, Yoshiyuki; Kato, Takeo; Kayama, Takamasa; Kubota, Isao

    2016-01-01

    Risk factors for death from respiratory failure in the general population are not established. The aim of this study was to determine the characteristics of individuals who die of respiratory failure in a Japanese general population. In total, 3253 adults aged 40 years or older participated in annual health check in Takahata, Yamagata, Japan from 2004 to 2006. Subject deaths through the end of 2010 were reviewed; 27 subjects died of respiratory failure (pneumonia, n = 22; COPD, n = 1; pulmonary fibrosis, n = 3; and bronchial asthma, n = 1). Cox proportional hazard analysis revealed that male sex; higher age, high levels of D-dimer and fibrinogen; lower body mass index (BMI) and total cholesterol; and history of stroke and gastric ulcer were independent risk factors for respiratory death. On analysis with C-statistics, net reclassification improvement, and integrated discrimination improvement, addition of the disease history and laboratory data significantly improved the model prediction for respiratory death using age and BMI. In conclusion, we identified risk factors for mortality from respiratory failure in a prospective cohort of a Japanese general population. Men who were older, underweight, hypocholesterolemic, hypercoagulo-fibrinolytic, and had a history of stroke or gastric ulcer had a higher risk of mortality due to respiratory failure. PMID:27180927

  16. Central respiratory failure during acute organophosphate poisoning.

    PubMed

    Carey, Jennifer L; Dunn, Courtney; Gaspari, Romolo J

    2013-11-01

    Organophosphate (OP) pesticide poisoning is a global health problem with over 250,000 deaths per year. OPs affect neuronal signaling through acetylcholine (Ach) neurotransmission via inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), leading to accumulation of Ach at the synaptic cleft and excessive stimulation at post-synaptic receptors. Mortality due to OP agents is attributed to respiratory dysfunction, including central apnea. Cholinergic circuits are integral to many aspects of the central control of respiration, however it is unclear which mechanisms predominate during acute OP intoxication. A more complete understanding of the cholinergic aspects of both respiratory control as well as neural modification of pulmonary function is needed to better understand OP-induced respiratory dysfunction. In this article, we review the physiologic mechanisms of acute OP exposure in the context of the known cholinergic contributions to the central control of respiration. We also discuss the potential central cholinergic contributions to the known peripheral physiologic effects of OP intoxication.

  17. State of the art. Neonatal respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Parker, L A

    1999-12-01

    Advances in ventilatory management of respiratory distress in the newborn have made dramatic strides during the last decade. Innovative treatments such as PTV, HFV, liquid ventilation, and NO therapy are just beginning to have an impact on the care of neonates in the NICU. These treatment modalities should continue to have an effect on the care of the newborn infant well into the future.

  18. Risk factors for nosocomial nontraumatic coma: sepsis and respiratory failure

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ye-Ting; Wang, Shao-Dan; Wang, Guang-Sheng; Chen, Xiao-Dong; Tong, Dao-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Background Coma’s are a major cause of clinical deterioration or death. Identification of risks that predispose to coma are important in managing patients; however, the risk factors for nosocomial nontraumatic coma (NNC) are not well known. Our aim was to investigate the risk factors in patients with NNC. Methods A retrospective case–control design was used to compare patients with NNC and a control group of patients without coma in a population-based cohort of 263 participants from the neurological intensive care unit in Shuyang County People’s Hospital of Northern China. Coma was diagnosed by a Glasgow Coma Scale score ≤8. Adjusted odds ratios for patients with NNC were derived from multivariate logistic regression analyses. Results A total of 96 subjects had NNC. The prevalence of NNC was 36.5% among the subjects. Among these, 82% had acute cerebrovascular etiology. Most of the NNC usually occurred at day 3 after admission to the neurological intensive care unit. Patients with NNC had higher hospital mortality rates (67.7% vs 3%, P<0.0001) and were more likely to have a central herniation (47.9% vs 0%, P<0.001) or uncal herniation (11.5% vs 0%, P<0.001) than those without NNC. Multiple logistic regression showed that systemic inflammatory response syndrome-positive sepsis (odds ratio =4, 95% confidence interval =1.875−8.567, P<0.001) and acute respiratory failure (odds ratio =3.275, 95% confidence interval =1.014−10.573, P<0.05) were the factors independently associated with a higher risk of NNC. Conclusion Systemic inflammatory response syndrome-positive sepsis and acute respiratory failure are independently associated with an increased risk of NNC. This information may be important for patients with NNC. PMID:27713634

  19. Common Cause Failure Modeling: Aerospace Versus Nuclear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stott, James E.; Britton, Paul; Ring, Robert W.; Hark, Frank; Hatfield, G. Spencer

    2010-01-01

    Aggregate nuclear plant failure data is used to produce generic common-cause factors that are specifically for use in the common-cause failure models of NUREG/CR-5485. Furthermore, the models presented in NUREG/CR-5485 are specifically designed to incorporate two significantly distinct assumptions about the methods of surveillance testing from whence this aggregate failure data came. What are the implications of using these NUREG generic factors to model the common-cause failures of aerospace systems? Herein, the implications of using the NUREG generic factors in the modeling of aerospace systems are investigated in detail and strong recommendations for modeling the common-cause failures of aerospace systems are given.

  20. Respiratory Diseases Caused by Coal Mine Dust

    PubMed Central

    Laney, A. Scott; Weissman, David N.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To provide an update on respiratory diseases caused by coal mine dust. Methods This article presents the results of a literature review initially performed for an International Conference on Occupational and Environmental Lung Disease held in summer 2013. Results Coal mine dust causes a spectrum of lung diseases collectively termed coal mine dust lung disease (CMDLD). These include Coal Workers’ Pneumoconiosis, silicosis, mixed dust pneumoconiosis, dust-related diffuse fibrosis (which can be mistaken for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis), and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. CMDLD continues to be a problem in the United States, particularly in the central Appalachian region. Treatment of CMDLD is symptomatic. Those with end-stage disease are candidates for lung transplantation. Because CMDLD cannot be cured, prevention is critical. Conclusions Coal mine dust remains a relevant occupational hazard and miners remain at risk for CMDLD. PMID:25285970

  1. An Unusual Cause of Postpartum Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Khaddash, Ibrahim; Hawatmeh, Amer; Altheeb, Zaid; Hamdan, Aiman; Shamoon, Fayez

    2017-01-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy is a weakness of the heart muscle. It is an idiopathic cardiomyopathy that presents with heart failure secondary to left ventricular systolic dysfunction toward the end of pregnancy or in the months after delivery, in the absence of any other cause of heart failure. It is a rare condition that can carry mild or severe symptoms. PMID:28074806

  2. Immunoadjuvant Therapy and Noninvasive Ventilation for Acute Respiratory Failure in Lung Tuberculosis: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Flores-Franco, René Agustín; Olivas-Medina, Dahyr Alberto; Pacheco-Tena, Cesar Francisco; Duque-Rodríguez, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Acute respiratory failure caused by pulmonary tuberculosis is a rare event but with a high mortality even while receiving mechanical ventilatory support. We report the case of a young man with severe pulmonary tuberculosis refractory to conventional therapy who successfully overcame the critical period of his condition using noninvasive ventilation and immunoadjuvant therapy that included three doses of etanercept 25 mg subcutaneously. We conclude that the use of etanercept along with antituberculosis treatment appears to be safe and effective in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis presenting with acute respiratory failure. PMID:26273486

  3. Ventilators for noninvasive ventilation to treat acute respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Scala, Raffaele; Naldi, Mario

    2008-08-01

    The application of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) to treat acute respiratory failure has increased tremendously both inside and outside the intensive care unit. The choice of ventilator is crucial for success of NIV in the acute setting, because poor tolerance and excessive air leaks are significantly correlated with NIV failure. Patient-ventilator asynchrony and discomfort can occur if the physician or respiratory therapist fails to adequately set NIV to respond to the patient's ventilatory demand, so clinicians need to fully understood the ventilator's technical peculiarities (eg, efficiency of trigger and cycle systems, speed of pressurization, air-leak compensation, CO(2) rebreathing, reliability of fraction of inspired oxygen reading, monitoring accuracy). A wide range of ventilators of different complexity have been introduced into clinical practice to noninvasively support patients in acute respiratory failure, but the numerous commercially available ventilators (bi-level, intermediate, and intensive care unit ventilators) have substantial differences that can influence patient comfort, patient-ventilator interaction, and, thus, the chance of NIV clinical success. This report examines the most relevant aspects of the historical evolution, the equipment, and the acute-respiratory-failure clinical application of NIV ventilators.

  4. Clinical issues and research in respiratory failure from severe acute respiratory syndrome.

    PubMed

    Levy, Mitchell M; Baylor, Melisse S; Bernard, Gordon R; Fowler, Rob; Franks, Teri J; Hayden, Frederick G; Helfand, Rita; Lapinsky, Stephen E; Martin, Thomas R; Niederman, Michael S; Rubenfeld, Gordon D; Slutsky, Arthur S; Stewart, Thomas E; Styrt, Barbara A; Thompson, B Taylor; Harabin, Andrea L

    2005-03-01

    The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, along with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, convened a panel to develop recommendations for treatment, prevention, and research for respiratory failure from severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and other newly emerging infections. The clinical and pathological features of acute lung injury (ALI) from SARS appear indistinguishable from ALI from other causes. The mainstay of treatments for ALI remains supportive. Patients with ALI from SARS who require mechanical ventilation should receive a lung protective, low tidal volume strategy. Adjuvant treatments recommended include prevention of venous thromboembolism, stress ulcer prophylaxis, and semirecumbent positioning during ventilation. Based on previous experience in Canada, infection control resources and protocols were recommended. Leadership structure, communication, training, and morale are an essential aspect of SARS management. A multicenter, placebo-controlled trial of corticosteroids for late SARS is justified because of widespread clinical use and uncertainties about relative risks and benefits. Studies of combined pathophysiologic endpoints were recommended, with mortality as a secondary endpoint. The group recommended preparation for studies, including protocols, ethical considerations, Web-based registries, and data entry systems.

  5. [Pain, agitation and delirium in acute respiratory failure].

    PubMed

    Funk, G-C

    2016-02-01

    Avoiding pain, agitation and delirium as well as avoiding unnecessary deep sedation is a powerful yet challenging strategy in critical care medicine. A number of interactions between cerebral function and respiratory function should be regarded in patients with respiratory failure and mechanical ventilation. A cooperative sedation strategy (i.e. patient is awake and free of pain and delirium) is feasible in many patients requiring invasive mechanical ventilation. Especially patients with mild acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) seem to benefit from preserved spontaneous breathing. While completely disabling spontaneous ventilation with or without neuromuscular blockade is not a standard strategy in ARDS, it might be temporarily required in patients with severe ARDS, who have substantial dyssynchrony or persistent hypoxaemia. Since pain, agitation and delirium compromise respiratory function they should also be regarded during noninvasive ventilation and during ventilator weaning. Pharmacological sedation can have favourable effects in these situations, but should not be given routinely or uncritically.

  6. Intermittent negative pressure ventilation in patients with restrictive respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Schiavina, M; Fabiani, A

    1993-01-01

    Thirty one patients in stable respiratory failure (arterial oxygen tension (PaO2) 67 +/- 20 mmHg (8.9 +/- 2.7 kPa) and arterial carbon dioxide tension (PaCO2) 59 +/- 10 mmHg 7.9 +/- 1.3 kPa)), secondary to non-obstructive ventilatory impairment, were treated by intermittent negative pressure ventilation (INPV), using a pneumowrap or poncho during the night. Daytime arterial blood gas measurements, taken before and after the ventilation, revealed a substantial improvement in PaO2, PaCO2 and maximal inspiratory pressure (Pimax). This improvement persisted during the six month follow-up of home nocturnal ventilation. The polysomnographic, recording during mechanical ventilation by poncho, in five patients, showed a general improvement in the quality and structure of sleep. All patients returned to normal arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2) values (> 90%), except for one. In three patients, the appearance of obstructive events was noted but the desaturation that they caused was, remarkably, lower than that caused by central events in baseline recording. We conclude that non-invasive treatment by INPV, in patients with neuromuscular and chest wall disease, is the method of choice as an alternative to intermittent positive pressure ventilation and to tracheostomy.

  7. Genetic causes of spermatogenic failure

    PubMed Central

    Massart, Annelien; Lissens, Willy; Tournaye, Herman; Stouffs, Katrien

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 10%–15% of couples are infertile, and a male factor is involved in almost half of these cases. This observation is due in part to defects in spermatogenesis, and the underlying causes, including genetic abnormalities, remain largely unknown. Until recently, the only genetic tests used in the diagnosis of male infertility were aimed at detecting the presence of microdeletions of the long arm of the Y chromosome and/or chromosomal abnormalities. Various other single-gene or polygenic defects have been proposed to be involved in male fertility. However, their causative effects often remain unproven. The recent evolution in the development of whole-genome-based techniques and the large-scale analysis of mouse models might help in this process. Through knockout mouse models, at least 388 genes have been shown to be associated with spermatogenesis in mice. However, problems often arise when translating this information from mice to humans. PMID:22138898

  8. Respiratory Failure Associated with Ascariasis in a Patient with Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Aleksandra, Lanocha; Barbara, Zdziarska; Natalia, Lanocha-Arendarczyk; Danuta, Kosik-Bogacka; Renata, Guzicka-Kazimierczak; Ewa, Marzec-Lewenstein

    2016-01-01

    In industrialized countries, risk groups for parasitic diseases include travelers, recent immigrants, and patients with immunodeficiency following chemotherapy and radiotherapy and AIDS. A 66-year-old Polish male was admitted in December 2012 to the Department of Haematology in a fairly good general condition. On the basis of cytological, cytochemical, immunophenotypic, and cytogenetic analysis of bone marrow, the patient was diagnosed with acute myeloblastic leukemia. On the 7th day of hospitalization in the Department of Haematology, patient was moved to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) due to acute respiratory and circulatory failure. In March 2013, 3 months after the onset of respiratory failures, a mature form of Ascaris spp. appeared in the patient's mouth. This report highlights the importance of considering an Ascaris infection in patients with low immunity presenting no eosinophilia but pulmonary failure in the central countries of Europe. PMID:27313919

  9. [Respiratory failure in cystic fibrosis: management in pediatric intensive care unit, lung transplantation recommendation].

    PubMed

    Pelluau, S; Oualha, M; Souilamas, R; Hubert, P H

    2012-05-01

    Admission to the ICU for respiratory failure of a child with cystic fibrosis is a telltale sign of the severity of the disease. Bronchopulmonary exacerbation, pneumothorax and hemoptysis are the primary causes, for which respiratory assistance is indispensable in these life-threatening situations. Non-invasive ventilation (NIV) has enabled significant progress in improving patient survival. The modalities of NIV must be tailored to both the patient and the cause of respiratory failure. Invasive ventilation, on the other hand, should be a treatment of last resort, because often associated with high mortality. It must be adapted to the therapeutic strategy involving an impending transplantation, including in critical situations where placement on a high emergency list is a possibility. Since admission to ICU is at times the reflection of the terminal evolution of the disease, ongoing treatment must hence be adapted to the comfort of the child.

  10. Flu Shot May Curb Respiratory Infections in People with Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Shot May Curb Respiratory Infections in People With Heart Failure Doctors should consider high-dose vaccine for those ... HealthDay News) -- Flu and pneumonia vaccines may reduce heart failure patients' risk of dangerous respiratory infections, a new ...

  11. Venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in adult respiratory failure

    PubMed Central

    Hsin, Chun-Hsien; Wu, Meng-Yu; Huang, Chung-Chi; Kao, Kuo-Chin; Lin, Pyng-Jing

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Despite a potentially effective therapy for adult respiratory failure, a general agreement on venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VV-ECMO) has not been reached among institutions due to its invasiveness and high resource usage. To establish consensus on the timing of intervention, large ECMO organizations have published the respiratory extracorporeal membrane oxygenation survival prediction (RESP) score and the ECMOnet score, which allow users to predict hospital mortality for candidates with their pre-ECMO presentations. This study was aimed to test the predictive powers of these published scores in a medium-sized cohort enrolling adults treated with VV-ECMO for acute respiratory failure, and develop an institutional prediction model under the framework of the 3 scores if a superior predictive power could be achieved. This retrospective study included 107 adults who received VV-ECMO for severe acute respiratory failure (a PaO2/FiO2 ratio <70 mm Hg) in a tertiary referral center from 2007 to 2015. Essential demographic and clinical data were collected to calculate the RESP score, the ECMOnet score, and the sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score before VV-ECMO. The predictive power of hospital mortality of each score was presented as the area under receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUROC). The multivariate logistic regression was used to develop an institutional prediction model. The surviving to discharge rate was 55% (n = 59). All of the 3 published scores had a real but poor predictive power of hospital mortality in this study. The AUROCs of RESP score, ECMOnet score, and SOFA score were 0.662 (P = 0.004), 0.616 (P = 0.04), and 0.667 (P = 0.003), respectively. An institutional prediction model was established from these score parameters and presented as follows: hospital mortality (Y) = −3.173 + 0.208 × (pre-ECMO SOFA score) + 0.148 × (pre-ECMO mechanical ventilation day) + 1.021

  12. Sedation in Critically Ill Children with Respiratory Failure

    PubMed Central

    Vet, Nienke J.; Kleiber, Niina; Ista, Erwin; de Hoog, Matthijs; de Wildt, Saskia N.

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses the rationale of sedation in respiratory failure, sedation goals, how to assess the need for sedation as well as effectiveness of interventions in critically ill children, with validated observational sedation scales. The drugs and non-pharmacological approaches used for optimal sedation in ventilated children are reviewed, and specifically the rationale for drug selection, including short- and long-term efficacy and safety aspects of the selected drugs. The specific pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic aspects of sedative drugs in the critically ill child and consequences for dosing are presented. Furthermore, we discuss different sedation strategies and their adverse events, such as iatrogenic withdrawal syndrome and delirium. These principles can guide clinicians in the choice of sedative drugs in pediatric respiratory failure. PMID:27606309

  13. Non-invasive ventilation in acute respiratory failure in children

    PubMed Central

    Abadesso, Clara; Nunes, Pedro; Silvestre, Catarina; Matias, Ester; Loureiro, Helena; Almeida, Helena

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to assess the clinical efficacy of non-invasive ventilation (NIV) in avoiding endotracheal intubation (ETI), to demonstrate clinical and gasometric improvement and to identify predictive risk factors associated with NIV failure. An observational prospective clinical study was carried out. Included Patients with acute respiratory disease (ARD) treated with NIV, from November 2006 to January 2010 in a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU). NIV was used in 151 patients with acute respiratory failure (ARF). Patients were divided in two groups: NIV success and NIV failure, if ETI was required. Mean age was 7.2±20.3 months (median: 1 min: 0,3 max.: 156). Main diagnoses were bronchiolitis in 102 (67.5%), and pneumonia in 44 (29%) patients. There was a significant improvement in respiratory rate (RR), heart rate (HR), pH, and pCO2 at 2, 6, 12 and 24 hours after NIV onset (P<0.05) in both groups. Improvement in pulse oximetric saturation/fraction of inspired oxygen (SpO2/FiO2) was verified at 2, 4, 6, 12 and 24 hours after NIV onset in the success group (P<0.001). In the failure group, significant SpO2/FiO2 improvement was only observed in the first 4 hours. NIV failure occurred in 34 patients (22.5%). Risk factors for NIV failure were apnea, prematurity, pneumonia, and bacterial co-infection (P<0.05). Independent risk factors for NIV failure were apneia (P<0.001; odds ratio 15.8; 95% confidence interval: 3.42–71.4) and pneumonia (P<0.001, odds ratio 31.25; 95% confidence interval: 8.33–111.11). There were no major complications related with NIV. In conclusion this study demonstrates the efficacy of NIV as a form of respiratory support for children and infants with ARF, preventing clinical deterioration and avoiding ETI in most of the patients. Risk factors for failure were related with immaturity and severe infection. PMID:22802994

  14. [Analogies between heart and respiratory muscle failure. Importance to clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Köhler, D

    2009-01-01

    Heart failure is an established diagnosis. Respiratory muscle or ventilatory pump failure, however, is less well known. The latter becomes obvious through hypercapnia, caused by hypoventilation. The respiratory centre tunes into hypercapnea in order to prevent the danger of respiratory muscle overload (hypercapnic ventilatory failure). Hypoventilation will consecutively cause hypoxemia but this will not be responsible for performance limitation. One therefore has to distinguish primary hypoxemia evolving from diseases in the lung parenchyma. Here hypoxemia is the key feature and compensatory hyperventilation usually decreases PaCO2 levels. The cardiac as well as the respiratory pump adapt to an inevitable burden caused by chronic disease. In either case organ muscle mass will increase. If the burden exceeds the range of possible physiological adaptation, compensatory mechanisms will set in that are similar in both instances. During periods of overload either muscle system is mainly fueled by muscular glycogen. In the recovery phase (e. g. during sleep) stores are replenished, which can be recognized by down-regulation of the blood pressure in case of the cardiac pumb or by augmentation of hypercapnia through hypoventilation in case of the respiratory pump. The main function of cardiac and respiratory pump is maintenance of oxygen transport. The human body has developed certain compensatory mechanisms to adapt to insufficient oxygen supply especially during periods of overload. These mechanisms include shift of the oxygen binding curve, expression of respiratory chain isoenzymes capable of producing ATP at lower partial pressures of oxygen and the development of polyglobulia. Medically or pharmacologically the cardiac pump can be unloaded with beta blockers, the respiratory pump by application of inspired oxygen. Newer forms of therapy augment the process of recovery. The heart can be supported through bypass surgery or intravascular pump systems, while respiratory

  15. Successful management of acute respiratory failure with noninvasive mechanical ventilation after drowning, in an epileptic-patient.

    PubMed

    Ruggeri, Paolo; Calcaterra, Salvatore; Bottari, Antonio; Girbino, Giuseppe; Fodale, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Sea drowning is a common cause of accidental death worldwide. Respiratory complications such as acute pulmonary oedema, which is often complicated by acute respiratory distress syndrome, is often seen. Noninvasive ventilation is already widely used as a first approach to treat acute respiratory failure resulting from multiple diseases. We report a case of a 45 year old man with a history of epilepsy, motor and mental handicap who developed acute respiratory failure secondary to sea water drowning after an epileptic crisis. We illustrate successful and rapid management of this case with noninvasive ventilation. We emphasize the advantages and limitations of using noninvasive ventilation to treat acute respiratory failure due to sea water drowning syndrome.

  16. Noninvasive Mechanical Ventilation in Acute Respiratory Failure Patients: A Respiratory Therapist Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Hidalgo, V; Giugliano-Jaramillo, C; Pérez, R; Cerpa, F; Budini, H; Cáceres, D; Gutiérrez, T; Molina, J; Keymer, J; Romero-Dapueto, C

    2015-01-01

    Physiotherapist in Chile and Respiratory Therapist worldwide are the professionals who are experts in respiratory care, in mechanical ventilation (MV), pathophysiology and connection and disconnection criteria. They should be experts in every aspect of the acute respiratory failure and its management, they and are the ones who in medical units are able to resolve doubts about ventilation and the setting of the ventilator. Noninvasive mechanical ventilation should be the first-line of treatment in acute respiratory failure, and the standard of care in severe exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema, and in immunosuppressed patients with high levels of evidence that support the work of physiotherapist. Exist other considerations where most of the time, physicians and other professionals in the critical units do not take into account when checking the patient ventilator synchrony, such as the appropriate patient selection, ventilator selection, mask selection, mode selection, and the selection of a trained team in NIMV. The physiotherapist needs to evaluate bedside; if patients are properly connected to the ventilator and in a synchronously manner. In Chile, since 2004, the physioterapist are included in the guidelines as a professional resource in the ICU organization, with the same skills and obligations as those described in the literature for respiratory therapists. PMID:26312104

  17. Noninvasive Mechanical Ventilation in Acute Respiratory Failure Patients: A Respiratory Therapist Perspective.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, V; Giugliano-Jaramillo, C; Pérez, R; Cerpa, F; Budini, H; Cáceres, D; Gutiérrez, T; Molina, J; Keymer, J; Romero-Dapueto, C

    2015-01-01

    Physiotherapist in Chile and Respiratory Therapist worldwide are the professionals who are experts in respiratory care, in mechanical ventilation (MV), pathophysiology and connection and disconnection criteria. They should be experts in every aspect of the acute respiratory failure and its management, they and are the ones who in medical units are able to resolve doubts about ventilation and the setting of the ventilator. Noninvasive mechanical ventilation should be the first-line of treatment in acute respiratory failure, and the standard of care in severe exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema, and in immunosuppressed patients with high levels of evidence that support the work of physiotherapist. Exist other considerations where most of the time, physicians and other professionals in the critical units do not take into account when checking the patient ventilator synchrony, such as the appropriate patient selection, ventilator selection, mask selection, mode selection, and the selection of a trained team in NIMV. The physiotherapist needs to evaluate bedside; if patients are properly connected to the ventilator and in a synchronously manner. In Chile, since 2004, the physioterapist are included in the guidelines as a professional resource in the ICU organization, with the same skills and obligations as those described in the literature for respiratory therapists.

  18. Chronic sublethal stress causes bee colony failure.

    PubMed

    Bryden, John; Gill, Richard J; Mitton, Robert A A; Raine, Nigel E; Jansen, Vincent A A

    2013-12-01

    Current bee population declines and colony failures are well documented yet poorly understood and no single factor has been identified as a leading cause. The evidence is equivocal and puzzling: for instance, many pathogens and parasites can be found in both failing and surviving colonies and field pesticide exposure is typically sublethal. Here, we investigate how these results can be due to sublethal stress impairing colony function. We mathematically modelled stress on individual bees which impairs colony function and found how positive density dependence can cause multiple dynamic outcomes: some colonies fail while others thrive. We then exposed bumblebee colonies to sublethal levels of a neonicotinoid pesticide. The dynamics of colony failure, which we observed, were most accurately described by our model. We argue that our model can explain the enigmatic aspects of bee colony failures, highlighting an important role for sublethal stress in colony declines.

  19. Chronic sublethal stress causes bee colony failure

    PubMed Central

    Bryden, John; Gill, Richard J; Mitton, Robert A A; Raine, Nigel E; Jansen, Vincent A A; Hodgson, David

    2013-01-01

    Current bee population declines and colony failures are well documented yet poorly understood and no single factor has been identified as a leading cause. The evidence is equivocal and puzzling: for instance, many pathogens and parasites can be found in both failing and surviving colonies and field pesticide exposure is typically sublethal. Here, we investigate how these results can be due to sublethal stress impairing colony function. We mathematically modelled stress on individual bees which impairs colony function and found how positive density dependence can cause multiple dynamic outcomes: some colonies fail while others thrive. We then exposed bumblebee colonies to sublethal levels of a neonicotinoid pesticide. The dynamics of colony failure, which we observed, were most accurately described by our model. We argue that our model can explain the enigmatic aspects of bee colony failures, highlighting an important role for sublethal stress in colony declines. PMID:24112478

  20. The role of high flow oxygen therapy in acute respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Masclans, J R; Pérez-Terán, P; Roca, O

    2015-11-01

    Acute respiratory failure represents one of the most common causes of intensive care unit admission and oxygen therapy remains the first-line therapy in the management of these patients. In recent years, high-flow oxygen via nasal cannula has been described as a useful alternative to conventional oxygen therapy in patients with acute respiratory failure. High-flow oxygen via nasal cannula rapidly alleviates symptoms of acute respiratory failure and improves oxygenation by several mechanisms, including dead space washout, reduction in oxygen dilution and inspiratory nasopharyngeal resistance, a moderate positive airway pressure effect that may generate alveolar recruitment and an overall greater tolerance and comfort with the interface and the heated and humidified inspired gases. However, the experience in adults is still limited and there are no clinical guidelines to establish recommendations for their use. This article aims to review the existing evidence on the use of high-flow oxygen via nasal cannula in adults with acute respiratory failure and its possible applications, advantages and limitations.

  1. Multicenter study on the prognosis associated with respiratory support for children with acute hypoxic respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Guo, Fei; Hao, Lin; Zhen, Qing; Diao, Min; Zhang, Chonglin

    2016-11-01

    The objective of the present study was to explore the factors influencing the outcomes related to respiratory support of children with acute hypoxic respiratory failure (AHRF) in 30 hospitals. This was a non-controlled prospective and collaborative multicenter clinical study conducted from June, 2010 to May, 2011 (each hospital for 12 consecutive months). Children aged from 29 days to 6 years and who met the diagnostic standards of AHRF were enrolled as subjects for the study. After patients were enrolled, general parameters including disease diagnosis, treatment and prognosis were recorded. Then we analyzed the differences in prognosis and respiratory therapy of patients with AHRF. During the study period, 13,906 cases of AHRF were admitted among the 30 hospitals, accounting for 75.3% of the total number of patients with AHRF. The proportion in different hospitals ranged from 16 to 98%. A total of 492 children with hypoxic respiratory failure were admitted among the 30 hospitals. The prevalence rate was 3.54%, and the incidence of AHRF in each hospital was 4.54%. Tidal volume and respiratory support treatment were compared with the results from a 2006 study, and the differences were statistically significant in positive end-expiratory pressure (5 vs. 4, P=0.018), fraction of inspire O2 (0.5 vs. 0.4, P<0.001), pressure of artery O2 (70 vs. 60 mmHg, P<0.001) and peak inspiratory pressure (20 vs. 24 cm H2Ο, P<0.001). In conclusion, academic background and the level of regional economic development are factors which influence the prognosis of children with AHRF. On the basis of unapparent differences between academic background and the level of regional economic development, there is a substantial difference in the prognosis from different forms of respiratory support management for AHRF. Therefore, it is essential to develop respiratory support and the level of critical management of pediatric intensive care units.

  2. Causes of catastrophic failure in complex systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, David A.

    2010-08-01

    Root causes of mission critical failures and major cost and schedule overruns in complex systems and programs are studied through the post-mortem analyses compiled for several examples, including the Hubble Space Telescope, the Challenger and Columbia Shuttle accidents, and the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant accident. The roles of organizational complexity, cognitive biases in decision making, the display of quantitative data, and cost and schedule pressure are all considered. Recommendations for mitigating the risk of similar failures in future programs are also provided.

  3. Acute respiratory failure secondary to mesalamine-induced interstitial pneumonitis

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Albin; Karakurum, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Interstitial pneumonitis as an adverse effect of mesalamine therapy is a rare but potentially serious complication. Patients typically have a mild disease course with no documented cases of respiratory failure in published literature. Given its variable latent period and non-specific signs and symptoms, it may be difficult to diagnose. We present the case of a 65-year-old man who presented with symptoms of fever, shortness of breath and a non-productive cough, 2 weeks after initiation of therapy with mesalamine. His hospital course was complicated by acute respiratory failure requiring intubation and mechanical ventilation. Radiographic studies revealed bilateral lower lobe infiltrates and bronchosopy with bronchoalveolar lavage and transbronchial biopsy were consistent with a diagnosis of drug-induced interstitial pneumonitis. The aim of this paper is to highlight the importance of considering a diagnosis of mesalamine-induced lung injury in patients presenting with respiratory symptoms while on mesalamine therapy and to review relevant literature. PMID:23964037

  4. [Effect of phenibut on the respiratory arrest caused by serotonin].

    PubMed

    Tarakanov, I A; Tarasova, N N; Belova, E A; Safonov, V A

    2006-01-01

    The role of the GABAergic system in mechanisms of the respiratory arrest caused by serotonin administration was studied in anaesthetized rats. Under normal conditions, the systemic administration of serotonin (20-60 mg/kg, i.v.) resulted in drastic changes of the respiratory pattern, whereby the initial phase of increased respiratory rate was followed by the respiratory arrest. The preliminary injection of phenibut (400 mg/kg, i.p.) abolished or sharply reduced the duration of the respiratory arrest phase induced by serotonin. Bilateral vagotomy following the phenibut injection potentiated the anti-apnoesic effect of phenibut, which was evidence of the additive action of vagotomy and phenibut administration. The mechanism of apnea caused by serotonin administration is suggested to include a central GABAergic element, which is activated by phenibut so as to counteract the respiratory arrest.

  5. Acute respiratory distress caused by Neosartorya udagawae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We describe the first reported case of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) attributed to Neosartorya infection. The mold grew rapidly in culture of both sputum and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid from a previously healthy 43-year-old woman with ARDS, which developed as the culmination of a...

  6. Pyrotechnic system failures: Causes and prevention

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, Laurence J.

    1988-01-01

    Although pyrotechnics have successfully accomplished many critical mechanical spacecraft functions, such as ignition, severance, jettisoning and valving (excluding propulsion), failures continue to occur. Provided is a listing of 84 failures of pyrotechnic hardware with completed design over a 23-year period, compiled informally by experts from every NASA Center, as well as the Air Force Space Division and the Naval Surface Warfare Center. Analyses are presented as to when and where these failures occurred, their technical source or cause, followed by the reasons why and how these kinds of failures persist. The major contributor is a fundamental lack of understanding of the functional mechanisms of pyrotechnic devices and systems, followed by not recognizing pyrotechnics as an engineering technology, insufficient manpower with hands-on experience, too few test facilities, and inadequate guidelines and specifications for design, development, qualification and acceptance. Recommendations are made on both a managerial and technical basis to prevent failures, increase reliability, improve existing and future designs, and develop the technology to meet future requirements.

  7. Occupational mercury vapour poisoning with a respiratory failure, pneumomediastinum and severe quadriparesis

    PubMed Central

    Smiechowicz, Jakub; Skoczynska, Anna; Nieckula-Szwarc, Agata; Kulpa, Katarzyna; Kübler, Andrzej

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Despite restrictions, mercury continues to pose a health concern. Mercury has the ability to deposit in most parts of the body and can cause a wide range of unspecific symptoms leading to diagnostic mistakes. Methods and results: We report the case of severe mercury vapour poisoning after occupational exposure in a chloralkali plant worker that resulted in life-threatening respiratory failure, pneumomediastinum and quadriparesis. Conclusions: Prolonged mechanical ventilation and treatment with penicillamine and spironolactone was used with successful outcome. PMID:28321305

  8. Special article: rescue therapies for acute hypoxemic respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Liu, Linda L; Aldrich, J Matthew; Shimabukuro, David W; Sullivan, Kristina R; Taylor, John M; Thornton, Kevin C; Gropper, Michael A

    2010-09-01

    The recent H1N1 epidemic has resulted in a large number of deaths, primarily from acute hypoxemic respiratory failure. We reviewed the current strategies to rescue patients with severe hypoxemia. Included in these strategies are high-frequency oscillatory ventilation, airway pressure release ventilation, inhaled vasodilators, and the use of extracorporeal life support. All of these strategies are targeted at improving oxygenation, but improved oxygenation alone has yet to be demonstrated to correlate with improved survival. The risks and benefits of these strategies, including cost-effectiveness data, are discussed.

  9. Noninvasive ventilation in acute respiratory failure from respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis

    PubMed Central

    Nizarali, Zahara; Cabral, Marta; Silvestre, Catarina; Abadesso, Clara; Nunes, Pedro; Loureiro, Helena; Almeida, Helena

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The present study focused on respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis with respiratory failure. The aim of the study was to determine whether noninvasive ventilation reduces the need for endotracheal intubation or slows the clinical progression of acute respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis by reducing the incidence of infectious complications. Methods The present study was a retrospective cohort study. Cohort A was comprised of children who were admitted to the pediatric intensive and special care unit from 2003-2005 before starting noninvasive ventilation; cohort B was comprised of children who were admitted to the pediatric intensive and special care unit from 2006-2008 after starting noninvasive ventilation. With the exception of noninvasive ventilation, the therapeutic support was the same for the two groups. All children who were diagnosed with respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis and respiratory failure between November 2003 and March 2008 were included in the cohort. Demographic, clinical and blood gas variables were analyzed. Results A total of 162 children were included; 75% of the subjects were less than 3 months old. Group A included 64 children, and group B included 98 children. In group B, 34 of the children required noninvasive ventilation. The distributions of the variables age, preterm birth, congenital heart disease, cerebral palsy and chronic lung disease were similar between the two groups. On admission, the data for blood gas analysis and the number of apneas were not significantly different between the groups. In group B, fewer children required invasive ventilation (group A: 12/64 versus group B: 7/98; p=0.02), and there was a reduction in the number of cases of bacterial pneumonia (group A: 19/64 versus group B: 12/98; p=0.008). There was no record of mortality in either of the groups. Conclusion By comparing children with the same disease both before and after noninvasive ventilation was used for ventilation support, we

  10. Emergency treatment and nursing of children with severe pneumonia complicated by heart failure and respiratory failure: 10 case reports

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wanli; An, Xinjiang; Fu, Mingyu; Li, Chunli

    2016-01-01

    Pneumonia refers to lung inflammation caused by different pathogens or other factors, and is a common pediatric disease occurring in infants and young children. It is closely related to the anatomical and physiological characteristics of infants and young children and is more frequent during winter and spring, or sudden changes in temperature. Pneumonia is a serious disease that poses a threat to children's health and its morbidity and mortality rank first, accounting for 24.5–65.2% of pediatric inpatients. Due to juvenile age, severe illness and rapid changes, children often suffer acute heart failure, respiratory failure and even toxic encephalopathy at the same time. The concurrence in different stages of the process of emergency treatment tends to relapse, which directly places the lives of these children at risk. Severe pneumonia constitutes one of the main causes of infant mortality. In the process of nursing children with severe pneumonia, intensive care was provided, including condition assessment and diagnosis, close observation of disease, keeping the airway unblocked, rational oxygen therapy, prevention and treatment of respiratory and circulatory failure, support of vital organs, complications, and health education. The inflammatory response was proactively controlled, to prevent suffocation and reduce mortality. In summary, positive and effective nursing can promote the rehabilitation of children patients, which can be reinforced with adequate communication with the parents and/or caretakers. PMID:27698703

  11. Emergency treatment and nursing of children with severe pneumonia complicated by heart failure and respiratory failure: 10 case reports.

    PubMed

    Li, Wanli; An, Xinjiang; Fu, Mingyu; Li, Chunli

    2016-10-01

    Pneumonia refers to lung inflammation caused by different pathogens or other factors, and is a common pediatric disease occurring in infants and young children. It is closely related to the anatomical and physiological characteristics of infants and young children and is more frequent during winter and spring, or sudden changes in temperature. Pneumonia is a serious disease that poses a threat to children's health and its morbidity and mortality rank first, accounting for 24.5-65.2% of pediatric inpatients. Due to juvenile age, severe illness and rapid changes, children often suffer acute heart failure, respiratory failure and even toxic encephalopathy at the same time. The concurrence in different stages of the process of emergency treatment tends to relapse, which directly places the lives of these children at risk. Severe pneumonia constitutes one of the main causes of infant mortality. In the process of nursing children with severe pneumonia, intensive care was provided, including condition assessment and diagnosis, close observation of disease, keeping the airway unblocked, rational oxygen therapy, prevention and treatment of respiratory and circulatory failure, support of vital organs, complications, and health education. The inflammatory response was proactively controlled, to prevent suffocation and reduce mortality. In summary, positive and effective nursing can promote the rehabilitation of children patients, which can be reinforced with adequate communication with the parents and/or caretakers.

  12. Respiratory failure induced by acute organophosphate poisoning in rats: effects of vagotomy.

    PubMed

    Gaspari, Romolo J; Paydarfar, David

    2009-03-01

    Acute organophosphate (OP) poisoning causes respiratory failure through two mechanisms: central apnea and pulmonary dysfunction. The vagus nerve is involved in both the central control of respiratory rhythm as well as the control of pulmonary vasculature, airways and secretions. We used a rat model of acute OP poisoning with and without a surgical vagotomy to explore the role of the vagus in OP-induced respiratory failure. Dichlorvos (2,2-dichlorovinyl dimethyl phosphate) injection (100mg/kg subcutaneously, 3 x LD50) resulted in progressive hypoventilation and apnea in all animals, irrespective of whether or not the vagi were intact. However, vagotomized animals exhibited a more rapidly progressive decline in ventilation and oxygenation. Artificial mechanical ventilation initiated at onset of apnea resulted in improvement in oxygenation and arterial pressure in poisoned animals with no difference between vagus intact or vagotomized animals. Our observations suggest that vagal mechanisms have a beneficial effect during the poisoning process. We speculate that vagally mediated feedback signals from the lung to the brainstem serve as a modest protective mechanism against central respiratory depressive effects of the poison and that bulbar-generated efferent vagal signals do not cause sufficient pulmonary dysfunction to impair pulmonary gas exchange.

  13. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation: a breakthrough for respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Frenckner, B

    2015-12-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is a method for providing long-term treatment of a patient in a modified heart-lung machine. Desaturated blood is drained from the patient, oxygenated and pumped back to a major vein or artery. ECMO supports heart and lung function and may be used in severe heart and/or lung failure when conventional intensive care fails. The Stockholm programme started in 1987 with treatment of neonates. In 1995, the first adult patient was accepted onto the programme. Interhospital transportation during ECMO was started in 1996, which enabled retrieval of extremely unstable patients during ECMO. Today, the programme has an annual volume of about 80 patients. It has been characterized by, amongst other things, minimal patient sedation. By 31 December 2014, over 900 patients had been treated, the vast majority for respiratory failure, and over 650 patients had been transported during ECMO. The median ECMO duration was 5.3, 5.7 and 7.1 days for neonatal, paediatric and adult patients, respectively. The survival to hospital discharge rate for respiratory ECMO was 81%, 70% and 63% in the different age groups, respectively, which is significantly higher than the overall international experience as reported to the Extracorporeal Life Support Organization (ELSO) Registry (74%, 57% and 57%, respectively). The survival rate was significantly higher in the Stockholm programme compared to ELSO for meconium aspiration syndrome, congenital diaphragmatic hernia in neonates and pneumocystis pneumonia in paediatric patients.

  14. Noninvasive ventilation for patients with hypoxemic acute respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Brochard, Laurent; Lefebvre, Jean-Claude; Cordioli, Ricardo Luiz; Akoumianaki, Evangelia; Richard, Jean-Christophe M

    2014-08-01

    Noninvasive ventilation (NIV) has an established efficacy to improve gas exchange and reduce the work of breathing in patients with hypoxemic acute respiratory failure. The clinical efficacy in terms of meaningful outcome is less clear and depends very much on patient selection and assessment of the risks of the technique. The potential risks include an insufficient reduction of the oxygen consumption of the respiratory muscles in case of shock, an excessive increase in tidal volume in case of lung injury, and a risk of delayed or emergent intubation. With a careful selection of patients and a rapid decision regarding the need for intubation in case of failure, great benefits can be offered to patients. Emerging indications include its use in patients with treatment limitations, in the postoperative period, and in patients with immunosuppression. This last indication will necessitate reappraisal because the prognosis of the conditions associated with immunosuppression has improved over the years. In all cases, there is both a time window and a severity window for NIV to work, after which delaying endotracheal intubation may worsen outcome. The preventive use of NIV seems promising in this setting but needs more research. An emerging interesting new option is the use of high flow humidified oxygen, which seems to be intermediate between oxygen alone and NIV.

  15. Vocal Cord Paralysis and Hypercapnic Respiratory Failure in a Patient with Familial Amyloidotic Polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Pıhtılı, Aylin; Bingol, Züleyha; Durmuş, Hacer; Parman, Yeşim; Kıyan, Esen

    2016-01-01

    We herein report a patient case with familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy (FAP) who presented with vocal cord paralysis (VCP). A 60-year-old man with FAP (Gly89Gln) presented with hoarseness and snoring for the previous two years. A chest X-ray demonstrated cardiomegaly and bilateral diaphragmatic elevation. The findings of a restrictive pattern on spirometry and daytime hypercapnia were consistent with respiratory muscle weakness related to neuropathy [forced expiratory volume (FEV1): 38%, forced vital capacity (FVC): 39%, FEV1/FVC: 77, partial pressure of arterial oxygen (PaO2): 80 mmHg, partial pressure of carbon dioxide in arterial blood (PaCO2): 52 mmHg]. An ear-nose-throat examination showed VCP. Polysomnography revealed severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). FAP may cause OSA by VCP and hypercapnic respiratory failure by respiratory muscle weakness. Therefore, an ear-nose-throat examination, spirometry, arterial blood gases analysis and polysomnography are important for these patients.

  16. Changes of Respiratory Mechanics in COPD Patients from Stable State to Acute Exacerbations with Respiratory Failure.

    PubMed

    Ceriana, Piero; Vitacca, Michele; Carlucci, Annalisa; Paneroni, Mara; Pisani, Lara; Nava, Stefano

    2017-04-01

    Symptoms, clinical course, functional and biological data during an exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (EXCOPD) have been investigated, but data on physiological changes of respiratory mechanics during a severe exacerbation with respiratory acidosis requiring noninvasive mechanical ventilation (NIMV) are scant. The aim of this study was to evaluate changes of respiratory mechanics in COPD patients comparing data observed during EXCOPD with those observed during stable state in the recovery phase. In 18 COPD patients having severe EXCOPD requiring NIMV for global respiratory failure, we measured respiratory mechanics during both EXCOPD (T0) and once the patients achieved a stable state (T1). The diaphragm and inspiratory muscles effort was significantly increased under relapse, as well as the pressure-time product of the diaphragm and the inspiratory muscle (PTPdi and PTPes). The resistive loads to breathe (i.e., PEEPi,dyn, compliance and inspiratory resistances) were also markedly increased, while the maximal pressures generated by the diaphragm and the inspiratory muscles, together with forced expired volumes were decreased. All these indices statistically improved but with a great intrasubject variability in stable condition. Moreover, tension-time index (TTdi) significantly improved from the EXCOPD state to the condition of clinical stability (0.156 ± 0.04 at T0 vs. 0.082 ± 0.02 at T1 p < 0.001). During an EXCOPD, the load/capacity of the respiratory pump is impaired, and although the patients exhibit a rapid shallow breathing pattern, this does not necessarily correlate with a TTdi ≥ 0.15. These changes are reverted once they recover from the EXCOPD, despite a large variability between patients.

  17. Causes of hatching failure in endangered birds

    PubMed Central

    Hemmings, N.; West, M.; Birkhead, T. R.

    2012-01-01

    About 10 per cent of birds' eggs fail to hatch, but the incidence of failure can be much higher in endangered species. Most studies fail to distinguish between infertility (due to a lack of sperm) and embryo mortality as the cause of hatching failure, yet doing so is crucial in order to understand the underlying problem. Using newly validated techniques to visualize sperm and embryonic tissue, we assessed the fertility status of unhatched eggs of five endangered species, including both wild and captive birds. All eggs were classified as ‘infertile’ when collected, but most were actually fertile with numerous sperm on the ovum. Eggs of captive birds had fewer sperm and were more likely to be infertile than those of wild birds. Our findings raise important questions regarding the management of captive breeding programmes. PMID:22977070

  18. Acute respiratory failure and mechanical ventilation in pregnant patient: A narrative review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Pradeep Kumar; Biyani, Ghansham; Mohammed, Sadik; Sethi, Priyanka; Bihani, Pooja

    2016-01-01

    Physiological changes of pregnancy imposes higher risk of acute respiratory failure (ARF) with even a slight insult and remains an important cause of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Although pregnant women have different respiratory physiology and different causes of ARF, guidelines specific to ventilatory settings, goals of oxygenation and weaning process could not be framed due to lack of large-scale randomized controlled trials. During the 2009 H1N1 pandemic, pregnant women had higher morbidity and mortality compared to nonpregnant women. During this period, alternative strategies of ventilation such as high-frequency oscillatory ventilation, inhalational of nitric oxide, prone positioning, and extra corporeal membrane oxygenation were increasingly used as a desperate measure to rescue pregnant patients with severe hypoxemia who were not improving with conventional mechanical ventilation. This article highlights the causes of ARF and recent advances in invasive, noninvasive and alternative strategies of ventilation used during pregnancy. PMID:28096571

  19. Timing of noninvasive ventilation failure: causes, risk factors, and potential remedies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Identifying the predictors of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) failure has attracted significant interest because of the strong link between failure and poor outcomes. However, very little attention has been paid to the timing of the failure. This narrative review focuses on the causes of NIV failure and risk factors and potential remedies for NIV failure, based on the timing factor. Results The possible causes of immediate failure (within minutes to <1 h) are a weak cough reflex, excessive secretions, hypercapnic encephalopathy, intolerance, agitation, and patient-ventilator asynchrony. The major potential interventions include chest physiotherapeutic techniques, early fiberoptic bronchoscopy, changing ventilator settings, and judicious sedation. The risk factors for early failure (within 1 to 48 h) may differ for hypercapnic and hypoxemic respiratory failure. However, most cases of early failure are due to poor arterial blood gas (ABGs) and an inability to promptly correct them, increased severity of illness, and the persistence of a high respiratory rate. Despite a satisfactory initial response, late failure (48 h after NIV) can occur and may be related to sleep disturbance. Conclusions Every clinician dealing with NIV should be aware of these risk factors and the predicted parameters of NIV failure that may change during the application of NIV. Close monitoring is required to detect early and late signs of deterioration, thereby preventing unavoidable delays in intubation. PMID:24520952

  20. Acute respiratory failure in a rapidly enlarging benign cervical goitre.

    PubMed

    Garingarao, Carlo Jan; Añonuevo-Cruz, Cecille; Gasacao, Ryan

    2013-07-22

    Benign goitres have the potential to reach massive sizes if neglected, but most have a protracted course that may or may not present with compressive symptoms. We report the case of a 57-year-old man who presented with a rapidly enlarging nodular goitre resulting in acute respiratory failure. Endotracheal intubation and emergency total thyroidectomy were performed, revealing massive thyroid nodules with minimal intrathoracic extension and tracheal erosion. Despite a course and clinical findings suggestive of malignant disease, histopathology was consistent with a benign multinodular goitre. Several cases of benign goitres necessitating endotracheal intubation have been reported. Airway compromise was attributed to a significant intrathoracic component, or inciting events such as thyroid haemorrhage, pregnancy, radioiodine uptake or major surgery. Obstructive symptoms may not correlate well with objective measures of upper airway obstruction such as radiographs or flow volume loops.

  1. [Euthyroid sick syndrome in patients with respiratory failure].

    PubMed

    Wawrzyńska, L; Sakowicz, A; Filipecki, S

    1996-01-01

    There have been report concerning decrease of thyroid gland hormones concentrations in respiratory diseases. The aim of this study was to estimate the influence of severe respiratory failure (RF) of Intensive Care Unit (ICU) patients on blood serum thyroid hormone concentration. The tests were carried out in 22 ICU- patients with partial or total RF in whom the relationship between PO2, pH, PCO2 and TT3, TT4, FT3, rT3, FT4 was tested. The obtained data indicate that: 1. In patients with RF ESS takes place, 2. ESS seems to be related to the decrease of PO2; statistically significant correlation between TT3, FT3, rT3, and PO2 exist, 3. The increase of TT3 serum concentration directly correlates with the improvement of clinical state of patients. The lowest TT3 concentrations were observed in "ante mortem" patients. This fact suggest the prognostic value of TT3, TT4 concentration measurements in patients with RF.

  2. Respiratory High-Dependency Care Units for the burden of acute respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Scala, Raffaele

    2012-06-01

    The burden of acute respiratory failure (ARF) has become one of the greatest epidemiological challenges for the modern health systems. Consistently, the imbalance between the increasing prevalence of acutely de-compensated respiratory diseases and the shortage of high-daily cost ICU beds has stimulated new health cost-effective solutions. Respiratory High-Dependency Care Units (RHDCU) provide a specialised environment for patients who require an "intermediate" level of care between the ICU and the ward, where non-invasive monitoring and assisted ventilation techniques are preferentially applied. Since they are dedicated to the management of "mono-organ" decompensations, treatment of ARF patients in RHDCU avoids the dangerous "under-assistance" in the ward and unnecessary "over-assistance" in ICU. RHDCUs provide a specialised quality of care for ARF with health resources optimisation and their spread throughout health systems has been driven by their high-level of expertise in non-invasive ventilation (NIV), weaning from invasive ventilation, tracheostomy care, and discharging planning for ventilator-dependent patients.

  3. High Viral Load and Respiratory Failure in Adults Hospitalized for Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections.

    PubMed

    Lee, Nelson; Chan, Martin C W; Lui, Grace C Y; Li, Ran; Wong, Rity Y K; Yung, Irene M H; Cheung, Catherine S K; Chan, Eugenia C Y; Hui, David S C; Chan, Paul K S

    2015-10-15

    A prospective study among adults hospitalized for polymerase chain reaction-confirmed respiratory syncytial virus infections (n = 123) showed frequent occurrence of lower respiratory-tract complications causing respiratory insufficiency (52.8%), requirement for assisted ventilation (16.3%), and intensive care unit admission/death (12.2%). High viral RNA concentration was detected at time of hospitalization, including in patients who presented later than 2 days of illness (day 1-2, 7.29 ± 1.47; day 3-4, 7.28 ± 1.41; day 5-8, 6.66 ± 1.87 log10 copies/mL). RNA concentration was independently associated with risk of complications and respiratory insufficiency (adjusted odds ratio 1.40 per log10 copies/mL increase, 95% confidence interval, 1.03-1.90; P = .034). Our data indicate the need and provide a basis for clinical research on antiviral therapy in this population.

  4. Physiological Correlation of Airway Pressure and Transpulmonary Pressure Stress Index on Respiratory Mechanics in Acute Respiratory Failure

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Chun; Chen, Lu; Zhang, Yun-Hang; Liu, Wei; Urbino, Rosario; Ranieri, V Marco; Qiu, Hai-Bo; Yang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Stress index at post-recruitment maneuvers could be a method of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) titration in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) patients. However, airway pressure (Paw) stress index may not reflect lung mechanics in the patients with high chest wall elastance. This study was to evaluate the Paw stress index on lung mechanics and the correlation between Paw stress index and transpulmonary pressure (PL) stress index in acute respiratory failure (ARF) patients. Methods: Twenty-four ARF patients with mechanical ventilation (MV) were consecutively recruited from July 2011 to April 2013 in Zhongda Hospital, Nanjing, China and Ospedale S. Giovanni Battista-Molinette Hospital, Turin, Italy. All patients underwent MV with volume control (tidal volume 6 ml/kg) for 20 min. PEEP was set according to the ARDSnet study protocol. The patients were divided into two groups according to the chest wall elastance/respiratory system elastance ratio. The high elastance group (H group, n = 14) had a ratio ≥30%, and the low elastance group (L group, n = 10) had a ratio <30%. Respiratory elastance, gas-exchange, Paw stress index, and PL stress index were measured. Student's t-test, regression analysis, and Bland–Altman analysis were used for statistical analysis. Results: Pneumonia was the major cause of respiratory failure (71.0%). Compared with the L group, PEEP was lower in the H group (5.7 ± 1.7 cmH2O vs. 9.0 ± 2.3 cmH2O, P < 0.01). Compared with the H group, lung elastance was higher (20.0 ± 7.8 cmH2O/L vs. 11.6 ± 3.6 cmH2O/L, P < 0.01), and stress was higher in the L group (7.0 ± 1.9 vs. 4.9 ± 1.9, P = 0.02). A linear relationship was observed between the Paw stress index and the PL stress index in H group (R2= 0.56, P < 0.01) and L group (R2= 0.85, P < 0.01). Conclusion: In the ARF patients with MV, Paw stress index can substitute for PL to guide ventilator settings. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02196870 (https

  5. Respiratory failure in a mouse model of myotonic dystrophy does not correlate with the CTG repeat length.

    PubMed

    Panaite, Petrica-Adrian; Kuntzer, Thierry; Gourdon, Geneviève; Barakat-Walter, Ibtissam

    2013-10-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM1) is a multisystemic disease caused by an expansion of CTG repeats in the region of DMPK, the gene encoding DM protein kinase. The severity of muscle disability in DM1 correlates with the size of CTG expansion. As respiratory failure is one of the main causes of death in DM1, we investigated the correlation between respiratory impairment and size of the (CTG)n repeat in DM1 animal models. Using pressure plethysmography the respiratory function was assessed in control and transgenic mice carrying either 600 (DM600) or >1300 CTG repeats (DMSXL). The statistical analysis of respiratory parameters revealed that both DM1 transgenic mice sub-lines show respiratory impairment compared to control mice. In addition, there is no significant difference in breathing functions between the DM600 and DMSXL mice. In conclusion, these results indicate that respiratory impairment is present in both transgenic mice sub-lines, but the severity of respiratory failure is not related to the size of the (CTG)n expansion.

  6. Radiation necrosis causing failure of automatic ventilation during sleep with central sleep apnea

    SciTech Connect

    Udwadia, Z.F.; Athale, S.; Misra, V.P.; Wadia, N.H.

    1987-09-01

    A patient operated upon for a midline cerebellar hemangioblastoma developed failure of automatic respiration during sleep, together with central sleep apnea syndrome, approximately two years after receiving radiation therapy to the brain. Clinical and CT scan findings were compatible with a diagnosis of radiation necrosis as the cause of his abnormal respiratory control.

  7. Severe hypoglycemia in a nondiabetic patient leading to acute respiratory failure.

    PubMed Central

    Baig, Muhammad Ahsan; Ali, Shaukat; Rasheed, Javeria; Bergman, Michael; Privman, Vladimir

    2006-01-01

    This report describes a unique case of prolonged hypoglycemia in a nondiabetic patient with end-stage renal disease and chronic liver disease. Following a less-than-24-hour period of being NPO (nothing per oral), the patient developed hypercapnic respiratory failure. Severe hypoglycemia in such a patient leading to respiratory failure provides major challenges in identification and management of his illness. To our knowledge, this is the first ever reported case of severe hypoglycemia leading to hypercapnic respiratory failure. We believe that the pathogenic basis for this patient's severe hypoglycemia is failure of contribution by the kidneys and liver to glucose production. PMID:16916139

  8. Clinical review: Respiratory failure in HIV-infected patients - a changing picture

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory failure in HIV-infected patients is a relatively common presentation to ICU. The debate on ICU treatment of HIV-infected patients goes on despite an overall decline in mortality amongst these patients since the AIDS epidemic. Many intensive care physicians feel that ICU treatment of critically ill HIV patients is likely to be futile. This is mainly due to the unfavourable outcome of HIV patients with Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia who need mechanical ventilation. However, the changing spectrum of respiratory illness in HIV-infected patients and improved outcome from critical illness remain under-recognised. Also, the awareness of certain factors that can affect their outcome remains low. As there are important ethical and practical implications for intensive care clinicians while making decisions to provide ICU support to HIV-infected patients, a review of literature was undertaken. It is notable that the respiratory illnesses that are not directly related to underlying HIV disease are now commonly encountered in the highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) era. The overall incidence of P. jirovecii as a cause of respiratory failure has declined since the AIDS epidemic and sepsis including bacterial pneumonia has emerged as a frequent cause of hospital and ICU admission amongst HIV patients. The improved overall outcome of HIV patients needing ICU admission is related to advancement in general ICU care, including adoption of improved ventilation strategies. An awareness of respiratory illnesses in HIV-infected patients along with an appropriate diagnostic and treatment strategy may obviate the need for invasive ventilation and improve outcome further. HIV-infected patients presenting with respiratory failure will benefit from early admission to critical care for treatment and support. There is evidence to suggest that continuing or starting HAART in critically ill HIV patients is beneficial and hence should be considered after multidisciplinary

  9. [Respiratory failure in the Guillain Barré syndrome].

    PubMed

    Schottlender, J G; Lombardi, D; Toledo, A; Otero, C; Mazia, C; Menga, G

    1999-01-01

    Severe involvement of the respiratory muscles is seen in 25% of patients with a diagnosis of Guillain Barré syndrome. In order to evaluate the clinical characteristics and evolution of this disorder we reviewed the clinical records of patients admitted with this diagnosis to our Hospital between January 1987 and December 1996. We identified 44 patients with respiratory failure. The age was 34.0 +/- 14.1 years, 31 patients were male and 13 female; 70.5% required mechanical ventilation (MV). The time elapsed between the beginning of symptoms and MV was 9.4 +/- 8.0 days. Total duration of MV was 1,224 +/- 1,208 hours. Patients who required ventilatory support during the first 48 hours of evolution had a significantly longer duration of MV compared to the rest of the group (2,100 +/- 2,076 vs 934 +/- 735 hours, p < 0.05). Two of the survivors needed ventilatory support for more than 6 months. All patients showed quadriparesia, 55% had cranial nerve involvement and 43% had autonomic dysregulation. Twenty-four percent had a positive serologic titer for cytomegalovirus infection. The vital capacity measured before the beginning of MV was 1,050 +/- 378 ml and at discharge 2,837 +/- 1,080 ml. Mortality was 18%, with a higher mean age among those who died (44.9 +/- 17.5 years vs 31.9 +/- 12.5, p < 0.02). Mortality was also related to sepsis, barotrauma and severe autonomic dysfunction. In our group, we identified male preponderance, a high percentage of MV with an extended duration, and a longer MV time in the group of patients with a faster evolution.

  10. Cardiac involvement in hereditary myopathy with early respiratory failure

    PubMed Central

    Steele, Hannah E.; Harris, Elizabeth; Barresi, Rita; Marsh, Julie; Beattie, Anna; Bourke, John P.; Straub, Volker

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess whether hereditary myopathy with early respiratory failure (HMERF) due to the c.951434T>C; (p.Cys31712Arg) TTN missense mutation also includes a cardiac phenotype. Method: Clinical cohort study of our HMERF cohort using ECG, 2D echocardiogram, and cross-sectional cardiac imaging with MRI or CT. Results: We studied 22 participants with the c.951434T>C; (p.Cys31712Arg) TTN missense mutation. Three were deceased. Cardiac conduction abnormalities were identified in 7/22 (32%): sustained atrioventricular tachycardia (n = 2), atrial fibrillation (n = 2), nonsustained atrial tachycardia (n = 1), premature supraventricular complexes (n = 1), and unexplained sinus bradycardia (n = 1). In addition, 4/22 (18%) had imaging evidence of otherwise unexplained cardiomyopathy. These findings are supported by histopathologic correlation suggestive of myocardial cytoskeletal remodeling. Conclusions: Coexisting cardiac and skeletal muscle involvement is not uncommon in patients with HMERF arising due to the c.951434T>C; (p.Cys31712Arg) TTN mutation. All patients with pathogenic or putative pathogenic TTN mutations should be offered periodic cardiac surveillance. PMID:27511179

  11. Non-invasive ventilation with bubble CPAP is feasible and improves respiratory physiology in hospitalised Malawian children with acute respiratory failure

    PubMed Central

    Walk, J.; Dinga, P.; Banda, C.; Msiska, T.; Chitsamba, E.; Chiwayula, N.; Lufesi, N.; Mlotha-Mitole, R.; Costello, A.; Phiri, A.; Colbourn, T.; McCollum, E. D.; Lang, H. J.

    2015-01-01

    Background In low-income countries and those with a high prevalence of HIV, respiratory failure is a common cause of death in children. However, the role of non-invasive ventilation with bubble continuous positive airway pressure (bCPAP) in these patients is not well established. Methods A prospective observational study of bCPAP was undertaken between July and September 2012 in 77 Malawian children aged 1 week to 14 years with progressive acute respiratory failure despite oxygen and antimicrobial therapy. Results Forty-one (53%) patients survived following bCPAP treatment, and an HIV-uninfected single-organ disease subgroup demonstrated bCPAP success in 14 of 17 (82%). Compared with children aged ≥60 months, infants of 0–2 months had a 93% lower odds of bCPAP failure (odds ratio 0.07, 95% confidence interval 0.004–1.02, P = 0.05). Following commencement of bCPAP, respiratory physiology improved, the average respiratory rate decreased from 61 to 49 breaths/minute (P = 0.0006), and mean oxygen saturation increased from 92.1% to 96.1% (P = 0.02). Conclusions bCPAP was well accepted by caregivers and patients and can be feasibly implemented into a tertiary African hospital with high-risk patients and limited resources. PMID:25434361

  12. Pathogenesis of acute respiratory illness caused by human parainfluenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Schomacker, Henrick; Schaap-Nutt, Anne; Collins, Peter L; Schmidt, Alexander C

    2012-06-01

    Human parainfluenza viruses (HPIVs) are a common cause of acute respiratory illness throughout life. Infants, children, and the immunocompromised are the most likely to develop severe disease. HPIV1 and HPIV2 are best known to cause croup while HPIV3 is a common cause of bronchiolitis and pneumonia. HPIVs replicate productively in respiratory epithelial cells and do not spread systemically unless the host is severely immunocompromised. Molecular studies have delineated how HPIVs evade and block cellular innate immune responses to permit efficient replication, local spread, and host-to-host transmission. Studies using ex vivo human airway epithelium have focused on virus tropism, cellular pathology and the epithelial inflammatory response, elucidating how events early in infection shape the adaptive immune response and disease outcome.

  13. Relevance of Lung Ultrasound in the Diagnosis of Acute Respiratory Failure*

    PubMed Central

    Mezière, Gilbert A.

    2008-01-01

    Background: This study assesses the potential of lung ultrasonography to diagnose acute respiratory failure. Methods: This observational study was conducted in university-affiliated teaching-hospital ICUs. We performed ultrasonography on consecutive patients admitted to the ICU with acute respiratory failure, comparing lung ultrasonography results on initial presentation with the final diagnosis by the ICU team. Uncertain diagnoses and rare causes (frequency < 2%) were excluded.Weincluded 260 dyspneic patients with a definite diagnosis. Three items were assessed: artifacts (horizontal A lines or vertical B lines indicating interstitial syndrome), lung sliding, and alveolar consolidation and/or pleural effusion. Combined with venous analysis, these items were grouped to assess ultrasound profiles. Results: Predominant A lines plus lung sliding indicated asthma (n = 34) or COPD (n = 49) with 89% sensitivity and 97% specificity. Multiple anterior diffuse B lines with lung sliding indicated pulmonary edema (n = 64) with 97% sensitivity and 95% specificity. A normal anterior profile plus deep venous thrombosis indicated pulmonary embolism (n = 21) with 81% sensitivity and 99% specificity. Anterior absent lung sliding plus A lines plus lung point indicated pneumothorax (n = 9) with 81% sensitivity and 100% specificity. Anterior alveolar consolidations, anterior diffuse B lines with abolished lung sliding, anterior asymmetric interstitial patterns, posterior consolidations or effusions without anterior diffuse B lines indicated pneumonia (n = 83) with 89% sensitivity and 94% specificity. The use of these profiles would have provided correct diagnoses in 90.5% of cases. Conclusions: Lung ultrasound can help the clinician make a rapid diagnosis in patients with acute respiratory failure, thus meeting the priority objective of saving time. PMID:18403664

  14. Infectious causes of equine respiratory disease on Ontario standardbred racetracks.

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, J; Thorsen, J; Barnum, D A; Mitchell, W R; Ingram, D G

    1977-01-01

    Upper respiratory disease has been a serious problem in Standardbred horses on racetracks in Ontario, with outbreaks occurring once or twice annually in late winter and early spring seasons. To determine the causes of these epidemics, a 3-year investigation was carried out in which nasal swabs and serum samples were obtained at intervals from apparently healthy horses and from horses suffering from upper respiratory disease. The nasal swabs were used to isolate bacteria and viruses. The serum samples were examined for the presence and level of antibodies to equine influenza viruses and equine herpesvirus 1. None of the bacteria isolated were associated with the outbreaks of disease. Equine herpesvirus 2 was isolated 72 times from both diseased and apparently healthy horses. Equine herpesvirus 1 was isolated 10 times from horses with respiratory disease, both during and between epidemics. Influenza equine/1 virus was isolated seven times and influenza equine/2 was isolated once during severe outbreaks of upper respiratory disease. Serological evidence confirmed that influenza viruses were the causes of the major epidemics, with the equine/1 strain being involved most often. PMID:192757

  15. Postmortem diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction in patients with acute respiratory failure - demographics, etiologic and pulmonary histologic analysis

    PubMed Central

    de Matos Soeiro, Alexandre; Ruppert, Aline D; Canzian, Mauro; Capelozzi, Vera L; Serrano, Carlos V

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Acute respiratory failure is present in 5% of patients with acute myocardial infarction and is responsible for 20% to 30% of the fatal post-acute myocardial infarction. The role of inflammation associated with pulmonary edema as a cause of acute respiratory failure post-acute myocardial infarction remains to be determined. We aimed to describe the demographics, etiologic data and histological pulmonary findings obtained through autopsies of patients who died during the period from 1990 to 2008 due to acute respiratory failure with no diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction during life. METHODS: This study considers 4,223 autopsies of patients who died of acute respiratory failure that was not preceded by any particular diagnosis while they were alive. The diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction was given in 218 (4.63%) patients. The age, sex and major associated diseases were recorded for each patient. Pulmonary histopathology was categorized as follows: diffuse alveolar damage, pulmonary edema, alveolar hemorrhage and lymphoplasmacytic interstitial pneumonia. The odds ratio of acute myocardial infarction associated with specific histopathology was determined by logistic regression. RESULTS: In total, 147 men were included in the study. The mean age at the time of death was 64 years. Pulmonary histopathology revealed pulmonary edema as well as the presence of diffuse alveolar damage in 72.9% of patients. Bacterial bronchopneumonia was present in 11.9% of patients, systemic arterial hypertension in 10.1% and dilated cardiomyopathy in 6.9%. A multivariate analysis demonstrated a significant positive association between acute myocardial infarction with diffuse alveolar damage and pulmonary edema. CONCLUSIONS: For the first time, we demonstrated that in autopsies of patients with acute respiratory failure as the cause of death, 5% were diagnosed with acute myocardial infarction. Pulmonary histology revealed a significant inflammatory response, which has

  16. Heart failure caused by toxoplasmosis in a fennec fox (Fennecus zerda).

    PubMed

    Kottwitz, Jack J; Preziosi, Diane E; Miller, Margaret A; Ramos-Vara, Jose A; Maggs, David J; Bonagura, John D

    2004-01-01

    A male fennec fox (Fennecus zerda) kit was examined for lethargy, inappetence, and weight loss. Clinical findings included respiratory distress, a gallop rhythm, and retinochoroiditis. Radiography indicated pleural effusion and cardiomegaly. Echocardiographic findings included left ventricular dilatation, low left ventricular ejection fraction, and atrioventricular valvular regurgitation. Necropsy findings were compatible with a diagnosis of congestive heart failure caused by myocarditis. Histopathology showed a disseminated infection with Toxoplasma gondii causing myocarditis, skeletal polymyositis, gastrointestinal myositis, and panuveitis. Toxoplasma-induced myocarditis should be included in the differential diagnosis of heart failure and retinochoroiditis in the fennec fox.

  17. Efficacy of emergent percutaneous cardiopulmonary support in cardiac or respiratory failure: fight or flight?

    PubMed

    Shinn, Sung Ho; Lee, Young Tak; Sung, Kiick; Min, Sunkyung; Kim, Wook Sung; Park, Pyo Won; Ha, Yi-Kyung

    2009-08-01

    We retrospectively evaluated early outcome and conducted this study to determine the predictive factors for percutaneous cardiopulmonary support (PCPS) weaning and hospital discharge. From January 2004 to December 2006, 92 patients diagnosed as cardiac or respiratory failure underwent PCPS using the Capiox emergent bypass system (Terumo, Tokyo, Japan). The mean+/-S.D. age was 56+/-18 (range, 14-85) years and 59 (64%) were male. The mean duration of PCPS was 90.9+/-126.0 h and that of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was 51.1+/-27.8 min. The rate of weaning was 59/92 (64%) and the rate of survival to discharge was 39/92 (42%). The results indicated that the etiologic disease (myocarditis) and the cause of PCPS (cardiopulmonary arrest) are significantly correlated with weaning, whereas cardiopulmonary arrest and a shorter CPR duration (<60 min) are considerably correlated with survival. On the contrary, elderly patients (>75 years) have similar rates of weaning and survival compared with younger patients. PCPS provides an acceptable survival rate and outcome in patients with cardiac or respiratory failure. Prompt application and selection of patients with a specific disease (myocarditis) provides good results. It is also effective in elderly patients, providing hospital survival similar to that for younger patients.

  18. Mechanical Ventilation during Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation in Patients with Acute Severe Respiratory Failure.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhongheng; Gu, Wan-Jie; Chen, Kun; Ni, Hongying

    2017-01-01

    Conventionally, a substantial number of patients with acute respiratory failure require mechanical ventilation (MV) to avert catastrophe of hypoxemia and hypercapnia. However, mechanical ventilation per se can cause lung injury, accelerating the disease progression. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) provides an alternative to rescue patients with severe respiratory failure that conventional mechanical ventilation fails to maintain adequate gas exchange. The physiology behind ECMO and its interaction with MV were reviewed. Next, we discussed the timing of ECMO initiation based on the risks and benefits of ECMO. During the running of ECMO, the protective ventilation strategy can be employed without worrying about catastrophic hypoxemia and carbon dioxide retention. There is a large body of evidence showing that protective ventilation with low tidal volume, high positive end-expiratory pressure, and prone positioning can provide benefits on mortality outcome. More recently, there is an increasing popularity on the use of awake and spontaneous breathing for patients undergoing ECMO, which is thought to be beneficial in terms of rehabilitation.

  19. Mechanical Ventilation during Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation in Patients with Acute Severe Respiratory Failure

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Wan-Jie; Chen, Kun; Ni, Hongying

    2017-01-01

    Conventionally, a substantial number of patients with acute respiratory failure require mechanical ventilation (MV) to avert catastrophe of hypoxemia and hypercapnia. However, mechanical ventilation per se can cause lung injury, accelerating the disease progression. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) provides an alternative to rescue patients with severe respiratory failure that conventional mechanical ventilation fails to maintain adequate gas exchange. The physiology behind ECMO and its interaction with MV were reviewed. Next, we discussed the timing of ECMO initiation based on the risks and benefits of ECMO. During the running of ECMO, the protective ventilation strategy can be employed without worrying about catastrophic hypoxemia and carbon dioxide retention. There is a large body of evidence showing that protective ventilation with low tidal volume, high positive end-expiratory pressure, and prone positioning can provide benefits on mortality outcome. More recently, there is an increasing popularity on the use of awake and spontaneous breathing for patients undergoing ECMO, which is thought to be beneficial in terms of rehabilitation. PMID:28127231

  20. Telemedicine system for the care of patients with neuromuscular disease and chronic respiratory failure

    PubMed Central

    Morete, Emilio; González, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Neuromuscular diseases cause a number of limitations which may be improved by using a telemedicine system. These include functional impairment and dependence associated with muscle weakness, the insidious development of respiratory failure and episodes of exacerbation. Material and methods The present study involved three patients with severe neuromuscular disease, chronic respiratory failure and long-term mechanical ventilation, who were followed up using a telemedicine platform. The telemedicine system is based on videoconferencing and telemonitoring of cardiorespiratory variables (oxygen saturation, heart rate, blood pressure and electrocardiogram). Two different protocols were followed depending on whether the patient condition was stable or unstable. Results Over a period of 5 years, we analyzed a series of variables including use of the system, patient satisfaction and clinical impact. Overall we performed 290 videoconference sessions, 269 short monitoring oximetry measurements and 110 blood pressure measurements. With respect to the clinical impact, after enrolment in the telemedicine program, the total number of hospital admissions fell from 18 to 3. Conclusions Our findings indicate that the system was user friendly for patients and care givers. Patient satisfaction scores were acceptable. The telemedicine system was effective for the home treatment of three patients with severe neuromuscular diseases and reduced the need for hospital admissions. PMID:25395959

  1. Respiratory failure due to blastomycosis infection in a patient with hypertension, cirrhosis and chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Alhaji, Mohammad; Sadikot, Ruxana T

    2013-12-01

    Blastomycosis is an endemic fungal infection in North America. It usually causes acute and occasionally chronic pneumonias with disseminated infection, particularly skin lesion, as an extrapulmonary manifestation. Many cases are asymptomatic; however, a few patients progress to develop severe pulmonary infection leading to acute respiratory distress syndrome, which carries a high mortality rate. Disseminated blastomycosis involving the heart is exceptionally rare and can be potentially life threatening. To our knowledge, there are only four reported cases of cardiac blastomycosis in the literature. Here, we report a case of cardiac blastomycosis who initially presented with respiratory failure. In our patient, it was practically impossible to establish a diagnosis of cardiac blastomycosis antemortem because of his previous cardiac history related to alcoholic cardiomyopathy, which confounded the cardiac findings. This case raises an important issue of clinically considering involvement of the heart in cases of disseminated blastomycosis. Perhaps if the patient did not have a prior cardiac history, a new onset heart failure may have suggested cardiac involvement.

  2. External Causes of Small Construction Firm Failures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-08-01

    reasons for non-management contractor failures. These interviews led to letters and some phone interviews with national surety associations as we! l as...Table C-4 * 14 * CONSTRUCTION FIRM LIABILITIES FOI LOWI NG FA I L UPF 2500 ..... 200 1500* 0 00 00 1954 190 1966 197 1978 1984 1957 1963 1969 1975 1981...payroll according to Mr. Randell Tanner of Huffines, Tanner, and Russell Incorporated a Georgia commercial insurance firm. --As if to negate contractor

  3. Respiratory Failure in Children With Hemato-oncological Diseases Admitted to the PICU: A Single-center Experience.

    PubMed

    García-Salido, Alberto; Mastro-Martínez, Ignacio; Cabeza-Martín, Beatriz; Oñoro, Gonzalo; Nieto-Moro, Montserrat; Iglesias-Bouzas, María I; Serrano-González, Ana; Casado-Flores, Juan

    2015-08-01

    Respiratory failure (RF) is a main cause of pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) admission in children with hemato-oncological diseases. We present a retrospective chart review of children admitted to our PICU because of RF (January 2006 to December 2010). The aims of this study are the following: (1) to describe the demographical and clinical characteristics and respiratory management of these children; and (2) to identify the factors associated with mechanical ventilation (MV) and mortality. A total of 69 patients, encompassing 88 episodes, were included (55/88 cases were hypoxemic RF). The first respiratory support at PICU admission was, in decreasing order of frequency, high-flow oxygen nasal cannula (HFNC; 50/88), noninvasive ventilation (NIV; 13/88), and oxygen nasal cannula (16/88). MV was necessary in 47/88 episodes, 38/47 after another respiratory support. In 18/28 children with initial NIV, MV was required later. MV was associated with O-PRISM score, NIV requirement, suspected respiratory infection, and days of PICU treatment. Patients without MV showed an increased survival rate (P=0.001). In summary, the hypoxemic RF was the main cause of PICU admission, and HFNC or NIV was almost always the first respiratory support. The use of MV was associated with a higher mortality rate. The utility of precocious HFNC or NIV should be investigated in larger clinical studies.

  4. Common-Cause Failure Analysis in Event Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Dana L. Kelly; Dale M. Rasmuson

    2008-09-01

    This paper describes the approach taken by the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission to the treatment of common-cause failure in probabilistic risk assessment of operational events. The approach is based upon the Basic Parameter Model for common-cause failure, and examples are illustrated using the alpha-factor parameterization, the approach adopted by the NRC in their Standardized Plant Analysis Risk (SPAR) models. The cases of a failed component (with and without shared common-cause failure potential) and a component being unavailable due to preventive maintenance or testing are addressed. The treatment of two related failure modes (e.g., failure to start and failure to run) is a new feature of this paper. These methods are being applied by the NRC in assessing the risk significance of operational events for the Significance Determination Process (SDP) and the Accident Sequence Precursor (ASP) program.

  5. Common-Cause Failure Analysis in Event Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    D. M. Rasmuson; D. L. Kelly

    2008-06-01

    This paper reviews the basic concepts of modelling common-cause failures (CCFs) in reliability and risk studies and then applies these concepts to the treatment of CCF in event assessment. The cases of a failed component (with and without shared CCF potential) and a component being unavailable due to preventive maintenance or testing are addressed. The treatment of two related failure modes (e.g. failure to start and failure to run) is a new feature of this paper, as is the treatment of asymmetry within a common-cause component group.

  6. Lung Postmortem Autopsy Revealing Extramedullary Involvement in Multiple Myeloma Causing Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ravinet, Aurélie; Perbet, Sébastien; Guièze, Romain; Guérin, Renaud; Gayraud, Guillaume; Aliane, Jugurtha; Tremblay, Aymeric; Pascal, Julien; Ledoux, Albane; Chaleteix, Carine; Dechelotte, Pierre; Bay, Jacques-Olivier; Bazin, Jean-Etienne; Constantin, Jean-Michel

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary involvement with multiple myeloma is rare. We report the case of a 61-year-old man with past medical history of chronic respiratory failure with emphysema, and a known multiple myeloma (Durie and Salmon stage III B and t(4;14) translocation). Six months after diagnosis and first line of treatment, he presented acute dyspnea with interstitial lung disease. Computed tomography showed severe bullous emphysema and diffuse, patchy, multifocal infiltrations bilaterally with nodular character, small bilateral pleural effusions, mediastinal lymphadenopathy, and a known lytic lesion of the 12th vertebra. He was treated with piperacillin-tazobactam, amikacin, oseltamivir, and methylprednisolone. Finally, outcome was unfavourable. Postmortem analysis revealed diffuse and nodular infracentimetric infiltration of the lung parenchyma by neoplastic plasma cells. Physicians should be aware that acute respiratory distress syndrome not responding to treatment of common causes could be a manifestation of the disease, even with negative BAL or biopsy and could be promptly treated with salvage therapy. PMID:25165587

  7. Respiratory disease in Niemann-Pick type C2 is caused by pulmonary alveolar proteinosis.

    PubMed

    Griese, M; Brasch, F; Aldana, V R; Cabrera, M M; Goelnitz, U; Ikonen, E; Karam, B J; Liebisch, G; Linder, M D; Lohse, P; Meyer, W; Schmitz, G; Pamir, A; Ripper, J; Rolfs, A; Schams, A; Lezana, F J

    2010-02-01

    Niemann-Pick diseases are hereditary neurovisceral lysosomal lipid storage disorders, of which the rare type C2 almost uniformly presents with respiratory distress in early infancy. In the patient presented here, the NPC2 exon 4 frameshift mutation c.408_409delAA caused reduced NPC2 protein levels in serum and lung lavage fluid and the synthesis of an aberrant, larger sized protein of around 28 kDa. Protein expression was strongly reduced also in alveolar macrophages. The infant developed failure to thrive and tachypnea. Lung lavage, computer tomography, and histology showed typical signs of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis with an abnormal intraalveolar accumulation of surfactant as well as macrophages. An NPC2-hypomorph animal model also showed pulmonary alveolar proteinosis and accumulation of macrophages in the lung, liver, and spleen long before the mice died. Due to the elevation of cholesterol, the surfactant had an abnormal composition and function. Despite the removal of large amounts of surfactant from the lungs by therapeutic lung lavages, this treatment was only temporarily successful and the infant died of respiratory failure. Our data indicate that respiratory distress in NPC2 disease is associated with a loss of normal NPC2 protein expression in alveolar macrophages and the accumulation of functionally inactive surfactant rich in cholesterol.

  8. Extracorporeal life support for adults with severe acute respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Del Sorbo, Lorenzo; Cypel, Marcelo; Fan, Eddy

    2014-02-01

    Extracorporeal life support (ECLS) is an artificial means of maintaining adequate oxygenation and carbon dioxide elimination to enable injured lungs to recover from underlying disease. Technological advances have made ECLS devices smaller, less invasive, and easier to use. ECLS might, therefore, represent an important step towards improved management and outcomes of patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome. Nevertheless, rigorous evidence of the ability of ECLS to improve short-term and long-term outcomes is needed before it can be widely implemented. Moreover, how to select patients and the timing and indications for ECLS in severe acute respiratory distress syndrome remain unclear. We describe the physiological principles, the putative risks and benefits, and the clinical evidence supporting the use of ECLS in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome. Additionally, we discuss controversies and future directions, such as novel technologies and indications, mechanical ventilation of the native lung during ECLS, and ethics considerations.

  9. Acute respiratory distress syndrome and acute renal failure from Plasmodium ovale infection with fatal outcome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Plasmodium ovale is one of the causative agents of human malaria. Plasmodium ovale infection has long been thought to be non-fatal. Due to its lower morbidity, P. ovale receives little attention in malaria research. Methods Two Malaysians went to Nigeria for two weeks. After returning to Malaysia, they fell sick and were admitted to different hospitals. Plasmodium ovale parasites were identified from blood smears of these patients. The species identification was further confirmed with nested PCR. One of them was successfully treated with no incident of relapse within 12-month medical follow-up. The other patient came down with malaria-induced respiratory complication during the course of treatment. Although parasites were cleared off the circulation, the patient’s condition worsened. He succumbed to multiple complications including acute respiratory distress syndrome and acute renal failure. Results Sequencing of the malaria parasite DNA from both cases, followed by multiple sequence alignment and phylogenetic tree construction suggested that the causative agent for both malaria cases was P. ovale curtisi. Discussion In this report, the differences between both cases were discussed, and the potential capability of P. ovale in causing severe complications and death as seen in this case report was highlighted. Conclusion Plasmodium ovale is potentially capable of causing severe complications, if not death. Complete travel and clinical history of malaria patient are vital for successful diagnoses and treatment. Monitoring of respiratory and renal function of malaria patients, regardless of the species of malaria parasites involved is crucial during the course of hospital admission. PMID:24180319

  10. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in adults for severe acute respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Rozé, H; Repusseau, B; Ouattara, A

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to examine the indications of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) for severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). This technique of oxygenation has significantly increased worldwide with the H1N1 flu pandemic. The goal of ECMO is to maintain a safe level of oxygenation and controlled respiratory acidosis under protective ventilation. The enthusiasm for ECMO should not obscure the consideration for potential associated complications. Before widespread diffusion of ECMO, new trials should test the efficacy of early initiation or CO2 removal in addition to, or even as an alternative to mechanical ventilation for severe ARDS.

  11. The Therapeutic Outcomes of Mechanical Ventilation in Hematological Malignancy Patients with Respiratory Failure.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Yusuke; Yamaguchi, Hiroki; Kobayashi, Katsuya; Marumo, Atsushi; Omori, Ikuko; Yamanaka, Satoshi; Yui, Shunsuke; Fukunaga, Keiko; Ryotokuji, Takeshi; Hirakawa, Tsuneaki; Okabe, Masahiro; Wakita, Satoshi; Tamai, Hayato; Okamoto, Muneo; Nakayama, Kazutaka; Takeda, Shinhiro; Inokuchi, Koiti

    2016-01-01

    Objective In hematological malignancy patients, the complication of acute respiratory failure often reaches a degree of severity that necessitates mechanical ventilation. The objective of the present study was to investigate the therapeutic outcomes of mechanical ventilation in hematological malignancy patients with respiratory failure and to analyze the factors that are associated with successful treatment in order to identify the issues that should be addressed in the future. Methods The present study was a retrospective analysis of 71 hematological malignancy patients with non-cardiogenic acute respiratory failure who were treated with mechanical ventilation at Nippon Medical School Hospital between 2003 and 2014. Results Twenty-six patients (36.6%) were treated with mechanical ventilation in an intensive care unit (ICU). Non-invasive positive pressure ventilation (NPPV) was applied in 29 cases (40.8%). The rate of successful mechanical ventilation treatment with NPPV alone was 13.8%. The rate of endotracheal extubation was 17.7%. A univariate analysis revealed that the following factors were associated with the successful extubation of patients who received invasive mechanical ventilation: respiratory management in an ICU (p=0.012); remission of the hematological disease (p=0.011); female gender (p=0.048); low levels of accompanying non-respiratory organ failure (p=0.041); and the non-use of extracorporeal circulation (p=0.005). A subsequent multivariate analysis revealed that respiratory management in an ICU was the only variable associated with successful extubation (p=0.030). Conclusion The outcomes of hematological malignancy patients who receive mechanical ventilation treatment for respiratory failure are very poor. Respiratory management in an ICU environment may be useful in improving the therapeutic outcomes of such patients.

  12. [Hospital management of acute respiratory failure: the role of the pulmonologist and of the respiratory intensive care unit].

    PubMed

    Scala, Raffaele

    2009-04-01

    Acute respiratory failure (ARF) is one of the most common and severe urgencies of the modern medicine which may require the application of mechanical ventilation and a careful monitoring of the patient's conditions. With the popularity of non-invasive ventilation and the interest of the pulmonologist for the care of the respiratory critical patient, in Italy there has been the spreading of Respiratory Intensive Care Units (RICU), which are as intermediate specialist structures in terms of intensity of care between the General Intensive Care Unit and the ordinary ward. In this article, the author analysed the cultural, scientific and organizational aspects of the central role played by the pulmonologist who's working in the RICU in the complex intra-hospital multi-disciplinary management of ARF.

  13. Failure-cause analysis: Air preheaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloney, K. L.; Benson, R. C.

    1981-07-01

    The major generic equipment and/or operating problems responsible for utility power plant outages are examined. Data analyzed from 118 generating units with an average size over 500 MW and using 236 air heaters demonstrates problems with air preheater systems and their components that contribute to loss in performance and unavailability of generating units. Nine major problem areas are identified: corrosion, fouling, plugging, soot blowers, water wash system, seals, fires, and drive and bearing systems. The indicated causes and effects are discussed. Recommendations are made to improve the reliability of existing air preheaters, and generic problems requiring future research and application of existing technologies are identified.

  14. Coexistence of Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Superior Vena Cava Syndromes Due to Substernal Goitre in a Patient With Respiratory Failure: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Tunc, Mehtap; Sazak, Hilal; Karlilar, Bulent; Ulus, Fatma; Tastepe, Irfan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Substernal goiter may rarely cause superior vena cava syndrome (SVCS) owing to venous compression, and cause acute respiratory failure due to tracheal compression. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) may rarely occur when there is a narrowing of upper airway by edema and vascular congestion resulting from SVCS. Case Presentation: We presented the clinical course and treatment of acute respiratory failure (ARF) developed in a patient with SVCS and OSAS due to substernal goiter. After treatment of ARF with invasive mechanical ventilation, weaning and total thyroidectomy were successfully performed through collar incision and median sternotomy without complications. Conclusions: Our case showed that if the respiratory failure occurred due to substernal goiter and SVCS, we would need to investigate the coexistence of OSAS and SVCS. PMID:26082848

  15. Central respiratory and circulatory depression caused by intravascular saxitoxin

    PubMed Central

    Borison, H.L.; Culp, W.J.; Gonsalves, S.F.; McCarthy, L.E.

    1980-01-01

    1 In cats anaesthetized with pentobarbitone and vagotomized, observations were made on the phrenic nerve action potential and the diaphragm electromyogram (EMG) at constant end-tidal Pco2. Arterial blood pressure was stabilized by intravenous infusions of noradrenaline. 2 Intravenous administration of saxitoxin (STX) initially abolished respiratory activity in the EMG and caused a slowing of oscillation in the central phrenic neurogram. Additional STX produced apneustic phrenic discharges followed by a progressive loss of nerve action potentials. 3 The inspiratory centre in the medulla oblongata was stimulated electrically to evoke a sustained phrenic nerve discharge. STX, given intravenously, resulted in the elimination of spontaneous nerve activity without interfering with the evoked response. 4 The cephalic intravascular infusion of STX into a carotid or vertebral artery depressed spontaneous respiratory activity while sparing EMG activity evoked by electrical stimulation of the intact phrenic nerve. 5 Spontaneous respiratory discharge in the phrenic nerve was eliminated by smaller doses of STX administered intra-arterially than were required intravenously. In addition, onset of and recovery from neural silence occurred faster following intra-arterial injection of STX. 6 Depressant effects on arterial blood pressure coincided with those on respiration when STX was given intra-arterially. 7 An electrophysiological assay on frog sartorius muscle was used to measure STX in the cerebrospinal fluid. Levels of STX detected were proportional to amounts of the toxin infused intra-arterially. 8 It is concluded that STX exchanges rapidly between blood and brain to bring about central depression and this adds to its peripheral paralytic actions. PMID:7357210

  16. A huge bladder calculus causing acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Komeya, Mitsuru; Sahoda, Tamami; Sugiura, Shinpei; Sawada, Takuto; Kitami, Kazuo

    2013-02-01

    A 81-year-old male was referred to our emergency outpatient unit due to acute renal failure. The level of serum creatinine was 276 μmol/l. A CT scan showed bilateral hydronephroureter, large bladder stone (7 cm × 6 cm × 6 cm) and bladder wall thickness. He was diagnosed as post renal failure due to bilateral hydronephroureter. Large bladder stone is thought to be the cause of bilateral hydronephroureter and renal failure. To improve renal failure, we performed open cystolithotomy and urethral catheterization. Three days after the surgery, the level of serum creatinine decreased to 224 μmol/l. He was discharged from our hospital with uneventful course. Bladder calculus is thought to be a rare cause of renal failure. We summarize the characteristics of bladder calculus causing renal failure. We should keep that long-term pyuria and urinary symptom, and repeated urinary tract infection can cause huge bladder calculus and renal failure in mind.

  17. Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus Memphis 37 Causes Acute Respiratory Disease in Perinatal Lamb Lung

    PubMed Central

    van Geelen, Albert; Gallup, Jack M.; Kienzle, Thomas; Shelly, Daniel A.; Cihlar, Tomas; King, Robert R.; Ackermann, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of hospitalization due to respiratory illness among infants and young children of industrialized countries. There is a lack of understanding of the severe disease mechanisms as well as limited treatment options, none of which are fully satisfactory. This is partly due to lack of a relevant animal model of perinatal RSV infection that mimics moderate to severe disease in infants. We and others have shown mild disease in perinatal lambs with either a bovine or a human A2 strain of RSV. The Memphis 37 clinical strain of human RSV has been used to produce mild to moderate upper respiratory disease in healthy adult volunteers. We hypothesized that the Memphis 37 strain of RSV would infect perinatal lambs and produce clinical disease similar to that in human infants. Perinatal (3- to 5-day-old) lambs were inoculated intranasally with 2 mL/nostril of 1×105 focus-forming units (FFU)/mL (n=2) or 2.1×108 FFU/mL (n=3) of RSV Memphis 37. Clinical signs, gross and histological lesions, and immune and inflammatory responses were assessed. Memphis 37 caused moderate to severe gross and histologic lesions along with increased mRNA expression of macrophage inflammatory protein. Clinically, four of the five infected lambs had a mild to severe increase in expiratory effort. Intranasally administered RSV strain Memphis 37 infects neonatal lambs with gross, histologic, and immune responses similar to those observed in human infants. PMID:24804166

  18. [Comparison of volume preset and pressure preset ventilators during daytime nasal ventilation in chronic respiratory failure].

    PubMed

    Perrin, C; Wolter, P; Berthier, F; Tamisier, R; Jullien, V; Lemoigne, F; Blaive, B

    2001-02-01

    Both volume preset and pressure preset ventilators are available for domiciliary nasal ventilation. Owing to their technical characteristics, it has been suggested that impaired ventilatory mechanics might cause a drop in the tidal volume (Vt) delivered by pressure preset devices, thereby placing mechanical ventilation at risk of inefficacy. We have assessed two ventilator systems (one pressure preset and one volume preset) with regard to the tidal volume and end-tidal carbon dioxide tension (PetCO(2)) changes that may be achieved in a group of awake patients with stable chronic respiratory failure (CRF). Eleven patients with stable CRF were ventilated in the assist/control mode for two consecutive one-hour periods. One ventilator was tested each hour, in random order. The VIGIL'AIR(R) system was used to record Vt, Respiratory Rate (RR), and Inspiratory/Expiratory ratio (I/E). The deviation E (E=preset value - measured value) was calculated for each measurement. Changes in PetCO(2) and arterial oxygen saturation were determined respectively by a capnometer and a pulse oximeter. Comparison of the mean deviation of Vt calculated for the two ventilators revealed a difference in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The deviation was greatest with the pressure preset ventilator (PPV), which gave mean measured values higher than the mean preset values. The same comparison failed to reveal any difference in restrictive CRF. Comparison of the volume preset and pressure preset ventilators for RR, I/E and PetCO(2) did not reveal any difference. Compared to the volume preset ventilator, the efficacy of PPV to ventilate is not affected by the restrictive or obstructive nature of CRF. Our results show that pressure-preset ventilator is an adequate alternative to the volume-preset device for daytime non invasive ventilation in chronic respiratory insufficiency.

  19. [Acute respiratory failure as the sol inaugural sign of Arnold-Chiari malformation. Two cases].

    PubMed

    Chaouch, N; Meraï, S; Cheikh Rouhou, S; Ben Romdhane, K; Ben Mrad, S; Besbes, M; Tritar, F

    2007-10-01

    Arnold-Chiari malformation is an occipitocervical malformation where the cerebellar amygdales descend below the occipital foramen. Acute respiratory failure is an exceptional inaugural sign. We report two cases disclosed by alveolar hypoventilation associated with type I Arnold-Chiari malformation. The two patients age 51 and 52 years had an uneventful past history and presented with hypercapnic encephalopathy with acute respiratory failure requiring ventilatory assistance. Respiratory function tests, helicoidal thoracic computed tomographic angiography, electromyogram, cardiac echography, and thyroid and immunological tests were normal. Blood gases and polysomnography were in favor of central hypoventilation without sleep apnea. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated type I Arnold-Chiari malformation. The course was complicated by recurrent respiratory failure in both patients. Surgical decompression performed for the first patient provided no improvement. This patient died two months after surgery subsequent to aspiration pneumonia. The second patient was treated with continuous positive pressure noninvasive ventilatory assistance and had a good outcome at 25 months. These two cases illustrate the absence of any neurological sign, acute respiratory failure being the only sign of Arnold-Chiari malformation.

  20. Modeling Common Cause Failures of Thrusters on ISS Visiting Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haught, Megan

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses the methodology used to model common cause failures of thrusters on the International Space Station (ISS) Visiting Vehicles. The ISS Visiting Vehicles each have as many as 32 thrusters, whose redundancy makes them susceptible to common cause failures. The Global Alpha Model (as described in NUREG/CR-5485) can be used to represent the system common cause contribution, but NUREG/CR-5496 supplies global alpha parameters for groups only up to size six. Because of the large number of redundant thrusters on each vehicle, regression is used to determine parameter values for groups of size larger than six. An additional challenge is that Visiting Vehicle thruster failures must occur in specific combinations in order to fail the propulsion system; not all failure groups of a certain size are critical.

  1. Modeling Common Cause Failures of Thrusters on ISS Visiting Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haught, Megan; Duncan, Gary

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses the methodology used to model common cause failures of thrusters on the International Space Station (ISS) Visiting Vehicles. The ISS Visiting Vehicles each have as many as 32 thrusters, whose redundancy and similar design make them susceptible to common cause failures. The Global Alpha Model (as described in NUREG/CR-5485) can be used to represent the system common cause contribution, but NUREG/CR-5496 supplies global alpha parameters for groups only up to size six. Because of the large number of redundant thrusters on each vehicle, regression is used to determine parameter values for groups of size larger than six. An additional challenge is that Visiting Vehicle thruster failures must occur in specific combinations in order to fail the propulsion system; not all failure groups of a certain size are critical.

  2. Effect of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus on the Risk of Incident Respiratory Failure: A National Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Jun-Jun; Wang, Yu-Chiao; Chen, Jiunn-Horng; Hsu, Wu-Huei

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We conducted a nationwide cohort study to investigate the relationship between systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and the risk of incident respiratory failure. Methods From the National Health Insurance Research Database, we identified 11 533 patients newly diagnosed with SLE and 46 132 controls without SLE who were randomly selected through frequency-matching according to age, sex, and index year. Both cohorts were followed until the end of 2011 to measure the incidence of incident respiratory failure, which was compared between the 2 cohorts through a Cox proportional hazards regression analysis. Results The adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) of incident respiratory failure was 5.80 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 5.15–6.52) for the SLE cohort after we adjusted for sex, age, and comorbidities. Both men (aHR = 3.44, 95% CI = 2.67–4.43) and women (aHR = 6.79, 95% CI = 5.93–7.77) had a significantly higher rate of incident respiratory failure in the SLE cohort than in the non-SLE cohort. Both men and women aged <35 years (aHR = 31.2, 95% CI = 21.6–45.2), 35–65 years; (aHR = 6.19, 95% CI = 5.09–7.54) and ≥65 years (aHR = 2.35, 95% CI = 1.92–2.87) had a higher risk of incident respiratory failure in the SLE cohort. Moreover, the risk of incident respiratory failure was higher in the SLE cohort than the non-SLE cohort, for subjects with (aHR = 2.65, 95% CI = 2.22–3.15) or without (aHR = 9.08, 95% CI = 7.72–10.7) pre-existing comorbidities. In the SLE cohort, subjects with >24 outpatient visits and hospitalizations per year had a higher incident respiratory failure risk (aHR = 21.7, 95% CI = 18.0–26.1) compared with the non-SLE cohort. Conclusion Patients with SLE are associated with an increased risk of incident respiratory failure, regardless of their age, sex, and pre-existing comorbidities; especially medical services with higher frequency. PMID:27654828

  3. Demographic, etiological, and histological pulmonary analysis of patients with acute respiratory failure: a study of 19 years of autopsies

    PubMed Central

    de Matos Soeiro, Alexandre; Ruppert, Aline D; Canzian, Mauro; Parra, Edwin R; Farhat, Cecília; Capelozzi, Vera L

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Acute respiratory failure has been one of the most important causes of death in intensive care units, and certain aspects of its pulmonary pathology are currently unknown. OBJECTIVES: The objective was to describe the demographic data, etiology, and pulmonary histopathological findings of different diseases in the autopsies of patients with acute respiratory failure. METHOD: Autopsies of 4,710 patients with acute respiratory failure from 1990 to 2008 were reviewed, and the following data were obtained: age, sex, and major associated diseases. The pulmonary histopathology was categorized as diffuse alveolar damage, pulmonary edema, alveolar hemorrhage, and lymphoplasmacytic interstitial pneumonia. The odds ratio of the concordance between the major associated diseases and specific autopsy findings was calculated using logistic regression. RESULTS: Bacterial bronchopneumonia was present in 33.9% of the cases and cancer in 28.1%. The pulmonary histopathology showed diffuse alveolar damage in 40.7% (1,917) of the cases. A multivariate analysis showed a significant and powerful association between diffuse alveolar damage and bronchopneumonia, HIV/AIDS, sepsis, and septic shock, between liver cirrhosis and pulmonary embolism, between pulmonary edema and acute myocardial infarction, between dilated cardiomyopathy and cancer, between alveolar hemorrhage and bronchopneumonia and pulmonary embolism, and between lymphoplasmacytic interstitial pneumonia and HIV/AIDS and liver cirrhosis. CONCLUSIONS: Bronchopneumonia was the most common diagnosis in these cases. The most prevalent pulmonary histopathological pattern was diffuse alveolar damage, which was associated with different inflammatory conditions. Further studies are necessary to elucidate the complete pathophysiological mechanisms involved with each disease and the development of acute respiratory failure. PMID:21876973

  4. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Respiratory Failure?

    MedlinePlus

    ... underlying cause and the levels of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the blood. A low oxygen level in ... on the skin, lips, and fingernails. A high carbon dioxide level can cause rapid breathing and confusion. Some ...

  5. Cascading Failures Due to Multiple Causes in Interdependent Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornbluth, Yosef; Buldyrev, Sergey

    2014-03-01

    In recent years, several models of network failure have been introduced. Some of these models are based on overload, in which increased traffic destroys nodes, while others are based on partial isolation, in which a node needs several functional neighbors to survive. In these systems, failure of a small fraction of nodes can cause a cascade of failures which may completely destroy the network. The majority of these models are studied in single networks. However, many real-world systems are comprised of multiple interdependent networks. Recent studies based on the concept of mutual percolation show that these systems are much more vulnerable than a single network. We numerically and analytically investigate how multiple causes of failure simultaneously acting in a system of interdependent networks affect their vulnerability.

  6. AIDS in an infant causing severe failure to thrive.

    PubMed

    Elias-Jones, A C; Larcher, V F; Price, E H

    1987-07-01

    A nine-month-old female Jamaican infant presented with a history of severe failure to thrive, recurrent pneumonia and developmental delay. She was found to have hepatosplenomegaly, generalised lymphadenopathy and hypotonia. Investigations revealed polyclonal hypergammaglobulinaemia, cytomegalovirus in her urine, and patchy lung infiltrates on her chest radiographs. Three separate tests were positive for human immunodeficiency virus in both the infant and her mother, suggesting vertical transmission, and confirming AIDS as the cause of the severe failure to thrive.

  7. The use of high-flow nasal oxygen therapy in the management of hypercarbic respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Millar, Jonathan; Lutton, Stuart; O'Connor, Philip

    2014-04-01

    Hypercarbic respiratory failure, occurring secondary to chronic lung disease, is a frequently encountered problem. These patients present a significant challenge to respiratory and critical care services, as many are unsuitable for mechanical ventilation and most have multiple comorbidities. Recently, noninvasive ventilation (NIV) has become established as the primary modality for respiratory support in this group of patients. Several factors limit patient compliance with NIV, not least comfort and tolerability. A recent innovation in adult critical care is the use of high-flow nasal oxygen (HFNO) devices. These systems are capable of delivering high gas flows via nasal cannulae, with the ability to blend air and oxygen to give a controlled FiO2. Few clinical studies have been conducted in adults, although several are planned. To date the majority of available evidence addresses the use of HFNO in hypoxemic respiratory failure. Here we present a case in which a HFNO system was used to successfully manage hypercarbic respiratory failure in a patient unable to tolerate conventional NIV.

  8. Central nervous system alterations caused by infection with the human respiratory syncytial virus.

    PubMed

    Bohmwald, Karen; Espinoza, Janyra A; González, Pablo A; Bueno, Susan M; Riedel, Claudia A; Kalergis, Alexis M

    2014-11-01

    Worldwide, the human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) is the leading cause of infant hospitalization because of acute respiratory tract infections, including severe bronchiolitis and pneumonia. Despite intense research, to date there is neither vaccine nor treatment available to control hRSV disease burden globally. After infection, an incubation period of 3-5 days is usually followed by symptoms, such as cough and low-grade fever. However, hRSV infection can also produce a larger variety of symptoms, some of which relate to the individual's age at infection. Indeed, infants can display severe symptoms, such as dyspnea and chest wall retractions. Upon examination, crackles and wheezes are also common features that suggest infection by hRSV. Additionally, infection in infants younger than 1 year is associated with several non-specific symptoms, such as failure to thrive, periodic breathing or apnea, and feeding difficulties that usually require hospitalization. Recently, neurological symptoms have also been associated with hRSV respiratory infection and include seizures, central apnea, lethargy, feeding or swallowing difficulties, abnormalities in muscle tone, strabismus, abnormalities in the CSF, and encephalopathy. Here, we discuss recent findings linking the neurological, extrapulmonary effects of hRSV with infection and functional impairment of the CNS.

  9. A case of split notochord syndrome: Presenting with respiratory failure in the neonatal period

    PubMed Central

    Coskun, Yesim; Akman, Ipek; Demir, Mustafa Kemal; Yapicier, Ozlem; Somuncu, Salih

    2016-01-01

    Summary Split notochord syndrome (SNS) is a very rare congenital anomaly. This report describes a male newborn with a neuroenteric cyst in the posterior mediastinum and multiple vertebrae anomalies presenting with respiratory failure and pulmonary hypertension. This report also discusses the embryological development and the etiologic theories of SNS. PMID:27195197

  10. The circulating glycosaminoglycan signature of respiratory failure in critically ill adults.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Eric P; Li, Guoyun; Li, Lingyun; Fu, Li; Yang, Yimu; Overdier, Katherine H; Douglas, Ivor S; Linhardt, Robert J

    2014-03-21

    Systemic inflammatory illnesses (such as sepsis) are marked by degradation of the endothelial glycocalyx, a layer of glycosaminoglycans (including heparan sulfate, chondroitin sulfate, and hyaluronic acid) lining the vascular lumen. We hypothesized that different pathophysiologic insults would produce characteristic patterns of released glycocalyx fragments. We collected plasma from healthy donors as well as from subjects with respiratory failure due to altered mental status (intoxication, ischemic brain injury), indirect lung injury (non-pulmonary sepsis, pancreatitis), or direct lung injury (aspiration, pneumonia). Mass spectrometry was employed to determine the quantity and sulfation patterns of circulating glycosaminoglycans. We found that circulating heparan sulfate fragments were significantly (23-fold) elevated in patients with indirect lung injury, while circulating hyaluronic acid concentrations were elevated (32-fold) in patients with direct lung injury. N-Sulfation and tri-sulfation of heparan disaccharides were significantly increased in patients with indirect lung injury. Chondroitin disaccharide sulfation was suppressed in all groups with respiratory failure. Plasma heparan sulfate concentrations directly correlated with intensive care unit length of stay. Serial plasma measurements performed in select patients revealed that circulating highly sulfated heparan fragments persisted for greater than 3 days after the onset of respiratory failure. Our findings demonstrate that circulating glycosaminoglycans are elevated in patterns characteristic of the etiology of respiratory failure and may serve as diagnostic and/or prognostic biomarkers of critical illness.

  11. Successful extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for respiratory failure in an infant with DiGeorge anomaly, following thymus transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hornik, Christoph P; Hartman, Mary E; Markert, M Louise; Lodge, Andrew J; Cheifetz, Ira M; Turner, David A

    2011-06-01

    We report the first successful use of venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) for refractory respiratory failure in an infant with DiGeorge anomaly, following thymus transplantation. A 23-month-old female with complete immune-incompetent DiGeorge anomaly 65 days after allogenic thymus transplantation was treated in our pediatric intensive care unit for acute respiratory failure secondary to bacterial sepsis. She subsequently developed acute hypercarbic respiratory failure unresponsive to conventional medical therapy. She was successfully managed with venovenous ECMO for 4 days, with complete resolution of her respiratory symptoms. This case demonstrates the complex decision making process regarding initiation of ECMO in patients with severe immunodeficiency.

  12. Non-invasive ventilation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: management of acute type 2 respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Roberts, C M; Brown, J L; Reinhardt, A K; Kaul, S; Scales, K; Mikelsons, C; Reid, K; Winter, R; Young, K; Restrick, L; Plant, P K

    2008-10-01

    Non-invasive ventilation (NIV) in the management of acute type 2 respiratory failure in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) represents one of the major technical advances in respiratory care over the last decade. This document updates the 2002 British Thoracic Society guidance and provides a specific focus on the use of NIV in COPD patients with acute type 2 respiratory failure. While there are a variety of ventilator units available most centres now use bi-level positive airways pressure units and this guideline refers specifically to this form of ventilatory support although many of the principles encompassed are applicable to other forms of NIV. The guideline has been produced for the clinician caring for COPD patients in the emergency and ward areas of acute hospitals.

  13. Treatment Failure and Mortality amongst Children with Severe Acute Malnutrition Presenting with Cough or Respiratory Difficulty and Radiological Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Chisti, Mohammod Jobayer; Salam, Mohammed Abdus; Bardhan, Pradip Kumar; Faruque, Abu S. G.; Shahid, Abu S. M. S. B.; Shahunja, K. M.; Das, Sumon Kumar; Hossain, Md Iqbal; Ahmed, Tahmeed

    2015-01-01

    respiratory difficulty and radiologic pneumonia who had WHO-defined danger signs of severe pneumonia more often had treatment failure and fatal outcome compared to those without the danger signs. In addition to danger signs of severe pneumonia, other common causes of both treatment failure and deaths were dehydration, hypocalcaemia, and bacteraemia on admission. The result underscores the importance for further research especially a randomized, controlled clinical trial to validate standard WHO therapy in SAM children with pneumonia especially with danger signs of severe pneumonia to reduce treatment failures and deaths. PMID:26451603

  14. [Light chain deposition disease as a cause of renal failure].

    PubMed

    Wohl, P; Chadimová, M; Englis, M; Táborský, P; Rossmann, P; Matl, I

    1998-11-30

    The objective of the paper is to draw attention to a rare cause of rapidly progressing renal failure which developed in the course of four months as a result of light chain deposition disease. The authors submit two case-histories of the disease assessed by renal biopsy after previous clinical and laboratory suspicion of monoclonal gammapathy. In one patient in the sternal punctate plasmacytoma was diagnosed and in the second case it was not possible to detect any type of monoclonal gammapathy or another possible cause of disease. Renal failure was in both cases irreversible and both patients were enlisted in regular haemodialyzation treatment.

  15. [Learning from failure - implications for respiratory and intensive care medicine: a conceptual review].

    PubMed

    Kabitz, H-J

    2013-08-01

    The clinical, social and economical impact of failure in medicine [i. e., adverse health care events (AHCE)] is overwhelming. Respiratory and intensive care medicine are strongly relevant to AHCE, particularly in cases associated with respiratory failure, mechanical ventilation and pharmacotherapy. In spite of the obvious necessity to learn from AHCE, its realisation in health-care organisations is still rare. This conceptual review therefore aims to (i) clarify the most relevant terminology, (ii) identify obstacles related to this health-care topic, and (iii) present possible strategies for solving the problems, thereby enabling respiratory and intensive care medicine to systematically and effectively learn from failure. A review of the literature (effective as of June 2013) derived from the electronic databases Medline via PubMed, EMBASE, ERIC and Google Scholar identified the following relevant obstacles (ii): a so-called blame culture associated with concealing failure, missing system analyses (vs. individual breakdown), and (economically) misdirected incentives. Possible strategies to overcome these obstacles (iii) include acknowledging the importance of leadership, a safe environment, open reporting, an effective feedback culture, and detection (e. g., trigger-tools), analysis and discussion (e. g., double loop learning) of failure. The underlying reasons for the occurrence of AHCE are based on structural, organisational and human shortcomings, and affect all categories of caregivers. Approaches to solving the problem should therefore focus primarily on the entire system, rather than on the individual alone.

  16. Long term non-invasive domiciliary assisted ventilation for respiratory failure following thoracoplasty.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, M.; Smith, I.; King, M.; Shneerson, J.

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Ventilatory failure is a well recognised complication of patients who have had a thoracoplasty for tuberculosis, but there are few data regarding the value of long term non-invasive assisted ventilation in this situation. METHODS--Thirty two patients who had had a thoracoplasty 20-46 years previously and who had developed respiratory failure were treated with nocturnal cuirass assisted ventilation or nasal positive pressure ventilation. Their survival and changes in arterial blood gases, nocturnal oximetry, and pulmonary function tests were assessed. RESULTS--The actuarial survival rates at one, three, five, and seven years after starting treatment were 91%, 74%, 64%, and 55%, respectively. Only seven of the 13 deaths were directly attributable to chronic respiratory or cardiac failure. The arterial PO2, PCO2, mean nocturnal oxygen saturation, vital capacity, and maximal inspiratory and expiratory pressures had all improved at the time of the initial post-treatment assessment (mean 12 days after starting treatment), but no subsequent improvements were seen after up to 48 months of follow up. Neither survival nor physiological improvements were correlated with the patients' age, the interval since thoracoplasty, or the pretreatment arterial blood gas tensions or results of pulmonary function tests. CONCLUSIONS--These results show that, even when ventilatory failure has developed, the prognosis with non-invasive assisted ventilation is good and the physiological abnormalities can be partially reversed. Patients who develop respiratory failure after a thoracoplasty should be considered for this type of long term domiciliary treatment. PMID:7940434

  17. Respiratory muscle training improves hemodynamics, autonomic function, baroreceptor sensitivity, and respiratory mechanics in rats with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Jaenisch, Rodrigo B; Hentschke, Vítor S; Quagliotto, Edson; Cavinato, Paulo R; Schmeing, Letiane A; Xavier, Léder L; Dal Lago, Pedro

    2011-12-01

    Respiratory muscle training (RMT) improves functional capacity in chronic heart-failure (HF) patients, but the basis for this improvement remains unclear. We evaluate the effects of RMT on the hemodynamic and autonomic function, arterial baroreflex sensitivity (BRS), and respiratory mechanics in rats with HF. Rats were assigned to one of four groups: sedentary sham (n = 8), trained sham (n = 8), sedentary HF (n = 8), or trained HF (n = 8). Trained animals underwent a RMT protocol (30 min/day, 5 day/wk, 6 wk of breathing through a resistor), whereas sedentary animals did not. In HF rats, RMT had significant effects on several parameters. It reduced left ventricular (LV) end-diastolic pressure (P < 0.01), increased LV systolic pressure (P < 0.01), and reduced right ventricular hypertrophy (P < 0.01) and pulmonary (P < 0.001) and hepatic (P < 0.001) congestion. It also decreased resting heart rate (HR; P < 0.05), indicating a decrease in the sympathetic and an increase in the vagal modulation of HR. There was also an increase in baroreflex gain (P < 0.05). The respiratory system resistance was reduced (P < 0.001), which was associated with the reduction in tissue resistance after RMT (P < 0.01). The respiratory system and tissue elastance (Est) were also reduced by RMT (P < 0.01 and P < 0.05, respectively). Additionally, the quasistatic Est was reduced after RMT (P < 0.01). These findings show that a 6-wk RMT protocol in HF rats promotes an improvement in hemodynamic function, sympathetic and vagal heart modulation, arterial BRS, and respiratory mechanics, all of which are benefits associated with improvements in cardiopulmonary interaction.

  18. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary myopathy with early respiratory failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... descent, and in at least one individual from Italy. Related Information What information about a genetic condition can statistics provide? Why are some genetic conditions more common in particular ethnic groups? Genetic Changes HMERF can be caused by a ...

  19. Postinfarct Left Ventricular Remodelling: A Prevailing Cause of Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Galli, Alessio; Lombardi, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure is a chronic disease with high morbidity and mortality, which represents a growing challenge in medicine. A major risk factor for heart failure with reduced ejection fraction is a history of myocardial infarction. The expansion of a large infarct scar and subsequent regional ventricular dilatation can cause postinfarct remodelling, leading to significant enlargement of the left ventricular chamber. It has a negative prognostic value, because it precedes the clinical manifestations of heart failure. The characteristics of the infarcted myocardium predicting postinfarct remodelling can be studied with cardiac magnetic resonance and experimental imaging modalities such as diffusion tensor imaging can identify the changes in the architecture of myocardial fibers. This review discusses all the aspects related to postinfarct left ventricular remodelling: definition, pathogenesis, diagnosis, consequences, and available therapies, together with experimental interventions that show promising results against postinfarct remodelling and heart failure. PMID:26989555

  20. Common Cause Failure Modeling in Space Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hark, Frank; Ring, Rob; Novack, Steven D.; Britton, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Common Cause Failures (CCFs) are a known and documented phenomenon that defeats system redundancy. CCFs are a set of dependent type of failures that can be caused for example by system environments, manufacturing, transportation, storage, maintenance, and assembly. Since there are many factors that contribute to CCFs, they can be reduced, but are difficult to eliminate entirely. Furthermore, failure databases sometimes fail to differentiate between independent and dependent CCF. Because common cause failure data is limited in the aerospace industry, the Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) Team at Bastion Technology Inc. is estimating CCF risk using generic data collected by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Consequently, common cause risk estimates based on this database, when applied to other industry applications, are highly uncertain. Therefore, it is important to account for a range of values for independent and CCF risk and to communicate the uncertainty to decision makers. There is an existing methodology for reducing CCF risk during design, which includes a checklist of 40+ factors grouped into eight categories. Using this checklist, an approach to produce a beta factor estimate is being investigated that quantitatively relates these factors. In this example, the checklist will be tailored to space launch vehicles, a quantitative approach will be described, and an example of the method will be presented.

  1. Immunological Features of Respiratory Syncytial Virus-Caused Pneumonia—Implications for Vaccine Design

    PubMed Central

    Rey-Jurado, Emma; Kalergis, Alexis M.

    2017-01-01

    The human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) is the causative agent for high rates of hospitalizations due to viral bronchiolitis and pneumonia worldwide. Such a disease is characterized by an infection of epithelial cells of the distal airways that leads to inflammation and subsequently to respiratory failure. Upon infection, different pattern recognition receptors recognize the virus and trigger the innate immune response against the hRSV. Further, T cell immunity plays an important role for virus clearance. Based on animal studies, it is thought that the host immune response to hRSV is based on a biased T helper (Th)-2 and Th17 T cell responses with the recruitment of T cells, neutrophils and eosinophils to the lung, causing inflammation and tissue damage. In contrast, human immunity against RSV has been shown to be more complex with no definitive T cell polarization profile. Nowadays, only a humanized monoclonal antibody, known as palivizumab, is available to protect against hRSV infection in high-risk infants. However, such treatment involves several injections at a significantly high cost. For these reasons, intense research has been focused on finding novel vaccines or therapies to prevent hRSV infection in the population. Here, we comprehensively review the recent literature relative to the immunological features during hRSV infection, as well as the new insights into preventing the disease caused by this virus. PMID:28273842

  2. Adult venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for severe respiratory failure: Current status and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Sen, Ayan; Callisen, Hannelisa E; Alwardt, Cory M; Larson, Joel S; Lowell, Amelia A; Libricz, Stacy L; Tarwade, Pritee; Patel, Bhavesh M; Ramakrishna, Harish

    2016-01-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) for severe acute respiratory failure was proposed more than 40 years ago. Despite the publication of the ARDSNet study and adoption of lung protective ventilation, the mortality for acute respiratory failure due to acute respiratory distress syndrome has continued to remain high. This technology has evolved over the past couple of decades and has been noted to be safe and successful, especially during the worldwide H1N1 influenza pandemic with good survival rates. The primary indications for ECMO in acute respiratory failure include severe refractory hypoxemic and hypercarbic respiratory failure in spite of maximum lung protective ventilatory support. Various triage criteria have been described and published. Contraindications exist when application of ECMO may be futile or technically impossible. Knowledge and appreciation of the circuit, cannulae, and the physiology of gas exchange with ECMO are necessary to ensure lung rest, efficiency of oxygenation, and ventilation as well as troubleshooting problems. Anticoagulation is a major concern with ECMO, and the evidence is evolving with respect to diagnostic testing and use of anticoagulants. Clinical management of the patient includes comprehensive critical care addressing sedation and neurologic issues, ensuring lung recruitment, diuresis, early enteral nutrition, treatment and surveillance of infections, and multisystem organ support. Newer technology that delinks oxygenation and ventilation by extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal may lead to ultra-lung protective ventilation, avoidance of endotracheal intubation in some situations, and ambulatory therapies as a bridge to lung transplantation. Risks, complications, and long-term outcomes and resources need to be considered and weighed in before widespread application. Ethical challenges are a reality and a multidisciplinary approach that should be adopted for every case in consideration.

  3. Adult venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for severe respiratory failure: Current status and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Ayan; Callisen, Hannelisa E.; Alwardt, Cory M.; Larson, Joel S.; Lowell, Amelia A.; Libricz, Stacy L.; Tarwade, Pritee; Patel, Bhavesh M.; Ramakrishna, Harish

    2016-01-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) for severe acute respiratory failure was proposed more than 40 years ago. Despite the publication of the ARDSNet study and adoption of lung protective ventilation, the mortality for acute respiratory failure due to acute respiratory distress syndrome has continued to remain high. This technology has evolved over the past couple of decades and has been noted to be safe and successful, especially during the worldwide H1N1 influenza pandemic with good survival rates. The primary indications for ECMO in acute respiratory failure include severe refractory hypoxemic and hypercarbic respiratory failure in spite of maximum lung protective ventilatory support. Various triage criteria have been described and published. Contraindications exist when application of ECMO may be futile or technically impossible. Knowledge and appreciation of the circuit, cannulae, and the physiology of gas exchange with ECMO are necessary to ensure lung rest, efficiency of oxygenation, and ventilation as well as troubleshooting problems. Anticoagulation is a major concern with ECMO, and the evidence is evolving with respect to diagnostic testing and use of anticoagulants. Clinical management of the patient includes comprehensive critical care addressing sedation and neurologic issues, ensuring lung recruitment, diuresis, early enteral nutrition, treatment and surveillance of infections, and multisystem organ support. Newer technology that delinks oxygenation and ventilation by extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal may lead to ultra-lung protective ventilation, avoidance of endotracheal intubation in some situations, and ambulatory therapies as a bridge to lung transplantation. Risks, complications, and long-term outcomes and resources need to be considered and weighed in before widespread application. Ethical challenges are a reality and a multidisciplinary approach that should be adopted for every case in consideration. PMID:26750681

  4. Nitrogen mustard hydrochloride-induced acute respiratory failure and myelosuppression: A case report

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, XIAOJUAN; ZHANG, ZHIDAN; CHEN, SONG; ZHAO, DONGMEI; ZHANG, FANGXIAO; HU, ZIWEI; XIAO, FENG; MA, XIAOCHUN

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogen mustards are chemical agents that are similar to sulfur mustards, with similar toxicities. The present study describes a case of nitrogen mustard-induced acute respiratory failure and myelosuppression in a 33-year-old man. The patient, who was accidentally exposed to nitrogen mustard hydrochloride in a pharmaceutical factory, exhibited severe inhalation injury and respiratory symptoms. Laboratory tests revealed reduced white blood cell counts and lowered platelet levels during the first 6 days after the skin exposure to nitrogen mustard. Following treatment with mechanical ventilation, immunity-enhancing agents and nutritional supplements for 1 month, the patient successfully recovered and was released from hospital. PMID:26622480

  5. Extracorporeal life support for 100 adult patients with severe respiratory failure.

    PubMed Central

    Kolla, S; Awad, S S; Rich, P B; Schreiner, R J; Hirschl, R B; Bartlett, R H

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors retrospectively reviewed their experience with extracorporeal life support (ECLS) in 100 adult patients with severe respiratory failure (ARF) to define techniques, characterize its efficacy and utilization, and determine predictors of outcome. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Extracorporeal life support maintains gas exchange during ARF, providing diseased lungs an optimal environment in which to heal. Extracorporeal life support has been successful in the treatment of respiratory failure in infants and children. In 1990, the authors instituted a standardized protocol for treatment of severe ARF in adults, which included ECLS when less invasive methods failed. METHODS: From January 1990 to July 1996, the authors used ECLS for 100 adults with severe acute hypoxemic respiratory failure (n = 94): paO2/FiO2 ratio of 55.7+/-15.9, transpulmonary shunt (Qs/Qt) of 52+/-22%, or acute hypercarbic respiratory failure (n = 6): paCO2 84.0+/-31.5 mmHg, despite and after maximal conventional ventilation. The technique included venovenous percutaneous access, lung "rest," transport on ECLS, minimal anticoagulation, hemofiltration, and optimal systemic oxygen delivery. RESULTS: Overall hospital survival was 54%. The duration of ECLS was 271.9+/-248.6 hours. Primary diagnoses included pneumonia (49 cases, 53% survived), adult respiratory distress syndrome (45 cases, 51 % survived), and airway support (6 cases, 83% survived). Multivariate logistic regression modeling identified the following pre-ECLS variables significant independent predictors of outcome: 1) pre-ECLS days of mechanical ventilation (p = 0.0003), 2) pre-ECLS paO2/FiO2 ratio (p = 0.002), and 3) age (years) (p = 0.005). Modeling of variables during ECLS showed that no mechanical complications were independent predictors of outcome, and the only patient-related complications associated with outcome were the presence of renal failure (p < 0.0001) and significant surgical site bleeding (p = 0

  6. Dexamethasone and indomethacin modify endotoxin-induced respiratory failure in pigs.

    PubMed

    Olson, N C; Brown, T T; Anderson, D L

    1985-01-01

    We studied the porcine pulmonary response to endotoxemia before and after administration of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAID, i.e., indomethacin or flunixin meglumine) or dexamethasone (DEX). Escherichia coli endotoxin was infused intravenously into anesthetized 10- to 12-wk old pigs for 4.5 h. In endotoxemic pigs, the phase 1 (i.e., 0-2 h) increases in pulmonary arterial pressure, pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR), and alveolar-arterial O2 gradient and the decreases in cardiac index (CI) and lung dynamic compliance (Cdyn) were blocked by NSAID. Thus phase 1 changes were cyclooxygenase dependent. Furthermore, these effects were blocked or greatly attenuated by DEX. During phase 2 of endotoxemia (i.e., 2-4.5 h), the increased PVR and decreased CI and Cdyn were not blocked by NSAID but were attenuated by DEX, suggesting the presence of cyclooxygenase-independent metabolites. Both NSAID and DEX blocked the endotoxin-induced increases in lung water, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) neutrophil, and BAL albumin content. The fall in plasma proteins persisted in NSAID but not DEX-treated pigs. We conclude that endotoxemia in the pig causes severe acute respiratory failure largely mediated by cyclooxygenase and possibly lipoxygenase products of arachidonic acid metabolism.

  7. Periodic Breathing in Heart Failure Explained by Dynamic and Static Properties of Respiratory Control

    PubMed Central

    Miyamoto, Tadayoshi; Nakahara, Hidehiro; Ueda, Shinya; Manabe, Kou; Kawai, Eriko; Inagaki, Masashi; Kawada, Toru; Sugimachi, Masaru

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The respiratory operating point is determined by the interplay between the controller and plant subsystem elements within the respiratory chemoreflex feedback system. This study aimed to establish the methodological basis for quantitative analysis of the open-loop dynamic properties of the human respiratory control system and to apply the results to explore detailed mechanisms of the regulation of respiration and the possible mechanism of periodic breathing in chronic heart failure. METHODS AND RESULTS In healthy volunteers, we measured arterial CO2 partial pressure (PaCO2) and minute ventilation (V˙E) to estimate the dynamic properties of the controller ( PaCO2→V˙E relation) and plant ( V˙E→PaCO2 relation). The dynamic properties of the controller and plant approximated first- and second-order exponential models, respectively, and were described using parameters including gain, time constant, and lag time. We then used the open-loop transfer functions to simulate the closed-loop respiratory response to an exogenous disturbance, while manipulating the parameter values to deviate from normal values but within physiological ranges. By increasing both the product of gains of the two subsystem elements (total loop gain) and the lag time, the condition of system oscillation (onset of periodic breathing) was satisfied. CONCLUSION When abnormality occurs in a part of the respiratory chemoreflex system, instability of the control system is amplified and may result in the manifestation of respiratory abnormalities such as periodic breathing. PMID:26561001

  8. A novel Xq22.1 deletion in a male with multiple congenital abnormalities and respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yang; Aypar, Umut

    2016-05-01

    Here we report the first male case of a novel Xq22.1 deletion. An 8-week-old boy with multiple congenital abnormalities and respiratory failure was referred to the Mayo Clinic Cytogenetics laboratory for testing. Chromosomal microarray analysis identified a novel 1.1 Mb deletion at Xq22.1. A similar deletion has only been described once in the literature in a female patient and her mother; both have intellectual disability and dysmorphic facial features. In addition, the mother had a son who died at 15 days due to breathing failure. Recently, a mouse model revealed that a 0.35 Mb sub-region, containing 4 genes, is sufficient to cause majority of the Xq22.1 deletion phenotypes. The deleted intervals in our male patient and the female patients contain 15 common genes, including the four described in the 0.35 Mb sub-region. Male mice with deletion of the 0.35 Mb sub-region died perinatally from respiratory failure due to pulmonary hypoplasia, consistent with the breathing problem and potential neonatal fatality in male patients. The phenotypes of the mouse models and the patients are strikingly similar; therefore, the deletion of these five genes (ARMCX5, ARMCX5-GPRASP2, GPRASP1, GPRASP2, and BHLHB9) is likely responsible for the novel Xq22.1 deletion syndrome.

  9. Complete Genome Sequences of Four Different Bordetella sp. Isolates Causing Human Respiratory Infections

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yanhui; Loparev, Vladimir; Batra, Dhwani; Bowden, Katherine E.; Cassiday, Pamela K.; Davis, Jamie K.; Johnson, Taccara; Juieng, Phalasy; Miner, Christine E.; Rowe, Lori; Sheth, Mili; Tondella, M. Lucia; Williams, Margaret M.

    2016-01-01

    Species of the genus Bordetella associate with various animal hosts, frequently causing respiratory disease. Bordetella pertussis is the primary agent of whooping cough and other Bordetella species can cause similar cough illness. Here, we report four complete genome sequences from isolates of different Bordetella species recovered from human respiratory infections. PMID:27795250

  10. Distempter Vaccination of Dogs: Factors Which Could Cause Vaccine Failure

    PubMed Central

    Povey, R. Charles

    1986-01-01

    Distemper vaccination failures are uncommon. A number of factors which could cause such failure are discussed. The blocking effect of maternal antibody can be expected in 50% of pups at six weeks but is not important after 12 weeks. Among intercurrent infections, the immunosuppressive effect of parvovirus has the potential to precipitate vaccine-induced distemper. Corticosteroids at levels up to 10 mg/kg do not interfere with successful distemper vaccination. Anesthesia or surgery has little effect but use of chloramphenicol or tetracyclines should be avoided. High environmental temperatures can lead to vaccine failure, as can vitamin E deficiency. Excessive environmental exposure to virulent distemper virus can overcome levels of protection which would be adequate under normal circumstances. PMID:17422690

  11. Analysis of the causes of pump failure and differences of failure characteristics.

    PubMed

    Korving, H; Ottenhoff, E C; Korving, H

    2008-01-01

    It is generally accepted that sewage pumping stations are directly responsible for affecting sewer system performance in terms of combined sewer overflows and flooding. However, the specific causes of pump failure are unknown. This paper presents the analysis of pump failure data provided by four sewer management authorities in The Netherlands. Pump failures have been studied accounting for the nature of failures, operation and maintenance procedures of the management authority, ageing of the pumps and changes in the environment of pumps. Pumps have been clustered on the basis of specific characteristics of their 'environment', including pump age, operating time, pump capacity and degree of pollution of the sewage. The analysis shows that the well known 'bathtub' type failure rate curve can describe failures of sewage pumps. The impact of the degree of pollution of the sewage, however, is less clear. Operating time and total pumping capacity show no correlation with failure rate. Consequently, further research using data mining techniques is needed to separate the impact of the different aspects of the environment of a pump.

  12. Hypoxic and hypercapnic response in asthmatic subjects with previous respiratory failure.

    PubMed Central

    Hutchison, A A; Olinsky, A

    1981-01-01

    Three children and two young adults with severe asthma who had frequent episodes of respiratory failure were studied. Isocapnic hypoxia and hyperoxic hypercapnia were produced separately using a rebreathing apparatus. Alveolar carbon dioxide tension and oxygen tension were estimated by continuously sampling expired gases. The three young children had a diminished response to hypoxia but a normal response to hypercapnia when compared to control asthmatic children (p less than 0.05) or healthy children (p less than 0.05). The two young adult patients had a normal response to hypoxia but one had a low response to hypercapnia. Studies of parents of these patients suggested that the chance combination of a possibly familial, inappropriate response to hypoxia with severe asthma would lead to a risk of respiratory failure. PMID:7330794

  13. REPRESENTING COMMON-CAUSE FAILURES IN THE SAPHIRE SOFTWARE

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis L. Smith

    2008-11-01

    Currently, the risk analysis software SAPHIRE has implemented a common-cause failure (CCF) module to represent standard CCF methods such as alpha-factor and multiple Greek letter approaches. However, changes to SAPHIRE are required to support the Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s 2007 “Risk Assessment Standardization Project” CCF analysis guidance for events assessment. This guidance provides an outline of how both the nominal CCF probabilities and conditional (e.g., after a redundant component has failed) CCF probabilities should be calculated. Based upon user-provided input and extending the limitations in the current version of SAPHIRE, the CCF module calculations will be made consistent with the new guidance. The CCF modifications will involve changes to (1) the SAPHIRE graphical user interface directing how end-users and modelers interface with PRA models and (2) algorithmic changes as required. Included in the modifications will be the possibility to treat CCF probability adjustments based upon failure types (e.g., independent versus dependent) and failure modes (e.g., failure-to-run versus failure-to-start). In general, SAPHIRE is being modified to allow the risk analyst to define a CCF object. This object is defined in terms of a basic event. For the CCF object, the analyst would need to specify a minimal set of information, including: - The number of redundant components - The failure criteria (how many component have to fail) - The CCF model type (alpha-factor, MGL, or beta-factor) - The parameters (e.g., the alpha-factors) associated with the model - Staggered or non-staggered testing assumption - Default level of detail (expanded, showing all of the specific failure combinations, or not) This paper will outline both the theory behind the probabilistic calculations and the resulting implementation in the SAPHIRE software.

  14. [Nasal Highflow (NHF): A New Therapeutic Option for the Treatment of Respiratory Failure].

    PubMed

    Bräunlich, J; Nilius, G

    2016-01-01

    The therapy of choice in hypoxemic respiratory failure (type 1) is the application of supplemental oxygen at flow rates of 1 to 15 l/min via nasal prongs or mask. Non-invasive or invasive positive pressure ventilation will be initiated when the oxygen therapy effects are not sufficient or if hypercapnic respiratory failure (type 2) is the underlying problem. Recently, an alternative therapy option is available, from the pathophysiology it can be classified between oxygen therapy and positive pressure ventilation. The therapy called Nasal High Flow (NHF) is based on the nasal application of a heated and humidified air oxygen mixture with a flow range of up to 60 l/min. The precise pathophysiological principles of NHF are only partly understood, yet various aspects are well studied already: it is possible to deliver high oxygen concentrations, airway dryness can be avoided, dead space ventilation reduced and clearance of nasal dead space is achieved. Additionally, an end expiratory positive pressure is built up, which helps to prevent airway collapse, thus resulting in an improvement of respiratory efficiency and reduction of breathing work. Current studies demonstrate improvement in gas exchange and reduction of reintubation rate when applying the NHF treatment in acute respiratory failure. Thus the NHF therapy attracts attention in intensive care medicine. The application in other fields like chronic respiratory insufficiency is less well clarified. The objectives of this review are to present the pathophysiological effects and mechanisms of NHF, as far as understood, and to give an overview over the current state of relevant studies.

  15. Challenges on non-invasive ventilation to treat acute respiratory failure in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Scala, Raffaele

    2016-11-15

    Acute respiratory failure is a frequent complication in elderly patients especially if suffering from chronic cardio-pulmonary diseases. Non-invasive mechanical ventilation constitutes a successful therapeutic tool in the elderly as, like in younger patients, it is able to prevent endotracheal intubation in a wide range of acute conditions; moreover, this ventilator technique is largely applied in the elderly in whom invasive mechanical ventilation is considered not appropriated. Furthermore, the integration of new technological devices, ethical issues and environment of treatment are still largely debated in the treatment of acute respiratory failure in the elderly.This review aims at reporting and critically analyzing the peculiarities in the management of acute respiratory failure in elderly people, the role of noninvasive mechanical ventilation, the potential advantages of applying alternative or integrated therapeutic tools (i.e. high-flow nasal cannula oxygen therapy, non-invasive and invasive cough assist devices and low-flow carbon-dioxide extracorporeal systems), drawbacks in physician's communication and "end of life" decisions. As several areas of this topic are not supported by evidence-based data, this report takes in account also "real-life" data as well as author's experience.The choice of the setting and of the timing of non-invasive mechanical ventilation in elderly people with advanced cardiopulmonary disease should be carefully evaluated together with the chance of using integrated or alternative supportive devices. Last but not least, economic and ethical issues may often challenges the behavior of the physicians towards elderly people who are hospitalized for acute respiratory failure at the end stage of their cardiopulmonary and neoplastic diseases.

  16. Postextubation laryngeal edema and stridor resulting in respiratory failure in critically ill adult patients: updated review.

    PubMed

    Pluijms, Wouter A; van Mook, Walther Nka; Wittekamp, Bastiaan Hj; Bergmans, Dennis Cjj

    2015-09-23

    Endotracheal intubation is frequently complicated by laryngeal edema, which may present as postextubation stridor or respiratory difficulty or both. Ultimately, postextubation laryngeal edema may result in respiratory failure with subsequent reintubation. Risk factors for postextubation laryngeal edema include female gender, large tube size, and prolonged intubation. Although patients at low risk for postextubation respiratory insufficiency due to laryngeal edema can be identified by the cuff leak test or laryngeal ultrasound, no reliable test for the identification of high-risk patients is currently available. If applied in a timely manner, intravenous or nebulized corticosteroids can prevent postextubation laryngeal edema; however, the inability to identify high-risk patients prevents the targeted pretreatment of these patients. Therefore, the decision to start corticosteroids should be made on an individual basis and on the basis of the outcome of the cuff leak test and additional risk factors. The preferential treatment of postextubation laryngeal edema consists of intravenous or nebulized corticosteroids combined with nebulized epinephrine, although no data on the optimal treatment algorithm are available. In the presence of respiratory failure, reintubation should be performed without delay. Application of noninvasive ventilation or inhalation of a helium/oxygen mixture is not indicated since it does not improve outcome and increases the delay to intubation.

  17. Spinal Fusion for Scoliosis in Rett Syndrome With an Emphasis on Respiratory Failure and Opioid Usage.

    PubMed

    Rumbak, Dania M; Mowrey, Wenzhu; W Schwartz, Skai; Sarwahi, Vishal; Djukic, Aleksandra; Killinger, James S; Katyal, Chhavi

    2016-02-01

    Our objective was to characterize our experience with 8 patients with Rett syndrome undergoing scoliosis surgery in regard to rates of respiratory failure and rates of ventilator-acquired pneumonia in comparison to patients with neurologic scoliosis and adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. This study was a retrospective chart review of patients undergoing scoliosis surgery at a tertiary children's hospital. Patients were divided into 3 groups: (1) adolescent idiopathic scoliosis, (2) neurologic scoliosis, and (3) Rett syndrome. There were 133 patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis, 48 patients with neurologic scoliosis, and 8 patients with Rett syndrome. We found that patients with Rett syndrome undergoing scoliosis surgery have higher rates of respiratory failure and longer ventilation times in the postoperative period when compared with both adolescent idiopathic scoliosis and neurologic scoliosis patients. There is insufficient evidence to suggest a difference in the incidence of ventilator-acquired pneumonia between the Rett syndrome and the neurologic scoliosis group. We believe our findings are the first in the literature to show a statistically significant difference between these 3 groups in regard to incidence of respiratory failure.

  18. Management of Patients with Gastroschisis Requiring Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation for Concurrent Respiratory Failure.

    PubMed

    Lalani, Alykhan; Benson Ham, P; Wise, Linda J; Daniel, John M; Walters, K Christian; Pipkin, Walter L; Stansfield, Brian; Hatley, Robyn M; Bhatia, Jatinder

    2016-09-01

    Treatment of gastroschisis often requires multiple surgical procedures to re-establish abdominal domain, reduce abdominal contents, and eventually close the abdominal wall. In patients who have concomitant respiratory failure requiring extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), this process becomes further complicated. This situation is rare and only five such cases have been reported in the ECMO registry database. Management of three of the five patients along with results and implications for future care of similar patients is discussed here. Two patients had respiratory failure due to meconium aspiration syndrome and one patient had persistent acidosis as well as worsening pulmonary hypertension leading to the decision of ECMO. The abdominal contents were placed in a spring-loaded silastic silo while on ECMO and primary closure was performed three to six days after the decannulation. All three patients survived and are developmentally appropriate. We recommend avoiding aggressively reducing the abdominal contents and using a silo to conservatively reducing the gastroschisis while the patient is on ECMO therapy. Keeping the intra-abdominal pressure below 20 mm Hg can possibly reduce ECMO days and ventilator time and has been shown to decrease morbidity and mortality. Patients with gastroschisis and respiratory failure requiring ECMO can have good outcomes despite the complexity of required care.

  19. [Successful microvascular decompression of the medulla oblongata for a case with respiratory failure: case report].

    PubMed

    Koguchi, Motofumi; Nakahara, Yukiko; Kawashima, Masatou; Takase, Yukinori; Matsushima, Toshio

    2011-11-01

    We report a case of the medulla oblongata syndrome successfully treated by microvascular decompression surgery. The patient was a 75-year-old woman and had been suffering from gradual progressive dyspnea since July, 2009. Two month later, intubation and medial ventilator treatments were began because of severe respiratory problems. The central respiratory problems were considered in extensive testing by the physician. The head MR imaging showed that the left vertebral artery had markedly compressed the medulla oblongata. We thought that her respiratory problems were associated with this vertebral artery compression of the medulla oblongata. We performed the microvascular decompression surgery by left trans-condylar fossa approach. Her hypoventilation graduately improved after the surgery and she needed neither ventilator nor oxygen in several months. She is able to perform daily activities by herself. We report the case, and discuss the cause of respiratory problems especially by compression of the medulla oblongata.

  20. Blastomyces gilchristii as Cause of Fatal Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dalcin, Daniel; Rothstein, Aaron; Spinato, Joanna; Escott, Nicholas; Kus, Julianne V

    2016-02-01

    Since the 2013 description of Blastomyces gilchristii, research describing the virulence or clinical outcome of B. gilchristii infection has been lacking. We report molecular evidence of B. gilchristii as an etiologic agent of fatal acute respiratory distress syndrome. B. gilchristii infection was confirmed by PCR and sequence analysis.

  1. Blastomyces gilchristii as Cause of Fatal Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rothstein, Aaron; Spinato, Joanna; Escott, Nicholas; Kus, Julianne V.

    2016-01-01

    Since the 2013 description of Blastomyces gilchristii, research describing the virulence or clinical outcome of B. gilchristii infection has been lacking. We report molecular evidence of B. gilchristii as an etiologic agent of fatal acute respiratory distress syndrome. B. gilchristii infection was confirmed by PCR and sequence analysis. PMID:26812599

  2. Glutaric aciduria type 2 presenting with acute respiratory failure in an adult

    PubMed Central

    Ersoy, Ebru Ortac; Rama, Dorina; Ünal, Özlem; Sivri, Serap; Topeli, Arzu

    2015-01-01

    Glutaric aciduria (GTA) type II can be seen as late onset form with myopathic phenotype. We present a case of a 19-year old female with progressive muscle weakness was admitted in intensive care unit (ICU) with respiratory failure and acute renal failure. Patient was unconscious. Pupils were anisocoric and light reflex was absent. She had hepatomegaly. The laboratory results showed a glucose level of 70 mg/dl and the liver enzymes were high. The patient also had hyponatremia (117 mEq/L) and lactate level of 3.9 mmol/L. Tandem MS and organic acid analysis were compatible with GTA type II. Carnitine 1gr, riboflavin 100 mg and co-enzymeQ10 100 mg was arranged. After four months from beginning of treatment tandem MS results are improved. Respiratory failure, acute renal failure due to profound proximal myopathy can be due to glutaric aciduria type II that responded rapidly to appropriate therapy. PMID:26236614

  3. ISS Fiber Optic Failure Investigation Root Cause Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leidecker, Henning; Plante, Jeannette

    2000-01-01

    In August of 1999, Boeing Corporation (Boeing) engineers began investigating failures of optical fiber being used on International Space Station flight hardware. Catastrophic failures of the fiber were linked to a defect in the glass fiber. Following several meetings of Boeing and NASA engineers and managers, Boeing created and led an investigation team, which examined the reliability of the cable installed in the U.S. Lab. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's Components Technologies and Radiation Effects Branch (GSFC) led a team investigating the root cause of the failures. Information was gathered from: regular telecons and other communications with the investigation team, investigative trips to the cable distributor's plant, the cable manufacturing plant and the fiber manufacturing plant (including a review of build records), destructive and non-destructive testing, and expertise supplied by scientists from Dupont, and Lucent-Bell Laboratories. Several theories were established early on which were not able to completely address the destructive physical analysis and experiential evidence. Lucent suggested hydrofluoric acid (HF) etching of the glass and successfully duplicated the "rocket engine" defect. Strength testing coupled with examination of the low strength break sites linked features in the polyimide coating with latent defect sites. The information provided below explains what was learned about the susceptibility of the pre-cabled fiber to failure when cabled as it was for Space Station and the nature of the latent defects.

  4. Respiratory Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... occur if your lungs can't properly remove carbon dioxide (a waste gas) from your blood. Too much carbon dioxide in your blood can harm your body's ... problems—a low oxygen level and a high carbon dioxide level in the blood—can occur at ...

  5. Respiratory failure during infusion of pamidronate in a 3 year-old male with osteogenesis imperfecta: a case report.

    PubMed

    Olson, Jennifer Ann

    2014-01-01

    Bisphosphonates are being used more frequently as part of the multi-disciplinary management of moderate to severe Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI). This report details the development of respiratory failure during the second infusion of pamidronate in a 3.5 year-old male with osteogenesis imperfecta type 1 and no prior history of respiratory disease.

  6. Acute liver failure caused by hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis in adults

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shide; Li, Ying; Long, Jun; Liu, Qichuan; Yang, Fangwan; He, Yihuai

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a rare condition that can be caused by a primary or acquired disorder of uncontrolled immune response. Liver injury is a common complication of HLH; however, HLH presenting as acute liver failure (ALF) has rarely been reported in adults. Case summary: A 34-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with nausea and fatigue persisting for 2 weeks and jaundice for 1 week. He had hyperthermia at the onset of disease. At admission, he had severe liver injury with unknown etiology. The laboratory data showed that he had hyperferritinemia, thrombocytopenia, anemia, hypertriglyceridemia, and hypofibrinogenemia. Finally, a bone marrow biopsy revealed hemophagocytic cells, and he was diagnosed with HLH. The patient was treated with prednisone and plasma exchange. However, the liver function of the patient deteriorated, and he finally died of multiorgan failure. Conclusions: Reports of adult patients with ALF caused by HLH have increased, and HLH should be suspected in patients with ALF of indeterminate cause. Although the efficacy of the treatment strategy recommended by the HLH 2004 remains to be confirmed in adult patients with ALF caused by HLH, early diagnosis and prompt combined treatment with steroids and cyclosporin A or etoposide should be emphasized. PMID:27893685

  7. A 5-month-old boy with recurrent respiratory infections, failure to thrive, and borderline elevated sweat chloride levels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Helen C; Whelan, Meg A; McGeady, Stephen J; Yousef, Ejaz

    2006-01-01

    Both severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) and cystic fibrosis (CF) may present in infancy with a history of respiratory infections and failure to thrive. Elevated sweat chloride levels on multiple sweat tests is diagnostic of CF; transient elevation of sweat chloride has been reported in patients with hypogammaglobulinemia and antibody deficiency without CF. This article presents a case report of a 5-month-old boy with recurrent respiratory infections, failure to thrive, and two borderline elevated sweat test levels. Laboratory evaluation including testing for CF as well as immune deficiency was performed in this patient. Two borderline abnormal sweat chloride tests together with isolation of Pseudomonas from the airway caused clinicians initially to suspect CF; however, mutation in gene coding for the gamma-chain of the IL-2 receptor and a negative CF genetic mutation analysis ultimately led to the final diagnosis of SCID. It is essential to make the diagnosis of SCID as early as possible because infants with SCID who do not undergo reconstitution of their immune system universally die in infancy because of infection. Early diagnosis and intervention can lead to an excellent prognosis in a previously fatal disease.

  8. Hypercalcemia as a Cause of Kidney Failure: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Stojceva-Taneva, Olivera; Taneva, Borjanka; Selim, Gjulsen

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hypercalcemia is a common manifestation in clinical practice and occurs as a result of primary hyperparathyroidism, malignancy, milk-alkali syndrome, hyper or hypothyroidism, sarcoidosis and other known and unknown causes. Patients with milk-alkali syndrome typically are presented with renal failure, hypercalcemia, and metabolic alkalosis caused by the ingestion of calcium and absorbable alkali. This syndrome is caused by high intake of milk and sodium bicarbonate. CASE PRESENTATION: We present a 28-year old male admitted to hospital with a one-month history of nausea, vomiting, epigastric pain, increased blood pressure and worsening of renal function with hypercalcemia. His serum PTH level was almost undetectable; he had mild alkalosis, renal failure with eGFR of 42 ml/min, anemia, hypertension and abnormal ECG with shortened QT interval and ST elevation in V1-V4. He had a positive medical history for calcium-containing antacids intake and after ruling out primary hyperparathyroidism, malignancy, multiple myelomas, sarcoidosis, and thyroid dysfunction, it seemed plausible to diagnose him as having the milk-alkali syndrome. CONCLUSION: Although milk-alkali syndrome currently may be more probably a result of calcium and vitamin D intake in postmenopausal women, or in elderly men with reduced kidney function taking calcium-containing medications, one should not exclude the possibility of its appearance in younger patients taking calcium-containing medications and consider it a serious condition taking into account its possibility of inducing renal insufficiency. PMID:27335601

  9. Rhabdomyolysis and respiratory failure: rare presentation of carnitine palmityl-transferase II deficiency.

    PubMed

    Gentili, A; Iannella, E; Masciopinto, F; Latrofa, M E; Giuntoli, L; Baroncini, S

    2008-05-01

    Carnitine palmityl-transferase (CPT) II deficiency is a rare disorder of the fatty acid beta-oxidation cycle. CPT II deficiency can be associated with rhabdomyolysis in particular conditions that increase the requirement for fatty acid oxidation, such as low-carbohydrate and high-fat diet, fasting, exposure to excessive cold, lack of sleep and prolonged exercise. The best known CPT II deficiency is the muscular form with episodic muscle necrosis and paroxysmal myoglobinuria after prolonged exercise. We report a case of a four-year-old male child, who, after one day of hyperthermia and fasting, developed a massive rhabdomyolysis beginning with acute respiratory failure and later complicated by acute renal failure. Appropriate management in Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) (mechanical ventilatory support, fluid supply combined with mannitol and bicarbonate infusions, administration of acetaminophen and antibiotics, and continuous venovenous haemofiltration) brought about complete resolution with an excellent outcome. Biochemical investigation of muscle biopsy and genetic analysis showed a deficiency of CPT II. The onset of CPT II deficiency with respiratory failure is extremely rare, but a correct and early diagnosis of rhabdomyolysis is the key to successful treatment. A metabolic myopathy such as CPT II deficiency should be suspected in children affected by rhabdomyolysis if trauma, crash, infections, drugs or extreme exertion can be excluded.

  10. Using transcutaneous carbon dioxide monitor (TOSCA 500) to detect respiratory failure in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a validation study.

    PubMed

    Rafiq, Muhammad K; Bradburn, Michael; Proctor, Alison R; Billings, Catherine; Bianchi, Stephen; McDermott, Christopher J; Shaw, Pamela J

    2012-10-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative condition, respiratory failure being the commonest cause of death. Quality of life and survival can be improved by supporting respiratory function with non-invasive ventilation. Transcutaneous carbon dioxide monitoring is a non-invasive method of measuring arterial carbon dioxide levels enabling simple and efficient screening for respiratory failure. The aim of this study was to validate the accuracy of carbon dioxide level recorded transcutaneously with a TOSCA 500 monitor. It is a prospective, observational study of 40 consecutive patients with ALS, recruited from a specialist ALS clinic. The partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PCO(2)) in each patient was determined by both transcutaneous monitoring and by an arterialized ear lobe capillary blood sample. The carbon dioxide (CO(2)) levels obtained with these two methods were compared by Bland-Altman analysis. The results showed that the mean difference between arterialized and transcutaneous readings was - 0.083 kPa (SD 0.318). The Bland-Altman limits of agreement ranged from 0.553 to - 0.719 kPa. The difference was < 0.5 kPa in 90% of the recordings. Four of the 40 measurements had a difference of > 0.5 kPa, with a maximum recorded difference of 0.95 kPa. In conclusion, non-invasive carbon dioxide monitoring using a TOSCA monitor is a useful clinical tool in neurology practice. Users should be aware of the possibility of occasional inaccurate readings. A clinically unexpected or incompatible reading should be verified with a blood gas analysis, especially when a decision to provide ventilatory support is required.

  11. [Home mechanical ventilation: Invasive and noninvasive ventilation therapy for chronic respiratory failure].

    PubMed

    Huttmann, S E; Storre, J H; Windisch, W

    2015-06-01

    Home mechanical ventilation represents a valuable therapeutic option to improve alveolar ventilation in patients with chronic respiratory failure. For this purpose both invasive ventilation via tracheostomy and noninvasive ventilation via facemasks are available. The primary goal of home mechanical ventilation is a reduction of symptoms, improvement of quality of life and in many cases reduction of mortality. Elective establishment of home mechanical ventilation is typically provided for noninvasive ventilation in respect to clinical symptoms and partial pressure of carbon dioxide depending on the underlying disease. However, invasive mechanical ventilation is increasingly being used to continue ventilatory support in polymorbid patients following unsuccessful weaning. Recommendations and guidelines have been published by the German Respiratory Society (DGP).

  12. State of the art: strategies for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Rehder, Kyle J; Turner, David A; Bonadonna, Desiree; Walczak, Richard J; Cheifetz, Ira M

    2012-11-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is an important rescue therapy for patients with cardiac and/or respiratory failure, with a growing body of literature supporting its use. Despite widespread use of ECMO, there remains a paucity of data on optimal management strategies for ECMO patients. Management of ECMO patients involves an understanding of the complex interaction between this technology and the critically ill patients being supported. ECMO providers typically rely on a combination of consensus guidelines and institutional experience to make management decisions. Substantial controversy continues to exist regarding many elements of ECMO management, including seemingly straightforward decisions such as the initial implementation of this technology. In addition, there are multiple providers involved in the management of ECMO patients who must be co-ordinated for this supportive therapy to be most effective. This manuscript provides an overview of current techniques for treating respiratory ECMO patients.

  13. [Respiratory failure due to delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol in a tetraplegic patient].

    PubMed

    Neuburger, M; Schley, M; Schmelz, M; Schuepfer, G; Konrad, C

    2006-11-01

    We report on a patient with an incomplete tetraplegia below C2 who suffered from a post-traumatic abdominal spasticity, spasticity of the legs, and bladder contractions of high intensity. Breathing was possible during the day using accessory respiratory musculature. All standard therapeutic regimes against spasticity failed. Treatment was started with delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol administered orally in a dosage of 2 x 2.5 mg/day. The spasticity of the legs and the bladder improved with the treatment. After 3 days, the patient complained about dyspnea and shortness of breath. Treatment with delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol was discontinued after 5 days but the patient needed ventilatory support for 1 week. After 1 week, spontaneous breathing was possible again. The reasons for respiratory failure in endangered patients during treatment with delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol could be effects such as sedation, combined treatment with baclofen, muscle weakness, or central nervous effects in the medulla oblongata.

  14. Atypical pulmonary sequestration causing respiratory distress in a 2-month-old male infant.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Julio Bauza

    2017-02-27

    Pulmonary sequestrations are non-functional masses of lung tissue lacking normal communication with the tracheobronchial tree and systemic-circulation-derived blood supply. The disconnection between the normal airway and pulmonary arterial supply prevents pulmonary sequestrations from participating in respiration while their aberrant circulation increases the potential for hemodynamic imbalance. Extralobar sequestrations are prenatally diagnosed, congenital lesions that may become symptomatic before or after birth, whereas intralobar sequestrations are usually identified during adulthood. This report describes a 2-month-old boy with respiratory distress caused by an anomaly characterized by a systemic artery feeding a large segment of the left lower lobe lacking normal ventilation due to absent bronchial connections. This segment that was surrounded by its own visceral pleura, and separated from the normal lower lobe by a fissure, drained through a large vessel into the left inferior pulmonary vein, causing left-to-left shunting and high output failure. Symptoms disappeared immediately following thoracoscopic division of the aberrant vessels and excision of only the sequestered segment. This case accentuates the hemodynamic imbalance set off by a left-to-left shunt across an atypical sequestration that although intralobar was separated by an accessory fissure from the normal parenchyma and also the benefits of video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery.

  15. Respiratory illness caused by overheating of polyvinyl chloride.

    PubMed Central

    Froneberg, B; Johnson, P L; Landrigan, P J

    1982-01-01

    On 9 August 1979, 62 (30.8%) of 201 workers and one of 60 management personnel in a polyvinyl chloride (PVC) fabricating plant developed acute upper and lower respiratory irritation, headache, nausea, and fainting. All were taken to hospital; none died. Sixty of the patients were women. Interviews two weeks later with 57 affected and 14 unaffected workers disclosed that illness had followed exposure to fumes from an overheated (362 degrees C) PVC extruding machine. Fumes were emitted from 1100 until 1150; cases occurred from 1100 until late afternoon. All workers who became ill worked west of the overheated extruder, and the affected manager had visited that area. The earliest cases occurred closest to the machine, and incidence decreased (from 53.3% to 15.4%) with distance westward. This pattern was consistent with plant ventilation. Incidence rates in men and women did not differ (p greater than 0.1). At two and 14 weeks, pulmonary function testing of workers with persistent pulmonary symptoms showed abnormalities in 13 of 16 and in 9 of 11 respectively; the group with persistent symptoms contained an excess of non-smokers and of those with previous respiratory illnesses. One kilogram of PVC heated to 300 degrees C releases an estimated 12.9 g of hydrochloric acid (HCl) and 4.9 g of carbon monoxide (CO). We attributed the outbreak to exposure to toxic HCl and CO and rejected the hypothesis of mass psychogenic illness. PMID:7093150

  16. Endoscopic lung volume reduction effectively treats acute respiratory failure secondary to bullous emphysema.

    PubMed

    Sexton, Paul; Garrett, Jeffrey E; Rankin, Nigel; Anderson, Graeme

    2010-10-01

    Emphysema often affects the lungs in a heterogeneous fashion, and collapse or removal of severely hyperinflated portions of lung can improve overall lung function and symptoms. The role of lung volume reduction (LVR) surgery in selected patients is well established, but that of non-surgical LVR is still being defined. In particular, use of endobronchial LVR is still under development. This case report describes a 48-year-old non-smoker with severe bullous emphysema complicated by acute hypercapnic respiratory failure, who was successfully treated by endobronchial valve placement while intubated in an intensive care unit.

  17. Successful management of severe respiratory failure combining heliox with noninvasive high-frequency percussive ventilation.

    PubMed

    Stucki, Pascal; Scalfaro, Pietro; de Halleux, Quentin; Vermeulen, François; Rappaz, Isabelle; Cotting, Jacques

    2002-03-01

    Heliox has been shown to be beneficial in the management of different obstructive pulmonary disorders. High-frequency percussive ventilation has recently been advocated to treat lung injury in children with reduced lung compliance. We report our experience of combining heliox with noninvasive high-frequency percussive ventilation in a 5-yr-old boy with severe acute respiratory failure resulting from advanced cystic fibrosis lung disease. The dramatic improvement allowed stabilization and withholding of endotracheal intubation. We hypothesize that this approach improved gas exchange by enhancing molecular diffusion and by favoring laminar flow throughout the upper and lower airways. Further investigations should study the mechanisms of this noninvasive bimodal therapy.

  18. The Hospital Course of a Successfully Treated Patient with Respiratory Failure: Beginning to End!

    PubMed

    Callister, T Brian

    The successful treatment of a patient with acute respiratory failure is a complex undertaking that requires clinical competence, evidence-based interventions, seamless coordination of care transitions, and transparent open communication among all members of the health care team. Many of the processes of care in these critically ill patients are reassuringly consistent across services, across hospitals, across health systems, and even across the country. Although the clinical course of such complicated patients can be extremely unpredictable, we are fortunate that the professional, technical, and psychosocial aspects of care for these patients can be relatively orderly, evidence-based, and transparent.

  19. Urgent awake thoracoscopic treatment of retained haemothorax associated with respiratory failure

    PubMed Central

    Cristino, Benedetto; Rogliani, Paola; Dauri, Mario

    2015-01-01

    A number of video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) procedures are being increasingly performed by awake anesthesia in an attempt of minimizing the surgical- and anesthesia-related traumas. However, so far the usefulness of awake VATS for urgent management of retained haemothorax has been scarcely investigated. Herein we present two patients with retained haemothorax following previous thoracentesis and blunt chest trauma, respectively, who developed acute respiratory failure and underwent successful urgent awake VATS management under local anesthesia through a single trocar access. PMID:26046053

  20. Incidence and causes of non-invasive mechanical ventilation failure after initial success

    PubMed Central

    Moretti, M.; Cilione, C.; Tampieri, A.; Fracchia, C.; Marchioni, A.; Nava, S.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—The rate of failure of non-invasive mechanical ventilation (NIMV) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) with acute respiratory insufficiency ranges from 5% to 40%. Most of the studies report an incidence of "late failure" (after >48 hours of NIMV) of about 10-20%. The recognition of this subset of patients is critical because prolonged application of NIMV may unduly delay the time of intubation.
METHODS—In this multicentre study the primary aims were to assess the rate of "late NIMV failure" and possible associated predictive factors; secondary aims of the study were evaluation of the best ventilatory strategy in this subset of patients and their outcomes in and out of hospital. The study was performed in two respiratory intensive care units (ICUs) on patients with COPD admitted with an episode of hypercapnic respiratory failure (mean (SD) pH 7.23(0.07), PaCO2 85.3 (15.8) mm Hg).
RESULTS—One hundred and thirty seven patients initially responded to NIMV in terms of objective (arterial blood gas tensions) and subjective improvement. After 8.4 (2.8) days of NIMV 31 patients (23%; 95% confidence interval (CI) 18 to 33) experienced a new episode of acute respiratory failure while still ventilated. The occurrence of "late NIMV failure" was significantly associated with functional limitations (ADL scale) before admission to the respiratory ICU, the presence of medical complications (particularly hyperglycaemia), and a lower pH on admission. Depending on their willingness or not to be intubated, the patients received invasive ventilation (n=19) or "more aggressive" (more hours/day) NIMV (n=12). Eleven (92%) of those in this latter subgroup died while in the respiratory ICU compared with 10 (53%) of the patients receiving invasive ventilation. The overall 90 day mortality was 21% and, after discharge from hospital, was similar in the "late NIMV failure" group and in patients who did not experience a second episode of acute

  1. Management of hypoxemic respiratory failure and pulmonary hypertension in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Ambalavanan, N; Aschner, J L

    2016-06-01

    While diagnoses of hypoxemic respiratory failure (HRF) and pulmonary hypertension (PH) in preterm infants may be based on criteria similar to those in term infants, management approaches often differ. In preterm infants, HRF can be classified as 'early' or 'late' based on an arbitrary threshold of 28 postnatal days. Among preterm infants with late HRF, the pulmonary vascular abnormalities associated with bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) represent a therapeutic challenge for clinicians. Surfactant, inhaled nitric oxide (iNO), sildenafil, prostacyclin and endothelin receptor blockers have been used to manage infants with both early and late HRF. However, evidence is lacking for most therapies currently in use. Chronic oral sildenafil therapy for BPD-associated PH has demonstrated some preliminary efficacy. A favorable response to iNO has been documented in some preterm infants with early PH following premature prolonged rupture of membranes and oligohydramnios. Management is complicated by a lack of clear demarcation between interventions designed to manage respiratory distress syndrome, prevent BPD and treat HRF. Heterogeneity in clinical phenotype, pathobiology and genomic underpinnings of BPD pose challenges for evidence-based management recommendations. Greater insight into the spectrum of disease phenotypes represented by BPD can optimize existing therapies and promote development of new treatments. In addition, better understanding of an individual's phenotype, genotype and biomarkers may suggest targeted personalized interventions. Initiatives such as the Prematurity and Respiratory Outcomes Program provide a framework to address these challenges using genetic, environmental, physiological and clinical data as well as large repositories of patient samples.

  2. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for diffuse alveolar hemorrhage and severe hypoxemic respiratory failure from silicone embolism.

    PubMed

    Mongero, L B; Brodie, D; Cunningham, J; Ventetuolo, C; Kim, H; Sylvan, E; Bacchetta, M D

    2010-07-01

    Liquid silicone is an inert material that may be used for cosmetic procedures by physicians as well as illegally by non-medical personnel. The use of silicone may result in severe complications, disfigurement, and even death. In addition, the indications for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) support have been increasing as a salvage therapy for a variety of life-threatening conditions. The patient is a 27-year-old woman with no significant medical conditions who developed silicone emboli, and subsequent diffuse alveolar hemorrhage after being injected with silicone in her gluteal region without medical supervision. She became profoundly hypoxemic and suffered a brief asystolic cardiac arrest in this setting. The patient was placed on veno-venous ECMO support for 14 days. Medical care during ECMO was complicated by pulmonary hemorrhage, hemothorax, pneumothorax, and blood clot, resulting in oxygenator change-out. A modified adult ECMO circuit (Jostra QuadroxD, Maquet Cardiopulmonary, Rastatt, Germany) was used to transport the patient from a nearby community affiliate hospital and then reconfigured for the medical intensive care unit on a standard HL-20 heart-lung console. Although the use of ECMO for severe hypoxemic respiratory failure has been widely reported, to our knowledge, this is the first reported successful use of ECMO for silicone embolism syndrome associated with diffuse alveolar hemorrhage and severe hypoxemic respiratory failure.

  3. Pathophysiological Basis of Acute Respiratory Failure on Non-Invasive Mechanical Ventilation.

    PubMed

    Romero-Dapueto, C; Budini, H; Cerpa, F; Caceres, D; Hidalgo, V; Gutiérrez, T; Keymer, J; Pérez, R; Molina, J; Giugliano-Jaramillo, C

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive mechanical ventilation (NIMV) was created for patients who needed noninvasive ventilator support, this procedure decreases the complications associated with the use of endotracheal intubation (ETT). The application of NIMV has acquired major relevance in the last few years in the management of acute respiratory failure (ARF), in patients with hypoxemic and hypercapnic failure. The main advantage of NIMV as compared to invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV) is that it can be used earlier outside intensive care units (ICUs). The evidence strongly supports its use in patients with COPD exacerbation, support in weaning process in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients, patients with acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema (ACPE), and Immunosuppressed patients. On the other hand, there is poor evidence that supports the use of NIMV in other pathologies such as pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), and during procedures as bronchoscopy, where its use is still controversial because the results of these studies are inconclusive against the decrease in the rate of intubation or mortality.

  4. Pathophysiological Basis of Acute Respiratory Failure on Non-Invasive Mechanical Ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Dapueto, C; Budini, H; Cerpa, F; Caceres, D; Hidalgo, V; Gutiérrez, T; Keymer, J; Pérez, R; Molina, J; Giugliano-Jaramillo, C

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive mechanical ventilation (NIMV) was created for patients who needed noninvasive ventilator support, this procedure decreases the complications associated with the use of endotracheal intubation (ETT). The application of NIMV has acquired major relevance in the last few years in the management of acute respiratory failure (ARF), in patients with hypoxemic and hypercapnic failure. The main advantage of NIMV as compared to invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV) is that it can be used earlier outside intensive care units (ICUs). The evidence strongly supports its use in patients with COPD exacerbation, support in weaning process in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients, patients with acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema (ACPE), and Immunosuppressed patients. On the other hand, there is poor evidence that supports the use of NIMV in other pathologies such as pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), and during procedures as bronchoscopy, where its use is still controversial because the results of these studies are inconclusive against the decrease in the rate of intubation or mortality. PMID:26312101

  5. Noninvasive ventilation practice patterns for acute respiratory failure in Canadian tertiary care centres: A descriptive analysis

    PubMed Central

    Digby, Geneviève C; Keenan, Sean P; Parker, Christopher M; Sinuff, Tasnim; Burns, Karen E; Mehta, Sangeeta; Ronco, Juan J; Kutsogiannis, Demetrios J; Rose, Louise; Ayas, Najib T; Berthiaume, Luc R; D’Arsigny, Christine L; Stollery, Daniel E; Muscedere, John

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The extent of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) use for patients with acute respiratory failure in Canadian hospitals, indications for use and associated outcomes are unknown. OBJECTIVE: To describe NIV practice variation in the acute setting. METHODS: A prospective observational study involving 11 Canadian tertiary care centres was performed. Data regarding NIV indication, mode and outcomes were collected for all adults (>16 years of age) treated with NIV for acute respiratory failure during a four-week period (between February and August 2011). Logistic regression with site as a random effect was used to examine the association between preselected predictors and mortality or intubation. RESULTS: A total of 330 patients (mean [± SD] 30±12 per centre) were included. The most common indications for NIV initiation were pulmonary edema (104 [31.5%]) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (99 [30.0%]). Significant differences in indications for NIV use across sites, specialty of ordering physician and location of NIV initiation were noted. Although intubation rates were not statistically different among sites (range 10.3% to 45.4%), mortality varied significantly (range 6.7% to 54.5%; P=0.006). In multivariate analysis, the most significant independent predictor of avoiding intubation was do-not-resuscitate status (OR 0.11 [95% CI 0.03 to 0.37]). CONCLUSION: Significant variability existed in NIV use and associated outcomes among Canadian tertiary care centres. Assignment of do-not-resuscitate status prevented intubation. PMID:26469155

  6. Mechanisms of improvement of respiratory failure in patients with COPD treated with NIV

    PubMed Central

    Nickol, Annabel H; Hart, Nicholas; Hopkinson, Nicholas S; Hamnegård, Carl-Hugo; Moxham, John; Simonds, Anita; Polkey, Michael I

    2008-01-01

    Background Noninvasive ventilation (NIV) improves gas-exchange and symptoms in selected chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients with hypercapnic respiratory failure. We hypothesized NIV reverses respiratory failure by one or all of increased ventilatory response to carbon-dioxide, reduced respiratory muscle fatigue, or improved pulmonary mechanics. Methods Nineteen stable COPD patients (forced expiratory volume in one second 35% predicted) were studied at baseline (D0), 5–8 days (D5) and 3 months (3M) after starting NIV. Results Ventilator use was 6.2 (3.7) hours per night at D5 and 3.4 (1.6) at 3M (p = 0.12). Mean (SD) daytime arterial carbon-dioxide tension (PaCO2) was reduced from 7.4 (1.2) kPa to 7.0 (1.1) kPa at D5 and 6.5 (1.1) kPa at 3M (p = 0.001). Total lung capacity decreased from 107 (28) % predicted to 103 (28) at D5 and 103 (27) % predicted at 3M (p = 0.035). At D5 there was an increase in the hypercapnic ventilatory response and some volitional measures of inspiratory and expiratory muscle strength, but not isolated diaphragmatic strength whether assessed by volitional or nonvolitional methods. Conclusion These findings suggest decreased gas trapping and increased ventilatory sensitivity to CO2 are the principal mechanism underlying improvements in gas-exchange in patients with COPD following NIV. Changes in some volitional but not nonvolitional muscle strength measures may reflect improved patient effort. PMID:18990974

  7. Dental prosthesis aspiration: An uncommon cause of respiratory distress.

    PubMed

    De Wilde, Belphine A L; Malfait, Thomas L; Bonte, Katrien; Malfait, Thomas L A

    2016-12-01

    We present a case of a 66-year-old Caucasian man with acute respiratory distress. The patient had a history of multiple cerebrovascular accidents which resulted in left hemiplegia, swallowing problems, and aphasia. He was tentatively diagnosed with aspiration pneumonia. However, because of clinical deterioration further investigations concluded to the aspiration of a dental prosthesis. After intubation and stabilization, the prosthesis could be manually extracted. However, the patient developed a Staphylococcus epidermidis sepsis and despite adequate antibiotic therapy, he eventually died. Dental prosthesis aspiration is a medical situation associated with a higher morbidity and mortality rate compared to ingested foreign bodies. It requires a high level of suspicion to ensure a timely diagnosis and life-saving treatment. Thorough history taking is of great importance in case of tracheobronchial aspiration, which is in the adult population mostly secondary to an underlying disorder. In impaired adults with missing dental prostheses there should be extra awareness for this problem. This case report illustrates the importance of a detailed history in case of tracheobronchial aspiration and shows the limitations in the diagnostic usefulness of bedside chest radiography.

  8. Causes and treatment of oedema in patients with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Clark, Andrew L; Cleland, John G F

    2013-03-01

    Oedema is one of the fundamental features of heart failure, but the pathophysiology of oedema varies. Patients present along a spectrum ranging from acute pulmonary oedema to gross fluid retention and peripheral oedema (anasarca). In patients with pure pulmonary oedema, the problem is one of acute haemodynamic derangement; the patient does not have excess fluid, but pulmonary venous pressure rises such that the rate of fluid transudation into the interstitium of the lung exceeds the capacity of the pulmonary lymphatics to drain away the fluid. Conversely, in patients with peripheral oedema, the problem is one of fluid retention. Understanding the causes of oedema will enable straightforward, correct management of the condition. For patients with acute pulmonary oedema, vasodilatation is important to reduce cardiac filling pressures. For patients with fluid retention, removing the fluid, using either diuretics or mechanical means, is the most important consideration.

  9. Diversity Strategies to Mitigate Postulated Common Cause Failure Vulnerabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Richard Thomas

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes an approach to establish effective mitigating strategies that can resolve potential common-cause failure (CCF) vulnerabilities in instrumentation and control (I&C) systems at nuclear power plants. A particular objective in the development of these strategies, which consist of combinations of diversity attributes and their associated criteria, is to address the unique characteristics of digital technology that can contribute to CCF concerns. The research approach employed to establish diversity strategies involves investigation of available documentation on diversity usage and experience from nuclear power and non-nuclear industries, capture of expert knowledge and lessons learned, determination of common practices, and assessment of the nature of CCFs and compensating diversity attributes. The resulting diversity strategies address considerations such as the effect of technology choices, the nature of CCF vulnerabilities, and the prospective impact of each diversity type. In particular, the impact of each attribute and criterion on the purpose, process, product, and performance aspects of diverse systems are considered.

  10. Chronic heart failure modifies respiratory mechanics in rats: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Pacheco, Deise M.; Silveira, Viviane D.; Thomaz, Alex; Nunes, Ramiro B.; Elsner, Viviane R.; Dal Lago, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To analyze respiratory mechanics and hemodynamic alterations in an experimental model of chronic heart failure (CHF) following myocardial infarction. Method Twenty-seven male adult Wistar rats were randomized to CHF group (n=12) or Sham group (n=15). Ten weeks after coronary ligation or sham surgery, the animals were anesthetized and submitted to respiratory mechanics and hemodynamic measurements. Pulmonary edema as well as cardiac remodeling were measured. Results The CHF rats showed pulmonary edema 26% higher than the Sham group. The respiratory system compliance (Crs) and the total lung capacity (TLC) were lower (40% and 27%, respectively) in the CHF rats when compared to the Sham group (P<0.01). There was also an increase in tissue resistance (Gti) and elastance (Hti) (28% and 45%, respectively) in the CHF group. Moreover, left ventricular end-diastolic pressure was higher (32 mmHg vs 4 mmHg, P<0.01), while the left ventricular systolic pressure was lower (118 mmHg vs 130 mmHg, P=0.02) in the CHF group when compared to the control. Pearson’s correlation coefficient showed a negative association between pulmonary edema and Crs (r=–0.70, P=0.0001) and between pulmonary edema and TLC (r=–0.67, P=0.0034). Pulmonary edema correlated positively with Gti (r=0.68, P=0.001) and Hti (r=0.68, P=0.001). Finally, there was a strong positive relationship between pulmonary edema and heart weight (r=0.80, P=0.001). Conclusion Rats with CHF present important changes in hemodynamic and respiratory mechanics, which may be associated with alterations in cardiopulmonary interactions. PMID:27556388

  11. Challenges, priorities and novel therapies for hypoxemic respiratory failure and pulmonary hypertension in the neonate.

    PubMed

    Aschner, J L; Gien, J; Ambalavanan, N; Kinsella, J P; Konduri, G G; Lakshminrusimha, S; Saugstad, O D; Steinhorn, R H

    2016-06-01

    Future priorities for the management of hypoxemic respiratory failure (HRF) and pulmonary hypertension include primary prevention of neonatal lung diseases, 'precision medicine' and translating promising clinical and preclinical research into novel therapies. Promising areas of investigation include noninvasive ventilation strategies, emerging pulmonary vasodilators (for example, cinaciguat, intravenous bosentan, rho-kinase inhibitors, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ agonists) and hemodynamic support (arginine vasopressin). Research challenges include the optimal timing for primary prevention interventions and development of validated biomarkers that predict later disease or serve as surrogates for long-term respiratory outcomes. Differentiating respiratory disease endotypes using biomarkers and experimental therapies tailored to the underlying pathobiology are central to the concept of 'precision medicine' (that is, prevention and treatment strategies that take individual variability into account). The ideal biomarker should be expressed early in the neonatal course to offer an opportunity for effective and targeted interventions to modify outcomes. The feasibility of this approach will depend on the identification and validation of accurate, rapid and affordable point-of-care biomarker tests. Trials targeting patient-specific pathobiology may involve less risk than traditional randomized controlled trials that enroll all at-risk neonates. Such approaches would reduce trial costs, potentially with fewer negative trials and improved health outcomes. Initiatives such as the Prematurity and Respiratory Outcomes Program, supported by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, provide a framework to develop refined outcome measures and early biomarkers that will enhance our understanding of novel, mechanistic therapeutic targets that can be tested in clinical trials in neonates with HRF.

  12. Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation in Severe Influenza Infection with Respiratory Failure: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sukhal, Shashvat; Sethi, Jaskaran; Ganesh, Malini; Villablanca, Pedro A; Malhotra, Anita K; Ramakrishna, Harish

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) has been extensively used for potentially reversible acute respiratory failure associated with severe influenza A (H1N1) pneumonia; however, it remains an expensive, resource-intensive therapy, with a high associated mortality. This systematic review and meta-analysis aims to summarize and pool outcomes data available in the published literature to guide clinical decision-making and further research. Methods: We conducted a systematic search of MEDLINE (1966 to April 15, 2015), EMBASE (1980 to April 15, 2015), CENTRAL, and Google Scholar for patients with severe H1N1 pneumonia and respiratory failure who received ECMO. The study validity was appraised by Newcastle–Ottawa Scale. The primary outcome was all-cause mortality. The secondary outcomes were duration of ECMO therapy, mechanical ventilation, and Intensive Care Unit (ICU) length of stay. Results: Of 698 abstracts screened and 142 full-text articles reviewed, we included 13 studies with a total of 494 patients receiving ECMO in our final review and meta-analysis. The study validity was satisfactory. The overall mortality was 37.1% (95% confidence interval: 30–45%) limited by underlying heterogeneity (I2 = 65%, P value of Q statistic = 0.006). The median duration for ECMO was 10 days, mechanical ventilation was 19 days, and ICU length of stay was 33 days. Exploratory meta-regression did not identify any statistically significant moderator of mortality (P < 0.05), except for the duration of pre-ECMO mechanical ventilation in days (coefficient 0.19, standard error: 0.09, Z = 2.01, P < 0.04, R2 = 0.16). The visual inspection of funnel plots did not suggest the presence of publication bias. Conclusions: ECMO therapy may be used as an adjunct or salvage therapy for severe H1N1 pneumonia with respiratory failure. It is associated with a prolonged duration of ventilator support, ICU length of stay, and high mortality. Initiating ECMO early once the patient

  13. Targeted inactivation of the murine Abca3 gene leads to respiratory failure in newborns with defective lamellar bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Hammel, Markus; Michel, Geert; Hoefer, Christina; Klaften, Matthias; Mueller-Hoecker, Josef; Angelis, Martin Hrabe de; Holzinger, Andreas . E-mail: andreas.holzinger@med.uni-muenchen.de

    2007-08-10

    Mutations in the human ABCA3 gene, encoding an ABC-transporter, are associated with respiratory failure in newborns and pediatric interstitial lung disease. In order to study disease mechanisms, a transgenic mouse model with a disrupted Abca3 gene was generated by targeting embryonic stem cells. While heterozygous animals developed normally and were fertile, individuals homozygous for the altered allele (Abca3-/-) died within one hour after birth from respiratory failure, ABCA3 protein being undetectable. Abca3-/- newborns showed atelectasis of the lung in comparison to a normal gas content in unaffected or heterozygous littermates. Electron microscopy demonstrated the absence of normal lamellar bodies in type II pneumocytes. Instead, condensed structures with apparent absence of lipid content were found. We conclude that ABCA3 is required for the formation of lamellar bodies and lung surfactant function. The phenotype of respiratory failure immediately after birth corresponds to the clinical course of severe ABCA3 mutations in human newborns.

  14. Failure of RQC machinery causes protein aggregation and proteotoxic stress.

    PubMed

    Choe, Young-Jun; Park, Sae-Hun; Hassemer, Timm; Körner, Roman; Vincenz-Donnelly, Lisa; Hayer-Hartl, Manajit; Hartl, F Ulrich

    2016-03-10

    Translation of messenger RNAs lacking a stop codon results in the addition of a carboxy-terminal poly-lysine tract to the nascent polypeptide, causing ribosome stalling. Non-stop proteins and other stalled nascent chains are recognized by the ribosome quality control (RQC) machinery and targeted for proteasomal degradation. Failure of this process leads to neurodegeneration by unknown mechanisms. Here we show that deletion of the E3 ubiquitin ligase Ltn1p in yeast, a key RQC component, causes stalled proteins to form detergent-resistant aggregates and inclusions. Aggregation is dependent on a C-terminal alanine/threonine tail that is added to stalled polypeptides by the RQC component, Rqc2p. Formation of inclusions additionally requires the poly-lysine tract present in non-stop proteins. The aggregates sequester multiple cytosolic chaperones and thereby interfere with general protein quality control pathways. These findings can explain the proteotoxicity of ribosome-stalled polypeptides and demonstrate the essential role of the RQC in maintaining proteostasis.

  15. CSB-PGBD3 Mutations Cause Premature Ovarian Failure

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guangyu; Tang, Tie-Shan; Zhao, Shidou; Jiao, Xue; Gong, Juanjuan; Gao, Fei; Guo, Caixia; Simpson, Joe Leigh; Chen, Zi-Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Premature ovarian failure (POF) is a rare, heterogeneous disorder characterized by cessation of menstruation occurring before the age of 40 years. Genetic etiology is responsible for perhaps 25% of cases, but most cases are sporadic and unexplained. In this study, through whole exome sequencing in a non-consanguineous family having four affected members with POF and Sanger sequencing in 432 sporadic cases, we identified three novel mutations in the fusion gene CSB-PGBD3. Subsequently functional studies suggest that mutated CSB-PGBD3 fusion protein was impaired in response to DNA damage, as indicated by delayed or absent recruitment to damaged sites. Our data provide the first evidence that mutations in the CSB-PGBD3 fusion protein can cause human disease, even in the presence of functional CSB, thus potentially explaining conservation of the fusion protein for 43 My since marmoset. The localization of the CSB-PGBD3 fusion protein to UVA-induced nuclear DNA repair foci further suggests that the CSB-PGBD3 fusion protein, like many other proteins that can cause POF, modulates or participates in DNA repair. PMID:26218421

  16. Non-invasive mechanical ventilation in the treatment of acute respiratory failure in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Ambrosino, N; Nava, S; Rubini, F

    1993-01-01

    Acute respiratory failure is usually managed by means of mechanical ventilation via an endotracheal tube or tracheostomy, when conservative treatment fails. Invasive mechanical ventilation is associated with several complications. The recent development of non-invasive methods of ventilation, has led to an attempt to avoid the complications of invasive mechanical ventilation during episodes of acute respiratory failure, ensuring at the same time a similar degree of efficacy. Both intermittent negative pressure ventilation and positive pressure ventilation by face or nasal mask have recently been used for this purpose. Negative pressure ventilation by means of iron lung, cuirass or poncho-wrap ventilators, has never been used in place of endotracheal intubation, and studies of this kind of ventilation are inconclusive: as a consequence, there is, at the moment, no indication for the generalized use of negative pressure ventilation in acute respiratory failure. Intermittent positive pressure ventilation by facial or nasal masks, has recently been used in the treatment of respiratory failure in place of endotracheal intubation. The results are promising, but remain controversial. It may be attempted in selected patients with obstructive respiratory disorders, but the procedure is very time-consuming for nurses.

  17. Negative Pressure Artificial Respiration: Use in Treatment of Respiratory Failure of the Newborn

    PubMed Central

    Stern, Leo; Ramos, Angeles D.; Outerbridge, Eugene W.; Beaudry, Pierre H.

    1970-01-01

    Ninety-one infants with respiratory failure secondary to primary pulmonary disease and with a birth weight of 1000 g. or over have been managed in a negative-pressure respirator (Air-Shields) over a three-year period. Of these the failure in 87 was due to respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) and in four it resulted from massive meconium aspiration. Respiratory failure was indicated initially by arterial blood gas tensions (while breathing 100% O2) of Po2 <40 mm. Hg, pH <7.10 and Pco2 >75 mm. Hg in the initial 47 cases; these levels were subsequently raised to Po2 < 50 mm. Hg, pH <7.20 and Pco2 >70 mm. Hg for the remainder. Fifty-four (59.3%) of the infants survived the use of the respirator and 47 of these (51.6%) were subsequently discharged alive and well. Mean time in hours to normalization of blood gas values while on the respirator were as follows: for Po2, 10.5; for pH, 11.6; and for Pco2, 22.6. These values indicate that the respirator is more efficient in promoting oxygenation (raising Po2) than ventilation (lowering Pco2). They also suggest that the observed acidosis is in large part secondary to the hypoxia rather than the result of co2 retention. For the survivors the average time of total respirator dependency before commencement of weaning was 53.7 hours. All the infants were managed without the use of endotracheal tubes although the use of the respirator and/or administration of 100% oxygen were either continuous or intermittent for periods of up to two weeks. There have been no instances of so-called respirator lung disease in the survivors or in those who died, which suggests that the use of high oxygen concentration by itself is not the major factor in the pathogenesis of this complication. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 3FIG. 4 PMID:5265797

  18. [Role of biomarkers in the differential diagnosis of acute respiratory failure in the immediate postoperative period of lung transplantation].

    PubMed

    Ruano, L; Sacanell, J; Roman, A; Rello, J

    2013-01-01

    Lung transplant recipients are at high risk of suffering many complications during the immediate postoperative period, such as primary graft dysfunction, acute graft rejection or infection. The most common symptom is the presence of acute respiratory failure, and the use of biomarkers could be useful for establishing an early diagnosis of these conditions. Different biomarkers have been studied, but none have proven to be the gold standard in the differential diagnosis of acute respiratory failure. This paper offers a review of the different biomarkers that have been studied in this field.

  19. Mitigation of Manhole Events Caused by Secondary Cable Failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lili

    "Manhole event" refers to a range of phenomena, such as smokers, fires and explosions which occur on underground electrical infrastructure, primarily in major cities. The most common cause of manhole events is decomposition of secondary cable initiated by an electric fault. The work presented in this thesis addresses various aspects related to the evolution and mitigation of the manhole events caused by secondary cable insulation failure. Manhole events develop as a result of thermal decomposition of organic materials present in the cable duct and manholes. Polymer characterization techniques are applied to intensively study the materials properties as related to manhole events, mainly the thermal decomposition behaviors of the polymers present in the cable duct. Though evolved gas analysis, the combustible gases have been quantitatively identified. Based on analysis and knowledge of field conditions, manhole events is divided into at least two classes, those in which exothermic chemical reactions dominate and those in which electrical energy dominates. The more common form of manhole event is driven by air flow down the duct. Numerical modeling of smolder propagation in the cable duct demonstrated that limiting air flow is effective in reducing the generation rate of combustible gas, in other words, limiting manhole events to relatively minor "smokers". Besides manhole events, another by-product of secondary cable insulation breakdown is stray voltage. The danger to personnel due to stray voltage is mostly caused by the 'step potential'. The amplitude of step potential as a result of various types of insulation defects is calculated using Finite Element Analysis (FEA) program.

  20. Effects of respiratory muscle work on blood flow distribution during exercise in heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Thomas P; Joyner, Michael J; Dietz, Niki M; Eisenach, John H; Curry, Timothy B; Johnson, Bruce D

    2010-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) patients have a reduced cardiac reserve and increased work of breathing. Increased locomotor muscle blood flow demand may result in competition between respiratory and locomotor vascular beds. We hypothesized that HF patients would demonstrate improved locomotor blood flow with respiratory muscle unloading during activity. Ten patients (ejection fraction = 31 ± 3%) and 10 controls (CTL) underwent two cycling sessions (60% peak work). Session 1 (S1): 5 min of normal breathing (NB), 5 min respiratory muscle unloading with a ventilator, and 5 min of NB. Session 2 (S2): 5 min NB, 5 min of respiratory muscle loading with inspiratory resistance, and 5 min of NB. Measurements included: leg blood flow (LBF, thermodilution), cardiac output , and oesophageal pressure (Ppl, index of pleural pressure). S1: Ppl was reduced in both groups (HF: 73 ± 8%; CTL: 60 ± 13%, P < 0.01). HF: increased (9.6 ± 0.4 vs. 11.3 ± 0.8 l min−1, P < 0.05) and LBF increased (4.8 ± 0.8 vs. 7.3 ± 1.1 l min−1, P < 0.01); CTL: no changes in (14.7 ± 1.0 vs. 14.8 ± 1.6 l min−1) or LBF (10.9 ± 1.8 vs. 10.3 ± 1.7 l min−1). S2: Ppl increased in both groups (HF: 172 ± 16%, CTL: 220 ± 40%, P < 0.01). HF: no change was observed in (10.0 ± 0.4 vs. 10.3 ± 0.8 l min−1) or LBF (5.0 ± 0.6 vs. 4.7 ± 0.5 l min−1); CTL: increased (15.4 ± 1.4 vs. 16.9 ± 1.5 l min−1, P < 0.01) and LBF remained unchanged (10.7 ± 1.5 vs. 10.3 ± 1.8 l min−1). These data suggest HF patients preferentially steal blood flow from locomotor muscles to accommodate the work of breathing during activity. Further, HF patients are unable to vasoconstrict locomotor vascular beds beyond NB when presented with a respiratory load. PMID:20457736

  1. Respiratory acidosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Names Ventilatory failure; Respiratory failure; Acidosis - respiratory Images Respiratory system References Effros RM, Swenson ER. Acid-base balance. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst JD, et al, eds. Murray and Nadel's Textbook of Respiratory Medicine . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016: ...

  2. Influenza A (H10N7) Virus Causes Respiratory Tract Disease in Harbor Seals and Ferrets

    PubMed Central

    Herfst, Sander; Bodewes, Rogier; Pfankuche, Vanessa M.; van de Bildt, Marco W. G.; Seehusen, Frauke; Puff, Christina; Richard, Mathilde; Siebert, Ursula; Lehnert, Kristina; Bestebroer, Theo; Lexmond, Pascal; Fouchier, Ron A. M.; Prenger-Berninghoff, Ellen; Herbst, Werner; Koopmans, Marion; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.

    2016-01-01

    Avian influenza viruses sporadically cross the species barrier to mammals, including humans, in which they may cause epidemic disease. Recently such an epidemic occurred due to the emergence of avian influenza virus of the subtype H10N7 (Seal/H10N7) in harbor seals (Phoca vitulina). This epidemic caused high mortality in seals along the north-west coast of Europe and represented a potential risk for human health. To characterize the spectrum of lesions and to identify the target cells and viral distribution, findings in 16 harbor seals spontaneously infected with Seal/H10N7 are described. The seals had respiratory tract inflammation extending from the nasal cavity to bronchi associated with intralesional virus antigen in respiratory epithelial cells. Virus infection was restricted to the respiratory tract. The fatal outcome of the viral infection in seals was most likely caused by secondary bacterial infections. To investigate the pathogenic potential of H10N7 infection for humans, we inoculated the seal virus intratracheally into six ferrets and performed pathological and virological analyses at 3 and 7 days post inoculation. These experimentally inoculated ferrets displayed mild clinical signs, virus excretion from the pharynx and respiratory tract inflammation extending from bronchi to alveoli that was associated with virus antigen expression exclusively in the respiratory epithelium. Virus was isolated only from the respiratory tract. In conclusion, Seal/H10N7 infection in naturally infected harbor seals and experimentally infected ferrets shows that respiratory epithelial cells are the permissive cells for viral replication. Fatal outcome in seals was caused by secondary bacterial pneumonia similar to that in fatal human cases during influenza pandemics. Productive infection of ferrets indicates that seal/H10N7 may possess a zoonotic potential. This outbreak of LPAI from wild birds to seals demonstrates the risk of such occasions for mammals and thus humans

  3. Noninvasive assessment of right and left ventricular function in acute and chronic respiratory failure

    SciTech Connect

    Matthay, R.A.; Berger, H.J.

    1983-05-01

    This review evaluates noninvasive techniques for assessing cardiovascular performance in acute and chronic respiratory failure. Radiographic, radionuclide, and echocardiographic methods for determining ventricular volumes, right (RV) and left ventricular (LV) ejection fractions, and pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) are emphasized. These methods include plain chest radiography, radionuclide angiocardiography, thallium-201 myocardial imaging, and M mode and 2-dimensional echocardiography, which have recently been applied in patients to detect pulmonary artery hypertension (PAH), right ventricular enlargement, and occult ventricular performance abnormalities at rest or exercise. Moreover, radionuclide angiocardiography has proven useful in combination with hemodynamic measurements, for evaluating the short-and long-term cardiovascular effects of therapeutic agents, such as oxygen, digitalis, theophylline, beta-adrenergic agents, and vasodilators.

  4. An unexpected finding in a man with multiple pulmonary nodules, a pleural effusion and respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Pang, Yik Lam; Jones, Quentin

    2017-01-01

    We report the case of a 47-year old Caucasian man with a history of depression and high alcohol intake who presented with a one-month history of weight loss, dry cough and abdominal pain. He had no smoking history of note. The patient was treated for a suspected chest infection, however developed respiratory failure and was intubated. A CT showed multiple pulmonary nodules, left pleural thickening extending to the mediastinum and bilateral pleural effusions-larger on the left, suggestive of disseminated malignancy. A broncho-alveolar lavage surprisingly contained numerous acid-fast bacilli and no malignant cells. Treatment for tuberculosis was initiated and the patient recovered gradually. After several weeks, a pyrazinamide-resistant organism was cultured and subsequently identified to be Mycobacterium Bovis. We discuss this unexpected finding and review the literature on Bovine Tuberculosis in humans.

  5. Eventration of diaphragm with dextrocardia and type 2 respiratory failure: A rare entity.

    PubMed

    Mir, Mohmad Hussain; Arshad, Faheem; Bagdadi, Farhana Siraj; Nasir, Syed Aejaz; Hajni, Mubashir Rashid

    2014-09-01

    Eventration of the diaphragm is a rare condition where the muscle is permanently elevated, but retains its continuity and attachments to costal margin. In this condition, all or part of the diaphragm is largely composed of fibrous tissue with a few or no interspersed muscle fibers. It can be complete or partial. It is seldom symptomatic and often requires no treatment. We present a 70-year-old male who came with progressive breathlessness and was admitted with type 2 respiratory failure, and on evaluation was found to have complete eventration of the left diaphragm with herniation of colon and stomach in the left chest with dextrocardia. Aim of reporting this rare case is to highlight the importance of history taking, good physical examination, and imaging in the diagnosis of diaphragmatic eventration.

  6. Assessment of respiratory flow cycle morphology in patients with chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Garde, Ainara; Sörnmo, Leif; Laguna, Pablo; Jané, Raimon; Benito, Salvador; Bayés-Genís, Antoni; Giraldo, Beatriz F

    2017-02-01

    Breathing pattern as periodic breathing (PB) in chronic heart failure (CHF) is associated with poor prognosis and high mortality risk. This work investigates the significance of a number of time domain parameters for characterizing respiratory flow cycle morphology in patients with CHF. Thus, our primary goal is to detect PB pattern and identify patients at higher risk. In addition, differences in respiratory flow cycle morphology between CHF patients (with and without PB) and healthy subjects are studied. Differences between these parameters are assessed by investigating the following three classification issues: CHF patients with PB versus with non-periodic breathing (nPB), CHF patients (both PB and nPB) versus healthy subjects, and nPB patients versus healthy subjects. Twenty-six CHF patients (8/18 with PB/nPB) and 35 healthy subjects are studied. The results show that the maximal expiratory flow interval is shorter and with lower dispersion in CHF patients than in healthy subjects. The flow slopes are much steeper in CHF patients, especially for PB. Both inspiration and expiration durations are reduced in CHF patients, mostly for PB. Using the classification and regression tree technique, the most discriminant parameters are selected. For signals shorter than 1 min, the time domain parameters produce better results than the spectral parameters, with accuracies for each classification of 82/78, 89/85, and 91/89 %, respectively. It is concluded that morphologic analysis in the time domain is useful, especially when short signals are analyzed.

  7. Role of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in adult respiratory failure: an overview.

    PubMed

    Anand, Suneesh; Jayakumar, Divya; Aronow, Wilbert S; Chandy, Dipak

    2016-01-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) provides complete or partial support of the heart and lungs. Ever since its inception in the 1960s, it has been used across all age groups in the management of refractory respiratory failure and cardiogenic shock. While it has gained widespread acceptance in the neonatal and pediatric physician community, ECMO remains a controversial therapy for Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) in adults. Its popularity was revived during the swine flu (H1N1) pandemic and advancements in technology have contributed to its increasing usage. ARDS continues to be a potentially devastating condition with significant mortality rates. Despite gaining more insights into this entity over the years, mechanical ventilation remains the only life-saving, yet potentially harmful intervention available for ARDS. ECMO shows promise in this regard by offering less dependence on mechanical ventilation, thereby potentially reducing ventilator-induced injury. However, the lack of rigorous clinical data has prevented ECMO from becoming the standard of care in the management of ARDS. Therefore, the results of two large ongoing randomized trials, which will hopefully throw more light on the role of ECMO in the management of this disease entity, are keenly awaited. In this article we will provide a basic overview of the development of ECMO, the types of ECMO, the pathogenesis of ARDS, different ventilation strategies for ARDS, the role of ECMO in ARDS and the role of ECMO as a bridge to lung transplantation.

  8. Episodic hypoxemia in an airline passenger with chronic respiratory failure on supplemental oxygen.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Paul T; Hlavac, Michael; Beckert, Lutz E

    2007-07-01

    Assessing the requirements for in-flight oxygen in passengers with pulmonary limitations can be a challenging task for clinicians. Aeromedical guidelines are available to help identify passengers that may require oxygen in flight. However, little is known about the actual in-flight response to passengers on oxygen. We measured the oxygen response (pulse oximetry) of a 67-yr-old female patient with chronic respiratory failure during a trans-Tasman flight (duration 170 min). This patient was assessed at the respiratory clinic before her journey and resting PaO2 (57 mmHg) indicated the requirement for in-flight oxygen. Bottled oxygen delivered at 2 L x min(-1) via nasal cannula was prescribed for her journey. Preflight SpO2 without supplemental oxygen was 92%. Mean in-flight SpO2 was well maintained at 93% while on oxygen at rest. There were four significant hypoxic events, which included light physical activity while on oxygen (three events; SpO2 to 84%) and a visit to the lavatory (off oxygen; SpO2 to 70%). Dyspnea and dizziness were reported during the lavatory visit. This case illustrates the importance of a preflight medical screening for passengers considered at risk during air travel and provides insight into the response of oxygen supplementation during flight.

  9. A rare cause of intermittent respiratory distress and epiphora in the newborn: congenital dacryocystocele

    PubMed Central

    Bozkurt, Fatma Merve; Icme, Gokhan; Eti, Can; Sari, Ayca

    2017-01-01

    Congenital dacryocystocele is a malformation of the nasolacrimal system. Most of the cases can be successfully treated with conservative treatment options such as sac massage. Congenital dacryocystoceles with concomitant intranasal cysts causing respiratory distress in the newborns are rarely published. In this case report we presented a 2-week-old newborn with bilateral congenital dacryocystoceles causing intermittent respiratory distress. We discuss the importance of nasal endoscopic treatment and multidisciplinary approach for these rare malformations in the light of the current literature. PMID:28210562

  10. Mechanism underlying renal failure caused by pathogenic Candida albicans infection.

    PubMed

    Jae-Chen, Shin; Young-Joo, Jeon; Seon-Min, Park; Kang Seok, Seo; Jung-Hyun, Shim; Jung-Il, Chae

    2015-03-01

    Candida albicans (C. albicans) is an opportunistic fungal pathogen that commonly causes nosocomial infections. Systemic candidiasis is encountered with increasing frequency in immunocompromised hosts, leading to renal failure that results in severe morbidity and mortality. The present study investigated the mechanisms underlying kidney susceptibility following infection with several C. albicans strains, such as B311 and SC5314. Fungal growth of the highly virulent SC5314 strain was 10(3)-fold higher compared to the nonpathogenic B311 strain in the kidneys. An intravenous challenge of SC5314 in mice, elevated blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatine levels, which resulted in mortality at 8 or 35 days after infection in a dose- and time-dependent manner, whereas all the B311-infected mice had BUN and creatinine levels in the normal range and survived. Whether virulent C. albicans may escape clearance by activating signaling pathways that lead to the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-1β, was investigated. B311 infections significantly elevated TNF-α and IL-1β mRNA expression in the kidneys, whereas the expression in SC5314-infected mice remained unchanged. Furthermore, B311 infection significantly elevated the plasma levels of TNF-α and IL-1β. These results indicated that the less virulent strains of C. albicans induced pro-inflammatory cytokines in mice. These results determined that an impairment of the protective mechanisms occurred in the kidneys with virulent C. albicans infection.

  11. Artificial placenta--lung assist devices for term and preterm newborns with respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Rochow, Niels; Chan, Emily C; Wu, Wen-I; Selvaganapathy, Ponnambalam R; Fusch, Gerhard; Berry, Leslie; Brash, John; Chan, Anthony K; Fusch, Christoph

    2013-06-25

    Respiratory insufficiency is a major cause of neonatal mortality and long-term morbidity, especially in very low birth weight infants. Today, non-invasive and mechanical ventilation are commonly accepted procedures to provide respiratory support to newborns, but they can reach their limit of efficacy. To overcome this technological plateau and further reduce mortality rates, the technology of an "artificial placenta", which is a pumpless lung assist device connected to the umbilical vessels, would serve to expand the therapeutic spectrum when mechanical ventilation becomes inadequate to treat neonates with severe respiratory insufficiency.
The first attempts to create such an artificial placenta took place more than 60 years ago. However, there has been a recent renaissance of this concept, including developments of its major components like the oxygenator, vascular access via umbilical vessels, flow control, as well as methods to achieve hemocompatibility in extracorporeal circuits. This paper gives a review of past and current development, animal experiments and human case studies of artificial placenta technology.

  12. Efficacy of "Awake ECMO" for critical respiratory failure after pediatric open-heart surgery.

    PubMed

    Higashida, Akihiko; Hoashi, Takaya; Kagisaki, Koji; Shimada, Masatoshi; Takahashi, Yuzo; Hayashi, Teruyuki; Ichikawa, Hajime

    2016-06-01

    A 4-year-old boy with atrioventricular discordance, double-outlet right ventricle, pulmonary stenosis, and mitral regurgitation, was undergoing anatomical repair consisting of Senning, Rastelli, Damus-Kaye-Stansel procedures, and a mitral valve repair, complained of post-operative excessive airway tract secretion, which ultimately developed into acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) 28 days after the operation. The cause of the ARDS was thought to be frequent manual positive pressure recruitment and prolonged inhalation of pure oxygen. At 45 days after the operation, hypercapnia and respiratory acidosis turned out to be irreversible, and therefore, veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) was established utilizing the Endumo(®)4000 system. Pulmonic interstitial inflammation gradually improved while resting the lung under ECMO support; however, effective ventilation volume decreased critically because a massive pulmonary hemorrhage occurred at 2 and 9 days after the initiation of ECMO. To maximize the effectiveness of respiratory physical therapy, "Awake ECMO" was started and tidal volume dramatically increased with a regained cough reflex. Five days later, he was successfully weaned off from ECMO, and discharged 7 months after the operation without any neurological and physiological sequelae.

  13. Taxonomy for Common-Cause Failure Vulnerability and Mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Richard Thomas; Korsah, Kofi; Mullens, James Allen; Pullum, Laura L.

    2015-09-01

    Applying current guidance and practices for common-cause failure (CCF) mitigation to digital instrumentation and control (I&C) systems has proven problematic, and the regulatory environment has been unpredictable. The potential for CCF vulnerability inhibits I&C modernization, thereby challenging the long-term sustainability of existing plants. For new plants and advanced reactor concepts, concern about CCF vulnerability in highly integrated digital I&C systems imposes a design burden that results in higher costs and increased complexity. The regulatory uncertainty in determining which mitigation strategies will be acceptable (e.g., what diversity is needed and how much is sufficient) drives designers to adopt complicated, costly solutions devised for existing plants. To address the conditions that constrain the transition to digital I&C technology by the US nuclear industry, crosscutting research is needed to resolve uncertainty, demonstrate necessary characteristics, and establish an objective basis for qualification of digital technology for nuclear power plant (NPP) I&C applications. To fulfill this research need, Oak Ridge National Laboratory is investigating mitigation of CCF vulnerability for nuclear-qualified applications. The outcome of this research is expected to contribute to a fundamentally sound, comprehensive basis to qualify digital technology for nuclear power applications. This report documents the development of a CCF taxonomy. The basis for the CCF taxonomy was generated by determining consistent terminology and establishing a classification approach. The terminology is based on definitions from standards, guides, and relevant nuclear power industry technical reports. The classification approach is derived from identified classification schemes focused on I&C systems and key characteristics, including failure modes. The CCF taxonomy provides the basis for a systematic organization of key systems aspects relevant to analyzing the potential for

  14. High Prevalence of Respiratory Muscle Weakness in Hospitalized Acute Heart Failure Elderly Patients

    PubMed Central

    Verissimo, Pedro; Timenetsky, Karina T.; Casalaspo, Thaisa Juliana André; Gonçalves, Louise Helena Rodrigues; Yang, Angela Shu Yun; Eid, Raquel Caserta

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Respiratory Muscle Weakness (RMW) has been defined when the maximum inspiratory pressure (MIP) is lower than 70% of the predictive value. The prevalence of RMW in chronic heart failure patients is 30 to 50%. So far there are no studies on the prevalence of RMW in acute heart failure (AHF) patients. Objectives Evaluate the prevalence of RMW in patients admitted because of AHF and the condition of respiratory muscle strength on discharge from the hospital. Methods Sixty-three patients had their MIP measured on two occasions: at the beginning of the hospital stay, after they had reached respiratory, hemodynamic and clinical stability and before discharge from the hospital. The apparatus and technique to measure MIP were adapted because of age-related limitations of the patients. Data on cardiac ejection fraction, ECG, brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels and on the use of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) were collected. Results The mean age of the 63 patients under study was 75 years. On admission the mean ejection fraction was 33% (95% CI: 31–35) and the BNP hormone median value was 726.5 pg/ml (range: 217 to 2283 pg/ml); 65% of the patients used NIV. The median value of MIP measured after clinical stabilization was -52.7 cmH2O (range: -20 to -120 cmH2O); 76% of the patients had MIP values below 70% of the predictive value. On discharge, after a median hospital stay of 11 days, the median MIP was -53.5 cmH2O (range:-20 to -150 cmH2O); 71% of the patients maintained their MIP values below 70% of the predictive value. The differences found were not statistically significant. Conclusion Elderly patients admitted with AHF may present a high prevalence of RMW on admission; this condition may be maintained at similar levels on discharge in a large percentage of these patients, even after clinical stabilization of the heart condition. PMID:25671566

  15. Congenital subclavian arteriovenous malformation causing cardiac failure in an adult.

    PubMed

    Anoop, T M; Sreejith, P; Thomas, Joby K; Gailin, B; Jabbar, P K; Ittycheria, Cherian C; George, Raju

    2009-07-01

    Congenital arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) of the thoracic region are rarely reported in adults. The authors report an unusual case of a 30-year-old man who presented with a large congenital AVM and heart failure. The diagnosis was made using transthoracic Doppler echocardiography and computed tomography. Embolization followed by surgical resection of the AVM resulted in the prompt relief of heart failure.

  16. Lower Respiratory Tract Diseases Caused by Common Respiratory Viruses among Stem Cell Transplantation Recipients: A Single Center Experience in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Kyung-Wook; Choi, Su-Mi; Cho, Sung-Yeon; Lee, Hyo-Jin; Choi, Jae-Ki; Kim, Si-Hyun; Park, Sun Hee; Choi, Jung-Hyun; Yoo, Jin-Hong; Lee, Jong-Wook

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To describe the incidence, clinical courses, and risk factors for mortality of lower respiratory tract diseases (LRDs) caused by common respiratory viruses (CRVs) in stem cell transplantation (SCT) recipients. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 1038 patients who received SCT between January 2007 and August 2011 at a single center in Korea. Results Seventy-one CRV-LRDs were identified in 67 (6.5%) patients. The human parainfluenza virus (HPIV) was the most common causative pathogen of CRV-LRDs at 100 days [cumulative incidence estimate, 23.5%; 95% confidence interval (CI), 3.3–43.7] and 1 year (cumulative incidence estimate, 69.2%; 95% CI, 45.9–92.5) following SCT. The 30-day overall mortality rates due to influenza-LRDs, respiratory syncytial virus-LRDs, HPIV-LRDs, and human rhinovirus-LRDs were 35.7, 25.8, 31.6, and 42.8%, respectively. Co-pathogens in respiratory specimens were detected in 23 (33.8%) patients. The overall mortality at day 30 after CRV-LRD diagnosis was 32.8% (22/67). High-dose steroid usage (p=0.025), a severe state of immunodeficiency (p=0.033), and lymphopenia (p=0.006) were significantly associated with death within 30 days following CRV-LRD diagnosis in a univariate analysis. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that high-dose steroid usage [odds ratio (OR), 4.05; 95% CI, 1.12–14.61; p=0.033] and lymphopenia (OR, 6.57; 95% CI, 1.80–24.03; p=0.004) were independent risk factors for mortality within 30 days of CRV-LRDs. Conclusion CRV-LRDs among SCT recipients showed substantially high morbidity and mortality rates. Therefore, the implement of an active diagnostic approaches for CRV infections is required for SCT recipients with respiratory symptoms, especially those receiving high-dose steroids or with lymphopenia. PMID:28120567

  17. Update on Common-Cause Failure Experience and Mitigation Practices

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Richard Thomas; Muhlheim, Michael David; Pullum, Laura L; Smith, Cyrus M; Holcomb, David Eugene; Korsah, Kofi

    2014-04-01

    Experience in other industries has shown that digital technology can provide substantial benefits in terms of performance and reliability. However, the U.S. nuclear power industry has been slow to adopt the technology extensively in its instrumentation and control (I&C) applications because of inhibiting factors such as regulatory uncertainty, insufficient technological experience base, implementation complexity, limited availability of nuclear-qualified products and vendors, and inadequate definition of modernization cost recapture. Although there have been examples of digital technology usage in the nuclear power industry, challenges to the qualification of digital technology for high-integrity nuclear power plant (NPP) applications have severely constrained more widespread progress in achieving the benefits that are possible through the transition to digital. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) established the Advanced Sensors and Instrumentation (ASI) technology area under the Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) Program to coordinate the instrumentation and controls (I&C) research across DOE NE and to identify and lead efforts to address common needs. As part of the NEET ASI research program, the Digital Technology Qualification project was established. Under this project, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is leading the investigation into mitigation of digital common-cause failure (CCF) vulnerabilities for nuclear-qualified applications. This technical report documents updated and expanded findings from research activities by ORNL. Specifically, the report describes CCF experience in the nuclear and nonnuclear industries, identifies the state of the practice for CCF mitigation through key examples, and presents conclusions from the determination of knowledge gaps.

  18. No inhalation in combination with high frequency ventilation treatment in the treatment of neonatal severe respiratory failure

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiaohui; Sun, Yanfeng; Miao, Jing; Cui, Min; Wang, Jiangbo; Han, Shuzhen

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To discuss over NO inhalation (iNO) in combination with high frequency ventilation treatment in relieving clinical symptoms and respiratory state of patients with neonatal severe respiratory failure. Methods: Ninety newborns with severe respiratory failure who received treatment in our hospital were selected for this study. They were divided into research group and control group according to visiting time. Patients in the control group were given conventional treatment in combination with high-frequency oscillatory ventilation, while patients in the research group were given iNO for treatment additionally besides the treatment the same as the control group. Changes of respiratory function indexes and arterial blood gas indexes of patients in the two groups were compared. Mechanical ventilation time, time of oxygen therapy and the length of hospital stay were recorded. Besides, postoperative outcome and the incidence of complications were analyzed. Results: After treatment, the level of PaO2 of both groups significantly improved, and respiratory function indexes such as partial pressure of carbon dioxide in artery (PaCO2), oxygenation index (OI), fraction of inspiration O2 (FiO2) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) decreased (P<0.05); the improvement of various indexes of the research group was more obvious than that of the control group (P<0.05). Mechanical ventilation time, oxygen therapy time and the length of hospital stay of the research group was much shorter than those of the control group. The incidence of complications in the two groups had no statistically significant difference (P>0.05), but the clinical outcome of the research group was better than that of the control group. Conclusion: NO inhalation in combination with high frequency ventilation for treating neonatal severe respiratory failure is effective in improving blood gas index and respiratory function, enhance cure rate, and reduce the incidence of complications and mortality; hence it

  19. An unusual cause of renal failure; Epstein syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Balwani, Manish R; Engineer, Divyesh P; Gumber, Manoj R; Kute, Vivek B; Singh, Rajesh; Patel, Himanshu V; Vanikar, Aruna V; Gera, Dinesh; Shah, Pankaj R; Trivedi, Hargovind L

    2016-01-01

    Epstein syndrome constitutes macrothrombocytopenia without neutrophil inclusion bodies along with deafness and renal failure. A diagnosis of Epstein syndrome was made in a 17 year-old-male patient with macrothrombopathic thrombocytopenia, renal failure and sensorineural hearing loss. Our patient is unique as he presented with rapidly progressive renal failure and developed chronic kidney disease in second decade of life with no symptomatic hearing loss or bleeding tendency. Epstein syndrome needs to be differentiated from Alport syndrome which is more common disease with similar clinical presentation. PMID:28197502

  20. Increased Expression of FoxM1 Transcription Factor in Respiratory Epithelium Inhibits Lung Sacculation and Causes Clara Cell Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, I-Ching; Zhang, Yufang; Snyder, Jonathan; Sutherland, Mardi J.; Burhans, Michael S.; Shannon, John M.; Park, Hyun Jung; Whitsett, Jeffrey A.; Kalinichenko, Vladimir V.

    2010-01-01

    Foxm1 is a member of the Forkhead Box (Fox) family of transcription factors. Foxm1 (previously called Foxm1b, HFH-11B, Trident, Win, or MPP2) is expressed in multiple cell types and plays important roles in cellular proliferation, differentiation and tumorigenesis. Genetic deletion of Foxm1 from mouse respiratory epithelium during initial stages of lung development inhibits lung maturation and causes respiratory failure after birth. However, the role of Foxm1 during postnatal lung morphogenesis remains unknown. In the present study, Foxm1 expression was detected in epithelial cells of conducting and peripheral airways and changing dynamically with lung maturation. To discern the biological role of Foxm1 in the prenatal and postnatal lung, a novel transgenic mouse line that expresses a constitutively active form of FoxM1 (FoxM1 N-terminal deletion mutant or FoxM1-ΔN) under the control of lung epithelial-specific SPC promoter was produced. Expression of the FoxM1-ΔN transgene during embryogenesis caused epithelial hyperplasia, inhibited lung sacculation and expression of the type II epithelial marker, pro-SPC. Expression of FoxM1-ΔN mutant during the postnatal period did not influence alveologenesis but caused focal airway hyperplasia and increased proliferation of Clara cells. Likewise, expression of FoxM1-ΔN mutant in conducting airways with Scgb1a1 promoter was sufficient to induce Clara cell hyperplasia. Furthermore, FoxM1-ΔN cooperated with activated K-Ras to induce lung tumor growth in vivo. Increased activity of Foxm1 altered lung sacculation, induced proliferation in the respiratory epithelium and accelerated lung tumor growth, indicating that precise regulation of Foxm1 is critical for normal lung morphogenesis and development of lung cancer. PMID:20816795

  1. WORLD TRADE CENTER FINE PARTICULATE MATTER CAUSES RESPIRATORY TRACT HYPERRESPONSIVENESS IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    World Trade Center Fine Particulate Matter Causes Respiratory Tract Hyperresponsiveness in Mice

    Stephen H. Gavett1, Najwa Haykal-Coates1, Jerry W. Highfill1, Allen D. Ledbetter1, Lung Chi Chen2, Mitchell D. Cohen2, Jack R. Harkema3, James G. Wagner3, and Daniel L. Costa1.<...

  2. [Postural trauma and rhabdomyolosis causing acute renal failure].

    PubMed

    Vecer, J; Kubátová, H; Soucek, M; Charvát, J; Kvapil, M; Matousovic, K; Martínek, V

    2000-02-01

    Rhabdomyolysis (damage of the muscles of various origin) leads to the efflux of the intracellular fluids in the circulation. The common complication of this status is the renal failure. The early diagnosis and the proper treatment makes the fall of renal function reversible. That is why the possibility of the rhabdomyolysis must be consider. The case report describes the development of renal failure in young, previously healthy men, followed by trauma mechanism after drug and alcohol abuse.

  3. [Developmental radicular groove as a cause of endodontic failure].

    PubMed

    Fabra Campos, H; Millet Part, J

    1989-01-01

    A clinical case of apical injury on an upper lateral incisor with endodontical and surgical failures in its treatment is presented. Extraction of the incisor and its study at the stereoscopic microscope showed the existence of a developmental groove running from the cingulum to the end of the root, establishing a communication between the crevice and the apical part of the tooth. Bacterial infection through the groove could provide an explanation for treatment failure.

  4. 20 CFR 404.454 - Good cause for failure to make required reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... that good cause does not exist (see § 404.705). In determining whether good cause for failure to report... or other legislation, or any physical, mental, educational, or linguistic limitations (including any... found where failure to file a timely report was caused by: (1) Serious illness of the individual,...

  5. 20 CFR 404.454 - Good cause for failure to make required reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... that good cause does not exist (see § 404.705). In determining whether good cause for failure to report... or other legislation, or any physical, mental, educational, or linguistic limitations (including any... found where failure to file a timely report was caused by: (1) Serious illness of the individual,...

  6. 20 CFR 404.454 - Good cause for failure to make required reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... that good cause does not exist (see § 404.705). In determining whether good cause for failure to report... or other legislation, or any physical, mental, educational, or linguistic limitations (including any... found where failure to file a timely report was caused by: (1) Serious illness of the individual,...

  7. 20 CFR 404.454 - Good cause for failure to make required reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... that good cause does not exist (see § 404.705). In determining whether good cause for failure to report... or other legislation, or any physical, mental, educational, or linguistic limitations (including any... found where failure to file a timely report was caused by: (1) Serious illness of the individual,...

  8. 20 CFR 404.454 - Good cause for failure to make required reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... that good cause does not exist (see § 404.705). In determining whether good cause for failure to report... or other legislation, or any physical, mental, educational, or linguistic limitations (including any... found where failure to file a timely report was caused by: (1) Serious illness of the individual,...

  9. Pill Properties that Cause Dysphagia and Treatment Failure

    PubMed Central

    Fields, Jeremy; Go, Jorge T.; Schulze, Konrad S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Pills (tablets and capsules) are widely used to administer prescription drugs or to take supplements such as vitamins. Unfortunately, little is known about how much effort it takes Americans to swallow these various pills. More specifically, it is not known to what extent hard-to-swallow pills might affect treatment outcomes (eg, interfering with adherence to prescribed medications or causing clinical complications). It is also unclear which properties (eg, size, shape, or surface texture) Americans prefer or reject for their pills. To learn more about these issues, we interviewed a small group of individuals. Methods We invited individuals in waiting rooms of our tertiary health care center to participate in structured interviews about their pill-taking habits and any problems they have swallowing pills. We inquired which pill properties they believed caused swallowing problems. Participants scored capsules and pills of representative size, shape, and texture for swallowing effort and reported their personal preferences. Results Of 100 successive individuals, 99 participants completed the interview (65% women, mean age = 41 years, range = 23-77 years). Eighty-three percent took pills daily (mean 4 pills/d; 56% of those pills were prescribed by providers). Fifty-four percent of participants replied yes to the question, "Did you ever have to swallow a solid medication that was too difficult?" Four percent recounted serious complications: 1% pill esophagitis, 1% pill impaction, and 2% stopped treatments (antibiotic and prenatal supplement) because they could not swallow the prescribed pills. Half of all participants routinely resorted to special techniques (eg, plenty of liquids or repeated or forceful swallows). Sixty-one percent of those having difficulties cited specific pill properties: 27% blamed size (20% of problems were caused by pills that were too large whereas 7% complained about pills that were too small to sense); 12% faulted rough surface

  10. Increased hydrogen peroxide in the expired breath of patients with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Sznajder, J I; Fraiman, A; Hall, J B; Sanders, W; Schmidt, G; Crawford, G; Nahum, A; Factor, P; Wood, L D

    1989-09-01

    Acute hypoxemic respiratory failure (AHRF) can result from diverse lung insults. Toxic oxygen metabolites have been implicated in this clinical condition and in animal models of pulmonary edema. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), an oxygen metabolite, mediates tissue injury. We measured H2O2 levels by a spectrophotometric technique in the breath condensate of 68 mechanically ventilated patients; 13 patients with normal lungs undergoing elective surgery had no such detectable levels of H2O2. Fifty-five patients in the ICU meeting criteria for the adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) had a higher concentration of H2O2 in the expired breath condensate than ICU patients without pulmonary infiltrates (2.34 +/- 1.15 vs 0.99 +/- 0.72 mumol/L, p less than 0.005). This marker had a sensitivity of 87.5 percent and a specificity of 81.3 percent in separating the two patient populations. Patients with AHRF and focal pulmonary infiltrates who did not meet criteria for ARDS also had higher concentrations of H2O2 (2.45 +/- 1.55 mumol/L) than patients without pulmonary infiltrates (p less than 0.001). No difference was observed between the expired H2O2 concentrations of patients with ARDS or patients with focal pulmonary infiltrates. Patients with brain injury or sepsis tended to have higher levels of H2O2 regardless of lung pathology. Increased levels of H2O2 are detected in the expired breath of ICU patients with focal lung infiltrates and in ARDS patients, which is consistent with the hypothesis that oxygen metabolites participate in the pathogenesis of ARDS and other forms of AHRF.

  11. The application of esophageal pressure measurement in patients with respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Akoumianaki, Evangelia; Maggiore, Salvatore M; Valenza, Franco; Bellani, Giacomo; Jubran, Amal; Loring, Stephen H; Pelosi, Paolo; Talmor, Daniel; Grasso, Salvatore; Chiumello, Davide; Guérin, Claude; Patroniti, Nicolo; Ranieri, V Marco; Gattinoni, Luciano; Nava, Stefano; Terragni, Pietro-Paolo; Pesenti, Antonio; Tobin, Martin; Mancebo, Jordi; Brochard, Laurent

    2014-03-01

    This report summarizes current physiological and technical knowledge on esophageal pressure (Pes) measurements in patients receiving mechanical ventilation. The respiratory changes in Pes are representative of changes in pleural pressure. The difference between airway pressure (Paw) and Pes is a valid estimate of transpulmonary pressure. Pes helps determine what fraction of Paw is applied to overcome lung and chest wall elastance. Pes is usually measured via a catheter with an air-filled thin-walled latex balloon inserted nasally or orally. To validate Pes measurement, a dynamic occlusion test measures the ratio of change in Pes to change in Paw during inspiratory efforts against a closed airway. A ratio close to unity indicates that the system provides a valid measurement. Provided transpulmonary pressure is the lung-distending pressure, and that chest wall elastance may vary among individuals, a physiologically based ventilator strategy should take the transpulmonary pressure into account. For monitoring purposes, clinicians rely mostly on Paw and flow waveforms. However, these measurements may mask profound patient-ventilator asynchrony and do not allow respiratory muscle effort assessment. Pes also permits the measurement of transmural vascular pressures during both passive and active breathing. Pes measurements have enhanced our understanding of the pathophysiology of acute lung injury, patient-ventilator interaction, and weaning failure. The use of Pes for positive end-expiratory pressure titration may help improve oxygenation and compliance. Pes measurements make it feasible to individualize the level of muscle effort during mechanical ventilation and weaning. The time is now right to apply the knowledge obtained with Pes to improve the management of critically ill and ventilator-dependent patients.

  12. Cost-effectiveness of Out-of-Hospital Continuous Positive Airway Pressure for Acute Respiratory Failure

    PubMed Central

    Thokala, Praveen; Goodacre, Steve; Ward, Matt; Penn-Ashman, Jerry; Perkins, Gavin D.

    2015-01-01

    Study objective We determine the cost-effectiveness of out-of-hospital continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) compared with standard care for adults presenting to emergency medical services with acute respiratory failure. Methods We developed an economic model using a United Kingdom health care system perspective to compare the costs and health outcomes of out-of-hospital CPAP to standard care (inhospital noninvasive ventilation) when applied to a hypothetical cohort of patients with acute respiratory failure. The model assigned each patient a probability of intubation or death, depending on the patient’s characteristics and whether he or she had out-of-hospital CPAP or standard care. The patients who survived accrued lifetime quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) and health care costs according to their age and sex. Costs were accrued through intervention and hospital treatment costs, which depended on patient outcomes. All results were converted into US dollars, using the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development purchasing power parities rates. Results Out-of-hospital CPAP was more effective than standard care but was also more expensive, with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of £20,514 per QALY ($29,720/QALY) and a 49.5% probability of being cost-effective at the £20,000 per QALY ($29,000/QALY) threshold. The probability of out-of-hospital CPAP’s being cost-effective at the £20,000 per QALY ($29,000/QALY) threshold depended on the incidence of eligible patients and varied from 35.4% when a low estimate of incidence was used to 93.8% with a high estimate. Variation in the incidence of eligible patients also had a marked influence on the expected value of sample information for a future randomized trial. Conclusion The cost-effectiveness of out-of-hospital CPAP is uncertain. The incidence of patients eligible for out-of-hospital CPAP appears to be the key determinant of cost-effectiveness. PMID:25737210

  13. Human Coronavirus in the 2014 Winter Season as a Cause of Lower Respiratory Tract Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyu Yeun; Han, Song Yi; Kim, Ho-Seong; Cheong, Hyang-Min; Kim, Sung Soon

    2017-01-01

    Purpose During the late autumn to winter season (October to December) in the Republic of Korea, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common pathogen causing lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs). Interestingly, in 2014, human coronavirus (HCoV) caused not only upper respiratory infections but also LRTIs more commonly than in other years. Therefore, we sought to determine the epidemiology, clinical characteristics, outcomes, and severity of illnesses associated with HCoV infections at a single center in Korea. Materials and Methods We retrospectively identified patients with positive HCoV respiratory specimens between October 2014 and December 2014 who were admitted to Severance Children’s Hospital at Yonsei University Medical Center for LRTI. Charts of the patients with HCoV infection were reviewed and compared with RSV infection. Results During the study period, HCoV was the third most common respiratory virus and accounted for 13.7% of infections. Coinfection was detected in 43.8% of children with HCoV. Interestingly, one patient had both HCoV-OC43 and HCoV-NL63. Mild pneumonia was most common (60.4%) with HCoV, and when combined with RSV, resulted in bronchiolitis. Two patients required care in the intensive care unit. However, compared with that of RSV infection, the disease course HCoV was short. Conclusion Infections caused by HCoVs are common, and can cause LRTIs. During an epidemic season, clinicians should be given special consideration thereto. When combined with other medical conditions, such as neurologic or cardiologic diseases, intensive care unit (ICU) care may be necessary. PMID:27873511

  14. Senile cardiac amyloidosis: an underappreciated cause of heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Shreena; Dungu, Jason; Dubrey, Simon William

    2013-01-01

    This case presents a patient with biopsy-proven, wild-type transthyretin (TTR) senile amyloidosis. The case was that of a man in his early 70s who presented with gradually progressive symptoms and signs of heart failure. The recent history included an episode of severe pancreatitis secondary to cholelithiasis and subsequently (and incidentally) noted hepatomegaly and marked ascites. Further evaluation of the aetiology of the heart failure, through echocardiography, coronary angiography and endomyocardial biopsy, led to an exact diagnosis of SSA. The patient is being treated with conventional heart failure medications while consideration is given to the use of diflusinal as an antiamyloidogenic small molecular stabiliser of TTR. Monitoring and further management advice are being coordinated by the National Amyloidosis Centre. PMID:23391947

  15. Acute renal failure caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae pyelonephritis.

    PubMed

    Creyghton, W M; Lobatto, S; Weening, J J

    2001-11-01

    We report a 34-year-old male patient without prior medical history who presented with acute renal failure due to acute bacterial pyelonephritis. Both blood and urine cultures grew Klebsiella pneumoniae. Although a kidney biopsy revealed extensive necrosis and no viable glomeruli, renal function recovered to near normal after intermittent hemodialysis and antibiotic therapy. We believe that it is important to include this entity in the differential diagnosis of acute renal failure since proper diagnosis and treatment is essential for recovery of renal function. Furthermore, we would like to draw attention to Klebsiella pneumoniae as an important potential pathogen in such cases, in addition to Escherichia coli.

  16. Tests find hammering, fluid cutting, erosion cause float shoe failures

    SciTech Connect

    Stringfellow, B.

    1985-01-21

    The results of a systematic test program to evaluate float equipment performance are presented. The testing has destroyed, over an eightmonth period, 160 float valves, float shoes and float collars. A new float valve design with greater resistance to failure has been developed as a result of the testing. New float collars and float shoes are expected to provide the operator with a failure rate of less than 1 1/2% when used within design limits and under normal cementing conditions. Further testing objectives include: extension of operating temperature limits to include deep well and geothermal conditions, and evaluation of the effects of more abrasive mud and cement systems.

  17. Data on respiratory variables in critically ill patients with acute respiratory failure placed on proportional assist ventilation with load adjustable gain factors (PAV+).

    PubMed

    Georgopoulos, Dimitris; Xirouchaki, Nectaria; Tzanakis, Nikolaos; Younes, Magdy

    2016-09-01

    The data show respiratory variables in 108 critically ill patients with acute respiratory failure placed on proportional assist ventilation with load adjustable gain factors (PAV+) after at least 36 h on passive mechanical ventilation. PAV+ was continued for 48 h until the patients met pre-defined criteria either for switching to controlled modes or for breathing without ventilator assistance. Data during passive mechanical ventilation and during PAV+ are reported. Data are acquired from the whole population, as well as from patients with and without acute respiratory distress syndrome. The reported variables are tidal volume, driving pressure (ΔP, the difference between static end-inspiratory plateau pressure and positive end-expiratory airway pressure), respiratory system compliance and resistance, and arterial blood gasses. The data are supplemental to our original research article, which described individual ΔP in these patients and examined how it related to ΔP when the same patients were ventilated with passive mechanical ventilation using the currently accepted lung-protective strategy "Driving pressure during assisted mechanical ventilation. Is it controlled by patient brain?" [1].

  18. Sleep-related breathing disorders in acute respiratory failure assisted by non-invasive ventilatory treatment: utility of portable polysomnographic system.

    PubMed

    Resta, O; Guido, P; Foschino Barbaro, M P; Picca, V; Talamo, S; Lamorgese, V

    2000-02-01

    In the majority of patients admitted to an Intensive Care Unit with acute respiratory failure (ARF), the aetiology for ARF is quite evident. In a minority of patients no obvious aetiology is apparent at presentation. In this group a previously unrecognized sleep-related breathing disorder (SRBD) may be the cause of the ARF. In spite of clinical suspicion SRBD remains infrequently diagnosed in ARF also because the technology necessary for this type of diagnosis (polysomnography) is usually unavailable in Intensive Care Units. The aim of this study was to evaluate the utility of portable polysomnography system (PSGp) in a group of patients with ARF of unclear aetiology and with a clinical suspicion of SRBD. We studied a selected group of 14 patients (eight males, six females) admitted to an Intermediate Intensive care unit with varying degree of acute respiratory failure. Mean (SD) age was 57 (13) years, pH 7.28 (0.04), PaO2 5.6 (0.7) kPa), PaO2 (8.8 (1.6) kPa), Body mass index 42.7 (9.6) kg m(-2). The patients had no history of skeletal, neuromuscular or cardiovascular disease. None of them had a history of overt chronic lung diseases or had obvious respiratory tract infections. They were submitted to cardiac and respiratory functional evaluation and to nightly PSGp (VITALOG HMS 5000, Respironics Inc., Redwood City, CA, U.S.A.) which was performed in an intermediate intensive care unit. Ten subjects had obstructive sleep apnoea-hypopnoea syndrome (OSAS), with mean respiratory disorder index h(-1) (RDI) 60.1 (25.9) [in five associated with obesity-hypoventilation syndrome (OHS)]; two had central sleep apnoea with mean RDI 45 (28.3) (one with hypothyroidism and one with cerebral multiple infarctions and right hemidiaphragmatic paralysis) and two had OHS with mean RDI 12.5 (3.5). Nocturnal hypoventilation was present in almost all patients. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) was effective in three patients. Eight patients needed to be treated with BILEVEL (Bi

  19. Physiology of respiratory disturbances in muscular dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Lo Mauro, Antonella

    2016-01-01

    Muscular dystrophy is a group of inherited myopathies characterised by progressive skeletal muscle wasting, including of the respiratory muscles. Respiratory failure, i.e. when the respiratory system fails in its gas exchange functions, is a common feature in muscular dystrophy, being the main cause of death, and it is a consequence of lung failure, pump failure or a combination of the two. The former is due to recurrent aspiration, the latter to progressive weakness of respiratory muscles and an increase in the load against which they must contract. In fact, both the resistive and elastic components of the work of breathing increase due to airway obstruction and chest wall and lung stiffening, respectively. The respiratory disturbances in muscular dystrophy are restrictive pulmonary function, hypoventilation, altered thoracoabdominal pattern, hypercapnia, dyspnoea, impaired regulation of breathing, inefficient cough and sleep disordered breathing. They can be present at different rates according to the type of muscular dystrophy and its progression, leading to different onset of each symptom, prognosis and degree of respiratory involvement. Key points A common feature of muscular dystrophy is respiratory failure, i.e. the inability of the respiratory system to provide proper oxygenation and carbon dioxide elimination. In the lung, respiratory failure is caused by recurrent aspiration, and leads to hypoxaemia and hypercarbia. Ventilatory failure in muscular dystrophy is caused by increased respiratory load and respiratory muscles weakness. Respiratory load increases in muscular dystrophy because scoliosis makes chest wall compliance decrease, atelectasis and fibrosis make lung compliance decrease, and airway obstruction makes airway resistance increase. The consequences of respiratory pump failure are restrictive pulmonary function, hypoventilation, altered thoracoabdominal pattern, hypercapnia, dyspnoea, impaired regulation of breathing, inefficient cough and

  20. [Acetaminophen (paracetamol) causing renal failure: report on 3 pediatric cases].

    PubMed

    Le Vaillant, J; Pellerin, L; Brouard, J; Eckart, P

    2013-06-01

    Renal failure secondary to acetaminophen poisoning is rare and occurs in approximately 1-2 % of patients with acetaminophen overdose. The pathophysiology is still being debated, and renal acetaminophen toxicity consists of acute tubular necrosis, without complication if treated promptly. Renal involvement can sometimes occur without prior liver disease, and early renal manifestations usually occur between the 2nd and 7th day after the acute acetaminophen poisoning. While therapy is exclusively symptomatic, sometimes serious metabolic complications can be observed. The monitoring of renal function should therefore be considered as an integral part of the management of children with acute, severe acetaminophen intoxication. We report 3 cases of adolescents who presented with acute renal failure as a result of voluntary drug intoxication with acetaminophen. One of these 3 girls developed severe renal injury without elevated hepatic transaminases. None of the 3 girls' renal function required hemodialysis, but one of the 3 patients had metabolic complications after her acetaminophen poisoning.

  1. Dexamethasone for treatment of patients mechanically ventilated for lower respiratory tract infection caused by respiratory syncytial virus

    PubMed Central

    van Woensel, J B M; van Aalderen, W M C; de Weerd, W; Jansen, N; van Gestel, J P J; Markhorst, D; van Vught, A J; Bos, A; Kimpen, J

    2003-01-01

    Background: A study was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy of dexamethasone in patients mechanically ventilated for lower respiratory infection caused by respiratory syncytial virus (RSV-LRTI). Methods: In a multicentre randomised controlled trial patients were randomised to receive either intravenous dexamethasone (0.15 mg/kg 6 hourly for 48 hours) or placebo. End points were the duration of mechanical ventilation, length of stay (LOS) in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) and in hospital, and the duration of supplemental oxygen administration. Results: Thirty seven patients received dexamethasone and 45 received placebo. There was no significant difference in any of the end points between the two groups. In a post hoc analysis patients were stratified into those with mild gas exchange anomalies (PaO2/FiO2 >200 mm Hg and/or mean airway pressure ⩽ 10 cm H2O, bronchiolitis group) and those with severe gas exchange anomalies (PaO2/FiO2 ⩽200 mm Hg and mean airway pressure >10 cm H2O, pneumonia group). In the 39 patients with bronchiolitis the duration of mechanical ventilation was 4.3 days shorter in the dexamethasone group than in the placebo group (4.9 v 9.2 days, 95% CI -7.8 to -0.8, p=0.02) and the duration of supplemental oxygen was 3.6 days shorter (7.7 v 11.3 days, 95% CI -8.0 to -0.1, p=0.048). No differences in end points were found in the pneumonia group. Conclusions: Dexamethasone had no beneficial effect in patients mechanically ventilated for RSV-LRTI but was found to have a beneficial effect in patients with bronchiolitis. PMID:12728156

  2. Mixed Acid-Base Disorders, Hydroelectrolyte Imbalance and Lactate Production in Hypercapnic Respiratory Failure: The Role of Noninvasive Ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Terzano, Claudio; Di Stefano, Fabio; Conti, Vittoria; Di Nicola, Marta; Paone, Gregorino; Petroianni, Angelo; Ricci, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Background Hypercapnic Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) exacerbation in patients with comorbidities and multidrug therapy is complicated by mixed acid-base, hydro-electrolyte and lactate disorders. Aim of this study was to determine the relationships of these disorders with the requirement for and duration of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) when treating hypercapnic respiratory failure. Methods Sixty-seven consecutive patients who were hospitalized for hypercapnic COPD exacerbation had their clinical condition, respiratory function, blood chemistry, arterial blood gases, blood lactate and volemic state assessed. Heart and respiratory rates, pH, PaO2 and PaCO2 and blood lactate were checked at the 1st, 2nd, 6th and 24th hours after starting NIV. Results Nine patients were transferred to the intensive care unit. NIV was performed in 11/17 (64.7%) mixed respiratory acidosis–metabolic alkalosis, 10/36 (27.8%) respiratory acidosis and 3/5 (60%) mixed respiratory-metabolic acidosis patients (p = 0.026), with durations of 45.1±9.8, 36.2±8.9 and 53.3±4.1 hours, respectively (p = 0.016). The duration of ventilation was associated with higher blood lactate (p<0.001), lower pH (p = 0.016), lower serum sodium (p = 0.014) and lower chloride (p = 0.038). Hyponatremia without hypervolemic hypochloremia occurred in 11 respiratory acidosis patients. Hypovolemic hyponatremia with hypochloremia and hypokalemia occurred in 10 mixed respiratory acidosis–metabolic alkalosis patients, and euvolemic hypochloremia occurred in the other 7 patients with this mixed acid-base disorder. Conclusions Mixed acid-base and lactate disorders during hypercapnic COPD exacerbations predict the need for and longer duration of NIV. The combination of mixed acid-base disorders and hydro-electrolyte disturbances should be further investigated. PMID:22539963

  3. An unusual cause of acute renal failure: renal lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Ozaltin, Fatih; Yalçin, Bilgehan; Orhan, Diclehan; Sari, Neriman; Caglar, Melda; Besbas, Nesrin; Bakkaloglu, Aysin

    2004-08-01

    Renal involvement is a common finding in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). Acute renal failure at initial presentation due to lymphomatous infiltration of the kidneys has been described infrequently. We report a 17-year-old male who presented with acute renal failure due to massive lymphomatous infiltration of the kidneys, which necessitated hemodialysis. The diagnosis of B-cell NHL was established by tru-cut biopsy of the kidneys and the patient had an excellent response to high-dose chemotherapy with no major complication. The presence of extrarenal involvement in the testes and the retroperitoneal lymph nodes made the diagnosis of primary renal lymphoma debatable. However, considering the delay in diagnosis and the high proliferative rate of B-cell NHL, we might postulate that the disease had originated primarily in the kidneys. We recommend that in NHL cases with severe renal involvement, full-dose chemotherapy should be instituted with meticulous clinical and laboratory follow-up in order to improve clinical and renal failure status rapidly and to avoid further dissemination of NHL.

  4. Considerations in the management of hypoxemic respiratory failure and persistent pulmonary hypertension in term and late preterm neonates.

    PubMed

    Lakshminrusimha, S; Konduri, G G; Steinhorn, R H

    2016-06-01

    Recent advances in our understanding of neonatal pulmonary circulation and the underlying pathophysiology of hypoxemic respiratory failure (HRF)/persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN) have resulted in more effective management strategies. Results from animal studies demonstrate that low alveolar oxygen tension (PAO2) causes hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction, whereas an increase in oxygen tension to normoxic levels (preductal arterial partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2) between 60 and 80 mm Hg and/or preductal peripheral capillary oxygen saturation between 90% and 97%) results in effective pulmonary vasodilation. Hyperoxia (preductal PaO2 >80 mm Hg) does not cause further pulmonary vasodilation, and oxygen toxicity may occur when high concentrations of inspired oxygen are used. It is therefore important to avoid both hypoxemia and hyperoxemia in the management of PPHN. In addition to oxygen supplementation, therapeutic strategies used to manage HRF/PPHN in term and late preterm neonates may include lung recruitment with optimal mean airway pressure and surfactant, inhaled and intravenous vasodilators and 'inodilators'. Clinical evidence suggests that administration of surfactant or inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) therapy at a lower acuity of illness can decrease the risk of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation/death, progression of HRF and duration of hospital stay. Milrinone may be beneficial as an inodilator and may have specific benefits following prolonged exposure to iNO plus oxygen owing to inhibition of phosphodiesterase (PDE)-3A. Additionally, sildenafil, and, in selected cases, hydrocortisone may be appropriate options after hyperoxia and oxidative stress owing to their effects on PDE-5 activity and expression. Continued investigation into these and other interventions is needed to optimize treatment and improve outcomes.

  5. Hypophosphatemia and phosphorus depletion in respiratory and peripheral muscles of patients with respiratory failure due to COPD.

    PubMed

    Fiaccadori, E; Coffrini, E; Fracchia, C; Rampulla, C; Montagna, T; Borghetti, A

    1994-05-01

    In 22 patients (19 men, 3 women; mean [+/- SD] age, 63 +/- 6 years) with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), phosphorus content was measured by spectrophotometric methods on muscle fragments of both peripheral (quadriceps femoris needle biopsy in 22 patients) and respiratory muscles (external intercostal muscle surgical biopsy in 14 patients). Thirty age- and sex-matched subjects were used as controls (19 for quadriceps femoris muscle biopsy and 11 for intercostal muscle biopsy). Serum phosphorus levels, as well as the main determinants of overall phosphorus metabolism (dietary intake of phosphorus and renal phosphate handling), were also obtained in all patients and control subjects. Muscle phosphorus content of both respiratory and peripheral muscles was significantly reduced in the COPD patient group, no matter what reference index was used (fat-free dry muscle weight or muscle fragment DNA content); muscle phosphorus depletion was present in about 50 percent of patients with COPD. In the same patient group, a significant relationship between muscle and serum phosphorus levels was demonstrable in the case of peripheral muscles only. No relationship was found between phosphorus content of both types of skeletal muscles and dietary phosphorus intake levels or with nutritional status, even though patients with COPD had significantly reduced anthropometric, biochemical, and immunologic indices as compared with controls. Renal phosphorus handling indices of the COPD patient group were compatible with a condition of inadequacy of the renal compensatory mechanism to hypophosphatemia and phosphorus depletion (low percent tubular reabsorption of phosphorus, low renal threshold concentration values). Our study suggests that phosphorus depletion occurs frequently in COPD, but in this clinical condition serum phosphorus levels are not representative of cellular phosphorus levels. Phosphorus depletion, which is equally severe in respiratory and peripheral muscles

  6. Phenotyping community-acquired pneumonia according to the presence of acute respiratory failure and severe sepsis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute respiratory failure (ARF) and severe sepsis (SS) are possible complications in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). The aim of the study was to evaluate prevalence, characteristics, risk factors and impact on mortality of hospitalized patients with CAP according to the presence of ARF and SS on admission. Methods This was a multicenter, observational, prospective study of consecutive CAP patients admitted to three hospitals in Italy, Spain, and Scotland between 2008 and 2010. Three groups of patients were identified: those with neither ARF nor SS (Group A), those with only ARF (Group B) and those with both ARF and SS (Group C) on admission. Results Among the 2,145 patients enrolled, 45% belonged to Group A, 36% to Group B and 20% to Group C. Patients in Group C were more severe than patients in Group B. Isolated ARF was correlated with age (p < 0.001), COPD (p < 0.001) and multilobar infiltrates (p < 0.001). The contemporary occurrence of ARF and SS was associated with age (p = 0.002), residency in nursing home (p = 0.007), COPD (p < 0.001), multilobar involvement (p < 0.001) and renal disease (p < 0.001). 4.2% of patients in Group A died, 9.3% in Group B and 26% in Group C, p < 0.001. After adjustment, the presence of only ARF had an OR for in-hospital mortality of 1.85 (p = 0.011) and the presence of both ARF and SS had an OR of 6.32 (p < 0.001). Conclusions The identification of ARF and SS on hospital admission can help physicians in classifying CAP patients into three different clinical phenotypes. PMID:24593040

  7. Safety of performing fiberoptic bronchoscopy in critically ill hypoxemic patients with acute respiratory failure

    PubMed Central

    Cracco, Christophe; Fartoukh, Muriel; Prodanovic, Hélène; Azoulay, Elie; Chenivesse, Cécile; Lorut, Christine; Beduneau, Gaëtan; Bui, Hoang Nam; Taille, Camille; Brochard, Laurent; Demoule, Alexandre; Maitre, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Background Safety of fibreoptic bronchoscopy (FOB) in nonintubated critically ill patients with acute respiratory failure have not been extensively evaluated. We aimed to measure the incidence of intubation and need to increase ventilatory support following FOB and to identify predictive factors of this event. Methods A prospective multicenter observational study was carried out in 8 French adult intensive care units. 169 FOB performed in patients with a PaO2/FiO2 ratio equal or less than 300 were analyzed. Our main end point was intubation rate. The secondary end point was rate of increased ventilatory support defined as greater than a 50% increase in oxygen requirement, the need to start non invasive-positive pressure ventilation (NI-PPV) or increase NI-PPV support. Results Within 24 hours, an increase in ventilatory support was required following 59 (35%) bronchoscopies, of which 25 (15%) led to endotracheal intubation. The existence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (OR:5.2 [1.6–17.8], p=0.007) or immunosuppression (OR : 5.4 [1.7–17.2], p=0.004) were significantly associated with the need for intubation in multivariable analysis. None of the baseline physiological parameters including the PaO2/FiO2 ratio was associated with intubation. Conclusion Bronchoscopy is often followed by an increase in ventilatory support in hypoxemic critically ill patients, but less frequently by the need for intubation. COPD, immunosuppression are associated with a need for invasive ventilation in the following 24 hours. PMID:23070123

  8. The Effects of Air Pollution on Cardiovascular and Respiratory Causes of Emergency Admission

    PubMed Central

    Shahi, Ali Mohammad; Omraninava, Ali; Goli, Mitra; Soheilarezoomand, Hamid Reza; Mirzaei, Nader

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Today, air pollution is one of the critical problems in metropolitans and necessary preparations are needed for confronting this crisis. The present study was based on the goal of determining the relationship of air pollutant levels with the rate of emergency admissions for respiratory and cardiovascular patients. Methods: In the present retrospective cross-sectional study, all respiratory and cardiovascular patients, referred to emergency department during 2012, were assessed. The meteorological and air pollution data were collected. Information regarding the numbers and dates (month, day) of admission for respiratory and cardiovascular diseases was achieved from the hospital's electronic registration system. The relation of air pollution and respiratory and cardiovascular admissions were analyzed by generalize additive model (GAM). Results: 5922 patients were assessed which included 4048 (68.36%) cardiovascular and 1874 (31.64%) respiratory. Carbon monoxide (CO) level was an independent risk factor of cardiovascular disease on the same day (RR=1.49; 95% CI: 1.25- 1.77; P<0.001), the day before (RR=1.22; 95% CI: 1.02- 1.45; P=0.03), and the last two days (RR=1.3; 95% CI: 1.09- 1.54; P<0.001). The same process was repeated for ozone (O3). In addition, the O3 level on the same day (RR=1.49; 95% CI: 1.25- 1.77; P<0.001), the day before (RR=1.22; 95% CI: 1.02- 1.45; P=0.03), the last two days (RR=1.3; 95% CI: 1.09- 1.54; P<0.001), and the last week (RR=1.004; 95% CI: 1.0007-1.008; P=0.02) were independent risk factors of respiratory admissions. The increased level of particulate matter less than 2.5 micrometers in diameter (PM2.5) like O3 led to growth in the admissions to emergency department. Conclusion: The findings of the present study suggested that rising levels of CO and O3 during two days leads to a significant increase in cardiovascular admission on the third day. Furthermore, increase in O3, PM2.5, nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and CO levels causes a

  9. Total Liquid Ventilation Provides Superior Respiratory Support to Conventional Mechanical Ventilation in a Large Animal Model of Severe Respiratory Failure

    PubMed Central

    Pohlmann, Joshua R; Brant, David O; Daul, Morgan A; Reoma, Junewai L; Kim, Anne C; Osterholzer, Kathryn R; Johnson, Kent J; Bartlett, Robert H; Cook, Keith E; Hirschl, Ronald B

    2011-01-01

    Total liquid ventilation (TLV) has the potential to provide respiratory support superior to conventional mechanical ventilation (CMV) in the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). However, laboratory studies are limited to trials in small animals for no longer than 4 hours. The objective of this study was to compare TLV and CMV in a large animal model of ARDS for 24 hours. Ten sheep weighing 53 ± 4 (SD) kg were anesthetized and ventilated with 100% oxygen. Oleic acid was injected into the pulmonary circulation until PaO2:FiO2 ≥ 60 mmHg, followed by transition to a protective CMV protocol (n=5) or TLV (n=5) for 24 hours. Pathophysiology was recorded and the lungs were harvested for histological analysis. Animals treated with CMV became progressively hypoxic and hypercarbic despite maximum ventilatory support. Sheep treated with TLV maintained normal blood gases with statistically greater PO2 (p<10−9) and lower PCO2 (p < 10−3) than the CMV group. Survival at 24 hours in the TLV and CMV groups were 100% and 40% respectively (p< 0.05). Thus, TLV provided gas exchange superior to CMV in this laboratory model of severe ARDS. PMID:21084968

  10. Total liquid ventilation provides superior respiratory support to conventional mechanical ventilation in a large animal model of severe respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Pohlmann, Joshua R; Brant, David O; Daul, Morgan A; Reoma, Junewai L; Kim, Anne C; Osterholzer, Kathryn R; Johnson, Kent J; Bartlett, Robert H; Cook, Keith E; Hirschl, Ronald B

    2011-01-01

    Total liquid ventilation (TLV) has the potential to provide respiratory support superior to conventional mechanical ventilation (CMV) in the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). However, laboratory studies are limited to trials in small animals for no longer than 4 hours. The objective of this study was to compare TLV and CMV in a large animal model of ARDS for 24 hours. Ten sheep weighing 53 ± 4 (SD) kg were anesthetized and ventilated with 100% oxygen. Oleic acid was injected into the pulmonary circulation until PaO2:FiO2 ≤ 60 mm Hg, followed by transition to a protective CMV protocol (n = 5) or TLV (n = 5) for 24 hours. Pathophysiology was recorded, and the lungs were harvested for histological analysis. Animals treated with CMV became progressively hypoxic and hypercarbic despite maximum ventilatory support. Sheep treated with TLV maintained normal blood gases with statistically greater PO2 (p < 10(-9)) and lower PCO2 (p < 10(-3)) than the CMV group. Survival at 24 hours in the TLV and CMV groups were 100% and 40%, respectively (p < 0.05). Thus, TLV provided gas exchange superior to CMV in this laboratory model of severe ARDS.

  11. Probable chronic renal failure caused by Lonomia caterpillar envenomation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Erucism is a skin reaction to envenomation from certain poisonous caterpillar bristles. In Brazil, most reports of erucism provoked by Lonomia caterpillars are from the southern region. Most manifestations of erucism are local and include burning pain, itching, local hyperthermia and, rarely, blisters (benign symptoms with spontaneous regression in a few hours). General symptoms such as nausea and vomiting, headache, fever, myalgia, abdominal pain and conjunctivitis may also occur. Uncommon symptoms include arthritis, coagulation disorders (manifested as bruising and bleeding), intracerebral hemorrhage and acute renal failure, which comprise serious complications. The present study reports the case of 60-year-old patient from Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil, who came into contact with a caterpillar and developed, a few days later, chronic renal disease. PMID:23849585

  12. Massive Hemolysis Causing Renal Failure in Acute Hepatitis E Infection

    PubMed Central

    Karki, Pragya; Malik, Sarthak; Mallick, Bipadabhanjan; Sharma, Vishal; Rana, Surinder S

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Acute viral hepatitis is usually a self-limiting illness. However, it can lead to complications that can be life-threatening, such as acute liver failure. Glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency in the setting of acute viral hepatitis can lead to a massive hemolysis, manifesting as acute kidney injury and markedly raised bilirubin levels; although cases are rare. Here, we report such a case. The patient had a viral hepatitis E infection and presented with kidney injury requiring dialysis. Examination showed very high mixed hyperbilirubinemia due to massive intravascular hemolysis. The patient experienced a long, protracted course of illness, requiring renal replacement therapy with other supportive management, which led to improvement over a period of four weeks. This case highlights the importance of recognizing associated hemolysis in a patient with viral hepatitis who presents with very high bilirubin levels or associated kidney injury. Such patients will require aggressive supportive care with prompt fluid and electrolyte management. PMID:28097104

  13. Neural dysfunction following respiratory viral infection as a cause of chronic cough hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Undem, Bradley J; Zaccone, Eric; McGarvey, Lorcan; Mazzone, Stuart B

    2015-08-01

    Respiratory viral infections are a common cause of acute coughing, an irritating symptom for the patient and an important mechanism of transmission for the virus. Although poorly described, the inflammatory consequences of infection likely induce coughing by chemical (inflammatory mediator) or mechanical (mucous) activation of the cough-evoking sensory nerves that innervate the airway wall. For some individuals, acute cough can evolve into a chronic condition, in which cough and aberrant airway sensations long outlast the initial viral infection. This suggests that some viruses have the capacity to induce persistent plasticity in the neural pathways mediating cough. In this brief review we present the clinical evidence of acute and chronic neural dysfunction following viral respiratory tract infections and explore possible mechanisms by which the nervous system may undergo activation, sensitization and plasticity.

  14. Effect of selected antiasthmatic plant constituents against micro organism causing upper respiratory tract infection.

    PubMed

    Nilani, P; Duraisamy, B; Dhamodaran, P; Ravichandran, S; Elango, K

    2010-01-01

    Most exacerbations of asthma can be proven to be associated with bacterial infections and there is scientific evidence that frequent respiratory infections particularly bacterial infections provoke asthma attack. Considering these facts different plant extracts and phytoconstituents with proven anti asthmatic property had been selected for screening anti microbial activity in in-vitro models. In the present study, Coleus forskohlii Willd. extract (10% Forskolin), Piper Longum L. Extract (20% Piperine), Adathoda vasica Nees. extract (30% Vasicinone), Curcuma longa L. extract (60% Curcumin) were screened for the antibacterial activity against human pathogens causing upper respiratory infection namely Haemophilus influenzae , Streptococcus pneumoniae , Streptococcus pyrogene and Staphylococcus aureus, by taking Gentamycin, Optochin, Bacitracin and Amoxicillin as reference standards. Except for Adathoda vasica Nees. extract, all the other selected plant extracts exhibited a moderate activity antibacterial activity against selected strains.

  15. Malabsorption of antimycobacterial drugs as a cause of treatment failure in tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Bento, João; Duarte, Raquel; Brito, Maria Céu; Leite, Sónia; Lobato, Maria Rosário; do Carmo Caldeira, Maria; Carvalho, Aurora

    2010-01-01

    Malabsorption of oral antimycobacterial drugs is a rare cause of treatment failure in tuberculosis (TB). Several predisposing comorbidities have been recognised. HIV infection is the most important risk factor referred in the literature. There are few reports about antimycobacterial drugs malabsorption, particularly in the absence of predisposing comorbidities. The authors present a clinical case of oral treatment failure in TB due to malabsorption; however, what caused the failure remained unclear. Possible causes of malabsorption are discussed under various sections. Purpose of this case report is to point to this rare situation that can easily go unnoticed unless a very high level of suspicion is present. PMID:22778380

  16. Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) is the number one disease affecting US swine. It is caused by the PRRS virus (PRRSV) and is recognized as reproductive failure of sows and respiratory problems of piglets and growing pigs. This book chapter is part of the Office of International E...

  17. Efficacy of high-flow oxygen by nasal cannula with active humidification in a patient with acute respiratory failure of neuromuscular origin.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Lobato, Salvador; Folgado, Miguel Angel; Chapa, Angel; Mayoralas Alises, Sagrario

    2013-12-01

    The treatment of choice for patients with respiratory failure of neuromuscular origin, especially in patients with hypercapnic respiratory acidosis, is noninvasive ventilation (NIV). Endotracheal intubation and invasive ventilation are indicated for patients with severe respiratory compromise or failure of NIV. In recent years, high-flow oxygen therapy and active humidification devices have been introduced, and emerging evidence suggests that high-flow oxygen may be effective in various clinical settings, such as acute respiratory failure, after cardiac surgery, during sedation and analgesia, in acute heart failure, in hypoxemic respiratory distress, in do-not-intubate patients, in patients with chronic cough and copious secretions, pulmonary fibrosis, or cancer, in critical areas and the emergency department. We report on a patient with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis who arrived at the emergency department with acute hypercapnic respiratory failure. She did not tolerate NIV and refused intubation, but was treated successfully with heated, humidified oxygen via high-flow nasal cannula. Arterial blood analysis after an hour on high-flow nasal cannula showed improved pH, P(aCO2), and awareness. The respiratory acidosis was corrected, and she was discharged after 5 days of hospitalization. Her response to high-flow nasal cannula was similar to that expected with NIV. We discuss the mechanisms of action of heated, humidified high-flow oxygen therapy.

  18. A comparison of synchronized intermittent mandatory ventilation and pressure-regulated volume control ventilation in elderly patients with acute exacerbations of COPD and respiratory failure

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Suchi; Shi, Jindong; Fu, Cuiping; Wu, Xu; Li, Shanqun

    2016-01-01

    Background COPD is the third leading cause of death worldwide. Acute exacerbations of COPD may cause respiratory failure, requiring intensive care unit admission and mechanical ventilation. Intensive care unit patients with acute exacerbations of COPD requiring mechanical ventilation have higher mortality rates than other hospitalized patients. Although mechanical ventilation is the most effective intervention for these conditions, invasive ventilation techniques have yielded variable effects. Objective We evaluated pressure-regulated volume control (PRVC) ventilation treatment efficacy and preventive effects on pulmonary barotrauma in elderly COPD patients with respiratory failure. Patients and methods Thirty-nine intubated patients were divided into experimental and control groups and treated with the PRVC and synchronized intermittent mandatory ventilation – volume control methods, respectively. Vital signs, respiratory mechanics, and arterial blood gas analyses were monitored for 2–4 hours and 48 hours. Results Both groups showed rapidly improved pH, partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2), and PaO2 per fraction of inspired O2 levels and lower partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PaCO2) levels. The pH and PaCO2 levels at 2–4 hours were lower and higher, respectively, in the test group than those in the control group (P<0.05 for both); after 48 hours, blood gas analyses showed no statistical difference in any marker (P>0.05). Vital signs during 2–4 hours and 48 hours of treatment showed no statistical difference in either group (P>0.05). The level of peak inspiratory pressure in the experimental group after mechanical ventilation for 2–4 hours and 48 hours was significantly lower than that in the control group (P<0.05), while other variables were not significantly different between groups (P>0.05). Conclusion Among elderly COPD patients with respiratory failure, application of PRVC resulted in rapid improvement in arterial blood gas analyses while maintaining

  19. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus: Another Zoonotic Betacoronavirus Causing SARS-Like Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Jasper F. W.; Lau, Susanna K. P.; To, Kelvin K. W.; Cheng, Vincent C. C.; Woo, Patrick C. Y.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The source of the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic was traced to wildlife market civets and ultimately to bats. Subsequent hunting for novel coronaviruses (CoVs) led to the discovery of two additional human and over 40 animal CoVs, including the prototype lineage C betacoronaviruses, Tylonycteris bat CoV HKU4 and Pipistrellus bat CoV HKU5; these are phylogenetically closely related to the Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) CoV, which has affected more than 1,000 patients with over 35% fatality since its emergence in 2012. All primary cases of MERS are epidemiologically linked to the Middle East. Some of these patients had contacted camels which shed virus and/or had positive serology. Most secondary cases are related to health care-associated clusters. The disease is especially severe in elderly men with comorbidities. Clinical severity may be related to MERS-CoV's ability to infect a broad range of cells with DPP4 expression, evade the host innate immune response, and induce cytokine dysregulation. Reverse transcription-PCR on respiratory and/or extrapulmonary specimens rapidly establishes diagnosis. Supportive treatment with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and dialysis is often required in patients with organ failure. Antivirals with potent in vitro activities include neutralizing monoclonal antibodies, antiviral peptides, interferons, mycophenolic acid, and lopinavir. They should be evaluated in suitable animal models before clinical trials. Developing an effective camel MERS-CoV vaccine and implementing appropriate infection control measures may control the continuing epidemic. PMID:25810418

  20. Panero et al. (2016): Failure to replicate methods caused the failure to replicate results.

    PubMed

    Kidd, David Comer; Castano, Emanuele

    2017-03-01

    Contrary to Kidd and Castano (2013), Panero et al. (2016) fail to find that reading literary fiction improves performance on an advanced test of theory of mind (ToM), the Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test. However, this commentary shows that the findings presented in Panero et al. (2016) are not reliable due to two striking threats to the internal validity of their studies that were not clearly disclosed or discussed in the manuscript or supplementary materials. First, no effective strategy was implemented to ensure that participants read their assigned texts, and examination of the data revealed many participants whose reading times indicate that they were not exposed to the manipulation. Second, further examination shows that two of the largest studies contributing to Panero et al. (2016) are not valid experiments due to a clear failure of random assignment to conditions. These threats to experimental internal validity make the conclusions presented in Panero et al. (2016) untenable. After removing cases in which participants were not exposed to the manipulation and the data from the two studies without random assignment, an analysis reveals that reading literary fiction improves ToM compared to reading popular genre fiction. This result is consistent with prior studies and indicates that a failure to carefully replicate the methods of Kidd and Castano (2013) led to the failure to replicate Kidd and Castano's (2013) results. (PsycINFO Database Record

  1. Green tea extract: A potential cause of acute liver failure

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Shreena S; Beer, Stacey; Kearney, Debra L; Phillips, Garrett; Carter, Beth A

    2013-01-01

    The use of herbal products has increased significantly in recent years. Because these products are not subject to regulation by the Food and Drug Administration and are often used without supervision by a healthcare provider, the indication for and consumption of these supplements is quite variable. Moreover, their use is generally regarded as safe and natural by the lay-public. Unfortunately, there has been an increase in the number of reported adverse events occurring with the use of herbal products. We present a case of acute impending liver failure in an adolescent male using a weight-loss product containing green tea extract. Our case adds to the growing concern surrounding the ingestion of green tea extract and serves to heighten healthcare provider awareness of a potential green tea extract hepatotoxicity. Despite the generally touted benefits of green tea as a whole, clinical concern regarding its use is emerging and has been linked to its concentration in multiple herbal supplements. Interestingly, the suspected harmful compounds are those previously proposed to be advantageous for weight-loss, cancer remedy, and anti-inflammatory purposes. Yet, we emphasize the need to be aware of not just green tea extract, but the importance of monitoring patient use of all dietary supplements and herbal products. PMID:23964154

  2. Star fruit (Averrhoa carambola) intoxication: an important cause of consciousness disturbance in patients with renal failure.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chin-Tung; Chen, Yung-Chang; Fang, Ji-Tseng; Huang, Chiu-Ching

    2002-05-01

    Star fruit intoxication is a rare cause of consciousness disturbance in patients with renal failure. Most cases in the literature are uremic patients on maintenance dialysis. We present a patient with chronic renal failure, who was not on dialysis program yet, suffered from star fruit intoxication with presentation of consciousness disturbance and successfully managed by a session of hemodialysis.

  3. Left ventricular failure produces profound lung remodeling and pulmonary hypertension in mice: heart failure causes severe lung disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yingjie; Guo, Haipeng; Xu, Dachun; Xu, Xin; Wang, Huan; Hu, Xinli; Lu, Zhongbing; Kwak, Dongmin; Xu, Yawei; Gunther, Roland; Huo, Yuqing; Weir, E Kenneth

    2012-06-01

    Chronic left ventricular failure causes pulmonary congestion with increased lung weight and type 2 pulmonary hypertension. Understanding the molecular mechanisms for type 2 pulmonary hypertension and the development of novel treatments for this condition requires a robust experimental animal model and a good understanding of the nature of the resultant pulmonary remodeling. Here we demonstrate that chronic transverse aortic constriction causes massive pulmonary fibrosis and remodeling, as well as type 2 pulmonary hypertension, in mice. Thus, aortic constriction-induced left ventricular dysfunction and increased left ventricular end-diastolic pressure are associated with a ≤5.3-fold increase in lung wet weight and dry weight, pulmonary hypertension, and right ventricular hypertrophy. Interestingly, the aortic constriction-induced increase in lung weight was not associated with pulmonary edema but resulted from profound pulmonary remodeling with a dramatic increase in the percentage of fully muscularized lung vessels, marked vascular and lung fibrosis, myofibroblast proliferation, and leukocyte infiltration. The aortic constriction-induced left ventricular dysfunction was also associated with right ventricular hypertrophy, increased right ventricular end-diastolic pressure, and right atrial hypertrophy. The massive lung fibrosis, leukocyte infiltration, and pulmonary hypertension in mice after transverse aortic constriction clearly indicate that congestive heart failure also causes severe lung disease. The lung fibrosis and leukocyte infiltration may be important mechanisms in the poor clinical outcome in patients with end-stage heart failure. Thus, the effective treatment of left ventricular failure may require additional efforts to reduce lung fibrosis and the inflammatory response.

  4. World Trade Center fine particulate matter causes respiratory tract hyperresponsiveness in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Gavett, Stephen H; Haykal-Coates, Najwa; Highfill, Jerry W; Ledbetter, Allen D; Chen, Lung Chi; Cohen, Mitchell D; Harkema, Jack R; Wagner, James G; Costa, Daniel L

    2003-01-01

    Pollutants originating from the destruction of the World Trade Center (WTC) in New York City on 11 September 2001 have been reported to cause adverse respiratory responses in rescue workers and nearby residents. We examined whether WTC-derived fine particulate matter [particulate matter with a mass median aerodynamic diameter < 2.5 microm (PM2.5)] has detrimental respiratory effects in mice to contribute to the risk assessment of WTC-derived pollutants. Samples of WTC PM2.5 were derived from settled dust collected at several locations around Ground Zero on 12 and 13 September 2001. Aspirated samples of WTC PM2.5 induced mild to moderate degrees of pulmonary inflammation 1 day after exposure but only at a relatively high dose (100 microg). This response was not as great as that caused by 100 microg PM2.5 derived from residual oil fly ash (ROFA) or Washington, DC, ambient air PM [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Standard Reference Material (SRM) 1649a]. However, this same dose of WTC PM2.5 caused airway hyperresponsiveness to methacholine aerosol comparable to that from SRM 1649a and to a greater degree than that from ROFA. Mice exposed to lower doses by aspiration or inhalation exposure did not develop significant inflammation or hyperresponsiveness. These results show that exposure to high levels of WTC PM2.5 can promote mechanisms of airflow obstruction in mice. Airborne concentrations of WTC PM2.5 that would cause comparable doses in people are high (approximately 425 microg/m3 for 8 hr) but conceivable in the aftermath of the collapse of the towers when rescue and salvage efforts were in effect. We conclude that a high-level exposure to WTC PM2.5 could cause pulmonary inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness in people. The effects of chronic exposures to lower levels of WTC PM2.5, the persistence of any respiratory effects, and the effects of coarser WTC PM are unknown and were not examined in these studies. Degree of exposure and respiratory

  5. World Trade Center fine particulate matter causes respiratory tract hyperresponsiveness in mice.

    PubMed

    Gavett, Stephen H; Haykal-Coates, Najwa; Highfill, Jerry W; Ledbetter, Allen D; Chen, Lung Chi; Cohen, Mitchell D; Harkema, Jack R; Wagner, James G; Costa, Daniel L

    2003-06-01

    Pollutants originating from the destruction of the World Trade Center (WTC) in New York City on 11 September 2001 have been reported to cause adverse respiratory responses in rescue workers and nearby residents. We examined whether WTC-derived fine particulate matter [particulate matter with a mass median aerodynamic diameter < 2.5 microm (PM2.5)] has detrimental respiratory effects in mice to contribute to the risk assessment of WTC-derived pollutants. Samples of WTC PM2.5 were derived from settled dust collected at several locations around Ground Zero on 12 and 13 September 2001. Aspirated samples of WTC PM2.5 induced mild to moderate degrees of pulmonary inflammation 1 day after exposure but only at a relatively high dose (100 microg). This response was not as great as that caused by 100 microg PM2.5 derived from residual oil fly ash (ROFA) or Washington, DC, ambient air PM [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Standard Reference Material (SRM) 1649a]. However, this same dose of WTC PM2.5 caused airway hyperresponsiveness to methacholine aerosol comparable to that from SRM 1649a and to a greater degree than that from ROFA. Mice exposed to lower doses by aspiration or inhalation exposure did not develop significant inflammation or hyperresponsiveness. These results show that exposure to high levels of WTC PM2.5 can promote mechanisms of airflow obstruction in mice. Airborne concentrations of WTC PM2.5 that would cause comparable doses in people are high (approximately 425 microg/m3 for 8 hr) but conceivable in the aftermath of the collapse of the towers when rescue and salvage efforts were in effect. We conclude that a high-level exposure to WTC PM2.5 could cause pulmonary inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness in people. The effects of chronic exposures to lower levels of WTC PM2.5, the persistence of any respiratory effects, and the effects of coarser WTC PM are unknown and were not examined in these studies. Degree of exposure and respiratory

  6. Pellagra: A clue as to why energy failure causes diseases?

    PubMed

    Williams, Adrian C; Ramsden, David B

    2007-01-01

    Pellagra is a curable dietary illness that unchecked leads to dementia, diarrhoea, dermatitis and death due to lack of the precursors for NAD(H). In addition it caused a wide range of monosyndromic degenerative and functional neurological disorders as well as profound developmental, premature aging and metabolic syndromes. Pellagrins harbour many chronic infections including tuberculosis, yeasts and malaria, that may be symbionts supplying nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide {NAD(H)} when the diet is poor. Many common diseases and aging may be caused by electrogenic energy mismatches from lack of a timely supply of NAD(H) creating disturbed metabolic fields and "protonopathies". Initially these may present in compartments fronted by homeostatic corrections from chronic symbiotic infections to inflammatory disease, cancer and degenerative/autophagic diseases that can all release NAD(H).

  7. [Iliac crest bone CO2 and CO2/Ca ratio in man during respiratory failure (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Bolot, J R; Berstein, S; Guérin, M A; Guibaud, S; Bernard, C; Sablière, S

    1976-01-01

    The bone is often considered as a slow exchanger and bone sampling from the iliac crest, by needle-biopsy, is a commonly used and atraumatic technique; therefore the significance of the evolution of CO2 stores has been investigated in iliac crest in respiratory failure. Samples are taken before ventilation and on the first, second, and in some cases third days after ventilation. The results show that ageing is to be considered, since the CO2/Ca ratio varies according to the age group (0.84 at 30 years and 1.35 at 60 years). Patients with respiratory failure may be distributed into two main categories: hypoxic patients without hypercapnia, and patients with predominant hypercapnia. Hypercapnic patients may be differentiated from the hypoxic ones, both before assisted ventilation and on account of the dynamic phenomena that come into play during respiratory support in this group of patients. If the equilibrium state (at least five days with rigorously steady gazometry), before assisted ventilation, remains unknown, it is not possible to distribute the patients in one of these two groups. The results' significance is discussed, as well as the possible therapeutic applications.

  8. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation with veno-venous bypass and apneic oxygenation for treatment of severe neonatal respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Somaschini, M; Bellan, C; Locatelli, G; Glauber, M; Colombo, A

    1995-10-01

    Seven newborn infants with life-threatening respiratory failure were treated with veno-venous (V-V) extracorporeal lung support and apneic oxygenation after maximal ventilatory and pharmacological treatment failed. Diagnosis were meconium aspiration syndrome in 3 cases, respiratory distress syndrome in 2, sepsis in 1, congenital diaphragmatic hernia in 1. Before ECMO 6 infants received tolazoline, 4 surfactant, 3 high frequency ventilation, 1 prostaglandin E, 1 epoprostenol, 2 nitric oxide. Newborns were highly hypoxemic at admission and all but one underwent rescue cannulation. V-V bypass was performed with a single lumen single cannula and tidal flow was generated by an alternating clamp using a non-occlusive roller pump. The mean duration of bypass was 162.4 +/- 162.3 hours and infants were extubated 94.5 +/- 74.8 hours after decannulation. Five newborns survived and two died. Growth and neurologic development of the older children is normal. The extracorporeal lung support with V-V bypass associated with apneic oxygenation was effective in reversing severe neonatal respiratory failure unresponsive to maximal ventilatory and pharmacological support. An early referral, prior to meeting ECMO criteria, is important in order to avoid hypoxic complications preceding ECMO.

  9. Three mixed venous saturation catheters in patients with circulatory shock and respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Rouby, J J; Poète, P; Bodin, L; Bourgeois, J L; Arthaud, M; Viars, P

    1990-10-01

    Thirty-one critically ill patients with acute respiratory failure and circulatory shock were divided into three groups. Group 1 included 11 patients with an inserted mixed venous saturation (SvO2) catheter using three-reference wavelengths and characterized by one transmitting and one detecting fiberoptic filament (Oximetrix opticath catheter); group 2 included eight patients with an inserted SvO2 catheter using two-reference wavelengths and characterized by one transmitting and one detecting fiberoptic filament; (Edwards sat-one catheter); group 3 included 12 patients with an inserted SvO2 catheter using two-reference wavelengths and characterized by one transmitting and two detecting fiberoptic filaments. Once calibration procedures were performed, SvO2 measured by the catheter and by an hemoximeter OSM 3 (reference value) were compared following each therapeutic intervention. Over a period of 1.5 to 6 hours during which the hematocrit value remained unchanged, 119 measurements were obtained in group 1, 91 in group 2 and 181 in group 3. The dispersion of SvO2 values was much more pronounced with the two-reference wavelength systems using either one or two detecting fiber optic filaments, and the correlation coefficient was significantly higher with the three-reference wavelength system (r = 0.970 for the Oximetrix catheter vs r = 0.855 for the Edwards catheter and r = 0.826 for the Spectramed catheter, p less than 0.001). After 24 hours, the spontaneous drifts in the two-reference wavelength systems, using either one or two detecting fiber optic filaments (expressed as the SvO2 value measured by the catheter minus the reference SvO2 value) were significantly higher than the spontaneous drift in the three-reference wavelength system (9.3 +/- 7 percent for the Edwards catheter and +/- 6 +/- 4.1 percent for the Spectramed catheter vs 3.3 +/- 3.1 percent for the Oximetrix catheter, p less than 0.05). This study shows that a three-wavelength system is more accurate

  10. A huge pelvic calculus causing acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Lai, Allen Yu-Hung; Kuo, Yuh-Chen

    2008-02-01

    We present a 69-year-old man with repeated urinary tract infection and lower abdominal pain. Kidney-ureter-bladder (KUB) scout film showed a huge, 320-g triangular pelvic calculus that was surgically removed with excellent results. Bladder stone is a common disease, but it is rare for such a calculus to be so large as to cause bilateral hydronephrosis. Surgical intervention by cystolithotomy or endoscopic cystolithotripsy can achieve satisfactory results. Bladder outlet obstruction should be treated simultaneously. Close follow-up, however, is mandatory because the recurrence of urolithiasis is high in those patients with voiding problems and recurrent urinary infection. To the best of our knowledge, this is the largest bladder stone in a human male. This case report also illustrates the importance of radiologic evaluation of patients with repeated urinary infections.

  11. First case of atypical takotsubo cardiomyopathy in a bilateral lung-transplanted patient due to acute respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Ghadri, Jelena R; Bataisou, Roxana D; Diekmann, Johanna; Lüscher, Thomas F; Templin, Christian

    2015-10-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy which is characterised by a transient left ventricular wall motion abnormality was first described in 1990. The disease is still not well known, and as such it is suggested that an emotional trigger is mandatory in this disease. We present the case of a 51-year old female patient seven years after bilateral lung transplantation, who developed acute respiratory distress syndrome and subsequently suffered from atypical takotsubo cardiomyopathy with transient severe reduction of ejection fraction and haemodynamic instability needing acute intensive care treatment. Acute respiratory failure has emerged as an important physical trigger factor in takotsubo cardiomyopathy. Little is known about the association of hypoxia and takotsubo cardiomyopathy which can elicit a life-threatening condition requiring acute intensive care. Therefore, experimental studies are needed to investigate the role of hypoxia in takotsubo cardiomyopathy.

  12. Common-Cause Failure Treatment in Event Assessment: Basis for a Proposed New Model

    SciTech Connect

    Dana Kelly; Song-Hua Shen; Gary DeMoss; Kevin Coyne; Don Marksberry

    2010-06-01

    Event assessment is an application of probabilistic risk assessment in which observed equipment failures and outages are mapped into the risk model to obtain a numerical estimate of the event’s risk significance. In this paper, we focus on retrospective assessments to estimate the risk significance of degraded conditions such as equipment failure accompanied by a deficiency in a process such as maintenance practices. In modeling such events, the basic events in the risk model that are associated with observed failures and other off-normal situations are typically configured to be failed, while those associated with observed successes and unchallenged components are assumed capable of failing, typically with their baseline probabilities. This is referred to as the failure memory approach to event assessment. The conditioning of common-cause failure probabilities for the common cause component group associated with the observed component failure is particularly important, as it is insufficient to simply leave these probabilities at their baseline values, and doing so may result in a significant underestimate of risk significance for the event. Past work in this area has focused on the mathematics of the adjustment. In this paper, we review the Basic Parameter Model for common-cause failure, which underlies most current risk modelling, discuss the limitations of this model with respect to event assessment, and introduce a proposed new framework for common-cause failure, which uses a Bayesian network to model underlying causes of failure, and which has the potential to overcome the limitations of the Basic Parameter Model with respect to event assessment.

  13. Viral Agents Causing Acute Respiratory Infections in Children under Five: A Study from Eastern India

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Pravakar; Nayak, Lipika; Dwibedi, Bhagirathi; Singh, Amitabh

    2016-01-01

    Background. Acute respiratory infections (ARIs) are important cause of mortality and morbidity in children under five in developing country. Methods. This observational study was conducted over two-year period in a tertiary care teaching hospital of Eastern India. Nasal and throat swabs were collected, transported to the laboratory at 2–8°C in viral transport media, and then processed for detection of viruses using mono/multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results. A total of 300 children aged 2–60 months with ARIs were included. The most common age group affected with LRI was 2–12 mo and with URI was >12–60 mo. Viruses were detected in 248 cases. In URI, 77 were positive for single virus and 19 were positive for more than one virus; in LRI, 113 were positive for single virus and 12 were positive for more than one virus. The most common viruses isolated from URI cases were rhinovirus and adenovirus. The most common viruses isolated from LRI cases were respiratory syncytial virus and influenza virus. Most cases occurred in the months of January, December, and August. Conclusion. Viruses constitute a significant cause of ARI in children under five. RSV, ADV, RV, and IFV were the most prevalent viruses isolated. PMID:28018433

  14. A randomized trial on the effects of body positions on lung function with acute respiratory failure patients.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myung J; Hwang, Hee J; Song, Hae H

    2002-07-01

    In a randomized controlled trial, we compared the potential benefits of position changes on arterial oxygen pressure in 32 patients with acute respiratory failure, maintained on artificial ventilators, distinguishing prominently as left-sided, right-sided or bilateral lung disease. Our results indicate that randomly alternating supine, left-lateral, right-lateral and prone positions have influence on gas exchange and that improvement of arterial oxygen pressure is associated with various positions. Our results show, therefore, that nursing care of patients on artificial ventilators involving changes in body positions (a simple and noninvasive means of assistance) has important therapeutic consequences and warrants attention in clinical practice.

  15. The role of ventilation-induced surfactant dysfunction and atelectasis in causing acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Albert, Richard K

    2012-04-01

    This Pulmonary Perspective describes a new pathophysiologic scenario by which the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) might develop, summarizes the literature on which this new scenario is based, and discusses the resulting implications with respect to patient management. Rather than ARDS occurring as a result of the inflammatory response associated with predisposing risk factors, the proposed scenario theorizes that the initiating problem is atelectasis that develops as a result of a surfactant abnormality that is caused by spontaneous or mechanical ventilation, together with our current approaches to patient positioning and sedation. The proposed pathophysiology implies that ventilation-induced lung injury occurs before, and causes, ARDS (rather than developing after the fact and only serving to magnify the existing injury) and that some instances of ARDS are iatrogenic. If the proposed scenario is correct, it also implies that at least some instances of ARDS might be prevented by implementing a number of simple, safe modifications in patient care.

  16. Successful management of acute respiratory failure in an Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis patient using an extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal system.

    PubMed

    Vianello, Andrea; Arcaro, Giovanna; Paladini, Luciana; Iovino, Silvia

    2016-08-01

    Patients with Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF) requiring Invasive Mechanical Ventilation (IMV) following unsuccessful treatment with Non-Invasive Ventilation (NIV) have a high mortality rate. IMV is, moreover, an independent predictor of poor outcome during the post-transplantation period in patients on waiting lists for Lung Transplantation (LT). Here we describe the successful management of an IPF patient with acute respiratory failure (ARF) using a pump-assisted veno-venous system for extracorporeal CO2 removal (ECCO2R) (ProLUNG® system) as an alternative to endotracheal intubation (ETI) following NIV failure. Given this positive experience, further studies are warranted focusing on the ECCO2R system's tolerability, safety, and efficacy in patients with IPF and severe ARF in whom NIV alone is ineffective.

  17. Deaths from heart failure: using coarsened exact matching to correct cause-of-death statistics

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Incomplete information on death certificates makes recorded cause-of-death data less useful for public health monitoring and planning. Certifying physicians sometimes list only the mode of death without indicating the underlying disease or diseases that led to the death. Inconsistent cause-of-death assignment among cardiovascular causes of death is of particular concern. This can prevent valid epidemiologic comparisons across countries and over time. Methods We propose that coarsened exact matching be used to infer the underlying causes of death where only the mode of death is known. We focus on the case of heart failure in US, Mexican, and Brazilian death records. Results Redistribution algorithms derived using this method assign the largest proportion of heart failure deaths to ischemic heart disease in all three countries (53%, 26%, and 22% respectively), with larger proportions assigned to hypertensive heart disease and diabetes in Mexico and Brazil (16% and 23% vs. 7% for hypertensive heart disease, and 13% and 9% vs. 6% for diabetes). Reassigning these heart failure deaths increases the US ischemic heart disease mortality rate by 6%. Conclusions The frequency with which physicians list heart failure in the causal chain for various underlying causes of death allows for inference about how physicians use heart failure on the death certificate in different settings. This easy-to-use method has the potential to reduce bias and increase comparability in cause-of-death data, thereby improving the public health utility of death records. PMID:20388206

  18. Investigation into Cause of High Temperature Failure of Boiler Superheater Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, D.; Ray, S.; Roy, H.; Shukla, A. K.

    2015-04-01

    The failure of the boiler tubes occur due to various reasons like creep, fatigue, corrosion and erosion. This paper highlights a case study of typical premature failure of a final superheater tube of 210 MW thermal power plant boiler. Visual examination, dimensional measurement, chemical analysis, oxide scale thickness measurement, microstructural examination are conducted as part of the investigations. Apart from these investigations, sulfur print, Energy Dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X ray diffraction analysis (XRD) are also conducted to ascertain the probable cause of failure of final super heater tube. Finally it has been concluded that the premature failure of the super heater tube can be attributed to the combination of localized high tube metal temperature and loss of metal from the outer surface due to high temperature corrosion. The corrective actions have also been suggested to avoid this type of failure in near future.

  19. ANLN truncation causes a familial fatal acute respiratory distress syndrome in Dalmatian dogs

    PubMed Central

    Syrjä, Pernilla; Arumilli, Meharji; Järvinen, Anna-Kaisa; Rajamäki, Minna

    2017-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is the leading cause of death in critical care medicine. The syndrome is typified by an exaggerated inflammatory response within the lungs. ARDS has been reported in many species, including dogs. We have previously reported a fatal familial juvenile respiratory disease accompanied by occasional unilateral renal aplasia and hydrocephalus, in Dalmatian dogs. The condition with a suggested recessive mode of inheritance resembles acute exacerbation of usual interstitial pneumonia in man. We combined SNP-based homozygosity mapping of two ARDS-affected Dalmatian dogs and whole genome sequencing of one affected dog to identify a case-specific homozygous nonsense variant, c.31C>T; p.R11* in the ANLN gene. Subsequent analysis of the variant in a total cohort of 188 Dalmatians, including seven cases, indicated complete segregation of the variant with the disease and confirmed an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. Low carrier frequency of 1.7% was observed in a population cohort. The early nonsense variant results in a nearly complete truncation of the ANLN protein and immunohistochemical analysis of the affected lung tissue demonstrated the lack of the membranous and cytoplasmic staining of ANLN protein in the metaplastic bronchial epithelium. The ANLN gene encodes an anillin actin binding protein with a suggested regulatory role in the integrity of intercellular junctions. Our study suggests that defective ANLN results in abnormal cellular organization of the bronchiolar epithelium, which in turn predisposes to acute respiratory distress. ANLN has been previously linked to a dominant focal segmental glomerulosclerosis in human without pulmonary defects. However, the lack of similar renal manifestations in the affected Dalmatians suggest a novel ANLN-related pulmonary function and disease association. PMID:28222102

  20. Nitric oxide: a greenhouse gas is used in the treatment of respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Supkis, D E; Graber, M

    2000-09-01

    Medical science has long made the improbable probable, saving lives and improving quality of life. Upon the introduction of medical devices that can deliver safe quantities of the poisonous gas nitric oxide to help patients with respiratory and other illnesses, the FDA requested ASTM Committee F29 on Anesthetic and Respiratory Equipment to provide standards for these devices. Dr. Daniel Supkis and Mark Graber explain the delicate process of delivering NO to patients and how ASTM standards now in development will increase the safety of this procedure.

  1. Reversions to respiratory competence of omnipotent sup45 suppressor mutants may be caused by secondary sup45 mutations.

    PubMed

    Mironova, L N; Samsonova, M G; Zhouravleva, G A; Kulikov, V N; Soom, M J

    1995-02-01

    The molecular nature of the sup45 respiratory deficient omnipotent suppressor, and of three reversions to respiratory competence which removed the suppressor effect of the initial mutation, was examined. All reversions were caused by secondary sup45 mutations which indicates a direct connection between sup45 "respiratory" and "translational" functions. Computer analysis showed the local changes of Sup45 protein characteristics in the suppressor strain and revertants in comparison to the wild-type protein. The distribution of mutant sites in relation to evolutionary conserved, and tentatively functional, regions in the Sup45 protein is discussed.

  2. Non-invasive ventilation for children with acute respiratory failure in the developing world: literature review and an implementation example.

    PubMed

    Balfour-Lynn, R E; Marsh, G; Gorayi, D; Elahi, E; LaRovere, J

    2014-06-01

    Over 2 million children die of acute respiratory infection every year, with around 98% of these deaths occurring in developing countries. Depending upon the clinical status of the patient, supplemental oxygen is usually the first line therapy. However this often proves inadequate for acute respiratory failure (ARF), in which case intubation and mechanical positive pressure ventilation are required. Adult intensive care successfully introduced non-invasive positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV) to treat ARF over a decade ago. This experience, coupled with the use of NIPPV in children with chronic respiratory insufficiency, has led to increasing use of NIPPV to treat ARF in paediatric populations. NIPPV can have similar or improved outcomes to IPPV, but with fewer complications. However there are no controlled trials of its use in children, and most data come from observational studies and retrospective reviews. In a developing world setting, where mortality from ARF is high and the risks of intubation are great and often not feasible, NIPPV can be a simple and cost-effective way to treat these patients. Its implementation in rural Northern Ghana shows NIPPV for ARF can be delivered safely with minimal training, and appears to impact significantly on mortality in those under 5 years.

  3. Recurrent Acute Decompensated Heart Failure Owing to Severe Iron Deficiency Anemia Caused by Inappropriate Habitual Bloodletting

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Woo-Hyun; Kim, Hack-Lyoung; Kim, Ki-Hwan; Na, Sang Hoon; Lee, Hyun-Jung; Kang, Eun Gyu; Seo, Jae-Bin; Chung, Woo-Young; Zo, Joo-Hee; Hong, Jung Ae; Kim, Kwangyoun; Kim, Myung-A

    2015-01-01

    A 68-year-old woman visited the emergency department twice with symptoms of acute heart failure including shortness of breath, general weakness, and abdominal distension. Laboratory findings showed extremely low level of serum hemoglobin at 1.4 g/dL. Echocardiographic examination demonstrated dilated left ventricular cavity with systolic dysfunction and moderate amount of pericardial effusion. In this patient, acute heart failure due to severe iron deficiency anemia was caused by inappropriate habitual bloodletting. PMID:26755934

  4. Drugs That May Cause or Exacerbate Heart Failure: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association.

    PubMed

    Page, Robert L; O'Bryant, Cindy L; Cheng, Davy; Dow, Tristan J; Ky, Bonnie; Stein, C Michael; Spencer, Anne P; Trupp, Robin J; Lindenfeld, JoAnn

    2016-08-09

    Heart failure is a common, costly, and debilitating syndrome that is associated with a highly complex drug regimen, a large number of comorbidities, and a large and often disparate number of healthcare providers. All of these factors conspire to increase the risk of heart failure exacerbation by direct myocardial toxicity, drug-drug interactions, or both. This scientific statement is designed to serve as a comprehensive and accessible source of drugs that may cause or exacerbate heart failure to assist healthcare providers in improving the quality of care for these patients.

  5. Causes of failure of the Kinemax Plus total knee replacement in the first five years.

    PubMed

    Davis, C R; Davies, A P; Newman, J H

    2007-03-01

    In order to investigate whether any single batch of polyethylene inserts was responsible for premature failure of total knee replacements (TKR), we performed a retrospective database review of 1133 consecutive primary Kinemax Plus TKR performed by 2 surgical teams between January 1992 and January 2001 at our institution. Cases re-operated in any way within 5 years of the index arthroplasty were identified, case notes studied and radiographs reviewed. The causes contributing to the premature failure of the implants were identified where possible and the polyethylene lot numbers were recorded. Nineteen cases were known to have been revised, 7 cases for deep infection of the prosthesis and 12 for aseptic failure. In 10 cases, an identifiable technical error had contributed to the early failure of the implant. In 4 of these cases, there was inadequate tissue balancing in patients with a significant pre-operative valgus deformity. In 2 cases, the tibial base plate was inserted in a varus mal-alignment. There was one extended tibial component, one internally rotated femoral component, one oversized femoral component and one femoral component with inadequate fixation. Two further cases failed aseptically, one with a fracture of the medial tibial plateau and one idiopathic. The lot numbers of the polyethylene inserts were all different. This study confirms that the premature failure rate of the Kinemax Plus TKR is low. Although a "bad batch" of polyethylene has been suggested as a cause for early failure in TKR, in this series, surgical error was the predominant cause.

  6. Oscillatory behavior of ventricular action potential duration in heart failure patients at respiratory rate and low frequency

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Ben; Child, Nick; Van Duijvenboden, Stefan; Orini, Michele; Chen, Zhong; Coronel, Ruben; Rinaldi, Christopher A.; Gill, Jaspal S.; Gill, Jaswinder S.; Taggart, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Oscillations of arterial pressure occur spontaneously at a frequency of approximately 0.1 Hz coupled with synchronous oscillations of sympathetic nerve activity (“Mayer waves”). This study investigated the extent to which corresponding oscillations may occur in ventricular action potential duration (APD). Fourteen ambulatory (outpatient) heart failure patients with biventricular pacing devices were studied while seated upright watching movie clips to maintain arousal. Activation recovery intervals (ARI) as a measure of ventricular APD were obtained from unipolar electrograms recorded from the LV epicardial pacing lead during steady state RV pacing from the device. Arterial blood pressure was measured non-invasively (Finapress) and respiration monitored. Oscillations were quantified using time frequency and coherence analysis. Oscillatory behavior of ARI at the respiratory frequency was observed in all subjects. The magnitude of the ARI variation ranged from 2.2 to 6.9 ms (mean 5.0 ms). Coherence analysis showed a correlation with respiratory oscillation for an average of 43% of the recording time at a significance level of p < 0.05. Oscillations in systolic blood pressure in the Mayer wave frequency range were observed in all subjects for whom blood pressure was recorded (n = 13). ARI oscillation in the Mayer wave frequency range was observed in 6/13 subjects (46%) over a range of 2.9 to 9.2 ms. Coherence with Mayer waves at the p < 0.05 significance level was present for an average of 29% of the recording time. In ambulatory patients with heart failure during enhanced mental arousal, left ventricular epicardial APD (ARI) oscillated at the respiratory frequency (approximately 0.25 Hz). In 6 patients (46%) APD oscillated at the slower Mayer wave frequency (approximately 0.1 Hz). These findings may be important in understanding sympathetic activity-related arrhythmogenesis. PMID:25389408

  7. Delayed intensive care unit admission is associated with increased mortality in patients with cancer with acute respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Mokart, Djamel; Lambert, Jérôme; Schnell, David; Fouché, Louis; Rabbat, Antoine; Kouatchet, Achille; Lemiale, Virginie; Vincent, François; Lengliné, Etienne; Bruneel, Fabrice; Pene, Frederic; Chevret, Sylvie; Azoulay, Elie

    2013-08-01

    Acute respiratory failure (ARF) is the leading reason for intensive care unit (ICU) admission in patients with cancer. The aim of this study was to identify early predictors of death in patients with cancer admitted to the ICU for ARF who were not intubated at admission. We conducted analysis of a prospective randomized controlled trial including 219 patients with cancer with ARF in which day-28 mortality was a secondary endpoint. Mortality at day 28 was 31.1%. By multivariate analysis, independent predictors of day-28 mortality were: age (odds ratio [OR] 1.30/10 years, 95% confidence interval [CI] [1.01-1.68], p = 0.04), more than one line of chemotherapy (OR 2.14, 95% CI [1.08-4.21], p = 0.03), time between respiratory symptoms onset and ICU admission > 2 days (OR 2.50, 95% CI [1.25-5.02], p = 0.01), oxygen flow at admission (OR 1.07/L, 95% CI [1.00-1.14], p = 0.04) and extra-respiratory symptoms (OR 2.84, 95%CI [1.30-6.21], p = 0.01). After adjustment for the logistic organ dysfunction (LOD) score at admission, only time between respiratory symptoms onset and ICU admission > 2 days and LOD score were independently associated with day-28 mortality. Determinants of death include both factors non-amenable to change, and delay in ARF management. These results suggest that early intensive care management of patients with cancer with ARF may translate to better survival.

  8. Effect of oral beta-blocker on short and long-term mortality in patients with acute respiratory failure: results from the BASEL-II-ICU study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Acute respiratory failure (ARF) is responsible for about one-third of intensive care unit (ICU) admissions and is associated with adverse outcomes. Predictors of short- and long-term outcomes in unselected ICU-patients with ARF are ill-defined. The purpose of this analysis was to determine predictors of in-hospital and one-year mortality and assess the effects of oral beta-blockers in unselected ICU patients with ARF included in the BASEL-II-ICU study. Methods The BASEL II-ICU study was a prospective, multicenter, randomized, single-blinded, controlled trial of 314 (mean age 70 (62 to 79) years) ICU patients with ARF evaluating impact of a B-type natriuretic peptide- (BNP) guided management strategy on short-term outcomes. Results In-hospital mortality was 16% (51 patients) and one-year mortality 41% (128 patients). Multivariate analysis assessed that oral beta-blockers at admission were associated with a lower risk of both in-hospital (HR 0.33 (0.14 to 0.74) P = 0.007) and one-year mortality (HR 0.29 (0.16 to 0.51) P = 0.0003). Kaplan-Meier analysis confirmed the lower mortality in ARF patients when admitted with oral beta-blocker and further shows that the beneficial effect of oral beta-blockers at admission holds true in the two subgroups of patients with ARF related to cardiac or non-cardiac causes. Kaplan-Meier analysis also shows that administration of oral beta-blockers before hospital discharge gives striking additional beneficial effects on one-year mortality. Conclusions Established beta-blocker therapy appears to be associated with a reduced mortality in ICU patients with acute respiratory failure. Cessation of established therapy appears to be hazardous. Initiation of therapy prior to discharge appears to confer benefit. This finding was seen regardless of the cardiac or non-cardiac etiology of respiratory failure. Trial registration clinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00130559 PMID:21047406

  9. Prevalence and susceptibility patterns of bacteria causing respiratory tract infections in North Waziristan, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Shah, Said Nasir; Ullah, Bait; Basit, Abdul; Begum, Asia; Tabassum, Anum; Zafar, Shaista; Saleha, Shamim

    2016-03-01

    Respiratory tract infections (RTIs) are the most common infectious diseases in humans and are the major cause of mortality and morbidity in Pakistan. These infections are the leading causes of consultations in primary care in Pakistan. Therefore, this study was aimed at determining bacterial pathogens of respiratory tract infections and the susceptibility patterns of bacterial isolates to antibiotics. The study was conducted between February, 2013 and March, 2014 in North Waziristan region of Pakistan. Sputum specimens were collected aseptically from 227 patients and cultured on the appropriate bacteriological media. Bacterial isolates were identified by biochemical tests and their antibiotics susceptibility patterns were determined by standard methods. Out of 227, various species of bacteria were isolated from 152 (75%) specimens. The prevalence of bacteria species isolated were as follows Pseudomonas aeruginosa (42.8%), Streptococcus pneumoniae (26.7%), Corynebacterium diphtheria (10.6%), Staphylococcus aureus (5.9%), Proteus vulgaris (4.6%), Micrococcus species (3.3%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (2.6%) and Bacillus species (2.6%). The susceptibility patterns varied among bacterial species depending on the antibiotics. For the susceptibility test 11 commercially available antibiotics against bacterial isolates were used. The results revealed that generally the bacterial isolates were susceptible to gentamicin (80.9%), meropenem (75 %), ceftazidime (62.5%), cefotaxime (57.9%) and ceftriazone (57.9%) and resistant to penicillin (84.9%) and doxycycline (78.9%). The antibiotics gentamicin (100%) meropenem (100%), ceftriaxone (58.5%), ciprofloxacin (60%) trimethoprim (60%), ceftazidime (66.2%) and cefotaxime (64.6%) were observed effective against the P. aeruginosa isolates. The findings of our study provide significant information for empiric therapy of patients with RTIs in North Waziristan region of Pakistan.

  10. Multiple imputation methods for nonparametric inference on cumulative incidence with missing cause of failure

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Minjung; Dignam, James J.; Han, Junhee

    2014-01-01

    We propose a nonparametric approach for cumulative incidence estimation when causes of failure are unknown or missing for some subjects. Under the missing at random assumption, we estimate the cumulative incidence function using multiple imputation methods. We develop asymptotic theory for the cumulative incidence estimators obtained from multiple imputation methods. We also discuss how to construct confidence intervals for the cumulative incidence function and perform a test for comparing the cumulative incidence functions in two samples with missing cause of failure. Through simulation studies, we show that the proposed methods perform well. The methods are illustrated with data from a randomized clinical trial in early stage breast cancer. PMID:25043107

  11. Pulmonary complications of neuromuscular disease: a respiratory mechanics perspective.

    PubMed

    Allen, Julian

    2010-03-01

    Paediatric neuromuscular disease compromises both the gas exchange and pump functions of the respiratory system. This can have profound implications for both growth and development of the respiratory system, as well as morbidity and mortality. Aspiration lung disease is common, and leads to increasingly restrictive pulmonary physiology over time. Abnormal lung and chest wall mechanics, and weak respiratory muscles, can combine to cause respiratory failure. Improving the balance between the work of breathing (by decreasing the respiratory load) and the respiratory pump (by improving respiratory muscle strength and decreasing respiratory muscle fatigue) can help prevent the onset of respiratory failure. Airway clearance techniques and non-invasive ventilation are two important tools in this effort. Better ways of assessing the respiratory pump, mechanical function, control and fatigue are needed especially in children.

  12. Ocular tropism of respiratory viruses.

    PubMed

    Belser, Jessica A; Rota, Paul A; Tumpey, Terrence M

    2013-03-01

    Respiratory viruses (including adenovirus, influenza virus, respiratory syncytial virus, coronavirus, and rhinovirus) cause a broad spectrum of disease in humans, ranging from mild influenza-like symptoms to acute respiratory failure. While species D adenoviruses and subtype H7 influenza viruses are known to possess an ocular tropism, documented human ocular disease has been reported following infection with all principal respiratory viruses. In this review, we describe the anatomical proximity and cellular receptor distribution between ocular and respiratory tissues. All major respiratory viruses and their association with human ocular disease are discussed. Research utilizing in vitro and in vivo models to study the ability of respiratory viruses to use the eye as a portal of entry as well as a primary site of virus replication is highlighted. Identification of shared receptor-binding preferences, host responses, and laboratory modeling protocols among these viruses provides a needed bridge between clinical and laboratory studies of virus tropism.

  13. Report: Identification of root cause failure of piping in a service water system

    SciTech Connect

    Lutey, R.W.; Mason, P.D.

    1994-12-31

    This report deals with studies on the identification of the root cause of piping failures in a service water system, and to develop a proposal for action to prevent further failures. The failures were characterized as pin hole through-wall penetrations associated with butt-welds, restricted to stagnant flow carbon steel piping. Based on extensive tests, inspections and observations the conclusions presented in this report are summarized as follows: (1) the pin hole failures were characterized as root cause, microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC), this conclusion was based upon microbiological, visual, and chemical testing at the as-is site of a recent failure, pipe segments were available for extensive testing and comparison to previous failures; (2) failures were isolated to stagnant sites at points where poor weld penetration provided optimum conditions for MIC to occur; (3) extensive examination of the process flow and intermittent flow sites characterized as high risk areas were made, no evidence of microbiological involvement with corrosion was found, no evidence of any type of significant pitting corrosion was found at these sites; (4) removal and replacement of stagnant line and weld sites was done as a major step in preventing further failures. MIC inoculum, primarily anaerobic microorganisms, was found at many anaerobic and aerobic sites in the system. This suggested that a preventive chemical treatment program would be appropriate to maintain the system at a MIC free status. A monitoring program was suggested to assess on a real-time-basis, the potential for MIC and to monitor the mitigation of MIC.

  14. Diseases causing end-stage renal failure in New South Wales.

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, J H; McCarthy, S W; Storey, B G; Roberts, B A; Gallery, E; Mahony, J F

    1975-01-01

    The nature of the original renal disease was determined in 403 consecutive cases of end-stage renal failure, in 317 of which the clinical diagnosis was corroborated by histological examination of the kidney. Five diseases accounted for 20 or more cases--glomerulonephritis (31% of the total), analgesic nephropathy (29%), primary vesicoureteral reflux (8%), essential hypertension (6%), and polycystic kidneys (5%). In only four cases did renal failure result from chronic pyelonephritis without a demonstrable primary cause. Greater use of micturating cystography and cystoscopy and routine urine testing for salicylate are advocated for earlier diagnosis of the major causes of "pyelonephritis". The incidence of end-stage renal failure in people aged 15-55 in New South Wales was estimated to be at least 34 new cases per million of total population each year. PMID:1090338

  15. Acute forearm compressive myopathy syndrome secondary to upper limb entrapment: an unusual cause of renal failure.

    PubMed

    Tachtsi, Maria D; Kalogirou, Thomas E; Atmatzidis, Stefanos K; Papadimitriou, Dimitrios K; Atmatzidis, Konstantinos S

    2011-05-01

    Compressive myopathy syndrome (SCM) is a syndrome characterized by the lesion of skeletal muscle resulting in subsequent release of intracellular contents (myoglobin, creatine phosphokinase, potassium, etc.) into the circulatory system, which can cause potentially lethal complications. There are numerous causes that can lead to SCM resulting to acute rhabdomyolysis, and many patients present with multiple causes. The most common potentially lethal complication is acute renal failure. The occurrence of acute rhabdomyolysis should be considered as a possibility in any patient who can remain stationary for long periods, or is in a coma, or is intoxicated in any form. We report the rare case of a 26-year-old patient who developed SCM caused by ischemia reperfusion, with subsequent acute rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure after prolonged compression of the right upper extremity.

  16. [Renoprotective effects of statins under the conditions of acute renal failure, caused by rhabdomyolysis].

    PubMed

    Zamorskiĭ, I I; Zeleniuk, V G

    2014-01-01

    The experiment on white rats was targeted at the examination of influence of statins (atorvastatin, lovastatin, simvastatin) under the conditions of acute renal failure, caused by rhabdomyolysis. Renoprotective effects of statins were demonstrated by reduction of hyperazotemia and proteinuria and improvement of renal excretory function, which correlated with antioxidant properties of drugs.

  17. 26 CFR 301.7432-1 - Civil cause of action for failure to release a lien.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., analysis, engineering report, test, or project prepared for a court proceeding; and (D) Fees paid or... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Civil cause of action for failure to release a... TREASURY (CONTINUED) PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION Judicial Proceedings...

  18. 26 CFR 301.7432-1 - Civil cause of action for failure to release a lien.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., analysis, engineering report, test, or project prepared for a court proceeding; and (D) Fees paid or... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Civil cause of action for failure to release a... TREASURY (CONTINUED) PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION Judicial Proceedings...

  19. 26 CFR 301.7432-1 - Civil cause of action for failure to release a lien.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., analysis, engineering report, test, or project prepared for a court proceeding; and (D) Fees paid or... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Civil cause of action for failure to release a... TREASURY (CONTINUED) PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION Judicial Proceedings...

  20. Vertical modelling: Analysis of competing risks data with missing causes of failure.

    PubMed

    Nicolaie, M A; van Houwelingen, H C; Putter, H

    2015-12-01

    We propose vertical modelling as a natural approach to the problem of analysis of competing risks data when failure types are missing for some individuals. Under a natural missing-at-random assumption for these missing failure types, we use the observed data likelihood to estimate its parameters and show that the all-cause hazard and the relative hazards appearing in vertical modelling are indeed key quantities of this likelihood. This fact has practical implications in that it suggests vertical modelling as a simple and attractive method of analysis in competing risks with missing causes of failure; all individuals are used in estimating the all-cause hazard and only those with non-missing cause of failure for relative hazards. The relative hazards also appear in a multiple imputation approach to the same problem proposed by Lu and Tsiatis and in the EM algorithm. We compare the vertical modelling approach with the method of Goetghebeur and Ryan for a breast cancer data set, highlighting the different aspects they contribute to the data analysis.

  1. Risk Factors for Respiratory Failure Following Operative Stabilization of Thoracic and Lumbar Spine Fractures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-01

    A CI C A N D LUM BA R SP I N E FR A CT U RE S severity score, neurological injury, and level of spinal injury. In- dividuals who had undergone...scores for the head and neck, face, chest, abdo - men, extremities, and external; GCS on initial evaluation in the emergency department; comorbidities...BA R SP I N E FR A CT U RE S patients in the resulting patient cohort. Patients diagnosed with either acute lung injury or adult respiratory distress

  2. Avian influenza A (H5N1) infection with respiratory failure and meningoencephalitis in a Canadian traveller.

    PubMed

    Rajabali, Naheed; Lim, Thomas; Sokolowski, Colleen; Prevost, Jason D; Lee, Edward Z

    2015-01-01

    In an urban centre in Alberta, an otherwise healthy 28-year-old woman presented to hospital with pleuritic chest and abdominal pain after returning from Beijing, China. After several days, this was followed by headache, confusion and, ultimately, respiratory failure, coma and death. Microbiology yielded influenza A subtype H5N1 from various body sites and neuroimaging was consistent with meningoencephalitis. While H5N1 infections in humans have been reported in Asia since 1997, this is the first documented case of H5N1 influenza in the Western Hemisphere. The present case demonstrated the typical manifestation of H5N1 influenza but, for the first time, also confirmed previous suggestions from human and animal studies that H5N1 is neurotropic and can manifest with neurological symptoms and meningoencephalitis.

  3. Acute Respiratory Failure Induced by Magnesium Replacement in a 62-Year-Old Woman with Myasthenia Gravis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Paramveer; Idowu, Olakunle; Malik, Imrana; Nates, Joseph L

    2015-10-01

    Magnesium is known to act at the neuromuscular junction by inhibiting the presynaptic release of acetylcholine and desensitizing the postsynaptic membrane. Because of these effects, magnesium has been postulated to potentiate neuromuscular weakness. We describe the case of a 62-year-old woman with myasthenia gravis and a metastatic thymoma who was admitted to our intensive care unit for management of a myasthenic crisis. The patient's neuromuscular weakness worsened in association with standard intravenous magnesium replacement, and the exacerbated respiratory failure necessitated intubation, mechanical ventilation, and an extended stay in the intensive care unit. The effect of magnesium replacement on myasthenia gravis patients has not been well documented, and we present this case to increase awareness and stimulate research. In addition, we discuss the relevant medical literature.

  4. Severe respiratory failure as a presenting feature of an interstitial lung disease associated with anti-synthetase syndrome (ASS).

    PubMed

    Piroddi, Ines Maria Grazia; Ferraioli, Gianluca; Barlascini, Cornelius; Castagneto, Corrado; Nicolini, Antonello

    2016-07-01

    Anti-synthetase syndrome (ASS) is defined as a heterogeneous connective tissue disorder characterized by the association of an interstitial lung disease (ILD) with or without inflammatory myositis with the presence of anti-aminoacyl-tRNA-synthetase antibodies. ILD is one of the major extra-muscular manifestations of polymyositis and dermatomyositis. We report a case of a patient with dyspnea, cough, and intermittent fever as well as ILD associated ASS in the absence of muscular involvement. This patient was admitted to the emergency department with severe respiratory failure requiring non-invasive ventilation. Our patient's case demonstrates that the diagnosis of ASS may not be obvious. However, its diagnosis leads to appropriate and potentially life-saving treatment.

  5. The fetal circulation, pathophysiology of hypoxemic respiratory failure and pulmonary hypertension in neonates, and the role of oxygen therapy.

    PubMed

    Lakshminrusimha, S; Saugstad, O D

    2016-06-01

    Neonatal hypoxemic respiratory failure (HRF), a deficiency of oxygenation associated with insufficient ventilation, can occur due to a variety of etiologies. HRF can result when pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) fails to decrease at birth, leading to persistent pulmonary hypertension of newborn (PPHN), or as a result of various lung disorders including congenital abnormalities such as diaphragmatic hernia, and disorders of transition such as respiratory distress syndrome, transient tachypnea of newborn and perinatal asphyxia. PVR changes throughout fetal life, evident by the dynamic changes in pulmonary blood flow at different gestational ages. Pulmonary vascular transition at birth requires an interplay between multiple vasoactive mediators such as nitric oxide, which can be potentially inactivated by superoxide anions. Superoxide anions have a key role in the pathophysiology of HRF. Oxygen (O2) therapy, used in newborns long before our knowledge of the complex nature of HRF and PPHN, has continued to evolve. Over time has come the discovery that too much O2 can be toxic. Recommendations on the optimal inspired O2 levels to initiate resuscitation in term newborns have ranged from 100% (pre 1998) to the currently recommended use of room air (21%). Questions remain about the most effective levels, particularly in preterm and low birth weight newborns. Attaining the appropriate balance between hypoxemia and hyperoxemia, and targeting treatments to the pathophysiology of HRF in each individual newborn are critical factors in the development of improved therapies to optimize outcomes.

  6. New insights on the viral and host factors contributing to the airway pathogenesis caused by the respiratory syncytial virus.

    PubMed

    Lay, Margarita K; Bueno, Susan M; Gálvez, Nicolás; Riedel, Claudia A; Kalergis, Alexis M

    2016-09-01

    The respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most prevalent etiological agent of lower respiratory tract infections and the first cause of hospitalization in infants due to respiratory disease worldwide. However, efforts to develop safe and effective vaccines and antivirals have been challenged by an incomplete understanding of the RSV pathogenesis and the host immune response to RSV infection in the airways. Here, we discuss recent advances in understanding the interaction between RSV and the epithelium to induce pathogenesis in the airways, such as the role of the RSV NS2 protein in the airway epithelium, as well as the events involved in the RSV entry process. In addition, we summarize the cellular factors produced by airway epithelial cells (AECs) in response to RSV infection that lead to the activation of innate and adaptive immune responses, inducing lung inflammation and disease. Further, we discuss the possible contribution of a recently identified cytokine, thymic stromal lymphopoitein (TSLP), in the lung immunopathology caused by RSV.

  7. Supine changes in lung function correlate with chronic respiratory failure in myotonic dystrophy patients.

    PubMed

    Poussel, Mathias; Kaminsky, Pierre; Renaud, Pierre; Laroppe, Julien; Pruna, Lelia; Chenuel, Bruno

    2014-03-01

    Quality of life and prognosis of patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1 (MD1) often depend on the degree of lung function impairment. This study was designed to assess the respective prevalence of ventilatory restriction, hypoxaemia and hypercapnia in MD1 patients and to determine whether postural changes in lung function could contribute to the early diagnosis of poor respiratory outcome. Fifty-eight patients (42.6±12.9 years) with MD1 were prospectively evaluated from April 2008 to June 2010 to determine their supine and upright lung function and arterial blood gases. The prevalence of ventilatory restriction was 36% and increased with the severity of muscular disability (from 7.7% to 70.6%). The prevalence of hypoxaemia and hypercapnia was 37.9% and 25.9%, respectively. Multiple regression analysis showed that the supine fall in FEV1 was the only variable associated with ventilatory restriction, hypoxaemia and hypercapnia. Our data indicate that supine evaluation of lung function could be helpful to predict poor respiratory outcome, which is closely correlated with hypoxaemia and/or hypercapnia.

  8. "Functional" Respiratory Muscle Training During Endurance Exercise Causes Modest Hypoxemia but Overall is Well Tolerated.

    PubMed

    Granados, Jorge; Gillum, Trevor L; Castillo, Weston; Christmas, Kevin M; Kuennen, Matthew R

    2016-03-01

    A novel commercial training mask purportedly allows for combined respiratory muscle training and altitude exposure during exercise. We examined the mask's ability to deliver on this claim. Ten men completed three bouts of treadmill exercise at a matched workload (60%VO2peak) in a controlled laboratory environment. During exercise, the mask was worn in 2 manufacturer-defined settings (9,000 ft [9K] and 15,000 ft [15K]) and a Sham configuration (∼3,500 ft). Ventilation (V(E)), tidal volume (V(T)), respiratory rate (R(R)), expired oxygen (F(E)O2) and carbon dioxide (F(E)CO2), peripheral oxygen saturation (S(P)O2), heart rate, and RPE were measured each minute during exercise, and subjects completed the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) immediately after. The mask caused a reduction in V(E) of ∼20 L/min in both the 9K and 15K configurations (p < 0.001). This was due to a reduction in R(R) of ∼10 b·min, but not V(T), which was elevated by ∼250 ml (p < 0.001). F(E)O2 was reduced and F(E)CO2 was elevated above Sham in both 9K and 15K (p < 0.001). VO2 was not different across conditions (p = 0.210), but VCO2 trended lower at 9K (p = 0.093) and was reduced at 15K (p = 0.016). V(E)/VO2 was 18.3% lower than Sham at 9K and 19.2% lower at 15K. V(E)/VCO2 was 16.2% lower than Sham at 9K and 18.8% lower at 15K (all p < 0.001). Heart rate increased with exercise (p < 0.001) but was not different among conditions (p = 0.285). S(P)O2 averaged 94% in Sham, 91% at 9K, and 89% at 15K (p < 0.001). RPE and BAI were also higher in 9K and 15K (p < 0.010), but there was no difference among mask conditions. The training mask caused inadequate hyperventilation that led to arterial hypoxemia and psychological discomfort, but the magnitude of these responses were small and they did not vary across mask configurations.

  9. Management and Outcomes of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Caused by Blastomycosis

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Ilan S.; Embil, John M.; Sharma, Atul; Goulet, Stephen; Light, R. Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is an uncommon, highly fatal, and poorly understood manifestation of blastomycosis. Optimal management remains unknown, including the roles of adjunctive corticosteroids and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). We conducted a retrospective chart review of patients with ARDS caused by blastomycosis, managed in intensive care units in Manitoba, Canada, from 1992 to 2014. ARDS was defined using the Berlin definition. Corticosteroid therapy was defined as ≥150 mg cortisol equivalent in 24 hours. Logistic regression was used to identify determinants of a fatal outcome, and bootstrap resampling was used to assess sample size requirements. Forty-three patients with ARDS caused by blastomycosis were identified. ARDS was mild, moderate, and severe in 2 (5%), 12 (28%), and 29 (67%) patients, respectively. Management included amphotericin B (n = 42, 98%), vasopressors (n = 36, 84%), corticosteroids (n = 22, 51%), renal replacement (n = 13, 30%), and ECMO (n = 4, 11%). Seventeen patients (40%) died. All patients treated with ECMO survived (P = 0.14). Corticosteroids were not associated with survival benefit in univariate (P = 0.43) or multivariate analyses (odds ratio 0.52, 95% confidence interval 0.11–2.34). Bootstrap studies indicated that almost 500 patients would be needed to confirm a significant reduction in mortality from corticosteroids (type I error = 0.05, power = 80%). Blastomycosis is an uncommon, albeit important, cause of ARDS in this geographic area. Given the rarity of disease and the large cohort needed to demonstrate mortality benefit, the role of adjunctive therapies, including corticosteroids and ECMO, may remain unconfirmed, and clinical judgment should guide management decisions. PMID:27149459

  10. Management and Outcomes of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Caused by Blastomycosis: A Retrospective Case Series.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Ilan S; Embil, John M; Sharma, Atul; Goulet, Stephen; Light, R Bruce

    2016-05-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is an uncommon, highly fatal, and poorly understood manifestation of blastomycosis. Optimal management remains unknown, including the roles of adjunctive corticosteroids and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO).We conducted a retrospective chart review of patients with ARDS caused by blastomycosis, managed in intensive care units in Manitoba, Canada, from 1992 to 2014. ARDS was defined using the Berlin definition. Corticosteroid therapy was defined as ≥150 mg cortisol equivalent in 24 hours. Logistic regression was used to identify determinants of a fatal outcome, and bootstrap resampling was used to assess sample size requirements.Forty-three patients with ARDS caused by blastomycosis were identified. ARDS was mild, moderate, and severe in 2 (5%), 12 (28%), and 29 (67%) patients, respectively. Management included amphotericin B (n = 42, 98%), vasopressors (n = 36, 84%), corticosteroids (n = 22, 51%), renal replacement (n = 13, 30%), and ECMO (n = 4, 11%). Seventeen patients (40%) died. All patients treated with ECMO survived (P = 0.14). Corticosteroids were not associated with survival benefit in univariate (P = 0.43) or multivariate analyses (odds ratio 0.52, 95% confidence interval 0.11-2.34). Bootstrap studies indicated that almost 500 patients would be needed to confirm a significant reduction in mortality from corticosteroids (type I error = 0.05, power = 80%).Blastomycosis is an uncommon, albeit important, cause of ARDS in this geographic area. Given the rarity of disease and the large cohort needed to demonstrate mortality benefit, the role of adjunctive therapies, including corticosteroids and ECMO, may remain unconfirmed, and clinical judgment should guide management decisions.

  11. Extreme windkessel effect can cause right heart failure early after truncus repair.

    PubMed

    Vanagt, Ward Y; Famaey, Nele; Rega, Filip; Gewillig, Marc

    2012-07-01

    An infant developed severe right heart failure early after truncal repair with a pulmonary homograft. A mechanical obstruction by narrowing could not be identified at the homograft or pulmonary arteries. However, functional obstruction was caused by an extreme windkessel effect in a massively dilated homograft that absorbed rather than transmitted the pulse wave. Effective treatment consisted of replacing the dilated homograft by a rigid aortic homograft of equal size as the initial homograft. When confronted with circulatory failure after allograft placement, the clinician should not only look for obstruction by narrowing, but also consider the windkessel phenomenon.

  12. [Reflux and obstructive nephropathy as a cause of renal failure in chronic dialysis children].

    PubMed

    Kałuzyńska, Anna; Jander, Anna; Puczko-Nogal, Barbara; Nowicki, Michał

    2008-01-01

    We carried out a retrospective analysis of medical files to evaluate causes of chronic renal failure in 80 children (M--49, F--31), age 1 month to 20 years) who started renal replacement therapy in the Department of Nephrology and Dialysis of the Polish Mothers Memorial Hospital in the years 1990-2007. In 28 children (35%) reflux and obstructive nephropathy was a cause of renal failure. In 5 children the disease was secondary to the neurogenic bladder. The incidence of these nephropathies in our population was constant in the analyzed years. In our group there were 2 neonates and 7 adolescent who were diagnosed with nephropathy as late as in the endstage phase. Boys with posterior urethral valve required renal replacement therapy earlier (146 +/- 55 months). We conclude that obstructive and reflux nephropathy are still the essential cause of end stage renal disease in children.

  13. A Case of Fetal Parvovirus B19 Myocarditis That Caused Terminal Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Parvovirus B19 is a well-established cause of fetal anemia and nonimmune fetal hydrops in pregnancy. Fetal parvovirus infection can cause severe destruction of erythroid progenitor cells, resulting in fetal anemia, hydrops, and intrauterine death. However, viral myocarditis with subsequent heart failure is another possible mechanism for hydrops formation as viral infection of fetal myocardial cells has been reported in postmortem examinations. We herein report a case of fetal cardiomegaly and massive pericardial effusion secondary to myocarditis as a result of parvovirus B19 infection. The case developed hydrops as consequence of severe anemia and experienced terminal heart failure, which led to the fetus dying an intrauterine death at 22 weeks of gestation. This case demonstrates that there may be an association between myocarditis caused by intrauterine parvovirus B19 infection and a poor outcome. The presence of viral myocarditis may be the determining prognostic factor in that situation. PMID:25328731

  14. A robust Bayesian approach to modeling epistemic uncertainty in common-cause failure models

    SciTech Connect

    Matthias C. M. Troffaes; Gero Walter; Dana Kelly

    2014-05-01

    In a standard Bayesian approach to the alpha-factor model for common-cause failure, a precise Dirichlet prior distribution models epistemic uncertainty in the alpha-factors. This Dirichlet prior is then updated with observed data to obtain a posterior distribution, which forms the basis for further inferences. In this paper, we adapt the imprecise Dirichlet model of Walley to represent epistemic uncertainty in the alpha-factors. In this approach, epistemic uncertainty is expressed more cautiously via lower and upper expectations for each alpha-factor, along with a learning parameter which determines how quickly the model learns from observed data. For this application, we focus on elicitation of the learning parameter, and find that values in the range of 1 to 10 seem reasonable. The approach is compared with Kelly and Atwood's minimally informative Dirichlet prior for the alpha-factor model, which incorporated precise mean values for the alpha-factors, but which was otherwise quite diffuse. Next, we explore the use of a set of Gamma priors to model epistemic uncertainty in the marginal failure rate, expressed via a lower and upper expectation for this rate, again along with a learning parameter. As zero counts are generally less of an issue here, we find that the choice of this learning parameter is less crucial. Finally, we demonstrate how both epistemic uncertainty models can be combined to arrive at lower and upper expectations for all common-cause failure rates. Thereby, we effectively provide a full sensitivity analysis of common-cause failure rates, properly reflecting epistemic uncertainty of the analyst on all levels of the common-cause failure model.

  15. Research on curative effect of traditional Chinese medicine treating low-grade fever of children caused by respiratory system infection.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiangyun

    2015-07-01

    This study aims to explore the curative effect of traditional Chinese medicine treating low-grade fever of children caused by respiratory system infection. Sixty children who suffered low-grade fever caused by respiratory system infection were selected and divided into treatment group and control group randomly, each with 30 cases. Control group was treated with conventional methods including oxygen uptake, nebulization and anti-infection, etc, while treatment group was given boil-free granules of traditional Chinese medicine besides the treatment which control group received. Then clinical curative effect of two groups was compared. Results showed that 28 cases (93.3%) were cured in treatment group; while 21 cases (70.0%) were cured in control group. Compared with control group, the treatment group showed up better treatment efficiency and the difference between groups was of statistical significance (P<0.05). Comparison of results of two groups suggested that, traditional Chinese medicine granules has satisfactory curative effect in the treatment of low-grade fever of children caused by respiratory system infection; characterized by short treatment cycle and effective treatment effect, Chinese medicine granules in the combination with oxygen atomization inhalation is proved to be able to efficiently remit symptoms such as coughing, gasp and labored breathing, with outstanding curative effect in the treatment of low-grade fever of children caused by respiratory system infection, thus it is worthy of popularization and application clinically.

  16. An Elderly Man with Fatal Respiratory Failure after Eating a Poisonous Mushroom Podostroma cornu-damae.

    PubMed

    Jang, Juah; Kim, Cheol-Hong; Yoo, Jun Jae; Kim, Mi Kang; Lee, Jae Eun; Lim, Ah Leum; Choi, Jeong-Hee; Hyun, In Gyu; Shim, Jung Weon; Shin, Ho-Seung; Han, Joungho; Seok, Soon Ja

    2013-12-01

    A 73-year-old, previously healthy man presented with nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, dry mouth and febrile sensation 3 hours after eating boiled wild mushrooms. After admission, he showed progressive severe respiratory distress, pancytopenia, azotemia, hypotension, hypoxemia and consolidation of the entire left lung on chest radiography. With a preliminary diagnosis of necrotizing pneumonia, he underwent left pneumonectomy in order to remove all necrotic lung tissue. Lung histology showed extensive hemorrhagic necrosis, massive inflammatory cell infiltration, prominent proliferation of young fibroblasts and the formation of an early-stage hyaline membrane along the alveolar wall. Despite aggressive treatment, including mechanical ventilation, continuous renal replacement therapy and administration of granulocyte colony stimulating factor and broad spectrum antibiotics, he died on hospitalization day 13. Subsequently, the mushroom was identified as Podostroma cornu-damae. This is the first case of a histological evidence of lung involvement by Podostroma cornu-damae poisoning in Korea.

  17. Rigid bronchoscopic management of acute respiratory failure in a 30-year-old woman

    PubMed Central

    Madan, Karan; Dhungana, Ashesh; Madan, Neha Kawatra; Mohan, Anant; Hadda, Vijay; Garg, Rakesh; Jain, Deepali; Guleria, Randeep

    2016-01-01

    A 30-year-old woman presented with a history of progressive shortness of breath, cough, and hoarseness. Stridor was audible on examination. Chest X-ray showed normal lung fields and contrast-enhanced computed tomography thorax showed lower tracheal occlusion with endoluminal growth. Diagnostic flexible bronchoscopy demonstrated multiple whitish glistening nodules over both vocal cords and lower tracheal occlusion by whitish nodular growth. In view of critical central airway obstruction, rigid bronchoscopy and excision of the lower tracheal growth were performed. Histopathological examination of the excised specimen demonstrated features of squamous papillomas. A diagnosis of respiratory papillomatosis was established. On follow-up surveillance bronchoscopy, there was a gradual spontaneous regression of the residual lesions, and the patient remains currently asymptomatic 1 year since the procedure. PMID:27891001

  18. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation as a rescue therapy for acute respiratory failure during chemotherapy in a patient with acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Won; Kim, Youn Seup

    2017-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) caused by pneumonia in patients with hematologic malignancies can be life-threatening. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is the only temporary treatment for patients with ARDS who are refractory to conventional treatment. However, the immunosuppression and coagulopathies in hematological malignancies such as lymphoma and acute leukemia are relative contraindications for ECMO, due to high risks of infection and bleeding. Here, we report a 22-year-old man with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) who developed pneumonia and ARDS during induction chemotherapy; he was treated with ECMO. PMID:28275497

  19. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation as a rescue therapy for acute respiratory failure during chemotherapy in a patient with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Won; Kim, Youn Seup; Hong, Goohyeon

    2017-02-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) caused by pneumonia in patients with hematologic malignancies can be life-threatening. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is the only temporary treatment for patients with ARDS who are refractory to conventional treatment. However, the immunosuppression and coagulopathies in hematological malignancies such as lymphoma and acute leukemia are relative contraindications for ECMO, due to high risks of infection and bleeding. Here, we report a 22-year-old man with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) who developed pneumonia and ARDS during induction chemotherapy; he was treated with ECMO.

  20. Spontaneous Bacterial Peritonitis and Anasarca in a Female Patient with Ovarian Hyperstimulation Syndrome Complicated by Respiratory and Kidney Failure

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Muhammad Abdul Mabood; Ghazni, Muhammad Salman; Tan, Jackson; Naseer, Nazish; Khalil, Muhammad Ashhad Ullah

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) was first described in 1960. It may occur as a complication of gonadotropin hormone therapy during assisted pregnancy or for primary infertility. A 26-year-old female patient with polycystic ovarian syndrome and primary infertility was treated to conceive. She received intravenous gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) along with follicle-stimulating hormone in an outside private clinic. She presented to the emergency department with abdominal and chest pain, loose stool, vomiting, shortness of breath and decreasing urine output. She was found to have edema, ascites, effusion and acute kidney injury (AKI). Considering the symptoms preceding the drug history and anasarca, a diagnosis of severe OHSS was made. Ascites was further complicated by spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP), which had already been reported before. We speculate that low immunity due to decreased immunoglobulin in patients with OHSS makes them prone to SBP. In our case, septicemia secondary to SBP and fluid loss due to capillary leakage from OHSS resulted in AKI and respiratory failure. This critically ill patient was treated in a special care unit, and she fully recovered with supportive measures. Severe OHSS may present as anasarca including ascites which can develop SBP leading to sepsis and multiorgan failure. PMID:27721728

  1. Effect of liver cirrhosis on long-term outcomes after acute respiratory failure: A population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Chih-Cheng; Ho, Chung-Han; Cheng, Kuo-Chen; Chao, Chien-Ming; Chen, Chin-Ming; Chou, Willy

    2017-01-01

    AIM To assessed the effect of liver cirrhosis (LC) on the poorly understood long-term mortality risk after first-ever mechanical ventilation (1-MV) for acute respiratory failure. METHODS All patients in Taiwan given a 1-MV between 1997 and 2013 were identified in Taiwan’s Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2000. Each patient with LC was individually matched, using a propensity-score method, to two patients without LC. The primary outcome was death after a 1-MV. RESULTS A total of 16653 patients were enrolled: 5551 LC-positive (LC[Pos]) patients, including 1732 with cryptogenic LCs and 11102 LC-negative (LC[Neg]) controls. LC[Pos] patients had more organ failures and were more likely to be admitted to medical department than were LC[Neg] controls. LC[Pos] patients had a significantly lower survival rate (AHR = 1.38, 95%CI: 1.32-1.44). Moreover, the mortality risk was significantly higher for patients with non-cryptogenic LC than for patients with cryptogenic LC (AHR = 1.43, 95%CI: 1.32-1.54) and patients without LC (AHR = 1.56, 95%CI: 1.32-1.54). However, there was no significant difference between patients with cryptogenic and without LC (HR = 1.05, 95%CI: 0.98-1.12). CONCLUSION LC, especially non-cryptogenic LC, significantly increases the risk of death after a 1-MV.

  2. Respiratory allergy caused by house dust mites: What do we really know?

    PubMed

    Calderón, Moisés A; Linneberg, Allan; Kleine-Tebbe, Jörg; De Blay, Frédéric; Hernandez Fernandez de Rojas, Dolores; Virchow, Johann Christian; Demoly, Pascal

    2015-07-01

    The house dust mite (HDM) is a major perennial allergen source and a significant cause of allergic rhinitis and allergic asthma. However, awareness of the condition remains generally low. This review assesses the links between exposure to HDM, development of the allergic response, and pathologic consequences in patients with respiratory allergic diseases. We investigate the epidemiology of HDM allergy to explore the interaction between mites and human subjects at the population, individual, and molecular levels. Core and recent publications were identified by using "house dust mite" as a key search term to evaluate the current knowledge of HDM epidemiology and pathophysiology. Prevalence data for HDM allergen sensitization vary from 65 to 130 million persons in the general population worldwide to as many as 50% among asthmatic patients. Heterogeneity of populations, terminology, and end points in the literature confound estimates, indicating the need for greater standardization in epidemiologic research. Exposure to allergens depends on multiple ecological strata, including climate and mite microhabitats within the domestic environment, with the latter providing opportunity for intervention measures to reduce allergen load. Inhaled mite aeroallergens are unusually virulent: they are able to activate both the adaptive and innate immune responses, potentially offering new avenues for intervention. The role of HDM allergens is crucial in the development of allergic rhinitis and asthma, but the translation of silent sensitization into symptomatic disease is still incompletely understood. Improved understanding of HDMs, their allergens, and their microhabitats will enable development of more effective outcomes for patients with HDM allergy.

  3. FRET-based detection and genotyping of HPV-6 and HPV-11 causing recurrent respiratory papillomatosis.

    PubMed

    Combrinck, Catharina E; Seedat, Riaz Y; Burt, Felicity J

    2013-05-01

    Recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP) is a potentially life-threatening disease caused by human papillomavirus (HPV), usually HPV types 6 and 11. The conventional method used for detection and typing the RRP isolates in our laboratory is the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA sequencing method. A real-time PCR assay based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) probe technology was developed for the detection and rapid genotyping of HPV-6 and-11 isolates from biopsy material. The primers and probes were designed using multiple alignments of HPV-6 and HPV-11 partial E6 and E7 sequences that included prototypic and non-prototypic variants. Real-time PCR followed by probe-specific melting-curve analysis allowed differentiation of HPV-6 and HPV-11. HPV-6 and HPV-11 amplicons were used to determine detection limits and inter- and intra-assay variability. The detection limit of the assay was 12.8 DNA copies for HPV-6 and 22.5 DNA copies for HPV-11. A total of 60 isolates were genotyped using the FRET real-time PCR assay and a 100% concordance was obtained when results were compared with genotyping based on conventional DNA sequencing. The real-time PCR assay based on FRET technology was able to detect and rapidly genotype HPV from tissue biopsy obtained from patients with RRP. The assay reduces the time required for genotyping from three working days to less than a day.

  4. Association between NOx exposure and deaths caused by respiratory diseases in a medium-sized Brazilian city

    PubMed Central

    César, A. C. G.; Carvalho, J. A.; Nascimento, L. F. C.

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to nitrogen oxides (NOx) emitted by burning fossil fuels has been associated with respiratory diseases. We aimed to estimate the effects of NOx exposure on mortality owing to respiratory diseases in residents of Taubaté, São Paulo, Brazil, of all ages and both sexes. This time-series ecological study from August 1, 2011 to July 31, 2012 used information on deaths caused by respiratory diseases obtained from the Health Department of Taubaté. Estimated daily levels of pollutants (NOx, particulate matter, ozone, carbon monoxide) were obtained from the Centro de Previsão de Tempo e Estudos Climáticos Coupled Aerosol and Tracer Transport model to the Brazilian developments on the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System. These environmental variables were used to adjust the multipollutant model for apparent temperature. To estimate association between hospitalizations owing to asthma and air pollutants, generalized additive Poisson regression models were developed, with lags as much as 5 days. There were 385 deaths with a daily mean (±SD) of 1.05±1.03 (range: 0-5). Exposure to NOx was significantly associated with mortality owing to respiratory diseases: relative risk (RR)=1.035 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.008-1.063) for lag 2, RR=1.064 (95%CI: 1.017-1.112) lag 3, RR=1.055 (95%CI: 1.025-1.085) lag 4, and RR=1.042 (95%CI: 1.010-1.076) lag 5. A 3 µg/m3 reduction in NOx concentration resulted in a decrease of 10-18 percentage points in risk of death caused by respiratory diseases. Even at NOx concentrations below the acceptable standard, there is association with deaths caused by respiratory diseases. PMID:26421866

  5. Nutritional Risk Screening 2002 as a Predictor of Outcome During General Ward-Based Noninvasive Ventilation in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease with Respiratory Failure

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Jinbo; Wan, Qunfang; Wu, Xiaoling; Zeng, Yihua; Jiang, Li; Ao, Dongmei; Wang, Feng; Chen, Ting; Li, Yanli

    2015-01-01

    Background Noninvasive ventilation (NIV) may reduce the need for intubation and mortality associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) with type II respiratory failure. Early and simple predictors of NIV outcome could improve clinical management. This study aimed to assess whether nutritional risk screening 2002 (NRS2002) is a useful outcome predictor in COPD patients with type II respiratory failure treated by noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV). Material/Methods This prospective observational study enrolled COPD patients with type II respiratory failure who accepted NIPPV. Patients were submitted to NRS2002 evaluation upon admission. Biochemical tests were performed the next day and blood gas analysis was carried out prior to NIPPV treatment and 4 hours thereafter. Patients were divided into NRS2002 score ≥3 and NRS2002 score <3 groups and NIV failure rates were compared between both groups. Results Of the 233 patients, 71 (30.5%) were not successfully treated by NIPPV. The failure rate was significantly higher in the NRS2002 score ≥3 group (35.23%) in comparison with patients with NRS2002 score <3 (15.79%) (p<0.05). Multivariate analysis indicated that PaCO2 (OR 1.25, 95%CI 1.172–1.671, p<0.05) prior to NIPPV treatment and NRS2002 score ≥3 (OR 1.76, 95%CI 1.303–2.374, p<0.05) were independent predictive factors for NIPPV treatment failure. Conclusions NRS2002 score ≥3 and PaCO2 values at admission may predict unsuccessful NIPPV treatment of COPD patients with type II respiratory failure and help to adjust therapeutic strategies. NRS2002 is a noninvasive and simple method for predicting NIPPV treatment outcome. PMID:26386778

  6. NASA's Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) Power Processing Unit (PPU) Capacitor Failure Root Cause Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soeder, James F.; Pinero, Luis; Schneidegger, Robert; Dunning, John; Birchenough, Art

    2012-01-01

    The NASA's Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) project is developing an advanced ion propulsion system for future NASA missions for solar system exploration. A critical element of the propulsion system is the Power Processing Unit (PPU) which supplies regulated power to the key components of the thruster. The PPU contains six different power supplies including the beam, discharge, discharge heater, neutralizer, neutralizer heater, and accelerator supplies. The beam supply is the largest and processes up to 93+% of the power. The NEXT PPU had been operated for approximately 200+ hours and has experienced a series of three capacitor failures in the beam supply. The capacitors are in the same, nominally non-critical location the input filter capacitor to a full wave switching inverter. The three failures occurred after about 20, 30, and 135 hours of operation. This paper provides background on the NEXT PPU and the capacitor failures. It discusses the failure investigation approach, the beam supply power switching topology and its operating modes, capacitor characteristics and circuit testing. Finally, it identifies root cause of the failures to be the unusual confluence of circuit switching frequency, the physical layout of the power circuits, and the characteristics of the capacitor.

  7. NASA's Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) Power Processing Unit (PPU) Capacitor Failure Root Cause Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soeder, James F.; Scheidegger, Robert J.; Pinero, Luis R.; Birchenough, Arthur J.; Dunning, John W.

    2012-01-01

    The NASA s Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) project is developing an advanced ion propulsion system for future NASA missions for solar system exploration. A critical element of the propulsion system is the Power Processing Unit (PPU) which supplies regulated power to the key components of the thruster. The PPU contains six different power supplies including the beam, discharge, discharge heater, neutralizer, neutralizer heater, and accelerator supplies. The beam supply is the largest and processes up to 93+% of the power. The NEXT PPU had been operated for approximately 200+ hr and has experienced a series of three capacitor failures in the beam supply. The capacitors are in the same, nominally non-critical location-the input filter capacitor to a full wave switching inverter. The three failures occurred after about 20, 30, and 135 hr of operation. This paper provides background on the NEXT PPU and the capacitor failures. It discusses the failure investigation approach, the beam supply power switching topology and its operating modes, capacitor characteristics and circuit testing. Finally, it identifies root cause of the failures to be the unusual confluence of circuit switching frequency, the physical layout of the power circuits, and the characteristics of the capacitor.

  8. Causes of Failure of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction and Revision Surgical Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Di Benedetto, Paolo; Di Benedetto, Enrico; Fiocchi, Andrea; Beltrame, Alessandro; Causero, Araldo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Long-term outcomes of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction are good or excellent; however, 0.7%–20% of patients suffer from recurrent instability due to graft failure. The purpose of this paper was to analyse failure aetiology and the possibilities of revision surgical strategies, with a description of our experience. We obtained optimal and good results in most of our patients. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed 42 patients who underwent revision surgery (43 revisions) due to relapsing instability after ACL reconstruction between 2006 and 2015. We used allografts in 39 cases and autografts in 4 cases. Results The 85.7% of the patients obtained optimal results (normal knee; group A) and the 7.2% obtained good results (nearly normal knee; group B) according to the International Knee Documentation Committee score. The most frequent failure causes were traumatic events, non-anatomic tunnel placement, and lack of graft incorporation. Conclusions A correct revision surgery requires accurate patient evaluation and knee imaging. Preoperative planning starts with the identification of the cause of failure of the primary reconstruction. Then, the most suitable procedure should be determined for each case. It is also important to accurately inform the patient of all the complexity of an ACL revision surgery even if it is a procedure with high rates of excellent and good outcomes. PMID:27894180

  9. Spatiotemporal analysis for the effect of ambient particulate matter on cause-specific respiratory mortality in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuying; Guo, Yuming; Li, Guoxing; Zhang, Yajuan; Westerdahl, Dane; Jin, Xiaobin; Pan, Xiaochuan; Chen, Liangfu

    2016-06-01

    This study explored the association between particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter of less than 10 μm (PM10) and the cause-specific respiratory mortality. We used the ordinary kriging method to estimate the spatial characteristics of ambient PM10 at 1-km × 1-km resolution across Beijing during 2008-2009 and subsequently fit the exposure-response relationship between the estimated PM10 and the mortality due to total respiratory disease, chronic lower respiratory disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and pneumonia at the street or township area levels using the generalized additive mixed model (GAMM). We also examined the effects of age, gender, and season in the stratified analysis. The effects of ambient PM10 on the cause-specific respiratory mortality were the strongest at lag0-5 except for pneumonia, and an inter-quantile range increase in PM10 was associated with an 8.04 % (95 % CI 4.00, 12.63) increase in mortality for total respiratory disease, a 6.63 % (95 % CI 1.65, 11.86) increase for chronic lower respiratory disease, and a 5.68 % (95 % CI 0.54, 11.09) increase for COPD, respectively. Higher risks due to the PM10 exposure were observed for females and elderly individuals. Seasonal stratification analysis showed that the effects of PM10 on mortality due to pneumonia were stronger during spring and autumn. While for COPD, the effect of PM10 in winter was statistically significant (15.54 %, 95 % CI 5.64, 26.35) and the greatest among the seasons. The GAMM model evaluated stronger associations between concentration of PM10. There were significant associations between PM10 and mortality due to respiratory disease at the street or township area levels. The GAMM model using high-resolution PM10 could better capture the association between PM10 and respiratory mortality. Gender, age, and season also acted as effect modifiers for the relationship between PM10 and respiratory mortality.

  10. Questioning the Role of Requirements Engineering in the Causes of Safety-Critical Software Failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C. W.; Holloway, C. M.

    2006-01-01

    Many software failures stem from inadequate requirements engineering. This view has been supported both by detailed accident investigations and by a number of empirical studies; however, such investigations can be misleading. It is often difficult to distinguish between failures in requirements engineering and problems elsewhere in the software development lifecycle. Further pitfalls arise from the assumption that inadequate requirements engineering is a cause of all software related accidents for which the system fails to meet its requirements. This paper identifies some of the problems that have arisen from an undue focus on the role of requirements engineering in the causes of major accidents. The intention is to provoke further debate within the emerging field of forensic software engineering.

  11. Incidence, causes and consequences of pregnancy failure in viviparous lizards: implications for research and conservation settings.

    PubMed

    Hare, Kelly M; Cree, Alison

    2010-01-01

    Research on the causes of pregnancy failure in vertebrates has historically been mammal-focussed. However, live-birth (viviparity) has evolved multiple times, and is present in all other vertebrate taxa except Aves and Agnatha. Viviparous lizards (O. Squamata, excluding snakes and amphisbaenians) provide a valuable experimental group when studying major evolutionary events and some are also species of high conservation value. Consequently, both researchers and herpetoculturists often require high reproductive output from captive-held lizards. We reviewed the literature to determine potential or known causes of pregnancy failure for captive lizards. Pregnancy success across species averages approximately 86%, but varies extensively and does not appear to be related to embryonic stage when brought into captivity or level of placentation. Causes of pregnancy failure also vary among species, but correct thermal environments are vital to success, and providing adequate nutrition before vitellogenesis increases the number of viable offspring. A coordinated sequence of hormonal changes involving both pro-pregnancy and pro-labour factors is important for successful pregnancies, although uncertainty remains around the maternal concentrations of corticosterone that allow successful development. Several research areas commonly studied in mammals have yet to be explored or fully addressed in pregnant lizards, including impacts of toxins, parasites, UV light and nutritional quality. As viviparity has evolved over 100 times in lizards, and many different levels of placentation exist, pregnant lizards provide valuable models for studies in ecology and evolution and offer a useful comparison for studies on other viviparous vertebrates.

  12. Interleukin-6 and Lung Inflammation: Evidences of A Causing Role in Inducing Respiratory System Resistance Increments.

    PubMed

    Rubini, Alessandro

    2013-07-10

    Interleukin-6 has been shown to be increased in various pathological conditions involving the lungs, both experimentally induced in animals, or spontaneously occurring in humans. Experimental data demonstrating a significant role of interleukin-6 in commonly occurring respiratory system inflammatory diseases are reviewed. These diseases, i.e. asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, are characterised by respiratory system mechanical derangement, most of all because increased elastance and airway resistance. Recent findings showing a causative role of interleukin-6 in determining an airway resistance increment are reviewed. By applying the end-inflation occlusion method to study respiratory system mechanical properties before and after interleukin-6 administration, it was shown that this cytokine induced significant increments in both the resistive pressure dissipation due to frictional forces opposing the airflow in the airway (ohmic resistance), and in the additional resistive pressure dissipation due to the visco-elastic properties of the system, i.e. stress relaxation (visco-elastic resistance). A dose-dependent effect was also demonstrated. No effects were instead detected on respiratory system elastance. Even solely administrated in healthy mammals, interleukin-6 exhibits a significant effect on respiratory system resistances, leading to increased inspiratory muscle mechanical work of breathing. Thus, IL-6 may play an active role in the pathogenesis of respiratory system diseases. The possible involved mechanisms are discussed.

  13. Treatment Failure and Miltefosine Susceptibility in Dermal Leishmaniasis Caused by Leishmania Subgenus Viannia Species

    PubMed Central

    Obonaga, Ricardo; Fernández, Olga Lucía; Valderrama, Liliana; Rubiano, Luisa Consuelo; Castro, Maria del Mar; Barrera, Maria Claudia; Gomez, Maria Adelaida

    2014-01-01

    Treatment failure and parasite drug susceptibility in dermal leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania (Viannia) species are poorly understood. Prospective evaluation of drug susceptibility of strains isolated from individual patients before drug exposure and at clinical failure allows intrinsic and acquired differences in susceptibility to be discerned and analyzed. To determine whether intrinsic susceptibility or loss of susceptibility to miltefosine contributed to treatment failure, we evaluated the miltefosine susceptibility of intracellular amastigotes and promastigotes of six Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis and six Leishmania (Viannia) panamensis strains isolated sequentially, at diagnosis and treatment failure, from two children and four adults ≥55 years old with concurrent conditions. Four patients presented only cutaneous lesions, one had mucosal disease, and one had disseminated mucocutaneous disease. Expression of the Leishmania drug transporter genes abca2, abca3, abcc2, abcc3, abcg4, abcg6, and LbMT was evaluated by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR). Intracellular amastigotes (median 50% effective concentration [EC50], 10.7 μmol/liter) were more susceptible to miltefosine than promastigotes (median EC50, 55.3 μmol/liter) (P < 0.0001). Loss of susceptibility at failure, demonstrated by a miltefosine EC50 of >32 μmol/liter (the upper limit of intracellular amastigote assay), occurred in L. panamensis infection in a child and in L. braziliensis infection in an adult and was accompanied by decreased expression of the miltefosine transporter LbMT (LbMT/β-tubulin, 0.42- to 0.26-fold [P = 0.039] and 0.70- to 0.57-fold [P = 0.009], respectively). LbMT gene polymorphisms were not associated with susceptibility phenotype. Leishmania ABCA3 transporter expression was inversely correlated with miltefosine susceptibility (r = −0.605; P = 0.037). Loss of susceptibility is one of multiple factors involved in failure of miltefosine treatment in dermal

  14. Identification of Modeling Approaches To Support Common-Cause Failure Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Korsah, Kofi; Wood, Richard Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Experience with applying current guidance and practices for common-cause failure (CCF) mitigation to digital instrumentation and control (I&C) systems has proven problematic, and the regulatory environment has been unpredictable. The impact of CCF vulnerability is to inhibit I&C modernization and, thereby, challenge the long-term sustainability of existing plants. For new plants and advanced reactor concepts, the issue of CCF vulnerability for highly integrated digital I&C systems imposes a design burden resulting in higher costs and increased complexity. The regulatory uncertainty regarding which mitigation strategies are acceptable (e.g., what diversity is needed and how much is sufficient) drives designers to adopt complicated, costly solutions devised for existing plants. The conditions that constrain the transition to digital I&C technology by the U.S. nuclear industry require crosscutting research to resolve uncertainty, demonstrate necessary characteristics, and establish an objective basis for qualification of digital technology for usage in Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) I&C applications. To fulfill this research need, Oak Ridge National Laboratory is conducting an investigation into mitigation of CCF vulnerability for nuclear-qualified applications. The outcome of this research is expected to contribute to a fundamentally sound, comprehensive technical basis for establishing the qualification of digital technology for nuclear power applications. This report documents the investigation of modeling approaches for representing failure of I&C systems. Failure models are used when there is a need to analyze how the probability of success (or failure) of a system depends on the success (or failure) of individual elements. If these failure models are extensible to represent CCF, then they can be employed to support analysis of CCF vulnerabilities and mitigation strategies. Specifically, the research findings documented in this report identify modeling approaches that

  15. Pressure-volume curves in acute respiratory failure: automated low flow inflation versus occlusion.

    PubMed

    Servillo, G; Svantesson, C; Beydon, L; Roupie, E; Brochard, L; Lemaire, F; Jonson, B

    1997-05-01

    Pressure-volume (P-V) curves of the respiratory system allow determination of compliance and lower and upper inflection points (LIP and UIP, respectively). To minimize lung trauma in mechanical ventilation the tidal volume should be limited to the P-V range between LIP and UIP. An automated low flow inflation (ALFI) technique, using a computer-controlled Servo Ventilator 900C, was compared with a more conventional technique using a series of about 20 different inflated volumes (Pst-V curve). The pressure in the distal lung (Pdist) was calculated by subtraction of resistive pressure drop in connecting tubes and airways. Compliance (Cdist), Pdist(LIP), and Pdist(UIP) were derived from the Pdist-V curve and compared with Cst, Pst(LIP), and Pst(UIP) derived from the Pst-V curve. Nineteen sedated, paralyzed patients (10 with ARDS and 9 with ARF) were studied. We found: Cdist = 2.3 + 0.98 x Cst ml/cm H2O (r = 0.98); Pdist(LIP) = 0.013 + 1.09 x Pst(LIP) cm H2O (r = 0.96). In patients with ARDS: Pdist(UIP) = 4.71 + 0.84 x Pst(UIP) cm H2O (r = 0.94). In ARF, we found differences in UIP between the methods, but discrepancies occurred above tidal volumes and had little practical importance. They may reflect that Pdist comprises dynamic phenomena contributing to pressure in the distal lung at large volumes. Compliance, but not LIP and UIP, could be accurately determined without subtraction of resistive pressure from the pressure measured in the ventilator. We conclude that ALFI, which is fully automated and needing no ventilator disconnection, gives useful clinical information.

  16. Proportional hazards model for competing risks data with missing cause of failure

    PubMed Central

    Hyun, Seunggeun; Sun, Yanqing

    2012-01-01

    We consider the semiparametric proportional hazards model for the cause-specific hazard function in analysis of competing risks data with missing cause of failure. The inverse probability weighted equation and augmented inverse probability weighted equation are proposed for estimating the regression parameters in the model, and their theoretical properties are established for inference. Simulation studies demonstrate that the augmented inverse probability weighted estimator is doubly robust and the proposed method is appropriate for practical use. The simulations also compare the proposed estimators with the multiple imputation estimator of Lu and Tsiatis (2001). The application of the proposed method is illustrated using data from a bone marrow transplant study. PMID:22468017

  17. Angiosarcoma of the liver as a cause of fulminant liver failure

    PubMed Central

    Montell García, Marco; Romero Cabello, Raúl; Romero Feregrino, Raul; Atri Moises, Mercado; Trejo Estrada, Rafael; Alvaro, Padilla-Rodríguez; Moreno Manlio Gerardo, Gama; Feregrino Rodrigo, Romero

    2012-01-01

    Primary liver sarcomas make up 2% of all malignant neoplasms of the liver; of these, angiosarcoma is the most common type. Primary liver tumours rarely cause fulminant hepatic failure (FHF), which is most frequently caused by non-neoplasmic pathologies. In the case of neoplasms, the most frequent are lymphoma and metastatic carcinomas. We describe the case of a 76-year-old man who suffered from FHF as a result of a liver angiosarcoma and we present a review of the medical literature in which we found only two cases of liver angiosarcomas linked to FHF. PMID:22865805

  18. Regression modeling of the cumulative incidence function with missing causes of failure using pseudo-values.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Betancur, Margarita; Latouche, Aurélien

    2013-08-15

    Competing risks arise when patients may fail from several causes. Strategies for modeling event-specific quantities often assume that the cause of failure is known for all patients, but this is seldom the case. Several authors have addressed the problem of modeling the cause-specific hazard rates with missing causes of failure. In contrast, direct modeling of the cumulative incidence function has received little attention.We provide a general framework for regression modeling of this function in the missing cause setting, encompassing key models such as the Fine and Gray and additive models, by considering two extensions of the Andersen–Klein pseudo-value approach. The first extension is a novel inverse probability weighting method, whereas the second extension is based on a previously proposed multiple imputation procedure.We evaluated the gain in using these approaches with small samples in an extensive simulation study. We analyzed the data from an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group breast cancer treatment clinical trial to illustrate the practical value and ease of implementation of the proposed methods.

  19. Semi-fluorinated alkanes as carriers for drug targeting in acute respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Dembinski, Rolf; Bensberg, Ralf; Marx, Gernot; Rossaint, Rolf; Quintel, Michael; Vohmann, Cathrin; Kuhlen, Ralf

    2010-10-01

    Partial liquid ventilation (PLV) with perfluorocarbons may cause pulmonary recruitment in acute lung injury (ALI). Semi-fluorinated alkanes (SFAs) provide biochemical properties similar to perfluorocarbons. Additionally, SFAs are characterized by increased lipophilicity. Therefore, SFA-PLV may be considered for deposition of certain therapeutic drugs into atelectatic lung areas. In this experimental study SFA-PLV was evaluated to demonstrate feasibility, pulmonary recruitment, and efficacy of drug deposition. Feasibility of SFA-PLV was determined in pigs with and without experimental ALI. Animals were randomized to PLV with SFAs up to a cumulative amount of 30 mL x kg⁻¹ or to conventional mechanical ventilation. Pulmonary recruitment effects were determined by analyzing ventilation-perfusion distributions. Efficacy of intrapulmonary drug deposition was evaluated in further experiments by measuring drug serum concentrations in the course of PLV with SFA-dissolved α-tocopherol and ibuprofen. Increasing SFA doses caused progressive reduction of intrapulmonary shunt in animals with ALI, indicating pulmonary recruitment. PLV with SFA-dissolved α-tocopherol had no effect on serum levels of α-tocopherol, whereas PLV with SFA-dissolved ibuprofen caused a rapid increase of serum levels of ibuprofen. The authors conclude that SFA-PLV is feasible and causes pulmonary recruitment in ALI. Effectiveness of drug deposition in the lung obviously depends on the partitioning drugs out of the SFA phase into blood.

  20. Designed for Workarounds: A Qualitative Study of the Causes of Operational Failures in Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Anita L; Heisler, W Scott; Janisse, Laura D

    2014-01-01

    Frontline care clinicians and staff in hospitals spend at least 10% of their time working around operational failures: situations in which information, supplies, or equipment needed for patient care are insufficient. However, little is known about underlying causes of operational failures and what hospitals can do to reduce their occurrence. To address this gap, we examined the internal supply chains at 2 hospitals with the aim of discovering organizational factors that contribute to operational failures. We conducted in-depth qualitative research, including observations and interviews of more than 80 individuals from 4 nursing units and the ancillary support departments that provide equipment and supplies needed for patient care. We found that a lack of interconnectedness among interdependent departments’ routines was a major source of operational failures. The low levels of interconnectedness occurred because of how the internal supply chains were designed and managed rather than because of employee error or a shortfall in training. Thus, we propose that the time that hospital staff members spend on workarounds can be reduced through deliberate efforts to increase interconnectedness among hospitals’ internal supply departments. Four dimensions of interconnectedness include: 1) hospital-level—rather than department-level—performance measures; 2) internal supply department routines that respond to specific patients’ needs rather than to predetermined stocking routines; 3) knowledge that is necessary for efficient handoffs of materials that is translated across departmental boundaries; and 4) cross-departmental collaboration mechanisms that enable improvement in the flow of materials across departmental boundaries. PMID:25102517

  1. Predictive value of daily living score in acute respiratory failure of COPD patients requiring invasive mechanical ventilation pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Mechanical ventilation (MV) is imperative in many forms of acute respiratory failure (ARF) in COPD patients. Previous studies have shown the difficulty to identify parameters predicting the outcome of COPD patients treated by invasive MV. Our hypothesis was that a non specialized score as the activities daily living (ADL) score may help to predict the outcome of these patients. Methods We studied the outcome of 25 COPD patients admitted to the intensive care unit for ARF requiring invasive MV. The patients were divided into those weaning success (group A n = 17, 68%) or failure (group B n = 8, 32%). We investigated the correlation between the ADL score and the outcome and mortality. Results The ADL score was higher in group A (5.1 ±1.1 vs 3.7 ± 0.7 in group B, p < 0.01). Weaning was achieved in 76.5% of the cases with an ADL score ≥ 4 and in 23.5% of the cases with an ADL score < 4 (p < 0.05). Pulmonary function test, arterial blood gases collected during period of clinical stability and at admission and nutritional status were similar in both groups. The mortality, at six months, was 36%. The ADL score was a significant predictor of 6-month mortality (80 with an ADL score <4, 20 with an ADL score ≥4, p < 0.01). Conclusion Our pilot study demonstrates that the ADL score is predictive of weaning success and mortality at 6 months, suggesting that the assessment of daily activities should be an important component of ARF management in COPD patients. PMID:23078114

  2. Modelling of a Francis Turbine Runner Fatigue Failure Process Caused by Fluid-Structure Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyutov, A.; Kryukov, A.; Cherny, S.; Chirkov, D.; Salienko, A.; Skorospelov, V.; Turuk, P.

    2016-11-01

    In the present paper considered is the problem of the numerical simulation of Francis turbine runner fatigue failure caused by fluid-structure interaction. The unsteady 3D flow is modeled simultaneously in the spiral chamber, each wicket gate and runner channels and in the draft tube using the Euler equations. Based on the unsteady runner loadings at each time step stresses in the whole runner are calculated using the elastic equilibrium equations solved with boundary element method. Set of static stress-strain states provides quasi-dynamics of runner cyclic loading. It is assumed that equivalent stresses in the runner are below the critical value after which irreversible plastic processes happen in the runner material. Therefore runner is subjected to the fatigue damage caused by high-cycle fatigue, in which the loads are generally low compared with the limit stress of the material. As a consequence, the stress state around the crack front can be fully characterized by linear elastic fracture mechanics. The place of runner cracking is determined as a point with maximal amplitude of stress oscillations. Stress pulsations amplitude is used to estimate the number of cycles until the moment of fatigue failure, number of loading cycles and oscillation frequency are used to calculate runner service time. Example of the real Francis runner which has encountered premature fatigue failure as a result of incorrect durability estimation is used to verify the developed numerical model.

  3. Primary Hyperoxaluria Type 1: A Cause for Infantile Renal Failure and Massive Nephrocalcinosis.

    PubMed

    Kurt-Sukur, E D; Özçakar, Z B; Fitöz, S; Yilmaz, S; Hoppe, B; Yalçinkaya, F

    2015-09-01

    Primary hyperoxaluria type 1 is a rare autosomal-recessive disease caused by the deficient activity of the liver specific enzyme alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase. Increased endogenous oxalate production induces severe hyperoxaluria, recurrent urolithiasis, progressive nephrocalcinosis and renal failure. Here we report a 6 month old boy who presented with vomiting and decreased urine volume. He was diagnosed with chronic kidney failure at 4 months of age and peritoneal dialysis was introduced at a local hospital. His parents were third degree cousins and family history revealed 2 maternal cousins who developed end stage renal disease during childhood. When he was admitted to our hospital, laboratory studies were consistent with end stage renal disease, ultrasound showed bilateral massive nephrocalcinosis. As clinical presentation was suggestive for primary hyperoxaluria type 1, plasma oxalate was determined and found extremely elevated. Genetic testing proved diagnosis by showing a disease causing homozygous mutation (AGXT-gene: c.971_972delT). The patient was put on pyridoxine treatment and aggressive dialysis programme. In conclusion; progressive renal failure in infancy with massive nephrocalcinosis, especially if accompanied by consanguinity and family history, should always raise the suspicion of PH type 1. Increased awareness of the disease would help physicians in both treating the patients and guiding the families who have diseased children and plan to have further pregnancies.

  4. Rapidly Progressive Muscle Paralysis and Acute Respiratory Failure Following Endoscopic Botulinum Toxin Injection

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Ahmed; Shor, Julia; Forester, Gary P.

    2016-01-01

    Botulism toxin injection (BTI) is a well-known and relatively safe endoscopic treatment for achalasia. We report a case of a 90-year-old female diagnosed with achalasia who subsequently underwent BTI with symptomatic relief. The therapy was complicated by systemic botulism, however, leading to progressive muscle paralysis with diaphragmatic involvement requiring mechanical ventilation support. This is the first reported case of BTI for achalasia causing systemic botulism. PMID:27921065

  5. [Foreign body in the esophagus as a cause of respiratory symptoms in children. Clinical cases].

    PubMed

    Cuestas, Giselle; Rodríguez, Verónica; Doormann, Flavia; Bellia Munzón, Patricio; Bellia Munzón, Gastón

    2017-04-01

    Foreign bodies in esophagus are avoidable accidents that occur most often in children younger than 3 years. The most common presenting symptoms are dysphagia, drooling and vomiting. Occasionally a foreign body in the esophagus may present with respiratory symptoms such as cough, stridor and respiratory distress. This is more common in young children and when the object remains lodged in the esophagus for a prolonged period. Clinical suspicion is essential for early diagnosis, which allows to avoid potential complications. We describe 3 children with a foreign body impacted in the esophagus who presented mainly respiratory symptoms. We alert pediatricians on symptomatic variation in the presentation of a foreign body ingestion and we underline the importance of early diagnosis and treatment.

  6. [Legionnaires' disease with acute renal failure caused by Legionella pneumophilla serogroup 4].

    PubMed

    Hase, Isano; Chibana, Kazuyuki; Ohara, Tetsuya; Takizawa, Hidenori; Furihata, Tomoe; Yamada, Issei; Fukushima, Yasutugu; Ishii, Yoshiki; Fukuda, Takeshi; Koide, Michio; Saitou, Atsushi

    2005-11-01

    A 77-year-old man who had fever and chest pain was admitted to a neighboring hospital on a diagnosis of pneumonia. Chest X-ray film finding deteriorated despite treatment with 2 g cefotaxime per day. Because of accompanying acute renal failure, he was transferred to our hospital. Hemodialysis with intravenous administration of erythromycin and meropenem resulted in recovery from acute renal failure, and his general condition improved. Because of liver dysfunction, erythromycin was changed to pazufloxacin. Although he was negative for Legionella urinary antigen determined with a rapid assay kit, Binax NOW, his serum titer for Legionella pneumophila serogroup 4 was elevated. Finally, a diagnosis of Legionnaires' disease caused by Legionella pneumophila serogroup 4 was established.

  7. Rocking bed and prolonged independence from nocturnal non-invasive ventilation in neurogenic respiratory failure associated with limb weakness

    PubMed Central

    Cormican, L; Higgins, S; Davidson, A; Howard, R; Williams, A

    2004-01-01

    A 40 year old mother of three with autosomal dominant scapuloperoneal muscular dystrophy presented with severe neurogenic respiratory failure requiring nocturnal non-invasive ventilation (NIV). Because of the development of profound proximal muscular weakness as a consequence of the progressive nature of her neurological disease, she eventually was unable to apply and remove the facial interface to set up her NIV circuit. She therefore became dependent on her children and carers to start and stop NIV during the night. A rocking bed was successfully employed as an alternative to nocturnal NIV. Ventilation was facilitated by the passive movement of the diaphragm as a consequence of the movement of the abdominal contents under the effect of gravity. Benefit was demonstrated objectively by pulse oximetry and subjectively by the improvement in the patient's symptomatology and continued independence at night. The ease of use of a rocking bed should be borne in mind when the necessity for nocturnal ventilatory support in neuromuscular disease results in the potential loss of independence for a patient. PMID:15192173

  8. Specific Metabolome Profile of Exhaled Breath Condensate in Patients with Shock and Respiratory Failure: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Fermier, Brice; Blasco, Hélène; Godat, Emmanuel; Bocca, Cinzia; Moënne-Loccoz, Joseph; Emond, Patrick; Andres, Christian R.; Laffon, Marc; Ferrandière, Martine

    2016-01-01

    Background: Shock includes different pathophysiological mechanisms not fully understood and remains a challenge to manage. Exhaled breath condensate (EBC) may contain relevant biomarkers that could help us make an early diagnosis or better understand the metabolic perturbations resulting from this pathological situation. Objective: we aimed to establish the metabolomics signature of EBC from patients in shock with acute respiratory failure in a pilot study. Material and methods: We explored the metabolic signature of EBC in 12 patients with shock compared to 14 controls using LC-HRMS. We used a non-targeted approach, and we performed a multivariate analysis based on Orthogonal Partial Least Square-Discriminant Analysis (OPLS-DA) to differentiate between the two groups of patients. Results: We optimized the procedure of EBC collection and LC-HRMS detected more than 1000 ions in this fluid. The optimization of multivariate models led to an excellent model of differentiation for both groups (Q2 > 0.4) after inclusion of only 6 ions. Discussion and conclusion: We validated the procedure of EBC collection and we showed that the metabolome profile of EBC may be relevant in characterizing patients with shock. We performed well in distinguishing these patients from controls, and the identification of relevant compounds may be promising for ICC patients. PMID:27598216

  9. Position paper for the organization of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation programs for acute respiratory failure in adult patients.

    PubMed

    Combes, Alain; Brodie, Daniel; Bartlett, Robert; Brochard, Laurent; Brower, Roy; Conrad, Steve; De Backer, Daniel; Fan, Eddy; Ferguson, Niall; Fortenberry, James; Fraser, John; Gattinoni, Luciano; Lynch, William; MacLaren, Graeme; Mercat, Alain; Mueller, Thomas; Ogino, Mark; Peek, Giles; Pellegrino, Vince; Pesenti, Antonio; Ranieri, Marco; Slutsky, Arthur; Vuylsteke, Alain

    2014-09-01

    The use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) for severe acute respiratory failure (ARF) in adults is growing rapidly given recent advances in technology, even though there is controversy regarding the evidence justifying its use. Because ECMO is a complex, high-risk, and costly modality, at present it should be conducted in centers with sufficient experience, volume, and expertise to ensure it is used safely. This position paper represents the consensus opinion of an international group of physicians and associated health-care workers who have expertise in therapeutic modalities used in the treatment of patients with severe ARF, with a focus on ECMO. The aim of this paper is to provide physicians, ECMO center directors and coordinators, hospital directors, health-care organizations, and regional, national, and international policy makers a description of the optimal approach to organizing ECMO programs for ARF in adult patients. Importantly, this will help ensure that ECMO is delivered safely and proficiently, such that future observational and randomized clinical trials assessing this technique may be performed by experienced centers under homogeneous and optimal conditions. Given the need for further evidence, we encourage restraint in the widespread use of ECMO until we have a better appreciation for both the potential clinical applications and the optimal techniques for performing ECMO.

  10. Capabilities of a mobile extracorporeal membrane oxygenation service for severe respiratory failure delivered by intensive care specialists.

    PubMed

    Sherren, P B; Shepherd, S J; Glover, G W; Meadows, C I S; Langrish, C; Ioannou, N; Wyncoll, D; Daly, K; Gooby, N; Agnew, N; Barrett, N A

    2015-06-01

    We conducted a single-centre observational study of retrievals for severe respiratory failure over 12 months. Our intensivist-delivered retrieval service has mobile extracorporeal membrane oxygenation capabilities. Sixty patients were analysed: 34 (57%) were female and the mean (SD) age was 44.1 (13.6) years. The mean (SD) PaO2 /FI O2 ratio at referral was 10.2 (4.1) kPa and median (IQR [range]) Murray score was 3.25 (3.0-3.5 [1.5-4.0]). Forty-eight patients (80%) required veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation at the referring centre. There were no cannulation or extracorporeal membrane oxygenation-related complications. The median (IQR [range]) retrieval distance was 47.2 (14.9-77.0 [2.3-342.0]) miles. There were no major adverse events during retrieval. Thirty-seven patients (77%) who received extracorporeal membrane oxygenation survived to discharge from the intensive care unit and 36 patients (75%) were alive after six months. Senior intensivist-initiated and delivered mobile extracorporeal membrane oxygenation is safe and associated with a high incidence of survival.

  11. Lung compliance as a measure of lung function in newborns with respiratory failure requiring extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Lotze, A; Short, B L; Taylor, G A

    1987-03-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) can now be used as an alternative mode of therapy for infants 2.0 kg or more with life-threatening respiratory failure. Current criteria for removal from ECMO are limited. We attempted to determine whether lung compliance (CL) could be used as a sensitive indicator of the neonates' lung improvement while they are on ECMO, as well as a predictor of their ability to tolerate removal from bypass. We obtained serial CL measurements in 13 infants, all of whom weaned successfully from ECMO. All had an initial CL on ECMO of 0.5 ml/cm H2O X kg or less (mean = 0.3), with a final CL of 0.8 ml/cm H2O X kg or more (mean = 1.7). The average change in CL from the initial to the final measurement was 0.6 ml/cm H2O X kg or more (mean = 1.5). CL findings correlated well with estimated bypass, expressed as a percent of cardiac output, and a radiographic score of pulmonary abnormality (r = -.66, p less than .0001, and r = -.52, p less than .0001, respectively). We conclude that CL measurements can be used to monitor clinical improvement in infants on ECMO, to predict their successful removal from bypass, and ultimately to shorten their total time spent on bypass.

  12. A Rare Case of Cor Triatriatum Leading to Respiratory Failure and Shock in an 8-Month-Old.

    PubMed

    Burger, Catherine

    2017-03-27

    An 8-month-old boy presents with 1 week of gradually worsening respiratory distress. After chest radiograph shows bilateral airspace opacities, he is treated for pneumonia with antibiotics and intravenous fluids. Shortly after this, he decompensates requiring intubation, followed by cardiopulmonary support with pressors and eventually extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. Bedside ultrasound then shows an additional congenital membrane in the left atrium obstructing pulmonary venous return and thought to have caused his original presentation and subsequent decompensation. After surgical correction, he is decannulated from extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, makes a quick recovery, and is discharged from the hospital in good condition within 2 weeks. This rare case of cor triatriatum highlights the importance of considering congenital heart disease even with common presentations in the pediatric population.

  13. Upper Respiratory Tract Disease in the Gopher Tortoise Is Caused by Mycoplasma agassizii†

    PubMed Central

    Brown, M. B.; McLaughlin, G. S.; Klein, P. A.; Crenshaw, B. C.; Schumacher, I. M.; Brown, D. R.; Jacobson, E. R.

    1999-01-01

    Upper respiratory tract disease (URTD) has been observed in a number of tortoise species, including the desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) and the gopher tortoise (Gopherus polyphemus). Clinical signs of URTD in gopher tortoises are similar to those in desert tortoises and include serous, mucoid, or purulent discharge from the nares, excessive tearing to purulent ocular discharge, conjunctivitis, and edema of the eyelids and ocular glands. The objectives of the present study were to determine if Mycoplasma agassizii was an etiologic agent of URTD in the gopher tortoise and to determine the clinical course of the experimental infection in a dose-response infection study. Tortoises were inoculated intranasally with 0.5 ml (0.25 ml/nostril) of either sterile SP4 broth (control group; n = 10) or 108 color-changing units (CCU) (total dose) of M. agassizii 723 (experimental infection group; n = 9). M. agassizii caused clinical signs compatible with those observed in tortoises with natural infections. Clinical signs of URTD were evident in seven of nine experimentally infected tortoises by 4 weeks postinfection (p.i.) and in eight of nine experimentally infected tortoises by 8 weeks p.i. In the dose-response experiments, tortoises were inoculated intranasally with a low (101 CCU; n = 6), medium (103 CCU; n = 6), or high (105 CCU; n = 5) dose of M. agassizii 723 or with sterile SP4 broth (n = 10). At all time points p.i. in both experiments, M. agassizii could be isolated from the nares of at least 50% of the tortoises. All of the experimentally infected tortoises seroconverted, and levels of antibody were statistically higher in infected animals than in control animals for all time points of >4 weeks p.i. (P < 0.0001). Control tortoises in both experiments did not show clinical signs, did not seroconvert, and did not have detectable M. agassizii by either culture or PCR at any point in the study. Histological lesions were compatible with those observed in tortoises with

  14. An inactivated influenza D virus vaccine partially protects cattle from respiratory disease caused by homologous challenge

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Originally isolated from swine, the proposed influenza D virus has since been shown to be common in cattle. Inoculation of IDV to naïve calves resulted in mild respiratory disease histologically characterized by tracheitis. As several studies have associated the presence of IDV with acute bovine r...

  15. An inactivated influenza D virus vaccine partially protects cattle from respiratory disease caused by homologous challenge.

    PubMed

    Hause, Ben M; Huntimer, Lucas; Falkenberg, Shollie; Henningson, Jamie; Lechtenberg, Kelly; Halbur, Tom

    2017-02-01

    Originally isolated from swine, the proposed influenza D virus has since been shown to be common in cattle. Inoculation of IDV to naïve calves resulted in mild respiratory disease histologically characterized by tracheitis. As several studies have associated the presence of IDV with acute bovine respiratory disease (BRD), we sought to investigate the efficacy of an inactivated IDV vaccine. Vaccinated calves seroconverted with hemagglutination inhibition titers 137-169 following two doses. Non-vaccinated calves challenged with a homologous virus exhibited signs of mild respiratory disease from days four to ten post challenge which was significantly different than negative controls at days five and nine post challenge. Peak viral shedding of approximately 5 TCID50/mL was measured in nasal and tracheal swabs and bronchoalveolar lavage fluids four to six days post challenge. Viral titers were significantly (P<0.05) decreased 1.4 TCID50/mL, 3.6 TCID50/mL and 5.0 TCID50/mL, respectively, in the aforementioned samples collected from vaccinated animals compared to non-vaccinated controls at peak shedding. Viral antigen was detected in the respiratory epithelium of the nasal turbinates and trachea by immunohistochemistry from all unvaccinated calves but in significantly fewer vaccinates. Inflammation characterized by neutrophils was observed in the nasal turbinate and trachea but not appreciably in lungs. Together these results support an etiologic role for IDV in BRD and demonstrate that partial protection is afforded by an inactivated vaccine.

  16. Identification of a mannheimia haemolytica genetic subtype that causes bovine respiratory disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC) is a serious health and economic problem that costs the United States cattle industry over a billion dollars annually. Mannheimia haemolytica is a major bacterial component of BRDC. An opportunistic pathogen, M. haemolytica resides within the upper respira...

  17. Scheduling Maintenance Operations Which Cause Age-Dependent Failure Rate Changes,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-01

    ENGI.. UNCLASSIFIED B EBRAHIMIAN ET AL I JUN 83 F/G 5/1 NLmEEmmEEmmmmEE EEIhEIIhEEIII EEIIIIIIIEIIIE EIIIEIIIIIIIEE IEEIhIhEIhEIhE EIIIEEEEEIhIhE...OPERATIONS WHICH CAUSE AGE-DEPENDENT FAILURE RATE CHANGES BY BEHNAM EBRAHIMIAN AND LEONARD SHAW Prepared for Office of Naval Research Contract N00014-75-C-0858... EBRAHIMIAN AND LEONARD SHAW Prepared for Office of Naval Research Contract N00014-75-C-0858 Report No. POLY EE/CS 83-002 Polytechnic Institute of New York

  18. The causes, consequences, and treatment of left or right heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Pazos-López, Pablo; Peteiro-Vázquez, Jesús; Carcía-Campos, Ana; García-Bueno, Lourdes; de Torres, Juan Pablo Abugattas; Castro-Beiras, Alfonso

    2011-01-01

    Chronic heart failure (HF) is a cardiovascular disease of cardinal importance because of several factors: a) an increasing occurrence due to the aging of the population, primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular events, and modern advances in therapy, b) a bad prognosis: around 65% of patients are dead within 5 years of diagnosis, c) a high economic cost: HF accounts for 1% to 2% of total health care expenditure. This review focuses on the main causes, consequences in terms of morbidity, mortality and costs and treatment of HF. PMID:21603593

  19. Frailty modeling for clustered competing risks data with missing cause of failure.

    PubMed

    Lee, Minjung; Ha, Il Do; Lee, Youngjo

    2017-02-01

    Competing risks data often occur within a center in multi-center clinical trials where the event times within a center may be correlated due to unobserved factors across individuals. In this paper, we consider the cause-specific proportional hazards model with a shared frailty to model the association between the event times within a center in the framework of competing risks. We use a hierarchical likelihood approach, which does not require any intractable integration over the frailty terms. In a clinical trial, cause of death information may not be observed for some patients. In such a case, analyses through exclusion of cases with missing cause of death may lead to biased inferences. We propose a hierarchical likelihood approach for fitting the cause-specific proportional hazards model with a shared frailty in the presence of missing cause of failure. We use multiple imputation methods to address missing cause of death information under the assumption of missing at random. Simulation studies show that the proposed procedures perform well, even if the imputation model is misspecified. The proposed methods are illustrated with data from EORTC trial 30791 conducted by European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC).

  20. A nonsense mutation in the DNA repair factor Hebo causes mild bone marrow failure and microcephaly

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shu; Pondarre, Corinne; Pennarun, Gaelle; Labussiere-Wallet, Helene; Vera, Gabriella; France, Benoit; Chansel, Marie; Rouvet, Isabelle; Revy, Patrick; Lopez, Bernard; Soulier, Jean; Bertrand, Pascale; Callebaut, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Inherited bone marrow failure syndromes are human conditions in which one or several cell lineages of the hemopoietic system are affected. They are present at birth or may develop progressively. They are sometimes accompanied by other developmental anomalies. Three main molecular causes have been recognized to result in bone marrow failure syndromes: (1) defects in the Fanconi anemia (FA)/BRCA DNA repair pathway, (2) defects in telomere maintenance, and (3) abnormal ribosome biogenesis. We analyzed a patient with mild bone marrow failure and microcephaly who did not present with the typical FA phenotype. Cells from this patient showed increased sensitivity to ionizing radiations and phleomycin, attesting to a probable DNA double strand break (dsb) repair defect. Linkage analysis and whole exome sequencing revealed a homozygous nonsense mutation in the ERCC6L2 gene. We identified a new ERCC6L2 alternative transcript encoding the DNA repair factor Hebo, which is critical for complementation of the patient’s DNAdsb repair defect. Sequence analysis revealed three structured regions within Hebo: a TUDOR domain, an adenosine triphosphatase domain, and a new domain, HEBO, specifically present in Hebo direct orthologues. Hebo is ubiquitously expressed, localized in the nucleus, and rapidly recruited to DNAdsb’s in an NBS1-dependent manner. PMID:27185855

  1. Acute liver failure caused by drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome associated with hyperferritinemia.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Masayuki; Tanaka, Masatake; Ueda, Akihiro; Yoshimoto, Tsuyoshi; Kato, Masaki; Nakamuta, Makoto; Kotoh, Kazuhiro; Takayanagi, Ryoichi

    2011-11-28

    Drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS) is a severe reaction usually characterized by fever, rash, and multiorgan failure, occurring 2-6 wk after drug introduction. It is an immune-mediated reaction involving macrophage and T-lymphocyte activation and cytokine release. A 54-year-old woman was diagnosed with rheumatic arthritis and initiated salazosulfapyridine by mouth. About 10 d later, she had a high fever, skin rash and liver dysfunction. She was admitted to hospital and diagnosed with a drug eruption. She was treated with oral prednisolone 30 mg/d; however, she developed high fever again and her blood tests showed acute liver failure and cytopenia associated with hyperferritinemia. She was diagnosed with acute liver failure and hemophagocytosis caused by DIHS. She was transferred to the Department of Medicine and Bioregulatory Science, Kyushu University, where she was treated with arterial steroid injection therapy. Following this treatment, her liver function improved and serum ferritin immediately decreased. We hypothesized that an immune-mediated reaction in DIHS may have generated over-activation of macrophages and T-lymphocytes, followed by a cytokine storm that affected various organs. The measurement of serum ferritin might be a useful marker of the severity of DIHS.

  2. Living with intestinal failure caused by Crohn disease: not letting the disease conquer life.

    PubMed

    Carlsson, Eva; Persson, Eva

    2015-01-01

    This article reports the findings of what it means to live with intestinal failure caused by Crohn disease and how it influences daily life. Ten patients, 7 with an ostomy and 7 on home parenteral nutrition followed up at an outpatient clinic for patients with intestinal failure, were interviewed using a qualitative, phenomenological-hermeneutic method. The analysis of the transcribed data is described thematically and resulted in 3 main themes; (a) struggling to not be controlled by the disease, (b) walking on a thin thread, and (c) being seen as a person, not just as a patient. These themes led to the comprehensive understanding that living with intestinal failure was interpreted as the criticality of maintaining control over one's life and body while maintaining autonomy and not letting the disease conquer life. Life entails a constant struggle with much planning to live as normally as possible and get the most out of life. It was of great importance to be seen as a person and not just as a disease, affirm that life as it is has meaning, there is a state of suffering related to the disease, there are existential issues, and suffering is related to care.

  3. Respiratory failure and spontaneous hypoglycemia during noninvasive rewarming from 24.7°C (76.5°F) core body temperature after prolonged avalanche burial.

    PubMed

    Strapazzon, Giacomo; Nardin, Michele; Zanon, Peter; Kaufmann, Marc; Kritzinger, Meinhard; Brugger, Hermann

    2012-08-01

    Clinical reports on management and rewarming complications after prolonged avalanche burial are not common. We present a case of an unreported combination of respiratory failure and unexpected spontaneous hypoglycemia during noninvasive rewarming from severe hypothermia. We collected anecdotal observations in a 42-year-old, previously healthy, male backcountry skier admitted to the ICU at a tertiary care center after 2 hours 7 minutes of complete avalanche burial, who presented with a patent airway and a core body temperature of 25.0°C (77.0°F) on extrication. There was no decrease in core body temperature during transport (from 25.0°C [77.0°F] to 24.7°C [76.5°F]). Atrial fibrillation occurred during active noninvasive external rewarming (to 37.0°C [98.6°F] during 5 hours), followed by pulmonary edema and respiratory failure (SaO(2) 73% and PaO(2)/FIO(2) 161 mm Hg), which resolved with endotracheal intubation and continuous positive end-respiratory pressure. Moreover, a marked spontaneous glycemic imbalance (from 22.2 to 1.4 mmol/L) was observed. Despite a possible favorable outcome, clinicians should be prepared to identify and treat severe respiratory problems and spontaneous hypoglycemia during noninvasive rewarming of severely hypothermic avalanche victims.

  4. Understanding the causes of kidney transplant failure: the dominant role of antibody-mediated rejection and nonadherence.

    PubMed

    Sellarés, J; de Freitas, D G; Mengel, M; Reeve, J; Einecke, G; Sis, B; Hidalgo, L G; Famulski, K; Matas, A; Halloran, P F

    2012-02-01

    We prospectively studied kidney transplants that progressed to failure after a biopsy for clinical indications, aiming to assign a cause to every failure. We followed 315 allograft recipients who underwent indication biopsies at 6 days to 32 years posttransplant. Sixty kidneys progressed to failure in the follow-up period (median 31.4 months). Failure was rare after T-cell-mediated rejection and acute kidney injury and common after antibody-mediated rejection or glomerulonephritis. We developed rules for using biopsy diagnoses, HLA antibody and clinical data to explain each failure. Excluding four with missing information, 56 failures were attributed to four causes: rejection 36 (64%), glomerulonephritis 10 (18%), polyoma virus nephropathy 4 (7%) and intercurrent events 6 (11%). Every rejection loss had evidence of antibody-mediated rejection by the time of failure. Among rejection losses, 17 of 36 (47%) had been independently identified as nonadherent by attending clinicians. Nonadherence was more frequent in patients who progressed to failure (32%) versus those who survived (3%). Pure T-cell-mediated rejection, acute kidney injury, drug toxicity and unexplained progressive fibrosis were not causes of loss. This prospective cohort indicates that many actual failures after indication biopsies manifest phenotypic features of antibody-mediated or mixed rejection and also underscores the major role of nonadherence.

  5. Mutation in PNPT1, which encodes a polyribonucleotide nucleotidyltransferase, impairs RNA import into mitochondria and causes respiratory-chain deficiency.

    PubMed

    Vedrenne, Vanessa; Gowher, Ali; De Lonlay, Pascale; Nitschke, Patrick; Serre, Valérie; Boddaert, Nathalie; Altuzarra, Cecilia; Mager-Heckel, Anne-Marie; Chretien, Florence; Entelis, Nina; Munnich, Arnold; Tarassov, Ivan; Rötig, Agnès

    2012-11-02

    Multiple-respiratory-chain deficiency represents an important cause of mitochondrial disorders. Hitherto, however, mutations in genes involved in mtDNA maintenance and translation machinery only account for a fraction of cases. Exome sequencing in two siblings, born to consanguineous parents, with severe encephalomyopathy, choreoathetotic movements, and combined respiratory-chain defects allowed us to identify a homozygous PNPT1 missense mutation (c.1160A>G) that encodes the mitochondrial polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase). Blue-native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that no PNPase complex could be detected in subject fibroblasts, confirming that the substitution encoded by c.1160A>G disrupts the trimerization of the protein. PNPase is predominantly localized in the mitochondrial intermembrane space and is implicated in RNA targeting to human mitochondria. Mammalian mitochondria import several small noncoding nuclear RNAs (5S rRNA, MRP RNA, some tRNAs, and miRNAs). By RNA hybridization experiments, we observed a significant decrease in 5S rRNA and MRP-related RNA import into mitochondria in fibroblasts of affected subject 1. Moreover, we found a reproducible decrease in the rate of mitochondrial translation in her fibroblasts. Finally, overexpression of the wild-type PNPT1 cDNA in fibroblasts of subject 1 induced an increase in 5S rRNA import in mitochondria and rescued the mitochondrial-translation deficiency. In conclusion, we report here abnormal RNA import into mitochondria as a cause of respiratory-chain deficiency.

  6. Neuroleptic malignant-like syndrome with a slight elevation of creatine-kinase levels and respiratory failure in a patient with Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Li; Chen, Yinghui

    2014-01-01

    Neuroleptic malignant-like syndrome (NMLS) is a rare but catastrophic complication of drug treatment for Parkinson’s disease (PD). Sudden withdrawal and abrupt reduction of antiparkinsonian drugs are major risk factors. Just as its name suggests, the clinical features of NMLS are similar to neuroleptic malignant syndrome, which is a dangerous adverse response to antipsychotic drugs. Both of these conditions can present with hyperthermia, marked muscle rigidity, altered consciousness, autonomic dysfunction, and elevated serum creatine-kinase (CK) levels. However, we describe a special NMLS case with a slight elevation of CK levels and respiratory failure in the full course of her treatment. The patient, a 68-year-old woman with a 4-years history of Parkinson’s disease, presented with hyperthermia and severe muscular rigidity. During the course of her treatment, her maximum temperature was extremely high (above 41°C). At the beginning, the diagnosis of NMLS secondary to dopamine decrease was difficult to make, because her initial blood examination revealed that her serum CK levels were mildly elevated and decreased to normal range rapidly. Although antiparkinsonian drugs and supportive treatment were applied, the patient developed an acute respiratory failure in the early course of treatment. This case report highlights that when confronted with Parkinson’s patients with high body temperature and muscle rigidity, NMLS should be taken into consideration even if there is no CK elevation. Likewise, the need for supportive care is essential, because its complications are severe, even such as respiratory failure. PMID:24600209

  7. Tsunamis caused by submarine slope failures along western Great Bahama Bank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnyder, Jara S. D.; Eberli, Gregor P.; Kirby, James T.; Shi, Fengyan; Tehranirad, Babak; Mulder, Thierry; Ducassou, Emmanuelle; Hebbeln, Dierk; Wintersteller, Paul

    2016-11-01

    Submarine slope failures are a likely cause for tsunami generation along the East Coast of the United States. Among potential source areas for such tsunamis are submarine landslides and margin collapses of Bahamian platforms. Numerical models of past events, which have been identified using high-resolution multibeam bathymetric data, reveal possible tsunami impact on Bimini, the Florida Keys, and northern Cuba. Tsunamis caused by slope failures with terminal landslide velocity of 20 ms‑1 will either dissipate while traveling through the Straits of Florida, or generate a maximum wave of 1.5 m at the Florida coast. Modeling a worst-case scenario with a calculated terminal landslide velocity generates a wave of 4.5 m height. The modeled margin collapse in southwestern Great Bahama Bank potentially has a high impact on northern Cuba, with wave heights between 3.3 to 9.5 m depending on the collapse velocity. The short distance and travel time from the source areas to densely populated coastal areas would make the Florida Keys and Miami vulnerable to such low-probability but high-impact events.

  8. Tsunamis caused by submarine slope failures along western Great Bahama Bank.

    PubMed

    Schnyder, Jara S D; Eberli, Gregor P; Kirby, James T; Shi, Fengyan; Tehranirad, Babak; Mulder, Thierry; Ducassou, Emmanuelle; Hebbeln, Dierk; Wintersteller, Paul

    2016-11-04

    Submarine slope failures are a likely cause for tsunami generation along the East Coast of the United States. Among potential source areas for such tsunamis are submarine landslides and margin collapses of Bahamian platforms. Numerical models of past events, which have been identified using high-resolution multibeam bathymetric data, reveal possible tsunami impact on Bimini, the Florida Keys, and northern Cuba. Tsunamis caused by slope failures with terminal landslide velocity of 20 ms(-1) will either dissipate while traveling through the Straits of Florida, or generate a maximum wave of 1.5 m at the Florida coast. Modeling a worst-case scenario with a calculated terminal landslide velocity generates a wave of 4.5 m height. The modeled margin collapse in southwestern Great Bahama Bank potentially has a high impact on northern Cuba, with wave heights between 3.3 to 9.5 m depending on the collapse velocity. The short distance and travel time from the source areas to densely populated coastal areas would make the Florida Keys and Miami vulnerable to such low-probability but high-impact events.

  9. Tsunamis caused by submarine slope failures along western Great Bahama Bank

    PubMed Central

    Schnyder, Jara S.D.; Eberli, Gregor P.; Kirby, James T.; Shi, Fengyan; Tehranirad, Babak; Mulder, Thierry; Ducassou, Emmanuelle; Hebbeln, Dierk; Wintersteller, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Submarine slope failures are a likely cause for tsunami generation along the East Coast of the United States. Among potential source areas for such tsunamis are submarine landslides and margin collapses of Bahamian platforms. Numerical models of past events, which have been identified using high-resolution multibeam bathymetric data, reveal possible tsunami impact on Bimini, the Florida Keys, and northern Cuba. Tsunamis caused by slope failures with terminal landslide velocity of 20 ms−1 will either dissipate while traveling through the Straits of Florida, or generate a maximum wave of 1.5 m at the Florida coast. Modeling a worst-case scenario with a calculated terminal landslide velocity generates a wave of 4.5 m height. The modeled margin collapse in southwestern Great Bahama Bank potentially has a high impact on northern Cuba, with wave heights between 3.3 to 9.5 m depending on the collapse velocity. The short distance and travel time from the source areas to densely populated coastal areas would make the Florida Keys and Miami vulnerable to such low-probability but high-impact events. PMID:27811961

  10. Can patients with moderate to severe acute respiratory failure from COPD be treated safely with noninvasive mechanical ventilation on the ward?

    PubMed Central

    Yalcinsoy, Murat; Salturk, Cuneyt; Oztas, Selahattin; Gungor, Sinem; Ozmen, Ipek; Kabadayi, Feyyaz; Oztim, Aysem Askim; Aksoy, Emine; Adıguzel, Nalan; Oruc, Ozlem; Karakurt, Zuhal

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Noninvasive mechanical ventilation (NIMV) usage outside of intensive care unit is not recommended in patients with COPD for severe acute respiratory failure (ARF). We assessed the factors associated with failure of NIMV in patients with ARF and severe acidosis admitted to the emergency department and followed on respiratory ward. Patients and methods This is a retrospective observational cohort study conducted in a tertiary teaching hospital specialized in chest diseases and thoracic surgery between June 1, 2013 and May 31, 2014. COPD patients who were admitted to our emergency department due to ARF were included. Patients were grouped according to the severity of acidosis into two groups: group 1 (pH=7.20–7.25) and group 2 (pH=7.26–7.30). Results Group 1 included 59 patients (mean age: 70±10 years, 30.5% female) and group 2 included 171 patients (mean age: 67±11 years, 28.7% female). On multivariable analysis, partial arterial oxygen pressure to the inspired fractionated oxygen (PaO2/FiO2) ratio <200, delta pH value <0.30, and pH value <7.31 on control arterial blood gas after NIMV in the emergency room and peak C-reactive protein were found to be the risk factors for NIMV failure in COPD patients with ARF in the ward. Conclusion NIMV is effective not only in mild respiratory failure but also with severe forms of COPD patients presenting with severe exacerbation. The determination of the failure criteria of NIMV and the expertise of the team is critical for treatment success. PMID:27330283

  11. Instantaneous responses to high-frequency chest wall oscillation in patients with acute pneumonic respiratory failure receiving mechanical ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Ming-Lung; Chou, Yi-Ling; Lee, Chai-Yuan; Huang, Shih-Feng

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Endotracheal intubation and prolonged immobilization of patients receiving mechanical ventilation may reduce expectoration function. High-frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO) may ameliorate airway secretion movement; however, the instantaneous changes in patients’ cardiopulmonary responses are unknown. Moreover, HFCWO may influence ventilator settings by the vigorous oscillation. The aim of this study was to investigate these issues. Methods: Seventy-three patients (52 men) aged 71.5 ± 13.4 years who were intubated with mechanical ventilation for pneumonic respiratory failure were recruited and randomly classified into 2 groups (HFCWO group, n = 36; and control group who received conventional chest physical therapy (CCPT, n = 37). HFCWO was applied with a fixed protocol, whereas CCPT was conducted using standard protocols. Both groups received sputum suction after the procedure. Changes in ventilator settings and the subjects’ responses were measured at preset intervals and compared within groups and between groups. Results: Oscillation did not affect the ventilator settings (all P > 0.05). The mean airway pressure, breathing frequency, and rapid shallow breathing index increased, and the tidal volume and SpO2 decreased (all P < 0.05). After sputum suction, the peak airway pressure (Ppeak) and minute ventilation decreased (all P < 0.05). The HFCWO group had a lower tidal volume and SpO2 at the end of oscillation, and lower Ppeak and tidal volume after sputum suction than the CCPT group. Conclusions: HFCWO affects breathing pattern and SpO2 but not ventilator settings, whereas CCPT maintains a steadier condition. After sputum suction, HFCWO slightly improved Ppeak compared to CCPT, suggesting that the study extends the indications of HFCWO for these patients in intensive care unit. (ClinicalTrials.gov number NCT02758106, retrospectively registered.) PMID:28248854

  12. Sleeping and resting respiratory rates in dogs and cats with medically-controlled left-sided congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Porciello, F; Rishniw, M; Ljungvall, I; Ferasin, L; Haggstrom, J; Ohad, D G

    2016-01-01

    Sleeping and resting respiratory rates (SRR and RRR, respectively) are commonly used to monitor dogs and cats with left-sided cardiac disease and to identify animals with left-sided congestive heart failure (L-CHF). Dogs and cats with subclinical heart disease have SRRmean values <30 breaths/min. However, little is known about SRR and RRR in dogs and cats with CHF that is well controlled with medical therapy. In this study, SRR and RRR were measured by the owners of 51 dogs and 22 cats with stable, well-controlled CHF. Median canine SRRmean was 20 breaths/min (7-39 breaths/min); eight dogs were ≥25 breaths/min and one dog only was ≥30 breaths/min. Canine SRRmean was unrelated to pulmonary hypertension or diuretic dose. Median feline SRRmean was 20 breaths/min (13-31 breaths/min); four cats were ≥25 breaths/min and only one cat was ≥30 breaths/min. Feline SRRmean was unrelated to diuretic dose. SRR remained stable during collection in both species with little day-to-day variability. The median canine RRRmean was 24 breaths/min (12-44 breaths/min), 17 were ≥25 breaths/min, seven were ≥30 breaths/min, two were >40 breaths/min. Median feline RRRmean was 24 breaths/min (15-45 breaths/min); five cats had RRRmean ≥25 breaths/min; one had ≥30 breaths/min, and two had ≥40 breaths/min. These data suggest that most dogs and cats with CHF that is medically well-controlled and stable have SRRmean and RRRmean <30 breaths/min at home. Clinicians can use these data to help determine how best to control CHF in dogs and cats.

  13. 76 FR 70768 - Common-Cause Failure Analysis in Event and Condition Assessment: Guidance and Research, Draft...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Common-Cause Failure Analysis in Event and Condition Assessment: Guidance and Research, Draft Report for Comment; Correction AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Draft NUREG; request...

  14. Viral agents causing lower respiratory tract infections in hospitalized children: evaluation of the Speed-Oligo® RSV assay for the detection of respiratory syncytial virus.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Yebra, W; Ávila-Carrillo, J A; Giménez-Sánchez, F; Reyes-Bertos, A; Sánchez-Forte, M; Morales-Torres, M; Rojas, A; Mendoza, J

    2012-03-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the viral agent which is more frequently involved in lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) in infants under 1 year of age in developed countries. A new oligochromatographic assay, Speed-Oligo® RSV, was designed and optimized for the specific detection and identification of RSV subtypes A and B. The test was evaluated in 289 clinical samples from 169 hospitalized children using an immunochromatography (IC) test, virus isolation by culture, and an in-house real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Other viruses causing LRTIs were investigated by cell culture or PCR-based tests. Sixty-two patients were infected by RSV (36.7%). In addition, adenovirus, influenza B, parainfluenza 2, and human metapneumovirus were detected in rates ranging from 5 to 8%. A proportion of 10.1% of the patients had mixed infections. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were, respectively, 94.9, 99.4, 98.9, and 97.4% for Speed-Oligo® RSV, 92.9, 96.3, 92.9, and 96.3% for RT-PCR/RSV, and 58.4, 98.1, 93.3, and 82.6% for IC. Our rates of viral detection and co-infection were similar to those of previously reported series. Finally, we find that Speed-Oligo® RSV is a rapid and easy-to-perform technique for the detection of RSV and the identification of subtypes A and B.

  15. Respiratory Viral Infection in Neonatal Piglets Causes Marked Microglia Activation in the Hippocampus and Deficits in Spatial Learning

    PubMed Central

    Elmore, Monica R. P.; Burton, Michael D.; Conrad, Matthew S.; Rytych, Jennifer L.; Van Alstine, William G.

    2014-01-01

    Environmental insults during sensitive periods can affect hippocampal development and function, but little is known about peripheral infection, especially in humans and other animals whose brain is gyrencephalic and experiences major perinatal growth. Using a piglet model, the present study showed that inoculation on postnatal day 7 with the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) caused microglial activation within the hippocampus with 82% and 43% of isolated microglia being MHC II+ 13 and 20 d after inoculation, respectively. In control piglets, <5% of microglia isolated from the hippocampus were MHC II+. PRRSV piglets were febrile (p < 0.0001), anorectic (p < 0.0001), and weighed less at the end of the study (p = 0.002) compared with control piglets. Increased inflammatory gene expression (e.g., IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, and IFN-γ) was seen across multiple brain regions, including the hippocampus, whereas reductions in CD200, NGF, and MBP were evident. In a test of spatial learning, PRRSV piglets took longer to acquire the task, had a longer latency to choice, and had a higher total distance moved. Overall, these data demonstrate that viral respiratory infection is associated with a marked increase in activated microglia in the hippocampus, neuroinflammation, and impaired performance in a spatial cognitive task. As respiratory infections are common in human neonates and infants, approaches to regulate microglial cell activity are likely to be important. PMID:24501353

  16. [Aspiration of milk in healthy infant--cause of acute respiratory arrest?].

    PubMed

    Erler, Thomas

    2007-02-01

    We present the case of 4month old female infant, who obviously suffered from a respiratory arrest during bottle-feed ing. After primary successful resuscitation the baby died after 49 days due to large intracranial hemorrages. The diagnosis of shaking trauma was based on the detailed medical examinations and on the case history taken from the police file. The life-threatening shaking trauma is rare as an emergency. Therefore every doctor should be aware of a potential victim in cases of infants who are normal developed without signs of injuries, have no history of a severe disease and show life-threatening symptomes.

  17. [Fractured tracheostomy tube: a rare cause of respiratory distress in the tracheotomized child. Case report].

    PubMed

    Cuestas, Giselle; Martínez, Juan C; Pena, Roberto; Razetti, Juan

    2015-12-01

    Fracture and migration of the tracheotomy tube in the tracheobronchial tree is an uncommon complication of tracheotomy. Early diagnosis and proper treatment are essential because of the potential risk of fatal respiratory obstruction. Diagnosis should be suspected in all tracheotomized children undergoing breathing difficulties. It is confirmed by chest x-ray and endoscopic examination. The recommended treatment includes the endoscopic removal of the aspirated cannula through the tracheal stoma. We describe the clinical presentation and the management of a broken tracheotomy tube which was presented as a foreign body in the airway of a 18-month-old child. Recommendations for tracheostomy care are listed.

  18. Budd-chiari syndrome causing acute liver failure: A multicenter case series.

    PubMed

    Parekh, Justin; Matei, Vlad M; Canas-Coto, Alejandro; Friedman, Daniel; Lee, William M

    2017-02-01

    Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS) is a rare disease resulting from obstruction of the hepatic venous outflow tract that typically presents with abdominal pain, jaundice, and ascites without frank liver failure. However, BCS may also evolve more rapidly to acute liver failure (ALF). In this study, we describe the clinical features, treatment, and outcomes of ALF due to BCS and compare our results with those in the published literature. Twenty of the 2344 patients enrolled in the Acute Liver Failure Study Group (ALFSG) registry since 1998 presented with a clinical diagnosis of BCS. An additional 19 patients of ALF-BCS in the English language literature were reviewed and compared with the ALFSG cases. Most ALF-BCS patients were white (84%) and female (84%) in their fourth decade. A hypercoagulable state was noted in 63% of patients. BCS was diagnosed by Doppler ultrasonography or abdominal computed tomography in all patients. Liver biopsies (n = 6) all had evidence of severe pericentral necrosis. Treatments used included most commonly anticoagulation (71%), but also transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS; 37%) and orthotopic liver transplantation (37%). In-hospital mortality was approximately 60%. In conclusion, BCS is a rare cause of ALF and mandates prompt diagnosis and management for successful outcomes. Once the diagnosis is confirmed, prompt anticoagulation is recommended in conjunction with evaluation for malignancy or thrombophilic disorder. Mortality may have improved in recent years with use of TIPS and/or orthotopic liver transplantation compared with prior published reports. Liver Transplantation 23 135-142 2017 AASLD.

  19. Fast detection of manufacturing systematic design pattern failures causing device yield loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Denmat, Jean-Christophe; Feldman, Nelly; Riewer, Olivia; Yesilada, Emek; Vallet, Michel; Suzor, Christophe; Talluto, Salvatore

    2015-03-01

    Starting from the 45nm technology node, systematic defectivity has a significant impact on device yield loss with each new technology node. The effort required to achieve patterning maturity with zero yield detractor is also significantly increasing with technology nodes. Within the manufacturing environment, new in-line wafer inspection methods have been developed to identify device systematic defects, including the process window qualification (PWQ) methodology used to characterize process robustness. Although patterning is characterized with PWQ methodology, some questions remain: How can we demonstrate that the measured process window is large enough to avoid design-based defects which will impact the device yield? Can we monitor the systematic yield loss on nominal wafers? From device test engineering point of view, systematic yield detractors are expected to be identified by Automated Test Pattern Generator (ATPG) test results diagnostics performed after electrical wafer sort (EWS). Test diagnostics can identify failed nets or cells causing systematic yield loss [1],[2]. Convergence from device failed nets and cells to failed manufacturing design pattern are usually based on assumptions that should be confirmed by an electrical failure analysis (EFA). However, many EFA investigations are required before the design pattern failures are found, and thus design pattern failure identification was costly in time and resources. With this situation, an opportunity to share knowledge exists between device test engineering and manufacturing environments to help with device yield improvement. This paper presents a new yield diagnostics flow dedicated to correlation of critical design patterns detected within manufacturing environment, with the observed device yield loss. The results obtained with this new flow on a 28nm technology device are described, with the defects of interest and the device yield impact for each design pattern. The EFA done to validate the design

  20. Hitch-hiker taken for a ride: an unusual cause of myocarditis, septic shock and adult respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kushawaha, Anurag; Brown, Mark; Martin, Ismael; Evenhuis, Walther

    2013-01-01

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is a serious tick-borne illness caused by Rickettsia rickettsii that is endemic in southeastern USA. Although RMSF has been described as causing the classic clinical triad of fever, headache and a characteristic rash, serious and potentially life-threatening manifestations can occur. Cardiopulmonary involvement, although infrequent, may occur with severe cases of RMSF. Rickettsial myocarditis is an uncommon occurrence. We present a case of a previously healthy 26-year-old man, who was hitch-hiking across the southeastern USA, with serologically proven RMSF causing adult respiratory distress syndrome, septic shock and myocarditis manifested by elevated cardiac enzymes and decrease in myocardial function. After treatment with antibiotics, the myocarditis resolved. Therefore, although unusual, clinicians should be aware of possible myocardial involvement in patients with appropriate tick-exposure histories or other clinical signs of RMSF. PMID:23314875

  1. Wernicke encephalopathy after gastrointestinal surgery for cancer: causes of diagnostic failure or delay.

    PubMed

    Rufa, A; Rosini, F; Cerase, A; Giannini, F; Pretegiani, E; Buccoliero, R; Dotti, M T; Federico, A

    2011-04-01

    Wernicke encephalopathy (WE) is a neurological emergency due to thiamine deficiency. We aimed to identify clinical course and causes of diagnostic delay or failure of WE in a group of patients who underwent surgery for gastrointestinal tumors. A retrospective review of clinical, laboratory, neuroimaging, and therapeutic features of 10 patients with WE following abdominal surgery for cancer was carried out. Four patients died; in these subjects, diagnosis was delayed and supplementation of vitamin was absent or likely inadequate. Diagnostic delay or failure was also related to the coexistence of several medical complications at presentation masking typical symptoms of WE. In the surviving patients, outcome was influenced by promptness and type of therapy. Postoperative abdominal bleeding and number of subsequent operations may also had an effect. Postsurgical patients with gastrointestinal tumors may develop a subtle WE. The number of subsequent operations and the severity of postoperative complications may increase the risk of unrecognized WE. The disease should be suspected in postsurgical patients who have unexpected mental status changes, even under prophylactic treatment with vitamins. We suggest that prophylaxis with high doses of thiamine should be undertaken in patients with gastrointestinal tumors before surgery.

  2. Fhf2 gene deletion causes temperature-sensitive cardiac conduction failure

    PubMed Central

    Park, David S.; Shekhar, Akshay; Marra, Christopher; Lin, Xianming; Vasquez, Carolina; Solinas, Sergio; Kelley, Kevin; Morley, Gregory; Goldfarb, Mitchell; Fishman, Glenn I.

    2016-01-01

    Fever is a highly conserved systemic response to infection dating back over 600 million years. Although conferring a survival benefit, fever can negatively impact the function of excitable tissues, such as the heart, producing cardiac arrhythmias. Here we show that mice lacking fibroblast growth factor homologous factor 2 (FHF2) have normal cardiac rhythm at baseline, but increasing core body temperature by as little as 3 °C causes coved-type ST elevations and progressive conduction failure that is fully reversible upon return to normothermia. FHF2-deficient cardiomyocytes generate action potentials upon current injection at 25 °C but are unexcitable at 40 °C. The absence of FHF2 accelerates the rate of closed-state and open-state sodium channel inactivation, which synergizes with temperature-dependent enhancement of inactivation rate to severely suppress cardiac sodium currents at elevated temperatures. Our experimental and computational results identify an essential role for FHF2 in dictating myocardial excitability and conduction that safeguards against temperature-sensitive conduction failure. PMID:27701382

  3. Stratgies for Diversity Usage to Mitigate Postulated Common Cause Failure Vulnerabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Richard Thomas; Waterman, Michael E.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes an approach to establish effective mitigating strategies that can resolve potential common-cause failure (CCF) vulnerabilities in instrumentation and control systems at nuclear power plants. A particular objective in the development of these strategies, which consist of combinations of diversity attributes and their associated criteria, is to address the unique characteristics of digital technology that can contribute to CCF concerns. The research approach employed to establish diversity strategies involves investigation of available documentation on diversity usage and experience from nuclear power and non-nuclear industries, capture of expert knowledge and lessons learned, determination of common practices, and assessment of the nature of CCFs and compensating diversity attributes. The resulting diversity strategies address considerations such as the effect of technology choices, the nature of CCF vulnerabilities, and the prospective impact of each diversity type. In particular, the impact of each attribute and criterion on the purpose, process, product, and performance aspects of diverse systems are considered.

  4. CFD research on runaway transient of pumped storage power station caused by pumping power failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L. G.; Zhou, D. Q.

    2013-12-01

    To study runaway transient of pumped storage power station caused by pumping power failure, three dimensional unsteady numerical simulations were executed on geometrical model of the whole flow system. Through numerical calculation, the changeable flow configuration and variation law of some parameters such as unit rotate speed,flow rate and static pressure of measurement points were obtained and compared with experimental data. Numerical results show that runaway speed agrees well with experimental date and its error was 3.7%. The unit undergoes pump condition, brake condition, turbine condition and runaway condition with flow characteristic changing violently. In runaway condition, static pressure in passage pulses very strongly which frequency is related to runaway speed.

  5. Analysis of ammonium sulfate circulation tank failure -- Possible causes and their remediation

    SciTech Connect

    O`Hearn, R.J.

    1997-12-31

    Acme steel manufactures a liquid solution of ammonium sulphate by scrubbing the coke oven gas with a dilute solution of sulphuric acid. When the bath reaches a predetermined specific gravity, it is isolated from the system, neutralized with aqua ammonia, pumped to the shipping tanks, re-charged with water and acid, then placed back in service. To improve the ammonia removal efficiency, three circulation tanks are used in this system. In June 1996, the volume of two of the sulfate solution tanks in the ammonia removal plant were increased by two different pressure events. The first tank was damaged by pressure that was not relieved due to a plugged vent line. The second tank was damaged by a pressure event generated during the process of making ammonium sulfate. This paper will discuss the cause of the second tank`s failure, and the design solution to restart the operation of the plant.

  6. Mutations in genes encoding condensin complex proteins cause microcephaly through decatenation failure at mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Carol-Anne; Murray, Jennie E.; Carroll, Paula; Leitch, Andrea; Mackenzie, Karen J.; Halachev, Mihail; Fetit, Ahmed E.; Keith, Charlotte; Bicknell, Louise S.; Fluteau, Adeline; Gautier, Philippe; Hall, Emma A.; Joss, Shelagh; Soares, Gabriela; Silva, João; Bober, Michael B.; Duker, Angela; Wise, Carol A.; Quigley, Alan J.; Phadke, Shubha R.; Wood, Andrew J.; Vagnarelli, Paola; Jackson, Andrew P.

    2016-01-01

    Compaction of chromosomes is essential for accurate segregation of the genome during mitosis. In vertebrates, two condensin complexes ensure timely chromosome condensation, sister chromatid disentanglement, and maintenance of mitotic chromosome structure. Here, we report that biallelic mutations in NCAPD2, NCAPH, or NCAPD3, encoding subunits of these complexes, cause microcephaly. In addition, hypomorphic Ncaph2 mice have significantly reduced brain size, with frequent anaphase chromatin bridge formation observed in apical neural progenitors during neurogenesis. Such DNA bridges also arise in condensin-deficient patient cells, where they are the consequence of failed sister chromatid disentanglement during chromosome compaction. This results in chromosome segregation errors, leading to micronucleus formation and increased aneuploidy in daughter cells. These findings establish “condensinopathies” as microcephalic disorders, with decatenation failure as an additional disease mechanism for microcephaly, implicating mitotic chromosome condensation as a key process ensuring mammalian cerebral cortex size. PMID:27737959

  7. A novel mitochondrial MTND5 frameshift mutation causing isolated complex I deficiency, renal failure and myopathy.

    PubMed

    Alston, Charlotte L; Morak, Monika; Reid, Christopher; Hargreaves, Iain P; Pope, Simon A S; Land, John M; Heales, Simon J; Horvath, Rita; Mundy, Helen; Taylor, Robert W

    2010-02-01

    Isolated complex I deficiency is the most commonly reported enzyme defect in paediatric mitochondrial disorders, and may arise due to mutations in nuclear-encoded structural or assembly genes, or the mitochondrial genome. We present the clinical, biochemical and molecular genetic data in a young girl whose clinical picture is dominated by chronic renal failure, myopathy and persistent lactic acidosis. An isolated complex I deficiency in muscle was identified due to a novel mutation (m.12425delA) in the MTND5 gene. This single nucleotide deletion is heteroplasmic and detectable in several tissues from the proband but not her mother, suggesting a de novo mutation event. The description of the first frameshift mutation in a mitochondrial complex I gene affirms mitochondrial DNA mutations as an important cause of isolated complex I deficiency in children and the importance of whole mitochondrial genome sequencing in the diagnostic work-up to elucidate the underlying molecular genetic abnormality and provide important genetic advice.

  8. Supersized Atheroma Causing Acquired Coarctation of Aorta Leading to Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Karakattu, Sajin; Murtaza, Ghulam; Dinesh, Sharma; Sivagnanam, Kamesh; Schoondyke, Jeffrey; Paul, Timir

    2017-01-01

    Calcified atheromatous aortic lesion causing significant narrowing of the aorta is an uncommon clinical entity. This calcified atheroma leads to obstruction of the lumen of the aorta simulating acquired coarctation of aorta causing impaired perfusion of lower limbs, visceral ischemia, and hypertension. We report a case of 58-year-old patient who presented with dyspnea on exertion, orthopnea, paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea, 25-lb weight gain, lower extremity edema, and chest pain. Extensive workup including computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a large calcific mass in the aortic arch causing his presenting symptoms. After surgical correction his symptoms resolved. Any patient presenting with heart failure symptoms in the setting of uncontrolled renovascular hypertension, intermittent claudication symptoms, or visceral ischemia with normal ejection fraction but moderate to severe left ventricular hypertrophy should be in high suspicion for acquired coarctation of aorta. The routine thorough examination of pulses in bilateral upper and lower extremities in all hypertensive patients is a very simple and useful clinical tool to diagnose acquired aortic coarctation. PMID:28203578

  9. [Recurrent infections of the respiratory tract and staphylococcal pneumonia with septic shock and total respiratory failure in a patient with histiocytosis X].

    PubMed

    Wawrzyńska, L; Meleniewska-Maciszewska, A; Burakowski, J

    1994-01-01

    Disseminated pulmonary infiltrates, cutaneous lesions and diabetes insipidus in a female patients with a history of recurrent pneumothorax and persistent respiratory tract infections suggested the diagnosis of histiocytosis X. The pathological examination of a biopsy lung tissue specimen confirmed that diagnosis. In the course of treatment many dangerous complications were observed. The intensive therapy including artificial ventilation (24 days) was fully effective and settle the beneficial clinical outcome.

  10. Atelectasis causes vascular leak and lethal right ventricular failure in uninjured rat lungs.

    PubMed

    Duggan, Michelle; McCaul, Conán L; McNamara, Patrick J; Engelberts, Doreen; Ackerley, Cameron; Kavanagh, Brian P

    2003-06-15

    During mechanical ventilation, lung recruitment attenuates injury caused by high VT, improves oxygenation, and may optimize pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR). We hypothesized that ventilation without recruitment would induce injury in otherwise healthy lungs. Anesthetized rats were ventilated with conventional mechanical ventilation (VT 8 ml/kg; respiratory frequency 40 per minute) and 21% inspired oxygen, with or without a recruitment strategy consisting of recruitment maneuvers plus positive end-expiratory pressure, in the presence or absence of a laparotomy. Additional experiments examined the impact of atelectasis on right ventricular function using echocardiography, as well as functional residual capacity and PVR. Lack of recruitment resulted in reduced overall survival (59% nonrecruited vs. 100% recruited, p < 0.05), increased microvascular leak, greater impairment of oxygenation and lung compliance, increased PVR, and elevated plasma lactate. Echocardiography demonstrated that right ventricular dysfunction occurred in the absence of recruitment. Finally, samples from nonrecruited lungs demonstrated ultrastructural evidence of microvascular endothelial disruption. Although such effects clearly do not occur with comparable magnitude in the clinical context, the current data suggest novel mechanisms (microvascular leak, right ventricular dysfunction) whereby derecruitment may contribute to development of lung injury and adverse systemic outcome.

  11. TRMT5 Mutations Cause a Defect in Post-transcriptional Modification of Mitochondrial tRNA Associated with Multiple Respiratory-Chain Deficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Christopher A.; Kopajtich, Robert; D’Souza, Aaron R.; Rorbach, Joanna; Kremer, Laura S.; Husain, Ralf A.; Dallabona, Cristina; Donnini, Claudia; Alston, Charlotte L.; Griffin, Helen; Pyle, Angela; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Strom, Tim M.; Meitinger, Thomas; Rodenburg, Richard J.; Schottmann, Gudrun; Schuelke, Markus; Romain, Nadine; Haller, Ronald G.; Ferrero, Ileana; Haack, Tobias B.; Taylor, Robert W.; Prokisch, Holger; Minczuk, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Deficiencies in respiratory-chain complexes lead to a variety of clinical phenotypes resulting from inadequate energy production by the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation system. Defective expression of mtDNA-encoded genes, caused by mutations in either the mitochondrial or nuclear genome, represents a rapidly growing group of human disorders. By whole-exome sequencing, we identified two unrelated individuals carrying compound heterozygous variants in TRMT5 (tRNA methyltransferase 5). TRMT5 encodes a mitochondrial protein with strong homology to members of the class I-like methyltransferase superfamily. Both affected individuals presented with lactic acidosis and evidence of multiple mitochondrial respiratory-chain-complex deficiencies in skeletal muscle, although the clinical presentation of the two affected subjects was remarkably different; one presented in childhood with failure to thrive and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and the other was an adult with a life-long history of exercise intolerance. Mutations in TRMT5 were associated with the hypomodification of a guanosine residue at position 37 (G37) of mitochondrial tRNA; this hypomodification was particularly prominent in skeletal muscle. Deficiency of the G37 modification was also detected in human cells subjected to TRMT5 RNAi. The pathogenicity of the detected variants was further confirmed in a heterologous yeast model and by the rescue of the molecular phenotype after re-expression of wild-type TRMT5 cDNA in cells derived from the affected individuals. Our study highlights the importance of post-transcriptional modification of mitochondrial tRNAs for faithful mitochondrial function. PMID:26189817

  12. Severe acute respiratory distress syndrome caused by unintentional sewing machine lubricant ingestion: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Kishore, Sunil; Chandelia, Sudha; Patharia, Neha; Swarnim

    2016-01-01

    Sewing machine oil ingestion is rare but is possible due to its availability at home. Chemically, it belongs to hydrocarbon family which is toxic if aspirated, owing to their physical properties such as high volatility and low viscosity. On the contrary, sewing machine lubricant has high viscosity and low volatility which makes it aspiration less likely. The main danger of hydrocarbon ingestion is chemical pneumonitis which may be as severe as acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We report a case of a 5-year-old girl with accidental ingestion of sewing machine lubricant oil, who subsequently developed ARDS refractory to mechanical ventilation. There was much improvement with airway pressure release ventilation mode of ventilation, but the child succumbed to death due to pulmonary hemorrhage. PMID:27994384

  13. An outbreak in 1965 of severe respiratory illness caused by the Legionnaires' disease bacterium.

    PubMed

    Thacker, S B; Bennett, J V; Tsai, T F; Fraser, D W; McDade, J E; Shepard, C C; Williams, K H; Stuart, W H; Dull, H B; Eickhoff, T C

    1978-10-01

    In January 1977 an unsolved outbreak of infection at St. Elizabeth's Hospital (Washington, D.C.) that occurred in 1965 was linked with Legionnaires' disease. The link was made by fluorescent antibody testing with the bacterium isolated from tissues of persons with Legionnaires' disease in the 1976 outbreak in Philadelphia. In July and August 1965, an epidemic of severe respiratory disease characterized by abrupt onset of high fever, weakness, malaise, and nonproductive cough, frequently accompanied by radiographic evidence of pneumonia, affected at least 81 patients at St. Elizabeth's Hospital, a general psychiatric hospital. Fourteen (17%) of the affected patients died. Intensive epidemiologic and laboratory investigations in 1965 did not determine the etiology. The etiologic organism may have become airborne from sites of soil excavation.

  14. Urea-induced ROS cause endothelial dysfunction in chronic renal failure

    PubMed Central

    D'Apolito, Maria; Du, Xueliang; Pisanelli, Daniela; Pettoello-Mantovani, Massimo; Campanozzi, Angelo; Giacco, Ferdinando; Maffione, Angela Bruna; Colia, Anna Laura; Brownlee, Michael; Giardino, Ida

    2015-01-01

    Objective The pathogenic events responsible for accelerated atherosclerosis in patients with chronic renal failure (CRF) are poorly understood. Here we investigate the hypothesis that concentrations of urea associated with CRF and increased ROS production in adipocytes might also increase ROS production directly in arterial endothelial cells, causing the same pathophysiologic changes seen with hyperglycemia. Methods Primary cultures of human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC) were exposed to 20 mM urea for 48 hrs. C57BL/6J wild-type mice underwent 5/6 nephrectomy or a sham operation. Randomized groups of 5/6 nephrectomized mice and their controls were also injected i.p. with a SOD/catalase mimetic (MnTBAP) for 15 days starting immediately after the final surgical procedure. Results Urea at concentrations seen in CRF induced mitochondrial ROS production in cultured HAEC. Urea-induced ROS caused the activation of endothelial pro-inflammatory pathways through the inhibition of GAPDH, including increased protein kinase C isoforms activity, increased hexosamine pathway activity, and accumulation of intracellular AGEs (advanced glycation end products). Urea-induced ROS directly inactivated the anti-atherosclerosis enzyme PGI2 synthase and also caused ER stress. Normalization of mitochondrial ROS production prevented each of these effects of urea. In uremic mice, treatment with MnTBAP prevented aortic oxidative stress, PGI2 synthase activity reduction and increased expression of the pro-inflammatory proteins TNFα, IL-6, VCAM1, Endoglin, and MCP-1. Conclusions Taken together, these data show that urea itself, at levels common in patients with CRF, causes endothelial dysfunction and activation of proatherogenic pathways. PMID:25682038

  15. Joint disorder; a contributory cause to reproductive failure in beef bulls?

    PubMed

    Persson, Ylva; Söderquist, Lennart; Ekman, Stina

    2007-11-05

    The lame sire, unsound for breeding, can cause substantial economic loss due to reduced pregnancies in the beef-producing herd. To test the hypothesis that joint disorder is a possible cause of infertility in beef sires, right and left hind limb bones from 34 beef sires were examined postmortem to identify lesions in the femorotibial, femoropatellar (stifle), tarsocrural, talocalcaneus, and proximal intertarsal (tarsal) joints. The bulls were slaughtered during or after the breeding season due to poor fertility results. Aliquots of the cauda epididymal contents taken postmortem from 26 bulls were used for sperm morphology evaluation. As a control, hind limbs (but no semen samples) from 11 beef bulls with good fertility results were included. Almost all infertile bulls (30/34) had lesions in at least one joint. Twenty-eight bulls (28/30, 93%) had lesions in the stifle joint, and 24 (24/28, 86%) of these were bilateral. Fourteen bulls (14/30, 47%) had lesions in the tarsal joint, and 10 (10/14, 71%) of these were bilateral. Four bulls (4/34, 12%) had no lesions, three bulls (3/34, 9%) had mild osteoarthritis (OA), 5 (5/34, 15%) moderate OA, 17 (17/34, 50%) severe OA and 5 (5/34, 15%) deformed OA. Almost all OA lesions (97%) were characterized as lesions secondary to osteochondrosis dissecans. All the bulls with satisfactory sperm morphology (n = 12/34) had joint lesions, with mostly severe or deformed bilateral lesions (83%). Consequently, the most likely cause of infertility in these 12 bulls was joint disease. Almost all control bulls (10/11) had OA lesions, but most of them were graded as mild (55%) or moderate (36%). None of the control bulls had severe lesions or deformed OA. We suggest that joint lesions should be taken into consideration as a contributory cause of reproductive failure in beef sires without symptoms of lameness.

  16. Predictive Factors for the Effect of Treatment by Noninvasive Ventilation in Patients with Respiratory Failure as a Result of Acute Exacerbation of the Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pejkovska, Sava; Kaeva, Biserka Jovkovska; Goseva, Zlatica; Arsovski, Zoran; Janeva, Jelena Jovanovska; Zeynel, Sead

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Noninvasive mechanical ventilation (NIV) applies ventilator support through the patient’s upper airway using a mask. AIM: The aim of the study is to define factors that will point out an increased risk of NIV failure in patients with exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients over the age of 40, treated with NIV, were prospectively recruited. After data processing, the patients were divided into two groups: 1) successful NIV treatment group; 2) failed NIV treatment group. RESULTS: On admission arterial pH and Glasgow coma scale (GCS) levels were lower (pH: p < 0.05, GCS: p < 0.05), and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE) score and PaCO2 were higher (p < 0.05) in the NIV failure group. Arterial pH was lower (p < 0.05) and PaCO2 and respiratory rate were higher (p < 0.05) after 1h, and arterial pH was lower (p < 0.05) and PaCO2 (p < 0.05), respiratory and heart rate were higher (p < 0.05) after 4h in the NIV failure group. CONCLUSION: Measurement and monitoring of certain parameters may be of value in terms of predicting the effectiveness of NIV treatment. PMID:27275303

  17. β-Amyloid Causes Depletion of Synaptic Vesicles Leading to Neurotransmission Failure*

    PubMed Central

    Parodi, Jorge; Sepúlveda, Fernando J.; Roa, Jorge; Opazo, Carlos; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C.; Aguayo, Luis G.

    2010-01-01

    Alzheimer disease is a progressive neurodegenerative brain disorder that leads to major debilitating cognitive deficits. It is believed that the alterations capable of causing brain circuitry dysfunctions have a slow onset and that the full blown disease may take several years to develop. Therefore, it is important to understand the early, asymptomatic, and possible reversible states of the disease with the aim of proposing preventive and disease-modifying therapeutic strategies. It is largely unknown how amyloid β-peptide (Aβ), a principal agent in Alzheimer disease, affects synapses in brain neurons. In this study, we found that similar to other pore-forming neurotoxins, Aβ induced a rapid increase in intracellular calcium and miniature currents, indicating an enhancement in vesicular transmitter release. Significantly, blockade of these effects by low extracellular calcium and a peptide known to act as an inhibitor of the Aβ-induced pore prevented the delayed failure, indicating that Aβ blocks neurotransmission by causing vesicular depletion. This new mechanism for Aβ synaptic toxicity should provide an alternative pathway to search for small molecules that can antagonize these effects of Aβ. PMID:19915004

  18. Acute liver failure caused by mushroom poisoning: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Erden, Abdulsamet; Esmeray, Kübra; Karagöz, Hatice; Karahan, Samet; Gümüşçü, Hasan Hüseyin; Başak, Mustafa; Cetinkaya, Ali; Avcı, Deniz; Poyrazoğlu, Orhan Kürşat

    2013-01-01

    It is estimated that there are over 5,000 species of mushrooms worldwide. Some of them are edible and some are poisonous due to containing significant toxins. In more than 95% of mushroom toxicity cases, poisoning occurs as a result of misidentification of the mushroom by an amateur mushroom hunter. The severity of mushroom poisoning may vary, depending on the geographic location where the mushroom is grown, growth conditions, the amount of toxin delivered, and the genetic characteristics of the mushroom. Amanita phalloides is the most common and fatal cause of mushroom poisoning. This mushroom contains amanitins, which are powerful hepatotoxins that inhibit RNA polymerase II in liver. Mushroom poisoning is a relatively rare cause of acute liver failure. A 63-year-old male patient was admitted to the emergency room with weakness, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. He reported ingesting several wild mushrooms about 36 hours earlier. In this article we report a case of lethal Amanita phalloides intoxication from stored mushrooms.

  19. Individual Differences in Self-Regulatory Failure and Menstrual Dysfunction Predict Upper Respiratory Infection Symptoms and Antibody Response to Flu Immunization

    PubMed Central

    Strauman, Timothy J.; Coe, Christopher L.; McCrudden, Megan C.; Vieth, Angela Z.; Kwapil, Lori

    2008-01-01

    Prior research indicates that cognitive priming manipulations that activate personal goals acutely increase or decrease natural killer cell cytotoxicity depending on whether individuals see themselves as making or failing to make progress toward their goals. Those findings in a laboratory setting revealed a psychobiological pathway whereby experiences of failure can influence health, but did not assess the impact of chronic perceived success/failure in goal pursuit on actual health outcomes. Three new studies investigated whether individual differences in perceived failure to attain personal goals influenced the self-reported symptoms of upper respiratory infections (URIs) as well as antibody response to flu immunization. Based on pilot data in young women, it also was hypothesized that the occurrence of menstrual dysfunction might interact with goal pursuit failure to more specifically predict cold and flu symptoms and optimal responses to vaccination. Perceived failure to attain goals did predict the reporting of URI symptoms as well as antibody levels post-immunization, both alone and in combination with menstrual dysfunction. PMID:18294813

  20. Common cause failure analysis of the rodded scram system of the Arkansas Nuclear One-Unit 1 Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Montague, D.F.; Campbell, D.J.; Flanagan, G.F.

    1986-10-01

    This study demonstrates the use of a formal method for common cause failure analysis in a reliability analysis of the Arkansas Nuclear One - Unit 1 rodded scram system. The scram system failure of interest is loss of capability of the system to shut the reactor down when required. The results of this analysis support the ATWS program sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The methods used in this analysis support the NRC's Risk Methods Integration and Evaluation Program (RMIEP).

  1. Prediction of risk of diabetic retinopathy for all-cause mortality, stroke and heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiao-Rong; Zhang, Yong-Peng; Bai, Lu; Zhang, Xue-Lian; Zhou, Jian-Bo; Yang, Jin-Kui

    2017-01-01

    Abstract To examine and quantify the potential relation between diabetic retinopathy (DR) and risk of all-cause mortality, stroke and heart failure (HF). The resources of meta-analysis of epidemiological observational studies were from Pub-med, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, conference, and proceedings. Random/fixed effects models were used to calculate pooled subgroup analysis stratified by different grades of DR was performed to explore the potential source of heterogeneity. Statistical manipulations were undertaken using program STATA. Of the included 25 studies, comprising 142,625 participants, 19 studies were concluded to find the relation of DR to all-cause mortality, 5 for stroke, and 3 for HF. Risk ratio (RR) for all-cause mortality with the presence of DR was 2.33 (95% CI 1.92–2.81) compared with diabetic individuals without DR. Evidences showed a higher risk of all-cause mortality associated with DR in patients with T2D or T1D (RR 2.25, 95% CI 1.91–2.65. RR 2.68, 95% CI 1.34–5.36). According to different grades of DR in patients with T2D, RR for all-cause mortality varied, the risk of nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR) was 1.38 (1.11–1.70), while the risk of proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) was 2.32 (1.75–3.06). There was no evidence of significant heterogeneity (Cochran Q test P = 0.29 vs 0.26, I2 = 19.6% vs 22.6%, respectively). Data from 5 studies in relation to DR and the risk of stroke showed that DR was significantly associated with increased risk of stroke (RR = 1.74, 95%CI: 1.35–2.24), compared with patients without DR. Furthermore, DR (as compared with individuals without DR) was associated with a marginal increased risk of HF in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) (n = 3 studies; RR 2.24, 95% CI 0.98–5.14, P = 0.056). Our results showed that DR increased the risk of all-cause mortality, regardless of the different stages, compared with the diabetic individuals without DR. DR predicted

  2. Cost-effectiveness of noninvasive ventilation for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease-related respiratory failure in Indian hospitals without ICU facilities

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Shraddha P; Pena, Margarita E; Babcock, Charlene Irvin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The majority of Indian hospitals do not provide intensive care unit (ICU) care or ward-based noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NIV). Because no mechanical ventilation or NIV is available in these hospitals, the majority of patients suffering from respiratory failure die. Objective: To perform a cost-effective analysis of two strategies (ward-based NIV with concurrent standard treatment vs standard treatment alone) in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) respiratory failure patients treated in Indian hospitals without ICU care. Materials and Methods: A decision-analytical model was created to compare the cost-effectiveness for the two strategies. Estimates from the literature were used for parameters in the model. Future costs were discounted at 3%. All costs were reported in USD (2012). One-way, two-way, and probabilistic sensitivity analysis were performed. The time horizon was lifetime and perspective was societal. Results: The NIV strategy resulted in 17.7% more survival and was slightly more costly (increased cost of $101 (USD 2012) but resulted in increased quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) (1.67 QALY). The cost-effectiveness (2012 USD)/QALY in the standard and NIV groups was $78/QALY ($535.02/6.82) and $75/QALY ($636.33/8.49), respectively. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was only $61 USD/QALY. This was substantially lower than the gross domestic product (GDP) per capita for India (1489 USD), suggesting the NIV strategy was very cost effective. Using a 5% discount rate resulted in only minimally different results. Probabilistic analysis suggests that NIV strategy was preferred 100% of the time when willingness to pay was >$250 2012 USD. Conclusion: Ward-based NIV treatment is cost-effective in India, and may increase survival of patients with COPD respiratory failure when ICU is not available. PMID:26664158

  3. Non-Invasive Ventilation (NIV) and Homeostatic Model Assessment (HOMA) Index in Stable Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Patients with Chronic Hypercapnic Respiratory Failure: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Dimoulis, Andreas; Pastaka, Chaido; Tsolaki, Vasiliki; Tsilioni, Irini; Pournaras, Spyridon; Liakos, Nikolaos; Georgoulias, Panagiotis; Gourgoulianis, Konstantinos

    2015-08-01

    The effects of Non-invasive Ventilation (NIV) on Insulin Resistance (IR) in stable Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) patients have not been fully explored. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of NIV on IR and adiponectin levels during one year application of NIV in stable COPD patients with Chronic Hypercapnic Respiratory Failure. Twenty-five (25) stable COPD patients with Chronic Hypercapnic Respiratory Failure and with no self-reported comorbidities completed the study. NIV was administered in the spontaneous/timed mode via a full face mask using a bi-level positive airway pressure system. Spirometry, blood pressure, arterial blood gases, dyspnea, daytime sleepiness, serum fasting glucose and insulin levels were assessed. IR was assessed with the calculation of the Homeostatic Model Assessment (HOMA) index. Adiponectin was measured with radioimmunoassay. Study participants were re-evaluated on the first, third, sixth, ninth and twelfth month after the initial evaluation. There was a significant improvement in FEV1 values from the first month (34.1 ± 11.6% vs 37 ± 12.3%, p = 0.05). There was a significant decrease in IR by the ninth month of NIV use (3.4 ± 2.3 vs 2.2 ± 1.4, p < 0.0001), while adiponectin levels significantly improved from the first month of NIV use. Stepwise regression analysis revealed that baseline HOMA index was associated with paCO2 (β = 0.07 ± 0.02, p = 0.001), while baseline adiponectin levels were associated with FVC (β = 0.05 ± 0.02, p = 0.035) and the concentration of serum bicarbonate (HCO3-) (-β = 0.18 ± 0.06, p = 0.002). Insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism as well as adiponectin levels improved along with the improvements in respiratory failure.

  4. Effect of high-flow nasal cannula oxygen therapy in adults with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Xiaofeng; Hua, Yusi; Liu, Jin; Gong, Cansheng; Zhao, Wenling

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Conflicting recommendations exist on whether high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) oxygen therapy should be administered to adult patients in critical care with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure. We performed a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to evaluate its effect on intubation rates. METHODS: We searched electronic databases from inception to April 2016. We included RCTs that compared HFNC oxygen therapy with usual care (conventional oxygen therapy or noninvasive ventilation) in adults with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure. Because of the different methodologies and variation in clinical outcomes, we conducted 2 subgroup analyses according to oxygen therapy used and disease severity. We pooled data using random-effects models. The primary outcome was the proportion of patients who required endotracheal intubation. RESULTS: We included 6 RCTs (n = 1892). Compared with conventional oxygen therapy, HFNC oxygen therapy was associated with a lower intubation rate (risk ratio [RR] 0.60, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.38 to 0.94; I2 = 49%). We found no significant difference in the rate between HFNC oxygen therapy and noninvasive ventilation (RR 0.86, 95% CI 0.68 to 1.09; I2 = 2%). In the subgroup analysis by disease severity, no significant differences were found in the intubation rate between HFNC oxygen therapy and either conventional oxygen therapy or noninvasive ventilation (interaction p = 0.3 and 0.4, respectively). INTERPRETATION: The intubation rate with HFNC oxygen therapy was lower than the rate with conventional oxygen therapy and similar to the rate with noninvasive ventilation among patients with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure. Larger, high-quality RCTs are needed to confirm these findings. PMID:28246239

  5. Integrated DNA and RNA extraction using magnetic beads from viral pathogens causing acute respiratory infections.

    PubMed

    He, Hui; Li, Rongqun; Chen, Yi; Pan, Ping; Tong, Wenjuan; Dong, Xueyan; Chen, Yueming; Yu, Daojun

    2017-03-23

    Current extraction methods often extract DNA and RNA separately, and few methods are capable of co-extracting DNA and RNA from sputum. We established a nucleic acid co-extraction method from sputum based on magnetic beads and optimized the method by evaluating influencing factors, such as the guanidinium thiocyanate (GTC) and dithiothreitol (DTT) concentrations, magnetic bead amount, incubation temperature, lysis buffer pH and RNA carrier type. The feasibility of the simultaneous nucleic acid co-extraction method was evaluated by amplifying DNA and RNA viruses from a single clinical specimen with a multiplex RT-qPCR method. Both DNA and RNA were most efficiently extracted when the GTC and DTT concentrations were 2.0 M and 80 mM, respectively, 20 μl magnetic beads were added, the incubation temperature was 80 °C, the pH was 8 or 9, and RNA carrier A was used. Therefore, we established a simple method to extract nucleic acids from two important respiratory viruses compared with other commercial kits. This magnetic beads-based co-extraction method for sputum followed by a multiplex RT-qPCR can rapidly and precisely detect DNA and RNA viruses from a single clinical specimen and has many advantages, such as decreased time, low cost, and a lack of harmful chemicals.

  6. Integrated DNA and RNA extraction using magnetic beads from viral pathogens causing acute respiratory infections

    PubMed Central

    He, Hui; Li, Rongqun; Chen, Yi; Pan, Ping; Tong, Wenjuan; Dong, Xueyan; Chen, Yueming; Yu, Daojun

    2017-01-01

    Current extraction methods often extract DNA and RNA separately, and few methods are capable of co-extracting DNA and RNA from sputum. We established a nucleic acid co-extraction method from sputum based on magnetic beads and optimized the method by evaluating influencing factors, such as the guanidinium thiocyanate (GTC) and dithiothreitol (DTT) concentrations, magnetic bead amount, incubation temperature, lysis buffer pH and RNA carrier type. The feasibility of the simultaneous nucleic acid co-extraction method was evaluated by amplifying DNA and RNA viruses from a single clinical specimen with a multiplex RT-qPCR method. Both DNA and RNA were most efficiently extracted when the GTC and DTT concentrations were 2.0 M and 80 mM, respectively, 20 μl magnetic beads were added, the incubation temperature was 80 °C, the pH was 8 or 9, and RNA carrier A was used. Therefore, we established a simple method to extract nucleic acids from two important respiratory viruses compared with other commercial kits. This magnetic beads-based co-extraction method for sputum followed by a multiplex RT-qPCR can rapidly and precisely detect DNA and RNA viruses from a single clinical specimen and has many advantages, such as decreased time, low cost, and a lack of harmful chemicals. PMID:28332631

  7. Lung microvascular transport properties measured by multiple indicator dilution methods in patients with adult respiratory distress syndrome. A comparison between patients reversing respiratory failure and those failing to reverse.

    PubMed

    Harris, T R; Bernard, G R; Brigham, K L; Higgins, S B; Rinaldo, J E; Borovetz, H S; Sibbald, W J; Kariman, K; Sprung, C L

    1990-02-01

    We conducted indicator dilution studies on the lungs of patients in the early phases of adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) to test the hypothesis that capillary permeability was increased in patients with respiratory failure. Indicator dilution studies were performed using 51Cr-erythrocytes, 125I-albumin, 14C-urea, and 3H-water as tracers. The injectate was infused as a bolus into a central venous line. Peripheral arterial blood was collected and counted for radioactivity. Mathematical analysis of the indicator curves yielded cardiac output, measures of the product of capillary permeability and surface area for urea (PS and D1/2S), the intravascular lung volume (Vv), and the extravascular lung water volume (Ve). Permeability was separated from surface area by normalizing PS and D1/2S to Vv. Patients could be divided into 16 in whom blood gas determinations and radiologic criteria for ARDS were reversed and 23 in whom they were not. We examined indicator dilution and other measures of lung function in the two groups to determine whether significant differences in microvascular function existed. PS and PS/Vv were significantly higher in the nonreversal patients. Ve was above normal, but not different between groups. Linear regression analysis showed significant correlations for all of the following in the nonreversal group: Ve and all measures of permeability, pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR), and the inverse of permeability-surface area measures and AaDO2 and PVR. Only measures of Ve and PS correlated in the reversal group. These results support the hypothesis that capillary permeability is increased in patients with early ARDS and continuing respiratory failure.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. [Prolonged exposure to atmospheric air pollution and mortality from respiratory causes].

    PubMed

    Eilstein, D

    2009-12-01

    Different designs can be used to analyze the relationships between respiratory mortality and long term exposure to atmospheric pollution: epidemiological studies (cohort, prevalence study) demonstrate the reality of the relationship and toxicological studies explain it. Cohort studies have the advantage of being able to take into account many confounding factors and thus avoid biases (which is not the case with prevalence studies), but require significant human and financial resources. They were first adopted in the US, but are now more often applied in Europe. The results are relatively consistent, as they all show a statistically significant association between an increase in particulate pollution and cardiopulmonary mortality. Mortality from lung cancer is also associated with long term exposition to particles and sometimes to ozone or nitrogen oxides. Cerebrovascular diseases and sudden death of young children have also been associated with particulate pollution. The relationships are more powerful for long term than short term exposure but are also linear and without threshold. In order to explain these effects (today the causality of the relationship is certain) there are many possible factors, particularly regarding particulate exposures: an increase in cardiovascular risk biomarkers (fibrinogen, white blood cells, and platelets), atherosclerosis, chronic inflammation of lung tissues increased by acute exposure, etc. More and more studies address the interaction between gene and environment and even epigenetic phenomena which could be responsible of these effects. Public Health impact could be quantified. The European E&H surveillance program Apheis, for example, estimated that if PM2.5 levels remained below 15 microg/m(3), a 30 year old person could see his life expectancy increased by 1 month to 2 years, depending on the studied city. Finally, mortality is not the only relevant indicator for health effects of air pollution. ISAAC studies address asthma

  9. Compensation for occupational disease with multiple causes: the case of coal miners respiratory diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Weeks, J.L.; Wagner, G.R.

    1986-01-01

    Many diseases associated with occupational exposures are clinically indistinguishable from diseases with non-occupational causes. Given this, how are fair decisions made about eligibility for compensation. This problem is discussed in relation to the federal black lung program. Conflicting definitions of terms--coal workers pneumoconiosis as defined by the medical profession, pneumoconiosis as defined by the United States Congress, and the popular term, black lung--are important considerations in this discussion. Each is embedded in different logical interpretations of the causes of occupational disease and of disability. Alternative views are presented and critically discussed.

  10. Reliability enhancement of APR + diverse protection system regarding common cause failures

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Y. G.; Kim, Y. M.; Yim, H. S.; Lee, S. J.

    2012-07-01

    The Advanced Power Reactor Plus (APR +) nuclear power plant design has been developed on the basis of the APR1400 (Advanced Power Reactor 1400 MWe) to further enhance safety and economics. For the mitigation of Anticipated Transients Without Scram (ATWS) as well as Common Cause Failures (CCF) within the Plant Protection System (PPS) and the Emergency Safety Feature - Component Control System (ESF-CCS), several design improvement features have been implemented for the Diverse Protection System (DPS) of the APR + plant. As compared to the APR1400 DPS design, the APR + DPS has been designed to provide the Safety Injection Actuation Signal (SIAS) considering a large break LOCA accident concurrent with the CCF. Additionally several design improvement features, such as channel structure with redundant processing modules, and changes of system communication methods and auto-system test methods, are introduced to enhance the functional reliability of the DPS. Therefore, it is expected that the APR + DPS can provide an enhanced safety and reliability regarding possible CCF in the safety-grade I and C systems as well as the DPS itself. (authors)

  11. Impaired working memory capacity is not caused by failures of selective attention in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Molly A; Hahn, Britta; Leonard, Carly J; Robinson, Benjamin; Gray, Brad; Luck, Steven J; Gold, James

    2015-03-01

    The cognitive impairments associated with schizophrenia have long been known to involve deficits in working memory (WM) capacity. To date, however, the causes of WM capacity deficits remain unknown. The present study examined selective attention impairments as a putative contributor to observed capacity deficits in this population. To test this hypothesis, we used an experimental paradigm that assesses the role of selective attention in WM encoding and has been shown to involve the prefrontal cortex and the basal ganglia. In experiment 1, participants were required to remember the locations of 3 or 5 target items (red circles). In another condition, 3-target items were accompanied by 2 distractor items (yellow circles), which participants were instructed to ignore. People with schizophrenia (PSZ) exhibited significant impairment in memory for the locations of target items, consistent with reduced WM capacity, but PSZ and healthy control subjects did not differ in their ability to filter the distractors. This pattern was replicated in experiment 2 for distractors that were more salient. Taken together, these results demonstrate that reduced WM capacity in PSZ is not attributable to a failure of filtering irrelevant distractors.

  12. Technical Basis for Evaluating Software-Related Common-Cause Failures

    SciTech Connect

    Muhlheim, Michael David; Wood, Richard

    2016-04-01

    The instrumentation and control (I&C) system architecture at a nuclear power plant (NPP) incorporates protections against common-cause failures (CCFs) through the use of diversity and defense-in-depth. Even for well-established analog-based I&C system designs, the potential for CCFs of multiple systems (or redundancies within a system) constitutes a credible threat to defeating the defense-in-depth provisions within the I&C system architectures. The integration of digital technologies into the I&C systems provides many advantages compared to the aging analog systems with respect to reliability, maintenance, operability, and cost effectiveness. However, maintaining the diversity and defense-in-depth for both the hardware and software within the digital system is challenging. In fact, the introduction of digital technologies may actually increase the potential for CCF vulnerabilities because of the introduction of undetected systematic faults. These systematic faults are defined as a “design fault located in a software component” and at a high level, are predominately the result of (1) errors in the requirement specification, (2) inadequate provisions to account for design limits (e.g., environmental stress), or (3) technical faults incorporated in the internal system (or architectural) design or implementation. Other technology-neutral CCF concerns include hardware design errors, equipment qualification deficiencies, installation or maintenance errors, instrument loop scaling and setpoint mistakes.

  13. What is the role of respiratory viruses in community-acquired pneumonia?: What is the best therapy for influenza and other viral causes of community-acquired pneumonia?

    PubMed

    Pavia, Andrew T

    2013-03-01

    Respiratory viruses have long been appreciated as a cause of community acquired pneumonia (CAP), particularly among children, people with serious medical comorbidities, and military recruits. They are increasingly recognized as a cause of CAP among adults. Polymerase chain reaction-based testing has allowed detection of newer agents and improved the ability to detect such viral infections as influenza virus and rhinovirus. Coinfection with viruses and bacteria is common and it remains challenging to determine which patients have only viral infection as the cause of CAP. Better ways to diagnose viral CAP and to integrate detection into management, and better treatment options for noninfluenza respiratory viral infections are needed.

  14. Hyaluronidase 2 Deficiency Causes Increased Mesenchymal Cells, Congenital Heart Defects, and Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Biswajit; Xiang, Bo; Liu, Michelle; Hemming, Richard; Dolinsky, Vernon W.

    2017-01-01

    Background— Hyaluronan (HA) is required for endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition and normal heart development in the mouse. Heart abnormalities in hyaluronidase 2 (HYAL2)–deficient (Hyal2−/−) mice and humans suggested removal of HA is also important for normal heart development. We have performed longitudinal studies of heart structure and function in Hyal2−/− mice to determine when, and how, HYAL2 deficiency leads to these abnormalities. Methods and Results— Echocardiography revealed atrial enlargement, atrial tissue masses, and valvular thickening at 4 weeks of age, as well as diastolic dysfunction that progressed with age, in Hyal2−/− mice. These abnormalities were associated with increased HA, vimentin-positive cells, and fibrosis in Hyal2−/− compared with control mice. Based on the severity of heart dysfunction, acute and chronic groups of Hyal2−/− mice that died at an average of 12 and 25 weeks respectively, were defined. Increased HA levels and mesenchymal cells, but not vascular endothelial growth factor in Hyal2−/− embryonic hearts, suggest that HYAL2 is important to inhibit endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition. Consistent with this, in wild-type embryos, HYAL2 and HA were readily detected, and HA levels decreased with age. Conclusions— These data demonstrate that disruption of normal HA catabolism in Hyal2−/− mice causes increased HA, which may promote endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition and proliferation of mesenchymal cells. Excess endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition, resulting in increased mesenchymal cells, is the likely cause of morphological heart abnormalities in both humans and mice. In mice, these abnormalities result in progressive and severe diastolic dysfunction, culminating in heart failure. PMID:28196902

  15. Diabetes treatments and risk of heart failure, cardiovascular disease, and all cause mortality: cohort study in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Coupland, Carol

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess associations between risks of cardiovascular disease, heart failure, and all cause mortality and different diabetes drugs in people with type 2 diabetes, particularly newer agents, including gliptins and thiazolidinediones (glitazones). Design Open cohort study. Setting 1243 general practices contributing data to the QResearch database in England. Participants 469 688 people with type 2 diabetes aged 25-84 years between 1 April 2007 and 31 January 2015. Exposures Diabetes drugs (glitazones, gliptins, metformin, sulphonylureas, insulin, other) alone and in combination. Main outcome measure First recorded diagnoses of cardiovascular disease, heart failure, and all cause mortality recorded on the patients’ primary care, mortality, or hospital record. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate hazard ratios for diabetes treatments, adjusting for potential confounders. Results During follow-up, 21 308 patients (4.5%) received prescriptions for glitazones and 32 533 (6.9%) received prescriptions for gliptins. Compared with non-use, gliptins were significantly associated with an 18% decreased risk of all cause mortality, a 14% decreased risk of heart failure, and no significant change in risk of cardiovascular disease; corresponding values for glitazones were significantly decreased risks of 23% for all cause mortality, 26% for heart failure, and 25% for cardiovascular disease. Compared with no current treatment, there were no significant associations between monotherapy with gliptins and risk of any complications. Dual treatment with gliptins and metformin was associated with a decreased risk of all three outcomes (reductions of 38% for heart failure, 33% for cardiovascular disease, and 48% for all cause mortality). Triple treatment with metformin, sulphonylureas, and gliptins was associated with a decreased risk of all three outcomes (reductions of 40% for heart failure, 30% for cardiovascular disease, and 51% for all cause

  16. [Congestive heart failure caused by the thyroid stimulating hormone(TSH) secreting pituitary adenoma: report of two cases].

    PubMed

    Fujita, K; Yanaka, K; Tomono, Y; Kamezaki, T; Kujiraoka, Y; Nose, T

    2001-08-01

    A 42-year-old man and a 31-year-old man with congestive heart failure caused by the thyroid stimulating hormone(TSH) secreting pituitary adenoma were reported. Heart failure was improved after transsphenoidal resection of the pituitary adenoma in each patient. The syndrome of inappropriate secretion of TSH causes hyperthyroidism. Thyroid hormone acts directly on cardiac muscle to increase the stroke volume. Hyperthyroidism itself reduces the peripheral vascular resistance and an elevated basal metabolism which is the basic physiologic change in hyperthyroidism dilates small vessels and reduces vascular resistance. The reduced vascular resistance contributes to increase stroke volume. Thyroid hormone also acts directly on the cardiac pacemakers to be apt to cause tachycardiac atrial fibrillation. These mechanical changes in hyperthyroidism increase not only the cardiac output but also the venous return. The increased blood volume and the shortened ventricular filling time due to tachycardia result in congestive heart failure. TSH secreting pituitary adenoma is a rare tumor, however heart failure is common disease. TSH secreting pituitary adenoma should be taken into consideration in patients with heart failure. The presented cases were very enlightening to understand the relation between brain tumor and heart disease.

  17. Comparison of Comfort and Effectiveness of Total Face Mask and Oronasal Mask in Noninvasive Positive Pressure Ventilation in Patients with Acute Respiratory Failure: A Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Somayeh; Fakharian, Atefeh; Nasri, Peiman; Kiani, Arda

    2017-01-01

    Background. There is a growing controversy about the use of oronasal masks (ONM) or total facemask (TFM) in noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NPPV), so we designed a trial to compare the uses of these two masks in terms of effectiveness and comfort. Methods. Between February and November 2014, a total of 48 patients with respiratory failure were studied. Patients were randomized to receive NPPV via ONM or TFM. Data were recorded at 60 minutes and six and 24 hours after intervention. Patient comfort was assessed using a questionnaire. Data were analyzed using t-test and chi-square test. Repeated measures ANOVA and Mann-Whitney U test were used to compare clinical and laboratory data. Results. There were no differences in venous blood gas (VBG) values between the two groups (P > 0.05). However, at six hours, TFM was much more effective in reducing the partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PCO2) (P = 0.04). Patient comfort and acceptance were statistically similar in both groups (P > 0.05). Total time of NPPV was also similar in the two groups (P > 0.05). Conclusions. TFM was superior to ONM in acute phase of respiratory failure but not once the patients were out of acute phase.

  18. Pretransplant Factors and Associations with Postoperative Respiratory Failure, ICU Length of Stay, and Short-Term Survival after Liver Transplantation in a High MELD Population

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Mark R.; Choi, Myunghan; Brink, Jeffrey A.

    2016-01-01

    Changes in distribution policies have increased median MELD at transplant with recipients requiring increasing intensive care perioperatively. We aimed to evaluate association of preoperative variables with postoperative respiratory failure (PRF)/increased intensive care unit length of stay (ICU LOS)/short-term survival in a high MELD cohort undergoing liver transplant (LT). Retrospective analysis identified cases of PRF and increased ICU LOS with recipient, donor, and surgical variables examined. Variables were entered into regression with end points of PRF and ICU LOS > 3 days. 164 recipients were examined: 41 (25.0%) experienced PRF and 74 (45.1%) prolonged ICU LOS. Significant predictors of PRF with univariate analysis: BMI > 30, pretransplant MELD, preoperative respiratory failure, LVEF < 50%, FVC < 80%, intraoperative transfusion > 6 units, warm ischemic time > 4 minutes, and cold ischemic time > 240 minutes. On multivariate analysis, only pretransplant MELD predicted PRF (OR 1.14, p = 0.01). Significant predictors of prolonged ICU LOS with univariate analysis are as follows: pretransplant MELD, FVC < 80%, FEV1 < 80%, deceased donor, and cold ischemic time > 240 minutes. On multivariate analysis, only pretransplant MELD predicted prolonged ICU LOS (OR 1.28, p < 0.001). One-year survival among cohorts with PRF and increased ICU LOS was similar to subjects without. Pretransplant MELD is a robust predictor of PRF and ICU LOS. Higher MELDs at LT are expected to increase need for ICU utilization and modify expectations for recovery in the immediate postoperative period. PMID:27980860

  19. Pretransplant Factors and Associations with Postoperative Respiratory Failure, ICU Length of Stay, and Short-Term Survival after Liver Transplantation in a High MELD Population.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Mark R; Choi, Myunghan; Brink, Jeffrey A; Seetharam, Anil B

    2016-01-01

    Changes in distribution policies have increased median MELD at transplant with recipients requiring increasing intensive care perioperatively. We aimed to evaluate association of preoperative variables with postoperative respiratory failure (PRF)/increased intensive care unit length of stay (ICU LOS)/short-term survival in a high MELD cohort undergoing liver transplant (LT). Retrospective analysis identified cases of PRF and increased ICU LOS with recipient, donor, and surgical variables examined. Variables were entered into regression with end points of PRF and ICU LOS > 3 days. 164 recipients were examined: 41 (25.0%) experienced PRF and 74 (45.1%) prolonged ICU LOS. Significant predictors of PRF with univariate analysis: BMI > 30, pretransplant MELD, preoperative respiratory failure, LVEF < 50%, FVC < 80%, intraoperative transfusion > 6 units, warm ischemic time > 4 minutes, and cold ischemic time > 240 minutes. On multivariate analysis, only pretransplant MELD predicted PRF (OR 1.14, p = 0.01). Significant predictors of prolonged ICU LOS with univariate analysis are as follows: pretransplant MELD, FVC < 80%, FEV1 < 80%, deceased donor, and cold ischemic time > 240 minutes. On multivariate analysis, only pretransplant MELD predicted prolonged ICU LOS (OR 1.28, p < 0.001). One-year survival among cohorts with PRF and increased ICU LOS was similar to subjects without. Pretransplant MELD is a robust predictor of PRF and ICU LOS. Higher MELDs at LT are expected to increase need for ICU utilization and modify expectations for recovery in the immediate postoperative period.

  20. Comparison of Comfort and Effectiveness of Total Face Mask and Oronasal Mask in Noninvasive Positive Pressure Ventilation in Patients with Acute Respiratory Failure: A Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, Somayeh; Nasri, Peiman

    2017-01-01

    Background. There is a growing controversy about the use of oronasal masks (ONM) or total facemask (TFM) in noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NPPV), so we designed a trial to compare the uses of these two masks in terms of effectiveness and comfort. Methods. Between February and November 2014, a total of 48 patients with respiratory failure were studied. Patients were randomized to receive NPPV via ONM or TFM. Data were recorded at 60 minutes and six and 24 hours after intervention. Patient comfort was assessed using a questionnaire. Data were analyzed using t-test and chi-square test. Repeated measures ANOVA and Mann–Whitney U test were used to compare clinical and laboratory data. Results. There were no differences in venous blood gas (VBG) values between the two groups (P > 0.05). However, at six hours, TFM was much more effective in reducing the partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PCO2) (P = 0.04). Patient comfort and acceptance were statistically similar in both groups (P > 0.05). Total time of NPPV was also similar in the two groups (P > 0.05). Conclusions. TFM was superior to ONM in acute phase of respiratory failure but not once the patients were out of acute phase. PMID:28270737

  1. Upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage in hepatic cirrhosis: causes and relation to hepatic failure and stress.

    PubMed

    Franco, D; Durandy, Y; Deporte, A; Bismuth, H

    1977-01-29

    Emergency fibroscopy revealed bleeding lesions in 84 cirrhotic patients. In patients with moderate or no hepatic failure, the commonest actively bleeding sources were oesophagogastric varices and acute mucosal ulcers associated with the ingestion of anti-inflammatory drugs. In patients with severe hepatic failure, acute mucosal ulcers unrelated to drugs predominated and there was evidence that these were stress-induced erosions.

  2. Root Cause Investigation of Lead-Free Solder Joint Interfacial Failures After Multiple Reflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; Hatch, Olen; Liu, Pilin; Goyal, Deepak

    2016-12-01

    Solder joint interconnects in three-dimensional (3D) packages with package stacking configurations typically must undergo multiple reflow cycles during the assembly process. In this work, interfacial open joint failures between the bulk solder and the intermetallic compound (IMC) layer were found in Sn-Ag-Cu (SAC) solder joints connecting a small package to a large package after multiple reflow reliability tests. Systematic progressive 3D x-ray computed tomography experiments were performed on both incoming and assembled parts to reveal the initiation and evolution of the open failures in the same solder joints before and after the reliability tests. Characterization studies, including focused ion beam cross-sections, scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, were conducted to determine the correlation between IMC phase transformation and failure initiation in the solder joints. A comprehensive failure mechanism, along with solution paths for the solder joint interfacial failures after multiple reflow cycles, is discussed in detail.

  3. Root Cause Investigation of Lead-Free Solder Joint Interfacial Failures After Multiple Reflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; Hatch, Olen; Liu, Pilin; Goyal, Deepak

    2017-03-01

    Solder joint interconnects in three-dimensional (3D) packages with package stacking configurations typically must undergo multiple reflow cycles during the assembly process. In this work, interfacial open joint failures between the bulk solder and the intermetallic compound (IMC) layer were found in Sn-Ag-Cu (SAC) solder joints connecting a small package to a large package after multiple reflow reliability tests. Systematic progressive 3D x-ray computed tomography experiments were performed on both incoming and assembled parts to reveal the initiation and evolution of the open failures in the same solder joints before and after the reliability tests. Characterization studies, including focused ion beam cross-sections, scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, were conducted to determine the correlation between IMC phase transformation and failure initiation in the solder joints. A comprehensive failure mechanism, along with solution paths for the solder joint interfacial failures after multiple reflow cycles, is discussed in detail.

  4. Determining the Cause of a Header Failure in a Natural Gas Production Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Matthes, S.A.; Covino, B.S., Jr.; Bullard, S.J.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Holcomb, G.R.

    2007-03-01

    An investigation was made into the premature failure of a gas-header at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) natural gas production facility. A wide variety of possible failure mechanisms were considered: design of the header, deviation from normal pipe alloy composition, physical orientation of the header, gas composition and flow rate, type of corrosion, protectiveness of the interior oxide film, time of wetness, and erosion-corrosion. The failed header was examined using metallographic techniques, scanning electron microscopy, and microanalysis. A comparison of the failure site and an analogous site that had not failed, but exhibited similar metal thinning was also performed. From these studies it was concluded that failure resulted from erosion-corrosion, and that design elements of the header and orientation with respect to gas flow contributed to the mass loss at the failure point.

  5. Why do organizations not learn from incidents? Bottlenecks, causes and conditions for a failure to effectively learn.

    PubMed

    Drupsteen, Linda; Hasle, Peter

    2014-11-01

    If organizations would be able to learn more effectively from incidents that occurred in the past, future incidents and consequential injury or damage can be prevented. To improve learning from incidents, this study aimed to identify limiting factors, i.e. the causes of the failure to effectively learn. In seven organizations focus groups were held to discuss factors that according to employees contributed to the failure to learn. By use of a model of the learning from incidents process, the steps, where difficulties for learning arose, became visible, and the causes for these difficulties could be studied. Difficulties were identified in multiple steps of the learning process, but most difficulties became visible when planning actions, which is the phase that bridges the gap from incident investigation to actions for improvement. The main causes for learning difficulties, which were identified by the participants in this study, were tightly related to the learning process, but some indirect causes - or conditions - such as lack of ownership and limitations in expertise were also mentioned. The results illustrate that there are two types of causes for the failure to effectively learn: direct causes and indirect causes, here called conditions. By actively and systematically studying learning, more conditions might be identified and indicators for a successful learning process may be determined. Studying the learning process does, however, require a shift from learning from incidents to learning to learn.

  6. An evaluation of the use of signal validation techniques as a defense against common-cause failures: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kujawski, E.; Jacobs, I.M.; Smith, A.M.

    1987-02-01

    The major objective of this project is to assess on-line signal validation techniques as a defense against common cause failures in instrumentation and control systems. The present study specifically addressed the BWR vessel level instrumentation, which has been a long-standing safety concern. The results of this study consist of (1) an assessment of current fault detection and isolation capabilities, (2) development of a generalized decision estimator for detection and isolation of common cause failures, and (3) quantification of safety impact of various signal validation design options. The major output of this study was the development of a generalized decision estimator with the ability to synthesize diverse information, identify plausible alternatives, and draw inferences from the available information or evidence and encoded knowledge. The basis of the proposed algorithm for the detection and identification of common cause failures is the use of functional diversity supplemented by additional plant condition information in situations where all direct redundant measurements may have failed or the specific evidence is not convincing. The inference process or decision estimator is based on a Bayesian formulation. The major conclusion of this study is that a properly implemented signal validation system using the proposed generalized decision estimator appears to provide successful protection against common cause failures in instrumentation and control systems. Specifically, it has been shown that implementation of signal validation using the generalized decision estimator could essentially eliminate a potentially important safety concern associated with the BWR vessel level instrumentation.

  7. Short-term reversibility of ultrastructural changes in pulmonary capillaries caused by stress failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, A. R.; Fu, Z.; Tsukimoto, K.; Prediletto, R.; Mathieu-Costello, O.; West, J. B.

    1992-01-01

    We previously showed that when the pulmonary capillaries in anesthetized rabbits are exposed to a transmural pressure (Ptm) of approximately 40 mmHg, stress failure of the walls occurs with disruption of the capillary endothelium, alveolar epithelium, or sometimes all layers. The present study was designed to determine whether some of the ultrastructural changes are rapidly reversible when the capillary pressure is reduced. To test this, the Ptm was raised to 52.5 cmH2O for 1 min of blood perfusion and then reduced to 12.5 cmH2O for 3 min of saline-dextran perfusion, followed by intravascular fixation at the same pressure. In another group of animals, the pressure was elevated for 1 min of blood and 3 min of saline-dextran before being reduced. The results were compared with previous studies in which the capillary pressures were maintained elevated at 52.5 cmH2O during the entire procedure. Control studies were also done at sustained low pressures. The results showed that the number of endothelial and epithelial breaks per millimeter and the total fraction area of the breaks were reduced when the pressure was lowered. For example, the number of endothelial breaks per millimeter decreased from 7.1 +/- 2.1 to 2.4 +/- 0.7, and the number of epithelial breaks per millimeter fell from 11.4 +/- 3.7 to 3.4 +/- 0.7. There was evidence that the breaks that closed were those that were initially small and were associated with an intact basement membrane. The results suggest that cells can move along their underlying matrix by rapid disengagement and reattachment of cell adhesion molecules, causing breaks to open or close within minutes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  8. Failure to activate the in-hospital emergency team: causes and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Vera; Gomes, Ernestina; Vaz, Senio; Azevedo, Gustavo; Fernandes, Gonçalo; Ferreira, Amélia; Araujo, Rui

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the incidence of afferent limb failure of the in-hospital Medical Emergency Team, characterizing it and comparing the mortality between the population experiencing afferent limb failure and the population not experiencing afferent limb failure. Methods A total of 478 activations of the Medical Emergency Team of Hospital Pedro Hispano occurred from January 2013 to July 2015. A sample of 285 activations was obtained after excluding incomplete records and activations for patients with less than 6 hours of hospitalization. The sample was divided into two groups: the group experiencing afferent limb failure and the group not experiencing afferent limb failure of the Medical Emergency Team. Both populations were characterized and compared. Statistical significance was set at p ≤ 0.05. Result Afferent limb failure was observed in 22.1% of activations. The causal analysis revealed significant differences in Medical Emergency Team activation criteria (p = 0.003) in the group experiencing afferent limb failure, with higher rates of Medical Emergency Team activation for cardiac arrest and cardiovascular dysfunction. Regarding patient outcomes, the group experiencing afferent limb failure had higher immediate mortality rates and higher mortality rates at hospital discharge, with no significant differences. No significant differences were found for the other parameters. Conclusion The incidence of cardiac arrest and the mortality rate were higher in patients experiencing failure of the afferent limb of the Medical Emergency Team. This study highlights the need for health units to invest in the training of all healthcare professionals regarding the Medical Emergency Team activation criteria and emergency medical response system operations. PMID:28099639

  9. Effect of noninvasive mechanical ventilation in elderly patients with hypercapnic acute-on-chronic respiratory failure and a do-not-intubate order.

    PubMed

    Scarpazza, Paolo; Incorvaia, Cristoforo; di Franco, Giuseppe; Raschi, Stefania; Usai, Pierfranco; Bernareggi, Monica; Bonacina, Cristiano; Melacini, Chiara; Vanni, Silvia; Bencini, Serena; Pravettoni, Chiara; Di Cara, Giuseppe; Yacoub, Mona-Rita; Riario-Sforza, Gian Galeazzo; Guffanti, Enrico; Casali, Walter

    2008-01-01

    Noninvasive mechanical ventilation (NIMV) is effective in the treatment of patients with acute respiratory failure (ARF). It proved to reduce the need of endotracheal intubation (ETI), the incidence of ETI-associated pneumonia, and mortality compared to nonventilated patients. A particular aspect concerns the outcome of NIMV in patients referring to an emergency room (ER) for ARF, and with a do-not-intubate (DNI) status due to advanced age or critical conditions. The aim of our study is to assess the outcome of NIMV in a group of elderly patients with acute hypercapnic ARF who had a DNI status. An overall number of 62 subjects (30 males, 32 females, mean age 81 +/- 4.8 years, range 79-91 years) referred to our semi-intensive respiratory department were enrolled in the study. The underlying diseases were severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in 50/62 subjects, restrictive thoracic disorders in 7/62 subjects, and multiorgan failure in 5/62 subjects. Fifty-four/62 patients were successfully treated with NIMV while 2/62 did not respond to NIMV and were therefore submitted to ETI (one survived). Among NIMV-treated patients, death occurred in 6 patients after a mean of 9.9 days; the overall rate of NIMV failure was 12.9%. Negative prognostic factors for NIMV response proved to be: an older age, a low Glasgow Coma Score, a high APACHE score at admission, a high PaCO2 after 12 hours and a low pH both after 1 and 12 hours of NIMV. We conclude that elderly patients with acute hypercapnic ARF with a DNI status can be successfully treated by NIMV.

  10. Effect of noninvasive mechanical ventilation in elderly patients with hypercapnic acute-on-chronic respiratory failure and a do-not-intubate order

    PubMed Central

    Scarpazza, Paolo; Incorvaia, Cristoforo; di Franco, Giuseppe; Raschi, Stefania; Usai, Pierfranco; Bernareggi, Monica; Bonacina, Cristiano; Melacini, Chiara; Vanni, Silvia; Bencini, Serena; Pravettoni, Chiara; Di Cara, Giuseppe; Yacoub, Mona-Rita; Galeazzo, Gian; Riario-Sforza; Guffanti, Enrico; Casali, Walter

    2008-01-01

    Noninvasive mechanical ventilation (NIMV) is effective in the treatment of patients with acute respiratory failure (ARF). It proved to reduce the need of endotracheal intubation (ETI), the incidence of ETI-associated pneumonia, and mortality compared to nonventilated patients. A particular aspect concerns the outcome of NIMV in patients referring to an emergency room (ER) for ARF, and with a do-not-intubate (DNI) status due to advanced age or critical conditions. The aim of our study is to assess the outcome of NIMV in a group of elderly patients with acute hypercapnic ARF who had a DNI status. An overall number of 62 subjects (30 males, 32 females, mean age 81 ± 4.8 years, range 79–91 years) referred to our semi-intensive respiratory department were enrolled in the study. The underlying diseases were severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in 50/62 subjects, restrictive thoracic disorders in 7/62 subjects, and multiorgan failure in 5/62 subjects. Fifty-four/62 patients were successfully treated with NIMV while 2/62 did not respond to NIMV and were therefore submitted to ETI (one survived). Among NIMV-treated patients, death occurred in 6 patients after a mean of 9.9 days; the overall rate of NIMV failure was 12.9%. Negative prognostic factors for NIMV response proved to be: an older age, a low Glasgow Coma Score, a high APACHE score at admission, a high PaCO2 after 12 hours and a low pH both after 1 and 12 hours of NIMV. We conclude that elderly patients with acute hypercapnic ARF with a DNI status can be successfully treated by NIMV. PMID:19281095

  11. Hyperthyroidism as a reversible cause of right ventricular overload and congestive heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Di Giovambattista, Raniero

    2008-01-01

    We describe a case of severe congestive heart failure and right ventricular overload associated with overt hyperthyroidism, completely reversed with antithyroid therapy in a few week. It represents a very unusual presentation of overt hyperthyroidism because of the severity of right heart failure. The impressive right ventricular volume overload made mandatory to perform transesophageal echo and angio-TC examination to exclude the coexistence of ASD or anomalous pulmonary venous return. Only a few cases of reversible right heart failure, with or without pulmonary hypertension, have been reported worldwide. In our case the most striking feature has been the normalization of the cardiovascular findings after six weeks of tiamazole therapy. PMID:18549503

  12. Primary Respiratory Chain Disease Causes Tissue-Specific Dysregulation of the Global Transcriptome and Nutrient-Sensing Signaling Network

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhe; Tsukikawa, Mai; Peng, Min; Polyak, Erzsebet; Nakamaru-Ogiso, Eiko; Ostrovsky, Julian; McCormack, Shana; Place, Emily; Clarke, Colleen; Reiner, Gail; McCormick, Elizabeth; Rappaport, Eric; Haas, Richard; Baur, Joseph A.; Falk, Marni J.

    2013-01-01

    Primary mitochondrial respiratory chain (RC) diseases are heterogeneous in etiology and manifestations but collectively impair cellular energy metabolism. Mechanism(s) by which RC dysfunction causes global cellular sequelae are poorly understood. To identify a common cellular response to RC disease, integrated gene, pathway, and systems biology analyses were performed in human primary RC disease skeletal muscle and fibroblast transcriptomes. Significant changes were evident in muscle across diverse RC complex and genetic etiologies that were consistent with prior reports in other primary RC disease models and involved dysregulation of genes involved in RNA processing, protein translation, transport, and degradation, and muscle structure. Global transcriptional and post-transcriptional dysregulation was also found to occur in a highly tissue-specific fashion. In particular, RC disease muscle had decreased transcription of cytosolic ribosomal proteins suggestive of reduced anabolic processes, increased transcription of mitochondrial ribosomal proteins, shorter 5′-UTRs that likely improve translational efficiency, and stabilization of 3′-UTRs containing AU-rich elements. RC disease fibroblasts showed a strikingly similar pattern of global transcriptome dysregulation in a reverse direction. In parallel with these transcriptional effects, RC disease dysregulated the integrated nutrient-sensing signaling network involving FOXO, PPAR, sirtuins, AMPK, and mTORC1, which collectively sense nutrient availability and regulate cellular growth. Altered activities of central nodes in the nutrient-sensing signaling network were validated by phosphokinase immunoblot analysis in RC inhibited cells. Remarkably, treating RC mutant fibroblasts with nicotinic acid to enhance sirtuin and PPAR activity also normalized mTORC1 and AMPK signaling, restored NADH/NAD+ redox balance, and improved cellular respiratory capacity. These data specifically highlight a common pathogenesis

  13. Peripartum heart failure caused by left ventricular diastolic dysfunction: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kakogawa, Jun; Nako, Takafumi; Igarashi, Suguru; Nakamura, Shin; Tanaka, Mamoru

    2014-08-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy is a rare but potentially life-threatening condition. The current definition of peripartum cardiomyopathy only includes patients with systolic dysfunction. We describe a 25-year-old nulligravid patient with heart failure, i.e. left ventricular diastolic dysfunction with preserved systolic dysfunction during the third trimester of pregnancy. She complained of dyspnea and was referred to our hospital at 31 weeks of gestation. The patient met the clinical criteria for peripartum cardiomyopathy with the exception of systolic dysfunction. Brain-type natriuretic peptide levels peaked at 1447 pg/dL. The patient responded to therapy for heart failure and showed resolution of her diastolic dysfunction by 1 month postpartum. The case demonstrated the important role of diastolic dysfunction in peripartum heart failure and the possibility of clarifying the pathophysiology of peripartum cardiomyopathy by evaluating diastolic function. Further investigations are needed to provide evidence regarding the clinical role of diastolic dysfunction in peripartum heart failure.

  14. A rare cause of heart failure treated by heart transplantation: noncompaction of the ventricular myocardium.

    PubMed

    Bordes, Julien; Jop, Bertrand; Imbert, Sandrine; Hraiech, Sami; Collard, Frédéric; Kerbaul, François

    2009-01-01

    Noncompaction of the ventricular myocardium is a rare cardiomyopathy due to an arrest of myocardial morphogenesis. The characteristic echocardiographic findings are prominent myocardial trabeculations and deep intertrabecular spaces communicating with the left ventricular cavity. The clinical manifestations include heart failure (HF) signs, ventricular arrhythmias, and cardioembolic events. We describe an illustrative case of noncompaction of the ventricular myocardium associated with bicuspid aortic valve, a 42-year-old male presenting a refractory acute heart failure successfully treated by emergency heart transplantation.

  15. Evidence of an emerging levee failure mechanism causing disastrous floods in Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlandini, Stefano; Moretti, Giovanni; Albertson, John D.

    2015-10-01

    A levee failure occurred along the Secchia River, Northern Italy, on 19 January 2014, resulting in flood damage in excess of $500 million. In response to this failure, immediate surveillance of other levees in the region led to the identification of a second breach developing on the neighboring Panaro River, where rapid mitigation efforts were successful in averting a full levee failure. The paired breach events that occurred along the Secchia and Panaro Rivers provided an excellent window on an emerging levee failure mechanism. In the Secchia River, by combining the information content of photographs taken from helicopters in the early stage of breach development and 10 cm resolution aerial photographs taken in 2010 and 2012, animal burrows were found to exist in the precise levee location where the breach originated. In the Panaro River, internal erosion was observed to occur at a location where a crested porcupine den was known to exist and this erosion led to the collapse of the levee top. This paper uses detailed numerical modeling of rainfall, river flow, and variably saturated flow in the levee to explore the hydraulic and geotechnical mechanisms that were triggered along the Secchia and Panaro Rivers by activities of burrowing animals leading to levee failures. As habitats become more fragmented and constrained along river corridors, it is possible that this failure mechanism could become more prevalent and, therefore, will demand greater attention in both the design and maintenance of earthen hydraulic structures as well as in wildlife management.

  16. Hyperbilirubinemia and rapid fatal hepatic failure in severe combined immunodeficiency caused by adenosine deaminase deficiency (ADA-SCID).

    PubMed

    Kühl, J S; Schwarz, K; Münch, A; Schmugge, M; Pekrun, A; Meisel, C; Wahn, V; Ebell, W; von Bernuth, H

    2011-03-01

    Adenosin deaminase (ADA) deficiency is the cause for Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID) in about 15% of patients with SCID, often presenting as T (-)B (-)NK (-)SCID. Treatment options for ADA-SCID are enzyme replacement, bone marrow transplantation or gene therapy. We here describe the first patient with ADA-SCID and fatal hepatic failure despite bone marrow transplantation from a 10/10 HLA identical related donor. As patients with ADA-SCID may be at yet underestimated increased risk for rapid hepatic failure we speculate whether hepatitis in ADA-SCID should lead to the immediate treatment with enzyme replacement by pegylated ADA.

  17. Delayed Recognition of Deterioration of Patients in General Wards Is Mostly Caused by Human Related Monitoring Failures: A Root Cause Analysis of Unplanned ICU Admissions

    PubMed Central

    Driesen, Babiche E. J. M.; Merten, Hanneke; Ludikhuize, Jeroen; van der Spoel, Johannes I.; Kramer, Mark H. H.; Nanayakkara, Prabath W. B.

    2016-01-01

    Background An unplanned ICU admission of an inpatient is a serious adverse event (SAE). So far, no in depth-study has been performed to systematically analyse the root causes of unplanned ICU-admissions. The primary aim of this study was to identify the healthcare worker-, organisational-, technical,- disease- and patient- related causes that contribute to acute unplanned ICU admissions from general wards using a Root-Cause Analysis Tool called PRISMA-medical. Although a Track and Trigger System (MEWS) was introduced in our hospital a few years ago, it was implemented without a clear protocol. Therefore, the secondary aim was to assess the adherence to a Track and Trigger system to identify deterioration on general hospital wards in patients eventually transferred to the ICU. Methods Retrospective observational study in 49 consecutive adult patients acutely admitted to the Intensive Care Unit from a general nursing ward. 1. PRISMA-analysis on root causes of unplanned ICU admissions 2. Assessment of protocol adherence to the early warning score system. Results Out of 49 cases, 156 root causes were identified. The most frequent root causes were healthcare worker related (46%), which were mainly failures in monitoring the patient. They were followed by disease-related (45%), patient-related causes (7, 5%), and organisational root causes (3%). In only 40% of the patients vital parameters were monitored as was instructed by the doctor. 477 vital parameter sets were found in the 48 hours before ICU admission, in only 1% a correct MEWS was explicitly documented in the record. Conclusions This in-depth analysis demonstrates that almost half of the unplanned ICU admissions from the general ward had healthcare worker related root causes, mostly due to monitoring failures in clinically deteriorating patients. In order to reduce unplanned ICU admissions, improving the monitoring of patients is therefore warranted. PMID:27537689

  18. Bactericidal Immunity to Salmonella in Africans and Mechanisms Causing Its Failure in HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Yun Shan; Necchi, Francesca; O’Shaughnessy, Colette M.; Micoli, Francesca; Gavini, Massimiliano; Young, Stephen P.; Msefula, Chisomo L.; Gondwe, Esther N.; Mandala, Wilson L.; Gordon, Melita A.; Saul, Allan J.; MacLennan, Calman A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Nontyphoidal strains of Salmonella are a leading cause of death among HIV-infected Africans. Antibody-induced complement-mediated killing protects healthy Africans against Salmonella, but increased levels of anti-lipopolysaccharide (LPS) antibodies in some HIV-infected African adults block this killing. The objective was to understand how these high levels of anti-LPS antibodies interfere with the killing of Salmonella. Methodology/Principal Findings Sera and affinity-purified antibodies from African HIV-infected adults that failed to kill invasive S. Typhimurium D23580 were compared to sera from HIV-uninfected and HIV-infected subjects with bactericidal activity. The failure of sera from certain HIV-infected subjects to kill Salmonella was found to be due to an inherent inhibitory effect of anti-LPS antibodies. This inhibition was concentration-dependent and strongly associated with IgA and IgG2 anti-LPS antibodies (p<0.0001 for both). IgG anti-LPS antibodies, from sera of HIV-infected individuals that inhibit killing at high concentration, induced killing when diluted. Conversely, IgG, from sera of HIV-uninfected adults that induce killing, inhibited killing when concentrated. IgM anti-LPS antibodies from all subjects also induced Salmonella killing. Finally, the inhibitory effect of high concentrations of anti-LPS antibodies is seen with IgM as well as IgG and IgA. No correlation was found between affinity or avidity, or complement deposition or consumption, and inhibition of killing. Conclusion/Significance IgG and IgM classes of anti-S. Typhimurium LPS antibodies from HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected individuals are bactericidal, while at very high concentrations, anti-LPS antibodies of all classes inhibit in vitro killing of Salmonella. This could be due to a variety of mechanisms relating to the poor ability of IgA and IgG2 to activate complement, and deposition of complement at sites where it cannot insert in the bacterial membrane. Vaccine trials

  19. Outcomes of a Telehealth Intervention for Homebound Older Adults with Heart or Chronic Respiratory Failure: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gellis, Zvi D.; Kenaley, Bonnie; McGinty, Jean; Bardelli, Ellen; Davitt, Joan; Ten Have, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Telehealth care is emerging as a viable intervention model to treat complex chronic conditions, such as heart failure (HF) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and to engage older adults in self-care disease management. Design and Methods: We report on a randomized controlled trial examining the impact of a multifaceted…

  20. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) following a H3N3 parainfluenza virus infection in a pregnant asthmatic woman with respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Zeb, Qaiser; Alegria, Ana

    2014-10-03

    This case report relates to a 31-year-old pregnant woman, asthmatic, admitted to the intensive care unit with respiratory failure, secondary to a viral community-acquired pneumonia. A type 3 (H3N3) parainfluenza virus RNA was isolated in her throat swab. The patient developed neurological symptoms (behavioural changes, irritability, agitation and impaired consciousness) while being weaned off sedation and ventilatory support. Cerebrospinal fluid was clear with an opening pressure of 26 cm H2O. Brain MRI showed features compatible with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis. Immune screen and EEG were normal. She was treated with intravenous methylprednisolone followed by oral prednisolone. The patient made an almost full neurological recovery within 4 weeks after starting on steroids. The patient delivered a healthy baby at 38 weeks gestation. This case highlights the importance to keep in mind rare conditions that need early recognition and prompt treatment. Brain MRI is the key to early diagnosis and treatment.

  1. Human respiratory syncytial virus Memphis 37 grown in HEp-2 cells causes more severe disease in lambs than virus grown in vero cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common cause of bronchiolitis in infants and young children. A small percentage of these individuals develop severe and even fatal disease. To better understand the pathogenesis of severe disease and develop therapies unique to the less-developed infan...

  2. Middle East respiratory syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zumla, Alimuddin; Hui, David S; Perlman, Stanley

    2015-09-05

    Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) is a highly lethal respiratory disease caused by a novel single-stranded, positive-sense RNA betacoronavirus (MERS-CoV). Dromedary camels, hosts for MERS-CoV, are implicated in direct or indirect transmission to human beings, although the exact mode of transmission is unknown. The virus was first isolated from a patient who died from a severe respiratory illness in June, 2012, in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. As of May 31, 2015, 1180 laboratory-confirmed cases (483 deaths; 40% mortality) have been reported to WHO. Both community-acquired and hospital-acquired cases have been reported with little human-to-human transmission reported in the community. Although most cases of MERS have occurred in Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates, cases have been reported in Europe, the USA, and Asia in people who travelled from the Middle East or their contacts. Clinical features of MERS range from asymptomatic or mild disease to acute respiratory distress syndrome and multiorgan failure resulting in death, especially in individuals with underlying comorbidities. No specific drug treatment exists for MERS and infection prevention and control measures are crucial to prevent spread in health-care facilities. MERS-CoV continues to be an endemic, low-level public health threat. However, the virus could mutate to have increased interhuman transmissibility, increasing its pandemic potential.

  3. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Causes Multiple Organ Damage and Lethal Disease in Mice Transgenic for Human Dipeptidyl Peptidase 4

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kun; Wohlford-Lenane, Christine; Perlman, Stanley; Zhao, Jincun; Jewell, Alexander K.; Reznikov, Leah R.; Gibson-Corley, Katherine N.; Meyerholz, David K.; McCray, Paul B.

    2016-01-01

    Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) causes life-threatening disease. Dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4) is the receptor for cell binding and entry. There is a need for small-animal models of MERS, but mice are not susceptible to MERS because murine dpp4 does not serve as a receptor. We developed transgenic mice expressing human DPP4 (hDPP4) under the control of the surfactant protein C promoter or cytokeratin 18 promoter that are susceptible to infection with MERS-CoV. Notably, mice expressing hDPP4 with the cytokeratin 18 promoter developed progressive, uniformly fatal disease following intranasal inoculation. High virus titers were present in lung and brain tissues 2 and 6 days after infection, respectively. MERS-CoV–infected lungs revealed mononuclear cell infiltration, alveolar edema, and microvascular thrombosis, with airways generally unaffected. Brain disease was observed, with the greatest involvement noted in the thalamus and brain stem. Animals immunized with a vaccine candidate were uniformly protected from lethal infection. These new mouse models of MERS-CoV should be useful for investigation of early disease mechanisms and therapeutic interventions. PMID:26486634

  4. Pets and cockroaches: two increasing causes of respiratory allergy in indoor environments. Characteristics of airways sensitization and prevention strategies.

    PubMed

    Liccardi, G; Cazzola, M; D'Amato, M; D'Amato, G

    2000-11-01

    The increasing prevalence of allergic sensitization to indoor allergens such as dust mites, pets and cockroaches is the result of the changes in indoor environments induced by human activities. The Westernized lifestyle and the increasing time spent indoors determine a reduction in natural air ventilation and, consequently, higher levels of allergen concentrations and longer exposure to allergens. The major cat allergen Fel d 1 is carried by small-dimension particles (< 5 microm diameter) that readily become airborne and persist immodified for a long time. Fel d 1 must be considered a ubiquitous allergen because it has been found in indoor environments and even in public places where a cat has never been kept. Recent research has demonstrated that clothing of cat owners may contribute to the dispersal of Fel d 1 in cat-free environments. Therefore, washing Fel d 1-contaminated clothes should be considered a simple and effective method for removing this allergen from clothing and, consequently, reducing the risk of Fel d 1 dispersion. Cockroach allergens constitute another important cause of environment-related respiratory allergy and may trigger asthma exacerbations in sensitized individuals. In the prevention of cockroach allergy, the use of chemical agents associated with an intensive vacuum cleaning of indoor environments is an important tool in removing cockroach material containing allergenic proteins. Early recognition of allergy-predisposed babies, monitoring indoor allergens and adequate strategies of allergen avoidance are likely to be important means for reducing the prevalence of bronchial asthma.

  5. Respiratory system involvement in Costello syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Ospina, Natalia; Kuo, Christin; Ananth, Amitha Lakshmi; Myers, Angela; Brennan, Marie-Luise; Stevenson, David A; Bernstein, Jonathan A; Hudgins, Louanne

    2016-07-01

    Costello syndrome (CS) is a multisystem disorder caused by heterozygous germline mutations in the HRAS proto-oncogene. Respiratory system complications have been reported in individuals with CS, but a comprehensive description of the full spectrum and incidence of respiratory symptoms in these patients is not available. Here, we report the clinical course of four CS patients with respiratory complications as a major cause of morbidity. Review of the literature identified 56 CS patients with descriptions of their neonatal course and 17 patients in childhood/adulthood. We found that in the neonatal period, respiratory complications are seen in approximately 78% of patients with transient respiratory distress reported in 45% of neonates. Other more specific respiratory diagnoses were reported in 62% of patients, the majority of which comprised disorders of the upper and lower respiratory tract. Symptoms of upper airway obstruction were reported in CS neonates but were more commonly diagnosed in childhood/adulthood (71%). Analysis of HRAS mutations and their respiratory phenotype revealed that the common p.Gly12Ser mutation is more often associated with transient respiratory distress and other respiratory diagnoses. Respiratory failure and dependence on mechanical ventilation occurs almost exclusively with rare mutations. In cases of prenatally diagnosed CS, the high incidence of respiratory complications in the neonatal period should prompt anticipatory guidance and development of a postnatal management plan. This may be important in cases involving rarer mutations. Furthermore, the high frequency of airway obstruction in CS patients suggests that otorhinolaryngological evaluation and sleep studies should be considered. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Impaired dynamics and function of mitochondria caused by mtDNA toxicity leads to heart failure.

    PubMed

    Lauritzen, Knut H; Kleppa, Liv; Aronsen, Jan Magnus; Eide, Lars; Carlsen, Harald; Haugen, Øyvind P; Sjaastad, Ivar; Klungland, Arne; Rasmussen, Lene Juel; Attramadal, Håvard; Storm-Mathisen, Jon; Bergersen, Linda H

    2015-08-01

    Cardiac mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in heart failure of diverse etiologies. Generalized mitochondrial disease also leads to cardiomyopathy with various clinical manifestations. Impaired mitochondrial homeostasis may over time, such as in the aging heart, lead to cardiac dysfunction. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), close to the electron transport chain and unprotected by histones, may be a primary pathogenetic site, but this is not known. Here, we test the hypothesis that cumulative damage of cardiomyocyte mtDNA leads to cardiomyopathy and heart failure. Transgenic mice with Tet-on inducible, cardiomyocyte-specific expression of a mutant uracil-DNA glycosylase 1 (mutUNG1) were generated. The mutUNG1 is known to remove thymine in addition to uracil from the mitochondrial genome, generating apyrimidinic sites, which obstruct mtDNA function. Following induction of mutUNG1 in cardiac myocytes by administering doxycycline, the mice developed hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, leading to congestive heart failure and premature death after ∼2 mo. The heart showed reduced mtDNA replication, severely diminished mtDNA transcription, and suppressed mitochondrial respiration with increased Pgc-1α, mitochondrial mass, and antioxidative defense enzymes, and finally failing mitochondrial fission/fusion dynamics and deteriorating myocardial contractility as the mechanism of heart failure. The approach provides a model with induced cardiac-restricted mtDNA damage for investigation of mtDNA-based heart disease.

  7. [Rare cause of heart failure in an elderly woman in Djibouti: left ventricular non compaction].

    PubMed

    Massoure, P L; Lamblin, G; Bertani, A; Eve, O; Kaiser, E

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the first case of left ventricular non compaction diagnosed in Djibouti. The patient was a 74-year-old Djiboutian woman with symptomatic heart failure. Echocardiography is the key tool for assessment of left ventricular non compaction. This rare cardiomyopathy is probably underdiagnosed in Africa.

  8. Examining the Causes of Memory Strength Variability: Recollection, Attention Failure, or Encoding Variability?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koen, Joshua D.; Aly, Mariam; Wang, Wei-Chun; Yonelinas, Andrew P.

    2013-01-01

    A prominent finding in recognition memory is that studied items are associated with more variability in memory strength than new items. Here, we test 3 competing theories for why this occurs--the "encoding variability," "attention failure", and "recollection" accounts. Distinguishing among these theories is critical…

  9. Pneumocystis carinii causes a distinctive interstitial pneumonia in immunocompetent laboratory rats that had been attributed to "rat respiratory virus".

    PubMed

    Henderson, K S; Dole, V; Parker, N J; Momtsios, P; Banu, L; Brouillette, R; Simon, M A; Albers, T M; Pritchett-Corning, K R; Clifford, C B; Shek, W R

    2012-05-01

    A prevalent and distinctive infectious interstitial pneumonia (IIP) of immunocompetent laboratory rats was suspected to be caused by a putative virus, termed rat respiratory virus, but this was never substantiated. To study this disease, 2 isolators were independently populated with rats from colonies with endemic disease, which was perpetuated by the regular addition of naive rats. After Pneumocystis was demonstrated by histopathology and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in the lungs of rats from both isolators and an earlier bedding transmission study, the relationship between Pneumocystis and IIP was explored further by analyzing specimens from 3 contact transmission experiments, diagnostic submissions, and barrier room breeding colonies, including 1 with and 49 without IIP. Quantitative (q) PCR and immunofluorescence assay only detected Pneumocystis infection and serum antibodies in rats from experiments or colonies in which IIP was diagnosed by histopathology. In immunocompetent hosts, the Pneumocystis concentration in lungs corresponded to the severity and prevalence of IIP; seroconversion occurred when IIP developed and was followed by the concurrent clearance of Pneumocystis from lungs and resolution of disease. Experimentally infected immunodeficient RNU rats, by contrast, did not seroconvert to Pneumocystis or recover from infection. qPCR found Pneumocystis at significantly higher concentrations and much more often in lungs than in bronchial and nasal washes and failed to detect Pneumocystis in oral swabs. The sequences of a mitochondrial ribosomal large-subunit gene region for Pneumocystis from 11 distinct IIP sources were all identical to that of P. carinii. These data provide substantial evidence that P. carinii causes IIP in immunocompetent rats.

  10. Concurrent nephrotic syndrome and acute renal failure caused by chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL): a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Dou, Xianrui; Hu, Haitang; Ju, Yongle; Liu, Yongdong; Kang, Kaifu; Zhou, Shufeng; Chen, Wenfang

    2011-10-13

    Kidney injury associated with lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is typically caused by direct tumor infiltration which occasionally results in acute renal failure. Glomerular involvement presenting as proteinuria or even nephrotic syndrome is exceptionally rare. Here we report a case of 54-year-old male CLL patient with nephrotic syndrome and renal failure. The lymph node biopsy confirmed that the patients had CLL with remarkable immunoglobulin light chain amyloid deposition. The renal biopsy demonstrated the concurrence of AL amyloidosis and neoplastic infiltration. Combined treatment of fludarabine, cyclophosphamide and rituximab resulted in remission of CLL, as well as the renal disfunction and nephrotic syndrome, without recurrence during a 12-month follow-up. To our knowledge, this is the first case of CLL patient showing the nephrotic syndrome and acute renal failure caused by AL amyloidosis and neoplastic infiltration. Though AL amyloidosis caused by plasma cell dyscrasia usually responses poorly to chemotherapy, this patient exhibited a satisfactory clinical outcome due to successful inhibition of the production of amylodogenic light chains by combined chemotherapy.

  11. Efficiency and outcome of non-invasive versus invasive positive pressure ventilation therapy in respiratory failure due to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed Central

    Amri Maleh, Valiollah; Monadi, Mahmood; Heidari, Behzad; Maleh, Parviz Amri; Bijani, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background: Application noninvasive ventilation in the patients with exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) reduced mortality. This case-control study was designed to compare efficiency and outcome of non-invasive (NIV) versus invasive positive pressure ventilation (IPPV) in respiratory failure due to COPD. Methods: The patients were assigned to NIV or IPPV intermittantly.The clinical parameters, including RR (respiratory rate), BP (blood pressure), HR (heart rate) and PH, PaCO2, PaO2 before and 1, 4 and 24 h after treatment were measured. Demographic information such as age, sex, severity of disease based on APACHE score, length of stay and outcome were recorded. Results: Fifty patients were enrolled in the NIV group and 50 patients in IPPV. The mean age was 70.5 in NIV and 63.9 in invasive ventilation group (p>0.05). In IPPV group, the average values of PH: PCO2: and PO2, were 7.22±0.11, 69.64 + 24.25: and 68.86±24.41 .In NIV, the respective values were 7.30±0.07, 83.94±18.95, and 60.60±19.88. In NIV group, after 1, 4 and 24 h treatment, the clinical and ventilation parameters were stable. The mean APACHE score in was IPPV, 26.46±5.45 and in NIV was 12.26±5.54 (p<0.05). The average length of hospital stay in IPPV was 15.90±10 and in NIV 8.12±6.49 days (p<0.05). The total mortality in the NIV was 4 (8%) and in IPPV, 27 patients (54%) (p<0.05). Conclusion: This study indicates that using NIPPV is a useful therapeutic mode of treatment for respiratory failure with acceptable success rate and lower mortality. The application of NIPPV reduces hospital stay, intubation and its consequent complications. PMID:27386061

  12. [Dampness in an electric plug as a cause of electricity failure in an operation theatre].

    PubMed

    Andersen, C; Pold, R; Nielsen, H D

    2000-02-07

    Two cases of electricity failure in an operation theatre during open heart surgery are discussed. The fuse for the patient monitor, ventilator, surgery instruments and heart lung machine was blown. Short-circuit was established because of humidity in the plug of the heater for fluid and blood. We recommend sealed or founded plugs and that anaesthesia equipment should not be used as an electrical supply for other electronic apparatus.

  13. Compounds from multilayer plastic bags cause reproductive failures in artificial insemination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nerin, C.; Ubeda, J. L.; Alfaro, P.; Dahmani, Y.; Aznar, M.; Canellas, E.; Ausejo, R.

    2014-05-01

    High levels of reproductive failure were detected in some Spanish sow farms in the Spring of 2010. Regular returns to estrus and variable reductions in litter size were observed. The problem started suddenly and did not appear to be related to the quality of the ejaculates, disease, alterations of body condition or any other apparent reasons. Subsequent studies determined that the problem was the origin of the plastic bags used for semen storage. Chemical analysis of the suspicious bags identified unexpected compounds such as BADGE, a cyclic lactone and an unknown phthalate that leached into the semen at concentrations of 0.2 to 2.5 mg/L. Spermatozoa preserved in these bags passed all of the routine quality control tests, and no differences were observed between storage in the control and suspicious bags (p > 0.05). In vitro fecundation tests and endocrine profiler panel analysis (EPP) did not show any alterations, whereas the in vivo tests confirmed the described failure. This is the first described relationship between reproductive failure and toxic compounds released from plastic bags.

  14. Compounds from multilayer plastic bags cause reproductive failures in artificial insemination.

    PubMed

    Nerin, C; Ubeda, J L; Alfaro, P; Dahmani, Y; Aznar, M; Canellas, E; Ausejo, R

    2014-05-09

    High levels of reproductive failure were detected in some Spanish sow farms in the Spring of 2010. Regular returns to estrus and variable reductions in litter size were observed. The problem started suddenly and did not appear to be related to the quality of the ejaculates, disease, alterations of body condition or any other apparent reasons. Subsequent studies determined that the problem was the origin of the plastic bags used for semen storage. Chemical analysis of the suspicious bags identified unexpected compounds such as BADGE, a cyclic lactone and an unknown phthalate that leached into the semen at concentrations of 0.2 to 2.5 mg/L. Spermatozoa preserved in these bags passed all of the routine quality control tests, and no differences were observed between storage in the control and suspicious bags (p > 0.05). In vitro fecundation tests and endocrine profiler panel analysis (EPP) did not show any alterations, whereas the in vivo tests confirmed the described failure. This is the first described relationship between reproductive failure and toxic compounds released from plastic bags.

  15. Understanding the failure mechanisms of microwave bipolar transistors caused by electrostatic discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Liu; Yongguang, Chen; Zhiliang, Tan; Jie, Yang; Xijun, Zhang; Zhenxing, Wang

    2011-10-01

    Electrostatic discharge (ESD) phenomena involve both electrical and thermal effects, and a direct electrostatic discharge to an electronic device is one of the most severe threats to component reliability. Therefore, the electrical and thermal stability of multifinger microwave bipolar transistors (BJTs) under ESD conditions has been investigated theoretically and experimentally. 100 samples have been tested for multiple pulses until a failure occurred. Meanwhile, the distributions of electric field, current density and lattice temperature have also been analyzed by use of the two-dimensional device simulation tool Medici. There is a good agreement between the simulated results and failure analysis. In the case of a thermal couple, the avalanche current distribution in the fingers is in general spatially unstable and results in the formation of current crowding effects and crystal defects. The experimental results indicate that a collector-base junction is more sensitive to ESD than an emitter-base junction based on the special device structure. When the ESD level increased to 1.3 kV, the collector-base junction has been burnt out first. The analysis has also demonstrated that ESD failures occur generally by upsetting the breakdown voltage of the dielectric or overheating of the aluminum-silicon eutectic. In addition, fatigue phenomena are observed during ESD testing, with devices that still function after repeated low-intensity ESDs but whose performances have been severely degraded.

  16. Effect of rescue breathing by lay rescuers for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest caused by respiratory disease: a nationwide, population-based, propensity score-matched study.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Tatsuma; Ohashi-Fukuda, Naoko; Kondo, Yutaka; Sera, Toshiki; Yahagi, Naoki

    2016-05-30

    The importance of respiratory care in cardiopulmonary resuscitation may vary depending on the cause of cardiac arrest. No previous study has investigated the effects of rescue breathing performed by a lay rescuer on the outcomes of patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) caused by intrinsic respiratory diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate whether rescue breathing performed by a lay rescuer is associated with outcomes after respiratory disease-related OHCA. In a nationwide, population-based, propensity score-matched study in Japan, among adult patients with OHCA caused by respiratory disease who received bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation from January 1, 2005 to December 31, 2010, we compared patients with rescue breathing to those without rescue breathing. The primary outcome was neurologically favorable survival 1 month after OHCA. Of the eligible 14,781 patients, 4970 received rescue breathing from a lay rescuer and 9811 did not receive rescue breathing. In a propensity score-matched cohort (4897 vs. 4897 patients), the neurologically favorable survival rate was similar between patients with and without rescue breathing from a lay rescuer [0.9 vs. 0.7 %; OR 1.23 (95 % CI 0.79-1.93)]. Additionally, in subgroup analyses, rescue breathing was not associated with neurological outcome regardless of the type of rescuer [family member: adjusted OR 0.83 (95 % CI 0.39-1.70); or non-family member: adjusted OR 1.91 (95 % CI 0.79-5.35)]. Even among patients with OHCA caused by respiratory disease, rescue breathing performed by a lay rescuer was not associated with neurological outcomes, regardless of the type of lay rescuer.

  17. Root-cause analysis and health failure mode and effect analysis: two leading techniques in health care quality assessment.

    PubMed

    Shaqdan, Khalid; Aran, Shima; Daftari Besheli, Laleh; Abujudeh, Hani

    2014-06-01

    In this review article, the authors provide a detailed series of guidelines for effectively performing root-cause analysis (RCA) and health failure mode and effect analysis (HFMEA). RCA is a retrospective approach used to ascertain the "root cause" of a problem that has already occurred, whereas HFMEA is a prospective risk assessment tool whose aim is to recognize risks to patient safety. RCA and HFMEA are used for the prevention of errors or recurring errors to create a safer workplace, maintain high standards in health care quality, and incorporate time-saving and cost-saving modifications to favorably affect the patient care environment. The principles and techniques provided here should allow reviewers to better understand the features of RCA and HFMEA and how to apply these processes appropriately. These principles include how to organize a team, identify root causes, seed out proximate causes, graphically describe the process, conduct a hazard analysis, and develop and implement potential action plans.

  18. Mutations in TFAM, encoding mitochondrial transcription factor A, cause neonatal liver failure associated with mtDNA depletion.

    PubMed

    Stiles, Ashlee R; Simon, Mariella T; Stover, Alexander; Eftekharian, Shaya; Khanlou, Negar; Wang, Hanlin L; Magaki, Shino; Lee, Hane; Partynski, Kate; Dorrani, Nagmeh; Chang, Richard; Martinez-Agosto, Julian A; Abdenur, Jose E

    2016-09-01

    In humans, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion syndromes are a group of genetically and clinically heterogeneous autosomal recessive disorders that arise as a consequence of defects in mtDNA replication or nucleotide synthesis. Clinical manifestations are variable and include myopathic, encephalomyopathic, neurogastrointestinal or hepatocerebral phenotypes. Through clinical exome sequencing, we identified a homozygous missense variant (c.533C>T; p.Pro178Leu) in mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) segregating in a consanguineous kindred of Colombian-Basque descent in which two siblings presented with IUGR, elevated transaminases, conjugated hyperbilirubinemia and hypoglycemia with progression to liver failure and death in early infancy. Results of the liver biopsy in the proband revealed cirrhosis, micro- and macrovesicular steatosis, cholestasis and mitochondrial pleomorphism. Electron microscopy of muscle revealed abnormal mitochondrial morphology and distribution while enzyme histochemistry was underwhelming. Electron transport chain testing in muscle showed increased citrate synthase activity suggesting mitochondrial proliferation, while respiratory chain activities were at the lower end of normal. mtDNA content was reduced in liver and muscle (11% and 21% of normal controls respectively). While Tfam mRNA expression was upregulated in primary fibroblasts, Tfam protein level was significantly reduced. Furthermore, functional investigations of the mitochondria revealed reduced basal respiration and spare respiratory capacity, decreased mtDNA copy number and markedly reduced nucleoids. TFAM is essential for transcription, replication and packaging of mtDNA into nucleoids. Tfam knockout mice display embryonic lethality secondary to severe mtDNA depletion. In this report, for the first time, we associate a homozygous variant in TFAM with a novel mtDNA depletion syndrome.

  19. [Respiratory symptoms caused by the use of electrocautery in physicians being trained in surgery in a Mexican hospital].

    PubMed

    Navarro-Meza, María Cristina; González-Baltazar, Raquel; Aldrete-Rodríguez, María Guadalupe; Carmona-Navarro, David Enrique; López-Cardona, María Guadalupe

    2013-03-01

    In order to determine the frequency of respiratory symptoms among residents from surgical specialties dures exposed to the electrocautery smoke, a cross-sectional study was conducted in February 2012. 50 third-year residents from different surgical specialties coming from a third-level hospital belonging to the Institute of Security and Social Services of the State Workers in Jalisco, Mexico, were included. The subject selection was non-probabilistic. A questionnaire on respiratory symptoms developed in Cuba was used for data collection. The most common symptoms were sensation of a lump in the throat (58%), and a sore throat (22%). The specialty with the highest rate of exposure was neurosurgery (24.1 min/surgical procedure). All, the physicians from this specialty had respiratory symptoms. We conclude that the cauterization smoke may be considered a risk for developing respiratory symptoms among physicians with surgical specialties.

  20. Thrombotic microangiopathy: An unusual cause of renal failure in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Sakthirajan, R.; Dhanapriya, J.; Dineshkumar, T.; Gopalakrishnan, N.; Murugan, S.; Balasubramaniyan, T.

    2017-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is one of the commonest rheumatological diseases. Renal involvement is not common but can occur as a result of chronic inflammation as part of disease process or drug toxicity. Thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) is characterized by microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and organ failure of variable severity. Only a few cases of TMA in patients with RA were reported to date. We describe a 45-year-old female patient with RA who presented with oliguria and edema. Renal biopsy showed TMA with patchy cortical necrosis. She improved with hemodialysis and plasmapheresis. PMID:28182045

  1. VIP Gene Deletion in Mice Causes Cardiomyopathy Associated with Upregulation of Heart Failure Genes

    SciTech Connect

    Szema, Anthony M.; Hamidi, Sayyed A.; Smith, S. David; Benveniste, Helene; Katare, Rajesh Gopalrao

    2013-05-20

    Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide (VIP), a pulmonary vasodilator and inhibitor of vascular smooth muscle proliferation, is absent in pulmonary arteries of patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). We previously determined that targeted deletion of the VIP gene in mice leads to PAH with pulmonary vascular remodeling and right ventricular (RV) dilatation. Whether the left ventricle is also affected by VIP gene deletion is unknown. In the current study, we examined if VIP knockout mice (VIP-/-) develop both right (RV) and left ventricular (LV) cardiomyopathy, manifested by LV dilatation and systolic dysfunction, as well as overexpression of genes conducive to heart failure.

  2. Severe Hiatal Hernia as a Cause of Failure to Thrive Discovered by Transthoracic Echocardiogram

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Clint J.; Conley, Devan A.; Berry-Cabán, Cristóbal S.

    2016-01-01

    A newborn infant with failure to thrive presented for murmur evaluation on day of life three due to a harsh 3/6 murmur. During the evaluation, a retrocardiac fluid filled mass was seen by transthoracic echocardiogram. The infant was also found to have a ventricular septal defect and partial anomalous pulmonary venous return. Eventually, a large hiatal hernia was diagnosed on subsequent imaging. The infant ultimately underwent surgical repair of the hiatal hernia at a tertiary care facility. Hiatal hernias have been noted as incidental extracardiac findings in adults, but no previous literature has documented hiatal hernias as incidental findings in the pediatric population. PMID:27895952

  3. An uncommon cause of postpartum renal failure--bilateral emphysematous pyelonephritis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Naresh; Singh, Narinder Pal; Mittal, Amit; Valson, Anna T; Hira, Harmanjeet Singh

    2009-01-01

    Peripartum acute renal failure is an important complication related to pregnancy leading to significant morbidity and mortality. Emphysematous pyelonephritis (EPN) is a severe necrotizing infection of the renal parenchyma, with formation of gas within the collecting system, renal parenchyma, or perirenal tissues. EPN is common in persons with diabetes or urinary tract obstruction. Herein we report a case of bilateral emphysematous pyelonephritis in a postpartum lady who had no evidence of diabetes or urinary tract obstruction. Management of this condition has traditionally been aggressive, and surgery has been considered mandatory. Our patient was managed successfully with antibiotics and supportive measures alone.

  4. SERCA2 Haploinsufficiency in a Mouse Model of Darier Disease Causes a Selective Predisposition to Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Vikram; Lorenz, John N; Lasko, Valerie M; Nieman, Michelle L; Huang, Wei; Wang, Yigang; Wieczorek, David W; Shull, Gary E

    2015-01-01

    Null mutations in one copy of ATP2A2, the gene encoding sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase isoform 2 (SERCA2), cause Darier disease in humans, a skin condition involving keratinocytes. Cardiac function appears to be unimpaired in Darier disease patients, with no evidence that SERCA2 haploinsufficiency itself causes heart disease. However, SERCA2 deficiency is widely considered a contributing factor in heart failure. We therefore analyzed Atp2a2 heterozygous mice to determine whether SERCA2 haploinsufficiency can exacerbate specific heart disease conditions. Despite reduced SERCA2a levels in heart, Atp2a2 heterozygous mice resembled humans in exhibiting normal cardiac physiology. When subjected to hypothyroidism or crossed with a transgenic model of reduced myofibrillar Ca(2+)-sensitivity, SERCA2 deficiency caused no enhancement of the disease state. However, when combined with a transgenic model of increased myofibrillar Ca(2+)-sensitivity, SERCA2 haploinsufficiency caused rapid onset of hypertrophy, decompensation, and death. These effects were associated with reduced expression of the antiapoptotic Hax1, increased levels of the proapoptotic genes Chop and Casp12, and evidence of perturbations in energy metabolism. These data reveal myofibrillar Ca(2+)-sensitivity to be an important determinant of the cardiac effects of SERCA2 haploinsufficiency and raise the possibility that Darier disease patients are more susceptible to heart failure under certain conditions.

  5. SERCA2 Haploinsufficiency in a Mouse Model of Darier Disease Causes a Selective Predisposition to Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Vikram; Lorenz, John N.; Lasko, Valerie M.; Nieman, Michelle L.; Huang, Wei; Wang, Yigang; Wieczorek, David W.; Shull, Gary E.

    2015-01-01

    Null mutations in one copy of ATP2A2, the gene encoding sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase isoform 2 (SERCA2), cause Darier disease in humans, a skin condition involving keratinocytes. Cardiac function appears to be unimpaired in Darier disease patients, with no evidence that SERCA2 haploinsufficiency itself causes heart disease. However, SERCA2 deficiency is widely considered a contributing factor in heart failure. We therefore analyzed Atp2a2 heterozygous mice to determine whether SERCA2 haploinsufficiency can exacerbate specific heart disease conditions. Despite reduced SERCA2a levels in heart, Atp2a2 heterozygous mice resembled humans in exhibiting normal cardiac physiology. When subjected to hypothyroidism or crossed with a transgenic model of reduced myofibrillar Ca2+-sensitivity, SERCA2 deficiency caused no enhancement of the disease state. However, when combined with a transgenic model of increased myofibrillar Ca2+-sensitivity, SERCA2 haploinsufficiency caused rapid onset of hypertrophy, decompensation, and death. These effects were associated with reduced expression of the antiapoptotic Hax1, increased levels of the proapoptotic genes Chop and Casp12, and evidence of perturbations in energy metabolism. These data reveal myofibrillar Ca2+-sensitivity to be an important determinant of the cardiac effects of SERCA2 haploinsufficiency and raise the possibility that Darier disease patients are more susceptible to heart failure under certain conditions. PMID:26064889

  6. Molecular epidemiology of a post-influenza pandemic outbreak of acute respiratory infections in Korea caused by human adenovirus type 3.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wan-Ji; Jung, Hee-Dong; Cheong, Hyang-Min; Kim, Kisoon

    2015-01-01

    An outbreak of upper respiratory tract infections associated with human adenovirus (HAdV) occurred on a national scale in Korea from September to December 2010, following a major H1N1 influenza pandemic. Data from the Korea Influenza and Respiratory Surveillance System (KINRESS) showed an unusually high positive rate accounting for up to 20% of all diagnosed cases. To determine the principal cause of the outbreak, direct polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification followed by sequence analysis targeting parts of the hexon gene of HAdV was performed. Serotypes of 1,007 PCR-diagnosed HAdV-positive samples from patients with an acute upper respiratory tract illness were determined and epidemiological characteristics including major aged group and clinical symptoms were analyzed. The principal symptom of HAdV infections was fever and the vulnerable aged group was 1-5 years old. Based on sequence analysis, HAdV-3 was the predominant serotype in the outbreak, with an incidence of 74.3%. From the beginning of 2010 until May, the major serotypes were HAdV-1, 2, and 5 (70-100%) in any given period. However, an outbreak dominated by HAdV-3 started between July and August and peaked in September. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that there was no genetic variation in HAdV-3. The results demonstrated that an outbreak of upper respiratory illness followed by H1N1 influenza pandemic in Korea was caused mainly by emerged HAdV-3. J.

  7. Acute cardiac tamponade: an unusual cause of acute renal failure in a renal transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Nampoory, Naryanan; Gheith, Osama; Al-Otaibi, Torki; Halim, Medhat; Nair, Prasad; Said, Tarek; Mosaad, Ahmed; Al-Sayed, Zakareya; Alsayed, Ayman; Yagan, Jude

    2015-04-01

    We report a case of slow graft function in a renal transplant recipient caused by uremic acute pericardial effusion with tamponade. Urgent pericardiocentesis was done with an improvement in blood pressure, immediate diuresis, and quick recovery of renal function back to baseline. Pericardial tamponade should be included in consideration of causes of type 1 cardiorenal syndrome in renal transplant recipients.