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Sample records for respiratory infections control

  1. Infection prevention and control measures for acute respiratory infections in healthcare settings: an update.

    PubMed

    Seto, W H; Conly, J M; Pessoa-Silva, C L; Malik, M; Eremin, S

    2013-01-01

    Viruses account for the majority of the acute respiratory tract infections (ARIs) globally with a mortality exceeding 4 million deaths per year. The most commonly encountered viruses, in order of frequency, include influenza, respiratory syncytial virus, parainfluenza and adenovirus. Current evidence suggests that the major mode of transmission of ARls is through large droplets, but transmission through contact (including hand contamination with subsequent self-inoculation) and infectious respiratory aerosols of various sizes and at short range (coined as "opportunistic" airborne transmission) may also occur for some pathogens. Opportunistic airborne transmission may occur when conducting highrisk aerosol generating procedures and airborne precautions will be required in this setting. General infection control measures effective for all respiratory viral infections are reviewed and followed by discussion on some of the common viruses, including severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus and the recently discovered novel coronavirus.

  2. Bacteraemic urinary tract infections may mimic respiratory infections: a nested case-control study.

    PubMed

    Denis, E; Martis, N; Guillouet-de Salvador, F; Demonchy, E; Degand, N; Carles, K; Roger, P-M

    2016-10-01

    Daily practice suggests that respiratory signs may be observed in bacteraemic urinary infections (BUI). Our objective was to search for an association between the presence of respiratory symptoms and the bacteraemic nature of urinary tract infections (UTI). A nested case-control study was carried out based on our computerised dashboard from January 2011 to June 2015. Cases were defined as patients with a BUI due to Enterobacteriaceae species, identified in blood and urine cultures. Controls had fever and a positive urinary sample but sterile blood cultures (NBUI) and a final diagnosis of urinary infection. Patients from the BUI group were 1:1 matched to the NBUI group according to four parameters: age, gender, cardiovascular and pulmonary comorbid conditions. Subjects with cognitive impairment limiting clinical accuracy and those with healthcare-associated infections were excluded. We compared systematically recorded respiratory and urinary symptoms between groups: signs on auscultation, dyspnoea, chest pain, cough and sputum, dysuria with burning, pollakiuria, flank or costovertebral angle tenderness and ischuria. One hundred BUI were compared to 100 NBUI, both groups exhibiting a similar rate for all considered comorbid conditions. In the BUI group, 58 % showed at least one respiratory sign vs. 20 % in the NBUI group, p < 0.001, while urinary signs were less frequent: 54 % vs. 71 %, p = 0.013. In the multivariate analysis, BUI was associated with the presence of abnormal pulmonary auscultation [adjusted odds ratio (AOR), 5.91; p < 0.001] and a trend towards less urinary symptoms (AOR, 1.58; p = 0.058). Patients with BUI presented with significantly more respiratory signs, which overshadowed urinary symptoms, compared to those with non-bacteraemic UTI. Such observations impact clinical decision-making.

  3. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Infection Control and Prevention Guideline for Healthcare Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Yong; Song, Joon Young; Yoon, Young Kyung; Choi, Seong-Ho; Song, Young Goo; Kim, Sung-Ran; Son, Hee-Jung; Jeong, Sun-Young; Choi, Jung-Hwa; Kim, Kyung Mi; Yoon, Hee Jung; Choi, Jun Yong; Kim, Tae Hyong; Choi, Young Hwa; Kim, Hong Bin; Yoon, Ji Hyun; Lee, Jacob; Eom, Joong Sik; Lee, Sang-Oh; Oh, Won Sup; Choi, Jung-Hyun; Yoo, Jin-Hong; Kim, Woo Joo

    2015-01-01

    Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) is an acute viral respiratory illness with high mortality caused by a new strain of betacoronavirus (MERS-CoV). Since the report of the first patient in Saudi Arabia in 2012, large-scale outbreaks through hospital-acquired infection and inter-hospital transmission have been reported. Most of the patients reported in South Korea were also infected in hospital settings. Therefore, to eliminate the spread of MERS-CoV, infection prevention and control measures should be implemented with rigor. The present guideline has been drafted on the basis of the experiences of infection control in the South Korean hospitals involved in the recent MERS outbreak and on domestic and international infection prevention and control guidelines. To ensure efficient MERS-CoV infection prevention and control, care should be taken to provide comprehensive infection control measures including contact control, hand hygiene, personal protective equipment, disinfection, and environmental cleaning. PMID:26788414

  4. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Infection Control and Prevention Guideline for Healthcare Facilities.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Yong; Song, Joon Young; Yoon, Young Kyung; Choi, Seong-Ho; Song, Young Goo; Kim, Sung-Ran; Son, Hee-Jung; Jeong, Sun-Young; Choi, Jung-Hwa; Kim, Kyung Mi; Yoon, Hee Jung; Choi, Jun Yong; Kim, Tae Hyong; Choi, Young Hwa; Kim, Hong Bin; Yoon, Ji Hyun; Lee, Jacob; Eom, Joong Sik; Lee, Sang-Oh; Oh, Won Sup; Choi, Jung-Hyun; Yoo, Jin-Hong; Kim, Woo Joo; Cheong, Hee Jin

    2015-12-01

    Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) is an acute viral respiratory illness with high mortality caused by a new strain of betacoronavirus (MERS-CoV). Since the report of the first patient in Saudi Arabia in 2012, large-scale outbreaks through hospital-acquired infection and inter-hospital transmission have been reported. Most of the patients reported in South Korea were also infected in hospital settings. Therefore, to eliminate the spread of MERS-CoV, infection prevention and control measures should be implemented with rigor. The present guideline has been drafted on the basis of the experiences of infection control in the South Korean hospitals involved in the recent MERS outbreak and on domestic and international infection prevention and control guidelines. To ensure efficient MERS-CoV infection prevention and control, care should be taken to provide comprehensive infection control measures including contact control, hand hygiene, personal protective equipment, disinfection, and environmental cleaning.

  5. A programme for controlling acute respiratory infections in children: Memorandum from a WHO Meeting*

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    The unacceptably high mortality related to acute respiratory infections (ARI) in children, recognition of the importance of bacteria in the causation of severe acute lower respiratory infection in developing countries, and the established effectiveness of antimicrobial and supportive treatment in averting death make a strong case for the initiation of an ARI control programme. This should be spearheaded by prototype ARI service activities, delivered through primary health care and backed up by well-coordinated health systems research. PMID:6609020

  6. Respiratory Tract Infections and its Preventive Measures among Hajj Pilgrims, 2010: A Nested Case Control Study.

    PubMed

    Emamian, Mohammad Hassan; Hassani, Ali Mohammad; Fateh, Mansooreh

    2013-09-01

    Respiratory tract infections are very common among the Hajj pilgrims. Some preventive measures including Influenza vaccination, using face mask and salt water gargling have been considered to control these infections and the reports show conflicting results about the effects of each one of these measures. This study is trying to assess the effects of these recommendations on respiratory tract infections. According to nested case-control design, in a cohort consisting of 338 Iranian pilgrims, the outcome examined, was all types of respiratory tract infections other than common colds. With occurrence of any patient in convoy, data collection form was completed for that person. On the same day, two people were randomly selected as control group from among pilgrims who have not affected so far. During Hajj, 32 pilgrims (9.5%) were affected by respiratory tract infections other than common colds. In univariable logistic regression analysis, salt water gargling (OR = 2.4, P = 0.08), existence of other patient in the room (OR = 2.14, P = 0.19), age over 60 years (OR = 1.84, P = 0.15) and the education more than or equal to 3 years (OR = 1.93, P = 0.16) were effective in the respiratory tract infections (P < 0.2). However, multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that none of the above mentioned factors are significantly associated with these infections. This study showed that measures such as seasonal influenza vaccination, use of face masks and personal prayer carpet have no effect on the incidence of respiratory tract infections. However, washing throat and mouth with salt water can be considered the most effective preventive measures.

  7. Respiratory Tract Infections and its Preventive Measures among Hajj Pilgrims, 2010: A Nested Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Emamian, Mohammad Hassan; Hassani, Ali Mohammad; Fateh, Mansooreh

    2013-01-01

    Background: Respiratory tract infections are very common among the Hajj pilgrims. Some preventive measures including Influenza vaccination, using face mask and salt water gargling have been considered to control these infections and the reports show conflicting results about the effects of each one of these measures. This study is trying to assess the effects of these recommendations on respiratory tract infections. Methods: According to nested case-control design, in a cohort consisting of 338 Iranian pilgrims, the outcome examined, was all types of respiratory tract infections other than common colds. With occurrence of any patient in convoy, data collection form was completed for that person. On the same day, two people were randomly selected as control group from among pilgrims who have not affected so far. Results: During Hajj, 32 pilgrims (9.5%) were affected by respiratory tract infections other than common colds. In univariable logistic regression analysis, salt water gargling (OR = 2.4, P = 0.08), existence of other patient in the room (OR = 2.14, P = 0.19), age over 60 years (OR = 1.84, P = 0.15) and the education more than or equal to 3 years (OR = 1.93, P = 0.16) were effective in the respiratory tract infections (P < 0.2). However, multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that none of the above mentioned factors are significantly associated with these infections. Conclusions: This study showed that measures such as seasonal influenza vaccination, use of face masks and personal prayer carpet have no effect on the incidence of respiratory tract infections. However, washing throat and mouth with salt water can be considered the most effective preventive measures. PMID:24130944

  8. AIDS and UK respiratory physicians: attitudes to confidentiality, infection control, and management.

    PubMed Central

    Church, S; Owen, S; Woodcock, A A

    1990-01-01

    Respiratory physicians are concerned in the management of most patients with AIDS. Attitudes and practices of 463 respiratory physicians in the United Kingdom in relation to confidentiality, infection control, and treatment were sought by questionnaire from December 1987 to March 1988; 266 replies were received. Thirty eight per cent of respondents had not seen an HIV positive patient at the time of the survey. Respiratory physicians followed General Medical Council guidelines in relation to consent and confidentiality, except that if the patient's consent was withheld three quarters of the physicians would still inform an at risk hospital health care worker; only a quarter, however, would inform an at risk spouse. Routine infection control was frequently inadequate and "disease specific"--that is, substantially increased for known HIV positive patients. Given an HIV positive patient with respiratory symptoms and an abnormal chest radiograph, two thirds of respiratory physicians said that they would treat empirically for Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia as opposed to immediate bronchoscopy for accurate diagnosis. If a patient with AIDS who had pneumocystis pneumonia developed respiratory failure, half the physicians said at that time that they would elect not to ventilate the patient. PMID:2321178

  9. VITAMIN E AND RESPIRATORY INFECTIONS AMONG ELDERLY NURSING HOME RESIDENTS: A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL**

    PubMed Central

    Meydani, Simin Nikbin; Leka, Lynette S.; Fine, Basil C.; Dallal, Gerard E.; Keusch, Gerald T.; Singh, Maria Fiatarone; Hamer, Davidson H.

    2008-01-01

    Context Respiratory infections are prevalent in the elderly, resulting in increased morbidity, mortality, and utilization of health care services. Vitamin E supplementation has been shown to improve immune response in the elderly. However, the clinical importance of these findings has not been determined. Objective To investigate the effect of 1-year vitamin E supplementation on respiratory infections in elderly nursing home residents Design A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial conducted from April 1998 to August 2001 Setting 33 long-term care facilities in the Boston, Massachusetts area Participants 617 subjects ≥65 years old, who met the study’s eligibility criteria were enrolled, 73% of whom completed the study. The follow-up time (mean ± SD) was 317±104 and 321±97 days, E and placebo respectively, for all subjects enrolled in the study. Intervention A daily vitamin E (200 IU) or placebo capsule; all subjects received a capsule containing 1/2 the Recommended Daily Allowance of essential vitamins and minerals. Main Outcome Measures Incidence, number of subjects and number of days with respiratory infections (upper and lower), and number of new antibiotic prescriptions. Results There was no statistically significant effect of vitamin E on incidence or number of days with infection for all, upper, or lower respiratory infections. However, fewer vitamin E-supplemented subjects acquired one or more respiratory infections (65% vs 74%, risk ratio=0.88, 95% CI=0.75–0.99, p=0.036 for completed subjects; 60% vs 68%, risk ratio=0.88, 95% CI=0.76–1.00, p=0.048 for all subjects), or upper respiratory infections (50% vs 62%, risk ratio = 0.81, 95% CI=0.66–0.96, p=0.013 for completed subjects; 44% vs 52%, risk ratio=0.84, 95% CI=0.69–1.00, p=0.051 for all subjects). Post hoc sub-group analysis on common colds indicated that the vitamin E group had a lower incidence of common cold (0.66 vs 0.83 per subject-year, rate ratio=0.80, 95% CI=0.64–0

  10. Alveolar Macrophages Can Control Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection in the Absence of Type I Interferons

    PubMed Central

    Makris, Spyridon; Bajorek, Monika; Culley, Fiona J.; Goritzka, Michelle; Johansson, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a common cause of lower respiratory tract infections. Immunity to RSV is initiated upon detection of the virus by pattern recognition receptors, such as RIG-I-like receptors. RIG-I-like receptors signal via MAVS to induce the synthesis of proinflammatory mediators, including type I interferons (IFNs), which trigger and shape antiviral responses and protect cells from infection. Alveolar macrophages (AMs) are amongst the first cells to encounter invading viruses and the ones producing type I IFNs. However, it is unclear whether IFNs act to prevent AMs from serving as vehicles for viral replication. In this study, primary AMs from MAVS (Mavs-/-)- or type I IFN receptor (Ifnar1-/-)-deficient mice were exposed to RSV ex vivo. Wild-type (wt) AMs but not Mavs-/- and Ifnar1-/- AMs produced inflammatory mediators in response to RSV. Furthermore, Mavs-/- and Ifnar1-/- AMs accumulated more RSV proteins than wt AMs, but the infection was abortive. Thus, RIG-I-like receptor-MAVS and IFNAR signalling are important for the induction of proinflammatory mediators from AMs upon RSV infection, but this signalling is not central for controlling viral replication. The ability to restrict viral replication makes AMs ideal sensors of RSV infection and important initiators of immune responses in the lung. PMID:27423203

  11. Specific antibody deficiency in children with recurrent respiratory infections: a controlled study with follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Ruuskanen, O; Nurkka, A; Helminen, M; Viljanen, M K; Käyhty, H; Kainulainen, L

    2013-01-01

    Specific antibody deficiency (SAD) to unconjugated pneumococcal vaccine (PPV) is an established primary B cell immunodeficiency. The occurrence and natural history of SAD in children is unclear. We conducted an observational study to identify SAD in children with recurrent respiratory infections. Ninety-nine children, mean age 5·9 (range 2–16) years, with recurrent or severe infections were vaccinated with PPV; serum antibody concentrations for serotypes 4, 6B, 9V, 14, 18C, 19F and 23F were measured before and 2 weeks after vaccination with enzyme immunoassay. The retrospective control group consisted of 89 healthy children matched for age and gender. No children had received previous conjugated pneumococcal vaccine (PCV) or PPV. The structured history of infectious diseases of all participants was collected. Ten of 91 (11%) children (eight excluded due to immunoglobulin G subclass deficiency) with recurrent respiratory infections had SAD. In the control group, three children (3%) responded inadequately to PPV (P = 0·05). Most children with SAD also had many other minor immune defects. After 0·5–5 years (medium 3·8), eight children with SAD were revaccinated with PPV; five responded adequately and three inadequately. Two SAD children were revaccinated with PCV, one developed an adequate and one an inadequate response. Two children with SAD received treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin; the remaining eight children recovered without replacement therapy during the follow-up. SAD is common in young children with recurrent respiratory infections, but it is often transient and resolves itself within a few years without specific treatment. PMID:23574320

  12. Probiotics and respiratory and gastrointestinal tract infections in Finnish military conscripts - a randomised placebo-controlled double-blinded study.

    PubMed

    Kalima, K; Lehtoranta, L; He, L; Pitkäniemi, J; Lundell, R; Julkunen, I; Roivainen, M; Närkiö, M; Mäkelä, M J; Siitonen, S; Korpela, R; Pitkäranta, A

    2016-09-01

    Military conscripts are susceptible to respiratory and gastrointestinal tract infections. In previous studies probiotics have shown potency to reduce upper respiratory and gastrointestinal infections. The aim was to study whether probiotic intervention has an impact on seasonal occurrence of upper respiratory and gastrointestinal infections in two different conscript groups. In a randomised, double-blinded, placebo controlled study (https://clinicaltrials.gov NCT01651195), a total of 983 healthy adults were enrolled from two intakes of conscripts. Conscripts were randomised to receive either a probiotic combination of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) and Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis BB12 (BB12) or a control chewing tablet twice daily for 150 days (recruits) or for 90 days (reserve officer candidates). Clinical examinations were carried out and daily symptom diaries were collected. Outcome measures were the number of days with respiratory and gastrointestinal symptoms and symptom incidence, number and duration of infection episodes, number of antibiotic treatments received and number of days out of service because of the infection. Statistically no significant differences were found between the intervention groups either in the risk of symptom incidence or duration. However, probiotic intervention was associated with reduction of specific respiratory infection symptoms in military recruits, but not in reserve officer candidates. Probiotics did not significantly reduce overall respiratory and gastrointestinal infection morbidity.

  13. Respiratory infections: clinical evaluation.

    PubMed

    Grassi, C

    1985-01-01

    A review of clinical studies of piperacillin shows that it is valuable for the treatment of respiratory infections due to Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonas sp, anaerobes, and mixed flora including anaerobes. Various studies of a total of 420 patients treated with piperacillin for lower respiratory tract infections found that 97% of the patients were cured or markedly improved. Piperacillin has also been found as effective as combination therapy (gentamicin or tobramycin plus carbenicillin or ticarcillin) in the treatment of serious infections, including pneumonia and several caused by gram-negative organisms and anaerobic organisms. A review of the literature on bacteriological responses to piperacillin shows that 126 of 153 (82%) of the susceptible strains could be eradicated. Streptococcus pneumoniae, beta-hemolytic streptococci, Haemophilus influenzae, Peptostreptococcus sp, Bacteroides sp, and Fusobacterium sp have been completely eradicated by treatment with piperacillin. Most of the published studies indicate that therapy with the drug is usually well tolerated.

  14. Transmission of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus from persistently infected sows to contact controls.

    PubMed Central

    Bierk, M D; Dee, S A; Rossow, K D; Otake, S; Collins, J E; Molitor, T W

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) could persist in non-pregnant sows and if persistently infected sows could transmit virus to naive contact controls. Twelve PRRSV-naive, non-pregnant sows (index sows) were infected with a field isolate of PRRSV and housed in individual isolation rooms for 42 to 56 days postinfection. Following this period, 1 naive contact sow was placed in each room divided by a gate allowing nose-to-nose contact with a single index sow. Index sows were not viremic at the time of contact sow entry. Virus nucleic acid was detected by polymerase chain reaction, and infectious virus was detected by virus isolation in sera from 3 of the 12 contact sows at 49, 56, and 86 days postinfection. All 3 infected contacts developed PRRSV antibodies. Virus nucleic acid was detected in tissues of all of the 12 index sows at 72 or 86 days postinfection. Nucleic acid sequencing indicated that representative samples from index and infected contacts were homologous (> 99%) to the PRRSV used to infect index sows at the onset of the study. This study demonstrates that PRRSV can persist in sows and that persistently infected sows can transmit virus to naive contact animals. PMID:11768134

  15. Probiotics in respiratory virus infections.

    PubMed

    Lehtoranta, L; Pitkäranta, A; Korpela, R

    2014-08-01

    Viral respiratory infections are the most common diseases in humans. A large range of etiologic agents challenge the development of efficient therapies. Research suggests that probiotics are able to decrease the risk or duration of respiratory infection symptoms. However, the antiviral mechanisms of probiotics are unclear. The purpose of this paper is to review the current knowledge on the effects of probiotics on respiratory virus infections and to provide insights on the possible antiviral mechanisms of probiotics. A PubMed and Scopus database search was performed up to January 2014 using appropriate search terms on probiotic and respiratory virus infections in cell models, in animal models, and in humans, and reviewed for their relevance. Altogether, thirty-three clinical trials were reviewed. The studies varied highly in study design, outcome measures, probiotics, dose, and matrices used. Twenty-eight trials reported that probiotics had beneficial effects in the outcome of respiratory tract infections (RTIs) and five showed no clear benefit. Only eight studies reported investigating viral etiology from the respiratory tract, and one of these reported a significant decrease in viral load. Based on experimental studies, probiotics may exert antiviral effects directly in probiotic-virus interaction or via stimulation of the immune system. Although probiotics seem to be beneficial in respiratory illnesses, the role of probiotics on specific viruses has not been investigated sufficiently. Due to the lack of confirmatory studies and varied data available, more randomized, double-blind, and placebo-controlled trials in different age populations investigating probiotic dose response, comparing probiotic strains/genera, and elucidating the antiviral effect mechanisms are necessary.

  16. Reliable Detection of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection in Children for Adequate Hospital Infection Control Management

    PubMed Central

    Abels, Susanne; Nadal, David; Stroehle, Angelika; Bossart, Walter

    2001-01-01

    By using a rapid test for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) detection (Abbott TestPack RSV), a number of patients were observed, showing repeatedly positive results over a period of up to 10 weeks. A prospective study was initiated to compare the rapid test with an antigen capture enzyme immunoassay (EIA) and a nested reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) protocol for detection of RSV serotypes A and B. Only respiratory samples from children exhibiting the prolonged presence of RSV (≥5 days) as determined by the rapid test were considered. A total of 134 specimens from 24 children was investigated by antigen capture EIA and nested RT-PCR. Using RT-PCR as the reference method, we determined the RSV rapid test to have a specificity of 63% and a sensitivity of 66% and the antigen capture EIA to have a specificity of 96% and a sensitivity of 69% for acute-phase samples and the homologous virus serotype A. In 7 (29%) of 24 patients, the positive results of the RSV rapid test could not be confirmed by either nested RT-PCR or antigen capture EIA. In these seven patients a variety of other respiratory viruses were detected. For general screening the RSV rapid test was found to be a reasonable tool to get quick results. However, its lack of specificity in some patients requires confirmation by additional tests to rule out false-positive results and/or detection of other respiratory viruses. PMID:11526141

  17. A Randomized Placebo Controlled Trial of Ibuprofen for Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection in a Bovine Model

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Paul; Behrens, Nicole; Carvallo Chaigneau, Francisco R.; McEligot, Heather; Agrawal, Karan; Newman, John W.; Anderson, Mark; Gershwin, Laurel J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common cause of bronchiolitis and hospital admission in infants. An analogous disease occurs in cattle and costs US agriculture a billion dollars a year. RSV causes much of its morbidity indirectly via adverse effects of the host response to the virus. RSV is accompanied by elevated prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) which is followed by neutrophil led inflammation in the lung. Ibuprofen is a prototypical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug that decreases PGE2 levels by inhibiting cyclooxygenase. Hypotheses We hypothesized that treatment of RSV with ibuprofen would decrease PGE2 levels, modulate the immune response, decrease clinical illness, and decrease the histopathological lung changes in a bovine model of RSV. We further hypothesized that viral replication would be unaffected. Methods We performed a randomized placebo controlled trial of ibuprofen in 16 outbred Holstein calves that we infected with RSV. We measured clinical scores, cyclooxygenase, lipoxygenase and endocannabinoid products in plasma and mediastinal lymph nodes and interleukin (Il)-4, Il-13, Il-17 and interferon-γ in mediastinal lymph nodes. RSV shedding was measured daily and nasal Il-6, Il-8 and Il-17 every other day. The calves were necropsied on Day 10 post inoculation and histology performed. Results One calf in the ibuprofen group required euthanasia on Day 8 of infection for respiratory distress. Clinical scores (p<0.01) and weight gain (p = 0.08) seemed better in the ibuprofen group. Ibuprofen decreased cyclooxygenase, lipoxygenase, and cytochrome P450 products, and increased monoacylglycerols in lung lymph nodes. Ibuprofen modulated the immune response as measured by narrowed range of observed Il-13, Il-17 and IFN-γ gene expression in mediastinal lymph nodes. Lung histology was not different between groups, and viral shedding was increased in calves randomized to ibuprofen. Conclusions Ibuprofen decreased PGE2, modulated the immune

  18. A Randomized Placebo Controlled Trial of Ibuprofen for Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection in a Bovine Model.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Paul; Behrens, Nicole; Carvallo Chaigneau, Francisco R; McEligot, Heather; Agrawal, Karan; Newman, John W; Anderson, Mark; Gershwin, Laurel J

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common cause of bronchiolitis and hospital admission in infants. An analogous disease occurs in cattle and costs US agriculture a billion dollars a year. RSV causes much of its morbidity indirectly via adverse effects of the host response to the virus. RSV is accompanied by elevated prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) which is followed by neutrophil led inflammation in the lung. Ibuprofen is a prototypical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug that decreases PGE2 levels by inhibiting cyclooxygenase. We hypothesized that treatment of RSV with ibuprofen would decrease PGE2 levels, modulate the immune response, decrease clinical illness, and decrease the histopathological lung changes in a bovine model of RSV. We further hypothesized that viral replication would be unaffected. We performed a randomized placebo controlled trial of ibuprofen in 16 outbred Holstein calves that we infected with RSV. We measured clinical scores, cyclooxygenase, lipoxygenase and endocannabinoid products in plasma and mediastinal lymph nodes and interleukin (Il)-4, Il-13, Il-17 and interferon-γ in mediastinal lymph nodes. RSV shedding was measured daily and nasal Il-6, Il-8 and Il-17 every other day. The calves were necropsied on Day 10 post inoculation and histology performed. One calf in the ibuprofen group required euthanasia on Day 8 of infection for respiratory distress. Clinical scores (p<0.01) and weight gain (p = 0.08) seemed better in the ibuprofen group. Ibuprofen decreased cyclooxygenase, lipoxygenase, and cytochrome P450 products, and increased monoacylglycerols in lung lymph nodes. Ibuprofen modulated the immune response as measured by narrowed range of observed Il-13, Il-17 and IFN-γ gene expression in mediastinal lymph nodes. Lung histology was not different between groups, and viral shedding was increased in calves randomized to ibuprofen. Ibuprofen decreased PGE2, modulated the immune response, and improved clinical outcomes. However lung

  19. Respiratory Infections in the U.S. Military: Recent Experience and Control

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Michael J.; Myers, Christopher A.; Cummings, James F.; Vest, Kelly G.; Russell, Kevin L.; Sanchez, Joyce L.; Hiser, Michelle J.; Gaydos, Charlotte A.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY This comprehensive review outlines the impact of military-relevant respiratory infections, with special attention to recruit training environments, influenza pandemics in 1918 to 1919 and 2009 to 2010, and peacetime operations and conflicts in the past 25 years. Outbreaks and epidemiologic investigations of viral and bacterial infections among high-risk groups are presented, including (i) experience by recruits at training centers, (ii) impact on advanced trainees in special settings, (iii) morbidity sustained by shipboard personnel at sea, and (iv) experience of deployed personnel. Utilizing a pathogen-by-pathogen approach, we examine (i) epidemiology, (ii) impact in terms of morbidity and operational readiness, (iii) clinical presentation and outbreak potential, (iv) diagnostic modalities, (v) treatment approaches, and (vi) vaccine and other control measures. We also outline military-specific initiatives in (i) surveillance, (ii) vaccine development and policy, (iii) novel influenza and coronavirus diagnostic test development and surveillance methods, (iv) influenza virus transmission and severity prediction modeling efforts, and (v) evaluation and implementation of nonvaccine, nonpharmacologic interventions. PMID:26085551

  20. Achromobacter respiratory infections.

    PubMed

    Swenson, Colin E; Sadikot, Ruxana T

    2015-02-01

    Achromobacteria are ubiquitous environmental organisms that may also become opportunistic pathogens in certain conditions, such as cystic fibrosis, hematologic and solid organ malignancies, renal failure, and certain immune deficiencies. Some members of this genus, such as xylosoxidans, cause primarily nosocomially acquired infections affecting multiple organ systems, including the respiratory tract, urinary tract, and, less commonly, the cardiovascular and central nervous systems. Despite an increasing number of published case reports and literature reviews suggesting a global increase in achromobacterial disease, most clinicians remain uncertain of the organism's significance when clinically isolated. Moreover, effective treatment can be challenging due to the organism's inherent and acquired multidrug resistance patterns. We reviewed all published cases to date of non-cystic fibrosis achromobacterial lung infections to better understand the organism's pathogenic potential and drug susceptibilities. We found that the majority of these cases were community acquired, typically presenting as pneumonias (88%), and were most frequent in individuals with hematologic and solid organ malignancies. Our findings also suggest that achromobacterial lung infections are difficult to treat, but respond well to extended-spectrum penicillins and cephalosporins, such as ticarcillin, piperacillin, and cefoperazone.

  1. Delayed antibiotic prescribing strategies for respiratory tract infections in primary care: pragmatic, factorial, randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Little, Paul; Moore, Michael; Kelly, Jo; Williamson, Ian; Leydon, Geraldine; McDermott, Lisa; Mullee, Mark; Stuart, Beth

    2014-03-06

    To estimate the effectiveness of different strategies involving delayed antibiotic prescription for acute respiratory tract infections. Open, pragmatic, parallel group, factorial, randomised controlled trial. Primary care in the United Kingdom. 889 patients aged 3 years and over with acute respiratory tract infection, recruited between 3 March 2010 and 28 March 2012 by 53 health professionals in 25 practices. Patients judged not to need immediate antibiotics were randomised to undergo four strategies of delayed prescription: recontact for a prescription, post-dated prescription, collection of the prescription, and be given the prescription (patient led). During the trial, a strategy of no antibiotic prescription was added as another randomised comparison. Analysis was intention to treat. Mean symptom severity (0-6 scale) at days 2-4 (primary outcome), antibiotic use, and patients' beliefs in the effectiveness of antibiotic use. Secondary analysis included comparison with immediate use of antibiotics. Mean symptom severity had minimal differences between the strategies involving no prescription and delayed prescription (recontact, post-date, collection, patient led; 1.62, 1.60, 1.82, 1.68, 1.75, respectively; likelihood ratio test χ(2) 2.61, P=0.625). Duration of symptoms rated moderately bad or worse also did not differ between no prescription and delayed prescription strategies combined (median 3 days v 4 days; 4.29, P=0.368). There were modest and non-significant differences in patients very satisfied with the consultation between the randomised groups (79%, 74%, 80%, 88%, 89%, respectively; likelihood ratio test χ(2) 2.38, P=0.667), belief in antibiotics (71%, 74%, 73%, 72%, 66%; 1.62, P=0.805), or antibiotic use (26%, 37%, 37%, 33%, 39%; 4.96, P=0.292). By contrast, most patients given immediate antibiotics used antibiotics (97%) and strongly believed in them (93%), but with no benefit for symptom severity (score 1.76) or duration (median 4 days). Strategies

  2. Viral respiratory diseases (ILT, aMPV infections, IB): are they ever under control?

    PubMed

    Jones, Richard C

    2010-02-01

    1. The use of vaccines is the main approach to control of the economically important poultry viral respiratory diseases infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT), avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) infections and infectious bronchitis (IB). This paper appraises the current methods of vaccine control in the light of the nature of each virus and epidemiological factors associated with each disease. 2. Infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) exists as a single type with a wide range of disease severity. It is a serious disease in certain regions of the world. Recent work has distinguished molecular differences between vaccine and field strains and vaccine virus can be a cause of disease. Vaccines have remained unaltered for many years but new ones are being developed to counter vaccine side effects and reversion and reactivation of latent virus. 3. Avian metapneumoviruses, the cause of turkey rhinotracheitis and respiratory disease in chickens exists as 4 subtypes, A, B, C and D. A and B are widespread and vaccines work well provided that accurate doses are given. Newer vaccine developments are designed to eliminate reversion and possibly counter the appearance of newer field strains which may break through established vaccine coverage. 4. IB presents the biggest problem of the three. Being an unstable RNA virus, part of the viral genome that codes for the S1 spike gene can undergo mutation and recombination so that important antigenic variants can appear irregularly which may evade existing vaccine protection. While conventional vaccines work well against homologous types, new strategies are needed to counter this instability. Molecular approaches involving tailoring viruses to suit field challenges are in progress. However, the simple use of two genetically different vaccines to protect against a wide range of heterologous types is now a widespread practice that is very effective. 5. None of the three diseases described can claim to be satisfactorily controlled and it remains

  3. Respiratory syncytial virus: co-infection and paediatric lower respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Lay-Myint; Suzuki, Motoi; Nguyen, Hien Anh; Le, Minh Nhat; Dinh Vu, Thiem; Yoshino, Hiroshi; Schmidt, Wolf-Peter; Nguyen, Thi Thuy Ai; Le, Huu Tho; Morimoto, Konosuke; Moriuchi, Hiroyuki; Dang, Duc Anh; Ariyoshi, Koya

    2013-08-01

    Comprehensive population-based data on the role of respiratory viruses in the development of lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) remain unclear. We investigated the incidence and effect of single and multiple infections with respiratory viruses on the risk of LRTIs in Vietnam. Population-based prospective surveillance and a case-control study of hospitalised paediatric patients with acute respiratory infection (ARI) were conducted from April 2007 through to March 2010. Healthy controls were randomly recruited from the same community. Nasopharyngeal samples were collected and tested for 13 respiratory viruses using multiplex PCRs. 1992 hospitalised ARI episodes, including 397 (19.9%) with LRTIs, were enrolled. Incidence of hospitalised LRTIs among children aged <24 months was 2171.9 per 100 000 (95% CI 1947.9-2419.7). The majority of ARI cases (60.9%) were positive for at least one virus. Human rhinovirus (24.2%), respiratory syncytial virus (20.1%) and influenza A virus (12.0%) were the most common and 9.5% had multiple-viral infections. Respiratory syncytial virus and human metapneumovirus infections independently increased the risk of LRTIs. Respiratory syncytial virus further increased the risk, when co-infected with human rhinovirus, human metapneumovirus and parainfluenza virus-3 but not with influenza A virus. The case-control analysis revealed that respiratory syncytial virus and influenza A virus increased the risk of ARI hospitalisation but not human rhinovirus. Respiratory syncytial virus is the leading pathogen associated with risk of ARI hospitalisation and LRTIs in Vietnam.

  4. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections

    MedlinePlus

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) causes mild, cold-like symptoms in adults and older healthy children. It can cause serious problems in ... tests can tell if your child has the virus. There is no specific treatment. You should give ...

  5. Vitamin D3 Supplementation and Upper Respiratory Tract Infections in a Randomized, Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Rees, Judy R.; Hendricks, Kristy; Barry, Elizabeth L.; Peacock, Janet L.; Mott, Leila A.; Sandler, Robert S.; Bresalier, Robert S.; Goodman, Michael; Bostick, Roberd M.; Baron, John A.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Randomized controlled trials testing the association between vitamin D status and upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) have given mixed results. During a multicenter, randomized controlled trial of colorectal adenoma chemoprevention, we tested whether 1000 IU/day vitamin D3 supplementation reduced winter episodes and duration of URTI and its composite syndromes, influenza-like illness (ILI; fever and ≥2 of sore throat, cough, muscle ache, or headache) and colds (no fever, and ≥2 of runny nose, nasal congestion, sneezing, sore throat, cough, swollen or tender neck glands). Methods. The 2259 trial participants were aged 45–75, in good health, had a history of colorectal adenoma, and had a serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level ≥12 ng/mL. They were randomized to vitamin D3 (1000 IU/day), calcium (1200 mg/day), both, or placebo. Of these, 759 participants completed daily symptom diaries. Secondary data included semiannual surveys of all participants. Results. Among those who completed symptom diaries, supplementation did not significantly reduce winter episodes of URTI (rate ratio [RR], 0.93; 95% confidence interval [CI], .79–1.09) including colds (RR, 0.93; 95% CI, .78–1.10) or ILI (RR, 0.95; 95% CI, .62–1.46), nor did it reduce winter days of illness (RR, 1.13; 95% CI, .90–1.43). There was no significant benefit according to adherence, influenza vaccination, body mass index, or baseline vitamin D status. Semiannual surveys of all participants (N = 2228) identified no benefit of supplementation on ILI (odds ratio [OR], 1.14; 95% CI, .84–1.54) or colds (OR, 1.03; 95% CI, .87–1.23). Conclusions. Supplementation with 1000 IU/day vitamin D3 did not significantly reduce the incidence or duration of URTI in adults with a baseline serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level ≥12 ng/mL. PMID:24014734

  6. Respiratory syncytial virus infection in adults.

    PubMed

    Falsey, Ann R

    2007-04-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a common winter time respiratory virus that affects persons of all ages and is the major cause of serious lower respiratory tract infections in young children. However, RSV is also an important pathogen in adults, particularly in the elderly, patients with chronic lung disease, or those with impaired immunity. Clinical features of RSV infections overlap with other respiratory viruses, so laboratory tests are required to establish the diagnosis. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) of samples from nasal swabs, sputum, or bronchoalveolar lavage is a sensitive test to substantiate the diagnosis. Serologies are useful in epidemiological surveys. The clinical course of RSV infections is variable. In infants, RSV presents as bronchiolitis. In adults, mild to moderate upper respiratory tract illness is characteristic. However, severe pneumonia can occur, particularly in the elderly with comorbidities or compromised immune status. Humoral antibodies confer partial immunity to RSV infection and disease severity; cellular immunity is important to eradicate RSV in established infections. Treatment of RSV infections is often supportive. Aerosolized ribavirin is approved for RSV infections in infants; its role in adults is controversial. Infection control measures are critical to limit spread of RSV. Currently, RSV vaccines are not available, but candidate vaccines are being developed.

  7. [Clinical and epidemiological differences between Bordetella pertussis and respiratory syncytial virus infections in infants: a matched case control study].

    PubMed

    Giménez-Sánchez, Francisco; Cobos-Carrascosa, Elena; Sánchez-Forte, Miguel; López-Sánchez, María Ángeles; González-Jiménez, Yolanda; Azor-Martínez, Ernestina

    2014-01-01

    An increase in cases of pertussis, mainly in young infants, has been reported in the last few years. The clinical presentation of this disease is very similar to that produced by respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), which makes the diagnosis difficult. To compare the clinical and epidemiological characteristics between Bordetella pertussis and RSV infections in infants admitted to hospital. An analytical matched case-control study was conducted during the period 2008-2011. Cases were defined as infants admitted with pertussis confirmed by PCR in nasopharyngeal aspirate. Each case was matched by age, sex and date of admission to two controls defined as patients with RSV infection detected by immunochromatography in nasal aspirate. Demographic, clinical, laboratory data were compared. Seventy eight patients (26 cases of pertussis and 52 controls RSV+) were included. Sociodemographic characteristics were similar in both groups. Cases had more days of symptoms prior to admission, longer hospital stays, and increased frequency of epidemic family environment. Apnoea and cyanosis were more frequent. Cases of pertussis were more likely to have apnoea, cyanosis, and lymphocytosis while RSV infections had more frequent fever, vomiting and respiratory distress. The clinical presentations of pertussis and RSV infection are similar, but there are some characteristics that can help to distinguish between them. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  8. A cluster-randomised controlled trial to test the efficacy of facemasks in preventing respiratory viral infection among Hajj pilgrims.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mandy; Barasheed, Osamah; Rashid, Harunor; Booy, Robert; El Bashir, Haitham; Haworth, Elizabeth; Ridda, Iman; Holmes, Edward C; Dwyer, Dominic E; Nguyen-Van-Tam, Jonathan; Memish, Ziad A; Heron, Leon

    2015-06-01

    Cost-effective interventions are needed to control the transmission of viral respiratory tract infections (RTIs) in mass gatherings. Facemasks are a promising preventive measure, however, previous studies on the efficacy of facemasks have been inconclusive. This study proposes a large-scale facemask trial during the Hajj pilgrimage in Saudi Arabia and presents this protocol to illustrate its feasibility and to promote both collaboration with other research groups and additional relevant studies. A cluster-randomised controlled trial is being conducted to test the efficacy of standard facemasks in preventing symptomatic and proven viral RTIs among pilgrims during the Hajj season in Mina, Mecca, Saudi Arabia. The trial will compare the 'supervised use of facemasks' versus 'standard measures' among pilgrims over several Hajj seasons. Cluster-randomisation will be done by accommodation tents with a 1:1 ratio. For the intervention tents, free facemasks will be provided to be worn consistently for 7days. Data on flu-like symptoms and mask use will be recorded in diaries. Nasal samples will be collected from symptomatic recruits and tested for nucleic acid of respiratory viruses. Data obtained from questionnaires, diaries and laboratory tests will be analysed to examine whether mask use significantly reduces the frequency of laboratory-confirmed respiratory viral infection and syndromic RTI as primary outcomes. This trial will provide valuable evidence on the efficacy of standard facemask use in preventing viral respiratory tract infections at mass gatherings. This study is registered at the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR), ACTRN: ACTRN12613001018707 (http://www.anzctr.org.au). Copyright © 2014 Ministry of Health, Saudi Arabia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Climate Change and Respiratory Infections.

    PubMed

    Mirsaeidi, Mehdi; Motahari, Hooman; Taghizadeh Khamesi, Mojdeh; Sharifi, Arash; Campos, Michael; Schraufnagel, Dean E

    2016-08-01

    The rate of global warming has accelerated over the past 50 years. Increasing surface temperature is melting glaciers and raising the sea level. More flooding, droughts, hurricanes, and heat waves are being reported. Accelerated changes in climate are already affecting human health, in part by altering the epidemiology of climate-sensitive pathogens. In particular, climate change may alter the incidence and severity of respiratory infections by affecting vectors and host immune responses. Certain respiratory infections, such as avian influenza and coccidioidomycosis, are occurring in locations previously unaffected, apparently because of global warming. Young children and older adults appear to be particularly vulnerable to rapid fluctuations in ambient temperature. For example, an increase in the incidence in childhood pneumonia in Australia has been associated with sharp temperature drops from one day to the next. Extreme weather events, such as heat waves, floods, major storms, drought, and wildfires, are also believed to change the incidence of respiratory infections. An outbreak of aspergillosis among Japanese survivors of the 2011 tsunami is one such well-documented example. Changes in temperature, precipitation, relative humidity, and air pollution influence viral activity and transmission. For example, in early 2000, an outbreak of Hantavirus respiratory disease was linked to a local increase in the rodent population, which in turn was attributed to a two- to threefold increase in rainfall before the outbreak. Climate-sensitive respiratory pathogens present challenges to respiratory health that may be far greater in the foreseeable future.

  10. The Use of Predatory Bacteria to Control Select Pathogens and Treat Respiratory Infections

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-13

    pressure of a drug and can develop in both free-floating bacteria, and in surface-attached bacteria or biofilms . An additional potential threat is the...problem of multidrug-resistant (MDR)-bacterial infections, biofilm related infections and the risk of weaponized biological agents has driven...capability to feed and proliferate on an array of human pathogens and biofilms , make these organisms ideal candidates for use as biological control agents. We

  11. Moxifloxacin in respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed

    Miravitlles, Marc

    2005-02-01

    Moxifloxacin is a fourth-generation fluoroquinolone that has been shown to be effective against respiratory pathogens, including Gram-positive (Streptococcus pneumoniae), Gram-negative (Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis), and atypical strains (Chlamydia pneumoniae, Mycoplasma pneumoniae), as well as multi-drug resistant S. pneumoniae, including strains resistant to penicillin, macrolides, tetracyclines, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and some fluoroquinolones. Moxifloxacin is highly concentrated in lung tissue, and has demonstrated rapid eradication rates. The bioavailability and half-life of moxifloxacin provides potent bactericidal effects at a dose of 400mg/day. The ratio of the area under the concentration-time curve to MIC of moxifloxacin is the highest among the fluoroquinolones against S. pneumoniae. The clinical efficacy of moxifloxacin has been shown in controlled studies of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), exacerbations of chronic bronchitis (CB) and acute bacterial rhinosinusitis. Moxifloxacin has demonstrated a faster resolution of symptoms in CAP and exacerbations of CB patients compared with first-line therapy. It has also demonstrated better eradication in exacerbations of CB compared with standard therapy, in particular the macrolides. Treatment guidelines should take into account the results of clinical trials with moxifloxacin in order to establish the role of this antimicrobial in the therapeutic arsenal against respiratory tract infections.

  12. Stress and acute respiratory infection

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, N.M.; Douglas, R.M.; Ryan, P.

    1986-09-01

    To examine the relationship between stress and upper respiratory tract infection, 235 adults aged 14-57 years, from 94 families affiliated with three suburban family physicians in Adelaide, South Australia, participated in a six-month prospective study. High and low stress groups were identified by median splits of data collected from the Life Events Inventory, the Daily Hassles Scale, and the General Health Questionnaire, which were administered both before and during the six months of respiratory diary data collection. Using intra-study stress data, the high stress group experienced significantly more episodes (mean of 2.71 vs. 1.56, p less than 0.0005) and symptom days (mean of 29.43 vs. 15.42, p = 0.005) of respiratory illness. The two groups were almost identical with respect to age, sex, occupational status, smoking, passive smoking, exposure to air pollution, family size, and proneness to acute respiratory infection in childhood. In a multivariate model with total respiratory episodes as the dependent variable, 21% of the variance was explained, and two stress variables accounted for 9% of the explained variance. Significant, but less strong relationships were also identified between intra-study stress variables and clinically definite episodes and symptom days in both clinically definite and total respiratory episodes. Pre-study measures of stress emphasized chronic stresses and were less strongly related to measures of respiratory illness than those collected during the study. However, significantly more episodes (mean of 2.50 vs. 1.75, p less than 0.02) and symptom days (mean of 28.00 vs. 17.06, p less than 0.03) were experienced in the high stress group. In the multivariate analyses, pre-study stress remained significantly associated with total respiratory episodes nd symptom days in total and ''definite'' respiratory episodes.

  13. A multi-strain Synbiotic may reduce viral respiratory infections in asthmatic children: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Ahanchian, Hamid; Jafari, Seyed Ali; Ansari, Elham; Ganji, Toktam; Kiani, Mohammad Ali; Khalesi, Maryam; Momen, Tooba; Kianifar, Hamidreza

    2016-01-01

    Background and objective Asthma is a growing problem worldwide. Acute exacerbations impose considerable morbidity, mortality, and increased cost. Viral respiratory infections are the most common cause (80–85%) of pediatric asthma exacerbations and admissions to the hospital. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of a new synbiotic Lactocare® on viral respiratory infections and asthma exacerbations in asthmatic children. Methods In this double blind, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial, 72 children with mild persistent asthma, aged between 6 and 12 years, were randomized to receive either Lactocare®, a Synbiotic containing 1 billion CFU/Capsule of Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Streptococcus thermophilus, Bifidobacterium breve, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Bifidobacterium infantis, Lactobacillus bulgaricus, and Fructooligosacharide (Zist Takhmir, Tehran, Iran) or placebo daily for 60 days. The primary outcome was the number of viral respiratory infections, and secondary outcomes were school absence, salbutamol and prednisolone usage, outpatient visits, and hospital admission for asthma. The outcomes were compared among study groups using the SPSS 11.5 program and the Mann Whitney and Fisher exact tests. Results Of the 72 children who were enrolled with mild persistent asthma, 36 were assigned randomly to be treated with synbiotic and 36 with placebo. The number of viral respiratory infections was significantly higher in placebo group than the synbiotic group during the first month of intervention (0.74 ± 0.12 vs. 0.44 ± 0.1, p < 0.007) but not during the second month (0.5 ± 0.8 vs. 0.5 ± 0.8, p < 0.641). Considering the total duration of the study (two months), infection episodes also were significantly lower in the synbiotic group (0.92 ± 0.15 vs. 0.69 ± 0.11, p < 0.046). Salbutamol consumption was significantly lower in the synbiotic group, but there were no significant differences in school absenteeism, oral

  14. Cost-effectiveness Analysis of Hospital Infection Control Response to an Epidemic Respiratory Virus Threat

    PubMed Central

    Dan, Yock Young; Sim, Joe; Lim, Jeremy; Hsu, Li Yang; Chow, Wai Leng; Fisher, Dale A.; Wong, Yue Sie; Ho, Khek Yu

    2009-01-01

    The outbreak of influenza A pandemic (H1N1) 2009 prompted many countries in Asia, previously strongly affected by severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), to respond with stringent measures, particularly in preventing outbreaks in hospitals. We studied actual direct costs and cost-effectiveness of different response measures from a hospital perspective in tertiary hospitals in Singapore by simulating outbreaks of SARS, pandemic (H1N1) 2009, and 1918 Spanish influenza. Protection measures targeting only infected patients yielded lowest incremental cost/death averted of $23,000 (US$) for pandemic (H1N1) 2009. Enforced protection in high-risk areas (Yellow Alert) and full protection throughout the hospital (Orange Alert) averted deaths but came at an incremental cost of up to $2.5 million/death averted. SARS and Spanish influenza favored more stringent measures. High case-fatality rates, virulence, and high proportion of atypical manifestations impacted cost-effectiveness the most. A calibrated approach in accordance with viral characteristics and community risks may help refine responses to future epidemics. PMID:19961669

  15. Acute Respiratory Infections in Children

    PubMed Central

    Laxdal, Oliver E.; Robertson, H. E.; Braaten, Virgil; Walker, W. Alan

    1963-01-01

    During a seven-month period from November 1960 to May 1961, 181 infants and children, hospitalized because of acute respiratory infections, were studied intensively to determine the responsible etiologic agents. Forty-two per cent of the illnesses in this group appeared to be caused by bacterial agents, either primary or secondary to virus. Parainfluenza viruses were identified as causes of laryngotracheobronchitis in nearly 50% of the cases. Adenoviruses were also found to be important pathogens, particularly as causes of pneumonia in infants. The over-all infection rate attributed to adenoviruses was 11.6%. An epidemic due to Influenza B virus affected approximately 40% of children in this city just following the hospital study. This study was conducted as the first step in a long-term project undertaken at the Regina General Hospital to determine the effectiveness of vaccines in the prevention and treatment of respiratory infections in children. PMID:20327546

  16. Immunocompromised Children with Severe Adenoviral Respiratory Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tylka, Joanna C.; McCrory, Michael C.; Gertz, Shira J.; Custer, Jason W.; Spaeder, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the impact of severe respiratory adenoviral infection on morbidity and case fatality in immunocompromised children. Methods. Combined retrospective-prospective cohort study of patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) in four children's hospitals with severe adenoviral respiratory infection and an immunocompromised state between August 2009 and October 2013. We performed a secondary case control analysis, matching our cohort 1 : 1 by age and severity of illness score with immunocompetent patients also with severe respiratory adenoviral infection. Results. Nineteen immunocompromised patients were included in our analysis. Eleven patients (58%) did not survive to hospital discharge. Case fatality was associated with cause of immunocompromised state (p = 0.015), multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (p = 0.001), requirement of renal replacement therapy (p = 0.01), ICU admission severity of illness score (p = 0.011), and treatment with cidofovir (p = 0.005). Immunocompromised patients were more likely than matched controls to have multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (p = 0.01), require renal replacement therapy (p = 0.02), and not survive to hospital discharge (p = 0.004). One year after infection, 43% of immunocompromised survivors required chronic mechanical ventilator support. Conclusions. There is substantial case fatality as well as short- and long-term morbidity associated with severe adenoviral respiratory infection in immunocompromised children. PMID:27242924

  17. A Numerically Subdominant CD8 T Cell Response to Matrix Protein of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Controls Infection with Limited Immunopathology

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jie; Haddad, Elias K.; Marceau, Joshua; Morabito, Kaitlyn M.; Rao, Srinivas S.; Filali-Mouhim, Ali; Sekaly, Rafick-Pierre; Graham, Barney S.

    2016-01-01

    CD8 T cells are involved in pathogen clearance and infection-induced pathology in respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection. Studying bulk responses masks the contribution of individual CD8 T cell subsets to protective immunity and immunopathology. In particular, the roles of subdominant responses that are potentially beneficial to the host are rarely appreciated when the focus is on magnitude instead of quality of response. Here, by evaluating CD8 T cell responses in CB6F1 hybrid mice, in which multiple epitopes are recognized, we found that a numerically subdominant CD8 T cell response against DbM187 epitope of the virus matrix protein expressed high avidity TCR and enhanced signaling pathways associated with CD8 T cell effector functions. Each DbM187 T effector cell lysed more infected targets on a per cell basis than the numerically dominant KdM282 T cells, and controlled virus replication more efficiently with less pulmonary inflammation and illness than the previously well-characterized KdM282 T cell response. Our data suggest that the clinical outcome of viral infections is determined by the integrated functional properties of a variety of responding CD8 T cells, and that the highest magnitude response may not necessarily be the best in terms of benefit to the host. Understanding how to induce highly efficient and functional T cells would inform strategies for designing vaccines intended to provide T cell-mediated immunity. PMID:26943673

  18. Yogurt supplemented with probiotics can protect the healthy elderly from respiratory infections: A randomized controlled open-label trial

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Fangfang; Guo, Yue; Li, Ming; Zhu, Hong; Wang, Shijie; Shen, Xi; He, Miao; Huang, Chengyu; He, Fang

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate whether yogurt supplemented with a probiotic strain could protect middle-aged and elderly people from acute upper respiratory tract infections (URTI) using a randomized, blank-controlled, parallel-group design. Patients and methods Two hundred and five volunteers aged ≥45 years were randomly divided into two groups. The subjects in the intervention group were orally administered 300 mL/d of yogurt supplemented with a probiotic strain, Lactobacillus paracasei N1115 (N1115), 3.6×107 CFU/mL for 12 weeks, while those in the control group retained their normal diet without any probiotic supplementation. The primary outcome was the incidence of URTI, and changes in serum protein, immunoglobulins, and the profiles of the T-lymphocyte subsets (total T-cells [CD3+], T-helper cells [CD4+], and T-cytotoxic-suppressor cells [CD8+]) during the intervention were the secondary outcomes. Results Compared to the control group, the number of persons diagnosed with an acute URTI and the number of URTI events significantly decreased in the intervention group (P=0.038, P=0.030, respectively). The risk of URTI in the intervention group was evaluated as 55% of that in the control group (relative risk =0.55, 95% CI: 0.307–0.969). The change in the percentage of CD3+ cells in the intervention group was significantly higher than in the control group (P=0.038). However, no significant differences were observed in the total protein, albumin, globulin, and prealbumin levels in both groups (P>0.05). Conclusion The study suggested that yogurt with selected probiotic strains such as N1115 may reduce the risk of acute upper tract infections in the elderly. The enhancement of the T-cell-mediated natural immune defense might be one of the important underlying mechanisms for probiotics to express their anti-infective effects. PMID:28848330

  19. ProSeal laryngeal mask airway in infants and toddlers with upper respiratory tract infections: a randomized control trial of spontaneous vs pressure control ventilation.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Aparna; Sharma, Bimla; Sood, Jayashree

    2009-10-01

    ProSeal LMA (PLMA), one of the advanced supraglottic devices has been successfully used to provide both spontaneous and controlled ventilation in children with upper respiratory tract infection (URTI). URTI does not imply restriction of disease to upper respiratory tract; it has been shown to produce pulmonary dysfunction. PEEP has been shown to improve oxygenation in such cases. This randomized prospective study was designed to compare postoperative adverse events associated with spontaneous respiration (SR) and pressure control ventilation (PCV) with PEEP in infants and toddlers with URTI when using PLMA as an airway device. In the present study, 90 children, 6 months-2 years, scheduled for infra umbilical surgery were randomized to receive either SR or PCV with PEEP of 5cm H2O. Patients with risk of aspiration, bronchial asthma, anticipated difficult airway, snoring, passive smoking, morbid obesity, coexisting pulmonary and cardiac disease, lower respiratory tract infection, fever > 38 degrees C and sneezing, were excluded. At emergence, airway secretions, coughing, breath holding, bronchospasm, upper airway obstruction or laryngospasm (LS) were assessed. The adverse events were significantly higher in spontaneously breathing patients. Score of adverse events was 6.33 +/- 1.6 in PCV and 7.7 +/- 2.2 in SR group (P = 0.001). The mean SpO2 (%) in PACU was 96.5 +/- 2 in PCV and 94.4 +/- 1.37 in SR (P = 000). Pressure control ventilation with PEEP using PLMA is associated with lower incidence of adverse events in comparison to spontaneous respiration in infants and toddlers with upper respiratory tract infection undergoing infra umbilical surgeries under general anesthesia.

  20. A randomized placebo controlled trial of ibuprofen for respiratory syncytial infection in a bovine model study

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common cause of bronchiolitis and hospital admission in infants. An analogous disease occurs in cattle and costs US agriculture a billion dollars a year. RSV causes much of its morbidity indirectly via adverse effects of the host response to ...

  1. [Hot topics in respiratory infections].

    PubMed

    de Souza-Galvao, M Luiza; García-Martínez, Miguel Ángel; Sanz, Francisco; Blanquer, José

    2011-01-01

    We review the most interesting articles on respiratory infections published in the last trimester of 2009 and in 2010. Notable publications in bronchiectasis were the Guidelines of the British Thoracic Society, as well as several articles on the natural course of the process, the impact of exacerbations on the course of the disease, and treatment with inhaled antibiotics. Other notable publications were the SEPAR-SEIMC consensus document for the management of tuberculosis and articles on the use of interferon-gamma in the diagnosis of tuberculosis infection. The new recommendations of the Spanish Society of Pneumology and Thoracic Surgery on community-acquired pneumonia have recently been published. Equally important are studies on the viral etiology of community-acquired pneumonia, the impact of corticosteroid treatment in pneumonia, the duration of antibiotic therapy and preventive measures in both community-acquired and nosocomial pneumonia.

  2. Animal model of Mycoplasma fermentans respiratory infection

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mycoplasma fermentans has been associated with respiratory, genitourinary tract infections and rheumatoid diseases but its role as pathogen is controversial. The purpose of this study was to probe that Mycoplasma fermentans is able to produce respiratory tract infection and migrate to several organs on an experimental infection model in hamsters. One hundred and twenty six hamsters were divided in six groups (A-F) of 21 hamsters each. Animals of groups A, B, C were intratracheally injected with one of the mycoplasma strains: Mycoplasma fermentans P 140 (wild strain), Mycoplasma fermentans PG 18 (type strain) or Mycoplasma pneumoniae Eaton strain. Groups D, E, F were the negative, media, and sham controls. Fragments of trachea, lungs, kidney, heart, brain and spleen were cultured and used for the histopathological study. U frequency test was used to compare recovery of mycoplasmas from organs. Results Mycoplasmas were detected by culture and PCR. The three mycoplasma strains induced an interstitial pneumonia; they also migrated to several organs and persisted there for at least 50 days. Mycoplasma fermentans P 140 induced a more severe damage in lungs than Mycoplasma fermentans PG 18. Mycoplasma pneumoniae produced severe damage in lungs and renal damage. Conclusions Mycoplasma fermentans induced a respiratory tract infection and persisted in different organs for several weeks in hamsters. This finding may help to explain the ability of Mycoplasma fermentans to induce pneumonia and chronic infectious diseases in humans. PMID:23298636

  3. Is acute idiopathic pericarditis associated with recent upper respiratory tract infection or gastroenteritis? A case–control study

    PubMed Central

    Rey, Florian; Delhumeau-Cartier, Cecile; Meyer, Philippe; Genne, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to assess the association of a clinical diagnosis of acute idiopathic pericarditis (AIP), and a reported upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) or gastroenteritis (GE) in the preceding month. Design Patients who were hospitalised with a first diagnosis of AIP were retrospectively compared with a control group of patients admitted with deep vein thrombosis (DVT), matched by gender and age. Setting Primary and secondary care level; one hospital serving a population of about 170 000. Participants A total of 51 patients with AIP were included, of whom 46 could be matched with 46 patients with control DVT. Only patients with a complete review of systems on the admission note were included in the study. Main outcome measure Conditional logistic regression was used to assess the association of a clinical diagnosis of AIP and an infectious episode (URTI or GE) in the month preceding AIP diagnosis. Results Patients with AIP had more often experienced a recent episode of URTI or GE than patients with DVT (39.1% vs 10.9%, p=0.002). The multivariate conditional regression showed that AIP was independently associated with URTI or GE in the last month preceding diagnosis (OR=37.18, 95% CI=1.91 to 724.98, p=0.017). Conclusions This is, to the best of our knowledge, the first study demonstrating an association between a recent episode of URTI or GE and a clinical diagnosis of AIP. PMID:26603247

  4. Personal healthcare worker (HCW) and work-site characteristics that affect HCWs' use of respiratory-infection control measures in ambulatory healthcare settings.

    PubMed

    Turnberg, Wayne; Daniell, William; Simpson, Terri; Van Buren, Jude; Seixas, Noah; Lipkin, Edward; Duchin, Jeffery

    2009-01-01

    To identify healthcare worker (HCW) and work-site characteristics associated with HCWs' reported use of recommended respiratory-infection control practices in primary and emergency care settings. A cross-sectional study using a self-administered questionnaire for HCWs during the summer and fall of 2005. Primary and emergency care clinics at 5 medical centers in King County, Seattle, Washington. Nurse professionals who reported receiving training (odds ratio [OR], 2.5 [confidence interval {CI}, 1.1-5.9]; P=.029), instructional feedback from supervisors (OR, 3.0 [CI, 1.5-5.9]; P=.002), and management support for implementing safe work practices had a higher odds of also reporting adherence to recommended respiratory precautions, compared with nurses who did not. Training was the only important determinant for adherence to respiratory precaution measures among medical practitioners (OR, 5.5 [CI, 1.2-25.8]; P=.031). The reported rate of adherence to hand hygiene practices was higher among nurse professionals who were male (OR, 2.2 [CI, 1.0-4.9]; P=.045), had infants, small children, or older adults living at home (OR, 2.2 [CI, 1.2-3.9]; P=.007), reported cleanliness and orderliness of the establishment where they worked (OR, 2.0 [CI, 1.1-3.5]; P=.019), had received respiratory-infection control training (OR, 3.2 [CI, 1.8-6.0]; P<.001), and reported fears about catching a dangerous respiratory infection at work (OR, 2.3 [CI, 1.2-4.5]; P=.011). A number of HCW and work-site characteristics associated with HCWs' use of recommended respiratory-infection control measures have been identified. These potentially influential characteristics should be considered as targets or guides for further investigation, which should include the evaluation of intervention strategies.

  5. Respiratory syncytial virus infection in cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (bRSV) is a cause of respiratory disease in cattle world-wide. It has an integral role in enzootic pneumonia in young dairy calves and summer pneumonia in nursing beef calves. Furthermore, bRSV infection can predispose calves to secondary bacterial infection by org...

  6. Homeopathic medicines for prevention of influenza and acute respiratory tract infections in children: blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, Camila Monteiro; Homsani, Fortune; da Veiga, Venício Féo; Lyrio, Carlos; Mattos, Haroldo; Passos, Sonia Regina Lambert; Couceiro, José Nelson; Quaresma, Carla Holandino

    2016-02-01

    Influenza and its complications are common at all ages, especially in children. Vaccines and anti-influenza drugs aim to prevent it. Preventative approaches with favorable risk profiles should be considered for flu, particularly since the evidence of the efficacy of anti-viral drugs is debated. This pragmatic clinical trial was conducted in the Brazilian Public Health System in Petrópolis (BPHSP) with children aged from 1 to 5 years old. The medications used were mainly selected based on in vitro experiments (InfluBio), and in successful qualitative clinical experiences (Homeopathic Complex). Following informed parental consent, subjects were randomly distributed, in a blind manner, to three experimental groups: Homeopathic Complex, Placebo, and InfluBio. BPHSP health agents collected flu and acute respiratory infection symptomatic episodes monthly following the established protocol. The number of these episodes was registered in one year (2009-2010). Out of the 600 children recruited, 445 (74.17%) completed the study (149: Homeopathic complex; 151: Placebo; 145: InfluBio). The number of flu and acute respiratory infection symptomatic episodes detected in this clinical trial was low; however, it was different between homeopathic groups and placebo (p < 0.001). In the first year post-intervention, 46/151 (30.5%) of children in the placebo group developed 3 or more flu and acute respiratory infection episodes, while there was no episode in the group of 149 children who used Homeopathic Complex, and only 1 episode in the group of 145 (1%) children who received InfluBio. These results suggested that the use of homeopathic medicines minimized the number of flu and acute respiratory infection symptomatic episodes in children, signalizing that the homeopathic prophylactic potential should be investigated in further studies. Copyright © 2015 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. METHODS USED TO STUDY RESPIRATORY VIRUS INFECTION

    PubMed Central

    Flaño, Emilio; Jewell, Nancy A.; Durbin, Russell K.; Durbin, Joan E.

    2009-01-01

    This unit describes protocols for infecting the mouse respiratory tract, and assaying virus replication and host response in the lung. Respiratory infections are the leading cause of acute illness worldwide, affecting mostly infants and children in developing countries. The purpose of this unit is to provide the readers with a basic strategy and protocols to study the pathogenesis and immunology of respiratory virus infection using the mouse as an animal model. The procedures include: (i) basic techniques for mouse infection, tissue sampling and preservation, (ii) determination of viral titers, isolation and analysis of lymphocytes and dendritic cells using flow-cytometry, and (iii) lung histology, immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. PMID:19499505

  8. Vitamin D and Respiratory Tract Infections: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Bergman, Peter; Lindh, Åsa U.; Björkhem-Bergman, Linda; Lindh, Jonatan D.

    2013-01-01

    Background Low levels of 25-OH vitamin D are associated with respiratory tract infection (RTI). However, results from randomized controlled trials are inconclusive. Therefore, we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the preventive effect of vitamin D supplementation on RTI. Methods Randomized, controlled trials of vitamin D for prevention of RTI were used for the analysis. The risks of within-trial and publication bias were assessed. Odds ratios of RTI were pooled using a random-effects model. Heterogeneity was assessed using Cochran's Q and I2. Meta-regressions and subgroup analyses were used to assess the influence of various factors on trial outcome. The pre-defined review protocol was registered at the PROSPERO international prospective register of systematic reviews, registration number CRD42013003530. Findings Of 1137 citations retrieved, 11 placebo-controlled studies of 5660 patients were included in the meta-analysis. Overall, vitamin D showed a protective effect against RTI (OR, 0.64; 95% CI, 0.49 to 0.84). There was significant heterogeneity among studies (Cohran's Q p<0.0001, I2 = 72%). The protective effect was larger in studies using once-daily dosing compared to bolus doses (OR = 0.51 vs OR = 0.86, p = 0.01). There was some evidence that results may have been influenced by publication bias. Interpretation Results indicate that vitamin D has a protective effect against RTI, and dosing once-daily seems most effective. Due to heterogeneity of included studies and possible publication bias in the field, these results should be interpreted with caution. PMID:23840373

  9. Primary care randomised controlled trial of a tailored interactive website for the self-management of respiratory infections (Internet Doctor).

    PubMed

    Little, Paul; Stuart, Beth; Andreou, Panayiota; McDermott, Lisa; Joseph, Judith; Mullee, Mark; Moore, Mike; Broomfield, Sue; Thomas, Tammy; Yardley, Lucy

    2016-04-20

    To assess an internet-delivered intervention providing advice to manage respiratory tract infections (RTIs). Open pragmatic parallel group randomised controlled trial. Primary care in UK. Adults (aged ≥18) registered with general practitioners, recruited by postal invitation. Patients were randomised with computer-generated random numbers to access the intervention website (intervention) or not (control). The intervention tailored advice about the diagnosis, natural history, symptom management (particularly paracetamol/ibuprofen use) and when to seek further help. Primary: National Health Service (NHS) contacts for those reporting RTIs from monthly online questionnaires for 20 weeks. Secondary: hospitalisations; symptom duration/severity. 3044 participants were recruited. 852 in the intervention group and 920 in the control group reported 1 or more RTIs, among whom there was a modest increase in NHS direct contacts in the intervention group (intervention 37/1574 (2.4%) versus control 20/1661 (1.2%); multivariate risk ratio (RR) 2.25 (95% CI 1.00 to 5.07, p=0.048)). Conversely, reduced contact with doctors occurred (239/1574 (15.2%) vs 304/1664 (18.3%); RR 0.71, 0.52 to 0.98, p=0.037). Reduction in contacts occurred despite slightly longer illness duration (11.3 days vs 10.7 days, respectively; multivariate estimate 0.60 days longer (-0.15 to 1.36, p=0.118) and more days of illness rated moderately bad or worse illness (0.52 days; 0.06 to 0.97, p=0.026). The estimate of slower symptom resolution in the intervention group was attenuated when controlling for whether individuals had used web pages which advocated ibuprofen use (length of illness 0.22 days, -0.51 to 0.95, p=0.551; moderately bad or worse symptoms 0.36 days, -0.08 to 0.80, p=0.105). There was no evidence of increased hospitalisations (risk ratio 0.25; 0.05 to 1.12; p=0.069). An internet-delivered intervention for the self-management of RTIs modifies help-seeking behaviour, and does not

  10. Interference between respiratory syncytial virus and rhinovirus in respiratory tract infections in children.

    PubMed

    Karppinen, S; Toivonen, L; Schuez-Havupalo, L; Waris, M; Peltola, V

    2016-02-01

    An acute viral respiratory tract infection might prevent infections by other viruses because of the antiviral innate immune response. However, with the use of PCR methods, simultaneous detection of two or more respiratory viruses is frequent. We analysed the effect of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection on the occurrence of simultaneous rhinovirus (RV) infection in children within a birth cohort study setting. We used PCR for virus detection in nasal swabs collected from children with an acute respiratory tract infection at the age of 0-24 months and from healthy control children, who were matched for age and date of sample collection. Of 226 children with RSV infections, 18 (8.0%) had co-infections with RV, whereas RV was detected in 31 (14%) of 226 control children (p 0.049 by chi-square test). Adjustment for sex, number of siblings and socio-economic status strengthened the negative association between RSV and RV (OR 0.46, 95% CI 0.24-0.90; p 0.02). The median durations of symptoms (cough, rhinorrhoea, or fever) were 11 days in children with single RSV infections and 14 days in children with RSV-RV co-infections (p 0.02). Our results suggest that the presence of RSV reduces the probability of RV infection, but that, if a co-infection occurs, both viruses cause clinical symptoms.

  11. Infectivity phenotypes of H3N2 influenza A viruses in primary swine respiratory epithelial cells are controlled by sialic acid binding

    PubMed Central

    Bateman, Allen C.; Busch, Marc G.; Karasin, Alexander I.; Olsen, Christopher W.

    2012-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Bateman et al. (2012) Infectivity phenotypes of H3N2 influenza A viruses in primary swine respiratory epithelial cells are controlled by sialic acid binding. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 6(6), 424–433. Background  In the late 1990s, triple reassortant H3N2 influenza A viruses emerged and spread widely in the US swine population. We have shown previously that an isolate representative of this virus‐lineage, A/Swine/Minnesota/593/99 (Sw/MN), exhibits phenotypic differences compared to a wholly human‐lineage H3N2 virus isolated during the same time period, A/Swine/Ontario/00130/97 (Sw/ONT). Specifically, Sw/MN was more infectious for pigs and infected a significantly higher proportion of cultured primary swine respiratory epithelial cells (SRECs). In addition, reverse genetics‐generated Sw/MN × Sw/ONT reassortant and point mutant viruses demonstrated that the infectivity phenotypes in SRECs were strongly dependent on three amino acids within the hemagglutinin (HA) gene. Objectives  To determine the mechanism by which Sw/MN attains higher infectivity than Sw/ONT in SRECs. Methods  A/Swine/Minnesota/593/99, Sw/ONT, and mutant (reverse genetics‐generated HA reassortant and point mutant) viruses were compared at various HA‐mediated stages of infection: initial sialic acid binding, virus entry, and the pH of virus–endosome fusion. Results/Conclusions  Sialic acid binding was the sole stage where virus differences directly paralleled infectivity phenotypes in SRECs, indicating that binding is the primary mechanism responsible for differences in the infectivity levels of Sw/MN and Sw/ONT. PMID:22353399

  12. Respiratory tract infections in the military environment.

    PubMed

    Korzeniewski, Krzysztof; Nitsch-Osuch, Aneta; Konior, Monika; Lass, Anna

    2015-04-01

    Military personnel fighting in contemporary battlefields as well as those participating in combat training are at risk of contracting respiratory infections. Epidemiological studies have demonstrated that soldiers deployed to the harsh environment have higher rates of newly reported respiratory symptoms than non-deployers. Acute respiratory diseases are the principle reason for outpatient treatment and hospitalization among military personnel, with an incidence exceeding that of the adult civilian population by up to three-fold. Adenoviruses, influenza A and B viruses, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus pyogenes, coronaviruses and rhinoviruses have been identified as the main causes of acute respiratory infections among the military population. Although infective pathogens have been extensively studied, a significant proportion of illnesses (over 40%) have been due to unknown causative agents. Other health hazards, which can lead to respiratory illnesses among troops, are extreme air temperatures, desert dust, emissions from burn pits, industrial pollutants, and airborne contaminants originating from degraded soil. Limited diagnostic capabilities, especially inside the area of operations, make it difficult to accurately estimate the exact number of respiratory diseases in the military environment. The aim of the study was to discuss the occurrence of respiratory tract infections in army personnel, existing risk factors and preventive measures.

  13. Respiratory Viral Infections in Chronic Lung Diseases.

    PubMed

    Britto, Clemente J; Brady, Virginia; Lee, Seiwon; Dela Cruz, Charles S

    2017-03-01

    Chronic lung diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, cystic fibrosis (CF) and interstitial lung diseases (ILD), affect many individuals worldwide. Patients with these chronic lung diseases are susceptible to respiratory lung infections and some of these viral infections can contribute to disease pathogenesis. This review highlights the associations of lung infections and the respective chronic lung diseases and how infection in the different lung diseases affects disease exacerbation and progression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. [Rapid diagnostic test for respiratory infections].

    PubMed

    Marimón, José María; Navarro-Marí, José María

    2017-02-01

    Acute respiratory infections are the second cause of morbidity and mortality in children and adults worldwide, being viruses, bacteria and fungi involved in their etiology. The rapid diagnosis allows for a better clinical management of the patient, for adopting public health measures and for controlling possible outbreaks. The main etiologic agents can be diagnosed within the first hours after the onset of symptoms with antigen detection techniques, primarily immunochromatography. Results are obtained in 15-30minutes, with 70-90% sensitivity and >95% specificity for the diagnosis of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Legionella pneumophila serogroup O1 infections from urine, Streptococcus pyogenes from throat swabs and respiratory syncytial virus from nasopharyngeal aspirates. Worse results are obtained for influenza viruses and Pneumocystis jirovecii with these techniques; however, other easy-to-perform molecular techniques are available for the rapid diagnosis of these microorganisms. In general, these techniques should not be used for monitoring the outcome or response to treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  15. Atypical pathogens and respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed

    Blasi, F

    2004-07-01

    The atypical respiratory pathogens Chlamydia pneumoniae, Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Legionella pneumophila are now recognised as a significant cause of acute respiratory-tract infections, implicated in community-acquired pneumonia, acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis, asthma, and less frequently, upper respiratory-tract infections. Chronic infection with C. pneumoniae is common among patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and may also play a role in the natural history of asthma, including exacerbations. The lack of a gold standard for diagnosis of these pathogens still handicaps the current understanding of their true prevalence and role in the pathogenesis of acute and chronic respiratory infections. While molecular diagnostic techniques, such as polymerase chain reaction, offer improvements in sensitivity, specificity and rapidity over culture and serology, the need remains for a consistent and reproducible diagnostic technique, available to all microbiology laboratories. Current treatment guidelines for community-acquired pneumonia recognise the importance of atypical respiratory pathogens in its aetiology, for which macrolides are considered suitable first-line agents. The value of atypical coverage in antibiotic therapy for acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis and exacerbations of asthma is less clear, while there is no evidence to suggest that atypical pathogens should be covered in antibiotic treatment of upper respiratory-tract infections.

  16. A randomized, controlled trial of the impact of early and rapid diagnosis of viral infections in children brought to an emergency department with febrile respiratory tract illnesses.

    PubMed

    Doan, Quynh H; Kissoon, Niranjan; Dobson, Simon; Whitehouse, Sandy; Cochrane, Doug; Schmidt, Brian; Thomas, Eva

    2009-01-01

    Acute respiratory tract infections represent a significant burden on pediatric emergency departments (ED) and families. We hypothesized that early and rapid diagnosis of a viral infection alleviates the need for ancillary testing and antibiotic treatment. We conducted a randomized, controlled trial of children 3 to 36 months of age with febrile acute respiratory tract infections at a pediatric ED. Two hundred four subjects were randomly assigned to receive rapid respiratory viral testing on admission or a routine ED admission protocol. Outcome measures were: mean length of visits, rate of ancillary tests, and antibiotic prescription in the ED. A follow-up call was made to all study subjects to inquire about further healthcare visits, ancillary testing, and antibiotic prescription after ED discharge. We did not find a statistically significant difference in ED length of visits, rate of ancillary testing, or antibiotic prescription rate in the ED between the study groups. There was, however, a significant reduction in antibiotic prescription after ED discharge (in the group who had rapid viral testing RR = 0.36; 95% CI = 0.14, 0.95). Rapid multi-viral testing in the ED did not significantly affect ED patient treatment but may reduce antibiotic prescription in the community after discharge from the ED, suggesting a novel strategy to alter community physician antibiotic prescription patterns.

  17. Respiratory syncytial virus infection in cattle.

    PubMed

    Sacco, R E; McGill, J L; Pillatzki, A E; Palmer, M V; Ackermann, M R

    2014-03-01

    Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a cause of respiratory disease in cattle worldwide. It has an integral role in enzootic pneumonia in young dairy calves and summer pneumonia in nursing beef calves. Furthermore, bovine RSV infection can predispose calves to secondary bacterial infection by organisms such as Mannheimia haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida, and Histophilus somni, resulting in bovine respiratory disease complex, the most prevalent cause of morbidity and mortality among feedlot cattle. Even in cases where animals do not succumb to bovine respiratory disease complex, there can be long-term losses in production performance. This includes reductions in feed efficiency and rate of gain in the feedlot, as well as reproductive performance, milk production, and longevity in the breeding herd. As a result, economic costs to the cattle industry from bovine respiratory disease have been estimated to approach $1 billion annually due to death losses, reduced performance, and costs of vaccinations and treatment modalities. Human and bovine RSV are closely related viruses with similarities in histopathologic lesions and mechanisms of immune modulation induced following infection. Therefore, where appropriate, we provide comparisons between RSV infections in humans and cattle. This review article discusses key aspects of RSV infection of cattle, including epidemiology and strain variability, clinical signs and diagnosis, experimental infection, gross and microscopic lesions, innate and adaptive immune responses, and vaccination strategies.

  18. Respiratory syncytial virus, adenoviruses, and mixed acute lower respiratory infections in children in a developing country.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Martínez, Carlos E; Rodríguez, Diego Andrés; Nino, Gustavo

    2015-05-01

    There is growing evidence suggesting greater severity and worse outcomes in children with mixed as compared to single respiratory virus infections. However, studies that assess the risk factors that may predispose a child to a mixture of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and adenoviral infections, are scarce. In a retrospective cohort study, the study investigated the epidemiology of RSV and adenovirus infections and predictors of mixed RSV-adenoviral infections in young children hospitalized with acute lower respiratory infection in Bogota, Colombia, South America, over a 2-year period 2009-2011. Of a total of 5,539 children admitted with a diagnosis of acute lower respiratory infection, 2,267 (40.9%) who were positive for RSV and/or adenovirus were selected. Out the total number of cases, 1,416 (62.5%) infections occurred during the 3-month period from March to May, the first rainy season of Bogota, Colombia. After controlling for gender, month when the nasopharyngeal sample was taken, and other pre-existing conditions, it was found that an age greater than 6 months (OR:1.74; CI 95%:1.05-2.89; P = 0.030) and malnutrition as a comorbidity (OR:9.92; CI 95%:1.01-100.9; P = 0.049) were independent predictors of mixed RSV-adenoviral infections in the sample of patients. In conclusion, RSV and adenovirus are significant causes of acute lower respiratory infection in infants and young children in Bogota, Colombia, especially during the first rainy season. The identified predictors of mixed RSV-adenoviral infections should be taken into account when planning intervention, in order to reduce the burden of acute lower respiratory infection in young children living in the country.

  19. Rapid testing for respiratory syncytial virus in a paediatric emergency department: benefits for infection control and bed management.

    PubMed

    Mills, J M; Harper, J; Broomfield, D; Templeton, K E

    2011-03-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is responsible for annual winter outbreaks of respiratory tract infection among children in temperate climates, placing severe pressure on hospital beds. Cohorting of affected infants has been demonstrated to be an effective strategy in reducing nosocomial transmission of RSV, and may keep cubicles free for other patients who require them. Testing of symptomatic children for RSV is standard practice, but unfortunately traditional laboratory testing is not rapid enough to aid decision-making processes. Rapid point-of-care testing (POCT) in the emergency department has been suggested as an alternative. We performed a prospective study to quantify the amount of cubicle time saved by using POCT results to allow a targeted cohorting strategy. Over the four-month study period, the POCT allowed 183 children to be admitted directly to a designated cohort area, thus saving 568.5 cubicle-days for other patients. This is equivalent to five cubicles being left free for each day of the study period. This is the first time the benefits of using POCT have been quantified in this way. POCT for RSV is a safe, cost-effective and efficient way to improve bed management.

  20. Respiratory syncytial virus infection: an innate perspective

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a common cause of upper respiratory tract infection in children and adults. However, infection with this virus sometimes leads to severe lower respiratory disease and is the major cause of infant hospitalisations in the developed world. Several risk factors such as baby prematurity and congenital heart disease are known to predispose towards severe disease but previously healthy, full-term infants can also develop bronchiolitis and viral pneumonia during RSV infection. The causes of severe disease are not fully understood but may include dysregulation of the immune response to the virus, resulting in excessive recruitment and activation of innate and adaptive immune cells that can cause damage. This review highlights recent discoveries on the balancing act of immune-mediated virus clearance versus immunopathology during RSV infection. PMID:28105323

  1. Rhinovirus viremia in children with respiratory infections.

    PubMed

    Xatzipsalti, Maria; Kyrana, Serena; Tsolia, Mariza; Psarras, Stelios; Bossios, Apostolos; Laza-Stanca, Vasile; Johnston, Sebastian L; Papadopoulos, Nikolaos G

    2005-10-15

    Viremia has been implicated in many viral infections; however, viremia due to rhinovirus (RV; rhinoviremia) has been considered not to occur in normal individuals. To evaluate whether RV enters the bloodstream and identify the possible risk factors. Nasopharyngeal washes (NPWs) of 221 children with respiratory infections were examined for the presence of RV by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Blood from 88 children, whose NPW was RV-positive, and 31 of RV-negative control subjects was subsequently examined for the presence of RV in the blood by semi-nested reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Rhinoviremia was then correlated with clinical characteristics of the disease. RV was detected in the blood of 10 out of 88 NPW RV-positive cases (11.4%): 7 of 28 children with asthma exacerbations (25.0%), 2 of 26 with common cold (7.7%), 1 of 25 with bronchiolitis (4.0%), and 0 of 9 with pneumonia (0%). All NPW RV-negative cases were negative in the blood. The proportion of rhinoviremia in children with asthma exacerbation was significantly higher compared with children suffering from the other diseases (25 vs. 5%, p = 0.01). Significant risk factors were: sampling respiratory infections in normal children and is rather common in the early course of acute asthma exacerbations, suggesting that rhinoviremia may be involved in asthma exacerbation pathogenesis.

  2. Respiratory tract infections and concomitant pericoronitis of the wisdom teeth.

    PubMed

    Meurman, J H; Rajasuo, A; Murtomaa, H; Savolainen, S

    1995-04-01

    To discover if there is an association between respiratory tract infections and pericoronitis of erupting third molars in young adults. Data from male military conscripts' medical records were collected over five years and the incidence of respiratory tract infection before and after acute pericoronitis (191 cases) and before and after standard (722 cases) and operative (741) extractions compared with that in controls (n = 703) who had no infections in the third molar regions. 14,500 male military conscripts aged 20. Garrisons in Valkeala and Kouvola, Finland. The incidence of respiratory tract infection was significantly higher during the two weeks before acute pericoronitis was diagnosed compared with that in controls. The highest incidence was observed in the three days before pericoronitis (odds ratio 6.8; 95% confidence interval 3.0 to 15.0). The incidence was also increased in the first week after pericoronitis (odds ratio 3.7; 1.6 to 8.4) and three days before (odds ratio 2.6; 0.9 to 7.5) and during the first week after extraction of third molars (odds ratio 2.6; 1.3 to 5.3). Respiratory tract infection may precipitate and occur concomitantly with acute pericoronitis. Third molar surgery for pericoronitis, on the other hand, may trigger respiratory tract infection.

  3. Respiratory tract infections and concomitant pericoronitis of the wisdom teeth.

    PubMed Central

    Meurman, J. H.; Rajasuo, A.; Murtomaa, H.; Savolainen, S.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To discover if there is an association between respiratory tract infections and pericoronitis of erupting third molars in young adults. DESIGN--Data from male military conscripts' medical records were collected over five years and the incidence of respiratory tract infection before and after acute pericoronitis (191 cases) and before and after standard (722 cases) and operative (741) extractions compared with that in controls (n = 703) who had no infections in the third molar regions. SUBJECTS--14,500 male military conscripts aged 20. SETTING--Garrisons in Valkeala and Kouvola, Finland. RESULTS--The incidence of respiratory tract infection was significantly higher during the two weeks before acute pericoronitis was diagnosed compared with that in controls. The highest incidence was observed in the three days before pericoronitis (odds ratio 6.8; 95% confidence interval 3.0 to 15.0). The incidence was also increased in the first week after pericoronitis (odds ratio 3.7; 1.6 to 8.4) and three days before (odds ratio 2.6; 0.9 to 7.5) and during the first week after extraction of third molars (odds ratio 2.6; 1.3 to 5.3). CONCLUSIONS--Respiratory tract infection may precipitate and occur concomitantly with acute pericoronitis. Third molar surgery for pericoronitis, on the other hand, may trigger respiratory tract infection. PMID:7711620

  4. Heart Attack Risk Spikes After Respiratory Infection, Study Finds

    MedlinePlus

    ... Spikes After Respiratory Infection, Study Finds Even the common cold was linked to a 13-fold increased risk ... on upper-respiratory tract infections, such as the common cold, sore throat, hay fever and sinus infections. "For ...

  5. Cluster of cases of severe acute respiratory syndrome among Toronto healthcare workers after implementation of infection control precautions: a case series.

    PubMed

    Ofner-Agostini, Marianna; Gravel, Denise; McDonald, L Clifford; Lem, Marcus; Sarwal, Shelley; McGeer, Allison; Green, Karen; Vearncombe, Mary; Roth, Virginia; Paton, Shirley; Loeb, Mark; Simor, Andrew

    2006-05-01

    To review the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) infection control practices, the types of exposure to patients with SARS, and the activities associated with treatment of such patients among healthcare workers (HCWs) who developed SARS in Toronto, Canada, after SARS-specific infection control precautions had been implemented. A retrospective review of work logs and patient assignments, detailed review of medical records of patients with SARS, and comprehensive telephone-based interviews of HCWs who met the case definition for SARS after implementation of infection control precautions. Seventeen HCWs from 6 hospitals developed disease that met the case definition for SARS after implementation of infection control precautions. These HCWs had a mean age (+/-SD) of 39+/-2.3 years. Two HCWs were not interviewed because of illness. Of the remaining 15, only 9 (60%) reported that they had received formal infection control training. Thirteen HCWs (87%) were unsure of proper order in which personal protective equipment should be donned and doffed. Six HCWs (40%) reused items (eg, stethoscopes, goggles, and cleaning equipment) elsewhere on the ward after initial use in a room in which a patient with SARS was staying. Use of masks, gowns, gloves, and eyewear was inconsistent among HCWs. Eight (54%) reported that they were aware of a breach in infection control precautions. HCWs reported fatigue due to an increased number and length of shifts; participants worked a median of 10 shifts during the 10 days before onset of symptoms. Seven HCWs were involved in the intubation of a patient with SARS. One HCW died, and the remaining 16 recovered. Multiple factors were likely responsible for SARS in these HCWs, including the performance of high-risk patient care procedures, inconsistent use of personal protective equipment, fatigue, and lack of adequate infection control training.

  6. Delayed antibiotic prescriptions for respiratory infections.

    PubMed

    Spurling, Geoffrey Kp; Del Mar, Chris B; Dooley, Liz; Foxlee, Ruth; Farley, Rebecca

    2017-09-07

    Concerns exist regarding antibiotic prescribing for respiratory tract infections (RTIs) owing to adverse reactions, cost, and antibacterial resistance. One proposed strategy to reduce antibiotic prescribing is to provide prescriptions, but to advise delay in antibiotic use with the expectation that symptoms will resolve first. This is an update of a Cochrane Review originally published in 2007, and updated in 2010 and 2013. To evaluate the effects on clinical outcomes, antibiotic use, antibiotic resistance, and patient satisfaction of advising a delayed prescription of antibiotics in respiratory tract infections. For this 2017 update we searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (the Cochrane Library, Issue 4, 2017), which includes the Cochrane Acute Respiratory Infection Group's Specialised Register; Ovid MEDLINE (2013 to 25 May 2017); Ovid Embase (2013 to 2017 Week 21); EBSCO CINAHL Plus (1984 to 25 May 2017); Web of Science (2013 to 25 May 2017); WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (1 September 2017); and ClinicalTrials.gov (1 September 2017). Randomised controlled trials involving participants of all ages defined as having an RTI, where delayed antibiotics were compared to immediate antibiotics or no antibiotics. We defined a delayed antibiotic as advice to delay the filling of an antibiotic prescription by at least 48 hours. We considered all RTIs regardless of whether antibiotics were recommended or not. We used standard Cochrane methodological procedures. Three review authors independently extracted and collated data. We assessed the risk of bias of all included trials. We contacted trial authors to obtain missing information. For this 2017 update we added one new trial involving 405 participants with uncomplicated acute respiratory infection. Overall, this review included 11 studies with a total of 3555 participants. These 11 studies involved acute respiratory infections including acute otitis media (three studies

  7. Questionnaire-based analysis of infection prevention and control in healthcare facilities in Saudi Arabia in regards to Middle East Respiratory Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rabaan, Ali A; Alhani, Hatem M; Bazzi, Ali M; Al-Ahmed, Shamsah H

    2017-02-16

    Effective implementation of infection prevention and control in healthcare facilities depends on training, awareness and compliance of healthcare workers. In Saudi Arabia recent significant hospital outbreaks, including Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV), have resulted from lack of, or breakdown in, infection prevention and control procedures. This study was designed to assess attitudes to, and awareness of, infection prevention and control policies and guidelines among healthcare workers of different professions and institution types in Saudi Arabia. A questionnaire was administered to 607 healthcare workers including physicians (n=133), nurses (n=162), laboratory staff (n=233) and other staff (n=79) in government hospitals, private hospitals and poly clinics. Results were compared using Chi square analysis according to profession type, institution type, age group and nationality (Saudi or non-Saudi) to assess variability. Responses suggested that there are relatively high levels of uncertainty among healthcare workers across a range of infection prevention and control issues, including institution-specific issues, surveillance and reporting standards, and readiness and competence to implement policies and respond to outbreaks. There was evidence to suggest that staff in private hospitals and nurses were more confident than other staff types. Carelessness of healthcare workers was the top-cited factor contributing to causes of outbreaks (65.07% of total group), and hospital infrastructure and design was the top-cited factor contributing to spread of infection in the hospital (54.20%), followed closely by lack and shortage of staff (53.71%) and no infection control training program (51.73%). An electronic surveillance system was considered the most effective by staff (81.22%). We have identified areas of concern among healthcare workers in Saudi Arabia on infection prevention and control which vary between institutions and among different

  8. Respiratory infections in the young child.

    PubMed

    Peltola, H

    1993-11-01

    Infants and young children are prone to respiratory infections for at least immunological, physiological and social reasons. Their inherent immunity diminishes within months after birth. Immunological protection has to be developed naturally through infection or artificially by immunization. The alveoli continue to increase in number throughout infancy, but the pulmonary reserve remains very limited. Low lung recoil, floppy chest wall and weak respiratory muscles add to the risk of atelectasis of the growing lung. Social factors, e.g. day care, passive smoking and personal hygiene, are of even more pratical importance as they can be influential. In selecting appropriate treatment, it is not sufficient simply to prescribe an antimicrobial agent; these additional factors should also be taken into account. Treatment of respiratory infections in the young is sometimes more of an art than a science.

  9. Bacterial Respiratory Infections Complicating Human Immunodeficiency Virus.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Charles; Anderson, Ronald

    2016-04-01

    Opportunistic bacterial and fungal infections of the lower respiratory tract, most commonly those caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus), Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and Pneumocystis jirovecii, remain the major causes of mortality in those infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Bacterial respiratory pathogens most prevalent in those infected with HIV, other than M. tuberculosis, represent the primary focus of the current review with particular emphasis on the pneumococcus, the leading cause of mortality due to HIV infection in the developed world. Additional themes include (1) risk factors; (2) the predisposing effects of HIV-mediated suppression on pulmonary host defenses, possibly intensified by smoking; (3) clinical and laboratory diagnosis, encompassing assessment of disease severity and outcome; and (4) antibiotic therapy. The final section addresses current recommendations with respect to pneumococcal immunization in the context of HIV infection, including an overview of the rationale underpinning the current "prime-boost" immunization strategy based on sequential administration of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine 13 and pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine 23.

  10. Infection control and prevention practices implemented to reduce transmission risk of Middle East respiratory syndrome-coronavirus in a tertiary care institution in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Butt, Taimur S; Koutlakis-Barron, Irene; AlJumaah, Suliman; AlThawadi, Sahar; AlMofada, Saleh

    2016-05-01

    Transmission of Middle East respiratory syndrome-coronavirus (MERS-CoV) among health care workers (HCWs) and patients has been documented with mortality rate approximating 36%. We propose advanced infection control measures (A-IC) used in conjunction with basic infection control measures (B-IC) help reduce pathogen transmission. B-IC include standard and transmission-based precautions. A-IC are initiatives implemented within our center to enhance effectiveness of B-IC. Study effectiveness of combining B-IC and A-IC to prevent transmission of MERS-CoV to HCWs. A retrospective observational study was undertaken. A-IC measures include administrative support with daily rounds; infection control risk assessment; timely screening, isolation, and specimen analysis; collaboration; epidemic planning; stockpiling; implementation of contingency plans; full personal protective equipment use for advanced airway management; use of a real-time electronic isolation flagging system; infection prevention and control team on-call protocols; pretransfer MERS-CoV testing; and education. A total of 874 real-time polymerase chain reaction MERS-CoV tests were performed during the period beginning July 1, 2013, and ending January 31, 2015. Six hundred ninety-four non-HCWs were tested, of these 16 tested positive for MERS-CoV and their infection was community acquired. Sixty-nine percent of the confirmed MERS-CoV-positive cases were men, with an average age of 56 years (range, 19-84 years). Of the total tested for MERS-CoV, 180 individuals were HCWs with zero positivity. Adhering to a combination of B-IC and A-IC reduces the risk of MERS-CoV transmission to HCWs. Copyright © 2016 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Transmission of communicable respiratory infections and facemasks

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi; Guo, Yue Ping; Wong, Kwok Ching Thomas; Chung, Wai Yee Joanne; Gohel, Mayur Danny Indulal; Leung, Hang Mei Polly

    2008-01-01

    Background Respiratory protection efficiency of facemasks is critically important in the battle against communicable respiratory infections such as influenza and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). We studied the spatial distributions of simulated virus-laden respiratory droplets when human subjects wore facemasks and were exposed to regulatory viral droplets by conducting in vivo experiments in facemask use. Methods Transmission pathway of aerosols of Fluorescein-KCl solution through facemasks and protective efficiency of facemasks were examined by using normal surgical facemasks and two facemasks with exhaust valves (Facemask A) and exhaust holes (Facemask B) covered with the same surgical filters situated at the back of the facemasks. Fluorescein-KCl solution was sprayed onto the faces of participants wearing the facemasks and performing intermittent exercises on a treadmill in a climatic chamber. Results Experimental results showed that when droplets spread onto a person face-to-face over short distances, 92.3% to 99.5% of droplets were blocked by the front surface of the facemask, whereas only 0.5% to 7.7% of droplets reached the back of the facemask. Both facemasks A and B had near or over 99% protection efficiency, compared with that of 95.5% to 97% of surgical facemasks. Using the same filters as normal surgical masks, facemasks A and B provided more effective respiratory protection against communicable respiratory infections such as influenza and SARS by the location of the breathing pathway to the back of the facemasks. Conclusions Separating the breathing pathway from the virus-contaminated area in facemasks can provide more effective protection against communicable respiratory infections such as influenza and SARS. PMID:21197329

  12. Respiratory infections in patients undergoing mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Rello, Jordi; Lisboa, Thiago; Koulenti, Despoina

    2014-09-01

    Lower respiratory tract infections in mechanically ventilated patients are a frequent cause of antibiotic treatment in intensive-care units. These infections present as severe sepsis or septic shock with respiratory dysfunction in intubated patients. Purulent respiratory secretions are needed for diagnosis, but distinguishing between pneumonia and tracheobronchitis is not easy. Both presentations are associated with longlasting mechanical ventilation and extended intensive-care unit stay, providing a rationale for antibiotic treatment initiation. Differentiation of colonisers from true pathogens is difficult, and microbiological data show Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa to be of great concern because of clinical outcomes and therapeutic challenges. Key management issues include identification of the pathogen, choice of initial empirical antibiotic, and decisions with regard to the resolution pattern.

  13. Antibiotic resistance in nosocomial respiratory infections.

    PubMed

    Denys, Gerald A; Relich, Ryan F

    2014-06-01

    Nosocomial respiratory infections are the most common acquired infections in patients with severe underlying conditions and are responsible for high morbidity and mortality in this patient population. Multidrug-resistant (MDR) pathogens are associated with hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) and ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). This article describes the etiology, epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of HAP and VAP associated with antibiotic-resistant bacterial pathogens. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Respiratory virus infections among children in South China.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xiao-Ying; Wang, Qiong; Lin, Guang-Yu; Cai, Zhi-Wei; Lin, Chuang-Xing; Chen, Pai-Zhen; Zhou, Xiao-Hua; Xie, Jin-Chun; Lu, Xue-Dong

    2014-07-01

    Acute respiratory tract infection is an important cause of morbidity and mortality with a worldwide disease burden. This study aimed to determine the prevalence and clinical characteristics of children with viral-induced acute respiratory tract infection, in Southern China. Nasopharyngeal aspirate samples from 1,980 pediatric patients with suspected acute respiratory tract infection, and 82 samples from healthy subject controls were collected for routine examination at the Second Affiliated Hospital of Shantou University Medical College, from October 2007 to August 2011. Specimens were tested by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (mPCR). At least one or more viruses were detected from 1,087 samples (54.9%). These included laboratory confirmations for 446 respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), 386 influenza virus A (FluA), 315 human rhinovirus (HRV), 135 human bocavirus (HBoV), 119 Parainfluenza virus 3 (PIV3), 82 Parainfluenza virus 1 (PIV1), 66 adenovirus (ADV), 53 WU polyomavirus (WUPyV), 52 human metapneumovirus (hMPV), and 29 influenza virus B (FluB) samples. Samples from healthy subjects were negative for any virus. Of the patients with positive specimens, 107 (9.8%) were admitted to pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). Co-infection with at least two of the viral pathogens under study was observed in 325 of the 1,980 patients (16.4% of the total number of cases). These findings may help in the diagnosis of viral infections of the respiratory tract in children, and help to consider current and potential therapeutic approaches for the treatment of acute respiratory tract infection, and further respiratory complications.

  15. Vitamin D Linked to Lower Risk of Respiratory Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163633.html Vitamin D Linked to Lower Risk of Respiratory Infections ... News) -- There's preliminary evidence that adequate amounts of vitamin D might help lower rates of respiratory infections. ...

  16. Epidemiology and prevention of pediatric viral respiratory infections in health-care institutions.

    PubMed Central

    Goldmann, D. A.

    2001-01-01

    Nosocomial viral respiratory infections cause considerable illness and death on pediatric wards. Common causes of these infections include respiratory syncytial virus and influenza. Although primarily a community pathogen, rhinovirus also occasionally results in hospitalization and serious sequelae. This article reviews effective infection control interventions for these three pathogens, as well as ongoing controversies. PMID:11294717

  17. Nasopharyngeal polymicrobial colonization during health, viral upper respiratory infection and upper respiratory bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qingfu; Wischmeyer, Jareth; Gonzalez, Eduardo; Pichichero, Michael E

    2017-07-01

    We sought to understand how polymicrobial colonization varies during health, viral upper respiratory infection (URI) and acute upper respiratory bacterial infection to understand differences in infection-prone vs. non-prone patients. Nasopharyngeal (NP) samples were collected from 74 acute otitis media (AOM) infection-prone and 754 non-prone children during 2094 healthy visits, 673 viral URI visits and 631 AOM visits. Three otopathogens Streptococcus pneumoniae (Spn), Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi), and Moraxella catarrhalis (Mcat) were identified by culture. NP colonization rates of multiple otopathogens during health were significantly lower than during viral URI, and during URI they were lower than at onset of upper respiratory bacterial infection in both AOM infection-prone and non-prone children. AOM infection-prone children had higher polymicrobial colonization rates than non-prone children during health, viral URI and AOM. Polymicrobial colonization rates of AOM infection-prone children during health were equivalent to that of non-prone children during viral URI, and during viral URI were equivalent to that of non-prone during AOM infection. Spn colonization was positively associated with NTHi and Mcat colonization during health, but negatively during AOM infection. The infection-prone patients more frequently have multiple potential bacterial pathogens in the NP than the non-prone patients. Polymicrobial interaction in the NP differs during health and at onset of infection. Copyright © 2017 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Adenovirus Respiratory Tract Infections in Peru

    PubMed Central

    Ampuero, Julia S.; Ocaña, Víctor; Gómez, Jorge; Gamero, María E.; Garcia, Josefina; Halsey, Eric S.; Laguna-Torres, V. Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Background Currently, there is a paucity of data regarding human adenovirus (HAdv) circulation in Andean regions of South America. To address this shortcoming, we report the clinical, phylogenetic, and epidemiologic characteristics of HAdv respiratory tract infection from a large sentinel surveillance study conducted among adults and children in Peru. Methods/Principal Findings Oropharyngeal swabs were collected from participants visiting any of 38 participating health centers, and viral pathogens were identified by immunofluorescence assay in cell culture. In addition, molecular characterization was performed on 226 randomly selected HAdv samples. Between 2000 and 2010, a total of 26,375 participants with influenza-like illness (ILI) or severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) were enrolled in the study. HAdv infection was identified in 2.5% of cases and represented 6.2% of all viral pathogens. Co-infection with a heterologous virus was found in 15.5% of HAdv cases. HAdv infection was largely confined to children under the age of 15, representing 88.6% of HAdv cases identified. No clinical characteristics were found to significantly distinguish HAdv infection from other respiratory viruses. Geographically, HAdv infections were more common in sites from the arid coastal regions than in the jungle or highland regions. Co-circulation of subgroups B and C was observed each year between 2006 and 2010, but no clear seasonal patterns of transmission were detected. Conclusions/Significance HAdv accounted for a significant fraction of those presenting with ILI and SARI in Peru and tended to affect the younger population disproportionately. Longitudinal studies will help better characterize the clinical course of patients with HAdv in Peru, as well as determine the role of co-infections in the evolution of illness. PMID:23056519

  19. Respiratory Mucosal Proteome Quantification in Human Influenza Infections

    PubMed Central

    Marion, Tony; Elbahesh, Husni; Thomas, Paul G.; DeVincenzo, John P.; Webby, Richard; Schughart, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory influenza virus infections represent a serious threat to human health. Underlying medical conditions and genetic make-up predispose some influenza patients to more severe forms of disease. To date, only a few studies have been performed in patients to correlate a selected group of cytokines and chemokines with influenza infection. Therefore, we evaluated the potential of a novel multiplex micro-proteomics technology, SOMAscan, to quantify proteins in the respiratory mucosa of influenza A and B infected individuals. The analysis included but was not limited to quantification of cytokines and chemokines detected in previous studies. SOMAscan quantified more than 1,000 secreted proteins in small nasal wash volumes from infected and healthy individuals. Our results illustrate the utility of micro-proteomic technology for analysis of proteins in small volumes of respiratory mucosal samples. Furthermore, when we compared nasal wash samples from influenza-infected patients with viral load ≥ 28 and increased IL-6 and CXCL10 to healthy controls, we identified 162 differentially-expressed proteins between the two groups. This number greatly exceeds the number of DEPs identified in previous studies in human influenza patients. Most of the identified proteins were associated with the host immune response to infection, and changes in protein levels of 151 of the DEPs were significantly correlated with viral load. Most important, SOMAscan identified differentially expressed proteins heretofore not associated with respiratory influenza infection in humans. Our study is the first report for the use of SOMAscan to screen nasal secretions. It establishes a precedent for micro-proteomic quantification of proteins that reflect ongoing response to respiratory infection. PMID:27088501

  20. Respiratory Mucosal Proteome Quantification in Human Influenza Infections.

    PubMed

    Marion, Tony; Elbahesh, Husni; Thomas, Paul G; DeVincenzo, John P; Webby, Richard; Schughart, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory influenza virus infections represent a serious threat to human health. Underlying medical conditions and genetic make-up predispose some influenza patients to more severe forms of disease. To date, only a few studies have been performed in patients to correlate a selected group of cytokines and chemokines with influenza infection. Therefore, we evaluated the potential of a novel multiplex micro-proteomics technology, SOMAscan, to quantify proteins in the respiratory mucosa of influenza A and B infected individuals. The analysis included but was not limited to quantification of cytokines and chemokines detected in previous studies. SOMAscan quantified more than 1,000 secreted proteins in small nasal wash volumes from infected and healthy individuals. Our results illustrate the utility of micro-proteomic technology for analysis of proteins in small volumes of respiratory mucosal samples. Furthermore, when we compared nasal wash samples from influenza-infected patients with viral load ≥ 2(8) and increased IL-6 and CXCL10 to healthy controls, we identified 162 differentially-expressed proteins between the two groups. This number greatly exceeds the number of DEPs identified in previous studies in human influenza patients. Most of the identified proteins were associated with the host immune response to infection, and changes in protein levels of 151 of the DEPs were significantly correlated with viral load. Most important, SOMAscan identified differentially expressed proteins heretofore not associated with respiratory influenza infection in humans. Our study is the first report for the use of SOMAscan to screen nasal secretions. It establishes a precedent for micro-proteomic quantification of proteins that reflect ongoing response to respiratory infection.

  1. Reducing absenteeism from gastrointestinal and respiratory illness in elementary school students: a randomized, controlled trial of an infection-control intervention.

    PubMed

    Sandora, Thomas J; Shih, Mei-Chiung; Goldmann, Donald A

    2008-06-01

    Students often miss school because of gastrointestinal and respiratory illnesses. We assessed the effectiveness of a multifactorial intervention, including alcohol-based hand-sanitizer and surface disinfection, in reducing absenteeism caused by gastrointestinal and respiratory illnesses in elementary school students. We performed a school-based cluster-randomized, controlled trial at a single elementary school. Eligible students in third to fifth grade were enrolled. Intervention classrooms received alcohol-based hand sanitizer to use at school and quaternary ammonium wipes to disinfect classroom surfaces daily for 8 weeks; control classrooms followed usual hand-washing and cleaning practices. Parents completed a preintervention demographic survey. Absences were recorded along with the reason for absence. Swabs of environmental surfaces were evaluated by bacterial culture and polymerase chain reaction for norovirus, respiratory syncytial virus, influenza, and parainfluenza 3. The primary outcomes were rates of absenteeism caused by gastrointestinal or respiratory illness. Days absent were modeled as correlated Poisson variables and compared between groups by using generalized estimating equations. Analyses were adjusted for family size, race, health status, and home sanitizer use. We also compared the presence of viruses and the total bacterial colony counts on several classroom surfaces. A total of 285 students were randomly assigned; baseline demographics were similar in the 2 groups. The adjusted absenteeism rate for gastrointestinal illness was significantly lower in the intervention-group subjects compared with control subjects. The adjusted absenteeism rate for respiratory illness was not significantly different between groups. Norovirus was the only virus detected and was found less frequently on surfaces in intervention classrooms compared with control classrooms (9% vs 29%). A multifactorial intervention including hand sanitizer and surface disinfection

  2. Protocol for a pragmatic cluster randomised controlled trial for reducing irrational antibiotic prescribing among children with upper respiratory infections in rural China

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Guanyang; Wei, Xiaolin; Hicks, Joseph P; Hu, Yanhong; Walley, John; Zeng, Jun; Elsey, Helen; King, Rebecca; Zhang, Zhitong; Deng, Simin; Huang, Yuanyuan; Blacklock, Claire; Yin, Jia; Sun, Qiang; Lin, Mei

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Irrational use of antibiotics is a serious issue within China and internationally. In 2012, the Chinese Ministry of Health issued a regulation for antibiotic prescriptions limiting them to <20% of all prescriptions for outpatients, but no operational details have been issued regarding policy implementation. This study aims to test the effectiveness of a multidimensional intervention designed to reduce the use of antibiotics among children (aged 2–14 years old) with acute upper respiratory infections in rural primary care settings in China, through changing doctors' prescribing behaviours and educating parents/caregivers. Methods and analysis This is a pragmatic, parallel-group, controlled, cluster-randomised superiority trial, with blinded evaluation of outcomes and data analysis, and un-blinded treatment. From two counties in Guangxi Province, 12 township hospitals will be randomised to the intervention arm and 13 to the control arm. In the control arm, the management of antibiotics prescriptions will continue through usual care via clinical consultations. In the intervention arm, a provider and patient/caregiver focused intervention will be embedded within routine primary care practice. The provider intervention includes operational guidelines, systematic training, peer review of antibiotic prescribing and provision of health education to patient caregivers. We will also provide printed educational materials and educational videos to patients' caregivers. The primary outcome is the proportion of all prescriptions issued by providers for upper respiratory infections in children aged 2–14 years old, which include at least one antibiotic. Ethics and dissemination The trial has received ethical approval from the Ethics Committee of Guangxi Provincial Centre for Disease Control and Prevention, China. The results will be disseminated through workshops, policy briefs, peer-reviewed publications, local and international conferences. Trial

  3. Acute respiratory infections in persons with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Burns, Stephen P

    2007-05-01

    Respiratory disorders are the leading cause of death for persons with both acute and chronic spinal cord injury (SCI), and much of the morbidity and mortality associated with respiratory disorders is related to acute respiratory infections. Pneumonia is the best recognized respiratory infection associated with mortality in this population. Recent evidence supports some management strategies that differ from those recommended for the general population. Upper respiratory tract infections and acute bronchitis may be precipitating factors in the development of pneumonia or ventilatory failure in patients with chronic SCI. This review emphasizes management principles for treatment and prevention of respiratory infections in persons with SCI.

  4. Bacterial Adaptation during Chronic Respiratory Infections

    PubMed Central

    Cullen, Louise; McClean, Siobhán

    2015-01-01

    Chronic lung infections are associated with increased morbidity and mortality for individuals with underlying respiratory conditions such as cystic fibrosis (CF) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The process of chronic colonisation allows pathogens to adapt over time to cope with changing selection pressures, co-infecting species and antimicrobial therapies. These adaptations can occur due to environmental pressures in the lung such as inflammatory responses, hypoxia, nutrient deficiency, osmolarity, low pH and antibiotic therapies. Phenotypic adaptations in bacterial pathogens from acute to chronic infection include, but are not limited to, antibiotic resistance, exopolysaccharide production (mucoidy), loss in motility, formation of small colony variants, increased mutation rate, quorum sensing and altered production of virulence factors associated with chronic infection. The evolution of Pseudomonas aeruginosa during chronic lung infection has been widely studied. More recently, the adaptations that other chronically colonising respiratory pathogens, including Staphylococcus aureus, Burkholderia cepacia complex and Haemophilus influenzae undergo during chronic infection have also been investigated. This review aims to examine the adaptations utilised by different bacterial pathogens to aid in their evolution from acute to chronic pathogens of the immunocompromised lung including CF and COPD. PMID:25738646

  5. Serum Procalcitonin Measurement and Viral Testing to Guide Antibiotic Use for Respiratory Infections in Hospitalized Adults: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Branche, Angela R.; Walsh, Edward E.; Vargas, Roberto; Hulbert, Barbara; Formica, Maria A.; Baran, Andrea; Peterson, Derick R.; Falsey, Ann R.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Viral lower respiratory tract illness (LRTI) frequently causes adult hospitalization and is linked to antibiotic overuse. European studies suggest that the serum procalcitonin (PCT) level may be used to guide antibiotic therapy. We conducted a trial assessing the feasibility of using PCT algorithms with viral testing to guide antibiotic use in a US hospital. Methods. Three hundred patients hospitalized with nonpneumonic LRTI during October 2013–April 2014 were randomly assigned at a ratio of 1:1 to receive standard care or PCT-guided care and viral PCR testing. The primary outcome was antibiotic exposure, and safety was assessed at 1 and 3 months. Results. Among the 151 patients in the intervention group, viruses were identified in 42% (63), and 83% (126) had PCT values of <0.25 µg/mL. There were no significant differences in antibiotic use or adverse events between intervention patients and those in the nonintervention group. Subgroup analyses revealed fewer subjects with positive results of viral testing and low PCT values who were discharged receiving antibiotics (20% vs 45%; P = .002) and shorter antibiotic durations among algorithm-adherent intervention patients versus nonintervention patients (2.0 vs 4.0 days; P = .004). Compared with historical controls (from 2008–2011), antibiotic duration in nonintervention patients decreased by 2 days (6.0 vs 4.0 days; P < .001), suggesting a study effect. Conclusions. Although antibiotic use was similar in the 2 arms, subgroup analyses of intervention patients suggest that physicians responded to viral and biomarker data. These data can inform the design of future US studies. Clinical Trials Registration. NCT01907659. PMID:25910632

  6. Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus: Infection and Pathology.

    PubMed

    Bohmwald, Karen; Espinoza, Janyra A; Rey-Jurado, Emma; Gómez, Roberto S; González, Pablo A; Bueno, Susan M; Riedel, Claudia A; Kalergis, Alexis M

    2016-08-01

    The human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) is by far the major cause of acute lower respiratory tract infections (ALRTIs) worldwide in infants and children younger than 2 years. The overwhelming number of hospitalizations due to hRSV-induced ALRTI each year is due, at least in part, to the lack of licensed vaccines against this virus. Thus, hRSV infection is considered a major public health problem and economic burden in most countries. The lung pathology developed in hRSV-infected individuals is characterized by an exacerbated proinflammatory and unbalanced Th2-type immune response. In addition to the adverse effects in airway tissues, hRSV infection can also cause neurologic manifestations in the host, such as seizures and encephalopathy. Although the origins of these extrapulmonary symptoms remain unclear, studies with patients suffering from neurological alterations suggest an involvement of the inflammatory response against hRSV. Furthermore, hRSV has evolved numerous mechanisms to modulate and evade the immune response in the host. Several studies have focused on elucidating the interactions between hRSV virulence factors and the host immune system, to rationally design new vaccines and therapies against this virus. Here, we discuss about the infection, pathology, and immune response triggered by hRSV in the host.

  7. Stenotrophomonas maltophilia in Lower Respiratory Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    Vishwanath, Shashidhar; Gupta, Ashu

    2014-01-01

    Background: Stenotrophomonas maltophilia infection is gaining importance as an important cause of nosocomial pneumonia due to its characteristic inherent resistance to many broad- spectrum antibiotics. In this study we evaluated the demographic, clinical and microbiological profile of patients with lower respiratory tract infection due to Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis of 33 patients diagnosed with Stenotrophomonas maltophilia lower respiratory tract infections during a period of two years from 2012 - 2013 was done. Results: The predominant predisposing factor observed was mechanical ventilation in 17(51.5%) cases. Fluoroquinolones were the most effective antibiotic (26;78.8%) followed by trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (24;72.7%). Among the 19 patients treated with proper antibiotic, 13(68.4%) showed clinical improvement. Among the 14 patients who did not receive appropriate antibiotic for Stenotrophomonas maltophilia infection, 8(57.1%) showed improvement. Two (6%) had blood culture positive for Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. Mortality rate was 21.2%. Conclusion: Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is emerging as an important nosocomial pathogen with increased risk in patients on mechanical ventilation in ICU. Empiric therapy should include agents active against S.maltophilia such as newer flouroquinolones and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. PMID:25653948

  8. Stenotrophomonas maltophilia in Lower Respiratory Tract Infections.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Kiran; Vishwanath, Shashidhar; Gupta, Ashu

    2014-12-01

    Stenotrophomonas maltophilia infection is gaining importance as an important cause of nosocomial pneumonia due to its characteristic inherent resistance to many broad- spectrum antibiotics. In this study we evaluated the demographic, clinical and microbiological profile of patients with lower respiratory tract infection due to Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. A retrospective analysis of 33 patients diagnosed with Stenotrophomonas maltophilia lower respiratory tract infections during a period of two years from 2012 - 2013 was done. The predominant predisposing factor observed was mechanical ventilation in 17(51.5%) cases. Fluoroquinolones were the most effective antibiotic (26;78.8%) followed by trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (24;72.7%). Among the 19 patients treated with proper antibiotic, 13(68.4%) showed clinical improvement. Among the 14 patients who did not receive appropriate antibiotic for Stenotrophomonas maltophilia infection, 8(57.1%) showed improvement. Two (6%) had blood culture positive for Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. Mortality rate was 21.2%. Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is emerging as an important nosocomial pathogen with increased risk in patients on mechanical ventilation in ICU. Empiric therapy should include agents active against S.maltophilia such as newer flouroquinolones and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole.

  9. Respiratory infections due to nontuberculous mycobacterias.

    PubMed

    Máiz Carro, Luis; Barbero Herranz, Esther; Nieto Royo, Rosa

    2017-09-15

    The most common infections caused by nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are lung infections. The microorganisms causing these infections most frequently are Mycobacterium avium complex, Mycobacterium kansasii and Mycobacterium abscessus complex. Their incidence has increased in the last three decades. After identifying an NTM in the respiratory tract, clinical and radiological aspects must be considered to determine if isolations are clinically relevant. Predisposing conditions that could contribute to infection must also be investigated. Pulmonary disease due to NTM is presented in three clinical forms: a) pneumonitis due to hypersensitivity; b) fibrocavitary form; and c) nodular-bronchiectasic. The diagnosis of respiratory disease due to NTM does not make it obligatory to immediately initiate treatment. Before initiating the latter, other factors must be considered, such as age, comorbidities, life expectancy, due to the prolonged nature of treatments, with potential side effects and, in many cases, only a slight response to the treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Modulation of respiratory dendritic cells during Klebsiella pneumonia infection

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Klebsiella pneumoniae is a leading cause of severe hospital-acquired respiratory tract infections and death but little is known regarding the modulation of respiratory dendritic cell (DC) subsets. Plasmacytoid DC (pDC) are specialized type 1 interferon producing cells and considered to be classical mediators of antiviral immunity. Method By using multiparameter flow cytometry analysis we have analysed the modulation of respiratory DC subsets after intratracheal Klebsiella pneumonia infection. Results Data indicate that pDCs and MoDC were markedly elevated in the post acute pneumonia phase when compared to mock-infected controls. Analysis of draining mediastinal lymph nodes revealed a rapid increase of activated CD103+ DC, CD11b+ DC and MoDC within 48 h post infection. Lung pDC identification during bacterial pneumonia was confirmed by extended phenotyping for 120G8, mPDCA-1 and Siglec-H expression and by demonstration of high Interferon-alpha producing capacity after cell sorting. Cytokine expression analysis of ex vivo-sorted respiratory DC subpopulations from infected animals revealed elevated Interferon-alpha in pDC, elevated IFN-gamma, IL-4 and IL-13 in CD103+ DC and IL-19 and IL-12p35 in CD11b+ DC subsets in comparison to CD11c+ MHC-class IIlow cells indicating distinct functional roles. Antigen-specific naive CD4+ T cell stimulatory capacity of purified respiratory DC subsets was analysed in a model system with purified ovalbumin T cell receptor transgenic naive CD4+ responder T cells and respiratory DC subsets, pulsed with ovalbumin and matured with Klebsiella pneumoniae lysate. CD103+ DC and CD11b+ DC subsets represented the most potent naive CD4+ T helper cell activators. Conclusion These results provide novel insight into the activation of respiratory DC subsets during Klebsiella pneumonia infection. The detection of increased respiratory pDC numbers in bacterial pneumonia may indicate possible novel pDC functions with respect to lung repair

  11. Modulation of respiratory dendritic cells during Klebsiella pneumonia infection.

    PubMed

    Hackstein, Holger; Kranz, Sabine; Lippitsch, Anne; Wachtendorf, Andreas; Kershaw, Olivia; Gruber, Achim D; Michel, Gabriela; Lohmeyer, Jürgen; Bein, Gregor; Baal, Nelli; Herold, Susanne

    2013-09-17

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is a leading cause of severe hospital-acquired respiratory tract infections and death but little is known regarding the modulation of respiratory dendritic cell (DC) subsets. Plasmacytoid DC (pDC) are specialized type 1 interferon producing cells and considered to be classical mediators of antiviral immunity. By using multiparameter flow cytometry analysis we have analysed the modulation of respiratory DC subsets after intratracheal Klebsiella pneumonia infection. Data indicate that pDCs and MoDC were markedly elevated in the post acute pneumonia phase when compared to mock-infected controls. Analysis of draining mediastinal lymph nodes revealed a rapid increase of activated CD103+ DC, CD11b+ DC and MoDC within 48 h post infection. Lung pDC identification during bacterial pneumonia was confirmed by extended phenotyping for 120G8, mPDCA-1 and Siglec-H expression and by demonstration of high Interferon-alpha producing capacity after cell sorting. Cytokine expression analysis of ex vivo-sorted respiratory DC subpopulations from infected animals revealed elevated Interferon-alpha in pDC, elevated IFN-gamma, IL-4 and IL-13 in CD103+ DC and IL-19 and IL-12p35 in CD11b+ DC subsets in comparison to CD11c+ MHC-class IIlow cells indicating distinct functional roles. Antigen-specific naive CD4+ T cell stimulatory capacity of purified respiratory DC subsets was analysed in a model system with purified ovalbumin T cell receptor transgenic naive CD4+ responder T cells and respiratory DC subsets, pulsed with ovalbumin and matured with Klebsiella pneumoniae lysate. CD103+ DC and CD11b+ DC subsets represented the most potent naive CD4+ T helper cell activators. These results provide novel insight into the activation of respiratory DC subsets during Klebsiella pneumonia infection. The detection of increased respiratory pDC numbers in bacterial pneumonia may indicate possible novel pDC functions with respect to lung repair and regeneration.

  12. Fluorescence diagnosis of upper respiratory tract infections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco, Kate C.; Inada, Natalia M.; Kurachi, Cristina; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.

    2015-06-01

    The pharyngitis and laryngitis are respiratory tract infections highly common. Pharyngitis can be accompanied by fever, especially if caused by a systemic infection. Laryngitis is an inflammation of your voice box (larynx) from irritation or infection. The conventional treatment is the antibiotics administration, which may be responsible by an increase of identification of bacterial strains resistant to drug. This fact associated to high incidence of these infections become important to develop new technologies for diagnosis. This study aims to evaluate the use of widefield fluorescence imaging for the characterization of oropharynx infections, in order to diagnose the bacteria colonization. The imaging system for wide field fluorescence visualization is Evince® (MMOptics, São Carlos, SP, Brazil) coupled to an Apple iPhone® cell phone device. The system consists of Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) operating in the violet blue region centered at green-red spectrum 450 nm and optical filters that allow viewing of fluorescence. A tongue depressor was adapted to Evince® for mouth opening. The same images were captured with white light and fluorescence with an optical system. The red fluorescence may be a bacterial marker for physiological monitoring of oropharynx infection processes. The bacterial biofilm on tissue were assigned to the presence of protoporphyrin IX. This work indicates that the autofluorescence of the tissue may be used as a non-invasive technique to aid in the oropharynx infection diagnostic.

  13. The Impact of a School-Based Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene Program on Absenteeism, Diarrhea, and Respiratory Infection: A Matched-Control Trial in Mali.

    PubMed

    Trinies, Victoria; Garn, Joshua V; Chang, Howard H; Freeman, Matthew C

    2016-06-01

    We conducted a matched-control trial in Mali to assess the effectiveness of a comprehensive school-based water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) intervention on pupil absence, diarrhea, and respiratory infections. After completion of the intervention, data were collected from 100 beneficiary schools and 100 matched comparison schools in 5-6 sessions over a 14-month period. Data collection included roll calls to assess absenteeism and interviews with a subset of pupils to assess recent absence and disease symptoms. The odds of pupils being absent at roll call were 23% higher in beneficiary schools than in comparison schools (odds ratio [OR]: 1.23, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.06, 1.42). The odds of pupils reporting being absent due to diarrhea (OR: 0.73, 95% CI: 0.56, 0.94) or having had diarrhea (OR: 0.71, 95% CI: 0.60, 0.85) or respiratory infection symptoms (OR: 0.75, 95% CI: 0.65, 0.86) in the past week were lower in beneficiary schools compared with comparison schools. We found that a school-based WASH intervention can have a positive effect on reducing rates of illness, as well as absence due to diarrhea. However, we did not find evidence that these health impacts led to a reduction in overall absence. Higher absence rates are less likely attributable to the intervention than the result of an imbalance in unobserved confounders between study groups. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  14. DIESEL EXHAUST ENHANCES INFLUENZA VIRUS INFECTIONS IN RESPIRATORY EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several factors, such as age and nutritional status can affect the susceptibility to influenza infections. Moreover, exposure to air pollutants, such as diesel exhaust (DE), has been shown to affect respiratory virus infections in rodent models. Influenza virus primarily infects ...

  15. DIESEL EXHAUST ENHANCES INFLUENZA VIRUS INFECTIONS IN RESPIRATORY EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several factors, such as age and nutritional status can affect the susceptibility to influenza infections. Moreover, exposure to air pollutants, such as diesel exhaust (DE), has been shown to affect respiratory virus infections in rodent models. Influenza virus primarily infects ...

  16. Effects of communication training with the MAAS-Global-D instrument on the antibiotic prescribing for respiratory infections in primary care: study protocol of a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Hammersen, Friederike; Goetz, Katja; Soennichsen, Andreas; Emcke, Timo; Steinhaeuser, Jost

    2016-04-02

    Primary care physicians account for the majority of antibiotic prescribing in ambulatory care in Germany. Respiratory diseases are, regardless of effectiveness, often treated with antibiotics. Research has found this use without indication to be caused largely by communication problems (e.g. expectations on the patient's part or false assumptions about them by the physician). The present randomised controlled trial (RCT) study evaluates whether communication training for primary care physicians can reduce the antibiotic prescribing rate for respiratory tract infections. The study consists of three groups: group A will receive communication training; group B will be given the same, plus additional, access to an evidence-based point-of-care tool; and group C will function as the control group. The primary endpoint is the difference between intervention and control groups regarding the antibiotic prescribing rate before and after the intervention assessed through routine data. The communication skills are captured with the help of the communication instrument MAAS-Global-D, as well as individual videos of physician-patient consultations recorded by the primary care physicians. These skills will also be regarded with respect to the antibiotic prescribing rate. A process evaluation using qualitative as well as quantitative methods should provide information about barriers and enablers to implementing the communication training. The trial contributes to an insight into the effectiveness of the different components to reduce antibiotic prescribing, which will also be supported by an extensive evaluation. Communication training could be an effective method of reducing antibiotic prescribing in primary care. DRKS00009566 DATE REGISTRATION: 5 November 2015.

  17. Pontine Mechanisms of Respiratory Control

    PubMed Central

    Dutschmann, Mathias; Dick, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    Pontine respiratory nuclei provide synaptic input to medullary rhythmogenic circuits to shape and adapt the breathing pattern. An understanding of this statement depends on appreciating breathing as a behavior, rather than a stereotypic rhythm. In this review, we focus on the pontine-mediated inspiratory off-switch (IOS) associated with postinspiratory glottal constriction. Further, IOS is examined in the context of pontine regulation of glottal resistance in response to multimodal sensory inputs and higher commands, which in turn rules timing, duration, and patterning of respiratory airflow. In addition, network plasticity in respiratory control emerges during the development of the pons. Synaptic plasticity is required for dynamic and efficient modulation of the expiratory breathing pattern to cope with rapid changes from eupneic to adaptive breathing linked to exploratory (foraging and sniffing) and expulsive (vocalizing, coughing, sneezing, and retching) behaviors, as well as conveyance of basic emotions. The speed and complexity of changes in the breathing pattern of behaving animals implies that “learning to breathe” is necessary to adjust to changing internal and external states to maintain homeostasis and survival. PMID:23720253

  18. Host response to respiratory syncytial virus infection.

    PubMed

    Arruvito, Lourdes; Raiden, Silvina; Geffner, Jorge

    2015-06-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection is the leading cause of bronchiolitis and hospitalization in young infants and causes 100, 000-200, 000 deaths annually. There is still no licensed vaccine against RSV infection and the therapeutic options are mainly supportive. Despite almost six decades of research, important knowledge gaps remain with respect to the characterization of immune mechanisms responsible for protection and pathogenesis, as well as to the identification of risk factors that predict the severity of infection. Observations made in mouse models and young children suggest that the early innate immune response plays a major role in the pathogenesis of bronchiolitis due to RSV infection. Recent studies have improved our understanding of the role of the adaptive immune response mediated by TH1, TH2, TH17, regulatory T cells, and CD8 T cells in the pathogenesis and resolution of RSV infection. Moreover, investigations performed in the last years have made important contributions to our knowledge of the immune response in young children, the principal risk group for severe disease. A comprehensive understanding of how the protective and deleterious immune response during the course of RSV infection is induced in young children remains a challenge over the coming years.

  19. Risk factors for febrile respiratory illness and mono-viral infections in a semi-closed military environment: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Pang, Junxiong; Jin, Jing; Loh, Jin Phang; Tan, Boon Huan; Koh, Wee Hong Victor; Ng, Sock Hoon; Ho, Zheng Jie Marc; Gao, Qiuhan; Cook, Alex R; Hsu, Li Yang; Lee, Vernon J; Chen, Mark I Cheng

    2015-07-25

    Febrile respiratory illness (FRI) results in substantial burden in semi-closed environments. Tackling risk factors may reduce transmission and infection. However, risk factors involved in one setting may not be generalizable in all settings due to differences in climate, residential environment, population genetic and cultural backgrounds. This study aims to identify risk factors of FRI and mono-viral infections in a tropical military environment. From year 2009 to 2012, military personnel with temperature ≥37.5 °C, cough and/or sore throat, and personnel with no fever or no respiratory symptoms were recruited as cases and controls, respectively. Subjects provided nasal wash specimens and answered a standardized questionnaire. Resplex assays were used to determine the viral etiologies. Descriptive, univariate and multivariate analyses of the variables were performed using appropriate descriptive tests and logistic regression modelling, respectively, with R program. A total of 7,743 FRI cases and 1,247 non-FRI study controls were recruited. Increasing age [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 1.03; 95 % confidence interval (CI) = 1.01-1.05], recruit camp (AOR = 4.67; 95 % CI = 3.99-5.46) and smoker (AOR = 1.31; 95 % CI = 1.13-1.52) were independent risk factors of FRI. Malay ethnicity was positively associated with influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 (AOR = 1.50; 95 % CI = 1.04-2.15) and coxsackie/echovirus (AOR = 1.67; 95 % CI = 1.19-2.36) mono-infection. Significant contact risk factors were stay-out personnel with ill household member (AOR = 4.96; 95 % CI = 3.39-7.24), and stay-in personnel with ill bunkmate and household member (AOR = 3.55; 95 % CI = 2.57-4.91). Staying in camp with none ill in bunk and at home was a protective factor against FRI (AOR = 0.80; 95 % CI = 0.64-0.99). These contact risk factors were similarly observed for the five most common viruses detected, namely adenovirus, rhinoviruses, influenza A and B, and coxsackie/echovirus. Increasing age

  20. Emerging drugs for respiratory syncytial virus infection.

    PubMed

    Olszewska, Wieslawa; Openshaw, Peter

    2009-06-01

    Although respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) was discovered > 40 years ago, treatment remains largely supportive. There are no safe and effective vaccines or specific treatments other than prophylaxis with passive antibody therapy (palivizumab). However, there are good reasons to think that the scene may soon change. As the pace of development of anti-viral drugs accelerates and optimism over vaccines increases, novel therapies are set to make a major impact in the management of this very common infection. The use and effect of such interventions are not easy to anticipate, but could ultimately include the interruption of RSV's transmission resulting in profound changes to the impact of RSV on human health.

  1. Management of respiratory viral infections in hematopoietic cell transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Dimpy P; Ghantoji, Shashank S; Mulanovich, Victor E; Ariza-heredia, Ella J; Chemaly, Roy F

    2012-01-01

    Advances in stem cell transplantation procedures and the overall improvement in the clinical management of hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) recipients over the past 2 decades have led to an increase in survival duration, in part owing to better strategies for prevention and treatment of post-transplant complications, including opportunistic infections. However, post-HCT infections remain a concern for HCT recipients, particularly infections caused by community respiratory viruses (CRVs), which can lead to significant morbidity and mortality. These viruses can potentially cause lower respiratory tract illness, which is associated with a higher mortality rate among HCT recipients. Clinical management of CRV infections in HCT recipients includes supportive care and antiviral therapy, especially in high-risk individuals, when available. Directed antiviral therapy is only available for influenza infections, where successful use of neuraminidase inhibitors (oseltamivir or zanamivir) and/or M2 inhibitors (amantadine or rimantadine) has been reported. Data on the successful use of ribavirin, with or without immunomodulators, for respiratory syncytial virus infections in HCT recipients has emerged over the past 2 decades but is still controversial at best because of a lack of randomized controlled trials. Because of the lack of directed antiviral therapy for most of these viruses, prevention should be emphasized for healthcare workers, patients, family, and friends and should include the promotion of the licensed inactivated influenza vaccine for HCT recipients, when indicated. In this review, we discuss the clinical management of respiratory viruses in this special patient population, focusing on commercially available antivirals, adjuvant therapy, and novel drugs under investigation, as well as on available means for prevention. PMID:23226621

  2. Cistus incanus (CYSTUS052) for treating patients with infection of the upper respiratory tract. A prospective, randomised, placebo-controlled clinical study.

    PubMed

    Kalus, Ulrich; Grigorov, Alexandre; Kadecki, Oliver; Jansen, Jan-Peter; Kiesewetter, Holger; Radtke, Hartmut

    2009-12-01

    In this prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical study we aimed to investigate the clinical effect of a Cistus extract (CYSTUS052) in 160 patients with infections of the upper respiratory tract. The extract contains a high percentage of highly polymeric polyphenols. In cell culture and in a mouse model it exerts antiviral and antimicrobial activities. Principal active constituents of the genus Cistus are polyphenolic compounds. Plant-derived polyphenols have been shown to be strong antioxidants with potential health benefits. Various reports have appeared on the antiviral and antibacterial potential, including several reports describing the antiviral activity of polyphenols against influenza virus. Clinical studies on the effectiveness of Cistus incanus are scarce. Only one controlled application observation study demonstrated the effectiveness of a Cistus extract. The present randomised, placebo-controlled clinical study was designed to compare the symptom scores in patients with common cold treated either with CYSTUS052 or with placebo. A score of subjective symptoms decreased significantly over the course of treatment with Cistus, whereas treatment with placebo resulted in a less distinct decrease of symptoms. Among the inflammatory markers investigated, the C-reactive protein was mostly affected by Cistus and decreased significantly in the treatment group.

  3. Low Serum Levels of Vitamins A, D, and E Are Associated with Recurrent Respiratory Tract Infections in Children Living in Northern China: A Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuguang; Ding, Fengshu; Li, Huaining; Zhao, Wenfeng; Jing, Hong; Yan, Yageng; Chen, Yanping

    2016-01-01

    Background This study aimed to investigate the association of serum concentrations of vitamin A, D, and E with recurrent respiratory tract infections (RRTIs). Methods A total of 1200 children aged at 0.5–14 years were selected via a face-to-face survey in Harbin, China. Among the participants, 600 children with RRTIs comprised the symptomatic group (RRTI group), whereas 600 healthy children were used as controls (control group). Blood samples were collected to measure serum levels of vitamins A and E by HPLC; the serum level of 25-hydroxycholecalciferol (25(OH)D), was measured by HPLC-MS/MS. Results Serum levels of vitamins A and E, as well as 25(OH)D, were significantly lower in the RRTI group than the control group. The conditional logistic regression model and the receiver-operating characteristic curve showed that the insufficiency or deficiency of vitamins A, D, and E was positively correlated with RRTI occurrence (p < 0.05). Conclusions Low serum concentrations of vitamins A, D, and E were associated with RRTIs in children from northern China. PMID:27936124

  4. Stress significantly increases mortality following a secondary bacterial respiratory infection

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A variety of mechanisms contribute to the viral-bacterial synergy which results in fatal secondary bacterial respiratory infections. Epidemiological investigations have implicated physical and psychological stressors as factors contributing to the incidence and severity of respiratory infections and psychological stress alters host responses to experimental viral respiratory infections. The effect of stress on secondary bacterial respiratory infections has not, however, been investigated. A natural model of secondary bacterial respiratory infection in naive calves was used to determine if weaning and maternal separation (WMS) significantly altered mortality when compared to calves pre-adapted (PA) to this psychological stressor. Following weaning, calves were challenged with Mannheimia haemolytica four days after a primary bovine herpesvirus-1 (BHV-1) respiratory infection. Mortality doubled in WMS calves when compared to calves pre-adapted to weaning for two weeks prior to the viral respiratory infection. Similar results were observed in two independent experiments and fatal viral-bacterial synergy did not extend beyond the time of viral shedding. Virus shedding did not differ significantly between treatment groups but innate immune responses during viral infection, including IFN-γ secretion, the acute-phase inflammatory response, CD14 expression, and LPS-induced TNFα production, were significantly greater in WMS versus PA calves. These observations demonstrate that weaning and maternal separation at the time of a primary BHV-1 respiratory infection increased innate immune responses that correlated significantly with mortality following a secondary bacterial respiratory infection. PMID:22435642

  5. Respiratory Infections: Respiratory Infections Challenge Child Care Centers. NCEDL Spotlights, No. 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collier, Albert M.; Henderson, Frederick W.

    This report, the fifth in the National Center for Early Development & Learning's (NCEDL) "Spotlight" series, is based on excerpts from a paper presented during the "Research into Practice in Infant/Toddler Care" synthesis conference in fall 1997. The report addresses preventing respiratory infections in child care centers.…

  6. The Burden of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection in Young Children

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Caroline Breese; Weinberg, Geoffrey A.; Iwane, Marika K.; Blumkin, Aaron K.; Edwards, Kathryn M.; Staat, Mary A.; Auinger, Peggy; Griffin, Marie R.; Poehling, Katherine A.; Erdman, Dean; Grijalva, Carlos G.; Zhu, Yuwei; Szilagyi, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background The primary role of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in causing infant hospitalizations is well recognized, but the total burden of RSV infection among young children remains poorly defined. Methods We conducted prospective, population-based surveillance of acute respiratory infections among children under 5 years of age in three U.S. counties. We enrolled hospitalized children from 2000 through 2004 and children presenting as outpatients in emergency departments and pediatric offices from 2002 through 2004. RSV was detected by culture and reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Clinical information was obtained from parents and medical records. We calculated population-based rates of hospitalization associated with RSV infection and estimated the rates of RSV-associated outpatient visits. Results Among 5067 children enrolled in the study, 919 (18%) had RSV infections. Overall, RSV was associated with 20% of hospitalizations, 18% of emergency department visits, and 15% of office visits for acute respiratory infections from November through April. Average annual hospitalization rates were 17 per 1000 children under 6 months of age and 3 per 1000 children under 5 years of age. Most of the children had no coexisting illnesses. Only prematurity and a young age were independent risk factors for hospitalization. Estimated rates of RSV-associated office visits among children under 5 years of age were three times those in emergency departments. Outpatients had moderately severe RSV-associated illness, but few of the illnesses (3%) were diagnosed as being caused by RSV. Conclusions RSV infection is associated with substantial morbidity in U.S. children in both inpatient and outpatient settings. Most children with RSV infection were previously healthy, suggesting that control strategies targeting only high-risk children will have a limited effect on the total disease burden of RSV infection. PMID:19196675

  7. Pneumococcal Colonization Rates in Patients Admitted to a United Kingdom Hospital with Lower Respiratory Tract Infection: a Prospective Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Johnstone, Catherine M. K.; Gritzfeld, Jenna F.; Banyard, Antonia; Hancock, Carole A.; Wright, Angela D.; Macfarlane, Laura; Ferreira, Daniela M.

    2016-01-01

    Current diagnostic tests are ineffective for identifying the etiological pathogen in hospitalized adults with lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs). The association of pneumococcal colonization with disease has been suggested as a means to increase the diagnostic precision. We compared the pneumococcal colonization rates and the densities of nasal pneumococcal colonization by (i) classical culture and (ii) quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) targeting lytA in patients with LRTIs admitted to a hospital in the United Kingdom and control patients. A total of 826 patients were screened for inclusion in this prospective case-control study. Of these, 38 patients were recruited, 19 with confirmed LRTIs and 19 controls with other diagnoses. Nasal wash (NW) samples were collected at the time of recruitment. Pneumococcal colonization was detected in 1 patient with LRTI and 3 controls (P = 0.6) by classical culture. By qPCR, pneumococcal colonization was detected in 10 LRTI patients and 8 controls (P = 0.5). Antibiotic usage prior to sampling was significantly higher in the LRTI group than in the control group (19 versus 3; P < 0.001). With a clinically relevant cutoff of >8,000 copies/ml on qPCR, pneumococcal colonization was found in 3 LRTI patients and 4 controls (P > 0.05). We conclude that neither the prevalence nor the density of nasal pneumococcal colonization (by culture and qPCR) can be used as a method of microbiological diagnosis in hospitalized adults with LRTI in the United Kingdom. A community-based study recruiting patients prior to antibiotic therapy may be a useful future step. PMID:26791364

  8. Viral coinfection in childhood respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Roig, A; Salvadó, M; Caballero-Rabasco, M A; Sánchez-Buenavida, A; López-Segura, N; Bonet-Alcaina, M

    2015-01-01

    The introduction of molecular techniques has enabled better understanding of the etiology of respiratory tract infections in children. The objective of the study was to analyze viral coinfection and its relationship to clinical severity. Hospitalized pediatric patients with a clinical diagnosis of respiratory infection were studied during the period between 2009-2010. Clinical and epidemiological data, duration of hospitalization, need for oxygen therapy, bacterial coinfection and need for mechanical ventilation were collected. Etiology was studied by multiplex PCR and low-density microarrays for 19 viruses. A total of 385 patients were positive, 44.94% under 12 months. The most frequently detected viruses were RSV-B: 139, rhinovirus: 114, RSV-A: 111, influenza A H1N1-2009: 93 and bocavirus: 77. Coinfection was detected in 61.81%, 36.36% with 2 viruses, 16.10% and 9.35% with 3 to 4 or more. Coinfection was higher in 2009 with 69.79 vs. 53.88% in 2010. Rhinovirus/RSV-B on 10 times and RSV-A/RSV-B on 5 times were the most detected coinfections. Hospitalization decreased with greater number of viruses (P<0,001). Oxygen therapy was required by 26.75% (one virus was detected in 55.34% of cases). A larger number of viruses resulted in less need for oxygen (P<0,001). Ten cases required mechanical ventilation, 4 patients with bacterial coinfection and 5 with viral coinfection (P=0,69). An inverse relationship was found between the number of viruses detected in nasopharyngeal aspirate, the need for oxygen therapy and hospitalization days. More epidemiological studies and improved quantitative detection techniques are needed to define the role of viral coinfections in respiratory disease and its correlation with the clinical severity. Copyright © 2013 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. Meditation or Exercise May Help Acute Respiratory Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... from hand-washing, no acute respiratory infection prevention strategies have previously been proven. The researchers concluded that future studies are needed to confirm these findings. Reference Barrett ...

  10. Biological agents and respiratory infections: Causative mechanisms and practice management.

    PubMed

    Takayanagi, Noboru

    2015-09-01

    Biological agents are increasingly being used to treat patients with immune-mediated inflammatory disease. In Japan, currently approved biological agents for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) include tumor necrosis factor inhibitors, interleukin-6 receptor-blocking monoclonal antibody, and T-cell costimulation inhibitor. Rheumatologists have recognized that safety issues are critical aspects of treatment decisions in RA. Therefore, a wealth of safety data has been gathered from a number of sources, including randomized clinical trials and postmarketing data from large national registries. These data revealed that the most serious adverse events from these drugs are respiratory infections, especially pneumonia, tuberculosis, nontuberculous mycobacteriosis, and Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia, and that the most common risk factors associated with these respiratory infections are older age, concomitant corticosteroid use, and underlying respiratory comorbidities. Because of this background, in 2014, the Japanese Respiratory Society published their consensus statement of biological agents and respiratory disorders. This review summarizes this statement and adds recent evidence, especially concerning respiratory infections in RA patients, biological agents and respiratory infections, and practice management of respiratory infections in patients treated with biological agents. To decrease the incidence of infections and reduce mortality, we should know the epidemiology, risk factors, management, and methods of prevention of respiratory infections in patients receiving biological agents. Copyright © 2015 The Japanese Respiratory Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Viral respiratory infections among Hajj pilgrims in 2013.

    PubMed

    Barasheed, Osamah; Rashid, Harunor; Alfelali, Mohammad; Tashani, Mohamed; Azeem, Mohammad; Bokhary, Hamid; Kalantan, Nadeen; Samkari, Jamil; Heron, Leon; Kok, Jen; Taylor, Janette; El Bashir, Haitham; Memish, Ziad A; Haworth, Elizabeth; Holmes, Edward C; Dwyer, Dominic E; Asghar, Atif; Booy, Robert

    2014-12-01

    Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) has emerged in the Arabian Gulf region, with its epicentre in Saudi Arabia, the host of the 'Hajj' which is the world's the largest mass gathering. Transmission of MERS-CoV at such an event could lead to its rapid worldwide dissemination. Therefore, we studied the frequency of viruses causing influenza-like illnesses (ILI) among participants in a randomised controlled trial at the Hajj 2013. We recruited 1038 pilgrims from Saudi Arabia, Australia and Qatar during the first day of Hajj and followed them closely for four days. A nasal swab was collected from each pilgrim who developed ILI. Respiratory viruses were detected using multiplex RT-PCR. ILI occurred in 112/1038 (11%) pilgrims. Their mean age was 35 years, 49 (44%) were male and 35 (31%) had received the influenza vaccine pre-Hajj. Forty two (38%) pilgrims had laboratory-confirmed viral infections; 28 (25%) rhinovirus, 5 (4%) influenza A, 2 (2%) adenovirus, 2 (2%) human coronavirus OC43/229E, 2 (2%) parainfluenza virus 3, 1 (1%) parainfluenza virus 1, and 2 (2%) dual infections. No MERS-CoV was detected in any sample. Rhinovirus was the commonest cause of ILI among Hajj pilgrims in 2013. Infection control and appropriate vaccination are necessary to prevent transmission of respiratory viruses at Hajj and other mass gatherings.

  12. Consumption of a fermented dairy product containing the probiotic Lactobacillus casei DN-114001 reduces the duration of respiratory infections in the elderly in a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Guillemard, E; Tondu, F; Lacoin, F; Schrezenmeir, J

    2010-01-01

    Common infectious diseases (CID) of the airways and the gastrointestinal tract are still a considerable cause of morbidity and mortality in elderly. The present study examined the beneficial effect of a dairy product containing the probiotic strain Lactobacillus casei DN-114 001 (fermented product) on the resistance of free-living elderly to CID. The study was multicentric, double blind and controlled, involving 1072 volunteers (median age = 76.0 years) randomised for consumption of either 200 g/d of fermented (n 537) or control (non-fermented) dairy product (n 535) for 3 months, followed by an additional 1 month's follow-up. The results showed that, when considering all CID, the fermented product significantly reduced the average duration per episode of CID (6.5 v. 8 d in control group; P = 0.008) and the cumulative duration of CID (7 v. 8 d in control group; P = 0.009). Reduction in both episode and cumulative durations was also significant for all upper respiratory tract infections (URTI; P < 0.001) and for rhinopharyngitis (P < 0.001). This was accompanied with an increase of L. casei species in stools throughout the fermented product consumption (2-3.8 x 107 equivalents of colony-forming unit/g of stools, P < 0.001). The cumulative number of CID (primary outcome) was not different between groups nor was the CID severity, fever, pathogens' occurrence, medication, immune blood parameters and quality of life. The fermented product was safe and well tolerated. In conclusion, consumption of a fermented dairy product containing the probiotic strain L. casei DN-114 001 in elderly was associated with a decreased duration of CID in comparison with the control group, especially for URTI such as rhinopharyngitis.

  13. WITHDRAWN: Immunoglobulin treatment for respiratory syncytial virus infection.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Hannah L; Del Mar, Chris B

    2010-09-08

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) bronchiolitis and pneumonia hospitalise hundreds of thousands of infants every year. Treatment is largely supportive therapy, (for example, oxygen, fluids and occasionally mechanical ventilation). Ribavirin, an antiviral agent, is licensed for severe RSV infection, although systematic reviews find it of no benefit. Passive protection against RSV can be achieved through monthly intramuscular injections of the humanised monoclonal anti-RSV antibody palivizumab (Synagis), and yields a 55% reduction in RSV hospitalisation in susceptible infants. This review assesses immunoglobulin treatment of RSV infection rather than its role as a prophylactic measure. To assess the efficacy of adding human or humanised immunoglobulin therapy to supportive therapy in infants hospitalised with laboratory-determined RSV infection. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library, 2006, issue 1) which contains the Acute Respiratory Infections Group's specialized regsiter, MEDLINE (1966 to Week 4, January 2006) and EMBASE (1980 to September 2005). We also ran searches of reference lists of relevant trials and review articles and searches of personal files. We did not impose any language restrictions. We selected randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that compared immunoglobulin treatment with a placebo control in children hospitalised for RSV infection with bronchiolitis or pneumonia or other lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) with laboratory-documented RSV infection. The primary outcomes of interest were mortality, length of hospitalisation, length of ventilation and oxygen dependence. Secondary outcome measures were pulmonary function and re-hospitalisations for recurrent breathing difficulties in subsequent years. Any adverse effects of the treatments were also noted, for example, hypersensitivity reactions. Data were extracted but cross-comparison was not possible due to the shortage of studies and

  14. Daily Zinc but Not Multivitamin Supplementation Reduces Diarrhea and Upper Respiratory Infections in Tanzanian Infants: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial12

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Christine M; Manji, Karim P; Kisenge, Rodrick; Aboud, Said; Spiegelman, Donna; Fawzi, Wafaie W; Duggan, Christopher P

    2015-01-01

    Background: Although various micronutrient regimens have been shown to prevent and treat common infectious diseases in children, the effects of daily multivitamin (MV) and/or zinc supplementation have not been widely evaluated in young African infants. Objective: The objective was to determine whether daily supplementation of HIV-unexposed Tanzanian infants with MVs or zinc reduces the risk of infectious morbidity compared with placebo. Methods: In a 2 × 2 factorial, double-blind, randomized controlled trial, 2400 infants who were 6 wk of age and born to HIV-negative mothers in a low-malaria setting were randomly assigned to receive daily oral supplementation of MVs (vitamin B complex and vitamins C and E), zinc, zinc + MVs, or placebo for 18 mo. Morbidity was assessed by study nurses at monthly visits and by physicians every 3 mo and/or when the child was acutely ill. Results: No significant differences were found in the percentage of nurse visits during which diarrhea, cough, or any other symptom were reported throughout the previous month when receiving either zinc or MVs. However, physician diagnoses of all types of diarrhea (RR = 0.88; 95% CI: 0.81, 0.96; P = 0.003), dysentery (RR = 0.84; 95% CI: 0.74, 0.95; P = 0.006), and acute upper respiratory infection (RR = 0.92; 95% CI: 0.88, 0.97; P = 0.0005) were significantly lower for infants supplemented with zinc than for those who did not receive zinc. Among the 2360 infants for whom vital status was obtained, there was a nonsignificant increase in all-cause mortality among infants who received zinc (HR = 1.80; 95% CI: 0.98, 3.31; P = 0.06) compared with those who did not receive zinc. MVs did not alter the rates of any recorded physician diagnoses or mortality. Neither zinc nor MVs reduced hospitalizations or unscheduled outpatient visits. Conclusions: Daily zinc supplementation of Tanzanian infants beginning at the age of 6 wk may lower the burden of diarrhea and acute upper respiratory infections, but

  15. Surveillance for Respiratory Infections, Including Severe Acute Respiratory, Syndrome (SARS), in Cobra Gold 2003

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-05-10

    to be causal. Respiratory illnesses caused by viruses in the family Coronaviridae have long been recognized.2-13 Two species known to cause human ...tested positive for influenza A, 2 (13%) for coronavirus OC43, 2 (13%) for respiratory syncytial virus , 1 (6%) rhinovirus, 9 and 4 (25%) were...NAVAL HEALTH RESEARCH CENTER SURVEILLANCE FOR RESPIRATORY INFECTIONS , INCLUDING SEVERE ACUTE RESPIRATORY SYNDROME (SARS), IN COBRA

  16. Phosphatidylinositol inhibits respiratory syncytial virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Numata, Mari; Kandasamy, Pitchaimani; Nagashima, Yoji; Fickes, Rachel; Murphy, Robert C.; Voelker, Dennis R.

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infects nearly all children under age 2, and reinfection occurs throughout life, seriously impacting adults with chronic pulmonary diseases. Recent data demonstrate that the anionic pulmonary surfactant lipid phosphatidylglycerol (PG) exerts a potent antiviral effect against RSV in vitro and in vivo. Phosphatidylinositol (PI) is also an anionic pulmonary surfactant phospholipid, and we tested its antiviral activity. PI liposomes completely suppress interleukin-8 production from BEAS2B epithelial cells challenged with RSV. The presence of PI during viral challenge in vitro reduces infection by a factor of >103. PI binds RSV with high affinity, preventing virus attachment to epithelial cells. Intranasal inoculation with PI along with RSV in mice reduces the viral burden 30-fold, eliminates the influx of inflammatory cells, and reduces tissue histopathology. Pharmacological doses of PI persist for >6 h in mouse lung. Pretreatment of mice with PI at 2 h prior to viral infection effectively suppresses inflammation and reduces the viral burden by 85%. These data demonstrate that PI has potent antiviral properties, a long residence time in the extracellular bronchoalveolar compartment, and a significant prophylaxis window. The findings demonstrate PG and PI have complementary roles as intrinsic, innate immune antiviral mediators in the lung. PMID:25561461

  17. To compare the effect of dextromethorphan, promethazine and placebo on nocturnal cough in children aged 1-12 y with upper respiratory infections: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Malobika; Joshi, Neha; Yadav, Sangita

    2013-11-01

    To evaluate whether promethazine and dextromethorphan reduce nocturnal cough and improve sleep quality in children aged 1-12 y with upper respiratory tract infection (URI). This randomised double-blinded placebo-controlled trial was conducted in Pediatric outpatient department of Lok Nayak Hospital, Delhi. After randomization into promethazine, dextromethorphan and placebo groups, parental assessment of 120 children with URI for nocturnal cough severity (child), post-tussive vomiting (child) and sleep quality (child and parent) on the night before enrolment and after 3 d of assigned medication was measured using an internally validated indigenously prepared ordinal scale. Entire cohort improved in all the study parameters after 3 d. However, no superior benefit was noted when individual parameters were compared in the promethazine and dextromethorphan groups with the placebo group. Adverse effects were more frequent in the dextromethorphan and promethazine groups although the difference was not statistically significant. Nocturnal cough in URI is self-resolving and dextromethorphan and promethazine prescribed for the same are not superior to placebo.

  18. Year in review 2013: Critical Care--respiratory infections.

    PubMed

    Nair, Girish B; Niederman, Michael S

    2014-10-29

    Infectious complications, particularly in the respiratory tract of critically ill patients, are related to increased mortality. Severe infection is part of a multiple system illness and female patients with severe sepsis have a worse prognosis compared to males. Kallistatin is a protective hormokine released during monocyte activation and low levels in the setting of septic shock can predict adverse outcomes. Presepsin is another biomarker that was recently evaluated and is elevated in patients with severe sepsis patients at risk of dying. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has introduced new definitions for identifying patients at risk of ventilator-associated complications (VACs), but several other conditions, such as pulmonary edema and acute respiratory distress syndrome, may cause VACs, and not all patients with VACs may have ventilator-associated pneumonia. New studies have suggested strategies to identify patients at risk for resistant pathogen infection and therapies that optimize efficacy, without the overuse of broad-spectrum therapy in patients with healthcare-associated pneumonia. Innovative strategies using optimized dosing of antimicrobials, maximizing the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of drugs in critically ill patients, and newer routes of drug delivery are being explored to combat drug-resistant pathogens. We summarize the major clinical studies on respiratory infections in critically ill patients published in 2013.

  19. Animal models of respiratory syncytial virus infection.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Geraldine

    2017-01-11

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) is a major cause of respiratory disease and hospitalisation of infants, worldwide, and is also responsible for significant morbidity in adults and excess deaths in the elderly. There is no licensed hRSV vaccine or effective therapeutic agent. However, there are a growing number of hRSV vaccine candidates that have been developed targeting different populations at risk of hRSV infection. Animal models of hRSV play an important role in the preclinical testing of hRSV vaccine candidates and although many have shown efficacy in preclinical studies, few have progressed to clinical trials or they have had only limited success. This is, at least in part, due to the lack of animal models that fully recapitulate the pathogenesis of hRSV infection in humans. This review summarises the strengths and limitations of animal models of hRSV, which include those in which hRSV is used to infect non-human mammalian hosts, and those in which non-human pneumoviruses, such as bovine (b)RSV and pneumonia virus of mice (PVM) are studied in their natural host. Apart from chimpanzees, other non-human primates (NHP) are only semi-permissive for hRSV replication and experimental infection with large doses of virus result in little or no clinical signs of disease, and generally only mild pulmonary pathology. Other animal models such as cotton rats, mice, ferrets, guinea pigs, hamsters, chinchillas, and neonatal lambs are also only semi-permissive for hRSV. Nevertheless, mice and cotton rats have been of value in the development of monoclonal antibody prophylaxis for infants at high risk of severe hRSV infection and have provided insights into mechanisms of immunity to and pathogenesis of hRSV. However, the extent to which they predict hRSV vaccine efficacy and safety is unclear and several hRSV vaccine candidates that are completely protective in rodent models are poorly effective in chimpanzees and other NHP, such as African Green monkeys. Furthermore

  20. Vitamin D supplementation to patients with frequent respiratory tract infections: a post hoc analysis of a randomized and placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Peter; Norlin, Anna-Carin; Hansen, Susanne; Björkhem-Bergman, Linda

    2015-08-30

    Vitamin D is considered to be important for a healthy immune system. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that vitamin D supplementation reduces number of respiratory tract infections (RTIs) and prolong the time to the first RTI in adult patients with frequent RTIs. We performed a post hoc analysis of a randomized, placebo-controlled and double-blinded study, where adult patients with a high burden of RTIs were randomized to placebo or vitamin D (4000 IE/day for 1 year, n = 124 in the per protocol cohort presented here). Vitamin D supplementation increased the probability to stay free of RTI during the study year (RR 0.64, 95% CI 0.43-0.94). Further, the total number of RTIs was also reduced in the vitamin D-group (86 RTIs) versus placebo (120 RTIs; p = 0.05). Finally, the time to the first RTI was significantly extended in the vitamin D-group (HR 1.68, 95% CI 1.03-2.68, p = 0.0376). Vitamin D supplementation was found to significantly increase the probability of staying infection free during the study period. This finding further supports the notion that vitamin D-status should be monitored in adult patients with frequent RTIs and suggests that selected patients with vitamin D deficiency are supplemented. This could be a safe and cheap way to reduce RTIs and improve health in this vulnerable patient population. The original trial was registered at http://www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01131858).

  1. Vitamin D supplementation improves well-being in patients with frequent respiratory tract infections: a post hoc analysis of a randomized, placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Peter; Norlin, Anna-Carin; Hansen, Susanne; Björkhem-Bergman, Linda

    2015-09-29

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that vitamin D supplementation improves well-being in patients with frequent respiratory tract infections (RTIs). We performed a post hoc analysis of a randomized, placebo-controlled and double-blind study in which patients with frequent RTIs were randomized to placebo or vitamin D (4000 IE/day for 1 year, n = 124). At the last visit of the study, patients were asked to perform a general assessment of their well-being during the study. The majority of patients, both placebo- and vitamin D treated, stated that they had felt 'better' during the study; 52% in the placebo group and 70% in the vitamin D group, relative risk 1.3 (95% CI 1.0-1.8; p = 0.06, Fisher's exact test). Statement of better well-being was associated with an increase in 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OHD) levels (p < 0.001). In contrast, worse well-being was associated with unchanged 25-OHD levels. Notably, a 25-OHD level above 100 nmol/L at the study end was associated with a higher chance of having a better well-being (p < 0.01). Four patients on anti-depressive treatment could terminate their antidepressant medication during the study. These patients had a significant increase in 25-OHD levels from low levels at study-start. Vitamin D supplementation to patients with frequent RTIs might be beneficial, not only for infections, but also for their general well-being. However, given the post hoc design of this study, these findings need to be confirmed in additional clinical trials before firm conclusions can be drawn. http://www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01131858), registered March 22, 2010.

  2. Effects 4.5 years after an interactive GP educational seminar on antibiotic therapy for respiratory tract infections: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Ferrat, E; Le Breton, J; Guéry, E; Adeline, F; Audureau, E; Montagne, O; Roudot-Thoraval, F; Attali, C; Le Corvoisier, P; Renard, V

    2016-04-01

    The few studies assessing long-term effects of educational interventions on antibiotic prescription have produced conflicting results. Our aim was to assess the effects after 4.5 years of an interactive educational seminar designed for GPs and focused on antibiotic therapy in respiratory tract infections (RTIs). The seminar was expected to decrease antibiotic prescriptions for any diagnosis. We conducted a randomized controlled parallel-group trial in a Paris suburb (France), with GPs as the randomization unit and prescriptions as the analysis unit. The intervention occurred in September 2004 and the final assessment in March 2009. Among 203 randomized GPs, 168 completed the study, 70 in the intervention group and 98 in the control group. Intervention GPs were randomized to attending only a 2-day interactive educational seminar on evidence-based guidelines about managing RTIs or also 1 day of problem-solving training. The primary outcome was the percentage of change in the proportion of prescriptions containing an antibiotic for any diagnosis in 2009 versus 2004. An intention-to-treat sensitivity analysis was performed using multiple imputation. After 4.5 years, absolute changes in the primary outcome measure were -1.1% (95% confidence interval: -2.2 to 0.0) in the intervention group and +1.4% (0.3-2.6) in the control group, yielding an adjusted between-group difference of -2.2% (-2.7 to -1.7; P < 0.001). Both intervention modalities had significant effects, and multiple imputation produced similar results. A single, standardized and interactive educational seminar targeting GPs significantly decreased antibiotic use for RTIs after 4.5 years. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Respiratory virus infection among hematopoietic cell transplant recipients: evidence for asymptomatic parainfluenza virus infection.

    PubMed

    Peck, Angela J; Englund, Janet A; Kuypers, Jane; Guthrie, Katherine A; Corey, Lawrence; Morrow, Rhoda; Hackman, Robert C; Cent, Anne; Boeckh, Michael

    2007-09-01

    The incidence of respiratory virus infection after hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) has probably been underestimated with conventional testing methods in symptomatic patients. This prospective study assessed viral infection episodes by testing weekly respiratory samples collected from HCT recipients, with and without symptoms reported by questionnaire, for 100 days after HCT. Samples were tested by culture and direct fluorescent antibody testing for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), parainfluenza virus (PIV), and influenza A and B, and by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction for RSV, PIV, influenza A and B, and metapneumovirus (MPV). Of 122 patients, 30 (25%) had 32 infection episodes caused by RSV (5), PIV (17), MPV (6), influenza (3), RSV, or influenza (1). PIV, with a cumulative incidence estimate of 17.9%, was the only virus for which asymptomatic infection was detected. Lower virus copy number in patients with no or one symptom compared with 2 or more symptoms was found for all viruses in all patients (P < .001), with PIV infection having a similar virus-specific comparison (P = .004). Subclinical infection with PIV may help explain why infection-control programs that emphasize symptoms are effective against RSV and influenza but often not against PIV.

  4. [Viral respiratory tract infections in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit].

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Carrasco, E; Calvo, C; García-García, M L; Beato, M; Muñoz-Archidona, C; Pozo, F; Casas, I

    2015-04-01

    Viral respiratory infections cause major morbidity and mortality in preterm infants. We have performed a prospective study in our neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) to determine the incidence of respiratory infections, their impact and the epidemiology and outcome in high risk neonates. From September 2011 to May 2013 a prospective study was conducted in all preterm infants < 32 weeks gestational age and in all term newborns admitted to NICU for any pathology that are anticipated to have an income exceeding two weeks. A nasopharyngeal aspirate (NPA) was collected the first day of life and weekly until discharge for virologic study with polymerase chain reaction. When these babies presented respiratory symptoms a new NPA was collected in this moment. A clinical form was filled by the physician. A total of 60 infants were analyzed: 30 (50%) had a gestational age < 32 weeks and 36 (60%) weighing less than 1500 grams. We collected a total of 256 nasopharyngeal aspirate samples, 24 of them being positive (9.3%). These 24 positive samples corresponded to 13 infants in our cohort (21.6% of the patients). Of them, 9 were symptomatic and had 11 episodes of infection (2 patients had two different episodes with negative control between them). The most frequently identified virus was rhinovirus in (19) 79% of cases. The most frequent clinical data was the presence or increased of apneas (75%) and the needed of oxygenotherapy. HRV infections are prevalent in the NICU, and preterm infants have a high risk of infections with clinical relevance. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Simultaneous influenza and respiratory syncytial virus infection in human respiratory tract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinky, Lubna Jahan Rashid; Dobrovolny, Hana

    2015-03-01

    Studies have shown that simultaneous infection of the respiratory tract with at least two viruses is not uncommon in hospitalized patients, although it is not clear whether these infections are more or less severe than single infections. We use mathematical models to study the dynamics of simultaneous influenza (flu) and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection, two of the more common respiratory viruses, in an effort to understand simultaneous infections. We examine the roles of initial viral inoculum, relative starting time, and cell regeneration on the severity of the infection. We also study the effect of antiviral treatment on the course of the infection. This study shows that, unless treated with antivirals, flu always takes over the infection no matter how small the initial dose and how delayed it starts with respect to RSV.

  6. Chlamydia pneumoniae respiratory infection after allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Geisler, William M; Corey, Lawrence

    2002-03-27

    Chlamydia pneumoniae is a common cause of upper and lower respiratory tract infections in immunocompetent patients; however, its role as a respiratory pathogen in immunocompromised hosts has been infrequently recognized. We describe C. pneumoniae lower respiratory tract infection in a 19-year-old male after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. The patient developed fever on day +14, and a subsequent computed tomography scan of the chest revealed a right lateral pleural-based opacity, which was then resected during thoracoscopy. Diagnosis was made by culture and staining of the resected tissue with C. pneumoniae-specific monoclonal antibodies, and azithromycin was administered. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of C. pneumoniae respiratory infection after stem cell or marrow transplantation. C. pneumoniae often coexists with other etiologic agents of pneumonia in immunocompromised patients. Considering the infrequency of infections from this organism in this clinical setting, one must still rule out other more likely respiratory pathogens.

  7. Providing evidence for use of Echinacea supplements in Hajj pilgrims for management of respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed

    Daneshmehr, Mohammad Ali; Tafazoli, Ali

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate potential applicability of Echinacea use for management of respiratory tract infections in Hajj travelers. The PubMed database was explored with Mesh terms "Echinacea" and "Respiratory Tract Infections". A hundred journal articles were yielded but only 66 most relevant ones used for the review. There is a considerable amount of evidence that shows effectiveness of Echinacea products in prevention and treatment of respiratory tract infections in this setting. Although there are some controversial findings, utilization of standardized products with adequate dose or combinations with other immune-stimulants in controlled and well-designed trials will be highly encouraging. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Incidence of respiratory viruses in Peruvian children with acute respiratory infections.

    PubMed

    del Valle Mendoza, Juana; Cornejo-Tapia, Angela; Weilg, Pablo; Verne, Eduardo; Nazario-Fuertes, Ronald; Ugarte, Claudia; del Valle, Luis J; Pumarola, Tomás

    2015-06-01

    Acute respiratory infections are responsible for high morbi-mortality in Peruvian children. However, the etiological agents are poorly identified. This study, conducted during the pandemic outbreak of H1N1 influenza in 2009, aims to determine the main etiological agents responsible for acute respiratory infections in children from Lima, Peru. Nasopharyngeal swabs collected from 717 children with acute respiratory infections between January 2009 and December 2010 were analyzed by multiplex RT-PCR for 13 respiratory viruses: influenza A, B, and C virus; parainfluenza virus (PIV) 1, 2, 3, and 4; and human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) A and B, among others. Samples were also tested with direct fluorescent-antibodies (DFA) for six respiratory viruses. RT-PCR and DFA detected respiratory viruses in 240 (33.5%) and 85 (11.9%) cases, respectively. The most common etiological agents were RSV-A (15.3%), followed by influenza A (4.6%), PIV-1 (3.6%), and PIV-2 (1.8%). The viruses identified by DFA corresponded to RSV (5.9%) and influenza A (1.8%). Therefore, respiratory syncytial viruses (RSV) were found to be the most common etiology of acute respiratory infections. The authors suggest that active surveillance be conducted to identify the causative agents and improve clinical management, especially in the context of possible circulation of pandemic viruses.

  9. Effect of Vitamin D3 Supplementation on Respiratory Tract Infections in Healthy Individuals: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Dao, Dyda; Gysin, Christian Michael; Lytvyn, Lyubov; Loeb, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Objective Vitamin D supplementation may be a simple preventive measure against respiratory tract infections (RTIs) but evidence from randomized controlled trials is inconclusive. We aimed to systematically summarize results from interventions studying the protective effect of vitamin D supplementation on clinical and laboratory confirmed RTIs in healthy adults and children. Methods Medline, EMBASE, CENTRAL, and CINAHL were screened from inception until present (last updated in January 2016) completed by a search of the grey literature, clinical trial registers and conference abstracts. We included randomized trials comparing vitamin D versus placebo or no treatment. Two independent reviewers were responsible for study selection and data extraction. Cochrane’s risk of bias tool and the GRADE approach were used for quality assessment. Estimates were pooled with random-effects models. Heterogeneity was explored by sub-group and meta-regression analyses. Results Of 2627 original hits, 15 trials including 7053 individuals were ultimately eligible. All used oral cholecalciferol. We found a 6% risk reduction with vitamin D3 supplementation on clinical RTIs, but the result was not statistically significant (RR 0.94; 95% CI 0.88 to 1.00). Heterogeneity was large (I-square 57%) and overall study quality was low. There were too few studies to reliably assess a potential risk reduction of laboratory confirmed RTI. Evidence was insufficient to demonstrate an association between vitamin D supplementation and risk of clinical RTI in sub-groups with vitamin D deficiency. Conclusions In previously healthy individuals vitamin D supplementation does not reduce the risk of clinical RTIs. However, this conclusion is based on a meta-analysis where the included studies differed with respect to population, baseline vitamin D levels and study length. This needs to be considered when interpreting the results. Future trials should focus on vitamin D deficient individuals and apply more

  10. [Antibiotic prescribing in acute respiratory tract infections in general practice].

    PubMed

    Malo, S; Bjerrum, L; Feja, C; Lallana, M J; Poncel, A; Rabanaque, M J

    2015-06-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is a worldwide threat to public health. Acute respiratory tract infections are the main reason for antibiotic prescribing in the Spanish paediatric population. The aim of the study was to describe the frequency of antibiotic prescription and their pattern of use in acute respiratory tract infections diagnosed in children in Primary Care in Aragón (Spain). A study was conducted over a 1-year period on children between 0 and 14 years-old, recording all episodes of acute otitis, acute pharyngotonsillitis, non-specific upper respiratory infection, and acute bronchitis. The proportion of episodes within each diagnosis receiving an antibiotic prescription was calculated, and the prescribing pattern was determined. Half (50%) of the children in Aragón were diagnosed with a respiratory tract infection during the study period. Non-specific upper respiratory infection was the most frequent diagnosis. An antibiotic was prescribed in 75% of pharyngotonsillitis episodes, 72% of otitis, 27% of bronchitis, and 16% of non-specific upper respiratory infections. Broad spectrum antibiotics, mainly amoxicillin and amoxicillin-clavulanic, were predominantly prescribed. Antibiotic prescribing in respiratory tract infections in children was generally high, and the choice of antibiotics was probably inappropriate in a high percentage of cases. Therefore an improvement in antibiotic prescribing in children appears to be needed. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Recurrent and persistent respiratory tract viral infections in patients with primary hypogammaglobulinemia.

    PubMed

    Kainulainen, Leena; Vuorinen, Tytti; Rantakokko-Jalava, Kaisu; Osterback, Riikka; Ruuskanen, Olli

    2010-07-01

    The occurrence of respiratory tract viral infections in patients with primary hypogammaglobulinemia has not been studied. We conducted a prospective 12-month follow-up study of respiratory tract infections in 12 adult patients with primary hypogammaglobulinemia. Nasal swab samples and induced sputum samples were taken at the onset of acute respiratory tract infection and every 3 months thereafter. Samples were tested for bacteria and viruses. PCR tests were performed for 15 respiratory tract viruses. In case the results for rhinovirus were positive, follow-up nasal swab samples were taken every 2 weeks until rhinoviral PCR results became negative. Patients completed symptom diaries, which were collected every month. The spouses of the patients served as healthy control subjects. During the 12-month period, the 12 patients had 65 episodes of acute respiratory tract infections, and the 11 spouses had 12 acute episodes (P < .001). Respiratory tract viruses were found in sputum in 54% of the infections. Rhinovirus was the most common virus. In more than half of our patients, rhinoviral PCR results stayed positive for more than 2 months. The most long-acting persistence with the same rhinovirus was 4 months. Despite adequate immunoglobulin replacement therapy, patients with primary hypogammaglobulinemia have increased susceptibility to respiratory tract viral infections. Rhinoviral infections are frequent and prolonged. Copyright 2010 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Prevention and treatment of viral respiratory infections by traditional Chinese herbs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoguang; Liu, Zejing

    2014-01-01

    This review focuses on current knowledge of traditional Chinese herbs on prevention and treatment of viral respiratory infections, especially caused by Severe Acute Respiratory Syndromes (SARS) virus, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and influenza viruses. The data used in this review were obtained from PubMed and CNKI up to May 2013. Terms of Chinese herbs and infections of respiratory tract were used in the search. Articles related that Chinese herbs preventing and treating infections in respiratory tract were retrieved and reviewed. The risk of bias of included studies was assessed by the method in the "Cochrane Handbook of Systematic Reveiws of Interventionsand studies" with high risk of bias were excluded. Four criteria for selections were set as following: randomized controlled trial, particular effective compound or derivative, reproducible result and animal test. Infectious respiratory tract diseases cause most mortality among infectious illnesses around the world. As traditional medicines, Chinese herbs have been widely used to deal with diseases for centuries and have been proved effective in practice. The administration of some Chinese herbs stimulates, suppresses or regulates the activity of immune system, thus protecting the respiratory tract or relieving infections of pathogens. Many herbs have remarkable antiviral effects, therefore they are used as substitutes of antimicrobial drugs. Based on the theory of traditional Chinese medicine, mix-using herbs provide a synergistic benefit on preventing and healing respiratory tract infections. Many commercial herbal medicines containing one or more compounds have been successfully applied to prevent and treat viral infections of respiratory tract clinically. Traditional Chinese herbs could directly inhibit pathogens infecting respiratory tract, or coordinate the activity of immune system to avoid or relieve infections. With the emergence of antidrug pathogens or new variants, Chinese herbs give strong

  13. Short course daily prednisolone therapy during an upper respiratory tract infection in children with relapsing steroid-sensitive nephrotic syndrome (PREDNOS 2): protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Relapses of childhood steroid-sensitive nephrotic syndrome (SSNS) are treated with a 4- to 8-week course of high-dose oral prednisolone, which may be associated with significant adverse effects. There is a clear association between upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) and relapse development. Previous studies in developing nations have suggested that introducing a 5- to 7-day course of daily prednisolone during an URTI may prevent a relapse developing and the need for a treatment course of high-dose prednisolone. The aim of PREDNOS 2 is to evaluate the effectiveness of a 6-day course of daily prednisolone therapy during an URTI in reducing the development of a subsequent relapse in a developed nation. Methods/design The subjects will be 300 children with relapsing SSNS (≥2 relapses in preceding year), who will be randomised to receive either a 6-day course of daily prednisolone or no change to their current therapy (with the use of placebo to double blind) each time they develop an URTI over 12 months. A strict definition for URTI will be used. Subjects will be reviewed at 3, 6, 9 and 12 months to capture data regarding relapse history, ongoing therapy and adverse effect profile, including behavioural problems and quality of life. A formal health economic analysis will also be performed. The primary end point of the study will be the incidence of URTI-related relapse (3 days of Albustix +++) following the first infection during the 12-month follow-up period. DNA and RNA samples will be collected to identify a potential genetic cause for the disease. Subjects will be recruited from over 100 UK centres with the assistance of the Medicines for Children Research Network. PREDNOS 2 is funded by the National Institute for Health Research Health Technology Assessment Programme (11/129/261). Discussion We propose that PREDNOS 2 will be a pivotal study that will inform the future standard of care for children with SSNS. If it is possible to reduce the

  14. Familial susceptibility to severe respiratory infection in early life.

    PubMed

    Goetghebuer, Tessa; Kwiatkowski, Dominic; Thomson, Anne; Hull, Jeremy

    2004-10-01

    Lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI) are common in the first year of life and are mostly caused by viruses. Severity of LRTI in infants is associated with early-life environmental factors. Genetic association studies also suggest a role of heredity in susceptibility to acute bronchiolitis. We designed a case control study to further investigate relative importance of familial influences in risk of LRTI in early childhood compared to environmental factors. From a hospital database, we selected 1,308 children (436 cases; 872 controls) living in Oxfordshire. Cases were children under age 5 years admitted to hospital with LRTI. Parental history and other exposures were recorded in cases and controls by postal questionnaire. Maternal history of asthma increased the risk of severe LRTI in the first year of life, independent of subsequent asthma in a child. History of maternal bronchiolitis also increased the risk of infant LRTI. These results further support the possibility that genetic factors play an important role in susceptibility to severe viral respiratory infections in early life, and suggest that this effect may be independent of subsequent childhood asthma.

  15. Respiratory viruses in children hospitalized for acute lower respiratory tract infection in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Kwofie, Theophilus B; Anane, Yaw A; Nkrumah, Bernard; Annan, Augustina; Nguah, Samuel B; Owusu, Michael

    2012-04-10

    Acute respiratory tract infections are one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality among young children in developing countries. Information on the viral aetiology of acute respiratory infections in developing countries is very limited. The study was done to identify viruses associated with acute lower respiratory tract infection among children less than 5 years. Nasopharyngeal samples and blood cultures were collected from children less than 5 years who have been hospitalized for acute lower respiratory tract infection. Viruses and bacteria were identified using Reverse Transcriptase Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction and conventional biochemical techniques. Out of 128 patients recruited, 33(25.88%%, 95%CI: 18.5% to 34.2%) were positive for one or more viruses. Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) was detected in 18(14.1%, 95%CI: 8.5% to 21.3%) patients followed by Adenoviruses (AdV) in 13(10.2%, 95%CI: 5.5% to 16.7%), Parainfluenza (PIV type: 1, 2, 3) in 4(3.1%, 95%CI: 0.9% to 7.8%) and influenza B viruses in 1(0.8%, 95%CI: 0.0 to 4.3). Concomitant viral and bacterial co-infection occurred in two patients. There were no detectable significant differences in the clinical signs, symptoms and severity for the various pathogens isolated. A total of 61.1% (22/36) of positive viruses were detected during the rainy season and Respiratory Syncytial Virus was the most predominant. The study has demonstrated an important burden of respiratory viruses as major causes of childhood acute respiratory infection in a tertiary health institution in Ghana. The data addresses a need for more studies on viral associated respiratory tract infection.

  16. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection (RSV): Transmission and Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection (RSV) Note: Javascript is disabled or is ... if you touch a surface that has the virus on it, like a doorknob, and then touch ...

  17. Respiratory tract viral infections in bone marrow transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Raboni, Sonia M; Nogueira, Meri B; Tsuchiya, Luine R V; Takahashi, Gislene A; Pereira, Luciane A; Pasquini, Ricardo; Siqueira, Marilda M

    2003-07-15

    Community respiratory viruses such as respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), adenovirus, influenza A, influenza B, and the parainfluenza group are frequent causes of respiratory disease in bone marrow transplant (BMT) patients. During the period from March 1993 to August 1999, 810 samples of respiratory secretions, nasopharyngeal aspirate (NPA) or bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), from 722 patients with upper respiratory infections symptoms at the BMT unit of the Federal University in the state of Paraná, Brazil were evaluated for respiratory virus infection. One hundred thirty-six (17%) samples were reactive in 62 patients. RSV was found in 30 of 62 (48%), influenza A in 14 of 62 (23%), influenza B in 9 of 62 (15%), parainfluenza group in 7 of 62 (11%), and adenovirus in 2 of 62 (3%) infected patients. The most frequent clinical manifestations were cough and fever. Pneumonia occurred in 19 of 62 (31%) cases. The mortality rate was 23 of 62 (37%), being higher among patients infected with adenovirus and influenza A. Infections in BMT patients occurred during the outbreak period of these viruses in the community, highlighting the need to establish surveillance measures in units with immunocompromised patients in addition to the development of sensitive and rapid diagnostic tests for the detection of these viruses in patients with respiratory symptoms.

  18. Respiratory syncytial virus shedding by children hospitalized with lower respiratory tract infection.

    PubMed

    Takeyama, Aya; Hashimoto, Koichi; Sato, Masatoki; Kawashima, Ryoko; Kawasaki, Yukihiko; Hosoya, Mitsuaki

    2016-06-01

    Children with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection shed virus for variable periods. The aim of this study was to quantify the viral load in nasopharyngeal aspirates of children with RSV throughout their hospitalization. This study included 37 children who were admitted with a diagnosis of RSV infection based on a positive rapid diagnostic test. Nasopharyngeal aspirates were collected from patients every day, from admission to discharge. Viral detection and quantification were performed using quantitative real-time PCR. Of the 37 patients, RSV-A was detected in 29 and RSV-B in 6. Two patients were PCR-negative for any type of RSV. RSV-A was detected in 12 of 16 patients (75%) 6 days after admission. These patients shed detectable virus from days 1 to 12, and for a significantly longer period (mean 5.7 days) than RSV-B (mean 3.8 days) patients. Half of the RSV-A patients were also positive on day 14 following onset. RSV-A was detected in patients <12 months of age for significantly longer periods after onset than in patients ≥12 months of age. RSV-A viral load was negatively correlated with days from admission and days from onset. Because RSV shedding was frequently prolonged, the hospitalized children may have contracted RSV as a nosocomial infection. To prevent nosocomial RSV infections in hospital wards, healthcare workers must take appropriate infection control measures and provide adequate guidance on hand washing to the family of the patient.

  19. Respiratory viral infections occurring after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Seo, Sachiko

    Respiratory viral infection is one of the most crucial complications after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), which affects approximately 60% of HSCT recipients within one year after transplantation. Prevalence of progression from upper respiratory tract infection to lower respiratory tract disease (LRD) among HSCT recipients is 15-20% and day-90 mortality after LRD is as high as 40%. Risk factors for the progression to LRD are early infection after HSCT, low neutrophil or lymphocyte count, old age, and corticosteroid use. Aerosolized or oral ribavirin for respiratory syncytial virus infection and neuraminidase inhibitors for influenza are effective for the prevention of progression to LRD and mortality from LRD. Conversely, there are no definitive data concerning the efficacy of intravenous immunoglobulin. In cases of respiratory viral infection after HSCT, we recommend reduction of steroid dosage to less than 1 mg/kg/day, if applicable. Future directions for the management of respiratory viral infections in Japan are widespread availability of multiplex PCR testing and the introduction of new antiviral drugs.

  20. Rationale, design and organization of the delayed antibiotic prescription (DAP) trial: a randomized controlled trial of the efficacy and safety of delayed antibiotic prescribing strategies in the non-complicated acute respiratory tract infections in general practice.

    PubMed

    de la Poza Abad, Mariam; Mas Dalmau, Gemma; Moreno Bakedano, Mikel; González González, Ana Isabel; Canellas Criado, Yolanda; Hernández Anadón, Silvia; Rotaeche del Campo, Rafael; Torán Monserrat, Pere; Negrete Palma, Antonio; Pera, Guillem; Borrell Thió, Eulàlia; Llor, Carl; Little, Paul; Alonso Coello, Pablo

    2013-05-19

    Respiratory tract infections are an important burden in primary care and it's known that they are usually self-limited and that antibiotics only alter its course slightly. This together with the alarming increase of bacterial resistance due to increased use of antimicrobials calls for a need to consider strategies to reduce their use. One of these strategies is the delayed prescription of antibiotics. Multicentric, parallel, randomised controlled trial comparing four antibiotic prescribing strategies in acute non-complicated respiratory tract infections. We will include acute pharyngitis, rhinosinusitis, acute bronchitis and acute exacerbation of chronic bronchitis or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (mild to moderate). The therapeutic strategies compared are: immediate antibiotic treatment, no antibiotic treatment, and two delayed antibiotic prescribing (DAP) strategies with structured advice to use a course of antibiotics in case of worsening of symptoms or not improving (prescription given to patient or prescription left at the reception of the primary care centre 3 days after the first medical visit). Delayed antibiotic prescription has been widely used in Anglo-Saxon countries, however, in Southern Europe there has been little research about this topic. The DAP trial wil evaluate two different delayed strategies in Spain for the main respiratory infections in primary care. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number http://NCT01363531.

  1. Rationale, design and organization of the delayed antibiotic prescription (DAP) trial: a randomized controlled trial of the efficacy and safety of delayed antibiotic prescribing strategies in the non-complicated acute respiratory tract infections in general practice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Respiratory tract infections are an important burden in primary care and it’s known that they are usually self-limited and that antibiotics only alter its course slightly. This together with the alarming increase of bacterial resistance due to increased use of antimicrobials calls for a need to consider strategies to reduce their use. One of these strategies is the delayed prescription of antibiotics. Methods Multicentric, parallel, randomised controlled trial comparing four antibiotic prescribing strategies in acute non-complicated respiratory tract infections. We will include acute pharyngitis, rhinosinusitis, acute bronchitis and acute exacerbation of chronic bronchitis or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (mild to moderate). The therapeutic strategies compared are: immediate antibiotic treatment, no antibiotic treatment, and two delayed antibiotic prescribing (DAP) strategies with structured advice to use a course of antibiotics in case of worsening of symptoms or not improving (prescription given to patient or prescription left at the reception of the primary care centre 3 days after the first medical visit). Discussion Delayed antibiotic prescription has been widely used in Anglo-Saxon countries, however, in Southern Europe there has been little research about this topic. The DAP trial wil evaluate two different delayed strategies in Spain for the main respiratory infections in primary care. Trial registration This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number http://NCT01363531. PMID:23682979

  2. Respiratory infections in patients with cystic fibrosis undergoing lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Leonard J; Noone, Peadar G

    2014-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is an inherited disease characterised by chronic respiratory infections associated with bronchiectasis. Lung transplantation has helped to extend the lives of patients with cystic fibrosis who have advanced lung disease. However, persistent, recurrent, and newly acquired infections can be problematic. Classic cystic fibrosis-associated organisms, such as Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, are generally manageable post-transplantation, and are associated with favourable outcomes. Burkholderia cenocepacia poses particular challenges, although other Burkholderia species are less problematic. Despite concerns about non-tuberculous mycobacteria, especially Mycobacterium abscessus, post-transplantation survival has not been definitively shown to be less than average in patients with these infections. Fungal species can be prevalent before and after transplantation and are associated with high morbidity, so should be treated aggressively. Appropriate viral screening and antiviral prophylaxis are necessary to prevent infection with and reactivation of Epstein-Barr virus and cytomegalovirus and their associated complications. Awareness of drug pharmacokinetics and interactions in cystic fibrosis is crucial to prevent toxic effects and subtherapeutic or supratherapeutic drug dosing. With the large range of potential infectious organisms in patients with cystic fibrosis, infection control in hospital and outpatient settings is important. Despite its complexity, lung transplantation in the cystic fibrosis population is safe, with good outcomes if the clinician is aware of all the potential pathogens and remains vigilant by means of surveillance and proactive treatment.

  3. Novel clinical features of recurrent human respiratory syncytial virus infections.

    PubMed

    Yui, Ikuko; Fujino, Motoko; Sawada, Akihito; Nakayama, Tetsuo

    2014-09-01

    Children and elderly individuals are often infected easily and repeatedly with human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV); however, the features of recurrent infection in the same individual are defined poorly. To clarify the clinical significance of repeated HRSV infections in relation to subgroup epidemiology, this study performed prospective and longitudinal analyses in children with lower respiratory tract infections over 20 consecutive epidemics between 1985 and 2005 at a pediatric outpatient clinic in Kawasaki, Japan. HRSV infections were confirmed by 2 types of reverse-transcription PCR. Samples obtained from patients with repeated infections were subjected to sequence analysis and cloning analysis. A total of 1,312 lower respiratory tract infections observed in 1,010 patients were diagnosed as HRSV infections. Repeated HRSV infections occurred in 208 of the 1,010 patients. Analysis of the patients with repeated infections revealed that children were often infected multiple times even within a single short epidemic. Some patients were re-infected with strains having the same or virtually identical N gene sequences. In patients infected more than 4 times, cloning analysis revealed more frequent dual infections with both subgroups (23.8%). The HRSV-A subgroup caused subsequent homologous infections more frequently than did HRSV-B; furthermore, HRSV-A infections provided no protection from a second homologous infection. In contrast, HRSV-B infections offered significant protection against a second homologous infection. Statistical analysis revealed alleviation of symptoms with a reduced rate of dyspnoeic attacks only in the group re-infected with homologous HRSV-A strains. Thus, this study elucidates new clinical features of recurrent HRSV infection.

  4. Consensus document for the prevention of respiratory infections in adults.

    PubMed

    Froes, F; Diniz, A; Robalo Cordeiro, C; Serrado, M; Ramalho de Almeida, A

    2014-01-01

    Infectious diseases are one of the principle causes of morbidity, mortality and drain on health resources worldwide. In recent years there has been an increase in the impact of respiratory infections, particularly in the Portuguese population. It is for this reason that the Portuguese Respiratory Society has presented a series of recommendations for the prevention of respiratory infections in adults. These recommendations include both general measures and vaccinations for flu and pneumococcal pneumonia. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Portuguesa de Pneumologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  5. Investigations of respiratory control systems simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, R. R.

    1973-01-01

    The Grodins' respiratory control model was investigated and it was determined that the following modifications were necessary before the model would be adaptable for current research efforts: (1) the controller equation must be modified to allow for integration of the respiratory system model with other physiological systems; (2) the system must be more closely correlated to the salient physiological functionings; (3) the respiratory frequency and the heart rate should be expanded to illustrate other physiological relationships and dependencies; and (4) the model should be adapted to particular individuals through a better defined set of initial parameter values in addition to relating these parameter values to the desired environmental conditions. Several of Milhorn's respiratory control models were also investigated in hopes of using some of their features as modifications for Grodins' model.

  6. Association of residential dampness and mold with respiratory tract infections and bronchitis: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Dampness and mold have been shown in qualitative reviews to be associated with a variety of adverse respiratory health effects, including respiratory tract infections. Several published meta-analyses have provided quantitative summaries for some of these associations, but not for respiratory infections. Demonstrating a causal relationship between dampness-related agents, which are preventable exposures, and respiratory tract infections would suggest important new public health strategies. We report the results of quantitative meta-analyses of published studies that examined the association of dampness or mold in homes with respiratory infections and bronchitis. Methods For primary studies meeting eligibility criteria, we transformed reported odds ratios (ORs) and confidence intervals (CIs) to the log scale. Both fixed and random effects models were applied to the log ORs and their variances. Most studies contained multiple estimated ORs. Models accounted for the correlation between multiple results within the studies analyzed. One set of analyses was performed with all eligible studies, and another set restricted to studies that controlled for age, gender, smoking, and socioeconomic status. Subgroups of studies were assessed to explore heterogeneity. Funnel plots were used to assess publication bias. Results The resulting summary estimates of ORs from random effects models based on all studies ranged from 1.38 to 1.50, with 95% CIs excluding the null in all cases. Use of different analysis models and restricting analyses based on control of multiple confounding variables changed findings only slightly. ORs (95% CIs) from random effects models using studies adjusting for major confounding variables were, for bronchitis, 1.45 (1.32-1.59); for respiratory infections, 1.44 (1.31-1.59); for respiratory infections excluding nonspecific upper respiratory infections, 1.50 (1.32-1.70), and for respiratory infections in children or infants, 1.48 (1

  7. Association of residential dampness and mold with respiratory tract infections and bronchitis: a meta-analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, William J.; Eliseeva, Ekaterina A.; Mendell, Mark J.

    2010-11-15

    Dampness and mold have been shown in qualitative reviews to be associated with a variety of adverse respiratory health effects, including respiratory tract infections. Several published meta-analyses have provided quantitative summaries for some of these associations, but not for respiratory infections. Demonstrating a causal relationship between dampness-related agents, which are preventable exposures, and respiratory tract infections would suggest important new public health strategies. We report the results of quantitative meta-analyses of published studies that examined the association of dampness or mold in homes with respiratory infections and bronchitis. For primary studies meeting eligibility criteria, we transformed reported odds ratios (ORs) and confidence intervals (CIs) to the log scale. Both fixed and random effects models were applied to the log ORs and their variances. Most studies contained multiple estimated ORs. Models accounted for the correlation between multiple results within the studies analyzed. One set of analyses was performed with all eligible studies, and another set restricted to studies that controlled for age, gender, smoking, and socioeconomic status. Subgroups of studies were assessed to explore heterogeneity. Funnel plots were used to assess publication bias. The resulting summary estimates of ORs from random effects models based on all studies ranged from 1.38 to 1.50, with 95% CIs excluding the null in all cases. Use of different analysis models and restricting analyses based on control of multiple confounding variables changed findings only slightly. ORs (95% CIs) from random effects models using studies adjusting for major confounding variables were, for bronchitis, 1.45 (1.32-1.59); for respiratory infections, 1.44 (1.31-1.59); for respiratory infections excluding nonspecific upper respiratory infections, 1.50 (1.32-1.70), and for respiratory infections in children or infants, 1.48 (1.33-1.65). Little effect of publication

  8. Antibiotics in respiratory tract infections in hospital pediatric emergency departments.

    PubMed

    Guzmán Molina, Claudia; Rodríguez-Belvís, Marta Velasco; Coroleu Bonet, Albert; Vall Combelles, Oriol; García-Algar, Oscar

    2014-09-01

    Respiratory tract infections are one of the most frequent problems in pediatric clinics and generate an elevated prescription of antibiotics. The aim of this study was to find out the standard of care practice about antibiotic use in these infections in a pediatric emergency department and to evaluate compliance with clinical guidelines. A pediatric emergency department database was reviewed from July 2005 to October 2007 under the category "respiratory infection", including variables such as age, antibiotic prescription and compliance with current clinical recommendations. Out of the 23,114 reviewed reports, 32.7% (7,567) were upper respiratory tract infections (URTI) (cold, acute otitis media [AOM], sinusitis and tonsillopharyngitis) or lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI) (laryngitis, bronchitis, bronchiolitis and pneumonia). Children under the age of 2 were the most represented age group. Amongst URTI, rhinopharyngitis was the most frequent infection, while bronchitis was the most frequent among LRTI. Antibiotic therapy (mainly amoxicillin) was prescribed in 30.8% of URTI (5.7% rhinopharyngitis, 96.5% AOM, and 36.7% tonsillopharyngitis) and in 12.4% of LRTI. The percentage of respiratory tract infections was similar to previous studies and the antibiotic prescriptions followed current guidelines, except for cases diagnosed with AOM. Prescription compliance and clinical course of the cases should be monitored. Copyright © 2013 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. Alcohol during pregnancy worsens acute respiratory infections in children.

    PubMed

    Libster, Romina; Ferolla, Fausto M; Hijano, Diego R; Acosta, Patricio L; Erviti, Anabella; Polack, Fernando P

    2015-11-01

    This study explored whether alcohol consumption during pregnancy increased the risk of life-threatening respiratory infections in children. We prospectively evaluated children under the age of two years admitted to hospitals in Buenos Aires, Argentina, with severe acute respiratory infections during the winters of 2011 and 2012. Information on maternal alcohol consumption during the third trimester of pregnancy was collected using standardised questionnaires and categorised as never, low if it was once a week and high if it was equal or more than once a week. Of the 3423 children hospitalised with acute respiratory infection, 2089 (63.7%) had respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). Alcohol consumption during the last trimester was reported by 398 mothers (12.4%) and categorised as low (n = 210, 6.5%) or high (n = 188, 5.9%). A greater effect on life-threatening respiratory infection, defined as oxygen saturation of or up to 87%, was observed with higher alcohol intake due to all viruses and specifically RSV in the logistic regression analyses. Alcohol consumption was strongly associated with life-threatening disease, particularly in boys whose adjusted odds ratio rose from 3.67 to 13.52 when their mothers drank alcohol. Alcohol consumption during pregnancy was associated with life-threatening respiratory infections in boys. ©2015 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. [Cycloferon, as an agent in the therapy and urgent prophylaxis of influenza and acute respiratory tract viral infection (multicentre randomized controlled comparative study)].

    PubMed

    Sologub, T V; Shul'diakov, A A; Romantsov, M G; Zhekalov, A N; Petlenko, S V; Erofeeva, M K; Maksakova, V L; Isakov, V A; Zarubaev, V V; Gatsan, V V; Kovalenko, A L

    2009-01-01

    Data on the study of the efficacy of the tablets of cycloferon, an early inductor of types 1 and 2 interferon, in the treatment of influenza and acute respiratory tract viral infections in adults are presented. The study enrolled 522 patients with moderate influenza of type A (H1N1) verified in 61% of the patients and type A (H3N2) verified in 7.5% of the cases. The patients were randomized with the envelope procedure. In the patients treated with cycloferon the intensity and period of the fever were stopped earlier and averaged from 1.8 to 3 days vs. 5 days in the reference group (symptomatic therapy). The improvement signs in the general state of the patients treated with cycloferon were noted on the 2nd day. The influenza complication as pneumonia was recorded in 2.2% of the patients treated with cycloferon, whereas in the patients under the symptomatic therapy the complications as bronchitis, pneumonia, angina were stated in 21.4% of the cases. For urgent prophylaxis of the influenza and respiratory tract viral infections (epidemiologic study) a group of 3717 subjects randomized with the table of random numbers was observed. 2080 patients were treated with cycloferon and 1637 patients were under the symptomatic therapy. The results were evaluated by the efficacy index and the protection estimate (T. A. Semenenko, 1991). The total efficacy index and the protection estimate in all the patients of the group were 4.9 and 79.8% respectively. The complicated forms of the disease were recorded in 1.5% of the patients treated with cycloferon and in 10.5 and 11.3% of the patients not treated with cycloferon.

  11. Respiratory viruses and torque teno virus in adults with acute respiratory infections.

    PubMed

    Prasetyo, Afiono Agung; Desyardi, Martinus Nuherwan; Tanamas, Jimmy; Suradi; Reviono; Harsini; Kageyama, Seiji; Chikumi, Hiroki; Shimizu, Eiji

    2015-01-01

    To define the molecular epidemiology of respiratory viral infections in adult patients. Nasal and throat swabs were collected from all adult patients with influenza-like illness (ILI), acute respiratory infection (ARI), or severe ARI (SARI) admitted to a tertiary hospital in Surakarta, Indonesia, between March 2010 and April 2011 and analyzed for 19 respiratory viruses and for torque teno virus (TTV) and human gyrovirus (HGyV). Respiratory viruses were detected in 61.3% of the subjects, most of whom had ARI (90.8%, OR = 11.39), were hospitalized (96.9%, OR = 22.31), had asthma exacerbation (90.9%, OR = 8.67), and/or had pneumonia (80%, OR = 4.0). Human rhinovirus (HRV) A43 predominated. Influenza A H3N2, human metapneumovirus (HMPV) subtypes A1 and A2, the influenza B virus, human adenovirus B, and human coronavirus OC43 were also detected. All respiratory viruses were detected in the transition month between the rainy and dry seasons. No mixed respiratory virus infection was found. Coinfections of the influenza A H3N2 virus with TTV, HMPV with TTV, HRV with TTV, and human parainfluenza virus-3 with TTV were found in 4.7, 2.8, 19.8, and 0.9% of the samples, respectively. This study highlights the need to perform routine detection of respiratory viruses in adults hospitalized with ARI, asthma exacerbation, and/or pneumonia. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel

  12. Relationship between common viral upper respiratory tract infections and febrile seizures in children from Suzhou, China.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jihong; Yan, Wenhua; Li, Yan; Zhang, Bingbing; Gu, Qing

    2014-10-01

    This study aimed to determine the potential predisposing factors for the development of febrile seizures among children with upper respiratory tract infection in the eastern Chinese region. Participants were individuals aged 6 months and 6 years (n = 189) who were diagnosed with febrile seizure, complicated with upper respiratory tract infection, and 174 age-matched children who had upper respiratory tract infection without seizures as controls. The viral antigens including influenza A and B, parainfluenza, adenovirus, and respiratory syncytial virus were detected from nasopharyngeal aspirates. The incidence of influenza A infection was much higher in patients with febrile seizure than controls, especially those children aged >36 months. Patients with influenza A infection had higher body temperatures at seizure occurrence, shorter seizure duration, and shorter fever duration before seizure onset. Influenza A infections are frequently associated with febrile seizure in children with upper respiratory tract infection. During an influenza epidemic, effective vaccination of children, especially those with a past history of febrile seizure, may minimize the development of febrile seizure. © The Author(s) 2014.

  13. Prevalence of non-influenza respiratory viruses in acute respiratory infection cases in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes-Matano, Larissa; Monroy-Muñoz, Irma Eloísa; Angeles-Martínez, Javier; Sarquiz-Martinez, Brenda; Palomec-Nava, Iliana Donají; Pardavé-Alejandre, Hector Daniel; Santos Coy-Arechavaleta, Andrea; Santacruz-Tinoco, Clara Esperanza; González-Ibarra, Joaquín; González-Bonilla, Cesar Raúl

    2017-01-01

    Background Acute respiratory infections are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although a viral aetiological agent is estimated to be involved in up to 80% of cases, the majority of these agents have never been specifically identified. Since 2009, diagnostic and surveillance efforts for influenza virus have been applied worldwide. However, insufficient epidemiological information is available for the many other respiratory viruses that can cause Acute respiratory infections. Methods This study evaluated the presence of 14 non-influenza respiratory viruses in 872 pharyngeal exudate samples using RT-qPCR. All samples met the operational definition of a probable case of an influenza-like illness or severe acute respiratory infection and had a previous negative result for influenza by RT-qPCR. Results The presence of at least one non-influenza virus was observed in 312 samples (35.8%). The most frequent viruses were rhinovirus (RV; 33.0%), human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV; 30.8%) and human metapneumovirus (HMPV; 10.6%). A total of 56 cases of co-infection (17.9%) caused by 2, 3, or 4 viruses were identified. Approximately 62.5% of all positive cases were in children under 9 years of age. Conclusion In this study, we identified 13 non-influenza respiratory viruses that could occur in any season of the year. This study provides evidence for the prevalence and seasonality of a wide range of respiratory viruses that circulate in Mexico and constitute a risk for the population. Additionally, our data suggest that including these tests more widely in the diagnostic algorithm for influenza may reduce the use of unnecessary antibiotics, reduce the hospitalisation time, and enrich national epidemiological data with respect to the infections caused by these viruses. PMID:28467515

  14. Prevalence of non-influenza respiratory viruses in acute respiratory infection cases in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Fernandes-Matano, Larissa; Monroy-Muñoz, Irma Eloísa; Angeles-Martínez, Javier; Sarquiz-Martinez, Brenda; Palomec-Nava, Iliana Donají; Pardavé-Alejandre, Hector Daniel; Santos Coy-Arechavaleta, Andrea; Santacruz-Tinoco, Clara Esperanza; González-Ibarra, Joaquín; González-Bonilla, Cesar Raúl; Muñoz-Medina, José Esteban

    2017-01-01

    Acute respiratory infections are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although a viral aetiological agent is estimated to be involved in up to 80% of cases, the majority of these agents have never been specifically identified. Since 2009, diagnostic and surveillance efforts for influenza virus have been applied worldwide. However, insufficient epidemiological information is available for the many other respiratory viruses that can cause Acute respiratory infections. This study evaluated the presence of 14 non-influenza respiratory viruses in 872 pharyngeal exudate samples using RT-qPCR. All samples met the operational definition of a probable case of an influenza-like illness or severe acute respiratory infection and had a previous negative result for influenza by RT-qPCR. The presence of at least one non-influenza virus was observed in 312 samples (35.8%). The most frequent viruses were rhinovirus (RV; 33.0%), human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV; 30.8%) and human metapneumovirus (HMPV; 10.6%). A total of 56 cases of co-infection (17.9%) caused by 2, 3, or 4 viruses were identified. Approximately 62.5% of all positive cases were in children under 9 years of age. In this study, we identified 13 non-influenza respiratory viruses that could occur in any season of the year. This study provides evidence for the prevalence and seasonality of a wide range of respiratory viruses that circulate in Mexico and constitute a risk for the population. Additionally, our data suggest that including these tests more widely in the diagnostic algorithm for influenza may reduce the use of unnecessary antibiotics, reduce the hospitalisation time, and enrich national epidemiological data with respect to the infections caused by these viruses.

  15. Exploratory mixed methods study of respiratory physiotherapy for patients with lower respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, A; Marques, A

    2016-03-01

    To assess the outcomes of respiratory physiotherapy for patients with lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI). Parallel group mixed-methods study. Patients were recruited from a general hospital. Respiratory physiotherapy took place in a community setting. Fifty-four patients aged ≥18 years and diagnosed with LRTI completed the study. Twenty-seven patients were allocated to the control group {CG: 10 male, mean age 53.3 [standard deviation (SD) 17.4] years} and 27 patients were allocated to the experimental group [EG: 10 male, mean age 58.6 (SD 17.2) years]. The CG received conventional medical treatment and the EG received conventional medical treatment plus respiratory physiotherapy for 3 weeks. Patients in both groups undertook the 6-minute walk test (6MWT), modified Borg scale (MBS), modified Medical Research Council questionnaire (mMRC), and Breathlessness, Cough and Sputum scale (BCSS) before and after the intervention. A telephone follow-up survey was performed 3 months after the first hospital visit. Interviews were conducted immediately after the intervention in the EG. In the EG, the distance walked in the 6MWT increased by more than the minimally important difference (P=0.001), and significantly more than the CG {EG: mean change 76m [standard deviation (SD) 63], 95% confidence interval (CI) 51 to 101; CG: mean change 27m (SD 56), 95% CI 5 to 49; mean difference between groups: 49m 95% CI 16 to 82; partial η(2)=0.15}. No differences in the MBS, mMRC and BCSS were found between the two groups. The EG reported high levels of satisfaction with the intervention (27/27; 100%) and with the physiotherapist (20/27; 74%). The intervention improved patients' symptoms (19/27; 70%) and their self-management skills to control/prevent future LRTI (19/27; 70%). Health service use was significantly less in the EG (P=0.04). Respiratory physiotherapy appears to be effective for the management of patients with LRTI. CLINICALTRIAL. NCT02053870. Copyright © 2015

  16. Acute respiratory infection with mouse adenovirus type 1

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, Jason B.; Stempfle, Gregory S.; Wilkinson, John E.; Younger, John G.; Spindler, Katherine R.

    2005-01-01

    Studies of the pathogenesis of adenovirus respiratory disease are limited by the strict species-specificity of the adenoviruses. Following intranasal inoculation of adult C57BL/6 mice with mouse adenovirus type 1 (MAV-1), we detected MAV-1 early region 3 (E3) and hexon gene expression in the lungs at 7 days post-infection (dpi). We detected MAV-1 E3 protein in the respiratory epithelium 7 dpi. We did not detect viral mRNA or protein at 14 dpi, but MAV-1 DNA was detected by PCR at 21 dpi. Chemokine transcript levels increased between 7 and 14 dpi in the lungs of infected mice. MAV-1 infection induced a patchy cellular infiltrate in lungs at 7 and 14 dpi. This is the first report demonstrating the presence of MAV-1 in the respiratory epithelium of infected mice and describing chemokine responses in the lung induced by MAV-1 respiratory infection. MAV-1 infection of mice has the potential to serve as a model for inflammatory changes seen in human adenovirus respiratory disease. PMID:16054189

  17. Acute respiratory infections among returning Hajj pilgrims-Jordan, 2014.

    PubMed

    Al-Abdallat, Mohammad Mousa; Rha, Brian; Alqasrawi, Sultan; Payne, Daniel C; Iblan, Ibrahim; Binder, Alison M; Haddadin, Aktham; Nsour, Mohannad Al; Alsanouri, Tarek; Mofleh, Jawad; Whitaker, Brett; Lindstrom, Stephen L; Tong, Suxiang; Ali, Sami Sheikh; Dahl, Rebecca Moritz; Berman, LaShondra; Zhang, Jing; Erdman, Dean D; Gerber, Susan I

    2017-04-01

    The emergence of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) has prompted enhanced surveillance for respiratory infections among pilgrims returning from the Hajj, one of the largest annual mass gatherings in the world. To describe the epidemiology and etiologies of respiratory illnesses among pilgrims returning to Jordan after the 2014 Hajj. Surveillance for respiratory illness among pilgrims returning to Jordan after the 2014 Hajj was conducted at sentinel health care facilities using epidemiologic surveys and molecular diagnostic testing of upper respiratory specimens for multiple respiratory pathogens, including MERS-CoV. Among the 125 subjects, 58% tested positive for at least one virus; 47% tested positive for rhino/enterovirus. No cases of MERS-CoV were detected. The majority of pilgrims returning to Jordan from the 2014 Hajj with respiratory illness were determined to have a viral etiology, but none were due to MERS-CoV. A greater understanding of the epidemiology of acute respiratory infections among returning travelers to other countries after Hajj should help optimize surveillance systems and inform public health response practices. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. ROLE OF MONOCYTES IN RESPIRATORY SYNCTIAL VIRUS (RSV) INFECTION.

    EPA Science Inventory

    ROLE OF MONOCYTES IN RESPIRATORY SYNCYTIAL VIRUS (RSV) INFECTION.
    Joleen M. Soukup and Susanne Becker, National Health and Environmental Effects Research
    Laboratory, US EPA, Research Traingle Park, NC USA.

    RSV infection in airway epithelial cells (EC) results i...

  19. Does Exercise Alter Immune Function and Respiratory Infections?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nieman, David C.

    2001-01-01

    This paper examines whether physical activity influences immune function as a consequence risk of infection from the common cold and other upper respiratory tract infections (URTI) and whether the immune system responds differently to moderate versus intense physical exertion. Research indicates that people who participate in regular moderate…

  20. ROLE OF MONOCYTES IN RESPIRATORY SYNCTIAL VIRUS (RSV) INFECTION.

    EPA Science Inventory

    ROLE OF MONOCYTES IN RESPIRATORY SYNCYTIAL VIRUS (RSV) INFECTION.
    Joleen M. Soukup and Susanne Becker, National Health and Environmental Effects Research
    Laboratory, US EPA, Research Traingle Park, NC USA.

    RSV infection in airway epithelial cells (EC) results i...

  1. Viral infections of the lower respiratory tract: old viruses, new viruses, and the role of diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Pavia, Andrew T

    2011-05-01

    Viral infections of the lower respiratory tract cause an enormous disease burden in children, and the role of respiratory viruses in serious lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) in older adults is increasingly appreciated. Although viruses are responsible for a large proportion LRTIs, antibiotics are often prescribed. New diagnostic platforms have the potential to detect a wider range of established and newly discovered viruses with greater sensitivity. This will create additional challenges. Although it is clear that influenza, parainfluenza, respiratory syncytial virus, human metapneumovirus, and adenovirus are important causes of pneumonia, the role of rhinoviruses and some of the newly described viruses, including human coronaviruses and bocavirus, is harder to determine. Better diagnostic tests that establish the cause of LRTIs in children have the potential to both reduce overall antibiotic use and to improve the targeted use of antibiotics. In addition, rapid identification of viral infections can help control nosocomial transmission.

  2. [Respiratory infections caused by respiratory syncytial virus in the adult population: description of 16 cases].

    PubMed

    Reina, Jordi; López, Carla

    2013-08-17

    Respiratory infections of viral etiology are frequent in the adult population. Those caused by respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) are a little known entity. The aim of this study was to determine the clinical and epidemiological characteristics of adult patients with respiratory infection due to RSV. We performed a prospective study from October 2012 to March 2013 on respiratory infections caused by RSV. Viral detection was performed using a technique of reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction genomic amplification in real time. We diagnosed 16 patients, 12 (75%) requiring hospitalization. Patients were grouped into immunocompromised (7 [43.7%]) and immunocompetent cases (9 cases 56.3%]). The first group included 3 patients with HIV infection (42.8%) and 4 hematologic patients (57.2%). The second group included those who had a baseline disease, 5 cases (55.5%), and those who lacked it, 4 cases (44.4%), and did not require hospitalization. The main clinical manifestations of patients prompting them to attend the Emergency Department were cough (50%), dyspnea (43.5%), fever (25%), expectoration (25%) and flu symptoms (25%). The most frequent diagnoses at discharge were pneumonia (37.5%) and flu syndrome (31.2%). Respiratory infections caused by RSV represent a rare condition that mainly affects immunocompromised patients. The underlying pathology determines the evolution of the process, which is favorable except in cases of severe immunosuppression. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  3. Respiratory infections in travelers returning from the tropics.

    PubMed

    Korzeniewski, Krzysztof; Nitsch-Osuch, Aneta; Lass, Anna; Guzek, Aneta

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory tract infections (RTIs), beside diarrheas, skin lesions, and fevers of unknown origin, are one of the most common health problems acquired by travelers going to tropical and subtropical countries. Visitors to African, Asian, or South American destinations, typically characterized by harsh environmental conditions and poor sanitation standards, are at risk of exposure to a large number of pathogens causing infectious diseases. The infections are transmitted from contaminated food and water, through the air, direct contact, or by insects. The main modes of RTIs transmission include droplet infection and direct contact. The clinical spectrum of RTIs in travelers is broad, from upper respiratory tract infections, pharyngitis, bronchitis, pneumonia, to influenza-like illness. The spectrum of microbial agents causing respiratory infections include numerous viruses and bacteria, rarely fungi, and parasites. Most travelers complain of mild infections, only a small minority seek medical assistance and report to health care facilities. Because of the risk of importing pathogens into Europe or North America and transferring them onto the local population, it is important to present the scale of the problem in relation to rapid development of tourism industry and an increasing number of intercontinental journeys. The aim of the study was to discuss the occurrence of travel-related respiratory infections among representatives of temperate climate traveling to and returning from the tropics.

  4. Influenza and respiratory syncytial virus infections in British Hajj pilgrims.

    PubMed

    Rashid, H; Shafi, S; Booy, R; El Bashir, H; Ali, K; Zambon, Mc; Memish, Za; Ellis, J; Coen, Pg; Haworth, E

    2008-01-01

    Viral respiratory infections including influenza and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) have been reported during the Hajj among international pilgrims. To help establish the burden of these infections at the Hajj, we set up a study to confirm these diagnoses in symptomatic British pilgrims who attended the 2005 Hajj. UK pilgrims with symptoms of upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) were invited to participate; after taking medical history, nasal swabs were collected for point-of-care testing (PoCT) of influenza and for subsequent PCR analysis for influenza and RSV. Of the 205 patients recruited, 37 (18%) were positive for either influenza or RSV. Influenza A (H3) accounted for 54% (20/37) of the virus-positive samples, followed by RSV 24% (9/37), influenza B 19% (7/37), and influenza A (H1) 3% (1/37). Of the influenza-positive cases, 29% (8/28) had recently had a flu immunisation. Influenza was more common in those who gave a history of contact with a pilgrim with a respiratory illness than those who did not (17 versus 9%). The overall rate of RSV was 4% (9/202). This study confirms that influenza and RSV cause acute respiratory infections in British Hajj pilgrims. Continuing surveillance and a programme of interventions to contain the spread of infection are needed at the Hajj, particularly when the world is preparing for an influenza pandemic.

  5. Influenza and respiratory syncytial virus infections in British Hajj pilgrims

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, H; Shafi, S; Booy, R; El Bashir, H; Ali, K; Zambon, MC; Memish, ZA; Ellis, J; Coen, PG; Haworth, E

    2008-01-01

    Viral respiratory infections including influenza and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) have been reported during the Hajj among international pilgrims. To help establish the burden of these infections at the Hajj, we set up a study to confirm these diagnoses in symptomatic British pilgrims who attended the 2005 Hajj. UK pilgrims with symptoms of upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) were invited to participate; after taking medical history, nasal swabs were collected for point-of-care testing (PoCT) of influenza and for subsequent PCR analysis for influenza and RSV. Of the 205 patients recruited, 37 (18%) were positive for either influenza or RSV. Influenza A (H3) accounted for 54% (20/37) of the virus-positive samples, followed by RSV 24% (9/37), influenza B 19% (7/37), and influenza A (H1) 3% (1/37). Of the influenza-positive cases, 29% (8/28) had recently had a flu immunisation. Influenza was more common in those who gave a history of contact with a pilgrim with a respiratory illness than those who did not (17 versus 9%). The overall rate of RSV was 4% (9/202). This study confirms that influenza and RSV cause acute respiratory infections in British Hajj pilgrims. Continuing surveillance and a programme of interventions to contain the spread of infection are needed at the Hajj, particularly when the world is preparing for an influenza pandemic. PMID:22460211

  6. A prospective study of respiratory infections in 12-year-old children actively engaged in sports.

    PubMed

    Osterback, L; Qvarnberg, Y

    1987-11-01

    Data on the incidence of respiratory tract infections, antimicrobial treatment, days with fever and absence from school on account of these infections were studied in children participating in extracurricular sports activities with regular supervised training and competitive events. Swimmers, ice-hockey players and apparatus gymnasts were compared to a control group of children. Their mean age was 12.7 years at the end of the one year study. The children were examined three times during the year. More information was collected by a nurse who contacted the mothers of the children every two months. The girls had contracted more respiratory tract infections than the boys during the study. This difference was only seen regarding common colds, not regarding major bacterial respiratory infections, i.e. otitis media, tonsillitis, sinusitis and pneumonia. Because of this difference the results were analysed separately for the sexes. No differences between the sports and the control groups were seen in any respect regarding respiratory infections. Contrary to general opinion, sports participation does not seem to have a preventive effect on the occurrence of respiratory infections in children.

  7. Prevention of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection: From Vaccine to Antibody.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kelly; Wu, Herren

    2014-08-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of lower respiratory tract disease in infants and young children. Initial efforts to develop a vaccine to prevent RSV lower respiratory tract disease in children were halted because of serious adverse events that occurred when children were infected with RSV following vaccination, including vaccine-related deaths. Subsequently, a major focus for researchers was to understand what led to these adverse events. Investment in a vaccine for RSV continues, and new strategies are under development. Success to prevent RSV disease was met by the development of immunoprophylaxis, first with intravenous immunoglobulin and then with recombinant monoclonal antibody. The story of immunoprophylaxis for RSV includes the first-in-class use of antibody technology for infectious disease, and palivizumab currently remains the only way to prevent serious lower respiratory tract disease due to RSV infection.

  8. [Respiratory infections research: a perspective from the tuberculosis and respiratory infections area (TIR)].

    PubMed

    Jesús Cremades, M; Luiza de Souza-Galvão, M; García, José M; Menéndez, Rosario

    2009-01-01

    The scientific production of the TIR Area of SEPAR during 2008 is reviewed. In pneumonias, studies on C-reactive protein, procalcitonin and the cytokines as predictive markers of treatment failure are noteworthy, as well as research into the genetic predisposition of the host (polymorphisms of mannose binding lectin) in the prognosis. Among the different activities on tuberculosis in the SEPAR year, was the publication of the new SEPAR guidelines for the . The studies into tuberculosis have been on, the tuberculosis infection, the new in vitro techniques for detecting interferon gamma, new non-bacillary tuberculosis diagnostic committees, and treatment schemes without rifampicin and isoniazid. In COPD,we have highlighted new aspects in the indications for antibiotic treatment in the Consensus Document for the antibiotic treatment of acute exacerbations of COPD, and in the SEPAR-ALAT Clinical Guidelines. In the field of cystic fibrosis (CF), we highlight 3 studies: a) association between colonising- Pseudomonas aeruginosa induced chronic infection and bronchial hyperreactivity; b) serum immunoglobulins response to Aspergillus fumigatus and Candida albicans in the colonising of the lower respiratory tract and its clinical significance; and c) prevalence of environmental mycobacteria in these patients. In the chapter on bronchiectasis, a study on the relationship between systemic inflammation and severity parameters is highlighted, and finally, the main contributions of the new SEPAR guidelines on the diagnosis and treatment of bronchiectasis.

  9. Acute respiratory viral infections in pediatric cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Benites, Eliana C A; Cabrini, Dayane P; Silva, Andrea C B; Silva, Juliana C; Catalan, Daniel T; Berezin, Eitan N; Cardoso, Maria R A; Passos, Saulo D

    2014-01-01

    to estimate the prevalence of infection by respiratory viruses in pediatric patients with cancer and acute respiratory infection (ARI) and/or fever. cross-sectional study, from January 2011 to December 2012. The secretions of nasopharyngeal aspirates were analyzed in children younger than 21 years with acute respiratory infections. Patients were treated at the Grupo em Defesa da Criança Com Câncer (Grendacc) and University Hospital (HU), Jundiaí, SP. The rapid test was used for detection of influenza virus (Kit Biotrin, Inc. Ireland), and real-time multiplex polymerase chain reaction (FTD, Respiratory pathogens, multiplex Fast Trade Kit, Malta) for detection of influenza virus (H1N1, B), rhinovirus, parainfluenza virus, adenovirus, respiratory syncytial virus, human parechovirus, bocavirus, metapneumovirus, and human coronavirus. The prevalence of viral infection was estimated and association tests were used (χ(2) or Fisher's exact test). 104 samples of nasopharyngeal aspirate and blood were analyzed. The median age was 12 ± 5.2 years, 51% males, 68% whites, 32% had repeated ARIs, 32% prior antibiotic use, 19.8% cough, and 8% contact with ARIs. A total of 94.3% were in good general status. Acute lymphocytic leukemia (42.3%) was the most prevalent neoplasia. Respiratory viruses were detected in 50 samples: rhinoviruses (23.1%), respiratory syncytial virus AB (8.7%), and coronavirus (6.8%). Co-detection occurred in 19% of cases with 2 viruses and in 3% of those with 3 viruses, and was more frequent between rhinovirus and coronavirus 43. Fever in neutropenic patients was observed in 13%, of which four (30.7) were positive for viruses. There were no deaths. the prevalence of respiratory viruses was relevant in the infectious episode, with no increase in morbidity and mortality. Viral co-detection was frequent in patients with cancer and ARIs. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  10. Mouse Model of Respiratory Tract Infection Induced by Waddlia chondrophila

    PubMed Central

    Pilloux, Ludovic; LeRoy, Didier; Brunel, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Waddlia chondrophila, an obligate intracellular bacterium belonging to the Chlamydiales order, is considered as an emerging pathogen. Some clinical studies highlighted a possible role of W. chondrophila in bronchiolitis, pneumonia and miscarriage. This pathogenic potential is further supported by the ability of W. chondrophila to infect and replicate within human pneumocytes, macrophages and endometrial cells. Considering that W. chondrophila might be a causative agent of respiratory tract infection, we developed a mouse model of respiratory tract infection to get insight into the pathogenesis of W. chondrophila. Following intranasal inoculation of 2 x 108 W. chondrophila, mice lost up to 40% of their body weight, and succumbed rapidly from infection with a death rate reaching 50% at day 4 post-inoculation. Bacterial loads, estimated by qPCR, increased from day 0 to day 3 post-infection and decreased thereafter in surviving mice. Bacterial growth was confirmed by detecting dividing bacteria using electron microscopy, and living bacteria were isolated from lungs 14 days post-infection. Immunohistochemistry and histopathology of infected lungs revealed the presence of bacteria associated with pneumonia characterized by an important multifocal inflammation. The high inflammatory score in the lungs was associated with the presence of pro-inflammatory cytokines in both serum and lungs at day 3 post-infection. This animal model supports the role of W. chondrophila as an agent of respiratory tract infection, and will help understanding the pathogenesis of this strict intracellular bacterium. PMID:26950066

  11. Coronavirus Infections in the Central Nervous System and Respiratory Tract Show Distinct Features in Hospitalized Children.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuanyuan; Li, Haipeng; Fan, Ruyan; Wen, Bo; Zhang, Jian; Cao, Xiaoying; Wang, Chengwu; Song, Zhanyi; Li, Shuochi; Li, Xiaojie; Lv, Xinjun; Qu, Xiaowang; Huang, Renbin; Liu, Wenpei

    2016-01-01

    Coronavirus (CoV) infections induce respiratory tract illnesses and central nervous system (CNS) diseases. We aimed to explore the cytokine expression profiles in hospitalized children with CoV-CNS and CoV-respiratory tract infections. A total of 183 and 236 hospitalized children with acute encephalitis-like syndrome and respiratory tract infection, respectively, were screened for anti-CoV IgM antibodies. The expression profiles of multiple cytokines were determined in CoV-positive patients. Anti-CoV IgM antibodies were detected in 22/183 (12.02%) and 26/236 (11.02%) patients with acute encephalitis-like syndrome and respiratory tract infection, respectively. Cytokine analysis revealed that the level of serum granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) was significantly higher in both CoV-CNS and CoV-respiratory tract infection compared with healthy controls. Additionally, the serum level of granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) was significantly higher in CoV-CNS infection than in CoV-respiratory tract infection. In patients with CoV-CNS infection, the levels of IL-6, IL-8, MCP-1, and GM-CSF were significantly higher in their cerebrospinal fluid samples than in matched serum samples. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report showing a high incidence of CoV infection in hospitalized children, especially with CNS illness. The characteristic cytokine expression profiles in CoV infection indicate the importance of host immune response in disease progression. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. [Patients compliance with antibiotherapy of respiratory tract infections].

    PubMed

    Kardas, Przemysław

    2003-01-01

    Non-compliance frequently occurs during outpatient antibiotherapy of respiratory tract infections. The most frequent form of non-compliance in such circumstances is omittion of single doses. Patient non-compliance during antibiotherapy is of practical importance. It leads to therapy failure, need of additional health services, growth of direct and indirect therapy cost and development of resistant strains. This paper summarises the methods of evaluating compliance and the results of research on compliance during antibiotherapy of respiratory tract infections. The reasons of patient non-compliance as well as the factors influencing this phenomenon are reviewed. Practical methods of augmenting compliance are suggested with particular stress on the relationship between dosage frequency and compliance. It should be remembered that when the antibiotic is needed for respiratory tract infections treatment, once daily dosing ensures the best possible compliance.

  13. Management of upper respiratory tract infections by telephone.

    PubMed Central

    Jepson, S; Holbrook, J H; Hale, D; Lyon, J

    1994-01-01

    We surveyed Utah general internists (N = 134) regarding their attitudes toward and practices associated with telephone management of upper respiratory tract infections. The questionnaire contained 3 case vignettes--viral upper respiratory tract infection, streptococcal pharyngitis, and acute infectious epiglottitis--and a series of questions were asked about telephone diagnosis, management preferences (clinic versus telephone), and telephone management practices. The 53 respondents (40%) were able to make important diagnostic distinctions about upper respiratory tract infections from a written vignette. As the likelihood of a complicated or serious condition increased, patients would be appropriately triaged for clinical evaluation. Most internists would make a written record of the telephone conversation. Only 1 internist of the 53 would charge for telephone management. PMID:8053174

  14. Essentials of paediatric infection control

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Dorothy L

    2001-01-01

    Young children readily transmit and acquire nosocomial infections. Children are also vulnerable to endogenous infections as a result of the breakdown of their normal defences by disease, invasive procedures or therapy. The increasing acuity of illness in hospitalized children and therapeutic advances have resulted in a patient population that is increasingly at higher risk for nosocomial infections. Antibiotic resistance has emerged as a problem in some paediatric hospitals, usually in intensive care and oncology units. Infection rates are the highest in neonatal and paediatric intensive care units (where bloodstream infections are the most frequent), and are usually associated with intravascular devices. On general paediatric wards, respiratory and gastrointestinal infections predominate, reflecting the occurrence in the community. The surveillance of nosocomial infections identifies priorities for infection control activities and permits evaluation of interventions. The prevention of transmission between patients and to personnel requires that certain measures be taken with all patients, and that additional precautions be taken with some infections, based on the route of transmission. The prevention of transmission from personnel involves ensuring that personnel are appropriately immunized and counselled about working with infections. The prevention of nosocomial infection also involves control of visitors, appropriate management of invasive procedures and devices, sterilization and disinfection of equipment, provision of a clean environment and adequate staffing. Severely immunocompromised children require extra protection, including ventilation systems that reduce the risk of exposure to filamentous fungi. Infection control in paediatrics is an evolving field that must adapt to changes in the paediatric patient population and in health care technology. PMID:20084127

  15. Mycoplasmal Upper Respiratory Infection Presenting as Leukocytoclastic Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Mana; Agrawal, Abhinav; Parikh, Manan; Banayat, Rikka; Thomas, Maria Joana; Guo, Tianhua; Lee, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma is a virulent organism that is known to primarily infect the respiratory tract; however, affection of the skin, nervous system, kidneys, heart and bloodstream has been observed in various forms, which include Stevens Johnson syndrome, erythema multiforme, toxic epidermal necrolysis, encephalitis, renal failure, conduction system abnormalities and hemolytic anemia. Small vessel vasculitis is a lesser-known complication of mycoplasma pneumonia infection. We report a case of mycoplasmal upper respiratory tract infection with striking cutaneous lesions as the presenting symptom. Mycoplasmal infection was confirmed by serology testing, skin biopsy was suggestive of leukocytoclastic vasculitis. This case brings forth an uncommon manifestation of mycoplasmal infection with extra-pulmonary affection, namely small vessel vasculitis. PMID:25874067

  16. Spinal metaplasticity in respiratory motor control

    PubMed Central

    Fields, Daryl P.; Mitchell, Gordon S.

    2015-01-01

    A hallmark feature of the neural system controlling breathing is its ability to exhibit plasticity. Less appreciated is the ability to exhibit metaplasticity, a change in the capacity to express plasticity (i.e., “plastic plasticity”). Recent advances in our understanding of cellular mechanisms giving rise to respiratory motor plasticity lay the groundwork for (ongoing) investigations of metaplasticity. This detailed understanding of respiratory metaplasticity will be essential as we harness metaplasticity to restore breathing capacity in clinical disorders that compromise breathing, such as cervical spinal injury, motor neuron disease and other neuromuscular diseases. In this brief review, we discuss key examples of metaplasticity in respiratory motor control, and our current understanding of mechanisms giving rise to spinal plasticity and metaplasticity in phrenic motor output; particularly after pre-conditioning with intermittent hypoxia. Progress in this area has led to the realization that similar mechanisms are operative in other spinal motor networks, including those governing limb movement. Further, these mechanisms can be harnessed to restore respiratory and non-respiratory motor function after spinal injury. PMID:25717292

  17. A school-based program for control of group a streptococcal upper respiratory tract infections: a controlled trial in Southern China.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shuguang; Kaplan, Edward L; Rao, Xuxu; Johnson, Dwight R; Deng, Mulan; Zhuo, Qiling; Yang, Pingzhen; Mai, Jinzhuang; Dong, Taiming; Liu, Xiaoqing

    2008-08-01

    A prospective, school-based study included daily monitoring for incidence of symptomatic streptococcal-associated pharyngitis and monthly determinations of group A streptococcal prevalence. A treatment group received penicillin/erythromycin therapy at school for positive throat cultures; the control group sought medical care from their regular provider. Prevalence and incidence of group A streptococcal pharyngitis were significantly lower among the treatment group than in the controls.

  18. Respiratory inflammation and infections in high-performance athletes.

    PubMed

    Gleeson, Maree; Pyne, David B

    2016-02-01

    Upper respiratory illness is the most common reason for non-injury-related presentation to a sports medicine clinic, accounting for 35-65% of illness presentations. Recurrent or persistent respiratory illness can have a negative impact on health and performance of athletes undertaking high levels of strenuous exercise. The cause of upper respiratory symptoms (URS) in athletes can be uncertain but the majority of cases are related to common respiratory viruses, viral reactivation, allergic responses to aeroallergens and exercise-related trauma to the integrity of respiratory epithelial membranes. Bacterial respiratory infections are uncommon in athletes. Undiagnosed or inappropriately treated asthma and/or allergy are common findings in clinical assessments of elite athletes experiencing recurrent URS. High-performance athletes with recurrent episodes of URS should undergo a thorough clinical assessment to exclude underlying treatable conditions of respiratory inflammation. Identifying athletes at risk of recurrent URS is important in order to prescribe preventative clinical, training and lifestyle strategies. Monitoring secretion rates and falling concentrations of salivary IgA can identify athletes at risk of URS. Therapeutic interventions are limited by the uncertainty of the underlying cause of inflammation. Topical anti-inflammatory sprays can be beneficial for some athletes. Dietary supplementation with bovine colostrum, probiotics and selected antioxidants can reduce the incidence or severity of URS in some athletes. Preliminary studies on athletes prone to URS indicate a genetic predisposition to a pro-inflammatory response and a dysregulated anti-inflammatory cytokine response to intense exercise as a possible mechanism of respiratory inflammation. This review focuses on respiratory infections and inflammation in elite/professional athletes.

  19. Management of Respiratory Viral Infections in Hematopoietic Cell Transplant Recipients and Patients With Hematologic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Chemaly, Roy F.; Shah, Dimpy P.; Boeckh, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Despite preventive strategies and increased awareness, a high incidence of respiratory viral infections still occur in patients with hematologic malignancies (HMs) and in recipients of hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT). Progression of these viral infections to lower respiratory tract may prove fatal, especially in HCT recipients. Increasing evidence on the successful use of ribavirin (alone or in combination with immunomodulators) for the treatment of respiratory syncytial virus infections in HM patients and HCT recipients is available from retrospective studies; however, prospective clinical trials are necessary to establish its efficacy with confidence. The impact on progression to pneumonitis and/or mortality of treating parainfluenza virus infections with available (ribavirin) or investigational (DAS181) antiviral agents still needs to be determined. Influenza infections have been successfully treated with neuraminidase inhibitors (oseltamivir or zanamivir); however, the efficacy of these agents for influenza pneumonia has not been established, and immunocompromised patients are highly susceptible to emergence of antiviral drug resistance, most probably due to prolonged viral shedding. Infection control measures and an appreciation of the complications following respiratory viral infections in immunocompromised patients remain crucial for reducing transmission. Future studies should focus on strategies to identify patients at high risk for increased morbidity and mortality from these infections and to determine the efficacy of novel or available antiviral drugs. PMID:25352629

  20. The Nasopharyngeal Microbiota of Children With Respiratory Infections in Botswana.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Matthew S; Surette, Michael G; Smieja, Marek; Pernica, Jeffrey M; Rossi, Laura; Luinstra, Kathy; Steenhoff, Andrew P; Feemster, Kristen A; Goldfarb, David M; Arscott-Mills, Tonya; Boiditswe, Sefelani; Rulaganyang, Ikanyeng; Muthoga, Charles; Gaofiwe, Letang; Mazhani, Tiny; Rawls, John F; Cunningham, Coleen K; Shah, Samir S; Seed, Patrick C

    2017-09-01

    Nearly half of child pneumonia deaths occur in sub-Saharan Africa. Microbial communities in the nasopharynx are a reservoir for pneumonia pathogens and remain poorly described in African children. Nasopharyngeal swabs were collected from children with pneumonia (N = 204), children with upper respiratory infection symptoms (N = 55) and healthy children (N = 60) in Botswana between April 2012 and April 2014. We sequenced the V3 region of the bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA gene and used partitioning around medoids to cluster samples into microbiota biotypes. We then used multivariable logistic regression to examine whether microbiota biotypes were associated with pneumonia and upper respiratory infection symptoms. Mean ages of children with pneumonia, children with upper respiratory infection symptoms and healthy children were 8.2, 11.4 and 8.0 months, respectively. Clustering of nasopharyngeal microbiota identified 5 distinct biotypes: Corynebacterium/Dolosigranulum-dominant (23%), Haemophilus-dominant (11%), Moraxella-dominant (24%), Staphylococcus-dominant (13%) and Streptococcus-dominant (28%). The Haemophilus-dominant [odds ratio (OR): 13.55; 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.10-87.26], the Staphylococcus-dominant (OR: 8.27; 95% CI: 2.13-32.14) and the Streptococcus-dominant (OR: 39.97; 95% CI: 6.63-241.00) biotypes were associated with pneumonia. The Moraxella-dominant (OR: 3.71; 95% CI: 1.09-12.64) and Streptococcus-dominant (OR: 12.26; 95% CI: 1.81-83.06) biotypes were associated with upper respiratory infection symptoms. In children with pneumonia, HIV infection was associated with a lower relative abundance of Dolosigranulum (P = 0.03). Pneumonia and upper respiratory infection symptoms are associated with distinct nasopharyngeal microbiota biotypes in African children. A lower abundance of the commensal genus Dolosigranulum may contribute to the higher pneumonia risk of HIV-infected children.

  1. Antitussive effect of a fixed combination of Justicia adhatoda, Echinacea purpurea and Eleutherococcus senticosus extracts in patients with acute upper respiratory tract infection: A comparative, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Barth, Anders; Hovhannisyan, Areg; Jamalyan, Kristina; Narimanyan, Mikael

    2015-12-01

    Kan Jang® oral solution (KJ) is a fixed combination of aqueous ethanolic extracts of Justicia adhatoda L. leaf, Echinacea purpurea (L.) Moench root, and Eleutherococcus senticosus (Rupr. & Maxim.) Harms root. It is approved in Scandinavia as an herbal medicinal product for respiratory tract infection treatment. The present clinical trial aimed to compare the antitussive effect of KJ with placebo (PL) and bromhexine (BH) among patients of 18-65 years old with non-complicated upper respiratory infections (URI; i.e., common cold). We performed a parallel-group, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial in in 177 patients with acute URI over a 5 day period. We investigated the antitussive effects of a KJ (30 ml/day; 762 mg genuine extracts with standardized contents of 0.2 mg/ml vasicine, 0.8 mg/ml chicoric acid, and 0.03 mg/ml eleutherosides B and E), bromhexine hydrochloride (24 mg/30 ml/day) and PL on cough and blood markers. The primary outcome was cough relief, which was assessed as the change of cough frequency from baseline (cough index). Secondary outcomes were safety with regards to reported adverse events (AEs) and hematological data. Both KJ and BH relieved cough more effectively than placebo. On the third and fourth days of treatment, we observed faster improvement in the group receiving KJ compared to in the groups receiving BH (100%) or PL (100%), indicating a slightly shorter recovery time in the KJ group. KJ showed a good tolerability and safety profile. KJ exerted significant antitussive effects in URI. The present data further support the therapeutic use of KJ in upper respiratory tract infections. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier GmbH.. All rights reserved.

  2. A systematic review of the preventive effect of oral hygiene on pneumonia and respiratory tract infection in elderly people in hospitals and nursing homes: effect estimates and methodological quality of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Sjögren, Petteri; Nilsson, Erika; Forsell, Marianne; Johansson, Olle; Hoogstraate, Janet

    2008-11-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the preventive effect of oral hygiene on pneumonia and respiratory tract infection, focusing on elderly people in hospitals and nursing homes, by systematically reviewing effect estimates and methodological quality of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and to provide an overview of additional clinical studies in this area. Literature searches were conducted in the Medline database, the Cochrane library databases, and by hand-searching reference lists. Included publications were analyzed for intervention (or topic) studied, main conclusions, strength of evidence, and study design. RCTs were further analyzed for effect magnitudes and methodological details. Absolute risk reductions (ARRs) and numbers needed to treat (NNTs) were calculated. Fifteen publications fulfilled the inclusion criteria. There was a wide variation in the design and quality of the studies included. The RCTs revealed positive preventive effects of oral hygiene on pneumonia and respiratory tract infection in hospitalized elderly people and elderly nursing home residents, with ARRs from 6.6% to 11.7% and NNTs from 8.6 to 15.3 individuals. The non-RCT studies contributed to inconclusive evidence on the association and correlation between oral hygiene and pneumonia or respiratory tract infection in elderly people. Mechanical oral hygiene has a preventive effect on mortality from pneumonia, and non-fatal pneumonia in hospitalized elderly people and elderly nursing home residents. Approximately one in 10 cases of death from pneumonia in elderly nursing home residents may be prevented by improving oral hygiene. Future research in this area should be focused on high-quality RCTs with appropriate sample size calculations.

  3. Risk Factors for Respiratory Failure Associated with Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Coley B.; Walsh, Edward E.; Peterson, Derick R.; Lee, F.Eun-Hyung; Falsey, Ann R.

    2010-01-01

    Risk factors associated with respiratory failure during respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection have not been assessed in adults. We identified RSV by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction in 58 adults during the 2007–2008 winter. Clinical variables and respiratory secretion viral loads were compared in 26 outpatients and 32 inpatients. Cardiopulmonary diseases were more common among inpatients than outpatients (91% vs 31%, P = .0001), whereas mean RSV load was similar. Nasal viral load was higher in ventilated vs nonventilated hospitalized patients (log10 3.7 ± 1.7 plaque-forming units (PFUs)/mL vs 2.4 ± 1.1 PFUs/mL, P = .02), and high viral load was independently associated with respiratory failure. PMID:19758094

  4. Nasopharyngeal Protein Biomarkers of Acute Respiratory Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Burke, Thomas W; Henao, Ricardo; Soderblom, Erik; Tsalik, Ephraim L; Thompson, J Will; McClain, Micah T; Nichols, Marshall; Nicholson, Bradly P; Veldman, Timothy; Lucas, Joseph E; Moseley, M Arthur; Turner, Ronald B; Lambkin-Williams, Robert; Hero, Alfred O; Woods, Christopher W; Ginsburg, Geoffrey S

    2017-02-21

    Infection of respiratory mucosa with viral pathogens triggers complex immunologic events in the affected host. We sought to characterize this response through proteomic analysis of nasopharyngeal lavage in human subjects experimentally challenged with influenza A/H3N2 or human rhinovirus, and to develop targeted assays measuring peptides involved in this host response allowing classification of acute respiratory virus infection. Unbiased proteomic discovery analysis identified 3285 peptides corresponding to 438 unique proteins, and revealed that infection with H3N2 induces significant alterations in protein expression. These include proteins involved in acute inflammatory response, innate immune response, and the complement cascade. These data provide insights into the nature of the biological response to viral infection of the upper respiratory tract, and the proteins that are dysregulated by viral infection form the basis of signature that accurately classifies the infected state. Verification of this signature using targeted mass spectrometry in independent cohorts of subjects challenged with influenza or rhinovirus demonstrates that it performs with high accuracy (0.8623 AUROC, 75% TPR, 97.46% TNR). With further development as a clinical diagnostic, this signature may have utility in rapid screening for emerging infections, avoidance of inappropriate antibacterial therapy, and more rapid implementation of appropriate therapeutic and public health strategies.

  5. Serologic studies of acute respiratory infections in military personnel.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, A. S.

    1975-01-01

    The advantages, disadvantages, and uses of serological epidemiology are discussed in relation to acute respiratory infections in military personnel. The prevalence of antibody reflects both current and past experience with respiratory agents and is a measure of susceptinility. Incidence data calculated by testing two serial serum samples, on entry and discharge from the service, has indicated high influenza and mycoplasma pneumoniae rates in South American recruits and low rates of adenovirus and parainfluenza infections. Serologic analysis of reinfection rates showed high protection against influenza infections at HI antibody levels of over 1:40, against adenovirus infections at neutralizing titers of 1:5, and against M. pneumoniae infections at TRI antibody levels over 1:8. Antibody responses persisting at least 7 mo following immunization were demonstrated in 70% of 428 vaccinated young adults for A2 antigen and 20% for influenza B antigen. No relation of ABO blood groups to respiratory infection was found. The lack of myxovirus infections in four Polaris submarines is presented. PMID:169640

  6. [Respiratory infections in adults hospitalized in internal medicine and pneumology departments. DIRA (Adult Respiratory Infection Day) study].

    PubMed

    Picazo, Juan J; Pérez-Cecilia, Elisa; Herreras, Amadeo

    2003-04-01

    Respiratory tract infections (RIs) are frequent processes that can require hospitalization or affect already hospitalized patients. The Foundation for the Study of Infection has promoted the DIRA (Adult Respiratory Infection Day) Project, with the aim of investigating and assessing the impact of this problem, particularly in Internal Medicine and Pneumology Departments. Prospective prevalence study involving 158 physicians in 100 Internal Medicine and Pneumology Departments. Data were collected on predetermined days, once every three months (total of four data sets) and included information on number of patients attended, number of patients with infection, and epidemiologic, clinical, microbiologic and treatment characteristics of patients with RI. A total of 3,596 patients were hospitalized at the four time points. Among these, 39.1% presented clinical symptoms consistent with infection and 34.3% of these were RIs. The mean age of RI patients was 65.6 years, 68.8% were males, 84.1% had an underlying disease (most frequently chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) and 25.1% had one or more predisposing factors. Pneumonia was the most frequent diagnosis (41.3% of RIs). RI was documented microbiologically in 15.8% of cases. Antibiotic treatment was applied in 99.7% of patients with acute bronchitis and 81.8% of those with upper respiratory tract infection; penicillins were the most frequent treatment. Data are presented by diagnosis. A substantial rate of respiratory infections was found in patients admitted to hospital Internal Medicine and Pneumology Departments, with pneumonia being the most frequent. There was a paucity of microbiologic documentation. It is likely that antibiotic treatment was not justified in the majority of patients with upper respiratory tract infections. A combination of two or more antimicrobial agents was used in about half of cases.

  7. Clinical Differentiation of Respiratory Nursing Diagnoses among Children with Acute Respiratory Infection.

    PubMed

    Pascoal, Lívia Maia; Lopes, Marcos Venícios de Oliveira; da Silva, Viviane Martins; Chaves, Daniel Bruno Resende; Beltrão, Beatriz Amorim; Nunes, Marília Mendes; de Moura, Karine Kerla Maia

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the defining characteristics that allow clinical differentiation of the nursing diagnoses, ineffective breathing pattern (IBP), ineffective airway clearance (IAC), and impaired gas exchange (IGE). A secondary analysis with a cohort design was developed from 1128 records obtained during the hospital stay of 136 children with acute respiratory infection. Groups of defining characteristics with greater differentiation capacity were identified by multiple correspondence analyses. The results showed that the defining characteristics that better differentiate the studied diagnoses are agitation, irritability and diaphoresis for IGE; dyspnea, use of accessory muscles to breathe, orthopnea, and abnormal breathing pattern for IBP and excessive sputum, absence of cough, difficulty verbalizing, nasal flaring, and adventitious breath sounds for IAC. Twelve defining characteristics that can assist clinicians to differentiate the three main respiratory nursing diagnoses among children with acute respiratory infection were identified in this study. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Do pollution and climate influence respiratory tract infections in children?

    PubMed

    Passos, Saulo Duarte; Gazeta, Rosa Estela; Felgueiras, Ana Paula; Beneli, Patrícia Costa; Coelho, Micheline de S Z S

    2014-01-01

    To review if pollution and climate changes can influence respiratory tract infections in children. Articles published on the subject in PubMed, SciELO, Bireme, EBSCO and UpTodate were reviewed. The following inclusion criteria were considered: scientific papers between 2002 and 2012, study design, the pediatric population, reference documents such as the CETESB and World Health Organization Summary of the data: We analyzed research that correlated respiratory viruses and climate and/or pollution changes. Respiratory syncytial virus has been the virus related most to changes in climate and humidity. Other "old and new" respiratory viruses such as Human Bocavirus, Metapneumovirus, Parechovirus and Parainfuenza would need to be investigated owing to their clinical importance. Although much has been studied with regard to the relationship between climate change and public health, specific studies about its influence on children's health remain scarce.

  9. New antimicrobial approaches to gram positive respiratory infections.

    PubMed

    Liapikou, Adamantia; Cilloniz, Catia; Mensa, Josep; Torres, Antonio

    2015-06-01

    Nowadays, we face growing resistance among gram-positive and gram-negative pathogens that cause respiratory infection in the hospital and in the community. The spread of penicillin- and macrolide-resistant pneumococci, Community-acquired methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (Ca-MRSA), the emergence of glycopeptide-resistant staphylococci underline the need for underline the need for therapeutic alternatives. A number of new therapeutic agents, with activity against the above Gram (+) respiratory pathogens, as ceftaroline, ceftopibrole, telavancin, tedizolid have become available, either in clinical trials or have been approved for clinical use. Especially, the development of new oral antibiotics, as nemonaxacin, omadacyclin, cethromycin and solithromycin will give a solution to the lack of oral drugs for outpatient treatment. In the future the clinician needs to optimize the use of old and new antibiotics to treat gram (+) respiratory serious infections.

  10. Recurrent Respiratory Infections and Psychological Problems in Junior School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelmanson, Igor A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recurrent respiratory infections (RRI) are among most common diseases in school-aged children. Little is known about possible associations between RRI and children psychological well-being. Aim: To study possible associations between RRI in junior school pupils and their emotional/behavioural characteristics. Methods: The RRI group…

  11. Cryptosporidium hominis Infection of the Human Respiratory Tract

    PubMed Central

    Buck, Gregory A.; Manque, Patricio A.; Ozaki, Luiz Shozo

    2007-01-01

    Cryptosporidium oocysts, observed in a natural sputum sample of a patient with HIV, were further studied by using DNA markers to determine the species of the parasite. C. hominis was identified as the species infecting the patient’s respiratory tract, a finding that strengthens evidence regarding this pathogen’s role in human disease. PMID:17552101

  12. Recurrent Respiratory Infections and Psychological Problems in Junior School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelmanson, Igor A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recurrent respiratory infections (RRI) are among most common diseases in school-aged children. Little is known about possible associations between RRI and children psychological well-being. Aim: To study possible associations between RRI in junior school pupils and their emotional/behavioural characteristics. Methods: The RRI group…

  13. Thrombophlebitis and upper respiratory tract virus infection.

    PubMed

    Doerfler, Walter

    2006-11-01

    During an episode of thrombophlebitis, the 72-year-old correspondent came down with a common cold presumably, but not provenly, due to infection by one of the rhinoviruses. During the 96 hr period of coryza, all symptoms of thrombophlebitis vanished completely. There is experimental evidence that rhinovirus infections elicit cytokine production [Stöckl et al. (1999): J Clin Invest 104: 957-965], and that IL-10 can assuage thrombosis in rats [Downing et al. (1998): J Immunol 161: 1471-1476].

  14. Herpes simplex virus infection of the adult lower respiratory tract.

    PubMed

    Graham, B S; Snell, J D

    1983-11-01

    We have reported six adult patients with HSV infection of the lower respiratory tract diagnosed ante-mortem, and have reviewed the literature on this subject. An attempt has been made to define the natural history of the infection, and suggestions have been made regarding diagnosis and treatment. HSV can infect the lower respiratory tract in immunologically normal patients, as well as the immunocompromised host. Many patients have been burned, or intubated, or have other reasons for squamous metaplasia of the respiratory epithelium. The pathogenesis in many cases is an extension or aspiration of oropharyngeal HSV, but there is a suggestion that some cases may be hematogenously spread. The diagnosis of the site and presence of HSV infection should be based initially on cytologic findings, histologic findings, or both. Viral cultures or immunofluorescent or immunoperoxidase labeling can be used to confirm the cytologic and histologic diagnoses. Bronchoscopy is valuable for visualizing ulcerations or membranes in the respiratory tract, and for improving the sensitivity and specificity of the cytologic diagnosis. Because the process is most often focused in the tracheobronchial tree, percutaneous needle biopsy and open lung biopsy may be less sensitive than bronchoscopy. Standard serologic tests are, in general, not helpful diagnostically. They can help verify that a recent HSV infection has occurred, but do not differentiate between primary and recurrent infection, and do not help in localizing the site of infection. However, paired complement fixation or neutralizing antibody titers may be useful prognostically. If the titers do not rise in the presence of a documented HSV lower respiratory tract infection, the outcome is more likely to be fatal. The respiratory epithelium from the oral mucosa to the alveoli can be infected with HSV. The manifestations can range from a few scattered ulcers in the trachea to a severe ulcerative process resulting in an obstructing

  15. Prospective Study of Respiratory Infections at the U.S. Naval Academy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-09-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus 0/78 0.0 attention for acute respiratory infection during the 11 months... syncytial virus infections . We relied on self-referral for evalua- STUDY RESPONDENTS tion of acute respiratory disease. As indicated by our high pro... Respiratory Infections at the U.S. Naval Academy TABLE II virus , and accordingly we may have missed some respiratory END-OF-YEAR QUESTIONNAIRE FINDINGS

  16. [IgG subclasses in healthy children and in children with frequent respiratory tract infections].

    PubMed

    Griese, M; Walda, M; Meuser, M; Reinhardt, D

    1990-10-01

    A group of 130 children presenting with frequent respiratory tract infections was examined for serum levels of IgG-subclasses IgG1, IgG2, IgG3 and IgG4 using radial immunodiffusion according to Mancini. Additionally a control group of 175 children not prone to infections was investigated. Both, low and high levels compared to controls were observed for IgG3 and IgG4. 11.5% of the children with frequent airway infections had IgG3 values below 2 SD below the mean for age compared to 2.8% in the control group (p less than 0.01). Likewise a low IgG4 level was observed more frequently in children prone to airway infections (9.8% versus 2.8% in control; p less than 0.05). IgG4 was undetectable (level less than 3.4 mg/dl) in 5 of the 175 control children. Despite an accumulation of low or undetectable IgG3 or IgG4 levels in children with frequent respiratory tract infections, no correlation between low IgG subclass-levels and the degree of the individual disease could be detected. Based on this lack of a simple causal relationship between frequent respiratory tract infections and the finding of low or undetectable IgG-subclass levels, an immunoglobulin replacement therapy has to be considered with reserve.

  17. [Evaluation of serum IgG sub-classes in children with recurrent respiratory infections].

    PubMed

    Mancini, S; Iacovoni, R; Fierimonte, V; Di Gilio, P; Spaini, A; Pichi, A

    1996-03-01

    Serum IgG sub-classes levels were measured by radial immunodiffusion with policlonal antibodies in 26 children aged 2 years to 8 years, affected with respiratory recurrent infections. These subjects were controlled and compared with normal children values for age groups. In 10 patients a deficit of IgG sub-classes levels was found, in 7 patients an increase level for IgG1 was detected. These data must be taken in account defining IgG-sub-classes deficiencies in children with respiratory recurrent infection.

  18. The Relationships between Respiratory Virus Infection and Aminotransferase in Children

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Jun Suk; Choi, Jun Sik; Lee, Young Hyuk; Ko, Kyung Og; Lim, Jae Woo; Cheon, Eun Jung; Lee, Gyung Min

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We sought to examine the relationship between the clinical manifestations of nonspecific reactive hepatitis and respiratory virus infection in pediatric patients. Methods Patients admitted to the pediatric unit of Konyang University Hospital for lower respiratory tract disease between January 1, 2014 and December 31, 2014 and who underwent reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction tests were examined. The patients were divided into those with increased levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) or aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and those with normal ALT or AST levels. Further, patients with increased ALT and AST levels were individually compared with patients in the normal group, and the blood test results were compared according to the type of respiratory virus. Results Patients with increased ALT or AST levels had one more day of hospital stay, on average, compared with patients in the normal group (5.3±3.1 days vs. 4.4±3.0 days, p=0.019). Patients in the increased ALT level group were younger and had a longer mean hospital stay, compared with patients in the normal group (p=0.022 and 0.003, respectively). The incidences of increased ALT or AST were the highest in adenovirus infections (6/24, 25.0%), followed by enterovirus (2/11, 18.2%) and respiratory syncytial virus A (21/131, 16.0%) infections. Conclusion Nonspecific reactive hepatitis is more common among patients with adenovirus, enterovirus and respiratory syncytial virus infection, as well as among those infected at a younger age. Compared with AST levels, ALT levels are better indicators of the severity of nonspecific reactive hepatitis. PMID:28090469

  19. The best of respiratory infections from the 2015 European Respiratory Society International Congress.

    PubMed

    Polverino, Eva; Bothamley, Graham H; Goletti, Delia; Heyckendorf, Jan; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Aliberti, Stefano

    2016-07-01

    The breadth and quality of scientific presentations on clinical and translational research into respiratory infections at the 2015 European Respiratory Society (ERS) International Congress in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, establishes this area as one of the leadings fields in pulmonology. The host-pathogen relationship in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and the impact of comorbidities and chronic treatment on clinical outcomes in patients with pneumonia were studied. Various communications were dedicated to bronchiectasis and, in particular, to different prognostic and clinical aspects of this disease, including chronic infection with Pseudomonas and inhaled antibiotic therapy. Recent data from the World Health Organization showed that Europe has the highest number of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis cases and the poorest countries have the least access to suitable treatments. Latent tuberculosis and different screening programmes were also discussed with particular attention to risk factors such as HIV infection and diabetes. Several biomarkers were proposed to distinguish between active tuberculosis and latent infection. Major treatment trials were discussed (REMOX, RIFQUIN and STREAM). The possibility of once-weekly treatment in the continuation phase (RIAQUIN) was especially exciting. The continuing rise of Mycobacterium abscessus as a significant pathogen was noted. This article reviews some of the best contributions from the Respiratory Infections Assembly to the 2015 ERS International Congress.

  20. The best of respiratory infections from the 2015 European Respiratory Society International Congress

    PubMed Central

    Polverino, Eva; Bothamley, Graham H.; Goletti, Delia; Heyckendorf, Jan; Aliberti, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    The breadth and quality of scientific presentations on clinical and translational research into respiratory infections at the 2015 European Respiratory Society (ERS) International Congress in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, establishes this area as one of the leadings fields in pulmonology. The host–pathogen relationship in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and the impact of comorbidities and chronic treatment on clinical outcomes in patients with pneumonia were studied. Various communications were dedicated to bronchiectasis and, in particular, to different prognostic and clinical aspects of this disease, including chronic infection with Pseudomonas and inhaled antibiotic therapy. Recent data from the World Health Organization showed that Europe has the highest number of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis cases and the poorest countries have the least access to suitable treatments. Latent tuberculosis and different screening programmes were also discussed with particular attention to risk factors such as HIV infection and diabetes. Several biomarkers were proposed to distinguish between active tuberculosis and latent infection. Major treatment trials were discussed (REMOX, RIFQUIN and STREAM). The possibility of once-weekly treatment in the continuation phase (RIAQUIN) was especially exciting. The continuing rise of Mycobacterium abscessus as a significant pathogen was noted. This article reviews some of the best contributions from the Respiratory Infections Assembly to the 2015 ERS International Congress. PMID:27730203

  1. Associations between co-detected respiratory viruses in children with acute respiratory infections.

    PubMed

    Kaida, Atsushi; Kubo, Hideyuki; Takakura, Koh-ichi; Sekiguchi, Jun-ichiro; Yamamoto, Seiji P; Kohdera, Urara; Togawa, Masao; Amo, Kiyoko; Shiomi, Masashi; Ohyama, Minori; Goto, Kaoru; Hase, Atsushi; Kageyama, Tsutomu; Iritani, Nobuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Viruses are the major etiological agents of acute respiratory infections (ARIs) in young children. Although respiratory virus co-detections are common, analysis of combinations of co-detected viruses has never been conducted in Japan. Nineteen respiratory viruses or subtypes were surveyed using multiplex real-time PCR on 1,044 pediatric (patient age < 6 years) ARI specimens collected in Osaka City, Japan between January 2010 and December 2011. In total, 891 specimens (85.3%) were virus positive (1,414 viruses were detected), and 388 of the virus-positive specimens (43.5%, 388/891) were positive for multiple viruses. The ratio of multiple/total respiratory virus-positive specimens was high in children aged 0-35 months. Statistical analyses revealed that human bocavirus 1 and human adenovirus were synchronously co-detected. On the other hand, co-detections of human parainfluenza virus type 1 (HPIV-1) with HPIV-3, HPIV-3 with human metapneumovirus (hMPV), hMPV with respiratory syncytial virus A (RSV A), hMPV with influenza virus A (H1N1) 2009 (FLUA (H1N1) 2009), RSV A with RSV B, and human rhinovirus and FLUA (H1N1) 2009 were exclusive. These results suggest that young children (<3 years) are highly susceptible to respiratory viruses, and some combinations of viruses are synchronously or exclusively co-detected.

  2. Pasteurella haemolytica complicated respiratory infections in sheep and goats.

    PubMed

    Brogden, K A; Lehmkuhl, H D; Cutlip, R C

    1998-01-01

    Respiratory infections which commonly occur in sheep and goats often result from adverse physical and physiological stress combined with viral and bacterial infections. Inevitably, Pasteurella haemolytica pneumonia occurs as a result of these interactions. In this review, we present recent advances in research on the complex etiology of pneumonia involving P. haemolytica. Initially stress, induced by factors such as heat, overcrowding, exposure to inclement weather, poor ventilation, handling and transport is a major predisposing factor. Respiratory viruses including parainfluenza 3 (PI-3) virus, adenovirus type 6 and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), and to a lesser extent bovine adenovirus type 2, ovine adenovirus types 1 and 5, and reovirus type 1 cause respiratory infections and pneumonia. More importantly these viruses also dramatically increase the susceptibility of sheep and goats to secondary P. haemolytica infection. Primary infection of the lower respiratory tract, with Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae and Bordetella parapertussis can increase the susceptibility of sheep and goats to secondary P. haemolytica infection. It is possible that initial infections with viral or primary bacterial agents break down the antimicrobial barrier consisting of beta defensins and anionic peptides found in epithelial cells, resident and inflammatory cells, and serous and mucous secretions of the respiratory tract. Loss of barrier integrity may release P. haemolytica from its usual commensal status. Once in the lung, P. haemolytica becomes opportunistic. To grow and colonize, P. haemolytica uses extracellular products like O-sialoglycoprotein endopeptidase, neuraminidase and RTX leukotoxin, as well as cell-associated products such as capsular polysaccharide, lipopolysaccharide, outer membrane proteins, proteins involved in iron acquisition and a periplasmic superoxide dismutase. In lambs and kids, pneumonic pasteurellosis can be acute, characterized by fever, listlessness, poor

  3. Respiratory syncytial virus infection increases chlorine-induced airway hyperresponsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Song, Weifeng; Yu, Zhihong; Doran, Stephen F.; Ambalavanan, Namasivayam; Steele, Chad; Garantziotis, Stavros

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to chlorine (Cl2) damages airway and alveolar epithelia resulting in acute lung injury and reactive airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) to methacholine. However, little is known about the effect of preexisting respiratory disease on Cl2-induced lung injury. By using a murine respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection model, we found that preexisting RSV infection increases Cl2 (187 ppm for 30 min)-induced lung inflammation and airway AHR at 24 h after exposure (5 days after infection). RSV infection and Cl2 exposure synergistically induced oxygen desaturation and neutrophil infiltration and increased MCP-1, MIP-1β, IL-10, IFN-γ, and RANTES concentrations in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). In contrast, levels of type 2 cytokines (i.e., IL-4, IL-5, IL-9, and IL-13) were not significantly affected by either RSV infection or Cl2 exposure. Cl2 exposure, but not RSV infection, induced AHR to methacholine challenge as measured by flexiVent. Moreover, preexisting RSV infection amplified BALF levels of hyaluronan (HA) and AHR. The Cl2-induced AHR was mitigated by treatment with inter-α-trypsin inhibitor antibody, which inhibits HA signaling, suggesting a mechanism of HA-mediated AHR from exacerbated oxidative injury. Our results show for the first time that preexisting RSV infection predisposes the lung to Cl2-induced injury. These data emphasize the necessity for further research on the effects of Cl2 in vulnerable populations and the development of appropriate treatments. PMID:26071553

  4. Public perceptions of non-pharmaceutical interventions for reducing transmission of respiratory infection: systematic review and synthesis of qualitative studies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Non-pharmaceutical public health interventions may provide simple, low-cost, effective ways of minimising the transmission and impact of acute respiratory infections in pandemic and non-pandemic contexts. Understanding what influences the uptake of non-pharmaceutical interventions such as hand and respiratory hygiene, mask wearing and social distancing could help to inform the development of effective public health advice messages. The aim of this synthesis was to explore public perceptions of non-pharmaceutical interventions that aim to reduce the transmission of acute respiratory infections. Methods Five online databases (MEDLINE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, EMBASE and Web of Science) were systematically searched. Reference lists of articles were also examined. We selected papers that used a qualitative research design to explore perceptions and beliefs about non-pharmaceutical interventions to reduce transmission of acute respiratory infections. We excluded papers that only explored how health professionals or children viewed non-pharmaceutical respiratory infection control. Three authors performed data extraction and assessment of study quality. Thematic analysis and components of meta-ethnography were adopted to synthesise findings. Results Seventeen articles from 16 studies in 9 countries were identified and reviewed. Seven key themes were identified: perceived benefits of non-pharmaceutical interventions, perceived disadvantages of non-pharmaceutical interventions, personal and cultural beliefs about infection transmission, diagnostic uncertainty in emerging respiratory infections, perceived vulnerability to infection, anxiety about emerging respiratory infections and communications about emerging respiratory infections. The synthesis showed that some aspects of non-pharmaceutical respiratory infection control (particularly hand and respiratory hygiene) were viewed as familiar and socially responsible actions to take. There was ambivalence about adopting

  5. Hand Hygiene Program Decreases School Absenteeism Due to Upper Respiratory Infections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azor-Martinez, Ernestina; Cobos-Carrascosa, Elena; Seijas-Vazquez, Maria Luisa; Fernández-Sánchez, Carmen; Strizzi, Jenna M.; Torres-Alegre, Pilar; Santisteban-Martínez, Joaquin; Gimenez-Sanchez, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Background: We assessed the effectiveness of a handwashing program using hand sanitizer to prevent school absenteeism due to upper respiratory infections (URIs). Methods: This was a randomized, controlled, and open study on a sample of 1341 children 4-12 years old, attending 5 state schools in Almería (Spain), with an 8-month follow-up. The…

  6. Hand Hygiene Program Decreases School Absenteeism Due to Upper Respiratory Infections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azor-Martinez, Ernestina; Cobos-Carrascosa, Elena; Seijas-Vazquez, Maria Luisa; Fernández-Sánchez, Carmen; Strizzi, Jenna M.; Torres-Alegre, Pilar; Santisteban-Martínez, Joaquin; Gimenez-Sanchez, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Background: We assessed the effectiveness of a handwashing program using hand sanitizer to prevent school absenteeism due to upper respiratory infections (URIs). Methods: This was a randomized, controlled, and open study on a sample of 1341 children 4-12 years old, attending 5 state schools in Almería (Spain), with an 8-month follow-up. The…

  7. Respiratory disease in growing pigs after Porcine rubulavirus experimental infection.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Benitez, José Francisco; Cuevas-Romero, Sandra; Pérez-Torres, Armando; Reyes-Leyva, Julio; Hernández, Jesús; Ramírez-Mendoza, Humberto

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the pathogenicity and distribution of Porcine rubulavirus (PorPV) in the respiratory tract of experimentally infected pigs. Nine 6-week-old pigs were infected with PorPV and examined clinically. Blood, nasal swab, and tissue samples were collected on different days post-infection (DPI). The humoral immune responses and viral loads were evaluated. The infected pigs exhibited an increase in the respiratory clinical signs. In addition, the excretion of PorPV was extended to 23 DPI in the nasal fluid. The distribution of PorPV in the respiratory tract tissues was extended until the end of the experiment; soft palate tonsil and lymph nodes exhibited high viral loads. The major microscopic lesions observed in the lungs corresponded to interstitial pneumonia and hyperplasia of the associated lymphoid tissue. In conclusion, PorPV infection causes a pneumonic disease characterized by a prolonged virus excretion and high viral load in the lymphoid tissues.

  8. Respiratory syncytial virus infections in infants affected by primary immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Lanari, Marcello; Vandini, Silvia; Capretti, Maria Grazia; Lazzarotto, Tiziana; Faldella, Giacomo

    2014-01-01

    Primary immunodeficiencies are rare inherited disorders that may lead to frequent and often severe acute respiratory infections. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is one of the most frequent pathogens during early infancy and the infection is more severe in immunocompromised infants than in healthy infants, as a result of impaired T- and B-cell immune response unable to efficaciously neutralize viral replication, with subsequent increased viral shedding and potentially lethal lower respiratory tract infection. Several authors have reported a severe clinical course after RSV infections in infants and children with primary and acquired immunodeficiencies. Environmental prophylaxis is essential in order to reduce the infection during the epidemic season in hospitalized immunocompromised infants. Prophylaxis with palivizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody against the RSV F protein, is currently recommended in high-risk infants born prematurely, with chronic lung disease or congenital heart disease. Currently however the prophylaxis is not routinely recommended in infants with primary immunodeficiency, although some authors propose the extension of prophylaxis to this high risk population.

  9. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections in Infants Affected by Primary Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Capretti, Maria Grazia; Lazzarotto, Tiziana; Faldella, Giacomo

    2014-01-01

    Primary immunodeficiencies are rare inherited disorders that may lead to frequent and often severe acute respiratory infections. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is one of the most frequent pathogens during early infancy and the infection is more severe in immunocompromised infants than in healthy infants, as a result of impaired T- and B-cell immune response unable to efficaciously neutralize viral replication, with subsequent increased viral shedding and potentially lethal lower respiratory tract infection. Several authors have reported a severe clinical course after RSV infections in infants and children with primary and acquired immunodeficiencies. Environmental prophylaxis is essential in order to reduce the infection during the epidemic season in hospitalized immunocompromised infants. Prophylaxis with palivizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody against the RSV F protein, is currently recommended in high-risk infants born prematurely, with chronic lung disease or congenital heart disease. Currently however the prophylaxis is not routinely recommended in infants with primary immunodeficiency, although some authors propose the extension of prophylaxis to this high risk population. PMID:25089282

  10. [Infection due to Rothia mucilaginosa. A respiratory pathogen?].

    PubMed

    Ramos, José M; Mateo, Ignacio; Vidal, Inmaculada; Rosillo, Eva M; Merino, Esperanza; Portilla, Joaquín

    2014-05-01

    To describe the spectrum of infections caused by Rothia mucilaginosa. Retrospective study of 20 cases diagnosed with R. mucilaginosa from 2009 to 2012. Pulmonary infection was the most frequent clinical presentation (n=14, 70%): bronchiectasis infected (10), followed by pleural empyema (2), pneumonia (1) and acute bronchitis (1). Two episodes were of gastrointestinal origin: cholangitis secondary to biliary drainage and secondary peritonitis. Two episodes included bacteremia in patients with hematological malignancy. One patient had a surgical wound infection with bacteremia, and another had a bacteremic urinary tract infection in a patient with nephrostomy. R. mucilaginosa may be responsible for infections of the lower respiratory tract in predisposed patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  11. Molecular Imaging of Influenza and Other Emerging Respiratory Viral Infections

    PubMed Central

    Lawler, James; Paragas, Jason; Jahrling, Peter B.; Mollura, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    Research on the pathogenesis and therapy of influenza and other emerging respiratory viral infections would be aided by methods that directly visualize pathophysiologic processes in patients and laboratory animals. At present, imaging of diseases, such as swine-origin H1N1 influenza, is largely restricted to chest radiograph and computed tomography (CT), which can detect pulmonary structural changes in severely ill patients but are more limited in characterizing the early stages of illness, differentiating inflammation from infection or tracking immune responses. In contrast, imaging modalities, such as positron emission tomography, single photon emission CT, magnetic resonance imaging, and bioluminescence imaging, which have become useful tools for investigating the pathogenesis of a range of disease processes, could be used to advance in vivo studies of respiratory viral infections in patients and animals. Molecular techniques might also be used to identify novel biomarkers of disease progression and to evaluate new therapies. PMID:21422476

  12. Aerosol Phage Therapy Efficacy in Burkholderia cepacia Complex Respiratory Infections

    PubMed Central

    Semler, Diana D.; Goudie, Amanda D.; Finlay, Warren H.

    2014-01-01

    Phage therapy has been suggested as a potential treatment for highly antibiotic-resistant bacteria, such as the species of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC). To address this hypothesis, experimental B. cenocepacia respiratory infections were established in mice using a nebulizer and a nose-only inhalation device. Following infection, the mice were treated with one of five B. cenocepacia-specific phages delivered as either an aerosol or intraperitoneal injection. The bacterial and phage titers within the lungs were assayed 2 days after treatment, and mice that received the aerosolized phage therapy demonstrated significant decreases in bacterial loads. Differences in phage activity were observed in vivo. Mice that received phage treatment by intraperitoneal injection did not demonstrate significantly reduced bacterial loads, although phage particles were isolated from their lung tissue. Based on these data, aerosol phage therapy appears to be an effective method for treating highly antibiotic-resistant bacterial respiratory infections, including those caused by BCC bacteria. PMID:24798268

  13. Aerosol phage therapy efficacy in Burkholderia cepacia complex respiratory infections.

    PubMed

    Semler, Diana D; Goudie, Amanda D; Finlay, Warren H; Dennis, Jonathan J

    2014-07-01

    Phage therapy has been suggested as a potential treatment for highly antibiotic-resistant bacteria, such as the species of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC). To address this hypothesis, experimental B. cenocepacia respiratory infections were established in mice using a nebulizer and a nose-only inhalation device. Following infection, the mice were treated with one of five B. cenocepacia-specific phages delivered as either an aerosol or intraperitoneal injection. The bacterial and phage titers within the lungs were assayed 2 days after treatment, and mice that received the aerosolized phage therapy demonstrated significant decreases in bacterial loads. Differences in phage activity were observed in vivo. Mice that received phage treatment by intraperitoneal injection did not demonstrate significantly reduced bacterial loads, although phage particles were isolated from their lung tissue. Based on these data, aerosol phage therapy appears to be an effective method for treating highly antibiotic-resistant bacterial respiratory infections, including those caused by BCC bacteria.

  14. Respiratory Infections by Enterovirus D68 in Outpatients and Inpatients Spanish Children

    PubMed Central

    Cuevas, María Teresa; Pozo, Francisco; García-García, María Luz; Molinero, Mar; Calderón, Ana; Gonzalez-Esguevillas, Mónica; Pérez-Sautu, Unai; Casas, Inmaculada

    2016-01-01

    Background: The incidence of enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) and the spectrum of clinical disease in children are not well known in European countries. We have designed a study with the objective of describing the clinical impact of EV-D68 detected in children with respiratory tract infections. Methods: As a part of a prospective study to identify the etiology and clinical characteristics of viral respiratory infections in children in Spain, we performed the analysis of the cases of EV infections in all children hospitalized in a secondary hospital in Madrid, during the epidemic respiratory season 2012–2013. A second group of samples was corresponded to infants of the same area, with ambulatory respiratory infection or asymptomatic. Phylogenetic EV-D68 analysis was made using the viral protein 1 gene (VP1). Clinical data of EV-D68 patients were compared with those infected by rhinovirus in the same period and population. Results: The study population consisted of 720 patients corresponding to 399 episodes of hospitalization for respiratory causes, 44 episodes of ambulatory respiratory infections and 277 children determined as a healthy control group. A total of 22 patients were positive for EVs (3.05%), and 12 of them were specifically typed as EV-D68 (11/443 respiratory infections, 2.5%). The most frequent diagnosis in the 10 hospitalized children with EV-D68 detection was recurrent wheezing. Hypoxia was present in 70% of cases, but admission in the intensive care unit was not required. No neurological signs or symptoms were observed. One patient had an ambulatory mild bronchiolitis and another was asymptomatic. No differences were found with rhinovirus infections except less duration of hypoxia and fever in EV-D68 group. Conclusions: EV-D68 infections were detected in 3.05% of respiratory studied samples (2.5% of admissions). The infection was associated with wheezing episodes with hypoxia. No admissions to intensive care unit or neurological symptoms were found. PMID

  15. Animal models of respiratory syncytial virus infection and disease.

    PubMed

    Sacco, Randy E; Durbin, Russell K; Durbin, Joan E

    2015-08-01

    The study of human respiratory syncytial virus pathogenesis and immunity has been hampered by its exquisite host specificity, and the difficulties encountered in adapting this virus to a murine host. The reasons for this obstacle are not well understood, but appear to reflect, at least in part, the inability of the virus to block the interferon response in any but the human host. This review addresses some of the issues encountered in mouse models of respiratory syncytial virus infection, and describes the advantages and disadvantages of alternative model systems.

  16. Animal Models of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sacco, Randy E.; Durbin, Russell K.; Durbin, Joan E.

    2015-01-01

    The study of human respiratory syncytial virus pathogenesis and immunity has been hampered by its exquisite host specificity, and the difficulties encountered in adapting this virus to a murine host. The reasons for this obstacle are not well understood, but appear to reflect, at least in part, the inability of the virus to block the interferon response in any but the human host. This review addresses some of the issues encountered in mouse models of respiratory syncytial virus infection, and describes the advantages and disadvantages of alternative model systems. PMID:26176495

  17. Respiratory viruses in transplant recipients: more than just a cold. Clinical syndromes and infection prevention principles.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Salma; Raybould, Jillian E; Sastry, Sangeeta; de la Cruz, Oveimar

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this review is to provide updated information on the clinical spectrum, treatment options, and infection prevention strategies for respiratory viral infections (RVIs) in both solid organ (SOT) and hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) patients. The MEDLINE and PubMed databases were searched for literature regarding the aforementioned aspects of RVIs, with focus on respiratory syncytial virus, adenovirus, influenza virus, parainfluenza virus, human metapneumovirus, and rhinovirus. Compared to immunocompetent hosts, SOT and HSCT patients are much more likely to experience a prolonged duration of illness, prolonged shedding, and progression of upper respiratory tract disease to pneumonia when infected with respiratory viruses. Adenovirus and respiratory syncytial virus tend to have the highest mortality and risk for disseminated disease, but all the RVIs are associated with higher morbidity and mortality in these patients than in the general population. These viruses are spread via direct contact and aerosolized droplets, and nosocomial spread has been reported. RVIs are associated with high morbidity and mortality among SOT and HSCT recipients. Management options are currently limited or lack strong clinical evidence. As community and nosocomial spread has been reported for all reviewed RVIs, strict adherence to infection control measures is key to preventing outbreaks. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. Bocavirus Infection in Otherwise Healthy Children with Respiratory Disease

    PubMed Central

    Principi, Nicola; Piralla, Antonio; Zampiero, Alberto; Bianchini, Sonia; Umbrello, Giulia; Scala, Alessia; Bosis, Samantha; Fossali, Emilio; Baldanti, Fausto; Esposito, Susanna

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the role of human bocavirus (hBoV) as a causative agent of respiratory disease, the importance of the viral load in respiratory disease type and severity and the pathogenicity of the different hBoV species, we studied all hBoV-positive nasopharyngeal samples collected from children who attended an emergency room for a respiratory tract infection during three winters (2009–2010, 2011–2012, and 2013–2014). Human bocavirus was detected using the respiratory virus panel fast assay and real-time PCR. Of the 1,823 nasopharyngeal samples, 104 (5.7%) were positive for hBoV; a similar prevalence was observed in all three periods studied. Among hBoV-infected children, 53.8% were between 1–2 years old, and hBoV was detected alone in 57/104 (54.8%) cases. All of the detected hBoV strains belonged to genotype 1. The median hBoV load was significantly higher in samples containing strains with both the N546H and T590S mutations compared to other samples (p<0.05). Children with a single hBoV-1 infection more frequently had upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs) than those who were co-infected (37.0% vs 17.8%, respectively, p = 0.04). The duration of hospitalization was longer among children with high viral loads than that observed among children with low viral loads (8.0 ±2.2 days vs 5.0 ±1.5 days, respectively, p = 0.03), and the use of aerosol therapy was more frequent among children with high viral loads than among those with low viral loads (77.1% vs 55.7%, respectively, p = 0.04). This study shows that hBoV is a relatively uncommon but stable infectious agent in children and that hBoV1 seems to be the only strain detected in Italy in respiratory samples. From a clinical point of view, hBoV1 seems to have in the majority of healthy children relatively low clinical relevance. Moreover, the viral load influences only the duration of hospitalization and the use of aerosol therapy without any association with the site of the respiratory disease. PMID

  19. Central nervous system alterations caused by infection with the human respiratory syncytial virus.

    PubMed

    Bohmwald, Karen; Espinoza, Janyra A; González, Pablo A; Bueno, Susan M; Riedel, Claudia A; Kalergis, Alexis M

    2014-11-01

    Worldwide, the human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) is the leading cause of infant hospitalization because of acute respiratory tract infections, including severe bronchiolitis and pneumonia. Despite intense research, to date there is neither vaccine nor treatment available to control hRSV disease burden globally. After infection, an incubation period of 3-5 days is usually followed by symptoms, such as cough and low-grade fever. However, hRSV infection can also produce a larger variety of symptoms, some of which relate to the individual's age at infection. Indeed, infants can display severe symptoms, such as dyspnea and chest wall retractions. Upon examination, crackles and wheezes are also common features that suggest infection by hRSV. Additionally, infection in infants younger than 1 year is associated with several non-specific symptoms, such as failure to thrive, periodic breathing or apnea, and feeding difficulties that usually require hospitalization. Recently, neurological symptoms have also been associated with hRSV respiratory infection and include seizures, central apnea, lethargy, feeding or swallowing difficulties, abnormalities in muscle tone, strabismus, abnormalities in the CSF, and encephalopathy. Here, we discuss recent findings linking the neurological, extrapulmonary effects of hRSV with infection and functional impairment of the CNS.

  20. Transmission of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Infections in Healthcare Settings, Abu Dhabi

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Duc; Aden, Bashir; Al Bandar, Zyad; Al Dhaheri, Wafa; Abu Elkheir, Kheir; Khudair, Ahmed; Al Mulla, Mariam; El Saleh, Feda; Imambaccus, Hala; Al Kaabi, Nawal; Sheikh, Farrukh Amin; Sasse, Jurgen; Turner, Andrew; Abdel Wareth, Laila; Weber, Stefan; Al Ameri, Asma; Abu Amer, Wesal; Alami, Negar N.; Bunga, Sudhir; Haynes, Lia M.; Hall, Aron J.; Kallen, Alexander J.; Kuhar, David; Pham, Huong; Pringle, Kimberly; Tong, Suxiang; Whitaker, Brett L.; Gerber, Susan I.; Al Hosani, Farida Ismail

    2016-01-01

    Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) infections sharply increased in the Arabian Peninsula during spring 2014. In Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, these infections occurred primarily among healthcare workers and patients. To identify and describe epidemiologic and clinical characteristics of persons with healthcare-associated infection, we reviewed laboratory-confirmed MERS-CoV cases reported to the Health Authority of Abu Dhabi during January 1, 2013–May 9, 2014. Of 65 case-patients identified with MERS-CoV infection, 27 (42%) had healthcare-associated cases. Epidemiologic and genetic sequencing findings suggest that 3 healthcare clusters of MERS-CoV infection occurred, including 1 that resulted in 20 infected persons in 1 hospital. MERS-CoV in healthcare settings spread predominantly before MERS-CoV infection was diagnosed, underscoring the importance of increasing awareness and infection control measures at first points of entry to healthcare facilities. PMID:26981708

  1. Transmission of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Infections in Healthcare Settings, Abu Dhabi.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Jennifer C; Nguyen, Duc; Aden, Bashir; Al Bandar, Zyad; Al Dhaheri, Wafa; Abu Elkheir, Kheir; Khudair, Ahmed; Al Mulla, Mariam; El Saleh, Feda; Imambaccus, Hala; Al Kaabi, Nawal; Sheikh, Farrukh Amin; Sasse, Jurgen; Turner, Andrew; Abdel Wareth, Laila; Weber, Stefan; Al Ameri, Asma; Abu Amer, Wesal; Alami, Negar N; Bunga, Sudhir; Haynes, Lia M; Hall, Aron J; Kallen, Alexander J; Kuhar, David; Pham, Huong; Pringle, Kimberly; Tong, Suxiang; Whitaker, Brett L; Gerber, Susan I; Al Hosani, Farida Ismail

    2016-04-01

    Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) infections sharply increased in the Arabian Peninsula during spring 2014. In Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, these infections occurred primarily among healthcare workers and patients. To identify and describe epidemiologic and clinical characteristics of persons with healthcare-associated infection, we reviewed laboratory-confirmed MERS-CoV cases reported to the Health Authority of Abu Dhabi during January 1, 2013-May 9, 2014. Of 65 case-patients identified with MERS-CoV infection, 27 (42%) had healthcare-associated cases. Epidemiologic and genetic sequencing findings suggest that 3 healthcare clusters of MERS-CoV infection occurred, including 1 that resulted in 20 infected persons in 1 hospital. MERS-CoV in healthcare settings spread predominantly before MERS-CoV infection was diagnosed, underscoring the importance of increasing awareness and infection control measures at first points of entry to healthcare facilities.

  2. Psychosocial Risk Factors for Upper Respiratory Infection: Depression as a Mediator of Associations between Neuroticism and Upper Respiratory Illness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-31

    8217•,Ij F11LE Copy • PSYCHOSOCIAL RISK FACTORS FOR UPPER RESPIRATORY INFECTION: DEPRESSION AS A MEDIATOR OF ASSOCIATIONS C14 BETWEEN NEUROTlClSM AND S... Factors for Upper Respiratory Infection: DEPRESSION AS A MEDIATOR OF ASSOCIATIONS BETWEEN NEUROTICISM AND UPPER RESPIRATORY ILLNESS I jlI Ross R...indicators of situational depression . Factor analyses of the CES-D in samples of the general U. S. civilian pcpulation typically identify 3 or 4 basic

  3. NK cell immunophenotypic and genotypic analysis of infants with severe respiratory syncytial virus infection.

    PubMed

    Noyola, Daniel E; Juárez-Vega, Guillermo; Monjarás-Ávila, César; Escalante-Padrón, Francisco; Rangel-Ramírez, Verónica; Cadena-Mota, Sandra; Monsiváis-Urenda, Adriana; García-Sepúlveda, Christian A; González-Amaro, Roberto

    2015-07-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of severe lower respiratory tract infection in infants. Reduced numbers of NK cells have been reported in infants with severe RSV infection; however, the precise role of NK cells during acute RSV infection is unclear. In this study the NK and T cell phenotypes, LILRB1 gene polymorphisms and KIR genotypes of infants hospitalized with RSV infection were analyzed. Compared to controls, infants with acute RSV infection showed a higher proportion of LILRB1+ T cells; in addition, a subgroup of infants with RSV infection showed an increase in LILRB1+ NK cells. No differences in NKG2C, NKG2A, or CD161 expression between RSV infected infants and controls were observed. LILRB1 genotype distribution of the rs3760860 A>G, and rs3760861 A>G single nucleotide polymorphisms differed between infants with RSV infection and healthy donors, whereas no differences in any of the KIR genes were observed. Our results suggest that LILRB1 participates in the pathogenesis of RSV infection. Further studies are needed to define the role of LILRB1+ NK in response to RSV and to confirm an association between LILRB1 polymorphisms and the risk of severe RSV infection.

  4. Work-related psychosocial stress as a risk factor for asthma, allergy, and respiratory infections in the Swedish workforce.

    PubMed

    Runeson-Broberg, Roma; Norbäck, Dan

    2014-04-01

    This study examined the association between work-related psychosocial stress and asthma, atopy, and respiratory infections. 532 randomly selected occupationally active people (272 men, 260 women; M age = 41 yr., SD = 13) in Sweden participated. Information on history of asthma, atopy, and respiratory infections was collected by a postal self-report questionnaire. Work stress was assessed based on the demands-control-support model. Current asthma and respiratory infections were associated with work-related psychosocial stress. When stratified for sex, these associations were only found in men. Associations between low control, low support, and current asthma were found among young participants (< 40 years), whereas among older participants (> 40 years) low supervisor support was associated with frequent respiratory infections.

  5. Respiratory Tract Infections Due to Human Metapneumovirus in Immunocompromised Children

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Helen Y.; Renaud, Christian; Ficken, Elle; Thomson, Blythe; Kuypers, Jane; Englund, Janet A.

    2014-01-01

    Background The clinical presentation and management of human metapneumovirus (hMPV) infections in immunocompromised children is not well understood. Methods We performed a retrospective evaluation of pediatric patients with laboratory-confirmed hMPV infections and underlying hematologic malignancy, solid tumors, solid organ transplant, rheumatologic disease, and/or receipt of chronic immunosuppressants. Data were analyzed using t tests and Fisher's exact tests. Results Overall, 55 patients (median age: 5 years; range: 5 months–19 years) with hMPV infection documented between 2006 and 2010 were identified, including 24 (44%) with hematologic malignancy, 9 (16%) undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplant, 9 (16%) with solid tumors, and 8 (15%) with solid organ transplants. Three (5%) presented with fever alone, 35 (64%) presented with upper respiratory tract infections, and 16 (29%) presented with lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI). Twelve (23%) patients required intensive care unit admission and/or supplemental oxygen ≥28% FiO2. Those with severe disease were more likely to be neutropenic (P = .02), but otherwise did not differ by age (P = .27), hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipient status (P = .19), or presence of lymphopenia (P = .09). Nine (16%) patients received treatment with ribavirin, intravenous immunoglobulin, or both. Three children (5%) died of hMPV pneumonia. Conclusions Immunocompromised pediatric patients with hMPV infection have high rates of LRTI and mortality. The benefits of treatment with ribavirin and intravenous immunoglobulin in this patient population require further evaluation. PMID:25419459

  6. Understanding respiratory syncytial virus infection to improve treatment and immunity.

    PubMed

    González, P A; Carreño, L J; Bueno, S M; Riedel, C A; Kalergis, A M

    2013-08-01

    Despite significant research since it was discovered more than 50 years ago, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) continues to be the leading agent causing infant hospitalization and respiratory distress worldwide. Although RSV normally does not cause mortality, this virus is recognized as a major public health and economic burden around the globe. RSV can modulate host immunity leading to an inflammatory response that produces lung damage and virus dissemination in the host airways. Remarkably, infection with the virus elicits poor immunity that in most cases fails to protect against subsequent exposures. Here, we review advances made on the understanding of the lifecycle of the virus, some of the molecular mechanisms it has evolved to cause pathology and ineffective immunity during infection. Hopefully, ongoing research will contribute to developing new drugs and candidate vaccines that will decrease the health burden caused by this virus.

  7. Behavior, Immunologic Response, and Upper Respiratory Infection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-11

    as opposed to celular immune suppression, we decided to use anti-rubella antibody in test sera to control for this alterantive interpretation. An...Chambers Dr. Terry C. Johnson Health Sciences Center Division of Biology University of Illinois at Chicago Ackert Hall P.O. Box 6998 Kansas State...Program Manager Scientific Officer, Immunology Program Biological/Human Factors Division Office of Naval Research Office of Naval Research, Code 125

  8. THE ETIOLOGY OF ACUTE UPPER RESPIRATORY INFECTION (COMMON COLD)

    PubMed Central

    Long, Perrin H.; Doull, James A.; Bourn, Janet M.; McComb, Emily

    1931-01-01

    Experimental upper respiratory infections similar to "common colds" were transmitted singly and in series through two and four passages in nine out of fifteen persons, by intransal inoculations with bacteria-free filtrates of nasopharyngeal washings obtained from individuals ill with natural "colds." These observations conform with those reported by previous workers and lend further support to the view that the incitant of the "common cold" is a filtrable virus. PMID:19869857

  9. THE ETIOLOGY OF ACUTE UPPER RESPIRATORY INFECTION (COMMON COLD).

    PubMed

    Long, P H; Doull, J A; Bourn, J M; McComb, E

    1931-03-31

    Experimental upper respiratory infections similar to "common colds" were transmitted singly and in series through two and four passages in nine out of fifteen persons, by intransal inoculations with bacteria-free filtrates of nasopharyngeal washings obtained from individuals ill with natural "colds." These observations conform with those reported by previous workers and lend further support to the view that the incitant of the "common cold" is a filtrable virus.

  10. [Designs of optimized microbial therapy systems of respiratory infections].

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Kazuhiro

    2013-01-01

    Several respiratory infections are frequently induced by pathogenic microorganisms in lung epithelial lining fluid (ELF) and alveolar macrophages (AM). Then, two studies concerning designs of antimicrobial therapy systems of respiratory infections were carried out; one was the distribution mechanisms of three macrolide and ketolide antibiotics, clarithromycin (CAM), azithromycin (AZM) and telithromycin (TEL) in plasma, ELF and AM, and the other was the efficient drug delivery to AM by pulmonary administration of fluoroquinolone antibiotic, a ciprofloxacin (CPFX) incorporated into liposomes (CPFX-liposome). In the first study, the areas under drug concentration-time curves (AUCs) in ELF following oral administration of three macrolide and ketolide antibiotics to rats were significantly higher than AUCs in plasma, furthermore AUCs in AM significantly higher than AUCs in ELF. The high distribution of these antibiotics to the respiratory infection site is due to the transport from blood to ELF via MDR1 in lung epithelial cells as well as the uptake by AM. These antibiotics were taken up by AM via active transport system and the trapping in organelles. In the second study, drug delivery efficacy of CPFX-liposome to AM was particle size-dependent over the 100-1000 nm and then become constant at over 1000 nm by pulmonary aerosolization to rats. This result indicates that the most effective size is 1000 nm. Furthermore, the drug delivery efficacy of mannosylated CPFX-liposome (particle size: 1000 nm) was highly delivered to AM and antibacterial effects were significantly higher than those of unmodified CPFX-liposome. This review provides useful findings for microbial therapy systems of respiratory infections.

  11. Differential Roles of Lung Dendritic Cell Subsets Against Respiratory Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Hoon

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory viruses can induce acute respiratory disease. Clinical symptoms and manifestations are dependent on interactions between the virus and host immune system. Dendritic cells (DCs), along with alveolar macrophages, constitute the first line of sentinel cells in the innate immune response against respiratory viral infection. DCs play an essential role in regulating the immune response by bridging innate and adaptive immunity. In the steady state, lung DCs can be subdivided into CD103+ conventional DCs (cDCs), CD11b+ cDCs, and plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs). In the inflammatory state, like a respiratory viral infection, monocyte-derived DCs (moDCs) are recruited to the lung. In inflammatory lung, discrimination between moDCs and CD11b+ DCs in the inflamed lung has been a critical challenge in understanding their role in the antiviral response. In particular, CD103+ cDCs migrate from the intraepithelial base to the draining mediastinal lymph nodes to primarily induce the CD8+ T cell response against the invading virus. Lymphoid CD8α+ cDCs, which have a developmental relationship with CD103+ cDCs, also play an important role in viral antigen presentation. Moreover, pDCs have been reported to promote an antiviral response by inducing type I interferon production rather than adaptive immunity. However, the role of these cells in respiratory infections remains unclear. These different DC subsets have functional specialization against respiratory viral infection. Under certain viral infection, contextually controlling the balance of these specialized DC subsets is important for an effective immune response and maintenance of homeostasis. PMID:24999309

  12. Viruses as Sole Causative Agents of Severe Acute Respiratory Tract Infections in Children

    PubMed Central

    Moesker, Fleur M.; van Kampen, Jeroen J. A.; van Rossum, Annemarie M. C.; de Hoog, Matthijs; Koopmans, Marion P. G.; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.; Fraaij, Pieter L. A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and influenza A viruses are known to cause severe acute respiratory tract infections (SARIs) in children. For other viruses like human rhinoviruses (HRVs) this is less well established. Viral or bacterial co-infections are often considered essential for severe manifestations of these virus infections. Objective The study aims at identifying viruses that may cause SARI in children in the absence of viral and bacterial co-infections, at identifying disease characteristics associated with these single virus infections, and at identifying a possible correlation between viral loads and disease severities. Study Design Between April 2007 and March 2012, we identified children (<18 year) with or without a medical history, admitted to our paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) with SARI or to the medium care (MC) with an acute respiratory tract infection (ARTI) (controls). Data were extracted from the clinical and laboratory databases of our tertiary care paediatric hospital. Patient specimens were tested for fifteen respiratory viruses with real-time reverse transcriptase PCR assays and we selected patients with a single virus infection only. Typical bacterial co-infections were considered unlikely to have contributed to the PICU or MC admission based on C-reactive protein-levels or bacteriological test results if performed. Results We identified 44 patients admitted to PICU with SARI and 40 patients admitted to MC with ARTI. Twelve viruses were associated with SARI, ten of which were also associated with ARTI in the absence of typical bacterial and viral co-infections, with RSV and HRV being the most frequent causes. Viral loads were not different between PICU-SARI patients and MC-ARTI patients. Conclusion Both SARI and ARTI may be caused by single viral pathogens in previously healthy children as well as in children with a medical history. No relationship between viral load and disease severity was identified. PMID:26964038

  13. [Molecular identification of Candida lusitaniae in lower respiratory tract infection].

    PubMed

    Espinosa, Israel Martínez; Ibarra, Misael González; Torres Guerrero, Haydee K

    2014-01-01

    Candida lusitaniae is a yeast that has emerged as a low frequency nosocomial pathogen in deep infections. Although it usually shows in vitro susceptibility to all antifungal agents, in vivo resistance to amphotericin B has been observed in several clinical cases. Therefore, its early identification in the course of therapy is important. We report the isolation of C. lusitaniae as an etiologic agent of a lower respiratory tract infection in a male patient. Urine and sputum cultures were negative for bacteria and positive for this yeast. Isolates were identified by routine phenotypic methods and confirmed by sequencing and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of PCR internal spacer of ribosomal DNA.

  14. Human respiratory syncytial virus in children with acute respiratory tract infections in China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rong-Fang; Jin, Yu; Xie, Zhi-Ping; Liu, Na; Yan, Kun-Long; Gao, Han-Chun; Song, Jing-Rong; Yuan, Xin-Hui; Xiao, Ni-Guang; Guo, Ming-Wei; Zhou, Qiong-Hua; Hou, Yun-De; Duan, Zhaojun

    2010-11-01

    There are limited data on the prevalence and clinical and molecular characterization of human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) in children with acute respiratory tract infections (ARTIs) in China. From December 2006 to March 2009, 894 nasopharyngeal aspirates (NPAs) were collected from children under 14 years of age with ARTIs. Samples were screened for HRSV and genotyped by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) and sequencing. Demographic and clinical information was recorded. A total of 38.14% (341/894) of samples were positive for HRSV. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that 60.4% of the selected 227 RSV strains were GA2, 34.4% were BA, 4.8% were GB2, and 0.4% were GB3. A total of 40.47% of all of the RSV-positive samples were coinfected with other respiratory viruses, and adenovirus was the most common additional respiratory virus. No statistical differences were found in the frequency of diagnosis and symptoms between the coinfection group and monoinfection group. Additionally, no statistical differences were found in epidemiological characterizations or disease severity between genotype BA- and GA2-positive patients, except for a greater frequency of lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) (mostly bronchitis)with BA. HRSV is the most important viral pathogen in Chinese children with ARTIs. Four genotypes (i.e., GA2, BA, GB2, and GB3) circulate locally, and the predominant genotype may shift between seasons. Coinfection with other viruses does not affect disease severity. HRSV genotypes were not associated with different epidemiological characterizations or disease severity.

  15. Surveillance of adenovirus respiratory infections in children in Osaka, Japan.

    PubMed

    Hiroi, Satoshi; Morikawa, Saeko; Nakata, Keiko; Kase, Tetsuo

    2017-09-11

    Human adenovirus (HAdV) strains isolated from respiratory specimens of 139 children between 2008 and 2015 were analyzed with the intent of evaluating the endemic situation of HAdV infections in Osaka, Japan. The cases increased in spring and winter, and the infections were confirmed mainly in children aged ≤ 5 years, comprising 91.9% of the total population examined. Molecular typing of the isolates revealed that the most common types belonged to HAdV-B and HAdV-C, and a case of co-infection with HAdV-C1 and HAdV-C2 was confirmed. The median age of HAdV-E cases were higher than that of HAdV-B and -C cases. These results revealed age and seasonal distribution of respiratory infections caused by HAdVs in children in Osaka, and indicate that the majority of children might have acquired immunity through infection with endemic HAdVs before school age.

  16. Lactobacillus helveticus Lafti L10 supplementation reduces respiratory infection duration in a cohort of elite athletes: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Michalickova, Danica; Minic, Rajna; Dikic, Nenad; Andjelkovic, Marija; Kostic-Vucicevic, Marija; Stojmenovic, Tamara; Nikolic, Ivan; Djordjevic, Brizita

    2016-07-01

    A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was conducted to evaluate if Lactobacillus helveticus Lafti L10 (Lallemand Health Solutions, Montreal, Que., Canada) supplementation during 14 weeks in winter can influence the duration, severity, and incidence of upper respiratory tract illness (URTI), as well as to monitor different immune parameters in the population of elite athletes. Before and after the treatment, cardiopulmonary testing and self-rated state of moods evaluation (by Profile of Mood States questionnaire) were performed and blood samples were collected. Thirty-nine elite athletes were randomized either to the placebo (n = 19) or the probiotic (n = 20) group. The probiotic group received L. helveticus Lafti L10, 2 × 10(10) Colony Forming Units. Lafti L10 significantly shortened the URTI episode duration (7.25 ± 2.90 vs. 10.64 ± 4.67 days, p = 0.047) and decreased the number of symptoms in the probiotic group (4.92 ± 1.96 vs. 6.91 ± 1.22, p = 0.035). Severity and incidence of URTI did not differ between the treatments. There were no significant changes in leukocyte subpopulation abundance, transforming growth factor-β serum levels, level of interleukin-10 secreted from peptidoglican stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), interferon-γ level secreted from concanavalin A-stimulated PBMCs or viability/proliferation of PBMCs upon antigen stimulation. Group effect for CD4+/CD8+ ratio was significant (F[1,37] = 6.99, p = 0.020, η(2) = 0.350); this difference was not significant at baseline, but was evident after 14 weeks (p = 0.02). A significant interaction effect was noted for self-rated sense of vigor (F[1,37] = 11.76, p = 0.009, η(2) = 0.595). Self-rated sense of vigor increased in the probiotic group (18.5 ± 4.1 vs. 21.0 ± 2.6, p = 0.012). Probiotic strain Lafti L10 can be a beneficial nutritional supplement for the reduction of URTI length in elite athletes.

  17. Experimental respiratory anthrax infection in the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus)

    PubMed Central

    Lever, Mark S; Stagg, Anthony J; Nelson, Michelle; Pearce, Peter; Stevens, Daniel J; Scott, Elizabeth A M; Simpson, Andrew J H; Fulop, Mark J

    2008-01-01

    Inhalational anthrax is a rare but potentially fatal infection in man. The common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) was evaluated as a small non-human primate (NHP) model of inhalational anthrax infection, as an alternative to larger NHP species. The marmoset was found to be susceptible to inhalational exposure to Bacillus anthracis Ames strain. The pathophysiology of infection following inhalational exposure was similar to that previously reported in the rhesus and cynomolgus macaque and humans. The calculated LD50 for B. anthracis Ames strain in the marmoset was 1.47 × 103 colony-forming units, compared with a published LD50 of 5.5 × 104 spores in the rhesus macaque and 4.13 × 103 spores in the cynomolgus macaque. This suggests that the common marmoset is an appropriate alternative NHP and will be used for the evaluation of medical countermeasures against respiratory anthrax infection. PMID:18460069

  18. Infection prevention and control.

    PubMed

    Pegram, Anne; Bloomfield, Jacqueline

    2015-03-18

    All newly registered graduate nurses are required to have the appropriate knowledge and understanding to perform the skills required for patient care, specifically the competencies identified in the Nursing and Midwifery Council's essential skills clusters. This article focuses on the third essential skills cluster - infection prevention and control. It provides an overview and discussion of the key skills and behaviours that must be demonstrated to meet the standards set by the Nursing and Midwifery Council. In doing so, it considers the key principles of infection prevention and control, including local and national policies, standard infection control precautions, risk assessment, standard isolation measures and asepsis.

  19. Animal models of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus infection

    PubMed Central

    van Doremalen, Neeltje; Munster, Vincent J.

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) in 2012 marked the second time that a new, highly pathogenic coronavirus has emerged in the human population in the 21st century. In this review, we discuss the current state of knowledge of animal models of MERS-CoV infection. Commonly used laboratory animal species such as Syrian hamsters, mice and ferrets are not susceptible to MERS-CoV, due to differences in the MERS-CoV receptor dipeptyl peptidase 4 (DPP4). The initially developed animal models comprise two nonhuman primate species, the rhesus macaque and the common marmoset. Rhesus macaques develop a mild to moderate respiratory disease upon inoculation, reminiscent of milder MERS cases, whereas marmosets develop a moderate to severe respiratory disease, recapitulating the severe disease observed in some patients. Dromedary camels, considered to be the reservoir for MERS-CoV, develop a mild upper respiratory tract infection with abundant viral shedding. Although normal mice are not susceptible to MERS-CoV, expression of the human DPP4 (hDPP4) overcomes the lack of susceptibility. Transgenic hDPP4 mice develop severe and lethal respiratory disease upon inoculation with MERS-CoV. These hDPP4 transgenic mice are potentially the ideal first line animal model for efficacy testing of therapeutic and prophylactic countermeasures. Further characterization of identified countermeasures would ideally be performed in the common marmoset model, due to the more severe disease outcome. This article forms part of a symposium in Antiviral Research on “From SARS to MERS: research on highly pathogenic human coronaviruses.” PMID:26192750

  20. [Rhinoviruses. Frequency in nonhospitalized children with acute respiratory infection].

    PubMed

    Marcone, Débora N; Ricarte, Carmen; Videla, Cristina; Ekstrom, Jorge; Carballal, Guadalupe; Vidaurreta, Santiago; Echavarría, Marcela

    2012-01-01

    Molecular methods for human rhinoviruses (HRV) have increased the sensitivity in their diagnosis. HRV may cause acute respiratory infections (ARI) of the upper and lower respiratory tract. HRV infection during childhood is a predictor of asthma development. In this study, the HRV frequency in outpatient children with ARI was determined, and their clinical features and previous conditions were evaluated. A total of 186 respiratory samples of children under 6 year old attending the CEMIC pediatric emergency room from June 1, 2008 to May 31, 2010, were studied. Classical respiratory viruses were detected by immunofluorescence. A real time RT-PCR that amplifies part of the 5' non coding genomic region was used for HRV detection. Viral detection was obtained in 61% of children. The frequency was: 27% for HRV, 16% for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), 9% for influenza, 8% for parainfluenza, 7% for metapneumovirus and 0.5% for adenovirus. Dual coinfection was detected in 8 children and HRV were the most frequent, detected in 4 of them. HRV circulated during the two year period of the study, with peaks during winter and spring. No clinical difference was observed between patients with or without HRV, except an increase percent of children with HRV without fever. HRV were the most frequent viruses detected in this population, mainly in children under 2 year old, the second cause of bronchiolitis after RSV and more frequently detected in children exposed to passive smoking (OR = 2.91; p = 0.012), and were detected as the sole etiologic agent in 28% of bronchiolitis.

  1. Hypothermia and physiological control: the respiratory system.

    PubMed

    Frappell, P

    1998-02-01

    1. Ventilation (VE) in unanaesthetized hypothermic animals remains tightly coupled to oxygen consumption (VO2) such that VE/VO2 remains constant despite changes in body temperature. 2. Ventilatory responses to hypoxia would suggest that, relative to metabolic rate, the gain of the respiratory system is unaltered in hypothermic animals. 3. Future studies should exercise care to ensure that the method applied in inducing hypothermia does not complicate ventilatory control and that the ability of the species to hibernate is taken into consideration.

  2. High Viral Load and Respiratory Failure in Adults Hospitalized for Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections.

    PubMed

    Lee, Nelson; Chan, Martin C W; Lui, Grace C Y; Li, Ran; Wong, Rity Y K; Yung, Irene M H; Cheung, Catherine S K; Chan, Eugenia C Y; Hui, David S C; Chan, Paul K S

    2015-10-15

    A prospective study among adults hospitalized for polymerase chain reaction-confirmed respiratory syncytial virus infections (n = 123) showed frequent occurrence of lower respiratory-tract complications causing respiratory insufficiency (52.8%), requirement for assisted ventilation (16.3%), and intensive care unit admission/death (12.2%). High viral RNA concentration was detected at time of hospitalization, including in patients who presented later than 2 days of illness (day 1-2, 7.29 ± 1.47; day 3-4, 7.28 ± 1.41; day 5-8, 6.66 ± 1.87 log10 copies/mL). RNA concentration was independently associated with risk of complications and respiratory insufficiency (adjusted odds ratio 1.40 per log10 copies/mL increase, 95% confidence interval, 1.03-1.90; P = .034). Our data indicate the need and provide a basis for clinical research on antiviral therapy in this population.

  3. Inhaled anti-infective chemotherapy for respiratory tract infections: Successes, challenges and the road ahead

    PubMed Central

    Velkov, Tony; Rahim, Nusaibah Abdul; Zhou, Qi (Tony); Chan, Hak-Kim; Li, Jian

    2014-01-01

    One of the most common causes of illnesses in humans is from respiratory tract infections caused by bacterial, viral or fungal pathogens. Inhaled anti-infective drugs are crucial for the prophylaxis and treatment of respiratory tract infections. The benefit of anti-infective drug delivery via inhalation is that it affords delivery of sufficient therapeutic dosages directly to the primary site of infection, while minimizing the risks of systemic toxicity or avoiding potential suboptimal pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics associated with systemic drug exposure. This review provides an up-to-date treatise of approved and novel developmental inhaled anti-infective agents, with particular attention to effective strategies for their use, pulmonary pharmacokinetic properties and safety. PMID:25446140

  4. IgA modulates respiratory dysfunction as a sequela to pulmonary chlamydial infection as neonates.

    PubMed

    Lanka, Gopala Krishna Koundinya; Yu, Jieh-Juen; Gong, Siqi; Gupta, Rishein; Mustafa, Shamimunisa B; Murthy, Ashlesh K; Zhong, Guangming; Chambers, James P; Guentzel, M Neal; Arulanandam, Bernard P

    2016-04-01

    Neonatal Chlamydia lung infections are associated with serious sequelae such as asthma and airway hyper-reactivity in children and adults. Our previous studies demonstrated the importance of Th-1 type cytokines, IL-12 and IFN-γ in protection against neonatal pulmonary chlamydial challenge; however, the role of the humoral arm of defense has not been elucidated. We hypothesized that B-cells and IgA, the major mucosal antibody, play a protective role in newborns against development of later life respiratory sequelae to Chlamydia infection. Our studies using neonatal mice revealed that all WT and IgA-deficient (IgA(-/-)) animals survived a sublethal pulmonary Chlamydia muridarum challenge at one day after birth with similar reduction in bacterial burdens over time. In contrast, all B-cell-deficient (μMT) mice succumbed to infection at the same challenge dose correlating to failure to control bacterial burdens in the lungs. Although IgA may not be important for bacterial clearance, we observed IgA(-/-) mice displayed greater respiratory dysfunction 5 weeks post challenge. Specifically, comparative respiratory functional analyses revealed a significant shift upward in P-V loops, and higher dynamic resistance in IgA(-/-) animals. This study provides insight(s) into the protective role of IgA in neonates against pulmonary chlamydial infection induced respiratory pathological sequelae observed later in life. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. ISG15 Is Upregulated in Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection and Reduces Virus Growth through Protein ISGylation

    PubMed Central

    González-Sanz, Rubén; Mata, Manuel; Bermejo-Martín, Jesús; Álvarez, Amparo; Cortijo, Julio; Melero, José A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), for which neither a vaccine nor an effective therapeutic treatment is currently available, is the leading cause of severe lower respiratory tract infections in children. Interferon-stimulated gene 15 (ISG15) is a ubiquitin-like protein that is highly increased during viral infections and has been reported to have an antiviral or a proviral activity, depending on the virus. Previous studies from our laboratory demonstrated strong ISG15 upregulation during RSV infection in vitro. In this study, an in-depth analysis of the role of ISG15 in RSV infection is presented. ISG15 overexpression and small interfering RNA (siRNA)-silencing experiments, along with ISG15 knockout (ISG15−/−) cells, revealed an anti-RSV effect of the molecule. Conjugation inhibition assays demonstrated that ISG15 exerts its antiviral activity via protein ISGylation. This antiviral activity requires high levels of ISG15 to be present in the cells before RSV infection. Finally, ISG15 is also upregulated in human respiratory pseudostratified epithelia and in nasopharyngeal washes from infants infected with RSV, pointing to a possible antiviral role of the molecule in vivo. These results advance our understanding of the innate immune response elicited by RSV and open new possibilities to control infections by the virus. IMPORTANCE At present, no vaccine or effective treatment for human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is available. This study shows that interferon-stimulated gene 15 (ISG15) lowers RSV growth through protein ISGylation. In addition, ISG15 accumulation highly correlates with the RSV load in nasopharyngeal washes from children, indicating that ISG15 may also have an antiviral role in vivo. These results improve our understanding of the innate immune response to RSV and identify ISG15 as a potential target for virus control. PMID:26763998

  6. Advances in infection control

    PubMed Central

    Marra, Alexandre Rodrigues

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Several initiatives took place in recent years in relation to nosocomial infection control in order to increase patient safety. Some of these initiatives will be commented in this brief review. PMID:27074240

  7. Detection of viral respiratory pathogens in mild and severe acute respiratory infections in Singapore

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Lili; Lee, Vernon Jian Ming; Cui, Lin; Lin, Raymond; Tan, Chyi Lin; Tan, Linda Wei Lin; Lim, Wei-yen; Leo, Yee-Sin; Low, Louie; Hibberd, Martin; Chen, Mark I-Cheng

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the performance of laboratory methods and clinical case definitions in detecting the viral pathogens for acute respiratory infections (ARIs) from a prospective community cohort and hospital inpatients, nasopharyngeal swabs from cohort members reporting ARIs (community-ARI) and inpatients admitted with ARIs (inpatient-ARI) were tested by Singleplex Real Time-Polymerase Chain Reaction (SRT-PCR), multiplex RT-PCR (MRT-PCR) and pathogen-chip system (PathChip) between April 2012 and December 2013. Community-ARI and inpatient-ARI was also combined with mild and severe cases of influenza from a historical prospective study as mild-ARI and severe-ARI respectively to evaluate the performance of clinical case definitions. We analysed 130 community-ARI and 140 inpatient-ARI episodes (5 inpatient-ARI excluded because multiple pathogens were detected), involving 138 and 207 samples respectively. Detection by PCR declined with days post-onset for influenza virus; decrease was faster for community-ARI than for inpatient-ARI. No such patterns were observed for non-influenza respiratory virus infections. PathChip added substantially to viruses detected for community-ARI only. Clinical case definitions discriminated influenza from other mild-ARI but performed poorly for severe-ARI and for older participants. Rational strategies for diagnosis and surveillance of influenza and other respiratory virus must acknowledge the differences between ARIs presenting in community and hospital settings. PMID:28218288

  8. Do delayed prescriptions reduce antibiotic use in respiratory tract infections? A systematic review.

    PubMed Central

    Arroll, Bruce; Kenealy, Tim; Kerse, Ngaire

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is concern about the increasing resistance of antibiotics to common bacteria. Delayed prescribing for respiratory tract infections is a strategy that may reduce the use of antibiotics. AIM: To systematically review controlled trials of delayed prescriptions to establish their capacity to reduce antibiotic intake. DESIGN OF STUDY: A systematic review of the literature. SETTING: Four studies were conducted in the United Kingdom and one in New Zealand. METHODS: We searched MEDLINE from 1966 to April 2003, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register using the following terms: 'delayed', 'antibiotics', 'prescriptions', and 'back-up' (as in back-up prescription). We included controlled trials of studies in which the intervention was a delayed prescription compared to an immediate prescription for patients with upper respiratory tract infections. The studies were selected independently and the results compared. Disagreements were resolved by discussion. The data and quality of the studies were extracted and assessed independently by two of the authors. RESULTS: Four randomised controlled trials and one before-after controlled trial contributed to the review. The relative risk in the randomised trials for lower antibiotic usage when a delayed prescription was given ranged from 0.54 for the common cold to 0.25 for otitis media. CONCLUSION: The consistent reduction in antibiotic usage in the five controlled trials included in this review suggests that delayed prescription is an effective means of reducing antibiotic usage for acute respiratory infections. The duration of delay for prescriptions ranged widely, from 1 to 7 days. PMID:14702908

  9. Similar cytokine profiles in response to infection with respiratory syncytial virus type a and type B in the upper respiratory tract in infants.

    PubMed

    Bermejo-Martin, Jesus F; Tenorio, Alberto; Ortiz de Lejarazu, Raul; Eiros, Jose M; Matías, Vanesa; Dominguez-Gil, Marta; Pino, Maria; Alonso, Ana; Blanco-Quiros, Alfredo; Arranz, Eduardo; Ardura, Julio

    2008-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading viral cause of severe respiratory illness in infants and young children worldwide. RSV isolates can be divided into 2 subgroups, type A and type B. Here, we compare for the first time the nasal profiles of 27 immune mediators in response to both viral subtypes in 14 children infected with RSV/A, 8 children infected with RSV/B, 11 children coinfected with RSV/A plus other respiratory viruses, and finally, 27 control children, all <2 years old. Our results evidence that children's infection with both RSV subtypes induces very similar profiles of immune mediators in the upper respiratory tract, characterized by the elevation of Th1 and Th2 cytokines, chemokines and growth factors. Interestingly, no major differences in the profiles of the immune mediators were found between the children infected exclusively with RSV/A and those infected with RSV/A plus other respiratory viruses. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Impaired learning resulting from Respiratory Syncytial Virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Espinoza, Janyra A.; Bohmwald, Karen; Céspedes, Pablo F.; Gómez, Roberto S.; Riquelme, Sebastián A.; Cortés, Claudia M.; Valenzuela, Javier A.; Sandoval, Rodrigo A.; Pancetti, Floria C.; Bueno, Susan M.; Riedel, Claudia A.; Kalergis, Alexis M.

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the major cause of respiratory illness in infants worldwide. Neurologic alterations, such as seizures and ataxia, have been associated with RSV infection. We demonstrate the presence of RSV proteins and RNA in zones of the brain—such as the hippocampus, ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus, and brainstem—of infected mice. One month after disease resolution, rodents showed behavioral and cognitive impairment in marble burying (MB) and Morris water maze (MWM) tests. Our data indicate that the learning impairment caused by RSV is a result of a deficient induction of long-term potentiation in the hippocampus of infected animals. In addition, immunization with recombinant bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG) expressing RSV nucleoprotein prevented behavioral disorders, corroborating the specific effect of RSV infection over the central nervous system. Our findings provide evidence that RSV can spread from the airways to the central nervous system and cause functional alterations to the brain, both of which can be prevented by proper immunization against RSV. PMID:23650398

  11. Activated mouse eosinophils protect against lethal respiratory virus infection.

    PubMed

    Percopo, Caroline M; Dyer, Kimberly D; Ochkur, Sergei I; Luo, Janice L; Fischer, Elizabeth R; Lee, James J; Lee, Nancy A; Domachowske, Joseph B; Rosenberg, Helene F

    2014-01-30

    Eosinophils are recruited to the airways as a prominent feature of the asthmatic inflammatory response where they are broadly perceived as promoting pathophysiology. Respiratory virus infections exacerbate established asthma; however, the role of eosinophils and the nature of their interactions with respiratory viruses remain uncertain. To explore these questions, we established acute infection with the rodent pneumovirus, pneumonia virus of mice (PVM), in 3 distinct mouse models of Th2 cytokine-driven asthmatic inflammation. We found that eosinophils recruited to the airways of otherwise naïve mice in response to Aspergillus fumigatus, but not ovalbumin sensitization and challenge, are activated by and degranulate specifically in response to PVM infection. Furthermore, we demonstrate that activated eosinophils from both Aspergillus antigen and cytokine-driven asthma models are profoundly antiviral and promote survival in response to an otherwise lethal PVM infection. Thus, although activated eosinophils within a Th2-polarized inflammatory response may have pathophysiologic features, they are also efficient and effective mediators of antiviral host defense.

  12. Incidence of acute otitis media and sinusitis complicating upper respiratory tract infection: the effect of age.

    PubMed

    Revai, Krystal; Dobbs, Laura A; Nair, Sangeeta; Patel, Janak A; Grady, James J; Chonmaitree, Tasnee

    2007-06-01

    Infants and young children are prone to developing upper respiratory tract infections, which often result in bacterial complications such as acute otitis media and sinusitis. We evaluated 623 upper respiratory tract infection episodes in 112 children (6-35 months of age) to determine the proportion of upper respiratory tract infection episodes that result in acute otitis media or sinusitis. Of all upper respiratory tract infections, 30% were complicated by acute otitis media and 8% were complicated by sinusitis. The rate of acute otitis media after upper respiratory tract infection declined with increasing age, whereas the rate of sinusitis after upper respiratory tract infection peaked in the second year of life. Risk for acute otitis media may be reduced substantially by avoiding frequent exposure to respiratory viruses (eg, avoidance of day care attendance) in the first year of life.

  13. Neuromodulation: purinergic signaling in respiratory control.

    PubMed

    Funk, Gregory D

    2013-01-01

    The main functions of the respiratory neural network are to produce a coordinated, efficient, rhythmic motor behavior and maintain homeostatic control over blood oxygen and CO2/pH levels. Purinergic (ATP) signaling features prominently in these homeostatic reflexes. The signaling actions of ATP are produced through its binding to a diversity of ionotropic P2X and metabotropic P2Y receptors. However, its net effect on neuronal and network excitability is determined by the interaction between the three limbs of a complex system comprising the signaling actions of ATP at P2Rs, the distribution of multiple ectonucleotidases that differentially metabolize ATP into ADP, AMP, and adenosine (ADO), and the signaling actions of ATP metabolites, especially ADP at P2YRs and ADO at P1Rs. Understanding the significance of purinergic signaling is further complicated by the fact that neurons, glia, and the vasculature differentially express P2 and P1Rs, and that both neurons and glia release ATP. This article reviews at cellular, synaptic, and network levels, current understanding and emerging concepts about the diverse roles played by this three-part signaling system in: mediating the chemosensitivity of respiratory networks to hypoxia and CO2/pH; modulating the activity of rhythm generating networks and inspiratory motoneurons, and; controlling blood flow through the cerebral vasculature.

  14. [Investigation of respiratory syncytial virus by three different methods in children with lower respiratory tract infection].

    PubMed

    Gökalp, Canan; Gökahmetoğlu, Selma; Deniz, Esma Saatçi; Güneş, Tamer

    2009-07-01

    Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) is the most important viral agent leading to lower respiratory tract infection in infants and children. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of RSV by direct immunofluorescence antibody (DFA), cell culture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in children with lower respiratory tract infection. Nasotracheal aspirate specimens collected from 80 hospitalized patients aged between 0-24 months and clinically diagnosed as lower respiratory tract infection, during November 2005-May 2006 period, were included to the study. RSV antigen was investigated in clinical specimens by DFA method (Monofluo Bio-Rad, France). Hep-2 culture was used for isolation of RSV. RSV-RNA was investigated by real-time PCR (Fluorion lontek, Turkey) in clinical specimens. RSV was found positive in 26 (32.5%) of 80 samples by DFA and in 17 (21.3%) samples by cell culture. Six specimens were not studied by PCR as sample amounts were not sufficient. Of the 74 samples tested, 20 (27%) were found to be positive by real-time PCR. Fifty-four of the samples were negative by 3 of the methods, while 12 were positive by all of them. DFA and PCR positive 8 samples yielded negative result in cell culture. Five of the 6 samples not investigated by PCR, were positive both in DFA and cell culture while 1 sample was positive only by DFA. Considering cell culture as the gold standard, the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values were found as 100%, 85.7%, 65.4% and 100%, respectively, for DFA and 100%, 94.7%, 85% and 100%, respectively, for PCR. As a conclusion for the accurate diagnosis of RSV infections the clinical samples should be collected in the early phase of the disease and inoculated to the cell cultures immediately for viral isolation. If cell culture or PCR facilities are not available for routine diagnosis, DFA method can be used for rapid and cost effective diagnosis of RSV infections.

  15. Detection and typing by molecular techniques of respiratory viruses in children hospitalized for acute respiratory infection in Rome, Italy.

    PubMed

    Pierangeli, Alessandra; Gentile, Massimo; Di Marco, Paola; Pagnotti, Paolo; Scagnolari, Carolina; Trombetti, Simona; Lo Russo, Lelia; Tromba, Valeria; Moretti, Corrado; Midulla, Fabio; Antonelli, Guido

    2007-04-01

    Detection of a broad number of respiratory viruses is not undertaken currently for the diagnosis of acute respiratory infection due to the large and always increasing list of pathogens involved. A 1-year study was undertaken on children hospitalized consecutively for acute respiratory infection in a Pediatric Department in Rome to characterize the viruses involved. Two hundred twenty-seven children were enrolled in the study with a diagnosis of asthma, bronchiolitis, bronchopneumonia, or laringo-tracheo bronchitis. A molecular approach was adopted using specific reverse transcription (RT)-PCR assays detecting 13 respiratory viruses including metapneumovirus (hMPV) and the novel coronaviruses NL63 and HKU1; most amplified fragments were sequenced to confirm positive results and differentiate the strain. Viral pathogens were detected in 97 samples (42.7%), with 4.8% of dual infections identified; respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) was detected in 17.2% of children, followed by rhinovirus (9.7%), parainfluenza virus type 3 (PIV3) (7.5%), and influenza type A (4.4%). Interestingly, more than half the patients (9/17) that have rhinovirus as the sole respiratory pathogen had pneumonia. HMPV infected children below 3 years in two peaks in March and June causing bronchiolitis and pneumonia. One case of NL63 infection is described, documenting NL63 circulation in central Italy. In conclusion, the use of a comprehensive number of PCR-based tests is recommended to define the burden of viral pathogens in patients with respiratory tract infection.

  16. Hemoglobin level as a risk factor for lower respiratory tract infections in Lebanese children

    PubMed Central

    Mourad, Sawsan; Rajab, Mariam; Alameddine, Aouni; Fares, Mohammad; Ziade, Fouad; Merhi, Bassem Abou

    2010-01-01

    Background: Pneumonia is the biggest single cause of childhood death under the age of 5 years, and anemia affects approximately 30% of infants and children all over the world. Aim: Determination of the relationship between anemia and lower respiratory tract infection as a risk factor in Lebanese children. Patients and Methods: A total number of two hundred infants and children aged nine months to twelve years were included; One hundred cases were hospitalized for lower respiratory tract infection in Department of Pediatrics, Makassed General Hospital, and one hundred healthy, age and sex matched controls, were selected from outpatient department. Complete blood count, iron level, ferritin level, and total iron binding capacity were taken if hemoglobin level less than eleven gram per deci-liter. In addition peripheral blood smear, chest radiograph and C-reactive protein were done to hospitalized cases. Definition of iron deficiency anemia and normal laboratory values were predetermined. Results: Anemia was found in 32% of hospitalized cases and 16% of healthy controls. Mean hemoglobin level was 9.99 ± 0.62 gram per deci-liter and 11.99 ± 0.92 gram per deci-liter in anemic and non-anemic group respectively with a significant P-value of 0.001. C-reactive protein levels and number hospitalization days were similar among the anemic and non-anemic group. History of recurrent chest infections was significantly higher in both anemic group and hospitalized cases compared to non-anemic group and healthy controls. Low hemoglobin level was a risk factor for lower respiratory tract infection with a P-value of 0.008. Conclusion: Anemic children were two times more susceptible to lower respiratory tract infection compared to the control group, and iron deficiency anemia was predominating. Accurate diagnosis and prevention of anemia, whatever its etiology, is essential. PMID:22558548

  17. Inhaled formulations and pulmonary drug delivery systems for respiratory infections.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qi Tony; Leung, Sharon Shui Yee; Tang, Patricia; Parumasivam, Thaigarajan; Loh, Zhi Hui; Chan, Hak-Kim

    2015-05-01

    Respiratory infections represent a major global health problem. They are often treated by parenteral administrations of antimicrobials. Unfortunately, systemic therapies of high-dose antimicrobials can lead to severe adverse effects and this calls for a need to develop inhaled formulations that enable targeted drug delivery to the airways with minimal systemic drug exposure. Recent technological advances facilitate the development of inhaled anti-microbial therapies. The newer mesh nebulisers have achieved minimal drug residue, higher aerosolisation efficiencies and rapid administration compared to traditional jet nebulisers. Novel particle engineering and intelligent device design also make dry powder inhalers appealing for the delivery of high-dose antibiotics. In view of the fact that no new antibiotic entities against multi-drug resistant bacteria have come close to commercialisation, advanced formulation strategies are in high demand for combating respiratory 'super bugs'.

  18. Respiratory Tract Infections Due to Human Metapneumovirus in Immunocompromised Children.

    PubMed

    Chu, Helen Y; Renaud, Christian; Ficken, Elle; Thomson, Blythe; Kuypers, Jane; Englund, Janet A

    2014-12-01

    The clinical presentation and management of human metapneumovirus (hMPV) infections in immunocompromised children is not well understood. We performed a retrospective evaluation of pediatric patients with laboratory-confirmed hMPV infections and underlying hematologic malignancy, solid tumors, solid organ transplant, rheumatologic disease, and/or receipt of chronic immunosuppressants. Data were analyzed using t tests and Fisher's exact tests. Overall, 55 patients (median age: 5 years; range: 5 months-19 years) with hMPV infection documented between 2006 and 2010 were identified, including 24 (44%) with hematologic malignancy, 9 (16%) undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplant, 9 (16%) with solid tumors, and 8 (15%) with solid organ transplants. Three (5%) presented with fever alone, 35 (64%) presented with upper respiratory tract infections, and 16 (29%) presented with lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI). Twelve (23%) patients required intensive care unit admission and/or supplemental oxygen ≥28% FiO2. Those with severe disease were more likely to be neutropenic (P = .02), but otherwise did not differ by age (P = .27), hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipient status (P = .19), or presence of lymphopenia (P = .09). Nine (16%) patients received treatment with ribavirin, intravenous immunoglobulin, or both. Three children (5%) died of hMPV pneumonia. Immunocompromised pediatric patients with hMPV infection have high rates of LRTI and mortality. The benefits of treatment with ribavirin and intravenous immunoglobulin in this patient population require further evaluation. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society.

  19. Bacteremia in Children Hospitalized with Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Pardo-Seco, Jacobo; Gómez-Carballa, Alberto; Martinón-Torres, Nazareth; Martinón-Sánchez, José María; Justicia-Grande, Antonio; Rivero-Calle, Irene; Pinnock, Elli; Salas, Antonio; Fink, Colin

    2016-01-01

    Background The risk of bacteremia is considered low in children with acute bronchiolitis. However the rate of occult bacteremia in infants with RSV infection is not well established. The aim was to determine the actual rate and predictive factors of bacteremia in children admitted to hospital due to confirmed RSV acute respiratory illness (ARI), using both conventional culture and molecular techniques. Methods A prospective multicenter study (GENDRES-network) was conducted between 2011–2013 in children under the age of two admitted to hospital because of an ARI. Among those RSV-positive, bacterial presence in blood was assessed using PCR for Meningococcus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pyogenes, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, and Staphylococcus aureus, in addition to conventional cultures. Results 66 children with positive RSV respiratory illness were included. In 10.6% patients, bacterial presence was detected: H. influenzae (n = 4) and S. pneumoniae (n = 2). In those patients with bacteremia, there was a previous suspicion of bacterial superinfection and had received empirical antibiotic treatment 6 out of 7 (85.7%) patients. There were significant differences in terms of severity between children with positive bacterial PCR and those with negative results: PICU admission (100% vs. 50%, P-value = 0.015); respiratory support necessity (100% vs. 18.6%, P-value < 0.001); Wood-Downes score (mean = 8.7 vs. 4.8 points, P-value < 0.001); GENVIP scale (mean = 17 vs. 10.1, P-value < 0.001); and length of hospitalization (mean = 12.1 vs. 7.5 days, P-value = 0.007). Conclusion Bacteremia is not frequent in infants hospitalized with RSV respiratory infection, however, it should be considered in the most severe cases. PMID:26872131

  20. Comorbidity and high viral load linked to clinical presentation of respiratory human bocavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Ghietto, Lucía María; Majul, Diego; Ferreyra Soaje, Patricia; Baumeister, Elsa; Avaro, Martín; Insfrán, Constanza; Mosca, Liliana; Cámara, Alicia; Moreno, Laura Beatriz; Adamo, Maria Pilar

    2015-01-01

    Human bocavirus (HBoV) is a new parvovirus associated with acute respiratory tract infection (ARTI). In order to evaluate HBoV significance as an agent of acute respiratory disease, we screened 1,135 respiratory samples from children and adults with and without symptoms during two complete calendar years. HBoV1 prevalence in patients with ARTI was 6.33 % in 2011 and 11.64 % in 2012, including neonatal and adult patients. HBoV1 was also detected in 3.77 % of asymptomatic individuals. The co-detection rate was 78.1 %. Among children, 87 % were clinically diagnosed with lower respiratory infection (no significant differences between patients with and without coinfection), and 31 % exhibited comorbidities. Pediatric patients with comorbidities were significantly older than patients without comorbidities. Patients with ARTI had either high or low viral load, while controls had only low viral load, but there were no clinical differences between patients with high or low viral load. In conclusion, we present evidence of the pathogenic potential of HBoV1 in young children with ARTI. Since patients with HBoV1-single infection are not significantly different from those with coinfection with respect to clinical features, the virus can be as pathogenic by itself as other respiratory agents are. Furthermore, an association between high HBoV1 load and disease could not be demonstrated in this study, but all asymptomatic individuals had low viral loads. Also, children with comorbidities are susceptible to HBoV1 infection at older ages than previously healthy children. Thus, the clinical presentation of infection may occur depending on both viral load and the particular interaction between the HBoV1 and the host.

  1. Infection control for norovirus

    PubMed Central

    Barclay, L.; Park, G. W.; Vega, E.; Hall, A.; Parashar, U.; Vinjé, J.; Lopman, B.

    2015-01-01

    Norovirus infections are notoriously difficult to prevent and control, owing to their low infectious dose, high shedding titre, and environmental stability. The virus can spread through multiple transmission routes, of which person-to-person and foodborne are the most important. Recent advances in molecular diagnostics have helped to establish norovirus as the most common cause of sporadic gastroenteritis and the most common cause of outbreaks of acute gastroenteritis across all ages. In this article, we review the epidemiology and virology of noroviruses, and prevention and control guidelines, with a focus on the principles of disinfection and decontamination. Outbreak management relies on sound infection control principles, including hand hygiene, limiting exposure to infectious individuals, and thorough environmental decontamination. Ideally, all infection control recommendations would rely on empirical evidence, but a number of challenges, including the inability to culture noroviruses in the laboratory and the challenges of outbreak management in complex environments, has made it difficult to garner clear evidence of efficacy in certain areas of infection control. New experimental data on cultivable surrogates for human norovirus and on environmental survivability and relative resistance to commonly used disinfectants are providing new insights for further refinining disinfection practices. Finally, clinical trials are underway to evaluate the efficacy of vaccines, which may shift the current infection control principles to more targeted interventions. PMID:24813073

  2. Gemifloxacin: a new fluoroquinolone approved for treatment of respiratory infections.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Bong K; Triller, Darren M; Yong, Chul-Soon; Lodise, Thomas P

    2004-01-01

    To evaluate the microbiology, pharmacokinetic parameters, drug interactions, and results of the available clinical trials of gemifloxacin for the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and acute exacerbation of chronic bronchitis (AECB). MEDLINE (1966-September 2003) was searched for primary and review articles. Data from the manufacturer were also included. Key words included adverse effects, clinical trials, drug interactions, gemifloxacin, and pharmacokinetic parameters. All articles and product labeling concerning gemifloxacin, a fluoroquinolone antibiotic recently approved by the Food and Drug Administration for treatment of CAP and AECB, were included for review. Compared with currently available fluoroquinolones, gemifloxacin demonstrated improved in vitro activity against Streptococcus pneumoniae (minimum inhibitory concentration for 90% eradication 0.03 microg/mL) and similar activity against gram-negative respiratory pathogens (Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis) and atypical pathogens such as Chlamydia pneumoniae, Legionella pneumophila, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Gemifloxacin, consistent with other available fluoroquinolones, has insufficient activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus to allow clinical use for such infections. Gemifloxacin has adequate bioavailability and a favorable drug interaction profile. Gemifloxacin was comparable to commonly employed nonfluoroquinolone regimens for treatment of CAP and AECB, although the studies were designed to demonstrate equivalence. Gemifloxacin once daily for 5-7 days was well tolerated in controlled and uncontrolled clinical studies. Available clinical data, however, are insufficient to draw clinical or toxicologic distinctions between gemifloxacin and other fluoroquinolones. Gemifloxacin may be a suitable choice for empiric treatment of CAP or AECB. However, due to the significant history of fluoroquinolone-induced hepatic failure and dermatologic complications, the

  3. Surveillance for hospitalized acute respiratory infection in Guatemala.

    PubMed

    Verani, Jennifer R; McCracken, John; Arvelo, Wences; Estevez, Alejandra; Lopez, Maria Renee; Reyes, Lissette; Moir, Juan Carlos; Bernart, Chris; Moscoso, Fabiola; Gray, Jennifer; Olsen, Sonja J; Lindblade, Kim A

    2013-01-01

    Acute respiratory infections (ARI) are an important cause of illness and death worldwide, yet data on the etiology of ARI and the population-level burden in developing countries are limited. Surveillance for ARI was conducted at two hospitals in Guatemala. Patients admitted with at least one sign of acute infection and one sign or symptom of respiratory illness met the criteria for a case of hospitalized ARI. Nasopharyngeal/oropharyngeal swabs were collected and tested by polymerase chain reaction for adenovirus, parainfluenza virus types 1,2 and 3, respiratory syncytial virus, influenza A and B viruses, human metapneumovirus, Chlamydia pneumioniae, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Urine specimens were tested for Streptococcus pneumoniae antigen. Blood culture and chest radiograph were done at the discretion of the treating physician. Between November 2007 and December 2011, 3,964 case-patients were enrolled. While cases occurred among all age groups, 2,396 (60.4%) cases occurred in children <5 years old and 463 (11.7%) among adults ≥65 years old. Viruses were found in 52.6% of all case-patients and 71.8% of those aged <1 year old; the most frequently detected was respiratory syncytial virus, affecting 26.4% of case-patients. Urine antigen testing for Streptococcus pneumoniae performed for case-patients ≥15 years old was positive in 15.1% of those tested. Among 2,364 (59.6%) of case-patients with a radiograph, 907 (40.0%) had findings suggestive of bacterial pneumonia. Overall, 230 (5.9%) case-patients died during the hospitalization. Using population denominators, the observed hospitalized ARI incidence was 128 cases per 100,000, with the highest rates seen among children <1 year old (1,703 per 100,000), followed by adults ≥65 years old (292 per 100,000). These data, which demonstrate a substantial burden of hospitalized ARI in Guatemala due to a variety of pathogens, can help guide public health policies aimed at reducing the burden of illness and death due to

  4. Clinical Impact of Mixed Respiratory Viral Infection in Children with Adenoviral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Young Eun

    2016-01-01

    Background Although adenovirus (ADV) infection occurs steadily all year round in Korea and the identification of respiratory viral coinfections has been increasing following the introduction of multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction tests, the clinical impact of viral coinfection in children with ADV infection has rarely been reported. Materials and Methods Medical records of children diagnosed with ADV infection were retrospectively reviewed. The enrolled children were divided into two groups based on the identified respiratory viruses: ADV group and coinfection group. Clinical and laboratory parameters were compared between the two groups. Results In total, 105 children (60 males and 45 females) with a median age of 29 months (range: 0-131 months) diagnosed with an ADV infection were enrolled. Fever (99.0%) was by far the most frequent symptom, followed by respiratory (82.9%), and gastrointestinal (22.9%) symptoms. Upper and lower respiratory tract infections were diagnosed in 56 (53.3%), and 32 (30.5%) children, respectively. Five (4.8%) children received oxygen therapy, and no child died due to ADV infection. Coinfection was diagnosed in 32 (30.5%) children, with rhinovirus (46.9%), and respiratory syncytial virus (21.9%) being the most frequent. The proportions of children younger than 24 months (P <0.001), with underlying medical conditions (P = 0.020), and diagnosed with lower respiratory tract infection (P = 0.011) were significantly higher in the coinfection group than in the ADV group. In a multivariate analysis, only the younger age was significantly associated with coinfection (P <0.001). Although more children in the coinfection group received oxygen therapy (P = 0.029), the duration of fever and hospitalization was not significantly different between the two groups. Conclusion Respiratory viral coinfection with ADV occurred more frequently in children younger than 24 months of age compared with children aged 24 months or older. Respiratory

  5. Respiratory syncytial virus infection in children with neuromuscular impairment.

    PubMed

    Simon, Arne; Prusseit, Julia; Müller, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Clinically obvious reasons why children with neurological impairment (NMI) may be more severely affected in case of a viral respiratory tract infection include reduced vital capacity due to muscular weakness or spastic scoliosis, disturbed clearance of respiratory excretions (weak coughing and dysphagia), inability to comply actively with physiotherapeutic interventions, recurrent micro-aspirations (gastroesophageal reflux disease, vomiting related to coughing), a history of frequent exposure to antibiotics and health care institutions, colonization with resistant pathogens, impaired immunologic defence mechanisms due to severe malnutrition and cachexia, and early clinical deterioration in case of high fever with metabolic acidosis and hypercapnia, and maybe associated seizures or febrile convulsions.Data from the literature suggests that in all children with NMI, who have to be hospitalized with severe clinical deterioration due to an airway infection, at least one specimen of nasopharyngeal secretions should be sent as soon as possible to a virologic laboratory to detect viral pathogens. Children with severe NMI and those mechanically ventilated for other reasons being hospitalized during the RSV season must be strictly protected against nosocomial RSV infection by means of standard and droplet precautions. Finally, children with severe NMI and age below 24 months of life should receive passive immunization with palivizumab following international recommendations.

  6. Community-acquired respiratory viruses and co-infection among patients of Ontario sentinel practices, April 2009 to February 2010.

    PubMed

    Peci, Adriana; Winter, Anne-Luise; Gubbay, Jonathan B; Skowronski, Danuta M; Balogun, Elizabeth I; De Lima, Cedric; Crowcroft, Natasha S; Rebbapragada, Anu

    2013-07-01

    Respiratory viruses are known to cocirculate but this has not been described in detail during an influenza pandemic. To describe respiratory viruses, including co-infection and associated attributes such as age, sex or comorbidity, in patients presenting with influenza-like illness to a community sentinel network, during the pandemic A(H1N1)pdm09 in Ontario, Canada. Respiratory samples and epidemiologic details were collected from 1018 patients with influenza-like illness as part of respiratory virus surveillance and a multiprovincial case-control study of influenza vaccine effectiveness. At least one virus was detected in 668 (65·6%) of 1018 samples; 512 (50·3%) had single infections and 156 (15·3%) co-infections. Of single infections, the most common viruses were influenza A in 304 (59·4%) samples of which 275 (90·5%) were influenza A(H1N1)pdm09, and enterovirus/rhinovirus in 149 (29·1%) samples. The most common co-infections were influenza A and respiratory syncytial virus B, and influenza A and enterovirus/rhinovirus. In multinomial logistic regression analyses adjusted for age, sex, comorbidity, and timeliness of sample collection, single infection was less often detected in the elderly and co-infection more often in patients <30 years of age. Co-infection, but not single infection, was more likely detected in patients who had a sample collected within 2 days of symptom onset as compared to 3-7 days. Respiratory viral co-infections are commonly detected when using molecular techniques. Early sample collection increases likelihood of detection of co-infection. Further studies are needed to better understand the clinical significance of viral co-infection. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Does Viral Co-Infection Influence the Severity of Acute Respiratory Infection in Children?

    PubMed

    Cebey-López, Miriam; Herberg, Jethro; Pardo-Seco, Jacobo; Gómez-Carballa, Alberto; Martinón-Torres, Nazareth; Salas, Antonio; Martinón-Sánchez, José María; Justicia, Antonio; Rivero-Calle, Irene; Sumner, Edward; Fink, Colin; Martinón-Torres, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Multiple viruses are often detected in children with respiratory infection but the significance of co-infection in pathogenesis, severity and outcome is unclear. To correlate the presence of viral co-infection with clinical phenotype in children admitted with acute respiratory infections (ARI). We collected detailed clinical information on severity for children admitted with ARI as part of a Spanish prospective multicenter study (GENDRES network) between 2011-2013. A nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) approach was used to detect respiratory viruses in respiratory secretions. Findings were compared to an independent cohort collected in the UK. 204 children were recruited in the main cohort and 97 in the replication cohort. The number of detected viruses did not correlate with any markers of severity. However, bacterial superinfection was associated with increased severity (OR: 4.356; P-value = 0.005), PICU admission (OR: 3.342; P-value = 0.006), higher clinical score (1.988; P-value = 0.002) respiratory support requirement (OR: 7.484; P-value < 0.001) and longer hospital length of stay (OR: 1.468; P-value < 0.001). In addition, pneumococcal vaccination was found to be a protective factor in terms of degree of respiratory distress (OR: 2.917; P-value = 0.035), PICU admission (OR: 0.301; P-value = 0.011), lower clinical score (-1.499; P-value = 0.021) respiratory support requirement (OR: 0.324; P-value = 0.016) and oxygen necessity (OR: 0.328; P-value = 0.001). All these findings were replicated in the UK cohort. The presence of more than one virus in hospitalized children with ARI is very frequent but it does not seem to have a major clinical impact in terms of severity. However bacterial superinfection increases the severity of the disease course. On the contrary, pneumococcal vaccination plays a protective role.

  8. Metabolomic profile of children with recurrent respiratory infections.

    PubMed

    Bozzetto, Sara; Pirillo, Paola; Carraro, Silvia; Berardi, Mariangela; Cesca, Laura; Stocchero, Matteo; Giordano, Giuseppe; Zanconato, Stefania; Baraldi, Eugenio

    2017-01-01

    Recurrent respiratory infections (RRI) represent a widespread condition which has a severe social and economic impact. Immunostimulants are used for their prevention. It is crucial to better characterize children with RRI to refine their diagnosis and identify effective personalized prevention strategies. Metabolomics is a high-dimensional biological method that can be used for hypothesis-free biomarker profiling, examining a large number of metabolites in a given sample using spectroscopic techniques. Multivariate statistical data analysis then enables us to infer which metabolic information is relevant to the biological characterization of a given physiological or pathological condition. This can lead to the emergence of new, sometimes unexpected metabolites, and hitherto unknown metabolic pathways, enabling the formulation of new pathogenetic hypotheses, and the identification of new therapeutic targets. The aim of our pilot study was to apply mass-spectrometry-based metabolomics to the analysis of urine samples from children with RRI, comparing these children's biochemical metabolic profiles with those of healthy peers. We also compared the RRI children's and healthy controls' metabolomic urinary profiles after the former had received pidotimod treatment for 3 months to see whether this immunostimulant was associated with biochemical changes in the RRI children's metabolic profile. 13 children (age range 3-6 yeas) with RRI and 15 matched per age healthy peers with no history of respiratory diseases or allergies were enrolled. Their metabolomic urine samples were compared before and after the RRI children had been treated with pidotimod for a period of 3 months. Metabolomic analyses on the urine samples were done using mass spectrometry combined with ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC-MS). The resulting spectroscopic data then underwent multivariate statistical analysis and the most relevant variables characterizing the two groups were identified

  9. Pneumococcal infection of respiratory cells exposed to welding fumes; Role of oxidative stress and HIF-1 alpha.

    PubMed

    Grigg, Jonathan; Miyashita, Lisa; Suri, Reetika

    2017-01-01

    Welders are more susceptible to pneumococcal pneumonia. The mechanisms are yet unclear. Pneumococci co-opt the platelet activating factor receptor (PAFR) to infect respiratory epithelial cells. We previously reported that exposure of respiratory cells to welding fumes (WF), upregulates PAFR-dependent pneumococcal infection. The signaling pathway for this response is unknown, however, in intestinal cells, hypoxia-inducible factor-1 α (HIF 1α) is reported to mediate PAFR-dependent infection. We sought to assess whether oxidative stress plays a role in susceptibility to pneumococcal infection via the platelet activating factor receptor. We also sought to evaluate the suitability of nasal epithelial PAFR expression in welders as a biomarker of susceptibility to infection. Finally, we investigated the generalisability of the effect of welding fumes on pneumococcal infection and growth using a variety of different welding fume samples. Nasal epithelial PAFR expression in welders and controls was analysed by flow cytometry. WF were collected using standard methodology. The effect of WF on respiratory cell reactive oxygen species production, HIF-1α expression, and pneumococcal infection was determined using flow cytometry, HIF-1α knockdown and overexpression, and pneumococcal infection assays. We found that nasal PAFR expression is significantly increased in welders compared with controls and that WF significantly increased reactive oxygen species production, HIF-1α and PAFR expression, and pneumococcal infection of respiratory cells. In unstimulated cells, HIF-1α knockdown decreased PAFR expression and HIF-1α overexpression increased PAFR expression. However, in knockdown cells pneumococcal infection was paradoxically increased and in overexpressing cells infection was unaffected. Nasal epithelial PAFR expression may be used as a biomarker of susceptibility to pneumococcal infection in order to target individuals, particularly those at high risk such as welders

  10. Pneumococcal infection of respiratory cells exposed to welding fumes; Role of oxidative stress and HIF-1 alpha

    PubMed Central

    Grigg, Jonathan; Miyashita, Lisa

    2017-01-01

    Welders are more susceptible to pneumococcal pneumonia. The mechanisms are yet unclear. Pneumococci co-opt the platelet activating factor receptor (PAFR) to infect respiratory epithelial cells. We previously reported that exposure of respiratory cells to welding fumes (WF), upregulates PAFR–dependent pneumococcal infection. The signaling pathway for this response is unknown, however, in intestinal cells, hypoxia-inducible factor-1 α (HIF 1α) is reported to mediate PAFR-dependent infection. We sought to assess whether oxidative stress plays a role in susceptibility to pneumococcal infection via the platelet activating factor receptor. We also sought to evaluate the suitability of nasal epithelial PAFR expression in welders as a biomarker of susceptibility to infection. Finally, we investigated the generalisability of the effect of welding fumes on pneumococcal infection and growth using a variety of different welding fume samples. Nasal epithelial PAFR expression in welders and controls was analysed by flow cytometry. WF were collected using standard methodology. The effect of WF on respiratory cell reactive oxygen species production, HIF-1α expression, and pneumococcal infection was determined using flow cytometry, HIF-1α knockdown and overexpression, and pneumococcal infection assays. We found that nasal PAFR expression is significantly increased in welders compared with controls and that WF significantly increased reactive oxygen species production, HIF-1α and PAFR expression, and pneumococcal infection of respiratory cells. In unstimulated cells, HIF-1α knockdown decreased PAFR expression and HIF-1α overexpression increased PAFR expression. However, in knockdown cells pneumococcal infection was paradoxically increased and in overexpressing cells infection was unaffected. Nasal epithelial PAFR expression may be used as a biomarker of susceptibility to pneumococcal infection in order to target individuals, particularly those at high risk such as welders

  11. Factors influencing the development of otitis media among Sicilian children affected by upper respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed

    Martines, Francesco; Salvago, Pietro; Ferrara, Sergio; Messina, Giuseppe; Mucia, Marianna; Plescia, Fulvio; Sireci, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Upper respiratory tract infection is a nonspecific term used to describe an acute infection involving the nose, paranasal sinuses, pharynx and larynx. Upper respiratory tract infections in children are often associated with Eustachian tube dysfunction and complicated by otitis media, an inflammatory process within the middle ear. Environmental, epidemiologic and familial risk factors for otitis media (such as sex, socioeconomic and educational factors, smoke exposure, allergy or duration of breastfeeding) have been previously reported, but actually no data about their diffusion among Sicilian children with upper respiratory tract infections are available. To investigate the main risk factors for otitis media and their prevalence in Sicilian children with and without upper respiratory tract infections. A case-control study of 204 children with upper respiratory tract infections who developed otitis media during a 3 weeks monitoring period and 204 age and sex-matched healthy controls. Seventeen epidemiologically relevant features were inventoried by means of standardized questionnaires and skin tests were performed. Univariate analysis and multivariate logistic regression analysis were used to examine the association between risk factors and occurrence of otitis media. Otitis media resulted strongly associated to large families, low parental educational attainment, schooling within the third years of life (p<0.05); children were more susceptible to develop otitis media in the presence of asthma, cough, laryngopharyngeal reflux disease, snoring and apnea (p<0.05). Allergy and urban localization increased the risk of otitis media in children exposed to smoke respectively of 166% and 277% (p<0.05); the joint effect of asthma and presence of pets in allergic population increased the risk of recurrence of 11%, while allergy, cough and runny nose together increased this risk of 74%. Upper respiratory tract infections and otitis media are common childhood diseases strongly

  12. Use of behavioral economics and social psychology to improve treatment of acute respiratory infections (BEARI): rationale and design of a cluster randomized controlled trial [1RC4AG039115-01]--study protocol and baseline practice and provider characteristics.

    PubMed

    Persell, Stephen D; Friedberg, Mark W; Meeker, Daniella; Linder, Jeffrey A; Fox, Craig R; Goldstein, Noah J; Shah, Parth D; Knight, Tara K; Doctor, Jason N

    2013-06-27

    Inappropriate antibiotic prescribing for nonbacterial infections leads to increases in the costs of care, antibiotic resistance among bacteria, and adverse drug events. Acute respiratory infections (ARIs) are the most common reason for inappropriate antibiotic use. Most prior efforts to decrease inappropriate antibiotic prescribing for ARIs (e.g., educational or informational interventions) have relied on the implicit assumption that clinicians inappropriately prescribe antibiotics because they are unaware of guideline recommendations for ARIs. If lack of guideline awareness is not the reason for inappropriate prescribing, educational interventions may have limited impact on prescribing rates. Instead, interventions that apply social psychological and behavioral economic principles may be more effective in deterring inappropriate antibiotic prescribing for ARIs by well-informed clinicians. The Application of Behavioral Economics to Improve the Treatment of Acute Respiratory Infections (BEARI) Trial is a multisite, cluster-randomized controlled trial with practice as the unit of randomization. The primary aim is to test the ability of three interventions based on behavioral economic principles to reduce the rate of inappropriate antibiotic prescribing for ARIs. We randomized practices in a 2 × 2 × 2 factorial design to receive up to three interventions for non-antibiotic-appropriate diagnoses: 1) Accountable Justifications: When prescribing an antibiotic for an ARI, clinicians are prompted to record an explicit justification that appears in the patient electronic health record; 2) Suggested Alternatives: Through computerized clinical decision support, clinicians prescribing an antibiotic for an ARI receive a list of non-antibiotic treatment choices (including prescription options) prior to completing the antibiotic prescription; and 3) Peer Comparison: Each provider's rate of inappropriate antibiotic prescribing relative to top-performing peers is reported back to

  13. Use of behavioral economics and social psychology to improve treatment of acute respiratory infections (BEARI): rationale and design of a cluster randomized controlled trial [1RC4AG039115-01] - study protocol and baseline practice and provider characteristics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Inappropriate antibiotic prescribing for nonbacterial infections leads to increases in the costs of care, antibiotic resistance among bacteria, and adverse drug events. Acute respiratory infections (ARIs) are the most common reason for inappropriate antibiotic use. Most prior efforts to decrease inappropriate antibiotic prescribing for ARIs (e.g., educational or informational interventions) have relied on the implicit assumption that clinicians inappropriately prescribe antibiotics because they are unaware of guideline recommendations for ARIs. If lack of guideline awareness is not the reason for inappropriate prescribing, educational interventions may have limited impact on prescribing rates. Instead, interventions that apply social psychological and behavioral economic principles may be more effective in deterring inappropriate antibiotic prescribing for ARIs by well-informed clinicians. Methods/design The Application of Behavioral Economics to Improve the Treatment of Acute Respiratory Infections (BEARI) Trial is a multisite, cluster-randomized controlled trial with practice as the unit of randomization. The primary aim is to test the ability of three interventions based on behavioral economic principles to reduce the rate of inappropriate antibiotic prescribing for ARIs. We randomized practices in a 2 × 2 × 2 factorial design to receive up to three interventions for non-antibiotic-appropriate diagnoses: 1) Accountable Justifications: When prescribing an antibiotic for an ARI, clinicians are prompted to record an explicit justification that appears in the patient electronic health record; 2) Suggested Alternatives: Through computerized clinical decision support, clinicians prescribing an antibiotic for an ARI receive a list of non-antibiotic treatment choices (including prescription options) prior to completing the antibiotic prescription; and 3) Peer Comparison: Each provider’s rate of inappropriate antibiotic prescribing relative to top

  14. [Constrictive pericarditis as complication of viral respiratory infection].

    PubMed

    Darocha, Szymon; Paczek, Anna; Wawrzyńska, Liliana; Szturmowicz, Monika; Kober, Jarosław; Kurzyna, Marcin; Oniszh, Karina; Langfort, Renata; Litwiński, Paweł; Torbicki, Adam

    2012-01-01

    A 24 year-old man with 3-months medical history of recurrent respiratory infections and pericardial effusion, despite treatment with nonsteroid anti-inflammatory drugs, was admitted to the hospital with dyspnea on exertion. On admission he presented the symptoms of right heart insufficiency. Computed tomography of the chest demonstrated a thickened pericardium. Echocardiographic examination and right heart catheterisation established the diagnosis of constrictive pericarditis. Serologic tests suggested viral aetiology. The patient was referred to cardiothoracic surgery, partial pericardiectomy was performed with marked haemodynamic improvement.

  15. The place of tobramycin in lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI).

    PubMed

    Gialdroni Grassi, G

    1995-08-01

    The Author provides a review of clinical experience with tobramycin as therapy for lower respiratory tract infections, in comparison to other aminoglycosides, including the pharmacokinetics and toxicity, dwelling on oto- and nephrotoxicity. The article includes a discussion of various dosing regimens of the aminoglycosides, focussing on efficacy and toxicity arising from once-daily administration. The Author then provides a more detailed description of tobramycin's pharmacokinetics, indications for its use, and the possibilities of once-daily dosing, concluding that toxicity is favorably influenced by a single daily administration as well as efficacy, and that patient compliance and reduced hospital costs are other advantages of this regimen.

  16. Effects of consumption of a fermented dairy product containing the probiotic Lactobacillus casei DN-114 001 on common respiratory and gastrointestinal infections in shift workers in a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Guillemard, Eric; Tanguy, Jérôme; Flavigny, Ann'Laure; de la Motte, Stephan; Schrezenmeir, Juergen

    2010-10-01

    The risk of infection may be increased in people under stress such as shift workers. This study examined the effect of a fermented dairy product containing the probiotic Lactobacillus casei DN-114 001 (verum) on the incidence of respiratory and gastrointestinal common infectious diseases (CIDs) and on immune functions in healthy shift workers. The study was single-center, randomized, double-blind, and controlled. Volunteers received 200 g/day of verum (n = 500) or control product (n = 500) for 3 months; 1-month follow-up was carried out. The cumulated number of CIDs (primary outcome) was not significantly different between groups. Because the Poisson distribution of the primary parameter did not fully fit the observed data, a post hoc categorical analysis was applied and showed a significantly lower cumulated number of CIDs in the verum group during the product consumption phase (odds ratio [OR] = 0.75, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.59-0.95, p = 0.017). Verum also reduced the proportion of volunteers experiencing at least 1 CID (43% vs. 51%, p = 0.005), increased the time to the first occurrence of CID (p = 0.017) in the whole population, and reduced the cumulated number of CIDs in the subgroup of smokers (p = 0.033). In the course of CID, cumulated duration of fever was lower in the verum group (in the whole study phase) (p = 0.022), and an increase in leukocyte, neutrophil, and natural killer (NK) cell counts and activity (p = 0.047 to p < 0.001) was observed compared with control group. Verum was safe and well tolerated. The results indicate that daily consumption of a fermented dairy product containing Lactobacillus casei DN-114 001 could reduce the risk of common infections in stressed individuals such as shift workers.

  17. Activation of cytokines and NF-kappa B in corneal epithelial cells infected by respiratory syncytial virus: potential relevance in ocular inflammation and respiratory infection

    PubMed Central

    Bitko, Vira; Garmon, Nicolle E; Cao, Tin; Estrada, Benjamin; Oakes, John E; Lausch, Robert N; Barik, Sailen

    2004-01-01

    Background Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of lower respiratory tract infection, claiming millions of lives annually. The virus infects various cells of the respiratory tract as well as resident inflammatory cells such as macrophages. Infection activates a variety of cellular factors such as cytokines and the pro-inflammatory transcription factor, NF-kappa B, all of which are important players in the respiratory disease. However, the exact natural route of RSV infection and its etiology remain relatively unknown. In this paper, we test the hypothesis that human corneal epithelial cells, which constitute the outermost layer of the cornea, can be infected with RSV, and that the infection leads to the activation of proinflammatory macromolecules. Results Corneal swabs obtained from pediatric patients with acute respiratory disease were found to contain RSV at a high frequency (43 positive out of 72 samples, i.e., 60%). Primary corneal epithelial cells in tissue culture supported robust infection and productive growth of RSV. Infection resulted in the activation of TNF-α, IL-6 and sixteen chemokines as well as NF-κB. Three proinflammatory CXC chemokines (MIG, I-TAC, IP-10) underwent the greatest activation. Conclusions The ocular epithelium is readily infected by RSV. The pro-inflammatory cytokines are likely to play critical roles in the etiology of inflammation and conjunctivitis commonly seen in pediatric patients with respiratory infections. RSV-eye interactions have important implications in RSV transmission, immunopathology of RSV disease, and in the management of conjunctivitis. PMID:15256003

  18. Cochrane Commentary: Probiotics For Prevention of Acute Upper Respiratory Infection.

    PubMed

    Quick, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    Probiotics may improve a person's health by regulating their immune function. Some trials have shown that probiotic strains can prevent respiratory infections. Even though the previous version of our review showed benefits of probiotics for acute upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs), several new studies have been published. To assess the effectiveness and safety of probiotics (any specified strain or dose), compared with placebo, in the prevention of acute URTIs in people of all ages, who are at risk of acute URTIs. We searched CENTRAL (2014, Issue 6), MEDLINE (1950 to July week 3, 2014), EMBASE (1974 to July 2014), Web of Science (1900 to July 2014), the Chinese Biomedical Literature Database, which includes the China Biological Medicine Database (from 1978 to July 2014), the Chinese Medicine Popular Science Literature Database (from 2000 to July 2014) and the Masters Degree Dissertation of Beijing Union Medical College Database (from 1981 to July 2014). We also searched the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) and ClinicalTrials.gov for completed and ongoing trials on 31 July 2014. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing probiotics with placebo to prevent acute URTIs. Two review authors independently assessed the eligibility and quality of trials, and extracted data using the standard methodological procedures expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. We included 13 RCTs, although we could only extract data to meta-analyze 12 trials, which involved 3720 participants including children, adults (aged around 40 years) and older people. We found that probiotics were better than placebo when measuring the number of participants experiencing episodes of acute URTI [at least one episode: odds ratio (OR): 0.53; 95% CI = 0.37-0.76, P < .001, low quality evidence; at least three episodes: OR: 0.53; 95% CI = 0.36-0.80, P = .002, low quality evidence]; the mean duration of an episode of acute URTI [mean difference

  19. [PROBIOTICS, NUTRITIONAL STATUS AND RESISTANCE TO RESPIRATORY INFECTIONS IN INFANTS].

    PubMed

    Gonchar, N V; Suvorov, A N; Maryshev, V P; Sorokina, T M; Churkova, T V; Kharit, S M

    2015-01-01

    Aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of prophylactic use of a liquid probiotic form based on Enterococcus faecium L3 in children first year of life to increase resistance to acute respiratory infections (ARI) in the winter-spring period and improve nutritional status. In a specialized (psychoneurologic) orphanage of St. Petersburg within three months of winter-spring period in 2014 observed 29 children in the first year of life. Observed children were randomly divided into two groups. The main group (n = 14) within three months received daily per os liquid probiotic form based on E.faecium L3 in a daily dose of 1.5 x 10(9) CFU. A control group of children (n = 15) was comparable with the main group by gender and age. The children observed groups studied the incidence of ARI; number of vaccinated children; the number of children who received two or more vaccinations at the same time; the number of children with acute infectious diseases within 1 month after vaccination; dynamics of Chulitskaya index, body mass index, body weight and length. The data obtained are subjected to statistical analysis, the results were considered significant at p < 0.05. The results showed that the use of probiotic forms E.faecium L3 in infants helped to reduce the average number of ARI cases per child (0.29 ± 0.13 vs. 0.73 ± 0.12 in the control group; p < 0.05) only in the first month of the observation that combined with a significantly higher BMI values increase this month (0.54 ± 0.25 vs. 0.07 ± 0.22 kg/m2 in the control group; p < 0.05). Use the liquid probiotic form E.faecium L3 in infants had a positive impact on overall health, which is reflected in the implementation of routine vaccination activities--in the main group, the number of children who received two or more vaccinations at the same time was 18.1% more.

  20. A Bovine Model of Respiratory Chlamydia psittaci Infection: Challenge Dose Titration

    PubMed Central

    Reinhold, Petra; Ostermann, Carola; Liebler-Tenorio, Elisabeth; Berndt, Angela; Vogel, Anette; Lambertz, Jacqueline; Rothe, Michael; Rüttger, Anke; Schubert, Evelyn; Sachse, Konrad

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to establish and evaluate a bovine respiratory model of experimentally induced acute C. psittaci infection. Calves are natural hosts and pathogenesis may resemble the situation in humans. Intrabronchial inoculation of C. psittaci strain DC15 was performed in calves aged 2–3 months via bronchoscope at four different challenge doses from 106 to 109 inclusion-forming units (ifu) per animal. Control groups received either UV-inactivated C. psittaci or cell culture medium. While 106 ifu/calf resulted in a mild respiratory infection only, the doses of 107 and 108 induced fever, tachypnea, dry cough, and tachycardia that became apparent 2–3 days post inoculation (dpi) and lasted for about one week. In calves exposed to 109 ifu C. psittaci, the respiratory disease was accompanied by severe systemic illness (apathy, tremor, markedly reduced appetite). At the time point of most pronounced clinical signs (3 dpi) the extent of lung lesions was below 10% of pulmonary tissue in calves inoculated with 106 and 107 ifu, about 15% in calves inoculated with 108 and more than 30% in calves inoculated with 109 ifu C. psittaci. Beside clinical signs and pathologic lesions, the bacterial load of lung tissue and markers of pulmonary inflammation (i.e., cell counts, concentration of proteins and eicosanoids in broncho-alveolar lavage fluid) were positively associated with ifu of viable C. psittaci. While any effect of endotoxin has been ruled out, all effects could be attributed to infection by the replicating bacteria. In conclusion, the calf represents a suitable model of respiratory chlamydial infection. Dose titration revealed that both clinically latent and clinically manifest infection can be reproduced experimentally by either 106 or 108 ifu/calf of C. psittaci DC15 while doses above 108 ifu C. psittaci cannot be recommended for further studies for ethical reasons. This defined model of different clinical expressions of chlamydial infection allows studying host

  1. The Association between Air Pollution and Population Health Risk for Respiratory Infection: A Case Study of Shenzhen, China.

    PubMed

    Xia, Xiaolin; Zhang, An; Liang, Shi; Qi, Qingwen; Jiang, Lili; Ye, Yanjun

    2017-08-23

    Nowadays, most of the research on air pollution and its adverse effects on public health in China has focused on megacities and heavily-polluted regions. Fewer studies have focused on cities that are slightly polluted. Shenzhen used to have a favorable air environment, but its air quality has deteriorated gradually as a result of development in recent years. So far, no systematic investigations have been conducted on the adverse effects of air pollution on public health in Shenzhen. This research has applied a time series analysis model to study the possible association between different types of air pollution and respiratory hospital admission in Shenzhen in 2013. Respiratory hospital admission was divided into two categories for comparison analysis among various population groups: acute upper respiratory infection and acute lower respiratory infection. The results showed that short-term exposure to ambient air pollution was significantly associated with acute respiratory infection hospital admission in Shenzhen in 2013. Children under 14 years old were the main susceptible population of acute respiratory infection due to air pollution. PM10, PM2.5 and NO₂ were the primary air pollutants threatening respiratory health in Shenzhen. Though air pollution level is generally relatively low in Shenzhen, it will benefit public health to control the pollution of particulate matter as well as other gaseous pollutants.

  2. The Association between Air Pollution and Population Health Risk for Respiratory Infection: A Case Study of Shenzhen, China

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Shi; Qi, Qingwen; Jiang, Lili; Ye, Yanjun

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays, most of the research on air pollution and its adverse effects on public health in China has focused on megacities and heavily-polluted regions. Fewer studies have focused on cities that are slightly polluted. Shenzhen used to have a favorable air environment, but its air quality has deteriorated gradually as a result of development in recent years. So far, no systematic investigations have been conducted on the adverse effects of air pollution on public health in Shenzhen. This research has applied a time series analysis model to study the possible association between different types of air pollution and respiratory hospital admission in Shenzhen in 2013. Respiratory hospital admission was divided into two categories for comparison analysis among various population groups: acute upper respiratory infection and acute lower respiratory infection. The results showed that short-term exposure to ambient air pollution was significantly associated with acute respiratory infection hospital admission in Shenzhen in 2013. Children under 14 years old were the main susceptible population of acute respiratory infection due to air pollution. PM10, PM2.5 and NO2 were the primary air pollutants threatening respiratory health in Shenzhen. Though air pollution level is generally relatively low in Shenzhen, it will benefit public health to control the pollution of particulate matter as well as other gaseous pollutants. PMID:28832531

  3. Rat respiratory coronavirus infection: replication in airway and alveolar epithelial cells and the innate immune response

    PubMed Central

    Funk, C. Joel; Manzer, Rizwan; Miura, Tanya A.; Groshong, Steve D.; Ito, Yoko; Travanty, Emily A.; Leete, Jennifer; Holmes, Kathryn V.; Mason, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    The rat coronavirus sialodacryoadenitis virus (SDAV) causes respiratory infection and provides a system for investigating respiratory coronaviruses in a natural host. A viral suspension in the form of a microspray aerosol was delivered by intratracheal instillation into the distal lung of 6–8-week-old Fischer 344 rats. SDAV inoculation produced a 7 % body weight loss over a 5 day period that was followed by recovery over the next 7 days. SDAV caused focal lesions in the lung, which were most severe on day 4 post-inoculation (p.i.). Immunofluorescent staining showed that four cell types supported SDAV virus replication in the lower respiratory tract, namely Clara cells, ciliated cells in the bronchial airway and alveolar type I and type II cells in the lung parenchyma. In bronchial alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) a neutrophil influx increased the population of neutrophils to 45 % compared with 6 % of the cells in control samples on day 2 after mock inoculation. Virus infection induced an increase in surfactant protein SP-D levels in BALF of infected rats on days 4 and 8 p.i. that subsided by day 12. The concentrations of chemokines MCP-1, LIX and CINC-1 in BALF increased on day 4 p.i., but returned to control levels by day 8. Intratracheal instillation of rats with SDAV coronavirus caused an acute, self-limited infection that is a useful model for studying the early events of the innate immune response to respiratory coronavirus infections in lungs of the natural virus host. PMID:19741068

  4. [Potential neurocognitive consequences of infection by human respiratory syncytial virus].

    PubMed

    Flores, Juan Carlos; Bohmwald, Karen; Espinoza, Janyra; Jara, Crlstlna; Peña, Marcela; Hoyos-Bachiloglu, Rodrigo; Iturriaga, Carolina; Kalergis, Alexis M; Borzutzky, Arturo

    2016-10-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection remains as a major cause of morbidity and mortality among pediatric population. Immune response is poor and unable to establish a long term effective protection against this virus. Of particular interest has been the description of extrapulmonary manifestations of RSV infection in liver, kidney, endocrine system, heart and brain, associated to infection of peripheral blood. In the central nervous system (CNS), recent studies in animals have suggested long term neurocognitive impairment due to a direct damage from the virus. This was prevented in rats by a recombinant BCG vaccine expressing a nucleoprotein N of RSV that produces an effective immune response against the virus, not allowing its dissemination to the CNS. These findings in animal models highlight the importance of conducting more specific studies in children affected with severe infection by RSV. Therefore, our group is currently conducting an assessment of the possible long-term cognitive impairment in children under 2 years. The results of this study could be a strong argument to continue looking for an effective method for protecting against RSV infection.

  5. Inflammatory damage on respiratory and nervous systems due to hRSV infection.

    PubMed

    Bohmwald, Karen; Espinoza, Janyra A; Becerra, Daniela; Rivera, Katherine; Lay, Margarita K; Bueno, Susan M; Riedel, Claudia A; Kalergis, Alexis M

    2015-10-01

    The exacerbated inflammatory response elicited by human Respiratory Syncytial Virus (hRSV) in the lungs of infected patients causes a major health burden in the pediatric and elderly population. Since the discovery of hRSV, the exacerbated host immune-inflammatory response triggered by this virus has been extensively studied. In this article, we review the effects on the airways caused by immune cells and cytokines/chemokines secreted during hRSV infection. While molecules such as interferons contribute at controlling viral infection, IL-17 and others produce damage to the hRSV-infected lung. In addition to affecting the airways, hRSV infection can cause significant neurologic abnormalities in the host, such as seizures and encephalopathy. Although the origin of these symptoms remains unclear, studies from patients suffering neurological alteration suggest an involvement of the inflammatory response against hRSV.

  6. Increased cytokine/chemokines in serum from asthmatic and non-asthmatic patients with viral respiratory infection

    PubMed Central

    Giuffrida, María J; Valero, Nereida; Mosquera, Jesús; Alvarez de Mon, Melchor; Chacín, Betulio; Espina, Luz Marina; Gotera, Jennifer; Bermudez, John; Mavarez, Alibeth

    2014-01-01

    Background Respiratory viral infections can induce different cytokine/chemokine profiles in lung tissues and have a significant influence on patients with asthma. There is little information about the systemic cytokine status in viral respiratory-infected asthmatic patients compared with non-asthmatic patients. Objectives The aim of this study was to determine changes in circulating cytokines (IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-4, IL-5) and chemokines (MCP1: monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and RANTES: regulated on activation normal T cell expressed and secreted) in patients with an asthmatic versus a non-asthmatic background with respiratory syncytial virus, parainfluenza virus or adenovirus respiratory infection. In addition, human monocyte cultures were incubated with respiratory viruses to determine the cytokine/chemokine profiles. Patients/Methods Patients with asthmatic (n = 34) and non-asthmatic (n = 18) history and respiratory infections with respiratory syncytial virus, parainfluenza, and adenovirus were studied. Healthy individuals with similar age and sex (n = 10) were used as controls. Cytokine/chemokine content in blood and culture supernatants was determined by ELISA. Monocytes were isolated by Hystopaque gradient and cocultured with each of the above-mentioned viruses. Results Similar increased cytokine concentrations were observed in asthmatic and non-asthmatic patients. However, higher concentrations of chemokines were observed in asthmatic patients. Virus-infected monocyte cultures showed similar cytokine/chemokine profiles to those observed in the patients. Conclusions Circulating cytokine profiles induced by acute viral lung infection were not related to asthmatic status, except for chemokines that were already increased in the asthmatic status. Monocytes could play an important role in the increased circulating concentration of cytokines found during respiratory viral infections. PMID:23962134

  7. Bile signalling promotes chronic respiratory infections and antibiotic tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Reen, F. Jerry; Flynn, Stephanie; Woods, David F.; Dunphy, Niall; Chróinín, Muireann Ní; Mullane, David; Stick, Stephen; Adams, Claire; O’Gara, Fergal

    2016-01-01

    Despite aggressive antimicrobial therapy, many respiratory pathogens persist in the lung, underpinning the chronic inflammation and eventual lung decline that are characteristic of respiratory disease. Recently, bile acid aspiration has emerged as a major comorbidity associated with a range of lung diseases, shaping the lung microbiome and promoting colonisation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Cystic Fibrosis (CF) patients. In order to uncover the molecular mechanism through which bile modulates the respiratory microbiome, a combination of global transcriptomic and phenotypic analyses of the P. aeruginosa response to bile was undertaken. Bile responsive pathways responsible for virulence, adaptive metabolism, and redox control were identified, with macrolide and polymyxin antibiotic tolerance increased significantly in the presence of bile. Bile acids, and chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) in particular, elicited chronic biofilm behaviour in P. aeruginosa, while induction of the pro-inflammatory cytokine Interleukin-6 (IL-6) in lung epithelial cells by CDCA was Farnesoid X Receptor (FXR) dependent. Microbiome analysis of paediatric CF sputum samples demonstrated increased colonisation by P. aeruginosa and other Proteobacterial pathogens in bile aspirating compared to non-aspirating patients. Together, these data suggest that bile acid signalling is a leading trigger for the development of chronic phenotypes underlying the pathophysiology of chronic respiratory disease. PMID:27432520

  8. Viral Co-Infections in Pediatric Patients Hospitalized with Lower Tract Acute Respiratory Infections

    PubMed Central

    Cebey-López, Miriam; Herberg, Jethro; Pardo-Seco, Jacobo; Gómez-Carballa, Alberto; Martinón-Torres, Nazareth; Salas, Antonio; Martinón-Sánchez, José María; Gormley, Stuart; Sumner, Edward; Fink, Colin; Martinón-Torres, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Background Molecular techniques can often reveal a broader range of pathogens in respiratory infections. We aim to investigate the prevalence and age pattern of viral co-infection in children hospitalized with lower tract acute respiratory infection (LT-ARI), using molecular techniques. Methods A nested polymerase chain reaction approach was used to detect Influenza (A, B), metapneumovirus, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), parainfluenza (1–4), rhinovirus, adenovirus (A—F), bocavirus and coronaviruses (NL63, 229E, OC43) in respiratory samples of children with acute respiratory infection prospectively admitted to any of the GENDRES network hospitals between 2011–2013. The results were corroborated in an independent cohort collected in the UK. Results A total of 204 and 97 nasopharyngeal samples were collected in the GENDRES and UK cohorts, respectively. In both cohorts, RSV was the most frequent pathogen (52.9% and 36.1% of the cohorts, respectively). Co-infection with multiple viruses was found in 92 samples (45.1%) and 29 samples (29.9%), respectively; this was most frequent in the 12–24 months age group. The most frequently observed co-infection patterns were RSV—Rhinovirus (23 patients, 11.3%, GENDRES cohort) and RSV—bocavirus / bocavirus—influenza (5 patients, 5.2%, UK cohort). Conclusion The presence of more than one virus in pediatric patients admitted to hospital with LT-ARI is very frequent and seems to peak at 12–24 months of age. The clinical significance of these findings is unclear but should warrant further analysis. PMID:26332375

  9. Reduction in emergency department visits for children's asthma, ear infections, and respiratory infections after the introduction of state smoke-free legislation.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Summer Sherburne; Hristakeva, Sylvia; Gottlieb, Mark; Baum, Christopher F

    2016-08-01

    Despite the benefits of smoke-free legislation on adult health, little is known about its impact on children's health. We examined the effects of tobacco control policies on the rate of emergency department (ED) visits for childhood asthma (N=128,807), ear infections (N=288,697), and respiratory infections (N=410,686) using outpatient ED visit data in Massachusetts (2001-2010), New Hampshire (2001-2009), and Vermont (2002-2010). We used negative binomial regression models to analyze the effect of state and local smoke-free legislation on ED visits for each health condition, controlling for cigarette taxes and health care reform legislation. We found no changes in the overall rate of ED visits for asthma, ear infections, and upper respiratory infections after the implementation of state or local smoke-free legislation or cigarette tax increases. However, an interaction with children's age revealed that among 10-17-year-olds state smoke-free legislation was associated with a 12% reduction in ED visits for asthma (adjusted incidence rate ratios (aIRR) 0.88; 95% CI 0.83, 0.95), an 8% reduction for ear infections (0.92; 0.88, 0.97), and a 9% reduction for upper respiratory infections (0.91; 0.87, 0.95). We found an overall 8% reduction in ED visits for lower respiratory infections after the implementation of state smoke-free legislation (0.92; 0.87, 0.96). The implementation of health care reform in Massachusetts was also associated with a 6-9% reduction in all children's ED visits for ear and upper respiratory infections. Our results suggest that state smoke-free legislation and health care reform may be effective interventions to improve children's health by reducing ED visits for asthma, ear infections, and respiratory infections. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Review of macrolides and ketolides: focus on respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed

    Zhanel, G G; Dueck, M; Hoban, D J; Vercaigne, L M; Embil, J M; Gin, A S; Karlowsky, J A

    2001-01-01

    The first macrolide, erythromycin A, demonstrated broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity and was used primarily for respiratory and skin and soft tissue infections. Newer 14-, 15- and 16-membered ring macrolides such as clarithromycin and the azalide, azithromycin, have been developed to address the limitations of erythromycin. The main structural component of the macrolides is a large lactone ring that varies in size from 12 to 16 atoms. A new group of 14-membered macrolides known as the ketolides have recently been developed which have a 3-keto in place of the L-cladinose moiety. Macrolides reversibly bind to the 23S rRNA and thus, inhibit protein synthesis by blocking elongation. The ketolides have also been reported to bind to 23S rRNA and their mechanism of action is similar to that of macrolides. Macrolide resistance mechanisms include target site alteration, alteration in antibiotic transport and modification of the antibiotic. The macrolides and ketolides exhibit good activity against gram-positive aerobes and some gram-negative aerobes. Ketolides have excellent activity versus macrolide-resistant Streptococcus spp. Including mefA and ermB producing Streptococcus pneumoniae. The newer macrolides, such as azithromycin and clarithromycin, and the ketolides exhibit greater activity against Haemophilus influenzae than erythromycin. The bioavailability of macrolides ranges from 25 to 85%, with corresponding serum concentrations ranging from 0.4 to 12 mg/L and area under the concentration-time curves from 3 to 115 mg/L x h. Half-lives range from short for erythromycin to medium for clarithromycin, roxithromycin and ketolides, to very long for dirithromycin and azithromycin. All of these agents display large volumes of distribution with excellent uptake into respiratory tissues and fluids relative to serum. The majority of the agents are hepatically metabolised and excretion in the urine is limited, with the exception of clarithromycin. Clinical trials involving

  11. Predictive factors for pneumonia development and progression to respiratory failure in MERS-CoV infected patients.

    PubMed

    Ko, Jae-Hoon; Park, Ga Eun; Lee, Ji Yeon; Lee, Ji Yong; Cho, Sun Young; Ha, Young Eun; Kang, Cheol-In; Kang, Ji-Man; Kim, Yae-Jean; Huh, Hee Jae; Ki, Chang-Seok; Jeong, Byeong-Ho; Park, Jinkyeong; Chung, Chi Ryang; Chung, Doo Ryeon; Song, Jae-Hoon; Peck, Kyong Ran

    2016-11-01

    After the 2015 Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) outbreak in Korea, prediction of pneumonia development and progression to respiratory failure was emphasized in control of MERS outbreak. MERS-CoV infected patients who were managed in a tertiary care center during the 2015 Korean MERS outbreak were reviewed. To analyze predictive factors for pneumonia development and progression to respiratory failure, we evaluated clinical variables measured within three days from symptom onset. A total of 45 patients were included in the study: 13 patients (28.9%) did not develop pneumonia, 19 developed pneumonia without respiratory failure (42.2%), and 13 progressed to respiratory failures (28.9%). The identified predictive factors for pneumonia development included age ≥45 years, fever ≥37.5 °C, thrombocytopenia, lymphopenia, CRP ≥ 2 mg/dL, and a threshold cycle value of PCR less than 28.5. For respiratory failure, the indicators included male, hypertension, low albumin concentration, thrombocytopenia, lymphopenia, and CRP ≥ 4 mg/dL (all P < 0.05). With ≥ two predictive factors for pneumonia development, 100% of patients developed pneumonia. Patients lacking the predictive factors did not progress to respiratory failure. For successful control of MERS outbreak, MERS-CoV infected patients with ≥ two predictive factors should be intensively managed from the initial presentation. Copyright © 2016 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Qualitative study on the shifting sociocultural meanings of the facemask in Hong Kong since the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) outbreak: implications for infection control in the post-SARS era.

    PubMed

    Siu, Judy Yuen-Man

    2016-05-04

    The clinical importance and efficacy of facemasks in infection prevention have been documented in the international literature. Past studies have shown that the perceived susceptibility, the perceived severity of being afflicted with life-threatening diseases, and the perceived benefits of using a facemask are predictors of a person's use of a facemask. However, I argue that people wear a facemask not merely for infection prevention, and various sociocultural reasons have been motivating people to wear (and not wear) a facemask. Facemasks thus have sociocultural implications for people. Research on the sociocultural meanings of facemasks is scant, and even less is known on how the shifting sociocultural meanings of facemasks are related to the changing social environment, which, I argue, serve as remarkable underlying factors for people using (and not using) facemasks. As new infectious diseases such as avian influenza and Middle East Respiratory Syndrome have been emerging, threatening people's health worldwide, and because facemasks have been documented to have substantial efficacy in the prevention of infection transmission, understanding the sociocultural meanings of facemasks has significant implications for public health policymakers and health care providers in designing a socially and culturally responsive public health and infection control policy for the community. A qualitative research design involving the use of 40 individual, in-depth semistructured interviews and a phenomenological analysis approach were adopted. The sociocultural meanings of the facemask have been undergoing constant change, from positive to negative, which resulted in the participants displaying hesitation in using a facemask in the post-SARS era. Because it represents a violation of societal ideologies and traditional Chinese cultural beliefs, the meanings of the facemask that had developed during the SARS outbreak failed to be sustained in the post-SARS era. The changes in

  13. Duration of symptoms of respiratory tract infections in children: systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Vodicka, Talley A; Blair, Peter S; Buckley, David I; Heneghan, Carl; Hay, Alastair D

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the expected duration of symptoms of common respiratory tract infections in children in primary and emergency care. Design Systematic review of existing literature to determine durations of symptoms of earache, sore throat, cough (including acute cough, bronchiolitis, and croup), and common cold in children. Data sources PubMed, DARE, and CINAHL (all to July 2012). Eligibility criteria for selecting studies Randomised controlled trials or observational studies of children with acute respiratory tract infections in primary care or emergency settings in high income countries who received either a control treatment or a placebo or over-the-counter treatment. Study quality was assessed with the Cochrane risk of bias framework for randomised controlled trials, and the critical appraisal skills programme framework for observational studies. Main outcome measures Individual study data and, when possible, pooled daily mean proportions and 95% confidence intervals for symptom duration. Symptom duration (in days) at which each symptom had resolved in 50% and 90% of children. Results Of 22 182 identified references, 23 trials and 25 observational studies met inclusion criteria. Study populations varied in age and duration of symptoms before study onset. In 90% of children, earache was resolved by seven to eight days, sore throat between two and seven days, croup by two days, bronchiolitis by 21 days, acute cough by 25 days, common cold by 15 days, and non-specific respiratory tract infections symptoms by 16 days. Conclusions The durations of earache and common colds are considerably longer than current guidance given to parents in the United Kingdom and the United States; for other symptoms such as sore throat, acute cough, bronchiolitis, and croup the current guidance is consistent with our findings. Updating current guidelines with new evidence will help support parents and clinicians in evidence based decision making for children with respiratory

  14. Livestock Susceptibility to Infection with Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus

    PubMed Central

    Vergara-Alert, Júlia; van den Brand, Judith M.A.; Widagdo, W.; Muñoz, Marta; Raj, Stalin; Schipper, Debby; Solanes, David; Cordón, Ivan; Bensaid, Albert; Haagmans, Bart L.

    2017-01-01

    Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) cases continue to be reported, predominantly in Saudi Arabia and occasionally other countries. Although dromedaries are the main reservoir, other animal species might be susceptible to MERS coronavirus (MERS-CoV) infection and potentially serve as reservoirs. To determine whether other animals are potential reservoirs, we inoculated MERS-CoV into llamas, pigs, sheep, and horses and collected nasal and rectal swab samples at various times. The presence of MERS-CoV in the nose of pigs and llamas was confirmed by PCR, titration of infectious virus, immunohistochemistry, and in situ hybridization; seroconversion was detected in animals of both species. Conversely, in sheep and horses, virus-specific antibodies did not develop and no evidence of viral replication in the upper respiratory tract was found. These results prove the susceptibility of llamas and pigs to MERS-CoV infection. Thus, the possibility of MERS-CoV circulation in animals other than dromedaries, such as llamas and pigs, is not negligible. PMID:27901465

  15. Respiratory syncytial virus infection: a decade of contributions.

    PubMed

    Blanco del Val, Alfredo; Eiros Bouza, José María; Mayo Iscar, Agustín; Bachillar Luque, M Rosario; Blanco del Val, Beatriz; Sánchez Porto, Antonio; Ortiz de Lejarzu, Raúl

    2012-09-01

    Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) is the main cause of acute lower respiratory tract infections in children under 2 years, its distribution is worldwide and even in very different climatic conditions, it appears to have similar features, certainly knowing it will produce a significant amount of infections each year. We present the results of a retrospective review of positive cases for RSV detected in the Microbiology Laboratory of the Hospital Clinico Universitario of Valladolid in the period between 1990 and 2000, dealing with its presentation at the given time with the weather variables of temperature and humidity. Every year, we have observed as the clustering of cases was associated with two outbreaks, one at the beginning and the other at the end of the year, coinciding with the coldest and wettest months. This pattern has been repeated every revised year, according to an annual rate, with the onset of the first insulation between the months of October and February, and of the last ending between March and June, showing the highest peaks of isolation during the month of February. Therefore, every year we observe a break or seasonal slip matching the months with higher temperatures and lower humidity.

  16. Effects of Cryptocaryon irritans infection on the survival, feeding, respiratory rate and ionic regulation of the marbled rockfish Sebastiscus marmoratus.

    PubMed

    Yin, Fei; Gong, Qiyang; Li, Yanwei; Dan, Xueming; Sun, Peng; Gao, Quanxin; Shi, Zhaohong; Peng, Shiming; Li, Anxing

    2014-02-01

    To clarify the effects of a Cryptocaryon irritans infection on the physiological functions of the marbled rockfish Sebastiscus marmoratus, this study utilized C. irritans at concentrations of 2500; 5000; 7500; 10,000; 20,000; and 30,000 theronts/fish to infect marbled rockfish weighing 45 ± 3 g. The survival rate, food intake, respiratory rate, serum ion concentrations and gill Na+/K+-ATPase activity were determined. With the increase of the infection concentration and the passage of time, the survival rate of the rockfish gradually decreased. The groups infected with more than 5000 theronts/fish had stopped feeding within 4 days. The respiratory rates of the fish in the groups infected with 2500 and 5000 theronts/fish initially increased and then decreased. In contrast, the respiratory rate of the fish in the groups infected with more than 7500 theronts/fish was elevated to levels significantly higher than the control group after 12 h. The Na+/K+-ATPase activity and serum Na+ and Cl- concentrations increased with increasing infection concentration. In conclusion, the physiological functions of the fish infected with low concentrations of C. irritans can be effectively restored, whereas a high concentration infection induced severe stress. The declined food intake and accelerated respiratory rate could be useful for an early warning system as important indicators.

  17. Management of acute respiratory infections by community health volunteers: experience of Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee (BRAC).

    PubMed Central

    Hadi, Abdullahel

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the role of management practices for acute respiratory infections (ARIs) in improving the competency of community health volunteers in diagnosing and treating acute respiratory infections among children. METHODS: Data were collected by a group of research physicians who observed the performance of a sample of 120 health volunteers in 10 sub-districts in Bangladesh in which Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee (BRAC) had run a community-based ARI control programme since mid-1992. Standardized tests were conducted until the 95% interphysician reliability on the observation of clinical examination was achieved. FINDINGS:The sensitivity, specificity, and overall agreement rates in diagnosing and treating ARIs were significantly higher among the health volunteers who had basic training and were supervised routinely than among those who had not. CONCLUSION: Diagnosis and treatment of ARIs at the household level in developing countries are possible if intensive basic training and the close supervision of service providers are ensured. PMID:12764514

  18. Respiratory infections and gastrointestinal illness on a cruise ship: A three-year prospective study.

    PubMed

    Pavli, Androula; Maltezou, Helena C; Papadakis, Antonis; Katerelos, Panagiotis; Saroglou, Georgios; Tsakris, Athanasios; Tsiodras, Sotirios

    2016-01-01

    Cruise ships carry a large number of people in confined spaces providing an environment for transmission of infections. The aim of this study is to estimate the incidence of and describe the spectrum of respiratory infections and gastrointestinal illness among passengers and crew of cruise Ship A. The study was carried out from January 2011 to December 2013 on cruise Ship A, including passengers and crew who presented with symptoms suggestive of acute respiratory infection (ARI), influenza-like illness (ILI) and gastrointestinal illness (GI). Advice about preventive measures of respiratory and gastrointestinal infections and influenza vaccination was given to passengers and crew. Data were collected by using one standardized form per patient. The most common destination was Northern Europe (90.7%). The mean duration of cruise was 10.6 days; 440 passengers and 421 crew members who sought medical attention were studied (mean age 72.6 ± 9.5 and 33 ± 7 years, respectively). ILI, ARI and GI were diagnosed in 32.7%, 15.9%, 17% and 10.9%, 80%, 0.2% of ill passengers and crew, respectively. The association of ARI, ILI and GI incidence in passengers was statistically significant with season, destination and duration of travel; the incidence for all illnesses was higher during winter, for travel to South America and for >14 days (p-value<0.001). ARI, ILI and GI continue to pose a burden on cruise travel; therefore pre-travel advice is crucial for passengers and crew regarding respiratory and gastrointestinal infections. Surveillance and implementation of control measures are important for outbreak prevention. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The effect of vitamin C on upper respiratory infections in adolescent swimmers: a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Constantini, Naama W; Dubnov-Raz, Gal; Eyal, Ben-Bassat; Berry, Elliot M; Cohen, Avner H; Hemilä, Harri

    2011-01-01

    The risk of upper respiratory infections (URIs) is increased in people who are under heavy physical stress, including recreational and competitive swimmers. Additional treatment options are needed, especially in the younger age group. The aim of this study was to determine whether 1 g/day vitamin C supplementation affects the rate, length, or severity of URIs in adolescent swimmers. We carried out a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial during three winter months, among 39 competitive young swimmers (mean age 13.8 ± 1.6 years) in Jerusalem, Israel. Vitamin C had no effect on the incidence of URIs (rate ratio = 1.01; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.70-1.46). The duration of respiratory infections was 22% shorter in vitamin C group, but the difference was not statistically significant. However, we found a significant interaction between vitamin C effect and sex, so that vitamin C shortened the duration of infections in male swimmers by 47% (95% CI: -80% to -14%), but had no effect on female swimmers (difference in duration: +17%; 95% CI: -38% to +71%). The effect of vitamin C on the severity of URIs was also different between male and female swimmers, so that vitamin C was beneficial for males, but not for females. Our study indicates that vitamin C does not affect the rate of respiratory infections in competitive swimmers. Nevertheless, we found that vitamin C decreased the duration and severity of respiratory infections in male swimmers, but not in females. This finding warrants further research.

  20. Febrile status epilepticus due to respiratory syncytial virus infection.

    PubMed

    Uda, Kazuhiro; Kitazawa, Katsuhiko

    2017-08-01

    Febrile status epilepticus can have neurological sequelae. The type of sequelae, however, depend on the etiology, including infection due to viral agents such as the influenza virus. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection in childhood may also contribute to this. The aim of this study was therefore to characterize febrile status epilepticus associated with RSV infection, and to determine whether this type of infection is a risk factor for neurological sequelae in febrile status epilepticus. We reviewed the medical records of children aged ≤3 years with febrile status epilepticus who were admitted to a tertiary hospital between January 2007 and December 2011. The differences between the RSV-positive and RSV-negative groups were evaluated according to the demographic and clinical data. A total of 99 patients with febrile status epilepticus who had been tested for RSV infection were identified. Three patients in the RSV-positive group (n = 19) and four in the RSV-negative group (n = 80) presented with bronchiolitis. The incidence of intubation and anti-seizure drug treatment in the RSV-positive group was significantly higher than in the -negative group. While all of the patients in the RSV-negative group recovered completely, six patients in the RSV-positive group developed encephalopathy and profound neurological sequelae. In five of the six patients, diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging showed subcortical white matter lesions. RSV infection in the absence of bronchiolitis can initially present as febrile status epilepticus and subsequently develop into acute encephalopathy with profound neurological sequelae. © 2017 Japan Pediatric Society.

  1. Predictors of hypoxaemia in hospital admissions with acute lower respiratory tract infection in a developing country.

    PubMed

    Weber, M W; Usen, S; Palmer, A; Jaffar, S; Mulholland, E K

    1997-04-01

    Since oxygen has to be given to most children in developing countries on the basis of clinical signs without performing blood gas analyses, possible clinical predictors of hypoxaemia were studied. Sixty nine children between the ages of 2 months and 5 years admitted to hospital with acute lower respiratory tract infection and an oxygen saturation (Sao2) < 90% were compared with 67 children matched for age and diagnosis from the same referral hospital with an Sao2 of 90% or above (control group 1), and 44 unreferred children admitted to a secondary care hospital with acute lower respiratory infection (control group 2). Using multiple logistic regression analysis, sleepiness, arousal, quality of cry, cyanosis, head nodding, decreased air entry, nasal flaring, and upper arm circumference were found to be independent predictors of hypoxaemia on comparison of the cases with control group 1. Using a simple model of cyanosis or head nodding or not crying, the sensitivity to predict hypoxaemia was 59%, and the specificity 94% and 93% compared to control groups 1 and 2, respectively; 80% of the children with an Sao2 < 80% were identified by the combination of these signs. Over half of the children with hypoxaemia could be identified with a combination of three signs: extreme respiratory distress, cyanosis, and severely compromised general status. Further prospective validation of this model with other datasets is warranted. No other signs improved the sensitivity without compromising specificity. If a higher sensitivity is required, pulse oximetry has to be used.

  2. Respiratory Tract Infection Caused by Fonsecaea monophora After Kidney Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Cleinman, Isabella Barbosa; Gonçalves, Sarah Santos; Nucci, Marcio; Quintella, Danielle Carvalho; Halpern, Márcia; Akiti, Tiyomi; Barreiros, Glória; Colombo, Arnaldo Lopes; Santoro-Lopes, Guilherme

    2017-06-28

    Fonsecaea spp. are melanized fungi which cause most cases of chromoblastomycosis. The taxonomy of this genus has been revised, now encompassing four species, with different pathogenic potential: F. pedrosoi, F. nubica, F. pugnacius, and F. monophora. The latter two species present wider clinical spectrum and have been associated with cases of visceral infection, most often affecting the brain. To our knowledge, this is the first report of proven case of F. monophora respiratory tract infection. A Brazilian 57-year-old-female patient underwent kidney transplantation on January 12, 2013. On the fourth postoperative month, the patient presented with fever, productive cough, and pleuritic pain in the right hemithorax. A thoracic CT scan showed a subpleural 2.2-cm nodular lesion in the right lung lower lobe, with other smaller nodules (0.5-0.7 cm) scattered in both lungs. Bronchoscopy revealed a grayish plaque on the right bronchus which was biopsied. Microscopic examination demonstrated invasion of bronchial mucosa by pigmented hyphae. Culture from the bronchial biopsy and bronchoalveolar lavage samples yielded a melanized mold, which was eventually identified as F. monophora. She started treatment with voriconazole (400 mg q.12h on the first day, followed by 200 mg q.12h). After 4 weeks of therapy, voriconazole dose was escalated to 200 mg q.8h and associated with amphotericin B (deoxycolate 1 mg/kg/day) because of a suspected dissemination to the brain. The patient eventually died of sepsis 8 weeks after the start of antifungal therapy. In conclusion, F. monophora may cause respiratory tract infection in solid organ transplant recipients.

  3. Research on curative effect of traditional Chinese medicine treating low-grade fever of children caused by respiratory system infection.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiangyun

    2015-07-01

    This study aims to explore the curative effect of traditional Chinese medicine treating low-grade fever of children caused by respiratory system infection. Sixty children who suffered low-grade fever caused by respiratory system infection were selected and divided into treatment group and control group randomly, each with 30 cases. Control group was treated with conventional methods including oxygen uptake, nebulization and anti-infection, etc, while treatment group was given boil-free granules of traditional Chinese medicine besides the treatment which control group received. Then clinical curative effect of two groups was compared. Results showed that 28 cases (93.3%) were cured in treatment group; while 21 cases (70.0%) were cured in control group. Compared with control group, the treatment group showed up better treatment efficiency and the difference between groups was of statistical significance (P<0.05). Comparison of results of two groups suggested that, traditional Chinese medicine granules has satisfactory curative effect in the treatment of low-grade fever of children caused by respiratory system infection; characterized by short treatment cycle and effective treatment effect, Chinese medicine granules in the combination with oxygen atomization inhalation is proved to be able to efficiently remit symptoms such as coughing, gasp and labored breathing, with outstanding curative effect in the treatment of low-grade fever of children caused by respiratory system infection, thus it is worthy of popularization and application clinically.

  4. High prevalence of respiratory viral infections in patients hospitalized in an intensive care unit for acute respiratory infections as detected by nucleic acid-based assays.

    PubMed

    Legoff, Jérôme; Guérot, Emmanuel; Ndjoyi-Mbiguino, Angélique; Matta, Mathieu; Si-Mohamed, Ali; Gutmann, Laurent; Fagon, Jean-Yves; Bélec, Laurent

    2005-01-01

    Forty-seven bronchoalveolar lavages (BAL) were obtained from 41 patients with acute pneumonia attending an intensive care unit. By molecular diagnosis, 30% of total BAL and 63% of bacteria-negative BAL were positive for respiratory viruses. Molecular detection allows for high-rate detection of respiratory viral infections in adult patients suffering from severe pneumonia.

  5. High Prevalence of Respiratory Viral Infections in Patients Hospitalized in an Intensive Care Unit for Acute Respiratory Infections as Detected by Nucleic Acid-Based Assays

    PubMed Central

    Legoff, Jérôme; Guérot, Emmanuel; Ndjoyi-Mbiguino, Angélique; Matta, Mathieu; Si-Mohamed, Ali; Gutmann, Laurent; Fagon, Jean-Yves; Bélec, Laurent

    2005-01-01

    Forty-seven bronchoalveolar lavages (BAL) were obtained from 41 patients with acute pneumonia attending an intensive care unit. By molecular diagnosis, 30% of total BAL and 63% of bacteria-negative BAL were positive for respiratory viruses. Molecular detection allows for high-rate detection of respiratory viral infections in adult patients suffering from severe pneumonia. PMID:15635014

  6. [The research of saffold virus in children with lower respiratory tract infection in Changsha].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qiong-hua; Zhang, Bing; Xie, Zhi-ping; Gao, Han-chun; Guo, Ming-wei; Zhang, Fei; Yan, Kun-long; Zhang, Rong-fang; Zhang, Jing; Cao, Chang-qing; Duan, Zhao-jun

    2011-02-01

    To investigate prevalence of Saffold virus (SAFV) in Changsha area of hospitalized children with respiratory tract infection, and to discuss whether this virus is related to respiratory tract infection of children. 643 nasopharyngeal aspirates samples were collected from hospitalized children with respiratory tract infection of the first affiliated hospital of Hunan nomal university during Nov. 2007 to Oct. 2008. Real-time fluorescent quanti-tative PCR(FQ-PCR) performed to screen the 5'UTR gene. And then analyze clinical data. SAFV were detected in 67 patients (10.42%) out of the 643 children, it was not detected over 5 years of age. The virus were detected in 8 patients (25.81%) out of the 31 children with persistent pneumonia and chronic pneumonia, there was statistically significant. There existed SAFV infection in hospitalized children with lower respiratory infection in Changsha area; SAFV maybe related to disease onset with lower respiratory tract infection of children.

  7. Control of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae infections in pigs.

    PubMed

    Maes, D; Segales, J; Meyns, T; Sibila, M; Pieters, M; Haesebrouck, F

    2008-01-25

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, the primary pathogen of enzootic pneumonia, occurs worldwide and causes major economic losses to the pig industry. The organism adheres to and damages the ciliated epithelium of the respiratory tract. Affected pigs show chronic coughing, are more susceptible to other respiratory infections and have a reduced performance. Control of the disease can be accomplished in a number of ways. First, management practices and housing conditions in the herd should be optimized. These include all-in/all-out production, limiting factors that may destabilize herd immunity, maintaining optimal stocking densities, prevention of other respiratory diseases, and optimal housing and climatic conditions. Strategic medication with antimicrobials active against M. hyopneumoniae and, preferably, also against major secondary bacteria may be useful during periods when the pigs are at risk for respiratory disease. Finally, commercial bacterins are widely used to control M. hyopneumoniae infections. The main effects of vaccination include less clinical symptoms, lung lesions and medication use, and improved performance. However, bacterins provide only partial protection and do not prevent colonization of the organism. Different vaccination strategies (timing of vaccination, vaccination of sows, vaccination combined with antimicrobial medication) can be used, depending on the type of herd, the production system and management practices, the infection pattern and the preferences of the pig producer. Research on new vaccines is actively occurring, including aerosol and feed-based vaccines as well as subunit and DNA vaccines. Eradication of the infection at herd level based on age-segregation and medication is possible, but there is a permanent risk for re-infections.

  8. [Consensus guidelines for the management of upper respiratory tract infections].

    PubMed

    Lopardo, Gustavo; Calmaggi, Aníbal; Clara, Liliana; Levy Hara, Gabriel; Mykietiuk, Analía; Pryluka, Daniel; Ruvinsky, Silvina; Vujacich, Claudia; Yahni, Diego; Bogdanowicz, Elizabeth; Klein, Manuel; López Furst, María J; Pensotti, Claudia; Rial, María J; Scapellato, Pablo

    2012-01-01

    Upper respiratory tract infections are the most common source of antibiotic prescriptions. Acute pharyngitis is caused mainly by viruses, viral cases can be distinguished from acute streptococcal pharyngitis using Centor clinical epidemiological criteria, by rapid antigen tests or throat culture. Treatment of choice for streptococcal infection is penicillin V given in two daily doses. In children, acute otitis media (AOM) is the infection for which antibiotics are most often prescribed. Predominant causative pathogens include Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae non-type b and Moraxella catarrhalis. Diagnosis is based on history, physical examination and otoscopic exam. Antibiotic treatment should be initiated promptly in all children<2 years of age, and in older children presenting bilateral AOM, otorrhoea, co-morbidities or severe illness. In Argentina, amoxicillin is the drug of choice given the low penicillin resistance rates for S. pneumoniae. In children who fail amoxicillin therapy, amoxicillin/clavulanate provides better coverage against beta-lactamase producing H. influenzae and M. catarrhalis. Rhinosinusitis is caused mainly by viruses, secondary bacterial complication occurs in less than 5% of cases. Diagnosis is based on physical examination and additional studies are not usually required. Acute bacterial sinusitis is caused by the same pathogens that cause AOM and amoxicillin is the drug of choice.

  9. New and emerging antifungal agents: impact on respiratory infections.

    PubMed

    Feldmesser, Marta

    2003-01-01

    Fungal pathogens are increasingly important causes of respiratory disease, yet the number of antifungal agents available for clinical use is limited. Use of amphotericin B deoxycholate is hampered by severe toxicity. Triazole agents currently available have significant drug interactions; fluconazole has a limited spectrum of activity and itraconazole was, until recently, available only in oral formulations with limited bioavailability. The development of resistance to all three agents is increasingly being recognized and some filamentous fungi are resistant to the action of all of these agents. In the past few years, new antifungal agents and new formulations of existing agents have become available.The use of liposomal amphotericin B preparations is associated with reduced, but still substantial, rates of nephrotoxicity and infusion-related reactions. An intravenous formulation of itraconazole has been introduced, and several new triazole agents have been developed, with the view of identifying agents that have enhanced potency, broader spectra of action and improved pharmacodynamic properties. One of these, voriconazole, has completed large-scale clinical trials. In addition, caspofungin, the first of a new class of agents, the echinocandins, which inhibit cell wall glucan synthesis, was approved for use in the US in 2001 as salvage therapy for invasive aspergillosis. It is hoped that the availability of these agents will have a significant impact on the morbidity and mortality of fungal respiratory infections. However, at the present time, our ability to assess their impact is limited by the problematic nature of conducting trials for antifungal therapy.

  10. Network meta-analysis of probiotics to prevent respiratory infections in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Marina Azambuja; Guedes, Gabriela Helena Barbosa Ferreira; Epifanio, Matias; Wagner, Mario Bernardes; Jones, Marcus Herbert; Mattiello, Rita

    2017-01-03

    Probiotics have emerged as a promising intervention for the prevention of respiratory tract infections (RTIs) in children. Assess the effect of probiotics on prevention of RTIs in children and adolescents. MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, SCIELO, CINAHL, SCOPUS, and Web of Science. Key words: "respiratory tract infections" AND probiotics. Randomized controlled trials RCT assessing the effect of probiotics on RTIs in children and adolescents were included. Two reviewers, working independently, to identify studies that met the eligibility criteria. Main and secondary outcomes were RTIs and adverse effects, respectively. Twenty-one trials with 6.603 participants were included. Pairwise meta-analysis suggested that Lactobacillus casei rhamnosus (LCA) was the only effective probiotic to the rate of RTIs compared to placebo (RR0.38; Crl 0.19-0.45). Network analysis showed that the LCA exhibited 54.7% probability of being classified in first, while the probability of Lactobacillus fermentum CECT5716 (LFC) being last in the ranking was 15.3%. LCA showed no better effect compared to other probiotic strains by indirect analysis. This systematic review found a lack of evidence to support the effect of probiotic on the incidence rate of respiratory infections in children and adolescents. Pediatr Pulmonol. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Systems biology unravels interferon responses to respiratory virus infections.

    PubMed

    Kroeker, Andrea L; Coombs, Kevin M

    2014-02-26

    Interferon production is an important defence against viral replication and its activation is an attractive therapeutic target. However, it has long been known that viruses perpetually evolve a multitude of strategies to evade these host immune responses. In recent years there has been an explosion of information on virus-induced alterations of the host immune response that have resulted from data-rich omics technologies. Unravelling how these systems interact and determining the overall outcome of the host response to viral infection will play an important role in future treatment and vaccine development. In this review we focus primarily on the interferon pathway and its regulation as well as mechanisms by which respiratory RNA viruses interfere with its signalling capacity.

  12. Probiotics in childhood: allergic illness and respiratory infections.

    PubMed

    del Giudice, Michele Miraglia; Leonardi, Salvatore; Ciprandi, Giorgio; Galdo, Francesca; Gubitosi, Adelmo; La Rosa, Mario; Salpietro, Carmelo; Marseglia, Gianluigi; Perrone, Laura

    2012-10-01

    Over the last decade, there has been a growing interest in the use of probiotics for allergic diseases. In the last years, some studies showed a significant improvement for atopic eczema by the administration of probiotics during pregnancy and postnatally. About food allergy, probiotics administration seems to be effective in the management of food allergy symptoms but has no effect on the prevention of sensitization. In the international literature, there are few studies that evaluated the probiotic effect on allergic rhinitis, and authors reported that probiotics might have a beneficial effect in AR by reducing symptom severity and medication use. Another major potential benefit of probiotics has been suggested in patients with asthma. On this topic, several studies have been carried out using different probiotics and the results have not been univocal. Indeed, probiotics seems to be able to offer protection about common cold and respiratory infections in healthy and hospitalized children.

  13. [Treatment results using cefixime for bacterial respiratory tract infections].

    PubMed

    Leonhardt, L

    1990-01-01

    In a prospective open clinical trial 20 patients with the diagnosis bacterial respiratory tract infection and underlying chronic obstructive lung disease were treated for 13 to 17 days with 200 mg cefixime b. i. d. 14 of 16 evaluable patients were treated successfully. In one patient the clinical symptoms remained unchanged and in another patient cefixime treatment failed. Ten of the 16 evaluable patients showed a positive baseline culture. In nine of these patients the initially isolated pathogens could be eliminated. In one patient, in whom cefixime therapy failed, change of pathogens was noticed after the end of treatment. Four of the 20 patients treated with cefixime reported side effects (gastritis, three; fungal dermatitis, one). In the patient with fungal dermatitis cefixime therapy was stopped.

  14. Airway microbiota and acute respiratory infection in children.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Kohei; Camargo, Carlos A

    2015-01-01

    Acute respiratory infections (ARIs), such as bronchiolitis and pneumonia, are the leading cause of hospitalization of infants in the US. While the incidence and severity of ARI can vary widely among children, the reasons for these differences are not fully explained by traditional risk factors (e.g., prematurity, viral pathogens). The recent advent of molecular diagnostic techniques has revealed the presence of highly functional communities of microbes inhabiting the human body (i.e., microbiota) that appear to influence development of local and systemic immune response. We propose a 'risk and resilience' model in which airway microbiota are associated with an increased (risk microbiota) or decreased (resilience microbiota) incidence and severity of ARI in children. We also propose that modulating airway microbiota (e.g., from risk to resilience microbiota) during early childhood will optimize airway immunity and, thereby, decrease ARI incidence and severity in children.

  15. Relevance of antibiotic tissue penetration in treating respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed

    Kneer, J

    1993-01-01

    The majority of bacterial respiratory tract infections are caused by streptococci, Haemophilus spp. and Moraxella catarrhalis. These pathogens are located extracellularly. In logical consequence, the bactericidal action of the antimicrobial is required in these loci. To define the reasonable dosing regimen for effective eradication without creating unnecessary toxic potential we need to know (1) the distribution principles and kinetics, and (2) the correct correlation between concentration profiles in extracellular fluid (ECF) and blood. According to the permeability of the vascular capillaries unbound drug concentrations in plasma and ECF are in a dynamic equilibrium. Thus, for the beta-lactam antibiotics therapeutic efficacy is predictable by maintaining the free drug concentration above the bacterial minimum inhibitory concentration. Tissue homogenate data can only be useful if correctly interpreted by correcting for the partitioning between the tissue components.

  16. Immune responses and disease enhancement during respiratory syncytial virus infection.

    PubMed

    Openshaw, Peter J M; Tregoning, John S

    2005-07-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is one of the commonest and most troublesome viruses of infancy. It causes most cases of bronchiolitis, which is associated with wheezing in later childhood. In primary infection, the peak of disease typically coincides with the development of specific T- and B-cell responses, which seem, in large part, to be responsible for disease. Animal models clearly show that a range of immune responses can enhance disease severity, particularly after vaccination with formalin-inactivated RSV. Prior immune sensitization leads to exuberant chemokine production, an excessive cellular influx, and an overabundance of cytokines during RSV challenge. Under different circumstances, specific mediators and T-cell subsets and antibody-antigen immune complex deposition are incriminated as major factors in disease. Animal models of immune enhancement permit a deep understanding of the role of specific immune responses in RSV disease, assist in vaccine design, and indicate which immunomodulatory therapy might be beneficial to children with bronchiolitis.

  17. The use of sialidase therapy for respiratory viral infections.

    PubMed

    Nicholls, John M; Moss, Ronald B; Haslam, Stuart M

    2013-06-01

    DAS181 is an inhaled bacterial sialidase which functions by removing sialic acid (Sia) from the surface of epithelial cells, preventing attachment and subsequent infection by respiratory viruses that utilize Sia as a receptor. DAS181 is typical of bacterial sialidases in cleaving Sia α2-3 and Sia α2-6 linkages, and it also has a demonstrated effect against acetylated and hydroxylated forms of Sia. The potency of the compound has been enhanced by coupling the active sialidase with an amphiregulin tag, allowing a longer duration of action and minimizing spread to the systemic circulation. DAS181 is now in Phase II development for the treatment of influenza, and it has also demonstrated activity in individual cases of parainfluenza in immunosuppressed patients. Continued evaluation of the roles and activities of bacterial sialidases is required to expand the range of successful antiviral therapies targeting Sia or its derivatives.

  18. Vitamin D for prevention of respiratory tract infections: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Charan, Jaykaran; Goyal, Jagdish P.; Saxena, Deepak; Yadav, Preeti

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To explore the effect of vitamin D supplementation in prevention of respiratory tract infections on the basis of published clinical trials. Materials and Methods: Clinical trials were searched from various electronic databases. Five clinical trials were suitable for inclusion. Outcome was events of respiratory tract infections in vitamin D group and placebo group. Data was reported as odds ratio with 95% confidence interval. Both random and fixed model was used for analysis. Analysis was done with the help of Comprehensive meta-analysis software 2. Results: Events of respiratory tract infections were significantly lower in vitamin D group as compared to control group [Odds ratio = 0.582 (0.417 – 0.812) P = 0.001] according to random model. Results were similar in fixed model. On separate analysis of clinical trials dealing with groups of children and adults, beneficial effect of vitamin D was observed in both, according to fixed model [Odds ratio = 0.579 (0.416 – 0.805), P = 0.001 and Odd ratio = 0.653 (0.472 – 0.9040, P = 0.010 respectively]. On using random model beneficial effect persisted in children's group but became nonsignificant in adults group [Odds ratio = 0.579 (0.416 – 0.805), P = 0.001 and Odd ratio = 0.544 (0.278 – 1.063) P = 0.075 respectively]. Conclusion: Vitamin D supplementation decreases the events related to respiratory tract infections. There is need of more well conducted clinical trials to reach to a certain conclusion. PMID:23326099

  19. Factors Associated with Antibiotic Misuse in Outpatient Treatment for Upper Respiratory Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    Schroeck, Jennifer L.; Ruh, Christine A.; Sellick, John A.; Ott, Michael C.; Mattappallil, Arun

    2015-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has promoted the appropriate use of antibiotics since 1995 when it initiated the National Campaign for Appropriate Antibiotic Use in the Community. This study examined upper respiratory tract infections included in the campaign to determine the degree to which antibiotics were appropriately prescribed and subsequent admission rates in a veteran population. This study was a retrospective chart review conducted among outpatients with a diagnosis of a respiratory tract infection, including bronchitis, pharyngitis, sinusitis, or nonspecific upper respiratory tract infection, between January 2009 and December 2011. The study found that 595 (35.8%) patients were treated appropriately, and 1,067 (64.2%) patients received therapy considered inappropriate based on the Get Smart Campaign criteria. Overall the subsequent readmission rate was 1.5%. The majority (77.5%) of patients were prescribed an antibiotic. The most common antibiotics prescribed were azithromycin (39.0%), amoxicillin-clavulanate (13.2%), and moxifloxacin (7.5%). A multivariate regression analysis demonstrated significant predictors of appropriate treatment, including the presence of tonsillar exudates (odds ratio [OR], 0.6; confidence interval [CI], 0.3 to 0.9), fever (OR, 0.6; CI, 0.4 to 0.9), and lymphadenopathy (OR, 0.4; CI, 0.3 to 0.6), while penicillin allergy (OR, 2.9; CI, 1.7 to 4.7) and cough (OR, 1.6; CI, 1.1 to 2.2) were significant predictors for inappropriate treatment. Poor compliance with the Get Smart Campaign was found in outpatients for respiratory infections. Results from this study demonstrate the overprescribing of antibiotics, while providing a focused view of improper prescribing. This article provides evidence that current efforts are insufficient for curtailing inappropriate antibiotic use. PMID:25870064

  20. Lower respiratory tract infection in cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) infected with group A Streptococcus.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Randall J; Ashraf, Madiha; Gonulal, Vedia E; Ayeras, Ara A; Cantu, Concepcion; Shea, Patrick R; Carroll, Ronan K; Humbird, Tammy; Greaver, Jamieson L; Swain, Jody L; Chang, Ellen; Ragasa, Willie; Jenkins, Leslie; Lally, Kevin P; Blasdel, Terry; Cagle, Philip; Musser, James M

    2010-12-01

    Group A Streptococcus (GAS), a human-specific pathogen, is best known for causing pharyngitis ("strep-throat") and necrotizing fasciitis ("flesh-eating disease"). However, the organism is also an uncommon but important cause of community-acquired bronchopneumonia, an infection with an exceptionally high mortality rate. Inasmuch as little is known about the molecular pathogenesis of GAS lower respiratory tract infection, we sought to develop a relevant human infection model. Nine cynomolgus macaques were infected by intra-bronchial instillation of either sterile saline or GAS (10(5) or 10(7) CFU). Animals were continuously monitored and sacrificed at five days post-inoculation. Serial bronchial alveolar lavage specimens and tissues collected at necropsy were used for histologic and immunohistochemical examination, quantitative microbial culture, lung and blood biomarker analysis, and in vivo GAS gene expression studies. The lower respiratory tract disease observed in cynomolgus macaques mimicked the clinical and pathological features of severe GAS bronchopneumonia in humans. This new monkey model will be useful for testing hypotheses bearing on the molecular pathogenesis of GAS in the lower respiratory tract. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Upper Respiratory Infections and Barotrauma Among Commercial Pilots.

    PubMed

    Boel, Nina Monrad; Klokker, Mads

    2017-01-01

    Health incapacitation is a serious threat to flight safety. Therefore, a study conducted 10 yr ago examined the incidents of ear-nose-throat (ENT) barotrauma and upper respiratory infection (URI) among commercial pilots and found that a large number continued to carry out their duties despite the risk of incapacitation. Now, 10 yr later, this new study examines if the attention to URIs has improved. This study was conducted at the Danish Aeromedical Centre over the course of 1 yr with 463 valid respondents to a questionnaire on URIs and ENT barotrauma. These respondents were compared to 940 respondents answering the same questionnaire 10 yr prior in the same setting. This study shows a significant increase in the number of pilots flying despite signs of an URI from 42.8 to 50.1% and in the number of pilots using decongestant medicine from 43.3 to 59.5%. The proportion of pilots experiencing one or more ENT barotraumas has also increased from 37.4 to 55.5% for barotitis media and from 19.5 to 27.9% for barosinusitis. Half of all pilots in this study fly despite signs of an URI. This is a significant increase and shows that after 10 yr an URI is still not considered a valid reason for reporting in sick despite international aeromedical recommendation. Based on these findings, the study recommends that awareness of the risk of flying with an URI be increased.Boel NM, Klokker M. Upper respiratory infections and barotrauma among commercial pilots. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2017; 88(1):17-22.

  2. Lack of detection of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus in mild and severe respiratory infections in Catalonia, northeastern Spain

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, M J; Marcos, M A; Gonzalo, V; Zboromyrska, Y; Isanta, R; Torner, N; Martinez, A; Jané, M; Mateu, A; Vila, J

    2014-01-01

    Surveillance of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) was conducted to explore the possible introduction and circulation of this novel virus in Catalonia, northeastern Spain. Five hundred and sixty-three samples from mild and severe respiratory infections collected between January 2012 and April 2013 were screened using real-time RT-PCR. All samples were negative, suggesting that MERS-CoV is not circulating silently in Catalonia. PMID:25356335

  3. Deficiency of LIGHT signaling pathway exacerbates Chlamydia psittaci respiratory tract infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Cai, Hengling; Chen, Shenghua; Xu, Sha; Sun, Yuanbin; Bai, Qinqin; Lu, Chunxue; Chen, Yuyu; Fu, Xizong; Xu, Guilian; Chen, Lili

    2016-11-01

    LIGHT, a costimulatory member of the immunoglobulin superfamily (Ig SF), can greatly impact T cell activation. The role of the LIGHT signaling pathway in chlamydial infection was evaluated in mice following respiratory tract infection with Chlamydia psittaci. Compared with wild type (WT) mice, LIGHT knockout (KO) mice showed significant reduction of body weight, much lower survival rate, higher bacterial burden, prolonged infection time courses and more severe pathological changes in lung tissue. The mRNA levels of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-17 and IL-12 in the lung tissue of LIGHT KO mice were significantly lower than those in WT mice. While there was no obvious difference in the percentages of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells in the spleens of the two groups of mice, there was a markedly elevated percentage of CD4(+) CD25(+) FoxP3(+) Treg cells in LIGHT KO mice. Together, these results demonstrate that the LIGHT signaling pathway is not only required for inflammatory cytokine production as part of the host response to chlamydial infection, but also influences the differentiation of CD4(+) CD25(+) FoxP3(+) Treg cells, both of which may be essential for control of C. psittaci respiratory tract infection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Effects of surface material, ventilation, and human behavior on indirect contact transmission risk of respiratory infection.

    PubMed

    Sze-To, Gin Nam; Yang, Yang; Kwan, Joseph K C; Yu, Samuel C T; Chao, Christopher Y H

    2014-05-01

    Infectious particles can be deposited on surfaces. Susceptible persons who contacted these contaminated surfaces may transfer the pathogens to their mucous membranes via hands, leading to a risk of respiratory infection. The exposure and infection risk contributed by this transmission route depend on indoor surface material, ventilation, and human behavior. In this study, quantitative infection risk assessments were used to compare the significances of these factors. The risks of three pathogens, influenza A virus, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), and rhinovirus, in an aircraft cabin and in a hospital ward were assessed. Results showed that reducing the contact rate is relatively more effective than increasing the ventilation rate to lower the infection risk. Nonfabric surface materials were found to be much more favorable in the indirect contact transmission for RSV and rhinovirus than fabric surface materials. In the cases considered in this study, halving the ventilation rate and doubling the hand contact rate to surfaces and the hand contact rate to mucous membranes would increase the risk by 3.7-16.2%, 34.4-94.2%, and 24.1-117.7%, respectively. Contacting contaminated nonfabric surfaces may pose an indirect contact risk up to three orders of magnitude higher than that of contacting contaminated fabric surfaces. These findings provide more consideration for infection control and building environmental design.

  5. Proteomic Profiling of a Respiratory Syncytial Virus-Infected Rat Pneumonia Model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue-Feng; Zhang, Xiu-Ying; Gao, Xuejuan; Liu, Xiao-Xue; Wang, Yi-Huan

    2016-07-22

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of lower respiratory tract disease in pediatric patients. Our goal was to obtain a detailed understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of RSV infections by studying the protein expression profiles in rats with pneumonia. First, we successfully established a pneumonia rat model by intranasally injecting RSV. The differentially expressed proteins in lung tissues of RSV-infected rats compared with those of the controls were analyzed by using 2-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF/TOF MS. In total. 41 differentially expressed protein spots representing 20 unique proteins were successfully identified. Classification analysis showed that most of these proteins are implicated in metabolic processes, cellular processes, cellular component organization or biogenesis, and immune system processes. The significantly elevated expressions levels of 4 proteins namely, T-kininogen 1, T-kininogen 2, haptoglobin, and hemopexin, which might serve as the potential biomarkers of RSV-infected pneumonia, were further validated in RSV-infected rats using western blot and immunohistochemistry. These results provide new insights into the pathogenesis of RSV infection-induced pneumonia and provide important future directions for functional studies and therapeutic design.

  6. Neonatal calf infection with respiratory syncytial virus: drawing parallels to the disease in human infants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common viral cause of childhood acute lower respiratory tract infections. It is estimated that RSV infections result in more than 100,000 deaths annually worldwide. Bovine RSV is a cause of enzootic pneumonia in young dairy calves and summer pneumonia ...

  7. Coxsackievirus A21, Enterovirus 68, and Acute Respiratory Tract Infection, China

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Zichun; Gonzalez, Richard; Wang, Zhong; Ren, Lili; Xiao, Yan; Li, Jianguo; Li, Yongjun; Vernet, Guy; Paranhos-Baccalà, Gláucia; Jin, Qi

    2012-01-01

    During August 2006–April 2010, in Beijing, China, 2 rare human enterovirus serotypes, coxsackievirus A21 and enterovirus 68, were detected most frequently in human enterovirus–positive adults with acute respiratory tract infections. Thus, during some years, these 2 viruses cause a substantial proportion of enterovirus-associated adult acute respiratory tract infections. PMID:22516379

  8. Acute respiratory distress syndrome in a child with human parvovirus B19 infection.

    PubMed

    Ferraz, Cláudia; Cunha, Francisco; Mota, Teresa C; Carvalho, José M; Simões, Joana S; Aparicio, José M

    2005-11-01

    A 6-year-old girl developed shock and multiple organ dysfunction including acute respiratory distress syndrome in association with parvovirus B19 infection. The diagnosis was based on positive antibodies and the detection of parvovirus 19 DNA in serum, bronchial secretions and skin biopsy. It seems likely, but it was not proved, that the parvovirus infection caused acute respiratory distress syndrome.

  9. Does Viral Co-Infection Influence the Severity of Acute Respiratory Infection in Children?

    PubMed Central

    Pardo-Seco, Jacobo; Gómez-Carballa, Alberto; Martinón-Torres, Nazareth; Salas, Antonio; Martinón-Sánchez, José María; Justicia, Antonio; Rivero-Calle, Irene; Sumner, Edward; Fink, Colin

    2016-01-01

    Background Multiple viruses are often detected in children with respiratory infection but the significance of co-infection in pathogenesis, severity and outcome is unclear. Objectives To correlate the presence of viral co-infection with clinical phenotype in children admitted with acute respiratory infections (ARI). Methods We collected detailed clinical information on severity for children admitted with ARI as part of a Spanish prospective multicenter study (GENDRES network) between 2011–2013. A nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) approach was used to detect respiratory viruses in respiratory secretions. Findings were compared to an independent cohort collected in the UK. Results 204 children were recruited in the main cohort and 97 in the replication cohort. The number of detected viruses did not correlate with any markers of severity. However, bacterial superinfection was associated with increased severity (OR: 4.356; P-value = 0.005), PICU admission (OR: 3.342; P-value = 0.006), higher clinical score (1.988; P-value = 0.002) respiratory support requirement (OR: 7.484; P-value < 0.001) and longer hospital length of stay (OR: 1.468; P-value < 0.001). In addition, pneumococcal vaccination was found to be a protective factor in terms of degree of respiratory distress (OR: 2.917; P-value = 0.035), PICU admission (OR: 0.301; P-value = 0.011), lower clinical score (-1.499; P-value = 0.021) respiratory support requirement (OR: 0.324; P-value = 0.016) and oxygen necessity (OR: 0.328; P-value = 0.001). All these findings were replicated in the UK cohort. Conclusion The presence of more than one virus in hospitalized children with ARI is very frequent but it does not seem to have a major clinical impact in terms of severity. However bacterial superinfection increases the severity of the disease course. On the contrary, pneumococcal vaccination plays a protective role. PMID:27096199

  10. A critical review of the fluoroquinolones: focus on respiratory infections.

    PubMed

    Zhanel, George G; Ennis, Kelly; Vercaigne, Lavern; Walkty, Andrew; Gin, Alfred S; Embil, John; Smith, Heather; Hoban, Daryl J

    2002-01-01

    The new fluoroquinolones (clinafloxacin, gatifloxacin, gemifloxacin, grepafloxacin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, sitafloxacin, sparfloxacin and trovafloxacin) offer excellent activity against Gram-negative bacilli and improved Gram-positive activity (e.g. against Streptococcus pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus) over ciprofloxacin. Ciprofloxacin still maintains the best in vitro activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Clinafloxacin, gatifloxacin, moxifloxacin, sitafloxacin, sparfloxacin and trovafloxacin display improved activity against anaerobes (e.g. Bacteroides fragilis) versus ciprofloxacin. All of the new fluoroquinolones display excellent bioavailability and have longer serum half-lives than ciprofloxacin allowing for once daily dose administration. Clinical trials comparing the new fluoroquinolones to each other or to standard therapy have demonstrated good efficacy in a variety of community-acquired respiratory infections (e.g. pneumonia, acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis and acute sinusitis). Limited data suggest that the new fluoroquinolones as a class may lead to better outcomes in community-acquired pneumonia and acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis versus comparators. Several of these agents have either been withdrawn from the market, had their use severely restricted because of adverse effects (clinafloxacin because of phototoxicity and hypoglycaemia; grepafloxacin because of prolongation of the QTc and resultant torsades de pointes; sparfloxacin because of phototoxicity; and trovafloxacin because of hepatotoxicity), or were discontinued during developmental phases. The remaining fluoroquinolones such as gatifloxacin, gemifloxacin, levofloxacin and moxifloxacin have adverse effect profiles similar to ciprofloxacin. Extensive post-marketing safety surveillance data (as are available with ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin) are required for all new fluoroquinolones before safety can be definitively established. Drug interactions are limited

  11. Cluster randomised controlled trial to examine medical mask use as source control for people with respiratory illness

    PubMed Central

    MacIntyre, Chandini Raina; Zhang, Yi; Chughtai, Abrar Ahmad; Seale, Holly; Zhang, Daitao; Chu, Yanhui; Zhang, Haiyan; Rahman, Bayzidur; Wang, Quanyi

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Medical masks are commonly used by sick individuals with influenza-like illness (ILI) to prevent spread of infections to others, but clinical efficacy data are absent. Objective Determine whether medical mask use by sick individuals with ILI protects well contacts from related respiratory infections. Setting 6 major hospitals in 2 districts of Beijing, China. Design Cluster randomised controlled trial. Participants 245 index cases with ILI. Intervention Index cases with ILI were randomly allocated to medical mask (n=123) and control arms (n=122). Since 43 index cases in the control arm also used a mask during the study period, an as-treated post hoc analysis was performed by comparing outcomes among household members of index cases who used a mask (mask group) with household members of index cases who did not use a mask (no-mask group). Main outcome measure Primary outcomes measured in household members were clinical respiratory illness, ILI and laboratory-confirmed viral respiratory infection. Results In an intention-to-treat analysis, rates of clinical respiratory illness (relative risk (RR) 0.61, 95% CI 0.18 to 2.13), ILI (RR 0.32, 95% CI 0.03 to 3.13) and laboratory-confirmed viral infections (RR 0.97, 95% CI 0.06 to 15.54) were consistently lower in the mask arm compared with control, although not statistically significant. A post hoc comparison between the mask versus no-mask groups showed a protective effect against clinical respiratory illness, but not against ILI and laboratory-confirmed viral respiratory infections. Conclusions The study indicates a potential benefit of medical masks for source control, but is limited by small sample size and low secondary attack rates. Larger trials are needed to confirm efficacy of medical masks as source control. Trial registration number ACTRN12613000852752; Results. PMID:28039289

  12. Cluster randomised controlled trial to examine medical mask use as source control for people with respiratory illness.

    PubMed

    MacIntyre, Chandini Raina; Zhang, Yi; Chughtai, Abrar Ahmad; Seale, Holly; Zhang, Daitao; Chu, Yanhui; Zhang, Haiyan; Rahman, Bayzidur; Wang, Quanyi

    2016-12-30

    Medical masks are commonly used by sick individuals with influenza-like illness (ILI) to prevent spread of infections to others, but clinical efficacy data are absent. Determine whether medical mask use by sick individuals with ILI protects well contacts from related respiratory infections. 6 major hospitals in 2 districts of Beijing, China. Cluster randomised controlled trial. 245 index cases with ILI. Index cases with ILI were randomly allocated to medical mask (n=123) and control arms (n=122). Since 43 index cases in the control arm also used a mask during the study period, an as-treated post hoc analysis was performed by comparing outcomes among household members of index cases who used a mask (mask group) with household members of index cases who did not use a mask (no-mask group). Primary outcomes measured in household members were clinical respiratory illness, ILI and laboratory-confirmed viral respiratory infection. In an intention-to-treat analysis, rates of clinical respiratory illness (relative risk (RR) 0.61, 95% CI 0.18 to 2.13), ILI (RR 0.32, 95% CI 0.03 to 3.13) and laboratory-confirmed viral infections (RR 0.97, 95% CI 0.06 to 15.54) were consistently lower in the mask arm compared with control, although not statistically significant. A post hoc comparison between the mask versus no-mask groups showed a protective effect against clinical respiratory illness, but not against ILI and laboratory-confirmed viral respiratory infections. The study indicates a potential benefit of medical masks for source control, but is limited by small sample size and low secondary attack rates. Larger trials are needed to confirm efficacy of medical masks as source control. ACTRN12613000852752; Results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  13. A genetic model of differential susceptibility to human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection.

    PubMed

    Ciencewicki, Jonathan M; Wang, Xuting; Marzec, Jacqui; Serra, M Elina; Bell, Douglas A; Polack, Fernando P; Kleeberger, Steven R

    2014-04-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the primary cause of lower respiratory tract infection during childhood and causes severe symptoms in some patients, which may cause hospitalization and death. Mechanisms for differential responses to RSV are unknown. Our objective was to develop an in vitro model of RSV infection to evaluate interindividual variation in response to RSV and identify susceptibility genes. Populations of human-derived HapMap lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) were infected with RSV. Compared with controls, RSV-G mRNA expression varied from ~1- to 400-fold between LCLs. Basal expression of a number of gene transcripts, including myxovirus (influenza virus) resistance 1 (MX1), significantly correlated with RSV-G expression in HapMap LCLs. Individuals in a case-control population of RSV-infected children who were homozygous (n=94) or heterozygous (n=172) for the predicted deleterious A allele in a missense G/A SNP in MX1 had significantly greater risk for developing severe RSV disease relative to those with the major allele (n=108) (χ(2)=5.305, P=0.021; OR: 1.750, 95% CI: 1.110, 2.758, P=0.021). We conclude that genetically diverse human LCLs enable identification of susceptibility genes (e.g., MX1) for RSV disease severity in children, providing insight for disease risk.

  14. Saffold cardiovirus infection in children associated with respiratory disease and its similarity to coxsackievirus infection.

    PubMed

    Itagaki, Tsutomu; Abiko, Chieko; Aoki, Yoko; Ikeda, Tatsuya; Mizuta, Katsumi; Noda, Masahiro; Kimura, Hirokazu; Matsuzaki, Yoko

    2011-08-01

    Saffold virus (SAFV) is a newly discovered virus belonging to the genus Cardiovirus of the family Picornaviridae. Using molecular techniques, SAFV has been detected, although infrequently, in the stools of both healthy and diarrheic children and in respiratory specimens collected from children with respiratory disease. The epidemiology and pathogenicity of SAFV remain unclear. Between July 2009 and October 2010, nasopharyngeal specimens were collected from children with acute respiratory infections. The collected samples were used to isolate respiratory viruses, including coxsackievirus, by cell culture and were tested for SAFV by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. SAFV genotype 2 (SAFV2) was detected in 54 (3.5%) of the 1525 children tested. SAFV2 detections showed an epidemic pattern for a 4-month period with a peak in October 2009. The median age of the SAFV2-positive children was 4 years (range: 7 months-16 years). Among the 35 SAFV2-positive children, excluding cases of viral coinfection, 13 (37.1%) had pharyngitis, 12 (34.3%) had tonsillitis, and 8 (22.8%) had herpangina. Bronchitis and gastroenteritis were detected in 1 case each. Fever (temperature, >38°C) was noted in 33 (94.3%) cases. The median duration of fever was 2 days (range: 1-3 days). Diarrhea was observed in 7 (20.0%) children, but watery and frequent diarrhea was not common. The age distribution and clinical diagnoses associated with SAFV2 infections were similar to those observed with coxsackievirus B4 infections, which detections showed an epidemic pattern during the study period. SAFV2 is a cause of upper respiratory tract illness that exhibits a pathogenicity similar to that of coxsackievirus B.

  15. Lung epithelial cells have virus-specific and shared gene expression responses to infection by diverse respiratory viruses.

    PubMed

    VanLeuven, James T; Ridenhour, Benjamin J; Gonzalez, Andres J; Miller, Craig R; Miura, Tanya A

    2017-01-01

    The severity of respiratory viral infections is partially determined by the cellular response mounted by infected lung epithelial cells. Disease prevention and treatment is dependent on our understanding of the shared and unique responses elicited by diverse viruses, yet few studies compare host responses to viruses from different families while controlling other experimental parameters. Murine models are commonly used to study the pathogenesis of respiratory viral infections, and in vitro studies using murine cells provide mechanistic insight into the pathogenesis observed in vivo. We used microarray analysis to compare changes in gene expression of murine lung epithelial cells infected individually by three respiratory viruses causing mild (rhinovirus, RV1B), moderate (coronavirus, MHV-1), and severe (influenza A virus, PR8) disease in mice. RV1B infection caused numerous gene expression changes, but the differential effect peaked at 12 hours post-infection. PR8 altered an intermediate number of genes whose expression continued to change through 24 hours. MHV-1 had comparatively few effects on host gene expression. The viruses elicited highly overlapping responses in antiviral genes, though MHV-1 induced a lower type I interferon response than the other two viruses. Signature genes were identified for each virus and included host defense genes for PR8, tissue remodeling genes for RV1B, and transcription factors for MHV-1. Our comparative approach identified universal and specific transcriptional signatures of virus infection that can be used to distinguish shared and virus-specific mechanisms of pathogenesis in the respiratory tract.

  16. [An amphibian model for the study of evolutionary respiratory control].

    PubMed

    Cuestas, Eduardo; Bas, José

    2007-01-01

    Recent perinal advances have made possible that premature newborns survive increasingtly in earlier developmental stages. This babies requires sophisticated and costly critical intensive care to address the problems associated with inmadurity of the respiratory system. In addition respiratory instability and apnea reflecting inmaturity of the respiratory control system are major causes of morbidity and prolonged hospitalization in this highly vulnerable group of patients. These concerns have contributed to the development of research in respiratoy evolutionary neurobiology. While the majority of researchers working in this field use rodents as an animal model, recent research using in vitro brainstem preparations from bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana) have reveled the technical advantages of this model to study the basic principles underlying respiratory control and its ontogeny between vertebrates. The present article review the recent advances in the area of research with special interest on episodic breathing and the role of serotoninergic and GABAergic modulation of respiratory control during development.

  17. The costs of preventing the spread of respiratory infection in family physician offices: a threshold analysis.

    PubMed

    Hogg, William; Gray, David; Huston, Patricia; Zhang, Wei

    2007-11-13

    Influenza poses concerns about epidemic respiratory infection. Interventions designed to prevent the spread of respiratory infection within family physician (FP) offices could potentially have a significant positive influence on the health of Canadians. The main purpose of this paper is to estimate the explicit costs of such an intervention. A cost analysis of a respiratory infection control was conducted. The costs were estimated from the perspective of provincial government. In addition, a threshold analysis was conducted to estimate a threshold value of the intervention's effectiveness that could generate potential savings in terms of averted health-care costs by the intervention that exceed the explicit costs. The informational requirements for these implicit costs savings are high, however. Some of these elements, such as the cost of hospitalization in the event of contacting influenza, and the number of patients passing through the physicians' office, were readily available. Other pertinent points of information, such as the proportion of infected people who require hospitalization, could be imported from the existing literature. We take an indirect approach to calculate a threshold value for the most uncertain piece of information, namely the reduction in the probability of the infection spreading as a direct result of the intervention, at which the intervention becomes worthwhile. The 5-week intervention costs amounted to a total of $52,810.71, or $131,094.73 prorated according to the length of the flu season, or $512,729.30 prorated for the entire calendar year. The variable costs that were incurred for this 5-week project amounted to approximately $923.16 per participating medical practice. The (fixed) training costs per practice were equivalent to $73.27 for the 5-week intervention, or $28.14 for 13-week flu season, or $7.05 for an entire one-year period. Based on our conservative estimates for the direct cost savings, there are indications that the

  18. Evidence for an intranasal immune response to human respiratory syncytial virus infection in cynomolgus macaques.

    PubMed

    Grandin, Clément; Lucas-Hourani, Marianne; Clavel, Marine; Taborik, Fabrice; Vabret, Astrid; Tangy, Frédéric; Contamin, Hugues; Vidalain, Pierre-Olivier

    2015-04-01

    There is no large-scale therapy available against human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV), a major pathogen responsible for acute respiratory diseases. Macaques represent an interesting animal model to evaluate potential treatments because of their genetic, anatomical and immunological proximity with humans. However, the parameters that influence hRSV growth and control in this model are still poorly understood. We have documented in the following study the influence of age as well as repeated infections on the virological, clinical and immunological parameters of this animal model. Following intranasal inoculation, hRSV replicated in the upper respiratory tract for less than 15 days with no clinical signs regardless of age. Interestingly, we observed the induction of a local immune response at the nasal mucosa as assessed by expression profiles of inflammatory and IFN-stimulated genes. Animals also developed specific antibodies and were immune to reinfection. Thus, we showed that even in infant macaques, intranasal hRSV infection induced both local and systemic immune responses to efficiently control the virus.

  19. IL-17-induced pulmonary pathogenesis during respiratory viral infection and exacerbation of allergic disease.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Sumanta; Lindell, Dennis M; Berlin, Aaron A; Morris, Susan B; Shanley, Thomas P; Hershenson, Marc B; Lukacs, Nicholas W

    2011-07-01

    Severe respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections are characterized by airway epithelial cell damage, mucus hypersecretion, and Th2 cytokine production. Less is known about the role of IL-17. We observed increased IL-6 and IL-17 levels in tracheal aspirate samples from severely ill infants with RSV infection. In a mouse model of RSV infection, time-dependent increases in pulmonary IL-6, IL-23, and IL-17 expression were observed. Neutralization of IL-17 during infection and observations from IL-17(-/-) knockout mice resulted in significant inhibition of mucus production during RSV infection. RSV-infected animals treated with anti-IL-17 had reduced inflammation and decreased viral load, compared with control antibody-treated mice. Blocking IL-17 during infection resulted in significantly increased RSV-specific CD8 T cells. Factors associated with CD8 cytotoxic T lymphocytes, T-bet, IFN-γ, eomesodermin, and granzyme B were significantly up-regulated after IL-17 blockade. Additionally, in vitro analyses suggest that IL-17 directly inhibits T-bet, eomesodermin, and IFN-γ in CD8 T cells. The role of IL-17 was also investigated in RSV-induced exacerbation of allergic airway responses, in which neutralization of IL-17 led to a significant decrease in the exacerbated disease, including reduced mucus production and Th2 cytokines, with decreased viral proteins. Taken together, our data demonstrate that IL-17 plays a pathogenic role during RSV infections.

  20. Fever without apparent source on clinical examination, lower respiratory infections in children, and enterovirus infections.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, P L; Klig, J E; Kennedy, W P; Kahn, J S

    2000-02-01

    This section focuses on issues in infectious disease that are commonly encountered in pediatric office practice. McCarthy discusses recent literature regarding the evaluation and management of acute fevers without apparent source on clinical examination in infants and children and the evaluation of children with prolonged fevers of unknown origin. Klig reviews recent literature about lower respiratory tract infection in children. Finally, Kennedy and Kahn discuss recent developments in infectious diseases pertinent to office practice.

  1. The effect of Fasciola hepatica infection on respiratory vaccine responsiveness in calves.

    PubMed

    Krump, L; Hamilton, C M; Sekiya, M; O'Neill, R; Mulcahy, G

    2014-03-17

    Fasciola hepatica is a common parasite in cattle, and bovine fasciolosis causes significant production losses, as well as being a zoonotic disease of global importance. F. hepatica has been shown to have immunoregulatory effects and the aim of this research was to establish whether F. hepatica infection influences the response to vaccination against respiratory pathogens in calves. A total of 48 calves were randomly and equally allocated to two groups. The experimental group was infected with F. hepatica, while the other group was used as a control. At week 2 and 6 after infection calves from both groups were administered a vaccine containing inactivated PI-3, BRSV and Mannheimia haemolytica, pathogens commonly associated with bovine respiratory disease. Blood samples were taken weekly over 12 weeks to measure specific antibodies against all vaccine antigens and against F. hepatica, as well as IgG1 and IgG2 isotypes for PI-3 and BRSV specific antibodies. Faecal samples were examined for F. hepatica eggs and routine haematology and liver enzyme biochemistry were performed and cytokine production in vitro measured. Liver enzymes (GGT and GLDH) and eosinophils were significantly higher in the experimental group, whereas neutrophil numbers were higher in the control group. There was no significant difference between the groups in terms of vaccine-specific total responses to PI-3, BRSV and M. haemolytica. IgG1 levels were higher in comparison to IgG2 levels in both PI-3 and BRSV specific antibodies. IL-4 levels from stimulated and unstimulated PBMC were significantly higher in the control group. IFN-γ levels were significantly higher in PBMC from the control group when cultured in medium only. No significant differences were noted in the levels of other cytokines measured. In this work, no effect of early F. hepatica infection on the antibody responses to a range of respiratory vaccine antigens in calves was shown. However, differences in cytokine responsiveness of

  2. Inhaled Antibiotics for Gram-Negative Respiratory Infections.

    PubMed

    Wenzler, Eric; Fraidenburg, Dustin R; Scardina, Tonya; Danziger, Larry H

    2016-07-01

    Gram-negative organisms comprise a large portion of the pathogens responsible for lower respiratory tract infections, especially those that are nosocomially acquired, and the rate of antibiotic resistance among these organisms continues to rise. Systemically administered antibiotics used to treat these infections often have poor penetration into the lung parenchyma and narrow therapeutic windows between efficacy and toxicity. The use of inhaled antibiotics allows for maximization of target site concentrations and optimization of pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic indices while minimizing systemic exposure and toxicity. This review is a comprehensive discussion of formulation and drug delivery aspects, in vitro and microbiological considerations, pharmacokinetics, and clinical outcomes with inhaled antibiotics as they apply to disease states other than cystic fibrosis. In reviewing the literature surrounding the use of inhaled antibiotics, we also highlight the complexities related to this route of administration and the shortcomings in the available evidence. The lack of novel anti-Gram-negative antibiotics in the developmental pipeline will encourage the innovative use of our existing agents, and the inhaled route is one that deserves to be further studied and adopted in the clinical arena. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  3. Inhaled Antibiotics for Gram-Negative Respiratory Infections

    PubMed Central

    Fraidenburg, Dustin R.; Scardina, Tonya

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Gram-negative organisms comprise a large portion of the pathogens responsible for lower respiratory tract infections, especially those that are nosocomially acquired, and the rate of antibiotic resistance among these organisms continues to rise. Systemically administered antibiotics used to treat these infections often have poor penetration into the lung parenchyma and narrow therapeutic windows between efficacy and toxicity. The use of inhaled antibiotics allows for maximization of target site concentrations and optimization of pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic indices while minimizing systemic exposure and toxicity. This review is a comprehensive discussion of formulation and drug delivery aspects, in vitro and microbiological considerations, pharmacokinetics, and clinical outcomes with inhaled antibiotics as they apply to disease states other than cystic fibrosis. In reviewing the literature surrounding the use of inhaled antibiotics, we also highlight the complexities related to this route of administration and the shortcomings in the available evidence. The lack of novel anti-Gram-negative antibiotics in the developmental pipeline will encourage the innovative use of our existing agents, and the inhaled route is one that deserves to be further studied and adopted in the clinical arena. PMID:27226088

  4. Bovine respiratory syncytial virus: infection dynamics within and between herds

    PubMed Central

    Klem, T. B.; Gulliksen, S. M.; Lie, K.-I.; Løken, T.; Østerås, O.; Stokstad, M.

    2013-01-01

    The infection dynamics of bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) were studied in randomly selected Norwegian dairy herds. A total of 134 herds were tested twice, six months apart. The herds were classified as positive for BRSV if at least one animal between 150 and 365 days old tested positive for antibodies against BRSV, thereby representing herds that had most likely had the virus present during the previous year. The prevalence of positive herds at the first and second sampling was 34 per cent and at 41 per cent, respectively, but varied greatly between regions. Negative herds were found in close proximity to positive herds. Some of these herds remained negative despite several new infections nearby. Of the herds initially being negative, 42 per cent changed status to positive during the six months. This occurred at the same rate during summer as winter, but a higher rate of animals in the herds was positive if it took place during winter. Of the herds initially being positive, 33 per cent changed to negative. This indicates that an effective strategy to lower the prevalence and the impact of BRSV could be to employ close surveillance and place a high biosecurity focus on the negative herds. PMID:24158321

  5. Respiratory syncytial virus infection in children admitted to hospital but ventilated mechanically for other reasons.

    PubMed

    von Renesse, Anja; Schildgen, Oliver; Klinkenberg, Dennis; Müller, Andreas; von Moers, Arpad; Simon, Arne

    2009-01-01

    One thousand five hundred sixty-eight RSV infections were documented prospectively in 1,541 pediatric patients. Of these, 20 (1.3%) had acquired the RSV infection while treated by mechanical ventilation for reasons other than the actual RSV infection (group ventilated mechanically). The clinical characteristics of children who were infected with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection while ventilated mechanically for other reasons are described and compared with a matched control group. Sixty percent of the group ventilated mechanically had at least one additional risk factor for a severe course of infection (prematurity 50%, chronic lung disease 20%, congenital heart disease 35%, immunodeficiency 20%). The median age at diagnosis in the group ventilated mechanically was 4.2 months. The matched pairs analysis (group ventilated mechanically vs. control group) revealed a higher proportion of patients with hypoxemia and apnoea in the group ventilated mechanically; more patients in the control group showed symptoms of airway obstruction (wheezing). At least one chest radiography was performed in 95% of the patients (n = 19) in the group ventilated mechanically versus 45% (n = 9) in the control group (P = 0.001). The frequency of pneumonia was 40% in the group ventilated mechanically and 20% in the control group. Despite existing consensus recommendations, only two patients (10%) of the group ventilated mechanically had received palivizumab previously. Significantly more patients in the group ventilated mechanically received antibiotic treatment (85% vs. 45%, P = 0.008), and attributable mortality was higher in the group ventilated mechanically (15% [n = 3] vs. 0% in the control group, P = 0.231). Children treated by long term mechanical ventilation may acquire RSV infection by transmission by droplets or caregivers and face an increased risk of a severe course of RSV infection. The low rate of immunoprophylaxis in this particular risk group should be improved.

  6. Cytokine regulation in SARS coronavirus infection compared to other respiratory virus infections.

    PubMed

    Okabayashi, Tamaki; Kariwa, Hiroaki; Yokota, Shin-ichi; Iki, Shigeo; Indoh, Tomokazu; Yokosawa, Noriko; Takashima, Ikuo; Tsutsumi, Hiroyuki; Fujii, Nobuhiro

    2006-04-01

    The pathogenesis of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is poorly understood and cytokine dysregulation has been suggested as one relevant mechanism to be explored. We compared the cytokine profile in Caco2 cells after infection of SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV) with other respiratory viruses including respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), influenza A virus (FluAV), and human parainfluenza virus type 2 (hPIV2). Interferon (IFN) system (production and response) was not suppressed by SARS-CoV infection. Therefore, SARS-CoV replication was suppressed by pretreatment with IFN. SARS-CoV and RSV induced high levels of IL-6 and RANTES compared with FluAV and hPIV2. Induction level of suppressor of cytokine signaling-3 (SOCS3) by SARS-CoV was significantly lower than that by RSV in spite of the significant production of IL-6. Toll-like receptors 4 and 9, which correlate with the induction of inflammatory response, were upregulated by SARS-CoV infection. Collectively, overinduction of inflammatory cytokine and dysregulation of cytokine signaling may contribute to the immunopathology associated with "severe" inflammation in SARS. Copyright 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Viral Infection in Adults with Severe Acute Respiratory Infection in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Remolina, Yuly Andrea; Ulloa, María Mercedes; Vargas, Hernán; Díaz, Liliana; Gómez, Sandra Liliana; Saavedra, Alfredo; Sánchez, Edgar; Cortés, Jorge Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To identify the viral aetiology in adult patients with severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) admitted to sentinel surveillance institutions in Bogotá in 2012. Design A cross-sectional study was conducted in which microarray molecular techniques for viral identification were used on nasopharyngeal samples of adult patients submitted to the surveillance system, and further descriptions of clinical features and relevant clinical outcomes, such as mortality, need for critical care, use of mechanical ventilation and hospital stay, were obtained. Setting Respiratory infections requiring hospital admission in surveillance centres in Bogotá, Colombia. Participants Ninety-one adult patients with acute respiratory infection (55% were female). Measurements Viral identification, intensive care unit admission, hospital stay, and mortality. Results Viral identification was achieved for 63 patients (69.2%). Comorbidity was frequently identified and mainly involved chronic pulmonary disease or pregnancy. Influenza, Bocavirus and Adenovirus were identified in 30.8%, 28.6% and 18.7% of the cases, respectively. Admission to the intensive care unit occurred in 42.9% of the cases, while mechanical ventilation was required for 36.3%. The average hospital stay was 9.9 days, and mortality was 15.4%. Antibiotics were empirically used in 90.1% of patients. Conclusions The prevalence of viral aetiology of SARI in this study was high, with adverse clinical outcomes, intensive care requirements and high mortality. PMID:26576054

  8. Lung Function in Wheezing Infants after Acute Lower Respiratory Tract Infection and Its Association with Respiratory Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Yuan-Yuan; Jiang, Gao-Li; Wang, Li-Bo; Wan, Cheng-Zhou; Zhang, Xiao-Bo; Qian, Li-Ling

    2017-01-01

    Background: Wheezing is common in early childhood and remains an important health concern. The aim of this study was to assess the lung function of wheezing infants and to investigate the relationship between lung function and respiratory outcome. Methods: Infants <2 years of age with acute lower respiratory tract infection (ALRTI) who had undergone lung function tests were included in the study. They were assigned to wheeze or no wheeze group based on physical examination. Infants without any respiratory diseases were enrolled as controls. Lung function was measured during the acute phase and 3 months after ALRTI. One-year follow-up for infants with ALRTI was achieved. Results: A total of 252 infants with ALRTI who had acceptable data regarding tidal breathing were included in the final analysis. Compared with the control and the no wheeze groups, infants in the wheeze group had significantly decreased time to peak tidal expiratory flow as a percentage of total expiratory time (TPTEF/TE) (20.1 ± 6.4% vs. 34.4 ± 6.2% and 26.4 ± 8.3%, respectively, P < 0.0001) and significantly increased peak tidal expiratory flow (PTEF) (90.7 ± 26.3 ml/s vs. 79.3 ± 18.4 ml/s and 86.1 ± 28.0 ml/s, respectively, P < 0.01), sReff and Reff. The infants in the wheeze group still had lower TPTEF/TE and volume to peak tidal expiratory flow as a percentage of total expiratory volume (VPTEF/VE) than the no wheeze infants 3 months after the ALRTI. Moreover, there was a significant inverse relationship between TPTEF/TE, VPTEF/VE, and the recurrence of wheezing and pneumonia. Conclusions: Impaired lung function was present in wheezing infants with ALRTI and the deficits persisted. In addition, the lower level of TPTEF/TE and VPTEF/VE was a risk factor for poor respiratory outcome. PMID:28051016

  9. Influenza A/H1N1 2009 Pandemic and Respiratory Virus Infections, Beijing, 2009–2010

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Vernet, Guy; Paranhos-Baccalà, Gláucia; Jin, Qi; Wang, Jianwei

    2012-01-01

    To determine the role of the pandemic influenza A/H1N1 2009 (A/H1N1 2009pdm) in acute respiratory tract infections (ARTIs) and its impact on the epidemic of seasonal influenza viruses and other common respiratory viruses, nasal and throat swabs taken from 7,776 patients with suspected viral ARTIs from 2006 through 2010 in Beijing, China were screened by real-time PCR for influenza virus typing and subtyping and by multiplex or single PCR tests for other common respiratory viruses. We observed a distinctive dual peak pattern of influenza epidemic during the A/H1N1 2009pdm in Beijing, China, which was formed by the A/H1N1 2009pdm, and a subsequent influenza B epidemic in year 2009/2010. Our analysis also shows a small peak formed by a seasonal H3N2 epidemic prior to the A/H1N1 2009pdm peak. Parallel detection of multiple respiratory viruses shows that the epidemic of common respiratory viruses, except human rhinovirus, was delayed during the pandemic of the A/H1N1 2009pdm. The H1N1 2009pdm mainly caused upper respiratory tract infections in the sampled patients; patients infected with H1N1 2009pdm had a higher percentage of cough than those infected with seasonal influenza or other respiratory viruses. Our findings indicate that A/H1N1 2009pdm and other respiratory viruses except human rhinovirus could interfere with each other during their transmission between human beings. Understanding the mechanisms and effects of such interference is needed for effective control of future influenza epidemics. PMID:23029253

  10. The Vitamin D Assessment (ViDA) Study: design of a randomized controlled trial of vitamin D supplementation for the prevention of cardiovascular disease, acute respiratory infection, falls and non-vertebral fractures.

    PubMed

    Scragg, Robert; Waayer, Debbie; Stewart, Alistair W; Lawes, Carlene M M; Toop, Les; Murphy, Judy; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Camargo, Carlos A

    2016-11-01

    Observational studies have shown that low vitamin D status is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, acute respiratory infection, falls and non-vertebral fractures. We recruited 5110 Auckland adults, aged 50-84 years, into a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to test whether vitamin D supplementation protects against these four major outcomes. The intervention is a monthly cholecalciferol dose of 100,000IU (2.5mg) for an estimated median 3.3 years (range 2.5-4.2) during 2011-2015. Participants were recruited primarily from family practices, plus community groups with a high proportion of Maori, Pacific, or South Asian individuals. The baseline evaluation included medical history, lifestyle, physical measurements (e.g. blood pressure, arterial waveform, lung function, muscle function), and a blood sample (stored at -80°C for later testing). Capsules are being mailed to home addresses with a questionnaire to collect data on non-hospitalized outcomes and to monitor adherence and potential adverse effects. Other data sources include New Zealand Ministry of Health data on mortality, hospitalization, cancer registrations and dispensed pharmaceuticals. A random sample of 438 participants returned for annual collection of blood samples to monitor adherence and safety (hypercalcemia), including repeat physical measurements at 12 months follow-up. The trial will allow testing of a priori hypotheses on several other endpoints including: weight, blood pressure, arterial waveform parameters, heart rate variability, lung function, muscle strength, gait and balance, mood, psoriasis, bone density, and chronic pain.

  11. Kinetics of the neutralizing antibody response to respiratory syncytial virus infections in a birth cohort.

    PubMed

    Sande, C J; Mutunga, M N; Okiro, E A; Medley, G F; Cane, P A; Nokes, D J

    2013-11-01

    The kinetics of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) neutralizing antibodies following birth, primary and secondary infections are poorly defined. The aims of the study were to measure and compare neutralizing antibody responses at different time points in a birth cohort followed-up over three RSV epidemics. Rural Kenyan children, recruited at birth between 2002 and 2003, were monitored for RSV infection over three epidemic seasons. Cord and 3-monthly sera, and acute and convalescent sera following RSV infection, were assayed in 28 children by plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT). Relative to the neutralizing antibody titers of pre-exposure control sera (1.8 log10 PRNT), antibody titers following primary infection were (i) no different in sera collected between 0 and 0.4 months post-infection (1.9 log10 PRNT, P=0.146), (ii) higher in sera collected between 0.5 and 0.9 (2.8 log10 PRNT, P<0.0001), 1.0-1.9 (2.5 log10 PRNT, P<0.0001), and 2.0-2.9 (2.3 log10 PRNT, P<0.001) months post-infection, and (iii) no different in sera collected at between 3.0 and 3.9 months post-infection (2.0 log10 PRNT, P=0.052). The early serum neutralizing response to secondary infection (3.02 log10 PRNT) was significantly greater than the early primary response (1.9 log10 PRNT, P<0.0001). Variation in population-level virus transmission corresponded with changes in the mean cohort-level neutralizing titers. It is concluded that following primary RSV infection the neutralizing antibody response declines to pre-infection levels rapidly (~3 months) which may facilitate repeat infection. The kinetics of the aggregate levels of acquired antibody reflect seasonal RSV occurrence, age, and infection history.

  12. Pteropine orthoreovirus infection among out-patients with acute upper respiratory tract infection in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Voon, Kenny; Tan, Yeh Fong; Leong, Pooi Pooi; Teng, Cheong Lieng; Gunnasekaran, Rajasekaran; Ujang, Kamsiah; Chua, Kaw Bing; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2015-12-01

    This study aims to assess the incidence rate of Pteropine orthreovirus (PRV) infection in patients with acute upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) in a suburban setting in Malaysia, where bats are known to be present in the neighborhood. Using molecular detection of PRVs directly from oropharyngeal swabs, our study demonstrates that PRV is among one of the common causative agents of acute URTI with cough and sore throat as the commonest presenting clinical features. Phylogenetic analysis on partial major outer and inner capsid proteins shows that these PRV strains are closely related to Melaka and Kampar viruses previously isolated in Malaysia. Further study is required to determine the public health significance of PRV infection in Southeast Asia, especially in cases where co-infection with other pathogens may potentially lead to different clinical outcomes.

  13. Patterns of antimicrobial use for respiratory tract infections in older residents of long-term care facilities

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    OBJECTIVE: To describe patterns of antimicrobial use for respiratory tract infections (RTIs) among elderly residents of long-term care facilities (LTCFs). DESIGN: Data from a prospective, randomized, controlled study conducted from April 1998 through August 2001 to investigate the effect of vitamin ...

  14. Clinical and pathological responses of pigs from two genetically diverse commercial lines to porcine respiratory and reproductive syndrome virus infection

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The response to infection from porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) for two genetically diverse commercial pig lines was investigated. Seventy two pigs from each line, aged 6 weeks, were challenged with PRRSV VR-2385, and 66 littermates served as control. The clinical response...

  15. Whole blood microarray analysis of pigs showing extreme phenotypes after a porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus infection

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background Observed variability in pig response to Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome virus (PRRSv) infection, and recently demonstrated genetic control of such responses, suggest that it may be possible to reduce the economic impact of this disease by selecting more disease-resistant pig...

  16. [Infection prevention and control for foodborne infections].

    PubMed

    Mitsuda, Toshihiro

    2012-08-01

    Patients' care for foodborne infections is sometimes very critical, since these patients exerting high copy numbers of contagious pathogens. Recently, Norovirus infection became the most frequent pathogen for large outbreaks in the community and the hospital around the world. Norovirus is alcohol-resistant and highly contagious. For preventing outbreaks of foodborne infections, standard precaution(and contact precaution for diaper changing patients) is required by the CDC's isolation precaution guideline revised at 2007. We need to provide for infection prevention and control in the epidemic winter period not only in healthcare facilities but also for communities.

  17. Intravenous immunoglobulin treatment of respiratory syncytial virus infections in infants and young children.

    PubMed Central

    Hemming, V G; Rodriguez, W; Kim, H W; Brandt, C D; Parrott, R H; Burch, B; Prince, G A; Baron, P A; Fink, R J; Reaman, G

    1987-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)-infected cotton rats (Sigmadon hispidus) and owl monkeys (Aotus trivirgatus) showed significant reductions in RSV shedding from their respiratory tracts following parenteral therapy with human intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) containing high titers of RSV-neutralizing antibody. Because this therapy was well tolerated and appeared safe, a double-blind, placebo-controlled IVIG immunotherapy pilot study was performed on 35 hospitalized, RSV-infected infants and children. The treatment was well tolerated and resulted in significant reductions in nasal RSV shedding and in improvements in transcutaneous oximetry readings. However, the mean duration of hospitalization was not reduced by IVIG treatment. Followup to date has revealed no harmful effects resulting from immunotherapy of RSV infections. These studies appear to refute the hypothesis that passively acquired antibody may exacerbate RSV bronchiolitis or pneumonia in infants. Studies with larger numbers of seriously ill children will be required to determine if immunoglobulin G immunotherapy of RSV infections in infants is of clinical value. PMID:3439796

  18. Viral bacterial co-infection of the respiratory tract during early childhood.

    PubMed

    Brealey, Jaelle C; Sly, Peter D; Young, Paul R; Chappell, Keith J

    2015-05-01

    Acute respiratory infection (ARI) is an important cause of morbidity in children. Mixed aetiology is frequent, with pathogenic viruses and bacteria co-detected in respiratory secretions. However, the clinical significance of these viral/bacterial co-infections has long been a controversial topic. While severe bacterial pneumonia following influenza infection has been well described, associations are less clear among infections caused by viruses that are more common in young children, such as respiratory syncytial virus. Although assessing the overall contribution of bacteria to disease severity is complicated by the presence of many confounding factors in clinical studies, understanding the role of viral/bacterial co-infections in defining the outcome of paediatric ARI will potentially reveal novel treatment and prevention strategies, improving patient outcomes. This review summarizes current evidence for the clinical significance of respiratory viral/bacterial co-infections in young children, discusses possible mechanisms of cooperative interaction between these pathogens and highlights areas that require further investigation.

  19. Use of bacterial antigen detection in the diagnosis of pediatric lower respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, B W; Marcuse, E K; Foy, H M; Cooney, M K; Allan, I; Brewer, D; Smith, A L

    1986-07-01

    Two immunochemical methods were used to identify Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pneumoniae capsular antigens in the urine and serum of 162 children with acute lower respiratory tract infection. These methods were compared with standard bacterial blood culture. Viral and mycoplasma cultures of respiratory secretions were obtained simultaneously to determine the frequency of antigenuria at the time of nonbacterial acute lower respiratory tract infection. Urine from groups of well children and children with acute otitis media was tested for capsular antigens to determine the incidence of antigenuria. Antigenuria was found in 24% of children 2 months to 18 years of age with acute lower respiratory tract infection compared with a 2% incidence of bacteremia. Antigenuria was found in 4% of asymptomatic children and 16% of children with acute otitis media. One third of children with symptoms of acute lower respiratory tract infection and viral isolates from the oropharynx had bacterial antigenuria. The sixfold increase in frequency of bacterial antigenuria in children at the time of lower respiratory symptoms suggests that bacterial acute lower respiratory tract infection may be more common than identified by traditional culture techniques. Because bacterial antigen may come from other sites such as the middle ear, further studies are needed to determine the role of antigen detection in the diagnosis of pediatric acute lower respiratory tract infection.

  20. Hospital admissions for lower respiratory tract infections among infants in the Canadian Arctic: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Banerji, Anna; Panzov, Val; Young, Michael; Robinson, Joan; Lee, Bonita; Moraes, Theo; Mamdani, Muhammad; Giles, B. Louise; Jiang, Depeng; Bisson, Danny; Dennis, Marguerite; Morel, Johanne; Hall, Judith; Hui, Charles; Paes, Bosco; Mahony, James B.

    2016-01-01

    Background: It is unknown whether this burden of disease of lower respiratory tract infections is comparable across the Canadian Arctic. The objectives of this surveillance study were to compare the rates of hospital admission for lower respiratory tract infection and the severity of infection across Arctic Canada, and to describe the responsible viruses. Methods: We performed a prospective multicentre surveillance study of infants less than 1 year of age admitted in 2009 with lower respiratory tract infection to all hospitals (5 regional, 4 tertiary) in the Northwest Territories, Nunavut and Nunavik to assess for regional differences. Nasopharyngeal aspirates were processed by means of a polymerase chain reaction respiratory viral panel, testing for 20 respiratory viruses and influenza A (H1N1). The role of coinfection was assessed by means of regression analysis for length of stay (short: < 7 d; long: > 14 d). Outcomes compared included rates of lower respiratory tract infection, respiratory syncytial virus infection, transfer to tertiary hospital and severe lower respiratory tract infection (respiratory failure, intubation and mechanical ventilation, and/or cardiopulmonary resuscitation). Results: There were 348 admissions for lower respiratory tract infection in the population of interest in 2009. Rates of admission per 1000 live births varied significantly, from 39 in the Northwest Territories to 456 in Nunavik (p < 0.001). The rates of tertiary admissions and severe lower respiratory tract infection per 1000 live births in the Northwest Territories were 5.6 and 1.4, respectively, compared to 55.9 and 17.1, respectively, in Nunavut and 52.0 and 20.0, respectively, in Nunavik (p ≤ 0.001). Respiratory syncytial virus was the most common virus identified (124 cases [41.6% of those tested]), and coinfection was detected in 51 cases (41.1%) of infection with this virus. Longer length of stay was associated with coinfection (odds ratio [OR] 2.64) and underlying

  1. WU and KI polyomavirus infections in Filipino children with lower respiratory tract disease.

    PubMed

    Rao, Suchitra; Lucero, Marilla G; Nohynek, Hanna; Tallo, Veronica; Lupisan, Socorro P; Garcea, Robert L; Simões, Eric A F

    2016-09-01

    WU and KI are human polyomaviruses initially detected in the respiratory tract, whose clinical significance remains uncertain. To determine the epidemiology, viral load and clinical characteristics of WU and KI polyomaviruses. We tested respiratory specimens collected during a randomized, placebo-controlled pneumococcal conjugate vaccine trial and related epidemiological study in the Philippines. We analyzed 1077 nasal washes from patients aged 6 weeks to 5 years who developed lower respiratory tract illness using quantitative real-time PCR for WU and KI. We collected data regarding presenting symptoms, signs, radiographic findings, laboratory data and coinfection. The prevalence and co-infection rates for WU were 5.3% and 74% respectively and 4.2% and 84% respectively for KI. Higher KI viral loads were observed in patients with severe or very severe pneumonia, those presenting with chest indrawing, hypoxia without wheeze, convulsions, and with KI monoinfection compared with co-infection. There was no significant association between viral load and clinical presentation for WU. These findings suggest a potential pathogenic role for KI, and that there is an association between KI viral load and illness severity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Achromobacter xylosoxidans respiratory tract infection in cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Lambiase, A; Catania, M R; Del Pezzo, M; Rossano, F; Terlizzi, V; Sepe, A; Raia, V

    2011-08-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the frequency of Achromobacter xylosoxidans infection in a cohort of cystic fibrosis patients, to investigate antimicrobial sensitivity, to establish possible clonal likeness among strains, and to address the clinical impact of this infection or colonization on the general outcome of these patients. The study was undertaken between January 2004 and December 2008 on 300 patients receiving care at the Regional Cystic Fibrosis Center of the Naples University "Federico II". Sputum samples were checked for bacterial identification. For DNA fingerprinting, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) was carried out. Fifty-three patients (17.6%) had at least one positive culture for A. xylosoxidans; of these, 6/53 (11.3%) patients were defined as chronically infected and all were co-colonized by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Of the patients, 18.8% persistently carried multidrug-resistant isolates. Macrorestriction analysis showed the presence of seven major clusters. DNA fingerprinting also showed a genetic relationship among strains isolated from the same patients at different times. The results of DNA fingerprinting indicate evidence of bacterial clonal likeness among the enrolled infected patients. We found no significant differences in the forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV(1)) and body mass index (BMI) when comparing the case group of A. xylosoxidans chronically infected patients with the control group of P. aeruginosa chronically infected patients.

  3. Fatal respiratory distress syndrome due to coronavirus infection in a child with severe combined immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Szczawinska-Poplonyk, Aleksandra; Jonczyk-Potoczna, Katarzyna; Breborowicz, Anna; Bartkowska-Sniatkowska, Alicja; Figlerowicz, Magdalena

    2013-09-01

    Coronaviruses have been demonstrated to contribute substantially to respiratory tract infections among the child population. Though infected children commonly present mild upper airway symptoms, in high-risk patients with underlying conditions, particularly in immunocompromised children these pathogens may lead to severe lung infection and extrapulmonary disorders. In this paper, we provide the first report of the case of a 15-month-old child with severe combined immunodeficiency and coronavirus HKU1-related pneumonia with fatal respiratory distress syndrome.

  4. Vaccines for the prevention of respiratory viral infections: problems and current status.

    PubMed

    Olszewska, Wieslawa; Helson, Rebecca; Openshaw, Peter J M

    2004-06-01

    Acute respiratory virus infections cause the majority of lower respiratory tract illnesses and hospitalisations of infants and the elderly. The emergence of new respiratory viruses and a high probability that influenza will cause further pandemics highlights the necessity for developing better preventative strategies. Although there is a clear and pressing need for vaccines to prevent respiratory syncytial virus, rhinoviruses, coronaviruses, parainfluenza and human metapneumovirus, progress has been extremely slow. This review presents the current status of vaccine development for respiratory viral diseases and outlines novel approaches for the future.

  5. Pulmonary cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) and COX-2 cellular expression and distribution after respiratory syncytial virus and parainfluenza virus infection.

    PubMed

    Radi, Zaher A; Meyerholz, David K; Ackermann, Mark R

    2010-02-01

    Prostaglandins (PGs) play an important role in pulmonary physiology and various pathophysiological processes following infection. The initial step in the biosynthesis of PGs is regulated by two distinct cyclooxygenase enzymes, cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) and COX-2. The goal of this study was to investigate the pulmonary cellular localization and distribution of COX-1 and COX-2 in a neonatal lamb model following respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and parainfluenza virus 3 (PI3) infection, organisms that also cause significant respiratory disease in children. No significant differences were seen in pulmonary COX-1 expression at various microanatomical locations following RSV or PI3 infection compared to controls. In contrast, COX-2 was upregulated following RSV and PI3 infection. Strong expression was restricted to bronchial and bronchiolar epithelial cells and macrophages, while minimal expression was present in the same microanatomical locations in the uninfected lungs. Other microanatomical locations in both the controls and the infected lungs lacked expression. This work suggests that during RSV or PI3 infection: (1) COX-1 cellular expression is not altered, (2) COX-2 cellular expression is upregulated in airway bronchiolar and bronchial epithelial cells and macrophages, (3) respiratory epithelium along with macrophages are important microanatomical compartments regulating the host inflammatory response during viral infection, and (4) COX-2 may be a potential target for RSV and PI3 therapy.

  6. Etiology, seasonality, and clinical characteristics of respiratory viruses in children with respiratory tract infections in Eastern India (Bhubaneswar, Odisha).

    PubMed

    Panda, Swagatika; Mohakud, Nirmal Kumar; Suar, Mrutyunjay; Kumar, Subrat

    2017-03-01

    Acute respiratory tract infections (ARTIs) are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in young children in low and middle income countries. To analyse the overall burden of respiratory viruses responsible for ARTIs in paediatrics population in eastern India, this study was performed. Clinical information, demographic information and nasal/oral swabs were collected from 332 paediatric patients (aged from 1 month to 12 years old) with the symptoms of ARTI, enrolled from the outpatient department from Nov 2012 to Oct 2014. Multiplex PCR was performed to detect eight respiratory viral pathogens. Seasonal, as well as age-wise prevalence of respiratory viruses was analysed. Of these 332 cases, 32.53% (108/332) were positive for at least one pathogen. Human rhinovirus (HRV) was the most frequently detected pathogen (24.7%, 82/332) followed by respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) (4.22%, 14/332), PIV (2.11%, 7/332), and hMPV (2.11%, 7/332). Single infection was detected in 92.6% (100/108) of positive cases. Respiratory virus infections showed seasonal variation, with peaks during the rainy season followed by winter season, and were most common in patients under 1 year of age. Phylogenetic analysis of HMPV positive samples confirmed the circulation of A2 subgroup in the study area. The present study is first of its kind and adds to our knowledge of the epidemiological characteristics of these common respiratory viruses among patients with ARTIs in the study area. J. Med. Virol. 89:553-558, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. A Mathematical Model of the Human Respiratory Control System

    PubMed Central

    Milhorn, Howard T.; Benton, Richard; Ross, Richard; Guyton, Arthur C.

    1965-01-01

    The respiratory system exhibits the properties of a control system of the regulator type. Equations describing this biological control system have been derived. Transient and steady-state solutions for various CO2 and O2 step input disturbances were obtained utilizing a digital computer and are compared with experimental results. The effectiveness of the respiratory system as a regulator is investigated. Further extensions of the model are suggested. PMID:14284328

  8. Acute respiratory infections in children: a case management intervention in Abbottabad District, Pakistan.

    PubMed Central

    Khan, A. J.; Khan, J. A.; Akbar, M.; Addiss, D. G.

    1990-01-01

    Between 1985 and 1987, a community-based case-management programme for acute lower respiratory infection (ALRI) was conducted in a rural district of northern Pakistan. The impact on infant and child mortality of this programme, which included active case-finding and maternal health education, was evaluated. In 1985-86, the ALRI-specific mortality rate among children less than 5 years old in 31 intervention villages was 6.3 deaths per 1000 children per year, compared with 14.4 in seven control villages (P = 0.0001). Within one year of the interventions being extended to the control villages in 1987, the ALRI-specific mortality rate in these villages dropped by 55% to 6.5 per 1000 children per year (P = 0.06). The total child mortality rate in 1985-86 was 29.0 per 1000 children per year in the intervention villages and 39.4 per 1000 children in the control villages, a difference of 26% (P = 0.01). With the interventions in 1987, the total child mortality rate in the control villages declined by 29% to 27.8 per 1000 children per year (P = 0.09). Similar intervention-associated declines in the infant mortality rate were also observed. Case management of acute respiratory infection by village-level community health workers backed up by local health centre staff appeared to significantly reduce both ALRI-specific and total infant and child mortality rates in this setting. PMID:2289294

  9. Face and/or neck burns: a risk factor for respiratory infection?

    PubMed

    Costa Santos, D; Barros, F; Gomes, N; Guedes, T; Maia, M

    2016-06-30

    Infections are a common cause of morbidity and mortality in burn patients, and almost 50% of infection-related deaths in burn patients are caused by pneumonia. The proportion of facial and/or neck burns (FNB) in burn centre admissions is high, and these patients have a well known respiratory risk. However, it is not well established in the literature if the occurrence of a FNB is a risk factor for respiratory infection during hospitalization. A retrospective, single-centre trial at the burn unit of the Prelada Hospital was conducted, including patients admitted between January 2011 and December 2014. The primary objective was to investigate the existence of a relation between face and/or neck burns and occurrence of respiratory infection. A total of 229 patients were included in the study, 126 with FNB and 103 without FNB. Higher total body surface area (TBSA) burned, inhalation injury and early endotracheal intubation were statistically more frequent in the FNB group. These variables were also more prevalent in the group that developed respiratory infection during the burn unit stay. Concerning FNB patients, the most frequent microbiological strains isolated in respiratory secretion cultures were Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Streptococcus pneumonia, while in nFNB patients it was Klebsiella pneumoniae. In our population, only early ETI, inhalation injury and higher TBSA appear to be independent risk factors for respiratory infection in FNB patients, although age, male sex and co-morbidities are also known risk factors for respiratory infection in burn patients.

  10. Face and/or neck burns: a risk factor for respiratory infection?

    PubMed Central

    Costa Santos, D.; Barros, F.; Gomes, N.; Guedes, T.; Maia, M.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Infections are a common cause of morbidity and mortality in burn patients, and almost 50% of infection-related deaths in burn patients are caused by pneumonia. The proportion of facial and/or neck burns (FNB) in burn centre admissions is high, and these patients have a well known respiratory risk. However, it is not well established in the literature if the occurrence of a FNB is a risk factor for respiratory infection during hospitalization. A retrospective, single-centre trial at the burn unit of the Prelada Hospital was conducted, including patients admitted between January 2011 and December 2014. The primary objective was to investigate the existence of a relation between face and/or neck burns and occurrence of respiratory infection. A total of 229 patients were included in the study, 126 with FNB and 103 without FNB. Higher total body surface area (TBSA) burned, inhalation injury and early endotracheal intubation were statistically more frequent in the FNB group. These variables were also more prevalent in the group that developed respiratory infection during the burn unit stay. Concerning FNB patients, the most frequent microbiological strains isolated in respiratory secretion cultures were Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Streptococcus pneumonia, while in nFNB patients it was Klebsiella pneumoniae. In our population, only early ETI, inhalation injury and higher TBSA appear to be independent risk factors for respiratory infection in FNB patients, although age, male sex and co-morbidities are also known risk factors for respiratory infection in burn patients. PMID:28149229

  11. Effectiveness of Interventions in Reducing Antibiotic Use for Upper Respiratory Infections in Ambulatory Care Practices

    PubMed Central

    Linkin, Darren R.; Localio, A. Russell; Leonard, Charles E.; Teal, Valerie L.; Fishman, Neil O.; Hennessy, Sean

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The objective was to evaluate the effect of separate interventions on antimicrobial prescribing for uncomplicated upper respiratory tract infections. The authors conducted a quasi-experimental pre-post study with concurrent control groups for each intervention. Academic detailing led to a significant reduction in unnecessary antibiotic prescribing. However, there was no significant change in antibiotic prescribing in response to educational mailings to providers or to provider involvement in patient mailings. Organizations that seek to reduce inappropriate use of antibiotics should use proven approaches, even when they are more expensive. (Population Health Management 2013;16:22–27) PMID:23113630

  12. Etiology and Clinical Characteristics of Single and Multiple Respiratory Virus Infections Diagnosed in Croatian Children in Two Respiratory Seasons.

    PubMed

    Ljubin-Sternak, Sunčanica; Marijan, Tatjana; Ivković-Jureković, Irena; Čepin-Bogović, Jasna; Gagro, Alenka; Vraneš, Jasmina

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the causative agent of acute respiratory infection (ARI) in hospitalized children, as well as investigate the characteristics of ARIs with single and multiple virus detection in two respiratory seasons. In 2010 and 2015, nasopharyngeal and pharyngeal swabs from a total of 134 children, admitted to the hospital due to ARI, were tested using multiplex PCR. Viral etiology was established in 81.3% of the patients. Coinfection with two viruses was diagnosed in 27.6% of the patients, and concurrent detection of three or more viruses was diagnosed in 12.8% of the patients. The most commonly diagnosed virus in both seasons combined was respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) (28.6%), followed by parainfluenza viruses (PIVs) types 1-3 (18.4%), rhinovirus (HRV) (14.3%), human metapneumovirus (10.1%), adenovirus (AdV) (7.1%), influenza viruses types A and B (4.8%), and coronaviruses (4.2%). In 2015, additional pathogens were investigated with the following detection rate: enterovirus (13.2%), bocavirus (HBoV) (10.5%), PIV-4 (2.6%), and parechovirus (1.3%). There were no statistical differences between single and multiple virus infection regarding patients age, localization of infection, and severity of disease (P > 0.05). AdV, HRV, HBoV, and PIVs were significantly more often detected in multiple virus infections compared to the other respiratory viruses (P < 0.001).

  13. Etiology and Clinical Characteristics of Single and Multiple Respiratory Virus Infections Diagnosed in Croatian Children in Two Respiratory Seasons

    PubMed Central

    Marijan, Tatjana; Ivković-Jureković, Irena; Čepin-Bogović, Jasna; Gagro, Alenka; Vraneš, Jasmina

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the causative agent of acute respiratory infection (ARI) in hospitalized children, as well as investigate the characteristics of ARIs with single and multiple virus detection in two respiratory seasons. In 2010 and 2015, nasopharyngeal and pharyngeal swabs from a total of 134 children, admitted to the hospital due to ARI, were tested using multiplex PCR. Viral etiology was established in 81.3% of the patients. Coinfection with two viruses was diagnosed in 27.6% of the patients, and concurrent detection of three or more viruses was diagnosed in 12.8% of the patients. The most commonly diagnosed virus in both seasons combined was respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) (28.6%), followed by parainfluenza viruses (PIVs) types 1–3 (18.4%), rhinovirus (HRV) (14.3%), human metapneumovirus (10.1%), adenovirus (AdV) (7.1%), influenza viruses types A and B (4.8%), and coronaviruses (4.2%). In 2015, additional pathogens were investigated with the following detection rate: enterovirus (13.2%), bocavirus (HBoV) (10.5%), PIV-4 (2.6%), and parechovirus (1.3%). There were no statistical differences between single and multiple virus infection regarding patients age, localization of infection, and severity of disease (P > 0.05). AdV, HRV, HBoV, and PIVs were significantly more often detected in multiple virus infections compared to the other respiratory viruses (P < 0.001). PMID:27656298

  14. Respiratory infections in children up to two years of age on prophylaxis with palivizumab

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, Ana Isabel M. P.; Bellei, Nancy Cristina J.; Sousa, Alessandra Ramos; dos Santos, Amélia Miyashiro N.; Weckx, Lily Yin

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify the viruses involved in acute respiratory tract infections and to analyze the rates of hospitalization and death in children on palivizumab prophylaxis. METHODS: Prospective cohort of 198 infants up to one year old who were born before 29 weeks of gestational age and infants under two years old with hemodynamically unstable cardiopathy or chronic pulmonary disease who received prophylactic palivizumab against severe respiratory syncytial virus infections in 2008. During the study period, in each episode of acute respiratory tract infection, nasopharyngeal aspirate was collected to identify respiratory syncytial virus, adenovirus, parainfluenza 1, 2 and 3, influenza A and B by direct immunofluorescence, rhinovirus and metapneumovirus by polymerase chain reaction preceded by reverse transcription. Data regarding hospitalization and deaths were monitored. RESULTS: Among the 198 studied infants, 117 (59.1%) presented acute respiratory tract infections, with a total of 175 episodes. Of the 76 nasopharyngeal aspirates collected during respiratory tract infections, 37 were positive, as follow: rhinovirus (75.7%), respiratory syncytial virus (18.9%), parainfluenza (8.1%), adenovirus 2 (2.7%), metapneumovirus (2.7%) and three samples presented multiple agents. Of the 198 children, 48 (24.4%) were hospitalized: 30 (15.2%) for non-infectious etiology and 18 (9.1%) for respiratory causes. Among these 18 children, one case of respiratory syncytial virus was identified. Two deaths were reported, but respiratory syncytial virus was not identified. CONCLUSIONS: During the prophylaxis period, low frequency of respiratory syncytial virus infections and low rates of hospitalization were observed, suggesting the benefit of palivizumab prophylaxis. PMID:25119744

  15. Does virus-bacteria coinfection increase the clinical severity of acute respiratory infection?

    PubMed

    Damasio, Guilherme A C; Pereira, Luciane A; Moreira, Suzana D R; Duarte dos Santos, Claudia N; Dalla-Costa, Libera M; Raboni, Sonia M

    2015-09-01

    This retrospective cohort study investigated the presence of bacteria in respiratory secretions of patients hospitalized with acute respiratory infections and analyzed the impact of viral and bacterial coinfection on severity and the mortality rate. A total of 169 patients with acute respiratory infections were included, viruses and bacteria in respiratory samples were detected using molecular methods. Among all samples, 73.3% and 59.7% were positive for viruses and bacteria, respectively; 45% contained both virus and bacteria. Bacterial coinfection was more frequent in patients infected by community respiratory viruses than influenza A H1N1pdm (83.3% vs. 40.6%). The most frequently bacteria detected were Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae. Both species were co-detected in 54 patients and identified alone in 22 and 21 patients, respectively. Overall, there were no significant differences in the period of hospitalization, severity, or mortality rate between patients infected with respiratory viruses alone and those coinfected by viruses and bacteria. The detection of mixed respiratory pathogens is frequent in hospitalized patients with acute respiratory infections, but its impact on the clinical outcome does not appear substantial. However, it should be noted that most of the patients received broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy, which may have contributed to this favorable outcome. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Recurrent respiratory infections: why not talking about it any more?

    PubMed

    Nencioni, E; Chiappini, E; Liguori, A; De Martino, M

    2008-12-01

    Recurrent respiratory infections (RRIs) are a common and benign condition affecting about 6% of schoolchildren. Only mild, likely postinfective, modifications of the immune system have been proven, and parents should be reassured that the condition is self-limited. Nevertheless, if not correctly diagnosed, children may undergo several unnecessary investigations and multiple antibiotic courses. On the other hand, in some cases, efforts should be made to identify promptly possible underlying disease, including congenital or acquired immunodeficiency, vascular or airways malformation, tuberculosis, cystic fibrosis, or immotile-cilia syndrome. Careful medical history and clinical examination are usually sufficient to distinguish RRIs and no further research is generally needed. In uncertain cases a complete blood count with differential and the evaluation of total immunoglobulin serum levels are sufficient to exclude neutropenia, T- or B-lymphocyte defects, and selective IgA deficiency. It is essential to observe environmental risk factors: reducing environmental tobacco smoke at home is a fundamental goal and the postponed enrolment of children at day-care centres reduces the risk of RRIs. Antibiotic treatment are not justified since they do not shorten the course of the condition or prevent complications. Use of anti-cough syrups should be avoided. Nasal lavage with saline serum and the blowing are the only justified interventions. Adenoidectomy and tonsillectomy should be planned only in conditions included in validated guidelines.

  17. [Current epidemiology of microbial low respiratory tract infections].

    PubMed

    Trémolières, F

    2006-01-01

    The recent literature brings nothing new since it provides only fragmented, though undoubtedly useful, studies which remain within the prevalence interval for the different bacterias. The occurrence of germs varies with time and space; nevertheless, whatever the studied series and the site of the studies, the 3 most frequent causal germs belong to the following five strains: Streptococcus pneumoniae, Influenza A, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Legionella pneumophila. Thus, 90% of all documented pneumoniae appear to be caused by the following pathogens: Pneumococcus; most frequent in hospitalized patients; Mycoplasma, Chlamydia and respiratory viruses were predominant in outpatients, with great variations; Staphylococcus and enterobacteriace may be encountered, mostly in elderlies with major debilitating diseases; association of germs, generally including pneumococcus, are increasingly identified. Last, in 25% to 50% of cases, the causal agent is not known. Recently, some Staphylococcus meticillin-resistant were identified. The diagnosis of viruses (as well as that of atypical bacterias) seems to have improved, thanks to the use of PCR though the interest of such a diagnosis remains questionable, except for epidemiological studies, as well as the relevance of this type of test in clinical practice. Nothing really new has come out on the epidemiology of acute bronchitis, while in bacterial exacerbation of COPD, attention focused on the colonizing or infective role of H. influenzae in the genesis of bronchus inflammation.

  18. [Treatment of fungal infections of upper respiratory tract and ear].

    PubMed

    Kurnatowski, Piotr; Kurnatowska, Agnieszka K

    2007-01-01

    Fungi, in comparison with other pathogenic factors, have high pathogenicity. The number of fungal species which are able to infect people is over 500. The upper respiratory tract and ear have permanent contact with external environment which makes their ontocenoses open to continuous exchange of microorganisms of which they consist. In etiology of inflammatory processes 21 species which belonging to 3 genera (Zygomycota, Ascomycota, Basidiomycota) of fungi play important role. Administration of antifungal drugs can be: prophylactic, empiric preemptive and therapeutic. Physicians may prescribe antibiotics (mainly pollens: amphotericin B, natamycin and nystatin) and chemiotherapeutics (mainly azoles and fluorpirymidins, pigments, chlorhexidine and chlorquinaldol). In ENT practice topical and systemic drugs can be administrated. Topical lozenges include amphotericin B, clotrimazole, chlorhexidine or chlorquinaldol and oral gels: nystatin and miconazole. Some of drugs are in the form of suspension/solution, which can be used for inhalation, into the sinus, for swabbing or for lavage: amphotericin B, natamycin, nystatin, clotrimazol, flucytosine, miconazole, fluconazole, vorykonazole, caspofungin. It should be underlined that only a few of dugs can be absorbed from the digestive tract: flucytosine, fluconazole, itraconazole, ketoconazole, miconazole, vorykonazole.

  19. The bacterial lysate Lantigen B reduces the number of acute episodes in patients with recurrent infections of the respiratory tract: the results of a double blind, placebo controlled, multicenter clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Braido, Fulvio; Melioli, Giovanni; Candoli, Piero; Cavalot, Andrea; Di Gioacchino, Mario; Ferrero, Vittorio; Incorvaia, Cristoforo; Mereu, Carlo; Ridolo, Erminia; Rolla, Giovanni; Rossi, Oliviero; Savi, Eleonora; Tubino, Libero; Reggiardo, Giorgio; Baiardini, Ilaria; di Marco, Eddi; Rinaldi, Gilberto; Canonica, Giorgio Walter; Accorsi, Carlo; Bossilino, Claudia; Bonzano, Laura; DiLizia, Michela; Fedrighini, Barbara; Garelli, Valentina; Gerace, Vincenzo; Maniscalco, Sara; Massaro, Ilaria; Messi, Alessandro; Milanese, Manlio; Peveri, Silvia; Penno, Arminio; Pizzimenti, Stefano; Pozzo, Tiziana; Raie, Alberto; Regina, Sergio; Sclifò, Francesca

    2014-12-01

    Studies in the 1970s and 1980s reported that bacterial lysates (BL) had a prophylactic effect on recurrent respiratory tract infections (RRTI). However, controlled clinical study procedures have evolved substantially since then. We performed a trial using updated methods to evaluate the efficacy of Lantigen B®, a chemical BL. This double blind, placebo controlled, multi-center clinical trial had the primary objective of assessing the capacity of Lantigen B to significantly reduce the total number of infectious episodes in patients with RRTI. Secondary aims were the RRTI duration, the frequency and the severity of the acute episodes, the use of drugs and the number of missed workdays. In the subgroup of allergic patients with RRTI, the number of allergic episodes (AE) and the use of anti-allergic drugs were also evaluated. One hundred and sixty patients, 79 allocated to the treated group (TG) and 81 to the placebo group (PG), were enrolled; 30 were lost during the study and 120 (79 females and 38 males) were evaluated. The PG had 1.43 episodes in the 8-months of follow-up while the TG had 0.86 episodes (p=0.036). A similar result was observed in the allergic patients (1.80 and 0.86 episodes for the PG and the TG, respectively, p=0.047). The use of antibiotics was reduced (mean 1.24 and 2.83 days of treatment for the TG and the PG). Logistic regression analysis indicated that the estimated risk of needing antibiotics and NSAIDs was reduced by 52.1 and 30.6%, respectively. With regard to the number of AE, no significant difference was observed between the two groups, but bronchodilators, antihistamines and local corticosteroids were reduced by 25.7%, 56.2% and 41.6%, respectively, in the TG. Lantigen B significantly reduced the number of infectious episodes in patients with RRTI. This finding suggests a first line use of this drug for the prophylaxis of infectious episodes in these patients.

  20. Patterns of Human Respiratory Viruses and Lack of MERS-Coronavirus in Patients with Acute Upper Respiratory Tract Infections in Southwestern Province of Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Alshrari, Ahmed S.; Badroon, Nassrin A.; Hassan, Ahmed M.; Alsubhi, Tagreed L.; Ejeeli, Saleh

    2017-01-01

    We undertook enhanced surveillance of those presenting with respiratory symptoms at five healthcare centers by testing all symptomatic outpatients between November 2013 and January 2014 (winter time). Nasal swabs were collected from 182 patients and screened for MERS-CoV as well as other respiratory viruses using RT-PCR and multiplex microarray. A total of 75 (41.2%) of these patients had positive viral infection. MERS-CoV was not detected in any of the samples. Human rhinovirus (hRV) was the most detected pathogen (40.9%) followed by non-MERS-CoV human coronaviruses (19.3%), influenza (Flu) viruses (15.9%), and human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) (13.6%). Viruses differed markedly depending on age in which hRV, Flu A, and hCoV-OC43 were more prevalent in adults and RSV, hCoV-HKU1, and hCoV-NL63 were mostly restricted to children under the age of 15. Moreover, coinfection was not uncommon in this study, in which 17.3% of the infected patients had dual infections due to several combinations of viruses. Dual infections decreased with age and completely disappeared in people older than 45 years. Our study confirms that MERS-CoV is not common in the southwestern region of Saudi Arabia and shows high diversity and prevalence of other common respiratory viruses. This study also highlights the importance and contribution of enhanced surveillance systems for better infection control. PMID:28348590

  1. Efficacy of combined vaccination against Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus in dually infected pigs.

    PubMed

    Bourry, Olivier; Fablet, Christelle; Simon, Gaëlle; Marois-Créhan, Corinne

    2015-11-18

    Porcine respiratory disease complex (PRDC) is one of the main causes of economic losses for swine producers. This complex is due to a combination of different pathogens and their interactions. Two major pathogens involved in PRDC are Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (Mhp) and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV). The objectives of this study were (i) to develop an experimental model of dual Mhp/PRRSV infection in SPF pigs with European strains of Mhp and PRRSV and (ii) to assess and compare the effects of single Mhp, single PRRSV or combined Mhp/PRRSV vaccination against this dual infection. Pigs dually infected with Mhp and PRRSV showed a combination of symptoms characteristic of each pathogen but no significant exacerbation of pathogenicity. Thus, the co-infected pigs displayed coughing and pneumonia typical of Mhp infection in addition to PRRSV-related hyperthermia and decrease in average daily gain (ADG). Hyperthermia was reduced in PRRSV vaccinated animals (single or combined vaccination), whereas ADG was restored in Mhp/PRRSV vaccinated pigs only. Regarding respiratory symptoms and lung lesions, no vaccine decreased coughing. However, all vaccines reduced the pneumonia score but more so in animals receiving the Mhp vaccine, whether single or combined. This vaccine also decreased the Mhp load in the respiratory tract. In conclusion, combined vaccination against both Mhp and PRRSV efficiently pooled the efficacy of each single PRRSV and Mhp vaccination and could be an interesting tool to control PRDC in European swine production.

  2. Human Metapneumovirus Infection is Associated with Severe Respiratory Disease in Preschool Children with History of Prematurity

    PubMed Central

    Pancham, Krishna; Sami, Iman; Perez, Geovanny F.; Huseni, Shehlanoor; Kurdi, Bassem; Rose, Mary C.; Rodriguez-Martinez, Carlos E.; Nino, Gustavo

    2017-01-01

    Rationale Human metapneumovirus (HMPV) is a recently discovered respiratory pathogen of the family Paramyxoviridae, the same of Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV). Premature children are at high risk of severe RSV infections, but it is unclear whether HMPV infection is more severe in hospitalized children with history of severe prematurity. Methods We conducted a retrospective analysis of the clinical respiratory presentation of all PCR-confirmed HMPV infections in preschool age children (≤5 yrs.) with and without history of severe prematurity (<32 weeks gestation). Respiratory distress scores were developed to examine the clinical severity of HMPV infections. Demographic and clinical variables were obtained from reviewing electronic medical records (EMR). Results A total of 571 pre-school children were identified by PCR-confirmed viral respiratory tract infection during the study period. HMPV was identified as a causative organism in 63 cases (11%). Fifty–eight (n=58) preschool age children with HMPV infection were included in this study after excluding those with significant co-morbidities. Our data demonstrated that 32.7% of children admitted with HMPV had history of severe prematurity. Preschool children with history of prematurity had more severe HMPV disease as illustrated by longer hospitalizations, new or increased need for supplemental O2, and higher severity scores independently of age, ethnicity and history of asthma. Conclusion Our study suggests that HMPV infection causes significant disease burden among preschool children with history of prematurity leading to severe respiratory infections and increasing health care resource utilization due to prolonged hospitalizations. PMID:26117550

  3. Predictors of hypoxaemia in hospital admissions with acute lower respiratory tract infection in a developing country

    PubMed Central

    Weber, M.; Usen, S.; Palmer, A.; Jaffar, S.; Mulholland, E

    1997-01-01

    Accepted 5 November 1996
 Since oxygen has to be given to most children in developing countries on the basis of clinical signs without performing blood gas analyses, possible clinical predictors of hypoxaemia were studied. Sixty nine children between the ages of 2 months and 5 years admitted to hospital with acute lower respiratory tract infection and an oxygen saturation (SaO2) < 90% were compared with 67 children matched for age and diagnosis from the same referral hospital with an SaO2 of 90% or above (control group 1), and 44unreferred children admitted to a secondary care hospital with acute lower respiratory infection (control group 2). Using multiple logistic regression analysis, sleepiness, arousal, quality of cry, cyanosis, head nodding, decreased air entry, nasal flaring, and upper arm circumference were found to be independent predictors of hypoxaemia on comparison of the cases with control group 1.Using a simple model of cyanosis or head nodding or not crying, the sensitivity to predict hypoxaemia was 59%, and the specificity 94% and 93% compared to control groups 1 and 2, respectively; 80% of the children with an SaO2 < 80% were identified by the combination of these signs. Over half of the children with hypoxaemia could be identified with a combination of three signs: extreme respiratory distress, cyanosis, and severely compromised general status. Further prospective validation of this model with other datasets is warranted. No other signs improved the sensitivity without compromising specificity. If a higher sensitivity is required, pulse oximetry has to be used.

 PMID:9166021

  4. [Risk factors for severe acute lower respiratory tract infection in Bogota, 2001].

    PubMed

    Jaimes, María Belén; Cáceres, Diana C; de la Hoz, Fernando; Gutiérrez, Camilo; Herrera, Diana; Pinilla, Jairo; Porras, Alexandra; Rodríguez, Fabio; Velandia, Martha

    2003-09-01

    Severity of acute respiratory infection is higher in developing countries, especially among the socioeconomically underprivileged. Viral pneumonias are more common, especially among children. A prospective hospital-based case control study was undertaken in Bogota between November 2000 and August 2001, aimed to identify factors related to severe low acute respiratory infection (SLARI). Cases were limited to children aged between 2 months and 5 years who filled WHO criteria for SLARI. Controls were children at the same hospital with ARI in a similar age range, but without symptoms of chest drawing. A total of 638 children (277 cases and 361 controls) were included. The most important risk factors included the following: living in borrowed houses (odds ratio (OR) = 2.7; 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 1.06-7.07), sharing the bed (OR = 1.88, CI: 1.0-3.7), living with more than 9 people (OR = 1.82, CI: 1.0-3.51), and living with smokers (OR = 1.4, CI: 1.0-2.05). Of the 114 samples collected (from children at third day after beginning of symptoms), 98 had viruses, sincitial respiratory virus was the most frequently identified virus (41.8%), followed by influenza A virus (3.1%) and influenza B virus (1%). All positive isolates for influenza A and B were sent to the United States Center for Disease Control (CDC) in Atlanta, where they were classified as influenza A/PANAMA/2007/99-like and influenza B/SICHUAN/379/99-like, respectively.

  5. Rhinitis, asthma and respiratory infections among adults in relation to the home environment in multi-family buildings in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan; Engvall, Karin; Smedje, Greta; Norbäck, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Risk factors for rhinitis, asthma and respiratory infections in the home environment were studied by a questionnaire survey. Totally 5775 occupants (≥ 18 years old) from a stratified random sample of multi-family buildings in Sweden participated (46%). 51.0% had rhinitis in the last 3 months (current rhinitis); 11.5% doctor diagnosed asthma; 46.4% respiratory infections in the last 3 months and 11.9% antibiotic medication for respiratory infections in the last 12 months. Associations between home environment and health were analyzed by multiple logistic regression, controlling for gender, age and smoking and mutual adjustment. Buildings constructed during 1960-1975 were risk factors for day time breathlessness (OR = 1.53, 95%CI 1.03-2.29). And those constructed during 1976-1985 had more current rhinitis (OR = 1.43, 95%CI 1.12-1.84) and respiratory infections (OR = 1.46, 95%CI 1.21-1.78). Cities with higher population density had more current rhinitis (p = 0.008) and respiratory infections (p<0.001). Rented apartments had more current rhinitis (OR = 1.23, 95%CI 1.07-1.40), wheeze (OR = 1.20, 95%CI 1.02-1.41), day time breathlessness (OR = 1.31, 95%CI 1.04-1.66) and respiratory infections (OR = 1.13, 95%CI 1.01-1.26). Living in colder parts of the country was a risk factor for wheeze (p = 0.03) and night time breathlessness (p = 0.002). Building dampness was a risk factor for wheeze (OR = 1.42, 95%CI 1.08-1.86) and day time breathlessness (OR = 1.57, 95%CI 1.09-2.27). Building dampness was a risk factor for health among those below 66 years old. Odor at home was a risk factor for doctor diagnosed asthma (OR = 1.49, 95%CI 1.08-2.06) and current asthma (OR = 1.52, 95%CI 1.03-2.24). Environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) was a risk factor for current asthma (OR = 1.53, 95%CI 1.09-2.16). Window panel condensation was a risk factor for antibiotic medication for respiratory infections (OR = 1.41, 95%CI 1.10-1.82). In conclusion, rhinitis, asthma and respiratory infections

  6. Heme Oxygenase-1 Modulates Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus Replication and Lung Pathogenesis during Infection.

    PubMed

    Espinoza, Janyra A; León, Miguel A; Céspedes, Pablo F; Gómez, Roberto S; Canedo-Marroquín, Gisela; Riquelme, Sebastían A; Salazar-Echegarai, Francisco J; Blancou, Phillipe; Simon, Thomas; Anegon, Ignacio; Lay, Margarita K; González, Pablo A; Riedel, Claudia A; Bueno, Susan M; Kalergis, Alexis M

    2017-07-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) is the leading cause of severe lower respiratory tract infections in children. The development of novel prophylactic and therapeutic antiviral drugs against hRSV is imperative to control the burden of disease in the susceptible population. In this study, we examined the effects of inducing the activity of the host enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) on hRSV replication and pathogenesis on lung inflammation induced by this virus. Our results show that after hRSV infection, HO-1 induction with metalloporphyrin cobalt protoporphyrin IX significantly reduces the loss of body weight due to hRSV-induced disease. Further, HO-1 induction also decreased viral replication and lung inflammation, as evidenced by a reduced neutrophil infiltration into the airways, with diminished cytokine and chemokine production and reduced T cell function. Concomitantly, upon cobalt protoporphyrin IX treatment, there is a significant upregulation in the production of IFN-α/β mRNAs in the lungs. Furthermore, similar antiviral and protective effects occur by inducing the expression of human HO-1 in MHC class II(+) cells in transgenic mice. Finally, in vitro data suggest that HO-1 induction can modulate the susceptibility of cells, especially the airway epithelial cells, to hRSV infection. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  7. Relationships between A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza infection and infections with other respiratory viruses.

    PubMed

    Meningher, Tal; Hindiyeh, Musa; Regev, Liora; Sherbany, Hilda; Mendelson, Ella; Mandelboim, Michal

    2014-07-01

    A(H1N1)pdm09, a new influenza pandemic virus emerged in 2009. The A(H1N1)pdm09 infection had several unique characteristics which included rapid transmissibility and high morbidity in obese individuals, pregnant women and individuals suffering from chronic diseases. To study the relationships between A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza infection and infections with other respiratory viruses such as respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), human metapneumo virus (hMPV), adenovirus and seasonal influenza. Samples (nasopharyngeal swabs or aspirates) collected between 2007 until 2012 from patients of various ages that were hospitalized due to respiratory virus infections were analyzed for the presence of various respiratory viruses, using qRT-PCR. In 2009-2010, when the pandemic influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 first appeared, two major infection peaks were noted and individuals of various ages were infected. Following the decline of the A(H1N1)pdm09 virus infection, the percentages of patients infected with adenovirus and hMPV increased, while infection frequency with RSV B and with seasonal influenza virus decreased. Furthermore, RSV infections were delayed and very few percentages of patients were co-infected with more than one virus. Interestingly, the A(H1N1)pdm09 virus lost its dominancy when it reappeared in the winter of 2010-2011, and at this time, only the incidence of RSV infections was affected by the A(H1N1)pdm09 virus. The A(H1N1)pdm09 virus had distinct effects on other respiratory viruses when it first appeared versus later, when it evolved from being a pandemic to a seasonal virus. © 2014 The Authors. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Is There Still Room for Novel Viral Pathogens in Pediatric Respiratory Tract Infections?

    PubMed Central

    Taboada, Blanca; Espinoza, Marco A.; Isa, Pavel; Aponte, Fernando E.; Arias-Ortiz, María A.; Monge-Martínez, Jesús; Rodríguez-Vázquez, Rubén; Díaz-Hernández, Fidel; Zárate-Vidal, Fernando; Wong-Chew, Rosa María; Firo-Reyes, Verónica; del Río-Almendárez, Carlos N.; Gaitán-Meza, Jesús; Villaseñor-Sierra, Alberto; Martínez-Aguilar, Gerardo; Salas-Mier, Ma. del Carmen; Noyola, Daniel E.; Pérez-Gónzalez, Luis F.; López, Susana; Santos-Preciado, José I.; Arias, Carlos F.

    2014-01-01

    Viruses are the most frequent cause of respiratory disease in children. However, despite the advanced diagnostic methods currently in use, in 20 to 50% of respiratory samples a specific pathogen cannot be detected. In this work, we used a metagenomic approach and deep sequencing to examine respiratory samples from children with lower and upper respiratory tract infections that had been previously found negative for 6 bacteria and 15 respiratory viruses by PCR. Nasal washings from 25 children (out of 250) hospitalized with a diagnosis of pneumonia and nasopharyngeal swabs from 46 outpatient children (out of 526) were studied. DNA reads for at least one virus commonly associated to respiratory infections was found in 20 of 25 hospitalized patients, while reads for pathogenic respiratory bacteria were detected in the remaining 5 children. For outpatients, all the samples were pooled into 25 DNA libraries for sequencing. In this case, in 22 of the 25 sequenced libraries at least one respiratory virus was identified, while in all other, but one, pathogenic bacteria were detected. In both patient groups reads for respiratory syncytial virus, coronavirus-OC43, and rhinovirus were identified. In addition, viruses less frequently associated to respiratory infections were also found. Saffold virus was detected in outpatient but not in hospitalized children. Anellovirus, rotavirus, and astrovirus, as well as several animal and plant viruses were detected in both groups. No novel viruses were identified. Adding up the deep sequencing results to the PCR data, 79.2% of 250 hospitalized and 76.6% of 526 ambulatory patients were positive for viruses, and all other children, but one, had pathogenic respiratory bacteria identified. These results suggest that at least in the type of populations studied and with the sampling methods used the odds of finding novel, clinically relevant viruses, in pediatric respiratory infections are low. PMID:25412469

  9. Is there still room for novel viral pathogens in pediatric respiratory tract infections?

    PubMed

    Taboada, Blanca; Espinoza, Marco A; Isa, Pavel; Aponte, Fernando E; Arias-Ortiz, María A; Monge-Martínez, Jesús; Rodríguez-Vázquez, Rubén; Díaz-Hernández, Fidel; Zárate-Vidal, Fernando; Wong-Chew, Rosa María; Firo-Reyes, Verónica; del Río-Almendárez, Carlos N; Gaitán-Meza, Jesús; Villaseñor-Sierra, Alberto; Martínez-Aguilar, Gerardo; Salas-Mier, Ma del Carmen; Noyola, Daniel E; Pérez-Gónzalez, Luis F; López, Susana; Santos-Preciado, José I; Arias, Carlos F

    2014-01-01

    Viruses are the most frequent cause of respiratory disease in children. However, despite the advanced diagnostic methods currently in use, in 20 to 50% of respiratory samples a specific pathogen cannot be detected. In this work, we used a metagenomic approach and deep sequencing to examine respiratory samples from children with lower and upper respiratory tract infections that had been previously found negative for 6 bacteria and 15 respiratory viruses by PCR. Nasal washings from 25 children (out of 250) hospitalized with a diagnosis of pneumonia and nasopharyngeal swabs from 46 outpatient children (out of 526) were studied. DNA reads for at least one virus commonly associated to respiratory infections was found in 20 of 25 hospitalized patients, while reads for pathogenic respiratory bacteria were detected in the remaining 5 children. For outpatients, all the samples were pooled into 25 DNA libraries for sequencing. In this case, in 22 of the 25 sequenced libraries at least one respiratory virus was identified, while in all other, but one, pathogenic bacteria were detected. In both patient groups reads for respiratory syncytial virus, coronavirus-OC43, and rhinovirus were identified. In addition, viruses less frequently associated to respiratory infections were also found. Saffold virus was detected in outpatient but not in hospitalized children. Anellovirus, rotavirus, and astrovirus, as well as several animal and plant viruses were detected in both groups. No novel viruses were identified. Adding up the deep sequencing results to the PCR data, 79.2% of 250 hospitalized and 76.6% of 526 ambulatory patients were positive for viruses, and all other children, but one, had pathogenic respiratory bacteria identified. These results suggest that at least in the type of populations studied and with the sampling methods used the odds of finding novel, clinically relevant viruses, in pediatric respiratory infections are low.

  10. Ameliorating Effect of Dietary Xylitol on Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus (hRSV) Infection.

    PubMed

    Xu, Mei Ling; Wi, Ga Ram; Kim, Hyoung Jin; Kim, Hong-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) is the most common cause of bronchiolitis and pneumonia in infants. The lack of proper prophylactics and therapeutics for controlling hRSV infection has been of great concern worldwide. Xylitol is a well-known sugar substitute and its effect against bacteria in the oral cavity is well known. However, little is known of its effect on viral infections. In this study, the effect of dietary xylitol on hRSV infection was investigated in a mouse model for the first time. Mice received xylitol for 14 d prior to virus challenge and for a further 3 d post challenge. Significantly larger reductions in lung virus titers were observed in the mice receiving xylitol than in the controls receiving phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). In addition, fewer CD3(+) and CD3(+)CD8(+) lymphocytes, whose numbers reflect inflammatory status, were recruited in the mice receiving xylitol. These results indicate that dietary xylitol can ameliorate hRSV infections and reduce inflammation-associated immune responses to hRSV infection.

  11. Influenza Virus Respiratory Infection and Transmission Following Ocular Inoculation in Ferrets

    PubMed Central

    Belser, Jessica A.; Gustin, Kortney M.; Maines, Taronna R.; Pantin-Jackwood, Mary J.; Katz, Jacqueline M.; Tumpey, Terrence M.

    2012-01-01

    While influenza viruses are a common respiratory pathogen, sporadic reports of conjunctivitis following human infection demonstrates the ability of this virus to cause disease outside of the respiratory tract. The ocular surface represents both a potential site of virus replication and a portal of entry for establishment of a respiratory infection. However, the properties which govern ocular tropism of influenza viruses, the mechanisms of virus spread from ocular to respiratory tissue, and the potential differences in respiratory disease initiated from different exposure routes are poorly understood. Here, we established a ferret model of ocular inoculation to explore the development of virus pathogenicity and transmissibility following influenza virus exposure by the ocular route. We found that multiple subtypes of human and avian influenza viruses mounted a productive virus infection in the upper respiratory tract of ferrets following ocular inoculation, and were additionally detected in ocular tissue during the acute phase of infection. H5N1 viruses maintained their ability for systemic spread and lethal infection following inoculation by the ocular route. Replication-independent deposition of virus inoculum from ocular to respiratory tissue was limited to the nares and upper trachea, unlike traditional intranasal inoculation which results in virus deposition in both upper and lower respiratory tract tissues. Despite high titers of replicating transmissible seasonal viruses in the upper respiratory tract of ferrets inoculated by the ocular route, virus transmissibility to naïve contacts by respiratory droplets was reduced following ocular inoculation. These data improve our understanding of the mechanisms of virus spread following ocular exposure and highlight differences in the establishment of respiratory disease and virus transmissibility following use of different inoculation volumes and routes. PMID:22396651

  12. Perinatal steroid exposure and respiratory control during early postnatal life.

    PubMed

    Soliz, J; Joseph, V

    2005-11-15

    Numerous factors involved in general homeostasis are able to modulate respiratory motor output. These include placental-derived steroids, which are necessary for maternal physiological adjustments during gestation, including respiratory stimulation. Despite the fact that these hormones exert potent effects on neural development in the fetus, the hypothesis of a developmental control of the neural respiratory network by placental-derived steroids has been approached experimentally only recently. The objective of this review is to summarize the role and mode of action of placental steroids on respiratory control in adult mammals and highlight the potential pathways by which such steroids are supplied to the developing fetus. Additionally, we present recent results showing that the beta estradiol and progesterone receptors are expressed in the carotid body of newborn male rats, thus supporting the hypothesis of receptor-mediated effect of estradiol and progesterone on carotid bodies.

  13. Acute middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus infection in livestock Dromedaries, Dubai, 2014.

    PubMed

    Wernery, Ulrich; Corman, Victor M; Wong, Emily Y M; Tsang, Alan K L; Muth, Doreen; Lau, Susanna K P; Khazanehdari, Kamal; Zirkel, Florian; Ali, Mansoor; Nagy, Peter; Juhasz, Jutka; Wernery, Renate; Joseph, Sunitha; Syriac, Ginu; Elizabeth, Shyna K; Patteril, Nissy Annie Georgy; Woo, Patrick C Y; Drosten, Christian

    2015-06-01

    Camels carry Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus, but little is known about infection age or prevalence. We studied >800 dromedaries of all ages and 15 mother-calf pairs. This syndrome constitutes an acute, epidemic, and time-limited infection in camels <4 years of age, particularly calves. Delayed social separation of calves might reduce human infection risk.

  14. Presentation of severe combined immunodeficiency with respiratory syncytial virus and pneumocystis co-infection.

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Pinilla, Nerea; Allende-Martínez, Luis; Corral Sánchez, María Dolores; Arocena, Jaime de Inocencio; González-Granado, Luis Ignacio

    2015-04-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency can cause severe, life-threatening viral, bacterial and fungal infections at an early age. We report a case of a 4-month-old boy with co-infection by respiratory syncytial virus and Pneumocystis jiroveci infection that led to recognition of severe combined immunodeficiency.

  15. Respiratory disease trends in the Pulmonary Complications of HIV Infection Study cohort. Pulmonary Complications of HIV Infection Study Group.

    PubMed

    Wallace, J M; Hansen, N I; Lavange, L; Glassroth, J; Browdy, B L; Rosen, M J; Kvale, P A; Mangura, B T; Reichman, L B; Hopewell, P C

    1997-01-01

    We examined trends in the incidence of specific respiratory disorders in a multicenter cohort with progressive human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease during a 5-yr period. Individuals with a wide range of HIV disease severity belonging to three transmission categories were evaluated at regular intervals and for episodic respiratory symptoms using standard diagnostic algorithms. Yearly incidence rates of respiratory diagnoses were assessed in the cohort as a whole and according to CD4 count or HIV transmission category. The most frequent respiratory disorders were upper respiratory tract infections, but the incidence of lower respiratory tract infections increased as CD4 counts declined. Specific lower respiratory infections followed distinctive patterns according to study-entry CD4 count and transmission category. Acute bronchitis was the predominant lower respiratory infection of cohort members with entry CD4 counts > or = 200 cells/mm3. In cohort members with entry CD4 counts of 200 to 499 cells/mm3, the incidence of bacterial and Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia each increased an average of 40% per year. In members with entry CD4 counts < 200 cells/mm3, acute bronchitis, bacterial pneumonia, and P. carinii pneumonia occurred at high rates without discernible time trends, despite chemoprophylaxis in more than 80% after Year 1, and the rate of other pulmonary opportunistic infections increased over time. Each year, injecting drug users had a higher incidence of bacterial pneumonia than did homosexual men. The yearly rate of tuberculosis was < 3 episodes/100 person-yr in each entry CD4 and HIV-transmission group. We conclude that the time trends of HIV-associated respiratory disorders are determined by HIV disease stage and influenced by transmission category. Whereas acute bronchitis is prevalent during all stages of HIV infection, incidence rates of bacterial pneumonia and P. carinii pneumonia rise continuously during progression to advanced disease. In

  16. Infection control and prevention considerations.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Titus L; Talbot, Thomas R

    2014-01-01

    Due to the nature of their underlying illness and treatment regimens, cancer patients are at increased risk of infection. Though the advent and widespread use of anti-infective agents has allowed for the application of ever-greater immune-suppressing therapies with successful treatment of infectious complications, prevention of infection remains the primary goal. The evolutionary changes of microorganisms, whereby resistance to anti-infective therapy is increasingly common, have facilitated a paradigm shift in the field of healthcare epidemiology. No longer is the focus on "control" of infection once established in a healthcare environment. Rather, the emphasis is on prevention of infection before it occurs. The most basic tenet of infection prevention, and the cornerstone of all well-designed infection prevention and control programs, is hand hygiene. The hands of healthcare workers provide a common potential source for transmission of infectious agents, and effective decontamination of the hands reduces the risk of transmission of infectious material to other patients. Once infection is suspected or established; however, implementation of effective control strategies is important to limit the spread of infection within a healthcare environment. This chapter outlines the basic tenets of infection prevention, principles of isolation precautions and control measures, and elements for a successful infection control and prevention program.

  17. Respiratory and allergic diseases: from upper respiratory tract infections to asthma.

    PubMed

    Jaber, Raja

    2002-06-01

    patient, mind-body interventions such as yoga, hypnosis, and biofeedback-assisted relaxation and breathing exercises are beneficial for stress reduction in general and may be helpful in further controlling asthma. Encouraging parents to learn how to massage their asthmatic children may appeal to some parents and provide benefits for parents and children alike. Acupuncture and chiropractic treatment cannot be recommended at this time, although some patients may derive benefit because of the placebo effect. For patients with allergic rhinitis, there are no good clinical research data on the use of quercetin and vitamin C. Similarly, freeze-dried stinging nettle leaves may be tried, but the applicable research evidence also is poor. Further studies are needed to assess the efficacy of these supplements and herbs. Homeopathic remedies based on extreme dilutions of the allergen may be beneficial in allergic rhinitis but require collaboration with an experienced homeopath. There are no research data on constitutional homeopathic approaches to asthma and allergic rhinitis. Patients with COPD are helped by exercise, pulmonary rehabilitation, and increased caloric protein and fat intake. Vitamin C and n-3 supplements are safe and reasonable; however, studies are needed to establish their efficacy in COPD. On the other hand, there are convincing data in favor of N-acetyl-cysteine supplementation for the patient with COPD at doses ranging between 400 and 1200 mg daily. Red blood cell magnesium levels may guide the use of magnesium replacement. The use of L-carnitine and coenzyme Q10 in patients with COPD needs further study. The addition of essential oils to the dietary regimen of patients with chronic bronchitis is worth exploring. Patients with upper respiratory tract infections can expect a shorter duration of symptoms by taking high doses of vitamin C (2 g) with zinc supplements, preferably the nasal zinc gel, at the onset of their symptoms. Adding an herb such as echinacea or

  18. Complete Genome Sequences of Four Different Bordetella sp. Isolates Causing Human Respiratory Infections

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yanhui; Loparev, Vladimir; Batra, Dhwani; Bowden, Katherine E.; Cassiday, Pamela K.; Davis, Jamie K.; Johnson, Taccara; Juieng, Phalasy; Miner, Christine E.; Rowe, Lori; Sheth, Mili; Tondella, M. Lucia; Williams, Margaret M.

    2016-01-01

    Species of the genus Bordetella associate with various animal hosts, frequently causing respiratory disease. Bordetella pertussis is the primary agent of whooping cough and other Bordetella species can cause similar cough illness. Here, we report four complete genome sequences from isolates of different Bordetella species recovered from human respiratory infections. PMID:27795250

  19. Cluster of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Infections in Iran, 2014

    PubMed Central

    Yavarian, Jila; Rezaei, Farshid; Shadab, Azadeh; Soroush, Mahmood; Gooya, Mohammad Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    During January 2013–August 2014, a total of 1,800 patients in Iran who had respiratory illness were tested for Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus. A cluster of 5 cases occurred in Kerman Province during May–July 2014, but virus transmission routes for some infections were unclear. PMID:25626079

  20. Saffold Cardioviruses of 3 Lineages in Children with Respiratory Tract Infections, Beijing, China

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Lili; Gonzalez, Richard; Xie, Zhengde; Xiao, Yan; Li, Yongjun; Liu, Chunyan; Chen, Lan; Yang, Qingqing; Vernet, Guy; Paranhos-Baccalà, Gláucia; Jin, Qi; Shen, Kunling

    2010-01-01

    To clarify the potential for respiratory transmission of Saffold cardiovirus (SAFV) and characterize the pathogen, we analyzed respiratory specimens from 1,558 pediatric patients in Beijing. We detected SAFV in 7 (0.5%) patients and identified lineages 1–3. However, because 3 patients had co-infections, we could not definitively say SAFV caused disease. PMID:20587195

  1. Influenza virus respiratory infection and transmission following ocular inoculation in ferrets

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    While influenza viruses are a common respiratory pathogen, sporadic reports of conjunctivitis following human infection demonstrates the ability of this virus to cause disease outside of the respiratory tract. The ocular surface represents both a potential site of virus replication and a portal of e...

  2. Respiratory source control using surgical masks with nanofiber media.

    PubMed

    Skaria, Shaji D; Smaldone, Gerald C

    2014-07-01

    Potentially infected individuals ('source') are sometimes encouraged to use face masks to reduce exposure of their infectious aerosols to others ('receiver'). To improve compliance with Respiratory Source Control via face mask and therefore reduce receiver exposure, a mask should be comfortable and effective. We tested a novel face mask designed to improve breathability and filtration using nanofiber filtration. Using radiolabeled test aerosols and a calibrated exposure chamber simulating source to receiver interaction, facepiece function was measured with a life-like ventilated manikin model. Measurements included mask airflow resistance (pressure difference during breathing), filtration, (mask capture of exhaled radiolabeled test aerosols), and exposure (the transfer of 'infectious' aerosols from the 'source' to a 'receiver'). Polydisperse aerosols were measured at the source with a mass median aerodynamic diameter of 0.95 µm. Approximately 90% of the particles were <2.0 µm. Tested facepieces included nanofiber prototype surgical masks, conventional surgical masks, and for comparison, an N95-class filtering facepiece respirator (commonly known as an 'N95 respirator'). Airflow through and around conventional surgical face mask and nanofiber prototype face mask was visualized using Schlieren optical imaging. Airflow resistance [ΔP, cmH2O] across sealed surgical masks (means: 0.1865 and 0.1791 cmH2O) approached that of the N95 (mean: 0.2664 cmH2O). The airflow resistance across the nanofiber face mask whether sealed or not sealed (0.0504 and 0.0311 cmH2O) was significantly reduced in comparison. In addition, 'infected' source airflow filtration and receiver exposure levels for nanofiber face masks placed on the source were comparable to that achieved with N95 placed on the source; 98.98% versus 82.68% and 0.0194 versus 0.0557, respectively. Compared to deflection within and around the conventional face masks, Schlieren optical imaging demonstrated enhanced

  3. Hyperimmune globulins in prevention and treatment of respiratory syncytial virus infections.

    PubMed Central

    Hemming, V G; Prince, G A; Groothuis, J R; Siber, G R

    1995-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is an important community and nosocomial respiratory pathogen for infants and young children. RSV causes especially severe disease in the prematurely born or those with chronic cardiopulmonary diseases. Elderly persons and those with T-cell deficiencies, such as bone marrow transplant recipients, are also at high risk for serious lower respiratory tract infections. To date, prevention of RSV infections by vaccination has proven elusive and no preventive drugs exist. Studies in animals and humans have shown that the lower respiratory tract can be protected from RSV infection by sufficient circulating RSV neutralizing antibody levels. Recently, an RSV hyperimmune immune globulin (RSVIG) was developed and tested for the prevention of RSV infections or reduction of disease severity. Passive immunization of high-risk children with RSVIG during the respiratory disease season effected significant reductions in RSV infections, hospitalizations, days of hospitalization, intensive care unit admissions, days in the intensive care unit, and ribavirin use. Studies in cotton rats and owl monkeys show that RSV infections can also be treated with inhalation of immune globulin at doses substantially smaller than required for parenteral treatment. Therapeutic trials of parenteral RSVIG have been completed and are pending analysis. The use of polyclonal, hyperimmune globulins and perhaps human monoclonal antibodies provides an additional approach to the prevention and perhaps the treatment of certain viral lower respiratory tract infections such as those caused by RSV. PMID:7704893

  4. Hyperimmune globulins in prevention and treatment of respiratory syncytial virus infections.

    PubMed

    Hemming, V G; Prince, G A; Groothuis, J R; Siber, G R

    1995-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is an important community and nosocomial respiratory pathogen for infants and young children. RSV causes especially severe disease in the prematurely born or those with chronic cardiopulmonary diseases. Elderly persons and those with T-cell deficiencies, such as bone marrow transplant recipients, are also at high risk for serious lower respiratory tract infections. To date, prevention of RSV infections by vaccination has proven elusive and no preventive drugs exist. Studies in animals and humans have shown that the lower respiratory tract can be protected from RSV infection by sufficient circulating RSV neutralizing antibody levels. Recently, an RSV hyperimmune immune globulin (RSVIG) was developed and tested for the prevention of RSV infections or reduction of disease severity. Passive immunization of high-risk children with RSVIG during the respiratory disease season effected significant reductions in RSV infections, hospitalizations, days of hospitalization, intensive care unit admissions, days in the intensive care unit, and ribavirin use. Studies in cotton rats and owl monkeys show that RSV infections can also be treated with inhalation of immune globulin at doses substantially smaller than required for parenteral treatment. Therapeutic trials of parenteral RSVIG have been completed and are pending analysis. The use of polyclonal, hyperimmune globulins and perhaps human monoclonal antibodies provides an additional approach to the prevention and perhaps the treatment of certain viral lower respiratory tract infections such as those caused by RSV.

  5. Dexamethasone for treatment of patients mechanically ventilated for lower respiratory tract infection caused by respiratory syncytial virus

    PubMed Central

    van Woensel, J B M; van Aalderen, W M C; de Weerd, W; Jansen, N; van Gestel, J P J; Markhorst, D; van Vught, A J; Bos, A; Kimpen, J

    2003-01-01

    Background: A study was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy of dexamethasone in patients mechanically ventilated for lower respiratory infection caused by respiratory syncytial virus (RSV-LRTI). Methods: In a multicentre randomised controlled trial patients were randomised to receive either intravenous dexamethasone (0.15 mg/kg 6 hourly for 48 hours) or placebo. End points were the duration of mechanical ventilation, length of stay (LOS) in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) and in hospital, and the duration of supplemental oxygen administration. Results: Thirty seven patients received dexamethasone and 45 received placebo. There was no significant difference in any of the end points between the two groups. In a post hoc analysis patients were stratified into those with mild gas exchange anomalies (PaO2/FiO2 >200 mm Hg and/or mean airway pressure ⩽ 10 cm H2O, bronchiolitis group) and those with severe gas exchange anomalies (PaO2/FiO2 ⩽200 mm Hg and mean airway pressure >10 cm H2O, pneumonia group). In the 39 patients with bronchiolitis the duration of mechanical ventilation was 4.3 days shorter in the dexamethasone group than in the placebo group (4.9 v 9.2 days, 95% CI -7.8 to -0.8, p=0.02) and the duration of supplemental oxygen was 3.6 days shorter (7.7 v 11.3 days, 95% CI -8.0 to -0.1, p=0.048). No differences in end points were found in the pneumonia group. Conclusions: Dexamethasone had no beneficial effect in patients mechanically ventilated for RSV-LRTI but was found to have a beneficial effect in patients with bronchiolitis. PMID:12728156

  6. Controlled human malaria infection.

    PubMed

    Spring, Michele; Polhemus, Mark; Ockenhouse, Christian

    2014-06-15

    Since 1986, investigators at Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (WRAIR) have been using controlled human malaria challenge (CHMI) in malaria-naive adults in order to define the protective efficacy of a malaria vaccine and thus guide programmatic decisions on vaccine candidates. Adapting this model to the dengue field could provide similar evidential support for a vaccine or therapeutic product. After completing a vaccine regimen, volunteers are bitten by 5 malaria-infected female Anopheles mosquitoes in a controlled environment. Volunteers are then monitored daily for peripheral parasitemia in a hotel setting with 24-hour access to a nurse and physician. If a single verified parasite is detected, effective antimalarials are promptly administered. The vast majority of the over 1000 volunteers having participated in CHMI clinical studies have done so at US military research centers. Numerous pre-erythrocytic and erythrocytic vaccine candidates have been evaluated safely and without any related serious adverse events using this model, including the soon-to-be licensed RTS,S malaria vaccine. The lessons learned from over 25 years of experience in consistent, careful preparation and execution of the CHMI model at WRAIR can provide a foundation from which the dengue field can begin to develop a rigorous and safe "CHDI" model. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Respiratory syncytial virus infection enhances Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm growth through dysregulation of nutritional immunity

    PubMed Central

    Hendricks, Matthew R.; Lashua, Lauren P.; Fischer, Douglas K.; Flitter, Becca A.; Eichinger, Katherine M.; Durbin, Joan E.; Sarkar, Saumendra N.; Coyne, Carolyn B.; Empey, Kerry M.; Bomberger, Jennifer M.

    2016-01-01

    Clinical observations link respiratory virus infection and Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization in chronic lung disease, including cystic fibrosis (CF) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The development of P. aeruginosa into highly antibiotic-resistant biofilm communities promotes airway colonization and accounts for disease progression in patients. Although clinical studies show a strong correlation between CF patients’ acquisition of chronic P. aeruginosa infections and respiratory virus infection, little is known about the mechanism by which chronic P. aeruginosa infections are initiated in the host. Using a coculture model to study the formation of bacterial biofilm formation associated with the airway epithelium, we show that respiratory viral infections and the induction of antiviral interferons promote robust secondary P. aeruginosa biofilm formation. We report that the induction of antiviral IFN signaling in response to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection induces bacterial biofilm formation through a mechanism of dysregulated iron homeostasis of the airway epithelium. Moreover, increased apical release of the host iron-binding protein transferrin during RSV infection promotes P. aeruginosa biofilm development in vitro and in vivo. Thus, nutritional immunity pathways that are disrupted during respiratory viral infection create an environment that favors secondary bacterial infection and may provide previously unidentified targets to combat bacterial biofilm formation. PMID:26729873

  8. Respiratory syncytial virus infection enhances Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm growth through dysregulation of nutritional immunity.

    PubMed

    Hendricks, Matthew R; Lashua, Lauren P; Fischer, Douglas K; Flitter, Becca A; Eichinger, Katherine M; Durbin, Joan E; Sarkar, Saumendra N; Coyne, Carolyn B; Empey, Kerry M; Bomberger, Jennifer M

    2016-02-09

    Clinical observations link respiratory virus infection and Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization in chronic lung disease, including cystic fibrosis (CF) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The development of P. aeruginosa into highly antibiotic-resistant biofilm communities promotes airway colonization and accounts for disease progression in patients. Although clinical studies show a strong correlation between CF patients' acquisition of chronic P. aeruginosa infections and respiratory virus infection, little is known about the mechanism by which chronic P. aeruginosa infections are initiated in the host. Using a coculture model to study the formation of bacterial biofilm formation associated with the airway epithelium, we show that respiratory viral infections and the induction of antiviral interferons promote robust secondary P. aeruginosa biofilm formation. We report that the induction of antiviral IFN signaling in response to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection induces bacterial biofilm formation through a mechanism of dysregulated iron homeostasis of the airway epithelium. Moreover, increased apical release of the host iron-binding protein transferrin during RSV infection promotes P. aeruginosa biofilm development in vitro and in vivo. Thus, nutritional immunity pathways that are disrupted during respiratory viral infection create an environment that favors secondary bacterial infection and may provide previously unidentified targets to combat bacterial biofilm formation.

  9. The CHICO (Children's Cough) Trial protocol: a feasibility randomised controlled trial investigating the clinical and cost-effectiveness of a complex intervention to improve the management of children presenting to primary care with acute respiratory tract infection.

    PubMed

    Turnbull, Sophie L; Redmond, Niamh M; Lucas, Patricia; Cabral, Christie; Ingram, Jenny; Hollinghurst, Sandra; Hay, Alastair D; Peters, Tim J; Horwood, Jeremy; Little, Paul; Francis, Nick; Blair, Peter S

    2015-09-15

    While most respiratory tract infections (RTIs) will resolve without treatment, many children will receive antibiotics and some will develop severe symptoms requiring hospitalisation. There have been calls for evidence to reduce uncertainty regarding the identification of children who will and will not benefit from antibiotics. The aim of this feasibility trial is to test recruitment and the acceptance of a complex behavioural intervention designed to reduce antibiotic prescribing, and to inform how best to conduct a larger trial. The CHICO (Children's Cough) trial is a single-centre feasibility cluster randomised controlled trial (RCT) comparing a web-based, within-consultation, behavioural intervention with usual care for children presenting to general practitioner practices with RTI and acute cough. The trial aims to recruit at least 300 children between October 2014 and April 2015, in a single area in South West England. Following informed consent, demographic information will be recorded, and symptoms and signs measured. Parents/carers of recruited children will be followed up on a weekly basis to establish symptom duration, resource use and cost of the illness to the parent until the child's cough has resolved or up to 8 weeks, whichever occurs earlier. A review of medical notes, including clinical history, primary care reconsultations and hospitalisations will be undertaken 2 months after recruitment. The trial feasibility will be assessed by: determining acceptability of the intervention to clinicians and parent/carers; quantifying differential recruitment and follow-up; determining intervention fidelity; the success in gathering the data necessary to conduct a cost-effectiveness analysis; and collecting data about antibiotic prescribing rates to inform the sample size needed for a fully powered RCT. The study was approved by the North West-Haydock Research Ethics Committee, UK (reference number: 14/NW/1034). The findings from this feasibility trial will

  10. Outcome of the Respiratory Syncytial Virus related acute lower respiratory tract infection among hospitalized newborns: a prospective multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Alan, Serdar; Erdeve, Omer; Cakir, Ufuk; Akduman, Hasan; Zenciroglu, Aysegul; Akcakus, Mustafa; Tunc, Turan; Gokmen, Zeynel; Ates, Can; Atasay, Begum; Arsan, Saadet

    2016-01-01

    To determine the incidence and outcomes of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)-related acute lower respiratory tract infection (ALRI) including morbidity, nosocomial infection and mortality among newborn infants who were admitted to the neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). A multicenter, prospective study was conducted in newborns who were hospitalized with community acquired or nosocomial RSV infection in 44 NICUs throughout Turkey. Newborns with ALRI were screened for RSV infection by Respi-Strip®-test. Main outcome measures were the incidence of RSV-associated admissions in the NICUs and morbidity, mortality and epidemics results related to these admissions. The incidence of RSV infection was 1.24% (n: 250) and RSV infection constituted 19.6% of all ALRI hospitalizations, 226 newborns (90.4%) had community-acquired whereas 24 (9.6%) patients had nosocomial RSV infection in the NICUs. Of the 250 newborns, 171 (68.4%) were full-term infants, 183 (73.2%) had a BW >2500 g. RSV-related mortality rate was 1.2%. Four NICUs reported seven outbreaks on different months, which could be eliminated by palivizumab prophylaxis in one NICU. RSV-associated ALRI both in preterm and term infants accounts an important percent of hospitalizations in the season, and may threat other high-risk patients in the NICU.

  11. Mortality from respiratory infections and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and associations with environmental quality.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Respiratory infections (RI) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have been identified by the World Health Organization as conditions which may be strongly influenced by environmental factors. We examined the associations between environmental quality and U.S. county m...

  12. Mortality from respiratory infections and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and associations with environmental quality.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Respiratory infections (RI) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have been identified by the World Health Organization as conditions which may be strongly influenced by environmental factors. We examined the associations between environmental quality and U.S. county m...

  13. Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus: transmission, virology and therapeutic targeting to aid in outbreak control

    PubMed Central

    Durai, Prasannavenkatesh; Batool, Maria; Shah, Masaud; Choi, Sangdun

    2015-01-01

    Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) causes high fever, cough, acute respiratory tract infection and multiorgan dysfunction that may eventually lead to the death of the infected individuals. MERS-CoV is thought to be transmitted to humans through dromedary camels. The occurrence of the virus was first reported in the Middle East and it subsequently spread to several parts of the world. Since 2012, about 1368 infections, including ~487 deaths, have been reported worldwide. Notably, the recent human-to-human ‘superspreading' of MERS-CoV in hospitals in South Korea has raised a major global health concern. The fatality rate in MERS-CoV infection is four times higher compared with that of the closely related severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus infection. Currently, no drug has been clinically approved to control MERS-CoV infection. In this study, we highlight the potential drug targets that can be used to develop anti-MERS-CoV therapeutics. PMID:26315600

  14. Care-seeking behavior for upper respiratory infections.

    PubMed

    Solberg, L I; Braun, B L; Fowles, J B; Kind, E A; Anderson, R S; Healey, M L

    2000-10-01

    Many recent efforts to reduce unnecessary medical services have targeted care of upper respiratory infections (URIs). We tested whether patients who seek care very early in their illness differ from those who seek care later and whether they might require a different approach to care. We surveyed by telephone 257 adult patients and 249 parents of child patients who called or visited one of 3 primary care clinics within 10 days (adults) or 14 days (parents) of the onset of uncomplicated URI symptoms. Those who contacted the clinic within the first 2 days of illness were compared with those who made contact later. Although 28% of adults and 41% of parents contacted their clinic within the first 2 days of symptom onset, we found very few differences in the characteristics of the caller or patient between those who called early and later. The illnesses of those who called early were not more severe, and they did not have different beliefs, histories, approaches to medical care, or needs. The only clinician-relevant difference was that adult patients calling in the first 2 days had a greater desire to rule out complications (84.7% vs 64.1% calling in 3-5 days and 70.6% calling after 5 days of illness, P < or = .05). Those who seek medical care very early for a URI do not appear to be different in clinically important ways. If we are going to reduce overuse of medical care and antibiotics for URIs, clinical trials of more effective and efficient strategies are needed to encourage home care and self-management.

  15. Cognitive reflection and antibiotic prescribing for acute respiratory infections

    PubMed Central

    Pineros, Dwan B; Doctor, Jason N; Friedberg, Mark W; Meeker, Daniella; Linder, Jeffrey A

    2016-01-01

    Background. Variation in clinical decision-making could be explained by clinicians’ tendency to make ‘snap-decisions’ versus making more reflective decisions. One common clinical decision with unexplained variation is the prescription of antibiotics for acute respiratory infections (ARIs). Objective. We hypothesized that clinicians who tended toward greater cognitive reflection would be less likely to prescribe antibiotics for ARIs. Methods. The Cognitive Reflection Test (CRT) is a psychological test with three questions with intuitive but incorrect answers that respondents reach if they do not consider the question carefully. The CRT is scored from 0 to 3, representing the number of correct answers. A higher score indicates greater cognitive reflection. We administered the CRT to 187 clinicians in 50 primary care practices. From billing and electronic health record data, we calculated clinician-level antibiotic prescribing rates for ARIs in 3 categories: all ARIs, antibiotic-appropriate ARIs and non-antibiotic-appropriate ARIs. Results. A total of 57 clinicians (31%) scored 0 points on the CRT; 38 (20%) scored 1; 51 (27%) scored 2; and 41 (22%) scored 3. We found a roughly U-shaped association between cognitive reflection and antibiotic prescribing. The antibiotic prescribing rate for CRT scores of 0, 1, 2 and 3 for all ARIs (n = 37080 visits) was 32%, 26%, 25% and 30% (P = 0.10); for antibiotic-appropriate ARIs (n = 11220 visits) was 60%, 55%, 54% and 58% (P = 0.63); and for non-antibiotic-appropriate ARIs (n = 25860 visits) was 21%, 17%, 13% and 18%, respectively (P = 0.03). Conclusions. In contrast to our hypothesis, there appears to be a ‘sweet-spot’ of cognitive reflection for antibiotic prescribing for non-antibiotic-appropriate ARIs. Differences in clinicians’ cognitive reflection may be associated with other variations in care. PMID:27006411

  16. Cognitive reflection and antibiotic prescribing for acute respiratory infections.

    PubMed

    Pineros, Dwan B; Doctor, Jason N; Friedberg, Mark W; Meeker, Daniella; Linder, Jeffrey A

    2016-06-01

    Variation in clinical decision-making could be explained by clinicians' tendency to make 'snap-decisions' versus making more reflective decisions. One common clinical decision with unexplained variation is the prescription of antibiotics for acute respiratory infections (ARIs). We hypothesized that clinicians who tended toward greater cognitive reflection would be less likely to prescribe antibiotics for ARIs. The Cognitive Reflection Test (CRT) is a psychological test with three questions with intuitive but incorrect answers that respondents reach if they do not consider the question carefully. The CRT is scored from 0 to 3, representing the number of correct answers. A higher score indicates greater cognitive reflection. We administered the CRT to 187 clinicians in 50 primary care practices. From billing and electronic health record data, we calculated clinician-level antibiotic prescribing rates for ARIs in 3 categories: all ARIs, antibiotic-appropriate ARIs and non-antibiotic-appropriate ARIs. A total of 57 clinicians (31%) scored 0 points on the CRT; 38 (20%) scored 1; 51 (27%) scored 2; and 41 (22%) scored 3. We found a roughly U-shaped association between cognitive reflection and antibiotic prescribing. The antibiotic prescribing rate for CRT scores of 0, 1, 2 and 3 for all ARIs (n = 37080 visits) was 32%, 26%, 25% and 30% (P = 0.10); for antibiotic-appropriate ARIs (n = 11220 visits) was 60%, 55%, 54% and 58% (P = 0.63); and for non-antibiotic-appropriate ARIs (n = 25860 visits) was 21%, 17%, 13% and 18%, respectively (P = 0.03). In contrast to our hypothesis, there appears to be a 'sweet-spot' of cognitive reflection for antibiotic prescribing for non-antibiotic-appropriate ARIs. Differences in clinicians' cognitive reflection may be associated with other variations in care. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Weather impacts on respiratory infections in Athens, Greece.

    PubMed

    Nastos, Panagiotis T; Matzarakis, Andreas

    2006-07-01

    In this study the contribution of meteorological parameters to the total variability of respiratory infections (RI) is analysed. For this purpose, data on the daily numbers of general practitioner (GP) consultations for RI during the year 2002 were used. This dataset has been compiled by the Local Health Service in the surroundings of Athens, Greece (Acharnes city). The meteorological data obtained by the Meteorological Station of the National Observatory of Athens comprise daily values of mean, maximum, and minimum air temperature, air temperature range, relative humidity, absolute humidity, sunshine, surface atmospheric pressure, wind speed, as well as day-to-day changes of these parameters. Furthermore, the following biometeorological parameters and thermal indices were also evaluated: mean radiant temperature (T (mrt)), predicted mean vote (PMV), physiologically equivalent temperature (PET) and standard effective temperature (SET*) as well as their day-to-day changes. First, the relationship between every meteorological-biometeorological parameter and consultations for RI was examined by applying the Pearson Chi-Square Test (chi (2)) to the data of the 25 compiled contingency tables. In the second stage, the application of generalised linear models (GLM) with Poisson distribution to the data revealed how much the weather variability leads to statistically important changes in consultations for RI. The results of this study contribute to the evidence that there is an association between weather conditions and the number of GP consultations for RI. More specifically, the influence of air temperature and absolute humidity on consultations on the same day is weaker than the lag effect ( approximately 2 weeks) related to cold existence and absolute humidity, while a strong wind during the preceding 3 days drives a peak in GP consultations.

  18. Systematic review of the treatment of upper respiratory tract infection

    PubMed Central

    Fahey, T.; Stocks, N.; Thomas, T.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To assess the risks and benefits of antibiotic treatment in children with symptoms of upper respiratory tract infection (URTI).
DESIGN—Quantitative systematic review of randomised trials that compare antibiotic treatment with placebo.
DATA SOURCES—Twelve trials retrieved from a systematic search (electronic databases, contact with authors, contact with drug manufacturers, reference lists); no restriction on language.
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES—The proportion of children in whom the clinical outcome was worse or unchanged; the proportion of children who suffered complications or progression of illness; the proportion of children who had side effects.
RESULTS—1699 children were randomised in six trials that contributed to the meta-analysis. Six trials were not used in the meta-analysis because of different outcomes or incomplete data. Clinical outcome was not improved by antibiotic treatment (relative risk 1.01,95% confidence interval (CI) 0.90 to 1.13), neither was the proportion of children suffering from complications or progression of illness (relative risk 0.71, 95% CI 0.45 to 1.12). Complications from URTI in the five trials that reported this outcome was low (range 2-15%). Antibiotic treatment was not associated with an increase in side effects compared with placebo (relative risk 0.8, 95% CI 0.54 to 1.21).
CONCLUSIONS—In view of the lack of efficacy and low complication rates, antibiotic treatment of children with URTI is not supported by current evidence from randomised trials.

 PMID:9875017

  19. Symptomatic Respiratory Virus Infection and Chronic Lung Allograft Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Cynthia E.; Preiksaitis, Carl M.; Lease, Erika D.; Edelman, Jeffrey; Kirby, Katharine A.; Leisenring, Wendy M.; Raghu, Ganesh; Boeckh, Michael; Limaye, Ajit P.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Chronic lung allograft dysfunction (CLAD) is a major cause of allograft loss post-lung transplantation. Prior studies have examined the association between respiratory virus infection (RVI) and CLAD were limited by older diagnostic techniques, study design, and case numbers. We examined the association between symptomatic RVI and CLAD using modern diagnostic techniques in a large contemporary cohort of lung transplant recipients (LTRs). Methods. We retrospectively assessed clinical variables including acute rejection, cytomegalovirus pneumonia, upper and lower RVI, and the primary endpoint of CLAD (determined by 2 independent reviewers) in 250 LTRs in a single university transplantation program. Univariate and multivariate Cox models were used to analyze the relationship between RVI and CLAD in a time-dependent manner, incorporating different periods of risk following RVI diagnosis. Results. Fifty patients (20%) were diagnosed with CLAD at a median of 95 weeks post-transplantation, and 79 (32%) had 114 episodes of RVI. In multivariate analysis, rejection and RVI were independently associated with CLAD (adjusted hazard ratio [95% confidence interval]) 2.2 (1.2–3.9), P = .01 and 1.9 (1.1–3.5), P = .03, respectively. The association of RVI with CLAD was stronger the more proximate the RVI episode: 4.8 (1.9–11.6), P < .01; 3.4 (1.5–7.5), P < .01; and 2.4 (1.2–5.0), P = .02 in multivariate analysis for 3, 6, and 12 months following RVI, respectively. Conclusions. Symptomatic RVI is independently associated with development of CLAD, with increased risk at shorter time periods following RVI. Prospective studies to characterize the virologic determinants of CLAD and define the underlying mechanisms are warranted. PMID:26565010

  20. Viral respiratory infections at the Hajj: comparison between UK and Saudi pilgrims.

    PubMed

    Rashid, H; Shafi, S; Haworth, E; El Bashir, H; Memish, Z A; Sudhanva, M; Smith, M; Auburn, H; Booy, R

    2008-06-01

    A high incidence of respiratory infection, including influenza, has been reported at the Hajj in Mecca, Saudi Arabia. Reported rates of influenza have been higher among UK than among domestic pilgrims, but this could be explained by methodological differences among studies. Accordingly, the present study compared the frequencies of respiratory viruses among UK and Saudi pilgrims using the same study design. Pilgrims with upper respiratory tract symptoms were recruited from Mecca and the neighbouring valley Mina during the Hajj 2006. Nasal swabs were used for point-of-care influenza testing and real-time RT-PCR (rtRT-PCR) tests for influenza virus, rhinovirus, parainfluenza virus, adenovirus, human metapneumovirus and respiratory syncytial virus. Of 260 pilgrims investigated, 150 were from the UK and 110 were Saudi; of these, 38 (25%) UK pilgrims and 14 (13%) Saudi pilgrims had respiratory infections detectable by rtRT-PCR (p 0.01). In the UK group, there were 19 (13%) cases of rhinovirus infection, 15 (10%) cases of influenza virus infection, two (1%) cases of dual infections with influenza virus and rhinovirus, one (3%) case of parainfluenza virus infection, and one (1%) case of respiratory syncytial virus infection. Fifty-six (37%) UK pilgrims had been vaccinated against influenza virus, with the rates of influenza in the vaccinated and unvaccinated group being 7% and 14%, respectively (p 0.19). In the Saudi group, there were three (3%) cases of rhinovirus infection and 11 (10%) cases of influenza. Only four (4%) Saudi pilgrims had been vaccinated against influenza virus, and none of these was infected with influenza virus. Overall, a significantly higher proportion of the UK pilgrims had detectable respiratory infections (25% vs. 13%, p 0.01). Influenza rates were similar in both groups, but the reported rates of influenza vaccination differed.

  1. Impact of respiratory infection in the results of cardiac surgery in a tertiary hospital in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Isaac Newton Guimarães; de Araújo, Diego Torres Aladin; de Moraes, Fernando Ribeiro

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the impact of respiratory tract infection in the postoperative period of cardiac surgery in relation to mortality and to identify patients at higher risk of developing this complication. Methods Cross-sectional observational study conducted at the Recovery of Cardiothoracic Surgery, using information from a database consisting of a total of 900 patients operated on in this hospital during the period from 01/07/2008 to 1/07/2009. We included patients whose medical records contained all the information required and undergoing elective surgery, totaling 109 patients with two excluded. Patients were divided into two groups, WITH and WITHOUT respiratory tract infection, as the development or respiratory tract infection in hospital, with patients in the group without respiratory tract infection, the result of randomization, using for the pairing of the groups the type of surgery performed. The outcome variables assessed were mortality, length of hospital stay and length of stay in intensive care unit. The means of quantitative variables were compared using the Wilcoxon and student t-test. Results The groups were similar (average age P=0.17; sex P=0.94; surgery performed P=0.85-1.00) Mortality in the WITH respiratory tract infection group was significantly higher (P<0.0001). The times of hospitalization and intensive care unit were significantly higher in respiratory tract infection (P<0.0001). The presence of respiratory tract infection was associated with the development of other complications such as renal failure dialysis and stroke P<0.00001 and P=0.002 respectively. Conclusion The development of respiratory tract infection postoperative cardiac surgery is related to higher mortality, longer periods of hospitalization and intensive care unit stay. PMID:26313727

  2. Ethnic variations in morbidity and mortality from lower respiratory tract infections: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Markus FC; Cezard, Genevieve; Bansal, Narinder; Fischbacher, Colin; Douglas, Anne; Bhopal, Raj; Sheikh, Aziz

    2015-01-01

    Objective There is evidence of substantial ethnic variations in asthma morbidity and the risk of hospitalisation, but the picture in relation to lower respiratory tract infections is unclear. We carried out an observational study to identify ethnic group differences for lower respiratory tract infections. Design A retrospective, cohort study. Setting Scotland. Participants 4.65 million people on whom information was available from the 2001 census, followed from May 2001 to April 2010. Main outcome measures Hospitalisations and deaths (any time following first hospitalisation) from lower respiratory tract infections, adjusted risk ratios and hazard ratios by ethnicity and sex were calculated. We multiplied ratios and confidence intervals by 100, so the reference Scottish White population’s risk ratio and hazard ratio was 100. Results Among men, adjusted risk ratios for lower respiratory tract infection hospitalisation were lower in Other White British (80, 95% confidence interval 73–86) and Chinese (69, 95% confidence interval 56–84) populations and higher in Pakistani groups (152, 95% confidence interval 136–169). In women, results were mostly similar to those in men (e.g. Chinese 68, 95% confidence interval 56–82), although higher adjusted risk ratios were found among women of the Other South Asians group (145, 95% confidence interval 120–175). Survival (adjusted hazard ratio) following lower respiratory tract infection for Pakistani men (54, 95% confidence interval 39–74) and women (31, 95% confidence interval 18–53) was better than the reference population. Conclusions Substantial differences in the rates of lower respiratory tract infections amongst different ethnic groups in Scotland were found. Pakistani men and women had particularly high rates of lower respiratory tract infection hospitalisation. The reasons behind the high rates of lower respiratory tract infection in the Pakistani community are now required. PMID:26152675

  3. [Prospects of use coryneformic bacteria drug to prevent and treat respiratory infections].

    PubMed

    Shmeleva, E A; Vartanian, R V; Aleshkin, V A; Paramonova, Iu Aq; Baturina, i G; Malyshev, N A

    2008-01-01

    This work shows the Codivac efficiency in its aerosol form to treat children sick of influenza and acute respiratory viral infections. Course of therapy with the Codivac drug leads to improve clinical picture and rapid elimination virus from human organism as compared with children undergone traditional therapy. Recovery is accompanied with improving of indices of cell immunity. The article shows the prospects of use Codivac to prevent and treat respiratory infections.

  4. Impact of respiratory infection in the results of cardiac surgery in a tertiary hospital in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Isaac Newton Guimarães; Araújo, Diego Torres Aladin de; Moraes Neto, Fernando Ribeiro de

    2015-01-01

    To assess the impact of respiratory tract infection in the postoperative period of cardiac surgery in relation to mortality and to identify patients at higher risk of developing this complication. Cross-sectional observational study conducted at the Recovery of Cardiothoracic Surgery, using information from a database consisting of a total of 900 patients operated on in this hospital during the period from 01/07/2008 to 1/07/2009. We included patients whose medical records contained all the information required and undergoing elective surgery, totaling 109 patients with two excluded. Patients were divided into two groups, WITH and WITHOUT respiratory tract infection, as the development or respiratory tract infection in hospital, with patients in the group without respiratory tract infection, the result of randomization, using for the pairing of the groups the type of surgery performed. The outcome variables assessed were mortality, length of hospital stay and length of stay in intensive care unit. The means of quantitative variables were compared using the Wilcoxon and student t-test. The groups were similar (average age P=0.17; sex P=0.94; surgery performed P=0.85-1.00) Mortality in the WITH respiratory tract infection group was significantly higher (P<0.0001). The times of hospitalization and intensive care unit were significantly higher in respiratory tract infection (P<0.0001). The presence of respiratory tract infection was associated with the development of other complications such as renal failure dialysis and stroke P<0.00001 and P=0.002 respectively. The development of respiratory tract infection postoperative cardiac surgery is related to higher mortality, longer periods of hospitalization and intensive care unit stay.

  5. A randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, multicenter, placebo-controlled study of the safety and efficacy of extended-release guaifenesin/pseudoephedrine hydrochloride for symptom relief as an adjunctive therapy to antibiotic treatment of acute respiratory infections.

    PubMed

    LaForce, Craig; Gentile, Deborah A; Skoner, David P

    2008-07-01

    This study assessed the efficacy and safety of guaifenesin 600 mg and pseudoephedrine hydrochloride 60 mg extended-release bilayer tablets in providing relief of acute respiratory symptoms when used as an adjunct to antibiotics in patients with an acute respiratory infection (ARI). Adult patients experiencing symptoms of ARI and meeting the physician's usual diagnostic criteria for oral antibiotic treatment were prescribed an antibiotic and randomized to adjunctive guaifenesin/pseudoephedrine hydrochloride or matching placebo twice daily for 7 days. Patients completed symptom diaries and treatment assessments twice daily and attended office visits on Days 4 and 8. The safety/intent-to-treat (ITT) population analysis included 601 patients (guaifenesin/pseudoephedrine, n = 303; placebo, n = 298). Mean symptom scores were lower with guaifenesin/pseudoephedrine from Day 3 for every symptom assessed, with statistically significant improvements in total symptom score from Day 3 (P = 0.026). The greatest effects of treatment with guaifenesin/pseudoephedrine were observed for nasal congestion and sinus headache. Time to overall relief was shorter with guaifenesin/pseudoephedrine (P = 0.038). Significantly more patients reported "the medication was helping during the day" on Day 2 with guaifenesin/pseudoephedrine (P = 0.002). Patient assessments of symptom relief showed a significant preference for guaifenesin/pseudoephedrine versus placebo (P = 0.021). Treatment with guaifenesin/pseudoephedrine was well tolerated. Insomnia (2.6%), nausea (2.3%), and headache (1.3%) were the most common treatment-related adverse effects. As adjunctive therapy for symptom relief for patients taking antibiotics for ARIs, guaifenesin/pseudoephedrine shortened time to relief and improved bothersome respiratory symptoms better than placebo, with greatest effects seen for nasal congestion and sinus headache.

  6. Immunomodulatory effect of pleuran (β-glucan from Pleurotus ostreatus) in children with recurrent respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed

    Jesenak, Milos; Majtan, Juraj; Rennerova, Zuzana; Kyselovic, Jan; Banovcin, Peter; Hrubisko, Martin

    2013-02-01

    Recurrent respiratory tract infections (RRTIs) represent a very important problem in daily clinical practice because of their significant contribution to morbidity in children. Several natural nutritional supplements have been used in the prevention of RRTIs, but the clinical efficacy of only a few preparations is supported by scientific evidence. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomised, multicentre study, we have observed a group of 175 children (aged 5.65 ± 2.39 years) with more than 5 respiratory infections that occurred during the 12 months prior to the beginning of the study. Children were randomised into an active group, treated with Imunoglukan P4H® syrup (with pleuran-β-glucan from Pleurotus ostreatus and vitamin C), or a placebo group (vitamin C only). During the 3 visits, within a 12-month period, questionnaires were completed, and blood samples were examined for immune parameters. In the active group, 36% of the children did not suffer from any respiratory infections throughout the treatment, compared to 21% in the placebo group (p<0.05). Imunoglukan P4H® also significantly decreased the frequency of flu and flu-like disease and the number of lower respiratory tract infections. Imunoglukan P4H® treatment resulted in a statistically significant modulation of humoral and cellular immunity. Results from this study demonstrate that Imunoglukan P4H® is effective in the prevention of RRTIs in children. Furthermore, our results also revealed complex immunomodulatory activity of this product. This is the first double-blind, placebo-controlled study in children with RRTIs that has addressed the preventive effects of pleuran on morbidity caused by respiratory infections. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The role of infections and coinfections with newly identified and emerging respiratory viruses in children

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Acute respiratory infections are a major cause of morbidity in children both in developed and developing countries. A wide range of respiratory viruses, including respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), influenza A and B viruses, parainfluenza viruses (PIVs), adenovirus, rhinovirus (HRV), have repeatedly been detected in acute lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI) in children in the past decades. However, in the last ten years thanks to progress in molecular technologies, newly discovered viruses have been identified including human Metapneumovirus (hMPV), coronaviruses NL63 (HcoV-NL63) and HKU1 (HcoV-HKU1), human Bocavirus (HBoV), new enterovirus (HEV), parechovirus (HpeV) and rhinovirus (HRV) strains, polyomaviruses WU (WUPyV) and KI (KIPyV) and the pandemic H1N1v influenza A virus. These discoveries have heavily modified previous knowledge on respiratory infections mainly highlighting that pediatric population is exposed to a variety of viruses with similar seasonal patterns. In this context establishing a causal link between a newly identified virus and the disease as well as an association between mixed infections and an increase in disease severity can be challenging. This review will present an overview of newly recognized as well as the main emerging respiratory viruses and seek to focus on the their contribution to infection and co-infection in LRTIs in childhood. PMID:23102237

  8. Respiratory tract infections in a military recruit setting: a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    German, Vasilios; Kopterides, Petros; Poulikakos, Panagiotis; Giannakos, Georgios; Falagas, Matthew E

    2008-01-01

    Acute respiratory tract infections (RTIs) are an important cause of morbidity in the military setting. Respiratory viruses are the most frequently implicated pathogens, especially adenovirus and respiratory syncytial virus. We performed this study to investigate the role of factors such as obesity, cigarette smoking, and educational level on the development of respiratory tract infections in a military recruit setting. A cohort of 472 military recruits was prospectively followed up for the basic training period of 3 weeks. Symptoms of infections were monitored during this period. Eighty-four of 472 recruits (17.8%) were diagnosed with infection; 55 (65.5%) with upper RTI (mainly rhinitis), 23 (27.4%) with flu-like syndrome, and 6 (7.1%) with tonsillitis. There was no association between age, BMI, or smoking status and symptomatic RTI (p>0.05). Occurrence of respiratory tract infections in military recruits is common, at least in some populations and settings. We did not find an association between risk factors such as BMI and smoking and symptomatic respiratory infection in our population, a result that may be associated with the limited power of this study. Copyright (c) 2008 King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The role of infections and coinfections with newly identified and emerging respiratory viruses in children.

    PubMed

    Debiaggi, Maurizia; Canducci, Filippo; Ceresola, Elisa Rita; Clementi, Massimo

    2012-10-27

    Acute respiratory infections are a major cause of morbidity in children both in developed and developing countries. A wide range of respiratory viruses, including