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Sample records for respiratory tract harmless

  1. Upper respiratory tract (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The major passages and structures of the upper respiratory tract include the nose or nostrils, nasal cavity, mouth, throat (pharynx), and voice box (larynx). The respiratory system is lined with a mucous membrane that ...

  2. Extensive upper respiratory tract sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Soares, Mafalda Trindade; Sousa, Carolina; Garanito, Luísa; Freire, Filipe

    2016-04-18

    Sarcoidosis is a chronic granulomatous disease of unknown aetiology. It can affect any part of the organism, although the lung is the most frequently affected organ. Upper airway involvement is rare, particularly if isolated. Sarcoidosis is a diagnosis of exclusion, established by histological evidence of non-caseating granulomas and the absence of other granulomatous diseases. The authors report a case of a man with sarcoidosis manifesting as a chronic inflammatory stenotic condition of the upper respiratory tract and trachea.

  3. The microbiota of the respiratory tract: gatekeeper to respiratory health.

    PubMed

    Man, Wing Ho; de Steenhuijsen Piters, Wouter A A; Bogaert, Debby

    2017-03-20

    The respiratory tract is a complex organ system that is responsible for the exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide. The human respiratory tract spans from the nostrils to the lung alveoli and is inhabited by niche-specific communities of bacteria. The microbiota of the respiratory tract probably acts as a gatekeeper that provides resistance to colonization by respiratory pathogens. The respiratory microbiota might also be involved in the maturation and maintenance of homeostasis of respiratory physiology and immunity. The ecological and environmental factors that direct the development of microbial communities in the respiratory tract and how these communities affect respiratory health are the focus of current research. Concurrently, the functions of the microbiome of the upper and lower respiratory tract in the physiology of the human host are being studied in detail. In this Review, we will discuss the epidemiological, biological and functional evidence that support the physiological role of the respiratory microbiota in the maintenance of human health.

  4. Pulmonary and respiratory tract receptors.

    PubMed

    Widdicombe, J G

    1982-10-01

    Nervous receptors in the lungs and respiratory tract can be grouped into four general categories. 1. Deep, slowly adapting end-organs, which respond to stretch of the airway wall and have large-diameter myelinated fibres; those in the lungs are responsible for the Breuer-Hering reflex. 2. Endings in and under the epithelium which respond to a variety of chemical and mechanical stimuli (i.e. are polymodal), usually with a rapidly adapting discharge, and with small-diameter myelinated fibres; they are responsible for defensive reflexes such as cough and sneeze, and for the reflex actions to inhaled irritants and to some respiratory disease processes. 3. Receptors with nonmyelinated nerve fibres which, being polymodal, are stimulated by tissue damage and oedema and by the mediators released in these conditions; these receptors may be similar in function to 'nociceptors' in other viscera, and set up appropriate reflexes as a reaction to respiratory damage. 4. Specialized receptors such as those for taste and swallowing, and those around joints and in skeletal muscle. Stimulation of any group of receptors may cause reflex changes in breathing (including defensive reflexes), bronchomotor tone, airway mucus secretion, the cardiovascular system (including the vascular bed of the airways), laryngeal calibre, spinal reflexes and sensation. The total pattern of motor responses is unique for each group of receptors, although it is probably unusual for one type of receptor to be stimulated in isolation. The variety of patterns of motor responses must reflect the complexity of brainstem organization of these systems.

  5. Atypical pathogens and respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed

    Blasi, F

    2004-07-01

    The atypical respiratory pathogens Chlamydia pneumoniae, Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Legionella pneumophila are now recognised as a significant cause of acute respiratory-tract infections, implicated in community-acquired pneumonia, acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis, asthma, and less frequently, upper respiratory-tract infections. Chronic infection with C. pneumoniae is common among patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and may also play a role in the natural history of asthma, including exacerbations. The lack of a gold standard for diagnosis of these pathogens still handicaps the current understanding of their true prevalence and role in the pathogenesis of acute and chronic respiratory infections. While molecular diagnostic techniques, such as polymerase chain reaction, offer improvements in sensitivity, specificity and rapidity over culture and serology, the need remains for a consistent and reproducible diagnostic technique, available to all microbiology laboratories. Current treatment guidelines for community-acquired pneumonia recognise the importance of atypical respiratory pathogens in its aetiology, for which macrolides are considered suitable first-line agents. The value of atypical coverage in antibiotic therapy for acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis and exacerbations of asthma is less clear, while there is no evidence to suggest that atypical pathogens should be covered in antibiotic treatment of upper respiratory-tract infections.

  6. Respiratory tract infections in the military environment.

    PubMed

    Korzeniewski, Krzysztof; Nitsch-Osuch, Aneta; Konior, Monika; Lass, Anna

    2015-04-01

    Military personnel fighting in contemporary battlefields as well as those participating in combat training are at risk of contracting respiratory infections. Epidemiological studies have demonstrated that soldiers deployed to the harsh environment have higher rates of newly reported respiratory symptoms than non-deployers. Acute respiratory diseases are the principle reason for outpatient treatment and hospitalization among military personnel, with an incidence exceeding that of the adult civilian population by up to three-fold. Adenoviruses, influenza A and B viruses, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus pyogenes, coronaviruses and rhinoviruses have been identified as the main causes of acute respiratory infections among the military population. Although infective pathogens have been extensively studied, a significant proportion of illnesses (over 40%) have been due to unknown causative agents. Other health hazards, which can lead to respiratory illnesses among troops, are extreme air temperatures, desert dust, emissions from burn pits, industrial pollutants, and airborne contaminants originating from degraded soil. Limited diagnostic capabilities, especially inside the area of operations, make it difficult to accurately estimate the exact number of respiratory diseases in the military environment. The aim of the study was to discuss the occurrence of respiratory tract infections in army personnel, existing risk factors and preventive measures.

  7. The Microbiome and the Respiratory Tract

    PubMed Central

    Dickson, Robert P.; Erb-Downward, John R.; Martinez, Fernando J.; Huffnagle, Gary B.

    2016-01-01

    Although the notion that “the normal lung is free from bacteria” remains common in textbooks, it is virtually always stated without citation or argument. The lungs are constantly exposed to diverse communities of microbes from the oropharynx and other sources, and over the past decade, novel culture-independent techniques of microbial identification have revealed that the lungs, previously considered sterile in health, harbor diverse communities of microbes. In this review, we describe the topography and population dynamics of the respiratory tract, both in health and as altered by acute and chronic lung disease. We provide a survey of current techniques of sampling, sequencing, and analysis of respiratory microbiota and review technical challenges and controversies in the field. We review and synthesize what is known about lung microbiota in various diseases and identify key lessons learned across disease states. PMID:26527186

  8. Crohn's disease with respiratory tract involvement.

    PubMed Central

    Lemann, M; Messing, B; D'Agay, F; Modigliani, R

    1987-01-01

    Symptomatic respiratory tract involvement with granulomatous bronchial lesions has not yet been described in Crohn's disease. We report two patients with colonic Crohn's disease and severe respiratory symptoms (dyspnoea associated in one of the patients with voicelessness); erythema, aphthoid and superficial ulcerations were found in the colon and whitish granulations in the bronchi at endoscopy. Non-caseating tuberculoid granulomas were found in the colonic mucosa of both patients, as well as in the bronchial mucosa of one of them; in the second a diffuse inflammatory infiltrate including epithelioid cells was found underneath an erosion of bronchial epithelium. Both patients improved on oral prednisone. These two patients probably had bronchial involvement by Crohn's disease. Images Figure PMID:3428695

  9. Environmentally mediated disorders of the respiratory tract

    SciTech Connect

    Utell, M.J.; Samet, J.M. )

    1990-03-01

    Although much of the evidence in environmental lung disease remains equivocal, some environmental exposures are known to be clinically relevant. Ambient air pollution remains of concern as a source of morbidity, particularly for susceptible populations such as persons with asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or cardiac disease and the elderly. The adverse effects of several components of indoor air pollution have been established. Environmental tobacco smoke contributes to lower-respiratory illness in infants; office workers exposed to thermophilic actinomycetes contaminating ventilation systems have developed hypersensitivity pneumonitis; and in the home, components of house dust and fungus spores may provoke asthma via immediate hypersensitivity. The evidence is less compelling for a link between other exposures and disorders of the respiratory tract. For example, formaldehyde may be responsible for provoking vague respiratory symptoms and even nasal cancers; however, the associations are unproved. Likewise, the relation between low-level exposure to asbestos and the development of lung cancer, although a concern, is not conclusively established. The clinician should be aware of practical measures for patients who inquire about air cleaning. Often, relatively simple solutions are effective. A knowledge of sources and exposures as well as an understanding of the principles of inhalation lung injury should prove useful in directing patient care. 33 references.

  10. Bovine coronaviruses from the respiratory tract: Antigenic and genetic diversity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine corona viruses (BoCV) isolated from respiratory tract, nasal swab and broncho alveolar washing fluid samples were evaluated for genetic and antigenic differences. These BoCV from the respiratory tract of healthy and clinically ill cattle with BRD signs were compared to reference and vaccine ...

  11. Bacteriology of the Upper Respiratory Tract: What is Important?

    PubMed Central

    Cimolai, Nevio

    1988-01-01

    Oropharyngeal and nasopharyngeal swabs are commonly collected from patients with a variety of respiratory infections. Unfortunately, the significance of potential pathogens in such specimens is clouded by the prevalence of these organisms in asymptomatic patients and in patients with non-bacterial upper respiratory tract illnesses. Specimens from the oro-and nasopharynx seldom predict the flora in other parts of the respiratory tract, and empiric antibiotic therapy for infections such as acute otitis media, sinusitis, and pneumonia is usually inevitable. The author of this article reviews the bacteriology of the upper respiratory tract and makes recommendations for diagnosis and treatment. PMID:21253244

  12. Adenovirus Respiratory Tract Infections in Peru

    PubMed Central

    Ampuero, Julia S.; Ocaña, Víctor; Gómez, Jorge; Gamero, María E.; Garcia, Josefina; Halsey, Eric S.; Laguna-Torres, V. Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Background Currently, there is a paucity of data regarding human adenovirus (HAdv) circulation in Andean regions of South America. To address this shortcoming, we report the clinical, phylogenetic, and epidemiologic characteristics of HAdv respiratory tract infection from a large sentinel surveillance study conducted among adults and children in Peru. Methods/Principal Findings Oropharyngeal swabs were collected from participants visiting any of 38 participating health centers, and viral pathogens were identified by immunofluorescence assay in cell culture. In addition, molecular characterization was performed on 226 randomly selected HAdv samples. Between 2000 and 2010, a total of 26,375 participants with influenza-like illness (ILI) or severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) were enrolled in the study. HAdv infection was identified in 2.5% of cases and represented 6.2% of all viral pathogens. Co-infection with a heterologous virus was found in 15.5% of HAdv cases. HAdv infection was largely confined to children under the age of 15, representing 88.6% of HAdv cases identified. No clinical characteristics were found to significantly distinguish HAdv infection from other respiratory viruses. Geographically, HAdv infections were more common in sites from the arid coastal regions than in the jungle or highland regions. Co-circulation of subgroups B and C was observed each year between 2006 and 2010, but no clear seasonal patterns of transmission were detected. Conclusions/Significance HAdv accounted for a significant fraction of those presenting with ILI and SARI in Peru and tended to affect the younger population disproportionately. Longitudinal studies will help better characterize the clinical course of patients with HAdv in Peru, as well as determine the role of co-infections in the evolution of illness. PMID:23056519

  13. Fluorescence diagnosis of upper respiratory tract infections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco, Kate C.; Inada, Natalia M.; Kurachi, Cristina; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.

    2015-06-01

    The pharyngitis and laryngitis are respiratory tract infections highly common. Pharyngitis can be accompanied by fever, especially if caused by a systemic infection. Laryngitis is an inflammation of your voice box (larynx) from irritation or infection. The conventional treatment is the antibiotics administration, which may be responsible by an increase of identification of bacterial strains resistant to drug. This fact associated to high incidence of these infections become important to develop new technologies for diagnosis. This study aims to evaluate the use of widefield fluorescence imaging for the characterization of oropharynx infections, in order to diagnose the bacteria colonization. The imaging system for wide field fluorescence visualization is Evince® (MMOptics, São Carlos, SP, Brazil) coupled to an Apple iPhone® cell phone device. The system consists of Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) operating in the violet blue region centered at green-red spectrum 450 nm and optical filters that allow viewing of fluorescence. A tongue depressor was adapted to Evince® for mouth opening. The same images were captured with white light and fluorescence with an optical system. The red fluorescence may be a bacterial marker for physiological monitoring of oropharynx infection processes. The bacterial biofilm on tissue were assigned to the presence of protoporphyrin IX. This work indicates that the autofluorescence of the tissue may be used as a non-invasive technique to aid in the oropharynx infection diagnostic.

  14. Particle size and pathogenicity in the respiratory tract

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Richard James

    2013-01-01

    Particle size dictates where aerosolized pathogens deposit in the respiratory tract, thereafter the pathogens potential to cause disease is influenced by tissue tropism, clearance kinetics and the host immunological response. This interplay brings pathogens into contact with a range of tissues spanning the respiratory tract and associated anatomical structures. In animal models, differential deposition within the respiratory tract influences infection kinetics for numerous select agents. Greater numbers of pathogens are required to infect the upper (URT) compared with the lower respiratory tract (LRT), and in comparison the URT infections are protracted with reduced mortality. Pathogenesis in the URT is characterized by infection of the URT lymphoid tissues, cervical lymphadenopathy and septicemia, closely resembling reported human infections of the URT. The olfactory, gastrointestinal, and ophthalmic systems are also infected in a pathogen-dependent manner. The relevant literature is reviewed with respect to particle size and infection of the URT in animal models and humans. PMID:24225380

  15. Management of upper respiratory tract infections by telephone.

    PubMed Central

    Jepson, S; Holbrook, J H; Hale, D; Lyon, J

    1994-01-01

    We surveyed Utah general internists (N = 134) regarding their attitudes toward and practices associated with telephone management of upper respiratory tract infections. The questionnaire contained 3 case vignettes--viral upper respiratory tract infection, streptococcal pharyngitis, and acute infectious epiglottitis--and a series of questions were asked about telephone diagnosis, management preferences (clinic versus telephone), and telephone management practices. The 53 respondents (40%) were able to make important diagnostic distinctions about upper respiratory tract infections from a written vignette. As the likelihood of a complicated or serious condition increased, patients would be appropriately triaged for clinical evaluation. Most internists would make a written record of the telephone conversation. Only 1 internist of the 53 would charge for telephone management. PMID:8053174

  16. [Patients compliance with antibiotherapy of respiratory tract infections].

    PubMed

    Kardas, Przemysław

    2003-01-01

    Non-compliance frequently occurs during outpatient antibiotherapy of respiratory tract infections. The most frequent form of non-compliance in such circumstances is omittion of single doses. Patient non-compliance during antibiotherapy is of practical importance. It leads to therapy failure, need of additional health services, growth of direct and indirect therapy cost and development of resistant strains. This paper summarises the methods of evaluating compliance and the results of research on compliance during antibiotherapy of respiratory tract infections. The reasons of patient non-compliance as well as the factors influencing this phenomenon are reviewed. Practical methods of augmenting compliance are suggested with particular stress on the relationship between dosage frequency and compliance. It should be remembered that when the antibiotic is needed for respiratory tract infections treatment, once daily dosing ensures the best possible compliance.

  17. Upper Respiratory Tract Diseases in Athletes in Different Sports Disciplines

    PubMed Central

    Gałązka-Franta, Anna; Jura-Szołtys, Edyta; Smółka, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Upper respiratory tract diseases in athletes are a very common medical problem. Training conditions in different sports disciplines increase the risk of upper respiratory disease. Epidemiological evidence suggests that heavy acute or chronic exercise is related to an increased incidence of upper respiratory tract infections in athletes. Regular physical exercise at high intensity may lead to transient immunosuppression due to high prevalence of allergic diseases in athletes. Regardless of the cause they can exclude athletes from the training program and significantly impair their performance. In the present work, the most common upper respiratory tract diseases in athletes taking into account the disciplines in which they most often occur were presented. The focus was laid on symptoms, diagnostic methods and pharmacotherapy. Moreover, preventive procedures which can help reduce the occurrence of upper respiratory tract disease in athletes were presented. Management according to anti-doping rules, criteria for return to training and competition as an important issues of athlete’s health were discussed. PMID:28149415

  18. FLOW SIMULATION IN THE HUMAN UPPER RESPIRATORY TRACT

    EPA Science Inventory


    ABSTRACT

    Computer simulations of airflow patterns within the human upper respiratory tract (URT) are presented. The URT model includes airways of the head (nasal and oral), throat (pharyngeal and laryngeal), and lungs (trachea and main bronchi). The head and throat mor...

  19. 3-D PARTICLE TRANSPORT WITHIN THE HUMAN UPPER RESPIRATORY TRACT

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study trajectories of inhaled particulate matter (PM) were simulated within a three-dimensional (3-D) computer model of the human upper respiratory tract (URT). The airways were described by computer-reconstructed images of a silicone rubber cast of the human head, throat...

  20. [Evaluation of occupational allergic diseases of the respiratory tract].

    PubMed

    Pankova, V B

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents the basic etiological and pathogenetic aspects of occupational allergic diseases of the respiratory tract, discusses the clinical course, diagnosis, and priorities of the prevention of allergic diseases of the upper airways and bronchopulmonary apparatus from the action of industrial allergens.

  1. [Outdoor and indoor allergens and the respiratory tract].

    PubMed

    Kanceljak-Macán, B; Macan, J; Plavec, D

    2000-09-01

    This paper gives an overview of common outdoor and indoor allergens which cause sensitisation of the respiratory tract and considers relevant biological and ecological hallmarks and symptoms of allergies. Grass, tree, and weed pollens as well as moulds (Cladosporium and Alternaria species) are a major source of allergens in the outdoor environment whereas mites (Pyroglyphidae, Acaridae, and Glycyphagidae), animals (pets, rodents, and insects), and moulds (Aspergillus, Penicillium, and Mucor species) are a major source in the indoor environment. The paper pays attention to the seasonal, geographical, and climatic influence on the concentration of allergen in the environment. The authors discuss differences between exposure to outdoor and indoor allergens, as well as the impact of pollutants on sensitisation of the respiratory tract. The paper proceeds with a short description of the primary prevention measures such as avoidance of the allergens and the secondary measures which are intended to prevent the occurrence or deterioration of respiratory symptoms in sensitised persons.

  2. The respiratory tract and the environment.

    PubMed Central

    Brain, J D

    1977-01-01

    The primary determinants of pulmonary disease are environmental. The same thinness and delicacy of the air-blood barrier which allows rapid exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide also reduce its effectiveness as a barrier to inhaled allergens, carcinogens, toxic particles, and noxious gases, and micro-organisms. Adults breath 10,000 to 20,000 liters of air daily. This volume of air contains potentially hazardous contaminating particles and gases. Future research should explore the diverse physiological mechanisms which prevent the accumulation and deleterious action of inhaled particles and gases. Since most pulmonary diseases are either initiated by or at least aggravated by the inhalagion of particles and gases, the role of environmental factors in the development of respiratory disease is an area worthy of continued support. PMID:598343

  3. Aerosol deposition in the human respiratory tract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winchester, John W.; Jones, Donald L.; Mu-tian, Bi

    1984-04-01

    Rising sulfur dioxide emissions from increased coal combustion present risks, not only of acid rain, but also to health by inhalation of the SO 2 and acid to the lung. We are investigating human inhalation of ppm SO 2 concentrations mixed with aerosol of submicrometer aqueous salt droplets to determine the effects on lung function and body chemistry. Unlike some investigators, we emphasize ammonium sulfate and trace element aerosol composition which simulates ambient air; aerosol pH, relative humidity, and temperature control to reveal gas-particle reaction mechanisms; and dose estimates from length of exposure, SO 2 concentration, and a direct measurement of respiratory deposition of aerosol as a function of particle size by cascade impactor sampling and elemental analysis by PIXE. Exposures, at rest or during exercise, are in a walk-in chamber at body temperature and high humidity to simulate Florida's summer climate. Lung function measurement by spirometry is carried out immediately after exposure. The results are significant in relating air quality to athletic performance and to public health in the southeastern United States.

  4. Composition and immunological significance of the upper respiratory tract microbiota.

    PubMed

    Schenck, Louis Patrick; Surette, Michael G; Bowdish, Dawn M E

    2016-11-01

    The intestinal microbiota is essential for nutrient acquisition, immune development, and exclusion of invading pathogens. The upper respiratory tract (URT) microbiota is less well studied and does not appear to abide by many of the paradigms of the gastrointestinal tract. Decades of carriage studies in children have demonstrated that microbe-microbe competition and collusion occurs in the URT. Whether colonization with common pathogens (e.g., Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae) alters immune development or susceptibility to respiratory conditions is just beginning to be understood. Herein, we discuss the biogeography of the URT microbiota, the succession and evolution of the microbiota through the life course, and discuss the evidence for microbe-microbe interactions in colonization and infection.

  5. Mouse Model of Respiratory Tract Infection Induced by Waddlia chondrophila

    PubMed Central

    Pilloux, Ludovic; LeRoy, Didier; Brunel, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Waddlia chondrophila, an obligate intracellular bacterium belonging to the Chlamydiales order, is considered as an emerging pathogen. Some clinical studies highlighted a possible role of W. chondrophila in bronchiolitis, pneumonia and miscarriage. This pathogenic potential is further supported by the ability of W. chondrophila to infect and replicate within human pneumocytes, macrophages and endometrial cells. Considering that W. chondrophila might be a causative agent of respiratory tract infection, we developed a mouse model of respiratory tract infection to get insight into the pathogenesis of W. chondrophila. Following intranasal inoculation of 2 x 108 W. chondrophila, mice lost up to 40% of their body weight, and succumbed rapidly from infection with a death rate reaching 50% at day 4 post-inoculation. Bacterial loads, estimated by qPCR, increased from day 0 to day 3 post-infection and decreased thereafter in surviving mice. Bacterial growth was confirmed by detecting dividing bacteria using electron microscopy, and living bacteria were isolated from lungs 14 days post-infection. Immunohistochemistry and histopathology of infected lungs revealed the presence of bacteria associated with pneumonia characterized by an important multifocal inflammation. The high inflammatory score in the lungs was associated with the presence of pro-inflammatory cytokines in both serum and lungs at day 3 post-infection. This animal model supports the role of W. chondrophila as an agent of respiratory tract infection, and will help understanding the pathogenesis of this strict intracellular bacterium. PMID:26950066

  6. Respiratory syncytial virus: co-infection and paediatric lower respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Lay-Myint; Suzuki, Motoi; Nguyen, Hien Anh; Le, Minh Nhat; Dinh Vu, Thiem; Yoshino, Hiroshi; Schmidt, Wolf-Peter; Nguyen, Thi Thuy Ai; Le, Huu Tho; Morimoto, Konosuke; Moriuchi, Hiroyuki; Dang, Duc Anh; Ariyoshi, Koya

    2013-08-01

    Comprehensive population-based data on the role of respiratory viruses in the development of lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) remain unclear. We investigated the incidence and effect of single and multiple infections with respiratory viruses on the risk of LRTIs in Vietnam. Population-based prospective surveillance and a case-control study of hospitalised paediatric patients with acute respiratory infection (ARI) were conducted from April 2007 through to March 2010. Healthy controls were randomly recruited from the same community. Nasopharyngeal samples were collected and tested for 13 respiratory viruses using multiplex PCRs. 1992 hospitalised ARI episodes, including 397 (19.9%) with LRTIs, were enrolled. Incidence of hospitalised LRTIs among children aged <24 months was 2171.9 per 100 000 (95% CI 1947.9-2419.7). The majority of ARI cases (60.9%) were positive for at least one virus. Human rhinovirus (24.2%), respiratory syncytial virus (20.1%) and influenza A virus (12.0%) were the most common and 9.5% had multiple-viral infections. Respiratory syncytial virus and human metapneumovirus infections independently increased the risk of LRTIs. Respiratory syncytial virus further increased the risk, when co-infected with human rhinovirus, human metapneumovirus and parainfluenza virus-3 but not with influenza A virus. The case-control analysis revealed that respiratory syncytial virus and influenza A virus increased the risk of ARI hospitalisation but not human rhinovirus. Respiratory syncytial virus is the leading pathogen associated with risk of ARI hospitalisation and LRTIs in Vietnam.

  7. Herpes simplex virus infection of the adult lower respiratory tract.

    PubMed

    Graham, B S; Snell, J D

    1983-11-01

    We have reported six adult patients with HSV infection of the lower respiratory tract diagnosed ante-mortem, and have reviewed the literature on this subject. An attempt has been made to define the natural history of the infection, and suggestions have been made regarding diagnosis and treatment. HSV can infect the lower respiratory tract in immunologically normal patients, as well as the immunocompromised host. Many patients have been burned, or intubated, or have other reasons for squamous metaplasia of the respiratory epithelium. The pathogenesis in many cases is an extension or aspiration of oropharyngeal HSV, but there is a suggestion that some cases may be hematogenously spread. The diagnosis of the site and presence of HSV infection should be based initially on cytologic findings, histologic findings, or both. Viral cultures or immunofluorescent or immunoperoxidase labeling can be used to confirm the cytologic and histologic diagnoses. Bronchoscopy is valuable for visualizing ulcerations or membranes in the respiratory tract, and for improving the sensitivity and specificity of the cytologic diagnosis. Because the process is most often focused in the tracheobronchial tree, percutaneous needle biopsy and open lung biopsy may be less sensitive than bronchoscopy. Standard serologic tests are, in general, not helpful diagnostically. They can help verify that a recent HSV infection has occurred, but do not differentiate between primary and recurrent infection, and do not help in localizing the site of infection. However, paired complement fixation or neutralizing antibody titers may be useful prognostically. If the titers do not rise in the presence of a documented HSV lower respiratory tract infection, the outcome is more likely to be fatal. The respiratory epithelium from the oral mucosa to the alveoli can be infected with HSV. The manifestations can range from a few scattered ulcers in the trachea to a severe ulcerative process resulting in an obstructing

  8. Incidence of acute otitis media and sinusitis complicating upper respiratory tract infection: the effect of age.

    PubMed

    Revai, Krystal; Dobbs, Laura A; Nair, Sangeeta; Patel, Janak A; Grady, James J; Chonmaitree, Tasnee

    2007-06-01

    Infants and young children are prone to developing upper respiratory tract infections, which often result in bacterial complications such as acute otitis media and sinusitis. We evaluated 623 upper respiratory tract infection episodes in 112 children (6-35 months of age) to determine the proportion of upper respiratory tract infection episodes that result in acute otitis media or sinusitis. Of all upper respiratory tract infections, 30% were complicated by acute otitis media and 8% were complicated by sinusitis. The rate of acute otitis media after upper respiratory tract infection declined with increasing age, whereas the rate of sinusitis after upper respiratory tract infection peaked in the second year of life. Risk for acute otitis media may be reduced substantially by avoiding frequent exposure to respiratory viruses (eg, avoidance of day care attendance) in the first year of life.

  9. Coinfections of the Respiratory Tract: Viral Competition for Resources

    PubMed Central

    Pinky, Lubna; Dobrovolny, Hana M.

    2016-01-01

    Studies have shown that simultaneous infection of the respiratory tract with at least two viruses is common in hospitalized patients, although it is not clear whether these infections are more or less severe than single virus infections. We use a mathematical model to study the dynamics of viral coinfection of the respiratory tract in an effort to understand the kinetics of these infections. Specifically, we use our model to investigate coinfections of influenza, respiratory syncytial virus, rhinovirus, parainfluenza virus, and human metapneumovirus. Our study shows that during coinfections, one virus can block another simply by being the first to infect the available host cells; there is no need for viral interference through immune response interactions. We use the model to calculate the duration of detectable coinfection and examine how it varies as initial viral dose and time of infection are varied. We find that rhinovirus, the fastest-growing virus, reduces replication of the remaining viruses during a coinfection, while parainfluenza virus, the slowest-growing virus is suppressed in the presence of other viruses. PMID:27196110

  10. The place of tobramycin in lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI).

    PubMed

    Gialdroni Grassi, G

    1995-08-01

    The Author provides a review of clinical experience with tobramycin as therapy for lower respiratory tract infections, in comparison to other aminoglycosides, including the pharmacokinetics and toxicity, dwelling on oto- and nephrotoxicity. The article includes a discussion of various dosing regimens of the aminoglycosides, focussing on efficacy and toxicity arising from once-daily administration. The Author then provides a more detailed description of tobramycin's pharmacokinetics, indications for its use, and the possibilities of once-daily dosing, concluding that toxicity is favorably influenced by a single daily administration as well as efficacy, and that patient compliance and reduced hospital costs are other advantages of this regimen.

  11. [Molecular identification of Candida lusitaniae in lower respiratory tract infection].

    PubMed

    Espinosa, Israel Martínez; Ibarra, Misael González; Torres Guerrero, Haydee K

    2014-01-01

    Candida lusitaniae is a yeast that has emerged as a low frequency nosocomial pathogen in deep infections. Although it usually shows in vitro susceptibility to all antifungal agents, in vivo resistance to amphotericin B has been observed in several clinical cases. Therefore, its early identification in the course of therapy is important. We report the isolation of C. lusitaniae as an etiologic agent of a lower respiratory tract infection in a male patient. Urine and sputum cultures were negative for bacteria and positive for this yeast. Isolates were identified by routine phenotypic methods and confirmed by sequencing and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of PCR internal spacer of ribosomal DNA.

  12. In-vitro activity of sparfloxacin in comparison with currently available antimicrobials against respiratory tract pathogens.

    PubMed

    Baquero, F; Cantón, R

    1996-05-01

    Bacterial resistance to antimicrobial agents is an ever-increasing problem. The in-vitro activity of sparfloxacin compared with that of currently available antimicrobial agents against pathogens implicated in respiratory tract infections is reviewed. Sparfloxacin is a fluoroquinolone active against both penicillin-susceptible and -resistant strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae. It is also active against many other respiratory tract pathogens and may be a suitable alternative for empirical therapy of community-acquired respiratory tract infections.

  13. Mycoplasmas isolated from the respiratory tract of horses.

    PubMed Central

    Allam, N. M.; Lemcke, R. M.

    1975-01-01

    Ten mycoplasmas were isolated from 130 nasopharyngeal swabs from thoroughbred horses with acute respiratory disease and three from 198 apparently normal horses. Two mycoplasmas were isolated from 21 tracheal swabs taken at necropsy. These mycoplasmas, together with six isolated from the equine respiratory tract by other workers, were subjected to biochemical and serological tests. Other properties examined in certain representative strains were appearance under the electron microscope, ability to adsorb or agglutinate the erythrocytes of various animal species and the electrophoretic pattern of the cell proteins. On the basis of these test, mycoplasmas from the equine respiratory tract were divided into seven species. Three species belonged to the genus Acholeplasma, members of which do not require sterol for growth, and were identified as A. laidlawii, A. oculi (formerly A. oculusi) originally isolated from the eyes of goats, and a recently named species A. equifoetale, previously isolated from aborted equine fetuses. Of the four sterol-dependent Mycoplasma species, one was indentified as M. pulmonis, a common rodent pathogen. Another cross-reacted serologically with M. felis and should probably be classified as that species. The other two species probably represent new species peculiar to the horse. One of these, represented by the strains N3 and N11, ferments glucose and is serologically distinct from 19 recognized species of glucose-utilizing mycoplasmas and from two species which do not metabolize either glucose or arginine. The other species, represented by four strains, hydrolyses arginine and, because it is serologically distinct from all the named arginine-hydrolysing Mycoplasma species, the name M. equirhinis sp.nov. is proposed for it. Of the seven species, only M. pulmonis and the glucose-utilizing species represented by N3 and N11 were found exclusively in horses with acute respiratory disease. A. oculi was isolated from an apparently normal horse. The

  14. Interference between respiratory syncytial virus and rhinovirus in respiratory tract infections in children.

    PubMed

    Karppinen, S; Toivonen, L; Schuez-Havupalo, L; Waris, M; Peltola, V

    2016-02-01

    An acute viral respiratory tract infection might prevent infections by other viruses because of the antiviral innate immune response. However, with the use of PCR methods, simultaneous detection of two or more respiratory viruses is frequent. We analysed the effect of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection on the occurrence of simultaneous rhinovirus (RV) infection in children within a birth cohort study setting. We used PCR for virus detection in nasal swabs collected from children with an acute respiratory tract infection at the age of 0-24 months and from healthy control children, who were matched for age and date of sample collection. Of 226 children with RSV infections, 18 (8.0%) had co-infections with RV, whereas RV was detected in 31 (14%) of 226 control children (p 0.049 by chi-square test). Adjustment for sex, number of siblings and socio-economic status strengthened the negative association between RSV and RV (OR 0.46, 95% CI 0.24-0.90; p 0.02). The median durations of symptoms (cough, rhinorrhoea, or fever) were 11 days in children with single RSV infections and 14 days in children with RSV-RV co-infections (p 0.02). Our results suggest that the presence of RSV reduces the probability of RV infection, but that, if a co-infection occurs, both viruses cause clinical symptoms.

  15. Detection of respiratory tract pathogens with molecular biology methods.

    PubMed

    Wozniak-Kosek, A; Kosek, J; Zielnik-Jurkiewicz, B

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the use in routine diagnosis of virological kit, which was designed to identify the 15 most common respiratory viruses in clinical specimens of nasopharyngeal aspirates, swabs, and bronchoalveolar lavage. It is a one-step multiplex RT-PCR system for the detection of influenza virus type A and type B, human respiratory syncytial virus type A, B; human adenovirus, human metapneumovirus, human coronaviruses 229E/NL63 and OC43, human parainfluenza type 1, 2, 3, human rhinovirus type A, B, human enterovirus, and bocavirus 1, 2, 3, 4. The article presents research conducted on the basis of swabs collected from patients who came to the Ear, Nose, and Throat Emergency Care Unit at the Department of Otolaryngology, Military Medical Institute in Warsaw, in February 2013. Due to the nature of work in an laryngological emergency ward, the material was collected only from those patients who reported problems associated with rhinitis or any dysfunction of the upper respiratory tract. The study shows that patients who came to seek laryngological assistance were usually infected with viruses having affinity for the airway epithelium.

  16. [Stem/progenitor cells in diseases of the respiratory tract].

    PubMed

    Płusa, Tadeusz

    2017-03-21

    Stem cells (SCs - stem cells) are characterized by plasticity and the ability to differentiate into other cell types. They are obtained from bone marrow, peripheral blood and cord blood. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) shows a broad immunomodulating, increases the number of regulatory T cells (Treg), modifies the activity of T cells, dendritic cells and NK (natural killer). Direct impact on reducing the release of proinflammatory cytokines and increased release of proinflammatory cytokines. Within the respiratory tract has a number of resident stem and progenitor cells referred to as L-MSCs (lung mesenchymal stem cells) whose presence was confirmed by markers as defined in the trachea, epithelial cells and alveolar. Demonstrated the efficacy of MSCs administration in the first stage of septic shock and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS - acute respiratory distress syndrome). There was a significant stimulation of repair processes, along with an improvement in lung function. Embryonic stem cells (ESCs - embryonic stem cells) are the latest addition in the treatment of congenital and acquired diseases of the airways and lung parenchyma. In patients with sarcoidosis MSCs are obtained from umbilical cord blood (PDA - placenta-derived mesenchymal-like cells) with phenotype CD34 +, CD10 +, CD105 + and CD200 +. The results of this therapy are very encouraging, and for this reason it is taken in subsequent research centers.

  17. Simultaneous influenza and respiratory syncytial virus infection in human respiratory tract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinky, Lubna Jahan Rashid; Dobrovolny, Hana

    2015-03-01

    Studies have shown that simultaneous infection of the respiratory tract with at least two viruses is not uncommon in hospitalized patients, although it is not clear whether these infections are more or less severe than single infections. We use mathematical models to study the dynamics of simultaneous influenza (flu) and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection, two of the more common respiratory viruses, in an effort to understand simultaneous infections. We examine the roles of initial viral inoculum, relative starting time, and cell regeneration on the severity of the infection. We also study the effect of antiviral treatment on the course of the infection. This study shows that, unless treated with antivirals, flu always takes over the infection no matter how small the initial dose and how delayed it starts with respect to RSV.

  18. Coxsackievirus A21, Enterovirus 68, and Acute Respiratory Tract Infection, China

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Zichun; Gonzalez, Richard; Wang, Zhong; Ren, Lili; Xiao, Yan; Li, Jianguo; Li, Yongjun; Vernet, Guy; Paranhos-Baccalà, Gláucia; Jin, Qi

    2012-01-01

    During August 2006–April 2010, in Beijing, China, 2 rare human enterovirus serotypes, coxsackievirus A21 and enterovirus 68, were detected most frequently in human enterovirus–positive adults with acute respiratory tract infections. Thus, during some years, these 2 viruses cause a substantial proportion of enterovirus-associated adult acute respiratory tract infections. PMID:22516379

  19. [Treatment results using cefixime for bacterial respiratory tract infections].

    PubMed

    Leonhardt, L

    1990-01-01

    In a prospective open clinical trial 20 patients with the diagnosis bacterial respiratory tract infection and underlying chronic obstructive lung disease were treated for 13 to 17 days with 200 mg cefixime b. i. d. 14 of 16 evaluable patients were treated successfully. In one patient the clinical symptoms remained unchanged and in another patient cefixime treatment failed. Ten of the 16 evaluable patients showed a positive baseline culture. In nine of these patients the initially isolated pathogens could be eliminated. In one patient, in whom cefixime therapy failed, change of pathogens was noticed after the end of treatment. Four of the 20 patients treated with cefixime reported side effects (gastritis, three; fungal dermatitis, one). In the patient with fungal dermatitis cefixime therapy was stopped.

  20. Relevance of antibiotic tissue penetration in treating respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed

    Kneer, J

    1993-01-01

    The majority of bacterial respiratory tract infections are caused by streptococci, Haemophilus spp. and Moraxella catarrhalis. These pathogens are located extracellularly. In logical consequence, the bactericidal action of the antimicrobial is required in these loci. To define the reasonable dosing regimen for effective eradication without creating unnecessary toxic potential we need to know (1) the distribution principles and kinetics, and (2) the correct correlation between concentration profiles in extracellular fluid (ECF) and blood. According to the permeability of the vascular capillaries unbound drug concentrations in plasma and ECF are in a dynamic equilibrium. Thus, for the beta-lactam antibiotics therapeutic efficacy is predictable by maintaining the free drug concentration above the bacterial minimum inhibitory concentration. Tissue homogenate data can only be useful if correctly interpreted by correcting for the partitioning between the tissue components.

  1. Velocity profiles in idealized model of human respiratory tract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elcner, J.; Jedelsky, J.; Lizal, F.; Jicha, M.

    2013-04-01

    This article deals with numerical simulation focused on velocity profiles in idealized model of human upper airways during steady inspiration. Three r gimes of breathing were investigated: Resting condition, Deep breathing and Light activity which correspond to most common regimes used for experiments and simulations. Calculation was validated with experimental data given by Phase Doppler Anemometry performed on the model with same geometry. This comparison was made in multiple points which form one cross-section in trachea near first bifurcation of bronchial tree. Development of velocity profile in trachea during steady inspiration was discussed with respect for common phenomenon formed in trachea and for future research of transport of aerosol particles in human respiratory tract.

  2. Human respiratory syncytial virus in children with acute respiratory tract infections in China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rong-Fang; Jin, Yu; Xie, Zhi-Ping; Liu, Na; Yan, Kun-Long; Gao, Han-Chun; Song, Jing-Rong; Yuan, Xin-Hui; Xiao, Ni-Guang; Guo, Ming-Wei; Zhou, Qiong-Hua; Hou, Yun-De; Duan, Zhaojun

    2010-11-01

    There are limited data on the prevalence and clinical and molecular characterization of human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) in children with acute respiratory tract infections (ARTIs) in China. From December 2006 to March 2009, 894 nasopharyngeal aspirates (NPAs) were collected from children under 14 years of age with ARTIs. Samples were screened for HRSV and genotyped by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) and sequencing. Demographic and clinical information was recorded. A total of 38.14% (341/894) of samples were positive for HRSV. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that 60.4% of the selected 227 RSV strains were GA2, 34.4% were BA, 4.8% were GB2, and 0.4% were GB3. A total of 40.47% of all of the RSV-positive samples were coinfected with other respiratory viruses, and adenovirus was the most common additional respiratory virus. No statistical differences were found in the frequency of diagnosis and symptoms between the coinfection group and monoinfection group. Additionally, no statistical differences were found in epidemiological characterizations or disease severity between genotype BA- and GA2-positive patients, except for a greater frequency of lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) (mostly bronchitis)with BA. HRSV is the most important viral pathogen in Chinese children with ARTIs. Four genotypes (i.e., GA2, BA, GB2, and GB3) circulate locally, and the predominant genotype may shift between seasons. Coinfection with other viruses does not affect disease severity. HRSV genotypes were not associated with different epidemiological characterizations or disease severity.

  3. An association between Helicobacter pylori and upper respiratory tract disease: Fact or fiction?

    PubMed Central

    Kariya, Shin; Okano, Mitsuhiro; Nishizaki, Kazunori

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a major cause of chronic gastritis and gastric ulcers and considerable evidence supports the notion that infection with this bacterium is also associated with gastric malignancy in addition to various other conditions including pulmonary, vascular and autoimmune disorders. Gastric juice infected with H. pylori might play an important role in upper respiratory tract infection. Although direct and/or indirect mechanisms might be involved in the association between H. pylori and upper respiratory tract diseases, the etiological role of H. pylori in upper respiratory tract disorders has not yet been fully elucidated. Although various studies over the past two decades have suggested a relationship between H. pylori and upper respiratory tract diseases, the findings are inconsistent. The present overview describes the outcomes of recent investigations into the impact of H. pylori on upper respiratory tract and adjacent lesions. PMID:24587622

  4. [Treatment of fungal infections of upper respiratory tract and ear].

    PubMed

    Kurnatowski, Piotr; Kurnatowska, Agnieszka K

    2007-01-01

    Fungi, in comparison with other pathogenic factors, have high pathogenicity. The number of fungal species which are able to infect people is over 500. The upper respiratory tract and ear have permanent contact with external environment which makes their ontocenoses open to continuous exchange of microorganisms of which they consist. In etiology of inflammatory processes 21 species which belonging to 3 genera (Zygomycota, Ascomycota, Basidiomycota) of fungi play important role. Administration of antifungal drugs can be: prophylactic, empiric preemptive and therapeutic. Physicians may prescribe antibiotics (mainly pollens: amphotericin B, natamycin and nystatin) and chemiotherapeutics (mainly azoles and fluorpirymidins, pigments, chlorhexidine and chlorquinaldol). In ENT practice topical and systemic drugs can be administrated. Topical lozenges include amphotericin B, clotrimazole, chlorhexidine or chlorquinaldol and oral gels: nystatin and miconazole. Some of drugs are in the form of suspension/solution, which can be used for inhalation, into the sinus, for swabbing or for lavage: amphotericin B, natamycin, nystatin, clotrimazol, flucytosine, miconazole, fluconazole, vorykonazole, caspofungin. It should be underlined that only a few of dugs can be absorbed from the digestive tract: flucytosine, fluconazole, itraconazole, ketoconazole, miconazole, vorykonazole.

  5. Bacterial Topography of the Healthy Human Lower Respiratory Tract

    PubMed Central

    Erb-Downward, John R.; Freeman, Christine M.; McCloskey, Lisa; Falkowski, Nicole R.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although culture-independent techniques have refuted lung sterility in health, controversy about contamination during bronchoscope passage through the upper respiratory tract (URT) has impeded research progress. We sought to establish whether bronchoscopic sampling accurately reflects the lung microbiome in health and to distinguish between two proposed routes of authentic microbial immigration, (i) dispersion along contiguous respiratory mucosa and (ii) subclinical microaspiration. During bronchoscopy of eight adult volunteers without lung disease, we performed seven protected specimen brushings (PSB) and bilateral bronchoalveolar lavages (BALs) per subject. We amplified, sequenced, and analyzed the bacterial 16S rRNA gene V4 regions by using the Illumina MiSeq platform. Rigorous attention was paid to eliminate potential sources of error or contamination, including a randomized processing order and the inclusion and analysis of exhaustive procedural and sequencing control specimens. Indices of mouth-lung immigration (mouth-lung community similarity, bacterial burden, and community richness) were all significantly greater in airway and alveolar specimens than in bronchoscope contamination control specimens, indicating minimal evidence of pharyngeal contamination. Ecological indices of mouth-lung immigration peaked at or near the carina, as predicted for a primary immigration route of microaspiration. Bacterial burden, diversity, and mouth-lung similarity were greater in BAL than PSB samples, reflecting differences in the sampled surface areas. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT02392182.) PMID:28196961

  6. Mycobiome in the Lower Respiratory Tract – A Clinical Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Robert; Moissl-Eichinger, Christine; Halwachs, Bettina; Gorkiewicz, Gregor; Berg, Gabriele; Valentin, Thomas; Prattes, Jürgen; Högenauer, Christoph; Zollner-Schwetz, Ines

    2017-01-01

    Recently the paradigm that the healthy lung is sterile was challenged and it is now believed that the lungs harbor a diverse microbiota also contributing to the pathogenesis of various diseases. Most of the research studies targeting the respiratory microbiome have focused on bacteria and their impact on lung health and lung diseases. Recently, also the mycobiome has gained attention. Lower respiratory tract (LRT) diseases (e.g., cystic fibrosis) and other diseases or conditions (e.g., HIV infection, lung transplantation, and treatment at intensive care units) have been investigated with regard to possible involvement of mycobiome in development or progression of diseases. It has been shown that diversities of mycobiome in the LRT vary in different populations and conditions. It has been proposed that the mycobiome diversity associated with LRT can vary with different stages of diseases. Overall, Candida was the dominant fungal genus in LRT samples. In this review, we summarize the recent findings regarding the human LRT mycobiome from a clinical perspective focussing on characterization of investigated patient groups and healthy controls as well as sampling techniques. From these data, clinical implications for further studies or routine practice are drawn. To obtain clinically relevant answers efforts should be enhanced to collect well characterized and described patient groups as well as healthy individuals for comparative data analysis and to apply thorough sampling techniques. We need to proceed with elucidation of the role of mycobiota in healthy LRT and LRT diseases to hopefully improve patient care. PMID:28119685

  7. Differential Expression of the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Receptor in the Upper Respiratory Tracts of Humans and Dromedary Camels

    PubMed Central

    Widagdo, W.; Raj, V. Stalin; Schipper, Debby; Kolijn, Kimberley; van Leenders, Geert J. L. H.; Bosch, Berend J.; Bensaid, Albert; Segalés, Joaquim; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.; Koopmans, Marion P.; van den Brand, Judith M. A.

    2016-01-01

    Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is not efficiently transmitted between humans, but it is highly prevalent in dromedary camels. Here we report that the MERS-CoV receptor—dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4)—is expressed in the upper respiratory tract epithelium of camels but not in that of humans. Lack of DPP4 expression may be the primary cause of limited MERS-CoV replication in the human upper respiratory tract and hence restrict transmission. PMID:26889022

  8. The Revised International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) dosimetric model for the human respiratory tract

    SciTech Connect

    Bair, W.J.

    1991-09-01

    The new respiratory tract model is based on the premise that the large differences in radiation sensitivity of respiratory tract tissues, and the wide range of doses they receive, argue for calculating specific tissue doses rather than average lung doses for radiation protection purposes. The new model is more complex than the current lung model because it describes deposition of inhaled radioactive material in the clearance from several tissues and regions of the respiratory tract and is applicable to the worldwide population of both workers and the public. 2 refs., 2 figs.

  9. Schizophyllum radiatum, an Emerging Fungus from Human Respiratory Tract.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, J P Z; Sutton, D; Gené, J; García, D; Guevara-Suarez, M; Decock, C; Wiederhold, N; Guarro, J

    2016-10-01

    Schizophyllum is an important genus of basidiomycetes that, apart from being of genetic and biotechnological interest, is also reported to be a plant and animal pathogen. Schizophyllum commune is the best-known species and the only one reported from clinical specimens thus far, being recovered mainly from the respiratory tract. The aim of this study was to determine the species diversity of 23 clinical isolates of Schizophyllum from the United States using multilocus phylogenetic analysis and their in vitro susceptibilities to six drugs. The markers used for sequencing were the internal transcribed spacer (ITS), a portion of the nuclear large subunit (LSU) of ribosomal DNA, the RNA polymerase II second-largest subunit (RPB2), and the translation elongation factor 1α (EF-1α) gene. The analyses revealed that 22 of the clinical isolates were in the Schizophyllum radiatum clade with high support values and 1 isolate was in the S. commune clade. This is the first report of this species in clinical samples. The two species mentioned above showed very similar morphological features in culture (i.e., white, cottony, unsporulated colonies composed of hyphae with clamp connections), making morphological discrimination between the two impossible. An epitype is designed for S. radiatum, and its sequences have been deposited in GenBank. The antifungal that showed the greatest in vitro activity against the strains tested was shown to be amphotericin B. In general, the strains of S. radiatum showed higher MICs than S. commune.

  10. Digestive and respiratory tract motor responses associated with eructation.

    PubMed

    Lang, Ivan M; Medda, Bidyut K; Shaker, Reza

    2013-06-01

    We studied the digestive and respiratory tract motor responses in 10 chronically instrumented dogs during eructation activated after feeding. Muscles were recorded from the cervical area, thorax, and abdomen. The striated muscles were recorded using EMG and the smooth muscles using strain gauges. We found eructation in three distinct functional phases that were composed of different sets of motor responses: gas escape, barrier elimination, and gas transport. The gas escape phase, activated by gastric distension, consists of relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter and diaphragmatic hiatus and contraction of the longitudinal muscle of the thoracic esophagus and rectus abdominis. All these motor events promote gas escape from the stomach. The barrier elimination phase, probably activated by rapid gas distension of the thoracic esophagus, consists of relaxation of the pharyngeal constrictors and excitation of dorsal and ventral upper esophageal sphincter distracting muscles, as well as rapid contraction of the diaphragmatic dome fibers. These motor events allow esophagopharyngeal air movement by promoting retrograde airflow and opening of the upper esophageal sphincter. The transport phase, possibly activated secondary to diaphragmatic contraction, consists of a retrograde contraction of the striated muscle esophagus that transports the air from the thoracic esophagus to the pharynx. We hypothesize that the esophageal reverse peristalsis is mediated by elementary reflexes, rather than a coordinated peristaltic response like secondary peristalsis. The phases of eructation can be activated independently of one another or in a different manner to participate in physiological events other than eructation that cause gastroesophageal or esophagogastric reflux.

  11. Schizophyllum radiatum, an Emerging Fungus from Human Respiratory Tract

    PubMed Central

    Siqueira, J. P. Z.; Sutton, D.; García, D.; Guevara-Suarez, M.; Decock, C.; Wiederhold, N.; Guarro, J.

    2016-01-01

    Schizophyllum is an important genus of basidiomycetes that, apart from being of genetic and biotechnological interest, is also reported to be a plant and animal pathogen. Schizophyllum commune is the best-known species and the only one reported from clinical specimens thus far, being recovered mainly from the respiratory tract. The aim of this study was to determine the species diversity of 23 clinical isolates of Schizophyllum from the United States using multilocus phylogenetic analysis and their in vitro susceptibilities to six drugs. The markers used for sequencing were the internal transcribed spacer (ITS), a portion of the nuclear large subunit (LSU) of ribosomal DNA, the RNA polymerase II second-largest subunit (RPB2), and the translation elongation factor 1α (EF-1α) gene. The analyses revealed that 22 of the clinical isolates were in the Schizophyllum radiatum clade with high support values and 1 isolate was in the S. commune clade. This is the first report of this species in clinical samples. The two species mentioned above showed very similar morphological features in culture (i.e., white, cottony, unsporulated colonies composed of hyphae with clamp connections), making morphological discrimination between the two impossible. An epitype is designed for S. radiatum, and its sequences have been deposited in GenBank. The antifungal that showed the greatest in vitro activity against the strains tested was shown to be amphotericin B. In general, the strains of S. radiatum showed higher MICs than S. commune. PMID:27440814

  12. [Consensus guidelines for the management of upper respiratory tract infections].

    PubMed

    Lopardo, Gustavo; Calmaggi, Aníbal; Clara, Liliana; Levy Hara, Gabriel; Mykietiuk, Analía; Pryluka, Daniel; Ruvinsky, Silvina; Vujacich, Claudia; Yahni, Diego; Bogdanowicz, Elizabeth; Klein, Manuel; López Furst, María J; Pensotti, Claudia; Rial, María J; Scapellato, Pablo

    2012-01-01

    Upper respiratory tract infections are the most common source of antibiotic prescriptions. Acute pharyngitis is caused mainly by viruses, viral cases can be distinguished from acute streptococcal pharyngitis using Centor clinical epidemiological criteria, by rapid antigen tests or throat culture. Treatment of choice for streptococcal infection is penicillin V given in two daily doses. In children, acute otitis media (AOM) is the infection for which antibiotics are most often prescribed. Predominant causative pathogens include Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae non-type b and Moraxella catarrhalis. Diagnosis is based on history, physical examination and otoscopic exam. Antibiotic treatment should be initiated promptly in all children<2 years of age, and in older children presenting bilateral AOM, otorrhoea, co-morbidities or severe illness. In Argentina, amoxicillin is the drug of choice given the low penicillin resistance rates for S. pneumoniae. In children who fail amoxicillin therapy, amoxicillin/clavulanate provides better coverage against beta-lactamase producing H. influenzae and M. catarrhalis. Rhinosinusitis is caused mainly by viruses, secondary bacterial complication occurs in less than 5% of cases. Diagnosis is based on physical examination and additional studies are not usually required. Acute bacterial sinusitis is caused by the same pathogens that cause AOM and amoxicillin is the drug of choice.

  13. Dysbiosis of upper respiratory tract microbiota in elderly pneumonia patients.

    PubMed

    de Steenhuijsen Piters, Wouter A A; Huijskens, Elisabeth G W; Wyllie, Anne L; Biesbroek, Giske; van den Bergh, Menno R; Veenhoven, Reinier H; Wang, Xinhui; Trzciński, Krzysztof; Bonten, Marc J; Rossen, John W A; Sanders, Elisabeth A M; Bogaert, Debby

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial pneumonia is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in elderly. We hypothesize that dysbiosis between regular residents of the upper respiratory tract (URT) microbiome, that is balance between commensals and potential pathogens, is involved in pathogen overgrowth and consequently disease. We compared oropharyngeal microbiota of elderly pneumonia patients (n=100) with healthy elderly (n=91) by 16S-rRNA-based sequencing and verified our findings in young adult pneumonia patients (n=27) and young healthy adults (n=187). Microbiota profiles differed significantly between elderly pneumonia patients and healthy elderly (PERMANOVA, P<0.0005). Highly similar differences were observed between microbiota profiles of young adult pneumonia patients and their healthy controls. Clustering resulted in 11 (sub)clusters including 95% (386/405) of samples. We observed three microbiota profiles strongly associated with pneumonia (P<0.05) and either dominated by lactobacilli (n=11), Rothia (n=51) or Streptococcus (pseudo)pneumoniae (n=42). In contrast, three other microbiota clusters (in total n=183) were correlated with health (P<0.05) and were all characterized by more diverse profiles containing higher abundances of especially Prevotella melaninogenica, Veillonella and Leptotrichia. For the remaining clusters (n=99), the association with health or disease was less clear. A decision tree model based on the relative abundance of five bacterial community members in URT microbiota showed high specificity of 95% and sensitivity of 84% (89% and 73%, respectively, after cross-validation) for differentiating pneumonia patients from healthy individuals. These results suggest that pneumonia in elderly and young adults is associated with dysbiosis of the URT microbiome with bacterial overgrowth of single species and absence of distinct anaerobic bacteria. Whether the observed microbiome changes are a cause or a consequence of the development of pneumonia or merely coincide with

  14. Systematic review of the treatment of upper respiratory tract infection

    PubMed Central

    Fahey, T.; Stocks, N.; Thomas, T.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To assess the risks and benefits of antibiotic treatment in children with symptoms of upper respiratory tract infection (URTI).
DESIGN—Quantitative systematic review of randomised trials that compare antibiotic treatment with placebo.
DATA SOURCES—Twelve trials retrieved from a systematic search (electronic databases, contact with authors, contact with drug manufacturers, reference lists); no restriction on language.
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES—The proportion of children in whom the clinical outcome was worse or unchanged; the proportion of children who suffered complications or progression of illness; the proportion of children who had side effects.
RESULTS—1699 children were randomised in six trials that contributed to the meta-analysis. Six trials were not used in the meta-analysis because of different outcomes or incomplete data. Clinical outcome was not improved by antibiotic treatment (relative risk 1.01,95% confidence interval (CI) 0.90 to 1.13), neither was the proportion of children suffering from complications or progression of illness (relative risk 0.71, 95% CI 0.45 to 1.12). Complications from URTI in the five trials that reported this outcome was low (range 2-15%). Antibiotic treatment was not associated with an increase in side effects compared with placebo (relative risk 0.8, 95% CI 0.54 to 1.21).
CONCLUSIONS—In view of the lack of efficacy and low complication rates, antibiotic treatment of children with URTI is not supported by current evidence from randomised trials.

 PMID:9875017

  15. Dysbiosis of upper respiratory tract microbiota in elderly pneumonia patients

    PubMed Central

    de Steenhuijsen Piters, Wouter A A; Huijskens, Elisabeth G W; Wyllie, Anne L; Biesbroek, Giske; van den Bergh, Menno R; Veenhoven, Reinier H; Wang, Xinhui; Trzciński, Krzysztof; Bonten, Marc J; Rossen, John W A; Sanders, Elisabeth A M; Bogaert, Debby

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial pneumonia is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in elderly. We hypothesize that dysbiosis between regular residents of the upper respiratory tract (URT) microbiome, that is balance between commensals and potential pathogens, is involved in pathogen overgrowth and consequently disease. We compared oropharyngeal microbiota of elderly pneumonia patients (n=100) with healthy elderly (n=91) by 16S-rRNA-based sequencing and verified our findings in young adult pneumonia patients (n=27) and young healthy adults (n=187). Microbiota profiles differed significantly between elderly pneumonia patients and healthy elderly (PERMANOVA, P<0.0005). Highly similar differences were observed between microbiota profiles of young adult pneumonia patients and their healthy controls. Clustering resulted in 11 (sub)clusters including 95% (386/405) of samples. We observed three microbiota profiles strongly associated with pneumonia (P<0.05) and either dominated by lactobacilli (n=11), Rothia (n=51) or Streptococcus (pseudo)pneumoniae (n=42). In contrast, three other microbiota clusters (in total n=183) were correlated with health (P<0.05) and were all characterized by more diverse profiles containing higher abundances of especially Prevotella melaninogenica, Veillonella and Leptotrichia. For the remaining clusters (n=99), the association with health or disease was less clear. A decision tree model based on the relative abundance of five bacterial community members in URT microbiota showed high specificity of 95% and sensitivity of 84% (89% and 73%, respectively, after cross-validation) for differentiating pneumonia patients from healthy individuals. These results suggest that pneumonia in elderly and young adults is associated with dysbiosis of the URT microbiome with bacterial overgrowth of single species and absence of distinct anaerobic bacteria. Whether the observed microbiome changes are a cause or a consequence of the development of pneumonia or merely coincide with

  16. Hospital admissions for lower respiratory tract infections among infants in the Canadian Arctic: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Banerji, Anna; Panzov, Val; Young, Michael; Robinson, Joan; Lee, Bonita; Moraes, Theo; Mamdani, Muhammad; Giles, B. Louise; Jiang, Depeng; Bisson, Danny; Dennis, Marguerite; Morel, Johanne; Hall, Judith; Hui, Charles; Paes, Bosco; Mahony, James B.

    2016-01-01

    Background: It is unknown whether this burden of disease of lower respiratory tract infections is comparable across the Canadian Arctic. The objectives of this surveillance study were to compare the rates of hospital admission for lower respiratory tract infection and the severity of infection across Arctic Canada, and to describe the responsible viruses. Methods: We performed a prospective multicentre surveillance study of infants less than 1 year of age admitted in 2009 with lower respiratory tract infection to all hospitals (5 regional, 4 tertiary) in the Northwest Territories, Nunavut and Nunavik to assess for regional differences. Nasopharyngeal aspirates were processed by means of a polymerase chain reaction respiratory viral panel, testing for 20 respiratory viruses and influenza A (H1N1). The role of coinfection was assessed by means of regression analysis for length of stay (short: < 7 d; long: > 14 d). Outcomes compared included rates of lower respiratory tract infection, respiratory syncytial virus infection, transfer to tertiary hospital and severe lower respiratory tract infection (respiratory failure, intubation and mechanical ventilation, and/or cardiopulmonary resuscitation). Results: There were 348 admissions for lower respiratory tract infection in the population of interest in 2009. Rates of admission per 1000 live births varied significantly, from 39 in the Northwest Territories to 456 in Nunavik (p < 0.001). The rates of tertiary admissions and severe lower respiratory tract infection per 1000 live births in the Northwest Territories were 5.6 and 1.4, respectively, compared to 55.9 and 17.1, respectively, in Nunavut and 52.0 and 20.0, respectively, in Nunavik (p ≤ 0.001). Respiratory syncytial virus was the most common virus identified (124 cases [41.6% of those tested]), and coinfection was detected in 51 cases (41.1%) of infection with this virus. Longer length of stay was associated with coinfection (odds ratio [OR] 2.64) and underlying

  17. Outbreak of lower respiratory tract illness associated with human enterovirus 68 among American Indian children.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Lara M; Redd, John T; Schneider, Eileen; Lu, Xiaoyan; Chern, Shur-Wern W; Oberste, M Steven; Erdman, Dean D; Fischer, Gayle E; Armstrong, Gregory L; Kodani, Maja; Montoya, Jennifer; Magri, Julie M; Cheek, James E

    2012-03-01

    Human enterovirus 68 (EV68) infections are rarely reported. We describe a respiratory outbreak associated with EV68 among 18 children admitted to a remote Indian Health Service facility during August 11, 2010 through September 14, 2010. Clinical illness was characterized by pneumonia and wheezing. EV68 should be considered as an etiology in outbreaks of lower respiratory tract illness.

  18. IRON AND IRON-RELATED PROTEINS IN THE LOWER RESPIRATORY TRACT OF ARDS PATIENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    OBJECTIVE: An increased oxidative stress in the lower respiratory tract of individuals with acute respiratory distress syndrome is considered to be one mechanism of lung injury in these patients. Cell and tissue damage resulting from an oxidative stress can ultimately be the cons...

  19. Effects of ambient air pollution on respiratory tract complaints and airway inflammation in primary school children.

    PubMed

    Altuğ, Hicran; Gaga, Eftade O; Döğeroğlu, Tuncay; Brunekreef, Bert; Hoek, Gerard; Van Doorn, Wim

    2014-05-01

    Respiratory health effects of ambient air pollution were studied in 605 school children 9 to 13 years in Eskişehir, Turkey. Each child performed a fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FENO) measurement and a lung function test (LFT). Self-reported respiratory tract complaints (having cold, complaints of throat, runny nose and shortness of breath/wheezing) in the last 7 days and on the day of testing were also recorded. As acute health outcomes were investigated, weekly average ambient concentrations of ozone (O3), nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) were determined by passive sampling in the school playgrounds simultaneously with the health survey. Effects of air pollution on respiratory tract complaints and exhaled NO/lung function were estimated by multivariate logistic regression and multivariate linear mixed effects models, respectively. Upper respiratory tract complaints were significantly (p<0.05) associated with weekly average O3 concentrations during the health survey (adjusted odds ratios (OR) of 1.21 and 1.28 for a 10 μgm(-3) increment for having cold and a runny nose on day of testing, respectively). FENO levels were significantly (p<0.05) increased in children with various upper respiratory tract complaints (ratio in FENO varied between 1.16 and 1.40). No significant change in FENO levels was detected in association with any of the measured pollutants (p ≥ 0.05). Lung function was not associated with upper respiratory tract complaints and FENO levels. Peak Expiratory Flow (PEF) levels were negatively associated with weekly average O3 levels for children without upper respiratory tract complaints. In summary, elevated levels of air pollutants increased respiratory tract complaints in children.

  20. Human coronavirus NL63 associated with lower respiratory tract symptoms in early life.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Laurent; Regamey, Nicolas; Roiha, Hanna; Deffernez, Christelle; Frey, Urs

    2005-11-01

    Coronavirus NL63 has been identified as a new member of the coronavirus genus, but its role as a cause of respiratory disease needs to be established. We studied the first episode of lower respiratory tract symptoms in a cohort of healthy neonates. NL63 was identified in 6 (7%) of 82 cases and was as frequent as other coronaviruses (9%). NL63 was recovered at the onset of symptoms and was cleared within 3 weeks in half of the cases. Our data suggests that coronavirus NL63 causes lower respiratory tract symptoms and is acquired in early life.

  1. [The current problems of diagnostics and expertise of occupational diseases of the upper respiratory tract].

    PubMed

    Pankova, V B

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to systematize the main etiological factors as well as specific clinical, morphological, immunological, and microbiological features characteristic of the development of pathogenic changes in nasal cavity mucosa associated with occupational diseases of the upper respiratory tract (URT) of the subjects professionally exposed to the inhaled industrial aerosols (IA) with the special emphasis laid on the role of URT disorders in the development of occupational pathology of the respiratory system. The main clinical forms of occupational diseases of the upper respiratory tract are considered in accordance with the List of occupational diseases. Much attention is given to the criteria for the occupational origin of dystrophic and allergic diseases of the upper respiratory tract developing under the action of industrial aerosols.

  2. The upper respiratory tract microbiome and its potential role in bovine respiratory disease and otitis media

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Svetlana F.; Teixeira, Andre Gustavo V.; Higgins, Catherine H.; Lima, Fabio S.; Bicalho, Rodrigo C.

    2016-01-01

    The upper respiratory tract (URT) hosts a complex microbial community of commensal microorganisms and potential pathogens. Analyzing the composition and nature of the healthy URT microbiota and how it changes over time will contribute to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of pneumonia and otitis. A longitudinal study was conducted including 174 Holstein calves that were divided in four groups: healthy calves, calves diagnosed with pneumonia, otitis or both diseases. Deep pharyngeal swabs were collected on days 3, 14, 28, and 35 of life, and next-generation sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene as well as quantitative PCR was performed. The URT of Holstein dairy calves aged 3 to 35 days revealed to host a highly diverse bacterial community. The relative abundances of the bacterial genera Mannheimia, Moraxella, and Mycoplasma were significantly higher in diseased versus healthy animals, and the total bacterial load of newborn calves at day 3 was higher for animals that developed pneumonia than for healthy animals. Our results corroborate the existing knowledge that species of Mannheimia and Mycoplasma are important pathogens in pneumonia and otitis. Furthermore, they suggest that species of Moraxella can potentially cause the same disorders (pneumonia and otitis), and that high neonatal bacterial load is a key contributor to the development of pneumonia. PMID:27363739

  3. Revision of the ICRP dosimetric model for the human respiratory tract

    SciTech Connect

    Bair, W.J.

    1990-12-01

    Although the dosimetric model of the respiratory tract used in ICRP Publication 30 had not been shown to be seriously deficient for the purpose of calculating Annual Limits on Intake (ALIs) for workers, the availability of new information led the ICRP in 1984 to create a special Task Group to review the dosimetric model of the respiratory tract and, if justified, propose revisions or a new model. The Task Group directed its efforts toward improving the model used in Publication 30 rather than developing a completely new model. The objective was a model that would facilitate calculation of biologically meaningful doses; be consistent with morphological, physiological, and radiobiological characteristics of the respiratory tract; incorporate current knowledge; meet all radiation protection needs; be user friendly by not being unnecessarily sophisticated; be adaptable to development of computer software for calculation of relevant radiation doses from knowledge of a few readily measured exposure parameters; be equally useful for assessment purposes as for calculating ALIs; be applicable to all members of the world population; and consider the influence of smoking, air pollutants, and diseases of the inhalation, deposition, and clearance of radioactive particles from the respiratory tract. The model provides for calculation of a committed dose equivalent for each region, adjusted for the relative cancer sensitivity of that region, and for the summing of these to yield a committed dose equivalent for the entire respiratory tract. 3 figs.

  4. Structure, material characteristics and function of the upper respiratory tract of the pygmy sperm whale.

    PubMed

    Davenport, John; Cotter, Liz; Rogan, Emer; Kelliher, Denis; Murphy, Colm

    2013-12-15

    Cetaceans are neckless, so the trachea is very short. The upper respiratory tract is separate from the mouth and pharynx, and the dorsal blowhole connects, via the vestibular and nasopalatine cavities, directly to the larynx. Toothed cetaceans (Odontoceti) are capable of producing sounds at depth, either for locating prey or for communication. It has been suggested that during dives, air from the lungs and upper respiratory tract can be moved to the vestibular and nasal cavities to permit sound generation to continue when air volume within these cavities decreases as ambient pressure rises. The pygmy sperm whale, Kogia breviceps, is a deep diver (500-1000 m) that is known to produce hunting clicks. Our study of an immature female shows that the upper respiratory tract is highly asymmetrical: the trachea and bronchi are extremely compressible, whereas the larynx is much more rigid. Laryngeal and tracheal volumes were established. Calculations based on Boyle's Law imply that all air from the lungs and bronchi would be transferred to the larynx and trachea by a depth of 270 m and that the larynx itself could not accommodate all respiratory air mass at a depth of 1000 m. This suggests that no respiratory air would be available for vocalisation. However, the bronchi, trachea and part of the larynx have a thick vascular lining featuring large, thin-walled vessels. We propose that these vessels may become dilated during dives to reduce the volume of the upper respiratory tract, permitting forward transfer of air through the larynx.

  5. Emerging novel and antimicrobial-resistant respiratory tract infections: new drug development and therapeutic options.

    PubMed

    Zumla, Alimuddin; Memish, Ziad A; Maeurer, Markus; Bates, Matthew; Mwaba, Peter; Al-Tawfiq, Jaffar A; Denning, David W; Hayden, Frederick G; Hui, David S

    2014-11-01

    The emergence and spread of antimicrobial-resistant bacterial, viral, and fungal pathogens for which diminishing treatment options are available is of major global concern. New viral respiratory tract infections with epidemic potential, such as severe acute respiratory syndrome, swine-origin influenza A H1N1, and Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus infection, require development of new antiviral agents. The substantial rise in the global numbers of patients with respiratory tract infections caused by pan-antibiotic-resistant Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and multiazole-resistant fungi has focused attention on investments into development of new drugs and treatment regimens. Successful treatment outcomes for patients with respiratory tract infections across all health-care settings will necessitate rapid, precise diagnosis and more effective and pathogen-specific therapies. This Series paper describes the development and use of new antimicrobial agents and immune-based and host-directed therapies for a range of conventional and emerging viral, bacterial, and fungal causes of respiratory tract infections.

  6. Principles of judicious antibiotic prescribing for upper respiratory tract infections in pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Hersh, Adam L; Jackson, Mary Anne; Hicks, Lauri A

    2013-12-01

    Most upper respiratory tract infections are caused by viruses and require no antibiotics. This clinical report focuses on antibiotic prescribing strategies for bacterial upper respiratory tract infections, including acute otitis media, acute bacterial sinusitis, and streptococcal pharyngitis. The principles for judicious antibiotic prescribing that are outlined focus on applying stringent diagnostic criteria, weighing the benefits and harms of antibiotic therapy, and understanding situations when antibiotics may not be indicated. The principles can be used to amplify messages from recent clinical guidelines for local guideline development and for patient communication; they are broadly applicable to antibiotic prescribing in general.

  7. Viral infections of the lower respiratory tract: old viruses, new viruses, and the role of diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Pavia, Andrew T

    2011-05-01

    Viral infections of the lower respiratory tract cause an enormous disease burden in children, and the role of respiratory viruses in serious lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) in older adults is increasingly appreciated. Although viruses are responsible for a large proportion LRTIs, antibiotics are often prescribed. New diagnostic platforms have the potential to detect a wider range of established and newly discovered viruses with greater sensitivity. This will create additional challenges. Although it is clear that influenza, parainfluenza, respiratory syncytial virus, human metapneumovirus, and adenovirus are important causes of pneumonia, the role of rhinoviruses and some of the newly described viruses, including human coronaviruses and bocavirus, is harder to determine. Better diagnostic tests that establish the cause of LRTIs in children have the potential to both reduce overall antibiotic use and to improve the targeted use of antibiotics. In addition, rapid identification of viral infections can help control nosocomial transmission.

  8. Mortality rates of human metapneumovirus and respiratory syncytial virus lower respiratory tract infections in hematopoietic cell transplantation recipients.

    PubMed

    Renaud, Christian; Xie, Hu; Seo, Sachiko; Kuypers, Jane; Cent, Anne; Corey, Lawrence; Leisenring, Wendy; Boeckh, Michael; Englund, Janet A

    2013-08-01

    Human metapneumovirus (HMPV), a common respiratory virus, can cause severe disease in pre- and post-hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) recipients. We conducted a retrospective cohort analysis in HCT patients with HMPV (n = 23) or respiratory syncytial virus (n = 23) detected in bronchoalveolar lavage samples by reverse transcription PCR between 2006 and 2011 to determine disease characteristics and factors associated with outcome. Mortality rates at 100 days were 43% for both HMPV and respiratory syncytial virus lower respiratory tract disease. Steroid therapy, oxygen requirement >2 L or mechanical ventilation, and bone marrow as cell source were significant risk factors for overall and virus-related mortality in multivariable models, whereas the virus type was not. The presence of centrilobular/nodular radiographic infiltrates was a possible protective factor for mechanical ventilation. Thus, HMPV lower respiratory tract disease is associated with high mortality in HCT recipients. Earlier detection in combination with new antiviral therapy is needed to reduce mortality among HCT recipients.

  9. Viral Etiologies of Lower Respiratory Tract Infections Among Egyptian Children under Five Years of Age

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-13

    authors thank Dr. Dean Erdman from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Atlanta, GA for providing the primers/probes and protocol...Etiology of acute respiratory tract infections among children in a combined community and hospital study in Rio de Janeiro. Clin Infect Dis 1995, 20(4...Garcia-Garcia ML, Blanco C, Vazquez MC, Frias ME, Perez-Brena P, Casas I: Multiple simultaneous viral infections in infants with acute respiratory

  10. Influenza A (H10N7) Virus Causes Respiratory Tract Disease in Harbor Seals and Ferrets

    PubMed Central

    Herfst, Sander; Bodewes, Rogier; Pfankuche, Vanessa M.; van de Bildt, Marco W. G.; Seehusen, Frauke; Puff, Christina; Richard, Mathilde; Siebert, Ursula; Lehnert, Kristina; Bestebroer, Theo; Lexmond, Pascal; Fouchier, Ron A. M.; Prenger-Berninghoff, Ellen; Herbst, Werner; Koopmans, Marion; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.

    2016-01-01

    Avian influenza viruses sporadically cross the species barrier to mammals, including humans, in which they may cause epidemic disease. Recently such an epidemic occurred due to the emergence of avian influenza virus of the subtype H10N7 (Seal/H10N7) in harbor seals (Phoca vitulina). This epidemic caused high mortality in seals along the north-west coast of Europe and represented a potential risk for human health. To characterize the spectrum of lesions and to identify the target cells and viral distribution, findings in 16 harbor seals spontaneously infected with Seal/H10N7 are described. The seals had respiratory tract inflammation extending from the nasal cavity to bronchi associated with intralesional virus antigen in respiratory epithelial cells. Virus infection was restricted to the respiratory tract. The fatal outcome of the viral infection in seals was most likely caused by secondary bacterial infections. To investigate the pathogenic potential of H10N7 infection for humans, we inoculated the seal virus intratracheally into six ferrets and performed pathological and virological analyses at 3 and 7 days post inoculation. These experimentally inoculated ferrets displayed mild clinical signs, virus excretion from the pharynx and respiratory tract inflammation extending from bronchi to alveoli that was associated with virus antigen expression exclusively in the respiratory epithelium. Virus was isolated only from the respiratory tract. In conclusion, Seal/H10N7 infection in naturally infected harbor seals and experimentally infected ferrets shows that respiratory epithelial cells are the permissive cells for viral replication. Fatal outcome in seals was caused by secondary bacterial pneumonia similar to that in fatal human cases during influenza pandemics. Productive infection of ferrets indicates that seal/H10N7 may possess a zoonotic potential. This outbreak of LPAI from wild birds to seals demonstrates the risk of such occasions for mammals and thus humans

  11. INCORPORATION OF LABELED NITRIC OXIDE INTO RESPIRATORY TRACT LINING FLUIDS AND BLOOD PLASMA DURING LUNG INFLAMMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Incorporation of labeled nitric oxide (N18O) into respiratory tract lining fluids and blood plasma during lung inflammation. Slade, R., Norwood, J., Crissman, K., McKee, J., Hatch, G. PTB, ETD, NHEERL, ORD, USEPA, Res. Tri. Pk., NC

    Our earlier studies have demonstrated t...

  12. WORLD TRADE CENTER FINE PARTICULATE MATTER CAUSES RESPIRATORY TRACT HYPERRESPONSIVENESS IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    World Trade Center Fine Particulate Matter Causes Respiratory Tract Hyperresponsiveness in Mice

    Stephen H. Gavett1, Najwa Haykal-Coates1, Jerry W. Highfill1, Allen D. Ledbetter1, Lung Chi Chen2, Mitchell D. Cohen2, Jack R. Harkema3, James G. Wagner3, and Daniel L. Costa1.<...

  13. Influenza A and B Virus Attachment to Respiratory Tract in Marine Mammals

    PubMed Central

    van Riel, Debby; van de Bildt, Marco W.G; Osterhaus, Albert; Kuiken, Thijs

    2012-01-01

    Patterns of virus attachment to the respiratory tract of 4 marine mammal species were determined for avian and human influenza viruses. Attachment of avian influenza A viruses (H4N5) and (H7N7) and human influenza B viruses to trachea and bronchi of harbor seals is consistent with reported influenza outbreaks in this species. PMID:22516350

  14. Disordered Microbial Communities in the Upper Respiratory Tract of Cigarette Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Charlson, Emily S.; Chen, Jun; Custers-Allen, Rebecca; Bittinger, Kyle; Li, Hongzhe; Sinha, Rohini; Hwang, Jennifer; Bushman, Frederic D.; Collman, Ronald G.

    2010-01-01

    Cigarette smokers have an increased risk of infectious diseases involving the respiratory tract. Some effects of smoking on specific respiratory tract bacteria have been described, but the consequences for global airway microbial community composition have not been determined. Here, we used culture-independent high-density sequencing to analyze the microbiota from the right and left nasopharynx and oropharynx of 29 smoking and 33 nonsmoking healthy asymptomatic adults to assess microbial composition and effects of cigarette smoking. Bacterial communities were profiled using 454 pyrosequencing of 16S sequence tags (803,391 total reads), aligned to 16S rRNA databases, and communities compared using the UniFrac distance metric. A Random Forest machine-learning algorithm was used to predict smoking status and identify taxa that best distinguished between smokers and nonsmokers. Community composition was primarily determined by airway site, with individuals exhibiting minimal side-of-body or temporal variation. Within airway habitats, microbiota from smokers were significantly more diverse than nonsmokers and clustered separately. The distributions of several genera were systematically altered by smoking in both the oro- and nasopharynx, and there was an enrichment of anaerobic lineages associated with periodontal disease in the oropharynx. These results indicate that distinct regions of the human upper respiratory tract contain characteristic microbial communities that exhibit disordered patterns in cigarette smokers, both in individual components and global structure, which may contribute to the prevalence of respiratory tract complications in this population. PMID:21188149

  15. Effects of chronic exposure to crack cocaine on the respiratory tract of mice.

    PubMed

    Herculiani, Percyleine P; Pires-Neto, Ruy C; Bueno, Heloisa M S; Zorzetto, Júlio C; Silva, Luiz C; Santos, Angela B G; Garcia, Raphael C T; Yonamine, Mauricio; Detregiachi, Cláudia R P; Saldiva, Paulo H N; Mauad, Thais

    2009-04-01

    Smoked cocaine (crack cocaine) causes several forms of injury to the respiratory tract, including asthma exacerbations, lung edema and hemorrhage, and nasal mucosal alterations. Few studies, however, have assessed respiratory tract pathology in habitual users of crack cocaine. Here, we describe the histological alterations in the respiratory tract of mice caused by chronic inhalation of crack cocaine. Twenty 2-month-old BALB/c mice were exposed to the smoke of 5 g crack cocaine in an inhalation chamber once a day for two months and compared to controls (n = 10). We then morphometrically analyzed nose and bronchiolar epithelial alterations, bronchiolar and alveolar macrophage cell density, alveolar hemosiderin content, and in addition determined the vasoconstriction index and the wall thickness of pulmonary arteries. The serum cocaine level was 212.5 ng/mL after a single inhalation. The mucus content of the nasal epithelium increased in crack-exposed animals, and the nasal and bronchial epithelium thickness decreased significantly. The alveolar hemosiderin content and the alveolar and bronchiolar macrophage cell density increased in animals exposed to crack. The vasoconstriction index increased in the pulmonary arteries of the exposed group. Chronic crack cocaine inhalation causes extensive histological changes along the entire respiratory tract.

  16. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in infants hospitalized for acute lower respiratory tract disease: incidence and associated risks.

    PubMed

    Riccetto, Adriana Gut Lopes; Ribeiro, José Dirceu; Silva, Marcos Tadeu Nolasco da; Almeida, Renata Servan de; Arns, Clarice Weis; Baracat, Emílio Carlos Elias

    2006-10-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is one of the main causes of acute lower respiratory tract infections worldwide. We examined the incidence and associated risks for RSV infection in infants hospitalized in two university hospitals in the state of São Paulo. We made a prospective cohort study involving 152 infants hospitalized for acute lower respiratory tract infections (ALRTI) in two university hospitals in Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil, between April and September 2004. Clinical and epidemiological data were obtained at admission. RSV was detected by direct immunofluorescence of nasopharyngeal secretions. Factors associated with RSV infection were assessed by calculating the relative risk (RR). The incidence of RSV infection was 17.5%. Risk factors associated with infection were: gestational age less than 35 weeks (RR: 4.17; 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.21-7.87); birth weight less than or equal to 2,500 grams (RR: 2.69; 95% CI 1.34-5.37); mother's educational level less than five years of schooling (RR: 2.28; 95% CI 1.13-4.59) and pulse oximetry at admission to hospital lower than 90% (RR: 2.19; 95% CI 1.10-4.37). Low birth weight and prematurity are factors associated with respiratory disease due to RSV in infants. Low educational level of the mother and poor socioeconomic conditions also constitute risk factors. Hypoxemia in RSV infections at admission indicates potential severity and a need for early oxygen therapy.

  17. Respiratory tract clearance model for dosimetry and bioassay of inhaled radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, M.R.; Birchall, A. ); Cuddihy, R.G. ); James, A.C. ); Roy, M. . Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire)

    1990-07-01

    The ICRP Task Group on Respiratory Tract Models is developing a model to describe the retention and clearance of deposited radionuclides for dose-intake calculations and interpretation of bioassay data. Clearance from each region is treated as competition between mechanical transport, which moves particles to the gastro-intestinal tract and lymph nodes, and the translocation of material to blood. It is assumed that mechanical transport rates are the same for all materials, and that rates of translocation to blood are the same in all regions. Time-dependent clearance is represented by combinations of compartments. Representative values of parameters to describe mechanical transport from the human respiratory tract have been estimated, and guidance is given on the determination of translocation rates. It is emphasized that the current version of the model described here is still provisional. 30 refs.

  18. Emerging viral respiratory tract infections--environmental risk factors and transmission.

    PubMed

    Gautret, Philippe; Gray, Gregory C; Charrel, Remi N; Odezulu, Nnanyelugo G; Al-Tawfiq, Jaffar A; Zumla, Alimuddin; Memish, Ziad A

    2014-11-01

    The past decade has seen the emergence of several novel viruses that cause respiratory tract infections in human beings, including Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) in Saudi Arabia, an H7N9 influenza A virus in eastern China, a swine-like influenza H3N2 variant virus in the USA, and a human adenovirus 14p1 also in the USA. MERS-CoV and H7N9 viruses are still a major worldwide public health concern. The pathogenesis and mode of transmission of MERS-CoV and H7N9 influenza A virus are poorly understood, making it more difficult to implement intervention and preventive measures. A united and coordinated global response is needed to tackle emerging viruses that can cause fatal respiratory tract infections and to fill major gaps in the understanding of the epidemiology and transmission dynamics of these viruses.

  19. Breastfeeding and the risk of respiratory tract infections after infancy: The Generation R Study

    PubMed Central

    Tromp, Ilse; Kiefte-de Jong, Jessica; Raat, Hein; Jaddoe, Vincent; Franco, Oscar; Hofman, Albert; de Jongste, Johan; Moll, Henriëtte

    2017-01-01

    Background The protection of breastfeeding against respiratory tract infections in the first year of life has often been suggested. Few studies examined the effect of breastfeeding on respiratory tract infections after infancy. Objective To examine the association between breastfeeding with lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI) and upper respiratory tract infections (URTI) after infancy up to 4 years of age (n = 5322). Methods This study was embedded in The Generation R study, a Dutch population-based prospective cohort study from fetal life until young adulthood. Information on breastfeeding duration (never; <3 months; 3–6 months; ≥6 months) and dose (never; partially until 4 months; predominantly until 4 months) were collected by questionnaire at 2, 6, and 12 months of age. Information on doctor attendance for LRTI and URTI were obtained by questionnaire at 2, 3, and 4 years of age. Results Breastfeeding for 6 months or longer was significantly associated with a reduced risk of LRTI up to 4 years of age (aOR: 0.71; 95% CI: 0.51–0.98). Similar ORs for LRTI were found with breastfeeding for less than 3 months and 3–6 months. Although in the same direction, weaker ORs were found for URTI and breastfeeding duration. The same trend was found for partial and predominant breastfeeding until 4 months and LRTI and URTI. Conclusion Breastfeeding duration for 6 months or longer is associated with a reduced risk of LRTI in pre-school children. These findings are compatible with the hypothesis that the protective effect of breastfeeding for respiratory tract infections persist after infancy therefore supporting current recommendations for breastfeeding for at least 6 months. PMID:28231310

  20. Microbial communities in the respiratory tract of patients with interstitial lung disease

    PubMed Central

    Garzoni, Christian; Brugger, Silvio D; Qi, Weihong; Wasmer, Sarah; Cusini, Alexia; Dumont, Philippe; Gorgievski-Hrisoho, Meri; Mühlemann, Kathrin; von Garnier, Christophe; Hilty, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Background Molecular methods based on phylogenetic differences in the 16S rRNA gene are able to characterise the microbiota of the respiratory tract in health and disease. Objectives Our goals were (1) to characterise bacterial communities in lower and upper airways of patients with interstitial lung disease (ILD) and (2) to compare the results with the microbiota of patients with Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) and normal controls. Methods We examined the upper and lower respiratory tract of 18 patients with ILD of whom 5, 6, and 7 had idiopathic interstitial pneumonia (IIP), non-IIP and sarcoidosis, respectively. In addition, six immune-compromised patients with PCP and nine healthy subjects were included as controls. Exclusion criteria were recent bacterial/viral respiratory tract infection, HIV-positivity and subjects receiving antibiotic therapy. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and oropharyngeal swabs were simultaneously collected, and microbiota was characterised by ultra-deep 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Results The microbiota in lower airways of the majority of patients (30; 90%) primarily consisted of Prevotellaceae, Streptococcaceae and Acidaminococcaceae. α and β diversity measurements revealed no significant differences in airway microbiota composition between the five different groups of patients. Comparison of bacterial populations in upper and lower respiratory tract showed significant topographical discontinuities for 7 (23%) individuals. Conclusions IIP, non-IIP and sarcoidosis are not associated with disordered airway microbiota and a pathogenic role of commensals in the disease process is therefore unlikely. Nevertheless, molecular analysis of the topographical microbiota continuity along the respiratory tract may provide additional information to assist management of individual patients. PMID:23945167

  1. Diacetyl and related flavorant α-Diketones: Biotransformation, cellular interactions, and respiratory-tract toxicity.

    PubMed

    Anders, M W

    2017-02-05

    Exposure to diacetyl and related α-diketones causes respiratory-tract damage in humans and experimental animals. Chemical toxicity is often associated with covalent modification of cellular nucleophiles by electrophilic chemicals. Electrophilic α-diketones may covalently modify nucleophilic arginine residues in critical proteins and, thereby, produce the observed respiratory-tract pathology. The major pathway for the biotransformation of α-diketones is reduction to α-hydroxyketones (acyloins), which is catalyzed by NAD(P)H-dependent enzymes of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) and the aldo-keto reductase (AKR) superfamilies. Reduction of α-diketones to the less electrophilic acyloins is a detoxication pathway for α-diketones. The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex may play a significant role in the biotransformation of diacetyl to CO2. The interaction of toxic electrophilic chemicals with cellular nucleophiles can be predicted by the hard and soft, acids and bases (HSAB) principle. Application of the HSAB principle to the interactions of electrophilic α-diketones with cellular nucleophiles shows that α-diketones react preferentially with arginine residues. Furthermore, the respiratory-tract toxicity and the quantum-chemical reactivity parameters of diacetyl and replacement flavorant α-diketones are similar. Hence, the identified replacement flavorant α-diketones may pose a risk of flavorant-induced respiratory-tract toxicity. The calculated indices for the reaction of α-diketones with arginine support the hypothesis that modification of protein-bound arginine residues is a critical event in α-diketone-induced respiratory-tract toxicity.

  2. Review of macrolides and ketolides: focus on respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed

    Zhanel, G G; Dueck, M; Hoban, D J; Vercaigne, L M; Embil, J M; Gin, A S; Karlowsky, J A

    2001-01-01

    The first macrolide, erythromycin A, demonstrated broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity and was used primarily for respiratory and skin and soft tissue infections. Newer 14-, 15- and 16-membered ring macrolides such as clarithromycin and the azalide, azithromycin, have been developed to address the limitations of erythromycin. The main structural component of the macrolides is a large lactone ring that varies in size from 12 to 16 atoms. A new group of 14-membered macrolides known as the ketolides have recently been developed which have a 3-keto in place of the L-cladinose moiety. Macrolides reversibly bind to the 23S rRNA and thus, inhibit protein synthesis by blocking elongation. The ketolides have also been reported to bind to 23S rRNA and their mechanism of action is similar to that of macrolides. Macrolide resistance mechanisms include target site alteration, alteration in antibiotic transport and modification of the antibiotic. The macrolides and ketolides exhibit good activity against gram-positive aerobes and some gram-negative aerobes. Ketolides have excellent activity versus macrolide-resistant Streptococcus spp. Including mefA and ermB producing Streptococcus pneumoniae. The newer macrolides, such as azithromycin and clarithromycin, and the ketolides exhibit greater activity against Haemophilus influenzae than erythromycin. The bioavailability of macrolides ranges from 25 to 85%, with corresponding serum concentrations ranging from 0.4 to 12 mg/L and area under the concentration-time curves from 3 to 115 mg/L x h. Half-lives range from short for erythromycin to medium for clarithromycin, roxithromycin and ketolides, to very long for dirithromycin and azithromycin. All of these agents display large volumes of distribution with excellent uptake into respiratory tissues and fluids relative to serum. The majority of the agents are hepatically metabolised and excretion in the urine is limited, with the exception of clarithromycin. Clinical trials involving

  3. In vitro sensitivities to antimicrobial drugs of ureaplasmas isolated from the bovine respiratory tract, genital tract and eye.

    PubMed

    Kishima, M; Hashimoto, K

    1979-09-01

    The sensitivity to 18 antimicrobial drugs was examined for 66 strains of Ureaplasma sp isolated from respiratory tracts of calves suffering from enzootic pneumonia, urinary tracts of bulls and eyes of cows suffering from infectious bovine kerato-conjunctivitis. Furamizole, tiamulin fumarate, erythromycin lactobionate, malidomycin C, doxycycline hydrochloride, kitasamycin tartrate, tylosin tartrate, T-2636C, tetracycline hydrochloride, oxytetracycline hydrochloride, chlortetracycline hydrochloride, oleandomycin phosphate, furazolidone, spiramycin adipate, chloramphenicol and thiophenicol showed strong inhibiting activity on all the test strains. Among them, furamizole, tiamulin fumarate and erythromycin lactobionate were most active. Kanamycin sulphate showed weak activity on all the strains tested. The differences in origin of the test strains did not affect their sensitivity to any of the drugs.

  4. Is There Still Room for Novel Viral Pathogens in Pediatric Respiratory Tract Infections?

    PubMed Central

    Taboada, Blanca; Espinoza, Marco A.; Isa, Pavel; Aponte, Fernando E.; Arias-Ortiz, María A.; Monge-Martínez, Jesús; Rodríguez-Vázquez, Rubén; Díaz-Hernández, Fidel; Zárate-Vidal, Fernando; Wong-Chew, Rosa María; Firo-Reyes, Verónica; del Río-Almendárez, Carlos N.; Gaitán-Meza, Jesús; Villaseñor-Sierra, Alberto; Martínez-Aguilar, Gerardo; Salas-Mier, Ma. del Carmen; Noyola, Daniel E.; Pérez-Gónzalez, Luis F.; López, Susana; Santos-Preciado, José I.; Arias, Carlos F.

    2014-01-01

    Viruses are the most frequent cause of respiratory disease in children. However, despite the advanced diagnostic methods currently in use, in 20 to 50% of respiratory samples a specific pathogen cannot be detected. In this work, we used a metagenomic approach and deep sequencing to examine respiratory samples from children with lower and upper respiratory tract infections that had been previously found negative for 6 bacteria and 15 respiratory viruses by PCR. Nasal washings from 25 children (out of 250) hospitalized with a diagnosis of pneumonia and nasopharyngeal swabs from 46 outpatient children (out of 526) were studied. DNA reads for at least one virus commonly associated to respiratory infections was found in 20 of 25 hospitalized patients, while reads for pathogenic respiratory bacteria were detected in the remaining 5 children. For outpatients, all the samples were pooled into 25 DNA libraries for sequencing. In this case, in 22 of the 25 sequenced libraries at least one respiratory virus was identified, while in all other, but one, pathogenic bacteria were detected. In both patient groups reads for respiratory syncytial virus, coronavirus-OC43, and rhinovirus were identified. In addition, viruses less frequently associated to respiratory infections were also found. Saffold virus was detected in outpatient but not in hospitalized children. Anellovirus, rotavirus, and astrovirus, as well as several animal and plant viruses were detected in both groups. No novel viruses were identified. Adding up the deep sequencing results to the PCR data, 79.2% of 250 hospitalized and 76.6% of 526 ambulatory patients were positive for viruses, and all other children, but one, had pathogenic respiratory bacteria identified. These results suggest that at least in the type of populations studied and with the sampling methods used the odds of finding novel, clinically relevant viruses, in pediatric respiratory infections are low. PMID:25412469

  5. Etiology, seasonality, and clinical characteristics of respiratory viruses in children with respiratory tract infections in Eastern India (Bhubaneswar, Odisha).

    PubMed

    Panda, Swagatika; Mohakud, Nirmal Kumar; Suar, Mrutyunjay; Kumar, Subrat

    2017-03-01

    Acute respiratory tract infections (ARTIs) are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in young children in low and middle income countries. To analyse the overall burden of respiratory viruses responsible for ARTIs in paediatrics population in eastern India, this study was performed. Clinical information, demographic information and nasal/oral swabs were collected from 332 paediatric patients (aged from 1 month to 12 years old) with the symptoms of ARTI, enrolled from the outpatient department from Nov 2012 to Oct 2014. Multiplex PCR was performed to detect eight respiratory viral pathogens. Seasonal, as well as age-wise prevalence of respiratory viruses was analysed. Of these 332 cases, 32.53% (108/332) were positive for at least one pathogen. Human rhinovirus (HRV) was the most frequently detected pathogen (24.7%, 82/332) followed by respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) (4.22%, 14/332), PIV (2.11%, 7/332), and hMPV (2.11%, 7/332). Single infection was detected in 92.6% (100/108) of positive cases. Respiratory virus infections showed seasonal variation, with peaks during the rainy season followed by winter season, and were most common in patients under 1 year of age. Phylogenetic analysis of HMPV positive samples confirmed the circulation of A2 subgroup in the study area. The present study is first of its kind and adds to our knowledge of the epidemiological characteristics of these common respiratory viruses among patients with ARTIs in the study area. J. Med. Virol. 89:553-558, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Measurement techniques for respiratory tract deposition of airborne nanoparticles: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Löndahl, Jakob; Möller, Winfried; Pagels, Joakim H; Kreyling, Wolfgang G; Swietlicki, Erik; Schmid, Otmar

    2014-08-01

    Determination of the respiratory tract deposition of airborne particles is critical for risk assessment of air pollution, inhaled drug delivery, and understanding of respiratory disease. With the advent of nanotechnology, there has been an increasing interest in the measurement of pulmonary deposition of nanoparticles because of their unique properties in inhalation toxicology and medicine. Over the last century, around 50 studies have presented experimental data on lung deposition of nanoparticles (typical diameter≤100 nm, but here≤300 nm). These data show a considerable variability, partly due to differences in the applied methodologies. In this study, we review the experimental techniques for measuring respiratory tract deposition of nano-sized particles, analyze critical experimental design aspects causing measurement uncertainties, and suggest methodologies for future studies. It is shown that, although particle detection techniques have developed with time, the overall methodology in respiratory tract deposition experiments has not seen similar progress. Available experience from previous research has often not been incorporated, and some methodological design aspects that were overlooked in 30-70% of all studies may have biased the experimental data. This has contributed to a significant uncertainty on the absolute value of the lung deposition fraction of nanoparticles. We estimate the impact of the design aspects on obtained data, discuss solutions to minimize errors, and highlight gaps in the available experimental set of data.

  7. Measurement Techniques for Respiratory Tract Deposition of Airborne Nanoparticles: A Critical Review

    PubMed Central

    Möller, Winfried; Pagels, Joakim H.; Kreyling, Wolfgang G.; Swietlicki, Erik; Schmid, Otmar

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Determination of the respiratory tract deposition of airborne particles is critical for risk assessment of air pollution, inhaled drug delivery, and understanding of respiratory disease. With the advent of nanotechnology, there has been an increasing interest in the measurement of pulmonary deposition of nanoparticles because of their unique properties in inhalation toxicology and medicine. Over the last century, around 50 studies have presented experimental data on lung deposition of nanoparticles (typical diameter≤100 nm, but here≤300 nm). These data show a considerable variability, partly due to differences in the applied methodologies. In this study, we review the experimental techniques for measuring respiratory tract deposition of nano-sized particles, analyze critical experimental design aspects causing measurement uncertainties, and suggest methodologies for future studies. It is shown that, although particle detection techniques have developed with time, the overall methodology in respiratory tract deposition experiments has not seen similar progress. Available experience from previous research has often not been incorporated, and some methodological design aspects that were overlooked in 30–70% of all studies may have biased the experimental data. This has contributed to a significant uncertainty on the absolute value of the lung deposition fraction of nanoparticles. We estimate the impact of the design aspects on obtained data, discuss solutions to minimize errors, and highlight gaps in the available experimental set of data. PMID:24151837

  8. The role and regulation of catalase in respiratory tract opportunistic bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Eason, Mia M; Fan, Xin

    2014-09-01

    Respiratory tract bacterial pathogens are the etiologic agents of a variety of illnesses. The ability of these bacteria to cause disease is imparted through survival within the host and avoidance of pathogen clearance by the immune system. Respiratory tract pathogens are continually bombarded by reactive oxygen species (ROS), which may be produced by competing bacteria, normal metabolic function, or host immunological responses. In order to survive and proliferate, bacteria have adapted defense mechanisms to circumvent the effects of ROS. Bacteria employ the use of anti-oxidant enzymes, catalases and catalase-peroxidases, to relieve the effects of the oxidative stressors to which they are continually exposed. The decomposition of ROS has been shown to provide favorable conditions in which respiratory tract opportunistic bacterial pathogens such as Haemophilus influenzae, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Legionella pneumophila, and Neisseria meningitidis are able to withstand exposure to highly reactive molecules and yet survive. Bacteria possessing mutations in the catalase gene have a decreased survival rate, yet may be able to compensate for the lack of catalatic activity if peroxidatic activity is present. An incomplete knowledge of the mechanisms by which catalase and catalase-peroxidases are regulated still persists, however, in some bacterial species, a regulatory factor known as OxyR has been shown to either up-regulate or down-regulate catalase gene expression. Yet, more research is still needed to increase the knowledge base in relation to this enzyme class. As with this review, we focus on major respiratory tract opportunistic bacterial pathogens in order to elucidate the function and regulation of catalases. The importance of the research could lead to the development of novel treatments against respiratory bacterial infections.

  9. Evaluation of the prescriptions written for upper respiratory tract infections

    PubMed Central

    Ozdemir, Serdar; Ozturk, Tuba Cimilli; Metiner, Yasin; Ak, Rohat; Ocal, Oktay

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We aimed to determine frequency of antibiotic use and retrospectively evaluate prescriptions written for the patients with diagnosis of acute pharyngitis, acute nasopharyngitis and acute tonsillitis by our hospital emergency department physicians in January 2014. METHODS: Records of the patients who were admitted to the education and research hospital between January 1st, 2014 to January 31st 2014 were analyzed in this study. Records of all the patients with the diagnosis of acute nasopharyngitis (J.00), acute pharyngitis (J.02) and acute tonsillitis (J.03) were analyzed, and patients with a second diagnosis or haven’t any prescription were excluded from the study. Frequency of antibiotic and other symptomatic medications use were analyzed in prescriptions of 5261 patients. RESULTS: Antibiotics were prescribed for 63.5% of the patients included in the study, and the most preferred antibiotics were penicilin and beta-lactamase combination (38.8%) and cephalosporins (26.2%). Combined preparations were the most preferred medications in symptomatic treatment (65.9%). Dexketoprofen was the most preferred among nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (63%). In each prescription, average number of 3.26 drugs were prescribed. CONCLUSION: Excessive and improrer use of antibiotics in the treatment of respiratuary tract infection is a global problem. The use of excess agents in symptomatic medication leads to polypharmacy. Training of physicians and patients on principles of rational drug use will contribute to the solution of this problem. PMID:28058350

  10. Aerosol deposition in human respiratory-tract casts

    SciTech Connect

    Martonen, T.B.

    1981-09-01

    To assess the health hazard to the human presented by airborne particulate matter in the mining and industrial work environment, information is needed concerning total dose deposition and its distribution. Data has been obtained by depositing monodisperse ammonium fluorscein aerosols in respiratory system simulators consisting of combined human replica larynx casts and single-pathway trachebronchial (TB) tue models. Since they have only two airways in each generation distal to the trachea, airflow rates and patterns could be controlled in a practical manner with rotometers. Larynx configurations correspond to inspiratory flow rates of 15, 30 and 60 lmin. The mass median aerodynamic diameters of the aerosols ranged from 3.0 ..mu..m to 10.6 ..mu..m with geometric standard deviations of 1.11 to 1.16. Total larynx and TB deposition measurements could be expressed in terms of a single parameter, the particle Stokes number. Intrabronchial dose distribution results indicated relatively large tracheal losses, attributed to the laryngeal jet. Some airway bifurcations were sites of enhanced deposition. Such hot spots would indicate very high dosage to epithelial cells of workers' airways and have important implications regarding the establishment of threshold exposure values. Findings are in agreement with aerosol deposition data from replica TB casts. Inhalation exposure tests support the use of the single-pathway TB model as a suitable surrogate in studies of factors affecting aerosol behavior and deposition in the human.

  11. Evaluation of Alere i RSV for Rapid Detection of Respiratory Syncytial Virus in Children Hospitalized with Acute Respiratory Tract Infection.

    PubMed

    Peters, Rebecca Marie; Schnee, Sarah Valerie; Tabatabai, Julia; Schnitzler, Paul; Pfeil, Johannes

    2017-04-01

    Alere i RSV is a novel rapid test which applies a nicking enzyme amplification reaction to detect respiratory syncytial virus in point-of-care settings. In this study, we evaluated the Alere i RSV assay by using frozen nasopharyngeal swab samples that were collected in viral transport medium from children hospitalized with acute respiratory tract infection during the 2015-2016 winter season. Alere i RSV assay results were compared to those for Altona RealStar RSV real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR). We found that the overall sensitivity and specificity of the Alere i RSV test was 100% (95% confidence intervals [CI], 93% to 100%) and 97% (95% CI, 89% to 100%), respectively. Positive samples were identified within 5 to 7 min from sample collection. Overall, the Alere i RSV test performed well compared to the RT-PCR assay and has the potential to facilitate the detection of RSV in point-of-care settings.

  12. Antibiotic Susceptibility of Streptococcus Pyogenes Isolated from Respiratory Tract Infections in Dakar, Senegal

    PubMed Central

    Camara, Makhtar; Dieng, Assane; Boye, Cheikh Saad Bouh

    2013-01-01

    Group A Streptococcus (GAS) is one of the major causes of respiratory tract infections. The objectives of this study were to identify isolates of S. pyogenes obtained from respiratory tract infections, and to assess their susceptibility to several antibiotics. A total of 40 strains were isolated and their susceptibility to 17 antibiotics was tested using a standard disk diffusion method. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined using the E-test. All isolates were sensitive to β-lactam antibiotics including penicillin, amoxicillin, and cephalosporins. Macrolides remain active with the exception of spiramycin, which showed reduced susceptibility. Out of the 40 isolates, 100% of the isolates were resistant to tetracycline. Interestingly, isolates were sensitive to chloramphenicol, teicoplanin, vancomycine, and levofloxacin, providing potential alternative choices of treatment against infections with S. pyogenes. PMID:24826076

  13. Inhaled anti-infective chemotherapy for respiratory tract infections: Successes, challenges and the road ahead

    PubMed Central

    Velkov, Tony; Rahim, Nusaibah Abdul; Zhou, Qi (Tony); Chan, Hak-Kim; Li, Jian

    2014-01-01

    One of the most common causes of illnesses in humans is from respiratory tract infections caused by bacterial, viral or fungal pathogens. Inhaled anti-infective drugs are crucial for the prophylaxis and treatment of respiratory tract infections. The benefit of anti-infective drug delivery via inhalation is that it affords delivery of sufficient therapeutic dosages directly to the primary site of infection, while minimizing the risks of systemic toxicity or avoiding potential suboptimal pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics associated with systemic drug exposure. This review provides an up-to-date treatise of approved and novel developmental inhaled anti-infective agents, with particular attention to effective strategies for their use, pulmonary pharmacokinetic properties and safety. PMID:25446140

  14. Cigarette smoking and mechanisms of susceptibility to infections of the respiratory tract and other organ systems.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Charles; Anderson, Ronald

    2013-09-01

    The predisposition of cigarette smokers for development of oral and respiratory infections caused by microbial pathogens is well recognised, with those infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) at particularly high risk. Smoking cigarettes has a suppressive effect on the protective functions of airway epithelium, alveolar macrophages, dendritic cells, natural killer (NK) cells and adaptive immune mechanisms, in the setting of chronic systemic activation of neutrophils. Cigarette smoke also has a direct effect on microbial pathogens to promote the likelihood of infective disease, specifically promotion of microbial virulence and antibiotic resistance. In addition to interactions between smoking and HIV infection, a number of specific infections/clinical syndromes have been associated epidemiologically with cigarette smoking, including those of the upper and lower respiratory tract, gastrointestinal tract, central nervous and other organ systems. Smoking cessation benefits patients in many ways, including reduction of the risk of infectious disease.

  15. Comparison of spiramycin and clarithromycin for community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed

    Rocha, R T; Awad, C E; Ali, A; Matyas, R; Vital, A C; Silva, C O; Dainesi, S M; Salazar, M S; Nakatani, J

    1999-09-01

    This open multicentre study compared the efficacy and tolerability of clarithromycin and spiramycin in the treatment of lower respiratory tract infections in Brazil and Colombia. A total of 125 patients with a clinical and radiological diagnosis of pneumonia, acute bronchitis or exacerbation of chronic bronchitis were randomised to receive oral doses of either clarithromycin (500 mg) or spiramycin (3 MIU) every 12 hours for courses of 5-10 days. Patients were assessed before the start of treatment, and at days 3-4 and days 9-17. Twenty-six (26) patients (16 in the spiramycin group and 10 in the clarithromycin group) reported adverse events, seven of whom withdrew from the trial. Statistical analysis detected no significant differences between efficacy (p = 0.768) or tolerability (p = 0.236) for the two treatment groups. Spiramycin therefore has similar efficacy to clarithromycin in the treatment of community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections.

  16. Direct disk diffusion susceptibility testing from respiratory tract specimens: focus on Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Perez, Leandro Reus Rodrigues; Freitas, Ana Lúcia Peixoto de; Barth, Afonso Luís; Dias, Cícero Armídio Gomes

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the application of direct disk diffusion (DDD) testing to respiratory tract specimens for the prediction of the antimicrobial susceptibility profile. DDD was performed on 144 specimens containing P. aeruginosa and the disk diffusion test was used as reference method. Agreement with the reference method was 77.8% for amikacin, 69.4% for cefepime, 86.1% for levofloxacin, 87.5% for meropenem, and 62.5% for piperacillin/tazobactam. Very major errors were observed for all agents, except levofloxacin. Our study showed that DDD results are inaccurate and may lead to errors in early decision-making regarding antibiotic therapy for lower respiratory tract infections.

  17. Endoscopic examination of the upper respiratory tract and oesophagus in small ruminants: technique and normal appearance.

    PubMed

    Stierschneider, Martina; Franz, Sonja; Baumgartner, Walter

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the technique of rhinolaryngotracheobronchoscopy and oesophagoscopy in small ruminants and to report the normal endoscopic appearance of the structures of the upper respiratory tract and oesophagus. Thirty sheep and 30 goats, all clinically normal, underwent rhinolaryngotracheobronchoscopy and oesophagoscopy using a flexible endoscope (length 100 cm; diameter 4 mm). The anatomical features of the structures and the appearance of the mucosa were investigated. The degree of mucosal pigmentation varied between breeds. The appearance of the pharyngeal tonsil and the shape of the trachea in cross-section showed most individual variation. The technique was easily performed and sedation was necessary in only a few cases. No major complications were encountered. It was concluded that the procedure facilitated more accurate diagnosis and prognosis of conditions of the upper respiratory tract and oesophagus.

  18. Gemella Species Bacteremia and Stroke in an Elderly Patient with Respiratory Tract Infection

    PubMed Central

    Gollol-Raju, Narasimha Swamy

    2017-01-01

    Gemella species are part of normal human flora. They are rarely associated with infections. As opportunistic pathogens, they can cause life-threatening infection in individuals with risk factors. We present an unusual case of an elderly patient, with no predisposing risk factors, who presented with respiratory tract infection and Gemella species bacteremia and suffered a stroke in the absence of features of endocarditis. PMID:28115939

  19. Nonvalue of sputum culture in the management of lower respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed Central

    Lentino, J R; Lucks, D A

    1987-01-01

    Establishment of the microbiological etiology of bacterial pneumonia by sputum culture is confounded by both lack of recovery of fastidious pathogens and contamination of specimens with oropharyngeal flora. We reviewed the clinical records from 249 patients over a 3-month period for evidence of pneumonia. Gram staining and cultures were performed on 381 specimens isolated from this population of patients. Recovery of respiratory tract pathogens was accomplished with 354 specimens from 226 patients; 27 specimens yielded normal flora in culture but were smear positive. An additional 256 specimens submitted to our microbiology laboratory did not meet smear criteria for purulence nor did they yield respiratory tract pathogens in culture. A total of 637 specimens submitted to the microbiology laboratory were evaluated for sputum purulence by the criteria of Bartlett. Of the total 354 specimens which were positive in culture for a pathogen, 182 (52%) were submitted from 150 patients with no objective evidence of pneumonia. The majority of specimens obtained from patients without pneumonia were nonpurulent. However, 71 of 182 culture-positive specimens obtained from 50 patients without pneumonia were purulent. Approximately half of these patients (31 of 50) had other pulmonary or upper respiratory tract pathology which could account for the sputum purulence. Among the 172 culture-positive specimens from 76 patients with pneumonia, only 100 (58%) were acceptable by smear criteria. An additional 23 patients provided expectorated purulent sputum from which no respiratory tract pathogen could be isolated. Of these 23, 7 had pneumonia. We conclude that sputum culture and Gram staining are neither specific nor sensitive as diagnostic tools. Objective criteria for purulence of Gram-stained specimens must be applied before their inoculation into culture media. Specimens should be sought only from patients with objective evidence of pneumonia. PMID:2438299

  20. Acute Respiratory Tract Toxicity of the Trichothecene Mycotoxin, T-2 Toxin.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-03-31

    either an LD5o or an LDio0 dose of T-2 toxin (Creasia, unpublished data). Examination by light microscopy has also failed to demonstrate any...T-2 toxin solution. Surprisingly, no significant lesions were observed by light microscopy in either the upper respiratory tract or lungs in any of...light microscopy . The mass median aerodynamic diameter of the aerosolized particles, as calculated from the material collected by a 7-stage cascade

  1. Particle deposition and clearance of atmospheric particles in the human respiratory tract during LACE 98

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bundke, U.; Hänel, G.

    2003-04-01

    During the LACE 98footnote{Lindenberg Aerosol Characterization Experiment, (Germany) 1998} experiment microphysical, chemical and optical properties of atmospheric particles were measured by several groups. (Bundke et al.). The particle deposition and clearance of the particles in the human respiratory tract was calculated using the ICRP (International Commission on Radiological Protection) deposition and clearance model (ICRP 1994). Particle growth as function of relative humidity outside the body was calculated from measurement data using the model introduced by Bundke et al.. Particle growth inside the body was added using a non-equilibrium particle growth model. As a result of the calculations, time series of the total dry particle mass and -size distribution were obtained for all compartments of the human respiratory tract defined by ICRP 1994. The combined ICRP deposition and clearance model was initialized for different probationers like man, woman, children of different ages and several circumstances like light work, sitting, sleeping etc. Keeping the conditions observed during LACE 98 constant a approximation of the aerosol burdens of the different compartments was calculated up to 4 years of exposure and compared to the results from Snipes et al. for the "Phoenix" and "Philadelphia" aerosol. References: footnotesize{ Bundke, U. et al.,it{Aerosol Optical Properties during the Lindenberg Aerosol Characterization Experiment (LACE 98)} ,10.1029/2000JD000188, JGR, 2002 ICRP,it{Human Respiratory Tract Model for Radiological Protection, Bd. ICRP Publication 66}, Annals of the ICRP, 24,1-3, Elsevier Science, Ocford, 1994 Snipes et al. ,it{The 1994 ICRP66 Human Respiratory Tract Model as a Tool for predicting Lung Burdens from Exposure to Environmental Aerosols}, Appl. Occup. Environ. Hyg., 12, 547-553,1997}

  2. Association between breast-feeding and severity of acute viral respiratory tract infection.

    PubMed

    Vereen, Shanda; Gebretsadik, Tebeb; Hartert, Tina V; Minton, Patricia; Woodward, Kimberly; Liu, Zhouwen; Carroll, Kecia N

    2014-09-01

    In a cross-sectional analysis of 629 mother-infants dyads, breast-feeding (ever vs. never) was associated with decreased relative odds of a lower versus upper respiratory tract infection (adjusted odds ratio: 0.64; 95% confidence interval: 0.42-0.99). There was not a significant association between breast-feeding and bronchiolitis severity score or length of hospital stay.

  3. Hemoglobin level as a risk factor for lower respiratory tract infections in Lebanese children

    PubMed Central

    Mourad, Sawsan; Rajab, Mariam; Alameddine, Aouni; Fares, Mohammad; Ziade, Fouad; Merhi, Bassem Abou

    2010-01-01

    Background: Pneumonia is the biggest single cause of childhood death under the age of 5 years, and anemia affects approximately 30% of infants and children all over the world. Aim: Determination of the relationship between anemia and lower respiratory tract infection as a risk factor in Lebanese children. Patients and Methods: A total number of two hundred infants and children aged nine months to twelve years were included; One hundred cases were hospitalized for lower respiratory tract infection in Department of Pediatrics, Makassed General Hospital, and one hundred healthy, age and sex matched controls, were selected from outpatient department. Complete blood count, iron level, ferritin level, and total iron binding capacity were taken if hemoglobin level less than eleven gram per deci-liter. In addition peripheral blood smear, chest radiograph and C-reactive protein were done to hospitalized cases. Definition of iron deficiency anemia and normal laboratory values were predetermined. Results: Anemia was found in 32% of hospitalized cases and 16% of healthy controls. Mean hemoglobin level was 9.99 ± 0.62 gram per deci-liter and 11.99 ± 0.92 gram per deci-liter in anemic and non-anemic group respectively with a significant P-value of 0.001. C-reactive protein levels and number hospitalization days were similar among the anemic and non-anemic group. History of recurrent chest infections was significantly higher in both anemic group and hospitalized cases compared to non-anemic group and healthy controls. Low hemoglobin level was a risk factor for lower respiratory tract infection with a P-value of 0.008. Conclusion: Anemic children were two times more susceptible to lower respiratory tract infection compared to the control group, and iron deficiency anemia was predominating. Accurate diagnosis and prevention of anemia, whatever its etiology, is essential. PMID:22558548

  4. Vitamin D for prevention of respiratory tract infections: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Charan, Jaykaran; Goyal, Jagdish P.; Saxena, Deepak; Yadav, Preeti

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To explore the effect of vitamin D supplementation in prevention of respiratory tract infections on the basis of published clinical trials. Materials and Methods: Clinical trials were searched from various electronic databases. Five clinical trials were suitable for inclusion. Outcome was events of respiratory tract infections in vitamin D group and placebo group. Data was reported as odds ratio with 95% confidence interval. Both random and fixed model was used for analysis. Analysis was done with the help of Comprehensive meta-analysis software 2. Results: Events of respiratory tract infections were significantly lower in vitamin D group as compared to control group [Odds ratio = 0.582 (0.417 – 0.812) P = 0.001] according to random model. Results were similar in fixed model. On separate analysis of clinical trials dealing with groups of children and adults, beneficial effect of vitamin D was observed in both, according to fixed model [Odds ratio = 0.579 (0.416 – 0.805), P = 0.001 and Odd ratio = 0.653 (0.472 – 0.9040, P = 0.010 respectively]. On using random model beneficial effect persisted in children's group but became nonsignificant in adults group [Odds ratio = 0.579 (0.416 – 0.805), P = 0.001 and Odd ratio = 0.544 (0.278 – 1.063) P = 0.075 respectively]. Conclusion: Vitamin D supplementation decreases the events related to respiratory tract infections. There is need of more well conducted clinical trials to reach to a certain conclusion. PMID:23326099

  5. Association of residential dampness and mold with respiratory tract infections and bronchitis: a meta-analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, William J.; Eliseeva, Ekaterina A.; Mendell, Mark J.

    2010-11-15

    Dampness and mold have been shown in qualitative reviews to be associated with a variety of adverse respiratory health effects, including respiratory tract infections. Several published meta-analyses have provided quantitative summaries for some of these associations, but not for respiratory infections. Demonstrating a causal relationship between dampness-related agents, which are preventable exposures, and respiratory tract infections would suggest important new public health strategies. We report the results of quantitative meta-analyses of published studies that examined the association of dampness or mold in homes with respiratory infections and bronchitis. For primary studies meeting eligibility criteria, we transformed reported odds ratios (ORs) and confidence intervals (CIs) to the log scale. Both fixed and random effects models were applied to the log ORs and their variances. Most studies contained multiple estimated ORs. Models accounted for the correlation between multiple results within the studies analyzed. One set of analyses was performed with all eligible studies, and another set restricted to studies that controlled for age, gender, smoking, and socioeconomic status. Subgroups of studies were assessed to explore heterogeneity. Funnel plots were used to assess publication bias. The resulting summary estimates of ORs from random effects models based on all studies ranged from 1.38 to 1.50, with 95% CIs excluding the null in all cases. Use of different analysis models and restricting analyses based on control of multiple confounding variables changed findings only slightly. ORs (95% CIs) from random effects models using studies adjusting for major confounding variables were, for bronchitis, 1.45 (1.32-1.59); for respiratory infections, 1.44 (1.31-1.59); for respiratory infections excluding nonspecific upper respiratory infections, 1.50 (1.32-1.70), and for respiratory infections in children or infants, 1.48 (1.33-1.65). Little effect of publication

  6. Respiratory and allergic diseases: from upper respiratory tract infections to asthma.

    PubMed

    Jaber, Raja

    2002-06-01

    patient, mind-body interventions such as yoga, hypnosis, and biofeedback-assisted relaxation and breathing exercises are beneficial for stress reduction in general and may be helpful in further controlling asthma. Encouraging parents to learn how to massage their asthmatic children may appeal to some parents and provide benefits for parents and children alike. Acupuncture and chiropractic treatment cannot be recommended at this time, although some patients may derive benefit because of the placebo effect. For patients with allergic rhinitis, there are no good clinical research data on the use of quercetin and vitamin C. Similarly, freeze-dried stinging nettle leaves may be tried, but the applicable research evidence also is poor. Further studies are needed to assess the efficacy of these supplements and herbs. Homeopathic remedies based on extreme dilutions of the allergen may be beneficial in allergic rhinitis but require collaboration with an experienced homeopath. There are no research data on constitutional homeopathic approaches to asthma and allergic rhinitis. Patients with COPD are helped by exercise, pulmonary rehabilitation, and increased caloric protein and fat intake. Vitamin C and n-3 supplements are safe and reasonable; however, studies are needed to establish their efficacy in COPD. On the other hand, there are convincing data in favor of N-acetyl-cysteine supplementation for the patient with COPD at doses ranging between 400 and 1200 mg daily. Red blood cell magnesium levels may guide the use of magnesium replacement. The use of L-carnitine and coenzyme Q10 in patients with COPD needs further study. The addition of essential oils to the dietary regimen of patients with chronic bronchitis is worth exploring. Patients with upper respiratory tract infections can expect a shorter duration of symptoms by taking high doses of vitamin C (2 g) with zinc supplements, preferably the nasal zinc gel, at the onset of their symptoms. Adding an herb such as echinacea or

  7. Prognostic value of procalcitonin in hospitalized patients with lower respiratory tract infections

    PubMed Central

    Nobre, Vandack; Borges, Isabela

    2016-01-01

    Lower respiratory tract infections are common and potentially lethal conditions and are a major cause of inadequate antibiotic prescriptions. Characterization of disease severity and prognostic prediction in affected patients can aid disease management and can increase accuracy in determining the need for and place of hospitalization. The inclusion of biomarkers, particularly procalcitonin, in the decision taken process is a promising strategy. This study aims to present a narrative review of the potential applications and limitations of procalcitonin as a prognostic marker in hospitalized patients with lower respiratory tract infections. The studies on this topic are heterogeneous with respect to procalcitonin measurement techniques, cutoff values, clinical settings, and disease severity. The results show that procalcitonin delivers moderate performance for prognostic prediction in patients with lower respiratory tract infections; its predictive performance was not higher than that of classical methods, and knowledge of procalcitonin levels is most useful when interpreted together with other clinical and laboratory results. Overall, repeated measurement of the procalcitonin levels during the first days of treatment provides more prognostic information than a single measurement; however, information on the cost-effectiveness of this procedure in intensive care patients is lacking. The results of studies that evaluated the prognostic value of initial procalcitonin levels in patients with community-acquired pneumonia are more consistent and have greater potential for practical application; in this case, low procalcitonin levels identify those patients with a low risk of adverse outcomes. PMID:27305038

  8. Inhalation dosimetry modeling provides insights into regional respiratory tract toxicity of inhaled diacetyl.

    PubMed

    Cichocki, Joseph A; Morris, John B

    2016-11-13

    Vapor dosimetry models provide a means of assessing the role of delivered dose in determining the regional airway response to inspired vapors. A validated hybrid computational fluid dynamics physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for inhaled diacetyl has been developed to describe inhaled diacetyl dosimetry in both the rat and human respiratory tracts. Comparison of the distribution of respiratory tract injury with dosimetry estimates provides strong evidence that regional delivered dose rather than regional airway tissue sensitivity to diacetyl-induced injury is the critical determinant of the regional respiratory tract response to this water soluble reactive vapor. In the rat, inhalation exposure to diacetyl causes much lesser injury in the distal bronchiolar airways compared to nose and large tracheobronchial airways. The degree of injury correlates very strongly to model based estimates of local airway diacetyl concentrations. According to the model, regional dosimetry patterns of diacetyl in the human differ greatly from those in the rat with much greater penetration of diacetyl to the bronchiolar airways in the lightly exercising mouth breathing human compared to the rat, providing evidence that rat inhalation toxicity studies underpredict the risk of bronchiolar injury in the human. For example, repeated exposure of the rat to 200ppm diacetyl results in bronchiolar injury; the estimated bronchiolar tissue concentration in rats exposed to 200ppm diacetyl would occur in lightly exercising mouth breathing humans exposed to 12ppm. Consideration of airway dosimetry patterns of inspired diacetyl is critical to the proper evaluation of rodent toxicity data and its relevance for predicting human risk.

  9. [IgG subclasses in healthy children and in children with frequent respiratory tract infections].

    PubMed

    Griese, M; Walda, M; Meuser, M; Reinhardt, D

    1990-10-01

    A group of 130 children presenting with frequent respiratory tract infections was examined for serum levels of IgG-subclasses IgG1, IgG2, IgG3 and IgG4 using radial immunodiffusion according to Mancini. Additionally a control group of 175 children not prone to infections was investigated. Both, low and high levels compared to controls were observed for IgG3 and IgG4. 11.5% of the children with frequent airway infections had IgG3 values below 2 SD below the mean for age compared to 2.8% in the control group (p less than 0.01). Likewise a low IgG4 level was observed more frequently in children prone to airway infections (9.8% versus 2.8% in control; p less than 0.05). IgG4 was undetectable (level less than 3.4 mg/dl) in 5 of the 175 control children. Despite an accumulation of low or undetectable IgG3 or IgG4 levels in children with frequent respiratory tract infections, no correlation between low IgG subclass-levels and the degree of the individual disease could be detected. Based on this lack of a simple causal relationship between frequent respiratory tract infections and the finding of low or undetectable IgG-subclass levels, an immunoglobulin replacement therapy has to be considered with reserve.

  10. Respiratory tract clinical sample selection for microbiota analysis in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Changes in respiratory tract microbiota have been associated with diseases such as tuberculosis, a global public health problem that affects millions of people each year. This pilot study was carried out using sputum, oropharynx, and nasal respiratory tract samples collected from patients with pulmonary tuberculosis and healthy control individuals, in order to compare sample types and their usefulness in assessing changes in bacterial and fungal communities. Findings Most V1-V2 16S rRNA gene sequences belonged to the phyla Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Fusobacteria, with differences in relative abundances and in specific taxa associated with each sample type. Most fungal ITS1 sequences were classified as Ascomycota and Basidiomycota, but abundances differed for the different samples. Bacterial and fungal community structures in oropharynx and sputum samples were similar to one another, as indicated by several beta diversity analyses, and both differed from nasal samples. The only difference between patient and control microbiota was found in oropharynx samples for both bacteria and fungi. Bacterial diversity was greater in sputum samples, while fungal diversity was greater in nasal samples. Conclusions Respiratory tract microbial communities were similar in terms of the major phyla identified, yet they varied in terms of relative abundances and diversity indexes. Oropharynx communities varied with respect to health status and resembled those in sputum samples, which are collected from tuberculosis patients only due to the difficulty in obtaining sputum from healthy individuals, suggesting that oropharynx samples can be used to analyze community structure alterations associated with tuberculosis. PMID:25225609

  11. Protection of human upper respiratory tract cell lines against sulphur mustard toxicity by hexamethylenetetramine (HMT).

    PubMed

    Andrew, D J; Lindsay, C D

    1998-07-01

    1. Sulphur mustard ('mustard gas', HD) is a highly toxic chemical warfare agent which affects the skin and respiratory tract. The primary targets of inhaled HD are the epithelia of the upper respiratory tract. Hexamethylenetetramine (HMT) has been shown to protect human lung cells against HD toxicity and has also been shown to be effective in vivo against the chemical warfare agent phosgene. The ability of HMT to protect against the toxicity of HD was investigated in the human upper respiratory tract cell lines BEAS-2B and RPMI 2650. 2. HD was highly toxic to both cell lines, with LC50 values of 15-30 microM. HMT, at a concentration of 10 mM, was shown to protect the cell lines against the toxic effects of 20 microM and 40 microM HD. Results demonstrated that it was necessary for HMT to be in situ at the time of exposure to HD for effective cytoprotection. No protection was seen when cells were treated with HMT following exposure to HD, or where HMT was removed prior to HD exposure. 3. Results suggest that HMT may be effective prophylaxis for exposure to HD by inhalation.

  12. MODULAR APPLICATION OF COMPUTATIONAL MODELS OF INHALED REACTIVE GAS DOSIMETRY FOR RISK ASSESSMENT OF RESPIRATORY TRACT TOXICITY: CHLORINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Inhaled reactive gases typically cause respiratory tract toxicity with a prominent proximal to distal lesion pattern. This pattern is largely driven by airflow and interspecies differences between rodents and humans result from factors such as airway architecture, ventilation ra...

  13. [Respiratory responses to microinjections of leptin into the solitary tract nucleus].

    PubMed

    Iniushkin, A N; Iniushkina, E M; Merkulova, N A

    2008-01-01

    Regulatory polypeptide leptin, apart from its well-known hypothalamic effects, stimulates ventilation. The present study on anaesthetised rats was undertaken to elucidate the respiratory effects of 10(-10)-10(-4) M leptin microinjected into the solitary tract nucleus, containing a high concentration of leptin receptors. Injections of 10(-8)-10(-4) M leptin induced dose-dependent increase in ventilation, tidal volume and electric activity of inspiratory muscles; 10(-6) M leptin additionally induced a short-term increase in respiratory frequency and a shortening of both inspiratory and expiratory duration. The respiratory responses to leptin is also characterised by appearance of sighs: deep and prolonged inspirations associated with an augmented burst in the activity of the inspiratory muscles and prolonged post-sigh inter-burst interval. The results taken together with evidence of high concentration of specific leptin ObRb-receptor in the solitary tract nucleus suggest involvement of endogenous leptin in the control of breathing via dorsal structures of the respiratory center.

  14. Prevalence of acute respiratory tract diseases among soldiers deployed for military operations in Iraq and Afghanistan.

    PubMed

    Korzeniewski, K; Nitsch-Osuch, Aneta; Konarski, M; Guzek, A; Prokop, E; Bieniuk, K

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory diseases are one of the most common health problems among service personnel assigned to contemporary military operations which are conducted in areas characterized by adverse environmental conditions. This article reviews the results of the studies into the prevalence of acute respiratory tract diseases among soldiers of the Polish Military Contingent deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan. The article also discusses a number of factors which increase the prevalence of diseases diagnosed in the population of soldiers on a military mission in different climatic and sanitary conditions. Retrospective analysis was based on medical records of Polish troops treated on an outpatient basis in Iraq in 2003-2004 (n = 871) and in Afghanistan in 2003-2005 (n = 400), 2009 (n = 2,300), and 2010 (n = 2,500). The intensity rates were calculated and were then used to calculate the prevalence of diseases per 100 persons in a given population of the military personnel. We found that acute respiratory tract diseases were one of the most common health problems treated in outpatient medical facilities in all four study populations. The incidence rate was 45.6 cases in Iraq in 2003-2004, and in Afghanistan it amounted to 61.8 in 2003-2005, 45.3 in 2009, and 54.8-100 persons in 2010. In conclusion, the prevalence of respiratory diseases was closely related to the environmental factors, such as sand and dust storms, extreme temperature changes, unsatisfactory sanitary conditions, and common disregard of basic principles concerning disease prevention.

  15. Mammalian Cell-Derived Respiratory Syncytial Virus-Like Particles Protect the Lower as well as the Upper Respiratory Tract.

    PubMed

    Walpita, Pramila; Johns, Lisa M; Tandon, Ravi; Moore, Martin L

    2015-01-01

    Globally, Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) is a leading cause of bronchiolitis and pneumonia in children less than one year of age and in USA alone, between 85,000 and 144,000 infants are hospitalized every year. To date, there is no licensed vaccine. We have evaluated vaccine potential of mammalian cell-derived native RSV virus-like particles (RSV VLPs) composed of the two surface glycoproteins G and F, and the matrix protein M. Results of in vitro testing showed that the VLPs were functionally assembled and immunoreactive, and that the recombinantly expressed F protein was cleaved intracellularly similarly to the virus-synthesized F protein to produce the F1 and F2 subunits; the presence of the F1 fragment is critical for vaccine development since all the neutralizing epitopes present in the F protein are embedded in this fragment. Additional in vitro testing in human macrophage cell line THP-1 showed that both virus and the VLPs were sensed by TLR-4 and induced a Th1-biased cytokine response. Cotton rats vaccinated with RSV VLPs adjuvanted with alum and monophosphoryl lipid A induced potent neutralizing antibody response, and conferred protection in the lower as well as the upper respiratory tract based on substantial virus clearance from these sites. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first VLP/virosome vaccine study reporting protection of the lower as well as the upper respiratory tract: Prevention from replication in the nose is an important consideration if the target population is infants < 6 months of age. This is because continued virus replication in the nose results in nasal congestion and babies at this age are obligate nose breathers. In conclusion, these results taken together suggest that our VLPs show promise to be a safe and effective vaccine for RSV.

  16. Factors Associated with Antibiotic Misuse in Outpatient Treatment for Upper Respiratory Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    Schroeck, Jennifer L.; Ruh, Christine A.; Sellick, John A.; Ott, Michael C.; Mattappallil, Arun

    2015-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has promoted the appropriate use of antibiotics since 1995 when it initiated the National Campaign for Appropriate Antibiotic Use in the Community. This study examined upper respiratory tract infections included in the campaign to determine the degree to which antibiotics were appropriately prescribed and subsequent admission rates in a veteran population. This study was a retrospective chart review conducted among outpatients with a diagnosis of a respiratory tract infection, including bronchitis, pharyngitis, sinusitis, or nonspecific upper respiratory tract infection, between January 2009 and December 2011. The study found that 595 (35.8%) patients were treated appropriately, and 1,067 (64.2%) patients received therapy considered inappropriate based on the Get Smart Campaign criteria. Overall the subsequent readmission rate was 1.5%. The majority (77.5%) of patients were prescribed an antibiotic. The most common antibiotics prescribed were azithromycin (39.0%), amoxicillin-clavulanate (13.2%), and moxifloxacin (7.5%). A multivariate regression analysis demonstrated significant predictors of appropriate treatment, including the presence of tonsillar exudates (odds ratio [OR], 0.6; confidence interval [CI], 0.3 to 0.9), fever (OR, 0.6; CI, 0.4 to 0.9), and lymphadenopathy (OR, 0.4; CI, 0.3 to 0.6), while penicillin allergy (OR, 2.9; CI, 1.7 to 4.7) and cough (OR, 1.6; CI, 1.1 to 2.2) were significant predictors for inappropriate treatment. Poor compliance with the Get Smart Campaign was found in outpatients for respiratory infections. Results from this study demonstrate the overprescribing of antibiotics, while providing a focused view of improper prescribing. This article provides evidence that current efforts are insufficient for curtailing inappropriate antibiotic use. PMID:25870064

  17. [Pharmacological effects of N-acetyl-L-cysteine on the respiratory tract. (I). Quantitative and qualitative changes in respiratory tract fluid and sputum (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Kogi, K; Saito, T; Kasé, Y; Hitoshi, T

    1981-06-01

    The following three experiments were performed to determine the effects of N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) on the quantity and quality of respiratory tract fluid (RTF) and sputum. All drugs used were administered into the stomach through a gastric tube. 1) Indirect measurement of bronchial secretion in rats, which was expressed by the amounts of dye excreted into the respiratory tract, was carried out according the the Sakuno's method, with some modification. Some expectorants of the secretomotor type, such as bromhexine and pilocarpine, significantly increased the secretion, even at low doses. On the other hand, mucolytic agents such as NAC augmented the secretion only in doses of 500 to 1500 mg/kg. 2)As a direct method of measurements, Kasé's modification of Perry and Boyd's method was used to collect RTF, quantitatively, from rabbits. The RTF of healthy rabbits was colorless and watery. The administration of NAC in doses of 500 to 1500 mg/kg augmented the output volume and RTF became slightly turbid, probably due to an increase in the viscous mucus. 3) Rabbits with subacute bronchitis were prepared by long-term exposure to air contaminated with SO2 gas and sputa were collected before and after administration of NAC, respectively, according to the Kase's method. The sputa were opalescent and viscous gel included nodular masses. The administration of NAC, 1000 and 1500 mg/kg resulted in a dose dependent decrease in the relative viscosity. The percent-decreased in viscosity with NAC was statistically correlated with that in amounts of dry matter, those in protein and polysaccharide in the sputa. From the results described above, it was concluded that NAC given into the stomach can liquefy sputum by splitting mucoprotein disulphide linkages, that is, altering the rheological characteristics of sputum to facilitate expectoration.

  18. Life-Threatening Respiratory Tract Disease with Human Bocavirus-1 Infection in a 4-Year-Old Child

    PubMed Central

    Edner, Niklas; Castillo-Rodas, Paul; Falk, Lars; Hedman, Klaus; Söderlund-Venermo, Maria

    2012-01-01

    The disease spectrum associated with human bocavirus-1 infection remains to be fully defined. We report a case of bocavirus-1-associated bronchiolitis, leading to severe respiratory failure and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in a 4-year-old child, and suggest blood testing for human bocavirus-1 in children with severe respiratory tract infection. PMID:22135260

  19. Microscopic anatomy of the lower respiratory tract of the grey short-tailed opossum (Monodelphis domestica).

    PubMed

    Cope, L A; Henry, R W; Reed, R B

    2012-04-01

    The respiratory tracts of seven grey short-tailed opossums were histologically examined. Six opossums were prepared by perfusion with buffered formalin. Opossum seven was perfused with gluteraldehyde. Samples taken from the respiratory passages and lungs of specimens 1-6 were stained with haematoxylin and eosin. A mixture of methylene and azure blue was used for specimen 7. The trachea and right and left principal bronchi are lined with a pseudostratified ciliated columnar epithelium with occasional goblet cells. The secondary and tertiary bronchi and the primary and secondary bronchioles are lined by a simple ciliated columnar epithelium. The terminal bronchioles and a portion of the respiratory bronchioles are lined by a simple ciliated cuboidal epithelium. The terminal portion of the respiratory bronchioles and the alveolar ducts are lined with simple squamous epithelium. Alveoli are lined by type I and II pneumocytes. Tracheal glands are present in the tela submucosa. The fibromusculocartilaginous tunic of the trachea consists of c-shaped cartilage rings and the trachealis muscle. A lamina muscularis mucosa begins in the intrapulmonary portion of the principal bronchus and continues into the respiratory bronchioles. Bronchial glands are present in the propria submucosa and tela submucosa of the principal bronchi. The musculocartilaginous tunic is localized to the extrapulmonary portion of the principal bronchus. The bronchial cartilages are irregular shaped plates and limited to the extrapulmonary portion of the principal bronchus. The visceral pleura is a simple squamous mesothelium covering the outer surface of the lung.

  20. Influences of parameter uncertainties within the ICRP-66 respiratory tract model: particle clearance.

    PubMed

    Bolch, Wesley E; Huston, Thomas E; Farfán, Eduardo B; Vernetson, William G; Bolch, W Emmett

    2003-04-01

    Quantifying radiological risk following the inhalation of radioactive aerosols entails not only an assessment of particle deposition within respiratory tract regions but a full accounting of clearance mechanisms whereby particles may be translocated to adjacent respiratory tissue regions, absorbed to blood, or released to the gastrointestinal tract. The model outlined in ICRP Publication 66 represents to date one of the most complete overall descriptions of particle deposition and clearance, as well as localized radiation dosimetry, within the respiratory tract. In this study, a previous review of the ICRP-66 deposition model is extended to the study of the subsequent clearance model. A systematic review of the clearance component within the ICRP 66 respiratory tract model was conducted in which probability density functions were assigned to all input parameters for both 239PuO2 and 238UO2/238U3O8. These distributions were subsequently incorporated within a computer code LUDUC (Lung Dose Uncertainty Code) in which Latin hypercube sampling techniques are used to generate multiple (e.g., 1,000) sets of input vectors (i.e., trials) for all model parameters needed to assess mechanical clearance and particle dissolution/absorption. Integral numbers of nuclear disintegrations, U(s), in various lung regions were shown to be well-described by lognormal probability distributions. Of the four extrathoracic clearance compartments of the respiratory tract, uncertainties in U(s), expressed as the ratio of its 95% to 5% confidence levels, were highest within the LN(ET) tissues for 239PuO2 (ratio of 50 to 130) and within the ET(seq) tissues for 238UO2/238U3O8 (ratio of 12 to 50). Peak uncertainties in U(s) in these respiratory regions occurred at particle sizes of approximately 0.5-0.6 microm where uncertainties in ET2 particle deposition fractions accounted for only approximately 10% of the total U(s) uncertainty for 239PuO2, and only approximately 30% of the total U

  1. Pediatric recurrent respiratory tract infections: when and how to explore the immune system? (About 53 cases)

    PubMed Central

    El-Azami-El-Idrissi, Mohammed; Lakhdar-Idrissi, Mounia; Chaouki, Sanae; Atmani, Samir; Bouharrou, Abdelhak; Hida, Moustapha

    2016-01-01

    Recurrent respiratory tract infections are one of the most frequent reasons for pediatric visits and hospitalization. Causes of this pathology are multiple ranging from congenital to acquired and local to general. Immune deficiencies are considered as underlying conditions predisposing to this pathology. Our work is about to determine when and how to explore the immune system when facing recurrent respiratory infections. This was based on the records of 53 children hospitalized at the pediatrics unit of Hassan II University Hospital, Fez Morocco. Thirty boys and 23 girls with age ranging from 5 months to 12 years with an average age of 2 years were involved in this study. Bronchial foreign body was the main etiology in children of 3 to 6 year old. Gastro-esophageal reflux, which in some cases is a consequence of chronic cough, as well as asthma were most frequent in infants (17 and 15% respectively). Immune deficiency was described in 7.5% of patients and the only death we deplored in our series belongs to this group. Recurrent respiratory tract infections have multiple causes. In our series they are dominated by foreign body inhalation and gastroesophageal reflux, which in some cases is a consequence of a chronic cough. Immune deficiency is not frequent but could influence the prognosis. Therefore immune explorations should be well codified. PMID:27642394

  2. Do delayed prescriptions reduce antibiotic use in respiratory tract infections? A systematic review.

    PubMed Central

    Arroll, Bruce; Kenealy, Tim; Kerse, Ngaire

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is concern about the increasing resistance of antibiotics to common bacteria. Delayed prescribing for respiratory tract infections is a strategy that may reduce the use of antibiotics. AIM: To systematically review controlled trials of delayed prescriptions to establish their capacity to reduce antibiotic intake. DESIGN OF STUDY: A systematic review of the literature. SETTING: Four studies were conducted in the United Kingdom and one in New Zealand. METHODS: We searched MEDLINE from 1966 to April 2003, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register using the following terms: 'delayed', 'antibiotics', 'prescriptions', and 'back-up' (as in back-up prescription). We included controlled trials of studies in which the intervention was a delayed prescription compared to an immediate prescription for patients with upper respiratory tract infections. The studies were selected independently and the results compared. Disagreements were resolved by discussion. The data and quality of the studies were extracted and assessed independently by two of the authors. RESULTS: Four randomised controlled trials and one before-after controlled trial contributed to the review. The relative risk in the randomised trials for lower antibiotic usage when a delayed prescription was given ranged from 0.54 for the common cold to 0.25 for otitis media. CONCLUSION: The consistent reduction in antibiotic usage in the five controlled trials included in this review suggests that delayed prescription is an effective means of reducing antibiotic usage for acute respiratory infections. The duration of delay for prescriptions ranged widely, from 1 to 7 days. PMID:14702908

  3. Development of a sampler for total aerosol deposition in the human respiratory tract.

    PubMed

    Koehler, Kirsten A; Clark, Phillip; Volckens, John

    2009-10-01

    Studies that seek to associate reduced human health with exposure to occupational and environmental aerosols are often hampered by limitations in the exposure assessment process. One limitation involves the measured exposure metric itself. Current methods for personal exposure assessment are designed to estimate the aspiration of aerosol into the human body. Since a large proportion of inhaled aerosol is subsequently exhaled, a portion of the aspirated aerosol will not contribute to the dose. This leads to variable exposure misclassification (for heterogenous exposures) and increased uncertainty in health effect associations. Alternatively, a metric for respiratory deposition would provide a more physiologically relevant estimate of risk. To address this challenge, we have developed a method to estimate the deposition of aerosol in the human respiratory tract using a sampler engineered from polyurethane foam. Using a semi-empirical model based on inertial, gravitational, and diffusional particle deposition, a foam was engineered to mimic aerosol total deposition in the human respiratory tract. The sampler is comprised of commercially available foam with fiber diameter = 49.5 microm (equivalent to industry standard 100 PPI foam) of 8 cm thickness operating at a face velocity of 1.3 m s(-1). Additionally, the foam sampler yields a relatively low-pressure drop, independent of aerosol loading, providing uniform particle collection efficiency over time.

  4. Pediatric recurrent respiratory tract infections: when and how to explore the immune system? (About 53 cases).

    PubMed

    El-Azami-El-Idrissi, Mohammed; Lakhdar-Idrissi, Mounia; Chaouki, Sanae; Atmani, Samir; Bouharrou, Abdelhak; Hida, Moustapha

    2016-01-01

    Recurrent respiratory tract infections are one of the most frequent reasons for pediatric visits and hospitalization. Causes of this pathology are multiple ranging from congenital to acquired and local to general. Immune deficiencies are considered as underlying conditions predisposing to this pathology. Our work is about to determine when and how to explore the immune system when facing recurrent respiratory infections. This was based on the records of 53 children hospitalized at the pediatrics unit of Hassan II University Hospital, Fez Morocco. Thirty boys and 23 girls with age ranging from 5 months to 12 years with an average age of 2 years were involved in this study. Bronchial foreign body was the main etiology in children of 3 to 6 year old. Gastro-esophageal reflux, which in some cases is a consequence of chronic cough, as well as asthma were most frequent in infants (17 and 15% respectively). Immune deficiency was described in 7.5% of patients and the only death we deplored in our series belongs to this group. Recurrent respiratory tract infections have multiple causes. In our series they are dominated by foreign body inhalation and gastroesophageal reflux, which in some cases is a consequence of a chronic cough. Immune deficiency is not frequent but could influence the prognosis. Therefore immune explorations should be well codified.

  5. Identification of a Novel Polyomavirus from Patients with Acute Respiratory Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    Gaynor, Anne M; Nissen, Michael D; Whiley, David M; Mackay, Ian M; Lambert, Stephen B; Wu, Guang; Brennan, Daniel C; Storch, Gregory A; Sloots, Theo P; Wang, David

    2007-01-01

    We report the identification of a novel polyomavirus present in respiratory secretions from human patients with symptoms of acute respiratory tract infection. The virus was initially detected in a nasopharyngeal aspirate from a 3-year-old child from Australia diagnosed with pneumonia. A random library was generated from nucleic acids extracted from the nasopharyngeal aspirate and analyzed by high throughput DNA sequencing. Multiple DNA fragments were cloned that possessed limited homology to known polyomaviruses. We subsequently sequenced the entire virus genome of 5,229 bp, henceforth referred to as WU virus, and found it to have genomic features characteristic of the family Polyomaviridae. The genome was predicted to encode small T antigen, large T antigen, and three capsid proteins: VP1, VP2, and VP3. Phylogenetic analysis clearly revealed that the WU virus was divergent from all known polyomaviruses. Screening of 2,135 patients with acute respiratory tract infections in Brisbane, Queensland, Australia, and St. Louis, Missouri, United States, using WU virus–specific PCR primers resulted in the detection of 43 additional specimens that contained WU virus. The presence of multiple instances of the virus in two continents suggests that this virus is geographically widespread in the human population and raises the possibility that the WU virus may be a human pathogen. PMID:17480120

  6. Antimicrobial resistance trends among community-acquired respiratory tract pathogens in Greece, 2009-2012.

    PubMed

    Maraki, Sofia; Papadakis, Ioannis S

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the antimicrobial resistance trends of respiratory tract pathogens isolated from patients with community-acquired respiratory tract infections (CARTIs) in Crete, Greece, over a 4-year period (2009-2012). A total of 588 community-acquired respiratory pathogens were isolated during the study period. Streptococcus pneumoniae was the most common organism responsible for 44.4% of CARTIs, followed by Haemophilus influenzae (44.2%) and Moraxella catarrhalis (11.4%). Among S. pneumoniae, the prevalence of isolates with intermediate- and high-level resistance to penicillin was 27.2% and 12.3%, respectively. Macrolide resistance slightly decreased from 29.4% over the period 2009-2010 to 28.8% over the period 2011-2012. Multiresistance was observed among 56 (54.4%) penicillin nonsusceptible isolates. A nonsignificant increase in resistance of H. influenzae isolates was noted for β -lactams, cotrimoxazole, and tetracycline. Among the 67 M. catarrhalis tested, 32 produced beta-lactamase and were resistant to ampicillin. Macrolide resistance decreased over the study period. All isolates were susceptible to amoxicillin + clavulanic acid, chloramphenicol, rifampicin, and the fluoroquinolones. Although a decreasing trend in the prevalence of resistance of the three most common pathogens involved in CARTIs was noted, continuous surveillance of antimicrobial susceptibility at the local and national level remains important, in order to guide appropriate empirical antimicrobial therapy.

  7. Altered Function in CD8+ T Cells following Paramyxovirus Infection of the Respiratory Tract

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Peter M.; Arimilli, Subhashini; Palmer, Ellen M.; Parks, Griffith D.; Alexander-Miller, Martha A.

    2005-01-01

    For many respiratory pathogens, CD8+ T cells have been shown to play a critical role in clearance. However, there are still many unanswered questions with regard to the factors that promote the most efficacious immune response and the potential for immunoregulation of effector cells at the local site of infection. We have used infection of the respiratory tract with the model paramyxovirus simian virus 5 (SV5) to study CD8+ T-cell responses in the lung. For the present study, we report that over time a population of nonresponsive, virus-specific CD8+ T cells emerged in the lung, culminating in a lack of function in ∼85% of cells specific for the immunodominant epitope from the viral matrix (M) protein by day 40 postinfection. Concurrent with the induction of nonresponsiveness, virus-specific cells that retained function at later times postinfection exhibited an increased requirement for CD8 engagement. This change was coupled with a nearly complete loss of functional phosphoprotein-specific cells, a response previously shown to be almost exclusively CD8 independent. These studies add to the growing evidence for immune dysregulation following viral infection of the respiratory tract. PMID:15731228

  8. The development of pharmacokinetically enhanced amoxicillin/clavulanate for the management of respiratory tract infections in adults.

    PubMed

    File, Thomas M

    2007-12-01

    Rising levels of resistance amongst the major respiratory pathogens have compromised empiric antimicrobial therapy. This, coupled with a recent lack in availability of novel classes of antibacterials, has led to a need for new approaches to combat community respiratory tract infections. Bacteriological and clinical efficacy in two trials involving patients with acute bacterial sinusitis and six trials of patients with community-acquired pneumonia has shown that the development of a pharmacokinetically enhanced formulation of amoxicillin/clavulanate (Augmentin SR, available as Augmentin XR in the USA) has allowed amoxicillin/clavulanate to retain its place in the treatment of respiratory tract infections today.

  9. Evaluation of serum galactomannan detection for diagnosis of feline upper respiratory tract aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    Whitney, J; Beatty, J A; Martin, P; Dhand, N K; Briscoe, K; Barrs, V R

    2013-02-22

    Measurement of serum galactomannan (GM), a polysaccharide fungal cell-wall component, is a non-invasive test for early diagnosis of invasive aspergillosis in humans. Feline upper respiratory tract (URT) aspergillosis is an emerging infectious disease in cats. Diagnosis requires biopsy for procurement of tissue specimens for cytological or histological detection of fungal hyphae and for fungal culture. The aim of this study was to evaluate serum GM measurement as a non-invasive diagnostic test for URT aspergillosis in cats. A one-stage, immunoenzymatic sandwich ELISA was used to detect serum GM in 4 groups of cats; Group 1 (URT aspergillosis) - confirmed URT aspergillosis (n=13, sinonasal aspergillosis (SNA) n=6 and sino-orbital aspergillosis (SOA) n=7), Group 2 (URT other) - other URT diseases (n=15), Group 3 (β-lactam) - cats treated with β-lactam antibiotics for non-respiratory tract disease (n=14), Group 4a - healthy young cats (≤ 1 y of age, n=28), Group 4b - healthy adult cats (>1 y of age, n=16). One cat with SNA and two cats with SOA caused by an Aspergillus fumigatus-mimetic species, tested positive for serum GM. For a cut-off optical density index of 1.5, the overall sensitivity and specificity of the assay was 23% and 78% respectively. False positive results occurred in 29% of cats in Group 3 and 32% of cats in Group 4a. Specificity increased to 90% when Groups 3 and 4a were excluded from the analysis. Overall, serum GM measurement has a poor sensitivity but is a moderately specific, non-invasive screening test to rule out infection in patients with suspected feline upper respiratory tract aspergillosis.

  10. Indoor aerosol modeling for assessment of exposure and respiratory tract deposited dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, Tareq; Wierzbicka, Aneta; Löndahl, Jakob; Lazaridis, Mihalis; Hänninen, Otto

    2015-04-01

    Air pollution is one of the major environmental problems that influence people's health. Exposure to harmful particulate matter (PM) occurs both outdoors and indoors, but while people spend most of their time indoors, the indoor exposures tend to dominate. Moreover, higher PM concentrations due to indoor sources and tightness of indoor environments may substantially add to the outdoor originating exposures. Empirical and real-time assessment of human exposure is often impossible; therefore, indoor aerosol modeling (IAM) can be used as a superior method in exposure and health effects studies. This paper presents a simple approach in combining available aerosol-based modeling techniques to evaluate the real-time exposure and respiratory tract deposited dose based on particle size. Our simple approach consists of outdoor aerosol data base, IAM simulations, time-activity pattern data-base, physical-chemical properties of inhaled aerosols, and semi-empirical deposition fraction of aerosols in the respiratory tract. These modeling techniques allow the characterization of regional deposited dose in any metric: particle mass, particle number, and surface area. The first part of this presentation reviews recent advances in simple mass-balance based modeling methods that are needed in analyzing the health relevance of indoor exposures. The second part illustrates the use of IAM in the calculations of exposure and deposited dose. Contrary to previous methods, the approach presented is a real-time approach and it goes beyond the exposure assessment to provide the required information for the health risk assessment, which is the respiratory tract deposited dose. This simplified approach is foreseen to support epidemiological studies focusing on exposures originating from both indoor and outdoor sources.

  11. Influenza C Virus and Human Metapneumovirus Infections in Hospitalized Children With Lower Respiratory Tract Illness.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Yukitoshi; Abiko, Chieko; Ikeda, Tatsuya; Mizuta, Katsumi; Matsuzaki, Yoko

    2015-11-01

    A 6-month prospective study in a hospital setting detected influenza C virus and human metapneumovirus in 10.0% (29/289) and 16.6% (48/289), respectively, of children hospitalized with lower respiratory tract illness. Influenza C virus infection had a similar rate of pneumonia (53.3% vs. 57.1%), significantly lower frequency of wheezing (13.3% vs. 68.6%) and higher values of white blood cell and C-reactive protein than human metapneumovirus infection.

  12. The potential of methylxanthine-based therapies in pediatric respiratory tract diseases.

    PubMed

    Oñatibia-Astibia, Ainhoa; Martínez-Pinilla, Eva; Franco, Rafael

    2016-03-01

    Caffeine, theophylline and theobromine are the most known methylxanthines as they are present in coffee, tea and/or chocolate. In the last decades, a huge experimental effort has been devoted to get insight into the variety of actions that these compounds exert in humans. From such knowledge it is known that methylxanthines have a great potential in prevention, therapy and/or management of a variety of diseases. The benefits of methylxanthine-based therapies in the apnea of prematurity and their translational potential in pediatric affections of the respiratory tract are here presented.

  13. Anaerobic bacteria in upper respiratory tract and head and neck infections: microbiology and treatment.

    PubMed

    Brook, Itzhak

    2012-04-01

    Anaerobes are the predominant components of oropharyngeal mucous membranes bacterial flora, and are therefore a common cause of bacterial infections of endogenous origin of upper respiratory tract and head and neck. This review summarizes the aerobic and anaerobic microbiology and antimicrobials therapy of these infections. These include acute and chronic otitis media, mastoiditis and sinusitis, pharyngo-tonsillitis, peritonsillar, retropharyngeal and parapharyngeal abscesses, suppurative thyroiditis, cervical lymphadenitis, parotitis, siliadenitis, and deep neck infections including Lemierre Syndrome. The recovery from these infections depends on prompt and proper medical and when indicated also surgical management.

  14. Insights into the respiratory tract microbiota of patients with cystic fibrosis during early Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization

    DOE PAGES

    Keravec, Marlène; Mounier, Jérôme; Prestat, Emmanuel; ...

    2015-08-09

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa plays a major role in cystic fibrosis (CF) progression. Therefore, it is important to understand the initial steps of P. aeruginosa infection. The structure and dynamics of CF respiratory tract microbial communities during the early stages of P. aeruginosa colonization were characterized by pyrosequencing and cloning-sequencing. The respiratory microbiota showed high diversity, related to the young age of the CF cohort (mean age 10 years). Wide inter- and intra-individual variations were revealed. A common core microbiota of 5 phyla and 13 predominant genera was found, the majority of which were obligate anaerobes. A few genera were significantly moremore » prevalent in patients never infected by P. aeruginosa. Persistence of an anaerobic core microbiota regardless of P. aeruginosa status suggests a major role of certain anaerobes in the pathophysiology of lung infections in CF. Some genera may be potential biomarkers of pulmonary infection state.« less

  15. Insights into the respiratory tract microbiota of patients with cystic fibrosis during early Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization

    SciTech Connect

    Keravec, Marlene; Mounier, Jerome; Prestat , Emmanuel; Vallet, Sophie; Jansson, Janet K.; Bergaud , Gaetaqn; Rosec, Silvain; Gourious, Stephanie; Rault, Gilles; Coton, Emmanuel; Barbier, George; Hery-Arnaud, Geneveieve

    2015-08-09

    Abstract Pseudomonas aeruginosa plays a major role in cystic fibrosis (CF) progression. Therefore, it is important to understand the initial steps of P. aeruginosa infection. The structure and dynamics of CF respiratory tract microbial communities during the early stages of P. aeruginosa colonization were characterized by pyrosequencing and cloning-sequencing. The respiratory microbiota showed high diversity, related to the young age of the CF cohort (mean age 10 years). Wide inter- and intra-individual variations were revealed. A common core microbiota of 5 phyla and 13 predominant genera was found, the majority of which were obligate anaerobes. A few genera were significantly more prevalent in patients never infected by P. aeruginosa. Persistence of an anaerobic core microbiota regardless of P. aeruginosa status suggests a major role of certain anaerobes in the pathophysiology of lung infections in CF. Some genera may be potential biomarkers of pulmonary infection state.

  16. Phylogenetically distinct equine influenza viruses show different tropism for the swine respiratory tract.

    PubMed

    Patrono, Livia V; Bonfante, Francesco; Zanardello, Claudia; Terregino, Calogero; Capua, Ilaria; Murcia, Pablo R

    2015-05-01

    Influenza A viruses circulate in a wide range of animals. H3N8 equine influenza virus (EIV) is an avian-origin virus that has established in dogs as canine influenza virus (CIV) and has also been isolated from camels and pigs. Previous work suggests that mutations acquired during EIV evolution might have played a role in CIV emergence. Given the potential role of pigs as a source of human infections, we determined the ability of H3N8 EIVs to replicate in pig cell lines and in respiratory explants. We show that phylogenetically distinct EIVs display different infection phenotypes along the pig respiratory tract, but not in cell lines. Our results suggest that EIV displays a dynamic host range along its evolutionary history, supporting the view that evolutionary processes play important roles in host range and tropism and also underscoring the utility of using explant cultures to study influenza pathogenesis.

  17. Lower Respiratory Tract Diseases Caused by Common Respiratory Viruses among Stem Cell Transplantation Recipients: A Single Center Experience in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Kyung-Wook; Choi, Su-Mi; Cho, Sung-Yeon; Lee, Hyo-Jin; Choi, Jae-Ki; Kim, Si-Hyun; Park, Sun Hee; Choi, Jung-Hyun; Yoo, Jin-Hong; Lee, Jong-Wook

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To describe the incidence, clinical courses, and risk factors for mortality of lower respiratory tract diseases (LRDs) caused by common respiratory viruses (CRVs) in stem cell transplantation (SCT) recipients. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 1038 patients who received SCT between January 2007 and August 2011 at a single center in Korea. Results Seventy-one CRV-LRDs were identified in 67 (6.5%) patients. The human parainfluenza virus (HPIV) was the most common causative pathogen of CRV-LRDs at 100 days [cumulative incidence estimate, 23.5%; 95% confidence interval (CI), 3.3–43.7] and 1 year (cumulative incidence estimate, 69.2%; 95% CI, 45.9–92.5) following SCT. The 30-day overall mortality rates due to influenza-LRDs, respiratory syncytial virus-LRDs, HPIV-LRDs, and human rhinovirus-LRDs were 35.7, 25.8, 31.6, and 42.8%, respectively. Co-pathogens in respiratory specimens were detected in 23 (33.8%) patients. The overall mortality at day 30 after CRV-LRD diagnosis was 32.8% (22/67). High-dose steroid usage (p=0.025), a severe state of immunodeficiency (p=0.033), and lymphopenia (p=0.006) were significantly associated with death within 30 days following CRV-LRD diagnosis in a univariate analysis. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that high-dose steroid usage [odds ratio (OR), 4.05; 95% CI, 1.12–14.61; p=0.033] and lymphopenia (OR, 6.57; 95% CI, 1.80–24.03; p=0.004) were independent risk factors for mortality within 30 days of CRV-LRDs. Conclusion CRV-LRDs among SCT recipients showed substantially high morbidity and mortality rates. Therefore, the implement of an active diagnostic approaches for CRV infections is required for SCT recipients with respiratory symptoms, especially those receiving high-dose steroids or with lymphopenia. PMID:28120567

  18. Evaluation of R-Mix shell vials for the diagnosis of viral respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Adriana; Brewster, Lori; Clark, Julia; Simoes, Eric

    2004-05-01

    Respiratory viruses cause significant morbidity and mortality. The management of these infections can be improved by a rapid diagnosis and administration of available virus-specific therapy. The goal of this study was to compare R-Mix, an engineered tissue monolayer for rapid shell vial (SV) diagnosis of viral respiratory infections, with conventional tissue culture (TC) and conventional respiratory SV (primary rhesus monkey kidney (RhMK) and Hep2 monolayers). The primary outcome measure was sensitivity for detection of influenza A and B, respiratory syncytial virus, parainfluenza 1-3, and adenovirus. The study was performed in two phases: (1) the three methods were compared using 250 nasal washes from children with lower respiratory tract infections; (2) a modified R-Mix SV harvesting schedule (SV were harvested at 24 and 120 h) was compared with TC and conventional RhMK/Hep2 SV using 311 respiratory specimens. A total of 110 viruses were identified in the first and 55 in the second phase. Diagnostic accuracies of R-Mix harvested at 24, 48, and 120 h were 98%, whereas for TC varied between 99 and 100%, and for RhMK/Hep2 SV between 98 and 99%. Sensitivities of R-Mix harvested at 24, 48, and 120 h were 26, 75, and 47%, respectively, whereas for TC varied between 60 and 94%, and for RhMK/Hep2 SV between 62 and 85%. R-Mix harvested at 48 h represent a valuable substitute for RhMK/Hep2 SV because they have comparable sensitivities and diagnostic accuracies, but R-Mix offers several technical advantages. In contrast, R-Mix harvested at 24h did not seem a very useful diagnostic tool. The utility of R-Mix harvested at 120 h, which accelerated the diagnosis of 16% of positive specimens in study phase 2, needs further investigation.

  19. The hidden ‘mycobacteriome’ of the human healthy oral cavity and upper respiratory tract

    PubMed Central

    Macovei, Lilia; McCafferty, Jon; Chen, Tsute; Teles, Flavia; Hasturk, Hatice; Paster, Bruce J.; Campos-Neto, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of opportunistic non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) infections has increased considerably in the past decades causing an array of infections, including respiratory and soft-tissue infections. NTM are ubiquitous and can be found in numerous environments, including households and water plants. However, NTM have not been reported to be associated with the healthy human oral microbiome. Since the oral cavity and upper respiratory track are the main ports of entry of microorganisms into the human body, elucidating NTM diversity and prevalence will assist in the assessment of the potential risks of infection elicited by these opportunistic pathogens. Here, we report the identification of a ‘non-tuberculous mycobacteriome’ in healthy individuals. We employed a modified DNA extraction procedure in conjunction with mycobacterial-specific primers to screen niches in the oral cavity (buccal mucosa and dental plaque) and upper respiratory tract (nostrils and oropharynx) of 10 healthy subjects. A total of 50 prevalent operational taxonomic units sequenced on MiSeq (Illumina) using 16S rRNA V3–V4 region were detected across all screened niches, showing the presence of diverse NTM communities. NTM DNA was detected in the nostrils of all 10 subjects, in buccal mucosa of 8 subjects, in the oropharynx of 7 subjects, and in the dental plaques of 5 subjects. Results from quantitative PCR showed each individual harbored 103–104 predicted NTM per each screened niche. The modification of standard DNA isolation methods to increase sensitivity toward mycobacterial species represents an important step to advance the knowledge of the oral as well as the overall human microbiome. These findings clearly reveal for the first time that healthy individuals harbor a ‘non-tuberculous mycobacteriome’ in their oral cavity and upper respiratory tract and may have important implications in our understanding of infections caused by NTM. PMID:25683180

  20. Occurence of Bordetella bronchiseptica in domestic cats with upper respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed

    Garbal, M; Adaszek, Ł; Łyp, P; Frymus, J; Winiarczyk, M; Winiarczyk, S

    2016-01-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica is a widespread Gram-negative pathogen occurring in different mammal species. It is known to play a role in the etiology of infectious atrophic rhinitis of swine, canine kennel cough, respiratory syndromes of cats, rabbits and guinea pigs, and sporadic human cases have also been reported. The aim of this article is to present the occurrence of infections caused by these bacteria in domestic cats with respiratory symptoms, as well as to conduct a molecular analysis of the flaA gene B. bronchiseptica for the purpose of ascertaining whether cats become infected with one or more bacteria strains. B. bronchiseptica was isolated from the respiratory system of 16 out of 35 domestic cats with symptoms of respiratory tract infections. Polymorphism analysis of polymerase chain reaction products of B. bronchiseptica flaA was performed to reveal the possible differences in nucleotide sequences of the flagellin gene. The phylogenetic analysis of nucleotide sequences obtained during PCR indicated that the isolates of bacteria from our own studies are characterised by 100% homology of the analysed fragment of the flaA gene, which suggests maintenance of a single genotype of these microorganisms in the cat population. Moreover, the bacteria revealed full homology with reference strain B. bronchiseptica ATCC 4617, and 99.4% homology with strain B. parapertussis ATCC 15311. This indicates that the PCR optimised for the Bordetella spp. flaA gene, combined with sequencing of amplicons obtained in PCR, is an effective diagnostic method allowing differentiation of Bordetella spp. type microorganisms.

  1. Respiratory syncytial virus shedding by children hospitalized with lower respiratory tract infection.

    PubMed

    Takeyama, Aya; Hashimoto, Koichi; Sato, Masatoki; Kawashima, Ryoko; Kawasaki, Yukihiko; Hosoya, Mitsuaki

    2016-06-01

    Children with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection shed virus for variable periods. The aim of this study was to quantify the viral load in nasopharyngeal aspirates of children with RSV throughout their hospitalization. This study included 37 children who were admitted with a diagnosis of RSV infection based on a positive rapid diagnostic test. Nasopharyngeal aspirates were collected from patients every day, from admission to discharge. Viral detection and quantification were performed using quantitative real-time PCR. Of the 37 patients, RSV-A was detected in 29 and RSV-B in 6. Two patients were PCR-negative for any type of RSV. RSV-A was detected in 12 of 16 patients (75%) 6 days after admission. These patients shed detectable virus from days 1 to 12, and for a significantly longer period (mean 5.7 days) than RSV-B (mean 3.8 days) patients. Half of the RSV-A patients were also positive on day 14 following onset. RSV-A was detected in patients <12 months of age for significantly longer periods after onset than in patients ≥12 months of age. RSV-A viral load was negatively correlated with days from admission and days from onset. Because RSV shedding was frequently prolonged, the hospitalized children may have contracted RSV as a nosocomial infection. To prevent nosocomial RSV infections in hospital wards, healthcare workers must take appropriate infection control measures and provide adequate guidance on hand washing to the family of the patient.

  2. Adaptation of the ICRP publication 66 respiratory tract model to data on plutonium biokinetics for Mayak workers.

    PubMed

    Khokhryakov, V F; Suslova, K G; Vostrotin, V V; Romanov, S A; Eckerman, K F; Krahenbuhl, M P; Miller, S C

    2005-02-01

    The biokinetics of inhaled plutonium were analyzed using compartment models representing their behavior within the respiratory tract, the gastrointestinal tract, and in systemic tissues. The processes of aerosol deposition, particle transport, absorption, and formation of a fixed deposit in the respiratory tract were formulated in the framework of the Human Respiratory Tract Model described in ICRP Publication 66. The values of parameters governing absorption and formation of the fixed deposit were established by fitting the model to the observations in 530 autopsy cases. The influence of smoking on mechanical clearance of deposited plutonium activity was considered. The dependence of absorption on the aerosol transportability, as estimated by in vitro methods (dialysis), was demonstrated. The results of this study were compared to those obtained from an earlier model of plutonium behavior in the respiratory tract, which was based on the same set of autopsy data. That model did not address the early phases of respiratory clearance and hence underestimated the committed lung dose by about 25% for plutonium oxides. Little difference in lung dose was found for nitrate forms.

  3. Seasonal and pandemic human influenza viruses attach better to human upper respiratory tract epithelium than avian influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    van Riel, Debby; den Bakker, Michael A; Leijten, Lonneke M E; Chutinimitkul, Salin; Munster, Vincent J; de Wit, Emmie; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F; Fouchier, Ron A M; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Kuiken, Thijs

    2010-04-01

    Influenza viruses vary markedly in their efficiency of human-to-human transmission. This variation has been speculated to be determined in part by the tropism of influenza virus for the human upper respiratory tract. To study this tropism, we determined the pattern of virus attachment by virus histochemistry of three human and three avian influenza viruses in human nasal septum, conchae, nasopharynx, paranasal sinuses, and larynx. We found that the human influenza viruses-two seasonal influenza viruses and pandemic H1N1 virus-attached abundantly to ciliated epithelial cells and goblet cells throughout the upper respiratory tract. In contrast, the avian influenza viruses, including the highly pathogenic H5N1 virus, attached only rarely to epithelial cells or goblet cells. Both human and avian viruses attached occasionally to cells of the submucosal glands. The pattern of virus attachment was similar among the different sites of the human upper respiratory tract for each virus tested. We conclude that influenza viruses that are transmitted efficiently among humans attach abundantly to human upper respiratory tract, whereas inefficiently transmitted influenza viruses attach rarely. These results suggest that the ability of an influenza virus to attach to human upper respiratory tract is a critical factor for efficient transmission in the human population.

  4. In Silico Models of Aerosol Delivery to the Respiratory Tract – Development and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Longest, P. Worth; Holbrook, Landon T.

    2011-01-01

    This review discusses the application of computational models to simulate the transport and deposition of inhaled pharmaceutical aerosols from the site of particle or droplet formation to deposition within the respiratory tract. Traditional one-dimensional (1-D) whole-lung models are discussed briefly followed by a more in-depth review of three-dimensional (3-D) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. The review of CFD models is organized into sections covering transport and deposition within the inhaler device, the extrathoracic (oral and nasal) region, conducting airways, and alveolar space. For each section, a general review of significant contributions and advancements in the area of simulating pharmaceutical aerosols is provided followed by a more in-depth application or case study that highlights the challenges, utility, and benefits of in silico models. Specific applications presented include the optimization of an existing spray inhaler, development of charge-targeted delivery, specification of conditions for optimal nasal delivery, analysis of a new condensational delivery approach, and an evaluation of targeted delivery using magnetic aerosols. The review concludes with recommendations on the need for more refined model validations, use of a concurrent experimental and CFD approach for developing aerosol delivery systems, and development of a stochastic individual path (SIP) model of aerosol transport and deposition throughout the respiratory tract. PMID:21640772

  5. Unsuitability of exhaled breath condensate for the detection of herpesviruses DNA in the respiratory tract.

    PubMed

    Costa, Cristina; Bucca, Caterina; Bergallo, Massimiliano; Solidoro, Paolo; Rolla, Giovanni; Cavallo, Rossana

    2011-05-01

    Exhaled breath condensate is a non-invasive method for detecting a wide number of molecules as well as genomic DNA in the airways. No study investigated the detection of viral DNA in exhaled breath condensate, while only one study excluded its usefulness for detection of influenza virus RNA. In this study, the suitability of exhaled breath condensate for detecting herpesviruses infection or reactivation in the respiratory tract of lung transplant recipients was evaluated. Twenty-four matched samples (exhaled breath condensate, bronchoalveolar lavage, whole blood, transbronchial biopsy) were evaluated for the detection of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), human herpesvirus (HHV-6 and -7), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA by real-time PCR. Eighteen bronchoalveolar lavages (75%), six whole blood samples (25%), and two transbronchial biopsies (8.3%) were positive for at least one herpesvirus. Only one exhaled breath condensate specimen was positive for HCMV DNA (and positive also in the bronchoalveolar lavage, with low viral load in both specimens); while no other patient, irrespective of the viral load in any specimen or the presence of clinical symptoms and signs, had a positive exhaled breath condensate. These findings seem to exclude the suitability of exhaled breath condensate for non-invasive detection of viral DNA in the respiratory tract of lung transplant recipients.

  6. In vitro activity of ABT-773 versus macrolides and quinolones against resistant respiratory tract pathogens.

    PubMed

    Dubois, J; St -Pierre, C

    2001-01-01

    ABT-773, a novel ketolide, was compared to erythromycin, azithromycin, clarithromycin, ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, gatifloxacin, and gemifloxacin against antibiotic-resistant strains recently isolated from patients with respiratory tract infections. MICs were determined by agar dilution using standard NCCLS methodology. ABT-773 (MIC(90) 0.06 mg/L) was more active than the macrolides (MIC(90) > or = 2 mg/L) and fluoroquinolones (MIC(90) > or = 0.5 mg/L) against penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae. The fluoroquinolones were the most active agents tested against beta-lactamase-positive Haemophilus influenzae (MIC(90) < or = 0.01-0.06 mg/L), against which ABT-773 (MIC(90) 4 mg/L) was comparable to azithromycin and two- and four-fold more active than erythromycin and clarithromycin, respectively. Against beta-lactamase positive Moraxella catarrhalis, the activity of ABT-773 (MIC(90) 0.06 mg/L) was comparable to gemifloxacin, trovafloxacin, levofloxacin, and ciprofloxacin (MIC(90) 0.03-0.06 mg/L) and 4- to eightfold greater than that of clarithromycin, gatifloxacin, and erythromycin. These data suggest ABT-773 could be a valuable compound for the treatment of respiratory tract infections, including those resistant to usual oral therapy.

  7. Oxidative stress and antioxidants at biosurfaces: plants, skin, and respiratory tract surfaces.

    PubMed Central

    Cross, C E; van der Vliet, A; Louie, S; Thiele, J J; Halliwell, B

    1998-01-01

    Atmospheric pollutants represent an important source of oxidative and nitrosative stress to both terrestrial plants and to animals. The exposed biosurfaces of plants and animals are directly exposed to these pollutant stresses. Not surprisingly, living organisms have developed complex integrated extracellular and intracellular defense systems against stresses related to reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS, RNS), including O3 and NO2. Plant and animal epithelial surfaces and respiratory tract surfaces contain antioxidants that would be expected to provide defense against environmental stress caused by ambient ROS and RNS, thus ameliorating their injurious effects on more delicate underlying cellular constituents. Parallelisms among these surfaces with regard to their antioxidant constituents and environmental oxidants are presented. The reactive substances at these biosurfaces not only represent an important protective system against oxidizing environments, but products of their reactions with ROS/RNS may also serve as biomarkers of environmental oxidative stress. Moreover, the reaction products may also induce injury to underlying cells or cause cell activation, resulting in production of proinflammatory substances including cytokines. In this review we discuss antioxidant defense systems against environmental toxins in plant cell wall/apoplastic fluids, dead keratinized cells/interstitial fluids of stratum corneum (the outermost skin layer), and mucus/respiratory tract lining fluids. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 PMID:9788905

  8. Differential response to bacteria, and TOLLIP expression, in the human respiratory tract

    PubMed Central

    Moncayo-Nieto, Olga Lucia; Wilkinson, Thomas S; Brittan, Mairi; McHugh, Brian J; Jones, Richard O; Conway Morris, Andrew; Walker, William S; Davidson, Donald J; Simpson, A John

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The observation that pathogenic bacteria are commonly tolerated in the human nose, yet drive florid inflammation in the lung, is poorly understood, partly due to limited availability of primary human cells from each location. We compared responses to bacterial virulence factors in primary human nasal and alveolar cells, and characterised the distribution of Toll-interacting protein (TOLLIP; an inhibitor of Toll-like receptor (TLR) signalling) in the human respiratory tract. Methods Primary cells were isolated from nasal brushings and lung tissue taken from patients undergoing pulmonary resection. Cells were exposed to lipopolysaccharide, lipoteichoic acid, peptidoglycan, CpG-C DNA or tumour necrosis factor (TNF). Cytokines were measured in cell supernatants. TOLLIP was characterised using quantitative real-time PCR and immunofluorescence. Results In primary alveolar, but not primary nasal, cells peptidoglycan significantly increased secretion of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10 and TNF. TLR2 expression was significantly higher in alveolar cells and correlated with IL-8 production. TOLLIP expression was significantly greater in nasal cells. Conclusion In conclusion, primary human alveolar epithelial cells are significantly more responsive to peptidoglycan than primary nasal epithelial cells. This may partly be explained by differential TLR2 expression. TOLLIP is expressed widely in the human respiratory tract, and may contribute to the regulation of inflammatory responses. PMID:25478190

  9. Proliferative and nonproliferative lesions of the rat and mouse respiratory tract.

    PubMed

    Renne, Roger; Brix, Amy; Harkema, Jack; Herbert, Ron; Kittel, Birgit; Lewis, David; March, Thomas; Nagano, Kasuke; Pino, Michael; Rittinghausen, Susanne; Rosenbruch, Martin; Tellier, Pierre; Wohrmann, Thomas

    2009-12-01

    The INHAND Project (International Harmonization of Nomenclature and Diagnostic Criteria for Lesions in Rats and Mice) is a joint initiative of the Societies of Toxicologic Pathology from Europe (ESTP), Great Britain (BSTP), Japan (JSTP) and North America (STP) to develop an internationally-accepted nomenclature for proliferative and non-proliferative lesions in laboratory animals. The purpose of this publication is to provide a standardized nomenclature for classifying microscopic lesions observed in the respiratory tract of laboratory rats and mice, with color photomicrographs illustrating examples of some lesions. The standardized nomenclature presented in this document is also available electronically on the internet (http://www.goreni.org/). Sources of material included histopathology databases from government, academia, and industrial laboratories throughout the world. Content includes spontaneous developmental and aging lesions as well as lesions induced by exposure to test materials. A widely accepted and utilized international harmonization of nomenclature for respiratory tract lesions in laboratory animals will decrease confusion among regulatory and scientific research organizations in different countries and provide a common language to increase and enrich international exchanges of information among toxicologists and pathologists.

  10. Pinimenthol ointment in patients suffering from upper respiratory tract infections - a post-marketing observational study.

    PubMed

    Kamin, Wolfgang; Kieser, Meinhard

    2007-12-01

    In order to gain further experience regarding the tolerability of Pinimenthol ointment(1) in adolescents (> or = 12 years) and adults suffering from upper respiratory tract infections, a post-marketing observational study was performed. In this study, data of 3060 patients were collected (64.9% prospectively over an individual observation period of 5-14 days, 35.1% retrospectively). The prospective documentation also comprised data concerning treatment effects. Sample size of the post-marketing observational study was calculated in the way that adverse drug reactions with an event probability of at least 1:1000 would occur within the study at least once with a probability of 95%. Most patients suffered from cold, acute or chronic bronchitis, bronchial catarrh or hoarseness. Pinimenthol ointment was prescribed to inunction (29.6%), inhalation (17.3%) or inunction and inhalation (53.1%), respectively. The mean duration of study participation was 8.0 +/- 3.4 days. The tolerability was rated as excellent or good by 96.7% of physicians and 95.7% of patients. A total of 22 patients (0.7%) reported adverse drug reactions which mostly affected the skin or mucus membrane and therefore correspond to the expected adverse effects profile of Pinimenthol ointment. The treatment effect was mostly judged as excellent or good (physicians: 88.3%; patients: 88.1%). In conclusion, the study confirms Pinimenthol ointment as a well tolerated therapy option for upper respiratory tract infections in both adolescents and adults.

  11. Respiratory virus multiplex RT-PCR assay sensitivities and influence factors in hospitalized children with lower respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed

    Deng, Jikui; Ma, Zhuoya; Huang, Wenbo; Li, Chengrong; Wang, Heping; Zheng, Yuejie; Zhou, Rong; Tang, Yi-Wei

    2013-04-01

    Multiplex RT-PCR assays have been widely used tools for detection and differentiation of a panel of respiratory viral pathogens. In this study, we evaluated the Qiagen ResPlex II V2.0 kit and explored factors influencing its sensitivity. Nasopharyngeal swab (NPS) specimens were prospectively collected from pediatric inpatients with lower respiratory tract infections at the time of admission in the Shenzhen Children's Hospital from May 2009 to April 2010. Total nucleic acids were extracted using the EZ1 system (Qiagen, Germany) and 17 respiratory viruses and genotypes including influenza A virus (FluA), FluB, parainfluenza virus 1 (PIV1), PIV2, PIV3, PIV4, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), human metapneumovirus (hMPV), rhinoviruses (RhV), enteroviruses (EnV), human bocaviruses (hBoV), adenoviruses (AdV), four coronaviruses (229E, OC43, NL63 and HKU1), and FluA 2009 pandemic H1N1(H1N1-p) were detected and identified by the ResPlex II kit. In parallel, 16 real-time TaqMan quantitative RT-PCR assays were used to quantitatively detect each virus except for RhV. Influenza and parainfluenza viral cultures were also performed. Among the total 438 NPS specimens collected during the study period, one or more viral pathogens were detected in 274 (62.6%) and 201(45.9%) specimens by monoplex TaqMan RT-PCR and multiplex ResPlex, respectively. When results from monoplex PCR or cell culture were used as the reference standard, the multiplex PCR possessed specificities of 92.9-100.0%. The sensitivity of multiplex PCR for PIV3, hMPV, PIV1 and BoV were 73.1%, 70%, 66.7% and 55.6%, respectively, while low sensitivities (11.1%-40.0%) were observed for FluA, EnV, OC43, RSV and H1N1. Among the seven viruses/genotypes detected with higher frequencies, multiplex PCR sensitivities were correlated significantly with viral loads determined by the TaqMan RT-PCR in FluA, H1N1-p and RSV (p=0.011-0.000). The Qiagen ResPlex II multiplex RT-PCR kit possesses excellent specificity for simultaneous

  12. Lung Function in Wheezing Infants after Acute Lower Respiratory Tract Infection and Its Association with Respiratory Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Yuan-Yuan; Jiang, Gao-Li; Wang, Li-Bo; Wan, Cheng-Zhou; Zhang, Xiao-Bo; Qian, Li-Ling

    2017-01-01

    Background: Wheezing is common in early childhood and remains an important health concern. The aim of this study was to assess the lung function of wheezing infants and to investigate the relationship between lung function and respiratory outcome. Methods: Infants <2 years of age with acute lower respiratory tract infection (ALRTI) who had undergone lung function tests were included in the study. They were assigned to wheeze or no wheeze group based on physical examination. Infants without any respiratory diseases were enrolled as controls. Lung function was measured during the acute phase and 3 months after ALRTI. One-year follow-up for infants with ALRTI was achieved. Results: A total of 252 infants with ALRTI who had acceptable data regarding tidal breathing were included in the final analysis. Compared with the control and the no wheeze groups, infants in the wheeze group had significantly decreased time to peak tidal expiratory flow as a percentage of total expiratory time (TPTEF/TE) (20.1 ± 6.4% vs. 34.4 ± 6.2% and 26.4 ± 8.3%, respectively, P < 0.0001) and significantly increased peak tidal expiratory flow (PTEF) (90.7 ± 26.3 ml/s vs. 79.3 ± 18.4 ml/s and 86.1 ± 28.0 ml/s, respectively, P < 0.01), sReff and Reff. The infants in the wheeze group still had lower TPTEF/TE and volume to peak tidal expiratory flow as a percentage of total expiratory volume (VPTEF/VE) than the no wheeze infants 3 months after the ALRTI. Moreover, there was a significant inverse relationship between TPTEF/TE, VPTEF/VE, and the recurrence of wheezing and pneumonia. Conclusions: Impaired lung function was present in wheezing infants with ALRTI and the deficits persisted. In addition, the lower level of TPTEF/TE and VPTEF/VE was a risk factor for poor respiratory outcome. PMID:28051016

  13. Bacteraemic urinary tract infections may mimic respiratory infections: a nested case-control study.

    PubMed

    Denis, E; Martis, N; Guillouet-de Salvador, F; Demonchy, E; Degand, N; Carles, K; Roger, P-M

    2016-10-01

    Daily practice suggests that respiratory signs may be observed in bacteraemic urinary infections (BUI). Our objective was to search for an association between the presence of respiratory symptoms and the bacteraemic nature of urinary tract infections (UTI). A nested case-control study was carried out based on our computerised dashboard from January 2011 to June 2015. Cases were defined as patients with a BUI due to Enterobacteriaceae species, identified in blood and urine cultures. Controls had fever and a positive urinary sample but sterile blood cultures (NBUI) and a final diagnosis of urinary infection. Patients from the BUI group were 1:1 matched to the NBUI group according to four parameters: age, gender, cardiovascular and pulmonary comorbid conditions. Subjects with cognitive impairment limiting clinical accuracy and those with healthcare-associated infections were excluded. We compared systematically recorded respiratory and urinary symptoms between groups: signs on auscultation, dyspnoea, chest pain, cough and sputum, dysuria with burning, pollakiuria, flank or costovertebral angle tenderness and ischuria. One hundred BUI were compared to 100 NBUI, both groups exhibiting a similar rate for all considered comorbid conditions. In the BUI group, 58 % showed at least one respiratory sign vs. 20 % in the NBUI group, p < 0.001, while urinary signs were less frequent: 54 % vs. 71 %, p = 0.013. In the multivariate analysis, BUI was associated with the presence of abnormal pulmonary auscultation [adjusted odds ratio (AOR), 5.91; p < 0.001] and a trend towards less urinary symptoms (AOR, 1.58; p = 0.058). Patients with BUI presented with significantly more respiratory signs, which overshadowed urinary symptoms, compared to those with non-bacteraemic UTI. Such observations impact clinical decision-making.

  14. Human Coronavirus in the 2014 Winter Season as a Cause of Lower Respiratory Tract Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyu Yeun; Han, Song Yi; Kim, Ho-Seong; Cheong, Hyang-Min; Kim, Sung Soon

    2017-01-01

    Purpose During the late autumn to winter season (October to December) in the Republic of Korea, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common pathogen causing lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs). Interestingly, in 2014, human coronavirus (HCoV) caused not only upper respiratory infections but also LRTIs more commonly than in other years. Therefore, we sought to determine the epidemiology, clinical characteristics, outcomes, and severity of illnesses associated with HCoV infections at a single center in Korea. Materials and Methods We retrospectively identified patients with positive HCoV respiratory specimens between October 2014 and December 2014 who were admitted to Severance Children’s Hospital at Yonsei University Medical Center for LRTI. Charts of the patients with HCoV infection were reviewed and compared with RSV infection. Results During the study period, HCoV was the third most common respiratory virus and accounted for 13.7% of infections. Coinfection was detected in 43.8% of children with HCoV. Interestingly, one patient had both HCoV-OC43 and HCoV-NL63. Mild pneumonia was most common (60.4%) with HCoV, and when combined with RSV, resulted in bronchiolitis. Two patients required care in the intensive care unit. However, compared with that of RSV infection, the disease course HCoV was short. Conclusion Infections caused by HCoVs are common, and can cause LRTIs. During an epidemic season, clinicians should be given special consideration thereto. When combined with other medical conditions, such as neurologic or cardiologic diseases, intensive care unit (ICU) care may be necessary. PMID:27873511

  15. Viral Co-Infections in Pediatric Patients Hospitalized with Lower Tract Acute Respiratory Infections

    PubMed Central

    Cebey-López, Miriam; Herberg, Jethro; Pardo-Seco, Jacobo; Gómez-Carballa, Alberto; Martinón-Torres, Nazareth; Salas, Antonio; Martinón-Sánchez, José María; Gormley, Stuart; Sumner, Edward; Fink, Colin; Martinón-Torres, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Background Molecular techniques can often reveal a broader range of pathogens in respiratory infections. We aim to investigate the prevalence and age pattern of viral co-infection in children hospitalized with lower tract acute respiratory infection (LT-ARI), using molecular techniques. Methods A nested polymerase chain reaction approach was used to detect Influenza (A, B), metapneumovirus, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), parainfluenza (1–4), rhinovirus, adenovirus (A—F), bocavirus and coronaviruses (NL63, 229E, OC43) in respiratory samples of children with acute respiratory infection prospectively admitted to any of the GENDRES network hospitals between 2011–2013. The results were corroborated in an independent cohort collected in the UK. Results A total of 204 and 97 nasopharyngeal samples were collected in the GENDRES and UK cohorts, respectively. In both cohorts, RSV was the most frequent pathogen (52.9% and 36.1% of the cohorts, respectively). Co-infection with multiple viruses was found in 92 samples (45.1%) and 29 samples (29.9%), respectively; this was most frequent in the 12–24 months age group. The most frequently observed co-infection patterns were RSV—Rhinovirus (23 patients, 11.3%, GENDRES cohort) and RSV—bocavirus / bocavirus—influenza (5 patients, 5.2%, UK cohort). Conclusion The presence of more than one virus in pediatric patients admitted to hospital with LT-ARI is very frequent and seems to peak at 12–24 months of age. The clinical significance of these findings is unclear but should warrant further analysis. PMID:26332375

  16. Candelabra aloe (Aloe arborescens) in the therapy and prophylaxis of upper respiratory tract infections: traditional use and recent research results.

    PubMed

    Bastian, Petra; Fal, Andrzej M; Jambor, Jerzy; Michalak, Anna; Noster, Britta; Sievers, Hartwig; Steuber, Anke; Walas-Marcinek, Natalia

    2013-02-01

    Aloe arborescens (Candelabra Aloe) has been used in the treatment of upper respiratory tract infections in Central and Eastern European countries for many decades. Originally introduced to support the healing and recovery in cornea transplant patients, aqueous A. arborescens extracts soon became popular in the treatment of upper respiratory tract infections with a focus on toddlers and children. Recent preclinical and clinical data show that immunomodulatory, antiinflammatory, and antiviral effects contribute to its therapeutic efficacy. Based on its well documented, longstanding traditional use and its excellent safety and tolerability, A. arborescens may be considered a valuable addition to the spectrum of herbal medicinal products for the treatment and prophylaxis of upper respiratory tract infections, in particular common cold, in adults and children.

  17. Limited Evidence on the Management of Respiratory Tract Infections in Down’s Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Kate; Venekamp, Roderick P.; Hayward, Andrew; Littlejohns, Peter; Schilder, Anne; Lakhanpaul, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Aims: To systematically review the effectiveness of preventative and therapeutic interventions for respiratory tract infections (RTIs) in people with Down’s syndrome. Methods: Databases were searched for any published and ongoing studies of respiratory tract diseases in children and adults with Down’s syndrome. These databases were searched for controlled trials, cohort studies and controlled before–after studies. Trial registries were searched for ongoing studies. Initially, all study types were included to provide a broad overview of the existing evidence base. However, those with a critical risk of bias were excluded using the Cochrane Risk of Bias tool. Results: A total of 13,575 records were identified from which 5 studies fulfilled the eligibility criteria and 3 fulfilled our criteria for data extraction. One randomized controlled trial of moderate risk of bias compared zinc therapy with placebo. Outcome data were only reported for 50 (78%) children who presented with extreme symptoms; no benefit of zinc therapy was found. One non-randomized controlled trial with serious risk of bias included 26 children and compared pidotimod (an immunostimulant) with no treatment; pidotimod was associated with fewer upper RTI recurrences compared with no treatment (1.43 vs. 3.82). A prospective cohort study with moderate risk of bias compared 532 palivizumab treated children with 233 untreated children and found that children treated with palivizumab had fewer respiratory syncytial virus-related hospitalization (23 untreated and 8 treated), but the same number of overall RTI-related hospitalizations (73 untreated and 74 treated) in the first 2 years of life. Conclusions: The evidence base for the management of RTIs in people with Down’s syndrome is incomplete; current studies included children only and carry a moderate to serious risk of bias. Methodologic rigorous studies are warranted to guide clinicians in how best to prevent and treat RTIs in children with Down

  18. Systematic Review of Factors Associated with Antibiotic Prescribing for Respiratory Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    Mah, Allison; McGrail, Kimberlyn; Patrick, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic use is a modifiable driver of antibiotic resistance. In many circumstances, antibiotic use is overly broad or unnecessary. We systematically assessed factors associated with antibiotic prescribing for respiratory tract infections (RTI). Studies were included if they used actual (not self-reported or intended) prescribing data, assessed factors associated with antibiotic prescribing for RTIs, and performed multivariable analysis of associations. We searched Medline, Embase, and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts using keyword and MeSH (medical subject headings) search terms. Two authors reviewed each abstract and independently appraised all included texts. Data on factors affecting antibiotic prescribing were extracted. Our searches retrieved a total of 2,848 abstracts, with 97 included in full-text review and 28 meeting full inclusion criteria. Compared to other factors, diagnosis of acute bronchitis was associated with increased antibiotic prescribing (range of adjusted odds ratios [aOR], 1.56 to 15.9). Features on physical exam, such as fever, purulent sputum, abnormal respiratory exam, and tonsillar exudate, were also associated with higher odds of antibiotic prescribing. Patient desire for an antibiotic was not associated or was modestly associated with prescription (range of aORs, 0.61 to 9.87), in contrast to physician perception of patient desire for antibiotics, which showed a stronger association (range of aORs, 2.11 to 23.3). Physician's perception of patient desire for antibiotics was strongly associated with antibiotic prescribing. Antimicrobial stewardship programs should continue to expand in the outpatient setting and should emphasize clear and direct communication between patients and physicians, as well as signs and symptoms that do and do not predict bacterial etiology of upper respiratory tract infections. PMID:27139474

  19. Glass fibers and vapor phase components of cigarette smoke as cofactors in experimental respiratory tract carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Feron, V.J.; Kuper, C.F.; Spit, B.J.; Reuzel, P.G.; Woutersen, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    Syrian golden hamsters were given intratracheal instillations of glass fibers with or without BP suspended in saline, once a fortnight for 52 weeks; the experiment was terminated at week 85. No tumors of the respiratory tract were observed in hamsters treated with glass fibers alone. There was no indication that glass fibers enhanced the development of respiratory tract tumors induced by BP. In another study Syrian golden hamsters were exposed to fresh air or to a mixture of 4 major vapor phase components of cigarette smoke, viz. isoprene (800----700 ppm), methyl chloride (1000----900 ppm), methyl nitrite (200----190 ppm) and acetaldehyde (1400----1200 ppm) for a period of at most 23 months. Some of the animals were also given repeated intratracheal instillations of BP or norharman in saline. Laryngeal tumors were found in 7/31 male and 6/32 female hamsters exposed only to the vapor mixture, whereas no laryngeal tumors occurred in controls. The tumor response of the larynx most probably has to be ascribed entirely to the action of acetaldehyde. Simultaneous treatment with norharman or BP did not affect the tumor response of the larynx. Acetaldehyde may occur in the vapor phase of cigarette smoke at levels up to 2000 ppm. Chronic inhalation exposure of rats to acetaldehyde at levels of 0 (controls), 750, 1500 or 3000----1000 ppm resulted in a high incidence of nasal carcinomas, both squamous cell carcinomas of the respiratory epithelium and adenocarcinomas of the olfactory epithelium. It was discussed that acetaldehyde may significantly contribute to the induction of bronchogenic cancer by cigarette smoke in man.

  20. Aerosol deposition along the respiratory tract at zero gravity: a theoretical study

    SciTech Connect

    Lehnert, B.E.; Smith, D.M.; Holland, L.M.; Tillery, M.I.; Thomas, R.G.

    1984-01-01

    Significant fractions of airborne particles composing inhaled aerosols can deposit along the respiratory tract during breathing. Depending on the environmental condition, some particles that enter the body via the respiratory route can pose health hazards. On earth, three general rate mechanisms are active in this deposition process: (1) inertial impaction; (2) diffusion; and (3) gravity-dependent sedimentation. Space craft, stations, and bases represent unique settings where potentially pathogenic aerosols may be encountered under the unique condition of zero or reduced gravity. The present study was undertaken in order to predict how particle deposition in the human respiratory tract at zero gravity may differ from that on earth. We employed the aerosol deposition model of the Task Group on Lung Dynamics to assess the regional deposition of particles ranging from 0.01 to 10 ..mu..m diameter at two particulate densities, 1 and 4, during simulated tidal breathing and breathing during moderate - heavy exercise. Our results suggest the gas exchange regions of the lungs of space travelers and residents are afforded some protection, relative to their earth-bound counterparts, against the deposition of particles due to the absence of gravity; and approximately 2 to 10 fold reduction in the efficiency of collection of particles > 0.5 ..mu..m in diameter occurred in the pulmonary region during resting conditions and exercise. Deposition along the tracheobronchial tree, however, is not markedly altered in the absence of gravity, indicating airway sites contributing to this structure remain susceptible to insults by inhaled aerosols. 18 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  1. How French general practitioners manage and prevent recurrent respiratory tract infections in children: the SOURIRRE survey

    PubMed Central

    Chicoulaa, Bruno; Haas, Hervé; Viala, Jérôme; Salvetat, Maryline; Olives, Jean-Pierre

    2017-01-01

    Background Recurrent respiratory tract infections (RRTIs) are the most common reason for children’s visits to primary care physicians in France; however, little is known about general practitioners’ (GPs) opinions and expectations concerning the management and prevention of these common and recurrent pathologies. Purpose To describe French GPs’ daily practice in the management of respiratory infections and the prevention of their recurrence in children. Methods A sample group of French GPs answered a structured questionnaire on risk factors, RRTI management, antibiotic use and prevention measures. Results A total of 358 GPs participated in the survey. Rhinopharyngitis, the most frequent respiratory infection, was considered to be recurrent if six or more episodes occurred in a year. Four risk factors were acknowledged as substantial: living in communities, passive smoking, pollution and allergies. Around 63% of GPs said that RRTIs are too often treated with antibiotics. More than 85% thought that prevention of RRTIs is possible. Smoking cessation, vaccination, allergen avoidance and hygiene were identified as the main preventive measures. A large majority of GPs (84%) prescribed products for prevention and ~90% would prescribe a product stimulating immunity if the efficacy and tolerability of these agents was proven and confirmed in their daily practice. Conclusions French GPs are well aware of the health and socioeconomic burdens resulting from RRTIs, as well as the risk of antibiotic overuse. They have a prevention-oriented approach, implement preventive measures when possible and prescribe products for prevention. PMID:28293116

  2. RESPIRATORY RESPONSE AND INTERNAL TISSUE DOSE OF INHALED CHLORINE IN THE RESPIRATORY TRACT OF F344 RATS: SEX AND SPECIES COMPARISONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Inhaled Cl2 causes irritant effects in the respiratory tract. Females of various toxicological studies show more severe effects than males, notably a decrease in survivability observed in rats of a 2-year bioassay (CIIT, 1993; Wolf et al., 1995, Fundam. Appl. Toxic...

  3. Bacterial Metabolism in the Host Environment: Pathogen Growth and Nutrient Assimilation in the Mammalian Upper Respiratory Tract.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Sandra K

    2015-06-01

    Pathogens evolve in specific host niches and microenvironments that provide the physical and nutritional requirements conducive to their growth. In addition to using the host as a source of food, bacterial pathogens must avoid the immune response to their presence. The mammalian upper respiratory tract is a site that is exposed to the external environment, and is readily colonized by bacteria that live as resident flora or as pathogens. These bacteria can remain localized, descend to the lower respiratory tract, or traverse the epithelium to disseminate throughout the body. By virtue of their successful colonization of the respiratory epithelium, these bacteria obtain the nutrients needed for growth, either directly from host resources or from other microbes. This chapter describes the upper respiratory tract environment, including its tissue and mucosal structure, prokaryotic biota, and biochemical composition that would support microbial life. Neisseria meningitidis and the Bordetella species are discussed as examples of bacteria that have no known external reservoirs but have evolved to obligately colonize the mammalian upper respiratory tract.

  4. A probabilistic respiratory tract dosimetry model with application to beta-particle and photon emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farfan, Eduardo Balderrama

    2002-01-01

    Predicting equivalent dose in the human respiratory tract is significant in the assessment of health risks associated with the inhalation of radioactive aerosols. A complete respiratory tract methodology based on the International Commission on Radiological Protection Publication 66 model was used in this research project for beta-particle and photon emitters. The conventional methodology has been to use standard values (from Reference Man) for parameters to obtain a single dose value. However, the methods used in the current study allow lung dose values to be determined as probability distributions to reflect the spread or variability in doses. To implement the methodology, a computer code, LUDUC, has been modified to include inhalation scenarios of beta-particle and photon emitters. For beta particles, a new methodology was implemented into Monte Carlo simulations to determine absorbed fractions in target tissues within the thoracic region of the respiratory tract. For photons, a new mathematical phantom of extrathoracic and thoracic regions was created based on previous studies to determine specific absorbed fractions in several tissues and organs of the human body due to inhalation of radioactive materials. The application of the methodology and developed data will be helpful in dose reconstruction and prediction efforts concerning the inhalation of short-lived radionuclides or radionuclides of Inhalation Class S. The resulting dose distributions follow a lognormal distribution shape for all scenarios examined. Applying the probabilistic computer code LUDUC to inhalation of strontium and yttrium aerosols has shown several trends, which could also be valid for many S radionuclide compounds that are beta-particle emitters. The equivalent doses are, in general, found to follow lognormal distributions. Therefore, these distributions can be described by geometric means and geometric standard deviations. Furthermore, a mathematical phantom of the extrathoracic and

  5. Diagnostic Value of Nasopharyngeal Aspirates in Children with Lower Respiratory Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ai-Zhen; Shi, Peng; Wang, Li-Bo; Qian, Li-Ling; Zhang, Xiao-Bo

    2017-01-01

    Background: The accuracy of nasopharyngeal aspirate (NPA) specimens in detecting lower respiratory pathogens remains controversial. The objective of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of aspirates (NPAs) specimen in lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) in children. Methods: The prospective study was designed to collect the data of paired NPAs and bronchoalveolar lavage fluids from children with acute LRTIs from January 2013 to December 2015. All specimens were subjected to pathogen detection: bacterial detection by culture, Mycoplasma pneumoniae (Mp) detection by polymerase chain reaction assay and virus (influenza A and B viruses, parainfluenza virus [PIV] Types 1 and 3, respiratory syncytial virus, and adenovirus) detection by immunofluorescence assay. The diagnostic accuracy analysis of NPAs was stratified by age ≤3 years (n = 194) and >3 years (n = 294). Results: We collected paired specimens from 488 children. The positive rate of pathogen was 61.6%. For Streptococcus pneumoniae, NPA culture had the specificity of 89.9% and negative predictive value of 100% in age ≤3 years, the specificity of 97.2% and negative predictive value of 98.9% in age >3 years. For Mp, the positive predictive values of NPA was 77.4% in children ≤3 years, and 89.1% in children >3 years. For PIV III, NPA specimen had the specificity of 99.8% and negative predictive value of 96.5% in children ≤3 years. For adenovirus, NPA had the specificity of 97.8% and negative predictive value of 98.4% in age ≤3 years, the specificity of 98.9% and negative predictive value of 99.3% in age >3 years. Conclusions: NPAs are less invasive diagnostic respiratory specimens, a negative NPA result is helpful in “rule out” lower airway infection; however, a positive result does not reliably “rule in” the presence of pathogens. PMID:28303845

  6. The Relationship Between In-Home Water Service and the Risk of Respiratory Tract, Skin, and Gastrointestinal Tract Infections Among Rural Alaska Natives

    PubMed Central

    Ritter, Troy; Holman, Robert C.; Bruden, Dana L.; Yorita, Krista L.; Bulkow, Lisa; Cheek, James E.; Singleton, Rosalyn J.; Smith, Jeff

    2008-01-01

    Objectives. We investigated the relationship between the presence of in-home piped water and wastewater services and hospitalization rates for respiratory tract, skin, and gastrointestinal tract infections in rural Alaska. Methods. We determined in-home water service and hospitalizations for selected infectious diseases among Alaska Natives by region during 2000 to 2004. Within 1 region, infant respiratory hospitalizations and skin infections for all ages were compared by village-level water services. Results. Regions with a lower proportion of home water service had significantly higher hospitalization rates for pneumonia and influenza (rate ratio [RR] = 2.5), skin or soft tissue infection (RR = 1.9), and respiratory syncytial virus (RR = 3.4 among those younger than 5 years) than did higher-service regions. Within 1 region, infants from villages with less than 10% of homes served had higher hospitalization rates for pneumonia (RR = 1.3) and respiratory syncytial virus (RR = 1.2) than did infants from villages with more than 80% served. Outpatient Staphylococcus aureus infections (RR = 5.1, all ages) and skin infection hospitalizations (RR = 2.7, all ages) were higher in low-service than in high-service villages. Conclusions. Higher respiratory and skin infection rates were associated with a lack of in-home water service. This disparity should be addressed through sanitation infrastructure improvements. PMID:18382002

  7. ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) Transporters of the Human Respiratory Tract Pathogen, Moraxella catarrhalis: Role in Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Timothy F; Brauer, Aimee L.; Johnson, Antoinette; Kirkham, Charmaine

    2016-01-01

    Moraxella catarrhalis is a human respiratory tract pathogen that causes otitis media (middle ear infections) in children and respiratory tract infections in adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In view of the huge global burden of disease caused by M. catarrhalis, the development of vaccines to prevent these infections and better approaches to treatment have become priorities. In previous work, we used a genome mining approach that identified three substrate binding proteins (SBPs) of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters as promising candidate vaccine antigens. In the present study, we performed a comprehensive assessment of 19 SBPs of 15 ABC transporter systems in the M. catarrhalis genome by engineering knockout mutants and studying their role in assays that assess mechanisms of infection. The capacity of M. catarrhalis to survive and grow in the nutrient-limited and hostile environment of the human respiratory tract, including intracellular growth, account in part for its virulence. The results show that ABC transporters that mediate uptake of peptides, amino acids, cations and anions play important roles in pathogenesis by enabling M. catarrhalis to 1) grow in nutrient-limited conditions, 2) invade and survive in human respiratory epithelial cells and 3) persist in the lungs in a murine pulmonary clearance model. The knockout mutants of SBPs and ABC transporters showed different patterns of activity in the assay systems, supporting the conclusion that different SBPs and ABC transporters function at different stages in the pathogenesis of infection. These results indicate that ABC transporters are nutritional virulence factors, functioning to enable the survival of M catarrhalis in the diverse microenvironments of the respiratory tract. Based on the role of ABC transporters as virulence factors of M. catarrhalis, these molecules represent potential drug targets to eradicate the organism from the human respiratory tract. PMID:27391026

  8. A HYBRID CFD-PBPK MODEL OF INHALED CHLORINE GAS UPTAKE AND TISSUE DOSIMETRY IN THE ISOLATED UPPER RESPIRATORY TRACT (URT) OF F344 RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chlorine (Cl2), an important commercial gas, is highly reactive in water, causing irritant effects in the respiratory tract on inhalation. Nasal extraction of Cl2 is high and resultant lesions in the respiratory tract show a proximal to distal distribution ...

  9. Regulation of immunologic homeostasis in peripheral tissues by dendritic cells: the respiratory tract as a paradigm.

    PubMed

    Holt, P G; Stumbles, P A

    2000-03-01

    Dendritic cells are now recognized as the gatekeepers of the immune response, possessing a unique potential for acquisition of antigens at extremely low exposure levels and for efficient presentation of these in an immunogenic form to the naive T-cell system. Dendritic cell populations throughout the body exhibit a wide range of features in common that are associated with their primary functions, and these are considered in the initial section of this review. In addition, it is becoming evident that the properties and functions of these cells are refined by microenvironmental factors unique to their tissues of residence, a prime example being mucosal microenvironments such as those in respiratory tract tissues, and the latter represents the focus of the second section of this review.

  10. [The possibility of an etiopathogenetic role of the fungi isolated from the respiratory tract (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Gargani, G

    1976-01-01

    The large number of fungous strains isolated from specimens coming from the respiratory tract is a possible source of diagnostic failures. For an accurate diagnosis it is necessary to screen between fungi in a saprophitic and in a parasitic position. This is very difficult both for fungi, which are largely spread in the environment, like Aspergillus sp., and for fungi, which are commonly found on the mucous membranes, like Candida or Torulopsis sp. The actual pathogenetic activity of a fungous strain may be established on a mycological approach by means of an accurate taxonomic definition: only few species have pathogenetic possibilities: f.i. A. fumigatus, C. albicans. For a clinical-immunological approach are very useful the presence of debilitating diseases and the defectiveness of immunological tests, especially those of delayed hypersentivitity.

  11. Macroscopic Anatomy of the Saimaa Ringed Seal (Phoca hispida saimensis) Lower Respiratory Tract.

    PubMed

    Laakkonen, Juha; Jernvall, Jukka

    2016-04-01

    We studied the macroscopic anatomy of the lower respiratory tract of the endangered Saimaa ringed seal (Phoca hispida saimensis). Examination of one adult and one young individual found dead showed that trachea had 85 and 86 complete cartilage rings. The adjacent cartilages exhibited very few random anastomoses. There was variation in the confirmation of the trachea between the cranial and caudal part of the trachea. The right lung was divided by partly incomplete inter-lobar fissures into cranial, middle, caudal, and accessory lobes. The left lung consisted of cranial, middle, and caudal lobes. The lungs were characterized by a high amount of interlobular connective tissue. Silicone casts were prepared of the two specimens to visualize the tracheobronchial branching which was similar to that of marine ringed seals but in the Saimaa ringed seal the right middle lobar bronchus originated at the same level as the accessory lobar bronchus.

  12. The safety of azithromycin in the treatment of adults with community-acquired respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed

    Treadway, Glenda; Pontani, Dennis; Reisman, Arlene

    2002-03-01

    The comparative safety of azithromycin was assessed in adult patients (> or =12 years) with community-acquired respiratory tract infections. Of 3229 patients evaluated, 1616 received azithromycin 500 mg once daily for 3 days and 1613 received standard regimens of amoxycillin, amoxycillin/clavulanic acid, cefaclor, clarithromycin, or roxithromycin. A similar incidence of treatment-related adverse events occurred with azithromycin (10.3%) and comparators (11.5%). Significantly fewer patients were withdrawn from azithromycin than comparator treatment (0.4 versus 2.1%; P=0.0001). Most adverse events were mild/moderate in intensity and affected the gastrointestinal system. Azithromycin was as well tolerated as other antibiotics commonly used for bacterial infections in adults.

  13. Pteropine orthoreovirus infection among out-patients with acute upper respiratory tract infection in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Voon, Kenny; Tan, Yeh Fong; Leong, Pooi Pooi; Teng, Cheong Lieng; Gunnasekaran, Rajasekaran; Ujang, Kamsiah; Chua, Kaw Bing; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2015-12-01

    This study aims to assess the incidence rate of Pteropine orthreovirus (PRV) infection in patients with acute upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) in a suburban setting in Malaysia, where bats are known to be present in the neighborhood. Using molecular detection of PRVs directly from oropharyngeal swabs, our study demonstrates that PRV is among one of the common causative agents of acute URTI with cough and sore throat as the commonest presenting clinical features. Phylogenetic analysis on partial major outer and inner capsid proteins shows that these PRV strains are closely related to Melaka and Kampar viruses previously isolated in Malaysia. Further study is required to determine the public health significance of PRV infection in Southeast Asia, especially in cases where co-infection with other pathogens may potentially lead to different clinical outcomes.

  14. Food allergy is associated with recurrent respiratory tract infections during childhood

    PubMed Central

    Woicka-Kolejwa, Katarzyna; Zaczeniuk, Magdalena; Majak, Paweł; Pawłowska-Iwanicka, Kamila; Kopka, Monika; Stelmach, Wlodzimierz; Jerzyńska, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Introduction To find out whether children with food allergy have an increased risk of recurrent upper and lower respiratory tract infections and of asthma. Aim To describe the clinical profile of children diagnosed with food allergy referred to the Allergy Clinic. Material and methods We conducted a retrospective study to assess the patients’ demographic, anthropometric and clinical data. The analysis included data of all children by the age of 10 years (registered with the Allergy Clinic between 2012 and 2013) in whom IgE mediated food allergy had been diagnosed during 18 months of observation. Results We included 280 children into the analysis. Recurrent respiratory tract infections (rRTI), asthma and gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms were observed in 153 (54.6%), 96 (34.3%), 39 (13.9%), respectively, with a significant increasing trend across age-subgroups. In children from 1 to 2 years old, sensitization to β-lactoglobulin increased the risk of rRTI (OR = 3.91; 95% CI: 1.03–14.87). In older children sensitization to allergens other than milk or egg decreases the risk of rRTI (OR = 0.25; 95% CI: 0.10–0.62); sensitization to egg decreased the risk of asthma diagnosis (OR = 0.09; 95% CI: 0.01–0.75). We did not identify food allergens which change the risk of GI symptoms in children. This finding was consistent throughout all age-subgroups. Conclusions Sensitization to β-lactoglobulin increased the risk of rRTI in children under 2 years of age nearly four times. The presence of sensitization to food allergens above 3 years of age did not increase the risk of developing clinical presentation of food allergy other than atopic dermatitis. PMID:27279819

  15. Aminomethyl Spectinomycins as Novel Therapeutics for Drug Resistant Respiratory Tract and Sexually Transmitted Bacterial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Madhura, Dora B.; Shcherbakov, Dimitri; Zheng, Zhong; Liu, Jiuyu; Abdelrahman, Yasser M.; Singh, Aman P.; Duscha, Stefan; Rathi, Chetan; Lee, Robin B.; Belland, Robert J.; Meibohm, Bernd; Rosch, Jason W.; Böttger, Erik C.; Lee, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    The antibiotic spectinomycin is a potent inhibitor of bacterial protein synthesis with a unique mechanism of action and an excellent safety index, but it lacks antibacterial activity against most clinically important pathogens. A novel series of N-benzyl substituted 3'-(R)- 3'-aminomethyl-3'-hydroxy spectinomycins was developed based on a computational analysis of the aminomethyl spectinomycin binding site and structure guided synthesis. These compounds had ribosomal inhibition values comparable to spectinomycin but showed increased potency against common respiratory tract pathogens Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Legionella pneumophila, and Moraxella catarrhalis as well as the sexually transmitted bacteria Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Chlamydia trachomatis. Non-ribosome binding 3'-(S) isomers of the leads demonstrated weak inhibitory activity in in vitro protein translation assays and poor antibacterial activity, indicating that the antibacterial activity of the series remains on target. In addition to improved antibacterial potency, compounds also demonstrated no mammalian cytotoxicity, improved microsomal stability, and favorable pharmacokinetic properties in rats. The lead compound from the series, compound 1, exhibited excellent chemical stability, which was superior to spectinomycin and had no significant interaction with a panel of human receptors and drug metabolism enzymes suggesting low potential for adverse reactions or drug-drug interactions in vivo. Compound 1 was active in vitro against a panel of penicillin, macrolide, and cephalosporin resistant S. pneumoniae clinical isolates and cured mice of fatal pneumococcal pneumonia and sepsis at a dose of 5 mg/kg. Together, these studies indicate N-benzyl aminomethyl spectinomycins possess suitable properties for further development as novel antibacterial agents to treat drug resistant respiratory tract and sexually transmitted bacterial infections. PMID:25995221

  16. Respiratory Tract Lung Geometry and Dosimetry Model for Male Sprague-Dawley Rats

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Frederick J.; Asgharian, Bahman; Schroeter, Jeffry D.; Price, Owen; Corley, Richard A.; Einstein, Daniel R.; Jacob, Rick E.; Cox, Timothy C.; Kabilan, Senthil; Bentley, Timothy

    2015-07-24

    While inhalation toxicological studies of various compounds have been conducted using a number of different strains of rats, mechanistic dosimetry models have only had tracheobronchial (TB) structural data for Long-Evans rats, detailed morphometric data on the alveolar region of Sprague-Dawley rats and limited alveolar data on other strains. Based upon CT imaging data for two male Sprague-Dawley rats, a 15-generation, symmetric typical path model was developed for the TB region. Literature data for the alveolar region of Sprague-Dawley rats were analyzed to develop an eight-generation model, and the two regions were joined to provide a complete lower respiratory tract model for Sprague-Dawley rats. The resulting lung model was used to examine particle deposition in Sprague-Dawley rats and to compare these results with predicted deposition in Long-Evans rats. Relationships of various physiologic variables and lung volumes were either developed in this study or extracted from the literature to provide the necessary input data for examining particle deposition. While the lengths, diameters and branching angles of the TB airways differed between the two Sprague-Dawley rats, the predicted deposition patterns in the three major respiratory tract regions were very similar. Between Sprague-Dawley and Long-Evans rats, significant differences in TB and alveolar predicted deposition fractions were observed over a wide range of particle sizes, with TB deposition fractions being up to 3- to 4-fold greater in Sprague-Dawley rats and alveolar deposition being significantly greater in Long-Evans rats. Thus, strain-specific lung geometry models should be used for particle deposition calculations and interspecies dose comparisons.

  17. Respiratory tract lung geometry and dosimetry model for male Sprague-Dawley rats.

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Frederick J.; Asgharian, Bahman; Schroeter, Jeffry D.; Price, Owen; Corley, Richard A.; Einstein, Daniel R.; Jacob, Rick E.; Cox, Timothy C.; Kabilan, Senthil; Bentley, Timothy

    2014-08-26

    While inhalation toxicological studies of various compounds have been conducted using a number of different strains of rats, mechanistic dosimetry models have only had tracheobronchial (TB) structural data for Long-Evans rats, detailed morphometric data on the alveolar region of Sprague-Dawley rats and limited alveolar data on other strains. Based upon CT imaging data for two male Sprague-Dawley rats, a 15-generation, symmetric typical path model was developed for the TB region. Literature data for the alveolar region of Sprague-Dawley rats were analyzed to develop an eight-generation model, and the two regions were joined to provide a complete lower respiratory tract model for Sprague-Dawley rats. The resulting lung model was used to examine particle deposition in Sprague-Dawley rats and to compare these results with predicted deposition in Long-Evans rats. Relationships of various physiologic variables and lung volumes were either developed in this study or extracted from the literature to provide the necessary input data for examining particle deposition. While the lengths, diameters and branching angles of the TB airways differed between the two Sprague- Dawley rats, the predicted deposition patterns in the three major respiratory tract regions were very similar. Between Sprague-Dawley and Long-Evans rats, significant differences in TB and alveolar predicted deposition fractions were observed over a wide range of particle sizes, with TB deposition fractions being up to 3- to 4-fold greater in Sprague-Dawley rats and alveolar deposition being significantly greater in Long-Evans rats. Thus, strain-specific lung geometry models should be used for particle deposition calculations and interspecies dose comparisons.

  18. Prevalence and susceptibility patterns of bacteria causing respiratory tract infections in North Waziristan, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Shah, Said Nasir; Ullah, Bait; Basit, Abdul; Begum, Asia; Tabassum, Anum; Zafar, Shaista; Saleha, Shamim

    2016-03-01

    Respiratory tract infections (RTIs) are the most common infectious diseases in humans and are the major cause of mortality and morbidity in Pakistan. These infections are the leading causes of consultations in primary care in Pakistan. Therefore, this study was aimed at determining bacterial pathogens of respiratory tract infections and the susceptibility patterns of bacterial isolates to antibiotics. The study was conducted between February, 2013 and March, 2014 in North Waziristan region of Pakistan. Sputum specimens were collected aseptically from 227 patients and cultured on the appropriate bacteriological media. Bacterial isolates were identified by biochemical tests and their antibiotics susceptibility patterns were determined by standard methods. Out of 227, various species of bacteria were isolated from 152 (75%) specimens. The prevalence of bacteria species isolated were as follows Pseudomonas aeruginosa (42.8%), Streptococcus pneumoniae (26.7%), Corynebacterium diphtheria (10.6%), Staphylococcus aureus (5.9%), Proteus vulgaris (4.6%), Micrococcus species (3.3%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (2.6%) and Bacillus species (2.6%). The susceptibility patterns varied among bacterial species depending on the antibiotics. For the susceptibility test 11 commercially available antibiotics against bacterial isolates were used. The results revealed that generally the bacterial isolates were susceptible to gentamicin (80.9%), meropenem (75 %), ceftazidime (62.5%), cefotaxime (57.9%) and ceftriazone (57.9%) and resistant to penicillin (84.9%) and doxycycline (78.9%). The antibiotics gentamicin (100%) meropenem (100%), ceftriaxone (58.5%), ciprofloxacin (60%) trimethoprim (60%), ceftazidime (66.2%) and cefotaxime (64.6%) were observed effective against the P. aeruginosa isolates. The findings of our study provide significant information for empiric therapy of patients with RTIs in North Waziristan region of Pakistan.

  19. The Use of Guidelines for Lower Respiratory Tract Infections in Tanzania: A Lesson from Kilimanjaro Clinicians

    PubMed Central

    Mbwele, B; Slot, A; De Mast, Q; Kweka, P; Msuya, M; Hulscher, M

    2016-01-01

    Background: Evaluations of the guidelines for the management of Lower Respiratory Tract Infections (LRTI) Sub-Saharan Africa, particularly in Tanzania is scant. Aim: The aim of the study was to assess the usefulness of the current Tanzanian treatment guideline for the management lower respiratory tract infection. Subjects and Methods: A descriptive cross sectional study in 11 hospitals of different levels in the Kilimanjaro region Data were collected from May 2012 to July 2012 by semi-structured interview for clinicians using 2 dummy cases for practical assessment. Data were analyzed by STATA v11 (StataCorp, TX, USA). Qualitative narratives from the interviews were translated, transcribed then coded by colors into meaningful themes. Results: A variety of principles for diagnosing and managing LRTI were demonstrated by 53 clinicians of Kilimanjaro. For the awareness, 67.9% (36/53) clinicians knew their responsibility to use Standard Treatment Guideline for managing LRTI. The content derived from Standard Treatment Guideline could be cited by 11.3% of clinicians (6/53) however they all showed concern of gaps in the guideline. Previous training in the management of patients with LRTI was reported by 25.9% (14/53), majority were pulmonary TB related. Correct microorganisms causing different forms of LRTI were mentioned by 11.3% (6/53). Exact cause of Atypical pneumonia and Q fever as an example was stated by 13.0% (7/53) from whom the need of developing the guideline for LRTI was explicitly elaborated. Conclusion: The current guidelines have not been used effectively for the management of LRTI in Tanzania. There is a need to review its content for the current practical use. PMID:27213093

  20. College Students, Shared Decision Making, and the Appropriate Use of Antibiotics for Respiratory Tract Infections: A Systematic Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blyer, Kristina; Hulton, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This systematic review examines shared decision making to promote the appropriate use of antibiotics for college students with respiratory tract infections. Participants/Methods: CINAL, Cochrane, PubMed, EBSCO, and PsycNET were searched in October 2014 using the following criteria: English language, human subjects, peer-reviewed, shared…

  1. Patterns of antimicrobial use for respiratory tract infections in older residents of long-term care facilities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    OBJECTIVE: To describe patterns of antimicrobial use for respiratory tract infections (RTIs) among elderly residents of long-term care facilities (LTCFs). DESIGN: Data from a prospective, randomized, controlled study conducted from April 1998 through August 2001 to investigate the effect of vitamin ...

  2. Human and Avian Influenza Viruses Target Different Cells in the Lower Respiratory Tract of Humans and Other Mammals

    PubMed Central

    van Riel, Debby; Munster, Vincent J.; de Wit, Emmie; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F.; Fouchier, Ron A.M.; Osterhaus, Albert D.M.E.; Kuiken, Thijs

    2007-01-01

    Viral attachment to the host cell is critical for tissue and species specificity of virus infections. Recently, pattern of viral attachment (PVA) in human respiratory tract was determined for highly pathogenic avian influenza virus of subtype H5N1. However, PVA of human influenza viruses and other avian influenza viruses in either humans or experimental animals is unknown. Therefore, we compared PVA of two human influenza viruses (H1N1 and H3N2) and two low pathogenic avian influenza viruses (H5N9 and H6N1) with that of H5N1 virus in respiratory tract tissues of humans, mice, ferrets, cynomolgus macaques, cats, and pigs by virus histochemistry. We found that human influenza viruses attached more strongly to human trachea and bronchi than H5N1 virus and attached to different cell types than H5N1 virus. These differences correspond to primary diagnoses of tracheobronchitis for human influenza viruses and diffuse alveolar damage for H5N1 virus. The PVA of low pathogenic avian influenza viruses in human respiratory tract resembled that of H5N1 virus, demonstrating that other properties determine its pathogenicity for humans. The PVA in human respiratory tract most closely mirrored that in ferrets and pigs for human influenza viruses and that in ferrets, pigs, and cats for avian influenza viruses. PMID:17717141

  3. UPTAKE AND INTERNAL DOSIMETRY OF INHALED CHLORINE IN THE ISOLATED UPPER RESPIRATORY TRACT (URT) OF F344 RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to large-volume commercial uses as an intermediate and for water disinfection, chlorine (Cl2) is an important hazardous air pollutant (HAP). Inhaled Cl2 causes irritant effects in the respiratory tract. We conducted studies to characterize determinants...

  4. Impacts of upper respiratory tract disease on olfactory behavior of the Mojave desert tortoise.

    PubMed

    Germano, Jennifer; Van Zerr, Vanessa E; Esque, Todd C; Nussear, Ken E; Lamberski, Nadine

    2014-04-01

    Upper respiratory tract disease (URTD) caused by Mycoplasma agassizii is considered a threat to desert tortoise populations that should be addressed as part of the recovery of the species. Clinical signs can be intermittent and include serous or mucoid nasal discharge and respiratory difficulty when nares are occluded. This nasal congestion may result in a loss of the olfactory sense. Turtles are known to use olfaction to identify food items, predators, and conspecifics; therefore, it is likely that URTD affects not only their physical well-being but also their behavior and ability to perform necessary functions in the wild. To determine more specifically the impact nasal discharge might have on free-ranging tortoises (Gopherus agassizii), we compared the responses of tortoises with and without nasal discharge and both positive and negative for M. agassizii antibodies to a visually hidden olfactory food stimulus and an empty control. We found that nasal discharge did reduce sense of smell and hence the ability to locate food. Our study also showed that moderate chronic nasal discharge in the absence of other clinical signs did not affect appetite in desert tortoises.

  5. Novel diversity of bacterial communities associated with bottlenose dolphin upper respiratory tracts.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Wesley R; Torralba, Manolito; Fair, Patricia A; Bossart, Gregory D; Nelson, Karen E; Morris, Pamela J

    2009-12-01

    Respiratory illness is thought to be most the common cause of death in both wild and captive populations of bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus). The suspected pathogens that have been isolated from diseased animals have also been isolated from healthy individuals, suggesting they may be part of the normal flora. Our current understanding of the bacteria associated with the upper respiratory tract (URT) of bottlenose dolphins is based exclusively upon culture-based isolation and identification. Because < 1% of naturally occurring bacteria are culturable, a substantial fraction of the bacterial community associated with the dolphin URT remains to be described. The dolphin URT microbiota revealed by sequencing of bacterial 16S rDNA exhibits almost no overlap with the taxa indicated in culture-based studies. The most abundant sequences in our libraries were similar among all of our study animals and shared the greatest homology to sequences of bacteria belonging to the genera Cardiobacterium, Suttonella, Psychrobacter, Tenacibaculum, Fluviicola and Flavobacterium; however, they were sufficiently different from database sequences from both cultured and uncultured organisms to suggest they represent novel genera and species. Our findings also demonstrate the dominance of three of the four bacterial phyla that dominate other mammalian microbiomes, including those of humans, and show tremendous diversity at the species/strain level, suggesting tight coevolution of the dolphin host and its URT bacterial community.

  6. Impacts of upper respiratory tract disease on olfactory behavior of the Mojave desert tortoise

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Germano, Jennifer; Van Zerr, Vanessa E.; Esque, Todd C.; Nussear, Ken E.; Lamberski, Nadine

    2014-01-01

    Upper respiratory tract disease (URTD) caused by Mycoplasma agassizii is considered a threat to desert tortoise populations that should be addressed as part of the recovery of the species. Clinical signs can be intermittent and include serous or mucoid nasal discharge and respiratory difficulty when nares are occluded. This nasal congestion may result in a loss of the olfactory sense. Turtles are known to use olfaction to identify food items, predators, and conspecifics; therefore, it is likely that URTD affects not only their physical well-being but also their behavior and ability to perform necessary functions in the wild. To determine more specifically the impact nasal discharge might have on free-ranging tortoises (Gopherus agassizii), we compared the responses of tortoises with and without nasal discharge and both positive and negative for M. agassizii antibodies to a visually hidden olfactory food stimulus and an empty control. We found that nasal discharge did reduce sense of smell and hence the ability to locate food. Our study also showed that moderate chronic nasal discharge in the absence of other clinical signs did not affect appetite in desert tortoises.

  7. Network pharmacology study on the mechanism of traditional Chinese medicine for upper respiratory tract infection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinzhuang; Gu, Jiangyong; Cao, Liang; Li, Na; Ma, Yiming; Su, Zhenzhen; Ding, Gang; Chen, Lirong; Xu, Xiaojie; Xiao, Wei

    2014-10-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is a multi-component and multi-target agent and could treat complex diseases in a holistic way, especially infection diseases. However, the underlying pharmacology remains unclear. Fortunately, network pharmacology by integrating system biology and polypharmacology provides a strategy to address this issue. In this work, Reduning Injection (RDN), a well-used TCM treatment in the clinic for upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs), was investigated to interpret the molecular mechanism and predict new clinical directions by integrating molecular docking, network analysis and cell-based assays. 32 active ingredients and 38 potential targets were identified. In vitro experiments confirmed the bioactivities of the compounds against lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated PGE2 and NO production in RAW264.7 cells. Moreover, network analysis showed that RDN could not only inhibit viral replication but also alleviate the sickness symptoms of URTIs through directly targeting the key proteins in the respiratory viral life cycle and indirectly regulating host immune systems. In addition, other clinical applications of RDN such as neoplasms, cardiovascular diseases and immune system diseases were predicted on the basis of the relationships between targets and diseases.

  8. Histamine synthesis by respiratory tract micro-organisms: possible role in pathogenicity.

    PubMed Central

    Devalia, J L; Grady, D; Harmanyeri, Y; Tabaqchali, S; Davies, R J

    1989-01-01

    Five bacterial species considered to be potential pathogens in acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis, cystic fibrosis, and pneumonia--Branhamella catarrhalis, Haemophilus parainfluenzae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae--were evaluated for their potential to synthesise histamine in vitro. Bacterial species commonly isolated from infected sputum but generally not considered to be pathogenic--Enterobacteriacae, Neisseria pharyngis, coagulase negative staphylococci, alpha-haemolytic streptococci, and Candida albicans--were similarly studied. Of the "pathogens", the Gram negative species B catarrhalis, H parainfluenzae and Ps aeruginosa synthesised clinically important amounts of histamine; this was not the case for the Gram positive species S aureus and S pneumoniae. Of the "non-pathogenic" species, only the Enterobacteriacae, as a group, were found to synthesise clinically important amounts of histamine. These results show that some Gram negative bacteria, associated with acute exacerbations in respiratory infections, produce histamine and possibly other inflammatory mediators, which may contribute to their pathogenecity in the lower respiratory tract in vivo. PMID:2499609

  9. Transendoscopic soft-tissue laser ablation in the equine upper respiratory tract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartels, K. E.; MacAllister, C. G.; Dickey, D. T.; Schafer, S. A.; Nordquist, R. E.

    1997-05-01

    Transendoscopic application of Nd:YAG laser energy for treatment of partial upper respiratory obstruction in the horse has been practiced for the last 12 years in both contact and non-contact modes. Endoscopic laser ablation has been limited to wavelengths transmitted through flexible optical fibers. Devices used for this purpose have been primarily the Nd:YAG (1064 nm), KTP (532 nm), holmium (2100 nm), and diode (805 nm) lasers. Few investigations have focused on use of the holmium or diode lasers. Objectives of this study were to evaluate use of fiber-deliverable laser wavelengths provided by newer, more portable, user-friendly, solid-state diode and holmium lasers for ablation of laryngeal tissues of the equine upper respiratory tract. In addition, information on efficacy and dosimetry for both the contact and non-contact modes was obtained using an in vitro cadaveric model. Preliminary conclusions based on histologic evaluation and scanning electron microscopy revealed that diode laser energy has the ability to penetrate laryngeal tissue easily and deeply with minimal collateral coagulation, but is sensitive to tissue color. Holmium laser energy can be used to incise laryngeal tissue easily in contact mode with moderate collateral damage, and absorption does not seem dependent on tissue color.

  10. The respiratory tract deposition model proposed by the ICRP Task Group

    SciTech Connect

    James, A.C.; Briant, J.K. ); Stahlhofen, W.; Rudolf, G. . Abt. fuer Biophysikalische Strahlenforschung); Egan, M.J.; Nixon, W. ); Gehr, P. . Anatomisches Inst.)

    1990-11-01

    The Task Group has developed a new model of the deposition of inhaled aerosols in each anatomical region of the respiratory tract. The model is used to evaluate the fraction of airborne activity that is deposited in respiratory regions having distinct retention characteristics and clearance pathways: the anterior nares, the extrathoracic airways of the naso- and oropharynx and larynx, the bronchi, the bronchioles, and the alveolated airways of the lung. Drawn from experimental data on total and regional deposition in human subjects, the model is based on extrapolation of these data by means of a detailed theoretical model of aerosol transport and deposition within the lung. The Task Group model applies to all practical conditions, and for aerosol particles and vapors from atomic size up to very coarse aerosols with an activity median aerodynamic diameter of 100 {mu}m. The model is designed to predict regional deposition in different subjects, including adults of either sex, children of various ages, and infants, and also to account for anatomical differences among Caucasian and non-Caucasian subjects. The Task Group model represents aerosol inhalability and regional deposition in different subjects by algebraic expressions of aerosol size, breathing rates, standard lung volumes, and scaling factors for airway dimensions. 35 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Human parainfluenza virus infection in Thai children with lower respiratory tract infection from 2010 to 2013.

    PubMed

    Ruampunpong, Hathaiphan; Payungporn, Sunchai; Samransamruajkit, Rujipat; Pratheepamornkul, Thitikarn; Theamboonlers, Apiradee; Poovorawan, Yong

    2014-05-01

    Human parainfluenza virus (HPIV) is a common cause of upper and lower respiratory illness in infants and young children. In order to classify the HPIV isolates circulating in the central part of Thailand, 650 samples obtained from the lower respiratory tract of patients from two hospital pediatric wards during 2010 to 2013, were analyzed for the presence and types of HPIVs by multiplex semi-nested PCR of hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) gene. The results showed that 4.8% of the samples were positive for HPIV, among which 0.5%, 2.5% and 1.5% were positive for HPIV-1, HPIV-3, and HPIV-4, respectively, and none were positive for HPIV-2. A phylogenetic tree constructed from 31 HPIV HN gene sequences compared to those in GenBank showed greater than 80% identity to other reference strains. Prevalence of HPIV infection and phylogenetic characteristics of the circulating HPIVs may help explain the impact of HPIVs infection in Thai children.

  12. Predictors of hypoxaemia in hospital admissions with acute lower respiratory tract infection in a developing country

    PubMed Central

    Weber, M.; Usen, S.; Palmer, A.; Jaffar, S.; Mulholland, E

    1997-01-01

    Accepted 5 November 1996
 Since oxygen has to be given to most children in developing countries on the basis of clinical signs without performing blood gas analyses, possible clinical predictors of hypoxaemia were studied. Sixty nine children between the ages of 2 months and 5 years admitted to hospital with acute lower respiratory tract infection and an oxygen saturation (SaO2) < 90% were compared with 67 children matched for age and diagnosis from the same referral hospital with an SaO2 of 90% or above (control group 1), and 44unreferred children admitted to a secondary care hospital with acute lower respiratory infection (control group 2). Using multiple logistic regression analysis, sleepiness, arousal, quality of cry, cyanosis, head nodding, decreased air entry, nasal flaring, and upper arm circumference were found to be independent predictors of hypoxaemia on comparison of the cases with control group 1.Using a simple model of cyanosis or head nodding or not crying, the sensitivity to predict hypoxaemia was 59%, and the specificity 94% and 93% compared to control groups 1 and 2, respectively; 80% of the children with an SaO2 < 80% were identified by the combination of these signs. Over half of the children with hypoxaemia could be identified with a combination of three signs: extreme respiratory distress, cyanosis, and severely compromised general status. Further prospective validation of this model with other datasets is warranted. No other signs improved the sensitivity without compromising specificity. If a higher sensitivity is required, pulse oximetry has to be used.

 PMID:9166021

  13. 20 CFR 498.224 - Harmless error.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Harmless error. 498.224 Section 498.224 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION CIVIL MONETARY PENALTIES, ASSESSMENTS AND RECOMMENDED... substantial justice. The ALJ and the DAB at every stage of the proceeding will disregard any error or...

  14. 20 CFR 498.224 - Harmless error.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Harmless error. 498.224 Section 498.224 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION CIVIL MONETARY PENALTIES, ASSESSMENTS AND RECOMMENDED... substantial justice. The ALJ and the DAB at every stage of the proceeding will disregard any error or...

  15. 20 CFR 498.224 - Harmless error.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Harmless error. 498.224 Section 498.224 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION CIVIL MONETARY PENALTIES, ASSESSMENTS AND RECOMMENDED... substantial justice. The ALJ and the DAB at every stage of the proceeding will disregard any error or...

  16. [Specific features of the development of pathology of the upper respiratory tracts in the workers employed in the ore mining industry in the subarctic regions].

    PubMed

    Fedina, I N; Sineva, E L

    2009-01-01

    Criteria for the risk of development of occupational pathology of the upper respiratory tracts in the workers employed in the ore mining industry have been proposed based on the results of evaluation of the occurrence of pathological changes, morpho-functional characteristics of upper respiratory tract mucosa, and immunological properties. These criteria provide a basis for the development of differential approach to the choice of priority hygienic and medical preventive measures designed to a lower the risk of respiratory organ pathology.

  17. RSV frequency in children below 2 years hospitalized for lower respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed

    Hacımustafaoğlu, Mustafa; Celebi, Solmaz; Bozdemir, Sefika Elmas; Ozgür, Taner; Ozcan, Ismail; Güray, Atilla; Cakır, Deniz

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most frequent agent of acute lower respiratory diseases and creates a significant burden of disease in children under 5 years all over the world. RSV causes severe lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI) that require hospitalization, especially in children ≤2 years. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of RSV in children ≤2 years of age hospitalized for LRTI. Children ≤2 years of age hospitalized for one year for LRTI in the three largest hospitals of Bursa City Center, Turkey were evaluated. These three hospitals comprise 67.5% of all child beds in central Bursa, so this study allows us to evaluate the total disease burden and hospitalization incidence in central Bursa. Nasal swabs of the children were evaluated with RSV Respi- Strip (Coris Bioconcept Organization). A total of 671 children were hospitalized for LRTI, and 254 (37.9%) had at least one hospitalization that was positive for RSV. Of all patients with LRTI, 54.8% (368/671) were hospitalized for acute bronchiolitis, while 45.2% (303/671) were hospitalized for pneumonia. Of patients with acute bronchiolitis or pneumonia, 41% (151/368) and 34% (103/303) were RSV+, respectively. Of RSV+ hospitalized children, 59.5% (151/254) were diagnosed as acute bronchiolitis and 40.5% (103/254) as pneumonia. The annual incidences of hospitalization due to LRTI, acute bronchiolitis and pneumonia were 20.5/1000, 11.2/1000 and 9.3/1000, respectively, in children ≤2 years of age. The annual incidences of hospitalization due to RSV+ LRTI, acute bronchiolitis and pneumonia were found as 7.8/1000, 4.6/1000 and 3.2/1000, respectively, in children ≤2 years of age. More than one-third of all children hospitalized with LRTI (38.3%, n=257) were in the 0-3 months age group. Compared to other age groups, RSV positivity was highest in that age group for acute bronchiolitis (57%), pneumonia (39.5%) and also total children with LRTI (47.9%). RSV is a very important

  18. [Recurrent infections of the respiratory tract and staphylococcal pneumonia with septic shock and total respiratory failure in a patient with histiocytosis X].

    PubMed

    Wawrzyńska, L; Meleniewska-Maciszewska, A; Burakowski, J

    1994-01-01

    Disseminated pulmonary infiltrates, cutaneous lesions and diabetes insipidus in a female patients with a history of recurrent pneumothorax and persistent respiratory tract infections suggested the diagnosis of histiocytosis X. The pathological examination of a biopsy lung tissue specimen confirmed that diagnosis. In the course of treatment many dangerous complications were observed. The intensive therapy including artificial ventilation (24 days) was fully effective and settle the beneficial clinical outcome.

  19. Correlation of rhinovirus load in the respiratory tract and clinical symptoms in hospitalized immunocompetent and immunocompromised patients.

    PubMed

    Gerna, G; Piralla, A; Rovida, F; Rognoni, V; Marchi, A; Locatelli, F; Meloni, F

    2009-08-01

    While human rhinoviruses (HRVs) are well accepted as a major cause of common cold syndromes (rhinitis), their role in the etiology of lower respiratory tract infections is still controversial, and their detection in asymptomatic patients is relatively common. The HRV pathogenic role in four groups of hospitalized patients (pediatric immunocompetent and immunocompromised patients, and adult immunocompetent and immunocompromised patients) was investigated by quantifying HRV load in nasopharyngeal aspirates or bronchoalveolar lavage samples by real-time reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR). Real-time RT-PCR was performed in duplicate on all respiratory samples resulting positive by qualitative RT-PCR. In addition, molecular typing allowed detection of all known HRV species (A, B, and C). In immunocompetent pediatric patients HRVs were mostly associated with lower respiratory tract infections (in the absence of other viral agents) and wheezing, when viral load was > or =10(6) RNA copies/ml. In young immunocompromised patients (stem cell transplantation recipients), an inverse correlation between HRV persistence over time and time at which the infection occurred after transplantation was observed, whereas in adult immunocompromised patients (lung transplant recipients) HRVs could be detected at a medium-low level (<10(5) RNA copies/ml) in bronchoalveolar lavage samples taken routinely from asymptomatic patients. In conclusion, when detected at high viral load, HRVs may cause severe upper and lower respiratory tract infections, whereas when detected at a medium-low viral load, an event more frequent in immunocompromised subjects, they may represent only bystander viruses.

  20. [Numerical simulation on cycle change form of the pressure and wall shear in human upper respiratory tract].

    PubMed

    Li, Fusheng; Xu, Xinxi; Sun, Dong; Zhao, Xiuguo; Tan, Shulin

    2013-04-01

    The research on cycle change form of the pressure and the wall shear in human upper respiratory tract can strengthen understanding of the characteristics of the airflow in the place and provide us with a scientific basis for analyzing the diffusion, transition and deposition patterns of aerosol there. In our study, we used large eddy simulation to emulate the pressure and wall shear in human upper respiratory tract in conditions of the low intensive respiratory patterns, and discussed the distributing disciplinarian of the pressure and wall shear in mouth-throat model and trachea-triple bifurcation. The results showed that the pressure gradient variation in human upper respiratory tract was mainly fastened from root of epiglottis to trachea. The minimum pressure at the interim of inspiration was a duplication of the interim of expiration, and located on the posterior wall of the glottis. The pressure gradient variation was evident on trachea and its fork. The wall shear changed with the velocity of the air flow, and its direction changed periodically with breath cycle.

  1. Therapeutic approaches to the treatment of recurrent respiratory papillomatosis of the aerodigestive tract (a clinical study)

    PubMed Central

    Avramov, Toma; Vetckova, Evelina; Nikolova, Maria; Valev, Dinko; Manolova, Antoaneta; Tafradgiiska, Maya; Kostadinov, Dimitar; Tchalacov, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP) is a rare disease, characterized by recurrent proliferation of benign squamous cell papillomas in the larynx as well as in the other parts of the aerodigestive tract. We have compared different treatment options for RRP of the aerodigestive tract including surgical, conservative and combined approaches. A total of 43 patients with papillomatosis that received a combined therapy were followed in the period from 2009 to 2013. The treatment included electrosurgery and CO2 laser surgery alongside with either immunotherapy with Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) (Calgevax) or α-interferon. In the control group without immunotherapy (n = 16) we used conventional microlaryngeal surgery. During the follow-up, relapse occurred in two patients for the CO2 laser surgery with Calgevax immunotherapy group (n = 16). In the group treated with α-interferon preceded by CO2 laser surgery (n = 9) and electrosurgery (n = 2), relapse had occurred in three patients. Among the control group, recurrence was observed in six patients. This required re-operation. Our data showed a three times more frequent relapses among patients who were operated with conventional surgery as compared to those operated with CO2 laser surgery and Calgevax immunotherapy, and two times more often relapses in patients operated with conventional surgery as compared to those with electrosurgery and CO2 laser surgery and application of α-interferon therapy. Conventional and laser surgeries have a palliative effect, though playing an important role in ensuring the airway patency. While specific antivirus treatment for human papilloma viruses does not exist, the immune modulation with Calgevax considerably reduces the frequency of relapses, by stimulating cellular immune effector mechanisms. The combined protocol allows rarefication of relapses and improvement of patients’ quality of life, but not complete healing. PMID:26692782

  2. Interleukin-13 promotes susceptibility to chlamydial infection of the respiratory and genital tracts.

    PubMed

    Asquith, Kelly L; Horvat, Jay C; Kaiko, Gerard E; Carey, Alison J; Beagley, Kenneth W; Hansbro, Philip M; Foster, Paul S

    2011-05-01

    Chlamydiae are intracellular bacteria that commonly cause infections of the respiratory and genital tracts, which are major clinical problems. Infections are also linked to the aetiology of diseases such as asthma, emphysema and heart disease. The clinical management of infection is problematic and antibiotic resistance is emerging. Increased understanding of immune processes that are involved in both clearance and immunopathology of chlamydial infection is critical for the development of improved treatment strategies. Here, we show that IL-13 was produced in the lungs of mice rapidly after Chlamydia muridarum (Cmu) infection and promoted susceptibility to infection. Wild-type (WT) mice had increased disease severity, bacterial load and associated inflammation compared to IL-13 deficient (-/-) mice as early as 3 days post infection (p.i.). Intratracheal instillation of IL-13 enhanced bacterial load in IL-13-/- mice. There were no differences in early IFN-g and IL-10 expression between WT and IL-13-/- mice and depletion of CD4+ T cells did not affect infection in IL-13-/- mice. Collectively, these data demonstrate a lack of CD4+ T cell involvement and a novel role for IL-13 in innate responses to infection. We also showed that IL-13 deficiency increased macrophage uptake of Cmu in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, the depletion of IL-13 during infection of lung epithelial cells in vitro decreased the percentage of infected cells and reduced bacterial growth. Our results suggest that enhanced IL-13 responses in the airways, such as that found in asthmatics, may promote susceptibility to chlamydial lung infection. Importantly the role of IL-13 in regulating infection was not limited to the lung as we showed that IL-13 also promoted susceptibility to Cmu genital tract infection. Collectively our findings demonstrate that innate IL-13 release promotes infection that results in enhanced inflammation and have broad implications for the treatment of chlamydial infections and IL

  3. Determining the basic characteristics of aerosols suitable for studies of deposition in the respiratory tract.

    PubMed

    Legáth, L; Naus, A; Halík, J

    1988-01-01

    Studies of aerosol particle deposition in the respiratory tract requires experimental inhalation of artificial model aerosols. The paper formulates some of the most important requirements for the properties of such aerosols. Several suitable fractions were prepared as part of a research project dealing with the use of microporous polymers for diagnostic purposes. 5 fractions of the polymer designated G-gel 60 with the particle size as stated by the manufacturer, ranging from 3 to 7 micron were evaluated using a 16-channel particle dispersity analyzer HIAC/ROYCO MT 3210 with the sensor 1200 and operated by a microprocessor, the equipment being coupled to an APPLE IIe computer. G-gel 60 particles introduced into the aerosol were characterized by the parameters CMAD, MMAD and sg both numerically and graphically. The measurement procedure was found to be very sensitive with respect to all fractions in evaluating the subtile differences between different lot numbers of the aerosol. G-gel 60 fractions characterized both numerically and graphically were compared with the known aerosols from paraffin oil and atmospheric air. The equipment MT 3210 enables prompt determination of the percentages of aerosol particles distribution by size class. The authors conclude that the procedure, both in its numerical and graphical versions, is particularly suitable for the diagnosis of aerosol particles deposition in the respiratory tract, offering a new application for HIAC/ROYCO in the field of medicine. In evaluating atmospheric aerosol in exhaled air, the number of particles was found to be below that in inhaled air, the difference being dependent on the choice of investigation methods. Percentual distribution of deposited particles following one minute ventilation proved to be at its maximum, as regards atmospheric aerosol, in the 0.30-0.50 micron range. The deposition curve was similar to already published curves, being characterized by an S-shaped pattern with maximum deposition

  4. Birth weight, childhood lower respiratory tract infection, and adult lung function

    PubMed Central

    Shaheen, S; Sterne, J; Tucker, J; Florey, C

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Historical cohort studies in England have found that impaired fetal growth and lower respiratory tract infections in early childhood are associated with lower levels of lung function in late adult life. These relations are investigated in a similar study in Scotland.
METHODS—In 1985-86 a follow up study was carried out of 1070 children who had been born in St Andrew's from 1921 to 1935 and followed from birth to 14 years of age by the Mackenzie Institute for Medical Research. Recorded information included birth weight and respiratory illnesses. The lung function of 239 of these individuals was measured.
RESULTS—There was no association between birth weight and lung function. Pneumonia before two years of age was associated with a difference in mean forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) of −0.39 litres (95% confidence interval (CI) −0.67, −0.11; p = 0.007) and in mean forced vital capacity (FVC) of −0.60 litres (95% CI −0.92, −0.28; p<0.001), after controlling for age, sex, height, smoking, type of spirometer, and other illnesses before two years. Similar reductions were seen in men and women. Bronchitis before two years was associated with smaller deficits in FEV1 and FVC. Asthma or wheeze at two years and older and cough after five years were also associated with a reduction in FEV1.
CONCLUSIONS—The relation between impaired fetal growth and lower lung function in late adult life seen in previous studies was not confirmed in this cohort. The deficits in FEV1 and FVC associated with pneumonia and bronchitis in the first two years of life are consistent with a causal relation.

 PMID:9797752

  5. A linear, time-varying simulation of the respiratory tract system

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, O.

    1992-11-01

    These results show that regional deposition efficiencies of inhaled particles are highly dependent on the level of physical activity in all the spectrum of thermodynamic and aerodynamic aerosol particle sizes; also it was shown that for particles in the aerodynamic size range, the values of regional deposition efficiencies at the inner regions of the lung are highly dependent on age. In addition, the shape of regional deposition efficiency curves as a function of particle size have a similar behavior for all ages; thus, any variation of the airway geometry and respiratory physiological parameters such as tidal volumes and breathing frequencies due to age difference do not cause a change in the fundamental mechanisms of deposition. Thus, for all the cases of physical activity and age dependency, the deposition of ultrafine aerosol particles is highly enhanced by diffusive processes in all regions of the respiratory tract, and for very large aerosol size particles this behavior is repeated again due to impaction and sedimentation mechanisms. Although the results presented at this work, are the result of computer simulations based on different sources of experimental data, the structure of the computer simulation code BIODEP is flexible enough to the acquisition of any kind of new experimental information in terms of biokinetic analysis and regional deposition parameters. In addition, since the design of BIODEP was intended for easy access to the users, then with exception of the subroutine DIVPAG, at this moment, the modular design of BIODEP using FORTRAN 77 allows the implementation of all the subroutines of BIODEP to be used in a interactive mode with any microcomputer.

  6. Heat and water rate transfer processes in the human respiratory tract at various altitudes.

    PubMed

    Kandjov, I M

    2001-02-01

    The process of the respiratory air conditioning as a process of heat and mass exchange at the interface inspired air-airways surface was studied. Using a model of airways (Olson et al., 1970) where the segments of the respiratory tract are like cylinders with a fixed length and diameter, the corresponding heat transfer equations, in the paper are founded basic rate exchange parameters-convective heat transfer coefficient h(c)(W m(-2) degrees C(-1)) and evaporative heat transfer coefficient h(e)(W m(-2)hPa(-1)). The rate transfer parameters assumed as sources with known heat power are connected to airflow rate in different airways segments. Relationships expressing warming rate of inspired air due to convection, warming rate of inspired air due to evaporation, water diffused in the inspired air from the airways wall, i.e. a system of air conditioning parameters, was composed. The altitude dynamics of the relations is studied. Every rate conditioning parameter is an increasing function of altitude. The process of diffusion in the peripheral bronchial generations as a basic transfer process is analysed. The following phenomenon is in effect: the diffusion coefficient increases with altitude and causes a compensation of simultaneous decreasing of O(2)and CO(2)densities in atmospheric air. Due to this compensation, the diffusion in the peripheral generations with altitude is approximately constant. The elements of the human anatomy optimality as well as the established dynamics are discussed and assumed. The square form of the airways after the trachea expressed in terms of transfer supposes (in view of maximum contact surface), that a maximum heat and water exchange is achieved, i.e. high degree of air condition at fixed environmental parameters and respiration regime.

  7. Microbiological Features of Upper Respiratory Tract Infections in Bulgarian Children for the Period 1998–2014

    PubMed Central

    Gergova, Raina Tzvetanova; Petrova, Guergana; Gergov, Stefan; Minchev, Petko; Mitov, Ivan; Strateva, Tanya

    2016-01-01

    Background Across the globe, upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs) are the most prevalent cause of morbidity in childhood. Aims The aim of our study is to analyze the incidence and etiology of bacterial URTIs in Bulgarian children, as well as the increasing antimicrobial resistance to the most common etiologic agents over a period of 17 years. Study Design Retrospective study. Methods The study material comprised the data from 4768 patients (aged 1–16 years) with URTI during the period from 1998–2014. Specific microbiology agent detection was performed by culture examination. Susceptibilities to the investigated pathogens were determined by the disk diffusion method and minimal inhibitory concentration according to the criteria of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI). Polymerase chain reaction was used to detect the presence of β-lactam resistance genes. Results We identified the following as the most common URTI bacterial pathogens: Streptococcus pneumoniae (40.94%), Streptococcus pyogenes (34.16%), Haemophilus influenzae (44.23%), Moraxella catarrhalis (39.19%) and Staphylococcus aureus (23.88%). In more than 70% of cases, a polymicrobial etiology was found. The most commonly affected individuals were pre-school-aged children, which accounted for more than 36% of all patients. During the study period, a dramatic increase in resistance to antibiotic agents was observed. The most frequent types of resistance were the enzymatic inactivation of penicillins and cephalosporins (close to 100% in staphylococci and moraxellae) and inducible macrolide-lincozamide resistance (about 20% of Gram-positive cocci). Conclusion Due to mandatory immunization against pneumococci and H. influenzae in Bulgaria and the vast expanding resistance to the most popular antimicrobial agents changes in the etiology of URTI have recently been noted. Regular analysis of this etiological dynamic and the antimicrobial resistance of respiratory pathogens is important

  8. Pharmacokinetics of moxifloxacin and high-dose levofloxacin in severe lower respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed

    Kontou, Paschalina; Manika, Katerina; Chatzika, Kalliopi; Papaioannou, Maria; Sionidou, Maria; Pitsiou, Georgia; Kioumis, Ioannis

    2013-09-01

    This study evaluated the pharmacokinetics of intravenous moxifloxacin 400 mg once and levofloxacin 500 mg twice daily in patients with lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) and assessed their pharmacodynamic adequacy against common respiratory pathogens. Eighteen patients with LRTIs hospitalised in general wards were included. Serial blood samples were obtained at steady state and concentrations were determined using HPLC. Pharmacokinetic variables were estimated by a two-compartment model. The characteristic pharmacodynamic parameter for fluoroquinolones (AUC(0-24)/MIC) was calculated. Peak and trough concentrations were, respectively, 4.81 ± 1.03 and 0.59 ± 1.13 mg/L for moxifloxacin and 6.42 ± 1.08 and 0.79 ± 0.39 mg/L for levofloxacin. Pharmacokinetic data for moxifloxacin and levofloxacin, respectively, were: CL, 10.27 ± 1.24 and 22.66 ± 6.62 L/h; t1/2, 13.43 ± 5.12 and 6.75 ± 1.34 h; Vss, 163.03 ± 53.88 and 170.73 ± 39.59 L; and AUC(0-24), 39.38 ±5.28 and 47.06 ± 14.09 mg·h/L. The pharmacodynamic target was attained in all patients by both antibiotics against the majority of respiratory pathogens. Moxifloxacin proved to be pharmacodynamically efficacious against Gram-positive bacteria with MICs ≤ 0.79 mg/L and Gram-negative bacteria with MICs ≤ 0.32 mg/L. These MIC thresholds for levofloxacin were 1.1 mg/L and 0.38 mg/L, respectively. Moxifloxacin and high-dose levofloxacin show a favourable pharmacokinetic profile in plasma of patients with severe LRTIs, without significant interpatient variability. They ensure optimal pharmacodynamic exposure against the majority of microbes involved in these infections. However, the predicted efficacy against Gram-negative bacteria with MICs ≥ 0.5 mg/L appears to be low.

  9. [Inhaled treatments: Choice of devices, systemic absorption of inhaled drugs and bitter taste receptors in the respiratory tract].

    PubMed

    Benattia, A; Cavaillon, P; Gachelin, E; Devillier, P; Vecellio, L; Williams, G; Dubus, J-C

    2015-10-01

    Inhaled drugs are now routinely prescribed in daily medical practice. Recent topics about these treatments have been developed during the fourth annual meeting of the Groupe de travail aérosolthérapie (GAT) of the French-speaking respiratory society (Société de pneumologie de langue française). This article focuses mainly upon the choice of devices, systemic absorption of inhaled drugs and bitter taste receptors in the respiratory tract, a potential new target for drug development.

  10. Mycoplasmosis and upper respiratory tract disease of tortoises: a review and update

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jacobson, Elliott R.; Brown, Mary B.; Wendland, Lori; Brown, Daniel R.; Klein, Paul A.; Christopher, Mary M.; Berry, Kristin H.

    2014-01-01

    Tortoise mycoplasmosis is one of the most extensively characterized infectious diseases of chelonians. A 1989 outbreak of upper respiratory tract disease (URTD) in free-ranging Agassiz's desert tortoises (Gopherus agassizii) brought together an investigative team of researchers, diagnosticians, pathologists, immunologists and clinicians from multiple institutions and agencies. Electron microscopic studies of affected tortoises revealed a microorganism in close association with the nasal mucosa that subsequently was identified as a new species, Mycoplasma agassizii. Over the next 24 years, a second causative agent, Mycoplasma testudineum, was discovered, the geographic distribution and host range of tortoise mycoplasmosis were expanded, diagnostic tests were developed and refined for antibody and pathogen detection, transmission studies confirmed the pathogenicity of the original M. agassizii isolate, clinical (and subclinical) disease and laboratory abnormalities were characterized, many extrinsic and predisposing factors were found to play a role in morbidity and mortality associated with mycoplasmal infection, and social behavior was implicated in disease transmission. The translation of scientific research into management decisions has sometimes led to undesirable outcomes, such as euthanasia of clinically healthy tortoises. In this article, we review and assess current research on tortoise mycoplasmosis, arguably the most important chronic infectious disease of wild and captive North American and European tortoises, and update the implications for management and conservation of tortoises in the wild.

  11. Pre-natal exposure to dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene and infant lower respiratory tract infections and wheeze.

    PubMed

    Gascon, Mireia; Vrijheid, Martine; Martínez, David; Ballester, Ferran; Basterrechea, Mikel; Blarduni, Elizabeth; Esplugues, Ana; Vizcaino, Esther; Grimalt, Joan O; Morales, Eva; Sunyer, Jordi

    2012-05-01

    The aim of our study was to examine whether pre-natal exposure to dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE) increases the risk of lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) and wheeze in infants. The study is based on a birth cohort of 1,455 mother-child pairs. Maternal serum concentrations of DDE, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and hexachlorobenzene (HCB) were measured during pregnancy. Parental reports on LRTI and wheeze were obtained when children were 12-14 months old. 35.4% of children developed at least one LRTI episode and 33.6% at least one wheezing episode during their first 12-14 months of life. Median DDE, PCBs and HCB concentrations were 116.3, 113.7 and 46.4 ng · g(-1) lipid, respectively. DDE concentrations were associated with LRTI risk (relative risk (RR) per 10% increase 1.11, 95% CI 1.00-1.22), also after adjustment for PCBs and HCB. In all quartiles of DDE exposure, the risk of LRTI was increased compared with the lowest quartile, but the increase was statistically significant only in the third quartile (RR 1.33, 95% CI 1.08-1.62). No association was observed for PCBs and HCB. Results were similar for wheeze. This study suggests that pre-natal DDE exposure is associated with a higher risk of LRTI and wheeze in infants independently of exposure to other organochlorine compounds.

  12. Meeting report: Fourth Forum on Respiratory Tract Infections, Sitges, Spain, 8 11 February 2007.

    PubMed

    Tillotson, Glenn S; Ball, Peter

    2007-09-01

    Over 420 delegates participated in this, the fourth of a biennial series of scientific meetings, drawing from 30 or more nations and encompassing the specialties of infectious diseases, clinical microbiology, pulmonary and general medicine and Industry inter alia. The 2007 Forum was chaired by Professors Antoni Torres Marti, Giuliana Gialdroni Grassi and Dr Peter Ball and received academic endorsement from the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy (BSAC), Italian Society for Chemotherapy, Spanish Pulmonology Society, Paul Ehrlich Society and the Société de Pneumologie de Langue Français. The Scientific Programme was scientifically and financially supported by the BSAC and a consortium of pharmaceutical companies. Discussion focused on key contemporary issues in respiratory tract infection (RTI), including the impact of antibiotic resistance on clinical outcomes and the continuing need for antibiotic conservation via evolving guidelines, the challenges of avian influenza, nosocomial RTIs and the emergence of new pathogens, e.g. community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, novel antimicrobial agents, disease definitions (e.g. healthcare-associated pneumonia) and therapeutic assessment criteria, such as patient-reported outcome measures, in improving RTI management. The entire meeting was granted CME recognition (18 sessions) by the European Accreditation Council for continuing medical education.

  13. [THE PATHOGENIC POTENTIAL OF MORAXELLA CATARRHALIS AND STAPHYLOCOCCUS EPIDERMIDIS UNDER INFLAMMATORY PROCESSES OF UPPER RESPIRATORY TRACTS].

    PubMed

    Kraeva, L A; Burgasova, O A; Kunilova, E S; Petrova, I S; Tseneva, G Ya; Bespalova, G L

    2015-11-01

    The frequent isolation from biological material of Moraxella catarrhalis under bronchitis and pneumonia and Staphilococcus epidermidis under rhinitis and sinusitis requires profound investigation offactors ofpathogenicity ofthe mentioned microorganisms. The genetic and phenotypic markers of virulence of strains M. catarrhalis and S. epidermidis are examined. Their etiologic role in development of infection processes of respiratory tract and middle ear is determined The most of M catarrhalis strains isolated under bronchitis and pneumonia have gene mcaP responsiblefor production ofprotein McaP that provides adhesion to epithelium cell of host and lipolitic activity of bacteria. The strains isolated from patients with pneumonia had the most adhesive activity. The cluster of genes ICA with leading role of gene icaA is responsible for for availability offactors of intercellular adhesion in Staphilococci strains. In the clinical samples from patients with sinusitis this gene is detected 5 times more frequently than from healthy individuals. In phenotypic tests, expression of gene icaA in S. epidermidis isolated from patients is three times higher than in strains isolated from healthy individuals. To establish etiologic role of M. catarrhalis and S. epidermidis and to develop tactic of therapy of patients with bronchitis, pneumonia and sinusitis complex approach is needed, including detection of genetic and phenotypic markers of virulence in isolated microorganisms.

  14. Non-Hodgkin's malignant lymphomas of upper digestive and respiratory tracts

    SciTech Connect

    Plantenga, K.F.; Hart, G.; Van Heerde, P.; Tierie, A.H.

    1981-10-01

    The history of 102 patients with primary Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of the upper digestive and respiratory tract is reviewed. An analysis is presented of the histopathologic, clinical and prognostic features of these patients, who presented to the Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital in Amsterdam between 1958-1976. The histological slides were reviewed in 91 patients. Ilio-lumbar lymphography and bone marrow examination were performed in 44 and 66 patients respectively: 4 lymphograms and 4 bone marrows were found to be abnormal. Of 82 patients with Stage I and II disease, there were 72 remissions with locoregional irradiation. Among these patients 36 suffered a relapse, 27 (75%) during the first year after treatment. The median survival was 14 months for all stages. The survival at 5 years was 28% for Stage I and 12% for Stage II patients. Prognosis was influenced by follicular cb/cc lymphomas, histiocytic poorly differentiated cell type, stage, size of primary tumor, and the radiation dose. We recommend adjuvant chemotherapy in Stage I and II patients after primary radiation treatment because of the high rate of primary relapse in distant sites.

  15. Medication use in European primary care patients with lower respiratory tract infection: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    Hamoen, Marleen; Broekhuizen, Berna DL; Little, Paul; Melbye, Hasse; Coenen, Samuel; Goossens, Herman; Butler, Chris C; Francis, Nick A; Verheij, Theo JM

    2014-01-01

    Background It is largely unknown what medication is used by patients with lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI). Aim To describe the use of self-medication and prescribed medication in adults presenting with LRTI in different European countries, and to relate self-medication to patient characteristics. Design and setting An observational study in 16 primary care networks in 12 European countries. Method A total of 2530 adult patients presenting with LRTI in 12 European countries filled in a diary on any medication used before and after a primary care consultation. Patient characteristics related to self-medication were determined by univariable and multivariable logistic regression analysis. Results The frequency and types of medication used differed greatly between European countries. Overall, 55.4% self-medicated before consultation, and 21.5% after consultation, most frequently with paracetamol, antitussives, and mucolytics. Females, non-smokers, and patients with more severe symptoms used more self-medication. Patients who were not prescribed medication during the consultation self-medicated more often afterwards. Self-medication with antibiotics was relatively rare. Conclusion A considerable amount of medication, often with no proven efficacy, was used by adults presenting with LRTI in primary care. There were large differences between European countries. These findings should help develop patient information resources, international guidelines, and international legislation concerning the availability of over-the-counter medication, and can also support interventions against unwarranted variations in care. In addition, further research on the effects of symptomatic medication is needed. PMID:24567621

  16. Occurrence and significance of Cryptococcus neoformans in the respiratory tract of patients with bronchopulmonary disorders.

    PubMed Central

    Randhawa, H S; Pal, M

    1977-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans was cultured from 13 (3%) of 469 clinical specimens examined from the respiratory tract of patients with bronchopulmonary diseases. These isolations came from 5 (2%) of 207 patients; 11 isolates were from sputum and 1 each were from bronchoscopic aspirate and empyema pus. The fungus was not cultured from the oropharyngeal washings of 101 apparently healthy volunteers. Of the 5 patients, 3 had pulmonary tuberculosis, including one with pyopneumothorax and 2 with allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis as the underlying disease. In the tuberculosis patient with pyopneumothorax and C. neoformans in empyema pus, the fungus was presumably a tissue invader, whereas its role could not be unequivocally ascertained in the remaining 4 patients from whom it was isolated from sputum or bronchial aspirate on at least two consecutive occasions. The question of C. neoformans being a transient resident, commensal, or incitant of benign minimal lesions in the tracheobronchial tree is discussed. A comprehensive laboratory and clinical follow-up is warranted in patients from whose sputum or bronchial aspirate C. neoformans may be cultured even though definitive signs of cryptococcosis may be lacking. PMID:319109

  17. Signs and Symptoms that Differentiate Acute Sinusitis from Viral Upper Respiratory Tract Infection

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Nader; Hoberman, Alejandro; Kearney, Diana H.; Colborn, D. Kathleen; Kurs-Lasky, Marcia; Jeong, Jong H.; Haralam, Mary Ann; Bowen, A’Delbert; Flom, Lynda L.; Wald, Ellen R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Differentiating acute bacterial sinusitis from viral upper respiratory tract infection (URI) is challenging; 20% to 40% of children diagnosed with acute sinusitis based on clinical criteria likely have an uncomplicated URI. The objective of this study was to determine which signs and symptoms could be used to identify the subgroup of children who meet current clinical criteria for sinusitis but who nevertheless have a viral URI. Methods We obtained sinus radiographs in consecutive children meeting a priori clinical criteria for acute sinusitis. We considered the subgroup of children with completely normal sinus radiographs to have an uncomplicated URI despite meeting the clinical diagnostic criteria for sinusitis. We examined the utility of signs and symptoms in identifying children with URI. Results Of 258 children enrolled, 54 (20.9%) children had completely normal radiographs. The absence of green nasal discharge, the absence of disturbed sleep, and mild symptoms were associated with a diagnosis of URI. No physical exam findings were particularly helpful in distinguishing between children with normal vs. abnormal radiographs. Conclusions Among children meeting current criteria for the diagnosis of acute sinusitis, those with mild symptoms are significantly more likely to have a URI than those with severe symptoms. In addition to assessing overall severity of symptoms, practitioners should ask about sleep disturbance and green nasal discharge when assessing children with suspected sinusitis; their absence favors a diagnosis of URI. PMID:23694838

  18. Characterisation of Candida within the Mycobiome/Microbiome of the Lower Respiratory Tract of ICU Patients

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Robert; Halwachs, Bettina; Thallinger, Gerhard G.; Klymiuk, Ingeborg; Gorkiewicz, Gregor; Hoenigl, Martin; Prattes, Jürgen; Valentin, Thomas; Heidrich, Katharina; Buzina, Walter; Salzer, Helmut J. F.; Rabensteiner, Jasmin; Prüller, Florian; Raggam, Reinhard B.; Meinitzer, Andreas; Moissl-Eichinger, Christine; Högenauer, Christoph; Quehenberger, Franz; Kashofer, Karl; Zollner-Schwetz, Ines

    2016-01-01

    Whether the presence of Candida spp. in lower respiratory tract (LRT) secretions is a marker of underlying disease, intensive care unit (ICU) treatment and antibiotic therapy or contributes to poor clinical outcome is unclear. We investigated healthy controls, patients with proposed risk factors for Candida growth in LRT (antibiotic therapy, ICU treatment with and without antibiotic therapy), ICU patients with pneumonia and antibiotic therapy and candidemic patients (for comparison of truly invasive and colonizing Candida spp.). Fungal patterns were determined by conventional culture based microbiology combined with molecular approaches (next generation sequencing, multilocus sequence typing) for description of fungal and concommitant bacterial microbiota in LRT, and host and fungal biomarkes were investigated. Admission to and treatment on ICUs shifted LRT fungal microbiota to Candida spp. dominated fungal profiles but antibiotic therapy did not. Compared to controls, Candida was part of fungal microbiota in LRT of ICU patients without pneumonia with and without antibiotic therapy (63% and 50% of total fungal genera) and of ICU patients with pneumonia with antibiotic therapy (73%) (p<0.05). No case of invasive candidiasis originating from Candida in the LRT was detected. There was no common bacterial microbiota profile associated or dissociated with Candida spp. in LRT. Colonizing and invasive Candida strains (from candidemic patients) did not match to certain clades withdrawing the presence of a particular pathogenic and invasive clade. The presence of Candida spp. in the LRT rather reflected rapidly occurring LRT dysbiosis driven by ICU related factors than was associated with invasive candidiasis. PMID:27206014

  19. Stability of cough reflex sensitivity during viral upper respiratory tract infection (common cold).

    PubMed

    Dicpinigaitis, Peter V; Tibb, Amit S; Ramsey, David L; Carr, Andrew N; Poore, Cathy L

    2014-08-01

    Cough is among the symptoms most commonly associated with an acute, viral upper respiratory tract infection (URI), such as the common cold. Two previous studies incorporating capsaicin cough challenge methodology have demonstrated that cough reflex sensitivity is transiently enhanced during URI. These studies used single measurements of cough reflex sensitivity during the URI period. To our knowledge, no previous studies have included multiple measurements of cough reflex sensitivity to capsaicin during a URI to evaluate the stability of this measure during the acute viral illness. In the current methodological investigation, we performed capsaicin cough challenges in 42 subjects with URI who were otherwise healthy, adult, nonsmokers (25 female). Subjects were enrolled within 72 h of onset of illness and randomly assigned to 3 groups (n = 14 each) that underwent cough reflex sensitivity measurement (C2 and C5) at days 0 and 1 for group 1; days 2 and 3 for group 2; or days 4 and 5 for group 3. Each subject returned 4-8 weeks post-viral infection to establish a healthy baseline measurement (recovery). Our results support that cough reflex sensitivity to capsaicin, as measured by C5, is a sensitive measure that remains stable during 6 days of a URI. These results suggest that cough reflex sensitivity measures in the presence of a URI provide a sensitive and reproducible approach that could be used in future investigations seeking to test experimental antitussive therapies.

  20. Morphology of respiratory tract lesions in rats exposed to radon progeny

    SciTech Connect

    Dagle, G.E.; Cross, F.T.; Gies, R.A.

    1992-12-31

    We will discuss the morphologic features of lesions in the respiratory tract of rats exposed to radon and radon progeny. Groups of male Wister rats were exposed to from 10 to 1000 working levels (WL) of radon progeny in the presence of less than 1 to about 15 mg m{sup {minus}3} uranium ore dust. Cumulative exposures ranged from 20 to approximately 10,000 working level months (WLM). Higher exposure levels produced radiation pneumonitis characterized by interstitial fibrosis, associated with alveolar epithelial cell hyperplasia and accumulations of alveolar macrophages containing phagocytosed uranium ore dust. Nodular fibrosis and alveolar proteinosis were correlated with deposits of uranium ore dust. Vesicular emphysema also occurred at higher exposure levels. Pulmonary adenomatosis appeared to be a preneoplastic lesion; it was composed of nodular proliferation of bronchioloalveolar epithelium without disruption of the general architecture of the parenchyma. At exposure levels where rats lived longer than 1 y, lung tumors and a few tumors of the nasal cavity developed. The principal lung tumors were pulmonary adenomas, bronchioloalveolar carcinomas, papillary adenocarcinomas, epidermoid carcinomas, and adenosquamous carcinomas. Occasionally, malignant mesotheliomas and sarcomas were also present. The malignant lung tumors were characterized by invasion and occasionally metastasized to regional lymph nodes. Lower exposure rates produced more tumors, generally of different histologic types, and more fatal tumors than higher exposure rates. The similarity to relationships of human radon progeny exposure as far as incidence and types of lung tumors establish the validity of this animal model for studying radon carcinogenesis in humans.

  1. Characteristics of Streptococcus pneumoniae Strains Colonizing Upper Respiratory Tract of Healthy Preschool Children in Poland

    PubMed Central

    Korona-Glowniak, Izabela; Malm, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Antibiotic resistant and invasive pneumococci may spread temporally and locally in day care centers (DCCs). We examined 267 children attending four DCCs located in the same city and 70 children staying at home in three seasons (autumn, winter, and spring) to determine prevalence, serotype distribution, antibiotic resistance patterns, and transmission of pneumococcal strains colonizing upper respiratory tract of healthy children without antipneumococcal vaccination. By pheno- and genotyping, we determined clonality of pneumococci, including drug-resistant strains. The average carriage of pneumococci in three seasons was 38.2%. 73.4% and 80.4% of the isolates belonged to serotypes present in 10- and 13-valent conjugate vaccine, respectively. Among the pneumococcal strains, 33.3% were susceptible to all antimicrobial tested and 39.2% had decreased susceptibility to penicillin. Multidrug resistance was common (35.7%); 97.5% of drug-resistant isolates represented serotypes included to 10- and 13-valent conjugate vaccine. According to BOX-PCR, clonality definitely was observed only in case of serotype 14. Multivariate analysis determined DCC attendance as strongly related to pneumococcal colonization in all three seasons, but important seasonal differences were demonstrated. In children attending DCCs, we observed dynamic turnover of pneumococcal strains, especially penicillin nonsusceptible and multidrug resistant, which were mostly distributed among serotypes included to available pneumococcal conjugate vaccines. PMID:22927787

  2. Reducing antibiotic prescribing for children with respiratory tract infections in primary care: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Vodicka, Talley A; Thompson, Matthew; Lucas, Patricia; Heneghan, Carl; Blair, Peter S; Buckley, David I; Redmond, Niamh; Hay, Alastair D

    2013-01-01

    Background Respiratory tract infections (RTIs) in children are common and often result in antibiotic prescription despite their typically self-limiting course. Aim To assess the effectiveness of primary care based interventions to reduce antibiotic prescribing for children with RTIs. Design and setting Systematic review. Method MEDLINE®, Embase, CINAHL®, PsycINFO, and the Cochrane library were searched for randomised, cluster randomised, and non-randomised studies testing educational and/or behavioural interventions to change antibiotic prescribing for children (<18 years) with RTIs. Main outcomes included change in proportion of total antibiotic prescribing or change in ‘appropriate’ prescribing for RTIs. Narrative analysis of included studies was used to identify components of effective interventions. Results Of 6301 references identified through database searching, 17 studies were included. Interventions that combined parent education with clinician behaviour change decreased antibiotic prescribing rates by between 6–21%; structuring the parent–clinician interaction during the consultation may further increase the effectiveness of these interventions. Automatic computerised prescribing prompts increased prescribing appropriateness, while passive information, in the form of waiting room educational materials, yielded no benefit. Conclusion Conflicting evidence from the included studies found that interventions directed towards parents and/or clinicians can reduce rates of antibiotic prescribing. The most effective interventions target both parents and clinicians during consultations, provide automatic prescribing prompts, and promote clinician leadership in the intervention design. PMID:23834881

  3. The upper respiratory tract is a natural reservoir of haemolytic Mannheimia species associated with ovine mastitis.

    PubMed

    Omaleki, Lida; Browning, Glenn F; Allen, Joanne L; Markham, Philip F; Barber, Stuart R

    2015-12-31

    Lamb suckling has been suggested to be an important way of infecting a ewe's udder with different bacteria, including Mannheimia haemolytica. To test the potential role of lambs in transferring Mannheimia species to the ewe's udder, the restriction endonuclease cleavage patterns of isolates obtained from nasopharyngeal swabs were compared with those obtained from cases of mastitis. Sterile cotton swabs were used to collect nasopharyngeal samples from 50 ewes and 36 lambs from three flocks. M. haemolytica and Mannheimia glucosida as well as haemolytic Mannheimia ruminalis-like organisms were detected in the upper respiratory tract of lambs and ewes. Comparison of the restriction endonuclease cleavage patterns of the isolates suggested that the M. haemolytica isolates obtained from different milk samples from ewes with mastitis were more clonal than those obtained from the nasal swabs. However, some nasal isolates within both Mannheimia species had restriction endonuclease cleavage patterns identical to those obtained from milk samples from ewes with mastitis, indicating that lambs may have a role in transferring these organisms to the udder. More clonality was observed between the M. glucosida isolates than between M. haemolytica isolates.

  4. Clearance of Bordetella parapertussis from the Lower Respiratory Tract Requires Humoral and Cellular Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Wolfe, Daniel N.; Kirimanjeswara, Girish S.; Harvill, Eric T.

    2005-01-01

    Bordetella parapertussis and Bordetella pertussis are closely related species that cause whooping cough, an acute, immunizing disease. Their coexistence in the same host populations at the same time and vaccine studies showing that B. pertussis vaccines have little effect on B. parapertussis infection or disease suggest that the protective immunity induced by each does not efficiently cross protect against the other. Although the mechanisms of protective immunity to B. pertussis have been well studied, those of B. parapertussis have not. The present study explores the mechanism by which B. parapertussis is cleared from the lower respiratory tract by anamnestic immunity. Serum antibodies are necessary and sufficient for elimination of this bacterium, and CD4+ T cells, complement, and neutrophils are required for serum antibody-mediated clearance. Mice lacking immunoglobulin A had no defect in their ability to control or clear infection. Interestingly, serum antibody-mediated clearance of B. parapertussis did not require Fc receptors that are required for antibody-mediated clearance of B. pertussis. Together these data support a model for the mechanism of protective immunity to B. parapertussis that is similar but distinct from that of B. pertussis. PMID:16177324

  5. [A case of chronic lower respiratory tract infection in which the traditional herbal medicine Hochuekkito was effective to prevent exacerbation].

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Masayuki; Bando, Masashi; Saito, Takefumi; Yamasawa, Hideaki; Sugiyama, Yukihiko; Itoh, Koichi

    2011-03-01

    A thin, 63-year-old man was receiving low-dose macrolide therapy for a diagnosis of chronic lower respiratory tract infection, but frequent exacerbations due to Streptococcus pneumoniae were observed. High-resolution computed tomography (CT) of the chest showed bronchiectasis and small centrilobular nodules in the right lower lobe. He had previously had several episodes of exacerbation of chronic lower respiratory tract infection, for which he had received antibiotic treatments (oral fluoroquinolones or intravenous cephems). However, he continued to experience recurrent exacerbations, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa was also isolated from his sputum. To improve his general condition, Hochuekkito, a herbal medicine, was initiated. His body weight and serum albumin level gradually increased, and after 6 months of administration, neither S. pneumoniae nor P. aeruginosa were isolated from his

  6. "Hold Harmless" Option for Staff Babysitting and Employee References

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruno, Holly Elissa

    2010-01-01

    Help for educators and administrators may be on the way in the form of "hold harmless" documents that allow for flexibility in enforcing program policies. Having a "No Babysitting policy," and "Hold Harmless" documentation will not stop one's program from being sued. However, with the "No Babysitting policy" and "Hold Harmless" documentation…

  7. Probiotics and respiratory and gastrointestinal tract infections in Finnish military conscripts - a randomised placebo-controlled double-blinded study.

    PubMed

    Kalima, K; Lehtoranta, L; He, L; Pitkäniemi, J; Lundell, R; Julkunen, I; Roivainen, M; Närkiö, M; Mäkelä, M J; Siitonen, S; Korpela, R; Pitkäranta, A

    2016-09-01

    Military conscripts are susceptible to respiratory and gastrointestinal tract infections. In previous studies probiotics have shown potency to reduce upper respiratory and gastrointestinal infections. The aim was to study whether probiotic intervention has an impact on seasonal occurrence of upper respiratory and gastrointestinal infections in two different conscript groups. In a randomised, double-blinded, placebo controlled study (https://clinicaltrials.gov NCT01651195), a total of 983 healthy adults were enrolled from two intakes of conscripts. Conscripts were randomised to receive either a probiotic combination of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) and Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis BB12 (BB12) or a control chewing tablet twice daily for 150 days (recruits) or for 90 days (reserve officer candidates). Clinical examinations were carried out and daily symptom diaries were collected. Outcome measures were the number of days with respiratory and gastrointestinal symptoms and symptom incidence, number and duration of infection episodes, number of antibiotic treatments received and number of days out of service because of the infection. Statistically no significant differences were found between the intervention groups either in the risk of symptom incidence or duration. However, probiotic intervention was associated with reduction of specific respiratory infection symptoms in military recruits, but not in reserve officer candidates. Probiotics did not significantly reduce overall respiratory and gastrointestinal infection morbidity.

  8. Chemical exposure-response relationship between air pollutants and reactive oxygen species in the human respiratory tract

    PubMed Central

    Lakey, Pascale S. J.; Berkemeier, Thomas; Tong, Haijie; Arangio, Andrea M.; Lucas, Kurt; Pöschl, Ulrich; Shiraiwa, Manabu

    2016-01-01

    Air pollution can cause oxidative stress and adverse health effects such as asthma and other respiratory diseases, but the underlying chemical processes are not well characterized. Here we present chemical exposure-response relations between ambient concentrations of air pollutants and the production rates and concentrations of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the epithelial lining fluid (ELF) of the human respiratory tract. In highly polluted environments, fine particulate matter (PM2.5) containing redox-active transition metals, quinones, and secondary organic aerosols can increase ROS concentrations in the ELF to levels characteristic for respiratory diseases. Ambient ozone readily saturates the ELF and can enhance oxidative stress by depleting antioxidants and surfactants. Chemical exposure-response relations provide a quantitative basis for assessing the relative importance of specific air pollutants in different regions of the world, showing that aerosol-induced epithelial ROS levels in polluted megacity air can be several orders of magnitude higher than in pristine rainforest air. PMID:27605301

  9. Chemical exposure-response relationship between air pollutants and reactive oxygen species in the human respiratory tract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakey, Pascale S. J.; Berkemeier, Thomas; Tong, Haijie; Arangio, Andrea M.; Lucas, Kurt; Pöschl, Ulrich; Shiraiwa, Manabu

    2016-09-01

    Air pollution can cause oxidative stress and adverse health effects such as asthma and other respiratory diseases, but the underlying chemical processes are not well characterized. Here we present chemical exposure-response relations between ambient concentrations of air pollutants and the production rates and concentrations of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the epithelial lining fluid (ELF) of the human respiratory tract. In highly polluted environments, fine particulate matter (PM2.5) containing redox-active transition metals, quinones, and secondary organic aerosols can increase ROS concentrations in the ELF to levels characteristic for respiratory diseases. Ambient ozone readily saturates the ELF and can enhance oxidative stress by depleting antioxidants and surfactants. Chemical exposure-response relations provide a quantitative basis for assessing the relative importance of specific air pollutants in different regions of the world, showing that aerosol-induced epithelial ROS levels in polluted megacity air can be several orders of magnitude higher than in pristine rainforest air.

  10. A Case of Lower Respiratory Tract Infection with Canine-associated Pasteurella canis in a Patient with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Preetam R.; Biranthabail, Dhanashree; Rangnekar, Aseem; Shiragavi, Sachin

    2015-01-01

    This is the report of lower respiratory tract infection with Pasteurella canis in a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patient with history of casual exposure to cats. Pasteurella species are part of the oral and gastrointestinal flora in the canine animals. These organisms are usually implicated in wound infection following animal bites, but can also be associated with a variety of infections including respiratory tract infections. PMID:26435948

  11. Tracking resistance among bacterial respiratory tract pathogens: summary of findings of the TRUST Surveillance Initiative, 2001-2005.

    PubMed

    Sahm, Daniel F; Brown, Nina P; Draghi, Deborah C; Evangelista, Alan T; Yee, Y Cheung; Thornsberry, Clyde

    2008-09-01

    Antimicrobial resistance observed among common respiratory tract pathogens--Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Moraxella catarrhalis--may complicate empiric therapeutic selection to treat community-acquired respiratory tract infections. The Tracking Resistance in the United States Today (TRUST) study determined the in vitro activities of frequently prescribed antimicrobial agents against isolates collected from all 50 states from 2001 to 2005. For S pneumoniae (N = 27,781), susceptibility of selected agents in ascending order were penicillin (oral) (65.4%), trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) (69.5%), erythromycin (72.0%), cefuroxime (oral) (75.9%), tetracycline (85.3%), amoxicillinclavulanate (92.6%), ceftriaxone (nonmeningitis) (96.6%), and levofloxacin (99.0%). Susceptibility to levofloxacin, which was used as a representative of the respiratory fluoroquinolones, was near 99% from 2001 to 2005, and the minimum inhibitory concentration (90%) (MIC(90)) remained unchanged at 1 microg/mL. Levofloxacin and the other respiratory fluoroquinolones remained highly effective against penicillin-resistant S pneumoniae(PRSP) (98%-99% susceptible). However, susceptibility of PRSP to amoxicillin-clavulanate decreased from 62%S in 2003 to 48%S in 2005. Haemophilus influenzae susceptibility to ampicillin averaged near 70%, and near 75% to TMP-SMX. Susceptibility rates to levofloxacin and the other respiratory fluoroquinolones for H influenzae and M catarrhalis remained at or near 100%. Although resistance rates among S pneumoniae have stabilized for penicillin (oral) at elevated levels and increased for macrolides, susceptibility to the respiratory fluoroquinolones has consistently remained high, as they have for H influenzae and M catarrhalis.

  12. Component-specific, cigarette particle deposition modeling in the human respiratory tract

    PubMed Central

    Price, Owen T.; Yurteri, Caner U.; Dickens, Colin; McAughey, John

    2014-01-01

    Inhalation of cigarette smoke particles (CSP) leads to adverse health effects in smokers. Determination of the localized dose to the lung of the inhaled smoke aids in determining vulnerable sites, and identifying components of the smoke that may be responsible for the adverse effects; thus providing a roadmap for harm reduction of cigarette smoking. A particle deposition model specific to CSP was developed for the oral cavity and the lung by accounting for cigarette particle size growth by hygroscopicity, phase change and coagulation. In addition, since the cigarette puff enters the respiratory tract as a dense cloud, the cloud effect on particle drag and deposition was accounted for in the deposition model. Models of particle losses in the oral cavities were developed during puff drawing and subsequent mouth-hold. Cigarette particles were found to grow by hygroscopicity and coagulation, but to shrink as a result of nicotine evaporation. The particle size reached a plateau beyond which any disturbances in the environmental conditions caused the various mechanisms to balance each other out and the particle size remain stable. Predicted particle deposition considering the cloud effects was greater than when treated as a collection of non-interacting particles (i.e. no cloud effects). Accounting for cloud movement provided the necessary physical mechanism to explain the greater than expected, experimentally observed and particle deposition. The deposition model for CSP can provide the necessary input to determine the fate of inhaled CSP in the lung. The knowledge of deposition will be helpful for health assessment and identification and reduction of harmful components of CSP. PMID:24354791

  13. Maternal agency influences the prevalence of diarrhea and acute respiratory tract infections among young Indonesian children.

    PubMed

    Agustina, Rina; Shankar, Anita V; Ayuningtyas, Azalea; Achadi, Endang L; Shankar, Anuraj H

    2015-05-01

    To examine the relationship between measures of mother's caretaking, practice and individual agency on acute diarrhea and respiratory tract infections (ARTIs) of Indonesian children. Using population-based household data from the Indonesian Demographic Health Surveys for 2002-2003 (n = 9,151 children) and 2007 (n = 9,714 children), we selected 28 indicators related to mother' caretaking, and applied principal component analysis to derive indices for access to care, practice and experience, and agency. The association between index quartiles (level 1-4) and the prevalence of diarrhea and ARTIs in the youngest child <5 years of age was assessed with multivariate logistic regression adjusting for socioeconomic status, residence type, mother's age and education, family size, child's age and sex, immunization status and received vitamin A supplementation. Moderate levels (level 3) of practice and experience were associated with decreased diarrheal risk (adjusted OR 0.86, 95 % CI 0.75-0.98), but not for ARTIs. Children of mothers with higher levels (level 4) of agency were protected against both diarrhea (adjusted OR 0.68, 95 % CI 0.60-0.77) and ARTIs (adjusted OR 0.77, 95 % CI 0.66-0.91). Stratified analyses with child's age and mother's education, and tests of interaction, showed that agency had a stronger effect on diarrhea and ARTIs prevalence in children <2 years of age. Maternal caretaking, especially agency, is strongly associated with lower prevalence of diarrhea and ARTIs in younger children. Interventions specifically designed to promote maternal autonomy and decision-making may lead to improved child health.

  14. From Visiting a Physician to Expecting Antibiotics: Korean Perspectives and Practices toward Respiratory Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is steadily rising worldwide. Respiratory tract infections (RTIs) are common indications, mostly imprudent, for antibiotic prescriptions in outpatient setting. In Korea, antibiotic prescription rate for RTIs is still high. As physician visit and antibiotic prescribing are influenced by patient's perceptions and beliefs, we aimed to explore the general public's perspectives and practices toward RTIs and to develop the ‘RTI clinical iceberg.’ A cross-sectional survey was conducted in Wonju Severance Christian Hospital (WSCH) among 550 adults attending outpatient departments during January 2016. Differences in distributions between groups were examined using two-tailed Pearson χ2 test. Using the Andersen's behavioral model as a conceptual framework, we constructed logistic regression models to assess factors associated with physician visit. Of 547 participants with complete questionnaires, 62.9% reported having experienced an RTI in the previous six months; 59.3% visited a physician for the illness, most commonly because the symptoms were severe or prolonged, and approximately 16% of them expected an antibiotic prescription from the visit. Perceptions of symptoms severity, the need factor, most strongly influenced physician visit. Predisposing and enabling factors such as inappropriate expectations for antibiotic for a sore throat or having national health insurance also influenced physician visit. Almost all participants who reported asking for an antibiotic were prescribed one, with a 37.1% non-adherence rate. Conclusively, public education on self-care for RTI symptoms that addresses their main concerns may reduce physician visits. Improving physician-patient relationship and informing patients about the lack of antibiotic benefit for most RTIs may also reduce antibiotic prescriptions. PMID:28049239

  15. Understanding the delayed prescribing of antibiotics for respiratory tract infection in primary care: a qualitative analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ryves, R; Eyles, C; Moore, M; McDermott, L; Little, P; Leydon, G M

    2016-01-01

    Objective To identify general practitioner (GP) views and understanding on the use of delayed prescribing in primary care. Design Qualitative semistructured telephone interview study. Setting Primary care general practices in England. Participants 32 GPs from identified high-prescribing and low-prescribing general practices in England. Method Semistructured telephone interviews were conducted with GPs identified from practices within clinical commissioning groups with the highest and lowest prescribing rates in England. A thematic analysis of the data was conducted to generate themes. Results All GPs had a good understanding of respiratory tract infection (RTI) management and how the delayed prescribing approach could be used in primary care. However, GPs highlighted factors that were influential as to whether delayed prescribing was successfully carried out during the consultation. These included the increase in evidence of antimicrobial resistance, and GPs' prior experiences of using delayed prescribing during the consultation. The patient–practitioner relationship could also influence treatment outcomes for RTI, and a lack of an agreed prescribing strategy within and between practices was considered to be of significance to GPs. Participants expressed that a lack of feedback on prescribing data at an individual and practice level made it difficult to know if delayed prescribing strategies were successful in reducing unnecessary consumption. GPs agreed that coherent and uniform training and guidelines would be of some benefit to ensure consistent prescribing throughout the UK. Conclusions Delayed prescribing is encouraged in primary care, but is not always implemented successfully. Greater uniformity within and between practices in the UK is needed to operationalise delayed prescribing, as well as providing feedback on the uptake of antibiotics. Finally, GPs may need further guidance on how to answer the concerns of patients without interpreting these questions

  16. Lower respiratory tract infections among human immunodeficiency virus-exposed, uninfected infants

    PubMed Central

    Mussi-Pinhata, Marisa M; Motta, Fabrizio; Freimanis-Hance, Laura; de Souza, Ricardo; Szyld, Edgardo; Succi, Regina CM; Christie, Celia DC; Rolon, Maria J.; Ceriotto, Mariana; Read, Jennifer S.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate whether maternal HIV disease severity during pregnancy is associated with an increased likelihood of lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) in HIV-exposed, uninfected infants. Methods HIV-exposed, uninfected, singleton, term infants enrolled in the NISDI Perinatal Study, with birth weight ≥ 2500 grams were followed from birth until six months of age. LRTI diagnoses, hospitalizations, and associated factors were assessed. Results Of 547 infants, 103 (18.8%) experienced 116 episodes of LRTIs (incidence=0.84 LRTIs/100 child-weeks). Most (81%) episodes were bronchiolitis. Forty-nine (9.0%) infants were hospitalized at least once with an LRTI. There were 53 hospitalizations (45.7%) for 116 LRTI episodes. None of these infants were breastfed. The odds of LRTI in infants whose mothers had CD4%<14 were 4.4 times than that of those whose mothers had CD4%≥29 (p=0.003). The odds of LRTI were 16.0 times that of infants with a CD4+ count [cells/mm3] < 750 at birth compared to those with CD4+≥750 (p=0.002). Maternal CD4+ decline and Infant hemoglobin at the 6-12 week visit were associated with infant LRTIs after 6-12 weeks and before six months of age. Conclusions Acute bronchiolitis is common and frequently severe among HIV-exposed, uninfected infants aged six months or less. Lower maternal and infant CD4+ values were associated with a higher risk of infant LRTIs. Further understanding of the immunological mechanisms of severe LRTIs is needed. PMID:20452798

  17. Expectations for consultations and antibiotics for respiratory tract infection in primary care: the RTI clinical iceberg

    PubMed Central

    McNulty, Cliodna AM; Nichols, Tom; French, David P; Joshi, Puja; Butler, Chris C

    2013-01-01

    Background Respiratory tract infection (RTI) is the commonest indication for community antibiotic prescriptions. Prescribing is rising and is influenced by patients’ consulting behaviour and beliefs. Aim To build up a profile of the ‘RTI clinical iceberg’ by exploring how the general public manage RTI, visit GPs and why. Design and setting Two-phase qualitative and quantitative study in England. Method Qualitative interviews with 17 participants with acute RTI visiting pharmacies in England, and face-to-face questionnaire survey of 1767 adults ≥15 years in households in England during January 2011. Results Qualitative interviews: interviewees with RTI visited GPs if they considered their symptoms were prolonged, or severe enough to cause pain, or interfered with daily activities or sleep. Questionnaire: 58% reported having had an RTI in the previous 6 months, and 19.7% (95% CI = 16.8 to 22.9%) of these contacted or visited their GP surgery for this, most commonly because ‘the symptoms were severe’; or ‘after several days the symptoms hadn’t improved’; 10.3% of those experiencing an RTI (or 53.1% of those contacting their GP about it) expected an antibiotic prescription. Responders were more likely to believe antibiotics would be effective for a cough with green rather than clear phlegm. Perceptions of side effects of antibiotics did not influence expectations for antibiotics. Almost all who reported asking for an antibiotic were prescribed one, but 25% did not finish them. Conclusion One-fifth of those with an RTI contact their GP and most who ask for antibiotics are prescribed them. A better public understanding about the lack of benefit of antibiotics for most RTIs and addressing concerns about illness duration and severity, could reduce GP consultations and antibiotic prescriptions for RTI. PMID:23834879

  18. Comparison of azithromycin versus clarithromycin in the treatment of patients with lower respiratory tract infection.

    PubMed

    Bradbury, F

    1993-06-01

    The efficacy and safety of azithromycin and clarithromycin in lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) were compared in an open, multicentre study. Five hundred and ten adult patients with a diagnosis of LRTI, including acute bronchitis, acute infective exacerbations of chronic bronchitis (AIECB) or pneumonia were enrolled. The patients were randomly assigned to receive either azithromycin (n = 252) as a single daily dose of 500 mg for three days, or clarithromycin (n = 258) 250 mg twice daily for ten days. In AIECB patients, baseline comparisons of the two treatment groups showed that there were no differences in the number of previous episodes of infection or in the incidence of current or past smokers. The overall clinical efficacy was found to be similar in each treatment group on day 10 to 14, with a satisfactory response (cured or improved) in 94% of azithromycin- and 97% of clarithromycin-treated patients. At follow-up evaluation (day 18 to 22), 97% of azithromycin- and 100% of clarithromycin-treated patients who had improved at day 10 to 14, showed satisfactory outcomes. Bacteriological efficacy was similar in both treatment groups, with eradication of 100% vs 95% of isolates in the azithromycin and clarithromycin groups, respectively. In AIECB, 100% of pathogens were eradicated by azithromycin, although one patient was clinically assessed as failed. Clarithromycin eradicated 93% of pathogens in this group; all patients being assessed as cured or improved. Both drugs were well tolerated, with 9% and 6% of patients reporting adverse events with azithromycin and clarithromycin, respectively. These adverse events were largely gastrointestinal in origin. It was concluded that a three-day course of azithromycin is as effective and well tolerated as a ten-day course of clarithromycin in adults with acute LRTIs.

  19. Comparison of azithromycin versus clarithromycin in the treatment of patients with upper respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed

    Müller, O

    1993-06-01

    well-tolerated as a ten-day course of clarithromycin in adults with acute upper respiratory tract infections.

  20. Spatial visualization of theoretical nanoparticle deposition in the human respiratory tract

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Although nanoparticles and their hazardous effects on human health are well elucidated meanwhile, inhalation and distribution of these materials in the human respiratory tract still represent partly enigmatic phenomena. Main objective of the present study was the detailed description of a mathematical method, with the help of which spatial distributions of nanoparticles deposited in the tracheobronchial tree may be visualized appropriately. Methods The technique is founded on a stochastic model of the bronchial network, within which inhaled particles follow individual, randomly selected trajectories. The lengths of these random paths depend on the airway-specific deposition probabilities calculated for the particles and the duration of the breath cycle. Positions of the deposited material were determined by computation of the exact lengths of individual particle trajectories and the orientation of single path segments within a Cartesian coordinate system, where the z-direction corresponds with the trachea. For a better quantification of the particle distribution and its eventual comparison with experimental data particle coordinates were fitted into a voxel grid [1 voxel = (0.467 cm)3]. Particle deposition is chiefly controlled by diffusive processes, whereas deposition mechanisms associated with inertia or gravity play a subordinate role. Results Deposition patterns were visualized for particles with sizes of 1, 10, and 100 nm. As clearly demonstrated by the results obtained from the modeling procedure, under normal breathing conditions 1-nm particles tend to deposit in the upper airways, whilst 10- and 100-nm particles are preferably accumulated in the airways of the central and peripheral lung. The particle dose deposited in the extrathoracic and thoracic airways within one breath cycle significantly declines with increasing particle size. Conclusions Based on the predictions presented in this study possible consequences of nanoparticle inhalation to

  1. Impact of symptomatic upper respiratory tract infections on insulin absorption and action of Technosphere inhaled insulin

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Philip A; Heinemann, Lutz; Boss, Anders; Rosenblit, Paul D

    2016-01-01

    Objective Uncomplicated, acute upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs) occur in patients with diabetes at a similar frequency to the general population. This study (NCT00642681) investigated the effect of URTIs on the pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) properties of Technosphere inhaled insulin (TI) in patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Research design and methods This was a phase 2 study conducted in patients who developed a URTI while being treated with TI in a phase 3 study (N=20, mean age 50 years, 60% men). Patients underwent two 4-hour meal challenges, during which blood samples were drawn to measure serum fumaryl diketopiperazine (FDKP; the excipient representing an essential part of TI), serum insulin, serum C-peptide, and plasma glucose. The primary outcome was the ratio of serum FDKP area under the concentration–time curve from 0 to 240 min (AUC0–240 min) during URTI and after clinical resolution of URTI symptoms (≥15 to ≤45 days). Results No significant differences in PK parameters were seen during URTI versus post-URTI for FDKP. The ratio of serum FDKP AUC0–240 min during URTI and post-URTI was 1.1 (SD 0.6), p=0.4462. Plasma glucose concentrations during each 4-hour meal challenge were similar, showing small non-significant differences. No adverse events, including hypoglycemia, occurred during meal challenge visits. Conclusions Development of an active, symptomatic URTI during treatment with TI had no significant impact on the PK/PD properties of TI, suggesting that no adjustment in prandial insulin dosing is needed. However, if patients are unable to conduct proper inhalation, they should administer their prandial insulin subcutaneously. Trial registration number NCT00642681; Results. PMID:27648286

  2. Antibiotic prescribing and admissions with major suppurative complications of respiratory tract infections: a data linkage study.

    PubMed Central

    Little, Paul; Watson, Louise; Morgan, Stephen; Williamson, Ian

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Systematic reviews of antibiotic treatment of common acute respiratory tract infections (RTIs) suggest modest symptomatic benefit, but provide limited evidence that prescribing prevents complications. AIM: To assess the relationship between penicillin prescribing (the most commonly used group of antibiotics for RTIs) and hospital admission with complications. DESIGN OF STUDY: Data linkage study. SETTING: Ninety-six health authorities of England for the year 1997-1998. METHOD: Hospital admissions related to RTIs were linked with prescribing analysis and cost (PACT) data. RESULTS: There was close correlation between items of penicillin use and total antibiotic use (r = 0.96). After controlling for SMR, age, sex, and Townsend score, a one-unit increase in penicillin use (items dispensed per capita) was associated with a reduction in annual incidence per 10,000 of admissions for quinsy (-3.55 admissions, 95% confidence interval [CI] = -6.85 to -0.26), and mastoiditis (square root of incidence of admissions = -1.05, 95% CI = -1.82 to -0.27). This does not represent lower referral thresholds among higher prescribers as higher prescribing was associated with more admissions for tonsillectomy and overall admissions. Increasing prescribing by 2000 items of penicillin for a practice of 10,000 patients could possibly prevent one admission for either mastoiditis or quinsy. CONCLUSION: Higher antibiotic prescribing is associated with significantly fewer admissions with major complications. However, the overall size of the effect is modest and it is difficult to advocate an overall increase in prescribing to prevent complications. Future research should concentrate on finding better methods of targeting antibiotics to individuals at risk of poor outcome. PMID:12030660

  3. Novel, host-restricted genotypes of Bordetella bronchiseptica associated with phocine respiratory tract isolates

    PubMed Central

    Ivanov, Yury V.; Harvill, Eric T.; Davison, Nick; Foster, Geoffrey

    2015-01-01

    During a succession of phocine morbillivirus outbreaks spanning the past 25 years, Bordetella bronchiseptica was identified as a frequent secondary invader and cause of death. The goal of this study was to evaluate genetic diversity and the molecular basis for host specificity among seal isolates from these outbreaks. MLST and PvuII ribotyping of 54 isolates from Scottish, English or Danish coasts of the Atlantic or North Sea revealed a single, host-restricted genotype. A single, novel genotype, unique from that of the Atlantic and North Sea isolates, was found in isolates from an outbreak in the Caspian Sea. Phylogenetic analysis based either on MLST sequence, ribotype patterns or genome-wide SNPs consistently placed both seal-specific genotypes within the same major clade but indicates a distinct evolutionary history for each. An additional isolate from the intestinal tract of a seal on the south-west coast of England has a genotype otherwise found in rabbit, guinea pig and pig isolates. To investigate the molecular basis for host specificity, DNA and predicted protein sequences of virulence genes that mediate host interactions were used in comparisons between a North Sea isolate, a Caspian Sea isolate and each of their closest relatives as inferred from genome-wide SNP analysis. Despite their phylogenetic divergence, fewer nucleotide and amino acid substitutions were found in comparisons of the two seal isolates than in comparisons with closely related strains. These data indicate isolates of B. bronchiseptica associated with respiratory disease in seals comprise unique, host-adapted and highly clonal populations. PMID:25627438

  4. Clinical effects of erdosteine in the treatment of acute respiratory tract diseases in children.

    PubMed

    Balli, F; Bergamini, B; Calistru, P; Ciofu, E P; Domenici, R; Doros, G; Dragomir, D; Gherghina, I; Iordachescu, F; Murgoci, G; Orasanu, D; Plesca, D; Vaccaro, A; Assereto, R

    2007-01-01

    Erdosteine has positive effects on mucus rheology and transport due to the active metabolite (Metabolite I) which contains a free thiol group. Erdosteine inhibits bacterial adhesiveness and has antioxidant properties. A synergistic effect of erdosteine with various antibiotics has been demonstrated in pharmacological and clinical studies. The present study was multicenter, randomized, double-blind and placebo-controlled. The aims of the study were to compare a combination of erdosteine with amoxicillin against an amoxicillin-placebo combination in pediatric patients with acute lower respiratory tract disease. A total of 158 patients (78 in the erdosteine group and 80 in the placebo group) were treated for 7 +/- 2 days. The efficacy parameters were cough (primary), polypnea, rhonchi, rales and body temperature (all measured at baseline, on Day 3 and at the end of treatment). Safety was assessed by strictly monitoring the occurrence of adverse events and using standard laboratory parameters. The results of the intention-to-treat analysis showed that the severity of cough was decreased by 47% at Day 3 in the erdosteine group with a statistically significant difference compared to placebo, the difference was still significant at the final visit. The decrease in the severity of rales was significantly greater at Day 3 in the erdosteine group than in the placebo group. The incidence of polypnea and rhonchi in the two groups showed similar decreases, an improvement mainly due to the antibiotic. No adverse events occurred and no adverse changes in laboratory parameters were observed. It is concluded that the combination of erdosteine and amoxicillin is a safe medication which is clinically superior to that of the antibiotic combined with placebo, especially in regard to the effects on cough.

  5. Relevance of nucleic acid amplification techniques for diagnosis of respiratory tract infections in the clinical laboratory.

    PubMed Central

    Ieven, M; Goossens, H

    1997-01-01

    Clinical laboratories are increasingly receiving requests to perform nucleic acid amplification tests for the detection of a wide variety of infectious agents. In this paper, the efficiency of nucleic acid amplification techniques for the diagnosis of respiratory tract infections is reviewed. In general, these techniques should be applied only for the detection of microorganisms for which available diagnostic techniques are markedly insensitive or nonexistent or when turnaround times for existing tests (e.g., viral culture) are much longer than those expected with amplification. This is the case for rhinoviruses, coronaviruses, and hantaviruses causing a pulmonary syndrome, Bordetella pertussis, Chlamydia pneumoniae, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, and Coxiella burnetii. For Legionella spp. and fungi, contamination originating from the environment is a limiting factor in interpretation of results, as is the difficulty in differentiating colonization and infection. Detection of these agents in urine or blood by amplification techniques remains to be evaluated. In the clinical setting, there is no need for molecular diagnostic tests for the diagnosis of Pneumocystis carinii. At present, amplification methods for Mycobacterium tuberculosis cannot replace the classical diagnostic techniques, due to their lack of sensitivity and the absence of specific internal controls for the detection of inhibitors of the reaction. Also, the results of interlaboratory comparisons are unsatisfactory. Furthermore, isolates are needed for susceptibility studies. Additional work remains to be done on sample preparation methods, comparison between different amplification methods, and analysis of results. The techniques can be useful for the rapid identification of M. tuberculosis in particular circumstances, as well as the rapid detection of most rifampin-resistant isolates. The introduction of diagnostic amplification techniques into a clinical laboratory implies a level of proficiency for

  6. Comparisons of calculated respiratory tract deposition of particles based on the NCRP/ITRI model and the new ICRP66 model

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, Hsu-Chi; Phalen, R.F.; Chang, I.

    1995-12-01

    The National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) in the United States and the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) have been independently reviewing and revising respiratory tract dosimetry models for inhaled radioactive aerosols. The newly proposed NCRP respiratory tract dosimetry model represents a significant change in philosophy from the old ICRP Task Group model. The proposed NCRP model describes respiratory tract deposition, clearance, and dosimetry for radioactive substances inhaled by workers and the general public and is expected to be published soon. In support of the NCRP proposed model, ITRI staff members have been developing computer software. Although this software is still incomplete, the deposition portion has been completed and can be used to calculate inhaled particle deposition within the respiratory tract for particle sizes as small as radon and radon progeny ({approximately} 1 nm) to particles larger than 100 {mu}m. Recently, ICRP published their new dosimetric model for the respiratory tract, ICRP66. Based on ICRP66, the National Radiological Protection Board of the UK developed PC-based software, LUDEP, for calculating particle deposition and internal doses. The purpose of this report is to compare the calculated respiratory tract deposition of particles using the NCRP/ITRI model and the ICRP66 model, under the same particle size distribution and breathing conditions. In summary, the general trends of the deposition curves for the two models were similar.

  7. Early Adaptive Immune Responses in the Respiratory Tract of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus-Infected Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Pega, J.; Bucafusco, D.; Di Giacomo, S.; Schammas, J. M.; Malacari, D.; Capozzo, A. V.; Arzt, J.; Pérez-Beascoechea, C.; Maradei, E.; Rodríguez, L. L.; Borca, M. V.

    2013-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious viral disease which affects both domestic and wild biungulate species. This acute disease, caused by the FMD virus (FMDV), usually includes an active replication phase in the respiratory tract for up to 72 h postinfection, followed by hematogenous dissemination and vesicular lesions at oral and foot epithelia. The role of the early local adaptive immunity of the host in the outcome of the infection is not well understood. Here we report the kinetics of appearance of FMDV-specific antibody-secreting cells (ASC) in lymphoid organs along the respiratory tract and the spleen in cattle infected by aerosol exposure. While no responses were observed for up to 3 days postinfection (dpi), all animals developed FMDV-ASC in all the lymphoid organs studied at 4 dpi. Tracheobronchial lymph nodes were the most reactive organs at this time, and IgM was the predominant isotype, followed by IgG1. Numbers of FMDV-ASC were further augmented at 5 and 6 dpi, with an increasing prevalence in upper respiratory organs. Systemic antibody responses were slightly delayed compared with the local reaction. Also, IgM was the dominant isotype in serum at 5 dpi, coinciding with a sharp decrease of viral RNA detection in peripheral blood. These results indicate that following aerogenous administration, cattle develop a rapid and vigorous genuine local antibody response throughout the respiratory tract. Time course and isotype profiles indicate the presence of an efficient T cell-independent antibody response which drives the IgM-mediated virus clearance in cattle infected by FMDV aerosol exposure. PMID:23255811

  8. Effect of Antimicrobial Consumption and Production Type on Antibacterial Resistance in the Bovine Respiratory and Digestive Tract.

    PubMed

    Catry, Boudewijn; Dewulf, Jeroen; Maes, Dominiek; Pardon, Bart; Callens, Benedicte; Vanrobaeys, Mia; Opsomer, Geert; de Kruif, Aart; Haesebrouck, Freddy

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between antimicrobial use and the occurrence of antimicrobial resistance in the digestive and respiratory tract in three different production systems of food producing animals. A longitudinal study was set up in 25 Belgian bovine herds (10 dairy, 10 beef, and 5 veal herds) for a 2 year monitoring of antimicrobial susceptibilities in E. coli and Pasteurellaceae retrieved from the rectum and the nasal cavity, respectively. During the first year of observation, the antimicrobial use was prospectively recorded on 15 of these farms (5 of each production type) and transformed into the treatment incidences according to the (animal) defined daily dose (TIADD) and (actually) used daily dose (TIUDD). Antimicrobial resistance rates of 4,174 E. coli (all herds) and 474 Pasteurellaceae (beef and veal herds only) isolates for 12 antimicrobial agents demonstrated large differences between intensively reared veal calves (abundant and inconstant) and more extensively reared dairy and beef cattle (sparse and relatively stable). Using linear mixed effect models, a strong relation was found between antimicrobial treatment incidences and resistance profiles of 1,639 E. coli strains (p<0.0001) and 309 Pasteurellaceae (p≤0.012). These results indicate that a high antimicrobial selection pressure, here found to be represented by low dosages of oral prophylactic and therapeutic group medication, converts not only the commensal microbiota from the digestive tract but also the opportunistic pathogenic bacteria in the respiratory tract into reservoirs of multi-resistance.

  9. Effect of Antimicrobial Consumption and Production Type on Antibacterial Resistance in the Bovine Respiratory and Digestive Tract

    PubMed Central

    Catry, Boudewijn; Dewulf, Jeroen; Maes, Dominiek; Pardon, Bart; Callens, Benedicte; Vanrobaeys, Mia; Opsomer, Geert; de Kruif, Aart; Haesebrouck, Freddy

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between antimicrobial use and the occurrence of antimicrobial resistance in the digestive and respiratory tract in three different production systems of food producing animals. A longitudinal study was set up in 25 Belgian bovine herds (10 dairy, 10 beef, and 5 veal herds) for a 2 year monitoring of antimicrobial susceptibilities in E. coli and Pasteurellaceae retrieved from the rectum and the nasal cavity, respectively. During the first year of observation, the antimicrobial use was prospectively recorded on 15 of these farms (5 of each production type) and transformed into the treatment incidences according to the (animal) defined daily dose (TIADD) and (actually) used daily dose (TIUDD). Antimicrobial resistance rates of 4,174 E. coli (all herds) and 474 Pasteurellaceae (beef and veal herds only) isolates for 12 antimicrobial agents demonstrated large differences between intensively reared veal calves (abundant and inconstant) and more extensively reared dairy and beef cattle (sparse and relatively stable). Using linear mixed effect models, a strong relation was found between antimicrobial treatment incidences and resistance profiles of 1,639 E. coli strains (p<0.0001) and 309 Pasteurellaceae (p≤0.012). These results indicate that a high antimicrobial selection pressure, here found to be represented by low dosages of oral prophylactic and therapeutic group medication, converts not only the commensal microbiota from the digestive tract but also the opportunistic pathogenic bacteria in the respiratory tract into reservoirs of multi-resistance. PMID:26820134

  10. IL-2 Expression and T lymphocyte Phenotyping in Young Children Suffering from Upper Respiratory Tract Infection with Streptococcus Pyogenes

    PubMed Central

    Guadalupe Ramirez-Valles, Eda; Dayali Gutierrez-Martinez, Verónica; Cervantes-Flores, Maribel; Ruiz-Baca, Estela; Alvarado-Esquivel, Cosme

    2016-01-01

    T cells are components of adaptive immunity and are involved in the resolution of respiratory infections, which are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in young children worldwide. Activation and differentiation of T cells is given mostly by the cytokine IL-2. This study aimed to determine the phenotype of T cells and IL-2 expression in children suffering from upper respiratory tract infection with Streptococcus pyogenes (S. pyogenes). For this purpose, IL-2 expression at its gene and protein levels and quantitation of CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes were assessed in children aged 0-5 years old suffering from upper respiratory tract infection with S. pyogenes and healthy children of the same age. Children with S. pyogenes infection had a higher expression of IL-2 gene and a lower level of this cytokine expression at protein level than healthy children. The numbers of CD4+ T lymphocytes were similar among the groups. In contrast, difference in the numbers of CD8+ T lymphocytes among the groups was found. We conclude that infections by S. pyogenes in young children lead to an increased expression of IL-2 mRNA. PMID:27493590

  11. Syrian hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus) oronasally inoculated with a Nipah virus isolate from Bangladesh or Malaysia develop similar respiratory tract lesions.

    PubMed

    Baseler, L; de Wit, E; Scott, D P; Munster, V J; Feldmann, H

    2015-01-01

    Nipah virus is a paramyxovirus in the genus Henipavirus, which has caused outbreaks in humans in Malaysia, India, Singapore, and Bangladesh. Whereas the human cases in Malaysia were characterized mainly by neurological symptoms and a case fatality rate of ∼40%, cases in Bangladesh also exhibited respiratory disease and had a case fatality rate of ∼70%. Here, we compared the histopathologic changes in the respiratory tract of Syrian hamsters, a well-established small animal disease model for Nipah virus, inoculated oronasally with Nipah virus isolates from human cases in Malaysia and Bangladesh. The Nipah virus isolate from Bangladesh caused slightly more severe rhinitis and bronchointerstitial pneumonia 2 days after inoculation in Syrian hamsters. By day 4, differences in lesion severity could no longer be detected. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated Nipah virus antigen in the nasal cavity and pulmonary lesions; the amount of Nipah virus antigen present correlated with lesion severity. Immunohistochemistry indicated that both Nipah virus isolates exhibited endotheliotropism in small- and medium-caliber arteries and arterioles, but not in veins, in the lung. This correlated with the location of ephrin B2, the main receptor for Nipah virus, in the vasculature. In conclusion, Nipah virus isolates from outbreaks in Malaysia and Bangladesh caused a similar type and severity of respiratory tract lesions in Syrian hamsters, suggesting that the differences in human disease reported in the outbreaks in Malaysia and Bangladesh are unlikely to have been caused by intrinsic differences in these 2 virus isolates.

  12. [Clinical and therapeutic management of respiratory tract infections. Consensus document of the Andalusian Infectious Diseases Society and the Andalusian Family and Community Medicine Society].

    PubMed

    Cordero Matía, Elisa; de Dios Alcántara Bellón, Juan; Caballero Granado, Javier; de la Torre Lima, Javier; Girón González, José Antonio; Lama Herrera, Carmen; Morán Rodríguez, Ana; Zapata López, Angel

    2007-04-01

    Respiratory tract infections are frequent and they are one of the commonest causes of antibiotic prescription. However, there are few clinical guidelines that consider this group of infections. This document has been written by the Andalusian Infectious Diseases Society and the Andalusian Family and Community Medicine Society. The primary objective has been to define the recommendations for the diagnosis and antibiotic treatment of respiratory tract infections apart from pneumonia. The clinical syndromes evaluated have been: a) pharyngitis; b) sinusitis; c) acute otitis media and otitis externa; d) acute bronchitis, laryngitis, epiglottitis; e) acute exacerbation of chronic bronchitis; and f) respiratory infectious in patients with bronchiectasis. This document has focused on immunocompetent patients.

  13. Vitamin D3 Supplementation and Upper Respiratory Tract Infections in a Randomized, Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Rees, Judy R.; Hendricks, Kristy; Barry, Elizabeth L.; Peacock, Janet L.; Mott, Leila A.; Sandler, Robert S.; Bresalier, Robert S.; Goodman, Michael; Bostick, Roberd M.; Baron, John A.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Randomized controlled trials testing the association between vitamin D status and upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) have given mixed results. During a multicenter, randomized controlled trial of colorectal adenoma chemoprevention, we tested whether 1000 IU/day vitamin D3 supplementation reduced winter episodes and duration of URTI and its composite syndromes, influenza-like illness (ILI; fever and ≥2 of sore throat, cough, muscle ache, or headache) and colds (no fever, and ≥2 of runny nose, nasal congestion, sneezing, sore throat, cough, swollen or tender neck glands). Methods. The 2259 trial participants were aged 45–75, in good health, had a history of colorectal adenoma, and had a serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level ≥12 ng/mL. They were randomized to vitamin D3 (1000 IU/day), calcium (1200 mg/day), both, or placebo. Of these, 759 participants completed daily symptom diaries. Secondary data included semiannual surveys of all participants. Results. Among those who completed symptom diaries, supplementation did not significantly reduce winter episodes of URTI (rate ratio [RR], 0.93; 95% confidence interval [CI], .79–1.09) including colds (RR, 0.93; 95% CI, .78–1.10) or ILI (RR, 0.95; 95% CI, .62–1.46), nor did it reduce winter days of illness (RR, 1.13; 95% CI, .90–1.43). There was no significant benefit according to adherence, influenza vaccination, body mass index, or baseline vitamin D status. Semiannual surveys of all participants (N = 2228) identified no benefit of supplementation on ILI (odds ratio [OR], 1.14; 95% CI, .84–1.54) or colds (OR, 1.03; 95% CI, .87–1.23). Conclusions. Supplementation with 1000 IU/day vitamin D3 did not significantly reduce the incidence or duration of URTI in adults with a baseline serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level ≥12 ng/mL. PMID:24014734

  14. Prevention and treatment of diarrhoea with Saccharomyces boulardii in children with acute lower respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed

    Shan, L-S; Hou, P; Wang, Z-J; Liu, F-R; Chen, N; Shu, L-H; Zhang, H; Han, X-H; Han, X-X; Cai, X-X; Shang, Y-X; Vandenplas, Y

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether Saccharomyces boulardii prevents and treats diarrhoea and antibiotic-associated diarrhoea (AAD) in children. A total of 333 hospitalised children with acute lower respiratory tract infection were enrolled in a 2-phase open randomised controlled trial. During the 1st phase, all children received intravenous antibiotics (AB). They were randomly allocated to group A (S. boulardii 500 mg/day + AB, n=167) or group B (AB alone, n=166) and followed for 2 weeks. Diarrhoea was defined as ≥3 loose/watery stools/day during at least 2 days, occurring during treatment and/or up to 2 weeks after AB therapy had stopped. AAD was considered when diarrhoea was caused by Clostridium difficile or when stool cultures remained negative. In the 2nd phase of the study, group B patients who developed diarrhoea were randomly allocated to two sub-groups: group B1 (S. boulardii + oral rehydration solution (ORS)) and group B2 (ORS alone). Data from 283 patients were available for analysis. Diarrhoea prevalence was lower in group A than in group B (11/139 (7.9%) vs. 42/144 (29.2%); relative risk (RR): 0.27, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.1-0.5). S. boulardii reduced the risk of AAD (6/139 (4.3%) vs. 28/144 (19.4%); RR: 0.22; 95% CI: 0.1-0.5). When group B patients developed diarrhoea (n=42), S. boulardii treatment during 5 days (group B1) resulted in lower stool frequency (P<0.05) and higher recovery rate (91.3% in group B1 vs. 21.1% in B2; P<0.001). The mean duration of diarrhoea in group B1 was shorter (2.31±0.95 vs. 8.97±1.07 days; P<0.001). No adverse effects related to S. boulardii were observed. S. boulardii appeared to be effective in the prevention and treatment of diarrhoea and AAD in children treated with intravenous antibiotics.

  15. Seroepidemiology of upper respiratory tract disease in the desert tortoise of California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, Mary B.; Berry, Kristin H.; Schumacher, Isabella M.; Nagy, Kenneth A.; Christopher, Mary M.; Klein, Paul A.

    1999-01-01

    Several factors have combined with an upper respiratory tract disease (URTD) to produce declines on some population numbers of desert tortoises (Gopherus agassizii) in the western USA. This study was designed to determine the seroepidemiology of URTD in a population of wild adult tortoises at the Desert Tortoise Research Natural Area (DTNA) study site in Kern County (California, USA). Prior to initiation of the study, there was a dramatic decline in the number of individuals in this population. At each individual time point, samples were obtained from 12 to 20 tortoises with radiotransmitters during winter, spring, summer, and fall from 1992 through 1995. During the course of the study, 35 animals were sampled at one or more times. Only 10 animals were available for consistent monitoring throughout the 4 yr period. Specific antibody (Ab) levels to Mycoplasma agassizii were determined for individual tortoises by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) test. Specific Ab levels were not influenced by the gender of the tortoise. Levels of Ab and distribution of ELISA+, ELISA– and suspect animals were not consistently affected by season within a single year or for a season among the study years. Significantly more tortoises presented with clinical signs in 1992 and 1995. The profile of ELISA+ animals with clinical signs shifted from 5% (1992) to 42% (1995). In 1992, 52% of tortoises lacked clinical signs and were ELISA–. In 1995, this category accounted for only 19% of tortoises. Based on the results of this study, we conclude that URTD was present in this population as evidenced by the presence of ELISA+ individual animals, and that the infectious agent is still present as evidenced by seroconversion of previously ELISA– animals during the course of the study. There is evidence to suggest that animals may remain ELISA+ without showing overt disease, a clinical pattern consistent with the chronic nature of most mycoplasmal infections. Further, there are

  16. Probiotics for prevention and treatment of respiratory tract infections in children

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yizhong; Li, Xiaolu; Ge, Ting; Xiao, Yongmei; Liao, Yang; Cui, Yun; Zhang, Yucai; Ho, Wenzhe; Yu, Guangjun; Zhang, Ting

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Respiratory tract infections (RTIs) represent one of the main health problems in children. Probiotics are viable bacteria that colonize the intestine and affect the host intestinal microbial balance. Accumulating evidence suggests that probiotic consumption may decrease the incidence of or modify RTIs. The authors systematically reviewed data from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to investigate the effect of probiotic consumption on RTIs in children. Methods: MEDLINE/PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, and Web of Science were systematically searched for RCTs regarding the effect of probiotics on RTIs in children. The outcomes included number of children experienced with at least 1 RTI episode, duration of illness episodes, days of illness per subject, and school/day care absenteeism due to infection. A random-effects model was used to calculate pooled relative risks, or mean difference (MD) with the corresponding 95% confidence interval (CI). Results: A total of 23 trials involving 6269 children were eligible for inclusion in the systematic review. None of the trials showed a high risk of bias. The quality of the evidence of outcomes was moderate. The age range of subjects was from newborn to 18 years. The results of meta-analysis showed that probiotic consumption significantly decreased the number of subjects having at least 1 RTI episode (17 RCTs, 4513 children, relative risk 0.89, 95% CI 0.82–0.96, P = 0.004). Children supplemented with probiotics had fewer numbers of days of RTIs per person compared with children who had taken a placebo (6 RCTs, 2067 children, MD −0.16, 95% CI −0.29 to 0.02, P = 0.03), and had fewer numbers of days absent from day care/school (8 RCTs, 1499 children, MD −0.94, 95% CI −1.72 to −0.15, P = 0.02). However, there was no statistically significant difference of illness episode duration between probiotic intervention group and placebo group (9 RCTs, 2817 children, MD −0.60, 95% CI −1

  17. Pharmacoepidemiology of common colds and upper respiratory tract infections in children and adolescents in Germany

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Medicines to treat common colds (CC) and upper respiratory tract infections (URTI) are widely used among children, but there are only few data about treatments actually applied for these diseases. In the present study we analyze the prevalence and correlations of self-medicated and prescribed drug use for the treatment of CCs and URTIs among children and adolescents in Germany. Methods Medicine use during the week preceding the interview was recorded among 17,450 children (0–17 years) who participated in the drug interview of the 2003–2006 German Health Interview and Examination Survey for Children and Adolescents (KiGGS). The definition of CCs and URTIs in the present study included the WHO-ICD-10 codes J00, J01.0, J01.9, J02.0, J02.9, J03.0, J03.9, J04.0, J06.8, J06.9, J11.1, J11.8, R05 and R07.0. Using the complex sample method, the prevalence and associated socio-demographic factors of self-medication, prescribed medicines and antibiotics were defined. Results 13.8% of the participating girls and boys use drugs to treat a CC or an URTI. About 50% of this group use prescribed medications. Among the users of prescribed medication, 11.5% use antibiotics for the treatment of these diseases. Looking at all prescribed medicines we find associations with younger age, immigration background, and lower social status. Antibiotic use in particular is associated with female sex, higher age, residency in the former East Germany and immigration background. Conclusions The use of medicines to treat CCs or URTIs is widespread among children and adolescents in Germany. Thus, longitudinal studies should investigate the risks associated with this drug use. Differences in socio-demographic variables regarding exposure to antibiotic use indicate that there could be an implausible prescribing behavior among physicians in Germany. PMID:25106446

  18. Upper Respiratory Tract Disease in the Gopher Tortoise Is Caused by Mycoplasma agassizii†

    PubMed Central

    Brown, M. B.; McLaughlin, G. S.; Klein, P. A.; Crenshaw, B. C.; Schumacher, I. M.; Brown, D. R.; Jacobson, E. R.

    1999-01-01

    Upper respiratory tract disease (URTD) has been observed in a number of tortoise species, including the desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) and the gopher tortoise (Gopherus polyphemus). Clinical signs of URTD in gopher tortoises are similar to those in desert tortoises and include serous, mucoid, or purulent discharge from the nares, excessive tearing to purulent ocular discharge, conjunctivitis, and edema of the eyelids and ocular glands. The objectives of the present study were to determine if Mycoplasma agassizii was an etiologic agent of URTD in the gopher tortoise and to determine the clinical course of the experimental infection in a dose-response infection study. Tortoises were inoculated intranasally with 0.5 ml (0.25 ml/nostril) of either sterile SP4 broth (control group; n = 10) or 108 color-changing units (CCU) (total dose) of M. agassizii 723 (experimental infection group; n = 9). M. agassizii caused clinical signs compatible with those observed in tortoises with natural infections. Clinical signs of URTD were evident in seven of nine experimentally infected tortoises by 4 weeks postinfection (p.i.) and in eight of nine experimentally infected tortoises by 8 weeks p.i. In the dose-response experiments, tortoises were inoculated intranasally with a low (101 CCU; n = 6), medium (103 CCU; n = 6), or high (105 CCU; n = 5) dose of M. agassizii 723 or with sterile SP4 broth (n = 10). At all time points p.i. in both experiments, M. agassizii could be isolated from the nares of at least 50% of the tortoises. All of the experimentally infected tortoises seroconverted, and levels of antibody were statistically higher in infected animals than in control animals for all time points of >4 weeks p.i. (P < 0.0001). Control tortoises in both experiments did not show clinical signs, did not seroconvert, and did not have detectable M. agassizii by either culture or PCR at any point in the study. Histological lesions were compatible with those observed in tortoises with

  19. Molecular Epidemiology of Streptococcus pneumoniae Isolates from Children with Recurrent Upper Respiratory Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    Korona-Glowniak, Izabela; Maj, Maciej; Siwiec, Radosław; Niedzielski, Artur; Malm, Anna

    2016-01-01

    A total of 125 isolates were recovered from adenoids and/or nasopharynx of 170 children aged 2 to 5 from south-east Poland; they had undergone adenoidectomy for recurrent and/or persistent symptoms of upper respiratory tract infections. Pneumococcal isolates were analyzed by phenotyping (serotyping and antimicrobial resistance tests) and genotyping together with the clonality of the pneumococcal isolates based on resistance determinants, transposon distribution and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Serotypes 19F, 6B and 23F constituted 44.8% of the isolates. Among all of the strains, 44.8% showed decreased susceptibility to penicillin and resistance to co-trimoxazole (52.8%), tetracycline (38.4%), erythromycin (53.6%), clindamycin (52.8%) and chloramphenicol (27.2%) was observed. Tn6002 was found in 34.8% of erythromycin-resistant isolates while composite Tn2010—in 16.7% of erm(B)-carrying isolates that harboured also mef(E) gene. Tn3872-related elements were detected in 27.3% of erythromycin-resistant strains. In the majority of chloramphenicol-resistant catpC194-carrying isolates (79.4%), ICESp23FST81-family elements were detected. The genotyping showed that pneumococcal population was very heterogeneous; 82 sequence types (STs) were identified, and the most frequent contributed to not more than 8% of the isolates. Nearly 44% STs were novel, each of them was recovered only from one child. Four STs belonged to one of the 43 worldwide spread resistant pneumococcal clones currently accepted by Pneumococcal Molecular Epidemiology Network (PMEN), i.e. Spain 9V-3, Spain 23F-1, Norway NT-42 and Poland 6B-20, accounting for 12 (16.7%) of the 75 nonususceptible isolates, and five STs were single-locus variants of PMEN resistant clones (England 14–9, Spain 9V-3, Spain 23F-1, Greece 21–30, Denmark 14–32), accounting 9 (12%) of nonsusceptible isolates. A few MDR clones belonging to 6B and 19F serotypes found among preschool children emphasizes rather the role of

  20. The Clinical and Economic Impact of Probiotics Consumption on Respiratory Tract Infections: Projections for Canada

    PubMed Central

    Gerlier, Laetitia; Roy, Denis; Reid, Gregor

    2016-01-01

    Introduction There is accumulating evidence supporting the use of probiotics, which are defined as “live micro-organisms which, when administered in adequate amounts, confer a health benefit on the host”, as a preventive measure against respiratory tract infections (RTI). Two recent meta-analyses showed probiotic consumption (daily intake of 107 to 1010 CFU in any form for up to 3 months) significantly reduced RTI duration, frequency, antibiotic use and work absenteeism. Objectives The aim of this study was to assess the impact of probiotic use in terms of number of RTI episodes and days averted, and the number of antibiotic prescriptions and missed workdays averted, in the general population of Canada. In addition, the corresponding economic impact from both a healthcare payer and a productivity perspective was estimated. Methods A microsimulation model was developed to reproduce the Canadian population (sample rate of 1/1000 = 35 540 individuals) employing age and gender. RTI incidence was taken from FluWatch consultation rates for influenza-like illness (2013–14) and StatCan all-cause consultations statistics. The model was calibrated on a 2.1% RTI annual incidence in the general population (5.2 million RTI days) and included known risk factors (smoking status, shared living conditions and vaccination status). RTI-related antibiotic prescriptions and work absenteeism were obtained from the literature. Results The results indicate that probiotic use saved 573 000–2.3 million RTI-days, according to the YHEC–Cochrane scenarios respectively. These reductions were associated with an avoidance of 52 000–84 000 antibiotic courses and 330 000–500 000 sick-leave days. A projection of corresponding costs reductions amounted to Can$1.3–8.9 million from the healthcare payer perspective and Can$61.2–99.7 million when adding productivity losses. Conclusion The analysis shows that the potential of probiotics to reduce RTI-related events may have a substantial

  1. Role of the Oligopeptide Permease ABC Transporter of Moraxella catarrhalis in Nutrient Acquisition and Persistence in the Respiratory Tract

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Megan M.; Johnson, Antoinette; Koszelak-Rosenblum, Mary; Kirkham, Charmaine; Brauer, Aimee L.; Malkowski, Michael G.

    2014-01-01

    Moraxella catarrhalis is a strict human pathogen that causes otitis media in children and exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in adults, resulting in significant worldwide morbidity and mortality. M. catarrhalis has a growth requirement for arginine; thus, acquiring arginine is important for fitness and survival. M. catarrhalis has a putative oligopeptide permease ABC transport operon (opp) consisting of five genes (oppB, oppC, oppD, oppF, and oppA), encoding two permeases, two ATPases, and a substrate binding protein. Thermal shift assays showed that the purified recombinant substrate binding protein OppA binds to peptides 3 to 16 amino acid residues in length regardless of the amino acid composition. A mutant in which the oppBCDFA gene cluster is knocked out showed impaired growth in minimal medium where the only source of arginine came from a peptide 5 to 10 amino acid residues in length. Whether methylated arginine supports growth of M. catarrhalis is important in understanding fitness in the respiratory tract because methylated arginine is abundant in host tissues. No growth of wild-type M. catarrhalis was observed in minimal medium in which arginine was present only in methylated form, indicating that the bacterium requires l-arginine. An oppA knockout mutant showed marked impairment in its capacity to persist in the respiratory tract compared to the wild type in a mouse pulmonary clearance model. We conclude that the Opp system mediates both uptake of peptides and fitness in the respiratory tract. PMID:25156736

  2. Application of computational fluid dynamics to regional dosimetry of inhaled chemicals in the upper respiratory tract of the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Kimbell, J.S.; Gross, E.A.; Joyner, D.R.; Godo, M.N.; Morgan, K.T. )

    1993-08-01

    For certain inhaled air pollutants, such as reactive, water soluble gases, the distribution of nasal lesions observed in F344 rats may be closely related to regional gas uptake patterns in the nose. These uptake patterns can be influenced by the currents of air flowing through the upper respiratory tract during the breathing cycle. Since data on respiratory tract lesions in F344 rats are extrapolated to humans to make predictions of risk to human health, a better understanding of the factors affecting these responses is needed. To assess potential effects of nasal airflow on lesion location and severity, a methodology was developed for creation of computer simulations of steady-state airflow and gas transport using a three-dimensional finite element grid reconstructed from serial step-sections of the nasal passages of a male F344 rat. Simulations on a supercomputer used the computational fluid dynamics package FIDAP (FDI, Evanston, IL). Distinct streams of bulk flow evident in the simulations matched inspiratory streams reported for the F344 rat. Moreover, simulated regional flow velocities matched measured velocities in concurrent laboratory experiments with a hollow nasal mold. Computer-predicted flows were used in simulations of gas transport to nasal passage walls, with formaldehyde as a test case. Results from the uptake simulations were compared with the reported distribution of formaldehyde-induced nasal lesions observed in the F344 rat, and indicated that airflow-driven uptake patterns probably play an important role in determining the location of certain nasal lesions induced by formaldehyde. This work demonstrated the feasibility of applying computational fluid dynamics to airflow-driven dosimetry of inhaled chemicals in the upper respiratory tract.

  3. Expression of heat-shock protein 70 (Hsp70) in the respiratory tract and lungs of fire victims.

    PubMed

    Marschall, S; Rothschild, M A; Bohnert, M

    2006-11-01

    Immunohistochemical investigation of the respiratory tract and lungs of 63 fire victims revealed a statistically significant enhanced expression of heat-shock protein 70 (Hsp70) in the epiglottis, the trachea, and the main and the peripheral bronchi compared with a control group. In the fire victims, a strong expression of Hsp70 was discernible not only particularly in the vessels but also in seromucous secretory cells, ciliated epithelial cells, smooth muscle cells, and alveolar cells. The results suggest a vital or supravital reaction due to the inhalation of hot fire fumes.

  4. Vitamin D supplementation to prevent acute respiratory tract infections: systematic review and meta-analysis of individual participant data.

    PubMed

    Martineau, Adrian R; Jolliffe, David A; Hooper, Richard L; Greenberg, Lauren; Aloia, John F; Bergman, Peter; Dubnov-Raz, Gal; Esposito, Susanna; Ganmaa, Davaasambuu; Ginde, Adit A; Goodall, Emma C; Grant, Cameron C; Griffiths, Christopher J; Janssens, Wim; Laaksi, Ilkka; Manaseki-Holland, Semira; Mauger, David; Murdoch, David R; Neale, Rachel; Rees, Judy R; Simpson, Steve; Stelmach, Iwona; Kumar, Geeta Trilok; Urashima, Mitsuyoshi; Camargo, Carlos A

    2017-02-15

    Objectives To assess the overall effect of vitamin D supplementation on risk of acute respiratory tract infection, and to identify factors modifying this effect.Design Systematic review and meta-analysis of individual participant data (IPD) from randomised controlled trials.Data sources Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Web of Science, ClinicalTrials.gov, and the International Standard Randomised Controlled Trials Number registry from inception to December 2015.Eligibility criteria for study selection Randomised, double blind, placebo controlled trials of supplementation with vitamin D3 or vitamin D2 of any duration were eligible for inclusion if they had been approved by a research ethics committee and if data on incidence of acute respiratory tract infection were collected prospectively and prespecified as an efficacy outcome.Results 25 eligible randomised controlled trials (total 11 321 participants, aged 0 to 95 years) were identified. IPD were obtained for 10 933 (96.6%) participants. Vitamin D supplementation reduced the risk of acute respiratory tract infection among all participants (adjusted odds ratio 0.88, 95% confidence interval 0.81 to 0.96; P for heterogeneity <0.001). In subgroup analysis, protective effects were seen in those receiving daily or weekly vitamin D without additional bolus doses (adjusted odds ratio 0.81, 0.72 to 0.91) but not in those receiving one or more bolus doses (adjusted odds ratio 0.97, 0.86 to 1.10; P for interaction=0.05). Among those receiving daily or weekly vitamin D, protective effects were stronger in those with baseline 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels <25 nmol/L (adjusted odds ratio 0.30, 0.17 to 0.53) than in those with baseline 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels ≥25 nmol/L (adjusted odds ratio 0.75, 0.60 to 0.95; P for interaction=0.006). Vitamin D did not influence the proportion of participants experiencing at least one serious adverse event (adjusted odds ratio 0.98, 0.80 to 1.20, P

  5. Present-day potentialities of endoscopic diagnostics and treatment of early cancer in respiratory and digestive tracts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, Victor V.; Zharkova, Natalia N.; Filonenko, E. V.; Telegina, L. V.; Karpova, E. S.

    1999-12-01

    The paper presents the latest potentialities of the endoscopic fluorescent diagnostics as well as endoscopic electric-, laser surgery and photodynamic therapy (PDT) of the early cancer in the respiratory and digestive tracts. We present in detail indication and factors determining the application of the endoscopic resection of the tumor. The advantages of the combination application of PDT, electro-, Nd:YAG laser surgery and brachitherapy are stressed. The near and remote results of endoscopic treatment of the early cancer in larynx (37), lung (109), esophagus (39) and stomach (58) are shown.

  6. Vitamin D supplementation to prevent acute respiratory tract infections: systematic review and meta-analysis of individual participant data

    PubMed Central

    Jolliffe, David A; Hooper, Richard L; Greenberg, Lauren; Aloia, John F; Bergman, Peter; Dubnov-Raz, Gal; Esposito, Susanna; Ganmaa, Davaasambuu; Ginde, Adit A; Goodall, Emma C; Grant, Cameron C; Griffiths, Christopher J; Janssens, Wim; Laaksi, Ilkka; Manaseki-Holland, Semira; Mauger, David; Murdoch, David R; Neale, Rachel; Rees, Judy R; Simpson, Steve; Stelmach, Iwona; Kumar, Geeta Trilok; Urashima, Mitsuyoshi; Camargo, Carlos A

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To assess the overall effect of vitamin D supplementation on risk of acute respiratory tract infection, and to identify factors modifying this effect. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis of individual participant data (IPD) from randomised controlled trials. Data sources Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Web of Science, ClinicalTrials.gov, and the International Standard Randomised Controlled Trials Number registry from inception to December 2015. Eligibility criteria for study selection Randomised, double blind, placebo controlled trials of supplementation with vitamin D3 or vitamin D2 of any duration were eligible for inclusion if they had been approved by a research ethics committee and if data on incidence of acute respiratory tract infection were collected prospectively and prespecified as an efficacy outcome. Results 25 eligible randomised controlled trials (total 11 321 participants, aged 0 to 95 years) were identified. IPD were obtained for 10 933 (96.6%) participants. Vitamin D supplementation reduced the risk of acute respiratory tract infection among all participants (adjusted odds ratio 0.88, 95% confidence interval 0.81 to 0.96; P for heterogeneity <0.001). In subgroup analysis, protective effects were seen in those receiving daily or weekly vitamin D without additional bolus doses (adjusted odds ratio 0.81, 0.72 to 0.91) but not in those receiving one or more bolus doses (adjusted odds ratio 0.97, 0.86 to 1.10; P for interaction=0.05). Among those receiving daily or weekly vitamin D, protective effects were stronger in those with baseline 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels <25 nmol/L (adjusted odds ratio 0.30, 0.17 to 0.53) than in those with baseline 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels ≥25 nmol/L (adjusted odds ratio 0.75, 0.60 to 0.95; P for interaction=0.006). Vitamin D did not influence the proportion of participants experiencing at least one serious adverse event (adjusted odds ratio 0.98, 0.80 to 1

  7. Microbiological Characterization of Haemophilus influenzae Isolated from Patients with Lower Respiratory Tract Infections in a Tertiary Care Hospital, South India

    PubMed Central

    Shenoy, Padmaja Ananth; Vishwanath, Shashidhar; Shaw, Dipika

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Haemophilus influenzae is responsible for wide range of localized and invasive lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI) with the highest burden of disease in low and middle income countries. Aim The aim of the present study was to characterize the H.influenzae isolates from suspected LRTI. Materials and Methods A prospective study was conducted over a period of one and half years (December 2012 to May 2014) including patients with LRTI. H.influenzae was isolated from lower respiratory specimens following standard procedures. Complete characterization of the isolates was performed by bio typing, capsular serotyping, molecular genotyping and antibiotic susceptibility testing. The predisposing factors and clinical presentation were studied in the infected patients. Results A total of 8995 samples were received during the study period, out of which growth was significantly observed in 2848 (31.7%) samples. Among the various respiratory pathogens, H.influenzae was isolated from 175 (6.14%) patients. Majority (78.9%) of the patients presented with acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The isolates most frequently were of Biotype II (35.42%). Only four of the 50 isolates subjected to capsular serotyping were typeable and were of type b, e and f. All the 50 isolates tested were found to be non-typeable by PCR for capsular genotyping. Maximum resistance was found against ampicillin (9.71%). Conclusion H.influenzae was found to be a significant cause of LRTI. Majority of the isolates were found to be non typeable strains. Non typeable H. influenzae isolates should not be neglected as they can colonize the respiratory tract in COPD patients and can lead to biofilm formation and treatment failure. PMID:27437218

  8. Impact of Candida spp. isolation in the respiratory tract in patients with intensive care unit-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Terraneo, S; Ferrer, M; Martín-Loeches, I; Esperatti, M; Di Pasquale, M; Giunta, V; Rinaudo, M; de Rosa, F; Li Bassi, G; Centanni, S; Torres, A

    2016-01-01

    In immunocompetent patients with nosocomial pneumonia, the relationship between Candida spp. isolation in respiratory samples and outcomes or association with other pathogens is controversial. We therefore compared the characteristics and outcomes of patients with intensive care unit-acquired pneumonia (ICUAP), with or without Candida spp. isolation in the respiratory tract. In this prospective non-interventional study, we assessed 385 consecutive immunocompetent patients with ICUAP, according to the presence or absence of Candida spp. in lower respiratory tract samples. Candida spp. was isolated in at least one sample in 82 (21%) patients. Patients with Candida spp. had higher severity scores and organ dysfunction at admission and at onset of pneumonia. In multivariate analysis, previous surgery, diabetes mellitus and higher Simplified Acute Physiology Score II at ICU admission independently predicted isolation of Candida spp. There were no significant differences in the rate of specific aetiological pathogens, the systemic inflammatory response, and length of stay between patients with and without Candida spp. Mortality was also similar, even adjusted for potential confounders in propensity-adjusted multivariate analyses (adjusted hazard ratio 1.08, 95% CI 0.57-2.05, p 0.80 for 28-day mortality and adjusted hazard ratio 1.38, 95% CI 0.81-2.35, p 0.24 for 90-day mortality). Antifungal therapy was more frequently prescribed in patients with Candida spp. in respiratory samples but did not influence outcomes. Candida spp. airway isolation in patients with ICUAP is associated with more initial disease severity but does not influence outcomes in these patients, regardless of the use or not of antifungal therapy.

  9. Clinical features of human metapneumovirus genotypes in children with acute lower respiratory tract infection in Changsha, China.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Sai-Zhen; Xiao, Ni-Guang; Zhong, Li-Li; Yu, Tian; Zhang, Bing; Duan, Zhao-Jun

    2015-11-01

    To explore the epidemiological and clinical features of different human metapneumovirus (hMPV) genotypes in hospitalized children. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) or PCR was employed to screen for both hMPV and other common respiratory viruses in 2613 nasopharyngeal aspirate specimens collected from children with lower respiratory tract infections from September 2007 to February 2011 (a period of 3.5 years). The demographics and clinical presentations of patients infected with different genotypes of hMPV were compared. A total of 135 samples were positive for hMPV (positive detection rate: 5.2%). Co-infection with other viruses was observed in 45.9% (62/135) of cases, and human bocavirus was the most common additional respiratory virus. The most common symptoms included cough, fever, and wheezing. The M gene was sequenced for 135 isolates; of these, genotype A was identified in 72.6% (98/135) of patients, and genotype B was identified in 27.4% (37/135) of patients. The predominant genotype of hMPV changed over the 3.5-year study period from genotype A2b to A2b or B1 and then to predominantly B1. Most of clinical features were similar between patients infected with different hMPV genotypes. These results suggested that hMPV is an important viral pathogen in pediatric patients with acute lower respiratory tract infection in Changsha. The hMPV subtypes A2b and B1 were found to co-circulate. The different hMPV genotypes exhibit similar clinical characteristics.

  10. Saffold Cardioviruses of 3 Lineages in Children with Respiratory Tract Infections, Beijing, China

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Lili; Gonzalez, Richard; Xie, Zhengde; Xiao, Yan; Li, Yongjun; Liu, Chunyan; Chen, Lan; Yang, Qingqing; Vernet, Guy; Paranhos-Baccalà, Gláucia; Jin, Qi; Shen, Kunling

    2010-01-01

    To clarify the potential for respiratory transmission of Saffold cardiovirus (SAFV) and characterize the pathogen, we analyzed respiratory specimens from 1,558 pediatric patients in Beijing. We detected SAFV in 7 (0.5%) patients and identified lineages 1–3. However, because 3 patients had co-infections, we could not definitively say SAFV caused disease. PMID:20587195

  11. Theoretical evaluation of burns to the human respiratory tract due to inhalation of hot gas in the early stage of fires.

    PubMed

    Lv, Yong-Gang; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Jun

    2006-06-01

    A transient two-dimensional mathematical model for heat and water vapor transport across the respiratory tract of human body was established and applied to predict the thermal impact of inhaled hot gas to the nasal tissues during the early stage of fires. Influences of individual's physiological status and environment variables were comprehensively investigated through numerical calculations. Burn evaluation was performed using the classical Henriques model to predict the time for thermal injury to occur. It was shown that decreasing the air velocity and increasing the respiratory rate is helpful to minimize the burn over the respiratory tract. The effect of relative humidity of surrounding dry hot air could be ignored in predicting burns for short duration exposures. Due to evaporation cooling on the mucousal membrane, the burn often occurs at certain positions underneath the skin of the tract near the inlet of the respiratory tract. Most of the tissues near the surface suffer injury immediately after exposure to fire, while in the deeper tissues, serious damage occurs after a relatively longer time period. The method presented in this paper may suggest a valuable approach to theoretically evaluate the injury of hot air to the human respiratory tract under various fire situations.

  12. Genomic Loads and Genotypes of Respiratory Syncytial Virus: Viral Factors during Lower Respiratory Tract Infection in Chilean Hospitalized Infants

    PubMed Central

    Espinosa, Yazmín; San Martín, Camila; Torres, Alejandro A.; Farfán, Mauricio J.; Torres, Juan P.; Avadhanula, Vasanthi; Piedra, Pedro A.; Tapia, Lorena I.

    2017-01-01

    The clinical impact of viral factors (types and viral loads) during respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection is still controversial, especially regarding newly described genotypes. In this study, infants with RSV bronchiolitis were recruited to describe the association of these viral factors with severity of infection. RSV antigenic types, genotypes, and viral loads were determined from hospitalized patients at Hospital Roberto del Río, Santiago, Chile. Cases were characterized by demographic and clinical information, including days of lower respiratory symptoms and severity. A total of 86 patients were included: 49 moderate and 37 severe cases. During 2013, RSV-A was dominant (86%). RSV-B predominated in 2014 (92%). Phylogenetic analyses revealed circulation of GA2, Buenos Aires (BA), and Ontario (ON) genotypes. No association was observed between severity of infection and RSV group (p = 0.69) or genotype (p = 0.87). After a clinical categorization of duration of illness, higher RSV genomic loads were detected in infants evaluated earlier in their disease (p < 0.001) and also in infants evaluated later, but coursing a more severe infection (p = 0.04). Although types and genotypes did not associate with severity in our children, higher RSV genomic loads and delayed viral clearance in severe patients define a group that might benefit from new antiviral therapies. PMID:28335547

  13. CREST biorepository for translational studies on malignant mesothelioma, lung cancer and other respiratory tract diseases: Informatics infrastructure and standardized annotation

    PubMed Central

    UGOLINI, DONATELLA; NERI, MONICA; BENNATI, LUCA; CANESSA, PIER ALDO; CASANOVA, GEORGIA; LANDO, CECILIA; LEONCINI, GIACOMO; MARRONI, PAOLA; PARODI, BARBARA; SIMONASSI, CLAUDIO; BONASSI, STEFANO

    2012-01-01

    Advances in molecular epidemiology and translational research have led to the need for biospecimen collection. The Cancer of the Respiratory Tract (CREST) biorepository is concerned with pleural malignant mesothelioma (MM) and lung cancer (LC). The biorepository staff has collected demographic and epidemiological data directly from consenting subjects using a structured questionnaire, in agreement with The Public Population Project in Genomics (P3G). Clinical and follow-up data were collected. Sample data were also recorded. The architecture is based on a database designed with Microsoft Access. Data standardization was carried out to conform with established conventions or procedures. As from January 31, 2011, the overall number of recruited subjects was 1,857 (454 LC, 245 MM, 130 other cancers and 1,028 controls). Due to its infrastructure, CREST was able to join international projects, sharing samples and/or data with other research groups in the field. The data management system allows CREST to be involved, through a minimum data set, in the national project for the construction of the Italian network of Oncologic BioBanks (RIBBO), and in the infrastructure of a pan-European biobank network (BBMRI). The CREST biorepository is a valuable tool for translational studies on respiratory tract diseases, because of its simple and efficient infrastructure. PMID:22969926

  14. Comments on serious anaphylaxis caused by nine Chinese herbal injections used to treat common colds and upper respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed

    Ji, Kunmei; Chen, Jiajie; Li, Meng; Liu, Zhigang; Xia, Lixin; Wang, Chunbo; Zhan, Zhengke; Wu, Xuli

    2009-11-01

    Reports describing severe allergic shock and fatality following treatment of a common cold or upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) with a Chinese herbal injection were collected. Our analysis of the risks associated with this treatment suggested that the potential risk of serious, or even lethal, anaphylaxis should preclude its use in treating common colds and URTIs. In light of our findings herein, we propose the following five suggestions for improving the clinical safety of delivering Chinese herbal injections as medical treatments. First, Chinese herbal injections should not be delivered in the clinic to treat patients in accordance with Bian zheng lun zhi (broad-spectrum application based on holistic Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) theory and methodology), but rather they should be administered to target specific indicated disease processes. Second, Chinese herbal injection indications should be based on the results of double-blind randomized controlled clinical trials. Third, Chinese herbal injections should be used only in cases involving severe disease or to rescue patients in critical condition; they should not be used to treat mild, relatively innocuous diseases, such as common colds and upper respiratory tract infections, given the risk of doing harm. Fourth, Chinese herbal injection formulas should include materials from only a single or a small number of plant sources in known quantities. Fifth, more studies examining the toxicology and allergenic potential of Chinese herbal injections are needed.

  15. Particle Deposition in a Child Respiratory Tract Model: In Vivo Regional Deposition of Fine and Ultrafine Aerosols in Baboons

    PubMed Central

    Albuquerque-Silva, Iolanda; Vecellio, Laurent; Durand, Marc; Avet, John; Le Pennec, Déborah; de Monte, Michèle; Montharu, Jérôme; Diot, Patrice; Cottier, Michèle; Dubois, Francis; Pourchez, Jérémie

    2014-01-01

    To relate exposure to adverse health effects, it is necessary to know where particles in the submicron range deposit in the respiratory tract. The possibly higher vulnerability of children requires specific inhalation studies. However, radio-aerosol deposition experiments involving children are rare because of ethical restrictions related to radiation exposure. Thus, an in vivo study was conducted using three baboons as a child respiratory tract model to assess regional deposition patterns (thoracic region vs. extrathoracic region) of radioactive polydisperse aerosols ([d16–d84], equal to [0.15 µm–0.5 µm], [0.25 µm–1 µm], or [1 µm–9 µm]). Results clearly demonstrated that aerosol deposition within the thoracic region and the extrathoraic region varied substantially according to particle size. High deposition in the extrathoracic region was observed for the [1 µm–9 µm] aerosol (72%±17%). The [0.15 µm–0.5 µm] aerosol was associated almost exclusively with thoracic region deposition (84%±4%). Airborne particles in the range of [0.25 µm–1 µm] showed an intermediate deposition pattern, with 49%±8% in the extrathoracic region and 51%±8% in the thoracic region. Finally, comparison of baboon and human inhalation experiments for the [1 µm–9 µm] aerosol showed similar regional deposition, leading to the conclusion that regional deposition is species-independent for this airborne particle sizes. PMID:24787744

  16. Particle deposition in a child respiratory tract model: in vivo regional deposition of fine and ultrafine aerosols in baboons.

    PubMed

    Albuquerque-Silva, Iolanda; Vecellio, Laurent; Durand, Marc; Avet, John; Le Pennec, Déborah; de Monte, Michèle; Montharu, Jérôme; Diot, Patrice; Cottier, Michèle; Dubois, Francis; Pourchez, Jérémie

    2014-01-01

    To relate exposure to adverse health effects, it is necessary to know where particles in the submicron range deposit in the respiratory tract. The possibly higher vulnerability of children requires specific inhalation studies. However, radio-aerosol deposition experiments involving children are rare because of ethical restrictions related to radiation exposure. Thus, an in vivo study was conducted using three baboons as a child respiratory tract model to assess regional deposition patterns (thoracic region vs. extrathoracic region) of radioactive polydisperse aerosols ([d16-d84], equal to [0.15 µm-0.5 µm], [0.25 µm-1 µm], or [1 µm-9 µm]). Results clearly demonstrated that aerosol deposition within the thoracic region and the extrathoraic region varied substantially according to particle size. High deposition in the extrathoracic region was observed for the [1 µm-9 µm] aerosol (72% ± 17%). The [0.15 µm-0.5 µm] aerosol was associated almost exclusively with thoracic region deposition (84% ± 4%). Airborne particles in the range of [0.25 µm-1 µm] showed an intermediate deposition pattern, with 49% ± 8% in the extrathoracic region and 51% ± 8% in the thoracic region. Finally, comparison of baboon and human inhalation experiments for the [1 µm-9 µm] aerosol showed similar regional deposition, leading to the conclusion that regional deposition is species-independent for this airborne particle sizes.

  17. Potency of parenteral antimicrobials including ceftolozane/tazobactam against nosocomial respiratory tract pathogens: considerations for empiric and directed therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sutherland, Christina A.

    2017-01-01

    Background Empiric therapy decisions are predicated on knowledge of both the epidemiology and antimicrobial susceptibility of the probable infecting pathogen(s). The objective of this study was to evaluate the microbial distribution and phenotypic profiles of nosocomial respiratory isolates collected from multiple US hospitals and assess the clinical utility of various monotherapy and combination regimens. Methods Hospitals provided consecutive non-duplicate adult inpatients Gram-negative nosocomial respiratory isolates from cultures received ≥48 h after hospital admission. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) for 12 antimicrobials were determined using broth microdilution methods. An antibiogram was constructed for monotherapy regimens as well as combinations inclusive of either tobramycin (TOB) or ciprofloxacin (CIP). Results Six hospitals provided 518 nosocomial respiratory isolates. P. aeruginosa (PSA) comprised 28% of the population followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae (13%), Enterobacter spp. (13%), S. maltophilia (9%), S. marcesens (6%), A. baumannii (6%), and others (18%). When considering monotherapy for the Enterobacteriaceae & PSA ceftolozane/tazobactam (C/T) provided the highest (87%) percent susceptibility (%S) followed by meropenem (MEM), CIP, cefepime (FEP), ceftazidime (CAZ) and piperacillin-tazobactam (TZP) at 71–85%S. The addition of TOB > CIP improved the probability that the antimicrobial combination would provide ≥1 active agent. Conclusions PSA was the predominant nosocomial respiratory pathogen; however, the Enterobacteriaceae comprised an additional 53% in this survey. When considering empiric β-lactam monotherapy therapy for the entire spectrum of pathogens C/T provided the highest (78%) %S followed by MEM, FEP and TZP. The addition of either TOB > CIP to these β-lactams enhances the likelihood that an active agent would be selected when considering empirical therapy choices for nosocomial respiratory tract infections. PMID

  18. Caudal Nuclei Of The Rat Nucleus Of The Solitary Tract Differentially Innervate Respiratory Compartments Within The Ventrolateral Medulla

    PubMed Central

    Alheid, George F.; Jiao, Weijie; McCrimmon, Donald R.

    2011-01-01

    A substantial array of respiratory, cardiovascular, visceral and somatic afferents are relayed via the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) to the brainstem (and forebrain). Despite some degree of overlap within the NTS, specificity is maintained in central respiratory reflexes driven by 2nd order afferent relay neurons in the NTS. While the topographical arrangement of respiratory-related afferents targeting the NTS has been extensively investigated, their higher order brainstem targets beyond the NTS has only rarely been defined with any precision. Nonetheless, the various brainstem circuits serving blood gas homeostasis and airway protective reflexes must clearly receive a differential innervation from the NTS in order to evoke stimulus appropriate behavioral responses. Accordingly, we have examined the question of which specific NTS nuclei project to particular compartments within the ventral respiratory column (VRC) of the ventrolateral medulla. Our analyses of NTS labeling after retrograde tracer injections in the VRC and the nearby neuronal groups controlling autonomic function indicate a significant distinction between projections to the Bötzinger complex and preBötzinger complex compared to the remainder of the VRC. Specifically, the caudomedial NTS, including caudal portions of the medial solitary nucleus and the commissural division of NTS project relatively densely to the region of the retrotrapezoid nucleus and rostral ventrolateral medullary nucleus as well as to the rostral ventral respiratory group while avoiding the intervening Bötzinger and preBötzinger complexes. Area postrema appears to demonstrate a pattern of projections similar to that of caudal medial and commissural NTS nuclei. Other, less pronounced differential projections of lateral NTS nuclei to the various VRC compartments are additionally noted. PMID:21704133

  19. Viral bacterial co-infection of the respiratory tract during early childhood.

    PubMed

    Brealey, Jaelle C; Sly, Peter D; Young, Paul R; Chappell, Keith J

    2015-05-01

    Acute respiratory infection (ARI) is an important cause of morbidity in children. Mixed aetiology is frequent, with pathogenic viruses and bacteria co-detected in respiratory secretions. However, the clinical significance of these viral/bacterial co-infections has long been a controversial topic. While severe bacterial pneumonia following influenza infection has been well described, associations are less clear among infections caused by viruses that are more common in young children, such as respiratory syncytial virus. Although assessing the overall contribution of bacteria to disease severity is complicated by the presence of many confounding factors in clinical studies, understanding the role of viral/bacterial co-infections in defining the outcome of paediatric ARI will potentially reveal novel treatment and prevention strategies, improving patient outcomes. This review summarizes current evidence for the clinical significance of respiratory viral/bacterial co-infections in young children, discusses possible mechanisms of cooperative interaction between these pathogens and highlights areas that require further investigation.

  20. Dexamethasone for treatment of patients mechanically ventilated for lower respiratory tract infection caused by respiratory syncytial virus

    PubMed Central

    van Woensel, J B M; van Aalderen, W M C; de Weerd, W; Jansen, N; van Gestel, J P J; Markhorst, D; van Vught, A J; Bos, A; Kimpen, J

    2003-01-01

    Background: A study was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy of dexamethasone in patients mechanically ventilated for lower respiratory infection caused by respiratory syncytial virus (RSV-LRTI). Methods: In a multicentre randomised controlled trial patients were randomised to receive either intravenous dexamethasone (0.15 mg/kg 6 hourly for 48 hours) or placebo. End points were the duration of mechanical ventilation, length of stay (LOS) in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) and in hospital, and the duration of supplemental oxygen administration. Results: Thirty seven patients received dexamethasone and 45 received placebo. There was no significant difference in any of the end points between the two groups. In a post hoc analysis patients were stratified into those with mild gas exchange anomalies (PaO2/FiO2 >200 mm Hg and/or mean airway pressure ⩽ 10 cm H2O, bronchiolitis group) and those with severe gas exchange anomalies (PaO2/FiO2 ⩽200 mm Hg and mean airway pressure >10 cm H2O, pneumonia group). In the 39 patients with bronchiolitis the duration of mechanical ventilation was 4.3 days shorter in the dexamethasone group than in the placebo group (4.9 v 9.2 days, 95% CI -7.8 to -0.8, p=0.02) and the duration of supplemental oxygen was 3.6 days shorter (7.7 v 11.3 days, 95% CI -8.0 to -0.1, p=0.048). No differences in end points were found in the pneumonia group. Conclusions: Dexamethasone had no beneficial effect in patients mechanically ventilated for RSV-LRTI but was found to have a beneficial effect in patients with bronchiolitis. PMID:12728156

  1. Alimentary and respiratory tract lesions in eight medically fragile Holstein cattle with bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD).

    PubMed

    Ackermann, M R; Kehrli, M E; Laufer, J A; Nusz, L T

    1996-05-01

    Lesions in the alimentary tract were studied in eight medically fragile Holstein cattle homozygous for the bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD) allele as determined by polymerase chain reaction and restriction endonuclease analysis. These cattle received institutional medical care but died or were euthanatized because of chronic debilitation associated with diarrhea (6/8) and pneumonia (4/8). The six cattle with diarrhea had acute (n = 3) or chronic (n = 3) intestinal ulcers, but the other two remained relatively healthy for 3 years and did not develop intestinal tract ulcers. Ulcerated areas were present in the small intestine in six animals, and two of these also had ulcers in the large intestine. Ulcers were covered by thick exudates that, in chronic lesions, partially occluded the intestinal lumen. Intramural and serosal fibrosis also contributed to lumen constriction. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was isolated from the intestine of four cattle. Bovine viral disease virus and Salmonella were not isolated from the five cattle that were tested. Respiratory tract lesions consisted of dense infiltrates of neutrophils in bronchi, bronchioles, and alveoli. This study suggests that intestinal lesions are integral to the demise of BLAD cattle that receive intensive medical care and that neutrophils do infiltrate the lung and enter airway lumina, despite the adhesion deficiency.

  2. Exposure of rhesus monkeys to cowpox virus Brighton Red by large-particle aerosol droplets results in an upper respiratory tract disease.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Reed F; Hammoud, Dima A; Perry, Donna L; Solomon, Jeffrey; Moore, Ian N; Lackemeyer, Matthew G; Bohannon, Jordan K; Sayre, Philip J; Minai, Mahnaz; Papaneri, Amy B; Hagen, Katie R; Janosko, Krisztina B; Jett, Catherine; Cooper, Kurt; Blaney, Joseph E; Jahrling, Peter B

    2016-08-01

    We previously demonstrated that small-particle (0.5-3.0 µm) aerosol infection of rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) with cowpox virus (CPXV)-Brighton Red (BR) results in fulminant respiratory tract disease characterized by severe lung parenchymal pathology but only limited systemic virus dissemination and limited classic epidermal pox-like lesion development (Johnson et al., 2015). Based on these results, and to further develop CPXV as an improved model of human smallpox, we evaluated a novel large-particle aerosol (7.0-9.0 µm) exposure of rhesus monkeys to CPXV-BR and monitored for respiratory tract disease by serial computed tomography (CT). As expected, the upper respiratory tract and large airways were the major sites of virus-induced pathology following large-particle aerosol exposure. Large-particle aerosol CPXV exposure of rhesus macaques resulted in severe upper airway and large airway pathology with limited systemic dissemination.

  3. Prevalence and Genetic Diversity of Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae in the Respiratory Tract of Infants and Primary Caregivers

    PubMed Central

    SCHUMACHER, SANDRA K.; MARCHANT, COLIN D.; LOUGHLIN, ANITA M.; BOUCHET, VALÉRIE; STEVENSON, ABBIE; PELTON, STEPHEN I.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) causes otitis media, sinusitis, and likely lower respiratory tract infections in children. Colonization, strain diversity, transmission, and antimicrobial susceptibility have implications for both children and their caregivers. METHODS For 13 months, we conducted a cross-sectional study of NTHi colonization. 273 infants and children aged 2 to 26 months old and their primary caregivers had upper respiratory tract cultures performed. NTHi isolates were characterized by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and antibiotic resistance was examined. RESULTS Of the 273 infants, 44 (16.1%) were colonized with NTHi. Prevalence of NTHi varied from 14% in infants less than 6 months of age to 32% in infants 19-26 months of age (p=0.003). NTHi colonized infants were more likely to attend daycare (30% vs. 11%), have a recent respiratory infection (68% vs. 38%), recent antibiotic use (27% vs. 9%), and caregiver reported asthma (11% vs. 1%) compared with other infants (p<0.001). Of the 44 infants colonized with NTHi, we identified 33 different MLSTs. Nine (20.5%) of the 44 infant-primary caregiver dyads were colonized with NTHi and 7/9 shared identical NTHi strains. We also found beta-lactamase negative NTHi with minimum inhibitory concentrations >2 μg/mL for amoxicillin and beta-lactamase positive NTHi with minimum inhibitory concentrations >2 μg/mL for amoxicillin clavulanate. CONCLUSIONS We found substantial diversity by MLST analysis among NTHi isolates from this community. Infant-primary caregiver dyads usually carried the same strain of NTHi, suggesting that infant-primary caregiver transmission is occurring. PMID:22051860

  4. Respiratory tract changes in guinea pigs, rats, and mice following a single six-hour exposure to methyl isocyanate vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, E.H.; Dodd, D.E.

    1987-06-01

    Groups of male and female Fischer 344 rats, B6C3F1 mice, and Hartley guinea pigs were exposed once for 6 hr to mean concentrations of 10.5, 5.4, 2.4, 1.0, or 0 (control) ppm of methyl isocyanate (MIC) vapor. Rats and mice were also exposed to 20.4 ppm of MIC. The majority of deaths occurred during postexposure days 1 through 3. The 6-hr LC/sub 50/ values were 6.1 ppm for rats, 12.2 ppm for mice, and 5.4 ppm for guinea pigs. Notable clinical observations during and immediately following MIC exposure were lacrimation, perinasal/perioral wetness, respiratory difficulty (e.g., mouth breathing), decreased activity, ataxia, and hypothermia. Body weight losses were common in all species following MIC exposures of 2.4 ppm or greater. Microscopic lesions included acute necrosis of the epithelial lining throughout the respiratory tract in animals that died shortly after exposure, coupled with congestion, edema, and inflammation. A microscopic lesion that appeared unique to guinea pigs was bronchiolitis obliterans. Additional microscopic lesions observed in some animals that died or were sacrificed at the end of the study (postexposure day 14) consisted of squamous metaplasia of respiratory epithelium in the nasal cavity, which extended into the larynx, trachea, and in some cases, the bronchi. In addition, epithelial regeneration throughout the tract and submucosal fibroplasia in the trachea, bronchi, and bronchioles were observed, the latter lesion being primarily confined to rodents. Only in guinea pigs were there lesions in the 1.0 ppm group attributed to MIC exposure. In conclusion, guinea pigs were more sensitive to the MIC vapor than were rats, which were in turn more sensitive than mice.

  5. Pertussis toxin inhibits early chemokine production to delay neutrophil recruitment in response to Bordetella pertussis respiratory tract infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Andreasen, Charlotte; Carbonetti, Nicholas H

    2008-11-01

    Pertussis is an acute respiratory disease of humans caused by the bacterium Bordetella pertussis. Pertussis toxin (PT) plays a major role in the virulence of this pathogen, including important effects that it has soon after inoculation. Studies in our laboratory and other laboratories have indicated that PT inhibits early neutrophil influx to the lungs and airways in response to B. pertussis respiratory tract infection in mice. Previous in vitro and in vivo studies have shown that PT can affect neutrophils directly by ADP ribosylating G(i) proteins associated with surface chemokine receptors, thereby inhibiting neutrophil migration in response to chemokines. However, in this study, by comparing responses to wild-type (WT) and PT-deficient strains, we found that PT has an indirect inhibitory effect on neutrophil recruitment to the airways in response to infection. Analysis of lung chemokine expression indicated that PT suppresses early neutrophil recruitment by inhibiting chemokine upregulation in alveolar macrophages and other lung cells in response to B. pertussis infection. Enhancement of early neutrophil recruitment to the airways in response to WT infection by addition of exogenous keratinocyte-derived chemokine, one of the dominant neutrophil-attracting chemokines in mice, further revealed an indirect effect of PT on neutrophil chemotaxis. Additionally, we showed that intranasal administration of PT inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced chemokine gene expression and neutrophil recruitment to the airways, presumably by modulation of signaling through Toll-like receptor 4. Collectively, these results demonstrate how PT inhibits early inflammatory responses in the respiratory tract, which reduces neutrophil influx in response to B. pertussis infection, potentially providing an advantage to the pathogen in this interaction.

  6. Size-resolved respiratory-tract deposition of fine and ultrafine hydrophobic and hygroscopic aerosol particles during rest and exercise.

    PubMed

    Löndahl, Jakob; Massling, Andreas; Pagels, Joakim; Swietlicki, Erik; Vaclavik, Elvira; Loft, Steffen

    2007-02-01

    Airborne ultrafine particles (diameter <100 nm) are ubiquitous in the environment and have been associated with adverse health effects. The respiratory-tract deposition of these particles is fundamentally influenced by their hygroscopicity: their ability to grow by condensation of water in the humid respiratory system. Ambient particles are typically hygroscopic, to varying degrees. This article investigates the influence of hygroscopicity, exercise level, gender, and intersubject variability on size-dependent deposition of fine and ultrafine particles during spontaneous breathing. Using a novel and well-characterized setup, respiratory-tract deposition in the range 12-320 nm has been measured for 29 healthy adults (20 men, 9 women). Each subject completed four sessions: rest and light exercise on an ergometer bicycle while inhaling both hydrophobic (diethylhexylsebacate) and hygroscopic (NaCl) particles. The deposited fraction (DF) based on dry diameters was two to four times higher for the hydrophobic ultrafine particles than for the hygroscopic. The DF of hygroscopic ultrafine particles could be estimated by calculating their equilibrium size at 99.5% relative humidity. The differences in average DF due to exercise level and gender were essentially less than 0.03. However, the minute ventilation increased fourfold during exercise and was 18-46% higher for the men than for the women. Consequently the deposited dose of particles was fourfold higher during exercise and considerably increased for the male subjects. Some individuals consistently had a high DF in all four sessions. As an example, the results show that an average person exposed to 100-nm hydrophobic particles during exercise will receive a 16 times higher dose than a relaxed person exposed to an equal amount of hygroscopic (NaCl) particles.

  7. Immunoglobulin E in Immunologic Deficiency Diseases. I. RELATION OF IGE AND IGA TO RESPIRATORY TRACT DISEASE IN ISOLATED IGE DEFICIENCY, IGA DEFICIENCY, AND ATAXIA TELANGIECTASIA

    PubMed Central

    Polmar, Stephen H.; Waldmann, Thomas A.; Balestra, Suellen T.; Jost, Margaret C.; Terry, William D.

    1972-01-01

    Serum immunoglobulin E concentration was studied in normal children and adults, in 25 patients with isolated IgA deficiency, and in 44 patients with ataxia telangiectasia using a double antibody radioimmunoassay. The geometric mean IgE level of the normal adult population studied was 105 ng/ml, with a broad 95% interval (5-2045 ng/ml). Individuals with concentrations less than 15 ng/ml were considered to be IgE deficient. IgE deficiency, defined in this way, was observed in 7 of 73 normal adults and was not found to be associated with respiratory tract disease. 80% (35 of 44) of patients with ataxia telangiectasia (AT) were IgE deficient, 66% were IgA deficient, and 57% had combined IgE and IgA deficiencies. Although 45% of the patients with AT had respiratory tract disease, there was no correlation found between IgE deficiency or combined IgE and IgA deficiency and respiratory tract disease in these patients. 11 of 25 individuals with isolated IgA deficiency were also IgE deficient. All 11 patients with both IgA and IgE deficiency were uniformly asymptomatic. However, there was an extremely high incidence (71%) of respiratory tract disease in IgA-deficient individuals who were not IgE deficient. These data fail to support the concept of a protective role for IgE in respiratory tract immunity. The possible role of IgE in the pathogenesis of respiratory tract disease in IgA-deficient patients is discussed. PMID:5009116

  8. Predictors of hospitalization for lower respiratory tract infection in children aged <2 years in the province of Quebec, Canada.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Z; Gilca, R; Deceuninck, G; Boucher, F D; Charest, H; DE Wals, P

    2016-04-01

    Young age, adverse environmental conditions and infectious agents are established risk factors of lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI), whereas pneumococcal conjugate vaccines may be protective. To explore their relative role as predictors of hospitalizations under the continental climate prevailing in the province of Quebec, Canada, an ecological study was performed. Records with a main diagnosis of LRTI in children born during 2007-2010 and observed up to their second-year anniversary were extracted from the provincial hospital administrative database. Respiratory virus surveillance data and statistics on ambient air temperature were obtained. Vaccine use in different birth cohorts was derived from the Quebec City Immunization Registry. Additive and multiplicative Poisson regression models were applied to estimate attributable fractions. Age, month of birth, ambient temperature, and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), human metapneumovirus (hMPV) and influenza-positive test proportions were significant predictors of LRTI hospitalizations. No substantial differences were observed in cohorts exposed to the 7-valent or 10-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccines. In the additive model, the fraction of hospitalizations explained by temperature variation was 37%, whereas RSV circulation explained 28%, hMPV 4% and influenza 1%. Complex interplay between biological, environmental and social mechanisms may explain the important role of ambient air temperature in predicting LRTI hospitalization risk in young children.

  9. Biological effects of diesel exhaust particles (DEP) on tissues and cells isolated from respiratory tracts of guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Hirafuji, M; Sakakibara, M; Endo, T; Murakami, S; Mori, Y; Sagai, M; Minami, M

    1995-11-01

    Diesel engine-powered vehicles emit some 30 to 100 times more particles than do gasoline engine cars. We previously reported that diesel exhaust particles (DEP) instilled intratracheally into mouse caused lung edema accompanying endothelial cell damage. In order to clarify further the biological effects of DEP on the respiratory system, the primary target of DEP instillation, we examined the direct action of DEP on isolated tissues and the cytotoxicity of DEP on cultured cells of respiratory tracts in guinea pigs. DEP were collected on glass fiber filters from a light-duty (2730 cc), four cylinder diesel engine. DEP induced a dose-dependent relaxation in tracheal smooth muscle and lung parenchymal preparations from guinea pigs. Neither propranolol nor ranitidine inhibited the relaxing effect of DEP on tracheal preparations. DEP also exhibited concentration- and time-dependent cytotoxicity on cultured tracheal smooth muscle cells and lung fibroblasts from guinea pigs, as assessed by specific [51Cr] release. These cytotoxicities induced by DEP were significantly inhibited by catalase, deferoxamine and MK-447, whereas SOD and mannitol had little effect. These inhibitory effects were blunted by the higher concentration of DEP. These results suggest that the cytotoxicity of DEP may cause dysfunction of respiratory tissues, which are mediated via oxygen radicals, probably hydroxyl radicals or hydrogen peroxides.

  10. New human coronavirus, HCoV-NL63, associated with severe lower respiratory tract disease in Australia.

    PubMed

    Arden, Katherine E; Nissen, Michael D; Sloots, Theo P; Mackay, Ian M

    2005-03-01

    A new human coronavirus, HCoV-NL63, was associated recently with bronchiolitis. The current study aimed to examine retrospectively stored specimens for the presence of HCoV-NL63 using nested RT-PCR assays targeting the 1a and 1b genes. The study population was composed of patients with acute respiratory disease warranting presentation to Queensland hospitals. HCoV-NL63 was detected in the nasopharyngeal aspirates (NPA) of 16 of 840 specimens representing 766 patients (2%). HCoV-NL63 positive individuals were diagnosed most commonly with lower respiratory tract (LRT) disease (81%). The clinical diagnosis was commonly supported by an abnormal chest X-ray (56%) together with respiratory distress (50%), wheeze (44%), and rales (25%) on first presentation with HCoV-NL63 infection. All patients positive for HCoV-NL63 required admission to hospital. Among 38% of HCoV-NL63 positive specimens a second pathogen was detected. Sequencing of amplicon from gene 1b revealed more than 99% nucleotide homology with the viral type strains while sequencing amplicon from gene 1a permitted the grouping of viral strains. It was shown that HCoV-NL63 is associated with severe LRT disease in an Australian hospital setting during the cooler months of the year. We propose that HCoV-NL63 is a global and seasonal pathogen of both children and adults associated with severe LRT illness.

  11. Clinical validation of 3 commercial real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction assays for the detection of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus from upper respiratory tract specimens.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Deqa H; AlHetheel, AbdulKarim F; Mohamud, Hanat S; Aldosari, Kamel; Alzamil, Fahad A; Somily, Ali M

    2017-04-01

    Since discovery of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV), a novel betacoronavirus first isolated and characterized in 2012, MERS-CoV real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) assays represent one of the most rapidly expanding commercial tests. However, in the absence of extensive evaluations of these assays on positive clinical material of different sources, evaluating their diagnostic effectiveness remains challenging. We describe the diagnostic performance evaluation of 3 common commercial MERS-CoV rRT-PCR assays on a large panel (n = 234) of upper respiratory tract specimens collected during an outbreak episode in Saudi Arabia. Assays were compared to the RealStar® MERS-CoV RT-PCR (Alton Diagnostics, Hamburg, Germany) assay as the gold standard. Results showed i) the TIB MolBiol® LightMix UpE and Orf1a assays (TIB MolBiol, Berlin, Germany) to be the most sensitive, followed by ii) the Anyplex™ Seegene MERS-CoV assay (Seegene, Seoul, Korea), and finally iii) the PrimerDesign™ Genesig® HCoV_2012 assay (PrimerDesign, England, United Kingdom). We also evaluate a modified protocol for the PrimerDesign™ Genesig® HCoV_2012 assay.

  12. Detection of human coronavirus NL63, human metapneumovirus and respiratory syncytial virus in children with respiratory tract infections in south-west Sweden.

    PubMed

    Koetz, A; Nilsson, P; Lindén, M; van der Hoek, L; Ripa, T

    2006-11-01

    Two recently detected viruses, human metapneumovirus (hMPV) and coronavirus NL63 (HCoV-NL63), have been associated with acute respiratory tract infections, particularly in young children. This study investigated the frequency of hMPV and HCoV-NL63 infections in Swedish children by screening 221 nasopharyngeal aspirates, collected between November 2003 and May 2005, from 212 children attending the paediatric department of a county hospital in Sweden or submitted from local general practitioners. The samples were originally submitted to be tested for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), and were examined retrospectively for hMPV and HCoV-NL63 by RT-PCR. Of the 212 patients, 101 were positive for RSV (48%), 22 (10%) were positive for hMPV, and 12 (6%) were positive for HCoV-NL63. The frequency of HCoV-NL63 infection increased from 1% in 2003-2004 to 10% in 2004-2005. Sequence analysis of parts of the coronavirus genomes showed considerable similarity to the HCoV-NL63 prototype sequence. The study demonstrated that HCoV-NL63 and hMPV occur in south-west Sweden with essentially the same frequency, seasonal distribution and clinical characteristics as have been reported in other countries.

  13. Mycoplasma agassizii sp., nov., isolated from the upper respiratory tract of the desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) and the gopher tortoise (Gopherus polyphemus).

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, Mary E.; Brown, D.R.; Kelin, P.A.; McLaughlin, G.S.; Schumacher, Isabella M.; Jacobson, E.R.; Adams, H.P.; Tully, J.G.

    2001-01-01

    Biochemical, serological and molecular genetic studies were performed on seven mycoplasma isolates that were recovered from the upper respiratory tract of clinically ill desert tortoises. The isolates were serologically related to each other but serologically distinct from previously described species. Unique mycoplasma species-specific 16S rRNA nucleotide sequences were found in the proposed type strain. The name Mycoplasma agassizii is proposed for these isolates. The type strain is PS6T (=ATCC 700616T) which caused upper respiratory tract disease (URTD) in experimentally infected tortoises.

  14. In vitro antibiotic susceptibility of Dutch Mycoplasma synoviae field isolates originating from joint lesions and the respiratory tract of commercial poultry.

    PubMed

    Landman, W J M; Mevius, D J; Veldman, K T; Feberwee, A

    2008-08-01

    The in vitro susceptibility of 17 Dutch Mycoplasma synoviae isolates from commercial poultry to enrofloxacin, difloxacin, doxycycline, tylosin and tilmicosin was examined. Three isolates originated from joint lesions and 14 were from the respiratory tract. The type strain M. synoviae WVU 1853 was included as a control strain. Antibiotic susceptibility was tested quantitatively using the broth microdilution test. Based on initial and final minimum inhibitory concentration values, all tested isolates were susceptible to doxycycline, tylosin and tilmicosin. Two isolates from the respiratory tract were resistant to enrofloxacin and showed intermediate resistance to difloxacin.

  15. Respiratory papillomas

    PubMed Central

    Alagusundaramoorthy, Sayee Sundar; Agrawal, Abhinav

    2016-01-01

    Papillomas are known to occur in the lower respiratory tract. They are however, rare compared to their occurrence in the upper respiratory tract. These are generally exophytic tumors in the more proximal upper airways however cases with more distal location with an inverted growth pattern have also been described in the literature. These can be solitary or multiple and multifocality associated with multiple papillomas in the upper respiratory/aerodigestive tract. The four major types of respiratory papillomas are (1) Recurrent respiratory papillomas, (2) solitary squamous papillomas, (3) solitary glandular papillomas, (4) mixed papillomas. We review the incidence, etiopathology, diagnosis, and possible treatment modalities and algorithms for these respiratory papillomas. PMID:27625447

  16. Development of Upper Respiratory Tract Microbiota in Infancy is Affected by Mode of Delivery.

    PubMed

    Bosch, Astrid A T M; Levin, Evgeni; van Houten, Marlies A; Hasrat, Raiza; Kalkman, Gino; Biesbroek, Giske; de Steenhuijsen Piters, Wouter A A; de Groot, Pieter-Kees C M; Pernet, Paula; Keijser, Bart J F; Sanders, Elisabeth A M; Bogaert, Debby

    2016-07-01

    Birth by Caesarian section is associated with short- and long-term respiratory morbidity. We hypothesized that mode of delivery affects the development of the respiratory microbiota, thereby altering its capacity to provide colonization resistance and consecutive pathobiont overgrowth and infections. Therefore, we longitudinally studied the impact of mode of delivery on the nasopharyngeal microbiota development from birth until six months of age in a healthy, unselected birth cohort of 102 children (n=761 samples). Here, we show that the respiratory microbiota develops within one day from a variable mixed bacterial community towards a Streptococcus viridans-predominated profile, regardless of mode of delivery. Within the first week, rapid niche differentiation had occurred; initially with in most infants Staphylococcus aureus predominance, followed by differentiation towards Corynebacterium pseudodiphteriticum/propinquum, Dolosigranulum pigrum, Moraxella catarrhalis/nonliquefaciens, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and/or Haemophilus influenzae dominated communities. Infants born by Caesarian section showed a delay in overall development of respiratory microbiota profiles with specifically reduced colonization with health-associated commensals like Corynebacterium and Dolosigranulum, thereby possibly influencing respiratory health later in life.

  17. Water extract of Pueraria lobata Ohwi has anti-viral activity against human respiratory syncytial virus in human respiratory tract cell lines.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tzeng-Jih; Yeh, Chia-Feng; Wang, Kuo-Chih; Chiang, Lien-Chai; Tsai, Jih-Jin; Chang, Jung-San

    2013-12-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) infects all age groups and causes bronchiolitis, pneumonia, and acute respiratory distress syndrome with a significant mortality rate. To date, only ribavirin has been used to manage HRSV infection. However, ribavirin is expensive with an only modest effect. Furthermore, ribavirin has several side effects, which means it has limited clinical benefit. Pueraria lobata Ohwi (P. lobata) is a common ingredient of Ge-Gen-Tang (Kakkon-to) and Sheng-Ma-Ge-Gen-Tang (Shoma-kakkon-to), which are prescriptions of Chinese traditional medicine proven to have antiviral activity against HRSV. Therefore, it was hypothesized that P. lobata might be effective against HRSV. To find a cost-effective therapeutic modality, both human upper (HEp-2) and lower (A549) respiratory tract cell lines were used to test the hypothesis that P. lobata could inhibit HRSV-induced plaque formation. Results showed that the water extract of P. lobata was effective (p < 0.0001) against HRSV-induced plaque formation. P. lobata was more effective when given prior to viral inoculation (p < 0.0001) by inhibiting viral attachment (p < 0.0001) and penetration (p < 0.0001). However, supplementation with P. lobata could not stimulate interferon secretion after HRSV infection. In conclusion, P. lobata has antiviral activity against HRSV-induced plaque formation in airway mucosa mainly by inhibiting viral attachment and internalization. Further identification of effective constituents could contribute to the prevention of HRSV infection.

  18. Simultaneous detection and high-throughput identification of a panel of RNA viruses causing respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed

    Li, Haijing; McCormac, Melinda A; Estes, R Wray; Sefers, Susan E; Dare, Ryan K; Chappell, James D; Erdman, Dean D; Wright, Peter F; Tang, Yi-Wei

    2007-07-01

    Clinical presentations for viral respiratory tract infections are often nonspecific, and a rapid, high-throughput laboratory technique that can detect a panel of common viral pathogens is clinically desirable. We evaluated two multiplex reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) products coupled with microarray-based systems for simultaneous detection of common respiratory tract viral pathogens. The NGEN respiratory virus analyte-specific assay (Nanogen, San Diego, CA) detects influenza A virus (Flu-A) and Flu-B, parainfluenza virus 1 (PIV-1), PIV-2, and PIV-3, and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), while the ResPlex II assay (Genaco Biomedical Products, Inc., Huntsville, AL) detects Flu-A, Flu-B, PIV-1, PIV-2, PIV-3, PIV-4, RSV, human metapneumovirus (hMPV), rhinoviruses (RhVs), enteroviruses (EnVs), and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus (CoV). A total of 360 frozen respiratory specimens collected for a full year were tested, and results were compared to those obtained with a combined reference standard of cell culture and monoplex real-time TaqMan RT-PCR assays. NGEN and ResPlex II gave comparable sensitivities for Flu-A (82.8 to 86.2%), Flu-B (90.0 to 100.0%), PIV-1 (87.5 to 93.8%), PIV-3 (66.7 to 72.2%), and RSV (63.3 to 73.3%); both assays achieved excellent specificities (99.1 to 100.0%) for these five common viruses. The ResPlex II assay detected hMPV in 13 (3.6%) specimens, with a sensitivity of 80.0% and specificity of 99.7%. The ResPlex II assay also differentiated RSV-A and RSV-B and gave positive results for RhV and EnV in 31 (8.6%) and 19 (5.3%) specimens, respectively. PIV-2, PIV-4, and SARS CoV were not detected in the specimens tested. The two systems can process 80 (NGEN) and 96 (ResPlex II) tests per run, with a hands-on time of approximately 60 min and test turnaround times of 6 h (ResPlex II) and 9 h (NGEN). Multiple-panel testing detected an additional unsuspected 9 (3.4%) PIV-1 and 10 (3.7%) PIV-3 infections. While test

  19. Brazilian medicinal plants to treat upper respiratory tract and bronchial illness: systematic review and meta-analyses—study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Luciane C; Silva, Maria Carolina O; Motta, Cristiane Bergamashi; Macho Quirós, Antonio; Biavatti, Maique Weber; de Oliveira, Jardel Corrêa; Guyatt, Gordon

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Respiratory illness, often associated with cough and sputum, is frequent. In Brazil, herbal medicines are often recommended as a first-line treatment for respiratory illness. There exists uncertainty regarding the effectiveness of these treatments. No systematic review has evaluated Brazilian medicinal plants (BMP) to treat upper respiratory tract and bronchial illness (URTI). Methods and analysis We will conduct a systematic review and, if appropriate, a series of meta-analyses evaluating the safety and effectiveness of BMP for URTI. Eligible randomised controlled trials and observational studies will enrol adult or paediatric patients presenting with URTI treated by BMP approved by the Brazilian Health Surveillance Agency compared with placebo, no treatment or an alternative therapy. Our search will include the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), which contains the Cochrane Acute Respiratory Illness Group's Specialized Register; MEDLINE; EMBASE; CINAHL (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature); Web of Science; AMED; LILACS; CAB abstracts; clinical trial.gov; the WHO Trial Register and the Brazilian thesis database (CAPES) without any language restrictions. Outcomes of interest are time to resolution of clinical symptoms and/or signs (cough, sputum production or activity limitations), severity of symptoms prior to resolution and major/minor adverse events. Teams of reviewers will, independently and in duplicate, screen titles and abstracts and the complete full text to determine eligibility. For eligible studies, reviewers will perform data abstraction and assess risk of bias of eligible trials. When appropriate, we will conduct meta-analyses. We will also assess the quality of body of evidence (confidence in estimates of effect) for each of the outcomes using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) approach. Ethics and dissemination The systematic review will be published in

  20. THREE-DIMENSIONAL COMPUTER MODELING OF THE HUMAN UPPER RESPIRATORY TRACT

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT
    Computer simulations of airflow and particle transport phenomena within the human respiratory system have important applications to aerosol therapy (e.g., the targeted delivery of inhaled drugs) and inhalation toxicology (e.g., the risk assessment of air pollutants). ...

  1. The morphology of the digestive tract and respiratory organs of the holothurian Cladolabes schmeltzii (Holothuroidea, Dendrochirotida).

    PubMed

    Kamenev, Ya O; Dolmatov, I Yu; Frolova, L T; Khang, Nguyen An

    2013-04-01

    The microanatomy of the digestive and respiratory systems of the holothurian Cladolabes schmeltzii was studied. The digestive tube of C. schmeltzii is divided into seven parts. The pharynx, esophagus, and stomach are lined with cuticular immersed epithelium. In these regions, the epithelial cells are connected via desmosomes, septate junctions, and rivet-like structures. The presence of the cuticle and rivet-like structures suggests an ectodermal origin for these parts of the digestive tube. The luminal intestinal epithelium is formed by vesicular enterocytes, which have different structures in different intestinal regions. Moreover, the epithelium of the first descending part of the intestine contains the granular enterocytes. The respiratory system consists of paired respiratory trees lined by a luminal epithelium that is formed by cells of irregular shape. The apical surface of these epithelial cells has few lamellae. The cells are connected to each other through a system of intercellular junctions, consisting of both desmosomes and well-developed septate junctions. The coelomic epithelium of the intestine and the respiratory trees consists of peritoneal and myoepithelial cells.

  2. Human Bocavirus in Korean Children with Gastroenteritis and Respiratory Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun Jin; Kim, Jae-Seok; Song, Wonkeun; Kim, MiYoung; Lee, Young Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Human bocaviruses (HBoVs) are suggested to be etiologic agents of childhood respiratory and gastrointestinal infections. There are four main recognized genotypes of HBoVs (HBoV1–4); the HBoV-1 genotype is considered to be the primary etiologic agent in respiratory infections, whereas the HBoV2–4 genotypes have been mainly associated with gastrointestinal infections. The aim of the present study was to determine the distribution of HBoV genotypes in children with respiratory or gastrointestinal infections in a hospital in Korea. A total of 662 nasopharyngeal swabs (NPSs) and 155 fecal specimens were collected from children aged 5 years or less. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was conducted to detect the NS1 HBoV gene. The VP1 gene of HBoV was further amplified in samples that were positive for the NS1 gene. The PCR products of VP1 gene amplification were genotyped by sequence analysis. HBoV was detected in 69 (14.5%) of 662 NPSs and in 10 (6.5%) of 155 fecal specimens. Thirty-three isolates from NPSs and five isolates from fecal specimens were genotyped, and all 38 sequenced isolates were identified as the HBoV-1 genotype. HBoV-1 is the most prevalent genotype in children with respiratory or gastrointestinal HBoV infections in a hospital in Korea. PMID:27990436

  3. Relationship between Respiratory Tract Complaints, Functional Status, and Smoking in Hairdressers, Auto Painters, and Carpenters

    PubMed Central

    Toru, Ümran; Arbak, Peri Meram; Süner, Kezban Özmen; Yavuz, Özlem; Karataş, Naciye

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aim. It was observed that occupation and smoking increased each other's effects on the development of airway diseases. We aimed to search the relationship between respiratory symptoms, smoking, and occupation. Materials and Methods. 225 employees in Düzce, Turkey, were applied a survey questioning respiratory complaints, pulmonary function tests (PFTs) and cotinine measurements in urine. Results. Cough (26.7%), phlegm (30.7%), and chest tightness (21.3%) were encountered more in carpenters compared to other groups and phlegm was statistically higher at significant level compared to other groups. The complaints of cough (30.4%), phlegm (27.4%), and chest tightness (21.5%) were significantly higher in individuals whose cotinine level was above 500 ng/mL and forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1)/forced vital capacity (FVC) ratio, maximum midexpiratory flow rate (MMFR) values were significantly lower. Dyspnea complaint of auto painters whose cotinine level was below 500 ng/mL was significantly higher and also expected MMFR% value of this group was significantly lower compared to other groups. While age had independent effect on respiratory function tests, type of the job was found to be independently effective on MMFR. Conclusion. Smoking increases respiratory complaints of employees. In auto painters, the occupation causes airway disease regardless of smoking. PMID:25105168

  4. Novel, host-restricted genotypes of Bordetella bronchiseptica associated with phocine respiratory tract isolates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bordetella bronchiseptica is a widespread respiratory pathogen in a variety of wild and domesticated animals. During a succession of phocine morbillivirus outbreaks occurring over the past 25 years, it was identified as a frequent secondary invader, often believed to be the cause of death. Prior a...

  5. Seroepidemiological studies of Chlamydia pneumoniae infections in 1-36 months old children with respiratory tract infections and other diseases in Poland.

    PubMed

    Podsiadły, Edyta; Fracka, Beata; Szmigielska, Agnieszka; Tylewska-Wierzbanowska, Stanisława

    2005-01-01

    Presence of specific IgM, IgG and IgA antibodies against Chlamydia pneumoniae was evaluated in children aged 1 week to 36 months to investigate the role of C. pneumoniae in respiratory infections and other diseases. Serum samples were obtained from 150 hospitalized children, including 123 children presenting the clinical symptoms of various respiratory tract infections, two children with acute diarrhoea, two children with meningitis, 14 children with urinary tract infection, and 9 children with non-infectious diseases. Levels of specific C. pneumoniae IgM, IgG and IgA serum antibodies were measured by enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA). C. pneumoniae IgM antibodies were detected in 16 (13.0 %) of 123 children with respiratory tract infections. Specific IgG antibodies were found in sera of 11 children under 12 months old. Among 27 children without symptoms of a respiratory tract disease, specific C. pneumoniae IgM were found in two (7.4%) children, including one child with meningitis and another child with urinary tract infection. Specific IgA antibodies were not found in any tested child. All cases of C. pneumoniae infections were identified within two calendar years out of eight that were analyzed, i.e. in 1997 and 2000. The incidence of C. pneumoniae infections varied seasonally, with most children infected in autumn. C. pneumoniae IgM antibodies were detected more often in girls (17.9%) then in boys (7.2%). C. pneumoniae infections occur among small children in central Poland. The results of this study indicate that C. pneumoniae may play a role in the etiology of respiratory tract infections in infants and young children.

  6. Acupuncture therapy for fever induced by viral upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) in military medical service: a case series.

    PubMed

    Kwon, SeungWon; Shin, KyoungHo; Jung, WooSang; Moon, SangKwan; Cho, KiHo

    2014-12-01

    We report the cases of eight military patients with fever (≥38°C) induced by viral upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) who requested treatment with acupuncture in the military medical service room. All patients were treated immediately after diagnosis with classical acupuncture (GV14, GB20, TE8 points) and a new type of acupuncture, equilibrium acupuncture (Feibing and Ganmao points). After one treatment session (20 min), reduction of body temperature was confirmed in all patients. Accompanying symptoms such as headache, myalgia and nasal obstruction also showed a tendency to decrease. Within 3 days of treatment, six of the eight patients had recovered from the URTI. No adverse effects of acupuncture treatment were reported.

  7. Role of lymphotoxin and homeostatic chemokines in the development and function of local lymphoid tissues in the respiratory tract.

    PubMed

    Rangel-Moreno, Javier; Carragher, Damian; Randall, Troy D

    2007-01-01

    Secondary lymphoid organs are strategically placed to recruit locally activated antigen presenting cells (APCs) as well as naïve, recirculating T and B cells. The structure of secondary lymphoid organs - separated B and T zones, populations of specialized stromal cells, high endothelial venules and lymphatic vessles - has also evolved to maximize encounters between APCs and lymphocytes and to facilitate the expansion and differentiation of antigen-stimulated T and B cells. Many of the general mechanisms that govern the development and organization of secondary lymphoid organs have been identified over the last decade. However, the specific cellular and molecular interactions involved in the development and organization of each secondary lymphoid organ are slightly different and probably reflect the cell types available at that time and location. Here we review the mechanisms involved in the development, organization and function of local lymphoid tissues in the respiratory tract, including Nasal Associated Lymphoid Tissue (NALT) and inducible Bronchus Associated Lymphoid Tissue (iBALT).

  8. Stress-induced cardiomyopathy following infection of the upper respiratory tract in an elderly female patient: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Huaiyu; Huang, Rongchong; Shi, Xiaoli; Wu, Baolin

    2016-01-01

    Stress-induced cardiomyopathy (SIC), also known as takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TTC), is a relatively newly-described condition, which has been increasingly reported in the literature. It is characterized by acute onset of symptoms and electrocardiogram changes mimicking myocardial infarction, with transient but completely reversible left ventricular (LV) dysfunction. SIC commonly occurs following physical or emotional stress. The present study discusses the case of a 68-year-old female patient who had suffered from infection of the upper respiratory tract for 10 days before admission to the hospital with symptoms of chest stuffiness and dyspnea that persisted for 2 days. Coronary angiography showed normal coronary artery function, while LV angiography demonstrated systolic apical ballooning. Based on these observed characteristics, the patient was diagnosed with SIC and was successfully treated. PMID:27882121

  9. [Specific features of centriole formation and ciliogenesis in ciliary epithelium cells of respiratory tracts in patients with Kartagener syndrome].

    PubMed

    Domaratskiĭ, K E; Uvakina, E V; Volkov, I K; Onishchenko, G E

    2005-01-01

    An electron microscopic study of the ciliary epithelium of respiratory tracts was carried out in children (members of the same family) with Kartagener syndrome, which is a variant of ciliary dyskinesia. It was shown that in the case of both mobile cilia and ciliary dyskinesia in man, centrioles are formed during formation of the ciliary basal bodies predominantly de novo, involving deuterosomes. A wide spectrum of pathological changes was described in literature, such as the absence of dynein arms in the axoneme and disorganization of axoneme structure. In addition to these changes in the ciliary system, we found integration of several ciliary axonemes by the same plasma membrane, running of microtubules from the plasma membrane as bundles, different orientation of basal legs, etc.

  10. Development of a bead-based suspension array for the detection of pathogens in acute respiratory tract infections

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong-Ru; Zhang, Wei; Hua, Zhi-Dan; Lin, Xiao-Hong; Lin, Meng-Qing; Huang, Wen-Sen; Huang, Li-Ping; Yu, Xiao-Li; Xu, Neng-Luan; Lin, Ming; Xie, Bao-Song; Shen, Xiao-Na; Xie, Jian-Feng; Wang, Yi; Huang, Meng; Wu, Yan-An; Hu, Xin-Lan

    2016-01-01

    We developed a high-throughput bead-based suspension array for simultaneous detection of 20 respiratory tract pathogens in clinical specimens. Pathogen-specific genes were amplified and hybridized to probes coupled to carboxyl-encoded microspheres. Fluorescence intensities generated via the binding of phycoerythrin-conjugated streptavidin with biotin-labeled targets were measured by the Luminex 100 bead-based suspension array system. The bead-based suspension array detected bacteria in a significantly higher number of samples compared to the conventional culture. There was no significant difference in the detection rate of atypical pathogensatypical pathogens or viruses between the bead-based suspension array and real-time PCR. This technology can play a significant role in screening patients with pneumonia. PMID:27190247

  11. Human coronavirus NL63 is not detected in the respiratory tracts of children with acute Kawasaki disease.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Chisato; Shike, Hiroko; Baker, Susan C; Garcia, Francesca; van der Hoek, Lia; Kuijpers, Taco W; Reed, Sharon L; Rowley, Anne H; Shulman, Stanford T; Talbot, Helen K B; Williams, John V; Burns, Jane C

    2005-11-15

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is a self-limited, systemic vasculitis of children for which an infectious trigger is suspected. Recently, an association between KD and human coronavirus (HCoV)-New Haven (NH) was reported, on the basis of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with primers that also amplified HCoV-NL63. We investigated the possible association between these HCoVs in the respiratory tract and KD by reverse-transcriptase (RT) PCR and viral culture in a geographically and ethnically diverse population. Only 1 (2%) of 48 patients with acute KD was positive by RT-PCR for HCoV-NL63/NH in a nasopharyngeal swab. These data do not support an association between these HCoVs and KD.

  12. Sodium hyaluronate improves quality of life and nasal endoscopy features in preschool children with upper respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed

    Montella, S; Cantone, E; Maglione, M; Iengo, M; Santamaria, F

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this prospective, randomised study was to evaluate the effects of nasal douches with sodium hyaluronate on clinical and endoscopic variables, on parental perception of their child’s health-related quality of life (HR-QoL), and on parental workdays lost in preschool recurrent upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs). Children aged 2-6 years with recurrent or persistent URTIs underwent at baseline the evaluation of upper respiratory tract symptoms in the previous two weeks, and nasal endoscopy. Parents of enrolled children were assessed for self-perception of their children’s HR-QoL using a standardised questionnaire. The same variables were reassessed after a 2-week treatment with either 9 mg sodium hyaluronate plus saline solution or saline alone by nasal douches. Forty of the 48 children enrolled completed the study (22 assigned to the combined treatment). Compared to baseline, the combined treatment resulted in a significant reduction of the prevalence of children with missed daycare days (45% vs 14%, p=0.04) and of parents with workdays lost (36% vs 5%, p=0.02), and in a significant improvement of HR-QoL score (3.7 vs 2.8, p=0.004). At endoscopy, the secretion and mucosal oedema score significantly improved after the combined treatment (6 vs 2, p < 0.001), and there was a trend towards a reduction of the adenoid hypertrophy score (p=0.06). No clinical, HR-QOL or endoscopy changes were found in the saline group. In preschool children with recurrent or persistent URTIs, sodium hyaluronate by nasal douche significantly improves endoscopic features. Additional benefits include the children’s HR-QoL and daycare attendance, and parental work.

  13. Responses in the respiratory tract of rats following exposure to sulphuric acid aerosols for 5 or 28 days.

    PubMed

    Kilgour, Joanne D; Foster, John; Soames, Anthony; Farrar, David G; Hext, Paul M

    2002-01-01

    Sulphuric acid mists have been classified by the International Agency for Research on Cancer as being carcinogenic to humans based on epidemiological findings of respiratory tract tumours. To determine if early changes in the respiratory tract following exposure to sulphuric acid (H(2)SO(4)) aerosols are consistent with the possible development of tumours after extended periods of exposure, groups of female rats were exposed to respirable aerosols of H(2)SO(4) at target concentrations of 0, 0.2, 1.0 or 5.0 mg m(-3) for 6 h per day for either 5 days or for 5 days a week over a 28-day period. Additional groups exposed to 0 or 5.0 mg m(-3) over the 28-day period were retained after exposure for 4 or 8 weeks to assess recovery. Histopathological examinations and quantitative cell proliferation measurements were conducted on the nasal passages, larynx and lung. Achieved concentrations were 0.3, 1.38 and 5.52 mg m(-3) H(2)SO(4). Histological and cell proliferative changes were confined to the larynx and no effects were seen in the nasal passages or lungs. At the two highest concentrations, squamous metaplasia accompanied by significant cell proliferation was apparent after 5 and 28 days of exposure and there was a reduction in the severity of the pathological changes following the recovery periods. No effects were seen at 0.3 mg m(-3) after 5 days of exposure and only minimal metaplastic change was seen after 28 days in a few animals and was not accompanied by cell proliferation. The toxicological relevance of these findings is discussed.

  14. Outpatient upper respiratory tract viral infections in children with malaria symptoms in Western Kenya.

    PubMed

    Waitumbi, John N; Kuypers, Jane; Anyona, Samuel B; Koros, Joseph N; Polhemus, Mark E; Gerlach, Jay; Steele, Matthew; Englund, Janet A; Neuzil, Kathleen M; Domingo, Gonzalo J

    2010-11-01

    A cross-sectional study was performed in children 5 through 10 years of age presenting to outpatient clinics in Nyanza Province, Kenya, in which nasal swab and blood specimens were collected during the high malaria transmission season. Patients presenting with malaria-like symptoms within 4 days of fever onset were enrolled in the study. Plasmodium parasitemia was determined by blood smear microscopy. Nasal swabs were screened for a panel of respiratory viruses by polymerase chain reaction. Influenza A, rhinoviruses, and other respiratory viruses were detected in 18%, 26%, and 12% of 197 specimens, respectively. Four of 36 patients with influenza A had a positive malaria blood slide, compared with 20 of 52 patients with rhinovirus. A significant burden of disease caused by influenza A in febrile children during the study period was observed, highlighting the need for further research into the burden of influenza disease in regions where malaria is holoendemic.

  15. Effect of selected antiasthmatic plant constituents against micro organism causing upper respiratory tract infection.

    PubMed

    Nilani, P; Duraisamy, B; Dhamodaran, P; Ravichandran, S; Elango, K

    2010-01-01

    Most exacerbations of asthma can be proven to be associated with bacterial infections and there is scientific evidence that frequent respiratory infections particularly bacterial infections provoke asthma attack. Considering these facts different plant extracts and phytoconstituents with proven anti asthmatic property had been selected for screening anti microbial activity in in-vitro models. In the present study, Coleus forskohlii Willd. extract (10% Forskolin), Piper Longum L. Extract (20% Piperine), Adathoda vasica Nees. extract (30% Vasicinone), Curcuma longa L. extract (60% Curcumin) were screened for the antibacterial activity against human pathogens causing upper respiratory infection namely Haemophilus influenzae , Streptococcus pneumoniae , Streptococcus pyrogene and Staphylococcus aureus, by taking Gentamycin, Optochin, Bacitracin and Amoxicillin as reference standards. Except for Adathoda vasica Nees. extract, all the other selected plant extracts exhibited a moderate activity antibacterial activity against selected strains.

  16. Progress in pediatrics in 2011. Choices in endocrinology, gastroenterology, hemato-oncology, infectious diseases, otolaryngology, pharmacotherapy and respiratory tract illnesses.

    PubMed

    Caffarelli, Carlo; Santamaria, Francesca; Cesari, Silvia; Di Giorgio, Angela; Bernasconi, Sergio

    2012-06-08

    Main progresses in endocrinology, gastroenterology, hemato-oncology, infectious diseases, otolaryngology, pharmacotherapy, and respiratory tract illnesses selected from articles published in The Italian Journal of Pediatrics in 2011 were reviewed. Risk factors for gastroenteritis and appendicitis in developing countries may be useful in improving our understanding of these diseases. Childhood hearing impairment is a world-wide problem which continues to have an high prevalence in newborns. Among the mechanisms of diseases, obese children often have asthma and high hepcidin levels that may reduce serum iron concentrations. In cystic fibrosis, 18q distal deletion has been described as a novel mutation. Hypothyroidism in children with central nervous system infections may increase mortality rates. Infrared tympanic thermometer (IRTT) in oral mode for the measurement of body temperature may be useful in fever screening in a busy setup. In newborns, the transmission of CMV infection through breast milk may be prevented through freezing or pasteurization. Recent advances in treatment of constipation, urinary tract infections, leukemia, pain in children with cancer, neonates with sepsis or difficult weaning from mechanical ventilation will likely contribute towards optimizing management of these common disorders. The work of the Family Pediatricians Medicines for Children Research Network aims to develop competence, infrastructure, networking and education for pediatric clinical trials.

  17. EFFECT OF RAPID SHALLOW BREATHING ON THE DISTRIBUTION OF 18-O-LABELED OZONE REACTION PRODUCT IN THE RESPIRATORY TRACT OF THE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined the effect of breathing pattern on ozone reaction product content within the respiratory tract. Thirty-four anesthetized, maleWistar rats were exposed to oxygen-18 (18O)-labeled ozone at 1.0 ppm for 2 h using a dual-chamber, negative-pressure ventilation system. Fre...

  18. Elizabethkingia anophelis Isolated from Patients with Multiple Organ Dysfunction Syndrome and Lower Respiratory Tract Infection: Report of Two Cases and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shaohua; Jiang, Tao; Zhang, Xia; Zhou, Yajun; Yi, Zhengjun; Wang, Youxi; Zhao, Sishou; Wang, Mingxi; Ming, Desong; Chen, Shicheng

    2017-01-01

    Elizabethkingia anophelis, originally discovered from Anopheles mosquito gut, is an emerging pathogen, especially in immunocompromised patients. We isolated two strains of E. anophelis from two separate patients with multiple organ dysfunction syndrome and lower respiratory tract infection. In this paper, we reviewed the status of E. anophelis infection and its antibiotics resistance from reported cases.

  19. Novel Avian-Origin Influenza A (H7N9) Virus Attaches to Epithelium in Both Upper and Lower Respiratory Tract of Humans

    PubMed Central

    van Riel, Debby; Leijten, Lonneke M.E.; de Graaf, Miranda; Siegers, Jurre Y.; Short, Kirsty R.; Spronken, Monique I.J.; Schrauwen, Eefje J.A.; Fouchier, Ron A.M.; Osterhaus, Albert D.M.E.; Kuiken, Thijs

    2014-01-01

    Influenza A viruses from animal reservoirs have the capacity to adapt to humans and cause influenza pandemics. The occurrence of an influenza pandemic requires efficient virus transmission among humans, which is associated with virus attachment to the upper respiratory tract. Pandemic severity depends on virus ability to cause pneumonia, which is associated with virus attachment to the lower respiratory tract. Recently, a novel avian-origin H7N9 influenza A virus with unknown pandemic potential emerged in humans. We determined the pattern of attachment of two genetically engineered viruses containing the hemagglutinin of either influenza virus A/Shanghai/1/13 or A/Anhui/1/13 to formalin-fixed human respiratory tract tissues using histochemical analysis. Our results show that the emerging H7N9 virus attached moderately or abundantly to both upper and lower respiratory tract, a pattern not seen before for avian influenza A viruses. With the caveat that virus attachment is only the first step in the virus replication cycle, these results suggest that the emerging H7N9 virus has the potential both to transmit efficiently among humans and to cause severe pneumonia. PMID:24029490

  20. Presence of soot in the respiratory tract and esophagus as an element of consultative process addressing intravital staying in fire atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Raczkowska, Zuzanna; Borowska-Solonynko, Aleksandra; Samojłowicz, Dorota

    2012-01-01

    This paper was prepared in view of consultative difficulties which occur during autopsies of bodies found at the seat of fire. The most difficult problem in such cases is establishing--in absence of typical signs of intravitality--whether the deceased was alive during the fire and inhaling the fire atmosphere; especially when the concentration of carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) in blood is higher than 10% and soot is found in the respiratory tract. The authors analyzed 241 reports of autopsies which had been performed at Institute of Forensic Medicine, Warsaw Medical University, between 2006 and 2011. The following data were analyzed: age, gender, the place where the body was found, blood concentration of COHb and alcohol and the presence of soot in the upper and lower respiratory tract, as well as in the esophagus. It was noted that if the concentration of COHb was higher, soot was more frequently present in the respiratory tract and esophagus. At the same time, the presence, as well as absence of soot was noted regardless of COHb concentration in blood, including 0% concentration. In cases of performing autopsies on bodies found at the seat of fire, examining the upper and down respiratory tract seems to be irrelevant in terms of its consultative usefulness; however, the presence of soot in the esophagus concomitant with low COHb concentration in blood is important in this context.

  1. Elizabethkingia anophelis Isolated from Patients with Multiple Organ Dysfunction Syndrome and Lower Respiratory Tract Infection: Report of Two Cases and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Shaohua; Jiang, Tao; Zhang, Xia; Zhou, Yajun; Yi, Zhengjun; Wang, Youxi; Zhao, Sishou; Wang, Mingxi; Ming, Desong; Chen, Shicheng

    2017-01-01

    Elizabethkingia anophelis, originally discovered from Anopheles mosquito gut, is an emerging pathogen, especially in immunocompromised patients. We isolated two strains of E. anophelis from two separate patients with multiple organ dysfunction syndrome and lower respiratory tract infection. In this paper, we reviewed the status of E. anophelis infection and its antibiotics resistance from reported cases. PMID:28337189

  2. Recent insights into pulmonary repair following virus-induced inflammation of the respiratory tract

    PubMed Central

    Gorski, Stacey A.; Hufford, Matthew M.; Braciale, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    A hallmark of infection by respiratory viruses is productive infection of and the subsequent destruction of the airway epithelium. These viruses can also target other stromal cell types as well as in certain instances, CD45+ hematopoietic cells either resident in the lungs or part of the inflammatory response to infection. The mechanisms by which the virus produces injury to these cell types include direct infection with cytopathic effects as a consequence of replication. Host mediated damage is also a culprit in pulmonary injury as both innate and adaptive immune cells produce soluble and cell-associated pro-inflammatory mediators. Recently, it has become increasingly clear that in addition to control of excess inflammation and virus elimination, the resolution of infection requires an active repair process, which is necessary to regain normal respiratory function and restore the lungs to homeostasis. The repair response must re-establish the epithelial barrier and regenerate the microarchitecture of the lung. Emerging areas of research have highlighted the importance of innate immune cells, particularly the newly described innate lymphoid cells, as well as alternatively activated macrophages and pulmonary stem cells in the repair process. The mechanisms by which respiratory viruses may impede or alter the repair response will be important areas of research for identifying therapeutic targets aimed at limiting virus and host mediated injury and expediting recovery. PMID:22608464

  3. Long-term morbidity and mortality following hypoxaemic lower respiratory tract infection in Gambian children.

    PubMed Central

    West, T. E.; Goetghebuer, T.; Milligan, P.; Mulholland, E. K.; Weber, M. W.

    1999-01-01

    Acute lower respiratory infections (ALRI) are the main cause of death in young children worldwide. We report here the results of a study to determine the long-term survival of children admitted to hospital with severe pneumonia. The study was conducted on 190 Gambian children admitted to hospital in 1992-94 for ALRI who survived to discharge. Of these, 83 children were hypoxaemic and were treated with oxygen, and 107 were not. On follow-up in 1996-97, 62% were traced. Of the children with hypoxaemia, 8 had died, compared with 4 of those without. The mortality rates were 4.8 and, 2.2 deaths per 100 child-years of follow-up for hypoxaemic and non-hypoxaemic children, respectively (P = 0.2). Mortality was higher for children who had been malnourished (Z-score < -2) when seen in hospital (rate ratio = 3.2; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.03-10.29; P = 0.045). Children with younger siblings experienced less frequent subsequent respiratory infections (rate ratio for further hospitalization with respiratory illness = 0.15; 95% CI = 0.04-0.50; P = 0.002). Children in Gambia who survive hospital admission with hypoxaemic pneumonia have a good prognosis. Survival depends more on nutritional status than on having been hypoxaemic. Investment in oxygen therapy appears justified, and efforts should be made to improve nutrition in malnourished children with pneumonia. PMID:10083713

  4. Development of a symptom score for clinical studies to identify children with a documented viral upper respiratory tract infection.

    PubMed

    Taylor, James A; Weber, Wendy J; Martin, Emily T; McCarty, Rachelle L; Englund, Janet A

    2010-09-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a symptom scoring system for use in clinical studies that differentiates children with cold symptoms who have an identifiable viral etiology for their upper respiratory tract infection (URI) from those in whom no virus is detected. Nasal swabs for PCR testing for identification of respiratory viruses were obtained on children aged 2-11 y at baseline and when parents thought their child was developing a cold. Parental-recorded severity of specific symptoms in children with and without a documented viral URI were compared. Nasal swabs were obtained on 108 children whose parents reported their child was developing a cold. A viral etiology was identified in 62 of 108 (57.4%) samples. Symptom measures that best differentiated children with a viral etiology from those without were significant runny nose and significant cough on days 1-4 of the illness. A URI symptom score was developed based on these symptoms, with a sensitivity of 81.4%, specificity of 61.9%, and accuracy of 73.3%. Parental impression is only a moderately accurate predictor of viral URI in children. Our URI symptom score provided a more accurate method for identifying children with viral URIs for clinical studies.

  5. A Defective Interfering Influenza RNA Inhibits Infectious Influenza Virus Replication in Human Respiratory Tract Cells: A Potential New Human Antiviral

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Claire M.; Scott, Paul D.; O’Callaghan, Christopher; Easton, Andrew J.; Dimmock, Nigel J.

    2016-01-01

    Defective interfering (DI) viruses arise during the replication of influenza A virus and contain a non-infective version of the genome that is able to interfere with the production of infectious virus. In this study we hypothesise that a cloned DI influenza A virus RNA may prevent infection of human respiratory epithelial cells with infection by influenza A. The DI RNA (244/PR8) was derived by a natural deletion process from segment 1 of influenza A/PR/8/34 (H1N1); it comprises 395 nucleotides and is packaged in the DI virion in place of a full-length genome segment 1. Given intranasally, 244/PR8 DI virus protects mice and ferrets from clinical influenza caused by a number of different influenza A subtypes and interferes with production of infectious influenza A virus in cells in culture. However, evidence that DI influenza viruses are active in cells of the human respiratory tract is lacking. Here we show that 244/PR8 DI RNA is replicated by an influenza A challenge virus in human lung diploid fibroblasts, bronchial epithelial cells, and primary nasal basal cells, and that the yield of challenge virus is significantly reduced in a dose-dependent manner indicating that DI influenza virus has potential as a human antiviral. PMID:27556481

  6. A Defective Interfering Influenza RNA Inhibits Infectious Influenza Virus Replication in Human Respiratory Tract Cells: A Potential New Human Antiviral.

    PubMed

    Smith, Claire M; Scott, Paul D; O'Callaghan, Christopher; Easton, Andrew J; Dimmock, Nigel J

    2016-08-22

    Defective interfering (DI) viruses arise during the replication of influenza A virus and contain a non-infective version of the genome that is able to interfere with the production of infectious virus. In this study we hypothesise that a cloned DI influenza A virus RNA may prevent infection of human respiratory epithelial cells with infection by influenza A. The DI RNA (244/PR8) was derived by a natural deletion process from segment 1 of influenza A/PR/8/34 (H1N1); it comprises 395 nucleotides and is packaged in the DI virion in place of a full-length genome segment 1. Given intranasally, 244/PR8 DI virus protects mice and ferrets from clinical influenza caused by a number of different influenza A subtypes and interferes with production of infectious influenza A virus in cells in culture. However, evidence that DI influenza viruses are active in cells of the human respiratory tract is lacking. Here we show that 244/PR8 DI RNA is replicated by an influenza A challenge virus in human lung diploid fibroblasts, bronchial epithelial cells, and primary nasal basal cells, and that the yield of challenge virus is significantly reduced in a dose-dependent manner indicating that DI influenza virus has potential as a human antiviral.

  7. COMPARATIVE COMPUTATIONAL MODELING OF AIRFLOWS AND VAPOR DOSIMETY IN THE RESPIRATORY TRACTS OF RAT, MONKEY, AND HUMAN

    SciTech Connect

    Corley, Richard A.; Kabilan, Senthil; Kuprat, Andrew P.; Carson, James P.; Minard, Kevin R.; Jacob, Rick E.; Timchalk, Charles; Glenny, Robb W.; Pipavath, Sudhaker; Cox, Timothy C.; Wallis, Chris; Larson, Richard; Fanucchi, M.; Postlewait, Ed; Einstein, Daniel R.

    2012-07-01

    Coupling computational fluid dynamics (CFD) with physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models is useful for predicting site-specific dosimetry of airborne materials in the respiratory tract and elucidating the importance of species differences in anatomy, physiology, and breathing patterns. Historically, these models were limited to discrete regions of the respiratory system. CFD/PBPK models have now been developed for the rat, monkey, and human that encompass airways from the nose or mouth to the lung. A PBPK model previously developed to describe acrolein uptake in nasal tissues was adapted to the extended airway models as an example application. Model parameters for each anatomic region were obtained from the literature, measured directly, or estimated from published data. Airflow and site-specific acrolein uptake patterns were determined under steadystate inhalation conditions to provide direct comparisons with prior data and nasalonly simulations. Results confirmed that regional uptake was dependent upon airflow rates and acrolein concentrations with nasal extraction efficiencies predicted to be greatest in the rat, followed by the monkey, then the human. For human oral-breathing simulations, acrolein uptake rates in oropharyngeal and laryngeal tissues were comparable to nasal tissues following nasal breathing under the same exposure conditions. For both breathing modes, higher uptake rates were predicted for lower tracheo-bronchial tissues of humans than either the rat or monkey. These extended airway models provide a unique foundation for comparing dosimetry across a significantly more extensive range of conducting airways in the rat, monkey, and human than prior CFD models.

  8. The Effectiveness and Safety of a Homeopathic Medicinal Product in Pediatric Upper Respiratory Tract Infections With Fever

    PubMed Central

    van Haselen, Robert; Thinesse-Mallwitz, Manuela; Maidannyk, Vitaliy; Buskin, Stephen L.; Weber, Stephan; Keller, Thomas; Burkart, Julia; Klement, Petra

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the clinical effectiveness of a homeopathic add-on therapy in a pediatric subpopulation with upper respiratory tract infections (URTI) in a randomized, controlled, multinational clinical trial. Patients received either on-demand symptomatic standard treatment (ST-group) or the same ST plus a homeopathic medication (Influcid; IFC-group) for 7 days. Outcome assessment was based on symptom and fever resolution and the Wisconsin Upper Respiratory Symptom Survey–21 (WURSS-21). A total of 261 pediatric (<12 years) patients (130 IFC-group; 131 ST-group) were recruited in Germany and the Ukraine. The IFC-group used less symptomatic medication, symptoms resolved significantly earlier (P = .0001), had higher proportions of fever-free children from day 3 onwards, and the WURSS-assessed global disease severity was significantly less (P < .0001) during the entire URTI episode. One adverse event (vomiting) was possibly related to IFC. IFC as add-on treatment in pediatric URTI reduced global disease severity, shortened symptom resolution, and was safe in use. PMID:27493984

  9. Insights into the respiratory tract microbiota of patients with cystic fibrosis during early Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization

    SciTech Connect

    Keravec, Marlène; Mounier, Jérôme; Prestat, Emmanuel; Vallet, Sophie; Jansson, Janet K.; Burgaud, Gaëtan; Rosec, Sylvain; Gouriou, Stéphanie; Rault, Gilles; Coton, Emmanuel; Barbier, Georges; Héry-Arnaud, Geneviève

    2015-08-09

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa plays a major role in cystic fibrosis (CF) progression. Therefore, it is important to understand the initial steps of P. aeruginosa infection. The structure and dynamics of CF respiratory tract microbial communities during the early stages of P. aeruginosa colonization were characterized by pyrosequencing and cloning-sequencing. The respiratory microbiota showed high diversity, related to the young age of the CF cohort (mean age 10 years). Wide inter- and intra-individual variations were revealed. A common core microbiota of 5 phyla and 13 predominant genera was found, the majority of which were obligate anaerobes. A few genera were significantly more prevalent in patients never infected by P. aeruginosa. Persistence of an anaerobic core microbiota regardless of P. aeruginosa status suggests a major role of certain anaerobes in the pathophysiology of lung infections in CF. Some genera may be potential biomarkers of pulmonary infection state.

  10. Viral agents causing lower respiratory tract infections in hospitalized children: evaluation of the Speed-Oligo® RSV assay for the detection of respiratory syncytial virus.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Yebra, W; Ávila-Carrillo, J A; Giménez-Sánchez, F; Reyes-Bertos, A; Sánchez-Forte, M; Morales-Torres, M; Rojas, A; Mendoza, J

    2012-03-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the viral agent which is more frequently involved in lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) in infants under 1 year of age in developed countries. A new oligochromatographic assay, Speed-Oligo® RSV, was designed and optimized for the specific detection and identification of RSV subtypes A and B. The test was evaluated in 289 clinical samples from 169 hospitalized children using an immunochromatography (IC) test, virus isolation by culture, and an in-house real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Other viruses causing LRTIs were investigated by cell culture or PCR-based tests. Sixty-two patients were infected by RSV (36.7%). In addition, adenovirus, influenza B, parainfluenza 2, and human metapneumovirus were detected in rates ranging from 5 to 8%. A proportion of 10.1% of the patients had mixed infections. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were, respectively, 94.9, 99.4, 98.9, and 97.4% for Speed-Oligo® RSV, 92.9, 96.3, 92.9, and 96.3% for RT-PCR/RSV, and 58.4, 98.1, 93.3, and 82.6% for IC. Our rates of viral detection and co-infection were similar to those of previously reported series. Finally, we find that Speed-Oligo® RSV is a rapid and easy-to-perform technique for the detection of RSV and the identification of subtypes A and B.

  11. Anti-viral activity of water extract of Paeonia lactiflora pallas against human respiratory syncytial virus in human respiratory tract cell lines.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tzeng-Jih; Wang, Kuo-Chih; Lin, Chun-Ching; Chiang, Lien-Chai; Chang, Jung-San

    2013-01-01

    Paeonia lactiflora Pallas (P. lactiflora, Ranunculaceae) is a common ingredient of Sheng-Ma-Ge-Gen-Tang (SMGGT; Shoma-kakkon-to) and Ge-Gen-Tang (GGT; kakkon-to). SMGGT and GGT are different prescriptions of traditional Chinese medicine with different ingredients designed for airway symptoms. Both SMGGT and GGT have anti-viral activity against human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV). Therefore, P. lactiflora was hypothesized to be the effective ingredient of both SMGGT and GGT against HRSV. However, P. lactiflora does not have any proven antiviral activity. This study used both human upper (Human larynx epidermoid carcinoma cell line, HEp-2) and lower (human lung carcinoma cell line, A549) respiratory tract cells to test the hypothesis that a hot water extract of P. lactiflora could effectively inhibit plaque formation induced by HRSV infection. The ability of P. lactiflora to stimulate anti-viral cytokines was evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The results showed that P. lactiflora was time-dependently and dose-dependently effective against HRSV in HEp-2 and A549 cells, particularly supplemented before viral inoculation (p < 0.0001). 10 μg/ml P. lactiflora had a comparable anti-HRSV activity with 10 μg/ml ribavirin, a broad-spectrum antiviral agent. P. lactiflora was dose-dependently effective against viral attachment (p < 0.0001), with a better effect on A549 cells (p < 0.0001). P. lactiflora was time-dependently (p < 0.0001) and dose-dependently (p < 0.0001) effective against viral penetration. Moreover, P. lactiflora stimulated IFN-β secretion without any effect on TNF-α secretion. Therefore, P. lactiflora could be beneficial at preventing HRSV infection by inhibiting viral attachment, internalization, and stimulating IFN secretion.

  12. Models to predict both sensible and latent heat transfer in the respiratory tract of Morada Nova sheep under semiarid tropical environment.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Vinícius Carvalho; Saraiva, Edilson Paes; Maia, Alex Sandro Campos; Nascimento, Carolina Cardoso Nagib; da Silva, Josinaldo Araújo; Pereira, Walter Esfraim; Filho, Edgard Cavalcanti Pimenta; Almeida, Maria Elivânia Vieira

    2016-10-10

    The aim of this study was to build a prediction model both sensible and latent heat transfer by respiratory tract for Morada Nova sheep under field conditions in a semiarid tropical environment, using easily measured physiological and environmental parameters. Twelve dry Morada Nova ewes with an average of 3 ± 1.2 years old and average body weight of 32.76 ± 3.72 kg were used in a Latin square design 12 × 12 (12 days of records and 12 schedules). Tidal volume, respiratory rate, expired air temperature, and partial vapor pressure of the expired air were obtained from the respiratory facial mask and using a physiological measurement system. Ewes were evaluated from 0700 to 1900 h in each day under shade. A simple nonlinear model to estimate tidal volume as a function of respiratory rate was developed. Equation to estimate the expired air temperature was built, and the ambient air temperature was the best predictor together with relative humidity and ambient vapor pressure. In naturalized Morada Nova sheep, respiratory convection seems to be a mechanism of heat transfer of minor importance even under mild air temperature. Evaporation from the respiratory system increased together with ambient air temperature. At ambient air temperature, up to 35 °C respiratory evaporation accounted 90 % of the total heat lost by respiratory system, on average. Models presented here allow to estimate the heat flow from the respiratory tract for Morada Nova sheep bred in tropical region, using easily measured physiological and environmental traits as respiratory rate, ambient air temperature, and relative humidity.

  13. Models to predict both sensible and latent heat transfer in the respiratory tract of Morada Nova sheep under semiarid tropical environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, Vinícius Carvalho; Saraiva, Edilson Paes; Maia, Alex Sandro Campos; Nascimento, Carolina Cardoso Nagib; da Silva, Josinaldo Araújo; Pereira, Walter Esfraim; Filho, Edgard Cavalcanti Pimenta; Almeida, Maria Elivânia Vieira

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to build a prediction model both sensible and latent heat transfer by respiratory tract for Morada Nova sheep under field conditions in a semiarid tropical environment, using easily measured physiological and environmental parameters. Twelve dry Morada Nova ewes with an average of 3 ± 1.2 years old and average body weight of 32.76 ± 3.72 kg were used in a Latin square design 12 × 12 (12 days of records and 12 schedules). Tidal volume, respiratory rate, expired air temperature, and partial vapor pressure of the expired air were obtained from the respiratory facial mask and using a physiological measurement system. Ewes were evaluated from 0700 to 1900 h in each day under shade. A simple nonlinear model to estimate tidal volume as a function of respiratory rate was developed. Equation to estimate the expired air temperature was built, and the ambient air temperature was the best predictor together with relative humidity and ambient vapor pressure. In naturalized Morada Nova sheep, respiratory convection seems to be a mechanism of heat transfer of minor importance even under mild air temperature. Evaporation from the respiratory system increased together with ambient air temperature. At ambient air temperature, up to 35 °C respiratory evaporation accounted 90 % of the total heat lost by respiratory system, on average. Models presented here allow to estimate the heat flow from the respiratory tract for Morada Nova sheep bred in tropical region, using easily measured physiological and environmental traits as respiratory rate, ambient air temperature, and relative humidity.

  14. 'Red Yeast Rice' Statin Alternative Not Harmless Either, Study Says

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163221.html 'Red Yeast Rice' Statin Alternative Not Harmless Either, Study Says The ... A natural cholesterol-lowering supplement called red yeast rice could pose the same health risks to users ...

  15. 34 CFR 200.73 - Applicable hold-harmless provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... children ages 5 to 17, inclusive, as a percentage of its total population of children ages 5 to 17...-harmless amount for four consecutive years. (Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under...

  16. Non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae biofilm production and severity in lower respiratory tract infections in a tertiary hospital in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Reséndez, Michel Fernando; González-Chávez, Juan Manuel; Garza-González, Elvira; Castro-Fuentes, Lorena Nefertiti; Gutiérrez-Ferman, Jessica Lizzeth; Echániz-Aviles, Gabriela; Camacho-Ortíz, Adrián; Carnalla-Barajas, María Noemí; Soto-Noguerón, Araceli; Maldonado-Garza, Héctor Jesús; Hernández-Balboa, Cristina Liliana; Llaca-Díaz, Jorge M; Flores-Treviño, Samantha

    2016-12-01

    Non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is a common opportunistic bacterial pathogen that primarily infects the respiratory mucosa. This study was conducted to assess clinical and microbiological data related to disease severity in patients with lower respiratory tract infections caused by NTHi in a tertiary care hospital in Mexico. NTHi isolates were subjected to serotyping, antimicrobial susceptibility evaluationand analyses of β-lactamase production, genetic relatednessand biofilm formation. Clinical and demographic data were retrieved from patients' records. The mean age of the patients was 40.3 years; the majority (n=44, 72.1 %) were male. The main comorbidities were arterial hypertension (n=22, 36.1 %) and diabetes mellitus (n=17, 27.9 %). NTHi isolates (n=98) were recovered from tracheal aspirate (n=57, 58.2 %), sputum (n=26, 26.5 %)and bronchial aspirate (n=15, 15.3 %) specimens. Low resistance to cefotaxime (n=0, 0.0 %), rifampin (n=1, 1.1 %) and chloramphenicol (n=3, 3.2 %) and greater resistance to ampicillin (n=30, 32.3 %) and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (n=49, 52.7 %) were detected. β-Lactamase production was found in 17 (17.3 %) isolates. Isolates displayed high genetic diversity, and only 10 (10.2 %) were found to be biofilm producers. The antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of biofilm-producing and non-producing isolates did not differ. Biofilm production was associated with prolonged hospital stay (P=0.05). Lower respiratory NTHi isolates from Mexico showed low antimicrobial resistance and weak biofilm production. Younger age was correlated with lower Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score (moderate, P=0.07; severe, P=0.03).

  17. Vitamin A Deficiency Impairs Mucin Expression and Suppresses the Mucosal Immune Function of the Respiratory Tract in Chicks

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guanhua; Zhao, Jingpeng; Jiao, Hongchao; Wang, Xiaojuan; Song, Zhigang; Lin, Hai

    2015-01-01

    The chicken immune system is immature at the time of hatching. The development of the respiratory immune system after hatching is vital to young chicks. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of dietary vitamin A supplement levels on respiratory mucin and IgA production in chicks. In this study, 120 one-day-old broiler chicks were randomly divided into 4 groups consisting of three replicates of 10 broilers and subjected to dietary vitamin A supplement levels of 0, 1,500, 6,000, or 12,000 IU/kg for seven days. Compared with control birds, vitamin A supplementation significantly increased the mucin and IgA levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) as well as the IgA level in serum. In the lungs, vitamin A supplementation downregulated TNF-α and EGFR mRNA expression. The TGF-β and MUC5AC mRNA expression levels were upregulated by vitamin A supplementation at a dose of 6,000 IU/kg, and the IL-13 mRNA expression level was increased at the 12,000 IU/kg supplement level. Vitamin A deficiency (control) significantly decreased the mRNA expression levels of MUC2, IgA, EGFR, IL-13 and TGF-β in trachea tissue. Histological section analysis revealed that the number of goblet cells in the tracheal epithelium was less in the 0 and 12,000 IU/kg vitamin A supplement groups than in the other groups. In conclusion, vitamin A deficiency suppressed the immunity of the airway by decreasing the IgA and mucin concentrations in neonatal chicks. This study suggested that a suitable level of vitamin A is essential for the secretion of IgA and mucin in the respiratory tract by regulating the gene expression of cytokines and epithelial growth factors. PMID:26422233

  18. Evaluation of swabbing methods for estimating the prevalence of bacterial carriage in the upper respiratory tract: a cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Coughtrie, A L; Whittaker, R N; Begum, N; Anderson, R; Tuck, A; Faust, S N; Jefferies, J M; Yuen, H M; Roderick, P J; Mullee, M A; Moore, M V; Clarke, S C

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Bacterial carriage in the upper respiratory tract is usually asymptomatic but can lead to respiratory tract infection (RTI), meningitis and septicaemia. We aimed to provide a baseline measure of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Moraxella catarrhalis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Haemophilus influenzae and Neisseria meningitidis carriage within the community. Self-swabbing and healthcare professional (HCP) swabbing were compared. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Individuals registered at 20 general practitioner practices within the Wessex Primary Care Research Network South West, UK. Participants 10 448 individuals were invited to participate; 5394 within a self-swabbing group and 5054 within a HCP swabbing group. Self-swabbing invitees included 2405 individuals aged 0–4 years and 3349 individuals aged ≥5 years. HCP swabbing invitees included 1908 individuals aged 0–4 years and 3146 individuals aged ≥5 years. Results 1574 (15.1%) individuals participated, 1260 (23.4%, 95% CI 22.3% to 24.5%) undertaking self-swabbing and 314 (6.2%, 95% CI 5.5% to 6.9%) undertaking HCP-led swabbing. Participation was lower in young children and more deprived practice locations. Swab positivity rates were 34.8% (95% CI 32.2% to 37.4%) for self-taken nose swabs (NS), 19% (95% CI 16.8% to 21.2%) for self-taken whole mouth swabs (WMS), 25.2% (95% CI 20.4% to 30%) for nasopharyngeal swabs (NPS) and 33.4% (95% CI 28.2% to 38.6%) for HCP-taken WMS. Carriage rates of S. aureus were highest in NS (21.3%). S. pneumoniae carriage was highest in NS (11%) and NPS (7.4%). M. catarrhalis carriage was highest in HCP-taken WMS (28.8%). H. influenzae and P. aeruginosa carriage were similar between swab types. N. meningitidis was not detected in any swab. Age and recent RTI affected carriage of S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae. Participant costs were lower for self-swabbing (£41.21) versus HCP swabbing (£69.66). Conclusions Higher participation and lower

  19. [Risk factors for severe acute lower respiratory tract infection in Bogota, 2001].

    PubMed

    Jaimes, María Belén; Cáceres, Diana C; de la Hoz, Fernando; Gutiérrez, Camilo; Herrera, Diana; Pinilla, Jairo; Porras, Alexandra; Rodríguez, Fabio; Velandia, Martha

    2003-09-01

    Severity of acute respiratory infection is higher in developing countries, especially among the socioeconomically underprivileged. Viral pneumonias are more common, especially among children. A prospective hospital-based case control study was undertaken in Bogota between November 2000 and August 2001, aimed to identify factors related to severe low acute respiratory infection (SLARI). Cases were limited to children aged between 2 months and 5 years who filled WHO criteria for SLARI. Controls were children at the same hospital with ARI in a similar age range, but without symptoms of chest drawing. A total of 638 children (277 cases and 361 controls) were included. The most important risk factors included the following: living in borrowed houses (odds ratio (OR) = 2.7; 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 1.06-7.07), sharing the bed (OR = 1.88, CI: 1.0-3.7), living with more than 9 people (OR = 1.82, CI: 1.0-3.51), and living with smokers (OR = 1.4, CI: 1.0-2.05). Of the 114 samples collected (from children at third day after beginning of symptoms), 98 had viruses, sincitial respiratory virus was the most frequently identified virus (41.8%), followed by influenza A virus (3.1%) and influenza B virus (1%). All positive isolates for influenza A and B were sent to the United States Center for Disease Control (CDC) in Atlanta, where they were classified as influenza A/PANAMA/2007/99-like and influenza B/SICHUAN/379/99-like, respectively.

  20. Segregation of Virulent Influenza A(H1N1) Variants in the Lower Respiratory Tract of Critically Ill Patients during the 2010–2011 Seasonal Epidemic

    PubMed Central

    Piralla, Antonio; Pariani, Elena; Rovida, Francesca; Campanini, Giulia; Muzzi, Alba; Emmi, Vincenzo; Iotti, Giorgio A.; Pesenti, Antonio; Conaldi, Pier Giulio; Zanetti, Alessandro; Baldanti, Fausto

    2011-01-01

    Background Since its appearance in 2009, the pandemic influenza A(H1N1) virus circulated worldwide causing several severe infections. Methods Respiratory samples from patients with 2009 influenza A(H1N1) and acute respiratory distress attending 24 intensive care units (ICUs) as well as from patients with lower respiratory tract infections not requiring ICU admission and community upper respiratory tract infections in the Lombardy region (10 million inhabitants) of Italy during the 2010–2011 winter-spring season, were analyzed. Results In patients with severe ILI, the viral load was higher in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) with respect to nasal swab (NS), (p<0.001) suggesting a higher virus replication in the lower respiratory tract. Four distinct virus clusters (referred to as cluster A to D) circulated simultaneously. Most (72.7%, n = 48) of the 66 patients infected with viruses belonging to cluster A had a severe (n = 26) or moderate ILI (n = 22). Amino acid mutations (V26I, I116M, A186T, D187Y, D222G/N, M257I, S263F, I286L/M, and N473D) were observed only in patients with severe ILI. D222G/N variants were detected exclusively in BAL samples. Conclusions Multiple virus clusters co-circulated during the 2010–2011 winter-spring season. Severe or moderate ILI were associated with specific 2009 influenza A(H1N1) variants, which replicated preferentially in the lower respiratory tract. PMID:22194826

  1. World Trade Center fine particulate matter causes respiratory tract hyperresponsiveness in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Gavett, Stephen H; Haykal-Coates, Najwa; Highfill, Jerry W; Ledbetter, Allen D; Chen, Lung Chi; Cohen, Mitchell D; Harkema, Jack R; Wagner, James G; Costa, Daniel L

    2003-01-01

    Pollutants originating from the destruction of the World Trade Center (WTC) in New York City on 11 September 2001 have been reported to cause adverse respiratory responses in rescue workers and nearby residents. We examined whether WTC-derived fine particulate matter [particulate matter with a mass median aerodynamic diameter < 2.5 microm (PM2.5)] has detrimental respiratory effects in mice to contribute to the risk assessment of WTC-derived pollutants. Samples of WTC PM2.5 were derived from settled dust collected at several locations around Ground Zero on 12 and 13 September 2001. Aspirated samples of WTC PM2.5 induced mild to moderate degrees of pulmonary inflammation 1 day after exposure but only at a relatively high dose (100 microg). This response was not as great as that caused by 100 microg PM2.5 derived from residual oil fly ash (ROFA) or Washington, DC, ambient air PM [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Standard Reference Material (SRM) 1649a]. However, this same dose of WTC PM2.5 caused airway hyperresponsiveness to methacholine aerosol comparable to that from SRM 1649a and to a greater degree than that from ROFA. Mice exposed to lower doses by aspiration or inhalation exposure did not develop significant inflammation or hyperresponsiveness. These results show that exposure to high levels of WTC PM2.5 can promote mechanisms of airflow obstruction in mice. Airborne concentrations of WTC PM2.5 that would cause comparable doses in people are high (approximately 425 microg/m3 for 8 hr) but conceivable in the aftermath of the collapse of the towers when rescue and salvage efforts were in effect. We conclude that a high-level exposure to WTC PM2.5 could cause pulmonary inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness in people. The effects of chronic exposures to lower levels of WTC PM2.5, the persistence of any respiratory effects, and the effects of coarser WTC PM are unknown and were not examined in these studies. Degree of exposure and respiratory

  2. World Trade Center fine particulate matter causes respiratory tract hyperresponsiveness in mice.

    PubMed

    Gavett, Stephen H; Haykal-Coates, Najwa; Highfill, Jerry W; Ledbetter, Allen D; Chen, Lung Chi; Cohen, Mitchell D; Harkema, Jack R; Wagner, James G; Costa, Daniel L

    2003-06-01

    Pollutants originating from the destruction of the World Trade Center (WTC) in New York City on 11 September 2001 have been reported to cause adverse respiratory responses in rescue workers and nearby residents. We examined whether WTC-derived fine particulate matter [particulate matter with a mass median aerodynamic diameter < 2.5 microm (PM2.5)] has detrimental respiratory effects in mice to contribute to the risk assessment of WTC-derived pollutants. Samples of WTC PM2.5 were derived from settled dust collected at several locations around Ground Zero on 12 and 13 September 2001. Aspirated samples of WTC PM2.5 induced mild to moderate degrees of pulmonary inflammation 1 day after exposure but only at a relatively high dose (100 microg). This response was not as great as that caused by 100 microg PM2.5 derived from residual oil fly ash (ROFA) or Washington, DC, ambient air PM [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Standard Reference Material (SRM) 1649a]. However, this same dose of WTC PM2.5 caused airway hyperresponsiveness to methacholine aerosol comparable to that from SRM 1649a and to a greater degree than that from ROFA. Mice exposed to lower doses by aspiration or inhalation exposure did not develop significant inflammation or hyperresponsiveness. These results show that exposure to high levels of WTC PM2.5 can promote mechanisms of airflow obstruction in mice. Airborne concentrations of WTC PM2.5 that would cause comparable doses in people are high (approximately 425 microg/m3 for 8 hr) but conceivable in the aftermath of the collapse of the towers when rescue and salvage efforts were in effect. We conclude that a high-level exposure to WTC PM2.5 could cause pulmonary inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness in people. The effects of chronic exposures to lower levels of WTC PM2.5, the persistence of any respiratory effects, and the effects of coarser WTC PM are unknown and were not examined in these studies. Degree of exposure and respiratory

  3. [Atrial chaotic tachycardia during a respiratory tract infection due to NL63 coronavirus].

    PubMed

    Chantreuil, J; Favrais, G; Soule, N; Maakaroun-Vermesse, Z; Chaillon, A; Chantepie, A; Saliba, E

    2013-03-01

    We report the case of a 3-month-old boy hospitalized with acute bronchiolitis. Respiratory distress was associated with cardiogenic shock caused by chaotic atrial tachycardia. The cause of bronchiolitis was a coronavirus NL63 viral infection, confirmed in nasopharyngeal aspirations. The patient required intensive care including diuretics (furosemide), anti-arrhythmic drugs (amiodarone and digoxin), and inotropic drugs (milrinone and levosimendan) associated with mechanical ventilation. The outcome was favorable in 10 days and the sinusal cardiac rhythm was completely restored at discharge.

  4. Antiadhesive and antibiofilm activity of hyaluronic acid against bacteria responsible for respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed

    Drago, Lorenzo; Cappelletti, Laura; De Vecchi, Elena; Pignataro, Lorenzo; Torretta, Sara; Mattina, Roberto

    2014-10-01

    To address the problem of limited efficacy of existing antibiotics in the treatment of bacterial biofilm, it is necessary to find alternative remedies. One candidate could be hyaluronic acid; this study therefore aimed to evaluate the in vitro antiadhesive and antibiofilm activity of hyaluronic acid toward bacterial species commonly isolated from respiratory infections. Interference exerted on bacterial adhesion was evaluated by using Hep-2 cells, while the antibiofilm activity was assessed by means of spectrophotometry after incubation of biofilm with hyaluronic acid and staining with crystal violet. Our data suggest that hyaluronic acid is able to interfere with bacterial adhesion to a cellular substrate in a concentration-dependent manner, being notably active when assessed as pure substance. Moreover, we found that Staphylococcus aureus biofilm was more sensitive to the action of hyaluronic acid than biofilm produced by Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis. In conclusion, hyaluronic acid is characterized by notable antiadhesive properties, while it shows a moderate activity against bacterial biofilm. As bacterial adhesion to oral cells is the first step for colonization, these results further sustain the role of hyaluronic acid in prevention of respiratory infections.

  5. Prolonged shedding of rhinovirus and re-infection in adults with respiratory tract illness.

    PubMed

    Zlateva, Kalina T; de Vries, Jutte J C; Coenjaerts, Frank E J; van Loon, Anton M; Verheij, Theo; Little, Paul; Butler, Christopher C; Goossens, Herman; Ieven, Margareta; Claas, Eric C J

    2014-07-01

    Rhinovirus infections occur frequently throughout life and have been reported in about one-third of asymptomatic cases. The clinical significance of sequential rhinovirus infections remains unclear. To determine the incidence and clinical relevance of sequential rhinovirus detections, nasopharyngeal samples from 2485 adults with acute cough/lower respiratory illness were analysed. Patients were enrolled prospectively by general practitioners from 12 European Union countries during three consecutive years (2007-2010). Nasopharyngeal samples were collected at the initial general practitioner consultation and 28 days thereafter and symptom scores were recorded by patients over that period. Rhinovirus RNA was detected in 444 (18%) out of 2485 visit one samples and in 110 (4.4%) out of 2485 visit two respiratory samples. 21 (5%) of the 444 patients had both samples positive for rhinovirus. Genotyping of both virus detections was successful for 17 (81%) out of 21 of these patients. Prolonged rhinovirus shedding occurred in six (35%) out of 21 and re-infection with a different rhinovirus in 11 (65%) out of 21. Rhinovirus re-infections were significantly associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (p=0.04) and asthma (p=0.02) and appeared to be more severe than prolonged infections. Our findings indicate that in immunocompetent adults rhinovirus re-infections are more common than prolonged infections, and chronic airway comorbidities might predispose to more frequent rhinovirus re-infections.

  6. Clinical efficacy and tolerability of grepafloxacin in lower respiratory tract infection.

    PubMed

    Chodosh, Sanford

    1998-03-01

    Studies in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) have compared grepafloxacin, 600 mg o.d. for 7--10 days, with amoxycillin, 500 mg t.d.s., cefaclor, 500 mg t.d.s., or clarithromycin, 250 mg b.d. Grepafloxacin appeared to be clinically as effective as the comparators. In CAP caused by Haemophilus influenzae, grepafloxacin was significantly superior to amoxycillin (p=0.005) and cefaclor (p=0.003) and equivalent to clarithromycin in eradicating the infecting organism. Bacterial eradication with grepafloxacin in CAP caused by Moraxella catarrhalis or Streptococcus pneumoniae was effective and equivalent to the comparator antibiotic. In an open study, grepafloxacin was also effective in treating atypical pneumonia caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Legionella pneumophila. In acute bacterial exacerbations of chronic bronchitis (ABECB), studies have found once-daily treatment with grepafloxacin, 400 mg or 600 mg for 7--10 days, to be equivalent to amoxycillin, 500 mg t.d.s., or ciprofloxacin, 500 mg b.d. In patients with documented infections, bacteriologic eradication with grepafloxacin, 400 mg or 600 mg o.d., was superior to amoxycillin, 500 mg t.d.s. Results from clinical trials so far indicate that grepafloxacin has a broad spectrum of activity covering all important community-acquired respiratory pathogens, and may be suitable for the empirical treatment of respiratory infection.

  7. Identification of Upper Respiratory Tract Pathogens Using Electrochemical Detection on an Oligonucleotide Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Lodes, Michael J.; Suciu, Dominic; Wilmoth, Jodi L.; Ross, Marty; Munro, Sandra; Dix, Kim; Bernards, Karen; Stöver, Axel G.; Quintana, Miguel; Iihoshi, Naomi; Lyon, Wanda J.; Danley, David L.; McShea, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    Bacterial and viral upper respiratory infections (URI) produce highly variable clinical symptoms that cannot be used to identify the etiologic agent. Proper treatment, however, depends on correct identification of the pathogen involved as antibiotics provide little or no benefit with viral infections. Here we describe a rapid and sensitive genotyping assay and microarray for URI identification using standard amplification and hybridization techniques, with electrochemical detection (ECD) on a semiconductor-based oligonucleotide microarray. The assay was developed to detect four bacterial pathogens (Bordetella pertussis, Streptococcus pyogenes, Chlamydia pneumoniae and Mycoplasma pneumoniae) and 9 viral pathogens (adenovirus 4, coronavirus OC43, 229E and HK, influenza A and B, parainfluinza types 1, 2, and 3 and respiratory syncytial virus. This new platform forms the basis for a fully automated diagnostics system that is very flexible and can be customized to suit different or additional pathogens. Multiple probes on a flexible platform allow one to test probes empirically and then select highly reactive probes for further iterative evaluation. Because ECD uses an enzymatic reaction to create electrical signals that can be read directly from the array, there is no need for image analysis or for expensive and delicate optical scanning equipment. We show assay sensitivity and specificity that are excellent for a multiplexed format. PMID:17895966

  8. Detection of KI WU and Merkel cell polyomavirus in respiratory tract of cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Iaria, M; Caccuri, F; Apostoli, P; Giagulli, C; Pelucchi, F; Padoan, R F; Caruso, A; Fiorentini, S

    2015-06-01

    In the last few years, many reports have confirmed the presence of WU, KI and Merkel cell (MC) polyomaviruses (PyV) in respiratory samples wordwide, but their pathogenic role in patients with underlying conditions such as cystic fibrosis is still debated. To determine the prevalence of MCPyV, WUPyV and KIPyV, we conducted a 1-year-long microbiological testing of respiratory specimens from 93 patients with cystic fibrosis in Brescia, Italy. We detected PyV DNA in 94 out of 337 analysed specimens. KIPyV was the most common virus detected (12.1%), followed by WUPyV (8.9%) and MCPyV (6.8%). We found an intriguing association between the presence of MCPyV and the concurrent isolation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, as well as with the patient status, classified as chronically colonized with P. aeruginosa. Our study adds perspective on the prevalence and the potential pathogenic role of PyV infections.

  9. Fungal levels in the home and lower respiratory tract illnesses in the first year of life.

    PubMed

    Stark, Paul C; Burge, Harriet A; Ryan, Louise M; Milton, Donald K; Gold, Diane R

    2003-07-15

    The association between home dampness and lower respiratory symptoms in children has been well documented. Whether fungal exposures contribute to this association is uncertain. In a prospective birth cohort of 499 children of parents with asthma/allergies, we examined in-home fungal concentrations as predictors of lower respiratory illnesses (LRI) (croup, pneumonia, bronchitis, and bronchiolitis) in the first year. In multivariate analyses, we found a significant increased relative risk (RR) between LRI and high levels (more than the 90th percentile) of airborne Penicillium (RR = 1.73, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.23, 2.43), dust-borne Cladosporium (RR = 1.52; CI, 1.02, 2.25), Zygomycetes (RR = 1.96; CI, 1.35, 2.83), and Alternaria (RR = 1.51; CI, 1.00, 2.28), after controlling for sex, presence of water damage or visible mold/mildew, born in winter, breastfeeding, and being exposed to other children through siblings. In a multivariate analysis, the RR of LRI was elevated in households with any fungal level at more than the 90th percentile (RR = 1.86; CI, 1.21, 2.88). Exposure to high fungal levels increased the risk of LRI in infancy, even for infants with nonwheezing LRI. Actual mechanisms remain unknown, but fungi and their components (glucans, mycotoxins, and proteins) may increase the risk of LRI by acting as irritants or through increasing susceptibility to infection.

  10. Prevalence of Pasteurella multocida and other respiratory pathogens in the nasal tract of Scottish calves.

    PubMed

    Hotchkiss, E J; Dagleish, M P; Willoughby, K; McKendrick, I J; Finlayson, J; Zadoks, R N; Newsome, E; Brulisauer, F; Gunn, G J; Hodgson, J C

    2010-10-09

    The prevalence of Pasteurella multocida, a cause of bovine respiratory disease, was studied in a random sample of beef suckler and dairy farms throughout Scotland, by means of a cross-sectional survey. A total of 637 calves from 68 farms from six geographical regions of Scotland were sampled between February and June 2008. Deep nasal swabs were taken, and samples that were culture-positive for P multocida were confirmed by PCR. Prevalence of P multocida was 17 per cent (105 of 616 calves); 47 per cent of farms had at least one positive animal. A higher prevalence was detected in dairy calves than beef calves (P=0.04). It was found that P multocida was associated with Mycoplasma-like organisms (P=0.06) and bovine parainfluenza type 3 virus (BPI-3) (P=0.04), detected by culture and quantitative PCR of nasal swabs, respectively. Detection of P multocida was not associated with bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV), bovine herpesvirus type 1 (BoHV-1) or bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV). Mycoplasma-like organisms, BPI-3, BRSV, BoHV-1 and BVDV were detected in 58, 17, four, 0 and eight calves, on 25, five, two, 0 and five of the 68 farms, respectively.

  11. New Epidemiological and Clinical Signatures of 18 Pathogens from Respiratory Tract Infections Based on a 5-Year Study

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yan; Chen, Dehui; Chen, Meixin; Qiu, Shuyan; Zeng, Zhiqi; Tian, Xingui; Cui, Hong; Zhou, Rong

    2015-01-01

    Background Respiratory tract infections (RTIs) are a heavy burden on society. However, due to the complex etiology of RTIs, the clinical diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of these infections remain challenging, especially in developing countries. Methods To determine the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of 18 respiratory pathogens, we analyzed 12,502 patients with acute respiratory infections (ARIs) by performing polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on patient pharyngeal swabs. Results Samples positive for at least 1 pathogen were obtained from 48.42% of the total patients. Of these pathogen-positive patients, 17.99% were infected with more than 1 pathogen. Of the 18 pathogens analyzed, four were detected with a positive detection rate (PDR) > 5%: influenza A virus (IAV) > respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) >Mycoplasma pneumoniae (MP) > human coronavirus (HCoV). The pathogens with the 4 highest co-infection rates (CIRs) were as follows: HCoV > human bocavirus (HBoV) > enterovirus (EV) > parainfluenza virus (PIV). The overall positive detection rate (PDR) varied significantly according to patient age, the season and year of detection, and the disease subgroup, but not according to patient sex. The individual PDRs of the pathogens followed 3 types of distributions for patient sex, 4 types of distributions for patient age, 4 types of seasonal distributions, 2 types of seasonal epidemic trends, 4 types of yearly epidemic trends, and different susceptibility distributions in the disease subgroups. Additionally, the overall CIR showed significantly different distributions according to patient sex, patient age, and the disease subgroup, whereas the CIRs of individual pathogens suggested significant preference characteristics. Conclusion IAV remains the most common pathogen among the pathogens analyzed. More effort should be directed toward the prevention and control of pathogens that show a trend of increasing incidence such as HCoV, human adenovirus (ADV), and

  12. Vertigo with a Vestibular Dysfunction in Children During Respiratory Tract Infections.

    PubMed

    Dzięciołowska-Baran, E A; Gawlikowska-Sroka, A

    2015-01-01

    Sudden balance disorders with violent vegetative symptoms (nausea and vomiting) pose a diagnostic and therapeutic problem. In children vertigo/dizziness with symptoms of vestibular dysfunction is rare, but as vascular etiology is unlikely in children such symptoms arouse concern. This article presents two cases of this type of vertigo. The patients were two boys (6 and 9 years old). They came down with similar symptoms: sudden dizziness, disabled walking, nausea and vomiting, spontaneous nystagmus, and a positive Romberg test. The onset of the balance disorder was preceded by respiratory infection: common cold with symptoms of inflammation of the mucous membrane in the nose and throat. Laboratory tests revealed increased levels of C-reactive protein only in the older boy. Neuroinfection and a displacement process were ruled out. Videonystagmography revealed vestibular dysfunction and vestibular neuronitis on the left side.

  13. Impact of cell regeneration in human respiratory tract on simultaneous viral infections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinky, Lubna Jahan Rashid; Dobrovolny, Hana

    2015-03-01

    Studies have found that ~ 40% of patients hospitalized with influenza-like illness are infected with at least two different viruses. In these longer infections, we need to consider the role of cell regeneration. Several mathematical models have been used to describe cell regeneration in infection models, though the effect of model choice on the predicted time course of simultaneous viral infections is not clear. We investigate a series of mathematical models of cell regeneration during simultaneous respiratory virus infections to determine the effect of cell regeneration on infection dynamics. We perform a nonlinear stability analysis for each model. The analysis suggests that coexistence of two viral species is not possible for any form of regeneration. We find that chronic illness is possible, but with only one viral species.

  14. Microscopic anatomy of the ringed seal (Phoca hispida) lower respiratory tract.

    PubMed

    Smodlaka, H; Reed, R B; Henry, R W

    2006-02-01

    The microscopic anatomy of the ringed seal lung exhibits unique features and many features similar to those described in other seal species. Unique features include: Trachealis muscle predominately oriented longitudinally; Large veins within the tracheal wall supported by elastic fibers; Goblet cells and pseudostratified epithelium lining the duct system of bronchial glands of the segmental bronchi; Lamina propria of the segmental bronchus heavily invested with elastic fibers clustered into dense longitudinal bundles; and Capillaries and venules covered with squamous epithelium protruding into bronchiolar lumina. Common features include: Cartilage support of the bronchial tree extending distally into respiratory bronchioles; Smooth muscle enhancements in the distal airways producing sphincter like formations; and Lungs extensively supported with interstitial tissue, which divide lungs into lobules.

  15. Alpha-chain disease with involvement of the respiratory tract in a Dutch child

    PubMed Central

    Stoop, J. W.; Ballieux, R. E.; Hijmans, W.; Zegers, B. J. W.

    1971-01-01

    A description is given of an 8-year-old girl of pure Dutch extraction who, since age 4, has shown unclassifiable skin changes, marked eosinophilia and diffuse infiltrative pulmonary changes with enlarged mediastinal lymph glands, dyspnoea and impaired diffusion. The patient's serum contained a large amount of proteins related to the Fc-fragment of IgA. She developed a pharyngeal tumour with the histological characteristics of a paragranuloma. The mucosa of the lower air passages is regarded as a possible site of origin of the abnormal serum protein. The disease was therefore interpreted as a disorder of the secretory IgA system, and this patient could well represent the respiratory form of the alpha-chain disease, described so far. ImagesFig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 1Fig. 2 PMID:4111693

  16. Comparative investigations on the upper respiratory tract in Norwich terriers, brachycephalic and mesaticephalic dogs.

    PubMed

    Koch, D A; Rosaspina, M; Wiestner, T; Arnold, S; Montavon, P M

    2014-03-01

    For some time Norwich terriers have been known to suffer from respiratory problems. In order to assign this weakness to a pathophysiology, 23 terriers were examined clinically, with laryngoscope and with rhinomanometry. In addition their skulls were dimensioned on radiographs. Widened nostrils, overlong soft palates and the everted laryngeal pouches were consistent with brachycephalic syndrome. Resistance values in the nasal passage corresponded to the appearance in brachycephalic dogs. Skull measurements gave inconsistent results, because length to width ratios and craniofacial angles denoted mesaticephaly, whereas the facial to cranial length ratios (S-index = 0.65) lay in the brachycephalic sector. It can be concluded, that the Norwich terrier breed is in transition towards brachycephaly with some individual dogs already suffering from the brachycephalic syndrome. Breeders are requested to introduce necessary counter measures.

  17. Bacterial Respiratory Tract Infections are Promoted by Systemic Hyperglycemia after Severe Burn Injury in Pediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kraft, Robert; Herndon, David N; Mlcak, Ronald P; Finnerty, Celeste C; Cox, Robert A; Williams, Felicia N; Jeschke, Marc G

    2014-01-01

    Background Burn injuries are associated with hyperglycemia leading to increased incidence of infections with pneumonia being one of the most prominent and adverse complication. Recently, various studies in critically ill patients indicated that increased pulmonary glucose levels with airway/blood glucose threshold over 150 mg/dl lead to an overwhelming growth of bacteria in the broncho-pulmonary system, subsequently resulting in an increased risk of pulmonary infections. The aim of the present study was to determine whether a similar cutoff value exists for severely burned pediatric patients. Methods One-hundred six severely burned pediatric patients were enrolled in the study. Patients were divided in two groups: high (H) defined as daily average glucose levels >75% of LOS >150 mg/dl), and low (L) with daily average glucose levels >75% of the LOS <150 mg/dl). Incidences of pneumonia, atelectasis, and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) were assessed. Incidence of infections, sepsis, and respiratory parameters were recorded. Blood was analyzed for glucose and insulin levels. Statistical analysis was performed using Student’s t-test and chi-square test. Significance was set at p<0.05. Results Patient groups were similar in demographics and injury characteristics. Pneumonia in patients on the mechanical ventilation (L: 21% H: 32%) and off mechanical ventilation (L: 5% H: 15%), as well as ARDS were significantly higher in the high group (L: 3% H: 19%), p<0.05, while atelectasis was not different. Patients in the high group required significantly longer ventilation compared to low patients (p<0.05). Furthermore, incidence of infection and sepsis were significantly higher in the high group, p<0.05. Conclusion Our results indicate that systemic glucose levels over 150 mg/dl are associated with a higher incidence of pneumonia confirming the previous studies in critically ill patients. PMID:24074819

  18. Pathologic changes induced in respiratory tract mucosa by polycyclic hydrocarbons of differing carcinogenic activity.

    PubMed Central

    Topping, D. C.; Pal, B. C.; Martin, D. H.; Nelson, F. R.; Nettesheim, P.

    1978-01-01

    Seven aromatic polycyclic hydrocarbons (PCHs) were investigated for their toxic effects on respiratory mucosa: benzo(e)pyrene (BeP), pyrene, anthracene, benz(a)anthracene(BaA), dibenz(a,c)anthracene(DBacA), benzo (a)pyrene (BaP), and dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA). The compounds were chosen because they comprise a spectrum of PCHs ranging from noncarcinogens, to initiators, to weak and strong carcinogens. All of them except DMBA are environmentally relevant chemicals. The chemicals were tested over an 8-week period. Heterotopic tracheal transplants were continously exposed and the histopathologic effects induced by the various PCHs were periodically assessed semiquantitatively. All PCHs exhibited varying degrees of toxicity for respiratory epithelium and submucosa. BeP clearly showed the least toxicity followed by pyrene and anthracene. BaA and DBacA caused marked epithelial and submucosal changes. In addition to epithelial hyperplasia, undifferentiated epithelium and squamous metaplasia developed. Marked mononuclear infiltration occurred in the subepithelial connective tissue. With BaP the epithelial and submucosal changes were similar but were much stronger. DMBA was the most toxic substance, causing epithelial necrosis followed by generalized keratinizing squamous metaplasia; the subepithelial changes consisted of an early acellular exudate and, later (at 8 weeks), marked condensation and hyalinization of the lamina propria. The toxic response pattern of the tracheal mucosa to carcinogenic agents was characterized by the chronicity of epithelial and connective tissue damage, as opposed to the short-lived hyperplastic and inflammatory response elicited by the noncarcinogens and weak initiators. Images Figure 2 Figure 1 PMID:102204

  19. Characterization of the Localized Immune Response in the Respiratory Tract of Ferrets following Infection with Influenza A and B Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Carolan, Louise A.; Rockman, Steve; Borg, Kathryn; Guarnaccia, Teagan; Reading, Patrick; Mosse, Jennifer; Kelso, Anne; Barr, Ian

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The burden of infection with seasonal influenza viruses is significant. Each year is typically characterized by the dominance of one (sub)type or lineage of influenza A or B virus, respectively. The incidence of disease varies annually, and while this may be attributed to a particular virus strain or subtype, the impacts of prior immunity, population differences, and variations in clinical assessment are also important. To improve our understanding of the impacts of seasonal influenza viruses, we directly compared clinical symptoms, virus shedding, and expression of cytokines, chemokines, and immune mediators in the upper respiratory tract (URT) of ferrets infected with contemporary A(H1N1)pdm09, A(H3N2), or influenza B virus. Gene expression in the lower respiratory tract (LRT) was also assessed. Clinical symptoms were minimal. Overall cytokine/chemokine profiles in the URT were consistent in pattern and magnitude between animals infected with influenza A and B viruses, and peak expression levels of interleukin-1α (IL-1α), IL-1β, IL-6, IL-12p40, alpha interferon (IFN-α), IFN-β, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) mRNAs correlated with peak levels of viral shedding. MCP1 and IFN-γ were expressed after the virus peak. Granzymes A and B and IL-10 reached peak expression as the virus was cleared and seroconversion was detected. Cytokine/chemokine gene expression in the LRT following A(H1N1)pdm09 virus infection reflected the observations seen for the URT but was delayed 2 or 3 days, as was virus replication. These data indicate that disease severities and localized immune responses following infection with seasonal influenza A and B viruses are similar, suggesting that other factors are likely to modulate the incidence and impact of seasonal influenza. IMPORTANCE Both influenza A and B viruses cocirculate in the human population, and annual influenza seasons are typically dominated by an influenza A virus subtype or an influenza B virus lineage

  20. Statistical Analysis Aiming at Predicting Respiratory Tract Disease Hospital Admissions from Environmental Variables in the City of São Paulo

    PubMed Central

    de Sousa Zanotti Stagliorio Coêlho, Micheline; Luiz Teixeira Gonçalves, Fabio; do Rosário Dias de Oliveira Latorre, Maria

    2010-01-01

    This study is aimed at creating a stochastic model, named Brazilian Climate and Health Model (BCHM), through Poisson regression, in order to predict the occurrence of hospital respiratory admissions (for children under thirteen years of age) as a function of air pollutants, meteorological variables, and thermal comfort indices (effective temperatures, ET). The data used in this study were obtained from the city of São Paulo, Brazil, between 1997 and 2000. The respiratory tract diseases were divided into three categories: URI (Upper Respiratory tract diseases), LRI (Lower Respiratory tract diseases), and IP (Influenza and Pneumonia). The overall results of URI, LRI, and IP show clear correlation with SO2 and CO, PM10 and O3, and PM10, respectively, and the ETw4 (Effective Temperature) for all the three disease groups. It is extremely important to warn the government of the most populated city in Brazil about the outcome of this study, providing it with valuable information in order to help it better manage its resources on behalf of the whole population of the city of Sao Paulo, especially those with low incomes. PMID:20706674

  1. A compartment model of alveolar-capillary oxygen diffusion with ventilation-perfusion gradient and dynamics of air transport through the respiratory tract.

    PubMed

    Jaworski, Jacek; Redlarski, Grzegorz

    2014-08-01

    This paper presents a model of alveolar-capillary oxygen diffusion with dynamics of air transport through the respiratory tract. For this purpose electrical model representing the respiratory tract mechanics and differential equations representing oxygen membrane diffusion are combined. Relevant thermodynamic relations describing the mass of oxygen transported into the human body are proposed as the connection between these models, as well as the influence of ventilation-perfusion mismatch on the oxygen diffusion. The model is verified based on simulation results of varying exercise intensities and statistical calculations of the results obtained during various clinical trials. The benefit of the approach proposed is its application in simulation-based research aimed to generate quantitative data of normal and pathological conditions. Based on the model presented, taking into account many essential physiological processes and air transport dynamics, comprehensive and combined studies of the respiratory efficiency can be performed. The impact of physical exercise, precise changes in respiratory tract mechanics and alterations in breathing pattern can be analyzed together with the impact of various changes in alveolar-capillary oxygen diffusion. This may be useful in simulation of effects of many severe medical conditions and increased activity level.

  2. Combination of Anti-IGF-1R Antibody A12 and Ionizing Radiation in Upper Respiratory Tract Cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Riesterer, Oliver; Yang Qiuan; Raju, Uma; Torres, Mylin; Molkentine, David; Patel, Nalini; Valdecanas, David; Milas, Luka; Ang, K. Kian

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: The IGF1/IGF-1R signaling pathway has emerged as a potential determinant of radiation resistance in human cancer cell lines. Therefore we investigated the potency of monoclonal anti-IGF-1R antibody, A12, to enhance radiation response in upper respiratory tract cancers. Methods and Materials: Cell lines were assessed for IGF-1R expression and IGF1-dependent response to A12 or radiation using viability and clonogenic cancer cell survival assays. In vivo response of tumor xenografts to 10 or 20 Gy and A12 (0.25-2 mg x 3) was assessed using growth delay assays. Combined treatment effects were also analyzed by immunohistochemical assays for tumor cell proliferation, apoptosis, necrosis, and vascular endothelial growth factor expression at Days 1 and 6 after start of treatment. Results: A12 enhanced the radiosensitivity of HN5 and FaDu head-and-neck carcinomas in vitro (p < 0.05) and amplified the radioresponse of FaDu xenografts in a dose-dependent manner, with enhancement factors ranging from 1.2 to 1.8 (p < 0.01). Immunohistochemical analysis of FaDu xenografts demonstrated that A12 inhibited tumor cell proliferation (p < 0.05) and vascular endothelial growth factor expression. When A12 was combined with radiation, this resulted in apoptosis induction that persisted until 6 days from the start of treatment and in increased necrosis at Day 1 (p < 0.01, respectively). Combined treatment with A12 and radiation resulted in additive or subadditive growth delay in H460 or A549 xenografts, respectively. Conclusions: The results of this study strengthen the evidence for investigating how anti-IGF-1R strategies can be integrated into radiation and radiation-cetuximab regimen in the treatment of cancer of the upper aerodigestive tract cancers.

  3. Unexpectedly Higher Morbidity and Mortality of Hospitalized Elderly Patients Associated with Rhinovirus Compared with Influenza Virus Respiratory Tract Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Ivan F. N.; Zhang, Anna Jinxia; To, Kelvin K. W.; Chan, Jasper F. W.; Zhu, Shawn H. S.; Zhang, Ricky; Chan, Tuen-Ching; Chan, Kwok-Hung; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2017-01-01

    Rhinovirus is a common cause of upper and lower respiratory tract infections in adults, especially among the elderly and immunocompromised. Nevertheless, its clinical characteristics and mortality risks have not been well described. A retrospective analysis on a prospective cohort was conducted in a single teaching hospital center over a one-year period. We compared adult patients hospitalized for pneumonia caused by rhinovirus infection with those hospitalized for influenza infection during the same period. All recruited patients were followed up for at least 3 months up to 15 months. Independent risk factors associated with mortality for rhinovirus infection were identified. Between 1 March 2014 and 28 February 2015, a total of 1946 patients were consecutively included for analysis. Of these, 728 patients were hospitalized for rhinovirus infection and 1218 patients were hospitalized for influenza infection. Significantly more rhinovirus patients were elderly home residents and had chronic lung diseases (p < 0.001), whereas more influenza patients had previous stroke (p = 0.02); otherwise, there were no differences in the Charlson comorbidity indexes between the two groups. More patients in the rhinovirus group developed pneumonia complications (p = 0.03), required oxygen therapy, and had a longer hospitalization period (p < 0.001), whereas more patients in the influenza virus group presented with fever (p < 0.001) and upper respiratory tract symptoms of cough and sore throat (p < 0.001), and developed cardiovascular complications (p < 0.001). The 30-day (p < 0.05), 90-day (p < 0.01), and 1-year (p < 0.01) mortality rate was significantly higher in the rhinovirus group than the influenza virus group. Intensive care unit admission (odds ratio (OR): 9.56; 95% confidence interval (C.I.) 2.17–42.18), elderly home residents (OR: 2.60; 95% C.I. 1.56–4.33), requirement of oxygen therapy during hospitalization (OR: 2.62; 95% C.I. 1.62–4.24), and hemoglobin level <13

  4. Mycological Profile of Sputum of HIV Positive Patients with Lower Respiratory Tract Infection and its Correlation with CD4+ T Lymphocyte Count

    PubMed Central

    Chandwani, Jyotsna; Vyas, Nitya; Hooja, Saroj; Maheshwari, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Fungal respiratory infections are important cause of mortality and morbidity among HIV positive individuals. They account for up to 70% of illness in Acquired Immunodeficiency Disease Syndrome cases (AIDS). The range of illness varies from asymptomatic mucosal candidiasis to overwhelming disseminated infections. In these patients dissemination of fungus leads to very serious outcomes hence, it is important to have the knowledge of prevailing profile of fungus causing infections, so that it can be treated at the onset. Low CD4+ T lymphocyte count is an excellent indicator of decreased immunity and can also be helpful to predict opportunistic fungal respiratory infections and other complications. Aim To define the fungal aetiology of lower respiratory tract infections in HIV positive patients and to correlate the occurrence of different fungi with CD4+ T lymphocyte count. Materials and Methods This was a cross sectional study conducted between May 2014 to April 2015, on 180 treatment naive HIV seropositive patients with lower respiratory tract infections attending the Integrated Counselling and Testing Centre, SMS Medical College, Jaipur, Rajasthan. Early morning expectorated and induced sputum samples were collected and processed for isolation and identification of fungal species. CD4+ T lymphocyte count estimation was done by BD FACS Calibur. Results Fungal species were isolated from 155 (86.1%) patients. The most common isolate was Candida albicans (31.7%), followed by Aspergillus niger (17.7%) and Aspergillus flavus (10%). The fungal species were most commonly isolated from patients with CD4+ T lymphocyte cell less than 200 cells/μl. Conclusion Fungal infections were seen in 86.1% of HIV positive patients with lower respiratory tract infections hence, high level of clinical suspicion for fungal aetiology of respiratory infections in HIV positive patients should be kept in mind. PMID:27790435

  5. Perceptions of medical students towards antibiotic prescribing for upper respiratory tract infections in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Harakeh, Steve; Almatrafi, Musab; Ungapen, Haifa; Hammad, Rotana; Olayan, Feras; Hakim, Reema; Ayoub, Mohammed; Bakhsh, Noura; Almasaudi, Saad B; Barbour, Elie; Bahijri, Suhad; Azhar, Esam; Damanhouri, Ghazi; Qari, Yousef; Kumosani, Taha; Harakeh, Zeena; Ahmad, Muhammad S; Cals, JochenW L

    2015-01-01

    Introduction This survey evaluates knowledge, attitudes and practices of medical students towards use of antibiotics for upper respiratory infections (URTIs). Methodology Cross-sectional questionnaire study among 1042 randomly selected medical students in Saudi Arabia. Results Respondents were mostly Saudis (97.5%), had previous knowledge of antibiotics (99.7%) and their usage (98.3%) against bacterial infections (93.7%). 18.1% thought that they could be used for viral infections. Nearly all students (97.2%) used antibiotics themselves during the previous year and self-medication without a prescription was high at 49% of cases. Most antibiotics were taken for URTI symptoms (61.8%). Female medical students had better knowledge on antibiotic effectiveness against bacteria and viruses, and overall knowledge increased with study year. Health seeking behaviour rates for symptoms of RTI and associated estimated necessity for antibiotics varied but were highest for cough with yellow/green phlegm. Conclusions The depth of knowledge that healthcare professionals have in relation to the proper use of antibiotics is essential in spreading the right message within communities. This is the first large study among medical students in Saudi Arabia, shedding important light on areas for improvement in the medical curriculum as well as antibiotic practices of medical students themselves. PMID:26175907

  6. MRSA eradication of newly acquired lower respiratory tract infection in cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Rendall, Jacqueline C.; Moore, John E.; McCaughan, John; Hoeritzauer, Anne I.; Tunney, Michael M.; Elborn, Joseph Stuart; Downey, Damian G.

    2016-01-01

    UK cystic fibrosis (CF) guidelines recommend eradication of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) when cultured from respiratory samples. As there is no clear consensus as to which eradication regimen is most effective, we determined the efficacy of eradication regimens used in our CF centre and long-term clinical outcome. All new MRSA positive sputum cultures (n=37) that occurred between 2000 and 2014 were reviewed. Eradication regimen characteristics and clinical, microbiological and long-term outcome data were collected. Rifampicin plus fusidic acid was the most frequently used regimen (24 (65%) out of 37 patients), with an overall success rate of 79% (19 out of 24 patients). Eradication failure was more likely in patients with an additional MRSA-positive peripheral screening swab (p=0.03) and was associated with worse survival (p=0.04). Our results demonstrate the feasibility and clinical benefits of MRSA eradication. As peripheral colonisation was associated with lower eradication success, strategies combining systemic and topical treatments should be considered to optimise outcomes in CF patients. PMID:27730175

  7. MRSA eradication of newly acquired lower respiratory tract infection in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Vallières, Emilie; Rendall, Jacqueline C; Moore, John E; McCaughan, John; Hoeritzauer, Anne I; Tunney, Michael M; Elborn, Joseph Stuart; Downey, Damian G

    2016-01-01

    UK cystic fibrosis (CF) guidelines recommend eradication of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) when cultured from respiratory samples. As there is no clear consensus as to which eradication regimen is most effective, we determined the efficacy of eradication regimens used in our CF centre and long-term clinical outcome. All new MRSA positive sputum cultures (n=37) that occurred between 2000 and 2014 were reviewed. Eradication regimen characteristics and clinical, microbiological and long-term outcome data were collected. Rifampicin plus fusidic acid was the most frequently used regimen (24 (65%) out of 37 patients), with an overall success rate of 79% (19 out of 24 patients). Eradication failure was more likely in patients with an additional MRSA-positive peripheral screening swab (p=0.03) and was associated with worse survival (p=0.04). Our results demonstrate the feasibility and clinical benefits of MRSA eradication. As peripheral colonisation was associated with lower eradication success, strategies combining systemic and topical treatments should be considered to optimise outcomes in CF patients.

  8. Fruit and Vegetable Intake and Risk of Upper Respiratory Tract Infection in Pregnant Women

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lin; Werler, Martha M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective The study evaluated the association between fruit and vegetable intake and upper respiratory infection (URI) incidence during pregnancy. Design In a cohort of 1034 North American women, each subject was asked retrospectively about their fruit and vegetable intake during the six months before the pregnancy and their occurrences of URI during the first half of pregnancy. Multivariable-adjusted hazards ratios (HRs) were calculated with Cox proportional hazards models. Results The adjusted HRs of URI for women in the highest quartile (median = 8.54 servings/day) vs. lowest quartile (median = 1.91 servings/day) of total fruit and vegetable intake were 0.74 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.53-1.05) for the 5-month follow-up period and 0.61 (95% CI = 0.39-0.97) for the 3-month follow-up period, respectively. A dose-related reduction of URI risk according to the quartiles of intake was found in the 3-month (p for trend = 0.03) but not the 5-month follow-up. No association was found between either fruit or vegetable intake alone in relation to the 5-month or the 3-month risk of URI. Conclusions Women who consume more fruits and vegetables have a moderate reduction in risk of URI during pregnancy, and this benefit appears to be derived from both fruits and vegetables, instead of either alone. PMID:19552829

  9. The consumption of propolis and royal jelly in preventing upper respiratory tract infections and as dietary supplementation in children.

    PubMed

    Yuksel, Sevda; Akyol, Sumeyya

    2016-01-01

    Propolis and royal jelly (RJ), two important honeybee products, have been used commonly all over the world as traditional and ethnopharmacological nutrients since ancient times. Both of them have a lot of active ingredients which are known to be effective for several medical conditions. In this article, medical databases were searched for the usage of RJ and propolis in upper respiratory tract infections (URTI) and as a dietary supplementation, together and separately. 10-hydroxy-2-decenoic acid is the most prominent active compound showing antimicrobial effect within RJ. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester is the most famous one that shows antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory effect within propolis. When compared with propolis, RJ was found to have richer content for all three main nutrients; proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids. More clinical, experimental, and basic studies are needed to find out the best standardized mixture to cope with URTI in which RJ and propolis will be main ingredients in addition to the other secondary compounds that have health-beneficial effects.

  10. Uncertainties in aerosol deposition within the respiratory tract using the icrp 66 model: a study in workers.

    PubMed

    Fritsch, P

    2006-02-01

    This study estimates uncertainties in aerosol deposition within the main regions of the human respiratory tract calculated using the ICRP 66 model. Uniform, triangular, normal, or lognormal distributions were assigned to the model parameters, which involve physical properties of aerosols, their inhalability, their thermo- and aerodynamic deposition efficiencies, and the anatomy, physiology, and exertion level of the individuals. Calculations were performed over a range of aerosol sizes from 0.01 to 50 mum. Monodispersed aerosols were characterized by their aerodynamic diameter (dae). Polydispersed aerosols were characterized by their activity median aerodynamic diameters (AMADs) and the geometric standard deviation (GSD) in diameter. Lognormal distributions of particle deposition were generally observed with low GSD (< 2). The highest uncertainties were observed within the deep lung for the smallest and the largest aerosol sizes, which were mainly due either to particle density or to aerodynamic deposition efficiencies and anatomical and physiological variability, respectively. In the case of diameters larger than 5 mum, uncertainties in the deep lung deposition were much more important for monodispersed than for polydispersed aerosols. This was explained both by the size distribution of the deposited aerosol, the median of which corresponded to a maximal dae value of about 7 and 5 in bronchioles and alveoli, respectively, and by the absence of deposition, which occurs for dae equal to or larger than 50 mum, depending on the exertion level. Thus, in the range of AMADs considered, for the four default workers proposed by ICRP 66, uncertainties in aerosol deposition remain low, with GSD smaller than 3.

  11. The influence of antibiotics and other factors on reconsultation for acute lower respiratory tract illness in primary care.

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, W F; Macfarlane, J T; Macfarlane, R M; Lewis, S

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Antibiotics are prescribed to the majority of patients consulting their general practitioner (GP) for lower respiratory tract illness (LRTi). A common reason for prescription is the belief that antibiotics reduce re-attendance; a motive supported by the high reconsultation rates for this largely self-limiting illness. Information about reconsultation following treatment of LRTi, and the factors that influence it, is scarce. AIM: To explore factors associated with reconsultation after initial management of LRTi. METHOD: Analysis of data collected prospectively during presentation of acute LRTi in primary care. RESULTS: Seventy-six per cent of 518 patients were prescribed antibiotics, and 30% reconsulted for similar symptoms within the next 28 days (29% of those who were given antibiotics and 33% of those who were not). Forty-one per cent of patients who had seen their GP 15 or more times in the previous two years reconsulted, compared with 13% of those who had made fewer than five visits. Reconsultation was more common in patients with a history of underlying disease (38.6% versus 24.3%) and in patients who reported dyspnoea (41.5% versus 24.3%). CONCLUSION: Reconsultation is common in acute LRTi and is associated with a heightened consulting habit prior to the index consultation, the presence of previous ill health, and dyspnoea. It appears not to be influenced by prescribing antibiotics. PMID:9463983

  12. Effectiveness of Polyvalent Bacterial Lysate and Autovaccines Against Upper Respiratory Tract Bacterial Colonization by Potential Pathogens: A Randomized Study

    PubMed Central

    Zagólski, Olaf; Stręk, Paweł; Kasprowicz, Andrzej; Białecka, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Background Polyvalent bacterial lysate (PBL) is an oral immunostimulating vaccine consisting of bacterial standardized lysates obtained by lysis of different strains of bacteria. Autovaccines are individually prepared based on the results of smears obtained from the patient. Both types of vaccine can be used to treat an ongoing chronic infection. This study sought to determine which method is more effective against nasal colonization by potential respiratory tract pathogens. Material/Methods We enrolled 150 patients with aerobic Gram stain culture and count results indicating bacterial colonization of the nose and/or throat by potential pathogens. The participants were randomly assigned to each of the following groups: 1. administration of PBL, 2. administration of autovaccine, and 3. no intervention (controls). Results Reduction of the bacterial count in Streptococcus pneumoniae-colonized participants was significant after the autovaccine (p<0.001) and PBL (p<0.01). Reduction of the bacterial count of other β-hemolytic streptococcal strains after treatment with the autovaccine was significant (p<0.01) and was non-significant after PBL. In Haemophilus influenzae colonization, significant reduction in the bacterial count was noted in the PBL group (p<0.01). Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonization did not respond to either treatment. Conclusions The autovaccine is more effective than PBL for reducing bacterial count of Streptococcus pneumoniae and β-hemolytic streptococci, while PBL was more effective against Haemophilus influenzae colonization. PMID:26434686

  13. Prevention of respiratory tract infections with bacterial lysate OM-85 bronchomunal in children and adults: a state of the art

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory tract infections (RTIs) are a leading cause of morbidity and also represent a cause of death in some parts of the world. The treatment of RTIs implies a continuous search for stronger therapies and represents an economical burden for health services and society. In this context the prevention of infections is absolutely required. The use of bacterial lysates as immuno-modulators to boost immunological response is widely debated. Aim of this review is to summarize the main clinical studies on the effect of the bacterial lysate OM-85 in treating RTIs in susceptible subjects - namely children and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)-affected adults. Results from clinical trials and recent systematic reviews are reported. The results show that mean number of RTIs decreases upon treatment with OM-85, as measured by frequency of exacerbations or number of antibiotic courses. Data from systematic reviews indicated that OM-85 is particularly beneficial in children at high risk of RTIs. In COPD-affected adults, clinical studies showed that treatment with OM-85 reduced exacerbations, although systematic reviews did not legitimate the protective effect of OM-85 toward COPD as significant. The use of OM-85 could be efficacious in reducing exacerbation frequency of RTIs in children and adults at risk. However further high-quality studies are needed to better explain the mechanism of action and confirm the beneficial results of OM85. PMID:23692890

  14. Narrative review of primary care point-of-care testing (POCT) and antibacterial use in respiratory tract infection (RTI)

    PubMed Central

    Cooke, Jonathan; Butler, Christopher; Hopstaken, Rogier; Dryden, Matthew Scott; McNulty, Cliodna; Hurding, Simon; Moore, Michael; Livermore, David Martin

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is a global problem and is being addressed through national strategies to improve diagnostics, develop new antimicrobials and promote antimicrobial stewardship. A narrative review of the literature was undertaken to ascertain the value of C reactive protein (CRP) and procalcitonin, measurements to guide antibacterial prescribing in adult patients presenting to GP practices with symptoms of respiratory tract infection (RTI). Studies that were included were randomised controlled trials, controlled before and after studies, cohort studies and economic evaluations. Many studies demonstrated that the use of CRP tests in patients presenting with RTI symptoms reduces antibiotic prescribing by 23.3% to 36.16%. Procalcitonin is not currently available as a point-of-care testing (POCT), but has shown value for patients with RTI admitted to hospital. GPs and patients report a good acceptability for a CRP POCT and economic evaluations show cost-effectiveness of CRP POCT over existing RTI management in primary care. POCTs increase diagnostic precision for GPs in the better management of patients with RTI. CRP POCT can better target antibacterial prescribing by GPs and contribute to national antimicrobial resistance strategies. Health services need to develop ways to ensure funding is transferred in order for POCT to be implemented. PMID:25973210

  15. In vitro activity of five tetracyclines and some other antimicrobial agents against four porcine respiratory tract pathogens.

    PubMed

    Pijpers, A; Van Klingeren, B; Schoevers, E J; Verheijden, J H; Van Miert, A S

    1989-09-01

    The minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of five tetracyclines and ten other antimicrobial agents were determined for four porcine bacterial respiratory tract pathogens by the agar dilution method. For the following oxytetracycline-susceptible strains, the MIC50 ranges of the tetracyclines were: P. multocida (n = 17) 0.25-0.5 micrograms/ml; B. bronchiseptica (n = 20) 0.25-1.0 micrograms/ml; H. pleuropneumoniae (n = 20) 0.25-0.5 micrograms/ml; S. suis Type 2 (n = 20) 0.06-0.25 micrograms/ml. For 19 oxytetracycline-resistant P. multocida strains the MIC50 of the tetracyclines varied from 64 micrograms/ml for oxytetracycline to 0.5 micrograms/ml for minocycline. Strikingly, minocycline showed no cross-resistance with oxytetracycline, tetracycline, chlortetracycline and doxycycline in P. multocida and in H. pleuropneumoniae. Moreover, in susceptible strains minocycline showed the highest in vitro activity followed by doxycycline. Low MIC50 values were observed for chloramphenicol, ampicillin, flumequine, ofloxacin and ciprofloxacin against P. multocida and H. pleuropneumoniae. B. bronchiseptica was moderately susceptible or resistant to these compounds. As expected tiamulin, lincomycin, tylosin and spiramycin were not active against H. pleuropneumoniae. Except for flumequine, the MIC50 values of nine antimicrobial agents were low for S. suis Type 2. Six strains of this species showed resistance to the macrolides and lincomycin.

  16. Pleuran (β-glucan from Pleurotus ostreatus) supplementation, cellular immune response and respiratory tract infections in athletes.

    PubMed

    Bergendiova, Katarina; Tibenska, Elena; Majtan, Juraj

    2011-09-01

    Prolonged and exhausting physical activity causes numerous changes in immunity and sometimes transient increases the risk of upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs). Nutritional supplements as countermeasures to exercise-induced changes have increasingly been studied in the last decade. One of the most promising nutritional supplements is β-glucan, a well-known immunomodulator with positive effects on the function of immunocompetent cells. In this double blind, placebo-controlled study, we investigated the effect of pleuran, an insoluble β-(1,3/1,6) glucan from mushroom Pleurotus ostreatus, on selected cellular immune responses and incidence of URTI symptoms in athletes. Fifty athletes were randomized to pleuran or placebo group, taking pleuran (commercial name Imunoglukan(®)) or placebo supplements during 3 months. Venous whole blood was collected before and after 3 months of supplementation and additionally 3 months after supplementation period was completed. Incidence of URTI symptoms together with characterization of changes in phagocytosis and natural killer (NK) cell count was monitored during the study. We found that pleuran significantly reduced the incidence of URTI symptoms and increased the number of circulating NK cells. In addition, the phagocytosis process remained stable in pleuran group during the study in contrast to placebo group where significant reduction of phagocytosis was observed. These findings indicate that pleuran may serve as an effective nutritional supplement for athletes under heavy physical training. Additional research is needed to determine the mechanisms of pleuran function.

  17. Surveillance for upper respiratory tract disease and Mycoplasma in free-ranging gopher tortoises (Gopherus polyphemus) in Georgia, USA.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Jessica L; Smith, Lora L; Guyer, Craig; Lockhart, J Mitchell; Lee, Gregory W; Yabsley, Michael J

    2014-10-01

    Abstract Upper respiratory tract disease (URTD) in the gopher tortoise (Gopherus polyphemus) is highly contagious and has been implicated in the reduction of populations throughout the range. With the exception of a few limited studies, the prevalence of URTD in Georgia, USA tortoise populations is poorly known. We found that exposure to Mycoplasma agassizii and Mycoplasma testudineum, associated with URTD, varied geographically among 11 Georgia tortoise populations. The prevalence of antibodies to M. agassizii in individual populations was either very low (0-3%, n=7 populations) or very high (96-100%, n=4 populations), whereas there was variation in the prevalence of antibodies to M. testudineum among populations (20-61%, n=10) with only one site being negative. Five sites had tortoises with antibodies to both pathogens, and these were the only sites where we observed tortoises with clinical signs consistent with URTD. We did not find tortoises with clinical signs of URTD at sites with tortoises with antibodies only to M. testudineum, which provides evidence that this organism may be of limited pathogenicity for gopher tortoises. Collectively, these data indicate that both M. agassizii and M. testudineum are present in Georgia populations of gopher tortoises and that clinical disease is apparent in populations where both pathogens are present. Additional research is needed to better understand the role of these two pathogens, and other potential pathogens, in the overall health of tortoise populations, especially if future conservation efforts involve translocation of tortoises.

  18. Why do general practitioners prescribe antibiotics for upper respiratory tract infections to meet patient expectations: a mixed methods study

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher-Lartey, Stephanie; Yee, Melissa; Gaarslev, Christina; Khan, Rabia

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To describe the role patient expectations play in general practitioners (GPs) antibiotic prescribing for upper respiratory tract infections (URTI). Methods Concurrent explanatory mixed methods approach using a cross-sectional survey and semistructured interviews. Settings Primary care GPs in Australia. Participants 584 GPs (response rate of 23.6%) completed the cross-sectional survey. 32 GPs were interviewed individually. Outcome measure Prescribing of antibiotics for URTI. Results More than half the GP respondents to the survey in Australia self-reported that they would prescribe antibiotics for an URTI to meet patient expectations. Our qualitative findings suggest that ‘patient expectations’ may be the main reason given for inappropriate prescribing, but it is an all-encompassing phrase that includes other reasons. These include limited time, poor doctor–patient communication and diagnostic uncertainty. We have identified three role archetypes to explain the behaviour of GPs in reference to antibiotic prescribing for URTIs. The main themes emerging from the qualitative component was that many GPs did not think that antibiotic prescribing in primary care was responsible for the development of antibiotic resistance nor that their individual prescribing would make any difference in light of other bigger issues like hospital prescribing or veterinary use. For them, there were negligible negative consequences from their inappropriate prescribing. Conclusions There is a need to increase awareness of the scope and magnitude of antibiotic resistance and the role primary care prescribing plays, and of the contribution of individual prescribing decisions to the problem of antibiotic resistance. PMID:27798010

  19. Progress in pediatrics in 2013: choices in allergology, endocrinology, gastroenterology, hypertension, infectious diseases, neonatology, neurology, nutrition and respiratory tract illnesses.

    PubMed

    Caffarelli, Carlo; Santamaria, Francesca; Vottero, Alessandra; Dascola, Carlotta Povesi; Mirra, Virginia; Sperli, Francesco; Bernasconi, Sergio

    2014-07-12

    This review will provide new information related to pathophysiology and management of specific diseases that have been addressed by selected articles published in the Italian Journal of Pediatrics in 2013, focusing on allergology, endocrinology, gastroenterology, hypertension, infectious diseases, neonatology, neurology, nutrition and respiratory tract illnesses in children. Recommendations for interpretation of skin prick test to foods in atopic eczema, management of allergic conjunctivitis, hypertension and breastfeeding in women treated with antiepileptic drugs and healthy breakfast have been reported. Epidemiological studies have given emphasis to high incidence of autoimmune disorders in patients with Turner syndrome, increasing prevalence of celiac disease, frequency of hypertension in adolescents, incidence and risk factor for retinopathy of prematurity. Advances in prevention include elucidation of the role of probiotics in reducing occurrence of allergies and feeding intolerance, and events of foetal life that influence later onset of diseases. Mechanistic studies suggested a role for vitamin D deficiency in asthma and type 1 diabetes and for reactivation of Varicella-Zoster virus in aseptic meningitis. Regarding diagnosis, a new mean for the diagnosis of hyperbilirubinaemia in newborns, a score for recognition of impaired nutritional status and growth and criteria for early Dyke-Davidoff-Masson Syndrome have been suggested. New therapeutic approaches consist of use of etanercept for reducing insulin dose in type 1 diabetes, probiotics in atopic eczema, and melatonin in viral infections.

  20. Is acute idiopathic pericarditis associated with recent upper respiratory tract infection or gastroenteritis? A case–control study

    PubMed Central

    Rey, Florian; Delhumeau-Cartier, Cecile; Meyer, Philippe; Genne, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to assess the association of a clinical diagnosis of acute idiopathic pericarditis (AIP), and a reported upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) or gastroenteritis (GE) in the preceding month. Design Patients who were hospitalised with a first diagnosis of AIP were retrospectively compared with a control group of patients admitted with deep vein thrombosis (DVT), matched by gender and age. Setting Primary and secondary care level; one hospital serving a population of about 170 000. Participants A total of 51 patients with AIP were included, of whom 46 could be matched with 46 patients with control DVT. Only patients with a complete review of systems on the admission note were included in the study. Main outcome measure Conditional logistic regression was used to assess the association of a clinical diagnosis of AIP and an infectious episode (URTI or GE) in the month preceding AIP diagnosis. Results Patients with AIP had more often experienced a recent episode of URTI or GE than patients with DVT (39.1% vs 10.9%, p=0.002). The multivariate conditional regression showed that AIP was independently associated with URTI or GE in the last month preceding diagnosis (OR=37.18, 95% CI=1.91 to 724.98, p=0.017). Conclusions This is, to the best of our knowledge, the first study demonstrating an association between a recent episode of URTI or GE and a clinical diagnosis of AIP. PMID:26603247

  1. Difficult identification of Haemophilus influenzae, a typical cause of upper respiratory tract infections, in the microbiological diagnostic routine.

    PubMed

    Hinz, Rebecca; Zautner, Andreas Erich; Hagen, Ralf Matthias; Frickmann, Hagen

    2015-03-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is a key pathogen of upper respiratory tract infections. Its reliable discrimination from nonpathogenic Haemophilus spp. is necessary because merely colonizing bacteria are frequent at primarily unsterile sites. Due to close phylogenetic relationship, it is not easy to discriminate H. influenzae from the colonizer Haemophilus haemolyticus. The frequency of H. haemolyticus isolations depends on factors like sampling site, patient condition, and geographic region. Biochemical discrimination has been shown to be nonreliable. Multiplex PCR including marker genes like sodC, fucK, and hpd or sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, the P6 gene, or multilocus-sequence-typing is more promising. For the diagnostic routine, such techniques are too expensive and laborious. If available, matrix-assisted laser-desorption-ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry is a routine-compatible option and should be used in the first line. However, the used database should contain well-defined reference spectra, and the spectral difference between H. influenzae and H. haemolyticus is small. Fluorescence in-situ hybridization is an option for less well-equipped laboratories, but the available protocol will not lead to conclusive results in all instances. It can be used as a second line approach. Occasional ambiguous results have to be resolved by alternative molecular methods like 16S rRNA gene sequencing.

  2. The consumption of propolis and royal jelly in preventing upper respiratory tract infections and as dietary supplementation in children

    PubMed Central

    Yuksel, Sevda; Akyol, Sumeyya

    2016-01-01

    Propolis and royal jelly (RJ), two important honeybee products, have been used commonly all over the world as traditional and ethnopharmacological nutrients since ancient times. Both of them have a lot of active ingredients which are known to be effective for several medical conditions. In this article, medical databases were searched for the usage of RJ and propolis in upper respiratory tract infections (URTI) and as a dietary supplementation, together and separately. 10-hydroxy-2-decenoic acid is the most prominent active compound showing antimicrobial effect within RJ. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester is the most famous one that shows antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory effect within propolis. When compared with propolis, RJ was found to have richer content for all three main nutrients; proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids. More clinical, experimental, and basic studies are needed to find out the best standardized mixture to cope with URTI in which RJ and propolis will be main ingredients in addition to the other secondary compounds that have health-beneficial effects. PMID:27366357

  3. Recruitment of phagocytizing cells into the respiratory tract as a response to the cytotoxic action of deposited particles

    SciTech Connect

    Katsnelson, B.A.; Privalova, L.I.

    1984-01-01

    Recruitment of phagocytizing cells into the lower respiratory tract plays a very important role in the pulmonary dust clearance, depending both on the number of particles deposited therein and on their aggressiveness. The higher cytotoxicity of the particles, the greater the number of such cells recruited and the higher the contribution of the neutrophilic leukocytes (NL) into the free cellular population of airways which normally is represented chiefly by alveolar macrophages (AM). Adaptation of the alveolar dust phagocytosis to properties of inhaled particles operates through autoregulation of this process in which a key role is played by macrophage breakdown products (PMB). A series of experiments in vitro and in vivo showed that PMB stimulate AM and NL, enhance their recruitment into airways with a dose-dependent increase of the NL/AM ratio, promote recruitment of their precursors via blood and replenishment of such precursor reserves. The most active factor of the PMB appears to be lipidic by nature. The variability between individuals and between groups of alveolar phagocytosis response to particles of a given cytotoxicity may be due to differences of the host's neurohormonal status. It was shown that influencing the latter significantly shifts response to a standard dose of the PMB.

  4. [Treatment of cough in respiratory tract infections - the effect of combining the natural active compounds with thymol].

    PubMed

    Schönknecht, Karina; Krauss, Hanna; Jambor, Jerzy; Fal, Andrzej M

    2016-01-01

    Cough is one of the characteristic symptoms of upper respiratory tract infections (URI). Herbal medicines are often used in the treatment of the cough associated with infection and to accelerate recovery or support the immune system. An example of such products are extracts of thyme and primrose, and also their combination with thymol. Thymus vulgaris is a spasmolytic, antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, immunomodulatory and antioxidant agent. The most important component responsible for the activity of thyme is thymol contained in the volatile thyme oil. Primrose is, most of all, a saponine agent with expectorant and secretolytic activity, showing also spasmolytic, anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial effects. Because of the additive effects of the mentioned extracts and their wide activity profile they are often used as a combination drug. The use of this combination was assessed in the URI with the effects of alleviation of cough and dyspnea, and shortening the length of the disease. The effectiveness of the drug containing the extracts of thyme and primrose with the addition of thymol (Bronchosol®) was comparable to synthetic ambroxol and its safety has been proved. Moreover, the in-vitro antibacterial and antifungal effects of this drug have been evaluated.

  5. Systematic Review of Clinical Trials Assessing the Effectiveness of Ivy Leaf (Hedera Helix) for Acute Upper Respiratory Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    Holzinger, Felix; Chenot, Jean-François

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. Among nonantibiotic cough remedies, herbal preparations containing extracts from leaves of ivy (Hedera helix) enjoy great popularity. Objective. A systematic review to assess the effectiveness and tolerability of ivy for acute upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs). Methods. We searched for randomized controlled trials (RCTs), nonrandomized controlled clinical trials and observational studies evaluating the efficacy of ivy preparations for acute URTIs. Study quality was assessed by the Jadad score or the EPHPP tool. Results. 10 eligible studies were identified reporting on 17463 subjects. Studies were heterogeneous in design and conduct; 2 were RCTs. Three studies evaluated a combination of ivy and thyme, 7 studies investigated monopreparations of ivy. Only one RCT (n = 360) investigating an ivy/thyme combination used a placebo control and showed statistically significant superiority in reducing the frequency and duration of cough. All other studies lack a placebo control and show serious methodological flaws. They all conclude that ivy extracts are effective for reducing symptoms of URTI. Conclusion. Although all studies report that ivy extracts are effective to reduce symptoms of URTI, there is no convincing evidence due to serious methodological flaws and lack of placebo controls. The combination of ivy and thyme might be more effective but needs confirmation. PMID:20976077

  6. Utility of bronchoalveolar lavage in diagnosing respiratory tract infections in patients with hematological malignancies: are invasive diagnostics still needed?

    PubMed Central

    Svensson, Tobias; Lundström, Kristina Lamberg; Höglund, Martin; Cherif, Honar

    2017-01-01

    Background Patients treated for hematological malignancies have an increased risk of serious infections. Diagnosis and prompt initiation of therapy are essential. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) is a well-established investigation for identifying the cause of pulmonary infiltrates in immunocompromised patients. The aim of the study was to determine the diagnostic yield of BAL in patients treated for hematological malignancies and how often it contributed to a modification of the anti-infectious therapy. Methods We reviewed records from 151 consecutive BAL procedures in 133 adult patients with hematological malignancies, treated at a tertiary hematology unit from 2004 to 2013. Extensive microbiological work-ups on BAL samples had been performed according to a standardized protocol. Results A microbiological finding causing the infectious episode could be identified in 59 (39%) cases. In 44 (29%) of the cases, results from BAL had an impact on clinical management either by contributing to a specific diagnosis (25%) or by leading to cessation of ongoing microbiological therapy. The most common diagnoses were invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA) and Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PJP). Diagnoses of IPA and PJP were based on results from BAL in 65% and 93% of cases, respectively. Several microbiological tests on BAL samples rendered no positive results. Complications were few and mainly mild. Conclusion BAL is still important for either verifying or excluding some of the most important respiratory tract pathogens in patients with hematological malignancies, particularly IPA and PJP. Standardized procedures for BAL sampling should be continually revised to exclude unnecessary microbiological tests. PMID:27739337

  7. Difficult identification of Haemophilus influenzae, a typical cause of upper respiratory tract infections, in the microbiological diagnostic routine

    PubMed Central

    Hinz, Rebecca; Zautner, Andreas Erich; Hagen, Ralf Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is a key pathogen of upper respiratory tract infections. Its reliable discrimination from nonpathogenic Haemophilus spp. is necessary because merely colonizing bacteria are frequent at primarily unsterile sites. Due to close phylogenetic relationship, it is not easy to discriminate H. influenzae from the colonizer Haemophilus haemolyticus. The frequency of H. haemolyticus isolations depends on factors like sampling site, patient condition, and geographic region. Biochemical discrimination has been shown to be nonreliable. Multiplex PCR including marker genes like sodC, fucK, and hpd or sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, the P6 gene, or multilocus-sequence-typing is more promising. For the diagnostic routine, such techniques are too expensive and laborious. If available, matrix-assisted laser-desorption–ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry is a routine-compatible option and should be used in the first line. However, the used database should contain well-defined reference spectra, and the spectral difference between H. influenzae and H. haemolyticus is small. Fluorescence in-situ hybridization is an option for less well-equipped laboratories, but the available protocol will not lead to conclusive results in all instances. It can be used as a second line approach. Occasional ambiguous results have to be resolved by alternative molecular methods like 16S rRNA gene sequencing. PMID:25883794

  8. Antibody response to the patient's own Haemophilus influenzae isolate can support the aetiology in lower respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed

    Strålin, Kristoffer; Holmberg, Hans; Olcén, Per

    2004-01-01

    In order to understand the clinical importance of Haemophilus influenzae isolated from sputum samples, an indirect immunofluorescence (IF) assay was developed, using the patient's own isolate as the antigen. The method was tested on samples from six patients with lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) and H. influenzae isolated from blood (n=2), sputum (n=3) or both (n=1), and on two healthy adults with H. influenzae isolated from the nasopharynx. Between acute and convalescent sera, a four-fold IgG antibody increase was achieved in five of six LRTI patients, including the three blood culture-positive patients. One LRTI patient and the two asymptomatic carriers showed stable antibody levels against their own isolate. Although small, the study indicates that indirect IF can be a promising tool for determining whether a H. influenzae strain represents the probable cause of infection or just a strain colonising the airways. More extensive studies should be performed in order to establish the usefulness of the assay.

  9. The influence of an arduous military training program on immune function and upper respiratory tract infection incidence.

    PubMed

    Whitham, Martin; Laing, Stewart J; Dorrington, Melanie; Walters, Robert; Dunklin, Steve; Bland, Duncan; Bilzon, James L J; Walsh, Neil P

    2006-08-01

    The effects of the first 19 weeks of U.K. Parachute Regiment (PARA) training on upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) incidence and immune function (circulating leukocyte counts, lymphocyte subsets, lipopolysaccharide-stimulated neutrophil degranulation, and salivary immunoglobulin A concentrations) were investigated for 14 PARA recruits and 12 control subjects. No significant differences were reported between groups for the number or duration of URTIs, lymphocyte subsets, or salivary immunoglobulin A concentrations during training. URTI incidence was greater in the PARA group at weeks 2 and 3 (p < 0.05), coinciding with a decrease in circulating leukocyte and lymphocyte counts (p < 0.05). Neutrophil degranulation was similar in the PARA and control groups at weeks 0 and 19. Decreases in saliva flow rate occurred in the PARA group at week 15 and weeks 18 to 20 (p < 0.05). These results show a limited effect of PARA training on URTI incidence and immune function. The progressive decrease in saliva flow rate during PARA training may indicate an ensuing state of hypohydration.

  10. [Allergic reactions to the house-dust mite in children with obstructive disease of the respiratory tract (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Richter, I; Kriebel, I

    1975-09-12

    160 children with obstructive allergic disease of the respiratory tract were tested with the modified pricktest. 58 showed positive reactions to the house-dust mite. Typically, in the case history of these children, is the presence of the complaints throughout the year, especially at night and not in particular seasons. Although, the modified pricktest could be negative in children under 4 years of age, in later years an allergen could be found. Children who have typical-complaints in their case-history, but show weak cutaneous reactions, are admitted in hospital, and a bronchial provocationtest is carried out to study the action of the allergen on the affected organ. 28 of the 58 children with house-dust mite allergy showed only weak positive cutaneous reactions and had mild complaints. Avoidance measurements brought in almost 80 p.c. of these cases good results. We recommended specific hyposensibilisation for the remaining 30 patients; in 22 of these cases the recommendation was carried out. The positive effect of the specific hyposensibilisation was proved when compared to a controll series.

  11. Calcification of the lower respiratory tract in relation to flight development in Jamaican fruit bats (Phyllostomidae, Artibeus jamaicensis).

    PubMed

    Carter, Richard T

    2017-04-01

    The production of echolocation calls in bats along with forces produced by contraction of thoracic musculature used in flight presumably puts relatively high mechanical loads on the lower respiratory tract (LRT). Thus, there are likely adaptations to prevent collapse or distortion of the bronchial tree and trachea during flight in echolocating bats. By clearing and staining (Alcian blue and Alizarin red) LRTs removed from nonvolant neonates, semivolant juveniles, volant subadults, and adult Jamaican fruit bats (Artibeus jamaicensis), I found that calcification of the tracheal, primary bronchial, and secondary bronchial (lobar) cartilage rings occurs over the span of about 3 days and coincides with later developmental stages of flight and the increased production of echolocation calls. Tracheal rings that are immediately adjacent to the larynx calcified first, followed by more caudal tracheal rings and then the rings of the primary and secondary bronchi. I suggest that calcification of LRT cartilage rings in echolocating bats provides increased rigidity to counter the thoracic compressions incurred during flight. Calcification of the LRT rings is an adaptation to support the emission of laryngeally produced echolocation calls during flight in bats.

  12. Biopersistence of nonfibrous mineral particles in the respiratory tracts of subjects following occupational exposure.

    PubMed Central

    Pairon, J C; Billon-Galland, M A; Iwatsubo, Y; Bernstein, M; Gaudichet, A; Bignon, J; Brochard, P

    1994-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy analysis (TEMA) was used to analyze the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of 262 subjects occupationally exposed (OE) to nonfibrous mineral particles (NFMP) and 42 controls not occupationally exposed to mineral dusts. OE subjects were divided into three groups according to the lapse of time since last exposure: < or = 1 year and < 10 years (E2), > or = 10 years (E3). The total BALF mineral particle concentration was significantly higher in OE patients than in controls and was closely related to the time lapse since last exposure to NFMP (median values for OE, 7.7 x 10(5) particles/ml; E1, 9 x 10(5) particles/ml; E2, 5 x 10(5) particles/ml; E3, 4.3 x 10(5) particles/ml; controls, 2 x 10(5) particles/ml). No statistical difference was observed for age and smoking habits between OE and control subjects. Concentrations of crystalline silica and metals (exogenous iron, aluminum, metallic alloys and other metals) were significantly higher in OE subjects than in controls, and even though these mineral concentrations decreased with increasing time since last occupational exposure, they still remained higher in the E3 group than in controls. Crystalline silica and metals were thus identified as biopersistent NFMP in the human lung using BALF ATEM method. This method is a useful tool in assessing occupational exposure to NFMP, even when a long period has elapsed since last exposure, and may be used in studying etiology of some respiratory diseases. PMID:7882949

  13. Distribution and relationship to serotype of Haemophilus influenzae biotypes isolated from upper respiratory tracts of children and adults in Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed Central

    Gratten, M; Lupiwa, T; Montgomery, J; Gerega, G

    1984-01-01

    The relationship between serotypes and biotypes of 505 carriage strains of Haemophilus influenzae isolated from the upper respiratory tracts of well children, children with pneumonia, and healthy adults was studied. All except serotype c were significantly associated with one or two specific biotypes (P less than 0.001). No encapsulated organisms belonging to biotypes V, VI, or VII were encountered. No significant difference in the interaction of biotypes and serotypes isolated from well and sick children was present. Both encapsulated and nonserotypable biotype I H. influenzae strains were commonly carried in the upper respiratory tracts of healthy Melanesian children. The distribution of nonserotypable H. influenzae strains occurred throughout all biotypes, and the frequency of nonencapsulated biotype III and IV strains differed significantly from serotypable organisms with the same biotype (P less than 0.001). PMID:6609168

  14. Effect of oral N-acetylcysteine (NAC) on volume and albumin content of respiratory tract fluid but not on epithelial secretory cell number in "smoking" rats.

    PubMed

    Robinson, N; Brattsand, R; Dahlbäck, M

    1990-03-01

    This study was designed to look at the effect of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) on epithelial secretory cells and the respiratory tract fluid volume and albumin content from the lower airways of "bronchitic" rats. Rats were exposed either to tobacco smoke (TS), TS and NAC, or NAC alone. TS caused a significant increase in epithelial secretory cell number which was not reduced by concomitant NAC administration; NAC alone had no effect on cell numbers. TS increased respiratory tract fluid volume and albumin content by a small but non-significant amount, whereas TS and NAC increased the volume and albumin content by a greater and significant amount; NAC alone was also shown to significantly increase both fluid volume and albumin content.

  15. Antimicrobial Resistance of Streptococcus pneumoniae Recovered from Outpatients with Respiratory Tract Infections in Germany from 1998 to 1999: Results of a National Surveillance Study

    PubMed Central

    Reinert, Ralf René; Simic, Smiljana; Al-Lahham, Adnan; Reinert, Susanne; Lemperle, Maria; Lütticken, Rudolf

    2001-01-01

    Clinically significant pneumococcal isolates were prospectively collected from outpatients with respiratory tract infections by 19 different clinical microbiology laboratories in Germany. Resistance rates in a total of 961 isolates were as follows: penicillin, 6.6%; clarithromycin, 10.6%; tetracycline, 13.9%; and levofloxacin, 0.1%. Among 324 isolates from children, pneumococcal serotypes 19F (17.0%), 23F (13.0%), and 6B (11.7%) were the predominant types. PMID:11230456

  16. Occupational exposures to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and respiratory and urinary tract cancers: an updated systematic review and a meta-analysis to 2014.

    PubMed

    Rota, Matteo; Bosetti, Cristina; Boccia, Stefania; Boffetta, Paolo; La Vecchia, Carlo

    2014-08-01

    Exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) has been associated with an excess risk of respiratory tract and bladder cancers in several industries, but the issue requires further quantification. We updated a previous systematic review by reviewing in details cohort studies on workers employed in selected industries with potential PAH exposure published between 2006 and 2014, and we summarized through a meta-analytic approach the main results of all available cohort studies published between 1958 and 2014 investigating cancers of the respiratory and urinary tracts. Thirteen papers on cohort studies investigating cancer risk in workers exposed to PAHs were retrieved through the literature search. These included workers from aluminum production industries (seven studies), iron and steel foundries (two studies), asphalt workers (two studies), and carbon black production (two studies). In the meta-analysis, an excess risk of respiratory tract cancers (mainly lung cancer) was found in iron and steel foundries [pooled relative risk (RR) 1.31, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.08-1.59 from 14 studies], while a weak excess risk (pooled RR 1.08, 95 % CI 0.95-1.23 from 11 studies) emerged for aluminum production. A borderline increase risk was also observed for cancer of the bladder in the aluminum production (pooled RR 1.28, 95 % CI 0.98-1.68 from 10 studies) and in iron and steel foundries (pooled RR 1.38, 95 % CI 1.00-1.91 from 9 studies). This updated review and meta-analysis confirm the increased risk from respiratory tract and bladder cancers in selected PAH-related occupations. It cannot be ruled out whether such excesses are due, at least in part, to possible bias or residual confounding.

  17. Severe lower respiratory tract infections associated with human parainfluenza viruses 1-3 in children infected and noninfected with HIV type 1.

    PubMed

    Madhi, S A; Ramasamy, N; Petersen, K; Madhi, A; Klugman, K P

    2002-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the clinical course of severe lower respiratory tract infections associated with human parainfluenza virus types 1-3 (HPIV 1-3) in hospitalised children infected with the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) versus that in hospitalised children not infected with HIV-1. Children were enrolled prospectively as part of a broader study that evaluated the aetiology of lower respiratory tract infections in HIV-1-infected and -noninfected children from March 1997 through March 1999. HPIV types 1-3 were isolated from nasopharyngeal aspirate samples that were analysed using immunofluorescein monoclonal antibody assays. Thirty percent (24 of 80) of the children from whom HPIV was isolated were infected with HIV-1. Sixty-six percent (47 of 62) and 22% (14 of 62) of the HPIV isolates that were typed were subtypes 3 and 1, respectively. The clinical presentation of severe lower respiratory tract infection was similar in both HIV-1-infected and -noninfected children, except that the former were less likely to have wheezing (4.2% vs. 28.6%, P=0.01). Furthermore, the duration of hospitalisation was longer in HIV-1-infected children than in HIV-1-noninfected children (median 11.5 days [range 1-15 days] vs. median 7.5 days [range 1-22 days]; P=0.02), and mortality was higher (5 of 24 [20.8%] infected children vs. 0 of 56 noninfected children; P=0.001). Importantly, four of five (80%) of the HIV-1-infected children who died had other concurrent illnesses or predisposing factors for severe HPIV-associated disease. HPIV-associated lower respiratory tract infection causes greater morbidity and mortality in HIV-1-infected children than in HIV-1-noninfected children; however, this may be due to other concurrent illnesses in HIV-1-infected children.

  18. The role of the local microbial ecosystem in respiratory health and disease.

    PubMed

    de Steenhuijsen Piters, Wouter A A; Sanders, Elisabeth A M; Bogaert, Debby

    2015-08-19

    Respiratory tract infections are a major global health concern, accounting for high morbidity and mortality, especially in young children and elderly individuals. Traditionally, highly common bacterial respiratory tract infections, including otitis media and pneumonia, were thought to be caused by a limited number of pathogens including Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae. However, these pathogens are also frequently observed commensal residents of the upper respiratory tract (URT) and form-together with harmless commensal bacteria, viruses and fungi-intricate ecological networks, collectively known as the 'microbiome'. Analogous to the gut microbiome, the respiratory microbiome at equilibrium is thought to be beneficial to the host by priming the immune system and providing colonization resistance, while an imbalanced ecosystem might predispose to bacterial overgrowth and development of respiratory infections. We postulate that specific ecological perturbations of the bacterial communities in the URT can occur in response to various lifestyle or environmental effectors, leading to diminished colonization resistance, loss of containment of newly acquired or resident pathogens, preluding bacterial overgrowth, ultimately resulting in local or systemic bacterial infections. Here, we review the current body of literature regarding niche-specific upper respiratory microbiota profiles within human hosts and the changes occurring within these profiles that are associated with respiratory infections.

  19. The role of the local microbial ecosystem in respiratory health and disease

    PubMed Central

    de Steenhuijsen Piters, Wouter A. A.; Sanders, Elisabeth A. M.; Bogaert, Debby

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory tract infections are a major global health concern, accounting for high morbidity and mortality, especially in young children and elderly individuals. Traditionally, highly common bacterial respiratory tract infections, including otitis media and pneumonia, were thought to be caused by a limited number of pathogens including Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae. However, these pathogens are also frequently observed commensal residents of the upper respiratory tract (URT) and form—together with harmless commensal bacteria, viruses and fungi—intricate ecological networks, collectively known as the ‘microbiome’. Analogous to the gut microbiome, the respiratory microbiome at equilibrium is thought to be beneficial to the host by priming the immune system and providing colonization resistance, while an imbalanced ecosystem might predispose to bacterial overgrowth and development of respiratory infections. We postulate that specific ecological perturbations of the bacterial communities in the URT can occur in response to various lifestyle or environmental effectors, leading to diminished colonization resistance, loss of containment of newly acquired or resident pathogens, preluding bacterial overgrowth, ultimately resulting in local or systemic bacterial infections. Here, we review the current body of literature regarding niche-specific upper respiratory microbiota profiles within human hosts and the changes occurring within these profiles that are associated with respiratory infections. PMID:26150660

  20. Human extrahepatic cytochromes P450: function in xenobiotic metabolism and tissue-selective chemical toxicity in the respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xinxin; Kaminsky, Laurence S

    2003-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes in extrahepatic tissues often play a dominant role in target tissue metabolic activation of xenobiotic compounds. They may also determine drug efficacy and influence the tissue burden of foreign chemicals or bioavailability of therapeutic agents. This review focuses on xenobiotic-metabolizing CYPs of the human respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts, including the lung, trachea, nasal respiratory and olfactory mucosa, esophagus, stomach, small intestine, and colon. Many CYPs are expressed in one or more of these organs, including CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP1B1, CYP2A6, CYP2A13, CYP2B6, CYP2C8, CYP2C9, CYP2C18, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, CYP2E1, CYP2F1, CYP2J2, CYP2S1, CYP3A4, CYP3A5, and CYP4B1. Of particular interest are the preferential expression of certain CYPs in the respiratory tract and the regional differences in CYP expression profile in different parts of the gastrointestinal tract. Current research activities on the characterization of CYP expression, function, and regulation in these tissues, as well as future research needs, are discussed.

  1. Antimicrobial susceptibility of bacterial pathogens associated with community-acquired respiratory tract infections in Asia: report from the Community-Acquired Respiratory Tract Infection Pathogen Surveillance (CARTIPS) study, 2009-2010.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Chen, Minjun; Xu, Yingchun; Sun, Hongli; Yang, Qiwen; Hu, Yunjian; Cao, Bin; Chu, Yunzhuo; Liu, Yong; Zhang, Rong; Yu, Yunsong; Sun, Ziyong; Zhuo, Chao; Ni, Yuxing; Hu, Bijie; Tan, Thean Yen; Hsueh, Po-Ren; Wang, Jen-Hsien; Ko, Wen-Chien; Chen, Yen-Hsu; Wahjono, Hendro

    2011-11-01

    A multicentre resistance surveillance study [Community-Acquired Respiratory Tract Infection Pathogen Surveillance (CARTIPS)] investigating the susceptibilities of 2963 clinical isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, meticillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) and Streptococcus spp. from Asia against 12 antimicrobial agents was undertaken from 2009 to 2010. Based on the breakpoints for oral penicillin V recommended by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute, the prevalence of penicillin-non-susceptible S. pneumoniae (PNSSP) ranged from 46% to 100%. Azithromycin and clarithromycin exhibited variable resistance rates of 0-88% against S. pneumoniae, 0-57% against MSSA and 0-76.5% against Streptococcus spp. isolates. The prevalence of extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing K. pneumoniae varied from 5.1% to 58.5%. β-Lactamase production rates amongst H. influenzae isolates ranged from 15% to 46.6% and amongst M. catarrhalis isolates from 90% to 100%. Amongst M. catarrhalis isolates, macrolide resistance and cefaclor resistance rates of 5.8% and 1.2%, respectively, were found, mainly in Mainland China. Levofloxacin resistance rates of 0-3.9% with a MIC(90) (minimum inhibitory concentration causing inhibition of 90% of isolates) of 1-2mg/L and moxifloxacin resistance rates of 0-1.7% with a MIC(90) of 0.125-0.5mg/L were found amongst PNSSP isolates. Moxifloxacin was very active against Streptococcus spp., H. influenzae and M. catarrhalis isolates, with MIC(90) values of 0.125-0.25, 0.032-0.5 and 0.064-0.125mg/L, respectively. These results from the CARTIPS study have confirmed some significant regional differences in the antimicrobial susceptibilities of S. pneumoniae, MSSA, K. pneumoniae, H. influenzae and Streptococcus spp. and emphasise the importance of antimicrobial surveillance programmes for guiding empirical therapy and for focusing interventional control of antimicrobial

  2. [The impact of viruses in lower respiratory tract infections of the adult. Part II: acute bronchitis, acute exacerbated COPD, pneumonia, and influenza].

    PubMed

    Ott, S R; Rohde, G; Lepper, P M; Hauptmeier, B; Bals, R; Pletz, M W R; Schumann, C; Steininger, C; Kleines, M; Geerdes-Fenge, H

    2010-01-01

    In industrialized countries respiratory tract infections are one of the most common reasons for medical consultations. It is assumed that almost one third of these infections affect the lower respiratory tract (LRTI), e. g. acute bronchitis, acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), community- or hospital-acquired pneumonia and influenza. Due to a lack of sufficient and valid investigations on the epidemiology of respiratory viruses, their impact on the pathogenesis of LRTI has probably been underestimated for a long time. Therefore, there might have been many cases of needless antibiotic treatment, particularly in cases of acute bronchitis or acute exacerbations of COPD, because of an assumed bacteriological aetiology. Following the introduction of diagnostic procedures with increased sensitivity, such as polymerase chain reaction, it is possible to reliably detect respiratory viruses and to illuminate their role in the pathogenesis of LRTI of the adult. We have reviewed the current literature to elucidate the role of viruses in the pathogenesis of LRTI. The first part of this series described frequent viral pathogens, pathogenesis of viral LRTI, and diagnostic procedures. In this 2 (nd) part the aetiological role of viruses in the most frequent forms of LRTI will be highlighted, and the third and last part will provide an overview of therapeutic and preventive options.

  3. 42 CFR 412.344 - Hold-harmless payment methodology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... System for Inpatient Hospital Capital Costs Determination of Transition Period Payment Rates for Capital-Related Costs § 412.344 Hold-harmless payment methodology. (a) General. A hospital paid under the hold... reasonable costs for old capital costs (100 percent for sole community hospitals) plus an amount for...

  4. 34 CFR 200.73 - Applicable hold-harmless provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Applicable hold-harmless provisions. 200.73 Section 200.73 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education OFFICE OF ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION TITLE I-IMPROVING THE ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT OF THE...

  5. Role of Kasahara Dashemani Vati in Kasa and Vyadhikshamatva in children with special reference to recurrent respiratory tract infections

    PubMed Central

    Subrahmanya, Nayan Kumar; Patel, Kalpana Shanthibhai; Kori, Virendra Kumar; Shrikrishna, Rajagopala

    2013-01-01

    The present single-centered randomized control trial (RCT) was carried out with the prime aim of assessing the effect of Kasahara Dashemani Vati (trial drug) on Kasa and Vyadhikshamatva in the children suffering from recurrent respiratory tract infections and comparing it with the efficacy of Indukanta Vati. The clinical trial included 40 patients belonging to age group of 3-12 years. The drugs were administered in a daily dose fixed as per “Clark's Rule” along with honey for duration of 60 days. The effect of treatment on the signs and symptoms of Kasa was assessed on the 15th day, whereas the effect on Vyadhikshamatva was assessed on the 60th day. The patients were under follow-up for a period of 60 days after completing the treatment course for evaluation of any recurrence. Effect of the therapy on the individual signs and symptoms of Kasa, laboratory parameters, immunoglobulin (Ig) biomarkers, status of Atura Bala, and prevention of recurrence during follow-up period were the parameters used to assess the overall effect of therapy. The observed data were subjected to appropriate statistical analysis for testing the statistical significance. Kasahara Dashemani provided relief in all symptoms of Kasa irrespective of Doshic involvement and on the parameters of Atura Bala. All the changes were statistically highly significant. The control group also showed similar effects which were statistically highly significant. The trial group was found to have a direct influence on serum Ig status. No patient has reported any adverse drug reactions during the treatment and follow-up periods. PMID:24501524

  6. A survey of cancer and occupation in young and middle aged men. I. Cancers of the respiratory tract.

    PubMed

    Coggon, D; Pannett, B; Osmond, C; Acheson, E D

    1986-05-01

    In a search for clues to previously industrial carcinogens the occupational and smoking histories of young and middle aged men with different types of cancer were compared. The study population comprised men aged 18-54 and resident in the counties of Cleveland, Humberside, and Cheshire (including the Wirral). From hospital and cancer registration records 2942 members of the study population in whom cancers were diagnosed during the period 1975-80 were identified retrospectively. The occupational and smoking histories of these patients were sought by a postal questionnaire addressed either to the patients themselves or, if they had died, to their next of kin. The overall response rate to the questionnaire was 52.1%. Additionally, limited occupational information was obtained for 89% of cases from their hospital notes. Analysis of these data suggests that no serious bias arose as a consequence of the incomplete response to the questionnaire. This paper concentrates on the results for cancers of the respiratory tract and mesothelioma. Mesothelioma was found to cluster in laggers, electricians, and shipyard workers, and nasal carcinoma in woodworkers. Carcinomas of the larynx and of the bronchus were examined by formal statistical techniques, each being compared with a control group made up of all other cancers combined. Several interesting occupational and industrial associations were shown, in particular, an excess of bronchial carcinoma in the leather industry (RR = 2.6, CI 1.2-6.0), in building labourers (RR = 1.7, CI 1.0-2.9) and other construction workers (RR = 1.8, CI 1.0-3.0), in bakers and pastry cooks (RR = 3.6, CI 1.3-10.4). and in cooks (RR = 2.5, CI 1.2-5.1). In addition, a small cluster of lung tumours was observed in men who had worked as dental mechanics.

  7. A randomised, multicentre study of ceftriaxone versus standard therapy in the treatment of lower respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed

    de Klerk, G J; van Steijn, J H; Lobatto, S; Jaspers, C A; van Veldhuizen, W C; Hensing, C A; Bunnik, M C; Geraedts, W H; Dofferhof, A S; Van Den Berg, J; Melis, J H; Hoepelman, A I

    1999-07-01

    In this study the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of i.v. ceftriaxone 1 g once daily (CTX) was compared with standard i.v. antibiotic treatment (STD) for lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI). STD was given according to the guidelines of the American Thoracic Society and consisted of either cefuroxime 1500 mg three times daily (q8h), amoxicillin/clavulanic acid 1200 mg q8h or ceftriaxone 2 g once daily; each with or without a macrolide. After a minimum of 5 days i.v. therapy, patients could be switched to oral therapy. One hundred patients were enrolled in the study; 52 patients received CTX and 48 STD. Groups were comparable with respect to demographic and baseline characteristics. Seventy patients had a confirmed diagnosis of pneumonia. Twenty-nine patients had a severe type I exacerbation of chronic bronchitis. In one patient the diagnosis of LRTI could not be confirmed. In approximately 50% of the patients a microbiological diagnosis could be made. The most important isolated pathogens from sputum and blood were (positive blood cultures in brackets): Streptococcus pneumoniae 14 (9) and Haemophilus influenzae 16. Mean duration of i.v. therapy was 7.4 days in both groups. Average duration of hospitalisation was 15.0 days for CTX patients and 15.9 days for STD patients. Overall cure and improvement rate at the end of treatment was 47 (90%) for patients receiving ceftriaxone 1 g compared to 37 (77%) for patients receiving standard therapy. Pathogens were eradicated or presumed to be eradicated in 84% of the CTX patients and in 76% of the STD patients. Mean total costs per treatment were lower for CTX than for STD treatment: NLG 169 versus 458. These results show, that i.v. ceftriaxone 1 g once daily is as effective as standard therapy in the treatment of LRTI and that its use reduces treatment costs, in view of the multiple daily dosing regimens of most standard therapies.

  8. Antibiotic prescribing of village doctors for children under 15 years with upper respiratory tract infections in rural China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhixia; Zhan, Xingxin; Zhou, Hongjun; Sun, Fang; Zhang, Heng; Zwarenstein, Merrick; Liu, Qian; Li, Yingxue; Yan, Weirong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to explore the knowledge, attitudes, and practices of village doctors regarding the prescribing of antibiotics for children under 15 years with upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs) in rural China. Twelve focus group discussions (FGDs) were conducted in Xianning, a prefecture-level city in rural China, during December 2014. We conducted 6 FGDs with 35 village doctors, 3 with 13 primary caregivers (11 parents), and 3 with 17 directors of township hospitals, county-level health bureaus, county-level Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or county-level Chinese Food and Drug Administration offices. Audio records of the interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using the thematic analysis approach. Participants believed that unnecessary antibiotic prescribing for children under 15 years with The occurrence of URTIs was a problem in village clinics in rural China. The discussions revealed that most of the village doctors had inadequate knowledge and misconceptions about antibiotic use, which was an important factor in the unnecessary prescribing. Village doctors and directors reported that the doctors’ fear of complications, the primary caregivers’ pressure for antibiotic treatment, and the financial considerations of patient retention were the main factors influencing the decision to prescribe antibiotics. Most of the primary caregivers insisted on antibiotics, even when the village doctors were reluctant to prescribe them, and they preferred to go to see those village doctors who prescribed antibiotics. The interviewees also gave their opinions on what would be the most effective measures for optimizing antibiotic prescriptions; these included educational/training campaigns, strict regulations on antibiotic prescription, and improved supervision. Findings emphasized the need to improve the dissemination of information and training/education, and implement legislation on the rational use of antibiotics. And it

  9. Pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic profiling of delafloxacin in a murine lung model against community-acquired respiratory tract pathogens.

    PubMed

    Thabit, Abrar K; Crandon, Jared L; Nicolau, David P

    2016-11-01

    Increasing antimicrobial resistance in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) pathogens has contributed to infection-related morbidity and mortality. Delafloxacin is a novel fluoroquinolone with broad-spectrum activity against Gram-positive and -negative organisms, including Streptococcus pneumoniae and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). This study aimed to define the pharmacodynamic profile of delafloxacin against CAP pathogens using a neutropenic murine lung infection model. Five S. pneumoniae, 2 methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA), 2 MRSA and 2 Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates were studied. Delafloxacin doses varied from 0.5 mg/kg/day to 640 mg/kg/day and were given as once-daily to every 3 h regimens over the 24-h treatment period. Efficacy was measured as the change in log10 CFU at 24 h compared with 0-h controls. Plasma and bronchopulmonary pharmacokinetic studies were conducted. Delafloxacin demonstrated potent in vitro and in vivo activity. Delafloxacin demonstrated high penetration into the lung compartment, as epithelial lining fluid concentrations were substantially higher than free drug in plasma. The ratio of the area under the free drug concentration-time curve to the minimum inhibitory concentration of the infecting organism (fAUC/MIC) was the parameter that best correlated with the efficacy of the drug, and the magnitude required to achieve 1 log10 CFU reduction was 31.8, 24.7, 0.4 and 9.6 for S. pneumoniae, MRSA, MSSA and K. pneumoniae, respectively. The observed in vivo efficacy of delafloxacin was supported by the high pulmonary disposition of the compound. The results derived from this pre-clinical lung model support the continued investigation of delafloxacin for the treatment of community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections.

  10. Effect of time of exposure to rat coronavirus and Mycoplasma pulmonis on respiratory tract lesions in the Wistar rat.

    PubMed Central

    Schunk, M K; Percy, D H; Rosendal, S

    1995-01-01

    The effects of time of exposure on the progression of pulmonary lesions in rats inoculated with Mycoplasma pulmonis and the rat coronavirus, sialodacryoadenitis virus (SDAV) were studied, using six groups of 18 SPF Wistar rats (n = 108). Rats were inoculated intranasally as follows: Group 1, sterile medium only; Group 2, sterile medium followed one week later by 150 TCID50 SDAV; Group 3, sterile medium followed by 10(5.7) colony forming units of M. pulmonis; Group 4, SDAV followed one week later by M. pulmonis; Group 5, M. pulmonis followed one week later by SDAV; Group 6, M. pulmonis followed two weeks later by SDAV. Six rats from each group were euthanized at one, two and three weeks after the final inoculation. In a separate experiment, six additional animals were inoculated in each of groups 3, 5 and 6 (n = 18) and were sampled at five weeks after they had received M. pulmonis. Bronchoalveolar lavage and quantitative lung mycoplasma cultures were conducted on two-thirds of the rats. Histopathological examination and scoring of lesion severity were performed on all animals. Based on the prevalence and extent of histopathological lesions, bronchoalveolar lavage cell numbers, neutrophil differential cell counts and the isolation of M. pulmonis, the most severe disease occurred in the groups that received both agents. There was no significant difference in lesion severity between the groups receiving both agents other than in those examined during the acute stages of SDAV infection. Based on these results, it is evident that SDAV enhances lower respiratory tract disease in Wistar rats whether exposure occurs at one week prior to or at various intervals following M. pulmonis infections. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 4. PMID:7704844

  11. Comparative Computational Modeling of Airflows and Vapor Dosimetry in the Respiratory Tracts of Rat, Monkey, and Human

    PubMed Central

    Corley, Richard A.

    2012-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models are useful for predicting site-specific dosimetry of airborne materials in the respiratory tract and elucidating the importance of species differences in anatomy, physiology, and breathing patterns. We improved the imaging and model development methods to the point where CFD models for the rat, monkey, and human now encompass airways from the nose or mouth to the lung. A total of 1272, 2172, and 135 pulmonary airways representing 17±7, 19±9, or 9±2 airway generations were included in the rat, monkey and human models, respectively. A CFD/physiologically based pharmacokinetic model previously developed for acrolein was adapted for these anatomically correct extended airway models. Model parameters were obtained from the literature or measured directly. Airflow and acrolein uptake patterns were determined under steady-state inhalation conditions to provide direct comparisons with prior data and nasal-only simulations. Results confirmed that regional uptake was sensitive to airway geometry, airflow rates, acrolein concentrations, air:tissue partition coefficients, tissue thickness, and the maximum rate of metabolism. Nasal extraction efficiencies were predicted to be greatest in the rat, followed by the monkey, and then the human. For both nasal and oral breathing modes in humans, higher uptake rates were predicted for lower tracheobronchial tissues than either the rat or monkey. These extended airway models provide a unique foundation for comparing material transport and site-specific tissue uptake across a significantly greater range of conducting airways in the rat, monkey, and human than prior CFD models. PMID:22584687

  12. A survey of cancer and occupation in young and middle aged men. I. Cancers of the respiratory tract.

    PubMed Central

    Coggon, D; Pannett, B; Osmond, C; Acheson, E D

    1986-01-01

    In a search for clues to previously industrial carcinogens the occupational and smoking histories of young and middle aged men with different types of cancer were compared. The study population comprised men aged 18-54 and resident in the counties of Cleveland, Humberside, and Cheshire (including the Wirral). From hospital and cancer registration records 2942 members of the study population in whom cancers were diagnosed during the period 1975-80 were identified retrospectively. The occupational and smoking histories of these patients were sought by a postal questionnaire addressed either to the patients themselves or, if they had died, to their next of kin. The overall response rate to the questionnaire was 52.1%. Additionally, limited occupational information was obtained for 89% of cases from their hospital notes. Analysis of these data suggests that no serious bias arose as a consequence of the incomplete response to the questionnaire. This paper concentrates on the results for cancers of the respiratory tract and mesothelioma. Mesothelioma was found to cluster in laggers, electricians, and shipyard workers, and nasal carcinoma in woodworkers. Carcinomas of the larynx and of the bronchus were examined by formal statistical techniques, each being compared with a control group made up of all other cancers combined. Several interesting occupational and industrial associations were shown, in particular, an excess of bronchial carcinoma in the leather industry (RR = 2.6, CI 1.2-6.0), in building labourers (RR = 1.7, CI 1.0-2.9) and other construction workers (RR = 1.8, CI 1.0-3.0), in bakers and pastry cooks (RR = 3.6, CI 1.3-10.4). and in cooks (RR = 2.5, CI 1.2-5.1). In addition, a small cluster of lung tumours was observed in men who had worked as dental mechanics. PMID:3707871

  13. Vitamin D and Respiratory Tract Infections: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Bergman, Peter; Lindh, Åsa U.; Björkhem-Bergman, Linda; Lindh, Jonatan D.

    2013-01-01

    Background Low levels of 25-OH vitamin D are associated with respiratory tract infection (RTI). However, results from randomized controlled trials are inconclusive. Therefore, we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the preventive effect of vitamin D supplementation on RTI. Methods Randomized, controlled trials of vitamin D for prevention of RTI were used for the analysis. The risks of within-trial and publication bias were assessed. Odds ratios of RTI were pooled using a random-effects model. Heterogeneity was assessed using Cochran's Q and I2. Meta-regressions and subgroup analyses were used to assess the influence of various factors on trial outcome. The pre-defined review protocol was registered at the PROSPERO international prospective register of systematic reviews, registration number CRD42013003530. Findings Of 1137 citations retrieved, 11 placebo-controlled studies of 5660 patients were included in the meta-analysis. Overall, vitamin D showed a protective effect against RTI (OR, 0.64; 95% CI, 0.49 to 0.84). There was significant heterogeneity among studies (Cohran's Q p<0.0001, I2 = 72%). The protective effect was larger in studies using once-daily dosing compared to bolus doses (OR = 0.51 vs OR = 0.86, p = 0.01). There was some evidence that results may have been influenced by publication bias. Interpretation Results indicate that vitamin D has a protective effect against RTI, and dosing once-daily seems most effective. Due to heterogeneity of included studies and possible publication bias in the field, these results should be interpreted with caution. PMID:23840373

  14. Antibiotics for acute respiratory tract infections: a mixed-methods study of patient experiences of non-medical prescriber management

    PubMed Central

    Courtenay, Molly; Rowbotham, Samantha; Lim, Rosemary; Deslandes, Rhian; Hodson, Karen; MacLure, Katie; Peters, Sarah; Stewart, Derek

    2017-01-01

    Objective To (1) explore patients' expectations and experiences of nurse and pharmacist non-medical prescriber-led management of respiratory tract infections (RTIs), (2) examine whether patient expectations for antibiotics affect the likelihood of receiving them and (3) understand factors influencing patient satisfaction with RTI consultations. Design Mixed methods. Setting Primary care. Participants Questionnaires from 120 patients and follow-up interviews with 22 patients and 16 nurse and pharmacist non-medical prescribers (NMPs). Results Patients had multiple expectations of their consultation with 43% expecting to be prescribed an antibiotic. There was alignment between self-reported patient expectations and those perceived by NMPs. Patient expectations for non-antibiotic strategies, such as education to promote self-management, were associated with receipt of those strategies, whereas patient expectations for an antibiotic were not associated with receipt of these medications. ‘Patient-centred’ management strategies (including reassurance and providing information) were received by 86.7% of patients. Regardless of patients' expectations or the management strategy employed, high levels of satisfaction were reported for all aspects of the consultation. Taking concerns seriously, conducting a physical examination, communicating the treatment plan, explaining treatment decisions and lack of time restrictions were each reported to contribute to patient satisfaction. Conclusions NMPs demonstrate an understanding of patient expectations of RTI consultations and use a range of non-antibiotic management strategies, particularly those resembling a patient-centred approach. Overall, patients' expectations were met and prescribers were not unduly influenced by patient expectations for an antibiotic. Patients were satisfied with the consultation, indicating that strategies used by NMPs were acceptable. However, the lower levels of satisfaction among patients who

  15. Clinical influences on antibiotic prescribing decisions for lower respiratory tract infection: a nine country qualitative study of variation in care

    PubMed Central

    Hood, Kerenza; Cooper, Lucy; Coenen, Samuel; Little, Paul; Verheij, Theo; Godycki-Cwirko, Maciek; Melbye, Hasse; Krawczyk, Jaroslaw; Borras-Santos, Alicia; Jakobsen, Kristin; Worby, Patricia; Goossens, Herman; Butler, Christopher C

    2012-01-01

    Objectives There is variation in antibiotic prescribing for lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI) in primary care that does not benefit patients. This study aims to investigate clinicians' accounts of clinical influences on antibiotic prescribing decisions for LRTI to better understand variation and identify opportunities for improvement. Design Multi country qualitative interview study. Semi-structured interviews using open-ended questions and a patient scenario. Data were subjected to five-stage analytic framework approach (familiarisation, developing a thematic framework from the interview questions and emerging themes, indexing, charting and mapping to search for interpretations), with interviewers commenting on preliminary reports. Setting Primary care. Participants 80 primary care clinicians randomly selected from primary care research networks based in nine European cities. Results Clinicians reported four main individual clinical factors that guided their antibiotic prescribing decision: auscultation, fever, discoloured sputum and breathlessness. These were considered alongside a general impression of the patient derived from building a picture of the illness course, using intuition and familiarity with the patient. Comorbidity and older age were considered main risk factors for poor outcomes. Clinical factors were similar across networks, apart from C reactive protein near patient testing in Tromsø. Clinicians developed ways to handle diagnostic and management uncertainty through their own clinical routines. Conclusions Clinicians emphasised the importance of auscultation, fever, discoloured sputum and breathlessness, general impression of the illness course, familiarity with the patient, comorbidity, and age in informing their antibiotic prescribing decisions for LRTI. As some of these factors may be overemphasised given the evolving evidence base, greater standardisation of assessment and integration of findings may help reduce unhelpful variation

  16. Nebulised amphotericin B to eradicate Candida colonisation from the respiratory tract in critically ill patients receiving selective digestive decontamination: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Colonisation of the lower respiratory tract with Candida species occurs in 25% of mechanically ventilated critically ill patients, and is associated with increased morbidity. Nebulised amphotericin B has been used to eradicate Candida as part of selective decontamination of the digestive tract (SDD) protocols, but its effectiveness is unknown. We aimed to determine the effectiveness of nebulised amphotericin B in eradicating Candida respiratory tract colonisation in patients receiving SDD. Methods We included consecutive mechanically ventilated patients during a four-year period. Microbiological screening was performed upon admission and twice weekly thereafter according to a standardised protocol. A colonisation episode was defined as the presence of Candida species in two consecutive sputum samples taken at least one day apart. To correct for time-varying bias and possible confounding, we used a multistate approach and performed time-varying Cox regression with adjustment for age, disease severity, Candida load at baseline and concurrent corticosteroid use. Results Among 1,819 patients, colonisation with Candida occurred 401 times in 363 patients; 333 of these events were included for analysis. Decolonisation occurred in 51 of 59 episodes (86%) and in 170 of 274 episodes (62%) in patients receiving and not receiving nebulised amphotericin B, respectively. Nebulised amphotericin B was associated with an increased rate of Candida eradication (crude HR 2.0; 95% CI 1.4 to 2.7, adjusted HR 2.2; 95% CI 1.6 to 3.0). Median times to decolonisation were six and nine days, respectively. The incidence rate of ventilator-associated pneumonia, length of stay and mortality did not differ between both groups. Conclusions Nebulised amphotericin B reduces the duration of Candida colonisation in the lower respiratory tracts of mechanically ventilated critically ill patients receiving SDD, but data remain lacking that this is associated with a meaningful improvement in

  17. Patient presentation and physician management of upper respiratory tract infections: a retrospective review of over 5 million primary clinic consultations in Hong Kong

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) has a significant healthcare burden worldwide. Considerable resources are consumed through health care consultations and prescribed treatment, despite evidence for little or no effect on recovery. Patterns of consultations and care including use of symptomatic medications and antibiotics for upper respiratory tract infections are poorly described. Methods We performed a retrospective review of computerized clinical data on patients presenting to all public primary care clinics in Hong Kong with symptoms of respiratory tract infections. International Classification of Primary care (ICPC)codes used to identify patients included otitis media (H71), streptococcal pharyngitis (R72), acute URTI (R74), acute sinusitis (R75), acute tonsillitis (R76), acute laryngitis (R77), and influenza (R80). Sociodemographic variables such as gender, age, chronic illness status, attendance date, type and duration of drug prescribed were also collected. Results Of the 5,529,755 primary care consultations for respiratory symptoms from 2005 to 2010, 98% resulted in a prescription. Prescription patterns of symptomatic medication were largely similar across the 5 years. In 2010 the mean number of drugs prescribed per consultation was 3.2, of which the commonly prescribed medication were sedating antihistamines (79.9%), analgesia (58.9%), throat lozenges (40.4%) and expectorant cough syrup (33.8%). During the study period, there was an overall decline in antibiotic prescription (8.1% to 5.1%). However, in consultations where the given diagnosis was otitis media (H71), streptococcal pharyngitis (R72), acute sinusitis (R75) or acute laryngitis (R76), over 90% resulted in antibiotic prescription. Conclusion There was a decline in overall antibiotic prescription over the study period. However, the use of antibiotics was high in some conditions e.g. otitis media and acute laryngitis a. Multiple symptomatic medications were given for upper

  18. Indoor air quality risk factors for severe lower respiratory tract infections in Inuit infants in Baffin Region, Nunavut: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kovesi, T; Creery, D; Gilbert, N L; Dales, R; Fugler, D; Thompson, B; Randhawa, N; Miller, J D

    2006-08-01

    Inuit infants have extremely high rates of lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI), but the causes for this are unclear. The aims of this study were to assess, in young Inuit children in Baffin Region, Nunavut, the feasibility of an epidemiologic study of the association between indoor air quality (IAQ) and respiratory health; to obtain data on IAQ in their housing; and to identify and classify risk factors for LRTI. Twenty houses in Cape Dorset, Nunavut with children below 2 years of age, were evaluated using a structured housing inspection and measurement of IAQ parameters, and a respiratory health questionnaire was administered. Twenty-five percent of the children had, at some time, been hospitalized for chest illness. Houses were very small, and had a median of six occupants per house. Forty-one percent of the houses had a calculated natural air change rate <0.35 air changes per hour. NO(2) concentrations were within the acceptable range. Smokers were present in at least 90% of the households, and nicotine concentrations exceeded 1.5 microg/m(3) in 25% of the dwellings. Particulates were found to be correlated closely with nicotine but not with NO(2) concentrations, suggesting that their main source was cigarette smoking rather than leakage from furnaces. Mattress fungal levels were markedly increased, although building fungal concentrations were low. Dust-mites were virtually non-existent. Potential risk factors related to IAQ for viral LRTI in Inuit infants were observed in this study, including reduced air exchange and environmental tobacco smoke exposure. Severe lower respiratory tract infection is common in Inuit infants. We found reduced air change rates and high occupancy levels in houses in Cape Dorset, which may increase the risk of respiratory infections. This suggests the measures to promote better ventilation or more housing may be beneficial. Further health benefits may be obtained by reducing bed sharing by infants and greater turnover of

  19. Marijuana: respiratory tract effects.

    PubMed

    Owen, Kelly P; Sutter, Mark E; Albertson, Timothy E

    2014-02-01

    Marijuana is the most commonly used drug of abuse in the USA. It is commonly abused through inhalation and therefore has effects on the lung that are similar to tobacco smoke, including increased cough, sputum production, hyperinflation, and upper lobe emphysematous changes. However, at this time, it does not appear that marijuana smoke contributes to the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Marijuana can have multiple physiologic effects such as tachycardia, peripheral vasodilatation, behavioral and emotional changes, and possible prolonged cognitive impairment. The carcinogenic effects of marijuana are unclear at this time. Studies are mixed on the ability of marijuana smoke to increase the risk for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, lung cancer, prostate cancer, and cervical cancer. Some studies show that marijuana is protective for development of malignancy. Marijuana smoke has been shown to have an inhibitory effect on the immune system. Components of cannabis are under investigation as treatment for autoimmune diseases and malignancy. As marijuana becomes legalized in many states for medical and recreational use, other forms of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) have been developed, such as food products and beverages. As most research on marijuana at this time has been on whole marijuana smoke, rather than THC, it is difficult to determine if the currently available data is applicable to these newer products.

  20. Acute viral infections of upper respiratory tract in elderly people living in the community: comparative, prospective, population based study of disease burden.

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, K. G.; Kent, J.; Hammersley, V.; Cancio, E.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the disease burden of upper respiratory infections in elderly people living at home. DESIGN: Prospective surveillance of elderly people. INTERVENTION: None. SETTING: Leicestershire, England SUBJECTS: 533 subjects 60 to 90 years of age. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Pathogens, symptoms, restriction of activity, duration of illness, medical consultations, interval between onset of illness and medical consultation, antibiotic use, admission to hospital, and death. RESULTS: 231 pathogens were identified for 211 (43%) of 497 episodes for which diagnostic specimens were available: 121 (52%) were rhinoviruses, 59 (26%) were coronaviruses, 22 (9.5%) were influenza A or B, 17 (7%) were respiratory syncytial virus, 7 (3%) were parainfluenza viruses, and 3 (1%) were Chlamydia species; an adenovirus and Mycoplasma pneumoniae caused one infection each. Infections occurred at a rate of 1.2 episodes per person per annum (95% confidence interval 1.0 to 1.7; range 0-10) and were clinically indistinguishable. Lower respiratory tract symptoms complicated 65% of upper respiratory infections and increased the medical consultation rate 2.4-fold (chi 2 test P < 0.001). The median interval between onset of illness and medical consultation was 3 days for influenza and 5 days for other infections. Rhinoviruses caused the greatest disease burden overall followed by episodes of unknown aetiology, coronaviruses, influenza A and B, and respiratory syncytial virus. CONCLUSIONS: Respiratory viruses cause substantial morbidity in elderly people. Although respiratory syncytial virus and influenza cause considerable individual morbidity, the burden of disease from rhinovirus infections and infections of unknown aetiology seems greater overall. The interval between onset of illness and consultation together with diagnostic difficulties raises concern regarding the role of antiviral drugs in treating influenza. PMID:9366736

  1. [Comparative radiography of the respiratory tract of snakes using conventional high-resolution film-screen-system and a digital detector system].

    PubMed

    Pees, Michael; Bochmann, Monika; Krautwald-Junghanns, Maria-Elisabeth; Schmidt, Volker; Ludewig, Eberhard

    2010-01-01

    A conventional high-resolution screen-film-system (film Kodak MIN-R S, screen Kodak MIN-R 2000) was compared to a digital detector system (Varian PaxScan 4030E) for the evaluation of the respiratory tract in snakes. Digital radiographs were taken with the same dose as well as with half the dose used for the conventional radiographs. A total of 20 Burmese pythons (Python molurus) were examined in dorsoventral and lateral projection. Four criteria (three features, one overall assessment) were defined for each of the anatomical structures lung, trachea and spinal column and assessed by five veterinarians in a semi-blinded study using a score system. Comparison of the ratings between the techniques used was done using a visual grading analysis. For the lung, two of the three features as well as the overall assessment were rated significantly superior using the digital system. The trachea was rated significantly superior using the conventional system for the overall assessment as well as for one feature. For the spinal column, the overall assessment was significantly superior using the digital system with the full dose. Conventional radiography as well as digital radiography using half the dose was rated significantly inferior for one feature each. The of the relatively low-contrast respiratory tract. A limiting factor is the demonstration of particularly small structures. Generally, a dose reduction (compared to a conventional high-resolution film-screen-system) is possible for the evaluation of the respiratory system.

  2. Molecular identification of adenovirus causing respiratory tract infection in pediatric patients at the University of Malaya Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background There are at least 51 adenovirus serotypes (AdV) known to cause human infections. The prevalence of the different human AdV (HAdV) serotypes varies among different regions. Presently, there are no reports of the prevalent HAdV types found in Malaysia. The present study was undertaken to identify the HAdV types associated primarily with respiratory tract infections (RTI) of young children in Malaysia. Methods Archived HAdV isolates from pediatric patients with RTI seen at the University of Malaya Medical Center (UMMC), Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia from 1999 to 2005 were used. Virus isolates were inoculated into cell culture and DNA was extracted when cells showed significant cytopathic effects. AdV partial hexon gene was amplified and the sequences together with other known HAdV hexon gene sequences were used to build phylogenetic trees. Identification of HAdV types found among young children in Malaysia was inferred from the phylograms. Results At least 2,583 pediatric patients with RTI sought consultation and treatment at the UMMC from 1999 to 2005. Among these patients, 48 (< 2%) were positive for HAdV infections. Twenty-seven isolates were recovered and used for the present study. Nineteen of the 27 (~70%) isolates belonged to HAdV species C (HAdV-C) and six (~22%) were of HAdV species B (HAdV-B). Among the HAdV-C species, 14 (~74%) of them were identified as HAdV type 1 (HAdV-1) and HAdV type 2 (HAdV-2), and among the HAdV-B species, HAdV type 3 (HAdV-3) was the most common serotype identified. HAdV-C species also was isolated from throat and rectal swabs of children with hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD). Two isolates were identified as corresponding to HAdV-F species from a child with HFMD and a patient with intestinal obstruction. Conclusions HAdV-1 and HAdV-2 were the most common HAdV isolated from pediatric patients who sought treatment for RTI at the UMMC from 1999 to 2005. HAdV-B, mainly HAdV-3, was recovered from ~22% of the patients. These

  3. Progress in Pediatrics in 2012: choices in allergy, endocrinology, gastroenterology, hematology, infectious diseases, neurology, nutrition and respiratory tract illnesses.

    PubMed

    Caffarelli, Carlo; Santamaria, Francesca; Vottero, Alessandra; Bernasconi, Sergio

    2013-05-08

    In this review, we summarize the progresses in allergy, endocrinology, gastroenterology, hematology, infectious diseases, neurology, nutrition and respiratory tract illnesses that have been published in The Italian Journal of Pediatrics in 2012. The induction of Treg activity by probiotics might be effective for promoting tolerance towards food allergens. Nasal cytology is useful in patients with rhinitis for diagnosing chronic non-allergic non-infectious diseases. Atopic eczema is associated both with an aberrant skin matrix and impaired systemic immune response. Therefore, isolated topical treatment may have suboptimal effect. Diagnostic work-up of exercise-induced anaphylaxis, including exercise challenge test, is necessary to reach a diagnosis. Studies may support a role for nutrition on prevention of asthma and cardiovascular diseases. Clinicians need to early identify adolescent menstrual abnormalities to minimize sequelae, and to promote health information. In Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 2B investigations include acetylcholinesterase study of rectal mucosa followed by the molecular analysis of RET mutation. Low adherence to gluten-free diet and osteopenia are common problems in children with diabetes mellitus type 1 and celiac disease. In infantile colic, laboratory tests are usually unnecessary and the treatment is based on reassurance. Prevalence of obesity and stunting is elucidated by several studies. Evidences are growing that dietetic measures are needed to prevent obesity in children with acute leukemia. Treatment studies for infectious diseases show promise for probiotics along with standard triple therapy in children with Helicobacter pilori infection, while zinc has no effect on pneumonia. Educational programs about the proper management of the febrile child are warranted. A new hour-specific total serum bilirubin nomogram has been shown to be able to predict newborns without hyperbilirubinemia after 48 to 72 hours of life. Newborns with

  4. Safety of reduced antibiotic prescribing for self limiting respiratory tract infections in primary care: cohort study using electronic health records

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Michael V; Little, Paul; Hay, Alastair D; Fox, Robin; Prevost, A Toby; Juszczyk, Dorota; Charlton, Judith; Ashworth, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine whether the incidence of pneumonia, peritonsillar abscess, mastoiditis, empyema, meningitis, intracranial abscess, and Lemierre’s syndrome is higher in general practices that prescribe fewer antibiotics for self limiting respiratory tract infections (RTIs). Design Cohort study. Setting 610 UK general practices from the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink. Participants Registered patients with 45.5 million person years of follow-up from 2005 to 2014. Exposures Standardised proportion of RTI consultations with antibiotics prescribed for each general practice, and rate of antibiotic prescriptions for RTIs per 1000 registered patients. Main outcome measures Incidence of pneumonia, peritonsillar abscess, mastoiditis, empyema, meningitis, intracranial abscess, and Lemierre’s syndrome, adjusting for age group, sex, region, deprivation fifth, RTI consultation rate, and general practice. Results From 2005 to 2014 the proportion of RTI consultations with antibiotics prescribed decreased from 53.9% to 50.5% in men and from 54.5% to 51.5% in women. From 2005 to 2014, new episodes of meningitis, mastoiditis, and peritonsillar abscess decreased annually by 5.3%, 4.6%, and 1.0%, respectively, whereas new episodes of pneumonia increased by 0.4%. Age and sex standardised incidences for pneumonia and peritonsillar abscess were higher for practices in the lowest fourth of antibiotic prescribing compared with the highest fourth. The adjusted relative risk increases for a 10% reduction in antibiotic prescribing were 12.8% (95% confidence interval 7.8% to 17.5%, P<0.001) for pneumonia and 9.9% (5.6% to 14.0%, P<0.001) for peritonsillar abscess. If a general practice with an average list size of 7000 patients reduces the proportion of RTI consultations with antibiotics prescribed by 10%, then it might observe 1.1 (95% confidence interval 0.6 to 1.5) more cases of pneumonia each year and 0.9 (0.5 to 1.3) more cases of peritonsillar abscess each decade

  5. Functional, radiological and biological markers of alveolitis and infections of the lower respiratory tract in patients with systemic sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    De Santis, Maria; Bosello, Silvia; La Torre, Giuseppe; Capuano, Anna; Tolusso, Barbara; Pagliari, Gabriella; Pistelli, Riccardo; Danza, Francesco Maria; Zoli, Angelo; Ferraccioli, Gianfranco

    2005-01-01

    HRCT and then underwent BAL, probably because the concomitant fibrosis influenced results. A diffuse skin involvement and a restrictive pattern on PFTs together with ground glass on HRCT were judged possible markers of alveolitis, a BAL examination being indicated as the next step. Nevertheless BAL would be necessary to detect any infections of the lower respiratory tract that may cause further deterioration in lung function. PMID:16107215

  6. Progress in Pediatrics in 2012: choices in allergy, endocrinology, gastroenterology, hematology, infectious diseases, neurology, nutrition and respiratory tract illnesses

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In this review, we summarize the progresses in allergy, endocrinology, gastroenterology, hematology, infectious diseases, neurology, nutrition and respiratory tract illnesses that have been published in The Italian Journal of Pediatrics in 2012. The induction of Treg activity by probiotics might be effective for promoting tolerance towards food allergens. Nasal cytology is useful in patients with rhinitis for diagnosing chronic non-allergic non-infectious diseases. Atopic eczema is associated both with an aberrant skin matrix and impaired systemic immune response. Therefore, isolated topical treatment may have suboptimal effect. Diagnostic work-up of exercise-induced anaphylaxis, including exercise challenge test, is necessary to reach a diagnosis. Studies may support a role for nutrition on prevention of asthma and cardiovascular diseases. Clinicians need to early identify adolescent menstrual abnormalities to minimize sequelae, and to promote health information. In Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 2B investigations include acetylcholinesterase study of rectal mucosa followed by the molecular analysis of RET mutation. Low adherence to gluten-free diet and osteopenia are common problems in children with diabetes mellitus type 1 and celiac disease. In infantile colic, laboratory tests are usually unnecessary and the treatment is based on reassurance. Prevalence of obesity and stunting is elucidated by several studies. Evidences are growing that dietetic measures are needed to prevent obesity in children with acute leukemia. Treatment studies for infectious diseases show promise for probiotics along with standard triple therapy in children with Helicobacter pilori infection, while zinc has no effect on pneumonia. Educational programs about the proper management of the febrile child are warranted. A new hour-specific total serum bilirubin nomogram has been shown to be able to predict newborns without hyperbilirubinemia after 48 to 72 hours of life. Newborns with

  7. Brain Cooling With Ventilation of Cold Air Over Respiratory Tract in Newborn Piglets: An Experimental and Numerical Study

    PubMed Central

    Bakhsheshi, Mohammad Fazel; Moradi, Hadi Vafadar; Stewart, Errol E.; Keenliside, Lynn; Lee, Ting-Yim

    2015-01-01

    We investigate thermal effects of pulmonary cooling which was induced by cold air through an endotracheal tube via a ventilator on newborn piglets. A mathematical model was initially employed to compare the thermal impact of two different gas mixtures, O2-medical air (1:2) and O2-Xe (1:2), across the respiratory tract and within the brain. Following mathematical simulations, we examined the theoretical predictions with O2-medical air condition on nine anesthetized piglets which were randomized to two treatment groups: 1) control group (\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}$n = 4$ \\end{document}) and 2) pulmonary cooling group (\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}$n = 5$ \\end{document}). Numerical and experimental results using O2-medical air mixture show that brain temperature fell from 38.5 °C and 38.3 °C ± 0.3 °C to 35.7 °C ± 0.9 °C and 36.5 °C ± 0.6 °C during 3 h cooling which corresponded to a mean cooling rate of 0.9 °C/h ± 0.2 °C/h and 0.6 °C/h ± 0.1 °C/h, respectively. According to the numerical results, decreasing the metabolic rate and increasing air velocity are helpful to maximize the cooling effect. We demonstrated that pulmonary cooling by cooling of inhalation gases immediately before they enter the trachea can slowly reduce brain and core body temperature of newborn piglets. Numerical simulations show no significant differences between two different inhaled conditions, i.e., O2-medical air (1:2) and O2-Xe (1:2) with respect to cooling rate. PMID:27170888

  8. Detection of feline upper respiratory tract disease pathogens using a commercially available real-time PCR test.

    PubMed

    Litster, A; Wu, C C; Leutenegger, C M

    2015-11-01

    Feline herpesvirus (FHV-1), feline calicivirus (FCV), Bordetella bronchiseptica (Bb), Chlamydia felis (Cf) and Mycoplasma felis (Mf) are common infectious agents identified in cats with upper respiratory tract disease (URTD). Each of these agents can either act as primary pathogens or cause subclinical infections, and pathogen identification can be used to prevent disease transmission in shelters, or to manage individual cats with recurrent URTD. The aim of this study was to compare pathogen detection rates using real-time PCR testing and virus isolation (VI) or bacterial culture in conjunctival, nasal and oropharyngeal swabs from 18 shelter-housed cats with clinical URTD. Co-infections were common; FHV-1 was most prevalent and Cf and FCV were least prevalent. Agents detected by PCR were FCV 2/18 (11%), FHV-1 17/18 (94%), Bb 8/18 (44%) and Mf 15/18 (83%). Agents detected by VI and bacterial culture were FCV 1/18 (6%), FHV-1 12/18 (67%), Bb 8/18 (44%) and Mf 12/18 (67%). Agreement between PCR results and the other two methods was: FHV-1, 57.4%; FCV, 98.1%; Bb, 75.0%; Mf, 60.0%. Discordancies included PCR-positive, VI-negative (FCV, n = 1/54, 1.9%; FHV-1, n = 23/54, 42.6%), PCR-positive, culture-negative (Bb, n = 6/36, 16.7%; Mf, n = 13/36, 36.1%) or PCR-negative, culture-positive (Bb, n = 3/36, 8.3%; Mf, n = 2/36, 5.6%) results. A combination of an oropharyngeal swab and either a conjunctival or a nasal swab submitted for PCR testing was able to detect all infectious agents tested for in each cat. PCR testing was a sensitive and convenient method of detection of infectious agents in cats with clinical signs of URTD.

  9. Debunking the viper's strike: harmless snakes kill a common assumption.

    PubMed

    Penning, David A; Sawvel, Baxter; Moon, Brad R

    2016-03-01

    To survive, organisms must avoid predation and acquire nutrients and energy. Sensory systems must correctly differentiate between potential predators and prey, and elicit behaviours that adjust distances accordingly. For snakes, strikes can serve both purposes. Vipers are thought to have the fastest strikes among snakes. However, strike performance has been measured in very few species, especially non-vipers. We measured defensive strike performance in harmless Texas ratsnakes and two species of vipers, western cottonmouths and western diamond-backed rattlesnakes, using high-speed video recordings. We show that ratsnake strike performance matches or exceeds that of vipers. In contrast with the literature over the past century, vipers do not represent the pinnacle of strike performance in snakes. Both harmless and venomous snakes can strike with very high accelerations that have two key consequences: the accelerations exceed values that can cause loss of consciousness in other animals, such as the accelerations experienced by jet pilots during extreme manoeuvres, and they make the strikes faster than the sensory and motor responses of mammalian prey and predators. Both harmless and venomous snakes can strike faster than the blink of an eye and often reach a target before it can move.

  10. Debunking the viper's strike: harmless snakes kill a common assumption

    PubMed Central

    Sawvel, Baxter; Moon, Brad R.

    2016-01-01

    To survive, organisms must avoid predation and acquire nutrients and energy. Sensory systems must correctly differentiate between potential predators and prey, and elicit behaviours that adjust distances accordingly. For snakes, strikes can serve both purposes. Vipers are thought to have the fastest strikes among snakes. However, strike performance has been measured in very few species, especially non-vipers. We measured defensive strike performance in harmless Texas ratsnakes and two species of vipers, western cottonmouths and western diamond-backed rattlesnakes, using high-speed video recordings. We show that ratsnake strike performance matches or exceeds that of vipers. In contrast with the literature over the past century, vipers do not represent the pinnacle of strike performance in snakes. Both harmless and venomous snakes can strike with very high accelerations that have two key consequences: the accelerations exceed values that can cause loss of consciousness in other animals, such as the accelerations experienced by jet pilots during extreme manoeuvres, and they make the strikes faster than the sensory and motor responses of mammalian prey and predators. Both harmless and venomous snakes can strike faster than the blink of an eye and often reach a target before it can move. PMID:26979562

  11. [The nutritional status change the effectiveness of a dietary supplement of lactic bacteria on the emerging of respiratory tract diseases in children].

    PubMed

    Río, María Esther; Zago Beatriz, Liliana; Garcia, Hugo; Winter, Luis

    2002-03-01

    One hundred children 6 to 24 month old, normal or undernourished according to weight for height index, received during three months--autumn to winter--a dietary supplement of live Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lactobacillus Casei, 10(7)-10(8)/ml in fermented milk (LB) or an equivalent amount of fluid milk (L) as control. Children's follow-up was performed as outpatients in the Hospital Posadas (Great Buenos Aires). Episodes of respiratory tract infections were recorded and classified according to severity as: Pneumonia (N); Bronchitis (B), Recurrent Obstructive Bronchitis (BOR) and upper respiratory tract infections (CVAS). 58% of children fitted the study protocol, 22 in the LB and 36 in the L group; 21 were undernourished and 37 presented normal weight/height. No deaths were recorded. Total episodes were 103: 34 in LB and 69 in L, that means a frequency of 1.55 and 1.92 episodes/children respectively. In LB a maximum of 3 episodes/children was recorded, meanwhile the number reached 7 in L (p = 0.0373). Severity was higher in L than LB: 0.06 vs. 0 for N; 0.69 vs. 0.45 for B + BOR and 1.17 vs. 1.09 for CVAS. In the control group frequency of severe pathologies was about twice in undernourished than in normal: 0.08 vs. 0.04 for N; 1.08 vs. 0.50 for B + BOR; no difference was found for CVAS. Live lactobacillus supplement suppressed pneumonia and decreased bronchitis in undernourished as well as in normal. In this study undernutrition not only increased the chance of suffering severe acute respiratory tract infections but also impaired the effectiveness of the supplement to decrease severity. The effect is explained on the basis of the immunocompetence depression linked to an inadequate nutritional status.

  12. An investigation into the effect of the IgG antibody system on the susceptibility of IgA-deficient patients to respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed Central

    French, M A; Harrison, G

    1986-01-01

    Serum IgG subclass concentrations and IgG-tetanus toxoid antibody (IgG-TTab) responses were measured in IgA-deficient patients with severe respiratory tract infections (n = 11), mild respiratory tract infections (n = 5) or no increased susceptibility to respiratory tract infections (n = 15). The severe infection group had lower IgG2 concentrations than the patients without infections (P less than 0.02) and was the only group with IgG2-deficient patients (36%). The number of sera in which IgG4 was not detected was higher in patients with severe infections than in both normal controls (45% vs 10%, P less than 0.01) and the other IgA-deficient patients (45% vs 20%), in part explained by a strong association with IgG2 deficiency. Subnormal IgG-TTab responses were demonstrated in 45% of patients with severe infections but in only one patient from each of the other two groups. Five patients with IgG2 deficiency and/or subnormal IgG-TTab responses were treated with gammaglobulin and apparently improved. There was a high serum concentration of IgG1 in 35% and IgG3 in 19% of the 31 patients, predominantly in those without severe infections. Thus a proportion of IgA-deficient patients have additional defects of IgG; IgG1 and IgG3 antibody responses may compensate for the IgA deficiency in asymptomatic patients. PMID:3568451

  13. Inclusion of thin target and source regions in alimentary and respiratory tract systems of mesh-type ICRP adult reference phantoms.

    PubMed

    Kim, Han Sung; Yeom, Yeon Soo; Nguyen, Thang Tat; Choi, Chansoo; Han, Min Cheol; Lee, Jai Ki; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Zankl, Maria; Petoussi-Henss, Nina; Bolch, Wesley E; Lee, Choonsik; Qiu, Rui; Eckerman, Keith; Chung, Beom Sun

    2017-03-21

    It is not feasible to define very small or complex organs and tissues in the current voxel-type adult reference computational phantoms of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), which limit dose coefficients for weakly penetrating radiations. To address the problem, the ICRP is converting the voxel-type reference phantoms into mesh-type phantoms. In the present study, as a part of the conversion project, the micrometer-thick target and source regions in the alimentary and respiratory tract systems as described in ICRP Publications 100 and 66 were included in the mesh-type ICRP reference adult male and female phantoms. In addition, realistic lung airway models were simulated to represent the bronchial (BB) and bronchiolar (bb) regions. The electron specific absorbed fraction (SAF) values for the alimentary and respiratory tract systems were then calculated and compared with the values calculated with the stylized models of ICRP Publications 100 and 66. The comparisons show generally good agreement for the oral cavity, oesophagus, and BB, whereas for the stomach, small intestine, large intestine, extrathoracic region, and bb, there are some differences (e.g. up to ~9 times in the large intestine). The difference is mainly due to anatomical difference in these organs between the realistic mesh-type phantoms and the simplified stylized models. The new alimentary and respiratory tract models in the mesh-type ICRP reference phantoms preserve the topology and dimensions of the voxel-type ICRP phantoms and provide more reliable SAF values than the simplified models adopted in previous ICRP Publications.

  14. Effect of point of care testing for C reactive protein and training in communication skills on antibiotic use in lower respiratory tract infections: cluster randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Christopher C; Hopstaken, Rogier M; Hood, Kerenza; Dinant, Geert-Jan

    2009-01-01

    Objective To assess the effect of general practitioner testing for C reactive protein (disease approach) and receiving training in enhanced communication skills (illness approach) on antibiotic prescribing for lower respiratory tract infection. Design Pragmatic, 2×2 factorial, cluster randomised controlled trial. Setting 20 general practices in the Netherlands. Participants 40 general practitioners from 20 practices recruited 431 patients with lower respiratory tract infection. Main outcome measures The primary outcome was antibiotic prescribing at the index consultation. Secondary outcomes were antibiotic prescribing during 28 days’ follow-up, reconsultation, clinical recovery, and patients’ satisfaction and enablement. Interventions General practitioners’ use of C reactive protein point of care testing and training in enhanced communication skills separately and combined, and usual care. Results General practitioners in the C reactive protein test group prescribed antibiotics to 31% of patients compared with 53% in the no test group (P=0.02). General practitioners trained in enhanced communication skills prescribed antibiotics to 27% of patients compared with 54% in the no training group (P<0.01). Both interventions showed a statistically significant effect on antibiotic prescribing at any point during the 28 days’ follow-up. Clinicians in the combined intervention group prescribed antibiotics to 23% of patients (interaction term was non-significant). Patients’ recovery and satisfaction were similar in all study groups. Conclusion Both general practitioners’ use of point of care testing for C reactive protein and training in enhanced communication skills significantly reduced antibiotic prescribing for lower respiratory tract infection without compromising patients’ recovery and satisfaction with care. A combination of the illness and disease focused approaches may be necessary to achieve the greatest reduction in antibiotic prescribing for this

  15. Influenza Virus A/Anhui/1/2013 (H7N9) Replicates Efficiently in the Upper and Lower Respiratory Tracts of Cynomolgus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    de Wit, Emmie; Rasmussen, Angela L.; Feldmann, Friederike; Bushmaker, Trenton; Martellaro, Cynthia; Haddock, Elaine; Okumura, Atsushi; Proll, Sean C.; Chang, Jean; Gardner, Don; Katze, Michael G.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT In March 2013, three fatal human cases of infection with influenza A virus (H7N9) were reported in China. Since then, human cases have been accumulating. Given the public health importance of this virus, we performed a pathogenicity study of the H7N9 virus in the cynomolgus macaque model, focusing on clinical aspects of disease, radiographic, histological, and gene expression profile changes in the upper and lower respiratory tracts, and changes in systemic cytokine and chemokine profiles during infection. Cynomolgus macaques developed transient, mild to severe disease with radiographic evidence of pulmonary infiltration. Virus replicated in the upper as well as lower respiratory tract, with sustained replication in the upper respiratory tract until the end of the experiment at 6 days after inoculation. Virus shedding occurred mainly via the throat. Histopathological changes in the lungs were similar to those observed in humans, albeit less severe, with diffuse alveolar damage, infiltration of polymorphonuclear cells, formation of hyaline membranes, pneumocyte hyperplasia, and fibroproliferative changes. Analysis of gene expression profiles in lung lesions identified pathways involved in tissue damage during H7N9 infection as well as leads for development of therapeutics targeting host responses rather than virus replication. Overall, H7N9 infection was not as severe in cynomolgus macaques as in humans, supporting the possible role of underlying medical complications in disease severity as discussed for human H7N9 infection (H. N. Gao et al., N. Engl. J. Med. 368:2277–2285, 2013, doi:10.1056/NEJMoa1305584). PMID:25118237

  16. Evaluation of the human adaptation of influenza A/H7N9 virus in PB2 protein using human and swine respiratory tract explant cultures

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Louisa L. Y.; Bui, Christine T. H.; Mok, Chris K. P.; Ng, Mandy M. T.; Nicholls, John M.; Peiris, J. S. Malik; Chan, Michael C. W.; Chan, Renee W. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Novel avian H7N9 virus emerged in China in 2013 resulting in a case fatality rate of around 39% and continues to pose zoonotic and pandemic risk. Amino acid substitutions in PB2 protein were shown to influence the pathogenicity and transmissibility of H7N9 following experimental infection of ferrets and mice. In this study, we evaluated the role of amino acid substitution PB2-627K or compensatory changes at PB2-591K and PB2-701N, on the tropism and replication competence of H7N9 viruses for human and swine respiratory tracts using ex vivo organ explant cultures. Recombinant viruses of A/Shanghai/2/2013 (rgH7N9) and its mutants with PB2-K627E, PB2-K627E + Q591K and PB2-K627E + D701N were generated by plasmid-based reverse genetics. PB2-E627K was essential for efficient replication of rgH7N9 in ex vivo cultures of human and swine respiratory tracts. Mutant rgPB2-K627E + D701N replicated better than rgPB2-K627E in human lung but not as well as rgH7N9 virus. The rgPB2-K627E mutant failed to replicate in human type I-like pneumocytes (ATI) and peripheral blood monocyte-derived macrophages (PMϕ) at 37 °C while the compensatory mutant rgPB2-K627E + Q591K and rgPB2-K627E + D701N had partly restored replication competence in PMϕ. Our results demonstrate that PB2-E627K was important for efficient replication of influenza H7N9 in both human and swine respiratory tracts. PMID:27739468

  17. Inclusion of thin target and source regions in alimentary and respiratory tract systems of mesh-type ICRP adult reference phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Han Sung; Yeom, Yeon Soo; Tat Nguyen, Thang; Choi, Chansoo; Han, Min Cheol; Lee, Jai Ki; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Zankl, Maria; Petoussi-Henss, Nina; Bolch, Wesley E.; Lee, Choonsik; Qiu, Rui; Eckerman, Keith; Chung, Beom Sun

    2017-03-01

    It is not feasible to define very small or complex organs and tissues in the current voxel-type adult reference computational phantoms of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), which limit dose coefficients for weakly penetrating radiations. To address the problem, the ICRP is converting the voxel-type reference phantoms into mesh-type phantoms. In the present study, as a part of the conversion project, the micrometer-thick target and source regions in the alimentary and respiratory tract systems as described in ICRP Publications 100 and 66 were included in the mesh-type ICRP reference adult male and female phantoms. In addition, realistic lung airway models were simulated to represent the bronchial (BB) and bronchiolar (bb) regions. The electron specific absorbed fraction (SAF) values for the alimentary and respiratory tract systems were then calculated and compared with the values calculated with the stylized models of ICRP Publications 100 and 66. The comparisons show generally good agreement for the oral cavity, oesophagus, and BB, whereas for the stomach, small intestine, large intestine, extrathoracic region, and bb, there are some differences (e.g. up to ~9 times in the large intestine). The difference is mainly due to anatomical difference in these organs between the realistic mesh-type phantoms and the simplified stylized models. The new alimentary and respiratory tract models in the mesh-type ICRP reference phantoms preserve the topology and dimensions of the voxel-type ICRP phantoms and provide more reliable SAF values than the simplified models adopted in previous ICRP Publications.

  18. Augmentin (amoxicillin/clavulanate) in the treatment of community-acquired respiratory tract infection: a review of the continuing development of an innovative antimicrobial agent.

    PubMed

    White, Anthony R; Kaye, Clive; Poupard, James; Pypstra, Rienk; Woodnutt, Gary; Wynne, Brian

    2004-01-01

    Amoxicillin/clavulanate (Augmentin) is a broad-spectrum antibacterial that has been available for clinical use in a wide range of indications for over 20 years and is now used primarily in the treatment of community-acquired respiratory tract infections. Amoxicillin/clavulanate was developed to provide a potent broad spectrum of antibacterial activity, coverage of beta-lactamase-producing pathogens and a favourable pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) profile. These factors have contributed to the high bacteriological and clinical efficacy of amoxicillin/clavulanate in respiratory tract infection over more than 20 years. This is against a background of increasing prevalence of antimicrobial resistance, notably the continued spread of beta-lactamase-mediated resistance in Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis, and penicillin, macrolide and quinolone resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae. The low propensity of amoxicillin/clavulanate to select resistance mutations as well as a favourable PK/PD profile predictive of high bacteriological efficacy may account for the longevity of this combination in clinical use. However, in certain defined geographical areas, the emergence of S. pneumoniae strains with elevated penicillin MICs has been observed. In order to meet the need to treat drug-resistant S. pneumoniae, two new high-dose amoxicillin/clavulanate formulations have been developed. A pharmacokinetically enhanced tablet dosage form of amoxicillin/clavulanate 2000/125 mg twice daily (available as Augmentin XR in the USA), has been developed for use in adult respiratory tract infection due to drug-resistant pathogens, such as S. pneumoniae with reduced susceptibility to penicillin, as well as beta-lactamase-producing H. influenzae and M. catarrhalis. Amoxicillin/clavulanate 90/6.4 mg/kg/day in two divided doses (Augmentin ES-600) is for paediatric use in persistent or recurrent acute otitis media where there are risk factors for the involvement of beta

  19. Pneumonia and empyema caused by Streptococcus intermedius that shows the diagnostic importance of evaluating the microbiota in the lower respiratory tract.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Shingo; Yatera, Kazuhiro; Kawanami, Toshinori; Yamasaki, Kei; Fukuda, Kazumasa; Naito, Keisuke; Akata, Kentarou; Nagata, Shuya; Ishimoto, Hiroshi; Taniguchi, Hatsumi; Mukae, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    The bacterial species in the Streptococcus anginosus group (S. constellatus, S. anginosus, S. intermedius) are important causative pathogens of bacterial pneumonia, pulmonary abscesses and empyema. However, the bacteria in this group are primarily oral resident bacteria and unable to grow significantly on ordinary aerobic culture media. We experienced a case of pneumonia and empyema caused by Streptococcus intermedius detected using a 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and pleural effusion, but not sputum. Even when applying the molecular method, sputum samples are occasionally unsuitable for identifying the causative pathogens of lower respiratory tract infections.

  20. [Correlations between the level of bacterial resistance and the rate of clinical efficiency in the therapy of community-acquired respiratory tract infections].

    PubMed

    Slănină, Ana-Maria; Filip, Olguţa; Felea, Doina; Cosmescu, Adriana; Petroaie, Antoneta; Barbacariu, Liliana; Novac, Otilia; Manole, Mihaela; Silvia, Mătăsaru

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate the efficiency of the first-line antibiotic treatment of the community-acquired respiratory tract infections in a population of young adults from an urban setting and to establish the pattern of antibiotic resistance of the germs involved. The bacteria most frequently identified have been: S. pneumoniae, H. influenzae, M. catarrhalis, atypical agents also being suspected. Antibiotic treatment has been chosen accordingly to the recent guidelines, total clinical remission rate being of 91.08%, despite the increasing resistance for the commonly used antibiotics; a close monitoring of the phenomenon is mandatory.

  1. Derivation of PM10 size-selected human equivalent concentrations of inhaled nickel based on cancer and non-cancer effects on the respiratory tract.

    PubMed

    Oller, Adriana R; Oberdörster, Günter; Seilkop, Steven K

    2014-08-01

    Abstract Nickel (Ni) in ambient air is predominantly present in the form of oxides and sulfates, with the distribution of Ni mass between the fine (particle aerodynamic diameter < 2.5 µm; PM2.5) and coarser (2.5-10 µm) size-selected aerosol fractions of PM10 dependent on the aerosol's origin. When deriving a long-term health protective reference concentration for Ni in ambient air, the respiratory toxicity and carcinogenicity effects of the predominant Ni compounds in ambient air must be considered. Dosimetric adjustments to account for differences in aerosol particle size and respiratory tract deposition and/or clearance among rats, workers, and the general public were applied to experimentally- and epidemiologically-determined points of departure (PODs) such as no(low)-effect concentrations, for both cancer and non-cancer respiratory effects. This approach resulted in the derivation of threshold-based PM10 size-selected equivalent concentrations (modified PODs) of 0.5 µg Ni/m(3) based on workers' cancer effects and 9-11 µg Ni/m(3) based on rodent respiratory toxicity effects. Sources of uncertainty in exposure extrapolations are described. These are not reference concentrations; rather the derived PM10 size-selected modified PODs can be used as the starting point for the calculation of ambient air reference concentrations for Ni. The described approach is equally applicable to other particulates.

  2. A theoretical study on modeling the respiratory tract with ladder networks by means of intrinsic fractal geometry.

    PubMed

    Ionescu, Clara Mihaela; Muntean, Ionut; Tenreiro-Machado, J A; De Keyser, Robin; Abrudean, Mihail

    2010-02-01

    Fractional order modeling of biological systems has received significant interest in the research community. Since the fractal geometry is characterized by a recurrent structure, the self-similar branching arrangement of the airways makes the respiratory system an ideal candidate for the application of fractional calculus theory. To demonstrate the link between the recurrence of the respiratory tree and the appearance of a fractional-order model, we develop an anatomically consistent representation of the respiratory system. This model is capable of simulating the mechanical properties of the lungs and we compare the model output with in vivo measurements of the respiratory input impedance collected in 20 healthy subjects. This paper provides further proof of the underlying fractal geometry of the human lungs, and the consequent appearance of constant-phase behavior in the total respiratory impedance.

  3. Relationships among Dissemination of Primary Parainfluenza Virus Infection in the Respiratory Tract, Mucosal and Peripheral Immune Responses, and Protection from Reinfection: a Noninvasive Bioluminescence-Imaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Crystal W.; Li, Mei; Hurwitz, Julia L.; Vogel, Peter

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Respiratory paramyxoviruses such as respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and human parainfluenza virus type 1 (HPIV1) to HPIV4 infect virtually all children by the age of 2 to 5 years, leading to partial but incomplete protection from reinfection. Here, we used luciferase-expressing reporter Sendai viruses (the murine counterpart of HPIV1) to noninvasively measure primary infection, immune responses, and protection from reinfection by either a lethal challenge or natural transmission in living mice. Both nonattenuated and attenuated reporter Sendai viruses were used, and three inoculation strategies were employed: intramuscular (i.m.), intranasal (i.n.) at a low dose and low volume, and i.n. at a high dose and high volume. High-dose, high-volume i.n. inoculation resulted in the highest levels of antibody responses and protection from reinfection. Low-dose, low-volume i.n. inoculation afforded complete protection from contact transmission and protection from morbidity, mortality, and viral growth during lethal challenge. i.m. inoculation was inferior to i.n. inoculation at inducing antibody responses and protection from challenge. For individual mice and across groups, the levels of serum binding and neutralizing antibody responses correlated with primary infection and protection from reinfection in the lungs. Contact transmission, the predominant mode of parainfluenza virus transmission, was modeled accurately by direct i.n. inoculation of Sendai virus at a low dose and low volume and was completely preventable by i.n. vaccination of an attenuated virus at a low dose and low volume. The data highlight differences in infection and protection from challenge in the upper versus lower respiratory tract and bear upon live attenuated vaccine development. IMPORTANCE There are currently no licensed vaccines against HPIVs and human RSV (HRSV), important respiratory pathogens of infants and children. Natural infection leads to partial but incomplete protective immunity

  4. Previous respiratory tract infections and antibiotic consumption in children with long- and short-term carriage of penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Gunnarsson, O.; Ekdahl, K.

    1998-01-01

    Previous respiratory tract infections (RTI) and antibiotics consumption as possible risk factors for extended duration of PRP carriage were investigated in 24 children (cases) with previous carriage of penicillin-resistant pneumococci (PRP) for a duration exceeding 120 days (median 168 days) and a control group of 53 children with a duration of PRP carriage less than 90 days (median 21 days). The cases had experienced 0.99 episodes of acute otitis media (AOM) per life-year compared to 0.79 episodes in the controls (P = 0.32). For antibiotic-treated RTI other than AOM, the corresponding numbers were 0.49 and 0.29 episodes per life-year, respectively (P = 0.01). No differences in antibiotic consumption in the 3 months preceding the carriage, nor during the carriage period were noted. Other factors than impaired host defence to respiratory tract pathogens or antibiotics consumption seem to be more important in determining the duration of PRP carriage. PMID:10030700

  5. A chicken influenza virus recognizes fucosylated α2,3 sialoglycan receptors on the epithelial cells lining upper respiratory tracts of chickens.

    PubMed

    Hiono, Takahiro; Okamatsu, Masatoshi; Nishihara, Shoko; Takase-Yoden, Sayaka; Sakoda, Yoshihiro; Kida, Hiroshi

    2014-05-01

    Influenza viruses recognize sialoglycans as receptors. Although viruses isolated form chickens preferentially bind to sialic acid α2,3 galactose (SAα2,3Gal) glycans as do those of ducks, chickens were not experimentally infected with viruses isolated from ducks. A chicken influenza virus, A/chicken/Ibaraki/1/2005 (H5N2) (Ck/IBR) bound to fucose-branched SAα2,3Gal glycans, whereas the binding towards linear SAα2,3Gal glycans was weak. On the epithelial cells of the upper respiratory tracts of chickens, fucose-branched SAα2,3Gal glycans were detected, but not linear SAα2,3Gal glycans. The growth of Ck/IBR in MDCK-FUT cells, which were genetically prepared to express fucose-branched SAα2,3Gal glycans, was significantly higher than that in the parental MDCK cells. The present results indicate that fucose-branched SAα2,3Gal glycans existing on the epithelial cells lining the upper respiratory tracts of chickens are critical for recognition by Ck/IBR.

  6. Fungal Colonization of the Respiratory Tract in Allogeneic and Autologous Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients: A Study of 573 Transplanted Patients

    PubMed Central

    Markowski, Jarosław; Helbig, Grzegorz; Widziszowska, Agnieszka; Likus, Wirginia; Kyrcz-Krzemień, Sławomira; Jarosz, Urszula; Dziubdziela, Włodzimierz; Markiewicz, Mirosław

    2015-01-01

    Background Fungal colonization and infections remain a major cause of infection morbidity and mortality following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in patients with hematological malignancies. The aim of this study was to analyze the spectrum of fungal microflora of the respiratory tract (oral cavity, pharynx, epiglottis, and sputum) in patients undergoing HSCT and to evaluate the relationship between HSCT type and incidence of mycotic colonization and infections. Material/Methods Retrospective analysis of fungal isolates collected from the respiratory tract (oral cavity, pharynx, epiglottis, and sputum) of 573 patients undergoing HSCT was performed. Results The overall rate of fungal colonization in patients undergoing HSCT was 8.7%. Patients undergoing allogeneic HSCT were statistically significantly more often colonized (12.95%) compared to autologous HSCT recipients (4.7%). Colonizing cultures were mainly C. albicans and C. krusei, and sporadically C. glabrata, C. famata, Aspergillus spp. and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. C. albicans was the most frequent species found in isolates from the pharynx, sputum, and oral cavity collected from patients undergoing HSCT. Aspergillosis was more common after allogeneic than after autologous HSCT. The pharynx was the most frequently colonized site. Conclusions Allogeneic HSCT recipients are more susceptible to fungal infections compared to the autologous group. Selection of species during prophylaxis and antifungal therapy requires developing more effective prevention and treatment strategies based on new antifungal drugs and microbe-specific diagnoses. PMID:25907308

  7. Reducing general practice trainees' antibiotic prescribing for respiratory tract infections: an evaluation of a combined face-to-face workshop and online educational intervention.

    PubMed

    Magin, Parker J; Morgan, Simon; Tapley, Amanda; Davis, Joshua S; McArthur, Lawrie; Henderson, Kim M; Mulquiney, Katie J; Dallas, Anthea; Davey, Andrew R; Scott, John; van Driel, Mieke L

    2016-03-01

    Over-prescription of antibiotics for non-pneumonia respiratory tract infections (RTIs) is a major concern in general practice. Australian general practice registrars (trainees) have inappropriately high rates of prescription of antibiotics for RTIs. The 'apprenticeship' educational model and the trainee-trainer relationship are drivers of this inappropriate prescribing. We aimed to reduce registrars' non-pneumonia RTI antibiotic prescribing via an educational intervention (a 90-min face-to-face workshop supported by online modules), complemented by delivery of the same intervention, separately, to their trainers. We conducted a pre- and post-intervention comparison of the registrars' intention to prescribe antibiotics for common RTIs using McNemar's test. We similarly tested changes in supervisors' intended prescribing. Prescribing intentions were elicited by responses to six written clinical vignettes (upper