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Sample records for response curve shape

  1. Comparing Angular and Curved Shapes in Terms of Implicit Associations and Approach/Avoidance Responses.

    PubMed

    Palumbo, Letizia; Ruta, Nicole; Bertamini, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Most people prefer smoothly curved shapes over more angular shapes. We investigated the origin of this effect using abstract shapes and implicit measures of semantic association and preference. In Experiment 1 we used a multidimensional Implicit Association Test (IAT) to verify the strength of the association of curved and angular polygons with danger (safe vs. danger words), valence (positive vs. negative words) and gender (female vs. male names). Results showed that curved polygons were associated with safe and positive concepts and with female names, whereas angular polygons were associated with danger and negative concepts and with male names. Experiment 2 used a different implicit measure, which avoided any need to categorise the stimuli. Using a revised version of the Stimulus Response Compatibility (SRC) task we tested with a stick figure (i.e., the manikin) approach and avoidance reactions to curved and angular polygons. We found that RTs for approaching vs. avoiding angular polygons did not differ, even in the condition where the angles were more pronounced. By contrast participants were faster and more accurate when moving the manikin towards curved shapes. Experiment 2 suggests that preference for curvature cannot derive entirely from an association of angles with threat. We conclude that smoothly curved contours make these abstract shapes more pleasant. Further studies are needed to clarify the nature of such a preference.

  2. Comparing Angular and Curved Shapes in Terms of Implicit Associations and Approach/Avoidance Responses

    PubMed Central

    Palumbo, Letizia; Ruta, Nicole; Bertamini, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Most people prefer smoothly curved shapes over more angular shapes. We investigated the origin of this effect using abstract shapes and implicit measures of semantic association and preference. In Experiment 1 we used a multidimensional Implicit Association Test (IAT) to verify the strength of the association of curved and angular polygons with danger (safe vs. danger words), valence (positive vs. negative words) and gender (female vs. male names). Results showed that curved polygons were associated with safe and positive concepts and with female names, whereas angular polygons were associated with danger and negative concepts and with male names. Experiment 2 used a different implicit measure, which avoided any need to categorise the stimuli. Using a revised version of the Stimulus Response Compatibility (SRC) task we tested with a stick figure (i.e., the manikin) approach and avoidance reactions to curved and angular polygons. We found that RTs for approaching vs. avoiding angular polygons did not differ, even in the condition where the angles were more pronounced. By contrast participants were faster and more accurate when moving the manikin towards curved shapes. Experiment 2 suggests that preference for curvature cannot derive entirely from an association of angles with threat. We conclude that smoothly curved contours make these abstract shapes more pleasant. Further studies are needed to clarify the nature of such a preference. PMID:26460610

  3. Tornado-Shaped Curves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martínez, Sol Sáez; de la Rosa, Félix Martínez; Rojas, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    In Advanced Calculus, our students wonder if it is possible to graphically represent a tornado by means of a three-dimensional curve. In this paper, we show it is possible by providing the parametric equations of such tornado-shaped curves.

  4. Tornado-Shaped Curves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martínez, Sol Sáez; de la Rosa, Félix Martínez; Rojas, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    In Advanced Calculus, our students wonder if it is possible to graphically represent a tornado by means of a three-dimensional curve. In this paper, we show it is possible by providing the parametric equations of such tornado-shaped curves.

  5. Population variability in biological adaptive responses to DNA damage and the shapes of carcinogen dose-response curves

    SciTech Connect

    Conolly, Rory B. . E-mail: Conolly.Rory@epa.gov; Gaylor, David W.; Lutz, Werner K.

    2005-09-01

    Carcinogen dose-response curves for both ionizing radiation and chemicals are typically assumed to be linear at environmentally relevant doses. This assumption is used to ensure protection of the public health in the absence of relevant dose-response data. A theoretical justification for the assumption has been provided by the argument that low dose linearity is expected when an exogenous agent adds to an ongoing endogenous process. Here, we use computational modeling to evaluate (1) how two biological adaptive processes, induction of DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoint control, may affect the shapes of dose-response curves for DNA-damaging carcinogens and (2) how the resulting dose-response behaviors may vary within a population. Each model incorporating an adaptive process was capable of generating not only monotonic dose-responses but also nonmonotonic (J-shaped) and threshold responses. Monte Carlo analysis suggested that all these dose-response behaviors could coexist within a population, as the spectrum of qualitative differences arose from quantitative changes in parameter values. While this analysis is largely theoretical, it suggests that (a) accurate prediction of the qualitative form of the dose-response requires a quantitative understanding of the mechanism (b) significant uncertainty is associated with human health risk prediction in the absence of such quantitative understanding and (c) a stronger experimental and regulatory focus on biological mechanisms and interindividual variability would allow flexibility in regulatory treatment of environmental carcinogens without compromising human health.

  6. The risk of chronic myeloid leukemia: can the dose-response curve be U-shaped?

    PubMed

    Radivoyevitch, Tomas; Kozubek, Stanislav; Sachs, Rainer K

    2002-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is caused by a BCR-ABL chromosome translocation in a primitive hematopoietic stem cell. The number of hematopoietic stem cells in the body is thus a major factor in CML risk. Evidence suggests that the number of hematopoietic stem cells in the body is only loosely regulated, having a broad "dead-band" of physiologically acceptable values. The existence of a dead-band is important, because it would imply that low levels of hematopoietic stem cell killing can be permanent; i.e., it would imply that low doses of ionizing radiation can cause permanent reductions in the total number of CML target cells and thus permanent reductions in the subsequent risk of spontaneous CML. Such reductions in risk could be substantial if hematopoietic stem cells are also hypersensitive to radiation killing at low dose. Our calculations indicate that, due to dead-band hematopoietic stem cell control, if hematopoietic stem cells are as hypersensitive to killing at low doses as epithelial cells, reductions in the spontaneous CML risk could exceed the low-dose risks of induced CML; i.e., the net lifetime CML risk could have a U-shaped dose-response curve.

  7. Dual effects of phytoestrogens result in u-shaped dose-response curves.

    PubMed Central

    Almstrup, Kristian; Fernández, Mariana F; Petersen, Jørgen H; Olea, Nicolas; Skakkebaek, Niels E; Leffers, Henrik

    2002-01-01

    Endocrine disruptors can affect the endocrine system without directly interacting with receptors, for example, by interfering with the synthesis or metabolism of steroid hormones. The aromatase that converts testosterone to 17beta-estradiol is a possible target. In this paper we describe an assay that simultaneously detects aromatase inhibition and estrogenicity. The principle is similar to that of other MCF-7 estrogenicity assays, but with a fixed amount of testosterone added. The endogenous aromatase activity in MCF-7 cells converts some of the testosterone to 17beta-estradiol, which is assayed by quantifying differences in the expression level of the estrogen-induced pS2 mRNA. Potential aromatase inhibitors can be identified by a dose-dependent reduction in the pS2 mRNA expression level after exposure to testosterone and the test compound. Using this assay, we have investigated several compounds, including synthetic chemicals and phytoestrogens, for aromatase inhibition. The phytoestrogens, except genistein, were aromatase inhibitors at low concentrations (< 1 micro M) but estrogenic at higher concentrations (greater than or equal to 1 micro M), resulting in U-shaped dose-response curves. None of the tested synthetic chemicals were aromatase inhibitors. The low-dose aromatase inhibition distinguished phytoestrogens from other estrogenic compounds and may partly explain reports about antiestrogenic properties of phytoestrogens. Aromatase inhibition may play an important role in the protective effects of phytoestrogens against breast cancer. PMID:12153753

  8. The shape of the glucose response curve during an oral glucose tolerance test heralds biomarkers of type 2 diabetes risk in obese youth

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The shape of the glucose response curve during an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), monophasic versus biphasic, identifies physiologically distinct groups of individuals with differences in insulin secretion and sensitivity. We aimed to verify the value of the OGTT-glucose response curve against m...

  9. Transforming Curves into Curves with the Same Shape.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Michael V.

    Curves are considered to have the same shape when they are related by a similarity transformation of a certain kind. This paper extends earlier work on parallel curves to curves with the same shape. Some examples are given more or less explicitly. A generalization is used to show that the theory is ordinal and to show how the theory may be applied…

  10. A study of the shape of dose-response curves for acute lethality at low response: a megadaphnia study'

    SciTech Connect

    Sebaugh, J.L.; Wilson, J.D.; Tucker, M.W.; Adams, W.J. )

    1991-12-01

    Dose-response curves were developed for the immobilization response in Daphnia magna to four toxicants. The purpose of this work was to study the effect of the form of the model and the number of concentration levels used on the estimates of typical low-dose effective concentrations (1%, 5%, 10%). The generalized four-parameter logistic model was used as the reference. When using 12 concentration levels, one of the logistic family two- or three-parameter models was shown reliably to represent each of these various sets of dose-response data, and to provide adequate estimates of EC01 and EC05, as well as EC10 and EC50. For two of the toxicants, an asymmetric model was required. When reducing the number of concentrations to five, the EC10 and EC50 were well estimated by the probit model, with acceptable results at the EC05 level.

  11. Inverse U-shaped curve for age dependency of torsional eye movement responses to galvanic vestibular stimulation.

    PubMed

    Jahn, Klaus; Naessl, Andrea; Schneider, Erich; Strupp, Michael; Brandt, Thomas; Dieterich, Marianne

    2003-07-01

    To investigate age dependent changes we analysed torsional eye movement responses to binaural and monaural galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) in 57 healthy subjects (20-69 years old). GVS (1-3 mA) induced torsional eye movements consisting of static torsion toward the anode (amplitude 1-6 degrees ) and superimposed torsional nystagmus (slow phase velocity 0.5-3 degrees /s, quick phase amplitude 0.5-2 degrees, nystagmus frequency 0.75-1.5 s-1). Static ocular torsion and torsional nystagmus increased from the third to the sixth decade and decreased in older subjects, e.g. slow phase velocity increased from 1.5 degrees /s (20-29 years) to 2.9 degrees /s (50-59 years) and decreased to 2.5 degrees /s for the seventh decade (60-69 years). Thus, an inverse U-shaped curve was found for the dependence of torsional eye movement responses on age. All structures relevant for vestibular function degenerate with age, but at varying times. Since hair cell loss precedes those seen in the vestibular nerve and Scarpa's ganglion, the decrease in hair cell counts could be compensated for by increased sensitivity of afferent nerve fibres or central mechanisms. Increased sensitivity could thus maintain normal function despite reduced peripheral input. As GVS acts at the vestibular nerve (thereby bypassing the hair cells), electrical stimulation should be more efficient in subjects with the beginning of hair cell degeneration, as seen in our data up to the sixth decade. The degeneration of nerve fibres, ganglion cells and central neurons becomes evident at older ages. Thus, the compensatory increase in sensitivity breaks down and GVS-induced eye movements decline-a finding that is reflected by the inverse U-shaped curve for age dependency presented in this study.

  12. Flexible Meta-Regression to Assess the Shape of the Benzene–Leukemia Exposure–Response Curve

    PubMed Central

    Vlaanderen, Jelle; Portengen, Lützen; Rothman, Nathaniel; Lan, Qing; Kromhout, Hans; Vermeulen, Roel

    2010-01-01

    Background Previous evaluations of the shape of the benzene–leukemia exposure–response curve (ERC) were based on a single set or on small sets of human occupational studies. Integrating evidence from all available studies that are of sufficient quality combined with flexible meta-regression models is likely to provide better insight into the functional relation between benzene exposure and risk of leukemia. Objectives We used natural splines in a flexible meta-regression method to assess the shape of the benzene–leukemia ERC. Methods We fitted meta-regression models to 30 aggregated risk estimates extracted from nine human observational studies and performed sensitivity analyses to assess the impact of a priori assessed study characteristics on the predicted ERC. Results The natural spline showed a supralinear shape at cumulative exposures less than 100 ppm-years, although this model fitted the data only marginally better than a linear model (p = 0.06). Stratification based on study design and jackknifing indicated that the cohort studies had a considerable impact on the shape of the ERC at high exposure levels (> 100 ppm-years) but that predicted risks for the low exposure range (< 50 ppm-years) were robust. Conclusions Although limited by the small number of studies and the large heterogeneity between studies, the inclusion of all studies of sufficient quality combined with a flexible meta-regression method provides the most comprehensive evaluation of the benzene–leukemia ERC to date. The natural spline based on all data indicates a significantly increased risk of leukemia [relative risk (RR) = 1.14; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.04–1.26] at an exposure level as low as 10 ppm-years. PMID:20064779

  13. Shape Preserving Interpolation by Curves

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-07-01

    curves Given data 1i E R2 , i = 0,..., N, we consider a curve r : [a, b] -- R2 satisfying r(ti) = Ii , i = 0,..., N, (3.1) for values a = to < tj...tN = b. For a closed curve the situation is extended periodically so that Ii +N =10, ti+N =ti, i E Z, r(t+b-a) =r(t), tc R. 3.1 Desirable properties...para- meterisation). When all vi = 0, r will reduce to the usual C2 cubic spline interpolant. As vi --+ oc, the curve is ’pulled tight’ at Ii and as

  14. Cellinoid shape model for multiple light curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xiao-Ping; Ip, Wing-Huen

    2015-04-01

    Extended from the ellipsoid shape, cellinoid shape model consists of eight octants from eight different ellipsoids with the constraint that the adjacent octants have the same semi-axes in common. With the asymmetric shape, cellinoid shape model could be adopted in simulating the irregular shapes of asteroids. In this article, we attempt to apply cellinoid shape model to multiple light curves observed in various geometries and present some techniques to make the whole inverse process more efficient. Finally numerical experiments confirm that cellinoid shape model could derive the physical parameters of asteroids from both of synthetic and real light curves.

  15. Inverted U-Shaped Dose-Response Curve of the Anxiolytic Effect of Cannabidiol during Public Speaking in Real Life

    PubMed Central

    Zuardi, Antonio W.; Rodrigues, Natália P.; Silva, Angélica L.; Bernardo, Sandra A.; Hallak, Jaime E. C.; Guimarães, Francisco S.; Crippa, José A. S.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the anxiolytic effect of cannabidiol (CBD) in humans follows the same pattern of an inverted U-shaped dose-effect curve observed in many animal studies. Sixty healthy subjects of both sexes aged between 18 and 35 years were randomly assigned to five groups that received placebo, clonazepam (1 mg), and CBD (100, 300, and 900 mg). The subjects were underwent a test of public speaking in a real situation (TPSRS) where each subject had to speak in front of a group formed by the remaining participants. Each subject completed the anxiety and sedation factors of the Visual Analog Mood Scale and had their blood pressure and heart rate recorded. These measures were obtained in five experimental sessions with 12 volunteers each. Each session had four steps at the following times (minutes) after administration of the drug/placebo, as time 0: -5 (baseline), 80 (pre-test), 153 (speech), and 216 (post-speech). Repeated-measures analyses of variance showed that the TPSRS increased the subjective measures of anxiety, heart rate, and blood pressure. Student-Newman-Keuls test comparisons among the groups in each phase showed significant attenuation in anxiety scores relative to the placebo group in the group treated with clonazepam during the speech phase, and in the clonazepam and CBD 300 mg groups in the post-speech phase. Clonazepam was more sedative than CBD 300 and 900 mg and induced a smaller increase in systolic and diastolic blood pressure than CBD 300 mg. The results confirmed that the acute administration of CBD induced anxiolytic effects with a dose-dependent inverted U-shaped curve in healthy subjects, since the subjective anxiety measures were reduced with CBD 300 mg, but not with CBD 100 and 900 mg, in the post-speech phase. PMID:28553229

  16. Inverted U-Shaped Dose-Response Curve of the Anxiolytic Effect of Cannabidiol during Public Speaking in Real Life.

    PubMed

    Zuardi, Antonio W; Rodrigues, Natália P; Silva, Angélica L; Bernardo, Sandra A; Hallak, Jaime E C; Guimarães, Francisco S; Crippa, José A S

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the anxiolytic effect of cannabidiol (CBD) in humans follows the same pattern of an inverted U-shaped dose-effect curve observed in many animal studies. Sixty healthy subjects of both sexes aged between 18 and 35 years were randomly assigned to five groups that received placebo, clonazepam (1 mg), and CBD (100, 300, and 900 mg). The subjects were underwent a test of public speaking in a real situation (TPSRS) where each subject had to speak in front of a group formed by the remaining participants. Each subject completed the anxiety and sedation factors of the Visual Analog Mood Scale and had their blood pressure and heart rate recorded. These measures were obtained in five experimental sessions with 12 volunteers each. Each session had four steps at the following times (minutes) after administration of the drug/placebo, as time 0: -5 (baseline), 80 (pre-test), 153 (speech), and 216 (post-speech). Repeated-measures analyses of variance showed that the TPSRS increased the subjective measures of anxiety, heart rate, and blood pressure. Student-Newman-Keuls test comparisons among the groups in each phase showed significant attenuation in anxiety scores relative to the placebo group in the group treated with clonazepam during the speech phase, and in the clonazepam and CBD 300 mg groups in the post-speech phase. Clonazepam was more sedative than CBD 300 and 900 mg and induced a smaller increase in systolic and diastolic blood pressure than CBD 300 mg. The results confirmed that the acute administration of CBD induced anxiolytic effects with a dose-dependent inverted U-shaped curve in healthy subjects, since the subjective anxiety measures were reduced with CBD 300 mg, but not with CBD 100 and 900 mg, in the post-speech phase.

  17. Shaped curve by blending two circular arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakaria, Wan Zafira Ezza Wan; Ali, Jamaludin Md

    2014-07-01

    Segments of two given circular arcs can be blended to produce a segment of a new curve. The new curve that been produced which also known as blending curve is form in a C-shape. That's mean the two circular arcs are blend at the same endpoints. Bezier Curve refer to [1] is the main application in this construction of blending curve. As the two circular arcs are create using the Rational Bezier Curve for the shape refer to [2]. First degree of Bezier Curve is use in blending function along with functionH(t). Blending can provide a smooth transition from one curve to another and can give various degrees of smoothness at the endpoints of the blend, where the smoothness is measured analogously to parametric continuity, Cn and geometric continuity, Gn. The accuracy of the approximation to a best blending curve obtained by different blending formulas is compared via analysis. Two types of blending formula introduced, which are Blend A and B. Blend A which involve only parametric continuity, C0, C1 and C2 Blend A. Next, new blending formula known as Blend B which actually a correction to the C0 Blend A. So, some correction term are added to the blending function in C0 Blend A for obtaining parametric continuity, C1 and C2 Blend B. Then, geometric continuity use for Blend B by increasing the smoothness of blending curve that result in parametric continuity. Some free parameter are added to the original blending function of C1 and C2 Blend B and secure to be G1 and G2 Blend B. Finally, the curvature which measures how quickly a tangent line turns on a curve is applied. So, appropriate result of blending curve can be obtained through the observation of the shape which lies within the convex hull of their control points and its curvature value at the start and end points equal to the curvature of the two circular arcs that are being blended.

  18. Shape of concentration-response curves between long-term particulate matter exposure and morbidities of chronic bronchitis: a review of epidemiological evidence

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Li; Yu, Li-Ya; Mu, Hui-Juan; Xing, Li-Ying; Li, Yan-Xia

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies have assessed the concentration-response (C-R) relationships between long-term exposure to particulate matter (PM) and mortality from cardiopulmonary diseases, but few studies have evaluated the C-R relationships between PM exposure and morbidity of chronic respiratory diseases or their symptoms, and to date no systematic review has been published on the characteristics of the C-R curves between PM exposure and respiratory disease morbidity. Screening of all available studies in Medline identified ten studies with figures or scatter plots showing the C-R relationships between PM exposure and chronic bronchitis or chronic cough/phlegm. The C-R relationships showed ballistic ‘S’ shaped curves, linear in the low to moderate PM range and flattening out in the high PM range. Moreover, the shape and level of the C-R curves differed markedly between susceptible and nonsusceptible populations. New evidence from a prospective cohort study confirmed that the C-R relationship between PM reduction and beneficial effects on respiratory health may be due to the decreased incidence of respiratory symptoms and increased recovery in individuals with symptoms of bronchitis. Additional studies are needed to assess the C-R relationships between different PM contents and chronic health parameters, especially in geographic areas with high PM pollution and in more susceptible populations. Evidence from prospective cohort studies in developing countries with areas of high PM pollution may help evaluate the burden of chronic respiratory disease attributable to PM pollution and air quality standards. PMID:25383206

  19. Mysteries of LiF TLD response following high ionisation density irradiation: nanodosimetry and track structure theory, dose response and glow curve shapes

    PubMed Central

    Horowitz, Y.; Fuks, E.; Datz, H.; Oster, L.; Livingstone, J.; Rosenfeld, A.

    2011-01-01

    Three outstanding effects of ionisation density on the thermoluminescence (TL) mechanisms giving rise to the glow peaks of LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD-100) are currently under investigation: (1) the dependence of the heavy charged particle (HCP) relative efficiency with increasing ionisation density and the effectiveness of its modelling by track structure theory (TST), (2) the behaviour of the TL efficiency, f(D), as a function of photon energy and dose. These studies are intended to promote the development of a firm theoretical basis for the evaluation of relative TL efficiencies to assist in their application in mixed radiation fields. And (3) the shape of composite peak 5 in the glow curve for various HCP types and energies and following high-dose electron irradiation, i.e. the ratio of the intensity of peak 5a to peak 5. Peak 5a is a low-temperature satellite of peak 5 arising from electron-hole capture in a spatially correlated trapping centre/luminescent centre (TC/LC) complex that has been suggested to possess a potential as a solid-state nanodosemeter due to the preferential electron/hole population of the TC/LC at high ionisation density. It is concluded that (1) the predictions of TST are very strongly dependent on the choice of photon energy used in the determination of f(D); (2) modified TST employing calculated values of f(D) at 2 keV is in agreement with 5-MeV alpha particle experimental results for composite peak 5 but underestimates the 1.5-MeV proton relative efficiencies. Both the proton and alpha particle relative TL efficiencies of the high-temperature TL (HTTL) peaks 7 and 8 are underestimated by an order of magnitude suggesting that the HTTL efficiencies are affected by other factors in addition to radial electron dose; (3) the dose–response supralinearity of peaks 7 and 8 change rapidly with photon energy: this behaviour is explained in the framework of the unified interaction model as due to a very strong dependence on photon energy of the relative

  20. Mysteries of LiF TLD response following high ionisation density irradiation: nanodosimetry and track structure theory, dose response and glow curve shapes.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, Y; Fuks, E; Datz, H; Oster, L; Livingstone, J; Rosenfeld, A

    2011-06-01

    Three outstanding effects of ionisation density on the thermoluminescence (TL) mechanisms giving rise to the glow peaks of LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD-100) are currently under investigation: (1) the dependence of the heavy charged particle (HCP) relative efficiency with increasing ionisation density and the effectiveness of its modelling by track structure theory (TST), (2) the behaviour of the TL efficiency, f(D), as a function of photon energy and dose. These studies are intended to promote the development of a firm theoretical basis for the evaluation of relative TL efficiencies to assist in their application in mixed radiation fields. And (3) the shape of composite peak 5 in the glow curve for various HCP types and energies and following high-dose electron irradiation, i.e. the ratio of the intensity of peak 5a to peak 5. Peak 5a is a low-temperature satellite of peak 5 arising from electron-hole capture in a spatially correlated trapping centre/luminescent centre (TC/LC) complex that has been suggested to possess a potential as a solid-state nanodosemeter due to the preferential electron/hole population of the TC/LC at high ionisation density. It is concluded that (1) the predictions of TST are very strongly dependent on the choice of photon energy used in the determination of f(D); (2) modified TST employing calculated values of f(D) at 2 keV is in agreement with 5-MeV alpha particle experimental results for composite peak 5 but underestimates the 1.5-MeV proton relative efficiencies. Both the proton and alpha particle relative TL efficiencies of the high-temperature TL (HTTL) peaks 7 and 8 are underestimated by an order of magnitude suggesting that the HTTL efficiencies are affected by other factors in addition to radial electron dose; (3) the dose-response supralinearity of peaks 7 and 8 change rapidly with photon energy: this behaviour is explained in the framework of the unified interaction model as due to a very strong dependence on photon energy of the relative

  1. Stochastic basis for curve shape, RBE and temporal dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, V.P.

    1982-08-10

    This paper uses biophysical-microdosimetric quantities, measured in a physical surrogate or phantom cell, to explain the shape of absorbed dose-quantal cell response curves, the role of radiation quality and the influence of dose rate. Responses expected are explored first in simple autonomous cell systems, followed by increasingly-complex systems. Complications seen with increasingly-complex systems appear to be confined largely to the higher dose and dose rate ranges.

  2. For whom the bell (curve) tolls: cortisol rapidly affects memory retrieval by an inverted U-shaped dose-response relationship.

    PubMed

    Schilling, Thomas M; Kölsch, Monika; Larra, Mauro F; Zech, Carina M; Blumenthal, Terry D; Frings, Christian; Schächinger, Hartmut

    2013-09-01

    Stress and cortisol are generally considered to impair declarative memory retrieval, although opposite results have also been reported. Dose-dependent effects and differences between genomic and non-genomic cortisol effects are possible reasons for these discrepancies. The aim of the current experiment was to assess the non-genomic effects of escalating doses of intravenous cortisol on cued recall of socially relevant information in humans. 40 participants (age range 20-30 years; 20 females) learned associations between male faces with a neutral facial expression and descriptions of either positive or negative social behaviors and were tested one week later in a cued recall paradigm. Escalating doses of cortisol (0, 3, 6, 12, 24 mg) were administered 8 min before testing according to a between-subjects design. An inverted U-shaped dose-response relationship between salivary cortisol levels and recall performance was observed, with moderate elevation of salivary cortisol resulting in the best recall performance. This is the first study in humans demonstrating that cortisol rapidly modulates declarative memory retrieval via a dose-dependent, non-genomic mechanism that follows an inverted U-shaped curve. Our result further emphasizes the importance of fast cortisol effects for human cognition.

  3. Piecewise quartic polynomial curves with a local shape parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xuli

    2006-10-01

    Piecewise quartic polynomial curves with a local shape parameter are presented in this paper. The given blending function is an extension of the cubic uniform B-splines. The changes of a local shape parameter will only change two curve segments. With the increase of the value of a shape parameter, the curves approach a corresponding control point. The given curves possess satisfying shape-preserving properties. The given curve can also be used to interpolate locally the control points with GC2 continuity. Thus, the given curves unify the representation of the curves for interpolating and approximating the control polygon. As an application, the piecewise polynomial curves can intersect an ellipse at different knot values by choosing the value of the shape parameter. The given curve can approximate an ellipse from the both sides and can then yield a tight envelope for an ellipse. Some computing examples for curve design are given.

  4. U-shaped dose-response curves: implications for risk characterization of essential elements and other chemicals.

    PubMed

    Douron, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The existing risk assessment and management model is a general framework that can incorporate the assessment of numerous types of chemicals, such as essential elements. The general nature of the framework, however, often precludes precise statements of risk and only gives assurances of accuracy by way of a judicious use of conservative assumptions. A mode-of-action framework may provide approaches that are both more precise and accurate, and that may be used for characterizing both risk and benefit of essential elements, but such a framework needs to address the differing severity of adverse effects. Current dose-response data gaps often hinder the evaluation of the risk and benefit of several essential elements; however, new modeling methods, such as categorical regression, need to be further explored. Finally, the essentiality of certain elements provides evidence that two thresholds likely exist in an individual for adverse effect, one at low doses for undernutrition, and another at high doses for toxicity, for the element of concern. This evidence may aid in the estimation of such thresholds in populations.

  5. U-Shaped Curves in Development: A PDP Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Timothy T.; Rakison, David H.; McClelland, James L.

    2004-01-01

    As the articles in this issue attest, U-shaped curves in development have stimulated a wide spectrum of research across disparate task domains and age groups and have provoked a variety of ideas about their origins and theoretical significance. In the authors' view, the ubiquity of the general pattern suggests that U-shaped curves can arise from…

  6. U-Shaped Curves in Development: A PDP Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Timothy T.; Rakison, David H.; McClelland, James L.

    2004-01-01

    As the articles in this issue attest, U-shaped curves in development have stimulated a wide spectrum of research across disparate task domains and age groups and have provoked a variety of ideas about their origins and theoretical significance. In the authors' view, the ubiquity of the general pattern suggests that U-shaped curves can arise from…

  7. Exercise, oxidants, and antioxidants change the shape of the bell-shaped hormesis curve.

    PubMed

    Radak, Zsolt; Ishihara, Kazunari; Tekus, Eva; Varga, Csaba; Posa, Aniko; Balogh, Laszlo; Boldogh, Istvan; Koltai, Erika

    2017-03-03

    It is debated whether exercise-induced ROS production is obligatory to cause adaptive response. It is also claimed that antioxidant treatment could eliminate the adaptive response, which appears to be systemic and reportedly reduces the incidence of a wide range of diseases. Here we suggest that if the antioxidant treatment occurs before the physiological function-ROS dose-response curve reaches peak level, the antioxidants can attenuate function. On the other hand, if the antioxidant treatment takes place after the summit of the bell-shaped dose response curve, antioxidant treatment would have beneficial effects on function. We suggest that the effects of antioxidant treatment are dependent on the intensity of exercise, since the adaptive response, which is multi pathway dependent, is strongly influenced by exercise intensity. It is further suggested that levels of ROS concentration are associated with peak physiological function and can be extended by physical fitness level and this could be the basis for exercise pre-conditioning. Physical inactivity, aging or pathological disorders increase the sensitivity to oxidative stress by altering the bell-shaped dose response curve.

  8. Bézier curves on the shape sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiev, Georgi H.

    2012-11-01

    There are two important models of the simplicial shape space of order (2,3). The first model introduced by D. Kendall is a two-dimensional sphere with radius 1/2. Therefore, this model is called the shape sphere. The second model introduced by F. Bookstein is a one-point extension of the Euclidean plane. Using a natural conformal mapping between these models we investigate curves on the shape sphere which correspond to Bézier curves in the Euclidean plane. We also describe two different types of rational spherical curves and their plane pre-images.

  9. Kinetic Modeling Reveals the Roles of Reactive Oxygen Species Scavenging and DNA Repair Processes in Shaping the Dose-Response Curve of KBrO₃-Induced DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    Spassova, Maria A; Miller, David J; Nikolov, Alexander S

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a kinetic model to investigate how DNA repair processes and scavengers of reactive oxygen species (ROS) can affect the dose-response shape of prooxidant induced DNA damage. We used as an example chemical KBrO3 which is activated by glutathione and forms reactive intermediates that directly interact with DNA to form 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine DNA adducts (8-OH-dG). The single strand breaks (SSB) that can result from failed base excision repair of these adducts were considered as an effect downstream from 8-OH-dG. We previously demonstrated that, in the presence of effective base excision repair, 8-OH-dG can exhibit threshold-like dose-response dependence, while the downstream SSB can still exhibit a linear dose-response. Here we demonstrate that this result holds for a variety of conditions, including low levels of GSH, the presence of additional SSB repair mechanisms, or a scavenger. It has been shown that melatonin, a terminal scavenger, inhibits KBrO3-caused oxidative damage. Our modeling revealed that sustained exposure to KBrO3 can lead to fast scavenger exhaustion, in which case the dose-response shapes for both endpoints are not substantially affected. The results are important to consider when forming conclusions on a chemical's toxicity dose dependence based on the dose-response of early genotoxic events.

  10. Mapping morphological shape as a high-dimensional functional curve.

    PubMed

    Fu, Guifang; Huang, Mian; Bo, Wenhao; Hao, Han; Wu, Rongling

    2017-01-06

    Detecting how genes regulate biological shape has become a multidisciplinary research interest because of its wide application in many disciplines. Despite its fundamental importance, the challenges of accurately extracting information from an image, statistically modeling the high-dimensional shape and meticulously locating shape quantitative trait loci (QTL) affect the progress of this research. In this article, we propose a novel integrated framework that incorporates shape analysis, statistical curve modeling and genetic mapping to detect significant QTLs regulating variation of biological shape traits. After quantifying morphological shape via a radius centroid contour approach, each shape, as a phenotype, was characterized as a high-dimensional curve, varying as angle θ runs clockwise with the first point starting from angle zero. We then modeled the dynamic trajectories of three mean curves and variation patterns as functions of θ Our framework led to the detection of a few significant QTLs regulating the variation of leaf shape collected from a natural population of poplar, Populus szechuanica var tibetica This population, distributed at altitudes 2000-4500 m above sea level, is an evolutionarily important plant species. This is the first work in the quantitative genetic shape mapping area that emphasizes a sense of 'function' instead of decomposing the shape into a few discrete principal components, as the majority of shape studies do. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Folding DNA into Twisted and Curved Nanoscale Shapes

    PubMed Central

    Dietz, Hendrik; Douglas, Shawn M.; Shih, William M.

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate the ability to engineer complex shapes that twist and curve at the nanoscale from DNA. Through programmable self-assembly, strands of DNA are directed to form a custom-shaped bundle of tightly crosslinked double helices, arrayed in parallel to their helical axes. Targeted insertions and deletions of base pairs cause the DNA bundles to develop twist of either handedness or to curve. The degree of curvature could be quantitatively controlled, and a radius of curvature as tight as 6 nanometers was achieved. We also combined multiple curved elements to build several different types of intricate nanostructures, such as a wireframe beach ball or square-toothed gears. PMID:19661424

  12. Angular Versus Curved Shapes: Correspondences and Emotional Processing.

    PubMed

    Blazhenkova, Olesya; Kumar, Melisa Maya

    2017-01-01

    The present work aimed to systematically examine sensory and higher level correspondences to angular and curved shapes. Participants matched angular and curved abstract shapes to sensory experiences in five different modalities as well as to emotion, gender, and name attributes presented as written labels (Study 1) and real experiences (Study 2). The results demonstrated nonarbitrary mapping of angular and curved shapes to attributes from all basic sensory modalities (vision, audition, gustation, olfaction, and tactation) and higher level attributes (emotion, gender, and name). Participants associated curved shapes with sweet taste, quiet or calm sound, vanilla smell, green color, smooth texture, relieved emotion, female gender, and wide-vowel names. In contrast, they associated angular shapes with sour taste, loud or dynamic sound, spicy or citrus smell, red color, rough texture, excited or surprise emotion, male gender, and narrow-vowel names. These prevalent correspondences were robust across different shape pairs as well as all sensory and higher level attributes, presented as both verbal labels and real sensory experiences. The second goal of this research was to examine the relationship between the shape correspondences and individual differences in emotional processing, assessed by self-report and performance measures. The results suggest that heightened emotional ability is associated with making shape attributions that go along with the found prevalent trends.

  13. Trends in scale and shape of survival curves.

    PubMed

    Weon, Byung Mook; Je, Jung Ho

    2012-01-01

    The ageing of the population is an issue in wealthy countries worldwide because of increasing costs for health care and welfare. Survival curves taken from demographic life tables may help shed light on the hypotheses that humans are living longer and that human populations are growing older. We describe a methodology that enables us to obtain separate measurements of scale and shape variances in survival curves. Specifically, 'living longer' is associated with the scale variance of survival curves, whereas 'growing older' is associated with the shape variance. We show how the scale and shape of survival curves have changed over time during recent decades, based on period and cohort female life tables for selected wealthy countries. Our methodology will be useful for performing better tracking of ageing statistics and it is possible that this methodology can help identify the causes of current trends in human ageing.

  14. Wavefront shaping through emulated curved space in waveguide settings

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Chong; Bekenstein, Rivka; Liu, Hui; Zhu, Shining; Segev, Mordechai

    2016-01-01

    The past decade has witnessed remarkable progress in wavefront shaping, including shaping of beams in free space, of plasmonic wavepackets and of electronic wavefunctions. In all of these, the wavefront shaping was achieved by external means such as masks, gratings and reflection from metasurfaces. Here, we propose wavefront shaping by exploiting general relativity (GR) effects in waveguide settings. We demonstrate beam shaping within dielectric slab samples with predesigned refractive index varying so as to create curved space environment for light. We use this technique to construct very narrow non-diffracting beams and shape-invariant beams accelerating on arbitrary trajectories. Importantly, the beam transformations occur within a mere distance of 40 wavelengths, suggesting that GR can inspire any wavefront shaping in highly tight waveguide settings. In such settings, we demonstrate Einstein's Rings: a phenomenon dating back to 1936. PMID:26899285

  15. The shape and mechanics of curved-fold origami structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, Marcelo A.; Santangelo, Christian D.

    2012-12-01

    We develop recursion equations to describe the three-dimensional shape of a sheet upon which a series of concentric curved folds have been inscribed. In the case of no stretching outside the fold, the three-dimensional shape of a single fold prescribes the shape of the entire origami structure. To better explore these structures, we derive continuum equations, valid in the limit of vanishing spacing between folds, to describe the smooth surface intersecting all the mountain folds. We find that this surface has negative Gaussian curvature with magnitude equal to the square of the fold's torsion. A series of open folds with constant fold angle generate a helicoid.

  16. Factors Affecting the Shape of Current-Potential Curves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maloy, J. T.

    1983-01-01

    Voltammetry, the fundamental electrochemical experiment, is the measurement of the current which flows at an electrode as a function of the potential applied to the electrode. Such an experiment is discussed, focusing on factors which influence the shape of the current potential curve. (JN)

  17. The Crystalline Dynamics of Spiral-Shaped Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudziński, Marcin; Górka, Przemysław

    2015-07-01

    We study the motion of spiral-shaped polygonal curves by crystalline curvature. We describe this dynamics by the corresponding infinitely dimensional system of ordinary differential equations and show that the considered model is uniquely solvable. Banach's Contraction Mapping Theorem and the Bellman-Gronwall inequality are the main tools applied in our proof.

  18. Shaping the learning curve: epigenetic dynamics in neural plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Bronfman, Zohar Z.; Ginsburg, Simona; Jablonka, Eva

    2014-01-01

    A key characteristic of learning and neural plasticity is state-dependent acquisition dynamics reflected by the non-linear learning curve that links increase in learning with practice. Here we propose that the manner by which epigenetic states of individual cells change during learning contributes to the shape of the neural and behavioral learning curve. We base our suggestion on recent studies showing that epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation, histone acetylation, and RNA-mediated gene regulation are intimately involved in the establishment and maintenance of long-term neural plasticity, reflecting specific learning-histories and influencing future learning. Our model, which is the first to suggest a dynamic molecular account of the shape of the learning curve, leads to several testable predictions regarding the link between epigenetic dynamics at the promoter, gene-network, and neural-network levels. This perspective opens up new avenues for therapeutic interventions in neurological pathologies. PMID:25071483

  19. The equilibrium shape of bubbles on curved interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, James; Poe, Daniel; Walls, Peter

    2016-11-01

    The equilibrium shape for a bubble resting at a free surface depends on a balance of hydrostatic and capillary forces, with the smallest bubbles approximating a sphere and a hemisphere for the largest. This shape has been shown to be important to several processes ranging from gas transfer across the thin film cap to the production of jet droplets. Past works calculating the equilibrium shape assume that the interface is flat. However, there are instances where the curvature of the boundary may be comparable to the bubble itself. For example, a bubble bursting on the surface of a rain droplet. Here we relax the assumption of a flat interface and extend the classic bubble shape calculations to account for a curved interface boundary. An understanding of the extent of this deformation and the precise equilibrium bubble shape is important to applications in fields ranging from air-sea exchange to combustion dynamics. We acknowledge financial support from NSF Grant No. 1351466.

  20. Rapid analysis of fold shape using Bézier curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Deepak C.; Lisle, Richard J.

    2004-09-01

    We approximate and classify the forms of profile sections of folded surfaces by comparison with cubic Bézier curves. The method analyses a digital image of the fold profile, by interactive visual comparison, with the curves generated by the Bézier drawing tool available commonly in graphics software products. Simplified equations of cubic Bézier curves form the basis of the classification in terms of two parameters. The first parameter, L, is related to the distribution of curvature on a single limb of a fold between the hinge point and the inflection point. It places the fold within a shape spectrum that ranges from straight-limbed chevron folds ( L=0) in which curvature is concentrated in the hinge region through to rounded folds with a uniform curvature distribution ( L=1). The second parameter, R, is related to the ratio of amplitude to wavelength. A graph of L against R serves to group samples of folds into 'shape groups'. This classification can be used as a tool to assist the determination of relative competence of folded layers and of the folding mechanism. The new method, which has the advantages of speed and simplicity, is applied to examples of natural and experimentally developed folds to demonstrate its versatility for analysing a wide range of fold geometries.

  1. Drop shape visualization and contact angle measurement on curved surfaces.

    PubMed

    Guilizzoni, Manfredo

    2011-12-01

    The shape and contact angles of drops on curved surfaces is experimentally investigated. Image processing, spline fitting and numerical integration are used to extract the drop contour in a number of cross-sections. The three-dimensional surfaces which describe the surface-air and drop-air interfaces can be visualized and a simple procedure to determine the equilibrium contact angle starting from measurements on curved surfaces is proposed. Contact angles on flat surfaces serve as a reference term and a procedure to measure them is proposed. Such procedure is not as accurate as the axisymmetric drop shape analysis algorithms, but it has the advantage of requiring only a side view of the drop-surface couple and no further information. It can therefore be used also for fluids with unknown surface tension and there is no need to measure the drop volume. Examples of application of the proposed techniques for distilled water drops on gemstones confirm that they can be useful for drop shape analysis and contact angle measurement on three-dimensional sculptured surfaces. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Pump function curve shape for a model lymphatic vessel.

    PubMed

    Bertram, C D; Macaskill, C; Moore, J E

    2016-07-01

    The transport capacity of a contractile segment of lymphatic vessel is defined by its pump function curve relating mean flow-rate and adverse pressure difference. Numerous system characteristics affect curve shape and the magnitude of the generated flow-rates and pressures. Some cannot be varied experimentally, but their separate and interacting effects can be systematically revealed numerically. This paper explores variations in the rate of change of active tension and the form of the relation between active tension and muscle length, factors not known from experiment to functional precision. Whether the pump function curve bends toward or away from the origin depends partly on the curvature of the passive pressure-diameter relation near zero transmural pressure, but rather more on the form of the relation between active tension and muscle length. A pump function curve bending away from the origin defines a well-performing pump by maximum steady output power. This behaviour is favoured by a length/active-tension relationship which sustains tension at smaller lengths. Such a relationship also favours high peak mechanical efficiency, defined as output power divided by the input power obtained from the lymphangion diameter changes and active-tension time-course. The results highlight the need to pin down experimentally the form of the length/active-tension relationship.

  3. Nonmonotonic Dose-Response Curves and Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals: Fact or Falderal?**

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nonmonotonic Dose-Response Curves and Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals: Fact or Falderal? The shape of the dose response curve in the low dose region has been debated since the 1940s, originally focusing on linear no threshold (LNT) versus threshold responses for cancer and noncanc...

  4. Nonmonotonic Dose-Response Curves and Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals: Fact or Falderal?**

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nonmonotonic Dose-Response Curves and Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals: Fact or Falderal? The shape of the dose response curve in the low dose region has been debated since the 1940s, originally focusing on linear no threshold (LNT) versus threshold responses for cancer and noncanc...

  5. Shape Selection of Surface-Bound Helical Filaments: Biopolymers on Curved Membranes.

    PubMed

    Quint, David A; Gopinathan, Ajay; Grason, Gregory M

    2016-10-04

    Motivated to understand the behavior of biological filaments interacting with membranes of various types, we employ a theoretical model for the shape and thermodynamics of intrinsically helical filaments bound to curved membranes. We show that filament-surface interactions lead to a host of nonuniform shape equilibria, in which filaments progressively unwind from their native twist with increasing surface interaction and surface curvature, ultimately adopting uniform-contact curved shapes. The latter effect is due to nonlinear coupling between elastic twist and bending of filaments on anisotropically curved surfaces such as the cylindrical surfaces considered here. Via a combination of numerical solutions and asymptotic analysis of shape equilibria, we show that filament conformations are critically sensitive to the surface curvature in both the strong- and weak-binding limits. These results suggest that local structure of membrane-bound chiral filaments is generically sensitive to the curvature radius of the surface to which it is bound, even when that radius is much larger than the filament's intrinsic pitch. Typical values of elastic parameters and interaction energies for several prokaryotic and eukaryotic filaments indicate that biopolymers are inherently very sensitive to the coupling between twist, interactions, and geometry and that this could be exploited for regulation of a variety of processes such as the targeted exertion of forces, signaling, and self-assembly in response to geometric cues including the local mean and Gaussian curvatures. Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The shape of the dose-response curve for radiation-induced neoplastic transformation in vitro: evidence for an adaptive response against neoplastic transformation at low doses of low-LET radiation.

    PubMed

    Redpath, J L; Liang, D; Taylor, T H; Christie, C; Elmore, E

    2001-12-01

    A dose-response curve for gamma-radiation-induced neoplastic transformation of HeLa x skin fibroblast human hybrid cells over the dose range 0.1 cGy to 1 Gy is presented. In the experimental protocol used, the spontaneous (background) frequency of neoplastic transformation of sham-irradiated cultures was compared to that of cultures which had been irradiated with (137)Cs gamma radiation and either plated immediately or held for 24 h at 37 degrees C prior to plating, for assay for neoplastic transformation. The pooled data from a minimum of three repeat large-scale experiments at each dose demonstrated a reduced transformation frequency for the irradiated compared to the sham-irradiated cells for doses of 0.1, 0.5, 1, 5 and 10 cGy for the delayed-plating arm. The probability of this happening by chance is given by 1/2(n), where n is the number of observations (5); i.e., 1/32 congruent with 0.031. This is indicative of an adaptive response against spontaneous neoplastic transformation at least up to a dose of 10 cGy of gamma radiation. The high-dose data obtained at 30 and 50 cGy and 1 Gy showed a good fit to a linear extrapolation through the sham-irradiated, zero-dose control. The delayed-plating data at 10 cGy and below showed a statistically significant divergence from this linear extrapolation.

  7. The analysis of dose-response curve from bioassays with quantal response: Deterministic or statistical approaches?

    PubMed

    Mougabure-Cueto, G; Sfara, V

    2016-04-25

    Dose-response relations can be obtained from systems at any structural level of biological matter, from the molecular to the organismic level. There are two types of approaches for analyzing dose-response curves: a deterministic approach, based on the law of mass action, and a statistical approach, based on the assumed probabilities distribution of phenotypic characters. Models based on the law of mass action have been proposed to analyze dose-response relations across the entire range of biological systems. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the principles that determine the dose-response relations. Dose-response curves of simple systems are the result of chemical interactions between reacting molecules, and therefore are supported by the law of mass action. In consequence, the shape of these curves is perfectly sustained by physicochemical features. However, dose-response curves of bioassays with quantal response are not explained by the simple collision of molecules but by phenotypic variations among individuals and can be interpreted as individual tolerances. The expression of tolerance is the result of many genetic and environmental factors and thus can be considered a random variable. In consequence, the shape of its associated dose-response curve has no physicochemical bearings; instead, they are originated from random biological variations. Due to the randomness of tolerance there is no reason to use deterministic equations for its analysis; on the contrary, statistical models are the appropriate tools for analyzing these dose-response relations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Task 4 Improvised Nuclear Device Response Curves

    SciTech Connect

    Alai, Maureen; Neuscamman, Stephanie

    2016-05-31

    LLNL performed fallout and nuclear blast modeling for the 60 cities using the NARAC modeling system and predominant weather patterns determined in a previous Task 4 effort. LLNL performed model simulations and analyses to identify and provide response curves (expressed as two-dimensional contours) for radioactive fallout deposition, transport, population, and blast overpressure as a function of yield, weather, location and time. These contours can then be further combined and correlated with infrastructure and population databases to estimate city specific effects on KPFs such as impacted infrastructure and casualty rates.

  9. An analytical solution for curved piezoelectric micromachined ultrasonic transducers with spherically shaped diaphragms.

    PubMed

    Sammoura, Firas; Akhbari, Sina; Lin, Liwei

    2014-09-01

    An analytical solution for piezoelectrically actuated spherically shaped diaphragms has been developed to study their dynamic behavior with targeted applications in piezoelectric micromachined ultrasonic transducers (pMUT). The analytical model starts with a curved pMUT composed of a piezoelectric diaphragm with a nominal radius in size, a radius of curvature in shape, and under both possible actuation sources of radial pressure and electric potential. The diaphragm has the piezoelectric material polarized in the direction perpendicular to its surface and sandwiched between two metal electrodes. When an electric field is applied between the two electrodes, the in-plane piezoelectric strain can cause larger out-of-plane deflections than a flat unimorph piezoelectric diaphragm because of the diaphragm's spherical curvature with a clamped periphery for high electromechanical coupling factor. Key performance parameters, including mechanical mode shapes, resonant frequencies, dynamic responses, and displacements, with respect to the curvature and size of the diaphragm have been investigated. Both analytical derivations and numerical simulations using finite element analysis have been performed for the optimal design of the electromechanical coupling factor, with varying factors such as mechanical resonant frequency, radius of curvature, nominal radius, and thickness. As such, this work provides theoretical foundations for the design of curved pMUTs with high electromechanical coupling factor compared with planar-shape pMUTs.

  10. Extension of Ko Straight-Beam Displacement Theory to Deformed Shape Predictions of Slender Curved Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Fleischer, Van Tran

    2011-01-01

    The Ko displacement theory originally developed for shape predictions of straight beams is extended to shape predictions of curved beams. The surface strains needed for shape predictions were analytically generated from finite-element nodal stress outputs. With the aid of finite-element displacement outputs, mathematical functional forms for curvature-effect correction terms are established and incorporated into straight-beam deflection equations for shape predictions of both cantilever and two-point supported curved beams. The newly established deflection equations for cantilever curved beams could provide quite accurate shape predictions for different cantilever curved beams, including the quarter-circle cantilever beam. Furthermore, the newly formulated deflection equations for two-point supported curved beams could provide accurate shape predictions for a range of two-point supported curved beams, including the full-circular ring. Accuracy of the newly developed curved-beam deflection equations is validated through shape prediction analysis of curved beams embedded in the windward shallow spherical shell of a generic crew exploration vehicle. A single-point collocation method for optimization of shape predictions is discussed in detail

  11. Factors influencing dB(A) ratings for sound insulation: Incident noise spectrum and shape of the transmission loss curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, A.

    1984-11-01

    A computer study of the influence of both the incident noise spectrum and the shape of the transmission loss curve on dB(A) ratings for assessing acoustical insulation is undertaken in this work. Transmission loss curves are classed into five idealized types suggested by the shapes observed in about 120 actual cases studied at four major laboratories. From them 5875 smoothed transmission loss curves, covering most common walls, were derived and joined to white, pink, traffic, speech, explosive and inversely humped spectrum noises, used as incident noises, to constitute the data base. Values of the incremental insulation Δ TL(A) (excess of dB(A) ratings over the arithmetic mean for a given TL curve) in dB(A) were computed for all possible pairs { TL curve: incident noise}. Computed results of Δ TL(A) grouped according to the incident noise and the idealized shape of the TL curve are presented in three dimensional graphic form. The spectrum of the incident noise and the shape of the transmission loss curve can influence significantly dB(A) ratings of sound insulation. Differences as high as 10 dB(A) can be found for actual cases when the incident noise varies from traffic to white noise. Previous results of various authors, for some discrete cases, are discussed. The convenience of a thorough study of a possible correlation between dB(A) ratings (or other frequency weightings) for acoustical insulation and community response is finally suggested.

  12. Finite element analysis of the effect of loading curve shape on brain injury predictors.

    PubMed

    Post, Andrew; Hoshizaki, Blaine; Gilchrist, Michael D

    2012-02-23

    Prediction of traumatic and mild traumatic brain injury is an important factor in managing their prevention. Currently, the prediction of these injuries is limited to peak linear and angular acceleration loading curves derived from laboratory reconstructions. However it remains unclear as to what aspect of these loading curves contributes to brain tissue damage. This research uses the University College Dublin Brain Trauma Model (UCDBTM) to analyse three distinct loading curve shapes meant to represent different helmet loading scenarios. The loading curves were applied independently in each axis of linear and angular acceleration and their effect on currently used predictors of TBI and mTBI was examined. Loading curve shape A had a late time to peak, B an early time to peak and C had a consistent plateau. The areas under the curve for all three loading curve shapes were identical. The results indicate that loading curve A produced consistently higher maximum principal strains and Von Mises stress than the other two loading curve types. Loading curve C consistently produced the lowest values of maximum principal strain and Von Mises stress, with loading curve B being lowest in only 2 cases. The areas of peak Von Mises stress and Principal strain also varied depending on loading curve shape and acceleration input.

  13. On the shape of the hospital industry long run average cost curve.

    PubMed

    Finkler, S A

    1979-01-01

    Empirical studies of the hospital industry have produced conflicting results with respect to the shape of the industry's long run average cost (LRAC) curve. Some of the studies have found a classical U-shaped curve. Others have produced results indicating that the LRAC curve is much closer to being L-shaped. Some theoretical support exists for both sets of findings. While classical theory predicts that the LRAC curve will be U-shaped, Alchian has presented theoretical arguments explaining why such curves would be L-shaped. This paper reconciles the results of these studies. The basis for the reconciliation is recognition of the failure of individual hospitals to produce all their individual product lines at efficient volumes. Such inefficient production is feasible and perhaps common, given the incentive structure which exists under current cost reimbursement systems. The implication of this paper is that large hospitals may have a greater potential for scale economies than has previously been recognized.

  14. On the shape of the hospital industry long run average cost curve.

    PubMed Central

    Finkler, S A

    1979-01-01

    Empirical studies of the hospital industry have produced conflicting results with respect to the shape of the industry's long run average cost (LRAC) curve. Some of the studies have found a classical U-shaped curve. Others have produced results indicating that the LRAC curve is much closer to being L-shaped. Some theoretical support exists for both sets of findings. While classical theory predicts that the LRAC curve will be U-shaped, Alchian has presented theoretical arguments explaining why such curves would be L-shaped. This paper reconciles the results of these studies. The basis for the reconciliation is recognition of the failure of individual hospitals to produce all their individual product lines at efficient volumes. Such inefficient production is feasible and perhaps common, given the incentive structure which exists under current cost reimbursement systems. The implication of this paper is that large hospitals may have a greater potential for scale economies than has previously been recognized. PMID:528221

  15. Kinetic Modeling Reveals the Roles of Reactive Oxygen Species Scavenging and DNA Repair Processes in Shaping the Dose-Response Curve of KBrO3-Induced DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Spassova, Maria A.; Miller, David J.; Nikolov, Alexander S.

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a kinetic model to investigate how DNA repair processes and scavengers of reactive oxygen species (ROS) can affect the dose-response shape of prooxidant induced DNA damage. We used as an example chemical KBrO3 which is activated by glutathione and forms reactive intermediates that directly interact with DNA to form 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine DNA adducts (8-OH-dG). The single strand breaks (SSB) that can result from failed base excision repair of these adducts were considered as an effect downstream from 8-OH-dG. We previously demonstrated that, in the presence of effective base excision repair, 8-OH-dG can exhibit threshold-like dose-response dependence, while the downstream SSB can still exhibit a linear dose-response. Here we demonstrate that this result holds for a variety of conditions, including low levels of GSH, the presence of additional SSB repair mechanisms, or a scavenger. It has been shown that melatonin, a terminal scavenger, inhibits KBrO3-caused oxidative damage. Our modeling revealed that sustained exposure to KBrO3 can lead to fast scavenger exhaustion, in which case the dose-response shapes for both endpoints are not substantially affected. The results are important to consider when forming conclusions on a chemical's toxicity dose dependence based on the dose-response of early genotoxic events. PMID:26448819

  16. The shape of the glucose concentration curve during an oral glucose tolerance test predicts risk for type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Heba M; Xu, Ping; Libman, Ingrid M; Becker, Dorothy J; Marks, Jennifer B; Skyler, Jay S; Palmer, Jerry P; Sosenko, Jay M

    2017-09-27

    We aimed to examine: (1) whether specific glucose-response curve shapes during OGTTs are predictive of type 1 diabetes development; and (2) the extent to which the glucose-response curve is influenced by insulin secretion. Autoantibody-positive relatives of people with type 1 diabetes whose baseline OGTT met the definition of a monophasic or biphasic glucose-response curve were followed for the development of type 1 diabetes (n = 2627). A monophasic curve was defined as an increase in OGTT glucose between 30 and 90 min followed by a decline of ≥ 0.25 mmol/l between 90 and 120 min. A biphasic response curve was defined as a decrease in glucose after an initial increase, followed by a second increase of ≥ 0.25 mmol/l. Associations of type 1 diabetes risk with glucose curve shapes were examined using cumulative incidence curve comparisons and proportional hazards regression. C-peptide responses were compared with and without adjustments for potential confounders. The majority of participants had a monophasic curve at baseline (n = 1732 [66%] vs n = 895 [34%]). The biphasic group had a lower cumulative incidence of type 1 diabetes (p < 0.001), which persisted after adjustments for age, sex, BMI z score and number of autoantibodies (p < 0.001). Among the monophasic group, the risk of type 1 diabetes was greater for those with a glucose peak at 90 min than for those with a peak at 30 min; the difference persisted after adjustments (p < 0.001). Compared with the biphasic group, the monophasic group had a lower early C-peptide (30-0 min) response, a lower C-peptide index (30-0 min C-peptide/30-0 min glucose), as well as a greater 2 h C-peptide level (p < 0.001 for all). Those with biphasic glucose curves have a lower risk of progression to type 1 diabetes than those with monophasic curves, and the risk among the monophasic group is increased when the glucose peak occurs at 90 min than at 30 min. Differences in glucose curve shapes between

  17. Potential Energy Curves and Associated Line Shape of Alkali-Metal and Noble-Gas Interactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-20

    Potential Energy Curves and Associated Line Shape of Alkali - Metal and Noble-Gas Interactions DISSERTATION Larry Aaron Blank, Civ AFIT-ENP-DS-14-D-51...OF ALKALI - METAL AND NOBLE-GAS INTERACTIONS DISSERTATION Presented to the Faculty Graduate School of Engineering and Management Air Force Institute of...ENP-DS-14-D-51 POTENTIAL ENERGY CURVES AND ASSOCIATED LINE SHAPE OF ALKALI - METAL AND NOBLE-GAS INTERACTIONS Larry Aaron Blank, B.S., M.S. Civ Approved

  18. Assessment of Shape Changes of Mistletoe Berries: A New Software Approach to Automatize the Parameterization of Path Curve Shaped Contours

    PubMed Central

    Derbidge, Renatus; Feiten, Linus; Conradt, Oliver; Heusser, Peter; Baumgartner, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    Photographs of mistletoe (Viscum album L.) berries taken by a permanently fixed camera during their development in autumn were subjected to an outline shape analysis by fitting path curves using a mathematical algorithm from projective geometry. During growth and maturation processes the shape of mistletoe berries can be described by a set of such path curves, making it possible to extract changes of shape using one parameter called Lambda. Lambda describes the outline shape of a path curve. Here we present methods and software to capture and measure these changes of form over time. The present paper describes the software used to automatize a number of tasks including contour recognition, optimization of fitting the contour via hill-climbing, derivation of the path curves, computation of Lambda and blinding the pictures for the operator. The validity of the program is demonstrated by results from three independent measurements showing circadian rhythm in mistletoe berries. The program is available as open source and will be applied in a project to analyze the chronobiology of shape in mistletoe berries and the buds of their host trees. PMID:23565255

  19. Assessment of shape changes of mistletoe berries: a new software approach to automatize the parameterization of path curve shaped contours.

    PubMed

    Derbidge, Renatus; Feiten, Linus; Conradt, Oliver; Heusser, Peter; Baumgartner, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    Photographs of mistletoe (Viscum album L.) berries taken by a permanently fixed camera during their development in autumn were subjected to an outline shape analysis by fitting path curves using a mathematical algorithm from projective geometry. During growth and maturation processes the shape of mistletoe berries can be described by a set of such path curves, making it possible to extract changes of shape using one parameter called Lambda. Lambda describes the outline shape of a path curve. Here we present methods and software to capture and measure these changes of form over time. The present paper describes the software used to automatize a number of tasks including contour recognition, optimization of fitting the contour via hill-climbing, derivation of the path curves, computation of Lambda and blinding the pictures for the operator. The validity of the program is demonstrated by results from three independent measurements showing circadian rhythm in mistletoe berries. The program is available as open source and will be applied in a project to analyze the chronobiology of shape in mistletoe berries and the buds of their host trees.

  20. Shape of porous region to control cooling along curved exit boundary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, R.; Snyder, A.

    1984-01-01

    A cooled porous insert in a curved wall has a specified spatially varying heat flux applied to one side. It is desired to control the distribution of coolant flow out through this curved surface so that the surface will be kept at a desired uniform temperature. The flow regulation is accomplished by shaping the surface through which the coolant enters the region to obtain the required variation of flow resistance within the region. The proper surface shape is found by solving a Cauchy boundary value problem. Analytical solutions are given in two dimensions for various shapes of the heated boundary subjected to different heating distributions.

  1. Curved contours and the associative response.

    PubMed

    Zusne, L

    1975-02-01

    72 random polygons and their curvilinear transformations were exposed for 3 sec. to 40 subjects who produced written associations during a 10-sec. interval. The number of associations varied, in general, directly with the amount of curved contour as well as with the degree of contour dispersion. The amount of variance accounted for by these two variables was small, however. Differences in curvature produced much greater differences in the content of the associations, greater degrees of curvature evoking more associations that were curved, man-made objects or living things and fewer associations that were straight-edged, man-made objects. A significant and inverse relationship was also established between contour dispersion and associations that were non-living, natural objects. It is concluded that physical form dimensions, especially curvature, affect less the association value (connotative meaning) of visual forms and much more their denotative meaning.

  2. Understanding the shape and diversity of dwarf galaxy rotation curves in ΛCDM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Read, J. I.; Iorio, G.; Agertz, O.; Fraternali, F.

    2016-11-01

    The shape and diversity of dwarf galaxy rotation curves is at apparent odds with dark matter halos in a Λ Cold Dark Matter (ΛCDM) cosmology. We use mock data from isolated dwarf galaxy simulations to show that this owes to three main effects. Firstly, stellar feedback heats dark matter, leading to a `CORENFW' dark matter density profile with a slowly rising rotation curve. Secondly, if close to a recent starburst, large H I bubbles push the rotation curve out of equilibrium, deforming the rotation curve shape. Thirdly, when galaxies are viewed near face-on, their best fit inclination is biased high. This can lead to a very shallow rotation curve that falsely implies a large dark matter core. All three problems can be avoided, however, by a combination of improved mass models and a careful selection of target galaxies. Fitting our CORENFW model to mock rotation curve data, we show that we can recover the rotation curve shape, dark matter halo mass M200 and concentration parameter c within our quoted uncertainties. We fit our CORENFW model to real data for four isolated dwarf irregulars, chosen to span a wide range of rotation curve shapes. We obtain an excellent fit for NGC 6822 and WLM, with tight constraints on M200, and c consistent with ΛCDM. However, IC 1613 and DDO 101 give a poor fit. For IC 1613, we show that this owes to disequilibria and its uncertain inclination i; for DDO 101, it owes to its uncertain distance D. If we assume iIC1613 ˜ 15° and DDDO101 ˜ 12 Mpc, consistent with current uncertainties, we are able to fit both galaxies very well. We conclude that ΛCDM appears to give an excellent match to dwarf galaxy rotation curves.

  3. Theoretical and practical implications of creep curve shape analyses for 2124 and 2419

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burt, H.; Wilshire, B.

    2004-06-01

    Creep and creep fracture properties are presented for two commercial aluminum alloys, 2124 and 2419, tested at stresses giving creep lives up to about 1000 hours at 373 to 463 K. The results are analyzed using the ϑ methodology, which quantifies the shape of individual creep curves and the variations in curve shape with changing stress and temperature. The ϑ relationships are shown to allow reasonable prediction of 100,000-hour stress rupture values, while also explaining the complex creep behavior patterns widely observed with precipitation-hardened alloys.

  4. Bayesian Analysis of Item Response Curves.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-07-01

    response.a are studied from a Bayesian viewpoint of estimating the item parameters. For the two-parameter logistic model with normally distributed ability...estimating the item parameters. For the two-parameter logistic model with normally distributed ability, restricted bivariate beta priors are used to...responses, Bayesian estimation, EM algorithm. 3 Introduction We will consider dichotomous responses to a set of test items which are designed to measure the

  5. Nonmonotonic dose response curves (NMDRCs) are common after Estrogen or Androgen signaling pathway disruption. Fact or Falderal?##

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nonmonotonic dose response curves (NMDRCs) are common after Estrogen or Androgen signaling pathway disruption. Fact or Falderal? Leon Earl Gray Jr, USEPA, ORD, NHEERL, TAD, RTB. RTP, NC, USA The shape of the dose response curve in the low dose region has been debated since th...

  6. Nonmonotonic dose response curves (NMDRCs) are common after Estrogen or Androgen signaling pathway disruption. Fact or Falderal?##

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nonmonotonic dose response curves (NMDRCs) are common after Estrogen or Androgen signaling pathway disruption. Fact or Falderal? Leon Earl Gray Jr, USEPA, ORD, NHEERL, TAD, RTB. RTP, NC, USA The shape of the dose response curve in the low dose region has been debated since th...

  7. Effect of vanes diffuser geometric components on shape of the Q-H-curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostornoi, A. S.; Lugova, S. O.; Olshtynskyi, P. L.

    2017-08-01

    The article deals with the effect of the vanes diffuser geometric components at the inlet (downstream of an impeller) and at the outlet (upstream of the impeller) on the shape and steepness of the Q-H-curve. Intermediate stage comparative curves based on centrifugal pump tests are given with corrections to the vanes diffuser components were made. This allows changing steepness of the Q-H-curve. Comparative tests of the intermediate stage with different types of vanes diffusers (with continuous crossover channels and discontinuous crossover channels) are shown.

  8. From Curves to Trees: A Tree-like Shapes Distance Using the Elastic Shape Analysis Framework.

    PubMed

    Mottini, A; Descombes, X; Besse, F

    2015-04-01

    Trees are a special type of graph that can be found in various disciplines. In the field of biomedical imaging, trees have been widely studied as they can be used to describe structures such as neurons, blood vessels and lung airways. It has been shown that the morphological characteristics of these structures can provide information on their function aiding the characterization of pathological states. Therefore, it is important to develop methods that analyze their shape and quantify differences between their structures. In this paper, we present a method for the comparison of tree-like shapes that takes into account both topological and geometrical information. This method, which is based on the Elastic Shape Analysis Framework, also computes the mean shape of a population of trees. As a first application, we have considered the comparison of axon morphology. The performance of our method has been evaluated on two sets of images. For the first set of images, we considered four different populations of neurons from different animals and brain sections from the NeuroMorpho.org open database. The second set was composed of a database of 3D confocal microscopy images of three populations of axonal trees (normal and two types of mutations) of the same type of neurons. We have calculated the inter and intra class distances between the populations and embedded the distance in a classification scheme. We have compared the performance of our method against three other state of the art algorithms, and results showed that the proposed method better distinguishes between the populations. Furthermore, we present the mean shape of each population. These shapes present a more complete picture of the morphological characteristics of each population, compared to the average value of certain predefined features.

  9. Modified Displacement Transfer Functions for Deformed Shape Predictions of Slender Curved Structures with Varying Curvatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Fleischer, Van Tran

    2014-01-01

    To eliminate the need to use finite-element modeling for structure shape predictions, a new method was invented. This method is to use the Displacement Transfer Functions to transform the measured surface strains into deflections for mapping out overall structural deformed shapes. The Displacement Transfer Functions are expressed in terms of rectilinearly distributed surface strains, and contain no material properties. This report is to apply the patented method to the shape predictions of non-symmetrically loaded slender curved structures with different curvatures up to a full circle. Because the measured surface strains are not available, finite-element analysis had to be used to analytically generate the surface strains. Previously formulated straight-beam Displacement Transfer Functions were modified by introducing the curvature-effect correction terms. Through single-point or dual-point collocations with finite-elementgenerated deflection curves, functional forms of the curvature-effect correction terms were empirically established. The resulting modified Displacement Transfer Functions can then provide quite accurate shape predictions. Also, the uniform straight-beam Displacement Transfer Function was applied to the shape predictions of a section-cut of a generic capsule (GC) outer curved sandwich wall. The resulting GC shape predictions are quite accurate in partial regions where the radius of curvature does not change sharply.

  10. Quantifying the shape of maximal expiratory flow-volume curves in healthy humans and asthmatic patients.

    PubMed

    Dominelli, Paolo B; Molgat-Seon, Yannick; Foster, Glen E; Dominelli, Giulio S; Haverkamp, Hans C; Henderson, William R; Sheel, A William

    2016-01-01

    Differences in the absolute flow and volume of maximal expiratory flow-volume (MEFV) curves have been studied extensively in health and disease. However, the shapes of MEFV curves have received less attention. We questioned if the MEFV curve shape was associated with (i) expiratory flow limitation (EFL) in health and (ii) changes in bronchial caliber in asthmatics. Using the slope-ratio (SR) index, we quantified MEFV curve shape in 84 healthy subjects and 8 matched asthmatics. Healthy subjects performed a maximal exercise test to assess EFL. Those with EFL during had a greater SR (1.15 ± 0.20 vs. 0.85 ± 0.20, p<0.05) yet, there was no association between maximal oxygen consumption and SR (r=0.14, p>0.05). Asthmatics average SR was greater than the healthy subjects (1.35 ± 0.03 vs. 0.90 ± 0.11, p<0.05), but there were no differences when bronchial caliber was manipulated. In conclusion, a greater SR is related to EFL and this metric could aid in discriminating between groups known to differ in the absolute size of MEFV curves.

  11. Curved Displacement Transfer Functions for Geometric Nonlinear Large Deformation Structure Shape Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Fleischer, Van Tran; Lung, Shun-Fat

    2017-01-01

    For shape predictions of structures under large geometrically nonlinear deformations, Curved Displacement Transfer Functions were formulated based on a curved displacement, traced by a material point from the undeformed position to deformed position. The embedded beam (depth-wise cross section of a structure along a surface strain-sensing line) was discretized into multiple small domains, with domain junctures matching the strain-sensing stations. Thus, the surface strain distribution could be described with a piecewise linear or a piecewise nonlinear function. The discretization approach enabled piecewise integrations of the embedded-beam curvature equations to yield the Curved Displacement Transfer Functions, expressed in terms of embedded beam geometrical parameters and surface strains. By entering the surface strain data into the Displacement Transfer Functions, deflections along each embedded beam can be calculated at multiple points for mapping the overall structural deformed shapes. Finite-element linear and nonlinear analyses of a tapered cantilever tubular beam were performed to generate linear and nonlinear surface strains and the associated deflections to be used for validation. The shape prediction accuracies were then determined by comparing the theoretical deflections with the finiteelement- generated deflections. The results show that the newly developed Curved Displacement Transfer Functions are very accurate for shape predictions of structures under large geometrically nonlinear deformations.

  12. Spline curve matching with sparse knot sets: applications to deformable shape detection and recognition

    Treesearch

    Sang-Mook Lee; A. Lynn. Abbott; Neil A. Clark; Philip A. Araman

    2003-01-01

    Splines can be used to approximate noisy data with a few control points. This paper presents a new curve matching method for deformable shapes using two-dimensional splines. In contrast to the residual error criterion, which is based on relative locations of corresponding knot points such that is reliable primarily for dense point sets, we use deformation energy of...

  13. Simulated Equating Using Several Item Response Curves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boldt, R. F.

    The comparison of item response theory models for the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) was extended to an equating context as simulation trials were used to "equate the test to itself." Equating sample data were generated from administration of identical item sets. Equatings that used procedures based on each model (simple…

  14. Emerging S-shaped curves in congenital scoliosis after hemivertebra resection and short segmental fusion.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xi; Song, Yueming; Liu, Limin; Zhou, Chunguang; Zhou, Zhongjie; Wang, Lei; Wang, Liang

    2016-10-01

    Posterior hemivertebra resection with short fusion has gradually become the mainstream treatment for the congenital scoliosis due to single fully segmented hemivertebra. A kind of unexpected emerging S-shaped scoliosis was found secondary to this surgery, and that has not been reported yet. The aim of the present study was to analyze the possible pathogenesis, clinical feature, and treatment of the emerging S-shaped scoliosis after posterior hemivertebra resection and short fusion. This study is a retrospective case series. A total of 128 patients participated. Preoperative and postoperative whole spine radiographs were used to measure the Cobb angle of main curve, compensatory curve, and emerging curves. And the hemivertebra location, the fused segment, the apical and ending vertebrae of postoperative-emerging curve (and preoperative compensatory curves) were assessed. Both the demographics and radiographic data were reviewed. Postoperative-emerging scoliosis was defined as the curve with an increasing angle of 20° and an apical vertebra locating at least two levels away from fusion region. Of the 128 patients, 9 (7%) showed postoperative-emerging S-shaped scoliosis. The mean age was 11.4 years old. The mean main curve was 36.1±14.4° preoperatively and been significantly corrected to 6.9±6.1° (p<.001). No significant difference was found in the main curve, kyphosis, coronal balance, or sagittal balance during follow-up. The emerging scoliosis occurred at 3 months (in four patients) or 6 months (in five patients) after initial surgery with an average angle of 42.6±12.9° at last follow-up. All patients underwent bracing or observation when the S-shaped scoliosis was arising, and four patients underwent a revision surgery because of deformity developing. The emerging S-shaped scoliosis was an extraordinary complication that may be developing from the preoperative compensatory scoliosis and usually occurred at 3-6 months after hemivertebra resection. The

  15. Neighborhood Socioeconomic Disadvantage and the Shape of the Age–Crime Curve

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Li-Chuan; Loeber, Rolf; Cohen, Jacqueline

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. We sought to better determine the way in which neighborhood disadvantage affects the shape of the age–crime curve. Methods. We used data from the Pittsburgh Youth Study (PYS), a 14-year longitudinal study, to compare the age–crime curves of individuals in neighborhoods of different disadvantage. We visually compared observed age–crime curves, and then used generalized linear mixed models to test for differences in curve parameters. Results. Adjusted for individual risk factors, the mixed models found that the parameters for interactions of neighborhood disadvantage with both linear age and quadratic age were significant (P < .05) and consistent with higher and longer age–crime curves in more disadvantaged neighborhoods. This implied that compared with boys in advantaged neighborhoods, rates of violence among boys in disadvantaged neighborhoods rose to higher levels that were sustained significantly longer. Conclusions. These results suggested that residing in a disadvantaged neighborhood during early adolescence may have an enduring effect on the shape of the age–crime curve throughout an individual's life. PMID:21778512

  16. Projectile shape influence on ballistic limit curves as determined by computational simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Hertel, E.S. Jr.; Chhabildas, L.C.

    1995-09-01

    A requirement for an effective debris shield is that it must protect a spacecraft from impacts by irregularly shaped particles. A series of numerical simulations has been performed using the multi-dimensional shock physics code CTH to numerically determine the ballistic limit curve for a Whipple bumper shield. Two different projectile shapes are considered for the numerical simulations, flat plates of varying diameters with a constant thickness and spheres of varying diameters. The critical diameter of ballistic limit was determined over a velocity range from 4 km/s to 15 km/s. We have found both experimentally and numerically that the particle shape has a significant effect on the debris cloud distribution, ballistic limit curve, and penetration capability.

  17. Origin of the Shape of Current-Voltage Curve through Nanopores: A Molecular Dynamics Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumikama, Takashi

    2016-05-01

    Ion transports through ion channels, biological nanopores, are essential for life: Living cells generate electrical signals by utilizing ion permeation through channels. The measured current-voltage (i-V) relations through most ion channels are sublinear, however, its physical meaning is still elusive. Here we calculated the i-V curves through anion-doped carbon nanotubes, a model of an ion channel, using molecular dynamics simulation. It was found the i-V curve reflects the physical origin of the rate-determining step: the i-V curve is sublinear when the permeation is entropy bottlenecked, while it is superlinear in the case of the energy bottlenecked permeation. Based on this finding, we discuss the relation between the molecular mechanism of ion permeation through the biological K+ channels and the shape of the i-V curves through them. This work also provides a clue for a novel design of nanopores that show current rectification.

  18. Origin of the Shape of Current-Voltage Curve through Nanopores: A Molecular Dynamics Study

    PubMed Central

    Sumikama, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Ion transports through ion channels, biological nanopores, are essential for life: Living cells generate electrical signals by utilizing ion permeation through channels. The measured current-voltage (i-V) relations through most ion channels are sublinear, however, its physical meaning is still elusive. Here we calculated the i-V curves through anion-doped carbon nanotubes, a model of an ion channel, using molecular dynamics simulation. It was found the i-V curve reflects the physical origin of the rate-determining step: the i-V curve is sublinear when the permeation is entropy bottlenecked, while it is superlinear in the case of the energy bottlenecked permeation. Based on this finding, we discuss the relation between the molecular mechanism of ion permeation through the biological K+ channels and the shape of the i-V curves through them. This work also provides a clue for a novel design of nanopores that show current rectification. PMID:27167118

  19. Comparison of curve shape between children with cerebral palsy, Friedreich's ataxia, and adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Aronsson, D D; Stokes, I A; Ronchetti, P J; Labelle, H B

    1994-05-01

    Fourteen patients with cerebral palsy (CP), 12 with Friedreich's ataxia (FA) and 26 with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) were studied to determine whether the shape of the scoliosis curve differs between these categories. The slope of the regression relationship between vertebral rotation and lateral deviation was greater for the CP group compared with the FA and AIS groups. The authors conclude that the scoliosis curve pattern of children with Friedreich's ataxia and adolescent idiopathic scoliosis is similar. In contrast, the scoliosis curve of children with CP was distinctly different, with more rotation of the apical vertebrae into the convexity of the scoliosis curve (transverse plane deformity) in relation to the amount of lateral deviation of the apical vertebrae from the spinal axis (coronal plane deformity).

  20. Robust Entrainment of Circadian Oscillators Requires Specific Phase Response Curves

    PubMed Central

    Pfeuty, Benjamin; Thommen, Quentin; Lefranc, Marc

    2011-01-01

    The circadian clocks keeping time in many living organisms rely on self-sustained biochemical oscillations entrained by external cues, such as light, to the 24-h cycle induced by Earth's rotation. However, environmental cues are unreliable due to the variability of habitats, weather conditions, or cue-sensing mechanisms among individuals. A tempting hypothesis is that circadian clocks have evolved so as to be robust to fluctuations in the signal that entrains them. To support this hypothesis, we analyze the synchronization behavior of weakly and periodically forced oscillators in terms of their phase response curve (PRC), which measures phase changes induced by a perturbation applied at different times of the cycle. We establish a general relationship between the robustness of key entrainment properties, such as stability and oscillator phase, on the one hand, and the shape of the PRC as characterized by a specific curvature or the existence of a dead zone, on the other hand. The criteria obtained are applied to computational models of circadian clocks and account for the disparate robustness properties of various forcing schemes. Finally, the analysis of PRCs measured experimentally in several organisms strongly suggests a case of convergent evolution toward an optimal strategy for maintaining a clock that is accurate and robust to environmental fluctuations. PMID:21641300

  1. Characterizing the frequency response curve of large rooms in the short and long time regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klales, Anna; Pittman, Suzanne; Barr, Matthew; Borunda, Mario; Heller, Eric

    2012-02-01

    Room acoustics can be modeled by real Gaussian statistics, corresponding to randomized ray trajectories and characterized for instance by the reverberation time T60 (free field to decay by 60 decibels) which is independent of position or source point in a room. In his 1954 paper, Manfred Schroeder found universal statistical features of the steady state frequency response curve of large rooms, based upon the assumption of Gaussian probability distributions of the pressure. For example, he found the standard deviation from the mean level is 11 decibels for any concert hall, regardless of the shape of the room or its T60, within reasonable limits. Using semi-classical and numerical methods, we find non-universal (room dependent) corrections to Schroeder's universal results for the statistics of the frequency response curve. Along with corrections to the steady-state frequency response, we present the behavior of the frequency response curve for short to intermediate times.

  2. Variation of spectral response curves of GaAs photocathodes in activation chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Jijun; Chang, Benkang; Yang, Zhi; Wang, Hui; Gao, Pin

    2006-09-01

    The spectral response curves of reflection-mode GaAs (100) photocathodes are measured in activation chamber by multi-information measurement system at RT, and by applying quantum efficiency formula, the variation of spectral response curves have been studied. Reflection-mode GaAs photocathodes materials are grown over GaAs wafer (100) by MBE with p-type beryllium doping, doping concentration is 1×10 19 cm -3 and the active layer thickness is 1.6μm. During the high-temperature activation process, the spectral response curves varied with activation time are measured. After the low-temperature activation, the photocathode is illuminated by a white light source, and the spectral response curves varied with illumination time are measured every other hour. Experimental results of both high-temperature and low-temperature activations show that the spectral response curve shape of photocathodes is a function of time. We use traditional quantum efficiency formulas of photocathodes, in which only the Γ photoemission is considered, to fit experimental spectral response curves, and find the theoretical curves are not in agreement with the experimental curves, the reason is other valley and hot-electron yields are necessary to be included in yields of reflection-mode photocathodes. Based on the two-minima diffusion model and the fit of escape probability, we modified the quantum efficiency formula of reflection-mode photocathodes, the modified formula can be used to explain the variation of yield curves of reflection-mode photocathodes very well.

  3. 3D shape shearography with integrated structured light projection for strain inspection of curved objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anisimov, Andrei G.; Groves, Roger M.

    2015-05-01

    Shearography (speckle pattern shearing interferometry) is a non-destructive testing technique that provides full-field surface strain characterization. Although real-life objects especially in aerospace, transport or cultural heritage are not flat (e.g. aircraft leading edges or sculptures), their inspection with shearography is of interest for both hidden defect detection and material characterization. Accurate strain measuring of a highly curved or free form surface needs to be performed by combining inline object shape measuring and processing of shearography data in 3D. Previous research has not provided a general solution. This research is devoted to the practical questions of 3D shape shearography system development for surface strain characterization of curved objects. The complete procedure of calibration and data processing of a 3D shape shearography system with integrated structured light projector is presented. This includes an estimation of the actual shear distance and a sensitivity matrix correction within the system field of view. For the experimental part a 3D shape shearography system prototype was developed. It employs three spatially-distributed shearing cameras, with Michelson interferometers acting as the shearing devices, one illumination laser source and a structured light projector. The developed system performance was evaluated with a previously reported cylinder specimen (length 400 mm, external diameter 190 mmm) loaded by internal pressure. Further steps for the 3D shape shearography prototype and the technique development are also proposed.

  4. Effects of Cutout Orientations on Natural Frequencies and Mode Shapes of Curved Rectangular Composite Panels.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-12-01

    AU 0? 630 EFFECTS OF CUTOUT ORIENTATIONS ON NATURAL FREGUENCiES 1/2 AND NIODE SHAPES OF.. (U) AIR FORCE INST OF TECH URIGHT-PRTTERSON AFI OH SCHOOL...OF CUTOUT ORIENTATION ON NATURAL FREQUENCIES AND MODE SHAPES OF CURVED RECTANGULAR COMPOSITE PANELS THESISDTIC Garry J Cyr ELETE Captain, USAF APR 0 3...197 AFIT/GAZ/AA/SOD-3 F ’’ D Approved for ~bix Distributio~ n jy td 5 5 qp 5 %.(. , AFIT/GAE/AA/88D-3 EFFECTS OF CUTOUT ORIENTATIONS ON NATURAL

  5. Birth weight as a predictor of type 2 diabetes mellitus: the U-shaped curve.

    PubMed

    Pettitt, D J; Jovanovic, L

    2001-08-01

    Recent findings have sparked intense interest in birth weight as a predictor of type 2 diabetes mellitus. In some populations, there is an inverse association between birth size and disease; however, in the Pima Indians, a population with very high rates of gestational diabetes, high birth weight and low birth weight are associated with diabetes. This results in a U-shaped curve with higher diabetes rates in both tails of the distribution. Similarly, there are reports of an inverse association between stature and prevalence of gestational diabetes, but, in California Latina women with gestational diabetes, there is a positive association between stature and glucose concentration. Could these disparate findings also represent the two ends of a U-shaped curve? The disparities are likely due to differences in the environment, both in utero and postnatally, that different groups experience.

  6. A Wave Traveling over a Hopf Instability Shapes the Cochlear Tuning Curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnasco, Marcelo O.

    2003-02-01

    The tuning curve of the cochlea measures how intense an input is required to elicit a given output level as a function of the frequency. It is a fundamental object of auditory theory, for it summarizes how to identify sounds on the basis of the cochlear output. A simple model is presented showing that only two elements are sufficient for establishing the cochlear tuning curve: a broadly tuned traveling wave, moving unidirectionally from high to low frequencies, and a set of mechanosensors poised at the threshold of an oscillatory (Hopf) instability. These two components generate the various frequency-response regimes needed for a cochlear tuning curve with a high slope.

  7. Search for QTL affecting the shape of the egg laying curve of the Japanese quail

    PubMed Central

    Minvielle, Francis; Kayang, Boniface B; Inoue-Murayama, Miho; Miwa, Mitsuru; Vignal, Alain; Gourichon, David; Neau, André; Monvoisin, Jean-Louis; Ito, Shin' ichi

    2006-01-01

    Background Egg production is of critical importance in birds not only for their reproduction but also for human consumption as the egg is a highly nutritive and balanced food. Consequently, laying in poultry has been improved through selection to increase the total number of eggs laid per hen. This number is the cumulative result of the oviposition, a cyclic and repeated process which leads to a pattern over time (the egg laying curve) which can be modelled and described individually. Unlike the total egg number which compounds all variations, the shape of the curve gives information on the different phases of egg laying, and its genetic analysis using molecular markers might contribute to understand better the underlying mechanisms. The purpose of this study was to perform the first QTL search for traits involved in shaping the egg laying curve, in an F2 experiment with 359 female Japanese quail. Results Eight QTL were found on five autosomes, and six of them could be directly associated with egg production traits, although none was significant at the genome-wide level. One of them (on CJA13) had an effect on the first part of the laying curve, before the production peak. Another one (on CJA06) was related to the central part of the curve when laying is maintained at a high level, and the four others (on CJA05, CJA10 and CJA14) acted on the last part of the curve where persistency is determinant. The QTL for the central part of the curve was mapped at the same position on CJA06 than a genome-wide significant QTL for total egg number detected previously in the same F2. Conclusion Despite its limited scope (number of microsatellites, size of the phenotypic data set), this work has shown that it was possible to use the individual egg laying data collected daily to find new QTL which affect the shape of the egg laying curve. Beyond the present results, this new approach could also be applied to longitudinal traits in other species, like growth and lactation in

  8. The curved shape of the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus enhances colonization of surfaces in flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persat, Alexandre; Gitai, Zemer; Stone, Howard

    2014-11-01

    Bacteria thrive in all types of fluid environments; flow is thus a ubiquitous aspect of their lives. Bacteria have evolved a variety of cellular components contributing to their growth in specific environments. However, cellular features that help them survive and develop in flow have been rarely characterized. Here, we show that Caulobacter crescentus may have evolved its curved shape to enhance the colonization of surfaces in flow. C. crescentus curvature is preserved in the wild but straight mutants have no known growth disadvantage in standard laboratory conditions. Leveraging microfluidics and single-cell imaging, we demonstrate that curvature enhances surface colonization in flow, promoting the formation of larger microcolonies. Cells attach to a surface from a single pole, so that flow affects their orientation. In flow, viscous forces generate a torque on the curved cell body, which reorients the cell in the direction of the flow. The curved cell appears to arc above the surface, optimally orienting its unattached pole towards the surface. This reduces the distance between the surface and the pole, thereby enhancing attachment of its progeny. Additionally, we show that curved shape enhances colony spreading across the direction of the flow, generating more robust biofilm compared to straight mutants.

  9. A rapid Bézier curve method for shape analysis and point representation of asymmetric folds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Deepak C.; Rastogi, Vipul; Ghosh, Rajit

    2010-05-01

    Point representation of fold shapes is useful, in particular, for classification of a large number of folds into different geometric populations. The methods for shape analysis and point representation of asymmetric folds are a few and tedious, although several methods exist for the analysis of the individual fold limbs, or symmetric folds. This article gives a rapid method that uses the Bézier curve tool, available in any common computer graphics software, for the analysis of a complete asymmetric fold and its point representation in the two-dimensional frame. The new method is based on the reduction of variables in the parametric equations of a cubic Bézier curve. It makes the length of one Bézier handle zero, pins the end point of the other Bézier handle at the origin of the X- Y frame and drags its control point along the Y-axis to fit the Bézier curve on the given asymmetric fold. A Cartesian plot between normalised length of the Bézier handle and the lift, i.e., difference between the heights of the two inflection points, gives the unique point that represents the given asymmetric fold shape. We test the validity of the new method on several computer simulated asymmetric folds and demonstrate its usefulness with the help of a natural example.

  10. Dose-response curve estimation: a semiparametric mixture approach.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ying; Yin, Guosheng

    2011-12-01

    In the estimation of a dose-response curve, parametric models are straightforward and efficient but subject to model misspecifications; nonparametric methods are robust but less efficient. As a compromise, we propose a semiparametric approach that combines the advantages of parametric and nonparametric curve estimates. In a mixture form, our estimator takes a weighted average of the parametric and nonparametric curve estimates, in which a higher weight is assigned to the estimate with a better model fit. When the parametric model assumption holds, the semiparametric curve estimate converges to the parametric estimate and thus achieves high efficiency; when the parametric model is misspecified, the semiparametric estimate converges to the nonparametric estimate and remains consistent. We also consider an adaptive weighting scheme to allow the weight to vary according to the local fit of the models. We conduct extensive simulation studies to investigate the performance of the proposed methods and illustrate them with two real examples.

  11. Reconstructing the Curve-Skeletons of 3D Shapes Using the Visual Hull.

    PubMed

    Livesu, Marco; Guggeri, Fabio; Scateni, Riccardo

    2012-11-01

    Curve-skeletons are the most important descriptors for shapes, capable of capturing in a synthetic manner the most relevant features. They are useful for many different applications: from shape matching and retrieval, to medical imaging, to animation. This has led, over the years, to the development of several different techniques for extraction, each trying to comply with specific goals. We propose a novel technique which stems from the intuition of reproducing what a human being does to deduce the shape of an object holding it in his or her hand and rotating. To accomplish this, we use the formal definitions of epipolar geometry and visual hull. We show how it is possible to infer the curve-skeleton of a broad class of 3D shapes, along with an estimation of the radii of the maximal inscribed balls, by gathering information about the medial axes of their projections on the image planes of the stereographic vision. It is definitely worth to point out that our method works indifferently on (even unoriented) polygonal meshes, voxel models, and point clouds. Moreover, it is insensitive to noise, pose-invariant, resolution-invariant, and robust when applied to incomplete data sets.

  12. Inner detached frequency response curves: an experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatti, Gianluca; Brennan, Michael J.

    2017-05-01

    Certain nonlinear vibrating systems have frequency response curves (FRCs), in which isolated detached curves exist inside the main continuous FRC. The behavior of these systems has hitherto been studied analytically and numerically, but to the authors' knowledge, there is no record of an inner detached FRC being detected experimentally. These curves may be hidden by numerical or experimental analysis, particularly when a system is subject to swept or stepped-sine excitation. Their existence may thus lead to unexpected dramatic changes in the amplitude of the system response. This paper presents an experimental study that involves the design, construction and testing of a specific system that has an isolated detached FRC inside the main continuous FRC. The experimental design of the test rig is supported by multibody dynamic simulations, and in the experimental tests the existence of a detached FRC was verified.

  13. Nonparametric Item Response Curve Estimation with Correction for Measurement Error

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guo, Hongwen; Sinharay, Sandip

    2011-01-01

    Nonparametric or kernel regression estimation of item response curves (IRCs) is often used in item analysis in testing programs. These estimates are biased when the observed scores are used as the regressor because the observed scores are contaminated by measurement error. Accuracy of this estimation is a concern theoretically and operationally.…

  14. A universal dose–response curve for radiochromic films

    SciTech Connect

    Martín-Viera Cueto, J. A. Parra Osorio, V.; Moreno Sáiz, C.; Navarro Guirado, F.; Casado Villalón, F. J.; Galán Montenegro, P.

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: This paper presents a model for dose–response curves of radiochromic films. It is based on a modified version of single-hit model to take into account the growth experienced by lithium salt of pentacosa-10,12-diynoic acid polymers after irradiation. Methods: Polymer growth in radiochromic films is a critical phenomenon that can be properly described by means of percolation theory to provide an appropriate distribution function for polymer sizes. Resulting functional form is a power function featuring a critical exponent and two adjustable parameters. Moreover, these parameters act as scaling factors setting a natural scale for sensitometric curves where the dependence on channel sensitivity is removed. A unique reduced response curve is then obtained from all the color channels describing film behavior independently of film dosimetry system. Results: Resulting functional form has been successfully tested in several sensitometric curves from different Gafchromic EBT models, providing excellent agreement with experimental data in a wide dose range up to about 40 Gy and low dose uncertainty. Conclusions: The model presented in this paper describes accurately the sensitometric curves of radiochromic films in wide dose ranges covering all typical ranges used in external radiotherapy. Resulting dose uncertainty is low enough to render a reasonably good performance in clinical applications. Due to cross-correlation, only one of the adjustable parameters is totally independent and characterizes film batches.

  15. Rainfall Extremes, Soil Moisture and The Shape of The Flood Frequency Curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connell, P. E.; Hashemi, A. M.; Franchini, M.

    It is now recognised that climate, expressed through the basin soil moisture regime, can exert a strong control on the shape of the flood frequency curve. Monte Carlo simulation experiments conducted with a stochastic point process rainfall model and a simple rainfall runoff model have shown that the probability distribution of soil mois- ture at the time of storm arrival can express the key link between the soil moisture regime and the flood frequency curve (ffc). Using further simulation experiments, a detailed investigation has been carried out into how the distributions of extreme rain- fall quantities, and their seasonality, interact with the soil moisture regime to produce the ffc. It has been found that the shape of the ffc can be explained in terms of a mixture of distributions with different variances. The mixture derives from (a) floods which occur under saturated conditions which have a variance closely reflecting that of the extreme rainfalls generating them, and (b) storms which occur under unsatu- rated conditions which have a much higher variance due to the interaction between the extreme rainfall and the soil moisture. The influence of the latter on the shape of the ffc can be large when the most extreme rainfalls occur in months when the soil is unsaturated. Consequently the distribution of rainfall extremes throughout the year can have an important influence on the ffc, and is a further climatic factor to be taken into account.

  16. Cyclic Fatigue Resistance and Force Generated by OneShape Instruments during Curved Canal Preparation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaolei

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the cyclic fatigue resistance and the force generated by OneShape files during preparation of simulated curved canals. Methods Six OneShape files (the test) and six ProTaper F2 files (the control) were subject to the bending ability test. Another thirty files of each type were used to prepare artificial canals (n = 60), which were divided into 3 groups according to respective curvatures of the canals (30°, 60°, and 90°). The numbers of cycles to fatigue (NCF) as well as the positive and negative forces that were generated by files during canal preparation were recorded. The scanning electron microscopy was applied to detect the fracture surfaces. Results Compared with ProTaper F2 files, the bending loads of OneShape files were significantly lower at deflections of 45°(P < .05), 60° (P < .05) and 75° (P < .01). No significant difference was found at 30°. OneShape files presented a higher NCF in both 60° and 90° canals than the control (P < .01). No significant difference of NCF was found between OneShape and ProTaper files in 30° canals. During the preparation of 30° canals by both files, the negative forces were dominant. With the increase of the curvature, more positive forces were observed. When the OneShape Files were compared with the control, significant different forces were found at D3 and D2 (P < .05) in 30° canals, at D2 (P < .05), D1 (P < .01) and D0 (P < .01) in 60° canals, and at D4 and D3 (P < .01) in 90° canals. Conclusions OneShape files possessed a reliable flexibility and cyclic fatigue resistance. According to the assessments of the forces generated by files, OneShape instruments performed in a more fatigue-resistant way during curved canal preparation, compared with the ProTaper F2 files. PMID:27513666

  17. Using Light Curves to Characterize Size and Shape of Pseudo-Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriquez, Heather M.; Abercromby, Kira J.; Jarvis, Kandy S.; Barker, Edwin

    2006-01-01

    Photometric measurements were collected for a new study aimed at estimating orbital debris sizes based on object brightness. To obtain a size from optical measurements the current practice is to assume an albedo and use a normalized magnitude to calculate optical size. However, assuming a single albedo value may not be valid for all objects or orbit types; material type and orientation can mask an object s true optical cross section. This experiment used a CCD camera to record data, a 300 W Xenon, Ozone Free collimated light source to simulate solar illumination, and a robotic arm with five degrees of freedom to move the piece of simulated debris through various orientations. The pseudo-debris pieces used in this experiment originate from the European Space Operations Centre s ESOC2 ground test explosion of a mock satellite. A uniformly illuminated white ping-pong ball was used as a zero-magnitude reference. Each debris piece was then moved through specific orientations and rotations to generate a light curve. This paper discusses the results of five different object-based light curves as measured through an x-rotation. Intensity measurements, from which each light curve was generated, were recorded in five degree increments from zero to 180 degrees. Comparing light curves of different shaped and sized pieces against their characteristic length establishes the start of a database from which an optical size estimation model will be derived in the future.

  18. Shape-anisotropic particles at curved fluid interfaces and role of Laplace pressure: a computational study.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Tian-Le; Wang, Yu U

    2013-07-15

    The self-assembly behavior of shape-anisotropic particles at curved fluid interfaces is computationally investigated by diffuse interface field approach (DIFA). A Gibbs-Duhem-type thermodynamic formalism is introduced to treat heterogeneous pressure within the phenomenological model, in agreement with Young-Laplace equation. Computer simulations are performed to study the effects of capillary forces (interfacial tension and Laplace pressure) on particle self-assembly at fluid interfaces in various two-dimensional cases. For isolated particles, it is found that the equilibrium liquid interface remains circular and particles of different shapes do not disturb the homogeneous curvature of liquid interface, while the equilibrium position, orientation and stability of a particle at the liquid interface depend on its shape and initial location with respect to the liquid interface. For interacting particles, the curvature of local liquid interfaces is different from the apparent curvature of the particle shell; nevertheless, irrespective of the particle shapes, a particle-coated droplet always tends to deform into a circular morphology under positive Laplace pressure, loses mechanical stability and collapses under negative Laplace pressure, while adapts to any morphology and stays in neutral equilibrium under zero Laplace pressure. Finally, the collective behaviors of particles and Laplace pressure evolution in bicontinuous interfacially jammed emulsion gels (bijels) are investigated. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Study of photometric phase curve: assuming a cellinoid ellipsoid shape for asteroid (106) Dione

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yi-Bo; Wang, Xiao-Bin; Pray, Donald P.; Wang, Ao

    2017-09-01

    We carried out new photometric observations of asteroid (106) Dione at three apparitions (2004, 2012 and 2015) to understand its basic physical properties. Based on a new brightness model, new photometric observational data and published data of (106) Dione were analyzed to characterize the morphology of Dione’s photometric phase curve. In this brightness model, a cellinoid ellipsoid shape and three-parameter (H,{G}1,{G}2) magnitude phase function system were involved. Such a model can not only solve the phase function system parameters of (106) Dione by considering an asymmetric shape of an asteroid, but also can be applied to more asteroids, especially those without enough photometric data to solve the convex shape. Using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method, Dione’s absolute magnitude of H={7.66}-0.03+0.03 mag, and phase function parameters {G}1={0.682}-0.077+0.077 and {G}2={0.081}-0.042+0.042 were obtained. Simultaneously, Dione’s simplistic shape, orientation of pole and rotation period were also determined preliminarily.

  20. Nonmonotonic dose response curves (NMDRCs) are common after Estrogen or Androgen signaling pathway disruption. Fact or Falderal? ###SETAC

    EPA Science Inventory

    The shape of the dose response curve in the low dose region has been debated since the late 1940s. The debate originally focused on linear no threshold (LNT) vs threshold responses in the low dose range for cancer and noncancer related effects. Recently, claims have arisen tha...

  1. NONMONOTONIC DOSE RESPONSE CURVES (NMDRCS) ARE COMMON AFTER ESTROGEN OR ANDROGEN SIGNALING PATHWAY DISRUPTION. FACT OR FALDERAL?

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT BODY: The shape of the dose response curve in the low dose region has been debated since the 1940s, originally focusing on linear no threshold (LNT) versus threshold responses for cancer and noncancer effects. Recently, it has been claimed that endocrine disrupters (EDCs...

  2. Nonmonotonic dose response curves (NMDRCs) are common after Estrogen or Androgen signaling pathway disruption. Fact or Falderal? ###SETAC

    EPA Science Inventory

    The shape of the dose response curve in the low dose region has been debated since the late 1940s. The debate originally focused on linear no threshold (LNT) vs threshold responses in the low dose range for cancer and noncancer related effects. Recently, claims have arisen tha...

  3. NONMONOTONIC DOSE RESPONSE CURVES (NMDRCS) ARE COMMON AFTER ESTROGEN OR ANDROGEN SIGNALING PATHWAY DISRUPTION. FACT OR FALDERAL?

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT BODY: The shape of the dose response curve in the low dose region has been debated since the 1940s, originally focusing on linear no threshold (LNT) versus threshold responses for cancer and noncancer effects. Recently, it has been claimed that endocrine disrupters (EDCs...

  4. Divergent selection for shape of growth curve in Japanese quail. 2. Embryonic development and growth.

    PubMed

    Hyánková, L; Novotná, B; Knízetová, H; Horácková, S

    2004-04-01

    1. Embryonic growth and development were analysed using meat type lines of Japanese quail, HG and LG, divergently selected for shape of the growth curve. A total of 1020 embryos of generations 9, 10 or 13 were used for analysis. 2. Considerable inter-line differences were observed in the rate of embryonic development. When compared to HG, LG embryos appeared to be developmentally accelerated during the first 42 h of incubation (larger blastoderm diameter, more somites and higher frequency of more advanced Hamburger-Hamilton stages) as well as at the end of the prenatal period (more embryos with the yolk sac inside the body cavity, shorter incubation period). This corresponded with the trend in postnatal development. 3. Embryonic growth of both lines exhibited an exponential trend. However, considerable inter-line differences were noted in the rate of embryonic growth. Initial growth retardation compensated subsequently by a higher growth rate of HG vs LG quail, characterised the lines after hatching. The same growth pattern repeated three times during the prenatal period (between d 0 and 3, 3 and 8, and 8 and 16). 4. The repeated occurrence of transient decreases in growth rate of the developmentally delayed HG line could be associated with a delayed onset of genetically determined physiological functions mediating utilisation of nutrient supply. 5. Hence, different shapes of growth curves in two genotypes with similar growth potential reveal inter-line differences in physiological age persisting during the whole ontogenesis.

  5. Analysis of complete fold shape based on quadratic Bézier curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chun; Zhang, Yikun; Wang, Yuan

    2009-06-01

    Six segments of quadratic Bézier curve are joined together according to some geometrical rules to approximate fold shape. In a classification of folds based on this method, an ideal fold shape is determined by two parameters. The first one, u c, termed the axial lift-up ratio of the central part, generates the folds within a broad spectrum of forms ranging from box folds to chevron folds. The other one, γ, is the interlimb angle. In the quantitative description of complete folds with multiple layers, three new parameters, θ, T and E are used to describe the deflection angle of the axial plane, the thickness increment of hinge zone and the limb elongation, respectively. Based on the modeling method, the program "Bézier Fold Profiler" has been developed, with which most types of folds can be simulated by varying thirteen parameters. Two description methods, complete fold description and individual layer description, can be used for the quantitative analysis of folds. The description methods are carried out by the visual matching of the fold profile displayed on-screen from an imported digital image. The layer curves of the model are displayed on the fold image. This method has the advantage of speed and simplicity.

  6. Static and dynamic response of graphite-epoxy curved frames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, J. S.; Johnson, E. R.

    1990-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to measure the three-dimensional static and vibratory response of two graphite-epoxy, thin-walled, open section frames. The frames are semicircular with a radius of three feet. One specimen had an I cross section and the other had a channel cross section. The experimental data is used to evaluate a mixed finite element model of the frames that is based on Vlasov-type, thin-walled, open section curved beam theory.

  7. An alternative method for comparing and describing methacholine response curves.

    PubMed

    Sherrill, D L; Martinez, F D; Sears, M R; Lebowitz, M D

    1993-07-01

    Tests of nonspecific airway hyperresponsiveness are frequently used in the study of asthma both in the clinical settings and in epidemiologic studies. However, standard methods for characterizing individual tests and comparing results between subgroups have not been established. The most frequently used method of characterizing response curves is to report the dose that results in a 20% fall in FEV1 from the initial or baseline FEV1 value (PD20FEV1). Other investigators have suggested using the response slopes. In this study we demonstrate an alternative method of analysis that uses all of each subject's response data, makes comparisons between subgroups, and can include explanatory covariables. This approach is demonstrated using methacholine challenge data obtained in New Zealand children at 9 and 11 yr of age. The results showed significant differences between the mean dose-response curves of wheezers and nonwheezers, that responsiveness increased with the frequency of reported wheeze, and that initial pulmonary function and serum IgE are significantly related to responsiveness. These factors were not always significant using more traditional methods of analysis, indicating an increased sensitivity with this method of analysis.

  8. An Investigation of How a Meteor Light Curve is Modified by Meteor Shape and Atmospheric Density Perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stokan, E.; Campbell-Brown, M. D.

    2011-01-01

    This is a preliminary investigation of how perturbations to meteoroid shape or atmospheric density affect a meteor light curve. A simple equation of motion and ablation are simultaneously solved numerically to give emitted light intensity as a function of height. It is found that changing the meteoroid shape, by changing the relationship between the cross-section area and the mass, changes the curvature and symmetry of the light curve, while making a periodic oscillation in atmospheric density gives a small periodic oscillation in the light curve.

  9. Quantifying inter-group variability in lactation curve shape and magnitude with the MilkBot(®) lactation model.

    PubMed

    Ehrlich, James L

    2013-01-01

    Genetic selection programs have driven development of most lactation models, to estimate the magnitude of animals' productive capacity from sampled milk production data. There has been less attention to management and research applications, where it may also be important to quantify the shape of lactation curves, and predict future daily milk production for incomplete lactations since residuals between predicted and actual daily production can be used to quantify the response to an intervention. A model may decrease the confounding effects of lactation stage, parity, breed, and possibly other factors depending on how the model is constructed and used, thus increasing the power of statistical analyses. Models with a mechanistic derivation may allow direct inference about biology from fitted production data. The MilkBot(®) lactation model is derived from abstract suppositions about growth of udder capacity. This permits inference about shape of the lactation curve directly from parameter values, but not direct conclusions about physiology. Individual parameters relate to the overall scale of the lactation, the ramp , or rate of growth around parturition, decay describing the senescence of productive capacity (inversely related to persistence ), and the relatively insignificant time offset between calving and the physiological start of milk secretion. A proprietary algorithm was used to fit monthly test data from two parity groups in 21 randomly selected herds, and results displayed in box-and-whisker charts and Z-test tables. Fitted curves are constrained by the MilkBot(®) equation to a single peak that blends into an exponential decline in late lactation. This is seen as an abstraction of productive capacity, with actual daily production higher or lower due to random error plus short-term environmental effects. The four MilkBot(®) parameters, and metrics calculated directly from them including fitting error, peak milk and cumulative production, can be used to

  10. Sampling design and the shape of species area curves on the regional scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulrich, Werner; Buszko, Jarosław

    2007-01-01

    Species-area relationships (SARs) are one of the fundamental patterns in ecology. However, how the way they were constructed influences resulting SAR shapes has gained astonishingly little attention. We use data of the distribution atlas of Polish butterflies to compare SARs constructed from four different designs: adding up species numbers of independent areas (species accumulation curves using contiguous and non-contiguous areas), using a nested design, and comparing species numbers of independent areas of different sizes. It appeared that the way of constructing SARs influences the outcome. We attribute this influence to the pronounced faunal dissimilarities of more distant areas (spatial species turnover). The nested design resulted in significantly higher slopes and lower intercepts of power function SARs than the other designs. SARs from all four sampling designs showed a pronounced downward curvature on small spatial scales. Only the nested design predicted species densities correctly. The implications of these results for the use of SARs in bioconservation are discussed.

  11. Radiation quality and the shape of dose-effect curves at low doses of ionizing radiation for eukaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Petin, V G; Kapultcevich, Yu G

    2014-06-01

    To explain different yeast and mammalian cell response to low and high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation in low dose region, the dependence of fine target structure on the stage of cell growth was supposed. Theoretical consideration based on this suggestion was carried out. Results of calculations are qualitatively in agreement with experimental data under assuming that hit-event for both mammalian and yeast cells is a group of ionizations produced by the same ionizing particle. In the dependence of cell cycle phase, sensitive sites (presumable the vulnerable sections of chromosomes) can be located either in periphery of cell nucleus forming a thin layer inside the nucleus or distributed evenly over the whole nucleus. Such rearrangement of the target results in the alteration of the dependence of both survival curve shape and the relative biological effectiveness values on radiation quality. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. What Ecological Factors Shape Species-Area Curves in Neutral Models?

    PubMed Central

    Cencini, Massimo; Pigolotti, Simone; Muñoz, Miguel A.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding factors that shape biodiversity and species coexistence across scales is of utmost importance in ecology, both theoretically and for conservation policies. Species-area relationships (SARs), measuring how the number of observed species increases upon enlarging the sampled area, constitute a convenient tool for quantifying the spatial structure of biodiversity. While general features of species-area curves are quite universal across ecosystems, some quantitative aspects can change significantly. Several attempts have been made to link these variations to ecological forces. Within the framework of spatially explicit neutral models, here we scrutinize the effect of varying the local population size (i.e. the number of individuals per site) and the level of habitat saturation (allowing for empty sites). We conclude that species-area curves become shallower when the local population size increases, while habitat saturation, unless strongly violated, plays a marginal role. Our findings provide a plausible explanation of why SARs for microorganisms are flatter than those for larger organisms. PMID:22675526

  13. Interactive 3D medical data cutting using closed curve with arbitrary shape.

    PubMed

    Ning, Hai; Yang, Rongqian; Ma, Amin; Wu, Xiaoming

    2015-03-01

    Interactive 3D cutting is widely used as a flexible manual segmentation tool to extract medical data on regions of interest. A novel method for clipping 3D medical data is proposed to reveal the interior of volumetric data. The 3D cutting method retains or clips away selected voxels projected inside an arbitrary-shaped closed curve which is clipping geometry constructed by interactive tool to make cutting operation more flexible. Transformation between the world and screen coordinate frames is studied to project voxels of medical data onto the screen frame and avoid computing intersection of clipping geometry and volumetric data in 3D space. For facilitating the decision on whether the voxels should be retained, voxels through coordinate transformation are all projected onto a binary mask image on screen frame which the closed curve is also projected onto to conveniently obtain the voxels of intersection. The paper pays special attention to optimization algorithm of cutting process. The optimization algorithm that mixes octree with quad-tree decomposition is introduced to reduce computation complexity, save computation time, and match real time. The paper presents results obtained from raw and segmented medical volume datasets and the process time of cutting operation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Phase response curves for models of earthquake fault dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Franović, Igor; Kostić, Srdjan; Perc, Matjaž; Klinshov, Vladimir; Nekorkin, Vladimir; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-06-15

    We systematically study effects of external perturbations on models describing earthquake fault dynamics. The latter are based on the framework of the Burridge-Knopoff spring-block system, including the cases of a simple mono-block fault, as well as the paradigmatic complex faults made up of two identical or distinct blocks. The blocks exhibit relaxation oscillations, which are representative for the stick-slip behavior typical for earthquake dynamics. Our analysis is carried out by determining the phase response curves of first and second order. For a mono-block fault, we consider the impact of a single and two successive pulse perturbations, further demonstrating how the profile of phase response curves depends on the fault parameters. For a homogeneous two-block fault, our focus is on the scenario where each of the blocks is influenced by a single pulse, whereas for heterogeneous faults, we analyze how the response of the system depends on whether the stimulus is applied to the block having a shorter or a longer oscillation period.

  15. Phase response curves for models of earthquake fault dynamics.

    PubMed

    Franović, Igor; Kostić, Srdjan; Perc, Matjaž; Klinshov, Vladimir; Nekorkin, Vladimir; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-06-01

    We systematically study effects of external perturbations on models describing earthquake fault dynamics. The latter are based on the framework of the Burridge-Knopoff spring-block system, including the cases of a simple mono-block fault, as well as the paradigmatic complex faults made up of two identical or distinct blocks. The blocks exhibit relaxation oscillations, which are representative for the stick-slip behavior typical for earthquake dynamics. Our analysis is carried out by determining the phase response curves of first and second order. For a mono-block fault, we consider the impact of a single and two successive pulse perturbations, further demonstrating how the profile of phase response curves depends on the fault parameters. For a homogeneous two-block fault, our focus is on the scenario where each of the blocks is influenced by a single pulse, whereas for heterogeneous faults, we analyze how the response of the system depends on whether the stimulus is applied to the block having a shorter or a longer oscillation period.

  16. Phase response curves in the characterization of epileptiform activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez Velazquez, J. L.; Galán, R. F.; Dominguez, L. Garcia; Leshchenko, Y.; Lo, S.; Belkas, J.; Erra, R. Guevara

    2007-12-01

    Coordinated cellular activity is a major characteristic of nervous system function. Coupled oscillator theory offers unique avenues to address cellular coordination phenomena. In this study, we focus on the characterization of the dynamics of epileptiform activity, based on some seizures that manifest themselves with very periodic rhythmic activity, termed absence seizures. Our approach consists in obtaining experimentally the phase response curves (PRCs) in the neocortex and thalamus, and incorporating these PRCs into a model of coupled oscillators. Phase preferences of the stationary states and their stability are determined, and these results from the model are compared with the experimental recordings, and interpreted in physiological terms.

  17. Trichinella spiralis: shaping the immune response.

    PubMed

    Ilic, Natasa; Gruden-Movsesijan, Alisa; Sofronic-Milosavljevic, Ljiljana

    2012-04-01

    The co-evolution of a wide range of helminth parasites and vertebrates represented a constant pressure on the host's immune system and a selective force for shaping the immune response. Modulation of the immune system by parasites is accomplished partly by dendritic cells. When exposed to helminth parasites or their products, dendritic cells do not become classically mature and are potent inducers of Th2 and regulatory responses. Treating animals with helminths (eggs, larvae, extracts) causes dampening or in some cases prevention of allergic or autoimmune diseases. Trichinella spiralis (T. spiralis) possess a capacity to retune the immune cell repertoire, acting as a moderator of the host response not only to itself but also to third party antigens. In this review, we will focus on the ability of T. spiralis-stimulated dendritic cells to polarize the immune response toward Th2 and regulatory mode in vitro and in vivo and also on the capacity of this parasite to modulate autoimmune disease--such as experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

  18. Estimation of a Ramsay-Curve Item Response Theory Model by the Metropolis-Hastings Robbins-Monro Algorithm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monroe, Scott; Cai, Li

    2014-01-01

    In Ramsay curve item response theory (RC-IRT) modeling, the shape of the latent trait distribution is estimated simultaneously with the item parameters. In its original implementation, RC-IRT is estimated via Bock and Aitkin's EM algorithm, which yields maximum marginal likelihood estimates. This method, however, does not produce the…

  19. Estimation of a Ramsay-Curve Item Response Theory Model by the Metropolis-Hastings Robbins-Monro Algorithm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monroe, Scott; Cai, Li

    2014-01-01

    In Ramsay curve item response theory (RC-IRT) modeling, the shape of the latent trait distribution is estimated simultaneously with the item parameters. In its original implementation, RC-IRT is estimated via Bock and Aitkin's EM algorithm, which yields maximum marginal likelihood estimates. This method, however, does not produce the…

  20. Measurement of infinitesimal phase response curves from noisy real neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ota, Keisuke; Omori, Toshiaki; Watanabe, Shigeo; Miyakawa, Hiroyoshi; Okada, Masato; Aonishi, Toru

    2011-10-01

    We sought to measure infinitesimal phase response curves (iPRCs) from rat hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. It is difficult to measure iPRCs from noisy neurons because of the dilemma that either the linearity or the signal-to-noise ratio of responses to external perturbations must be sacrificed. To overcome this difficulty, we used an iPRC measurement model formulated as the Langevin phase equation (LPE) to extract iPRCs in the Bayesian scheme. We then simultaneously verified the effectiveness of the measurement model and the reliability of the estimated iPRCs by demonstrating that LPEs with the estimated iPRCs could predict the stochastic behaviors of the same neurons, whose iPRCs had been measured, when they were perturbed by periodic stimulus currents. Our results suggest that the LPE is an effective model for real oscillating neurons and that many theoretical frameworks based on it may be applicable to real nerve systems.

  1. Interpretation of psychophysics response curves using statistical physics.

    PubMed

    Knani, S; Khalfaoui, M; Hachicha, M A; Mathlouthi, M; Ben Lamine, A

    2014-05-15

    Experimental gustatory curves have been fitted for four sugars (sucrose, fructose, glucose and maltitol), using a double layer adsorption model. Three parameters of the model are fitted, namely the number of molecules per site n, the maximum response RM and the concentration at half saturation C1/2. The behaviours of these parameters are discussed in relationship to each molecule's characteristics. Starting from the double layer adsorption model, we determined (in addition) the adsorption energy of each molecule on taste receptor sites. The use of the threshold expression allowed us to gain information about the adsorption occupation rate of a receptor site which fires a minimal response at a gustatory nerve. Finally, by means of this model we could calculate the configurational entropy of the adsorption system, which can describe the order and disorder of the adsorbent surface.

  2. Timing of cochlear responses inferred from frequency-threshold tuning curves of auditory-nerve fibers

    PubMed Central

    Temchin, Andrei N.; Recio-Spinoso, Alberto; Ruggero, Mario A.

    2010-01-01

    Links between frequency tuning and timing were explored in the responses to sound of auditory-nerve fibers. Synthetic transfer functions were constructed by combining filter functions, derived via minimum-phase computations from average frequency-threshold tuning curves of chinchilla auditory-nerve fibers with high spontaneous activity (A. N. Temchin et al., J. Neurophysiol. 100: 2889–2898, 2008), and signal-front delays specified by the latencies of basilar-membrane and auditory-nerve fiber responses to intense clicks (A. N. Temchin et al., J. Neurophysiol. 93: 3635–3648, 2005). The transfer functions predict several features of the phase-frequency curves of cochlear responses to tones, including their shape transitions in the regions with characteristic frequencies of 1 kHz and 3–4 kHz (A. N. Temchin and M. A. Ruggero, JARO 11: 297–318, 2010). The transfer functions also predict the shapes of cochlear impulse responses, including the polarities of their frequency sweeps and their transition at characteristic frequencies around 1 kHz. Predictions are especially accurate for characteristic frequencies < 1 kHz. PMID:20951191

  3. Improved Distances to Type Ia Supernovae withMulticolor Light Curve Shapes: MLCS2k2

    SciTech Connect

    Jha, Saurabh; Riess, Adam G.; Kirshner, Robert P.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.

    2007-01-05

    We present an updated version of the Multicolor Light Curve Shape method to measure distances to type Ia supernovae (SN Ia), incorporating new procedures for K-correction and extinction corrections. We also develop a simple model to disentangle intrinsic color variations and reddening by dust, and expand the method to incorporate U-band light curves and to more easily accommodate prior constraints on any of the model parameters. We apply this method to 133 nearby SN Ia, including 95 objects in the Hubble flow (cz {ge} 2500 km s{sup -1}), which give an intrinsic dispersion of less than 7% in distance. The Hubble flow sample, which is of critical importance to all cosmological uses of SN Ia, is the largest ever presented with homogeneous distances. We find the Hubble flow supernovae with H{sub 0}d{sub SN} {ge} 7400 km s{sup -1} yield an expansion rate that is 6.5 {+-} 1.8% lower than the rate determined from supernovae within that distance, and this can have a large effect on measurements of the dark energy equation of state with SN Ia. Peculiar velocities of SN Ia host galaxies in the rest frame of the Local Group are consistent with the dipole measured in the Cosmic Microwave Background. Direct fits of SN Ia that are significantly reddened by dust in their host galaxies suggest their mean extinction law may be described by R{sub V} {approx_equal} 2.7, but optical colors alone provide weak constraints on R{sub V}.

  4. Associations between the time of conception and the shape of the lactation curve in early lactation in Norwegian dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Fredrik; Østerås, Olav; Reksen, Olav; Toft, Nils; Gröhn, Yrjo T

    2011-02-08

    This study was carried out to determine if an association exists between the shape of the lactation curve before it is influenced by the event of conception and the time from calving to conception in Norwegian dairy cattle. Lactation curves of Norwegian Red cows during 5 to 42 days in milk (DIM) were compared between cows conceiving between 43 and 93 DIM and cows conceiving after 93 DIM. Data from 23,049 cows, represented by one lactation each, with 219,538 monthly test days were extracted from the Norwegian Dairy Herd Recording System, which represents 97% of all Norwegian dairy cows. Besides veterinary treatments, these records also included information on daily milk yield at monthly test days. The data were stratified by parity groups (1, 2, and 3 and higher) and time to conception periods (43-93 DIM and >93 DIM). The sample was selected using the following selection criteria: conception later than 42 DIM, calving season July to September, no records of veterinary treatment and the level of energy fed as concentrates between 8.69 and 12.83 MJ. The shape of the lactation curves were parameterized using a modified Wilmink-model in a mixed model analysis. Differences in the parameters of the lactation curves with different conception times were evaluated using confidence intervals. Lactation curves characterized by a low intercept and a steep ascending slope and a steep descending slope were associated with early conception across all parities. The peak milk yield was not associated with time of conception. A practical application of the study results is the use of the shape of the lactation curve in future herd management. Groups of cows with impaired reproductive performance may be identified due to an unfavorable shape of the lactation curve. Monitoring lactation curves and adjusting the feeding strategy to adjust yield therefore may be useful for the improvement of reproductive performance at herd level.

  5. Light curve and fan-shaped coma of comet P/Tempel 2 in 1988-1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akisawa, Hiroki; Tsumura, Mitsunori; Nakamura, Akimasa; Watanabe, Jun-Ichi

    1992-01-01

    Visual and Photographic Monitoring observations of comet P/Tempel 2 were carried out by a Japanese amateur group 'Hoshi-no-Hiroba' in 1988-1989. We analyzed the light curve and the time variation of the fan-shaped coma. The light curve was asymmetric to the perihelion passage. The fan angle in September-October was wider than that in December. The direction of the fan generally coincided with Sekanina's prediction (1988).

  6. CALUX measurements: statistical inferences for the dose-response curve.

    PubMed

    Elskens, M; Baston, D S; Stumpf, C; Haedrich, J; Keupers, I; Croes, K; Denison, M S; Baeyens, W; Goeyens, L

    2011-09-30

    Chemical Activated LUciferase gene eXpression [CALUX] is a reporter gene mammalian cell bioassay used for detection and semi-quantitative analyses of dioxin-like compounds. CALUX dose-response curves for 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin [TCDD] are typically smooth and sigmoidal when the dose is portrayed on a logarithmic scale. Non-linear regression models are used to calibrate the CALUX response versus TCDD standards and to convert the sample response into Bioanalytical EQuivalents (BEQs). Several complications may arise in terms of statistical inference, specifically and most important is the uncertainty assessment of the predicted BEQ. This paper presents the use of linear calibration functions based on Box-Cox transformations to overcome the issue of uncertainty assessment. Main issues being addressed are (i) confidence and prediction intervals for the CALUX response, (ii) confidence and prediction intervals for the predicted BEQ-value, and (iii) detection/estimation capabilities for the sigmoid and linearized models. Statistical comparisons between different calculation methods involving inverse prediction, effective concentration ratios (ECR(20-50-80)) and slope ratio were achieved with example datasets in order to provide guidance for optimizing BEQ determinations and expand assay performance with the recombinant mouse hepatoma CALUX cell line H1L6.1c3.

  7. U-shaped curve of psychosis according to cannabis use: New evidence from a snowball sample.

    PubMed

    Brañas, Antía; Barrigón, María L; Garrido-Torres, Nathalia; Perona-Garcelán, Salvador; Rodriguez-Testal, Juan F; Lahera, Guillermo; Ruiz-Veguilla, Miguel

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between psychotic-like experiences (PLEs) assessed using the Community Assessment of Psychic Experience (CAPE) questionnaire and the pattern of cannabis use in a non-clinical sample collected by snowball sampling. Our sample was composed of 204 subjects, distributed into three groups by their cannabis use pattern: 68 were non-cannabis users, 40 were moderate cannabis users and 96 were daily cannabis users. We assessed the psychotic experiences in each group with the CAPE questionnaire; and then controlled for the effect of possible confounding factors like sex, age, social exclusion, age of onset of cannabis use, alcohol use and other drug use. We found a significant quadratic association between the frequency of cannabis use and positive (β = -1.8; p = 0.004) and negative dimension scores (β = -1.2; p = 0.04). The first-rank and mania factors showed a significant quadratic association (p < 0.05), while the voices factor showed a trend (p = 0.07). Scores for the different groups tended to maintain a U-shape in their values for the different factors. When we adjusted for gender, age, social exclusion, age of onset of cannabis use, and use of alcohol and other drugs, only the first-rank experiences remained significant. We found there was a U-shaped curve in the association between cannabis use and the positive and negative dimensions of the CAPE score. We also found this association in mania and first-rank experiences. © The Author(s) 2016.

  8. Systems Cancer Biology and the Controlling Mechanisms for the J-Shaped Cancer Dose Response: Towards Relaxing the LNT Hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Lou, In Chio; Zhao, Yuchao; Wu, Yingjie; Ricci, Paolo F

    2012-01-01

    The hormesis phenomena or J-shaped dose response have been accepted as a common phenomenon regardless of the involved biological model, endpoint measured and chemical class/physical stressor. This paper first introduced a mathematical dose response model based on systems biology approach. It links molecular-level cell cycle checkpoint control information to clonal growth cancer model to predict the possible shapes of the dose response curves of Ionizing Radiation (IR) induced tumor transformation frequency. J-shaped dose response curves have been captured with consideration of cell cycle checkpoint control mechanisms. The simulation results indicate the shape of the dose response curve relates to the behavior of the saddle-node points of the model in the bifurcation diagram. A simplified version of the model in previous work of the authors was used mathematically to analyze behaviors relating to the saddle-node points for the J-shaped dose response curve. It indicates that low-linear energy transfer (LET) is more likely to have a J-shaped dose response curve. This result emphasizes the significance of systems biology approach, which encourages collaboration of multidiscipline of biologists, toxicologists and mathematicians, to illustrate complex cancer-related events, and confirm the biphasic dose-response at low doses.

  9. Constraining the Physical Properties of Meteor Stream Particles by Light Curve Shapes Using the Virtual Meteor Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koschny, D.; Gritsevich, M.; Barentsen, G.

    2011-01-01

    Different authors have produced models for the physical properties of meteoroids based on the shape of a meteor's light curve, typically from short observing campaigns. We here analyze the height profiles and light curves of approx.200 double-station meteors from the Leonids and Perseids using data from the Virtual Meteor Observatory, to demonstrate that with this web-based meteor database it is possible to analyze very large datasets from different authors in a consistent way. We compute the average heights for begin point, maximum luminosity, and end heights for Perseids and Leonids. We also compute the skew of the light curve, usually called the F-parameter. The results compare well with other author's data. We display the average light curve in a novel way to assess the light curve shape in addition to using the F-parameter. While the Perseids show a peaked light curve, the average Leonid light curve has a more flat peak. This indicates that the particle distribution of Leonid meteors can be described by a Gaussian distribution; the Perseids can be described with a power law. The skew for Leonids is smaller than for Perseids, indicating that the Leonids are more fragile than the Perseids.

  10. Collective phase response curves for heterogeneous coupled oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannay, Kevin M.; Booth, Victoria; Forger, Daniel B.

    2015-08-01

    Phase response curves (PRCs) have become an indispensable tool in understanding the entrainment and synchronization of biological oscillators. However, biological oscillators are often found in large coupled heterogeneous systems and the variable of physiological importance is the collective rhythm resulting from an aggregation of the individual oscillations. To study this phenomena we consider phase resetting of the collective rhythm for large ensembles of globally coupled Sakaguchi-Kuramoto oscillators. Making use of Ott-Antonsen theory we derive an asymptotically valid analytic formula for the collective PRC. A result of this analysis is a characteristic scaling for the change in the amplitude and entrainment points for the collective PRC compared to the individual oscillator PRC. We support the analytical findings with numerical evidence and demonstrate the applicability of the theory to large ensembles of coupled neuronal oscillators.

  11. A Statistical Theory for Shape Analysis of Curves and Surfaces with Applications in Image Analysis, Biometrics, Bioinformatics and Medical Diagnostics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-10

    investigated. For further details, please refer to the article [14]. 5 2. Shape Analysis of Elastic Curves in Euclidean Spaces: This work introduces...predicting shapes from novel poses. For further details, please refer to the conference articles [3, 4] and the journal article [18]. 3. Path...this framework in shapebased object recognition or classification. For further details, please refer to the article [5]. Figure 2: Two examples of

  12. Professional development for nurses: mentoring along the u-shaped curve.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Joyce E; Billingsley, Molly; Crichlow, Tori; Ferrell, Eileen

    2011-01-01

    Shortages of nurses are expected to continue throughout the coming decade. To meet the demand, nursing leaders must develop creative approaches for nurturing and sustaining nursing talent. Traditionally, nursing has embraced a variety of development strategies to enhance the leadership abilities of nurses and to fill the leadership ranks with top talent. We describe the rationale, design, and impact of a 3-pronged organizational approach to mentoring nursing talent at Georgetown University Hospital, the first Magnet hospital in Washington, District of Columbia. The design of these programs was driven by the demographics of our nursing staff. Analysis of length of tenure revealed a modified "U-shaped curve" with the majority of new nurses with tenure less than 5 years, few in the middle between 5 and 15 years, and a moderate number with 15 or more years. Investment in all our nurses' leadership development required integrating a diverse developmental process into our organizational culture, which values personal growth and mastery. A strong mentoring program makes good business sense in terms of employee job satisfaction, improved cost control, and better patient outcomes. Our experience suggests that voluntary mentoring programs work synergistically to further the development of a mentoring culture in today's hospitals.

  13. Dome Shape Optimization of Composite Pressure Vessels Based on Rational B-Spline Curve and Genetic Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vafaeesefat, Abbas

    2009-10-01

    This paper presents an algorithm for shape optimization of composite pressure vessels head. The shape factor which is defined as the ratio of internal volume to weight of the vessel is used as an objective function. Design constrains consist of the geometrical limitations, winding conditions, and Tsai-Wu failure criterion. The geometry of dome shape is defined by a B-spline rational curve. By altering the weights of control points, depth of dome, and winding angle, the dome shape is changed. The proposed algorithm uses genetic algorithm and finite element analysis to optimize the design parameters. The algorithm is applied on a CNG pressure vessel and the results show that the proposed algorithm can efficiently define the optimal dome shape. This algorithm is general and can be used for general shape optimization.

  14. LAMOST Spectrograph Response Curves: Stability and Application to Flux Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Bing; Luo, A.-Li; Kong, Xiao; Zhang, Jian-Nan; Guo, Yan-Xin; Cook, Neil James; Hou, Wen; Yang, Hai-Feng; Li, Yin-Bi; Song, Yi-Han; Chen, Jian-Jun; Zuo, Fang; Wu, Ke-Fei; Wang, Meng-Xin; Wu, Yue; Wang, You-Fen; Zhao, Yong-Heng

    2016-12-01

    The task of flux calibration for Large sky Area Multi-Object Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) spectra is difficult due to many factors, such as the lack of standard stars, flat-fielding for large field of view, and variation of reddening between different stars, especially at low Galactic latitudes. Poor selection, bad spectral quality, or extinction uncertainty of standard stars not only might induce errors to the calculated spectral response curve (SRC) but also might lead to failures in producing final 1D spectra. In this paper, we inspected spectra with Galactic latitude | b| ≥slant 60^\\circ and reliable stellar parameters, determined through the LAMOST Stellar Parameter Pipeline (LASP), to study the stability of the spectrograph. To guarantee that the selected stars had been observed by each fiber, we selected 37,931 high-quality exposures of 29,000 stars from LAMOST DR2, and more than seven exposures for each fiber. We calculated the SRCs for each fiber for each exposure and calculated the statistics of SRCs for spectrographs with both the fiber variations and time variations. The result shows that the average response curve of each spectrograph (henceforth ASPSRC) is relatively stable, with statistical errors ≤10%. From the comparison between each ASPSRC and the SRCs for the same spectrograph obtained by the 2D pipeline, we find that the ASPSRCs are good enough to use for the calibration. The ASPSRCs have been applied to spectra that were abandoned by the LAMOST 2D pipeline due to the lack of standard stars, increasing the number of LAMOST spectra by 52,181 in DR2. Comparing those same targets with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), the relative flux differences between SDSS spectra and LAMOST spectra with the ASPSRC method are less than 10%, which underlines that the ASPSRC method is feasible for LAMOST flux calibration.

  15. Maximum likelihood estimation for cytogenetic dose-response curves

    SciTech Connect

    Frome, E.L.; DuFrain, R.J.

    1986-03-01

    In vitro dose-response curves are used to describe the relation between chromosome aberrations and radiation dose for human lymphocytes. The lymphocytes are exposed to low-LET radiation, and the resulting dicentric chromosome aberrations follow the Poisson distribution. The expected yield depends on both the magnitude and the temporal distribution of the dose. A general dose-response model that describes this relation has been presented by Kellerer and Rossi (1972, Current Topics on Radiation Research Quarterly 8, 85-158; 1978, Radiation Research 75, 471-488) using the theory of dual radiation action. Two special cases of practical interest are split-dose and continuous exposure experiments, and the resulting dose-time-response models are intrinsically nonlinear in the parameters. A general-purpose maximum likelihood estimation procedure is described, and estimation for the nonlinear models is illustrated with numerical examples from both experimental designs. Poisson regression analysis is used for estimation, hypothesis testing, and regression diagnostics. Results are discussed in the context of exposure assessment procedures for both acute and chronic human radiation exposure.

  16. Therapeutic efficacy of endostatin exhibits a biphasic dose-response curve.

    PubMed

    Celik, Ilhan; Sürücü, Oguzkan; Dietz, Carsten; Heymach, John V; Force, Jeremy; Höschele, Iris; Becker, Christian M; Folkman, Judah; Kisker, Oliver

    2005-12-01

    We show here that recombinant endostatin protein has a biphasic effect on the inhibition of endothelial cell migration in vitro. In tumor-bearing animals, there is a similar biphasic effect on the inhibition of tumor growth and on circulating endothelial cells after once-daily s.c. injections. This biphasic effect is revealed as a U-shaped curve in which efficacy is optimal between very low and very high doses depending on the tumor type. This result may be applicable to other inhibitors of endothelial growth and to angiogenesis. Furthermore, these results have important implications for clinicians who administer angiogenesis inhibitors for cancer or other angiogenesis-dependent diseases. When these results are taken together with two previous reports of angiogenesis inhibitors with a U-shaped dose-response, they suggest that other regulators of endothelial growth may display a similar pattern.

  17. [Dose response curve of paclitaxel measured by histoculture drug response assay].

    PubMed

    Yoshimasu, Tatsuya; Oura, Shoji; Hirai, Issei; Kokawa, Yozo; Okamura, Yoshitaka; Furukawa, Tomoko

    2005-04-01

    Dose response curves of paclitaxel were measured by histoculture drug response assay (HDRA) in 11 lung cancer patients. Inhibition rates of paclitaxel at several concentrations were measured and fitted to the sigmoid dose response curve, using non-linear least square analysis, with fitting equation y=A (1-1/(1+exp (b (x-log (ED50)). Parameters A, b, and ED50 were 88.3+/-6.0 (80.0-100.0) %, 9.57+/-4.32 (2.25-15.0), and 26.8+/-8.1 (15.0-41.0) microg/ml, respectively. The parameter b was lower in well-differentiated tumors compared with moderately and poorly-differentiated tumors. Dose response curves of paclitaxel could be measured by HDRA in lung cancer. This method provides us more information for drug sensitivity than the usual HDRA method. This may lead to the improved accuracy of HDRA.

  18. Finite-time Lyapunov exponents and metabolic control coefficients for threshold detection of stimulus-response curves.

    PubMed

    Duc, Luu Hoang; Chávez, Joseph Páez; Son, Doan Thai; Siegmund, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    In biochemical networks transient dynamics plays a fundamental role, since the activation of signalling pathways is determined by thresholds encountered during the transition from an initial state (e.g. an initial concentration of a certain protein) to a steady-state. These thresholds can be defined in terms of the inflection points of the stimulus-response curves associated to the activation processes in the biochemical network. In the present work, we present a rigorous discussion as to the suitability of finite-time Lyapunov exponents and metabolic control coefficients for the detection of inflection points of stimulus-response curves with sigmoidal shape.

  19. Ramsay-Curve Item Response Theory for the Three-Parameter Logistic Item Response Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Carol M.

    2008-01-01

    In Ramsay-curve item response theory (RC-IRT), the latent variable distribution is estimated simultaneously with the item parameters of a unidimensional item response model using marginal maximum likelihood estimation. This study evaluates RC-IRT for the three-parameter logistic (3PL) model with comparisons to the normal model and to the empirical…

  20. Maximum likelihood estimation for cytogenetic dose-response curves

    SciTech Connect

    Frome, E.L; DuFrain, R.J.

    1983-10-01

    In vitro dose-response curves are used to describe the relation between the yield of dicentric chromosome aberrations and radiation dose for human lymphocytes. The dicentric yields follow the Poisson distribution, and the expected yield depends on both the magnitude and the temporal distribution of the dose for low LET radiation. A general dose-response model that describes this relation has been obtained by Kellerer and Rossi using the theory of dual radiation action. The yield of elementary lesions is kappa(..gamma..d + g(t, tau)d/sup 2/), where t is the time and d is dose. The coefficient of the d/sup 2/ term is determined by the recovery function and the temporal mode of irradiation. Two special cases of practical interest are split-dose and continuous exposure experiments, and the resulting models are intrinsically nonlinear in the parameters. A general purpose maximum likelihood estimation procedure is described and illustrated with numerical examples from both experimental designs. Poisson regression analysis is used for estimation, hypothesis testing, and regression diagnostics. Results are discussed in the context of exposure assessment procedures for both acute and chronic human radiation exposure.

  1. In search of a phase response curve for lithium chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Readey, M.A.; Groh, K.R.; Ehret, C.F.

    1987-01-01

    Male rats were free-run, and one day later were exposed to a single, punctate dose of 5 mM LiCl/kg body weight by injection at one of eight equally spaced times throughout the 24-h period. For each of the six days following injection, a separate phase response curve was derived from core-temperature chronograms. Unlike the classical response induced by chronobiotics such as dexamethasone, alpha-methyl-para-tyrosine, and theophylline, statistically significant phase shifts for lithium were observed only on the first day following injection. These induced phase changes were not permanent, but instead were transient. By the sixth day of free-run, all experimental rats had drifted to the control acrophase; i.e., by the end of the experiment, most of the treated rats again had phase and confidence arcs not significantly different from their controls. The confidence arcs of the acrophases of the individual animals on the subsequent days post injection reveal that in this experiment, lithium was transiently dyschronogenic rather than definitively chronobiotic. The results suggest that punctate rather than chronic administration of lithium, followed by strict orthochronal administration of traditional zeitgebers, would be an effective way of restoring circadian synchrony in an internally desynchronized system. 122 refs.

  2. Estimation of the phase response curve from Parkinsonian tremor

    PubMed Central

    Saifee, Tabish A.; Edwards, Mark J.; Kassavetis, Panagiotis

    2015-01-01

    Phase response curves (PRCs), characterizing the response of an oscillator to weak external perturbation, have been estimated from a broad range of biological oscillators, including single neurons in vivo. PRC estimates, in turn, provide an intuitive insight into how oscillatory systems become entrained and how they can be desynchronized. Here, we explore the application of PRC theory to the case of Parkinsonian tremor. Initial attempts to establish a causal effect of subthreshold transcranial magnetic stimulation applied to primary motor cortex on the filtered tremor phase were unsuccessful. We explored the possible explanations of this and demonstrate that assumptions made when estimating the PRC in a traditional setting, such as a single neuron, are not arbitrary when applied to the case of tremor PRC estimation. We go on to extract the PRC of Parkinsonian tremor using an iterative method that requires varying the definition of the tremor cycle and estimating the PRC at multiple peristimulus time samples. Justification for this method is supported by estimates of PRC from simulated single neuron data. We provide an approach to estimating confidence limits for tremor PRC and discuss the interpretational caveats introduced by tremor harmonics and the intrinsic variability of the tremor's period. PMID:26561596

  3. Effect of phase response curve skewness on synchronization of electrically coupled neuronal oscillators

    PubMed Central

    Dodla, Ramana; Wilson, Charles J.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate why electrically coupled neuronal oscillators synchronize or fail to synchronize using the theory of weakly coupled oscillators. Stability of synchrony and antisynchrony is predicted analytically and verified using numerical bifurcation diagrams. The shape of the phase response curve (PRC), the shape of the voltage time course, and the frequency of spiking are freely varied to map out regions of parameter spaces that hold stable solutions. We find that type-1 and type-2 PRCs can both hold synchronous and antisynchronous solutions, but the shape of the PRC and the voltage determine the extent of their stability. This is achieved by introducing a five-piecewise linear model to the PRC, and a three-piecewise linear model to the voltage time course, and then analyzing the resultant eigenvalue equations that determine the stability of the phase-locked solutions. A single time parameter defines the skewness of the PRC, and another single time parameter defines the spike width and frequency. Our approach gives a comprehensive picture of the relation between the PRC shape, voltage time course and the stability of the resultant synchronous and antisynchronous solutions. PMID:23777519

  4. Linear control of neuronal spike timing using phase response curves.

    PubMed

    Stigen, Tyler; Danzl, Per; Moehlis, Jeff; Netoff, Theoden

    2009-01-01

    We propose a simple, robust, linear method to control the spike timing of a periodically firing neuron. The control scheme uses the neuron's phase response curve to identify an area of optimal sensitivity for the chosen stimulation parameters. The spike advance as a function of current pulse amplitude is characterized at the optimal phase and a linear least-squares regression is fit to the data. The inverted regression is used as the control function for this method. The efficacy of this method is demonstrated through numerical simulations of a Hodgkin-Huxley style neuron model as well as in real neurons from rat hippocampal slice preparations. The study shows a proof of concept for the application of a linear control scheme to control neuron spike timing in-vitro. This study was done on an individual cell level, but translation to a tissue or network level is possible. Control schemes of this type could be implemented in a closed loop implantable device to treat neuromotor disorders involving pathologically neuronal activity such as epilepsy or Parkinson's disease.

  5. Phase-response curves and synchronized neural networks

    PubMed Central

    Smeal, Roy M.; Ermentrout, G. Bard; White, John A.

    2010-01-01

    We review the principal assumptions underlying the application of phase-response curves (PRCs) to synchronization in neuronal networks. The PRC measures how much a given synaptic input perturbs spike timing in a neural oscillator. Among other applications, PRCs make explicit predictions about whether a given network of interconnected neurons will synchronize, as is often observed in cortical structures. Regarding the assumptions of the PRC theory, we conclude: (i) The assumption of noise-tolerant cellular oscillations at or near the network frequency holds in some but not all cases. (ii) Reduced models for PRC-based analysis can be formally related to more realistic models. (iii) Spike-rate adaptation limits PRC-based analysis but does not invalidate it. (iv) The dependence of PRCs on synaptic location emphasizes the importance of improving methods of synaptic stimulation. (v) New methods can distinguish between oscillations that derive from mutual connections and those arising from common drive. (vi) It is helpful to assume linear summation of effects of synaptic inputs; experiments with trains of inputs call this assumption into question. (vii) Relatively subtle changes in network structure can invalidate PRC-based predictions. (viii) Heterogeneity in the preferred frequencies of component neurons does not invalidate PRC analysis, but can annihilate synchronous activity. PMID:20603361

  6. Human Adolescent Phase Response Curves to Bright White Light.

    PubMed

    Crowley, Stephanie J; Eastman, Charmane I

    2017-08-01

    Older adolescents are particularly vulnerable to circadian misalignment and sleep restriction, primarily due to early school start times. Light can shift the circadian system and could help attenuate circadian misalignment; however, a phase response curve (PRC) to determine the optimal time for receiving light and avoiding light is not available for adolescents. We constructed light PRCs for late pubertal to postpubertal adolescents aged 14 to 17 years. Participants completed 2 counterbalanced 5-day laboratory sessions after 8 or 9 days of scheduled sleep at home. Each session included phase assessments to measure the dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) before and after 3 days of free-running through an ultradian light-dark (wake-sleep) cycle (2 h dim [~20 lux] light, 2 h dark). In one session, intermittent bright white light (~5000 lux; four 20-min exposures) was alternated with 10 min of dim room light once per day for 3 consecutive days. The time of light varied among participants to cover the 24-h day. For each individual, the phase shift to bright light was corrected for the free-run derived from the other laboratory session with no bright light. One PRC showed phase shifts in response to light start time relative to the DLMO and another relative to home sleep. Phase delay shifts occurred around the hours corresponding to home bedtime. Phase advances occurred during the hours surrounding wake time and later in the afternoon. The transition from delays to advances occurred at the midpoint of home sleep. The adolescent PRCs presented here provide a valuable tool to time bright light in adolescents.

  7. Shape of the Hanle curve in spin-transport structures in the presence of an ac drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roundy, R. C.; Prestgard, M. C.; Tiwari, A.; Raikh, M. E.

    2014-11-01

    Resistance between two ferromagnetic electrodes coupled to a normal channel depends on their relative magnetizations. The spin-dependent component, R , of the resistance changes with magnetic field, B , normal to the directions of magnetizations. In the field of spin transport, this change, R (B ) , originating from the Larmour spin precession, is called the Hanle curve. We demonstrate that the shape of the Hanle curve evolves upon application of an ac drive and study this evolution theoretically as a function of the amplitude, B1, and frequency, ω , of the drive. If the distance between the electrodes, L , is smaller than the spin-diffusion length, λs, the prime effect of a weak circular-polarized drive is the shift of the center of the curve to the value of B for which the Larmour frequency, ωL, is ˜B12/ω . Magnetic resonance at ωL˜ω manifests itself in the derivative, d/R d B . For large L ≫λs the ac drive affects the Hanle curve if the drive amplitude exceeds the spin-relaxation rate, τs-1, i.e., at B1τs≳1 . The prime effect of the drive is the elimination of a minimum in R (B ) . A linearly polarized drive has a fundamentally different effect on the Hanle curve, affecting not its shape but rather its width.

  8. Shape optimization of 3D curved slots and its application to the squirrel-cage elastic support design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dan; Zhang, Weihong; Wang, Zhenpei; Zhu, Jihong

    2010-10-01

    The squirrel-cage elastic support is one of the most important components of an aero-engine rotor system. A proper structural design will favor the static and dynamic performances of the system. In view of the deficiency of the current shape optimization techniques, a new mapping approach is proposed to define shape design variables based on the parametric equations of 3D curves and surfaces. It is then applied for the slot shape optimization of a squirrel-cage elastic support. To this end, an automatic design procedure that integrates the Genetic Algorithm (GA) is developed to solve the problem. Two typical examples with different shape constraints are considered. Numerical results provide reasonable optimum designs for the improvement of stiffness and strength of the squirrel-cage elastic support.

  9. The light curve shapes as a key to resolving the origin of long secondary periods in red giant stars

    SciTech Connect

    Soszyński, I.; Udalski, A. E-mail: udalski@astrouw.edu.pl

    2014-06-10

    We present a study of Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment light curves of red giant stars exhibiting long secondary periods (LSPs)—an enigmatic phenomenon commonly observed in stars on the upper red giant branch and asymptotic giant branch. We show that the light curves of LSP stars are essentially identical to those of the spotted variables with one dark spot on their photospheres. Such behavior can be explained by the presence of a dusty cloud orbiting the red giant together with a low-mass companion in a close, circular orbit. We argue that the binary scenario is in agreement with most of the observational properties of LSP variables, including non-sinusoidal shapes of their radial velocity curves.

  10. A Simple Experiment Demonstrating the Relationship between Response Curves and Absorption Spectra.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Chia-yu

    1984-01-01

    Describes an experiment for recording two individual spectrophotometer response curves. The two curves are directly related to the power of transmitted beams that pass through a solvent and solution. An absorption spectrum of the solution can be constructed from the calculated rations of the curves as a function of wavelength. (JN)

  11. A Simple Experiment Demonstrating the Relationship between Response Curves and Absorption Spectra.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Chia-yu

    1984-01-01

    Describes an experiment for recording two individual spectrophotometer response curves. The two curves are directly related to the power of transmitted beams that pass through a solvent and solution. An absorption spectrum of the solution can be constructed from the calculated rations of the curves as a function of wavelength. (JN)

  12. Effect of non-linearity of a predictor on the shape and magnitude of its receiver-operating-characteristic curve in predicting a binary outcome.

    PubMed

    Ho, Kwok M

    2017-08-31

    Area under a receiver-operating-characteristic (AUROC) curve is widely used in medicine to summarize the ability of a continuous predictive marker to predict a binary outcome. This study illustrated how a U-shaped or inverted U-shaped continuous predictor would affect the shape and magnitude of its AUROC curve in predicting a binary outcome by comparing the ROC curves of the worst first 24-hour arterial pH values of 9549 consecutive critically ill patients in predicting hospital mortality before and after centering the predictor by its mean or median. A simulation dataset with an inverted U-shaped predictor was used to assess how this would affect the shape and magnitude of the AUROC curve. An asymmetrical U-shaped relationship between pH and hospital mortality, resulting in an inverse-sigmoidal ROC curve, was observed. The AUROC substantially increased after centering the predictor by its mean (0.611 vs 0.722, difference = 0.111, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.087-0.135), and was further improved after centering by its median (0.611 vs 0.745, difference = 0.133, 95%CI 0.110-0.157). A sigmoidal-shaped ROC curve was observed for an inverted U-shaped predictor. In summary, a non-linear predictor can result in a biphasic-shaped ROC curve; and centering the predictor can reduce its bias towards null predictive ability.

  13. Effects of mistuning and matrix structure on the topology of frequency response curves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Afolabi, Dare

    1989-01-01

    The stability of a frequency response curve under mild perturbations of the system's matrix is investigated. Using recent developments in the theory of singularities of differentiable maps, it is shown that the stability of a response curve depends on the structure of the system's matrix. In particular, the frequency response curves of a cylic system are shown to be unstable. Consequently, slight parameter variations engendered by mistuning will induce a significant difference in the topology of the forced response curves, if the mistuning transformation crosses the bifurcation set.

  14. Mass estimation of shaped charge jets from x-ray shadow graph with new calibration curve method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Fumikazu; Kishimura, Hiroaki; Kumakura, Akira; Sakai, Shun

    2015-06-01

    In order to assess the penetration capability of the Al and Cu metal jets against a bumper structure (such as Al plate and/or Al block), we measured the initial formation process of the metal jets generated from conical shaped charge device. The shaped charge device configurations employed in the experimental and numerical investigations have conical aluminum (and cupper) liner and steel casing with PBX explosive charge. The profile and velocity of the jets are measured with flash x-ray and x-ray film system. The mass of the jet tip are estimated from x-ray images by a calibration curve method proposed by our group. Al targets are used to evaluate a penetration performance of the jets. Additionally, we have simulated the initial formation process of the shaped charge jets with Autodyne-2D hydrodynamic code, which proposed important data to compare the experimental one.

  15. Curve evolution with a dual shape similarity and its application to segmentation of left ventricle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Jonghye; Hong, Byung-Woo; Ramesh, Amit; Germano, Guido; Kuo, C.-C. Jay; Slomka, Piotr

    2009-02-01

    Automated image segmentation has been playing a critical role in medical image analysis. Recentl, Level Set methods have shown an efficacy and efficiency in various imaging modalities. In this paper, we present a novel segmentation approach to jointly delineate the boundaries of epi- and endocardium of the left ventricle on the Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) images in a variational framework using level sets, which is in great demand as a clinical application in cardiology. One strategy to tackle segmentation under undesirable conditions such as subtle boundaries and occlusions is to exploit prior knowledge which is specific to the object to segment, in this case the knowledge about heart anatomy. While most left ventricle segmentation approaches incorporate a shape prior obtained by a training process from an ensemble of examples, we exploit a novel shape constraint using an implicit shape prior knowledge, which assumes shape similarity between epi- and endocardium allowing a variation under the Gaussian distribution. Our approach does not demand a training procedure which is usually subject to the training examples and is also laborious and time-consuming in generating the shape prior. Instead, we model a shape constraint by a statistical distance between the shape of epi- and endocardium employing signed distance functions. We applied this technique to cardiac MRI data with quantitative evaluations performed on 10 subjects. The experimental results show the robustness and effectiveness of our shape constraint within a Mumford-Shah segmentation model in the segmentation of left ventricle from cardiac MRI images in comparison with the manual segmentation results.

  16. Re-shaping graphene hydrogels for effectively enhancing actuation responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Jiangli; Hu, Chuangang; Lv, Lingxiao; Dai, Liming; Qu, Liangti

    2015-07-01

    The development of actuation-enabled materials is important for smart devices and systems. Among them, graphene with outstanding electric, thermal, and mechanical properties holds great promise as a new type of stimuli-responsive material. In this study, we developed a re-shaping strategy to construct structure-controlled graphene hydrogels for highly enhanced actuation responses. Actuators based on the re-shaped graphene hydrogel showed a much higher actuation response than that of the common graphene counterparts. On the other hand, once composited with a conducting polymer (e.g., polypyrrole), the re-shaped hybrid actuator exhibits excellent actuation behavior in response to electrochemical potential variation. Even under stimulation at a voltage as low as 0.8 V, actuators based on the re-shaped graphene-polypyrrole composite hydrogel exhibit a maximum strain response of up to 13.5%, which is the highest value reported to date for graphene-based materials.The development of actuation-enabled materials is important for smart devices and systems. Among them, graphene with outstanding electric, thermal, and mechanical properties holds great promise as a new type of stimuli-responsive material. In this study, we developed a re-shaping strategy to construct structure-controlled graphene hydrogels for highly enhanced actuation responses. Actuators based on the re-shaped graphene hydrogel showed a much higher actuation response than that of the common graphene counterparts. On the other hand, once composited with a conducting polymer (e.g., polypyrrole), the re-shaped hybrid actuator exhibits excellent actuation behavior in response to electrochemical potential variation. Even under stimulation at a voltage as low as 0.8 V, actuators based on the re-shaped graphene-polypyrrole composite hydrogel exhibit a maximum strain response of up to 13.5%, which is the highest value reported to date for graphene-based materials. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available

  17. The NURBS curves in modelling the shape of the boundary in the parametric integral equations systems for solving the Laplace equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zieniuk, Eugeniusz; Kapturczak, Marta; Sawicki, Dominik

    2016-06-01

    In solving of boundary value problems the shapes of the boundary can be modelled by the curves widely used in computer graphics. In parametric integral equations system (PIES) such curves are directly included into the mathematical formalism. Its simplify the way of definition and modification of the shape of the boundary. Until now in PIES the B-spline, Bézier and Hermite curves were used. Recent developments in the computer graphics paid our attention, therefore we implemented in PIES possibility of defining the shape of boundary using the NURBS curves. The curves will allow us to modeling different shapes more precisely. In this paper we will compare PIES solutions (with applied NURBS) with the solutions existing in the literature.

  18. Modeling and regression analysis of semiochemical dose-response curves of insect antennal reception and behavior

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Dose-response curves with semiochemicals are reported in many articles in insect chemical ecology regarding neurophysiology and behavioral bioassays. Most such curves are shown in figures where the x-axis has order of magnitude increases in dosages versus responses on the y-axis represented by point...

  19. USE OF MECHANISTIC DATA TO HELP DEFINE DOSE-RESPONSE CURVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Use of Mechanistic Data to Help Define Dose-Response Curves

    The cancer risk assessment process described by the U.S. EPA necessitates a description of the dose-response curve for tumors in humans at low (environmental) exposures. This description can either be a default l...

  20. Confidence Bands for the Three-Parameter Logistic Item Response Curve.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lord, Frederic M.; Pashley, Peter J.

    A large sample method for obtaining asymptotic simultaneous confidence bands for a three-parameter logistic response curve is described. Simultaneous confidence bands indicate the sampling variation of item response curves relative to a fitted function. A procedure is given which requires as input maximum likelihood parameter estimates and an…

  1. Points on the curve: An analysis of methods for assessing the shape of vertebrate claws.

    PubMed

    Tinius, Alexander; Patrick Russell, Anthony

    2017-02-01

    The form of amniote claws has been extensively investigated, often with inferences about ecological association being drawn from studies of their geometry. Various methods have been used to quantify differences in the geometry of claws, but rarely have the underlying assumptions of such methods been addressed. Here, we use one set of bird claws and apply six methods (five that have been previously used, and a new one) that are tasked with comparing their shape. In doing so, we compare the (1) ability of these methods to represent the shape of the claw; (2) validity of the assumptions made about underlying claw geometry; (3) their ability to be applied unambiguously; and (4) their ability to differentiate between predetermined functional clusters. We find that of the six methods considered only the geometric morphometric approach reveals differences in the shapes of bird claws. Our comparison shows that geometry-based methods can provide a general estimate of the degree of curvature of claw arcs, but are unable to differentiate between shapes. Of all of the geometry-based approaches, we conclude that the adjusted version of the Zani (2000) method is the most useful because it can be applied without ambiguity, and provides a reliable estimate of claw curvature. The three landmarks that define that method (tip and base of the claw arc, plus the intersection between said claw arc and a line drawn perpendicular from the midpoint of tip and claw base) do not all bear biological significance, but relatively clearly circumscribe the length-to-height ratio of the claw, which relates to its curvature. Overall, our comparisons reveal that the shape of avian claws does not differ significantly between climbing and perching birds, and that the utilization of preordained functional clusters in comparative data analysis can hinder the discovery of meaningful differences in claw shape. J. Morphol. 278:150-169, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals,Inc.

  2. Clone history shapes Populus drought responses.

    PubMed

    Raj, Sherosha; Bräutigam, Katharina; Hamanishi, Erin T; Wilkins, Olivia; Thomas, Barb R; Schroeder, William; Mansfield, Shawn D; Plant, Aine L; Campbell, Malcolm M

    2011-07-26

    Just as animal monozygotic twins can experience different environmental conditions by being reared apart, individual genetically identical trees of the genus Populus can also be exposed to contrasting environmental conditions by being grown in different locations. As such, clonally propagated Populus trees provide an opportunity to interrogate the impact of individual environmental history on current response to environmental stimuli. To test the hypothesis that current responses to an environmental stimulus, drought, are contingent on environmental history, the transcriptome- level drought responses of three economically important hybrid genotypes-DN34 (Populus deltoides × Populus nigra), Walker [P. deltoides var. occidentalis × (Populus laurifolia × P. nigra)], and Okanese [Walker × (P. laurifolia × P. nigra)]-derived from two different locations were compared. Strikingly, differences in transcript abundance patterns in response to drought were based on differences in geographic origin of clones for two of the three genotypes. This observation was most pronounced for the genotypes with the longest time since establishment and last common propagation. Differences in genome-wide DNA methylation paralleled the transcriptome level trends, whereby the clones with the most divergent transcriptomes and clone history had the most marked differences in the extent of total DNA methylation, suggesting an epigenomic basis for the clone history-dependent transcriptome divergence. The data provide insights into the interplay between genotype and environment in the ecologically and economically important Populus genus, with implications for the industrial application of Populus trees and the evolution and persistence of these important tree species and their associated hybrids.

  3. AN INVESTIGATION OF THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN SHAPE AND ROTATION TO EXPLAIN THE LIGHT CURVE OF NEREID

    SciTech Connect

    Hesselbrock, Andrew J.; Alexander, S. G.; Harp, Thomas W.; Abel, N. P.

    2013-06-15

    The observed photometric variability of Nereid over both short and long time scales has been known for some time and has remained a mystery. Schaefer et al. have documented some twenty years worth of observations that reveal that Nereid's light curve shows both short period intranight variations and long term active and inactive episodes. In this work, we report on a set of computational simulations of both the orbital and rotational motion of Nereid in an effort to understand Nereid's behavior. We model Nereid as an ellipsoid that is subject to torques from other bodies, and we calculate both its orbital and rotational motion. In addition, we only consider the case where Nereid is uniformly reflecting with no albedo variations on its surface. Thus, any brightness variations are caused solely by Nereid's changing orientation. We find for reasonable geometries, orientation, and spin rates that we can reproduce some of the features, but not all, of the observed light curve for Nereid. In particular, we show how active and inactive episodes can arise; however, our calculated light curve differs from observations in other aspects.

  4. The R-curve response of ceramics with microscopic reinforcements: Reinforcement and additive effects

    SciTech Connect

    Becher, P.F.; Sun, E.Y.; Plucknett, K,P.; Hsueh, C.H.

    1996-05-01

    Using direct observations with the scanning electron and optical microscopes, simultaneous measurements of fracture resistance versus crack length (R-curve behavior) and crack interactions with microstructural features at the crack tip and in its wake were made. Selecting whisker-reinforced aluminas and self-reinforced silicon nitrides, one can examine the effects of systematic modifications of microstructure and composition on the R-curve response and the mechanisms giving rise to it. Specifically, increases in whisker content and size can increase the R-Curve response, even for short crack lengths. In the self-reinforced silicon nitrides, changes in alumina: yttria additive ratios also modify the R-curve. Modeling of the R-curve response allows one to verify toughening mechanisms and, with experimental studies, to optimize the R-curve behavior in ceramics containing microscopic reinforcements, e.g., whiskers and elongated grain structures.

  5. Modeling the modified drug release from curved shape drug delivery systems - Dome Matrix(®).

    PubMed

    Caccavo, D; Barba, A A; d'Amore, M; De Piano, R; Lamberti, G; Rossi, A; Colombo, P

    2017-09-13

    The controlled drug release from hydrogel-based drug delivery systems is a topic of large interest for research in pharmacology. The mathematical modeling of the behavior of these systems is a tool of emerging relevance, since the simulations can be of use in the design of novel systems, in particular for complex shaped tablets. In this work a model, previously developed, was applied to complex-shaped oral drug delivery systems based on hydrogels (Dome Matrix®). Furthermore, the model was successfully adopted in the description of drug release from partially accessible Dome Matrix® systems (systems with some surfaces coated). In these simulations, the erosion rate was used as a fitting parameter, and its dependence upon the surface area/volume ratio and upon the local fluid dynamics was discussed. The model parameters were determined by comparison with the drug release profile from a cylindrical tablet, then the model was successfully used for the prediction of the drug release from a Dome Matrix® system, for simple module configuration and for module assembled (void and piled) configurations. It was also demonstrated that, given the same initial S/V ratio, the drug release is independent upon the shape of the tablets but it is only influenced by the S/V evolution. The model reveals itself able to describe the observed phenomena, and thus it can be of use for the design of oral drug delivery systems, even if complex shaped. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. AN ANALYSIS OF THE SHAPES OF INTERSTELLAR EXTINCTION CURVES. VI. THE NEAR-IR EXTINCTION LAW

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzpatrick, E. L.; Massa, D. E-mail: massa@derckmassa.net

    2009-07-10

    We combine new observations from the Hubble Space Telescope's Advanced Camera of Survey with existing data to investigate the wavelength dependence of near-IR (NIR) extinction. Previous studies suggest a power law form for NIR extinction, with a 'universal' value of the exponent, although some recent observations indicate that significant sight line-to-sight line variability may exist. We show that a power-law model for the NIR extinction provides an excellent fit to most extinction curves, but that the value of the power, {beta}, varies significantly from sight line to sight line. Therefore, it seems that a 'universal NIR extinction law' is not possible. Instead, we find that as {beta} decreases, R(V) {identical_to} A(V)/E(B - V) tends to increase, suggesting that NIR extinction curves which have been considered 'peculiar' may, in fact, be typical for different R(V) values. We show that the power-law parameters can depend on the wavelength interval used to derive them, with the {beta} increasing as longer wavelengths are included. This result implies that extrapolating power-law fits to determine R(V) is unreliable. To avoid this problem, we adopt a different functional form for NIR extinction. This new form mimics a power law whose exponent increases with wavelength, has only two free parameters, can fit all of our curves over a longer wavelength baseline and to higher precision, and produces R(V) values which are consistent with independent estimates and commonly used methods for estimating R(V). Furthermore, unlike the power-law model, it gives R(V)s that are independent of the wavelength interval used to derive them. It also suggests that the relation R(V) = -1.36 E(K-V)/(E(B-V)) - 0.79 can estimate R(V) to {+-}0.12. Finally, we use model extinction curves to show that our extinction curves are in accord with theoretical expectations, and demonstrate how large samples of observational quantities can provide useful constraints on the grain properties.

  7. Clone history shapes Populus drought responses

    PubMed Central

    Raj, Sherosha; Bräutigam, Katharina; Hamanishi, Erin T.; Wilkins, Olivia; Thomas, Barb R.; Schroeder, William; Mansfield, Shawn D.; Plant, Aine L.; Campbell, Malcolm M.

    2011-01-01

    Just as animal monozygotic twins can experience different environmental conditions by being reared apart, individual genetically identical trees of the genus Populus can also be exposed to contrasting environmental conditions by being grown in different locations. As such, clonally propagated Populus trees provide an opportunity to interrogate the impact of individual environmental history on current response to environmental stimuli. To test the hypothesis that current responses to an environmental stimulus, drought, are contingent on environmental history, the transcriptome- level drought responses of three economically important hybrid genotypes—DN34 (Populus deltoides × Populus nigra), Walker [P. deltoides var. occidentalis × (Populus laurifolia × P. nigra)], and Okanese [Walker × (P. laurifolia × P. nigra)]—derived from two different locations were compared. Strikingly, differences in transcript abundance patterns in response to drought were based on differences in geographic origin of clones for two of the three genotypes. This observation was most pronounced for the genotypes with the longest time since establishment and last common propagation. Differences in genome-wide DNA methylation paralleled the transcriptome level trends, whereby the clones with the most divergent transcriptomes and clone history had the most marked differences in the extent of total DNA methylation, suggesting an epigenomic basis for the clone history-dependent transcriptome divergence. The data provide insights into the interplay between genotype and environment in the ecologically and economically important Populus genus, with implications for the industrial application of Populus trees and the evolution and persistence of these important tree species and their associated hybrids. PMID:21746919

  8. Reducing Conservatism of Analytic Transient Response Bounds via Shaping Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwan, Aiyueh; Bedrossian, Nazareth; Jan, Jiann-Woei; Grigoriadis, Karolos; Hua, Tuyen (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Recent results show that the peak transient response of a linear system to bounded energy inputs can be computed using the energy-to-peak gain of the system. However, analytically computed peak response bound can be conservative for a class of class bounded energy signals, specifically pulse trains generated from jet firings encountered in space vehicles. In this paper, shaping filters are proposed as a Methodology to reduce the conservatism of peak response analytic bounds. This Methodology was applied to a realistic Space Station assembly operation subject to jet firings. The results indicate that shaping filters indeed reduce the predicted peak response bounds.

  9. Simulation of the shape of chaperonins using the small-angle x-ray scattering curves and torus form factor

    SciTech Connect

    Amarantov, S. V.; Naletova, I. N.; Kurochkina, L. P.

    2011-08-15

    The inverse scattering problem has been solved for protein complexes whose surfaces can be described by a set of the simplest doubly connected surfaces in the uniform approximation (a scattering potential inside the molecule is a constant). Solutions of two proteins-well-known GroEL bacterial chaperonin and poor-studied bacteriophage chaperonin, which is a product of 146 gene (gp146)-were taken for the experiment. The shapes of protein complexes have been efficiently reconstructed from the experimental scattering curves. The shell method, the method of the rotation of amino acid sequences with the use of the form factor of an amino acid, and the method of seeking the model parameters of a protein complex with the preliminarily obtained form factor of the model have been used to reconstruct the shape of these particles.

  10. Analysis of curved shape micro-mirrors for on-chip communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beiu, Roxana Mariana; Mnerie, Corina; Duma, Virgil-Florin

    2016-12-01

    New ways of employing optics at the micro and nanometer scale are of interest. This study analyses the most common two micro-mirror shapes (i.e., spherical and parabolic) that can be used for on-chip communication - in conjunction with fiber optics/waveguides. The classical conic sections that can be used for micro-mirrors are described and a technological approach to design and manufacture such devices is presented. Finally an optimization of the parabolic micro-mirror is achieved. Other micro-mirror shapes (e.g., elliptical and hyperbolic) can be approached and compared using the same procedure. The large area of applications of such micro-mirrors includes intra- or inter-chips communications, as well as free-space optics used for various optical systems: micro-optics, optical amplifiers, lasers, and wavelength converters.

  11. Shape effect of Cu-nanoparticles in unsteady flow through curved artery with catheterized stenosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Ashfaq; Nadeem, Sohail

    In this study the arterial flow of Cu-nanofluid through catheterized arteries having a balloon angioplasty with time-varying overlapping stenosis is considered. The nanofluid comprises different shaped nanoparticles such as bricks, cylinders and platelets. In the arteries the nature of Cu-blood nanofluid is examined mathematically by considering it as a different shaped nanoparticles inclusion in viscous fluid in toroidal coordinate system. The problem is solved using a perturbation approximation in terms of a variant of curvature parameter (ɛ) to achieve the axial velocity, the stream function, the resistance impedance, and the wall shear stress distribution of nanofluid. Also, the results were obtained from explicit values of the physical parameters, such as the curvature parameter (ɛ), the balloon height (σ∗), the volume fraction (ϕ) and the shape factor of Cu-nanoparticles (m). The obtained results show that there is a notable difference between curvature and non-curvature annulus flows through catheterized stenosed arteries. The Platlets Cu-nanoparticle in the central portion of the tube are not sheared, and the slight velocity gradients are only found in the layers near the wall of artery than Bricks Cylinders Cu-nanoparticles.

  12. Differential thermal performance curves in response to different habitats in the parasitoid Venturia canescens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foray, Vincent; Gibert, Patricia; Desouhant, Emmanuel

    2011-08-01

    Environmental variability is expected to be important in shaping performance curves, reaction norms of phenotypic traits related to fitness. Models predict that the breadth of performance curves should increase with environmental variability at the expense of maximal performance. In this study, we compared the thermal performance curves of two sympatric populations of the parasitoid Venturia canescens that were observed under contrasting thermal regimes in their respective preferred habitats and differing in their modes of reproduction. Our results confirm the large effect of developmental temperature on phenotypic traits of insects and demonstrate that thelytokous and arrhenotokous wasps respond differently to temperature during development, in agreement with model predictions. For traits related to fecundity, thelytokous parasitoids, which usually occur in stable thermal conditions, exhibit specialist performance curves, maximising their reproductive success under a restricted range of temperature. In contrast, arrhenotokous parasitoids, which occur in variable climates, exhibit generalist performance curves, in keeping with the hypothesis "jack of all temperatures, master of none".

  13. Low blood lead level effects on intelligence: can a dose-response curve be determined from the epidemiological data?

    PubMed

    Banner, W; Kahn, C M

    2014-02-01

    CONTEXT. Recent publications have graphically demonstrated a curvilinear relationship between measures of intelligence and blood lead levels at low concentrations (< 10 mcg/dl). This led to speculation that a greater biologic effect occurs at lower concentrations. Critics of this conclusion hypothesized that this graphical relationship may be a function of the underlying distributions of these variables. OBJECTIVE. To study the impact of the distribution of data on the shape of apparent dose-response curves. METHODS. Random data based on varied distributions were constructed to simulate a previous study using a single, randomly generated covariate income (Inc) to demonstrate the impact of normally versus exponentially distributed data on the shape of the graph of intelligence quotient (IQ) versus blood lead. We also used an existing database of US blood lead levels and constructed a similar model of income and IQ using both assumptions of distribution for the intermediate variable income. RESULTS. When both lead and income are exponentially distributed, the graph of lead and IQ will be a curve. CONCLUSION. The apparent shape of a dose-response relationship from simulated epidemiological data is nonlinear when one variable and a covariate are exponentially distributed. A non-linear biological relationship should not be assumed and in fact may be the least likely explanation. The use of observational epidemiological data to discern a dose-response relationship between two variables may be misleading.

  14. Mistletoe Berry Outline Mapping with a Path Curve Function and Recording the Circadian Rhythm of Their Phenotypic Shape Change

    PubMed Central

    Derbidge, Renatus; Baumgartner, Stephan; Heusser, Peter

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a discovery: the change of the outline shape of mistletoe (Viscum album ssp. album) berries in vivo and in situ during ripening. It was found that a plant organ that is usually considered to merely increase in size actually changes shape in a specific rhythmic fashion. We introduce a new approach to chronobiological research on a macro-phenotypic scale to trace changes over long periods of time (with a resolution from hours to months) by using a dynamic form-determining parameter called Lambda (λ). λ is known in projective geometry as a measure for pertinent features of the outline shapes of egg-like forms, so called path curves. Ascertained circadian changes of form were analyzed for their correlation with environmental factors such as light, temperature, and other weather influences. Certain weather conditions such as sky cover, i.e., sunshine minutes per hour, have an impact on the amplitude of the daily change in form. The present paper suggests a possible supplement to established methods in chronobiology, as in this case the dynamic of form-change becomes a measurable feature, displaying a convincing accordance between mathematical rule and plant shape. PMID:27933073

  15. Assessing response in breast cancer with dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging: are signal intensity-time curves adequate?

    PubMed

    Woolf, David K; Padhani, Anwar R; Taylor, N Jane; Gogbashian, Andrew; Li, Sonia P; Beresford, Mark J; Ah-See, Mei-Lin; Stirling, James; Collins, David J; Makris, Andreas

    2014-09-01

    Quantitative DCE-MRI parameters including K(trans) (transfer constant min(-1)) can predict both response and outcome in breast cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). Quantitative methods are time-consuming to calculate, requiring expensive software and interpretive expertise. For diagnostic purposes, signal intensity-time curves (SITCs) are used for tissue characterisation. In this study, we compare the ability of NAC-related changes in SITCs with K(trans) to predict response and outcomes. 73 women with primary breast cancer underwent DCE-MRI studies before and after two cycles of NAC. Patients received anthracycline and/or docetaxel-based chemotherapy. At completion of NAC, patients had local treatment with surgery & radiotherapy and further systemic treatments. SITCs for paired DCE-MRI studies were visually scored using a five-curve type classification schema encompassing wash-in and wash-out phases and correlated with K(trans) values and to the endpoints of pathological response, OS and DFS. 58 paired patients studies were evaluable. The median size by MRI measurement for 52 tumours was 38 mm (range 17-86 mm) at baseline and 26 mm (range 10-85 mm) after two cycles of NAC. Median baseline K(trans) (min(-1)) was 0.214 (range 0.085-0.469), and post-two cycles of NAC was 0.128 (range 0.013-0.603). SITC shapes were significantly related to K(trans) values both before (χ (2) = 43.3, P = 0.000) and after two cycles of NAC (χ (2) = 60.5, P = 0.000). Changes in curve shapes were significantly related to changes in K(trans) (χ (2) = 53.5, P = 0.000). Changes in curve shape were significantly correlated with clinical (P = 0.005) and pathological response (P = 0.005). Reductions in curve shape of ≥1 point were significant for overall improved survival using Kaplan-Meier analysis with a 5-year OS of 80.9 versus 68.6 % (P = 0.048). SITCs require no special software to generate and provide a useful method of assessing the

  16. Urbanisation shapes behavioural responses to a pesticide.

    PubMed

    Tüzün, Nedim; Debecker, Sara; Op de Beeck, Lin; Stoks, Robby

    2015-06-01

    The degree of urbanisation is rapidly increasing worldwide. Due to anthropogenic impact, urban populations are exposed to higher levels of contaminants and higher temperatures. Despite this, urbanisation is a largely overlooked spatial component in ecotoxicology. We tested in a common garden rearing experiment whether replicated urban and rural populations of the damselfly Coenagrion puella differ in their vulnerability to sublethal levels of a widespread pesticide, chlorpyrifos, in terms of ecologically relevant behaviours (exploration behaviour, activity, boldness and food intake), and to what extent these patterns are affected by temperature (20 and 24°C). Except boldness, all behaviours were affected by previous pesticide exposure. While the pesticide did not affect exploration behaviour at 20°C, it was associated with increased exploration at 24°C, which may reflect an increased toxicity of chlorpyrifos at higher temperatures. Importantly, rural and urban larvae showed consistently different, sometimes even opposite behavioural responses to pesticide exposure. When exposed to the pesticide, rural larvae decreased activity and food intake at both temperatures; urban larvae instead increased activity at both temperatures and only reduced food intake at the high temperature. This suggests that urban larvae were less affected by the pesticide, which would be consistent with a scenario of local adaptation to higher contaminant levels. Our results highlight that urbanisation may be an important factor to arrive at a spatially explicit ecological risk assessment, and may be an ignored reason why studies on the same species may generate widely different vulnerabilities to pesticides. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. The variation of rotation curve shapes as a signature of the effects of baryons on dark matter density profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brook, Chris B.

    2015-12-01

    Rotation curves of galaxies show a wide range of shapes, which can be paramaterized as scatter in Vrot(1 kpc)/Vmax , i.e. the ratio of the rotation velocity measured at 1 kpc and the maximum measured rotation velocity. We examine whether the observed scatter can be accounted for by combining scatters in disc scalelengths, the concentration-halo mass relation, and the M⋆-Mhalo relation. We use these scatters to create model galaxy populations; when housed within dark matter haloes that have universal, Navarro, Frenk & White density profiles, the model does not match the lowest observed values of Vrot(1 kpc)/Vmax and has too little scatter in Vrot(1 kpc)/Vmax compared to observations. By contrast, a model using a mass-dependent dark matter profile, where the inner slope is determined by the ratio of M⋆/Mhalo, produces galaxies with low values of Vrot(1 kpc)/Vmax and a much larger scatter, both in agreement with observation. We conclude that the large observed scatter in Vrot(1 kpc)/Vmax favours density profiles that are significantly affected by baryonic processes. Alternative dark matter core formation models such as self-interacting dark matter may also account for the observed variation in rotation curve shapes, but these observations may provide important constraints in terms of core sizes, and whether they vary with halo mass and/or merger history.

  18. Interpreting 'dose-response' curves using homeodynamic data: with an improved explanation for hormesis.

    PubMed

    Stebbing, A R D

    2009-04-15

    A re-interpretation of the 'dose-response' curve is given that accommodates homeostasis. The outcome, or overall effect, of toxicity is the consequence of toxicity that is moderated by homeodynamic responses. Equilibrium is achieved by a balance of opposing forces of toxic inhibition countered by a stimulatory response. A graphical model is given consisting of two linked curves (response vs concentration and effect vs concentration), which provide the basis for a re-interpretation of the 'dose-response' curve. The model indicates that such relationships are non-linear with a threshold, which is due to homeodynamic responses. Subthreshold concentrations in 'dose-response' curves provide the sum of toxic inhibition minus the homeodynamic response; the response itself is unseen in serving its purpose of neutralizing perturbation. This interpretation suggests why the alpha- and beta-curves are non-linear. The beta-curve indicates adaptive overcorrection to toxicity that confers greater resistance to subsequent toxic exposure, with hormesis as an epiphenomenon.

  19. Determination of individual stimulus--response curves in the visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Hagenbeek, Rogier E; Rombouts, Serge A R B; van Dijk, Bob W; Barkhof, Frederik

    2002-12-01

    Activation in the visual cortex is typically studied using group average changes in an on-off paradigm for a single flicker frequency. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to characterize the stimulus-response curve in the visual cortex as a function of flicker frequency in individual subjects, using LED goggles with 17 frequency steps between 0 and 30 Hz. Ten healthy young individuals were studied on two different occasions (mean interval; 22 days). In all but one subject, a third-order polynomial curve could be fitted to the data. From the response curve we calculated the peak response (the frequency where the response amplitude was maximal), the percentage change (relative difference) of the response amplitudes between 8 Hz and the peak frequency, and the average slope of response (towards the peak). On both occasions we could determine a peak response for each subject with small within-subject variability. The average absolute difference in peak response between both sessions was 1.37 Hz (range, 0.2-4.3 Hz), indicating that the peak frequency is rather stable for a given individual. In conclusion, our study illustrates the ability of fMRI to examine the stimulus-response curve in individual subjects in the visual cortex. Based on our findings, the peak response and the slope of response seem highly reproducible within subjects. A similar analysis of the stimulus-response curve may be applicable to other types of stimuli.

  20. Estimation of Two-Parameter Logistic Item Response Curves.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-01

    the one- parameter logistic ( Rasch ) model by Rigdon and Tsutakawa (1983). Here we will consider one of these estimators, namely MLF, where the...response model for n dichotomously scored items. Psychometrika, 1970, 35, 179-197. 4. Dempster, A.P. Laird, N.M. & Rubin, D.B. Maximum likelihood...reverse aide it neceesary and Identify by block number) Item responses, logistic model , EM algorithm, maximum likelihood 20. ABSTRACT (Continue an

  1. The sigmoidally transformed cosine curve: a mathematical model for circadian rhythms with symmetric non-sinusoidal shapes.

    PubMed

    Marler, Matthew R; Gehrman, Philip; Martin, Jennifer L; Ancoli-Israel, Sonia

    2006-11-30

    We introduce a family of non-linear transformations of the traditional cosine curve used in the modelling of biological rhythms. The non-linear transformation is the sigmoidal family, represented here by three family members: the Hill function, the anti-logistic function, and the arctangent function. These transforms add two additional parameters that must be estimated, in addition to the acrophase, MESOR, and amplitude (and period in some applications), but the estimated curves have shapes requiring many more than two additional harmonics to achieve the same fit when modelled by harmonic regression. Particular values of the additional parameters can yield rectangular waves, narrow pulses, wide pulses, and for rectangular waves (representing alternating 'on' and 'off' states) the times of onset and offset (hence duration, as when modelling the duration of the large night-time melatonin secretory epoch). We illustrate the sigmoidally transformed cosine curves, and compare them to harmonic regression modelling, in a sample of eight activity recordings made on patients in a nursing home.

  2. Photo-Responsive Shape-Memory and Shape-Changing Liquid-Crystal Polymer Networks

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Danish; Samiullah, Muhammad Haris

    2013-01-01

    “Surrounding matters” is a phrase that has become more significant in recent times when discussing polymeric materials. Although regular polymers do respond to external stimuli like softening of material at higher temperatures, that response is gradual and linear in nature. Smart polymers (SPs) or stimuli-responsive polymers (SRPs) behave differently to those external stimuli, as their behavior is more rapid and nonlinear in nature and even a small magnitude of external stimulus can cause noticeable changes in their shape, size, color or conductivity. Of these SRPs, two types of SPs with the ability to actively change can be differentiated: shape-memory polymers and shape-changing polymers. The uniqueness of these materials lies not only in the fast macroscopic changes occurring in their structure but also in that some of these shape changes are reversible. This paper presents a brief review of current progress in the area of light activated shape-memory polymers and shape-changing polymers and their possible field of applications. PMID:28809298

  3. Driver Vision Based Perception-Response Time Prediction and Assistance Model on Mountain Highway Curve.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Chen, Yuren

    2016-12-30

    To make driving assistance system more humanized, this study focused on the prediction and assistance of drivers' perception-response time on mountain highway curves. Field tests were conducted to collect real-time driving data and driver vision information. A driver-vision lane model quantified curve elements in drivers' vision. A multinomial log-linear model was established to predict perception-response time with traffic/road environment information, driver-vision lane model, and mechanical status (last second). A corresponding assistance model showed a positive impact on drivers' perception-response times on mountain highway curves. Model results revealed that the driver-vision lane model and visual elements did have important influence on drivers' perception-response time. Compared with roadside passive road safety infrastructure, proper visual geometry design, timely visual guidance, and visual information integrality of a curve are significant factors for drivers' perception-response time.

  4. Driver Vision Based Perception-Response Time Prediction and Assistance Model on Mountain Highway Curve

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi; Chen, Yuren

    2016-01-01

    To make driving assistance system more humanized, this study focused on the prediction and assistance of drivers’ perception-response time on mountain highway curves. Field tests were conducted to collect real-time driving data and driver vision information. A driver-vision lane model quantified curve elements in drivers’ vision. A multinomial log-linear model was established to predict perception-response time with traffic/road environment information, driver-vision lane model, and mechanical status (last second). A corresponding assistance model showed a positive impact on drivers’ perception-response times on mountain highway curves. Model results revealed that the driver-vision lane model and visual elements did have important influence on drivers’ perception-response time. Compared with roadside passive road safety infrastructure, proper visual geometry design, timely visual guidance, and visual information integrality of a curve are significant factors for drivers’ perception-response time. PMID:28042851

  5. Reclaimed mineland curve number response to temporal distribution of rainfall

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warner, R.C.; Agouridis, C.T.; Vingralek, P.T.; Fogle, A.W.

    2010-01-01

    The curve number (CN) method is a common technique to estimate runoff volume, and it is widely used in coal mining operations such as those in the Appalachian region of Kentucky. However, very little CN data are available for watersheds disturbed by surface mining and then reclaimed using traditional techniques. Furthermore, as the CN method does not readily account for variations in infiltration rates due to varying rainfall distributions, the selection of a single CN value to encompass all temporal rainfall distributions could lead engineers to substantially under- or over-size water detention structures used in mining operations or other land uses such as development. Using rainfall and runoff data from a surface coal mine located in the Cumberland Plateau of eastern Kentucky, CNs were computed for conventionally reclaimed lands. The effects of temporal rainfall distributions on CNs was also examined by classifying storms as intense, steady, multi-interval intense, or multi-interval steady. Results indicate that CNs for such reclaimed lands ranged from 62 to 94 with a mean value of 85. Temporal rainfall distributions were also shown to significantly affect CN values with intense storms having significantly higher CNs than multi-interval storms. These results indicate that a period of recovery is present between rainfall bursts of a multi-interval storm that allows depressional storage and infiltration rates to rebound. ?? 2010 American Water Resources Association.

  6. Scaling of Perceptual Errors Can Predict the Shape of Neural Tuning Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shouval, Harel Z.; Agarwal, Animesh; Gavornik, Jeffrey P.

    2013-04-01

    Weber’s law, first characterized in the 19th century, states that errors estimating the magnitude of perceptual stimuli scale linearly with stimulus intensity. This linear relationship is found in most sensory modalities, generalizes to temporal interval estimation, and even applies to some abstract variables. Despite its generality and long experimental history, the neural basis of Weber’s law remains unknown. This work presents a simple theory explaining the conditions under which Weber’s law can result from neural variability and predicts that the tuning curves of neural populations which adhere to Weber’s law will have a log-power form with parameters that depend on spike-count statistics. The prevalence of Weber’s law suggests that it might be optimal in some sense. We examine this possibility, using variational calculus, and show that Weber’s law is optimal only when observed real-world variables exhibit power-law statistics with a specific exponent. Our theory explains how physiology gives rise to the behaviorally characterized Weber’s law and may represent a general governing principle relating perception to neural activity.

  7. Scaling of perceptual errors can predict the shape of neural tuning curves.

    PubMed

    Shouval, Harel Z; Agarwal, Animesh; Gavornik, Jeffrey P

    2013-04-19

    Weber's law, first characterized in the 19th century, states that errors estimating the magnitude of perceptual stimuli scale linearly with stimulus intensity. This linear relationship is found in most sensory modalities, generalizes to temporal interval estimation, and even applies to some abstract variables. Despite its generality and long experimental history, the neural basis of Weber's law remains unknown. This work presents a simple theory explaining the conditions under which Weber's law can result from neural variability and predicts that the tuning curves of neural populations which adhere to Weber's law will have a log-power form with parameters that depend on spike-count statistics. The prevalence of Weber's law suggests that it might be optimal in some sense. We examine this possibility, using variational calculus, and show that Weber's law is optimal only when observed real-world variables exhibit power-law statistics with a specific exponent. Our theory explains how physiology gives rise to the behaviorally characterized Weber's law and may represent a general governing principle relating perception to neural activity.

  8. Scaling of Perceptual Errors Can Predict the Shape of Neural Tuning Curves

    PubMed Central

    Shouval, Harel Z.; Agarwal, Animesh; Gavornik, Jeffrey P.

    2014-01-01

    Weber’s law, first characterized in the 19th century, states that errors estimating the magnitude of perceptual stimuli scale linearly with stimulus intensity. This linear relationship is found in most sensory modalities, generalizes to temporal interval estimation, and even applies to some abstract variables. Despite its generality and long experimental history, the neural basis of Weber’s law remains unknown. This work presents a simple theory explaining the conditions under which Weber’s law can result from neural variability and predicts that the tuning curves of neural populations which adhere to Weber’s law will have a log-power form with parameters that depend on spike-count statistics. The prevalence of Weber’s law suggests that it might be optimal in some sense. We examine this possibility, using variational calculus, and show that Weber’s law is optimal only when observed real-world variables exhibit power-law statistics with a specific exponent. Our theory explains how physiology gives rise to the behaviorally characterized Weber’s law and may represent a general governing principle relating perception to neural activity. PMID:23679640

  9. Estimation of a Ramsay-Curve Item Response Theory Model by the Metropolis-Hastings Robbins-Monro Algorithm. CRESST Report 834

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monroe, Scott; Cai, Li

    2013-01-01

    In Ramsay curve item response theory (RC-IRT, Woods & Thissen, 2006) modeling, the shape of the latent trait distribution is estimated simultaneously with the item parameters. In its original implementation, RC-IRT is estimated via Bock and Aitkin's (1981) EM algorithm, which yields maximum marginal likelihood estimates. This method, however,…

  10. RASS SOT Webinar - Nonmonotonic Dose Response Curves (NMDRCs) Common after Estrogen or Androgen Signaling Pathway Disruption

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presentation provides the listening and viewing audience with Dr Gray's scientific information on the relevance of nonmonotonic dose response curves to the risk assessment of estrogenic and androgenic chemicals

  11. Implications of Nonlinear Concentration Response Curve for Ozone related Mortality on Health Burden Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    We characterize the sensitivity of the ozone attributable health burden assessment with respect to different modeling strategies of concentration-response function. For this purpose, we develop a flexible Bayesian hierarchical model allowing for a nonlinear ozone risk curve with ...

  12. Implications of Nonlinear Concentration Response Curve for Ozone related Mortality on Health Burden Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    We characterize the sensitivity of the ozone attributable health burden assessment with respect to different modeling strategies of concentration-response function. For this purpose, we develop a flexible Bayesian hierarchical model allowing for a nonlinear ozone risk curve with ...

  13. RASS SOT Webinar - Nonmonotonic Dose Response Curves (NMDRCs) Common after Estrogen or Androgen Signaling Pathway Disruption

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presentation provides the listening and viewing audience with Dr Gray's scientific information on the relevance of nonmonotonic dose response curves to the risk assessment of estrogenic and androgenic chemicals

  14. Dose-response curve slope is a missing dimension in the analysis of HIV-1 drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Sampah, Maame Efua S; Shen, Lin; Jilek, Benjamin L; Siliciano, Robert F

    2011-05-03

    HIV-1 drug resistance is a major clinical problem. Resistance is evaluated using in vitro assays measuring the fold change in IC(50) caused by resistance mutations. Antiretroviral drugs are used at concentrations above IC(50), however, and inhibition at clinical concentrations can only be predicted from IC(50) if the shape of the dose-response curve is also known. Curve shape is influenced by cooperative interactions and is described mathematically by the slope parameter or Hill coefficient (m). Implicit in current analysis of resistance is the assumption that mutations shift dose-response curves to the right without affecting the slope. We show here that m is altered by resistance mutations. For reverse transcriptase and fusion inhibitors, single resistance mutations affect both slope and IC(50). For protease inhibitors, single mutations primarily affect slope. For integrase inhibitors, only IC(50) is affected. Thus, there are fundamental pharmacodynamic differences in resistance to different drug classes. Instantaneous inhibitory potential (IIP), the log inhibition of single-round infectivity at clinical concentrations, takes into account both slope and IC(50), and thus provides a direct measure of the reduction in susceptibility produced by mutations and the residual activity of drugs against resistant viruses. The standard measure, fold change in IC(50), does not correlate well with changes in IIP when mutations alter slope. These results challenge a fundamental assumption underlying current analysis of HIV-1 drug resistance and suggest that a more complete understanding of how resistance mutations reduce antiviral activity requires consideration of a previously ignored parameter, the dose-response curve slope.

  15. Design and sample size for evaluating combinations of drugs of linear and loglinear dose-response curves.

    PubMed

    Fang, Hong-Bin; Tian, Guo-Liang; Li, Wei; Tan, Ming

    2009-07-01

    The study of drug combinations has become important in drug development due to its potential for efficacy at lower, less toxic doses and the need to move new therapies rapidly into clinical trials. The goal is to identify which combinations are additive, synergistic, or antagonistic. Although there exists statistical framework for finding doses and sample sizes needed to detect departure from additivity, e.g., the power maximized F-test, different classes of drugs of different does-response shapes require different derivation for calculating sample size and finding doses. Motivated by two anticancer combination studies that we are involved with, this article proposes dose-finding and sample size method for detecting departures from additivity of two drugs with linear and log-linear single dose-response curves. The first study involves combination of two drugs, where one single drug dose-response curve is linear and the other is log-linear. The second study involves combinations of drugs whose single drug dose-response curves are linear. The experiment had been planned with the common fixed ratio design before we were consulted, but the resulting data missed the synergistic combinations. However, the experiment based on the proposed design was able to identify the synergistic combinations as anticipated. Thus we shall summarize the analysis of the data collected according to the proposed design and discuss why the commonly used fixed ratio method failed and the implications of the proposed method for other combination studies.

  16. Boxy/Peanut/X-Shaped Bulges: Steep Inner Rotation Curve Leads to Barlens Face-on Morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salo, H.; Laurikainen, E.

    2017-02-01

    We use stellar dynamical bulge/disk/halo simulations to study whether barlenses (lens-like structures embedded in the narrow bar component) are only the face-on counterparts of Boxy/Peanut/X-shapes (B/P/X) seen in edge-on bars, or if some additional physical parameter affects that morphology. A range of bulge-to-disk mass and size ratios are explored: our nominal parameters (B/D=0.08, {r}{eff}/{h}r=0.07, disk comprising two-thirds of total force at 2.2{h}r) correspond to typical Milky Way mass galaxies. In all models, a bar with pronounced B/P/X forms in a few Gyr, visible in the edge-on view. However, the pure barlens morphology forms only in models with sufficiently steep inner rotation curves, {{dV}}{cir}/{dr}≳ 5{V}\\max /{h}r, achieved when including a small classical bulge with B/D≳ 0.02 and {r}{eff}/{h}r≲ 0.1. For shallower slopes, the central structure still resembles a barlens, but shows a clear X signature even in low inclinations. A similar result holds for bulge-less simulations, where the central slope is modified by changing the halo concentration. The predicted sensitivity on the inner rotation curve is consistent with the slopes that are estimated from gravitational potentials calculated from the 3.6 μm images, for the observed barlens and X-shaped galaxies in the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies (S4G). For inclinations <60° the galaxies with barlenses have on average twice steeper inner rotation curves than galaxies with X shapes: the limiting slope is ˜250 km s-1 kpc-1. Among barred galaxies, those with barlenses have both the strongest bars and the largest relative excess of inner surface density, both in barlens regions (≲ 0.5{h}r) and near the center (≲ 0.1{h}r); this provides evidence for bar-driven secular evolution in galaxies.

  17. FMRI evidence of 'mirror' responses to geometric shapes.

    PubMed

    Press, Clare; Catmur, Caroline; Cook, Richard; Widmann, Hannah; Heyes, Cecilia; Bird, Geoffrey

    2012-01-01

    Mirror neurons may be a genetic adaptation for social interaction. Alternatively, the associative hypothesis proposes that the development of mirror neurons is driven by sensorimotor learning, and that, given suitable experience, mirror neurons will respond to any stimulus. This hypothesis was tested using fMRI adaptation to index populations of cells with mirror properties. After sensorimotor training, where geometric shapes were paired with hand actions, BOLD response was measured while human participants experienced runs of events in which shape observation alternated with action execution or observation. Adaptation from shapes to action execution, and critically, observation, occurred in ventral premotor cortex (PMv) and inferior parietal lobule (IPL). Adaptation from shapes to execution indicates that neuronal populations responding to the shapes had motor properties, while adaptation to observation demonstrates that these populations had mirror properties. These results indicate that sensorimotor training induced populations of cells with mirror properties in PMv and IPL to respond to the observation of arbitrary shapes. They suggest that the mirror system has not been shaped by evolution to respond in a mirror fashion to biological actions; instead, its development is mediated by stimulus-general processes of learning within a system adapted for visuomotor control.

  18. Curve fitting of aeroelastic transient response data with exponential functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, R. M.; Desmarais, R. N.

    1976-01-01

    The extraction of frequency, damping, amplitude, and phase information from unforced transient response data is considered. These quantities are obtained from the parameters determined by fitting the digitized time-history data in a least-squares sense with complex exponential functions. The highlights of the method are described, and the results of several test cases are presented. The effects of noise are considered both by using analytical examples with random noise and by estimating the standard deviation of the parameters from maximum-likelihood theory.

  19. A Grid Algorithm for High Throughput Fitting of Dose-Response Curve Data

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuhong; Jadhav, Ajit; Southal, Noel; Huang, Ruili; Nguyen, Dac-Trung

    2010-01-01

    We describe a novel algorithm, Grid algorithm, and the corresponding computer program for high throughput fitting of dose-response curves that are described by the four-parameter symmetric logistic dose-response model. The Grid algorithm searches through all points in a grid of four dimensions (parameters) and finds the optimum one that corresponds to the best fit. Using simulated dose-response curves, we examined the Grid program’s performance in reproducing the actual values that were used to generate the simulated data and compared it with the DRC package for the language and environment R and the XLfit add-in for Microsoft Excel. The Grid program was robust and consistently recovered the actual values for both complete and partial curves with or without noise. Both DRC and XLfit performed well on data without noise, but they were sensitive to and their performance degraded rapidly with increasing noise. The Grid program is automated and scalable to millions of dose-response curves, and it is able to process 100,000 dose-response curves from high throughput screening experiment per CPU hour. The Grid program has the potential of greatly increasing the productivity of large-scale dose-response data analysis and early drug discovery processes, and it is also applicable to many other curve fitting problems in chemical, biological, and medical sciences. PMID:21331310

  20. A grid algorithm for high throughput fitting of dose-response curve data.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuhong; Jadhav, Ajit; Southal, Noel; Huang, Ruili; Nguyen, Dac-Trung

    2010-10-21

    We describe a novel algorithm, Grid algorithm, and the corresponding computer program for high throughput fitting of dose-response curves that are described by the four-parameter symmetric logistic dose-response model. The Grid algorithm searches through all points in a grid of four dimensions (parameters) and finds the optimum one that corresponds to the best fit. Using simulated dose-response curves, we examined the Grid program's performance in reproducing the actual values that were used to generate the simulated data and compared it with the DRC package for the language and environment R and the XLfit add-in for Microsoft Excel. The Grid program was robust and consistently recovered the actual values for both complete and partial curves with or without noise. Both DRC and XLfit performed well on data without noise, but they were sensitive to and their performance degraded rapidly with increasing noise. The Grid program is automated and scalable to millions of dose-response curves, and it is able to process 100,000 dose-response curves from high throughput screening experiment per CPU hour. The Grid program has the potential of greatly increasing the productivity of large-scale dose-response data analysis and early drug discovery processes, and it is also applicable to many other curve fitting problems in chemical, biological, and medical sciences.

  1. WPerfit: A Program for Computing Parametric Person-Fit Statistics and Plotting Person Response Curves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrando, Pere J.; Lorenzo, Urbano

    2000-01-01

    Describes a program for computing different person-fit measures under different parametric item response models for binary items. The indexes can be computed for the Rasch model and the two- and three-parameter logistic models. The program can plot person response curves to allow the researchers to investigate the nonfitting response behavior of…

  2. Structural Acoustic Response of Shape Memory Alloy Hybrid Composite Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Travis L.

    1996-01-01

    A method has been developed to predict the structural acoustic response of shape memory alloy hybrid composite panels subjected to acoustic excitation. The panel is modeled by a finite element analysis and the radiated field is predicted using Rayleigh's integral. Transmission loss predictions for the case of an aluminum panel excited by a harmonic acoustic pressure are shown to compare very well with a classical analysis. Predictions of the normal velocity response and transmitted acoustic pressure for a clamped aluminum panel show excellent agreement with experimental measurements. Predicted transmission loss performance for a composite panel with and without shape memory alloy reinforcement are also presented. The preliminary results demonstrate that the transmission loss can be significantly increased with shape memory alloy reinforcement.

  3. Structural Acoustic Response of Shape Memory Alloy Hybrid Composite Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Travis L.

    1996-01-01

    A method has been developed to predict the structural acoustic response of shape memory alloy hybrid composite panels subjected to acoustic excitation. The panel is modeled by a finite element analysis and the radiated field is predicted using Rayleigh's integral. Transmission loss predictions for the case of an aluminum panel excited by a harmonic acoustic pressure are shown to compare very well with a classical analysis. Predictions of the normal velocity response and transmitted acoustic pressure for a clamped aluminum panel show excellent agreement with experimental measurements. Predicted transmission loss performance for a composite panel with and without shape memory alloy reinforcement are also presented. The preliminary results demonstrate that the transmission loss can be significantly increased with shape memory alloy reinforcement.

  4. Shape-Morphing Materials from Stimuli-Responsive Hydrogel Hybrids.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Seog-Jin; Hauser, Adam W; Hayward, Ryan C

    2017-02-21

    The formation of well-defined and functional three-dimensional (3D) structures by buckling of thin sheets subjected to spatially nonuniform stresses is common in biological morphogenesis and has become a subject of great interest in synthetic systems, as such programmable shape-morphing materials hold promise in areas including drug delivery, biomedical devices, soft robotics, and biomimetic systems. Given their ability to undergo large changes in swelling in response to a wide variety of stimuli, hydrogels have naturally emerged as a key type of material in this field. Of particular interest are hybrid systems containing rigid inclusions that can define both the anisotropy and spatial nonuniformity of swelling as well as nanoparticulate additives that can enhance the responsiveness and functionality of the material. In this Account, we discuss recent progress in approaches to achieve well-defined shape morphing in hydrogel hybrids. First, we provide an overview of materials and methods that facilitate fabrication of such systems and outline the geometry and mechanics behind shape morphing of thin sheets. We then discuss how patterning of stiff inclusions within soft responsive hydrogels can be used to program both bending and swelling, thereby providing access to a wide array of complex 3D forms. The use of discretely patterned stiff regions to provide an effective composite response offers distinct advantages in terms of scalability and ease of fabrication compared with approaches based on smooth gradients within a single layer of responsive material. We discuss a number of recent advances wherein control of the mechanical properties and geometric characteristics of patterned stiff elements enables the formation of 3D shapes, including origami-inspired structures, concatenated helical frameworks, and surfaces with nonzero Gaussian curvature. Next, we outline how the inclusion of functional elements such as nanoparticles can enable unique pathways to programmable

  5. Laser Beam Shaping For Lithography on Inclined and Curved Surfaces Using a liquid crystal Spatial Light Modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatabi, Javad R.; Geerts, Wilhelmus; Tamir, Dan; Pandey, Kumar

    2013-03-01

    An exposure tool for lithography on non-flat substrates that includes a real time photoresist thickness and surface topography monitor is under development at Texas State University. Exposure dose and focusing are corrected on curved parts of the sample using novel laser beam shaping techniques: two approaches using a Holoeye liquid crystal spatial light modulator (LC-SLM) are being investigated: (1) the implementation of multiple lenses with different focal lengths to split the beam into several parts and keeping each part in focus depending on sample topography; (2) the implementation of a tilted lens function resulting in a tilt of the image plane. Image quality is limited by quantization aberration, caused by the phase modulator's bit depth limitation, and pixelation aberration, caused by the modulator's pixel size. A statistical analysis on lenses with different focal lengths provides a detailed description of the mentioned aberrations. The image quality, i.e. resolution and contrast of both techniques, are determined from developed photoresist patterns on curved samples and compared to the theory.

  6. Effect of phase response curve skew on synchronization with and without conduction delays

    PubMed Central

    Canavier, Carmen C.; Wang, Shuoguo; Chandrasekaran, Lakshmi

    2013-01-01

    A central problem in cortical processing including sensory binding and attentional gating is how neurons can synchronize their responses with zero or near-zero time lag. For a spontaneously firing neuron, an input from another neuron can delay or advance the next spike by different amounts depending upon the timing of the input relative to the previous spike. This information constitutes the phase response curve (PRC). We present a simple graphical method for determining the effect of PRC shape on synchronization tendencies and illustrate it using type 1 PRCs, which consist entirely of advances (delays) in response to excitation (inhibition). We obtained the following generic solutions for type 1 PRCs, which include the pulse-coupled leaky integrate and fire model. For pairs with mutual excitation, exact synchrony can be stable for strong coupling because of the stabilizing effect of the causal limit region of the PRC in which an input triggers a spike immediately upon arrival. However, synchrony is unstable for short delays, because delayed inputs arrive during a refractory period and cannot trigger an immediate spike. Right skew destabilizes antiphase and enables modes with time lags that grow as the conduction delay is increased. Therefore, right skew favors near synchrony at short conduction delays and a gradual transition between synchrony and antiphase for pairs coupled by mutual excitation. For pairs with mutual inhibition, zero time lag synchrony is stable for conduction delays ranging from zero to a substantial fraction of the period for pairs. However, for right skew there is a preferred antiphase mode at short delays. In contrast to mutual excitation, left skew destabilizes antiphase for mutual inhibition so that synchrony dominates at short delays as well. These pairwise synchronization tendencies constrain the synchronization properties of neurons embedded in larger networks. PMID:24376399

  7. Kinematics of the Torcal Shear Zone: transpressional tectonics shaping orogenic curves in the northern Gibraltar Arc.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barcos, Leticia; Balanyá, Juan Carlos; Díaz-Azpiroz, Manuel; Expósito, Inmaculada; Jiménez-Bonilla, Alejandro

    2014-05-01

    zones as well as normal faults accommodating fold axis parallel extension. iiii) The Sierra de las Cabras-Camorolos sector, located at the E-end of the TSZ, is divided into two structural domains: a western domain, dominated by N120ºE dextral strike-slip faults, and an eastern domain structured by a WSW-ENE thrust system and normal faults with extension subparallel to the direction of the shortening structures. TSZ displacement at the lateral tip of this sector seems to be mainly accommodated by NNE trending thrusts in the northern TSZ block. The TSZ induces the near vertical extrusion of paleomargin rock units within the deformation band and the dextral deflection of the structural trend shaping the lateral end of the WGA salient. Our results suggest the TSZ started in the Upper Miocene and is still active. Moreover, the TSZ trends oblique to regional transport direction assessed both by field data and modelling. The estimated WNW-ESE far-field velocity vector in the TAM and the SVA points to the importance of the westward drift of the Internal Zones relative to the external wedge and fits well with the overall WGA kinematic frame. Nor the WGA salient neither the TSZ can be fully explained by the single Europe-Africa plate convergence.

  8. 'Abnormal' angle response curves of TW/Rs for near zero tilt and high tilt channeling implants

    SciTech Connect

    Guo Baonian; Gossmann, Hans-Joachim; Toh, Terry; Colombeau, Benjamin; Todorov, Stan; Sinclair, Frank; Shim, Kyu-Ha; Henry, Todd

    2012-11-06

    Angle control has been widely accepted as the key requirement for ion implantation in semiconductor device processing. From an ion implanter point of view, the incident ion direction should be measured and corrected by suitable techniques, such as XP-VPS for the VIISta implanter platform, to ensure precision ion placement in device structures. So called V-curves have been adopted to generate the wafer-based calibration using channeling effects as the Si lattice steer ions into a channeling direction. Thermal Wave (TW) or sheet resistance (Rs) can be used to determine the minimum of the angle response curve. Normally it is expected that the TW and Rs have their respective minima at identical angles. However, the TW and Rs response to the angle variations does depend on factors such as implant species, dose, and wafer temperature. Implant damage accumulation effects have to be considered for data interpretation especially for some 'abnormal' V-curve data. In this paper we will discuss some observed 'abnormal' angle responses, such as a) TW/Rs reverse trend for Arsenic beam, 2) 'W' shape of Rs Boron, and 3) apparent TW/Rs minimum difference for high tilt characterization, along with experimental data and TCAD simulations.

  9. An automated fitting procedure and software for dose-response curves with multiphasic features

    PubMed Central

    Veroli, Giovanni Y. Di; Fornari, Chiara; Goldlust, Ian; Mills, Graham; Koh, Siang Boon; Bramhall, Jo L; Richards, Frances M.; Jodrell, Duncan I.

    2015-01-01

    In cancer pharmacology (and many other areas), most dose-response curves are satisfactorily described by a classical Hill equation (i.e. 4 parameters logistical). Nevertheless, there are instances where the marked presence of more than one point of inflection, or the presence of combined agonist and antagonist effects, prevents straight-forward modelling of the data via a standard Hill equation. Here we propose a modified model and automated fitting procedure to describe dose-response curves with multiphasic features. The resulting general model enables interpreting each phase of the dose-response as an independent dose-dependent process. We developed an algorithm which automatically generates and ranks dose-response models with varying degrees of multiphasic features. The algorithm was implemented in new freely available Dr Fit software (sourceforge.net/projects/drfit/). We show how our approach is successful in describing dose-response curves with multiphasic features. Additionally, we analysed a large cancer cell viability screen involving 11650 dose-response curves. Based on our algorithm, we found that 28% of cases were better described by a multiphasic model than by the Hill model. We thus provide a robust approach to fit dose-response curves with various degrees of complexity, which, together with the provided software implementation, should enable a wide audience to easily process their own data. PMID:26424192

  10. Detecting the subtle shape differences in hemodynamic responses at the group level

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gang; Saad, Ziad S.; Adleman, Nancy E.; Leibenluft, Ellen; Cox, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    The nature of the hemodynamic response (HDR) is still not fully understood due to the multifaceted processes involved. Aside from the overall amplitude, the response may vary across cognitive states, tasks, brain regions, and subjects with respect to characteristics such as rise and fall speed, peak duration, undershoot shape, and overall duration. Here we demonstrate that the fixed-shape (FSM) or adjusted-shape (ASM) methods may fail to detect some shape subtleties (e.g., speed of rise or recovery, or undershoot). In contrast, the estimated-shape method (ESM) through multiple basis functions can provide the opportunity to identify some subtle shape differences and achieve higher statistical power at both individual and group levels. Previously, some dimension reduction approaches focused on the peak magnitude, or made inferences based on the area under the curve (AUC) or interaction, which can lead to potential misidentifications. By adopting a generic framework of multivariate modeling (MVM), we showcase a hybrid approach that is validated by simulations and real data. With the whole HDR shape integrity maintained as input at the group level, the approach allows the investigator to substantiate these more nuanced effects through the unique HDR shape features. Unlike the few analyses that were limited to main effect, two- or three-way interactions, we extend the modeling approach to an inclusive platform that is more adaptable than the conventional GLM. With multiple effect estimates from ESM for each condition, linear mixed-effects (LME) modeling should be used at the group level when there is only one group of subjects without any other explanatory variables. Under other situations, an approximate approach through dimension reduction within the MVM framework can be adopted to achieve a practical equipoise among representation, false positive control, statistical power, and modeling flexibility. The associated program 3dMVM is publicly available as part of the

  11. A ‘T’ shaped flexible multiband ultra-thin terahertz metamaterial with consistent curved transmission spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hairun; Yang, Bin; Zhao, Xiaoqing; Gui, Yan; Liu, Jingquan; Chen, Xiang; Wang, Xiaolin; Yang, Chunsheng

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, we designed a flexible multiband ultra-thin terahertz metamaterial with four ‘T’ shaped beams deposited on parylene-C substrate to achieve sensing. The simulated and experimental investigations of transmission spectra showed two resonant peaks, respectively, which demonstrated a good numerical and experimental agreement. Due to this special ‘T’ shaped structure, the transmission spectra were nearly unchanged in the first resonant peak and slightly fluctuant in the second resonant peak after bending with a constant step, which successfully confirmed a pretty consistent curved transmission performance. A further study about the effect of polarization and incident angle direction of terahertz wave on transmission spectra indicated that the transmission of the sample did not vary with the change of polarization angles but would be influenced by incident angles. In order to explore the performance of the structure in terms of sensing phenomenon, a final contrast simulation on different surface analytes and without analyte was carried out, consequently suggesting a promising and remarkable function in sensing applications especially in detecting biomolecules.

  12. Stimuli-Responsive, Shape-Transforming Nanostructured Particles.

    PubMed

    Lee, Junhyuk; Ku, Kang Hee; Kim, Mingoo; Shin, Jae Man; Han, Junghun; Park, Chan Ho; Yi, Gi-Ra; Jang, Se Gyu; Kim, Bumjoon J

    2017-08-01

    Development of particles that change shape in response to external stimuli has been a long-thought goal for producing bioinspired, smart materials. Herein, the temperature-driven transformation of the shape and morphology of polymer particles composed of polystyrene-b-poly(4-vinylpyridine) (PS-b-P4VP) block copolymers (BCPs) and temperature-responsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) surfactants is reported. PNIPAM acts as a temperature-responsive surfactant with two important roles. First, PNIPAM stabilizes oil-in-water droplets as a P4VP-selective surfactant, creating a nearly neutral interface between the PS and P4VP domains together with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, a PS-selective surfactant, to form anisotropic PS-b-P4VP particles (i.e., convex lenses and ellipsoids). More importantly, the temperature-directed positioning of PNIPAM depending on its solubility determines the overall particle shape. Ellipsoidal particles are produced above the critical temperature, whereas convex lens-shaped particles are obtained below the critical temperature. Interestingly, given that the temperature at which particle shape change occurs depends solely on the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of the polymer surfactants, facile tuning of the transition temperature is realized by employing other PNIPAM derivatives with different LCSTs. Furthermore, reversible transformations between different shapes of PS-b-P4VP particles are successfully demonstrated using a solvent-adsorption annealing with chloroform, suggesting great promise of these particles for sensing, smart coating, and drug delivery applications. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Evaluation of optimum profile modification curves of profile shifted spur gears based on vibration responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hui; Pang, Xu; Feng, Ranjiao; Wen, Bangchun

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, a mesh stiffness model is developed for profile shifted gears with addendum modifications and tooth profile modifications (TPMs). The time-varying mesh stiffness (TVMS), load sharing factor (LSF), loaded static transmission error (LSTE) and non-loaded static transmission error (NLSTE) of a profile shifted spur gear pair with TPMs are obtained by the analytical model. The optimum profile modification curve under different amounts of TPM is determined by analyzing the LSTE first. Then, considering the effect of NLSTE, finite element (FE) model of a geared rotor system is established. The system vibration responses under different TPM curves are analyzed and the optimum modification curve is further evaluated by amplitude frequency responses. The results show that the optimum modification curve is related to the amount of TPM and modification coefficients. The comparison of the optimum profile modification curves is evaluated by LSTE and vibration responses, which shows that the optimum modification curve should be determined by evaluating the vibration response of the geared rotor system in the low mesh frequency range.

  14. Isothermal recovery response and constitutive model of thermoset shape memory polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Huifeng; Zhou, Tao; Liu, Yuyan; Lan, Lan

    2012-04-01

    Deformation recovery capability is one of the important indexes to examination shape memory effect of the shape memory polymers (SMPs). And the shape memory characteristic of SMPs is closely related to different phase states and mechanical properties above and below the glass transition temperature (Tg). In this paper, we investigated the strain recovery response of a thermoset shape memory epoxy resin modified by polyurethane (PU) through uniaxial compression experiments under various isothermal conditions and strain rates and developed a "three-phase" constitutive model based on phase transition concept, which including stationary phase, active phase and frozen phase. This model established the mutual transformation relationships between frozen phase and active phase of SMPs by introducing temperature switch function, which presents the stain storage and release process of SMPs under loading and changing temperature environment. Besides, the proposed model represents the SMPs deformation process of viscous hysteresis response by employing the rheological elements description of the three phases. The numerical results agree very well with experiment results of stress-strain response curve of isothermal compression/unloading test, which validated this model can predict the finite deformation behavior of SMPs.

  15. Isothermal recovery response and constitutive model of thermoset shape memory polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Huifeng; Zhou, Tao; Liu, Yuyan; Lan, Lan

    2011-11-01

    Deformation recovery capability is one of the important indexes to examination shape memory effect of the shape memory polymers (SMPs). And the shape memory characteristic of SMPs is closely related to different phase states and mechanical properties above and below the glass transition temperature (Tg). In this paper, we investigated the strain recovery response of a thermoset shape memory epoxy resin modified by polyurethane (PU) through uniaxial compression experiments under various isothermal conditions and strain rates and developed a "three-phase" constitutive model based on phase transition concept, which including stationary phase, active phase and frozen phase. This model established the mutual transformation relationships between frozen phase and active phase of SMPs by introducing temperature switch function, which presents the stain storage and release process of SMPs under loading and changing temperature environment. Besides, the proposed model represents the SMPs deformation process of viscous hysteresis response by employing the rheological elements description of the three phases. The numerical results agree very well with experiment results of stress-strain response curve of isothermal compression/unloading test, which validated this model can predict the finite deformation behavior of SMPs.

  16. GABAergic inhibition shapes SAM responses in rat auditory thalamus.

    PubMed

    Cai, R; Caspary, D M

    2015-07-23

    Auditory thalamus (medial geniculate body [MGB]) receives ascending inhibitory GABAergic inputs from inferior colliculus (IC) and descending GABAergic projections from the thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) with both inputs postulated to play a role in shaping temporal responses. Previous studies suggested that enhanced processing of temporally rich stimuli occurs at the level of MGB, with our recent study demonstrating enhanced GABA sensitivity in MGB compared to IC. The present study used sinusoidal amplitude-modulated (SAM) stimuli to generate modulation transfer functions (MTFs), to examine the role of GABAergic inhibition in shaping the response properties of MGB single units in anesthetized rats. Rate MTFs (rMTFs) were parsed into "bandpass (BP)", "mixed (Mixed)", "highpass (HP)" or "atypical" response types, with most units showing the Mixed response type. GABAA receptor blockade with iontophoretic application of the GABAA receptor (GABAAR) antagonist gabazine (GBZ) selectively altered the response properties of most MGB neurons examined. Mixed and HP units showed significant GABAAR-mediated SAM-evoked rate response changes at higher modulation frequencies (fms), which were also altered by N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor blockade (2R)-amino-5-phosphonopentanoate (AP5). BP units, and the lower arm of Mixed units responded to GABAAR blockade with increased responses to SAM stimuli at or near the rate best modulation frequency (rBMF). The ability of GABA circuits to shape responses at higher modulation frequencies is an emergent property of MGB units, not observed at lower levels of the auditory pathway and may reflect activation of MGB NMDA receptors (Rabang and Bartlett, 2011; Rabang et al., 2012). Together, GABAARs exert selective rate control over selected fms, generally without changing the units' response type. These results showed that coding of modulated stimuli at the level of auditory thalamus is at least, in part, strongly controlled by GABA

  17. Dose-response curve for anaesthetics based on the Monod-Wyman-Changeux model.

    PubMed

    Iwai, T; Kihara, H; Imaiand, K; Uchida, M

    1996-10-01

    We have analysed the dose-response curve for halothane and isoflurane according to the Monod-Wyman-Changeux (MWC) model. This model describes the nature of the physiological data reported by Wakamori, Ikemoto and Akaike for inhibitory Cl currents induced by GABA or glycine in dissociated rat brain neurones and by Herrington and colleagues for Ca2+ currents in clonal pituitary cells. With some assumptions on the difference in response to anaesthetics between patients, the model is applicable in vivo, and it also describes well the human dose-response curve for isoflurane reported by Mather, Raftery and Prys-Roberts. However, the steeply sigmoidal dose-response curve in humans for halothane presented by deJong and Eger is difficult to understand with the same model, because it gives rise to unrealistic MWC variables.

  18. Provisioning responsibilities: how relationships shape the work that women do.

    PubMed

    Neysmith, Sheila M; Reitsma-Street, Marge; Baker-Collins, Stephanie; Porter, Elaine; Tam, Sandra

    2010-05-01

    This study documents the work women do to provision for themselves and others. It charts the contours of this work and examines associated responsibilities. The concept of provisioning informed interviews with 100 women. The diversity and range of women's work were surfaced by selecting women from six community groups, marginalized by income, race, and age, in two Canadian provinces. Findings summarize the types of provisioning activities and strategies women use to meet their responsibilities. Because the latter flow through pathways of relationships, negotiating the boundaries of their provisioning responsibilities shapes women's daily work and possibilities for engaging in civil society.

  19. Thermomechanical Methodology for Stabilizing Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padula, II, Santo A (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Methods and apparatuses for stabilizing the strain-temperature response for a shape memory alloy are provided. To perform stabilization of a second sample of the shape memory alloy, a first sample of the shape memory alloy is selected for isobaric treatment and the second sample is selected for isothermal treatment. When applying the isobaric treatment to the first sample, a constant stress is applied to the first sample. Temperature is also cycled from a minimum temperature to a maximum temperature until a strain on the first sample stabilizes. Once the strain on the first sample stabilizes, the isothermal treatment is performed on the second sample. During isothermal treatment, different levels of stress on the second sample are applied until a strain on the second sample matches the stabilized strain on the first sample.

  20. Thermomechanical Methodology for Stabilizing Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padula, Santo A., II (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Methods and apparatuses for stabilizing the strain-temperature response for a shape memory alloy are provided. To perform stabilization of a second sample of the shape memory alloy, a first sample of the shape memory alloy is selected for isobaric treatment and the second sample is selected for isothermal treatment. When applying the isobaric treatment to the first sample, a constant stress is applied to the first sample. Temperature is also cycled from a minimum temperature to a maximum temperature until a strain on the first sample stabilizes. Once the strain on the first sample stabilizes, the isothermal treatment is performed on the second sample. During isothermal treatment, different levels of stress on the second sample are applied until a strain on the second sample matches the stabilized strain on the first sample.

  1. Computational tools for fitting the Hill equation to dose-response curves.

    PubMed

    Gadagkar, Sudhindra R; Call, Gerald B

    2015-01-01

    Many biological response curves commonly assume a sigmoidal shape that can be approximated well by means of the 4-parameter nonlinear logistic equation, also called the Hill equation. However, estimation of the Hill equation parameters requires access to commercial software or the ability to write computer code. Here we present two user-friendly and freely available computer programs to fit the Hill equation - a Solver-based Microsoft Excel template and a stand-alone GUI-based "point and click" program, called HEPB. Both computer programs use the iterative method to estimate two of the Hill equation parameters (EC50 and the Hill slope), while constraining the values of the other two parameters (the minimum and maximum asymptotes of the response variable) to fit the Hill equation to the data. In addition, HEPB draws the prediction band at a user-defined confidence level, and determines the EC50 value for each of the limits of this band to give boundary values that help objectively delineate sensitive, normal and resistant responses to the drug being tested. Both programs were tested by analyzing twelve datasets that varied widely in data values, sample size and slope, and were found to yield estimates of the Hill equation parameters that were essentially identical to those provided by commercial software such as GraphPad Prism and nls, the statistical package in the programming language R. The Excel template provides a means to estimate the parameters of the Hill equation and plot the regression line in a familiar Microsoft Office environment. HEPB, in addition to providing the above results, also computes the prediction band for the data at a user-defined level of confidence, and determines objective cut-off values to distinguish among response types (sensitive, normal and resistant). Both programs are found to yield estimated values that are essentially the same as those from standard software such as GraphPad Prism and the R-based nls. Furthermore, HEPB also has

  2. Solvent free energy curves for electron transfer reactions: A nonlinear solvent response model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichiye, Toshiko

    1996-05-01

    Marcus theory for electron transfer assumes a linear response of the solvent so that both the reactant and product free energy curves are parabolic functions of the solvent polarization, each with the same solvent force constant k characterizing the curvature. Simulation data by other workers indicate that the assumption of parabolic free energy curves is good for the Fe2+-Fe3+ self-exchange reaction but that the k of the reactant and product free energy curves are different for the reaction D0+A0→D1-+A1+. However, the fluctuations sampled in these simulations were not large enough to reach the activation barrier region, which was thus treated either by umbrella sampling or by parabolic extrapolation. Here, we present free energy curves calculated from a simple model of ionic solvation developed in an earlier paper by Hyun, Babu, and Ichiye, which we refer to here as the HBI model. The HBI model describes the nonlinearity of the solvent response due to the orientation of polar solvent molecules. Since it is a continuum model, it may be considered the first-order nonlinear correction to the linear response Born model. Moreover, in the limit of zero charge or infinite radius, the Born model and the Marcus relations are recovered. Here, the full free energy curves are calculated using analytic expressions from the HBI model. The HBI reactant and product curves have different k for D0+A0→D1-+A1+ as in the simulations, but examining the full curves shows they are nonparabolic due to the nonlinear response of the solvent. On the other hand, the HBI curves are close to parabolic for the Fe2+-Fe3+ reaction, also in agreement with simulations, while those for another self-exchange reaction D0-A1+ show greater deviations from parabolic behavior than the Fe2+-Fe3+ reaction. This indicates that transitions from neutral to charged species will have the largest deviations. Thus, the second moment of the polarization is shown to be a measure of the deviation from Marcus

  3. Comparative evaluation of shaping ability of different rotary NiTi instruments in curved canals using CBCT

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Anshul; Taneja, Sonali; Kumar, Mohit

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to compare the canal transportation, canal centering ability, and time taken for preparation of curved root canals after instrumentation with ProFile GT Series X (GTX) files, Revo-S files, twisted files, and Mtwo files by using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Materials and Methods: Forty mesiobuccal canals of mandibular molars with an angle of curvature ranging from 20 to 40 were divided according to the instrument used in canal preparation into four groups of 10 samples each: GTX (group I), Revo-S (group II), twisted file (group III), and Mtwo (group IV). The teeth were instrumented according to manufacturer's guidelines, with all groups being prepared to size 30, 0.06 taper master apical file. Canals were scanned using an i-CAT CBCT scanner (Imaging Science International, Hatfield, PA, USA) before and after preparation to evaluate the transportation and centering ratio at 3 mm, 5 mm, 7 mm, 9 mm, and 11 mm from the apex. The data collected were evaluated using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) with Tukey's honestly significant difference (HSD) test. Results: Twisted file system showed significantly least canal transportation and highest canal centering ability values as compared to GTX, Revo-S, and Mtwo file systems. Overall, GTX, Revo-S, and Mtwo showed comparable results with respect to canal transportation and centering ability. Conclusion: The innovative method of manufacturing the TF system resulted in superior shaping ability in curved canals, with the instruments remaining more centered and producing less canal transportation than GTX, Revo-S, and Mtwo file systems. PMID:24554858

  4. Behavioral responses to noxious stimuli shape the perception of pain

    PubMed Central

    May, Elisabeth S.; Tiemann, Laura; Schmidt, Paul; Nickel, Moritz M.; Wiedemann, Nina; Dresel, Christian; Sorg, Christian; Ploner, Markus

    2017-01-01

    Pain serves vital protective functions. To fulfill these functions, a noxious stimulus might induce a percept which, in turn, induces a behavioral response. Here, we investigated an alternative view in which behavioral responses do not exclusively depend on but themselves shape perception. We tested this hypothesis in an experiment in which healthy human subjects performed a reaction time task and provided perceptual ratings of noxious and tactile stimuli. A multi-level moderated mediation analysis revealed that behavioral responses are significantly involved in the translation of a stimulus into perception. This involvement was significantly stronger for noxious than for tactile stimuli. These findings show that the influence of behavioral responses on perception is particularly strong for pain which likely reflects the utmost relevance of behavioral responses to protect the body. These observations parallel recent concepts of emotions and entail implications for the understanding and treatment of pain. PMID:28276487

  5. Behavioral responses to noxious stimuli shape the perception of pain.

    PubMed

    May, Elisabeth S; Tiemann, Laura; Schmidt, Paul; Nickel, Moritz M; Wiedemann, Nina; Dresel, Christian; Sorg, Christian; Ploner, Markus

    2017-03-09

    Pain serves vital protective functions. To fulfill these functions, a noxious stimulus might induce a percept which, in turn, induces a behavioral response. Here, we investigated an alternative view in which behavioral responses do not exclusively depend on but themselves shape perception. We tested this hypothesis in an experiment in which healthy human subjects performed a reaction time task and provided perceptual ratings of noxious and tactile stimuli. A multi-level moderated mediation analysis revealed that behavioral responses are significantly involved in the translation of a stimulus into perception. This involvement was significantly stronger for noxious than for tactile stimuli. These findings show that the influence of behavioral responses on perception is particularly strong for pain which likely reflects the utmost relevance of behavioral responses to protect the body. These observations parallel recent concepts of emotions and entail implications for the understanding and treatment of pain.

  6. Comparative Analysis of Biologically Relevant Response Curves in Gene Expression Experiments: Heteromorphy, Heterochrony, and Heterometry.

    PubMed

    Baker, Stuart G

    2014-02-14

    To gain biological insights, investigators sometimes compare sequences of gene expression measurements under two scenarios (such as two drugs or species). For this situation, we developed an algorithm to fit, identify, and compare biologically relevant response curves in terms of heteromorphy (different curves), heterochrony (different transition times), and heterometry (different magnitudes). The curves are flat, linear, sigmoid, hockey-stick (sigmoid missing a steady state), transient (sigmoid missing two steady states), impulse (with peak or trough), step (with intermediate-level plateau), impulse+ (impulse with an extra parameter), step+ (step with an extra parameter), further characterized by upward or downward trend. To reduce overfitting, we fit the curves to every other response, evaluated the fit in the remaining responses, and identified the most parsimonious curves that yielded a good fit. We measured goodness of fit using a statistic comparable over different genes, namely the square root of the mean squared prediction error as a percentage of the range of responses, which we call the relative prediction error (RPE). We illustrated the algorithm using data on gene expression at 14 times in the embryonic development in two species of frogs. Software written in Mathematica is freely available.

  7. Shape similarity of charge-transfer (CT) excitation energy curves in a series of donor-acceptor complexes and its description with a transferable energy of CT orbital

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritsenko, O. V.

    2017-08-01

    A simple nature of charge-transfer (CT) in the prototype complexes Dp -F2 (Dp =NH3 , H2O) manifests itself in a very close shape of their CT excitation energy curves ωCT (R) along the donor-acceptor separation R. It affords a simple orbital description in terms of the CT orbitals (CTOs) obtained with a transformation of the virtual orbitals of the standard local density approximation (LDA). The transferable energy of the relevant CTO as a function of R closely approximates the common shape of ωCT (R) , while the height of the individual curve is determined with the ionization potential of Dp .

  8. Thermal response of novel shape memory polymer-shape memory alloy hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossiter, Jonathan; Takashima, Kazuto; Mukai, Toshiharu

    2014-03-01

    Shape memory polymers (SMP) and shape memory alloys (SMA) have both been proven important smart materials in their own fields. Shape memory polymers can be formed into complex three-dimensional structures and can undergo shape programming and large strain recovery. These are especially important for deployable structures including those for space applications and micro-structures such as stents. Shape memory alloys on the other hand are readily exploitable in a range of applications where simple, silent, light-weight and low-cost repeatable actuation is required. These include servos, valves and mobile robotic artificial muscles. Despite their differences, one important commonality between SMPs and SMAs is that they are both typically activated by thermal energy. Given this common characteristic it is important to consider how these two will behave when in close environmental proximity, and hence exposed to the same thermal stimulus, and when they are incorporated into a hybrid SMA-SMP structure. In this paper we propose and examine the operation of SMA-SMP hybrids. The relationship between the two temperatures Tg, the glass transition temperature of the polymer, and Ta, the nominal austenite to martensite transition temperature of the alloy is considered. We examine how the choice of these two temperatures affects the thermal response of the hybrid. Electrical stimulation of the SMA is also considered as a method not only of actuating the SMA but also of inducing heating in the surrounding polymer, with consequent effects on actuator behaviour. Likewise by varying the rate and degree of thermal stimulation of the SMA significantly different actuation and structural stiffness can be achieved. Novel SMP-SMA hybrid actuators and structures have many ready applications in deployable structures, robotics and tuneable engineering systems.

  9. Nonlocal optical response of metal nanostructures with arbitrary shape.

    SciTech Connect

    McMahon, J. M.; Gray, S. K.; Schatz, G. C.; Northwestern Univ.

    2009-08-28

    We present an implementation of Maxwell's equations that incorporates the spatially nonlocal response of materials, an effect necessary to describe the optical properties of structures with features less than 10 nm. For the first time it is possible to investigate the nonlocal optical response of structures without spherical or planar shape, and outside of the electrostatic limit. As an illustration, we calculate the optical properties of Au nanowires and show that nonlocal effects are particularly important in structures with apex features, even for arbitrarily large sizes.

  10. Thermo-Mechanical Methodology for Stabilizing Shape Memory Alloy Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padula, Santo

    2013-01-01

    This innovation is capable of significantly reducing the amount of time required to stabilize the strain-temperature response of a shape memory alloy (SMA). Unlike traditional stabilization processes that take days to weeks to achieve stabilized response, this innovation accomplishes stabilization in a matter of minutes, thus making it highly useful for the successful and practical implementation of SMA-based technologies in real-world applications. The innovation can also be applied to complex geometry components, not just simple geometries like wires or rods.

  11. Asymmetry of stress-strain curves under tension and compression for NiTi shape memory alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.; Xie, Z.; Van Humbeeck, J.; Delaey, L.

    1998-07-24

    The stress-strain curves of polycrystalline martensitic NiTi shape memory alloys are often different for loading under tension and compression. Under tension, a flat stress-plateau occurs, while under compression, the material is quickly strain hardened and no flat stress-plateau is observed. Cyclic deformation under tension-compression also shows that it is more difficult to deform the material during compression than during tension, where an asymmetric stress-strain loop is obtained. TEM observations show that, under tension to 4% strain, martensite variants are partially reoriented via migration of variant interfaces with formation of dislocation networks mainly along the junction plane areas, and no significantly plastic deformation has been observed inside the martensite twin bands. While under compression to 4% strain, a high density of dislocations has been generated in both the martensite twin bands and the variant accommodation area, and no significant martensite reorientation via variant interfacial migration has been observed. This shows that the deformation mechanism of martensitic polycrystalline NiTi SMAs under tension is different from that under compression.

  12. Photic entrainment of Period mutant mice is predicted from their phase response curves

    PubMed Central

    Pendergast, Julie S.; Friday, Rio C.; Yamazaki, Shin

    2010-01-01

    A fundamental property of circadian clocks is that they entrain to environmental cues. The circadian genes, Period1 and Period2, are involved in entrainment of the mammalian circadian system. To investigate the roles of the Period genes in photic entrainment, we constructed phase response curves (PRC) to light pulses for C57BL/6J wild-type, Per1−/−, Per2−/−, and Per3−/− mice and tested whether the PRCs accurately predict entrainment to non-24 light-dark cycles (T-cycles) and constant light (LL). The PRCs of wild-type and Per3−/− mice are similar in shape and amplitude and have relatively large delay zones and small advance zones, resulting in successful entrainment to T26, but not T21, with similar phase angles. Per1−/− mice have a high-amplitude PRC, resulting in entrainment to a broad range of T-cycles. Per2−/− mice also entrain to a wide range of T-cycles because the advance portion of their PRC is larger than wild-types. Period aftereffects following entrainment to T-cycles were similar among all genotypes. We found that the ratio of the advance portion to the delay portion of the PRC accurately predicts the lengthening of the period of the activity rhythm in LL. Wild-type, Per1−/−, and Per3−/− mice had larger delay zones than advance zones and lengthened (>24hrs) periods in LL, while Per2−/− mice had delay and advance zones that were equal in size and no period lengthening in LL. Together, these results demonstrate that PRCs are powerful tools for predicting and understanding photic entrainment of circadian mutant mice. PMID:20826680

  13. A strategy to model nonmonotonic dose-response curve and estimate IC50.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Holden-Wiltse, Jeanne; Wang, Jiong; Liang, Hua

    2013-01-01

    The half-maximal inhibitory concentration IC[Formula: see text] is an important pharmacodynamic index of drug effectiveness. To estimate this value, the dose response relationship needs to be established, which is generally achieved by fitting monotonic sigmoidal models. However, recent studies on Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) mutants developing resistance to antiviral drugs show that the dose response curve may not be monotonic. Traditional models can fail for nonmonotonic data and ignore observations that may be of biologic significance. Therefore, we propose a nonparametric model to describe the dose response relationship and fit the curve using local polynomial regression. The nonparametric approach is shown to be promising especially for estimating the IC[Formula: see text] of some HIV inhibitory drugs, in which there is a dose-dependent stimulation of response for mutant strains. This model strategy may be applicable to general pharmacologic, toxicologic, or other biomedical data that exhibits a nonmonotonic dose response relationship for which traditional parametric models fail.

  14. J-R Curve Determination for Disk-shaped Compact Specimens Based on the Normalization Method and Direct Current Potential Drop Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xiang; Nanstad, Randy K; Sokolov, Mikhail A

    2014-01-01

    Material ductile fracture toughness can be described by J-integral versus crack extension relationship (J-R curve). As a conventional J-R curve measurement method, unloading compliance (UC) becomes impractical in elevated temperature testing due to relaxation of the material and a friction induced back-up shape of the J-R curve. In addition, the UC method may underpredict the crack extension for standard disk-shaped compact (DC(T)) specimens. In order to address these issues, the normalization method and direct current potential drop (DCPD) technique were applied for determining J-R curves at 24 C and 500 C for 0.18T DC(T) specimens made from type 316L stainless steel. For comparison purchase, the UC method was also applied in 24 C tests. The normalization method was able to yield valid J-R curves in all tests. The J-R curves from the DCPD technique need adjustment to account for the potential drop induced by plastic deformation, crack blunting, etc. and after applying a newly-developed DCPD adjustment procedure, the post-adjusted DCPD J-R curves essentially matched J-R curves from the normalization method. In contrast, the UC method underpredicted the crack extension in all tests resulting in substantial deviation in the derived J-R curves manifested by high Jq values than the normalization or DCPD method. Only for tests where the UC method underpredicted the crack extension by a very small value, J-R curves determined by the UC method were similar to those determined by the normalization or DCPD method.

  15. The effect of measurement error on the dose-response curve

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshimura, I. )

    1990-07-01

    In epidemiological studies for an environmental risk assessment, doses are often observed with errors. However, they have received little attention in data analysis. This paper studies the effect of measurement errors on the observed dose-response curve. Under the assumptions of the monotone likelihood ratio on errors and a monotone increasing dose-response curve, it is verified that the slope of the observed dose-response curve is likely to be gentler than the true one. The observed variance of responses are not so homogeneous as to be expected under models without errors. The estimation of parameters in a hockey-stick type dose-response curve with a threshold is considered on line of the maximum likelihood method for a functional relationship model. Numerical examples adaptable to the data in a 1986 study of the effect of air pollution that was conducted in Japan are also presented. The proposed model is proved to be suitable to the data in the example cited in this paper.

  16. Water relations of Robinia pseudoacacia L.: do vessels cavitate and refill diurnally or are R-shaped curves invalid in Robinia?

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruiqing; Zhang, Lingling; Zhang, Shuoxin; Cai, Jing; Tyree, Melvin T

    2014-12-01

    Since 2005, an unresolved debate has questioned whether R-shaped vulnerability curves (VCs) might be an artefact of the centrifuge method of measuring VCs. VCs with R-shape show loss of stem conductivity from approximately zero tension, and if true, this suggests that some plants either refill embolized vessels every night or function well with a high percentage of vessels permanently embolized. The R-shaped curves occur more in species with vessels greater than half the length of the segments spun in a centrifuge. Many have hypothesized that the embolism is seeded by agents (bubbles or particles) entering the stem end and travelling towards the axis of rotation in long vessels, causing premature cavitation. VCs were measured on Robinia pseudoacacia L. by three different techniques to yield three different VCs; R-shaped: Cavitron P50  = 0.30 MPa and S-shaped: air injection P50  = 1.48 MPa and bench top dehydration P50  = 3.57 MPa. Stem conductivity measured in the Cavitron was unstable and is a function of vessel length when measured repeatedly with constant tension, and this observation is discussed in terms of stability of air bubbles drawn into cut-open vessels during repeated Cavitron measurement of conductivity; hence, R-shaped curves measured in a Cavitron are probably invalid. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. The Axial Curve Rotator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Walter M.

    This document contains detailed directions for constructing a device that mechanically produces the three-dimensional shape resulting from the rotation of any algebraic line or curve around either axis on the coordinate plant. The device was developed in response to student difficulty in visualizing, and thus grasping the mathematical principles…

  18. Force responses of strongly intrinsically curved DNA helices deviate from worm-like chain predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tompitak, M.; Schiessel, H.; Barkema, G. T.

    2016-12-01

    DNA sequences with nontrivial intrinsic curvature are of interest for a range of biological and artificial DNA systems. We design both intrinsically strongly curved and intrinsically straight sequences. We find that such sequences with opposing curvatures can be designed even under constraints that would naively lead one to assume that those sequences would be highly similar in their mechanical properties. We then characterize the force response of those sequences and find that their force-extension curves deviate significantly in the low-force regime, and that the standard worm-like chain description is inadequate to describe the low-force response of the strongly bent sequences. We propose a modified description that takes the intrinsic curvature into account, making the DNA act, in the low-force regime, like a nanoscale helical spring. We find strongly improved agreement between the model and the simulated force-extension curves.

  19. Assembly of responsive-shape coated nanoparticles at water surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, J. Matthew D.; Grest, Gary S.

    2014-04-01

    Nanoparticle (NP) assembly and aggregation can be controlled using a variety of organic coatings that bind to the nanoparticle surface and alter its affinity for solvent and other particles. We show that surprisingly simple short chain polymer coatings can be effectively used to selectively control the aggregation of very small nanoparticles by taking advantage of the environment-responsive shape produced by the coating's spontaneous asymmetry on high-curvature nanoparticles. Using extremely long molecular dynamics simulations of alkanethiol coated Au nanoparticles, we show that varying the terminal groups of a nanoparticle coating dramatically alters the coating shape at the water liquid-vapor interface, producing very different assembly morphologies. NPs with CH3-terminated coatings assemble into short linear groupings with a highly aligned structure at early time and then form more disordered clusters as these linear groupings further assemble. NPs with COOH-terminated coatings assemble into dimers and disordered clumps with no preferred alignment at short time and longer disordered chains of particles at longer times. We also find that the responsive shape of the coating continues to adapt to local environment during assembly. The orientations of chains within NP coatings are significantly different when the NPs are arranged in aggregates than when they are isolated.

  20. Plasma adrenocorticotropin responses to opioid blockade with naloxone: generating a dose-response curve in a single session.

    PubMed

    Mangold, D; McCaul, M E; Ali, M; Wand, G S

    2000-08-15

    We examined two methods of generating a dose-response curve to the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone. In 15 healthy male subjects (18-25 years) plasma adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) responses to five doses of naloxone studied over 5 separate days were compared to plasma ACTH responses to five incremental doses of naloxone studied within a single session. There was a statistically significant positive correlation in ACTH responses (area under the curve and peak) between dosing methods. Furthermore, the doses of naloxone that produced half-maximal and maximal ACTH response were similar. The comparability of ACTH responses between the two naloxone dosing techniques, combined with the safety and ease associated with the single-session methodology, underscores the usefulness of the single-session technique for future investigations.

  1. Item Response Theory with Estimation of the Latent Density Using Davidian Curves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Carol M.; Lin, Nan

    2009-01-01

    Davidian-curve item response theory (DC-IRT) is introduced, evaluated with simulations, and illustrated using data from the Schedule for Nonadaptive and Adaptive Personality Entitlement scale. DC-IRT is a method for fitting unidimensional IRT models with maximum marginal likelihood estimation, in which the latent density is estimated,…

  2. Item Response Theory with Estimation of the Latent Density Using Davidian Curves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Carol M.; Lin, Nan

    2009-01-01

    Davidian-curve item response theory (DC-IRT) is introduced, evaluated with simulations, and illustrated using data from the Schedule for Nonadaptive and Adaptive Personality Entitlement scale. DC-IRT is a method for fitting unidimensional IRT models with maximum marginal likelihood estimation, in which the latent density is estimated,…

  3. Measurement Error in Nonparametric Item Response Curve Estimation. Research Report. ETS RR-11-28

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guo, Hongwen; Sinharay, Sandip

    2011-01-01

    Nonparametric, or kernel, estimation of item response curve (IRC) is a concern theoretically and operationally. Accuracy of this estimation, often used in item analysis in testing programs, is biased when the observed scores are used as the regressor because the observed scores are contaminated by measurement error. In this study, we investigate…

  4. Mixed-effects Gaussian process functional regression models with application to dose-response curve prediction.

    PubMed

    Shi, J Q; Wang, B; Will, E J; West, R M

    2012-11-20

    We propose a new semiparametric model for functional regression analysis, combining a parametric mixed-effects model with a nonparametric Gaussian process regression model, namely a mixed-effects Gaussian process functional regression model. The parametric component can provide explanatory information between the response and the covariates, whereas the nonparametric component can add nonlinearity. We can model the mean and covariance structures simultaneously, combining the information borrowed from other subjects with the information collected from each individual subject. We apply the model to dose-response curves that describe changes in the responses of subjects for differing levels of the dose of a drug or agent and have a wide application in many areas. We illustrate the method for the management of renal anaemia. An individual dose-response curve is improved when more information is included by this mechanism from the subject/patient over time, enabling a patient-specific treatment regime.

  5. Effect of shaping sensor data on pilot response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Roger M.

    1990-01-01

    The pilot of a modern jet aircraft is subjected to varying workloads while being responsible for multiple, ongoing tasks. The ability to associate the pilot's responses with the task/situation, by modifying the way information is presented relative to the task, could provide a means of reducing workload. To examine the feasibility of this concept, a real time simulation study was undertaken to determine whether preprocessing of sensor data would affect pilot response. Results indicated that preprocessing could be an effective way to tailor the pilot's response to displayed data. The effects of three transformations or shaping functions were evaluated with respect to the pilot's ability to predict and detect out-of-tolerance conditions while monitoring an electronic engine display. Two nonlinear transformations, on being the inverse of the other, were compared to a linear transformation. Results indicate that a nonlinear transformation that increases the rate-or-change of output relative to input tends to advance the prediction response and improve the detection response, while a nonlinear transformation that decreases the rate-of-change of output relative to input tends to lengthen the prediction response and make detection more difficult.

  6. Probability and the changing shape of response distributions for orientation.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Britt

    2014-11-18

    Spatial attention and feature-based attention are regarded as two independent mechanisms for biasing the processing of sensory stimuli. Feature attention is held to be a spatially invariant mechanism that advantages a single feature per sensory dimension. In contrast to the prediction of location independence, I found that participants were able to report the orientation of a briefly presented visual grating better for targets defined by high probability conjunctions of features and locations even when orientations and locations were individually uniform. The advantage for high-probability conjunctions was accompanied by changes in the shape of the response distributions. High-probability conjunctions had error distributions that were not normally distributed but demonstrated increased kurtosis. The increase in kurtosis could be explained as a change in the variances of the component tuning functions that comprise a population mixture. By changing the mixture distribution of orientation-tuned neurons, it is possible to change the shape of the discrimination function. This prompts the suggestion that attention may not "increase" the quality of perceptual processing in an absolute sense but rather prioritizes some stimuli over others. This results in an increased number of highly accurate responses to probable targets and, simultaneously, an increase in the number of very inaccurate responses.

  7. Robust Measurements of Phase Response Curves Realized via Multicycle Weighted Spike-Triggered Averages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imai, Takashi; Ota, Kaiichiro; Aoyagi, Toshio

    2017-02-01

    Phase reduction has been extensively used to study rhythmic phenomena. As a result of phase reduction, the rhythm dynamics of a given system can be described using the phase response curve. Measuring this characteristic curve is an important step toward understanding a system's behavior. Recently, a basic idea for a new measurement method (called the multicycle weighted spike-triggered average method) was proposed. This paper confirms the validity of this method by providing an analytical proof and demonstrates its effectiveness in actual experimental systems by applying the method to an oscillating electric circuit. Some practical tips to use the method are also presented.

  8. Octupole response and stability of spherical shape in heavy nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrosimov, V. I.; Davidovskaya, O. I.; Dellafiore, A.; Matera, F.

    2003-11-01

    The isoscalar octupole response of a heavy spherical nucleus is analyzed in a semiclassical model based on the linearized Vlasov equation. The octupole strength function is evaluated with different degrees of approximation. The zero-order fixed-surface response displays a remarkable concentration of strength in the 1ℏ ω and 3ℏ ω regions, in excellent agreement with the quantum single-particle response. The collective fixed-surface response reproduces both the high- and low-energy octupole resonances, but not the low-lying 3 - collective states, while the moving-surface response function gives a good qualitative description of all the main features of the octupole response in heavy nuclei. The role of triangular nucleon orbits, that have been related to a possible instability of the spherical shape with respect to octupole-type deformations, is discussed within this model. It is found that, rather than creating instability, the triangular trajectories are the only classical orbits contributing to the damping of low-energy octupole excitations.

  9. On the shape of neutron dose-effect curves for radiogenic cancers and life shortening in mice.

    PubMed

    Storer, J B; Fry, R J

    1995-03-01

    Male and female hybrid BCF1 (C57BL/6 Bd x BALB/c Bd) were exposed to total neutron doses of 0.06, 0.12, 0.24, and 0.48 Gy in fractions over a period of 24 weeks. The fractionation regimens were: 24 weekly fractions of 0.0025 Gy, 12 fractions of 0.01 Gy every 2 weeks, 6 fractions of 0.04 Gy every 4 weeks, and 3 fractions of 0.16 Gy every 8 weeks. In order to detect any change in susceptibility with age over the period of exposures from 16 weeks to 40 weeks of age, mice were exposed to single doses of 0.025, 0.05, 0.10, and 0.2 Gy at 16 and 40 weeks of age. These experiments were designed to test whether the initial parts of the dose-response relationships for life shortening and cancer induction could be determined economically by using fractionated exposures and whether or not the initial slopes were linear. The conclusions were that for life shortening and most radiogenic cancers, the dose-effect curves are linear and that fractionation of the neutron dose has no effect on the magnitude of the response of equal total doses over the range of doses studied. The ratio of such initial slopes and comparable linear initial slopes for a reference radiation should provide maximum and constant relative biological effectiveness values.

  10. Fast-Response-Time Shape-Memory-Effect Foam Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jardine, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Bulk shape memory alloys, such as Nitinol or CuAlZn, display strong recovery forces undergoing a phase transformation after being strained in their martensitic state. These recovery forces are used for actuation. As the phase transformation is thermally driven, the response time of the actuation can be slow, as the heat must be passively inserted or removed from the alloy. Shape memory alloy TiNi torque tubes have been investigated for at least 20 years and have demonstrated high actuation forces [3,000 in.-lb (approximately equal to 340 N-m) torques] and are very lightweight. However, they are not easy to attach to existing structures. Adhesives will fail in shear at low-torque loads and the TiNi is not weldable, so that mechanical crimp fits have been generally used. These are not reliable, especially in vibratory environments. The TiNi is also slow to heat up, as it can only be heated indirectly using heater and cooling must be done passively. This has restricted their use to on-off actuators where cycle times of approximately one minute is acceptable. Self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) has been used in the past to make porous TiNi metal foams. Shape Change Technologies has been able to train SHS derived TiNi to exhibit the shape memory effect. As it is an open-celled material, fast response times were observed when the material was heated using hot and cold fluids. A methodology was developed to make the open-celled porous TiNi foams as a tube with integrated hexagonal ends, which then becomes a torsional actuator with fast response times. Under processing developed independently, researchers were able to verify torques of 84 in.-lb (approximately equal to 9.5 Nm) using an actuator weighing 1.3 oz (approximately equal to 37 g) with very fast (less than 1/16th of a second) initial response times when hot and cold fluids were used to facilitate heat transfer. Integrated structural connections were added as part of the net shape process, eliminating

  11. Shape sensitivity analysis of flutter response of a laminated wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergen, Fred D.; Kapania, Rakesh K.

    1988-01-01

    A method is presented for calculating the shape sensitivity of a wing aeroelastic response with respect to changes in geometric shape. Yates' modified strip method is used in conjunction with Giles' equivalent plate analysis to predict the flutter speed, frequency, and reduced frequency of the wing. Three methods are used to calculate the sensitivity of the eigenvalue. The first method is purely a finite difference calculation of the eigenvalue derivative directly from the solution of the flutter problem corresponding to the two different values of the shape parameters. The second method uses an analytic expression for the eigenvalue sensitivities of a general complex matrix, where the derivatives of the aerodynamic, mass, and stiffness matrices are computed using a finite difference approximation. The third method also uses an analytic expression for the eigenvalue sensitivities, but the aerodynamic matrix is computed analytically. All three methods are found to be in good agreement with each other. The sensitivities of the eigenvalues were used to predict the flutter speed, frequency, and reduced frequency. These approximations were found to be in good agreement with those obtained using a complete reanalysis.

  12. Shape memory gels with multi-stimuli-responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Tatsuo; Miyazaki, Takashi; Yamaoka, Kanji; Katayama, Yuichi; Matsuda, Atsushi; Gong, Jianping; Osada, Yoshihito

    1999-05-01

    The shape memory effect with multi stimuli responses of the hydrogels having the various type of long alkyl chains: poly (stearyl acrylate -co- acrylic acid) p(HA-co-AA), poly(16- acryloylhexadecanoic acid -co- acrylic acid) p(AHA-co-AA), poly(12-acryloyldodecanoic acid -co- acrylic acid) p(ADA-co- AA), and poly (stearyl acrylate -co- methyl acrylate) p(SA-co- MA) were investigated. P(SA-co-AA) gel exhibited the reversible order-disorder transition on heating at 49 degrees Celsius and on cooling at 42 degrees Celsius. The transition was derived from the melting of the hydrophobic domain formed by the long alkyl side chain. The Young's modulus decreased dramatically during the transition. Besides this gel showed the shape memory effect based on the order-disorder transition. The shape of deformed p(SA-co-AA) gel recovered very quickly (5s). In the p(SA-co-MA) gel system, the transition temperature could be varied. Moreover, p(AHA-co-AA) gel responded to not only temperature change but also change of pH and solvent composition. 10

  13. Seed Pubescence and Shape Modulate Adaptive Responses to Fire Cues.

    PubMed

    Gómez-González, Susana; Ojeda, Fernando; Torres-Morales, Patricio; Palma, Jazmín E

    2016-01-01

    Post-fire recruitment by seeds is regarded as an adaptive response in fire-prone ecosystems. Nevertheless, little is known about which heritable seed traits are functional to the main signals of fire (heat and smoke), thus having the potential to evolve. Here, we explored whether three seed traits (pubescence, dormancy and shape) and fire regime modulate seed response to fire cues(heat and smoke). As a model study system, we used Helenium aromaticum (Asteraceae), a native annual forb from the Chilean matorral, where fires are anthropogenic. We related seed trait values with fitness responses (germination and survival) after exposure to heat-shock and smoke experimental treatments on seeds from 10 H. aromaticum wild populations. We performed a phenotypic selection experiment to examine the relationship of seed traits with post-treatment fitness within a population (adaptive hypothesis). We then explored whether fire frequency in natural habitats was associated with trait expression across populations, and with germination and survival responses to experimental fire-cues. We found that populations subjected to higher fire frequency had, in average, more rounded and pubescent seeds than populations from rarely burned areas. Populations with more rounded and pubescent seeds were more resistant to 80°C heat-shock and smoke treatments.There was correlated selection on seed traits: pubescent-rounded or glabrouscent-elongated seeds had the highest probability of germinating after heat-shock treatments. Seed pubescence and shape in H. aromaticum are heritable traits that modulate adaptive responses to fire. Our results provide new insights into the process of plant adaptation to fire and highlight the relevance of human-made fires as a strong evolutionary agent in the Anthropocene.

  14. Seed Pubescence and Shape Modulate Adaptive Responses to Fire Cues

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-González, Susana; Ojeda, Fernando; Torres-Morales, Patricio; Palma, Jazmín E.

    2016-01-01

    Post-fire recruitment by seeds is regarded as an adaptive response in fire-prone ecosystems. Nevertheless, little is known about which heritable seed traits are functional to the main signals of fire (heat and smoke), thus having the potential to evolve. Here, we explored whether three seed traits (pubescence, dormancy and shape) and fire regime modulate seed response to fire cues(heat and smoke). As a model study system, we used Helenium aromaticum (Asteraceae), a native annual forb from the Chilean matorral, where fires are anthropogenic. We related seed trait values with fitness responses (germination and survival) after exposure to heat-shock and smoke experimental treatments on seeds from 10 H. aromaticum wild populations. We performed a phenotypic selection experiment to examine the relationship of seed traits with post-treatment fitness within a population (adaptive hypothesis). We then explored whether fire frequency in natural habitats was associated with trait expression across populations, and with germination and survival responses to experimental fire-cues. We found that populations subjected to higher fire frequency had, in average, more rounded and pubescent seeds than populations from rarely burned areas. Populations with more rounded and pubescent seeds were more resistant to 80°C heat-shock and smoke treatments.There was correlated selection on seed traits: pubescent-rounded or glabrouscent-elongated seeds had the highest probability of germinating after heat-shock treatments. Seed pubescence and shape in H. aromaticum are heritable traits that modulate adaptive responses to fire. Our results provide new insights into the process of plant adaptation to fire and highlight the relevance of human-made fires as a strong evolutionary agent in the Anthropocene. PMID:27438267

  15. Thermomechanical response of shape memory alloy hybrid composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Travis L.

    2000-10-01

    This study examines the use of embedded shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators for adaptive control of the themomechanical response of composite structures. Control of static and dynamic responses are demonstrated including thermal buckling, thermal post-buckling, vibration, sonic fatigue, and acoustic transmission. A thermomechanical model is presented for analyzing such shape memory alloy hybrid composite (SMAHC) structures exposed to thermal and mechanical loads. Also presented are (1) fabrication procedures for SMAHC specimens, (2) characterization of the constituent materials for model quantification, (3) development of the test apparatus for conducting static and dynamic experiments on specimens with and without SMA, (4) discussion of the experimental results, and (5) validation of the analytical and numerical tools developed in the study. The constitutive model developed to describe the mechanics of a SMAHC lamina captures the material nonlinearity with temperature of the SMA and matrix material if necessary. It is in a form that is amenable to commercial finite element (FE) code implementation. The model is valid for constrained, restrained, or free recovery configurations with appropriate measurements of fundamental engineering properties. This constitutive model is used along with classical lamination theory and the FE method to formulate the equations of motion for panel-type structures subjected to steady-state thermal and dynamic mechanical loads. Mechanical loads that are considered include acoustic pressure, inertial (base acceleration), and concentrated forces. Four solution types are developed from the governing equations including thermal buckling, thermal post-buckling, dynamic response, and acoustic transmission/radiation. These solution procedures are compared with closed-form and/or other known solutions to benchmark the numerical tools developed in this study. Practical solutions for overcoming fabrication issues and obtaining repeatable

  16. Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potential (VEMP) Testing: Normative Threshold Response Curves and Effects of Age

    PubMed Central

    Janky, Kristen L.; Shepard, Neil

    2009-01-01

    Background Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potential (VEMP) testing has gained increased interest in the diagnosis of a variety of vestibular etiologies. Comparisons of P13 / N23 latency, amplitude and threshold response curves have been used to compare pathologic groups to normal controls. Appropriate characterization of these etiologies requires normative data across the frequency spectrum and age range. Purpose The objective of the current study was to test the hypothesis that significant changes in VEMP responses occur as a function of increased age across all test stimuli as well as characterize the VEMP threshold response curve across age. Research Design This project incorporated a prospective study design using a sample of convenience. Openly recruited subjects were assigned to groups according to age. Study Sample Forty-six normal controls ranging between 20 and 76 years of age participated in the study. Participants were separated by decade into 5 age categories from 20 to 60 plus years. Normal participants were characterized by having normal hearing sensitivity, no history of neurologic or balance/dizziness involvement and negative results on a direct office vestibular examination. Intervention VEMP responses were measured at threshold to click and 250, 500, 750, and 1000 Hz tone burst stimuli and at a suprathreshold level to 500 Hz toneburst stimuli at123 dBSPL. Data Collection and Analysis A mixed group factorial ANOVA and linear regression were performed to examine the effects of VEMP characteristics upon age. Results There were no significant differences between ears for any of the test parameters. There were no significant differences between age groups for n23 latency or amplitude in response to any of the stimuli. Significant mean differences did exist between age groups for p13 latency (250, 750, and 1000 Hz) and threshold (500 and 750 Hz). Age was significantly correlated with VEMP parameters. VEMP threshold was positively correlated (250, 500, 750

  17. Lognormal model for determining dose-response curves from epidemiological data and for health risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Saltzman, B E

    2001-07-01

    A practical method is proposed for determining human dose-response curves based on reasonable assumptions and simplifications. The epidemiological data needed are the fractions of the population suffering an adverse response from exposures to two or more patterns of fluctuating concentrations of a pollutant, and the statistical parameters of each pattern. The method calculates the two parameters of the threshold type dose-response curve of the pollutant, represented by a cumulative lognormal distribution. This distribution was derived from a reasonable statistical model. The calculation does not require any arbitrary safety factors and yields central values. The dose-response parameters then may be used to calculate the health risk rate of exposure to any other fluctuating concentration pattern. Another method is proposed to select appropriate threshold limit values (TLVs) using calculations involving these parameters. Examples are given to illustrate the calculations. Results with hypothetical data gave apparently reasonable results. They showed the importance not only of the geometric mean concentration but also of the geometric standard deviations of both the concentrations and of the dose-response curve, that greatly influence the results. It is believed that results of useful accuracy should be obtained. Health risk rates are readily understood. They are useful for cost-benefit calculations. Relative rates can be used to compare the hazards of different operations and different plants. The method may make possible the development of standards specifying maximum allowable risk rates.

  18. Shaping of Peripheral T Cell Responses by Lymphatic Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Humbert, Marion; Hugues, Stéphanie; Dubrot, Juan

    2017-01-01

    Lymph node stromal cells (LNSCs) have newly been promoted to the rank of new modulators of T cell responses. The different non-hematopoietic cell subsets in lymph node (LN) were considered for years as a simple scaffold, forming routes and proper environment for antigen (Ag)-lymphocyte encountering. Deeper characterization of those cells has recently clearly shown their impact on both dendritic cell and T cell functions. In particular, lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) control lymphocyte trafficking and homeostasis in LNs and limit adaptive immune responses. Therefore, the new role of LECs in shaping immune responses has drawn the attention of immunologists. Striking is the discovery that LECs, among other LNSCs, ectopically express a large range of peripheral tissue-restricted Ags (PTAs), and further present PTA-derived peptides through major histocompatibility class I molecules to induce self-reactive CD8+ T cell deletional tolerance. In addition, both steady-state and tumor-associated LECs were described to be capable of exogenous Ag cross-presentation. Whether LECs can similarly impact CD4+ T cell responses through major histocompatibility class II restricted Ag presentation is still a matter of debate. Here, we review and discuss our current knowledge on the contribution of Ag-presenting LECs as regulators of peripheral T cell responses in different immunological contexts, including autoimmunity and cancer. PMID:28127298

  19. Modeling and regression analysis of semiochemical dose-response curves of insect antennal reception and behavior.

    PubMed

    Byers, John A

    2013-08-01

    Dose-response curves of the effects of semiochemicals on neurophysiology and behavior are reported in many articles in insect chemical ecology. Most curves are shown in figures representing points connected by straight lines, in which the x-axis has order of magnitude increases in dosage vs. responses on the y-axis. The lack of regression curves indicates that the nature of the dose-response relationship is not well understood. Thus, a computer model was developed to simulate a flux of various numbers of pheromone molecules (10(3) to 5 × 10(6)) passing by 10(4) receptors distributed among 10(6) positions along an insect antenna. Each receptor was depolarized by at least one strike by a molecule, and subsequent strikes had no additional effect. The simulations showed that with an increase in pheromone release rate, the antennal response would increase in a convex fashion and not in a logarithmic relation as suggested previously. Non-linear regression showed that a family of kinetic formation functions fit the simulated data nearly perfectly (R(2) >0.999). This is reasonable because olfactory receptors have proteins that bind to the pheromone molecule and are expected to exhibit enzyme kinetics. Over 90 dose-response relationships reported in the literature of electroantennographic and behavioral bioassays in the laboratory and field were analyzed by the logarithmic and kinetic formation functions. This analysis showed that in 95% of the cases, the kinetic functions explained the relationships better than the logarithmic (mean of about 20% better). The kinetic curves become sigmoid when graphed on a log scale on the x-axis. Dose-catch relationships in the field are similar to dose-EAR (effective attraction radius, in which a spherical radius indicates the trapping effect of a lure) and the circular EARc in two dimensions used in mass trapping models. The use of kinetic formation functions for dose-response curves of attractants, and kinetic decay curves for

  20. Dynamic response and optimal design of curved metallic sandwich panels under blast loading.

    PubMed

    Qi, Chang; Yang, Shu; Yang, Li-Jun; Han, Shou-Hong; Lu, Zhen-Hua

    2014-01-01

    It is important to understand the effect of curvature on the blast response of curved structures so as to seek the optimal configurations of such structures with improved blast resistance. In this study, the dynamic response and protective performance of a type of curved metallic sandwich panel subjected to air blast loading were examined using LS-DYNA. The numerical methods were validated using experimental data in the literature. The curved panel consisted of an aluminum alloy outer face and a rolled homogeneous armour (RHA) steel inner face in addition to a closed-cell aluminum foam core. The results showed that the configuration of a "soft" outer face and a "hard" inner face worked well for the curved sandwich panel against air blast loading in terms of maximum deflection (MaxD) and energy absorption. The panel curvature was found to have a monotonic effect on the specific energy absorption (SEA) and a nonmonotonic effect on the MaxD of the panel. Based on artificial neural network (ANN) metamodels, multiobjective optimization designs of the panel were carried out. The optimization results revealed the trade-off relationships between the blast-resistant and the lightweight objectives and showed the great use of Pareto front in such design circumstances.

  1. Dynamic Response and Optimal Design of Curved Metallic Sandwich Panels under Blast Loading

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shu; Han, Shou-Hong; Lu, Zhen-Hua

    2014-01-01

    It is important to understand the effect of curvature on the blast response of curved structures so as to seek the optimal configurations of such structures with improved blast resistance. In this study, the dynamic response and protective performance of a type of curved metallic sandwich panel subjected to air blast loading were examined using LS-DYNA. The numerical methods were validated using experimental data in the literature. The curved panel consisted of an aluminum alloy outer face and a rolled homogeneous armour (RHA) steel inner face in addition to a closed-cell aluminum foam core. The results showed that the configuration of a “soft” outer face and a “hard” inner face worked well for the curved sandwich panel against air blast loading in terms of maximum deflection (MaxD) and energy absorption. The panel curvature was found to have a monotonic effect on the specific energy absorption (SEA) and a nonmonotonic effect on the MaxD of the panel. Based on artificial neural network (ANN) metamodels, multiobjective optimization designs of the panel were carried out. The optimization results revealed the trade-off relationships between the blast-resistant and the lightweight objectives and showed the great use of Pareto front in such design circumstances. PMID:25126606

  2. Shaping the pupil's response to light in the hooded rat.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Robert J

    2007-02-01

    The contribution of iris muscle steady state and dynamic response characteristics to the shaping of the pupil response to light in the hooded rat were studied using electrical stimulation of the parasympathetic fibers in the III nerve. The waveforms of pupillary contractions to single or brief trains of electrical impulses applied to the III nerve were virtually identical to those elicited with short duration light flashes. Individual contractions could be resolved at stimulation rates of 2 Hz and below, and the size of the contractions increased with the decrease in frequency. The pupil responded to long trains of stimuli above 2 Hz with smooth tonic contractions. Steady state contraction amplitude was linearly related to log stimulation frequency. The mean time constant of pupil constriction to stimulus trains was 1.41 s (SD +/- 0.71 s) and the shortest mean latency was 292 ms (SD +/- 30 ms). The fastest mean latency of pupil constriction to the brightest light flash used was 295 ms. In contrast, the time constant of pupillary dilation was 7 s (SD +/- 1.4 s) and the shortest latency was 485 ms (SD +/- 74 ms). Therefore, the sluggish dynamic properties of the iris musculature are responsible for the asymmetries in pupil contraction, dilation, and latencies as well as low flicker fusion frequency and constriction amplitude characteristics of pupil responses to light.

  3. Adaptive shaping of cortical response selectivity in the vibrissa pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, He J. V.; Wang, Qi

    2015-01-01

    One embodiment of context-dependent sensory processing is bottom-up adaptation, where persistent stimuli decrease neuronal firing rate over hundreds of milliseconds. Adaptation is not, however, simply the fatigue of the sensory pathway, but shapes the information flow and selectivity to stimulus features. Adaptation enhances spatial discriminability (distinguishing stimulus location) while degrading detectability (reporting presence of the stimulus), for both the ideal observer of the cortex and awake, behaving animals. However, how the dynamics of the adaptation shape the cortical response and this detection and discrimination tradeoff is unknown, as is to what degree this phenomenon occurs on a continuum as opposed to a switching of processing modes. Using voltage-sensitive dye imaging in anesthetized rats to capture the temporal and spatial characteristics of the cortical response to tactile inputs, we showed that the suppression of the cortical response, in both magnitude and spatial spread, is continuously modulated by the increasing amount of energy in the adapting stimulus, which is nonuniquely determined by its frequency and velocity. Single-trial ideal observer analysis demonstrated a tradeoff between detectability and spatial discriminability up to a moderate amount of adaptation, which corresponds to the frequency range in natural whisking. This was accompanied by a decrease in both detectability and discriminability with high-energy adaptation, which indicates a more complex coupling between detection and discrimination than a simple switching of modes. Taken together, the results suggest that adaptation operates on a continuum and modulates the tradeoff between detectability and discriminability that has implications for information processing in ethological contexts. PMID:25787959

  4. Changing the Risk Paradigms Can be Good for Our Health: J-Shaped, Linear and Threshold Dose-Response Models.

    PubMed

    Ricci, P F; Straja, S R; Cox, A L

    2012-01-01

    Both the linear (at low doses)-no-threshold (LNT) and the threshold models (S-shapes) dose-response lead to no benefit from low exposure. We propose three new models that allow and include, but do not require - unlike LNT and S-shaped models - this strong assumption. We also provide the means to calculate benefits associated with bi-phasic biological behaviors, when they occur and propose:THREE HORMETIC (PHASIC) MODELS: the J-shaped, inverse J-shaped, the min-max, andMethod for calculating the direct benefits associated with the J and inverse J-shaped models.The J-shaped and min-max models for mutagens and carcinogenic agents include an experimentally justified repair stage for toxic and carcinogenic damage. We link these to stochastic transition models for cancer and show how abrupt transitions in cancer hazard rates, as functions of exposure concentrations and durations, can emerge naturally in large cell populations even when the rates of cell-level events increase smoothly (e.g., proportionally) with concentration. In this very general family of models, J-shaped dose-response curves emerge. These results are universal, i.e., independent of specific biological details represented by the stochastic transition networks. Thus, using them suggests a more complete and realistic way to assess risks at low doses or dose-rates.

  5. Cyclic response of shape memory alloy smart composite beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friend, Clifford M.; Morgan, Neil B.

    1994-09-01

    'Smart' structure are an emerging technology which will provide the possibility of engineering structures with enhanced functionality for a wide range of applications. In most current Smart Structural Concepts a mechatronic or 'Frankenstein' approach is adopted where separate sensors, signal processing and actuators are 'bolted-together' to produce a 'Smart' system response. In the majority of these concepts the sensors and actuators are integrated within the host structure itself, and many of the sensor and actuator materials are familiar from other more conventional sensing/actuation applications. Amongst the materials used/proposed for actuators are Shape- Memory Alloys (SMAs) since these materials offer a range of attractive properties, including the possibility of high strain/stress actuation. The literature-base on the integration of SMA actuators into composite structures is not extensive. However, their use has been investigated for vibration [1], acoustic radiation [1,2], damage [3], buckling [1,2], and shape [1] control. An interesting feature of this work has been a heavy bias towards modelling, with only limited attempts to experimentally verify the calculated results. Previous work has also failed to produce a systematic database on one other key issue. This is the durability of SPA hybrid composites. The present work was therefore undertaken to provide a preliminary appraisal of the durability issues associated with the use of SMA hybrid composites. This work addressed a number of issues including (i) the effect of actuator fraction on strain outputs, (ii) the effect of actuator fraction and maximum strain on the cyclic stability of shape changes, and (iii) the effect of these variables on damage accumulation within the hybrid structures.

  6. Stimulus-response curve of human motor nerves: multicenter assessment of various indexes.

    PubMed

    Boërio, D; Hogrel, J-Y; Lefaucheur, J-P; Wang, F C; Verschueren, A; Pouget, J; Carrera, E; Kuntzer, T

    2008-02-01

    The value of various indexes to characterize the stimulus-response curve of human motor nerves was assessed in 40 healthy subjects recruited from four European centers of investigation (Créteil, Lausanne, Liège, Marseille). Stimulus-response curves were established by stimulating the right median and ulnar motor nerves at the wrist, with stimulus durations of 0.05 and 0.5 ms. The following parameters were studied: the threshold intensity of stimulation to obtain 10% (I 10), 50% (I 50), and 90% (I 90) of the maximal compound muscle action potential, the ratios I 10/I 50, I 90/I 50, (I 90 - I 10)/I 10, (I 90-I 50)/I 50, and (I 50 - I 10)/I 10, and the slopes of the stimulus-response curves with or without normalization to I 50. For each parameter, within-center variability and reproducibility (in a test-retest study) were assessed and between-center comparisons were made. For most of the parameters, the results varied significantly within and between the centers. Within the centers, only the ratios I 10/I 50 and I 90/I 50 were found constant and reproducible. Between the centers, the absolute intensity thresholds (I 10, I 50, I 90) and the ratio I 90/I 50 did not show significant differences at stimulus duration of 0.5 ms, whatever the stimulated nerve. The reduced variability and good reproducibility of the ratios I 10/I 50 and I 90/I 50 open perspectives in neurophysiological practice for the use of these indexes of the stimulus-response curve, a rapid and noninvasive test.

  7. Heterogeneity in glucose response curves during an oral glucose tolerance test and associated cardiometabolic risk.

    PubMed

    Hulman, Adam; Simmons, Rebecca K; Vistisen, Dorte; Tabák, Adam G; Dekker, Jacqueline M; Alssema, Marjan; Rutters, Femke; Koopman, Anitra D M; Solomon, Thomas P J; Kirwan, John P; Hansen, Torben; Jonsson, Anna; Gjesing, Anette Prior; Eiberg, Hans; Astrup, Arne; Pedersen, Oluf; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Witte, Daniel R; Færch, Kristine

    2017-02-01

    We aimed to examine heterogeneity in glucose response curves during an oral glucose tolerance test with multiple measurements and to compare cardiometabolic risk profiles between identified glucose response curve groups. We analyzed data from 1,267 individuals without diabetes from five studies in Denmark, the Netherlands and the USA. Each study included between 5 and 11 measurements at different time points during a 2-h oral glucose tolerance test, resulting in 9,602 plasma glucose measurements. Latent class trajectories with a cubic specification for time were fitted to identify different patterns of plasma glucose change during the oral glucose tolerance test. Cardiometabolic risk factor profiles were compared between the identified groups. Using latent class trajectory analysis, five glucose response curves were identified. Despite similar fasting and 2-h values, glucose peaks and peak times varied greatly between groups, ranging from 7-12 mmol/L, and 35-70 min. The group with the lowest and earliest plasma glucose peak had the lowest estimated cardiovascular risk, while the group with the most delayed plasma glucose peak and the highest 2-h value had the highest estimated risk. One group, with normal fasting and 2-h values, exhibited an unusual profile, with the highest glucose peak and the highest proportion of smokers and men. The heterogeneity in glucose response curves and the distinct cardiometabolic risk profiles may reflect different underlying physiologies. Our results warrant more detailed studies to identify the source of the heterogeneity across the different phenotypes and whether these differences play a role in the development of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

  8. Bayesian fitting of a logistic dose-response curve with numerically derived priors.

    PubMed

    Huson, L W; Kinnersley, N

    2009-01-01

    In this report we describe the Bayesian analysis of a logistic dose-response curve in a Phase I study, and we present two simple and intuitive numerical approaches to construction of prior probability distributions for the model parameters. We combine these priors with the expert prior opinion and compare the results of the analyses with those obtained from the use of alternative prior formulations.

  9. Yield response curves of crops exposed to SO 2 time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Male, Larry; Preston, Eric; Neely, Grady

    Six species (alfalfa, onion, lettuce, radish, red clover, Douglas fir) were exposed in field growth chambers to both constant concentration and stochastic SO 2 time series. Yield response curves were generated with median concentrations ranging from 0 to 20 pphm. Constant concentration treatments were found to underestimate yield loss compared with the pollutant time series treatments. An heuristic model of plant assimilation of SO 2 is presented to explain this result.

  10. The effect of anabolic steroids on lean body mass: the dose response curve.

    PubMed

    Forbes, G B

    1985-06-01

    Data from human subjects given various amounts of anabolic steroids show that the resultant increment in lean body mass (LBM) has the features of a typical dose response curve. Low doses produce a very modest effect, while large doses result in a progressive augmentation of the LBM. Endogenous testosterone production during male adolescence is accompanied by a sex differential in LBM that is comparable to the LBM increment generated by exogenous steroids given to adults.

  11. Unconscious response priming by shape depends on geniculostriate visual projection.

    PubMed

    Koivisto, Mika; Henriksson, Linda; Revonsuo, Antti; Railo, Henry

    2012-02-01

    It has been suggested that unconscious visual processing of some stimulus features might occur without the contribution of early visual cortex (V1/V2). In the present study, the causal role of V1/V2 in unconscious processing of simple shapes in intact human brain was studied by applying transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) on early visual cortex or lateral occipital cortex (LO) while observers performed a metacontrast-masked response priming task with arrow figures as visual stimuli. Magnetic stimulation of V1/V2 impaired masked priming 30-90 ms after the onset of the prime. Stimulation of LO reduced the magnitude of masked priming at 90-120 ms, but this effect occurred only in the early parts of the priming experiment. A control task measuring the visibility of masked primes indicated that the orientation of masked primes could not be consciously discriminated and that TMS did not influence the conscious visibility of the primes indirectly by reducing the effectiveness of the mask in the critical time windows. We conclude that feedforward sweep of processing from V1/V2 (30-90 ms) to LO (90 ms and above) is necessary for unconscious priming of shape, whereas conscious perception requires also the contribution of recurrent (feedback) processing. © 2012 The Authors. European Journal of Neuroscience © 2012 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Modeling U-Shaped Exposure-Response Relationships for Agents that Demonstrate Toxicity Due to Both Excess and Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Milton, Brittany; Farrell, Patrick J; Birkett, Nicholas; Krewski, Daniel

    2017-02-01

    Essential elements such as copper and manganese may demonstrate U-shaped exposure-response relationships due to toxic responses occurring as a result of both excess and deficiency. Previous work on a copper toxicity database employed CatReg, a software program for categorical regression developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, to model copper excess and deficiency exposure-response relationships separately. This analysis involved the use of a severity scoring system to place diverse toxic responses on a common severity scale, thereby allowing their inclusion in the same CatReg model. In this article, we present methods for simultaneously fitting excess and deficiency data in the form of a single U-shaped exposure-response curve, the minimum of which occurs at the exposure level that minimizes the probability of an adverse outcome due to either excess or deficiency (or both). We also present a closed-form expression for the point at which the exposure-response curves for excess and deficiency cross, corresponding to the exposure level at which the risk of an adverse outcome due to excess is equal to that for deficiency. The application of these methods is illustrated using the same copper toxicity database noted above. The use of these methods permits the analysis of all available exposure-response data from multiple studies expressing multiple endpoints due to both excess and deficiency. The exposure level corresponding to the minimum of this U-shaped curve, and the confidence limits around this exposure level, may be useful in establishing an acceptable range of exposures that minimize the overall risk associated with the agent of interest.

  13. Perceived trustworthiness shapes neural empathic responses toward others' pain.

    PubMed

    Sessa, Paola; Meconi, Federica

    2015-12-01

    As might be expected, neural empathic responses toward someone in pain are shaped by the affective/social relationship between the observer and the suffering person. Brain activity associated with empathy is sensitive to previous knowledge on the other's social conduct, such that, for instance, an unfair person in pain elicits in the observer reduced activations of empathy-related brain regions compared to a fair person. We conjectured that even in the absence of information on the personality and social behavior of an individual, empathy might be modulated by the 'first impression' based on other's physical facial features, such that the other is perceived as trustworthy or untrustworthy. By means of event-related potentials technique, we monitored in two experiments the neural empathic responses associated with the pain of trustworthy and untrustworthy faces, either computerized and parametrically manipulated (Experiment 1) and real faces (Experiment 2) in a cue-based paradigm. We observed P3 empathic reactions towards individuals looking trustworthy whereas the reactions towards individuals looking untrustworthy were negligible, if not null. An additional experiment (Experiment 3) was conducted in order to substantiate our conclusions by demonstrating that the experimental paradigm we designed did very likely activate an empathic response. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Thermoluminescence response and glow curve structure of Sc₂TiO₅ ß-irradiated.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, I C; Brown, F; Durán-Muñoz, H; Cruz-Zaragoza, E; Durán-Torres, B; Alvarez-Montaño, V E

    2014-08-01

    Discandium titanate (Sc2TiO5) powder was synthesized in order to analyze its thermoluminescence (TL) response. The TL glow curve structure shows two peaks: at 453-433 K and at 590-553 K. The TL beta dose-response has a linear behavior over the dose range 50-500 Gy. The T(stop) preheat method shows five glow peaks that were taken into account to calculate the kinetic parameters using the CGCD procedure. TL results support the possible use of Sc2TiO5 as a new phosphor in high ß-dose dosimetry.

  15. Influences of membrane properties on phase response curve and synchronization stability in a model globus pallidus neuron.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Tomohiro; Fukai, Tomoki; Kitano, Katsunori

    2012-06-01

    The activity patterns of the globus pallidus (GPe) and subthalamic nucleus (STN) are closely associated with motor function and dysfunction in the basal ganglia. In the pathological state caused by dopamine depletion, the STN-GPe network exhibits rhythmic synchronous activity accompanied by rebound bursts in the STN. Therefore, the mechanism of activity transition is a key to understand basal ganglia functions. As synchronization in GPe neurons could induce pathological STN rebound bursts, it is important to study how synchrony is generated in the GPe. To clarify this issue, we applied the phase-reduction technique to a conductance-based GPe neuronal model in order to derive the phase response curve (PRC) and interaction function between coupled GPe neurons. Using the PRC and interaction function, we studied how the steady-state activity of the GPe network depends on intrinsic membrane properties, varying ionic conductances on the membrane. We noted that a change in persistent sodium current, fast delayed rectifier Kv3 potassium current, M-type potassium current and small conductance calcium-dependent potassium current influenced the PRC shape and the steady state. The effect of those currents on the PRC shape could be attributed to extension of the firing period and reduction of the phase response immediately after an action potential. In particular, the slow potassium current arising from the M-type potassium and the SK current was responsible for the reduction of the phase response. These results suggest that the membrane property modulation controls synchronization/asynchronization in the GPe and the pathological pattern of STN-GPe activity.

  16. An Invert U-Shaped Curve: Relationship Between Fasting Plasma Glucose and Serum Uric Acid Concentration in a Large Health Check-Up Population in China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Haibo; Zha, Xiaojuan; Zhu, Yu; Liu, Mengxue; Guo, Rui; Wen, Yufeng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract There are some published studies focus on the invert U-shaped relationship between fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and serum uric acid (UA), while the threshold value and gender differences of this relationship were still obscure. We aimed to explore the dose–response relation between FPG level and serum UA concentration by conducted this epidemiological research in a large health check-up population in China. A total of 237,703 people were collected from January 2011 to July 2014 in our cross-sectional study; 100,348 subjects age 18 to 89 years and without known diabetes were included for the current analysis. One-way analysis of variance, generalized additive models, and 2-piecewise linear regression model were used. The mean concentration of UA with FPG of <6.1, 6.1 to 6.9, and ≥7.0 mmol/L was 240.9, 260.2, and 259.6 μmol/L in women and 349.0, 360.8, and 331.0 μmol/L in men. An invert U-shape with a threshold FPG of 7.5 (women)/6.5 (men) mmol/L was observed in the regression curve of FPG and UA, even after adjusting for potential confounders. The adjusted regression coefficients were 2.4 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.5 to 3.4, P < 0.001) for FPG < 7.5 mmol/L, −3.2 (95% CI: −5.0 to −1.3, P < 0.001) for FPG ≥ 7.5 mmol/L in women; while 0.8 (95% CI: −0.4 to 2.0, P = 0.19) for FPG < 6.5 mmol/L, −7.1 (95% CI: −8.0 to −6.1, P < 0.001) for FPG ≥ 6.5 mmol/L in men. Furthermore, the interaction between different FPG level and sex was significant (P < 0.05). An invert U-shape with a threshold of FPG was existed for serum UA level in Chinese adults age 18 to 89 years without known diabetes, and significant gender differences were found. Future researches should pay more attention to this relationship. PMID:27100447

  17. The J-shaped Curve for Blood Pressure and Cardiovascular Disease Risk: Historical Context and Recent Updates.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Faisal; McEvoy, John W

    2017-08-01

    The definition and treatment of hypertension have both changed dramatically over the last century, with recent trials suggesting benefit for lower blood pressure (BP) targets than ever before considered. However, tempering the enthusiasm for more intensive BP targets are long-held concerns that BP reduction below a certain threshold may pose dangers, the so-called "J-curve." In this review, we summarize the evidence for a J-curve in the treatment of hypertension. The Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial (SPRINT) reported that achieving a systolic BP target of 120 mmHg reduces cardiovascular disease in high-risk individuals, supporting more intensive BP reduction. However, contemporary observational studies consistently demonstrate a BP J-curve, the threshold of which is often close to the SPRINT target. Studies also suggest that the BP level of this J-curve may vary based on patient characteristics, including age and comorbidities. There is also more compelling evidence for the specific presence of a J-curve between diastolic BP and coronary events, in contrast to conflicting evidence of a J-curve with systolic BP and cardiovascular disease more generally. There is increased risk of coronary events below a diastolic BP of 60-70 mmHg. In comparison, the presence of a systolic J-curve is less clear and some persons at high risk may actually benefit from systolic levels down to 120 mmHg. Therefore, we suggest a personalized approach to BP management considering individual risks, benefits, and preferences when choosing therapeutic targets. Further, well-designed studies are required to support our suggestions and to define J-curve thresholds more clearly.

  18. Species response curves of oak species along climatic gradients in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Uğurlu, Emin; Oldeland, Jens

    2012-01-01

    The genus Quercus is one of the most important tree species in Turkey. However, little is known on the ecological preferences of Turkish oak species regarding climate. We analyzed species response curves using a HOF-model approach to describe the general pattern of oak distributions along climatic gradients and to identify the driving climatic factors for eight oak species in Turkey. While climate data were extracted from the free available worldclim dataset, occurrence data on oak species were assembled from the literature into a vegetation database (n = 1,104). From the analyzed species response curves, only fa ew (16%) showed unimodal responses, while most were linear (31%) or exhibited a threshold response (31%). The driving factors were seasonality of temperature and seasonality of precipitation, indicating that Turkish oak species can be characterized best by the preference of climatic stability. These findings have important implications for conservation and climate change research, which usually focuses on trends of the mean values of temperature or precipitation but less often on the seasonality. In this study, we further tested whether niche optima derived from raw mean values of occurrences could replace missing model optima due to non-responsiveness of HOF models of type I. However, we did not find this to be a satisfactory solution. Finally, we discuss the need for the construction of a national database based on phytosociological relevés for Turkey.

  19. An operational model of pharmacological agonism: the effect of E/[A] curve shape on agonist dissociation constant estimation.

    PubMed Central

    Black, J. W.; Leff, P.; Shankley, N. P.; Wood, J.

    1985-01-01

    An operational model of pharmacological agonism has been analysed to predict the behaviour of rectangular hyperbolic and non-hyperbolic agonist-concentration effect, E/[A], curves with variation in receptor concentration, [Ro]. Irreversible antagonism is predicted to cause E/[A] curve gradient changes in non-hyperbolic cases but not in hyperbolic cases; in both cases estimation of agonist dissociation constants (KAS) is theoretically valid. 5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) produced "steep' E/[A] curves in contracting the rabbit isolated aorta preparation. Irreversible antagonism by phenoxybenzamine (Pbz) produced a flattened E/[A] curve, consistent with theoretical predictions. Fitting 5-HT E/[A] curves in the presence and absence of Pbz to the model provided an estimate of KA for 5-HT which was not significantly different from the estimate obtained using Furchgott's null method. The operational model of agonism appears to account qualitatively and quantitatively for the effects of [Ro] changes on hyperbolic and non-hyperbolic E/[A] curves. Under conditions where irreversible antagonism may be used to estimate KAS, fitting the operational model directly to E/[A] data represents a valid, economical and analytically simple alternative to the conventional null method. PMID:3978322

  20. How B cells shape the immune response against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Maglione, Paul J; Chan, John

    2009-03-01

    Extensive work illustrating the importance of cellular immune mechanisms for protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis has largely relegated B-cell biology to an afterthought within the tuberculosis (TB) field. However, recent studies have illustrated that B lymphocytes, through a variety of interactions with the cellular immune response, play previously underappreciated roles in shaping host defense against non-viral intracellular pathogens, including M. tuberculosis. Work in our laboratory has recently shown that, by considering these lymphocytes more broadly within their variety of interactions with cellular immunity, B cells have a significant impact on the outcome of airborne challenge with M. tuberculosis as well as the resultant inflammatory response. In this review, we advocate for a revised view of TB immunology in which roles of cellular and humoral immunity are not mutually exclusive. In the context of our current understanding of host defense against non-viral intracellular infections, we review recent data supporting a more significant role of B cells during M. tuberculosis infection than previously thought.

  1. Thermal responses of shape memory alloy artificial anal sphincters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yun; Takagi, Toshiyuki; Matsuzawa, Kenichi

    2003-08-01

    This paper presents a numerical investigation of the thermal behavior of an artificial anal sphincter using shape memory alloys (SMAs) proposed by the authors. The SMA artificial anal sphincter has the function of occlusion at body temperature and can be opened with a thermal transformation induced deformation of SMAs to solve the problem of severe fecal incontinence. The investigation of its thermal behavior is of great importance in terms of practical use in living bodies as a prosthesis. In this work, a previously proposed phenomenological model was applied to simulate the thermal responses of SMA plates that had undergone thermally induced transformation. The numerical approach for considering the thermal interaction between the prosthesis and surrounding tissues was discussed based on the classical bio-heat equation. Numerical predictions on both in vitro and in vivo cases were verified by experiments with acceptable agreements. The thermal responses of the SMA artificial anal sphincter were discussed based on the simulation results, with the values of the applied power and the geometric configuration of thermal insulation as parameters. The results obtained in the present work provided a framework for the further design of SMA artificial sphincters to meet demands from the viewpoint of thermal compatibility as prostheses.

  2. Nanostructure shape effects on response of plasmonic aptamer sensors.

    PubMed

    Balamurugan, Subramanian; Mayer, Kathryn M; Lee, Seunghyun; Soper, Steven A; Hafner, Jason H; Spivak, David A

    2013-09-01

    A localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) sensor surface was fabricated by the deposition of gold nanorods on a glass substrate and subsequent immobilization of the DNA aptamer, which specifically bind to thrombin. This LSPR aptamer sensor showed a response of 6-nm λ(max) shift for protein binding with the detection limit of at least 10 pM, indicating one of the highest sensitivities achieved for thrombin detection by optical extinction LSPR. We also tested the LSPR sensor fabricated using gold bipyramid, which showed higher refractive index sensitivity than the gold nanorods, but the overall response of gold bipyramid sensor appears to be 25% less than that of the gold nanorod substrate, despite the approximately twofold higher refractive index sensitivity. XPS analysis showed that this is due to the low surface density of aptamers on the gold bipyramid compared with gold nanorods. The low surface density of the aptamers on the gold bipyramid surface may be due to the effect of shape of the nanostructure on the kinetics of aptamer monolayer formation. The small size of aptamers relative to other bioreceptors is the key to achieving high sensitivity by biosensors on the basis of LSPR, demonstrated here for protein binding. The generality of aptamer sensors for protein detection using gold nanorod and gold nanobipyramid substrates is anticipated to have a large impact in the important development of sensors toward biomarkers, environmental toxins, and warfare agents. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Quantitative aspects of informed consent: considering the dose response curve when estimating quantity of information.

    PubMed

    Lynöe, N; Hoeyer, K

    2005-12-01

    Information is usually supposed to be a prerequisite for people making decisions on whether or not to participate in a clinical trial. Previously conducted studies and research ethics scandals indicate that participants have sometimes lacked important pieces of information. Over the past few decades the quantity of information believed to be adequate has increased significantly, and in some instances a new maxim seems to be in place: the more information, the better the ethics in terms of respecting a participant's autonomy. The authors hypothesise that the dose-response curve from pharmacology or toxicology serves as a model to illustrate that a large amount of written information does not equal optimality. Using the curve as a pedagogical analogy when teaching ethics to students in clinical sciences, and also in engaging in dialogue with research institutions, may promote reflection on how to adjust information in relation to the preferences of individual participants, thereby transgressing the maxim that more information means better ethics.

  4. Embedding responses in spontaneous neural activity shaped through sequential learning.

    PubMed

    Kurikawa, Tomoki; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2013-01-01

    Recent experimental measurements have demonstrated that spontaneous neural activity in the absence of explicit external stimuli has remarkable spatiotemporal structure. This spontaneous activity has also been shown to play a key role in the response to external stimuli. To better understand this role, we proposed a viewpoint, "memories-as-bifurcations," that differs from the traditional "memories-as-attractors" viewpoint. Memory recall from the memories-as-bifurcations viewpoint occurs when the spontaneous neural activity is changed to an appropriate output activity upon application of an input, known as a bifurcation in dynamical systems theory, wherein the input modifies the flow structure of the neural dynamics. Learning, then, is a process that helps create neural dynamical systems such that a target output pattern is generated as an attractor upon a given input. Based on this novel viewpoint, we introduce in this paper an associative memory model with a sequential learning process. Using a simple hebbian-type learning, the model is able to memorize a large number of input/output mappings. The neural dynamics shaped through the learning exhibit different bifurcations to make the requested targets stable upon an increase in the input, and the neural activity in the absence of input shows chaotic dynamics with occasional approaches to the memorized target patterns. These results suggest that these dynamics facilitate the bifurcations to each target attractor upon application of the corresponding input, which thus increases the capacity for learning. This theoretical finding about the behavior of the spontaneous neural activity is consistent with recent experimental observations in which the neural activity without stimuli wanders among patterns evoked by previously applied signals. In addition, the neural networks shaped by learning properly reflect the correlations of input and target-output patterns in a similar manner to those designed in our previous study.

  5. Embedding Responses in Spontaneous Neural Activity Shaped through Sequential Learning

    PubMed Central

    Kurikawa, Tomoki; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2013-01-01

    Recent experimental measurements have demonstrated that spontaneous neural activity in the absence of explicit external stimuli has remarkable spatiotemporal structure. This spontaneous activity has also been shown to play a key role in the response to external stimuli. To better understand this role, we proposed a viewpoint, “memories-as-bifurcations,” that differs from the traditional “memories-as-attractors” viewpoint. Memory recall from the memories-as-bifurcations viewpoint occurs when the spontaneous neural activity is changed to an appropriate output activity upon application of an input, known as a bifurcation in dynamical systems theory, wherein the input modifies the flow structure of the neural dynamics. Learning, then, is a process that helps create neural dynamical systems such that a target output pattern is generated as an attractor upon a given input. Based on this novel viewpoint, we introduce in this paper an associative memory model with a sequential learning process. Using a simple Hebbian-type learning, the model is able to memorize a large number of input/output mappings. The neural dynamics shaped through the learning exhibit different bifurcations to make the requested targets stable upon an increase in the input, and the neural activity in the absence of input shows chaotic dynamics with occasional approaches to the memorized target patterns. These results suggest that these dynamics facilitate the bifurcations to each target attractor upon application of the corresponding input, which thus increases the capacity for learning. This theoretical finding about the behavior of the spontaneous neural activity is consistent with recent experimental observations in which the neural activity without stimuli wanders among patterns evoked by previously applied signals. In addition, the neural networks shaped by learning properly reflect the correlations of input and target-output patterns in a similar manner to those designed in our previous

  6. On the Firing Rate Dependency of the Phase Response Curve of Rat Purkinje Neurons In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Couto, João; Linaro, Daniele; De Schutter, E; Giugliano, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Synchronous spiking during cerebellar tasks has been observed across Purkinje cells: however, little is known about the intrinsic cellular mechanisms responsible for its initiation, cessation and stability. The Phase Response Curve (PRC), a simple input-output characterization of single cells, can provide insights into individual and collective properties of neurons and networks, by quantifying the impact of an infinitesimal depolarizing current pulse on the time of occurrence of subsequent action potentials, while a neuron is firing tonically. Recently, the PRC theory applied to cerebellar Purkinje cells revealed that these behave as phase-independent integrators at low firing rates, and switch to a phase-dependent mode at high rates. Given the implications for computation and information processing in the cerebellum and the possible role of synchrony in the communication with its post-synaptic targets, we further explored the firing rate dependency of the PRC in Purkinje cells. We isolated key factors for the experimental estimation of the PRC and developed a closed-loop approach to reliably compute the PRC across diverse firing rates in the same cell. Our results show unambiguously that the PRC of individual Purkinje cells is firing rate dependent and that it smoothly transitions from phase independent integrator to a phase dependent mode. Using computational models we show that neither channel noise nor a realistic cell morphology are responsible for the rate dependent shift in the phase response curve. PMID:25775448

  7. CoSi: Correlation of signals-A new measure to assess the correlation of history response curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murmann, Robert; Harzheim, Lothar; Dominico, Stefan; Immel, Rainer

    2016-12-01

    In the context of CAE work it is often required to assess the level of agreement of two curves objectively, e.g. measured against numerically computed results. Therefore a new comprehensive measure is proposed in this paper. The new measure 'CoSi' (Correlation of Signals) allows to account for uncertainties in both curves. This is achieved by constructing a corridor around one curve which considers deviations in direction of both abscissa and ordinate. Here CoSi differs from other common corridor approaches which consider only the deviation on the ordinate. It is explained how CoSi aligns the two curves taking the uncertainties of the second curve by scaling and shifting into account. This leads to the best theoretical achievable agreement between the two curves. Based on the aligned curves, quality factors are calculated to evaluate the results in terms of amplitudes of the curves, their overall match in shape, the phase between the curves, and all these combined into a comprehensive quality factor. The properties and results of CoSi are compared with other metrics from literature using various examples.

  8. Characterizing dynamic interactions between ultradian glucocorticoid rhythmicity and acute stress using the phase response curve.

    PubMed

    Rankin, James; Walker, Jamie J; Windle, Richard; Lightman, Stafford L; Terry, John R

    2012-01-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is a dynamic oscillatory hormone signalling system that regulates the pulsatile secretion of glucocorticoids from the adrenal glands. In addition to regulation of basal levels of glucocorticoids, the HPA axis provides a rapid hormonal response to stress that is vitally important for homeostasis. Recently it has become clear that glucocorticoid pulses encode an important biological signal that regulates receptor signalling both in the central nervous system and in peripheral tissues. It is therefore important to understand how stressful stimuli disrupt the pulsatile dynamics of this system. Using a computational model that incorporates the crucial feed-forward and feedback components of the axis, we provide novel insight into experimental observations that the size of the stress-induced hormonal response is critically dependent on the timing of the stress. Further, we employ the theory of Phase Response Curves to show that an acute stressor acts as a phase-resetting mechanism for the ultradian rhythm of glucocorticoid secretion. Using our model, we demonstrate that the magnitude of an acute stress is a critical factor in determining whether the system resets via a Type 1 or Type 0 mechanism. By fitting our model to our in vivo stress-response data, we show that the glucocorticoid response to an acute noise stress in rats is governed by a Type 0 phase-resetting curve. Our results provide additional evidence for the concept of a deterministic sub-hypothalamic oscillator regulating the ultradian glucocorticoid rhythm, which constitutes a highly responsive peripheral hormone system that interacts dynamically with hypothalamic inputs to regulate the overall hormonal response to stress.

  9. The Add-Arm Design for Unimodal Response Curve with Unknown Mode.

    PubMed

    Chang, Mark; Wang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    In a classical drop-loser (or drop-arm) design, patients are randomized into all arms (doses) and at the interim analysis, inferior arms are dropped. Therefore, compared to the traditional dose-finding design, this adaptive design can reduce the sample size by not carrying over all doses to the end of the trial or dropping the losers earlier. However, all the doses have to be explored. For unimodal (including linear or umbrella) response curves, we proposed an effective dose-finding design that allows adding arms at the interim analysis. The trial design starts with two arms, depending on the response of the two arms and the unimodality assumption; we can decide which new arms to be added. This design does not require exploring all arms (doses) to find the best responsive dose; therefore, it can further reduce the sample size from the drop-loser design by as much as 10-20%.

  10. No-threshold dose-response curves for nongenotoxic chemicals: Findings and applications for risk assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Sheehan, Daniel M. . E-mail: dansheeh@swbell.net

    2006-01-15

    We tested the hypothesis that no threshold exists when estradiol acts through the same mechanism as an active endogenous estrogen. A Michaelis-Menten (MM) equation accounting for response saturation, background effects, and endogenous estrogen level fit a turtle sex-reversal data set with no threshold and estimated the endogenous dose. Additionally, 31 diverse literature dose-response data sets were analyzed by adding a term for nonhormonal background; good fits were obtained but endogenous dose estimations were not significant due to low resolving power. No thresholds were observed. Data sets were plotted using a normalized MM equation; all 178 data points were accommodated on a single graph. Response rates from {approx}1% to >95% were well fit. The findings contradict the threshold assumption and low-dose safety. Calculating risk and assuming additivity of effects from multiple chemicals acting through the same mechanism rather than assuming a safe dose for nonthresholded curves is appropriate.

  11. Type curve analysis of inertial effects in the response of a well to a slug test.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kipp, K.L.

    1985-01-01

    The water level response to a slug or bailer test in a well completed in a confined aquifer, has been evaluated taking into account well-bore storage and inertial effects of the water column in the well. The response range, from overdamped with negligible inertial effects to damped oscillations, was covered employing numerical inversions of the Laplace-transform solution. By scaling the time with respect to the undamped natural period of the well-aquifer system and by using the damping parameter for a second-order damped, inertial-elastic system, a set of type curves was constructed that enables water level response data from a slug or bailer test to be analyzed under conditions where the inertial parameter is large.-from Author

  12. Asymmetric distribution of cone-shaped lipids in a highly curved bilayer revealed by a small angle neutron scattering technique.

    PubMed

    Sakuma, Y; Urakami, N; Taniguchi, T; Imai, M

    2011-07-20

    We have investigated the lipid sorting in a binary small unilamellar vesicle (SUV) composed of cone-shaped (1,2-dihexanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine: DHPC) and cylinder-shaped (1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine: DPPC) lipids. In order to reveal the lipid sorting we adopted a contrast matching technique of small angle neutron scattering (SANS), which extracts the distribution of deuterated lipids in the bilayer quantitatively without steric modification of lipids as in fluorescence probe techniques. First the SANS profile of protonated SUVs at a film contrast condition showed that SUVs have a spherical shape with an inner radius of 190 Å and a bilayer thickness of 40 Å. The SANS profile of deuterated SUVs at a contrast matching condition showed a characteristic scattering profile, indicating an asymmetric distribution of cone-shaped lipids in the bilayer. The characteristic profile was described well by a spherical bilayer model. The fitting revealed that most DHPC molecules are localized in the outer leaflet. Thus the shape of the lipid is strongly coupled with the membrane curvature. We compared the obtained asymmetric distribution of the cone-shaped lipids in the bilayer with the theoretical prediction based on the curvature energy model.

  13. Asymmetric distribution of cone-shaped lipids in a highly curved bilayer revealed by a small angle neutron scattering technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakuma, Y.; Urakami, N.; Taniguchi, T.; Imai, M.

    2011-07-01

    We have investigated the lipid sorting in a binary small unilamellar vesicle (SUV) composed of cone-shaped (1,2-dihexanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine: DHPC) and cylinder-shaped (1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine: DPPC) lipids. In order to reveal the lipid sorting we adopted a contrast matching technique of small angle neutron scattering (SANS), which extracts the distribution of deuterated lipids in the bilayer quantitatively without steric modification of lipids as in fluorescence probe techniques. First the SANS profile of protonated SUVs at a film contrast condition showed that SUVs have a spherical shape with an inner radius of 190 Å and a bilayer thickness of 40 Å. The SANS profile of deuterated SUVs at a contrast matching condition showed a characteristic scattering profile, indicating an asymmetric distribution of cone-shaped lipids in the bilayer. The characteristic profile was described well by a spherical bilayer model. The fitting revealed that most DHPC molecules are localized in the outer leaflet. Thus the shape of the lipid is strongly coupled with the membrane curvature. We compared the obtained asymmetric distribution of the cone-shaped lipids in the bilayer with the theoretical prediction based on the curvature energy model.

  14. Dose-response curve of a microfluidic magnetic bead-based surface coverage sandwich assay.

    PubMed

    Cornaglia, Matteo; Trouillon, Raphaël; Tekin, H Cumhur; Lehnert, Thomas; Gijs, Martin A M

    2015-09-25

    Magnetic micro- and nanoparticles ('magnetic beads') have been used to advantage in many microfluidic devices for sensitive antigen (Ag) detection. Today, assays that use as read-out of the signal the number count of immobilized beads on a surface for quantification of a sample's analyte concentration have been among the most sensitive and have allowed protein detection lower than the fgmL(-1) concentration range. Recently, we have proposed in this category a magnetic bead surface coverage assay (Tekin et al., 2013 [1]), in which 'large' (2.8μm) antibody (Ab)-functionalized magnetic beads captured their Ag from a serum and these Ag-carrying beads were subsequently exposed to a surface pattern of fixed 'small' (1.0μm) Ab-coated magnetic beads. When the system was exposed to a magnetic induction field, the magnet dipole attractive interactions between the two bead types were used as a handle to approach both bead surfaces and assist with Ag-Ab immunocomplex formation, while unspecific binding (in absence of an Ag) of a large bead was reduced by exploiting viscous drag flow. The dose-response curve of this type of assay had two remarkable features: (i) its ability to detect an output signal (i.e. bead number count) for very low Ag concentrations, and (ii) an output signal of the assay that was non-linear with respect to Ag concentration. We explain here the observed dose-response curves and show that the type of interactions and the concept of our assay are in favour of detecting the lowest analyte concentrations (where typically either zero or one Ag is carried per large bead), while higher concentrations are less efficiently detected. We propose a random walk process for the Ag-carrying bead over the magnetic landscape of small beads and this model description explains the enhanced overall capture probability of this assay and its particular non-linear dose response curves.

  15. Curve fitting toxicity test data: Which comes first, the dose response or the model?

    SciTech Connect

    Gully, J.; Baird, R.; Bottomley, J.

    1995-12-31

    The probit model frequently does not fit the concentration-response curve of NPDES toxicity test data and non-parametric models must be used instead. The non-parametric models, trimmed Spearman-Karber, IC{sub p}, and linear interpolation, all require a monotonic concentration-response. Any deviation from a monotonic response is smoothed to obtain the desired concentration-response characteristics. Inaccurate point estimates may result from such procedures and can contribute to imprecision in replicate tests. The following study analyzed reference toxicant and effluent data from giant kelp (Macrocystis pyrifera), purple sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus), red abalone (Haliotis rufescens), and fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) bioassays using commercially available curve fitting software. The purpose was to search for alternative parametric models which would reduce the use of non-parametric models for point estimate analysis of toxicity data. Two non-linear models, power and logistic dose-response, were selected as possible alternatives to the probit model based upon their toxicological plausibility and ability to model most data sets examined. Unlike non-parametric procedures, these and all parametric models can be statistically evaluated for fit and significance. The use of the power or logistic dose response models increased the percentage of parametric model fits for each protocol and toxicant combination examined. The precision of the selected non-linear models was also compared with the EPA recommended point estimation models at several effect.levels. In general, precision of the alternative models was equal to or better than the traditional methods. Finally, use of the alternative models usually produced more plausible point estimates in data sets where the effects of smoothing and non-parametric modeling made the point estimate results suspect.

  16. Artificial selection on larval growth curves in Tribolium: correlated responses and constraints.

    PubMed

    Irwin, K K; Carter, P A

    2014-10-01

    Body size is often constrained from evolving. Although artificial selection on body size in insects frequently results in a sizable response, these responses usually bear fitness costs. Further, these experiments tend to select only on size at one landmark age, rather than selecting for patterns of growth over the whole larval life stage. To address whether constraints may be caused by larval growth patterns rather than final size, we implemented a function-valued (FV) trait method of selection, in which entire larval growth curves from Tribolium were artificially selected. The selection gradient function used was previously predicted to give the maximal response and was implemented using a novel selection index in the FV framework. Results indicated a significant response after one generation of selection, but no response in subsequent generations. Correlated responses included increased mortality, increased critical weight, and decreased development time (DT). The lack of response in size and development time after the first generation was likely caused by increased mortality suffered in selected lines; we demonstrated that the selection criterion caused both increased body size and increased mortality. We conclude that artificial selection on continuous traits using FV methods is very efficient and that the constraint of body size evolution is likely caused by a suite of trade-offs with other traits.

  17. The dose-response curve of the gravitropic reaction: a re-analysis.

    PubMed

    Perbal, Gérald; Jeune, Bernard; Lefranc, Agnès; Carnero-Diaz, Eugénie; Driss-Ecole, Dominique

    2002-03-01

    The dose-response curve of the gravitropic reaction is often used to evaluate the gravisensing of plant organs. It has been proposed (Larsen 1957) that the response (curvature) varies linearly as a function of the logarithm of the dose of gravistimulus. As this model fitted correctly most of the data obtained in the literature, the presentation time (tp, minimal duration of stimulation in the gravitational field to induce a response) or the presentation dose (dp, minimal quantity in g.s of stimulation to induce a response) were estimated by extrapolating down to zero curvature the straight line representing the response as a function of the logarithm of the stimulus. This method was preferred to a direct measurement of dp or tp with minute stimulations, since very slight gravitropic response cannot be distinguished from the background oscillations of the extremity of the organs. In the present review, it is shown that generally the logarithmic model (L) does not fit the experimental data published in the literature as well as the hyperbolic model (H). The H model in its simplest form is related to a response in which a ligand-receptor system is the limiting phase in the cascade of events leading to the response (Weyers et al. 1987). However, it is demonstrated that the differential growth, responsible for the curvature (and the angle of curvature), would vary as a hyperbolic function of the dose of stimulation, even if several steps involving ligand-receptor systems are responsible for the gravitropic curvature. In the H model, there is theoretically no presentation time (or presentation dose) since the curve passes through the origin. The value of the derivative of the H function equals a/b and represents the slope of the cune at the origin. It could be therefore used to estimate gravisensitivity. This provides a measurement of graviresponsiveness for threshold doses of stimulation. These results imply that the presentation time (or presentation dose) derived from

  18. Musical training shapes neural responses to melodic and prosodic expectation.

    PubMed

    Zioga, Ioanna; Di Bernardi Luft, Caroline; Bhattacharya, Joydeep

    2016-11-01

    Current research on music processing and syntax or semantics in language suggests that music and language share partially overlapping neural resources. Pitch also constitutes a common denominator, forming melody in music and prosody in language. Further, pitch perception is modulated by musical training. The present study investigated how music and language interact on pitch dimension and whether musical training plays a role in this interaction. For this purpose, we used melodies ending on an expected or unexpected note (melodic expectancy being estimated by a computational model) paired with prosodic utterances which were either expected (statements with falling pitch) or relatively unexpected (questions with rising pitch). Participants' (22 musicians, 20 nonmusicians) ERPs and behavioural responses in a statement/question discrimination task were recorded. Participants were faster for simultaneous expectancy violations in the melodic and linguistic stimuli. Further, musicians performed better than nonmusicians, which may be related to their increased pitch tracking ability. At the neural level, prosodic violations elicited a front-central positive ERP around 150ms after the onset of the last word/note, while musicians presented reduced P600 in response to strong incongruities (questions on low-probability notes). Critically, musicians' P800 amplitudes were proportional to their level of musical training, suggesting that expertise might shape the pitch processing of language. The beneficial aspect of expertise could be attributed to its strengthening effect of general executive functions. These findings offer novel contributions to our understanding of shared higher-order mechanisms between music and language processing on pitch dimension, and further demonstrate a potential modulation by musical expertise. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Construction and validation of a dose-response curve using the comet assay to determine human radiosensitivity to ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Güerci, A; Zúñiga, L; Marcos, R

    2011-01-01

    Individual radiosensitivity is an individual characteristic associated with an increased reaction to ionizing radiation. The purpose of our work is to establish a dose-response curve useful to classify individuals as radiosensitive or radioresistant. Thus, a dose-response curve was constructed by measuring in vitro responses to increasing doses (0 to 8 Gy) of gamma radiation in the comet assay. The obtained curve fit well with a linear equation in the range of 0 to 8 Gy. The overall dose-response curve was constructed for percent DNA in tail, as a measure of the genetic damage induced by irradiation. To probe the goodness of the constructed curve, a validation study was carried out with whole blood from two donors in a blind study. Results show that, for the two applied doses (2 and 6 Gy), the obtained values fit well inside the interval of confidence of the curve. In conclusion, our results demonstrate the usefulness of the comet assay in determining individual responses to defined doses of gamma radiation. The standard dose-response curve constructed may be used to detect individuals departing from reference values.

  20. On-farm evaluation of the effect of metabolic diseases on the shape of the lactation curve in dairy cows through the MilkBot lactation model.

    PubMed

    Hostens, M; Ehrlich, J; Van Ranst, B; Opsomer, G

    2012-06-01

    The effects of metabolic diseases (MD) occurring during the transition period on milk production of dairy cows have been evaluated in many different ways, often with conflicting conclusions. The present study used a fitted lactation model to analyze specific aspects of lactation curve shape and magnitude in cows that avoided culling or death in the first 120 d in milk (DIM). Production and health records of 1,946 lactations in a 1-yr follow-up study design were collected from a transition management facility in Germany to evaluate both short- and long-term effects of MD on milk production. Milk production data were fitted with the nonlinear MilkBot lactation model, and health records were used to classify cows as healthy (H), affected by one MD (MD), or by multiple MD (MD+). The final data set contained 1,071 H, 348 MD, and 136 MD+ cows, with distinct incidences of 3.7% twinning, 4.8% milk fever, 3.6% retained placenta, 15.4% metritis, 8.3% ketosis, 2.0% displaced abomasum, and 3.7% mastitis in the first 30 DIM. The model containing all healthy and diseased cows showed that lactations classified as H had milk production that increased faster (lower ramp) and also declined faster (lower persistence) compared with cows that encountered one or more metabolic problems. The level of production (scale) was only lowered in MD+ cows compared with H and MD cows. Although the shape of the lactation curve changed when cows encounter uncomplicated (single) MD or complicated MD (more than one MD), the slower increase to a lower peak seemed to be compensated for by greater persistency, resulting in the overall 305-d milk production only being lowered in MD+ cows. In the individual disease models, specific changes in the shape of the lactation curve were found for all MD except twinning. Milk fever, retained placenta, ketosis, and mastitis mainly affected the lactation curve when accompanied by another MD, whereas metritis and displaced abomasum affected the lactation curve

  1. Test-Anchored Vibration Response Predictions for an Acoustically Energized Curved Orthogrid Panel with Mounted Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frady, Gregory P.; Duvall, Lowery D.; Fulcher, Clay W. G.; Laverde, Bruce T.; Hunt, Ronald A.

    2011-01-01

    rich body of vibroacoustic test data was recently generated at Marshall Space Flight Center for component-loaded curved orthogrid panels typical of launch vehicle skin structures. The test data were used to anchor computational predictions of a variety of spatially distributed responses including acceleration, strain and component interface force. Transfer functions relating the responses to the input pressure field were generated from finite element based modal solutions and test-derived damping estimates. A diffuse acoustic field model was applied to correlate the measured input sound pressures across the energized panel. This application quantifies the ability to quickly and accurately predict a variety of responses to acoustically energized skin panels with mounted components. Favorable comparisons between the measured and predicted responses were established. The validated models were used to examine vibration response sensitivities to relevant modeling parameters such as pressure patch density, mesh density, weight of the mounted component and model form. Convergence metrics include spectral densities and cumulative root-mean squared (RMS) functions for acceleration, velocity, displacement, strain and interface force. Minimum frequencies for response convergence were established as well as recommendations for modeling techniques, particularly in the early stages of a component design when accurate structural vibration requirements are needed relatively quickly. The results were compared with long-established guidelines for modeling accuracy of component-loaded panels. A theoretical basis for the Response/Pressure Transfer Function (RPTF) approach provides insight into trends observed in the response predictions and confirmed in the test data. The software developed for the RPTF method allows easy replacement of the diffuse acoustic field with other pressure fields such as a turbulent boundary layer (TBL) model suitable for vehicle ascent. Structural responses

  2. GLP-1-induced alterations in the glucose-stimulated insulin secretory dose-response curve.

    PubMed

    Brandt, A; Katschinski, M; Arnold, R; Polonsky, K S; Göke, B; Byrne, M M

    2001-08-01

    The present study was undertaken to establish in normal volunteers the alterations in beta-cell responsiveness to glucose associated with a constant infusion of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) or a pretreatment infusion for 60 min. A high-dose graded glucose infusion protocol was used to explore the dose-response relationship between glucose and insulin secretion. Studies were performed in 10 normal volunteers, and insulin secretion rates (ISR) were calculated by deconvolution of peripheral C-peptide levels by use of a two-compartmental model that utilized mean kinetic parameters. During the saline study, from 5 to 15 mM glucose, the relationship between glucose and ISR was linear. Constant GLP-1 infusion (0.4 pmol x kg(-1) x min(-1)) shifted the dose-response curve to the left, with an increase in the slope of this curve from 5 to 9 mM glucose from 71.0 +/- 12.4 pmol x min(-1) x mM(-1) during the saline study to 241.7 +/- 36.6 pmol x min(-1) x mM(-1) during the constant GLP-1 infusion (P < 0.0001). GLP-1 consistently stimulated a >200% increase in ISR at each 1 mM glucose interval, maintaining plasma glucose at <10 mM (P < 0.0007). Pretreatment with GLP-1 for 60 min resulted in no significant priming of the beta-cell response to glucose (P = 0.2). Insulin clearance rates were similar in all three studies at corresponding insulin levels. These studies demonstrate that physiological levels of GLP-1 stimulate glucose-induced insulin secretion in a linear manner, with a consistent increase in ISR at each 1 mM glucose interval, and that they have no independent effect on insulin clearance and no priming effect on subsequent insulin secretory response to glucose.

  3. A sex-specific dose-response curve for testosterone: could excessive testosterone limit sexual interaction in women?

    PubMed

    Krapf, Jill M; Simon, James A

    2017-04-01

    Testosterone treatment increases sexual desire and well-being in women with hypoactive sexual desire disorder; however, many studies have shown only modest benefits limited to moderate doses. Unlike men, available data indicate women show a bell-shaped dose-response curve for testosterone, wherein a threshold dosage of testosterone leads to desirable sexual function effects, but exceeding this threshold results in a lack of further positive sexual effects or may have a negative impact. Emotional and physical side-effects of excess testosterone, including aggression and virilization, may counteract the modest benefits on sexual interaction, providing a possible explanation for a threshold dose of testosterone in women. In this commentary, we will review and critically analyze data supporting a curvilinear dose-response relationship between testosterone treatment and sexual activity in women with low libido, and also explore possible explanations for this observed relationship. Understanding optimal dosing of testosterone unique to women may bring us one step closer to overcoming regulatory barriers in treating female sexual dysfunction.

  4. Response to Martini and Habeck: Semiochemical dose-response curves fit by kinetic formation functions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Martini and Habeck (2014) correctly describe the conceptual simulation model of Byers (2013) where molecules in an odor filament pass by an antenna causing an electrophysiological antennographic (EAG) response that is proportional to how many of the receptors are hit at least once by a molecule. Inc...

  5. Shaping ability of Reciproc and TF Adaptive systems in severely curved canals of rapid microCT-based prototyping molar replicas

    PubMed Central

    ORDINOLA-ZAPATA, Ronald; BRAMANTE, Clovis Monteiro; DUARTE, Marco Antonio Húngaro; CAVENAGO, Bruno Cavalini; JARAMILLO, David; VERSIANI, Marco Aurélio

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the shaping ability of Reciproc and Twisted-File Adaptive systems in rapid prototyping replicas. Material and Methods: Two mandibular molars showing S-shaped and 62-degree curvatures in the mesial root were scanned by using a microcomputed tomography (μCT) system. The data were exported in the stereolitograhic format and 20 samples of each molar were printed at 16 µm resolution. The mesial canals of 10 replicas of each specimen were prepared with each system. Transportation was measured by overlapping radiographs taken before and after preparation and resin thickness after instrumentation was measured by μCT. Results: Both systems maintained the original shape of the apical third in both anatomies (P>0.05). Overall, considering the resin thickness in the 62-degree replicas, no statistical difference was found between the systems (P>0.05). In the S-shaped curvature replica, Reciproc significantly decreased the thickness of the resin walls in comparison with TF Adaptive. Conclusions: The evaluated systems were able to maintain the original shape at the apical third of severely curved mesial canals of molar replicas. PMID:24918662

  6. An analytical and experimental investigation of the response of the curved, composite frame/skin specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moas, Eduardo; Boitnott, Richard L.; Griffin, O. Hayden, Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Six-foot diameter, semicircular graphite/epoxy specimens representative of generic aircraft frames were loaded quasi-statistically to determine their load response and failure mechanisms for large deflections that occur in airplanes crashes. These frame/skin specimens consisted of a cylindrical skin section co-cured with a semicircular I-frame. The skin provided the necessary lateral stiffness to keep deformations in the plane of the frame in order to realistically represent deformations as they occur in actual fuselage structures. Various frame laminate stacking sequences and geometries were evaluated by statically loading the specimen until multiple failures occurred. Two analytical methods were compared for modeling the frame/skin specimens: a two-dimensional shell finite element analysis and a one-dimensional, closed-form, curved beam solution derived using an energy method. Flange effectivities were included in the beam analysis to account for the curling phenomenon that occurs in thin flanges of curved beams. Good correlation was obtained between experimental results and the analytical predictions of the linear response of the frames prior to the initial failure. The specimens were found to be useful for evaluating composite frame designs.

  7. Melatonin entrains free-running blind people according to a physiological dose-response curve.

    PubMed

    Lewy, Alfred J; Emens, Jonathan S; Lefler, Bryan J; Yuhas, Krista; Jackman, Angela R

    2005-01-01

    The specific circadian role proposed for endogenous melatonin production was based on a study of sighted people who took low pharmacological doses (500 microg) of this chemical signal for the "biological night": the magnitude and direction of the induced phase shifts were dependent on what time of day exogenous melatonin was administered and were described by a phase-response curve that turned out to be the opposite of that for light. We now report that lower (physiological) doses of up to 300 microg can entrain (synchronize) free-running circadian rhythms of 10 totally blind subjects that would otherwise drift later each day. The resulting log-linear dose-response curve in the physiological range adds support for a circadian function of endogenous melatonin in humans. Efficacy of exogenous doses in the physiological range are of clinical significance for totally blind people who will need to take melatonin daily over their entire lifetimes in order to remain entrained to the 24 h day. Left untreated, their free-running endocrine, metabolic, behavioral, and sleep/wake cycles can be almost as burdensome as not having vision.

  8. Linearization of dose-response curve of the radiochromic film dosimetry system

    SciTech Connect

    Devic, Slobodan; Tomic, Nada; Aldelaijan, Saad; DeBlois, Francois; Seuntjens, Jan; Chan, Maria F.; Lewis, Dave

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: Despite numerous advantages of radiochromic film dosimeter (high spatial resolution, near tissue equivalence, low energy dependence) to measure a relative dose distribution with film, one needs to first measure an absolute dose (following previously established reference dosimetry protocol) and then convert measured absolute dose values into relative doses. In this work, we present result of our efforts to obtain a functional form that would linearize the inherently nonlinear dose-response curve of the radiochromic film dosimetry system. Methods: Functional form [{zeta}= (-1){center_dot}netOD{sup (2/3)}/ln(netOD)] was derived from calibration curves of various previously established radiochromic film dosimetry systems. In order to test the invariance of the proposed functional form with respect to the film model used we tested it with three different GAFCHROMIC Trade-Mark-Sign film models (EBT, EBT2, and EBT3) irradiated to various doses and scanned on a same scanner. For one of the film models (EBT2), we tested the invariance of the functional form to the scanner model used by scanning irradiated film pieces with three different flatbed scanner models (Epson V700, 1680, and 10000XL). To test our hypothesis that the proposed functional argument linearizes the response of the radiochromic film dosimetry system, verification tests have been performed in clinical applications: percent depth dose measurements, IMRT quality assurance (QA), and brachytherapy QA. Results: Obtained R{sup 2} values indicate that the choice of the functional form of the new argument appropriately linearizes the dose response of the radiochromic film dosimetry system we used. The linear behavior was insensitive to both film model and flatbed scanner model used. Measured PDD values using the green channel response of the GAFCHROMIC Trade-Mark-Sign EBT3 film model are well within {+-}2% window of the local relative dose value when compared to the tabulated Cobalt-60 data. It was also

  9. Cross-formational flow of water into coalbed methane reservoirs: controls on relative permeability curve shape and production profile.

    PubMed

    Salmachi, Alireza; Karacan, C Özgen

    2017-03-01

    Coalbed methane (CBM) wells tend to produce large volumes of water, especially when there is hydraulic connectivity between coalbed and nearby formations. Cross-formational flow between producing coal and adjacent formations can have significant production and environmental implications, affecting economic viability of production from these shallow reservoirs. Such flows can also affect how much gas can be removed from a coalbed prior to mining and thus can have implications for methane control in mining as well. The aim of this paper is to investigate the impact of water flow from an external source into coalbed on production performance and also on reservoir variables including cleat porosity and relative permeability curves derived from production data analysis. A reservoir model is constructed to investigate the production performance of a CBM well when cross-formational flow is present between the coalbed and the overlying formation. Results show that cleat porosity calculated by analysis of production data can be more than one order of magnitude higher than actual cleat porosity. Due to hydraulic connectivity, water saturation within coalbed does not considerably change for a period of time, and hence, the peak of gas production is delayed. Upon depletion of the overlying formation, water saturation in coalbed quickly decreases. Rapid decline of water saturation in the coalbed corresponds to a sharp increase in gas production. As an important consequence, when cross-flow is present, gas and water relative permeability curves, derived from simulated production data, have distinctive features compared to the initial relative permeability curves. In the case of cross-flow, signatures of relative permeability curves are concave downward and low gas permeability for a range of water saturation, followed by rapid increase afterward for water and gas, respectively. The results and analyses presented in this work can help to assess the impact of cross

  10. Cross-formational flow of water into coalbed methane reservoirs: controls on relative permeability curve shape and production profile

    PubMed Central

    Karacan, C. Özgen

    2017-01-01

    Coalbed methane (CBM) wells tend to produce large volumes of water, especially when there is hydraulic connectivity between coalbed and nearby formations. Cross-formational flow between producing coal and adjacent formations can have significant production and environmental implications, affecting economic viability of production from these shallow reservoirs. Such flows can also affect how much gas can be removed from a coalbed prior to mining and thus can have implications for methane control in mining as well. The aim of this paper is to investigate the impact of water flow from an external source into coalbed on production performance and also on reservoir variables including cleat porosity and relative permeability curves derived from production data analysis. A reservoir model is constructed to investigate the production performance of a CBM well when cross-formational flow is present between the coalbed and the overlying formation. Results show that cleat porosity calculated by analysis of production data can be more than one order of magnitude higher than actual cleat porosity. Due to hydraulic connectivity, water saturation within coalbed does not considerably change for a period of time, and hence, the peak of gas production is delayed. Upon depletion of the overlying formation, water saturation in coalbed quickly decreases. Rapid decline of water saturation in the coalbed corresponds to a sharp increase in gas production. As an important consequence, when cross-flow is present, gas and water relative permeability curves, derived from simulated production data, have distinctive features compared to the initial relative permeability curves. In the case of cross-flow, signatures of relative permeability curves are concave downward and low gas permeability for a range of water saturation, followed by rapid increase afterward for water and gas, respectively. The results and analyses presented in this work can help to assess the impact of cross

  11. Segmentation of neuronal structures using SARSA (λ)-based boundary amendment with reinforced gradient-descent curve shape fitting.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Fei; Liu, Quan; Fu, Yuchen; Shen, Bairong

    2014-01-01

    The segmentation of structures in electron microscopy (EM) images is very important for neurobiological research. The low resolution neuronal EM images contain noise and generally few features are available for segmentation, therefore application of the conventional approaches to identify the neuron structure from EM images is not successful. We therefore present a multi-scale fused structure boundary detection algorithm in this study. In the algorithm, we generate an EM image Gaussian pyramid first, then at each level of the pyramid, we utilize Laplacian of Gaussian function (LoG) to attain structure boundary, we finally assemble the detected boundaries by using fusion algorithm to attain a combined neuron structure image. Since the obtained neuron structures usually have gaps, we put forward a reinforcement learning-based boundary amendment method to connect the gaps in the detected boundaries. We use a SARSA (λ)-based curve traveling and amendment approach derived from reinforcement learning to repair the incomplete curves. Using this algorithm, a moving point starts from one end of the incomplete curve and walks through the image where the decisions are supervised by the approximated curve model, with the aim of minimizing the connection cost until the gap is closed. Our approach provided stable and efficient structure segmentation. The test results using 30 EM images from ISBI 2012 indicated that both of our approaches, i.e., with or without boundary amendment, performed better than six conventional boundary detection approaches. In particular, after amendment, the Rand error and warping error, which are the most important performance measurements during structure segmentation, were reduced to very low values. The comparison with the benchmark method of ISBI 2012 and the recent developed methods also indicates that our method performs better for the accurate identification of substructures in EM images and therefore useful for the identification of imaging

  12. Segmentation of Neuronal Structures Using SARSA (λ)-Based Boundary Amendment with Reinforced Gradient-Descent Curve Shape Fitting

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Fei; Liu, Quan; Fu, Yuchen; Shen, Bairong

    2014-01-01

    The segmentation of structures in electron microscopy (EM) images is very important for neurobiological research. The low resolution neuronal EM images contain noise and generally few features are available for segmentation, therefore application of the conventional approaches to identify the neuron structure from EM images is not successful. We therefore present a multi-scale fused structure boundary detection algorithm in this study. In the algorithm, we generate an EM image Gaussian pyramid first, then at each level of the pyramid, we utilize Laplacian of Gaussian function (LoG) to attain structure boundary, we finally assemble the detected boundaries by using fusion algorithm to attain a combined neuron structure image. Since the obtained neuron structures usually have gaps, we put forward a reinforcement learning-based boundary amendment method to connect the gaps in the detected boundaries. We use a SARSA (λ)-based curve traveling and amendment approach derived from reinforcement learning to repair the incomplete curves. Using this algorithm, a moving point starts from one end of the incomplete curve and walks through the image where the decisions are supervised by the approximated curve model, with the aim of minimizing the connection cost until the gap is closed. Our approach provided stable and efficient structure segmentation. The test results using 30 EM images from ISBI 2012 indicated that both of our approaches, i.e., with or without boundary amendment, performed better than six conventional boundary detection approaches. In particular, after amendment, the Rand error and warping error, which are the most important performance measurements during structure segmentation, were reduced to very low values. The comparison with the benchmark method of ISBI 2012 and the recent developed methods also indicates that our method performs better for the accurate identification of substructures in EM images and therefore useful for the identification of imaging

  13. A Theoretical Model for the Hormetic Dose-response Curve for Anticancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Yoshimasu, Tatsuya; Ohashi, Takuya; Oura, Shoji; Kokawa, Yozo; Kawago, Mitsumasa; Hirai, Yoshimitsu; Miyasaka, Miwako; Nishiguchi, Haruka; Kawashima, Sayoko; Yata, Yumi; Honda, Mariko; Fujimoto, Takahiro; Okamura, Yoshitaka

    2015-11-01

    In the present article, we quantitatively evaluated the dose-response relationship of hormetic reactions of anticancer agents in vitro. Serial dilutions of gemcitabine, cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil, vinorelbine, and paclitaxel were administered to the A549 non-small-cell lung cancer cell line. The bi-phasic sigmoidal curve with hormetic and cytotoxic effects is given by the formula y=(a-b/(1+exp(c(*)log(x)-d)))/(1+exp(e(*)log(x)-f)), that was used to perform a non-linear least square regression. The dose-responses of the five anticancer agents were fitted to this equation. Gemcitabine and 5-fluorouracil, which had the lowest ED50 for their hormetic reaction, had the most pronounced promotive effects out of the five anticancer agents tested. The hormetic reaction progressed exponentially with culturing time. Our theoretical model will be useful in predicting how hormetic reactions affect patients with malignant tumors.

  14. Bumetanide and frusemide: a comparison of dose-response curves in healthy men.

    PubMed Central

    Ramsay, L E; McInnes, G T; Hettiarachchi, J; Shelton, J; Scott, P

    1978-01-01

    1 Log dose-responses for the loop diuretics bumetanide and frusemide in healthy subjects deviated significantly from parallelism as regards urine volume and sodium excretion. Ignoring the nonparallelism the best estimate of natriuretic potency (bumetanide: frusemide) was 46:1 in the bumetanide dose range 0.5-2 mg. 2 For a given natriuresis the urinary potassium excretion following bumetanide was significantly lower than that for frusemide within this dose range. 3 The data illustrate the limitations of studies comparing diuretics at a single dose level. Extrapolation of the observed log dose-response curves provides one possible explanation for the relative potency (bumetanide: frusemide) of 20:1 reported when the drugs are used at high dosage in patients with renal failure. PMID:656269

  15. Effect of crystal shape on neutron rocking curves of perfect single crystals designed for ultra-small-angle scattering experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freund, A. K.; Rehm, C.

    2014-07-01

    The present study has been conducted in the framework of the channel-cut crystal design for the Kookaburra ultra-small-angle neutron scattering (USANS) instrument to be installed at the OPAL reactor of ANSTO. This facility is based on the classical Bonse-Hart method that uses two multiple-reflection crystal systems. The dynamical theory of diffraction by perfect crystals distinguishes two cases: the Darwin case applying to infinitely thick crystals and the Ewald solution for very small absorption taking into account the reflection from the rear face of a plane-parallel crystal reflecting in Bragg geometry. The former is preferable because it yields narrower rocking curves. To prevent the neutrons to "see" the rear face, grooves were machined into the backside of perfect Si test crystals for single reflection and filled with neutron absorbing material. These samples were examined at the S18 instrument of the Institut Laue-Langevin. Unexpectedly the crystals with empty slots showed an increase of the rocking curve width. When filling the slots with an absorber the widths decreased, but without reaching that of the Darwin curve. Understanding the results and achieving a successful crystal design call for the development of a theory that permits to describe neutron diffraction from crystals with a structured back face.

  16. Study of real heating profiles in routine TLD readout: influences of temperature lags and non-linearities in the heating profiles on the glow curve shape.

    PubMed

    Stadtmann, H; Delgado, A; Gómez-Ros, J M

    2002-01-01

    This paper reports on the results of a heating profile analysis using a commercial routine read-out system with non-contact hot nitrogen heating, using linear heating gas profiles. Glow curves of TLD-100 were analysed for different linear heating gas rates from 1 degree C x s(-1) to 30 degrees C x s(-1). The analysis of the individual peak maxima (Peak 2-5) leads to an approximation of the real heating profile in the TL detector. It was found that the real heating profile deviates strongly from linearity, and that the temperature lag between the heating gas and the detector reaches values up to some tens of degrees C. The consequences of this non-linearity, with respect to the resulting glow curves, are discussed in this paper. These results lead to a better understanding of the shape of routine TL glow curves and help to improve the use of glow curves analysis in routine services. In addition, a simple procedure is described which allows calculation of the real heating profile based on the heating gas temperature profile. This model shows a very good match between experimental data and calculated values.

  17. A method for inverse bifurcation of biochemical switches: inferring parameters from dose response curves.

    PubMed

    Otero-Muras, Irene; Yordanov, Pencho; Stelling, Joerg

    2014-11-20

    Within cells, stimuli are transduced into cell responses by complex networks of biochemical reactions. In many cell decision processes the underlying networks behave as bistable switches, converting graded stimuli or inputs into all or none cell responses. Observing how systems respond to different perturbations, insight can be gained into the underlying molecular mechanisms by developing mathematical models. Emergent properties of systems, like bistability, can be exploited to this purpose. One of the main challenges in modeling intracellular processes, from signaling pathways to gene regulatory networks, is to deal with high structural and parametric uncertainty, due to the complexity of the systems and the difficulty to obtain experimental measurements. Formal methods that exploit structural properties of networks for parameter estimation can help to overcome these problems. We here propose a novel method to infer the kinetic parameters of bistable biochemical network models. Bistable systems typically show hysteretic dose response curves, in which the so called bifurcation points can be located experimentally. We exploit the fact that, at the bifurcation points, a condition for multistationarity derived in the context of the Chemical Reaction Network Theory must be fulfilled. Chemical Reaction Network Theory has attracted attention from the (systems) biology community since it connects the structure of biochemical reaction networks to qualitative properties of the corresponding model of ordinary differential equations. The inverse bifurcation method developed here allows determining the parameters that produce the expected behavior of the dose response curves and, in particular, the observed location of the bifurcation points given by experimental data. Our inverse bifurcation method exploits inherent structural properties of bistable switches in order to estimate kinetic parameters of bistable biochemical networks, opening a promising route for developments in

  18. Concentration Response Curve for Ozone Realted Mortality at High Concentrations for presentation at International Society for Environmental Epidemiology

    EPA Science Inventory

    Concentration Response Curve for Ozone related Mortality at High Concentrations Ana G. Rappold, James Crooks, Lucas M. Neas Background Rising temperatures and decreased global circulation in the upcoming decades are expected to have a detrimental impact on air quality, particular...

  19. Concentration Response Curve for Ozone Realted Mortality at High Concentrations for presentation at International Society for Environmental Epidemiology

    EPA Science Inventory

    Concentration Response Curve for Ozone related Mortality at High Concentrations Ana G. Rappold, James Crooks, Lucas M. Neas Background Rising temperatures and decreased global circulation in the upcoming decades are expected to have a detrimental impact on air quality, particular...

  20. Reconfigurable Photonic Crystals Enabled by Multistimuli-Responsive Shape Memory Polymers Possessing Room Temperature Shape Processability.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yin; Leo, Sin-Yen; Ni, Yongliang; Wang, Junyu; Wang, Bingchen; Yu, Long; Dong, Zhe; Dai, Yuqiong; Basile, Vito; Taylor, Curtis; Jiang, Peng

    2017-02-15

    Traditional shape memory polymers (SMPs) are mostly thermoresponsive, and their applications in nano-optics are hindered by heat-demanding programming and recovery processes. By integrating a polyurethane-based shape memory copolymer with templating nanofabrication, reconfigurable/rewritable macroporous photonic crystals have been demonstrated. This SMP coupled with the unique macroporous structure enables unusual all-room-temperature shape memory cycles. "Cold" programming involving microscopic order-disorder transitions of the templated macropores is achieved by mechanically deforming the macroporous SMP membranes. The rapid recovery of the permanent, highly ordered photonic crystal structure from the temporary, disordered configuration can be triggered by multiple stimuli including a large variety of vapors and solvents, heat, and microwave radiation. Importantly, the striking chromogenic effects associated with these athermal and thermal processes render a sensitive and noninvasive optical methodology for quantitatively characterizing the intriguing nanoscopic shape memory effects. Some critical parameters/mechanisms that could significantly affect the final performance of SMP-based reconfigurable photonic crystals including strain recovery ratio, dynamics and reversibility of shape recovery, as well as capillary condensation of vapors in macropores, which play a crucial role in vapor-triggered recovery, can be evaluated using this new optical technology.

  1. Scaling the Non-linear Impact Response of Flat and Curved Composite Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambur, Damodar R.; Chunchu, Prasad B.; Rose, Cheryl A.; Feraboli, Paolo; Jackson, Wade C.

    2005-01-01

    The application of scaling laws to thin flat and curved composite panels exhibiting nonlinear response when subjected to low-velocity transverse impact is investigated. Previous research has shown that the elastic impact response of structural configurations exhibiting geometrically linear response can be effectively scaled. In the present paper, a preliminary experimental study is presented to assess the applicability of the scaling laws to structural configurations exhibiting geometrically nonlinear deformations. The effect of damage on the scalability of the structural response characteristics, and the effect of scale on damage development are also investigated. Damage is evaluated using conventional methods including C-scan, specimen de-plying and visual inspection of the impacted panels. Coefficient of restitution and normalized contact duration are also used to assess the extent of damage. The results confirm the validity of the scaling parameters for elastic impacts. However, for the panels considered in the study, the extent and manifestation of damage do not scale according to the scaling laws. Furthermore, the results indicate that even though the damage does not scale, the overall panel response characteristics, as indicated by contact force profiles, do scale for some levels of damage.

  2. Biphasic Fluence-Response Curves for Phytochrome-Mediated Kalanchoë Seed Germination 1

    PubMed Central

    Rethy, Roger; Dedonder, Andrée; De Petter, Edwin; Van Wiemeersch, Luc; Fredericq, Henri; De Greef, Jan; Steyaert, Herman; Stevens, Hilde

    1987-01-01

    The fluence-response curves for the effect of two red pulses separated by 24 hours on the germination of Kalanchoe blossfeldiana Poelln. cv Vesuv seeds, incubated on gibberellic acid (GA3) are biphasic for suboptimal concentrations. The response in the low fluence range corresponds with a classical red/far-red reversible phytochrome mediated reaction. GA3 induces an additional response in the very low fluence range, which is also phytochrome mediated. The sensitivity to phytochrome-far-red absorbing form (Pfr), however, is increased about 20,000-fold, so that even far-red fluences become saturating. Both in the very low and low fluence response range, the maximal responses induced by saturating fluences are modulated by the GA3 concentration. GA3 having no direct influence on the phytochrome phototransformations, alters the Pfr requirement and determines the responding seed population fraction in the very low and low fluence range. The effet of GA3 appears to be on the transduction chain of the phytochrome signal. PMID:16665187

  3. Development of fragility curves by incorporating new spectral shape indicators and a weighted damage index: case study of steel braced frames in the city of Mashhad, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazemi, Hamid; Ghafory-Ashtiany, Mohsen; Azarbakht, Alireza

    2017-04-01

    In this study, strong ground motion record (SGMR) selection based on Eta ( η) as a spectral shape indicator has been investigated as applied to steel braced frame structures. A probabilistic seismic hazard disaggregation analysis for the definition of the target Epsilon ( ɛ) and the target Eta ( η) values at different hazard levels is presented, taking into account appropriately selected SGMR's. Fragility curves are developed for different limit states corresponding to three representative models of typical steel braced frames having significant irregularities in plan, by means of a weighted damage index. The results show that spectral shape indicators have an important effect on the predicted median structural capacities, and also that the parameter η is a more robust predictor of damage than searching for records with appropriate ɛ values.

  4. POD curves for non-maximizable ultrasonic responses: Statistical derivation and application to solid freight axles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carboni, Michele; Cantini, Stefano

    2016-02-01

    The most relevant standards on ultrasonic testing, and an effective inspection practice, require the maximization of echo responses due to indications before their evaluation in terms of amplitude and size. This is achieved effectively pointing the acoustic axis of the sound beam to the indication, in a way to get back the maximum possible sound energy. Considering some operative cases, however, such a response maximization is not always feasible, mainly due to geometrical constraints impeding the inspection of the whole control area with a constant sensitivity. The traditional end inspection of solid railway axles by a rotating probe mounting conventional sensors falls back into this kind of inspections. In particular, inspection angles are fixed and the probe holder cannot move along the axle allowing response maximization of in-service damages located, for example, along the cylindrical body. It follows some control areas cannot be inspected using the maximum sound pressure. The present research shows how the derivation of "Probability of Detection" curves for non-maximizable ultrasonic responses cannot be carried out by the traditional statistical approach and a novel one, of the "Model-Assisted Probability of Detection" kind, is consequently proposed based on experiments and numerical simulations.

  5. Curve Number and Peakflow Responses Following the Cerro Grande Fire on a Small Watershed.

    SciTech Connect

    Springer, E. P.; Hawkins, Richard H.

    2005-01-01

    The Curve Number (CN) method is routinely used to estimate runoff and peakflows following forest fires, but there has been essentially no literature on the estimated value and temporal variation of CNs following wildland fires. In May 2000, the Cerro Grande Fire burned the headwaters of the major watersheds that cross Los Alamos National Laboratory, and a stream gauging network presented an opportunity to assess CNs following the fire. Analysis of rainfall-runoff events indicated that the pre-fire watershed response was complacent or limited watershed area contributed to runoff. The post-fire response indicated that the complacent behavior continued so the watershed response was not dramatically changed. Peakflows did increase by 2 orders of magnitude following the fire, and this was hypothesized to be a function of increase in runoff volume and changes in watershed network allowing more efficient delivery of runoff. More observations and analyses following fires are needed to support definition of CNs for post-fire response and mitigation efforts.

  6. Plant community response to landscape connectivity and patch shape.

    SciTech Connect

    Damschen, Ellen I.

    2005-07-01

    Ph.D Dissertation. North Carolina State University. Raleigh, North Carolina. 135 pp. Abstract. Land transformation is the single most important factor promoting the global loss of terrestrial biological diversity. Remaining habitat fragments contain more edges, less interior habitat, and are more isolated from other habitat fragments, all of which decrease rates of colonization following local extinctions, reduce reproductive rates and gene flow between populations, and ultimately lead to species extinctions. The best approach to prevent species loss, therefore, is to preserve greater areas of habitat. In many cases, however, habitat has already been fragmented and strategies are needed to configure and manage the remaining land. Land managers often create reserve networks that incorporate the use of landscape corridors, linear strips of habitat connecting isolated patches, to reduce species loss by increasing colonizations and decreasing extinctions. Most empirical tests of corridors have been limited to individuals and populations, leaving corridor effects on diversity largely unknown, especially at large spatial scales. Additionally, only a handful of studies have examined corridor effects on plants, which may be especially sensitive to the abiotic changes resulting from alterations in patch shape due to dispersal limitation. Using one of the best-replicated, large-scale habitat fragmentation experiments, I tested explicitly for corridor effects on plant community diversity and composition by examining the established plant community and the soil seedbank. My experimental design distinguished among the three possible ways corridors can affect between-patch processes: by acting as a movement conduit between connected patches (“connectivity effects”), by increasing area alone (“area effects”), and by intercepting organisms moving across the landscape and filtering them into connected patches (“drift-fence effects”). Additionally, I tested for the

  7. Thermal and Mechanical Buckling and Postbuckling Responses of Selected Curved Composite Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breivik, Nicole L.; Hyer, Michael W.; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    The results of an experimental and numerical study of the buckling and postbuckling responses of selected unstiffened curved composite panels subjected to mechanical end shortening and a uniform temperature increase are presented. The uniform temperature increase induces thermal stresses in the panel when the axial displacement is constrained. An apparatus for testing curved panels at elevated temperature is described, numerical results generated by using a geometrically nonlinear finite element analysis code are presented. Several analytical modeling refinements that provide more accurate representation of the actual experimental conditions, and the relative contribution of each refinement, are discussed. Experimental results and numerical predictions are presented and compared for three loading conditions including mechanical end shortening alone, heating the panels to 250 F followed by mechanical end shortening, and heating the panels to 400 F. Changes in the coefficients of thermal expansion were observed as temperature was increased above 330 F. The effects of these changes on the experimental results are discussed for temperatures up to 400 F.

  8. Nonlinear and snap-through responses of curved panels to intense acoustic excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, C. F.

    1989-01-01

    Assuming a single-mode transverse displacement, a simple formula is derived for the transverse load-displacement relationship of a plate under in-plane compression. The formula is used to derive a simple analytical expression for the nonlinear dynamic response of postbuckled plates under sinusoidal or random excitation. The highly nonlinear motion of snap-through can be easily interpreted using the single-mode formula. Experimental results are obtained with buckled and cylindrical aluminum panels using discrete frequency and broadband excitation of mechanical and acoustic forces. Some important effects of the snap-through motion on the dynamic response of the postbuckled plates are described. Static tests were used to identify the deformation shape during snap-through.

  9. Clinical application of Chamomilla recutita in phlebitis: dose response curve study.

    PubMed

    Reis, Paula Elaine Diniz Dos; Carvalho, Emilia Campos de; Bueno, Paula Carolina Pires; Bastos, Jairo Kenupp

    2011-01-01

    This experimental and dose-response curve study aimed to carry out the quality control of the Chamomilla recutita sample, as well as to estimate the ideal dose, for anti-inflammatory effect, of the extract of its capitula, in patients with phlebitis due to peripheral intravenous infusion of antineoplastic chemotherapy and to evaluate the toxicity of this extract in human beings. The therapeutic efficacy, concerning the anti-inflammatory potential, of different doses of Chamomilla recutita extract were analyzed and compared in 25 patients. The time of regression of phlebitis was shorter for groups with 2.5% concentration (mean=29.2h, standard deviation = 8.98) and 5% concentration (mean = 38.8h, standard deviation = 17.47). Local toxicity was almost not observed. This research contributes to the innovation of the nursing clinical practice, since it suggests an alternative for the treatment of phlebitis through the clinical use of phytotherapeutic drugs.

  10. Fertilizer Response Curves for Commercial Southern Forest Species Defined with an Un-Replicated Experimental Design.

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, Mark; Aubrey, Doug; Coyle, David, R.; Daniels, Richard, F.

    2005-11-01

    There has been recent interest in use of non-replicated regression experimental designs in forestry, as the need for replication in experimental design is burdensome on limited research budgets. We wanted to determine the interacting effects of soil moisture and nutrient availability on the production of various southeastern forest trees (two clones of Populus deltoides, open pollinated Platanus occidentalis, Liquidambar styraciflua and Pinus taeda). Additionally, we required an understanding of the fertilizer response curve. To accomplish both objectives we developed a composite design that includes a core ANOVA approach to consider treatment interactions, with the addition of non-replicated regression plots receiving a range of fertilizer levels for the primary irrigation treatment.

  11. Hole-transport limited S-shaped I-V curves in planar heterojunction organic photovoltaic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Minlu; Wang, Hui; Tang, C. W.

    2011-11-01

    Current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of planar heterojunction organic photovoltaic cells based on N',N'-Di-[(1-naphthyl)-N',N'-diphenyl]-1,1'-biphenyl)-4,4'-diamine (NPB) and C60 are investigated. Through variation of the layer thickness and composition, specifically chemical doping NPB with MoOx, we show that the hole-transport limitation in the NPB layer is the determining factor in shaping the I-V characteristics of NPB/C60 cells.

  12. An analytical approach to estimating aberrations in curved multilayer optics for hard x-rays: 1. Derivation of caustic shapes.

    PubMed

    Guigay, J-P; Morawe, Ch; Mocella, V; Ferrero, C

    2008-08-04

    An analytical approach has been developed to derive aberration effects in parabolic and elliptic multilayer optics with weak interaction between photons and matter. The method is based on geometrical ray tracing including refraction effects up to the first order of the refractive index decrement delta. In the parabolic case, the derivation leads to simple parametric equations for the caustic shape. In the elliptic case, the analytical results more involved, but can be well approximated by the parabolic solution. Both geometries are compared with regard to the fundamental impact on their focusing properties.

  13. Interpretation of the margin of exposure for genotoxic carcinogens - elicitation of expert knowledge about the form of the dose response curve at human relevant exposures.

    PubMed

    Boobis, Alan; Flari, Villie; Gosling, John Paul; Hart, Andy; Craig, Peter; Rushton, Lesley; Idahosa-Taylor, Ehi

    2013-07-01

    The general approach to risk assessment of genotoxic carcinogens has been to advise reduction of exposure to "as low as reasonably achievable/practicable" (ALARA/P). However, whilst this remains the preferred risk management option, it does not provide guidance on the urgency or extent of risk management actions necessary. To address this, the "Margin of Exposure" (MOE) approach has been proposed. The MOE is the ratio between the point of departure for carcinogenesis and estimated human exposure. However, interpretation of the MOE requires implicit or explicit consideration of the shape of the dose-response curve at human relevant exposures. In a structured elicitation exercise, we captured expert opinion on available scientific evidence for low dose-response relationships for genotoxic carcinogens. This allowed assessment of: available evidence for the nature of dose-response relationships at human relevant exposures; the generality of judgments about such dose-response relationships; uncertainties affecting judgments on the nature of such dose-response relationships; and whether this last should differ for different classes of genotoxic carcinogens. Elicitation results reflected the variability in experts' views on the form of the dose-response curve for low dose exposure and major sources of uncertainty affecting the assumption of a linear relationship.

  14. Combining freeform-shaped holographic grating and curved detectors in a scheme of multi-slit astronomic spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muslimov, Eduard R.; Hugot, Emmanuel; Ferrari, Marc

    2017-05-01

    In the present work we consider optical design of a multi-slit astronomic spectrograph for UV domain with freeform reflective elements. The scheme consists of only two reflective elements - a holographic grating imposed on freeform surface and a freeform mirror. The freeforms are described by standard Zernike polynomials and the hologram is recorded by two coherent point sources. We demonstrate that in such a scheme it's possible to obtain quite high optical quality for an extended field of view and relatively high dispersion on a curved image surface. The spectrograph works with linear field of view of 76x32 mm and provides reciprocal linear dispersion equal to 0.5 nm/mm and typical resolving power of 15 000 over the UV range of 100-200 nm. Feasibility of the optical components is discussed and coupling of the spectrograph with a TMA telescope is demonstrated.

  15. Smoking and cotton dust effects in cotton textile workers: an analysis of the shape of the maximum expiratory flow volume curve

    SciTech Connect

    Schachter, E.N.; Kapp, M.C.; Maunder, L.R.; Beck, G.; Witek, T.J.

    1986-04-01

    Cotton textile workers have an increased prevalence of both obstructive and restrictive lung function patterns when compared to control subjects. Similar abnormal lung function patterns may occur with other respiratory diseases, notably those associated with cigarette smoking. The shape of the maximum expiratory flow volume (MEFV) curve has been used to characterize patterns of lung function abnormality. The authors defined a new functional parameter (angle ..beta..) related to the shape of the MEFV curve in order better to characterize the respiratory effects of cotton dust exposure. In this study, 477 cotton textile workers, both current smokers and never smokers 45 years and older, were compared to 932 similarly aged control subjects from three communities: Lebanon and Ansonia, CT, and Winnsboro, SC. Smokers, regardless of their occupational exposure or sex, have smaller values of ..beta.. than do nonsmokers. Cotton textile workers who have more abnormal lung function than do controls, cannot be distinguished from controls by ..beta... They suggest that such functional differences between cotton and smoking effects may reflect injury to different portions of the bronchial tree.

  16. Effect of intrinsic motivation on affective responses during and after exercise: latent curve model analysis.

    PubMed

    Shin, Myoungjin; Kim, Inwoo; Kwon, Sungho

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the relationship between affect and exercise is helpful in predicting human behavior with respect to exercise participation. The goals of the present study were to investigate individual differences in affective response during and after exercise and to identify the role of intrinsic motivation in affective changes. 30 active male college students (M age = 21.4 yr.) who regularly participated in sports activities volunteered to answer a questionnaire measuring intrinsic motivation toward running activities and performed a 20-min. straight running protocol at heavy intensity (about 70% of VO2max). Participants' affective responses were measured every 5 min. from the beginning of the run to 10 min. after completing the run. Latent curve model analysis indicated that individuals experienced different changes in affective state during exercise, moderated by intrinsic motivation. Higher intrinsic motivation was associated with more positive affect during exercise. There were no significant individual differences in the positive tendency of the participants' affective responses after exercise over time. Intrinsic motivation seems to facilitate positive feelings during exercise and encourages participation in exercise.

  17. Non-parametric estimators of a monotonic dose-response curve and bootstrap confidence intervals.

    PubMed

    Dilleen, Maria; Heimann, Günter; Hirsch, Ian

    2003-03-30

    In this paper we consider study designs which include a placebo and an active control group as well as several dose groups of a new drug. A monotonically increasing dose-response function is assumed, and the objective is to estimate a dose with equivalent response to the active control group, including a confidence interval for this dose. We present different non-parametric methods to estimate the monotonic dose-response curve. These are derived from the isotonic regression estimator, a non-negative least squares estimator, and a bias adjusted non-negative least squares estimator using linear interpolation. The different confidence intervals are based upon an approach described by Korn, and upon two different bootstrap approaches. One of these bootstrap approaches is standard, and the second ensures that resampling is done from empiric distributions which comply with the order restrictions imposed. In our simulations we did not find any differences between the two bootstrap methods, and both clearly outperform Korn's confidence intervals. The non-negative least squares estimator yields biased results for moderate sample sizes. The bias adjustment for this estimator works well, even for small and moderate sample sizes, and surprisingly outperforms the isotonic regression method in certain situations.

  18. Adaptive urn designs for estimating several percentiles of a dose--response curve.

    PubMed

    Mugno, Raymond; Zhus, Wei; Rosenberger, William F

    2004-07-15

    Dose--response experiments are crucial in biomedical studies. There are usually multiple objectives in such experiments and among the goals is the estimation of several percentiles on the dose--response curve. Here we present the first non-parametric adaptive design approach to estimate several percentiles simultaneously via generalized Pólya urns. Theoretical properties of these designs are investigated and their performance is gaged by the locally compound optimal designs. As an example, we re-investigated a psychophysical experiment where one of the goals was to estimate the three quartiles. We show that these multiple-objective adaptive designs are more efficient than the original single-objective adaptive design targeting the median only. We also show that urn designs which target the optimal designs are slightly more efficient than those which target the desired percentiles directly. Guidelines are given as to when to use which type of design. Overall we are pleased with the efficiency results and hope compound adaptive designs proposed in this work or their variants may prove to be a viable non-parametric alternative in multiple-objective dose--response studies.

  19. Quality control procedures for dose-response curve generation using nanoliter dispense technologies.

    PubMed

    Quintero, Catherine; Rosenstein, Craig; Hughes, Bethany; Middleton, Richard; Kariv, Ilona

    2007-09-01

    With the advancement of high-throughput biomolecular screening techniques to the lead optimization stage, there is a critical need to quality control (QC) dose-response curves generated by robotic liquid handlers to ensure accurate affinity determinations. One challenge in evaluating the performance of liquid handlers is identifying and validating a robust method for testing dispense volumes across different instruments. Although traditional automated liquid handlers are still considered the standard platform in many laboratories, nanoliter dispensers are becoming more common and pose new challenges for routine quality control procedures. For example, standard gravimetric measurements are unreliable for testing the accuracy of nanoliter liquid dispenses. However, nanoliter dispensing technology allows for the conservation of compound, reduces compound carryover from well to well through discrete dispenses, and eliminates the need for intermediate compound dilution steps to achieve a low final DMSO assay concentration. Moreover, an intermediate dilution step in aqueous solution might result in compound precipitation at high concentrations. This study compared representative automation procedures done on a variety of liquid dispensers, including manual, traditional, and nanodispense volumes. The data confirmed the importance of establishing robust QC procedures for dose-response generation in addition to accuracy and precision determinations for each instrument, and they validated the use of nanoliter pipettors for dose-response testing. The results of this study also support the requirement for thorough mixing during serial compound dilutions prepared for high-throughput lead optimization strategies using traditional liquid handlers.

  20. Evaluation of alternative model selection criteria in the analysis of unimodal response curves using CART

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ribic, C.A.; Miller, T.W.

    1998-01-01

    We investigated CART performance with a unimodal response curve for one continuous response and four continuous explanatory variables, where two variables were important (ie directly related to the response) and the other two were not. We explored performance under three relationship strengths and two explanatory variable conditions: equal importance and one variable four times as important as the other. We compared CART variable selection performance using three tree-selection rules ('minimum risk', 'minimum risk complexity', 'one standard error') to stepwise polynomial ordinary least squares (OLS) under four sample size conditions. The one-standard-error and minimum-risk-complexity methods performed about as well as stepwise OLS with large sample sizes when the relationship was strong. With weaker relationships, equally important explanatory variables and larger sample sizes, the one-standard-error and minimum-risk-complexity rules performed better than stepwise OLS. With weaker relationships and explanatory variables of unequal importance, tree-structured methods did not perform as well as stepwise OLS. Comparing performance within tree-structured methods, with a strong relationship and equally important explanatory variables, the one-standard-error-rule was more likely to choose the correct model than were the other tree-selection rules 1) with weaker relationships and equally important explanatory variables; and 2) under all relationship strengths when explanatory variables were of unequal importance and sample sizes were lower.

  1. Test-Anchored Vibration Response Predictions for an Acoustically Energized Curved Orthogrid Panel with Mounted Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frady, Gregory P.; Duvall, Lowery D.; Fulcher, Clay W. G.; Laverde, Bruce T.; Hunt, Ronald A.

    2011-01-01

    A rich body of vibroacoustic test data was recently generated at Marshall Space Flight Center for a curved orthogrid panel typical of launch vehicle skin structures. Several test article configurations were produced by adding component equipment of differing weights to the flight-like vehicle panel. The test data were used to anchor computational predictions of a variety of spatially distributed responses including acceleration, strain and component interface force. Transfer functions relating the responses to the input pressure field were generated from finite element based modal solutions and test-derived damping estimates. A diffuse acoustic field model was employed to describe the assumed correlation of phased input sound pressures across the energized panel. This application demonstrates the ability to quickly and accurately predict a variety of responses to acoustically energized skin panels with mounted components. Favorable comparisons between the measured and predicted responses were established. The validated models were used to examine vibration response sensitivities to relevant modeling parameters such as pressure patch density, mesh density, weight of the mounted component and model form. Convergence metrics include spectral densities and cumulative root-mean squared (RMS) functions for acceleration, velocity, displacement, strain and interface force. Minimum frequencies for response convergence were established as well as recommendations for modeling techniques, particularly in the early stages of a component design when accurate structural vibration requirements are needed relatively quickly. The results were compared with long-established guidelines for modeling accuracy of component-loaded panels. A theoretical basis for the Response/Pressure Transfer Function (RPTF) approach provides insight into trends observed in the response predictions and confirmed in the test data. The software modules developed for the RPTF method can be easily adapted for

  2. Characterization of Nonlinear Rate Dependent Response of Shape Memory Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volk, Brent; Lagoudas, Dimitris C.; Chen, Yi-Chao; Whitley, Karen S.

    2007-01-01

    Shape Memory Polymers (SMPs) are a class of polymers, which can undergo deformation in a flexible state at elevated temperatures, and when cooled below the glass transition temperature, while retaining their deformed shape, will enter and remain in a rigid state. Upon heating above the glass transition temperature, the shape memory polymer will return to its original, unaltered shape. SMPs have been reported to recover strains of over 400%. It is important to understand the stress and strain recovery behavior of SMPs to better develop constitutive models which predict material behavior. Initial modeling efforts did not account for large deformations beyond 25% strain. However, a model under current development is capable of describing large deformations of the material. This model considers the coexisting active (rubber) and frozen (glass) phases of the polymer, as well as the transitions between the material phases. The constitutive equations at the continuum level are established with internal state variables to describe the microstructural changes associated with the phase transitions. For small deformations, the model reduces to a linear model that agrees with those reported in the literature. Thermomechanical characterization is necessary for the development, calibration, and validation of a constitutive model. The experimental data reported in this paper will assist in model development by providing a better understanding of the stress and strain recovery behavior of the material. This paper presents the testing techniques used to characterize the thermomechanical material properties of a shape memory polymer (SMP) and also presents the resulting data. An innovative visual-photographic apparatus, known as a Vision Image Correlation (VIC) system was used to measure the strain. The details of this technique will also be presented in this paper. A series of tensile tests were performed on specimens such that strain levels of 10, 25, 50, and 100% were applied to

  3. Shape-independent object category responses revealed by MEG and fMRI decoding

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Daniel; Azzalini, Damiano C.

    2016-01-01

    Neuroimaging research has identified category-specific neural response patterns to a limited set of object categories. For example, faces, bodies, and scenes evoke activity patterns in visual cortex that are uniquely traceable in space and time. It is currently debated whether these apparently categorical responses truly reflect selectivity for categories or instead reflect selectivity for category-associated shape properties. In the present study, we used a cross-classification approach on functional MRI (fMRI) and magnetoencephalographic (MEG) data to reveal both category-independent shape responses and shape-independent category responses. Participants viewed human body parts (hands and torsos) and pieces of clothing that were closely shape-matched to the body parts (gloves and shirts). Category-independent shape responses were revealed by training multivariate classifiers on discriminating shape within one category (e.g., hands versus torsos) and testing these classifiers on discriminating shape within the other category (e.g., gloves versus shirts). This analysis revealed significant decoding in large clusters in visual cortex (fMRI) starting from 90 ms after stimulus onset (MEG). Shape-independent category responses were revealed by training classifiers on discriminating object category (bodies and clothes) within one shape (e.g., hands versus gloves) and testing these classifiers on discriminating category within the other shape (e.g., torsos versus shirts). This analysis revealed significant decoding in bilateral occipitotemporal cortex (fMRI) and from 130 to 200 ms after stimulus onset (MEG). Together, these findings provide evidence for concurrent shape and category selectivity in high-level visual cortex, including category-level responses that are not fully explicable by two-dimensional shape properties. PMID:26740535

  4. Measurement and analysis of the air pressure curve on the rigid lenses by use of ocular response analyzer.

    PubMed

    Kasprzak, Henryk; Mazur, Ewa; Widlicka, Magdalena

    2014-01-01

    Pressure curves obtained from Ocular Response Analyzer (ORA) differ for the same patient in form and height. In some cases measurements on the subject show significant differences between recorded pressure curves. The purpose of the paper is to examine if the differences result from the corneal properties or from the device operation. Examination of air pressure curves was carried out on four plano-convex glass lenses with radii of curvature close to the central corneal radius. Lenses were mounted in front of the air jet of the ORA analyzer. Series of 30 measurements on each lenses were recorded with 20 s and 60 s time interval between measurements. RESULTS were exported to computer and analyzed numerically. RESULTS show much higher reproducibility of pressure curves in every series of measurements in comparison to pressure curves recorded on the patients eye. This demonstrates that ORA produces air pulses with high reproducibility. Differences in air pressure pulses for the real eye can indicate the dynamics of ocular properties during measurements. Obtained pressure curves are not symmetrical and not well fitted by Gaussian curve. Type of asymmetry of air pressure curves may be explained by viscoelasticity of air.

  5. Complex, non-monotonic dose-response curves with multiple maxima: Do we (ever) sample densely enough?

    PubMed Central

    Cvrčková, Fatima; Luštinec, Jiří; Žárský, Viktor

    2015-01-01

    We usually expect the dose-response curves of biological responses to quantifiable stimuli to be simple, either monotonic or exhibiting a single maximum or minimum. Deviations are often viewed as experimental noise. However, detailed measurements in plant primary tissue cultures (stem pith explants of kale and tobacco) exposed to varying doses of sucrose, cytokinins (BA or kinetin) or auxins (IAA or NAA) revealed that growth and several biochemical parameters exhibit multiple reproducible, statistically significant maxima over a wide range of exogenous substance concentrations. This results in complex, non-monotonic dose-response curves, reminiscent of previous reports of analogous observations in both metazoan and plant systems responding to diverse pharmacological treatments. These findings suggest the existence of a hitherto neglected class of biological phenomena resulting in dose-response curves exhibiting periodic patterns of maxima and minima, whose causes remain so far uncharacterized, partly due to insufficient sampling frequency used in many studies. PMID:26336980

  6. Patients who do not respond to the "usual" dose: why Terry fell off the dose-response curve.

    PubMed

    Preskorn, Sheldon H

    2009-11-01

    Clinical trials are aimed at determining what happens in the "usual" patient; however, clinicians are interested in what happens in their patients even if they are not usual. The usual dose-response relationship is determined as part of the drug development process required for approval of a new drug. However, clinicians are likely to encounter patients who "fall off" the usual dose-response curve because they are either sensitive or resistant to the beneficial (efficacy) or adverse effects of a drug. This column is the first in a series that will examine why specific patients fall off the usual dose-response curve and how clinicians can manage such patients when they encounter them. This column discusses what a dose-response curve is, how it is determined, and why it is clinically important.

  7. A comparison of Greater Taper files, ProFiles, and stainless steel files to shape curved root canals.

    PubMed

    Park, H

    2001-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of engine-driven nickel-titanium files to maintain the original curvature of root canals during canal preparation. A total of 36 simulated curved canals on resin blocks were instrumented with Greater Taper (GT) files, ProFiles, and stainless steel files. With the mounting device, which can reproduce the same position of the resin blocks and the camera, the unprepared and prepared canals were accurately compared by means of a double-exposure photographic technique. The analysis of variance test was used for the statistical analysis of data obtained. The canals prepared by means of a ProFile with a 6% taper up to the working length were excellent in taper and in maintaining the original curvature. The canals prepared with GT files were also found to be excellent in taper and in maintaining the original curvature; however, these canals showed a slight enlargement toward the inner side at the beginning of the curvature. The canals prepared with stainless steel files showed nontapered widening and severe transportation. The canals prepared with GT files and ProFiles were excellently tapered and maintained the original curvature of the canals in comparison with the ones prepared with stainless steel files.

  8. A U-shaped dose-response relationship between x radiation and sex-linked recessive lethal mutation in male germ cells of Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Koana, Takao; Tsujimura, Hidenobu

    2010-07-01

    We reported previously that low-dose X irradiation of DNA repair-proficient immature sperm of wild-type Drosophila melanogaster at a low dose rate (50 mGy/min) resulted in a mutation frequency that was lower than that in the sham-irradiated group. Therefore, a U-shaped dose-response relationship was suggested. Here we show that the dose-response curve is actually U-shaped by carrying out a large-scale sex-linked recessive lethal assay using Drosophila. No reduction of the mutation frequency was observed in a strain mutant for the nucleotide excision repair gene mei-9a (Drosophila homologue of human XPF). Introduction of a chromosome fragment containing mei-9+ into the mei-9a mutant strain restored the reduction of the mutation frequency in the low-dose-irradiated group. These results showed that DNA repair was responsible for the U-shaped dose-response relationship in Drosophila.

  9. Evaluation of the Phase-Dependent Rhythm Control of Human Walking Using Phase Response Curves

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Yuki; Aoi, Shinya; Imai, Takashi; Aoyagi, Toshio; Tomita, Nozomi; Tsuchiya, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Humans and animals control their walking rhythms to maintain motion in a variable environment. The neural mechanism for controlling rhythm has been investigated in many studies using mechanical and electrical stimulation. However, quantitative evaluation of rhythm variation in response to perturbation at various timings has rarely been investigated. Such a characteristic of rhythm is described by the phase response curve (PRC). Dynamical simulations of human skeletal models with changing walking rhythms (phase reset) described a relation between the effective phase reset on stability and PRC, and phase reset around touch-down was shown to improve stability. A PRC of human walking was estimated by pulling the swing leg, but such perturbations hardly influenced the stance leg, so the relation between the PRC and walking events was difficult to discuss. This research thus examines human response to variations in floor velocity. Such perturbation yields another problem, in that the swing leg is indirectly (and weakly) perturbed, so the precision of PRC decreases. To solve this problem, this research adopts the weighted spike-triggered average (WSTA) method. In the WSTA method, a sequential pulsed perturbation is used for stimulation. This is in contrast with the conventional impulse method, which applies an intermittent impulsive perturbation. The WSTA method can be used to analyze responses to a large number of perturbations for each sequence. In the experiment, perturbations are applied to walking subjects by rapidly accelerating and decelerating a treadmill belt, and measured data are analyzed by the WSTA and impulse methods. The PRC obtained by the WSTA method had clear and stable waveforms with a higher temporal resolution than those obtained by the impulse method. By investigation of the rhythm transition for each phase of walking using the obtained PRC, a rhythm change that extends the touch-down and mid-single support phases is found to occur. PMID:27203839

  10. SmartShape™ technology. Modifying the shape of the beef cuberoll and the consumer response to shaped scotch fillet steaks.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Johanne; van de Ven, Remy; Hopkins, David L

    2014-03-01

    SmartShape™ is a novel meat processing technology that uses air pressure to compress and elongate whole cold-boned primals and packages them to retain form. A two stage study was conducted. The first stage established the ability of the SmartShape™ treated beef cube roll (m. longissimus lumborum) to retain shape in a commercial setting. Twelve hours chilling time following treatment was found to be adequate for steaks to retain their shape for up to 24h after slicing. Steak shape and size did not change substantially until after cooking, when the steaks looked less formed. In the second stage a survey was conducted of 421 consumers to clarify the response to the shaping of a subset of raw and cooked scotch fillet steaks. There was no difference in preference for shaped or control steaks. A secondary survey found that informed consumers were more amenable to the SmartShape™ scotch fillet steaks presented here, but would not pay a premium for them.

  11. Heavy particle irradiation, neurochemistry and behavior: thresholds, dose-response curves and recovery of function.

    PubMed

    Rabin, B M; Joseph, J A; Shukitt-Hale, B

    2004-01-01

    Exposure to heavy particles can affect the functioning of the central nervous system (CNS), particularly the dopaminergic system. In turn, the radiation-induced disruption of dopaminergic function affects a variety of behaviors that are dependent upon the integrity of this system, including motor behavior (upper body strength), amphetamine (dopamine)-mediated taste aversion learning, and operant conditioning (fixed-ratio bar pressing). Although the relationships between heavy particle irradiation and the effects of exposure depend, to some extent, upon the specific behavioral or neurochemical endpoint under consideration, a review of the available research leads to the hypothesis that the endpoints mediated by the CNS have certain characteristics in common. These include: (1) a threshold, below which there is no apparent effect; (2) the lack of a dose-response relationship, or an extremely steep dose-response curve, depending on the particular endpoint; and (3) the absence of recovery of function, such that the heavy particle-induced behavioral and neural changes are present when tested up to one year following exposure. The current report reviews the data relevant to the degree to which these characteristics are common to neurochemical and behavioral endpoints that are mediated by the effects of exposure to heavy particles on CNS activity.

  12. Aspergillus flavus dose-response curves to selected natural and synthetic antimicrobials.

    PubMed

    López-Malo, Aurelio; Alzamora, Stella M; Palou, Enrique

    2002-03-01

    The effects of selected concentrations of antimicrobials from natural (vanillin, thymol, eugenol, carvacrol or citral) or synthetic (potassium sorbate or sodium benzoate) origin on Aspergillus flavus lag time inoculated in laboratory media formulated at water activity (a(w)) 0.99 and pH 4.5 or 3.5, were evaluated. Time to detect a colony with a diameter > 0.5 mm was determined. Mold response was modeled using the Fermi function. Antimicrobial minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) was defined as the minimal required inhibiting mold growth for 2 months. Fermi function successfully captured A. flavus dose-response curves to the tested antimicrobials with a highly satisfactory fit. Fermi equation coefficients, Pc and k, were used to compare antimicrobials and assess the effect of pH. Important differences in Pc and k were observed among antimicrobials, being natural antimicrobials less pH dependent than synthetic antimicrobials. A large Pc value represents a small antimicrobial effect on A. flavus lag time; thus, high concentrations are needed to delay growth. A. flavus exhibited higher sensitivity to thymol, eugenol, carvacrol, potassium sorbate (at pH 3.5), and sodium benzoate (at pH 3.5) than to vanillin or citral. MICs varied from 200 ppm of sodium bcnzoate at pH 3.5 to 1800 ppm of citral at both evaluated pHs.

  13. Heavy particle irradiation, neurochemistry and behavior: thresholds, dose-response curves and recovery of function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabin, B. M.; Joseph, J. A.; Shukitt-Hale, B.

    2004-01-01

    Exposure to heavy particles can affect the functioning of the central nervous system (CNS), particularly the dopaminergic system. In turn, the radiation-induced disruption of dopaminergic function affects a variety of behaviors that are dependent upon the integrity of this system, including motor behavior (upper body strength), amphetamine (dopamine)-mediated taste aversion learning, and operant conditioning (fixed-ratio bar pressing). Although the relationships between heavy particle irradiation and the effects of exposure depend, to some extent, upon the specific behavioral or neurochemical endpoint under consideration, a review of the available research leads to the hypothesis that the endpoints mediated by the CNS have certain characteristics in common. These include: (1) a threshold, below which there is no apparent effect; (2) the lack of a dose-response relationship, or an extremely steep dose-response curve, depending on the particular endpoint; and (3) the absence of recovery of function, such that the heavy particle-induced behavioral and neural changes are present when tested up to one year following exposure. The current report reviews the data relevant to the degree to which these characteristics are common to neurochemical and behavioral endpoints that are mediated by the effects of exposure to heavy particles on CNS activity.

  14. Heavy particle irradiation, neurochemistry and behavior: thresholds, dose- response curves and recovery of function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabin, B.; Joseph, J.; Shukitt-Hale, B.

    Exposure to heavy particles can affect the functioning of the central nervous system (CNS), particularly the dopaminergic system. In turn, the radiation- induced disruption of dopaminergic function disrupts a variety of behaviors that are dependent upon the integrity of the dopaminergic system, including motor behavior (upper body strength), amphetamine (dopamine)-mediated taste aversion learning, spatial learning and memory (Morris water maze), and operant conditioning (fixed-ratio bar pressing). Although the relationships between heavy particle irradiation and the effects of exposure depend, to some extent, upon the specific behavioral or neurochemical endpoint under consideration, a review of the available research leads to the hypothesis that the endpoints mediated by the CNS have certain characteristics in common. These include: (1) a threshold, below which there is no apparent effect; (2) the lack of a dose-response relationship, or an extremely steep dose-response curve, depending on the particular endpoint; and (3) the absence of recovery of function, such that the heavy particle-induced behavioral and neural changes are present when tested up to one year following exposure. The current presentation will review the data relevant to the degree to which these characteristics are in fact common to neurochemical and behavioral endpoints that are mediated by the effects of exposure to heavy particles on CNS activity. Supported by N.A.S.A. Grant NAG9-1190.

  15. Heavy particle irradiation, neurochemistry and behavior: thresholds, dose-response curves and recovery of function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabin, B. M.; Joseph, J. A.; Shukitt-Hale, B.

    2004-01-01

    Exposure to heavy particles can affect the functioning of the central nervous system (CNS), particularly the dopaminergic system. In turn, the radiation-induced disruption of dopaminergic function affects a variety of behaviors that are dependent upon the integrity of this system, including motor behavior (upper body strength), amphetamine (dopamine)-mediated taste aversion learning, and operant conditioning (fixed-ratio bar pressing). Although the relationships between heavy particle irradiation and the effects of exposure depend, to some extent, upon the specific behavioral or neurochemical endpoint under consideration, a review of the available research leads to the hypothesis that the endpoints mediated by the CNS have certain characteristics in common. These include: (1) a threshold, below which there is no apparent effect; (2) the lack of a dose-response relationship, or an extremely steep dose-response curve, depending on the particular endpoint; and (3) the absence of recovery of function, such that the heavy particle-induced behavioral and neural changes are present when tested up to one year following exposure. The current report reviews the data relevant to the degree to which these characteristics are common to neurochemical and behavioral endpoints that are mediated by the effects of exposure to heavy particles on CNS activity. c2004 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Heavy particle irradiation, neurochemistry and behavior: thresholds, dose-response curves and recovery of function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabin, B. M.; Joseph, J. A.; Shukitt-Hale, B.

    2004-01-01

    Exposure to heavy particles can affect the functioning of the central nervous system (CNS), particularly the dopaminergic system. In turn, the radiation-induced disruption of dopaminergic function affects a variety of behaviors that are dependent upon the integrity of this system, including motor behavior (upper body strength), amphetamine (dopamine)-mediated taste aversion learning, and operant conditioning (fixed-ratio bar pressing). Although the relationships between heavy particle irradiation and the effects of exposure depend, to some extent, upon the specific behavioral or neurochemical endpoint under consideration, a review of the available research leads to the hypothesis that the endpoints mediated by the CNS have certain characteristics in common. These include: (1) a threshold, below which there is no apparent effect; (2) the lack of a dose-response relationship, or an extremely steep dose-response curve, depending on the particular endpoint; and (3) the absence of recovery of function, such that the heavy particle-induced behavioral and neural changes are present when tested up to one year following exposure. The current report reviews the data relevant to the degree to which these characteristics are common to neurochemical and behavioral endpoints that are mediated by the effects of exposure to heavy particles on CNS activity. c2004 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Convolution effect on TCR log response curve and the correction method for it

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Q.; Liu, L. J.; Gao, J.

    2016-09-01

    Through-casing resistivity (TCR) logging has been successfully used in production wells for the dynamic monitoring of oil pools and the distribution of the residual oil, but its vertical resolution has limited its efficiency in identification of thin beds. The vertical resolution is limited by the distortion phenomenon of vertical response of TCR logging. The distortion phenomenon was studied in this work. It was found that the vertical response curve of TCR logging is the convolution of the true formation resistivity and the convolution function of TCR logging tool. Due to the effect of convolution, the measurement error at thin beds can reach 30% or even bigger. Thus the information of thin bed might be covered up very likely. The convolution function of TCR logging tool was obtained in both continuous and discrete way in this work. Through modified Lyle-Kalman deconvolution method, the true formation resistivity can be optimally estimated, so this inverse algorithm can correct the error caused by the convolution effect. Thus it can improve the vertical resolution of TCR logging tool for identification of thin beds.

  18. Resting and active motor thresholds versus stimulus–response curves to determine transcranial magnetic stimulation intensity in quadriceps femoris

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a widely-used investigative technique in motor cortical evaluation. Recently, there has been a surge in TMS studies evaluating lower-limb fatigue. TMS intensity of 120-130% resting motor threshold (RMT) and 120% active motor threshold (AMT) and TMS intensity determined using stimulus–response curves during muscular contraction have been used in these studies. With the expansion of fatigue research in locomotion, the quadriceps femoris is increasingly of interest. It is important to select a stimulus intensity appropriate to evaluate the variables, including voluntary activation, being measured in this functionally important muscle group. This study assessed whether selected quadriceps TMS stimulus intensity determined by frequently employed methods is similar between methods and muscles. Methods Stimulus intensity in vastus lateralis, rectus femoris and vastus medialis muscles was determined by RMT, AMT (i.e. during brief voluntary contractions at 10% maximal voluntary force, MVC) and maximal motor-evoked potential (MEP) amplitude from stimulus–response curves during brief voluntary contractions at 10, 20 and 50% MVC at different stimulus intensities. Results Stimulus intensity determined from a 10% MVC stimulus–response curve and at 120 and 130% RMT was higher than stimulus intensity at 120% AMT (lowest) and from a 50% MVC stimulus–response curve (p < 0.05). Stimulus intensity from a 20% MVC stimulus–response curve was similar to 120% RMT and 50% MVC stimulus–response curve. Mean stimulus intensity for stimulus–response curves at 10, 20 and 50% MVC corresponded to approximately 135, 115 and 100% RMT and 180, 155 and 130% AMT, respectively. Selected stimulus intensity was similar between muscles for all methods (p > 0.05). Conclusions Similar optimal stimulus intensity and maximal MEP amplitudes at 20 and 50% MVC and the minimal risk of residual fatigue at 20% MVC suggest that a 20% MVC

  19. Making Sense of Shape: An Analysis of Children's Written Responses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walcott, Crystal; Mohr, Doris; Kastberg, Signe E.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we examine a large set of student responses to a constructed-response geometry item on the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) administered in 1992 and 1996. The item asks students to name the similarities and differences between a parallelogram and a rectangle of equal area presented side by side on a grid. Through…

  20. Framing Obesity: How News Frames Shape Attributions and Behavioral Responses.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ye; Krakow, Melinda; John, Kevin K; Liu, Miao; Weaver, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    Based on a public health model of obesity, this study set out to examine whether a news article reporting the obesity issue in a societal versus individual frame would increase perceptions of societal responsibilities for the obesity problem and motivate responsibility-taking behaviors. Responsibility-taking behaviors were examined at 3 levels: personal, interpersonal, and societal. Data from a Web-based experiment revealed significant framing effects on behaviors via causal and treatment responsibility attributions. The societal frame increased societal causal and treatment attribution, which led to greater likelihoods of interpersonal and social responsibility-taking behaviors as well as personal behaviors. Our findings suggest that news framing can be an effective venue for raising awareness of obesity as a societal issue and mobilizing collective efforts.

  1. Steepness of the radiation dose-response curve for dose-per-fraction escalation keeping the number of fractions fixed.

    PubMed

    Bentzen, Søren M

    2005-01-01

    Clinically, there is growing interest in strategies for intensifying radiation therapy by escalating the dose per fraction. This paper considers the steepness of the dose-response curve in this case. The steepness of a radiation dose-response curve is most conveniently quantified by the normalized dose-response gradient, gamma. Under the assumption of a linear-quadratic dose-effect model, a simple analytical relationship is derived between the gamma-value for a dose-response curve generated by varying the total dose while keeping the number of fractions constant, i.e. escalating the dose per fraction, and the gamma-value for a dose-response curve generated by varying the total dose while keeping the dose per fraction constant. This formulation is compared with clinical dose-response data from the literature and shown to be in good agreement with the observations. Some implications of this formulation for non-uniform dose distributions delivered using 3D conformal radiotherapy or intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) are briefly discussed.

  2. Pyrene-Bridged Boron Subphthalocyanine Dimers: Combination of Planar and Bowl-Shaped π-Conjugated Systems for Creating Uniquely Curved π-Conjugated Systems.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Shota; Kage, Yuto; Furuta, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Nagao; Shimizu, Soji

    2016-06-01

    Pyrene-bridged boron subphthalocyanine dimers were synthesized from a mixed-condensation reaction of 2,7-di-tert-butyl-4,5,9,10-tetracyanopyrene and tetrafluorophthalonitrile, and their syn and anti isomers arising from the result of connecting two bowl-shaped boron subphthalocyanine molecules were successfully separated. Expansion of the conjugated system of boron subphthalocyanine through a pyrene bridge caused a redshift of the Q band absorption relative to the parent pyrene-fused monomer, whereas combining the curved π-conjugation of boron subphthalocyanine with the planar π-conjugation of pyrene enabled facile embracement of C60 molecules, owing to the enhanced concave-convex π-π stacking interactions. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Variation of the relaxographic "shutter-speed" for transcytolemmal water exchange affects the CR bolus-tracking curve shape.

    PubMed

    Yankeelov, Thomas E; Rooney, William D; Li, Xin; Springer, Charles S

    2003-12-01

    Contrast reagents (CRs) may enter the tissue interstitium for a period after a vascular bolus injection. As the amount of interstitial CR increases, the longitudinal relaxographic NMR "shutter-speed" (T(-1)) for the equilibrium transcytolemmal water exchange process increases. The quantity T(-1) is given by |r(1o)[CR(o)] + R(1o0) - R(1i)| (where r(1o) and [CR(o)] represent the interstitial (extracellular) CR relaxivity and concentration, respectively, and R(1o0) and R(1i) are the extra- and intracellular (1)H(2)O relaxation rate constants, respectively, in the absence of exchange). The increase of T(-1) with [CR(o)] causes the kinetics of the water exchange equilibrium to appear to decrease. Here, analytical theory for two-site-exchange processes is combined with that for pharmacokinetic CR delivery, extraction, and distribution in a method termed BOLus Enhanced Relaxation Overview (BOLERO(Copyright )). The shutter-speed effect alters the shape of the bolus-tracking (B-T) time-course. It is shown that this is mostly accounted for by the inclusion of only one additional parameter, which measures the mean intracellular lifetime of a water molecule. Simulated and real data demonstrate that the effect of shutter-speed variation on pharmacokinetic parameters can be very significant: neglecting this effect can lead to an underestimation of the parameter values by 50%. This phenomenon can be heterogeneous. Within a tiny gliosarcoma implanted in the rat brain, the interstitial CR in the tumor core never rises to a level sufficient to cause apparent slowing of the exchange process. However, within the few microns needed to reach the proliferating rim, this occurs to a significant degree. Thus, even relative pharmacokinetic quantities can be incorrectly represented in a parametric map that neglects this effect. The BOLERO analysis shows promise for in vivo vascular phenotyping in pathophysiology. It also includes a provision for approximating the separation of the perfusion

  4. Modeling of thermomechanical response of porous shape memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagoudas, Dimitris C.; Entchev, Pavlin B.; Vandygriff, Eric L.; Qidwai, Muhammad A.; DeGiorgi, Virginia G.

    2000-06-01

    Shape memory alloys (SMAs) have emerged as a class of materials with unique thermal and mechanical properties that have found numerous applications in various engineering areas. While the shape memory and pseudoelasticity effects have been extensively studied, only a few studies have been done on the high capacity of energy dissipation of SMAs. Because of this property, SMAs hold the promise of making high-efficiency damping devices that are superior to those made of conventional materials. In addition to the energy absorption capability of the dense SMA material, porous SMAs offer the possibility of higher specific damping capacity under dynamic loading conditions, du to scattering of waves. Porous SMAs also offer the possibility of impedance matching by grading the porosity at connecting joints with other structural materials. As a first step, the focus of this work, is on establishing the static properties of porous SMA material. To accomplish this, a micromechanics-based analysis of the overall behavior of porous SMA is carried out. The porous SMA is modeled as a composite with SMA matrix, which is modeled using an incremental formulation, and pores as inhomogeneities of zero stiffness. The macroscopic constitutive behavior of the effective medium is established using the incremental More-Tanaka averaging method for a random distribution of pores, and a FEM analysis of a unit cell for a periodic arrangement of pores. Results form both analyses are compared under various loading conditions.

  5. The response of spit shapes to wave-angle climates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ashton, A.D.; Murray, A.B.; Littlewood, R.

    2007-01-01

    We investigate spit formation and evolution in light of the high-wave-angle instability in shoreline shape arising from a maximizing angle for wave-driven alongshore sediment transport. Single spits emerge in a simple one-contour line numerical model that evolves the coast using morphodynamic feedbacks and a 'climate' of waves approaching the shore from variable directions. Analysis of sediment transport and shoreline stability metrics illustrate how spits can be generated, demonstrating how waves from all angles can play a role in spit formation and evolution. Simulations suggest that regardless of whether high- or low-angle waves dominate relative to the general shoreline trend, as spits extend offshore, they tend to orient themselves such that most of their coast barely experiences low-angle waves and alongshore sediment transport to the spit end is maximized. This 'graded' spit shape minimizes gradients in sediment flux, while the recurve at the spit end experiences larger gradients and a region of high-angle instability. Examining hindcast wave data, similar trends are seen along the natural example of Long Point, Lake Erie, Canada. ?? 2007 ASCE.

  6. Functionally grading the shape memory response in NiTi films: Laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Birnbaum, A. J.; Satoh, G.; Yao, Y. L.

    2009-08-15

    A new process and mechanism are presented for controlling the shape memory response spatially within monolithic NiTi thin film structures. This technique is shown to effectively control the martensitic phase transformation temperature and exhibits control over aspects of the mechanical and shape memory responses as well. Specifically, the martensitic phase transformation temperature decreases with incident laser energy density. Concomitant modifications are observed in both the mechanical and shape memory responses in laser processed films. Analysis and characterization are performed via temperature controlled optical microscopy, x-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, and nanoindentation.

  7. Dose-response curve slope helps predict therapeutic potency and breadth of HIV broadly neutralizing antibodies.

    PubMed

    Webb, Nicholas E; Montefiori, David C; Lee, Benhur

    2015-09-29

    A new generation of HIV broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) with remarkable potency, breadth and epitope diversity has rejuvenated interest in immunotherapeutic strategies. Potencies defined by in vitro IC50 and IC80 values (50 and 80% inhibitory concentrations) figure prominently into the selection of clinical candidates; however, much higher therapeutic levels will be required to reduce multiple logs of virus and impede escape. Here we predict bnAb potency at therapeutic levels by analysing dose-response curve slopes, and show that slope is independent of IC50/IC80 and specifically relates to bnAb epitope class. With few exceptions, CD4-binding site and V3-glycan bnAbs exhibit slopes >1, indicative of higher expected therapeutic effectiveness, whereas V2-glycan, gp41 membrane-proximal external region (MPER) and gp120-gp41 bnAbs exhibit less favourable slopes <1. Our results indicate that slope is one major predictor of both potency and breadth for bnAbs at clinically relevant concentrations, and may better coordinate the relationship between bnAb epitope structure and therapeutic expectations.

  8. Multidimensional representations of the phase response curve for both type 1 and type 2 membrane excitability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raidt, Robert; Smith, Andrew J.; Oprisan, Sorinel A.

    2012-02-01

    Neurons are complex excitable cells with a highly nonlinear response to external perturbations, such as presynaptic inputs and biological noise. Single-cell activity is determined by the properties of ionic channels and the ionic makeup of cell's environment and is mathematically described by coupled and nonlinear evolution equations. The phase resetting curve (PRC) reduces the complexity of the biophysical mechanisms involved in generating action potentials to tabulating advances or delays of subsequent spikes of a neuron due to an external perturbation. The PRC is widely used to predict the activity of large neural networks that by replacing the computationally intensive integration of evolution equations with lookup tables. The fundamental assumption of the PRC approach in predicting phase-locked modes in coupled neural networks is that the transient PRC measured for isolated and bursting neurons (open-loop) remains the same under the recurrent inputs of a phase-locked mode (close-loop). The novelties of our approach are: 1) the use of discrete sine transforms (DST's) to store the PRC's as a series of coefficients, and 2) the use of multidimensional stacks to represent multidimensional objects.

  9. An interactive computer program for randomization analysis of response curves with facilities for multiple comparisons.

    PubMed

    Tan, E S; Roos, J M; Volovics, A; Van Baak, M A; Does, R J

    1992-04-01

    An interactive Fortran program, MUCRA, is presented. The program can perform randomization analysis of a completely randomized or randomized-blocks design extended to growth and response curves. A single-step Scheffé-type procedure as well as the Peritz's closed step-down procedure have been implemented which control the familywise type I error-rate. In general, MUCRA is suitable as a computer tool for a distribution-free analysis of variance with repeated measures. The use of MUCRA is demonstrated by analyzing the effects oxprenolol and atenolol have on exercise heart rate. Oxprenolol is a non-selective beta-blocker with moderate intrinsic sympathomimetic activity (ISA), given by the Oros delivery system. Atenolol is a beta 1-selective blocker without ISA. A randomized placebo-controlled crossover design was used to compare the effects of the beta 1-blockers on heart rate during a progressive maximal exercise test on a bicycle ergometer. Application of the Scheffé-type procedure showed that the two drugs significantly (alpha = .05) reduce the heart rate during the exercise test at the three prechosen times (2, 5, and 24 hr) after intake. The reduction from atenolol is more pronounced than from oxprenolol Oros at 2 and 5 hr.

  10. [Dose-response curve in the study of the effects of exposure to crystalline silica].

    PubMed

    Di Lorenzo, L; Cassano, F

    2003-01-01

    The cumulative exposure to crystalline silica (SiO2) implies a linear relation between duration of exposure and SiO2 concentration, not always suitable to working situations of the last decades. A more correct definition of dose-response curve has currently to consider also different characteristics of SiO2, specifically: possible short-term increases in environmental SiO2 concentration, different mineralogical and surface properties of natural silica polymorphs, age of SiO2 particles, presence of contaminants on the surface of silica particles or even in the respirable fraction of total dust, respirable dust concentration in which SiO2 is diluted and other conditions, also affecting the host, able to slow alveolar clearance and lengthen permanence time of particles in the lung. Many models of definition of cumulative exposure so conceived have been proposed. However, to define the occupational risk threshold to contract silicosis and other silica-related diseases a number of models of cumulative exposure, i.e. biologically effective dose of SiO2, are likely to be delineated that take into account only factors specifically present in different occupational situations.

  11. Reliable estimation of biochemical parameters from C3 leaf photosynthesis-intercellular carbon dioxide response curves

    SciTech Connect

    Wullschleger, Stan D; Gu, Lianhong; Pallardy, Stephen G.; Tu, Kevin; Law, Beverly E.

    2010-01-01

    The Farquhar-von Caemmerer-Berry (FvCB) model of photosynthesis is a change-point model and structurally overparameterized for interpreting the response of leaf net assimilation (A) to intercellular CO{sub 2} concentration (Ci). The use of conventional fitting methods may lead not only to incorrect parameters but also several previously unrecognized consequences. For example, the relationships between key parameters may be fixed computationally and certain fits may be produced in which the estimated parameters result in contradictory identification of the limitation states of the data. Here we describe a new approach that is better suited to the FvCB model characteristics. It consists of four main steps: (1) enumeration of all possible distributions of limitation states; (2) fitting the FvCB model to each limitation state distribution by minimizing a distribution-wise cost function that has desirable properties for parameter estimation; (3) identification and correction of inadmissible fits; and (4) selection of the best fit from all possible limitation state distributions. The new approach implemented theoretical parameter resolvability with numerical procedures that maximally use the information content of the data. It was tested with model simulations, sampled A/Ci curves, and chlorophyll fluorescence measurements of different tree species. The new approach is accessible through the automated website leafweb.ornl.gov.

  12. Can we predict ectotherm responses to climate change using thermal performance curves and body temperatures?

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Brent J; Marshall, Katie E; Sewell, Mary A; Levesque, Danielle L; Willett, Christopher S; Slotsbo, Stine; Dong, Yunwei; Harley, Christopher D G; Marshall, David J; Helmuth, Brian S; Huey, Raymond B

    2016-11-01

    Thermal performance curves (TPCs), which quantify how an ectotherm's body temperature (Tb ) affects its performance or fitness, are often used in an attempt to predict organismal responses to climate change. Here, we examine the key - but often biologically unreasonable - assumptions underlying this approach; for example, that physiology and thermal regimes are invariant over ontogeny, space and time, and also that TPCs are independent of previously experienced Tb. We show how a critical consideration of these assumptions can lead to biologically useful hypotheses and experimental designs. For example, rather than assuming that TPCs are fixed during ontogeny, one can measure TPCs for each major life stage and incorporate these into stage-specific ecological models to reveal the life stage most likely to be vulnerable to climate change. Our overall goal is to explicitly examine the assumptions underlying the integration of TPCs with Tb , to develop a framework within which empiricists can place their work within these limitations, and to facilitate the application of thermal physiology to understanding the biological implications of climate change. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  13. Anticipated synchronization in neuronal circuits unveiled by a phase-response-curve analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matias, Fernanda S.; Carelli, Pedro V.; Mirasso, Claudio R.; Copelli, Mauro

    2017-05-01

    Anticipated synchronization (AS) is a counterintuitive behavior that has been observed in several systems. When AS occurs in a sender-receiver configuration, the latter can predict the future dynamics of the former for certain parameter values. In particular, in neuroscience AS was proposed to explain the apparent discrepancy between information flow and time lag in the cortical activity recorded in monkeys. Despite its success, a clear understanding of the mechanisms yielding AS in neuronal circuits is still missing. Here we use the well-known phase-response-curve (PRC) approach to study the prototypical sender-receiver-interneuron neuronal motif. Our aim is to better understand how the transitions between delayed to anticipated synchronization and anticipated synchronization to phase-drift regimes occur. We construct a map based on the PRC method to predict the phase-locking regimes and their stability. We find that a PRC function of two variables, accounting simultaneously for the inputs from sender and interneuron into the receiver, is essential to reproduce the numerical results obtained using a Hodgkin-Huxley model for the neurons. On the contrary, the typical approximation that considers a sum of two independent single-variable PRCs fails for intermediate to high values of the inhibitory coupling strength of the interneuron. In particular, it loses the delayed-synchronization to anticipated-synchronization transition.

  14. [Light response curve of dominant tree species photosynthesis in broadleaved Korean pine forest of Changbai mountain].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mi; Wu, Jiabing; Guan, Dexin; Shi, Tingting; Chen, Pengshi; Ji, Ruipeng

    2006-09-01

    Based on the measurements of leaf photosynthesis, the light response curves of Pinus koraiensis, Tilia amurensis, Quercus mongolica and Fraxinus mandshurica photosynthesis in broadleaved Korean pine forest of Changbai Mountains were fitted with rectangle and non-rectangle hyperbolae. The results showed that rectangle hyperbola was simpler for fitting, while non-rectangle hyperbola was more reasomable because of its fitted results better matched physiological meanings. The values of intrinsic quantum efficiency for CO2 uptake (alpha), light-saturated net photosynthetic rate (Pmax), and dark respiration rate (Rd) of the four tree species were higher when fitted with rectangle hyperbola than with non-rectangle hyperbola, while that of light compensation point (Lcp) varied with tree species. The values of alpha and Rd obtained from the two hyperholae had the same sequences, i.e., F. mandshurica > T. amurensis > Q. mongolica > P. koraiensis for alpha, and F. mandshurica > Q. mongolica > T. amurensis > P. koraiensis for Rd, but for Pmax and Lcp, the sequences were not the same.

  15. Hydrothermal fabrication of octahedral-shaped Fe3O4 nanoparticles and their magnetorheological response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, H. S.; Choi, H. J.

    2015-05-01

    Octahedral-shaped Fe3O4 nanoparticles were synthesized in the presence of 1,3-diaminopropane using a hydrothermal method and assessed as a potential magnetorheological (MR) material. Their morphology, crystal structure, and magnetic properties were examined by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and vibrating sample magnetometry, respectively. The MR characteristics of the octahedral-shaped, Fe3O4 nanoparticle-based MR particles when dispersed in silicone oil with a 10 vol. % particle concentration were examined using a rotational rheometer under an external magnetic field. The resulting MR fluids exhibited a Bingham-like behavior with a distinctive yield stress from their flow curves.

  16. Constrained Ordination Analysis with Enrichment of Bell-Shaped Response Functions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yingjie; Thas, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Constrained ordination methods aims at finding an environmental gradient along which the species abundances are maximally separated. The species response functions, which describe the expected abundance as a function of the environmental score, are according to the ecological fundamental niche theory only meaningful if they are bell-shaped. Many classical model-based ordination methods, however, use quadratic regression models without imposing the bell-shape and thus allowing for meaningless U-shaped response functions. The analysis output (e.g. a biplot) may therefore be potentially misleading and the conclusions are prone to errors. In this paper we present a log-likelihood ratio criterion with a penalisation term to enforce more bell-shaped response shapes. We report the results of a simulation study and apply our method to metagenomics data from microbial ecology.

  17. The experimental cascade curves of EAS at E sub 0 10(17) eV obtained by the method of detection of Cherenkov pulse shape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fomin, Y. A.; Kalmykov, G. B.; Khristiansen, M. V.; Motova, M. V.; Nechin, Y. A.; Prosin, V. V.; Zhukov, V. Y.; Efimov, N. N.; Grigoriev, V. M.; Nikiforova, E. S.

    1985-01-01

    The individual cascade curves of EAS with E sub 0 10 to the 17th power eV/I to 3/ were studied by detection of EAS Cherenkov light pulses. The scintillators located at the center of the Yakutsk EAS array within a 500-m radius circle were used to select the showers and to determine the main EAS parameters. The individual cascade curves N(t) were obtained using the EAS Cherenkov light pulses satisfying the following requirements: (1) the signal-to-noise ratio fm/delta sub n 15, (2) the EAS axis-detector distance tau sub 350 m, (3) the zenith angle theta 30 deg, (4) the probability for EAS to be detected by scintillators W 0.8. Condition (1) arises from the desire to reduce the amplitude distortion of Cherenkov pulses due to noise and determines the range of EAS sizes, N(t). The resolution times of the Cherenkov pulse shape detectors are tau sub 0 approx. 23 ns which results in distortion of a pulse during the process of the detection. The distortion of pulses due to the finiteness of tau sub 0 value was estimated. It is shown that the rise time of pulse becomes greater as tau sub 0.5/tau sub 0 ratio decreases.

  18. Analysis of thrust shear zones in curve-shaped belts: Deformation mode and timing of the Olevano-Antrodoco-Sibillini thrust (Central/Northern Apennines of Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calamita, F.; Satolli, S.; Turtù, A.

    2012-11-01

    This work reports the results of our analysis of the brittle-ductile shear zone associated with the Olevano-Antrodoco-Sibillini (OAS) curved-shape thrust in the Central/Northern Apennines of Italy. Its southern sector is characterized by NNW-SSE trending footwall anticlines, which also affect the OAS thrust surface. S tectonites in the NNE-SSW trending sector are crenulated by conjugate extensional surfaces (extensional crenulation cleavage). The NW-SE trending segment of the OAS thrust is characterized by SC tectonites developed along the thrust-related shear zone. Both the SC and S tectonites are consistent with a top-to-the N60-70°E direction of tectonic transport. The SC tectonites are associated with a simple-shear-dominated deformation (Wn = 0.86-0.98). On the other hand, the S tectonites and their related extensional shear planes document two stages of strain: (i) sub-simple shear (Wn = 0.34-0.50, related to OAS thrusting contemporaneous to growing incipient footwall anticlines, and (ii) pure-shear-dominated deformation (Wn = 0.17-0.00), subsequent to the OAS thrusting and caused by the definitive growth of footwall anticlines within an in-sequence deformation context. The present study proposes the analysis of shear zones to: (i) discriminate in-sequence against out-of-sequence evolution, and (ii) use as a tool to constrain the modes and timing of the curved belt's development.

  19. Mechanism Underlying Time-dependent Cross-phenomenon between Concentration-response Curves and Concentration Addition Curves: A Case Study of Sulfonamides-Erythromycin mixtures on Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Haoyu; Ge, Hongming; Zheng, Min; Lin, Zhifen; Liu, Ying

    2016-09-01

    Previous studies have identified a phenomenon in which the concentration-response curves (CRCs) for mixtures cross the curves for concentration addition model when predicting or judging joint toxic actions. However, mechanistic investigations of this phenomenon are extremely limited. In this study, a similar phenomenon was observed when we determined the joint toxic actions of sulfonamides (SAs) and erythromycin (ERY) on Escherichia coli (E. coli), which we named the “cross-phenomenon”, and it was characterized by antagonism in the low-concentration range, addition in the medium-concentration range, and synergism in the high-concentration range. The mechanistic investigation of the cross-phenomenon was as follows: SAs and ERY could form a double block to inhibit the bacterial growth by exhibiting a synergistic effect; however, the hormetic effect of SAs on E. coli led to antagonism in the low-concentration range, resulting from the stimulation of sdiA mRNA expression by SAs, which increased the expression of the efflux pump (AcrAB-TolC) to discharge ERY. Furthermore, this cross-phenomenon was observed to be a time-dependent process induced by the increase of both the concentration and extent of stimulation of sdiA mRNA with exposure time. This work explains the dose-dependent and time-dependent cross-phenomenon and provides evidence regarding the interaction between hormesis and cross-phenomenon.

  20. Mechanism Underlying Time-dependent Cross-phenomenon between Concentration-response Curves and Concentration Addition Curves: A Case Study of Sulfonamides-Erythromycin mixtures on Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Haoyu; Ge, Hongming; Zheng, Min; Lin, Zhifen; Liu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have identified a phenomenon in which the concentration-response curves (CRCs) for mixtures cross the curves for concentration addition model when predicting or judging joint toxic actions. However, mechanistic investigations of this phenomenon are extremely limited. In this study, a similar phenomenon was observed when we determined the joint toxic actions of sulfonamides (SAs) and erythromycin (ERY) on Escherichia coli (E. coli), which we named the “cross-phenomenon”, and it was characterized by antagonism in the low-concentration range, addition in the medium-concentration range, and synergism in the high-concentration range. The mechanistic investigation of the cross-phenomenon was as follows: SAs and ERY could form a double block to inhibit the bacterial growth by exhibiting a synergistic effect; however, the hormetic effect of SAs on E. coli led to antagonism in the low-concentration range, resulting from the stimulation of sdiA mRNA expression by SAs, which increased the expression of the efflux pump (AcrAB-TolC) to discharge ERY. Furthermore, this cross-phenomenon was observed to be a time-dependent process induced by the increase of both the concentration and extent of stimulation of sdiA mRNA with exposure time. This work explains the dose-dependent and time-dependent cross-phenomenon and provides evidence regarding the interaction between hormesis and cross-phenomenon. PMID:27644411

  1. Genetic variances, heritabilities and maternal effects on body weight, breast meat yield, meat quality traits and the shape of the growth curve in turkey birds

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Turkey is an important agricultural species and is largely used as a meat bird. In 2004, turkey represented 6.5% of the world poultry meat production. The world-wide turkey population has rapidly grown due to increased commercial farming. Due to the high demand for turkey meat from both consumers and industry global turkey stocks increased from 100 million in 1970 to over 276 million in 2004. This rapidly increasing importance of turkeys was a reason to design this study for the estimation of genetic parameters that control body weight, body composition, meat quality traits and parameters that shape the growth curve in turkey birds. Results The average heritability estimate for body weight traits was 0.38, except for early weights that were strongly affected by maternal effects. This study showed that body weight traits, upper asymptote (a growth curve trait), percent breast meat and redness of meat had high heritability whereas heritabilities of breast length, breast width, percent drip loss, ultimate pH, lightness and yellowness of meat were medium to low. We found high positive genetic and phenotypic correlations between body weight, upper asymptote, most breast meat yield traits and percent drip loss but percent drip loss was found strongly negatively correlated with ultimate pH. Percent breast meat, however, showed genetic correlations close to zero with body weight traits and upper asymptote. Conclusion The results of this analysis and the growth curve from the studied population of turkey birds suggest that the turkey birds could be selected for breeding between 60 and 80 days of age in order to improve overall production and the production of desirable cuts of meat. The continuous selection of birds within this age range could promote high growth rates but specific attention to meat quality would be needed to avoid a negative impact on the quality of meat. PMID:21266032

  2. Construction of dose response calibration curves for dicentrics and micronuclei for X radiation in a Serbian population.

    PubMed

    Pajic, J; Rakic, B; Jovicic, D; Milovanovic, A

    2014-10-01

    Biological dosimetry using chromosome damage biomarkers is a valuable dose assessment method in cases of radiation overexposure with or without physical dosimetry data. In order to estimate dose by biodosimetry, any biological dosimetry service have to have its own dose response calibration curve. This paper reveals the results obtained after irradiation of blood samples from fourteen healthy male and female volunteers in order to establish biodosimetry in Serbia and produce dose response calibration curves for dicentrics and micronuclei. Taking into account pooled data from all the donors, the resultant fitted curve for dicentrics is: Ydic=0.0009 (±0.0003)+0.0421 (±0.0042)×D+0.0602 (±0.0022)×D(2); and for micronuclei: Ymn=0.0104 (±0.0015)+0.0824 (±0.0050)×D+0.0189 (±0.0017)×D(2). Following establishment of the dose response curve, a validation experiment was carried out with four blood samples. Applied and estimated doses were in good agreement. On this basis, the results reported here give us confidence to apply both calibration curves for future biological dosimetry requirements in Serbia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Lateral-torsional response of base-isolated buildings with curved surface sliding system subjected to near-fault earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazza, Fabio

    2017-08-01

    The curved surface sliding (CSS) system is one of the most in-demand techniques for the seismic isolation of buildings; yet there are still important aspects of its behaviour that need further attention. The CSS system presents variation of friction coefficient, depending on the sliding velocity of the CSS bearings, while friction force and lateral stiffness during the sliding phase are proportional to the axial load. Lateral-torsional response needs to be better understood for base-isolated structures located in near-fault areas, where fling-step and forward-directivity effects can produce long-period (horizontal) velocity pulses. To analyse these aspects, a six-storey reinforced concrete (r.c.) office framed building, with an L-shaped plan and setbacks in elevation, is designed assuming three values of the radius of curvature for the CSS system. Seven in-plan distributions of dynamic-fast friction coefficient for the CSS bearings, ranging from a constant value for all isolators to a different value for each, are considered in the case of low- and medium-type friction properties. The seismic analysis of the test structures is carried out considering an elastic-linear behaviour of the superstructure, while a nonlinear force-displacement law of the CSS bearings is considered in the horizontal direction, depending on sliding velocity and axial load. Given the lack of knowledge of the horizontal direction at which near-fault ground motions occur, the maximum torsional effects and residual displacements are evaluated with reference to different incidence angles, while the orientation of the strongest observed pulses is considered to obtain average values.

  4. Thermomechanical responses of nonlinear torsional vibration with NiTi shape memory alloy - Alternative stable states and their jumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Minglu; Sun, Qingping

    2017-05-01

    The dynamic response of nonlinear torsional vibration system with phase transformable NiTi Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) wire is investigated by experiment in this paper. The thermomechanical responses of the NiTi wire as a softening nonlinear damping spring in the torsional vibration system are measured by synchronized acquisition of rotational angle and temperature under external excitation. Frequency Response Curves (FRCs) at fixed excitation amplitude and Amplitude Response Curves (ARCs) at fixed frequency are obtained in the frequency and amplitude domains respectively. It is found that, as the deformation of NiTi wire goes into the softening nonlinear phase transition region, the smooth and stable dynamic responses along one branch of FRC or ARC will gradually enter into metastable region and eventually become unstable and drastically switch to a new contrasting alternative stable state along the other branch. The jump phenomenon between the alternative stable states on the lower and upper branches of the FRC or ARC and the hysteresis between the jump-up and jump-down are identified by experiments. In addition, the effects of external disturbance (both magnitude and direction) on triggering the jumps between the alternative stable states along the two metastable branches are examined in the time domain. The stability of the nonlinear dynamic response is analyzed by the Duffing oscillator model and interpreted via the stability landscape. For the first time, we directly reveal the alternative stable states and jump phenomena of thermomechanical responses by experiments in the frequency, amplitude and time domains. The results not only show the important roles of phase transition nonlinearity in bringing multiple equilibrium states and their fast switches, but also provide a solid experimental base for the identification of metastable regions as well as further management of the undesired dynamic responses of vibration system where NiTi is used as a nonlinear

  5. A dose-response curve for biodosimetry from a 6 MV electron linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Lemos-Pinto, M M P; Cadena, M; Santos, N; Fernandes, T S; Borges, E; Amaral, A

    2015-05-26

    Biological dosimetry (biodosimetry) is based on the investigation of radiation-induced biological effects (biomarkers), mainly dicentric chromosomes, in order to correlate them with radiation dose. To interpret the dicentric score in terms of absorbed dose, a calibration curve is needed. Each curve should be constructed with respect to basic physical parameters, such as the type of ionizing radiation characterized by low or high linear energy transfer (LET) and dose rate. This study was designed to obtain dose calibration curves by scoring of dicentric chromosomes in peripheral blood lymphocytes irradiated in vitro with a 6 MV electron linear accelerator (Mevatron M, Siemens, USA). Two software programs, CABAS (Chromosomal Aberration Calculation Software) and Dose Estimate, were used to generate the curve. The two software programs are discussed; the results obtained were compared with each other and with other published low LET radiation curves. Both software programs resulted in identical linear and quadratic terms for the curve presented here, which was in good agreement with published curves for similar radiation quality and dose rates.

  6. A dose-response curve for biodosimetry from a 6 MV electron linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Lemos-Pinto, M M P; Cadena, M; Santos, N; Fernandes, T S; Borges, E; Amaral, A

    2015-10-01

    Biological dosimetry (biodosimetry) is based on the investigation of radiation-induced biological effects (biomarkers), mainly dicentric chromosomes, in order to correlate them with radiation dose. To interpret the dicentric score in terms of absorbed dose, a calibration curve is needed. Each curve should be constructed with respect to basic physical parameters, such as the type of ionizing radiation characterized by low or high linear energy transfer (LET) and dose rate. This study was designed to obtain dose calibration curves by scoring of dicentric chromosomes in peripheral blood lymphocytes irradiated in vitro with a 6 MV electron linear accelerator (Mevatron M, Siemens, USA). Two software programs, CABAS (Chromosomal Aberration Calculation Software) and Dose Estimate, were used to generate the curve. The two software programs are discussed; the results obtained were compared with each other and with other published low LET radiation curves. Both software programs resulted in identical linear and quadratic terms for the curve presented here, which was in good agreement with published curves for similar radiation quality and dose rates.

  7. Culture Shapes Empathic Responses to Physical and Social Pain

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The present research investigates the extent to which cultural background moderates empathy in response to observing someone undergoing physical or social pain. In 3 studies, we demonstrate that, East Asian and White British participants differ in both affective and cognitive components of their empathic reactions in response to someone else’s pain. Compared with East Asian participants, British participants report greater empathic concern and show lower empathic accuracy. More important, findings cannot be explained by an in-group advantage effect. Potential reasons for observed cultural differences are discussed. PMID:26950365

  8. Culture shapes empathic responses to physical and social pain.

    PubMed

    Atkins, David; Uskul, Ayse K; Cooper, Nicholas R

    2016-08-01

    The present research investigates the extent to which cultural background moderates empathy in response to observing someone undergoing physical or social pain. In 3 studies, we demonstrate that East Asian and White British participants differ in both affective and cognitive components of their empathic reactions in response to someone else's pain. Compared with East Asian participants, British participants report greater empathic concern and show lower empathic accuracy. More important, findings cannot be explained by an in-group advantage effect. Potential reasons for observed cultural differences are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. Standard Errors and Confidence Intervals from Bootstrapping for Ramsay-Curve Item Response Theory Model Item Parameters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gu, Fei; Skorupski, William P.; Hoyle, Larry; Kingston, Neal M.

    2011-01-01

    Ramsay-curve item response theory (RC-IRT) is a nonparametric procedure that estimates the latent trait using splines, and no distributional assumption about the latent trait is required. For item parameters of the two-parameter logistic (2-PL), three-parameter logistic (3-PL), and polytomous IRT models, RC-IRT can provide more accurate estimates…

  10. Standard Errors and Confidence Intervals from Bootstrapping for Ramsay-Curve Item Response Theory Model Item Parameters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gu, Fei; Skorupski, William P.; Hoyle, Larry; Kingston, Neal M.

    2011-01-01

    Ramsay-curve item response theory (RC-IRT) is a nonparametric procedure that estimates the latent trait using splines, and no distributional assumption about the latent trait is required. For item parameters of the two-parameter logistic (2-PL), three-parameter logistic (3-PL), and polytomous IRT models, RC-IRT can provide more accurate estimates…

  11. Human phase response curve to intermittent blue light using a commercially available device

    PubMed Central

    Revell, Victoria L; Molina, Thomas A; Eastman, Charmane I

    2012-01-01

    Light shifts the timing of the circadian clock according to a phase response curve (PRC). To date, all human light PRCs have been to long durations of bright white light. However, melanopsin, the primary photopigment for the circadian system, is most sensitive to short wavelength blue light. Therefore, to optimise light treatment it is important to generate a blue light PRC. We used a small, commercially available blue LED light box, screen size 11.2 × 6.6 cm at ∼50 cm, ∼200 μW cm−2, ∼185 lux. Subjects participated in two 5 day laboratory sessions 1 week apart. Each session consisted of circadian phase assessments to obtain melatonin profiles before and after 3 days of free-running through an ultradian light–dark cycle (2.5 h wake in dim light, 1.5 h sleep in the dark), forced desynchrony protocol. During one session subjects received intermittent blue light (three 30 min pulses over 2 h) once a day for the 3 days of free-running, and in the other session (control) they remained in dim room light, counterbalanced. The time of blue light was varied among subjects to cover the entire 24 h day. For each individual, the phase shift to blue light was corrected for the free-run determined during the control session. The blue light PRC had a broad advance region starting in the morning and extending through the afternoon. The delay region started a few hours before bedtime and extended through the night. This is the first PRC to be constructed to blue light and to a stimulus that could be used in the real world. PMID:22753544

  12. A phase response curve to single bright light pulses in human subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khalsa, Sat Bir S.; Jewett, Megan E.; Cajochen, Christian; Czeisler, Charles A.

    2003-01-01

    The circadian pacemaker is differentially sensitive to the resetting effects of retinal light exposure, depending upon the circadian phase at which the light exposure occurs. Previously reported human phase response curves (PRCs) to single bright light exposures have employed small sample sizes, and were often based on relatively imprecise estimates of circadian phase and phase resetting. In the present study, 21 healthy, entrained subjects underwent pre- and post-stimulus constant routines (CRs) in dim light (approximately 2-7 lx) with maintained wakefulness in a semi-recumbent posture. The 6.7 h bright light exposure stimulus consisted of alternating 6 min fixed gaze (approximately 10 000 lx) and free gaze (approximately 5000-9000 lx) exposures. Light exposures were scheduled across the circadian cycle in different subjects so as to derive a PRC. Plasma melatonin was used to determine the phase of the onset, offset, and midpoint of the melatonin profiles during the CRs. Phase shifts were calculated as the difference in phase between the pre- and post-stimulus CRs. The resultant PRC of the midpoint of the melatonin rhythm revealed a characteristic type 1 PRC with a significant peak-to-trough amplitude of 5.02 h. Phase delays occurred when the light stimulus was centred prior to the critical phase at the core body temperature minimum, phase advances occurred when the light stimulus was centred after the critical phase, and no phase shift occurred at the critical phase. During the subjective day, no prolonged 'dead zone' of photic insensitivity was apparent. Phase shifts derived using the melatonin onsets showed larger magnitudes than those derived from the melatonin offsets. These data provide a comprehensive characterization of the human PRC under highly controlled laboratory conditions.

  13. Functional Phase Response Curves: A Method for Understanding Synchronization of Adapting Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Jianxia; Canavier, Carmen C.; Butera, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Phase response curves (PRCs) for a single neuron are often used to predict the synchrony of mutually coupled neurons. Previous theoretical work on pulse-coupled oscillators used single-pulse perturbations. We propose an alternate method in which functional PRCs (fPRCs) are generated using a train of pulses applied at a fixed delay after each spike, with the PRC measured when the phasic relationship between the stimulus and the subsequent spike in the neuron has converged. The essential information is the dependence of the recovery time from pulse onset until the next spike as a function of the delay between the previous spike and the onset of the applied pulse. Experimental fPRCs in Aplysia pacemaker neurons were different from single-pulse PRCs, principally due to adaptation. In the biological neuron, convergence to the fully adapted recovery interval was slower at some phases than that at others because the change in the effective intrinsic period due to adaptation changes the effective phase resetting in a way that opposes and slows the effects of adaptation. The fPRCs for two isolated adapting model neurons were used to predict the existence and stability of 1:1 phase-locked network activity when the two neurons were coupled. A stability criterion was derived by linearizing a coupled map based on the fPRC and the existence and stability criteria were successfully tested in two-simulated-neuron networks with reciprocal inhibition or excitation. The fPRC is the first PRC-based tool that can account for adaptation in analyzing networks of neural oscillators. PMID:19420126

  14. A three pulse phase response curve to three milligrams of melatonin in humans

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Helen J; Revell, Victoria L; Eastman, Charmane I

    2008-01-01

    Exogenous melatonin is increasingly used for its phase shifting and soporific effects. We generated a three pulse phase response curve (PRC) to exogenous melatonin (3 mg) by administering it to free-running subjects. Young healthy subjects (n = 27) participated in two 5 day laboratory sessions, each preceded by at least a week of habitual, but fixed sleep. Each 5 day laboratory session started and ended with a phase assessment to measure the circadian rhythm of endogenous melatonin in dim light using 30 min saliva samples. In between were three days in an ultradian dim light (< 150 lux)–dark cycle (LD 2.5 : 1.5) during which each subject took one pill per day at the same clock time (3 mg melatonin or placebo, double blind, counterbalanced). Each individual's phase shift to exogenous melatonin was corrected by subtracting their phase shift to placebo (a free-run). The resulting PRC has a phase advance portion peaking about 5 h before the dim light melatonin onset, in the afternoon. The phase delay portion peaks about 11 h after the dim light melatonin onset, shortly after the usual time of morning awakening. A dead zone of minimal phase shifts occurred around the first half of habitual sleep. The fitted maximum advance and delay shifts were 1.8 h and 1.3 h, respectively. This new PRC will aid in determining the optimal time to administer exogenous melatonin to achieve desired phase shifts and demonstrates that using exogenous melatonin as a sleep aid at night has minimal phase shifting effects. PMID:18006583

  15. Functional phase response curves: a method for understanding synchronization of adapting neurons.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jianxia; Canavier, Carmen C; Butera, Robert J

    2009-07-01

    Phase response curves (PRCs) for a single neuron are often used to predict the synchrony of mutually coupled neurons. Previous theoretical work on pulse-coupled oscillators used single-pulse perturbations. We propose an alternate method in which functional PRCs (fPRCs) are generated using a train of pulses applied at a fixed delay after each spike, with the PRC measured when the phasic relationship between the stimulus and the subsequent spike in the neuron has converged. The essential information is the dependence of the recovery time from pulse onset until the next spike as a function of the delay between the previous spike and the onset of the applied pulse. Experimental fPRCs in Aplysia pacemaker neurons were different from single-pulse PRCs, principally due to adaptation. In the biological neuron, convergence to the fully adapted recovery interval was slower at some phases than that at others because the change in the effective intrinsic period due to adaptation changes the effective phase resetting in a way that opposes and slows the effects of adaptation. The fPRCs for two isolated adapting model neurons were used to predict the existence and stability of 1:1 phase-locked network activity when the two neurons were coupled. A stability criterion was derived by linearizing a coupled map based on the fPRC and the existence and stability criteria were successfully tested in two-simulated-neuron networks with reciprocal inhibition or excitation. The fPRC is the first PRC-based tool that can account for adaptation in analyzing networks of neural oscillators.

  16. Analysis of substrate competition in regulatory network motifs: Stimulus-response curves, thresholds and ultrasensitivity.

    PubMed

    Straube, Ronny

    2015-09-07

    In the simplest case, substrate competition arises if two ligands compete for access to a single binding site of a receptor protein (or enzyme). If the two ligands exhibit different binding affinities the competition becomes biased: as long as the receptor concentration remains lower than that of the high-affinity ligand the latter blocks all of the available binding sites so that the concentration of the complex comprising the low-affinity ligand remains low. The latter only rises if the receptor concentration is increased beyond that of the high-affinity ligand. Depending on the binding affinity of the low-affinity ligand this increase may then occur in an ultrasensitive manner. Similar behavior has been observed in a phosphorylation/dephosphorylation cycle involved in cell-cycle regulation. However, a steady state analysis shows that in this case the threshold concentration is modulated by the catalytic rate constants for phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of the high-affinity substrate. As a consequence, there exists a trade-off between the dynamic range of the system as measured by the maximal phosphorylation level of the substrate and the sensitivity of the system as measured by the position of the threshold. Using the ratio of the binding affinities as a small parameter we derive explicit expressions for the stimulus-response curves as a function of the receptor (or enzyme) concentration as well as conditions for the occurrence of ultrasensitivity. Interestingly, the network motifs investigated in this study are described by structurally similar steady state equations indicating that the analysis presented here may be extendable for analyzing substrate competition in more complex regulatory networks. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A phase response curve to single bright light pulses in human subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khalsa, Sat Bir S.; Jewett, Megan E.; Cajochen, Christian; Czeisler, Charles A.

    2003-01-01

    The circadian pacemaker is differentially sensitive to the resetting effects of retinal light exposure, depending upon the circadian phase at which the light exposure occurs. Previously reported human phase response curves (PRCs) to single bright light exposures have employed small sample sizes, and were often based on relatively imprecise estimates of circadian phase and phase resetting. In the present study, 21 healthy, entrained subjects underwent pre- and post-stimulus constant routines (CRs) in dim light (approximately 2-7 lx) with maintained wakefulness in a semi-recumbent posture. The 6.7 h bright light exposure stimulus consisted of alternating 6 min fixed gaze (approximately 10 000 lx) and free gaze (approximately 5000-9000 lx) exposures. Light exposures were scheduled across the circadian cycle in different subjects so as to derive a PRC. Plasma melatonin was used to determine the phase of the onset, offset, and midpoint of the melatonin profiles during the CRs. Phase shifts were calculated as the difference in phase between the pre- and post-stimulus CRs. The resultant PRC of the midpoint of the melatonin rhythm revealed a characteristic type 1 PRC with a significant peak-to-trough amplitude of 5.02 h. Phase delays occurred when the light stimulus was centred prior to the critical phase at the core body temperature minimum, phase advances occurred when the light stimulus was centred after the critical phase, and no phase shift occurred at the critical phase. During the subjective day, no prolonged 'dead zone' of photic insensitivity was apparent. Phase shifts derived using the melatonin onsets showed larger magnitudes than those derived from the melatonin offsets. These data provide a comprehensive characterization of the human PRC under highly controlled laboratory conditions.

  18. Sun exposure and pterygium of the eye: a dose-response curve.

    PubMed

    Threlfall, T J; English, D R

    1999-09-01

    To present a quantitative analysis of pterygium and ocular sun exposure, a dose-response curve, and a discussion of the health-promotion implications of the findings. A hospital-based, case-control study was conducted in Perth, Western Australia. Case subjects had surgical removal of a pterygium; control subjects had an ear, nose, or throat procedure. A lifetime history of residence, sun exposure patterns, and use of hats, spectacles, and sunglasses was obtained at interview. Measures of potential sun exposure included latitude, daily sunshine hours, and daily global solar radiant energy. The most complex estimate of actual sun exposure was the daily ocular solar radiation dose, calculated from climatic data, time spent outdoors not under shade, and the use of hats and spectacles. There were strong positive associations between pterygium and measures of potential and actual sun exposure. Associations were as strong for whole-life measures as for those in any specific age range. Pterygium odds ratios increased with exposure level; the odds ratio was 4.0 (95% confidence interval, 1.6 to 10.9) for the highest quarter of the daily sun exposure. The strongest associations were seen for the estimated daily ocular solar radiation dose, with an odds ratio of 6.8 (95% confidence interval, 2.6 to 19.7) for the highest quarter of exposure. Pterygium is strongly related to ocular sun exposure, with little evidence that exposure during any particular period of life is more important than in other periods; the implication for prevention of pterygium is that ocular protection is beneficial at all ages.

  19. Human phase response curve to intermittent blue light using a commercially available device.

    PubMed

    Revell, Victoria L; Molina, Thomas A; Eastman, Charmane I

    2012-10-01

    Light shifts the timing of the circadian clock according to a phase response curve (PRC). To date, all human light PRCs have been to long durations of bright white light. However, melanopsin, the primary photopigment for the circadian system, is most sensitive to short wavelength blue light. Therefore, to optimise light treatment it is important to generate a blue light PRC.We used a small, commercially available blue LED light box, screen size 11.2 × 6.6 cm at ∼50 cm, ∼200 μW cm(−2), ∼185 lux. Subjects participated in two 5 day laboratory sessions 1 week apart. Each session consisted of circadian phase assessments to obtain melatonin profiles before and after 3 days of free-running through an ultradian light–dark cycle (2.5 h wake in dim light, 1.5 h sleep in the dark), forced desynchrony protocol. During one session subjects received intermittent blue light (three 30 min pulses over 2 h) once a day for the 3 days of free-running, and in the other session (control) they remained in dim room light, counterbalanced. The time of blue light was varied among subjects to cover the entire 24 h day. For each individual, the phase shift to blue light was corrected for the free-run determined during the control session. The blue light PRC had a broad advance region starting in the morning and extending through the afternoon. The delay region started a few hours before bedtime and extended through the night. This is the first PRC to be constructed to blue light and to a stimulus that could be used in the real world.

  20. Novel competitors shape species' responses to climate change.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Jake M; Diez, Jeffrey M; Levine, Jonathan M

    2015-09-24

    Understanding how species respond to climate change is critical for forecasting the future dynamics and distribution of pests, diseases and biological diversity. Although ecologists have long acknowledged species' direct physiological and demographic responses to climate, more recent work suggests that these direct responses can be overwhelmed by indirect effects mediated via other interacting community members. Theory suggests that some of the most dramatic impacts of community change will probably arise through the assembly of novel species combinations after asynchronous migrations with climate. Empirical tests of this prediction are rare, as existing work focuses on the effects of changing interactions between competitors that co-occur today. To explore how species' responses to climate warming depend on how their competitors migrate to track climate, we transplanted alpine plant species and intact plant communities along a climate gradient in the Swiss Alps. Here we show that when alpine plants were transplanted to warmer climates to simulate a migration failure, their performance was strongly reduced by novel competitors that could migrate upwards from lower elevation; these effects generally exceeded the impact of warming on competition with current competitors. In contrast, when we grew the focal plants under their current climate to simulate climate tracking, a shift in the competitive environment to novel high-elevation competitors had little to no effect. This asymmetry in the importance of changing competitor identity at the leading versus trailing range edges is best explained by the degree of functional similarity between current and novel competitors. We conclude that accounting for novel competitive interactions may be essential to predict species' responses to climate change accurately.

  1. The influence of higher harmonic flow forces on the response of a curved circular cylinder undergoing vortex-induced vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyed-Aghazadeh, Banafsheh; Budz, Collin; Modarres-Sadeghi, Yahya

    2015-09-01

    Vortex-induced vibration (VIV) of a curved circular cylinder (a quarter of a ring, with no extension added to either end) free to oscillate in the crossflow direction was studied experimentally. Both the concave and the convex orientations (with respect to the oncoming flow direction) were considered. As expected, the amplitude of oscillations in both configurations was decreased compared to a vertical cylinder with the same mass ratio. Flow visualizations showed that the vortices were shed in parallel to the curved cylinder, when the cylinder was free to oscillate. The sudden jump in the phase difference between the flow forces and the cylinder displacement observed in the VIV of vertical cylinders was not observed in the curved cylinders. Higher harmonic force components at frequencies twice and three times the frequency of oscillations were observed in flow forces acting on the vertical cylinder, as well as the curved cylinder. Asymmetry in the wake was responsible for the 2nd harmonic force component and the relative velocity of the structure with respect to the oncoming flow was responsible for the 3rd harmonic force component. The lock-in occurred over the same range of reduced velocities for the curved cylinder in the convex orientation as for a vertical cylinder, but it was extended to higher reduced velocities for a curved cylinder in the concave orientation. Higher harmonic force components were found to be responsible for the extended lock-in range in the concave orientation. Within this range, the higher harmonic forces were even larger than the first harmonic force and the structure was being excited mainly by these higher harmonic forces.

  2. Ozone as U-Shaped Dose Responses Molecules (Hormetins)

    PubMed Central

    Martínez- Sánchez, G.; Pérez-Davison, G.; Re, L.; Giuliani, A.

    2010-01-01

    Redox environment involves a broad network of pro-oxidant and antioxidant components. Health benefit or damage can be induced as a consequence of an adaptive cellular stress response. A consequence of hormetic amplification is an increase in the homeodynamic space of a living system in terms of an increased defense capacity and a reduced load of damaged macromolecules. Ozone, when used at appropriate doses, promotes the formation of reactive oxygen species and lipid peroxides allows them to become late and long-lasting messengers. Healthy aging may be achieved by hormesis through mild and periodic, but not severe or chronic, physical and mental challenges, and by the use of nutritional hormesis incorporating mild stress-inducing molecules called hormetins. The paradoxical concept that ozone eventually induces an antioxidant response capable of reversing a chronic oxidative stress is common in the animal and vegetal kingdom; it is already supported by findings of an increased level of antioxidant enzymes during ozone therapy. Those facts can include ozone as a hormetin. The established scientific foundations of hormesis are ready to pave the way for new and effective approaches in redox-related disease research and intervention; ozone therapy can be a good candidate. PMID:21431076

  3. Ozone as u-shaped dose responses molecules (hormetins).

    PubMed

    Martínez-Sánchez, G; Pérez-Davison, G; Re, L; Giuliani, A

    2010-05-10

    Redox environment involves a broad network of pro-oxidant and antioxidant components. Health benefit or damage can be induced as a consequence of an adaptive cellular stress response. A consequence of hormetic amplification is an increase in the homeodynamic space of a living system in terms of an increased defense capacity and a reduced load of damaged macromolecules. Ozone, when used at appropriate doses, promotes the formation of reactive oxygen species and lipid peroxides allows them to become late and long-lasting messengers. Healthy aging may be achieved by hormesis through mild and periodic, but not severe or chronic, physical and mental challenges, and by the use of nutritional hormesis incorporating mild stress-inducing molecules called hormetins. The paradoxical concept that ozone eventually induces an antioxidant response capable of reversing a chronic oxidative stress is common in the animal and vegetal kingdom; it is already supported by findings of an increased level of antioxidant enzymes during ozone therapy. Those facts can include ozone as a hormetin. The established scientific foundations of hormesis are ready to pave the way for new and effective approaches in redox-related disease research and intervention; ozone therapy can be a good candidate.

  4. Resource Competition Shapes the Response of Genetic Circuits.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yili; Huang, Hsin-Ho; Jiménez, José I; Del Vecchio, Domitilla

    2017-04-03

    A common approach to design genetic circuits is to compose gene expression cassettes together. While appealing, this modular approach is challenged by the fact that expression of each gene depends on the availability of transcriptional/translational resources, which is in turn determined by the presence of other genes in the circuit. This raises the question of how competition for resources by different genes affects a circuit's behavior. Here, we create a library of genetic activation cascades in E. coli bacteria, where we explicitly tune the resource demand by each gene. We develop a general Hill-function-based model that incorporates resource competition effects through resource demand coefficients. These coefficients lead to nonregulatory interactions among genes that reshape the circuit's behavior. For the activation cascade, such interactions result in surprising biphasic or monotonically decreasing responses. Finally, we use resource demand coefficients to guide the choice of ribosome binding site and DNA copy number to restore the cascade's intended monotonically increasing response. Our results demonstrate how unintended circuit's behavior arises from resource competition and provide a model-guided methodology to minimize the resulting effects.

  5. Low Dose Radiation Response Curves, Networks and Pathways in Human Lymphoblastoid Cells Exposed from 1 to 10 cGy of Acute Gamma Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Wyrobek, A. J.; Manohar, C. F.; Nelson, D. O.; Furtado, M. R.; Bhattacharya, M. S.; Marchetti, F.; Coleman, M.A.

    2011-04-18

    We investigated the low dose dependency of the transcriptional response of human cells to characterize the shape and biological functions associated with the dose response curve and to identify common and conserved functions of low dose expressed genes across cells and tissues. Human lymphoblastoid (HL) cells from two unrelated individuals were exposed to graded doses of radiation spanning the range of 1-10 cGy were analyzed by transcriptome profiling, qPCR and bioinformatics, in comparison to sham irradiated samples. A set of {approx}80 genes showed consistent responses in both cell lines; these genes were associated with homeostasis mechanisms (e.g., membrane signaling, molecule transport), subcellular locations (e.g., Golgi, and endoplasmic reticulum), and involved diverse signal transduction pathways. The majority of radiation-modulated genes had plateau-like responses across 1-10 cGy, some with suggestive evidence that transcription was modulated at doses below 1 cGy. MYC, FOS and TP53 were the major network nodes of the low-dose response in HL cells. Comparison our low dose expression findings in HL cells with those of prior studies in mouse brain after whole body exposure, in human keratinocyte cultures, and in endothelial cells cultures, indicates that certain components of the low dose radiation response are broadly conserved across cell types and tissues, independent of proliferation status.

  6. Low dose radiation response curves, networks and pathways in human lymphoblastoid cells exposed from 1 to 10cGy of acute gamma radiation.

    PubMed

    Wyrobek, A J; Manohar, C F; Krishnan, V V; Nelson, D O; Furtado, M R; Bhattacharya, M S; Marchetti, F; Coleman, M A

    2011-06-17

    We investigated the low dose dependency of the transcriptional response of human cells to characterize the shape and biological functions associated with the dose-response curve and to identify common and conserved functions of low dose expressed genes across cells and tissues. Human lymphoblastoid (HL) cells from two unrelated individuals were exposed to graded doses of radiation spanning the range of 1-10cGy were analyzed by transcriptome profiling, qPCR and bioinformatics, in comparison to sham irradiated samples. A set of ∼80 genes showed consistent responses in both cell lines; these genes were associated with homeostasis mechanisms (e.g., membrane signaling, molecule transport), subcellular locations (e.g., Golgi, and endoplasmic reticulum), and involved diverse signal transduction pathways. The majority of radiation-modulated genes had plateau-like responses across 1-10cGy, some with suggestive evidence that transcription was modulated at doses below 1cGy. MYC, FOS and TP53 were the major network nodes of the low-dose-response in HL cells. Comparison our low dose expression findings in HL cells with those of prior studies in mouse brain after whole body exposure, in human keratinocyte cultures, and in endothelial cells cultures, indicates that certain components of the low dose radiation response are broadly conserved across cell types and tissues, independent of proliferation status. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Comparison of the shaping ability of RaCe, FlexMaster, and ProFile nickel-titanium instruments in severely curved root canals

    PubMed Central

    Burkhardt, Lea; Weidmann, Frank; Rüttermann, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Background This in vitro study compared the shaping ability of RaCe, FlexMaster, and ProFile rotary nickel-titanium instruments in severely curved root canals of extracted teeth. Material and Methods Sixty maxillary molars with curvatures ranging from 25° to 65° were embedded in a muffle system and portioned into five horizontal sections (thickness 1.2 mm), starting from the apex. Canals were divided into three groups (n = 20, each) and were prepared with RaCe, FlexMaster, or ProFile rotary nickel-titanium instruments and the TriAuto ZX handpiece using a crown-down preparation technique. We evaluated the difference between pre- and postoperative root canal cross-sections, loss of working length, instrument failure, and preparation time. The root canal area before and after the intervention was determined using an area-measuring software. The data were analyzed statistically using a one-way ANOVA followed by a Kruskal-Wallis multiple-comparison Z-value test. Results Specimens treated with FlexMaster showed the greatest change from preoperative cross-sections, followed by RaCe and ProFile. The cross-sectional changes induced by RaCe and FlexMaster preparation differed significantly from those produced by ProFile. Loss of working length, instrument failure, and preparation time did not differ significantly between the groups. Conclusions Root canal preparation with the three instruments did not lead to any significant alteration of the original root anatomy or working length. Thus, we conclude that RaCe, FlexMaster, and ProFile instruments are of comparable efficiency and usefulness in the preparation of severely curved root canals. Key words:Endodontics, root canal preparation, rotary, extracted teeth, nickel-titanium. PMID:27957264

  8. MYC and HIF in shaping immune response and immune metabolism.

    PubMed

    Gnanaprakasam, J N Rashida; Sherman, John William; Wang, Ruoning

    2017-06-01

    Upon antigen stimulation, quiescent naive T cells undergo a phase of cell mass accumulation followed by cell cycle entry, clonal expansion, differentiation into functional subsets and back again to a quiescent state as they develop into memory cells. The transitions between these distinct cellular states place unique metabolic demands on energy, redox and biosynthesis. To fulfill these demands, T cells switch back and forth between their primary catabolic pathways. While quiescent naive and memory T cells largely rely on the oxidation of fatty acids and glucose, active T cells rely on glycolysis and glutaminolysis to sustain cell growth, proliferation and differentiation. Beyond several key signaling kinase cascades, the hypoxia inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) and the proto-oncogene MYC, act alone or in concert, to coordinate T cell metabolic reprogramming, cell proliferation, functional differentiation and apoptosis, enabling a robust T cell-mediated adaptive immune response. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. 3D Printed Reversible Shape Changing Components with Stimuli Responsive Materials.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yiqi; Ding, Zhen; Yuan, Chao; Ai, Shigang; Isakov, Michael; Wu, Jiangtao; Wang, Tiejun; Dunn, Martin L; Qi, H Jerry

    2016-04-25

    The creation of reversibly-actuating components that alter their shapes in a controllable manner in response to environmental stimuli is a grand challenge in active materials, structures, and robotics. Here we demonstrate a new reversible shape-changing component design concept enabled by 3D printing two stimuli responsive polymers-shape memory polymers and hydrogels-in prescribed 3D architectures. This approach uses the swelling of a hydrogel as the driving force for the shape change, and the temperature-dependent modulus of a shape memory polymer to regulate the time of such shape change. Controlling the temperature and aqueous environment allows switching between two stable configurations - the structures are relatively stiff and can carry load in each - without any mechanical loading and unloading. Specific shape changing scenarios, e.g., based on bending, or twisting in prescribed directions, are enabled via the controlled interplay between the active materials and the 3D printed architectures. The physical phenomena are complex and nonintuitive, and so to help understand the interplay of geometric, material, and environmental stimuli parameters we develop 3D nonlinear finite element models. Finally, we create several 2D and 3D shape changing components that demonstrate the role of key parameters and illustrate the broad application potential of the proposed approach.

  10. 3D Printed Reversible Shape Changing Components with Stimuli Responsive Materials

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Yiqi; Ding, Zhen; Yuan, Chao; Ai, Shigang; Isakov, Michael; Wu, Jiangtao; Wang, Tiejun; Dunn, Martin L.; Qi, H. Jerry

    2016-01-01

    The creation of reversibly-actuating components that alter their shapes in a controllable manner in response to environmental stimuli is a grand challenge in active materials, structures, and robotics. Here we demonstrate a new reversible shape-changing component design concept enabled by 3D printing two stimuli responsive polymers—shape memory polymers and hydrogels—in prescribed 3D architectures. This approach uses the swelling of a hydrogel as the driving force for the shape change, and the temperature-dependent modulus of a shape memory polymer to regulate the time of such shape change. Controlling the temperature and aqueous environment allows switching between two stable configurations – the structures are relatively stiff and can carry load in each – without any mechanical loading and unloading. Specific shape changing scenarios, e.g., based on bending, or twisting in prescribed directions, are enabled via the controlled interplay between the active materials and the 3D printed architectures. The physical phenomena are complex and nonintuitive, and so to help understand the interplay of geometric, material, and environmental stimuli parameters we develop 3D nonlinear finite element models. Finally, we create several 2D and 3D shape changing components that demonstrate the role of key parameters and illustrate the broad application potential of the proposed approach. PMID:27109063

  11. 3D Printed Reversible Shape Changing Components with Stimuli Responsive Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Yiqi; Ding, Zhen; Yuan, Chao; Ai, Shigang; Isakov, Michael; Wu, Jiangtao; Wang, Tiejun; Dunn, Martin L.; Qi, H. Jerry

    2016-04-01

    The creation of reversibly-actuating components that alter their shapes in a controllable manner in response to environmental stimuli is a grand challenge in active materials, structures, and robotics. Here we demonstrate a new reversible shape-changing component design concept enabled by 3D printing two stimuli responsive polymers—shape memory polymers and hydrogels—in prescribed 3D architectures. This approach uses the swelling of a hydrogel as the driving force for the shape change, and the temperature-dependent modulus of a shape memory polymer to regulate the time of such shape change. Controlling the temperature and aqueous environment allows switching between two stable configurations – the structures are relatively stiff and can carry load in each – without any mechanical loading and unloading. Specific shape changing scenarios, e.g., based on bending, or twisting in prescribed directions, are enabled via the controlled interplay between the active materials and the 3D printed architectures. The physical phenomena are complex and nonintuitive, and so to help understand the interplay of geometric, material, and environmental stimuli parameters we develop 3D nonlinear finite element models. Finally, we create several 2D and 3D shape changing components that demonstrate the role of key parameters and illustrate the broad application potential of the proposed approach.

  12. Reconfigurable photonic crystals enabled by pressure-responsive shape-memory polymers.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yin; Ni, Yongliang; Leo, Sin-Yen; Taylor, Curtis; Basile, Vito; Jiang, Peng

    2015-06-15

    Smart shape-memory polymers can memorize and recover their permanent shape in response to an external stimulus (for example, heat). They have been extensively exploited for a wide spectrum of applications ranging from biomedical devices to aerospace morphing structures. However, most of the existing shape-memory polymers are thermoresponsive and their performance is hindered by heat-demanding programming and recovery steps. Although pressure is an easily adjustable process variable such as temperature, pressure-responsive shape-memory polymers are largely unexplored. Here we report a series of shape-memory polymers that enable unusual 'cold' programming and instantaneous shape recovery triggered by applying a contact pressure at ambient conditions. Moreover, the interdisciplinary integration of scientific principles drawn from two disparate fields--the fast-growing photonic crystal and shape-memory polymer technologies--enables fabrication of reconfigurable photonic crystals and simultaneously provides a simple and sensitive optical technique for investigating the intriguing shape-memory effects at nanoscale.

  13. Reconfigurable photonic crystals enabled by pressure-responsive shape-memory polymers

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Yin; Ni, Yongliang; Leo, Sin-Yen; Taylor, Curtis; Basile, Vito; Jiang, Peng

    2015-01-01

    Smart shape-memory polymers can memorize and recover their permanent shape in response to an external stimulus (for example, heat). They have been extensively exploited for a wide spectrum of applications ranging from biomedical devices to aerospace morphing structures. However, most of the existing shape-memory polymers are thermoresponsive and their performance is hindered by heat-demanding programming and recovery steps. Although pressure is an easily adjustable process variable such as temperature, pressure-responsive shape-memory polymers are largely unexplored. Here we report a series of shape-memory polymers that enable unusual ‘cold' programming and instantaneous shape recovery triggered by applying a contact pressure at ambient conditions. Moreover, the interdisciplinary integration of scientific principles drawn from two disparate fields—the fast-growing photonic crystal and shape-memory polymer technologies—enables fabrication of reconfigurable photonic crystals and simultaneously provides a simple and sensitive optical technique for investigating the intriguing shape-memory effects at nanoscale. PMID:26074349

  14. Birefringence imaging and orientation of laser patterned β-BaB{sub 2}O{sub 4} crystals with bending and curved shapes in glass

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Kazuki; Honma, Tsuyoshi; Komatsu, Takayuki

    2013-11-15

    Nonlinear optical β-BaB{sub 2}O{sub 4} crystals (β-BBO) with bending and curved shapes were patterned at the surface of 8Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3}–42BaO–50B{sub 2}O{sub 3} glass by laser irradiations (Yb:YVO{sub 4} laser with a wavelength of 1080 nm, power of 0.8 W, and scanning speed of 4 μm/s), and the orientation state of β-BBO crystals was examined from the birefringence imaging obtained by polarization optical microscope (POM) observations. The formation (crystallization) of β-BBO crystals follows along laser scanning direction even if the laser scanning direction changes at a certain point within the bending angle of 60°. The birefringence images indicate that the formation of highly c-axis oriented β-BBO crystals follows along laser scanning direction even if the laser scanning direction changes, and in particular the direction of the c-axis of β-BBO crystals changes gradually at the bending point. The model for the orientation of the c-axis of β-BBO near the bending point is proposed. The present study proposes that the laser-induced crystallization opens a new door for the science and technology in crystal growth engineering. - Graphical abstract: This figure shows the birefringence images obtained by the Abrio IM imaging system (λ=546 nm) for the laser-patterned β-BaB{sub 2}O{sub 4} crystal line with the bending angle of 45° in the glass. The relation between the direction of slow axis and color is also shown. It is demonstrated that the formation (crystallization) of highly c-axis oriented β-BaB{sub 2}O{sub 4} crystals follows along laser scanning direction even if the laser scanning direction changes. Display Omitted - Highlights: • β-BaB{sub 2}O{sub 4} crystals with bending and curved shapes were patterned by laser irradiations. • The orientation was examined from the birefringence imaging. • Highly c-axis oriented crystals follows along laser scanning direction. • The c-axis direction changes gradually at the bending point. • The

  15. Modal Response of Trapezoidal Wing Structures Using Second Order Shape Sensitivities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Youhua; Kapania, Rakesh K.

    2000-01-01

    The modal response of wing structures is very important for assessing their dynamic response including dynamic aeroelastic instabilities. Moreover, in a recent study an efficient structural optimization approach was developed using structural modes to represent the static aeroelastic wing response (both displacement and stress). In this paper, the modal response of general trapezoidal wing structures is approximated using shape sensitivities up to the 2nd order. Also different approaches of computing the derivatives are investigated.

  16. Plant Photosynthesis-Irradiance Curve Responses to Pollution Show Non-Competitive Inhibited Michaelis Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Lin, Maozi; Wang, Zhiwei; He, Lingchao; Xu, Kang; Cheng, Dongliang; Wang, Genxuan

    2015-01-01

    Photosynthesis-irradiance (PI) curves are extensively used in field and laboratory research to evaluate the photon-use efficiency of plants. However, most existing models for PI curves focus on the relationship between the photosynthetic rate (Pn) and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), and do not take account of the influence of environmental factors on the curve. In the present study, we used a new non-competitive inhibited Michaelis-Menten model (NIMM) to predict the co-variation of Pn, PAR, and the relative pollution index (I). We then evaluated the model with published data and our own experimental data. The results indicate that the Pn of plants decreased with increasing I in the environment and, as predicted, were all fitted well by the NIMM model. Therefore, our model provides a robust basis to evaluate and understand the influence of environmental pollution on plant photosynthesis.

  17. Plant Photosynthesis-Irradiance Curve Responses to Pollution Show Non-Competitive Inhibited Michaelis Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Maozi; Wang, Zhiwei; He, Lingchao; Xu, Kang; Cheng, Dongliang; Wang, Genxuan

    2015-01-01

    Photosynthesis-irradiance (PI) curves are extensively used in field and laboratory research to evaluate the photon-use efficiency of plants. However, most existing models for PI curves focus on the relationship between the photosynthetic rate (Pn) and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), and do not take account of the influence of environmental factors on the curve. In the present study, we used a new non-competitive inhibited Michaelis-Menten model (NIMM) to predict the co-variation of Pn, PAR, and the relative pollution index (I). We then evaluated the model with published data and our own experimental data. The results indicate that the Pn of plants decreased with increasing I in the environment and, as predicted, were all fitted well by the NIMM model. Therefore, our model provides a robust basis to evaluate and understand the influence of environmental pollution on plant photosynthesis. PMID:26561863

  18. GAMMA-RAY BURST AFTERGLOW LIGHT CURVES FROM A LORENTZ-BOOSTED SIMULATION FRAME AND THE SHAPE OF THE JET BREAK

    SciTech Connect

    Van Eerten, Hendrik; MacFadyen, Andrew

    2013-04-20

    The early stages of decelerating gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglow jets have been notoriously difficult to resolve numerically using two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations even at very high resolution, due to the extreme thinness of the blast wave and high outflow Lorentz factors. However, these resolution issues can be avoided by performing the simulations in a boosted frame, which makes it possible to calculate afterglow light curves from numerically computed flows in sufficient detail to accurately quantify the shape of the jet break and the post-break steepening of the light curve. Here, we study afterglow jet breaks for jets with opening angles of 0.05, 0.1, and 0.2 radians decelerating in a surrounding medium of constant density, observed at various angles ranging from on-axis to the edge of the jet. A single set of scale-invariant functions describing the time evolution of afterglow synchrotron spectral break frequencies and peak flux, depending only on jet opening angle and observer angle, are all that is needed to reconstruct light curves for arbitrary explosion energy, circumburst density and synchrotron particle distribution power law slope p. These functions are presented in the paper. Their time evolutions change directly following the jet break, although an earlier reported temporary post-break steepening of the cooling break is found to have been resolution-induced. We compare synthetic light curves to fit functions using sharp power law breaks as well as smooth power law transitions. We confirm our earlier finding that the measured jet break time is very sensitive to the angle of the observer and can be postponed significantly. We find that the difference in temporal indices across the jet break is larger than theoretically anticipated and is about -(0.5 + 0.5p) below the cooling break and about -(0.25 + 0.5p) above the cooling break, both leading to post-break slopes of roughly about 0.25 - 1.3p, although different observer angles, jet opening

  19. Mitotic kinases and phosphatases cooperate to shape the right response.

    PubMed

    Vallardi, Giulia; Saurin, Adrian T

    2015-01-01

    Kinases and phosphatases, two sides of the same coin; are they opposing forces that switch signals on and off or enzymes that work together to give the right type of response at the right time? It depends on how close you stand when you view the big picture. Up close and detailed, and you'll see individual phosphorylation sites as binary switches - lights being toggled on/off by antagonistic forces. Take a step back and multiple copies of the same light are being toggled, perhaps leading to a range of intensities, or a flickering pattern, lights flashing in unison or at random. It depends what the signal requires. Stand even further back, let the story unfold, and you'll see a dazzling multicolour array of different lights. A coordinated sequence of color that appears to burst into life at different times in different places, with a pace that is both frantic and serene. This is a vision of mitosis and what a true spectacle it is.

  20. BY HOW MUCH DO SHAPES OF TOXICOLOGICAL DOSE-RESPONSE RELATIONSHIPS VARY? (SOT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A re-analysis of a large number of historical dose-response data for continuous endpoints showed that the shapes of the dose-response relationships were surprisingly homogenous. The datasets were selected on the sole criterion that they were expected to provide relatively good in...

  1. BY HOW MUCH DO SHAPES OF TOXICOLOGICAL DOSE-RESPONSE RELATIONSHIPS VARY? (SOT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A re-analysis of a large number of historical dose-response data for continuous endpoints showed that the shapes of the dose-response relationships were surprisingly homogenous. The datasets were selected on the sole criterion that they were expected to provide relatively good in...

  2. The form of the auto-shaped response with food or water reinforcers1

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, H. M.; Moore, Bruce R.

    1973-01-01

    The relation between the form of auto-shaped responses to the lighting of a key and the consummatory responses of pecking grain and drinking water was examined in pigeons. Responses on the key were analyzed by means of high-speed photography, recordings of the force of contact, and judges' ratings of response-form based on film and videotape recordings. The first experiment showed that food-deprived birds presented grain as a reinforcer responded on the key with a grain-pecking movement, while water-deprived birds presented water as a reinforcer responded with drinking-like movements. The second and third experiments showed that the resemblance between auto-shaped and consummatory responses does not require the dominance of the deprivational state appropriate to the reinforcer. Changing the dominant state of deprivation did not immediately change the form of the key response, and in subjects simultaneously deprived of food and water, the form of response depended on the reinforcer. In the fourth and fifth experiments, subjects simultaneously deprived of food and water received one stimulus signalling food and another signalling water in a random series. In most subjects, the response to each stimulus resembled the consummatory response to the particular reinforcer that was signalled by the stimulus. This result demonstrates the role of association between a stimulus and a reinforcer in producing a resemblance of the auto-shaped response to the consummatory response. ImagesFig. 2.Fig. 3.Fig. 4. PMID:4752087

  3. Evaluation of dose-response curve analysis in delineating shared or different molecular sites of action for osteolathyrogens.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Douglas A; Scott, Brenda D; Ellenberger, M Jason; Pöch, Gerald; Rinaldi, Andrea C

    2004-03-01

    Single-chemical and mixture concentration-response curves generated using a frog embryo model were examined for value in assessing whether chemicals exert toxic effects at the same or at different molecular sites of action. Toxicity tests were conducted on a series of osteolathyrogens, i.e. chemicals that inhibit cross-linking of developing connective tissue fibers. Induction of osteolathyrism, which manifests as lesions in the notochord of exposed tadpoles, has several possible molecular sites of action, including agent-cofactor reactivity during the enzyme-mediated cross-linking process. UV-VIS spectrophotometry of osteolathyrogen-cofactor reactivity (i.e. in vitro analysis) was coupled with the 96-h frog embryo mixture toxicity assay (i.e. in vivo toxicity) to compare molecular sites of action for several osteolathyrogens with the combined osteolathyritic effects of the agents. Single-chemical concentration-response curves were used to calculate theoretical curves for the dose-addition model of combined effect. Slope and EC(50) values for both theoretical and experimental mixture curves were then generated to statistically examine the hypothesis that agents with shared sites of action have dose-response curve (DRC) slopes that are similar when given alone and in combination, and slope and EC(50) values that, when administered together, are consistent with those calculated for dose-addition. For combinations of cofactor-binding agents (semicarbazide, thiosemicarbazide, aminoacetonitrile), slope values were generally similar with additivity quotients near 1.0 (1.0=dose-additive) and combined osteolathyritic effects that were consistent with dose-addition. None of these were true for combinations that included agents that did not show rapid cofactor binding (β-aminopropionitrile, methyleneaminoacetonitrile). The results suggest that DRC analysis could be a useful tool for delineating common or different molecular sites of toxic action and that the approaches used

  4. Shaping ability of reciprocating motion of WaveOne and HyFlex in moderate to severe curved canals: A comparative study with cone beam computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Simpsy, Gurram Samuel; Sajjan, Girija S.; Mudunuri, Padmaja; Chittem, Jyothi; Prasanthi, Nalam N. V. D.; Balaga, Pankaj

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: M-Wire and reciprocating motion of WaveOne and controlled memory (CM) wire) of HyFlex were the recent innovations using thermal treatment. Therefore, a study was planned to evaluate the shaping ability of reciprocating motion of WaveOne and HyFlex using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Methodology: Forty-five freshly extracted mandibular teeth were selected and stored in saline until use. All teeth were scanned pre- and post-operatively using CBCT (Kodak 9000). All teeth were accessed and divided into three groups. (1) Group 1 (control n = 15): Instrumented with ProTaper. (2) Group 2 (n = 15): Instrumented with primary file (8%/25) WaveOne. (3) Group 3 (n = 15): Instrumented with (4%/25) HyFlex CM. Sections at 1, 3, and 5 mm were obtained from the pre- and post-operative scans. Measurement was done using CS3D software and Adobe Photoshop software. Apical transportation and degree of straightening were measured and statistically analyzed. Results: HyFlex showed lesser apical transportation when compared to other groups at 1 and 3 mm. WaveOne showed lesser degree of straightening when compared to other groups. Conclusion: This present study concluded that all systems could be employed in routine endodontics whereas HyFlex and WaveOne could be employed in severely curved canals. PMID:27994323

  5. Sensitivity of the curve-to-growth technique utilized in rocket experiments to determine the line shape of solar He I resonance lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, C. Y. R.; Ogawa, H. S.

    1986-01-01

    The sensitivity of the curve-of-growth (COG) technique utilized in rocket measurements to determine the line profiles of the solar He I resonance emissions is theoretically examined with attention to the possibility of determining the line core shape using this technique. The line at 584.334 A is chosen as an illustration. Various possible source functions of the solar line have been assumed in the computation of the integrated transmitted intensity. A recent observational data set obtained by the present researchers is used as the constraint of the computation. It is confirmed that the COG technique can indeed provide a good measurement of the solar line width. However, to obtain detailed knowledge of the solar profile at line center and in the core region, (1) it is necessary to be able to carry out relative solar flux measurements with a 1-percent or better precision, and (2) it must be possible to measure the He gas pressure in the absorption cell to lower than 0.1 mtorr. While these numbers apply specifically to the present geometry, the results are readily scaled to other COG measurements using other experimental parameters.

  6. Axially symmetric /sup 31/P NMR line shapes with selective excitation in the presence of lateral diffusion on a curved surface

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, D.W.; Boylan, J.G.; Cole, B.R.

    1987-10-22

    An NMR pulse sequence which is useful for the study of phospholipid diffusion in cellular membranes is presented. The sequence involves selective excitation with a DANTE pulse train followed by an evolution interval during which diffusion effects are observable. A method is presented to simulate /sup 31/P NMR spectra which are obtain by use of the pulse sequence. The simulation treats the case in which molecules with axially symmetric line shapes undergo lateral diffusion on a curved surface. The Bloch equations, written for equally populated intervals on a sphere and modified by inclusion of jump model terms to account for the diffusion, were used for the calculations. Diffusion between adjacent intervals is given in terms of a correlation time tau/sub 2/, which is proportional to D/sub diff//r/sup 2/, where D/sub diff/ is the lateral diffusion coefficient and r is the radius of curvature. The resulting differential equations were solved by using eigenvalue problem techniques and applying appropriate boundary conditions to give complex FIDs, which were Fourier transformed to give the spectra. Normal spectra and spectra obtained by use of the special pulse sequence were simulated. By fitting a set of spectra for which the system is allowed to evolve for a variable time interval after DANTE excitation, they were able to estimate tau/sub 2/. Simulated spectra and experimental spectra of egg yolk lecithin vesicle samples were in excellent agreement.

  7. Shape and size-dependent immune response to antigen-carrying nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sunny; Anselmo, Aaron C; Banerjee, Amrita; Zakrewsky, Michael; Mitragotri, Samir

    2015-12-28

    The immune system has evolved to recognize and respond to a wide variety of pathogens and produce distinct immune responses against diverse pathogenic structures. Despite remarkable advances, the general mechanisms by which the immune system differentiates the structure of antigen presenting particulates have yet to be elucidated. Using particles of various sizes and shapes, we assessed the role of morphological features of particles in antigen presentation and subsequent processing by the immune cells. Ovalbumin was used as a model antigen. Spherical polystyrene particles of 193 nm and 521 nm diameters were successfully stretched to form rod-shaped particles of 376 nm and 1530 nm in length, respectively. Ovalbumin conjugation to these different particle types was optimized to achieve ~50 μg of ovalbumin conjugation per mg of particle. In vivo immunization study results revealed that small spherical particles (193 nm in diameter) produced a Th1-biased response whereas rod-shaped particles (1530 nm in length) produced a Th2-biased response against ovalbumin. Among different particle types, smaller spherical (193 nm) particles generated stronger Th1 and Th2 immune responses compared to the other particle types. In vitro studies with dendritic cells indicated that spherical (193 nm) and rod (1530 nm) shaped particles were internalized by dendritic cells and delivered ovalbumin. These results provide evidence for size- and shape-dependent modulation of immune responses and this knowledge can be leveraged to rationally design and develop next generation vaccines against a wide range of pathogens.

  8. Fast Response Shape Memory Effect Titanium Nickel (TiNi) Foam Torque Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jardine, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Shape Change Technologies has developed a process to manufacture net-shaped TiNi foam torque tubes that demonstrate the shape memory effect. The torque tubes dramatically reduce response time by a factor of 10. This Phase II project matured the actuator technology by rigorously characterizing the process to optimize the quality of the TiNi and developing a set of metrics to provide ISO 9002 quality assurance. A laboratory virtual instrument engineering workbench (LabVIEW'TM')-based, real-time control of the torsional actuators was developed. These actuators were developed with The Boeing Company for aerospace applications.

  9. Earthquake Response of Reinforced Concrete Building Retrofitted with Geopolymer Concrete and X-shaped Metallic Damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madheswaran, C. K.; Prakash vel, J.; Sathishkumar, K.; Rao, G. V. Rama

    2017-06-01

    A three-storey half scale reinforced concrete (RC) building is fixed with X-shaped metallic damper at the ground floor level, is designed and fabricated to study its seismic response characteristics. Experimental studies are carried out using the (4 m × 4 m) tri-axial shake-table facility to evaluate the seismic response of a retrofitted RC building with open ground storey (OGS) structure using yielding type X-shaped metallic dampers (also called as Added Damping and Stiffness-ADAS elements) and repairing the damaged ground storey columns using geopolymer concrete composites. This elasto-plastic device is normally incorporated within the frame structure between adjacent floors through chevron bracing, so that they efficiently enhance the overall energy dissipation ability of the seismically deficient frame structure under earthquake loading. Free vibration tests on RC building without and with yielding type X-shaped metallic damper is carried out. The natural frequencies and mode shapes of RC building without and with yielding type X-shaped metallic damper are determined. The retrofitted reinforced concrete building is subjected to earthquake excitations and the response from the structure is recorded. This work discusses the preparation of test specimen, experimental set-up, instrumentation, method of testing of RC building and the response of the structure. The metallic damper reduces the time period of the structure and displacement demands on the OGS columns of the structure. Nonlinear time history analysis is performed using structural analysis package, SAP2000.

  10. Establishment of a Dose-response Curve for X-ray-Induced Micronuclei in Human Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lusiyanti, Yanti; Alatas, Zubaidah; Syaifudin, Mukh; Purnami, Sofiati

    2016-01-01

    The cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay in peripheral blood lymphocytes is an established technique for biodosimetry. The aim of this project was to generate a X-ray induced micronuclei (MN) curve for peripheral blood lymphocytes taken from five healthy donors. The blood samples were irradiated with X-rays of 122 KeV at a dose rate of 0.652 Gy/min to doses of 0.5, 1, 2, 3, and 4 Gy. The blood samples were then cultured for 72 h at 37°C and processed following the International Atomic Energy Agency standard procedure with slight modifications. The result showed that the yields of MN frequencies were increased with the increase of radiation dose. Reconstruction of the relationship of MN with dose was fitted to a linear-quadratic model using Chromosome Aberration Calculation Software version 2.0. Due to their advantages, mainly, the dependence on radiation dose and dose rate, despite their limitation, these curves will be useful as alternative method for in vitro dose reconstruction and can support the preparedness for public or occupational radiation overexposure and protection. The results reported here also give us confidence to apply the obtained calibration curve of MN for future biological dosimetry requirements in Indonesia. PMID:28217283

  11. Establishment of a Dose-response Curve for X-ray-Induced Micronuclei in Human Lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Lusiyanti, Yanti; Alatas, Zubaidah; Syaifudin, Mukh; Purnami, Sofiati

    2016-01-01

    The cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay in peripheral blood lymphocytes is an established technique for biodosimetry. The aim of this project was to generate a X-ray induced micronuclei (MN) curve for peripheral blood lymphocytes taken from five healthy donors. The blood samples were irradiated with X-rays of 122 KeV at a dose rate of 0.652 Gy/min to doses of 0.5, 1, 2, 3, and 4 Gy. The blood samples were then cultured for 72 h at 37°C and processed following the International Atomic Energy Agency standard procedure with slight modifications. The result showed that the yields of MN frequencies were increased with the increase of radiation dose. Reconstruction of the relationship of MN with dose was fitted to a linear-quadratic model using Chromosome Aberration Calculation Software version 2.0. Due to their advantages, mainly, the dependence on radiation dose and dose rate, despite their limitation, these curves will be useful as alternative method for in vitro dose reconstruction and can support the preparedness for public or occupational radiation overexposure and protection. The results reported here also give us confidence to apply the obtained calibration curve of MN for future biological dosimetry requirements in Indonesia.

  12. Suspended-sediment rating curve response to urbanization and wildfire, Santa Ana River, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warrick, J.A.; Rubin, D.M.

    2007-01-01

    River suspended-sediment concentrations provide insights to the erosion and transport of materials from a landscape, and changes in concentrations with time may result from landscape processes or human disturbance. Here we show that suspended-sediment concentrations in the Santa Ana River, California, decreased 20-fold with respect to discharge during a 34-year period (1968−2001). These decreases cannot be attributed to changes in sampling technique or timing, nor to event or seasonal hysteresis. Annual peak and total discharge, however, reveal sixfold increases over the 34-year record, which largely explain the decreases in sediment concentration by a nonlinear dilution process. The hydrological changes were related to the widespread urbanization of the watershed, which resulted in increases in storm water discharge without detectable alteration of sediment discharge, thus reducing suspended-sediment concentrations. Periodic upland wildfire significantly increased water discharge, sediment discharge, and suspended-sediment concentrations and thus further altered the rating curve with time. Our results suggest that previous inventories of southern California sediment flux, which assume time-constant rating curves and extend these curves beyond the sampling history, may have substantially overestimated loads during the most recent decades.

  13. The influence of yield surface shape and damage in the depth-dependent response of bone tissue to nanoindentation using spherical and Berkovich indenters.

    PubMed

    Schwiedrzik, Johann Jakob; Zysset, Philippe Kurt

    2015-01-01

    Prevention and treatment of osteoporosis rely on understanding of the micromechanical behaviour of bone and its influence on fracture toughness and cell-mediated adaptation processes. Postyield properties may be assessed by nonlinear finite element simulations of nanoindentation using elastoplastic and damage models. This computational study aims at determining the influence of yield surface shape and damage on the depth-dependent response of bone to nanoindentation using spherical and conical tips. Yield surface shape and damage were shown to have a major impact on the indentation curves. Their influence on indentation modulus, hardness, their ratio as well as the elastic-to-total work ratio is well described by multilinear regressions for both tip shapes. For conical tips, indentation depth was not statistically significant (p < 0.0001). For spherical tips, damage was not a significant parameter (p < 0.0001). The gained knowledge can be used for developing an inverse method for identification of postelastic properties of bone from nanoindentation.

  14. fMRI Evidence of ‘Mirror’ Responses to Geometric Shapes

    PubMed Central

    Press, Clare; Catmur, Caroline; Cook, Richard; Widmann, Hannah; Heyes, Cecilia; Bird, Geoffrey

    2012-01-01

    Mirror neurons may be a genetic adaptation for social interaction [1]. Alternatively, the associative hypothesis [2], [3] proposes that the development of mirror neurons is driven by sensorimotor learning, and that, given suitable experience, mirror neurons will respond to any stimulus. This hypothesis was tested using fMRI adaptation to index populations of cells with mirror properties. After sensorimotor training, where geometric shapes were paired with hand actions, BOLD response was measured while human participants experienced runs of events in which shape observation alternated with action execution or observation. Adaptation from shapes to action execution, and critically, observation, occurred in ventral premotor cortex (PMv) and inferior parietal lobule (IPL). Adaptation from shapes to execution indicates that neuronal populations responding to the shapes had motor properties, while adaptation to observation demonstrates that these populations had mirror properties. These results indicate that sensorimotor training induced populations of cells with mirror properties in PMv and IPL to respond to the observation of arbitrary shapes. They suggest that the mirror system has not been shaped by evolution to respond in a mirror fashion to biological actions; instead, its development is mediated by stimulus-general processes of learning within a system adapted for visuomotor control. PMID:23251653

  15. The cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus assay: dose-response calibration curve, background frequency in the population and dose estimation.

    PubMed

    Rastkhah, E; Zakeri, F; Ghoranneviss, M; Rajabpour, M R; Farshidpour, M R; Mianji, F; Bayat, M

    2016-03-01

    An in vitro study of the dose responses of human peripheral blood lymphocytes was conducted with the aim of creating calibrated dose-response curves for biodosimetry measuring up to 4 Gy (0.25-4 Gy) of gamma radiation. The cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus (CBMN) assay was employed to obtain the frequencies of micronuclei (MN) per binucleated cell in blood samples from 16 healthy donors (eight males and eight females) in two age ranges of 20-34 and 35-50 years. The data were used to construct the calibration curves for men and women in two age groups, separately. An increase in micronuclei yield with the dose in a linear-quadratic way was observed in all groups. To verify the applicability of the constructed calibration curve, MN yields were measured in peripheral blood lymphocytes of two real overexposed subjects and three irradiated samples with unknown dose, and the results were compared with dose values obtained from measuring dicentric chromosomes. The comparison of the results obtained by the two techniques indicated a good agreement between dose estimates. The average baseline frequency of MN for the 130 healthy non-exposed donors (77 men and 55 women, 20-60 years old divided into four age groups) ranged from 6 to 21 micronuclei per 1000 binucleated cells. Baseline MN frequencies were higher for women and for the older age group. The results presented in this study point out that the CBMN assay is a reliable, easier and valuable alternative method for biological dosimetry.

  16. Dome-shaped functional response induced by nutrient imbalance of the prey.

    PubMed

    Bressendorff, Berith B; Toft, Søren

    2011-08-23

    Nutritional ecological theory predicts that predators should adjust prey capture and consumption rates depending on the prey's nutritional composition. This would affect the predator's functional response, at least at high prey densities, i.e. near predator satiation. Using a simple fruitfly-wolf spider laboratory system in Petri dishes, we found that functional responses changed from day to day over a 7 day period. After 1 to 2 days of feeding, dome-shaped functional responses (i.e. reduced predation at highest prey densities) appeared in spiders fed nutritionally imbalanced prey, compared with steadily increasing or asymptotic functional responses with nutritionally near-optimal prey. Later again (days 5-7), the difference disappeared as the level of the functional response was reduced in both treatments. Experiments with adult females in spring and subadult spiders in autumn revealed opposite patterns: a dome-shaped response with high-lipid prey for reproductive females, for which protein-rich prey are optimal, and a dome-shaped (or simply reduced) response with high-protein prey for pre-winter subadults, for which high-lipid flies are the optimal prey. Our results have implications for predation theory and models of biological control that have, so far, neglected nutritional aspects; in particular, the dynamic nutritional state of the predators should be incorporated.

  17. Dome-shaped functional response induced by nutrient imbalance of the prey

    PubMed Central

    Bressendorff, Berith B.; Toft, Søren

    2011-01-01

    Nutritional ecological theory predicts that predators should adjust prey capture and consumption rates depending on the prey's nutritional composition. This would affect the predator's functional response, at least at high prey densities, i.e. near predator satiation. Using a simple fruitfly-wolf spider laboratory system in Petri dishes, we found that functional responses changed from day to day over a 7 day period. After 1 to 2 days of feeding, dome-shaped functional responses (i.e. reduced predation at highest prey densities) appeared in spiders fed nutritionally imbalanced prey, compared with steadily increasing or asymptotic functional responses with nutritionally near-optimal prey. Later again (days 5–7), the difference disappeared as the level of the functional response was reduced in both treatments. Experiments with adult females in spring and subadult spiders in autumn revealed opposite patterns: a dome-shaped response with high-lipid prey for reproductive females, for which protein-rich prey are optimal, and a dome-shaped (or simply reduced) response with high-protein prey for pre-winter subadults, for which high-lipid flies are the optimal prey. Our results have implications for predation theory and models of biological control that have, so far, neglected nutritional aspects; in particular, the dynamic nutritional state of the predators should be incorporated. PMID:21367780

  18. Assessment of Pulse Echo Response of Flat Bottom Holes Through Curved Interfaces Using the Patch Element Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhu, G.; Reddy, Sudhan; Krishnamurthy, C. V.; Balasubramaniam, Krishnan

    2009-03-01

    The World Federations of Non-Destructive Evaluations Centers (WFNDEC) has proposed two studies for 2008 Benchmark problem. The first study deals with surface curvature effects across fluid-solid media to evaluate immersion transducer's P-wave response from Flat Bottom Holes (FBH) situated in the solid medium. The second study pertains to pulse echo response from Side Drilled Holes (SDH). We report the results for P-wave response from a FBH due to a transducer placed above a curved interface using the frequency domain Patch Element Model (PEM), developed at CNDE at IITM. The assessment employs an optimized algorithm to determine the points of reflection/refraction on any planar or curved interface between two media and incorporates the Divergence Factor (DF) to account for curvature effects on the field assessment. We also report results on the 2007 benchmark problem dealing with the response from FBH which has two parts: One is model based study and the other is comparison of model with experiments. The PEM results for 2007 and 2008 are compared with the available results from experiments and other models.

  19. Shape controlled flower-like silicon oxide nanowires and their pH response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Qi; Que, Rong-hui; Shao, Ming-wang; Zhou, Qing; Ma, Dorothy Duo Duo; Lee, Shuit-Tong

    2011-04-01

    Silicon oxide nanowires were synthesized with high-temperature evaporation using silicon monoxide as starting materials and tin and gallium as catalysts. The products take the shape of flowers with petals composed of silicon oxide nanowires. The pH response of the products reveals excellent linear relation due to their vast surface area.

  20. When Legitimacy Shapes Environmentally Responsible Behaviors: Considering Exposure to University Sustainability Initiatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Lesley; Hegtvedt, Karen A.; Johnson, Cathryn; Parris, Christie L.; Subramanyam, Shruthi

    2017-01-01

    This study examines how perceptions of the legitimacy of university sustainability efforts--support by the administration (authorization) or from students' peers (endorsement)--as well as the physical context in which students live, matter in shaping students' environmentally responsible behaviors (ERBs). Using survey data collected from…

  1. Polylactide-based polyurethane shape memory nanocomposites (Fe3O4/PLAUs) with fast magnetic responsiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Shu-Ying; Jin, Sheng-Peng; Gao, Xie-Feng; Mu, Jian

    2016-05-01

    Polylactide-based polyurethane shape memory nanocomposites (Fe3O4/PLAUs) with fast magnetic responsiveness are presented. For the purpose of fast response and homogeneous dispersion of magnetic nanoparticles, oleic acid was used to improve the dispersibility of Fe3O4 nanoparticles in a polymer matrix. A homogeneous distribution of Fe3O4 nanoparticles in the polymer matrix was obtained for nanocomposites with low Fe3O4 loading content. A small agglomeration was observed for nanocomposites with 6 wt% and 9 wt% loading content, leading to a small decline in the mechanical properties. PLAU and its nanocomposites have glass transition around 52 °C, which can be used as the triggering temperature. PLAU and its nanocomposites have shape fixity ratios above 99%, shape recovery ratios above 82% for the first cycle and shape recovery ratios above 91% for the second cycle. PLAU and its nanocomposites also exhibit a fast water bath or magnetic responsiveness. The magnetic recovery time decreases with an increase in the loading content of Fe3O4 nanoparticles due to an improvement in heating performance for increased weight percentage of fillers. The nanocomposites have fast responses in an alternating magnetic field and have potential application in biomedical areas such as intravascular stent.

  2. The Skipping Rope Curve

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nordmark, Arne; Essen, Hanno

    2007-01-01

    The equilibrium of a flexible inextensible string, or chain, in the centrifugal force field of a rotating reference frame is investigated. It is assumed that the end points are fixed on the rotation axis. The shape of the curve, the skipping rope curve or "troposkien", is given by the Jacobi elliptic function sn. (Contains 3 figures.)

  3. The Skipping Rope Curve

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nordmark, Arne; Essen, Hanno

    2007-01-01

    The equilibrium of a flexible inextensible string, or chain, in the centrifugal force field of a rotating reference frame is investigated. It is assumed that the end points are fixed on the rotation axis. The shape of the curve, the skipping rope curve or "troposkien", is given by the Jacobi elliptic function sn. (Contains 3 figures.)

  4. Analysis of the dynamic response of eccentric, disposable, and arch-shaped bracing systems to earthquakes

    SciTech Connect

    Shiah, G.C.

    1988-01-01

    This research investigates the dynamic response of the split K braced frame (SKBF), disposable knee braced frame (DKBF), and arch shape braced frame (ASBF) subjected to earthquake loads and the influence of shear, rotatory inertia, and axial force on the frequencies and mode shapes of the vibrating built-in beams. An asymmetric braced model is introduced to study the elastic stability of the arch shaped braced frame. The influence of the axial force on the natural frequencies and the mode shapes of the higher modes of the vibrating built-in beam are also studied. The earthquake loads are simulated by the random process using several built-up computer models. In these generated artificial earthquake models, the Autoregressive/Moving-Average (ARMA) models are used to analyze the San Fernando 1971 and El Centro 1941 earthquake loads. The energy-dissipating plates are used as the devices in the arch-shaped bracing frame in this study for the absorption of the earthquake energy. It is shown that the arch-shaped frame has a uniform story drift variation compared to split-K braced frame. The disposable knee braced frame has small story drift, and the arch-braced frame has no floor damages during earthquakes.

  5. Quantitative separation of the influence of copper (II) chloride mass migration on the chemo-responsive shape memory effect in polyurethane shape memory polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Haibao; Lu, Chunrui; Huang, Wei Min; Leng, Jinsong

    2016-10-01

    Chemo-responsive shape memory effect in polyurethane shape memory polymer (SMP) composite triggered by mass migration of copper (II) chloride (CuCl2) has been experimentally demonstrated. In this study, we present a comprehensive study on quantitative separation of the effect of CuCl2 particle mass migration on the chemo-responsive shape recovery behavior of polyurethane SMP composites with different concentrations of CuCl2 particles. It is found that the SMP is featured with a critical release rate of the mechanical energy storage associated with the shape recovery behavior due to mass migration of the CuCl2 particle. A sequence of molecular interactions among CuCl2 particles, polyurethane macromolecules and water molecules, i.e., assembly of the CuCl2 particle with polyurethane macromolecules, and then disassembly and dissolution of the CuCl2 particle in water, results in an acceleration of water-induced shape recovery of polyurethane SMP. This study focuses on the quantitative separation of the influence of mass migration on the chemo-responsive shape recovery behavior of polyurethane SMP in response to water. It is expected to promote and achieve the actuation of chemo-responsive SMPs in a fully controllable manner.

  6. The influence of maternal care and overprotection on youth adrenocortical stress response: a multiphase growth curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Vergara-Lopez, Chrystal; Chaudoir, Stephenie; Bublitz, Margaret; O'Reilly Treter, Maggie; Stroud, Laura

    2016-11-01

    We examined the association between two dimensions of maternal parenting style (care and overprotection) and cortisol response to an acute laboratory-induced stressor in healthy youth. Forty-three participants completed the Parental Bonding Instrument and an adapted version of the Trier Social Stress Test-Child (TSST-C). Nine cortisol samples were collected to investigate heterogeneity in different phases of youth's stress response. Multiphase growth-curve modeling was utilized to create latent factors corresponding to individual differences in cortisol during baseline, reactivity, and recovery to the TSST-C. Youth report of maternal overprotection was associated with lower baseline cortisol levels, and a slower cortisol decline during recovery, controlling for maternal care, puberty, and gender. No additive or interactive effects involving maternal care emerged. These findings suggest that maternal overprotection may exert a unique and important influence on youth's stress response.

  7. On the Shock Response of the Shape Memory Alloy, NiTi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millett, J. C. F.; Bourne, N. K.; Gray, G. T., III; Stevens, G. S.

    2002-07-01

    There has been recent interest in the behaviour of the shape-memory alloy NiTi since it undergoes a stress-induced phase change at a low stress value. It has been additionally noted that the NiTi does not appear to exhibit a Hugoniot elastic limit (HEL) in the way normally associated with other metals. In order to investigate the possible mechanisms operating to give rise to these effects, a series of plate impact experiments have been conducted in order to probe the material's response to shock. In particular attention has been paid to determination of the material Hugoniot in order to ascertain whether the observed features of the response may be explained. A series of other shots where shaped waves are applied are described in order to probe the lower rate response.

  8. Mathematical Modeling of Allelopathy. III. A Model for Curve-Fitting Allelochemical Dose Responses.

    PubMed

    Liu, De Li; An, Min; Johnson, Ian R; Lovett, John V

    2003-01-01

    Bioassay techniques are often used to study the effects of allelochemicals on plant processes, and it is generally observed that the processes are stimulated at low allelochemical concentrations and inhibited as the concentrations increase. A simple empirical model is presented to analyze this type of response. The stimulation-inhibition properties of allelochemical-dose responses can be described by the parameters in the model. The indices, p% reductions, are calculated to assess the allelochemical effects. The model is compared with experimental data for the response of lettuce seedling growth to Centaurepensin, the olfactory response of weevil larvae to alpha-terpineol, and the responses of annual ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam.), creeping red fescue (Festuca rubra L., cv. Ensylva), Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis L., cv. Kenblue), perennial ryegrass (L. perenne L., cv. Manhattan), and Rebel tall fescue (F. arundinacea Schreb) seedling growth to leachates of Rebel and Kentucky 31 tall fescue. The results show that the model gives a good description to observations and can be used to fit a wide range of dose responses. Assessments of the effects of leachates of Rebel and Kentucky 31 tall fescue clearly differentiate the properties of the allelopathic sources and the relative sensitivities of indicators such as the length of root and leaf.

  9. Mathematical Modeling of Allelopathy. III. A Model for Curve-Fitting Allelochemical Dose Responses

    PubMed Central

    Liu, De Li; An, Min; Johnson, Ian R.; Lovett, John V.

    2003-01-01

    Bioassay techniques are often used to study the effects of allelochemicals on plant processes, and it is generally observed that the processes are stimulated at low allelochemical concentrations and inhibited as the concentrations increase. A simple empirical model is presented to analyze this type of response. The stimulation-inhibition properties of allelochemical-dose responses can be described by the parameters in the model. The indices, p% reductions, are calculated to assess the allelochemical effects. The model is compared with experimental data for the response of lettuce seedling growth to Centaurepensin, the olfactory response of weevil larvae to α-terpineol, and the responses of annual ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam.), creeping red fescue (Festuca rubra L., cv. Ensylva), Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis L., cv. Kenblue), perennial ryegrass (L. perenne L., cv. Manhattan), and Rebel tall fescue (F. arundinacea Schreb) seedling growth to leachates of Rebel and Kentucky 31 tall fescue. The results show that the model gives a good description to observations and can be used to fit a wide range of dose responses. Assessments of the effects of leachates of Rebel and Kentucky 31 tall fescue clearly differentiate the properties of the allelopathic sources and the relative sensitivities of indicators such as the length of root and leaf. PMID:19330111

  10. Mechanics of Curved Folds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, Marcelo A.; Santangelo, Christian D.

    2011-03-01

    Despite an almost two thousand year history, origami, the art of folding paper, remains a challenge both artistically and scientifically. Traditionally, origami is practiced by folding along straight creases. A whole new set of shapes can be explored, however, if, instead of straight creases, one folds along arbitrary curves. We present a mechanical model for curved fold origami in which the energy of a plastically-deformed crease is balanced by the bending energy of developable regions on either side of the crease. Though geometry requires that a sheet buckle when folded along a closed curve, its shape depends on the elasticity of the sheet. NSF DMR-0846582.

  11. Combining optimization methods with response spectra curve-fitting toward improved damping ratio estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewick, Patrick T.; Smyth, Andrew W.

    2016-12-01

    The authors have previously shown that many traditional approaches to operational modal analysis (OMA) struggle to properly identify the modal damping ratios for bridges under traffic loading due to the interference caused by the driving frequencies of the traffic loads. This paper presents a novel methodology for modal parameter estimation in OMA that overcomes the problems presented by driving frequencies and significantly improves the damping estimates. This methodology is based on finding the power spectral density (PSD) of a given modal coordinate, and then dividing the modal PSD into separate regions, left- and right-side spectra. The modal coordinates were found using a blind source separation (BSS) algorithm and a curve-fitting technique was developed that uses optimization to find the modal parameters that best fit each side spectra of the PSD. Specifically, a pattern-search optimization method was combined with a clustering analysis algorithm and together they were employed in a series of stages in order to improve the estimates of the modal damping ratios. This method was used to estimate the damping ratios from a simulated bridge model subjected to moving traffic loads. The results of this method were compared to other established OMA methods, such as Frequency Domain Decomposition (FDD) and BSS methods, and they were found to be more accurate and more reliable, even for modes that had their PSDs distorted or altered by driving frequencies.

  12. Ground response curves for rock excavations supported by ungrouted tensioned rockbolts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labiouse, V.

    1996-01-01

    A numerical analysis has been developed for the design of ungrouted tensioned rockbolts as support of excavations under axisymmetric conditions. The bolts dimensions (length, crosssection, longitudinal and circumferential spacings), their stiffness, their pre-tension load and the delay of installation are taken into account. Moreover, the method effects three main improvements in the usual theory, taking into consideration: 1. the reaction force transferred to the rock mass in the bolts anchoring zone, 2. the elastic recompression of the carrying ring surrounding the excavation due to the bolts preload, and 3. the relative displacement of the bolts ends which has a repercussion on their tension. Since the usual rock-support interaction analysis is only available when the rock mass and the support behave independently, an alternative solution has been explored for the bolting system (since it cannot be considered as an internal support). It consists to include the effect of the rockbolts into the ground reaction curve. In this paper, the principles of the analysis are explained and a numerical application is taken.

  13. Medium response in JEWEL and its impact on jet shape observables in heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, Raghav; Zapp, Korinna Christine

    2017-07-01

    Realistic modeling of medium-jet interactions in heavy ion collisions is becoming increasingly important to successfully predict jet structure and shape observables. In Jewel, all partons belonging to the parton showers initiated by hard scattered partons undergo collisions with thermal partons from the medium, leading to both elastic and radiative energy loss. The recoiling medium partons carry away energy and momentum from the jet. Since the thermal component of these recoils' momenta is part of the soft background activity, comparison with data requires the implementation of a subtraction procedure. We present two independent procedures through which background subtraction can be performed and discuss the impact of the medium recoil on jet shape observables. Keeping track of the medium response significantly improves the Jewel description of jet shape measurements.

  14. Climatic predictors of temperature performance curve parameters in ectotherms imply complex responses to climate change.

    PubMed

    Clusella-Trullas, Susana; Blackburn, Tim M; Chown, Steven L

    2011-06-01

    Determining organismal responses to climate change is one of biology's greatest challenges. Recent forecasts for future climates emphasize altered temperature variation and precipitation, but most studies of animals have largely focused on forecasting the outcome of changes in mean temperature. Theory suggests that extreme thermal variation and precipitation will influence species performance and hence affect their response to changes in climate. Using an information-theoretic approach, we show that in squamate ectotherms (mostly lizards and snakes), two fitness-influencing components of performance, the critical thermal maximum and the thermal optimum, are more closely related to temperature variation and to precipitation, respectively, than they are to mean thermal conditions. By contrast, critical thermal minimum is related to mean annual temperature. Our results suggest that temperature variation and precipitation regimes have had a strong influence on the evolution of ectotherm performance, so that forecasts for animal responses to climate change will have to incorporate these factors and not only changes in average temperature.

  15. Detecting small environmental differences: risk-response curves for predator-induced behavior and morphology.

    PubMed

    Schoeppner, Nancy M; Relyea, Rick A

    2008-01-01

    Most organisms possess traits that are sensitive to changes in the environment (i.e., plastic traits) which results in the expression of environmentally induced polymorphisms. While most phenotypically plastic traits have traditionally been treated as threshold switches between induced and uninduced states, there is growing evidence that many traits can respond in a continuous fashion. In this experiment we exposed larval anurans (wood frog tadpoles, Rana sylvatica) to an increasing gradient of predation risk to determine how organisms respond to small environmental changes. We manipulated predation risk in two ways: by altering the amount of prey consumed by a constant number of predators (Dytiscus sp.) and by altering the number of predators that consume a constant amount of prey. We then quantified the expression of predator-induced behavior, morphology, and mass to determine the level of risk that induced each trait, the level of risk that induced the maximal phenotypic response for each trait, whether the different traits exhibited a plateauing response, and whether increasing risk via increasing predator number or via increasing prey consumption induced similar phenotypic changes. We found that all of the traits exhibited fine-tuned, graded responses and most of them exhibited a plateauing response with increased predation risk, suggesting either a limit to plasticity or the reflection of high costs of the defensive phenotype. For many traits, a large proportion of the maximum induction occurred at low levels of risk, suggesting that the chemical cues of predation are effective at extremely low concentrations. In contrast to earlier work, we found that behavioral and morphological responses to increased predator number were simply a response to increased total prey consumption. These results have important implications for models of plasticity evolution, models of optimal phenotypic design, expectations for how organisms respond to fine-grained changes (i

  16. Plasma corticosterone of city and desert Curve-billed Thrashers, Toxostoma curvirostre, in response to stress-related peptide administration.

    PubMed

    Fokidis, H Bobby; Deviche, Pierre

    2011-05-01

    We compared the activity and responsiveness of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis of an urban (Phoenix, Arizona) and desert population of a male songbird species (Curve-billed Thrasher, Toxostoma curvirostre), by measuring plasma corticosterone in response to acute administration of corticotropin-releasing factor, arginine vasotocin, or adrenocorticotropin hormone. Urban adult male thrashers showed greater responsiveness than desert birds to an injection of arginine vasotocin or adrenocorticotropin hormone, suggesting a population difference in pituitary and adrenal gland sensitivity. Plasma corticosterone in response to corticotropin-releasing factor injection did, however, not differ between populations. The differential corticosterone response to arginine vasotocin and corticotropin-releasing factor may reflect effects of chronic stress or habituation, which are known to favor arginine vasotocin over corticotropin-releasing factor sensitivity. Efficacy of HPA negative feedback by glucocorticoids was determined by measuring plasma corticosterone in response to acute administration of the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone. This administration decreased plasma corticosterone similarly in urban and desert thrashers, suggesting that the negative feedback of glucocorticoids on the HPA axis in the two populations was equally effective. The higher sensitivity of urban than desert thrashers to adrenocorticotropin hormone and arginine vasotocin may result from up-regulation of the HPA axis in urban birds. This up-regulation may in turn make it easier for city birds to cope with urban environment-associated stressors.

  17. Direct Writing of Three-Dimensional Macroporous Photonic Crystals on Pressure-Responsive Shape Memory Polymers.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yin; Ni, Yongliang; Leo, Sin-Yen; Wang, Bingchen; Basile, Vito; Taylor, Curtis; Jiang, Peng

    2015-10-28

    Here we report a single-step direct writing technology for making three-dimensional (3D) macroporous photonic crystal patterns on a new type of pressure-responsive shape memory polymer (SMP). This approach integrates two disparate fields that do not typically intersect: the well-established templating nanofabrication and shape memory materials. Periodic arrays of polymer macropores templated from self-assembled colloidal crystals are squeezed into disordered arrays in an unusual shape memory "cold" programming process. The recovery of the original macroporous photonic crystal lattices can be triggered by direct writing at ambient conditions using both macroscopic and nanoscopic tools, like a pencil or a nanoindenter. Interestingly, this shape memory disorder-order transition is reversible and the photonic crystal patterns can be erased and regenerated hundreds of times, promising the making of reconfigurable/rewritable nanooptical devices. Quantitative insights into the shape memory recovery of collapsed macropores induced by the lateral shear stresses in direct writing are gained through fundamental investigations on important process parameters, including the tip material, the critical pressure and writing speed for triggering the recovery of the deformed macropores, and the minimal feature size that can be directly written on the SMP membranes. Besides straightforward applications in photonic crystal devices, these smart mechanochromic SMPs that are sensitive to various mechanical stresses could render important technological applications ranging from chromogenic stress and impact sensors to rewritable high-density optical data storage media.

  18. Selecting the “Best” Yield Response Curve – How Much Does It Matter?

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Computing the economic optimum N rate (EONR) for corn yield response to nitrogen (N) fertilizer rate is one of the fundamental first steps in designing an optimum application program for N fertilizer. Numerous studies have examined the strengths and weaknesses of various mathematical equations for t...

  19. Anisotropic post-yield response of cancellous bone simulated by stress-strain curves of bulk equivalent structures.

    PubMed

    Tsouknidas, Alexander; Maliaris, Georgios; Savvakis, Savvas; Michailidis, Nikolaos

    2015-01-01

    During the last decade, finite element (FE) modelling has become ubiquitous in understanding complex mechanobiological phenomena, e.g. bone-implant interactions. The extensive computational effort required to achieve biorealistic results when modelling the post-yield behaviour of microstructures like cancellous bone is a major limitation of these techniques. This study describes the anisotropic biomechanical response of cancellous bone through stress-strain curves of equivalent bulk geometries. A cancellous bone segment, reverse engineered by micro computed tomography, was subjected to uniaxial compression. The material's constitutive law, obtained by nano-indentations, was considered during the simulation of the experimental process. A homodimensionally bulk geometry was employed to determine equivalent properties, resulting in a similar anisotropic response to the trabecular structure. The experimental verification of our model sustained that the obtained stress-strain curves can adequately reflect the post-yield behaviour of the sample. The introduced approach facilitates the consideration of nonlinearity and anisotropy of the tissue, while reducing the geometrical complexity of the model to a minimum.

  20. Analysis of the Effect of Light and Temperature on the Fluence Response Curves for Germination of Rumex obtusifolius

    PubMed Central

    Takaki, Massanori; Heeringa, Gerda H.; Cone, John W.; Kendrick, Richard E.

    1985-01-01

    Both red light (10 minutes) and 35°C treatment (60 minutes) stimulate the germination of seeds of Rumex obtusifolius otherwise maintained in darkness at 25°C. Fluence response curves were determined for the effect of red light to stimulate germination of seeds with and without 35°C treatment. The endogenous far-red absorbing form (Pfr) level in the seeds was determined using short saturating fluences of wavelengths of light which maintain different proportions of phytochrome as Pfr at equilibrium. In the seed batches investigated, the endogenous Pfr level was found to be 4% or less of the total phytochrome. High dark germination after 35°C treatment does not result from an increase in sensitivity of the whole population to Pfr. Calculated fluence response curves for germination which best fit the experimental data suggest that seeds germinate in darkness after 35°C treatment because of a nonphytochrome-related process (overriding factor). PMID:16664125

  1. Understanding the shape effect on the plasmonic response of small ligand coated nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xing; Jensen, Lasse

    2016-07-01

    The plasmonic properties of metallic nanoparticles typically depend strongly on their shapes and local environment. However, not much is known about the shape effects on the plasmonic response in small metallic nanoparticles when quantum size effects become important. In this work, we use atomistic electrodynamics models incorporated with quantum size effects to study the optical properties of both bare and ligand coated Ag nanoparticles in different shapes. Using classical electrodynamics, we find that the plasmonic response of bare metallic nanoparticles depends strongly on the morphology of the nanoparticles due to the presence of higher-order plasmon modes. By including quantum size effects in the simulations, we find a significant blue-shift of the dipole plasmon as well as the smearing-out of the multipole plasmon modes, and both lead to a weak shape dependence. The ligand effects on the nanoparticles cause a significant red-shift of the plasmon resonance arising from the reduction of the conductivity of the Ag atoms where the ligands bind. In contrast to the bare nanoparticles, we find several higher-order plasmon modes in the ligand coated nanoparticles, that are likely caused by the weak electron spill-out effect and the symmetry breaking at the surface in the presence of the ligands. Furthermore, we show that the ligand layer strongly modify the near-field distribution due to the screening of the ligands. This work highlights the importance of quantum size and ligand effects on the optical properties of small metallic nanoparticles.

  2. Curvilinearity in the dose-response curve for cancer in Japanese atomic bomb survivors.

    PubMed Central

    Little, M P; Muirhead, C R

    1997-01-01

    Recently released data on cancer incidence in Japanese atomic bomb survivors are analyzed using a variety of relative risk models that take account of errors in estimates of dose to assess the dose response at low doses. If a relative risk model with a threshold (the dose response is assumed linear above the threshold) is fitted to solid cancer data, a threshold of more than about 0.2 Sv is inconsistent with the data, whereas these data are consistent with there being no threshold. Among solid cancer subtypes there is strong evidence for a possible dose threshold only for nonmelanoma skin cancer. If a relative risk model with a threshold (the dose response is assumed linear above the threshold) is fitted to the leukemia data, a threshold of more than about 0.3 Sv is inconsistent with the data. In contrast to the estimates for the threshold level for solid cancer data, the best estimate for the threshold level in the leukemia data is significantly different from zero even when allowance is made for a possible quadratic term in the dose response, albeit at borderline levels of statistical significance (p = 0.04). There is little evidence for curvature in the leukemia dose response from 0.2 Sv upwards. However, possible underestimation of the errors in the estimates of the dose threshold as a result of confounding and uncertainties not taken into account in the analysis, together with the lack of biological plausibility of a threshold, makes interpretation of this finding questionable. PMID:9467073

  3. Dose-response curve and time-course of effect of vecuronium in male and female patients.

    PubMed

    Xue, F S; Liao, X; Liu, J H; Tong, S Y; Zhang, Y M; Zhang, R J; An, G; Luo, L K

    1998-06-01

    To determine the differences between men and women in the dose-response curve and the time-course of effect of vecuronium, we studied 60 adult patients (30 male and 30 female), ASA I, age 18-51 yr, undergoing elective plastic surgery. Anaesthesia was maintained with nitrous oxide 60% in oxygen; thiopentone and incremental doses of fentanyl were given as required. Neuromuscular function was assessed mechanomyographically using the train-of-four (TOF) stimulation at the wrist every 12 s. The percentage depression of T1 was used as the study variable. The dose-response relationship of vecuronium was determined by a cumulative dose-response technique. The dose-response curve in men was shifted in a parallel fashion to the right, indicating a decrease in the sensitivity to vecuronium-induced neuromuscular block, compared with women. The ED50, ED90 and ED95 of vecuronium were 23.9 (4.7), 45.4 (11.2) and 55.7 (14.3) micrograms kg-1 in men and 18.4 (3.7), 33.5 (7.8) and 39.8 (9.6) micrograms kg-1 in women respectively. There were statistically significant differences in these values between the two groups (P < 0.01 in each instance). After a total dose of vecuronium 80 micrograms kg-1, neuromuscular block was significantly longer in women than in men. The duration of peak effect, clinical duration, and the total duration were 18.7 (7.1), 26.6 (8.8) and 50.6 (16.0) min respectively in men and 26.0 (7.2), 37.1 (11.2) and 65.9 (20.7) min in women. They differed significantly between men and women (P < 0.005 in each case).

  4. Blast response of curved carbon/epoxy composite panels: Experimental study and finite-element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phadnis, V. A.; Kumar, P.; Shukla, A.; Roy, A.; Silberschmidt, V. V.

    2013-07-01

    Experimental and numerical studies were conducted to understand the effect of plate curvature on blast response of carbon/epoxy composite panels. A shock-tube system was utilized to impart controlled shock loading to quasi-isotropic composite panels with differing range of radii of curvatures. A 3D Digital Image Correlation (DIC) technique coupled with high-speed photography was used to obtain out-of-plane deflection and velocity, as well as in-plane strain on the back face of the panels. Macroscopic post-mortem analysis was performed to compare yielding and deformation in these panels. A dynamic computational simulation that integrates fluid-structure interaction was conducted to evaluate the panel response in general purpose finite-element software ABAQUS/Explicit. The obtained numerical results were compared to the experimental data and showed a good correlation.

  5. Exercise and Health: Dose and Response, Considering Both Ends of the Curve.

    PubMed

    Simon, Harvey B

    2015-11-01

    Over the past 60 years, an enormous body of data has demonstrated that exercise is good for health. Recently, however, there has been concern that repetitive intense exercise may have deleterious cardiovascular effects. To evaluate this possibility, I have reviewed the health response to exercise, with particular attention to the body's minimum daily requirement and to the maximum amount that is safe and effective. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Modeling lateral geniculate nucleus cell response spectra and Munsell reflectance spectra with cone sensitivity curves.

    PubMed

    Romney, A Kimball; D'Andrade, Roy G

    2005-11-08

    We find that the cell response spectra of lateral geniculate nucleus cells, as well as the reflectance spectra of Munsell color chips, may be modeled by using the cone sensitivity functions of the long and medium cones. We propose a simple model for how the neural signals from the photoreceptors might be combined in the retina to closely approximate the reflectance spectra of Munsell color chips without input from the short cone.

  7. Adaptive changes in prey vulnerability shape the response of predator populations to mortality.

    PubMed

    Abrams, Peter A

    2009-11-21

    Simple models are used to explore how adaptive changes in prey vulnerability alter the population response of their predator to increased mortality. If the mortality is an imposed harvest, the change in prey vulnerability also influences the relationship between harvest effort and yield of the predator. The models assume that different prey phenotypes share a single resource, but have different vulnerabilities to the predator. Decreased vulnerability is assumed to decrease resource consumption rate. Adaptive change may occur by phenotypic changes in the traits of a single species or by shifts in the abundances of a pair of coexisting species or morphs. The response of the predator population is influenced by the shape of the predator's functional response, the shape of resource density dependence, and the shape of the tradeoff between vulnerability and food intake in the prey. Given a linear predator functional response, adaptive prey defense tends to produce a decelerating decline in predator population size with increased mortality. Prey defense may also greatly increase the range of mortality rates that allow predator persistence. If the predator has a type-2 response with a significant handling time, adaptive prey defense may have a greater variety of effects on the predator's response to mortality, sometimes producing alternative attractors, population cycles, or increased mean predator density. Situations in which there is disruptive selection on prey defense often imply a bimodal change in yield as a function of harvesting effort, with a minimum at intermediate effort. These results argue against using single-species models of density dependent growth to manage predatory species, and illustrate the importance of incorporating anti-predator behavior into models in applied population ecology.

  8. Shaping of a system's frequency response using an array of subordinate oscillators.

    PubMed

    Vignola, Joseph F; Judge, John A; Kurdila, Andrew J

    2009-07-01

    The frequency response of an oscillating structure can be tailored by attaching one or more subordinate oscillators. This paper shows how the magnitude and phase of the frequency response can be deliberately shaped by prescribing the distributions of the dynamic properties in an array of such subordinate oscillators. Exact analytic governing equations of motion are derived for the coupled system composed of the primary system and the subordinate array. For a relatively small number (<100) of attached oscillators whose total mass is small (<1%) relative to the primary structure, it is possible to engineer frequency-response functions of the primary oscillator to have, for example, nearly linear phase or constant amplitude over a frequency band of interest. The frequency range over which response shaping is achieved is determined by the band of the attached oscillators. It is shown that the common analytic methodology for designing a dynamic vibration absorber represents the limiting case of a single oscillator in the subordinate set. Moreover, increasing the number of subordinate oscillators (without increasing the total added mass) offers a number of advantages in reshaping the dominant system's frequency response.

  9. Effects of range bin shape and Doppler filter response in a digital SAR data processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, C. R.

    1978-01-01

    In calibrating the backscatter coefficient obtained with an imaging synthetic aperture radar (SAR) system to determine absolute values of radar cross-section and reflectivity it is common practice to use a target of known radar cross-section placed within the scene. A corner reflector acts as a point target, but the return from it may not be centered in the resolution cell. It is important, for accurate calibration, to perform straddling corrections based on the range bin and Doppler filter response curves.

  10. Determination of in vivo mechanical properties of long bones from their impedance response curves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borders, S. G.

    1981-01-01

    A mathematical model consisting of a uniform, linear, visco-elastic, Euler-Bernoulli beam to represent the ulna or tibia of the vibrating forearm or leg system is developed. The skin and tissue compressed between the probe and bone is represented by a spring in series with the beam. The remaining skin and tissue surrounding the bone is represented by a visco-elastic foundation with mass. An extensive parametric study is carried out to determine the effect of each parameter of the mathematical model on its impedance response. A system identification algorithm is developed and programmed on a digital computer to determine the parametric values of the model which best simulate the data obtained from an impedance test.

  11. Magnetically responsive gourd-shaped colloidal particles in cholesteric liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Senyuk, Bohdan; Varney, Michael C M; Lopez, Javier A; Wang, Sijia; Wu, Ning; Smalyukh, Ivan I

    2014-08-28

    Particle shape and medium chirality are two key features recently used to control anisotropic colloidal self-assembly and dynamics in liquid crystals. Here, we study magnetically responsive gourd-shaped colloidal particles dispersed in cholesteric liquid crystals with periodicity comparable or smaller than the particle's dimensions. Using magnetic manipulation and optical tweezers, which allow one to position colloids near the confining walls, we measured the elastic repulsive interactions of these particles with confining surfaces and found that separation-dependent particle-wall interaction force is a non-monotonic function of separation and shows oscillatory behavior. We show that gourd-shaped particles in cholesterics reside not on a single sedimentation level, but on multiple long-lived metastable levels separated by a distance comparable to cholesteric periodicity. Finally, we demonstrate three-dimensional laser tweezers assisted assembly of gourd-shaped particles taking advantage of both orientational order and twist periodicity of cholesterics, potentially allowing new forms of orientationally and positionally ordered colloidal organization in these media.

  12. Magnetically responsive gourd-shaped colloidal particles in cholesteric liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senyuk, Bohdan; Varney, Michael C. M.; Lopez, Javier A.; Wang, Sijia; Wu, Ning; Smalyukh, Ivan I.

    2014-07-01

    Particle shape and medium chirality are two key features recently used to control anisotropic colloidal self-assembly and dynamics in liquid crystals. Here, we study magnetically responsive gourd-shaped colloidal particles dispersed in cholesteric liquid crystals with periodicity comparable or smaller than the particle's dimensions. Using magnetic manipulation and optical tweezers, which allow one to position colloids near the confining walls, we measured the elastic repulsive interactions of these particles with confining surfaces and found that separation-dependent particle-wall interaction force is a non-monotonic function of separation and shows oscillatory behavior. We show that gourd-shaped particles in cholesterics reside not on a single sedimentation level, but on multiple long-lived metastable levels separated by a distance comparable to cholesteric periodicity. Finally, we demonstrate three-dimensional laser tweezers assisted assembly of gourd-shaped particles taking advantage of both orientational order and twist periodicity of cholesterics, potentially allowing new forms of orientationally and positionally ordered colloidal organization in these media.

  13. Subjective response to sonic booms having different shapes, rise times, and durations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccurdy, David A.

    1994-01-01

    Two laboratory experiments were conducted to quantify the subjective response of people to simulated outdoor sonic booms having different pressure signatures. The specific objectives of the experiments were to compare subjective response to sonic booms when described in terms of 'loudness' and 'annoyance'; to determine the ability of various noise metrics to predict subjective response to sonic booms; to determine the effects on subjective response of rise time, duration, and level; and to compare the subjective response to 'N-wave' sonic boom signatures with the subjective response to 'minimized' sonic boom signatures. The experiments were conducted in a computer-controlled, man-rated sonic boom simulator capable of reproducing user-specified pressure signatures for a wide range of sonic boom parameters. One hundred and fifty sonic booms representing different combinations of two wave shapes, four rise times, seven durations, and three peak overpressures were presented to 36 test subjects in each experiment. The test subjects in the first experiment made judgments of 'loudness' while the test subjects in the second experiment judged 'annoyance.' Subjective response to sonic booms was the same whether expressed in terms of loudness or in terms of annoyance. Analyses of several different noise metrics indicated that A-weighted sound exposure level and Perceived Level were the best predictors of subjective response. Further analyses indicated that, of these two noise metrics, only Perceived Level completely accounted for the effects of wave shape, rise time, and peak overpressure. Neither metric fully accounted for the effect of duration. However, the magnitude of the duration effect was small over the very wide range of durations considered.

  14. Bending the curve: force health protection during the insertion phase of the Ebola outbreak response.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Mark S; Beaton, K; Bowley, D; Eardley, W; Hunt, P; Johnson, S; Round, J; Tarmey, N T; Williams, A

    2016-06-01

    After >10 years of enduring operations in Iraq and Afghanistan, Defence Strategic Direction is returning to a contingency posture. As the first post-Afghanistan operation, in September 2014, a UK Joint Inter-Agency Task Force deployed to Sierra Leone in response to the Ebola virus disease (EVD) epidemic in West Africa. The aims were expanding treatment capacity, assisting with training and supporting host nation resilience. The insertion phase of this deployment created a unique set of challenges for force health protection. In addition to the considerable risk of tropical disease and trauma, deployed personnel faced the risks of working in an EVD epidemic. This report explores how deployed medical assets overcame the difficulties of mounting a short-notice contingent operation in a region of the world with inherent major climatic and health challenges. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  15. Phase response curve analysis of a full morphological globus pallidus neuron model reveals distinct perisomatic and dendritic modes of synaptic integration

    PubMed Central

    Schultheiss, Nathan W.; Edgerton, Jeremy R.; Jaeger, Dieter

    2010-01-01

    Synchronization of globus pallidus (GP) neurons and cortically-entrained oscillations between GP and other basal ganglia nuclei are key features of the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease. Phase response curves (PRCs), which tabulate the effects of phasic inputs within a neuron's spike cycle on output spike timing, are efficient tools for predicting the emergence of synchronization in neuronal networks and entrainment to periodic input. In this study we apply physiologically realistic synaptic conductance inputs to a full morphological GP neuron model to determine the phase response properties of the soma and different regions of the dendritic tree. We find that perisomatic excitatory inputs delivered throughout the inter-spike interval advance the phase of the spontaneous spike cycle yielding a type I PRC. In contrast, we demonstrate that distal dendritic excitatory inputs can either delay or advance the next spike depending on whether they occur early or late in the spike cycle. We find this latter pattern of responses, summarized by a biphasic (type II) PRC, was a consequence of dendritic activation of the small conductance calcium-activated potassium current, SK. We also evaluate the spike-frequency dependence of somatic and dendritic PRC shapes, and we demonstrate the robustness of our results to variations of conductance densities, distributions, and kinetic parameters. We conclude that the distal dendrite of GP neurons embodies a distinct dynamical subsystem that could promote synchronization of pallidal networks to excitatory inputs. These results highlight the need to consider different effects of perisomatic and dendritic inputs in the control of network behavior. PMID:20164360

  16. The other side of the curve: examining the relationship between pre-stressor physiological responses and stress reactivity.

    PubMed

    Balodis, Iris M; Wynne-Edwards, Katherine E; Olmstead, Mary C

    2010-10-01

    There is widespread consensus that stress induces dramatic physiological changes, but no agreement on the quantitative parameters that are appropriate to measure these responses. More importantly, the interpretation of various stress measurements, and how individual responses should be evaluated, has not been properly addressed. Even the definition of baseline, against which stress responses must be measured, is not clearly established. The current experiment sought to address these shortcomings by comparing the predictive value of different calculated parameters for psychosocial and physiological measures of stress across individuals. Subjects were 29 male and 59 female healthy undergraduate students with saliva samples collected over a 3-h interval that included a Trier Social Stress Test. Salivary cortisol and alpha-amylase response were analyzed using the absolute concentration, the percent change in concentration, the area under the curve (Pruessner et al., 2003), and the arrival index (change from arrival to 1h after arrival). The arrival index correlated with the subsequent stress response for both cortisol (r=0.76, p<0.01) and alpha-amylase (r=0.86, p<0.01). The arrival index for both cortisol and alpha-amylase was also related to subjective ratings of anxiety following the psychosocial stressor. A subset of individuals with high self-reported anxiety also displayed higher reactivity in response to the psychosocial stressor. Thus, the magnitude of the difference in cortisol and alpha-amylase between arrival and 1h after arrival was a predictor of subsequent stress reactivity. These findings suggest that different psychosocial profiles may be reflected in cortisol and alpha-amylase changes. For this reason: (1) a recovery period after arrival is essential to establish a baseline, (2) the difference between arrival and post-recovery period baseline should be included in experimental designs as a predictive variable, and (3) transformation of individual

  17. Mechanisms of cell shape change: the cytomechanics of cellular response to chemical environment and mechanical loading

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Processes such as cell locomotion and morphogenesis depend on both the generation of force by cytoskeletal elements and the response of the cell to the resulting mechanical loads. Many widely accepted theoretical models of processes involving cell shape change are based on untested hypotheses about the interaction of these two components of cell shape change. I have quantified the mechanical responses of cytoplasm to various chemical environments and mechanical loading regimes to understand better the mechanisms of cell shape change and to address the validity of these models. Measurements of cell mechanical properties were made with strands of cytoplasm submerged in media containing detergent to permeabilize the plasma membrane, thus allowing control over intracellular milieu. Experiments were performed with equipment that generated sinusoidally varying length changes of isolated strands of cytoplasm from Physarum polycephalum. Results indicate that stiffness, elasticity, and viscosity of cytoplasm all increase with increasing concentration of Ca2+, Mg2+, and ATP, and decrease with increasing magnitude and rate of deformation. These results specifically challenge assumptions underlying mathematical models of morphogenetic events such as epithelial folding and cell division, and further suggest that gelation may depend on both actin cross-linking and actin polymerization. PMID:1556158

  18. Analysis of the finite deformation response of shape memory polymers: I. Thermomechanical characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volk, Brent L.; Lagoudas, Dimitris C.; Chen, Yi-Chao; Whitley, Karen S.

    2010-07-01

    This study presents the analysis of the finite deformation response of a shape memory polymer (SMP). This two-part paper addresses the thermomechanical characterization of SMPs, the derivation of material parameters for a finite deformation phenomenological model, the numerical implementation of such a model, and the predictions from the model with comparisons to experimental data. Part I of this work presents the thermomechanical characterization of the material behavior of a shape memory polymer. In this experimental investigation, the vision image correlation system, a visual-photographic apparatus, was used to measure displacements in the gauge area. A series of tensile tests, which included nominal values of the extension of 10%, 25%, 50%, and 100%, were performed on SMP specimens. The effects on the free recovery behavior of increasing the value of the applied deformation and temperature rate were considered. The stress-extension relationship was observed to be nonlinear for increasing values of the extension, and the shape recovery was observed to occur at higher temperatures upon increasing the temperature rate. The experimental results, aided by the advanced experimental apparatus, present components of the material behavior which are critical for the development and calibration of models to describe the response of SMPs.

  19. Responsive nanoporous metals: recoverable modulations on strength and shape by watering.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xing-Long; Liu, Ling-Zhi; Jin, Hai-Jun

    2016-08-12

    Many biological materials can readily modulate their mechanical properties and shape by interacting with water in the surrounding environment, which is essential to their high performance in application. In contrast, typical inorganic materials (such as the metals) cannot change their strength and shape without involving thermal/mechanical treatments. By introducing nano-scale porous structure and exploiting a simple physical concept-the water-capillarity in nanopores, here we report that a 'dead' metal can be transformed into a 'smart' material with water-responsive properties. We demonstrate that the apparent strength, volume and shape of nanoporous Au and Au(Pt) can be modulated in situ, dramatically and recoverably, in response to water-dipping and partial-drying. The amplitude of strength-modulation reaches 20 MPa, which is nearly 50% of the yield strength at initial state. This approach also leads to reversible length change up to 1.3% in nanoporous Au and a large reversible bending motion of a bi-layer strip with tip displacement of ∼20 mm, which may be used for actuation. This method is simple and effective, occurring in situ under ambient conditions and requiring no external power, analogous to biological materials. The findings may open up novel applications in many areas such as micro-robotics and bio-medical devices.

  20. Responsive nanoporous metals: recoverable modulations on strength and shape by watering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Xing-Long; Liu, Ling-Zhi; Jin, Hai-Jun

    2016-08-01

    Many biological materials can readily modulate their mechanical properties and shape by interacting with water in the surrounding environment, which is essential to their high performance in application. In contrast, typical inorganic materials (such as the metals) cannot change their strength and shape without involving thermal/mechanical treatments. By introducing nano-scale porous structure and exploiting a simple physical concept—the water-capillarity in nanopores, here we report that a ‘dead’ metal can be transformed into a ‘smart’ material with water-responsive properties. We demonstrate that the apparent strength, volume and shape of nanoporous Au and Au(Pt) can be modulated in situ, dramatically and recoverably, in response to water-dipping and partial-drying. The amplitude of strength-modulation reaches 20 MPa, which is nearly 50% of the yield strength at initial state. This approach also leads to reversible length change up to 1.3% in nanoporous Au and a large reversible bending motion of a bi-layer strip with tip displacement of ∼20 mm, which may be used for actuation. This method is simple and effective, occurring in situ under ambient conditions and requiring no external power, analogous to biological materials. The findings may open up novel applications in many areas such as micro-robotics and bio-medical devices.

  1. Mutations induced in Tradescantia by small doses of X-rays and neutrons - Analysis of dose-response curves.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparrow, A. H.; Underbrink, A. G.; Rossi, H. H.

    1972-01-01

    Dose-response curves for pink somatic mutations in Tradescantia stamen hairs were analyzed after neutron and X-ray irradiation with doses ranging from a fraction of a rad to the region of saturation. The dose-effect relation for neutrons indicates a linear dependence from 0.01 to 8 rads; between 0.25 and 5 rads, a linear dependence is indicated for X-rays also. As a consequence the relative biological effectiveness reaches a constant value (about 50) at low doses. The observations are in good agreement with the predictions of the theory of dual radiation action and support its interpretation of the effects of radiation on higher organisms. The doubling dose of X-rays was found to be nearly 1 rad.

  2. Mutations induced in Tradescantia by small doses of X-rays and neutrons - Analysis of dose-response curves.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparrow, A. H.; Underbrink, A. G.; Rossi, H. H.

    1972-01-01

    Dose-response curves for pink somatic mutations in Tradescantia stamen hairs were analyzed after neutron and X-ray irradiation with doses ranging from a fraction of a rad to the region of saturation. The dose-effect relation for neutrons indicates a linear dependence from 0.01 to 8 rads; between 0.25 and 5 rads, a linear dependence is indicated for X-rays also. As a consequence the relative biological effectiveness reaches a constant value (about 50) at low doses. The observations are in good agreement with the predictions of the theory of dual radiation action and support its interpretation of the effects of radiation on higher organisms. The doubling dose of X-rays was found to be nearly 1 rad.

  3. Enhanced Response Time of Electrowetting Lenses with Shaped Input Voltage Functions.

    PubMed

    Supekar, Omkar D; Zohrabi, Mo; Gopinath, Juliet T; Bright, Victor M

    2017-05-16

    Adaptive optical lenses based on the electrowetting principle are being rapidly implemented in many applications, such as microscopy, remote sensing, displays, and optical communication. To characterize the response of these electrowetting lenses, the dependence upon direct current (DC) driving voltage functions was investigated in a low-viscosity liquid system. Cylindrical lenses with inner diameters of 2.45 and 3.95 mm were used to characterize the dynamic behavior of the liquids under DC voltage electrowetting actuation. With the increase of the rise time of the input exponential driving voltage, the originally underdamped system response can be damped, enabling a smooth response from the lens. We experimentally determined the optimal rise times for the fastest response from the lenses. We have also performed numerical simulations of the lens actuation with input exponential driving voltage to understand the variation in the dynamics of the liquid-liquid interface with various input rise times. We further enhanced the response time of the devices by shaping the input voltage function with multiple exponential rise times. For the 3.95 mm inner diameter lens, we achieved a response time improvement of 29% when compared to the fastest response obtained using single-exponential driving voltage. The technique shows great promise for applications that require fast response times.

  4. The superior paraolivary nucleus shapes temporal response properties of neurons in the inferior colliculus

    PubMed Central

    Felix, Richard A.; Magnusson, Anna K.; Berrebi, Albert S.

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian superior paraolivary nucleus (SPON) is a major source of GABAergic inhibition to neurons in the inferior colliculus (IC), a well-studied midbrain nucleus that is the site of convergence and integration for the majority ascending auditory pathways en route to the cortex. Neurons in the SPON and IC exhibit highly precise responses to temporal sound features, which are important perceptual cues for naturally occurring sounds. To determine how inhibitory input from the SPON contributes to the encoding of temporal information in the IC, a reversible inactivation procedure was conducted to silence SPON neurons while recording responses to amplitude-modulated tones and silent gaps between tones in the IC. The results show that SPON-derived inhibition shapes responses of onset and sustained units in the IC via different mechanisms. Onset neurons appear to be driven primarily by excitatory inputs and their responses are shaped indirectly by SPON-derived inhibition, whereas sustained neurons are heavily influenced directly by transient offset inhibition from the SPON. The findings also demonstrate that a more complete dissection of temporal processing pathways is critical for understanding how biologically important sounds are encoded by the brain. PMID:24973970

  5. Learning shapes the aversion and reward responses of lateral habenula neurons

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Daqing; Li, Yi; Feng, Qiru; Guo, Qingchun; Zhou, Jingfeng; Luo, Minmin

    2017-01-01

    The lateral habenula (LHb) is believed to encode negative motivational values. It remains unknown how LHb neurons respond to various stressors and how learning shapes their responses. Here, we used fiber-photometry and electrophysiology to track LHb neuronal activity in freely-behaving mice. Bitterness, pain, and social attack by aggressors intensively excite LHb neurons. Aversive Pavlovian conditioning induced activation by the aversion-predicting cue in a few trials. The experience of social defeat also conditioned excitatory responses to previously neutral social stimuli. In contrast, fiber photometry and single-unit recordings revealed that sucrose reward inhibited LHb neurons and often produced excitatory rebound. It required prolonged conditioning and high reward probability to induce inhibition by reward-predicting cues. Therefore, LHb neurons can bidirectionally process a diverse array of aversive and reward signals. Importantly, their responses are dynamically shaped by learning, suggesting that the LHb participates in experience-dependent selection of behavioral responses to stressors and rewards. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.23045.001 PMID:28561735

  6. How much is enough? Modulation of dose-response curve for steroid receptor-regulated gene expression by changing concentrations of transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Simons, S Stoney

    2006-01-01

    The position of the dose-response curve for steroid-regulated gene expression determines how much variation in response will accompany the normal physiological changes in circulating steroid. Over the last several years, it has become clear that the concentration of steroid hormone required for half-maximal induction or repression by a given receptor-steroid complex, which is normally called the EC50, is not constant for all responsive genes. Thus, the position of the dose-response curve can change so that a single concentration of steroid produces very different percentages of maximal activity. This, in turn, allows for the differential expression of genes by a common steroid hormone concentration during development, differentiation, and homeostasis. Here we review the variety of factors that influence the EC50 and position of the dose-response curve for steroid hormone receptors, discuss what is known about the mechanisms, and highlight promising areas for future research.

  7. Investigation of the Thermomechanical Response of Shape Memory Alloy Hybrid Composite Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Brian A.

    2005-01-01

    Previous work at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) involved fabrication and testing of composite beams with embedded, pre-strained shape memory alloy (SMA) ribbons. That study also provided comparison of experimental results with numerical predictions from a research code making use of a new thermoelastic model for shape memory alloy hybrid composite (SMAHC) structures. The previous work showed qualitative validation of the numerical model. However, deficiencies in the experimental-numerical correlation were noted and hypotheses for the discrepancies were given for further investigation. The goal of this work is to refine the experimental measurement and numerical modeling approaches in order to better understand the discrepancies, improve the correlation between prediction and measurement, and provide rigorous quantitative validation of the numerical model. Thermal buckling, post-buckling, and random responses to thermal and inertial (base acceleration) loads are studied. Excellent agreement is achieved between the predicted and measured results, thereby quantitatively validating the numerical tool.

  8. Titration Curves: Fact and Fiction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chamberlain, John

    1997-01-01

    Discusses ways in which datalogging equipment can enable titration curves to be measured accurately and how computing power can be used to predict the shape of curves. Highlights include sources of error, use of spreadsheets to generate titration curves, titration of a weak acid with a strong alkali, dibasic acids, weak acid and weak base, and…

  9. Titration Curves: Fact and Fiction.