Science.gov

Sample records for response die modulation

  1. Patient control over dying: responses of health care professionals.

    PubMed

    Kelner, M J; Bourgeault, I L

    1993-03-01

    Decisions concerning how, when and where patients should die have traditionally been the exclusive domain of health care professionals. More recently, patients and their families are demanding increasing control over these decisions. This paper reports on the responses of 20 physicians and 20 nurses in a major teaching hospital regarding the desire of patients to exert more control over the circumstances of their dying. The findings, based on in-depth, semi-structured interviews, suggest that while health care professionals are generally in favour of the principle of patient control over dying, they have reservations about accommodating patients' wishes in actual clinical situations. Key factors that underly their ambivalence on this point are: (1) specific patient circumstances, such as age, severity of illness and mental competence; (2) moral and legal concerns; and (3) the type of intervention requested by patient. The results indicate that patient control over dying represents a challenge to the clinical judgement of health care professionals; that it runs counter to their perception of their role as healers and supporters; that it raises crucial concerns about their personal ethics and legal liability and that it poses a challenge to their professional autonomy and power. It is likely that health care practitioners will increasingly be pressured to concede their autonomy and enter into a partnership with patients in the decision-making process.

  2. A module on death and dying to develop empathy in student pharmacists.

    PubMed

    Manolakis, Michael L; Olin, Jacqueline L; Thornton, Phillip L; Dolder, Christian R; Hanrahan, Conor

    2011-05-10

    To implement an integrated module on death and dying into a 15-week bioethics course and determine whether it increased student pharmacists' empathy. Students participated in a 5-week death and dying module that included presentation of the film Wit, an interactive lecture on hospice, and a lecture on the ethics of pain management. Fifty-six students completed the 30-item Balanced Emotional Empathy Scale (BEES) before and after completing the module and wrote a reflective essay. Students demonstrated an appreciation of patient-specific values in their essay. Quantitative data collected via BEES scores demonstrated significant improvement in measured empathy. A 5-week instructional model on death and dying significantly increased student empathy.

  3. Can Arousal Modulate Response Inhibition?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinbach, Noam; Kalanthroff, Eyal; Avnit, Amir; Henik, Avishai

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to examine if and how arousal can modulate response inhibition. Two competing hypotheses can be drawn from previous literature. One holds that alerting cues that elevate arousal should result in an impulsive response and therefore impair response inhibition. The other suggests that alerting enhances processing of…

  4. Can Arousal Modulate Response Inhibition?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinbach, Noam; Kalanthroff, Eyal; Avnit, Amir; Henik, Avishai

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to examine if and how arousal can modulate response inhibition. Two competing hypotheses can be drawn from previous literature. One holds that alerting cues that elevate arousal should result in an impulsive response and therefore impair response inhibition. The other suggests that alerting enhances processing of…

  5. Rights & Responsibilities. Personnel Management Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Gale; And Others

    This module on rights and responsibilities is intended to introduce the hospitality manager or supervisor to sound personnel management practices that comply with the law. The material is presented in a self-instructional format in seven sections. At the beginning of each section is a statement of the objectives that will be achieved as a result…

  6. Modulating macrophage response to biomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaveri, Toral

    Macrophages recruited to the site of biomaterial implantation are the primary mediators of the chronic foreign body response to implanted materials. Since foreign body response limits performance and functional life of numerous implanted biomaterials/medical devices, various approaches have been investigated to modulate macrophage interactions with biomaterial surfaces to mitigate this response. In this work we have explored two independent approaches to modulate the macrophage inflammatory response to biomaterials. The first approach targets surface integrins, cell surface receptors that mediate cell adhesion to biomaterials through adhesive proteins spontaneously adsorbed on biomaterial surfaces. The second approach involves surface modification of biomaterials using nanotopographic features since nanotopography has been reported to modulate cell adhesion and viability in a cell type-dependent manner. More specifically, Zinc Oxide (ZnO) nanorod surface was investigated for its role in modulating macrophage adhesion and survival in vitro and foreign body response in vivo. For the first approach, we have investigated the role of integrin Mac-1 and RGD-binding integrins in the in-vivo osteolysis response and macrophage inflammatory processes of phagocytosis as well as inflammatory cytokine secretion in response to particulate biomaterials. We have also investigated the in vivo foreign body response (FBR) to subcutaneously implanted biomaterials by evaluating the thickness of fibrous capsule formed around the implants after 2 weeks of implantation. The role of Mac-1 integrin was isolated using a Mac-1 KO mouse and comparing it to a WT control. The role of RGD binding integrins in FBR was investigated by coating the implanted biomaterial with ELVAX(TM) polymer loaded with Echistatin which contains the RGD sequence. For the in-vivo osteolysis study and to study the in-vitro macrophage response to particulate biomaterials, we used the RGD peptide encapsulated in ELVAX

  7. Pathogen response-like recruitment and activation of neutrophils by sterile immunogenic dying cells drives neutrophil-mediated residual cell killing.

    PubMed

    Garg, Abhishek D; Vandenberk, Lien; Fang, Shentong; Fasche, Tekele; Van Eygen, Sofie; Maes, Jan; Van Woensel, Matthias; Koks, Carolien; Vanthillo, Niels; Graf, Norbert; de Witte, Peter; Van Gool, Stefaan; Salven, Petri; Agostinis, Patrizia

    2017-05-01

    Innate immune sensing of dying cells is modulated by several signals. Inflammatory chemokines-guided early recruitment, and pathogen-associated molecular patterns-triggered activation, of major anti-pathogenic innate immune cells like neutrophils distinguishes pathogen-infected stressed/dying cells from sterile dying cells. However, whether certain sterile dying cells stimulate innate immunity by partially mimicking pathogen response-like recruitment/activation of neutrophils remains poorly understood. We reveal that sterile immunogenic dying cancer cells trigger (a cell autonomous) pathogen response-like chemokine (PARC) signature, hallmarked by co-release of CXCL1, CCL2 and CXCL10 (similar to cells infected with bacteria or viruses). This PARC signature recruits preferentially neutrophils as first innate immune responders in vivo (in a cross-species, evolutionarily conserved manner; in mice and zebrafish). Furthermore, key danger signals emanating from these dying cells, that is, surface calreticulin, ATP and nucleic acids stimulate phagocytosis, purinergic receptors and toll-like receptors (TLR) i.e. TLR7/8/9-MyD88 signaling on neutrophil level, respectively. Engagement of purinergic receptors and TLR7/8/9-MyD88 signaling evokes neutrophil activation, which culminates into H2O2 and NO-driven respiratory burst-mediated killing of viable residual cancer cells. Thus sterile immunogenic dying cells perform 'altered-self mimicry' in certain contexts to exploit neutrophils for phagocytic targeting of dead/dying cancer cells and cytotoxic targeting of residual cancer cells.

  8. Modeling and Analysis of The Pressure Die Casting Using Response Surface Methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Kittur, Jayant K.; Herwadkar, T. V.; Parappagoudar, M. B.

    2010-10-26

    Pressure die casting is successfully used in the manufacture of Aluminum alloys components for automobile and many other industries. Die casting is a process involving many process parameters having complex relationship with the quality of the cast product. Though various process parameters have influence on the quality of die cast component, major influence is seen by the die casting machine parameters and their proper settings. In the present work, non-linear regression models have been developed for making predictions and analyzing the effect of die casting machine parameters on the performance characteristics of die casting process. Design of Experiments (DOE) with Response Surface Methodology (RSM) has been used to analyze the effect of effect of input parameters and their interaction on the response and further used to develop nonlinear input-output relationships. Die casting machine parameters, namely, fast shot velocity, slow shot to fast shot change over point, intensification pressure and holding time have been considered as the input variables. The quality characteristics of the cast product were determined by porosity, hardness and surface rough roughness (output/responses). Design of experiments has been used to plan the experiments and analyze the impact of variables on the quality of casting. On the other-hand Response Surface Methodology (Central Composite Design) is utilized to develop non-linear input-output relationships (regression models). The developed regression models have been tested for their statistical adequacy through ANOVA test. The practical usefulness of these models has been tested with some test cases. These models can be used to make the predictions about different quality characteristics, for the known set of die casting machine parameters, without conducting the experiments.

  9. Modeling and Analysis of The Pressure Die Casting Using Response Surface Methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kittur, Jayant K.; Herwadkar, T. V.; Parappagoudar, M. B.

    2010-10-01

    Pressure die casting is successfully used in the manufacture of Aluminum alloys components for automobile and many other industries. Die casting is a process involving many process parameters having complex relationship with the quality of the cast product. Though various process parameters have influence on the quality of die cast component, major influence is seen by the die casting machine parameters and their proper settings. In the present work, non-linear regression models have been developed for making predictions and analyzing the effect of die casting machine parameters on the performance characteristics of die casting process. Design of Experiments (DOE) with Response Surface Methodology (RSM) has been used to analyze the effect of effect of input parameters and their interaction on the response and further used to develop nonlinear input-output relationships. Die casting machine parameters, namely, fast shot velocity, slow shot to fast shot change over point, intensification pressure and holding time have been considered as the input variables. The quality characteristics of the cast product were determined by porosity, hardness and surface rough roughness (output/responses). Design of experiments has been used to plan the experiments and analyze the impact of variables on the quality of casting. On the other-hand Response Surface Methodology (Central Composite Design) is utilized to develop non-linear input-output relationships (regression models). The developed regression models have been tested for their statistical adequacy through ANOVA test. The practical usefulness of these models has been tested with some test cases. These models can be used to make the predictions about different quality characteristics, for the known set of die casting machine parameters, without conducting the experiments.

  10. Discussing Death, Dying, and End-of-Life Goals of Care: A Communication Skills Training Module for Oncology Nurses.

    PubMed

    Coyle, Nessa; Manna, Ruth; Shen, Megan; Banerjee, Smita C; Penn, Stacey; Pehrson, Cassandra; Krueger, Carol A; Maloney, Erin K; Zaider, Talia; Bylund, Carma L

    2015-12-01

    Effective communication, particularly at the end of life, is an essential skill for oncology nurses, but few receive formal training in this area. The aim of this article is to adapt an end-of-life care communication skills training (CST) module, originally developed for oncologists, for oncology nurses and to evaluate participants' confidence in using the communication skills learned and their satisfaction with the module. The adapted end-of-life care module consisted of a 45-minute didactic, exemplary video and 90 minutes of small group interaction and experiential role play with a simulated patient. Using a five-point Likert-type scale, 247 inpatient oncology nurses completed pre-/post-workshop surveys rating their confidence in discussing death, dying, and end-of-life goals of care with patients, as well as overall satisfaction with the module. Nurses' confidence in discussing death, dying, and end-of-life goals of care increased significantly after attending the workshop. Nurse participants indicated satisfaction with the module by agreeing or strongly agreeing to all six items assessing satisfaction 90%-98% of the time. Nurses' CST in discussing death, dying, and end-of-life care showed feasibility, acceptability, and potential benefit at improving confidence in having end-of-life care discussions.

  11. Regional vegetation die-off in response to global-change-type drought

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Breshears, D.D.; Cobb, N.S.; Rich, P.M.; Price, K.P.; Allen, C.D.; Balice, R.G.; Romme, W.H.; Kastens, J.H.; Floyd, M. Lisa; Belnap, J.; Anderson, J.J.; Myers, O.B.; Meyer, Clifton W.

    2005-01-01

    Future drought is projected to occur under warmer temperature conditions as climate change progresses, referred to here as global-change-type drought, yet quantitative assessments of the triggers and potential extent of drought-induced vegetation die-off remain pivotal uncertainties in assessing climate-change impacts. Of particular concern is regional-scale mortality of overstory trees, which rapidly alters ecosystem type, associated ecosystem properties, and land surface conditions for decades. Here, we quantify regional-scale vegetation die-off across southwestern North American woodlands in 2002-2003 in response to drought and associated bark beetle infestations. At an intensively studied site within the region, we quantified that after 15 months of depleted soil water content, >90% of the dominant, overstory tree species (Pinus edulis, a pin??on) died. The die-off was reflected in changes in a remotely sensed index of vegetation greenness (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index), not only at the intensively studied site but also across the region, extending over 12,000 km2 or more; aerial and field surveys confirmed the general extent of the die-off. Notably, the recent drought was warmer than the previous subcontinental drought of the 1950s. The limited, available observations suggest that die-off from the recent drought was more extensive than that from the previous drought, extending into wetter sites within the tree species' distribution. Our results quantify a trigger leading to rapid, drought-induced die-off of overstory woody plants at subcontinental scale and highlight the potential for such die-off to be more severe and extensive for future global-change-type drought under warmer conditions. ?? 2005 by The National Academy of Sciences of the USA.

  12. Regional vegetation die-off in response to global-change-type drought.

    PubMed

    Breshears, David D; Cobb, Neil S; Rich, Paul M; Price, Kevin P; Allen, Craig D; Balice, Randy G; Romme, William H; Kastens, Jude H; Floyd, M Lisa; Belnap, Jayne; Anderson, Jesse J; Myers, Orrin B; Meyer, Clifton W

    2005-10-18

    Future drought is projected to occur under warmer temperature conditions as climate change progresses, referred to here as global-change-type drought, yet quantitative assessments of the triggers and potential extent of drought-induced vegetation die-off remain pivotal uncertainties in assessing climate-change impacts. Of particular concern is regional-scale mortality of overstory trees, which rapidly alters ecosystem type, associated ecosystem properties, and land surface conditions for decades. Here, we quantify regional-scale vegetation die-off across southwestern North American woodlands in 2002-2003 in response to drought and associated bark beetle infestations. At an intensively studied site within the region, we quantified that after 15 months of depleted soil water content, >90% of the dominant, overstory tree species (Pinus edulis, a piñon) died. The die-off was reflected in changes in a remotely sensed index of vegetation greenness (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index), not only at the intensively studied site but also across the region, extending over 12,000 km2 or more; aerial and field surveys confirmed the general extent of the die-off. Notably, the recent drought was warmer than the previous subcontinental drought of the 1950s. The limited, available observations suggest that die-off from the recent drought was more extensive than that from the previous drought, extending into wetter sites within the tree species' distribution. Our results quantify a trigger leading to rapid, drought-induced die-off of overstory woody plants at subcontinental scale and highlight the potential for such die-off to be more severe and extensive for future global-change-type drought under warmer conditions.

  13. Regional vegetation die-off in response to global-change-type drought

    PubMed Central

    Breshears, David D.; Cobb, Neil S.; Rich, Paul M.; Price, Kevin P.; Allen, Craig D.; Balice, Randy G.; Romme, William H.; Kastens, Jude H.; Floyd, M. Lisa; Belnap, Jayne; Anderson, Jesse J.; Myers, Orrin B.; Meyer, Clifton W.

    2005-01-01

    Future drought is projected to occur under warmer temperature conditions as climate change progresses, referred to here as global-change-type drought, yet quantitative assessments of the triggers and potential extent of drought-induced vegetation die-off remain pivotal uncertainties in assessing climate-change impacts. Of particular concern is regional-scale mortality of overstory trees, which rapidly alters ecosystem type, associated ecosystem properties, and land surface conditions for decades. Here, we quantify regional-scale vegetation die-off across southwestern North American woodlands in 2002-2003 in response to drought and associated bark beetle infestations. At an intensively studied site within the region, we quantified that after 15 months of depleted soil water content, >90% of the dominant, overstory tree species (Pinus edulis, a piñon) died. The die-off was reflected in changes in a remotely sensed index of vegetation greenness (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index), not only at the intensively studied site but also across the region, extending over 12,000 km2 or more; aerial and field surveys confirmed the general extent of the die-off. Notably, the recent drought was warmer than the previous subcontinental drought of the 1950s. The limited, available observations suggest that die-off from the recent drought was more extensive than that from the previous drought, extending into wetter sites within the tree species' distribution. Our results quantify a trigger leading to rapid, drought-induced die-off of overstory woody plants at subcontinental scale and highlight the potential for such die-off to be more severe and extensive for future global-change-type drought under warmer conditions. PMID:16217022

  14. Noncanonical autophagy inhibits the autoinflammatory, lupus-like response to dying cells.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Jennifer; Cunha, Larissa D; Park, Sunmin; Yang, Mao; Lu, Qun; Orchard, Robert; Li, Quan-Zhen; Yan, Mei; Janke, Laura; Guy, Cliff; Linkermann, Andreas; Virgin, Herbert W; Green, Douglas R

    2016-05-05

    Defects in clearance of dying cells have been proposed to underlie the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Mice lacking molecules associated with dying cell clearance develop SLE-like disease, and phagocytes from patients with SLE often display defective clearance and increased inflammatory cytokine production when exposed to dying cells in vitro. Previously, we and others described a form of noncanonical autophagy known as LC3-associated phagocytosis (LAP), in which phagosomes containing engulfed particles, including dying cells, recruit elements of the autophagy pathway to facilitate maturation of phagosomes and digestion of their contents. Genome-wide association studies have identified polymorphisms in the Atg5 (ref. 8) and possibly Atg7 (ref. 9) genes, involved in both canonical autophagy and LAP, as markers of a predisposition for SLE. Here we describe the consequences of defective LAP in vivo. Mice lacking any of several components of the LAP pathway show increased serum levels of inflammatory cytokines and autoantibodies, glomerular immune complex deposition, and evidence of kidney damage. When dying cells are injected into LAP-deficient mice, they are engulfed but not efficiently degraded and trigger acute elevation of pro-inflammatory cytokines but not anti-inflammatory interleukin (IL)-10. Repeated injection of dying cells into LAP-deficient, but not LAP-sufficient, mice accelerated the development of SLE-like disease, including increased serum levels of autoantibodies. By contrast, mice deficient in genes required for canonical autophagy but not LAP do not display defective dying cell clearance, inflammatory cytokine production, or SLE-like disease, and, like wild-type mice, produce IL-10 in response to dying cells. Therefore, defects in LAP, rather than canonical autophagy, can cause SLE-like phenomena, and may contribute to the pathogenesis of SLE.

  15. Noncanonical autophagy inhibits the auto-inflammatory, lupus-like response to dying cells

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Jennifer; Cunha, Larissa D.; Park, Sunmin; Yang, Mao; Lu, Qun; Orchard, Robert; Li, Quan-Zhen; Yan, Mei; Janke, Laura; Guy, Cliff; Linkermann, Andreas; Virgin, Herbert W.; Green, Douglas R.

    2016-01-01

    Defects in dying cell clearance are postulated to underlie the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)1. Mice lacking molecules associated with dying cell clearance develop SLE-like disease2, and phagocytes from SLE patients often display defective clearance and increased inflammatory cytokine production when exposed to dying cells in vitro. Previously, we3–6 and others7 described a form of noncanonical autophagy called “LC3-associated phagocytosis” (LAP), wherein phagosomes containing engulfed particles, including dying cells3,4,7, recruit elements of the autophagy pathway to facilitate phagosome maturation and digestion of cargo. Genome-wide association studies have identified polymorphisms in atg58 and possibly atg79, involved in both canonical autophagy and LAP3–7, as predisposition markers for SLE. Here, we describe the consequences of defective LAP in vivo. Mice lacking any of several components of the LAP pathway display elevated serum inflammatory cytokines, autoantibodies, glomerular immune complex deposition, and evidence of kidney damage. Dying cells, injected into LAP-deficient animals, are engulfed but not efficiently degraded, and trigger acute elevation of pro-inflammatory cytokines but not the anti-inflammatory interleukin (IL)-10. Repeated injection of dying cells into LAP-deficient, but not LAP-sufficient animals accelerated SLE-like disease, including increased serum levels of autoantibodies. In contrast, animals deficient for genes required for canonical autophagy but not LAP do not display defective dead cell clearance, inflammatory cytokine production, or SLE-like disease, and like wild-type animals, produce IL-10 in response to dying cells. Therefore, defects in LAP, rather than canonical autophagy, can cause SLE-like phenomena, and may contribute to the pathogenesis of SLE. PMID:27096368

  16. On the spectral response of PV modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, J. Y.; Guo, S.; Walsh, T. M.; Hishikawa, Y.; Stangl, R. A.

    2014-09-01

    The spectral response of silicon wafer based and thin-film photovoltaic (PV) modules is studied using simulation and experimental methods. Circuit simulations show that the module spectral response (SR) depends on (1) the SR of the cells, (2) the shunt resistance Rshunt of the cells, and (3) the bypass diodes of the module. For realistic Rshunt values, the module SR is significantly higher than the minimal SR of the individual cells (which would be the module SR in the case of infinite Rshunt). Round-robin tests using different experimental methods (partial illumination and full-area illumination) to determine the SR of a wafer-based module and a thin-film silicon module were conducted. Both SR methods are found to agree reasonably well. However, circuit simulations indicate that if only one cell, or a few cells, within the module have significantly different characteristics but not known, the results may differ considerably. The partial illumination method can access the SR of the individual cells within a module, but it possibly requires a long measurement time in order to measure the SR and Rshunt of each cell for confirming the SR of the whole module. In contrast, full-area illumination methods measure the module SR directly, but they cannot access the cell SRs if problematic cells exist. An uncertainty analysis of the full-area illumination method is conducted, which reveals that—if the calibrated reference cell is chosen properly—the calibration uncertainty of the reference cell itself is the main source of uncertainty.

  17. Identifying Regulators of the Immune Response to Dying Cells | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    Cytotoxic T cells are responsible for carrying out antigen-mediated immune responses against virally-infected and malignant cells. In both cases, cytotoxic T cells are stimulated by interacting with antigen presenting cells, such as dendritic cells (DCs). Infected cells produce virus-specific antigens and pathogen associated molecular patterns, which are recognized by DCs and lead to robust T cell activation. Dead or dying uninfected cells, on the other hand, release damage associated molecular patterns, but their release does not always appear to be sufficient to induce cytotoxic T cell activity. Tim Greten, M.D., of CCR’s Medical Oncology Branch, and a group of international collaborators set out to understand how immune responses against dying cancer cells are regulated. These processes are likely to be important for improving the efficacy of cancer treatment vaccines, which induce an immune reaction against a patient’s cancer cells.

  18. Glucagon signaling modulates sweet taste responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Elson, Amanda E T; Dotson, Cedrick D; Egan, Josephine M; Munger, Steven D

    2010-10-01

    The gustatory system provides critical information about the quality and nutritional value of food before it is ingested. Thus, physiological mechanisms that modulate taste function in the context of nutritional needs or metabolic status could optimize ingestive decisions. We report that glucagon, which plays important roles in the maintenance of glucose homeostasis, enhances sweet taste responsiveness through local actions in the mouse gustatory epithelium. Using immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy, we found that glucagon and its receptor (GlucR) are coexpressed in a subset of mouse taste receptor cells. Most of these cells also express the T1R3 taste receptor implicated in sweet and/or umami taste. Genetic or pharmacological disruption of glucagon signaling in behaving mice indicated a critical role for glucagon in the modulation of taste responsiveness. Scg5(-/-) mice, which lack mature glucagon, had significantly reduced responsiveness to sucrose as compared to wild-type littermates in brief-access taste tests. No significant differences were seen in responses to prototypical salty, sour, or bitter stimuli. Taste responsiveness to sucrose was similarly reduced upon acute and local disruption of glucagon signaling by the GlucR antagonist L-168,049. Together, these data indicate a role for local glucagon signaling in the peripheral modulation of sweet taste responsiveness.

  19. STING-mediated DNA sensing promotes antitumor and autoimmune responses to dying cells.

    PubMed

    Klarquist, Jared; Hennies, Cassandra M; Lehn, Maria A; Reboulet, Rachel A; Feau, Sonia; Janssen, Edith M

    2014-12-15

    Adaptive immune responses to Ags released by dying cells play a critical role in the development of autoimmunity, allograft rejection, and spontaneous as well as therapy-induced tumor rejection. Although cell death in these situations is considered sterile, various reports have implicated type I IFNs as drivers of the ensuing adaptive immune response to cell-associated Ags. However, the mechanisms that underpin this type I IFN production are poorly defined. In this article, we show that dendritic cells (DCs) can uptake and sense nuclear DNA-associated entities released by dying cells to induce type I IFN. Remarkably, this molecular pathway requires STING, but not TLR or NLR function, and results in the activation of IRF3 in a TBK1-dependent manner. DCs are shown to depend on STING function in vivo to efficiently prime IFN-dependent CD8(+) T cell responses to tumor Ags. Furthermore, loss of STING activity in DCs impairs the generation of follicular Th cells and plasma cells, as well as anti-nuclear Abs, in an inducible model of systemic lupus erythematosus. These findings suggest that the STING pathway could be manipulated to enable the rational design of immunotherapies that enhance or diminish antitumor and autoimmune responses, respectively. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  20. (Fuel efficient rapid response water heating module)

    SciTech Connect

    Ripka, C.D.

    1991-02-19

    This patent describes a fuel efficient rapid response water heating module. It comprises: a water heating tank; a burner cavity disposed within the water heating tank; a burner disposed within the burner cavity; means for supplying a mixture of fuel and air to the burner; preheater jacket means, surrounding the water heating tank; flue means disposed within the water heating tank forming a path for the transfer of combustion gases from the burner cavity to the preheater jacket means; means for supplying cold water to the module; outlet means for providing service hot water from the module; preheater means disposed within the preheater jacket means both to preheat water coming into the module from the cold water supply means and to condense combustion gases within the jacket means; means for transferring preheated water from the preheater jacket means to the water heating tank; means, in flow communication with the preheater jacket means, for draining condensate from the preheater jacket means; and means for causing a flow of the fuel and air mixture to the burner and for causing a flow of combustion gases from the burner cavity, through the flue means and through the preheater jacket means to the atmosphere.

  1. Attentional Modulation of Eye Torsion Responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, Scott B.; Mahadevan, Madhumitha S.; Mulligan, Jeffrey B.

    2016-01-01

    Eye movements generally have both reflexive and voluntary aspects, but torsional eye movements are usually thought of as a reflexive response to image rotation around the line of sight (torsional OKN) or to head roll (torsional VOR). In this study we asked whether torsional responses could be modulated by attention in a case where two stimuli rotated independently, and whether attention would influence the latency of responses. The display consisted of rear-projected radial "pinwheel" gratings, with an inner annulus segment extending from the center to 22 degrees eccentricity, and an outer annulus segment extending from 22 degrees out to 45 degrees eccentricity. The two segments rotated around the center in independent random walks, stepping randomly 4 degrees clockwise or counterclockwise at 60 Hz. Subjects were asked to attend to one or the other while keeping fixation steady at the center of the display. To encourage attention on one or the other segment of the display, subjects were asked to move a joystick in synchrony with the back and forth rotations of one part of the image while ignoring the other. Eye torsion was recorded with the scleral search coil technique, sampled at 500 Hz. All four subjects showed roughly 50% stronger torsion responses to the attended compared to unattended segments. Latency varied from 100 to 150 msec across subjects and was unchanged by attention. These findings suggest that attention can influence eye movement responses that are not typically under voluntary control.

  2. Modulating immune responses with probiotic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, T; Chin, J

    2000-02-01

    For many years, probiotic bacteria have been known to confer health benefits to the consumer. One possible mechanism for this may be the ability of probiotic bacteria to modulate immune responses. Oral administration of Lactobacillus casei strain Shirota (LcS) has been found to enhance innate immunity by stimulating the activity of splenic NK cells. Oral feeding with killed LcS was able to stimulate the production of Th1 cytokines, resulting in repressed production of IgE antibodies against Ovalbumin in experimental mice. The ability to switch mucosal immune responses towards Th1 with probiotic bacteria provides a strategy for treatment of allergic disorders. Growth of Meth A tumour cells in the lungs was also inhibited by intrapleural injection of LcS. Oral administration of other probiotic bacteria, such as Streptococcus thermophilus (St), Lactobacillus fermentum (Lf) and yeast (Y), elicited different immune responses. Mice that were prefed yeast or Lf followed by feeding with ovalbumin (OVA) responded better to vaccination with OVA than mice not given either probiotic or OVA or mice that had been prefed only OVA. However, antibody responses were significantly suppressed in response to vaccination with OVA in mice that had been prefed yeast followed by yeast and OVA as well as mice prefed Lf followed by Lf and OVA. Prefeeding St followed by OVA feeding enhanced cellular immune responses against ovalbumin. In contrast, mice prefed St followed by St + OVA were hyporesponsive against OVA. While antigen feeding alone appears to prime for an immune response, cofeeding antigen with probiotic bacteria can suppress both antibody and cellular immune responses and may provide an efficacious protocol to attenuate autoimmune diseases, such as experimental allergic encephalomyelitis, by jointly dosing with myelin basic protein and probiotic bacteria.

  3. Relational responsibility, and not only stewardship, a Roman Catholic view on voluntary euthanasia for dying and non-dying patients.

    PubMed

    Schotsmans, Paul T

    2003-01-01

    The Roman Catholic theological approach to euthanasia is radically prohibitive. The main theological argument for this prohibition is the so-called "stewardship argument": Christians cannot escape accounting to God for stewardship of the bodies given them on earth. This contribution presents an alternative approach based on European existentialist and philosophical traditions. The suggestion is that exploring the fullness of our relational responsibility is more apt for a pluralist--and even secular--debate on the legitimacy of euthanasia.

  4. Nutritional modulation of the inflammatory bowel response.

    PubMed

    Ioannidis, Orestis; Varnalidis, Ioannis; Paraskevas, George; Botsios, Dimitrios

    2011-01-01

    Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis represent distinct phenotypic forms of inflammatory bowel disease and continue to be a common cause of morbidity. The corticosteroids and the immunomodulatory drugs, which are the basis of treatment for the inflammatory bowel diseases, do not assure always satisfactory outcomes. Nutrition has been used in order to modify the inflammatory response of various chronic inflammatory diseases, including Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. In the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases, the intestinal microflora and the intestinal mucosal disorders play a crucial role. Also, the release of reactive oxygen species is a significant factor of initiation and preservation of the inflammatory reaction in these diseases. The advantages of the nutritional treatment derive from the sequestration of intraluminal agents which may promote the inflammatory bowel response or, alternatively, nutrition is able to modify the immune response, reducing the uncontrolled inflammatory reaction. Furthermore, nutrition can enhance the mucosal barrier function and consists a significant source of antioxidants. This review focuses on certain nutritional components that modulate the inflammatory response of the bowel and aims to present a rational thesis regarding the use of nutritional agents in the management of inflammatory bowel diseases.

  5. [Modulation of immune response by bacterial lipopolysaccharides].

    PubMed

    Aldapa-Vega, Gustavo; Pastelín-Palacios, Rodolfo; Isibasi, Armando; Moreno-Eutimio, Mario A; López-Macías, Constantino

    2016-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a molecule that is profusely found on the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria and is also a potent stimulator of the immune response. As the main molecule on the bacterial surface, is also the most biologically active. The immune response of the host is activated by the recognition of LPS through Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and this receptor-ligand interaction is closely linked to LPS structure. Microorganisms have evolved systems to control the expression and structure of LPS, producing structural variants that are used for modulating the host immune responses during infection. Examples of this include Helicobacter pylori, Francisella tularensis, Chlamydia trachomatis and Salmonella spp. High concentrations of LPS can cause fever, increased heart rate and lead to septic shock and death. However, at relatively low concentrations some LPS are highly active immunomodulators, which can induce non-specific resistance to invading microorganisms. The elucidation of the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in the recognition of LPS and its structural variants has been fundamental to understand inflammation and is currently a pivotal field of research to understand the innate immune response, inflammation, the complex host-pathogen relationship and has important implications for the rational development of new immunomodulators and adjuvants.

  6. Generals die in friendly fire, or modeling immune response to HIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouzine, Igor M.; Murali-Krishna, Kaja; Ahmed, Rafi

    2005-12-01

    We develop a kinetic model for CD8 T lymphocytes (CTL) whose purpose is to kill cells infected with viruses and intracellular parasites. Using a set of first-order nonlinear differential equations, the model predicts how numbers of different cell types involved in CTL response depend on time. The model postulates that CTL response requires continuous presence of professional antigen-presenting cells (APC) comprised of macrophages and dendritic cells. It assumes that any virus present in excess of a threshold level activates APC that, in turn, activate CTL that expand in number and become armed "effector" cells. In the end, APC are deactivated after virus is cleared. The lack of signal from APC causes effector cells to differentiate, by default, into "transitory cells" that either die, or, in a small part, become long-lived memory cells. Viruses capable of infecting APC will cause premature retirement of effector CTL. If transitory cells encounter virus, which takes place after the premature depletion, CTL become anergic (unresponsive to external stimuli). The model is designed to fit recent experiments on primary CTL response to simian immunodeficiency virus closely related to HIV and lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus. The two viruses are known to infect APC and make them targets for CTL they are supposed to control. Both viruses cause premature depletion and anergy of CTL and persist in the host for life.

  7. [Amplitude modulation following responses in audiological diagnostics].

    PubMed

    Pethe, J; Mühler, R; von Specht, H

    2002-12-01

    The registration of brainstem potentials currently represents one of the most common methods in objective audiological diagnostics. However, regardless of their use, they are still known to possess important disadvantages, such as low specificity and validity in the lower frequency range due to broadband stimuli, or uncertainties due to the need for subjective evaluation. One potential solution to these problems could involve the registration of amplitude modulation following responses (AMFR). These potentials are being discussed much more regularly within the anglo-american literature due to their known frequency specificity within the high frequency range (resulting from a very narrow frequency band of stimulation), and also their ability to permit assessment of the hearing threshold at lower frequencies. Another additional advantage of AMFR results from the simple statistical verification of its presence.Extensive studies on the influence of both stimulating and recording parameters have also shown that the registration of AMFR could prove to be a very promising audiological tool, with past interest being focussed primarily on the optimal modulation frequency, the influence of vigilance of the generation of potentials, and the precise assessment of an objective threshold.

  8. Baseline blood oxygenation modulates response amplitude

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hanzhang; Zhao, Chenguang; Ge, Yulin; Lewis-Amezcua, Kelly

    2008-01-01

    Although BOLD fMRI provides a useful tool for probing neuronal activities, large inter-subject variations in signal amplitude are commonly observed. Understanding the physiologic basis for these variations will have a significant impact on many fMRI studies. First, the physiologic modulator can be used as a regressor to reduce variations across subjects, thereby improving statistical power for detecting group differences. Second, if a pathologic condition or a drug treatment is shown to change fMRI responses, monitoring this modulatory parameter is useful in correctly interpreting the fMRI changes to neuronal deficits/recruitments. Here we present evidence that the task-evoked fMRI signals are modulated by baseline blood oxygenation. To measure global blood oxygenation, we used a recently developed technique, T2-Relaxation-Under-Spin-Tagging MRI, yielding baseline oxygenation of 63.7±7.2% in sagittal sinus with an estimation error of 1.3%. It was found that individuals with higher baseline oxygenation tend to have a smaller fMRI signal and vice versa. For every 10% difference in baseline oxygenation across subjects, the BOLD and cerebral blood flow signal differ by -0.4% and -30.0%, respectively, when using visual stimulation. TRUST MRI is a useful measurement for fMRI studies to control for the modulatory effects of baseline oxygenation that are unique to each subject. PMID:18666103

  9. Corticofugal modulation of peripheral auditory responses

    PubMed Central

    Terreros, Gonzalo; Delano, Paul H.

    2015-01-01

    The auditory efferent system originates in the auditory cortex and projects to the medial geniculate body (MGB), inferior colliculus (IC), cochlear nucleus (CN) and superior olivary complex (SOC) reaching the cochlea through olivocochlear (OC) fibers. This unique neuronal network is organized in several afferent-efferent feedback loops including: the (i) colliculo-thalamic-cortico-collicular; (ii) cortico-(collicular)-OC; and (iii) cortico-(collicular)-CN pathways. Recent experiments demonstrate that blocking ongoing auditory-cortex activity with pharmacological and physical methods modulates the amplitude of cochlear potentials. In addition, auditory-cortex microstimulation independently modulates cochlear sensitivity and the strength of the OC reflex. In this mini-review, anatomical and physiological evidence supporting the presence of a functional efferent network from the auditory cortex to the cochlear receptor is presented. Special emphasis is given to the corticofugal effects on initial auditory processing, that is, on CN, auditory nerve and cochlear responses. A working model of three parallel pathways from the auditory cortex to the cochlea and auditory nerve is proposed. PMID:26483647

  10. Maintaining everyday life in a family with a dying parent: Teenagers' experiences of adapting to responsibility.

    PubMed

    Melcher, Ulrica; Sandell, Rolf; Henriksson, Anette

    2015-12-01

    Teenagers are living through a turbulent period in their development, when they are breaking away from the family to form their own identities, and so they are particularly vulnerable to the stressful situation of having a parent affected by a progressive and incurable illness. The current study sought to gain more knowledge about the ways that teenagers themselves describe living in a family with a seriously ill and dying parent. More specifically, the aims were to describe how teenagers are emotionally affected by everyday life in a family with a dying parent and to determine how they attempt to adapt to this situation. The study employed a descriptive and interpretive design using qualitative content analysis. A total of 10 teenagers (aged 14-19 years, 7 boys and 3 girls) participated through repeated, individual, informal interviews that were carried out as free-ranging conversations. While contending with their own vulnerable developmental period of life, the teenagers were greatly affected by their parent's illness and took on great responsibility for supporting their parents and siblings, and for maintaining family life. Lacking sufficient information and support left them rather unprepared, having to guess and to interpret the vague signs of failing health on their own, with feelings of uncertainty and loneliness as a consequence. Support from healthcare professionals should be designed to help and encourage parents to have open communications about their illness with their teenaged children. Our results add further support to the literature, reinforcing the need for an approach that uses a systemic perspective and considers the family to be the appropriate unit of care and offers a suitable support system.

  11. Peroxiredoxin 5 modulates immune response in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Radyuk, Svetlana N.; Michalak, Katarzyna; Klichko, Vladimir I.; Benes, Judith; Orr, William C.

    2010-01-01

    Background Peroxiredoxins are redox-sensing enzymes with multiple cellular functions. Previously, we reported on the potent antioxidant function of Drosophila peroxiredoxin 5 (dPrx5). Studies with mammalian and human cells suggest that peroxiredoxins can modulate immune-related signaling. Methods Survivorship studies and bacteriological analysis were used to determine resistance of flies to fungal and bacterial infections. RT-PCR and immunoblot analyses determined expression of dPrx5 and immunity factors in response to bacterial challenge. Double mutants for dprx5 gene and genes comprising the Imd/Relish and dTak1/Basket branches of the immune signaling pathways were used in epistatic analysis. Results The dprx5 mutant flies were more resistant to bacterial infection than controls, while flies overexpressing dPrx5 were more susceptible. The enhanced resistance to bacteria was accompanied by rapid induction of the Imd-dependent antimicrobial peptides, phosphorylation of the JNK kinase Basket and altered transcriptional profiling of the transient response genes, puckered, ets21C and relish, while the opposite effects were observed in flies over-expressing dPrx5. Epistatic analysis of double mutants, using attacin D and Puckered as read outs of activation of the Imd and JNK pathways, implicated dPrx5 function in the control of the dTak1-JNK arm of immune signaling. Conclusions Differential effects on fly survivorship suggested a trade-off between the antioxidant and immune functions of dPrx5. Molecular and epistatic analyses identified dPrx5 as a negative regulator in the dTak1-JNK arm of immune signaling. General significance Our findings suggest that peroxiredoxins play an important modulatory role in the Drosophila immune response. PMID:20600624

  12. Simulation of differential die-away instrument's response to asymmetrically burned spent nuclear fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinik, Tomas; Henzl, Vladimir; Grape, Sophie; Svärd, Staffan Jacobsson; Jansson, Peter; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Tobin, Stephen J.

    2015-07-01

    Previous simulation studies of Differential Die-Away (DDA) instrument's response to active interrogation of spent nuclear fuel from a pressurized water reactor (PWR) yielded promising results in terms of its capability to accurately measure or estimate basic spent fuel assembly (SFA) characteristics, such as multiplication, initial enrichment (IE) and burn-up (BU) as well as the total plutonium content. These studies were however performed only for a subset of idealized SFAs with a symmetric BU with respect to its longitudinal axis. Therefore, to complement the previous results, additional simulations have been performed of the DDA instrument's response to interrogation of asymmetrically burned spent nuclear fuel in order to determine whether detailed assay of SFAs from all 4 sides will be necessary in real life applications or whether a cost and time saving single sided assay could be used to achieve results of similar quality as previously reported in case of symmetrically burned SFAs. The results of this study suggest that DDA instrument response depends on the position of the individual neutron detectors and in fact can be split in two modes. The first mode, measured by the back detectors, is not significantly sensitive to the spatial distribution of fissile isotopes and neutron absorbers, but rather reflects the total amount of both contributors as in the cases of symmetrically burned SFAs. In contrary, the second mode, measured by the front detectors, yields certain sensitivity to the orientation of the asymmetrically burned SFA inside the assaying instrument. This study thus provides evidence that the DDA instrument can potentially be utilized as necessary in both ways, i.e. a quick determination of the average SFA characteristics in a single assay, as well as a more detailed characterization involving several DDA observables through assay of the SFA from all of its four sides that can possibly map the burn-up distribution and/or identify diversion or

  13. Low-concentration photovoltaic module with reflective compound parabolic concentrator fabricated by roll-to-roll slot-die coating and 3D printing.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyungman; Lim, Heonkwang; Park, Sungsik; Lee, Dongjin

    2016-12-26

    We fabricate a low-concentration photovoltaic (LCPV) module with a reflective compound parabolic concentrator (CPC) using roll-to-roll (R2R) slot-die coating and 3D printing technologies. A highly reflective silver thin-film is coated on a flexible plastic substrate, and the CPC frame is manufactured via 3D printing. The slot-die-coated silver film with thickness of more than 100 nm stably exhibits 95% reflectivity at 550 nm. Further, CPC concentrators with concentration ratios of 4X and 3X are assembled into silicon solar cells and characterized. Although the fill factor and maximum voltage slightly decrease, power and efficiency increase by factors of 3.51 and 2.63 with respect to the no-CPC-module case. Our approach can be used to optimize the design of various engineering products.

  14. Cellular response to modulated radiation fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claridge Mackonis, E.; Suchowerska, N.; Zhang, M.; Ebert, M.; McKenzie, D. R.; Jackson, M.

    2007-09-01

    Cell survival following exposure to spatially modulated beams, as created by intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), is investigated. In vitro experiments were performed using malignant melanoma cells (MM576) exposed to a therapeutic megavoltage photon beam. We compared cell survival in modulated fields with cell survival in uniform control fields. Three different spatial modulations of the field were used: a control 'uniform' field in which all cells in a flask were uniformly exposed; a 'quarter' field in which 25% of cells at one end of the flask were exposed and a 'striped' field in which 25% of cells were exposed in three parallel stripes. The cell survival in both the shielded and unshielded regions of the modulated fields, as determined by a clonogenic assay, were compared to the cell survival in the uniform field. We have distinguished three ways in which cell survival is influenced by the fate of neighbouring cells. The first of these (type I effect) is the previously reported classical Bystander effect, where cell survival is reduced when communicating with irradiated cells. We find two new types of Bystander effect. The type II effect is an observed increase in cell survival when nearby cells receive a lethal dose. The type III effect is an increase in the survival of cells receiving a high dose of radiation, when nearby cells receive a low dose. These observations of the Bystander effects emphasize the need for improved radiobiological models, which include communicated effects and account for the effects of modulated dose distribution.

  15. Differential die-away analysis system response modeling and detector design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, K. A.; Gozani, T.; Vujic, J.

    2008-05-01

    Differential die-away-analysis (DDAA) is a sensitive technique to detect presence of fissile materials such as 235U and 239Pu. DDAA uses a high-energy (14 MeV) pulsed neutron generator to interrogate a shipping container. The signature is a fast neutron signal hundreds of microseconds after the cessation of the neutron pulse. This fast neutron signal has decay time identical to the thermal neutron diffusion decay time of the inspected cargo. The theoretical aspects of a cargo inspection system based on the differential die-away technique are explored. A detailed mathematical model of the system is developed, and experimental results validating this model are presented.

  16. Finite response time of shock wave modulation by turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inokuma, Kento; Watanabe, Tomoaki; Nagata, Koji; Sasoh, Akihiro; Sakai, Yasuhiko

    2017-05-01

    Response time of the post-shock wave (SW) overpressure modulation by turbulence is investigated in wind tunnel experiments. A peak-overpressure fluctuation, observed on a wall, is induced by turbulence around the SW ray, but away from the wall, demonstrating finite response time of the modulation. We propose a model of the modulation based on the SW deformation by a local flow disturbance, which yields the response time being proportional to the product of the large-eddy turnover time and (MT/MS0)0.5 (MT: turbulent Mach number and MS0: shock Mach number), in consistent with the experiments.

  17. Modulation of the host response in periodontal therapy.

    PubMed

    Oringer, Richard J

    2002-04-01

    This paper was prepared by the Research, Science, and Therapy Committee of the American Academy of Periodontology to provide the dental profession an overview of current and potential methods to modulate the host response in the treatment of periodontal diseases. Specifically, it discusses components of periodontal disease pathogenesis (i.e., immune and inflammatory responses, excessive production of matrix metalloproteinases and arachidonic acid metabolites, and regulation of bone metabolism) and their modulation.

  18. Response of Plasmonic Terahertz Detectors to Modulated Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudin, Sergey; Rupper, Greg; Reed, Meredith; Shur, Michael

    We present theoretical study of the response of two-dimensional gated electron gas to an amplitude modulated signals with carrier frequency in the terahertz range. Our model is based on complete hydrodynamic equations, and includes effects of viscosity, pressure gradients and thermal transport in the conduction channel of a high electron mobility semiconductor transistor. The modulation response was evaluated as a function of modulation frequency for a range of mobility values in different semiconductor materials. Maximum modulation frequency was evaluated as a function of channel mobility, with typical values in the subterahertz range of frequencies. Our analysis shows that short channel field effect transistors operating in the plasmonic regime meets the requirements for applications as terahertz detectors and modulators in high-speed wireless communication circuits.

  19. Response of plasmonic terahertz detectors to amplitude modulated signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rupper, Greg; Rudin, Sergey; Shur, Michael

    2015-09-01

    We present theoretical study of the response of two-dimensional gated electron gas to an amplitude modulated signals with carrier frequency in the terahertz range. The model is based on complete hydrodynamic equations, and includes effects of viscosity, pressure gradients and thermal transport in the conduction channel of a high electron mobility semiconductor transistor (HEMT). The modulation response was evaluated as a function of modulation frequency fM for a wide range of mobility values. Maximum modulation frequency fMAX was evaluated as a function of channel mobility, with typical values of fMAX in the subterahertz range of frequencies. Our analysis shows that short channel field effect transistors operating in the plasmonic regime can meet all the requirements for applications as terahertz detectors and modulators in ultra high-speed wireless communication circuits.

  20. The Effect of an Instructional Module on Death and Dying on the Death Anxiety of Emergency Medical Technician Trainees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Ted

    1993-01-01

    Examined whether instructional unit on death and dying during emergency medical technician course reduced death anxiety in trainees. Found no significant differences between treatment group (n=28) that received unit and control group (n=25) that did not on pre-, post-, or delayed-tests. Death education apparently had no more influence on death…

  1. The Angry Dying Patient.

    PubMed

    Houston, Robert E.

    1999-02-01

    Over 25 years ago, Kubler-Ross identified anger as a predictable part of the dying process. When the dying patient becomes angry in the clinical setting, all types of communication become strained. Physicians can help the angry dying patient through this difficult time by using 10 rules of engagement. When physicians engage and empathize with these patients, they improve the patient's response to pain and they reduce patient suffering. When physicians educate patients on their normal responses to dying and enlist them in the process of family reconciliation, they can impact the end-of-life experience in a positive way.

  2. An NCME Instructional Module on Polytomous Item Response Theory Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penfield, Randall David

    2014-01-01

    A polytomous item is one for which the responses are scored according to three or more categories. Given the increasing use of polytomous items in assessment practices, item response theory (IRT) models specialized for polytomous items are becoming increasingly common. The purpose of this ITEMS module is to provide an accessible overview of…

  3. An NCME Instructional Module on Polytomous Item Response Theory Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penfield, Randall David

    2014-01-01

    A polytomous item is one for which the responses are scored according to three or more categories. Given the increasing use of polytomous items in assessment practices, item response theory (IRT) models specialized for polytomous items are becoming increasingly common. The purpose of this ITEMS module is to provide an accessible overview of…

  4. Torso flexion modulates stiffness and reflex response.

    PubMed

    Granata, K P; Rogers, E

    2007-08-01

    Neuromuscular factors that contribute to spinal stability include trunk stiffness from passive and active tissues as well as active feedback from reflex response in the paraspinal muscles. Trunk flexion postures are a recognized risk factor for occupational low-back pain and may influence these stabilizing control factors. Sixteen healthy adult subjects participated in an experiment to record trunk stiffness and paraspinal muscle reflex gain during voluntary isometric trunk extension exertions. The protocol was designed to achieve trunk flexion without concomitant influences of external gravitational moment, i.e., decouple the effects of trunk flexion posture from trunk moment. Systems identification analyses identified reflex gain by quantifying the relation between applied force disturbances and time-dependent EMG response in the lumbar paraspinal muscles. Trunk stiffness was characterized from a second order model describing the dynamic relation between the force disturbances versus the kinematic response of the torso. Trunk stiffness increased significantly with flexion angle and exertion level. This was attributed to passive tissue contributions to stiffness. Reflex gain declined significantly with trunk flexion angle but increased with exertion level. These trends were attributed to correlated changes in baseline EMG recruitment in the lumbar paraspinal muscles. Female subjects demonstrated greater reflex gain than males and the decline in reflex gain with flexion angle was greater in females than in males. Results reveal that torso flexion influences neuromuscular factors that control spinal stability and suggest that posture may contribute to the risk of instability injury.

  5. Climatic events inducing die-off in Mediterranean shrublands: are species' responses related to their functional traits?

    PubMed

    Lloret, Francisco; de la Riva, Enrique G; Pérez-Ramos, Ignacio M; Marañón, Teodoro; Saura-Mas, Sandra; Díaz-Delgado, Ricardo; Villar, Rafael

    2016-04-01

    Extreme climatic episodes, likely associated with climate change, often result in profound alterations of ecosystems and, particularly, in drastic events of vegetation die-off. Species attributes are expected to explain different biological responses to these environmental alterations. Here we explored how changes in plant cover and recruitment in response to an extreme climatic episode of drought and low temperatures were related to a set of functional traits (of leaves, roots and seeds) in Mediterranean shrubland species of south-west Spain. Remaining aerial green cover 2 years after the climatic event was positively related to specific leaf area (SLA), and negatively to leaf water potential, stable carbon isotope ratio and leaf proline content. However, plant cover resilience, i.e. the ability to attain pre-event values, was positively related to a syndrome of traits distinguished by a higher efficiency of water use and uptake. Thus, higher SLA and lower water-use efficiency characterized species that were able to maintain green biomass for a longer period of time but were less resilient in the medium term. There was a negative relationship between such syndromes and the number of emerging seedlings. Species with small seeds produced more seedlings per adult. Overall, recruitment was positively correlated with species die-off. This study demonstrates the relationship between plant traits and strong environmental pulses related to climate change, providing a functional interpretation of the recently reported episodes of climate-induced vegetation die-off. Our findings reveal the importance of selecting meaningful traits to interpret post-event resilience processes, particularly when combined with demographic attributes.

  6. Modulation of stimulus contrast on the human pupil orienting response.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chin-An; Munoz, Douglas P

    2014-09-01

    The sudden appearance of a novel stimulus initiates a series of responses to orient the body for appropriate actions, including not only shifts of gaze and attention, but also transient pupil dilation. Modulation of pupil dynamics by stimulus properties is less understood, although its effects on other components of orienting have been extensively explored. Microstimulation of the superior colliculus evoked transient pupil dilation, and the initial component of pupil dilation evoked by microstimulation was similar to that elicited by the presentation of salient sensory stimuli, suggesting a coordinated role of the superior colliculus on this behavior, although evidence in humans is yet to be established. To examine pupil orienting responses in humans, we presented visual stimuli while participants fixated on a central visual spot. Transient pupil dilation in humans was elicited after presentation of a visual stimulus in the periphery. The evoked pupil responses were modulated systematically by stimulus contrast, with faster and larger pupil responses triggered by higher contrast stimuli. The pupil response onset latencies for high contrast stimuli were similar to those produced by the light reflex and significantly faster than the darkness reflex, suggesting that the initial component of pupil dilation is probably mediated by inhibition of the parasympathetic pathway. The contrast modulation was pronounced under different levels of baseline pupil size. Together, our results demonstrate visual contrast modulation on the orienting pupil response in humans.

  7. Hemodynamic responses can modulate the brain oscillations in low frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Feng-Mei; Wang, Yi-Feng; Yuan, Zhen

    2016-03-01

    Previous studies have showed that the steady-state responses were able to be used as an effective index for modulating the neural oscillations in the high frequency ranges (> 1 Hz). However, the neural oscillations in low frequency ranges (<1 Hz) remain unknown. In this study, a series of fNIRS experimental tests were conducted to validate if the low frequency bands (0.1 Hz - 0.8 Hz) steady-state hemoglobin responses (SSHbRs) could be evoked and modulate the neural oscillation during a serial reaction time (SRT) task.

  8. FTO modulates fibrogenic responses in obstructive nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao-Yung; Shie, Shian-Sen; Tsai, Ming-Lung; Yang, Chia-Hung; Hung, Kuo-Chun; Wang, Chun-Chieh; Hsieh, I-Chang; Wen, Ming-Shien

    2016-01-04

    Genome-wide association studies have shown that variants in fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO) gene are robustly associated with body mass index and obesity. These FTO variants are also associated with end stage renal disease and all-cause mortality in chronic kidney diseases. However, the exact role of FTO in kidneys is currently unknown. Here we show that FTO expression is increased after ureteral obstruction and renal fibrosis. Deficiency of the FTO gene attenuates the fibrogenic responses induced by ureteral obstruction in the kidney. Renal tubular cells deficient of FTO produce less α-SMA after TGF-β stimulation. FTO is indispensable for the extracellular matrix synthesis after ureteral obstruction in kidneys. Indeed, global gene transcriptions amplitude is reduced in FTO deficient kidneys after ureteral obstruction. These data establish the importance of FTO in renal fibrosis, which may have potential therapeutic implications.

  9. Micromechanical die attachment surcharge

    DOEpatents

    Filter, William F.; Hohimer, John P.

    2002-01-01

    An attachment structure is disclosed for attaching a die to a supporting substrate without the use of adhesives or solder. The attachment structure, which can be formed by micromachining, functions purely mechanically in utilizing a plurality of shaped pillars (e.g. round, square or polygonal and solid, hollow or slotted) that are formed on one of the die or supporting substrate and which can be urged into contact with various types of mating structures including other pillars, a deformable layer or a plurality of receptacles that are formed on the other of the die or supporting substrate, thereby forming a friction bond that holds the die to the supporting substrate. The attachment structure can further include an alignment structure for precise positioning of the die and supporting substrate to facilitate mounting the die to the supporting substrate. The attachment structure has applications for mounting semiconductor die containing a microelectromechanical (MEM) device, a microsensor or an integrated circuit (IC), and can be used to form a multichip module. The attachment structure is particularly useful for mounting die containing released MEM devices since these devices are fragile and can otherwise be damaged or degraded by adhesive or solder mounting.

  10. Halophyte die-off in response to anthropogenic impacts on tidal flats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yoon-Kyung; Park, Wook; Choi, Jong-Kuk; Ryu, Joo-Hyung; Won, Joong-Sun

    2014-12-01

    This study analyzed an abrupt change in halophyte populations, especially the annual plant Suaeda japonica. The boundaries and distributions of S. japonica and Phragmites australis were determined based on the decision tree classifier of TerraSAR-X, SAVI of Landsat ETM+, and density slicing of aerial photography. A large patch of S. japonica in the eastern parts of Donggum-do, South Korea, disappeared in 2007, while populations have been stable in the western parts of the island. To understand the reason behind the sudden die-off, mean sea level was analyzed based on gaged tidal data. Sedimentation rate was measured using Vernier caliper and RTK leveling data. Sedimentation rate between 2006 and 2007 was above the threshold at which S. japonica can germinate. After the loss of an 11-ha S. japonica patch from the eastern part of Donggum-do, sedimentation was accelerated because of a decrease in tidal current caused by a series of land reclamation projects. The increased monthly exposure duration due to continuous sediment accretion altered the type of salt marsh. Our results imply that accumulated effects from a series of coastal construction projects around Ganghwa-do can change not only tide and current hydrodynamics, but also sedimentation and erosion rates, which can cause large halophyte patches to disappear.

  11. Attention modulates responses in the human lateral geniculate nucleus.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Daniel H; Fukui, Miki M; Pinsk, Mark A; Kastner, Sabine

    2002-11-01

    Attentional mechanisms are important for selecting relevant information and filtering out irrelevant information from cluttered visual scenes. Selective attention has previously been shown to affect neural activity in both extrastriate and striate visual cortex. Here, evidence from functional brain imaging shows that attentional response modulation is not confined to cortical processing, but can occur as early as the thalamic level. We found that attention modulated neural activity in the human lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) in several ways: it enhanced neural responses to attended stimuli, attenuated responses to ignored stimuli and increased baseline activity in the absence of visual stimulation. The LGN, traditionally viewed as the gateway to visual cortex, may also serve as a 'gatekeeper' in controlling attentional response gain.

  12. Response function of modulated grid Faraday cup plasma instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnett, A.; Olbert, S.

    1986-01-01

    Modulated grid Faraday cup plasma analyzers are a very useful tool for making in situ measurements of space plasmas. One of their great attributes is that their simplicity permits their angular response function to be calculated theoretically. An expression is derived for this response function by computing the trajectories of the charged particles inside the cup. The Voyager plasma science experiment is used as a specific example. Two approximations to the rigorous response function useful for data analysis are discussed. Multisensor analysis of solar wind data indicates that the formulas represent the true cup response function for all angles of incidence with a maximum error of only a few percent.

  13. Modulation of Response to Environmental Stimulation in Autistic Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kootz, John P.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Autistic children's blood pressure, heart rate, peripheral blood flow (PBF), and peripheral vascular resistance (PVR) were measured during three types of tasks (reaction time, social interaction, at rest). Disturbances in filtering environmental stimulation and modulating response to novelty may be part of the basic pathology of autism apparent…

  14. Modulation of Response to Environmental Stimulation in Autistic Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kootz, John P.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Autistic children's blood pressure, heart rate, peripheral blood flow (PBF), and peripheral vascular resistance (PVR) were measured during three types of tasks (reaction time, social interaction, at rest). Disturbances in filtering environmental stimulation and modulating response to novelty may be part of the basic pathology of autism apparent…

  15. Modulation of taste responsiveness by the satiation hormone peptide YY

    PubMed Central

    La Sala, Michael S.; Hurtado, Maria D.; Brown, Alicia R.; Bohórquez, Diego V.; Liddle, Rodger A.; Herzog, Herbert; Zolotukhin, Sergei; Dotson, Cedrick D.

    2013-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that the peripheral taste system may be modulated in the context of an animal's metabolic state. One purported mechanism for this phenomenon is that circulating gastrointestinal peptides modulate the functioning of the peripheral gustatory system. Recent evidence suggests endocrine signaling in the oral cavity can influence food intake (FI) and satiety. We hypothesized that these hormones may be affecting FI by influencing taste perception. We used immunohistochemistry along with genetic knockout models and the specific reconstitution of peptide YY (PYY) in saliva using gene therapy protocols to identify a role for PYY signaling in taste. We show that PYY is expressed in subsets of taste cells in murine taste buds. We also show, using brief-access testing with PYY knockouts, that PYY signaling modulates responsiveness to bitter-tasting stimuli, as well as to lipid emulsions. We show that salivary PYY augmentation, via viral vector therapy, rescues behavioral responsiveness to a lipid emulsion but not to bitter stimuli and that this response is likely mediated via activation of Y2 receptors localized apically in taste cells. Our findings suggest distinct functions for PYY produced locally in taste cells vs. that circulating systemically.—La Sala, M. S., Hurtado, M. D., Brown, A. R., Bohórquez, D. V., Liddle, R. A., Herzog, H., Zolotukhin, S., Dotson, C. D. Modulation of taste responsiveness by the satiation hormone peptide YY. PMID:24043261

  16. Amygdala responsiveness is modulated by tryptophan hydroxylase-2 gene variation.

    PubMed

    Canli, T; Congdon, E; Gutknecht, L; Constable, R T; Lesch, K P

    2005-11-01

    The tryptophan hydroxylase-2 gene (TPH2) codes for the enzyme of serotonin (5-HT) synthesis in the brain and variation of TPH2 has been implicated in disorders of emotion regulation. Here, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to demonstrate that a potentially functional variant of TPH2 modulates amygdala responsiveness to emotional stimuli of both negative and positive valence.

  17. SPHERICAL DIE

    DOEpatents

    Livingston, J.P.

    1959-01-27

    A die is presented for pressing powdered materials into a hemispherical shape of uniforin density and wall thickness comprising a fcmale and male die element held in a stationary spaced relation with the space being equivalent to the wall thickness and defining the hemispherical shape, a pressing ring linearly moveable along the male die element, an inlet to fill the space with powdered materials, a guiding system for moving the pressing ring along the male die element so as to press the powdered material and a heating system for heating the male element so that the powdered material is heated while being pressed.

  18. An optimizing process of profiled cross-sectional aluminum alloy porthole die extrusion using response surface methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Fujian; Li, Feng; Shi, Liansheng; Jiang, Hongwei

    2016-03-01

    The porthole die extrusion process of profiled cross-section hollow aluminum alloy is influenced by numerous factors, which brings inconvenience to the process design. In this paper, 7075 aluminum alloy is taken as an example, the fitting model of the ultimate load is analyzed by variance and regression analysis using response surface method (RSM). The influences of extrusion speed, friction factor and initial temperature on the change of extruded ultimate load are investigated systematically, and the important influence factors (initial temperature > friction factor > extrusion speed) to the load are determined eventually. By comparison, the error between the ultimate load model obtained after fitting and the calculated value is only 2.4%, further verifying the reliability of this model. The optimal objective is to minimize the ultimate load, then the optimum technological parameters are obtained by optimizing the process, where the initial temperature, the extrusion speed and the friction factor are 430∘C, 2.28mm/s and 0.31, respectively. The results provide a theoretical basis for the scientific design of the porthole die extrusion process of profiled cross-section hollow aluminum alloy.

  19. Reprogramming immune responses via microRNA modulation

    PubMed Central

    Cubillos-Ruiz, Juan R.; Rutkowski, Melanie R; Tchou, Julia; Conejo-Garcia, Jose R.

    2013-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly clear that there are unique sets of miRNAs that have distinct governing roles in several aspects of both innate and adaptive immune responses. In addition, new tools allow selective modulation of the expression of individual miRNAs, both in vitro and in vivo. Here, we summarize recent advances in our understanding of how miRNAs drive the activity of immune cells, and how their modulation in vivo opens new avenues for diagnostic and therapeutic interventions in multiple diseases, from immunodeficiency to cancer. PMID:25285232

  20. Immune Response Modulation of Conjugated Agonists with Changing Linker Length.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Keun Ah; Slowinska, Katarzyna; Moore, Troy; Esser-Kahn, Aaron

    2016-12-16

    We report immune response modulation with linked Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists. Conjugating two agonists of synergistic TLRs induce an increase in immune activity compared to equal molarity of soluble agonists. Additionally, varying the distance between the agonists by changing the linker length alters the level of macrophage NF-κB activity as well as primary bone marrow derived dendritic cell IL-6 production. This modulation is effected by the size of the agonists and the pairing of the stimulated TLRs. The sensitivity of linker-length-dependent immune activity of conjugated agonists provides the potential for developing application specific therapeutics.

  1. Transient pupil response is modulated by contrast-based saliency.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chin-An; Boehnke, Susan E; Itti, Laurent; Munoz, Douglas P

    2014-01-08

    The sudden appearance of a novel stimulus in the environment initiates a series of orienting responses that include coordinated shifts of gaze and attention, and also transient changes in pupil size. Although numerous studies have identified a significant effect of stimulus saliency on shifts of gaze and attention, saliency effects on pupil size are less understood. To examine salience-evoked pupil responses, we presented visual, auditory, or audiovisual stimuli while monkeys fixated a central visual spot. Transient pupil dilation was elicited after visual stimulus presentation regardless of target luminance relative to background, and auditory stimuli also evoked similar pupil responses. Importantly, the evoked pupil response was modulated by contrast-based saliency, with faster and larger pupil responses following the presentation of more salient stimuli. The initial transient component of pupil dilation was qualitatively similar to that evoked by weak microstimulation of the midbrain superior colliculus. The pupil responses elicited by audiovisual stimuli were well predicted by a linear summation of each modality response. Together, the results suggest that the transient pupil response, as one component of orienting, is modulated by contrast-based saliency, and the superior colliculus is likely involved in its coordination.

  2. Modulation of immune response in experimental Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Basso, Beatriz

    2013-02-20

    Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi), the etiological agent of Chagas disease, affects nearly 18 million people in Latin America and 90 million are at risk of infection. The parasite presents two stages of medical importance in the host, the amastigote, intracellular replicating form, and the extracellular trypomastigote, the infective form. Thus infection by T. cruzi induces a complex immune response that involves effectors and regulatory mechanisms. That is why control of the infection requires a strong humoral and cellular immune response; hence, the outcome of host-parasite interaction in the early stages of infection is extremely important. A critical event during this period of the infection is innate immune response, in which the macrophage's role is vital. Thus, after being phagocytized, the parasite is able to develop intracellularly; however, during later periods, these cells induce its elimination by means of toxic metabolites. In turn, as the infection progresses, adaptive immune response mechanisms are triggered through the TH1 and TH2 responses. Finally, T. cruzi, like other protozoa such as Leishmania and Toxoplasma, have numerous evasive mechanisms to the immune response that make it possible to spread around the host. In our Laboratory we have developed a vaccination model in mice with Trypanosoma rangeli, nonpathogenic to humans, which modulates the immune response to infection by T. cruzi, thus protecting them. Vaccinated animals showed an important innate response (modulation of NO and other metabolites, cytokines, activation of macrophages), a strong adaptive cellular response and significant increase in specific antibodies. The modulation caused early elimination of the parasites, low parasitaemia, the absence of histological lesions and high survival rates. Even though progress has been made in the knowledge of some of these mechanisms, new studies must be conducted which could target further prophylactic and therapeutic trials against T. cruzi

  3. Innate immune response during Yersinia infection: critical modulation of cell death mechanisms through phagocyte activation.

    PubMed

    Bergsbaken, Tessa; Cookson, Brad T

    2009-11-01

    Yersinia pestis, the etiological agent of plague, is one of the most deadly pathogens on our planet. This organism shares important attributes with its ancestral progenitor, Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, including a 70-kb virulence plasmid, lymphotropism during growth in the mammalian host, and killing of host macrophages. Infections with both organisms are biphasic, where bacterial replication occurs initially with little inflammation, followed by phagocyte influx, inflammatory cytokine production, and tissue necrosis. During infection, plasmid-encoded attributes facilitate bacterial-induced macrophage death, which results from two distinct processes and corresponds to the inflammatory crescendo observed in vivo: Naïve cells die by apoptosis (noninflammatory), and later in infection, activated macrophages die by pyroptosis (inflammatory). The significance of this redirected cell death for the host is underscored by the importance of phagocyte activation for immunity to Yersinia and the protective role of pyroptosis during host responses to anthrax lethal toxin and infections with Francisella, Legionella, Pseudomonas, and Salmonella. The similarities of Y. pestis and Y. pseudotuberculosis, including conserved, plasmid-encoded functions inducing at least two distinct mechanisms of cell death, indicate that comparative studies are revealing about their critical pathogenic mechanism(s) and host innate immune responses during infection. Validation of this idea and evidence of similar interactions with the host immune system are provided by Y. pseudotuberculosis-priming, cross-protective immunity against Y. pestis. Despite these insights, additional studies indicate much remains to be understood concerning effective host responses against Yersinia, including chromosomally encoded attributes that also contribute to bacterial evasion and modulation of innate and adaptive immune responses.

  4. A Normalization Model of Attentional Modulation of Single Unit Responses

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joonyeol; Maunsell, John H. R.

    2009-01-01

    Although many studies have shown that attention to a stimulus can enhance the responses of individual cortical sensory neurons, little is known about how attention accomplishes this change in response. Here, we propose that attention-based changes in neuronal responses depend on the same response normalization mechanism that adjusts sensory responses whenever multiple stimuli are present. We have implemented a model of attention that assumes that attention works only through this normalization mechanism, and show that it can replicate key effects of attention. The model successfully explains how attention changes the gain of responses to individual stimuli and also why modulation by attention is more robust and not a simple gain change when multiple stimuli are present inside a neuron's receptive field. Additionally, the model accounts well for physiological data that measure separately attentional modulation and sensory normalization of the responses of individual neurons in area MT in visual cortex. The proposal that attention works through a normalization mechanism sheds new light a broad range of observations on how attention alters the representation of sensory information in cerebral cortex. PMID:19247494

  5. Simulation of differential die-away instrument’s response to asymmetrically burned spent nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Martinik, Tomas; Henzl, Vladimir; Grape, Sophie; Svard, Staffan Jacobsson; Jansson, Peter; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Tobin, Stephen J.

    2015-03-04

    Here, previous simulation studies of Differential Die–Away (DDA) instrument’s response to active interrogation of spent nuclear fuel from a pressurized water reactor (PWR) yielded promising results in terms of its capability to accurately measure or estimate basic spent fuel assembly (SFA) characteristics, such as multiplication, initial enrichment (IE) and burn-up (BU) as well as the total plutonium content. These studies were however performed only for a subset of idealized SFAs with a symmetric BU with respect to its longitudinal axis. Therefore, to complement the previous results, additional simulations have been performed of the DDA instrument’s response to interrogation of asymmetrically burned spent nuclear fuel in order to determine whether detailed assay of SFAs from all 4 sides will be necessary in real life applications or whether a cost and time saving single sided assay could be used to achieve results of similar quality as previously reported in case of symmetrically burned SFAs.

  6. Attentional Modulation of Auditory Steady-State Responses

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Yatin; Davis, Chris; Kim, Jeesun

    2014-01-01

    Auditory selective attention enables task-relevant auditory events to be enhanced and irrelevant ones suppressed. In the present study we used a frequency tagging paradigm to investigate the effects of attention on auditory steady state responses (ASSR). The ASSR was elicited by simultaneously presenting two different streams of white noise, amplitude modulated at either 16 and 23.5 Hz or 32.5 and 40 Hz. The two different frequencies were presented to each ear and participants were instructed to selectively attend to one ear or the other (confirmed by behavioral evidence). The results revealed that modulation of ASSR by selective attention depended on the modulation frequencies used and whether the activation was contralateral or ipsilateral. Attention enhanced the ASSR for contralateral activation from either ear for 16 Hz and suppressed the ASSR for ipsilateral activation for 16 Hz and 23.5 Hz. For modulation frequencies of 32.5 or 40 Hz attention did not affect the ASSR. We propose that the pattern of enhancement and inhibition may be due to binaural suppressive effects on ipsilateral stimulation and the dominance of contralateral hemisphere during dichotic listening. In addition to the influence of cortical processing asymmetries, these results may also reflect a bias towards inhibitory ipsilateral and excitatory contralateral activation present at the level of inferior colliculus. That the effect of attention was clearest for the lower modulation frequencies suggests that such effects are likely mediated by cortical brain structures or by those in close proximity to cortex. PMID:25334021

  7. [Dependence of "amplitude modulation following response" on attention].

    PubMed

    Pethe, J; Mühler, R; von Specht, H

    2001-03-01

    Amplitude modulation following responses (AMFR) allows good estimation of the hearing threshold due to the very narrow band excitation of the cochlea. Audiological use of AMFR requires knowledge of the relationship of these responses to the state of vigilance. The few studies published compared only qualitatively the amplitude of AMFR recorded in awake subjects to that recorded in sleeping subjects. A quantitative determination of the level of vigilance on the basis of recorded physiological parameters has not yet been carried out. In the present study, the relationship between the amplitude of AMFR and the level of vigilance was investigated quantitatively. In eight adults with normal hearing, the relationship between the AMFR amplitude and EEG amplitude in the delta- and theta-band was determined. The amplitude in both frequency bands was used to indicate the state of vigilance. The subjects were studied during natural and drug-induced sleep. A 1-kHz carrier tone with a sinusoidally modulated amplitude of 40 Hz or 80 Hz was used as stimulus. At 40-Hz modulation frequency, the AMFR amplitude correlates with the EEG amplitude both in natural and drug-induced sleep. An increase in EEG activity is paralleled by a significant reduction of AMFR amplitude. At 80-Hz modulation frequency, no relationship between AMFR amplitude and EEG activity could be detected. Under all conditions, the amplitudes of AMFR evoked by a modulation frequency of 80 Hz were significantly lower than those evoked by 40 Hz. These results suggest that for an audiological use of the 40-Hz AMFR the state of vigilance should be stabilised at a constantly high level. In spite of the lower influence of vigilance on the 80-Hz AMFR, this response appears less ideal for threshold estimation in adults due to the significantly smaller amplitudes.

  8. Simulation of differential die-away instrument’s response to asymmetrically burned spent nuclear fuel

    DOE PAGES

    Martinik, Tomas; Henzl, Vladimir; Grape, Sophie; ...

    2015-03-04

    Here, previous simulation studies of Differential Die–Away (DDA) instrument’s response to active interrogation of spent nuclear fuel from a pressurized water reactor (PWR) yielded promising results in terms of its capability to accurately measure or estimate basic spent fuel assembly (SFA) characteristics, such as multiplication, initial enrichment (IE) and burn-up (BU) as well as the total plutonium content. These studies were however performed only for a subset of idealized SFAs with a symmetric BU with respect to its longitudinal axis. Therefore, to complement the previous results, additional simulations have been performed of the DDA instrument’s response to interrogation of asymmetricallymore » burned spent nuclear fuel in order to determine whether detailed assay of SFAs from all 4 sides will be necessary in real life applications or whether a cost and time saving single sided assay could be used to achieve results of similar quality as previously reported in case of symmetrically burned SFAs.« less

  9. Perceived reputation of others modulates empathic neural responses.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Li; Wang, Qianfeng; Cheng, Xuemei; Li, Lin; Yang, Guang; Sun, Lining; Ling, Xiaoli; Guo, Xiuyan

    2016-01-01

    Empathy enables us to understand and share the emotional and affective states of another person and plays a key role in social behaviors. The current study investigated whether and how empathic neural responses to pain were modulated by the perceived reputation of others. Action histories reflecting individuals' past cooperation or betrayal actions in the repeated prisoner's dilemma game were introduced as an index of reputation. We assessed brain activity with functional magnetic resonance imaging while the participants observed individuals with a good or bad reputation receiving or not receiving pain. The results indicated that the participants exhibited reduced empathic responses in AI and dACC to the individual who had a bad reputation relative to the one who had a good reputation, suggesting that their empathy for pain was modulated by the perceived reputation of others.

  10. Shade response of a full size TESSERA module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slooff, Lenneke H.; Carr, Anna J.; de Groot, Koen; Jansen, Mark J.; Okel, Lars; Jonkman, Rudi; Bakker, Jan; de Gier, Bart; Harthoorn, Adriaan

    2017-08-01

    A full size TESSERA shade tolerant module has been made and was tested under various shadow conditions. The results show that the dedicated electrical interconnection of cells result in an almost linear response under shading. Furthermore, the voltage at maximum power point is almost independent of the shadow. This decreases the demand on the voltage range of the inverter. The increased shadow linearity results in a calculated increase in annual yield of about 4% for a typical Dutch house.

  11. Dying online: live broadcasts of Chinese emerging adult suicides and crisis response behaviors.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jing; Zhang, Wei; Harris, Keith; Chen, Qiang; Xu, Xiaolin

    2016-08-11

    Social media and online environments are becoming increasingly popular and integral to modern lives. The online presentation of suicidal behaviors is an example of the importance of communication technologies, and the need for professionals to respond to a changing world. These types of behaviors, however, have rarely been scientifically analyzed. This study aimed to examine the behaviors of both suicide broadcasters and their audience, with attention on prevention/crisis opportunities. Multiple case studies were employed to explore live-broadcast suicide by Chinese emerging adults (aged 18-25 years). Six cases were selected (four males, two females; aged 19-24, M = 21.60, SD = 2.25), retrieved from 190 public documents (case range = 5 to 32; M = 11.50, SD = 10.37). A qualitative study based on grounded theory was adopted. Information on case background, stages, participants and their behaviors were collected. (1) Five stages of blogcast suicide incidents were revealed, including: Signaling, Initial reactions, Live blogcast of suicide attempts, Crisis responses, and Final outcomes. (2) Common behavioral trends (e.g., comforting, verbal abuse) were identified from the blogcast participants (e.g., active audience, peers, parents and police). (3) Suicide blogcasters exhibited tendencies to communicated signs of pain and cries for help. This multi-case study found live presentations of suicidal behaviors offered unique opportunities to respond to suicidal crises, and also to learn more about the relationships between suicidal people and potential help sources. Findings showed many audience members wanted to be helpful but lacked appropriate skills or knowledge. Others engaged in suicide cyberbullying. The social media is an environment in the making. This study revealed that increasing knowledge and skills for crisis response and suicide prevention is needed. Such efforts could lead to empowered netizens and a more hospitable online world.

  12. Modulation of taste responsiveness by the satiation hormone peptide YY.

    PubMed

    La Sala, Michael S; Hurtado, Maria D; Brown, Alicia R; Bohórquez, Diego V; Liddle, Rodger A; Herzog, Herbert; Zolotukhin, Sergei; Dotson, Cedrick D

    2013-12-01

    It has been hypothesized that the peripheral taste system may be modulated in the context of an animal's metabolic state. One purported mechanism for this phenomenon is that circulating gastrointestinal peptides modulate the functioning of the peripheral gustatory system. Recent evidence suggests endocrine signaling in the oral cavity can influence food intake (FI) and satiety. We hypothesized that these hormones may be affecting FI by influencing taste perception. We used immunohistochemistry along with genetic knockout models and the specific reconstitution of peptide YY (PYY) in saliva using gene therapy protocols to identify a role for PYY signaling in taste. We show that PYY is expressed in subsets of taste cells in murine taste buds. We also show, using brief-access testing with PYY knockouts, that PYY signaling modulates responsiveness to bitter-tasting stimuli, as well as to lipid emulsions. We show that salivary PYY augmentation, via viral vector therapy, rescues behavioral responsiveness to a lipid emulsion but not to bitter stimuli and that this response is likely mediated via activation of Y2 receptors localized apically in taste cells. Our findings suggest distinct functions for PYY produced locally in taste cells vs. that circulating systemically.

  13. Goals and task difficulty expectations modulate striatal responses to feedback.

    PubMed

    DePasque Swanson, Samantha; Tricomi, Elizabeth

    2014-06-01

    The striatum plays a critical role in learning from reward, and it has been implicated in learning from performance-related feedback as well. Positive and negative performance-related feedback is known to engage the striatum during learning by eliciting a response similar to the reinforcement signal for extrinsic rewards and punishments. Feedback is an important tool used to teach new skills and promote healthful lifestyle changes, so it is important to understand how motivational contexts can modulate its effectiveness at promoting learning. While it is known that striatal responses scale with subjective factors influencing the desirability of rewards, it is less clear how expectations and goals might modulate the striatal responses to cognitive feedback during learning. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate the effects of task difficulty expectations and achievement goals on feedback processing during learning. We found that individuals who scored high in normative goals, which reflect a desire to outperform other students academically, showed the strongest effects of our manipulation. High levels of normative goals were associated with greater performance gains and exaggerated striatal sensitivity to positive versus negative feedback during blocks that were expected to be more difficult. Our findings suggest that normative goals may enhance performance when difficulty expectations are high, while at the same time modulating the subjective value of feedback as processed in the striatum.

  14. Serotonin modulates striatal responses to fairness and retaliation in humans

    PubMed Central

    Crockett, MJ; Apergis-Schoute, AM; Herrmann, B; Lieberman, MD; Müller, U; Robbins, TW; Clark, L

    2013-01-01

    Humans are willing to incur personal costs to punish others who violate social norms. Such ‘costly punishment’ is an important force for sustaining human cooperation, but the causal neurobiological determinants of punishment decisions remain unclear. Using a combination of behavioral, pharmacological and neuroimaging techniques, we show that manipulating the serotonin system in humans alters costly punishment decisions by modulating responses to fairness and retaliation in the striatum. Following dietary depletion of the serotonin precursor tryptophan, participants were more likely to punish those who treated them unfairly, and were slower to accept fair exchanges. Neuroimaging data revealed activations in the ventral and dorsal striatum that were associated with fairness and punishment, respectively. Depletion simultaneously reduced ventral striatal responses to fairness and increased dorsal striatal responses during punishment, an effect that predicted its influence on punishment behavior. Finally, we provide behavioral evidence that serotonin modulates specific retaliation, rather than general norm enforcement: depleted participants were more likely to punish unfair behavior directed toward themselves, but not unfair behavior directed toward others. Our findings demonstrate that serotonin modulates social value processing in the striatum, producing context-dependent effects on social behavior. PMID:23426678

  15. ESTRADIOL RAPIDLY MODULATES ODOR RESPONSES IN MOUSE VOMERONASAL SENSORY NEURONS

    PubMed Central

    CHERIAN, S.; LAM, Y. WAI; MCDANIELS, I.; STRUZIAK, M.; DELAY, R. J.

    2014-01-01

    In rodents, many social behaviors are driven by the sense of smell. The vomeronasal organ (VNO), part of the accessory olfactory system mediates many of these chemically driven behaviors. The VNO is heavily vascularized, and is readily accessible to circulating peptide or steroid hormones. Potentially, this allows circulating hormones to alter behavior through modulating the output of the primary sensory neurons in the VNO, the vomeronasal sensory neurons (VSNs). Based on this, we hypothesized that steroid hormones, in particular 17β-estradiol, would modulate activity of VSNs. In this paper, we show that the estrogen receptors, GPR30 and ERα, were present in VSNs and that estradiol may be synthesized locally in the VNO. Our results also showed that 17β-estradiol decreased responses of isolated VSNs to dilute urine, a potent natural stimulus, with respect to current amplitudes and depolarization. Further, 17β-estradiol increased the latency of the first action potential (AP) and the AP amplitude. Additionally, calcium responses to sulfated steroids (present in the low molecular weight fraction of urine) that act as ligands for apical vomeronasal receptors were decreased by 17β-estradiol. In conclusion, we show that estradiol modulates odorant responses mediated by VSNs and hence paves the way for future studies to better understand the mechanisms by which odorant mediated behavior is altered by endocrine status of the animal. PMID:24680884

  16. Serotonin differentially modulates responses to tones and frequency-modulated sweeps in the inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Hurley, L M; Pollak, G D

    1999-09-15

    Although almost all auditory brainstem nuclei receive serotonergic innervation, little is known about its effects on auditory neurons. We address this question by evaluating the effects of serotonin on sound-evoked activity of neurons in the inferior colliculus (IC) of Mexican free-tailed bats. Two types of auditory stimuli were used: tone bursts at the neuron's best frequency and frequency-modulated (FM) sweeps with a variety of spectral and temporal structures. There were two main findings. First, serotonin changed tone-evoked responses in 66% of the IC neurons sampled. Second, the influence of serotonin often depended on the type of signal presented. Although serotonin depressed tone-evoked responses in most neurons, its effects on responses to FM sweeps were evenly mixed between depression and facilitation. Thus in most cells serotonin had a different effect on tone-evoked responses than it did on FM-evoked responses. In some neurons serotonin depressed responses evoked by tone bursts but left the responses to FM sweeps unchanged, whereas in others serotonin had little or no effect on responses to tone bursts but substantially facilitated responses to FM sweeps. In addition, serotonin could differentially affect responses to various FM sweeps that differed in temporal or spectral structure. Previous studies have revealed that the efficacy of the serotonergic innervation is partially modulated by sensory stimuli and by behavioral states. Thus our results suggest that the population activity evoked by a particular sound is not simply a consequence of the hard wiring that connects the IC to lower and higher regions but rather is highly dynamic because of the functional reconfigurations induced by serotonin and almost certainly other neuromodulators as well.

  17. Extrusion die geometry effects on the energy absorbing properties and deformation response of 6063-type Al-Mg-Si aluminum alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gbenebor, O. P.; Fayomi, O. S. I.; Popoola, A. P. I.; Inegbenebor, A. O.; Oyawale, F.

    The response of 6063-type Al-Mg-Si alloy to deformation via extrusion was studied using tool steel dies with 15°, 30°, 45°, 60° and 75° entry angles. Compressive loads were subjected to each sample using the AVERY DENISON machine, adapted to supply a compressive load on the punch. The ability of the extrudate to absorb energy before fracture was calculated by integrating numerically the polynomial relationship between the compressive stress and sample strains. Strain rate was calculated for each specimen and the deformation zone length was mathematically derived from the die geometry to decipher its influence on both lateral and axial deformations. Results showed that extruding with a 15° die was the fastest as a result of the low flow stress encountered. Outstanding compressive strength, plastic deformation, strain rate and energy absorbing capacity were observed for the alloy extruded with a 75° die angle. Increase in die angles led to a decrease in deformation zone length and samples deformed more in the axial direction than in the lateral except for the 45o die which showed the opposite; the sample also showed the least ductility.

  18. Melatonin modulates the fetal cardiovascular defense response to acute hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Thakor, Avnesh S; Allison, Beth J; Niu, Youguo; Botting, Kimberley J; Serón-Ferré, Maria; Herrera, Emilio A; Giussani, Dino A

    2015-01-01

    Experimental studies in animal models supporting protective effects on the fetus of melatonin in adverse pregnancy have prompted clinical trials in human pregnancy complicated by fetal growth restriction. However, the effects of melatonin on the fetal defense to acute hypoxia, such as that which may occur during labor, remain unknown. This translational study tested the hypothesis, in vivo, that melatonin modulates the fetal cardiometabolic defense responses to acute hypoxia in chronically instrumented late gestation fetal sheep via alterations in fetal nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. Under anesthesia, 6 fetal sheep at 0.85 gestation were instrumented with vascular catheters and a Transonic flow probe around a femoral artery. Five days later, fetuses were exposed to acute hypoxia with or without melatonin treatment. Fetal blood was taken to determine blood gas and metabolic status and plasma catecholamine concentrations. Hypoxia during melatonin treatment was repeated during in vivo NO blockade with the NO clamp. This technique permits blockade of de novo synthesis of NO while compensating for the tonic production of the gas, thereby maintaining basal cardiovascular function. Melatonin suppressed the redistribution of blood flow away from peripheral circulations and the glycemic and plasma catecholamine responses to acute hypoxia. These are important components of the fetal brain sparing response to acute hypoxia. The effects of melatonin involved NO-dependent mechanisms as the responses were reverted by fetal treatment with the NO clamp. Melatonin modulates the in vivo fetal cardiometabolic responses to acute hypoxia by increasing NO bioavailability. PMID:25908097

  19. Modulation of Untruthful Responses with Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Fecteau, Shirley; Boggio, Paulo; Fregni, Felipe; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2013-01-01

    Deceptive abilities have long been studied in relation to personality traits. More recently, studies explored the neural substrates associated with deceptive skills suggesting a critical role of the prefrontal cortex. Here we investigated whether non-invasive brain stimulation over the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) could modulate generation of untruthful responses about subject’s personal life across contexts (i.e., deceiving on guilt-free questions on daily activities; generating previously memorized lies about past experience; and producing spontaneous lies about past experience), as well as across modality responses (verbal and motor responses). Results reveal that real, but not sham, transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) over the DLPFC can reduce response latency for untruthful over truthful answers across contexts and modality responses. Also, contexts of lies seem to incur a different hemispheric laterality. These findings add up to previous studies demonstrating that it is possible to modulate some processes involved in generation of untruthful answers by applying non-invasive brain stimulation over the DLPFC and extend these findings by showing a differential hemispheric contribution of DLPFCs according to contexts. PMID:23550273

  20. Modulation of Intestinal Epithelial Defense Responses by Probiotic Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Wan, L Y M; Chen, Z J; Shah, N P; El-Nezami, H

    2016-12-09

    Probiotics are live microorganisms, which when administered in food confer numerous health benefits. In previous studies about beneficial effects of probiotic bacteria to health, particularly in the fields of intestinal mucosa defense responses, specific probiotics, in a strain-dependent manner, show certain degree of potential to reinforce the integrity of intestinal epithelium and/or regulate some immune components. The mechanism of probiotic action is an area of interest. Among all possible routes of modulation by probiotics of intestinal epithelial cell-mediated defense responses, modulations of intestinal barrier function, innate, and adaptive mucosal immune responses, as well as signaling pathways are considered to play important role in the intestinal defense responses against pathogenic bacteria. This review summarizes the beneficial effects of probiotic bacteria to intestinal health together with the mechanisms affected by probiotic bacteria: barrier function, innate, and adaptive defense responses such as secretion of mucins, defensins, trefoil factors, immunoglobulin A (IgA), Toll-like receptors (TLRs), cytokines, gut associated lymphoid tissues, and signaling pathways.

  1. The response function of modulated grid Faraday cup plasma instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnett, A.; Olbert, S.

    1986-01-01

    Modulated grid Faraday cup plasma analyzers are a very useful tool for making in situ measurements of space plasmas. One of their great attributes is that their simplicity permits their angular response function to be calculated theoretically. An expression is derived for this response function by computing the trajectories of the charged particles inside the cup. The Voyager Plasma Science (PLS) experiment is used as a specific example. Two approximations to the rigorous response function useful for data analysis are discussed. The theoretical formulas were tested by multi-sensor analysis of solar wind data. The tests indicate that the formulas represent the true cup response function for all angles of incidence with a maximum error of only a few percent.

  2. The response function of modulated grid Faraday cup plasma instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnett, A.; Olbert, S.

    Modulated grid Faraday cup plasma analyzers are a very useful tool for making in situ measurements of space plasmas. One of their great attributes is that their simplicity permits their angular response function to be calculated theoretically. An expression is derived for this response function by computing the trajectories of the charged particles inside the cup. The Voyager Plasma Science (PLS) experiment is used as a specific example. Two approximations to the rigorous response function useful for data analysis are discussed. The theoretical formulas were tested by multi-sensor analysis of solar wind data. The tests indicate that the formulas represent the true cup response function for all angles of incidence with a maximum error of only a few percent.

  3. Visual-induced expectations modulate auditory cortical responses

    PubMed Central

    van Wassenhove, Virginie; Grzeczkowski, Lukasz

    2015-01-01

    Active sensing has important consequences on multisensory processing (Schroeder et al., 2010). Here, we asked whether in the absence of saccades, the position of the eyes and the timing of transient color changes of visual stimuli could selectively affect the excitability of auditory cortex by predicting the “where” and the “when” of a sound, respectively. Human participants were recorded with magnetoencephalography (MEG) while maintaining the position of their eyes on the left, right, or center of the screen. Participants counted color changes of the fixation cross while neglecting sounds which could be presented to the left, right, or both ears. First, clear alpha power increases were observed in auditory cortices, consistent with participants' attention directed to visual inputs. Second, color changes elicited robust modulations of auditory cortex responses (“when” prediction) seen as ramping activity, early alpha phase-locked responses, and enhanced high-gamma band responses in the contralateral side of sound presentation. Third, no modulations of auditory evoked or oscillatory activity were found to be specific to eye position. Altogether, our results suggest that visual transience can automatically elicit a prediction of “when” a sound will occur by changing the excitability of auditory cortices irrespective of the attended modality, eye position or spatial congruency of auditory and visual events. To the contrary, auditory cortical responses were not significantly affected by eye position suggesting that “where” predictions may require active sensing or saccadic reset to modulate auditory cortex responses, notably in the absence of spatial orientation to sounds. PMID:25705174

  4. Visual distance cues modulate neuromagnetic auditory N1m responses.

    PubMed

    Altmann, Christian F; Matsuhashi, Masao; Votinov, Mikhail; Goto, Kazuhiro; Mima, Tatsuya; Fukuyama, Hidenao

    2012-11-01

    Auditory distance judgment relies on several acoustic cues and can be modulated by visual information. Sound intensity serves as one such cue as it decreases with increasing distance. In this magnetoencephalography (MEG) experiment, we tested whether N1m MEG responses, previously described to scale with sound intensity, are modulated by visual distance cues. We recorded behavioral and MEG data from 15 healthy normal hearing participants. Noise bursts at different sound pressure levels were paired with synchronous visual cues at different distances. We hypothesized that noise paired with far visual cues will be represented louder and result in increased N1m amplitudes compared to a pairing with close visual cues. This might be based on a compensation of visually induced distance when processing loudness. Psychophysically, we observed no significant modulation of loudness judgments by visual cues. However, N1m MEG responses at about 100ms after stimulus onset were significantly stronger with distal compared to proximal visual cues in the left auditory cortex. Our results suggest an audio-visual interaction at an early stage in the left auditory cortex, possibly related to cue integration for auditory distance processing. Sound distance processing could prove itself as a promising model system for the investigation of intra-modal and cross-modal integration principles. Copyright © 2012 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Regional modulation of the response to glutathione in Hydra vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Pierobon, Paola

    2015-07-01

    In the presence of prey, or upon exposure to reduced glutathione (GSH), Hydra polyps open a mouth to ingest the captured prey and close it after feeding; at rest the mouth is not evident. In previous papers we have shown that GABA, glycine and NMDA modulate the mechanisms of mouth closure through ligand-gated-ion-channel receptors that are similar to their mammalian analogues in terms of biochemical and pharmacological properties. In order to study the regional distribution of these receptors, we have applied the GSH assay to polyps amputated at different levels of the body column. The response to 1-10 µmol l(-1) GSH of polyps lacking either peduncle and foot or the entire body columns (heads) was not different from control, whole animals. In the presence of GABA or muscimol, duration of the response was significantly decreased in heads; the decrease was suppressed by the GABA antagonists gabazine and bicuculline. By contrast, in animals lacking peduncle and foot, duration of the response did not vary upon GABA administration. Conversely, in the presence of glycine, duration of the response in heads preparations was similar to control, whereas in footless polyps, it was significantly reduced. The decrease was mimicked by the glycine agonists taurine and β-alanine, and counteracted by strychnine. These results suggest a regional distribution of receptors to GABA and glycine in the neuromuscular circuitry modulating the feeding behaviour. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  6. Citrate modulates lipopolysaccharide-induced monocyte inflammatory responses

    PubMed Central

    Ashbrook, M J; McDonough, K L; Pituch, J J; Christopherson, P L; Cornell, T T; Selewski, D T; Shanley, T P; Blatt, N B

    2015-01-01

    Citrate, a central component of cellular metabolism, is a widely used anti-coagulant due to its ability to chelate calcium. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-citrate lyase, which metabolizes citrate, has been shown to be essential for inflammation, but the ability of exogenous citrate to impact inflammatory signalling cascades remains largely unknown. We hypothesized that citrate would modulate inflammatory responses as both a cellular metabolite and calcium chelator, and tested this hypothesis by determining how clinically relevant levels of citrate modulate monocyte proinflammatory responses to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in a human acute monocytic leukaemia cell line (THP-1). In normal medium (0·4 mM calcium), citrate inhibited LPS-induced tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-8 transcripts, whereas in medium supplemented with calcium (1·4 mM), TNF-α and IL-8 levels increased and appeared independent of calcium chelation. Using an IL-8–luciferase plasmid construct, the same increased response was observed in the activation of the IL-8 promoter region, suggesting transcriptional regulation. Tricarballylic acid, an inhibitor of ATP-citrate lyase, blocked the ability of citrate to augment TNF-α, linking citrate's augmentation effect with its metabolism by ATP-citrate lyase. In the presence of citrate, increased histone acetylation was observed in the TNF-α and IL-8 promoter regions of THP-1 cells. We observed that citrate can both augment and inhibit proinflammatory cytokine production via modulation of inflammatory gene transactivation. These findings suggest that citrate anti-coagulation may alter immune function through complex interactions with the inflammatory response. PMID:25619261

  7. Glycan-Based Cell Targeting To Modulate Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Johannssen, Timo; Lepenies, Bernd

    2017-04-01

    Glycosylation is an integral post-translational modification present in more than half of all eukaryotic proteins. It affects key protein functions, including folding, stability, and immunogenicity. Glycoengineering approaches, such as the use of bacterial N-glycosylation systems, or expression systems, including yeasts, insect cells, and mammalian cells, have enabled access to defined and homogenous glycoproteins. Given that glycan structures on proteins can be recognized by host lectin receptors, they may facilitate cell-specific targeting and immune modulation. Myeloid C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) expressed by antigen-presenting cells are attractive targets to shape immune responses. Multivalent glycan display on nanoparticles, liposomes, or dendrimers has successfully enabled CLR targeting. In this review, we discuss novel strategies to access defined glycan structures and highlight CLR targeting approaches for immune modulation.

  8. Modulation of host signaling and cellular responses by Chlamydia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Modulation of host cell signaling and cellular functions is key to intracellular survival of pathogenic bacteria. Intracellular growth has several advantages e.g. escape from the humoral immune response and access to a stable nutrient rich environment. Growth in such a preferred niche comes at the price of an ongoing competition between the bacteria and the host as well as other microbes that compete for the very same host resources. This requires specialization and constant evolution of dedicated systems for adhesion, invasion and accommodation. Interestingly, obligate intracellular bacteria of the order Chlamydiales have evolved an impressive degree of control over several important host cell functions. In this review we summarize how Chlamydia controls its host cell with a special focus on signal transduction and cellular modulation. PMID:24267514

  9. Threat modulates neural responses to looming visual stimuli.

    PubMed

    Vagnoni, Eleonora; Lourenco, Stella F; Longo, Matthew R

    2015-09-01

    Objects on a collision course with an observer produce a specific pattern of optical expansion on the retina known as looming, which in theory exactly specifies the time-to-collision (TTC) of approaching objects. It was recently demonstrated that the affective content of looming stimuli influences perceived TTC, with threatening objects judged as approaching sooner than non-threatening objects. Here, the neural mechanisms by which perceived threat modulates spatiotemporal perception were investigated. Participants judged the TTC of threatening (snakes, spiders) or non-threatening (butterflies, rabbits) stimuli, which expanded in size at a rate indicating one of five TTCs. Visual-evoked potentials (VEPs) and oscillatory neural responses measured with electroencephalography were analysed. The arrival time of threatening stimuli was underestimated compared with non-threatening stimuli, though an interaction suggested that this underestimation was not constant across TTCs. Further, both speed of approach and threat modulated both VEPs and oscillatory responses. Speed of approach modulated the N1 parietal and oscillations in the beta band. Threat modulated several VEP components (P1, N1 frontal, N1 occipital, early posterior negativity and late positive potential) and oscillations in the alpha and high gamma band. The results for the high gamma band suggest an interaction between these two factors. Previous evidence suggests that looming stimuli activate sensorimotor areas, even in the absence of an intended action. The current results show that threat disrupts the synchronization over the sensorimotor areas that are likely activated by the presentation of a looming stimulus. © 2015 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Glucose and insulin modulate sickness responses in male Siberian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Carlton, Elizabeth D; Demas, Gregory E

    2017-02-01

    Mounting a sickness response is an energetically expensive task and requires precise balancing of energy allocation to ensure pathogen clearance while avoiding compromising energy reserves. Sickness intensity has previously been shown to be modulated by food restriction, body mass, and hormonal signals of energy. In the current study, we tested the hypothesis that sickness intensity is modulated by glucose availability and an endocrine signal of glucose availability, insulin. We utilized male Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus) and predicted that pharmacological induction of glucoprivation with 2-deoxy-d-glucose (2-DG), a non-metabolizable glucose analog that disrupts glycolysis, would attenuate energetically expensive sickness symptoms. Alternatively, we predicted that treatment of animals with insulin would enhance energetically expensive sickness symptoms, as insulin would act as a signal of increased glucose availability. Upon experimental treatment with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), we found that glucose deprivation resulted in increased sickness-induced hypothermia as compared to control- and insulin-treated animals; however, it did not have any effects on sickness-induced anorexia or body mass loss. Insulin treatment resulted in an unexpectedly exaggerated sickness response in animals of lesser body masses; however, in animals of greater body masses, insulin actually attenuated sickness-induced body mass loss and had no effects on hypothermia or anorexia. The effects of insulin on sickness severity may be modulated by sensitivity to sickness-induced hypoglycemia. Collectively, these results demonstrate that both glucose availability and signals of glucose availability can modulate the intensity of energetically expensive sickness symptoms, but their effects differ among different sickness symptoms and are sensitive to energetic context. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Lumbopelvic flexibility modulates neuromuscular responses during trunk flexion-extension.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Zuriaga, Daniel; Artacho-Pérez, Carla; Biviá-Roig, Gemma

    2016-06-01

    Various stimuli such as the flexibility of lumbopelvic structures influence the neuromuscular responses of the trunk musculature, leading to different load sharing strategies and reflex muscle responses from the afferents of lumbopelvic mechanoreceptors. This link between flexibility and neuromuscular response has been poorly studied. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between lumbopelvic flexibility and neuromuscular responses of the erector spinae, hamstring and abdominal muscles during trunk flexion-extension. Lumbopelvic movement patterns were measured in 29 healthy women, who were separated into two groups according to their flexibility during trunk flexion-extension. The electromyographic responses of erector spinae, rectus abdominis and biceps femoris were also recorded. Subjects with greater lumbar flexibility had significantly less pelvic flexibility and vice versa. Subjects with greater pelvic flexibility had a higher rate of relaxation and lower levels of hamstring activation during maximal trunk flexion. The neuromuscular response patterns of the hamstrings seem partially modulated by pelvic flexibility. Not so with the lumbar erector spinae and lumbar flexibility, despite the assertions of some previous studies. The results of this study improve our knowledge of the relationships between trunk joint flexibility and neuromuscular responses, a relationship which may play a role in low back pain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The immune response and its therapeutic modulation in bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Daheshia, Massoud; Prahl, James D; Carmichael, Jacob J; Parrish, John S; Seda, Gilbert

    2012-01-01

    Bronchiectasis (BC) is a chronic pulmonary disease with tremendous morbidity and significant mortality. As pathogen infection has been advocated as a triggering insult in the development of BC, a central role for the immune response in this process seems obvious. Inflammatory cells are present in both the airways as well as the lung parenchyma, and multiple mediators of immune cells including proteases and cytokines or their humoral products are increased locally or in the periphery. Interestingly, a defect in the immune system or suppression of immune response during conditions such as immunodeficiency may well predispose one to the devastating effects of BC. Thus, the outcome of an active immune response as detrimental or protective in the pathogenesis of BC may be dependent on the state of the patient's immunity, the severity of infection, and the magnitude of immune response. Here we reassess the function of the innate and acquired immunity in BC, the major sites of immune response, and the nature of the bioactive mediators. Furthermore, the potential link(s) between an ongoing immune response and structural alterations accompanying the disease and the success of therapies that can modulate the nature and extent of immune response in BC are elaborated upon.

  13. Monte Carlo Simulation of Response Time for Velocity Modulation Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maezawa, Koichi; Mizutani, Takashi; Tomizawa, Masaaki

    1992-03-01

    We have studied the response time for velocity modulation transistors (VMTs) using particle Monte Carlo simulation. The intrinsic VMT model with zero gate-source spacing was used to avoid the change in total number of electrons due to the difference in source resistances between the two channels. The results show that the response time for VMTs is about half that for ordinary high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs). The remaining factor limiting the response time is the electron redistribution in the channel, which is shown to be caused by the difference in velocity-electric field characteristics in the two channels. A “virtual” VMT model with a single channel, where the impurity concentration is changed abruptly at a certain moment, has also been studied to clarify the effect of electron redistribution.

  14. Frequency response control of semiconductor laser by using hybrid modulation scheme.

    PubMed

    Mieda, Shigeru; Yokota, Nobuhide; Isshiki, Ryuto; Kobayashi, Wataru; Yasaka, Hiroshi

    2016-10-31

    A hybrid modulation scheme that simultaneously applies the direct current modulation and intra-cavity loss modulation to a semiconductor laser is proposed. Both numerical calculations using rate equations and experiments using a fabricated laser show that the hybrid modulation scheme can control the frequency response of the laser by changing a modulation ratio and time delay between the two modulations. The modulation ratio and time delay provide the degree of signal mixing of the two modulations and an optimum condition is found when a non-flat frequency response for the intra-cavity loss modulation is compensated by that for the direct current modulation. We experimentally confirm a 8.64-dB improvement of the modulation sensitivity at 20 GHz compared with the pure direct current modulation with a 0.7-dB relaxation oscillation peak.

  15. Integrin-directed modulation of macrophage responses to biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Zaveri, Toral D; Lewis, Jamal S; Dolgova, Natalia V; Clare-Salzler, Michael J; Keselowsky, Benjamin G

    2014-04-01

    Macrophages are the primary mediator of chronic inflammatory responses to implanted biomaterials, in cases when the material is either in particulate or bulk form. Chronic inflammation limits the performance and functional life of numerous implanted medical devices, and modulating macrophage interactions with biomaterials to mitigate this response would be beneficial. The integrin family of cell surface receptors mediates cell adhesion through binding to adhesive proteins nonspecifically adsorbed onto biomaterial surfaces. In this work, the roles of integrin Mac-1 (αMβ2) and RGD-binding integrins were investigated using model systems for both particulate and bulk biomaterials. Specifically, the macrophage functions of phagocytosis and inflammatory cytokine secretion in response to a model particulate material, polystyrene microparticles were investigated. Opsonizing proteins modulated microparticle uptake, and integrin Mac-1 and RGD-binding integrins were found to control microparticle uptake in an opsonin-dependent manner. The presence of adsorbed endotoxin did not affect microparticle uptake levels, but was required for the production of inflammatory cytokines in response to microparticles. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that integrin Mac-1 and RGD-binding integrins influence the in vivo foreign body response to a bulk biomaterial, subcutaneously implanted polyethylene terephthalate. A thinner foreign body capsule was formed when integrin Mac-1 was absent (~30% thinner) or when RGD-binding integrins were blocked by controlled release of a blocking peptide (~45% thinner). These findings indicate integrin Mac-1 and RGD-binding integrins are involved and may serve as therapeutic targets to mitigate macrophage inflammatory responses to both particulate and bulk biomaterials.

  16. The dorsal raphe modulates sensory responsiveness during arousal in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Yokogawa, Tohei; Hannan, Markus C.; Burgess, Harold A.

    2012-01-01

    During waking behavior animals adapt their state of arousal in response to environmental pressures. Sensory processing is regulated in aroused states and several lines of evidence imply that this is mediated at least partly by the serotonergic system. However there is little information directly showing that serotonergic function is required for state-dependent modulation of sensory processing. Here we find that zebrafish larvae can maintain a short-term state of arousal during which neurons in the dorsal raphe modulate sensory responsiveness to behaviorally relevant visual cues. Following a brief exposure to water flow, larvae show elevated activity and heightened sensitivity to perceived motion. Calcium imaging of neuronal activity after flow revealed increased activity in serotonergic neurons of the dorsal raphe. Genetic ablation of these neurons abolished the increase in visual sensitivity during arousal without affecting baseline visual function or locomotor activity. We traced projections from the dorsal raphe to a major visual area, the optic tectum. Laser ablation of the tectum demonstrated that this structure, like the dorsal raphe, is required for improved visual sensitivity during arousal. These findings reveal that serotonergic neurons of the dorsal raphe have a state-dependent role in matching sensory responsiveness to behavioral context. PMID:23100441

  17. Social hierarchy modulates neural responses of empathy for pain

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Chunliang; Li, Zhihao; Feng, Xue; Wang, Lili; Tian, Tengxiang

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence indicates that empathic responses to others’ pain are modulated by various situational and individual factors. However, few studies have examined how empathy and underlying brain functions are modulated by social hierarchies, which permeate human society with an enormous impact on social behavior and cognition. In this study, social hierarchies were established based on incidental skill in a perceptual task in which all participants were mediumly ranked. Afterwards, participants were scanned with functional magnetic resonance imaging while watching inferior-status or superior-status targets receiving painful or non-painful stimulation. The results revealed that painful stimulation applied to inferior-status targets induced higher activations in the anterior insula (AI) and anterior medial cingulate cortex (aMCC), whereas these empathic brain activations were significantly attenuated in response to superior-status targets’ pain. Further, this neural empathic bias to inferior-status targets was accompanied by stronger functional couplings of AI with brain regions important in emotional processing (i.e. thalamus) and cognitive control (i.e. middle frontal gyrus). Our findings indicate that emotional sharing with others’ pain is shaped by relative positions in a social hierarchy such that underlying empathic neural responses are biased toward inferior-status compared with superior-status individuals. PMID:26516169

  18. Social hierarchy modulates neural responses of empathy for pain.

    PubMed

    Feng, Chunliang; Li, Zhihao; Feng, Xue; Wang, Lili; Tian, Tengxiang; Luo, Yue-Jia

    2016-03-01

    Recent evidence indicates that empathic responses to others' pain are modulated by various situational and individual factors. However, few studies have examined how empathy and underlying brain functions are modulated by social hierarchies, which permeate human society with an enormous impact on social behavior and cognition. In this study, social hierarchies were established based on incidental skill in a perceptual task in which all participants were mediumly ranked. Afterwards, participants were scanned with functional magnetic resonance imaging while watching inferior-status or superior-status targets receiving painful or non-painful stimulation. The results revealed that painful stimulation applied to inferior-status targets induced higher activations in the anterior insula (AI) and anterior medial cingulate cortex (aMCC), whereas these empathic brain activations were significantly attenuated in response to superior-status targets' pain. Further, this neural empathic bias to inferior-status targets was accompanied by stronger functional couplings of AI with brain regions important in emotional processing (i.e. thalamus) and cognitive control (i.e. middle frontal gyrus). Our findings indicate that emotional sharing with others' pain is shaped by relative positions in a social hierarchy such that underlying empathic neural responses are biased toward inferior-status compared with superior-status individuals. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. A Computational Model of Cellular Response to Modulated Radiation Fields

    SciTech Connect

    McMahon, Stephen J.; Butterworth, Karl T.; McGarry, Conor K.; Trainor, Colman; O'Sullivan, Joe M.; Hounsell, Alan R.; Prise, Kevin M.

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To develop a model to describe the response of cell populations to spatially modulated radiation exposures of relevance to advanced radiotherapies. Materials and Methods: A Monte Carlo model of cellular radiation response was developed. This model incorporated damage from both direct radiation and intercellular communication including bystander signaling. The predictions of this model were compared to previously measured survival curves for a normal human fibroblast line (AGO1522) and prostate tumor cells (DU145) exposed to spatially modulated fields. Results: The model was found to be able to accurately reproduce cell survival both in populations which were directly exposed to radiation and those which were outside the primary treatment field. The model predicts that the bystander effect makes a significant contribution to cell killing even in uniformly irradiated cells. The bystander effect contribution varies strongly with dose, falling from a high of 80% at low doses to 25% and 50% at 4 Gy for AGO1522 and DU145 cells, respectively. This was verified using the inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor aminoguanidine to inhibit the bystander effect in cells exposed to different doses, which showed significantly larger reductions in cell killing at lower doses. Conclusions: The model presented in this work accurately reproduces cell survival following modulated radiation exposures, both in and out of the primary treatment field, by incorporating a bystander component. In addition, the model suggests that the bystander effect is responsible for a significant portion of cell killing in uniformly irradiated cells, 50% and 70% at doses of 2 Gy in AGO1522 and DU145 cells, respectively. This description is a significant departure from accepted radiobiological models and may have a significant impact on optimization of treatment planning approaches if proven to be applicable in vivo.

  20. Modulation Response of Twin Optically Coupled Diode Lasers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-27

    the past year and a half. I would also like to thank Dr . Kovanis and Maj. Niday for their wisdom and guidance. v Table of Contents Page Abstract...set of subscripts to arrive at dR dt̂ = N̂R (40) dθ dt̂ = −αN̂ (41) T dN̂ dt̂ = P̂ − N̂ − (1 + 2N̂)R2. (42) To find the infinitesimal modulation...response Equations (40-42) are linearized about their steady state values. The steady state values are found by equating dR dt in Equa- tion (40) to zero

  1. Bifidobacterium bifidum PRL2010 Modulates the Host Innate Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Turroni, Francesca; Taverniti, Valentina; Ruas-Madiedo, Patricia; Duranti, Sabrina; Guglielmetti, Simone; Lugli, Gabriele Andrea; Gioiosa, Laura; Palanza, Paola; Margolles, Abelardo; van Sinderen, Douwe

    2014-01-01

    Here, we describe data obtained from transcriptome profiling of human cell lines and intestinal cells of a murine model upon exposure and colonization, respectively, with Bifidobacterium bifidum PRL2010. Significant changes were detected in the transcription of genes that are known to be involved in innate immunity. Furthermore, results from enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) showed that exposure to B. bifidum PRL2010 causes enhanced production of interleukin 6 (IL-6) and IL-8 cytokines, presumably through NF-κB activation. The obtained global transcription profiles strongly suggest that Bifidobacterium bifidum PRL2010 modulates the innate immune response of the host. PMID:24242237

  2. Engineering biomaterials surfaces to modulate the host response.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kai; Mei, Yan; Hadjesfandiari, Narges; Kizhakkedathu, Jayachandran N

    2014-12-01

    Undesirable host response is responsible for the surface induced thrombus generation, activation of the complement system and the inflammatory reactions by the blood-contacting biomaterials. The surface interaction of biomaterials with different blood components is thought to be the critical factor that dictates the host response to biomaterials. Surface engineering can be utilized as a method to enhance the biocompatibility and tailor the biological response to biomaterials. This review provides a brief account of various polymer brush based approaches used for biomaterials surface modification, both passive and bioactive, to make the material surfaces biocompatible and antibacterial. Initially we discuss the utilization of polymer brushes with different structure and chemistry as a novel strategy to design the surface non-fouling that passively prevent the subsequent biological responses. Further we explore the utility of different bioactive agents including peptides, carbohydrates and proteins which can be conjugated the polymer brush to make the surface actively interact with the body and modulate the host response. A number of such avenues have also been explored in this review.

  3. Tissue engineering tools for modulation of the immune response

    PubMed Central

    Boehler, Ryan M.; Graham, John G.; Shea, Lonnie D.

    2012-01-01

    Tissue engineering scaffolds have emerged as a powerful tool within regenerative medicine. These materials are being designed to create environments that promote regeneration through a combination of: (i) scaffold architecture, (ii) the use of scaffolds as vehicles for transplanting progenitor cells, and/or (iii) localized delivery of inductive factors or genes encoding for these inductive factors. This review describes the techniques associated with each of these components. Additionally, the immune response is increasingly recognized as a factor influencing regeneration. The immune reaction to an implant begins with an acute response to the injury and innate recognition of foreign materials, with the subsequent chronic immune response involving specific recognition of antigens (e.g., transplanted cells) by the adaptive immune response, which can eventually lead to rejection of the implant. Thus, we also describe the impact of each component on the immune response, and strategies (e.g., material design, anti-inflammatory cytokine delivery, and immune cell recruitment/transplantation) to modulate, yet not eliminate, the local immune response in order to promote regeneration, which represents another important tool for regenerative medicine. PMID:21988690

  4. Living and dying for sex. A theory of aging based on the modulation of cell cycle signaling by reproductive hormones.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Richard L; Atwood, Craig S

    2004-01-01

    A mechanistic understanding of aging has yet to be described; this paper puts forth a new theory that has the potential to explain aging in all sexually reproductive life forms. The theory also puts forth a new definition of aging - any change in an organism over time. This definition includes not only the changes associated with the loss of function (i.e. senescence, the commonly accepted definition of aging), but also the changes associated with the gain of function (growth and development). Using this definition, the rate of aging would be synonymous with the rate of change. The rate of change/aging is most rapid during the fetal period when organisms develop from a single cell at conception to a multicellular organism at birth. Therefore, 'fetal aging' would be determined by factors regulating the rate of mitogenesis, differentiation, and cell death. We suggest that these factors also are responsible for regulating aging throughout life. Thus, whatever controls mitogenesis, differentiation and cell death must also control aging. Since life-extending modalities consistently affect reproduction, and reproductive hormones are known to regulate mitogenesis and differentiation, we propose that aging is primarily regulated by the hormones that control reproduction (hence, the Reproductive-Cell Cycle Theory of Aging). In mammals, reproduction is controlled by the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis hormones. Longevity inducing interventions, including caloric restriction, decrease fertility by suppressing HPG axis hormones and HPG hormones are known to affect signaling through the well-documented longevity regulating GH/IGF-1/PI3K/Akt/Forkhead pathway. This is exemplified by genetic alterations in Caenorhabditis elegans where homologues of the HPG axis pathways, as well as the daf-2 and daf-9 pathways, all converge on daf-16, the homologue of human Forkhead that functions in the regulation of cell cycle events. In summary, we propose that the hormones that

  5. Pharmacoepigenomics: an interplay of epigenetic modulation of drug response and modulation of the epigenome by drugs.

    PubMed

    Mendiratta, Shweta; Jain, Shruti; Maini, Jayant; Brahmachari, Vani

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetic modulation captures the lack of correlation between the genotype and the phenotype. It also provides an interface between environment and the genotype leading to functional plasticity of the genome. While drug response can be modulated by the epigenome, the therapeutic intervention by drugs can also be considered as an environmental cue for epigenetic alterations. The effect of genetic polymorphism has accrued considerable interest and population polymorphism leading to variation in drug response is being studied extensively. The available data on the epigenetic marking of the whole genome in different contexts implies that no biological pathway or process in the mammalian system is free of epigenetic influence and thus, drug metabolism would not be an exception. In the light of the fact that the epigenome is not only variable between individuals, but that it also varies between different tissues of the same individual and with the age of the individual, it is still a long journey to transit from the correlation to causal relationship between drug response and the epigenomic variations. The present review is focused on recent developments in the area and a brief discussion of the future prospects and challenges.

  6. Seed Pubescence and Shape Modulate Adaptive Responses to Fire Cues.

    PubMed

    Gómez-González, Susana; Ojeda, Fernando; Torres-Morales, Patricio; Palma, Jazmín E

    2016-01-01

    Post-fire recruitment by seeds is regarded as an adaptive response in fire-prone ecosystems. Nevertheless, little is known about which heritable seed traits are functional to the main signals of fire (heat and smoke), thus having the potential to evolve. Here, we explored whether three seed traits (pubescence, dormancy and shape) and fire regime modulate seed response to fire cues(heat and smoke). As a model study system, we used Helenium aromaticum (Asteraceae), a native annual forb from the Chilean matorral, where fires are anthropogenic. We related seed trait values with fitness responses (germination and survival) after exposure to heat-shock and smoke experimental treatments on seeds from 10 H. aromaticum wild populations. We performed a phenotypic selection experiment to examine the relationship of seed traits with post-treatment fitness within a population (adaptive hypothesis). We then explored whether fire frequency in natural habitats was associated with trait expression across populations, and with germination and survival responses to experimental fire-cues. We found that populations subjected to higher fire frequency had, in average, more rounded and pubescent seeds than populations from rarely burned areas. Populations with more rounded and pubescent seeds were more resistant to 80°C heat-shock and smoke treatments.There was correlated selection on seed traits: pubescent-rounded or glabrouscent-elongated seeds had the highest probability of germinating after heat-shock treatments. Seed pubescence and shape in H. aromaticum are heritable traits that modulate adaptive responses to fire. Our results provide new insights into the process of plant adaptation to fire and highlight the relevance of human-made fires as a strong evolutionary agent in the Anthropocene.

  7. Laminar circuit organization and response modulation in mouse visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Olivas, Nicholas D.; Quintanar-Zilinskas, Victor; Nenadic, Zoran; Xu, Xiangmin

    2012-01-01

    The mouse has become an increasingly important animal model for visual system studies, but few studies have investigated local functional circuit organization of mouse visual cortex. Here we used our newly developed mapping technique combining laser scanning photostimulation (LSPS) with fast voltage-sensitive dye (VSD) imaging to examine the spatial organization and temporal dynamics of laminar circuit responses in living slice preparations of mouse primary visual cortex (V1). During experiments, LSPS using caged glutamate provided spatially restricted neuronal activation in a specific cortical layer, and evoked responses from the stimulated layer to its functionally connected regions were detected by VSD imaging. In this study, we first provided a detailed analysis of spatiotemporal activation patterns at specific V1 laminar locations and measured local circuit connectivity. Then we examined the role of cortical inhibition in the propagation of evoked cortical responses by comparing circuit activity patterns in control and in the presence of GABAa receptor antagonists. We found that GABAergic inhibition was critical in restricting layer-specific excitatory activity spread and maintaining topographical projections. In addition, we investigated how AMPA and NMDA receptors influenced cortical responses and found that blocking AMPA receptors abolished interlaminar functional projections, and the NMDA receptor activity was important in controlling visual cortical circuit excitability and modulating activity propagation. The NMDA receptor antagonist reduced neuronal population activity in time-dependent and laminar-specific manners. Finally, we used the quantitative information derived from the mapping experiments and presented computational modeling analysis of V1 circuit organization. Taken together, the present study has provided important new information about mouse V1 circuit organization and response modulation. PMID:23060751

  8. Motivational orientation modulates the neural response to reward.

    PubMed

    Linke, Julia; Kirsch, Peter; King, Andrea V; Gass, Achim; Hennerici, Michael G; Bongers, André; Wessa, Michèle

    2010-02-01

    Motivational orientation defines the source of motivation for an individual to perform a particular action and can either originate from internal desires (e.g., interest) or external compensation (e.g., money). To this end, motivational orientation should influence the way positive or negative feedback is processed during learning situations and this might in turn have an impact on the learning process. In the present study, we thus investigated whether motivational orientation, i.e., extrinsic and intrinsic motivation modulates the neural response to reward and punishment as well as learning from reward and punishment in 33 healthy individuals. To assess neural responses to reward, punishment and learning of reward contingencies we employed a probabilistic reversal learning task during functional magnetic resonance imaging. Extrinsic and intrinsic motivation were assessed with a self-report questionnaire. Rewarding trials fostered activation in the medial orbitofrontal cortex and anterior cingulate gyrus (ACC) as well as the amygdala and nucleus accumbens, whereas for punishment an increased neural response was observed in the medial and inferior prefrontal cortex, the superior parietal cortex and the insula. High extrinsic motivation was positively correlated to increased neural responses to reward in the ACC, amygdala and putamen, whereas a negative relationship between intrinsic motivation and brain activation in these brain regions was observed. These findings show that motivational orientation indeed modulates the responsiveness to reward delivery in major components of the human reward system and therefore extends previous results showing a significant influence of individual differences in reward-related personality traits on the neural processing of reward.

  9. Ethylene Modulates Root-Wave Responses in Arabidopsis1[w

    PubMed Central

    Buer, Charles S.; Wasteneys, Geoffrey O.; Masle, Josette

    2003-01-01

    When stimulated to bend downward by being held at 45 degrees off vertical but unable to penetrate into agar-based media, Arabidopsis roots develop waving and looping growth patterns. Here, we demonstrate that ethylene modulates these responses. We determined that agar-containing plates sealed with low-porosity film generate abiotic ethylene concentrations of 0.1 to 0.3 μL L-1, whereas in plates wrapped with porous tape, ethylene remains at trace levels. We demonstrate that exogenous ethylene at concentrations as low as a few nanoliters per liter modulates root waving, root growth direction, and looping but through partly different mechanisms. Nutrients and Suc modify the effects of ethylene on root waving. Thus, ethylene had little effect on temporal wave frequency when nutrients were omitted but reduced it significantly on nutrient-supplemented agar. Suc masked the ethylene response. Ethylene consistently suppressed the normal tendency for roots of Landsberg erecta to skew to the right as they grow against hard-agar surfaces and also generated righthanded petiole twisting. Furthermore, ethylene suppressed root looping, a gravity-dependent growth response that was enhanced by high nutrient and Suc availability. Our work demonstrates that cell file twisting is not essential for root waving or skewing to occur. Differential flank growth accounted for both the extreme root waving on zero-nutrient plates and for root skewing. Root twisting was nutrient-dependent and was thus strongly associated with the looping response. The possible role of auxin transport in these responses and the involvement of circadian rhythms are discussed. PMID:12805636

  10. Seed Pubescence and Shape Modulate Adaptive Responses to Fire Cues

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-González, Susana; Ojeda, Fernando; Torres-Morales, Patricio; Palma, Jazmín E.

    2016-01-01

    Post-fire recruitment by seeds is regarded as an adaptive response in fire-prone ecosystems. Nevertheless, little is known about which heritable seed traits are functional to the main signals of fire (heat and smoke), thus having the potential to evolve. Here, we explored whether three seed traits (pubescence, dormancy and shape) and fire regime modulate seed response to fire cues(heat and smoke). As a model study system, we used Helenium aromaticum (Asteraceae), a native annual forb from the Chilean matorral, where fires are anthropogenic. We related seed trait values with fitness responses (germination and survival) after exposure to heat-shock and smoke experimental treatments on seeds from 10 H. aromaticum wild populations. We performed a phenotypic selection experiment to examine the relationship of seed traits with post-treatment fitness within a population (adaptive hypothesis). We then explored whether fire frequency in natural habitats was associated with trait expression across populations, and with germination and survival responses to experimental fire-cues. We found that populations subjected to higher fire frequency had, in average, more rounded and pubescent seeds than populations from rarely burned areas. Populations with more rounded and pubescent seeds were more resistant to 80°C heat-shock and smoke treatments.There was correlated selection on seed traits: pubescent-rounded or glabrouscent-elongated seeds had the highest probability of germinating after heat-shock treatments. Seed pubescence and shape in H. aromaticum are heritable traits that modulate adaptive responses to fire. Our results provide new insights into the process of plant adaptation to fire and highlight the relevance of human-made fires as a strong evolutionary agent in the Anthropocene. PMID:27438267

  11. Do plants modulate biomass allocation in response to petroleum pollution?

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Ming; Yang, Qiang; Jiang, Li-Fen; Fang, Chang-Ming; Chen, Jia-Kuan; Li, Bo

    2010-01-01

    Biomass allocation is an important plant trait that responds plastically to environmental heterogeneities. However, the effects on this trait of pollutants owing to human activities remain largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the response of biomass allocation of Phragmites australis to petroleum pollution by a 13CO2 pulse-labelling technique. Our data show that plant biomass significantly decreased under petroleum pollution, but the root–shoot ratio for both plant biomass and 13C increased with increasing petroleum concentration, suggesting that plants could increase biomass allocation to roots in petroleum-polluted soil. Furthermore, assimilated 13C was found to be significantly higher in soil, microbial biomass and soil respiration after soils were polluted by petroleum. These results suggested that the carbon released from roots is rapidly turned over by soil microbes under petroleum pollution. This study found that plants can modulate biomass allocation in response to petroleum pollution. PMID:20484231

  12. Do plants modulate biomass allocation in response to petroleum pollution?

    PubMed

    Nie, Ming; Yang, Qiang; Jiang, Li-Fen; Fang, Chang-Ming; Chen, Jia-Kuan; Li, Bo

    2010-12-23

    Biomass allocation is an important plant trait that responds plastically to environmental heterogeneities. However, the effects on this trait of pollutants owing to human activities remain largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the response of biomass allocation of Phragmites australis to petroleum pollution by a ¹³CO₂ pulse-labelling technique. Our data show that plant biomass significantly decreased under petroleum pollution, but the root-shoot ratio for both plant biomass and ¹³C increased with increasing petroleum concentration, suggesting that plants could increase biomass allocation to roots in petroleum-polluted soil. Furthermore, assimilated ¹³C was found to be significantly higher in soil, microbial biomass and soil respiration after soils were polluted by petroleum. These results suggested that the carbon released from roots is rapidly turned over by soil microbes under petroleum pollution. This study found that plants can modulate biomass allocation in response to petroleum pollution.

  13. An adjuvant-modulated vaccine response in human whole blood.

    PubMed

    Hakimi, Jalil; Azizi, Ali; Ausar, Salvador F; Todryk, Stephen M; Rahman, Nausheen; Brookes, Roger H

    2017-09-02

    The restimulation of an immune memory response by in vitro culture of blood cells with a specific antigen has been used as a way to gauge immunity to vaccines for decades. In this commentary we discuss a less appreciated application to support vaccine process development. We report that human whole blood from pre-primed subjects can generate a profound adjuvant-modulated, antigen-specific response to several different vaccine formulations. The response is able to differentiate subtle changes in the quality of an immune memory response to vaccine formulations and can be used to select optimal conditions relating to a particular manufacture process step. While questions relating to closeness to in vivo vaccination remain, the approach is another big step nearer to the more relevant human response. It has special importance for new adjuvant development, complementing other preclinical in vivo and in vitro approaches to considerably de-risk progression of novel vaccines before and throughout early clinical development. Broader implications of the approach are discussed.

  14. miRNA modulation of the cellular stress response.

    PubMed

    Babar, Imran A; Slack, Frank J; Weidhaas, Joanne B

    2008-04-01

    Cellular stress responses are potent and dynamic, allowing cells to effectively counteract diverse stresses. These pathways are crucial not only for maintaining normal cellular homeostasis, but also for protecting cells from what would otherwise lead to their demise. A novel class of genes, termed miRNAs, has recently been implicated in the cellular stress response. For example, it has been demonstrated that a cardiac-specific miRNA that is not required for normal development is requisite for a normal cardiac stress response in mice. In addition, we have found that a miRNA family is able to modulate the cellular response to cytotoxic cancer treatment both in vitro and in vivo. In this review, we will discuss these and other important developments in the field. In particular, we will focus on studies that have linked miRNAs to the genotoxic stress response and will suggest how this connection may be both important for our understanding of biology and pertinent for the development of novel cancer therapies.

  15. Modulation of amygdala response to task-irrelevant emotion.

    PubMed

    Sebastian, Catherine L; McCrory, Eamon J; De Brito, Stephane A; Viding, Essi

    2017-01-24

    It has been shown that as cognitive demands of a non-emotional task increase, amygdala response to task-irrelevant emotional stimuli is reduced. However, it remains unclear whether effects are due to altered task demands, or altered perceptual input associated with task demands. Here, we present fMRI data from 20 adult males during a novel cognitive conflict task in which the requirement to scan emotional information was necessary for task performance and held constant across levels of cognitive conflict. Response to fearful facial expressions was attenuated under high (vs. low) conflict conditions, as indexed by both slower reaction times (RTs) and reduced right amygdala response. Psychophysiological interaction (PPI) analysis showed that increased amygdala response to fear in the low conflict condition was accompanied by increased functional coupling with middle frontal gyrus, a prefrontal region previously associated with emotion regulation during cognitive task performance. These data suggest that amygdala response to emotion is modulated as a function of task demands, even when perceptual inputs are closely matched across load conditions. PPI data also show that, in particular emotional contexts, increased functional coupling of amygdala with prefrontal cortex can paradoxically occur when executive demands are lower.

  16. Nutritional strategies to modulate the adaptive response to endurance training.

    PubMed

    Hawley, John A

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, advances in molecular biology have allowed scientists to elucidate how endurance exercise training stimulates skeletal muscle remodeling (i.e. promotes mitochondrial biogenesis). A growing field of interest directly arising from our understanding of the molecular bases of training adaptation is how nutrient availability can alter the regulation of many contraction-induced events in muscle in response to endurance exercise. Acutely manipulating substrate availability can exert profound effects on muscle energy stores and patterns of fuel metabolism during exercise, as well as many processes activating gene expression and cell signaling. Accordingly, such interventions when repeated over weeks and months have the potential to modulate numerous adaptive processes in skeletal muscle that ultimately drive the phenotype-specific characteristics observed in highly trained athletes. In this review, the molecular and cellular events that occur in skeletal muscle during and after endurance exercise are discussed and evidence provided to demonstrate that nutrient availability plays an important role in modulating many of the adaptive responses to training. Emphasis is on human studies that have determined the regulatory role of muscle glycogen availability on cell metabolism, endurance training capacity and performance.

  17. Auditory Cortex Basal Activity Modulates Cochlear Responses in Chinchillas

    PubMed Central

    León, Alex; Elgueda, Diego; Silva, María A.; Hamamé, Carlos M.; Delano, Paul H.

    2012-01-01

    Background The auditory efferent system has unique neuroanatomical pathways that connect the cerebral cortex with sensory receptor cells. Pyramidal neurons located in layers V and VI of the primary auditory cortex constitute descending projections to the thalamus, inferior colliculus, and even directly to the superior olivary complex and to the cochlear nucleus. Efferent pathways are connected to the cochlear receptor by the olivocochlear system, which innervates outer hair cells and auditory nerve fibers. The functional role of the cortico-olivocochlear efferent system remains debated. We hypothesized that auditory cortex basal activity modulates cochlear and auditory-nerve afferent responses through the efferent system. Methodology/Principal Findings Cochlear microphonics (CM), auditory-nerve compound action potentials (CAP) and auditory cortex evoked potentials (ACEP) were recorded in twenty anesthetized chinchillas, before, during and after auditory cortex deactivation by two methods: lidocaine microinjections or cortical cooling with cryoloops. Auditory cortex deactivation induced a transient reduction in ACEP amplitudes in fifteen animals (deactivation experiments) and a permanent reduction in five chinchillas (lesion experiments). We found significant changes in the amplitude of CM in both types of experiments, being the most common effect a CM decrease found in fifteen animals. Concomitantly to CM amplitude changes, we found CAP increases in seven chinchillas and CAP reductions in thirteen animals. Although ACEP amplitudes were completely recovered after ninety minutes in deactivation experiments, only partial recovery was observed in the magnitudes of cochlear responses. Conclusions/Significance These results show that blocking ongoing auditory cortex activity modulates CM and CAP responses, demonstrating that cortico-olivocochlear circuits regulate auditory nerve and cochlear responses through a basal efferent tone. The diversity of the obtained effects

  18. Sequential modulations of stimulus-response correspondence effects depend on awareness of response conflict.

    PubMed

    Kunde, Wilfried

    2003-03-01

    In two experiments, sequential modulations of prime-target correspondence effects were investigated in a metacontrast paradigm. Primes were either unmasked and thus consciously discriminable, or entirely masked and thus indiscriminable. Mirroring similar findings from Eriksen- and Simon-type tasks, the influence of prime-target correspondence was reduced in trials that followed a noncorresponding prime-target pair, which suggests that prime-induced response activation can be temporarily suppressed after an incompatible trial. This sequential modulation was independent of prime discriminability in the current trial, but it occurred only when the prime, and thus a conflict between the prime-induced and the deliberately to-be-selected response, was consciously experienced in the preceding trial. This suggests that the suppression of automatic response priming is not an immediate consequence of response conflict, but an intention-mediated strategy.

  19. Neural response to reward anticipation is modulated by Gray's impulsivity.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Tim; Dresler, Thomas; Ehlis, Ann-Christine; Plichta, Michael M; Heinzel, Sebastian; Polak, Thomas; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Breuer, Felix; Jakob, Peter M; Fallgatter, Andreas J

    2009-07-15

    According to the Reinforcement Sensitivity Theory (RST), Gray's dimension of impulsivity, reflecting human trait reward sensitivity, determines the extent to which stimuli activate the Behavioural Approach System (BAS). The potential neural underpinnings of the BAS, however, remain poorly understood. In the present study, we examined the association between Gray's impulsivity as defined by the RST and event-related fMRI BOLD-response to anticipation of reward in twenty healthy human subjects in brain regions previously associated with reward processing. Anticipation of reward during a Monetary Incentive Delay Task elicited activation in key components of the human reward circuitry such as the ventral striatum, the amygdala and the orbitofrontal cortex. Interindividual differences in Gray's impulsivity accounted for a significant amount of variance of the reward-related BOLD-response in the ventral striatum and the orbitofrontal cortex. Specifically, higher trait reward sensitivity was associated with increased activation in response to cues indicating potential reward. Extending previous evidence, here we show that variance in functional brain activation during anticipation of reward is attributed to interindividual differences regarding Gray's dimension of impulsivity. Thus, trait reward sensitivity contributes to the modulation of responsiveness in major components of the human reward system which thereby display a core property of the BAS. Generally, fostering our understanding of the neural underpinnings of the association of reward-related interindividual differences in affective traits might aid researchers in quest for custom-tailored treatments of psychiatric disorders, further disentangling the complex relationship between personality traits, emotion, and health.

  20. Human protein status modulates brain reward responses to food cues.

    PubMed

    Griffioen-Roose, Sanne; Smeets, Paul Am; van den Heuvel, Emmy; Boesveldt, Sanne; Finlayson, Graham; de Graaf, Cees

    2014-07-01

    Protein is indispensable in the human diet, and its intake appears tightly regulated. The role of sensory attributes of foods in protein intake regulation is far from clear. We investigated the effect of human protein status on neural responses to different food cues with the use of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The food cues varied by taste category (sweet compared with savory) and protein content (low compared with high). In addition, food preferences and intakes were measured. We used a randomized crossover design whereby 23 healthy women [mean ± SD age: 22 ± 2 y; mean ± SD body mass index (in kg/m(2)): 22.5 ± 1.8] followed two 16-d fully controlled dietary interventions involving consumption of either a low-protein diet (0.6 g protein · kg body weight(-1) · d(-1), ~7% of energy derived from protein, approximately half the normal protein intake) or a high-protein diet (2.2 g protein · kg body weight(-1) · d(-1), ~25% of energy, approximately twice the normal intake). On the last day of the interventions, blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) responses to odor and visual food cues were measured by using fMRI. The 2 interventions were followed by a 1-d ad libitum phase, during which a large array of food items was available and preference and intake were measured. When exposed to food cues (relative to the control condition), the BOLD response was higher in reward-related areas (orbitofrontal cortex, striatum) in a low-protein state than in a high-protein state. Specifically, BOLD was higher in the inferior orbitofrontal cortex in response to savory food cues. In contrast, the protein content of the food cues did not modulate the BOLD response. A low protein state also increased preferences for savory food cues and increased protein intake in the ad libitum phase as compared with a high-protein state. Protein status modulates brain responses in reward regions to savory food cues. These novel findings suggest that dietary protein status

  1. Resting autonomic modulations and the heart rate response to exercise.

    PubMed

    Nunan, David; Jakovljevic, Djordje G; Donovan, Gay; Singleton, Lynette D; Sandercock, Gavin R H; Brodie, David A

    2010-08-01

    Identify the underlying role of resting heart rate variability (HRV) in the hearts response to graded exercise testing (GXT). Resting 5-min HRV and heart rate (HR) measurements were made in 33 volunteers (19 males, median age 34, range 25-63 years and 14 females median age 48, range 21-63 years). Measures of VO2 peak and HR obtained during a maximal GXT and heart rate recovery (HRR) post-GXT were assessed for associations with resting HRV. Differences and effect size (d) for measures of HRV were assessed between groups based on established risk cut-points for resting, exercise and recovery HR responses. Small associations were observed for the majority of resting HRV and GXT HR responses (best r value = -0.27, P > 0.05). Measures of HRV demonstrated moderate associations with HRR (best r value = 0.46, P < 0.05) and were able to predict a negative risk HRR. In contrast to other dependent variables, measures of HRV were consistently able to demonstrate significant and moderate to large (d = 0.9-2.0) differences between groups based on literature defined prognostic HR cut-points. Small associations with HR responses to exercise prevent their accurate prediction from resting HRV. Data support the use of vagally mediated resting HRV in predicting better HRR. Lower resting autonomic modulations underlined high risk resting and exercise HR responses. Resting short-term HRV measurements should be considered when assessing cardiac autonomic health from the HR response before, during and/or after exercise.

  2. Responses to amplitude modulated infrared stimuli in the guinea pig inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Richter, Claus-Peter; Young, Hunter

    2013-03-08

    Responses of units in the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus of the guinea pig were recorded with tungsten electrodes. The set of data presented here is limited to high stimulus levels. The effect of changing the modulation frequency and the modulation depth was explored for acoustic and laser stimuli. The selected units responded to sinusoidal amplitude modulated (AM) tones, AM trains of clicks, and AM trains of laser pulses with a modulation of their spike discharge. At modulation frequencies of 20 Hz, some units tended to respond with 40 Hz to the acoustic stimuli, but only at 20 Hz for the trains of laser pulses. For all modes of stimulation the responses revealed a dominant response to the first cycle of the modulation, with decreasing number of action potential during successive cycles. While amplitude modulated tone bursts and amplitude modulated trains of acoustic clicks showed similar patterns, the response to trains of laser pulses was different.

  3. Responses to amplitude modulated infrared stimuli in the guinea pig inferior colliculus

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Claus-Peter; Young, Hunter

    2014-01-01

    Responses of units in the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus of the guinea pig were recorded with tungsten electrodes. The set of data presented here is limited to high stimulus levels. The effect of changing the modulation frequency and the modulation depth was explored for acoustic and laser stimuli. The selected units responded to sinusoidal amplitude modulated (AM) tones, AM trains of clicks, and AM trains of laser pulses with a modulation of their spike discharge. At modulation frequencies of 20 Hz, some units tended to respond with 40 Hz to the acoustic stimuli, but only at 20 Hz for the trains of laser pulses. For all modes of stimulation the responses revealed a dominant response to the first cycle of the modulation, with decreasing number of action potential during successive cycles. While amplitude modulated tone bursts and amplitude modulated trains of acoustic clicks showed similar patterns, the response to trains of laser pulses was different. PMID:25075264

  4. Modulation of sweet responses of taste receptor cells.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Ryusuke; Niki, Mayu; Jyotaki, Masafumi; Sanematsu, Keisuke; Shigemura, Noriatsu; Ninomiya, Yuzo

    2013-03-01

    Taste receptor cells play a major role in detection of chemical compounds in the oral cavity. Information derived from taste receptor cells, such as sweet, bitter, salty, sour and umami is important for evaluating the quality of food components. Among five basic taste qualities, sweet taste is very attractive for animals and influences food intake. Recent studies have demonstrated that sweet taste sensitivity in taste receptor cells would be affected by leptin and endocannabinoids. Leptin is an anorexigenic mediator that reduces food intake by acting on leptin receptor Ob-Rb in the hypothalamus. Endocannabinoids such as anandamide [N-arachidonoylethanolamine (AEA)] and 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (2-AG) are known as orexigenic mediators that act via cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) in the hypothalamus and limbic forebrain to induce appetite and stimulate food intake. At the peripheral gustatory organs, leptin selectively suppresses and endocannabinoids selectively enhance sweet taste sensitivity via Ob-Rb and CB1 expressed in sweet sensitive taste cells. Thus leptin and endocannabinoids not only regulate food intake via central nervous systems but also modulate palatability of foods by altering peripheral sweet taste responses. Such reciprocal modulation of leptin and endocannabinoids on peripheral sweet sensitivity may play an important role in regulating energy homeostasis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Response functions for sine- and square-wave modulations of disparity.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, W.

    1972-01-01

    Depth sensations cannot be elicited by modulations of disparity that are more rapid than about 6 Hz, regardless of the modulation amplitude. Vergence tracking also fails at similar modulation rates, suggesting that this portion of the oculomotor system is limited by the behavior of disparity detectors. For sinusoidal modulations of disparity between 1/2 to 2 deg of disparity, most depth-response functions exhibit a low-frequency decrease that is not observed with square-wave modulations of disparity.

  6. Attention modulates the dorsal striatum response to love stimuli.

    PubMed

    Langeslag, Sandra J E; van der Veen, Frederik M; Röder, Christian H

    2014-02-01

    In previous functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies concerning romantic love, several brain regions including the caudate and putamen have consistently been found to be more responsive to beloved-related than control stimuli. In those studies, infatuated individuals were typically instructed to passively view the stimuli or to think of the viewed person. In the current study, we examined how the instruction to attend to, or ignore the beloved modulates the response of these brain areas. Infatuated individuals performed an oddball task in which pictures of their beloved and friend served as targets and distractors. The dorsal striatum showed greater activation for the beloved than friend, but only when they were targets. The dorsal striatum actually tended to show less activation for the beloved than the friend when they were distractors. The longer the love and relationship duration, the smaller the response of the dorsal striatum to beloved-distractor stimuli was. We interpret our findings in terms of reinforcement learning. By virtue of using a cognitive task with a full factorial design, we show that the dorsal striatum is not activated by beloved-related information per se, but only by beloved-related information that is attended.

  7. Modulation of vaccine response by concomitant probiotic administration

    PubMed Central

    Maidens, Catherine; Childs, Caroline; Przemska, Agnieszka; Dayel, Iman Bin; Yaqoob, Parveen

    2013-01-01

    Evidence suggests that probiotic bacteria modulate both innate and adaptive immunity in the host, and in some situations can result in reduced severity of common illnesses, such as acute rotavirus infection and respiratory infections. Responses to vaccination are increasingly being used to provide high quality information on the immunomodulatory effects of dietary components in humans. The present review focuses on the effect of probiotic administration upon vaccination response. The majority of studies investigating the impact of probiotics on responses to vaccination have been conducted in healthy adults, and at best they show modest effects of probiotics on serum or salivary IgA titres. Studies in infants and in elderly subjects are very limited, and it is too early to draw any firm conclusions regarding the potential for probiotics to act as adjuvants in vaccination. Although some studies are comparable in terms of duration of the intervention, age and characteristics of the subjects, most differ in terms of the probiotic selected. Further well designed, randomized, placebo‐controlled studies are needed to understand fully the immunomodulatory properties of probiotics, whether the effects exerted are strain‐dependent and age‐dependent and their clinical relevance in enhancing immune protection following vaccination. PMID:22845346

  8. Personality traits modulate neural responses to emotions expressed in music.

    PubMed

    Park, Mona; Hennig-Fast, Kristina; Bao, Yan; Carl, Petra; Pöppel, Ernst; Welker, Lorenz; Reiser, Maximilian; Meindl, Thomas; Gutyrchik, Evgeny

    2013-07-26

    Music communicates and evokes emotions. The number of studies on the neural correlates of musical emotion processing is increasing but few have investigated the factors that modulate these neural activations. Previous research has shown that personality traits account for individual variability of neural responses. In this study, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate how the dimensions Extraversion and Neuroticism are related to differences in brain reactivity to musical stimuli expressing the emotions happiness, sadness and fear. 12 participants (7 female, M=20.33 years) completed the NEO-Five Factor Inventory (NEO-FFI) and were scanned while performing a passive listening task. Neurofunctional analyses revealed significant positive correlations between Neuroticism scores and activations in bilateral basal ganglia, insula and orbitofrontal cortex in response to music expressing happiness. Extraversion scores were marginally negatively correlated with activations in the right amygdala in response to music expressing fear. Our findings show that subjects' personality may have a predictive power in the neural correlates of musical emotion processing and should be considered in the context of experimental group homogeneity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Modulation of Primary Immune Response by Different Vaccine Adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Ciabattini, Annalisa; Pettini, Elena; Fiorino, Fabio; Pastore, Gabiria; Andersen, Peter; Pozzi, Gianni; Medaglini, Donata

    2016-01-01

    Adjuvants contribute to enhancing and shaping the vaccine immune response through different modes of action. Here early biomarkers of adjuvanticity after primary immunization were investigated using four different adjuvants combined with the chimeric tuberculosis vaccine antigen H56. C57BL/6 mice were immunized by the subcutaneous route with different vaccine formulations, and the modulation of primary CD4+ T cell and B cell responses was assessed within draining lymph nodes, blood, and spleen, 7 and 12 days after priming. Vaccine formulations containing the liposome system CAF01 or a squalene-based oil-in-water emulsion (o/w squalene), but not aluminum hydroxide (alum) or CpG ODN 1826, elicited a significant primary antigen-specific CD4+ T cell response compared to antigen alone, 7 days after immunization. The effector function of activated CD4+ T cells was skewed toward a Th1/Th17 response by CAF01, while a Th1/Th2 response was elicited by o/w squalene. Differentiation of B cells in short-lived plasma cells, and subsequent early H56-specific IgG secretion, was observed in mice immunized with o/w squalene or CpG adjuvants. Tested adjuvants promoted the germinal center reaction with different magnitude. These results show that the immunological activity of different adjuvants can be characterized by profiling early immunization biomarkers after primary immunization. These data and this approach could give an important contribution to the rational development of heterologous prime–boost vaccine immunization protocols. PMID:27781036

  10. YY1 modulates taxane response in epithelial ovarian cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumura, Noriomi; Huang, Zhiqing; Baba, Tsukasa; Lee, Paula S.; Barnett, Jason C.; Mori, Seiichi; Chang, Jeffrey T.; Kuo, Wen-Lin; Gusberg, Alison H.; Whitaker, Regina S.; Gray, JoeW.; Fujii, Shingo; Berchuck, Andrew; Murphy, Susan K.

    2008-10-10

    The results of this study show that a high YY1 gene signature (characterized by coordinate elevated expression of transcription factor YY1 and putative YY1 target genes) within serous epithelial ovarian cancers is associated with enhanced response to taxane-based chemotherapy and improved survival. If confirmed in a prospective study, these results have important implications for the potential future use of individualized therapy in treating patients with ovarian cancer. Identification of the YY1 gene signature profile within a tumor prior to initiation of chemotherapy may provide valuable information about the anticipated response of these tumors to taxane-based drugs, leading to better informed decisions regarding chemotherapeutic choice. Survival of ovarian cancer patients is largely dictated by their response to chemotherapy, which depends on underlying molecular features of the malignancy. We previously identified YIN YANG 1 (YY1) as a gene whose expression is positively correlated with ovarian cancer survival. Herein we investigated the mechanistic basis of this association. Epigenetic and genetic characteristics of YY1 in serous epithelial ovarian cancer (SEOC) were analyzed along with YY1 mRNA and protein. Patterns of gene expression in primary SEOC and in the NCI60 database were investigated using computational methods. YY1 function and modulation of chemotherapeutic response in vitro was studied using siRNA knockdown. Microarray analysis showed strong positive correlation between expression of YY1 and genes with YY1 and transcription factor E2F binding motifs in SEOC and in the NCI60 cancer cell lines. Clustering of microarray data for these genes revealed that high YY1/E2F3 activity positively correlates with survival of patients treated with the microtubule stabilizing drug paclitaxel. Increased sensitivity to taxanes, but not to DNA crosslinking platinum agents, was also characteristic of NCI60 cancer cell lines with a high YY1/E2F signature. YY1

  11. Human Envelope Following Responses to Amplitude Modulation: Effects of Aging and Modulation Depth.

    PubMed

    Dimitrijevic, Andrew; Alsamri, Jamal; John, M Sasha; Purcell, David; George, Sahara; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2016-01-01

    To record envelope following responses (EFRs) to monaural amplitude-modulated broadband noise carriers in which amplitude modulation (AM) depth was slowly changed over time and to compare these objective electrophysiological measures to subjective behavioral thresholds in young normal hearing and older subjects. three groups of subjects included a young normal-hearing group (YNH 18 to 28 years; pure-tone average = 5 dB HL), a first older group ("O1"; 41 to 62 years; pure-tone average = 19 dB HL), and a second older group ("O2"; 67 to 82 years; pure-tone average = 35 dB HL). Electrophysiology: In condition 1, the AM depth (41 Hz) of a white noise carrier, was continuously varied from 2% to 100% (5%/s). EFRs were analyzed as a function of the AM depth. In condition 2, auditory steady-state responses were recorded to fixed AM depths (100%, 75%, 50%, and 25%) at a rate of 41 Hz. Psychophysics: A 3 AFC (alternative forced choice) procedure was used to track the AM depth needed to detect AM at 41 Hz (AM detection). The minimum AM depth capable of eliciting a statistically detectable EFR was defined as the physiological AM detection threshold. Across all ages, the fixed AM depth auditory steady-state response and swept AM EFR yielded similar response amplitudes. Statistically significant correlations (r = 0.48) were observed between behavioral and physiological AM detection thresholds. Older subjects had slightly higher (not significant) behavioral AM detection thresholds than younger subjects. AM detection thresholds did not correlate with age. All groups showed a sigmoidal EFR amplitude versus AM depth function but the shape of the function differed across groups. The O2 group reached EFR amplitude plateau levels at lower modulation depths than the normal-hearing group and had a narrower neural dynamic range. In the young normal-hearing group, the EFR phase did not differ with AM depth, whereas in the older group, EFR phase showed a consistent decrease with increasing

  12. Hormonal modulation of the heat shock response: insights from fish with divergent cortisol stress responses.

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, Sacha; Höglund, Erik; Gilmour, Kathleen M; Currie, Suzanne

    2012-01-01

    Acute temperature stress in animals results in increases in heat shock proteins (HSPs) and stress hormones. There is evidence that stress hormones influence the magnitude of the heat shock response; however, their role is equivocal. To determine whether and how stress hormones may affect the heat shock response, we capitalized on two lines of rainbow trout specifically bred for their high (HR) and low (LR) cortisol response to stress. We predicted that LR fish, with a low cortisol but high catecholamine response to stress, would induce higher levels of HSPs after acute heat stress than HR trout. We found that HR fish have significantly higher increases in both catecholamines and cortisol compared with LR fish, and LR fish had no appreciable stress hormone response to heat shock. This unexpected finding prevented further interpretation of the hormonal modulation of the heat shock response but provided insight into stress-coping styles and environmental stress. HR fish also had a significantly greater and faster heat shock response and less oxidative protein damage than LR fish. Despite these clear differences in the physiological and cellular responses to heat shock, there were no differences in the thermal tolerance of HR and LR fish. Our results support the hypothesis that responsiveness to environmental change underpins the physiological differences in stress-coping styles. Here, we demonstrate that the heat shock response is a distinguishing feature of the HR and LR lines and suggest that it may have been coselected with the hormonal responses to stress.

  13. Platelet activation and apoptosis modulate monocyte inflammatory responses in dengue

    PubMed Central

    Hottz, Eugenio D.; Medeiros-de-Moraes, Isabel M.; Vieira-de-Abreu, Adriana; de Assis, Edson F.; Vals-de-Souza, Rogério; Castro-Faria-Neto, Hugo C.; Weyrich, Andrew S.; Zimmerman, Guy A.; Bozza, Fernando A.; Bozza, Patrícia T.

    2014-01-01

    Background Dengue is the most prevalent human arbovirus disease in the world. Dengue infection has a large spectrum of clinical manifestations from self-limited febrile illness to severe syndromes accompanied by bleeding and shock. Thrombocytopenia and vascular leak with altered cytokine profiles in plasma are features of severe dengue. Although monocytes have been recognized as important sources of cytokines in dengue, the contributions of platelet-monocyte interactions to inflammatory responses in dengue have not been addressed. Patients/Methods Patients with dengue were investigated for platelet-monocyte aggregate formation and markers of monocyte activation. Platelet-induced cytokine responses by monocytes and underlying mechanisms were also investigated in vitro. Results We observed increased levels of platelet-monocyte aggregates in blood samples from patients with dengue, especially patients with thrombocytopenia and increased vascular permeability. Moreover, the exposure of monocytes from healthy volunteers to platelets from patients with dengue induced the secretion of the cytokines IL-1β, IL-8, IL-10 and MCP-1, while the exposure to platelets from healthy volunteers only induced the secretion of MCP-1. In addition to the well-established modulation of monocyte cytokine responses by activated platelets through P-selectin binding, we found that interaction of monocytes with apoptotic platelets mediate IL-10 secretion through phosphatidylserine recognition in platelet-monocyte aggregates. Moreover, IL-10 secretion required platelet-monocyte contact but not phagocytosis. Conclusions Together, our results demonstrate that activated and apoptotic platelets aggregate with monocytes during dengue infection and signal specific cytokine responses that may contribute to the pathogenesis of dengue. PMID:25015827

  14. Interleukin-10 does not modulate clopidogrel platelet response in mice.

    PubMed

    Yin, Q; Tai, T; Ji, J-Z; Mi, Q-Y; Zhang, M-R; Huang, W-J; Cao, C-C; Xie, H-G

    2016-03-01

    ESSENTIALS: It is unclear whether interleukin-10 (IL-10) could affect clopidogrel metabolism and response. The bioactivation of and response to clopidogrel were determined between mice with or without IL-10. Maximum clopidogrel active metabolite levels were the major driver of platelet response to clopidogrel. IL-10 did not modulate maximum levels of clopidogrel active metabolite and its antiplatelet effects. Elevated plasma interleukin-10 (IL-10) levels were observed in patients who responded less to clopidogrel (a prodrug that is required for further metabolic bioactivation in the liver). However, no data are currently available suggesting whether there is such an association. To systematically explore possible differences in the formation of and response to clopidogrel active metabolite (CAM) in mice with or without IL-10 gene expression. A single oral dose of clopidogrel (10 mg kg(-1)) was given to IL-10 knockout (KO) mice and wild-type (WT) control mice, respectively, and pharmacokinetic parameters of clopidogrel and CAM were calculated. Moreover, adenosine diphosphate-induced whole-blood platelet aggregation was measured in mice receiving 0, 5, 10, or 20 mg kg(-1) of clopidogrel, respectively. Compared with IL-10 KO mice, WT mice had significantly lower area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) of CAM as a result of a shorter mean elimination half-life but had significantly higher AUC of clopidogrel due to slower systemic clearance and smaller volume of distribution. Although AUC of CAM was significantly lower in WT mice than in KO mice, antiplatelet effects of clopidogrel did not differ significantly between the two mouse groups, as their maximum plasma concentrations (Cmax ) of CAM were not significantly different. IL-10 expression level affects AUC rather than Cmax of CAM, but the Cmax of CAM is the major driver of antiplatelet effects of clopidogrel in mice. © 2015 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  15. Using Module Analysis for Multiple Choice Responses: A New Method Applied to Force Concept Inventory Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brewe, Eric; Bruun, Jesper; Bearden, Ian G.

    2016-01-01

    We describe "Module Analysis for Multiple Choice Responses" (MAMCR), a new methodology for carrying out network analysis on responses to multiple choice assessments. This method is used to identify modules of non-normative responses which can then be interpreted as an alternative to factor analysis. MAMCR allows us to identify conceptual…

  16. Using Module Analysis for Multiple Choice Responses: A New Method Applied to Force Concept Inventory Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brewe, Eric; Bruun, Jesper; Bearden, Ian G.

    2016-01-01

    We describe "Module Analysis for Multiple Choice Responses" (MAMCR), a new methodology for carrying out network analysis on responses to multiple choice assessments. This method is used to identify modules of non-normative responses which can then be interpreted as an alternative to factor analysis. MAMCR allows us to identify conceptual…

  17. Cinobufagin Modulates Human Innate Immune Responses and Triggers Antibacterial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Shanshan; Spelmink, Laura; Codemo, Mario; Subramanian, Karthik; Pütsep, Katrin

    2016-01-01

    The traditional Chinese medicine Chan-Su is widely used for treatment of cancer and cardiovascular diseases, but also as a remedy for infections such as furunculosis, tonsillitis and acute pharyngitis. The clinical use of Chan-Su suggests that it has anti-infective effects, however, the mechanism of action is incompletely understood. In particular, the effect on the human immune system is poorly defined. Here, we describe previously unrecognized immunomodulatory activities of cinobufagin (CBG), a major bioactive component of Chan-Su. Using human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs), we show that LPS-induced maturation and production of a number of cytokines was potently inhibited by CBG, which also had a pro-apoptotic effect, associated with activation of caspase-3. Interestingly, CBG triggered caspase-1 activation and significantly enhanced IL-1β production in LPS-stimulated cells. Finally, we demonstrate that CBG upregulates gene expression of the antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) hBD-2 and hBD-3 in DCs, and induces secretion of HNP1-3 and hCAP-18/LL-37 from neutrophils, potentiating neutrophil antibacterial activity. Taken together, our data indicate that CBG modulates the inflammatory phenotype of DCs in response to LPS, and triggers an antibacterial innate immune response, thus proposing possible mechanisms for the clinical effects of Chan-Su in anti-infective therapy. PMID:27529866

  18. Periostin as a multifunctional modulator of the wound healing response.

    PubMed

    Walker, John T; McLeod, Karrington; Kim, Shawna; Conway, Simon J; Hamilton, Douglas W

    2016-09-01

    During tissue healing, the dynamic and temporal alterations required for effective repair occur in the structure and composition of the extracellular matrix (ECM). Matricellular proteins (MPs) are a group of diverse non-structural ECM components that bind cell surface receptors mediating interactions between the cell and its microenviroment, effectively regulating adhesion, migration, proliferation, signaling, and cell phenotype. Periostin (Postn), a pro-fibrogenic secreted glycoprotein, is defined as an MP based on its expression pattern and regulatory roles during development and healing and in disease processes. Postn consists of a typical signal sequence, an EMI domain responsible for binding to fibronectin, four tandem fasciclin-like domains that are responsible for integrin binding, and a C-terminal region in which multiple splice variants originate. This review focuses specifically on the role of Postn in wound healing and remodeling, an area of intense research during the last 10 years, particularly as related to skin healing and myocardium post-infarction. Postn interacts with cells through various integrin pairs and is an essential downstream effector of transforming growth factor-β superfamily signaling. Across various tissues, Postn is associated with the pro-fibrogenic process: specifically, the transition of fibroblasts to myofibroblasts, collagen fibrillogenesis, and ECM synthesis. Although the complexity of Postn as a modulator of cell behavior in tissue healing is only beginning to be elucidated, its expression is clearly a defining event in moving wound healing through the proliferative and remodeling phases.

  19. Modulation of host responses by oral commensal bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Devine, Deirdre A.; Marsh, Philip D.; Meade, Josephine

    2015-01-01

    Immunomodulatory commensal bacteria are proposed to be essential for maintaining healthy tissues, having multiple roles including priming immune responses to ensure rapid and efficient defences against pathogens. The default state of oral tissues, like the gut, is one of inflammation which may be balanced by regulatory mechanisms and the activities of anti-inflammatory resident bacteria that modulate Toll-like receptor (TLR) signalling or NF-κB activation, or influence the development and activities of immune cells. However, the widespread ability of normal resident organisms to suppress inflammation could impose an unsustainable burden on the immune system and compromise responses to pathogens. Immunosuppressive resident bacteria have been isolated from the mouth and, for example, may constitute 30% of the resident streptococci in plaque or on the tongue. Their roles in oral health and dysbiosis remain to be determined. A wide range of bacterial components and/or products can mediate immunomodulatory activity, raising the possibility of development of alternative strategies for therapy and health promotion using probiotics, prebiotics, or commensal-derived immunomodulatory molecules. PMID:25661061

  20. SIGIRR modulates the inflammatory response in the brain.

    PubMed

    Watson, Melanie B; Costello, Derek A; Carney, Dónal G; McQuillan, Keith; Lynch, Marina A

    2010-08-01

    One of the more recently described members of the interleukin-1 (IL-1) receptor family, single-Ig-interleukin-1 related receptor (SIGIRR), has been identified as a negative regulator of inflammation in several tissues. It modulates the responses triggered by stimulation of Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 and IL-1 in several peripheral cell types, possibly in an NFkappaB-dependent manner. Consistently, responses to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) are exaggerated in SIGIRR-deficient mice and the symptoms of experimental inflammatory conditions are more profound in these animals. Here, we set out to establish whether the absence of SIGIRR was associated with inflammatory changes in the brain and report that, LPS-induced a greater effect on CD40 and ICAM mRNA in mixed glia prepared from SIGIRR(-/-), compared with wildtype mice. This was associated with parallel changes in TNFalpha and IL-6 at mRNA and protein levels, an effect which was observed in purified microglia but not astrocytes. Similarly, LPS exerted a more profound effect on microglial activation and cytokine production in hippocampal tissue prepared from SIGIRR(-/-), compared with wildtype mice. The effect of LPS on exploratory behaviour was also accentuated in SIGIRR(-/-) mice. The evidence suggests that these changes are a likely consequence of increased hippocampal expression of CD14 and TLR4, and NFkappaB activation in SIGIRR(-/-) mice. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Temperature modulates phototrophic periphyton response to chronic copper exposure.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Anne Sophie; Dabrin, Aymeric; Morin, Soizic; Gahou, Josiane; Foulquier, Arnaud; Coquery, Marina; Pesce, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    Streams located in vineyard areas are highly prone to metal pollution. In a context of global change, aquatic systems are generally subjected to multi-stress conditions due to multiple chemical and/or physical pressures. Among various environmental factors that modulate the ecological effects of toxicants, special attention should be paid to climate change, which is driving an increase in extreme climate events such as sharp temperature rises. In lotic ecosystems, periphyton ensures key ecological functions such as primary production and nutrient cycling. However, although the effects of metals on microbial communities are relatively well known, there is scant data on possible interactions between temperature increase and metal pollution. Here we led a study to evaluate the influence of temperature on the response of phototrophic periphyton to copper (Cu) exposure. Winter communities, collected in a 8 °C river water, were subjected for six weeks to four thermal conditions in microcosms in presence or not of Cu (nominal concentration of 15 μg L(-1)). At the initial river temperature (8 °C), our results confirmed the chronic impact of Cu on periphyton, both in terms of structure (biomass, distribution of algal groups, diatomic composition) and function (photosynthetic efficiency). At higher temperatures (13, 18 and 23 °C), Cu effects were modulated. Indeed, temperature increase reduced Cu effects on algal biomass, algal class proportions, diatom assemblage composition and photosynthetic efficiency. This reduction of Cu effects on periphyton may be related to lower bioaccumulation of Cu and/or to selection of more Cu-tolerant species at higher temperatures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Modulation of Autophagy by Sorafenib: Effects on Treatment Response

    PubMed Central

    Prieto-Domínguez, Nestor; Ordóñez, Raquel; Fernández, Anna; García-Palomo, Andres; Muntané, Jordi; González-Gallego, Javier; Mauriz, José L.

    2016-01-01

    The multikinase inhibitor sorafenib is, at present, the only drug approved for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), one of the most lethal types of cancer worldwide. However, the increase in the number of sorafenib tumor resistant cells reduces efficiency. A better knowledge of the intracellular mechanism of the drug leading to reduced cell survival could help to improve the benefits of sorafenib therapy. Autophagy is a bulk cellular degradation process activated in a broad range of stress situations, which allows cells to degrade misfolded proteins or dysfunctional organelles. This cellular route can induce survival or death, depending on cell status and media signals. Sorafenib, alone or in combination with other drugs is able to induce autophagy, but cell response to the drug depends on the complex integrative crosstalk of different intracellular signals. In cancerous cells, autophagy can be regulated by different cellular pathways (Akt-related mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibition, 5′ AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) induction, dissociation of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) family proteins from Beclin-1), or effects of some miRNAs. Inhibition of mTOR signaling by sorafenib and diminished interaction between Beclin-1 and myeloid cell leukemia 1 (Mcl-1) have been related to induction of autophagy in HCC. Furthermore, changes in some miRNAs, such as miR-30α, are able to modulate autophagy and modify sensitivity in sorafenib-resistant cells. However, although AMPK phosphorylation by sorafenib seems to play a role in the antiproliferative action of the drug, it does not relate with modulation of autophagy. In this review, we present an updated overview of the effects of sorafenib on autophagy and its related activation pathways, analyzing in detail the involvement of autophagy on sorafenib sensitivity and resistance. PMID:27375485

  3. Stress-responsive hydroxycinnamate glycosyltransferase modulates phenylpropanoid metabolism in Populus

    PubMed Central

    Babst, Benjamin A.; Chen, Han-Yi; Wang, Hong-Qiang; Payyavula, Raja S.; Thomas, Tina P.; Harding, Scott A.; Tsai, Chung-Jui

    2014-01-01

    The diversity of phenylpropanoids offers a rich inventory of bioactive chemicals that can be exploited for plant improvement and human health. Recent evidence suggests that glycosylation may play a role in the partitioning of phenylpropanoid precursors for a variety of downstream uses. This work reports the functional characterization of a stress-responsive glycosyltransferase, GT1-316 in Populus. GT1-316 belongs to the UGT84A subfamily of plant glycosyltransferase family 1 and is designated UGT84A17. Recombinant protein analysis showed that UGT84A17 is a hydroxycinnamate glycosyltransferase and able to accept a range of unsubstituted and substituted cinnamic and benzoic acids as substrates in vitro. Overexpression of GT1-316 in transgenic Populus led to plant-wide increases of hydroxycinnamoyl-glucose esters, which were further elevated under N-limiting conditions. Levels of the two most abundant flavonoid glycosides, rutin and kaempferol-3-O-rutinoside, decreased, while levels of other less abundant flavonoid and phenylpropanoid conjugates increased in leaves of the GT1-316-overexpressing plants. Transcript levels of representative phenylpropanoid pathway genes were unchanged in transgenic plants, supporting a glycosylation-mediated redirection of phenylpropanoid carbon flow as opposed to enhanced phenylpropanoid pathway flux. The metabolic response of N-replete transgenic plants overlapped with that of N-stressed wild types, as the majority of phenylpropanoid derivatives significantly affected by GT1-316 overexpression were also significantly changed by N stress in the wild types. These results suggest that UGT84A17 plays an important role in phenylpropanoid metabolism by modulating biosynthesis of hydroxycinnamoyl-glucose esters and their derivatives in response to developmental and environmental cues. PMID:24803501

  4. Polyamine depletion inhibits the autophagic response modulating Trypanosoma cruzi infectivity.

    PubMed

    Vanrell, María C; Cueto, Juan A; Barclay, Jeremías J; Carrillo, Carolina; Colombo, María I; Gottlieb, Roberta A; Romano, Patricia S

    2013-07-01

    Autophagy is a cell process that in normal conditions serves to recycle cytoplasmic components and aged or damaged organelles. The autophagic pathway has been implicated in many physiological and pathological situations, even during the course of infection by intracellular pathogens. Many compounds are currently used to positively or negatively modulate the autophagic response. Recently it was demonstrated that the polyamine spermidine is a physiological inducer of autophagy in eukaryotic cells. We have previously shown that the etiological agent of Chagas disease, the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, interacts with autophagic compartments during host cell invasion and that preactivation of autophagy significantly increases host cell colonization by this parasite. In the present report we have analyzed the effect of polyamine depletion on the autophagic response of the host cell and on T. cruzi infectivity. Our data showed that depleting intracellular polyamines by inhibiting the biosynthetic enzyme ornithine decarboxylase with difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) suppressed the induction of autophagy in response to starvation or rapamycin treatment in two cell lines. This effect was associated with a decrease in the levels of LC3 and ATG5, two proteins required for autophagosome formation. As a consequence of inhibiting host cell autophagy, DFMO impaired T. cruzi colonization, indicating that polyamines and autophagy facilitate parasite infection. Thus, our results point to DFMO as a novel autophagy inhibitor. While other autophagy inhibitors such as wortmannin and 3-methyladenine are nonspecific and potentially toxic, DFMO is an FDA-approved drug that may have value in limiting autophagy and the spread of the infection in Chagas disease and possibly other pathological settings.

  5. Polyamine depletion inhibits the autophagic response modulating Trypanosoma cruzi infectivity

    PubMed Central

    Vanrell, María C.; Cueto, Juan A.; Barclay, Jeremías J.; Carrillo, Carolina; Colombo, María I.; Gottlieb, Roberta A.; Romano, Patricia S.

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy is a cell process that in normal conditions serves to recycle cytoplasmic components and aged or damaged organelles. The autophagic pathway has been implicated in many physiological and pathological situations, even during the course of infection by intracellular pathogens. Many compounds are currently used to positively or negatively modulate the autophagic response. Recently it was demonstrated that the polyamine spermidine is a physiological inducer of autophagy in eukaryotic cells. We have previously shown that the etiological agent of Chagas disease, the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, interacts with autophagic compartments during host cell invasion and that preactivation of autophagy significantly increases host cell colonization by this parasite. In the present report we have analyzed the effect of polyamine depletion on the autophagic response of the host cell and on T. cruzi infectivity. Our data showed that depleting intracellular polyamines by inhibiting the biosynthetic enzyme ornithine decarboxylase with difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) suppressed the induction of autophagy in response to starvation or rapamycin treatment in two cell lines. This effect was associated with a decrease in the levels of LC3 and ATG5, two proteins required for autophagosome formation. As a consequence of inhibiting host cell autophagy, DFMO impaired T. cruzi colonization, indicating that polyamines and autophagy facilitate parasite infection. Thus, our results point to DFMO as a novel autophagy inhibitor. While other autophagy inhibitors such as wortmannin and 3-methyladenine are nonspecific and potentially toxic, DFMO is an FDA-approved drug that may have value in limiting autophagy and the spread of the infection in Chagas disease and possibly other pathological settings. PMID:23697944

  6. The ethics of and the appropriate legislation concerning killing people and letting them die: a response to Merkel.

    PubMed

    McLachlan, Hugh V

    2017-07-01

    With regard to ethics and legislation, what is the significant difference between a doctor terminating the life-supporting treatment of a patient in the course of his job and a greedy relative of the patient doing the same thing to inherit his wealth? Merkel offers an interesting and inventive answer to this question in terms of the improper violation of personal boundaries. However, despite Merkel's claim to the contrary, his answer does not directly address the question of the relevant ethical similarities and differences between killing and letting die in general. Furthermore, it does not provide the basis a plausible rationale for legislation concerning killing and letting die. The questions of whether letting someone die is ethically the same as killing someone and whether it should be treated the same way by the criminal law are not the same as or tantamount to the question of whether or not it involves the transgression of another person's boundaries. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  7. Retinoblastoma loss modulates DNA damage response favoring tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Seoane, Marcos; Iglesias, Pablo; Gonzalez, Teresa; Dominguez, Fernando; Fraga, Maximo; Aliste, Carlos; Forteza, Jeronimo; Costoya, Jose A

    2008-01-01

    Senescence is one of the main barriers against tumor progression. Oncogenic signals in primary cells result in oncogene-induced senescence (OIS), crucial for protection against cancer development. It has been described in premalignant lesions that OIS requires DNA damage response (DDR) activation, safeguard of the integrity of the genome. Here we demonstrate how the cellular mechanisms involved in oncogenic transformation in a model of glioma uncouple OIS and DDR. We use this tumor type as a paradigm of oncogenic transformation. In human gliomas most of the genetic alterations that have been previously identified result in abnormal activation of cell growth signaling pathways and deregulation of cell cycle, features recapitulated in our model by oncogenic Ras expression and retinoblastoma (Rb) inactivation respectively. In this scenario, the absence of pRb confers a proliferative advantage and activates DDR to a greater extent in a DNA lesion-independent fashion than cells that express only HRas(V12). Moreover, Rb loss inactivates the stress kinase DDR-associated p38MAPK by specific Wip1-dependent dephosphorylation. Thus, Rb loss acts as a switch mediating the transition between premalignant lesions and cancer through DDR modulation. These findings may have important implications for the understanding the biology of gliomas and anticipate a new target, Wip1 phosphatase, for novel therapeutic strategies.

  8. Systemic corazonin signalling modulates stress responses and metabolism in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Kubrak, Olga I.; Lushchak, Oleh V.; Zandawala, Meet

    2016-01-01

    Stress triggers cellular and systemic reactions in organisms to restore homeostasis. For instance, metabolic stress, experienced during starvation, elicits a hormonal response that reallocates resources to enable food search and readjustment of physiology. Mammalian gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and its insect orthologue, adipokinetic hormone (AKH), are known for their roles in modulating stress-related behaviour. Here we show that corazonin (Crz), a peptide homologous to AKH/GnRH, also alters stress physiology in Drosophila. The Crz receptor (CrzR) is expressed in salivary glands and adipocytes of the liver-like fat body, and CrzR knockdown targeted simultaneously to both these tissues increases the fly's resistance to starvation, desiccation and oxidative stress, reduces feeding, alters expression of transcripts of Drosophila insulin-like peptides (DILPs), and affects gene expression in the fat body. Furthermore, in starved flies, CrzR-knockdown increases circulating and stored carbohydrates. Thus, our findings indicate that elevated systemic Crz signalling during stress coordinates increased food intake and diminished energy stores to regain metabolic homeostasis. Our study suggests that an ancient stress-peptide in Urbilateria evolved to give rise to present-day GnRH, AKH and Crz signalling systems. PMID:27810969

  9. Keratinocytes can modulate and directly initiate nociceptive responses

    PubMed Central

    Baumbauer, Kyle M; DeBerry, Jennifer J; Adelman, Peter C; Miller, Richard H; Hachisuka, Junichi; Lee, Kuan Hsien; Ross, Sarah E; Koerber, H Richard; Davis, Brian M; Albers, Kathryn M

    2015-01-01

    How thermal, mechanical and chemical stimuli applied to the skin are transduced into signals transmitted by peripheral neurons to the CNS is an area of intense study. Several studies indicate that transduction mechanisms are intrinsic to cutaneous neurons and that epidermal keratinocytes only modulate this transduction. Using mice expressing channelrhodopsin (ChR2) in keratinocytes we show that blue light activation of the epidermis alone can produce action potentials (APs) in multiple types of cutaneous sensory neurons including SA1, A-HTMR, CM, CH, CMC, CMH and CMHC fiber types. In loss of function studies, yellow light stimulation of keratinocytes that express halorhodopsin reduced AP generation in response to naturalistic stimuli. These findings support the idea that intrinsic sensory transduction mechanisms in epidermal keratinocytes can directly elicit AP firing in nociceptive as well as tactile sensory afferents and suggest a significantly expanded role for the epidermis in sensory processing. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09674.001 PMID:26329459

  10. Fetal Sex Modulates Developmental Response to Maternal Malnutrition

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Bulnes, Antonio; Torres-Rovira, Laura; Astiz, Susana; Ovilo, Cristina; Sanchez-Sanchez, Raul; Gomez-Fidalgo, Ernesto; Perez-Solana, Mariluz; Martin-Lluch, Mercedes; Garcia-Contreras, Consuelo; Vazquez-Gomez, Marta

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of obesity and metabolic diseases is dramatically high in rapidly developing countries. Causes have been related to intrinsic ethnic features with development of a thrifty genotype for adapting to food scarcity, prenatal programming by undernutrition, and postnatal exposure to obesogenic lifestyle. Observational studies in humans and experimental studies in animal models evidence that the adaptive responses of the offspring may be modulated by their sex. In the contemporary context of world globalization, the new question arising is the existence and extent of sex-related differences in developmental and metabolic traits in case of mixed-race. Hence, in the current study, using a swine model, we compared male and female fetuses that were crossbred from mothers with thrifty genotype and fathers without thrifty genotype. Female conceptuses evidence stronger protective strategies for their adequate growth and postnatal survival. In brief, both male and female fetuses developed a brain-sparing effect but female fetuses were still able to maintain the development of other viscerae than the brain (mainly liver, intestine and kidneys) at the expense of carcass development. Furthermore, these morphometric differences were reinforced by differences in nutrient availability (glucose and cholesterol) favoring female fetuses with severe developmental predicament. These findings set the basis for further studies aiming to increase the knowledge on the interaction between genetic and environmental factors in the determination of adult phenotype PMID:26544862

  11. Hyaluronidase Modulates Inflammatory Response and Accelerates the Cutaneous Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Fronza, Marcio; Caetano, Guilherme F.; Leite, Marcel N.; Bitencourt, Claudia S.; Paula-Silva, Francisco W. G.; Andrade, Thiago A. M.; Frade, Marco A. C.; Merfort, Irmgard; Faccioli, Lúcia H.

    2014-01-01

    Hyaluronidases are enzymes that degrade hyaluronan an important constituent of the extracellular matrix. They have been used as a spreading agent, improving the absorption of drugs and facilitating the subcutaneous infusion of fluids. Here, we investigated the influence of bovine testes hyaluronidase (HYAL) during cutaneous wound healing in in vitro and in vivo assays. We demonstrated in the wound scratch assay that HYAL increased the migration and proliferation of fibroblasts in vitro at low concentration, e.g. 0.1 U HYAL enhanced the cell number by 20%. HYAL presented faster and higher reepithelialization in in vivo full-thickness excisional wounds generated on adult Wistar rats back skin already in the early phase at 2nd day post operatory compared to vehicle-control group. Wound closured area observed in the 16 U and 32 U HYAL treated rats reached 38% and 46% compared to 19% in the controls, respectively. Histological and biochemical analyses supported the clinical observations and showed that HYAL treated wounds exhibited increased granulation tissue, diminished edema formation and regulated the inflammatory response by modulating the release of pro and anti-inflammatory cytokines, growth factor and eicosanoids mediators. Moreover, HYAL increased gene expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR) γ and PPAR β/δ, the collagen content in the early stages of healing processes as well as angiogenesis. Altogether these data revealed that HYAL accelerates wound healing processes and might be beneficial for treating wound disorders. PMID:25393024

  12. Fetal Sex Modulates Developmental Response to Maternal Malnutrition.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Bulnes, Antonio; Torres-Rovira, Laura; Astiz, Susana; Ovilo, Cristina; Sanchez-Sanchez, Raul; Gomez-Fidalgo, Ernesto; Perez-Solana, Mariluz; Martin-Lluch, Mercedes; Garcia-Contreras, Consuelo; Vazquez-Gomez, Marta

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of obesity and metabolic diseases is dramatically high in rapidly developing countries. Causes have been related to intrinsic ethnic features with development of a thrifty genotype for adapting to food scarcity, prenatal programming by undernutrition, and postnatal exposure to obesogenic lifestyle. Observational studies in humans and experimental studies in animal models evidence that the adaptive responses of the offspring may be modulated by their sex. In the contemporary context of world globalization, the new question arising is the existence and extent of sex-related differences in developmental and metabolic traits in case of mixed-race. Hence, in the current study, using a swine model, we compared male and female fetuses that were crossbred from mothers with thrifty genotype and fathers without thrifty genotype. Female conceptuses evidence stronger protective strategies for their adequate growth and postnatal survival. In brief, both male and female fetuses developed a brain-sparing effect but female fetuses were still able to maintain the development of other viscerae than the brain (mainly liver, intestine and kidneys) at the expense of carcass development. Furthermore, these morphometric differences were reinforced by differences in nutrient availability (glucose and cholesterol) favoring female fetuses with severe developmental predicament. These findings set the basis for further studies aiming to increase the knowledge on the interaction between genetic and environmental factors in the determination of adult phenotype.

  13. BCL6 modulation of acute lymphoblastic leukemia response to chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Slone, William L; Moses, Blake S; Hare, Ian; Evans, Rebecca; Piktel, Debbie; Gibson, Laura F

    2016-04-26

    The bone marrow niche has a significant impact on acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cell phenotype. Of clinical relevance is the frequency with which quiescent leukemic cells, in this niche, survive treatment and contribute to relapse. This study suggests that marrow microenvironment regulation of BCL6 in ALL is one factor that may be involved in the transition between proliferative and quiescent states of ALL cells. Utilizing ALL cell lines, and primary patient tumor cells we observed that tumor cell BCL6 protein abundance is decreased in the presence of primary human bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) and osteoblasts (HOB). Chemical inhibition, or shRNA knockdown, of BCL6 in ALL cells resulted in diminished ALL proliferation. As many chemotherapy regimens require tumor cell proliferation for optimal efficacy, we investigated the consequences of constitutive BCL6 expression in leukemic cells during co-culture with BMSC or HOB. Forced chronic expression of BCL6 during co-culture with BMSC or HOB sensitized the tumor to chemotherapy induced cell death. Combination treatment of caffeine, which increases BCL6 expression in ALL cells, with chemotherapy extended the event free survival of mice. These data suggest that BCL6 is one factor, modulated by microenvironment derived cues that may contribute to regulation of ALL therapeutic response.

  14. BCL6 modulation of acute lymphoblastic leukemia response to chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Slone, William L.; Moses, Blake S.; Hare, Ian; Evans, Rebecca; Piktel, Debbie; Gibson, Laura F.

    2016-01-01

    The bone marrow niche has a significant impact on acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cell phenotype. Of clinical relevance is the frequency with which quiescent leukemic cells, in this niche, survive treatment and contribute to relapse. This study suggests that marrow microenvironment regulation of BCL6 in ALL is one factor that may be involved in the transition between proliferative and quiescent states of ALL cells. Utilizing ALL cell lines, and primary patient tumor cells we observed that tumor cell BCL6 protein abundance is decreased in the presence of primary human bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) and osteoblasts (HOB). Chemical inhibition, or shRNA knockdown, of BCL6 in ALL cells resulted in diminished ALL proliferation. As many chemotherapy regimens require tumor cell proliferation for optimal efficacy, we investigated the consequences of constitutive BCL6 expression in leukemic cells during co-culture with BMSC or HOB. Forced chronic expression of BCL6 during co-culture with BMSC or HOB sensitized the tumor to chemotherapy induced cell death. Combination treatment of caffeine, which increases BCL6 expression in ALL cells, with chemotherapy extended the event free survival of mice. These data suggest that BCL6 is one factor, modulated by microenvironment derived cues that may contribute to regulation of ALL therapeutic response. PMID:27015556

  15. Tamibarotene modulates the local immune response in experimental periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Jin, Ying; Wang, Linyuan; Liu, Dixin; Lin, Xiaoping

    2014-12-01

    Tamibarotene (Am80), a synthetic retinoic acid receptor (RAR), is an agonist with high specificity for RARα and RARβ. Retinoid agonists have been shown to inhibit Th17 cell polarization and to enhance forkhead box P3 (Foxp3) expression during the course of inflammatory diseases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the previously unrecognized role of Am80 in regulating the immune responses of periodontitis within the oral microenvironment. The experimental model of periodontitis in mice was induced by oral infection with Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) W83. Our results indicated that Am80 effectively suppressed alveolar bone resorption induced by P. gingivalis W83 and decreased the number of osteoclasts. We clarified that these effects were closely associated with the reduced percentage of CD4(+) retinoid-related orphan receptor (ROR)γt(+) cells and increased the percentage of CD4(+) Foxp3(+) cells in the gingival tissues, cervical lymph nodes (CLNs), and spleen. Furthermore, in P. gingivalis-infected mice, Am80 down-regulated mRNA expression levels of interleukin-17A (IL-17A), receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa beta ligand (RANKL), monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), IL-6, and IL-1β. Simultaneously, Am80 up-regulated expression levels of IL-10 and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) in gingival tissues and the CLNs. Our results suggest that Am80 could protect against periodontal bone resorption, primarily through the modulation of immune responses in the oral microenvironment, and demonstrate the potential of Am80 as a novel clinical strategy for preventing periodontitis.

  16. SHORT- AND LONG-TERM MODULATION OF THE EXERCISE VENTILATORY RESPONSE

    PubMed Central

    Babb, Tony G; Wood, Helen E; Mitchell, Gordon S

    2011-01-01

    The importance of adaptive control strategies (modulation and plasticity) in the control of breathing during exercise has become recognized only in recent years. In this review we discuss new evidence for modulation of the exercise ventilatory response in humans, specifically, short-and long-term modulation. Short-term modulation is proposed to be an important regulatory mechanism that helps maintain blood gas homeostasis during exercise. PMID:20164813

  17. Frequency Modulated Translocational Oscillations of Nrf2 Mediate the Antioxidant Response Element Cytoprotective Transcriptional Response

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Mingzhan; Momiji, Hiroshi; Rabbani, Naila; Barker, Guy; Bretschneider, Till; Shmygol, Anatoly; Rand, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Stress responsive signaling coordinated by nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) provides an adaptive response for protection of cells against toxic insults, oxidative stress and metabolic dysfunction. Nrf2 regulates a battery of protective genes by binding to regulatory antioxidant response elements (AREs). The aim of this study was to examine how Nrf2 signals cell stress status and regulates transcription to maintain homeostasis. Results: In live cell microscopy we observed that Nrf2 undergoes autonomous translocational frequency-modulated oscillations between cytoplasm and nucleus. Oscillations occurred in quiescence and when cells were stimulated at physiological levels of activators, they decrease in period and amplitude and then evoke a cytoprotective transcriptional response. We propose a mechanism whereby oscillations are produced by negative feedback involving successive de-phosphorylation and phosphorylation steps. Nrf2 was inactivated in the nucleus and reactivated on return to the cytoplasm. Increased frequency of Nrf2 on return to the cytoplasm with increased reactivation or refresh-rate under stress conditions activated the transcriptional response mediating cytoprotective effects. The serine/threonine-protein phosphatase PGAM5, member of the Nrf2 interactome, was a key regulatory component. Innovation: We found that Nrf2 is activated in cells without change in total cellular Nrf2 protein concentration. Regulation of ARE-linked protective gene transcription occurs rather through translocational oscillations of Nrf2. We discovered cytoplasmic refresh rate of Nrf2 is important in maintaining and regulating the transcriptional response and links stress challenge to increased cytoplasmic surveillance. We found silencing and inhibition of PGAM5 provides potent activation of Nrf2. Conclusion: Frequency modulated translocational oscillations of Nrf2 mediate the ARE-linked cytoprotective transcriptional response. Antioxid. Redox

  18. Dies1/VISTA expression loss is a recurrent event in gastric cancer due to epigenetic regulation

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Patrícia; Carvalho, Joana; Rocha, Sara; Azevedo, Mafalda; Reis, Inês; Camilo, Vânia; Sousa, Bárbara; Valente, Sofia; Paredes, Joana; Almeida, Raquel; Huntsman, David; Oliveira, Carla

    2016-01-01

    Dies1/VISTA induces embryonic stem-cell differentiation, via BMP-pathway, but also acts as inflammation regulator and immune-response modulator. Dies1 inhibition in a melanoma-mouse model led to increased tumour-infiltrating T-cells and decreased tumour growth, emphasizing Dies1 relevance in tumour-microenvironment. Dies1 is involved in cell de/differentiation, inflammation and cancer processes, which mimic those associated with Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal-Transition (EMT). Despite this axis linking Dies1 with EMT and cancer, its expression, modulation and relevance in these contexts is unknown. To address this, we analysed Dies1 expression, its regulation by promoter-methylation and miR-125a-5p overexpression, and its association with BMP-pathway downstream-effectors, in a TGFβ1-induced EMT-model, cancer cell-lines and primary samples. We detected promoter-methylation as a mechanism controlling Dies1 expression in our EMT-model and in several cancer cell-lines. We showed that the relationship between Dies1 expression and BMP-pathway effectors observed in the EMT-model, was not present in all cell-lines, suggesting that Dies1 has other cell-specific effectors, beyond the BMP-pathway. We further demonstrated that: Dies1 expression loss is a recurrent event in GC, caused by promoter methylation and/or miR-125a-5p overexpression and; GC-microenvironment myofibroblasts overexpress Dies1. Our findings highlight Dies1 as a novel player in GC, with distinct roles within tumour cells and in the tumour-microenvironment. PMID:27721458

  19. Dies1/VISTA expression loss is a recurrent event in gastric cancer due to epigenetic regulation.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Patrícia; Carvalho, Joana; Rocha, Sara; Azevedo, Mafalda; Reis, Inês; Camilo, Vânia; Sousa, Bárbara; Valente, Sofia; Paredes, Joana; Almeida, Raquel; Huntsman, David; Oliveira, Carla

    2016-10-10

    Dies1/VISTA induces embryonic stem-cell differentiation, via BMP-pathway, but also acts as inflammation regulator and immune-response modulator. Dies1 inhibition in a melanoma-mouse model led to increased tumour-infiltrating T-cells and decreased tumour growth, emphasizing Dies1 relevance in tumour-microenvironment. Dies1 is involved in cell de/differentiation, inflammation and cancer processes, which mimic those associated with Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal-Transition (EMT). Despite this axis linking Dies1 with EMT and cancer, its expression, modulation and relevance in these contexts is unknown. To address this, we analysed Dies1 expression, its regulation by promoter-methylation and miR-125a-5p overexpression, and its association with BMP-pathway downstream-effectors, in a TGFβ1-induced EMT-model, cancer cell-lines and primary samples. We detected promoter-methylation as a mechanism controlling Dies1 expression in our EMT-model and in several cancer cell-lines. We showed that the relationship between Dies1 expression and BMP-pathway effectors observed in the EMT-model, was not present in all cell-lines, suggesting that Dies1 has other cell-specific effectors, beyond the BMP-pathway. We further demonstrated that: Dies1 expression loss is a recurrent event in GC, caused by promoter methylation and/or miR-125a-5p overexpression and; GC-microenvironment myofibroblasts overexpress Dies1. Our findings highlight Dies1 as a novel player in GC, with distinct roles within tumour cells and in the tumour-microenvironment.

  20. Tree die-off in response to global change-type drought: mortality insights from a decade of plant water potential measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Breshears, D.D.; Myers, O.B.; Meyer, Clifton W.; Barnes, F.J.; Zou, C.B.; Allen, C.D.; McDowell, N.G.; Pockman, W. T.

    2009-01-01

    Global climate change is projected to produce warmer, longer, and more frequent droughts, referred to here as "global change-type droughts", which have the potential to trigger widespread tree die-off. However, droughtinduced tree mortality cannot be predicted with confidence, because long-term field observations of plant water stress prior to, and culminating in, mortality are rare, precluding the development and testing of mechanisms. Here, we document plant water stress in two widely distributed, co-occurring species, pi??on pine (Pinus edulis) and juniper (Juniperus monosperma), over more than a decade, leading up to regional-scale die-off of pi??on pine trees in response to global change-related drought. Pi??on leaf water potentials remained substantially below their zero carbon assimilation point for at least 10 months prior to dying, in contrast to those of juniper, which rarely dropped below their zero-assimilation point. These data suggest that pi??on mortality was driven by protracted water stress, leading to carbon starvation and associated increases in susceptibility to other disturbances (eg bark beetles), a finding that should help to improve predictions of mortality during drought. ?? The Ecological Society of America.

  1. Developmental Changes in Hemodynamic Responses and Cardiovagal Modulation during Isometric Handgrip Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Goulopoulou, Styliani; Fernhall, Bo; Kanaley, Jill A.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine differences in pressor response and cardiovagal modulation during isometric handgrip exercise (IHG) between children and adults. Beat-to-beat heart rate (HR) and blood pressure were measured in 23 prepubertal children and 23 adults at baseline and during IHG. Cardiovagal modulation was quantified by analysis of HR variability. Mean arterial pressure responses to IHG were greater in adults compared to children (P < .05) whereas there were no group differences in HR responses (P > .05). Children had a greater reduction in cardiovagal modulation in response to IHG compared to adults (P < .05). Changes in mean arterial pressure during IHG were correlated with baseline cardiovagal modulation and force produced during isometric contraction (P < .05). In conclusion, differences in pressor reflex response between children and adults cannot be solely explained by differences in autonomic modulation and appear to be associated with factors contributing to the force produced during isometric contraction. PMID:20862202

  2. Detection of innate immune response modulating impurities in therapeutic proteins.

    PubMed

    Haile, Lydia Asrat; Puig, Montserrat; Kelley-Baker, Logan; Verthelyi, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic proteins can contain multiple impurities, some of which are variants of the product, while others are derived from the cell substrate and the manufacturing process. Such impurities, even when present at trace levels, have the potential to activate innate immune cells in peripheral blood or embedded in tissues causing expression of cytokines and chemokines, increasing antigen uptake, facilitating processing and presentation by antigen presenting cells, and fostering product immunogenicity. Currently, while products are tested for host cell protein content, assays to control innate immune response modulating impurities (IIRMIs) in products are focused mainly on endotoxin and nucleic acids, however, depending on the cell substrate and the manufacturing process, numerous other IIRMI could be present. In these studies we assess two approaches that allow for the detection of a broader subset of IIRMIs. In the first, we use commercial cell lines transfected with Toll like receptors (TLR) to detect receptor-specific agonists. This method is sensitive to trace levels of IIRMI and provides information of the type of IIRMIs present but is limited by the availability of stably transfected cell lines and requires pre-existing knowledge of the IIRMIs likely to be present in the product. Alternatively, the use of a combination of macrophage cell lines of human and mouse origin allows for the detection of a broader spectrum of impurities, but does not identify the source of the activation. Importantly, for either system the lower limit of detection (LLOD) of impurities was similar to that of PBMC and it was not modified by the therapeutic protein tested, even in settings where the product had inherent immune modulatory properties. Together these data indicate that a cell-based assay approach could be used to screen products for the presence of IIRMIs and inform immunogenicity risk assessments, particularly in the context of comparability exercises.

  3. Sputtered protective coatings for die casting dies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirtich, M. J.; Nieh, C. Y.; Wallace, J. F.

    1981-01-01

    This investigation determined whether selected ion beam sputtered coatings on H-13 die steel would have the potential of improving the thermal fatigue behavior of the steel used as a die in aluminum die casting. The coatings were selected to test candidate insulators and metals capable of providing protection of the die surface. The studies indicate that 1 micrometer thick W and Pt coatings reduced the thermal fatigue more than any other coating tested and are candidates to be used on a die surface to increase die life.

  4. Using module analysis for multiple choice responses: A new method applied to Force Concept Inventory data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewe, Eric; Bruun, Jesper; Bearden, Ian G.

    2016-12-01

    We describe Module Analysis for Multiple Choice Responses (MAMCR), a new methodology for carrying out network analysis on responses to multiple choice assessments. This method is used to identify modules of non-normative responses which can then be interpreted as an alternative to factor analysis. MAMCR allows us to identify conceptual modules that are present in student responses that are more specific than the broad categorization of questions that is possible with factor analysis and to incorporate non-normative responses. Thus, this method may prove to have greater utility in helping to modify instruction. In MAMCR the responses to a multiple choice assessment are first treated as a bipartite, student X response, network which is then projected into a response X response network. We then use data reduction and community detection techniques to identify modules of non-normative responses. To illustrate the utility of the method we have analyzed one cohort of postinstruction Force Concept Inventory (FCI) responses. From this analysis, we find nine modules which we then interpret. The first three modules include the following: Impetus Force, More Force Yields More Results, and Force as Competition or Undistinguished Velocity and Acceleration. This method has a variety of potential uses particularly to help classroom instructors in using multiple choice assessments as diagnostic instruments beyond the Force Concept Inventory.

  5. Transient Response of Cadmium Telluride Modules to Light Exposure: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Deline, C.; del Cueto, J.; Albin, D. S.; Petersen, C.; Tyler, L.; TamizhMani, G.

    2011-07-01

    Commercial cadmium telluride (CdTe) photovoltaic (PV) modules from three different manufacturers were monitored for performance changes during indoor and outdoor light-exposure. Short-term transients in Voc were recorded on some modules, with characteristic times of ~1.1 hours. Outdoor performance data shows a similar drop in Voc after early morning light exposure. Preliminary analysis of FF changes show light-induced changes on multiple time scales, including a long time scale.

  6. Phototropism: a "simple" physiological response modulated by multiple interacting photosensory-response pathways.

    PubMed

    Liscum, E; Stowe-Evans, E L

    2000-09-01

    Phototropism is the process by which plants reorient growth of various organs, most notably stems, in response to lateral differences in light quantity and/or quality. The ubiquitous nature of the phototropic response in the plant kingdom implies that it provides some adaptive evolutionary advantage. Upon visual inspection it is tempting to surmise that phototropic curvatures result from a relatively simple growth response to a directional stimulus. However, detailed photophysiological, and more recently genetic and molecular, studies have demonstrated that phototropism is in fact regulated by complex interactions among several photosensory systems. At least two receptors, phototropin and a presently unidentified receptor, appear to mediate the primary photoreception of directional blue light cues in dark-grown plants. PhyB may also function as a primary receptor to detect lateral increases in far-red light in neighbor-avoidance responses of light-grown plants. Phytochromes (phyA and phyB at a minimum) also appear to function as secondary receptors to regulate adaptation processes that ultimately modulate the magnitude of curvature induced by primary photoperception. As a result of the interactions of these multiple photosensory systems plants are able to maximize the adaptive advantage of the phototropic response in ever changing light environments.

  7. Multivalent proteoglycan modulation of FGF mitogenic responses in perivascular cells.

    PubMed

    Cattaruzza, Sabrina; Ozerdem, Ugur; Denzel, Martin; Ranscht, Barbara; Bulian, Pietro; Cavallaro, Ugo; Zanocco, Daniela; Colombatti, Alfonso; Stallcup, William B; Perris, Roberto

    2013-04-01

    Sprouting of angiogenic perivascular cells is thought to be highly dependent upon autocrine and paracrine growth factor stimulation. Accordingly, we report that corneal angiogenesis induced by ectopic FGF implantation is strongly impaired in NG2/CSPG4 proteoglycan (PG) null mice known to harbour a putative deficit in pericyte proliferation/mobilization. Conversely, no significant differences were seen between wild type and knockout corneas when VEGF was used as an angiocrine factor. Perturbed responsiveness of NG2-deficient pericytes to paracrine and autocrine stimulation by several FGFs could be confirmed in cells isolated from NG2 null mice, while proliferation induced by other growth factors was equivalent in wild type and knockout cells. Identical results were obtained after siRNA-mediated knock-down of NG2 in human smooth muscle-like cell lines, as also demonstrated by the decreased levels of FGF receptor phosphorylation detected in these NG2 deprived cells. Binding assays with recombinant proteins and molecular interactions examined on live cells asserted that FGF-2 bound to NG2 in a glycosaminoglycan-independent, core protein-mediated manner and that the PG was alone capable of retaining FGF-2 on the cell membrane for subsequent receptor presentation. The use of dominant-negative mutant cells, engineered by combined transduction of NG2 deletion constructs and siRNA knock-down of the endogenous PG, allowed us to establish that the FGF co-receptor activity of NG2 is entirely mediated by its extracellular portion. In fact, forced overexpression of the NG2 ectodomain in human smooth muscle-like cells increased their FGF-2-induced mitosis and compensated for low levels of FGF receptor surface expression, in a manner equivalent to that produced by overexpression of the full-length NG2. Upon FGF binding, the cytoplasmic domain of NG2 is phosphorylated, but there is no evidence that this event elicits signal transductions that could bypass the FGFR-mediated ones

  8. Serotoninergic Modulation of Basal Cardiovascular Responses and Responses Induced by Isotonic Extracellular Volume Expansion in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Semionatto, Isadora Ferraz; Raminelli, Adrieli Oliveira; Alves, Angelica Cristina; Capitelli, Caroline Santos; Chriguer, Rosangela Soares

    2017-01-01

    Background Isotonic blood volume expansion (BVE) induced alterations of sympathetic and parasympathetic activity in the heart and blood vessels, which can be modulated by serotonergic pathways. Objective To evaluate the effect of saline or serotonergic agonist (DOI) administration in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) on cardiovascular responses after BVE. Methods We recorded pulsatile blood pressure through the femoral artery to obtain the mean arterial pressure (MAP), systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP), heart rate (HR) and the sympathetic-vagal ratio (LF/HF) of Wistar rats before and after they received bilateral microinjections of saline or DOI into the PVN, followed by BVE. Results No significant differences were observed in the values of the studied variables in the different treatments from the control group. However, when animals are treated with DOI followed by BVE there is a significant increase in relation to the BE control group in all the studied variables: MBP (114.42±7.85 vs 101.34±9.17); SBP (147.23±14.31 vs 129.39±10.70); DBP (98.01 ±4.91 vs 87.31±8.61); HR (421.02±43.32 vs 356.35±41.99); and LF/HF ratio (2.32±0.80 vs 0.27±0.32). Discussion The present study showed that the induction of isotonic BVE did not promote alterations in MAP, HR and LF/HF ratio. On the other hand, the injection of DOI into PVN of the hypothalamus followed by isotonic BVE resulted in a significant increase of all variables. Conclusion These results suggest that serotonin induced a neuromodulation in the PVN level, which promotes an inhibition of the baroreflex response to BVE. Therefore, the present study suggests the involvement of the serotonergic system in the modulation of vagal reflex response at PVN in the normotensive rats. PMID:28099586

  9. Odorant response properties of individual neurons in an olfactory glomerular module

    PubMed Central

    Kikuta, Shu; Fletcher, Max L.; Homma, Ryota; Yamasoba, Tatsuya; Nagayama, Shin

    2013-01-01

    Summary Neuronal networks that are directly associated with glomeruli in the olfactory bulb are thought to comprise functional modules. However, this has not yet been experimentally proven. In this study, we explored the anatomical and functional architecture of glomerular modules using in vivo two-photon calcium imaging. Surprisingly, the deep portions of the glomerular modules showed considerable spatial overlap with other modules. Juxtaglomerular cells showed similar excitatory odorant response profiles to presynaptic olfactory sensory neuron inputs. Mitral cells exhibited a more sharply tuned molecular receptive range compared to juxtaglomerular cells, and their odorant response profiles varied depending on their interneuronal horizontal distances. These data suggest that glomerular modules are composed of functionally distinct neurons, and that homogenous odor inputs to each glomerulus may be parsed and processed in different fashions within the modules before being sent to higher olfactory centers. PMID:23522047

  10. Wege in die Zukunft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauermann, Göran; Mosler, Karl

    Die Zukunft stellt große Herausforderungen an die Arbeit der Deutschen Statistischen Gesellschaft. Sie betreffen die gestiegenen Anforderungen der Nutzer von Statistik, die Kommunikationsmöglichkeiten des Internets sowie die Dynamik der statistischen Wissenschaften und ihrer Anwendungsgebiete. Das Kapitel 5 beschreibt, wie sich die Gesellschaft diesen Herausforderungen stellt und welche Ziele sie sich in der wissenschaftlichen Zusammenarbeit und im Kampf gegen das Innumeratentum gesetzt hat.

  11. Temporal Modulation Transfer Functions Measured From Auditory-Nerve Responses Following Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Kale, Sushrut; Heinz, Michael G.

    2012-01-01

    The ability of auditory-nerve (AN) fibers to encode modulation frequencies, as characterized by temporal modulation transfer functions (TMTFs), generally shows a low-pass shape with a cut-off frequency that increases with fiber characteristic frequency (CF). Because AN-fiber bandwidth increases with CF, this result has been interpreted to suggest that peripheral filtering has a significant effect on limiting the encoding of higher modulation frequencies. Sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL), which is typically associated with broadened tuning, is thus predicted to increase the range of modulation frequencies encoded; however, perceptual studies have generally not supported this prediction. The present study sought to determine whether the range of modulation frequencies encoded by AN fibers is affected by SNHL, and whether the effects of SNHL on envelope coding are similar at all modulation frequencies within the TMTF passband. Modulation response gain for sinusoidally amplitude modulated (SAM) tones was measured as a function of modulation frequency, with the carrier frequency placed at fiber CF. TMTFs were compared between normal-hearing chinchillas and chinchillas with a noise-induced hearing loss for which AN fibers had significantly broadened tuning. Synchrony and phase responses for individual SAM-tone components were quantified to explore a variety of factors that can influence modulation coding. Modulation gain was found to be higher than normal in noise-exposed fibers across the entire range of modulation frequencies encoded by AN fibers. The range of modulation frequencies encoded by noise-exposed AN fibers was not affected by SNHL, as quantified by TMTF 3- and 10-dB cut-off frequencies. These results suggest that physiological factors other than peripheral filtering may have a significant role in determining the range of modulation frequencies encoded in AN fibers. Furthermore, these neural data may help to explain the lack of a consistent association

  12. [Role of interoceptive signalization in modulating emotional-behavioral responses].

    PubMed

    Emel'ianenko, I V; Raĭtses, V S

    1976-03-01

    Chronic experiments were conducted on rabbits; electrodes were implanted into the deep structures of the brain. Stimulation of gastric receptors led to modulation of the emotional-behavioristic reactions induced by electric stimulation of the hypothalamus, the amygdala and the hypocampus. The effect depended on the intensity of interoceptive stimulation and peculiarities of the emotional reaction with own cerebral control systems.

  13. Optimize the modulation response of twisted-nematic liquid crystal displays as pure phase spatial light modulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Baiheng; Peng, Fei; Kang, Mingwu; Zhou, Jiawu

    2014-11-01

    Twisted-nematic liquid crystal displays (TN-LCD) are widely used in numerous research fields of optics working as spatial light modulators. Approaches to obtaining desired intensity or phase modulation by TN-LCD have been extensively studied based on the knowledge of TN-LCD's internal structure parameters, e.g., the orientation of LC molecules at the surfaces, the twist angle, the thickness of the LC layer, and the birefringence of the material. Generally TN-LCD placed between two linear polarizers (P) produces coupled intensity and phase modulation. To obtain the commonly used pure phase modulation, quarter wave plates (QWP) are often used in front of and/or behind the LCD. In this paper, we present a method to optimize the optical modulation properties of the TN-LCD to obtain pure phase modulation in the configuration of P-QWP-LCD-QWP-P each with proper orientation. Firstly an improved method for determining the Jones matrix of the TN-LCD without knowing its internal parameters is presented, which is based on the macroscopical Jones matrix descriptions for TN-LCD, linear polarizer and QWP. Only three sets of intensity measurements are needed for the complete determination of the TN-LCD's Jones matrix for a single wavelength. Then Jones matrix calculations are carried out to determine the orientations of the polarizers and QWPs for pure phase modulation response. In addition, we prove that the phase modulation depth (PMD) of the TN-LCD can be further increased provided that the mean intensity transmission is decreased to a lower level, which is very useful when the TN-LCD is used as a phase modulator and the ratio between the intensities of the desired diffracted order relative to the other diffracted orders is required higher. Experimental results coincide well with the optical modulation properties of the TN-LCD predicted by our determined Jones matrix. In contrast to the traditional method which requires knowledge of the TN-LCD's internal structure parameters

  14. Optimization of coherent optical OFDM transmitter using DP-IQ modulator with nonlinear response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Sun Hyok; Kang, Hun-Sik; Moon, Sang-Rok; Lee, Joon Ki

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we investigate the performance of dual polarization orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (DP-OFDM) signal generation when the signal is generated by a DP-IQ optical modulator. The DP-IQ optical modulator is made of four parallel Mach-Zehnder modulators (MZMs) which have nonlinear responses and limited extinction ratios. We analyze the effects of the MZM in the DP-OFDM signal generation by numerical simulation. The operating conditions of the DP-IQ modulator are optimized to have the best performance of the DP-OFDM signal.

  15. Dopamine modulates the plasticity of mechanosensory responses in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Sanyal, Suparna; Wintle, Richard F; Kindt, Katie S; Nuttley, William M; Arvan, Rokhand; Fitzmaurice, Paul; Bigras, Eve; Merz, David C; Hébert, Terence E; van der Kooy, Derek; Schafer, William R; Culotti, Joseph G; Van Tol, Hubert H M

    2004-01-01

    Dopamine-modulated behaviors, including information processing and reward, are subject to behavioral plasticity. Disruption of these behaviors is thought to support drug addictions and psychoses. The plasticity of dopamine-mediated behaviors, for example, habituation and sensitization, are not well understood at the molecular level. We show that in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, a D1-like dopamine receptor gene (dop-1) modulates the plasticity of mechanosensory behaviors in which dopamine had not been implicated previously. A mutant of dop-1 displayed faster habituation to nonlocalized mechanical stimulation. This phenotype was rescued by the introduction of a wild-type copy of the gene. The dop-1 gene is expressed in mechanosensory neurons, particularly the ALM and PLM neurons. Selective expression of the dop-1 gene in mechanosensory neurons using the mec-7 promoter rescues the mechanosensory deficit in dop-1 mutant animals. The tyrosine hydroxylase-deficient C. elegans mutant (cat-2) also displays these specific behavioral deficits. These observations provide genetic evidence that dopamine signaling modulates behavioral plasticity in C. elegans. PMID:14739932

  16. Modulation response of an injection locked quantum-dash Fabry Perot laser at 1550nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pochet, M.; Naderi, N. A.; Grillot, F.; Terry, N.; Kovanis, V.; Lester, L. F.

    2009-02-01

    The microwave domain modulation response of an injection-locked laser system is analyzed in the context of a Quantum Dash Fabry-Perot laser. This work demonstrates the applicability of a newly-derived modulation response function by using it to least-squares fit data collected on an injection-locked system with a Quantum-Dash Fabry-Perot semiconductor slave laser. The maximum injection strength, linewidth enhancement factor, coupled phase between the master and slave, and field enhancement factor characterizing the deviation of the locked slave laser from its freerunning value are extracted by least-squares fitting the collected data with the function. The extracted values are then compared with theoretically expected values under the given detuning conditions. The correlation between the frequency of the resonance peak of the modulation response at the positive frequency detuning edge and a pole in the modulation response function under this detuning condition is illustrated. The calculation of the injection strength based on the experimental operating conditions is verified by applying the modulation response function to the experimental data. With the modulation response function, injection-locked behaviors can be accurately simulated in the microwave domain and used to predict operating conditions ideal for high-performance RF links.

  17. ATM modulates transcription in response to histone deacetylase inhibition as part of its DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Jang, Eun Ryoung; Choi, Jae Duk; Park, Mi Ae; Jeong, Gajin; Cho, Hyeseong; Lee, Jong-Soo

    2010-03-31

    Chromatin structure has a crucial role in a diversity of physiological processes, including development, differentiation and stress responses, via regulation of transcription, DNA replication and DNA damage repair. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors regulate chromatin structure and activate the DNA damage checkpoint pathway involving Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM). Herein, we investigated the impact of histone acetylation/deacetylation modification on the ATM-mediated transcriptional modulation to provide a better understanding of the transcriptional function of ATM. The prototype HDAC inhibitor trichostain A (TSA) reprograms expression of the myeloid cell leukemia-1 (MCL1) and Gadd45 genes via the ATM-mediated signal pathway. Transcription of MCL1 and Gadd45alpha is enhanced following TSA treatment in ATM(+) cells, but not in isogenic ATM(-) or kinase-dead ATM expressing cells, in the ATM-activated E2F1 or BRCA1- dependent manner, respectively. These findings suggest that ATM and its kinase activity are essential for the TSA-induced regulation of gene expression. In summary, ATM controls the transcriptional upregulation of MCL1 and Gadd45 through the activation of the ATM-mediated signal pathway in response to HDAC inhibition. These findings are important in helping to design combinatory treatment schedules for anticancer radio- or chemo-therapy with HDAC inhibitors.

  18. Emotional Content Modulates Perceptual and Response Inhibition Processing

    PubMed Central

    YANG, SUYONG; LUO, WENBO; ZHU, XIANGRU; BROSTER, LUCAS S.; CHEN, TAOLIN; LI, JINZHEN; LUO, YUEJIA

    2015-01-01

    In this study, event-related potentials were used to investigate the effect of emotion on response inhibition. Participants performed an emotional go/no-go task that required responses to human faces associated with a “go” valence (i.e., emotional, neutral) and response inhibition to human faces associated with a “no-go” valence. Emotional content impaired response inhibition, as evidenced by decreased response accuracy and N2 amplitudes in no-go trials. More importantly, emotional expressions elicited larger N170 amplitudes than neutral expressions, and this effect was larger in no-go than in go trials, indicating that the perceptual processing of emotional expression had priority in inhibitory trials. In no-go trials, correlation analysis showed that increased N170 amplitudes were associated with decreased N2 amplitudes. Taken together, our findings suggest that that emotional content impairs response inhibition due to the prioritization of emotional content processing. PMID:24942597

  19. Pharmacological modulation of aversive responsiveness in honey bees.

    PubMed

    Tedjakumala, Stevanus R; Aimable, Margaux; Giurfa, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Within a honey bee colony, individuals performing different tasks exhibit different sensitivities to noxious stimuli. Noxious-stimulus sensitivity can be quantified in harnessed bees by measuring the sting extension response (SER) to a series of increasing voltages. Biogenic amines play a crucial role in the control of insect responsiveness. Whether or not these neurotransmitters affect the central control of aversive responsiveness, and more specifically of electric-shock responsiveness, remains unknown. Here we studied the involvement of the biogenic amines octopamine, dopamine and serotonin, and of the ecdysteroid 20-hydroxyecdisone in the central control of sting responsiveness to electric shocks. We injected pharmacological antagonists of these signaling pathways into the brain of harnessed bees and determined the effect of blocking these different forms of neurotransmission on shock responsiveness. We found that both octopamine and 20-hydroxyecdisone are dispensable for shock responsiveness while dopamine and serotonin act as down-regulators of sting responsiveness. As a consequence, antagonists of these two biogenic amines induce an increase in shock responsiveness to shocks of intermediate voltage; serotonin, can also increase non-specific responsiveness. We suggest that different classes of dopaminergic neurons exist in the bee brain and we define at least two categories: an instructive class mediating aversive labeling of conditioned stimuli in associative learning, and a global gain-control class which down-regulates responsiveness upon perception of noxious stimuli. Serotonergic signaling together with down-regulating dopaminergic signaling may play an essential role in attentional processes by suppressing responses to irrelevant, non-predictive stimuli, thereby allowing efficient behavioral performances.

  20. Pharmacological modulation of aversive responsiveness in honey bees

    PubMed Central

    Tedjakumala, Stevanus R.; Aimable, Margaux; Giurfa, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Within a honey bee colony, individuals performing different tasks exhibit different sensitivities to noxious stimuli. Noxious-stimulus sensitivity can be quantified in harnessed bees by measuring the sting extension response (SER) to a series of increasing voltages. Biogenic amines play a crucial role in the control of insect responsiveness. Whether or not these neurotransmitters affect the central control of aversive responsiveness, and more specifically of electric-shock responsiveness, remains unknown. Here we studied the involvement of the biogenic amines octopamine, dopamine and serotonin, and of the ecdysteroid 20-hydroxyecdisone in the central control of sting responsiveness to electric shocks. We injected pharmacological antagonists of these signaling pathways into the brain of harnessed bees and determined the effect of blocking these different forms of neurotransmission on shock responsiveness. We found that both octopamine and 20-hydroxyecdisone are dispensable for shock responsiveness while dopamine and serotonin act as down-regulators of sting responsiveness. As a consequence, antagonists of these two biogenic amines induce an increase in shock responsiveness to shocks of intermediate voltage; serotonin, can also increase non-specific responsiveness. We suggest that different classes of dopaminergic neurons exist in the bee brain and we define at least two categories: an instructive class mediating aversive labeling of conditioned stimuli in associative learning, and a global gain-control class which down-regulates responsiveness upon perception of noxious stimuli. Serotonergic signaling together with down-regulating dopaminergic signaling may play an essential role in attentional processes by suppressing responses to irrelevant, non-predictive stimuli, thereby allowing efficient behavioral performances. PMID:24431993

  1. Waking State: Rapid Variations Modulate Neural and Behavioral Responses

    PubMed Central

    McGinley, Matthew J.; Vinck, Martin; Reimer, Jacob; Batista-Brito, Renata; Zagha, Edward; Cadwell, Cathryn R.

    2015-01-01

    The state of the brain and body constantly varies on rapid and slow time scales. These variations contribute to the apparent noisiness of sensory responses at both the neural and behavioral level. Recent investigations of rapid state changes in awake, behaving animals have provided insight into the mechanisms by which optimal sensory encoding and behavioral performance are achieved. Fluctuations in state, as indexed by pupillometry, impact both the “signal” (sensory evoked response) and the “noise” (spontaneous activity) of cortical responses. By taking these fluctuations into account, neural response (co-)variability is significantly reduced, revealing the brain to be more reliable and predictable than previously thought. PMID:26402600

  2. Medullary taste responses are modulated by the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis.

    PubMed

    Smith, David V; Ye, Mi-Kyung; Li, Cheng-Shu

    2005-06-01

    Previous studies have shown a modulatory influence of limbic forebrain areas, such as the central nucleus of the amygdala and lateral hypothalamus, on the activity of taste-responsive cells in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NST). The bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BST), which receives gustatory afferent information, also sends descending axons to the NST. The present studies were designed to investigate the role of the BST in the modulation of NST gustatory activity. Extracellular action potentials were recorded from 101 taste-responsive cells in the NST of urethane-anesthetized hamsters and analyzed for a change in excitability following bilateral electrical stimulation of the BST. The response of NST taste cells to stimulation of the BST was predominately inhibitory. Orthodromic inhibitory responses were observed in 29 of 101 (28.7%) NST taste-responsive cells, with four cells inhibited bilaterally. An increase in excitability was observed in seven of the 101 (6.9%) NST taste cells. Of the 34 cells showing these responses, 25 were modulated by the ipsilateral BST and 15 by the contralateral; four were inhibited bilaterally and two inhibited ipsilaterally and excited contralaterally. The duration of inhibitory responses (mean = 177.9 ms) was significantly longer than that of excitatory responses (35.4 ms). Application of subthreshold electrical stimulation to the BST during taste trials inhibited or excited the taste responses of every BST-responsive NST cell tested with this protocol. NST neurons that were most responsive to sucrose, NaCl, citric acid or quinine hydrochloride were all affected by BST stimulation, although citric acid-best cells were significantly more often modulated and NaCl-best less often modulated than expected by chance. These results combine with excitatory and inhibitory modulation of NST neurons by the insular cortex, lateral hypothalamus and central nucleus of the amygdala to demonstrate extensive centrifugal modulation of

  3. Modulation of the host response in the treatment of periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Golub, L M; Ryan, M E; Williams, R C

    1998-10-01

    Periodontitis has two distinct but interconnected etiologic components: periodontopathic bacteria adjacent to the periodontal tissues, and host-mediated connective tissue-destructive responses to the specific causative bacteria and their metabolic products. Although past and existing therapies have focused primarily on the causative microbial challenge, the host component of periodontal destruction has recently been intensely studied. New treatment strategies that focus on attenuating destructive host responses are emerging. Host modulatory agents, when used adjunctively, may enhance clinical therapeutic responses and make these responses more predictable in the susceptible host. The ongoing development of safe, effective pharmacotherapies that specifically target host response mechanisms, and the introduction of such pharmacotherapies as adjuncts to traditional, antimicrobial interventions may represent a new, integrated approach in the long-term treatment and management of this chronic disease.

  4. Regulating the ethylene response of a plant by modulation of F-box proteins

    DOEpatents

    Guo, Hongwei [Beijing, CN; Ecker, Joseph R [Carlsbad, CA

    2014-01-07

    The relationship between F-box proteins and proteins invovled in the ethylene response in plants is described. In particular, F-box proteins may bind to proteins involved in the ethylene response and target them for degradation by the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway. The transcription factor EIN3 is a key transcription factor mediating ethylne-regulated gene expression and morphological responses. EIN3 is degraded through a ubiquitin/proteasome pathway mediated by F-box proteins EBF1 and EBF2. The link between F-box proteins and the ethylene response is a key step in modulating or regulating the response of a plant to ethylene. Described herein are transgenic plants having an altered sensitivity to ethylene, and methods for making transgenic plant haing an althered sensitivity to ethylene by modulating the level of activity of F-box proteins. Methods of altering the ethylene response in a plant by modulating the activity or expression of an F-box protein are described. Also described are methods of identifying compounds that modulate the ethylene response in plants by modulating the level of F-box protein expression or activity.

  5. Personality traits modulate emotional and physiological responses to stress

    PubMed Central

    Childs, Emma; White, Tara L.; de Wit, Harriet

    2014-01-01

    An individual’s susceptibility to psychological and physical disorders associated with chronic stress exposure e.g., cardiovascular and infectious disease, may also be predicted by their reactivity to acute stress. One factor associated with both stress resilience and health outcomes is personality. An understanding of how personality influences responses to acute stress may shed light upon individual differences in susceptibility to chronic stress-linked disease. This study examined relationships between personality and acute responses to stress in 125 healthy adults, using hierarchical linear regression. We assessed personality traits using the Multidimensional Personality Questionnaire (MPQ-BF), and responses to acute stress (cortisol, heart rate, blood pressure, mood) using a standardised laboratory psychosocial stress task, the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST). Individuals with high Negative Emotionality exhibited greater emotional distress and lower blood pressure responses to the TSST. Individuals with high Agentic Positive Emotionality exhibited prolonged heart rate responses to stress, whereas those with high Communal Positive Emotionality exhibited smaller cortisol and blood pressure responses. Separate personality traits differentially predicted emotional, cardiovascular, and cortisol responses to a psychosocial stressor in healthy volunteers. Future research investigating the association of personality with chronic stress-related disease may provide further clues to the relationship between acute stress reactivity and susceptibility to disease. PMID:25036730

  6. BAD Modulates Counterregulatory Responses to Hypoglycemia and Protective Glucoprivic Feeding

    PubMed Central

    Osundiji, Mayowa A.; Godes, Marina L.; Evans, Mark L.; Danial, Nika N.

    2011-01-01

    Hypoglycemia or glucoprivation triggers protective hormonal counterregulatory and feeding responses to aid the restoration of normoglycemia. Increasing evidence suggests pertinent roles for the brain in sensing glucoprivation and mediating counterregulation, however, the precise nature of the metabolic signals and molecular mediators linking central glucose sensing to effector functions are not fully understood. Here, we demonstrate that protective hormonal and feeding responses to hypoglycemia are regulated by BAD, a BCL-2 family protein with dual functions in apoptosis and metabolism. BAD-deficient mice display impaired glycemic and hormonal counterregulatory responses to systemic glucoprivation induced by 2-deoxy-D-glucose. BAD is also required for proper counterregulatory responses to insulin-induced hypoglycemia as evident from significantly higher glucose infusion rates and lower plasma epinephrine levels during hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemic clamps. Importantly, RNA interference-mediated acute knockdown of Bad in the brain provided independent genetic evidence for its relevance in central glucose sensing and proper neurohumoral responses to glucoprivation. Moreover, BAD deficiency is associated with impaired glucoprivic feeding, suggesting that its role in adaptive responses to hypoglycemia extends beyond hormonal responses to regulation of feeding behavior. Together, these data indicate a previously unappreciated role for BAD in the control of central glucose sensing. PMID:22162752

  7. Response Modality Modulator PRP Interference, Even When Task 1 is a no-go trial

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanSelst, Mark; Johnston, James C.; Shafto, Michael (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    In a Psychological Refractory Period paradigm where the first task requires one of several possible responses on some trials (the go trials), but no response on other (no-go) trials, response modality modulates the amount of interference on Task 2 processing. This is true even when Task 1 is no-go trial. Differences in the cost of switching response sets between processing for Task 1 and Task 2 may provide an account of this surprising phenomenon.

  8. Response Modality Modulator PRP Interference, Even When Task 1 is a no-go trial

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanSelst, Mark; Johnston, James C.; Shafto, Michael (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    In a Psychological Refractory Period paradigm where the first task requires one of several possible responses on some trials (the go trials), but no response on other (no-go) trials, response modality modulates the amount of interference on Task 2 processing. This is true even when Task 1 is no-go trial. Differences in the cost of switching response sets between processing for Task 1 and Task 2 may provide an account of this surprising phenomenon.

  9. Outsmarting the host: bacteria modulating the immune response.

    PubMed

    Woolard, Matthew D; Frelinger, Jeffrey A

    2008-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria and their hosts have had a two-way conversation for millions of years. This interaction has led to many measure/counter-measure responses by the host and bacteria. The host immune response has developed many mechanisms to neutralize and remove pathogen bacteria. In turn pathogenic bacteria have developed mechanisms to alter and evade the host immune response. We will review some of the mechanisms utilized by bacteria to accomplish this goal. We will also examine the current state of understanding of Francisella tularensis mediated immune evasion.

  10. Waking State: Rapid Variations Modulate Neural and Behavioral Responses.

    PubMed

    McGinley, Matthew J; Vinck, Martin; Reimer, Jacob; Batista-Brito, Renata; Zagha, Edward; Cadwell, Cathryn R; Tolias, Andreas S; Cardin, Jessica A; McCormick, David A

    2015-09-23

    The state of the brain and body constantly varies on rapid and slow timescales. These variations contribute to the apparent noisiness of sensory responses at both the neural and the behavioral level. Recent investigations of rapid state changes in awake, behaving animals have provided insight into the mechanisms by which optimal sensory encoding and behavioral performance are achieved. Fluctuations in state, as indexed by pupillometry, impact both the "signal" (sensory evoked response) and the "noise" (spontaneous activity) of cortical responses. By taking these fluctuations into account, neural response (co)variability is significantly reduced, revealing the brain to be more reliable and predictable than previously thought. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Association of Auditory Steady State Responses with Perception of Temporal Modulations and Speech in Noise

    PubMed Central

    Manju, Venugopal; Gopika, Kizhakke Kodiyath; Arivudai Nambi, Pitchai Muthu

    2014-01-01

    Amplitude modulations in the speech convey important acoustic information for speech perception. Auditory steady state response (ASSR) is thought to be physiological correlate of amplitude modulation perception. Limited research is available exploring association between ASSR and modulation detection ability as well as speech perception. Correlation of modulation detection thresholds (MDT) and speech perception in noise with ASSR was investigated in twofold experiments. 30 normal hearing individuals and 11 normal hearing individuals within age range of 18–24 years participated in experiments 1 and 2, respectively. MDTs were measured using ASSR and behavioral method at 60 Hz, 80 Hz, and 120 Hz modulation frequencies in the first experiment. ASSR threshold was obtained by estimating the minimum modulation depth required to elicit ASSR (ASSR-MDT). There was a positive correlation between behavioral MDT and ASSR-MDT at all modulation frequencies. In the second experiment, ASSR for amplitude modulation (AM) sweeps at four different frequency ranges (30–40 Hz, 40–50 Hz, 50–60 Hz, and 60–70 Hz) was recorded. Speech recognition threshold in noise (SRTn) was estimated using staircase procedure. There was a positive correlation between amplitude of ASSR for AM sweep with frequency range of 30–40 Hz and SRTn. Results of the current study suggest that ASSR provides substantial information about temporal modulation and speech perception. PMID:25006511

  12. Selective modulation of cell response on engineered fractal silicon substrates

    PubMed Central

    Gentile, Francesco; Medda, Rebecca; Cheng, Ling; Battista, Edmondo; Scopelliti, Pasquale E.; Milani, Paolo; Cavalcanti-Adam, Elisabetta A.; Decuzzi, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    A plethora of work has been dedicated to the analysis of cell behavior on substrates with ordered topographical features. However, the natural cell microenvironment is characterized by biomechanical cues organized over multiple scales. Here, randomly rough, self-affinefractal surfaces are generated out of silicon,where roughness Ra and fractal dimension Df are independently controlled. The proliferation rates, the formation of adhesion structures, and the morphology of 3T3 murine fibroblasts are monitored over six different substrates. The proliferation rate is maximized on surfaces with moderate roughness (Ra ~ 40 nm) and large fractal dimension (Df ~ 2.4); whereas adhesion structures are wider and more stable on substrates with higher roughness (Ra ~ 50 nm) and lower fractal dimension (Df ~ 2.2). Higher proliferation occurson substrates exhibiting densely packed and sharp peaks, whereas more regular ridges favor adhesion. These results suggest that randomly roughtopographies can selectively modulate cell behavior. PMID:23492898

  13. Response of Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta) to the Body of a Group Member That Died from a Fatal Attack

    PubMed Central

    Buhl, Jacqueline S.; Aure, Bonn; Ruiz-Lambides, Angelina; Gonzalez-Martinez, Janis; Platt, Michael L.; Brent, Lauren J. N.

    2013-01-01

    Among animals that form social bonds, the death of a conspecific may be a significant social event, representing the loss of an ally and resulting in disruptions to the dominance hierarchy. Despite this potential biological importance, we have only limited knowledge of animals' reactions to the death of a group member. This is particularly true of responses to dead adults, as most reports describe the responses of mothers to dead infants. Here, we describe in detail and provide video evidence of the behavioral responses of a group of free-ranging rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) immediately after the death of a mid-ranking adult male as a result of a fatal attack. High-ranking male members of the group, suspected to have carried out the attack, dragged and bit the dead body, exhibiting a rate of aggression 20 times greater than baseline levels. Lower-ranking individuals approached and inspected the body by looking closely, smelling, and grooming the fur. There was inconclusive evidence that these rhesus macaques found the death of a conspecific stressful: Levels of grooming between group members after the fatal attack were significantly higher than baseline levels, and higher than levels of grooming after nonfatal attacks. However, when grooming levels were adjusted based on the assumption that individuals positioned close to the body, i.e., those visible to researchers, were more likely to be engaged in grooming than those positioned farther away, this difference from baseline was no longer significant. The rate of self-directed behaviors after the fatal attack was also not different from baseline. Many of the behaviors we observed directed toward the body (aggression, inspection) have been previously reported in chimpanzees and geladas, and are similar to reactions sometimes displayed by humans. As such, this report represents a potentially valuable contribution the nascent field of nonhuman primate thanatology. PMID:23459587

  14. Stress-response balance drives the evolution of a network module and its host genome

    PubMed Central

    González, Caleb; Ray, Joe Christian J; Manhart, Michael; Adams, Rhys M; Nevozhay, Dmitry; Morozov, Alexandre V; Balázsi, Gábor

    2015-01-01

    Stress response genes and their regulators form networks that underlie drug resistance. These networks often have an inherent tradeoff: their expression is costly in the absence of stress, but beneficial in stress. They can quickly emerge in the genomes of infectious microbes and cancer cells, protecting them from treatment. Yet, the evolution of stress resistance networks is not well understood. Here, we use a two-component synthetic gene circuit integrated into the budding yeast genome to model experimentally the adaptation of a stress response module and its host genome in three different scenarios. In agreement with computational predictions, we find that: (i) intra-module mutations target and eliminate the module if it confers only cost without any benefit to the cell; (ii) intra- and extra-module mutations jointly activate the module if it is potentially beneficial and confers no cost; and (iii) a few specific mutations repeatedly fine-tune the module's noisy response if it has excessive costs and/or insufficient benefits. Overall, these findings reveal how the timing and mechanisms of stress response network evolution depend on the environment. PMID:26324468

  15. Selective attention modulates human auditory brainstem responses: relative contributions of frequency and spatial cues.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Alexandre; Schönwiesner, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Selective attention is the mechanism that allows focusing one's attention on a particular stimulus while filtering out a range of other stimuli, for instance, on a single conversation in a noisy room. Attending to one sound source rather than another changes activity in the human auditory cortex, but it is unclear whether attention to different acoustic features, such as voice pitch and speaker location, modulates subcortical activity. Studies using a dichotic listening paradigm indicated that auditory brainstem processing may be modulated by the direction of attention. We investigated whether endogenous selective attention to one of two speech signals affects amplitude and phase locking in auditory brainstem responses when the signals were either discriminable by frequency content alone, or by frequency content and spatial location. Frequency-following responses to the speech sounds were significantly modulated in both conditions. The modulation was specific to the task-relevant frequency band. The effect was stronger when both frequency and spatial information were available. Patterns of response were variable between participants, and were correlated with psychophysical discriminability of the stimuli, suggesting that the modulation was biologically relevant. Our results demonstrate that auditory brainstem responses are susceptible to efferent modulation related to behavioral goals. Furthermore they suggest that mechanisms of selective attention actively shape activity at early subcortical processing stages according to task relevance and based on frequency and spatial cues.

  16. Voice fundamental frequency modulates vocal response to pitch perturbations during English speech.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hanjun; Auger, James; Larson, Charles R

    2010-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated task-dependent vocal responses to pitch perturbations during speech production. The present study investigated the effect of voice fundamental frequency (F(0)) on the modulation of vocal responses during English speech. Randomized pitch shifts of +/-100 or 200 cents during speaking were presented to English speakers. Results indicated larger vocal responses and shorter latencies at a high voice F(0) than at a low voice F(0), but no significance differences were observed for stimulus magnitude or direction. These findings suggest that the pitch-shift reflex during speech can be modulated as a function of voice F(0).

  17. Biting intentions modulate digastric reflex responses to sudden unloading of the jaw.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Anders S; Pruszynski, J Andrew; Edin, Benoni B; Westberg, Karl-Gunnar

    2014-09-01

    Reflex responses in jaw-opening muscles can be evoked when a brittle object cracks between the teeth and suddenly unloads the jaw. We hypothesized that this reflex response is flexible and, as such, is modulated according to the instructed goal of biting through an object. Study participants performed two different biting tasks when holding a peanut half stacked on a chocolate piece between their incisors. In one task, they were asked to split the peanut half only (single-split task), and in the other task, they were asked to split both the peanut and the chocolate in one action (double-split task). In both tasks, the peanut split evoked a jaw-opening muscle response, quantified from electromyogram (EMG) recordings of the digastric muscle in a window 20-60 ms following peanut split. Consistent with our hypothesis, we found that the jaw-opening muscle response in the single-split trials was about twice the size of the jaw-opening muscle response in the double-split trials. A linear model that predicted the jaw-opening muscle response on a single-trial basis indicated that task settings played a significant role in this modulation but also that the presplit digastric muscle activity contributed to the modulation. These findings demonstrate that, like reflex responses to mechanical perturbations in limb muscles, reflex responses in jaw muscles not only show gain-scaling but also are modulated by subject intent.

  18. An NCME Instructional Module on Latent DIF Analysis Using Mixture Item Response Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cho, Sun-Joo; Suh, Youngsuk; Lee, Woo-yeol

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this ITEMS module is to provide an introduction to differential item functioning (DIF) analysis using mixture item response models. The mixture item response models for DIF analysis involve comparing item profiles across latent groups, instead of manifest groups. First, an overview of DIF analysis based on latent groups, called…

  19. An NCME Instructional Module on Latent DIF Analysis Using Mixture Item Response Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cho, Sun-Joo; Suh, Youngsuk; Lee, Woo-yeol

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this ITEMS module is to provide an introduction to differential item functioning (DIF) analysis using mixture item response models. The mixture item response models for DIF analysis involve comparing item profiles across latent groups, instead of manifest groups. First, an overview of DIF analysis based on latent groups, called…

  20. Molecular modulation of airway epithelial ciliary response to sneezing.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ke-Qing; Cowan, Andrew T; Lee, Robert J; Goldstein, Natalia; Droguett, Karla; Chen, Bei; Zheng, Chunquan; Villalon, Manuel; Palmer, James N; Kreindler, James L; Cohen, Noam A

    2012-08-01

    Our purpose was to evaluate the effect of the mechanical force of a sneeze on sinonasal cilia function and determine the molecular mechanism responsible for eliciting the ciliary response to a sneeze. A novel model was developed to deliver a stimulation simulating a sneeze (55 mmHg for 50 ms) at 26°C to the apical surface of mouse and human nasal epithelial cells. Ciliary beating was visualized, and changes in ciliary beat frequency (CBF) were determined. To interrogate the molecular cascades driving sneeze-induced changes of CBF, pharmacologic manipulation of intra- and extracellular calcium, purinergic, PKA, and nitric oxide (NO) signaling were performed. CBF rapidly increases by ≥150% in response to a sneeze, which is dependent on the release of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), calcium influx, and PKA activation. Furthermore, apical release of ATP is independent of calcium influx, but calcium influx and subsequent increase in CBF are dependent on the ATP release. Lastly, we observed a blunted ciliary response in surgical specimens derived from patients with chronic rhinosinusitis compared to control patients. Apical ATP release with subsequent calcium mobilization and PKA activation are involved in sinonasal ciliary response to sneezing, which is blunted in patients with upper-airway disease.

  1. Do competitors modulate rare plant response to precipitation change?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Levine, J.M.; Kathryn, Mceachern A.; Cowan, C.

    2010-01-01

    Ecologists increasingly suspect that climate change will directly impact species physiology, demography, and phenology, but also indirectly affect these measures via changes to the surrounding community. Unfortunately, few studies examine both the direct and indirect pathways of impact. Doing so is important because altered competitive pressures can reduce or magnify the direct responses of a focal species to climate change. Here, we examine the effects of changing rainfall on three rare annual plant species in the presence and absence of competition on the California Channel Islands. We used rain-out shelters and hand watering to exclude and augment early, late, and season-long rainfall, spanning the wide range of precipitation change forecast for the region. In the absence of competition, droughts reduced the population growth rates of two of three focal annuals, while increased rainfall was only sometimes beneficial, As compared to the focal species, the dominant competitors were more sensitive to the precipitation treatments, benefiting from increased season-long precipitation and harmed by droughts. Importantly, the response of two of three competitors to the precipitation treatments tended to be positively correlated with those of the focal annuals. Although this leads to the expectation that increased competition will counter the direct benefits of favorable conditions, such indirect effects of precipitation change proved weak to nonexistent in our experiment. Competitors had little influence on the precipitation response of two focal species, due to their low sensitivity to competition and highly variable precipitation responses. Competition did affect how our third focal species responded to precipitation change, but this effect only approached significance, and whether it truly resulted from competitor response to precipitation change was unclear. Our work suggests that even when competitors respond to climate change, these responses may have little

  2. Accurate extraction method for the FM response of tunable diode lasers based on wavelength modulation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Hangauer, A.; Strzoda, R.; Amann, M.-C.

    2008-02-01

    An accurate wavelength modulation spectroscopy based method to measure the dynamics of the wavelength modulation behavior of tunable diode lasers is introduced in this paper. This method requires only standard equipment and a simple mechanical setup. Under the condition of a constant laser modulation current, the wavelength modulation amplitude can be determined by analysis of the distance between the two zero crossings of the measured second harmonic spectrum of gas absorption. When measuring at different modulation frequencies, the frequency response of the current-to-wavelength tuning coefficient can be obtained. The use of a frequency analyzer instead of a lock-in amplifier to obtain the second harmonic spectrum has two advantages: it provides a higher bandwidth and allows for very precise detection of the zero crossings because of the logarithmic output. The results exhibit very good agreement with a reference measurement performed with a fast FTIR Spectrometer.

  3. Growth plate cartilage shows different strain patterns in response to static versus dynamic mechanical modulation.

    PubMed

    Kaviani, Rosa; Londono, Irene; Parent, Stefan; Moldovan, Florina; Villemure, Isabelle

    2016-08-01

    Longitudinal growth of long bones and vertebrae occurs in growth plate cartilage. This process is partly regulated by mechanical forces, which are one of the underlying reasons for progression of growth deformities such as idiopathic adolescent scoliosis and early-onset scoliosis. This concept of mechanical modulation of bone growth is also exploited in the development of fusionless treatments of these deformities. However, the optimal loading condition for the mechanical modulation of growth plate remains to be identified. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of in vitro static versus dynamic modulation and of dynamic loading parameters, such as frequency and amplitude, on the mechanical responses and histomorphology of growth plate explants. Growth plate explants from distal ulnae of 4-week-old swines were extracted and randomly distributed among six experimental groups: baseline ([Formula: see text]), control ([Formula: see text]), static ([Formula: see text]) and dynamic ([Formula: see text]). For static and dynamic groups, mechanical modulation was performed in vitro using an Indexed CartiGen bioreactor. A stress relaxation test combined with confocal microscopy and digital image correlation was used to characterize the mechanical responses of each explant in terms of peak stress, equilibrium stress, equilibrium modulus of elasticity and strain pattern. Histomorphometrical measurements were performed on toluidine blue tissue sections using a semi-automatic custom-developed MATLAB toolbox. Results suggest that compared to dynamic modulation, static modulation changes the strain pattern of the tissue and thus is more detrimental for tissue biomechanics, while the histomorphological parameters are not affected by mechanical modulation. Also, under dynamic modulation, changing the frequency or amplitude does not affect the biomechanical response of the tissue. Results of this study will be useful in finding optimal and non-damaging parameters

  4. Differential modulation by extracellular ATP of carotid chemosensory responses.

    PubMed

    Spergel, D; Lahiri, S

    1993-06-01

    The possibility that the carotid body has ATP surface receptors that mediate O2 chemoreception was tested. To distinguish between the event(s) initiating chemoreception and those at the neurotransmitter level, we also tested the chemosensory response to nicotine before and after ATP administration. Carotid bodies from cats anesthetized with pentobarbital sodium were perfused and superfused in vitro with modified Tyrode solution (PCO2 < 1 Torr, pH 7.4, 36 degrees C) equilibrated at PO2 > 400 or approximately 150 Torr while chemosensory discharge was recorded extracellularly. ATP and adenosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate stimulated discharge with similar dose dependence, whereas adenosine had little effect. ATP infusion for > or = 2 min evoked an initial stimulation of discharge followed by a decline to baseline (desensitization). Desensitization did not affect the response to hypoxia (perfusate flow interruption) but inhibited the response to nicotine (4-nmol pulse). Therefore, 1) the carotid body has surface ATP receptors that may mediate the chemosensory response to nicotine but not to hypoxia and 2) nicotinic receptors are not required for carotid body O2 chemoreception.

  5. Immune response modulation by curcumin in a latex allergy model

    PubMed Central

    Kurup, Viswanath P; Barrios, Christy S; Raju, Raghavan; Johnson, Bryon D; Levy, Michael B; Fink, Jordan N

    2007-01-01

    Background There has been a worldwide increase in allergy and asthma over the last few decades, particularly in industrially developed nations. This resulted in a renewed interest to understand the pathogenesis of allergy in recent years. The progress made in the pathogenesis of allergic disease has led to the exploration of novel alternative therapies, which include herbal medicines as well. Curcumin, present in turmeric, a frequently used spice in Asia has been shown to have anti-allergic and inflammatory potential. Methods We used a murine model of latex allergy to investigate the role of curcumin as an immunomodulator. BALB/c mice were exposed to latex allergens and developed latex allergy with a Th2 type of immune response. These animals were treated with curcumin and the immunological and inflammatory responses were evaluated. Results Animals exposed to latex showed enhanced serum IgE, latex specific IgG1, IL-4, IL-5, IL-13, eosinophils and inflammation in the lungs. Intragastric treatment of latex-sensitized mice with curcumin demonstrated a diminished Th2 response with a concurrent reduction in lung inflammation. Eosinophilia in curcumin-treated mice was markedly reduced, co-stimulatory molecule expression (CD80, CD86, and OX40L) on antigen-presenting cells was decreased, and expression of MMP-9, OAT, and TSLP genes was also attenuated. Conclusion These results suggest that curcumin has potential therapeutic value for controlling allergic responses resulting from exposure to allergens. PMID:17254346

  6. Social status modulates the neural response to unfairness

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jie; Blue, Philip R.; Yu, Hongbo; Gong, Xiaoliang; Xiang, Yang; Jiang, Changjun

    2016-01-01

    In human society, which is organized by social hierarchies, resources are usually allocated unequally and based on social status. In this study, we analyze how being endowed with different social statuses in a math competition affects the perception of fairness during asset allocation in a subsequent Ultimatum Game (UG). Behavioral data showed that when participants were in high status, they were more likely to reject unfair UG offers than in low status. This effect of social status correlated with activity in the right anterior insula (rAI) and with the functional connectivity between the rAI and a region in the anterior middle cingulate cortex, indicating that these two brain regions are crucial for integrating contextual factors and social norms during fairness perception. Additionally, there was an interaction between social status and UG offer fairness in the amygdala and thalamus, implicating the role of these regions in the modulation of social status on fairness perception. These results demonstrate the effect of social status on fairness perception and the potential neural underpinnings for this effect. PMID:26141925

  7. Immune modulation in response to stress and relaxation.

    PubMed

    Mahbub-E-Sobhani; Haque, N; Salma, U; Ahmed, A

    2011-03-15

    Traditional medical science has kept the mind separate from the body. Recently people realize the effect of mind on health and psychoneuroimmunology is the new evolved science that describes the interactions between psyche and soma. In this review through a typical psycho-neuro-endocrino-immune network the effects of psychological stress (acute, brief naturalistic and chronic) and relaxation on immune modulation has been shown. From this network Corticotrophin Releasing Factor (CRF), Adrenocorticotrophic Hormone (ACTH), Glucocorticoids (GC), alpha-endorphin and Met-enkephalin are found as important endocrine components and T cells, B cells, monocytes/macrophages, Natural Killer (NK) cells and their cytokines that is Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), Interferon Gamma (IFN-alpha) and interleukins such as IL-1, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12 etc. are found as important immune components. Finally, it has been shown that, acute, brief naturalistic and chronic stress have different immune modulatory activities which are harmful to one's homeostasis and relaxation can help to maintain that homeostasis.

  8. Mallotus roxburghianus modulates antioxidant responses in pancreas of diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Roy, V K; Chenkual, L; Gurusubramanian, G

    2016-03-01

    Mallotus roxburghianus has long been used by Mizo tribal people for the treatment of diabetes. Scientific validation at known doses may provide information about its safety and efficacy. Methanolic leaf extract of M. roxburghianus (MRME 100 and 400mg/kg) was tested in comparison with normal and alloxan diabetic rats for 28 days p.o. in terms of body and pancreatic weight, blood glucose level, antioxidant enzymes, expression of visfatin and PCNA, histopathology and histomorphometric measurements of pancreas. The results were evaluated statistically using ANOVA, correlation and regression and Principal component analysis (PCO). MRME (100 and 400mg/kg) treatment significantly (p<0.0001) decreased the body weight, blood glucose level, improved the mass and size of pancreas, elevated the levels of antioxidant enzymes and up regulate the expression of visfatin and PCNA. PCO analysis was good to fitness and prediction distinguishes the therapeutic effects of M. roxburghianus from the alloxan induced diabetic rats. MRME has significant role in protecting animals from alloxan-induced diabetic oxidative stress in pancreas and exhibited promising antihyperglycaemic and antioxidant activities along with significant reversal of disturbed antioxidant status and lipid peroxidative damage. Pancreatic architecture and physiology under diabetic oxidative stress have been significantly modulated by MRME and validated as a drug candidate for antidiabetic treatment. M. roxburghianus treatment restores the antioxidant enzyme system and rejuvenates the islets mass in alloxanized rat by accelerating visfatin and PCNA expression in pancreatic tissue.

  9. Adult attachment style modulates neural responses in a mentalizing task.

    PubMed

    Schneider-Hassloff, H; Straube, B; Nuscheler, B; Wemken, G; Kircher, T

    2015-09-10

    Adult attachment style (AAS) is a personality trait that affects social cognition. Behavioral data suggest that AAS influences mentalizing proficiency, i.e. the ability to predict and explain people's behavior with reference to mental states, but the neural correlates are unknown. We here tested how the AAS dimensions "avoidance" (AV) and "anxiety" (ANX) modulate neural correlates of mentalizing. We measured brain activation using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in 164 healthy subjects during an interactive mentalizing paradigm (Prisoner's Dilemma Game). AAS was assessed with the Relationship Scales Questionnaire, including the subscales AV and ANX. Our task elicited a strong activation of the mentalizing network, including bilateral precuneus, (anterior, middle, and posterior) cingulate cortices, temporal poles, inferior frontal gyri (IFG), temporoparietal junctions, superior medial frontal gyri as well as right medial orbital frontal gyrus, superior temporal gyrus, middle frontal gyrus (MFG), and amygdala. We found that AV is positively and ANX negatively correlated with task-associated neural activity in the right amygdala, MFG, midcingulate cortex, and superior parietal lobule, and in bilateral IFG. These data suggest that avoidantly attached adults activate brain areas implicated in emotion regulation and cognitive control to a larger extent than anxiously attached individuals during mentalizing.

  10. Cylindrical PVF2 film based fiber optic phase modulator - Phase shift nonlinearity and frequency response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudarshanam, V. S.; Claus, Richard O.

    1993-03-01

    A new cylindrical coil configuration for polyvinylidene flouride (PVF2) film based fiber optic phase modulator is studied for the frequency response and nonlinearity of phase shift at the resonance frequency. This configuration, hitherto unapproached for PVF2 film modulators, offers resonance at well defined, controllable and higher frequencies than possible for the flat-strip configuration. Two versions of this configuration are presented that differ strongly in both the resonance frequency and the phase shift nonlinearity coefficient.

  11. Human Neuromagnetic Steady-State Responses to Amplitude-Modulated Tones, Speech, and Music

    PubMed Central

    Parkkonen, Lauri; Hari, Riitta

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Auditory steady-state responses that can be elicited by various periodic sounds inform about subcortical and early cortical auditory processing. Steady-state responses to amplitude-modulated pure tones have been used to scrutinize binaural interaction by frequency-tagging the two ears’ inputs at different frequencies. Unlike pure tones, speech and music are physically very complex, as they include many frequency components, pauses, and large temporal variations. To examine the utility of magnetoencephalographic (MEG) steady-state fields (SSFs) in the study of early cortical processing of complex natural sounds, the authors tested the extent to which amplitude-modulated speech and music can elicit reliable SSFs. Design: MEG responses were recorded to 90-s-long binaural tones, speech, and music, amplitude-modulated at 41.1 Hz at four different depths (25, 50, 75, and 100%). The subjects were 11 healthy, normal-hearing adults. MEG signals were averaged in phase with the modulation frequency, and the sources of the resulting SSFs were modeled by current dipoles. After the MEG recording, intelligibility of the speech, musical quality of the music stimuli, naturalness of music and speech stimuli, and the perceived deterioration caused by the modulation were evaluated on visual analog scales. Results: The perceived quality of the stimuli decreased as a function of increasing modulation depth, more strongly for music than speech; yet, all subjects considered the speech intelligible even at the 100% modulation. SSFs were the strongest to tones and the weakest to speech stimuli; the amplitudes increased with increasing modulation depth for all stimuli. SSFs to tones were reliably detectable at all modulation depths (in all subjects in the right hemisphere, in 9 subjects in the left hemisphere) and to music stimuli at 50 to 100% depths, whereas speech usually elicited clear SSFs only at 100% depth. The hemispheric balance of SSFs was toward the right hemisphere

  12. Human neuromagnetic steady-state responses to amplitude-modulated tones, speech, and music.

    PubMed

    Lamminmäki, Satu; Parkkonen, Lauri; Hari, Riitta

    2014-01-01

    Auditory steady-state responses that can be elicited by various periodic sounds inform about subcortical and early cortical auditory processing. Steady-state responses to amplitude-modulated pure tones have been used to scrutinize binaural interaction by frequency-tagging the two ears' inputs at different frequencies. Unlike pure tones, speech and music are physically very complex, as they include many frequency components, pauses, and large temporal variations. To examine the utility of magnetoencephalographic (MEG) steady-state fields (SSFs) in the study of early cortical processing of complex natural sounds, the authors tested the extent to which amplitude-modulated speech and music can elicit reliable SSFs. MEG responses were recorded to 90-s-long binaural tones, speech, and music, amplitude-modulated at 41.1 Hz at four different depths (25, 50, 75, and 100%). The subjects were 11 healthy, normal-hearing adults. MEG signals were averaged in phase with the modulation frequency, and the sources of the resulting SSFs were modeled by current dipoles. After the MEG recording, intelligibility of the speech, musical quality of the music stimuli, naturalness of music and speech stimuli, and the perceived deterioration caused by the modulation were evaluated on visual analog scales. The perceived quality of the stimuli decreased as a function of increasing modulation depth, more strongly for music than speech; yet, all subjects considered the speech intelligible even at the 100% modulation. SSFs were the strongest to tones and the weakest to speech stimuli; the amplitudes increased with increasing modulation depth for all stimuli. SSFs to tones were reliably detectable at all modulation depths (in all subjects in the right hemisphere, in 9 subjects in the left hemisphere) and to music stimuli at 50 to 100% depths, whereas speech usually elicited clear SSFs only at 100% depth.The hemispheric balance of SSFs was toward the right hemisphere for tones and speech, whereas

  13. Displaced capillary dies

    DOEpatents

    Kalejs, Juris P.; Chalmers, Bruce; Surek, Thomas

    1982-01-01

    An asymmetrical shaped capillary die made exclusively of graphite is used to grow silicon ribbon which is capable of being made into solar cells that are more efficient than cells produced from ribbon made using a symmetrically shaped die.

  14. Displaced capillary dies

    DOEpatents

    Kalejs, Juris P.; Chalmers, Bruce; Surek, Thomas

    1984-01-01

    An asymmetrical shaped capillary die made exclusively of graphite is used to grow silicon ribbon which is capable of being made into solar cells that are more efficient than cells produced from ribbon made using a symmetrically shaped die.

  15. Packaged die heater

    DOEpatents

    Spielberger, Richard; Ohme, Bruce Walker; Jensen, Ronald J.

    2011-06-21

    A heater for heating packaged die for burn-in and heat testing is described. The heater may be a ceramic-type heater with a metal filament. The heater may be incorporated into the integrated circuit package as an additional ceramic layer of the package, or may be an external heater placed in contact with the package to heat the die. Many different types of integrated circuit packages may be accommodated. The method provides increased energy efficiency for heating the die while reducing temperature stresses on testing equipment. The method allows the use of multiple heaters to heat die to different temperatures. Faulty die may be heated to weaken die attach material to facilitate removal of the die. The heater filament or a separate temperature thermistor located in the package may be used to accurately measure die temperature.

  16. Season-modulated responses of Neotropical bats to forest fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Diogo F; Rocha, Ricardo; López-Baucells, Adrià; Farneda, Fábio Z; Carreiras, João M B; Palmeirim, Jorge M; Meyer, Christoph F J

    2017-06-01

    Seasonality causes fluctuations in resource availability, affecting the presence and abundance of animal species. The impacts of these oscillations on wildlife populations can be exacerbated by habitat fragmentation. We assessed differences in bat species abundance between the wet and dry season in a fragmented landscape in the Central Amazon characterized by primary forest fragments embedded in a secondary forest matrix. We also evaluated whether the relative importance of local vegetation structure versus landscape characteristics (composition and configuration) in shaping bat abundance patterns varied between seasons. Our working hypotheses were that abundance responses are species as well as season specific, and that in the wet season, local vegetation structure is a stronger determinant of bat abundance than landscape-scale attributes. Generalized linear mixed-effects models in combination with hierarchical partitioning revealed that relationships between species abundances and local vegetation structure and landscape characteristics were both season specific and scale dependent. Overall, landscape characteristics were more important than local vegetation characteristics, suggesting that landscape structure is likely to play an even more important role in landscapes with higher fragment-matrix contrast. Responses varied between frugivores and animalivores. In the dry season, frugivores responded more to compositional metrics, whereas during the wet season, local and configurational metrics were more important. Animalivores showed similar patterns in both seasons, responding to the same group of metrics in both seasons. Differences in responses likely reflect seasonal differences in the phenology of flowering and fruiting between primary and secondary forests, which affected the foraging behavior and habitat use of bats. Management actions should encompass multiscale approaches to account for the idiosyncratic responses of species to seasonal variation in

  17. When the forest dies: the response of forest soil fungi to a bark beetle-induced tree dieback.

    PubMed

    Stursová, Martina; Snajdr, Jaroslav; Cajthaml, Tomáš; Bárta, Jiří; Santrůčková, Hana; Baldrian, Petr

    2014-09-01

    Coniferous forests cover extensive areas of the boreal and temperate zones. Owing to their primary production and C storage, they have an important role in the global carbon balance. Forest disturbances such as forest fires, windthrows or insect pest outbreaks have a substantial effect on the functioning of these ecosystems. Recent decades have seen an increase in the areas affected by disturbances in both North America and Europe, with indications that this increase is due to both local human activity and global climate change. Here we examine the structural and functional response of the litter and soil microbial community in a Picea abies forest to tree dieback following an invasion of the bark beetle Ips typographus, with a specific focus on the fungal community. The insect-induced disturbance rapidly and profoundly changed vegetation and nutrient availability by killing spruce trees so that the readily available root exudates were replaced by more recalcitrant, polymeric plant biomass components. Owing to the dramatic decrease in photosynthesis, the rate of decomposition processes in the ecosystem decreased as soon as the one-time litter input had been processed. The fungal community showed profound changes, including a decrease in biomass (2.5-fold in the litter and 12-fold in the soil) together with the disappearance of fungi symbiotic with tree roots and a relative increase in saprotrophic taxa. Within the latter group, successive changes reflected the changing availability of needle litter and woody debris. Bacterial biomass appeared to be either unaffected or increased after the disturbance, resulting in a substantial increase in the bacterial/fungal biomass ratio.

  18. When the forest dies: the response of forest soil fungi to a bark beetle-induced tree dieback

    PubMed Central

    Štursová, Martina; Šnajdr, Jaroslav; Cajthaml, Tomáš; Bárta, Jiří; Šantrůčková, Hana; Baldrian, Petr

    2014-01-01

    Coniferous forests cover extensive areas of the boreal and temperate zones. Owing to their primary production and C storage, they have an important role in the global carbon balance. Forest disturbances such as forest fires, windthrows or insect pest outbreaks have a substantial effect on the functioning of these ecosystems. Recent decades have seen an increase in the areas affected by disturbances in both North America and Europe, with indications that this increase is due to both local human activity and global climate change. Here we examine the structural and functional response of the litter and soil microbial community in a Picea abies forest to tree dieback following an invasion of the bark beetle Ips typographus, with a specific focus on the fungal community. The insect-induced disturbance rapidly and profoundly changed vegetation and nutrient availability by killing spruce trees so that the readily available root exudates were replaced by more recalcitrant, polymeric plant biomass components. Owing to the dramatic decrease in photosynthesis, the rate of decomposition processes in the ecosystem decreased as soon as the one-time litter input had been processed. The fungal community showed profound changes, including a decrease in biomass (2.5-fold in the litter and 12-fold in the soil) together with the disappearance of fungi symbiotic with tree roots and a relative increase in saprotrophic taxa. Within the latter group, successive changes reflected the changing availability of needle litter and woody debris. Bacterial biomass appeared to be either unaffected or increased after the disturbance, resulting in a substantial increase in the bacterial/fungal biomass ratio. PMID:24671082

  19. Modulation of immune responses in stress by Yoga.

    PubMed

    Arora, Sarika; Bhattacharjee, Jayashree

    2008-07-01

    Stress is a constant factor in today's fastpaced life that can jeopardize our health if left unchecked. It is only in the last half century that the role of stress in every ailment from the common cold to AIDS has been emphasized, and the mechanisms involved in this process have been studied. Stress influences the immune response presumably through the activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary adrenal axis, hypothalamic pituitary-gonadal axis, and the sympathetic-adrenal-medullary system. Various neurotransmitters, neuropeptides, hormones, and cytokines mediate these complex bidirectional interactions between the central nervous system (CNS) and the immune system. The effects of stress on the immune responses result in alterations in the number of immune cells and cytokine dysregulation. Various stress management strategies such as meditation, yoga, hypnosis, and muscle relaxation have been shown to reduce the psychological and physiological effects of stress in cancers and HIV infection. This review aims to discuss the effect of stress on the immune system and examine how relaxation techniques such as Yoga and meditation could regulate the cytokine levels and hence, the immune responses during stress.

  20. CNS leptin action modulates immune response and survival in sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Tschöp, Johannes; Nogueiras, Ruben; Haas-Lockie, Sarah; Kasten, Kevin; Castañeda, Tamara R.; Huber, Nadine; Guanciale, Kelsey; Perez-Tilve, Diego; Habegger, Kirk; Ottaway, Nickki; Woods, Stephen C.; Oldfield, Brian; Clarke, Iain; Chua, Streamson; Farooqi, I. Sadaf; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Caldwell, Charles C.; Tschöp, Matthias H.

    2010-01-01

    Sepsis describes a complex clinical syndrome that results from an infection, setting off a cascade of systemic inflammatory responses that can lead to multiple organ failure and death. Leptin is a 16 kDa adipokine that, among its multiple known effects, is involved in regulating immune function. Here we demonstrate that leptin deficiency in ob/ob mice leads to higher mortality and more severe organ damage in a standard model of sepsis in mice (cecal ligation and puncture, CLP). Moreover, systemic leptin replacement improved the immune response to CLP. Based on the molecular mechanisms of leptin regulation of energy metabolism and reproductive function, we hypothesized that leptin acts in the central nervous system (CNS) to efficiently coordinate peripheral immune defense in sepsis. We now report that leptin signaling in the brain increases survival during sepsis in leptin-deficient as well as in wild-type mice and that endogenous CNS leptin action is required for an adequate systemic immune response. These findings reveal the existence of a relevant neuroendocrine control of systemic immune defense, and suggest a possible therapeutic potential for leptin analogues in infectious disease. PMID:20427662

  1. PRMT5 modulates the metabolic response to fasting signals.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Wen-Wei; Niessen, Sherry; Goebel, Naomi; Yates, John R; Guccione, Ernesto; Montminy, Marc

    2013-05-28

    Under fasting conditions, increases in circulating glucagon maintain glucose balance by promoting hepatic gluconeogenesis. Triggering of the cAMP pathway stimulates gluconeogenic gene expression through the PKA-mediated phosphorylation of the cAMP response element binding (CREB) protein and via the dephosphorylation of the latent cytoplasmic CREB regulated transcriptional coactivator 2 (CRTC2). CREB and CRTC2 activities are increased in insulin resistance, in which they promote hyperglycemia because of constitutive induction of the gluconeogenic program. The extent to which CREB and CRTC2 are coordinately up-regulated in response to glucagon, however, remains unclear. Here we show that, following its activation, CRTC2 enhances CREB phosphorylation through an association with the protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5). In turn, PRMT5 was found to stimulate CREB phosphorylation via increases in histone H3 Arg2 methylation that enhanced chromatin accessibility at gluconeogenic promoters. Because depletion of PRMT5 lowers hepatic glucose production and gluconeogenic gene expression, these results demonstrate how a chromatin-modifying enzyme regulates a metabolic program through epigenetic changes that impact the phosphorylation of a transcription factor in response to hormonal stimuli.

  2. Modulation of immune responses in stress by Yoga

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Sarika; Bhattacharjee, Jayashree

    2008-01-01

    Stress is a constant factor in today's fastpaced life that can jeopardize our health if left unchecked. It is only in the last half century that the role of stress in every ailment from the common cold to AIDS has been emphasized, and the mechanisms involved in this process have been studied. Stress influences the immune response presumably through the activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary adrenal axis, hypothalamic pituitary-gonadal axis, and the sympathetic-adrenal-medullary system. Various neurotransmitters, neuropeptides, hormones, and cytokines mediate these complex bidirectional interactions between the central nervous system (CNS) and the immune system. The effects of stress on the immune responses result in alterations in the number of immune cells and cytokine dysregulation. Various stress management strategies such as meditation, yoga, hypnosis, and muscle relaxation have been shown to reduce the psychological and physiological effects of stress in cancers and HIV infection. This review aims to discuss the effect of stress on the immune system and examine how relaxation techniques such as Yoga and meditation could regulate the cytokine levels and hence, the immune responses during stress. PMID:21829284

  3. The Ambiguous Dying Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bern-Klug, Mercedes

    2004-01-01

    More than one-half of the 2.4 million deaths that will occur in the United States in 2004 will be immediately preceded by a time in which the likelihood of dying can best be described as "ambiguous." Many people die without ever being considered "dying" or "at the end of life." These people may miss out on the…

  4. The Ambiguous Dying Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bern-Klug, Mercedes

    2004-01-01

    More than one-half of the 2.4 million deaths that will occur in the United States in 2004 will be immediately preceded by a time in which the likelihood of dying can best be described as "ambiguous." Many people die without ever being considered "dying" or "at the end of life." These people may miss out on the…

  5. A circuit for pupil orienting responses: implications for cognitive modulation of pupil size.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chin-An; Munoz, Douglas P

    2015-08-01

    Pupil size, as a component of orienting, changes rapidly in response to local salient events in the environment, in addition to its well-known illumination-dependent modulation. Recent research has shown that visual, auditory, or audiovisual stimuli can elicit transient pupil dilation, and the timing and size of the evoked responses are systematically modulated by stimulus salience. Moreover, weak microstimulation of the superior colliculus (SC), a midbrain structure involved in eye movements and attention, evokes similar transient pupil dilation, suggesting that the SC coordinates the orienting response which includes transient pupil dilation. Projections from the SC to the pupil control circuitry provide a novel neural substrate underlying pupil modulation by various cognitive processes.

  6. Wheat ROP proteins modulate defense response through lignin metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qing-Hu; Zhu, Hai-Hao; Han, Jia-Qi

    2017-09-01

    ROP is a subfamily of small GTP-binding proteins that uniquely exist in plants. It acts as versatile molecular switches that regulate various developmental processes. Some ROP proteins are also reported to affect defense responses, although their exact mechanism is not fully understood. Herein, ROP members in wheat were mined; the functions of three wheat ROP proteins were studied. RT-PCR results showed that the expression of TaRac1 was rapidly and strongly induced after leaf rust infection. TaRac1 interacted with TaCCR in yeast-hybridization assay. The overexpression of TaRac1 in tobacco promoted CCR and CAD gene expression, increased the total lignin content and sinapyl lignin proportion, and then enhanced resistance to tobacco black shank and bacterial wilt diseases. In contrast, TaRac3 and TaRac4 did not show to interact with TaCCR. Furthermore, the overexpression of TaRac3 and TaRac4 did not increase lignin gene expression and lignin accumulation either. Unlike TaRac1, the overexpression of TaRac3 increased susceptibility to both black shank and bacterial wilt pathogens, while overexpression of TaRac4 showed no effect on disease resistance but promoted the root growth in tobacco seedling. These data collectively suggest that TaRac1 in Group II is mainly involved in regulating lignin metabolism which, in turn, responsible for the observed roles in pathogen resistance. TaRac3 and TaRac4 have the minor roles in defense response but may act on regulation in plant developmental processes. These results shed light on the complexity and diverse function of ROP in plant defense pathway. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Modulation of Human Immune Response by Fungal Biocontrol Agents

    PubMed Central

    Konstantinovas, Cibele; de Oliveira Mendes, Tiago A.; Vannier-Santos, Marcos A.; Lima-Santos, Jane

    2017-01-01

    Although the vast majority of biological control agents is generally regarded as safe for humans and environment, the increased exposure of agriculture workers, and consumer population to fungal substances may affect the immune system. Those compounds may be associated with both intense stimulation, resulting in IgE-mediated allergy and immune downmodulation induced by molecules such as cyclosporin A and mycotoxins. This review discusses the potential effects of biocontrol fungal components on human immune responses, possibly associated to infectious, inflammatory diseases, and defective defenses. PMID:28217107

  8. Modulating the pituitary-adrenal response to stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernikos-Danellis, J.

    1975-01-01

    Serotonin is believed to be a transmitter or regulator of neuronal function. A possible relationship between the pituitary-adrenal secretion of steroids and brain serotonin in the rat was investigated by evaluating the effects of altering brain 5-hydroxy tryptamine (HT) levels on the daily fluctuation of plasma corticosterone and on the response of the pituitary-adrenal system to a stressful or noxious stimulus in the rat. The approach was either to inhibit brain 5-HT synthesis with para-chlorophenyl alanine or to raise its level with precursors such as tryptophan or 5-hydroxy tryptophan.

  9. Modulating the pituitary-adrenal response to stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernikos-Danellis, J.

    1975-01-01

    Serotonin is believed to be a transmitter or regulator of neuronal function. A possible relationship between the pituitary-adrenal secretion of steroids and brain serotonin in the rat was investigated by evaluating the effects of altering brain 5-hydroxy tryptamine (HT) levels on the daily fluctuation of plasma corticosterone and on the response of the pituitary-adrenal system to a stressful or noxious stimulus in the rat. The approach was either to inhibit brain 5-HT synthesis with para-chlorophenyl alanine or to raise its level with precursors such as tryptophan or 5-hydroxy tryptophan.

  10. Modulation of Human Immune Response by Fungal Biocontrol Agents.

    PubMed

    Konstantinovas, Cibele; de Oliveira Mendes, Tiago A; Vannier-Santos, Marcos A; Lima-Santos, Jane

    2017-01-01

    Although the vast majority of biological control agents is generally regarded as safe for humans and environment, the increased exposure of agriculture workers, and consumer population to fungal substances may affect the immune system. Those compounds may be associated with both intense stimulation, resulting in IgE-mediated allergy and immune downmodulation induced by molecules such as cyclosporin A and mycotoxins. This review discusses the potential effects of biocontrol fungal components on human immune responses, possibly associated to infectious, inflammatory diseases, and defective defenses.

  11. Pupil size directly modulates the feedforward response in human primary visual cortex independently of attention.

    PubMed

    Bombeke, Klaas; Duthoo, Wout; Mueller, Sven C; Hopf, Jens-Max; Boehler, C Nico

    2016-02-15

    Controversy revolves around the question of whether psychological factors like attention and emotion can influence the initial feedforward response in primary visual cortex (V1). Although traditionally, the electrophysiological correlate of this response in humans (the C1 component) has been found to be unaltered by psychological influences, a number of recent studies have described attentional and emotional modulations. Yet, research into psychological effects on the feedforward V1 response has neglected possible direct contributions of concomitant pupil-size modulations, which are known to also occur under various conditions of attentional load and emotional state. Here we tested the hypothesis that such pupil-size differences themselves directly affect the feedforward V1 response. We report data from two complementary experiments, in which we used procedures that modulate pupil size without differences in attentional load or emotion while simultaneously recording pupil-size and EEG data. Our results confirm that pupil size indeed directly influences the feedforward V1 response, showing an inverse relationship between pupil size and early V1 activity. While it is unclear in how far this effect represents a functionally-relevant adaptation, it identifies pupil-size differences as an important modulating factor of the feedforward response of V1 and could hence represent a confounding variable in research investigating the neural influence of psychological factors on early visual processing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Spongionella Secondary Metabolites, Promising Modulators of Immune Response through CD147 Receptor Modulation.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Jon Andoni; Alfonso, Amparo; Rodriguez, Ines; Alonso, Eva; Cifuentes, José Manuel; Bermudez, Roberto; Rateb, Mostafa E; Jaspars, Marcel; Houssen, Wael E; Ebel, Rainer; Tabudravu, Jioji; Botana, Luís M

    2016-01-01

    The modulation of the immune system can have multiple applications such as cancer treatment, and a wide type of processes involving inflammation where the potent chemotactic agent cyclophilin A (Cyp A) is implicated. The Porifera phylum, in which Spongionella is encompassed, is the main producer of marine bioactive compounds. Four secondary metabolites obtained from Spongionella (Gracilin H, A, L, and Tetrahydroaplysulphurin-1) were described to hit Cyp A and to block the release of inflammation mediators. Based on these results, some role of Spongionella compounds on other steps of the signaling pathway mediated by this chemotactic agent can be hypothesized. In the present paper, we studied the effect of these four compounds on the surface membrane CD147 receptor expression, on the extracellular levels of Cyp A and on the ability to migrate of concanavalin (Con A)-activated T lymphocytes. Similar to a well-known immunosuppressive agent cyclosporine A (CsA), Gracilin H, A, L, and tetrahydroaplysulphurin-1 were able to reduce the CD147 membrane expression and to block the release of Cyp A to the medium. Besides, by using Cyp A as chemotactic agent, T cell migration was inhibited when cells were previously incubated with Gracilin A and Gracilin L. These positive results lead us to test the in vivo effect of Gracilin H and L in a mouse ear delayed hypersensitive reaction. Thus, both compounds efficiently reduce the ear swelling as well as the inflammatory cell infiltration. These results provide more evidences for their potential therapeutic application in immune-related diseases of Spongionella compounds.

  13. Spongionella Secondary Metabolites, Promising Modulators of Immune Response through CD147 Receptor Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Jon Andoni; Alfonso, Amparo; Rodriguez, Ines; Alonso, Eva; Cifuentes, José Manuel; Bermudez, Roberto; Rateb, Mostafa E.; Jaspars, Marcel; Houssen, Wael E.; Ebel, Rainer; Tabudravu, Jioji; Botana, Luís M.

    2016-01-01

    The modulation of the immune system can have multiple applications such as cancer treatment, and a wide type of processes involving inflammation where the potent chemotactic agent cyclophilin A (Cyp A) is implicated. The Porifera phylum, in which Spongionella is encompassed, is the main producer of marine bioactive compounds. Four secondary metabolites obtained from Spongionella (Gracilin H, A, L, and Tetrahydroaplysulphurin-1) were described to hit Cyp A and to block the release of inflammation mediators. Based on these results, some role of Spongionella compounds on other steps of the signaling pathway mediated by this chemotactic agent can be hypothesized. In the present paper, we studied the effect of these four compounds on the surface membrane CD147 receptor expression, on the extracellular levels of Cyp A and on the ability to migrate of concanavalin (Con A)-activated T lymphocytes. Similar to a well-known immunosuppressive agent cyclosporine A (CsA), Gracilin H, A, L, and tetrahydroaplysulphurin-1 were able to reduce the CD147 membrane expression and to block the release of Cyp A to the medium. Besides, by using Cyp A as chemotactic agent, T cell migration was inhibited when cells were previously incubated with Gracilin A and Gracilin L. These positive results lead us to test the in vivo effect of Gracilin H and L in a mouse ear delayed hypersensitive reaction. Thus, both compounds efficiently reduce the ear swelling as well as the inflammatory cell infiltration. These results provide more evidences for their potential therapeutic application in immune-related diseases of Spongionella compounds. PMID:27822214

  14. Acoustic change responses to amplitude modulation: a method to quantify cortical temporal processing and hemispheric asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Han, Ji Hye; Dimitrijevic, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Sound modulation is a critical temporal cue for the perception of speech and environmental sounds. To examine auditory cortical responses to sound modulation, we developed an acoustic change stimulus involving amplitude modulation (AM) of ongoing noise. The AM transitions in this stimulus evoked an acoustic change complex (ACC) that was examined parametrically in terms of rate and depth of modulation and hemispheric symmetry. Auditory cortical potentials were recorded from 64 scalp electrodes during passive listening in two conditions: (1) ACC from white noise to 4, 40, 300 Hz AM, with varying AM depths of 100, 50, 25% lasting 1 s and (2) 1 s AM noise bursts at the same modulation rate. Behavioral measures included AM detection from an attend ACC condition and AM depth thresholds (i.e., a temporal modulation transfer function, TMTF). The N1 response of the ACC was large to 4 and 40 Hz and small to the 300 Hz AM. In contrast, the opposite pattern was observed with bursts of AM showing larger responses with increases in AM rate. Brain source modeling showed significant hemispheric asymmetry such that 4 and 40 Hz ACC responses were dominated by right and left hemispheres respectively. N1 responses to the ACC resembled a low pass filter shape similar to a behavioral TMTF. In the ACC paradigm, the only stimulus parameter that changes is AM and therefore the N1 response provides an index for this AM change. In contrast, an AM burst stimulus contains both AM and level changes and is likely dominated by the rise time of the stimulus. The hemispheric differences are consistent with the asymmetric sampling in time hypothesis suggesting that the different hemispheres preferentially sample acoustic time across different time windows. The ACC provides a novel approach to studying temporal processing at the level of cortex and provides further evidence of hemispheric specialization for fast and slow stimuli.

  15. 'Green revolution' genes encode mutant gibberellin response modulators.

    PubMed

    Peng, J; Richards, D E; Hartley, N M; Murphy, G P; Devos, K M; Flintham, J E; Beales, J; Fish, L J; Worland, A J; Pelica, F; Sudhakar, D; Christou, P; Snape, J W; Gale, M D; Harberd, N P

    1999-07-15

    World wheat grain yields increased substantially in the 1960s and 1970s because farmers rapidly adopted the new varieties and cultivation methods of the so-called 'green revolution'. The new varieties are shorter, increase grain yield at the expense of straw biomass, and are more resistant to damage by wind and rain. These wheats are short because they respond abnormally to the plant growth hormone gibberellin. This reduced response to gibberellin is conferred by mutant dwarfing alleles at one of two Reduced height-1 (Rht-B1 and Rht-D1) loci. Here we show that Rht-B1/Rht-D1 and maize dwarf-8 (d8) are orthologues of the Arabidopsis Gibberellin Insensitive (GAI) gene. These genes encode proteins that resemble nuclear transcription factors and contain an SH2-like domain, indicating that phosphotyrosine may participate in gibberellin signalling. Six different orthologous dwarfing mutant alleles encode proteins that are altered in a conserved amino-terminal gibberellin signalling domain. Transgenic rice plants containing a mutant GAI allele give reduced responses to gibberellin and are dwarfed, indicating that mutant GAI orthologues could be used to increase yield in a wide range of crop species.

  16. Peripheral modulation of worker bee responses to queen mandibular pheromone.

    PubMed

    Vergoz, Vanina; McQuillan, H James; Geddes, Lisa H; Pullar, Kiri; Nicholson, Brad J; Paulin, Michael G; Mercer, Alison R

    2009-12-08

    It is generally accepted that young worker bees (Apis mellifera L.) are highly attracted to queen mandibular pheromone (QMP). Our results challenge this widely held view. We have found that unless young workers are exposed to QMP early in adult life, they, like foragers, avoid contact with this pheromone. Our data indicate that responses to QMP are regulated peripherally, at the level of the antennal sensory neurons, and that a window of opportunity exists in which QMP can alter a young bee's response to this critically important pheromone. Exposing young bees to QMP from the time of adult emergence reduces expression in the antennae of the D1-like dopamine receptor gene, Amdop1. Levels of Amdop3 transcript, on the other hand, and of the octopamine receptor gene Amoa1, are significantly higher in the antennae of bees strongly attracted to QMP than in bees showing no attraction to this pheromone. A decline in QMP attraction with age is accompanied by a fall in expression in worker antennae of the D2-like dopamine receptor, AmDOP3, a receptor that is selectively activated by QMP. Taken together, our findings suggest that QMP's actions peripherally not only suppress avoidance behavior, but also enhance attraction to QMP, thereby facilitating attendance of the queen.

  17. To live or to die? Evidence of variable drivers of wood d13C reveal different responses to disturbance in co-occurring oaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, A. S.; Stephen, F. M.; Billings, S. A.

    2011-12-01

    A major oak decline event in recent decades in Northwest Arkansas permits insight into disturbance impacts on forests, which is important for understanding global carbon, nutrient and climate cycles given projections of increasing disturbance event frequency in the future. The decline event, associated with an increase in population of a native, wood-boring insect, followed a cycle of droughts and resulted in a mosaic of apparently healthy red oaks (Quercus rubra) neighboring severely declining trees of the same species. Tree-ring evidence suggests decreased growth rates following increases in the insect's population decades prior to visible external decline symptoms (i.e. decreased crown coverage, mortality), but only in trees destined to die during the insect outbreak. Reasons why some trees experienced mortality and some remained healthy are unclear. Through analysis of stable isotopes of carbon (δ13C) and oxygen (δ18O) in wood and leaf δ13C and nitrogen among co-occurring trees, we can infer differential responses of red oaks to disturbance and associated resilience to mortality. Tree-ring a-cellulose δ13C varied from -27.3to -23.0%, and δ18O values varied from 27.5 to 31.8%. Neither δ13C nor δ18O exhibited signficant differences between healthy and declining trees. However, declining trees exhibited a significant, positive relationship between δ13C and δ18O (p <0.05, r2=0.15) prior to peak insect infestation. In contrast, apparently healthy individuals did not exhibit a significant relationship between these parameters, but exhibited significant, positive relationships between current year leaf δ13C and nitrogen content (p<0.05, r2=0.77). These results suggest that healthy and declining trees had different strategies for coping with insect infestation. Correlation between tree-ring δ13C and δ18O in dying trees suggests that trees destined to die during the infestation regulated their δ13C values primarily via stomatal conductance, a mechanism that

  18. Urokinase receptor modulates cellular and angiogenic responses in obstructive nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guoqiang; Kim, Heungsoo; Cai, Xiaohe; Lopez-Guisa, Jesus M; Carmeliet, Peter; Eddy, Allison A

    2003-05-01

    Interstitial cells have been implicated in the pathogenesis of renal fibrosis. Given that the urokinase receptor (uPAR) is known to play a role in cell adhesion, migration, and angiogenesis, the present study was designed to evaluate the role of uPAR in the regulation of the phenotypic composition of interstitial cells (macrophages, myofibroblasts, capillaries) in response to chronic renal injury. Groups of uPAR wild-type (+/+) and knockout (-/-) mice were investigated between 3 and 14 d after unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) or sham surgery (n = 8 mice per group). The density of F4/80+ interstitial macrophages (Mphi) was significantly lower in the -/- mice (3.3 +/- 0.4 versus 6.9 +/- 1.7% area at day 3 UUO; 10.8 +/- 1.6 versus 15.7 +/- 1.0% at day 14 UUO; -/- versus +/+). In contrast, in the -/- mice there were significantly more alpha smooth muscle actin (alphaSMA)-positive cells (12.9 +/- 3.2 versus 7.8 +/- 1.5% area at day 3 UUO; 21.0 +/- 4.7 versus 9.7 +/- 1.9% at day 14 UUO) and CD34-positive endothelial cells (8.4 +/- 1.9 versus 4.0 +/- 1.1% area at day 14 UUO). These differences were associated with significantly more interstitial fibrosis in the -/- mice based on Sirius red staining (4.6 +/- 0.9 versus 2.3 +/- 0.9% area at 14 d UUO). Absence of the uPAR scavenger receptor was associated with significantly greater accumulation of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 protein (PAI-1) (20.5 +/- 3.5 versus 9.1 +/- 2.9% area, day 14 UUO) and vitronectin protein (2.4 +/- 1.1 versus 0.9 +/- 0.4% area, day 14 UUO). By immunostaining alphaSMA+ cells, CD34+ cells, vitronectin and PAI-1 co-localized to the same tubulointerstitial area. The number of apoptotic cells increased in response to UUO but was significantly higher in the -/- mice (2.0 +/- 0.2 versus 1.2 +/- 0.2 per 100 tubulointerstitial cells, day 14 UUO) while the number of proliferating cells was significantly lower in the uPAR-/- mice. These data suggest that uPAR deficiency suppresses renal Mphi

  19. Steady state responses to temporally congruent and incongruent auditory and vibrotactile amplitude modulated stimulation.

    PubMed

    Budd, Timothy W; Timora, Justin R

    2013-09-01

    Recent research suggests that multisensory integration may occur at an early phase in sensory processing and within cortical regions traditionally though to be exclusively unisensory. Evidence from perceptual and electrophysiological studies indicate that the cross modal temporal correspondence of multisensory stimuli plays a fundamental role in the cortical integration of information across separate sensory modalities. Further, oscillatory neural activity in sensory cortices may provide the principle mechanism whereby sensory information from separate modalities is integrated. In the present study we aimed to extend this prior research by using the steady-state EEG response (SSR) to examine whether variations in the cross-modality temporal correspondence of amplitude modulated auditory and vibrotactile stimulation are apparent in SSR activity to multisensory stimulation. To achieve this we varied the cross-modal congruence of modulation rate for passively and simultaneously presented amplitude modulated auditory and vibrotactile stimuli. In order to maximise the SSR response in both modalities 21 and 40 Hz modulation rates were selected. Consistent with prior SSR studies, the present results showed clear evidence of phase-locking for EEG frequencies corresponding to the modulation rate of auditory and vibrotactile stimulation. As also found previously, the optimal modulation rate for SSR activity differed according to the modality, being greater at 40 Hz for auditory responses and greater at 21 Hz for vibrotactile responses. Despite consistent and reliable changes in SSR activity with manipulations of modulation rate within modality, the present study failed to provide strong evidence of multisensory interactions in SSR activity for temporally congruent, relative to incongruent, cross modal conditions. The results are discussed in terms of the role of attention as a possible factor in reconciling inconsistencies in SSR studies of multisensory integration. Crown

  20. Attention to primes modulates affective priming of pronunciation responses.

    PubMed

    De Houwer, Jan; Randell, Tom

    2002-01-01

    In studies on affective priming of pronunciation responses, two words are presented on each trial and participants are asked to read the second word out loud. Whereas some studies revealed shorter reaction times when the two words had the same valence than when they had a different valence, other studies either found no effect of affective congruence or revealed a reversed effect. In the present experiments, a significant effect of affective congruence only emerged when filler trials were presented in which the prime and target were identical and participants were instructed to attend to the primes (Experiment 2). No effects were found when participants were merely instructed to attend to or ignore the primes (Experiment 1), or when affectively incongruent filler trials were presented and participants were instructed to ignore the primes (Experiment 2).

  1. Modulation of immune responses by immunotherapy in allergic diseases.

    PubMed

    Cavkaytar, Ozlem; Akdis, Cezmi A; Akdis, Mübeccel

    2014-08-01

    Allergen immunotherapy (AIT) has been used for 100 years and until now different immunoregulatory pathways have been shown to take place in its mechanisms of action. It is characterized by administration of the causative allergen and is shown to be clinically efficient even after discontinuation of therapy particularly in allergic respiratory diseases, bee venom allergy, and food allergy. Generation of antigen/allergen-specific peripheral tolerance is the key mechanism during immunotherapy. It is mediated by development of T and B regulatory cells, IgG4 isotype allergen-specific antibodies and the involvement of multiple suppressor factors, which lead to decreased tissue inflammation, early and late phase responses. Describing novel regulatory mechanisms in the process of immune tolerance induction will help to identify treatment modalities not only for allergic disorders, but also for autoimmune diseases, organ transplantation, chronic infections, and cancer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Acetaminophen Modulates the Transcriptional Response to Recombinant Interferon-β

    PubMed Central

    Farnsworth, Aaron; Flaman, Anathea S.; Prasad, Shiv S.; Gravel, Caroline; Williams, Andrew; Yauk, Carole L.; Li, Xuguang

    2010-01-01

    Background Recombinant interferon treatment can result in several common side effects including fever and injection-site pain. Patients are often advised to use acetaminophen or other over-the-counter pain medications as needed. Little is known regarding the transcriptional changes induced by such co-administration. Methodology/Principal Findings We tested whether the administration of acetaminophen causes a change in the response normally induced by interferon-β treatment. CD-1 mice were administered acetaminophen (APAP), interferon-β (IFN-β) or a combination of IFN-β+APAP and liver and serum samples were collected for analysis. Differential gene expression was determined using an Agilent 22 k whole mouse genome microarray. Data were analyzed by several methods including Gene Ontology term clustering and Gene Set Enrichment Analysis. We observed a significant change in the transcription profile of hepatic cells when APAP was co-administered with IFN-β. These transcriptional changes included a marked up-regulation of genes involved in signal transduction and cell differentiation and down-regulation of genes involved in cellular metabolism, trafficking and the IκBK/NF-κB cascade. Additionally, we observed a large decrease in the expression of several IFN-induced genes including Ifit-3, Isg-15, Oasl1, Zbp1 and predicted gene EG634650 at both early and late time points. Conclusions/Significance A significant change in the transcriptional response was observed following co-administration of IFN-β+APAP relative to IFN-β treatment alone. These results suggest that administration of acetaminophen has the potential to modify the efficacy of IFN-β treatment. PMID:20544007

  3. Acute Exercise Modulates Feature-selective Responses in Human Cortex.

    PubMed

    Bullock, Tom; Elliott, James C; Serences, John T; Giesbrecht, Barry

    2017-04-01

    An organism's current behavioral state influences ongoing brain activity. Nonhuman mammalian and invertebrate brains exhibit large increases in the gain of feature-selective neural responses in sensory cortex during locomotion, suggesting that the visual system becomes more sensitive when actively exploring the environment. This raises the possibility that human vision is also more sensitive during active movement. To investigate this possibility, we used an inverted encoding model technique to estimate feature-selective neural response profiles from EEG data acquired from participants performing an orientation discrimination task. Participants (n = 18) fixated at the center of a flickering (15 Hz) circular grating presented at one of nine different orientations and monitored for a brief shift in orientation that occurred on every trial. Participants completed the task while seated on a stationary exercise bike at rest and during low- and high-intensity cycling. We found evidence for inverted-U effects; such that the peak of the reconstructed feature-selective tuning profiles was highest during low-intensity exercise compared with those estimated during rest and high-intensity exercise. When modeled, these effects were driven by changes in the gain of the tuning curve and in the profile bandwidth during low-intensity exercise relative to rest. Thus, despite profound differences in visual pathways across species, these data show that sensitivity in human visual cortex is also enhanced during locomotive behavior. Our results reveal the nature of exercise-induced gain on feature-selective coding in human sensory cortex and provide valuable evidence linking the neural mechanisms of behavior state across species.

  4. HIGH PRESSURE DIES

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, W.B.

    1960-05-31

    A press was invented for subjecting specimens of bismuth, urania, yttria, or thoria to high pressures and temperatures. The press comprises die parts enclosing a space in which is placed an electric heater thermally insulated from the die parts so as not to damage them by heat. The die parts comprise two opposed inner frustoconical parts and an outer part having a double frustoconical recess receiving the inner parts. The die space decreases in size as the inner die parts move toward one another against the outer part and the inner parts, though very hard, do not fracture because of the mode of support provided by the outer part.

  5. Vestibular Activation Differentially Modulates Human Early Visual Cortex and V5/MT Excitability and Response Entropy

    PubMed Central

    Guzman-Lopez, Jessica; Arshad, Qadeer; Schultz, Simon R; Walsh, Vincent; Yousif, Nada

    2013-01-01

    Head movement imposes the additional burdens on the visual system of maintaining visual acuity and determining the origin of retinal image motion (i.e., self-motion vs. object-motion). Although maintaining visual acuity during self-motion is effected by minimizing retinal slip via the brainstem vestibular-ocular reflex, higher order visuovestibular mechanisms also contribute. Disambiguating self-motion versus object-motion also invokes higher order mechanisms, and a cortical visuovestibular reciprocal antagonism is propounded. Hence, one prediction is of a vestibular modulation of visual cortical excitability and indirect measures have variously suggested none, focal or global effects of activation or suppression in human visual cortex. Using transcranial magnetic stimulation-induced phosphenes to probe cortical excitability, we observed decreased V5/MT excitability versus increased early visual cortex (EVC) excitability, during vestibular activation. In order to exclude nonspecific effects (e.g., arousal) on cortical excitability, response specificity was assessed using information theory, specifically response entropy. Vestibular activation significantly modulated phosphene response entropy for V5/MT but not EVC, implying a specific vestibular effect on V5/MT responses. This is the first demonstration that vestibular activation modulates human visual cortex excitability. Furthermore, using information theory, not previously used in phosphene response analysis, we could distinguish between a specific vestibular modulation of V5/MT excitability from a nonspecific effect at EVC. PMID:22291031

  6. Vestibular activation differentially modulates human early visual cortex and V5/MT excitability and response entropy.

    PubMed

    Seemungal, Barry M; Guzman-Lopez, Jessica; Arshad, Qadeer; Schultz, Simon R; Walsh, Vincent; Yousif, Nada

    2013-01-01

    Head movement imposes the additional burdens on the visual system of maintaining visual acuity and determining the origin of retinal image motion (i.e., self-motion vs. object-motion). Although maintaining visual acuity during self-motion is effected by minimizing retinal slip via the brainstem vestibular-ocular reflex, higher order visuovestibular mechanisms also contribute. Disambiguating self-motion versus object-motion also invokes higher order mechanisms, and a cortical visuovestibular reciprocal antagonism is propounded. Hence, one prediction is of a vestibular modulation of visual cortical excitability and indirect measures have variously suggested none, focal or global effects of activation or suppression in human visual cortex. Using transcranial magnetic stimulation-induced phosphenes to probe cortical excitability, we observed decreased V5/MT excitability versus increased early visual cortex (EVC) excitability, during vestibular activation. In order to exclude nonspecific effects (e.g., arousal) on cortical excitability, response specificity was assessed using information theory, specifically response entropy. Vestibular activation significantly modulated phosphene response entropy for V5/MT but not EVC, implying a specific vestibular effect on V5/MT responses. This is the first demonstration that vestibular activation modulates human visual cortex excitability. Furthermore, using information theory, not previously used in phosphene response analysis, we could distinguish between a specific vestibular modulation of V5/MT excitability from a nonspecific effect at EVC.

  7. Dissociable Neural Response Signatures for Slow Amplitude and Frequency Modulation in Human Auditory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Molly J.; Obleser, Jonas

    2013-01-01

    Natural auditory stimuli are characterized by slow fluctuations in amplitude and frequency. However, the degree to which the neural responses to slow amplitude modulation (AM) and frequency modulation (FM) are capable of conveying independent time-varying information, particularly with respect to speech communication, is unclear. In the current electroencephalography (EEG) study, participants listened to amplitude- and frequency-modulated narrow-band noises with a 3-Hz modulation rate, and the resulting neural responses were compared. Spectral analyses revealed similar spectral amplitude peaks for AM and FM at the stimulation frequency (3 Hz), but amplitude at the second harmonic frequency (6 Hz) was much higher for FM than for AM. Moreover, the phase delay of neural responses with respect to the full-band stimulus envelope was shorter for FM than for AM. Finally, the critical analysis involved classification of single trials as being in response to either AM or FM based on either phase or amplitude information. Time-varying phase, but not amplitude, was sufficient to accurately classify AM and FM stimuli based on single-trial neural responses. Taken together, the current results support the dissociable nature of cortical signatures of slow AM and FM. These cortical signatures potentially provide an efficient means to dissect simultaneously communicated slow temporal and spectral information in acoustic communication signals. PMID:24205309

  8. Melatonin Regulates Root Architecture by Modulating Auxin Response in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Chengzhen; Li, Aifu; Yu, Hua; Li, Wenzhen; Liang, Chengzhi; Guo, Sandui; Zhang, Rui; Chu, Chengcai

    2017-01-01

    It has been suggested that melatonin acts as an important regulator in controlling root growth and development, but the underlying molecular mechanism driving this relationship remains undetermined. In this study, we demonstrated that melatonin acts as a potent molecule to govern root architecture in rice. Treatments with melatonin significantly inhibited embryonic root growth, and promoted lateral root formation and development. Genome-wide expression profiling by RNA-sequencing revealed auxin-related genes were significantly activated under melatonin treatment. Moreover, several transcription factors and candidate cis-regulatory elements involved in root growth and developments, as well as auxin-related processes, were over-represented in both co-up and -down differentially expressed genes, suggesting that melatonin-mediated root growth occurs in an auxin signal pathway-dependent manner. Further, gravitropic response analysis determined that melatonin affects auxin-regulated processes in rice root. These data show that melatonin shapes root architecture by directly or indirectly activating the auxin signaling pathway. PMID:28223997

  9. WWOX modulates the ATR-mediated DNA damage checkpoint response.

    PubMed

    Abu-Odeh, Mohammad; Hereema, Nyla A; Aqeilan, Rami I

    2016-01-26

    For many decades genomic instability is considered one of the hallmarks of cancer. Role of the tumor suppressor WWOX (WW domain-containing oxidoreductase) in DNA damage response upon double strand breaks has been recently revealed. Here we demonstrate unforeseen functions for WWOX upon DNA single strand breaks (SSBs) checkpoint activation. We found that WWOX levels are induced following SSBs and accumulate in the nucleus. WWOX deficiency is associated with reduced activation of ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related protein (ATR) checkpoint proteins and increased chromosomal breaks. At the molecular level, we show that upon SSBs WWOX is modified at lysine 274 by ubiquitination mediated by the ubiquitin E3 ligase ITCH and interacts with ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM). Interestingly, ATM inhibition was associated with reduced activation of ATR checkpoint proteins suggesting that WWOX manipulation of ATR checkpoint proteins is ATM-dependent. Taken together, the present findings indicate that WWOX plays a key role in ATR checkpoint activation, while its absence might facilitate genomic instability.

  10. WWOX modulates the ATR-mediated DNA damage checkpoint response

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Odeh, Mohammad; Hereema, Nyla A.; Aqeilan, Rami I.

    2016-01-01

    For many decades genomic instability is considered one of the hallmarks of cancer. Role of the tumor suppressor WWOX (WW domain-containing oxidoreductase) in DNA damage response upon double strand breaks has been recently revealed. Here we demonstrate unforeseen functions for WWOX upon DNA single strand breaks (SSBs) checkpoint activation. We found that WWOX levels are induced following SSBs and accumulate in the nucleus. WWOX deficiency is associated with reduced activation of ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related protein (ATR) checkpoint proteins and increased chromosomal breaks. At the molecular level, we show that upon SSBs WWOX is modified at lysine 274 by ubiquitination mediated by the ubiquitin E3 ligase ITCH and interacts with ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM). Interestingly, ATM inhibition was associated with reduced activation of ATR checkpoint proteins suggesting that WWOX manipulation of ATR checkpoint proteins is ATM-dependent. Taken together, the present findings indicate that WWOX plays a key role in ATR checkpoint activation, while its absence might facilitate genomic instability. PMID:26675548

  11. Modulation of T cell response by Phellinus linteus.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chun-Jung; Lien, Hsiu-Man; Lin, Hwai-Jeng; Huang, Chao-Lu; Kao, Min-Chuan; Chen, Yu-An; Wang, Chien-Kuo; Chang, Hsiao-Yun; Chang, Yin-Kuang; Wu, Hua-Shan; Lai, Chih-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Phellinus linteus, a species of mushroom, has been shown to contribute to health benefits, such as anti-inflammatory activity and immunomodulatory efficacy. The aim of this study was to analyze the most effective constituents of P. linteus fermented broths, polysaccharides, and to evaluate their immunoregulatory effects on T cells. Four fermented broths (PL1-4) and the dialyzate medium (MD) were prepared from P. linteus mycelia, and the polysaccharide contents of each were analyzed. The P. linteus samples were tested for biological activity in the regulation of T cell activation. In T cells, the production of mitogen-induced interleukin (IL)-2 and cell cycle progression were dose-responsively inhibited by PL3 and MD, primarily through cell-cycle arrest in S phase. PL3 broth, which contained large quantities of polysaccharides, significantly decreased the ratio of interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) to interleukin 4 (IL-4) in T cells. Thus, P. linteus fermented broths produced additive effects on the regulation of the Th1/Th2 balance and show promise for the development of immunomodulatory therapeutics.

  12. Iloprost modulates the immune response in systemic sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Iloprost has been suggested to possess anti-inflammatory and immunomodulating actions and it is widely use as a vasodilatator in systemic sclerosis (SSc). In this study we evaluate the effect of iloprost on immune response in SSc patients. To this extend we enrolled 15 women affected by SSc and infused iloprost for 5 days. The effect of iloprost on T cells and monocytes was measured by flow cytometry, Real time PCR and measuring cytokines production in vivo and in vitro by ELISA. Results Our results demonstrate that Iloprost reduces T cell and TNF alpha production both in vivo and in vitro. It reduces T regulatory cells number, but increases their activity after immune stimulation. It increases serum IL-2 and this increase persists 28 days after the last infusion, also RANKL was increased both in vivo and in vitro. We observed no effect on IFN gamma production. Conclusions These results suggest that iloprost has anti-inflammatory and immunomodulating effects, reducing TNF alpha production by T cells and the number of T regulatory cells and increasing IL-2 and RANKL. PMID:21159177

  13. Fall Armyworm-Associated Gut Bacteria Modulate Plant Defense Responses.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Flor E; Peiffer, Michelle; Tan, Ching-Wen; Stanley, Bruce A; Stanley, Anne; Wang, Jie; Jones, Asher G; Hoover, Kelli; Rosa, Cristina; Luthe, Dawn; Felton, Gary

    2017-02-01

    Mechanical damage caused by insect feeding along with components present in insect saliva and oral secretions are known to induce jasmonic acid-mediated defense responses in plants. This study investigated the effects of bacteria from oral secretions of the fall armyworm Spodoptera frugiperda on herbivore-induced defenses in tomato and maize plants. Using culture-dependent methods, we identified seven different bacterial isolates belonging to the family Enterobacteriacea from the oral secretions of field-collected caterpillars. Two isolates, Pantoea ananatis and Enterobacteriaceae-1, downregulated the activity of the plant defensive proteins polyphenol oxidase and trypsin proteinase inhibitors (trypsin PI) but upregulated peroxidase (POX) activity in tomato. A Raoultella sp. and a Klebsiella sp. downregulated POX but upregulated trypsin PI in this plant species. Conversely, all of these bacterial isolates upregulated the expression of the herbivore-induced maize proteinase inhibitor (mpi) gene in maize. Plant treatment with P. ananatis and Enterobacteriaceae-1 enhanced caterpillar growth on tomato but diminished their growth on maize plants. Our results highlight the importance of herbivore-associated microbes and their ability to mediate insect plant interactions differently in host plants fed on by the same herbivore.

  14. Optically addressed and submillisecond response phase only liquid crystal spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiangjie; Duan, Jiazhu; Zhang, Dayong; Luo, Yongquan

    2014-10-01

    Liquid crystal based phase only spatial light modulator has attracted many research interests since last decades because of its superior advantage. Until now the liquid crystal spatial light modulator has been applied in many fields, but the response speed of nematic LC limited its further application. In this paper, an optically addressed phase only LC spatial light modulator was proposed based on polymer network liquid crystal. Morphology effect on the light scattering of PNLC was studied, which was mainly consisted of fiber and fiber bundles. The morphology nearly determined the light scattering and electro-optical property. Due to the high threshold voltage, to address the PNLC phase modulator was also concerned. Optical addressing method was proposed, in which BSO crystal was selected to replace one of the glass substrate. The response speed of PNLC was so fast that the reorientation of liquid crystal director will follow the change of effective voltage applied on LC layer, which was related with the voltage signal and especially with electron transport of photo-induced carriers due to diffusion and drift. The on state dynamic response of phase change was investigated. Based on this device, beam steering was also achieved by loading 488nm laser strip on the optical addressed phase only spatial light modulator.

  15. Modulations in oscillatory activity with amplitude asymmetry can produce cognitively relevant event-related responses.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, Hanneke; van der Werf, Jurrian; Mazaheri, Ali; Medendorp, W Pieter; Jensen, Ole

    2010-01-12

    Event-related responses and oscillatory activity are typically regarded as manifestations of different neural processes. Recent work has nevertheless revealed a mechanism by which slow event-related responses are created as a direct consequence of modulations in brain oscillations with nonsinusoidal properties. It remains unknown if this mechanism applies to cognitively relevant event-related responses. Here, we investigated whether sustained event-related fields (ERFs) measured during working memory maintenance can be explained by modulations in oscillatory power. In particular, we focused on contralateral delayed activity (CDA) typically observed in working memory tasks in which hemifield specific attention is manipulated. Using magnetoencephalography, we observed sustained posterior ERFs following the presentation of the memory target. These ERFs were systematically lateralized with respect to the hemisphere in which the target was presented. A strikingly similar pattern emerged for modulations in alpha (9-13 Hz) power. The alpha power and ERF lateralization were strongly correlated over subjects. Based on a mechanistic argument pertaining to the nonsinusoidal properties of the alpha activity, we conclude that the ERFs modulated by working memory are likely to be directly produced by the modulations in oscillatory alpha activity. Given that posterior alpha activity typically reflects disengagement, we conclude that the CDA is not attributable to an additive process reflecting memory maintenance per se but, rather, is a consequence of how attentional resources are allocated.

  16. Serotoninergic Modulation of Basal Cardiovascular Responses and Responses Induced by Isotonic Extracellular Volume Expansion in Rats.

    PubMed

    Semionatto, Isadora Ferraz; Raminelli, Adrieli Oliveira; Alves, Angelica Cristina; Capitelli, Caroline Santos; Chriguer, Rosangela Soares

    2017-02-01

    Isotonic blood volume expansion (BVE) induced alterations of sympathetic and parasympathetic activity in the heart and blood vessels, which can be modulated by serotonergic pathways. To evaluate the effect of saline or serotonergic agonist (DOI) administration in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) on cardiovascular responses after BVE. We recorded pulsatile blood pressure through the femoral artery to obtain the mean arterial pressure (MAP), systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP), heart rate (HR) and the sympathetic-vagal ratio (LF/HF) of Wistar rats before and after they received bilateral microinjections of saline or DOI into the PVN, followed by BVE. No significant differences were observed in the values of the studied variables in the different treatments from the control group. However, when animals are treated with DOI followed by BVE there is a significant increase in relation to the BE control group in all the studied variables: MBP (114.42±7.85 vs 101.34±9.17); SBP (147.23±14.31 vs 129.39±10.70); DBP (98.01 ±4.91 vs 87.31±8.61); HR (421.02±43.32 vs 356.35±41.99); and LF/HF ratio (2.32±0.80 vs 0.27±0.32). The present study showed that the induction of isotonic BVE did not promote alterations in MAP, HR and LF/HF ratio. On the other hand, the injection of DOI into PVN of the hypothalamus followed by isotonic BVE resulted in a significant increase of all variables. These results suggest that serotonin induced a neuromodulation in the PVN level, which promotes an inhibition of the baroreflex response to BVE. Therefore, the present study suggests the involvement of the serotonergic system in the modulation of vagal reflex response at PVN in the normotensive rats. Expansão de volume extracelular (EVEC) promove alterações da atividade simpática e parassimpática no coração e vasos sanguíneos, os quais podem ser moduladas por vias serotoninérgicas. Avaliar o efeito da administração de salina ou agonista serotonin

  17. cGMP modulates responses to queen mandibular pheromone in worker honey bees

    PubMed Central

    Fussnecker, Brendon L.; McKenzie, Alexander M.; Grozinger, Christina M.

    2013-01-01

    Responses to social cues, such as pheromones, can be modified by genotype, physiology, or environmental context. Honey bee queens produce a pheromone (queen mandibular pheromone; QMP) which regulates aspects of worker bee behavior and physiology. Forager bees are less responsive to QMP than young bees engaged in brood care, suggesting that physiological changes associated with behavioral maturation modulate response to this pheromone. Since 3′, 5′-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) is a major regulator of behavioral maturation in workers, we examined its role in modulating worker responses to QMP. Treatment with a cGMP analog resulted in significant reductions in both behavioral and physiological responses to QMP in young caged workers. Treatment significantly reduced attraction to QMP and inhibited the QMP-mediated increase in vitellogenin RNA levels in the fat bodies of worker bees. Genome-wide analysis of brain gene expression patterns demonstrated that cGMP has a larger effect on expression levels than QMP, and that QMP has specific effects in the presence of cGMP, suggesting that some responses to QMP may be dependent on an individual bees' physiological state. Our data suggest that cGMP-mediated processes play a role in modulating responses to QMP in honey bees at the behavioral, physiological, and molecular levels. PMID:21626397

  18. Assist Clients with Equity Rights and Responsibilities. Module CG C-18 of Category C--Implementing. Competency-Based Career Guidance Modules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancaster, Anita Sklare

    This learning module, one in a series of competency-based guidance program training packages focusing upon professional and paraprofessional competencies of guidance personnel, deals with assisting clients with equity rights and responsibilities. Addressed in the module are the following topics: defining various terms related to equality of…

  19. Auditory steady-state responses in cochlear implant users: Effect of modulation frequency and stimulation artifacts.

    PubMed

    Gransier, Robin; Deprez, Hanne; Hofmann, Michael; Moonen, Marc; van Wieringen, Astrid; Wouters, Jan

    2016-05-01

    Previous studies have shown that objective measures based on stimulation with low-rate pulse trains fail to predict the threshold levels of cochlear implant (CI) users for high-rate pulse trains, as used in clinical devices. Electrically evoked auditory steady-state responses (EASSRs) can be elicited by modulated high-rate pulse trains, and can potentially be used to objectively determine threshold levels of CI users. The responsiveness of the auditory pathway of profoundly hearing-impaired CI users to modulation frequencies is, however, not known. In the present study we investigated the responsiveness of the auditory pathway of CI users to a monopolar 500 pulses per second (pps) pulse train modulated between 1 and 100 Hz. EASSRs to forty-three modulation frequencies, elicited at the subject's maximum comfort level, were recorded by means of electroencephalography. Stimulation artifacts were removed by a linear interpolation between a pre- and post-stimulus sample (i.e., blanking). The phase delay across modulation frequencies was used to differentiate between the neural response and a possible residual stimulation artifact after blanking. Stimulation artifacts were longer than the inter-pulse interval of the 500pps pulse train for recording electrodes ipsilateral to the CI. As a result the stimulation artifacts could not be removed by artifact removal on the bases of linear interpolation for recording electrodes ipsilateral to the CI. However, artifact-free responses could be obtained in all subjects from recording electrodes contralateral to the CI, when subject specific reference electrodes (Cz or Fpz) were used. EASSRs to modulation frequencies within the 30-50 Hz range resulted in significant responses in all subjects. Only a small number of significant responses could be obtained, during a measurement period of 5 min, that originate from the brain stem (i.e., modulation frequencies in the 80-100 Hz range). This reduced synchronized activity of brain stem

  20. Preserved emotional modulation of motor response time despite psychomotor slowing in young-old adults.

    PubMed

    Hälbig, Thomas D; Creighton, Judy; Assuras, Stephanie; Borod, Joan C; Tse, Winona; Gracies, Jean-Michel; Foldi, Nancy S; Kaufmann, Horacio; Olanow, C Warren; Voustianiouk, Andrei

    2011-08-01

    Whereas aging affects cognitive and psychomotor processes negatively, the impact of aging on emotional processing is less clear. Using an "old-new" binary decision task, we ascertained the modulation of response latencies after presentation of neutral and emotional pictures in "young" (M = 27.1 years) and "young-old" adults with a mean age below 60 (M = 57.7 years). Stimuli varied on valence (pleasant, neutral, and unpleasant) and arousal (high and low) dimensions. Young-old adults had significantly longer reaction times. However, young and young-old adults showed the exact same pattern of response time modulation by emotional stimuli: Response latencies were longer for high-arousal than for low-arousal pictures and longer for negative than for positive or neutral stimuli. This result suggests that the specific effects of implicitly processed emotional valence and arousal information on behavioral response time are preserved in young-old adults despite significant age-related psychomotor decline.

  1. Oxytocin, but not vassopressin, modulates nociceptive responses in dorsal horn neurons.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Piloni, Gerardo; Gerardo, Rojas-Piloni; Mejía-Rodríguez, Rosalinda; Rosalinda, Mejía-Rodríguez; Martínez-Lorenzana, Guadalupe; Guadalupe, Martínez-Lorenzana; Condés-Lara, Miguel; Miguel, Condés-Lara

    2010-05-26

    Oxytocin (OT) and vasopressin (VP) are synthesized and secreted by the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus (PVN), and both peptides have been implicated in the pain modulatory system. In the spinal cord, activation of OT-containing axons modulates nociceptive neuronal responses in dorsal horn neurons; however, it is not known whether the direct VPergic descending projection participates. Here, we show that both PVN electrical stimulation and topical application of OT in the vicinity of identified and recorded dorsal horn WDR selectively inhibit Adelta and C-fiber responses. In contrast, the topical administration of VP on the same neurons did not affect the nociceptive responses. In addition, the reduction in nociceptive responses caused by PVN stimulation or OT administration was blocked with a selective OT antagonist. The results suggest that the VP descending projection does not modulate the antinociceptive effects mediated by the PVN on dorsal horn neurons; instead, it is the hypothalamic-spinal OT projection that regulates nociceptive information.

  2. Startle response and prepulse inhibition modulation by positive- and negative-induced affect.

    PubMed

    De la Casa, Luis Gonzalo; Mena, Auxiliadora; Puentes, Andrea

    2014-02-01

    The startle response, a set of reflex behaviours intended to prepare the organism to face a potentially threatening stimulus, can be modulated by several factors as, for example, changes in affective state, or previous presentation of a weak stimulus (a phenomenon termed Pre-Pulse Inhibition [PPI]). In this paper we analyse whether the induction of positive or negative affective states in the participants modulates the startle response and the PPI phenomenon. The results revealed a decrease of the startle response and an increase of the PPI effect when registered while the participants were exposed to pleasant images (Experiment 1), and an increase of the startle response and of the PPI effect when they were exposed to a video-clip of unpleasant content (Experiment 2). These data are interpreted considering that changes in affective states correlate with changes in the startle reflex intensity, but changes in PPI might be the result of an attentional process. © 2013.

  3. Concurrent information affects response inhibition processes via the modulation of theta oscillations in cognitive control networks.

    PubMed

    Chmielewski, Witold X; Mückschel, Moritz; Dippel, Gabriel; Beste, Christian

    2016-11-01

    Inhibiting responses is a challenge, where the outcome (partly) depends on the situational context. In everyday situations, response inhibition performance might be altered when irrelevant input is presented simultaneously with the information relevant for response inhibition. More specifically, irrelevant concurrent information may either brace or interfere with response-relevant information, depending on whether these inputs are redundant or conflicting. The aim of this study is to investigate neurophysiological mechanisms and the network underlying such modulations using EEG beamforming as method. The results show that in comparison to a baseline condition without concurrent information, response inhibition performance can be aggravated or facilitated by manipulating the extent of conflict via concurrent input. This depends on whether the requirement for cognitive control is high, as in conflicting trials, or whether it is low, as in redundant trials. In line with this, the total theta frequency power decreases in a right hemispheric orbitofrontal response inhibition network including the SFG, MFG, and SMA, when concurrent redundant information facilitates response inhibition processes. Vice versa, theta activity in a left-hemispheric response inhibition network (i.e., SFG, MFG, and IFG) increases, when conflicting concurrent information compromises response inhibition processes. We conclude that concurrent information bi-directionally shifts response inhibition performance and modulates the network architecture underlying theta oscillations which are signaling different levels of the need for cognitive control.

  4. Project S.P.I.C.E.: Special Partnership in Career Education. Rights and Responsibility Teaching Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emerson, Debby H.; And Others

    The rights and responsibility teaching module is one of a series of six modules prepared by Project SPICE (Special Partnership in Career Education) as a means of providing career awareness information to educable mentally handicapped students (ages 11-to-13 years). After an overview, a module profile is provided which charts the activities, and…

  5. SU-E-T-97: Dependence Of Optically Stimulated Luminescent Dosimeter (OSLD) Out Of Field Response On Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) Field Modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Ware, S; Clouser, E

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To determine the out of field response of Microstar ii OSLDs as a function of field modulation and distance in VMAT plan delivery. This work has potential application in fetal dose monitoring or measurements on cardiac pacemakers Methods: VMAT plans were created in Eclipse and optimized to varying degrees of modulation. Three plans were chosen to represent low, medium and high degrees of modulation (modulation factors as defined by MU/cGy). Plans were delivered to slabs of solid water with dimensions 60cm length, 30cm width, and 10cm height. For each modulation factor, 2 OSLDs were placed at 1cm depth with out of field distances of 1, 2, 3, 5, 8 and 10cm and the plan delivered isocentrically to a depth of 5cm. This technique was repeated for a Farmer Chamber by incrementing the table by the appropriate distance. The charge readings for the Farmer Chamber were converted to dose and the ratios taken as functions of modulation factors and distances out of field Results: Examination of the results as a function of out of field distance shows a trend of increasing OSLD/Farmer Chamber ratios for all modulation factors. The slopes appear to be roughly equivalent for all modulation factors investigated. Results as a function of modulation showed a downward trend for all out of field distances, with the greatest differences seen at 5cm and 8cm Conclusion: This study demonstrates that the response of OSLD dosimeters change as a function of out of field distance and modulation. The differences seen are within the stated accuracy of the system for the out of field distances and modulations investigated. Additional investigation is warranted to see if the OSLD response changes appreciably with longer out of field distances or wider ranges of modulation.

  6. An NCME Instructional Module on Item-Fit Statistics for Item Response Theory Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ames, Allison J.; Penfield, Randall D.

    2015-01-01

    Drawing valid inferences from item response theory (IRT) models is contingent upon a good fit of the data to the model. Violations of model-data fit have numerous consequences, limiting the usefulness and applicability of the model. This instructional module provides an overview of methods used for evaluating the fit of IRT models. Upon completing…

  7. An Evaluation of the Response Modulation Hypothesis in Relation to Attention-Deficit/ Hyperactivity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Richard F.; Rucklidge, Julia J.

    2006-01-01

    Several hypotheses related to Newman's (e.g., Patterson & Newman, 1993) response modulation hypothesis were examined among adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD; n = 18) and normal controls (n = 23). Consistent with predictions, youth with ADHD committed more passive avoidance errors (PAEs) than controls during the latter…

  8. Individual Differences in Mathematical Competence Modulate Brain Responses to Arithmetic Errors: An fMRI Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ansari, Daniel; Grabner, Roland H.; Koschutnig, Karl; Reishofer, Gernot; Ebner, Franz

    2011-01-01

    Data from both neuropsychological and neuroimaging studies have implicated the left inferior parietal cortex in calculation. Comparatively less attention has been paid to the neural responses associated with the commission of calculation errors and how the processing of arithmetic errors is modulated by individual differences in mathematical…

  9. Stress Response Recruits the Hippocampal Endocannabinoid System for the Modulation of Fear Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alvares, Lucas de Oliveira; Engelke, Douglas Senna; Diehl, Felipe; Scheffer-Teixeira, Robson; Haubrich, Josue; Cassini, Lindsey de Freitas; Molina, Victor Alejandro; Quillfeldt, Jorge Alberto

    2010-01-01

    The modulation of memory processes is one of the several functions of the endocannabinoid system (ECS) in the brain, with CB1 receptors highly expressed in areas such as the dorsal hippocampus. Experimental evidence suggested an important role of the ECS in aversively motivated memories. Similarly, glucocorticoids released in response to stress…

  10. An NCME Instructional Module on Item-Fit Statistics for Item Response Theory Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ames, Allison J.; Penfield, Randall D.

    2015-01-01

    Drawing valid inferences from item response theory (IRT) models is contingent upon a good fit of the data to the model. Violations of model-data fit have numerous consequences, limiting the usefulness and applicability of the model. This instructional module provides an overview of methods used for evaluating the fit of IRT models. Upon completing…

  11. An NCME Instructional Module on Estimating Item Response Theory Models Using Markov Chain Monte Carlo Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Jee-Seon; Bolt, Daniel M.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this ITEMS module is to provide an introduction to Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) estimation for item response models. A brief description of Bayesian inference is followed by an overview of the various facets of MCMC algorithms, including discussion of prior specification, sampling procedures, and methods for evaluating chain…

  12. An NCME Instructional Module on Estimating Item Response Theory Models Using Markov Chain Monte Carlo Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Jee-Seon; Bolt, Daniel M.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this ITEMS module is to provide an introduction to Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) estimation for item response models. A brief description of Bayesian inference is followed by an overview of the various facets of MCMC algorithms, including discussion of prior specification, sampling procedures, and methods for evaluating chain…

  13. Stress Response Recruits the Hippocampal Endocannabinoid System for the Modulation of Fear Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alvares, Lucas de Oliveira; Engelke, Douglas Senna; Diehl, Felipe; Scheffer-Teixeira, Robson; Haubrich, Josue; Cassini, Lindsey de Freitas; Molina, Victor Alejandro; Quillfeldt, Jorge Alberto

    2010-01-01

    The modulation of memory processes is one of the several functions of the endocannabinoid system (ECS) in the brain, with CB1 receptors highly expressed in areas such as the dorsal hippocampus. Experimental evidence suggested an important role of the ECS in aversively motivated memories. Similarly, glucocorticoids released in response to stress…

  14. The Response Scale for the Intellectual Disability Module of the WHOQOL: 5-Point or 3-Point?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fang, J.; Fleck, M. P.; Green, A.; McVilly, K.; Hao, Y.; Tan, W.; Fu, R.; Power, M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To deal with the question of whether a 5-point response Likert scale should be changed to a 3-point scale when used in the field testing of people with intellectual disabilities (IDs), which was raised after the pilot study of World Health Organization Quality of Life (WHOQOL)-DIS, a module being developed with the World Health…

  15. A photo-responsive metallomesogen for an optically and electrically tunable polarized light modulator.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae-Yoon; Kang, Dong-Gue; Lee, Myong-Hoon; Kim, Jin-Soo; Lee, Cheul-Ro; Jeong, Kwang-Un

    2016-10-25

    A palladium(ii)-based metallomesogen with azobenzene was synthesized for the fabrication of an optically and electrically tunable polarized light modulator. Owing to the extended molecular geometry constructed by organometallic chemistry, the photo-responsive metallomesogen showed an excellent orientation in liquid crystal media.

  16. Baseline and Modulated Acoustic Startle Responses in Adolescent Girls with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipschitz, Deborah S.; Mayes, Linda M.; Rasmusson, Ann M.; Anyan, Walter; Billingslea, Eileen; Gueorguieva, Ralitza; Southwick, Steven M.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To assess baseline and modulated acoustic startle responses in adolescent girls with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Method: Twenty-eight adolescent girls with PTSD and 23 healthy control girls were recruited for participation in the study. Acoustic stimuli were bursts of white noise of 104 dB presented biaurally through…

  17. An Evaluation of the Response Modulation Hypothesis in Relation to Attention-Deficit/ Hyperactivity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Richard F.; Rucklidge, Julia J.

    2006-01-01

    Several hypotheses related to Newman's (e.g., Patterson & Newman, 1993) response modulation hypothesis were examined among adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD; n = 18) and normal controls (n = 23). Consistent with predictions, youth with ADHD committed more passive avoidance errors (PAEs) than controls during the latter…

  18. Preexisting antigen-specific immune responses are modulated by oral KLH feeding in humans.

    PubMed

    Hostmann, Arwed; Meyer, Tim; Maul, Jochen; Preiss, Jan; Boortz, Bertram; Thiel, Andreas; Duchmann, Rainer; Ullrich, Reiner

    2015-07-01

    Oral tolerance is the antigen-specific inhibition of a systemic immune response after oral antigen uptake and well established in animal models. We recently showed that keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) feeding modulates subsequently induced systemic immune responses in humans as well. In the present study, we investigated whether oral KLH can also modulate preexisting antigen-specific systemic B- and T-cell responses. We induced delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reactions as well as systemic KLH-specific B- and T-cell responses by subcutaneous KLH injections. Subsequent oral KLH administration decreased the small proportion of antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells positive for the cytokine IL-17 at the end of the feeding regimen even further. After reimmunization, there was no difference in DTH reactions and the KLH-specific B-cell responses, but KLH-fed volunteers had an increased proportion of antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells positive for IL-10 and a reduced proportion of antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells positive for the skin-homing receptor cutaneous lymphocyte antigen and IL-2 and IFN-γ. Taken together, oral KLH can modulate a preexisting systemic KLH-specific immune response. These results suggest that feeding antigen may offer therapeutic strategies for the suppression of unwanted immune reactions in humans.

  19. A surface ice module for wind turbine dynamic response simulation using FAST

    DOE PAGES

    Yu, Bingbin; Karr, Dale G.; Song, Huimin; ...

    2016-06-03

    It is a fact that developing offshore wind energy has become more and more serious worldwide in recent years. Many of the promising offshore wind farm locations are in cold regions that may have ice cover during wintertime. The challenge of possible ice loads on offshore wind turbines raises the demand of modeling capacity of dynamic wind turbine response under the joint action of ice, wind, wave, and current. The simulation software FAST is an open source computer-aided engineering (CAE) package maintained by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. In this paper, a new module of FAST for assessing the dynamicmore » response of offshore wind turbines subjected to ice forcing is presented. In the ice module, several models are presented which involve both prescribed forcing and coupled response. For conditions in which the ice forcing is essentially decoupled from the structural response, ice forces are established from existing models for brittle and ductile ice failure. For conditions in which the ice failure and the structural response are coupled, such as lock-in conditions, a rate-dependent ice model is described, which is developed in conjunction with a new modularization framework for FAST. In this paper, analytical ice mechanics models are presented that incorporate ice floe forcing, deformation, and failure. For lower speeds, forces slowly build until the ice strength is reached and ice fails resulting in a quasi-static condition. For intermediate speeds, the ice failure can be coupled with the structural response and resulting in coinciding periods of the ice failure and the structural response. A third regime occurs at high speeds of encounter in which brittle fracturing of the ice feature occurs in a random pattern, which results in a random vibration excitation of the structure. An example wind turbine response is simulated under ice loading of each of the presented models. This module adds to FAST the capabilities for analyzing the response of wind

  20. A surface ice module for wind turbine dynamic response simulation using FAST

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Bingbin; Karr, Dale G.; Song, Huimin; Sirnivas, Senu

    2016-06-03

    It is a fact that developing offshore wind energy has become more and more serious worldwide in recent years. Many of the promising offshore wind farm locations are in cold regions that may have ice cover during wintertime. The challenge of possible ice loads on offshore wind turbines raises the demand of modeling capacity of dynamic wind turbine response under the joint action of ice, wind, wave, and current. The simulation software FAST is an open source computer-aided engineering (CAE) package maintained by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. In this paper, a new module of FAST for assessing the dynamic response of offshore wind turbines subjected to ice forcing is presented. In the ice module, several models are presented which involve both prescribed forcing and coupled response. For conditions in which the ice forcing is essentially decoupled from the structural response, ice forces are established from existing models for brittle and ductile ice failure. For conditions in which the ice failure and the structural response are coupled, such as lock-in conditions, a rate-dependent ice model is described, which is developed in conjunction with a new modularization framework for FAST. In this paper, analytical ice mechanics models are presented that incorporate ice floe forcing, deformation, and failure. For lower speeds, forces slowly build until the ice strength is reached and ice fails resulting in a quasi-static condition. For intermediate speeds, the ice failure can be coupled with the structural response and resulting in coinciding periods of the ice failure and the structural response. A third regime occurs at high speeds of encounter in which brittle fracturing of the ice feature occurs in a random pattern, which results in a random vibration excitation of the structure. An example wind turbine response is simulated under ice loading of each of the presented models. This module adds to FAST the capabilities for analyzing the response of wind

  1. A surface ice module for wind turbine dynamic response simulation using FAST

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Bingbin; Karr, Dale G.; Song, Huimin; Sirnivas, Senu

    2016-06-03

    It is a fact that developing offshore wind energy has become more and more serious worldwide in recent years. Many of the promising offshore wind farm locations are in cold regions that may have ice cover during wintertime. The challenge of possible ice loads on offshore wind turbines raises the demand of modeling capacity of dynamic wind turbine response under the joint action of ice, wind, wave, and current. The simulation software FAST is an open source computer-aided engineering (CAE) package maintained by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. In this paper, a new module of FAST for assessing the dynamic response of offshore wind turbines subjected to ice forcing is presented. In the ice module, several models are presented which involve both prescribed forcing and coupled response. For conditions in which the ice forcing is essentially decoupled from the structural response, ice forces are established from existing models for brittle and ductile ice failure. For conditions in which the ice failure and the structural response are coupled, such as lock-in conditions, a rate-dependent ice model is described, which is developed in conjunction with a new modularization framework for FAST. In this paper, analytical ice mechanics models are presented that incorporate ice floe forcing, deformation, and failure. For lower speeds, forces slowly build until the ice strength is reached and ice fails resulting in a quasi-static condition. For intermediate speeds, the ice failure can be coupled with the structural response and resulting in coinciding periods of the ice failure and the structural response. A third regime occurs at high speeds of encounter in which brittle fracturing of the ice feature occurs in a random pattern, which results in a random vibration excitation of the structure. An example wind turbine response is simulated under ice loading of each of the presented models. This module adds to FAST the capabilities for analyzing the response of wind

  2. Sputtered protective coatings for die casting dies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirtich, M. J.; Nieh, C.-Y.; Wallace, J. F.

    1981-01-01

    Three experimental research designs investigating candidate materials and processes involved in protective die surface coating procedures by sputter deposition, using ion beam technologies, are discussed. Various pre-test results show that none of the coatings remained completely intact for 15,000 test cycles. The longest lifetime was observed for coatings such as tungsten, platinum, and molybdenum which reduced thermal fatigue, but exhibited oxidation and suppressed crack initiation only as long as the coating did not fracture. Final test results confirmed earlier findings and coatings with Pt and W proved to be the candidate materials to be used on a die surface to increase die life. In the W-coated specimens, which remained intact on the surface after thermal fatigue testing, no oxidation was found under the coating, although a few cracks formed on the surface where the coating broke down. Further research is planned.

  3. Sputtered protective coatings for die casting dies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirtich, M. J.; Nieh, C.-Y.; Wallace, J. F.

    1981-01-01

    Three experimental research designs investigating candidate materials and processes involved in protective die surface coating procedures by sputter deposition, using ion beam technologies, are discussed. Various pre-test results show that none of the coatings remained completely intact for 15,000 test cycles. The longest lifetime was observed for coatings such as tungsten, platinum, and molybdenum which reduced thermal fatigue, but exhibited oxidation and suppressed crack initiation only as long as the coating did not fracture. Final test results confirmed earlier findings and coatings with Pt and W proved to be the candidate materials to be used on a die surface to increase die life. In the W-coated specimens, which remained intact on the surface after thermal fatigue testing, no oxidation was found under the coating, although a few cracks formed on the surface where the coating broke down. Further research is planned.

  4. Die singulation method

    DOEpatents

    Swiler, Thomas P [Albuquerque, NM; Garcia, Ernest J [Albuquerque, NM; Francis, Kathryn M [Rio Rancho, NM

    2014-01-07

    A method is disclosed for singulating die from a semiconductor substrate (e.g. a semiconductor-on-insulator substrate or a bulk silicon substrate) containing an oxide layer (e.g. silicon dioxide or a silicate glass) and one or more semiconductor layers (e.g. monocrystalline or polycrystalline silicon) located above the oxide layer. The method etches trenches through the substrate and through each semiconductor layer about the die being singulated, with the trenches being offset from each other around at least a part of the die so that the oxide layer between the trenches holds the substrate and die together. The trenches can be anisotropically etched using a Deep Reactive Ion Etching (DRIE) process. After the trenches are etched, the oxide layer between the trenches can be etched away with a HF etchant to singulate the die. A release fixture can be located near one side of the substrate to receive the singulated die.

  5. Die singulation method

    DOEpatents

    Swiler, Thomas P.; Garcia, Ernest J.; Francis, Kathryn M.

    2013-06-11

    A method is disclosed for singulating die from a semiconductor substrate (e.g. a semiconductor-on-insulator substrate or a bulk silicon substrate) containing an oxide layer (e.g. silicon dioxide or a silicate glass) and one or more semiconductor layers (e.g. monocrystalline or polycrystalline silicon) located above the oxide layer. The method etches trenches through the substrate and through each semiconductor layer about the die being singulated, with the trenches being offset from each other around at least a part of the die so that the oxide layer between the trenches holds the substrate and die together. The trenches can be anisotropically etched using a Deep Reactive Ion Etching (DRIE) process. After the trenches are etched, the oxide layer between the trenches can be etched away with an HF etchant to singulate the die. A release fixture can be located near one side of the substrate to receive the singulated die.

  6. Extrusion die and method

    DOEpatents

    Lipp, G. Daniel

    1994-04-26

    A method and die apparatus for manufacturing a honeycomb body of rhombic cell cross-section by extrusion through an extrusion die of triangular cell discharge slot configuration, the die incorporating feedholes at selected slot intersections only, such that slot segments communicating directly with the feedholes discharge web material and slot segments not so connected do not discharge web material, whereby a rhombic cell cross-section in the extruded body is provided.

  7. Reconstructing the spectrotemporal modulations of real-life sounds from fMRI response patterns

    PubMed Central

    Santoro, Roberta; Moerel, Michelle; De Martino, Federico; Valente, Giancarlo; Ugurbil, Kamil; Yacoub, Essa; Formisano, Elia

    2017-01-01

    Ethological views of brain functioning suggest that sound representations and computations in the auditory neural system are optimized finely to process and discriminate behaviorally relevant acoustic features and sounds (e.g., spectrotemporal modulations in the songs of zebra finches). Here, we show that modeling of neural sound representations in terms of frequency-specific spectrotemporal modulations enables accurate and specific reconstruction of real-life sounds from high-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) response patterns in the human auditory cortex. Region-based analyses indicated that response patterns in separate portions of the auditory cortex are informative of distinctive sets of spectrotemporal modulations. Most relevantly, results revealed that in early auditory regions, and progressively more in surrounding regions, temporal modulations in a range relevant for speech analysis (∼2–4 Hz) were reconstructed more faithfully than other temporal modulations. In early auditory regions, this effect was frequency-dependent and only present for lower frequencies (<∼2 kHz), whereas for higher frequencies, reconstruction accuracy was higher for faster temporal modulations. Further analyses suggested that auditory cortical processing optimized for the fine-grained discrimination of speech and vocal sounds underlies this enhanced reconstruction accuracy. In sum, the present study introduces an approach to embed models of neural sound representations in the analysis of fMRI response patterns. Furthermore, it reveals that, in the human brain, even general purpose and fundamental neural processing mechanisms are shaped by the physical features of real-world stimuli that are most relevant for behavior (i.e., speech, voice). PMID:28420788

  8. Size matters: plasticity in metabolic scaling shows body-size may modulate responses to climate change.

    PubMed

    Carey, Nicholas; Sigwart, Julia D

    2014-08-01

    Variability in metabolic scaling in animals, the relationship between metabolic rate ( R: ) and body mass ( M: ), has been a source of debate and controversy for decades. R: is proportional to MB: , the precise value of B: much debated, but historically considered equal in all organisms. Recent metabolic theory, however, predicts B: to vary among species with ecology and metabolic level, and may also vary within species under different abiotic conditions. Under climate change, most species will experience increased temperatures, and marine organisms will experience the additional stressor of decreased seawater pH ('ocean acidification'). Responses to these environmental changes are modulated by myriad species-specific factors. Body-size is a fundamental biological parameter, but its modulating role is relatively unexplored. Here, we show that changes to metabolic scaling reveal asymmetric responses to stressors across body-size ranges; B: is systematically decreased under increasing temperature in three grazing molluscs, indicating smaller individuals were more responsive to warming. Larger individuals were, however, more responsive to reduced seawater pH in low temperatures. These alterations to the allometry of metabolism highlight abiotic control of metabolic scaling, and indicate that responses to climate warming and ocean acidification may be modulated by body-size. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  9. Pheromones modulate reward responsiveness and non-associative learning in honey bees.

    PubMed

    Baracchi, David; Devaud, Jean-Marc; d'Ettorre, Patrizia; Giurfa, Martin

    2017-08-29

    Pheromones are chemical messengers that trigger stereotyped behaviors and/or physiological processes in individuals of the same species. Recent reports suggest that pheromones can modulate behaviors not directly related to the pheromonal message itself and contribute, in this way, to behavioral plasticity. We tested this hypothesis by studying the effect of pheromones on sucrose responsiveness and habituation in honey bees. We exposed workers to three pheromone components: geraniol, which in nature is used in an appetitive context, and isopentyl acetate (IPA) and 2-heptanone (2H), which signal aversive situations. Pheromones associated with an aversive context induced a significant decrease of sucrose responsiveness as 40% and 60% of bees exposed to IPA and 2H, respectively, did not respond to any sucrose concentration. In bees that responded to sucrose, geraniol enhanced sucrose responsiveness while 2H, but not IPA, had the opposite effect. Geraniol and IPA had no effect on habituation while 2H induced faster habituation than controls. Overall, our results demonstrate that pheromones modulate reward responsiveness and to a lower degree habituation. Through their effect on sucrose responsiveness they could also affect appetitive associative learning. Thus, besides conveying stereotyped messages, pheromones may contribute to individual and colony-level plasticity by modulating motivational state and learning performances.

  10. Size matters: plasticity in metabolic scaling shows body-size may modulate responses to climate change

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Nicholas; Sigwart, Julia D.

    2014-01-01

    Variability in metabolic scaling in animals, the relationship between metabolic rate (R) and body mass (M), has been a source of debate and controversy for decades. R is proportional to Mb, the precise value of b much debated, but historically considered equal in all organisms. Recent metabolic theory, however, predicts b to vary among species with ecology and metabolic level, and may also vary within species under different abiotic conditions. Under climate change, most species will experience increased temperatures, and marine organisms will experience the additional stressor of decreased seawater pH (‘ocean acidification’). Responses to these environmental changes are modulated by myriad species-specific factors. Body-size is a fundamental biological parameter, but its modulating role is relatively unexplored. Here, we show that changes to metabolic scaling reveal asymmetric responses to stressors across body-size ranges; b is systematically decreased under increasing temperature in three grazing molluscs, indicating smaller individuals were more responsive to warming. Larger individuals were, however, more responsive to reduced seawater pH in low temperatures. These alterations to the allometry of metabolism highlight abiotic control of metabolic scaling, and indicate that responses to climate warming and ocean acidification may be modulated by body-size. PMID:25122741

  11. Morphology effect on the light scattering and dynamic response of polymer network liquid crystal phase modulator.

    PubMed

    Xiangjie, Zhao; Cangli, Liu; Jiazhu, Duan; Jiancheng, Zeng; Dayong, Zhang; Yongquan, Luo

    2014-06-16

    Polymer network liquid crystal (PNLC) was one of the most potential liquid crystal for submillisecond response phase modulation, which was possible to be applied in submillisecond response phase only spatial light modulator. But until now the light scattering when liquid crystal director was reoriented by external electric field limited its phase modulation application. Dynamic response of phase change when high voltage was applied was also not elucidated. The mechanism that determines the light scattering was studied by analyzing the polymer network morphology by SEM method. Samples were prepared by varying the polymerization temperature, UV curing intensity and polymerization time. The morphology effect on the dynamic response of phase change was studied, in which high voltage was usually applied and electro-striction effect was often induced. The experimental results indicate that the polymer network morphology was mainly characterized by cross linked single fibrils, cross linked fibril bundles or even both. Although the formation of fibril bundle usually induced large light scattering, such a polymer network could endure higher voltage. In contrast, although the formation of cross linked single fibrils induced small light scattering, such a polymer network cannot endure higher voltage. There is a tradeoff between the light scattering and high voltage endurance. The electro-optical properties such as threshold voltage and response time were taken to verify our conclusion. For future application, the monomer molecular structure, the liquid crystal solvent and the polymerization conditions should be optimized to generate optimal polymer network morphology.

  12. Mitochondrial functions modulate neuroendocrine, metabolic, inflammatory, and transcriptional responses to acute psychological stress

    PubMed Central

    Picard, Martin; McManus, Meagan J.; Gray, Jason D.; Nasca, Carla; Moffat, Cynthia; Kopinski, Piotr K.; Seifert, Erin L.; McEwen, Bruce S.; Wallace, Douglas C.

    2015-01-01

    The experience of psychological stress triggers neuroendocrine, inflammatory, metabolic, and transcriptional perturbations that ultimately predispose to disease. However, the subcellular determinants of this integrated, multisystemic stress response have not been defined. Central to stress adaptation is cellular energetics, involving mitochondrial energy production and oxidative stress. We therefore hypothesized that abnormal mitochondrial functions would differentially modulate the organism’s multisystemic response to psychological stress. By mutating or deleting mitochondrial genes encoded in the mtDNA [NADH dehydrogenase 6 (ND6) and cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI)] or nuclear DNA [adenine nucleotide translocator 1 (ANT1) and nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase (NNT)], we selectively impaired mitochondrial respiratory chain function, energy exchange, and mitochondrial redox balance in mice. The resulting impact on physiological reactivity and recovery from restraint stress were then characterized. We show that mitochondrial dysfunctions altered the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis, sympathetic adrenal–medullary activation and catecholamine levels, the inflammatory cytokine IL-6, circulating metabolites, and hippocampal gene expression responses to stress. Each mitochondrial defect generated a distinct whole-body stress-response signature. These results demonstrate the role of mitochondrial energetics and redox balance as modulators of key pathophysiological perturbations previously linked to disease. This work establishes mitochondria as stress-response modulators, with implications for understanding the mechanisms of stress pathophysiology and mitochondrial diseases. PMID:26627253

  13. Local modulation of human brain responses by circadian rhythmicity and sleep debt.

    PubMed

    Muto, Vincenzo; Jaspar, Mathieu; Meyer, Christelle; Kussé, Caroline; Chellappa, Sarah L; Degueldre, Christian; Balteau, Evelyne; Shaffii-Le Bourdiec, Anahita; Luxen, André; Middleton, Benita; Archer, Simon N; Phillips, Christophe; Collette, Fabienne; Vandewalle, Gilles; Dijk, Derk-Jan; Maquet, Pierre

    2016-08-12

    Human performance is modulated by circadian rhythmicity and homeostatic sleep pressure. Whether and how this interaction is represented at the regional brain level has not been established. We quantified changes in brain responses to a sustained-attention task during 13 functional magnetic resonance imaging sessions scheduled across the circadian cycle, during 42 hours of wakefulness and after recovery sleep, in 33 healthy participants. Cortical responses showed significant circadian rhythmicity, the phase of which varied across brain regions. Cortical responses also significantly decreased with accrued sleep debt. Subcortical areas exhibited primarily a circadian modulation that closely followed the melatonin profile. These findings expand our understanding of the mechanisms involved in maintaining cognition during the day and its deterioration during sleep deprivation and circadian misalignment.

  14. Differential modulation of auditory responses to attended and unattended speech in different listening conditions

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Ying-Yee; Mullangi, Ala; Ding, Nai

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates how top-down attention modulates neural tracking of the speech envelope in different listening conditions. In the quiet conditions, a single speech stream was presented and the subjects paid attention to the speech stream (active listening) or watched a silent movie instead (passive listening). In the competing speaker (CS) conditions, two speakers of opposite genders were presented diotically. Ongoing electroencephalographic (EEG) responses were measured in each condition and cross-correlated with the speech envelope of each speaker at different time lags. In quiet, active and passive listening resulted in similar neural responses to the speech envelope. In the CS conditions, however, the shape of the cross-correlation function was remarkably different between the attended and unattended speech. The cross-correlation with the attended speech showed stronger N1 and P2 responses but a weaker P1 response compared with the cross-correlation with the unattended speech. Furthermore, the N1 response to the attended speech in the CS condition was enhanced and delayed compared with the active listening condition in quiet, while the P2 response to the unattended speaker in the CS condition was attenuated compared with the passive listening in quiet. Taken together, these results demonstrate that top-down attention differentially modulates envelope-tracking neural activity at different time lags and suggest that top-down attention can both enhance the neural responses to the attended sound stream and suppress the responses to the unattended sound stream. PMID:25124153

  15. Computational identification of genetic subnetwork modules associated with maize defense response to Fusarium verticillioides

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Maize, a crop of global significance, is vulnerable to a variety of biotic stresses resulting in economic losses. Fusarium verticillioides (teleomorph Gibberella moniliformis) is one of the key fungal pathogens of maize, causing ear rots and stalk rots. To better understand the genetic mechanisms involved in maize defense as well as F. verticillioides virulence, a systematic investigation of the host-pathogen interaction is needed. The aim of this study was to computationally identify potential maize subnetwork modules associated with its defense response against F. verticillioides. Results We obtained time-course RNA-seq data from B73 maize inoculated with wild type F. verticillioides and a loss-of-virulence mutant, and subsequently established a computational pipeline for network-based comparative analysis. Specifically, we first analyzed the RNA-seq data by a cointegration-correlation-expression approach, where maize genes were jointly analyzed with known F. verticillioides virulence genes to find candidate maize genes likely associated with the defense mechanism. We predicted maize co-expression networks around the selected maize candidate genes based on partial correlation, and subsequently searched for subnetwork modules that were differentially activated when inoculated with two different fungal strains. Based on our analysis pipeline, we identified four potential maize defense subnetwork modules. Two were directly associated with maize defense response and were associated with significant GO terms such as GO:0009817 (defense response to fungus) and GO:0009620 (response to fungus). The other two predicted modules were indirectly involved in the defense response, where the most significant GO terms associated with these modules were GO:0046914 (transition metal ion binding) and GO:0046686 (response to cadmium ion). Conclusion Through our RNA-seq data analysis, we have shown that a network-based approach can enhance our understanding of the

  16. Modulation of shark prey capture kinematics in response to sensory deprivation.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, Jayne M; Atema, Jelle; Hueter, Robert E; Motta, Philip J

    2017-02-01

    The ability of predators to modulate prey capture in response to the size, location, and behavior of prey is critical to successful feeding on a variety of prey types. Modulating in response to changes in sensory information may be critical to successful foraging in a variety of environments. Three shark species with different feeding morphologies and behaviors were filmed using high-speed videography while capturing live prey: the ram-feeding blacktip shark, the ram-biting bonnethead, and the suction-feeding nurse shark. Sharks were examined intact and after sensory information was blocked (olfaction, vision, mechanoreception, and electroreception, alone and in combination), to elucidate the contribution of the senses to the kinematics of prey capture. In response to sensory deprivation, the blacktip shark demonstrated the greatest amount of modulation, followed by the nurse shark. In the absence of olfaction, blacktip sharks open the jaws slowly, suggestive of less motivation. Without lateral line cues, blacktip sharks capture prey from greater horizontal angles using increased ram. When visual cues are absent, blacktip sharks elevate the head earlier and to a greater degree, allowing them to overcome imprecise position of the prey relative to the mouth, and capture prey using decreased ram, while suction remains unchanged. When visual cues are absent, nurse sharks open the mouth wider, extend the labial cartilages further, and increase suction while simultaneously decreasing ram. Unlike some bony fish, neither species switches feeding modalities (i.e. from ram to suction or vice versa). Bonnetheads failed to open the mouth when electrosensory cues were blocked, but otherwise little to no modulation was found in this species. These results suggest that prey capture may be less plastic in elasmobranchs than in bony fishes, possibly due to anatomical differences, and that the ability to modulate feeding kinematics in response to available sensory information varies

  17. The urge-to-cough and cough motor response modulation by the central effects of nicotine.

    PubMed

    Davenport, Paul W; Vovk, Andrea; Duke, Rita K; Bolser, Donald C; Robertson, Erin

    2009-04-01

    The urge-to-cough is a respiratory sensation that precedes the cough motor response. Since affective state modulates the perception of respiratory sensations such as dyspnoea, we wanted to test whether nicotine, an anxiolytic, would modulate the urge-to-cough and hence, the cough motor response. We hypothesized that withdrawal from and administration of nicotine in smoking subjects would modulate their anxiety levels, urge-to-cough and cough motor response to capsaicin stimulation. Twenty smoking (SM) adults (8F, 12M; 22+/-3 years; 2.9+/-2.0 pack years) and matched non-smoking (NS) controls (22+/-2 years) were presented with randomized concentrations of capsaicin (0-200 microM) before and after nicotine (SM only) gum and/or placebo (SM and NS) gum. Subjects rated their urge-to-cough using a Borg scale at the end of each capsaicin presentation. Cough number and cough motor pattern were determined from airflow tracings. Subjects completed State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) questionnaires before and after gum administration. SM subjects that withdrew from cigarette smoking for 12 h exhibited an increase in anxiety scores, a greater number of coughs and higher urge-to-cough ratings compared to NS subjects. Administration of nicotine gum reduced anxiety scores, cough number and urge-to-cough ratings to match the NS subjects. There was no effect of placebo gum on any of the measured parameters in the SM and NS groups. The results from this study suggest that modulation of the central neural state with nicotine withdrawal and administration in young smoking adults is associated with a change in anxiety levels which in turn modulates the perceptual and motor response to irritant cough stimulants.

  18. A Computational Model of Inferior Colliculus Responses to Amplitude Modulated Sounds in Young and Aged Rats

    PubMed Central

    Rabang, Cal F.; Parthasarathy, Aravindakshan; Venkataraman, Yamini; Fisher, Zachery L.; Gardner, Stephanie M.; Bartlett, Edward L.

    2012-01-01

    The inferior colliculus (IC) receives ascending excitatory and inhibitory inputs from multiple sources, but how these auditory inputs converge to generate IC spike patterns is poorly understood. Simulating patterns of in vivo spike train data from cellular and synaptic models creates a powerful framework to identify factors that contribute to changes in IC responses, such as those resulting in age-related loss of temporal processing. A conductance-based single neuron IC model was constructed, and its responses were compared to those observed during in vivo IC recordings in rats. IC spike patterns were evoked using amplitude-modulated tone or noise carriers at 20–40 dB above threshold and were classified as low-pass, band-pass, band-reject, all-pass, or complex based on their rate modulation transfer function tuning shape. Their temporal modulation transfer functions were also measured. These spike patterns provided experimental measures of rate, vector strength, and firing pattern for comparison with model outputs. Patterns of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic convergence to IC neurons were based on anatomical studies and generalized input tuning for modulation frequency. Responses of modeled ascending inputs were derived from experimental data from previous studies. Adapting and sustained IC intrinsic models were created, with adaptation created via calcium-activated potassium currents. Short-term synaptic plasticity was incorporated into the model in the form of synaptic depression, which was shown to have a substantial effect on the magnitude and time course of the IC response. The most commonly observed IC response sub-types were recreated and enabled dissociation of inherited response properties from those that were generated in IC. Furthermore, the model was used to make predictions about the consequences of reduction in inhibition for age-related loss of temporal processing due to a reduction in GABA seen anatomically with age. PMID:23129994

  19. Die Soldering in Aluminium Die Casting

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Q.; Kenik, E.A.; Viswanathan, S.

    2000-03-15

    Two types of tests, dipping tests and dip-coating tests were carried out on small steel cylinders using pure aluminum and 380 alloy to investigate the mechanism of die soldering during aluminum die casting. Optical and scanning electron microscopy were used to study the morphology and composition of the phases formed during soldering. A soldering mechanism is postulated based on experimental observations. A soldering critical temperature is postulated at which iron begins to react with aluminum to form an aluminum-rich liquid phase and solid intermetallic compounds. When the temperature at the die surface is higher than this critical temperature, the aluminum-rich phase is liquid and joins the die with the casting during the subsequent solidification. The paper discusses the mechanism of soldering for the case of pure aluminum and 380 alloy casting in a steel mold, the factors that promote soldering, and the strength of the bond formed when soldering occurs. conditions, an aluminum-rich soldering layer may also form over the intermetallic layer. Although a significant amount of research has been conducted on the nature of these intermetallics, little is known about the conditions under which soldering occurs.

  20. Is Dying Young Worse than Dying Old?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jecker, Nancy S.; Schneiderman, Lawrence J.

    1994-01-01

    Notes that, in contemporary Western society, people feel death of small child is greater injustice than death of older adult and experience correspondingly greater sorrow, anger, regret, or bitterness when very young person dies. Contrasts these attitudes with those of ancient Greece and shows relevance that different attitudes toward death have…

  1. Is Dying Young Worse than Dying Old?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jecker, Nancy S.; Schneiderman, Lawrence J.

    1994-01-01

    Notes that, in contemporary Western society, people feel death of small child is greater injustice than death of older adult and experience correspondingly greater sorrow, anger, regret, or bitterness when very young person dies. Contrasts these attitudes with those of ancient Greece and shows relevance that different attitudes toward death have…

  2. Non-uniform spatial response of the LCoS spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Víctor; González-Vega, Arturo; Aguilar, Alberto; Landgrave, J. E. A.; García-Márquez, Jorge

    2016-05-01

    Liquid crystal on silicon (LCoS) spatial light modulators have been considered for a wide variety of scientific applications, due to their phase modulation capability and high spatial resolution. Nevertheless, their intrinsic characteristics, like the extensively studied depolarization and phase shift fluctuations, can make their behavior significantly distant from the ideal and somewhat unpredictable. Here, we present the characterization of a different source of uncertainty: the non-uniform spatial response of the LCoS, which is fundamentally different to the static aberrations of the panel. We measured local deviations of ±22% from the expected phase shift, resulting in non-negligible effects for phase modulation measurements, phase shifting interferometry, wavefront correction, and speckle interferometry.

  3. Delayed response of a fermion pair condensate to a modulation of the interaction strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plata, J.

    2009-09-01

    The effect of a sinusoidal modulation of the interaction strength on a fermion pair condensate is analytically studied. The system is described by a generalization of the coupled fermion-boson model that incorporates a time-dependent intermode coupling induced via a magnetic Feshbach resonance. Nontrivial effects are shown to emerge depending on the relative magnitude of the modulation period and the relaxation time of the condensate. Specifically, a nonadiabatic modulation drives the system out of thermal equilibrium: the external field induces a variation of the quasiparticle energies, and, in turn, a disequilibrium of the associated populations. The subsequent relaxation process is studied and an analytical description of the gap dynamics is obtained. Recent experimental findings are explained: the delay observed in the response to the applied field is understood as a temperature effect linked to the condensate relaxation time.

  4. Near-infrared Light Responsive Synthetic c-di-GMP Module for Optogenetic Applications

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Enormous potential of cell-based therapeutics is hindered by the lack of effective means to control genetically engineered cells in mammalian tissues. Here, we describe a synthetic module for remote photocontrol of engineered cells that can be adapted for such applications. The module involves photoactivated synthesis of cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP), a stable small molecule that is not produced by higher eukaryotes and therefore is suitable for orthogonal regulation. The key component of the photocontrol module is an engineered bacteriophytochrome diguanylate cyclase, which synthesizes c-di-GMP from GTP in a light-dependent manner. Bacteriophytochromes are particularly attractive photoreceptors because they respond to light in the near-infrared window of the spectrum, where absorption by mammalian tissues is minimal, and also because their chromophore, biliverdin IXα, is naturally available in mammalian cells. The second component of the photocontrol module, a c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase, maintains near-zero background levels of c-di-GMP in the absence of light, which enhances the photodynamic range of c-di-GMP concentrations. In the E. coli model used in this study, the intracellular c-di-GMP levels could be upregulated by light by >50-fold. Various c-di-GMP-responsive proteins and riboswitches identified in bacteria can be linked downstream of the c-di-GMP-mediated photocontrol module for orthogonal regulation of biological activities in mammals as well as in other organisms lacking c-di-GMP signaling. Here, we linked the photocontrol module to a gene expression output via a c-di-GMP-responsive transcription factor and achieved a 40-fold photoactivation of gene expression. PMID:24926804

  5. Pultrusion Die Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Maywood L. (Inventor); Johnson, Gary S. (Inventor); Frye, Mark W. (Inventor); Stanfield, Clarence E. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    This invention relates generally to pultrusion die assemblies, and more particularly, to a pultrusion die assembly which incorporates a plurality of functions in order to produce a continuous, thin composite fiber reinforced thermoplastic material. The invention is useful for making high performance thermoplastic composite materials in sheets which can be coiled on a spool and stored for further processing.

  6. Extrusion die and method

    DOEpatents

    Lipp, G. Daniel

    1994-05-03

    A method and die apparatus for manufacturing a honeycomb body of triangular cell cross-section and high cell density, the die having a combination of (i) feedholes feeding slot intersections and (ii) feedholes feeding slot segments not supplied from slot intersections, whereby a reduction in feedhole count is achieved while still retaining good extrusion efficiency and extrudate uniformity.

  7. Extrusion die and method

    SciTech Connect

    Lipp, G.D.

    1994-05-03

    A method and die apparatus for manufacturing a honeycomb body of triangular cell cross-section and high cell density, the die having a combination of (i) feedholes feeding slot intersections and (ii) feedholes feeding slot segments not supplied from slot intersections, whereby a reduction in feedhole count is achieved while still retaining good extrusion efficiency and extrudate uniformity. 4 figures.

  8. Modulation of the Contrast Response Function by Electrical Microstimulation of the Macaque Frontal Eye Field

    PubMed Central

    Ekstrom, Leeland B.; Roelfsema, Pieter R.; Arsenault, John T.; Kolster, Hauke; Vanduffel, Wim

    2009-01-01

    Spatial attention influences representations in visual cortical areas as well as perception. Some models predict a contrast gain, while others a response or activity gain when attention is directed to a contrast varying stimulus. Recent evidence has indicated that microstimulating the Frontal Eye Field (FEF) can produce modulations of V4 neuronal firing rates that resemble spatial attention-like effects, and we have shown similar modulations of functional magnetic resonance imaging activity throughout the visual system. Here, we used fMRI in awake, fixating monkeys to first measure the response in twelve visual cortical areas to stimuli of varying luminance contrast. Next, we simultaneously microstimulated sub-regions of the FEF with movement fields that overlapped the stimulus locations and measured how microstimulation modulated these contrast response functions (CRFs) throughout visual cortex. In general, we found evidence for a non-proportional scaling of the CRF under these conditions, resembling a contrast gain effect. Representations of low contrast stimuli were enhanced by stimulation of the FEF below the threshold needed to evoke saccades, while high contrast stimuli were unaffected or in some areas even suppressed. Further, we measured a characteristic spatial pattern of enhancement and suppression across the cortical surface, from which we propose a simple schematic of this contrast-dependent fMRI response. PMID:19710320

  9. Insight in modulation of inflammation in response to diclofenac intervention: a human intervention study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Chronic systemic low-grade inflammation in obese subjects is associated with health complications including cardiovascular diseases, insulin resistance and diabetes. Reducing inflammatory responses may reduce these risks. However, available markers of inflammatory status inadequately describe the complexity of metabolic responses to mild anti-inflammatory therapy. Methods To address this limitation, we used an integrative omics approach to characterize modulation of inflammation in overweight men during an intervention with the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac. Measured parameters included 80 plasma proteins, >300 plasma metabolites (lipids, free fatty acids, oxylipids and polar compounds) and an array of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) gene expression products. These measures were submitted to multivariate and correlation analysis and were used for construction of biological response networks. Results A panel of genes, proteins and metabolites, including PGE2 and TNF-alpha, were identified that describe a diclofenac-response network (68 genes in PBMC, 1 plasma protein and 4 plasma metabolites). Novel candidate markers of inflammatory modulation included PBMC expression of annexin A1 and caspase 8, and the arachidonic acid metabolite 5,6-DHET. Conclusion In this study the integrated analysis of a wide range of parameters allowed the development of a network of markers responding to inflammatory modulation, thereby providing insight into the complex process of inflammation and ways to assess changes in inflammatory status associated with obesity. Trial registration The study is registered as NCT00221052 in clinicaltrials.gov database. PMID:20178593

  10. Module-Based Analysis of Robustness Tradeoffs in the Heat Shock Response System

    PubMed Central

    Iwasaki, Rei; Ohtake, Hisao; Doyle, John C; Grigorova, Irina; Gross, Carol A; Khammash, Mustafa

    2006-01-01

    Biological systems have evolved complex regulatory mechanisms, even in situations where much simpler designs seem to be sufficient for generating nominal functionality. Using module-based analysis coupled with rigorous mathematical comparisons, we propose that in analogy to control engineering architectures, the complexity of cellular systems and the presence of hierarchical modular structures can be attributed to the necessity of achieving robustness. We employ the Escherichia coli heat shock response system, a strongly conserved cellular mechanism, as an example to explore the design principles of such modular architectures. In the heat shock response system, the sigma-factor σ32 is a central regulator that integrates multiple feedforward and feedback modules. Each of these modules provides a different type of robustness with its inherent tradeoffs in terms of transient response and efficiency. We demonstrate how the overall architecture of the system balances such tradeoffs. An extensive mathematical exploration nevertheless points to the existence of an array of alternative strategies for the existing heat shock response that could exhibit similar behavior. We therefore deduce that the evolutionary constraints facing the system might have steered its architecture toward one of many robustly functional solutions. PMID:16863396

  11. Dopamine modulates carotid nerve responses induced by acetylcholine on the cat petrosal ganglion in vitro.

    PubMed

    Alcayaga, J; Varas, R; Arroyo, J; Iturriaga, R; Zapata, P

    1999-06-12

    We have recently reported that application of acetylcholine (ACh) or nicotine to the petrosal ganglion-the sensory ganglion of the glossopharyngeal nerve-elicits a burst of discharges in the carotid nerve branch, innervating the carotid body and sinus, but not in the glossopharyngeal branch, innervating the tongue and pharynx. Thus, the perikarya of sensory neurons for the carotid bifurcation exhibit selective cholinosensitivity. Since dopamine (DA) modulates carotid nerve chemosensory activity, we searched for the presence of DA sensitivity at the perikarya of these neurons in the cat petrosal ganglion superfused in vitro. Applications of DA in doses of up to 5 mg to the ganglion did not modify the rate of spontaneous discharges in the carotid nerve. However, if DA was applied 30 s before ACh injections, ACh-evoked reactions were modified: low doses of DA enhanced the subsequent responses to ACh, while high doses of DA depressed the responses to ACh. This depressant effect of DA on ACh responses was partially antagonized by adding spiroperone to the superfusate. Our results show that the response to ACh of petrosal ganglion neurons projecting through the carotid nerve is modulated by DA acting on D(2) receptors located in the somata of these neurons. Thus, dopaminergic modulation of cholinosensitivity could be shared also by the membranes of peripheral endings and perikarya of primary sensory neurons involved in arterial chemoreception.

  12. Deciphering the response of Mycobacterium smegmatis to nitrogen stress using bipartite active modules

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The ability to adapt to environments with fluctuating nutrient availability is vital for bacterial survival. Although essential for growth, few nitrogen metabolism genes have been identified or fully characterised in mycobacteria and nitrogen stress survival mechanisms are unknown. Results A global transcriptional analysis of the mycobacterial response to nitrogen stress, showed a significant change in the differential expression of 16% of the Mycobacterium smegmatis genome. Gene expression changes were mapped onto the metabolic network using Active Modules for Bipartite Networks (AMBIENT) to identify metabolic pathways showing coordinated transcriptional responses to the stress. AMBIENT revealed several key features of the metabolic response not identified by KEGG enrichment alone. Down regulated reactions were associated with the general reduction in cellular metabolism as a consequence of reduced growth rate. Up-regulated modules highlighted metabolic changes in nitrogen assimilation and scavenging, as well as reactions involved in hydrogen peroxide metabolism, carbon scavenging and energy generation. Conclusions Application of an Active Modules algorithm to transcriptomic data identified key metabolic reactions and pathways altered in response to nitrogen stress, which are central to survival under nitrogen limiting environments. PMID:23819599

  13. Temporal response of ganglion cells of the macaque retina to cone-specific modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, T.; Lee, B. B.; Kremers, J.

    1995-03-01

    The temporal response of cone inputs to macaque retinal ganglion cells were compared with cone-specific sinusoidal modulation used to isolate each cone type. For all cell types of the parvocellular (PC) pathway, temporal responsivity was similar for short (S)-, middle (M)-, and long (L)-wavelength-sensitive cone inputs, apart from small latency differences between inputs to center and surround. The temporal response resembled that expected from receptor physiology. Responses of cells of the magnocellular pathway to M- or L-cone modulation showed more complex properties indicative of postreceptoral processing. Human psychophysical temporal-sensitivity functions were acquired with S-cone modulation under conditions similar to those for the physiological measurements. Ratios of psychophysical to physiological data from S-cone cells (the only cells that respond to this stimulus) yielded an estimate of the central filter acting upon PC-pathway signals. The filter characteristic could be described by a four-stage low-pass filter with corner frequency 3-5 Hz.

  14. Individual differences in attentional modulation of cortical responses correlate with selective attention performance.

    PubMed

    Choi, Inyong; Wang, Le; Bharadwaj, Hari; Shinn-Cunningham, Barbara

    2014-08-01

    Many studies have shown that attention modulates the cortical representation of an auditory scene, emphasizing an attended source while suppressing competing sources. Yet, individual differences in the strength of this attentional modulation and their relationship with selective attention ability are poorly understood. Here, we ask whether differences in how strongly attention modulates cortical responses reflect differences in normal-hearing listeners' selective auditory attention ability. We asked listeners to attend to one of three competing melodies and identify its pitch contour while we measured cortical electroencephalographic responses. The three melodies were either from widely separated pitch ranges ("easy trials"), or from a narrow, overlapping pitch range ("hard trials"). The melodies started at slightly different times; listeners attended either the leading or lagging melody. Because of the timing of the onsets, the leading melody drew attention exogenously. In contrast, attending the lagging melody required listeners to direct top-down attention volitionally. We quantified how attention amplified auditory N1 response to the attended melody and found large individual differences in the N1 amplification, even though only correctly answered trials were used to quantify the ERP gain. Importantly, listeners with the strongest amplification of N1 response to the lagging melody in the easy trials were the best performers across other types of trials. Our results raise the possibility that individual differences in the strength of top-down gain control reflect inherent differences in the ability to control top-down attention.

  15. Modulation of the yeast protein interactome in response to DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Rochette, Samuel; Gagnon-Arsenault, Isabelle; Diss, Guillaume; Landry, Christian R

    2014-04-04

    Cells deploy diverse mechanisms to physiologically adapt to potentially detrimental perturbations. These mechanisms include changes in the organization of protein-protein interaction networks (PINs). Most PINs characterized to date are portrayed in a single environmental condition and are thus likely to miss important connections among biological processes. In this report, we show that the yeast DHFR-PCA on high-density arrays allows to detects modulations of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) in different conditions by testing more than 1000 PPIs in standard and in a drug-inducing DNA damage conditions. We identify 156 PPIs that show significant modulation in response to DNA damage. We provide evidence that modulated PPIs involve essential genes (NOP7, EXO84 and LAS17) playing critical roles in response to DNA damage. Additionally, we show that a significant proportion of PPI changes are likely explained by changes in protein localization and, to a lesser extent, protein abundance. The protein interaction modules affected by changing PPIs support the role of mRNA stability and translation, protein degradation and ubiquitylation and the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton in response to DNA damage. Overall, we provide a valuable tool and dataset for the study of the rewiring of PINs in response to environmental perturbations. We show that the DHFR-PCA is a high-throughput method that allows the detection of changes in PPIs associated with different environmental conditions using DNA damage response as a testbed. We provide a valuable resource for the study of DNA damage in eukaryotic cells. This article is part of a Special Issue: Can Proteomics Fill the Gap Between Genomics and Phenotypes? Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Direct sensorimotor corticospinal modulation of dorsal horn neuronal C-fiber responses in the rat.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Piloni, Gerardo; Martínez-Lorenzana, Guadalupe; Condés-Lara, Miguel; Rodríguez-Jiménez, Javier

    2010-09-10

    Clinically, the stimulation of motor cortical areas has been used to alleviate certain pain conditions. However, the attempts to understand the mechanisms of cortical nociceptive modulation at the spinal cord level have yielded controversial results. The objectives of the present work were to: 1) determine the effects of activating and suppressing the activity of sensorimotor cortical neurons on the nociceptive electrophysiological responses of the segmental C-fibers, and 2) evaluate the contribution of direct and indirect corticospinal projections in segmental nociceptive modulation. By means of a bipolar matrix of stimulation electrodes we mapped the stimulation of cortical areas that modulate C-fiber evoked field potentials in the dorsal horn. In addition, suppressing the cortical activity by means of cortical spreading depression, we observed that the C-fiber evoked field potentials in the dorsal horn are facilitated when cortical activity is suppressed specifically in sensorimotor cortex. Moreover, the C-fiber evoked field potentials were inhibited during spontaneous activation of cortical projecting neurons. Furthermore, after a lesion of the pyramidal tract contralateral to the spinal cord recording sites, the cortical action was suppressed. Our results show that corticospinal tract fibers arising from the sensorimotor cortex modulate directly the nociceptive C-fiber evoked responses of the dorsal horn.

  17. A phenomenological model of peripheral and central neural responses to amplitude-modulated tones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Paul C.; Carney, Laurel H.

    2004-10-01

    A phenomenological model with time-varying excitation and inhibition was developed to study possible neural mechanisms underlying changes in the representation of temporal envelopes along the auditory pathway. A modified version of an existing auditory-nerve model [Zhang et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 109, 648-670 (2001)] was used to provide inputs to higher hypothetical processing centers. Model responses were compared directly to published physiological data at three levels: the auditory nerve, ventral cochlear nucleus, and inferior colliculus. Trends and absolute values of both average firing rate and synchrony to the modulation period were accurately predicted at each level for a wide range of stimulus modulation depths and modulation frequencies. The diversity of central physiological responses was accounted for with realistic variations of model parameters. Specifically, enhanced synchrony in the cochlear nucleus and rate-tuning to modulation frequency in the inferior colliculus were predicted by choosing appropriate relative strengths and time courses of excitatory and inhibitory inputs to postsynaptic model cells. The proposed model is fundamentally different than others that have been used to explain the representation of envelopes in the mammalian midbrain, and it provides a computational tool for testing hypothesized relationships between physiology and psychophysics. .

  18. Perceptual demand modulates activation of human auditory cortex in response to task-irrelevant sounds.

    PubMed

    Sabri, Merav; Humphries, Colin; Verber, Matthew; Mangalathu, Jain; Desai, Anjali; Binder, Jeffrey R; Liebenthal, Einat

    2013-09-01

    In the visual modality, perceptual demand on a goal-directed task has been shown to modulate the extent to which irrelevant information can be disregarded at a sensory-perceptual stage of processing. In the auditory modality, the effect of perceptual demand on neural representations of task-irrelevant sounds is unclear. We compared simultaneous ERPs and fMRI responses associated with task-irrelevant sounds across parametrically modulated perceptual task demands in a dichotic-listening paradigm. Participants performed a signal detection task in one ear (Attend ear) while ignoring task-irrelevant syllable sounds in the other ear (Ignore ear). Results revealed modulation of syllable processing by auditory perceptual demand in an ROI in middle left superior temporal gyrus and in negative ERP activity 130-230 msec post stimulus onset. Increasing the perceptual demand in the Attend ear was associated with a reduced neural response in both fMRI and ERP to task-irrelevant sounds. These findings are in support of a selection model whereby ongoing perceptual demands modulate task-irrelevant sound processing in auditory cortex.

  19. Cross-Modulation of Homeostatic Responses to Temperature, Oxygen and Carbon Dioxide in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Kodama-Namba, Eiji; Fenk, Lorenz A.; Bretscher, Andrew J.; Gross, Einav; Busch, K. Emanuel; de Bono, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Different interoceptive systems must be integrated to ensure that multiple homeostatic insults evoke appropriate behavioral and physiological responses. Little is known about how this is achieved. Using C. elegans, we dissect cross-modulation between systems that monitor temperature, O2 and CO2. CO2 is less aversive to animals acclimated to 15°C than those grown at 22°C. This difference requires the AFD neurons, which respond to both temperature and CO2 changes. CO2 evokes distinct AFD Ca2+ responses in animals acclimated at 15°C or 22°C. Mutants defective in synaptic transmission can reprogram AFD CO2 responses according to temperature experience, suggesting reprogramming occurs cell autonomously. AFD is exquisitely sensitive to CO2. Surprisingly, gradients of 0.01% CO2/second evoke very different Ca2+ responses from gradients of 0.04% CO2/second. Ambient O2 provides further contextual modulation of CO2 avoidance. At 21% O2 tonic signalling from the O2-sensing neuron URX inhibits CO2 avoidance. This inhibition can be graded according to O2 levels. In a natural wild isolate, a switch from 21% to 19% O2 is sufficient to convert CO2 from a neutral to an aversive cue. This sharp tuning is conferred partly by the neuroglobin GLB-5. The modulatory effects of O2 on CO2 avoidance involve the RIA interneurons, which are post-synaptic to URX and exhibit CO2-evoked Ca2+ responses. Ambient O2 and acclimation temperature act combinatorially to modulate CO2 responsiveness. Our work highlights the integrated architecture of homeostatic responses in C. elegans. PMID:24385919

  20. Communicating With Dying Patients and Their Families: Multimedia Training in End-of-Life Care.

    PubMed

    Chappell, Phylliss M; Healy, Jennifer; Lee, Shuko; Medellin, Glen; Sanchez-Reilly, Sandra

    2017-08-01

    The need for end-of-life (EOL), high-impact education initiatives to prepare medical students to communicate with dying patients and their families and to cope with issues of death and dying, is well recognized. Third-year medical students (n = 224), during their ambulatory rotation, completed a multimedia EOL curriculum, which included pre-/posttests, an online case-based module, didactic presentation, and a tablet computer application designed to demonstrate the signs and symptoms seen in the last hours of life for families of dying patients. Pre- and posttests were compared using Pearson χ(2) or Fisher exact test, and improvement was measured by weighted κ coefficient. On preintervention surveys, the majority of students demonstrated positive attitudes toward the care of dying patients and their families. Despite this high pretest positive attitude, there was a statistically significant overall positive attitude change after the intervention. The lowest pretest positive attitudes and lowest posttest positive attitude shifts, although all statistically improved, involved addressing the thoughts and feelings of dying patients and in coping with their own emotional response. Medical students exposure to this multimedia EOL curriculum increases positive attitudes in caring for dying patients and their families.

  1. Ketamine modulation of the haemodynamic response to spreading depolarization in the gyrencephalic swine brain.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Porras, Renán; Santos, Edgar; Schöll, Michael; Kunzmann, Kevin; Stock, Christian; Silos, Humberto; Unterberg, Andreas W; Sakowitz, Oliver W

    2017-05-01

    Spreading depolarization (SD) generates significant alterations in cerebral haemodynamics, which can have detrimental consequences on brain function and integrity. Ketamine has shown an important capacity to modulate SD; however, its impact on SD haemodynamic response is incompletely understood. We investigated the effect of two therapeutic ketamine dosages, a low-dose of 2 mg/kg/h and a high-dose of 4 mg/kg/h, on the haemodynamic response to SD in the gyrencephalic swine brain. Cerebral blood volume, pial arterial diameter and cerebral blood flow were assessed through intrinsic optical signal imaging and laser-Doppler flowmetry. Our findings indicate that frequent SDs caused a persistent increase in the baseline pial arterial diameter, which can lead to a diminished capacity to further dilate. Ketamine infused at a low-dose reduced the hyperemic/vasodilative response to SD; however, it did not alter the subsequent oligemic/vasoconstrictive response. This low-dose did not prevent the baseline diameter increase and the diminished dilative capacity. Only infusion of ketamine at a high-dose suppressed SD and the coupled haemodynamic response. Therefore, the haemodynamic response to SD can be modulated by continuous infusion of ketamine. However, its use in pathological models needs to be explored to corroborate its possible clinical benefit.

  2. Sequence learning modulates neural responses and oscillatory coupling in human and monkey auditory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Attaheri, Adam; Wilson, Benjamin; Rhone, Ariane E.; Nourski, Kirill V.; Gander, Phillip E.; Kovach, Christopher K.; Kawasaki, Hiroto; Griffiths, Timothy D.; Howard, Matthew A.; Petkov, Christopher I.

    2017-01-01

    Learning complex ordering relationships between sensory events in a sequence is fundamental for animal perception and human communication. While it is known that rhythmic sensory events can entrain brain oscillations at different frequencies, how learning and prior experience with sequencing relationships affect neocortical oscillations and neuronal responses is poorly understood. We used an implicit sequence learning paradigm (an “artificial grammar”) in which humans and monkeys were exposed to sequences of nonsense words with regularities in the ordering relationships between the words. We then recorded neural responses directly from the auditory cortex in both species in response to novel legal sequences or ones violating specific ordering relationships. Neural oscillations in both monkeys and humans in response to the nonsense word sequences show strikingly similar hierarchically nested low-frequency phase and high-gamma amplitude coupling, establishing this form of oscillatory coupling—previously associated with speech processing in the human auditory cortex—as an evolutionarily conserved biological process. Moreover, learned ordering relationships modulate the observed form of neural oscillatory coupling in both species, with temporally distinct neural oscillatory effects that appear to coordinate neuronal responses in the monkeys. This study identifies the conserved auditory cortical neural signatures involved in monitoring learned sequencing operations, evident as modulations of transient coupling and neuronal responses to temporally structured sensory input. PMID:28441393

  3. Strategies for modulating the inflammatory response after decompression from abdominal compartment syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Management of the open abdomen is an increasingly common part of surgical practice. The purpose of this review is to examine the scientific background for the use of temporary abdominal closure (TAC) in the open abdomen as a way to modulate the local and systemic inflammatory response, with an emphasis on decompression after abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS). Methods A review of the relevant English language literature was conducted. Priority was placed on articles published within the last 5 years. Results/Conclusion Recent data from our group and others have begun to lay the foundation for the concept of TAC as a method to modulate the local and/or systemic inflammatory response in patients with an open abdomen resulting from ACS. PMID:22472164

  4. Utilizing the response patterns of a temperature modulated chemoresistive gas sensor for gas diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amini, Amir; Ghafarinia, Vahid

    2011-02-01

    The observed features in the temporal response patterns of a temperature-modulated chemoresistive gas sensor were used for gas diagnosis. The patterns were recorded for clean air and air contaminated with different levels of some volatile organic compounds while a staircase heating voltage waveform had been applied to the microheater of a tin oxide gas sensor that modulated its operating temperature. Combining the steady-state and transient parameters of the recorded responses in the 50-400°C range resulted in discriminatory feature vectors which were utilized for contaminant classification. The information content of these feature vectors was proved sufficient for discrimination of methanol, ethanol, 1-butanol, and acetone contaminations in a wide concentration range.

  5. Insulin signaling genes modulate nicotine-induced behavioral responses in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Wescott, Seth A.; Ronan, Elizabeth A.; Xu, X.Z. Shawn

    2015-01-01

    Insulin signaling has been suggested to modulate nicotine dependence, but the underlying genetic evidence has been lacking. Here, we used the nematode, C. elegans, to investigate whether genetic alterations in the insulin signaling pathway affect behavioral responses to nicotine. To do so, we challenged drug-naïve C. elegans with an acute dose of nicotine [100 μM] while recording changes in their locomotion speed. While nicotine treatment stimulated locomotion speed in wild-type C. elegans, the same treatment reduced locomotion speed in mutants defective in insulin signaling. This phenotype could be suppressed by mutations in daf-16, a gene encoding a FOXO transcription factor that acts downstream of insulin signaling. Our data suggest that insulin signaling genes, daf-2, age-1, pdk-1, akt-1, and akt-2 modulate behavioral responses to nicotine in C. elegans, revealing a genetic link between nicotine behavior and insulin signaling. PMID:26317299

  6. Modulation of immune response by organophosphorus pesticides: fishes as a potential model in immunotoxicology.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Resendiz, K J G; Toledo-Ibarra, G A; Girón-Pérez, M I

    2015-01-01

    Immune response is modulated by different substances that are present in the environment. Nevertheless, some of these may cause an immunotoxic effect. In this paper, the effect of organophosphorus pesticides (frequent substances spilled in aquatic ecosystems) on the immune system of fishes and in immunotoxicology is reviewed. Furthermore, some cellular and molecular mechanisms that might be involved in immunoregulation mechanisms of organophosphorus pesticides are discussed.

  7. Modulation Response of a Long-Cavity, Gain-Levered Quantum-Dot Semiconductor Laser - Postprint

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-27

    of self-injected quantum-dot semiconductor diode lasers ,” IEEE J. Sel. Top. Quantum Electron. 19(4), 1900812 (2013). 7. M. Asada, Y. Mitamoto, and Y...capacity of existing semiconductor laser material structures by simply adding a single feature to a device’s electrical contact layout. Another...AFRL-RY-WP-TP-2014-0295 MODULATION RESPONSE OF A LONG-CAVITY, GAIN- LEVERED QUANTUM-DOT SEMICONDUCTOR LASER -POSTPRINT Nicholas G. Usechak

  8. Modulation of Immune Response by Organophosphorus Pesticides: Fishes as a Potential Model in Immunotoxicology

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Resendiz, K. J. G.; Toledo-Ibarra, G. A.; Girón-Pérez, M. I.

    2015-01-01

    Immune response is modulated by different substances that are present in the environment. Nevertheless, some of these may cause an immunotoxic effect. In this paper, the effect of organophosphorus pesticides (frequent substances spilled in aquatic ecosystems) on the immune system of fishes and in immunotoxicology is reviewed. Furthermore, some cellular and molecular mechanisms that might be involved in immunoregulation mechanisms of organophosphorus pesticides are discussed. PMID:25973431

  9. Self-referenced electrical method for measuring frequency response of high-speed Mach-Zehnder modulators based on two-tone modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Heng; Zhang, Shangjian; Zou, Xinhai; Zhang, Yali; Liu, Yong

    2016-11-01

    We demonstrated a self-referenced electrical method for measuring frequency response of high-speed Mach-Zehnder modulators (MZMs) based on two-tone modulation. The modulation index and half-wave voltage can be extracted from the heterodyne ratio of two desired components by properly adjusting bias voltage. The method achieves the electrical domain measurement of the frequency-dependent modulation indices and frequency-dependent half-wave voltages of MZMs without any extra calibration for the responsivity fluctuation in the photodetection. Moreover, it reduces half bandwidth requirements of photodetector and electrical spectrum analyzer by carefully choosing a half frequency relationship of two-tone microwave signals. The consistency between our method and the optical spectrum analysis method verifies the simple but accurate measurement.

  10. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor modulates acute and late mast cell responses.

    PubMed

    Sibilano, Riccardo; Frossi, Barbara; Calvaruso, Marco; Danelli, Luca; Betto, Elena; Dall'Agnese, Alessandra; Tripodo, Claudio; Colombo, Mario P; Pucillo, Carlo E; Gri, Giorgia

    2012-07-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-dependent transcription factor whose activity is modulated by xenobiotics as well as physiological ligands. These compounds may modulate inflammatory responses and contribute to the rising prevalence of allergic diseases observed in industrialized countries. Mast cells (MCs), located within tissues at the boundary of the external environment, represent a potential target of AhR ligands. In this study, we report that murine and human MCs constitutively express AhR, and its activation by the high-affinity ligand 6-formylindolo[3,2-b]carbazole (FICZ) determines a boost in degranulation. On the contrary, repeated exposure to FICZ inhibits MC degranulation. Accordingly, histamine release, in an in vivo passive systemic anaphylactic model, is exacerbated by a single dose and is attenuated by repetitive stimulation of AhR. FICZ-exposed MCs produce reactive oxygen species and IL-6 in response to cAMP-dependent signals. Moreover, AhR-activated MCs produce IL-17, a critical player in chronic inflammation and autoimmunity, suggesting a novel pathway for MC activation in the pathogenesis of these diseases. Indeed, histological analysis of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease revealed an enrichment in AhR/IL-6 and AhR/IL-17 double-positive MCs within bronchial lamina propria. Thus, tissue-resident MCs could translate external chemical challenges through AhR by modulating allergic responses and contributing to the generation of inflammation-related diseases.

  11. Synthetic PreImplantation Factor (PIF) prevents fetal loss by modulating LPS induced inflammatory response

    PubMed Central

    Marana, Riccardo; Castellani, Roberta; Ria, Francesco; Veglia, Manuela; Scambia, Giovanni; Surbek, Daniel; Barnea, Eytan

    2017-01-01

    Maternal control of inflammation is essential during pregnancy and an exaggerated response is one of the underlying causes of fetal loss. Inflammatory response is mediated by multiple factors and Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are central. Activation of TLRs results in NALP-3 mediated assembly of apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD (ASC) and caspase-1 into the inflammasome and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-18. Given that preventing measures are lacking, we investigated PreImplantation Factor (PIF) as therapeutic option as PIF modulates Inflammation in pregnancy. Additionally, synthetic PIF (PIF analog) protects against multiple immune disorders. We used a LPS induced murine model of fetal loss and synthetic PIF reduced this fetal loss and increased the embryo weight significantly. We detected increased PIF expression in the placentae after LPS insult. The LPS induced serum and placenta cytokines were abolished by synthetic PIF treatment and importantly synthetic PIF modulated key members of inflammasome complex NALP-3, ASC, and caspase-1 as well. In conclusion our results indicate that synthetic PIF protects against LPS induced fetal loss, likely through modulation of inflammatory response especially the inflammasome complex. Given that synthetic PIF is currently tested in autoimmune diseases of non-pregnant subjects (clinicaltrials.gov, NCT02239562), therapeutic approach during pregnancy can be envisioned. PMID:28704412

  12. Symbiotic association between Salix purpurea L. and Rhizophagus irregularis: modulation of plant responses under copper stress.

    PubMed

    Almeida-Rodríguez, Adriana M; Gómes, Marcelo P; Loubert-Hudon, Audrey; Joly, Simon; Labrecque, Michel

    2016-04-01

    There are increasing concerns about trace metal levels such as copper (Cu) in industrial sites and the broader environment. Different studies have highlighted the role of mycorrhizal associations in plant tolerance to trace metals, modulating some of the plant metabolic and physiological responses. In this study, we investigated the role of the symbiotic association betweenRhizophagus irregularisandSalix purpureaL. in modulating plant responses under Cu stress. We measured Cu accumulation, oxidative stress-related, photosynthetic-related and hydraulic traits, for non-inoculated (non-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi) and inoculated saplings exposed to different Cu concentrations. We found thatS. purpureais a suitable option for phytoremediation of Cu, acting as a phytostabilizer of this trace metal in its root system. We observed that the symbiotic association modulates a broad spectrum of metabolic and physiological responses inS. purpureaunder Cu conditions, including (i) a reduction in gas exchange associated with chlorophyll content changes and (ii) the sequestration of Cu into the cell walls, modifying vessels anatomy and impacting leaf specific conductivity (KL) and root hydraulic conductance (LP). UpholdingKLandLPunder Cu stress might be related to a dynamic Aquaporin gene regulation ofPIP1;2along with an up-regulation ofTIP2;2in the roots of inoculatedS. purpurea. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Modulation by octopamine of olfactory responses to nonpheromone odorants in the cockroach, Periplaneta americana L.

    PubMed

    Zhukovskaya, Marianna I

    2012-06-01

    Olfactory receptor cells in insects are modulated by neurohormones. Recordings from cockroach olfactory sensilla showed that a subset of sensory neurons increase their responses to selected nonpheromone odorants after octopamine application. With octopamine application, recordings demonstrated increased firing rates by the short but not the long alcohol-sensitive sensilla to the nonpheromone volatile, hexan-1-ol. Within the same sensillum, individual receptor cells are shown to be modulated independently from each other, indicating that the octopamine receptors reside in the receptor not in the accessory cells. A uniform decrease in the amplitude of electroantennogram, which is odorant independent, is suggested to reflect the rise in octopamine concentration in the antennal hemolymph. Perception of general odorants measured as behavioral responses changed qualitatively under octopamine treatment: namely, repulsive hexan-1-ol became neutral, whereas neutral eucalyptol became attractive. Octopamine induced a change in male behavioral responses to general odors that were essentially the same as in the state of sexual arousal. Our findings suggest that sensitivity to odors having different biological significances is modulated selectively at the peripheral as well as other levels of olfactory processing.

  14. Impaired early visual response modulations to spatial information in chronic schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Knebel, Jean-François; Javitt, Daniel C.; Murray, Micah M.

    2011-01-01

    Early visual processing stages have been demonstrated to be impaired in schizophrenia patients and their first-degree relatives. The amplitude and topography of the P1 component of the visual evoked potential (VEP) are both affected; the latter of which indicates alterations in active brain networks between populations. At least two issues remain unresolved. First, the specificity of this deficit (and suitability as an endophenotype) has yet to be established, with evidence for impaired P1 responses in other clinical populations. Second, it remains unknown whether schizophrenia patients exhibit intact functional modulation of the P1 VEP component; an aspect that may assist in distinguishing effects specific to schizophrenia. We applied electrical neuroimaging analyses to VEPs from chronic schizophrenia patients and healthy controls in response to variation in the parafoveal spatial extent of stimuli. Healthy controls demonstrated robust modulation of the VEP strength and topography as a function of the spatial extent of stimuli during the P1 component. By contrast, no such modulations were evident at early latencies in the responses from patients with schizophrenia. Source estimations localized these deficits to the left precuneus and medial inferior parietal cortex. These findings provide insights on potential underlying low-level impairments in schizophrenia. PMID:21764264

  15. Synthetic PreImplantation Factor (PIF) prevents fetal loss by modulating LPS induced inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Di Simone, Nicoletta; Di Nicuolo, Fiorella; Marana, Riccardo; Castellani, Roberta; Ria, Francesco; Veglia, Manuela; Scambia, Giovanni; Surbek, Daniel; Barnea, Eytan; Mueller, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Maternal control of inflammation is essential during pregnancy and an exaggerated response is one of the underlying causes of fetal loss. Inflammatory response is mediated by multiple factors and Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are central. Activation of TLRs results in NALP-3 mediated assembly of apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD (ASC) and caspase-1 into the inflammasome and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-18. Given that preventing measures are lacking, we investigated PreImplantation Factor (PIF) as therapeutic option as PIF modulates Inflammation in pregnancy. Additionally, synthetic PIF (PIF analog) protects against multiple immune disorders. We used a LPS induced murine model of fetal loss and synthetic PIF reduced this fetal loss and increased the embryo weight significantly. We detected increased PIF expression in the placentae after LPS insult. The LPS induced serum and placenta cytokines were abolished by synthetic PIF treatment and importantly synthetic PIF modulated key members of inflammasome complex NALP-3, ASC, and caspase-1 as well. In conclusion our results indicate that synthetic PIF protects against LPS induced fetal loss, likely through modulation of inflammatory response especially the inflammasome complex. Given that synthetic PIF is currently tested in autoimmune diseases of non-pregnant subjects (clinicaltrials.gov, NCT02239562), therapeutic approach during pregnancy can be envisioned.

  16. Intestinal Epithelial Cells Modulate CD4 T Cell Responses via the Thymus Leukemia Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Olivares-Villagómez, Danyvid; Algood, Holly M. Scott; Singh, Kshipra; Parekh, Vrajesh V.; Ryan, Kaitlyn E.; Piazuelo, M. Blanca; Wilson, Keith T.; Van Kaer, Luc

    2011-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium is comprised of a monolayer of intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) which provide, among other functions, a physical barrier between the high antigen content of the intestinal lumen and the sterile environment beyond the epithelium. IEC express a non-classical MHC class I molecule known as the thymus leukemia (TL) antigen. TL is known to interact with CD8αα-expressing cells, which are abundant in the intestinal intraepithelial lymphocyte compartment. In this report we provide evidence indicating that expression of TL by IEC modulates the cytokine profile of CD4+ T cells favoring IL-17 production. We show in an adoptive transfer model of colitis that donor-derived cells become more pathogenic when TL is expressed on IEC in recipient animals. Moreover, TL+IEC promote development of IL-17-mediated responses capable of protecting mice from Citrobacter rodentium infection. We also show that modulation of IL-17-mediated responses by TL+IEC is controlled by the expression of CD8α on CD4+ T cells. Overall, our results provide evidence for an important interaction between IEC and CD4+ T cells via TL, which modulates mucosal immune responses. PMID:21900182

  17. The influence of stress on the affective modulation of the startle response to nicotine cues.

    PubMed

    Lechner, William V; Grant, DeMond M; Meier, Ellen; Mills, Adam C; Judah, Matt R; Dempsey, Jared P

    2014-12-01

    Recent research suggesting that nicotine cues are appetitive in nature promotes the affective modulation of the startle reflex (AMSR) paradigm as a potentially valuable psychophysiological tool for elucidating mechanisms involved in nicotine addiction. Despite numerous studies indicating stress as a key factor in nicotine dependence, specific behavioral mechanisms linking stress and smoking have yet to be explicated. The current study aimed to determine the effects of stress, a negative affective state intimately linked with nicotine use, on the psychophysiological responding of nicotine dependent individuals during smoking cues. Twenty-nine nicotine dependent individuals were randomly assigned to the trier social stress test or control condition directly prior to administration of the AMSR paradigm, which examined their physiological responses to appetitive, neutral, aversive, and nicotine cue images. Both groups evinced significantly decreased startle magnitudes in response to nicotine cues as compared to aversive images. However, exposure to stress did not significantly modulate the startle reflex while viewing nicotine cues. Stress induction does not appear to modulate the AMSR paradigm when evaluating responses to nicotine images. These findings suggest that AMSR is robust to effects of acute stress induction in nicotine dependent individuals which may increase its viability as a clinical tool for assessing success in smoking cessation interventions.

  18. Die Kometenmission Rosetta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krüger, Harald

    2016-11-01

    Die Rosetta-Mission ist ein Meilenstein in der Erforschung der Kometen und ihrer Entstehung. Eine der größten üerraschungen war die unregelmäßge hantelförmige Gestalt des Zielkometen 67P/Tschurjumow-Gerassimenko. Er besteht wahrscheinlich aus zwei Einzelkörpern, die durch ihre Schwerkraft aneinander gehalten werden. Seine Oberfläche ist sehr rau und zeigt eine sehr vielf ältige Morphologie, die auf eine Vielzahl von ablaufenden Prozessen hindeutet. Der Kometenkern ist vermutlich auf Gr ößnskalen von mehr als etwa 10 bis 100 Metern homogen, Inhomogenitäten auf kleineren Skalen k nnten f r seine Aktivä t verantwortlich sein. Diese ist auf kleine Gebiete konzentriert, und auch Oberflächenveränderungen, die sich innerhalb von einigen Tagen bis wenigen Wochen abspielen, sind lokal. Im Kometenmaterial wurde eine Vielzahl an organischen Substanzen gemessen, die zum Teil als Schlüsselmoleküle für die Synthese der Grundbausteine des Lebens gelten, wie wir es kennen.

  19. The peak frequency of motor-related gamma oscillations is modulated by response competition.

    PubMed

    Heinrichs-Graham, Elizabeth; Hoburg, Joslynn M; Wilson, Tony W

    2017-09-28

    Movement execution generally occurs in an environment with numerous distractors, and requires the selection of a motor plan from multiple possible alternatives. However, the impact of such distractors on cortical motor function during movement remains largely unknown. Previous studies have identified two movement-related oscillatory responses that are critical to motor planning and execution, and these responses include the peri-movement beta event-related desynchronization (ERD) and the movement-related gamma synchronization (MRGS). In the current study, we investigate how visual distractors cuing alternative movements modulate the beta ERD and MRGS responses. To this end, we recorded magnetoencephalography (MEG) during an arrow-based version of the Eriksen flanker task in 42 healthy adults. All MEG data were transformed in to the time-frequency domain and the beta ERD and MRGS responses were imaged using a beamformer. Virtual sensors (voxel time series) were then extracted from the peak voxels of each response for the congruent and incongruent flanker conditions separately, and these data were examined for conditional differences during the movement. Our results indicated that participants exhibited the classic "flanker effect," as they responded significantly slower during incongruent relative to congruent trials. Our most important MEG finding was a significant increase in the peak frequency of the MRGS in the incongruent compared to the congruent condition, with no conditional effect on response amplitude. In addition, we found significantly stronger peri-movement beta ERD responses in the ipsilateral motor cortex during incongruent compared to congruent trials, but no conditional effect on frequency. These data are the first to show that the peak frequency of the MRGS response is linked to the task parameters, and varies from trial to trial in individual participants. More globally, these data suggest that beta and gamma oscillations are modulated by visual

  20. Materials approaches for modulating neural tissue responses to implanted microelectrodes through mechanical and biochemical means

    PubMed Central

    Sommakia, Salah; Lee, Heui C.; Gaire, Janak; Otto, Kevin J.

    2014-01-01

    Implantable intracortical microelectrodes face an uphill struggle for widespread clinical use. Their potential for treating a wide range of traumatic and degenerative neural disease is hampered by their unreliability in chronic settings. A major factor in this decline in chronic performance is a reactive response of brain tissue, which aims to isolate the implanted device from the rest of the healthy tissue. In this review we present a discussion of materials approaches aimed at modulating the reactive tissue response through mechanical and biochemical means. Benefits and challenges associated with these approaches are analyzed, and the importance of multimodal solutions tested in emerging animal models are presented. PMID:25530703

  1. Regulating the ethylene response of a plant by modulation of F-box proteins

    DOEpatents

    Guo, Hongwei [Beijing, CN; Ecker, Joseph R [Carlsbad, CA

    2011-03-08

    The invention relates to transgenic plants having reduced sensitivity to ethylene as a result of having a recombinant nucleic acid encoding an F-box protein that interacts with a EIN3 involved in an ethylene response of plants, and a method of producing a transgenic plant with reduced ethylene sensitivity by transforming the plant with a nucleic acid sequence encoding an F-box protein. The inventions also relates to methods of altering the ethylene response in a plant by modulating the activity or expression of an F-box protein.

  2. Modulation of Auditory Responses to Speech vs. Nonspeech Stimuli during Speech Movement Planning.

    PubMed

    Daliri, Ayoub; Max, Ludo

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we showed that the N100 amplitude in long latency auditory evoked potentials (LLAEPs) elicited by pure tone probe stimuli is modulated when the stimuli are delivered during speech movement planning as compared with no-speaking control conditions. Given that we probed the auditory system only with pure tones, it remained unknown whether the nature and magnitude of this pre-speech auditory modulation depends on the type of auditory stimulus. Thus, here, we asked whether the effect of speech movement planning on auditory processing varies depending on the type of auditory stimulus. In an experiment with nine adult subjects, we recorded LLAEPs that were elicited by either pure tones or speech syllables when these stimuli were presented prior to speech onset in a delayed-response speaking condition vs. a silent reading control condition. Results showed no statistically significant difference in pre-speech modulation of the N100 amplitude (early stages of auditory processing) for the speech stimuli as compared with the nonspeech stimuli. However, the amplitude of the P200 component (later stages of auditory processing) showed a statistically significant pre-speech modulation that was specific to the speech stimuli only. Hence, the overall results from this study indicate that, immediately prior to speech onset, modulation of the auditory system has a general effect on early processing stages but a speech-specific effect on later processing stages. This finding is consistent with the hypothesis that pre-speech auditory modulation may play a role in priming the auditory system for its role in monitoring auditory feedback during speech production.

  3. Modulation of Auditory Responses to Speech vs. Nonspeech Stimuli during Speech Movement Planning

    PubMed Central

    Daliri, Ayoub; Max, Ludo

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we showed that the N100 amplitude in long latency auditory evoked potentials (LLAEPs) elicited by pure tone probe stimuli is modulated when the stimuli are delivered during speech movement planning as compared with no-speaking control conditions. Given that we probed the auditory system only with pure tones, it remained unknown whether the nature and magnitude of this pre-speech auditory modulation depends on the type of auditory stimulus. Thus, here, we asked whether the effect of speech movement planning on auditory processing varies depending on the type of auditory stimulus. In an experiment with nine adult subjects, we recorded LLAEPs that were elicited by either pure tones or speech syllables when these stimuli were presented prior to speech onset in a delayed-response speaking condition vs. a silent reading control condition. Results showed no statistically significant difference in pre-speech modulation of the N100 amplitude (early stages of auditory processing) for the speech stimuli as compared with the nonspeech stimuli. However, the amplitude of the P200 component (later stages of auditory processing) showed a statistically significant pre-speech modulation that was specific to the speech stimuli only. Hence, the overall results from this study indicate that, immediately prior to speech onset, modulation of the auditory system has a general effect on early processing stages but a speech-specific effect on later processing stages. This finding is consistent with the hypothesis that pre-speech auditory modulation may play a role in priming the auditory system for its role in monitoring auditory feedback during speech production. PMID:27242494

  4. Death, dying, and domination.

    PubMed

    Spindelman, Marc

    2008-06-01

    This Article critiques conventional liberal arguments for the right to die on liberal grounds. It contends that these arguments do not go far enough to recognize and address private, and in particular structural, forms of domination. It presents an alternative that does, which is thus more respectful of true freedom in the context of death and dying, and also more consistent with liberalism. After discussing obstacles to the achievement of a right to die that encompasses freedom from both public and private domination, the Article closes with a significant reform project within bioethics that might help bring it about.

  5. Polarized immune responses modulated by layered double hydroxides nanoparticle conjugated with CpG.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shiyu; Rolfe, Barbara E; Zhang, Bing; Mohammed, Yousuf H; Gu, Wenyi; Xu, Zhi P

    2014-11-01

    Modulation of the immune response is an important step in the induction of protective humoral and cellular immunity against pathogens. In this study, we investigated the possibility of using a nanomaterial conjugated with the toll-like receptor (TLR) ligand CpG to modulate the immune response towards the preferred polarity. MgAl-layered double hydroxide (LDH) nanomaterial has a very similar chemical composition to Alum, an FDA approved adjuvant for human vaccination. We used a model antigen, ovalbumin (OVA) to demonstrate that MgAl-LDH had comparable adjuvant activity to Alum, but much weaker inflammation. Conjugation of TLR9 ligand CpG to LDH nanoparticles significantly enhanced the antibody response and promoted a switch from Th2 toward Th1 response, demonstrated by a change in the IgG2a:IgG1 ratio. Moreover, immunization of mice with CpG-OVA-conjugated LDH before challenge with OVA-expressing B16/F10 tumor cells retarded tumor growth. Together, these data indicate that LDH nanomaterial can be used as an immune adjuvant to promote Th1 or Th2 dominant immune responses suitable for vaccination purposes.

  6. Controlled release strategies for modulating immune responses to promote tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Courtney M; Park, Jonghyuck; Shea, Lonnie D

    2015-12-10

    Advances in the field of tissue engineering have enhanced the potential of regenerative medicine, yet the efficacy of these strategies remains incomplete, and is limited by the innate and adaptive immune responses. The immune response associated with injury or disease combined with that mounted to biomaterials, transplanted cells, proteins, and gene therapies vectors can contribute to the inability to fully restore tissue function. Blocking immune responses such as with anti-inflammatory or immunosuppressive agents are either ineffective, as the immune response contributes significantly to regeneration, or have significant side effects. This review describes targeted strategies to modulate the immune response in order to limit tissue damage following injury, promote an anti-inflammatory environment that leads to regeneration, and induce antigen (Ag)-specific tolerance that can target degenerative diseases that destroy tissues and promote engraftment of transplanted cells. Focusing on targeted immuno-modulation, we describe local delivery techniques to sites of inflammation as well as systemic approaches that preferentially target subsets of immune populations.

  7. SPINAL SEROTONIN RECEPTOR ACTIVATION MODULATES THE EXERCISE VENTILATORY RESPONSE WITH INCREASED DEAD SPACE IN GOATS

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, G. S.; Turner, D. L.; Henderson, D. R.; Foley, K. T.

    2008-01-01

    Small increases in respiratory dead space (VD) augment the exercise ventilatory response by a serotonin-dependent mechanism known as short-term modulation (STM). We tested the hypotheses that the relevant serotonin receptors for STM are in the spinal cord, and are of the 5-HT2-receptor subtype. After preparing adult female goats with a mid-thoracic (T6–T8) subarachnoid catheter, ventilation and arterial blood gases were measured at rest and during treadmill exercise (4.8 km/h; 5% grade) with and without an increased VD (0.2–0.3 L). Measurements were made before and after spinal or intravenous administration of a broad-spectrum serotonin receptor antagonist (methysergide, 1–2 mg total) and a selective 5-HT2-receptor antagonist (ketanserin, 5–12 mg total). Although spinal methysergide had no effect on the exercise ventilatory response in control conditions, the augmented response with increased VD was impaired, allowing PaCO2 to increase from rest to exercise. Spinal methysergide diminished both mean inspiratory flow and frequency responses to exercise with increased VD. Spinal ketanserin impaired PaCO2 regulation with increased VD, although its ventilatory effects were less clear. Intrathecal dye injections indicated CSF drug distribution was caudal to the upper cervical spinal cord and intravenous drugs at the same total dose did not affect STM. We conclude that spinal 5-HT2 receptors modulate the exercise ventilatory response with increased VD in goats. PMID:18396470

  8. Modulation of Immune Responses by Exosomes Derived from Antigen-Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shenoda, Botros B.; Ajit, Seena K.

    2016-01-01

    Exosome-mediated signaling is important in mediating the inflammatory response. To exert their biological or pathophysiological functions in the recipient cells, exosomes deliver a diverse array of biomacromolecules including long and short coding and non-coding RNAs, proteins, and lipids. Exosomes secreted by antigen-presenting cells can confer therapeutic benefits by attenuating or stimulating the immune response. Exosomes play a crucial role in carrying and presenting functional major histocompatibility peptide complexes to modulate antigen-specific T cell responses. Exosomes from Dendritic Cells (DCs) can activate T and B cells and have been explored for their immunostimulatory properties in cancer therapy. The immunosuppressive properties of exosomes derived from macrophages and DCs can reduce inflammation in animal models for several inflammatory disorders. This review focuses on the protective role of exosomes in attenuating inflammation or augmenting immune response, emphasizing studies on exosomes derived from DCs and macrophages. PMID:27660518

  9. Conservation of Modules but not Phenotype in Bacterial Response to Environmental Stress

    SciTech Connect

    Timberlake, Sonia; Joachimiak, Marcin; Joyner, Dominique; Chakraborty, Romy; Baumohl, Jason; Dehal, Paramvir; Arkin, Adam; Hazen, Terry; Alm, Eric

    2010-05-17

    Microbes live in changing environments and change their phenotype via gene regulation in response. Although this transcriptional response is important for fitness, very little is known about how it evolves in microbes. We started by asking a number of high-level questions about the evolution of transcriptional phenotype: (1) To what extent is transcriptional response conserved, i.e. do conserved genes respond similarly to the same condition; (2) To what extent are transcriptional modules conserved; and (3) Does there exist a general stress response to a variety of stressors? To illuminate these questions, we analyzed more than 500 microarray experiments across the bacterial domain. We looked for conservation of transcriptional regulation both in close sister species and vastly divergent clades. In addition, we produced and analyzed an extensive in-house compendium of environmental stress data in three metal-reducing bacteria.

  10. Modulation of visual responses by behavioral state in mouse visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Niell, Cristopher M; Stryker, Michael P

    2010-02-25

    Studies of visual processing in rodents have conventionally been performed on anesthetized animals, precluding examination of the effects of behavior on visually evoked responses. We have now studied the response properties of neurons in primary visual cortex of awake mice that were allowed to run on a freely rotating spherical treadmill with their heads fixed. Most neurons showed more than a doubling of visually evoked firing rate as the animal transitioned from standing still to running, without changes in spontaneous firing or stimulus selectivity. Tuning properties in the awake animal were similar to those measured previously in anesthetized animals. Response magnitude in the lateral geniculate nucleus did not increase with locomotion, demonstrating that the striking change in responsiveness did not result from peripheral effects at the eye. Interestingly, some narrow-spiking cells were spontaneously active during running but suppressed by visual stimuli. These results demonstrate powerful cell-type-specific modulation of visual processing by behavioral state in awake mice.

  11. Tissue response to micropulse modulation in retinal laser therapy (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jenny; Quan, Yi; Dalal, Roopa; Palanker, Daniel V.

    2017-02-01

    Micropulse modulation in retinal laser therapy was intended to confine tissue heating around the light-absorbing layers, such as RPE and choroid, while the transparent retina is heated less as a result of slow heat diffusion. Current implementations use micropulses of 100-300μs at 500Hz, with overall pulse envelope of 100-300ms. The effect of such modulation compared to continuous-wave (CW) is not well characterized and misleading comparisons are made in the literature between exposures of different average power or overall duration. In this study, we modeled and measured the retinal tissue response to pulse trains with duty cycles from 4% (80μs pulse at 500Hz) to CW at overall envelope of 200ms and 20ms. Three thresholds of tissue response were measured in Dutch-belted rabbits: immediate (<3s after laser delivery) and delayed (1-5min) ophthalmoscopic visibility of lesions corresponding to photoreceptor damage, as well as fluorescein angiography visibility indicating RPE damage. Both the model and experimental results show that tissue response to micropulse modulation with long pulse envelope (200ms) is not significantly different from CW exposures at the same average power and duration. Heat confinement is improved with lower duty cycle (2%) and shorter pulse envelope (20ms), however further decrease in exposure duration raises the temperature dangerously close to vaporization. Pulse modulation cannot improve the therapeutic range of non-damaging thermal therapy since it is defined by the Arrhenius integral, regardless of the time course of hyperthermia. However, it does allow greater thermal stress to the RPE and underlying choroid while avoiding damage to neural retina.

  12. B1-kinin receptors modulate Mesobuthus tamulus venom-induced vasosensory reflex responses in anesthetized rats

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sanjeev K.; Deshpande, Shripad B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Intra-arterial injection of Mesobuthus tamulus (BT) venom produces reflex vasosensory responses modulating cardiorespiratory parameters in albino rats. The present study was conducted to understand the role of kinin receptors in modulating vasosensory reflexes evoked by BT venom. Materials and Methods: In urethane-anesthetized rats, tracheostomy was performed to keep the airway patent. The femoral artery was cannulated proximally, as well as distally, to record the blood pressure (BP) and to inject the chemicals, respectively. Electrocardiographic and respiratory excursions were recorded to compute the heart rate (HR) and respiratory rate (RR). A group of animals was pretreated with saline/kinin receptor antagonists intra-arterially (B1/B2 receptor antagonists) before the injection of venom. Results: After intra-arterial injection of BT venom (1 mg/kg), there was an immediate increase in RR, which reached to 40% within 30 s, followed by a decrease of 40%. Further, there was sustained increase in RR (50%) up to 60 min. The BP started to increase at 40 s, peaking at 5 min (50%), and remained above the initial level up to 60 min. The bradycardiac response started after 5 min which peaked (50% of initial) at 25 min and remained at that level up to 60 min. In B1 receptor antagonist (des-Arg) pretreated animals, venom-induced cardiovascular responses were attenuated (by 20–25% in mean arterial pressure and HR) significantly but not in B2 receptor antagonist (Hoe-140) pretreated animals. Either of the antagonists failed to alter the RR responses. Conclusions: BT venom-induced vasosensory reflex responses modulating cardiovascular parameters are mediated via B1-kinin receptors in anesthetized rats. PMID:27756949

  13. Genetic Modulation of Plasma NPY Stress Response is Suppressed in Substance Abuse: Association with Clinical Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ke; Hong, Kwangik Adam; Zhou, Zhifeng; Hauger, Richard L; Goldman, David; Sinha, Rajita

    2011-01-01

    Background Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is involved in stress regulation. Genetic variations predict plasma NPY and neural correlates of emotion and stress. We examined whether the functional NPY haplotype modulates stress-induced NPY and anxiety responses, and if plasma NPY stress responses are associated with substance dependence outcomes. Methods Thirty-seven treatment-engaged, abstinent substance dependent patients (SD) and 28 controls (HC) characterized on NPY diplotypes (HH: high expression; HLLL: intermediate/low expression) were exposed to stress, alcohol/drug cues and neutral relaxing cues, using individualized guided imagery, in a 3-session laboratory experiment. Plasma NPY, heart rate and anxiety were assessed. Patients were prospectively followed for 90-days post-treatment to assess relapse outcomes. Results HH individuals showed significantly lower stress-induced NPY with greater heart rate and anxiety ratings, while the HLLL group showed the reverse pattern of NPY, anxiety and heart rate responses. This differential genetic modulation of NPY stress response was suppressed in the SD group, who showed no stress-related increases in NPY and higher heart rate and greater anxiety, regardless of diplotype. Lower NPY predicted subsequent higher number of days and greater amounts of post-treatment drug use. Conclusion These preliminary findings are the first to document chronic drug abuse influences on NPY diplotype expression where NPY diplotype modulation of stress-related plasma NPY, heart rate and anxiety responses was absent in the substance abuse sample. The finding that lower stress-related NPY is predictive of greater relapse severity provides support for therapeutic development of neuropeptide Y targets in the treatment of substance use disorders. PMID:21917383

  14. Genetic modulation of plasma NPY stress response is suppressed in substance abuse: association with clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ke; Hong, Kwangik Adam; Zhou, Zhifeng; Hauger, Richard L; Goldman, David; Sinha, Rajita

    2012-04-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is involved in stress regulation. Genetic variations predict plasma NPY and neural correlates of emotion and stress. We examined whether the functional NPY haplotype modulates stress-induced NPY and anxiety responses, and if plasma NPY stress responses are associated with substance dependence outcomes. Thirty-seven treatment-engaged, abstinent substance dependent (SD) patients and 28 healthy controls (HCs) characterized on NPY diplotypes (HH: high expression; HLLL: intermediate/low expression) were exposed to stress, alcohol/drug cues and neutral relaxing cues, using individualized guided imagery, in a 3-session laboratory experiment. Plasma NPY, heart rate and anxiety were assessed. Patients were prospectively followed for 90-days post-treatment to assess relapse outcomes. HH individuals showed significantly lower stress-induced NPY with greater heart rate and anxiety ratings, while the HLLL group showed the reverse pattern of NPY, anxiety and heart rate responses. This differential genetic modulation of NPY stress response was suppressed in the SD group, who showed no stress-related increases in NPY and higher heart rate and greater anxiety, regardless of diplotype. Lower NPY predicted subsequent higher number of days and greater amounts of post-treatment drug use. These preliminary findings are the first to document chronic drug abuse influences on NPY diplotype expression where NPY diplotype modulation of stress-related plasma NPY, heart rate and anxiety responses was absent in the substance abuse sample. The finding that lower stress-related NPY is predictive of greater relapse severity provides support for therapeutic development of neuropeptide Y targets in the treatment of substance use disorders. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Differential modulation of auditory responses to attended and unattended speech in different listening conditions.

    PubMed

    Kong, Ying-Yee; Mullangi, Ala; Ding, Nai

    2014-10-01

    This study investigates how top-down attention modulates neural tracking of the speech envelope in different listening conditions. In the quiet conditions, a single speech stream was presented and the subjects paid attention to the speech stream (active listening) or watched a silent movie instead (passive listening). In the competing speaker (CS) conditions, two speakers of opposite genders were presented diotically. Ongoing electroencephalographic (EEG) responses were measured in each condition and cross-correlated with the speech envelope of each speaker at different time lags. In quiet, active and passive listening resulted in similar neural responses to the speech envelope. In the CS conditions, however, the shape of the cross-correlation function was remarkably different between the attended and unattended speech. The cross-correlation with the attended speech showed stronger N1 and P2 responses but a weaker P1 response compared to the cross-correlation with the unattended speech. Furthermore, the N1 response to the attended speech in the CS condition was enhanced and delayed compared with the active listening condition in quiet, while the P2 response to the unattended speaker in the CS condition was attenuated compared with the passive listening in quiet. Taken together, these results demonstrate that top-down attention differentially modulates envelope-tracking neural activity at different time lags and suggest that top-down attention can both enhance the neural responses to the attended sound stream and suppress the responses to the unattended sound stream. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Serotonin modulates the effects of Pavlovian aversive predictions on response vigor.

    PubMed

    Crockett, Molly J; Clark, Luke; Apergis-Schoute, Annemieke M; Morein-Zamir, Sharon; Robbins, Trevor W

    2012-09-01

    Updated theoretical accounts of the role of serotonin (5-HT) in motivation propose that 5-HT operates at the intersection of aversion and inhibition, promoting withdrawal in the face of aversive predictions. However, the specific cognitive mechanisms through which 5-HT modulates withdrawal behavior remain poorly understood. Behavioral inhibition in response to punishments reflects at least two concurrent processes: instrumental aversive predictions linking stimuli, responses, and punishments, and Pavlovian aversive predictions linking stimuli and punishments irrespective of response. In the current study, we examined to what extent 5-HT modulates the impact of instrumental vs Pavlovian aversive predictions on behavioral inhibition. We used acute tryptophan depletion to lower central 5-HT levels in healthy volunteers, and observed behavior in a novel task designed to measure the influence of Pavlovian and instrumental aversive predictions on choice (response bias) and response vigor (response latencies). After placebo treatment, participants were biased against responding on the button that led to punishment, and they were slower to respond in a punished context, relative to a non-punished context. Specifically, participants slowed their responses in the presence of stimuli predictive of punishments. Tryptophan depletion removed the bias against responding on the punished button, and abolished slowing in the presence of punished stimuli, irrespective of response. We suggest that this set of results can be explained by a role for 5-HT in Pavlovian aversive predictions. These findings suggest additional specificity for the influence of 5-HT on aversively motivated behavioral inhibition and extend recent models of the role of 5-HT in aversive predictions.

  17. Die Zeitung der Zukunft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieser, Christoph; Schaffert, Sebastian

    Schon lange wird spekuliert, wie wir in Zukunft Zeitung lesen werden. Werden wir am Frühstückstisch wie gewohnt in einer Zeitung aus Papier schmökern oder werden wir die Zeitung als biegsame Folie beschrieben mit elektronischer Tinte in Händen halten? Wird die Zeitung mit anderen Medien wie Radio und Fernsehen verschmelzen? Viele Varianten sind denkbar. Heute lässt sich schon ein Trend ablesen: Immer mehr Leser entdecken die Online-Zeitung als Informationsmedium, eine Voraussetzung für die Nutzung neuer Technologien in der Zeitung der Zukunft. In diesem Kapitel stellen wir Entwicklungsmöglichkeiten der Online-Zeitung dar, wie sie im Social Semantic Web möglich werden.

  18. Modulation of Ethylene Responses Affects Plant Salt-Stress Responses1[OA

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Wan-Hong; Liu, Jun; He, Xin-Jian; Mu, Rui-Ling; Zhou, Hua-Lin; Chen, Shou-Yi; Zhang, Jin-Song

    2007-01-01

    Ethylene signaling plays important roles in multiple aspects of plant growth and development. Its functions in abiotic stress responses remain largely unknown. Here, we report that alteration of ethylene signaling affected plant salt-stress responses. A type II ethylene receptor homolog gene NTHK1 (Nicotiana tabacum histidine kinase 1) from tobacco (N. tabacum) conferred salt sensitivity in NTHK1-transgenic Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants as judged from the phenotypic change, the relative electrolyte leakage, and the relative root growth under salt stress. Ethylene precursor 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid suppressed the salt-sensitive phenotype. Analysis of Arabidopsis ethylene receptor gain-of-function mutants further suggests that receptor function may lead to salt-sensitive responses. Mutation of EIN2, a central component in ethylene signaling, also results in salt sensitivity, suggesting that EIN2-mediated signaling is beneficial for plant salt tolerance. Overexpression of the NTHK1 gene or the receptor gain-of-function activated expression of salt-responsive genes AtERF4 and Cor6.6. In addition, the transgene NTHK1 mRNA was accumulated under salt stress, suggesting a posttranscriptional regulatory mechanism. These findings imply that ethylene signaling may be required for plant salt tolerance. PMID:17189334

  19. Goal-dependent modulation of the long-latency stretch response at the shoulder, elbow, and wrist

    PubMed Central

    Gribble, Paul L.; Pruszynski, J. Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that muscle activity 50–100 ms after a mechanical perturbation (i.e., the long-latency stretch response) can be modulated in a manner that reflects voluntary motor control. These previous studies typically assessed modulation of the long-latency stretch response from individual muscles rather than how this response is concurrently modulated across multiple muscles. Here we investigated such concurrent modulation by having participants execute goal-directed reaches to visual targets after mechanical perturbations of the shoulder, elbow, or wrist while measuring activity from six muscles that articulate these joints. We found that shoulder, elbow, and wrist muscles displayed goal-dependent modulation of the long-latency stretch response, that the relative magnitude of participants' goal-dependent activity was similar across muscles, that the temporal onset of goal-dependent muscle activity was not reliably different across the three joints, and that shoulder muscles displayed goal-dependent activity appropriate for counteracting intersegmental dynamics. We also observed that the long-latency stretch response of wrist muscles displayed goal-dependent modulation after elbow perturbations and that the long-latency stretch response of elbow muscles displayed goal-dependent modulation after wrist perturbations. This pattern likely arises because motion at either joint could bring the hand to the visual target and suggests that the nervous system rapidly exploits such simple kinematic redundancy when processing sensory feedback to support goal-directed actions. PMID:26445871

  20. Goal-dependent modulation of the long-latency stretch response at the shoulder, elbow, and wrist.

    PubMed

    Weiler, Jeffrey; Gribble, Paul L; Pruszynski, J Andrew

    2015-12-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that muscle activity 50-100 ms after a mechanical perturbation (i.e., the long-latency stretch response) can be modulated in a manner that reflects voluntary motor control. These previous studies typically assessed modulation of the long-latency stretch response from individual muscles rather than how this response is concurrently modulated across multiple muscles. Here we investigated such concurrent modulation by having participants execute goal-directed reaches to visual targets after mechanical perturbations of the shoulder, elbow, or wrist while measuring activity from six muscles that articulate these joints. We found that shoulder, elbow, and wrist muscles displayed goal-dependent modulation of the long-latency stretch response, that the relative magnitude of participants' goal-dependent activity was similar across muscles, that the temporal onset of goal-dependent muscle activity was not reliably different across the three joints, and that shoulder muscles displayed goal-dependent activity appropriate for counteracting intersegmental dynamics. We also observed that the long-latency stretch response of wrist muscles displayed goal-dependent modulation after elbow perturbations and that the long-latency stretch response of elbow muscles displayed goal-dependent modulation after wrist perturbations. This pattern likely arises because motion at either joint could bring the hand to the visual target and suggests that the nervous system rapidly exploits such simple kinematic redundancy when processing sensory feedback to support goal-directed actions.

  1. Cortical excitability is not depressed in movement-modulated stretch response of human thumb flexor.

    PubMed

    Wallace, C J; Miles, T S

    2001-08-01

    There is strong evidence that the predominant pathway of the long-latency stretch reflex for flexor pollicis longus crosses the motor cortex. This reflex response is diminished during active thumb movements. We tested the hypothesis that this could be due to a decrease in the excitability of the transcortical component during movement. During isometric, concentric and eccentric thumb movements, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the motor cortex was given at a time when the reflex signal was traversing the motor cortex. TMS was also given earlier in separate runs when the signal was traversing the spinal cord under each of the three contractile conditions. The electromyogram was analysed for non-linear summation between stretch responses and the potential evoked by the cortical stimulus. The response to TMS alone was uniform across the three types of contraction, and the lack of cortical involvement in the short-latency reflex was confirmed. The TMS-evoked response summed in a non-linear manner with the long-latency reflex response, confirming that the excitability of the motor cortex was increased as the reflex signal passed through it. The long-latency response was markedly depressed during isotonic compared with isometric contractions. However, the non-linear summation was not greater during the isometric contractions. Thus, the depressed reflex responses during isotonic movements do not stem from reduced motor cortical responsiveness or afferent input to the transcortical pathway, and may instead reflect modulation of cutaneous reflexes during isotonic contractions.

  2. Ethylene plays multiple nonprimary roles in modulating the gravitropic response in tomato

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madlung, A.; Behringer, F. J.; Lomax, T. L.; Davies, E. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Ethylene is known to interact with auxin in regulating stem growth, and yet evidence for the role of ethylene in tropic responses is contradictory. Our analysis of four mutants of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) altered in their response to gravity, auxin, and/or ethylene revealed concentration-dependent modulation of shoot gravitropism by ethylene. Ethylene inhibitors reduce wild-type gravicurvature, and extremely low (0.0005-0.001 microliter L-1) ethylene concentrations can restore the reduced gravitropic response of the auxin-resistant dgt (diageotropica) mutant to wild-type levels. Slightly higher concentrations of ethylene inhibit the gravitropic response of all but the ethylene-insensitive nr (never-ripe) mutant. The gravitropic responses of nr and the constitutive-response mutant epi (epinastic) are slightly and significantly delayed, respectively, but otherwise normal. The reversal of shoot gravicurvature by red light in the lz-2 (lazy-2) mutant is not affected by ethylene. Taken together, these data indicate that, although ethylene does not play a primary role in the gravitropic response of tomato, low levels of ethylene are necessary for a full gravitropic response, and moderate levels of the hormone specifically inhibit gravicurvature in a manner different from ethylene inhibition of overall growth.

  3. Ethylene plays multiple nonprimary roles in modulating the gravitropic response in tomato

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madlung, A.; Behringer, F. J.; Lomax, T. L.; Davies, E. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Ethylene is known to interact with auxin in regulating stem growth, and yet evidence for the role of ethylene in tropic responses is contradictory. Our analysis of four mutants of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) altered in their response to gravity, auxin, and/or ethylene revealed concentration-dependent modulation of shoot gravitropism by ethylene. Ethylene inhibitors reduce wild-type gravicurvature, and extremely low (0.0005-0.001 microliter L-1) ethylene concentrations can restore the reduced gravitropic response of the auxin-resistant dgt (diageotropica) mutant to wild-type levels. Slightly higher concentrations of ethylene inhibit the gravitropic response of all but the ethylene-insensitive nr (never-ripe) mutant. The gravitropic responses of nr and the constitutive-response mutant epi (epinastic) are slightly and significantly delayed, respectively, but otherwise normal. The reversal of shoot gravicurvature by red light in the lz-2 (lazy-2) mutant is not affected by ethylene. Taken together, these data indicate that, although ethylene does not play a primary role in the gravitropic response of tomato, low levels of ethylene are necessary for a full gravitropic response, and moderate levels of the hormone specifically inhibit gravicurvature in a manner different from ethylene inhibition of overall growth.

  4. Assisted Dying & Disability.

    PubMed

    Riddle, Christopher A

    2017-07-01

    This article explores at least two dominant critiques of assisted dying from a disability rights perspective. In spite of these critiques, I conclude that assisted dying ought to be permissible. I arrive at the conclusion that if we respect and value people with disabilities, we ought to permit assisted dying. I do so in the following manner. First, I examine recent changes in legislation that have occurred since the Royal Society of Canada Expert Panel on End-of-Life Decision-Making report, published in this journal. I suggest that these changes are likely to only strengthen opposition to assisted dying from disability rights activists and people with disabilities. Second, I focus on respect for people with disabilities and in particular, respect for their autonomy and decision-making abilities. Third, I explore the opposition to assisted dying that focuses on risk and the vulnerability of people with disabilities. Here I suggest that this risk ought not to be of special concern. Ultimately, I conclude that upholding respect for the disabled requires the legalization of assisted dying, rather than the denial of access in a misguided effort to protect people with disabilities. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Dual modulation of MCL-1 and mTOR determines the response to sunitinib

    PubMed Central

    Elgendy, Mohamed; Abdel-Aziz, Amal Kamal; Renne, Salvatore Lorenzo; Bornaghi, Viviana; Procopio, Giuseppe; Colecchia, Maurizio; Kanesvaran, Ravindran; Toh, Chee Keong; Bossi, Daniela; Pallavicini, Isabella; Perez-Gracia, Jose Luis; Lozano, Maria Dolores; Giandomenico, Valeria; Mercurio, Ciro; Lanfrancone, Luisa; Fazio, Nicola; Nole, Franco; Teh, Bin Tean; Renne, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Most patients who initially respond to treatment with the multi–tyrosine kinase inhibitor sunitinib eventually relapse. Therefore, developing a deeper understanding of the contribution of sunitinib’s numerous targets to the clinical response or to resistance is crucial. Here, we have shown that cancer cells respond to clinically relevant doses of sunitinib by enhancing the stability of the antiapoptotic protein MCL-1 and inducing mTORC1 signaling, thus evoking little cytotoxicity. Inhibition of MCL-1 or mTORC1 signaling sensitized cells to clinically relevant doses of sunitinib in vitro and was synergistic with sunitinib in impairing tumor growth in vivo, indicating that these responses are triggered as prosurvival mechanisms that enable cells to tolerate the cytotoxic effects of sunitinib. Furthermore, higher doses of sunitinib were cytotoxic, triggered a decline in MCL-1 levels, and inhibited mTORC1 signaling. Mechanistically, we determined that sunitinib modulates MCL-1 stability by affecting its proteasomal degradation. Dual modulation of MCL-1 stability at different dose ranges of sunitinib was due to differential effects on ERK and GSK3β activity, and the latter also accounted for dual modulation of mTORC1 activity. Finally, comparison of patient samples prior to and following sunitinib treatment suggested that increases in MCL-1 levels and mTORC1 activity correlate with resistance to sunitinib in patients. PMID:27893461

  6. A Critical Role for CLSP2 in the Modulation of Antifungal Immune Response in Mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan-Hong; Hu, Yang; Xing, Long-Sheng; Jiang, Hong; Hu, Song-Nian; Raikhel, Alexander S; Zou, Zhen

    2015-06-01

    Entomopathogenic fungi represent a promising class of bio-insecticides for mosquito control. Thus, detailed knowledge of the molecular mechanisms governing anti-fungal immune response in mosquitoes is essential. In this study, we show that CLSP2 is a modulator of immune responses during anti-fungal infection in the mosquito Aedes aegypti. With a fungal infection, the expression of the CLSP2 gene is elevated. CLSP2 is cleaved upon challenge with Beauveria bassiana conidia, and the liberated CLSP2 CTL-type domain binds to fungal cell components and B. bassiana conidia. Furthermore, CLPS2 RNA interference silencing significantly increases the resistance to the fungal challenge. RNA-sequencing transcriptome analysis showed that the majority of immune genes were highly upregulated in the CLSP2-depleted mosquitoes infected with the fungus. The up-regulated immune gene cohorts belong to melanization and Toll pathways, but not to the IMD or JAK-STAT. A thioester-containing protein (TEP22), a member of α2-macroglobulin family, has been implicated in the CLSP2-modulated mosquito antifungal defense. Our study has contributed to a greater understanding of immune-modulating mechanisms in mosquitoes.

  7. Gentiana asclepiadea and Armoracia rusticana can modulate the adaptive response induced by zeocin in human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Hudecova, A; Hasplova, K; Kellovska, L; Ikreniova, M; Miadokova, E; Galova, E; Horvathova, E; Vaculcikova, D; Gregan, F; Dusinska, M

    2012-01-01

    Zeocin is a member of bleomycin/phleomycin family of antibiotics isolated from Streptomyces verticullus. This unique radiomimetic antibiotic is known to bind to DNA and induce oxidative stress in different organisms producing predominantly single- and double- strand breaks, as well as a DNA base loss resulting in apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites. The aim of this study was to induce an adaptive response (AR) by zeocin in freshly isolated human lymphocytes from blood and to observe whether plant extracts could modulate this response. The AR was evaluated by the comet assay. The optimal conditions for the AR induction and modulation were determined as: 2 h-intertreatment time (in PBS, at 4°C) given after a priming dose (50 µg/ml) of zeocin treatment. Genotoxic impact of zeocin to lymphocytes was modulated by plant extracts isolated from Gentiana asclepiadea (methanolic and aqueous haulm extracts, 0.25 mg/ml) and Armoracia rusticana (methanolic root extract, 0.025 mg/ml). These extracts enhanced the AR and also decreased DNA damage caused by zeocin (after 0, 1 and 4 h-recovery time after the test dose of zeocin application) to more than 50%. These results support important position of plants containing many biologically active compounds in the field of pharmacology and medicine.

  8. Use of amplitude-modulated breathing for assessment of cardiorespiratory frequency response within subrespiratory frequencies.

    PubMed

    Patwardhan, A; Vallurupalli, S; Evans, J; Knapp, C; Bruce, E

    1998-02-01

    We present a new technique which uses amplitude-modulated breathing patterns to obtain estimates of frequency response between respiration and heart rate within subrespiratory frequencies. Frequency response between respiration and heart rate has been previously estimated using broadband respiration and metronomic breathing. However, the estimates obtained using these techniques show low coherence between respiration and heart rate within the subrespiratory frequencies (< 0.12-0.15 Hz). The advantages of amplitude-modulated breathing are: enhancement in the degree of perturbation within subrespiratory frequencies as indicated by relatively higher coherencies between respiration and heart rate (approximately equal to 0.7), and the subjects do not have to breathe at very low breathing frequencies or resort to breath holds. Use of a squared sine wave carrier modulated by sinusoidal functions enabled us to obtain energy distributions at subrespiratory frequencies without using demodulation. Results obtained at eight subrespiratory frequencies from ten subjects show that the new technique is easy to implement and produces relatively higher coherence between respiration and heart rate. The advantage of the new technique in terms of enhancing the level of perturbations within subrespiratory frequencies is particularly important, because it is in this frequency range that the interpretation of variability in heart rate in terms of autonomic origins is incompletely understood and is confounded by respiratory interactions.

  9. Modulation of auditory brainstem responses by serotonin and specific serotonin receptors.

    PubMed

    Papesh, Melissa A; Hurley, Laura M

    2016-02-01

    The neuromodulator serotonin is found throughout the auditory system from the cochlea to the cortex. Although effects of serotonin have been reported at the level of single neurons in many brainstem nuclei, how these effects correspond to more integrated measures of auditory processing has not been well-explored. In the present study, we aimed to characterize the effects of serotonin on far-field auditory brainstem responses (ABR) across a wide range of stimulus frequencies and intensities. Using a mouse model, we investigated the consequences of systemic serotonin depletion, as well as the selective stimulation and suppression of the 5-HT1 and 5-HT2 receptors, on ABR latency and amplitude. Stimuli included tone pips spanning four octaves presented over a forty dB range. Depletion of serotonin reduced the ABR latencies in Wave II and later waves, suggesting that serotonergic effects occur as early as the cochlear nucleus. Further, agonists and antagonists of specific serotonergic receptors had different profiles of effects on ABR latencies and amplitudes across waves and frequencies, suggestive of distinct effects of these agents on auditory processing. Finally, most serotonergic effects were more pronounced at lower ABR frequencies, suggesting larger or more directional modulation of low-frequency processing. This is the first study to describe the effects of serotonin on ABR responses across a wide range of stimulus frequencies and amplitudes, and it presents an important step in understanding how serotonergic modulation of auditory brainstem processing may contribute to modulation of auditory perception.

  10. Responsive nanoporous metals: recoverable modulations on strength and shape by watering.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xing-Long; Liu, Ling-Zhi; Jin, Hai-Jun

    2016-08-12

    Many biological materials can readily modulate their mechanical properties and shape by interacting with water in the surrounding environment, which is essential to their high performance in application. In contrast, typical inorganic materials (such as the metals) cannot change their strength and shape without involving thermal/mechanical treatments. By introducing nano-scale porous structure and exploiting a simple physical concept-the water-capillarity in nanopores, here we report that a 'dead' metal can be transformed into a 'smart' material with water-responsive properties. We demonstrate that the apparent strength, volume and shape of nanoporous Au and Au(Pt) can be modulated in situ, dramatically and recoverably, in response to water-dipping and partial-drying. The amplitude of strength-modulation reaches 20 MPa, which is nearly 50% of the yield strength at initial state. This approach also leads to reversible length change up to 1.3% in nanoporous Au and a large reversible bending motion of a bi-layer strip with tip displacement of ∼20 mm, which may be used for actuation. This method is simple and effective, occurring in situ under ambient conditions and requiring no external power, analogous to biological materials. The findings may open up novel applications in many areas such as micro-robotics and bio-medical devices.

  11. Responsive nanoporous metals: recoverable modulations on strength and shape by watering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Xing-Long; Liu, Ling-Zhi; Jin, Hai-Jun

    2016-08-01

    Many biological materials can readily modulate their mechanical properties and shape by interacting with water in the surrounding environment, which is essential to their high performance in application. In contrast, typical inorganic materials (such as the metals) cannot change their strength and shape without involving thermal/mechanical treatments. By introducing nano-scale porous structure and exploiting a simple physical concept—the water-capillarity in nanopores, here we report that a ‘dead’ metal can be transformed into a ‘smart’ material with water-responsive properties. We demonstrate that the apparent strength, volume and shape of nanoporous Au and Au(Pt) can be modulated in situ, dramatically and recoverably, in response to water-dipping and partial-drying. The amplitude of strength-modulation reaches 20 MPa, which is nearly 50% of the yield strength at initial state. This approach also leads to reversible length change up to 1.3% in nanoporous Au and a large reversible bending motion of a bi-layer strip with tip displacement of ∼20 mm, which may be used for actuation. This method is simple and effective, occurring in situ under ambient conditions and requiring no external power, analogous to biological materials. The findings may open up novel applications in many areas such as micro-robotics and bio-medical devices.

  12. An interaction between a neuropeptide Y gene polymorphism and early adversity modulates endocrine stress responses.

    PubMed

    Witt, Stephanie H; Buchmann, Arlette F; Blomeyer, Dorothea; Nieratschker, Vanessa; Treutlein, Jens; Esser, Günter; Schmidt, Martin H; Bidlingmaier, Martin; Wiedemann, Klaus; Rietschel, Marcella; Laucht, Manfred; Wüst, Stefan; Zimmermann, Ulrich S

    2011-08-01

    Interindividual variability in the regulation of the human stress system accounts for a part of the individual's liability to stress-related diseases. These differences are influenced by environmental and genetic factors. Early childhood adversity is a well-studied environmental factor affecting an individual's stress response which has been shown to be modulated by gene-environment interaction (GxE). Neuropeptide Y (NPY) plays a role in stress regulation and genetic variation in NPY may influence stress responses. In this study, we analyzed the association of a common variant in the NPY gene promoter, rs16147, with cortisol and ACTH responses to acute psychosocial stress in young adults from the Mannheim Study of Children at Risk (MARS), an ongoing epidemiological cohort study following the outcome of early adversity from birth into adulthood. We found evidence of a GxE interaction between rs16147 and early adversity significantly affecting HPA axis responses to acute psychosocial stress. These findings suggest that the neurobiological mechanisms linking early adverse experience and later neuroendocrine stress regulation are modulated by a gene variant whose functional relevance is documented by increasing convergent evidence from in vitro, animal and human studies.

  13. IDO2 Modulates T Cell-Dependent Autoimmune Responses through a B Cell-Intrinsic Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Merlo, Lauren M F; DuHadaway, James B; Grabler, Samantha; Prendergast, George C; Muller, Alexander J; Mandik-Nayak, Laura

    2016-06-01

    Mechanistic insight into how adaptive immune responses are modified along the self-nonself continuum may offer more effective opportunities to treat autoimmune disease, cancer, and other sterile inflammatory disorders. Recent genetic studies in the KRN mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis demonstrate that the immunomodulatory molecule IDO2 modifies responses to self-antigens; however, the mechanisms involved are obscure. In this study, we show that IDO2 exerts a critical function in B cells to support the generation of autoimmunity. In experiments with IDO2-deficient mice, adoptive transplant experiments demonstrated that IDO2 expression in B cells was both necessary and sufficient to support robust arthritis development. IDO2 function in B cells was contingent on a cognate, Ag-specific interaction to exert its immunomodulatory effects on arthritis development. We confirmed a similar requirement in an established model of contact hypersensitivity, in which IDO2-expressing B cells are required for a robust inflammatory response. Mechanistic investigations showed that IDO2-deficient B cells lacked the ability to upregulate the costimulatory marker CD40, suggesting IDO2 acts at the T-B cell interface to modulate the potency of T cell help needed to promote autoantibody production. Overall, our findings revealed that IDO2 expression by B cells modulates autoimmune responses by supporting the cross talk between autoreactive T and B cells.

  14. Empathic neural responses are modulated by the perceived fairness of others

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Tania; Seymour, Ben; O'Doherty, John P.; Stephan, Klaas E.; Dolan, Raymond J.; Frith, Chris D.

    2009-01-01

    The neural processes underlying empathy are a subject of intense interest within the social neurosciences1-3. However, very little is known about how brain empathic responses are modulated by the affective link between individuals. We show here that empathic responses are modulated by learned preferences, a result consistent with economic models of social preferences4-7. We engaged male and female volunteers in an economic game, in which two confederates played fairly or unfairly, and then measured brain activity with functional magnetic resonance imaging while these same volunteers observed the confederates receiving pain. Both sexes exhibited empathy-related activation in pain-related brain areas (fronto-insular and anterior cingulate cortices) towards fair players. However, these empathy-related responses were significantly reduced in males when observing an unfair person receiving pain. This effect was accompanied by increased activation in reward-related areas, correlated with an expressed desire for revenge. We conclude that in men (at least) empathic responses are shaped by valuation of other people's social behaviour, such that they empathize with fair opponents while favouring the physical punishment of unfair opponents, a finding that echoes recent evidence for altruistic punishment. PMID:16421576

  15. Proactive modulation of long-interval intracortical inhibition during response inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Cowie, Matthew J.; MacDonald, Hayley J.; Cirillo, John

    2016-01-01

    Daily activities often require sudden cancellation of preplanned movement, termed response inhibition. When only a subcomponent of a whole response must be suppressed (required here on Partial trials), the ensuing component is markedly delayed. The neural mechanisms underlying partial response inhibition remain unclear. We hypothesized that Partial trials would be associated with nonselective corticomotor suppression and that GABAB receptor-mediated inhibition within primary motor cortex might be responsible for the nonselective corticomotor suppression contributing to Partial trial response delays. Sixteen right-handed participants performed a bimanual anticipatory response inhibition task while single- and paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation was delivered to elicit motor evoked potentials in the left first dorsal interosseous muscle. Lift times, amplitude of motor evoked potentials, and long-interval intracortical inhibition were examined across the different trial types (Go, Stop-Left, Stop-Right, Stop-Both). Go trials produced a tight distribution of lift times around the target, whereas those during Partial trials (Stop-Left and Stop-Right) were substantially delayed. The modulation of motor evoked potential amplitude during Stop-Right trials reflected anticipation, suppression, and subsequent reinitiation of movement. Importantly, suppression was present across all Stop trial types, indicative of a “default” nonselective inhibitory process. Compared with blocks containing only Go trials, inhibition increased when Stop trials were introduced but did not differ between trial types. The amount of inhibition was positively correlated with lift times during Stop-Right trials. Tonic levels of inhibition appear to be proactively modulated by task context and influence the speed at which unimanual responses occur after a nonselective “brake” is applied. PMID:27281744

  16. Perifornical hypothalamic orexin and serotonin modulate the counterregulatory response to hypoglycemic and glucoprivic stimuli.

    PubMed

    Otlivanchik, Oleg; Le Foll, Christelle; Levin, Barry E

    2015-01-01

    Previous reports suggested an important role for serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine [5-HT]) in enhancing the counterregulatory response (CRR) to hypoglycemia. To elucidate the sites of action mediating this effect, we initially found that insulin-induced hypoglycemia stimulates 5-HT release in widespread forebrain regions, including the perifornical hypothalamus (PFH; 30%), ventromedial hypothalamus (34%), paraventricular hypothalamus (34%), paraventricular thalamic nucleus (64%), and cerebral cortex (63%). Of these, we focused on the PFH because of its known modulation of diverse neurohumoral and behavioral responses. In awake, behaving rats, bilateral PFH glucoprivation with 5-thioglucose stimulated adrenal medullary epinephrine (Epi) release (3,153%) and feeding (400%), while clamping PFH glucose at postprandial brain levels blunted the Epi response to hypoglycemia by 30%. The PFH contained both glucose-excited (GE) and glucose-inhibited (GI) neurons; GE neurons were primarily excited, while GI neurons were equally excited or inhibited by 5-HT at hypoglycemic glucose levels in vitro. Also, 5-HT stimulated lactate production by cultured hypothalamic astrocytes. Depleting PFH 5-HT blunted the Epi (but not feeding) response to focal PFH (69%) and systemic glucoprivation (39%), while increasing PFH 5-HT levels amplified the Epi response to hypoglycemia by 32%. Finally, the orexin 1 receptor antagonist SB334867A attenuated both the Epi (65%) and feeding (47%) responses to focal PFH glucoprivation. Thus we have identified the PFH as a glucoregulatory region where both 5-HT and orexin modulate the CRR and feeding responses to glucoprivation. © 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  17. Nitric oxide modulates salt and sugar responses via different signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Newland, Philip L; Yates, Paul

    2008-04-01

    Locusts lay their eggs by digging into a substrate using rhythmic opening and closing movements of ovipositor valves at the end of the abdomen. The digging rhythm is inhibited by chemosensory stimulation of chemoreceptors on the valves. Nitric oxide (NO) modulated the effects of chemosensory stimulation on the rhythm. Stimulation with either sucrose or sodium chloride (NaCl) stopped the digging rhythm, whereas simultaneous bath application of the NO inhibitor, N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), increased the duration for which the digging rhythm stopped. Increasing NO levels caused a significant reduction in the cessation of the rhythm in response to the same 2 chemicals. Bath applying cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), the soluble guanylate inhibitor 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ), and the generic protein kinase inhibitor H-7 had no effect on the duration for which the rhythm stopped in response to NaCl stimulation. Conversely, bath application of cGMP and ODQ resulted in a significant decrease and increase, respectively, in the duration for which the digging rhythm stopped when stimulated with sucrose. Moreover, bath application of the selective protein kinase G (PKG) inhibitor KT-5823 also resulted in a significant increase in the duration of cessation of the rhythm when stimulated with sucrose. Results suggest that NO modulates the behavioral responses to NaCl via a cGMP/PKG-independent pathway while modulating the responses to sucrose via a NO-cGMP/PKG-dependent pathway.

  18. Modulation of the in vitro immune response by lead, nickel and zinc

    SciTech Connect

    Warner, G.L.

    1986-01-01

    The ability of Pb, Ni and Zn to modulate the in vitro murine immune response was examined. 100 ..mu..M Pb and Ni were shown to enhance the in vitro PFC response to SRBC while 100 ..mu..M Zn had inhibitory effects. Each of the cations stimulated splenocyte proliferation as determined by (/sup 3/H) thymidine incorporation, autoradiography and flow cytometric cell cycle analysis (acridine orange staining). Media selection was an important factor in the ability of these cations to modulate the immune response. Cation induced lymphoproliferation occurred late in culture (day 5 or later), was dependent on cell density (cells/ml) and required the presence of both T cells and la/sup +/ cells. Treatment of splenocytes with anti-Thyl. 2, anti-Lytl or anti-L3T4 completely abrogated the ability of these metals to induce proliferation, indicating that helper T cells (Lytl/sup +/ + 2/sup -/, L3T4/sup +/) are required at the initiation of culture. Pb, Ni or Zn preferentially enhanced the recovery of Thy/sup +/ cells as determined by flow cytometry of 7 day cation stimulated splenocytes. Zn preferentially enhanced the entry of T suppressor cells (Lyt2/sup +/) into the cell cycle. Pb, Ni and Zn induced the production/secretion of IL2, the expression of IL2 receptor (IL2R), and monoclonal anti-IL2, anti-IL2R and anti(gamma)IFN inhibited the induction of lymphoproliferation. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that Pb, Ni, and Zn modulate the immune response by activating T cells specific for altered self la or by altering immunoregulation associated with the autologous MLR.

  19. Specific prebiotic oligosaccharides modulate the early phase of a murine vaccination response.

    PubMed

    Vos, Arjan P; Knol, Jan; Stahl, Bernd; M'rabet, Laura; Garssen, Johan

    2010-05-01

    The immune-modulatory effect of specific prebiotic oligosaccharides was shown in previous preclinical and clinical studies. To enhance the understanding of this effect, kinetic aspects of immune modulation and the correlation between microbiological and immunological parameters were investigated in a murine vaccination model. C57BL/6 mice were supplemented with short-chain galactooligosaccharides and long-chain fructooligosaccharides (ratio 9:1; Immunofortis()) in combination with pectin-derived acidic oligosaccharides. The timing of supplementation was varied around the primary (day 0) and secondary (day 21) vaccinations. Supplementation before the primary vaccination was necessary to increase delayed-type hypersensitivity responses (DTH) significantly at day 30. Supplementation after day 8 did not affect the DTH response at day 30, indicating that immune modulation occurred during the early phase. Therefore, correlation analysis of microbiological and immunological parameters was performed in a shortened experiment to focus on the early phase. At day 9 post-priming, the percentages of cecal lactobacilli were correlated to the DTH responses (p=0.01). Furthermore, the results suggested that yet unidentified factors may play a role. Additional analysis of intestinal Peyer's patch major lymphocyte populations did not show effects of supplementation. In conclusion, a specific oligosaccharide mixture was shown to exert its immune-modulatory effect during the early phase of a murine immune response. The results are consistent with a role of the microbiota and possibly other factors in oligosaccharide-induced immune modulation. Furthermore, the results demonstrate that it is critical to consider kinetic aspects of immune-modulatory and prebiotic effects in order to study their interaction in a meaningful way. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. DNA damage response inhibition at dysfunctional telomeres by modulation of telomeric DNA damage response RNAs.

    PubMed

    Rossiello, Francesca; Aguado, Julio; Sepe, Sara; Iannelli, Fabio; Nguyen, Quan; Pitchiaya, Sethuramasundaram; Carninci, Piero; d'Adda di Fagagna, Fabrizio

    2017-02-27

    The DNA damage response (DDR) is a set of cellular events that follows the generation of DNA damage. Recently, site-specific small non-coding RNAs, also termed DNA damage response RNAs (DDRNAs), have been shown to play a role in DDR signalling and DNA repair. Dysfunctional telomeres activate DDR in ageing, cancer and an increasing number of identified pathological conditions. Here we show that, in mammals, telomere dysfunction induces the transcription of telomeric DDRNAs (tDDRNAs) and their longer precursors from both DNA strands. DDR activation and maintenance at telomeres depend on the biogenesis and functions of tDDRNAs. Their functional inhibition by sequence-specific antisense oligonucleotides allows the unprecedented telomere-specific DDR inactivation in cultured cells and in vivo in mouse tissues. In summary, these results demonstrate that tDDRNAs are induced at dysfunctional telomeres and are necessary for DDR activation and they validate the viability of locus-specific DDR inhibition by targeting DDRNAs.

  1. Resveratrol modulates the inflammatory response via an estrogen receptor-signal integration network

    PubMed Central

    Nwachukwu, Jerome C; Srinivasan, Sathish; Bruno, Nelson E; Parent, Alexander A; Hughes, Travis S; Pollock, Julie A; Gjyshi, Olsi; Cavett, Valerie; Nowak, Jason; Garcia-Ordonez, Ruben D; Houtman, René; Griffin, Patrick R; Kojetin, Douglas J; Katzenellenbogen, John A; Conkright, Michael D; Nettles, Kendall W

    2014-01-01

    Resveratrol has beneficial effects on aging, inflammation and metabolism, which are thought to result from activation of the lysine deacetylase, sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), the cAMP pathway, or AMP-activated protein kinase. In this study, we report that resveratrol acts as a pathway-selective estrogen receptor-α (ERα) ligand to modulate the inflammatory response but not cell proliferation. A crystal structure of the ERα ligand-binding domain (LBD) as a complex with resveratrol revealed a unique perturbation of the coactivator-binding surface, consistent with an altered coregulator recruitment profile. Gene expression analyses revealed significant overlap of TNFα genes modulated by resveratrol and estradiol. Furthermore, the ability of resveratrol to suppress interleukin-6 transcription was shown to require ERα and several ERα coregulators, suggesting that ERα functions as a primary conduit for resveratrol activity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02057.001 PMID:24771768

  2. Modulated ferromagnetic ordering and the magnetocaloric response of Eu{sub 4}PdMg

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, D. H. Legros, Anaëlle; Niehaus, Oliver; Pöttgen, Rainer; Cadogan, J. M.; Flacau, R.

    2015-05-07

    Neutron powder diffraction confirms that the primary ordering mode in Eu{sub 4}PdMg is ferromagnetic with a europium moment of 6.5(2) μ{sub B}. {sup 151}Eu Mössbauer spectroscopy shows that the unusual linear temperature dependence of the magnetisation reported for this system is an intrinsic property and not an artefact of the applied field. The form and temperature evolution of the {sup 151}Eu Mössbauer spectra strongly suggest that there is an incommensurate modulation to the magnetic structure that modifies the basic ferromagnetic order. This modulated structure may be the origin of the broad magnetocaloric response previously observed in Eu{sub 4}PdMg.

  3. Glucose administration does not modulate prolactin response to exercise, TRH or haloperidol injection.

    PubMed

    Vigas, M; Jezová, D

    1994-01-01

    Glucose was found to exert an In vitro regulatory effect on prolactin secretion. Its role in the modulation of stimulated secretion of prolactin in man is, however, not clear. To evaluate the effect of hyperglycaemia on prolactin release, three stimulatory tests with different mechanisms of stimulation were employed. Healthy male subjects served as volunteers during submaximal exercise, TRH test (0.2 mg i.v.) and administration of haloperidol (2 mg i.v.). Glucose (100 g in 400 ml) or an equal volume of water was given 30 min before the tests. Blood for glucose and prolactin analysis was taken via an indwelling catheter. The plasma prolactin concentration increased in response to each of the stimuli applied. However, the prolactin increase during hyperglycaemia did not differ from values obtained in tests performed in normoglycaemia after water administration. These results indicate that prolactin release in healthy man is not modulated by hyperglycaemia.

  4. [Dying and death in societal transformation].

    PubMed

    Heller, Andreas; Wegleitner, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    Dying and death in modern societies are subject to profound social, professional and cultural-religious changes. Secularization and a stronger differentiation of societies have led to a change in the way humans handle the dying process. Normatively ritualized collective behaviour has been replaced by an individual, subjectivized approach. In late modern societies there are many different views of what "successful" or "good" dying means.In the article this change is described by the following seven theses: 1. We live longer and we die longer. 2. We no longer die suddenly and unexpectedly but slowly and foreseeably. 3. Even though our biological life on earth has become longer, our life has been shortened by the loss of eternity. 4. We no longer die on the stage of ritualized relationships with our family and neighbours but behind the curtains of organizations. 5. We live and die in a society of organizations and have to get organized for the final phase of our life. 6. Living and dying are no large, state-owned enterprises but small, private enterprises. 7. The hospice movement as well as palliative medicine have created public awareness, made dying a matter of discussion and offered a new set of options.In late modernism end-of-life care requires new approaches based on individual and shared responsibility as well as cooperation between professional institutions and community-based voluntary care.A change towards community care is visible. Thus "dying" is a topic in the discussion about the future of public health and societal solidarity.

  5. Awareness of dying: it needs words.

    PubMed

    Lokker, Martine E; van Zuylen, Lia; Veerbeek, Laetitia; van der Rijt, Carin C D; van der Heide, Agnes

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this research is to study to what extent dying patients are aware of the imminence of death, whether such awareness is associated with patient characteristics, symptoms and acceptance of dying, and whether medical records and nurses' and family caregivers' views on patients' awareness of dying agree. Nurses and family caregivers of 475 deceased patients from three different care settings in the southwest Netherlands were requested to fill out questionnaires. The two groups were asked whether a patient had been aware of the imminence of death. Also, medical records were screened for statements indicating that the patient had been informed of the imminence of death. Nurses completed questionnaires about 472 patients, family caregivers about 280 patients (response 59%). According to the medical records, 51% of patients had been aware of the imminence of death; according to nurses, 58%; according to family caregivers, 62%. Patients who, according to their family caregiver, had been aware of the imminence of death were significantly more often in peace with dying and felt more often that life had been worth living. Inter-rater agreement on patients' awareness of dying was fair (Cohen's kappa = 0.23-0.31). Being aware of dying is associated with acceptance of dying, which supports the idea that open communication in the dying phase can contribute to the quality of the dying process. However, views on whether or not patients are aware of the imminence of death diverge between different caregivers. This suggests that communication in the dying phase of patients is open for improvement.

  6. Is Baseline Cardiac Autonomic Modulation Related to Performance and Physiological Responses Following a Supramaximal Judo Test?

    PubMed Central

    Blasco-Lafarga, Cristina; Martínez-Navarro, Ignacio; Mateo-March, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Little research exists concerning Heart Rate (HR) Variability (HRV) following supramaximal efforts focused on upper-body explosive strength-endurance. Since they may be very demanding, it seems of interest to analyse the relationship among performance, lactate and HR dynamics (i.e. HR, HRV and complexity) following them; as well as to know how baseline cardiac autonomic modulation mediates these relationships. The present study aimed to analyse associations between baseline and post-exercise HR dynamics following a supramaximal Judo test, and their relationship with lactate, in a sample of 22 highly-trained male judoists (20.70±4.56 years). A large association between the increase in HR from resting to exercise condition and performance suggests that individuals exerted a greater sympathetic response to achieve a better performance (Rating of Perceived Exertion: 20; post-exercise peak lactate: 11.57±2.24 mmol/L; 95.76±4.13 % of age-predicted HRmax). Athletes with higher vagal modulation and lower sympathetic modulation at rest achieved both a significant larger ∆HR and a faster post-exercise lactate removal. A enhanced resting parasympathetic modulation might be therefore related to a further usage of autonomic resources and a better immediate metabolic recovery during supramaximal exertions. Furthermore, analyses of variance displayed a persistent increase in α1 and a decrease in lnRMSSD along the 15 min of recovery, which are indicative of a diminished vagal modulation together with a sympathovagal balance leaning to sympathetic domination. Eventually, time-domain indices (lnRMSSD) showed no lactate correlations, while nonlinear indices (α1 and lnSaEn) appeared to be moderate to strongly correlated with it, thus pointing to shared mechanisms between neuroautonomic and metabolic regulation. PMID:24205273

  7. Soluble Mediators in Platelet Concentrates Modulate Dendritic Cell Inflammatory Responses in an Experimental Model of Transfusion.

    PubMed

    Perros, Alexis J; Christensen, Anne-Marie; Flower, Robert L; Dean, Melinda M

    2015-10-01

    The transfusion of platelet concentrates (PCs) is widely used to treat thrombocytopenia and severe trauma. Ex vivo storage of PCs is associated with a storage lesion characterized by partial platelet activation and the release of soluble mediators, such as soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L), RANTES, and interleukin (IL)-8. An in vitro whole blood culture transfusion model was employed to assess whether mediators present in PC supernatants (PC-SNs) modulated dendritic cell (DC)-specific inflammatory responses (intracellular staining) and the overall inflammatory response (cytometric bead array). Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was included in parallel cultures to model the impact of PC-SNs on cell responses following toll-like receptor-mediated pathogen recognition. The impact of both the PC dose (10%, 25%) and ex vivo storage period was investigated [day 2 (D2), day 5 (D5), day 7 (D7)]. PC-SNs alone had minimal impact on DC-specific inflammatory responses and the overall inflammatory response. However, in the presence of LPS, exposure to PC-SNs resulted in a significant dose-associated suppression of the production of DC IL-12, IL-6, IL-1α, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1β and storage-associated suppression of the production of DC IL-10, TNF-α, and IL-8. For the overall inflammatory response, IL-6, TNF-α, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, and inflammatory protein (IP)-10 were significantly suppressed and IL-8, IL-10, and IL-1β significantly increased following exposure to PC-SNs in the presence of LPS. These data suggest that soluble mediators present in PCs significantly suppress DC function and modulate the overall inflammatory response, particularly in the presence of an infectious stimulus. Given the central role of DCs in the initiation and regulation of the immune response, these results suggest that modulation of the DC inflammatory profile is a probable mechanism contributing to transfusion-related complications.

  8. Response of cardiac autonomic modulation after a single exposure to musical auditory stimulation.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Lucas L; Vanderlei, Luiz Carlos M; Guida, Heraldo L; de Abreu, Luiz Carlos; Garner, David M; Vanderlei, Franciele M; Ferreira, Celso; Valenti, Vitor E

    2015-01-01

    The acute effects after exposure to different styles of music on cardiac autonomic modulation assessed through heart rate variability (HRV) analysis have not yet been well elucidated. We aimed to investigate the recovery response of cardiac autonomic modulation in women after exposure to musical auditory stimulation of different styles. The study was conducted on 30 healthy women aged between 18 years and 30 years. We did not include subjects having previous experience with musical instruments and those who had an affinity for music styles. The volunteers remained at rest for 10 min and were exposed to classical baroque (64-84 dB) and heavy metal (75-84 dB) music for 10 min, and their HRV was evaluated for 30 min after music cessation. We analyzed the following HRV indices: Standard deviation of normal-to-normal (SDNN) intervals, root mean square of successive differences (RMSSD), percentage of normal-to-normal 50 (pNN50), low frequency (LF), high frequency (HF), and LF/HF ratio. SDNN, LF in absolute units (ms 2 ) and normalized (nu), and LF/HF ratio increased while HF index (nu) decreased after exposure to classical baroque music. Regarding the heavy metal music style, it was observed that there were increases in SDNN, RMSSD, pNN50, and LF (ms 2 ) after the musical stimulation. In conclusion, the recovery response of cardiac autonomic modulation after exposure to auditory stimulation with music featured an increased global activity of both systems for the two musical styles, with a cardiac sympathetic modulation for classical baroque music and a cardiac vagal tone for the heavy metal style.

  9. Response of cardiac autonomic modulation after a single exposure to musical auditory stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Lucas L.; Vanderlei, Luiz Carlos M.; Guida, Heraldo L.; de Abreu, Luiz Carlos; Garner, David M.; Vanderlei, Franciele M.; Ferreira, Celso; Valenti, Vitor E.

    2015-01-01

    The acute effects after exposure to different styles of music on cardiac autonomic modulation assessed through heart rate variability (HRV) analysis have not yet been well elucidated. We aimed to investigate the recovery response of cardiac autonomic modulation in women after exposure to musical auditory stimulation of different styles. The study was conducted on 30 healthy women aged between 18 years and 30 years. We did not include subjects having previous experience with musical instruments and those who had an affinity for music styles. The volunteers remained at rest for 10 min and were exposed to classical baroque (64-84 dB) and heavy metal (75-84 dB) music for 10 min, and their HRV was evaluated for 30 min after music cessation. We analyzed the following HRV indices: Standard deviation of normal-to-normal (SDNN) intervals, root mean square of successive differences (RMSSD), percentage of normal-to-normal 50 (pNN50), low frequency (LF), high frequency (HF), and LF/HF ratio. SDNN, LF in absolute units (ms2) and normalized (nu), and LF/HF ratio increased while HF index (nu) decreased after exposure to classical baroque music. Regarding the heavy metal music style, it was observed that there were increases in SDNN, RMSSD, pNN50, and LF (ms2) after the musical stimulation. In conclusion, the recovery response of cardiac autonomic modulation after exposure to auditory stimulation with music featured an increased global activity of both systems for the two musical styles, with a cardiac sympathetic modulation for classical baroque music and a cardiac vagal tone for the heavy metal style. PMID:25774614

  10. Antidromic potential spread modulates the receptor responses in the stretch receptor neurons of the crayfish.

    PubMed

    Purali, Nuhan

    2011-12-01

    The effects of antidromic potential spread were investigated in the stretch receptor neurons of the crayfish. Current and potential responses to conductance changes were recorded in the dynamic clamp condition and compared to those obtained by using some conventional clamp methods and a compartmental neuron model. An analogue circuit was used for dynamic calculation of the injected receptor current as a function of the membrane potential and the given conductance change. Alternatively, receptor current responses to a mechanical stimulus were recorded and compared when the cell was voltage clamped to a previously recorded impulse wave form and the resting potential, respectively. Under dynamic clamp, the receptor current had an oscillating waveform which contrasts with the conventional recordings. Frequency, amplitude and sign of the oscillations were dependent on the applied conductance level, reversal potential and electrotonic attenuation. Mean current amplitude and frequency of the evoked impulse responses were smaller under dynamic clamp, especially for large conductance increases. However, firing frequency was larger if plotted against the mean current response. Recorded responses were similar to those calculated in the model. It was not possible to evoke any adaptation in the slowly adapting neuron by using the dynamic clamp. Evoked potential change served as a self limiting response, preventing the depolarization block. However, impulse duration was significantly shorter in the rapidly adapting neuron when the dynamic clamp was used. It was concluded that, in the stretch receptor neurons during a conductance increase, antidromic potential spread modulates the receptor responses and contributes to adaptation.

  11. A network-based phenotype mapping approach to identify genes that modulate drug response phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Cairns, Junmei; Ung, Choong Yong; da Rocha, Edroaldo Lummertz; Zhang, Cheng; Correia, Cristina; Weinshilboum, Richard; Wang, Liewei; Li, Hu

    2016-01-01

    To better address the problem of drug resistance during cancer chemotherapy and explore the possibility of manipulating drug response phenotypes, we developed a network-based phenotype mapping approach (P-Map) to identify gene candidates that upon perturbed can alter sensitivity to drugs. We used basal transcriptomics data from a panel of human lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCL) to infer drug response networks (DRNs) that are responsible for conferring response phenotypes for anthracycline and taxane, two common anticancer agents use in clinics. We further tested selected gene candidates that interact with phenotypic differentially expressed genes (PDEGs), which are up-regulated genes in LCL for a given class of drug response phenotype in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells. Our results indicate that it is possible to manipulate a drug response phenotype, from resistant to sensitive or vice versa, by perturbing gene candidates in DRNs and suggest plausible mechanisms regulating directionality of drug response sensitivity. More important, the current work highlights a new way to formulate systems-based therapeutic design: supplementing therapeutics that aim to target disease culprits with phenotypic modulators capable of altering DRN properties with the goal to re-sensitize resistant phenotypes. PMID:27841317

  12. HLA class II genes modulate vaccine-induced antibody responses to affect HIV-1 acquisition.

    PubMed

    Prentice, Heather A; Tomaras, Georgia D; Geraghty, Daniel E; Apps, Richard; Fong, Youyi; Ehrenberg, Philip K; Rolland, Morgane; Kijak, Gustavo H; Krebs, Shelly J; Nelson, Wyatt; DeCamp, Allan; Shen, Xiaoying; Yates, Nicole L; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Nitayaphan, Sorachai; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Ferrari, Guido; McElrath, M Juliana; Montefiori, David C; Bailer, Robert T; Koup, Richard A; O'Connell, Robert J; Robb, Merlin L; Michael, Nelson L; Gilbert, Peter B; Kim, Jerome H; Thomas, Rasmi

    2015-07-15

    In the RV144 vaccine trial, two antibody responses were found to correlate with HIV-1 acquisition. Because human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II-restricted CD4(+) T cells are involved in antibody production, we tested whether HLA class II genotypes affected HIV-1-specific antibody levels and HIV-1 acquisition in 760 individuals. Indeed, antibody responses correlated with acquisition only in the presence of single host HLA alleles. Envelope (Env)-specific immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibodies were associated with increased risk of acquisition specifically in individuals with DQB1*06. IgG antibody responses to Env amino acid positions 120 to 204 were higher and were associated with decreased risk of acquisition and increased vaccine efficacy only in the presence of DPB1*13. Screening IgG responses to overlapping peptides spanning Env 120-204 and viral sequence analysis of infected individuals defined differences in vaccine response that were associated with the presence of DPB1*13 and could be responsible for the protection observed. Overall, the underlying genetic findings indicate that HLA class II modulated the quantity, quality, and efficacy of antibody responses in the RV144 trial.

  13. HLA class II genes modulate vaccine-induced antibody responses to affect HIV-1 acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Prentice, Heather A.; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Geraghty, Daniel E.; Apps, Richard; Fong, Youyi; Ehrenberg, Philip K.; Rolland, Morgane; Kijak, Gustavo H.; Krebs, Shelly J.; Nelson, Wyatt; DeCamp, Allan; Shen, Xiaoying; Yates, Nicole L.; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Nitayaphan, Sorachai; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Ferrari, Guido; Juliana McElrath, M.; Montefiori, David C.; Bailer, Robert T.; Koup, Richard A.; O’Connell, Robert J.; Robb, Merlin L.; Michael, Nelson L.; Gilbert, Peter B.; Kim, Jerome H.; Thomas, Rasmi

    2016-01-01

    In the RV144 vaccine trial, two antibody responses were found to correlate with HIV-1 acquisition. Because human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II–restricted CD4+ T cells are involved in antibody production, we tested whether HLA class II genotypes affected HIV-1–specific antibody levels and HIV-1 acquisition in 760 individuals. Indeed, antibody responses correlated with acquisition only in the presence of single host HLA alleles. Envelope (Env)–specific immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibodies were associated with increased risk of acquisition specifically in individuals with DQB1*06. IgG antibody responses to Env amino acid positions 120 to 204 were higher and were associated with decreased risk of acquisition and increased vaccine efficacy only in the presence of DPB1*13. Screening IgG responses to overlapping peptides spanning Env 120–204 and viral sequence analysis of infected individuals defined differences in vaccine response that were associated with the presence of DPB1*13 and could be responsible for the protection observed. Overall, the underlying genetic findings indicate that HLA class II modulated the quantity, quality, and efficacy of antibody responses in the RV144 trial. PMID:26180102

  14. Interactions between Starch, Lipids, and Proteins in Foods: Microstructure Control for Glycemic Response Modulation.

    PubMed

    Parada, Javier; Santos, Jose L

    2016-10-25

    In real food, starch is usually forming part of a matrix with lipids and proteins. However, research on this ternary system and interactions between such food components has been scarce so far. The control of food microstructure is crucial to determine the product properties, including sensorial and nutritionals ones. This paper reviews the microstructural principles of interactions between starch, lipids, and proteins in foods as well as their effect on postprandial glycemic response, considering human intrinsic differences on postprandial glycemic responses. Several lines of research support the hypothesis that foods without rapidly digestible starch will not mandatorily generate the lowest postprandial glycemic response, highlighting that the full understanding of food microstructure, which modulates starch digestion, plays a key role on food design from a nutritional viewpoint.

  15. Reward-Modulated Response Inhibition, Cognitive Shifting, and the Orbital Frontal Cortex in Early Adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Zu Wei; Pajtek, Stefan; Luna, Beatriz; Geier, Charles F.; Ridenour, Ty A.; Clark, Duncan B.

    2014-01-01

    Immaturities in cognitive shifting are associated with adolescent risk behaviors. The orbital frontal cortex (OFC) regulates reward processing and response inhibition. This study tested the relationship between cognitive shifting, OFC activity, and reward-modulated response inhibition in young adolescents. An fMRI antisaccade (AS) paradigm examined the effects of reward conditions on inhibitory response and OFC processing. A validated self-report inventory assessed cognitive shifting. Compared to neutral, reward trials showed better AS performance and increased OFC activation. Cognitive shifting positively associated with AS performance in reward and neutral trials. Poorer cognitive shifting predicted greater OFC activation. Results indicate lower OFC efficiency, as greater activation to achieve correct performance, underlies cognitive shifting problems. These neurocognitive impairments are relevant for understanding adolescent risk behaviors. PMID:26755891

  16. Cyclic dinucleotides modulate human T-cell response through monocyte cell death.

    PubMed

    Tosolini, Marie; Pont, Frédéric; Verhoeyen, Els; Fournié, Jean-Jacques

    2015-12-01

    Cyclic dinucleotides, a class of microbial messengers, have been recently identified in bacteria, but their activity in humans remains largely unknown. Here, we have studied the function of cyclic dinucleotides in humans. We found that c-di-AMP and cGAMP, two adenosine-based cyclic dinucleotides, activated T lymphocytes in an unusual manner through monocyte cell death. c-di-AMP and cGAMP induced the selective apoptosis of human monocytes, and T lymphocytes were activated by the direct contact with these dying monocytes. The ensuing T-cell response comprised cell-cycle exit, phenotypic maturation into effector memory cells and proliferation arrest, but not cell death. This quiescence was transient since T cells remained fully responsive to further restimulation. Together, our results depict a novel activation pattern for human T lymphocytes: a transient quiescence induced by c-di-AMP- or cGAMP-primed apoptotic monocytes. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Histamine in the posterodorsal medial amygdala modulates cardiovascular reflex responses in awake rats.

    PubMed

    Quagliotto, E; Neckel, H; Riveiro, D F; Casali, K R; Mostarda, C; Irigoyen, M C; Dall'ago, P; Rasia-Filho, A A

    2008-12-10

    Centrally injected histamine (HA) affects heart rate (HR), arterial blood pressure (BP), and sympathetic activity in rats. The posterodorsal medial amygdala (MePD) has high levels of histidine decarboxylase, connections with brain areas involved with the modulation of cardiovascular responses, and is relevant for the pathogenesis of hypertension. However, there is no report demonstrating the role of the MePD histaminergic activity on the cardiovascular function in awake rats. The aims of the present work were: 1) to study the effects of two doses (10-100 nM) of HA microinjected in the MePD on basal cardiovascular recordings and on baroreflex- and chemoreflex-mediated responses; 2) to reveal whether cardiovascular reflex responses could be affected by MePD microinjections of (R)-alpha-methylhistamine (AH3), an agonist of the inhibitory autoreceptor H3; and, 3) to carry out a power spectral analysis to evaluate the contribution of the sympathetic and parasympathetic components in the variability of the HR and BP recordings. When compared with the control group (microinjected with saline, 0.3 microl), HA (10 nM) promoted an increase in the MAP50, i.e. the mean value of BP at half of the HR range evoked by the baroreflex response. Histamine (100 nM) did not affect the baroreflex activity, but significantly decreased the parasympathetic component of the HR variability, increased the sympathetic/parasympathetic balance at basal conditions (these two latter evaluated by the power spectral analysis), and promoted an impairment in the chemoreflex bradycardic response. Microinjection of AH3 (10 microM) led to mixed results, which resembled the effects of both doses of HA employed here. Present data suggest that cardiovascular changes induced by baroreceptors and chemoreceptors involve the histaminergic activity in the MePD. This neural regulation of reflex cardiovascular responses can have important implications for homeostatic and allostatic conditions and possibly for the

  18. Predicting invasive species impacts: a community module functional response approach reveals context dependencies.

    PubMed

    Paterson, Rachel A; Dick, Jaimie T A; Pritchard, Daniel W; Ennis, Marilyn; Hatcher, Melanie J; Dunn, Alison M

    2015-03-01

    Predatory functional responses play integral roles in predator-prey dynamics, and their assessment promises greater understanding and prediction of the predatory impacts of invasive species. Other interspecific interactions, however, such as parasitism and higher-order predation, have the potential to modify predator-prey interactions and thus the predictive capability of the comparative functional response approach. We used a four-species community module (higher-order predator; focal native or invasive predators; parasites of focal predators; native prey) to compare the predatory functional responses of native Gammarus duebeni celticus and invasive Gammarus pulex amphipods towards three invertebrate prey species (Asellus aquaticus, Simulium spp., Baetis rhodani), thus, quantifying the context dependencies of parasitism and a higher-order fish predator on these functional responses. Our functional response experiments demonstrated that the invasive amphipod had a higher predatory impact (lower handling time) on two of three prey species, which reflects patterns of impact observed in the field. The community module also revealed that parasitism had context-dependent influences, for one prey species, with the potential to further reduce the predatory impact of the invasive amphipod or increase the predatory impact of the native amphipod in the presence of a higher-order fish predator. Partial consumption of prey was similar for both predators and occurred increasingly in the order A. aquaticus, Simulium spp. and B. rhodani. This was associated with increasing prey densities, but showed no context dependencies with parasitism or higher-order fish predator. This study supports the applicability of comparative functional responses as a tool to predict and assess invasive species impacts incorporating multiple context dependencies.

  19. Changes in Response Properties of RVM Neurons during Prolonged Inflammation: Modulation by NK-1 Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Khasabov, Sergey G.; Brink, Thaddeus; Schupp, Marianna; Noack, Joseph; Simone, Donald A.

    2012-01-01

    Activation of neurokinin-1 (NK-1) receptors in the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM) can facilitate pain transmission in conditions such as inflammation, and thereby contribute to hyperalgesia. Since blockade of NK-1 receptors in the RVM can attenuate hyperalgesia produced by prolonged inflammation, we examined the role of NK-1 receptors in changes of response properties of RVM neurons following 4 days of hind paw inflammation with complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA). Recording were made from functionally identified ON, OFF and NEUTRAL cells in the RVM. Spontaneous activity and responses evoked by a series of mechanical (10, 15, 26, 60, 100, and 180 g) and heat (34–50°C) stimuli applied to the inflamed and non-inflamed hind paws were determined before and at 15 and 60 min after injection of the NK1-antagonist L-733,060 or vehicle into the RVM. Prolonged inflammation did not alter the proportions of functionally-identified ON, OFF and NEUTRAL cells. ON cells exhibited enhanced responses to mechanical (60–100 g) and heat (48°–50°C) stimuli applied to the inflamed paw, which were attenuated by L-733,060 but not by vehicle. Inhibitory responses of OFF cells evoked by mechanical stimuli applied to the inflamed paw were also inhibited by L-733,060, but responses evoked by stimulation of the contralateral paw were increased. Heat-evoked responses of OFF cells were not altered by L-733,060. Also, neither L-733,060 nor vehicle altered spontaneous ongoing discharge rate of RVM neurons. These data indicate that NK-1 receptors modulate excitability of ON cells which contribute to both mechanical and heat hyperalgesia, whereas NK-1 modulation of OFF cells contributes to mechanical hyperalgesia during prolonged inflammation. PMID:22917610

  20. Predicting invasive species impacts: a community module functional response approach reveals context dependencies

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, Rachel A; Dick, Jaimie T A; Pritchard, Daniel W; Ennis, Marilyn; Hatcher, Melanie J; Dunn, Alison M

    2015-01-01

    Summary Predatory functional responses play integral roles in predator–prey dynamics, and their assessment promises greater understanding and prediction of the predatory impacts of invasive species. Other interspecific interactions, however, such as parasitism and higher-order predation, have the potential to modify predator–prey interactions and thus the predictive capability of the comparative functional response approach. We used a four-species community module (higher-order predator; focal native or invasive predators; parasites of focal predators; native prey) to compare the predatory functional responses of native Gammarus duebeni celticus and invasive Gammarus pulex amphipods towards three invertebrate prey species (Asellus aquaticus, Simulium spp., Baetis rhodani), thus, quantifying the context dependencies of parasitism and a higher-order fish predator on these functional responses. Our functional response experiments demonstrated that the invasive amphipod had a higher predatory impact (lower handling time) on two of three prey species, which reflects patterns of impact observed in the field. The community module also revealed that parasitism had context-dependent influences, for one prey species, with the potential to further reduce the predatory impact of the invasive amphipod or increase the predatory impact of the native amphipod in the presence of a higher-order fish predator. Partial consumption of prey was similar for both predators and occurred increasingly in the order A. aquaticus, Simulium spp. and B. rhodani. This was associated with increasing prey densities, but showed no context dependencies with parasitism or higher-order fish predator. This study supports the applicability of comparative functional responses as a tool to predict and assess invasive species impacts incorporating multiple context dependencies. PMID:25265905

  1. Intracellular responses to frequency modulated tones in the dorsal cortex of the mouse inferior colliculus

    PubMed Central

    Geis, H.-Rüdiger A. P.; Borst, J. Gerard G.

    2013-01-01

    Frequency modulations occur in many natural sounds, including vocalizations. The neuronal response to frequency modulated (FM) stimuli has been studied extensively in different brain areas, with an emphasis on the auditory cortex and the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus. Here, we measured the responses to FM sweeps in whole-cell recordings from neurons in the dorsal cortex of the mouse inferior colliculus. Both up- and downward logarithmic FM sweeps were presented at two different speeds to both the ipsi- and the contralateral ear. Based on the number of action potentials that were fired, between 10 and 24% of cells were selective for rate or direction of the FM sweeps. A somewhat lower percentage of cells, 6–21%, showed selectivity based on EPSP size. To study the mechanisms underlying the generation of FM selectivity, we compared FM responses with responses to simple tones in the same cells. We found that if pairs of neurons responded in a similar way to simple tones, they generally also responded in a similar way to FM sweeps. Further evidence that FM selectivity can be generated within the dorsal cortex was obtained by reconstructing FM sweeps from the response to simple tones using three different models. In about half of the direction selective neurons the selectivity was generated by spectrally asymmetric synaptic inhibition. In addition, evidence for direction selectivity based on the timing of excitatory responses was also obtained in some cells. No clear evidence for the local generation of rate selectivity was obtained. We conclude that FM direction selectivity can be generated within the dorsal cortex of the mouse inferior colliculus by multiple mechanisms. PMID:23386812

  2. Leptin modulates the late fever response to LPS in diet-induced obese animals.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Joanna; Woodside, Barbara; Luheshi, Giamal N

    2014-11-01

    Leptin is an important modulator of both inflammation and energy homeostasis, making it a key interface between the inflammatory response to pathogenic stimuli and the energy status of the host. In previous studies we demonstrated that sickness responses to systemic immune challenge, including fever, are significantly exacerbated in diet induced obese animals. To investigate whether this exacerbation is functionally linked to the obesity associated increase in circulating levels of leptin, a species-specific leptin antiserum (LAS) was used to neutralize endogenous leptin in diet-induced obese adult male Wistar rats treated with a single intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (100μg/kg). LAS significantly reduced the magnitude of the later phases of the fever response, and attenuated the circulating levels of IL-6, IL-1ra and bioactivity of leptin in the obese animals. In addition, the antiserum significantly attenuated the hypothalamic expression of IL-1ß, IκBα, COX2, SOCS3 and IL-6 in both lean and obese rats 10h after the LPS injection and NF-IL6 in the hypothalamus of obese rats only. The relatively late rise in brain IL-6 suggested a role in mediating the extended fever response in obese animals and we tested this by neutralizing brain IL-6 using an IL6-AS injected intracerebroventricularly (4μl, icv). The IL6-AS significantly but transiently (between 9h and 12h post LPS) reduced the late fever response of obese rats. These results demonstrate that leptin plays an important part in modulating the late portion of the fever response to LPS, likely through the induction of hypothalamic IL-6 in obese animals.

  3. A mixed glucocorticoid/mineralocorticoid receptor modulator dampens endocrine and hippocampal stress responsivity in male rats.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Elizabeth T; Streicher, Joshua; Berman, Sarah; Caldwell, Jody L; Ghisays, Valentina; Estrada, Christina M; Wulsin, Aynara C; Solomon, Matia B

    2017-09-01

    Aberrant glucocorticoid secretion is implicated in the pathophysiology of stress-related disorders (i.e., depression, anxiety). Glucocorticoids exert biological effects via mineralocorticoid (MR) and glucocorticoid (GR) receptors. Previous data from our laboratory indicate that GR antagonism/modulation (i.e., mifepristone, CORT 108297) regulate endocrine, behavioral, and central stress responses. Because of the dynamic interplay between MR and GR on HPA axis regulation and emotionality, compounds targeting both receptors are of interest for stress-related pathology. We investigated the effects of CORT 118335 (a dual selective GR modulator/MR antagonist) on endocrine, behavioral, and central (c-Fos) stress responses in male rats. Rats were treated for five days with CORT 118335, imipramine (positive control), or vehicle and exposed to restraint or forced swim stress (FST). CORT 118335 dampened corticosterone responses to both stressors, without a concomitant antidepressant-like effect in the FST. Imipramine decreased corticosterone responses to restraint stress; however, the antidepressant-like effect of imipramine in the FST was independent of circulating glucocorticoids. These findings indicate dissociation between endocrine and behavioral stress responses in the FST. CORT 118335 decreased c-Fos expression only in the CA1 division of the hippocampus. Imipramine decreased c-Fos expression in the basolateral amygdala and CA1 and CA3 divisions of the hippocampus. Overall, the data indicate differential effects of CORT 118335 and imipramine on stress-induced neuronal activity in various brain regions. The data also highlight a complex relationship between neuronal activation in stress and mood regulatory brain regions and the ensuing impact on endocrine and behavioral stress responses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Modulation of Neuronal Responses by Exogenous Attention in Macaque Primary Visual Cortex.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng; Chen, Minggui; Yan, Yin; Zhaoping, Li; Li, Wu

    2015-09-30

    Visual perception is influenced by attention deployed voluntarily or triggered involuntarily by salient stimuli. Modulation of visual cortical processing by voluntary or endogenous attention has been extensively studied, but much less is known about how involuntary or exogenous attention affects responses of visual cortical neurons. Using implanted microelectrode arrays, we examined the effects of exogenous attention on neuronal responses in the primary visual cortex (V1) of awake monkeys. A bright annular cue was flashed either around the receptive fields of recorded neurons or in the opposite visual field to capture attention. A subsequent grating stimulus probed the cue-induced effects. In a fixation task, when the cue-to-probe stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA) was <240 ms, the cue induced a transient increase of neuronal responses to the probe at the cued location during 40-100 ms after the onset of neuronal responses to the probe. This facilitation diminished and disappeared after repeated presentations of the same cue but recurred for a new cue of a different color. In another task to detect the probe, relative shortening of monkey's reaction times for the validly cued probe depended on the SOA in a way similar to the cue-induced V1 facilitation, and the behavioral and physiological cueing effects remained after repeated practice. Flashing two cues simultaneously in the two opposite visual fields weakened or diminished both the physiological and behavioral cueing effects. Our findings indicate that exogenous attention significantly modulates V1 responses and that the modulation strength depends on both novelty and task relevance of the stimulus. Significance statement: Visual attention can be involuntarily captured by a sudden appearance of a conspicuous object, allowing rapid reactions to unexpected events of significance. The current study discovered a correlate of this effect in monkey primary visual cortex. An abrupt, salient, flash enhanced neuronal

  5. DNA damage response inhibition at dysfunctional telomeres by modulation of telomeric DNA damage response RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Rossiello, Francesca; Aguado, Julio; Sepe, Sara; Iannelli, Fabio; Nguyen, Quan; Pitchiaya, Sethuramasundaram; Carninci, Piero; d’Adda di Fagagna, Fabrizio

    2017-01-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) is a set of cellular events that follows the generation of DNA damage. Recently, site-specific small non-coding RNAs, also termed DNA damage response RNAs (DDRNAs), have been shown to play a role in DDR signalling and DNA repair. Dysfunctional telomeres activate DDR in ageing, cancer and an increasing number of identified pathological conditions. Here we show that, in mammals, telomere dysfunction induces the transcription of telomeric DDRNAs (tDDRNAs) and their longer precursors from both DNA strands. DDR activation and maintenance at telomeres depend on the biogenesis and functions of tDDRNAs. Their functional inhibition by sequence-specific antisense oligonucleotides allows the unprecedented telomere-specific DDR inactivation in cultured cells and in vivo in mouse tissues. In summary, these results demonstrate that tDDRNAs are induced at dysfunctional telomeres and are necessary for DDR activation and they validate the viability of locus-specific DDR inhibition by targeting DDRNAs. PMID:28239143

  6. The Amygdala Mediates the Emotional Modulation of Threat-Elicited Skin Conductance Response

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Kimberly H.; Ver Hoef, Lawrence W.; Knight, David C.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to respond adaptively to threats in a changing environment is an important emotional function. The amygdala is a critical component of the neural circuit that mediates many emotion- related processes, and thus likely plays an important role in modulating the peripheral emotional response to threat. However, prior research has largely focused on the amygdala’s response to stimuli that signal impending threat, giving less attention to the amygdala’s response to the threat itself. From a functional perspective, however, it is the response to the threat itself that is most biologically relevant. Thus, understanding the factors that influence the amygdala’s response to threat is critical for a complete understanding of adaptive emotional processes. Therefore, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate factors (i.e. valence and arousal of co-occurring visual stimuli) that influence the amygdala’s response to threat (loud white-noise). We also assessed whether changes in amygdala activity varied with the peripheral expression of emotion (indexed via skin conductance response; SCR). The results showed that threat-elicited amygdala activation varied with the arousal, not valence of emotional images. More specifically, threat-elicited amygdala activation was larger to the threat when presented during high arousal (i.e. negative & positive) vs. low arousal (i.e. neutral) images. Further, the threat-elicited amygdala response was positively correlated with threat-elicited SCR. These findings indicate the amygdala’s response to threat is modified by the nature (e.g. arousal) of other stimuli in the environment. In turn, the amygdala appears to mediate important aspects of the peripheral emotional response to threat. PMID:24866521

  7. Interaction between serotonin 5-HT1A receptors and beta-endorphins modulates antidepressant response.

    PubMed

    Navinés, Ricard; Martín-Santos, Rocío; Gómez-Gil, Esther; Martínez de Osaba, María J; Gastó, Cristòbal

    2008-12-12

    Interactions between serotonergic and the endogenous opioid systems have been suggested to be involved in the etiopathogenesis of depression and in the mechanism of action of antidepressants. Activation of serotonin 5-HT1A receptors has been shown to increase plasma beta-endorphin (beta-END) levels in animal studies and in healthy humans. To assess interaction abnormalities between 5-HT1A receptors and the endogenous opioid system in patients with major depression and the possible modulating effect of citalopram. The beta-END response to the 5-HT1A receptor agonist, buspirone (30 mg), was measured in 30 patients with major depression and in 30 age- and sex-matched healthy controls before and after an 8-week treatment with citalopram. Pre-treatment score of the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD) was >or=17. Antidepressant response was defined by a 50% decrease in the HRSD. Pre- and post-treatment maximum peak response (Deltamax) and the area under the curve (AUC) of beta-END response were compared. Three time points were measured (60, 90 and 120 min). We also examined the correlations between the beta-END response and the antidepressant response. Buspirone plasma levels were not measured. At baseline, beta-END response was similar in patients and controls. After 8 weeks of citalopram treatment depressed patients showed a significant decrease in the beta-END response (Deltamax: p<.001; AUC: p<.001). A significant correlation between the beta-END reduction in the response and the reduction in the HRSD score (r=.656; p<.001) was observed. Changes in interaction between 5-HT1A receptor system and the endogenous opioid system may play a role both in the mechanism of action and response to antidepressant drugs.

  8. Pili-like proteins of Akkermansia muciniphila modulate host immune responses and gut barrier function

    PubMed Central

    Reunanen, Justus; Meijerink, Marjolein; Pietilä, Taija E.; Kainulainen, Veera; Klievink, Judith; Huuskonen, Laura; Aalvink, Steven; Skurnik, Mikael; Boeren, Sjef; Satokari, Reetta; Mercenier, Annick; Palva, Airi; Smidt, Hauke; de Vos, Willem M.; Belzer, Clara

    2017-01-01

    Gut barrier function is key in maintaining a balanced response between the host and its microbiome. The microbiota can modulate changes in gut barrier as well as metabolic and inflammatory responses. This highly complex system involves numerous microbiota-derived factors. The gut symbiont Akkermansia muciniphila is positively correlated with a lean phenotype, reduced body weight gain, amelioration of metabolic responses and restoration of gut barrier function by modulation of mucus layer thickness. However, the molecular mechanisms behind its metabolic and immunological regulatory properties are unexplored. Herein, we identify a highly abundant outer membrane pili-like protein of A. muciniphila MucT that is directly involved in immune regulation and enhancement of trans-epithelial resistance. The purified Amuc_1100 protein and enrichments containing all its associated proteins induced production of specific cytokines through activation of Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 and TLR4. This mainly leads to high levels of IL-10 similar to those induced by the other beneficial immune suppressive microorganisms such as Faecalibacterium prausnitzii A2-165 and Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1. Together these results indicate that outer membrane protein composition and particularly the newly identified highly abundant pili-like protein Amuc_1100 of A. muciniphila are involved in host immunological homeostasis at the gut mucosa, and improvement of gut barrier function. PMID:28249045

  9. Hepcidin mediates transcriptional changes that modulate acute cytokine-induced inflammatory responses in mice

    PubMed Central

    De Domenico, Ivana; Zhang, Tian Y.; Koening, Curry L.; Branch, Ryan W.; London, Nyall; Lo, Eric; Daynes, Raymond A.; Kushner, James P.; Li, Dean; Ward, Diane M.; Kaplan, Jerry

    2010-01-01

    Hepcidin is a peptide hormone that regulates iron homeostasis and acts as an antimicrobial peptide. It is expressed and secreted by a variety of cell types in response to iron loading and inflammation. Hepcidin mediates iron homeostasis by binding to the iron exporter ferroportin, inducing its internalization and degradation via activation of the protein kinase Jak2 and the subsequent phosphorylation of ferroportin. Here we have shown that hepcidin-activated Jak2 also phosphorylates the transcription factor Stat3, resulting in a transcriptional response. Hepcidin treatment of ferroportin-expressing mouse macrophages showed changes in mRNA expression levels of a wide variety of genes. The changes in transcript levels for half of these genes were a direct effect of hepcidin, as shown by cycloheximide insensitivity, and dependent on the presence of Stat3. Hepcidin-mediated transcriptional changes modulated LPS-induced transcription in both cultured macrophages and in vivo mouse models, as demonstrated by suppression of IL-6 and TNF-α transcript and secreted protein. Hepcidin-mediated transcription in mice also suppressed toxicity and morbidity due to single doses of LPS, poly(I:C), and turpentine, which is used to model chronic inflammatory disease. Most notably, we demonstrated that hepcidin pretreatment protected mice from a lethal dose of LPS and that hepcidin-knockout mice could be rescued from LPS toxicity by injection of hepcidin. The results of our study suggest a new function for hepcidin in modulating acute inflammatory responses. PMID:20530874

  10. GABAergic and glycinergic inhibition modulate monaural auditory response properties in the avian superior olivary nucleus.

    PubMed

    Coleman, W L; Fischl, M J; Weimann, S R; Burger, R M

    2011-05-01

    The superior olivary nucleus (SON) is the primary source of inhibition in the avian auditory brainstem. While much is known about the role of inhibition at the SON's target nuclei, little is known about how the SON itself processes auditory information or how inhibition modulates these properties. Additionally, the synaptic physiology of inhibitory inputs within the SON has not been described. We investigated these questions using in vivo and in vitro electrophysiological techniques in combination with immunohistochemistry in the chicken, an organism for which the auditory brainstem has otherwise been well characterized. We provide a thorough characterization of monaural response properties in the SON and the influence of inhibitory input in shaping these features. We found that the SON contains a heterogeneous mixture of response patterns to acoustic stimulation and that in most neurons these responses are modulated by both GABAergic and glycinergic inhibitory inputs. Interestingly, many SON neurons tuned to low frequencies have robust phase-locking capability and the precision of this phase locking is enhanced by inhibitory inputs. On the synaptic level, we found that evoked and spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) within the SON are also mediated by both GABAergic and glycinergic inhibition in all neurons tested. Analysis of spontaneous IPSCs suggests that most SON cells receive a mixture of both purely GABAergic terminals, as well as terminals from which GABA and glycine are coreleased. Evidence for glycinergic signaling within the SON is a novel result that has important implications for understanding inhibitory function in the auditory brainstem.

  11. Long-term ethanol effects on acute stress responses: modulation by dynorphin.

    PubMed

    Rácz, Ildikó; Markert, Astrid; Mauer, Daniela; Stoffel-Wagner, Birgit; Zimmer, Andreas

    2013-07-01

    The brain stress-response system is critically involved in the addiction process, stimulating drug consumption and the relapse to drug taking in abstinent addicts. At the same time, its functioning is affected by chronic drug exposure. Here, we have investigated the role of the endogenous opioid peptide dynorphin as a modulator of effects of long-term ethanol consumption on the brain stress-response system. Using the two-bottle choice paradigm, we demonstrate an enhanced ethanol preference in male dynorphin knockout mice. Exposure to mild foot shock increased ethanol consumption in wild-type control littermates, but not in dynorphin-deficient animals. Blood adrenocorticotropic hormone levels determined 5 minutes after the shock were not affected by the genotype. We also determined the neuronal reactivity after foot shock exposure using c-Fos immunoreactivity in limbic structures. This was strongly influenced by both genotype and chronic ethanol consumption. Long-term alcohol exposure elevated the foot shock-induced c-Fos expression in the basolateral amygdala in wild-type animals, but had the opposite effect in dynorphin-deficient mice. An altered c-Fos reactivity was also found in the periventricular nucleus, the thalamus and the hippocampus of dynorphin knockouts. Together these data suggest that dynorphin plays an important role in the modulation of the brain stress-response systems after chronic ethanol exposure. © 2012 The Authors, Addiction Biology © 2012 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  12. GABAergic and glycinergic inhibition modulate monaural auditory response properties in the avian superior olivary nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, W. L.; Fischl, M. J.; Weimann, S. R.

    2011-01-01

    The superior olivary nucleus (SON) is the primary source of inhibition in the avian auditory brainstem. While much is known about the role of inhibition at the SON's target nuclei, little is known about how the SON itself processes auditory information or how inhibition modulates these properties. Additionally, the synaptic physiology of inhibitory inputs within the SON has not been described. We investigated these questions using in vivo and in vitro electrophysiological techniques in combination with immunohistochemistry in the chicken, an organism for which the auditory brainstem has otherwise been well characterized. We provide a thorough characterization of monaural response properties in the SON and the influence of inhibitory input in shaping these features. We found that the SON contains a heterogeneous mixture of response patterns to acoustic stimulation and that in most neurons these responses are modulated by both GABAergic and glycinergic inhibitory inputs. Interestingly, many SON neurons tuned to low frequencies have robust phase-locking capability and the precision of this phase locking is enhanced by inhibitory inputs. On the synaptic level, we found that evoked and spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) within the SON are also mediated by both GABAergic and glycinergic inhibition in all neurons tested. Analysis of spontaneous IPSCs suggests that most SON cells receive a mixture of both purely GABAergic terminals, as well as terminals from which GABA and glycine are coreleased. Evidence for glycinergic signaling within the SON is a novel result that has important implications for understanding inhibitory function in the auditory brainstem. PMID:21368002

  13. Temporal and spectral dynamics underlying cognitive control modulated by task-irrelevant stimulus-response learning.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yanan; Cao, Xiangyi; Yue, Zhenzhu; Wang, Ling

    2017-02-01

    Behavioral and recent neuroimaging findings have shown reversal of interference effects due to manipulating proportion congruency (PC), which suggests that task-irrelevant stimulus-response (S-R) associations are strengthened and applied to predict responses. However, it is unclear how the strengthened S-R associations are represented and applied in the brain. We investigated with a between-subjects PC paradigm of the Hedge and Marsh task using electroencephalography (EEG). The behavioral results showed the reversal of the conflict effects, suggesting that task-irrelevant S-R associations were strengthened and used to prepare responses. The EEG results revealed the PC-related reversal of the conflict effects in the frontocentral N2 and parietal P3b amplitudes. Time-frequency analyses showed more pronounced PC-related reversal of the conflict effects in theta band (4-8 Hz) activity in frontocentral sites. These results suggest that the strengthened S-R associations due to PC manipulation modulated cognitive control. Importantly, the amplitude of lateralized readiness potential was higher in the high-PC condition than in the low-PC condition, suggesting that the strengthened short-term-memory spatial S-R associations that modulated cognitive control were applied similarly to long-term-memory spatial S-R associations.

  14. Dickkopf-3, a tissue-derived modulator of local T-cell responses.

    PubMed

    Meister, Michael; Papatriantafyllou, Maria; Nordström, Viola; Kumar, Varun; Ludwig, Julia; Lui, Kathy O; Boyd, Ashleigh S; Popovic, Zoran V; Fleming, Thomas Henry; Moldenhauer, Gerhard; Nawroth, Peter P; Gröne, Hermann-Josef; Waldmann, Herman; Oelert, Thilo; Arnold, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    The adaptive immune system protects organisms from harmful environmental insults. In parallel, regulatory mechanisms control immune responses in order to assure preservation of organ integrity. Yet, molecules involved in the control of T-cell responses in peripheral tissues are poorly characterized. Here, we investigated the function of Dickkopf-3 in the modulation of local T-cell reactivity. Dkk3 is a secreted, mainly tissue-derived protein with highest expression in organs considered as immune-privileged such as the eye, embryo, placenta, and brain. While T-cell development and activation status in naïve Dkk3-deficient mice was comparable to littermate controls, we found that Dkk3 contributes to the immunosuppressive microenvironment that protects transplanted, class-I mismatched embryoid bodies from T-cell-mediated rejection. Moreover, genetic deletion or antibody-mediated neutralization of Dkk3 led to an exacerbated experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). This phenotype was accompanied by a change of T-cell polarization displayed by an increase of IFNγ-producing T cells within the central nervous system. In the wild-type situation, Dkk3 expression in the brain was up-regulated during the course of EAE in an IFNγ-dependent manner. In turn, Dkk3 decreased IFNγ activity and served as part of a negative feedback mechanism. Thus, our findings suggest that Dkk3 functions as a tissue-derived modulator of local CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell responses.

  15. Cognitive modulation of psychophysical, respiratory and autonomic responses to cold pressor test.

    PubMed

    Santarcangelo, Enrica L; Paoletti, Giulia; Chiavacci, Iacopo; Palombo, Carlo; Carli, Giancarlo; Varanini, Maurizio

    2013-01-01

    In healthy subjects with high hypnotisability (highs) under hypnosis, subjectively effective suggestions for analgesia abolish the increases in blood pressure associated with cold pressor test (cpt) by reducing the peripheral vascular resistance. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of the suggestions of analgesia on the responses to cpt in healthy highs (n = 22) and in low hypnotisable participants (lows, n = 22) out of hypnosis. Cpt was administered without (CPT) and with suggestions for analgesia (CPT+AN). Psychophysical (pain intensity, pain threshold, cpt duration (time of immersion) and pain tolerance, defined as the difference between cpt duration and pain threshold), respiratory (amplitude and frequency) and autonomic variables (tonic skin conductance, mean RR interval (RR = 1/heart rate), blood pressure, skin blood flow) were studied. The suggestions for analgesia increased cpt duration and RR in both groups, but decreased pain intensity and enhanced pain threshold only in highs; in both groups they did not modulate systolic blood pressure, tonic skin conductance and skin blood flow; thus, increased parasympathetic activity appears responsible for the heart rate reduction induced by suggestions in both groups. In conclusion, our findings show that suggestions modulate pain experience differentially in highs and lows, and are partially effective also in lows. We hypothesize that the mechanisms responsible for the efficacy of suggestions in healthy lows may be involved also in their efficacy in chronic pain patients with low hypnotisability.

  16. Cognitive Modulation of Psychophysical, Respiratory and Autonomic Responses to Cold Pressor Test

    PubMed Central

    Santarcangelo, Enrica L.; Paoletti, Giulia; Chiavacci, Iacopo; Palombo, Carlo; Carli, Giancarlo; Varanini, Maurizio

    2013-01-01

    In healthy subjects with high hypnotisability (highs) under hypnosis, subjectively effective suggestions for analgesia abolish the increases in blood pressure associated with cold pressor test (cpt) by reducing the peripheral vascular resistance. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of the suggestions of analgesia on the responses to cpt in healthy highs (n = 22) and in low hypnotisable participants (lows, n = 22) out of hypnosis. Cpt was administered without (CPT) and with suggestions for analgesia (CPT+AN). Psychophysical (pain intensity, pain threshold, cpt duration (time of immersion) and pain tolerance, defined as the difference between cpt duration and pain threshold), respiratory (amplitude and frequency) and autonomic variables (tonic skin conductance, mean RR interval (RR = 1/heart rate), blood pressure, skin blood flow) were studied. The suggestions for analgesia increased cpt duration and RR in both groups, but decreased pain intensity and enhanced pain threshold only in highs; in both groups they did not modulate systolic blood pressure, tonic skin conductance and skin blood flow; thus, increased parasympathetic activity appears responsible for the heart rate reduction induced by suggestions in both groups. In conclusion, our findings show that suggestions modulate pain experience differentially in highs and lows, and are partially effective also in lows. We hypothesize that the mechanisms responsible for the efficacy of suggestions in healthy lows may be involved also in their efficacy in chronic pain patients with low hypnotisability. PMID:24130680

  17. Modulation of Temporal Precision in Thalamic Population Responses to Natural Visual Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Desbordes, Gaëlle; Jin, Jianzhong; Alonso, Jose-Manuel; Stanley, Garrett B.

    2010-01-01

    Natural visual stimuli have highly structured spatial and temporal properties which influence the way visual information is encoded in the visual pathway. In response to natural scene stimuli, neurons in the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) are temporally precise – on a time scale of 10–25 ms – both within single cells and across cells within a population. This time scale, established by non stimulus-driven elements of neuronal firing, is significantly shorter than that of natural scenes, yet is critical for the neural representation of the spatial and temporal structure of the scene. Here, a generalized linear model (GLM) that combines stimulus-driven elements with spike-history dependence associated with intrinsic cellular dynamics is shown to predict the fine timing precision of LGN responses to natural scene stimuli, the corresponding correlation structure across nearby neurons in the population, and the continuous modulation of spike timing precision and latency across neurons. A single model captured the experimentally observed neural response, across different levels of contrasts and different classes of visual stimuli, through interactions between the stimulus correlation structure and the nonlinearity in spike generation and spike history dependence. Given the sensitivity of the thalamocortical synapse to closely timed spikes and the importance of fine timing precision for the faithful representation of natural scenes, the modulation of thalamic population timing over these time scales is likely important for cortical representations of the dynamic natural visual environment. PMID:21151356

  18. Nitrite is a positive modulator of the Frank-Starling response in the vertebrate heart.

    PubMed

    Angelone, Tommaso; Gattuso, Alfonsina; Imbrogno, Sandra; Mazza, Rosa; Tota, Bruno

    2012-06-01

    Evidence from both mammalian and nonmammalian vertebrates indicates that intracardiac nitric oxide (NO) facilitates myocardial relaxation, ventricular diastolic distensibility, and, consequently, the Frank-Starling response, i.e., the preload-induced increase of cardiac output. Since nitrite ion (NO(2)(-)), the major storage pool of bioactive NO, recently emerged as a cardioprotective endogenous modulator, we explored its influence on the Frank-Starling response in eel, frog, and rat hearts, used as paradigms of fish, amphibians, and mammals, respectively. We demonstrated that, like NO, exogenous nitrite improves the Frank-Starling response in all species, as indicated by an increase of stroke volume and stroke work (eel and frog) and of left ventricular (LV) pressure and LVdP/dt max (rat), used as indexes of inotropism. Unlike in frog and rat, in eel, the positive influence of nitrite appeared to be dependent on NO synthase inhibition. In all species, the effect was sensitive to NO scavengers, independent on nitroxyl anion, and mediated by a cGMP/PKG-dependent pathway. Moreover, the nitrite treatment increased S-nitrosylation of lower-molecular-weight proteins in cytosolic and membrane fractions. These results suggest that nitrite acts as a physiological source of NO, modulating through different species-specific mechanisms, the stretch-induced intrinsic regulation of the vertebrate heart.

  19. Growth modulation using functional appliances--cephalometric predictors of successful response.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sharanya Ajit; Shetty, K Sadashiva; Prakash, A T

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine any skeletal morphologic features evident on a pretreatment lateral cephalogram that may be used to predict improvement in the sagittal relationship during functional appliance therapy in Class II patients and compare changes between cases with and without a favorable response to growth modulation. Pretreatment and postfunctional lateral cephalograms were analyzed, and the change in the ANB angle was used to determine the skeletal response to treatment with a functional appliance. Based on the change in the ANB angle, the patients were divided into two groups of 12 patients each. Comparisons were made between the mean pretreatment (T1) cephalometric parameters of group I (skeletal) and group II (nonskeletal) to assess any pretreatment parameters that were significantly different between the groups. Changes due to functional appliance therapy from the pretreatment (T1) to postfunctional (T2) stage was measured as T2-T1 in both groups. The mean changes seen in group I and group II were then compared to assess the difference between changes brought about by growth modulation using functional appliances. Comparative statistical analysis of the data was done using one-way analysis of variance F test. This study showed that not all cases respond favorably to growth modulation. The pretreatment parameters that correlated to a favorable response were low mandibular plane angle, low basal plane angle, and a high Jarabak ratio. In those cases that responded favorably, the changes seen were an increase in Co-Go (ramus height), decrease in overjet, increase in SNB, and increase in the Jarabak ratio.

  20. Identification of Pharmacological Modulators of HMGB1-Induced Inflammatory Response by Cell-Based Screening

    PubMed Central

    Gerö, Domokos; Szoleczky, Petra; Módis, Katalin; Pribis, John P.; Al-Abed, Yousef; Yang, Huan; Chevan, Sangeeta; Billiar, Timothy R.; Tracey, Kevin J.; Szabo, Csaba

    2013-01-01

    High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), a highly conserved, ubiquitous protein, is released into the circulation during sterile inflammation (e.g. arthritis, trauma) and circulatory shock. It participates in the pathogenesis of delayed inflammatory responses and organ dysfunction. While several molecules have been identified that modulate the release of HMGB1, less attention has been paid to identify pharmacological inhibitors of the downstream inflammatory processes elicited by HMGB1 (C23-C45 disulfide C106 thiol form). In the current study, a cell-based medium-throughput screening of a 5000+ compound focused library of clinical drugs and drug-like compounds was performed in murine RAW264.7 macrophages, in order to identify modulators of HMGB1-induced tumor-necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) production. Clinically used drugs that suppressed HMGB1-induced TNFα production included glucocorticoids, beta agonists, and the anti-HIV compound indinavir. A re-screen of the NIH clinical compound library identified beta-agonists and various intracellular cAMP enhancers as compounds that potentiate the inhibitory effect of glucocorticoids on HMGB1-induced TNFα production. The molecular pathways involved in this synergistic anti-inflammatory effect are related, at least in part, to inhibition of TNFα mRNA synthesis via a synergistic suppression of ERK/IκB activation. Inhibition of TNFα production by prednisolone+salbutamol pretreatment was also confirmed in vivo in mice subjected to HMGB1 injection; this effect was more pronounced than the effect of either of the agents administered separately. The current study unveils several drug-like modulators of HMGB1-mediated inflammatory responses and offers pharmacological directions for the therapeutic suppression of inflammatory responses in HMGB1-dependent diseases. PMID:23799067

  1. Identification of pharmacological modulators of HMGB1-induced inflammatory response by cell-based screening.

    PubMed

    Gerö, Domokos; Szoleczky, Petra; Módis, Katalin; Pribis, John P; Al-Abed, Yousef; Yang, Huan; Chevan, Sangeeta; Billiar, Timothy R; Tracey, Kevin J; Szabo, Csaba

    2013-01-01

    High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), a highly conserved, ubiquitous protein, is released into the circulation during sterile inflammation (e.g. arthritis, trauma) and circulatory shock. It participates in the pathogenesis of delayed inflammatory responses and organ dysfunction. While several molecules have been identified that modulate the release of HMGB1, less attention has been paid to identify pharmacological inhibitors of the downstream inflammatory processes elicited by HMGB1 (C23-C45 disulfide C106 thiol form). In the current study, a cell-based medium-throughput screening of a 5000+ compound focused library of clinical drugs and drug-like compounds was performed in murine RAW264.7 macrophages, in order to identify modulators of HMGB1-induced tumor-necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) production. Clinically used drugs that suppressed HMGB1-induced TNFα production included glucocorticoids, beta agonists, and the anti-HIV compound indinavir. A re-screen of the NIH clinical compound library identified beta-agonists and various intracellular cAMP enhancers as compounds that potentiate the inhibitory effect of glucocorticoids on HMGB1-induced TNFα production. The molecular pathways involved in this synergistic anti-inflammatory effect are related, at least in part, to inhibition of TNFα mRNA synthesis via a synergistic suppression of ERK/IκB activation. Inhibition of TNFα production by prednisolone+salbutamol pretreatment was also confirmed in vivo in mice subjected to HMGB1 injection; this effect was more pronounced than the effect of either of the agents administered separately. The current study unveils several drug-like modulators of HMGB1-mediated inflammatory responses and offers pharmacological directions for the therapeutic suppression of inflammatory responses in HMGB1-dependent diseases.

  2. Thalidomide modulates Mycobacterium leprae-induced NF-κB pathway and lower cytokine response.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Maristela de Oliveira; Fulco, Tatiana de Oliveira; Pinheiro, Roberta Olmo; Pereira, Renata de Meirelles Santos; Redner, Paulo; Sarno, Euzenir Nunes; Lopes, Ulisses Gazos; Sampaio, Elizabeth Pereira

    2011-11-16

    It is widely accepted that tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) plays a critical role in the development of tissue and nerve damage in leprosy and during the reactional episodes of acute inflammation. Thalidomide (N-α-phthalimidoglutarimide), a drug used to treat leprosy reaction, modulates immune response, inhibits inflammation and NF-κB activity. Here we investigated whether thalidomide inhibits NF-κB activation induced by Mycobacterium leprae, p38 and ERK1/2 MAPK activation. EMSA and supershift assays were performed to investigate NF-κB activation in response to M. leprae and its modulation following in vitro treatment with thalidomide. Luciferase assay was assayed in transfected THP-1 cells to determine NF-κB transcriptional activity. Flow cytometry and immunofluorescence were used to investigate p65 accumulation in the nucleus. Immunoblotting was used to investigate p38 and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Following activation of PBMC and monocytes with M. leprae, the formation and nuclear localization of NF-κB complexes composed mainly of p65/p50 and p50/p50 dimers was observed. Induction of NF-κB activation and DNA binding activity was inhibited by thalidomide. The drug also reduced M. leprae-induced TNF-α production and inhibited p38 and ERK1/2 activation. Definition of the activation mechanisms in cells stimulated with M. leprae can lead to the development of new therapy applications to modulate NF-κB activation and to control the inflammatory manifestations due to enhanced TNF-α response as observed in leprosy and in leprosy reactions.

  3. Segregation of Visual Response Properties in the Mouse Superior Colliculus and Their Modulation during Locomotion.

    PubMed

    Ito, Shinya; Feldheim, David A; Litke, Alan M

    2017-08-30

    The superior colliculus (SC) receives direct input from the retina and integrates it with information about sound, touch, and state of the animal that is relayed from other parts of the brain to initiate specific behavioral outcomes. The superficial SC layers (sSC) contain cells that respond to visual stimuli, whereas the deep SC layers (dSC) contain cells that also respond to auditory and somatosensory stimuli. Here, we used a large-scale silicon probe recording system to examine the visual response properties of SC cells of head-fixed and alert male mice. We found cells with diverse response properties including: (1) orientation/direction-selective (OS/DS) cells with a firing rate that is suppressed by drifting sinusoidal gratings (negative OS/DS cells); (2) suppressed-by-contrast cells; (3) cells with complex-like spatial summation nonlinearity; and (4) cells with Y-like spatial summation nonlinearity. We also found specific response properties that are enriched in different depths of the SC. The sSC is enriched with cells with small RFs, high evoked firing rates (FRs), and sustained temporal responses, whereas the dSC is enriched with the negative OS/DS cells and with cells with large RFs, low evoked FRs, and transient temporal responses. Locomotion modulates the activity of the SC cells both additively and multiplicatively and changes the preferred spatial frequency of some SC cells. These results provide the first description of the negative OS/DS cells and demonstrate that the SC segregates cells with different response properties and that the behavioral state of a mouse affects SC activity.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The superior colliculus (SC) receives visual input from the retina in its superficial layers (sSC) and induces eye/head-orientating movements and innate defensive responses in its deeper layers (dSC). Despite their importance, very little is known about the visual response properties of dSC neurons. Using high-density electrode recordings and novel

  4. Immunobiotic Bifidobacteria Strains Modulate Rotavirus Immune Response in Porcine Intestinal Epitheliocytes via Pattern Recognition Receptor Signaling.

    PubMed

    Ishizuka, Takamasa; Kanmani, Paulraj; Kobayashi, Hisakazu; Miyazaki, Ayako; Soma, Junichi; Suda, Yoshihito; Aso, Hisashi; Nochi, Tomonori; Iwabuchi, Noriyuki; Xiao, Jin-zhong; Saito, Tadao; Villena, Julio; Kitazawa, Haruki

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we aimed to characterize the antiviral response of an originally established porcine intestinal epithelial cell line (PIE cells) by evaluating the molecular innate immune response to rotavirus (RVs). In addition, we aimed to select immunomodulatory bacteria with antiviral capabilities. PIE cells were inoculated with RVs isolated from different host species and the infective titers and the molecular innate immune response were evaluated. In addition, the protection against RVs infection and the modulation of immune response by different lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains was studied. The RVs strains OSU (porcine) and UK (bovine) effectively infected PIE cells. Our results also showed that RVs infection in PIE cells triggered TLR3-, RIG-I- and MDA-5-mediated immune responses with activation of IRF3 and NF-κB, induction of IFN-β and up-regulation of the interferon stimulated genes MxA and RNase L. Among the LAB strains tested, Bifidobacterium infantis MCC12 and B. breve MCC1274 significantly reduced RVs titers in infected PIE cells. The beneficial effects of both bifidobacteria were associated with reduction of A20 expression, and improvements of IRF-3 activation, IFN-β production, and MxA and RNase L expressions. These results indicate the value of PIE cells for studying RVs molecular innate immune response in pigs and for the selection of beneficial bacteria with antiviral capabilities.

  5. Nitric oxide differentially modulates ON and OFF responses of retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guo-Yong; Liets, Lauren C; Chalupa, Leo M

    2003-08-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that nitric oxide (NO) can regulate diverse retinal functions, but whether this gas is capable of modulating the visual responses of retinal output neurons has not been established. In the present study the effects of NO on rod-driven responses of retinal ganglion cells were tested by making whole cell patch-clamp recordings from morphologically identified ganglion cells in the isolated ferret retina. Bath application of L-arginine, the substrate of nitric oxide synthase, and S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine, the NO donor, was found to differentially affect on and off discharge patterns. The introduction of these drugs significantly decreased visual responses of retinal ganglion cells, but the effects were more pronounced on off than on on discharges. The peak discharge rates of on responses were usually reduced by about 40%, but not completely blocked. In contrast, off responses were completely blocked in most cells. These differential effects were observed in on-off cells as well as in cells that yielded just on or off discharges. The off responses that were blocked by NO were also blocked by DL-2-amino-phosphonobutyric acid (APB) and strychnine, suggesting the involvement of the APB-sensitive rod pathway.

  6. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor 1a (p21) Modulates Response to Cocaine and Motivated Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Scholpa, Natalie E.; Briggs, Sherri B.; Wagner, John J.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the functional role of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1a (Cdkn1a or p21) in cocaine-induced responses using a knockout mouse model. Acute locomotor activity after cocaine administration (15 mg/kg, i.p.) was decreased in p21−/− mice, whereas cocaine-induced place preference was enhanced. Interestingly, κ-opioid–induced place aversion was also significantly enhanced. Concentration-dependent analysis of locomotor activity in response to cocaine demonstrated a rightward shift in the p21−/− mice. Pretreatment with a 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor antagonist did not alter the enhancement of cocaine-induced conditioned place preference in p21−/− mice, indicating a lack of involvement of serotonergic signaling in this response. Cocaine exposure increased p21 expression exclusively in the ventral sector of the hippocampus of rodents after either contingent or noncontingent drug administration. Increased p21 expression was accompanied by increased histone acetylation of the p21 promoter region in rats. Finally, increased neurogenesis in the dorsal hippocampus of p21−/− mice was also observed. These results show that functional loss of p21 altered the acute locomotor response to cocaine and the conditioned responses to either rewarding or aversive stimuli. Collectively, these findings demonstrate a previously unreported involvement of p21 in modulating responses to cocaine and in motivated behaviors. PMID:26791604

  7. Blunted Opiate Modulation of Prolactin Response in Smoking Men and Women

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Darcy; al’Absi, Mustafa

    2010-01-01

    Endogenous opioids are integral in modulating drug reward, but it is believed these may act through several mechanisms including hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) and dopamine pathways. This study was developed to examine how nicotine dependence alters endogenous opioid regulation of prolactin response, a peripheral marker of dopaminergic activity. Smokers and nonsmokers completed two sessions during which placebo or 50 mg of naltrexone was administered, using a double-blind, counterbalanced design. Blood samples and mood measures were obtained during a resting absorption period, after exposure to two noxious stimuli (cold pressor and thermal pain), and during an extended recovery period. Opioid blockade increased prolactin response, indicating an inhibitory effect of the endogenous opioid system on prolactin, possibly mediated by reduced stimulatory effects of dopamine on this hormone. These responses were attenuated in smokers relative to nonsmokers. There was also gender disparity in prolactin response, with women showing a stronger response to endogenous opioid modification than men regardless of smoking status. The attenuated effects of opioid blockade may reflect dysregulated opiodergic and dopaminergic effects. Results extend previous reports showing blunted opioid regulation of the HPA response in dependent smokers. PMID:19969014

  8. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor 1a (p21) Modulates Response to Cocaine and Motivated Behaviors.

    PubMed

    Scholpa, Natalie E; Briggs, Sherri B; Wagner, John J; Cummings, Brian S

    2016-04-01

    This study investigated the functional role of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1a (Cdkn1a or p21) in cocaine-induced responses using a knockout mouse model. Acute locomotor activity after cocaine administration (15 mg/kg, i.p.) was decreased in p21(-/-) mice, whereas cocaine-induced place preference was enhanced. Interestingly, κ-opioid-induced place aversion was also significantly enhanced. Concentration-dependent analysis of locomotor activity in response to cocaine demonstrated a rightward shift in the p21(-/-) mice. Pretreatment with a 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor antagonist did not alter the enhancement of cocaine-induced conditioned place preference in p21(-/-) mice, indicating a lack of involvement of serotonergic signaling in this response. Cocaine exposure increased p21 expression exclusively in the ventral sector of the hippocampus of rodents after either contingent or noncontingent drug administration. Increased p21 expression was accompanied by increased histone acetylation of the p21 promoter region in rats. Finally, increased neurogenesis in the dorsal hippocampus of p21(-/-) mice was also observed. These results show that functional loss of p21 altered the acute locomotor response to cocaine and the conditioned responses to either rewarding or aversive stimuli. Collectively, these findings demonstrate a previously unreported involvement of p21 in modulating responses to cocaine and in motivated behaviors.

  9. Immunobiotic Bifidobacteria Strains Modulate Rotavirus Immune Response in Porcine Intestinal Epitheliocytes via Pattern Recognition Receptor Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Ayako; Soma, Junichi; Suda, Yoshihito; Aso, Hisashi; Nochi, Tomonori; Iwabuchi, Noriyuki; Xiao, Jin-zhong; Saito, Tadao; Villena, Julio; Kitazawa, Haruki

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we aimed to characterize the antiviral response of an originally established porcine intestinal epithelial cell line (PIE cells) by evaluating the molecular innate immune response to rotavirus (RVs). In addition, we aimed to select immunomodulatory bacteria with antiviral capabilities. PIE cells were inoculated with RVs isolated from different host species and the infective titers and the molecular innate immune response were evaluated. In addition, the protection against RVs infection and the modulation of immune response by different lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains was studied. The RVs strains OSU (porcine) and UK (bovine) effectively infected PIE cells. Our results also showed that RVs infection in PIE cells triggered TLR3-, RIG-I- and MDA-5-mediated immune responses with activation of IRF3 and NF-κB, induction of IFN-β and up-regulation of the interferon stimulated genes MxA and RNase L. Among the LAB strains tested, Bifidobacterium infantis MCC12 and B. breve MCC1274 significantly reduced RVs titers in infected PIE cells. The beneficial effects of both bifidobacteria were associated with reduction of A20 expression, and improvements of IRF-3 activation, IFN-β production, and MxA and RNase L expressions. These results indicate the value of PIE cells for studying RVs molecular innate immune response in pigs and for the selection of beneficial bacteria with antiviral capabilities. PMID:27023883

  10. Sharks modulate their escape behavior in response to predator size, speed and approach orientation.

    PubMed

    Seamone, Scott; Blaine, Tristan; Higham, Timothy E

    2014-12-01

    Escape responses are often critical for surviving predator-prey interactions. Nevertheless, little is known about how predator size, speed and approach orientation impact escape performance, especially in larger prey that are primarily viewed as predators. We used realistic shark models to examine how altering predatory behavior and morphology (size, speed and approach orientation) influences escape behavior and performance in Squalus acanthias, a shark that is preyed upon by apex marine predators. Predator models induced C-start escape responses, and increasing the size and speed of the models triggered a more intense response (increased escape turning rate and acceleration). In addition, increased predator size resulted in greater responsiveness from the sharks. Among the responses, predator approach orientation had the most significant impact on escapes, such that the head-on approach, as compared to the tail-on approach, induced greater reaction distances and increased escape turning rate, speed and acceleration. Thus, the anterior binocular vision in sharks renders them less effective at detecting predators approaching from behind. However, it appears that sharks compensate by performing high-intensity escapes, likely induced by the lateral line system, or by a sudden visual flash of the predator entering their field of view. Our study reveals key aspects of escape behavior in sharks, highlighting the modulation of performance in response to predator approach. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. Dying autologous cells as instructors of the immune system.

    PubMed

    Munoz, L E; Herrmann, M; Berens, C

    2015-01-01

    In an organism, cell death occurs at many different sites and in many different forms. It is frequently part of normal development or serves to maintain cell homeostasis. In other cases, cell death not only occurs due to injury, disease or infection, but also as a consequence of various therapeutic interventions. However, in all of these scenarios, the immune system has to react to the dying and dead cells and decide whether to mount an immune response, to remain quiet or to initiate healing and repopulation. This is essential for the organism, testified by many diseases that are associated with malfunctioning in the cell death process, the corpse removal, or the ensuing immune responsiveness. Therefore, dying cells generally have to be considered as instructors of the immune system. How this happens and which signals and pathways contribute to modulate or shape the immune response is still elusive in many conditions. The articles presented in this Special Issue address such open questions. They highlight that the context in which cell death occurs will not only influence the cell death process itself, but also affect the surrounding cellular milieu, how the generation and presence of 'eat me' signals can have an impact on cell clearance, and that the exact nature of the residual 'debris' and how it is processed are fundamental to determining the immunological consequences. Hopefully, these articles initiate new approaches and new experiments to complete our understanding of how cell death and the immune system interact with each other.

  12. Orexin 1 receptors are a novel target to modulate panic responses and the panic brain network.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Philip L; Samuels, Brian C; Fitz, Stephanie D; Federici, Lauren M; Hammes, Nathan; Early, Maureen C; Truitt, William; Lowry, Christopher A; Shekhar, Anantha

    2012-12-05

    Although the hypothalamic orexin system is known to regulate appetitive behaviors and promote wakefulness and arousal (Sakurai, 2007 [56]), this system may also be important in adaptive and pathological anxiety/stress responses (Suzuki et al., 2005 [4]). In a recent study, we demonstrated that CSF orexin levels were significantly higher in patients experiencing panic attacks compared to non-panicking depressed subjects (Johnson et al., 2010 [9]). Furthermore, genetically silencing orexin synthesis or blocking orexin 1 receptors attenuated lactate-induced panic in an animal model of panic disorder. Therefore, in the present study, we tested if orexin (ORX) modulates panic responses and brain pathways activated by two different panicogenic drugs. We conducted a series of pharmacological, behavioral, physiological and immunohistochemical experiments to study the modulation by the orexinergic inputs of anxiety behaviors, autonomic responses, and activation of brain pathways elicited by systemic injections of anxiogenic/panicogenic drugs in rats. We show that systemic injections of two different anxiogenic/panicogenic drugs (FG-7142, an inverse agonist at the benzodiazepine site of the GABA(A) receptor, and caffeine, a nonselective competitive adenosine receptor antagonist) increased c-Fos induction in a specific subset of orexin neurons located in the dorsomedial/perifornical (DMH/PeF) but not the lateral hypothalamus. Pretreating rats with an orexin 1 receptor antagonist attenuated the FG-7142-induced anxiety-like behaviors, increased heart rate, and neuronal activation in key panic pathways, including subregions of the central nucleus of the amygdala, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, periaqueductal gray and in the rostroventrolateral medulla. Overall, the data here suggest that the ORX neurons in the DMH/PeF region are critical to eliciting coordinated panic responses and that ORX1 receptor antagonists constitute a potential novel treatment strategy for panic and

  13. Oxytocin modulates unconditioned fear response in lactating dams: an fMRI study

    PubMed Central

    Febo, Marcelo; Shields, Jessica; Ferris, Craig F.; King, Jean A.

    2009-01-01

    Oxytocinergic neurotransmission during lactation contributes to reduction of anxiety levels and fear. However, our knowledge of where oxytocin acts in the brain to achieve this effect, particularly to an unconditioned fear stimulus, is incomplete. We used blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) fMRI to test whether central administration of oxytocin 45–60 minutes before fMRI scanning alters maternal brain activation in response to a predator scent (TMT, trimethylthiazoline). Comparison behavioral experiments that examined maternal responses to this unconditioned fear -inducing odor were carried out in a separate cohort of lactating rats given similar treatments. Behavioral experiments confirmed the effectiveness of oxytocin at reducing freezing behavior as compared to vehicle controls. Our fMRI findings indicate that oxytocin modulated both positive and negative BOLD responses across several olfactory and forebrain nuclei. Significantly greater percent increases in BOLD signal in response to TMT were observed in the anterior cingulate, bed nucleus of stria terminalis and perirhinal area of oxytocin pretreated rats. These animals also showed significantly larger percent decreases in BOLD in mammillary bodies, secondary motor cortex, gustatory cortex, prelimbic prefrontal cortex, orbital cortex, and the anterior olfactory nucleus. The observed pattern of brain activity suggests that oxytocin enhances neural processing in emotion and cognition driven brain areas such as the cingulate cortex, while dramatically reducing activity in areas also controlling autonomic, visceromotor and skeletomotor responses. The present data contribute to the growing literature suggesting the oxytocin modulate the integration of emotional and cognitive information through myriad brain regions to facilitate decreases in anxiety (even to an unconditioned stimulus) while potentially promoting pair-bonding, social memory and parental care. PMID:19766607

  14. Sex differences in the response to influenza virus infection: modulation by stress.

    PubMed

    Avitsur, Ronit; Mays, Jacqueline W; Sheridan, John F

    2011-02-01

    Influenza virus infection is a significant public health problem; however factors affecting the incidence and severity of disease have not been fully elucidated. The present study sought to examine the role of sex and stress in mediating susceptibility to an influenza viral infection in mice. Male and female mice underwent repeated cycles of restraint (RST) stress, followed by an influenza A/PR8 virus infection. Following these manipulations, levels of circulating corticosterone, lung proinflammatory cytokine gene expression and sickness behavior were examined. The data indicate sex differences in several aspects of the response to the A/PR8 virus infection. The kinetics of lung interleukin-1β mRNA expression were faster in infected males compared to females, while circulating corticosterone levels were elevated in infected females, but not in males. Anorexia and reduced saccharin consumption began earlier and symptoms were more pronounced in infected males than in females. In addition, RST modulated the response to the A/PR8 virus infection. Proinflammatory cytokine gene expression in response to infection was enhanced and sickness behavior was modulated by RST in both males and females. These data suggest that males mount more vigorous immune and behavioral responses to influenza viral infection compared to females, and stress exacerbates the response in both males and females. In conclusion, complex interactions between biological and behavioral factors are involved in mediating individual differences in health and disease. Additional studies may help uncover some of the factors contributing to the individual differences in susceptibility to influenza infection. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Orexin 1 receptors are a novel target to modulate panic responses and the panic brain network

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Philip L.; Samuels, Brian C.; Fitz, Stephanie D.; Federici, Lauren M.; Hammes, Nathan; Early, Maureen C.; Truitt, William; Lowry, Christopher A.; Shekhar, Anantha

    2012-01-01

    Background Although the hypothalamic orexin system is known to regulate appetitive behaviors and promote wakefulness and arousal (Sakurai, 2007), this system may also be important in adaptive and pathological anxiety/stress responses (Suzuki et al., 2005). In a recent study, we demonstrated that CSF orexin levels were significantly higher in patients experiencing panic attacks compared to non-panicking depressed subjects (Johnson et al., 2010). Furthermore, genetically silencing orexin synthesis or blocking orexin 1 receptors attenuated lactate-induced panic in an animal model of panic disorder. Therefore, in the present study, we tested if orexin (ORX) modulates the panic responses and brain pathways activated by two different panicogenic drugs. Methods We conducted a series of pharmacological, behavioral, physiological and immunohistochemical experiments to study the modulation by the orexinergic inputs of anxiety behaviors, autonomic responses, and activation of brain pathways elicited by systemic injections of anxiogenic/panicogenic drugs in rats. Results We show that systemic injections of two different anxiogenic/panicogenic drugs (FG-7142, an inverse agonist at the benzodiazepine site of the GABAA receptor, and caffeine, a nonselective competitive adenosine receptor antagonist) increased c-Fos induction in a specific subset of orexin neurons located in the dorsomedial/ perifornical (DMH/PeF) but not the lateral hypothalamus. Pre-treating rats with an orexin 1 receptor antagonist attenuated the FG-7142-induced anxiety-like behaviors, increased heart rate, and neuronal activation in key panic pathways, including subregions of the central nucleus of the amygdala, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, periaqueductal gray and in the rostroventrolateral medulla. Conclusion Overall, the data here suggest that the ORX neurons in the DMH/PeF region are critical to eliciting a coordinated panic responses and that ORX1 receptor antagonists constitute a potential novel

  16. Effects of Spectral Degradation on Attentional Modulation of Cortical Auditory Responses to Continuous Speech.

    PubMed

    Kong, Ying-Yee; Somarowthu, Ala; Ding, Nai

    2015-12-01

    This study investigates the effect of spectral degradation on cortical speech encoding in complex auditory scenes. Young normal-hearing listeners were simultaneously presented with two speech streams and were instructed to attend to only one of them. The speech mixtures were subjected to noise-channel vocoding to preserve the temporal envelope and degrade the spectral information of speech. Each subject was tested with five spectral resolution conditions (unprocessed speech, 64-, 32-, 16-, and 8-channel vocoder conditions) and two target-to-masker ratio (TMR) conditions (3 and 0 dB). Ongoing electroencephalographic (EEG) responses and speech comprehension were measured in each spectral and TMR condition for each subject. Neural tracking of each speech stream was characterized by cross-correlating the EEG responses with the envelope of each of the simultaneous speech streams at different time lags. Results showed that spectral degradation and TMR both significantly influenced how top-down attention modulated the EEG responses to the attended and unattended speech. That is, the EEG responses to the attended and unattended speech streams differed more for the higher (unprocessed, 64 ch, and 32 ch) than the lower (16 and 8 ch) spectral resolution conditions, as well as for the higher (3 dB) than the lower TMR (0 dB) condition. The magnitude of differential neural modulation responses to the attended and unattended speech streams significantly correlated with speech comprehension scores. These results suggest that severe spectral degradation and low TMR hinder speech stream segregation, making it difficult to employ top-down attention to differentially process different speech streams.

  17. Polarisation response of delay dependent absorption modulation in strong field dressed helium atoms probed near threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, E. R.; Sanchez-Gonzalez, A.; Austin, D. R.; Diveki, Z.; Hutchinson, S. E. E.; Siegel, T.; Ruberti, M.; Averbukh, V.; Miseikis, L.; Strüber, C. S.; Chipperfield, L.; Marangos, J. P.

    2016-08-01

    We present the first measurement of the vectorial response of strongly dressed helium atoms probed by an attosecond pulse train (APT) polarised either parallel or perpendicular to the dressing field polarisation. The transient absorption is probed as a function of delay between the APT and the linearly polarised 800 nm field of peak intensity 1.3× {10}14 {{W}} {{cm}}-2. The APT spans the photon energy range 16-42 eV, covering the first ionisation energy of helium (24.59 eV). With parallel polarised dressing and probing fields, we observe modulations with periods of one half and one quarter of the dressing field period. When the polarisation of the dressing field is altered from parallel to perpendicular with respect to the APT polarisation we observe a large suppression in the modulation depth of the above ionisation threshold absorption. In addition to this we present the intensity dependence of the harmonic modulation depth as a function of delay between the dressing and probe fields, with dressing field peak intensities ranging from 2 × 1012 to 2 × 1014 {{W}} {{cm}}-2. We compare our experimental results with a full-dimensional solution of the single-atom time-dependent (TD) Schrödinger equation obtained using the recently developed abinitio TD B-spline ADC method and find good qualitative agreement for the above threshold harmonics.

  18. Neurotensin Modulates the Migratory and Inflammatory Response of Macrophages under Hyperglycemic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Moura, Liane I. F.; Silva, Lucília; Leal, Ermelindo C.; Tellechea, Ana; Cruz, Maria Teresa; Carvalho, Eugénia

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) are characterized by an unsatisfactory inflammatory and migratory response. Skin inflammation involves the participation of many cells and particularly macrophages. Macrophage function can be modulated by neuropeptides; however, little is known regarding the role of neurotensin (NT) as a modulator of macrophages under inflammatory and hyperglycemic conditions. RAW 264.7 cells were maintained at 10/30 mM glucose, stimulated with/without LPS (1 μg/mL), and treated with/without NT(10 nM). The results show that NT did not affect macrophage viability. However, NT reverted the hyperglycemia-induced impair in the migration of macrophages. The expression of IL-6 and IL-1β was significantly increased under 10 mM glucose in the presence of NT, while IL-1β and IL-12 expression significantly decreased under inflammatory and hyperglycemic conditions. More importantly, high glucose modulates NT and NT receptor expression under normal and inflammatory conditions. These results highlight the effect of NT on cell migration, which is strongly impaired under hyperglycemic conditions, as well as its effect in decreasing the proinflammatory status of macrophages under hyperglycemic and inflammatory conditions. These findings provide new insights into the potential therapeutic role of NT in chronic wounds, such as in DFU, characterized by a deficit in the migratory properties of cells and a chronic proinflammatory status. PMID:24000330

  19. Spatio-temporal variation in prevalence and intensity of trematodes responsible for waterfowl die-offs in faucet snail-infested waterbodies of Minnesota, USA.

    PubMed

    Roy, Charlotte L; St-Louis, Véronique

    2017-12-01

    Several non-native trematodes hosted by the invasive Eurasian faucet snail, Bithynia tentaculata, have been causing die-offs of waterfowl in the Midwestern United States and Canada for several decades. Because of the potential implications of these die-offs on waterfowl in non-native settings, it is necessary to better understand the trematodes that cause the die-offs. Here, we studied the spatio-temporal dynamics of two trematodes, Cyathocotyle bushiensis and Sphaeridiotrema spp., known to infect waterfowl in northern Minnesota, USA, via their intermediate host, the faucet snail (Bithynia tentaculata). We studied prevalence (% of snails infected within a sample) and intensity (mean number of parasites per infected snail within a sample) of faucet snail infection with these two trematodes in small lakes, large lakes, ponds, and rivers in northern Minnesota in the spring, summer, and fall of 2011-2013. We tested whether parasite prevalence and infection intensity could be explained spatially (as a function of the abundance of faucet snails, average snail size, water depth, and proximity to known waterfowl groups) and temporally (across years and seasons) using generalized estimating equation models. The spatial and temporal patterns we observed varied within and among waterbodies. For both parasite species, parasite prevalence and intensity of infection were consistently higher in samples with larger snails and in deeper portions of the waterbodies. In Lake Winnibigoshish, prevalence was lower farther from the large waterfowl groups we observed, but the abundance of snails in a sample had no effect on prevalence or intensity of infection. Our findings help improve understanding of this multi-species system, but also illustrate the complexity of modeling the spatial and temporal dynamics of infections in waterbodies that are so variable in size, shape, waterfowl use, and function.

  20. Hypothalamic neuronal histamine modulates febrile response but not anorexia induced by lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Seiichi; Itateyama, Emi; Oka, Kyoko; Masaki, Takayuki; Sakata, Toshiie; Yoshimatsu, Hironobu

    2005-05-01

    This study examined the contribution of hypothalamic neuronal histamine (HA) to the anorectic and febrile responses induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), an exogenous pyrogen, and the endogenous pyrogens interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). Intraperitoneal (ip) injection of LPS, IL-1beta, or TNF-alpha suppressed 24-hr cumulative food intake and increased rectal temperature in rats. To analyze the histaminergic contribution, rats were pretreated with intracerebroventricular (icv) injection of 2.44 mmol/kg or ip injection of 244 mmol/kg of alpha-fluoromethylhistidine (FMH), a suicide inhibitor of histidine decarboxylase (HDC), to deplete neural HA. The depletion of neural HA augmented the febrile response to ip injection of LPS and IL-1beta and alleviated the anorectic response to ip injection of IL-1beta. However, the depletion of neural HA did not modify the LPS-induced anorectic response or TNF-alpha-induced febrile and anorectic responses. Consistent with these results, the rate of hypothalamic HA turnover, assessed by the accumulation of tele-methylhistamine (t-MH), was elevated with ip injections of LPS and IL-1beta, but unaffected by TNF-alpha at equivalent doses. This suggests that (i) LPS and IL-1beta activate hypothalamic neural HA turnover; (ii) hypothalamic neural HA suppresses the LPS- and IL-1beta-induced febrile responses and accelerates the IL-1beta-induced anorectic response; and (iii) TNF-alpha modulates the febrile and anorectic responses via a neural HA-independent pathway. Therefore, hypothalamic neural HA is involved in the IL-1beta-dominant pathway, rather than the TNF-alpha-dominant pathway, preceding the systemic inflammatory response induced by exogenous pyrogens, such as LPS. Further research on this is needed.

  1. Die einzelnen Beanspruchungsarten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böge, Gert; Böge, Wolfgang

    Wird ein Stab mit beliebigem, gleichbleibendem Querschnitt durch die äußere Kraft F in der Schwerachse auf Zug oder Druck beansprucht, so wird bei gleichmäßiger Spannungsverteilung, also in genügender Entfernung vom Angriffspunkt der Kraft, die Zug- oder Druckspannung σ_{z,d}= Zug- oder Druckkraft F/Querschnittsfläche A {Zug- und Druck-Hauptgleichung} σ_{z,d}=F/A\\qquad σ&F&A N/mm2 & N&mm2 Je nach vorliegender Aufgabe kann die Hauptgleichung umgestellt werden zur Berechnung des erforderlichen Querschnitts (Querschnittsnachweis): A_{erf}=F/σ_{zul} Berechnung der vorhandenen Spannung (Spannungsnachweis): σ_{vorh}=F/A Berechnung der maximal zulässigen Belastung (Belastungsnachweis): F_{max}=σ_{zul}A Treten Zug- und Druckspannungen in einer Rechnung gleichzeitig auf, werden sie durch den Index z und d oder durch das Vorzeichen + und - unterschieden.

  2. Interactions Between Odorant Functional Group and Hydrocarbon Structure Influence Activity in Glomerular Response Modules in the Rat Olfactory Bulb

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Brett A.; Farahbod, Haleh; Leon, Michael

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the effect of odorant hydrocarbon structure on spatial representations in the olfactory bulb systematically, we exposed rats to odorant chemicals possessing one of four different oxygen-containing functional groups on one of five different hydrocarbon backbones. We also used several hydrocarbon odorants lacking other functional groups. Hydrocarbon structural categories included straight-chained, branched, double-bonded, alicyclic, and aromatic features. Activity throughout the entire glomerular layer was measured as uptake of [14C]2-deoxyglucose and was mapped into anatomically standardized data matrices for statistical comparisons across different animals. Patterns evoked by straight-chained aliphatic odorants confirmed an association of activity in particular glomerular response modules with particular functional groups. However, the amount of activity in these same modules also was affected significantly by differences in hydrocarbon structure. Thus, the molecular features recognized by receptors projecting to these response modules appear to involve both functional group and hydrocarbon structural elements. In addition, particular benzyl and cyclohexyl odorants evoked activity in dorsal modules previously associated with the ketone functional group, which represents an exception to the rule of one feature per response module that had emerged from our previous studies. These dorsal modules also responded to nitrogen-containing aromatic compounds involving pyridine and pyrazine rings. The unexpected overlap in modular responses to ketones and odorants seemingly unrelated to ketones may reflect some covert shared molecular feature, the existence of odorant sensory neurons with multiple specificities, or a mosaic of sensory neuron projections to these particular modules. PMID:15678471

  3. Assisted Dying in Canada.

    PubMed

    Schuklenk, Udo

    2014-01-01

    This paper makes an affirmative ethical case in favour of the decriminalization of assisted dying in Canada. It then proceeds to defending the affirmative case against various slippery-slope arguments that are typically deployed by opponents of assisted dying. Finally, a recent case of questionable professional conduct by anti-euthanasia campaigners cum academics is flagged as a warning to all of us not to permit the quality of the professional debate to deteriorate unacceptably, despite the personal emotional investments involved on all sides of the debate.

  4. BT cationic peptides: small peptides that modulate innate immune responses of chicken heterophils and monocytes.

    PubMed

    Kogut, Michael H; Genovese, Kenneth J; He, Haiqi; Swaggerty, Christina L; Jiang, Yi Wei

    2012-01-15

    Neonatal poultry exhibit a transient susceptibility to infectious diseases during the first week of life that stems from inefficient host defense mechanisms. Yet, the initial host immune response to pathogens is a critical determinant of disease resistance and susceptibility. With this context in mind, novel ways to stimulate or modulate the hosts' natural immune response is emerging as an important area of interest for food animal producers including the poultry industry. Specifically, we have been investigating new modulation strategies tailored around the selective stimulation of the host's immune system, and particularly rapid acting innate immunity, as an alternative to direct targeting of microbial pathogens. One such approach that we have been investigating is the use of a group of cationic peptides produced by a Gram-positive soil bacterium, Brevibacillus texasporus (BT peptides). We have previously shown that, provided as a feed additive, BT peptides significantly induced a concentration-dependent protection against cecal colonization and extraintestinal colonization by Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (SE). This protection is not the result of direct antibacterial activity of the BT peptides on the SE since the concentrations used were below the minimum inhibitory concentration for SE. We also found that BT are not absorbed in the intestine, but still induce a significant up-regulation in the functional efficiency of peripheral blood heterophils and monocytes. The mechanisms of this immune modulation are unknown. Here, using in vitro models for measuring: (1) leukocyte oxidative burst, (2) changes in leukocyte cytokine and chemokines gene expression profiles, and (3) phosphorylation of the mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in leukocytes, we evaluated the role of BT peptides as priming mediators for heterophil and monocyte responses at the level of cell function, gene transcription/expression, and cell phosphorylation following stimulation

  5. Modulation of heat shock protein response in SH-SY5Y by mobile phone microwaves

    PubMed Central

    Calabrò, Emanuele; Condello, Salvatore; Currò, Monica; Ferlazzo, Nadia; Caccamo, Daniela; Magazù, Salvatore; Ientile, Riccardo

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate putative biological damage caused by GSM mobile phone frequencies by assessing electromagnetic fields during mobile phone working. METHODS: Neuron-like cells, obtained by retinoic-acid-induced differentiation of human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells, were exposed for 2 h and 4 h to microwaves at 1800 MHz frequency bands. RESULTS: Cell stress response was evaluated by MTT assay as well as changes in the heat shock protein expression (Hsp20, Hsp27 and Hsp70) and caspase-3 activity levels, as biomarkers of apoptotic pathway. Under our experimental conditions, neither cell viability nor Hsp27 expression nor caspase-3 activity was significantly changed. Interestingly, a significant decrease in Hsp20 expression was observed at both times of exposure, whereas Hsp70 levels were significantly increased only after 4 h exposure. CONCLUSION: The modulation of the expression of Hsps in neuronal cells can be an early response to radiofrequency microwaves. PMID:22371824

  6. An evaluation of the response modulation hypothesis in relation to attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Farmer, Richard F; Rucklidge, Julia J

    2006-08-01

    Several hypotheses related to Newman's (e.g., Patterson & Newman, 1993) response modulation hypothesis were examined among adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD; n=18) and normal controls (n=23). Consistent with predictions, youth with ADHD committed more passive avoidance errors (PAEs) than controls during the latter trials of a computerized go/no go task with mixed incentives, and this effect remained significant or marginally significant even after common variance associated with variables that covary with ADHD (i.e., IQ, oppositional-defiant/conduct disorder [ODD/CD] symptoms, anxious/depressed mood) was removed. While a moderate inverse association was observed between PAE frequency and the amount of time spent viewing response feedback following punishment, both categorical (diagnostic) and dimensional analyses of ADHD symptomatology indicated that ADHD and reflection on punishment feedback are uniquely associated with PAE commission. Findings from this study are discussed in relation to models of disinhibition applicable to youth with ADHD.

  7. Attentional Modulation of Brain Responses to Primary Appetitive and Aversive Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Field, Brent A.; Buck, Cara L.; McClure, Samuel M.; Nystrom, Leigh E.; Kahneman, Daniel; Cohen, Jonathan D.

    2015-01-01

    Studies of subjective well-being have conventionally relied upon self-report, which directs subjects’ attention to their emotional experiences. This method presumes that attention itself does not influence emotional processes, which could bias sampling. We tested whether attention influences experienced utility (the moment-by-moment experience of pleasure) by using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to measure the activity of brain systems thought to represent hedonic value while manipulating attentional load. Subjects received appetitive or aversive solutions orally while alternatively executing a low or high attentional load task. Brain regions associated with hedonic processing, including the ventral striatum, showed a response to both juice and quinine. This response decreased during the high-load task relative to the low-load task. Thus, attentional allocation may influence experienced utility by modulating (either directly or indirectly) the activity of brain mechanisms thought to represent hedonic value. PMID:26158468

  8. Modulations of muscle modes in automatic postural responses induced by external surface translations.

    PubMed

    Asaka, Tadayoshi; Yahata, Kentaro; Mani, Hiroki; Wang, Yun

    2011-01-01

    The authors applied principal component analysis to investigate muscle activation patterns (M-modes) involved in the automatic postural responses induced by external surface perturbations. They focused on M-mode modulations as responses to the effects of practice, stability of the conditions and perturbed directions. While peak center of mass velocity reduced with practice, M-modes were similar with practice and across stability conditions. In contrast, atypical sway mode coactivations that combined proximal trunk muscles with distal muscles of the opposite lower extremity of the ventral-dorsal side were observed under the unstable conditions in both forward and backward perturbations after practice. In addition, M-modes in the forward translations were characterized by increased cocontraction patterns. Results suggest that compositions of the underlying M-modes show minor differences in each perturbed direction, but practice enhances coactivation patterns combining proximal muscles with distal muscles, and with accompanying cocontraction patterns, under more challenging conditions.

  9. Cellular adaptive response to glutathione depletion modulates endothelial dysfunction triggered by TNF-α.

    PubMed

    Speciale, Antonio; Anwar, Sirajudheen; Ricciardi, Elisabetta; Chirafisi, Joselita; Saija, Antonella; Cimino, Francesco

    2011-12-15

    Several interrelated cellular signaling molecules are involved in modulating adaptive compensatory changes elicited by low exposures to toxins and other stressors. The most prominent example of signaling pathway typically involved in this adaptive stress response, is represented by the activation of a redox-sensitive gene regulatory network mediated by the NF-E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) which is intimately involved in mediating the Antioxidant Responsive Element (ARE)-driven response to oxidative stress and xenobiotics. We investigated if Nrf2 pathway activation following intracellular glutathione depletion through buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) exposure, might be able to alter the response to TNF-α, a proinflammatory cytokine, in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Herein, we revealed that such a change in the cellular redox status is able to reduce TNF-α induced endothelial activation (as shown by a decreased gene expression of adhesion molecules) by activating an adaptive response mediated by an increased Nrf2 nuclear translocation and overexpression of the ARE genes HO-1 and NQO-1. Furthermore, we have demonstrated the involvement of ERK1/2 kinases in Nrf2 nuclear translocation activated by BSO-induced glutathione depletion. The coordinate induction of endogenous cytoprotective proteins through adaptive activation of Nrf2 pathway is a field of great interest for potential application in prevention and therapy of inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Parathyroid hormone modulates the response of osteoblast-like cells to mechanical stimulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryder, K. D.; Duncan, R. L.

    2000-01-01

    Mechanical loading stimulates many responses in bone and osteoblasts associated with osteogenesis. Since loading and parathyroid hormone (PTH) activate similar signaling pathways in osteoblasts, we postulate that PTH can potentiate the effects of mechanical stimulation. Using an in vitro four-point bending device, we found that expression of COX-2, the inducible isoform of cyclooxygenase, was dependent on fluid forces generated across the culture plate, but not physiologic levels of strain in MC3T3-E1 osteoblast-like cells. Addition of 50 nM PTH during loading increased COX-2 expression at both subthreshold and threshold levels of fluid forces compared with either stimuli alone. We also demonstrated that application of fluid shear to MC3T3-E1 cells induced a rapid increase in [Ca(2+)](i). Although PTH did not significantly change [Ca(2+)](i) levels, flow and PTH did produce a significantly greater [Ca(2+)](i) response and increased the number of responding cells than is found in fluid shear alone. The [Ca(2+)](i) response to these stimuli was significantly decreased when the mechanosensitive channel inhibitor, gadolinium, was present. These studies indicate that PTH increases the cellular responses of osteoblasts to mechanical loading. Furthermore, this response may be mediated by alterations in [Ca(2+)](i) by modulating the mechanosensitive channel.

  11. Phototropin 1 and dim-blue light modulate the red light de-etiolation response

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yihai; M Folta, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Light signals regulate seedling morphological changes during de-etiolation through the coordinated actions of multiple light-sensing pathways. Previously we have shown that red-light-induced hypocotyl growth inhibition can be reversed by addition of dim blue light through the action of phototropin 1 (phot1). Here we further examine the fluence-rate relationships of this blue light effect in short-term (hours) and long-term (days) hypocotyl growth assays. The red stem-growth inhibition and blue promotion is a low-fluence rate response, and blue light delays or attenuates both the red light and far-red light responses. These de-etiolation responses include blue light reversal of red or far-red induced apical hook opening. This response also requires phot1. Cryptochromes (cry1 and cry2) are activated by higher blue light fluence-rates and override phot1's influence on hypocotyl growth promotion. Exogenous application of auxin transport inhibitor naphthylphthalamic acid abolished the blue light stem growth promotion in both hypocotyl growth and hook opening. Results from the genetic tests of this blue light effect in auxin transporter mutants, as well as phytochrome kinase substrate mutants indicated that aux1 may play a role in blue light reversal of red light response. Together, the phot1-mediated adjustment of phytochrome-regulated photomorphogenic events is most robust in dim blue light conditions and is likely modulated by auxin transport through its transporters. PMID:25482790

  12. Mitochondrial and Chloroplast Stress Responses Are Modulated in Distinct Touch and Chemical Inhibition Phases1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Ivanova, Aneta; Millar, A. Harvey; Whelan, James

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have identified a range of transcription factors that modulate retrograde regulation of mitochondrial and chloroplast functions in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). However, the relative importance of these regulators and whether they act downstream of separate or overlapping signaling cascades is still unclear. Here, we demonstrate that multiple stress-related signaling pathways, with distinct kinetic signatures, converge on overlapping gene sets involved in energy organelle function. The transcription factor ANAC017 is almost solely responsible for transcript induction of marker genes around 3 to 6 h after chemical inhibition of organelle function and is a key regulator of mitochondrial and specific types of chloroplast retrograde signaling. However, an independent and highly transient gene expression phase, initiated within 10 to 30 min after treatment, also targets energy organelle functions, and is related to touch and wounding responses. Metabolite analysis demonstrates that this early response is concurrent with rapid changes in tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates and large changes in transcript abundance of genes encoding mitochondrial dicarboxylate carrier proteins. It was further demonstrated that transcription factors AtWRKY15 and AtWRKY40 have repressive regulatory roles in this touch-responsive gene expression. Together, our results show that several regulatory systems can independently affect energy organelle function in response to stress, providing different means to exert operational control. PMID:27208304

  13. Spatial Attention and Temporal Expectation Under Timed Uncertainty Predictably Modulate Neuronal Responses in Monkey V1

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Jitendra; Sugihara, Hiroki; Katz, Yarden; Schummers, James; Tenenbaum, Joshua; Sur, Mriganka

    2015-01-01

    The brain uses attention and expectation as flexible devices for optimizing behavioral responses associated with expected but unpredictably timed events. The neural bases of attention and expectation are thought to engage higher cognitive loci; however, their influence at the level of primary visual cortex (V1) remains unknown. Here, we asked whether single-neuron responses in monkey V1 were influenced by an attention task of unpredictable duration. Monkeys covertly attended to a spot that remained unchanged for a fixed period and then abruptly disappeared at variable times, prompting a lever release for reward. We show that monkeys responded progressively faster and performed better as the trial duration increased. Neural responses also followed monkey's task engagement—there was an early, but short duration, response facilitation, followed by a late but sustained increase during the time monkeys expected the attention spot to disappear. This late attentional modulation was significantly and negatively correlated with the reaction time and was well explained by a modified hazard function. Such bimodal, time-dependent changes were, however, absent in a task that did not require explicit attentional engagement. Thus, V1 neurons carry reliable signals of attention and temporal expectation that correlate with predictable influences on monkeys' behavioral responses. PMID:24836689

  14. Phototropin 1 and dim-blue light modulate the red light de-etiolation response.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yihai; M Folta, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Light signals regulate seedling morphological changes during de-etiolation through the coordinated actions of multiple light-sensing pathways. Previously we have shown that red-light-induced hypocotyl growth inhibition can be reversed by addition of dim blue light through the action of phototropin 1 (phot1). Here we further examine the fluence-rate relationships of this blue light effect in short-term (hours) and long-term (days) hypocotyl growth assays. The red stem-growth inhibition and blue promotion is a low-fluence rate response, and blue light delays or attenuates both the red light and far-red light responses. These de-etiolation responses include blue light reversal of red or far-red induced apical hook opening. This response also requires phot1. Cryptochromes (cry1 and cry2) are activated by higher blue light fluence-rates and override phot1's influence on hypocotyl growth promotion. Exogenous application of auxin transport inhibitor naphthylphthalamic acid abolished the blue light stem growth promotion in both hypocotyl growth and hook opening. Results from the genetic tests of this blue light effect in auxin transporter mutants, as well as phytochrome kinase substrate mutants indicated that aux1 may play a role in blue light reversal of red light response. Together, the phot1-mediated adjustment of phytochrome-regulated photomorphogenic events is most robust in dim blue light conditions and is likely modulated by auxin transport through its transporters.

  15. Intensity modulated radiotherapy induces pro-inflammatory and pro-survival responses in prostate cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    EL-SAGHIRE, HOUSSEIN; VANDEVOORDE, CHARLOT; OST, PIET; MONSIEURS, PIETER; MICHAUX, ARLETTE; DE MEERLEER, GERT; BAATOUT, SARAH; THIERENS, HUBERT

    2014-01-01

    Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is one of the modern conformal radiotherapies that is widely used within the context of cancer patient treatment. It uses multiple radiation beams targeted to the tumor, however, large volumes of the body receive low doses of irradiation. Using γ-H2AX and global genome expression analysis, we studied the biological responses induced by low doses of ionizing radiation in prostate cancer patients following IMRT. By means of different bioinformatics analyses, we report that IMRT induced an inflammatory response via the induction of viral, adaptive, and innate immune signaling. In response to growth factors and immune-stimulatory signaling, positive regulation in the progression of cell cycle and DNA replication were induced. This denotes pro-inflammatory and pro-survival responses. Furthermore, double strand DNA breaks were induced in every patient 30 min after the treatment and remaining DNA repair and damage signaling continued after 18–24 h. Nine genes belonging to inflammatory responses (TLR3, SH2D1A and IL18), cell cycle progression (ORC4, SMC2 and CCDC99) and DNA damage and repair (RAD17, SMC6 and MRE11A) were confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR. This study emphasizes that the risk assessment of health effects from the out-of-field low doses during IMRT should be of concern, as these may increase the risk of secondary cancers and/or systemic inflammation. PMID:24435511

  16. Mechanisms of Cholera Toxin in the Modulation of TH17 Responses.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Hsing-Chuan; Wu, Reen

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies have shown that TH17 cells and their signature cytokine IL-17A are critical to host defense against various bacterial and fungal infections. The protective responses mediated by TH17 cells and IL-17A include the recruitment of neutrophils, release of antimicrobial peptides and chemokines, and enhanced tight junction of epithelial cells. Due to the importance of TH17 cells in infections, efforts have been made to develop TH17-based vaccines. The goal of vaccination is to establish a protective immunological memory. Most currently approved vaccines are antibody-based and have limited protection against stereotypically different strains. Studies show that T-cell-based vaccines may overcome this limitation and protect hosts against infection of different strains. Two main strategies are used to develop TH17 vaccines: identification of TH17-specific antigens and TH17-skewing adjuvants. Studies have revealed that cholera toxin (CT) induces a potent Th17 response following vaccination. Antigen vaccination along with CT induces a robust TH17 response, which is sometimes accompanied by TH1 responses. Due to the toxicity of CT, it is hard to apply CT in a clinical setting. Thus, understanding how CT modulates TH17 responses may lead to the development of successful TH17-based vaccines.

  17. Modulation of. beta. -adrenergic response in rat brain astrocytes by serum and hormones

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, D.K.; Morrison, R.S.; de Vellis, J.

    1985-01-01

    Purified astrocyte cultures from neonatal rat cerebrum respond to isoproterenol, a ..beta..-adrenergic agonist, with a transient rise in cAMP production. This astroglial property was regulated by serum, a chemically defined medium (serum-free medium plus hydrocortisone, putrescine, prostaglandin F/sub 2/, insulin, and fibroblast growth factor) and epidermal growth factor. Compared to astrocytes grown in serum-supplemented medium, astrocytes grown in the chemically defined medium were nonresponsive to isoproterenol stimulation, and this difference did not appear to be due to selection of a subpopulation of cells by either medium. The data suggest that a decreased ..beta..-adrenergic receptor number and an increased degradation of cAMP may account for the reduced response to ..beta..-adrenergic stimulation. The nonresponsive state of astrocytes in the defined medium was reversible when the medium was replaced with serum-supplemented medium. An active substance(s) in serum was responsible for restoring the responsiveness of astrocytes. Each of the five components of the defined medium had little effect by itself; however, together they acted synergistically to desensitize astrocytes to ..beta..-adrenergic stimulation. On the other hand, epidermal growth factor, a potent mitogen for astrocytes, was very competent by itself in reducing the cAMP response of astrocytes to ..beta..-adrenergic stimulation. Thus purified astrocytes grown in the chemically defined medium appear to be a good model for the study of hormonal interactions and of serum factors which may modulate the ..beta..-adrenergic response.

  18. Parathyroid hormone modulates the response of osteoblast-like cells to mechanical stimulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryder, K. D.; Duncan, R. L.

    2000-01-01

    Mechanical loading stimulates many responses in bone and osteoblasts associated with osteogenesis. Since loading and parathyroid hormone (PTH) activate similar signaling pathways in osteoblasts, we postulate that PTH can potentiate the effects of mechanical stimulation. Using an in vitro four-point bending device, we found that expression of COX-2, the inducible isoform of cyclooxygenase, was dependent on fluid forces generated across the culture plate, but not physiologic levels of strain in MC3T3-E1 osteoblast-like cells. Addition of 50 nM PTH during loading increased COX-2 expression at both subthreshold and threshold levels of fluid forces compared with either stimuli alone. We also demonstrated that application of fluid shear to MC3T3-E1 cells induced a rapid increase in [Ca(2+)](i). Although PTH did not significantly change [Ca(2+)](i) levels, flow and PTH did produce a significantly greater [Ca(2+)](i) response and increased the number of responding cells than is found in fluid shear alone. The [Ca(2+)](i) response to these stimuli was significantly decreased when the mechanosensitive channel inhibitor, gadolinium, was present. These studies indicate that PTH increases the cellular responses of osteoblasts to mechanical loading. Furthermore, this response may be mediated by alterations in [Ca(2+)](i) by modulating the mechanosensitive channel.

  19. Characterizing responses to CFTR-modulating drugs using rectal organoids derived from subjects with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Dekkers, Johanna F; Berkers, Gitte; Kruisselbrink, Evelien; Vonk, Annelotte; de Jonge, Hugo R; Janssens, Hettie M; Bronsveld, Inez; van de Graaf, Eduard A; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E S; Houwen, Roderick H J; Vleggaar, Frank P; Escher, Johanna C; de Rijke, Yolanda B; Majoor, Christof J; Heijerman, Harry G M; de Winter-de Groot, Karin M; Clevers, Hans; van der Ent, Cornelis K; Beekman, Jeffrey M

    2016-06-22

    Identifying subjects with cystic fibrosis (CF) who may benefit from cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)-modulating drugs is time-consuming, costly, and especially challenging for individuals with rare uncharacterized CFTR mutations. We studied CFTR function and responses to two drugs-the prototypical CFTR potentiator VX-770 (ivacaftor/KALYDECO) and the CFTR corrector VX-809 (lumacaftor)-in organoid cultures derived from the rectal epithelia of subjects with CF, who expressed a broad range of CFTR mutations. We observed that CFTR residual function and responses to drug therapy depended on both the CFTR mutation and the genetic background of the subjects. In vitro drug responses in rectal organoids positively correlated with published outcome data from clinical trials with VX-809 and VX-770, allowing us to predict from preclinical data the potential for CF patients carrying rare CFTR mutations to respond to drug therapy. We demonstrated proof of principle by selecting two subjects expressing an uncharacterized rare CFTR genotype (G1249R/F508del) who showed clinical responses to treatment with ivacaftor and one subject (F508del/R347P) who showed a limited response to drug therapy both in vitro and in vivo. These data suggest that in vitro measurements of CFTR function in patient-derived rectal organoids may be useful for identifying subjects who would benefit from CFTR-correcting treatment, independent of their CFTR mutation.

  20. The neuromagnetic response to spoken sentences: Co-modulation of theta band amplitude and phase

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Mary F.; Poeppel, David

    2013-01-01

    Speech elicits a phase-locked response in the auditory cortex that is dominated by theta (3–7 Hz) frequencies when observed via magnetoencephalography (MEG). This phase-locked response is potentially explained as new phase-locked activity superimposed on the ongoing theta oscillation or, alternatively, as phase-resetting of the ongoing oscillation. The conventional method used to distinguish between the two hypotheses is the comparison of post- to prestimulus amplitude for the phase-locked frequency across a set of trials. In theory, increased amplitude indicates the presence of additive activity, while unchanged amplitude points to phase-resetting. However, this interpretation may not be valid if the amplitude of ongoing background activity also changes following the stimulus. In this study, we employ a new approach that circumvents this problem. Specifically, we utilize a fine-grained time–frequency analysis of MEG channel data to examine the co-modulation of amplitude change and phase coherence in the post-stimulus theta-band response. If the phase-locked response is attributable solely to phase-resetting of the ongoing theta oscillation, then amplitude and phase coherence should be uncorrelated. In contrast, additive activity should produce a positive correlation. We find significant positive correlation not only during the onset response but also throughout the response period. In fact, transient increases in phase coherence are accompanied by transi