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Sample records for response genes induced

  1. Radiation-induced gene responses

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Paunesku, T.; Shearin-Jones, P.; Oryhon, J.

    1996-12-31

    In the process of identifying genes that are differentially regulated in cells exposed to ultraviolet radiation (UV), we identified a transcript that was repressed following the exposure of cells to a combination of UV and salicylate, a known inhibitor of NF-kappaB. Sequencing this band determined that it has identify to lactate dehydrogenase, and Northern blots confirmed the initial expression pattern. Analysis of the sequence of the LDH 5` region established the presence of NF-kappaB, Sp1, and two Ap-2 elements; two partial AP- 1; one partial RE, and two halves of E-UV elements were also found. Electromobility shift assays were then performed for the AP-1, NF- kappaB, and E-UV elements. These experiments revealed that binding to NF-kappaB was induced by UV but repressed with salicylic acid; UV did not affect AP-1 binding, but salicylic acid inhibited it alone or following UV exposure; and E-UV binding was repressed by UV, and salicylic acid had little effect. Since the binding of no single element correlated with the expression pattern of LDH, it is likely that multiple elements govern UV/salicylate-mediated expression.

  2. Mechanisms of radiation-induced gene responses

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Paunesku, T.

    1996-10-01

    In the process of identifying genes differentially expressed in cells exposed ultraviolet radiation, we have identified a transcript having a 26-bp region that is highly conserved in a variety of species including Bacillus circulans, yeast, pumpkin, Drosophila, mouse, and man. When the 5` region (flanking region or UTR) of a gene, the sequence is predominantly in +/+ orientation with respect to the coding DNA strand; while in the coding region and the 3` region (UTR), the sequence is most frequently in the +/-orientation with respect to the coding DNA strand. In two genes, the element is split into two parts; however, in most cases, it is found only once but with a minimum of 11 consecutive nucleotides precisely depicting the original sequence. The element is found in a large number of different genes with diverse functions (from human ras p21 to B. circulans chitonase). Gel shift assays demonstrated the presence of a protein in HeLa cell extracts that binds to the sense and antisense single-stranded consensus oligomers, as well as to the double- stranded oligonucleotide. When double-stranded oligomer was used, the size shift demonstrated as additional protein-oligomer complex larger than the one bound to either sense or antisense single-stranded consensus oligomers alone. It is speculated either that this element binds to protein(s) important in maintaining DNA is a single-stranded orientation for transcription or, alternatively that this element is important in the transcription-coupled DNA repair process.

  3. Marek's disease virus-induced immunosuppression: array analysis of chicken immune response gene expression profiling.

    PubMed

    Heidari, Mohammad; Sarson, Aimie J; Huebner, Marianne; Sharif, Shayan; Kireev, Dmitry; Zhou, Huaijun

    2010-06-01

    Marek's disease (MD) is a lymphoproliferative disease of chickens induced by a highly cell-associated oncogenic alpha-herpesvirus, Marek's disease virus (MDV). MDV replicates in chicken lymphocytes and establishes a latency infection within CD4(+) T cells. Host-virus interaction, immune responses to infection, and transcriptional profiling of chicken gene expression in MD are poorly understood. In this study we conducted a global host gene expression analysis in the splenocytes of MDV-infected chickens using oligonucleotide-based Affymetrix GeneChip Chicken Genome Arrays. These arrays contain probes for more than 32,000 chicken transcripts and most of the known MDV genes and open reading frames. Two-week-old MD-susceptible chickens were inoculated with an oncogenic strain of MDV, and spleen samples were collected 5 and 15 days post-infection (dpi) for RNA isolation and microarray analysis. Array results displayed a significant differential pattern of immune response transcriptome between the two phases of MDV infection. The expression levels of more than 22 immune-response and related genes were downregulated, while the expression levels of at least 58 genes were increased at 5 dpi (cytolytic infection), compared to age-matched control birds. In comparison, out of 73 immune-response and related genes, 67 genes were downregulated, with only 6 genes having higher expression levels at 15 dpi (latency infection). Cytokines, chemokines, MHC molecules and related receptors, and adhesion molecules were among the many MDV-induced downregulated genes that are critical for an effective antiviral immune response. In addition, several apoptosis-associated genes were decreased in expression during latent infection, suggesting an MDV-induced blocking of initiation or progression of programmed cell death processes. These chicken arrays are valuable tools in understanding the molecular mechanisms behind viral pathogenesis and chicken gene expression patterns, and associated

  4. Differential metal response and regulation of human heavy metal-inducible genes.

    PubMed

    Murata, M; Gong, P; Suzuki, K; Koizumi, S

    1999-07-01

    A number of heavy metal-inducible genes have been reported, but their ranges of response to various metal species are not well known. It is also unclear if these genes are regulated through common mechanisms. To answer these questions, we compared induction kinetics of human metal-inducible genes including the MT-IIA (coding for a metallothionein isoform), hsp70 (coding for the 70-kDa heat-shock protein), and c-fos genes in HeLa cells exposed to Zn, Cd, Ag, Hg, Cu(II), Co, or Ni ions. Transcripts from these three genes were increased after exposure to wide ranges of metals, but each gene was unique in its induction kinetics. Generally, induction was observed at lower metal concentrations in the order of MT-IIA, hsp70, and c-fos. These genes also showed differential responses in time course: more rapid induction was observed in the order of c-fos, hsp70, and MT-IIA after exposure to Zn or Cd. Since the metal-responsive element (MRE) and heat shock element (HSE) of the MT-IIA and hsp70 genes, respectively, are thought to be the cis-acting DNA elements that mediate metal response, we compared the properties of proteins that specifically bind to these elements. MRE-binding activity was detected only in the extract from cells exposed to Zn. By contrast, HSE-binding activity was detected in extracts from cells treated with Zn, Cd, Ag, and Cu. The former was also activated by Zn in vitro, while the latter was not. Each of these DNA-binding activities showed no affinity to the recognition sequence of the other. These results demonstrate that the human metal-inducible genes have broad ranges of response to a variety of heavy metals, but suggest that they are probably regulated through independent mechanisms.

  5. Transcriptome analysis and identification of induced genes in the response of Harmonia axyridis to cold hardiness.

    PubMed

    Tang, Bin; Liu, Xiao-Jun; Shi, Zuo-Kun; Shen, Qi-Da; Xu, Yan-Xia; Wang, Su; Zhang, Fan; Wang, Shi-Gui

    2017-06-01

    Harmonia axyridis is an important predatory lady beetle that is a natural enemy of agricultural and forestry pests. In this research, the cold hardiness induced genes and their expression changes in H. axyridis were screened and detected by the way of the transcriptome and qualitative real-time PCR under normal and low temperatures, using high-throughput transcriptome and digital gene-expression-tag technologies. We obtained a 10Gb transcriptome and an 8Mb gene expression tag pool using Illumina deep sequencing technology and RNA-Seq analysis (accession number SRX540102). Of the 46,980 non-redundant unigenes identified, 28,037 (59.7%) were matched to known genes in GenBank, 21,604 (46.0%) in Swiss-Prot, 19,482 (41.5%) in Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes and 13,193 (28.1%) in Gene Ontology databases. Seventy-five percent of the unigene sequences had top matches with gene sequences from Tribolium castaneum. Results indicated that 60 genes regulated the entire cold-acclimation response, and, of these, seven genes were always up-regulated and five genes always down-regulated. Further screening revealed that six cold-resistant genes, E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase, transketolase, trehalase, serine/arginine repetitive matrix protein 2, glycerol kinase and sugar transporter SWEET1-like, play key roles in the response. Expression from a number of the differentially expressed genes was confirmed with quantitative real-time PCR (HaCS_Trans). The paper attempted to identify cold-resistance response genes, and study the potential mechanism by which cold acclimation enhances the insect's cold endurance. Information on these cold-resistance response genes will improve the development of low-temperature storage technology of natural enemy insects for future use in biological control. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A long noncoding RNA induced by TLRs mediates both activation and repression of immune response genes

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Susan; Atianand, Maninjay; Aiello, Daniel; Ricci, Emiliano; Gandhi, Pallavi; Hall, Lisa L.; Byron, Meg; Monks, Brian; Henry-Bezy, Meabh; O’Neill, Luke A.J; Lawrence, Jeanne B.; Moore, Melissa J.; Caffrey, Daniel R.; Fitzgerald, Katherine A.

    2015-01-01

    An inducible program of inflammatory gene expression is central to anti-microbial defenses. Signal-dependent activation of transcription factors, transcriptional co-regulators and chromatin modifying factors collaborate to control this response. Here we identify a long noncoding RNA that acts as a key regulator of this inflammatory response. Germline-encoded receptors such as the Toll-like receptors induce the expression of numerous lncRNAs. One of these, lincRNA-Cox2 mediates both the activation and repression of distinct classes of immune genes. Transcriptional repression of target genes is dependent on interactions of lincRNA-Cox2 with heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A/B and A2/B1. Collectively, these studies unveil a central role of lincRNA-Cox2 as a broad acting regulatory component of the circuit that controls the inflammatory response. PMID:23907535

  7. Muscle Contraction Induces Acute Hydroxymethylation of the Exercise-Responsive Gene Nr4a3

    PubMed Central

    Pattamaprapanont, Pattarawan; Garde, Christian; Fabre, Odile; Barrès, Romain

    2016-01-01

    Exercise training triggers numerous positive adaptations through the regulation of genes controlling muscle structure and function. Epigenetic modifications, including DNA methylation, participate in transcriptional activation by allowing the recruitment of the transcription machinery to gene promoters. Exercise induces dynamic DNA demethylation at gene promoters; however, the contribution of the demethylation precursor hydroxymethylcytosine is unknown. Given the evanescent nature of hydroxymethylcytosine, a muscle contraction model that allows for the collection of samples that are repeatedly stimulated over time is required to determine whether contraction-induced demethylation is preceded by changes in the hydroxymethylcytosine level. Here, we established an acute skeletal muscle contraction model to mimic the effects of acute exercise on gene expression. We used this model to investigate the effect of muscle contraction on DNA demethylation and hydroxymethylation. First, we performed an acute exercise study in healthy humans to identify an exercise-responsive gene that we could study in culture. We identified the nuclear receptor subfamily 4 group A member 3 (Nr4a3) gene with the highest fold-expression increase after acute exercise. We then refined an electrical pulse stimulation (EPS) protocol that could induce expression of the Nr4a3 gene in C2C12 myotubes. Using targeted bisulfite sequencing, we found that in response to EPS, a region of the Nr4a3 promoter is rapidly demethylated at 60 min and re-methylated at 120 min. Of interest, hydroxymethylation of the differentially methylated region of Nr4a3 promoter after EPS was elevated immediately after EPS, with lowest levels reached at 60 min after EPS. In conclusion, we have established a cell culture-based protocol to mimic the acute transcriptional responses to exercise. Furthermore, we provide insight into the mechanism by which the exercise-responsive gene Nr4a3 is demethylated after muscle

  8. Expression of bacterial superantigen genes in mice induces localized mononuclear cell inflammatory responses.

    PubMed Central

    Dow, S W; Potter, T A

    1997-01-01

    Bacterial superantigens are potent T cell activators, and superantigen proteins have been injected into mice and other animals to study T cell responses in vivo. When superantigen proteins are injected, however, the T cell stimulatory effects cannot be confined to specific tissues. Therefore, to target superantigen expression to specific tissues, we used gene transfer techniques to express bacterial superantigen genes in mammalian cells in vitro and in tissues in vivo. Murine, human, and canine cells transfected with superantigen genes in vitro all produced superantigen proteins both intracellularly and extracellularly, as assessed by bioassay, immunocytochemistry, and antigen ELISA. Superantigens produced by transfected eukaryotic cells retained their biologic specificity for T cell receptor binding. Intramuscular injection of superantigen plasmid DNA in vivo induced an intense intramuscular mononuclear cell infiltrate, an effect that could not be reproduced by intramuscular injection of superantigen protein. Intradermal and intravenous injection of superantigen DNA induced cutaneous and intrapulmonary mononuclear cell inflammatory responses, respectively. Thus, superantigen genes can be expressed by mammalian cells in vivo. Superantigen gene therapy represents a novel method of targeting localized T cell inflammatory reactions, with potential application to treatment of cancer and certain infectious diseases. PMID:9169491

  9. Hydrogen peroxide induces adaptive response and differential gene expression in human embryo lung fibroblast cells.

    PubMed

    Wei, Qinzhi; Huang, Haiyan; Yang, Linqing; Yuan, Jianhui; Yang, Xiaohua; Liu, Yungang; Zhuang, Zhixiong

    2014-04-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ), a substance involved in cellular oxidative stress, has been observed to induce an adaptive response, which is characterized by a protection against the toxic effect of H2 O2 at higher concentrations. However, the molecular mechanism for the adaptive response remains unclear. In particular, the existing reports on H2 O2 -induced adaptive response are limited to animal cells and human tumor cells, and relatively normal human cells have never been observed for an adaptive response to H2 O2 . In this study, a human embryo lung fibroblast (MRC-5) cell line was used to model an adaptive response to H2 O2 , and the relevant differential gene expressions by using fluoro mRNA differential display RT-PCR. The results showed significant suppression of cytotoxicity of H2 O2 (1100 μM, 1 h) after pretreatment of the cells with H2 O2 at lower concentrations (0.088-8.8 μM, 24 h), as indicated by cell survival, lactate dehydrogenase release, and the rate of apoptotic cells. Totally 60 mRNA components were differentially expressed compared to untreated cells, and five of them (sizing 400-600 bp) which demonstrated the greatest increase in expression were cloned and sequenced. They showed identity with known genes, such as BCL-2, eIF3S5, NDUFS4, and RPS10. Real time RT-PCR analysis of the five genes displayed a pattern of differential expression consistent with that by the last method. These five genes may be involved in the induction of adaptive response by H2 O2 in human cells, at least in this particular cell type. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Differential expression of genes encoding calmodulin-binding proteins in response to bacterial pathogens and inducers of defense responses.

    PubMed

    Ali, Gul Shad; Reddy, Vaka S; Lindgren, Peter B; Jakobek, Judy L; Reddy, A S N

    2003-04-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) plays an important role in sensing and transducing changes in cellular Ca2+ concentration in response to several biotic and abiotic stresses. Although CaM is implicated in plant-pathogen interactions, its molecular targets and their role in defense signaling pathway(s) are poorly understood. To elucidate the signaling pathways that link CaM to defense responses, we screened a cDNA library constructed from bean leaves undergoing a hypersensitive response (HR) with radiolabeled CaM isoforms. A total of 26 putative CBPs were identified. Sequencing of the cDNAs revealed that they represent 8 different genes. They are homologues of previously identified CaM-binding proteins (CBPs) in other systems. However, some CBPs are novel members of known CBP families. The proteins encoded by these clones bound CaM in a Ca2+-dependent manner. To determine if these CBPs are involved in plant defense responses, we analyzed their expression in bean leaves inoculated with compatible, incompatible and nonpathogenic bacterial strains. Expression of three CBPs including an isoform of cyclic nucleotide-gated channels (PvCNGC-A) and two hypothetical proteins (PvCBP60-C and PvCBP60-D) was induced whereas the expression of two other isoforms of CNGCs (PvCNGC-B and PvCNGC-C) was repressed in response to incompatible pathogens. The expression of the rest, a small auxin up RNA (PvSAUR1) and two hypothetical proteins (PvCBP60-A and PvCBP60-B), was not changed. The expression of most of the pathogen-regulated genes was also affected by salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, hydrogen peroxide and a fungal elicitor, which are known to induce defense responses. Our results strongly suggest that at least five bean CBPs are involved in plant defense responses.

  11. Living in the cold: freeze-induced gene responses in freeze-tolerant vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Storey, K B

    1999-01-01

    1. Winter survival for numerous cold-blooded animals includes freeze tolerance: the ability to endure the conversion of as much as 65% of total body water into extracellular ice. Selected molecular adaptations underlying freeze tolerance (e.g. cryoprotectants, ice nucleating proteins) have been widely studied, but the full range of metabolic adjustments needed for freeze endurance remains unknown. 2. Recent studies using gene screening techniques are providing a different approach to the search for biochemical responses that support freezing survival by identifying genes and proteins that are up-regulated by freezing or thawing in freeze-tolerant amphibians and reptiles. 3. Screening of a cDNA library from wood frog liver revealed the freeze-induced up-regulation of genes coding for the alpha- and gamma-subunits of fibrinogen (a plasma clotting protein), the mitochondrial ADP/ATP translocase and a novel 10 kDa protein containing a nuclear exporting sequence. 4. Northern blotting revealed that these genes were differentially responsive to two of the component stresses of freezing (dehydration and anoxia), indicating that different genes are induced by signals radiating either from cell volume change or oxygen deprivation during freezing. 5. Freeze up-regulation of fibrinogen synthesis in liver and other organs appears to be a damage repair response that anticipates a need for enhanced plasma clotting capacity to deal with ice crystal damage to capillary beds. 6. Up-regulation of ADP/ATP translocase in frog liver is linked with ischaemia resistance and studies with freeze-tolerant turtles have shown that other genes encoding proteins involved in mitochondrial energetics (NADH-ubiquinone oxido-reductase subunit 5, cytochrome C oxidase subunit 1) are also up-regulated by both anoxia and freezing exposures. 7. These studies are making major advances in our understanding of freeze tolerance as a natural phenomenon and also highlight new key areas that can be targeted by

  12. Discrimination of phytochrome dependent light inducible from non-light inducible plant genes. Prediction of a common light-responsive element (LRE) in phytochrome dependent light inducible plant genes.

    PubMed Central

    Grob, U; Stüber, K

    1987-01-01

    We aligned 14 5'-leading sequences of small subunit ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (rbcS) genes. A strong consensus sequence ("CCTTATCAT") was located directly upstream of the TATA-box. The occurrence of this motif in other light dependent phytochrome regulated plant genes led to the calculation of two consensus matrices. With these two matrices we are able to distinguish almost all known light induced plant genes which are phytochrome regulated from non-light induced plant genes indicating, that all these genes share a common light-responsive element (LRE). The results obtained by computer analysis are discussed with regard to experimental data. PMID:3697087

  13. VIP1 response elements mediate mitogen-activated protein kinase 3-induced stress gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Pitzschke, Andrea; Djamei, Armin; Teige, Markus; Hirt, Heribert

    2009-01-01

    The plant pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens transforms plant cells by delivering its T-DNA into the plant cell nucleus where it integrates into the plant genome and causes tumor formation. A key role of VirE2-interacting protein 1 (VIP1) in the nuclear import of T-DNA during Agrobacterium-mediated plant transformation has been unravelled and VIP1 was shown to undergo nuclear localization upon phosphorylation by the mitogen-activated protein kinase MPK3. Here, we provide evidence that VIP1 encodes a functional bZIP transcription factor that stimulates stress-dependent gene expression by binding to VIP1 response elements (VREs), a DNA hexamer motif. VREs are overrepresented in promoters responding to activation of the MPK3 pathway such as Trxh8 and MYB44. Accordingly, plants overexpressing VIP1 accumulate high levels of Trxh8 and MYB44 transcripts, whereas stress-induced expression of these genes is impaired in mpk3 mutants. Trxh8 and MYB44 promoters are activated by VIP1 in a VRE-dependent manner. VIP1 strongly enhances expression from a synthetic promoter harboring multiple VRE copies and directly interacts with VREs in vitro and in vivo. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays of the MYB44 promoter confirm that VIP1 binding to VREs is enhanced under conditions of MPK3 pathway stimulation. These results provide molecular insight into the cellular mechanism of target gene regulation by the MPK3 pathway. PMID:19820165

  14. Dexamethasone-induced expression of the glucocorticoid response gene lipocalin 2 in chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Owen, H C; Roberts, S J; Ahmed, S F; Farquharson, C

    2008-06-01

    Glucocorticoids (GC) are commonly used anti-inflammatory drugs, but long-term use can result in marked growth retardation in children due to their actions on growth plate chondrocytes. To gain an insight into the mechanisms involved in GC-induced growth retardation, we performed Affymetrix microarray analysis of the murine chondrogenic cell line ATDC5, incubated with 10(-6) M dexamethasone (Dex) for 24 h. Downregulated genes included secreted frizzled-related protein and IGF-I, and upregulated genes included serum/GC-regulated kinase, connective-tissue growth factor, and lipocalin 2. Lipocalin 2 expression increased 40-fold after 24-h Dex treatment. Expression increased further after 48-h (75-fold) and 96-h (84-fold) Dex treatment, and this response was Dex concentration dependent. Lipocalin 2 was immunolocalized to both proliferating and hypertrophic growth plate zones, and its expression was increased by Dex in primary chondrocytes at 6 h (3-fold, P < 0.05). The lipocalin 2 response was blocked by the GC-receptor antagonist RU-486 and was increased further by the protein synthesis blocker cycloheximide. Proliferation in lipocalin 2-overexpressing cells was less than in control cells (49%, P < 0.05), and overexpression caused an increase in collagen type X expression (4-fold, P < 0.05). The effects of lipocalin 2 overexpression on chondrocyte proliferation (64%, P < 0.05) and collagen type X expression (8-fold, P < 0.05) were further exacerbated with the addition of 10(-6) M Dex. This synergistic effect may be explained by a further increase in lipocalin 2 expression with Dex treatment of transfected cells (45%, P < 0.05). These results suggest that lipocalin 2 may mediate Dex effects on chondrocytes and provides a potential novel mechanism for GC-induced growth retardation.

  15. Identification of rapidly induced genes in the response of peanut (Arachis hypogaea) to water deficit and abscisic acid.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoyun; Lu, Jiabao; Liu, Shuai; Liu, Xu; Lin, Yingying; Li, Ling

    2014-06-26

    Peanut (Arachis hypogaea) is an important crop, but droughts often affect peanut production. There is a lack of genomic information available for peanut; therefore, little is known about the molecular basis of its drought stress response. Previously, we found that peanut stomata close rapidly during water deficit and in response to abscisic acid (ABA) treatment, and many genes show changes in their expression levels. To screen for candidate genes involved in the water deficit response, we used the Illumina HiSeq2000/MiSeq sequencing platform to conduct a global transcriptome analysis of peanut seedlings under water deficit with or without an ABA pretreatment. Three peanut tissues (leaves, roots, and stems) collected at each of three developmental stages (four-leaf, flowering, and podding stages) were used to construct sequence libraries. Then, 4.96 × 10⁷ raw sequence reads were generated and the high quality reads were assembled into 47,842 unigenes. We analyzed these sequence libraries to identify differentially expressed genes (DEGs) under water deficit with or without ABA pretreatment. In total, 621 genes were induced rapidly (≥1.5 fold change compared with control) under water deficit, 2,665 genes were induced rapidly under water deficit + ABA pretreatment, and 279 genes overlapped between water deficit and water deficit + ABA pretreatment. Of the 279 overlapping genes, 264 showed the same expression pattern and 15 showed opposite expression patterns. Among the DEGs, 257 were highly induced (>5 fold) by water deficit + ABA pretreatment, while 19 were highly induced (>5 fold) by water deficit alone. The genes induced under water deficit + ABA pretreatment included 100 putative transcription factor (TF) genes, while those induced under water deficit alone included only 22 putative TF genes. To validate the transcriptome results, we conducted quantitative PCR (qPCR) analyses to quantify the transcript levels of nine candidate genes. The

  16. Identification of rapidly induced genes in the response of peanut (Arachis hypogaea) to water deficit and abscisic acid

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Peanut (Arachis hypogaea) is an important crop, but droughts often affect peanut production. There is a lack of genomic information available for peanut; therefore, little is known about the molecular basis of its drought stress response. Results Previously, we found that peanut stomata close rapidly during water deficit and in response to abscisic acid (ABA) treatment, and many genes show changes in their expression levels. To screen for candidate genes involved in the water deficit response, we used the Illumina HiSeq2000/MiSeq sequencing platform to conduct a global transcriptome analysis of peanut seedlings under water deficit with or without an ABA pretreatment. Three peanut tissues (leaves, roots, and stems) collected at each of three developmental stages (four-leaf, flowering, and podding stages) were used to construct sequence libraries. Then, 4.96 × 107 raw sequence reads were generated and the high quality reads were assembled into 47,842 unigenes. We analyzed these sequence libraries to identify differentially expressed genes (DEGs) under water deficit with or without ABA pretreatment. In total, 621 genes were induced rapidly (≥1.5 fold change compared with control) under water deficit, 2,665 genes were induced rapidly under water deficit + ABA pretreatment, and 279 genes overlapped between water deficit and water deficit + ABA pretreatment. Of the 279 overlapping genes, 264 showed the same expression pattern and 15 showed opposite expression patterns. Among the DEGs, 257 were highly induced (>5 fold) by water deficit + ABA pretreatment, while 19 were highly induced (>5 fold) by water deficit alone. The genes induced under water deficit + ABA pretreatment included 100 putative transcription factor (TF) genes, while those induced under water deficit alone included only 22 putative TF genes. To validate the transcriptome results, we conducted quantitative PCR (qPCR) analyses to quantify the transcript levels of nine

  17. Histone deacetylase inhibitor panobinostat induces clinical responses with associated alterations in gene expression profiles in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Leigh; Pan, Yan; Smyth, Gordon K; George, Daniel J; McCormack, Chris; Williams-Truax, Roxanne; Mita, Monica; Beck, Joachim; Burris, Howard; Ryan, Gail; Atadja, Peter; Butterfoss, Dale; Dugan, Margaret; Culver, Kenneth; Johnstone, Ricky W; Prince, H Miles

    2008-07-15

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors can alter gene expression and mediate diverse antitumor activities. Herein, we report the safety and activity of the histone deacetylase inhibitor panobinostat (LBH589) in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) and identify genes commonly regulated by panobinostat. Panobinostat was administered orally to patients with CTCL on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday of each week on a 28-day cycle. A dose of 30 mg was considered excessively toxic, and subsequent patients were treated at the expanded maximum tolerated dose of 20 mg. Biopsies from six patients taken 0, 4, 8, and 24 h after administration were subjected to microarray gene expression profiling and real-time quantitative PCR of selected genes. Patients attained a complete response (n = 2), attained a partial response (n = 4), achieved stable disease with ongoing improvement (n = 1), and progressed on treatment (n = 2). Microarray data showed distinct gene expression response profiles over time following panobinostat treatment, with the majority of genes being repressed. Twenty-three genes were commonly regulated by panobinostat in all patients tested. Panobinostat is well tolerated and induces clinical responses in CTCL patients. Microarray analyses of tumor samples indicate that panobinostat induces rapid changes in gene expression, and surprisingly more genes are repressed than are activated. A unique set of genes that can mediate biological responses such as apoptosis, immune regulation, and angiogenesis were commonly regulated in response to panobinostat. These genes are potential molecular biomarkers for panobinostat activity and are strong candidates for the future assessment of their functional role(s) in mediating the antitumor responses of panobinostat.

  18. Functional characterization of blue-light-induced responses and PHOTOTROPIN 1 gene in Welwitschia mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Ishishita, Kazuhiro; Suetsugu, Noriyuki; Hirose, Yuki; Higa, Takeshi; Doi, Michio; Wada, Masamitsu; Matsushita, Tomonao; Gotoh, Eiji

    2016-03-01

    The blue light (BL) receptor phototropin (phot) is specifically found in green plants; it regulates various BL-induced responses such as phototropism, chloroplast movement, stomatal opening, and leaf flattening. In Arabidopsis thaliana, two phototropins--phot1 and phot2--respond to blue light in overlapping but distinct ways. These BL-receptor-mediated responses enhance the photosynthetic activity of plants under weak light and minimize photodamage under strong light conditions. Welwitschia mirabilis Hook.f. found in the Namib Desert, and it has adapted to severe environmental stresses such as limiting water and strong sunlight. Although the plant has physiologically and ecologically unique features, it is unknown whether phototropin is functional in this plant. In this study, we assessed the functioning of phot-mediated BL responses in W. mirabilis. BL-dependent phototropism and stomatal opening was observed but light-dependent chloroplast movement was not detected. We performed a functional analysis of the PHOT1 gene of W. mirabilis, WmPHOT1, in Arabidopsis thaliana. We generated transgenic A. thaliana lines expressing WmPHOT1 in a phot1 phot2 double mutant background. Several Wmphot1 transgenic plants showed normal growth, although phot1 phot2 double mutant plants showed stunted growth. Furthermore, Wmphot1 transgenic plants showed normal phot1-mediated responses including phototropism, chloroplast accumulation, stomatal opening, and leaf flattening, but lacked the chloroplast avoidance response that is specifically mediated by phot2. Thus, our findings indicate that W. mirabilis possesses typical phot-mediated BL responses that were at least partially mediated by functional phototropin 1, an ortholog of Atphot1.

  19. Calcium channel blockade reduces mechanical strain-induced extracellular matrix gene response in lamina cribrosa cells.

    PubMed

    Quill, B; Irnaten, M; Docherty, N G; McElnea, E M; Wallace, D M; Clark, A F; O'Brien, C J

    2015-07-01

    This study examines the effect of the L-type calcium channel blocker verapamil on mechanical strain-induced extracellular matrix genes in optic nerve head lamina cribrosa (LC) cells. Changes in LC cell intracellular calcium [Ca(2+)]i following hypotonic cell membrane stretch were measured with the fluorescent probe fura-2/AM. Fluorescence intensity was measured, after labelling, by calcium (Ca2+) imaging confocal microscopy. Confluent human LC cell cultures were serum starved for 24 h prior to exposure to cyclical mechanical strain (1 Hz, 15%) for 24 h in the presence or absence of verapamil (10 mm). Transforming growth factor-β 1 (TGF-β1), collagen 6A3 (COL6A3) and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan 2 (CSPG2) mRNA expression levels were assessed by quantitative RT-PCR. Hypotonic cell membrane stretch of LC cells from normal donors significantly increased [Ca2+]i (p<0.05). Exposure to cyclical mechanical strain (15% strain) produced a statistically significant increase in the three matrix genes that were examined (TGF-β1, COL6A3 and CSPG2). This response in both cyclical and mechanical stretch was significantly reduced by pretreating LC cells with the L-type calcium channel blocker verapamil (p<0.05). This study provides evidence of a novel mechanotransduction pathway linking mechanical strain, cation channel function and the induction of LC cell matrix gene transcription. This highlights the potential involvement of calcium influx in the activation of matrix remodelling responses in the optic nerve head and supports the rationale that calcium channel blockers may attenuate disease progression in glaucoma. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  20. A functional polymorphism of the MAOA gene is associated with neural responses to induced anger control.

    PubMed

    Denson, Thomas F; Dobson-Stone, Carol; Ronay, Richard; von Hippel, William; Schira, Mark M

    2014-07-01

    Aggressiveness is highly heritable. Recent experimental work has linked individual differences in a functional polymorphism of the monoamine oxidase-A gene (MAOA) to anger-driven aggression. Other work has implicated the dorsal ACC (dACC) in cognitive-emotional control and the amygdala in emotional arousal. The present imaging genetics study investigated dACC and amygdala reactivity to induced anger control as a function of MAOA genotype. A research assistant asked 38 healthy male undergraduates to control their anger in response to an insult by a rude experimenter. Men with the low-expression allele showed increased dACC and amygdala activation after the insult, but men with the high-expression allele did not. Both dACC and amygdala activation independently mediated the relationship between MAOA genotype and self-reported anger control. Moreover, following the insult, men with the high-functioning allele showed functional decoupling between the amygdala and dACC, but men with the low-functioning allele did not. These results suggest that heightened dACC and amygdala activation and their connectivity are neuroaffective mechanisms underlying anger control in participants with the low-functioning allele of the MAOA gene.

  1. Hypoxia-induced endothelial NO synthase gene transcriptional activation is mediated through the tax-responsive element in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Min, Jiho; Jin, Yoon-Mi; Moon, Je-Sung; Sung, Min-Sun; Jo, Sangmee Ahn; Jo, Inho

    2006-06-01

    Although hypoxia is known to induce upregulation of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) gene expression, the underlying mechanism is largely unclear. In this study, we show that hypoxia increases eNOS gene expression through the binding of phosphorylated cAMP-responsive element binding (CREB) protein (pCREB) to the eNOS gene promoter. Hypoxia (1% O2) increased both eNOS expression and NO production, peaking at 24 hours, in bovine aortic endothelial cells, and these increases were accompanied by increases in pCREB. Treatment with the protein kinase A inhibitor H-89 or transfection with dominant-negative inhibitor of CREB reversed the hypoxia-induced increases in eNOS expression and NO production, with concomitant inhibition of the phosphorylation of CREB induced by hypoxia, suggesting an involvement of protein kinase A/pCREB-mediated pathway. To map the regulatory elements of the eNOS gene responsible for pCREB binding under hypoxia, we constructed an eNOS gene promoter (-1600 to +22 nucleotides) fused with a luciferase reporter gene [pGL2-eNOS(-1600)]. Hypoxia (for 24-hour incubation) increased the promoter activity by 2.36+/-0.18-fold in the bovine aortic endothelial cells transfected with pGL2-eNOS(-1600). However, progressive 5'-deletion from -1600 to -873 completely attenuated the hypoxia-induced increase in promoter activity. Electrophoretic mobility shift, anti-pCREB antibody supershift, and site-specific mutation analyses showed that pCREB is bound to the Tax-responsive element (TRE) site, a cAMP-responsive element-like site, located at -924 to -921 of the eNOS promoter. Our data demonstrate that the interaction between pCREB and the Tax-responsive element site within the eNOS promoter may represent a novel mechanism for the mediation of hypoxia-stimulated eNOS gene expression.

  2. Analysis of the N Gene Hypersensitive Response Induced by a Fluorescently Tagged Tobacco Mosaic Virus1

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Kathryn M.; Duncan, George H.; Pradel, Katja S.; Carr, Fiona; Wood, Susannah; Oparka, Karl J.; Cruz, Simon Santa

    2000-01-01

    The hypersensitive response (HR) triggered on Nicotiana edwardsonii by tobacco mosaic virus was studied using a modified viral genome that directed expression of the green fluorescent protein. Inoculated plants were initially incubated at 32°C to inhibit the N gene-mediated HR. Transfer to 20°C initiated the HR, and fluorescent infection foci were monitored for early HR-associated events. Membrane damage, which preceded visible cell collapse by more than 3 h, was accompanied by a transient restriction of the xylem within infection sites. Following cell collapse and the rapid desiccation of tissue undergoing the HR, isolated, infected cells were detected at the margin of necrotic lesions. These virus-infected cells were able to reinitiate infection on transfer to 32°C, however, if maintained at 20°C they eventually died. The results indicate that the tobacco mosaic virus-induced HR is a two-phase process with an early stage culminating in rapid cell collapse and tissue desiccation followed by a more extended period during which the remaining infected cells are eliminated. PMID:10938355

  3. MicroRNA-target gene responses to lead-induced stress in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.).

    PubMed

    He, Qiuling; Zhu, Shuijin; Zhang, Baohong

    2014-09-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play key roles in plant responses to various metal stresses. To investigate the miRNA-mediated plant response to heavy metals, cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.), the most important fiber crop in the world, was exposed to different concentrations (0, 25, 50, 100, and 200 µM) of lead (Pb) and then the toxicological effects were investigated. The expression patterns of 16 stress-responsive miRNAs and 10 target genes were monitored in cotton leaves and roots by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR); of these selected genes, several miRNAs and their target genes are involved in root development. The results show a reciprocal regulation of cotton response to lead stress by miRNAs. The characterization of the miRNAs and the associated target genes in response to lead exposure would help in defining the potential roles of miRNAs in plant adaptation to heavy metal stress and further understanding miRNA regulation in response to abiotic stress.

  4. Immunogenic response induced by wzm and wzt gene deletion mutants from Brucella abortus S19.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiu-Ran; Yan, Guang-Mou; Zhang, Rui; Lang, Xu-Long; Yang, Yan-Ling; Li, Xiao-Yan; Chen, Si; Qian, Jing; Wang, Xing-Long

    2014-02-01

    Brucellosis is an infectious disease affecting humans and animals worldwide. Effective methods of control include inducing immunity in animals by vaccination and elimination. Brucella abortus S19 is one of the popular vaccines for control of cattle brucellosis, as it has low virulence. In this paper, allelic exchange plasmids of wzm and wzt genes were constructed and partially knocked out to evaluate the effects on the induction of immunity to Brucella abortus S19 mutants. Cytokine secretion in vitro, INF-γ induction in vivo and antibody dynamics were evaluated. These data suggested that the immunity-eliciting ability of the wzm and wzt gene deletion mutants was similar, although reduced compared with the S19 strain. The results demonstrated that the wzt gene may be more important in the regulation of the induction of immunity than the wzm gene.

  5. Biological Characterization of Gene Response to Insulin-Induced Hypoglycemia in Mouse Retina

    PubMed Central

    Emery, Martine; Nanchen, Natacha; Preitner, Frédéric; Ibberson, Mark; Roduit, Raphaël

    2016-01-01

    Glucose is the most important metabolic substrate of the retina and maintenance of normoglycemia is an essential challenge for diabetic patients. Chronic, exaggerated, glycemic excursions could lead to cardiovascular diseases, nephropathy, neuropathy and retinopathy. We recently showed that hypoglycemia induced retinal cell death in mouse via caspase 3 activation and glutathione (GSH) decrease. Ex vivo experiments in 661W photoreceptor cells confirmed the low-glucose induction of death via superoxide production and activation of caspase 3, which was concomitant with a decrease of GSH content. We evaluate herein retinal gene expression 4 h and 48 h after insulin-induced hypoglycemia. Microarray analysis demonstrated clusters of genes whose expression was modified by hypoglycemia and we discuss the potential implication of those genes in retinal cell death. In addition, we identify by gene set enrichment analysis, three important pathways, including lysosomal function, GSH metabolism and apoptotic pathways. Then we tested the effect of recurrent hypoglycemia (three successive 4h periods of hypoglycemia spaced by 48 h recovery) on retinal cell death. Interestingly, exposure to multiple hypoglycemic events prevented GSH decrease and retinal cell death, or adapted the retina to external stress by restoring GSH level comparable to control situation. We hypothesize that scavenger GSH is a key compound in this apoptotic process, and maintaining “normal” GSH level, as well as a strict glycemic control, represents a therapeutic challenge in order to avoid side effects of diabetes, especially diabetic retinopathy. PMID:26918849

  6. Marek's Disease Virus-Induced Immunosuppression: Array Analysis of Chicken Immune Response Gene Expression Profiling

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Marek’s disease (MD) is a lymphoproliferative disease of chickens induced by a highly cell-associated oncogenic alpha-herpesvirus, Marek’s disease virus (MDV). MDV replicates in chicken lymphocytes and establishes a latency infection within CD4+ T cells. Host-virus interaction, immune responses to...

  7. Identification of novel pepper genes involved in Bax- or INF1-mediated cell death responses by high-throughput virus-induced gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong Hee; Kim, Young Cheol; Choi, Doil; Park, Jeong Mee

    2013-11-19

    Hot pepper is one of the economically important crops in Asia. A large number of gene sequences, including expressed sequence tag (EST) and genomic sequences are publicly available. However, it is still a daunting task to determine gene function due to difficulties in genetic modification of a pepper plants. Here, we show the application of the virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) repression for the study of 459 pepper ESTs selected as non-host pathogen-induced cell death responsive genes from pepper microarray experiments in Nicotiana benthamiana. Developmental abnormalities in N. benthamiana plants are observed in the 32 (7%) pepper ESTs-silenced plants. Aberrant morphological phenotypes largely comprised of three groups: stunted, abnormal leaf, and dead. In addition, by employing the combination of VIGS and Agrobacterium-mediated transient assays, we identified novel pepper ESTs that involved in Bax or INF1-mediated cell death responses. Silencing of seven pepper ESTs homologs suppressed Bax or INF1-induced cell death, five of which suppressed both cell death responses in N. benthamiana. The genes represented by these five ESTs encode putative proteins with functions in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and lipid signaling. The genes represented by the other two pepper ESTs showing only Bax-mediated cell death inhibition encode a CCCH-type zinc finger protein containing an ankyrin-repeat domain and a probable calcium-binding protein, CML30-like. Taken together, we effectively isolated novel pepper clones that are involved in hypersensitive response (HR)-like cell death using VIGS, and identified silenced clones that have different responses to Bax and INF1 exposure, indicating separate signaling pathways for Bax- and INF1-mediated cell death.

  8. Identification of Novel Pepper Genes Involved in Bax- or INF1-Mediated Cell Death Responses by High-Throughput Virus-Induced Gene Silencing

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeong Hee; Kim, Young Cheol; Choi, Doil; Park, Jeong Mee

    2013-01-01

    Hot pepper is one of the economically important crops in Asia. A large number of gene sequences, including expressed sequence tag (EST) and genomic sequences are publicly available. However, it is still a daunting task to determine gene function due to difficulties in genetic modification of a pepper plants. Here, we show the application of the virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) repression for the study of 459 pepper ESTs selected as non-host pathogen-induced cell death responsive genes from pepper microarray experiments in Nicotiana benthamiana. Developmental abnormalities in N. benthamiana plants are observed in the 32 (7%) pepper ESTs-silenced plants. Aberrant morphological phenotypes largely comprised of three groups: stunted, abnormal leaf, and dead. In addition, by employing the combination of VIGS and Agrobacterium-mediated transient assays, we identified novel pepper ESTs that involved in Bax or INF1-mediated cell death responses. Silencing of seven pepper ESTs homologs suppressed Bax or INF1-induced cell death, five of which suppressed both cell death responses in N. benthamiana. The genes represented by these five ESTs encode putative proteins with functions in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and lipid signaling. The genes represented by the other two pepper ESTs showing only Bax-mediated cell death inhibition encode a CCCH-type zinc finger protein containing an ankyrin-repeat domain and a probable calcium-binding protein, CML30-like. Taken together, we effectively isolated novel pepper clones that are involved in hypersensitive response (HR)-like cell death using VIGS, and identified silenced clones that have different responses to Bax and INF1 exposure, indicating separate signaling pathways for Bax- and INF1-mediated cell death. PMID:24256816

  9. Adaptive Response of a Gene Network to Environmental Changes by Fitness-Induced Attractor Selection

    PubMed Central

    Kashiwagi, Akiko; Urabe, Itaru; Kaneko, Kunihiko; Yomo, Tetsuya

    2006-01-01

    Cells switch between various stable genetic programs (attractors) to accommodate environmental conditions. Signal transduction machineries efficiently convey environmental changes to the gene regulation apparatus in order to express the appropriate genetic program. However, since the number of environmental conditions is much larger than that of available genetic programs so that the cell may utilize the same genetic program for a large set of conditions, it may not have evolved a signaling pathway for every environmental condition, notably those that are rarely encountered. Here we show that in the absence of signal transduction, switching to the appropriate attractor state expressing the genes that afford adaptation to the external condition can occur. In a synthetic bistable gene switch in Escherichia coli in which mutually inhibitory operons govern the expression of two genes required in two alternative nutritional environments, cells reliably selected the “adaptive attractor” driven by gene expression noise. A mathematical model suggests that the “non-adaptive attractor” is avoided because in unfavorable conditions, cellular activity is lower, which suppresses mRNA metabolism, leading to larger fluctuations in gene expression. This, in turn, renders the non-adaptive state less stable. Although attractor selection is not as efficient as signal transduction via a dedicated cascade, it is simple and robust, and may represent a primordial mechanism for adaptive responses that preceded the evolution of signaling cascades for the frequently encountered environmental changes. PMID:17183678

  10. Heterografting with nonself rootstocks induces genes involved in stress responses at the graft interface when compared with autografted controls.

    PubMed

    Cookson, S J; Clemente Moreno, M J; Hevin, C; Nyamba Mendome, L Z; Delrot, S; Magnin, N; Trossat-Magnin, C; Ollat, N

    2014-06-01

    Although grafting is widely used in the agriculture of fruit-bearing crops, little is known about graft union formation in particular when two different species are grafted together. It is fascinating that two different plant species brought together can develop harmoniously as one organism for many decades. The objective of this study was to determine whether grafting two different grapevine genotypes alters gene expression at the graft interface in comparison to the presumably wound-like gene expression changes induced in autografts. Gene expression at the graft interface was studied 3, 7, 14, and 28 d after grafting in hetero- and autografts of grapevine (Vitis spp.). Genes differentially expressed between the hetero- and autografts during graft union formation were identified. These genes were clustered according to their expression profile over the time course. MapMan and Gene Ontology enrichment analysis revealed the coordinated upregulation of genes from numerous functional categories related to stress responses in the hetero- compared to the autografts. This indicates that heterografting with nonself rootstocks upregulates stress responses at the graft interface, potentially suggesting that the cells of the graft interface can detect the presence of a nonself grafting partner. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  11. Heterografting with nonself rootstocks induces genes involved in stress responses at the graft interface when compared with autografted controls

    PubMed Central

    Cookson, S. J.

    2014-01-01

    Although grafting is widely used in the agriculture of fruit-bearing crops, little is known about graft union formation in particular when two different species are grafted together. It is fascinating that two different plant species brought together can develop harmoniously as one organism for many decades. The objective of this study was to determine whether grafting two different grapevine genotypes alters gene expression at the graft interface in comparison to the presumably wound-like gene expression changes induced in autografts. Gene expression at the graft interface was studied 3, 7, 14, and 28 d after grafting in hetero- and autografts of grapevine (Vitis spp.). Genes differentially expressed between the hetero- and autografts during graft union formation were identified. These genes were clustered according to their expression profile over the time course. MapMan and Gene Ontology enrichment analysis revealed the coordinated upregulation of genes from numerous functional categories related to stress responses in the hetero- compared to the autografts. This indicates that heterografting with nonself rootstocks upregulates stress responses at the graft interface, potentially suggesting that the cells of the graft interface can detect the presence of a nonself grafting partner. PMID:24692649

  12. Sequence elements in the human osteocalcin gene confer basal activation and inducible response to hormonal vitamin D3.

    PubMed

    Kerner, S A; Scott, R A; Pike, J W

    1989-06-01

    Osteoblast-specific expression of the bone protein osteocalcin is controlled at the transcriptional level by the steroid hormone 1 alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3. As this protein may represent a marker for bone activity in human disease, we examined the regulation of its expression at the molecular level by evaluating human osteocalcin gene promoter function. We describe regions within the promoter that contribute to basal expression of the gene in osteoblast-like cells in culture. Further, we define a 21-base-pair DNA element with the sequence 5'-GTGACTCACCGGGTGAACGGG-3', which acts in cis to mediate 1 alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 inducibility of the osteocalcin gene. This response element bears sequence similarity with other short DNA segments, particularly those for estrogen and thyroid hormone, which act together with their respective trans-acting receptors to modulate gene transcription.

  13. Insulin signaling genes modulate nicotine-induced behavioral responses in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Wescott, Seth A.; Ronan, Elizabeth A.; Xu, X.Z. Shawn

    2015-01-01

    Insulin signaling has been suggested to modulate nicotine dependence, but the underlying genetic evidence has been lacking. Here, we used the nematode, C. elegans, to investigate whether genetic alterations in the insulin signaling pathway affect behavioral responses to nicotine. To do so, we challenged drug-naïve C. elegans with an acute dose of nicotine [100 μM] while recording changes in their locomotion speed. While nicotine treatment stimulated locomotion speed in wild-type C. elegans, the same treatment reduced locomotion speed in mutants defective in insulin signaling. This phenotype could be suppressed by mutations in daf-16, a gene encoding a FOXO transcription factor that acts downstream of insulin signaling. Our data suggest that insulin signaling genes, daf-2, age-1, pdk-1, akt-1, and akt-2 modulate behavioral responses to nicotine in C. elegans, revealing a genetic link between nicotine behavior and insulin signaling. PMID:26317299

  14. Two genes with similarity to bacterial response regulators are rapidly and specifically induced by cytokinin in Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandstatter, I.; Kieber, J. J.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Cytokinins are central regulators of plant growth and development, but little is known about their mode of action. By using differential display, we identified a gene, IBC6 (for induced by cytokinin), from etiolated Arabidopsis seedlings, that is induced rapidly by cytokinin. The steady state level of IBC6 mRNA was elevated within 10 min by the exogenous application of cytokinin, and this induction did not require de novo protein synthesis. IBC6 was not induced by other plant hormones or by light. A second Arabidopsis gene with a sequence highly similar to IBC6 was identified. This IBC7 gene also was induced by cytokinin, although with somewhat slower kinetics and to a lesser extent. The pattern of expression of the two genes was similar, with higher expression in leaves, rachises, and flowers and lower transcript levels in roots and siliques. Sequence analysis revealed that IBC6 and IBC7 are similar to the receiver domain of bacterial two-component response regulators. This homology, coupled with previously published work on the CKI1 histidine kinase homolog, suggests that these proteins may play a role in early cytokinin signaling.

  15. Two genes with similarity to bacterial response regulators are rapidly and specifically induced by cytokinin in Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandstatter, I.; Kieber, J. J.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Cytokinins are central regulators of plant growth and development, but little is known about their mode of action. By using differential display, we identified a gene, IBC6 (for induced by cytokinin), from etiolated Arabidopsis seedlings, that is induced rapidly by cytokinin. The steady state level of IBC6 mRNA was elevated within 10 min by the exogenous application of cytokinin, and this induction did not require de novo protein synthesis. IBC6 was not induced by other plant hormones or by light. A second Arabidopsis gene with a sequence highly similar to IBC6 was identified. This IBC7 gene also was induced by cytokinin, although with somewhat slower kinetics and to a lesser extent. The pattern of expression of the two genes was similar, with higher expression in leaves, rachises, and flowers and lower transcript levels in roots and siliques. Sequence analysis revealed that IBC6 and IBC7 are similar to the receiver domain of bacterial two-component response regulators. This homology, coupled with previously published work on the CKI1 histidine kinase homolog, suggests that these proteins may play a role in early cytokinin signaling.

  16. Endosulfan isomers and sulfate metabolite induced reproductive toxicity in Caenorhabditis elegans involves genotoxic response genes.

    PubMed

    Du, Hua; Wang, Min; Dai, Hui; Hong, Wei; Wang, Mudi; Wang, Jingjing; Weng, Nanyan; Nie, Yaguang; Xu, An

    2015-02-17

    Endosulfan is enlisted as one of the persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and exists in the form of its α and β isomers in the environment as well as in the form of endosulfan sulfate, a toxic metabolite. General endosulfan toxicity has been investigated in various organisms, but the effect of the isomers and sulfate metabolites on reproductive function is unclear. This study was aimed at studying the reproductive dysfunction induced by endosulfan isomers and its sulfate metabolite in Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans). We also determined a role for the DNA-damage-checkpoint gene hus-1. Compared to β-endosulfan and its sulfate metabolite, α-endosulfan caused a dramatically higher level of germ cell apoptosis, which was regulated by DNA damage signal pathway. Both endosulfan isomers and the sulfate metabolite induced germ cell cycle arrest. Loss-of-function studies using hus-1, egl-1, and cep-1 mutants revealed that hus-1 specifically influenced the fecundity, hatchability, and sexual ratio after endosulfan exposure. Our data provide clear evidence that the DNA-checkpoint gene hus-1 has an essential role in endosulfan-induced reproductive dysfunction and that α-endosulfan exhibited the highest reproductive toxicity among the different forms of endosulfan.

  17. Virus-induced gene silencing is a versatile tool for unraveling the functional relevance of multiple abiotic-stress-responsive genes in crop plants

    PubMed Central

    Ramegowda, Venkategowda; Mysore, Kirankumar S.; Senthil-Kumar, Muthappa

    2014-01-01

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is an effective tool for gene function analysis in plants. Over the last decade, VIGS has been successfully used as both a forward and reverse genetics technique for gene function analysis in various model plants, as well as crop plants. With the increased identification of differentially expressed genes under various abiotic stresses through high-throughput transcript profiling, the application of VIGS is expected to be important in the future for functional characterization of a large number of genes. In the recent past, VIGS was proven to be an elegant tool for functional characterization of genes associated with abiotic stress responses. In this review, we provide an overview of how VIGS is used in different crop species to characterize genes associated with drought-, salt-, oxidative- and nutrient-deficiency-stresses. We describe the examples from studies where abiotic stress related genes are characterized using VIGS. In addition, we describe the major advantages of VIGS over other currently available functional genomics tools. We also summarize the recent improvements, limitations and future prospects of using VIGS as a tool for studying plant responses to abiotic stresses. PMID:25071806

  18. Virus-induced gene silencing is a versatile tool for unraveling the functional relevance of multiple abiotic-stress-responsive genes in crop plants.

    PubMed

    Ramegowda, Venkategowda; Mysore, Kirankumar S; Senthil-Kumar, Muthappa

    2014-01-01

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is an effective tool for gene function analysis in plants. Over the last decade, VIGS has been successfully used as both a forward and reverse genetics technique for gene function analysis in various model plants, as well as crop plants. With the increased identification of differentially expressed genes under various abiotic stresses through high-throughput transcript profiling, the application of VIGS is expected to be important in the future for functional characterization of a large number of genes. In the recent past, VIGS was proven to be an elegant tool for functional characterization of genes associated with abiotic stress responses. In this review, we provide an overview of how VIGS is used in different crop species to characterize genes associated with drought-, salt-, oxidative- and nutrient-deficiency-stresses. We describe the examples from studies where abiotic stress related genes are characterized using VIGS. In addition, we describe the major advantages of VIGS over other currently available functional genomics tools. We also summarize the recent improvements, limitations and future prospects of using VIGS as a tool for studying plant responses to abiotic stresses.

  19. Stra6, a retinoic acid-responsive gene, participates in p53-induced apoptosis after DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Carrera, S; Cuadrado-Castano, S; Samuel, J; Jones, G D D; Villar, E; Lee, S W; Macip, S

    2013-01-01

    Stra6 is the retinoic acid (RA)-inducible gene encoding the cellular receptor for holo-retinol binding protein. This transmembrane protein mediates the internalization of retinol, which then upregulates RA-responsive genes in target cells. Here, we show that Stra6 can be upregulated by DNA damage in a p53-dependent manner, and it has an important role in cell death responses. Stra6 expression induced significant amounts of apoptosis in normal and cancer cells, and it was also able to influence p53-mediated cell fate decisions by turning an initial arrest response into cell death. Moreover, inhibition of Stra6 severely compromised p53-induced apoptosis. We also found that Stra6 induced mitochondria depolarization and accumulation of reactive oxygen species, and that it was present not only at the cellular membrane but also in the cytosol. Finally, we show that these novel functions of Stra6 did not require downstream activation of RA signalling. Our results present a previously unknown link between the RA and p53 pathways and provide a rationale to use retinoids to upregulate Stra6, and thus enhance the tumour suppressor functions of p53. This may have implications for the role of vitamin A metabolites in cancer prevention and treatment. PMID:23449393

  20. HER2/neu DNA vaccination by intradermal gene delivery in a mouse tumor model: Gene gun is superior to jet injector in inducing CTL responses and protective immunity.

    PubMed

    Nguyen-Hoai, Tam; Kobelt, Dennis; Hohn, Oliver; Vu, Minh D; Schlag, Peter M; Dörken, Bernd; Norley, Steven; Lipp, Martin; Walther, Wolfgang; Pezzutto, Antonio; Westermann, Jörg

    2012-12-01

    DNA vaccines are potential tools for the induction of immune responses against both infectious disease and cancer. The dermal application of DNA vaccines is of particular interest since the epidermal and dermal layers of the skin are characterized by an abundance of antigen-presenting cells (APCs). The aim of our study was to compare tumor protection as obtained by two different methods of intradermal DNA delivery (gene gun and jet injector) in a well-established HER2/neu mouse tumor model. BALB/c mice were immunized twice with a HER2/neu-coding plasmid by gene gun or jet injector. Mice were then subcutaneously challenged with HER2/neu(+) syngeneic D2F2/E2 tumor cells. Protection against subsequent challenges with tumor cells as well as humoral and T-cell immune responses induced by the vaccine were monitored. Gene gun immunization was far superior to jet injector both in terms of tumor protection and induction of HER2/neu-specific immune responses. After gene gun immunization, 60% of the mice remained tumor-free until day 140 as compared with 25% after jet injector immunization. Furthermore, gene gun vaccination was able to induce both a strong T(H)1-polarized T-cell response with detectable cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) activity and a humoral immune response against HER2/neu, whereas the jet injector was not. Although the disadvantages that were associated with the use of the jet injector in our model may be overcome with methodological modifications and/or in larger animals, which exhibit a thicker skin and/or subcutaneous muscle tissue, we conclude that gene gun delivery constitutes the method of choice for intradermal DNA delivery in preclinical mouse models and possibly also for the clinical development of DNA-based vaccines.

  1. Use of Hydroxyapatite Doping to Enhance Responsiveness of Heat-Inducible Gene Switches to Focused Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Fabiilli, Mario L; Phanse, Rahul A; Moncion, Alexander; Fowlkes, J Brian; Franceschi, Renny T

    2016-03-01

    Recently, we demonstrated that ultrasound-based hyperthermia can activate cells containing a heat-activated and ligand-inducible gene switch in a spatio-temporally controlled manner. These engineered cells can be incorporated into hydrogel scaffolds (e.g., fibrin) for in vivo implantation, where ultrasound can be used to non-invasively pattern transgene expression. Due to their high water content, the acoustic attenuation of fibrin scaffolds is low. Thus, long ultrasound exposures and high acoustic intensities are needed to generate sufficient hyperthermia for gene activation. Here, we demonstrate that the attenuation of fibrin scaffolds and the resulting hyperthermia achievable with ultrasound can be increased significantly by doping the fibrin with hydroxyapatite (HA) nanopowder. The attenuation of a 1% (w/v) fibrin scaffold with 5% (w/v) HA was similar to soft tissue. Transgene activation of cells harboring the gene switch occurred at lower acoustic intensities and shorter exposures when the cells were encapsulated in HA-doped fibrin scaffolds versus undoped scaffolds. Inclusion of HA in the fibrin scaffold did not affect the viability of the encapsulated cells.

  2. Use of Hydroxyapatite Doping to Enhance Responsiveness of Heat-Inducible Gene Switches to Focused Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Fabiilli, Mario L.; Phanse, Rahul A.; Moncion, Alexander; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Franceschi, Renny T.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, we demonstrated that ultrasound-based hyperthermia can activate cells containing a heat-activated and ligand-inducible gene switch in a spatio-temporally controlled manner. These engineered cells can be incorporated into hydrogel scaffolds (e.g., fibrin) for in vivo implantation, where ultrasound can be used to non-invasively pattern transgene expression. Due to their high water content, the acoustic attenuation of fibrin scaffolds is low. Thus, long ultrasound exposures and high acoustic intensities are needed to generate sufficient hyperthermia for gene activation. Here, we demonstrate that the attenuation of fibrin scaffolds and the resulting hyperthermia achievable with ultrasound can be increased significantly by doping the fibrin with hydroxyapatite (HA) nanopowder. The attenuation of a 1% (w/v) fibrin scaffold with 5% (w/v) HA was similar to soft tissue. Transgene activation of cells harboring the gene switch occurred at lower acoustic intensities and shorter exposures when the cells were encapsulated in HA-doped fibrin scaffolds versus undoped scaffolds. Inclusion of HA in the fibrin scaffold did not affect the viability of the encapsulated cells. PMID:26712417

  3. Ets-1 as an early response gene against hypoxia-induced apoptosis in pancreatic β-cells.

    PubMed

    Qiao, N; Xu, C; Zhu, Y-X; Cao, Y; Liu, D-C; Han, X

    2015-02-19

    Hypoxia complicates islet isolation for transplantation and may contribute to pancreatic β-cell failure in type 2 diabetes. Pancreatic β-cells are susceptible to hypoxia-induced apoptosis. Severe hypoxic conditions during the immediate post-transplantation period are a main non-immune factor leading to β-cell death and islet graft failure. In this study, we identified the transcription factor Ets-1 (v-ets erythroblastosis virus E26 oncogene homolog 1) as an early response gene against hypoxia-induced apoptosis in pancreatic β-cells. Hypoxia regulates Ets-1 at multiple levels according to the degree of β-cell oxygen deprivation. Moderate hypoxia promotes Ets-1 gene transcription, whereas severe hypoxia promotes its transactivation activity, as well as its ubiquitin-proteasome mediated degradation. This degradation causes a relative insufficiency of Ets-1 activity, and limits the transactivation effect of Ets-1 on downstream hypoxic-inducible genes and its anti-apoptotic function. Overexpression of ectopic Ets-1 in MIN6 and INS-1 cells protects them from severe hypoxia-induced apoptosis in a mitochondria-dependent manner, confirming that a sufficient amount of Ets-1 activity is critical for protection of pancreatic β-cells against hypoxic injury. Targeting Ets-1 expression may be a useful strategy for islet graft protection during the immediate post-transplantation period.

  4. Ets-1 as an early response gene against hypoxia-induced apoptosis in pancreatic β-cells

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, N; Xu, C; Zhu, Y-X; Cao, Y; Liu, D-C; Han, X

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia complicates islet isolation for transplantation and may contribute to pancreatic β-cell failure in type 2 diabetes. Pancreatic β-cells are susceptible to hypoxia-induced apoptosis. Severe hypoxic conditions during the immediate post-transplantation period are a main non-immune factor leading to β-cell death and islet graft failure. In this study, we identified the transcription factor Ets-1 (v-ets erythroblastosis virus E26 oncogene homolog 1) as an early response gene against hypoxia-induced apoptosis in pancreatic β-cells. Hypoxia regulates Ets-1 at multiple levels according to the degree of β-cell oxygen deprivation. Moderate hypoxia promotes Ets-1 gene transcription, whereas severe hypoxia promotes its transactivation activity, as well as its ubiquitin-proteasome mediated degradation. This degradation causes a relative insufficiency of Ets-1 activity, and limits the transactivation effect of Ets-1 on downstream hypoxic-inducible genes and its anti-apoptotic function. Overexpression of ectopic Ets-1 in MIN6 and INS-1 cells protects them from severe hypoxia-induced apoptosis in a mitochondria-dependent manner, confirming that a sufficient amount of Ets-1 activity is critical for protection of pancreatic β-cells against hypoxic injury. Targeting Ets-1 expression may be a useful strategy for islet graft protection during the immediate post-transplantation period. PMID:25695603

  5. Suppression of vascular smooth muscle cell responses induced by TNF-α in GM3 synthase gene transfected cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung-Suk; Kim, Wun-Jae; Moon, Sung-Kwon

    2011-01-01

    The natural accumulation of ganglioside GM3 (N-glycolylneuraminic acid) on atherosclerotic lesions is a common theory. The present study is the first to examine the effects of the GM3 synthase gene on the responses of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) to tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). We found that overexpression of the GM3 synthase gene inhibited DNA synthesis and ERK1/2 activity induced by TNF-α in VSMC, whereas the basal levels of DNA synthesis and ERK1/2 activity remained unchanged. In addition, GM3 synthase gene transfectants significantly reduced the migration and invasion of VSMC following TNF-α treatment, compared with empty vector transfectants. Furthermore, TNF-α-induced matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) expression and promoter activity were also decreased in GM3 synthase gene transfectants. GM3 synthase gene expression markedly suppressed the TNF-α-stimulated transcriptional activity of activator protein-1 (AP-1) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), which are the controlling factors of MMP-9 expression. Consistent with these results, the addition of anti-GM3 antibody into the GM3 synthase gene transfectants blocked inhibition of DNA synthesis, ERK1/2 activity, migration and invasion. Finally, GM3 synthase gene transfectants treated with anti-GM3 antibody reversed the suppression of MMP-9 expression by reducing AP-1 and NF-κB binding activity. These results suggest regulatory roles for the GM3 synthase gene in VSMC proliferation and migration during the formation of atherosclerotic lesions.

  6. Hepatitis B Virus Induces Expression of Antioxidant Response Element-regulated Genes by Activation of Nrf2*

    PubMed Central

    Schaedler, Stephanie; Krause, Janis; Himmelsbach, Kiyoshi; Carvajal-Yepes, Monica; Lieder, Franziska; Klingel, Karin; Nassal, Michael; Weiss, Thomas S.; Werner, Sabine; Hildt, Eberhard

    2010-01-01

    The expression of a variety of cytoprotective genes is regulated by short cis-acting elements in their promoters, called antioxidant response elements (AREs). A central regulator of ARE-mediated gene expression is the NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2). Human hepatitis B virus (HBV) induces a strong activation of Nrf2/ARE-regulated genes in vitro and in vivo. This is triggered by the HBV-regulatory proteins (HBx and LHBs) via c-Raf and MEK. The Nrf2/ARE-mediated induction of cytoprotective genes by HBV results in a better protection of HBV-positive cells against oxidative damage as compared with control cells. Furthermore, there is a significantly increased expression of the Nrf2/ARE-regulated proteasomal subunit PSMB5 in HBV-positive cells that is associated with a decreased level of the immunoproteasome subunit PSMB5i. In accordance with this finding, HBV-positive cells display a higher constitutive proteasome activity and a decreased activity of the immunoproteasome as compared with control cells even after interferon α/γ treatment. The HBV-dependent induction of Nrf2/ARE-regulated genes might ensure survival of the infected cell, shape the immune response to HBV, and thereby promote establishment of the infection. PMID:20956535

  7. Gene silencing of Tead3 abrogates radiation-induced adaptive response in cultured mouse limb bud cells.

    PubMed

    Vares, Guillaume; Wang, Bing; Tanaka, Kaoru; Shang, Yi; Taki, Keiko; Nakajima, Tetsuo; Nenoi, Mitsuru

    2011-01-01

    There is a crucial need to better understand the effects of low-doses of ionizing radiation in fetal models. Radiation-induced adaptive response (AR) was described in mouse embryos pre-exposed in utero to low-doses of X-rays, which exhibited lower apoptotic levels in the limb bud. We previously described AR-specific gene modulations in the mouse embryo. In this study, we evaluated the role of three candidate genes in the apoptotic AR in a micromass culture of limb bud cells: Csf1, Cacna1a and Tead3. Gene silencing of these three genes abrogated AR. Knowing that TEAD3 protein levels are significantly higher in adapted cells and that YAP/TAZ/TEAD are involved in the control of cell proliferation and apoptosis, we suggest that modulation of Tead3 could play a role in the induction of AR in our model, seen as a reduction of radiation-induced apoptosis and a stimulation of proliferation and differentiation in limb bud cells.

  8. Influence of E. coli-induced Prostatic Inflammation on Expression of Androgen-Responsive Genes and Transforming Growth Factor Beta 1 Cascade Genes in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Funahashi, Yasuhito; Wang, Zhou; O’Malley, Katherine J.; Tyagi, Pradeep; DeFranco, Donald B.; Gingrich, Jeffrey R.; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Majima, Tsuyoshi; Gotoh, Momokazu; Yoshimura, Naoki

    2014-01-01

    Background Prostatic inflammation is reportedly associated with the development of prostatic hyperplasia. We investigated the effects of prostatic inflammation on expression levels of androgen-responsive genes and growth factors in the rat prostate. Methods Prostatic inflammation was induced by Escherichia coli (strain 1677) injection (0.2 mL of 1 × 108 CFU/mL) into the prostatic urethra of male Sprague-Dawley rats, and ventral lobes of the prostate were harvested on day 84. Rats were given 10 mg/kg celecoxib during the last month in the COX-2 inhibitor treated group. Histopathology and multiplex ELISA for inflammation-related proteins were performed. Glandular epithelial cells and stromal regions were separately isolated using laser-capture microdissection (LCM). Real-time RT-PCR was performed to examine mRNA levels of androgen-responsive genes in the epithelium and TGF-β1 cascade genes in the stroma. Results Hematoxylin and eosin staining showed that mild inflammation was distributed diffusely throughout the prostate. Polymorphonuclear cells infiltrated the slightly edematous stroma, but no morphological changes were observed in the epithelium. Immunohistochemically, expression of androgen receptor and TGF-β1 in addition to IL-6 and COX-2 were enhanced in the E. coli inoculated rats. All of these factors were suppressed in the celecoxib-treated rats. Upregulation of IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, and RANTES in the E. coli-inoculated rats was normalized by celecoxib treatment. Significant upregulation of androgen receptor and androgen-responsive genes such as Eaf2, ELL2, FKBP5, calreticulin and ornithine decarboxylase was observed in the LCM-dissected epithelium. Also TGF-β1 and its downstream cascade genes such as Hic-5, collagen 1, and fibronectin were upregulated significantly in the LCM-dissected stroma. The COX-2 inhibitor treatment suppressed upregulation of these genes. Conclusions Prostatic inflammation changed the expression of androgen-responsive genes in the

  9. Mumps virus induces innate immune responses in mouse ovarian granulosa cells through the activation of Toll-like receptor 2 and retinoic acid-inducible gene I.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing; Wu, Han; Cheng, Lijing; Yan, Keqin; Shi, Lili; Zhao, Xiang; Jiang, Qian; Wang, Fei; Chen, Yongmei; Li, Qihan; Han, Daishu

    2016-11-15

    Mumps virus (MuV) infection may lead to oophoritis and perturb ovarian function. However, the mechanisms underlying the activation of innate immune responses to MuV infection in the ovary have not been investigated. This study showed that Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) and retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) cooperatively initiate innate immune responses to MuV infection in mouse ovarian granulosa cells. Ovarian granulosa cells infected with MuV significantly produced pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, including interleukin-1β (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1), and type 1 interferons (IFN-α and IFN-β). Knockdown of RIG-I significantly decreased MuV-induced cytokine expression. TLR2 deficiency reduced the expression of IL-1β, TNF-α, and MCP-1 but did not affect the expression of IFN-α and IFN-β in granulosa cells after infection with MuV. Intraperitoneal injection of MuV induced the ovarian innate immune responses in vivo, which suppressed estradiol synthesis and induced granulosa cell apoptosis. The results provide novel insights into the mechanisms underlying MuV-induced innate immune responses in the mouse ovary. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Identification of direct serum-response factor gene targets during Me2SO-induced P19 cardiac cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shu Xing; Garcia-Gras, Eduardo; Wycuff, Diane R; Marriot, Suzanne J; Kadeer, Nijiati; Yu, Wei; Olson, Eric N; Garry, Daniel J; Parmacek, Michael S; Schwartz, Robert J

    2005-05-13

    Serum-response factor (SRF) is an obligatory transcription factor, required for the formation of vertebrate mesoderm leading to the origin of the cardiovascular system. Protein A-TEV-tagged chromatin immunoprecipitation technology was used to collect direct SRF-bound gene targets from pluripotent P19 cells, induced by Me2SO treatment into an enriched cardiac cell population. From 242 sequenced DNA fragments, we identified 188 genomic DNA fragments as potential direct SRF targets that contain CArG boxes and CArG-like boxes. Of the 92 contiguous genes that were identified, a subgroup of 43 SRF targets was then further validated by co-transfection assays with SRF. Expression patterns of representative candidate genes were compared with the LacZ reporter expression activity of the endogenous SRF gene. According to the Unigene data base, 84% of the SRF target candidates were expressed, at least, in the heart. In SRF null embryonic stem cells, 81% of these SRF target candidates were greatly affected by the absence of SRF. Among these SRF-regulated genes, Raf1, Map4k4, and Bicc1 have essential roles in mesoderm formation. The 12 regulated SRF target genes, Mapk10 (JNK3), Txnl2, Azi2, Tera, Sema3a, Lrp4, Actc1, Myl3, Hspg2, Pgm2, Hif3a, and Asb5, have been implicated in cardiovascular formation, and the Ski and Hes6 genes have roles in muscle differentiation. SRF target genes related to cell mitosis and cycle, E2f5, Npm1, Cenpb, Rbbp6, and Scyl1, expressed in the heart tissue were differentially regulated in SRF null ES cells.

  11. Posttranscriptional regulation of adrenal TH gene expression contributes to the maladaptive responses triggered by insulin-induced recurrent hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Kudrick, Necla; Chan, Owen; La Gamma, Edmund F; Kim, Juhye Lena; Tank, Arnold William; Sterling, Carol; Nankova, Bistra B

    2015-02-01

    Acute metabolic stress such as insulin-induced hypoglycemia triggers a counterregulatory response during which the release of catecholamines (epinephrine), the activation of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) enzyme and subsequent compensatory catecholamine biosynthesis occur in the adrenal medulla. However, recurrent exposure to hypoglycemia (RH), a consequence of tight glycemic control in individuals with type 1 and type 2 diabetes compromises this physiological response. The molecular mechanisms underlying the maladaptive response to repeated glucose deprivation are incompletely understood. We hypothesize that impaired epinephrine release following RH reflects altered regulation of adrenal catecholamine biosynthesis. To test this hypothesis, we compared the effect of single daily (RH) and twice-daily episodes of insulin-induced hypoglycemia (2RH) on adrenal epinephrine release and production in normal rats. Control animals received saline injections under similar conditions (RS and 2RS, respectively). Following 3 days of treatment, we assessed the counterregulatory hormonal responses during a hypoglycemic clamp. Changes in adrenal TH gene expression were also analyzed. The counterregulatory responses, relative TH transcription and TH mRNA levels and Ser40-TH phosphorylation (marker for enzyme activation) were induced to a similar extent in RS, 2RS, and RH groups. In contrast, epinephrine and glucagon responses were attenuated in the 2RH group and this was associated with a limited elevation of adrenal TH mRNA, rapid inactivation of TH enzyme and no significant changes in TH protein. Our results suggest that novel posttranscriptional mechanisms controlling TH mRNA and activated TH enzyme turnover contribute to the impaired epinephrine responses and may provide new therapeutic targets to prevent HAAF.

  12. Radiation induced pulmonary fibrosis as a model of progressive fibrosis: Contributions of DNA damage, inflammatory response and cellular senescence genes.

    PubMed

    Beach, Tyler A; Johnston, Carl J; Groves, Angela M; Williams, Jacqueline P; Finkelstein, Jacob N

    2017-04-01

    Purpose/Aim of Study: Studies of pulmonary fibrosis (PF) have resulted in DNA damage, inflammatory response, and cellular senescence being widely hypothesized to play a role in the progression of the disease. Utilizing these aforementioned terms, genomics databases were interrogated along with the term, "pulmonary fibrosis," to identify genes common among all 4 search terms. Findings were compared to data derived from a model of radiation-induced progressive pulmonary fibrosis (RIPF) to verify that these genes are similarly expressed, supporting the use of radiation as a model for diseases involving PF, such as human idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). In an established model of RIPF, C57BL/6J mice were exposed to 12.5 Gy thorax irradiation and sacrificed at 24 hours, 1, 4, 12, and 32 weeks following exposure, and lung tissue was compared to age-matched controls by RNA sequencing. Of 176 PF associated gene transcripts identified by database interrogation, 146 (>82%) were present in our experimental model, throughout the progression of RIPF. Analysis revealed that nearly 85% of PF gene transcripts were associated with at least 1 other search term. Furthermore, of 22 genes common to all four terms, 16 were present experimentally in RIPF. This illustrates the validity of RIPF as a model of progressive PF/IPF based on the numbers of transcripts reported in both literature and observed experimentally. Well characterized genes and proteins are implicated in this model, supporting the hypotheses that DNA damage, inflammatory response and cellular senescence are associated with the pathogenesis of PF.

  13. Skin sensitizers induce antioxidant response element dependent genes: application to the in vitro testing of the sensitization potential of chemicals.

    PubMed

    Natsch, Andreas; Emter, Roger

    2008-03-01

    Tests for skin sensitization are required prior to the market launch of new cosmetic ingredients and in vitro tests are needed to replace the current animal tests. Protein reactivity is the common feature of skin sensitizers and it is a crucial question whether a cellular in vitro assay can detect protein reactivity of diverse test chemicals. The signaling pathway involving the repressor protein Keap1 and the transcription factor nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2, which binds to the antioxidant response element (ARE) in the promoter of many phase II detoxification genes, is a potential cellular marker because Keap1 had been shown to be covalently modified by electrophiles which leads to activation of ARE-dependent genes. To evaluate whether this regulatory pathway can be used to develop a predictive cellular in vitro test for sensitization, 96 different chemicals of known skin sensitization potential were added to Hepa1C1C7 cells and the induction of the ARE-regulated quinone reductase (QR) activity was determined. In parallel, 102 chemicals were tested on the reporter cell line AREc32, which contains an eightfold repeat of the ARE sequence upstream of a luciferase gene. Among the strong/extreme skin sensitizers 14 out of 15 and 30 out of 34 moderate sensitizers induced the ARE-dependent luciferase activity and in many cases this response was paralleled by an induction of QR activity in Hepa1C1C7 cells. Sixty percent of the weak sensitizers also induced luciferase activity, and the overall accuracy of the assay was 83 percent. Only four of 30 tested nonsensitizers induced low levels of luciferase activity, indicating a high specificity of the assay. Thus, measurement of the induction of this signaling pathway provides an interesting in vitro test to screen for the skin sensitization potential of novel chemicals.

  14. C/EBPβ: a major PML–RARA-responsive gene in retinoic acid-induced differentiation of APL cells

    PubMed Central

    Duprez, Estelle; Wagner, Katharina; Koch, Heike; Tenen, Daniel G.

    2003-01-01

    In acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), the translocation t(15;17) induces a block at the promyelocytic stage of differentiation in an all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA)-responsive manner. Here we report that upon treatment with ATRA, t(15;17) cells (NB4) reveal a very rapid increase in protein level and binding activity of C/EBPβ, a C/EBP family member, which was not observed in an ATRA-resistant NB4 cell line. We further provide evidence that ATRA mediates a direct increase of C/EBPβ, only in PML–RARA (promyelocytic leukemia–retinoic acid receptor α)-expressing cells. In addition, transactivation experiments indicate that the PML–RARA fusion protein, but not PML–RARA mutants defective in transactivation, strongly transactivates the C/EBPβ promoter. These results suggest that PML–RARA mediates ATRA-induced C/EBPβ expression. Finally, we demonstrate the importance of C/EBPβ in granulocytic differentiation. We show that not only does C/EBPβ induce granulocytic differentiation of non-APL myeloid cell lines independent of addition of ATRA or other cytokines, but also that C/EBPβ induction is required during ATRA-induced differentiation of APL cells. Taken together, C/EBPβ is an ATRA-dependent PML–RARA target gene involved in ATRA-induced differentiation of APL cells. PMID:14592978

  15. Perchlorate exposure induces hypothyroidism and affects thyroid-responsive genes in liver but not brain of quail chicks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; McNabb, F M Anne; Sible, Jill C

    2009-10-01

    Ground-dwelling birds in perchlorate-contaminated areas are exposed to perchlorate ion, a known thyroid disruptor, and might be vulnerable to the developmental effects of perchlorate-induced hypothyroidism. We hypothesized that perchlorate-induced hypothyroidism would alter the expression of thyroid-responsive genes involved in thyroid hormone (TH) regulation and in the development of target organ function. Japanese quail chicks were exposed to 2000 mg/L ammonium perchlorate in drinking water for 7.5 weeks beginning on day 5 posthatch. Hypothyroidism was evident after 2 weeks of exposure as lower plasma THs and lower TH content in exposed chicks than in controls. The degree of hypothyroidism was increased at 7.5 weeks, as indicated by significant thyroid gland hypertrophy and sustained changes in thyroid function. After 2 weeks of exposure, hypothyroidism increased type 2 5'-deiodinase (D2) mRNA level and decreased Spot 14 (SP14) mRNA level in the liver, whereas D2 mRNA and RC3 mRNA levels in brain were not affected. After 7.5 weeks of exposure, mRNA levels in the exposed group did not differ from those in controls in either the liver or brain, suggesting the responsiveness of these genes to THs decreased during development. These results suggest that the brain, but not the liver, was protected from the effects of hypothyroidism, probably by changes in D2 activity at the protein level and/or regulation of TH entry and exit from the brain. We concluded that perchlorate exposure caused hypothyroidism in young Japanese quail and affected the expression of thyroid-responsive genes during early posthatch development.

  16. Protective immune response in mice induced by a suicidal DNA vaccine encoding NTPase-II gene of Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Lina; Hu, Yue; Hua, Qianqian; Luo, Fangjun; Xie, Guizhen; Li, Xiangzhi; Lin, Jiaxin; Wan, Yujing; Ren, Shoufeng; Pan, Changwang; Tan, Feng

    2017-02-01

    DNA-based alphaviral RNA replicon vectors, also called suicidal DNA vectors, have been employed to alleviate biosafety concerns attribution to its ability to induce apoptotic cell death of the transfected cells. Toxoplasma gondii nucleoside triphosphate hydrolase-II (TgNTPase-II), which facilitates the parasite to salvage purines from the host cell for survival and replication, have been demonstrated to be a potential vaccine candidate for toxoplasmosis. Herein, we evaluated the immunogenic potential of a suicidal DNA vaccine encoding TgNTPase-II gene, pDREP-TgNTPase-II, delivered intramuscularly in combination with electroporation. Immunization of mice with pDREP-TgNTPase-II elicited specific humoral responses, with high IgG antibody titers and a mixed IgG1/IgG2a response. The cellular immune response was associated with high level production of IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-10 cytokines and low level IL-4 production as well as the increase of the percentage of CD8+ T cells, indicating that a Th1 predominant response was elicited. Furthermore, mice vaccinated with this suicidal DNA vaccine displayed partial protection against acute infection with the virulent RH strain as well as chronic infection with PRU cyst, which shows 77.7% and 71.4% reduction in brain cyst burden in comparison to PBS and pDREP-eGFP control group, respectively. Based on the cellular and antibody responses, the suicidal DNA vaccine elicited a Th1-predominant immune response against T. gondii challenge.

  17. Turgor-responsive gene transcription and RNA levels increase rapidly when pea shoots are wilted. Sequence and expression of three inducible genes.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, F D; Jones, J T; Mullet, J E

    1990-07-01

    Reduction of turgor in pea shoots caused the accumulation of several poly(A) RNAs. cDNA clones derived from three different poly(A) RNAs which accumulate in wilted pea shoots were isolated, sequenced and expression of the corresponding genes examined. Clone 7a encoded a 289 amino acid protein. The C-terminal 180 amino acids of this protein were homologous to soybean nodulin-26. RNA hybridizing to cDNA 7a was abundant in roots, and induced in shoots by dehydration, heat shock and to a small extent by ABA. Hydropathic plots indicate that the protein encoded by cDNA 7a contains six potential membrane spanning domains similar to proteins which form ion channels. Clone 15a encoded a 363 amino acid protein with high homology to cysteine proteases. RNA hybridizing to cDNA 15a was more abundant in roots than shoots of control plants. Dehydration of pea shoots induced cDNA 15a mRNA levels whereas heat shock or ABA treatment did not. Clone 26g encoded a 508 amino acid protein with 30% residue identity to several aldehyde dehydrogenases. RNA hybridizing to cDNA 26g was induced by dehydration of shoots but not roots and heat shock and ABA did not modulate RNA levels. Levels of the three poly(A) RNAs increased 4-6-fold by 4 h after wilting and this increase was not altered by pretreatment of shoots with cycloheximide. When wilted shoots were rehydrated, RNA hybridizing to cDNA 26g declined to pre-stress levels within 2 h. Run-on transcription experiments using nuclei from pea shoots showed that transcription of the genes which encode the three poly(A) RNAs was induced within 30 min following reduction of shoot turgor. One of the genes showed a further increase in transcription by 4 h after dehydration whereas transcription of the other 2 genes declined. These results indicate that plant cells respond to changes in cell turgor by rapidly increasing transcription of several genes. Furthermore, the expression of the turgor-responsive genes varies with respect to the time course of

  18. Cadmium-induced ethylene production and responses in Arabidopsis thaliana rely on ACS2 and ACS6 gene expression

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Anthropogenic activities cause metal pollution worldwide. Plants can absorb and accumulate these metals through their root system, inducing stress as a result of excess metal concentrations inside the plant. Ethylene is a regulator of multiple plant processes, and is affected by many biotic and abiotic stresses. Increased ethylene levels have been observed after exposure to excess metals but it remains unclear how the increased ethylene levels are achieved at the molecular level. In this study, the effects of cadmium (Cd) exposure on the production of ethylene and its precursor 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC), and on the expression of the ACC Synthase (ACS) and ACC Oxidase (ACO) multigene families were investigated in Arabidopsis thaliana. Results Increased ethylene release after Cd exposure was directly measurable in a system using rockwool-cultivated plants; enhanced levels of the ethylene precursor ACC together with higher mRNA levels of ethylene responsive genes: ACO2, ETR2 and ERF1 also indicated increased ethylene production in hydroponic culture. Regarding underlying mechanisms, it was found that the transcript levels of ACO2 and ACO4, the most abundantly expressed members of the ACO multigene family, were increased upon Cd exposure. ACC synthesis is the rate-limiting step in ethylene biosynthesis, and transcript levels of both ACS2 and ACS6 showed the highest increase and became the most abundant isoforms after Cd exposure, suggesting their importance in the Cd-induced increase of ethylene production. Conclusions Cadmium induced the biosynthesis of ACC and ethylene in Arabidopsis thaliana plants mainly via the increased expression of ACS2 and ACS6. This was confirmed in the acs2-1acs6-1 double knockout mutants, which showed a decreased ethylene production, positively affecting leaf biomass and resulting in a delayed induction of ethylene responsive gene expressions without significant differences in Cd contents between wild-type and

  19. A comparison of gene expression responses in rat whole embryo culture and in vivo: time-dependent retinoic acid-induced teratogenic response.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Joshua F; Verhoef, Aart; Pennings, Jeroen L A; Pronk, Tessa E; Piersma, Aldert H

    2012-03-01

    The whole embryo culture (WEC) model serves as a potential alternative for classical in vivo developmental toxicity testing. In the WEC, cultured rat embryos are exposed during neurulation and early organogenesis and evaluated for morphological effects. Toxicogenomic-based approaches may improve the predictive ability of WEC by providing molecular-based markers associated with chemical exposure, which can be compared across multiple parameters (e.g., exposure duration, developmental time, experimental model). Additionally, comparisons between in vitro and in vivo models may identify objective relevant molecular responses linked with developmental toxicity endpoints in vivo. In this study, using a transcriptomic approach, we compared all-trans retinoic acid (RA)-exposed and nonexposed Wistar rat embryos derived using WEC (RA, 0.5 μg/ml) or in vivo (RA, 50 mg/kg, oral gavage) to identify overlapping and nonoverlapping effects of RA on RNA expression in parallel with morphological changes. Across six time points (gestational day 10 + 2-48 h), we observed strong similarities in RA response at the gene (directionality, significance) and functional (e.g., embryonic development, cell differentiation) level which associated with RA-induced adverse morphological effects, including growth reduction as well as alterations in neural tube, limb, branchial, and mandible development. We observed differences between models in the timing of RA-induced effects on genes related to embryonic development and RA metabolism. These observations on the gene expression level were associated with specific differential morphological outcomes. This study supports the use of WEC to examine compound-induced molecular responses relative to in vivo and, furthermore, assists in defining the applicability domain of the WEC in determining complementary windows of sensitivity for developmental toxicological investigations.

  20. De Novo Foliar Transcriptome of Chenopodium amaranticolor and Analysis of Its Gene Expression During Virus-Induced Hypersensitive Response

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yongqiang; Pei, Xinwu; Zhang, Chao; Lu, Zifeng; Wang, Zhixing; Jia, Shirong; Li, Weimin

    2012-01-01

    Background The hypersensitive response (HR) system of Chenopodium spp. confers broad-spectrum virus resistance. However, little knowledge exists at the genomic level for Chenopodium, thus impeding the advanced molecular research of this attractive feature. Hence, we took advantage of RNA-seq to survey the foliar transcriptome of C. amaranticolor, a Chenopodium species widely used as laboratory indicator for pathogenic viruses, in order to facilitate the characterization of the HR-type of virus resistance. Methodology and Principal Findings Using Illumina HiSeq™ 2000 platform, we obtained 39,868,984 reads with 3,588,208,560 bp, which were assembled into 112,452 unigenes (3,847 clusters and 108,605 singletons). BlastX search against the NCBI NR database identified 61,698 sequences with a cut-off E-value above 10−5. Assembled sequences were annotated with gene descriptions, GO, COG and KEGG terms, respectively. A total number of 738 resistance gene analogs (RGAs) and homology sequences of 6 key signaling proteins within the R proteins-directed signaling pathway were identified. Based on this transcriptome data, we investigated the gene expression profiles over the stage of HR induced by Tobacco mosaic virus and Cucumber mosaic virus by using digital gene expression analysis. Numerous candidate genes specifically or commonly regulated by these two distinct viruses at early and late stages of the HR were identified, and the dynamic changes of the differently expressed genes enriched in the pathway of plant-pathogen interaction were particularly emphasized. Conclusions To our knowledge, this study is the first description of the genetic makeup of C. amaranticolor, providing deep insight into the comprehensive gene expression information at transcriptional level in this species. The 738 RGAs as well as the differentially regulated genes, particularly the common genes regulated by both TMV and CMV, are suitable candidates which merit further functional characterization

  1. A high-throughput virus-induced gene-silencing vector for screening transcription factors in virus-induced plant defense response in orchid.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hsiang-Chia; Hsieh, Ming-Hsien; Chen, Cheng-En; Chen, Hong-Hwa; Wang, Hsiang-Iu; Yeh, Hsin-Hung

    2012-06-01

    The large number of species and worldwide spread of species of Orchidaceae indicates their successful adaptation to environmental stresses. Thus, orchids provide rich resources to study how plants have evolved to cope with stresses. This report describes our improvement of our previously reported orchid virus-induced gene silencing vector, pCymMV-pro60, with a modified Gateway cloning system which requires only one recombination and can be inoculated by agroinfiltration. We cloned 1,700 DNA fragments, including 187 predicted transcription factors derived from an established expression sequence tag library of orchid, into pCymMV-Gateway. Phalaenopsis aphrodite was inoculated with these vectors that contained DNA fragments of the 187 predicted transcription factors. The viral vector initially triggered the expression of the salicylic acid (SA)-related plant defense responses and later induced silencing of the endogenous target transcription factor genes. By monitoring the expression of the SA-related plant defense marker PhaPR1 (homolog of PR1), we identified a gene, PhaTF15, involved in the expression of PhaPR1. Knockdown of PhaTF15 by virus-induced gene silencing and by transient delivery of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) reduced expression of the orchid homolog of the conserved positive defense regulator NPR1, PhaNPR1. Cymbidium mosaic virus also accumulated to high levels with knockdown of PhaTF15 by transient delivery of dsRNA. We demonstrated efficient cloning and screening strategies for high-throughput analysis of orchid and identify a gene, PhaTF15, involved in regulation of SA-related plant defense.

  2. A hot pepper gene encoding WRKY transcription factor is induced during hypersensitive response to Tobacco mosaic virus and Xanthomonas campestris.

    PubMed

    Park, Chang-Jin; Shin, Yun-Chul; Lee, Boo-Ja; Kim, Ki-Jeong; Kim, Jeong-Kook; Paek, Kyung-Hee

    2006-01-01

    Plant WRKY transcription factors were previously implicated in the alteration of gene expression in response to various pathogens. The WRKY proteins constitute a large family of plant transcription factors, whose precise functions have yet to be elucidated. Using a domain-specific differential display procedure, we isolated a WRKY gene, which is rapidly induced during an incompatible interaction between hot pepper and Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) or Xanthomonas campestris pv . vesicatoria (Xcv). The full-length cDNA of CaWRKY-a (Capsicum annuum WRKY-a) encodes a putative polypeptide of 546 amino acids, containing two WRKY domains with a zinc finger motif. The expression of CaWRKY-a could be rapidly induced by not only chemical elicitor such as salicylic acid (SA) or ethephon but also wounding treatments. The nuclear localization of CaWRKY-a was determined in transient expression system using tobacco BY-2 cells by polyethylene glycol (PEG)-mediated transformation experiment. With oligonucleotide molecules containing the putative W-box sequences as a probe, we confirmed that CaWRKY-a protein had W-box-binding activity. These results suggest that CaWRKY-a might be involved as a transcription factor in plant defense-related signal transduction pathways.

  3. DNA damage-responsive Drosophila melanogaster gene is also induced by heat shock

    SciTech Connect

    Vivino, A.A.; Smith, M.D.; Minton, K.W.

    1986-12-01

    A gene isolated by screening Drosophila melanogaster tissue culture cells for DNA damage regulation was also found to be regulated by heat shock. After UV irradiation or heat shock, induction is at the transcriptional level and results in the accumulation of a 1.0-kilobase polyadenylated transcript. The restriction map of the clone bears no resemblance to the known heat shock genes, which are shown to be uninduced by UV irradiation.

  4. Regulation of glutathione S-transferase Ya subunit gene expression: Identification of a unique xenobiotic-responsive element controlling inducible expression by planar aromatic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Rushmore, T.H.; King, R.G.; Pickett, C.B. ); Paulson, K.E. )

    1990-05-01

    The authors have identified a region in the 5{prime} flanking sequence of the glutathione S-transferase Ya subunit gene that contains a unique xenobiotic-responsive element (XRE). The regulatory region spans nucleotides {minus}722 to {minus}682 of the 5{prime} flanking sequence and is responsible for part of the basal level as well as inducible expression of the Ya subunit gene by planar aromatic compounds such as {beta}-naphthoflavone ({beta}-NF) and 3-methylcholanthrene. The DNA sequence of this region ({beta}-NF-responsive element) is distinct from the DNA sequence of the XRE found in the cytochrome P-450 IA1 gene. In addition to the region containing the {beta}-NF-responsive element, two other regulatory regions of the Ya subunit gene have been identified. The data suggest that regulation of gene expression by planar aromatic compounds can be mediated by a DNA sequence this is distinct from the XRE sequence.

  5. Depletion of the cereblon gene activates the unfolded protein response and protects cells from ER stress-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwang Min; Yang, Seung-Joo; Park, Sojung; Choi, Yoo Duk; Shin, Hwa Kyoung; Pak, Jhang Ho; Park, Chul-Seung; Kim, Inki

    2015-02-27

    Previous studies showed that cereblon (CRBN) binds to various cellular target proteins, implying that CRBN regulates a wide range of cell responses. In this study, we found that deletion of the Crbn gene desensitized mouse embryonic fibroblast cells to various cell death-promoting stimuli, including endoplasmic reticulum stress inducers. Mechanistically, deletion of Crbn activates pathways involved in the unfolded protein response prior to ER stress induction. Loss of Crbn activated PKR-like ER kinase (PERK) with enhanced phosphorylation of eIF2α. Following ER stress induction, loss of Crbn delayed dephosphorylation of eIF2α, while reconstitution of Crbn reversed enhanced phosphorylation of PERK and eIF2α. Lastly, we found that activation of the PERK/eIF2α pathway following Crbn deletion is caused by activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). We propose that CRBN plays a role in cellular stress signaling, including the unfolded protein response, by controlling the activity of AMPK.

  6. HLA class II genes modulate vaccine-induced antibody responses to affect HIV-1 acquisition.

    PubMed

    Prentice, Heather A; Tomaras, Georgia D; Geraghty, Daniel E; Apps, Richard; Fong, Youyi; Ehrenberg, Philip K; Rolland, Morgane; Kijak, Gustavo H; Krebs, Shelly J; Nelson, Wyatt; DeCamp, Allan; Shen, Xiaoying; Yates, Nicole L; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Nitayaphan, Sorachai; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Ferrari, Guido; McElrath, M Juliana; Montefiori, David C; Bailer, Robert T; Koup, Richard A; O'Connell, Robert J; Robb, Merlin L; Michael, Nelson L; Gilbert, Peter B; Kim, Jerome H; Thomas, Rasmi

    2015-07-15

    In the RV144 vaccine trial, two antibody responses were found to correlate with HIV-1 acquisition. Because human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II-restricted CD4(+) T cells are involved in antibody production, we tested whether HLA class II genotypes affected HIV-1-specific antibody levels and HIV-1 acquisition in 760 individuals. Indeed, antibody responses correlated with acquisition only in the presence of single host HLA alleles. Envelope (Env)-specific immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibodies were associated with increased risk of acquisition specifically in individuals with DQB1*06. IgG antibody responses to Env amino acid positions 120 to 204 were higher and were associated with decreased risk of acquisition and increased vaccine efficacy only in the presence of DPB1*13. Screening IgG responses to overlapping peptides spanning Env 120-204 and viral sequence analysis of infected individuals defined differences in vaccine response that were associated with the presence of DPB1*13 and could be responsible for the protection observed. Overall, the underlying genetic findings indicate that HLA class II modulated the quantity, quality, and efficacy of antibody responses in the RV144 trial.

  7. HLA class II genes modulate vaccine-induced antibody responses to affect HIV-1 acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Prentice, Heather A.; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Geraghty, Daniel E.; Apps, Richard; Fong, Youyi; Ehrenberg, Philip K.; Rolland, Morgane; Kijak, Gustavo H.; Krebs, Shelly J.; Nelson, Wyatt; DeCamp, Allan; Shen, Xiaoying; Yates, Nicole L.; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Nitayaphan, Sorachai; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Ferrari, Guido; Juliana McElrath, M.; Montefiori, David C.; Bailer, Robert T.; Koup, Richard A.; O’Connell, Robert J.; Robb, Merlin L.; Michael, Nelson L.; Gilbert, Peter B.; Kim, Jerome H.; Thomas, Rasmi

    2016-01-01

    In the RV144 vaccine trial, two antibody responses were found to correlate with HIV-1 acquisition. Because human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II–restricted CD4+ T cells are involved in antibody production, we tested whether HLA class II genotypes affected HIV-1–specific antibody levels and HIV-1 acquisition in 760 individuals. Indeed, antibody responses correlated with acquisition only in the presence of single host HLA alleles. Envelope (Env)–specific immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibodies were associated with increased risk of acquisition specifically in individuals with DQB1*06. IgG antibody responses to Env amino acid positions 120 to 204 were higher and were associated with decreased risk of acquisition and increased vaccine efficacy only in the presence of DPB1*13. Screening IgG responses to overlapping peptides spanning Env 120–204 and viral sequence analysis of infected individuals defined differences in vaccine response that were associated with the presence of DPB1*13 and could be responsible for the protection observed. Overall, the underlying genetic findings indicate that HLA class II modulated the quantity, quality, and efficacy of antibody responses in the RV144 trial. PMID:26180102

  8. Immune responses induced by DNA vaccines bearing Spike gene of PEDV combined with porcine IL-18

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) is the causative agent of porcine epidemic diarrhea, a highly contagious enteric disease of swine. The Spike (S) protein is one of the main structural proteins of PEDV capable of inducing neutralizing antibodies in vivo. Herein, we generated three distinct DNA ...

  9. RAD51-dependent break-induced replication differs in kinetics and checkpoint responses from RAD51-mediated gene conversion.

    PubMed

    Malkova, Anna; Naylor, Maria L; Yamaguchi, Miyuki; Ira, Grzegorz; Haber, James E

    2005-02-01

    Diploid Saccharomyces cells experiencing a double-strand break (DSB) on one homologous chromosome repair the break by RAD51-mediated gene conversion >98% of the time. However, when extensive homologous sequences are restricted to one side of the DSB, repair can occur by both RAD51-dependent and RAD51-independent break-induced replication (BIR) mechanisms. Here we characterize the kinetics and checkpoint dependence of RAD51-dependent BIR when the DSB is created within a chromosome. Gene conversion products appear within 2 h, and there is little, if any, induction of the DNA damage checkpoint; however, RAD51-dependent BIR occurs with a further delay of 2 to 4 h and cells arrest in response to the G(2)/M DNA damage checkpoint. RAD51-dependent BIR does not require special facilitating sequences that are required for a less efficient RAD51-independent process. RAD51-dependent BIR occurs efficiently in G(2)-arrested cells. Once repair is initiated, the rate of repair replication during BIR is comparable to that of normal DNA replication, as copying of >100 kb is completed less than 30 min after repair DNA synthesis is detected close to the DSB.

  10. Molecular Characterization of Hap Complex Components Responsible for Methanol-Inducible Gene Expression in the Methylotrophic Yeast Candida boidinii

    PubMed Central

    Oda, Saori; Yurimoto, Hiroya; Nitta, Nobuhisa; Sasano, Yu

    2015-01-01

    We identified genes encoding components of the Hap complex, CbHAP2, CbHAP3, and CbHAP5, as transcription factors regulating methanol-inducible gene expression in the methylotrophic yeast Candida boidinii. We found that the Cbhap2Δ, Cbhap3Δ, and Cbhap5Δ gene-disrupted strains showed severe growth defects on methanol but not on glucose and nonfermentable carbon sources such as ethanol and glycerol. In these disruptants, the transcriptional activities of methanol-inducible promoters were significantly decreased compared to those of the wild-type strain, indicating that CbHap2p, CbHap3p, and CbHap5p play indispensable roles in methanol-inducible gene expression. Further molecular and biochemical analyses demonstrated that CbHap2p, CbHap3p, and CbHap5p localized to the nucleus and bound to the promoter regions of methanol-inducible genes regardless of the carbon source, and heterotrimer formation was suggested to be necessary for binding to DNA. Unexpectedly, distinct from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the Hap complex functioned in methanol-specific induction rather than glucose derepression in C. boidinii. Our results shed light on a novel function of the Hap complex in methanol-inducible gene expression in methylotrophic yeasts. PMID:25595445

  11. Molecular characterization of hap complex components responsible for methanol-inducible gene expression in the methylotrophic yeast Candida boidinii.

    PubMed

    Oda, Saori; Yurimoto, Hiroya; Nitta, Nobuhisa; Sasano, Yu; Sakai, Yasuyoshi

    2015-03-01

    We identified genes encoding components of the Hap complex, CbHAP2, CbHAP3, and CbHAP5, as transcription factors regulating methanol-inducible gene expression in the methylotrophic yeast Candida boidinii. We found that the Cbhap2Δ, Cbhap3Δ, and Cbhap5Δ gene-disrupted strains showed severe growth defects on methanol but not on glucose and nonfermentable carbon sources such as ethanol and glycerol. In these disruptants, the transcriptional activities of methanol-inducible promoters were significantly decreased compared to those of the wild-type strain, indicating that CbHap2p, CbHap3p, and CbHap5p play indispensable roles in methanol-inducible gene expression. Further molecular and biochemical analyses demonstrated that CbHap2p, CbHap3p, and CbHap5p localized to the nucleus and bound to the promoter regions of methanol-inducible genes regardless of the carbon source, and heterotrimer formation was suggested to be necessary for binding to DNA. Unexpectedly, distinct from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the Hap complex functioned in methanol-specific induction rather than glucose derepression in C. boidinii. Our results shed light on a novel function of the Hap complex in methanol-inducible gene expression in methylotrophic yeasts.

  12. Apoptosis-related genes induced in response to ketamine during early life stages of zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Félix, Luís M; Serafim, Cindy; Valentim, Ana M; Antunes, Luís M; Matos, Manuela; Coimbra, Ana M

    2017-09-05

    Increasing evidence supports that ketamine, a widely used anaesthetic, potentiates apoptosis during development through the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. Defects in the apoptotic machinery can cause or contribute to the developmental abnormalities previously described in ketamine-exposed zebrafish. The involvement of the apoptotic machinery in ketamine-induced teratogenicity was addressed by assessing the apoptotic signals at 8 and 24 hpf following 20min exposure to ketamine at three stages of early zebrafish embryo development (256 cell, 50% epiboly and 1-4 somites stages). Exposure at the 256-cell stage to ketamine induced an up-regulation of casp8 and pcna at 8 hpf while changes in pcna at the mRNA level were observed at 24 hpf. After the 50% epiboly stage exposure, the mRNA levels of casp9 were increased at 8 and 24 hpf while aifm1 was affected at 24 hpf. Both tp53 and pcna expressions were increased at 8 hpf. After exposure during the 1-4 somites stage, no meaningful changes on transcript levels were observed. The distribution of apoptotic cells and the caspase-like enzymatic activities of caspase-3 and -9 were not affected by ketamine exposure. It is proposed that ketamine exposure at the 256-cell stage induced a cooperative mechanism between proliferation and cellular death while following exposure at the 50% epiboly, a p53-dependent and -independent caspase activation may occur. Finally, at the 1-4 somites stage, the defence mechanisms are already fully in place to protect against ketamine-insult. Thus, ketamine teratogenicity seems to be dependent on the functional mechanisms present in each developmental stage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Dynamic expression analysis of early response genes induced by potato virus Y in PVY-resistant Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuai; Li, Fengxia; Liu, Dan; Jiang, Caihong; Cui, Lijie; Shen, Lili; Liu, Guanshan; Yang, Aiguo

    2017-02-01

    Dynamic transcriptional changes of the host early responses genes were detected in PVY-resistant tobacco varieties infected with Potato virus Y; PVY resistance is a complex process that needs series of stress responses. Potato virus Y (PVY) causes a severe viral disease in cultivated crops, especially in Solanum plants. To understand the molecular basis of plant responses to the PVY stress, suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) and microarray approaches were combined to identify the potentially important or novel genes that were involved in early stages (12 h, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8 days) of tobacco response to PVY infection. Dynamic changes of the host plant early responses to PVY infection on a transcriptional level were detected. In total, 167 different expressed ESTs were identified. The majority of genes involved in the metabolic process were found to be down-regulated at 12 h and 1 day, and then up-regulated at least one later period. Genes related to signaling and transcriptions were almost up-regulated at 12 h, 1 or 2 days, while stress response genes were almost up-regulated at a later stage. Genes involved in transcription, transport, cell wall, and several stress responses were found to have changed expression during the PVY infection stage, and numbers of these genes have not been previously reported to be associated with tobacco PVY infection. The diversity expression of these genes indicated that PVY resistance is a complex process that needs a series of stress responses. To resist the PVY infection, the tobacco plant has numerous active and silent responses.

  14. "Bad genes" & criminal responsibility.

    PubMed

    González-Tapia, María Isabel; Obsuth, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    The genetics of the accused is trying to break into the courts. To date several candidate genes have been put forward and their links to antisocial behavior have been examined and documented with some consistency. In this paper, we focus on the so called "warrior gene", or the low-activity allele of the MAOA gene, which has been most consistently related to human behavior and specifically to violence and antisocial behavior. In preparing this paper we had two objectives. First, to summarize and analyze the current scientific evidence, in order to gain an in depth understanding of the state of the issue and determine whether a dominant line of generally accepted scientific knowledge in this field can be asserted. Second, to derive conclusions and put forward recommendations related to the use of genetic information, specifically the presence of the low-activity genotype of the MAOA gene, in modulation of criminal responsibility in European and US courts.

  15. Aldosterone-induced osteopontin gene transcription in vascular smooth muscle cells involves glucocorticoid response element.

    PubMed

    Kiyosue, Arihiro; Nagata, Daisuke; Myojo, Masahiro; Sato, Tomohiko; Takahashi, Masao; Satonaka, Hiroshi; Nagai, Ryozo; Hirata, Yasunobu

    2011-12-01

    Osteopontin (OPN) is known to be one of the cytokines that is involved in the vascular inflammation caused by aldosterone (Aldo). Previous reports have shown that Aldo increases OPN transcripts, and the mechanisms for this remain to be clarified. In this study, we investigated how Aldo increases OPN transcripts in the vascular smooth muscle cells of rats. Aldosterone increased OPN transcripts time-dependently as well as dose-dependently. This increase was diminished by eplerenone, a mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonist. Luciferase promoter assays showed that the OPN promoter deleted to the -1599 site retained the same promoting ability as the full-length OPN promoter when stimulated by 10(-7) M Aldo, but the promoter deleted to the -1300 site lost the promoting ability. A glucocorticoid response element (GRE) is located in that deleted region. Luciferase assays of a mutated promoter without the GRE lost the luciferase upregulation, although mutated promoters with the deletion of other consensus sites maintained the promoter activity. The binding of the Aldo-MR complex to the GRE fragment was confirmed by an electrophoretic-mobility shift assay. This is the first report showing that Aldo regulates the transcriptional levels of OPN and inflammatory responses in the vasculature through a specific GRE site in the OPN promoter region.

  16. Honey bee foraging induces upregulation of early growth response protein 1, hormone receptor 38 and candidate downstream genes of the ecdysteroid signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Singh, A S; Shah, A; Brockmann, A

    2017-10-07

    In honey bees, continuous foraging at an artificial feeder induced a sustained upregulation of the immediate early genes early growth response protein 1 (Egr-1) and hormone receptor 38 (Hr38). This gene expression response was accompanied by an upregulation of several Egr-1 candidate downstream genes: ecdysone receptor (EcR), dopamine/ecdysteroid receptor (DopEcR), dopamine decarboxylase and dopamine receptor 2. Hr38, EcR and DopEcR are components of the ecdysteroid signalling pathway, which is highly probably involved in learning and memory processes in honey bees and other insects. Time-trained foragers still showed an upregulation of Egr-1 when the feeder was presented at an earlier time of the day, suggesting that the genomic response is more dependent on the food reward than training time. However, presentation of the feeder at the training time without food was still capable of inducing a transient increase in Egr-1 expression. Thus, learnt feeder cues, or even training time, probably affect Egr-1 expression. In contrast, whole brain Egr-1 expression changes did not differ between dancing and nondancing foragers. On the basis of our results we propose that food reward induced continuous foraging ultimately elicits a genomic response involving Egr-1 and Hr38 and their downstream genes. Furthermore this genomic response is highly probably involved in foraging-related learning and memory responses. © 2017 The Royal Entomological Society.

  17. MUC1-induced alterations in a lipid metabolic gene network predict response of human breast cancers to tamoxifen treatment

    PubMed Central

    Pitroda, Sean P.; Khodarev, Nikolai N.; Beckett, Michael A.; Kufe, Donald W.; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.

    2009-01-01

    The mucin 1 (MUC1) oncoprotein is aberrantly overexpressed in human breast cancers. Although MUC1 modulates the activity of estrogen receptor α (ER), there is no information regarding the effects of MUC1 on global gene expression patterns and the potential role of MUC1-induced genes in predicting outcome for breast cancer patients. We have developed an experimental model of MUC1-induced transformation that has identified the activation of genes involved in cholesterol and fatty acid metabolism. A 38-gene set of experimentally derived MUC1-induced genes associated with lipid metabolism was applied to the analysis of ER+ breast cancer patients treated with tamoxifen. The results obtained from 2 independent databases demonstrate that patients overexpressing MUC1 and the lipid metabolic pathways are at significantly higher risk for death and recurrence/distant metastasis. By contrast, these genes were not predictive in untreated patients. Furthermore, a positive correlation was found between expression of the 38-gene set and the ER signaling pathway. These findings indicate that (i) MUC1 regulates cholesterol and fatty acid metabolism, and (ii) activation of these pathways in ER+ breast cancers predicts failure to tamoxifen treatment. PMID:19289846

  18. Immune responses and gene expression in white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei, induced by Lactobacillus plantarum.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Chiu-Hsia; Guu, Yuan-Kuang; Liu, Chun-Hung; Pan, Tzu-Ming; Cheng, Winton

    2007-08-01

    The total haemocyte counts, phenoloxidase (PO) activity, respiratory bursts, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, and phagocytic activity and clearance efficiency to Vibrio alginolyticus, as well as prophenoloxidase (proPO), lipopolysaccharide- and beta-1,3-glucan-binding protein (LGBP), serine protein (SP), and peroxinectin (PE) mRNA transcription of L. vannamei, and its susceptibility to V. alginolyticus when the shrimp were fed diets containing Lactobacillus plantarum at 0 (control), 10(7), and 10(10) cfu (kg diet) (-1) for 48 and 168 h were evaluated. The results indicated that PO activity, SOD activity, clearance efficiency to V. alginolyticus, proPO and PE mRNA transcription, and the survival rate after challenge with V. alginolyticus all significantly increased, but the total haemocyte counts significantly decreased in shrimp fed a diet containing Lac. plantarum at 10(10) cfu (kg diet) (-1) for 168 h. However, no significant differences in phagocytosis, LGBP, or SP mRNA expression of shrimp were observed among the different treatments. It was concluded that administration of Lac. plantarum in the diet at 10(10) cfu (kg diet) (-1) induced immune modulation and enhanced the immune ability of L. vannamei, and increased its resistance to V. alginolyticus infection.

  19. Keratin gene mutations influence the keratinocyte response to DNA damage and cytokine induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zupancic, Tina; Sersa, Gregor; Törmä, Hans; Lane, Ellen Birgitte; Herrmann, Harald; Komel, Radovan; Liovic, Mirjana

    2017-06-24

    The keratin filament cytoskeleton is vital to the normal function of epithelial cells. It provides structural support and regulates different aspects of cell metabolism. Mutations in keratins 5 and 14 cause a skin fragility disorder, epidermolysis bullosa simplex (EBS). Patients with severe EBS have an increased cumulative risk for basal cell carcinoma. In this study, we tested how keratin 5 and 14 mutant EBS patient-derived keratinocytes behave in the face of two different types of stressors that are able to induce cell death: ionizing radiation and cytokines TNF-α and TRAIL. The data point out to a substantial difference between how normal and keratin mutant keratinocytes deal with such stresses. When case of DNA damage, the ATM/Chk2-pathway is one of the two main tracks that can prevent the progression of mitosis and so allow repair. This was altered in all investigated keratin mutants with a particular down-regulation of the activated form of checkpoint kinase 2 (pChk2). Keratin mutants also appear less sensitive than normal cells to treatment with TNF-α or TRAIL, and this may be linked to the up-regulation of two pro-survival proteins, Bcl-2 and FLIP. Such changes are likely to have a profound effect on mutant keratinocytes ability to survive and withstand stress, and in theory this may be also a contributing factor to cell transformation.

  20. A novel TMV-induced hot pepper cell wall protein gene (CaTin2) is associated with virus-specific hypersensitive response pathway.

    PubMed

    Shin, Ryoung; Park, Chang-Jin; An, Jong-Min; Paek, Kyung-Hee

    2003-03-01

    Incompatible plant-pathogen interactions result in the rapid cell death response known as hypersensitive response (HR) and activation of host defense related genes. To understand the cellular mechanism controlling defense response better, a novel pathogenesis-related (PR) gene and putative cell wall protein gene, CaTin2, was isolated through differential screening of a hot pepper cDNA library and characterized. CaTin2 gene was locally and systemically induced in hot pepper plants upon TMV-P0 inoculation which induces HR. However, CaTin2 gene wasn't regulated by bacterial HR-specific signal pathway. The full-length cDNA for CaTin2, which is 864 nucleotides long, contained the open reading frame of 200 amino acids including cell wall targeting sequences of 26 amino acids. CaTin2 gene has no sequence similarity with other cell wall protein genes except the signal sequence and exists as only one copy in hot pepper genome. CaTin2 gene contains repeated helix-turn-helix motif consisting of 39 amino acids. CaTin2 mRNA accumulation was induced in response to various treatments such as ethylene, SA, MeJA, ABA, methyl viologen, NaCl and wounding at early time points. Subcelluar localization of CaTin2 was confirmed in the cell wall in hot pepper leaves by making CaTin2::smGFP fusion protein. The transgenic plants overexpressing CaTin2 cDNA were resistant to TMV and CMV inoculation. From these results, CaTin2 gene may encode a virus-related new cell wall protein member.

  1. Myoglobin-deficient mice activate a distinct cardiac gene expression program in response to isoproterenol-induced hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Molojavyi, Andrei; Lindecke, Antje; Raupach, Annika; Moellendorf, Sarah; Köhrer, Karl; Gödecke, Axel

    2010-04-01

    Myoglobin knockout mice (myo-/-) adapt to the loss of myoglobin by the activation of a variety of compensatory mechanisms acting on the structural and functional level. To analyze to what extent myo-/- mice would tolerate cardiac stress we used the model of chronic isoproterenol application to induce cardiac hypertrophy in myo-/- mice and wild-type (WT) controls. After 14 days of isoproterenol infusion cardiac hypertrophy in WT and myo-/- mice reached a similar level. WT mice developed lung edema and left ventricular dilatation suggesting the development of heart failure. In contrast, myo-/- mice displayed conserved cardiac function and no signs of left ventricular dilatation. Analysis of the cardiac gene expression profiles using 40K mouse oligonucleotide arrays showed that isoproterenol affected the expression of 180 genes in WT but only 92 genes of myo-/- hearts. Only 40 of these genes were regulated in WT as well as in myo-/- hearts. In WT hearts a pronounced induction of genes of the extracellular matrix occurred suggesting a higher level of cardiac remodeling. myo-/- hearts showed altered transcription of genes involved in carbon metabolism, inhibition of apoptosis and muscular repair. Interestingly, a subset of genes that was altered in myo-/- mice already under basal conditions was differentially expressed in WT hearts under isoproterenol treatment. In summary, our data show a high capacity of myoglobin-deficient mice to adapt to catecholamine induced cardiac stress which is associated with activation of a distinct cardiac gene expression program.

  2. Effect of pistachio oil on gene expression of IFN-induced protein with tetratricopeptide repeats 2: a biomarker of inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Kris-Etherton, Penny M; Thompson, Jerry T; Vanden Heuvel, John P

    2010-05-01

    When incorporated into the diet, pistachios have a beneficial effect on lipid and lipoprotein profiles. However, little is known about potential anti-inflammatory properties. This study was conducted to determine whether pistachio oil and an organic extract from pistachio oil extract (PE) regulated expression of inflammation-related genes. A mouse macrophage cell line (RAW 264.7 cells) was treated with pistachio oil and gene expression microarray analyses were performed. Pistachio oil significantly affected genes involved in immune response, defense response to bacteria, and gene silencing, of which INF-induced protein with tetratricopeptide repeats 2 (Ifit-2) was the most dramatically reduced. PE reduced the LPS-induced Ifit-2 by 78% and the bioactive molecules contained in PE, linoleic acid, and beta-sitosterol recapitulated this inhibition. Promoter analysis identified two adjacent IFN-stimulated response elements, which lie between -110 and -85bp of the 5'-flanking region of the Ifit-2 promoter, as being responsive to LPS activation and inhibition by PE. Our results indicate that pistachio oil and bioactive molecules present therein decrease Ifit-2 expressions, and due to the sensitivity of this effect, this gene is a potential biomarker for monitoring diet-induced changes in inflammation.

  3. The Arabidopsis Prohibitin Gene PHB3 Functions in Nitric Oxide-Mediated Responses and in Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Nitric Oxide Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Ries, Amber; Wu, Kati; Yang, Albert; Crawford, Nigel M

    2010-01-01

    To discover genes involved in nitric oxide (NO) metabolism, a genetic screen was employed to identify mutants defective in NO accumulation after treatment with the physiological inducer hydrogen peroxide. In wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana plants, NO levels increase eightfold in roots after H(2)O(2) treatment for 30 min. A mutant defective in H(2)O(2)-induced NO accumulation was identified, and the corresponding mutation was mapped to the prohibitin gene PHB3, converting the highly conserved Gly-37 to an Asp in the protein's SPFH domain. This point mutant and a T-DNA insertion mutant were examined for other NO-related phenotypes. Both mutants were defective in abscisic acid-induced NO accumulation and stomatal closure and in auxin-induced lateral root formation. Both mutants were less sensitive to salt stress, showing no increase in NO accumulation and less inhibition of primary root growth in response to NaCl treatment. In addition, light-induced NO accumulation was dramatically reduced in cotyledons. We found no evidence for impaired H(2)O(2) metabolism or signaling in the mutants as H(2)O(2) levels and H(2)O(2)-induced gene expression were unaffected by the mutations. These findings identify a component of the NO homeostasis system in plants and expand the function of prohibitin genes to include regulation of NO accumulation and NO-mediated responses.

  4. The Arabidopsis Prohibitin Gene PHB3 Functions in Nitric Oxide–Mediated Responses and in Hydrogen Peroxide–Induced Nitric Oxide Accumulation[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong; Ries, Amber; Wu, Kati; Yang, Albert; Crawford, Nigel M.

    2010-01-01

    To discover genes involved in nitric oxide (NO) metabolism, a genetic screen was employed to identify mutants defective in NO accumulation after treatment with the physiological inducer hydrogen peroxide. In wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana plants, NO levels increase eightfold in roots after H2O2 treatment for 30 min. A mutant defective in H2O2-induced NO accumulation was identified, and the corresponding mutation was mapped to the prohibitin gene PHB3, converting the highly conserved Gly-37 to an Asp in the protein's SPFH domain. This point mutant and a T-DNA insertion mutant were examined for other NO-related phenotypes. Both mutants were defective in abscisic acid–induced NO accumulation and stomatal closure and in auxin-induced lateral root formation. Both mutants were less sensitive to salt stress, showing no increase in NO accumulation and less inhibition of primary root growth in response to NaCl treatment. In addition, light-induced NO accumulation was dramatically reduced in cotyledons. We found no evidence for impaired H2O2 metabolism or signaling in the mutants as H2O2 levels and H2O2-induced gene expression were unaffected by the mutations. These findings identify a component of the NO homeostasis system in plants and expand the function of prohibitin genes to include regulation of NO accumulation and NO-mediated responses. PMID:20068191

  5. Expression of a Grapevine NAC Transcription Factor Gene Is Induced in Response to Powdery Mildew Colonization in Salicylic Acid-Independent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Toth, Zsofia; Winterhagen, Patrick; Kalapos, Balazs; Su, Yingcai; Kovacs, Laszlo; Kiss, Erzsebet

    2016-01-01

    Tissue colonization by grape powdery mildew (PM) pathogen Erysiphe necator (Schw.) Burr triggers a major remodeling of the transcriptome in the susceptible grapevine Vitis vinifera L. While changes in the expression of many genes bear the signature of salicylic acid (SA) mediated regulation, the breadth of PM-induced changes suggests the involvement of additional regulatory networks. To explore PM-associated gene regulation mediated by other SA-independent systems, we designed a microarray experiment to distinguish between transcriptome changes induced by E. necator colonization and those triggered by elevated SA levels. We found that the majority of genes responded to both SA and PM, but certain genes were responsive to PM infection alone. Among them, we identified genes of stilbene synthases, PR-10 proteins, and several transcription factors. The microarray results demonstrated that the regulation of these genes is either independent of SA, or dependent, but SA alone is insufficient to bring about their regulation. We inserted the promoter-reporter fusion of a PM-responsive transcription factor gene into a wild-type and two SA-signaling deficient Arabidopsis lines and challenged the resulting transgenic plants with an Arabidopsis-adapted PM pathogen. Our results provide experimental evidence that this grape gene promoter is activated by the pathogen in a SA-independent manner. PMID:27488171

  6. BRG1 and BRM chromatin-remodeling complexes regulate the hypoxia response by acting as coactivators for a subset of hypoxia-inducible transcription factor target genes.

    PubMed

    Sena, Johnny A; Wang, Liyi; Hu, Cheng-Jun

    2013-10-01

    Chromatin remodeling is an active process, which represses or enables the access of transcription machinery to genes in response to external stimuli, including hypoxia. However, in hypoxia, the specific requirement, as well as the molecular mechanism by which the chromatin-remodeling complexes regulate gene expression, remains unclear. In this study, we report that the Brahma (BRM) and Brahma-related gene 1 (BRG1) ATPase-containing SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complexes promote the expression of the hypoxia-inducible transcription factor 1α (HIF1α) and HIF2α genes and also promote hypoxic induction of a subset of HIF1 and HIF2 target genes. We show that BRG1 or BRM knockdown in Hep3B and RCC4T cells reduces hypoxic induction of HIF target genes, while reexpression of BRG1 or BRM in BRG1/BRM-deficient SW13 cells increases HIF target gene activation. Mechanistically, HIF1 and HIF2 increase the hypoxic induction of HIF target genes by recruiting BRG1 complexes to HIF target gene promoters, which promotes nucleosome remodeling of HIF target gene promoters in a BRG1 ATPase-dependent manner. Importantly, we found that the function of BRG1 complexes in hypoxic SW13 and RCC4T cells is dictated by the HIF-mediated hypoxia response and could be opposite from their function in normoxic SW13 and RCC4T cells.

  7. The promoters of 3 celery salt-induced phloem-specific genes as new tools for monitoring salt stress responses.

    PubMed

    Landouar-Arsivaud, Lucie; Juchaux-Cachau, Marjorie; Jeauffre, Julien; Biolley, Jean-Philippe; Maurousset, Laurence; Lemoine, Rémi

    2011-01-01

    Genes induced by a progressive 3 week salt stress (final NaCl concentration 300 mM) were identified in the phloem of celery (Apium graveolens L., cv Vert d'Elne). A subtractive library was constructed and screened for salt-induced, phloem-specific genes. Work was focused on phloem due to its central role in inter-organ exchanges. Three genes were studied in more details, 2 coding for metallothioneins (AgMT2 and AgMT3) and one for a new mannitol transporter (AgMaT3). Expression of a reporter gene in transgenic Arabidopsis under control of promoter of each gene was located in the phloem. pAgMT2 has a typical phloem pattern with slight induction by salt stress. pAgMT3 and pAgMaT3 expression was induced by salt stress, except in minor veins. pAgMaT3 was highly active in stressed roots. The promoters described here could be regarded as new tools for engineering salt-resistant plants.

  8. NSAID-induced acute phase response is due to increased intestinal permeability and characterized by early and consistent alterations in hepatic gene expression.

    PubMed

    Tugendreich, Stuart; Pearson, Cecelia I; Sagartz, John; Jarnagin, Kurt; Kolaja, Kyle

    2006-01-01

    Toxicogenomics using a reference database can provide a better understanding and prediction of toxicity, largely by creating biomarkers that tie gene expression to actual pathology events. During the course of building a toxicogenomic database, an observation was made that a number of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory compounds (NSAIDs) at supra-pharmacologic doses induced an acute phase response (APR) and displayed hepatic gene expression patterns similar to that of intravenous lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Since NSAIDs are known to cause injury along the gastrointestinal tract, it has been suggested that NSAIDs increase intestinal permeability, allowing LPS and/or bacteria into the systemic circulation and stimulating an APR detectable in the liver. A short term study was subsequently conducted examining the effects of aspirin, indomethacin, ibuprofen, and rofecoxib to rats and a variety of endpoints were examined that included serum levels of inflammatory cytokines, histologic evaluation, and hepatic gene expression. Both indomethacin and ibuprofen injured the gastrointestinal tract, induced an APR, and increased serum levels of LPS, while rofecoxib and aspirin did not affect the GI tract or induce an APR. In treatments that eventually showed a systemic inflammatory response, hepatic expression of many inflammatory genes was noted as early as 6 hours after treatment well before alterations in traditional clinical pathology markers were detected. This finding led to the creation of a hepatic gene expression biomarker of APR that was effectively shown to be an early identifier of imminent inflammatory injury. In terms of the relative gastrointestinal safety and the NSAIDs studied, an important safety distinction can be made between the presumptive efficacious dose and the APR-inducing dose for indomethacin (1-2-fold), ibuprofen (5-fold), and rofecoxib (approximately 250-fold). Our data support the notion that NSAID-induced intestinal injury results in leakage of

  9. Analysis of stress-induced hepatic gene expression in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) selected for high- and low-responsiveness to stress.

    PubMed

    Pemmasani, Jhansi K; Pottinger, Tom G; Cairns, Michael T

    2011-12-01

    The production and welfare of intensively reared fish would be improved by reducing stress responsiveness. One approach to achieving this goal is selective breeding utilising stress-responsive genes as direct genetic markers of the desirable trait. As a first step in this process, microarray analysis has been carried out on liver tissues of rainbow trout selectively bred for high (HR) or low (LR) responsiveness to a stressor. Microarray hybridizations provided gene expression profiles for pooled samples of fish confined for 6 h, 24 h and 168 h and for individual fish (168 h only). 161 genes were shown to be differentially regulated in HR and LR fish during confinement exposure and eight of these gene expression profiles were validated by quantitative PCR. Genes of particular interest included intelectin-2 precursor which showed greater than 100-fold higher expression in HR fish compared to LR fish irrespective of whether the fish were confined or not; interferon inducible transmembrane protein 3 which was differentially stress-induced between the two lines; and hepatic pro-opiomelanocortin B (POMC B) which was upregulated during stress in HR fish but downregulated in LR fish. All these offer potential as direct markers of low stress responsiveness in a marker-assisted selection scheme. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Differential gene expression in pancreatic tissues of streptozocin-induced diabetic rats and genetically-diabetic mice in response to hypoglycemic dipeptide cyclo (His-Pro) treatment.

    PubMed

    Choi, Song Ah; Suh, Hyung Joo; Yun, Jong Won; Choi, Jang Won

    2012-09-01

    Diabetic studies are mostly interested in gene expression in the pancreas, the site of insulin secretion that regulates blood glucose levels. However, a single gene approach has been ruled out for many years in discovering new genes or the molecular networks involved in the induction process of diabetes. To understand the molecular mechanisms by which cyclo (His-Pro) (CHP) affects amelioration of diabetes mellitus, we performed gene expression profiling in the pancreatic tissues of two diabetic animal models, streptozocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats (T1DM) and genetically-diabetic (C57BL/6J ob/ob) mice (T2DM). To understand the healing process of these diabetic rodents, we examined the effects of CHP on various gene expression in pancreatic tissues of both animal models. Our microarray analysis revealed that a total of 1,175 genes were down-regulated and 629 genes were up-regulated in response to STZ treatment, and the altered expression levels of numerous genes were restored to normal state upon CHP treatment. In particular, 476 genes showed significantly altered gene expression upon CHP treatment. In a functional classification, 7,198 genes were counted as differentially expressed in pancreatic tissues of STZ- and CHP-treated rats compared with control, whereas 1,534 genes were restored to normal states by CHP treatment. Microarray data demonstrated for the first time that overexpression of the genes encoding IL-1 receptor, lipid metabolic enzymes (e.g. Mte1, Ptdss1, and Sult2a1), myo-inositol oxygenase, glucagon, and somatostatin as well as down-regulation of olfactory receptor 984 and mitochondrial ribosomal protein, which are highly linked to T1DM etiology. In genetically-diabetic mice, 4,384 genes were altered in gene expression by more than 2-fold compared to the control mice, when counted differentially expressed. In genetically-diabetic mice, 4,384 genes altered in expression by higher than 2-fold were counted as differentially expressed genes in

  11. Two Novel Anoxia-Induced Ethylene Response Factors That Interact with Promoters of Deastringency-Related Genes from Persimmon

    PubMed Central

    Min, Ting; Fang, Fang; Ge, Hang; Shi, Yan-na; Luo, Zheng-rong; Yao, Yun-cong; Grierson, Donald; Yin, Xue-ren; Chen, Kun-song

    2014-01-01

    A hypoxic environment is generally undesirable for most plants and stimulates anaerobic metabolism. It is a beneficial treatment, however, for the removal of astringency from persimmon to improve the fruit quality after harvest. High soluble tannins (SCTs) content is one of most important causes of astringency. High CO2 (95%) treatment effectively reduced SCTs in both “Mopan” and “Gongcheng-shuishi” persimmon fruit by causing increases in acetaldehyde. Using RNA-seq and realtime PCR, twelve ethylene response factor genes (DkERF11-22) were isolated and characterized, to determine those responsive to high CO2 treatment. Only two genes, DkERF19 and DkERF22, showed trans-activation effects on the promoters of deastringency-related genes pyruvate decarboxylase genes (DkPDC2 and DkPDC3) and the transcript levels of these genes was enhanced by hypoxia. Moreover, DkERF19 and the previously isolated DkERF9 had additive effects on activating the DkPDC2 promoter. Taken together, these results provide further evidence that transcriptome changes in the level of DkERF mRNAs regulate deastringency-related genes and their role in the mechanism of persimmon fruit deastringency is discussed. PMID:24805136

  12. Immersion infection of germ-free zebrafish with Listeria monocytogenes induces transient expression of innate immune response genes

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Ying; Fang, Chun; Cheng, Changyong; Wang, Yong; Peng, Jinrong; Fang, Weihuan

    2015-01-01

    Zebrafish, Denio rerio, can be an alternative to other classic animal models for human infectious diseases to examine the processes of microbial infections and host–pathogen interactions in vivo because of their small body dimension but large clutch size. We established germ-free zebrafish infection models of Listeria monocytogenes through different routes of infection: oral immersion and injection via yolk sac, brain ventricle and blood island. Immersion of zebrafish larva even with 1010 CFU/mL L. monocytogenes EGDe strain in egg water was unable to cause mortality, but GFP-expressing bacteria in the gut lumen can be observed in frozen sections. Several selected maker genes of the innate immune system, including cyp1a, irg1l, il1b, and mmp9, were significantly induced by oral immersion not only with strain EGDe, but also with strain M7 and L. innocua, though to a lesser degree (P < 0.01). Such induction appears to be transient with peak at 48 h post-infection, but returned to basal level at 72 h post-infection. Of the three injection routes, mortality after infection by yolk sac was 80% in early stage of infection. Few eggs can survive and hatch. Injection into zebrafish embryos via brain ventricle or blood island led to progressive lethal infection. L. mocytogenes EGDe showed steady replication in the fish embryos and was far more pathogenic than strain M7, which is consistent with findings in the murine model. We conclude that zebrafish can serve as susceptible and microscopically visible infection models for L. monocytogenes via different routes and can be applied to further studies on the interactions between bacterial virulence factors and host immune responses. PMID:25972853

  13. Endogenous interferon-β-inducible gene expression and interferon-β-treatment are associated with reduced T cell responses to myelin basic protein in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Börnsen, Lars; Romme Christensen, Jeppe; Ratzer, Rikke; Hedegaard, Chris; Søndergaard, Helle B; Krakauer, Martin; Hesse, Dan; Nielsen, Claus H; Sorensen, Per S; Sellebjerg, Finn

    2015-01-01

    Autoreactive CD4+ T-cells are considered to play a major role in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis. In experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, an animal model of multiple sclerosis, exogenous and endogenous type I interferons restrict disease severity. Recombinant interferon-β is used for treatment of multiple sclerosis, and some untreated multiple sclerosis patients have increased expression levels of type I interferon-inducible genes in immune cells. The role of endogenous type I interferons in multiple sclerosis is controversial: some studies found an association of high expression levels of interferon-β-inducible genes with an increased expression of interleukin-10 and a milder disease course in untreated multiple sclerosis patients, whereas other studies reported an association with a poor response to treatment with interferon-β. In the present study, we found that untreated multiple sclerosis patients with an increased expression of interferon-β-inducible genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and interferon-β-treated multiple sclerosis patients had decreased CD4+ T-cell reactivity to the autoantigen myelin basic protein ex vivo. Interferon-β-treated multiple sclerosis patients had increased IL10 and IL27 gene expression levels in monocytes in vivo. In vitro, neutralization of interleukin-10 and monocyte depletion increased CD4+ T-cell reactivity to myelin basic protein while interleukin-10, in the presence or absence of monocytes, inhibited CD4+ T-cell reactivity to myelin basic protein. Our findings suggest that spontaneous expression of interferon-β-inducible genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from untreated multiple sclerosis patients and treatment with interferon-β are associated with reduced myelin basic protein-induced T-cell responses. Reduced myelin basic protein-induced CD4+ T-cell autoreactivity in interferon-β-treated multiple sclerosis patients may be mediated by monocyte-derived interleukin-10.

  14. Induced Sézary syndrome PBMCs poorly express immune response genes up-regulated in stimulated memory T cells.

    PubMed

    Chong, Benjamin F; Dantzer, Patrick; Germeroth, Thomas; Hafner, Mikehl; Wilson, Adam J; Xiao, Guanghua; Wong, Henry K

    2010-10-01

    Dysfunctions in memory T cells contribute to various inflammatory autoimmune diseases and neoplasms. We hypothesize that investigating the differences of genetic profiles between resting and activated naïve and memory T cells may provide insight into the characterization of abnormal memory T cells in diseases, such as Sézary syndrome (SS), a neoplasm composed of CD4(+) CD45RO(+) cells. We determined genes distinctively expressed between resting and activated naive and memory cells. Levels of up-regulated genes in resting and activated memory cells were measured in SS PBMCs, which were largely comprised of CD4(+) CD45RO(+) cells, to quantitatively assess how different Sézary cells were from memory cells. We compared gene expression profiles using high-density oligo-microarrays between resting and activated naïve and memory CD4(+) T cells. Differentially expressed genes were confirmed by qRT-PCR and immunoblotting. Levels of genes up-regulated in activated and resting memory T cells were determined in SS PBMCs by qRT-PCR. Activated memory cells expressed greater numbers of immune-mediated genes involved in effector function compared to naïve cells in our microarray analysis and qRT-PCR. Nine out of 14 genes with enhanced levels in activated memory cells had reduced levels in SS PBMCs (p<0.05). Activation of memory and naïve CD4(+) T cells revealed a diverging gap in gene expression between these subsets, with memory cells expressing immune-related genes important for effector function. Many of these genes were markedly depressed in SS patients, implying Sézary cells are markedly impaired in mounting immune responses compared to memory cells. Copyright © 2010 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Transcription factor ATF4 directs basal and stress-induced gene expression in the unfolded protein response and cholesterol metabolism in the liver.

    PubMed

    Fusakio, Michael E; Willy, Jeffrey A; Wang, Yongping; Mirek, Emily T; Al Baghdadi, Rana J T; Adams, Christopher M; Anthony, Tracy G; Wek, Ronald C

    2016-05-01

    Disturbances in protein folding and membrane compositions in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) elicit the unfolded protein response (UPR). Each of three UPR sensory proteins-PERK (PEK/EIF2AK3), IRE1, and ATF6-is activated by ER stress. PERK phosphorylation of eIF2 represses global protein synthesis, lowering influx of nascent polypeptides into the stressed ER, coincident with preferential translation of ATF4 (CREB2). In cultured cells, ATF4 induces transcriptional expression of genes directed by the PERK arm of the UPR, including genes involved in amino acid metabolism, resistance to oxidative stress, and the proapoptotic transcription factor CHOP (GADD153/DDIT3). In this study, we characterize whole-body and tissue-specific ATF4-knockout mice and show in liver exposed to ER stress that ATF4 is not required for CHOP expression, but instead ATF6 is a primary inducer. RNA-Seq analysis indicates that ATF4 is responsible for a small portion of the PERK-dependent UPR genes and reveals a requirement for expression of ATF4 for expression of genes involved in oxidative stress response basally and cholesterol metabolism both basally and under stress. Consistent with this pattern of gene expression, loss of ATF4 resulted in enhanced oxidative damage, and increased free cholesterol in liver under stress accompanied by lowered cholesterol in sera.

  16. Transcription factor ATF4 directs basal and stress-induced gene expression in the unfolded protein response and cholesterol metabolism in the liver

    PubMed Central

    Fusakio, Michael E.; Willy, Jeffrey A.; Wang, Yongping; Mirek, Emily T.; Al Baghdadi, Rana J. T.; Adams, Christopher M.; Anthony, Tracy G.; Wek, Ronald C.

    2016-01-01

    Disturbances in protein folding and membrane compositions in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) elicit the unfolded protein response (UPR). Each of three UPR sensory proteins—PERK (PEK/EIF2AK3), IRE1, and ATF6—is activated by ER stress. PERK phosphorylation of eIF2 represses global protein synthesis, lowering influx of nascent polypeptides into the stressed ER, coincident with preferential translation of ATF4 (CREB2). In cultured cells, ATF4 induces transcriptional expression of genes directed by the PERK arm of the UPR, including genes involved in amino acid metabolism, resistance to oxidative stress, and the proapoptotic transcription factor CHOP (GADD153/DDIT3). In this study, we characterize whole-body and tissue-specific ATF4-knockout mice and show in liver exposed to ER stress that ATF4 is not required for CHOP expression, but instead ATF6 is a primary inducer. RNA-Seq analysis indicates that ATF4 is responsible for a small portion of the PERK-dependent UPR genes and reveals a requirement for expression of ATF4 for expression of genes involved in oxidative stress response basally and cholesterol metabolism both basally and under stress. Consistent with this pattern of gene expression, loss of ATF4 resulted in enhanced oxidative damage, and increased free cholesterol in liver under stress accompanied by lowered cholesterol in sera. PMID:26960794

  17. Virus induced gene silencing of Arabidopsis gene homologues in wheat identify genes conferring improved drought tolerance

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In a non-model staple crop like wheat, functional validation of potential drought stress responsive genes identified in Arabidopsis could provide gene targets for wheat breeding. Virus induced gene silencing (VIGS) of genes of interest can overcome the inherent problems of polyploidy and limited tra...

  18. Dendritic cells pulsed with alpha-fetoprotein and mutant P53 fused gene induce bi-targeted cytotoxic T lymphocyte response against hepatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jun; Jia, Jun; Zhang, Hongmei; Zhang, Liwang; Ma, Bo; Jiang, Hanfang; Di, Lijun; Song, Guohong; Yu, Jing

    2008-07-01

    Dendritic cell (DC)-based immunotherapy is rapidly emerging as a promising treatment in cancer therapy. We had previously shown that DC pulsed with either defined mRNA of tumor antigen (Ag) such as alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), or total RNA of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) could elicit Ag-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response. Therefore, we suggested a novel DC-based therapeutic method, in which DCs derived from CD34(+) cells enriched peripheral blood mononuclear cells were pulsed with liposome-coated AFP and mutant P53 (mtP53) fused gene pEGFP-C3/AFP-mtP53 to induce bi-targeted specific CTL responses against HCC. Three different genotype HCC cell lines, HepG2 (human histocompatibility leukocyte antigens (HLA) A2 positive, AFP expressing positive, P53 expressing negative), SMMC7721 (HLA A2 positive, neither AFP nor P53 expressing positive), and HMCC97 (HLA A2 positive, both AFP and P53 expressing positive) were selected as targets for CTL responses. An important finding was that DCs pulsed with the liposome-coated fused gene could evoke more intensive bi-targeted Ag-specific CTL responses against HMCC97 than DCs pulsed with either AFP or P53 single gene (P < 0.05). This experimental therapeutic model provides a new promising cytotherapeutic approach, in that DCs pulsed with the fused gene of different Ags might induce more extensive multitargeted antitumor immunity.

  19. Glycinebetaine-induced water-stress tolerance in codA-expressing transgenic indica rice is associated with up-regulation of several stress responsive genes.

    PubMed

    Kathuria, Hitesh; Giri, Jitender; Nataraja, Karaba N; Murata, Norio; Udayakumar, Makarla; Tyagi, Akhilesh K

    2009-08-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.), a non-accumulator of glycinebetaine (GB), is highly susceptible to abiotic stress. Transgenic rice with chloroplast-targeted choline oxidase encoded by the codA gene from Arthrobacter globiformis has been evaluated for inheritance of transgene up to R5 generation and water-stress tolerance. During seedling, vegetative and reproductive stages, transgenic plants could maintain higher activity of photosystem II and they show better physiological performance, for example, enhanced detoxification of reactive oxygen species compared to wild-type plants under water-stress. Survival rate and agronomic performance of transgenic plants is also better than wild-type following prolonged water-stress. Choline oxidase converts choline into GB and H2O2 in a single step. It is possible that H2O2/GB might activate stress response pathways and prepare transgenic plants to mitigate stress. To check this possibility, microarray-based transcriptome analysis of transgenic rice has been done. It unravelled altered expression of many genes involved in stress responses, signal transduction, gene regulation, hormone signalling and cellular metabolism. Overall, 165 genes show more than two-fold up-regulation at P-value < 0.01 in transgenic rice. Out of these, at least 50 genes are known to be involved in plant stress response. Exogenous application of H2O2 or GB to wild-type plants also induces such genes. Our data show that metabolic engineering for GB is a promising strategy for introducing stress tolerance in crop plants and which could be imparted, in part, by H2O2- and/or GB-induced stress response genes.

  20. Colostrum whey down-regulates the expression of early and late inflammatory response genes induced by Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica Typhimurium components in intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Blais, M; Fortier, M; Pouliot, Y; Gauthier, S F; Boutin, Y; Asselin, C; Lessard, M

    2015-01-28

    Pathogenic invasion by Escherichia coli and Salmonellae remains a constant threat to the integrity of the intestinal epithelium and can rapidly induce inflammatory responses. At birth, colostrum consumption exerts numerous beneficial effects on the properties of intestinal epithelial cells and protects the gastrointestinal tract of newborns from pathogenic invasion. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of colostrum on the early and late inflammatory responses induced by pathogens. The short-term (2 h) and long-term (24 h) effects of exposure to heat-killed (HK) E. coli and Salmonella enterica Typhimurium on gene expression in the porcine intestinal epithelial cell (IPEC-J2) model were first evaluated by microarray and quantitative PCR analyses. Luciferase assays were performed using a NF-κB-luc reporter construct to investigate the effect of colostrum whey treatment on the activation of NF-κB induced by HK bacteria. Luciferase assays were also performed using NF-κB-luc, IL-8-luc and IL-6-luc reporter constructs in human colon adenocarcinoma Caco-2/15 cells exposed to dose-response stimulations with HK bacteria and colostrum whey. Bovine colostrum whey treatment decreased the expression of early and late inflammatory genes induced by HK bacteria in IPEC-J2, as well as the transcriptional activation of NF-κB-luc induced by HK bacteria. Unlike that with colostrum whey, treatment with other milk fractions failed to decrease the activation of NF-κB-luc induced by HK bacteria. Lastly, the reduction of the HK bacteria-induced activation of NF-κB-luc, IL-8-luc and IL-6-luc by colostrum whey was dose dependent. The results of the present study indicate that bovine colostrum may protect and preserve the integrity of the intestinal mucosal barrier in the host by controlling the expression levels of early and late inflammatory genes following invasion by enteric pathogens.

  1. Polymorphisms of interferon-inducible genes OAS associated with interferon-α treatment response in chronic HBV infection.

    PubMed

    Ren, Shan; Yu, Haibin; Zhang, Hongwei; Liu, Ying; Huang, Yanxiang; Ma, Lina; Wei, Lai; Wu, Hao; Chen, Xinyue

    2011-03-01

    To evaluate the role of host single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS) in predicting IFN response in patients with HBV infection, OAS gene and four SNPs were examined in 363 patients with chronic HBV infection (including 41 patients with HBsAg seroconversion) and 57 healthy controls. One SNP and three haplotypes were identified after adjustment for age, sex, HBV DNA. The frequency of OAS3T/C heterozygotes is 52.2% in responders (R) and 38.2% in non-responders (NR), with an odds ratio (OR) of 1.511 (P = 0.018). For complete responders (CR) and NR, the OR reached 2.323(P = 0.023). Haplotype analyses revealed significant association between three OAS haplotypes and response to IFN-α treatment. Genotype combination and interaction between gene-gene analyses disclosed that there was a positive interaction between OAS2/OAS3 and OAS3/OASL, and the rate of OR was 2.46 (likelihood test, P = 0.004) and 4.46 (likelihood test, P = 0.004), respectively. Our results suggest that OAS gene variations may play an important role in response to IFN-α and provide a novel strategy for the resolution of HBV infection.

  2. Salinity stress induces the production of 2-(2-phenylethyl)chromones and regulates novel classes of responsive genes involved in signal transduction in Aquilaria sinensis calli.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaohui; Gao, Bowen; Liu, Xiao; Dong, Xianjuan; Zhang, Zhongxiu; Fan, Huiyan; Zhang, Le; Wang, Juan; Shi, Shepo; Tu, Pengfei

    2016-05-26

    Agarwood, is a resinous portion derived from Aquilaria sinensis, has been widely used in traditional medicine and incense. 2-(2-phenylethyl)chromones are principal components responsible for the quality of agarwood. However, the molecular basis of 2-(2-phenylethyl)chromones biosynthesis and regulation remains almost unknown. Our research indicated that salt stress induced production of several of 2-(2-phenylethyl)chromones in A. sinensis calli. Transcriptome analysis of A. sinensis calli treated with NaCl is required to further facilitate the multiple signal pathways in response to salt stress and to understand the mechanism of 2-(2-phenylethyl)chromones biosynthesis. Forty one 2-(2-phenylethyl)chromones were identified from NaCl-treated A. sinensis calli. 93 041 unigenes with an average length of 1562 nt were generated from the control and salt-treated calli by Illmunina sequencing after assembly, and the unigenes were annotated by comparing with the public databases including NR, Swiss-Prot, KEGG, COG, and GO database. In total, 18 069 differentially expressed transcripts were identified by the transcriptome comparisons on the control calli and calli induced by 24 h or 120 h salinity stress. Numerous genes involved in signal transduction pathways including the genes responsible for hormone signal transduction, receptor-like kinases, MAPK cascades, Ca(2+) signal transduction, and transcription factors showed clear differences between the control calli and NaCl-treated calli. Furthermore, our data suggested that the genes annotated as chalcone synthases and O-methyltransferases may contribute to the biosynthesis of 2-(2-phenylethyl)chromones. Salinity stress could induce the production of 41 2-(2-phenylethyl)chromones in A. sinensis calli. We conducted the first deep-sequencing transcriptome profiling of A. sinensis under salt stress and observed a large number of differentially expressed genes in response to salinity stress. Moreover, salt stress induced

  3. Xenobiotic-inducible expression of murine glutathione S-transferase Ya subunit gene is controlled by an electrophile-responsive element

    SciTech Connect

    Friling, R.S.; Bensimon, A.; Tichauer, Y.; Daniel, V. )

    1990-08-01

    Glutathione S-transferase (GST) Ya subunit gene expression is induced in mammalian tissues by two types of chemical agents: (i) planar aromatic compounds (e.g., 3-methylcholanthrene, {beta}-naphthoflavone, and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin) and (ii) electrophiles (e.g., trans-4-phenyl-3-buten-2-one and dimethyl fumarate) or compounds easily oxidized to electrophiles (e.g., tert-butylhydroquinone). To study the mechanism of this induction, the authors have introduced deletions in the 5{prime} flanking region of a mouse GST Ya subunit gene, fused it to the coding sequence for chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) activity, and transfected the Ya-CAT genes for expression into hepatoma cells. They show that a single cis-regulatory element, between nucleotides {minus}754 and {minus}713 from the start of transcription, is responsible for the induction by both planar aromatic and electrophilic compounds. Using murine hepatoma cell mutants defective in either the Ah-encoded aryl hydrocarbon receptor (BP{sup r}c1 mutant) or in cytochrome P{sub 1}-450 gene (c1 mutant), they show that induction by planar aromatic but not by electrophilic inducers requires a functional Ah receptor and cytochrome P{sub 1}-450 activity. From this it is concluded that Ya gene activation by planar aromatic compounds involves metabolism of these inducers by the phase I xenobiotic-metabolizing cytochrome P{sub 1}-450 system into electrophilic compounds. Therefore, the regulatory sequence of the Ya gene should be considered an electrophile-responsive element (EpRE) activated exclusively by inducers containing an electrophilic center.

  4. Myristicin from nutmeg induces apoptosis via the mitochondrial pathway and down regulates genes of the DNA damage response pathways in human leukaemia K562 cells.

    PubMed

    Martins, Célia; Doran, Carolina; Silva, Inês C; Miranda, Claudia; Rueff, José; Rodrigues, António S

    2014-07-25

    Myristicin, an allylbenzene, is a major active component of various spices, such as nutmeg and cinnamon, plants from the Umbelliferae family or in some essential oils, such as oils of clove or marjoram. Human exposure to myristicin is low but widespread due to consumption of these spices and essential oils, added to food (e.g. cola drinks) or in traditional medicine. Occasionally high dose exposure occurs, leading to various clinical symptoms, however the molecular mechanisms underlying them are unknown. Our previous studies revealed that myristicin is not genotoxic and yet presented apoptotic activity. Therefore, in this work we assessed the apoptotic mechanisms induced by myristicin in human leukaemia cells. In order to gain further insight on the potential of myristicin to modulate gene expression we also analysed alterations in expression of 84 genes associated with the DNA damage response pathway. The results obtained show that myristicin can induce apoptosis as characterised by alterations in the mitochondrial membrane potential, cytochrome c release, caspase-3 activation, PARP-cleavage and DNA fragmentation. The gene expression profile revealed an overall down regulation of DNA damage response genes after exposure to myristicin, with significant under-expression of genes associated with nucleotide excision repair (ERCC1), double strand break repair (RAD50, RAD51) and DNA damage signalling (ATM) and stress response (GADD45A, GADD45G). On the whole, we demonstrate that myristicin can alter mitochondrial membrane function, induce apoptosis and modulate gene expression in human leukaemia K562 cells. This study provides further detail on the molecular mechanisms underlying the biological activity of myristicin.

  5. Analysis of Magnaporthe oryzae Genome Reveals a Fungal Effector, Which Is Able to Induce Resistance Response in Transgenic Rice Line Containing Resistance Gene, Pi54

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Soham; Singh, Pankaj K.; Gupta, Deepak K.; Mahato, Ajay K.; Sarkar, Chiranjib; Rathour, Rajeev; Singh, Nagendra K.; Sharma, Tilak R.

    2016-01-01

    Rice blast caused by Magnaporthe oryzae is one of the most important diseases of rice. Pi54, a rice gene that imparts resistance to M. oryzae isolates prevalent in India, was already cloned but its avirulent counterpart in the pathogen was not known. After decoding the whole genome of an avirulent isolate of M. oryzae, we predicted 11440 protein coding genes and then identified four candidate effector proteins which are exclusively expressed in the infectious structure, appresoria. In silico protein modeling followed by interaction analysis between Pi54 protein model and selected four candidate effector proteins models revealed that Mo-01947_9 protein model encoded by a gene located at chromosome 4 of M. oryzae, interacted best at the Leucine Rich Repeat domain of Pi54 protein model. Yeast-two-hybrid analysis showed that Mo-01947_9 protein physically interacts with Pi54 protein. Nicotiana benthamiana leaf infiltration assay confirmed induction of hypersensitive response in the presence of Pi54 gene in a heterologous system. Genetic complementation test also proved that Mo-01947_9 protein induces avirulence response in the pathogen in presence of Pi54 gene. Here, we report identification and cloning of a new fungal effector gene which interacts with blast resistance gene Pi54 in rice. PMID:27551285

  6. Analysis of Magnaporthe oryzae Genome Reveals a Fungal Effector, Which Is Able to Induce Resistance Response in Transgenic Rice Line Containing Resistance Gene, Pi54.

    PubMed

    Ray, Soham; Singh, Pankaj K; Gupta, Deepak K; Mahato, Ajay K; Sarkar, Chiranjib; Rathour, Rajeev; Singh, Nagendra K; Sharma, Tilak R

    2016-01-01

    Rice blast caused by Magnaporthe oryzae is one of the most important diseases of rice. Pi54, a rice gene that imparts resistance to M. oryzae isolates prevalent in India, was already cloned but its avirulent counterpart in the pathogen was not known. After decoding the whole genome of an avirulent isolate of M. oryzae, we predicted 11440 protein coding genes and then identified four candidate effector proteins which are exclusively expressed in the infectious structure, appresoria. In silico protein modeling followed by interaction analysis between Pi54 protein model and selected four candidate effector proteins models revealed that Mo-01947_9 protein model encoded by a gene located at chromosome 4 of M. oryzae, interacted best at the Leucine Rich Repeat domain of Pi54 protein model. Yeast-two-hybrid analysis showed that Mo-01947_9 protein physically interacts with Pi54 protein. Nicotiana benthamiana leaf infiltration assay confirmed induction of hypersensitive response in the presence of Pi54 gene in a heterologous system. Genetic complementation test also proved that Mo-01947_9 protein induces avirulence response in the pathogen in presence of Pi54 gene. Here, we report identification and cloning of a new fungal effector gene which interacts with blast resistance gene Pi54 in rice.

  7. Norepinephrine genes predict response time variability and methylphenidate-induced changes in neuropsychological function in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bung-Nyun; Kim, Jae-Won; Cummins, Tarrant D R; Bellgrove, Mark A; Hawi, Ziarih; Hong, Soon-Beom; Yang, Young-Hui; Kim, Hyo-Jin; Shin, Min-Sup; Cho, Soo-Churl; Kim, Ji-Hoon; Son, Jung-Woo; Shin, Yun-Mi; Chung, Un-Sun; Han, Doug-Hyun

    2013-06-01

    Noradrenergic dysfunction may be associated with cognitive impairments in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), including increased response time variability, which has been proposed as a leading endophenotype for ADHD. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between polymorphisms in the α-2A-adrenergic receptor (ADRA2A) and norepinephrine transporter (SLC6A2) genes and attentional performance in ADHD children before and after pharmacological treatment.One hundred one medication-naive ADHD children were included. All subjects were administered methylphenidate (MPH)-OROS for 12 weeks. The subjects underwent a computerized comprehensive attention test to measure the response time variability at baseline before MPH treatment and after 12 weeks. Additive regression analyses controlling for ADHD symptom severity, age, sex, IQ, and final dose of MPH examined the association between response time variability on the comprehensive attention test measures and allelic variations in single-nucleotide polymorphisms of the ADRA2A and SLC6A2 before and after MPH treatment.Increasing possession of an A allele at the G1287A polymorphism of SLC6A2 was significantly related to heightened response time variability at baseline in the sustained (P = 2.0 × 10) and auditory selective attention (P = 1.0 × 10) tasks. Response time variability at baseline increased additively with possession of the T allele at the DraI polymorphism of the ADRA2A gene in the auditory selective attention task (P = 2.0 × 10). After medication, increasing possession of a G allele at the MspI polymorphism of the ADRA2A gene was associated with increased MPH-related change in response time variability in the flanker task (P = 1.0 × 10).Our study suggested an association between norepinephrine gene variants and response time variability measured at baseline and after MPH treatment in children with ADHD. Our results add to a growing body of evidence, suggesting that response time

  8. mRNA Noise Reveals that Activators Induce a Biphasic Response in the Promoter Kinetics of Highly Regulated Genes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, Katie; To, Tsz-Leung; Maheshri, Narendra

    2012-02-01

    A dominant source of fluctuations in gene expression is thought to be the process of transcription. The statistics of these fluctuations arise from the kinetics of transcription. Multiple studies suggest the bulk of fluctuations can be understood by a simple process where genes are inactive for exponentially distributed times punctuated by geometric bursts of mRNA. Yet it's largely unknown how cis and trans factors affect the two lumped kinetic parameters, burst size and burst frequency, that describe this process. Importantly, how these parameters are regulated in a single gene can qualitatively affect the dynamical behavior of the network it is embedded within. Here, we ask whether transcriptional activators increase gene expression by increasing the burst size or burst frequency. We do so by deducing these parameters from steady-state mRNA distributions measured in individual yeast cells using single molecule mRNA FISH. We find that for both a synthetic and natural promoter, activators appear to first increase burst size, then burst frequency. We suggest this biphasic response may be common to all highly regulated genes and was previously unappreciated because of measurement techniques. Furthermore, its origins appear to relate to cis events at the promoter, and may arise from combinations of basal and activator-dependent bursts. Our measurements shed new light on transcriptional mechanisms and should assist in building synthetic promoters with tunable statistics.

  9. Characterization of Changes in Global Genes Expression in the Distal Colon of Loperamide-Induced Constipation SD Rats in Response to the Laxative Effects of Liriope platyphylla

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Eun; Park, So Hae; Kwak, Moon Hwa; Go, Jun; Koh, Eun Kyoung; Song, Sung Hwa; Sung, Ji Eun; Lee, Hee Seob; Hong, Jin Tae; Hwang, Dae Youn

    2015-01-01

    To characterize the changes in global gene expression in the distal colon of constipated SD rats in response to the laxative effects of aqueous extracts of Liriope platyphylla (AEtLP), including isoflavone, saponin, oligosaccharide, succinic acid and hydroxyproline, the total RNA extracted from the distal colon of AEtLP-treated constipation rats was hybridized to oligonucleotide microarrays. The AEtLP treated rats showed an increase in the number of stools, mucosa thickness, flat luminal surface thickness, mucin secretion, and crypt number. Overall, compared to the controls, 581 genes were up-regulated and 216 genes were down-regulated by the constipation induced by loperamide in the constipated rats. After the AEtLP treatment, 67 genes were up-regulated and 421 genes were down-regulated. Among the transcripts up-regulated by constipation, 89 were significantly down-regulated and 22 were recovered to the normal levels by the AEtLP treatment. The major genes in the down-regulated categories included Slc9a5, klk10, Fgf15, and Alpi, whereas the major genes in the recovered categories were Cyp2b2, Ace, G6pc, and Setbp1. On the other hand, after the AEtLP treatment, ten of these genes down-regulated by constipation were up-regulated significantly and five were recovered to the normal levels. The major genes in the up-regulated categories included Serpina3n, Lcn2 and Slc5a8, whereas the major genes in the recovered categories were Tmem45a, Rerg and Rgc32. These results indicate that several gene functional groups and individual genes as constipation biomarkers respond to an AEtLP treatment in constipated model rats. PMID:26151867

  10. Constitutive or Inducible Protective Mechanisms against UV-B Radiation in the Brown Alga Fucus vesiculosus? A Study of Gene Expression and Phlorotannin Content Responses.

    PubMed

    Creis, Emeline; Delage, Ludovic; Charton, Sophie; Goulitquer, Sophie; Leblanc, Catherine; Potin, Philippe; Ar Gall, Erwan

    2015-01-01

    A role as UV sunscreens has been suggested for phlorotannins, the phenolic compounds that accumulate in brown algae in response to a number of external stimuli and take part in cell wall structure. After exposure of the intertidal brown alga Fucus vesiculosus to artificial UV-B radiation, we examined its physiological responses by following the transcript level of the pksIII gene encoding a phloroglucinol synthase, likely to be involved in the first step of phlorotannins biosynthesis. We also monitored the expression of three targeted genes, encoding a heat shock protein (hsp70), which is involved in global stress responses, an aryl sulfotransferase (ast), which could be involved in the sulfation of phlorotannins, and a vanadium bromoperoxidase (vbpo), which can potentially participate in the scavenging of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) and in the cross-linking and condensation of phlorotannins. We investigated whether transcriptional regulation of these genes is correlated with an induction of phlorotannin accumulation by establishing metabolite profiling of purified fractions of low molecular weight phlorotannins. Our findings demonstrated that a high dose of UV-B radiation induced a significant overexpression of hsp70 after 12 and 24 hours following the exposure to the UV-B treatment, compared to control treatment. The physiological performance of algae quantified by the photosynthetic efficiency (Fv/Fm) was slightly reduced. However UV-B treatment did not induce the accumulation of soluble phlorotannins in F. vesiculosus during the kinetics of four weeks, a result that may be related to the lack of induction of the pksIII gene expression. Taken together these results suggest a constitutive accumulation of phlorotannins occurring during the development of F.vesiculosus, rather than inducible processes. Gene expression studies and phlorotannin profiling provide here complementary approaches to global quantifications currently used in studies of phenolic compounds

  11. Constitutive or Inducible Protective Mechanisms against UV-B Radiation in the Brown Alga Fucus vesiculosus? A Study of Gene Expression and Phlorotannin Content Responses

    PubMed Central

    Creis, Emeline; Delage, Ludovic; Charton, Sophie; Goulitquer, Sophie; Leblanc, Catherine; Potin, Philippe; Ar Gall, Erwan

    2015-01-01

    A role as UV sunscreens has been suggested for phlorotannins, the phenolic compounds that accumulate in brown algae in response to a number of external stimuli and take part in cell wall structure. After exposure of the intertidal brown alga Fucus vesiculosus to artificial UV-B radiation, we examined its physiological responses by following the transcript level of the pksIII gene encoding a phloroglucinol synthase, likely to be involved in the first step of phlorotannins biosynthesis. We also monitored the expression of three targeted genes, encoding a heat shock protein (hsp70), which is involved in global stress responses, an aryl sulfotransferase (ast), which could be involved in the sulfation of phlorotannins, and a vanadium bromoperoxidase (vbpo), which can potentially participate in the scavenging of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) and in the cross-linking and condensation of phlorotannins. We investigated whether transcriptional regulation of these genes is correlated with an induction of phlorotannin accumulation by establishing metabolite profiling of purified fractions of low molecular weight phlorotannins. Our findings demonstrated that a high dose of UV-B radiation induced a significant overexpression of hsp70 after 12 and 24 hours following the exposure to the UV-B treatment, compared to control treatment. The physiological performance of algae quantified by the photosynthetic efficiency (Fv/Fm) was slightly reduced. However UV-B treatment did not induce the accumulation of soluble phlorotannins in F. vesiculosus during the kinetics of four weeks, a result that may be related to the lack of induction of the pksIII gene expression. Taken together these results suggest a constitutive accumulation of phlorotannins occurring during the development of F.vesiculosus, rather than inducible processes. Gene expression studies and phlorotannin profiling provide here complementary approaches to global quantifications currently used in studies of phenolic compounds

  12. Association study of olanzapine-induced weight gain and therapeutic response with SERT gene polymorphisms in female schizophrenic patients.

    PubMed

    Bozina, Nada; Medved, Vesna; Kuzman, Martina Rojnic; Sain, Ivica; Sertic, Jadranka

    2007-09-01

    We investigated the relationships between L/S promoter (SERTPR) and l/s intron2 (SERTin2) genetic variants of serotonin transporter (SERT) polymorphisms with olanzapine-induced weight gain and treatment response in 94 female schizophrenic patients treated with olanzapine for up to 3 months. Body mass index (BMI) was calculated for each patient prior to olanzapine administration and 3 months afterwards. To assess and evaluate improvement of clinical psychotic symptoms and therapeutic response to the antipsychotic, all patients were rated using the Positive and Negative Syndrome ScaLe (PANSS). Overall, the presence of S SERTPR allelic variant and SS genotype was associated with significantly higher weight gain in subjects who were non-obese at the time of admission. The presence of L SERTPR variant was associated with significantly better treatment response measured with total PANSS and general PANSS subscale, while the presence of l SERTin2 variant determined better treatment response only in several items. No evidence of linkage disequilibrium between the two loci was found in the sample. These findings identify genetic factors associated with oLanzapine-induced weight gain and treatment response in femaLe schizophrenic patients.

  13. The characterization of six auxin-induced tomato GH3 genes uncovers a member, SlGH3.4, strongly responsive to arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Liao, Dehua; Chen, Xiao; Chen, Aiqun; Wang, Huimin; Liu, Jianjian; Liu, Junli; Gu, Mian; Sun, Shubin; Xu, Guohua

    2015-04-01

    In plants, the GH3 gene family is widely considered to be involved in a broad range of plant physiological processes, through modulation of hormonal homeostasis. Multiple GH3 genes have been functionally characterized in several plant species; however, to date, limited works to study the GH3 genes in tomato have been reported. Here, we characterize the expression and regulatory profiles of six tomato GH3 genes, SlGH3.2, SlGH3.3, SlGH3.4, SlGH3.7, SlGH3.9 and SlGH3.15, in response to different phytohormone applications and arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungal colonization. All six GH3 genes showed inducible responses to external IAA, and three members were significantly up-regulated in response to AM symbiosis. In particular, SlGH3.4, the transcripts of which were barely detectable under normal growth conditions, was strongly activated in the IAA-treated and AM fungal-colonized roots. A comparison of the SlGH3.4 expression in wild-type plants and M161, a mutant with a defect in AM symbiosis, confirmed that SlGH3.4 expression is highly correlated to mycorrhizal colonization. Histochemical staining demonstrated that a 2,258 bp SlGH3.4 promoter fragment could drive β-glucuronidase (GUS) expression strongly in root tips, steles and cortical cells of IAA-treated roots, but predominantly in the fungal-colonized cells of mycorrhizal roots. A truncated 654 bp promoter failed to direct GUS expression in IAA-treated roots, but maintained the symbiosis-induced activity in mycorrhizal roots. In summary, our results suggest that a mycorrhizal signaling pathway that is at least partially independent of the auxin signaling pathway has evolved for the co-regulation of the auxin- and mycorrhiza-activated GH3 genes in plants.

  14. Sonicated Protein Fractions of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae Induce Inflammatory Responses and Differential Gene Expression in a Murine Alveolar Macrophage Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Damte, Dereje; Lee, Seung-Jin; Birhanu, Biruk Tesfaye; Suh, Joo-Won; Park, Seung-Chun

    2015-12-28

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is known to cause porcine enzootic pneumonia (EP), an important disease in swine production. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of sonicated protein fractions of M. hyopneumoniae on inflammatory response and gene expression in the murine alveolar macrophage MH-S cell line. The effects of sonicated protein fractions and intact M. hyopneumoniae on the gene expression of cytokines and iNOS were assessed using RT-PCR. The Annealing Control Primer (ACP)-based PCR method was used to screen differentially expressed genes. Increased transcription of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, COX-2, and iNOS mRNA was observed after exposure to the supernatant (SPT), precipitant (PPT), and intact M. hyopneumoniae protein. A time-dependent analysis of the mRNA expression revealed an upregulation after 4 h for IL-6 and iNOS and after 12 h for IL-1β and TNF-α, for both SPT and PPT; the fold change in COX-2 expression was less. A dose- and time-dependent correlation was observed in nitrite (NO) production for both protein fractions; however, there was no significant difference between the effects of the two protein fractions. In a differential gene analysis, PCR revealed differential expression for nine gene bands after 3 h of stimulation - only one gene was downregulated, while the remaining eight were upregulated. The results of this study provide insights that help improve our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of and macrophage defenses against M. hyopneumoniae assault, and suggest targets for future studies on therapeutic interventions for M. hyopneumoniae infections.

  15. Cellular responses and gene expression profile changes due to bleomycin-induced DNA damage in human fibroblasts in space

    PubMed Central

    Kidane, Yared; Feiveson, Alan; Stodieck, Louis; Karouia, Fathi; Ramesh, Govindarajan; Rohde, Larry; Wu, Honglu

    2017-01-01

    Living organisms in space are constantly exposed to radiation, toxic chemicals or reactive oxygen species generated due to increased levels of environmental and psychological stresses. Understanding the impact of spaceflight factors, microgravity in particular, on cellular responses to DNA damage is essential for assessing the radiation risk for astronauts and the mutation rate in microorganisms. In a study conducted on the International Space Station, confluent human fibroblasts in culture were treated with bleomycin for three hours in the true microgravity environment. The degree of DNA damage was quantified by immunofluorescence staining for γ-H2AX, which is manifested in three types of staining patterns. Although similar percentages of these types of patterns were found between flight and ground cells, there was a slight shift in the distribution of foci counts in the flown cells with countable numbers of γ-H2AX foci. Comparison of the cells in confluent and in exponential growth conditions indicated that the proliferation rate between flight and the ground may be responsible for such a shift. We also performed a microarray analysis of gene expressions in response to bleomycin treatment. A qualitative comparison of the responsive pathways between the flown and ground cells showed similar responses with the p53 network being the top upstream regulator. The microarray data was confirmed with a PCR array analysis containing a set of genes involved in DNA damage signaling; with BBC3, CDKN1A, PCNA and PPM1D being significantly upregulated in both flight and ground cells after bleomycin treatment. Our results suggest that whether microgravity affects DNA damage response in space can be dependent on the cell type and cell growth condition. PMID:28248986

  16. Involvement of insulin-induced reversible chromatin remodeling in altering the expression of oxidative stress-responsive genes under hyperglycemia in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Jeena; Tikoo, Kulbhushan

    2012-08-10

    The epigenetic control mechanisms, regulating insulin-induced oxidative stress generation, under hyperglycemic condition are yet to be elucidated. We set out to assess the role of chromatin regulatory factors in regulating the transcription of genes that are critical for mediating oxidative stress response under hyperglycemic/hyperinsulinemic condition. Our results outline a significant increase in the ROS generation accompanied by a decrease in the histone H3 acetylation, H3 Ser-10 phosphorylation, H3K4 methylation and an increase in the H3K9 methylation, after 30 min of insulin treatment under hyperglycemic condition. However, after 12h of insulin treatment a reversal of these histone H3 modifications was observed which commensurate with the reduced ROS generation. Microarray data revealed that the expression of stress responsive genes (Hsp90, Hspd1, DnajC15, Hsf5 and Mapk3) decreased after12h of insulin treatment, after an initial increase at 30 min. We observed the direct regulation of these stress responsive genes by reversible histone modifications under hyperglycemic/hyperinsulinemic condition at both time intervals. Further, pre-incubation with catalase attenuates these changes. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report that shows the role of reversible histone modifications in regulating oxidative stress-responsive genes under hyperglycemic condition in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. A genome-wide screen for ethylene-induced ethylene response factors (ERFs) in hybrid aspen stem identifies ERF genes that modify stem growth and wood properties.

    PubMed

    Vahala, Jorma; Felten, Judith; Love, Jonathan; Gorzsás, András; Gerber, Lorenz; Lamminmäki, Airi; Kangasjärvi, Jaakko; Sundberg, Björn

    2013-10-01

    Ethylene Response Factors (ERFs) are a large family of transcription factors that mediate responses to ethylene. Ethylene affects many aspects of wood development and is involved in tension wood formation. Thus ERFs could be key players connecting ethylene action to wood development. We identified 170 gene models encoding ERFs in the Populus trichocarpa genome. The transcriptional responses of ERF genes to ethylene treatments were determined in stem tissues of hybrid aspen (Populus tremula × tremuloides) by qPCR. Selected ethylene-responsive ERFs were overexpressed in wood-forming tissues and characterized for growth and wood chemotypes by FT-IR. Fifty ERFs in Populus showed more than five-fold increased transcript accumulation in response to ethylene treatments. Twenty-six ERFs were selected for further analyses. A majority of these were induced during tension wood formation. Overexpression of ERFs 18, 21, 30, 85 and 139 in wood-forming tissues of hybrid aspen modified the wood chemotype. Moreover, overexpression of ERF139 caused a dwarf-phenotype with altered wood development, and overexpression of ERF18, 34 and 35 slightly increased stem diameter. We identified ethylene-induced ERFs that respond to tension wood formation, and modify wood formation when overexpressed. This provides support for their role in ethylene-mediated regulation of wood development.

  18. Yeast genes involved in response to lactic acid and acetic acid: acidic conditions caused by the organic acids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cultures induce expression of intracellular metal metabolism genes regulated by Aft1p.

    PubMed

    Kawahata, Miho; Masaki, Kazuo; Fujii, Tsutomu; Iefuji, Haruyuki

    2006-09-01

    Using two types of genome-wide analysis to investigate yeast genes involved in response to lactic acid and acetic acid, we found that the acidic condition affects metal metabolism. The first type is an expression analysis using DNA microarrays to investigate 'acid shock response' as the first step to adapt to an acidic condition, and 'acid adaptation' by maintaining integrity in the acidic condition. The other is a functional screening using the nonessential genes deletion collection of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The expression analysis showed that genes involved in stress response, such as YGP1, TPS1 and HSP150, were induced under the acid shock response. Genes such as FIT2, ARN1 and ARN2, involved in metal metabolism regulated by Aft1p, were induced under the acid adaptation. AFT1 was induced under acid shock response and under acid adaptation with lactic acid. Moreover, green fluorescent protein-fused Aft1p was localized to the nucleus in cells grown in media containing lactic acid, acetic acid, or hydrochloric acid. Both analyses suggested that the acidic condition affects cell wall architecture. The depletion of cell-wall components encoded by SED1, DSE2, CTS1, EGT2, SCW11, SUN4 and YNL300W and histone acetyltransferase complex proteins encoded by YID21, EAF3, EAF5, EAF6 and YAF9 increased resistance to lactic acid. Depletion of the cell-wall mannoprotein Sed1p provided resistance to lactic acid, although the expression of SED1 was induced by exposure to lactic acid. Depletion of vacuolar membrane H+-ATPase and high-osmolarity glycerol mitogen-activated protein kinase proteins caused acid sensitivity. Moreover, our quantitative PCR showed that expression of PDR12 increased under acid shock response with lactic acid and decreased under acid adaptation with hydrochloric acid.

  19. Soluble CD30 and lymphocyte activation gene-3 (CD223), as potential serological markers of T helper-type cytokine response induced by acellular pertussis vaccine.

    PubMed

    Ausiello, C M; Palazzo, R; Spensieri, F; Urbani, F; Massari, M; Triebel, F; Benagiano, M; D'Elios, M M; Del Prete, G; Cassone, A

    2006-01-01

    T cell responses are involved in vaccine-induced immunity to pertussis but no easy-to-monitor, serological markers are available to assess these responses. The lymphocyte activation gene-3 (CD223) molecule is present on, and released by, activated T helper (Th) 1 cells, whereas CD30 molecules have been associated with Th2 immune responses. Starting from the recent knowledge of the cytokine profile induced by pertussis vaccination, we examined the levels of soluble (s)CD223 and sCD30 proteins in child recipients of acellular pertussis (aP) and diphtheria-tetanus (DT) vaccines and in children receiving DT vaccine only, as control. The correlation of the two proteins with specific antibody and T cell responses was assessed. The main findings are: i) sCD223 and sCD30 levels are inversely related, suggesting that the two markers are the expression of different and counter-regulated T-cell responses; ii) sCD30 level correlated with induction of T cell proliferation to pertussis vaccine antigens and antibody response to pertussis toxin. Overall, sCD30 and sCD223 levels seem to be promising candidate markers to assess the induction of Th-type responses in vaccine recipients.

  20. Microarray Analysis of Mercury-Induced Changes in Gene Expression in Human Liver Carcinoma (HepG2) Cells: Importance in Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Ayensu, Wellington K.; Tchounwou, Paul B.

    2006-01-01

    to the Welch’s ANOVA/Welch’s t-test. Further analyses of affected genes identified genes located on all human chromosomes except chromosome 22 with higher than normal effects on genes found on chromosomes 1–14, 17–20 (sex-determining region Y)-box18SRY, 21 (splicing factor, arginine/serine-rich 15 and ATP-binding), and X (including BCL6-co-repressor). These genes are categorized as control and regulatory genes for metabolic pathways involving the cell cycle (cyclin-dependent kinases), apoptosis, cytokine expression, Na+/K+ ATPase, stress responses, G-protein signal transduction, transcription factors, DNA repair as well as metal-regulatory transcription factor 1, MTF1 HGNC, chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan 5 (neuroglycan C), ATP-binding cassette, sub-family G (WHITE), cytochrome b-561 family protein, CDC-like kinase 1 (CLK1 HGNC) (protein tyrosine kinase STY), Na+/H+ exchanger regulatory factor (NHERF HGNC), potassium voltage-gated channel subfamily H member 2 (KCNH2), putative MAPK activating protein (PM20, PM21), ras homolog gene family, polymerase (DNA directed), δ regulatory subunit (50kDa), leptin receptor involved in hematopoietin/interferon-class (D200-domain) cytokine receptor activity and thymidine kinase 2, mitochondrial TK2 HGNC and related genes. Significant alterations in these specific genes provide new directions for deeper mechanistic investigations that would lead to a better understanding of the molecular basis of mercury-induced toxicity and human diseases that may result from disturbances in the immune system. PMID:16823088

  1. [The in vitro antitumor responses of murine peritoneal macrophages induced by adenovirus-mediated IL-4 and/or M-CSF gene therapy].

    PubMed

    Yu, Y; Cao, X; Lei, H

    1996-07-01

    To observe the antitumor responses of murine peritoneal macrophages induced by adenovirus-mediated IL-4 and/or M-CSF gene transfer. The IL-4 gene and/or M-CSF gene was transfected into murine peritoneal macrophages-mediated by adenovirus and the levels of IL-4, M-CSF, TNF, IL-1 and NO in the supernatant of the macrophages and the cytotoxicity of the macrophages to tumor cells were assayed. The high levels of IL-4 and M-CSF could be detected in the supernatant of macrophages 18 hours after being infected with advenovirus expressing IL-4 or M-CSF. The cytotoxicity of the macrophages engineered to secrete IL-4 or M-CSF increased significantly, and when IL-4 gene and M-CSF gene were cotransfected into the macrophages or the macrophages were co-stimulated with LPS, the cytotoxicity increased even more significantly. The levels of TNF, IL-land NO in the supernatant of macrophages also increased. The results demonstrated that transfection of IL-4 and/or M-CSF gene into macrophages could augment their anti-tumor immunity.

  2. Inducible nitric oxide synthase response and associated cytokine gene expression in the spleen of mice infected with Clonorchis sinensis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ji-Qing; Yang, Qing-Li; Xue, Yan; Cheng, Xiao-Bing; Jiang, Zhi-Hua; Yang, Yi-Chao; Chen, Ying-Dan; Zhou, Xiao-Nong

    2015-05-01

    Clonorchis sinensis is a food-borne parasite that induces a permanent increase of nitrosation in the body upon infection. The spleen is an important secondary lymphoid organ for the regulation of immune responses locally and in the whole body. However, the functions and mechanisms of the spleen in nitric oxide (NO) responses after C. sinensis infection remain unknown. In this study, BALB/c mice were infected with 20, 40, and 80 C. sinensis metacercariae to simulate mild, moderate, and severe infections, respectively. We examined the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in the spleen and the relevant cytokine transcription in splenocytes from the mice infected with different amounts of metacercariae. The iNOS of the mice infected with 80 metacercariae was expressed in the spleen as early as 10 days post-infection (dpi) and gradually increased until 90 dpi. The iNOS expression in the mice infected with 40 metacercariae was detected only at 45 and 90 dpi, but not in the mice infected with 20 metacercariae. The level of interferon (IFN)-γ messenger RNA (mRNA) transcription in splenocytes significantly increased at 10 and 20 dpi (P < 0.05) in response to mild/moderate infection but gradually decreased to normal levels after 45 dpi. The level of IL-12p35 mRNA transcription did not change at 10 and 20 dpi but significantly decreased after 45 dpi under moderate/severe infection (P < 0.05/0.01/0.001). The level of IL-18 mRNA transcription significantly increased at 10 dpi (P < 0.05/0.01) but significantly decreased after 20 dpi (P < 0.05/0.01/0.001). These results suggest that spleen is an important organ for iNOS/NO responses, which correspond to the severity of C. sinensis infection, but cannot be attributed to the expression of the Th1 cytokines.

  3. Extracellular simian virus 40 induces an ERK/MAP kinase-independent signalling pathway that activates primary response genes and promotes virus entry.

    PubMed

    Dangoria, N S; Breau, W C; Anderson, H A; Cishek, D M; Norkin, L C

    1996-09-01

    Simian virus 40 (SV40) binding to growth-arrested cells activated an intracellular signalling pathway that induced the up-regulation of the primary response genes c-myc, c-jun and c-sis within 30 min and of JE within 90 min. The up-regulation of the primary response genes occurred in the presence of cycloheximide and when UV-inactivated SV40 was adsorbed to cells. SV40 binding did not activate Raf or mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP/ERK1), or mobilize intracellular Ca2+. The SV40-induced up-regulation of c-myc and c-jun was blocked by the tyrosine kinase inhibitor, genistein, and by the protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor, calphostin C, but not by expression of the MAP kinase-specific phosphatase, MKP-1. These results suggest that the SV40-induced signalling pathway includes the activities of a tyrosine kinase and a Ca(2+)-independent isoform of PKC, but not of Raf or MAP kinase. Finally, SV40 infectious entry into cells was specifically and reversibly blocked by genistein.

  4. Local and systemic mycorrhiza-induced protection against the ectoparasitic nematode Xiphinema index involves priming of defence gene responses in grapevine

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Zhipeng; Fayolle, Léon; van Tuinen, Diederik; Chatagnier, Odile; Gianinazzi, Silvio; Gianinazzi-Pearson, Vivienne

    2012-01-01

    The ectoparasitic dagger nematode (Xiphinema index), vector of Grapevine fanleaf virus (GFLV), provokes gall formation and can cause severe damage to the root system of grapevines. Mycorrhiza formation by Glomus (syn. Rhizophagus) intraradices BEG141 reduced both gall formation on roots of the grapevine rootstock SO4 (Vitis berlandieri×V. riparia) and nematode number in the surrounding soil. Suppressive effects increased with time and were greater when the nematode was post-inoculated rather than co-inoculated with the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus. Using a split-root system, decreased X. index development was shown in mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal parts of mycorrhizal root systems, indicating that both local and systemic induced bioprotection mechanisms were active against the ectoparasitic nematode. Expression analyses of ESTs (expressed sequence tags) generated in an SSH (subtractive suppressive hybridization) library, representing plant genes up-regulated during mycorrhiza-induced control of X. index, and of described grapevine defence genes showed activation of chitinase 1b, pathogenesis-related 10, glutathione S-transferase, stilbene synthase 1, 5-enolpyruvyl shikimate-3-phosphate synthase, and a heat shock proein 70-interacting protein in association with the observed local and/or systemic induced bioprotection against the nematode. Overall, the data suggest priming of grapevine defence responses by the AM fungus and transmission of a plant-mediated signal to non-mycorrhizal tissues. Grapevine gene responses during AM-induced local and systemic bioprotection against X. index point to biological processes that are related either to direct effects on the nematode or to protection against nematode-imposed stress to maintain root tissue integrity. PMID:22407649

  5. Local and systemic mycorrhiza-induced protection against the ectoparasitic nematode Xiphinema index involves priming of defence gene responses in grapevine.

    PubMed

    Hao, Zhipeng; Fayolle, Léon; van Tuinen, Diederik; Chatagnier, Odile; Li, Xiaolin; Gianinazzi, Silvio; Gianinazzi-Pearson, Vivienne

    2012-06-01

    The ectoparasitic dagger nematode (Xiphinema index), vector of Grapevine fanleaf virus (GFLV), provokes gall formation and can cause severe damage to the root system of grapevines. Mycorrhiza formation by Glomus (syn. Rhizophagus) intraradices BEG141 reduced both gall formation on roots of the grapevine rootstock SO4 (Vitis berlandieri×V. riparia) and nematode number in the surrounding soil. Suppressive effects increased with time and were greater when the nematode was post-inoculated rather than co-inoculated with the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus. Using a split-root system, decreased X. index development was shown in mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal parts of mycorrhizal root systems, indicating that both local and systemic induced bioprotection mechanisms were active against the ectoparasitic nematode. Expression analyses of ESTs (expressed sequence tags) generated in an SSH (subtractive suppressive hybridization) library, representing plant genes up-regulated during mycorrhiza-induced control of X. index, and of described grapevine defence genes showed activation of chitinase 1b, pathogenesis-related 10, glutathione S-transferase, stilbene synthase 1, 5-enolpyruvyl shikimate-3-phosphate synthase, and a heat shock proein 70-interacting protein in association with the observed local and/or systemic induced bioprotection against the nematode. Overall, the data suggest priming of grapevine defence responses by the AM fungus and transmission of a plant-mediated signal to non-mycorrhizal tissues. Grapevine gene responses during AM-induced local and systemic bioprotection against X. index point to biological processes that are related either to direct effects on the nematode or to protection against nematode-imposed stress to maintain root tissue integrity.

  6. Rhodiola inhibits dengue virus multiplication by inducing innate immune response genes RIG-I, MDA5 and ISG in human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Diwaker, Drishya; Mishra, K P; Ganju, Lilly; Singh, S B

    2014-08-01

    Recognition of virus infection by retinoic acid-inducible gene (RIG) I and melanoma differentiation-associated protein (MDA) 5, which are RNA helicases, and interferon-stimulated gene (ISG) 15 activates cascades of signal transduction pathways leading to production of type I interferons and proinflammatory cytokines that orchestrate the elimination of the viruses. However, it has been demonstrated that RNA-helicase-mediated innate immunity plays an essential role in defending the host from infection. In our efforts to identify plant-derived antivirals that selectively enhance ISG- and RNA-helicase-mediated antiviral immune responses, we identified a plant, rhodiola, that significantly promoted ISG, RIG-I and MDA 5 gene expression and an antiviral immune response against dengue virus (DENV) infection. Rhodiola induced interferon (IFN) β and other cytokines, including IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-8, in infected cells. It was also found that rhodiola upregulated phosphorylated eIF-2α, PKR and NF-kB in infected cells. In addition, the number of NK cells was also increased by rhodiola treatment in dengue-virus-infected human PBMCs. Treatment with a crude extract of rhodiola (RAE) resulted in effects in the 20 % range, which is similar to the magnitude of the same effects observed in DENV infections. Taken together, our results imply that rhodiola induces pharmacological modulation of RIG-I, MDA 5 and ISG signal transduction pathways in favor of the induction of a beneficial antiviral immune response against dengue virus, which can be a novel therapeutic strategy for management of infection.

  7. Astrogliosis involves activation of retinoic acid-inducible gene-like signaling in the innate immune response after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    de Rivero Vaccari, Juan Pablo; Minkiewicz, Julia; Wang, Xiaoliang; De Rivero Vaccari, Juan Carlos; German, Ramon; Marcillo, Alex E; Dietrich, W Dalton; Keane, Robert W

    2012-03-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) induces a glial response in which astrocytes become activated and produce inflammatory mediators. The molecular basis for regulation of glial-innate immune responses remains poorly understood. Here, we examined the activation of retinoic acid-inducible gene (RIG)-like receptors (RLRs) and their involvement in regulating inflammation after SCI. We show that astrocytes express two intracellular RLRs: RIG-I and melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5. SCI and stretch injury of cultured astrocytes stimulated RLR signaling as determined by phosphorylation of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) leading to production of type I interferons (IFNs). RLR signaling stimulation with synthetic ribonucleic acid resulted in RLR activation, phosphorylation of IRF3, and increased expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and vimentin, two hallmarks of reactive astrocytes. Moreover, mitochondrial E3 ubiquitin protein ligase 1, an RLR inhibitor, decreased production of GFAP and vimentin after RIG-I signaling stimulation. Our findings identify a role for RLR signaling and type I IFN in regulating astrocyte innate immune responses after SCI. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Waterborne Signaling Primes the Expression of Elicitor-Induced Genes and Buffers the Oxidative Responses in the Brown Alga Laminaria digitata

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, François; Cosse, Audrey; Goulitquer, Sophie; Raimund, Stefan; Morin, Pascal; Valero, Myriam; Leblanc, Catherine; Potin, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    As marine sessile organisms, seaweeds must respond efficiently to biotic and abiotic challenges in their natural environment to reduce the fitness consequences of wounds and oxidative stress. This study explores the early steps of the defense responses of a large marine brown alga (the tangle kelp Laminaria digitata) and investigates its ability to transmit a warning message to neighboring conspecifics. We compared the early responses to elicitation with oligoguluronates in laboratory-grown and harvested wild individuals of L. digitata. We followed the release of H2O2 and the concomitant production of volatile organic compounds. We also monitored the kinetics of expression of defense-related genes following the oxidative burst. Laboratory-grown algae were transplanted in kelp habitats to further evaluate their responses to elicitation after a transient immersion in natural seawater. In addition, a novel conditioning procedure was established to mimic field conditions in the laboratory. Our experiments showed that L. digitata integrates waterborne cues present in the kelp bed and/or released from elicited neighboring plants. Indeed, the exposure to elicited conspecifics changes the patterns of oxidative burst and volatile emissions and potentiates this kelp for faster induction of genes specifically regulated in response to oligoguluronates. Thus, waterborne signals shape the elicitor-induced responses of kelps through a yet unknown mechanism reminiscent of priming in land plants. PMID:21731761

  9. Waterborne signaling primes the expression of elicitor-induced genes and buffers the oxidative responses in the brown alga Laminaria digitata.

    PubMed

    Thomas, François; Cosse, Audrey; Goulitquer, Sophie; Raimund, Stefan; Morin, Pascal; Valero, Myriam; Leblanc, Catherine; Potin, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    As marine sessile organisms, seaweeds must respond efficiently to biotic and abiotic challenges in their natural environment to reduce the fitness consequences of wounds and oxidative stress. This study explores the early steps of the defense responses of a large marine brown alga (the tangle kelp Laminaria digitata) and investigates its ability to transmit a warning message to neighboring conspecifics. We compared the early responses to elicitation with oligoguluronates in laboratory-grown and harvested wild individuals of L. digitata. We followed the release of H₂O₂ and the concomitant production of volatile organic compounds. We also monitored the kinetics of expression of defense-related genes following the oxidative burst. Laboratory-grown algae were transplanted in kelp habitats to further evaluate their responses to elicitation after a transient immersion in natural seawater. In addition, a novel conditioning procedure was established to mimic field conditions in the laboratory. Our experiments showed that L. digitata integrates waterborne cues present in the kelp bed and/or released from elicited neighboring plants. Indeed, the exposure to elicited conspecifics changes the patterns of oxidative burst and volatile emissions and potentiates this kelp for faster induction of genes specifically regulated in response to oligoguluronates. Thus, waterborne signals shape the elicitor-induced responses of kelps through a yet unknown mechanism reminiscent of priming in land plants.

  10. Immortalization by c-myc, H-ras, and Ela oncogenes induces differential cellular gene expression and growth factor responses

    SciTech Connect

    Kelekar, A.; Cole, M.D.

    1987-11-01

    Early-passage rat kidney cells were immortalized or rescued from senescence with three different oncogenes: viral promoter-driven c-myc, H-ras (Val-12), and adenovirus type 5 E1a. The normal c-myc and H-ras (Gly-12) were unable to immortalize cells under similar conditions. Quantitation of RNA in the ras-immortalized lines demonstrated that the H-ras oncogene was expressed at a level equivalent to that of the normal H-ras gene in established human or rat cell lines. Cell lines immortalized by different oncogenes were found to have distinct growth responses to individual growth factors in a short-term assay. E1a-immortalized cells were largely independent of serum growth factors, whereas c-myc-immortalized cells responded to serum better than to epidermal growth factor and insulin. H-ras-immortalized cells responded significantly to insulin alone and gave a maximal response to epidermal growth factor and insulin. Several cellular genes associated with platelet-derived growth factor stimulation, including c-myc, were expressed at high levels in the H-ras-immortalized cells, and c-myc expression was deregulated, suggesting that the H-ras oncogene has provided a ''competence'' function. H-ras-immortalized cells could not be morphologically transformed by secondary transfection with a long terminal repeat-c-myc oncogene, but secondary transfection of the same cells with H-ras (Val-12) produced morphologically transformed colonies that had 20- to 40-fold higher levels of H-ras oncogene expression. Thus transformation in this system is dependent on high levels of H-ras oncogene expression rather than on the presence of activated H-ras and c-myc oncogenes in the same cell.

  11. Gene-inducing program of human dendritic cells in response to BCG cell-wall skeleton (CWS), which reflects adjuvancy required for tumor immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Kazuo; Kurita-Taniguchi, Mitsue; Aoki, Mikio; Kimura, Toru; Kashiwazaki, Yasuo; Matsumoto, Misako; Seya, Tsukasa

    2005-05-15

    Adjuvants induce the expression of a number of genes in dendritic cells (DCs), which facilitate effective antigen-presentation and cytokine/chemokine liberation. It has been accepted that the toll-like receptor (TLR) family governs the adjuvant activity in DCs. An adjuvant with a long history is mycobacteria in an oil-in-water emulsion, namely Freund's complete adjuvant. Since the active center for the adjuvancy in mycobacteria is the cell-wall skeleton (CWS), we used the bacillus Calmette-Guerin cell-wall skeleton (BCG-CWS) to test DC maturation by GeneChip analysis. We identified the genes supporting an efficient DC response and output. Approximately 2000 genes were up-regulated by BCG-CWS stimulation. BCG-CWS-, peptidoglycan (PGN)- and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulation generally up-regulated some gene clusters including genes for inflammatory cytokines (TNF, IL1alpha, IL1beta, IL6, IL12 p40, IL23 p19, etc.), chemokines (CCL20, IL8, etc.), cell adhesion molecules (ICAM-1, etc.), apoptosis-related proteins (GADD45B, BCL2A1, etc.), metabolic enzymes (PTGS2, SOD2, etc.) and miscellaneous proteins (EHD1, TNFAIP6, etc.). LPS-stimulation, but not BCG-CWS- or PGN-stimulation, up-regulated the interferon-inducible antiviral proteins, including IFIT1, IFIT2, IFIT4, CXCL10, ISG15, OASL, IFITM1 and MX1. We also found that the BCG-CWS- or PGN-stimulation up-regulated CXCL5, MMP1, etc. We discussed their properties in association with TLRs and recently discovered TLR adapters.

  12. The quorum sensing luxS gene is induced in Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM in response to Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Moslehi-Jenabian, Saloomeh; Vogensen, Finn Kvist; Jespersen, Lene

    2011-10-03

    The luxS gene involved in quorum sensing has been shown to control different behaviour of probiotic lactobacilli. In this study we investigated if luxS in Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM was up-regulated in response to Listeria monocytogenes EGD-e. The two bacterial strains were grown in mono- and co-culture and the growth of both bacteria and the transcriptional level of luxS in L. acidophilus cells were monitored. Contrary to L. acidophilus, the growth of L. monocytogenes was significantly affected by co-cultivation. Transcriptional analysis showed that the expression of luxS increased during exponential growth in L. acidophilus cells with the highest level in the late-exponential growth phase, decreasing in the stationary phase. Following co-cultivation with L. monocytogenes, the transcriptional level of luxS increased significantly in mid-exponential growing cells of L. acidophilus after incubation with viable L. monocytogenes cells and by addition of cell-free culture supernatant of L. monocytogenes, whereas incubation with heat killed cells of L. monocytogenes had no effect on the transcriptional level. This could indicate that the up-regulation of luxS is due to a response to a secreted compound produced by L. monocytogenes cells.

  13. Cross-talk between calcineurin/NFAT and Jak/STAT signalling induces cardioprotective αB-crystallin gene expression in response to hypertrophic stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Manukyan, Irena; Galatioto, Josephine; Mascareno, Eduardo; Bhaduri, Sikha; Siddiqui, MAQ

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Among the stress proteins that are up-regulated in the heart due to imposed biomechanical stress, αB-crystallin (CryAB) is the most abundant and pivotal in rendering protection against stress-induced cell damage. Cardiomyocyte-specific expression of the CryAB gene was shown to be dependent upon an intact αBE4 cis-element located in the CryAB enhancer. To date, there is no evidence on the identity of regulatory proteins and associated signalling molecules that control CryAB expression in cardiomyocytes. In this study, we define a mechanism by which the calcineurin/NFAT and Jak/STAT pathways regulate CryAB gene expression in response to a hypertrophic agonist endothelin-1 (En-1), in hypertrophic hearts of mice with pressure overload (TAC) and in heart-targeted calcineurin over-expressing mice (MHC-CnA). We observed that in response to various hypertrophic stimuli the transcription factors NFAT, Nished and STAT3 form a dynamic ternary complex and interact with the αBE4 promoter element of the CryAB gene. Both dominant negative NFAT and AG490, an inhibitor of the Jak2 phosphorylation, inhibited CryAB gene transcription in transient transfection assays. AG490 was also effective in blocking the nuclear translocation of NFAT and STAT3 in cardiomyocytes treated with En-1. We observed a marked increase in CryAB gene expression in MHC-CnA mouse hearts accompanied with increased phosphorylation of STAT3. We conclude that hypertrophy-dependent CryAB gene expression can be attributed to a functional linkage between the Jak/STAT and calcineurin/NFAT signalling pathways, each of which are otherwise known to be involved independently in the deleterious outcome in cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:19538478

  14. Cross-talk between calcineurin/NFAT and Jak/STAT signalling induces cardioprotective alphaB-crystallin gene expression in response to hypertrophic stimuli.

    PubMed

    Manukyan, Irena; Galatioto, Josephine; Mascareno, Eduardo; Bhaduri, Sikha; Siddiqui, M A Q

    2010-06-01

    Among the stress proteins that are up-regulated in the heart due to imposed biomechanical stress, alphaB-crystallin (CryAB) is the most abundant and pivotal in rendering protection against stress-induced cell damage. Cardiomyocyte-specific expression of the CryAB gene was shown to be dependent upon an intact alphaBE4 cis-element located in the CryAB enhancer. To date, there is no evidence on the identity of regulatory proteins and associated signalling molecules that control CryAB expression in cardiomyocytes. In this study, we define a mechanism by which the calcineurin/NFAT and Jak/STAT pathways regulate CryAB gene expression in response to a hypertrophic agonist endothelin-1 (En-1), in hypertrophic hearts of mice with pressure overload (TAC) and in heart-targeted calcineurin over-expressing mice (MHC-CnA). We observed that in response to various hypertrophic stimuli the transcription factors NFAT, Nished and STAT3 form a dynamic ternary complex and interact with the alphaBE4 promoter element of the CryAB gene. Both dominant negative NFAT and AG490, an inhibitor of the Jak2 phosphorylation, inhibited CryAB gene transcription in transient transfection assays. AG490 was also effective in blocking the nuclear translocation of NFAT and STAT3 in cardiomyocytes treated with En-1. We observed a marked increase in CryAB gene expression in MHC-CnA mouse hearts accompanied with increased phosphorylation of STAT3. We conclude that hypertrophy-dependent CryAB gene expression can be attributed to a functional linkage between the Jak/STAT and calcineurin/NFAT signalling pathways, each of which are otherwise known to be involved independently in the deleterious outcome in cardiac hypertrophy.

  15. Glucocorticoid regulation of a phenobarbital-inducible cytochrome P-450 gene: the presence of a functional glucocorticoid response element in the 5'-flanking region of the CYP2B2 gene.

    PubMed Central

    Jaiswal, A K; Haaparanta, T; Luc, P V; Schembri, J; Adesnik, M

    1990-01-01

    The rat cytochrome P450 CYP2B2 gene encodes one of the two major phenobarbital-inducible forms of hepatic microsomal cytochrome P-450. The sequence of a 1.4 Kb DNA segment from the 5' flanking region of this region [Jaiswal, A., Rivkin, E. and Adesnik, M. Nucl. Acids. Res. 15: 6755 (1987)] reveals the presence of a pentadecameric oligonucleotide sequence, located approximately 1.3 Kb upstream of the transcription initiation site, which is highly similar to the sequences of glucocorticoid response elements (GREs) that mediate the hormone-dependent transcriptional activation of many other genes. The putative GRE in the CYP2B2 gene 5' flanking region is shown to be functional by demonstrating that segments of DNA that contain it, including one that is only 25bp long, are capable of conferring dexamethasone inducibility on a chloramphenicol acetyltransfer-ase gene whose transcription is driven by the Herpes virus thymidine kinase gene promoter. Moreover, binding of a protein contained in a rat liver nuclear extract to a 25 bp synthetic DNA segment that contains the putative GRE was demonstrated in a gel mobility shift assay. This binding was specifically competed away by a DNA segment that contains the murine mammary tumor virus long terminal repeat which encompasses several well characterized GRE elements. The implications of these findings for the in vivo regulation of the P450IIB2 gene by glucocorticoids are discussed. Images PMID:2377462

  16. The novel histone deacetylase inhibitor, LBH589, induces expression of DNA damage response genes and apoptosis in Ph- acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Scuto, Anna; Kirschbaum, Mark; Kowolik, Claudia; Kretzner, Leo; Juhasz, Agnes; Atadja, Peter; Pullarkat, Vinod; Bhatia, Ravi; Forman, Stephen; Yen, Yun; Jove, Richard

    2008-05-15

    We investigated the mechanism of action of LBH589, a novel broad-spectrum HDAC inhibitor belonging to the hydroxamate class, in Philadelphia chromosome-negative (Ph(-)) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Two model human Ph(-) ALL cell lines (T-cell MOLT-4 and pre-B-cell Reh) were treated with LBH589 and evaluated for biologic and gene expression responses. Low nanomolar concentrations (IC(50): 5-20 nM) of LBH589 induced cell-cycle arrest, apoptosis, and histone (H3K9 and H4K8) hyperacetylation. LBH589 treatment increased mRNA levels of proapoptosis, growth arrest, and DNA damage repair genes including FANCG, FOXO3A, GADD45A, GADD45B, and GADD45G. The most dramatically expressed gene (up to 45-fold induction) observed after treatment with LBH589 is GADD45G. LBH589 treatment was associated with increased histone acetylation at the GADD45G promoter and phosphorylation of histone H2A.X. Furthermore, treatment with LBH589 was active against cultured primary Ph(-) ALL cells, including those from a relapsed patient, inducing loss of cell viability (up to 70%) and induction of GADD45G mRNA expression (up to 35-fold). Thus, LBH589 possesses potent growth inhibitory activity against including Ph(-) ALL cells associated with up-regulation of genes critical for DNA damage response and growth arrest. These findings provide a rationale for exploring the clinical activity of LBH589 in the treatment of patients with Ph(-) ALL.

  17. Identification of low Ca(2+) stress-induced embryo apoptosis response genes in Arachis hypogaea by SSH-associated library lift (SSHaLL).

    PubMed

    Chen, Hua; Zhang, Chong; Cai, Tie Cheng; Deng, Ye; Zhou, Shuangbiao; Zheng, Yixiong; Ma, Shiwei; Tang, Ronghua; Varshney, Rajeev K; Zhuang, Weijian

    2016-02-01

    Calcium is a universal signal in the regulation of wide aspects in biology, but few are known about the function of calcium in the control of early embryo development. Ca(2+) deficiency in soil induces early embryo abortion in peanut, producing empty pods, which is a general problem; however, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. In this study, embryo abortion was characterized to be caused by apoptosis marked with cell wall degradation. Using a method of SSH cDNA libraries associated with library lift (SSHaLL), 62 differentially expressed genes were isolated from young peanut embryos. These genes were classified to be stress responses, catabolic process, carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, embryo morphogenesis, regulation, etc. The cell retardation with cell wall degradation was caused by up-regulated cell wall hydrolases and down-regulated cellular synthases genes. HsfA4a, which was characterized to be important to embryo development, was significantly down-regulated under Ca(2+) -deficient conditions from 15 days after pegging (DAP) to 30 DAP. Two AhCYP707A4 genes, encoding abscisic acid (ABA) 8'-hydroxylases, key enzymes for ABA catabolism, were up-regulated by 21-fold under Ca(2+) -deficient conditions upstream of HsfA4a, reducing the ABA level in early embryos. Over-expression of AhCYP707A4 in Nicotiana benthamiana showed a phenotype of low ABA content with high numbers of aborted embryos, small pods and less seeds, which confirms that AhCYP707A4 is a key player in regulation of Ca(2+) deficiency-induced embryo abortion via ABA-mediated apoptosis. The results elucidated the mechanism of low Ca(2+) -induced embryo abortion and described the method for other fields of study. © 2015 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Epinephrine-induced QT interval prolongation: a gene-specific paradoxical response in congenital long QT syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ackerman, Michael J; Khositseth, Anant; Tester, David J; Hejlik, Joseph B; Shen, Win-Kuang; Porter, Co-burn J

    2002-05-01

    To determine the effect of epinephrine on the QT interval in patients with genotyped long QT syndrome (LQTS). Between May 1999 and April 2001, 37 patients (24 females) with genotyped LQTS (19 LQT1, 15 LQT2, 3 LQT3, mean age, 27 years; range, 10-53 years) from 21 different kindreds and 27 (16 females) controls (mean age, 31 years; range, 13-45 years) were studied at baseline and during gradually increasing doses of intravenous epinephrine infusion (0.05, 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3 microg x k(-1) x min(-1)). The 12-lead electrocardiogram was monitored continuously, and heart rate, QT, and corrected QT interval (QTc) were measured during each study stage. There was no significant difference in resting heart rate or chronotropic response to epinephrine between LQTS patients and controls. The mean +/- SD baseline QTc was greater in LQTS patients (500+/-68 ms) than in controls (436+/-19 ms, P<.001). However, 9 (47%) of 19 KVLQT1-genotyped LQT1 patients had a nondiagnostic resting QTc (<460 milliseconds), whereas 11 (41%) of 27 controls had a resting QTc higher than 440 milliseconds. During epinephrine infusion, every LQT1 patient manifested prolongation of the QT interval (paradoxical response), whereas healthy controls and patients with either LQT2 or LQT3 tended to have shortened QT intervals (P<.001). The maximum mean +/- SD change in QT (AQT [epinephrine QT minus baseline QT]) was -5+/-47 ms (controls), +94+/-31 ms (LQT1), and -87+/-67 ms (LQT2 and LQT3 patients). Of 27 controls, 6 had lengthening of their QT intervals (AQT >30 milliseconds) during high-dose epinephrine. Low-dose epinephrine (0.05 microg x kg(-1) x min(-1)) completely discriminated LQT1 patients (AQT, +82+/-34 ms) from controls (AQT, -7+/-13 ms; P<.001). Epinephrine-triggered nonsustained ventricular tachycardia occurred in 2 patients with LQTS and in 1 control. Epinephrine-induced prolongation of the QT interval appears pathognomonic for LQT1. Low-dose epinephrine infusion distinguishes controls from

  19. Heat induces gene amplification in cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Bin; Ouyang, Ruoyun; Huang, Chenghui; Liu, Franklin; Neill, Daniel; Li, Chuanyuan; Dewhirst, Mark

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study discovered that heat exposure (hyperthermia) results in gene amplification in cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hyperthermia induces DNA double strand breaks. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA double strand breaks are considered to be required for the initiation of gene amplification. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The underlying mechanism of heat-induced gene amplification is generation of DNA double strand breaks. -- Abstract: Background: Hyperthermia plays an important role in cancer therapy. However, as with radiation, it can cause DNA damage and therefore genetic instability. We studied whether hyperthermia can induce gene amplification in cancer cells and explored potential underlying molecular mechanisms. Materials and methods: (1) Hyperthermia: HCT116 colon cancer cells received water-submerged heating treatment at 42 or 44 Degree-Sign C for 30 min; (2) gene amplification assay using N-(phosphoacetyl)-L-aspartate (PALA) selection of cabamyl-P-synthetase, aspartate transcarbarmylase, dihydro-orotase (cad) gene amplified cells; (3) southern blotting for confirmation of increased cad gene copies in PALA-resistant cells; (4) {gamma}H2AX immunostaining to detect {gamma}H2AX foci as an indication for DNA double strand breaks. Results: (1) Heat exposure at 42 or 44 Degree-Sign C for 30 min induces gene amplification. The frequency of cad gene amplification increased by 2.8 and 6.5 folds respectively; (2) heat exposure at both 42 and 44 Degree-Sign C for 30 min induces DNA double strand breaks in HCT116 cells as shown by {gamma}H2AX immunostaining. Conclusion: This study shows that heat exposure can induce gene amplification in cancer cells, likely through the generation of DNA double strand breaks, which are believed to be required for the initiation of gene amplification. This process may be promoted by heat when cellular proteins that are responsible for checkpoints, DNA replication, DNA repair and

  20. Gene expression profiling of Gram-negative bacteria-induced inflammation in human whole blood: The role of complement and CD14-mediated innate immune response.

    PubMed

    Lau, Corinna; Olstad, Ole Kristoffer; Holden, Marit; Nygård, Ståle; Fure, Hilde; Lappegård, Knut Tore; Brekke, Ole-Lars; Espevik, Terje; Hovig, Eivind; Mollnes, Tom Eirik

    2015-09-01

    Non-sterile pathogen-induced sepsis and sterile inflammation like in trauma or ischemia-reperfusion injury may both coincide with the life threatening systemic inflammatory response syndrome and multi-organ failure. Consequently, there is an urgent need for specific biomarkers in order to distinguish sepsis from sterile conditions. The overall aim of this study was to uncover putative sepsis biomarkers and biomarker pathways, as well as to test the efficacy of combined inhibition of innate immunity key players complement and Toll-like receptor co-receptor CD14 as a possible therapeutic regimen for sepsis. We performed whole blood gene expression analyses using microarray in order to profile Gram-negative bacteria-induced inflammatory responses in an ex vivo human whole blood model. The experiments were performed in the presence or absence of inhibitors of complement proteins (C3 and CD88 (C5a receptor 1)) and CD14, alone or in combination. In addition, we used blood from a C5-deficient donor. Anti-coagulated whole blood was challenged with heat-inactivated Escherichia coli for 2 h, total RNA was isolated and microarray analyses were performed on the Affymetrix GeneChip Gene 1.0 ST Array platform. The initial experiments were performed in duplicates using blood from two healthy donors. C5-deficiency is very rare, and only one donor could be recruited. In order to increase statistical power, a technical replicate of the C5-deficient samples was run. Subsequently, log2-transformed intensities were processed by robust multichip analysis and filtered using a threshold of four. In total, 73 microarray chips were run and analyzed. The normalized and filtered raw data have been deposited in NCBI's Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) and are accessible with GEO Series accession number GSE55537. Linear models for microarray data were applied to estimate fold changes between data sets and the respective multiple testing adjusted p-values (FDR q-values). The interpretation of the

  1. Expression of tomato salicylic acid (SA)-responsive pathogenesis-related genes in Mi-1-mediated and SA-induced resistance to root-knot nematodes.

    PubMed

    Molinari, Sergio; Fanelli, Elena; Leonetti, Paola

    2014-04-01

    The expression pattern of pathogenesis-related genes PR-1, PR-2 and PR-5, considered as markers for salicylic acid (SA)-dependent systemic acquired resistance (SAR), was examined in the roots and shoots of tomato plants pre-treated with SA and subsequently infected with root-knot nematodes (RKNs) (Meloidogyne incognita). PR-1 was up-regulated in both roots and shoots of SA-treated plants, whereas the expression of PR-5 was enhanced only in roots. The over-expression of PR-1 in the whole plant occurred as soon as 1 day after SA treatment. Up-regulation of the PR-1 gene was considered to be the main marker of SAR elicitation. One day after treatment, plants were inoculated with active juveniles (J2s) of M. incognita. The number of J2s that entered the roots and started to develop was significantly lower in SA-treated than in untreated plants at 5 and 15 days after inoculation. The expression pattern of PR-1, PR-2 and PR-5 was also examined in the roots and shoots of susceptible and Mi-1-carrying resistant tomato plants infected by RKNs. Nematode infection produced a down-regulation of PR genes in both roots and shoots of SA-treated and untreated plants, and in roots of Mi-carrying resistant plants. Moreover, in resistant infected plants, PR gene expression, in particular PR-1 gene expression, was highly induced in shoots. Thus, nematode infection was demonstrated to elicit SAR in shoots of resistant plants. The data presented in this study show that the repression of host defence SA signalling is associated with the successful development of RKNs, and that SA exogenously added as a soil drench is able to trigger a SAR-like response to RKNs in tomato.

  2. Calmodulin of the tropical sea cucumber: Gene structure, inducible expression and contribution to nitric oxide production and pathogen clearance during immune response.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ting; Ren, Chunhua; Li, Wuhu; Jiang, Xiao; Xia, Jianjun; Wong, Nai-Kei; Hu, Chaoqun

    2015-08-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is an essential second messenger protein that transduces calcium signals by binding calcium ions (Ca(2+)) and modulating its interactions with various target proteins. In contrast to vertebrates, where CaM is well established as a cofactor for Ca(2+)-dependent physiological and cellular functions including host defense, there is a paucity of understanding on CaM in invertebrates (such as echinoderms) in response to immune challenge or microbial infections. In this study, we obtained and described the gene sequence of CaM from the tropical sea cucumber Stichopus monotuberculatus, a promising yet poorly characterized aquacultural species. mRNA expression of StmCaM could be detected in the intestine and coelomic fluid after Vibrio alginolyticus injection. Transcriptional and translational expression of StmCaM was inducible in nature, as evidenced by the expression patterns in primary coelomocytes following Vibrio challenge. This response could be mimicked by the Vibrio cells membrane components or lipopolysaccharides (LPS), and blocked by co-treatment of the LPS-neutralizing agent polymyxin B (PMB). Furthermore, inhibition of CaM activity by incubation with its inhibitor trifluoroperazine dihydrochloride (TFP) blunted the production of Vibrio-induced nitric oxide (NO) and augmented the survival of invading Vibrio in coelomocytes. Collectively, our study here supplied the first evidence for echinoderm CaM participation in innate immunity, and provided a functional link between CaM expression and antibacterial NO production in sea cucumber. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of florfenicol on the immune responses and the interferon-inducible genes in broiler chickens under the impact of E. coli infection.

    PubMed

    Hassanin, Ola; Abdallah, Fatma; Awad, Ashraf

    2014-03-01

    Florfenicol (FFC) as a chloramphenicol's derivative is a special broad-spectrum antibiotic that was used in veterinary clinics. In the present study, we investigated the effect of different doses of FFC on the humoral immune response of broiler chickens to Newcastle disease virus (NDV) vaccine under the impact of E. coli infection. In addition, the expression of the interferon-inducible genes (IRF7, 2'-5'OAS and Mx1) were analyzed in the spleen tissue of these chickens using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). The non-treated group with FFC and non-infected with E. coli had the highest immune responses against NDV compared with the FFC treated groups. In the case of E. coli infection, the group treated with FFC (30 mg/Kg BWt) showed lower NDV HI and IgG ELISA Ab levels compared to the group treated with FFC (60 mg/Kg BWt). A dose dependent up-regulation was observed in the level of the interferon-alpha pathway related genes (IRF7 and 2'-5'OAS) in the FFC treated groups compared to the non-treated group. At the slaughter time, the numbers of adipocyte in the bone marrow were significantly higher with moderate atrophy of the hematopoietic lineages in the FFC treated birds compared to the non-treated birds. These results indicated that this FFC dosage dependent increase in the humoral immune responses against NDV vaccine could be attributed to its efficient therapeutic effect on the E. coli infection. However, the increase in the FFC dosage can negatively but temporarily affect the chicken body weights. Additionally, it can exert up regulation effect on the chicken innate immune response with moderate hypoplasia of the bone marrow cells.

  4. Immune Responses Induced by Gene Gun or Intramuscular Injection of DNA Vaccines That Express Immunogenic Regions of the Serine Repeat Antigen from Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Belperron, Alexia A.; Feltquate, David; Fox, Barbara A.; Horii, Toshihiro; Bzik, David J.

    1999-01-01

    The liver- and blood-stage-expressed serine repeat antigen (SERA) of Plasmodium falciparum is a candidate protein for a human malaria vaccine. We compared the immune responses induced in mice immunized with SERA-expressing plasmid DNA vaccines delivered by intramuscular (i.m.) injection or delivered intradermally by Gene Gun immunization. Mice were immunized with a pcdna3 plasmid encoding the entire 47-kDa domain of SERA (amino acids 17 to 382) or the N-terminal domain (amino acids 17 to 110) of SERA. Minimal antibody responses were detected following DNA vaccination with the N-terminal domain of SERA, suggesting that the N-terminal domain alone is not highly immunogenic by this route of vaccine delivery. Immunization of mice by Gene Gun delivery of the 47-kDa domain of SERA elicited a significantly higher serum antibody titer to the antigen than immunization of mice by i.m. injection with the same plasmid did. The predominant isotype subclass of the antibodies elicited to the SERA protein following i.m. and Gene Gun immunizations with SERA plasmid DNA was immunoglobulin G1. Coimmunization of mice with SERA plasmid DNA and a plasmid expressing the hepatitis B surface antigen (pCMV-s) by the i.m. route resulted in higher anti-SERA titers than those generated in mice immunized with the SERA DNA plasmid alone. Vaccination with DNA may provide a viable alternative or may be used in conjunction with protein-based subunit vaccines to maximize the efficacy of a human malaria vaccine that includes immunogenic regions of the SERA protein. PMID:10496891

  5. DNA-damage response gene GADD45A induces differentiation in hematopoietic stem cells without inhibiting cell cycle or survival.

    PubMed

    Wingert, Susanne; Thalheimer, Frederic B; Haetscher, Nadine; Rehage, Maike; Schroeder, Timm; Rieger, Michael A

    2016-03-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) maintain blood cell production life-long by their unique abilities of self-renewal and differentiation into all blood cell lineages. Growth arrest and DNA-damage-inducible 45 alpha (GADD45A) is induced by genotoxic stress in HSCs. GADD45A has been implicated in cell cycle control, cell death and senescence, as well as in DNA-damage repair. In general, GADD45A provides cellular stability by either arresting the cell cycle progression until DNA damage is repaired or, in cases of fatal damage, by inducing apoptosis. However, the function of GADD45A in hematopoiesis remains controversial. We revealed the changes in murine HSC fate control orchestrated by the expression of GADD45A at single cell resolution. In contrast to other cellular systems, GADD45A expression did not cause a cell cycle arrest or an alteration in the decision between cell survival and apoptosis in HSCs. Strikingly, GADD45A strongly induced and accelerated the differentiation program in HSCs. Continuous tracking of individual HSCs and their progeny via time-lapse microscopy elucidated that once GADD45A was expressed, HSCs differentiate into committed progenitors within 29 hours. GADD45A-expressing HSCs failed to long-term reconstitute the blood of recipients by inducing multilineage differentiation in vivo. Importantly, γ-irradiation of HSCs induced their differentiation by upregulating endogenous GADD45A. The differentiation induction by GADD45A was transmitted by activating p38 Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling and allowed the generation of megakaryocytic-erythroid, myeloid, and lymphoid lineages. These data indicate that genotoxic stress-induced GADD45A expression in HSCs prevents their fatal transformation by directing them into differentiation and thereby clearing them from the system.

  6. DNA‐damage response gene GADD45A induces differentiation in hematopoietic stem cells without inhibiting cell cycle or survival

    PubMed Central

    Wingert, Susanne; Thalheimer, Frederic B.; Haetscher, Nadine; Rehage, Maike; Schroeder, Timm

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) maintain blood cell production life‐long by their unique abilities of self‐renewal and differentiation into all blood cell lineages. Growth arrest and DNA‐damage‐inducible 45 alpha (GADD45A) is induced by genotoxic stress in HSCs. GADD45A has been implicated in cell cycle control, cell death and senescence, as well as in DNA‐damage repair. In general, GADD45A provides cellular stability by either arresting the cell cycle progression until DNA damage is repaired or, in cases of fatal damage, by inducing apoptosis. However, the function of GADD45A in hematopoiesis remains controversial. We revealed the changes in murine HSC fate control orchestrated by the expression of GADD45A at single cell resolution. In contrast to other cellular systems, GADD45A expression did not cause a cell cycle arrest or an alteration in the decision between cell survival and apoptosis in HSCs. Strikingly, GADD45A strongly induced and accelerated the differentiation program in HSCs. Continuous tracking of individual HSCs and their progeny via time‐lapse microscopy elucidated that once GADD45A was expressed, HSCs differentiate into committed progenitors within 29 hours. GADD45A‐expressing HSCs failed to long‐term reconstitute the blood of recipients by inducing multilineage differentiation in vivo. Importantly, γ‐irradiation of HSCs induced their differentiation by upregulating endogenous GADD45A. The differentiation induction by GADD45A was transmitted by activating p38 Mitogen‐activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling and allowed the generation of megakaryocytic‐erythroid, myeloid, and lymphoid lineages. These data indicate that genotoxic stress‐induced GADD45A expression in HSCs prevents their fatal transformation by directing them into differentiation and thereby clearing them from the system. Stem Cells 2016;34:699–710 PMID:26731607

  7. Expression of pIX gene induced by transgene promoter: possible cause of host immune response in first-generation adenoviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Nakai, Michio; Komiya, Kazuo; Murata, Masashi; Kimura, Toru; Kanaoka, Masaharu; Kanegae, Yumi; Saito, Izumu

    2007-10-01

    First-generation (FG) adenoviral vectors (AdVs) have been widely used not only for gene therapy but also for basic studies. Because vectors of this type lack the E1A gene that is essential for the expression of other viral genes, their expression levels in target cells have been considered low. However, we found that the viral pIX gene, located immediately downstream of the inserted expression unit of the transgene, was significantly coexpressed with the transgene in cells infected with FG AdV. Whereas CAG and SRalpha promoters activated the pIX promoter considerably through their enhancer effects, the EF1alpha promoter hardly did. Moreover, when the expression unit was inserted in the rightward orientation, not only the pIX protein but also a fusion protein consisting of the N-terminal part of transgene product and pIX were sometimes coexpressed with the transgene product through an aberrant splicing mechanism. In in vivo experiments, a LacZ-expressing AdV bearing the CAG promoter caused an elevation of alanine aminotransferase, but an AdV bearing the EF1alpha promoter produced no detectable levels. Whereas the FG AdV expressing human growth hormone under the control of the CAG promoter maintained a high hormone level for less than 1 month, the FG AdV under the control of the EF1alpha promoter maintained a high level for at least 6 months. These results suggest that pIX coexpression may be one of the main causes of AdV-induced immune responses, and that the EF1alpha promoter is probably valuable for the long-term expression of FG AdV. Thus, the in vivo utility of FG AdV should be reevaluated.

  8. Differential expression of two TEF-1 (TEAD) genes during Xenopus laevis development and in response to inducing factors.

    PubMed

    Naye, François; Tréguer, Karine; Soulet, Fabienne; Faucheux, Corinne; Fédou, Sandrine; Thézé, Nadine; Thiébaud, Pierre

    2007-01-01

    Transcription enhancer factors 1 (TEF-1 or TEAD) make a highly conserved family of eukaryotic DNA binding proteins that activate not only viral regulatory elements but muscle specific genes and are involved in several developmental processes. In this study, we report the identification and the expression pattern of NTEF-1 (TEAD1) and DTEF-1 (TEAD3), two members of this family in Xenopus laevis. Both X. laevis NTEF-1 (XNTEF-1 or XTEAD1) and DTEF-1 (XDTEF-1 or XTEAD3) possess a 72 amino acid TEA domain characteristic of TEF-1 proteins. XNTEF-1 is a 426 amino acid protein that has 96% identity with the avian or the mammalian NTEF-1 proteins while XDTEF-1 is a 433 amino acid protein with 77 to 80% identity with the avian and mammalian DTEF-1 sequences respectively. Temporal expression analysis by RT-PCR indicated that the two genes are expressed maternally and throughout embryonic development. In the adult, the two genes are broadly expressed although they showed differences of expression between tissues. Spatial expression analysis by whole mount in situ hybridization showed that the XNTEF-1 and XDTEF-1 mRNAS were predominantly detected in eye, embryonic brain, somites and heart. In animal cap assay, the two genes are activated by bFGF but are differently regulated by BMP4, and the muscle regulatory factor Mef2d.

  9. Oryzanol Modifies High Fat Diet-Induced Obesity, Liver Gene Expression Profile, and Inflammation Response in Mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Long; Lin, Qinlu; Yang, Tao; Liang, Ying; Nie, Ying; Luo, Yi; Shen, Junjun; Fu, Xiangjin; Tang, Yiping; Luo, Feijun

    2017-09-27

    In Western countries and China, the dietary habit of high calories usually results in hyperlipidemia, which is closely associated with cardiovascular diseases. In the study, we investigated the antihyperlipidemic effect of oryzanol and its molecular mechanism in the high fat diet (HFD) mouse model. In total, 60 ICR mice were randomly divided into control group, HFD group, and HFD+Ory group. The mice from the HFD+Ory group were additionally fed with 100 mg/kg of oryzanol by intragastric administration. Our data indicated that oryzanol treatment for 10 weeks significantly reduced bodyweight, liver weight, and adipose tissues weight of the mice; lowered the contents of total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), and low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C); and elevated high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) in the plasma of HFD mice. Compared with the HFD group, H&E staining showed that oryzanol treatment decreased the size of fat droplets of liver tissues and the size of adipocytes. Gene chip data found that oryzanol administration caused 32 genes to increase expressions while 60 genes had reduced expressions in the liver tissues of HFD mice. IPA software was used to analyze the protein interaction network and found that transcript factor NF-κB located in the central role of network, meaning NF-κB may have important function in the lipid-lowering effect of oryzanol. Western blotting and RT-qPCR confirmed that lipid metabolism-related gene expressions were obviously regulated by oryzanol administration. Oryzanol also inhibited expressions of inflammatory factor in the liver tissues of HDF mice. Taken together, our data indicate that oryzanol treatment can regulate lipid metabolism-related gene expressions and inhibit HDF-caused obesity in mice.

  10. Homogeneous Inflammatory Gene Profiles Induced in Human Dermal Fibroblasts in Response to the Three Main Species of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato

    PubMed Central

    Meddeb, Mariam; Carpentier, Wassila; Cagnard, Nicolas; Nadaud, Sophie; Grillon, Antoine; Barthel, Cathy; De Martino, Sylvie Josiane; Jaulhac, Benoît; Boulanger, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    In Lyme borreliosis, the skin is the key site for bacterial inoculation by the infected tick and for cutaneous manifestations. We previously showed that different strains of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto isolated from tick and from different clinical stages of the Lyme borreliosis (erythema migrans, and acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans) elicited a very similar transcriptional response in normal human dermal fibroblasts. In this study, using whole transcriptome microarray chips, we aimed to compare the transcriptional response of normal human dermal fibroblasts stimulated by 3 Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato strains belonging to 3 main pathogenic species (B. afzelii, B. garinii and B. burgdorferi sensu stricto) in order to determine whether “species-related” inflammatory pathways could be identified. The three Borrelia strains tested exhibited similar transcriptional profiles, and no species-specific fingerprint of transcriptional changes in fibroblasts was observed. Conversely, a common core of chemokines/cytokines (CCL2, CXCL1, CXCL2, CXCL6, CXCL10, IL-6, IL-8) and interferon-related genes was stimulated by all the 3 strains. Dermal fibroblasts appear to play a key role in the cutaneous infection with Borrelia, inducing a homogeneous inflammatory response, whichever Borrelia species was involved. PMID:27706261

  11. Interplay of the E box, the cyclic AMP response element, and HTF4/HEB in transcriptional regulation of the neurospecific, neurotrophin-inducible vgf gene.

    PubMed Central

    Di Rocco, G; Pennuto, M; Illi, B; Canu, N; Filocamo, G; Trani, E; Rinaldi, A M; Possenti, R; Mandolesi, G; Sirinian, M I; Jucker, R; Levi, A; Nasi, S

    1997-01-01

    vgf is a neurotrophin response-specific, developmentally regulated gene that codes for a neurosecretory polypeptide. Its transcription in neuronal cells is selectively activated by the neurotrophins nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and neurotrophin 3, which induce survival and differentiation, and not by epidermal growth factor. We studied a short region of the rat vgf promoter which is essential for its regulated expression. A cyclic AMP response element (CRE) within this region is necessary for NGF induction of vgf transcription. Two sites upstream of CRE, an E box and a CCAAT sequence, bind nuclear protein complexes and are involved in transcriptional control. The E box has a dual role. It acts as an inhibitor in NIH 3T3 fibroblasts, together with a second E box located downstream, and as a stimulator in the NGF-responsive cell line PC12. By expression screening, we have isolated the cDNA for a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, a homolog of the HTF4/HEB E protein, that specifically binds the vgf promoter E box. The E protein was present in various cell lines, including PC12 cells, and was a component of a multiprotein nuclear complex that binds the promoter in vitro. The E box and CRE cooperate in binding to this complex, which may be an important determinant for neural cell-specific expression. PMID:9032251

  12. Hepatitis C Virus Frameshift/Alternate Reading Frame Protein Suppresses Interferon Responses Mediated by Pattern Recognition Receptor Retinoic-Acid-Inducible Gene-I

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seung Bum; Seronello, Scott; Mayer, Wasima; Ojcius, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) actively evades host interferon (IFN) responses but the mechanisms of how it does so are not completely understood. In this study, we present evidence for an HCV factor that contributes to the suppression of retinoic-acid-inducible gene-I (RIG-I)-mediated IFN induction. Expression of frameshift/alternate reading frame protein (F/ARFP) from HCV -2/+1 frame in Huh7 hepatoma cells suppressed type I IFN responses stimulated by HCV RNA pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) and poly(IC). The suppression occurred independently of other HCV factors; and activation of interferon stimulated genes, TNFα, IFN-λ1, and IFN-λ2/3 was likewise suppressed by HCV F/ARFP. Point mutations in the full-length HCV sequence (JFH1 genotype 2a strain) were made to introduce premature termination codons in the -2/+1 reading frame coding for F/ARFP while preserving the original reading frame, which enhanced IFNα and IFNβ induction by HCV. The potentiation of IFN response by the F/ARFP mutations was diminished in Huh7.5 cells, which already have a defective RIG-I, and by decreasing RIG-I expression in Huh7 cells. Furthermore, adding F/ARFP back via trans-complementation suppressed IFN induction in the F/ARFP mutant. The F/ARFP mutants, on the other hand, were not resistant to exogenous IFNα. Finally, HCV-infected human liver samples showed significant F/ARFP antibody reactivity, compared to HCV-uninfected control livers. Therefore, HCV F/ARFP likely cooperates with other viral factors to suppress type I and III IFN induction occurring through the RIG-I signaling pathway. This study identifies a novel mechanism of pattern recognition receptor modulation by HCV and suggests a biological function of the HCV alternate reading frame in the modulation of host innate immunity. PMID:27404108

  13. Defining the chromatin signature of inducible genes in T cells

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Specific chromatin characteristics, especially the modification status of the core histone proteins, are associated with active and inactive genes. There is growing evidence that genes that respond to environmental or developmental signals may possess distinct chromatin marks. Using a T cell model and both genome-wide and gene-focused approaches, we examined the chromatin characteristics of genes that respond to T cell activation. Results To facilitate comparison of genes with similar basal expression levels, we used expression-profiling data to bin genes according to their basal expression levels. We found that inducible genes in the lower basal expression bins, especially rapidly induced primary response genes, were more likely than their non-responsive counterparts to display the histone modifications of active genes, have RNA polymerase II (Pol II) at their promoters and show evidence of ongoing basal elongation. There was little or no evidence for the presence of active chromatin marks in the absence of promoter Pol II on these inducible genes. In addition, we identified a subgroup of genes with active promoter chromatin marks and promoter Pol II but no evidence of elongation. Following T cell activation, we find little evidence for a major shift in the active chromatin signature around inducible gene promoters but many genes recruit more Pol II and show increased evidence of elongation. Conclusions These results suggest that the majority of inducible genes are primed for activation by having an active chromatin signature and promoter Pol II with or without ongoing elongation. PMID:19807913

  14. A maize landrace that emits defense volatiles in response to herbivore eggs possesses a strongly inducible terpene synthase gene.

    PubMed

    Tamiru, Amanuel; Bruce, Toby J A; Richter, Annett; Woodcock, Christine M; Midega, Charles A O; Degenhardt, Jörg; Kelemu, Segenet; Pickett, John A; Khan, Zeyaur R

    2017-04-01

    Maize (Zea mays) emits volatile terpenes in response to insect feeding and egg deposition to defend itself against harmful pests. However, maize cultivars differ strongly in their ability to produce the defense signal. To further understand the agroecological role and underlying genetic mechanisms for variation in terpene emission among maize cultivars, we studied the production of an important signaling component (E)-caryophyllene in a South American maize landrace Braz1006 possessing stemborer Chilo partellus egg inducible defense trait, in comparison with the European maize line Delprim and North American inbred line B73. The (E)-caryophyllene production level and transcript abundance of TPS23, terpene synthase responsible for (E)-caryophyllene formation, were compared between Braz1006, Delprim, and B73 after mimicked herbivory. Braz1006-TPS23 was heterologously expressed in E. coli, and amino acid sequences were determined. Furthermore, electrophysiological and behavioral responses of a key parasitic wasp Cotesia sesamiae to C. partellus egg-induced Braz1006 volatiles were determined using coupled gas chromatography electroantennography and olfactometer bioassay studies. After elicitor treatment, Braz1006 released eightfold higher (E)-caryophyllene than Delprim, whereas no (E)-caryophyllene was detected in B73. The superior (E)-caryophyllene production by Braz1006 was positively correlated with high transcript levels of TPS23 in the landrace compared to Delprim. TPS23 alleles from Braz1006 showed dissimilarities at different sequence positions with Delprim and B73 and encodes an active enzyme. Cotesia sesamiae was attracted to egg-induced volatiles from Braz1006 and synthetic (E)-caryophyllene. The variation in (E)-caryophyllene emission between Braz1006 and Delprim is positively correlated with induced levels of TPS23 transcripts. The enhanced TPS23 activity and corresponding (E)-caryophyllene production by the maize landrace could be attributed to the

  15. Early growth response gene (EGR)-1 regulates leukotriene D4-induced cytokine transcription in Hodgkin lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Hongya; Xue-Franzén, Yongtao; Miao, Xinyan; Nagy, Edit; Li, Nailin; Xu, Dawei; Sjöberg, Jan; Björkholm, Magnus; Claesson, Hans-Erik

    2015-09-01

    Classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) has a unique pathological feature characterized by a minority of malignant Hodgkin Reed-Sternberg (H-RS) cells surrounded by numerous inflammatory cells. Cysteinyl-leukotrienes (CysLTs) are produced by eosinophils, macrophages and mast cells in the HL tumor microenvironment. In the present study we have explored the signal transduction pathways leading to leukotriene (LT) D4 induced expression of cytokines in the Hodgkin lymphoma cell line L1236 and KM-H2. Stimulation of L1236 and KM-H2 cells with LTD4 led to a concentration- and time-dependent increase at the transcriptional level of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 3 (CCL3) and CCL4. The expression of several transcription factors was induced upon stimulation of Hodgkin cell lines with LTD4. Among these, EGR-1 was required for cytokine production. Inhibition of EGR-1 expression using shEGR-1 transduced by lentivirus led to suppression of the expression of TNF-α and IL-6. The effect of LTD4 on the expression of transcription factors and cytokines were also blocked by the specific CysLT1 receptor antagonist zafirlukast. These results demonstrate that EGR-1 plays a critical role in LTD4-induced cytokine transcription in Hodgkin cell lines.

  16. Chronic DPP-IV inhibition with PKF-275-055 attenuates inflammation and improves gene expressions responsible for insulin secretion in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Akarte, Atul Sureshrao; Srinivasan, B P; Gandhi, Sonia; Sole, Sushant

    2012-09-29

    Inhibitors of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-IV), a key regulator of the actions of incretin hormones, exert antihyperglycemic effects in type 2 diabetic patients. A major question concerns the potential ability of long term DPP-IV inhibition to have beneficial disease-modifying effects, specifically to attenuate loss of pancreatic β-cell mass due to oxidative stress induced inflammation. Here, we investigated the effects of a potent and selective DPP-4 inhibitor, an analog of vildagliptin (PKF-275-055), on glycemic control, pancreatic β-cell mass, genes and proteins expressions, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and nitric oxide in an n2-STZ diabetic model of rat with defects in insulin sensitivity and secretion. To induce NIDDM, streptozotocin (STZ) 90 mg/kg was administered i.p. to a group of 2 days old pups. Diabetic rats were administered orally with vildagliptin analog PKF-275-055. Saline treated animals served as diabetic control. Significant and dose-dependent correction of postprandial hyperglycemia was observed in diabetic rats following 8 weeks of chronic therapy. Treatment with PKF-275-055 showed increased the number of insulin-positive β-cells in islets and improved the expressions of genes and proteins are responsible for insulin secretions. In addition, treatment of rats with PKF-275-055 significantly increased insulin content, glycogen content and total proteins content; and decreased the inflammatory markers i.e. nitric oxide and TNF-alpha. The present studies indicate that PKF-275-055 is a novel selective DPP-IV inhibitor having potential to reduce inflammation that might be a potential agent for type 2 diabetes.

  17. Systematic analysis of potato acid invertase genes reveals that a cold-responsive member, StvacINV1, regulates cold-induced sweetening of tubers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xun; Zhang, Chi; Ou, Yongbin; Lin, Yuan; Song, Botao; Xie, Conghua; Liu, Jun; Li, Xiu-Qing

    2011-08-01

    Acid invertase is believed to play a regulatory role during plant developmental processes and to respond to environmental stimuli. The expression profiles of the entire acid invertase family are not yet available for potato. By searching existing databases, it was determined that there are at least six acid invertase genes in potato, including four cell-wall invertase genes and two vacuolar invertase genes. They were subjected to comparative expression profiling in various organs of potato plants and in stored tubers to exploit their potential functions. The results revealed that each gene exhibited a unique expression pattern, which differed in transcript abundance or showed organ-specific features, pointing to the possible involvement of individual genes in plant development. The vacuolar invertase gene StvacINV1 had the highest expression level among three genes detected in the potato tubers. Further storage experiments showed that StvacINV1 was strongly induced by low temperatures, which is consistent with glucose accumulation in cold-stored tubers. Suppression of StvacINV1 by the antisense transformation in potato confirmed that lower StvacINV1 transcript abundance in transgenic tubers is related to lower reducing sugar content and lighter chip color in comparison with the wild type. The evidence strongly suggests that StvacINV1 is a gene involved in regulation of cold-induced sweetening of potato tubers. This provides an avenue for studying the mechanism involved in the regulation of the cold-induced sweetening trait and for agronomic enhancement.

  18. Protective immune responses in rabbits induced by a suicidal DNA vaccine of the VP60 gene of rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yingjie; Chen, Zongyan; Li, Chuanfeng; Meng, Chun; Wu, Run; Liu, Guangqing

    2013-03-01

    A suicidal DNA vaccine based on a Semliki Forest virus (SFV) replicon was evaluated for the development of a vaccine against rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV). The VP60 gene of RHDV was cloned and inserted into pSCA1, an SFV DNA-based replicon vector. The resultant plasmid, pSCA/VP60, was transfected into BHK-21 cells, and the antigenicity of the expressed protein was confirmed using indirect immunofluorescence and a western blot assay. In addition, immunogenicity was studied in rabbits. Fifteen rabbits were injected intramuscularly twice with pSCA/VP60 at 2-week intervals. They were challenged with an RHDV isolate 2weeks after the second immunization. In all cases, anti-RHDV antibodies were detected by ELISA. Additionally, the lymphocyte proliferation response was tested by the 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide method, and neutralizing antibodies were measured by microneutralization tests. Our results showed that RHDV-specific antibodies and an RHDV-specific cell-mediated immune response were strongly induced in rabbits. Furthermore, all of the rabbits were protected against challenge with wild type RHDV. In conclusion, we demonstrated that the suicidal DNA vaccine is a promising vaccine candidate that facilitates the prevention of rabbit hemorrhagic disease caused by RHDV.

  19. Analysis of anamnestic immune responses in adult horses and priming in neonates induced by a DNA vaccine expressing the vapA gene of Rhodococcus equi.

    PubMed

    Lopez, A Marianela; Hines, Melissa T; Palmer, Guy H; Knowles, Donald P; Alperin, Debra C; Hines, Stephen A

    2003-09-08

    Rhodococcus equi remains one of the most important pathogens of early life in horses, yet conventional vaccines to prevent rhodococcal pneumonia have not been successful. DNA vaccination offers an alternative to conventional vaccines with specific advantages for immunization of neonates. We developed a DNA vaccine expressing the vapA gene (pVR1055vapA) that induced an anamnestic response characterized by virulence associated protein A (VapA)-specific IgG antibodies in sera and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) as well as VapA-specific proliferation of pulmonary lymphocytes when tested in adult ponies. In contrast, none of the adults receiving the control plasmid responded. To determine if pVR1055vapA induced VapA-specific responses in the foal, the targeted age group for vaccination against R. equi, 10 naïve foals were randomly assigned at birth to two groups of five. At 8-15 days of age (day 1), foals were vaccinated by intranasal and intradermal (i.d.) routes with either pVR1055vapA or the negative control pVR1055vapA_rev. All foals were DNA boosted at day 14 and protein boosted at day 30 with either recombinant VapA or recombinant CAT (control group). Prior to the protein boost, neither group developed VapA-specific immune responses. However, at day 45, two of the VR1055vapA-vaccinated foals had increased titers of VapA-specific IgGb, IgM and IgGa in the sera, and IgG in the BALF. The induction of the opsonizing isotypes IgGa and IgGb has been previously shown to be associated with protection against R. equi. No VapA-specific immune responses were detected in the control group. This study indicates that the DNA vaccine effectively stimulates anamnestic systemic and pulmonary immune responses in adult horses. The results in foals suggest that the DNA vaccine also primed a subset of immunized neonates. These data support further development and modification to produce a DNA vaccine to more effectively prime neonatal foals.

  20. The ECF sigma factor, PSPTO_1043, in Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 is induced by oxidative stress and regulates genes involved in oxidative stress response

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The bacterial plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae adapts to changes in the environment by modifying its gene expression profile. In many cases, the response is mediated by the activation of extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigma factors that direct RNA polymerase to transcribe specific sets of genes....

  1. Changes in Gene Expression Profiles in Response to Selenium Supplementation among Individuals with Arsenic-induced Pre-malignant Skin Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Kibriya, Muhammad G.; Jasmine, Farzana; Argos, Maria; Verret, Wendy J.; Rakibuz-Zaman, Muhammad; Ahmed, Alauddin; Parvez, Faruque; Ahsan, Habibul

    2007-01-01

    The molecular basis and downstream targets of oral selenium supplementation in individuals with elevated risk of cancer due to chronic exposure from environmental carcinogens has been largely unexplored. In this study, we investigated genome-wide differential gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from individuals with pre-malignant arsenic (As)-induced skin lesions before and after six months daily oral supplementation of 200 μg l-selenomethionine. The Affymetrix GeneChip Human 133A 2.0 array, containing probes for 22,277 gene transcripts, was used to assess gene expression. Three different normalization methods, RMA (Robust Multi-chip Analysis), GC-RMA and PLIER (Probe Logarithmic Intensity Error), were applied to explore differentially expressed genes. We identified a list of 28 biologically meaningful, significantly differentially expressed genes. Genes up-regulated by selenium supplementation included TNF, IL1B, IL8, SOD2, CXCL2 and several other immunological and oxidative stress-related genes. When mapped to a biological association network, many of the differentially expressed genes were found to regulate functional classes such as fibroblast growth factor, collagenase, matrix metalloproteinase and stromelysin-1, and thus, considered to affect cellular processes like apoptosis, proliferation and others. Many of the significantly up-regulated genes following selenium-supplementation were previously found by us to be down-regulated in a different set of individuals with As-induced skin lesions compared to those without. In conclusion, findings from this study may elucidate the biological effect of selenium supplementation in humans. Additionally, this study suggests that long-term selenium supplementation may revert some of the gene expression changes presumably induced by chronic As exposure in individuals with pre-malignant skin lesions. PMID:17293063

  2. Hyperbaric oxygen treatment induces antioxidant gene expression.

    PubMed

    Godman, Cassandra A; Joshi, Rashmi; Giardina, Charles; Perdrizet, George; Hightower, Lawrence E

    2010-06-01

    Although the underlying molecular causes of aging are not entirely clear, hormetic agents like exercise, heat, and calorie restriction may generate a mild pro-oxidant stress that induces cell protective responses to promote healthy aging. As an individual ages, many cellular and physiological processes decline, including wound healing and reparative angiogenesis. This is particularly critical in patients with chronic non-healing wounds who tend to be older. We are interested in the potential beneficial effects of hyperbaric oxygen as a mild hormetic stress on human microvascular endothelial cells. We analyzed global gene expression changes in human endothelial cells following a hyperbaric exposure comparable to a clinical treatment. Our analysis revealed an upregulation of antioxidant, cytoprotective, and immediate early genes. This increase coincided with an increased resistance to a lethal oxidative stress. Our data indicate that hyperbaric oxygen can induce protection against oxidative insults in endothelial cells and may provide an easily administered hormetic treatment to help promote healthy aging.

  3. Gravity-Induced Gene Expression in Plants.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sederoff, Heike; Heber, Steffen; Howard, Brian; Myburg-Nichols, Henrietta; Hammond, Rebecca; Salinas-Mondragon, Raul; Brown, Christopher S.

    Plants sense changes in their orientation towards the vector of gravity and respond with directional growth. Several metabolites in the signal transduction cascade have been identified. However, very little is known about the interaction between these sensing and signal transduction events and even less is known about their role in the differential growth response. Gravity induced changes in transcript abundance have been identified in Arabidopsis whole seedlings and root apices (Moseyko et al. 2002; Kimbrough et al. 2004). Gravity induced transcript abundance changes can be observed within less than 1 min after stimulation (Salinas-Mondragon et al. 2005). Gene expression however requires not only transcription but also translation of the mRNA. Translation can only occur when mRNA is associated with ribosomes, even though not all mRNA associated with ribosomes is actively translated. To approximate translational capacity we quantified whole genome transcript abundances in corn stem pulvini during the first hour after gravity stimulation in total and poly-ribosomal fractions. As in Arabidopsis root apices, transcript abundances of several clusters of genes responded to gravity stimulation. The vast majority of these transcripts were also found to associate with polyribosomes in the same temporal and quantitative pattern. These genes are transcriptionally regulated by gravity stimulation, but do not exhibit translational regulation. However, a small group of genes showed increased transcriptional regulation after gravity stimulation, but no association with polysomes. These transcripts likely are translationally repressed. The mechanism of translational repression for these transcripts is unknown. Based on the hypothesis that the genes essential for gravitropic responses should be expressed in most or all species, we compared the temporal gravity induced expression pattern of all orthologs identified between maize and Arabidopsis. A small group of genes showed high

  4. Early induced protein 1 (PrELIP1) and other photosynthetic, stress and epigenetic regulation genes are involved in Pinus radiata D. don UV-B radiation response.

    PubMed

    Valledor, Luis; Cañal, María Jesús; Pascual, Jesús; Rodríguez, Roberto; Meijón, Mónica

    2012-11-01

    The continuous atmospheric and environmental deterioration is likely to increase, among others, the influx of ultraviolet B (UV-B) radiation. The plants have photoprotective responses, which are complex mechanisms involving different physiological responses, to avoid the damages caused by this radiation that may lead to plant death. We have studied the adaptive responses to UV-B in Pinus radiata, given the importance of this species in conifer forests and reforestation programs. We analyzed the photosynthetic activity, pigments content, and gene expression of candidate genes related to photosynthesis, stress and gene regulation in needles exposed to UV-B during a 96 h time course. The results reveal a clear increase of pigments under UV-B stress while photosynthetic activity decreased. The expression levels of the studied genes drastically changed after UV-B exposure, were stress related genes were upregulated while photosynthesis (RBCA and RBCS) and epigenetic regulation were downregulated (MSI1, CSDP2, SHM4). The novel gene PrELIP1, fully sequenced for this work, was upregulated and expressed mainly in the palisade parenchyma of needles. This gene has conserved domains related to the dissipation of the UV-B radiation that give to this protein a key role during photoprotection response of the needles in Pinus radiata.

  5. Injury-induced immune responses in Hydra.

    PubMed

    Wenger, Yvan; Buzgariu, Wanda; Reiter, Silke; Galliot, Brigitte

    2014-08-01

    The impact of injury-induced immune responses on animal regenerative processes is highly variable, positive or negative depending on the context. This likely reflects the complexity of the innate immune system that behaves as a sentinel in the transition from injury to regeneration. Early-branching invertebrates with high regenerative potential as Hydra provide a unique framework to dissect how injury-induced immune responses impact regeneration. A series of early cellular events likely require an efficient immune response after amputation, as antimicrobial defence, epithelial cell stretching for wound closure, migration of interstitial progenitors toward the wound, cell death, phagocytosis of cell debris, or reconstruction of the extracellular matrix. The analysis of the injury-induced transcriptomic modulations of 2636 genes annotated as immune genes in Hydra identified 43 genes showing an immediate/early pulse regulation in all regenerative contexts examined. These regulations point to an enhanced cytoprotection via ROS signaling (Nrf, C/EBP, p62/SQSMT1-l2), TNFR and TLR signaling (TNFR16-like, TRAF2l, TRAF5l, jun, fos-related, SIK2, ATF1/CREB, LRRC28, LRRC40, LRRK2), proteasomal activity (p62/SQSMT1-l1, Ced6/Gulf, NEDD8-conjugating enzyme Ubc12), stress proteins (CRYAB1, CRYAB2, HSP16.2, DnaJB9, HSP90a1), all potentially regulating NF-κB activity. Other genes encoding immune-annotated proteins such as NPYR4, GTPases, Swap70, the antiproliferative BTG1, enzymes involved in lipid metabolism (5-lipoxygenase, ACSF4), secreted clotting factors, secreted peptidases are also pulse regulated upon bisection. By contrast, metalloproteinases and antimicrobial peptide genes largely follow a context-dependent regulation, whereas the protease inhibitor α2macroglobulin gene exhibits a sustained up-regulation. Hence a complex immune response to injury is linked to wound healing and regeneration in Hydra. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights

  6. Phosphate starvation induces DNA methylation in the vicinity of cis-acting elements known to regulate the expression of phosphate-responsive genes.

    PubMed

    Yong-Villalobos, Lenin; Cervantes-Pérez, Sergio Alan; Gutiérrez-Alanis, Dolores; Gonzáles-Morales, Sandra; Martínez, Octavio; Herrera-Estrella, Luis

    2016-05-03

    Phosphate (Pi) limitation is a constraint for plant growth in many natural and agricultural ecosystems. Plants possess adaptive mechanisms that enable them to cope with conditions of limited Pi supply, including a highly regulated genetic program controlling the expression of genes involved in different metabolic, signaling and development processes of plants. Recently, we showed that in response to phosphate limitation Arabidopsis thaliana sets specific DNA methylation patterns of genic features that often correlated with changes in gene expression. Our findings included, dynamic methylation changes in response to phosphate starvation and the observation that the expression of genes encoding DNA methyltransferases appear to be directly controlled by the key regulator PHOSPHATE RESPONSE 1 (PHR1). These results provide insight into how epigenetic marks can influence plant genomes and transcriptional programs to respond and adapt to harsh conditions. Here we present an analysis of DNA methylation in the upstream regions of low Pi responsive genes in Arabidopsis seedlings exposed to low Pi conditions. We found that hypo- and hyper-methylation in the vicinity of cognate binding sites for transcription factors known to regulate the phosphate starvation response clearly correlates with increased or decreased expression of low-Pi responsive genes.

  7. Biphasic response of checkpoint control proteins in hyperoxia: exposure to lower levels of oxygen induces genome maintenance genes in experimental baboon BPD.

    PubMed

    Das, Kumuda C; Wasnick, John D

    2014-10-01

    Breathing high concentrations of oxygen (hyperoxia) causes lung injury and is associated with lung diseases such as bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), respiratory distress syndrome and persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborns. Hyperoxia (95-100 %O2) causes DNA damage and growth arrest of lung cells and consequently cells die by apoptosis or necrosis. Although supplemental oxygen therapy is clinically important, the level and duration of hyperoxic exposure that would allow lung cells to reenter the cell cycle remains unclear. We hypothesized that cells exposed to lower concentrations of hyperoxia will retain the capacity to enter cell cycle when recovered in room air. We employed varying concentrations of oxygen (21-95 %) to determine the response of lung cells to hyperoxia. Our results indicate that cells were growth arrested and failed to reenter the cell cycle when exposed to greater than 60 % oxygen. Cell cycle checkpoint proteins were increased in a biphasic manner, increasing until 70 % oxygen, but declined in greater than 90 % oxygen. Microarray analysis shows that there is significant decrease in the abundance of Cdks 6-8 and retinoblastoma protein (Rb), p107 and p130 in exposure to 90 % oxygen for 48 h. We further tested the effect of clinically relevant as needed oxygen [(pro-re-nata (prn)] in premature infant (125-days and 140-days) baboon model of BPD. The microarray results show that 6 or 14d PRN oxygen-exposed animals had induced expression of chromosomal maintenance genes (MCMs), genes related to anti-inflammation, proliferation, and differentiation.

  8. Evaluation of the immune response induced by DNA vaccines expressing MIF and MCD-1 genes of Trichinella spiralis in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Tang, F; Xu, L; Yan, R; Song, X; Li, X

    2012-12-01

    Plasmids expressing macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) of Trichinella spiralis (TsMIF), multi-cystatin-like domain protein (MCD-1) of T. spiralis (TsMCD-1), or co-expressing TsMIF and TsMCD-1 were constructed with a pVAX1 vector. Their ability to generate a protective immune response against T. spiralis infection was evaluated in BALB/c mice. Groups of mice were immunized twice at 2-week intervals with 100 μg of recombinant plasmids pVAX1-Tsmif, pVAX1-Tsmcd-1 or pVAX1-Tsmif-Tsmcd-1. Control animals were immunized with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) or blank vector plasmid. Specific antibody levels (IgG, IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b, IgM, IgA, IgE) against the recombinant protein TsMIF-TsMCD-1, serum cytokines (interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 and IL-17) and CD4+/CD8+ T cells were monitored. Challenge infection was performed 2 weeks following the second immunization and worm burden was assayed at 35 days post-challenge. Vaccination with pVAX1-Tsmif induced moderate serum IFN-γ and increases of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, but no specific immunoglobulin antibody response. Vaccination with pVAX1-Tsmcd-1 induced a predominant Th1 antibody (IgG2a and IgG2b) response and strong levels of serum IFN-γ, and increases of CD4+ T cells. Importantly, co-expression of TsMIF and TsMCD-1 in DNA immunization produced more serum IFN-γ and markedly enhanced CD4+ and CD8+ T cells than the single DNA vaccine of the two genes. Challenge infection demonstrated that immunization with pVAX1-Tsmif-Tsmcd-1 reduced worm burdens (by 23.17%; P < 0.05).

  9. Protective immune responses in guinea pigs and swine induced by a suicidal DNA vaccine of the capsid gene of swine vesicular disease virus.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shi-Qi; Liu, Xiang-Tao; Guo, Hui-Chen; Yin, Shuang-Hui; Shang, You-Jun; Feng, Xia; Liu, Zai-Xin; Xie, Qing-Ge

    2007-03-01

    A suicidal DNA vaccine based on a Semliki Forest virus (SFV) replicon was evaluated for the development of a vaccine against swine vesicular disease virus (SVDV). The 1BCD gene of SVDV was cloned and inserted into pSCA1, an SFV DNA-based replicon vector. The resultant plasmid, pSCA/1BCD, was transfected into BHK-21 cells and the antigenicity of the expressed protein was confirmed using an indirect immunofluorescence assay. Immunogenicity was studied in guinea pigs and swine. Animals were injected intramuscularly three times with pSCA/1BCD at regular intervals. Anti-SVDV antibodies were detected by ELISA, the lymphocyte proliferation response was tested by the 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide method and neutralizing antibodies were measured by microneutralization tests. The data showed that SVDV-specific antibodies, neutralizing antibodies and lymphocyte proliferation were induced in both guinea pigs and swine. Furthermore, after three successive vaccinations with pSCA/1BCD, half of the pigs were protected against challenge with SVDV. These results should encourage further work towards the development of a DNA vaccine against SVDV.

  10. Functional dissection of an abscisic acid (ABA)-inducible gene reveals two independent ABA-responsive complexes each containing a G-box and a novel cis-acting element.

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Q; Ho, T H

    1995-01-01

    To elucidate the mechanism by which abscisic acid (ABA) regulates gene expression, the promoter of the barley ABA-responsive HVA22 gene has been analyzed by both loss- and gain-of-function studies. Previous reports indicate that G-box sequences, which are present in genes responding to a variety of environmental and physiological cues, are involved in ABA response. However, our data suggest that G-box sequences are necessary but not sufficient for ABA response. Instead, an ABA response complex consisting of a G-box, namely, ABRE3 (GCCACGTACA), and a novel coupling element, CE1 (TGCCACCGG), is sufficient for high-level ABA induction, and replacement of either of these sequences abolishes ABA responsiveness. We suggest that the interaction between G-box sequences, such as ABRE3 in the HVA22 gene, and CE-type sequences determines the specificity in ABA-regulated gene expression. Our results also demonstrate that the ABA response complex is the minimal promoter unit governing high-level ABA induction; four copies of this 49-bp-long complex linked to a minimal promoter can confer more than 100-fold ABA-induced gene expression. In addition to ABA response complex 1, composed of ABRE3 and CE1, the HVA22 promoter contains another ABA response complex. The ABA responsiveness of this ABA response complex 2 relies on the interaction of G-box (ABRE2; CGCACGTGTC) with another yet unidentified coupling element. These two complexes contribute incrementally to the expression level of HVA22 in response to ABA. PMID:7734964

  11. Immunomodulation of bivalent Newcastle disease DNA vaccine induced immune response by co-delivery of chicken IFN-γ and IL-4 genes.

    PubMed

    Sawant, P M; Verma, P C; Subudhi, P K; Chaturvedi, U; Singh, M; Kumar, Rajeev; Tiwari, A K

    2011-11-15

    The basic objective of this study was to enumerate whether co-administration of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and/or interleukin-4 (IL-4) gene along with a bivalent Newcastle disease (ND) DNA vaccine construct could modulate the immune response to the DNA vaccine in chickens. pVIVO2 vector carrying Haemaglutinin-Neuraminidase (HN) and Fusion (F) genes of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) at its two cloning sites was used as a DNA vaccine. The same vector was used to clone the chicken IFN-γ and IL-4 genes at the multiple cloning site-1 separately. In vitro expression of IFN-γ and IL-4 gene constructs was assessed by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and that of HN and F genes by indirect fluorescent antibody technique (IFAT) in addition to RT-PCR. The chickens were immunized thrice intramuscularly at 21, 36 and 46 days of age with the bivalent DNA vaccine alone, or in combination with IFN-γ/IL-4 or both cytokine gene constructs. The bivalent DNA vaccine led to increase in both NDV specific antibodies as assessed by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and haemagglutination inhibition test (HI) and cell mediated immune (CMI) response as assessed by lymphocyte transformation test (LTT) employing MTT assay. Co-administration of the DNA vaccine with IL-4 gene resulted in highest IgY levels while IFN-γ produced highest CMI response. The DNA vaccine alone could afford only 10% protection against challenge infection by velogenic NDV. This protection was increased to 40% when IL-4 gene construct was co-administered with the DNA vaccine. Co-injection of IFN-γ as well as the combination of IFN-γ and IL-4 gene constructs with the DNA vaccine yielded 20% protection. Our study suggests that IL-4 may prove to be more appropriate as a genetic adjuvant than IFN-γ for ND DNA vaccine.

  12. Tetracycline-inducible gene regulation in mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Blokpoel, Marian C. J.; Murphy, Helen N.; O'Toole, Ronan; Wiles, Siouxsie; Runn, Ellen S. C.; Stewart, Graham R.; Young, Douglas B.; Robertson, Brian D.

    2005-01-01

    A system for the tetracycline-inducible regulation of gene expression in mycobacteria has been developed. We have sub-cloned the tetRO region from the Corynebacterium glutamicum TetZ locus into a mycobacterial shuttle plasmid, making expression of genes cloned downstream of tetRO responsive to tetracycline. Using the luxAB-encoded luciferase from Vibrio harveyi as a reporter (pMind-Lx), we observed a 40-fold increase in light output from Mycobacterium smegmatis cultures 2 h after adding 20 ng ml−1 of tetracycline. Similarly, exposure to the drug resulted in up to 20-fold increase in relative light units from M.bovis BCG carrying the reporter construct, and a 10-fold increase for M.tuberculosis. Tetracycline induction was demonstrated in log and stationary phase cultures. To evaluate whether this system is amenable to use in vivo, J774 macrophages were infected with M.bovis BCG[pMind-Lx], treated with amikacin to kill extracellular bacteria, and then incubated with tetracycline. A 10-fold increase in light output was measured after 24 h, indicating that intracellular bacteria are accessible and responsive to exogenously added tetracycline. To test the use of the tetracycline-inducible system for conditional gene silencing, mycobacteria were transformed with a pMind construct with tetRO driving expression of antisense RNA for the ftsZ gene. Bacterial cells containing the antisense construct formed filaments after 24 h exposure to tetracycline. These results demonstrate the potential of this tetracycline-regulated system for the manipulation of mycobacterial gene expression inside and outside cells. PMID:15687380

  13. Transfer RNA Derived Small RNAs Targeting Defense Responsive Genes Are Induced during Phytophthora capsici Infection in Black Pepper (Piper nigrum L.).

    PubMed

    Asha, Srinivasan; Soniya, Eppurath V

    2016-01-01

    Small RNAs derived from transfer RNAs were recently assigned as potential gene regulatory candidates for various stress responses in eukaryotes. In this study, we report on the cloning and identification of tRNA derived small RNAs from black pepper plants in response to the infection of the quick wilt pathogen, Phytophthora capsici. 5'tRFs cloned from black pepper were validated as highly expressed during P. capsici infection. A high-throughput systematic analysis of the small RNAome (sRNAome) revealed the predominance of 5'tRFs in the infected leaf and root. The abundance of 5'tRFs in the sRNAome and the defense responsive genes as their potential targets indicated their regulatory role during stress response in black pepper. The 5'Ala(CGC) tRF mediated cleavage was experimentally mapped at the tRF binding sites on the mRNA targets of Non-expresser of pathogenesis related protein (NPR1), which was down-regulated during pathogen infection. Comparative sRNAome further demonstrated sequence conservation of 5'Ala tRFs across the angiosperm plant groups, and many important genes in the defense response were identified in silico as their potential targets. Our findings uncovered the diversity, differential expression and stress responsive functional role of tRNA-derived small RNAs during Phytophthora infection in black pepper.

  14. Transfer RNA Derived Small RNAs Targeting Defense Responsive Genes Are Induced during Phytophthora capsici Infection in Black Pepper (Piper nigrum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Asha, Srinivasan; Soniya, Eppurath V.

    2016-01-01

    Small RNAs derived from transfer RNAs were recently assigned as potential gene regulatory candidates for various stress responses in eukaryotes. In this study, we report on the cloning and identification of tRNA derived small RNAs from black pepper plants in response to the infection of the quick wilt pathogen, Phytophthora capsici. 5′tRFs cloned from black pepper were validated as highly expressed during P. capsici infection. A high-throughput systematic analysis of the small RNAome (sRNAome) revealed the predominance of 5′tRFs in the infected leaf and root. The abundance of 5′tRFs in the sRNAome and the defense responsive genes as their potential targets indicated their regulatory role during stress response in black pepper. The 5′AlaCGC tRF mediated cleavage was experimentally mapped at the tRF binding sites on the mRNA targets of Non-expresser of pathogenesis related protein (NPR1), which was down-regulated during pathogen infection. Comparative sRNAome further demonstrated sequence conservation of 5′Ala tRFs across the angiosperm plant groups, and many important genes in the defense response were identified in silico as their potential targets. Our findings uncovered the diversity, differential expression and stress responsive functional role of tRNA-derived small RNAs during Phytophthora infection in black pepper. PMID:27313593

  15. Genome-wide siRNA screen of genes regulating the LPS-induced NF-κB and TNF-α responses in mouse macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ning; Katz, Samuel; Dutta, Bhaskar; Benet, Zachary L.; Sun, Jing; Fraser, Iain D.C.

    2017-01-01

    The mammalian innate immune system senses many bacterial stimuli through the toll-like receptor (TLR) family. Activation of the TLR4 receptor by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is the most widely studied TLR pathway due to its central role in host responses to gram-negative bacterial infection and its contribution to endotoxemia and sepsis. Here we describe a genome-wide siRNA screen to identify genes regulating the mouse macrophage TNF-α and NF-κB responses to LPS. We include a secondary validation screen conducted with six independent siRNAs per gene to facilitate removal of off-target screen hits. We also provide microarray data from the same LPS-treated macrophage cells to facilitate downstream data analysis. These data provide a resource for analyzing gene function in the predominant pathway driving inflammatory signaling and cytokine expression in mouse macrophages. PMID:28248925

  16. Identification and Functional Analysis of Light-Responsive Unique Genes and Gene Family Members in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Ki-Hong; Lee, Jinwon; Dardick, Chris; Seo, Young-Su; Cao, Peijian; Canlas, Patrick; Phetsom, Jirapa; Xu, Xia; Ouyang, Shu; An, Kyungsook; Cho, Yun-Ja; Lee, Geun-Cheol; Lee, Yoosook; An, Gynheung; Ronald, Pamela C.

    2008-01-01

    Functional redundancy limits detailed analysis of genes in many organisms. Here, we report a method to efficiently overcome this obstacle by combining gene expression data with analysis of gene-indexed mutants. Using a rice NSF45K oligo-microarray to compare 2-week-old light- and dark-grown rice leaf tissue, we identified 365 genes that showed significant 8-fold or greater induction in the light relative to dark conditions. We then screened collections of rice T-DNA insertional mutants to identify rice lines with mutations in the strongly light-induced genes. From this analysis, we identified 74 different lines comprising two independent mutant lines for each of 37 light-induced genes. This list was further refined by mining gene expression data to exclude genes that had potential functional redundancy due to co-expressed family members (12 genes) and genes that had inconsistent light responses across other publicly available microarray datasets (five genes). We next characterized the phenotypes of rice lines carrying mutations in ten of the remaining candidate genes and then carried out co-expression analysis associated with these genes. This analysis effectively provided candidate functions for two genes of previously unknown function and for one gene not directly linked to the tested biochemical pathways. These data demonstrate the efficiency of combining gene family-based expression profiles with analyses of insertional mutants to identify novel genes and their functions, even among members of multi-gene families. PMID:18725934

  17. Metal ions induced heat shock protein response by elevating superoxide anion level in HeLa cells transformed by HSE-SEAP reporter gene.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhanjiang; Yang, Xiaoda; Wang, Kui

    2006-06-01

    The aim of this work is to define the relationship between heat shock protein (HSP) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the cells exposed to different concentrations of metal ions, and to evaluate a new method for tracing the dynamic levels of cellular reactive oxygen species using a HSE-SEAP reporter gene. The expression of heat shock protein was measured using a secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) reporter gene transformed into HeLa cell strain, the levels of superoxide anion (O(2)(-)) and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) were determined by NBT reduction assay and DCFH staining flow cytometry (FCM), respectively. The experimental results demonstrated that the expression of heat shock protein induced by metal ions was linearly related to the cellular superoxide anion level before cytotoxic effects were observed, but not related to the cellular hydrogen peroxide level. The experimental results suggested that metal ions might induce heat shock protein by elevating cellular superoxide anion level, and thus the expression of heat shock protein indicated by the HSE-SEAP reporter gene can be an effective model for monitoring the dynamic level of superoxide anion and early metal-induced oxidative stress/cytotoxicity.

  18. Induced polarization response of microbial induced sulfideprecipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Ntarlagiannis, Dimitrios; Williams, Kenneth Hurst; Slater, Lee; Hubbard, Susan

    2004-06-04

    A laboratory scale experiment was conducted to examine the use of induced polarization and electrical conductivity to monitor microbial induced sulfide precipitation under anaerobic conditions in sand filled columns. Three columns were fabricated; one for electrical measurements, one for geochemical sampling and a third non-inoculated column was used as a control. A continual upward flow of nutrients and metals in solution was established in each column. Desulfovibrio vulgaris microbes were injected into the middle of the geochemical and electrical columns. Iron and zinc sulfides precipitated along a microbial action front as a result of sulfate reduction due by Desulfovibrio vulgaris. The precipitation front initially developed near the microbial injection location, and subsequently migrated towards the nutrient inlet, as a result of chemotaxis by Desulfovibrio vulgaris. Sampling during and subsequent to the experiment revealed spatiotemporal changes in the biogeochemical measurements associated with microbial sulfate reduction. Conductivity measurements were insensitive to all biogeochemical changes occurred within the column. Changes in the IP response (of up to 14 mrad)were observed to coincide in place and in time with the active microbe respiration/sulfide precipitation front as determined from geochemical sampling. The IP response is correlated with the lactate concentration gradient, an indirect measurement of microbial metabolism, suggesting the potential of IP as a method for monitoring microbial respiration/activity. Post experimental destructive sample analysis and SEM imaging verified the geochemical results and supported our hypothesis that microbe induced sulfide precipitation is directly detectable using electrical methods. Although the processes not fully understood, the IP response appears to be sensitive to this anaerobic microbial precipitation, suggesting a possible novel application for the IP method.

  19. Specific activation of PLEKHG2-induced serum response element-dependent gene transcription by four-and-a-half LIM domains (FHL) 1, but not FHL2 or FHL3.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Masashi; Sato, Katsuya; Nakano, Shun; Yamakawa, Hisashi; Nagase, Takahiro; Ueda, Hiroshi

    2017-05-10

    PLEKHG2 is a Gβγ- and Gαs-dependent guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Rac1 and Cdc42 small GTPases and has been shown to mediate signaling pathways such as those for actin cytoskeletal reorganization and serum response element (SRE)-dependent gene transcription. We have shown that the four-and-a-half LIM domains (FHL) 1 acts as a positive regulator of PLEKHG2. Here, we evaluated the other FHL family members and found that the FHL1A specifically regulate the PLEKHG2 activity. Moreover, FHL1A further enhanced Gβγ- and PLEKHG2-induced SRE-dependent gene transcription, whereas FHL1A partially restored the attenuated PLEKHG2-induced SRE-dependent gene transcription by Gαs. Our results suggest that FHL1A specifically interacts with PLEKHG2 to regulate a function of PLEKHG2 that is modified by the interaction of Gβγ and Gαs.

  20. Light signalling mediated by phytochrome plays an important role in cold-induced gene expression through the C-repeat/dehydration responsive element (C/DRE) in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyoun-Joung; Kim, Yun-Kyoung; Park, Jin-Young; Kim, Jungmook

    2002-03-01

    Low temperature induces a number of genes that encode the proteins promoting tolerance to freezing, mediated by ABA-dependent and ABA-independent pathways in plants. The cis-acting element called C/DRE is known to respond to low temperature independently of ABA action. To investigate the signalling and network of ABA-independent pathways, the transgenic Arabidopsis plants were generated containing several copies of the C/DRE derived from cor15a gene with a minimal promoter fused to a GUS reporter gene. The transgenic plants containing four copies of the C/DRE (4C/DRE-GUS) showed responsiveness to cold and drought treatments and were used for characterization of cold signalling and cross-talk. Cold-induced GUS expression was inhibited by okadaic acid at 1 nM, indicating that protein phosphatase 2A might act as a positive regulator. Light was shown to activate cold- and drought-induced GUS expression. Photo-reversibility of the GUS mRNA by red and far-red light with concomitant cold treatment suggests a role of phytochrome as a photoreceptor in mediating light signalling to activate the cold-induced gene expression through the C/DRE. Furthermore, GUS expression analysis in phyA or phyB or phyAphyB mutant backgrounds showed that phytochrome B is a primary photoreceptor responsible for the activation of cold-stress signalling in response to light. Light enhanced the induction kinetics of CBF1, 2, and 3 encoding the cognate transcription factors, and cor15a, in a consecutive manner compared to the dark condition in the cold, suggesting that the connection point between cold and light signalling mediated by phytochrome is at a higher step than the expression of CBF genes.

  1. Strong Magnetic Field Induced Changes of Gene Expression in Arabidopsis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, A.-L.; Ferl, R. J.; Klingenberg, B.; Brooks, J. S.; Morgan, A. N.; Yowtak, J.; Meisel, M. W.

    2005-07-01

    We review our studies of the biological impact of magnetic field strengths of up to 30 T on transgenic arabidopsis plants engineered with a stress response gene consisting of the alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) gene promoter driving the β-glucuronidase (GUS) gene reporter. Field strengths in excess of 15 T induce expression of the Adh/GUS transgene in the roots and leaves. Microarray analyses indicate that such field strengths have a far reaching effect on the genome. Wide spread induction of stress-related genes and transcription factors, and a depression of genes associated with cell wall metabolism are prominent examples.

  2. Inhibition of lipopolysaccharide-induced gene expression by liver X receptor ligands in macrophages involves interference with early growth response factor 1.

    PubMed

    Guillem-Llobat, Paloma; Íñiguez, Miguel A

    2015-05-01

    Liver X receptors (LXRs) are nuclear receptors that act as ligand-dependent transcription factors forming permissive heterodimers with retinoid X receptors (RXRs). In this study we aimed to assess the effect of LXR/RXR activation on the transcriptional induction of pro-inflammatory genes including cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and microsomal prostaglandin E2 synthase-1 (mPGES-1) in activated macrophages. Our study shows that LXR ligands such as oxysterols, GW3965 or TO901317, as well as RXR ligands like 9cis retinoic acid or SR11237, decreased LPS-induced expression of COX-2 and mPGES-1. Consequently, LPS-dependent PGE2 production was substantially reduced in macrophages treated with LXR/RXR ligands. The inhibitory effects of LXR/RXR activation on LPS-induced expression of COX-2 and mPGES-1 in macrophages, occurred by a mechanism involving interference with transcriptional activation of these genes. LXR/RXR activation interfered with the activity of transcription factors essential in the up-regulation of the expression of pro-inflammatory genes in these cells, such as NFκB, but also Egr-1, which had not been previously associated with LXR-mediated gene repression. As this transcription factor is involved in the regulation of a variety of genes involved in inflammatory processes, LXR and RXR-mediated interference with Egr-1 signaling could represent an important event mediating the anti-inflammatory effects of these receptors in macrophages. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. cAMP-dependent protein kinase type I regulates ethanol-induced cAMP response element-mediated gene expression via activation of CREB-binding protein and inhibition of MAPK.

    PubMed

    Constantinescu, Anastasia; Wu, Meiye; Asher, Orna; Diamond, Ivan

    2004-10-08

    We have shown that the two types of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) in NG108-15 cells differentially mediate forskolin- and ethanol-induced cAMP response element (CRE)-binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation and CRE-mediated gene transcription. Activated type II PKA is translocated into the nucleus where it phosphorylates CREB. By contrast, activated type I PKA does not translocate to the nucleus but is required for CRE-mediated gene transcription by inducing the activation of other transcription cofactors such as CREB-binding protein (CBP). We show here that CBP is required for forskolin- and ethanol-induced CRE-mediated gene expression. Forskolin- and ethanol-induced CBP phosphorylation, demonstrable at 10 min, persists up to 24 h. CBP phosphorylation requires type I PKA but not type II PKA. In NG108-15 cells, ethanol and forskolin activation of type I PKA also inhibits several components of the MAPK pathway including B-Raf kinase, ERK1/2, and p90RSK phosphorylation. As a result, unphosphorylated p90RSK no longer binds to nor inhibits CBP. Moreover, MEK inhibition by PD98059 induces a significant increase of CRE-mediated gene activation. Taken together, our findings suggest that inhibition of the MAPK pathway enhances cAMP-dependent gene activation during exposure of NG108-15 cells to ethanol. This mechanism appears to involve type I PKA-dependent phosphorylation of CBP and inhibition of MEK-dependent phosphorylation of p90RSK. Under these conditions p90RSK is no longer bound to CBP, thereby promoting CBP-dependent CREB-mediated gene expression.

  4. Interferon γ-inducible protein (IFI) 16 transcriptionally regulates type i interferons and other interferon-stimulated genes and controls the interferon response to both DNA and RNA viruses.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Mikayla R; Sharma, Shruti; Atianand, Maninjay; Jensen, Søren B; Carpenter, Susan; Knipe, David M; Fitzgerald, Katherine A; Kurt-Jones, Evelyn A

    2014-08-22

    The interferon γ-inducible protein 16 (IFI16) has recently been linked to the detection of nuclear and cytosolic DNA during infection with herpes simplex virus-1 and HIV. IFI16 binds dsDNA via HIN200 domains and activates stimulator of interferon genes (STING), leading to TANK (TRAF family member-associated NF-κB activator)-binding kinase-1 (TBK1)-dependent phosphorylation of interferon regulatory factor (IRF) 3 and transcription of type I interferons (IFNs) and related genes. To better understand the role of IFI16 in coordinating type I IFN gene regulation, we generated cell lines with stable knockdown of IFI16 and examined responses to DNA and RNA viruses as well as cyclic dinucleotides. As expected, stable knockdown of IFI16 led to a severely attenuated type I IFN response to DNA ligands and viruses. In contrast, expression of the NF-κB-regulated cytokines IL-6 and IL-1β was unaffected in IFI16 knockdown cells, suggesting that the role of IFI16 in sensing these triggers was unique to the type I IFN pathway. Surprisingly, we also found that knockdown of IFI16 led to a severe attenuation of IFN-α and the IFN-stimulated gene retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) in response to cyclic GMP-AMP, a second messenger produced by cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS) as well as RNA ligands and viruses. Analysis of IFI16 knockdown cells revealed compromised occupancy of RNA polymerase II on the IFN-α promoter in these cells, suggesting that transcription of IFN-stimulated genes is dependent on IFI16. These results indicate a broader role for IFI16 in the regulation of the type I IFN response to RNA and DNA viruses in antiviral immunity. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Diurnal Oscillations of Soybean Circadian Clock and Drought Responsive Genes

    PubMed Central

    Marcolino-Gomes, Juliana; Rodrigues, Fabiana Aparecida; Fuganti-Pagliarini, Renata; Bendix, Claire; Nakayama, Thiago Jonas; Celaya, Brandon; Molinari, Hugo Bruno Correa; de Oliveira, Maria Cristina Neves; Harmon, Frank G.; Nepomuceno, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Rhythms produced by the endogenous circadian clock play a critical role in allowing plants to respond and adapt to the environment. While there is a well-established regulatory link between the circadian clock and responses to abiotic stress in model plants, little is known of the circadian system in crop species like soybean. This study examines how drought impacts diurnal oscillation of both drought responsive and circadian clock genes in soybean. Drought stress induced marked changes in gene expression of several circadian clock-like components, such as LCL1-, GmELF4- and PRR-like genes, which had reduced expression in stressed plants. The same conditions produced a phase advance of expression for the GmTOC1-like, GmLUX-like and GmPRR7-like genes. Similarly, the rhythmic expression pattern of the soybean drought-responsive genes DREB-, bZIP-, GOLS-, RAB18- and Remorin-like changed significantly after plant exposure to drought. In silico analysis of promoter regions of these genes revealed the presence of cis-elements associated both with stress and circadian clock regulation. Furthermore, some soybean genes with upstream ABRE elements were responsive to abscisic acid treatment. Our results indicate that some connection between the drought response and the circadian clock may exist in soybean since (i) drought stress affects gene expression of circadian clock components and (ii) several stress responsive genes display diurnal oscillation in soybeans. PMID:24475115

  6. Diurnal oscillations of soybean circadian clock and drought responsive genes.

    PubMed

    Marcolino-Gomes, Juliana; Rodrigues, Fabiana Aparecida; Fuganti-Pagliarini, Renata; Bendix, Claire; Nakayama, Thiago Jonas; Celaya, Brandon; Molinari, Hugo Bruno Correa; de Oliveira, Maria Cristina Neves; Harmon, Frank G; Nepomuceno, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Rhythms produced by the endogenous circadian clock play a critical role in allowing plants to respond and adapt to the environment. While there is a well-established regulatory link between the circadian clock and responses to abiotic stress in model plants, little is known of the circadian system in crop species like soybean. This study examines how drought impacts diurnal oscillation of both drought responsive and circadian clock genes in soybean. Drought stress induced marked changes in gene expression of several circadian clock-like components, such as LCL1-, GmELF4- and PRR-like genes, which had reduced expression in stressed plants. The same conditions produced a phase advance of expression for the GmTOC1-like, GmLUX-like and GmPRR7-like genes. Similarly, the rhythmic expression pattern of the soybean drought-responsive genes DREB-, bZIP-, GOLS-, RAB18- and Remorin-like changed significantly after plant exposure to drought. In silico analysis of promoter regions of these genes revealed the presence of cis-elements associated both with stress and circadian clock regulation. Furthermore, some soybean genes with upstream ABRE elements were responsive to abscisic acid treatment. Our results indicate that some connection between the drought response and the circadian clock may exist in soybean since (i) drought stress affects gene expression of circadian clock components and (ii) several stress responsive genes display diurnal oscillation in soybeans.

  7. Pyrosequencing-based transcriptomic resources in the pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis, with a focus on genes involved in molecular response to diquat-induced stress.

    PubMed

    Bouétard, Anthony; Noirot, Céline; Besnard, Anne-Laure; Bouchez, Olivier; Choisne, Damien; Robe, Eugénie; Klopp, Christophe; Lagadic, Laurent; Coutellec, Marie-Agnès

    2012-11-01

    Due to their ability to explore whole genome response to drugs and stressors, omics-based approaches are widely used in toxicology and ecotoxicology, and identified as powerful tools for future ecological risk assessment and environmental monitoring programs. Understanding the long-term effects of contaminants may indeed benefit from the coupling of genomics and eco-evolutionary hypotheses. Next-generation sequencing provides a new way to investigate pollutants impact, by targeting early responses, screening chemicals, and directly quantifying gene expression, even in organisms without reference genome. Lymnaea stagnalis is a freshwater mollusk in which access to genomic resources is critical for many scientific issues, especially in ecotoxicology. We used 454-pyrosequencing to obtain new transcriptomic resources in L. stagnalis and to preliminarily explore gene expression response to a redox-cycling pesticide, diquat. We obtained 151,967 and 128,945 high-quality reads from control and diquat-exposed individuals, respectively. Sequence assembly provided 141,999 contigs, of which 124,387 were singletons. BlastX search revealed significant match for 34.6 % of the contigs (21.2 % protein hits). KEGG annotation showed a predominance of hits with genes involved in energy metabolism and circulatory system, and revealed more than 400 putative genes involved in oxidative stress, cellular/molecular stress and signaling pathways, apoptosis, and metabolism of xenobiotics. Results also suggest that diquat may have a great diversity of molecular effects. Moreover, new genetic markers (putative SNPs) were discovered. We also created a Ensembl-like web-tool for data-mining ( http://genotoul-contigbrowser.toulouse.inra.fr:9095/Lymnaea_stagnalis/index.html ). This resource is expected to be relevant for any genomic approach aimed at understanding the molecular basis of physiological and evolutionary responses to environmental stress in L. stagnalis.

  8. Genome-wide siRNA screen of genes regulating the LPS-induced TNF-α response in human macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jing; Katz, Samuel; Dutta, Bhaskar; Wang, Ze; Fraser, Iain D.C.

    2017-01-01

    The mammalian innate immune system senses many bacterial stimuli through the toll-like receptor (TLR) family. Activation of the TLR4 receptor by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is the most widely studied TLR pathway due to its central role in host responses to gram-negative bacterial infection and its contribution to endotoxemia and sepsis. Here we describe a genome-wide siRNA screen to identify genes regulating the human macrophage TNF-α response to LPS. We include a secondary validation screen conducted with six independent siRNAs per gene to facilitate removal of off-target screen hits. We also provide microarray data from the same LPS-treated macrophage cells to facilitate downstream data analysis. Tertiary screening with multiple TLR ligands and a microbial extract demonstrate that novel screen hits have broad effects on the innate inflammatory response to microbial stimuli. These data provide a resource for analyzing gene function in the predominant pathway driving inflammatory cytokine expression in human macrophages. PMID:28248930

  9. Development of EMS-induced mutation population for amylose and resistant starch variation in bread wheat (Triticum aestivum) and identification of candidate genes responsible for amylose variation.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Ankita; Singh, Anuradha; Sharma, Monica; Kumar, Pankaj; Roy, Joy

    2016-10-06

    Starch is a major part of cereal grain. It comprises two glucose polymer fractions, amylose (AM) and amylopectin (AP), that make up about 25 and 75 % of total starch, respectively. The ratio of the two affects processing quality and digestibility of starch-based food products. Digestibility determines nutritional quality, as high amylose starch is considered a resistant or healthy starch (RS type 2) and is highly preferred for preventive measures against obesity and related health conditions. The topic of nutrition security is currently receiving much attention and consumer demand for food products with improved nutritional qualities has increased. In bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), variation in amylose content is narrow, hence its limited improvement. Therefore, it is necessary to produce wheat lines or populations showing wide variation in amylose/resistant starch content. In this study, a set of EMS-induced M4 mutant lines showing dynamic variation in amylose/resistant starch content were produced. Furthermore, two diverse mutant lines for amylose content were used to study quantitative expression patterns of 20 starch metabolic pathway genes and to identify candidate genes for amylose biosynthesis. A population comprising 101 EMS-induced mutation lines (M4 generation) was produced in a bread wheat (Triticum aestivum) variety. Two methods of amylose measurement in grain starch showed variation in amylose content ranging from ~3 to 76 % in the population. The method of in vitro digestion showed variation in resistant starch content from 1 to 41 %. One-way ANOVA analysis showed significant variation (p < 0.05) in amylose and resistant starch content within the population. A multiple comparison test (Dunnett's test) showed that significant variation in amylose and resistant starch content, with respect to the parent, was observed in about 89 and 38 % of the mutant lines, respectively. Expression pattern analysis of 20 starch metabolic pathway genes in

  10. Transcriptional Activity and Nuclear Localization of Cabut, the Drosophila Ortholog of Vertebrate TGF-β-Inducible Early-Response Gene (TIEG) Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Belacortu, Yaiza; Weiss, Ron; Kadener, Sebastian; Paricio, Nuria

    2012-01-01

    Background Cabut (Cbt) is a C2H2-class zinc finger transcription factor involved in embryonic dorsal closure, epithelial regeneration and other developmental processes in Drosophila melanogaster. Cbt orthologs have been identified in other Drosophila species and insects as well as in vertebrates. Indeed, Cbt is the Drosophila ortholog of the group of vertebrate proteins encoded by the TGF-ß-inducible early-response genes (TIEGs), which belong to Sp1-like/Krüppel-like family of transcription factors. Several functional domains involved in transcriptional control and subcellular localization have been identified in the vertebrate TIEGs. However, little is known of whether these domains and functions are also conserved in the Cbt protein. Methodology/Principal Findings To determine the transcriptional regulatory activity of the Drosophila Cbt protein, we performed Gal4-based luciferase assays in S2 cells and showed that Cbt is a transcriptional repressor and able to regulate its own expression. Truncated forms of Cbt were then generated to identify its functional domains. This analysis revealed a sequence similar to the mSin3A-interacting repressor domain found in vertebrate TIEGs, although located in a different part of the Cbt protein. Using β-Galactosidase and eGFP fusion proteins, we also showed that Cbt contains the bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLS) previously identified in TIEG proteins, although it is non-functional in insect cells. Instead, a monopartite NLS, located at the amino terminus of the protein and conserved across insects, is functional in Drosophila S2 and Spodoptera exigua Sec301 cells. Last but not least, genetic interaction and immunohistochemical assays suggested that Cbt nuclear import is mediated by Importin-α2. Conclusions/Significance Our results constitute the first characterization of the molecular mechanisms of Cbt-mediated transcriptional control as well as of Cbt nuclear import, and demonstrate the existence of

  11. Five-aza-2'-deoxycytidine-induced hypomethylation of cholesterol 25-hydroxylase gene is responsible for cell death of myelodysplasia/leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Tsujioka, Takayuki; Yokoi, Akira; Itano, Yoshitaro; Takahashi, Kentaro; Ouchida, Mamoru; Okamoto, Shuichiro; Kondo, Toshinori; Suemori, Shin-ichiro; Tohyama, Yumi; Tohyama, Kaoru

    2015-11-18

    DNA methyltransferase inhibitors (DNMT inhibitors) are administered for high-risk MDS, but their action mechanisms are not fully understood. Hence, we performed a genome-wide DNA methylation assay and focused on cholesterol 25-hydroxylase (CH25H) among the genes whose expression was up-regulated and whose promoter region was hypomethylated after decitabine (DAC) treatment in vitro. CH25H catalyzes hydroxylation of cholesterol and produces 25-hydroxycholesterol (25-OHC). Although CH25H mRNA expression level was originally low in MDS/leukemia cell lines, exposure to DNMT inhibitors enhanced CH25H mRNA expression. The promoter region of CH25H was originally hypermethylated in HL-60 and MDS-L cells, but DAC treatment induced their hypomethylation together with increased CH25H mRNA expression, activation of CH25H-oxysterol pathway, 25-OHC production and apoptotic cell death. We further confirmed that normal CD34-positive cells revealed hypomethylated status of the promoter region of CH25H gene. CH25H-knockdown by transfection of shRNA lentiviral vector into the cell lines partially protected the cells from DAC-induced cell death. Exogenous addition of 25-OHC suppressed leukemic cell growth. The present study raises a possibility that DNMT inhibitors activate CH25H-oxysterol pathway by their hypomethylating mechanism and induce leukemic cell death. Further investigations of the promoter analysis of CH25H gene and therapeutic effects of DNMT inhibitors on MDS/leukemia will be warranted.

  12. Reconstruction of Gene Networks of Iron Response in Shewanella oneidensis

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yunfeng; Harris, Daniel P; Luo, Feng; Joachimiak, Marcin; Wu, Liyou; Dehal, Paramvir; Jacobsen, Janet; Yang, Zamin Koo; Gao, Haichun; Arkin, Adam; Palumbo, Anthony Vito; Zhou, Jizhong

    2009-01-01

    It is of great interest to study the iron response of the -proteobacterium Shewanella oneidensis since it possesses a high content of iron and is capable of utilizing iron for anaerobic respiration. We report here that the iron response in S. oneidensis is a rapid process. To gain more insights into the bacterial response to iron, temporal gene expression profiles were examined for iron depletion and repletion, resulting in identification of iron-responsive biological pathways in a gene co-expression network. Iron acquisition systems, including genes unique to S. oneidensis, were rapidly and strongly induced by iron depletion, and repressed by iron repletion. Some were required for iron depletion, as exemplified by the mutational analysis of the putative siderophore biosynthesis protein SO3032. Unexpectedly, a number of genes related to anaerobic energy metabolism were repressed by iron depletion and induced by repletion, which might be due to the iron storage potential of their protein products. Other iron-responsive biological pathways include protein degradation, aerobic energy metabolism and protein synthesis. Furthermore, sequence motifs enriched in gene clusters as well as their corresponding DNA-binding proteins (Fur, CRP and RpoH) were identified, resulting in a regulatory network of iron response in S. oneidensis. Together, this work provides an overview of iron response and reveals novel features in S. oneidensis, including Shewanella-specific iron acquisition systems, and suggests the intimate relationship between anaerobic energy metabolism and iron response.

  13. The novel white spot syndrome virus-induced gene, PmERP15, encodes an ER stress-responsive protein in black tiger shrimp, Penaeus monodon.

    PubMed

    Leu, Jiann-Horng; Liu, Kuan-Fu; Chen, Kuan-Yu; Chen, Shu-Hwa; Wang, Yu-Bin; Lin, Chung-Yen; Lo, Chu-Fang

    2015-04-01

    By microarray screening, we identified a white spot syndrome virus (WSSV)-strongly induced novel gene in gills of Penaeus monodon. The gene, PmERP15, encodes a putative transmembrane protein of 15 kDa, which only showed some degree of similarity (54-59%) to several unknown insect proteins, but had no hits to shrimp proteins. RT-PCR showed that PmERP15 was highly expressed in the hemocytes, heart and lymphoid organs, and that WSSV-induced strong expression of PmERP15 was evident in all tissues examined. Western blot analysis likewise showed that WSSV strongly up-regulated PmERP15 protein levels. In WSSV-infected hemocytes, immunofluorescence staining showed that PmERP15 protein was colocalized with an ER enzyme, protein disulfide isomerase, and in Sf9 insect cells, PmERP15-EGFP fusion protein colocalized with ER -Tracker™ Red dye as well. GRP78, an ER stress marker, was found to be up-regulated in WSSV-infected P. monodon, and both PmERP15 and GRP78 were up-regulated in shrimp injected with ER stress inducers tunicamycin and dithiothreitol. Silencing experiments showed that although PmERP15 dsRNA-injected shrimp succumbed to WSSV infection more rapidly, the WSSV copy number had no significant changes. These results suggest that PmERP15 is an ER stress-induced, ER resident protein, and its induction in WSSV-infected shrimp is caused by the ER stress triggered by WSSV infection. Furthermore, although PmERP15 has no role in WSSV multiplication, its presence is essential for the survival of WSSV-infected shrimp. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Diacylglycerol Kinases Are Widespread in Higher Plants and Display Inducible Gene Expression in Response to Beneficial Elements, Metal, and Metalloid Ions.

    PubMed

    Escobar-Sepúlveda, Hugo F; Trejo-Téllez, Libia I; Pérez-Rodríguez, Paulino; Hidalgo-Contreras, Juan V; Gómez-Merino, Fernando C

    2017-01-01

    Diacylglycerol kinases (DGKs) are pivotal signaling enzymes that phosphorylate diacylglycerol (DAG) to yield phosphatidic acid (PA). The biosynthesis of PA from phospholipase D (PLD) and the coupled phospholipase C (PLC)/DGK route is a crucial signaling process in eukaryotic cells. Next to PLD, the PLC/DGK pathway is the second most important generator of PA in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. In eukaryotic cells, DGK, DAG, and PA are implicated in vital processes such as growth, development, and responses to environmental cues. A plethora of DGK isoforms have been identified so far, making this a rather large family of enzymes in plants. Herein we performed a comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of DGK isoforms in model and crop plants in order to gain insight into the evolution of higher plant DGKs. Furthermore, we explored the expression profiling data available in public data bases concerning the regulation of plant DGK genes in response to beneficial elements and other metal and metalloid ions, including silver (Ag), aluminum (Al), arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), mercury (Hg), and sodium (Na). In all plant genomes explored, we were able to find DGK representatives, though in different numbers. The phylogenetic analysis revealed that these enzymes fall into three major clusters, whose distribution depends on the composition of structural domains. The catalytic domain conserves the consensus sequence GXGXXG/A where ATP binds. The expression profiling data demonstrated that DGK genes are rapidly but transiently regulated in response to certain concentrations and time exposures of beneficial elements and other ions in different plant tissues analyzed, suggesting that DGKs may mediate signals triggered by these elements. Though this evidence is conclusive, further signaling cascades that such elements may stimulate during hormesis, involving the phosphoinositide signaling pathway and DGK genes and enzymes, remain to be elucidated.

  15. Diacylglycerol Kinases Are Widespread in Higher Plants and Display Inducible Gene Expression in Response to Beneficial Elements, Metal, and Metalloid Ions

    PubMed Central

    Escobar-Sepúlveda, Hugo F.; Trejo-Téllez, Libia I.; Pérez-Rodríguez, Paulino; Hidalgo-Contreras, Juan V.; Gómez-Merino, Fernando C.

    2017-01-01

    Diacylglycerol kinases (DGKs) are pivotal signaling enzymes that phosphorylate diacylglycerol (DAG) to yield phosphatidic acid (PA). The biosynthesis of PA from phospholipase D (PLD) and the coupled phospholipase C (PLC)/DGK route is a crucial signaling process in eukaryotic cells. Next to PLD, the PLC/DGK pathway is the second most important generator of PA in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. In eukaryotic cells, DGK, DAG, and PA are implicated in vital processes such as growth, development, and responses to environmental cues. A plethora of DGK isoforms have been identified so far, making this a rather large family of enzymes in plants. Herein we performed a comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of DGK isoforms in model and crop plants in order to gain insight into the evolution of higher plant DGKs. Furthermore, we explored the expression profiling data available in public data bases concerning the regulation of plant DGK genes in response to beneficial elements and other metal and metalloid ions, including silver (Ag), aluminum (Al), arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), mercury (Hg), and sodium (Na). In all plant genomes explored, we were able to find DGK representatives, though in different numbers. The phylogenetic analysis revealed that these enzymes fall into three major clusters, whose distribution depends on the composition of structural domains. The catalytic domain conserves the consensus sequence GXGXXG/A where ATP binds. The expression profiling data demonstrated that DGK genes are rapidly but transiently regulated in response to certain concentrations and time exposures of beneficial elements and other ions in different plant tissues analyzed, suggesting that DGKs may mediate signals triggered by these elements. Though this evidence is conclusive, further signaling cascades that such elements may stimulate during hormesis, involving the phosphoinositide signaling pathway and DGK genes and enzymes, remain to be elucidated. PMID:28223993

  16. Advances in Overcoming Immune Responses following Hemophilia Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Carol H.

    2012-01-01

    Both Clinical trials and pre-clinical experiments for hemophilia gene therapy showed that it is important to overcome potential immune responses against gene transfer vectors and/or transgene products to ensure the success of gene therapy. Recently various approaches have been investigated to prevent or modulate such responses. Gene transfer vectors have been specifically engineered and immunosuppressive regimens have been administered to avoid or manipulate the immune responses against the vectors. In order to prevent cytotoxic lymphocyte or antibody formation induced by transgene expression, novel approaches have been developed, including methods to manipulate antigen presentation, development of variant genes encoding less immunogenic proteins or gene transfer protocols to evade immune responses, as well as immunosuppressive strategies to target either T and/or B cell responses. Most of these successful protocols involve the induction of activated regulatory T cells to create a regulatory immune environment during tolerance induction. Recent development of these strategies to evade vector-specific immune responses and induce long-term immune tolerance specific to the transgene product will be discussed. PMID:22737594

  17. A Mixture of Persistent Organic Pollutants and Perfluorooctanesulfonic Acid Induces Similar Behavioural Responses, but Different Gene Expression Profiles in Zebrafish Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Khezri, Abdolrahman; Fraser, Thomas W. K.; Nourizadeh-Lillabadi, Rasoul; Kamstra, Jorke H.; Berg, Vidar; Zimmer, Karin E.; Ropstad, Erik

    2017-01-01

    Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) are widespread in the environment and some may be neurotoxic. As we are exposed to complex mixtures of POPs, we aimed to investigate how a POP mixture based on Scandinavian human blood data affects behaviour and neurodevelopment during early life in zebrafish. Embryos/larvae were exposed to a series of sub-lethal doses and behaviour was examined at 96 h post fertilization (hpf). In order to determine the sensitivity window to the POP mixture, exposure models of 6 to 48 and 48 to 96 hpf were used. The expression of genes related to neurological development was also assessed. Results indicate that the POP mixture increases the swimming speed of larval zebrafish following exposure between 48 to 96 hpf. This behavioural effect was associated with the perfluorinated compounds, and more specifically with perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS). The expression of genes related to the stress response, GABAergic, dopaminergic, histaminergic, serotoninergic, cholinergic systems and neuronal maintenance, were altered. However, there was little overlap in those genes that were significantly altered by the POP mixture and PFOS. Our findings show that the POP mixture and PFOS can have a similar effect on behaviour, yet alter the expression of genes relevant to neurological development differently. PMID:28146072

  18. A Mixture of Persistent Organic Pollutants and Perfluorooctanesulfonic Acid Induces Similar Behavioural Responses, but Different Gene Expression Profiles in Zebrafish Larvae.

    PubMed

    Khezri, Abdolrahman; Fraser, Thomas W K; Nourizadeh-Lillabadi, Rasoul; Kamstra, Jorke H; Berg, Vidar; Zimmer, Karin E; Ropstad, Erik

    2017-01-29

    Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) are widespread in the environment and some may be neurotoxic. As we are exposed to complex mixtures of POPs, we aimed to investigate how a POP mixture based on Scandinavian human blood data affects behaviour and neurodevelopment during early life in zebrafish. Embryos/larvae were exposed to a series of sub-lethal doses and behaviour was examined at 96 h post fertilization (hpf). In order to determine the sensitivity window to the POP mixture, exposure models of 6 to 48 and 48 to 96 hpf were used. The expression of genes related to neurological development was also assessed. Results indicate that the POP mixture increases the swimming speed of larval zebrafish following exposure between 48 to 96 hpf. This behavioural effect was associated with the perfluorinated compounds, and more specifically with perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS). The expression of genes related to the stress response, GABAergic, dopaminergic, histaminergic, serotoninergic, cholinergic systems and neuronal maintenance, were altered. However, there was little overlap in those genes that were significantly altered by the POP mixture and PFOS. Our findings show that the POP mixture and PFOS can have a similar effect on behaviour, yet alter the expression of genes relevant to neurological development differently.

  19. Epigenetic regulation of gene responsiveness in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    To, Taiko K.; Kim, Jong Myong

    2014-01-01

    The regulation of chromatin structure is inevitable for proper transcriptional response in eukaryotes. Recent reports in Arabidopsis have suggested that gene responsiveness is modulated by particular chromatin status. One such feature is H2A.Z, a histone variant conserved among eukaryotes. In Arabidopsis, H2A.Z is enriched within gene bodies of transcriptionally variable genes, which is in contrast to genic DNA methylation found within constitutive genes. In the absence of H2A.Z, the genes normally harboring H2A.Z within gene bodies are transcriptionally misregulated, while DNA methylation is unaffected. Therefore, H2A.Z may promote variability of gene expression without affecting genic DNA methylation. Another epigenetic information that could be important for gene responsiveness is trimethylation of histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4me3). The level of H3K4me3 increases when stress responsive genes are transcriptionally activated, and it decreases after recovery from the stress. Even after the recovery, however, H3K4me3 is kept at some atypical levels, suggesting possible role of H3K4me3 for a stress memory. In this review, we summarize and discuss the growing evidences connecting chromatin features and gene responsiveness. PMID:24432027

  20. Immune responses in rats and sheep induced by a DNA vaccine containing the phosphoglycerate kinase gene of Fasciola hepatica and liver fluke infection.

    PubMed

    Wesołowska, Agnieszka; Zawistowska-Deniziak, Anna; Norbury, Luke J; Wilkowski, Przemysław; Januszkiewicz, Kamil; Pyziel, Anna M; Zygner, Wojciech; Wędrychowicz, Halina

    2016-03-01

    Immune responses of rats and sheep following vaccination with cDNA encoding phosphoglycerate kinase of Fasciola hepatica (cDNA-FhPGK/pCMV) and F. hepatica infection were investigated in the present study. cDNA-FhPGK/pCMV vaccinated female Sprague-Dawley rats were better protected by vaccination than their male counterparts - 48% reduction in fluke burden for females and no protection for males when compared with appropriate infection control groups. Moreover, male rats developed marked leukocytosis during the study with higher neutrophil, eosinophil and monocyte responses than females. Additionally, dynamics of eosinophil and monocyte responses varied between sexes. Increased titres of anti-FhPGK IgG1 and IgG2a correlated with the protective effect of vaccination that was observed among female rats. In the case of male sheep, no differences in worm burdens and in the course of the immune response were observed following vaccination. Titres of specific antibodies detected were low, and cellular responses were not significant. Apparently, sheep immune responses induced by cDNA-FhPGK/pCMV vaccination are not effective at controlling F. hepatica infection. Poor immunogenicity of DNA vaccines in large animals is still a major obstacle of this technology that has to be overcome.

  1. Regulation of ascorbate biosynthesis in green algae has evolved to enable rapid stress-induced response via the VTC2 gene encoding GDP-l-galactose phosphorylase.

    PubMed

    Vidal-Meireles, André; Neupert, Juliane; Zsigmond, Laura; Rosado-Souza, Laise; Kovács, László; Nagy, Valéria; Galambos, Anikó; Fernie, Alisdair R; Bock, Ralph; Tóth, Szilvia Z

    2017-04-01

    Ascorbate (vitamin C) plays essential roles in stress resistance, development, signaling, hormone biosynthesis and regulation of gene expression; however, little is known about its biosynthesis in algae. In order to provide experimental proof for the operation of the Smirnoff-Wheeler pathway described for higher plants and to gain more information on the regulation of ascorbate biosynthesis in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, we targeted the VTC2 gene encoding GDP-l-galactose phosphorylase using artificial microRNAs. Ascorbate concentrations in VTC2 amiRNA lines were reduced to 10% showing that GDP-l-galactose phosphorylase plays a pivotal role in ascorbate biosynthesis. The VTC2 amiRNA lines also grow more slowly, have lower chlorophyll content, and are more susceptible to stress than the control strains. We also demonstrate that: expression of the VTC2 gene is rapidly induced by H2 O2 and (1) O2 resulting in a manifold increase in ascorbate content; in contrast to plants, there is no circadian regulation of ascorbate biosynthesis; photosynthesis is not required per se for ascorbate biosynthesis; and Chlamydomonas VTC2 lacks negative feedback regulation by ascorbate in the physiological concentration range. Our work demonstrates that ascorbate biosynthesis is also highly regulated in Chlamydomonas albeit via mechanisms distinct from those previously described in land plants.

  2. Lentivirus-mediated TNF-α gene silencing and overexpression of osteoprotegerin inhibit titanium particle-induced inflammatory response and osteoclastogenesis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Peng, Li; Wang, Hongzhi; Song, Keguan; Wang, Hai; Liu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages and osteoclasts release proinflammatory factors and promote osteoclastogenesis following the phagocytosis of wear particles. During this pathological process, receptor of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α are critical factors contributing to resorption and the inflammatory response. The present study aimed to construct recombination lentivirus vectors carrying TNF-α small interfering (si)RNA and osteoprotegerin (OPG) cDNA, and to examine the effects of Lenti‑siTNFα‑OPG on the wear particle‑induced inflammatory response and osteoclastogenesis in a titanium (Ti) particle‑induced‑inflammatory response cell model. Lenti‑siTNFα‑OPG vectors were constructed and transnfected into RAW264.7 and MC3T3‑E1 cells, respectively, prior to particle stimulation. The protein levels of TNF‑α, OPG and RANKL were evaluated using western blot analysis and enzyme‑linked immunosorbent assays, and the mRNA expression levels of the inflammatory factors, TNF‑α, interleukin (IL)‑1β and IL‑6, as well as OPG and RANKL, were measured using reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis. The activity of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) was examined using an ALP kit. In the presence of the Lenti‑siTNFα‑OPG vector, the mRNA expression levels of the inflammatory factors and RANKL were downregulated, as were the protein levels of TNF‑α. The mRNA expression and protein levels of OPG were upregulated, and ALP activity was increased. These findings suggested that Lenti‑siTNFα‑OPG transfection inhibited the wear particle‑induced inflammatory response and osteoclastogenesis, which warrants further investigation for the prevention and/or treatment of wear particle-induced osteolysis.

  3. Suppression subtractive hybridization identifies genes induced in response to UV-B irradiation in apple skin: isolation of a putative UDP-glucose 4-epimerase.

    PubMed

    Ban, Yusuke; Honda, Chikako; Bessho, Hideo; Pang, Xiao-Ming; Moriguchi, Takaya

    2007-01-01

    Suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) successfully identified 11 cDNAs in apple skin with highly induced expression as a result of ultraviolet (UV)-B irradiation. Apart from three putative flavonoid biosynthetic genes, chalcone synthase (CHS; A5C), flavanone-3-hydroxylase (F3H; B5F), and flavonol synthase (FLS; D1F), five clones (A1H, A10E, B11G, D5F, and D11H) were induced by low temperature (17 degrees C) as well, which is also known to induce anthocyanin accumulation in apple skin. Moreover, four clones (A1H, A10E, B11G, and D11H), showing higher expression levels in the skin, accumulated higher anthocyanin concentrations than their counterparts. Of the four clones, only A10E, a putative UDP-glucose 4-epimerase (UGE), was deemed to play an important role in anthocyanin accumulation in apple skin based on the facts that: (i) its transcription level was higher in the deep red cultivar, 'Jonathan', than in the pale red cultivar, 'Tsugaru'; and (ii) it could reversibly catalyse UDP-glucose to UDP-galactose, and the latter molecule is a major sugar donor for cyanidin-glycoside in apple. Therefore, the full-length cDNA of A10E was isolated by rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) and designated as MdUGE1. Further analysis demonstrated that UGE enzymatic activity was positively correlated with anthocyanin accumulation in apple skin. Thus, MdUGE1 isolated by SSH could play an important role in anthocyanin biosynthesis in apple skin in concert with other flavonoid biosynthetic genes.

  4. Exercise-induced stress response as an adaptive tolerance strategy.

    PubMed Central

    Sonneborn, J S; Barbee, S A

    1998-01-01

    Interaction between the quality of the environment and the health of the exposed population determines the survival response of living organisms. The phenomenon of induced tolerance by exposure to threshold levels of stressors to stimulate natural defense mechanisms has potential therapeutic value. The paucity of information on predictability of individual response and information on the operative fundamental mechanisms limit applicability of the adaptive tolerance strategy. A potential biomarker of the stress response includes members of the stress-inducible ubiquitin gene family. Transcript sizes detected with Northern blot analysis identify different classes of ubiquitin gene family members and the intensity of the radioactive signal allows abundance determinations. Using moderate exercise as the stressor, significant increase (p < 0.028) in abundance of inducible polyubiquitin genes was found in human blood. Both the potential of exercise as a model system of a natural stress inducer and polyubiquitin as a biomarker of stress were established in these studies. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:9539026

  5. Early growth response protein 1 (EGR1) regulates pro-inflammatory gene expression in response to palmitate and TNF alpha in human placenta cells and is induced in obese placenta

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Maternal obesity has been hypothesized to induce a pro-inflammatory response in the placenta. However, the specific factors contributing to this pro-infalmmatory response are yet to be determined. Our objective was to examine the effects of palmitic acid (PA), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alph...

  6. Responses of a triple mutant defective in three iron deficiency-induced Basic Helix-Loop-Helix genes of the subgroup Ib(2) to iron deficiency and salicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Felix; Naranjo Arcos, Maria Augusta; Bauer, Petra

    2014-01-01

    Plants are sessile organisms that adapt to external stress by inducing molecular and physiological responses that serve to better cope with the adverse growth condition. Upon low supply of the micronutrient iron, plants actively increase the acquisition of soil iron into the root and its mobilization from internal stores. The subgroup Ib(2) BHLH genes function as regulators in this response, however their concrete functions are not fully understood. Here, we analyzed a triple loss of function mutant of BHLH39, BHLH100 and BHLH101 (3xbhlh mutant). We found that this mutant did not have any iron uptake phenotype if iron was provided. However, under iron deficiency the mutant displayed a more severe leaf chlorosis than the wild type. Microarray-based transcriptome analysis revealed that this mutant phenotype resulted in the mis-regulation of 198 genes, out of which only 15% were associated with iron deficiency regulation itself. A detailed analysis revealed potential targets of the bHLH transcription factors as well as genes reflecting an exaggerated iron deficiency response phenotype. Since the BHLH genes of this subgroup have been brought into the context of the plant hormone salicylic acid, we investigated whether the 3xbhlh mutant might have been affected by this plant signaling molecule. Although a very high number of genes responded to SA, also in a differential manner between mutant and wild type, we did not find any indication for an association of the BHLH gene functions in SA responses upon iron deficiency. In summary, our study indicates that the bHLH subgroup Ib(2) transcription factors do not only act in iron acquisition into roots but in other aspects of the adaptation to iron deficiency in roots and leaves.

  7. Δγ₁134.5 herpes simplex viruses encoding human cytomegalovirus IRS1 or TRS1 induce interferon regulatory factor 3 phosphorylation and an interferon-stimulated gene response.

    PubMed

    Cassady, Kevin A; Saunders, Ute; Shimamura, Masako

    2012-01-01

    The chimeric herpes simplex viruses (HSV) are Δγ₁34.5 vectors encoding the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) IRS1 or TRS1 genes. They are capable of late viral protein synthesis and are superior to Δγ₁34.5 HSVs in oncolytic activity. The interferon (IFN) response limits efficient HSV gene expression and replication. HCMV TRS1 and IRS1 restore one γ₁34.5 gene function: evasion of IFN-inducible protein kinase R, allowing late viral protein synthesis. Here we show that, unlike wild-type HSV, the chimeric HSV do not restore another γ₁34.5 function, the suppression of early IFN signaling mediated by IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3).

  8. Stimuli-responsive polymers in gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Piskin, Erhan

    2005-07-01

    Recent interest in clinical therapy has been directed to deliver nucleic acids (DNA, RNA or short-chain oligonucleotides) that alter gene expression within a specific cell population, thereby manipulating cellular processes and responses, which in turn stimulate immune responses or tissue regeneration, or blocks expression at the level of transcription or translation for treatment of several diseases. Both ex vivo and in vivo gene delivery can be achieved mostly by using a delivery system (vector). Viral vectors exhibit high gene expression, but also have very significant side effects. Mainly cationic polymeric systems are used as nonviral vectors, although usually with low levels of transfection. Through the use of stimuli-responsive polymers as novel vectors for gene delivery, two benefits can be obtained: high gene expression efficiency and more selective gene expression.

  9. Ligand-induced repression of the glucocorticoid receptor gene is mediated by an NCoR1 repression complex formed by long-range chromatin interactions with intragenic glucocorticoid response elements.

    PubMed

    Ramamoorthy, Sivapriya; Cidlowski, John A

    2013-05-01

    Glucocorticoids are among the most potent and effective agents for treating inflammatory diseases and hematological cancers. However, subpopulations of patients are often resistant to steroid therapy, and determining the molecular mechanisms that contribute to glucocorticoid resistance is thus critical to addressing this clinical problem affecting patients with chronic inflammatory disorders. Since the cellular level of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is a critical determinant of glucocorticoid sensitivity and resistance, we investigated the molecular mechanisms mediating repression of glucocorticoid receptor gene expression. We show here that glucocorticoid-induced repression of GR gene expression is mediated by inhibition of transcription initiation. This process is orchestrated by the recruitment of agonist-bound GR to exon 6, followed by the assembly of a GR-NCoR1-histone deacetylase 3-containing repression complex at the transcriptional start site of the GR gene. A functional negative glucocorticoid response element (nGRE) in exon 6 of the GR gene and a long-range interaction occurring between this intragenic response element and the transcription start site appear to be instrumental in this repression. This autoregulatory mechanism of repression implies that the GR concentration can coordinate repression with excess ligand, regardless of the combinatorial associations of tissue-specific transcription factors. Consequently, the chronic nature of inflammatory conditions involving long-term glucocorticoid administration may lead to constitutive repression of GR gene transcription and thus to glucocorticoid resistance.

  10. Intra-specific variations in expression of stress-related genes in beech progenies are stronger than drought-induced responses.

    PubMed

    Carsjens, Caroline; Nguyen Ngoc, Quynh; Guzy, Jonas; Knutzen, Florian; Meier, Ina Christin; Müller, Markus; Finkeldey, Reiner; Leuschner, Christoph; Polle, Andrea

    2014-12-01

    Rapidly decreasing water availability as a consequence of climate change is likely to endanger the range of long-lived tree species. A pressing question is, therefore, whether adaptation to drought exists in important temperate tree species like European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.), a wide-spread, dominant forest tree in Central Europe. Here, five beech stands were selected along a precipitation gradient from moist to dry conditions. Neutral genetic markers revealed strong variation within and little differentiation between the populations. Natural regeneration from these stands was transferred to a common garden and used to investigate the expression of genes for abscisic acid (ABA)-related drought signaling [9-cis-epoxy-dioxygenase (NCED), protein phosphatase 2C (PP2C), early responsive to dehydration (ERD)] and stress protection [ascorbate peroxidase (APX), superoxide dismutase (SOD), aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), glutamine amidotransferase (GAT)] that are involved in drought acclimation. We hypothesized that progenies from dry sites exhibit constitutively higher expression levels of ABA- and stress-related genes and are less drought responsive than progenies from moist sites. Transcript levels and stress responses (leaf area loss, membrane integrity) of well-irrigated and drought-stressed plants were measured during the early, mid- and late growing season. Principal component (PC) analysis ordered the beech progenies according to the mean annual precipitation at tree origin by the transcript levels of SOD, ALDH, GAT and ERD as major loadings along PC1. PC2 separated moist and drought treatments with PP2C levels as important loading. These results suggest that phosphatase-mediated signaling is flexibly acclimated to the current requirements, whereas stress compensatory measures exhibited genotypic variation, apparently underlying climate selection. In contrast to expectation, the drought responses were less pronounced than the progeny-related differences and the

  11. Virus-induced down-regulation of GmERA1A and GmERA1B genes enhances the stomatal response to abscisic acid and drought resistance in soybean.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Takuya; Nagatoshi, Yukari; Yamagishi, Noriko; Yoshikawa, Nobuyuki; Fujita, Yasunari

    2017-01-01

    Drought is a major threat to global soybean production. The limited transformation potential and polyploid nature of soybean have hindered functional analysis of soybean genes. Previous research has implicated farnesylation in the plant's response to abscisic acid (ABA) and drought tolerance. We therefore used virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) to evaluate farnesyltransferase genes, GmERA1A and GmERA1B (Glycine max Enhanced Response to ABA1-A and -B), as potential targets for increasing drought resistance in soybean. Apple latent spherical virus (ALSV)-mediated GmERA1-down-regulated soybean leaves displayed an enhanced stomatal response to ABA and reduced water loss and wilting under dehydration conditions, suggesting that GmERA1A and GmERA1B negatively regulate ABA signaling in soybean guard cells. The findings provide evidence that the ALSV-VIGS system, which bypasses the need to generate transgenic plants, is a useful tool for analyzing gene function using only a single down-regulated leaf. Thus, the ALSV-VIGS system could constitute part of a next-generation molecular breeding pipeline to accelerate drought resistance breeding in soybean.

  12. Virus-induced down-regulation of GmERA1A and GmERA1B genes enhances the stomatal response to abscisic acid and drought resistance in soybean

    PubMed Central

    Ogata, Takuya; Nagatoshi, Yukari; Yamagishi, Noriko; Yoshikawa, Nobuyuki; Fujita, Yasunari

    2017-01-01

    Drought is a major threat to global soybean production. The limited transformation potential and polyploid nature of soybean have hindered functional analysis of soybean genes. Previous research has implicated farnesylation in the plant’s response to abscisic acid (ABA) and drought tolerance. We therefore used virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) to evaluate farnesyltransferase genes, GmERA1A and GmERA1B (Glycine max Enhanced Response to ABA1-A and -B), as potential targets for increasing drought resistance in soybean. Apple latent spherical virus (ALSV)-mediated GmERA1-down-regulated soybean leaves displayed an enhanced stomatal response to ABA and reduced water loss and wilting under dehydration conditions, suggesting that GmERA1A and GmERA1B negatively regulate ABA signaling in soybean guard cells. The findings provide evidence that the ALSV-VIGS system, which bypasses the need to generate transgenic plants, is a useful tool for analyzing gene function using only a single down-regulated leaf. Thus, the ALSV-VIGS system could constitute part of a next-generation molecular breeding pipeline to accelerate drought resistance breeding in soybean. PMID:28419130

  13. Nicotine and caffeine-mediated modulation in the expression of toxicant responsive genes and vesicular monoamine transporter-2 in 1-methyl 4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine-induced Parkinson's disease phenotype in mouse.

    PubMed

    Singh, Seema; Singh, Kavita; Patel, Suman; Patel, Devendra Kumar; Singh, Chetna; Nath, Chandishwar; Singh, Mahendra Pratap

    2008-05-01

    Epidemiological evidence revealed that cigarette smokers and coffee drinkers have lower risk of Parkinson's disease (PD). Nicotine inhibits monoamine oxidase activity, and induces expression of neurotrophic factors and nicotinic acetylcholinergic receptors. However, caffeine is capable of antagonizing adenosine A(2A) receptor. Toxicant responsive enzymes and vesicular monoamine transporter-2 (VMAT-2) play critical roles in chemically induced PD. Despite some known functions, the effects of nicotine and caffeine on the expression and activity of toxicant responsive genes and on VMAT-2 are still not known. The study was therefore undertaken to investigate the effect of nicotine and caffeine on the expression and activity of toxicant responsive genes, i.e., CYP1A1, CYP2E1, GST-ya, GST-yc, GSTA4-4 and VMAT-2 in the striatum of control and MPTP-induced PD phenotype in mouse. The animals were treated intraperitoneally daily with nicotine (1 mg/kg) or caffeine (20 mg/kg) for 8 weeks, followed by 1-methyl 4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP; 20 mg/kg)+nicotine or caffeine for 4 weeks. MPTP significantly attenuated CYP1A1 and VMAT-2, and augmented CYP2E1, GST-ya, GST-yc and GSTA4-4 expression/activity. Nicotine or caffeine-treated animals showed significant restoration against most of the MPTP-induced alterations. The results obtained thus suggest that nicotine and caffeine modulate MPTP-induced alterations in CYP1A1, CYP2E1, GST-ya, GST-yc, GSTA4-4 and VMAT-2 expression/activity.

  14. Promoter analysis of TCDD-inducible genes in a thymic epithelial cell line indicates the potential for cell-specific transcription factor crosstalk in the AhR response

    SciTech Connect

    Frericks, Markus; Burgoon, Lyle D.; Zacharewski, Timothy R.; Esser, Charlotte

    2008-10-15

    Activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR{sup 1}) by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) elicits severe immunosuppression accompanied by thymic atrophy. Previous evidence suggests that TCDD targets both thymocytes and thymic epithelial cells. The AhR induces cell-specific changes in gene transcription via binding to the dioxin response element DRE; however, the underlying specificity-mechanisms, in particular with regard to the role of promoter element context, and possible transcription factor crosstalk remain poorly understood. Global gene expression in the cortical thymic epithelial cell line ET at 2, 4, and 6 h following 5 nM TCDD exposure resulted in differential regulation of 201 genes. JASPAR and TRANSFAC mapped the statistically over-represented promoter elements in the regulated genes to specific transcription factor binding sites, suggesting a regulatory role in AhR signaling. Over-represented elements included the xenobiotic response element XRE, NF{kappa}B-Rel, HRE, PPAR{gamma}, GR, PAX-4 and estrogen receptor binding sites. Co-treatment experiments with TCDD and CoCl{sub 2}, to induce hypoxia, or TCDD and 17-{beta}-estradiol (E2) indicated crosstalk between AhR and Hif or ER, in agreement with other experimental models. The computational identification of TFBS and the demonstration of interaction confirm their interactions with AhR signaling and suggest that the other over-represented elements may also be important in the immunosuppressive effects elicited by TCDD. In conclusion, we demonstrated the importance of promoter element cooperation in the shaping of a cell-specific AhR response. Our findings regarding the transcriptional changes in cortical epithelial cells are congruent with the well-known thymotoxic TCDD-phenotype, and useful in new hypothesis generation of the role of cortical TECs in TCDD toxicity.

  15. Ask1 gene deletion blocks maternal diabetes-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress in the developing embryo by disrupting the unfolded protein response signalosome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang; Wu, Yanqing; Gu, Hui; Reece, E Albert; Fang, Shengyun; Gabbay-Benziv, Rinat; Aberdeen, Graham; Yang, Peixin

    2015-03-01

    Apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) is activated by various stresses. The link between ASK1 activation and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, two causal events in diabetic embryopathy, has not been determined. We sought to investigate whether ASK1 is involved in the unfolded protein response (UPR) that leads to ER stress. Deleting Ask1 abrogated diabetes-induced UPR by suppressing phosphorylation of inositol-requiring enzyme 1α (IRE1α), and double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase (PKR)-like ER kinase (PERK) blocked the mitochondrial translocation of proapoptotic Bcl-2 members and ER stress. ASK1 participated in the IRE1α signalosome, and removing ASK1 abrogated the proapoptotic kinase activity of IRE1α. Ask1 deletion suppressed diabetes-induced IRE1α endoriboneclease activities, which led to X-box binding protein 1 mRNA cleavage, an ER stress marker, decreased expression of microRNAs, and increased expression of a miR-17 target, thioredoxin-interacting protein (Txnip), a thioredoxin binding protein, which enhanced ASK1 activation by disrupting the thioredoxin-ASK1 complexes. ASK1 is essential for the assembly and function of the IRE1α signalosome, which forms a positive feedback loop with ASK1 through Txnip. ASK1 knockdown in C17.2 neural stem cells diminished high glucose- or tunicamycin-induced IRE1α activation, which further supports our hypothesis that ASK1 plays a causal role in diabetes-induced ER stress and apoptosis.

  16. Ask1 Gene Deletion Blocks Maternal Diabetes–Induced Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in the Developing Embryo by Disrupting the Unfolded Protein Response Signalosome

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fang; Wu, Yanqing; Gu, Hui; Reece, E. Albert; Fang, Shengyun; Gabbay-Benziv, Rinat; Aberdeen, Graham

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis signal–regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) is activated by various stresses. The link between ASK1 activation and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, two causal events in diabetic embryopathy, has not been determined. We sought to investigate whether ASK1 is involved in the unfolded protein response (UPR) that leads to ER stress. Deleting Ask1 abrogated diabetes-induced UPR by suppressing phosphorylation of inositol-requiring enzyme 1α (IRE1α), and double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase (PKR)-like ER kinase (PERK) blocked the mitochondrial translocation of proapoptotic Bcl-2 members and ER stress. ASK1 participated in the IRE1α signalosome, and removing ASK1 abrogated the proapoptotic kinase activity of IRE1α. Ask1 deletion suppressed diabetes-induced IRE1α endoriboneclease activities, which led to X-box binding protein 1 mRNA cleavage, an ER stress marker, decreased expression of microRNAs, and increased expression of a miR-17 target, thioredoxin-interacting protein (Txnip), a thioredoxin binding protein, which enhanced ASK1 activation by disrupting the thioredoxin-ASK1 complexes. ASK1 is essential for the assembly and function of the IRE1α signalosome, which forms a positive feedback loop with ASK1 through Txnip. ASK1 knockdown in C17.2 neural stem cells diminished high glucose– or tunicamycin-induced IRE1α activation, which further supports our hypothesis that ASK1 plays a causal role in diabetes-induced ER stress and apoptosis. PMID:25249581

  17. Inducible and reversible regulation of endogenous gene in mouse

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ruilin; Zhao, Kai; Shen, Ruling; Cai, Lei; Yang, Xingyu; Kuang, Ying; Mao, Jifang; Huang, Fang; Wang, Zhugang; Fei, Jian

    2012-01-01

    Methods for generating loss-of-function mutations, such as conventional or conditional gene knockout, are widely used in deciphering gene function in vivo. By contrast, inducible and reversible regulation of endogenous gene expression has not been well established. Using a mouse model, we demonstrate that a chimeric transcriptional repressor molecule (tTS) can reversibly inhibit the expression of an endogenous gene, Nmyc. In this system, a tetracycline response element (TRE) artificially inserted near the target gene’s promoter region turns the gene on and off in a tetracycline-inducible manner. NmycTRE mice were generated by inserting a TRE into the first intron of Nmyc by the knockin technique. NmycTRE mice were crossed to tTS transgenic mice to produce NmycTRE/TRE: tTS embryos. In these embryos, tTS blocked Nmyc expression, and embryonic lethality was observed at E11.5d. When the dam was exposed to drinking water containing doxycycline (dox), normal endogenous Nmyc expression was rescued, and the embryo survived to birth. This novel genetic modification strategy based on the tTS–dox system for inducible and reversible regulation of endogenous mouse genes will be a powerful tool to investigate target genes that cause embryonic lethality or other defects where reversible regulation or temporary shutdown of the target gene is needed. PMID:22879379

  18. Synapsins are late activity-induced genes regulated by birdsong

    PubMed Central

    Velho, Tarciso A. F.; Mello, Claudio V.

    2008-01-01

    The consolidation of long-lasting sensory memories requires the activation of gene expression programs in the brain. In spite of considerable knowledge about the early components of this response, little is known about late components (i.e. genes regulated 2-6 hr after stimulation) and the relationship between early and late genes. Birdsong represents one of the best natural behaviors to study sensory-induced gene expression in awake, freely behaving animals. Here we show that the expression of several isoforms of synapsins, a group of phosphoproteins thought to regulate the dynamics of synaptic vesicle storage and release, is induced by auditory stimulation with birdsong in the caudomedial nidopallium (NCM) of the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata) brain. This induction occurs mainly in excitatory (non-GABAergic) neurons and is modulated (suppressed) by early song-inducible proteins. We also show that ZENK, an early song-inducible transcription factor, interacts with the syn3 promoter in vivo, consistent with a direct regulatory effect and an emerging novel view of ZENK action. These results demonstrate that synapsins are a late component of the genomic response to neuronal activation and that their expression depends on a complex set of regulatory interactions between early and late regulated genes. PMID:19005052

  19. DNA fusion-gene vaccination in patients with prostate cancer induces high-frequency CD8(+) T-cell responses and increases PSA doubling time.

    PubMed

    Chudley, Lindsey; McCann, Katy; Mander, Ann; Tjelle, Torunn; Campos-Perez, Juan; Godeseth, Rosemary; Creak, Antonia; Dobbyn, James; Johnson, Bernadette; Bass, Paul; Heath, Catherine; Kerr, Paul; Mathiesen, Iacob; Dearnaley, David; Stevenson, Freda; Ottensmeier, Christian

    2012-11-01

    We report on the immunogenicity and clinical effects in a phase I/II dose escalation trial of a DNA fusion vaccine in patients with prostate cancer. The vaccine encodes a domain (DOM) from fragment C of tetanus toxin linked to an HLA-A2-binding epitope from prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA), PSMA(27-35). We evaluated the effect of intramuscular vaccination without or with electroporation (EP) on vaccine potency. Thirty-two HLA-A2(+) patients were vaccinated and monitored for immune and clinical responses for a follow-up period of 72 weeks. At week 24, cross-over to the immunologically more effective delivery modality was permitted; this was shown to be with EP based on early antibody data, and subsequently, 13/15 patients crossed to the +EP arm. Thirty-two HLA-A2(-) control patients were assessed for time to next treatment and overall survival. Vaccination was safe and well tolerated. The vaccine induced DOM-specific CD4(+) and PSMA(27)-specific CD8(+) T cells, which were detectable at significant levels above baseline at the end of the study (p = 0.0223 and p = 0.00248, respectively). Of 30 patients, 29 had a measurable CD4(+) T-cell response and PSMA(27)-specific CD8(+) T cells were detected in 16/30 patients, with or without EP. At week 24, before cross-over, both delivery methods led to increased CD4(+) and CD8(+) vaccine-specific T cells with a trend to a greater effect with EP. PSA doubling time increased significantly from 11.97 months pre-treatment to 16.82 months over the 72-week follow-up (p = 0.0417), with no clear differential effect of EP. The high frequency of immunological responses to DOM-PSMA(27) vaccination and the clinical effects are sufficiently promising to warrant further, randomized testing.

  20. Interferon gamma rapidly induces in human monocytes a DNA-binding factor that recognizes the gamma response region within the promoter of the gene for the high-affinity Fc gamma receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, K C; Finbloom, D S

    1992-01-01

    Interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) transcriptionally activates several early-response genes in monocytes that are important for the ultimate phenotype of the activated macrophage. One of these genes is the high-affinity Fc receptor for IgG (Fc gamma RI). Recently, Pearse et al. [Pearse, R.N., Feinman, R. & Ravetch, J. V. (1991) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 88, 11305-11309] defined within the promoter region of the Fc gamma RI gene an element, the gamma response region, which was necessary for IFN-gamma-induced enhancement of Fc gamma RI. In this report we describe the induction by IFN-gamma of a DNA-binding factor, FcRF gamma (Fc gamma RI DNA-binding factor, IFN-gamma induced), that specifically recognizes the gamma response region element. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) demonstrated the presence of FcRF gamma in human monocytes within 1 min after exposure to IFN-gamma. On EMSA, FcRF gamma consisted of two complexes termed FcRF gamma 1 and FcRF gamma 2. The nuclear concentration of FcRF gamma rapidly increased, peaked at 15 min, and then fell after 1-2 hr. Dose-response studies revealed (i) as little as 0.05 ng of IFN-gamma per ml induced FcRF gamma, (ii) maximum activation occurred at 1 ng/ml, and (iii) steady-state levels of Fc gamma RI mRNA closely paralleled that of FcRF gamma. Since FcRF gamma was activated in cells normally not expressing Fc gamma RI RNA, other regulatory mechanisms must control Fc gamma RI-restricted tissue expression. Activation of FcRF gamma by IFN-gamma was inhibited by pretreatment with 500 nM staurosporin and 25 microM phenyl arsine oxide. These data suggest that a kinase and possibly a phosphatase activity are required for IFN-gamma-induced signaling of FcRF gamma in monocytes. Images PMID:1334553

  1. The cytochrome P450 2AA gene cluster in zebrafish (Danio rerio): Expression of CYP2AA1 and CYP2AA2 and response to phenobarbital-type inducers

    SciTech Connect

    Kubota, Akira; Bainy, Afonso C.D.; Woodin, Bruce R.; Goldstone, Jared V.; Stegeman, John J.

    2013-10-01

    The cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2 gene family is the largest and most diverse CYP gene family in vertebrates. In zebrafish, we have identified 10 genes in a new subfamily, CYP2AA, which does not show orthology to any human or other mammalian CYP genes. Here we report evolutionary and structural relationships of the 10 CYP2AA genes and expression of the first two genes, CYP2AA1 and CYP2AA2. Parsimony reconstruction of the tandem duplication pattern for the CYP2AA cluster suggests that CYP2AA1, CYP2AA2 and CYP2AA3 likely arose in the earlier duplication events and thus are most diverged in function from the other CYP2AAs. On the other hand, CYP2AA8 and CYP2AA9 are genes that arose in the latest duplication event, implying functional similarity between these two CYPs. A molecular model of CYP2AA1 showing the sequence conservation across the CYP2AA cluster reveals that the regions with the highest variability within the cluster map onto CYP2AA1 near the substrate access channels, suggesting differing substrate specificities. Zebrafish CYP2AA1 transcript was expressed predominantly in the intestine, while CYP2AA2 was most highly expressed in the kidney, suggesting differing roles in physiology. In the liver CYP2AA2 expression but not that of CYP2AA1, was increased by 1,4-bis [2-(3,5-dichloropyridyloxy)] benzene (TCPOBOP) and, to a lesser extent, by phenobarbital (PB). In contrast, pregnenolone 16α-carbonitrile (PCN) increased CYP2AA1 expression, but not CYP2AA2 in the liver. The results identify a CYP2 subfamily in zebrafish that includes genes apparently induced by PB-type chemicals and PXR agonists, the first concrete in vivo evidence for a PB-type response in fish. - Highlights: • A tandemly duplicated cluster of ten CYP2AA genes was described in zebrafish. • Parsimony and duplication analyses suggest pathways to CYP2AA diversity. • Homology models reveal amino acid positions possibly related to functional diversity. • The CYP2AA locus does not share synteny with

  2. Radiation response and regulation of apoptosis induced by a combination of TRAIL and CHX in cells lacking mitochondrial DNA: A role for NF-{kappa}B-STAT3-directed gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, Vladimir N. Ghandhi, Shanaz A.; Zhou, Hongning; Huang, Sarah X.; Chai, Yunfei; Amundson, Sally A.; Hei, Tom K.

    2011-07-01

    Mitochondrial DNA depleted ({rho}{sup 0}) human skin fibroblasts (HSF) with suppressed oxidative phosphorylation were characterized by significant changes in the expression of 2100 nuclear genes, encoding numerous protein classes, in NF-{kappa}B and STAT3 signaling pathways, and by decreased activity of mitochondrial death pathway, compared to the parental {rho}{sup +} HSF. In contrast, the extrinsic TRAIL/TRAIL-Receptor mediated death pathway remained highly active, and exogenous TRAIL in a combination with cycloheximide (CHX) induced higher levels of apoptosis in {rho}{sup 0} cells compared to {rho}{sup +} HSF. Global gene expression analysis using microarray and qRT-PCR demonstrated that mRNA expression levels of many growth factors and their adaptor proteins (FGF13, HGF, IGFBP4, IGFBP6, and IGFL2), cytokines (IL6, {Oota}L17{Beta}, {Oota}L18, {Oota}L19, and {Oota}L28{Beta}) and cytokine receptors (IL1R1, IL21R, and IL31RA) were substantially decreased after mitochondrial DNA depletion. Some of these genes were targets of NF-{kappa}B and STAT3, and their protein products could regulate the STAT3 signaling pathway. Alpha-irradiation further induced expression of several NF-{kappa}B/STAT3 target genes, including IL1A, IL1B, IL6, PTGS2/COX2 and MMP12, in {rho}{sup +} HSF, but this response was substantially decreased in {rho}{sup 0} HSF. Suppression of the IKK-NF-{kappa}B pathway by the small molecular inhibitor BMS-345541 and of the JAK2-STAT3 pathway by AG490 dramatically increased TRAIL-induced apoptosis in the control and irradiated {rho}{sup +} HSF. Inhibitory antibodies against IL6, the main activator of JAK2-STAT3 pathway, added into the cell media, also increased TRAIL-induced apoptosis in HSF, especially after alpha-irradiation. Collectively, our results indicated that NF-{kappa}B activation was partially lost in {rho}{sup 0} HSF resulting in downregulation of the basal or radiation-induced expression of numerous NF-{kappa}B targets, further suppressing IL6

  3. Silencing of odorant binding protein gene AlinOBP4 by RNAi induces declining electrophysiological responses of Adelphocoris lineolatus to six semiochemicals.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xue-Ying; Zhu, Xiao-Qiang; Gu, Shao-Hua; Zhou, Yan-Le; Wang, Song-Ying; Zhang, Yong-Jun; Guo, Yu-Yuan

    2016-06-06

    Odorant binding proteins (OBPs) are believed to be important for transporting semiochemicals through the aqueous sensillar lymph to the olfactory receptor cells within the insect antennal sensilla. Here, we injected AlinOBP4-siRNA into the conjunctivum between prothorax and mesothorax of the lucerne plant bug, Adelphocoris lineolatus and evaluated the silencing of AlinOBP4 by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis, quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) test and electroantennogram (EAG) assay. The combination of RT-PCR and qPCR analyses revealed that the levels of messenger RNA transcript were significantly reduced ∼95% in AlinOBP4-siRNA-treated A. lineolatus males and ∼75% in RNAi-treated females within 48 hours. It was found that there are different EAG responses between male and female bugs when the AlinOBP4 gene was silenced by RNAi. The EAGs of A. lineolatus to two plant volatiles, tridecanal and hexyl alcohol, were reduced 9.09% and 79.45% in RNAi-treated males, 62.08% and 62.08% in RNAi-treated females compared to the controls, separately. Antennae of RNAi-treated bugs showed significantly lower electrophysiological responses to four sex pheromone analogs, butyl butanoate, 1-hexyl butyrate, (E)-2-hexenyl butyrate and hexyl hexanoate. The EAG recordings were reduced 35.43%, 35.24%, 39.96% and 78.47% in RNAi-treated males and 64.52%, 18.13%, 36.88% and 49.52% in RNAi-treated females, respectively. The results suggested that AlinOBP4 might play dual-roles in the identification of plant volatiles and sex pheromones. It was suspected that AlinOBP4 may have different functions in odor perception between male and female A. lineolatus.

  4. Characterization and expression of gamma-interferon-inducible lysosomal thiol reductase (GILT) gene in amphioxus Branchiostoma belcheri with implications for GILT in innate immune response.

    PubMed

    Liu, Naiguo; Zhang, Shicui; Liu, Zhenhui; Gaowa, Saren; Wang, Yongjun

    2007-04-01

    An amphioxus cDNA, AmphiGILT, encoding GILT protein was isolated from the gut cDNA library of Branchiostoma belcheri. It codes for a deduced protein of 254 amino acids, which has all the main features typical of GILT proteins including the signature sequence CQHGX(2)CX(2)NX(4)C, CXXC motif and 11 conserved cysteines. Phylogenetic analysis showed that AmphiGILT and sea urchin GILT clubbed together and positioned at the base of vertebrate GILT clade, suggesting that both AmphiGILT and sea urchin GILT might share some characteristics of the archetype of vertebrate GILT proteins. The genomic DNA sequence of B. floridae contains seven exons and six introns, which is similar to vertebrate GILT exon-intron organization. AmphiGILT was expressed in a tissue-specific manner with the most abundant mRNA in the digestive system including hepatic caecum and hind-gut. It was also found that mammalian IFN-gamma only exerted a slight effect on the expression of GILT gene in amphioxus, forming a contrast to the marked induction of human and mouse GILT expression by IFN-gamma. Taken the absence of the adaptive immune system including MHC class II molecules and lymphocytes into consideration, these results suggest that AmphiGILT is highly likely to play a role in the innate immune responses in amphioxus.

  5. Microarray analysis of radiation response genes in primary human fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Kis, Enikoe; Szatmari, Tuende; Keszei, Marton; Farkas, Robert; Esik, Olga; Lumniczky, Katalin; Falus, Andras; Safrany, Geza . E-mail: safrany@hp.osski.hu

    2006-12-01

    Purpose: To identify radiation-induced early transcriptional responses in primary human fibroblasts and understand cellular pathways leading to damage correction. Methods and Materials: Primary human fibroblast cell lines were irradiated with 2 Gy {gamma}-radiation and RNA isolated 2 h later. Radiation-induced transcriptional alterations were investigated with microarrays covering the entire human genome. Time- and dose dependent radiation responses were studied by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Results: About 200 genes responded to ionizing radiation on the transcriptional level in primary human fibroblasts. The expression profile depended on individual genetic backgrounds. Thirty genes (28 up- and 2 down-regulated) responded to radiation in identical manner in all investigated cells. Twenty of these consensus radiation response genes were functionally categorized: most of them belong to the DNA damage response (GADD45A, BTG2, PCNA, IER5), regulation of cell cycle and cell proliferation (CDKN1A, PPM1D, SERTAD1, PLK2, PLK3, CYR61), programmed cell death (BBC3, TP53INP1) and signaling (SH2D2A, SLIC1, GDF15, THSD1) pathways. Four genes (SEL10, FDXR, CYP26B1, OR11A1) were annotated to other functional groups. Many of the consensus radiation response genes are regulated by, or regulate p53. Time- and dose-dependent expression profiles of selected consensus genes (CDKN1A, GADD45A, IER5, PLK3, CYR61) were investigated by quantitative RT-PCR. Transcriptional alterations depended on the applied dose, and on the time after irradiation. Conclusions: The data presented here could help in the better understanding of early radiation responses and the development of biomarkers to identify radiation susceptible individuals.

  6. RNAi induced gene silencing in crop improvement.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Subodh Kumar

    2010-12-01

    The RNA silencing is one of the innovative and efficient molecular biology tools to harness the down-regulation of expression of gene(s) specifically. To accomplish such selective modification of gene expression of a particular trait, homology dependent gene silencing uses a stunning variety of gene silencing viz. co-suppression, post-transcriptional gene silencing, virus-induced gene silencing etc. This family of diverse molecular phenomena has a common exciting feature of gene silencing which is collectively called RNA interference abbreviated to as RNAi. This molecular phenomenon has become a focal point of plant biology and medical research throughout the world. As a result, this technology has turned out to be a powerful tool in understanding the function of individual gene and has ultimately led to the tremendous use in crop improvement. This review article illustrates the application of RNAi in a broad area of crop improvement where this technology has been successfully used. It also provides historical perspective of RNAi discovery and its contemporary phenomena, mechanism of RNAi pathway.

  7. Human tumor necrosis factor-alpha gene 3' untranslated region confers inducible toxin responsiveness to homologous promoter in monocytic THP-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Seiler-Tuyns, A; Dufour, N; Spertini, F

    1999-07-30

    To better define the role of 3' untranslated region (3'UTR) on transcriptional regulation of the human tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha gene, monocytic human THP-1 cells were transfected with two TNF-alpha promoter constructs spanning base pairs -1897/-1 and -1214/-1, respectively, and linked to the rabbit beta-globin gene. Quantitative globin gene expression of chimerae was measured by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. A construct linking the chicken beta-actin promoter and a deleted portion of the beta-globin gene was cotransfected and used as internal standard. Unexpectedly, when THP-1 cells were stimulated with lipopolysaccharide or toxic shock syndrome toxin-1, gene regulation was hardly detected. In contrast, endogenous TNF-alpha gene regulation measured by the same reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction procedure was vigorous. Remarkably, ligation of 3'UTR to chimeric constructs led to a drastic drop in the basal level of chimeric gene expression, resulting in a 15- to 40-fold induction of the reporter gene. Consistently, when the TNF-alpha promoter was replaced by the cytomegalovirus early immediate promoter, gene expression was also uniformly reduced but was no longer up-regulated upon stimulation with lipopolysaccharide and toxic shock syndrome toxin-1. These data provide the first line of evidence that, in addition to its role in TNF-alpha transcript stability and translation, human TNF-alpha 3'UTR also participates in modulating gene expression at the transcriptional level.

  8. Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester Induces Adrenoleukodystrophy (Abcd2) Gene in Human X-ALD Fibroblasts and Inhibits the Proinflammatory Response in Abcd1/2 Silenced Mouse Primary Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Jaspreet; Khan, Mushfiquddin; Singh, Inderjit

    2013-01-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is a peroxisomal disorder caused by mutations in the ABCD1 gene. Accumulation of very long chain fatty acids (VLCFA) that have been attributed to reduced peroxisomal VLCFA β-oxidation activity are the hallmark of the disease. Overexpression of ABCD2 gene, the closest homolog of ABCD1, has been shown to compensate for ABCD1, thus correcting the VLCFA derrangement. The accumulation of VLCFA leads to a neuroinflammatory disease process associated with demyelination of the cerebral white matter. The present study underlines the importance of caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) in inducing the expression of ABCD2 (ALDRP), and normalizing the peroxisomal β-oxidation as well as the levels of saturated and monounsaturated VLCFAs in cultured human skin fibroblasts of X-ALD patients. The expression of ELOVL1, the single elongase catalyzing the synthesis of both saturated VLCFA (C26:0) and mono-unsaturated VLCFA (C26:1), was also reduced by CAPE treatment. Importantly, CAPE upregulated Abcd2 expression and peroxisomal β-oxidation and lowered the VLCFA levels in Abcd1-deficient U87 astrocytes and B12 oligodendrocytes. In addition, using Abcd1/Abcd2-silenced mouse primary astrocytes we examined the effects of CAPE in VLCFA-induced inflammatory response. CAPE treatment decreased the inflammatory response as the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase, inflammatory cytokine, and activation of NF-κB in Abcd1/Abcd2-silenced mouse primary astrocytes was reduced. The observations indicate that CAPE corrects both the metabolic disease of VLCFA as well as secondary inflammatory disease; therefore, it may be a potential drug candidate to be tested for X-ALD therapy in humans. PMID:23318275

  9. A peptide tetramer Tk-tPN induces tolerance of cardiac allografting by conversion of type 1 to type 2 immune responses via the Toll-like receptor 2 signal-promoted activation of the MCP1 gene.

    PubMed

    Li, Zuoqing; Yang, Neng; Zhou, Ling; Gu, Peng; Wang, Hui; Zhou, Yun; Zhou, Peijun; Lu, Liming; Chou, Kuang-Yen

    2016-03-01

    The plant protein trichosanthin (Tk) and its derived peptide tetramer Tk-tPN have been shown to stimulate the type 2 immune responses for treating autoimmune disease. This work explores the possibility of using Tk-tPN as a non-toxic immunosuppressant to induce transplantation tolerance using the mechanisms by which T-cell-mediated immune responses are transferred from type 1 to type 2 through innate immunity-related pathways. Immunocytes and cytokine secretions involved in the mouse cardiac allografting model with Tk-tPN treatment were characterized. Identification of critical genes and analysis of their functions through Toll-like receptor (TLR) -initiated signalling and the possible epigenetic changes were performed. Mean survival times of the cardiac allografts were delayed from 7.7 ± 0.3 days (control) to 22.7 ± 3.9 days (P < 0.01) or 79.1 ± 19.2 days (P < 0.0001) when Tk-tPN was introduced into the recipients alone or together with rapamycin, respectively. The grafting tolerance was donor-specific. The secretion pattern of the type 1 cytokine/transcription factor (IL-2(+) IFN-γ(+) T-bet(+)), which is responsible for the acute graft rejection, was shifted to the type 2 factor (IL-4(+) IL-10(+) Gata3+), together with a selective expansion of the IL-4/IL-10-producing CD8+ CD28- regulatory T-cell subset. A TLR2-initiated high expression of chemokine gene MCP1 was detectable simultaneously. Epigenetically Tk/Tk-tPN could also acetylate the histone H3K9 of MCP1 promoter to skew the immunity towards T helper type 2 responses. Tk/Tk-tPN is therefore capable of down-regulating the type 1 response-dominant rejection of cardiac allografts by evoking type 2 immunity through the activation of a TLR2-initiated signalling pathway and MCP1 gene to expand the IL-4/IL-10-secreting CD8+ CD28- regulatory T cells. Tk-tPN could be a promising novel immunosuppressant to induce tolerance in allotransplantation. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Plant antioxidant gene responses to fungal pathogens.

    PubMed

    Williamson, J D; Scandalios, J G

    1993-09-01

    Antioxidant defense systems are a prominent element in plant responses to environmental stress. Activated oxygen species have themselves been implicated as both a part of the plant's defense against pathogen attack as well as the phytotoxic component of photosensitizing fungal toxins. Molecular analyses are just beginning to define how plant oxidant and antioxidant genes might integrate with other defense responses to provide effective protection against pathogen attack.

  11. Oxytocin receptor gene variation predicts subjective responses to MDMA.

    PubMed

    Bershad, Anya K; Weafer, Jessica J; Kirkpatrick, Matthew G; Wardle, Margaret C; Miller, Melissa A; de Wit, Harriet

    2016-12-01

    3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, "ecstasy") enhances desire to socialize and feelings of empathy, which are thought to be related to increased oxytocin levels. Thus, variation in the oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) may influence responses to the drug. Here, we examined the influence of a single OXTR nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) on responses to MDMA in humans. Based on findings that carriers of the A allele at rs53576 exhibit reduced sensitivity to oxytocin-induced social behavior, we hypothesized that these individuals would show reduced subjective responses to MDMA, including sociability. In this three-session, double blind, within-subjects study, healthy volunteers with past MDMA experience (N = 68) received a MDMA (0, 0.75 mg/kg, and 1.5 mg/kg) and provided self-report ratings of sociability, anxiety, and drug effects. These responses were examined in relation to rs53576. MDMA (1.5 mg/kg) did not increase sociability in individuals with the A/A genotype as it did in G allele carriers. The genotypic groups did not differ in responses at the lower MDMA dose, or in cardiovascular or other subjective responses. These findings are consistent with the idea that MDMA-induced sociability is mediated by oxytocin, and that variation in the oxytocin receptor gene may influence responses to the drug.

  12. Transcription dynamics of inducible genes modulated by negative regulations.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanyan; Tang, Moxun; Yu, Jianshe

    2015-06-01

    Gene transcription is a stochastic process in single cells, in which genes transit randomly between active and inactive states. Transcription of many inducible genes is also tightly regulated: It is often stimulated by extracellular signals, activated through signal transduction pathways and later repressed by negative regulations. In this work, we study the nonlinear dynamics of the mean transcription level of inducible genes modulated by the interplay of the intrinsic transcriptional randomness and the repression by negative regulations. In our model, we integrate negative regulations into gene activation process, and make the conventional assumption on the production and degradation of transcripts. We show that, whether or not the basal transcription is temporarily terminated when cells are stimulated, the mean transcription level grows in the typical up and down pattern commonly observed in immune response genes. With the help of numerical simulations, we clarify the delicate impact of the system parameters on the transcription dynamics, and demonstrate how our model generates the distinct temporal gene-induction patterns in mouse fibroblasts discerned in recent experiments.

  13. [Immune response genes products in human physiology].

    PubMed

    Khaitov, R M; Alekseev, L P

    2012-09-01

    Current data on physiological role of human immune response genes' proteomic products (antigens) are discussed. The antigens are specified by a very high level of diversity that mediates a wide specter ofphysiological functions. They actually provide integrity and biological stability of human as species. These data reveal new ideas on many pathological processes as well as drafts new approaches for prophylaxis and treatment.

  14. Expression of ethylene response genes during persimmon fruit astringency removal.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xue-ren; Shi, Yan-na; Min, Ting; Luo, Zheng-rong; Yao, Yun-Cong; Xu, Qian; Ferguson, Ian; Chen, Kun-song

    2012-05-01

    Thirteen ethylene signaling related genes were isolated and studied during ripening of non-astringent 'Yangfeng' and astringent 'Mopan' persimmon fruit. Some of these genes were characterized as ethylene responsive. Treatments, including ethylene and CO(2), had different effects on persimmon ripening, but overlapping roles in astringency removal, such as increasing the reduction in levels of soluble tannins. DkERS1, DkETR2, and DkERF8, may participate in persimmon fruit ripening and softening. The expression patterns of DkETR2, DkERF4, and DkERF5 had significant correlations with decreases in soluble tannins in 'Mopan' persimmon fruit, suggesting that these genes might be key components in persimmon fruit astringency removal and be the linkage between different treatments, while DkERF1 and DkERF6 may be specifically involved in CO(2) induced astringency removal. The possible roles of ethylene signaling genes in persimmon fruit astringency removal are discussed.

  15. The acute phase response of cod (Gadus morhua L.): expression of immune response genes.

    PubMed

    Audunsdottir, Sigridur S; Magnadottir, Bergljot; Gisladottir, Berglind; Jonsson, Zophonias O; Bragason, Birkir Th

    2012-02-01

    An acute phase response (APR) was experimentally induced in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua L.) by intramuscular injection of turpentine oil. The change in the expression of immune related genes was monitored in the anterior kidney and the spleen over a period of 7 days. The genes examined were two types of pentraxins, apolipoprotein A1 (ApoA-I), the complement component C3, interleukin-1β (IL-1β), transferrin, cathelicidin, and hepcidin. All genes were constitutively expressed in both organs and their expression amplified by the turpentine injection. A pattern of response was observed both with respect to the organ preference and to the timing of a maximum response. The increased gene expression of the pentraxins, ApoA-I and C3 was restricted to the anterior kidney, the gene expression of IL-1β, cathelicidin, and transferrin increased in both organs, while hepcidin gene expression was only significantly increased in the spleen. The pentraxins and ApoA-I appear to be early mediators of APR in cod, possibly stimulating C3 and IL-1β response, while the antimicrobial peptides may play a minor role. The increase in transferrin gene expression in both organs, and apparent indifference to cortisol release associated with the turpentine injection, suggests that this could be a typical acute phase protein in cod.

  16. Epigenetic regulation of inducible gene expression in the immune system.

    PubMed

    Lim, Pek Siew; Li, Jasmine; Holloway, Adele F; Rao, Sudha

    2013-07-01

    T cells are exquisitely poised to respond rapidly to pathogens and have proved an instructive model for exploring the regulation of inducible genes. Individual genes respond to antigenic stimulation in different ways, and it has become clear that the interplay between transcription factors and the chromatin platform of individual genes governs these responses. Our understanding of the complexity of the chromatin platform and the epigenetic mechanisms that contribute to transcriptional control has expanded dramatically in recent years. These mechanisms include the presence/absence of histone modification marks, which form an epigenetic signature to mark active or inactive genes. These signatures are dynamically added or removed by epigenetic enzymes, comprising an array of histone-modifying enzymes, including the more recently recognized chromatin-associated signalling kinases. In addition, chromatin-remodelling complexes physically alter the chromatin structure to regulate chromatin accessibility to transcriptional regulatory factors. The advent of genome-wide technologies has enabled characterization of the chromatin landscape of T cells in terms of histone occupancy, histone modification patterns and transcription factor association with specific genomic regulatory regions, generating a picture of the T-cell epigenome. Here, we discuss the multi-layered regulation of inducible gene expression in the immune system, focusing on the interplay between transcription factors, and the T-cell epigenome, including the role played by chromatin remodellers and epigenetic enzymes. We will also use IL2, a key inducible cytokine gene in T cells, as an example of how the different layers of epigenetic mechanisms regulate immune responsive genes during T-cell activation.

  17. Proximity of Radiation Desiccation Response Motif to the core promoter is essential for basal repression as well as gamma radiation-induced gyrB gene expression in Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Anaganti, Narasimha; Basu, Bhakti; Mukhopadhyaya, Rita; Apte, Shree Kumar

    2017-03-02

    The radioresistant D. radiodurans regulates its DNA damage regulon (DDR) through interaction between a 17bp palindromic cis-regulatory element called the Radiation Desiccation Response Motif (RDRM), the DdrO repressor and a protease IrrE. The role of RDRM in regulation of DDR was dissected by constructing RDRM sequence-, position- or deletion-variants of Deinococcal gyrB gene (DR0906) promoter and by RDRM insertion in the non-RDRM groESL gene (DR0606) promoter, and monitoring the effect of such modifications on the basal as well as gamma radiation inducible promoter activity by quantifying fluorescence of a GFP reporter. RDRM sequence-variants revealed that the conservation of sequence at the 5th and 13th position and the ends of RDRM is essential for basal repression by interaction with DdrO. RDRM position-variants showed that the sequence acts as a negative regulatory element only when located around transcription start site (TSS) and within the span of RNA polymerase (RNAP) binding region. RDRM deletion-variants indicated that the 5' sequence of RDRM possibly possesses an enhancer-like element responsible for higher expression yields upon repressor clearance post-irradiation. The results suggest that RDRM plays both a negative as well as a positive role of in the regulation of DDR in D. radiodurans.

  18. Are solar UV-B- and UV-A-dependent gene expression and metabolite accumulation in Arabidopsis mediated by the stress response regulator RADICAL-INDUCED CELL DEATH1?

    PubMed

    Morales, Luis O; Brosché, Mikael; Vainonen, Julia P; Sipari, Nina; Lindfors, Anders V; Strid, Åke; Aphalo, Pedro J

    2015-05-01

    Wavelengths in the ultraviolet (UV) region of the solar spectrum, UV-B (280-315 nm) and UV-A (315-400 nm), are key environmental signals modifying several aspects of plant physiology. Despite significant advances in the understanding of plant responses to UV-B and the identification of signalling components involved, there is limited information on the molecular mechanisms that control UV-B signalling in plants under natural sunlight. Here, we aimed to corroborate the previous suggested role for RADICAL-INDUCED CELL DEATH1 (RCD1) in UV-B signalling under full spectrum sunlight. Wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana and the rcd1-1 mutant were used in an experimental design outdoors where UV-B and UV-A irradiances were manipulated using plastic films, and gene expression, PYRIDOXINE BIOSYNTHESIS1 (PDX1) accumulation and metabolite profiles were analysed in the leaves. At the level of transcription, RCD1 was not directly involved in the solar UV-B regulation of genes with functions in UV acclimation, hormone signalling and stress-related markers. Furthermore, RCD1 had no role on PDX1 accumulation but modulated the UV-B induction of flavonoid accumulation in leaves of Arabidopsis exposed to solar UV. We conclude that RCD1 does not play an active role in UV-B signalling but rather modulates UV-B responses under full spectrum sunlight. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Significance and nature of bystander responses induced by various agents.

    PubMed

    Verma, Neha; Tiku, Ashu Bhan

    2017-07-01

    Bystander effects in a biological system are the responses shown by non-targeted neighbouring cells/tissues/organisms. These responses are triggered by factors released from targeted cells when exposed to a stress inducing agent. The biological response to stress inducing agents is complex, owing to the diversity of mechanisms and pathways activated in directly targeted and bystander cells. These responses are highly variable and can be either beneficial or hazardous depending on the cell lines tested, dose of agent used, experimental end points and time course selected. Recently non-targeted cells have even been reported to rescue the directly exposed cells by releasing protective signals that might be induced by non-targeted bystander responses. The nature of bystander signal/s is not yet clear. However, there are evidences suggesting involvement of ROS, RNS, protein factors and even DNA molecules leading to the activation of a number of signaling pathways. These can act independently or in a cascade, to induce events leading to changes in gene expression patterns that could elicit detrimental or beneficial effects. Many review articles on radiation induced bystander responses have been published. However, to the best of our knowledge, a comprehensive review on bystander responses induced by other genotoxic chemicals and stress inducing agents has not been published so far. Therefore, the aim of the present review is to give an overview of the literature on different aspects of bystander responses: agents that induce these responses, factors that can modulate bystander responses and the mechanisms involved. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Identification of Novel Defense Response Genes in Medicago truncatula for Improving Disease Resistance in Alfalfa

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Infection of plants by pathogens initiates a cascade of defense responses that halt or limit pathogen growth. However, the role of many of the genes induced by pathogens is unknown. Transcript profiling was used to identify genes associated with defense responses in the model legume Medicago truncat...

  1. Gene regulation in the immediate-early response process.

    PubMed

    Bahrami, Shahram; Drabløs, Finn

    2016-09-01

    Immediate-early genes (IEGs) can be activated and transcribed within minutes after stimulation, without the need for de novo protein synthesis, and they are stimulated in response to both cell-extrinsic and cell-intrinsic signals. Extracellular signals are transduced from the cell surface, through receptors activating a chain of proteins in the cell, in particular extracellular-signal-regulated kinases (ERKs), mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and members of the RhoA-actin pathway. These communicate through a signaling cascade by adding phosphate groups to neighboring proteins, and this will eventually activate and translocate TFs to the nucleus and thereby induce gene expression. The gene activation also involves proximal and distal enhancers that interact with promoters to simulate gene expression. The immediate-early genes have essential biological roles, in particular in stress response, like the immune system, and in differentiation. Therefore they also have important roles in various diseases, including cancer development. In this paper we summarize some recent advances on key aspects of the activation and regulation of immediate-early genes. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Insulin Response Genes in Different Stages of Periodontal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yu, N.; Barros, S.P.; Zhang, S.; Moss, K.L.; Phillips, S.T.; Offenbacher, S.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial infections are known to alter glucose metabolism within tissues via mechanisms of inflammation. We conducted this study to examine whether insulin response genes are differentially expressed in gingival tissues, comparing samples from experimental gingivitis and periodontitis subjects to those from healthy individuals. Total RNA was extracted from gingival biopsies from 26 participants: 8 periodontally healthy, 9 experimental gingivitis, and 9 periodontitis subjects. Gene expression patterns were evaluated with a polymerase chain reaction array panel to examine 84 candidate genes involved with glucose metabolism, insulin resistance, and obesity. Array data were evaluated with a t test adjusted by the false discover rate (P < 0.05), and ingenuity pathway analysis was performed for statistical testing of pathways. Although tissue samples were not sufficient to enable protein quantification, we confirmed the upregulation of the key gene using lipopolysaccharide-stimulated primary gingival epithelial cells by Western blot. The mRNA expression patterns of genes that are associated with insulin response and glucose metabolism are markedly different in experimental gingivitis subjects compared with healthy controls. Thirty-two genes are upregulated significantly by at least 2-fold, adjusted for false discover rate (P < 0.05). Periodontitis subjects show similar but attenuated changes in gene expression patterns, and no genes meet the significance criteria. Ingenuity pathway analysis demonstrates significant activation of the carbohydrate metabolism network in experimental gingivitis but not in periodontitis. G6PD protein increases in response to lipopolysaccharide stimulation in primary gingival epithelial cells, which is in the same direction as upregulated mRNA in tissues. Acute gingival inflammation may be associated with tissue metabolism changes, but these changes are not evident in chronic periodontitis. This study suggests that acute gingival inflammation

  3. Insulin Response Genes in Different Stages of Periodontal Disease.

    PubMed

    Yu, N; Barros, S P; Zhang, S; Moss, K L; Phillips, S T; Offenbacher, S

    2015-09-01

    Bacterial infections are known to alter glucose metabolism within tissues via mechanisms of inflammation. We conducted this study to examine whether insulin response genes are differentially expressed in gingival tissues, comparing samples from experimental gingivitis and periodontitis subjects to those from healthy individuals. Total RNA was extracted from gingival biopsies from 26 participants: 8 periodontally healthy, 9 experimental gingivitis, and 9 periodontitis subjects. Gene expression patterns were evaluated with a polymerase chain reaction array panel to examine 84 candidate genes involved with glucose metabolism, insulin resistance, and obesity. Array data were evaluated with a t test adjusted by the false discover rate (P < 0.05), and ingenuity pathway analysis was performed for statistical testing of pathways. Although tissue samples were not sufficient to enable protein quantification, we confirmed the upregulation of the key gene using lipopolysaccharide-stimulated primary gingival epithelial cells by Western blot. The mRNA expression patterns of genes that are associated with insulin response and glucose metabolism are markedly different in experimental gingivitis subjects compared with healthy controls. Thirty-two genes are upregulated significantly by at least 2-fold, adjusted for false discover rate (P < 0.05). Periodontitis subjects show similar but attenuated changes in gene expression patterns, and no genes meet the significance criteria. Ingenuity pathway analysis demonstrates significant activation of the carbohydrate metabolism network in experimental gingivitis but not in periodontitis. G6PD protein increases in response to lipopolysaccharide stimulation in primary gingival epithelial cells, which is in the same direction as upregulated mRNA in tissues. Acute gingival inflammation may be associated with tissue metabolism changes, but these changes are not evident in chronic periodontitis. This study suggests that acute gingival inflammation

  4. Salt induced gene expression in Prosopis farcta

    SciTech Connect

    Heimer, I.M.; Golan, A.; Lips, H.

    1987-04-01

    The authors hypothesize that in facultative halophytes, the genes which impart salt tolerance are expressed when the plants are exposed to salt. As a first step towards possible identification of these genes, they examined salt induced changes of gene expression in the facultative halophyte Prosopis farcta at the protein level, by SDS-PAGE. Exposure to salt of aseptically grown, two-week old seedlings, was carried out in one of two ways: (1) a one step transfer of seedlings from medium without salt to that with the indicated concentrations followed by 5 hr or 24 hr incubation periods. During the last 2 hrs of each incubation period the seedlings were pulse-labelled with /sup 35/S Sulfate or L-Methionine; (2) a gradual increase of the salt concentration at 50 mM increments at 2-4 day intervals. Two days after reaching the desired salt concentration, the seedlings were pulse-labelled for 2 hrs with /sup 35/S sulfate or L-methionine. Protein from roots were extracted and analyzed. Polypeptides were visualized by staining with coomassie blue or by fluorography. Qualitative as well as quantitative changes of gene expression as induced by salt could be observed. Their significance regarding salt tolerance will be discussed.

  5. Cold Responsive Gene Expression Profiling of Sugarcane and Saccharum spontaneum with Functional Analysis of a Cold Inducible Saccharum Homolog of NOD26-Like Intrinsic Protein to Salt and Water Stress

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong-Won; Benatti, Thiago R.; Marconi, Thiago; Yu, Qingyi; Solis-Gracia, Nora; Mora, Victoria; da Silva, Jorge A.

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptome analysis of sugarcane hybrid CP72-1210 (cold susceptible) and Saccharum spontaneum TUS05-05 (cold tolerant) using Sugarcane Assembled Sequences (SAS) from SUCEST-FUN Database showed that a total of 35,340 and 34,698 SAS genes, respectively, were expressed before and after chilling stress. The analysis revealed that more than 600 genes are differentially expressed in each genotype after chilling stress. Blast2Go annotation revealed that the major difference in gene expression profiles between CP72-1210 and TUS05-05 after chilling stress are present in the genes related to the transmembrane transporter activity. To further investigate the relevance of transmembrane transporter activity against abiotic stress tolerance, a S. spontaneum homolog of a NOD26-like major intrinsic protein gene (SspNIP2) was selected for functional analysis, of which expression was induced after chilling stress in the cold tolerant TUS05-05. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that SspNIP2 expression was increased ~2.5 fold at 30 minutes after cold treatment and stayed induced throughout the 24 hours of cold treatment. The amino acid sequence analysis of the cloned SspNIP2 confirmed the presence of six transmembrane domains and two NPA (Asn-Pro-Ala) motifs, signature features of major intrinsic protein families. Amino acid analysis confirmed that four amino acids, comprising the ar/R (aromatic residue/arginine) region responsible for the substrate specificity among MIPs, are conserved among monocot silicon transporters and SspNIP2. Salinity stress test on SspNIP2 transgenic tobacco plants resulted in more vigorous transgenic lines than the non-transgenic tobacco plants, suggesting some degree of tolerance to salt stress conferred by SspNIP2. SspNIP2-transgenic plants, exposed to 2 weeks of water stress without irrigation, developed various degrees of water stress symptom. The water stress test confirmed that the SspNIP2 transgenic lines had lower evapotranspiration rates than non

  6. Cold Responsive Gene Expression Profiling of Sugarcane and Saccharum spontaneum with Functional Analysis of a Cold Inducible Saccharum Homolog of NOD26-Like Intrinsic Protein to Salt and Water Stress.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong-Won; Benatti, Thiago R; Marconi, Thiago; Yu, Qingyi; Solis-Gracia, Nora; Mora, Victoria; da Silva, Jorge A

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptome analysis of sugarcane hybrid CP72-1210 (cold susceptible) and Saccharum spontaneum TUS05-05 (cold tolerant) using Sugarcane Assembled Sequences (SAS) from SUCEST-FUN Database showed that a total of 35,340 and 34,698 SAS genes, respectively, were expressed before and after chilling stress. The analysis revealed that more than 600 genes are differentially expressed in each genotype after chilling stress. Blast2Go annotation revealed that the major difference in gene expression profiles between CP72-1210 and TUS05-05 after chilling stress are present in the genes related to the transmembrane transporter activity. To further investigate the relevance of transmembrane transporter activity against abiotic stress tolerance, a S. spontaneum homolog of a NOD26-like major intrinsic protein gene (SspNIP2) was selected for functional analysis, of which expression was induced after chilling stress in the cold tolerant TUS05-05. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that SspNIP2 expression was increased ~2.5 fold at 30 minutes after cold treatment and stayed induced throughout the 24 hours of cold treatment. The amino acid sequence analysis of the cloned SspNIP2 confirmed the presence of six transmembrane domains and two NPA (Asn-Pro-Ala) motifs, signature features of major intrinsic protein families. Amino acid analysis confirmed that four amino acids, comprising the ar/R (aromatic residue/arginine) region responsible for the substrate specificity among MIPs, are conserved among monocot silicon transporters and SspNIP2. Salinity stress test on SspNIP2 transgenic tobacco plants resulted in more vigorous transgenic lines than the non-transgenic tobacco plants, suggesting some degree of tolerance to salt stress conferred by SspNIP2. SspNIP2-transgenic plants, exposed to 2 weeks of water stress without irrigation, developed various degrees of water stress symptom. The water stress test confirmed that the SspNIP2 transgenic lines had lower evapotranspiration rates than non

  7. Heat-induced reactivation of HSV-1 in latent mice: upregulation in the TG of CD83 and other immune response genes and their LAT-ICP0 locus.

    PubMed

    Clement, Christian; Bhattacharjee, Partha S; Kaufman, Herbert E; Hill, James M

    2009-06-01

    To determine changes in host gene expression in HSV-1 latent trigeminal ganglia (TG) after hyperthermic stress. Scarified corneas of 6-week-old female BALB/c mice were inoculated with either HSV-1 17Syn(+) (high phenotypic reactivator) or 17DeltaPst(LAT(-)) (low phenotypic reactivator) at 10(4) plaque-forming units/eye. At 28 days after infection, viral reactivation was induced in some of the infected mice with hyperthermic stress, and the mice were killed after 1 hour. Heat-treated uninfected mice served as the control. Labeled cRNA derived from TG-isolated total RNA was hybridized to 430 2.0 chips containing 14,000 mouse genes. Gene expression was confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR. There was no difference in gene expression in the non-heat-treated mice. Gene expression in the TG of each of the heat-treated mouse groups (17Syn(+), 17DeltaPst(LAT(-)) and uninfected) yielded upregulation of more than twofold of a group of the same genes, designated as heat stress-induced gene expression. Twenty-nine genes (0.2%) were significantly upregulated (2- to 17-fold) when the heat stress-induced gene expression was subtracted from the gene expression of 17Syn(+) latent TG relative to 17DeltaPst(LAT(-)) latent TG 1 hour after mouse hyperthermic stress. Nine host adaptive immunity genes comprising Ig molecules, CD83, CD8A, ADA, and CCL8 were the largest subset upregulated, and all were confirmed by real-time PCR. Others identified included genes involved in hypothalamic-pituitary gland functions. Hyperthermic stress-induced reactivation of the HSV-1 high phenotypic reactivator can upregulate gene expression involved in B-cell function and in T-cell function. CD83 is implicated in HSV-1 latency, suggesting it could also be involved in immune-mediated mechanisms of viral reactivation.

  8. Heat-Induced Reactivation of HSV-1 in Latent Mice: Upregulation in the TG of CD83 and Other Immune Response Genes and Their LAT-ICP0 Locus

    PubMed Central

    Clement, Christian; Bhattacharjee, Partha S.; Kaufman, Herbert E.; Hill, James M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To determine changes in host gene expression in HSV-1 latent trigeminal ganglia (TG) after hyperthermic stress. Methods Scarified corneas of 6-week-old female BALB/c mice were inoculated with either HSV-1 17Syn+ (high phenotypic reactivator) or 17ΔPst(LAT−) (low phenotypic reactivator) at 104 plaque-forming units/eye. At 28 days after infection, viral reactivation was induced in some of the infected mice with hyperthermic stress, and the mice were killed after 1 hour. Heat-treated uninfected mice served as the control. Labeled cRNA derived from TG-isolated total RNA was hybridized to 430 2.0 chips containing 14,000 mouse genes. Gene expression was confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR. Results There was no difference in gene expression in the non–heat-treated mice. Gene expression in the TG of each of the heat-treated mouse groups (17Syn+, 17ΔPst(LAT−) and uninfected) yielded upregulation of more than twofold of a group of the same genes, designated as heat stress–induced gene expression. Twenty-nine genes (0.2%) were significantly upregulated (2- to 17-fold) when the heat stress–induced gene expression was subtracted from the gene expression of 17Syn+ latent TG relative to 17ΔPst(LAT−) latent TG 1 hour after mouse hyperthermic stress. Nine host adaptive immunity genes comprising Ig molecules, CD83, CD8A, ADA, and CCL8 were the largest subset upregulated, and all were confirmed by real-time PCR. Others identified included genes involved in hypothalamic-pituitary gland functions. Conclusions Hyperthermic stress–induced reactivation of the HSV-1 high phenotypic reactivator can upregulate gene expression involved in B-cell function and in T-cell function. CD83 is implicated in HSV-1 latency, suggesting it could also be involved in immune-mediated mechanisms of viral reactivation. PMID:19151393

  9. Identification of formaldehyde-responsive genes by suppression subtractive hybridization.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min-Ho; Kim, Young-Ae; Na, Tae-Young; Kim, Sung-Hye; Shin, Young Kee; Lee, Byung-Hoon; Shin, Ho-Sang; Lee, Mi-Ock

    2008-01-14

    Formaldehyde is frequently used in indoor household and occupational environments. Inhalation of formaldehyde invokes an inflammatory response, including a variety of allergic signs and symptoms. Therefore, formaldehyde has been considered as the most prevalent cause of sick building syndrome, which has become a major social problem, especially in developing urban areas. Further formaldehyde is classified as a genotoxicant in the respiratory tract of rats and humans. To better understand the molecular mechanisms involved in formaldehyde intoxication, we sought differentially regulated genes by formaldehyde exposure to Hs 680.Tr human trachea cells, using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based suppression subtractive hybridization. We identified 27 different formaldehyde-inducible genes, including those coding for the major histocompatibility complex, class IA, calcyclin, glutathione S-transferase pi, mouse double minute 2 (MDM2), platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha, and which are known to be associated with cell proliferation and differentiation, immunity and inflammation, and detoxification. Induction of these genes by formaldehyde treatment was confirmed by reverse transcription PCR and western blot analysis. Further, the expression of calcyclin, glutathione S-transferase pi, PDGFRA and MDM2 were significantly induced in the tracheal epithelium of Sprague Dawley rats after formaldehyde inhalation. Our results suggest that the elevated levels of these genes may be associated with the formaldehyde-induced toxicity, and that they deserve evaluation as potential biomarkers for formaldehyde intoxication.

  10. Gene encoding γ-carbonic anhydrase is cotranscribed with argC and induced in response to stationary phase and high CO2 in Azospirillum brasilense Sp7

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Carbonic anhydrase (CA) is a ubiquitous enzyme catalyzing the reversible hydration of CO2 to bicarbonate, a reaction underlying diverse biochemical and physiological processes. Gamma class carbonic anhydrases (γ-CAs) are widespread in prokaryotes but their physiological roles remain elusive. At present, only γ-CA of Methanosarcina thermophila (Cam) has been shown to have CA activity. Genome analysis of a rhizobacterium Azospirillum brasilense, revealed occurrence of ORFs encoding one β-CA and two γ-CAs. Results One of the putative γ-CA encoding genes of A. brasilense was cloned and overexpressed in E. coli. Electrometric assays for CA activity of the whole cell extracts overexpressing recombinant GCA1 did not show CO2 hydration activity. Reverse transcription-PCR analysis indicated that gca1 in A. brasilense is co-transcribed with its upstream gene annotated as argC, which encodes a putative N-acetyl-γ-glutamate-phosphate reductase. 5'-RACE also demonstrated that there was no transcription start site between argC and gca1, and the transcription start site located upstream of argC transcribed both the genes (argC-gca1). Using transcriptional fusions of argC-gca1 upstream region with promoterless lacZ, we further demonstrated that gca1 upstream region did not have any promoter and its transcription occurred from a promoter located in the argC upstream region. The transcription of argC-gca1 operon was upregulated in stationary phase and at elevated CO2 atmosphere. Conclusions This study shows lack of CO2 hydration activity in a recombinant protein expressed from a gene predicted to encode a γ-carbonic anhydrase in A. brasilense although it cross reacts with anti-Cam antibody raised against a well characterized γ-CA. The organization and regulation of this gene along with the putative argC gene suggests its involvement in arginine biosynthetic pathway instead of the predicted CO2 hydration. PMID:20598158

  11. Convolution models for induced electromagnetic responses

    PubMed Central

    Litvak, Vladimir; Jha, Ashwani; Flandin, Guillaume; Friston, Karl

    2013-01-01

    In Kilner et al. [Kilner, J.M., Kiebel, S.J., Friston, K.J., 2005. Applications of random field theory to electrophysiology. Neurosci. Lett. 374, 174–178.] we described a fairly general analysis of induced responses—in electromagnetic brain signals—using the summary statistic approach and statistical parametric mapping. This involves localising induced responses—in peristimulus time and frequency—by testing for effects in time–frequency images that summarise the response of each subject to each trial type. Conventionally, these time–frequency summaries are estimated using post‐hoc averaging of epoched data. However, post‐hoc averaging of this sort fails when the induced responses overlap or when there are multiple response components that have variable timing within each trial (for example stimulus and response components associated with different reaction times). In these situations, it is advantageous to estimate response components using a convolution model of the sort that is standard in the analysis of fMRI time series. In this paper, we describe one such approach, based upon ordinary least squares deconvolution of induced responses to input functions encoding the onset of different components within each trial. There are a number of fundamental advantages to this approach: for example; (i) one can disambiguate induced responses to stimulus onsets and variably timed responses; (ii) one can test for the modulation of induced responses—over peristimulus time and frequency—by parametric experimental factors and (iii) one can gracefully handle confounds—such as slow drifts in power—by including them in the model. In what follows, we consider optimal forms for convolution models of induced responses, in terms of impulse response basis function sets and illustrate the utility of deconvolution estimators using simulated and real MEG data. PMID:22982359

  12. Ornithine decarboxylase gene (CaODC1) is specifically induced during TMV-mediated but salicylate-independent resistant response in hot pepper.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Tae Hyoung; Park, Chang-Jin; Ham, Byung-Kook; Kim, Ki-Jeong; Paek, Kyung-Hee

    2004-10-01

    A gene encoding putative ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) has been isolated by differential screening of a cDNA library from the resistant hot pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) inoculated with avirulent tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) pathotype P0. In hot pepper plants, transcripts of the CaODC1 (C. annuum ODC1) gene started to accumulate at 24 h post-inoculation of TMV-P0 and the signal was spread systemically. The transcript level of CaODC1 was increased rapidly in a hot pepper resistant to Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Xcv) but not in a susceptible hot pepper after inoculation. These results suggest possible role(s) for CaODC1 in plant defense against a broad range of pathogens including viruses and bacteria.

  13. Monoterpene-induced molecular responses in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Godard, Kimberley-Ann; White, Richard; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2008-06-01

    Terpenoid volatiles mediate various forms of chemical communications of plants with other organisms. In this paper we demonstrate that exposure of intact Arabidopsis thaliana plants to monoterpene volatiles results in substantial changes of the plant transcriptome and induction of methyl jasmonate (MeJA) accumulation. We used a heterologous pinII::GUS reporter system to test monoterpenes for their potential to induce a response in A. thaliana. Plants showed increased pinII-promoter activity upon exposure to different monoterpene volatiles, similar to the response induced by MeJA, mechanical wounding, or insect feeding. Microarray gene expression profiling indicated induced changes in the abundance of several hundred transcripts in wild-type plants upon either exposure to myrcene volatiles or exposure to a blend of ocimene volatiles consisting of (E)-beta-ocimene, (Z)-beta-ocimene, and allo-ocimene. Many of the monoterpene-induced transcripts are annotated as either transcription factors or as stress or defense genes including several steps in the octadecanoid pathway. Metabolite analysis showed that exposure of Arabidopsis for 2h to myrcene or ocimene induced increased tissue levels of MeJA. Octadecanoid biosynthesis (aoc) and signaling (coi1) mutants showed some reduced ocimene-induction of gene expression.

  14. Extracellular-signal regulated kinase (Erk1/2), mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 2 (MK2) and tristetraprolin (TTP) comprehensively regulate injury-induced immediate early gene (IEG) response in in vitro liver organ culture.

    PubMed

    Tran, Doan Duy Hai; Koch, Alexandra; Saran, Shashank; Armbrecht, Marcel; Ewald, Florian; Koch, Martina; Wahlicht, Tom; Wirth, Dagmar; Braun, Armin; Nashan, Björn; Gaestel, Matthias; Tamura, Teruko

    2016-05-01

    Differentiated hepatocytes are long-lived and normally do not undergo cell division, however they have the unique capacity to autonomously decide their replication fate after liver injury. In this context, the key players of liver regeneration immediately after injury have not been adequately studied. Using an in vitro liver culture system, we show that after liver injury, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK), mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 2 (MK2) and extracellular-signal regulated kinase (Erk)1/2 were activated within 15 min and continued to be phosphorylated for more than 2h. Both p38MAPK and Erk1/2 were activated at the edge of the cut as well as on the liver surface where the mesothelial cell sheet expresses several cytokines. Notably, in human liver Erk1/2 was also activated under the mesothelial cell sheet shortly after liver resections. Furthermore, in in vitro liver slice culture immediate early genes (IEGs) were upregulated within 1-2 h and the S phase marker proliferation-cell-nuclear-antigen (PCNA) appeared 24 h after injury. Although Erk1/2 was activated after injury, in MK2 depleted liver a set of IEGs, such as Dusp1, Cox2, or c-Myc and proliferation marker gene Ki67 were not induced. In addition, in immortalized hepatocyte cells, THLE-2, the same subset of genes was upregulated upon stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), but not in the presence of MK2 inhibitor. The protein level of tristetraprolin (TTP), a substrate for MK2 that plays a role in mRNA degradation, was increased in the presence of MK2 inhibitor. In this context, the depletion of TTP gene rescued Dusp1, Cox2, or c-Myc upregulation in the presence of MK2 inhibitor. These data imply that MK2 pathway is positively involved in Erk1/2 induced IEG response after liver injury. These data also suggest that in vitro liver culture may be a useful tool for measuring the proliferation potential of hepatocytes in individual liver.

  15. Inhibition of Breast Cancer-Induced Angiogenesis by a Diverged Homeobox Gene

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-01

    Dickkopf homolog 1 ( DKK1 ) Signal transduction -8.0 0.0002 NM_002852 Pentaxin-related gene, rapidly induced by IL-1 beta (PTX3) Immune response -9.2...Dickkopf homologue 1 ( DKK1 ) Signal transduction 8.0 0.0002 NM_002852 Pentaxin-related gene, rapidly induced by IL-1 h (PTX3) Immune response 9.2 0.0142

  16. Microarray studies of psychostimulant-induced changes in gene expression.

    PubMed

    Yuferov, Vadim; Nielsen, David; Butelman, Eduardo; Kreek, Mary Jeanne

    2005-03-01

    Alterations in the expression of multiple genes in many brain regions are likely to contribute to psychostimulant-induced behaviours. Microarray technology provides a powerful tool for the simultaneous interrogation of gene expression levels of a large number of genes. Several recent experimental studies, reviewed here, demonstrate the power, limitations and progress of microarray technology in the field of psychostimulant addiction. These studies vary in the paradigms of cocaine or amphetamine administration, drug doses, route and also mode of administration, duration of treatment, animal species, brain regions studied and time of tissue collection after final drug administration. The studies also utilize different microarray platforms and statistical techniques for analysis of differentially expressed genes. These variables influence substantially the results of these studies. It is clear that current microarray techniques cannot detect small changes reliably in gene expression of genes with low expression levels, including functionally significant changes in components of major neurotransmission systems such as glutamate, dopamine, opioid and GABA receptors, especially those that may occur after chronic drug administration or drug withdrawal. However, the microarray studies reviewed here showed cocaine- or amphetamine-induced alterations in the expression of numerous genes involved in the modulation of neuronal growth, cytoskeletal structures, synaptogenesis, signal transduction, apoptosis and cell metabolism. Application of laser capture microdissection and single-cell cDNA amplification may greatly enhance microarray studies of gene expression profiling. The combination of rapidly evolving microarray technology with established methods of neuroscience, molecular biology and genetics, as well as appropriate behavioural models of drug reinforcement, may provide a productive approach for delineating the neurobiological underpinnings of drug responses that lead to

  17. Inducible gene expression systems and plant biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Corrado, Giandomenico; Karali, Marianthi

    2009-01-01

    Plant biotechnology relies heavily on the genetic manipulation of crops. Almost invariantly, the gene of interest is expressed in a constitutive fashion, although this may not be strictly necessary for several applications. Currently, there are several regulatable expression systems for the temporal, spatial and quantitative control of transgene activity. These molecular switches are based on components derived from different organisms, which range from viruses to higher eukaryotes. Many inducible systems have been designed for fundamental and applied research and since their initial development, they have become increasingly popular in plant molecular biology. This review covers a broad number of inducible expression systems examining their properties and relevance for plant biotechnology in its various guises, from molecular breeding to pharmaceutical and industrial applications. For each system, we examine some advantages and limitations, also in relation to the strategy on which they rely. Besides being necessary to control useful genes that may negatively affect crop yield and quality, we discuss that inducible systems can be also used to increase public acceptance of GMOs, reducing some of the most common concerns. Finally, we suggest some directions and future developments for their further diffusion in agriculture and biotechnology.

  18. Comparative gene responses to collected ambient particles in vitro: endothelial responses

    PubMed Central

    Aung, Hnin H.; Lame, Michael W.; Gohil, Kishorchandra; He, Guochun; Denison, Michael S.; Rutledge, John C.

    2011-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies associate exposure to ambient particulate matter (APM) with increased cardiovascular mortality. Since both pulmonary inflammation and systemic circulation of ultrafine particles are hypothesized as initiating cardiovascular effects, we examined responses of potential target cells in vitro. Human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC) were exposed to 10 μg/ml fine and ultrafine APM collected in an urban setting in summer 2006 or winter 2007 in the San Joaquin Valley, California. RNA isolated after 3 h was analyzed with high-density oligonucleotide arrays. Summer APM treatment affected genes involved in xenobiotic and oxidoreductase activity, transcription factors, and inflammatory responses in HAEC, while winter APM had a robust xenobiotic but lesser inflammatory response. Real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis confirmed that particulate matter (PM)-treated HAEC increased mRNA levels of xenobiotic response enzymes CYP1A1, ALDH1A3, and TIPARP and cellular stress response transcription factor ATF3. Inflammatory response genes included E-selectin, PTGS2, CXCL-2 (MIP-2α), and CCL-2 (MCP-1). Multiplex protein assays showed secretion of IL-6 and MCP-1 by HAEC. Since induction of CYP1A1 is mediated through the ligand-activated aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), we demonstrated APM induced AhR nuclear translocation by immunofluorescence and Western blotting and activation of the AhR response element using a luciferase reporter construct. Inhibitor studies suggest differential influences of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon signaling, ROS-mediated responses and endotoxin alter stress and proinflammatory endothelial cell responses. Our findings demonstrate gene responses correlated with current concepts that systemic inflammation drives cardiovascular effects of particulate air pollution. We also demonstrate a unique pattern of gene responses related to xenobiotic metabolism in PM-exposed HAEC. PMID:21652769

  19. JC virus induces altered patterns of cellular gene expression: Interferon-inducible genes as major transcriptional targets

    SciTech Connect

    Verma, Saguna; Ziegler, Katja; Ananthula, Praveen; Co, Juliene K.G.; Frisque, Richard J.; Yanagihara, Richard; Nerurkar, Vivek R. . E-mail: nerurkar@pbrc.hawaii.edu

    2006-02-20

    Human polyomavirus JC (JCV) infects 80% of the population worldwide. Primary infection, typically occurring during childhood, is asymptomatic in immunocompetent individuals and results in lifelong latency and persistent infection. However, among the severely immunocompromised, JCV may cause a fatal demyelinating disease, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). Virus-host interactions influencing persistence and pathogenicity are not well understood, although significant regulation of JCV activity is thought to occur at the level of transcription. Regulation of the JCV early and late promoters during the lytic cycle is a complex event that requires participation of both viral and cellular factors. We have used cDNA microarray technology to analyze global alterations in gene expression in JCV-permissive primary human fetal glial cells (PHFG). Expression of more than 400 cellular genes was altered, including many that influence cell proliferation, cell communication and interferon (IFN)-mediated host defense responses. Genes in the latter category included signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1), interferon stimulating gene 56 (ISG56), myxovirus resistance 1 (MxA), 2'5'-oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS), and cig5. The expression of these genes was further confirmed in JCV-infected PHFG cells and the human glioblastoma cell line U87MG to ensure the specificity of JCV in inducing this strong antiviral response. Results obtained by real-time RT-PCR and Western blot analyses supported the microarray data and provide temporal information related to virus-induced changes in the IFN response pathway. Our data indicate that the induction of an antiviral response may be one of the cellular factors regulating/controlling JCV replication in immunocompetent hosts and therefore constraining the development of PML.

  20. Assessment of the Immune Responses Induced in Cattle after Inoculation of a Mycobacterium bovis Strain Deleted in Two mce2 Genes

    PubMed Central

    Blanco, Federico Carlos; Soria, Marcelo; Gravisaco, María José; Bianco, María Verónica; Meikle, Virginia; Garbaccio, Sergio; Vagnoni, Lucas; Cataldi, Angel Adrián; Bigi, Fabiana

    2012-01-01

    The generation of efficient candidate vaccines against bovine tuberculosis will contribute to the control of this zoonotic disease. Rationally attenuated Mycobacterium bovis strains generated by knockout of virulence genes are promising candidate vaccines. However, to be effective, these candidate vaccines should at least maintain the immunological properties of their virulent parental M. bovis strains. Therefore, the aim of this study was to obtain an M. bovis strain deleted in the mce2 genes and evaluate the effect of the mutation on the immunological profile elicited by the bacteria in cattle. We showed that the activation of CD4+ T cells in cattle inoculated with the mutant strain was equivalent to that in animals inoculated with the parental strain. Moreover, after in vitro stimulation, peripheral blood mononuclear cells from animals inoculated with the mutant produced higher levels of mRNA Th-1 cytokines than the parental strain. Therefore, these results indicate that the mce2 mutant is a promising candidate vaccine against bovine tuberculosis. PMID:22719207

  1. Targeted Gene Silencing to Induce Permanent Sterility

    PubMed Central

    Dissen, Gregory A.; Lomniczi, Alejandro; Boudreau, Ryan L.; Chen, Yong Hong; Davidson, Beverly L.; Ojeda, Sergio R.

    2012-01-01

    Contents A nonsurgical method to induce sterility would be a useful tool to control feral populations of animals. Our laboratories have experience with approaches aimed at targeting brain cells in vivo with vehicles that deliver a payload of either inhibitory RNAs or genes intended to correct cellular dysfunction. A combination/modification of these methods may provide a useful framework for the design of approaches that can be used to sterilize cats and dogs. For this approach to succeed it has to meet several conditions: It needs to target a gene essential for fertility. It must involve a method that can selectively silence the gene of interest. It also needs to deliver the silencing agent via a minimally invasive method. Finally, the silencing effect needs to be sustained for many years, so that expansion of the targeted population can be effectively prevented. In this article we discuss this subject and provide a succinct account of our previous experience with: a) molecular reagents able to disrupt reproductive cyclicity when delivered to regions of the brain involved in the control of reproduction, and b) molecular reagents able to ameliorate neuronal disease when delivered systemically using a novel approach of gene therapy. PMID:22827375

  2. Nonlinear responses for chromosome and gene level effects induced by vinyl acetate monomer and its metabolite, acetaldehyde in TK6 cells.

    PubMed

    Budinsky, Robert; Gollapudi, Bhaskar; Albertini, Richard J; Valentine, Rudolph; Stavanja, Mari; Teeguarden, Justin; Fensterheim, Robert; Rick, David; Lardie, Thomas; McFadden, Lisa; Green, Amanda; Recio, Leslie

    2013-12-01

    Vinyl acetate monomer (VAM) produced rat nasal tumors at concentrations in the hundreds of parts per million. However, VAM is weakly genotoxic in vitro and shows no genotoxicity in vivo. A European Union Risk Assessment concluded that VAM's hydrolysis to acetaldehyde (AA), via carboxylesterase, is a critical key event in VAM's carcinogenic potential. In the following study, we observed increases in micronuclei (MN) and thymidine kinase (Tk) mutants that were dependent on the ability of TK6 cell culture conditions to rapidly hydrolyze VAM to AA. Heat-inactivated horse serum demonstrated a high capacity to hydrolyze VAM to AA; this activity was highly correlated with a concomitant increase in MN. In contrast, heat-inactivated fetal bovine serum (FBS) did not hydrolyze VAM and no increase in MN was observed. AA's ability to induce MN was not impacted by either serum since it directly forms Schiff bases with DNA and proteins. Increased mutant frequency at the Tk locus was similarly mitigated when AA formation was not sufficiently rapid, such as incubating VAM in the presence of FBS for 4 hr. Interestingly, neither VAM nor AA induced mutations at the HPRT locus. Finally, cytotoxicity paralleled genotoxicity demonstrating that a small degree of cytotoxicity occurred prior to increases in MN. These results established 0.25 mM as a consistent concentration where genotoxicity first occurred for both VAM and AA provided VAM is hydrolyzed to AA. This information further informs significant key events related to the mode of action of VAM-induced nasal mucosal tumors in rats.

  3. Estrogen-Responsive Genes Overlap with Triiodothyronine-Responsive Genes in a Breast Carcinoma Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Cestari, Sílvia Helena; Conde, Sandro José; Luvizotto, Renata Azevedo Melo; De Sibio, Maria Teresa; Perone, Denise; Katayama, Maria Lúcia Hirata; Carraro, Dirce Maria; Brentani, Helena Paula; Brentani, Maria Mitzi; Nogueira, Célia Regina

    2014-01-01

    It has been well established that estrogen plays an important role in the progression and treatment of breast cancer. However, the role of triiodothyronine (T3) remains controversial. We have previously shown its capacity to stimulate the development of positive estrogen receptor breast carcinoma, induce the expression of genes (PR, TGF-alpha) normally stimulated by estradiol (E2), and suppress genes (TGF-beta) normally inhibited by E2. Since T3 regulates growth hormones, metabolism, and differentiation, it is important to verify its action on other genes normally induced by E2. Therefore, we used DNA microarrays to compare gene expression patterns in MCF-7 breast adenocarcinoma cells treated with E2 and T3. Several genes were modulated by both E2 and T3 in MCF-7 cells (Student's t-test, P < 0.05). Specifically, we found eight genes that were differentially expressed after treatment with both E2 and T3, including amphiregulin, fibulin 1, claudin 6, pericentriolar material 1, premature ovarian failure 1B, factor for adipocyte differentiation-104, sterile alpha motif domain containing 9, and likely ortholog of rat vacuole membrane protein 1 (fold change > 2.0, pFDR < 0.05). We confirmed our microarray results by real-time PCR. Our findings reveal that certain genes in MCF-7 cells can be regulated by both E2 and T3. PMID:24587767

  4. Widespread Inducible Transcription Downstream of Human Genes

    PubMed Central

    Vilborg, Anna; Passarelli, Maria C.; Yario, Therese A.; Tycowski, Kazimierz T.; Steitz, Joan A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Pervasive transcription of the human genome generates RNAs whose mode of formation and functions are largely uncharacterized. Here, we combine RNA-Seq with detailed mechanistic studies to describe a transcript type derived from protein-coding genes. The resulting RNAs, which we call DoGs for downstream of gene containing transcripts, possess long non-coding regions (often >45 kb) and remain chromatin bound. DoGs are inducible by osmotic stress through an IP3 receptor signaling-dependent pathway, indicating active regulation. DoG levels are increased by decreased termination of the upstream transcript, a previously undescribed mechanism for rapid transcript induction. Relative depletion of polyA signals in DoG regions correlates with increased levels of DoGs after osmotic stress. We detect DoG transcription in several human cell lines and provide evidence for thousands of DoGs genome-wide. PMID:26190259

  5. Virus-induced gene silencing of Arabidopsis thaliana gene homologues in wheat identifies genes conferring improved drought tolerance.

    PubMed

    Manmathan, Harish; Shaner, Dale; Snelling, Jacob; Tisserat, Ned; Lapitan, Nora

    2013-03-01

    In a non-model staple crop like wheat (Triticum aestivumI L.), functional validation of potential drought stress responsive genes identified in Arabidopsis could provide gene targets for breeding. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) of genes of interest can overcome the inherent problems of polyploidy and limited transformation potential that hamper functional validation studies in wheat. In this study, three potential candidate genes shown to be involved in abiotic stress response pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana were selected for VIGS experiments in wheat. These include Era1 (enhanced response to abscisic acid), Cyp707a (ABA 8'-hydroxylase), and Sal1 (inositol polyphosphate 1-phosphatase). Gene homologues for these three genes were identified in wheat and cloned in the viral vector barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV) in the antisense direction, followed by rub inoculation of BSMV viral RNA transcripts onto wheat plants. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that VIGS-treated wheat plants had significant reductions in target gene transcripts. When VIGS-treated plants generated for Era1 and Sal1 were subjected to limiting water conditions, they showed increased relative water content, improved water use efficiency, reduced gas exchange, and better vigour compared to water-stressed control plants inoculated with RNA from the empty viral vector (BSMV0). In comparison, the Cyp707a-silenced plants showed no improvement over BSMV0-inoculated plants under limited water condition. These results indicate that Era1 and Sal1 play important roles in conferring drought tolerance in wheat. Other traits affected by Era1 silencing were also studied. Delayed seed germination in Era1-silenced plants suggests this gene may be a useful target for developing resistance to pre-harvest sprouting.

  6. Virus-induced gene silencing of Arabidopsis thaliana gene homologues in wheat identifies genes conferring improved drought tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Lapitan, Nora

    2013-01-01

    In a non-model staple crop like wheat (Triticum aestivumI L.), functional validation of potential drought stress responsive genes identified in Arabidopsis could provide gene targets for breeding. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) of genes of interest can overcome the inherent problems of polyploidy and limited transformation potential that hamper functional validation studies in wheat. In this study, three potential candidate genes shown to be involved in abiotic stress response pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana were selected for VIGS experiments in wheat. These include Era1 (enhanced response to abscisic acid), Cyp707a (ABA 8’-hydroxylase), and Sal1 (inositol polyphosphate 1-phosphatase). Gene homologues for these three genes were identified in wheat and cloned in the viral vector barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV) in the antisense direction, followed by rub inoculation of BSMV viral RNA transcripts onto wheat plants. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that VIGS-treated wheat plants had significant reductions in target gene transcripts. When VIGS-treated plants generated for Era1 and Sal1 were subjected to limiting water conditions, they showed increased relative water content, improved water use efficiency, reduced gas exchange, and better vigour compared to water-stressed control plants inoculated with RNA from the empty viral vector (BSMV0). In comparison, the Cyp707a-silenced plants showed no improvement over BSMV0-inoculated plants under limited water condition. These results indicate that Era1 and Sal1 play important roles in conferring drought tolerance in wheat. Other traits affected by Era1 silencing were also studied. Delayed seed germination in Era1-silenced plants suggests this gene may be a useful target for developing resistance to pre-harvest sprouting. PMID:23364940

  7. Ethanol-induced stress response of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Pando, Jasmine M; Pfeltz, Richard F; Cuaron, Jesus A; Nagarajan, Vijayaraj; Mishra, Mukti N; Torres, Nathanial J; Elasri, Mohamed O; Wilkinson, Brian J; Gustafson, John E

    2017-09-01

    Transcriptional profiles of 2 unrelated clinical methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates were analyzed following 10% (v/v) ethanol challenge (15 min), which arrested growth but did not reduce viability. Ethanol-induced stress (EIS) resulted in differential gene expression of 1091 genes, 600 common to both strains, of which 291 were upregulated. With the exception of the downregulation of genes involved with osmotic stress functions, EIS resulted in the upregulation of genes that contribute to stress response networks, notably those altered by oxidative stress, protein quality control in general, and heat shock in particular. In addition, genes involved with transcription, translation, and nucleotide biosynthesis were downregulated. relP, which encodes a small alarmone synthetase (RelP), was highly upregulated in both MRSA strains following ethanol challenge, and relP inactivation experiments indicated that this gene contributed to EIS growth arrest. A number of persistence-associated genes were also upregulated during EIS, including those that encode toxin-antitoxin systems. Overall, transcriptional profiling indicated that the MRSA investigated responded to EIS by entering a state of dormancy and by altering the expression of elements from cross protective stress response systems in an effort to protect preexisting proteins.

  8. Independent glucocorticoid induction and repression of two contiguous responsive genes.

    PubMed Central

    Charron, J; Richard-Foy, H; Berard, D S; Hager, G L; Drouin, J

    1989-01-01

    Specific DNA sequence elements which contain binding sites for the glucocorticoid receptor mediate the action of glucocorticoid hormones on gene transcription. In glucocorticoid-inducible genes, these glucocorticoid-responsive elements behave as hormone-inducible enhancers of transcription. We have taken advantage of the bovine papillomavirus (BPV) system to test the stringency of glucocorticoid regulation of transcription. BPV episomes were constructed to contain two hormone-regulated transcription units in close proximity; one transcription unit is under control of a glucocorticoid-inducible promoter (mouse mammary tumor virus) while the other is under control of a glucocorticoid-inhibited promoter (pro-opiomelanocortin). Glucocorticoids independently regulated transcription of the two physically linked transcription units, irrespective of their relative orientation and of their proximity on the BPV episomes. This result contrasts with the so-called position-independent activity of enhancers and suggests that the multicomponent organization of eucaryotic promoters restricts the action of hormone-responsive regulatory elements to a specific transcription unit, thus accounting for the stringency of hormonal regulation observed in vivo. Images PMID:2550796

  9. Distinct cold responsiveness of a StInvInh2 gene promoter in transgenic potato tubers with contrasting resistance to cold-induced sweetening.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xun; Shi, Weiling; Yin, Wang; Wang, Jichun

    2017-02-01

    Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) vacuolar invertase (β-fructofuranosidase; EC 3.2.1.26) inhibitor 2 (StInvInh2) plays an important role in cold-induced sweetening (CIS) of potato tubers. The transcript levels of StInvInh2 were increased by prolonged cold in potato tubers with CIS-resistance but decreased in potato tubers with CIS-sensitivity. However, the transcript regulation mechanisms of StInvInh2 responding to prolonged cold are largely unclear in CIS-resistant and CIS-sensitive genotypes. In the present study, the 5'-flanking sequence of the StInvInh2 was cloned, and cis-acting elements were predicted. No informative differences in StInvInh2 promoter structure between resistant and sensitive-CIS potato genotypes were observed. Histochemical assay showed that the promoter of StInvInh2 mainly governed β-glucuronidase (GUS) expression in potato microtubers. Quantitative analysis of GUS expression suggested that StInvInh2 promoter activity was enhanced by prolonged cold in CIS-resistant genotype tubers but suppressed in CIS-sensitive tubers. These findings provide essential information regarding transcriptional regulatory mechanisms of StInvInh2 in cold-stored tubers contrasting CIS capacity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Shock wave induced sonoporation and gene transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Douglas L.

    2003-10-01

    During shockwave (SW) treatment, cavitation activity can be applied for cell killing. A bonus is that some surviving cells appear to be briefly permeabilized, or sonoporated, allowing them to take up large molecules including DNA. In vitro research has indicated that as the number of SW increased, survival declined exponentially but the number of sonoporated cells increased to better than 50% of survivors for 1000 SW. In vivo tests have demonstrated SW-induced tumor ablation could indeed be accompanied by the transfection of marker plasmids into mouse B16 melanoma tumors in vivo. With intratumor injection of plasmid DNA and air bubbles, significant results were obtained for only 400 SW. In a trial of cancer therapy, the effects of 500 SW combined with interleukin-12 immuno-gene therapy was observed on the progression of two mouse tumors, B16 melanoma and RENCA renal carcinoma. The combination of SW and IL-12 plasmid injection provided a statistically significant inhibition of tumor growth relative to SW alone for both tumor models, demonstrating feasibility for this treatment method. In the future, the development of intravenous gene delivery and improved transfection, together with image-guided ultrasound treatment, should lead to the clinical application of ultrasound enhanced gene therapy. [Work supported by NIH Grant No. EB002782.

  11. Neonicotinoid insecticides induce salicylate-associated plant defense responses

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Kevin A.; Casida, John E.; Chandran, Divya; Gulevich, Alexander G.; Okrent, Rachel A.; Durkin, Kathleen A.; Sarpong, Richmond; Bunnelle, Eric M.; Wildermuth, Mary C.

    2010-01-01

    Neonicotinoid insecticides control crop pests based on their action as agonists at the insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, which accepts chloropyridinyl- and chlorothiazolyl-analogs almost equally well. In some cases, these compounds have also been reported to enhance plant vigor and (a)biotic stress tolerance, independent of their insecticidal function. However, this mode of action has not been defined. Using Arabidopsis thaliana, we show that the neonicotinoid compounds, imidacloprid (IMI) and clothianidin (CLO), via their 6-chloropyridinyl-3-carboxylic acid and 2-chlorothiazolyl-5-carboxylic acid metabolites, respectively, induce salicylic acid (SA)-associated plant responses. SA is a phytohormone best known for its role in plant defense against pathogens and as an inducer of systemic acquired resistance; however, it can also modulate abiotic stress responses. These neonicotinoids effect a similar global transcriptional response to that of SA, including genes involved in (a)biotic stress response. Furthermore, similar to SA, IMI and CLO induce systemic acquired resistance, resulting in reduced growth of a powdery mildew pathogen. The action of CLO induces the endogenous synthesis of SA via the SA biosynthetic enzyme ICS1, with ICS1 required for CLO-induced accumulation of SA, expression of the SA marker PR1, and fully enhanced resistance to powdery mildew. In contrast, the action of IMI does not induce endogenous synthesis of SA. Instead, IMI is further bioactivated to 6-chloro-2-hydroxypyridinyl-3-carboxylic acid, which is shown here to be a potent inducer of PR1 and inhibitor of SA-sensitive enzymes. Thus, via different mechanisms, these chloropyridinyl- and chlorothiazolyl-neonicotinoids induce SA responses associated with enhanced stress tolerance. PMID:20876120

  12. Extracellular Matrix Induced Gene Expression in Human Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Garamszegi, Nandor; Garamszegi, Susanna P.; Shehadeh, Lina A.; Scully, Sean P.

    2009-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules modify gene expression through attachment-dependent (i.e., focal adhesion related) integrin receptor signalling. It was previously unknown whether the same molecules acting as soluble peptides could generate signal cascades without the associated mechanical anchoring, a condition that may be encountered during matrix remodelling, degradation and relevant to invasion and metastatic processes. In the current study the role of ECM ligand regulated gene expression through this attachment independent process was examined. It was observed that fibronectin, laminin, collagens type I and II induce Smad2 activation in MCF-10A and MCF-7 cells. This activation is not caused by TGFβ ligand contamination or autocrine TGF involvement and is 3–5 fold less robust than the TGFβ1 ligand. The resulting nuclear translocation of Smad4 in response to ECM ligand indicates downstream transcriptional responses occurring. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments determined that type II collagen and laminin act through interaction with integrin α2β1 receptor complex. The ECM ligand induced Smad activation (termed signalling crosstalk) resulted cell type and ligand specific transcriptional changes which are distinct from the TGFβ ligand induced responses. These findings demonstrate that cell-matrix communication is more complex than previously thought. Soluble ECM peptides drive transcriptional regulation through corresponding adhesion and non-attachment related processes. The resultant gene expressional patterns correlate with pathway activity and not by the extent of Smad activation. These results extend the complexity and the existing paradigms of ECM-cell communication to ECM ligand regulation without the necessity of mechanical coupling. PMID:19276183

  13. Mitochondrial gene expression, antioxidant responses, and histopathology after cadmium exposure.

    PubMed

    Al Kaddissi, Simone; Legeay, Alexia; Elia, Antonia Concetta; Gonzalez, Patrice; Floriani, Magali; Cavalie, Isabelle; Massabuau, Jean-Charles; Gilbin, Rodolphe; Simon, Olivier

    2014-08-01

    The present study investigates cadmium effects on the transcription of mitochondrial genes of Procambarus clarkii after acute (0.05, 0.5, and 5 mg Cd/L; 4-10 days) and chronic exposures (10 μg Cd/L; 30-60 days). Transcriptional responses of cox1, atp6, and 12S using quantitative real-time RT-PCR were assessed in gills and hepatopancreas. Additionally, the expression levels of genes involved in detoxification and/or oxidative stress responses [mt, sod(Mn)] and enzymatic activities of antioxidants (SOD, CAT, GPX, and GST) were analyzed. The histopathological effects in hepatopancreas of crayfish were evaluated by light microscopy. Relationships between endpoints at different levels of biological organization and Cd bioaccumulation were also examined. Cd induced high levels of bioaccumulation, which was followed by mitochondrial dysfunction and histological alterations in both experiments. Moreover, perturbations in the defence mechanisms against oxidative stress tended to increase with time. Results also showed that molecular responses can vary depending on the intensity and duration of the chemical stress applied to the organisms and that the study of mt gene expression levels seemed to be the best tool to assess Cd intoxication.

  14. Expression analysis of MYC genes from Tamarix hispida in response to different abiotic stresses.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xiaoyu; Wang, Yucheng; Liu, Guifeng

    2012-01-01

    The MYC genes are a group of transcription factors containing both bHLH and ZIP motifs that play important roles in the regulation of abscisic acid (ABA)-responsive genes. In the present study, to investigate the roles of MYC genes under NaCl, osmotic and ABA stress conditions, nine MYC genes were cloned from Tamarix hispida. Real-time reverse-transcriptase (RT)-PCR showed that all nine MYC genes were expressed in root, stem and leaf tissues, but that the levels of the transcripts of these genes in the various tissues differed notably. The MYC genes were highly induced in the roots in response to ABA, NaCl and osmotic stresses after 3 h; however, in the stem and leaf tissues, MYC genes were highly induced only when exposed to these stresses for 6 h. In addition, most of these MYC genes were highly expressed in roots in comparison with stems and leaves. Furthermore, the MYC genes were more highly induced in roots than in stem and leaf tissues, indicating that these genes may play roles in stress responses mainly in the roots rather than the stems and leaves. The results of this present study suggest that MYCs are involved in salt and osmotic stress tolerances and are controlled by the ABA signal transduction pathway.

  15. Transposable Elements Contribute to Activation of Maize Genes in Response to Abiotic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Makarevitch, Irina; Waters, Amanda J.; West, Patrick T.; Stitzer, Michelle; Hirsch, Candice N.; Ross-Ibarra, Jeffrey; Springer, Nathan M.

    2015-01-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) account for a large portion of the genome in many eukaryotic species. Despite their reputation as “junk” DNA or genomic parasites deleterious for the host, TEs have complex interactions with host genes and the potential to contribute to regulatory variation in gene expression. It has been hypothesized that TEs and genes they insert near may be transcriptionally activated in response to stress conditions. The maize genome, with many different types of TEs interspersed with genes, provides an ideal system to study the genome-wide influence of TEs on gene regulation. To analyze the magnitude of the TE effect on gene expression response to environmental changes, we profiled gene and TE transcript levels in maize seedlings exposed to a number of abiotic stresses. Many genes exhibit up- or down-regulation in response to these stress conditions. The analysis of TE families inserted within upstream regions of up-regulated genes revealed that between four and nine different TE families are associated with up-regulated gene expression in each of these stress conditions, affecting up to 20% of the genes up-regulated in response to abiotic stress, and as many as 33% of genes that are only expressed in response to stress. Expression of many of these same TE families also responds to the same stress conditions. The analysis of the stress-induced transcripts and proximity of the transposon to the gene suggests that these TEs may provide local enhancer activities that stimulate stress-responsive gene expression. Our data on allelic variation for insertions of several of these TEs show strong correlation between the presence of TE insertions and stress-responsive up-regulation of gene expression. Our findings suggest that TEs provide an important source of allelic regulatory variation in gene response to abiotic stress in maize. PMID:25569788

  16. CXCR4 gene transfer prevents pressure overload induced heart failure

    PubMed Central

    LaRocca, Thomas J.; Jeong, Dongtak; Kohlbrenner, Erik; Lee, Ahyoung; Chen, JiQiu; Hajjar, Roger J.; Tarzami, Sima T.

    2012-01-01

    Stem cell and gene therapies are being pursued as strategies for repairing damaged cardiac tissue following myocardial infarction in an attempt to prevent heart failure. The chemokine receptor-4 (CXCR4) and its ligand, CXCL12, play a critical role in stem cell recruitment post-acute myocardial infarction. Whereas progenitor cell migration via the CXCL12/CXCR4 axis is well characterized, little is known about the molecular mechanisms of CXCR4 mediated modulation of cardiac hypertrophy and failure. We used gene therapy to test the effects of CXCR4 gene delivery on adverse ventricular remodeling due to pressure overload. We assessed the effect of cardiac overexpression of CXCR4 during trans-aortic constriction (TAC) using a cardiotropic adeno-associated viral vector (AAV9) carrying the CXCR4 gene. Cardiac overexpression of CXCR4 in mice with pressure overload prevented ventricular remodeling, preserved capillary density and maintained function as determined by echocardiography and in vivo hemodynamics. In isolated adult rat cardiac myocytes, CXCL12 treatment prevented isoproterenol induced hypertrophy and interrupted the calcineurin/NFAT pathway. Finally, a complex involving the L-type calcium channel, β2-adenoreceptor, and CXCR4 (Cav1.2/β2AR/CXCR4) was identified in healthy cardiac myocytes and was shown to dissociate as a consequence of heart failure. CXCR4 administered to the heart via gene transfer prevents pressure overload induced heart failure. The identification of CXCR4 participation in a Cav1.2-β2AR regulatory complex provides further insight into the mechanism by which CXCR4 modulates calcium homeostasis and chronic pressure overload responses in the cardiac myocyte. Together these results suggest AAV9.CXCR4 gene therapy is a potential therapeutic approach for congestive heart failure. PMID:22668785

  17. Characterizing gene responses to drought stress in fourwing saltbush [Atriplex canescens (Pursh.) Nutt.)

    Treesearch

    Linda S. Adair; David L. Andrews; John Cairney; Edward A. Funkhouser; Ronald J. Newton; Earl F. Aldon

    1992-01-01

    New techniques in molecular biology can be used to characterize genes whose expression is induced by drought stress. These techniques can be used to understand responses of range plants to environmental stresses at the biochemical and molecular level. For example, they can be used to characterize genes that respond to drought stress conditions in the native shrub

  18. Virus-Induced gene silencing in ornamental plants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Virus-Induced Gene Silencing (VIGS) provides an attractive tool for high throughput analysis of the functional effects of gene knock-down. Virus genomes are engineered to include fragments of target host genes, and the infected plant recognizes and silences the target genes as part of its viral defe...

  19. Virus-Induced Gene Silencing in Ornametal Plants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Virus-Induced Gene Silencing (VIGS) provides an attractive tool for high throughput analysis of the functional effects of gene knock-down. Virus genomes are engineered to include fragments of target host genes, and the infected plant recognizes and silences the target genes as part of its viral defe...

  20. Progesterone attenuates cocaine-induced responses.

    PubMed

    Quinones-Jenab, Vanya; Jenab, Shirzad

    2010-06-01

    In this review, we summarize literature focused on how progesterone alters cocaine-induced psychomotor, reinforcement, and physiological responses. Clinical studies suggest that progesterone attenuates the subjective effects of cocaine. Similarly, preclinical studies have demonstrated that cocaine-induced reward and psychomotor responses are attenuated after progesterone administration. In rats progesterone also reduces the reinforcement effects of cocaine attenuates acquisition, escalation, reinstatement of cocaine self-administration, and cocaine-seeking behaviors. Progesterone also counteracts the facilitatory effects of estrogen on cocaine self-administration and psychomotor activation. These findings suggest that progesterone has a potential in clinical applications as a treatment for cocaine addiction. Constantly changing progesterone serum levels in female humans and rats affect the female's reinforcement responses to cocaine and may in part contribute to the known sex differences in cocaine responses.

  1. Identification of novel stress-induced genes downstream of chop.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, X Z; Kuroda, M; Sok, J; Batchvarova, N; Kimmel, R; Chung, P; Zinszner, H; Ron, D

    1998-01-01

    CHOP (GADD153) is a small nuclear protein that dimerizes avidly with members of the C/EBP family of transcription factors. Normally undetectable, it is expressed at high levels in cells exposed to conditions that perturb protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum and induce an endoplasmic reticulum stress response. CHOP expression in stressed cells is linked to the development of programmed cell death and, in some instances, cellular regeneration. In this study, representational difference analysis was used to compare the complement of genes expressed in stressed wild-type mouse embryonic fibroblasts with those expressed in cells nullizygous for chop. CHOP expression, in concert with a second signal, was found to be absolutely required for the activation by stress of a set of previously undescribed genes referred to as DOCs (for downstream of CHOP). DOC4 is a mammalian ortholog of a Drosophila gene, Tenm/Odz, implicated in patterning of the early fly embryo, whereas DOC6 encodes a newly recognized homolog of the actin-binding proteins villin and gelsolin. These results reveal the existence of a novel CHOP-dependent signaling pathway, distinct from the known endoplasmic reticulum unfolded protein response, which may mediate changes in cell phenotype in response to stress. PMID:9649432

  2. Identification and characterization of a novel NOD-like receptor family CARD domain containing 3 gene in response to extracellular ATP stimulation and its role in regulating LPS-induced innate immune response in Japanese flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) head kidney macrophages.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuo; Chen, Xiaoli; Hao, Gaixiang; Geng, Xuyun; Zhan, Wenbin; Sun, Jinsheng

    2016-03-01

    Nucleotide oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptor (NLR) family with a caspase activation and recruitment domain (CARD) containing 3 (NLRC3) protein is an important cytosolic pattern recognition receptor that negatively regulates innate immune response in mammals. Hitherto, the immunological significance of NLRC3 protein in fish remains largely uncharacterized. Here we identified and characterized a novel NLRC3 gene (named poNLRC3) implicated in regulation of fish innate immunity from Japanese flounder Paralichthys olivaceus. The poNLRC3 protein is a cytoplasmic protein with an undefined N-terminal domain, a NACHT domain, a fish-specific NACHT associated domain, six LRR motifs, and a C-terminal fish-specific PYR/SPYR (B30.2) domain but only shares less than 40% sequence identities with the known Japanese flounder NLRC proteins. poNLRC3 gene is ubiquitously expressed in all tested tissues and is dominantly expressed in the Japanese flounder head kidney macrophages (HKMs). We for the first time showed that poNLRC3 expression was significantly modulated by the stimulation of extracellular ATP, an important danger/damage-associated molecular pattern in activating innate immunity in P. olivaceus. Importantly, we revealed that poNLRC3 plays an important role in positively regulating ATP-induced IL-1beta and IL-6 gene expression, suggesting the involvement of poNLRC3 in extracellular ATP-mediated immune signaling. In addition, we showed that poNLRC3 mRNA expression was up-regulated in response to LPS and Edwardsiella tarda immune challenges. Finally, we showed that down-regulating the endogenous poNLRC3 expression with small interfering RNA significantly reduced LPS-induced proinflammatory cytokine gene expression in the Japanese flounder HKM cells. Altogether, we have identified a novel inducible fish NLR member, poNLRC3, which is involved in extracellular ATP-mediated immune signaling and may positively regulate the LPS-induced innate immune response in the Japanese

  3. Human pigmentation genes and their response to solar UV radiation.

    PubMed

    Sturm, R A

    1998-11-09

    Identification and characterisation of the genes involved in melanin pigment formation, together with the study of how their action is influenced by exposure to UV radiation, is providing a molecular understanding of the process of skin photoprotection through tanning. The mechanisms underlying this change in epidermal melanin involve both a transcriptional response of the pigmentation genes and post-translational control of the melanin biosynthetic pathway. UV rays are known to interact with numerous molecules within cells, and among these the photochemical reactions involving lipids and DNA are implicated in modulating melanogenesis. The combination of DNA damage, the formation of diacylglycerol, and the action of the melanocyte stimulating hormone receptor are all likely to be involved in UV-induced tanning.

  4. Bitumen fume-induced gene expression profile in rat lung

    SciTech Connect

    Gate, Laurent . E-mail: laurent.gate@inrs.fr; Langlais, Cristina; Micillino, Jean-Claude; Nunge, Herve; Bottin, Marie-Claire; Wrobel, Richard; Binet, Stephane

    2006-08-15

    Exposure to bitumen fumes during paving and roofing activities may represent an occupational health risk. To date, most of the studies performed on the biological effect of asphalt fumes have been done with regard to their content in carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). In order to gain an additional insight into the mechanisms of action of bitumen fumes, we studied their pulmonary effects in rodents following inhalation using the microarray technology. Fisher 344 rats were exposed for 5 days, 6 h/day to bitumen fumes generated at road paving temperature (170 {sup o}C) using a nose-only exposition device. With the intention of studying the early transcriptional events induced by asphalt fumes, lung tissues were collected immediately following exposure and gene expression profiles in control and exposed rats were determined by using oligonucleotide microarrays. Data analysis revealed that genes involved in lung inflammatory response as well as genes associated with PAH metabolization and detoxification were highly expressed in bitumen-exposed animals. In addition, the expression of genes related to elastase activity and its inhibition which are associated with emphysema was also modulated. More interestingly genes coding for monoamine oxidases A and B involved in the metabolism of neurotransmitters and xenobiotics were downregulated in exposed rats. Altogether, these data give additional information concerning the bitumen fumes biological effects and would allow to better review the health effects of occupational asphalt fumes exposure.

  5. Bitumen fume-induced gene expression profile in rat lung.

    PubMed

    Gate, Laurent; Langlais, Cristina; Micillino, Jean-Claude; Nunge, Hervé; Bottin, Marie-Claire; Wrobel, Richard; Binet, Stéphane

    2006-08-15

    Exposure to bitumen fumes during paving and roofing activities may represent an occupational health risk. To date, most of the studies performed on the biological effect of asphalt fumes have been done with regard to their content in carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). In order to gain an additional insight into the mechanisms of action of bitumen fumes, we studied their pulmonary effects in rodents following inhalation using the microarray technology. Fisher 344 rats were exposed for 5 days, 6 h/day to bitumen fumes generated at road paving temperature (170 degrees C) using a nose-only exposition device. With the intention of studying the early transcriptional events induced by asphalt fumes, lung tissues were collected immediately following exposure and gene expression profiles in control and exposed rats were determined by using oligonucleotide microarrays. Data analysis revealed that genes involved in lung inflammatory response as well as genes associated with PAH metabolization and detoxification were highly expressed in bitumen-exposed animals. In addition, the expression of genes related to elastase activity and its inhibition which are associated with emphysema was also modulated. More interestingly genes coding for monoamine oxidases A and B involved in the metabolism of neurotransmitters and xenobiotics were downregulated in exposed rats. Altogether, these data give additional information concerning the bitumen fumes biological effects and would allow to better review the health effects of occupational asphalt fumes exposure.

  6. Cytokines induce selective granulocyte chemotactic responses.

    PubMed

    Bittleman, D B; Erger, R A; Casale, T B

    1996-02-01

    Neutrophils, eosinophils and cytokines are important in allergic airway inflammatory responses. However, it is unclear how cytokines selectively influence neutrophils versus eosinophils to migrate to an inflammatory site. The cytokines, transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1), interleukin (IL)-1alpha, IL-5, IL-8, granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), are released subsequent to allergic reactions and affect both neutrophil and eosinophil functions. We studied whether these cytokines differed in capacity to induce human neutrophil versus eosinophil migration through naked filters and human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) and human pulmonary type II-like epithelial (A549) cell monolayers grown on filters. Dose-response experiments using all barriers were performed for each granulocyte and cytokine. TGF-beta1 did not induce granulocyte migration. IL-5 induced eosinophil migration only through naked filters. IL-1alpha stimulated neutrophil migration through cellular barriers, but not through naked filters. TNF-alpha and GM-CSF induced neutrophil and eosinophil migration through filters, but only neutrophil migration through cellular monolayers. Only IL-8 induced significant neutrophil and eosinophil migration; however, there were clear-cut differences between the neutrophilotactic and eosinophilotactic responses through all barriers employed. Thus, our data show that these cytokines induce distinct chemotactic responses for neutrophils versus eosinophils. Moreover, by using relevant cellular barriers versus naked filters, our data better examines the capability of these cytokines to induce selective granulocyte migration to an inflammatory site in lung diseases such as asthma.

  7. Bifidobacterium bifidum Actively Changes the Gene Expression Profile Induced by Lactobacillus acidophilus in Murine Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Gudrun; Rasmussen, Simon; Nielsen Fink, Lisbeth; Jarmer, Hanne; Nøhr Nielsen, Birgit; Frøkiær, Hanne

    2010-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) play a pivotal regulatory role in activation of both the innate as well as the adaptive immune system by responding to environmental microorganisms. We have previously shown that Lactobacillus acidophilus induces a strong production of the pro-inflammatory and Th1 polarizing cytokine IL-12 in DC, whereas bifidobacteria do not induce IL-12 but inhibit the IL-12 production induced by lactobacilli. In the present study, genome-wide microarrays were used to investigate the gene expression pattern of murine DC stimulated with Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM and Bifidobacterium bifidum Z9. L. acidophilus NCFM strongly induced expression of interferon (IFN)-β, other virus defence genes, and cytokine and chemokine genes related to the innate and the adaptive immune response. By contrast, B. bifidum Z9 up-regulated genes encoding cytokines and chemokines related to the innate immune response. Moreover, B. bifidum Z9 inhibited the expression of the Th1-promoting genes induced by L. acidophilus NCFM and had an additive effect on genes of the innate immune response and Th2 skewing genes. The gene encoding Jun dimerization protein 2 (JDP2), a transcription factor regulating the activation of JNK, was one of the few genes only induced by B. bifidum Z9. Neutralization of IFN-β abrogated L. acidophilus NCFM-induced expression of Th1-skewing genes, and blocking of the JNK pathway completely inhibited the expression of IFN-β. Our results indicate that B. bifidum Z9 actively inhibits the expression of genes related to the adaptive immune system in murine dendritic cells and that JPD2 via blocking of IFN-β plays a central role in this regulatory mechanism. PMID:20548777

  8. Alcohol-induced histone acetylation reveals a gene network involved in alcohol tolerance.

    PubMed

    Ghezzi, Alfredo; Krishnan, Harish R; Lew, Linda; Prado, Francisco J; Ong, Darryl S; Atkinson, Nigel S

    2013-01-01

    Sustained or repeated exposure to sedating drugs, such as alcohol, triggers homeostatic adaptations in the brain that lead to the development of drug tolerance and dependence. These adaptations involve long-term changes in the transcription of drug-responsive genes as well as an epigenetic restructuring of chromosomal regions that is thought to signal and maintain the altered transcriptional state. Alcohol-induced epigenetic changes have been shown to be important in the long-term adaptation that leads to alcohol tolerance and dependence endophenotypes. A major constraint impeding progress is that alcohol produces a surfeit of changes in gene expression, most of which may not make any meaningful contribution to the ethanol response under study. Here we used a novel genomic epigenetic approach to find genes relevant for functional alcohol tolerance by exploiting the commonalities of two chemically distinct alcohols. In Drosophila melanogaster, ethanol and benzyl alcohol induce mutual cross-tolerance, indicating that they share a common mechanism for producing tolerance. We surveyed the genome-wide changes in histone acetylation that occur in response to these drugs. Each drug induces modifications in a large number of genes. The genes that respond similarly to either treatment, however, represent a subgroup enriched for genes important for the common tolerance response. Genes were functionally tested for behavioral tolerance to the sedative effects of ethanol and benzyl alcohol using mutant and inducible RNAi stocks. We identified a network of genes that are essential for the development of tolerance to sedation by alcohol.

  9. Alcohol-Induced Histone Acetylation Reveals a Gene Network Involved in Alcohol Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Ghezzi, Alfredo; Krishnan, Harish R.; Lew, Linda; Prado, Francisco J.; Ong, Darryl S.; Atkinson, Nigel S.

    2013-01-01

    Sustained or repeated exposure to sedating drugs, such as alcohol, triggers homeostatic adaptations in the brain that lead to the development of drug tolerance and dependence. These adaptations involve long-term changes in the transcription of drug-responsive genes as well as an epigenetic restructuring of chromosomal regions that is thought to signal and maintain the altered transcriptional state. Alcohol-induced epigenetic changes have been shown to be important in the long-term adaptation that leads to alcohol tolerance and dependence endophenotypes. A major constraint impeding progress is that alcohol produces a surfeit of changes in gene expression, most of which may not make any meaningful contribution to the ethanol response under study. Here we used a novel genomic epigenetic approach to find genes relevant for functional alcohol tolerance by exploiting the commonalities of two chemically distinct alcohols. In Drosophila melanogaster, ethanol and benzyl alcohol induce mutual cross-tolerance, indicating that they share a common mechanism for producing tolerance. We surveyed the genome-wide changes in histone acetylation that occur in response to these drugs. Each drug induces modifications in a large number of genes. The genes that respond similarly to either treatment, however, represent a subgroup enriched for genes important for the common tolerance response. Genes were functionally tested for behavioral tolerance to the sedative effects of ethanol and benzyl alcohol using mutant and inducible RNAi stocks. We identified a network of genes that are essential for the development of tolerance to sedation by alcohol. PMID:24348266

  10. GENE EXPRESSION CHANGES IN FEMALE ZEBRAFISH (DANIO RERIO) BRAIN IN RESPONSE TO ACUTE EXPOSURE TO METHYLMERCURY

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Catherine A.; Garcia-Reyero, Natàlia; Martyniuk, Chris; Knoebl, Iris; Pope, Marie; Wright-Osment, Maureen K.; Denslow, Nancy D.; Tillitt, Donald E.

    2010-01-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a potent neurotoxicant and endocrine disruptor that accumulates in aquatic systems. Previous studies have shown suppression of hormone levels in both male and female fish, suggesting effects on gonadotropin regulation in the brain. The gene expression profile in adult female zebrafish whole brain induced by acute (96 hr) MeHg exposure was investigated. Fish were exposed by injection to 0 or 0.5 μg MeHg/g. Gene expression changes in the brain were examined using a 22,000 feature zebrafish microarray. At a significance level of p<0.01, 79 genes were up-regulated and 76 genes were down-regulated in response to MeHg exposure. Individual genes exhibiting altered expression in response to MeHg exposure implicate effects on glutathione metabolism in the mechanism of MeHg neurotoxicity. Gene ontology (GO) terms significantly enriched among altered genes included protein folding, cell redox homeostasis, and steroid biosynthetic process. The most affected biological functions were related to the nervous system development and function, as well as lipid metabolism and molecular transport. These results support the involvement of oxidative stress and effects on protein structure in the mechanism of action of MeHg in the female brain. Future studies will compare the gene expression profile induced in response to MeHg with that induced by other toxicants and investigate responsive genes as potential biomarkers of MeHg exposure. PMID:21082716

  11. Gene expression changes in female zebrafish (Danio rerio) brain in response to acute exposure to methylmercury

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richter, Catherine A.; Garcia-Reyero, Natàlia; Martyniuk, Chris; Knoebl, Iris; Pope, Marie; Wright-Osment, Maureen K.; Denslow, Nancy D.; Tillitt, Donald E.

    2011-01-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a potent neurotoxicant and endocrine disruptor that accumulates in aquatic systems. Previous studies have shown suppression of hormone levels in both male and female fish, suggesting effects on gonadotropin regulation in the brain. The gene expression profile in adult female zebrafish whole brain induced by acute (96 h) MeHg exposure was investigated. Fish were exposed by injection to 0 or 0.5(mu or u)g MeHg/g. Gene expression changes in the brain were examined using a 22,000-feature zebrafish microarray. At a significance level of pgenes were up-regulated and 76 genes were down-regulated in response to MeHg exposure. Individual genes exhibiting altered expression in response to MeHg exposure implicate effects on glutathione metabolism in the mechanism of MeHg neurotoxicity. Gene ontology (GO) terms significantly enriched among altered genes included protein folding, cell redox homeostasis, and steroid biosynthetic process. The most affected biological functions were related to nervous system development and function, as well as lipid metabolism and molecular transport. These results support the involvement of oxidative stress and effects on protein structure in the mechanism of action of MeHg in the female brain. Future studies will compare the gene expression profile induced in response to MeHg with that induced by other toxicants and will investigate responsive genes as potential biomarkers of MeHg exposure.

  12. Stress, and pathogen response gene expression in modeled microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundaresan, Alamelu; Pellis, Neal R.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Immune suppression in microgravity has been well documented. With the advent of human exploration and long-term space travel, the immune system of the astronaut must be optimally maintained. It is important to investigate the expression patterns of cytokine genes, because they are directly related to immune response. Heat shock proteins (HSPs), also called stress proteins, are a group of proteins that are present in the cells of every life form. These proteins are induced when a cell responds to stressors such as heat, cold and oxygen deprivation. Microgravity is another stressor that may regulate HSPs. Heat shock proteins trigger immune response through activities that occur both inside the cell (intracellular) and outside the cell (extracellular). Knowledge about these two gene groups could lead to establishment of a blueprint of the immune response and adaptation-related genes in the microgravity environment. Methods: Human peripheral blood cells were cultured in 1g (T flask) and modeled microgravity (MMG, rotating-wall vessel) for 24 and 72 hours. Cell samples were collected and subjected to gene array analysis using the Affymetrix HG_U95 array. Data was collected and subjected to a two-way analysis of variance. The genes related to immune and stress responses were analyzed. Results and Conclusions: HSP70 was up-regulated by more than two fold in microgravity culture, while HSP90 was significantly down-regulated. HSP70 is not typically expressed in all kinds of cells, but it is expressed at high levels in stress conditions. HSP70 participates in translation, protein translocation, proteolysis and protein folding, suppressing aggregation and reactivating denatured proteins. Increased serum HSP70 levels correlate with a better outcome for heat-stroke or severe trauma patients. At the same time, elevated serum levels of HSP70 have been detected in patients with peripheral or renal vascular disease. HSP90 has been identified in the cytosol, nucleus and

  13. Stress, and pathogen response gene expression in modeled microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundaresan, Alamelu; Pellis, Neal R.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Immune suppression in microgravity has been well documented. With the advent of human exploration and long-term space travel, the immune system of the astronaut must be optimally maintained. It is important to investigate the expression patterns of cytokine genes, because they are directly related to immune response. Heat shock proteins (HSPs), also called stress proteins, are a group of proteins that are present in the cells of every life form. These proteins are induced when a cell responds to stressors such as heat, cold and oxygen deprivation. Microgravity is another stressor that may regulate HSPs. Heat shock proteins trigger immune response through activities that occur both inside the cell (intracellular) and outside the cell (extracellular). Knowledge about these two gene groups could lead to establishment of a blueprint of the immune response and adaptation-related genes in the microgravity environment. Methods: Human peripheral blood cells were cultured in 1g (T flask) and modeled microgravity (MMG, rotating-wall vessel) for 24 and 72 hours. Cell samples were collected and subjected to gene array analysis using the Affymetrix HG_U95 array. Data was collected and subjected to a two-way analysis of variance. The genes related to immune and stress responses were analyzed. Results and Conclusions: HSP70 was up-regulated by more than two fold in microgravity culture, while HSP90 was significantly down-regulated. HSP70 is not typically expressed in all kinds of cells, but it is expressed at high levels in stress conditions. HSP70 participates in translation, protein translocation, proteolysis and protein folding, suppressing aggregation and reactivating denatured proteins. Increased serum HSP70 levels correlate with a better outcome for heat-stroke or severe trauma patients. At the same time, elevated serum levels of HSP70 have been detected in patients with peripheral or renal vascular disease. HSP90 has been identified in the cytosol, nucleus and

  14. Comparative transcriptional profiling-based identification of raphanusanin-inducible genes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Raphanusanin (Ra) is a light-induced growth inhibitor involved in the inhibition of hypocotyl growth in response to unilateral blue-light illumination in radish seedlings. Knowledge of the roles of Ra still remains elusive. To understand the roles of Ra and its functional coupling to light signalling, we constructed the Ra-induced gene library using the Suppression Subtractive Hybridisation (SSH) technique and present a comparative investigation of gene regulation in radish seedlings in response to short-term Ra and blue-light exposure. Results The predicted gene ontology (GO) term revealed that 55% of the clones in the Ra-induced gene library were associated with genes involved in common defence mechanisms, including thirty four genes homologous to Arabidopsis genes implicated in R-gene-triggered resistance in the programmed cell death (PCD) pathway. Overall, the library was enriched with transporters, hydrolases, protein kinases, and signal transducers. The transcriptome analysis revealed that, among the fifty genes from various functional categories selected from 88 independent genes of the Ra-induced library, 44 genes were up-regulated and 4 were down-regulated. The comparative analysis showed that, among the transcriptional profiles of 33 highly Ra-inducible genes, 25 ESTs were commonly regulated by different intensities and duration of blue-light irradiation. The transcriptional profiles, coupled with the transcriptional regulation of early blue light, have provided the functional roles of many genes expected to be involved in the light-mediated defence mechanism. Conclusions This study is the first comprehensive survey of transcriptional regulation in response to Ra. The results described herein suggest a link between Ra and cellular defence and light signalling, and thereby contribute to further our understanding of how Ra is involved in light-mediated mechanisms of plant defence. PMID:20553608

  15. Characterization of feline TRIM genes: molecular cloning, expression in tissues, and response to type I interferon.

    PubMed

    Koba, Ryota; Kokaji, Chika; Fujisaki, Gentoku; Oguma, Keisuke; Sentsui, Hiroshi

    2013-05-15

    Members of the tripartite motif (TRIM) protein family in mammals are responsible for various cellular processes. Previous studies have revealed that several TRIM proteins were induced by interferons (IFN) and that these proteins were involved in innate immune response against retroviral infection. Although retroviral infection is prevalent in domestic cats, the expression profiles and roles of feline TRIM genes against these viral infections are not well understood. In the present study, we examined tissue expression and IFN inducibility of nine feline TRIM genes. In addition, the complete coding sequences of six cloned TRIM genes were determined, and their structures were analyzed. Nine TRIM genes were expressed in feline tissues and five were up-regulated by type I IFN. The predicted amino acid sequence of six feline TRIM proteins showed high sequence similarities to other mammalian TRIM proteins, and suggest that feline TRIM genes are potentially involved in antiviral reactivity in IFN-mediated immune response.

  16. Response to Nodal morphogen gradient is determined by the kinetics of target gene induction

    PubMed Central

    Dubrulle, Julien; Jordan, Benjamin M; Akhmetova, Laila; Farrell, Jeffrey A; Kim, Seok-Hyung; Solnica-Krezel, Lilianna; Schier, Alexander F

    2015-01-01

    Morphogen gradients expose cells to different signal concentrations and induce target genes with different ranges of expression. To determine how the Nodal morphogen gradient induces distinct gene expression patterns during zebrafish embryogenesis, we measured the activation dynamics of the signal transducer Smad2 and the expression kinetics of long- and short-range target genes. We found that threshold models based on ligand concentration are insufficient to predict the response of target genes. Instead, morphogen interpretation is shaped by the kinetics of target gene induction: the higher the rate of transcription and the earlier the onset of induction, the greater the spatial range of expression. Thus, the timing and magnitude of target gene expression can be used to modulate the range of expression and diversify the response to morphogen gradients. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05042.001 PMID:25869585

  17. Molecular basis for developmental changes in interleukin-2 gene inducibility.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, D; Rothenberg, E V

    1993-01-01

    At least three stages in the intrathymic development of pre-T cells are demarcated by differences in the competence to express the interleukin-2 (IL-2) gene as an acute response to stimulation. IL-2 inducibility appears to be acquired relatively early, prior to T-cell receptor (TcR) gene rearrangement. It is then abrogated during the stage when cells are subject to positive and negative selection, i.e., the fate determination processes that select cells for maturation or death. IL-2 inducibility finally reappears in mature classes of thymocytes that have undergone positive selection. To provide a basis for a molecular explanation of these developmental transitions, we have examined the representation in different thymocyte subsets of a set of DNA-binding proteins implicated in IL-2 gene regulation. As the DNA-binding activities of many factors are elicited only by inductive stimuli, the cells were cultured in the presence or absence of the calcium ionophore A23187 and phorbol ester. Our results separate these factors into four regulatory classes: (i) constitutive factors, such as Oct-1 and probably Sp1, that are expressed in thymocytes at all stages; (ii) inducible factors, such as NF-kappa B and complexes binding to the region of a CD28 response element, that can be activated in all thymocytes, including those cells (CD4+ CD8+ TcRlow) that can undergo selection; (iii) inducible factors, such as NF-AT and AP-1, that can be activated in mature (CD4+ CD8- TcRhigh) and immature (CD4- CD8- TcR-) thymocytes alike but not in the transitional stages when the cells (CD4+ CD8+ TcRlow) are subject to selection; and (iv) a factor containing CREB, which can be activated in thymocytes of all developmental stages by culture but does not require specific induction. These results verify that inducible transcription factors are targets of intrathymic developmental change. They also identify NF-AT and AP-1 as factors that are particularly sensitive to the mechanism altering

  18. Triplex-induced DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Faye A; Tiwari, Meetu Kaushik

    2013-12-13

    Cellular DNA damage response is critical to preserving genomic integrity following exposure to genotoxic stress. A complex series of networks and signaling pathways become activated after DNA damage and trigger the appropriate cellular response, including cell cycle arrest, DNA repair, and apoptosis. The response elicited is dependent upon the type and extent of damage sustained, with the ultimate goal of preventing propagation of the damaged DNA. A major focus of our studies is to determine the cellular pathways involved in processing damage induced by altered helical structures, specifically triplexes. Our lab has demonstrated that the TFIIH factor XPD occupies a central role in triggering apoptosis in response to triplex-induced DNA strand breaks. We have shown that XPD co-localizes with γH2AX, and its presence is required for the phosphorylation of H2AX tyrosine142, which stimulates the signaling pathway to recruit pro-apoptotic factors to the damage site. Herein, we examine the cellular pathways activated in response to triplex formation and discuss our finding that suggests that XPD-dependent apoptosis plays a role in preserving genomic integrity in the presence of excessive structurally induced DNA damage.

  19. Physiological responses induced by pleasant stimuli.

    PubMed

    Watanuki, Shigeki; Kim, Yeon-Kyu

    2005-01-01

    The specific physiological responses induced by pleasant stimuli were investigated in this study. Various physiological responses of the brain (encephaloelectrogram; EEG), autonomic nervous system (ANS), immune system and endocrine system were monitored when pleasant stimuli such as odors, emotional pictures and rakugo, a typical Japanese comical story-telling, were presented to subjects. The results revealed that (i) EEG activities of the left frontal brain region were enhanced by a pleasant odor; (ii) emotional pictures related to primitive element such as nudes and erotic couples elevated vasomotor sympathetic nervous activity; and (iii) an increase in secretory immunoglobulin A (s-IgA) and a decrease in salivary cortisol (s-cortisol) were induced by rakugo-derived linguistic pleasant emotion. Pleasant emotion is complicated state. However, by considering the evolutionary history of human being, it is possible to assess and evaluate pleasant emotion from certain physiological responses by appropriately summating various physiological parameters.

  20. Systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS): molecular pathophysiology and gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Naoyuki; Hattori, Yuichi

    2006-07-01

    In recent years, extensive basic science research has led to a clear understanding of the molecular mechanisms contributing to the pathophysiology of sepsis. Sepsis is now defined as a systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) in which there is an identifiable focus of infection. SIRS can be also precipitated by non-infective events such as trauma, pancreatitis, and surgery. As a consequence of an overactive SIRS response, the function of various organ systems may be compromised, resulting in multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) and death. Production and activation of multiple proinflammatory genes are likely to play a key role in the pathogenesis of MODS development. This review article focuses on the molecular mechanisms and components involved in the pathogenesis of severe sepsis. This includes cellular targets of sepsis-inducing bacterial products and their signaling pathways with a major emphasis on transcription factors and new therapeutic approaches to severe sepsis.

  1. Full genome gene expression analysis of the heat stress response in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Sørensen, Jesper G.; Nielsen, Morten M.; Kruhøffer, Mogens; Justesen, Just; Loeschcke, Volker

    2005-01-01

    The availability of full genome sequences has allowed the construction of microarrays, with which screening of the full genome for changes in gene expression is possible. This method can provide a wealth of information about biology at the level of gene expression and is a powerful method to identify genes and pathways involved in various processes. In this study, we report a detailed analysis of the full heat stress response in Drosophila melanogaster females, using whole genome gene expression arrays (Affymetrix Inc, Santa Clara, CA, USA). The study focuses on up- as well as downregulation of genes from just before and at 8 time points after an application of short heat hardening (36°C for 1 hour). The expression changes were followed up to 64 hours after the heat stress, using 4 biological replicates. This study describes in detail the dramatic change in gene expression over time induced by a short-term heat treatment. We found both known stress responding genes and new candidate genes, and processes to be involved in the stress response. We identified 3 main groups of stress responsive genes that were early–upregulated, early– downregulated, and late–upregulated, respectively, among 1222 differentially expressed genes in the data set. Comparisons with stress sensitive genes identified by studies of responses to other types of stress allow the discussion of heat-specific and general stress responses in Drosophila. Several unexpected features were revealed by this analysis, which suggests that novel pathways and mechanisms are involved in the responses to heat stress and to stress in general. The majority of stress responsive genes identified in this and other studies were downregulated, and the degree of overlap among downregulated genes was relatively high, whereas genes responding by upregulation to heat and other stress factors were more specific to the stress applied or to the conditions of the particular study. As an expected exception, heat shock

  2. Epistasis-Induced Evolutionary Plateaus in Selection Responses.

    PubMed

    Le Rouzic, Arnaud; Álvarez-Castro, José M

    2016-12-01

    Understanding and predicting evolution is a central challenge in both population and quantitative genetics. The amount of genetic variance for quantitative traits available in a population conditions the particular way in which this population will (or will not) evolve under natural or artificial selection. Here, we explore the potential of gene-gene interactions (epistasis) to induce evolutionary plateaus at which evolutionary change virtually collapses for a number of generations, followed by the release of previously cryptic genetic variation. First, we demonstrate theoretically that a wide range of epistatic interactions has the potential to generate temporary decelerations in the course of response to selection. Second, we perform simulations to show that such microevolutionary plateaus may occur in selection responses under empirically based assumptions. Finally, we show that such events can be traced in artificial selection experiments, thus providing further empirical evidence for this phenomenon.

  3. Upregulation of interferon-induced genes in infants with virus-associated acute bronchiolitis.

    PubMed

    Scagnolari, Carolina; Midulla, Fabio; Trombetti, Simona; Pierangeli, Alessandra; Tromba, Valeria; Grossi, Rosanna; Di Marco, Paola; Dianzani, Caterina; Girardi, Enrico; Antonelli, Guido

    2007-11-01

    To determine whether there is an airway IFN response in infants with acute bronchiolitis and to establish whether the rate of such a response is related to the severity of illness, the expression of some IFN-induced genes was measured in nasopharyngeal washes from 39 infants with acute bronchiolitis. The results indicate that in infants with a virus-associated acute bronchiolitis there is a strong activation of IFN system and that the severity of illness is inversely related to the level of expression of IFN-induced genes. This suggests that the IFN response plays an important role in determining virus-associated respiratory disease in early life.

  4. A specific library of randomly integrated reporter genes for the isolation of inducible functions by cell sorting

    SciTech Connect

    Lapeyre, J.N.; Marini, F.; Gratzner, H.G. AMC ImmunoDiagnostics, Houston, TX )

    1993-01-01

    A library of cells containing randomly integrated reporter genes has been constructed. The purpose of this library is to enable the isolation of genes of interest which are inducible by radiation, biological response modifiers, cytokines, or other agents. These genes are located near reporter genes which can be induced by the upstream promoter of the gene of interest. The reporter gene, Lac Z, was randomly inserted into the genome by retroviral transduction and subsequent selection of the neo[sup r] gene with gentamycin. Studies of radiation inducible genes were undertaken, whereby cells with the radiation sensitive function were isolated by sorting the cells fluorescent after staining with the beta gal substrate, fluorescein digalactoside (FDG). This gene-tagging approach is an improvement over the cDNA library subtraction protocol in that a single library of cells with random marker gene integration can be repeatedly and sequentially probed by sorting under different, selective conditions, dependent upon the genes to be characterized.

  5. Zebrafish Model for Functional Screening of Flow-Responsive Genes

    PubMed Central

    Serbanovic-Canic, Jovana; de Luca, Amalia; Warboys, Christina; Ferreira, Pedro F.; Luong, Le A.; Hsiao, Sarah; Gauci, Ismael; Mahmoud, Marwa; Feng, Shuang; Souilhol, Celine; Bowden, Neil; Ashton, John-Paul; Walczak, Henning; Firmin, David; Krams, Rob; Mason, Justin C.; Haskard, Dorian O.; Sherwin, Spencer; Ridger, Victoria; Chico, Timothy J.A.

    2017-01-01

    Objective— Atherosclerosis is initiated at branches and bends of arteries exposed to disturbed blood flow that generates low shear stress. This mechanical environment promotes lesions by inducing endothelial cell (EC) apoptosis and dysfunction via mechanisms that are incompletely understood. Although transcriptome-based studies have identified multiple shear-responsive genes, most of them have an unknown function. To address this, we investigated whether zebrafish embryos can be used for functional screening of mechanosensitive genes that regulate EC apoptosis in mammalian arteries. Approach and Results— First, we demonstrated that flow regulates EC apoptosis in developing zebrafish vasculature. Specifically, suppression of blood flow in zebrafish embryos (by targeting cardiac troponin) enhanced that rate of EC apoptosis (≈10%) compared with controls exposed to flow (≈1%). A panel of candidate regulators of apoptosis were identified by transcriptome profiling of ECs from high and low shear stress regions of the porcine aorta. Genes that displayed the greatest differential expression and possessed 1 to 2 zebrafish orthologues were screened for the regulation of apoptosis in zebrafish vasculature exposed to flow or no-flow conditions using a knockdown approach. A phenotypic change was observed in 4 genes; p53-related protein (PERP) and programmed cell death 2–like protein functioned as positive regulators of apoptosis, whereas angiopoietin-like 4 and cadherin 13 were negative regulators. The regulation of perp, cdh13, angptl4, and pdcd2l by shear stress and the effects of perp and cdh13 on EC apoptosis were confirmed by studies of cultured EC exposed to flow. Conclusions— We conclude that a zebrafish model of flow manipulation coupled to gene knockdown can be used for functional screening of mechanosensitive genes in vascular ECs, thus providing potential therapeutic targets to prevent or treat endothelial injury at atheroprone sites. PMID:27834691

  6. Hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress responses in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Aifen; He, Zhili; Redding-Johanson, Alyssa M; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Hemme, Christopher L; Joachimiak, Marcin P; Luo, Feng; Deng, Ye; Bender, Kelly S; He, Qiang; Keasling, Jay D; Stahl, David A; Fields, Matthew W; Hazen, Terry C; Arkin, Adam P; Wall, Judy D; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-10-01

    To understand how sulphate-reducing bacteria respond to oxidative stresses, the responses of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough to H(2)O(2)-induced stresses were investigated with transcriptomic, proteomic and genetic approaches. H(2)O(2) and induced chemical species (e.g. polysulfide, ROS) and redox potential shift increased the expressions of the genes involved in detoxification, thioredoxin-dependent reduction system, protein and DNA repair, and decreased those involved in sulfate reduction, lactate oxidation and protein synthesis. A gene coexpression network analysis revealed complicated network interactions among differentially expressed genes, and suggested possible importance of several hypothetical genes in H(2)O(2) stress. Also, most of the genes in PerR and Fur regulons were highly induced, and the abundance of a Fur regulon protein increased. Mutant analysis suggested that PerR and Fur are functionally overlapped in response to stresses induced by H(2)O(2) and reaction products, and the upregulation of thioredoxin-dependent reduction genes was independent of PerR or Fur. It appears that induction of those stress response genes could contribute to the increased resistance of deletion mutants to H(2)O(2)-induced stresses. In addition, a conceptual cellular model of D. vulgaris responses to H(2)O(2) stress was constructed to illustrate that this bacterium may employ a complicated molecular mechanism to defend against the H(2)O(2)-induced stresses.

  7. Gene Expression Profiles of Chicken Embryo Fibroblasts in Response to Salmonella Enteritidis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Szmolka, Ama; Wiener, Zoltán; Matulova, Marta Elsheimer; Varmuzova, Karolina; Rychlik, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    The response of chicken to non-typhoidal Salmonella infection is becoming well characterised but the role of particular cell types in this response is still far from being understood. Therefore, in this study we characterised the response of chicken embryo fibroblasts (CEFs) to infection with two different S. Enteritidis strains by microarray analysis. The expression of chicken genes identified as significantly up- or down-regulated (≥3-fold) by microarray analysis was verified by real-time PCR followed by functional classification of the genes and prediction of interactions between the proteins using Gene Ontology and STRING Database. Finally the expression of the newly identified genes was tested in HD11 macrophages and in vivo in chickens. Altogether 19 genes were induced in CEFs after S. Enteritidis infection. Twelve of them were also induced in HD11 macrophages and thirteen in the caecum of orally infected chickens. The majority of these genes were assigned different functions in the immune response, however five of them (LOC101750351, K123, BU460569, MOBKL2C and G0S2) have not been associated with the response of chicken to Salmonella infection so far. K123 and G0S2 were the only ’non-immune’ genes inducible by S. Enteritidis in fibroblasts, HD11 macrophages and in the caecum after oral infection. The function of K123 is unknown but G0S2 is involved in lipid metabolism and in β-oxidation of fatty acids in mitochondria. PMID:26046914

  8. A Drosophila immune response against Ras-induced overgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Hauling, Thomas; Krautz, Robert; Markus, Robert; Volkenhoff, Anne; Kucerova, Lucie; Theopold, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Our goal is to characterize the innate immune response against the early stage of tumor development. For this, animal models where genetic changes in specific cells and tissues can be performed in a controlled way have become increasingly important, including the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster. Many tumor mutants in Drosophila affect the germline and, as a consequence, also the immune system itself, making it difficult to ascribe their phenotype to a specific tissue. Only during the past decade, mutations have been induced systematically in somatic cells to study the control of tumorous growth by neighboring cells and by immune cells. Here we show that upon ectopic expression of a dominant-active form of the Ras oncogene (RasV12), both imaginal discs and salivary glands are affected. Particularly, the glands increase in size, express metalloproteinases and display apoptotic markers. This leads to a strong cellular response, which has many hallmarks of the granuloma-like encapsulation reaction, usually mounted by the insect against larger foreign objects. RNA sequencing of the fat body reveals a characteristic humoral immune response. In addition we also identify genes that are specifically induced upon expression of RasV12. As a proof-of-principle, we show that one of the induced genes (santa-maria), which encodes a scavenger receptor, modulates damage to the salivary glands. The list of genes we have identified provides a rich source for further functional characterization. Our hope is that this will lead to a better understanding of the earliest stage of innate immune responses against tumors with implications for mammalian immunity. PMID:24659248

  9. Light-dependent expression of flg22-induced defense genes in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Sano, Satoshi; Aoyama, Mayu; Nakai, Kana; Shimotani, Koji; Yamasaki, Kanako; Sato, Masa H; Tojo, Daisuke; Suwastika, I Nengah; Nomura, Hironari; Shiina, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Chloroplasts have been reported to generate retrograde immune signals that activate defense gene expression in the nucleus. However, the roles of light and photosynthesis in plant immunity remain largely elusive. In this study, we evaluated the effects of light on the expression of defense genes induced by flg22, a peptide derived from bacterial flagellins which acts as a potent elicitor in plants. Whole-transcriptome analysis of flg22-treated Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings under light and dark conditions for 30 min revealed that a number of (30%) genes strongly induced by flg22 (>4.0) require light for their rapid expression, whereas flg22-repressed genes include a significant number of genes that are down-regulated by light. Furthermore, light is responsible for the flg22-induced accumulation of salicylic acid (SA), indicating that light is indispensable for basal defense responses in plants. To elucidate the role of photosynthesis in defense, we further examined flg22-induced defense gene expression in the presence of specific inhibitors of photosynthetic electron transport: 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU) and 2,5-dibromo-3-methyl-6-isopropyl-benzoquinone (DBMIB). Light-dependent expression of defense genes was largely suppressed by DBMIB, but only partially suppressed by DCMU. These findings suggest that photosynthetic electron flow plays a role in controlling the light-dependent expression of flg22-inducible defense genes.

  10. The chemical defensome: environmental sensing and response genes in the Strongylocentrotus purpuratus genome.

    PubMed

    Goldstone, J V; Hamdoun, A; Cole, B J; Howard-Ashby, M; Nebert, D W; Scally, M; Dean, M; Epel, D; Hahn, M E; Stegeman, J J

    2006-12-01

    Metazoan genomes contain large numbers of genes that participate in responses to environmental stressors. We surveyed the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus genome for homologs of gene families thought to protect against chemical stressors; these genes collectively comprise the 'chemical defensome.' Chemical defense genes include cytochromes P450 and other oxidases, various conjugating enzymes, ATP-dependent efflux transporters, oxidative detoxification proteins, and transcription factors that regulate these genes. Together such genes account for more than 400 genes in the sea urchin genome. The transcription factors include homologs of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor, hypoxia-inducible factor, nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2, heat shock factor, and nuclear hormone receptors, which regulate stress-response genes in vertebrates. Some defense gene families, including the ABCC, the UGT, and the CYP families, have undergone expansion in the urchin relative to other deuterostome genomes, whereas the stress sensor gene families do not show such expansion. More than half of the defense genes are expressed during embryonic or larval life stages, indicating their importance during development. This genome-wide survey of chemical defense genes in the sea urchin reveals evolutionary conservation of this network combined with lineage-specific diversification that together suggest the importance of these chemical stress sensing and response mechanisms in early deuterostomes. These results should facilitate future studies on the evolution of chemical defense gene networks and the role of these networks in protecting embryos from chemical stress during development.

  11. Aluminum Induces Oxidative Stress Genes in Arabidopsis thaliana1

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Keith D.; Schott, Eric J.; Sharma, Yogesh K.; Davis, Keith R.; Gardner, Richard C.

    1998-01-01

    Changes in gene expression induced by toxic levels of Al were characterized to investigate the nature of Al stress. A cDNA library was constructed from Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings treated with Al for 2 h. We identified five cDNA clones that showed a transient induction of their mRNA levels, four cDNA clones that showed a longer induction period, and two down-regulated genes. Expression of the four long-term-induced genes remained at elevated levels for at least 48 h. The genes encoded peroxidase, glutathione-S-transferase, blue copper-binding protein, and a protein homologous to the reticuline:oxygen oxidoreductase enzyme. Three of these genes are known to be induced by oxidative stresses and the fourth is induced by pathogen treatment. Another oxidative stress gene, superoxide dismutase, and a gene for Bowman-Birk protease inhibitor were also induced by Al in A. thaliana. These results suggested that Al treatment of Arabidopsis induces oxidative stress. In confirmation of this hypothesis, three of four genes induced by Al stress in A. thaliana were also shown to be induced by ozone. Our results demonstrate that oxidative stress is an important component of the plant's reaction to toxic levels of Al. PMID:9449849

  12. Gene transcripts encoding hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) exhibit tissue- and muscle fiber type-dependent responses to hypoxia and hypercapnic hypoxia in the Atlantic blue crab, Callinectes sapidus.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Kristin M; Follett, Chandler R; Burnett, Louis E; Lema, Sean C

    2012-09-01

    Hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) is a transcription factor that under low environmental oxygen regulates the expression of suites of genes involved in metabolism, angiogenesis, erythropoiesis, immune function, and growth. Here, we isolated and sequenced partial cDNAs encoding hif-α and arnt/hif-β from the Atlantic blue crab, Callinectes sapidus, an estuarine species that frequently encounters concurrent hypoxia (low O(2)) and hypercapnia (elevated CO(2)). We then examined the effects of acute exposure (1h) to hypoxia (H) and hypercapnic hypoxia (HH) on relative transcript abundance for hif-α and arnt/hif-β in different tissues (glycolytic muscle, oxidative muscle, hepatopancreas, gill, and gonads) using quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Our results indicate that hif-α and arnt/hif-β mRNAs were constitutively present under well-aerated normoxia (N) conditions in all tissues examined. Further, H and HH exposure resulted in both tissue-specific and muscle fiber type-specific effects on relative hif-α transcript abundance. In the gill and glycolytic muscle, relative hif-α mRNA levels were significantly lower under H and HH, compared to N, while no change (or a slight increase) was detected in oxidative muscle, hepatopancreas and gonadal tissues. H and HH did not affect relative transcript abundance for arnt/hif-β in any tissue or muscle fiber type. Thus, in crustaceans the HIF response to H and HH appears to involve changes in hif transcript abundance, with variation in hif-α and arnt/hif-β transcriptional dynamics occurring in both a tissue- and muscle fiber type-dependent manner.

  13. Targeted identification of glucocorticoid-attenuated response genes: in vitro and in vivo models.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jeffrey B; Herschman, Harvey R

    2004-01-01

    Glucocorticoids attenuate the induction of numerous inflammatory mediators. We hypothesized that a targeted screening for genes with these regulatory characteristics, called glucocorticoid-attenuated response genes (GARGs), would be an efficient way to identify genes participating in glucocorticoid-sensitive inflammatory processes. An initial application of this idea, using an in vitro model, identified 12 cDNAs induced by LPS and attenuated by dexamethasone, including a new chemokine designated LIX. In vivo studies demonstrated that endotoxemia-induced lung mRNA expression of LIX, but not of two related chemokines, is markedly enhanced by adrenalectomy and attenuated by dexamethasone. This work provided the basis for an in vivo screening project that identified 36 GARG cDNAs induced in the lung during endotoxemia. The majority represent genes of unknown function, or genes not previously implicated in the pulmonary response to inflammation. Four encode previously undescribed proteins, including a chemokine, a member of a family of guanylate-binding proteins, a 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthetase-like protein, and a novel lung-inducible Neuralized-related C3HC4 RING protein (LINCR). Our results indicate that glucocorticoid-attenuated response genes are much more diverse than originally anticipated. Future studies using microarrays in this and other inflammation models may identify many additional glucocorticoid-regulated genes potentially important in inflammatory diseases.

  14. MADS box genes control vernalization-induced flowering in cereals

    PubMed Central

    Trevaskis, Ben; Bagnall, David J.; Ellis, Marc H.; Peacock, W. James; Dennis, Elizabeth S.

    2003-01-01

    By comparing expression levels of MADS box transcription factor genes between near-isogenic winter and spring lines of bread wheat, Triticum aestivum, we have identified WAP1 as the probable candidate for the Vrn-1 gene, the major locus controlling the vernalization flowering response in wheat. WAP1 is strongly expressed in spring wheats and moderately expressed in semispring wheats, but is not expressed in winter wheat plants that have not been exposed to vernalization treatment. Vernalization promotes flowering in winter wheats and strongly induces expression of WAP1. WAP1 is located on chromosome 5 in wheat and, by synteny with other cereal genomes, is likely to be collocated with Vrn-1. These results in hexaploid bread wheat cultivars extend the conclusion made by Yan et al. [Yan, L., Loukoianov, A., Tranquilli, G., Helguera, M., Fahima, T. & Dubcovsky, J. (2003) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 100, 6263–6268] in the diploid wheat progenitor Triticum monococcum that WAP1 (TmAP1) corresponds to the Vrn-1 gene. The barley homologue of WAP1, BM5, shows a similar pattern of expression to WAP1 and TmAP1. BM5 is not expressed in winter barleys that have not been vernalized, but as with WAP1, expression of BM5 is strongly induced by vernalization treatment. In spring barleys, the level of BM5 expression is determined by interactions between the Vrn-H1 locus and a second locus for spring habit, Vrn-H2. There is now evidence that AP1-like genes determine the time of flowering in a range of cereal and grass species. PMID:14557548

  15. A family of Turandot-related genes in the humoral stress response of Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Ekengren, S; Hultmark, D

    2001-06-22

    The Drosophila Turandot A (TotA) gene was recently shown to encode a stress-induced humoral factor which gives increased resistance to the lethal effects of high temperature. Here we show that TotA belongs to a family of eight Tot genes distributed at three different sites in the Drosophila genome. All Tot genes are induced under stressful conditions such as bacterial infection, heat shock, paraquat feeding or exposure to ultraviolet light, suggesting that all members of this family play a role in Drosophila stress tolerance. The induction of the Tot genes differs in important respects from the heat shock response, such as the strong but delayed response to bacterial infection seen for several of the genes.

  16. Predicting drug response and toxicity based on gene polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Robert, Jacques; Morvan, Valérie Le; Smith, Denis; Pourquier, Philippe; Bonnet, Jacques

    2005-06-01

    The sequencing of the human genome has allowed the identification of thousands of gene polymorphisms, most often single nucleotide polymorphims (SNP), which may play an important role in the expression level and activity of the corresponding proteins. When these polymorphisms occur at the level of drug metabolising enzymes or transporters, the disposition of the drug may be altered and, consequently, its efficacy may be compromised or its toxicity enhanced. Polymorphisms can also occur at the level of proteins directly involved in drug action, either when the protein is the target of the drug or when the protein is involved in the repair of drug-induced lesions. There again, these polymorphisms may lead to alterations in drug efficacy and/or toxicity. The identification of functional polymorphisms in patients undergoing chemotherapy may help the clinician prescribe the optimal drug combination or schedule and predict with more accuracy the response to these prescriptions. We have recorded in this review the polymorphisms that have been identified up till now in genes involved in anticancer drug activity. Some of them appear especially important in predicting drug toxicity and should be determined in routine before drug administration; this is the case of the most common variations of thiopurine methyltransferase for 6-mercaptopurine and of dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase for fluorouracil. Other appear determinant for drug response, such as the common SNPs found in glutathione S-transferase P1 or xereoderma pigmentosum group D enzyme for the activity of oxaliplatin. However, confusion factors may exist between the role of gene polymorphisms in cancer risk or overall prognosis and their role in drug response.

  17. Silver nanoparticles induce endoplasmatic reticulum stress response in zebrafish

    SciTech Connect

    Christen, Verena; Capelle, Martinus; Fent, Karl

    2013-10-15

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) find increasing applications, and therefore humans and the environment are increasingly exposed to them. However, potential toxicological implications are not sufficiently known. Here we investigate effects of AgNPs (average size 120 nm) on zebrafish in vitro and in vivo, and compare them to human hepatoma cells (Huh7). AgNPs are incorporated in zebrafish liver cells (ZFL) and Huh7, and in zebrafish embryos. In ZFL cells AgNPs lead to induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS), endoplasmatic reticulum (ER) stress response, and TNF-α. Transcriptional alterations also occur in pro-apoptotic genes p53 and Bax. The transcriptional profile differed in ZFL and Huh7 cells. In ZFL cells, the ER stress marker BiP is induced, concomitant with the ER stress marker ATF-6 and spliced XBP-1 after 6 h and 24 h exposure to 0.5 g/L and 0.05 g/L AgNPs, respectively. This indicates the induction of different pathways of the ER stress response. Moreover, AgNPs induce TNF-α. In zebrafish embryos exposed to 0.01, 0.1, 1 and 5 mg/L AgNPs hatching was affected and morphological defects occurred at high concentrations. ER stress related gene transcripts BiP and Synv are significantly up-regulated after 24 h at 0.1 and 5 mg/L AgNPs. Furthermore, transcriptional alterations occurred in the pro-apoptotic genes Noxa and p21. The ER stress response was strong in ZFL cells and occurred in zebrafish embryos as well. Our data demonstrate for the first time that AgNPs lead to induction of ER stress in zebrafish. The induction of ER stress can have several consequences including the activation of apoptotic and inflammatory pathways. - Highlights: • Effects of silver nanoparticles (120 nm AgNPs) are investigated in zebrafish. • AgNPs induce all ER stress reponses in vitro in zebrafish liver cells. • AgNPs induce weak ER stress in zebrafish embryos. • AgNPs induce oxidative stress and transcripts of pro-apoptosis genes.

  18. Global identification and expression analysis of stress-responsive genes of the Argonaute family in apple.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ruirui; Liu, Caiyun; Li, Ning; Zhang, Shizhong

    2016-12-01

    Argonaute (AGO) proteins, which are found in yeast, animals, and plants, are the core molecules of the RNA-induced silencing complex. These proteins play important roles in plant growth, development, and responses to biotic stresses. The complete analysis and classification of the AGO gene family have been recently reported in different plants. Nevertheless, systematic analysis and expression profiling of these genes have not been performed in apple (Malus domestica). Approximately 15 AGO genes were identified in the apple genome. The phylogenetic tree, chromosome location, conserved protein motifs, gene structure, and expression of the AGO gene family in apple were analyzed for gene prediction. All AGO genes were phylogenetically clustered into four groups (i.e., AGO1, AGO4, MEL1/AGO5, and ZIPPY/AGO7) with the AGO genes of Arabidopsis. These groups of the AGO gene family were statistically analyzed and compared among 31 plant species. The predicted apple AGO genes are distributed across nine chromosomes at different densities and include three segment duplications. Expression studies indicated that 15 AGO genes exhibit different expression patterns in at least one of the tissues tested. Additionally, analysis of gene expression levels indicated that the genes are mostly involved in responses to NaCl, PEG, heat, and low-temperature stresses. Hence, several candidate AGO genes are involved in different aspects of physiological and developmental processes and may play an important role in abiotic stress responses in apple. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to report a comprehensive analysis of the apple AGO gene family. Our results provide useful information to understand the classification and putative functions of these proteins, especially for gene members that may play important roles in abiotic stress responses in M. hupehensis.

  19. Susceptibility genes for gentamicin-induced vestibular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Roth, Stephen M; Williams, Scott M; Jiang, Lan; Menon, Kalapurakkal S; Jeka, John J

    2008-01-01

    Approximately 5% of patients administered gentamicin (GM), an aminoglycoside antibiotic, experience vestibular ototoxicity resulting in balance dysfunction. In the present study, we sought to identify susceptibility genes associated with GM-induced vestibular dysfunction using a case/control design. White cases (n=137; 55 men, 82 women) were recruited based on physician-confirmed unilateral or bilateral vestibular dysfunction attributed to GM administration. Controls (n=126; 54 men, 72 women) were healthy, age-matched individuals without vestibular dysfunction or balance impairment. Buccal cell samples were obtained from all subjects and DNA was genotyped for 15 polymorphisms in 9 genes. Candidate genes were identified primarily for their roles in oxidative stress based on predicted mechanisms of gentamicin-induced ototoxicity. Statistical analyses included the multi-dimensionality reduction (MDR) method for identifying gene x gene interactions across multiple candidate genes. Both single gene and MDR analyses revealed the NOS3 (ENOS) p.Glu298Asp polymorphism as significantly associated with GM-induced vestibular dysfunction (both p gene combination, consisting of NOS3 (p.Glu298Asp), GSTZ1 (p.Lys32Glu), and GSTP1 (p.Ile105Val), that provided the highest predictive model for GM-induced vestibular dysfunction (64% accuracy; p=0.009). The results indicate that carriers of risk alleles at three oxidative stress-related genes have increased susceptibility to GM-induced vestibular dysfunction.

  20. In vivo characterization of a reporter gene system for imaging hypoxia-induced gene expression.

    PubMed

    Carlin, Sean; Pugachev, Andrei; Sun, Xiaorong; Burke, Sean; Claus, Filip; O'Donoghue, Joseph; Ling, C Clifton; Humm, John L

    2009-10-01

    To characterize a tumor model containing a hypoxia-inducible reporter gene and to demonstrate utility by comparison of reporter gene expression to the uptake and distribution of the hypoxia tracer (18)F-fluoromisonidazole ((18)F-FMISO). Three tumors derived from the rat prostate cancer cell line R3327-AT were grown in each of two rats as follows: (1) parental R3327-AT, (2) positive control R3327-AT/PC in which the HSV1-tkeGFP fusion reporter gene was expressed constitutively, (3) R3327-AT/HRE in which the reporter gene was placed under the control of a hypoxia-inducible factor-responsive promoter sequence (HRE). Animals were coadministered a hypoxia-specific marker (pimonidazole) and the reporter gene probe (124)I-2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-1-beta-d-arabinofuranosyl-5-iodouracil ((124)I-FIAU) 3 h prior to sacrifice. Statistical analysis of the spatial association between (124)I-FIAU uptake and pimonidazole fluorescent staining intensity was then performed on a pixel-by-pixel basis. Utility of this system was demonstrated by assessment of reporter gene expression versus the exogenous hypoxia probe (18)F-FMISO. Two rats, each bearing a single R3327-AT/HRE tumor, were injected with (124)I-FIAU (3 h before sacrifice) and (18)F-FMISO (2 h before sacrifice). Statistical analysis of the spatial association between (18)F-FMISO and (124)I-FIAU on a pixel-by-pixel basis was performed. Correlation coefficients between (124)I-FIAU uptake and pimonidazole staining intensity were: 0.11 in R3327-AT tumors, -0.66 in R3327-AT/PC and 0.76 in R3327-AT/HRE, confirming that only in the R3327-AT/HRE tumor was HSV1-tkeGFP gene expression associated with hypoxia. Correlation coefficients between (18)F-FMISO and (124)I-FIAU uptakes in R3327-AT/HRE tumors were r=0.56, demonstrating good spatial correspondence between the two tracers. We have confirmed hypoxia-specific expression of the HSV1-tkeGFP fusion gene in the R3327-AT/HRE tumor model and demonstrated the utility of this model for the

  1. Control of target gene specificity during metamorphosis by the steroid response gene E93

    PubMed Central

    Mou, Xiaochun; Duncan, Dianne M.; Baehrecke, Eric H.; Duncan, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Hormonal control of sexual maturation is a common feature in animal development. A particularly dramatic example is the metamorphosis of insects, in which pulses of the steroid hormone ecdysone drive the wholesale transformation of the larva into an adult. The mechanisms responsible for this transformation are not well understood. Work in Drosophila indicates that the larval and adult forms are patterned by the same underlying sets of developmental regulators, but it is not understood how the same regulators pattern two distinct forms. Recent studies indicate that this ability is facilitated by a global change in the responsiveness of target genes during metamorphosis. Here we show that this shift is controlled in part by the ecdysone-induced transcription factor E93. Although long considered a dedicated regulator of larval cell death, we find that E93 is expressed widely in adult cells at the pupal stage and is required for many patterning processes at this time. To understand the role of E93 in adult patterning, we focused on a simple E93-dependent process, the induction of the Dll gene within bract cells of the pupal leg by EGF receptor signaling. In this system, we show that E93 functions to cause Dll to become responsive to EGF receptor signaling. We demonstrate that E93 is both necessary and sufficient for directing this switch. E93 likely controls the responsiveness of many other target genes because it is required broadly for patterning during metamorphosis. The wide conservation of E93 orthologs suggests that similar mechanisms control life-cycle transitions in other organisms, including vertebrates. PMID:22308414

  2. Control of target gene specificity during metamorphosis by the steroid response gene E93.

    PubMed

    Mou, Xiaochun; Duncan, Dianne M; Baehrecke, Eric H; Duncan, Ian

    2012-02-21

    Hormonal control of sexual maturation is a common feature in animal development. A particularly dramatic example is the metamorphosis of insects, in which pulses of the steroid hormone ecdysone drive the wholesale transformation of the larva into an adult. The mechanisms responsible for this transformation are not well understood. Work in Drosophila indicates that the larval and adult forms are patterned by the same underlying sets of developmental regulators, but it is not understood how the same regulators pattern two distinct forms. Recent studies indicate that this ability is facilitated by a global change in the responsiveness of target genes during metamorphosis. Here we show that this shift is controlled in part by the ecdysone-induced transcription factor E93. Although long considered a dedicated regulator of larval cell death, we find that E93 is expressed widely in adult cells at the pupal stage and is required for many patterning processes at this time. To understand the role of E93 in adult patterning, we focused on a simple E93-dependent process, the induction of the Dll gene within bract cells of the pupal leg by EGF receptor signaling. In this system, we show that E93 functions to cause Dll to become responsive to EGF receptor signaling. We demonstrate that E93 is both necessary and sufficient for directing this switch. E93 likely controls the responsiveness of many other target genes because it is required broadly for patterning during metamorphosis. The wide conservation of E93 orthologs suggests that similar mechanisms control life-cycle transitions in other organisms, including vertebrates.

  3. Single cell gene expression analysis in injury-induced collective cell migration.

    PubMed

    Riahi, Reza; Long, Min; Yang, Yongliang; Dean, Zachary; Zhang, Donna D; Slepian, Marvin J; Wong, Pak Kin

    2014-02-01

    Collective cell behavior in response to mechanical injury is central to various regenerative and pathological processes. Using a double-stranded locked nucleic acid probe for monitoring real-time intracellular gene expression, we examined the spatiotemporal response of epithelial cells during injury-induced collective migration and compared to the blocker assay with minimal injury as control. We showed that cells ∼150 μm from the wound edge exhibit a gradient in response to mechanical injury, expressing different genes depending on the wounding process. While release of contact inhibition is sufficient to trigger the migratory behavior, cell injury additionally induces reactive oxygen species, Nrf2 protein, and stress response genes, including heat shock protein 70 and heme oxygenase-1, in a spatiotemporal manner. Furthermore, we show that Nrf2 has an inhibitory role in injury-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition, suggesting a potential autoregulatory mechanism in injury-induced response. Taken together, our single-cell gene expression analyses reveal modular cell responses to mechanical injury, manipulation of which may afford novel strategies for tissue repair and prevention of tumor invasion in the future.

  4. Single Cell Gene Expression Analysis in Injury-Induced Collective Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Riahi, Reza; Long, Min; Yang, Yongliang; Dean, Zachary; Zhang, Donna D.; Slepian, Marvin J.; Wong, Pak Kin

    2014-01-01

    Collective cell behavior in response to mechanical injury is central to various regenerative and pathological processes. Using a double-stranded locked nucleic acid probe for monitoring real-time intracellular gene expression, we examined the spatiotemporal response of epithelial cells during injury-induced collective migration and compared to the blocker assay with minimal injury as control. We showed that cells ~150 µm from the wound edge exhibit a gradient in response to mechanical injury, expressing different genes depending on the wounding process. While release of contact inhibition is sufficient to trigger the migratory behavior, cell injury additionally induces reactive oxygen species, Nrf2 protein, and stress response genes, including heat shock protein 70 and heme oxygenase-1, in a spatiotemporal manner. Furthermore, we show that Nrf2 has an inhibitory role in injury-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition, suggesting a potential autoregulatory mechanism in injury-induced response. Taken together, our single-cell gene expression analyses reveal modular cell responses to mechanical injury, manipulation of which may afford novel strategies for tissue repair and prevention of tumor invasion in the future. PMID:24336811

  5. Upregulation of jasmonate biosynthesis and jasmonate-responsive genes in rice leaves in response to a bacterial pathogen mimic.

    PubMed

    Ranjan, Ashish; Vadassery, Jyothilakshmi; Patel, Hitendra Kumar; Pandey, Alok; Palaparthi, Ramesh; Mithöfer, Axel; Sonti, Ramesh V

    2015-05-01

    Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, the causal agent of bacterial blight of rice, secretes several cell wall degrading enzymes including cellulase (ClsA) and lipase/esterase (LipA). Prior treatment of rice leaves with purified cell wall degrading enzymes such as LipA can confer enhanced resistance against subsequent X. oryzae pv. oryzae infection. To understand LipA-induced rice defense responses, microarray analysis was performed 12 h after enzyme treatment of rice leaves. This reveals that 867 (720 upregulated and 147 downregulated) genes are differentially regulated (≥2-fold). A number of genes involved in defense, stress, signal transduction, and catabolic processes were upregulated while a number of genes involved in photosynthesis and anabolic processes were downregulated. The microarray data also suggested upregulation of jasmonic acid (JA) biosynthetic and JA-responsive genes. Estimation of various phytohormones in LipA-treated rice leaves demonstrated a significant increase in the level of JA-Ile (a known active form of JA) while the levels of other phytohormones were not changed significantly with respect to buffer-treated control. This suggests a role for JA-Ile in cell wall damage induced innate immunity. Furthermore, a comparative analysis of ClsA- and LipA-induced rice genes has identified key rice functions that might be involved in elaboration of damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP)-induced innate immunity.

  6. TNFα signals through specialized factories where responsive coding and miRNA genes are transcribed

    PubMed Central

    Papantonis, Argyris; Kohro, Takahide; Baboo, Sabyasachi; Larkin, Joshua D; Deng, Binwei; Short, Patrick; Tsutsumi, Shuichi; Taylor, Stephen; Kanki, Yasuharu; Kobayashi, Mika; Li, Guoliang; Poh, Huay-Mei; Ruan, Xiaoan; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Ruan, Yijun; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Wada, Youichiro; Cook, Peter R

    2012-01-01

    Tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) is a potent cytokine that signals through nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) to activate a subset of human genes. It is usually assumed that this involves RNA polymerases transcribing responsive genes wherever they might be in the nucleus. Using primary human endothelial cells, variants of chromosome conformation capture (including 4C and chromatin interaction analysis with paired-end tag sequencing), and fluorescence in situ hybridization to detect single nascent transcripts, we show that TNFα induces responsive genes to congregate in discrete ‘NFκB factories'. Some factories further specialize in transcribing responsive genes encoding micro-RNAs that target downregulated mRNAs. We expect all signalling pathways to contain this extra leg, where responding genes are transcribed in analogous specialized factories. PMID:23103767

  7. Cervical Carcinogenesis and Immune Response Gene Polymorphisms: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Mooij, Merel

    2017-01-01

    The local immune response is considered a key determinant in cervical carcinogenesis after persistent infection with oncogenic, high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) infections. Genetic variation in various immune response genes has been shown to influence risk of developing cervical cancer, as well as progression and survival among cervical cancer patients. We reviewed the literature on associations of immunogenetic single nucleotide polymorphism, allele, genotype, and haplotype distributions with risk and progression of cervical cancer. Studies on HLA and KIR gene polymorphisms were excluded due to the abundance on literature on that subject. We show that multiple genes and loci are associated with variation in risk of cervical cancer. Rather than one single gene being responsible for cervical carcinogenesis, we postulate that variations in the different immune response genes lead to subtle differences in the effectiveness of the antiviral and antitumour immune responses, ultimately leading to differences in risk of developing cervical cancer and progressive disease after HPV infection. PMID:28280748

  8. Gene expression profile changes induced by acute toxicity of [C16 mim]Cl in loach (Paramisgurnus dabryanus).

    PubMed

    Nan, Ping; Yan, Shuaiguo; Wang, Yaxing; Du, Qiyan; Chang, Zhongjie

    2017-02-01

    Ionic liquids (ILs) are widely used as reaction media in various commercial applications. Many reports have indicated that most ILs are poorly decomposed by microorganisms and are toxic to aquatic organisms. In this study, differential gene expression profiling was conducted using a suppression subtraction hybridization cDNA library from hepatic tissue of the loach (Paramisgurnus dabryanus) after exposure to 1-hexadecyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([C16 mim]Cl), a representative IL. Two hundred and fifty-nine differentially expressed candidate genes, whose expression was altered by >2.0-fold by the [C16 mim]Cl treatment, were identified, including 127 upregulated genes and 132 downregulated genes. A gene ontology analysis of the known genes isolated in this study showed that [C16 mim]Cl-responsive genes were involved in cell cycle, stimulus response, defense response, DNA damage response, oxidative stress responses, and other biological responses. To identify candidate genes that may be involved in [C16 mim]Cl-induced toxicity, 259 clones were examined by Southern blot macroarray hybridization, and 20 genes were further characterized using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Finally, six candidate genes were selected, including three DNA damage response genes, two toxic substance metabolic genes, and one stress protein gene. Our results indicate that these changes in gene expression are associated with [C16 mim]Cl-induced toxicity, and that these six candidate genes can be promising biomarkers for detecting [C16 mim]Cl-induced toxicity. Therefore, this study demonstrates the use of a powerful assay to identify genes potentially involved in [C16 mim]Cl toxicity, and it provides a foundation for the further study of related genes and the molecular mechanism of [C16 mim]Cl toxicity. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 32: 404-416, 2017.

  9. Dynamic gene expression changes precede dioxin-induced liver pathogenesis in medaka fish.

    PubMed

    Volz, David C; Hinton, David E; Law, J McHugh; Kullman, Seth W

    2006-02-01

    A major challenge for environmental genomics is linking gene expression to cellular toxicity and morphological alteration. Herein, we address complexities related to hepatic gene expression responses after a single injection of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) agonist 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (dioxin) and illustrate an initial stress response followed by cytologic and adaptive changes in the teleost fish medaka. Using a custom 175-gene array, we find that overall hepatic gene expression and histological changes are strongly dependent on dose and time. The most pronounced dioxin-induced gene expression changes occurred early and preceded morphologic alteration in the liver. Following a systematic search for putative Ah response elements (AHREs) (5'-CACGCA-3') within 2000 bp upstream of the predicted transcriptional start site, the majority (87%) of genes screened in this study did not contain an AHRE, suggesting that gene expression was not solely dependent on AHRE-mediated transcription. Moreover, in the highest dosage, we observed gene expression changes associated with adaptation that persisted for almost two weeks, including induction of a gene putatively identified as ependymin that may function in hepatic injury repair. These data suggest that the cellular response to dioxin involves both AHRE- and non-AHRE-mediated transcription, and that coupling gene expression profiling with analysis of morphologic pathogenesis is essential for establishing temporal relationships between transcriptional changes, toxicity, and adaptation to hepatic injury.

  10. Differential gene signatures in rat mammary tumors induced by DMBA and those induced by fractionated gamma radiation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hae-June; Lee, Yoon-Jin; Kang, Chang-Mo; Bae, Sangwoo; Jeoung, Dooil; Jang, Ja-June; Lee, Seung-Sook; Cho, Chul-Koo; Lee, Yun-Sil

    2008-11-01

    The aim of this work was to identify specific genes involved in rat mammary tumors induced by dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) or radiation. More TUNEL- and PCNA-positive cells were present in mammary tumors induced by radiation than in tumors induced by DMBA, whereas DNA damage responses like p53 accumulation and histone H2AX phosphorylation were higher in DMBA-induced tumors, even though the pathology was similar in both types of tumors. cDNA microarray and real-time RT-PCR analysis of radiation- or DMBA-induced tumor tissues, revealed that stanniocalcin 2 (Stc2), interferon regulatory factor 1 (Irf1), interleukin 18 binding protein (Il18bp), and chloride channel calcium activated 3 (Clca3) were expressed in both, and that arachidonate 5-lipoxygenase activating protein 1 (Alox5ap) and cathepsin S (Ctss) were expressed only in radiation-induced tumors. No DMBA-specific gene signatures were found. Soft agar growth assays were carried out to identify the carcinogenic features of these specific genes. Cells stably transfected with Alox5ap, Ctss, Stc2, Irf1, Il18bp and Clca3 showed morphological changes compared to controls. These findings indicate different gene alterations in carcinogen- or radiation-induced mammary tumors with similar pathological stages.

  11. Gene expression induced by Toll-like receptors in macrophages requires the transcription factor NFAT5.

    PubMed

    Buxadé, Maria; Lunazzi, Giulia; Minguillón, Jordi; Iborra, Salvador; Berga-Bolaños, Rosa; Del Val, Margarita; Aramburu, José; López-Rodríguez, Cristina

    2012-02-13

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) engage networks of transcriptional regulators to induce genes essential for antimicrobial immunity. We report that NFAT5, previously characterized as an osmostress responsive factor, regulates the expression of multiple TLR-induced genes in macrophages independently of osmotic stress. NFAT5 was essential for the induction of the key antimicrobial gene Nos2 (inducible nitric oxide synthase [iNOS]) in response to low and high doses of TLR agonists but is required for Tnf and Il6 mainly under mild stimulatory conditions, indicating that NFAT5 could regulate specific gene patterns depending on pathogen burden intensity. NFAT5 exhibited two modes of association with target genes, as it was constitutively bound to Tnf and other genes regardless of TLR stimulation, whereas its recruitment to Nos2 or Il6 required TLR activation. Further analysis revealed that TLR-induced recruitment of NFAT5 to Nos2 was dependent on inhibitor of κB kinase (IKK) β activity and de novo protein synthesis, and was sensitive to histone deacetylases. In vivo, NFAT5 was necessary for effective immunity against Leishmania major, a parasite whose clearance requires TLRs and iNOS expression in macrophages. These findings identify NFAT5 as a novel regulator of mammalian anti-pathogen responses.

  12. Gene expression induced by Toll-like receptors in macrophages requires the transcription factor NFAT5

    PubMed Central

    Buxadé, Maria; Lunazzi, Giulia; Minguillón, Jordi; Iborra, Salvador; Berga-Bolaños, Rosa; del Val, Margarita; Aramburu, José

    2012-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) engage networks of transcriptional regulators to induce genes essential for antimicrobial immunity. We report that NFAT5, previously characterized as an osmostress responsive factor, regulates the expression of multiple TLR-induced genes in macrophages independently of osmotic stress. NFAT5 was essential for the induction of the key antimicrobial gene Nos2 (inducible nitric oxide synthase [iNOS]) in response to low and high doses of TLR agonists but is required for Tnf and Il6 mainly under mild stimulatory conditions, indicating that NFAT5 could regulate specific gene patterns depending on pathogen burden intensity. NFAT5 exhibited two modes of association with target genes, as it was constitutively bound to Tnf and other genes regardless of TLR stimulation, whereas its recruitment to Nos2 or Il6 required TLR activation. Further analysis revealed that TLR-induced recruitment of NFAT5 to Nos2 was dependent on inhibitor of κB kinase (IKK) β activity and de novo protein synthesis, and was sensitive to histone deacetylases. In vivo, NFAT5 was necessary for effective immunity against Leishmania major, a parasite whose clearance requires TLRs and iNOS expression in macrophages. These findings identify NFAT5 as a novel regulator of mammalian anti-pathogen responses. PMID:22312110

  13. Tomato Whole Genome Transcriptional Response to Tetranychus urticae Identifies Divergence of Spider Mite-Induced Responses Between Tomato and Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Martel, Catherine; Zhurov, Vladimir; Navarro, Marie; Martinez, Manuel; Cazaux, Marc; Auger, Philippe; Migeon, Alain; Santamaria, M Estrella; Wybouw, Nicky; Diaz, Isabel; Van Leeuwen, Thomas; Navajas, Maria; Grbic, Miodrag; Grbic, Vojislava

    2015-03-01

    The two-spotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae is one of the most significant mite pests in agriculture, feeding on more than 1,100 plant hosts, including model plants Arabidopsis thaliana and tomato, Solanum lycopersicum. Here, we describe timecourse tomato transcriptional responses to spider mite feeding and compare them with Arabidopsis in order to determine conserved and divergent defense responses to this pest. To refine the involvement of jasmonic acid (JA) in mite-induced responses and to improve tomato Gene Ontology annotations, we analyzed transcriptional changes in the tomato JA-signaling mutant defenseless1 (def-1) upon JA treatment and spider mite herbivory. Overlay of differentially expressed genes (DEG) identified in def-1 onto those from the timecourse experiment established that JA controls expression of the majority of genes differentially regulated by herbivory. Comparison of defense responses between tomato and Arabidopsis highlighted 96 orthologous genes (of 2,133 DEG) that were recruited for defense against spider mites in both species. These genes, involved in biosynthesis of JA, phenylpropanoids, flavonoids, and terpenoids, represent the conserved core of induced defenses. The remaining tomato DEG support the establishment of tomato-specific defenses, indicating profound divergence of spider mite-induced responses between tomato and Arabidopsis.

  14. Bacterial Outer Membrane Vesicles Induce Plant Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Bahar, Ofir; Mordukhovich, Gideon; Luu, Dee Dee; Schwessinger, Benjamin; Daudi, Arsalan; Jehle, Anna Kristina; Felix, Georg; Ronald, Pamela C

    2016-05-01

    Gram-negative bacteria continuously pinch off portions of their outer membrane, releasing membrane vesicles. These outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are involved in multiple processes including cell-to-cell communication, biofilm formation, stress tolerance, horizontal gene transfer, and virulence. OMVs are also known modulators of the mammalian immune response. Despite the well-documented role of OMVs in mammalian-bacterial communication, their interaction with plants is not well studied. To examine whether OMVs of plant pathogens modulate the plant immune response, we purified OMVs from four different plant pathogens and used them to treat Arabidopsis thaliana. OMVs rapidly induced a reactive oxygen species burst, medium alkalinization, and defense gene expression in A. thaliana leaf discs, cell cultures, and seedlings, respectively. Western blot analysis revealed that EF-Tu is present in OMVs and that it serves as an elicitor of the plant immune response in this form. Our results further show that the immune coreceptors BAK1 and SOBIR1 mediate OMV perception and response. Taken together, our results demonstrate that plants can detect and respond to OMV-associated molecules by activation of their immune system, revealing a new facet of plant-bacterial interactions.

  15. Insect and wound induced GUS gene expression from a Beta vulgaris proteinase inhibitor gene promoter

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Inducible gene promoters that are specifically activated by pathogen invasion or insect pest attack are needed for effective expression of resistance genes to control plant diseases. In the present study, a promoter from a serine proteinase inhibitor gene (BvSTI) shown to be up-regulated in resist...

  16. Ecdysone Receptor Gene Switch Technology for Inducible Gene Expression in Plants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Inducible gene regulation systems based on specific chemicals have many potential applications in agriculture and in the basic understanding of gene function. As a result several gene switches have been developed. However, the properties of the chemicals used in most of these switches make their use...

  17. Protein synthesis inhibitors enhance the expression of mRNAs for early inducible inflammatory genes via mRNA stabilization.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Soh; Takeshige, Koichiro

    2008-02-01

    Expression of inflammatory genes is regulated at multiple steps, including transcriptional activation and mRNA stabilization. During an investigation into the requirement of de novo protein synthesis for the induction of inflammatory genes, it was revealed that protein synthesis inhibitors unexpectedly potentiated the induction of mRNAs for primary response genes, while the inhibitors suppressed the induction of secondary inducible genes as previously described. Stimulus-induced nuclear translocation and promoter recruitment of NF-kappaB, which is responsible for the transcriptional activation of many inflammatory genes, were largely unaffected by the inhibitors. Instead, these inhibitors prolonged the half-lives of all of the primary inducible mRNAs tested. Thus, these findings emphasize the important contribution of regulated mRNA longevity to gene expression induced by pro-inflammatory stimulation.

  18. Radiation-induced genomic instability: radiation quality and dose response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Leslie E.; Nagar, Shruti; Kim, Grace J.; Morgan, William F.

    2003-01-01

    Genomic instability is a term used to describe a phenomenon that results in the accumulation of multiple changes required to convert a stable genome of a normal cell to an unstable genome characteristic of a tumor. There has been considerable recent debate concerning the importance of genomic instability in human cancer and its temporal occurrence in the carcinogenic process. Radiation is capable of inducing genomic instability in mammalian cells and instability is thought to be the driving force responsible for radiation carcinogenesis. Genomic instability is characterized by a large collection of diverse endpoints that include large-scale chromosomal rearrangements and aberrations, amplification of genetic material, aneuploidy, micronucleus formation, microsatellite instability, and gene mutation. The capacity of radiation to induce genomic instability depends to a large extent on radiation quality or linear energy transfer (LET) and dose. There appears to be a low dose threshold effect with low LET, beyond which no additional genomic instability is induced. Low doses of both high and low LET radiation are capable of inducing this phenomenon. This report reviews data concerning dose rate effects of high and low LET radiation and their capacity to induce genomic instability assayed by chromosomal aberrations, delayed lethal mutations, micronuclei and apoptosis.

  19. Radiation-induced genomic instability: radiation quality and dose response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Leslie E.; Nagar, Shruti; Kim, Grace J.; Morgan, William F.

    2003-01-01

    Genomic instability is a term used to describe a phenomenon that results in the accumulation of multiple changes required to convert a stable genome of a normal cell to an unstable genome characteristic of a tumor. There has been considerable recent debate concerning the importance of genomic instability in human cancer and its temporal occurrence in the carcinogenic process. Radiation is capable of inducing genomic instability in mammalian cells and instability is thought to be the driving force responsible for radiation carcinogenesis. Genomic instability is characterized by a large collection of diverse endpoints that include large-scale chromosomal rearrangements and aberrations, amplification of genetic material, aneuploidy, micronucleus formation, microsatellite instability, and gene mutation. The capacity of radiation to induce genomic instability depends to a large extent on radiation quality or linear energy transfer (LET) and dose. There appears to be a low dose threshold effect with low LET, beyond which no additional genomic instability is induced. Low doses of both high and low LET radiation are capable of inducing this phenomenon. This report reviews data concerning dose rate effects of high and low LET radiation and their capacity to induce genomic instability assayed by chromosomal aberrations, delayed lethal mutations, micronuclei and apoptosis.

  20. Cell geometry dictates TNFα-induced genome response.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Aninda; Venkatachalapathy, Saradha; Ratna, Prasuna; Wang, Yejun; Jokhun, Doorgesh Sharma; Shivashankar, G V

    2017-05-16

    Cells in physiology integrate local soluble and mechanical signals to regulate genomic programs. Whereas the individual roles of these signals are well studied, the cellular responses to the combined chemical and physical signals are less explored. Here, we investigated the cross-talk between cellular geometry and TNFα signaling. We stabilized NIH 3T3 fibroblasts into rectangular anisotropic or circular isotropic geometries and stimulated them with TNFα and analyzed nuclear translocation of transcription regulators -NFκB (p65) and MKL and downstream gene-expression patterns. We found that TNFα induces geometry-dependent actin depolymerization, which enhances IκB degradation, p65 nuclear translocation, nuclear exit of MKL, and sequestration of p65 at the RNA-polymerase-II foci. Further, global transcription profile of cells under matrix-TNFα interplay reveals a geometry-dependent gene-expression pattern. At a functional level, we find cell geometry affects TNFα-induced cell proliferation. Our results provide compelling evidence that fibroblasts, depending on their geometries, elicit distinct cellular responses for the same cytokine.

  1. Cell geometry dictates TNFα-induced genome response

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Aninda; Venkatachalapathy, Saradha; Ratna, Prasuna; Wang, Yejun; Jokhun, Doorgesh Sharma; Shivashankar, G. V.

    2017-01-01

    Cells in physiology integrate local soluble and mechanical signals to regulate genomic programs. Whereas the individual roles of these signals are well studied, the cellular responses to the combined chemical and physical signals are less explored. Here, we investigated the cross-talk between cellular geometry and TNFα signaling. We stabilized NIH 3T3 fibroblasts into rectangular anisotropic or circular isotropic geometries and stimulated them with TNFα and analyzed nuclear translocation of transcription regulators –NFκB (p65) and MKL and downstream gene-expression patterns. We found that TNFα induces geometry-dependent actin depolymerization, which enhances IκB degradation, p65 nuclear translocation, nuclear exit of MKL, and sequestration of p65 at the RNA-polymerase-II foci. Further, global transcription profile of cells under matrix-TNFα interplay reveals a geometry-dependent gene-expression pattern. At a functional level, we find cell geometry affects TNFα-induced cell proliferation. Our results provide compelling evidence that fibroblasts, depending on their geometries, elicit distinct cellular responses for the same cytokine. PMID:28461498

  2. RelA-Induced Interferon Response Negatively Regulates Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Kochupurakkal, Bose S.; Wang, Zhigang C.; Hua, Tony; Culhane, Aedin C.; Rodig, Scott J.; Rajkovic-Molek, Koraljka; Lazaro, Jean-Bernard; Richardson, Andrea L.; Biswas, Debajit K.; Iglehart, J. Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Both oncogenic and tumor-suppressor activities are attributed to the Nuclear Factor kappa B (NF-kB) pathway. Moreover, NF-kB may positively or negatively regulate proliferation. The molecular determinants of these opposing roles of NF-kB are unclear. Using primary human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) as a model, we show that increased RelA levels and consequent increase in basal transcriptional activity of RelA induces IRF1, a target gene. Induced IRF1 upregulates STAT1 and IRF7, and in consort, these factors induce the expression of interferon response genes. Activation of the interferon pathway down-regulates CDK4 and up-regulates p27 resulting in Rb hypo-phosphorylation and cell cycle arrest. Stimulation of HMEC with IFN-γ elicits similar phenotypic and molecular changes suggesting that basal activity of RelA and IFN-γ converge on IRF1 to regulate proliferation. The anti-proliferative RelA-IRF1-CDK4 signaling axis is retained in ER+/HER2- breast tumors analyzed by The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Using immuno-histochemical analysis of breast tumors, we confirm the negative correlation between RelA levels and proliferation rate in ER+/HER2- breast tumors. These findings attribute an anti-proliferative tumor-suppressor role to basal RelA activity. Inactivation of Rb, down-regulation of RelA or IRF1, or upregulation of CDK4 or IRF2 rescues the RelA-IRF1-CDK4 induced proliferation arrest in HMEC and are points of disruption in aggressive tumors. Activity of the RelA-IRF1-CDK4 axis may explain favorable response to CDK4/6 inhibition observed in patients with ER+ Rb competent tumors. PMID:26460486

  3. Fire-Induced Response in Foam Encapsulants

    SciTech Connect

    Borek, T.T.; Chu, T.Y.; Erickson, K.L.; Gill, W.; Hobbs, M.L.; Humphries, L.L.; Renlund, A.M.; Ulibarri, T.A.

    1999-04-02

    The paper provides a concise overview of a coordinated experimental/theoretical/numerical program at Sandia National Laboratories to develop an experimentally validated model of fire-induced response of foam-filled engineered systems for nuclear and transportation safety applications. Integral experiments are performed to investigate the thermal response of polyurethane foam-filled systems exposed to fire-like heat fluxes. A suite of laboratory experiments is performed to characterize the decomposition chemistry of polyurethane. Mass loss and energy associated with foam decomposition and chemical structures of the virgin and decomposed foam are determined. Decomposition chemistry is modeled as the degradation of macromolecular structures by bond breaking followed by vaporization of small fragments of the macromolecule with high vapor pressures. The chemical decomposition model is validated against the laboratory data. Data from integral experiments is used to assess and validate a FEM foam thermal response model with the chemistry model developed from the decomposition experiments. Good agreement was achieved both in the progression of the decomposition front and the in-depth thermal response.

  4. L-glutamine Induces Expression of Listeria monocytogenes Virulence Genes.

    PubMed

    Haber, Adi; Friedman, Sivan; Lobel, Lior; Burg-Golani, Tamar; Sigal, Nadejda; Rose, Jessica; Livnat-Levanon, Nurit; Lewinson, Oded; Herskovits, Anat A

    2017-01-01

    The high environmental adaptability of bacteria is contingent upon their ability to sense changes in their surroundings. Bacterial pathogen entry into host poses an abrupt and dramatic environmental change, during which successful pathogens gauge multiple parameters that signal host localization. The facultative human pathogen Listeria monocytogenes flourishes in soil, water and food, and in ~50 different animals, and serves as a model for intracellular infection. L. monocytogenes identifies host entry by sensing both physical (e.g., temperature) and chemical (e.g., metabolite concentrations) factors. We report here that L-glutamine, an abundant nitrogen source in host serum and cells, serves as an environmental indicator and inducer of virulence gene expression. In contrast, ammonia, which is the most abundant nitrogen source in soil and water, fully supports growth, but fails to activate virulence gene transcription. We demonstrate that induction of virulence genes only occurs when the Listerial intracellular concentration of L-glutamine crosses a certain threshold, acting as an on/off switch: off when L-glutamine concentrations are below the threshold, and fully on when the threshold is crossed. To turn on the switch, L-glutamine must be present, and the L-glutamine high affinity ABC transporter, GlnPQ, must be active. Inactivation of GlnPQ led to complete arrest of L-glutamine uptake, reduced type I interferon response in infected macrophages, dramatic reduction in expression of virulence genes, and attenuated virulence in a mouse infection model. These results may explain observations made with other pathogens correlating nitrogen metabolism and virulence, and suggest that gauging of L-glutamine as a means of ascertaining host localization may be a general mechanism.

  5. L-glutamine Induces Expression of Listeria monocytogenes Virulence Genes

    PubMed Central

    Lobel, Lior; Burg-Golani, Tamar; Sigal, Nadejda; Rose, Jessica; Livnat-Levanon, Nurit; Lewinson, Oded; Herskovits, Anat A.

    2017-01-01

    The high environmental adaptability of bacteria is contingent upon their ability to sense changes in their surroundings. Bacterial pathogen entry into host poses an abrupt and dramatic environmental change, during which successful pathogens gauge multiple parameters that signal host localization. The facultative human pathogen Listeria monocytogenes flourishes in soil, water and food, and in ~50 different animals, and serves as a model for intracellular infection. L. monocytogenes identifies host entry by sensing both physical (e.g., temperature) and chemical (e.g., metabolite concentrations) factors. We report here that L-glutamine, an abundant nitrogen source in host serum and cells, serves as an environmental indicator and inducer of virulence gene expression. In contrast, ammonia, which is the most abundant nitrogen source in soil and water, fully supports growth, but fails to activate virulence gene transcription. We demonstrate that induction of virulence genes only occurs when the Listerial intracellular concentration of L-glutamine crosses a certain threshold, acting as an on/off switch: off when L-glutamine concentrations are below the threshold, and fully on when the threshold is crossed. To turn on the switch, L-glutamine must be present, and the L-glutamine high affinity ABC transporter, GlnPQ, must be active. Inactivation of GlnPQ led to complete arrest of L-glutamine uptake, reduced type I interferon response in infected macrophages, dramatic reduction in expression of virulence genes, and attenuated virulence in a mouse infection model. These results may explain observations made with other pathogens correlating nitrogen metabolism and virulence, and suggest that gauging of L-glutamine as a means of ascertaining host localization may be a general mechanism. PMID:28114430

  6. EVIDENCE FOR THE MACROPHAGE INDUCING GENE IN MYCOBACTERIUM INTRACELLULARE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: The Mycobacterium avium Complex (MAC) includes the species M. avium (MA), M. intracellulare (MI), and possibly others. Organisms belonging to the MAC are phylogenetically closely related, opportunistic pathogens. The macrophage inducing gene (mig) is the only well-des...

  7. EVIDENCE FOR THE MACROPHAGE INDUCING GENE IN MYCOBACTERIUM INTRACELLULARE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: The Mycobacterium avium Complex (MAC) includes the species M. avium (MA), M. intracellulare (MI), and possibly others. Organisms belonging to the MAC are phylogenetically closely related, opportunistic pathogens. The macrophage inducing gene (mig) is the only well-des...

  8. HRGFish: A database of hypoxia responsive genes in fishes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashid, Iliyas; Nagpure, Naresh Sahebrao; Srivastava, Prachi; Kumar, Ravindra; Pathak, Ajey Kumar; Singh, Mahender; Kushwaha, Basdeo

    2017-02-01

    Several studies have highlighted the changes in the gene expression due to the hypoxia response in fishes, but the systematic organization of the information and the analytical platform for such genes are lacking. In the present study, an attempt was made to develop a database of hypoxia responsive genes in fishes (HRGFish), integrated with analytical tools, using LAMPP technology. Genes reported in hypoxia response for fishes were compiled through literature survey and the database presently covers 818 gene sequences and 35 gene types from 38 fishes. The upstream fragments (3,000 bp), covered in this database, enables to compute CG dinucleotides frequencies, motif finding of the hypoxia response element, identification of CpG island and mapping with the reference promoter of zebrafish. The database also includes functional annotation of genes and provides tools for analyzing sequences and designing primers for selected gene fragments. This may be the first database on the hypoxia response genes in fishes that provides a workbench to the scientific community involved in studying the evolution and ecological adaptation of the fish species in relation to hypoxia.

  9. HRGFish: A database of hypoxia responsive genes in fishes

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, Iliyas; Nagpure, Naresh Sahebrao; Srivastava, Prachi; Kumar, Ravindra; Pathak, Ajey Kumar; Singh, Mahender; Kushwaha, Basdeo

    2017-01-01

    Several studies have highlighted the changes in the gene expression due to the hypoxia response in fishes, but the systematic organization of the information and the analytical platform for such genes are lacking. In the present study, an attempt was made to develop a database of hypoxia responsive genes in fishes (HRGFish), integrated with analytical tools, using LAMPP technology. Genes reported in hypoxia response for fishes were compiled through literature survey and the database presently covers 818 gene sequences and 35 gene types from 38 fishes. The upstream fragments (3,000 bp), covered in this database, enables to compute CG dinucleotides frequencies, motif finding of the hypoxia response element, identification of CpG island and mapping with the reference promoter of zebrafish. The database also includes functional annotation of genes and provides tools for analyzing sequences and designing primers for selected gene fragments. This may be the first database on the hypoxia response genes in fishes that provides a workbench to the scientific community involved in studying the evolution and ecological adaptation of the fish species in relation to hypoxia. PMID:28205556

  10. HRGFish: A database of hypoxia responsive genes in fishes.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Iliyas; Nagpure, Naresh Sahebrao; Srivastava, Prachi; Kumar, Ravindra; Pathak, Ajey Kumar; Singh, Mahender; Kushwaha, Basdeo

    2017-02-13

    Several studies have highlighted the changes in the gene expression due to the hypoxia response in fishes, but the systematic organization of the information and the analytical platform for such genes are lacking. In the present study, an attempt was made to develop a database of hypoxia responsive genes in fishes (HRGFish), integrated with analytical tools, using LAMPP technology. Genes reported in hypoxia response for fishes were compiled through literature survey and the database presently covers 818 gene sequences and 35 gene types from 38 fishes. The upstream fragments (3,000 bp), covered in this database, enables to compute CG dinucleotides frequencies, motif finding of the hypoxia response element, identification of CpG island and mapping with the reference promoter of zebrafish. The database also includes functional annotation of genes and provides tools for analyzing sequences and designing primers for selected gene fragments. This may be the first database on the hypoxia response genes in fishes that provides a workbench to the scientific community involved in studying the evolution and ecological adaptation of the fish species in relation to hypoxia.

  11. PDT-induced inflammatory and host responses.

    PubMed

    Firczuk, Małgorzata; Nowis, Dominika; Gołąb, Jakub

    2011-05-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is used in the management of neoplastic and nonmalignant diseases. Its unique mechanisms of action include direct cytotoxic effects exerted towards tumor cells, destruction of tumor and peritumoral vasculature and induction of local acute inflammatory reaction. The latter develops in response to (1) damage to tumor and stromal cells that leads to the release of cell death-associated molecular patterns (CDAMs) or damage associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), (2) early vascular changes that include increased vascular permeability, vascular occlusion, and release of vasoactive and proinflammatory mediators, (3) activation of alternative pathway of complement leading to generation of potent chemotactic factors, and (4) induction of signaling cascades and transcription factors that trigger secretion of cytokines, matrix metalloproteinases, or adhesion molecules. The majority of studies indicate that induction of local inflammatory response contributes to the antitumor effects of PDT and facilitates development of systemic immunity. However, the degree of PDT-induced inflammation and its subsequent contribution to its antitumor efficacy depend on multiple parameters, such as chemical nature, concentration and subcellular localization of the photosensitizers, the spectral characteristics of the light source, light fluence and fluence rate, oxygenation level, and tumor type. Identification of detailed molecular mechanisms and development of therapeutic approaches modulating PDT-induced inflammation will be necessary to tailor this treatment to particular clinical conditions.

  12. Virus-induced gene silencing of WRKY53 and an inducible phenylalanine ammonia-lyase in wheat reduces aphid resistance.

    PubMed

    Van Eck, Leon; Schultz, Thia; Leach, Jan E; Scofield, Steven R; Peairs, Frank B; Botha, Anna-Maria; Lapitan, Nora L V

    2010-12-01

    Although several wheat genes differentially expressed during the Russian wheat aphid resistance response have recently been identified, their requirement for and specific role in resistance remain unclear. Progress in wheat-aphid interaction research is hampered by inadequate collections of mutant germplasm and difficulty in transforming hexaploid wheat. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) technology is emerging as a viable reverse genetics approach in cereal crops. However, the potential of VIGS for determining aphid defence gene function in wheat has not been evaluated. We report on the use of recombinant barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV) to target and silence a WRKY53 transcription factor and an inducible phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) gene, both predicted to contribute to aphid defence in a genetically resistant wheat line. After inoculating resistant wheat with the VIGS constructs, transcript abundance was reduced to levels similar to that observed in susceptible wheat. Notably, the level of PAL expression was also suppressed by the WKRY53 construct, suggesting that these genes operate in the same defence response network. Both knockdowns exhibited a susceptible phenotype upon aphid infestation, and aphids feeding on silenced plants exhibited a significant increase in fitness compared to aphids feeding on control plants. Altered plant phenotype and changes in aphid behaviour after silencing imply that WKRY53 and PAL play key roles in generating a successful resistance response. This study is the first report on the successful use of VIGS to investigate genes involved in wheat-insect interactions.

  13. Inducible and combinatorial gene manipulation in mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Dogbevia, Godwin K.; Marticorena-Alvarez, Ricardo; Bausen, Melanie; Sprengel, Rolf; Hasan, Mazahir T.

    2015-01-01

    We have deployed recombinant adeno-associated viruses equipped with tetracycline-controlled genetic switches to manipulate gene expression in mouse brain. Here, we show a combinatorial genetic approach for inducible, cell type-specific gene expression and Cre/loxP mediated gene recombination in different brain regions. Our chemical-genetic approach will help to investigate ‘when’, ‘where’, and ‘how’ gene(s) control neuronal circuit dynamics, and organize, for example, sensory signal processing, learning and memory, and behavior. PMID:25954155

  14. Gene expression plasticity in response to salinity acclimation in threespine stickleback ecotypes from different salinity habitats.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, Taylor C; Metzger, David C H; Healy, Timothy M; Schulte, Patricia M

    2017-02-18

    Phenotypic plasticity is thought to facilitate the colonization of novel environments and shape the direction of evolution in colonizing populations. However, the relative prevalence of various predicted patterns of changes in phenotypic plasticity following colonization remains unclear. Here, we use a whole-transcriptome approach to characterize patterns of gene expression plasticity in the gills of a freshwater-adapted and a saltwater-adapted ecotype of threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) exposed to a range of salinities. The response of the gill transcriptome to environmental salinity had a large shared component common to both ecotypes (2159 genes) with significant enrichment of genes involved in transmembrane ion transport and the restructuring of the gill epithelium. This transcriptional response to freshwater acclimation is induced at salinities below two parts per thousand. There was also differentiation in gene expression patterns between ecotypes (2515 genes), particularly in processes important for changes in the gill structure and permeability. Only 508 genes that differed between ecotypes also responded to salinity and no specific processes were enriched among this gene set, and an even smaller number (87 genes) showed evidence of changes in the extent of the response to salinity acclimation between ecotypes. No pattern of relative expression dominated among these genes, suggesting that neither gains nor losses of plasticity dominated the changes in expression patterns between the ecotypes. These data demonstrate that multiple patterns of changes in gene expression plasticity can occur following colonization of novel habitats.

  15. The cytoskeleton enhances gene expression in the response to the Harpin elicitor in grapevine.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Fei; Chang, Xiao-Li; Nick, Peter

    2010-09-01

    The cytoskeleton undergoes dramatic reorganization during plant defence. This response is generally interpreted as part of the cellular repolarization establishing physical barriers against the invading pathogen. To gain insight into the functional significance of cytoskeletal responses for defence, two Vitis cell cultures that differ in their microtubular dynamics were used, and the cytoskeletal response to the elicitor Harpin in parallel to alkalinization of the medium as a fast response, and the activation of defence-related genes were followed. In one cell line derived from the grapevine cultivar 'Pinot Noir', microtubules contained mostly tyrosinylated alpha-tubulin, indicating high microtubular turnover, whereas in another cell line derived from the wild grapevine V. rupestris, the alpha-tubulin was strongly detyrosinated, indicating low microtubular turnover. The cortical microtubules were disrupted and actin filaments were bundled in both cell lines, but the responses were elevated in V. rupestris as compared with V. vinifera cv. 'Pinot Noir'. The cytoskeletal responsiveness correlated with elicitor-induced alkalinization and the expression of defence genes. Using resveratrol synthase and stilbene synthase as examples, it could be shown that pharmacological manipulation of microtubules could induce gene expression in the absence of elicitor. These findings are discussed with respect to a role for microtubules as positive regulators of defence-induced gene expression.

  16. The cytoskeleton enhances gene expression in the response to the Harpin elicitor in grapevine

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Fei; Chang, Xiao-Li; Nick, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The cytoskeleton undergoes dramatic reorganization during plant defence. This response is generally interpreted as part of the cellular repolarization establishing physical barriers against the invading pathogen. To gain insight into the functional significance of cytoskeletal responses for defence, two Vitis cell cultures that differ in their microtubular dynamics were used, and the cytoskeletal response to the elicitor Harpin in parallel to alkalinization of the medium as a fast response, and the activation of defence-related genes were followed. In one cell line derived from the grapevine cultivar ‘Pinot Noir’, microtubules contained mostly tyrosinylated α-tubulin, indicating high microtubular turnover, whereas in another cell line derived from the wild grapevine V. rupestris, the α-tubulin was strongly detyrosinated, indicating low microtubular turnover. The cortical microtubules were disrupted and actin filaments were bundled in both cell lines, but the responses were elevated in V. rupestris as compared with V. vinifera cv. ‘Pinot Noir’. The cytoskeletal responsiveness correlated with elicitor-induced alkalinization and the expression of defence genes. Using resveratrol synthase and stilbene synthase as examples, it could be shown that pharmacological manipulation of microtubules could induce gene expression in the absence of elicitor. These findings are discussed with respect to a role for microtubules as positive regulators of defence-induced gene expression. PMID:20675535

  17. Estrogen receptor genes in gastropods: phylogenetic divergence and gene expression responses to a synthetic estrogen.

    PubMed

    Hultin, Cecilia L; Hallgren, Per; Hansson, Maria C

    2016-11-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) have the potential to affect development and reproduction in gastropods. However, one is today lacking basic understanding of the Molluscan endocrine system and one can therefore not fully explain these EDC-induced affects. Furthermore, only a few genes that potentially may be connected to the endocrine system have been sequenced in gastropods. An example is the estrogen receptor gene (er) that have been identified in a restricted number of freshwater and marine gastropods. Here, we have identified a new partial coding sequence of an estrogen receptor gene (er) in the European common heterobranch Radix balthica. The following phylogenetic analysis divided the ers of heterobranchs and ceanogastropods in two branches. Furthermore, exposure to the synthetic estrogen 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) showed that exposure could significantly affect er expression level in the heterobranch R. balthica. This paper is the first that phylogenetically compares gastropods' er, basal er expression profiles, and transcriptional estrogenic responses in gastropods from two different evolutionary groups.

  18. Clinical significance of in vivo cytarabine-induced gene expression signature in AML.

    PubMed

    Lamba, Jatinder K; Pounds, Stanley; Cao, Xueyuan; Crews, Kristine R; Cogle, Christopher R; Bhise, Neha; Raimondi, Susana C; Downing, James R; Baker, Sharyn D; Ribeiro, Raul C; Rubnitz, Jeffrey E

    2016-01-01

    Despite initial remission, ∼60-70% of adult and 30% of pediatric patients experience relapse or refractory AML. Studies so far have identified base line gene expression profiles of pathogenic and prognostic significance in AML; however, the extent of change in gene expression post-initiation of treatment has not been investigated. Exposure of leukemic cells to chemotherapeutic agents such as cytarabine, a mainstay of AML chemotherapy, can trigger adaptive response by influencing leukemic cell transcriptome and, hence, development of resistance or refractory disease. It is, however, challenging to perform such a study due to lack of availability of specimens post-drug treatment. The primary objective of this study was to identify in vivo cytarabine-induced changes in leukemia cell transcriptome and to evaluate their impact on clinical outcome. The results highlight genes relevant to cytarabine resistance and support the concept of targeting cytarabine-induced genes as a means of improving response.

  19. Identification of genes involved in the response of Arabidopsis to simultaneous biotic and abiotic stresses.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Nicky J; Lilley, Catherine J; Urwin, Peter E

    2013-08-01

    In field conditions, plants may experience numerous environmental stresses at any one time. Research suggests that the plant response to multiple stresses is different from that for individual stresses, producing nonadditive effects. In particular, the molecular signaling pathways controlling biotic and abiotic stress responses may interact and antagonize one another. The transcriptome response of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) to concurrent water deficit (abiotic stress) and infection with the plant-parasitic nematode Heterodera schachtii (biotic stress) was analyzed by microarray. A unique program of gene expression was activated in response to a combination of water deficit and nematode stress, with 50 specifically multiple-stress-regulated genes. Candidate genes with potential roles in controlling the response to multiple stresses were selected and functionally characterized. RAPID ALKALINIZATION FACTOR-LIKE8 (AtRALFL8) was induced in roots by joint stresses but conferred susceptibility to drought stress and nematode infection when overexpressed. Constitutively expressing plants had stunted root systems and extended root hairs. Plants may produce signal peptides such as AtRALFL8 to induce cell wall remodeling in response to multiple stresses. The methionine homeostasis gene METHIONINE GAMMA LYASE (AtMGL) was up-regulated by dual stress in leaves, conferring resistance to nematodes when overexpressed. It may regulate methionine metabolism under conditions of multiple stresses. AZELAIC ACID INDUCED1 (AZI1), involved in defense priming in systemic plant immunity, was down-regulated in leaves by joint stress and conferred drought susceptibility when overexpressed, potentially as part of abscisic acid-induced repression of pathogen response genes. The results highlight the complex nature of multiple stress responses and confirm the importance of studying plant stress factors in combination.

  20. Synergism between Hedgehog-GLI and EGFR signaling in Hedgehog-responsive human medulloblastoma cells induces downregulation of canonical Hedgehog-target genes and stabilized expression of GLI1.

    PubMed

    Götschel, Frank; Berg, Daniela; Gruber, Wolfgang; Bender, Christian; Eberl, Markus; Friedel, Myriam; Sonntag, Johanna; Rüngeler, Elena; Hache, Hendrik; Wierling, Christoph; Nietfeld, Wilfried; Lehrach, Hans; Frischauf, Annemarie; Schwartz-Albiez, Reinhard; Aberger, Fritz; Korf, Ulrike

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant activation of Hedgehog (HH) signaling has been identified as a key etiologic factor in many human malignancies. Signal strength, target gene specificity, and oncogenic activity of HH signaling depend profoundly on interactions with other pathways, such as epidermal growth factor receptor-mediated signaling, which has been shown to cooperate with HH/GLI in basal cell carcinoma and pancreatic cancer. Our experimental data demonstrated that the Daoy human medulloblastoma cell line possesses a fully inducible endogenous HH pathway. Treatment of Daoy cells with Sonic HH or Smoothened agonist induced expression of GLI1 protein and simultaneously prevented the processing of GLI3 to its repressor form. To study interactions between HH- and EGF-induced signaling in greater detail, time-resolved measurements were carried out and analyzed at the transcriptomic and proteomic levels. The Daoy cells responded to the HH/EGF co-treatment by downregulating GLI1, PTCH, and HHIP at the transcript level; this was also observed when Amphiregulin (AREG) was used instead of EGF. We identified a novel crosstalk mechanism whereby EGFR signaling silences proteins acting as negative regulators of HH signaling, as AKT- and ERK-signaling independent process. EGFR/HH signaling maintained high GLI1 protein levels which contrasted the GLI1 downregulation on the transcript level. Conversely, a high-level synergism was also observed, due to a strong and significant upregulation of numerous canonical EGF-targets with putative tumor-promoting properties such as MMP7, VEGFA, and IL-8. In conclusion, synergistic effects between EGFR and HH signaling can selectively induce a switch from a canonical HH/GLI profile to a modulated specific target gene profile. This suggests that there are more wide-spread, yet context-dependent interactions, between HH/GLI and growth factor receptor signaling in human malignancies.

  1. Synergism between Hedgehog-GLI and EGFR Signaling in Hedgehog-Responsive Human Medulloblastoma Cells Induces Downregulation of Canonical Hedgehog-Target Genes and Stabilized Expression of GLI1

    PubMed Central

    Götschel, Frank; Berg, Daniela; Gruber, Wolfgang; Bender, Christian; Eberl, Markus; Friedel, Myriam; Sonntag, Johanna; Rüngeler, Elena; Hache, Hendrik; Wierling, Christoph; Nietfeld, Wilfried; Lehrach, Hans; Frischauf, Annemarie; Schwartz-Albiez, Reinhard; Aberger, Fritz; Korf, Ulrike

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant activation of Hedgehog (HH) signaling has been identified as a key etiologic factor in many human malignancies. Signal strength, target gene specificity, and oncogenic activity of HH signaling depend profoundly on interactions with other pathways, such as epidermal growth factor receptor-mediated signaling, which has been shown to cooperate with HH/GLI in basal cell carcinoma and pancreatic cancer. Our experimental data demonstrated that the Daoy human medulloblastoma cell line possesses a fully inducible endogenous HH pathway. Treatment of Daoy cells with Sonic HH or Smoothened agonist induced expression of GLI1 protein and simultaneously prevented the processing of GLI3 to its repressor form. To study interactions between HH- and EGF-induced signaling in greater detail, time-resolved measurements were carried out and analyzed at the transcriptomic and proteomic levels. The Daoy cells responded to the HH/EGF co-treatment by downregulating GLI1, PTCH, and HHIP at the transcript level; this was also observed when Amphiregulin (AREG) was used instead of EGF. We identified a novel crosstalk mechanism whereby EGFR signaling silences proteins acting as negative regulators of HH signaling, as AKT- and ERK-signaling independent process. EGFR/HH signaling maintained high GLI1 protein levels which contrasted the GLI1 downregulation on the transcript level. Conversely, a high-level synergism was also observed, due to a strong and significant upregulation of numerous canonical EGF-targets with putative tumor-promoting properties such as MMP7, VEGFA, and IL-8. In conclusion, synergistic effects between EGFR and HH signaling can selectively induce a switch from a canonical HH/GLI profile to a modulated specific target gene profile. This suggests that there are more wide-spread, yet context-dependent interactions, between HH/GLI and growth factor receptor signaling in human malignancies. PMID:23762360

  2. Global Gene-Expression Analysis to Identify Differentially Expressed Genes Critical for the Heat Stress Response in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xiangshu; Yi, Hankuil; Lee, Jeongyeo; Nou, Ill-Sup; Han, Ching-Tack; Hur, Yoonkang

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide dissection of the heat stress response (HSR) is necessary to overcome problems in crop production caused by global warming. To identify HSR genes, we profiled gene expression in two Chinese cabbage inbred lines with different thermotolerances, Chiifu and Kenshin. Many genes exhibited >2-fold changes in expression upon exposure to 0.5- 4 h at 45°C (high temperature, HT): 5.2% (2,142 genes) in Chiifu and 3.7% (1,535 genes) in Kenshin. The most enriched GO (Gene Ontology) items included 'response to heat', 'response to reactive oxygen species (ROS)', 'response to temperature stimulus', 'response to abiotic stimulus', and 'MAPKKK cascade'. In both lines, the genes most highly induced by HT encoded small heat shock proteins (Hsps) and heat shock factor (Hsf)-like proteins such as HsfB2A (Bra029292), whereas high-molecular weight Hsps were constitutively expressed. Other upstream HSR components were also up-regulated: ROS-scavenging genes like glutathione peroxidase 2 (BrGPX2, Bra022853), protein kinases, and phosphatases. Among heat stress (HS) marker genes in Arabidopsis, only exportin 1A (XPO1A) (Bra008580, Bra006382) can be applied to B. rapa for basal thermotolerance (BT) and short-term acquired thermotolerance (SAT) gene. CYP707A3 (Bra025083, Bra021965), which is involved in the dehydration response in Arabidopsis, was associated with membrane leakage in both lines following HS. Although many transcription factors (TF) genes, including DREB2A (Bra005852), were involved in HS tolerance in both lines, Bra024224 (MYB41) and Bra021735 (a bZIP/AIR1 [Anthocyanin-Impaired-Response-1]) were specific to Kenshin. Several candidate TFs involved in thermotolerance were confirmed as HSR genes by real-time PCR, and these assignments were further supported by promoter analysis. Although some of our findings are similar to those obtained using other plant species, clear differences in Brassica rapa reveal a distinct HSR in this species. Our data could also provide a

  3. Global Gene-Expression Analysis to Identify Differentially Expressed Genes Critical for the Heat Stress Response in Brassica rapa

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xiangshu; Yi, Hankuil; Lee, Jeongyeo; Nou, Ill-Sup; Han, Ching-Tack; Hur, Yoonkang

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide dissection of the heat stress response (HSR) is necessary to overcome problems in crop production caused by global warming. To identify HSR genes, we profiled gene expression in two Chinese cabbage inbred lines with different thermotolerances, Chiifu and Kenshin. Many genes exhibited >2-fold changes in expression upon exposure to 0.5– 4 h at 45°C (high temperature, HT): 5.2% (2,142 genes) in Chiifu and 3.7% (1,535 genes) in Kenshin. The most enriched GO (Gene Ontology) items included ‘response to heat’, ‘response to reactive oxygen species (ROS)’, ‘response to temperature stimulus’, ‘response to abiotic stimulus’, and ‘MAPKKK cascade’. In both lines, the genes most highly induced by HT encoded small heat shock proteins (Hsps) and heat shock factor (Hsf)-like proteins such as HsfB2A (Bra029292), whereas high-molecular weight Hsps were constitutively expressed. Other upstream HSR components were also up-regulated: ROS-scavenging genes like glutathione peroxidase 2 (BrGPX2, Bra022853), protein kinases, and phosphatases. Among heat stress (HS) marker genes in Arabidopsis, only exportin 1A (XPO1A) (Bra008580, Bra006382) can be applied to B. rapa for basal thermotolerance (BT) and short-term acquired thermotolerance (SAT) gene. CYP707A3 (Bra025083, Bra021965), which is involved in the dehydration response in Arabidopsis, was associated with membrane leakage in both lines following HS. Although many transcription factors (TF) genes, including DREB2A (Bra005852), were involved in HS tolerance in both lines, Bra024224 (MYB41) and Bra021735 (a bZIP/AIR1 [Anthocyanin-Impaired-Response-1]) were specific to Kenshin. Several candidate TFs involved in thermotolerance were confirmed as HSR genes by real-time PCR, and these assignments were further supported by promoter analysis. Although some of our findings are similar to those obtained using other plant species, clear differences in Brassica rapa reveal a distinct HSR in this species. Our data

  4. Global gene expression response to telomerase in bovine adrenocortical cells

    SciTech Connect

    Perrault, Steven D.; Hornsby, Peter J.; Betts, Dean H. . E-mail: bettsd@uoguelph.ca

    2005-09-30

    The infinite proliferative capability of most immortalized cells is dependent upon the presence of the enzyme telomerase and its ability to maintain telomere length and structure. However, telomerase may be involved in a greater system than telomere length regulation, as recent evidence has shown it capable of increasing wound healing in vivo, and improving cellular proliferation rate and survival from apoptosis in vitro. Here, we describe the global gene expression response to ectopic telomerase expression in an in vitro bovine adrenocortical cell model. Telomerase-immortalized cells showed an increased ability for proliferation and survival in minimal essential medium above cells transgenic for GFP. cDNA microarray analyses revealed an altered cell state indicative of increased adrenocortical cell proliferation regulated by the IGF2 pathway and alterations in members of the TGF-B family. As well, we identified alterations in genes associated with development and wound healing that support a model that high telomerase expression induces a highly adaptable, progenitor-like state.

  5. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) in barley seedling leaves

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is one of the most potent reverse genetics technologies for gene functional characterization. This method exploits a dsRNA-mediated antiviral defense mechanism in plants. Using this method allows researchers to generate rapid phenotypic data in a relatively rapid ...

  6. Expression of DNA damage-inducible genes of Escherichia coli upon treatment with methylating, ethylating and propylating agents.

    PubMed

    Volkert, M R; Gately, F H; Hajec, L I

    1989-03-01

    Several alkylation-inducible genes have been identified by construction of Mu-d1 (Apr lac) fusions to genes whose expression is increased in response to alkylation treatment, but not UV treatment. We have examined the induction of 4 different alkylation-inducible genes by treatment with a variety of methylating and ethylating agents, and a propylating agent. We have compared the induction of the alkylation-inducible genes with the induction of the sulA gene, which is a component of the SOS response to DNA damage. We find that the Ada-regulated adaptive response genes (ada-alkB, alkA and aidB) are induced primarily in response to methylation treatment. The ada-independent aidC gene is induced upon treatment with agents that alkylate predominantly by SN1 nucleophilic attack. aidC induction occurs only when cells are not aerated during treatment. The SOS response, as indicated by sulA induction, is strongly induced by all types of alkylating agents used.

  7. Identification of novel light-induced genes in the suprachiasmatic nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Porterfield, Veronica M; Piontkivska, Helen; Mintz, Eric M

    2007-01-01

    Background The transmission of information about the photic environment to the circadian clock involves a complex array of neurotransmitters, receptors, and second messenger systems. Exposure of an animal to light during the subjective night initiates rapid transcription of a number of immediate-early genes in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus. Some of these genes have known roles in entraining the circadian clock, while others have unknown functions. Using laser capture microscopy, microarray analysis, and quantitative real-time PCR, we performed a comprehensive screen for changes in gene expression immediately following a 30 minute light pulse in suprachiasmatic nucleus of mice. Results The results of the microarray screen successfully identified previously known light-induced genes as well as several novel genes that may be important in the circadian clock. Newly identified light-induced genes include early growth response 2, proviral integration site 3, growth-arrest and DNA-damage-inducible 45 beta, and TCDD-inducible poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. Comparative analysis of promoter sequences revealed the presence of evolutionarily conserved CRE and associated TATA box elements in most of the light-induced genes, while other core clock genes generally lack this combination of promoter elements. Conclusion The photic signalling cascade in the suprachiasmatic nucleus activates an array of immediate-early genes, most of which have unknown functions in the circadian clock. Detected evolutionary conservation of CRE and TATA box elements in promoters of light-induced genes suggest that the functional role of these elements has likely remained the same over evolutionary time across mammalian orders. PMID:18021443

  8. The acid adaptive tolerance response in Campylobacter jejuni induces a global response, as suggested by proteomics and microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Varsaki, Athanasia; Murphy, Caroline; Barczynska, Alicja; Jordan, Kieran; Carroll, Cyril

    2015-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni CI 120 is a natural isolate obtained during poultry processing and has the ability to induce an acid tolerance response (ATR) to acid + aerobic conditions in early stationary phase. Other strains tested they did not induce an ATR or they induced it in exponential phase. Campylobacter spp. do not contain the genes that encode the global stationary phase stress response mechanism. Therefore, the aim of this study was to identify genes that are involved in the C. jejuni CI 120 early stationary phase ATR, as it seems to be expressing a novel mechanism of stress tolerance. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was used to examine the expression profile of cytosolic proteins during the C. jejuni CI 120 adaptation to acid + aerobic stress and microarrays to determine the genes that participate in the ATR. The results indicate induction of a global response that activated a number of stress responses, including several genes encoding surface components and genes involved with iron uptake. The findings of this study provide new insights into stress tolerance of C. jejuni, contribute to a better knowledge of the physiology of this bacterium and highlight the diversity among different strains. PMID:26221965

  9. The acid adaptive tolerance response in Campylobacter jejuni induces a global response, as suggested by proteomics and microarrays.

    PubMed

    Varsaki, Athanasia; Murphy, Caroline; Barczynska, Alicja; Jordan, Kieran; Carroll, Cyril

    2015-11-01

    Campylobacter jejuni CI 120 is a natural isolate obtained during poultry processing and has the ability to induce an acid tolerance response (ATR) to acid + aerobic conditions in early stationary phase. Other strains tested they did not induce an ATR or they induced it in exponential phase. Campylobacter spp. do not contain the genes that encode the global stationary phase stress response mechanism. Therefore, the aim of this study was to identify genes that are involved in the C. jejuni CI 120 early stationary phase ATR, as it seems to be expressing a novel mechanism of stress tolerance. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was used to examine the expression profile of cytosolic proteins during the C. jejuni CI 120 adaptation to acid + aerobic stress and microarrays to determine the genes that participate in the ATR. The results indicate induction of a global response that activated a number of stress responses, including several genes encoding surface components and genes involved with iron uptake. The findings of this study provide new insights into stress tolerance of C. jejuni, contribute to a better knowledge of the physiology of this bacterium and highlight the diversity among different strains.

  10. Paired hormone response elements predict caveolin-1 as a glucocorticoid target gene.

    PubMed

    van Batenburg, Marinus F; Li, Hualing; Polman, J Annelies; Lachize, Servane; Datson, Nicole A; Bussemaker, Harmen J; Meijer, Onno C

    2010-01-21

    Glucocorticoids act in part via glucocorticoid receptor binding to hormone response elements (HREs), but their direct target genes in vivo are still largely unknown. We developed the criterion that genomic occurrence of paired HREs at an inter-HRE distance less than 200 bp predicts hormone responsiveness, based on synergy of multiple HREs, and HRE information from known target genes. This criterion predicts a substantial number of novel responsive genes, when applied to genomic regions 10 kb upstream of genes. Multiple-tissue in situ hybridization showed that mRNA expression of 6 out of 10 selected genes was induced in a tissue-specific manner in mice treated with a single dose of corticosterone, with the spleen being the most responsive organ. Caveolin-1 was strongly responsive in several organs, and the HRE pair in its upstream region showed increased occupancy by glucocorticoid receptor in response to corticosterone. Our approach allowed for discovery of novel tissue specific glucocorticoid target genes, which may exemplify responses underlying the permissive actions of glucocorticoids.

  11. Regulation of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis hypoxic response gene encoding alpha -crystallin.

    PubMed

    Sherman, D R; Voskuil, M; Schnappinger, D; Liao, R; Harrell, M I; Schoolnik, G K

    2001-06-19

    Unlike many pathogens that are overtly toxic to their hosts, the primary virulence determinant of Mycobacterium tuberculosis appears to be its ability to persist for years or decades within humans in a clinically latent state. Since early in the 20th century latency has been linked to hypoxic conditions within the host, but the response of M. tuberculosis to a hypoxic signal remains poorly characterized. The M. tuberculosis alpha-crystallin (acr) gene is powerfully and rapidly induced at reduced oxygen tensions, providing us with a means to identify regulators of the hypoxic response. Using a whole genome microarray, we identified >100 genes whose expression is rapidly altered by defined hypoxic conditions. Numerous genes involved in biosynthesis and aerobic metabolism are repressed, whereas a high proportion of the induced genes have no known function. Among the induced genes is an apparent operon that includes the putative two-component response regulator pair Rv3133c/Rv3132c. When we interrupted expression of this operon by targeted disruption of the upstream gene Rv3134c, the hypoxic regulation of acr was eliminated. These results suggest a possible role for Rv3132c/3133c/3134c in mycobacterial latency.

  12. Comparison of the expression patterns of two small gene families of S gene family receptor kinase genes during the defence response in Brassica oleracea and Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Pastuglia, Martine; Swarup, Ranjan; Rocher, Anne; Saindrenan, Patrick; Roby, Dominique; Dumas, Christian; Cock, J Mark

    2002-01-09

    SFR2, a member of the S gene family of receptor kinases, has been shown to be rapidly induced by wounding and bacterial infection suggesting that this gene may play a role in the defence response in Brassica. In this study we have compared the response of SFR2 to that of two other members of the SFR gene family in Brassica (SFR1 and SFR3) and to the closely-related ARK genes of Arabidopsis. Different patterns of mRNA accumulation were observed for different members of these families. SFR1 transcripts only accumulated in response to bacterial infection and their abundance was not significantly affected by wounding. Neither treatment induced accumulation of SFR3 transcripts. ARK1 and ARK3 resembled SFR2 in that their mRNAs accumulated in response to both wounding and bacterial infection. Both SFR1 and SFR2 mRNAs accumulated in response to exogenously applied salicylic acid (SA) and SA was shown to be required for induction of expression from the SFR2 promoter in Arabidopsis. However, the timing of the increase in endogenous SA levels following bacterial infiltration in Brassica indicates that the accumulation of SFR mRNA in the first few hours after infiltration does not occur in response to an increase in SA levels. We discuss the possibility that induction of SFR gene expression by SA may contribute to potentialization of the defence response. Taken together with previous studies that indicate a possible role during development, the data presented here suggest that the SFR and ARK gene families may have overlapping roles in both defence and during development.

  13. Angiotensinogen gene knockout delays and attenuates cold-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhongjie; Cade, Robert; Zhang, Zhonge; Alouidor, James; Van, Huong

    2003-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess our hypothesis that the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is responsible for cold-induced hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy. Two groups of wild-type (WT) mice and 2 groups of angiotensinogen gene knockout (Agt-KO) mice (6 per group) were used. After blood pressures (BP) of the four groups were measured 3 times at room temperature (25 degrees C), 1 WT and 1 Agt-KO group were exposed to cold (5 degrees C). The remaining groups were kept at 25 degrees C. BP of the cold-exposed WT group increased significantly in 1 week of cold exposure and rose gradually to 168+/-7 mm Hg by week 5, whereas the BP of the Agt-KO group did not increase until week 3. The cold-induced increase in BP (DeltaBP) was decreased significantly in the Agt-KO mice (19+/-3 mm Hg) compared with that of the WT mice (61+/-5 mm Hg) by 5 weeks of exposure to cold. Both WT and Agt-KO groups had cardiac hypertrophy in cold to the same extent. Agt-KO caused a significant increase in nitric oxide (NO) production. Thus, the RAS may inhibit NO formation. Chronic cold exposure decreased NO production, which may be mediated partially by activation of the RAS. These results strongly support that the RAS plays a critical role in the development of cold-induced hypertension but not cardiac hypertrophy. Moreover, the role of the RAS in cold-induced hypertension may be mediated in part by its inhibition on NO production. The findings also reveal the possible relation between the RAS and NO in cardiovascular regulation.

  14. Novel radiation response genes identified in gene-trapped MCF10A mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Malone, Jennifer; Ullrich, Robert

    2007-02-01

    We have used a gene-trapping strategy to screen human mammary epithelial cells for radiation response genes. Relative mRNA expression levels of five candidate genes in MCF10A cells were analyzed, both with and without exposure to radiation. In all five cases, the trapped genes were significantly down-regulated after radiation treatment. Sequence analysis of the fusion transcripts identified the trapped genes: (1) the human androgen receptor, (2) the uncharacterized DREV1 gene, which has known homology to DNA methyltransferases, (3) the human creatine kinase gene, (4) the human eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1 beta 2, and (5) the human ribosomal protein L27. All five genes were down-regulated significantly after treatment with varying doses of ionizing radiation (0.10 to 4.0 Gy) and at varying times (2-30 h after treatment). The genes were also analyzed in human fibroblast and lymphoblastoid cell lines to determine whether the radiation response being observed was cell-type specific. The results verified that the observed radiation response was not a cell-type-specific phenomenon, suggesting that the genes play essential roles in the radiation damage control pathways. This study demonstrates the potential of the gene-trap approach for the identification and functional analysis of novel radiation response genes.

  15. Transduction of a Foreign Histocompatibility Gene into the Arterial Wall Induces Vasculitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabel, Elizabeth G.; Plautz, Gregory; Nabel, Gary J.

    1992-06-01

    Autoimmune vasculitis represents a disease characterized by focal inflammation within arteries at multiple sites in the vasculature. Therapeutic interventions in this disease are empirical and often unsuccessful, and the mechanisms of immune injury are not well-defined. The direct transfer of recombinant genes and their expression in the arterial wall provides an opportunity to explore the pathogenesis and treatment of vascular disease. In this report, an animal model for vasculitis has been developed. Inflammation has been elicited by direct gene transfer of a foreign class I major histocompatibility complex gene, HLA-B7, to specific sites in porcine arteries. Transfer and expression of this recombinant gene was confirmed by a polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry, and cytolytic T cells specific for HLA-B7 were detected. These findings demonstrate that expression of a recombinant gene in the vessel wall can induce a focal immune response and suggest that vessel damage induced by cell-mediated immune injury can initiate vasculitis.

  16. Comparative Digital Gene Expression Analysis of the Arabidopsis Response to Volatiles Emitted by Bacillus amyloliquefaciens

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Hai-Ting; Zhao, Xia; Shang, Qian-Han; Wang, Yun; Guo, Zhi-Hong; Zhang, Yu-Bao; Xie, Zhong-Kui; Wang, Ruo-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Some plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) regulated plant growth and elicited plant basal immunity by volatiles. The response mechanism to the Bacillus amyloliquefaciens volatiles in plant has not been well studied. We conducted global gene expression profiling in Arabidopsis after treatment with Bacillus amyloliquefaciens FZB42 volatiles by Illumina Digital Gene Expression (DGE) profiling of different growth stages (seedling and mature) and tissues (leaves and roots). Compared with the control, 1,507 and 820 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified in leaves and roots at the seedling stage, respectively, while 1,512 and 367 DEGs were identified in leaves and roots at the mature stage. Seventeen genes with different regulatory patterns were validated using quantitative RT-PCR. Numerous DEGs were enriched for plant hormones, cell wall modifications, and protection against stress situations, which suggests that volatiles have effects on plant growth and immunity. Moreover, analyzes of transcriptome difference in tissues and growth stage using DGE profiling showed that the plant response might be tissue-specific and/or growth stage-specific. Thus, genes encoding flavonoid biosynthesis were downregulated in leaves and upregulated in roots, thereby indicating tissue-specific responses to volatiles. Genes related to photosynthesis were downregulated at the seedling stage and upregulated at the mature stage, respectively, thereby suggesting growth period-specific responses. In addition, the emission of bacterial volatiles significantly induced killing of cells of other organism pathway with up-regulated genes in leaves and the other three pathways (defense response to nematode, cell morphogenesis involved in differentiation and trichoblast differentiation) with up-regulated genes were significantly enriched in roots. Interestingly, some important alterations in the expression of growth-related genes, metabolic pathways, defense response to biotic

  17. Disruption of the splicing enhancer sequence within exon 27 of the dystrophin gene by a nonsense mutation induces partial skipping of the exon and is responsible for Becker muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Shiga, N; Takeshima, Y; Sakamoto, H; Inoue, K; Yokota, Y; Yokoyama, M; Matsuo, M

    1997-01-01

    The mechanism of exon skipping induced by nonsense mutations has not been well elucidated. We now report results of in vitro splicing studies which disclosed that a particular example of exon skipping is due to disruption of a splicing enhancer sequence located within the exon. A nonsense mutation (E1211X) due to a G to T transversion at the 28th nucleotide of exon 27 (G3839T) was identified in the dystrophin gene of a Japanese Becker muscular dystrophy case. Partial skipping of the exon resulted in the production of truncated dystrophin mRNA, although the consensus sequences for splicing at both ends of exon 27 were unaltered. To determine how E1211X induced exon 27 skipping, the splicing enhancer activity of purine-rich region within exon 27 was examined in an in vitro splicing system using chimeric doublesex gene pre-mRNA. The mutant sequence containing G3839T abolished splicing enhancer activity of the wild-type purine-rich sequence for the upstream intron in this chimeric pre-mRNA. An artificial polypurine oligonucleotide mimicking the purine-rich sequence of exon 27 also showed enhancer activity that was suppressed by the introduction of a T nucleotide. Furthermore, the splicing enhancer activity was more markedly inhibited when a nonsense codon was created by the inserted T residue. This is the first evidence that partial skipping of an exon harboring a nonsense mutation is due to disruption of a splicing enhancer sequence. PMID:9410897

  18. Functional characterization of cotton genes responsive to Verticillium dahliae through bioinformatics and reverse genetics strategies.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lian; Zhang, Wenwen; He, Xin; Liu, Min; Zhang, Kun; Shaban, Muhammad; Sun, Longqing; Zhu, Jiachen; Luo, Yijing; Yuan, Daojun; Zhang, Xianlong; Zhu, Longfu

    2014-12-01

    Verticillium wilt causes dramatic cotton yield loss in China. Although some genes or biological processes involved in the interaction between cotton and Verticillium dahliae have been identified, the molecular mechanism of cotton resistance to this disease is still poorly understood. The basic innate immune response for defence is somewhat conserved among plant species to defend themselves in complex environments, which makes it possible to characterize genes involved in cotton immunity based on information from model plants. With the availability of Arabidopsis databases, a data-mining strategy accompanied by virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) and heterologous expression were adopted in cotton and tobacco, respectively, for global screening and gene function characterization. A total of 232 Arabidopsis genes putatively involved in basic innate immunity were screened as candidate genes, and bioinformatic analysis suggested a role of these genes in the immune response. In total, 38 homologous genes from cotton were singled out to characterize their response to V. dahliae and methyl jasmonate treatment through quantitative real-time PCR. The results revealed that 24 genes were differentially regulated by pathogen inoculation, and most of these genes responded to both Verticillium infection and jasmonic acid stimuli. Furthermore, the efficiency of the strategy was illustrated by the functional identification of six candidate genes via heterologous expression in tobacco or a knock-down approach using VIGS in cotton. Functional categorization of these 24 differentially expressed genes as well as functional analysis suggest that reactive oxygen species, salicylic acid- and jasmonic acid-signalling pathways are involved in the cotton disease resistance response to V. dahliae. Our data demonstrate how information from model plants can allow the rapid translation of information into non-model species without complete genome sequencing, via high-throughput screening and

  19. Suppression of p53-inducible gene 3 is significant for glioblastoma progression and predicts poor patient prognosis.

    PubMed

    Quan, Jishu; Li, Yong; Jin, Meihua; Chen, Dunfu; Yin, Xuezhe; Jin, Ming

    2017-03-01

    Glioblastoma is the most malignant and invasive brain tumor with extremely poor prognosis. p53-inducible gene 3, a downstream molecule of the tumor suppressor p53, has been found involved in apoptosis and oxidative stress response. However, the functions of p53-inducible gene 3(PIG3) in cancer are far from clear including glioblastoma. In this study, we found that p53-inducible gene 3 expression was suppressed in glioblastoma tissues compared with normal tissues. And the expression of p53-inducible gene 3 was significantly associated with the World Health Organization grade. Patients with high p53-inducible gene 3 expression have a significantly longer median survival time (15 months) than those with low p53-inducible gene 3 expression (8 months). According to Cox regression analysis, p53-inducible gene 3 was an independent prognostic factor with multivariate hazard ratio of 0.578 (95% confidence interval, 0.352-0.947; p = 0.030) for overall survival. Additionally, gain and loss of function experiments showed that knockdown of p53-inducible gene 3 significantly increased the proliferation and invasion ability of glioblastoma cells while overexpression of p53-inducible gene 3 inhibited the proliferation and invasion ability. The results of in vivo glioblastoma models further confirmed that p53-inducible gene 3 suppression promoted glioblastoma progression. Altogether, our data suggest that high expression of p53-inducible gene 3 is significant for glioblastoma inhibition and p53-inducible gene 3 independently indicates good prognosis in patients, which might be a novel prognostic biomarker or potential therapeutic target in glioblastoma.

  20. Arsenic- and cadmium-induced toxicogenomic response in mouse embryos undergoing neurulation

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Joshua F.; Yu, Xiaozhong; Moreira, Estefania G.; Hong, Sungwoo; Faustman, Elaine M.

    2011-01-15

    Arsenic (As) and cadmium (Cd) are well-characterized teratogens in animal models inducing embryotoxicity and neural tube defects (NTDs) when exposed during neurulation. Toxicological research is needed to resolve the specific biological processes and associated molecular pathways underlying metal-induced toxicity during this timeframe in gestational development. In this study, we investigated the dose-dependent effects of As and Cd on gene expression in C57BL/6J mouse embryos exposed in utero during neurulation (GD8) to identify significantly altered genes and corresponding biological processes associated with embryotoxicity. We quantitatively examined the toxicogenomic dose-response relationship at the gene level. Our results suggest that As and Cd induce dose-dependent gene expression alterations representing shared (cell cycle, response to UV, glutathione metabolism, RNA processing) and unique (alcohol/sugar metabolism) biological processes, which serve as robust indicators of metal-induced developmental toxicity and indicate underlying embryotoxic effects. Our observations also correlate well with previously identified impacts of As and Cd on specific genes associated with metal-induced toxicity (Cdkn1a, Mt1). In summary, we have identified in a quantitative manner As and Cd induced dose-dependent effects on gene expression in mouse embryos during a peak window of sensitivity to embryotoxicity and NTDs in the sensitive C57BL/6J strain.

  1. Cytomegalovirus: pathophysiological mechanisms of the cytomegalovirus-induced cellular responses

    SciTech Connect

    Nokta, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection of fibroblasts of human origin is associated with a cascade of morphologic cellular responses which in other systems have been associated with regulation of intracellular free (IF) (Ca/sup + +/). In the present study, the relationship of specific ion fluxes (Ca/sup + +/, Na/sup +/) to the development of cytomegalovirus (CMV)-induced morphologic cellular responses was investigated. An influx of Ca/sup + +/ was observed by the first hour after CMV infection (PI), and total calcium sequestered by infected cells was enhanced by 5 hr Pl. A gradual rise in intracellular free (IF) (Ca/sup + +/) was observed that continued through 48 hour postinfection (hr Pl). The IF (Ca/sup + +/) response to CMV infection was shown to be multiplicity dependent, require viable virus, and occur under conditions consistent with the expression of immediate early CMV genes. Development and progression of cytomegaly was found to be independent of CMV DNA synthesis and appeared to be dependent on the IF (Ca/sup + +/) response. Ca/sup + +/ influx blockers (e.g. verapamil) and cyclic nucleotide modulators (e.g. papaverine) inhibited both Ca/sup + +/ responses and cytomegaly. Quabain-sensitive /sup 86/Rb uptake and sequestering of Ca/sup + +/ increased in parallel with development of cytomegaly. There may be a relationship between Ca/sup + +/ influx, IF (Ca/sup + +/), activation of the Na/sup +//H/sup +/ exchanger, induction of Na/sup +/, Cl/sup -/, HCO/sub 3/ cotransport, Na/sup +/ entry, Na/sup +//K/sup +/ ATPase activity and development of CMV-induced morphologic cellular responses including cytomegaly.

  2. Association of a functional polymorphism in the adrenomedullin gene (ADM) with response to paroxetine.

    PubMed

    Glubb, D M; McHugh, P C; Deng, X; Joyce, P R; Kennedy, M A

    2010-04-01

    To identify genes that may be relevant to the molecular action of antidepressants, we investigated transcriptional changes induced by the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor paroxetine in a serotonergic cell line. We examined gene expression changes after acute treatment with paroxetine and sought to validate microarray results by quantitative PCR (qPCR). Concordant transcriptional changes were confirmed for 14 genes by qPCR and five of these, including the adrenomedullin gene (Adm), either approached or reached statistical significance. Reporter gene assays showed that a SNP (rs11042725) in the upstream flanking region of ADM significantly altered expression. Association analysis demonstrated rs11042725 to be significantly associated with response to paroxetine (odds ratio=0.075, P<0.001) but not with response to either fluoxetine or citalopram. Our results suggest that ADM is involved with the therapeutic efficacy of paroxetine, which may have pharmacogenetic utility.

  3. Swi/SNF-GCN5-dependent chromatin remodelling determines induced expression of GDH3, one of the paralogous genes responsible for ammonium assimilation and glutamate biosynthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Avendaño, Amaranta; Riego, Lina; DeLuna, Alexander; Aranda, Cristina; Romero, Guillermo; Ishida, Cecilia; Vázquez-Acevedo, Miriam; Rodarte, Beatriz; Recillas-Targa, Félix; Valenzuela, Lourdes; Zonszein, Sergio; González, Alicia

    2005-07-01

    It is accepted that Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome arose from complete duplication of eight ancestral chromosomes; functionally normal ploidy was recovered because of the massive loss of 90% of duplicated genes. There is evidence that indicates that part of this selective conservation of gene pairs is compelling to yeast facultative metabolism. As an example, the duplicated NADP-glutamate dehydrogenase pathway has been maintained because of the differential expression of the paralogous GDH1 and GDH3 genes, and the biochemical specialization of the enzymes they encode. The present work has been aimed to the understanding of the regulatory mechanisms that modulate GDH3 transcriptional activation. Our results show that GDH3 expression is repressed in glucose-grown cultures, as opposed to what has been observed for GDH1, and induced under respiratory conditions, or under stationary phase. Although GDH3 pertains to the nitrogen metabolic network, and its expression is Gln3p-regulated, complete derepression is ultimately determined by the carbon source through the action of the SAGA and SWI/SNF chromatin remodelling complexes. GDH3 carbon-mediated regulation is over-imposed to that exerted by the nitrogen source, highlighting the fact that operation of facultative metabolism requires strict control of enzymes, like Gdh3p, involved in biosynthetic pathways that use tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates.

  4. The Transcriptional Response of Caenorhabditis elegans to Ivermectin Exposure Identifies Novel Genes Involved in the Response to Reduced Food Intake

    PubMed Central

    Laing, Steven T.; Ivens, Al; Butler, Victoria; Ravikumar, Sai P.; Laing, Roz; Woods, Debra J.; Gilleard, John S.

    2012-01-01

    We have examined the transcriptional response of Caenorhabditis elegans following exposure to the anthelmintic drug ivermectin (IVM) using whole genome microarrays and real-time QPCR. Our original aim was to identify candidate molecules involved in IVM metabolism and/or excretion. For this reason the IVM tolerant strain, DA1316, was used to minimise transcriptomic changes related to the phenotype of drug exposure. However, unlike equivalent work with benzimidazole drugs, very few of the induced genes were members of xenobiotic metabolising enzyme families. Instead, the transcriptional response was dominated by genes associated with fat mobilization and fatty acid metabolism including catalase, esterase, and fatty acid CoA synthetase genes. This is consistent with the reduction in pharyngeal pumping, and consequential reduction in food intake, upon exposure of DA1316 worms to IVM. Genes with the highest fold change in response to IVM exposure, cyp-37B1, mtl-1 and scl-2, were comparably up-regulated in response to short–term food withdrawal (4 hr) independent of IVM exposure, and GFP reporter constructs confirm their expression in tissues associated with fat storage (intestine and hypodermis). These experiments have serendipitously identified novel genes involved in an early response of C. elegans to reduced food intake and may provide insight into similar processes in higher organisms. PMID:22348077

  5. The expression of Spodoptera exigua P450 and UGT genes: tissue specificity and response to insecticides.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bo; Zhang, Shu-Heng; Ren, Miao-Miao; Tian, Xiang-Rui; Wei, Qi; Mburu, David Kibe; Su, Jian-Ya

    2017-09-07

    Cytochrome P450 and UDP-glucosyltransferase as phase I and phase II metabolism enzymes respectively, play vital roles in the breakdown of endobiotics and xenobiotics. Insects can increase the expression of detoxification enzymes to cope with the stress from xenobiotics including insecticides. However, the molecular mechanisms for insecticide detoxification in Spodoptera exigua remain elusive, and the genes conferred insecticide metabolisms in this species are less reported. In this study, 68 P450 and 32 UGT genes were identified. Phylogenetic analysis showed gene expansions in CYP3 and CYP4 clans of P450 genes and UGT33 family of this pest. P450 and UGT genes exhibited specific tissue expression pattern. Insecticide treatments in fat body cells of S. exigua revealed that the expression levels of P450 and UGT genes were significantly influenced by challenges of abamectin, lambda-cyhalothrin, chlorantraniliprole, metaflumizone and indoxacarb respectively. Multiple genes for detoxification were affected in expression levels after insecticide exposures. The results demonstrated that lambda-cyhalothrin, chlorantraniliprole, metaflumizone and indoxacarb induced similar response in the expression of P450 and UGT genes in fat body cells, eight P450 genes and four UGT genes were co-up-regulated significantly, and no or only a few CYP/UGT genes were down-regulated significantly by these four insecticides. However, abamectin triggered a distinct response for P450 and UGT gene expression, more P450 and UGT genes were down-regulated by abamectin than by other four compounds. In conclusion, P450 and UGT genes from S. exigua were identified, and difference responses to abamectin suggest a different mechanism for insecticide detoxification. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  6. Genotype-dependent regulation of drought-responsive genes in tolerant and sensitive sugarcane cultivars.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Manassés Daniel; de Oliveira Silva, Roberta Lane; Ferreira Neto, José Ribamar Costa; Benko-Iseppon, Ana Maria; Kido, Ederson Akio

    2017-10-30

    Drought is the most damaging among the major abiotic stresses. Transcriptomic studies allow a global overview of expressed genes, providing the basis for molecular markers development. Here, the HT-SuperSAGE technique allowed the evaluation of four drought-tolerant cultivars and four-sensitive cultivars, after 24h of irrigation suppression. We identified 9831 induced unitags from roots of the tolerant cultivars with different regulations by the -sensitive cultivars after the applied stress. These unitags allowed a proposal of 15 genes, whose expressed profiles were validated by RT-qPCR, evaluating each cultivar independently. These genes covered broad metabolic processes: ethylene stress attenuation (ACCD); root growth (β-EXP8); protein degradation [ubiquitination pathway (E2, 20SPβ4); plant proteases (AP, C13)]; oxidative detoxification (TRX); fatty acid synthesis (ACC); amino acid transport (AAT), and carbohydrate metabolism [glycolysis (PFK, TPI, FBA); TCA cycle (LDP, MDH); pentose phosphate pathway (TKT)]. The expressed profiles showed a genotype-dependent regulation of the target genes. Two drought-tolerant cultivars (SP83-2847; CTC6) presented each one, nine of the induced genes. Among the -sensitive cultivars, CTC13 induced only one, while SP90-1636 induced two genes. These genes should help breeders to identify accessions managing drought stress tolerance responses, showing better ethylene stress attenuation, energy allocation, amino acid transport, and protein homeostasis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Moderate malnutrition in rats induces somatic gene mutations.

    PubMed

    Pacheco-Martínez, M Monserrat; Cortés-Barberena, Edith; Cervantes-Ríos, Elsa; Del Carmen García-Rodríguez, María; Rodríguez-Cruz, Leonor; Ortiz-Muñiz, Rocío

    2016-07-01

    The relationship between malnutrition and genetic damage has been widely studied in human and animal models, leading to the observation that interactions between genotoxic exposure and micronutrient status appear to affect genomic stability. A new assay has been developed that uses the phosphatidylinositol glycan class A gene (Pig-a) as a reporter for measuring in vivo gene mutation. The Pig-a assay can be employed to evaluate mutant frequencies (MFs) in peripheral blood reticulocytes (RETs) and erythrocytes (RBCs) using flow cytometry. In the present study, we assessed the effects of malnutrition on mutagenic susceptibility by exposing undernourished (UN) and well-nourished (WN) rats to N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) and measuring Pig-a MFs. Two week-old UN and WN male Han-Wistar rats were treated daily with 0, 20, or 40mg/kg ENU for 3 consecutive days. Blood was collected from the tail vein one day before ENU treatment (Day-1) and after ENU administration on Days 7, 14, 21, 28, 35, 42, 49, 56 and 63. Pig-a MFs were measured in RETs and RBCs as the RET(CD59-) and RBC(CD59-) frequencies. In the vehicle control groups, the frequencies of mutant RETs and RBCs were significantly higher in UN rats compared with WN rats at all sampling times. The ENU treatments increased RET and RBC MFs starting at Day 7. Although ENU-induced Pig-a MFs were consistently lower in UN rats than in WN rats, these differences were not significant. To understand these responses, further studies should use other mutagens and nucleated surrogate cells and examine the types of mutations induced in UN and WN rats. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Inducible Anti-Angiogenic Gene Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    stable dominant-negative USF- 1-inducible HaCaT cell line that is suitable for in vivo expression "switching" is also available for distribution. When...formation of functional USF-I complexes on the PAI-I promoter. Cell lines were created that were inducible for dominant-negative USF expression upon...transfected into murine endothelial cells as well as when delivered to our established T2 line of rat cells . Transfection studies established that our selected

  9. Downstream DNA sequences are required to modulate Pvlea-18 gene expression in response to dehydration.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Fonseca, L P; Covarrubias, A A

    2001-03-01

    We have previously shown that mRNA and protein encoded by the Pvlea-18 gene from Phaseolus vulgaris L., a member of a new family of late embryogenesis-abundant (LEA) proteins, accumulate in dark-grown bean seedlings not only in response to water deficit but also during optimal irrigation. In this work, we studied Pvlea-18 gene transcriptional regulation by using transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants containing a chimeric gene consisting of the Pvlea-18 promoter region and the 3'-nos terminator fused to the GUS gene-coding region. We demonstrate that the chimeric gene is active during Arabidopsis normal development under well-irrigated conditions, and that it is further induced in response to ABA and dehydration treatments. Replacing the 3'-nos terminator with the Pvlea-18 3' region led to an additional increase in expression during development and in response to dehydration, but not in response to exogenous ABA. These results reveal an enhancer effect of the Pvlea-18 3' region, which showed to be higher specifically under dehydration. The small decrease in Pvlea-18 promoter expression observed when transgenic plants treated with fluridone (an ABA biosynthesis inhibitor) were subjected to dehydration suggests that the Pvlea-18 gene dehydration response is predominantly ABA-independent. Finally, we present evidence indicating that Pvlea-18 gene expression is negatively regulated during etiolated growth, particularly in roots, in contrast to the expression pattern observed during normal development.

  10. Investigating Gene Function in Cereal Rust Fungi by Plant-Mediated Virus-Induced Gene Silencing.

    PubMed

    Panwar, Vinay; Bakkeren, Guus

    2017-01-01

    Cereal rust fungi are destructive pathogens, threatening grain production worldwide. Targeted breeding for resistance utilizing host resistance genes has been effective. However, breakdown of resistance occurs frequently and continued efforts are needed to understand how these fungi overcome resistance and to expand the range of available resistance genes. Whole genome sequencing, transcriptomic and proteomic studies followed by genome-wide computational and comparative analyses have identified large repertoire of genes in rust fungi among which are candidates predicted to code for pathogenicity and virulence factors. Some of these genes represent defence triggering avirulence effectors. However, functions of most genes still needs to be assessed to understand the biology of these obligate biotrophic pathogens. Since genetic manipulations such as gene deletion and genetic transformation are not yet feasible in rust fungi, performing functional gene studies is challenging. Recently, Host-induced gene silencing (HIGS) has emerged as a useful tool to characterize gene function in rust fungi while infecting and growing in host plants. We utilized Barley stripe mosaic virus-mediated virus induced gene silencing (BSMV-VIGS) to induce HIGS of candidate rust fungal genes in the wheat host to determine their role in plant-fungal interactions. Here, we describe the methods for using BSMV-VIGS in wheat for functional genomics study in cereal rust fungi.

  11. GAS6 is an estrogen-inducible gene in mammary epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Rigen; Zhu, Yiwei Tony; Zhang, Zhongyi; Rao, Sambasiva M.; Zhu, Yi-Jun

    2007-01-01

    To identify estrogen responsive genes in mammary glands, microarray assays were performed. Twenty genes were found to be up-regulated while 16 genes were repressed in the 9h estrogen treated glands. The induction of GAS6, one of the genes up-regulated by estrogen, was confirmed by RNase protection assay. Furthermore, GAS6 was also demonstrated to be induced by estrogen in ER positive breast cancer cells. Analysis of GAS6 promoter revealed that GAS6 promoter was regulated by estrogen. An estrogen response element (ERE) was identified in the GAS6 promoter. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay revealed that ERα interacted with the ERE in the GAS6 promoter. Chromatin immunoprecipitation demonstrated that ERα was recruited to the GAS6 promoter upon estrogen stimulation. These results suggested that GAS6 is an estrogen target gene in mammary epithelial cells. PMID:17174935

  12. Rhizobacteria-mediated induced systemic resistance (ISR) in Arabidopsis is not associated with a direct effect on expression of known defense-related genes but stimulates the expression of the jasmonate-inducible gene Atvsp upon challenge.

    PubMed

    van Wees, S C; Luijendijk, M; Smoorenburg, I; van Loon, L C; Pieterse, C M

    1999-11-01

    Selected strains of nonpathogenic rhizobacteria from the genus Pseudomonas are capable of eliciting broad-spectrum induced systemic resistance (ISR) in plants that is phenotypically similar to pathogen-induced systemic acquired resistance (SAR). In Arabidopsis, the ISR pathway functions independently of salicylic acid (SA) but requires responsiveness to jasmonate and ethylene. Here, we demonstrate that known defense-related genes, i.e. the SA-responsive genes PR-1, PR-2, and PR-5, the ethylene-inducible gene Hel, the ethylene- and jasmonate-responsive genes ChiB and Pdf1.2, and the jasmonate-inducible genes Atvsp, Lox1, Lox2, Pall, and Pin2, are neither induced locally in the roots nor systemically in the leaves upon induction of ISR by Pseudomonas fluorescens WCS417r. In contrast, plants infected with the virulent leaf pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) or expressing SAR induced by preinfecting lower leaves with the avirulent pathogen Pst(avrRpt2) exhibit elevated expression levels of most of the defense-related genes studied. Upon challenge inoculation with Pst, PR gene transcripts accumulated to a higher level in SAR-expressing plants than in control-treated and ISR-expressing plants, indicating that SAR involves potentiation of SA-responsive PR gene expression. In contrast, pathogen challenge of ISR-expressing plants led to an enhanced level of Atvsp transcript accumulation. The otherjasmonate-responsive defense-related genes studied were not potentiated during ISR, indicating that ISR is associated with the potentiation of specific jasmonate-responsive genes.

  13. Gene expression changes induced by space flight in single-cells of the fern Ceratopteris richardii.

    PubMed

    Salmi, Mari L; Roux, Stanley J

    2008-12-01

    This work describes a rare high-throughput evaluation of gene expression changes induced by space flight in a single plant cell. The cell evaluated is the spore of the fern Ceratopteris richardii, which exhibits both perception and response to gravity. cDNA microarray and Q RT-PCR analysis of spores germinating in microgravity onboard NASA space shuttle flight STS-93 revealed changes in the mRNA expression of roughly 5% of genes analyzed. These gene expression changes were compared with gene expression changes that occur during gravity perception and response in animal cells and multicellular plants. Our data contribute to a better understanding of the impact of space flight conditions, including microgravity, on cellular growth and development, and provide insights into the adaptive strategies of individual cells in response to these conditions.

  14. Identification of Genes Responsive to Solar Simulated UV Radiation in Human Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    de la Fuente, Hortensia; Lamana, Amalia; Mittelbrunn, María; Perez-Gala, Silvia; Gonzalez, Salvador; García-Diez, Amaro; Vega, Miguel; Sanchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2009-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation has profound effects on the skin and the systemic immune system. Several effects of UV radiation on Dendritic cells (DCs) functions have been described. However, gene expression changes induced by UV radiation in DCs have not been addressed before. In this report, we irradiated human monocyte-derived DCs with solar-simulated UVA/UVB and analyzed regulated genes on human whole genome arrays. Results were validated by RT-PCR and further analyzed by Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA). Solar-simulated UV radiation up-regulated expression of genes involved in cellular stress and inflammation, and down-regulated genes involved in chemotaxis, vesicular transport and RNA processing. Twenty four genes were selected for comparison by RT-PCR with similarly treated human primary keratinocytes and human melanocytes. Several genes involved in the regulation of the immune response were differentially regulated in UVA/UVB irradiated human monocyte-derived DCs, such as protein tyrosine phosphatase, receptor type E (PTPRE), thrombospondin-1 (THBS1), inducible costimulator ligand (ICOSL), galectins, Src-like adapter protein (SLA), IL-10 and CCR7. These results indicate that UV-exposure triggers the regulation of a complex gene repertoire involved in human-DC–mediated immune responses. PMID:19707549

  15. Using molecular features of xenobiotics to predict hepatic gene expression response.

    PubMed

    Fernald, Guy Haskin; Altman, Russ B

    2013-10-28

    Despite recent advances in molecular medicine and rational drug design, many drugs still fail because toxic effects arise at the cellular and tissue level. In order to better understand these effects, cellular assays can generate high-throughput measurements of gene expression changes induced by small molecules. However, our understanding of how the chemical features of small molecules influence gene expression is very limited. Therefore, we investigated the extent to which chemical features of small molecules can reliably be associated with significant changes in gene expression. Specifically, we analyzed the gene expression response of rat liver cells to 170 different drugs and searched for genes whose expression could be related to chemical features alone. Surprisingly, we can predict the up-regulation of 87 genes (increased expression of at least 1.5 times compared to controls). We show an average cross-validation predictive area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) of 0.7 or greater for each of these 87 genes. We applied our method to an external data set of rat liver gene expression response to a novel drug and achieved an AUROC of 0.7. We also validated our approach by predicting up-regulation of Cytochrome P450 1A2 (CYP1A2) in three drugs known to induce CYP1A2 that were not in our data set. Finally, a detailed analysis of the CYP1A2 predictor allowed us to identify which fragments made significant contributions to the predictive scores.

  16. Gene Expression During Imidacloprid-Induced Hormesis in Green Peach Aphid

    PubMed Central

    Ayyanath, Murali-Mohan; Cutler, G. Christopher; Scott-Dupree, Cynthia D.; Prithiviraj, Balakrishnan; Kandasamy, Saveetha; Prithiviraj, Kalyani

    2014-01-01

    Imidacloprid-induced hormesis in the form of stimulated reproduction has previously been reported in green peach aphid, Myzus persicae. Changes in gene expression accompanying this hormetic response have not been previously investigated. In this study, expression of stress response (Hsp60), dispersal (OSD, TOL and ANT), and developmental (FPPS I) genes were examined for two generations during imidacloprid-induced reproductive stimulation in M. persicae. Global DNA methylation was also measured to test the hypothesis that changes in gene expression are heritable. At hormetic concentrations, down-regulation of Hsp60 was followed by up-regulation of this gene in the subsequent generation. Likewise, expression of dispersal-related genes and FPPS I varied with concentration, life stage, and generation. These results indicate that reproductive hormesis in M. persicae is accompanied by a complex transgenerational pattern of up- and down-regulation of genes that likely reflects trade-offs in gene expression and related physiological processes during the phenotypic dose-response. Moreover, DNA methylation in second generation M. persicae occurred at higher doses than in first-generation aphids, suggesting that heritable adaptability to low doses of the stressor might have occurred. PMID:25249837

  17. RNA-Seq analysis of high NaCl-induced gene expression.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Yuichiro; Yang, Wenjing; Zhu, Jun; Burg, Maurice B; Ferraris, Joan D

    2015-10-01

    High extracellular NaCl is known to change expression of numerous genes, many of which are regulated by the osmoprotective transcription factor nuclear factor of activated T cells-5 (NFAT5). In the present study we employed RNA-Seq to provide a comprehensive, unbiased account of genes regulated by high NaCl in mouse embryonic fibroblast cells (MEFs). To identify genes regulated by NFAT5 we compared wild-type MEFs (WT-MEFs) to MEFs in which mutation of the NFAT5 gene inhibits its transcriptional activity (Null-MEFs). In WT-MEFs adding NaCl to raise osmolality from 300 to 500 mosmol/kg for 24 h increases expression of 167 genes and reduces expression of 412. Raising osmolality through multiple passages (adapted cells) increases expression of 196 genes and reduces expression of 528. In Null-MEFs, after 24 h of high NaCl, expression of 217 genes increase and 428 decrease, while in adapted Null-MEFs 143 increase and 622 decrease. Fewer than 10% of genes are regulated in common between WT- and null-MEFs, indicating a profound difference in regulation of high-NaCl induced genes induced by NFAT5 compared with those induced in the absence of NFAT5. Based on our findings we suggest a mechanism for this phenomenon, which had previously been unexplained. The NFAT5 DNA-binding motif (osmotic response element) is overrepresented in the vicinity of genes that NFAT5 upregulates, but not genes that it downregulates. We used Gene Ontology and manual curation to determine the function of the genes targeted by NFAT5, revealing many novel consequences of NFAT5 transcriptional activity.

  18. Temperature-induced gene expression associated with different thermal reaction norms for growth rate.

    PubMed

    Ellers, Jacintha; Mariën, Janine; Driessen, Gerard; van Straalen, Nico M

    2008-03-15

    Although nearly all organisms are subject to fluctuating temperature regimes in their natural habitat, little is known about the genetics underlying the response to thermal conditions, and even less about the genetic differences that cause individual variation in thermal response. Here, we aim to elucidate possible pathways involved in temperature-induced phenotypic plasticity of growth rate. Our model organism is the collembolan Orchesella cincta that occurs in a wide variety of habitats and is known to be adapted to local thermal conditions. Because sequence information is lacking in O. cincta, we constructed cDNA libraries enriched for temperature-responsive genes using suppression subtractive hybridization. We compared gene expression of O. cincta with steep thermal reaction norms (high plasticity) to those with flat thermal reaction norms (low plasticity) for juvenile growth after exposure to a temperature switch composed of a cooling or a warming treatment. Using suppression subtractive hybridization, we found differential expression of ten nuclear genes, including several genes involved in energy metabolism, such as pantothenate kinase and carbonic anhydrase. In addition, seven mitochondrial genes were found in the cloned subtracted library, but further analysis showed this was caused by allelic variation in mitochondrial genes in our founder population, and that a specific haplotype was associated with high thermal responsiveness. Future work will focus on candidate genes from pathways such as the oxidative phosphorylation and biosynthesis of coenzyme A which are possibly involved in thermal responsiveness of juvenile growth rate.

  19. Dynamic, mating-induced gene expression changes in female head and brain tissues of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Drosophila melanogaster females show changes in behavior and physiology after mating that are thought to maximize the number of progeny resulting from the most recent copulation. Sperm and seminal fluid proteins induce post-mating changes in females, however, very little is known about the resulting gene expression changes in female head and central nervous system tissues that contribute to the post-mating response. Results We determined the temporal gene expression changes in female head tissues 0-2, 24, 48 and 72 hours after mating. Females from each time point had a unique post-mating gene expression response, with 72 hours post-mating having the largest number of genes with significant changes in expression. At most time points, genes expressed in the head fat body that encode products involved in metabolism showed a marked change in expression. Additional analysis of gene expression changes in dissected brain tissues 24 hours post-mating revealed changes in transcript abundance of many genes, notably, the reduced transcript abundance of genes that encode ion channels. Conclusions Substantial changes occur in the regulation of many genes in female head tissues after mating, which might underlie aspects of the female post-mating response. These results provide new insights into the physiological and metabolic changes that accompany changes in female behaviors. PMID:20925960

  20. [Stress response genes expression analysis of barley Hordeum vulgare under space flight environment].

    PubMed

    Shagimardanova, E I; Gusev, O A; Sychev, V N; Levinskikh, M A; Sharipova, M R; Il'inskaia, O N; Bingham, G; Sugimoto, M

    2010-01-01

    Transcriptome of barley Hordeum vulgare grown aboard International Space Station (ISS) was analyzed by means of microarray. It was revealed 500 genes with mRNA level, changed more than two folds in space environment. Among them are genes encoding stress response proteins, videlicet Heat Shock Proteins (HSP), Pathogenesis-Related Proteins (PR) and Antioxidant Proteins. Further analysis of these genes by real time PCR showed enhanced transcription level of Reactive oxygen Species (ROS) scavenging genes. The mRNA level of superoxide dismutase (sod) was 6 folds higher in space environment when compare to Earth conditions. Glutamyl transferase gene expression was enhanced 24 times in space. Transcription of catalase gene (cat) was increased 18 times and of ascorbate peroxidase was increased 3 times in space in comparison with ground control. For the first time it was shown that space flight environment may induce oxidative stress in plants.

  1. Sucralose Induces Biochemical Responses in Daphnia magna

    PubMed Central

    Eriksson Wiklund, Ann-Kristin; Adolfsson-Erici, Margaretha; Liewenborg, Birgitta; Gorokhova, Elena

    2014-01-01

    The intense artificial sweetener sucralose has no bioconcentration properties, and no adverse acute toxic effects have been observed in standard ecotoxicity tests, suggesting negligible environmental risk. However, significant feeding and behavioural alterations have been reported in non-standard tests using aquatic crustaceans, indicating possible sublethal effects. We hypothesized that these effects are related to alterations in acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and oxidative status in the exposed animals and investigated changes in AChE and oxidative biomarkers (oxygen radical absorbing capacity, ORAC, and lipid peroxidation, TBARS) in the crustacean Daphnia magna exposed to sucralose (0.0001–5 mg L−1). The sucralose concentration was a significant positive predictor for ORAC, TBARS and AChE in the daphnids. Moreover, the AChE response was linked to both oxidative biomarkers, with positive and negative relationships for TBARS and ORAC, respectively. These joint responses support our hypothesis and suggest that exposure to sucralose may induce neurological and oxidative mechanisms with potentially important consequences for animal behaviour and physiology. PMID:24699280

  2. Sucralose induces biochemical responses in Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Eriksson Wiklund, Ann-Kristin; Adolfsson-Erici, Margaretha; Liewenborg, Birgitta; Gorokhova, Elena

    2014-01-01

    The intense artificial sweetener sucralose has no bioconcentration properties, and no adverse acute toxic effects have been observed in standard ecotoxicity tests, suggesting negligible environmental risk. However, significant feeding and behavioural alterations have been reported in non-standard tests using aquatic crustaceans, indicating possible sublethal effects. We hypothesized that these effects are related to alterations in acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and oxidative status in the exposed animals and investigated changes in AChE and oxidative biomarkers (oxygen radical absorbing capacity, ORAC, and lipid peroxidation, TBARS) in the crustacean Daphnia magna exposed to sucralose (0.0001-5 mg L(-1)). The sucralose concentration was a significant positive predictor for ORAC, TBARS and AChE in the daphnids. Moreover, the AChE response was linked to both oxidative biomarkers, with positive and negative relationships for TBARS and ORAC, respectively. These joint responses support our hypothesis and suggest that exposure to sucralose may induce neurological and oxidative mechanisms with potentially important consequences for animal behaviour and physiology.

  3. Transcriptional 'memory' of a stress: transient chromatin and memory (epigenetic) marks at stress-response genes.

    PubMed

    Avramova, Zoya

    2015-07-01

    Drought, salinity, extreme temperature variations, pathogen and herbivory attacks are recurring environmental stresses experienced by plants throughout their life. To survive repeated stresses, plants provide responses that may be different from their response during the first encounter with the stress. A different response to a similar stress represents the concept of 'stress memory'. A coordinated reaction at the organismal, cellular and gene/genome levels is thought to increase survival chances by improving the plant's tolerance/avoidance abilities. Ultimately, stress memory may provide a mechanism for acclimation and adaptation. At the molecular level, the concept of stress memory indicates that the mechanisms responsible for memory-type transcription during repeated stresses are not based on repetitive activation of the same response pathways activated by the first stress. Some recent advances in the search for transcription 'memory factors' are discussed with an emphasis on super-induced dehydration stress memory response genes in Arabidopsis.

  4. Insect oral secretions suppress wound-induced responses in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Consales, Floriane; Schweizer, Fabian; Erb, Matthias; Gouhier-Darimont, Caroline; Bodenhausen, Natacha; Bruessow, Friederike; Sobhy, Islam;