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Sample records for response surface method

  1. A facile method for fabrication of responsive micropatterned surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demiryürek, Rıdvan; Kassim Ali, Mariamu; Ozaydin Ince, Gozde

    2014-09-01

    Responsive micropatterned surfaces are fabricated using a facile, one-step method that allows for the separate control of topography and surface chemistry. Temperature responsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (pNIPAAm), and amphiphilic poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate-co-perfluorodecylacrylate) (p(HEMA-co-PFA)) polymer thin films are deposited on prestrained polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrates using the initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD) technique. Subsequent release of the strain results in the formation of periodic wrinkle structures on the surface of polymer thin films. The iCVD technique allows control of the chemical composition while preserving the functional groups of the polymers intact. Surface topography is controlled separately by tuning elastic modulus of the polymer coatings and substrates. Highly ordered, well-defined wrinkle structures are obtained on pNIPAAm surfaces whereas wrinkles on the amphiphilic surfaces are less ordered due to the difference in elastic moduli of the polymers. Furthermore, process temperature is observed to have detrimental effects on the ordering of the wrinkles.

  2. An adaptive response surface method for crashworthiness optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Lei; Yang, Ren-Jye; Zhu, Ping

    2013-11-01

    Response surface-based design optimization has been commonly used for optimizing large-scale design problems in the automotive industry. However, most response surface models are built by a limited number of design points without considering data uncertainty. In addition, the selection of a response surface in the literature is often arbitrary. This article uses a Bayesian metric to systematically select the best available response surface among several candidates in a library while considering data uncertainty. An adaptive, efficient response surface strategy, which minimizes the number of computationally intensive simulations, was developed for design optimization of large-scale complex problems. This methodology was demonstrated by a crashworthiness optimization example.

  3. Response Surface Methods For Spatially-Resolved Optical Measurement Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danehy, P. M.; Dorrington, A. A.; Cutler, A. D.; DeLoach, R.

    2003-01-01

    Response surface methods (or methodology), RSM, have been applied to improve data quality for two vastly different spatially-resolved optical measurement techniques. In the first application, modern design of experiments (MDOE) methods, including RSM, are employed to map the temperature field in a direct-connect supersonic combustion test facility at NASA Langley Research Center. The laser-based measurement technique known as coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) is used to measure temperature at various locations in the combustor. RSM is then used to develop temperature maps of the flow. Even though the temperature fluctuations at a single point in the flowfield have a standard deviation on the order of 300 K, RSM provides analytic fits to the data having 95% confidence interval half width uncertainties in the fit as low as +/- 30 K. Methods of optimizing future CARS experiments are explored. The second application of RSM is to quantify the shape of a 5-meter diameter, ultra-lightweight, inflatable space antenna at NASA Langley Research Center. Photogrammetry is used to simultaneously measure the shape of the antenna at approximately 500 discrete spatial locations. RSM allows an analytic model to be developed that describes the shape of the majority of the antenna with an uncertainty of 0.4 mm, with 95% confidence. This model would allow a quantitative comparison between the actual shape of the antenna and the original design shape. Accurately determining this shape also allows confident interpolation between the measured points. Such a model could, for example, be used for ray tracing of radio-frequency waves up to 95 GHz. to predict the performance of the antenna.

  4. Designing Pulse Laser Surface Modification of H13 Steel Using Response Surface Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aqida, S. N.; Brabazon, D.; Naher, S.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a design of experiment (DOE) for laser surface modification process of AISI H13 tool steel in achieving the maximum hardness and minimum surface roughness at a range of modified layer depth. A Rofin DC-015 diffusion-cooled CO2 slab laser was used to process AISI H13 tool steel samples. Samples of 10 mm diameter were sectioned to 100 mm length in order to process a predefined circumferential area. The parameters selected for examination were laser peak power, overlap percentage and pulse repetition frequency (PRF). The response surface method with Box-Behnken design approach in Design Expert 7 software was used to design the H13 laser surface modification process. Metallographic study and image analysis were done to measure the modified layer depth. The modified surface roughness was measured using two-dimensional surface profilometer. The correlation of the three laser processing parameters and the modified surface properties was specified by plotting three-dimensional graph. The hardness properties were tested at 981 mN force. From metallographic study, the laser modified surface depth was between 37 μm and 150 μm. The average surface roughness recorded from the 2D profilometry was at a minimum value of 1.8 μm. The maximum hardness achieved was between 728 and 905 HV0.1. These findings are significant to modern development of hard coatings for wear resistant applications.

  5. An optimal design of wind turbine and ship structure based on neuro-response surface method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae-Chul; Shin, Sung-Chul; Kim, Soo-Young

    2015-07-01

    The geometry of engineering systems affects their performances. For this reason, the shape of engineering systems needs to be optimized in the initial design stage. However, engineering system design problems consist of multi-objective optimization and the performance analysis using commercial code or numerical analysis is generally time-consuming. To solve these problems, many engineers perform the optimization using the approximation model (response surface). The Response Surface Method (RSM) is generally used to predict the system performance in engineering research field, but RSM presents some prediction errors for highly nonlinear systems. The major objective of this research is to establish an optimal design method for multi-objective problems and confirm its applicability. The proposed process is composed of three parts: definition of geometry, generation of response surface, and optimization process. To reduce the time for performance analysis and minimize the prediction errors, the approximation model is generated using the Backpropagation Artificial Neural Network (BPANN) which is considered as Neuro-Response Surface Method (NRSM). The optimization is done for the generated response surface by non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm-II (NSGA-II). Through case studies of marine system and ship structure (substructure of floating offshore wind turbine considering hydrodynamics performances and bulk carrier bottom stiffened panels considering structure performance), we have confirmed the applicability of the proposed method for multi-objective side constraint optimization problems.

  6. Application of Neural Networks to Wind tunnel Data Response Surface Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, Ching F.; Zhao, J. L.; DeLoach, Richard

    2000-01-01

    The integration of nonlinear neural network methods with conventional linear regression techniques is demonstrated for representative wind tunnel force balance data modeling. This work was motivated by a desire to formulate precision intervals for response surfaces produced by neural networks. Applications are demonstrated for representative wind tunnel data acquired at NASA Langley Research Center and the Arnold Engineering Development Center in Tullahoma, TN.

  7. High Efficiency of Optimization of Response Surface Method for Structure Dynamic Characteristics by Using Perturbation Method with Complementary Term

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xilu; Terane, Teppei; Shin, Hyunjin; Hagiwara, Ichiro

    In this paper, a new perturbation method is proposed, and is shown that the correction vector can be calculated shorter than ever. And, the computing efficiency of the response surface optimization method could improve greatly by applying perturbation method with complementary term to example analysis in the optimization of vibration characteristics by the response surface methodology and by finishing eigenvalue analysis which takes most computing time just once. Moreover, the validity and effectiveness is examined by examples by inducing approximately estimated formula of the vibration response value based on orthogonal polynomial. Lastly, it is shown that the computing time is shorten greatly compared with former method by applying this method to analysis of optimization problem of vibration characteristics.

  8. Comparison of Response Surface Construction Methods for Derivative Estimation Using Moving Least Squares, Kriging and Radial Basis Functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnamurthy, Thiagarajan

    2005-01-01

    Response construction methods using Moving Least Squares (MLS), Kriging and Radial Basis Functions (RBF) are compared with the Global Least Squares (GLS) method in three numerical examples for derivative generation capability. Also, a new Interpolating Moving Least Squares (IMLS) method adopted from the meshless method is presented. It is found that the response surface construction methods using the Kriging and RBF interpolation yields more accurate results compared with MLS and GLS methods. Several computational aspects of the response surface construction methods also discussed.

  9. Method for Constructing Composite Response Surfaces by Combining Neural Networks with other Interpolation or Estimation Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rai, Man Mohan (Inventor); Madavan, Nateri K. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A method and system for design optimization that incorporates the advantages of both traditional response surface methodology (RSM) and neural networks is disclosed. The present invention employs a unique strategy called parameter-based partitioning of the given design space. In the design procedure, a sequence of composite response surfaces based on both neural networks and polynomial fits is used to traverse the design space to identify an optimal solution. The composite response surface has both the power of neural networks and the economy of low-order polynomials (in terms of the number of simulations needed and the network training requirements). The present invention handles design problems with many more parameters than would be possible using neural networks alone and permits a designer to rapidly perform a variety of trade-off studies before arriving at the final design.

  10. Bonding Analysis of Amino Resin Wood Adhesive with Pesticide Using Response Surface Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bono, Awang; Rajin, Mariani; Siambun, Nancy Julius

    Wood base industries are among the dominant players in Malaysia economic activities. In this research, by using Response Surface Method (RSM), studies of bonding between Disodium Tetraborate Decahydrate (DTD) pesticide and various formulation of wood adhesive i.e., Melamine-Urea-Formaldehyde (MUF) resin is carried out. The RSM formulated twenty-five MUF formulations, consisting combination of different amount of formaldehyde, melamine, urea added in stage-1 and stage-2 of resin synthesis and DTD pesticide. The liquid products of resin are then hardened and tested using Fourier Transformation Infra-Red (FTIR) and visible spectrophotometer (VIS), to analyse the bonding of the resin and pesticide. The data from the FTIR and VIS analysis were then compiled and analysed using Response Surface Method. The results show that, different amount of the formaldehyde, melamine, urea and DTD pesticide, gives specific impact to the strength of MUF resin-pesticide bonding.

  11. Optimum Design of a Helicopter Rotor for Low Vibration Using Aeroelastic Analysis and Response Surface Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguli, R.

    2002-11-01

    An aeroelastic analysis based on finite elements in space and time is used to model the helicopter rotor in forward flight. The rotor blade is represented as an elastic cantilever beam undergoing flap and lag bending, elastic torsion and axial deformations. The objective of the improved design is to reduce vibratory loads at the rotor hub that are the main source of helicopter vibration. Constraints are imposed on aeroelastic stability, and move limits are imposed on the blade elastic stiffness design variables. Using the aeroelastic analysis, response surface approximations are constructed for the objective function (vibratory hub loads). It is found that second order polynomial response surfaces constructed using the central composite design of the theory of design of experiments adequately represents the aeroelastic model in the vicinity of the baseline design. Optimization results show a reduction in the objective function of about 30 per cent. A key accomplishment of this paper is the decoupling of the analysis problem and the optimization problems using response surface methods, which should encourage the use of optimization methods by the helicopter industry.

  12. Method for Constructing Composite Response Surfaces by Combining Neural Networks with Polynominal Interpolation or Estimation Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rai, Man Mohan (Inventor); Madavan, Nateri K. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A method and system for data modeling that incorporates the advantages of both traditional response surface methodology (RSM) and neural networks is disclosed. The invention partitions the parameters into a first set of s simple parameters, where observable data are expressible as low order polynomials, and c complex parameters that reflect more complicated variation of the observed data. Variation of the data with the simple parameters is modeled using polynomials; and variation of the data with the complex parameters at each vertex is analyzed using a neural network. Variations with the simple parameters and with the complex parameters are expressed using a first sequence of shape functions and a second sequence of neural network functions. The first and second sequences are multiplicatively combined to form a composite response surface, dependent upon the parameter values, that can be used to identify an accurate mode

  13. Distributed collaborative response surface method for mechanical dynamic assembly reliability design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Guangchen; Fei, Chengwei

    2013-11-01

    Because of the randomness of many impact factors influencing the dynamic assembly relationship of complex machinery, the reliability analysis of dynamic assembly relationship needs to be accomplished considering the randomness from a probabilistic perspective. To improve the accuracy and efficiency of dynamic assembly relationship reliability analysis, the mechanical dynamic assembly reliability(MDAR) theory and a distributed collaborative response surface method(DCRSM) are proposed. The mathematic model of DCRSM is established based on the quadratic response surface function, and verified by the assembly relationship reliability analysis of aeroengine high pressure turbine(HPT) blade-tip radial running clearance(BTRRC). Through the comparison of the DCRSM, traditional response surface method(RSM) and Monte Carlo Method(MCM), the results show that the DCRSM is not able to accomplish the computational task which is impossible for the other methods when the number of simulation is more than 100 000 times, but also the computational precision for the DCRSM is basically consistent with the MCM and improved by 0.40˜4.63% to the RSM, furthermore, the computational efficiency of DCRSM is up to about 188 times of the MCM and 55 times of the RSM under 10000 times simulations. The DCRSM is demonstrated to be a feasible and effective approach for markedly improving the computational efficiency and accuracy of MDAR analysis. Thus, the proposed research provides the promising theory and method for the MDAR design and optimization, and opens a novel research direction of probabilistic analysis for developing the high-performance and high-reliability of aeroengine.

  14. Stochastic response surface methods (SRSMs) for uncertainty propagation: Application to environmental and biological systems

    SciTech Connect

    Isukapalli, S.S.; Roy, A.; Georgopoulos, P.G. |

    1998-06-01

    Comprehensive uncertainty analyses of complex models of environmental and biological systems are essential but often not feasible due to the computational resources they require. Traditional methods, such as standard Monte Carlo and Latin Hypercube Sampling, for propagating uncertainty and developing probability densities of model outputs, may in fact require performing a prohibitive number of model simulations. An alternative is offered, for a wide range of problems, by the computationally efficient Stochastic Response Surface Methods (SRSMs) for uncertainty propagation. These methods extend the classical response surface methodology to systems with stochastic inputs and outputs. This is accomplished by approximating both inputs and outputs of the uncertain system through stochastic series of well behaved standard random variables; the series expansions of the outputs contain unknown coefficients which are calculated by a method that uses the results of a limited number of model simulations. Two case studies are presented here involving (a) a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for perchloroethylene (PERC) for humans, and (b) an atmospheric photochemical model, the Reactive Plume Model (RPM-IV). The results obtained agree closely with those of traditional Monte Carlo and Latin Hypercube Sampling methods, while significantly reducing the required number of model simulations.

  15. Progressive Response Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romero, V. J.; Swiler, L. P.

    2004-01-01

    Response surface functions are often used as simple and inexpensive replacements for computationally expensive computer models that simulate the behavior of a complex system over some parameter space. Progressive response surfaces are ones that are built up progressively as global information is added from new sample points in the parameter space. As the response surfaces are globally upgraded based on new information, heuristic indications of the convergence of the response surface approximation to the exact (fitted) function can be inferred. Sampling points can be incrementally added in a structured fashion, or in an unstructured fashion. Whatever the approach, at least in early stages of sampling it is usually desirable to sample the entire parameter space uniformly. At later stages of sampling, depending on the nature of the quantity being resolved, it may be desirable to continue sampling uniformly over the entire parameter space (Progressive response surfaces), or to switch to a focusing/economizing strategy of preferentially sampling certain regions of the parameter space based on information gained in early stages of sampling (Adaptive response surfaces). Here we consider Progressive response surfaces where a balanced indication of global response over the parameter space is desired.We use a variant of Moving Least Squares to fit and interpolate structured and unstructured point sets over the parameter space. On a 2-D test problem we compare response surface accuracy for three incremental sampling methods: Progressive Lattice Sampling; Simple-Random Monte Carlo; and Halton Quasi-Monte-Carlo sequences. We are ultimately after a system for constructing efficiently upgradable response surface approximations with reliable error estimates.

  16. Assessment of the Impact of Geomechanical Parameters Variability on Underground Excavations Stability Using Response Surface Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pytel, Witold; Świtoń, Joanna

    2013-03-01

    Recognition of properties of the rock mass surrounding a mineral deposit is particularly important for the mining operations at greater depths. Since the rock mass is usually not homogeneous, and its parameters have characteristics of randomness, underground workings safety issue should always be analysed taking into account the dispersion of the values of these parameters around their mean values. In order to assess the impact of geotechnical parameters uncertainty on the excavation stability one uses the appropriate statistical approach. In this paper, by analysing successive combinations of geomechanical parameters of the rock in the measured range, we examined the effect of their variability on risk of underground excavation instability using response surface method.

  17. Pressurization Risk Assessment of CO2 Reservoirs Utilizing Design of Experiments and Response Surface Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guyant, E.; Han, W. S.; Kim, K. Y.; Park, E.; Han, K.

    2015-12-01

    Monitoring of pressure buildup can provide explicit information on reservoir integrity and is an appealing tool, however pressure variation is dependent on a variety of factors causing high uncertainty in pressure predictions. This work evaluated pressurization of a reservoir system in the presence of leakage pathways as well as exploring the effects of compartmentalization of the reservoir utilizing design of experiments (Definitive Screening, Box Behnken, Central Composite, and Latin Hypercube designs) and response surface methods. Two models were developed, 1) an idealized injection scenario in order to evaluate the performance of multiple designs, and 2) a complex injection scenario implementing the best performing design to investigate pressurization of the reservoir system. A holistic evaluation of scenario 1, determined that the Central Composite design would be used for the complex injection scenario. The complex scenario evaluated 5 risk factors: reservoir, seal, leakage pathway and fault permeabilities, and horizontal position of the pathway. A total of 60 response surface models (RSM) were developed for the complex scenario with an average R2 of 0.95 and a NRMSE of 0.067. Sensitivity to the input factors was dynamic through space and time; at the earliest time (0.05 years) the reservoir permeability was dominant, and for later times (>0.5 years) the fault permeability became dominant for all locations. The RSM's were then used to conduct a Monte Carlo Analysis to further analyze pressurization risks, identifying the P10, P50, P90 values. This identified the in zone (lower) P90 values as 2.16, 1.77, and 1.53 MPa and above zone values of 1.35, 1.23, 1.09 MPa for monitoring locations 1, 2, and 3, respectively. In summary, the design of experiments and response surface methods allowed for an efficient sensitivity and uncertainty analysis to be conducted permitting a complete evaluation of the pressurization across the entire parameter space.

  18. Using Response Surface Methods to Correlate the Modal Test of an Inflatable Test Article

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Anju

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a practical application of response surface methods (RSM) to correlate a finite element model of a structural modal test. The test article is a quasi-cylindrical inflatable structure which primarily consists of a fabric weave, with an internal bladder and metallic bulkheads on either end. To mitigate model size, the fabric weave was simplified by representing it with shell elements. The task at hand is to represent the material behavior of the weave. The success of the model correlation is measured by comparing the four major modal frequencies of the analysis model to the four major modal frequencies of the test article. Given that only individual strap material properties were provided and material properties of the overall weave were not available, defining the material properties of the finite element model became very complex. First it was necessary to determine which material properties (modulus of elasticity in the hoop and longitudinal directions, shear modulus, Poisson's ratio, etc.) affected the modal frequencies. Then a Latin Hypercube of the parameter space was created to form an efficiently distributed finite case set. Each case was then analyzed with the results input into RSM. In the resulting response surface it was possible to see how each material parameter affected the modal frequencies of the analysis model. If the modal frequencies of the analysis model and its corresponding parameters match the test with acceptable accuracy, it can be said that the model correlation is successful.

  19. Optimization of Preparation of Antioxidative Peptides from Pumpkin Seeds Using Response Surface Method

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Sanhong; Hu, Yanan; Li, Chen; Liu, Yanrong

    2014-01-01

    Protein isolates of pumpkin (Cucurbita pepo L) seeds were hydrolyzed by acid protease to prepare antioxidative peptides. The hydrolysis conditions were optimized through Box-Behnken experimental design combined with response surface method (RSM). The second-order model, developed for the DPPH radical scavenging activity of pumpkin seed hydrolysates, showed good fit with the experiment data with a high value of coefficient of determination (0.9918). The optimal hydrolysis conditions were determined as follows: hydrolyzing temperature 50°C, pH 2.5, enzyme amount 6000 U/g, substrate concentration 0.05 g/ml and hydrolyzing time 5 h. Under the above conditions, the scavenging activity of DPPH radical was as high as 92.82%. PMID:24637721

  20. Optimization of preparation of antioxidative peptides from pumpkin seeds using response surface method.

    PubMed

    Fan, Sanhong; Hu, Yanan; Li, Chen; Liu, Yanrong

    2014-01-01

    Protein isolates of pumpkin (Cucurbita pepo L) seeds were hydrolyzed by acid protease to prepare antioxidative peptides. The hydrolysis conditions were optimized through Box-Behnken experimental design combined with response surface method (RSM). The second-order model, developed for the DPPH radical scavenging activity of pumpkin seed hydrolysates, showed good fit with the experiment data with a high value of coefficient of determination (0.9918). The optimal hydrolysis conditions were determined as follows: hydrolyzing temperature 50°C, pH 2.5, enzyme amount 6000 U/g, substrate concentration 0.05 g/ml and hydrolyzing time 5 h. Under the above conditions, the scavenging activity of DPPH radical was as high as 92.82%.

  1. Applications of Response Surface-Based Methods to Noise Analysis in the Conceptual Design of Revolutionary Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Geoffrey A.; Olson, Erik D.

    2004-01-01

    Due to the growing problem of noise in today's air transportation system, there have arisen needs to incorporate noise considerations in the conceptual design of revolutionary aircraft. Through the use of response surfaces, complex noise models may be converted into polynomial equations for rapid and simplified evaluation. This conversion allows many of the commonly used response surface-based trade space exploration methods to be applied to noise analysis. This methodology is demonstrated using a noise model of a notional 300 passenger Blended-Wing-Body (BWB) transport. Response surfaces are created relating source noise levels of the BWB vehicle to its corresponding FAR-36 certification noise levels and the resulting trade space is explored. Methods demonstrated include: single point analysis, parametric study, an optimization technique for inverse analysis, sensitivity studies, and probabilistic analysis. Extended applications of response surface-based methods in noise analysis are also discussed.

  2. Constrained Response Surface Optimisation and Taguchi Methods for Precisely Atomising Spraying Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luangpaiboon, P.; Suwankham, Y.; Homrossukon, S.

    2010-10-01

    This research presents a development of a design of experiment technique for quality improvement in automotive manufacturing industrial. The quality of interest is the colour shade, one of the key feature and exterior appearance for the vehicles. With low percentage of first time quality, the manufacturer has spent a lot of cost for repaired works as well as the longer production time. To permanently dissolve such problem, the precisely spraying condition should be optimized. Therefore, this work will apply the full factorial design, the multiple regression, the constrained response surface optimization methods or CRSOM, and Taguchi's method to investigate the significant factors and to determine the optimum factor level in order to improve the quality of paint shop. Firstly, 2κ full factorial was employed to study the effect of five factors including the paint flow rate at robot setting, the paint levelling agent, the paint pigment, the additive slow solvent, and non volatile solid at spraying of atomizing spraying machine. The response values of colour shade at 15 and 45 degrees were measured using spectrophotometer. Then the regression models of colour shade at both degrees were developed from the significant factors affecting each response. Consequently, both regression models were placed into the form of linear programming to maximize the colour shade subjected to 3 main factors including the pigment, the additive solvent and the flow rate. Finally, Taguchi's method was applied to determine the proper level of key variable factors to achieve the mean value target of colour shade. The factor of non volatile solid was found to be one more additional factor at this stage. Consequently, the proper level of all factors from both experiment design methods were used to set a confirmation experiment. It was found that the colour shades, both visual at 15 and 45 angel of measurement degrees of spectrophotometer, were nearly closed to the target and the defective at

  3. Optimization of suitable ethanol blend ratio for motorcycle engine using response surface method.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Liang; Chen, Suming; Tsai, Jin-Ming; Tsai, Chao-Yin; Fang, Hsin-Hsiung; Yang, I-Chang; Liu, Sen-Yuan

    2012-01-01

    In view of energy shortage and air pollution, ethanol-gasoline blended fuel used for motorcycle engine was studied in this work. The emissions of carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NO(X)) and engine performance of a 125 cc four-stroke motorcycle engine with original carburetor using ethanol-gasoline fuels were investigated. The model of three-variable Box Behnken design (BBD) was used for experimental design, the ethanol blend ratios were prepared at 0, 10, 20 vol%; the speeds of motorcycle were selected as 30, 45, 60 km/h; and the throttle positions were set at 30, 60, 90 %. Both engine performance and air pollutant emissions were then analyzed by response surface method (RSM) to yield optimum operation parameters for tolerable pollutant emissions and maximum engine performance. The RSM optimization analysis indicated that the most suitable ethanol-gasoline blended ratio was found at the range of 3.92-4.12 vol% to yield a comparable fuel conversion efficiency, while considerable reductions of exhaust pollutant emissions of CO (-29 %) and NO(X) (-12 %) when compared to pure gasoline fuel. This study demonstrated low ethanol-gasoline blended fuels could be used in motorcycle carburetor engines without any modification to keep engine power while reducing exhaust pollutants.

  4. Shape Optimization of Supersonic Turbines Using Response Surface and Neural Network Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papila, Nilay; Shyy, Wei; Griffin, Lisa W.; Dorney, Daniel J.

    2001-01-01

    Turbine performance directly affects engine specific impulse, thrust-to-weight ratio, and cost in a rocket propulsion system. A global optimization framework combining the radial basis neural network (RBNN) and the polynomial-based response surface method (RSM) is constructed for shape optimization of a supersonic turbine. Based on the optimized preliminary design, shape optimization is performed for the first vane and blade of a 2-stage supersonic turbine, involving O(10) design variables. The design of experiment approach is adopted to reduce the data size needed by the optimization task. It is demonstrated that a major merit of the global optimization approach is that it enables one to adaptively revise the design space to perform multiple optimization cycles. This benefit is realized when an optimal design approaches the boundary of a pre-defined design space. Furthermore, by inspecting the influence of each design variable, one can also gain insight into the existence of multiple design choices and select the optimum design based on other factors such as stress and materials considerations.

  5. Estimation of Supersonic Stage Separation Aerodynamics of Winged-Body Launch Vehicles Using Response Surface Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Gary E.

    2010-01-01

    Response surface methodology was used to estimate the longitudinal stage separation aerodynamic characteristics of a generic, bimese, winged multi-stage launch vehicle configuration at supersonic speeds in the NASA LaRC Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel. The Mach 3 staging was dominated by shock wave interactions between the orbiter and booster vehicles throughout the relative spatial locations of interest. The inference space was partitioned into several contiguous regions within which the separation aerodynamics were presumed to be well-behaved and estimable using central composite designs capable of fitting full second-order response functions. The underlying aerodynamic response surfaces of the booster vehicle in belly-to-belly proximity to the orbiter vehicle were estimated using piecewise-continuous lower-order polynomial functions. The quality of fit and prediction capabilities of the empirical models were assessed in detail, and the issue of subspace boundary discontinuities was addressed. Augmenting the central composite designs to full third-order using computer-generated D-optimality criteria was evaluated. The usefulness of central composite designs, the subspace sizing, and the practicality of fitting lower-order response functions over a partitioned inference space dominated by highly nonlinear and possibly discontinuous shock-induced aerodynamics are discussed.

  6. Estimation of Supersonic Stage Separation Aerodynamics of Winged-Body Launch Vehicles Using Response Surface Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Gary E.; Deloach, Richard

    2008-01-01

    A collection of statistical and mathematical techniques referred to as response surface methodology was used to estimate the longitudinal stage separation aerodynamic characteristics of a generic, bimese, winged multi-stage launch vehicle configuration using data obtained on small-scale models at supersonic speeds in the NASA Langley Research Center Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel. The simulated Mach 3 staging was dominated by multiple shock wave interactions between the orbiter and booster vehicles throughout the relative spatial locations of interest. This motivated a partitioning of the overall inference space into several contiguous regions within which the separation aerodynamics were presumed to be well-behaved and estimable using cuboidal and spherical central composite designs capable of fitting full second-order response functions. The primary goal was to approximate the underlying overall aerodynamic response surfaces of the booster vehicle in belly-to-belly proximity to the orbiter vehicle using relatively simple, lower-order polynomial functions that were piecewise-continuous across the full independent variable ranges of interest. The quality of fit and prediction capabilities of the empirical models were assessed in detail, and the issue of subspace boundary discontinuities was addressed. The potential benefits of augmenting the central composite designs to full third order using computer-generated D-optimality criteria were also evaluated. The usefulness of central composite designs, the subspace sizing, and the practicality of fitting low-order response functions over a partitioned inference space dominated by highly nonlinear and possibly discontinuous shock-induced aerodynamics are discussed.

  7. The effect of different parameters on mechanical properties of PA-6/clay nanocomposite through genetic algorithm and response surface methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghri, M.; Shamaee, H.; Shahrajabian, H.; Ghannadzadeh, A.

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents a methodology for determination of the optimal material and processing parameters (i.e., nanoclay content, melt temperature, feeding rate, and screw speed) to maximize simultaneously tensile modulus and tensile strength of injection-molded PA-6/clay nanocomposites through coupling response surface method and genetic algorithm. The tensile tests on PA-6/clay nanocomposites are conducted to obtain tensile modulus and tensile strength values, and then analysis of variance is performed. The predicted models for tensile modulus and tensile strength are created by response surface method, and then the functions are optimized by a genetic algorithm code implemented in MATLAB. Acceptable agreement has been observed between the values of the process parameters predicted by the response surface method and genetic algorithm and those of the process parameters obtained through experimental measurements. This study shows that the response surface method coupled with the GA can be utilized effectively to find the optimum process variables in tensile test of PA-6/NC nanocomposites.

  8. Cicer α-galactosidase immobilization onto functionalized graphene nanosheets using response surface method and its applications.

    PubMed

    Singh, Neelesh; Srivastava, Garima; Talat, Mahe; Raghubanshi, Himanshu; Srivastava, Onkar Nath; Kayastha, Arvind M

    2014-01-01

    Cicer α-galactosidase was immobilized onto functionalized graphene with immobilization efficiency of 84% using response surface methodology (Box-Behnken design). The immobilized enzyme had higher thermal stability than the soluble one, attractive for industrial applications. Immobilization of the enzyme lowered the Km to 1/3rd compared to the soluble enzyme. Raffinose family oligosaccharides (RFOs) are mainly responsible for flatulence by taking soybean derived food products. The immobilized enzyme can be used effectively for the hydrolysis of RFOs. After ten successive runs, the immobilized enzyme still retained approximately 60% activity, with soybean RFOs. The easy availability of enzyme source, ease of its immobilization on matrices, non-toxicity, increased stability of immobilized enzyme and effective hydrolysis of RFOs increase the Cicer α-galactosidase application in food processing industries.

  9. Optimizing the medium components in bioemulsifiers production by Candida lipolytica with response surface method.

    PubMed

    Albuquerque, C D C; Filetti, A M F; Campos-Takaki, G M

    2006-06-01

    A response surface methodology was used to study bioemulsifier production by Candida lipolytica. A 2(4) full experimental design was previously carried out to investigate the effects and interactions of the concentrations of corn oil, urea, ammonium sulfate, and potassium dihydrogen orthophosphate on the emulsification activity (EA) of the bioemulsifier produced by C. lipolytica. The best EA value (3.727 units of emulsification activity (UEA)) was obtained with a medium composed of 0.4 g of urea, 1.1 g of ammonium sulfate, 2.04 g of potassium dihydrogen orthophosphate, 5 mL of corn oil, 50 mL of distilled water, and 50 mL of seawater. A curvature check was performed and revealed a lack of fit of the linear approximation. The proximity of the optimum point was evident, as was the need for quadratic model and second-order designs that incorporate the effect of the curvature. Medium constituents were then optimized for the EA using a three-factor central composite design and response surface methodology. The second-order model showed statistical significance and predictive ability. It was found that the maximum EA produced was 4.415 UEA, and the optimum levels of urea, ammonium sulfate, and potassium dihydrogen orthophosphate were, respectively, 0.544% (m/v), 2.131% (m/v), and 2.628% (m/v).

  10. [Optmization for cutting procedure of astragali radix with Box-Behnken design and response surface method].

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiu-Juan; Zhou, Qian; Sun, Li-Li; Dai, Yan-Peng; Yan, Xue-Sheng

    2014-07-01

    Astragali Radix was firstly recorded in the "Shen Nong's Herbal Classic" as a top-grade and commonly used traditional Chinese medicine. Its frequently used slices include raw Astragali Radix and honey-processed products. In current studies, many reports were made on honey-processed Astragali Radix, whereas fewer study reports were made on the cutting process of Astragali Radix. Currently, because Astragali Radix is primarily cut by drug workers according to their operating experience, but with out specific cutting parameters, it is easy to cause the loss or mildew of active ingredients. As a result, the quality of Astragali Radix circulated in the market is not guaranteed, and the quality of their slices and preparations are hard to be controlled, which seriously impact the clinical efficacy. In response, this experiment was performed, in which the optimum cutting process of Astragali Radix was taken as the study objective, the Box-Benhnken central composite design in the response surface analysis was adopted, and the content and appearance character of astragaloside and calycosin-7-glucoside were regarded as the study indicators. Three factors, namely the softening time, the drying temperature and the drying time, were selected to optimize the cutting process of Astragali Radix and obtain the optimum cutting process parameters as follows: the softening time was 3 hours, the drying temperature was 50 degrees C, and the drying time was 4 hours. According to the verification test, the Astragali Radix cutting process is steady and feasible, which has certain significance for normalizing the cutting process of Astragali Radix. PMID:25276971

  11. Reducing Design Risk Using Robust Design Methods: A Dual Response Surface Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unal, Resit; Yeniay, Ozgur; Lepsch, Roger A. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Space transportation system conceptual design is a multidisciplinary process containing considerable element of risk. Risk here is defined as the variability in the estimated (output) performance characteristic of interest resulting from the uncertainties in the values of several disciplinary design and/or operational parameters. Uncertainties from one discipline (and/or subsystem) may propagate to another, through linking parameters and the final system output may have a significant accumulation of risk. This variability can result in significant deviations from the expected performance. Therefore, an estimate of variability (which is called design risk in this study) together with the expected performance characteristic value (e.g. mean empty weight) is necessary for multidisciplinary optimization for a robust design. Robust design in this study is defined as a solution that minimizes variability subject to a constraint on mean performance characteristics. Even though multidisciplinary design optimization has gained wide attention and applications, the treatment of uncertainties to quantify and analyze design risk has received little attention. This research effort explores the dual response surface approach to quantify variability (risk) in critical performance characteristics (such as weight) during conceptual design.

  12. [Optimization of spraying dry technology of Biqiu ranules ethanol extract by Box-Behnken response surface method].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan-jun; Liu, Li-li; Hu, Jun-hua; Wu, Yun; Chao, En-xiang; Xiao, Wei

    2015-09-01

    With inlet temperature, specific gravity, feeding speed as independent variables, the comprehensive evaluating indexes of content of schisandrin and arctiin as dependent variable, the experimental data were fitted to a second order polynomial equation. Based on establishing the mathematical relationship between the comprehensive evaluating indexes and respective variables, Box-Benhnken central composite test and response surface analysis method was employed to optimize the spray drying technology of Biqiu granules ethanol extract. The optimal drying parameter was as follows: the inlet temperature was 175 degrees C, the specific gravity was 1.10, feeding speed was 32 r x min(-1). Under these conditions, the comprehensive evaluating indexes of spraying dry processes was 92.68, which was close to the model prediction. The spraying dry technology of Biqiu granules ethanol extract optimized by response surface methodology was accurate and feasible, which provided theoretical experiment basis for the industrialization production. PMID:26983204

  13. A method for achieving monotonic frequency-temperature response for langasite surface-acoustic-wave high-temperature sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaoming, Bao; Yabing, Ke; Yanqing, Zheng; Lina, Cheng; Honglang, Li

    2016-02-01

    To achieve the monotonic frequency-temperature response for a high-temperature langasite (LGS) surface-acoustic-wave (SAW) sensor in a wide temperature range, a method utilizing two substrate cuts with different propagation angles on the same substrate plane was proposed. In this method, the theory of effective permittivity is adopted to calculate the temperature coefficients of frequency (TCF), electromechanical coupling coefficients (k2), and power flow angle (PFA) for different propagation angles on the same substrate plane, and then the two substrate cuts were chosen to have large k2 and small PFA, as well as the difference in their TCFs (ΔTCF) to always have the same sign of their values. The Z-cut LGS substrate plane was taken as an example, and the two suitable substrate cuts with propagation angles of 74 and 80° were chosen to derive a monotonic frequency-temperature response for LGS SAW sensors at -50 to 540 °C. Experiments on a LGS SAW sensor using the above two substrate cuts were designed, and its measured frequency-temperature response at -50 to 540 °C agreed well with the theory, demonstrating the high accuracy of the proposed method.

  14. Response surface development using RETRAN

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, R.E.; Sorensen, J.M.; May, R.S.; Doran, K.J. ); Trikouros, N.G.; Mozias, E.S. )

    1991-01-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and GPU Nuclear Corporation have completed a demonstration project that provides justification for relaxing the high-pressure setpoints for the Oyster Creek Nuclear Generating Station. The project was undertaken because an undesirable overlap had been identified in the high-pressure setpoints when accounting for measurement uncertainties experienced during plant operation. The project employed a statistical combination of uncertainties (SCU) process to provide increased margin for measurement uncertainties. This approach was used because previous experience indicated that there was insufficient margin to justify the desired setpoints using conventional deterministic inputs to the safety analysis and plant performance analysis processes. Through the use of SCU methodology and other deterministic analyses, it is possible to provide comprehensive bases for the desired technical specification changes to the high-pressure setpoints. The SCU process is based on the EPRI setpoint analysis guidelines, and it requires the development of response surfaces to simulate RETRAN peak pressure calculations for the limiting transient event. The use of response surfaces adds an intermediate step to the SCU process, but reduces the number of RETRAN cases required to make appropriate statistical statements about the result probabilities. Basically, each response surface is an approximation of the RETRAN code for one particular event and one output variable of interest, which is valid over a limited region. The response surfaces can be sampled very inexpensively using simple Monte Carlo methods. The basic input to the development of a response surface is a set of results obtained from specific RETRAN cases.

  15. Application of response surface methodology for determination of methyl red in water samples by spectrophotometry method.

    PubMed

    Khodadoust, Saeid; Ghaedi, Mehrorang

    2014-12-10

    In this study a rapid and effective method (dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME)) was developed for extraction of methyl red (MR) prior to its determination by UV-Vis spectrophotometry. Influence variables on DLLME such as volume of chloroform (as extractant solvent) and methanol (as dispersive solvent), pH and ionic strength and extraction time were investigated. Then significant variables were optimized by using a Box-Behnken design (BBD) and desirability function (DF). The optimized conditions (100μL of chloroform, 1.3mL of ethanol, pH 4 and 4% (w/v) NaCl) resulted in a linear calibration graph in the range of 0.015-10.0mgmL(-1) of MR in initial solution with R(2)=0.995 (n=5). The limits of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) were 0.005 and 0.015mgmL(-1), respectively. Finally, the DLLME method was applied for determination of MR in different water samples with relative standard deviation (RSD) less than 5% (n=5).

  16. Application of response surface methodology for determination of methyl red in water samples by spectrophotometry method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodadoust, Saeid; Ghaedi, Mehrorang

    2014-12-01

    In this study a rapid and effective method (dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) was developed for extraction of methyl red (MR) prior to its determination by UV-Vis spectrophotometry. Influence variables on DLLME such as volume of chloroform (as extractant solvent) and methanol (as dispersive solvent), pH and ionic strength and extraction time were investigated. Then significant variables were optimized by using a Box-Behnken design (BBD) and desirability function (DF). The optimized conditions (100 μL of chloroform, 1.3 mL of ethanol, pH 4 and 4% (w/v) NaCl) resulted in a linear calibration graph in the range of 0.015-10.0 mg mL-1 of MR in initial solution with R2 = 0.995 (n = 5). The limits of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) were 0.005 and 0.015 mg mL-1, respectively. Finally, the DLLME method was applied for determination of MR in different water samples with relative standard deviation (RSD) less than 5% (n = 5).

  17. A new, simple method for the production of meat-curing pigment under optimised conditions using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Soltanizadeh, Nafiseh; Kadivar, Mahdi

    2012-12-01

    The production of cured meat pigment using nitrite and ascorbate in acidic conditions was evaluated. HCl, ascorbate and nitrite concentrations were optimised at three levels using the response surface method (RSM). The effects of process variables on the nitrosoheme yield, the wavelength of maximum absorbance (λ(max)), and L*, a* and b* values were evaluated. The response surface equations indicate that variables exerted a significant effect on all dependent factors. The optimum combinations for the reaction were HCl=-0.8, ascorbate=0.46 and nitrite=1.00 as coded values for conversion of 1mM hemin to nitrosoheme, by which a pigment yield of 100%, which was similar to the predicted value of 99.5%, was obtained. Likewise, the other parameters were not significantly different from predicted values as the λ(max), L*, a* and b* values were 558 nm, 47.03, 45.17 and 17.20, respectively. The structure of the pigment was identified using FTIR and ESI/MS.

  18. Optimization of Cholesterol Removal by Probiotics in the Presence of Prebiotics by Using a Response Surface Method

    PubMed Central

    Liong, M. T.; Shah, N. P.

    2005-01-01

    Lactobacillus casei ASCC 292 was grown in the presence of six prebiotics, namely, sorbitol, mannitol, maltodextrin, high-amylose maize, fructooligosaccharide (FOS), and inulin, in order to determine the combination of probiotic and prebiotics that would remove the highest level of cholesterol. A first-order model showed that the combination of L. casei ASCC 292, FOS, and maltodextrin was the most efficient for the removal of cholesterol, and the optimum experimental region was developed by using the steepest ascent. This led to the middle points of probiotic (1.70% [wt/vol]), FOS (4.80% [wt/vol]), and maltodextrin (6.80% [wt/vol]) for the development of a central composite design for optimization. Perturbation plot, response surface, and coefficient estimates showed that all three factors had significant quadratic effects on cholesterol removal, with FOS showing the most conspicuous quadratic change. A second-order polynomial regression model estimated that the optimum condition of the factors for cholesterol removal by L. casei ASCC 292 is 1.71% (wt/vol) probiotic, 4.95% (wt/vol) FOS, and 6.62% (wt/vol) maltodextrin. Validation experiments showed that the predicted optimum conditions were more efficient than the high and low levels of the factors and the center points. A response surface method proved reliable for developing the model, optimizing factors, and analyzing interaction effects. Analyses of growth, substrate utilization, growth yield, mean doubling time, and short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) production by the use of quadratic models indicated that cholesterol removal was growth associated. The concentration of L. casei ASCC 292 had the most significant quadratic effect on all responses studied, except for substrate utilization and SCFA production, which were significantly (P < 0.05) influenced by the interactions between the probiotic and both prebiotics, indicating that they were closely associated with the uptake of prebiotics. PMID:15811997

  19. Bioactivity of a Novel Glycolipid Produced by a Halophilic Buttiauxella sp. and Improving Submerged Fermentation Using a Response Surface Method.

    PubMed

    Marzban, Abdolrazagh; Ebrahimipour, Gholamhossein; Danesh, Abolghasem

    2016-01-01

    An antimicrobial glycolipid biosurfactant (GBS), extracted and identified from a marine bacterium, was studied to inhibit pathogenic microorganisms. Production of the GBS was optimized using a statistical method, a response surface method (RSM) with a central composite design (CCD) for obtaining maximum yields on a cost-effective substrate, molasses. The GBS-producing bacterium was identified as Buttiauxella Species in terms of biochemical and molecular characteristics. This compound showed a desirable antimicrobial activity against some pathogens such as E. coli, Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus cereus, Candida albicans, Aspergilus niger, Salmonella enterica. The rheological studies described the stability of the GBS at high values in a range of pH (7-8), temperature (20-60) and salinity (0%-3%). The statistical optimization of GBS fermentation was found to be pH 7, temperature 33 °C, Peptone 1%, NaCl 1% and molasses 1%. The potency of the GBS as an effective antimicrobial agent provides evidence for its use against food and human pathogens. Moreover, favorable production of the GBS in the presence of molasses as a cheap substrate and the feasibility of pilot scale fermentation using an RSM method could expand its uses in food, pharmaceutical products and oil industries. PMID:27669197

  20. Response Surface Optimization of a Rapid Ultrasound-Assisted Extraction Method for Simultaneous Determination of Tetracycline Antibiotics in Manure

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lanqing; Sun, Mingxing; Zhou, Hui; Zhou, Yun; Chen, Ping; Min, Hong; Shen, Guoqing

    2015-01-01

    A rapid and cleanup-free ultrasound-assisted extraction method is proposed for the simultaneous extraction of oxytetracycline, tetracycline, chlortetracycline, and doxycycline in manure. The analytes were determined using high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detector. The influence of several variables on the efficiency of the extraction procedure was investigated by single-factor experiments. The temperature, pH, and amount of extraction solution were selected for optimization experiment using response surface methodology. The calibration curves showed good linearity (R2 > 0.99) for all analytes in the range of 0.1–20 μg/mL. The four antibiotics were successfully extracted from manure with recoveries ranging from 81.89 to 92.42% and good reproducibility (RSD, <4.06%) under optimal conditions, which include 50 mL of McIlvaine buffer extraction solution (pH 7.15) mixed with 1 g of manure sample, extraction temperature of 40°C, extraction time of 10 min, and three extraction cycles. Method quantification limits of 1.75–2.32 mg/kg were obtained for the studied compounds. The proposed procedure demonstrated clear reductions in extraction time and elimination of cleanup steps. Finally, the applicability to tetracyclines antibiotics determination in real samples was evaluated through the successful determination of four target analytes in swine, cow manure, and mixture of animal manure with inorganic fertilizer. PMID:25922787

  1. Optimization of Ultrasonic-Assisted Extraction of Flavonoid Compounds and Antioxidants from Alfalfa Using Response Surface Method.

    PubMed

    Jing, Chang-Liang; Dong, Xiao-Fang; Tong, Jian-Ming

    2015-08-26

    Ultrasonic-assisted extraction (UAE) was used to extract flavonoid-enriched antioxidants from alfalfa aerial part. Response surface methodology (RSM), based on a four-factor, five-level central composite design (CCD), was employed to obtain the optimal extraction parameters, in which the flavonoid content was maximum and the antioxidant activity of the extracts was strongest. Radical scavenging capacity of the extracts, which represents the amounts of antioxidants in alfalfa, was determined by using 2,2'-azino-bis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonicacid) (ABTS) and 2,2'-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) methods. The results showed good fit with the proposed models for the total flavonoid extraction (R² = 0.9849), for the antioxidant extraction assayed by ABTS method (R² = 0.9764), and by DPPH method (R² = 0.9806). Optimized extraction conditions for total flavonoids was a ratio of liquid to solid of 57.16 mL/g, 62.33 °C, 57.08 min, and 52.14% ethanol. The optimal extraction parameters of extracts for the highest antioxidant activity by DPPH method was a ratio of liquid to solid 60.3 mL/g, 54.56 °C, 45.59 min, and 46.67% ethanol, and by ABTS assay was a ratio of liquid to solid 47.29 mL/g, 63.73 °C, 51.62 min, and 60% ethanol concentration. Our work offers optimal extraction conditions for total flavonoids and antioxidants from alfalfa.

  2. Response surface optimization of a method for extracting extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) from subaerial biofilms on rocky substrata.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Nion, Daniel; Echeverri, María; Silva, Benita; Prieto, Beatriz

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to optimize a protocol for extracting extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) from biofilms on rocky substrata, as the EPS matrix is considered key to understanding the biofilm mode of life. For this purpose, we tested the extraction efficacy of NaOH and H2SO4 at different concentrations, temperatures and times for obtaining EPS from multi-species subaerial biofilms grown on granite blocks under laboratory conditions. Two experimental designs (Box-Behnken design and full factorial design) were used in testing each extractant. The extraction efficiency was determined by analysing the carbohydrate, protein and DNA contents of the extracts obtained. H2SO4 proved unsuitable as an extractant as it caused excessive cell lysis. However, response surface optimization of NaOH-mediated extraction enabled cell lysis to be minimized. Confirmation experiments were performed under the optimal conditions established and a protocol for extracting EPS is proposed, yielding the first quantitative data on EPS extracted from subaerial biofilms developed on rocky substrata. Graphical abstract Development of a method for extracting EPS from subaerial biofilms on rocky substrata. PMID:27423193

  3. Response surface optimization of a method for extracting extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) from subaerial biofilms on rocky substrata.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Nion, Daniel; Echeverri, María; Silva, Benita; Prieto, Beatriz

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to optimize a protocol for extracting extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) from biofilms on rocky substrata, as the EPS matrix is considered key to understanding the biofilm mode of life. For this purpose, we tested the extraction efficacy of NaOH and H2SO4 at different concentrations, temperatures and times for obtaining EPS from multi-species subaerial biofilms grown on granite blocks under laboratory conditions. Two experimental designs (Box-Behnken design and full factorial design) were used in testing each extractant. The extraction efficiency was determined by analysing the carbohydrate, protein and DNA contents of the extracts obtained. H2SO4 proved unsuitable as an extractant as it caused excessive cell lysis. However, response surface optimization of NaOH-mediated extraction enabled cell lysis to be minimized. Confirmation experiments were performed under the optimal conditions established and a protocol for extracting EPS is proposed, yielding the first quantitative data on EPS extracted from subaerial biofilms developed on rocky substrata. Graphical abstract Development of a method for extracting EPS from subaerial biofilms on rocky substrata.

  4. Performance comparison of several response surface surrogate models and ensemble methods for water injection optimization under uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babaei, Masoud; Pan, Indranil

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we defined a relatively complex reservoir engineering optimization problem of maximizing the net present value of the hydrocarbon production in a water flooding process by controlling the water injection rates in multiple control periods. We assessed the performance of a number of response surface surrogate models and their ensembles which are combined by Dempster-Shafer theory and Weighted Averaged Surrogates as found in contemporary literature works. Most of these ensemble methods are based on the philosophy that multiple weak learners can be leveraged to obtain one strong learner which is better than the individual weak ones. Even though these techniques have been shown to work well for test bench functions, we found them not offering a considerable improvement compared to an individually used cubic radial basis function surrogate model. Our simulations on two and three dimensional cases, with varying number of optimization variables suggest that cubic radial basis functions-based surrogate model is reliable, outperforms Kriging surrogates and multivariate adaptive regression splines, and if it does not outperform, it is rarely outperformed by the ensemble surrogate models.

  5. An efficient Bayesian framework incorporating the Stochastic Response Surface Method for the uncertainty analysis of subsurface and multimedia transport models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakrishnan, S.; Roy, A.; Ierapetritou, M. G.; Flach, G. P.; Georgopoulos, P. G.

    2002-05-01

    Comprehensive uncertainty analyses of complex models of environmental and biological systems are essential but often not feasible due to the computational resources they require. Traditional Monte Carlo methods, e.g. involving standard or Latin Hypercube sampling, for propagating uncertainty and developing probability densities of model outputs, may require performing a large number of model simulations that can be prohibitive in the case of 3D dynamic finite element or finite difference models. An alternative approach is provided by the Stochastic Response Surface Method (SRSM), which is a computationally efficient framework that facilitates uncertainty analysis through the determination of statistically equivalent reduced models; SRSM is applied here to subsurface transport modeling. Past applications of SRSM included the uncertainty analysis of atmospheric chemistry and transport models, groundwater models, and physiologically based pharmacokinetic models [Isukapalli et al., 1998, Risk Analysis, 18(3), 351-363;Isukapalli et al., 2000, Risk Analysis, 20(5), 591-602]. The present work further demonstrates how the SRSM framework can be used in a Bayesian manner not only to characterize but also to reduce uncertainties, by incorporating observational information in estimates of model parameters. This is achieved by the combined application of the SRSM and Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods. Current and ongoing work includes the application of this novel framework to the groundwater and unsaturated zone modeling of the General Separations Area (GSA) of the US DOE Savannah River Site. Subsurface processes are simulated with the Flow And Contaminant Transport (FACT) code [Flach, G.P. and M.K. Harris, 2000, WSRC-TR-96-00399]. FACT is transient three-dimensional, finite element code designed to simulate isothermal groundwater flow, moisture movement, and solute transport in variably saturated and fully saturated subsurface porous media. Furthermore, FACT is designed

  6. Competitive removal of hazardous dyes from aqueous solution by MIL-68(Al): Derivative spectrophotometric method and response surface methodology approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tehrani, Mahnaz Saghanejhad; Zare-Dorabei, Rouholah

    2016-05-01

    MIL-68(Al) as a metal-organic framework (MOF) was synthesized and characterized by different techniques such as SEM, BET, FTIR, and XRD analysis. This material was then applied for simulations removal of malachite green (MG) and methylene blue (MB) dyes from aqueous solutions using second order derivative spectrophotometric method (SODS) which was applied to resolve the overlap between the spectra of these dyes. The dependency of dyes removal efficiency in binary solutions was examined and optimized toward various parameters including initial dye concentration, pH of the solution, adsorbent dosage and ultrasonic contact time using central composite design (CCD) under response surface methodology (RSM) approach. The optimized experimental conditions were set as pH 7.78, contact time 5 min, initial MB concentration 22 mg L- 1, initial MG concentration 12 mg L- 1 and adsorbent dosage 0.0055 g. The equilibrium data was fitted to isotherm models such as Langmuir, Freundlich and Tempkin and the results revealed the suitability of the Langmuir model. The maximum adsorption capacity of 666.67 and 153.85 mg g- 1 was obtained for MB and MG removal respectively. Kinetics data fitting to pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order and Elovich models confirmed the applicability of pseudo-second order kinetic model for description of the mechanism and adsorption rate. Dye-loaded MIL-68(Al) can be easily regenerated using methanol and applied for three frequent sorption/desorption cycles with high performance. The impact of ionic strength on removal percentage of both dyes in binary mixture was studied by using NaCl and KCl soluble salts at different concentrations. According to our findings, only small dosage of the proposed MOF is considerably capable to remove large amounts of dyes at room temperature and in very short time that is a big advantage of MIL-68(Al) as a promising adsorbent for adsorptive removal processes.

  7. Application of Response Surface based Calibration and Sensitivity Analysis methods for Regional Hydrogeological Modelling in the Western Canada Sedimentary Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, A.; Palombi, D.; Huff, G. F.

    2014-12-01

    A regional scale study of groundwater flow dynamics was undertaken in the Western Canada Sedimentary Basin (WCSB), comprising parts of Alberta, Saskatchewan and British Columbia. The objective of the study is to investigate basin-scale hydrogeology in WCSB and to establish boundary conditions for future local-scale groundwater management models. Earlier work in the Alberta basin has acknowledged the fact that in addition to topography controlled conditions, a substantial part of the basin exhibits sub-hydrostatic regimes. The basin-scale model (approx. 420,000 km2) includes Upper Cretaceous aquifers to Recent age sediments which collectively attain maximum thicknesses of >2600 m. Regional aquifer units considered for the numerical model are Quaternary sediments, and the sedimentary rocks of the Paskapoo, Scollard, Horseshoe Canyon formations and the Belly River Group. Regional aquitards delineated include the Battle and Bear Paw formations. The study area is bound to the west by the Brazeau-Waptiti thrust belt and to the south by the Canada-USA international border. The boundary to the north and east is delineated by the maximum extent of the Wapiti and Belly River groups and Judith River Formation. USGS MODFLOW was implemented for numerical simulation. The steady state numerical model was calibrated using a Response Surface based (Radial Basis Functions) optimization method. The calibration targets (~2000) were comprised of drill stem tests for deeper units and static water levels for shallower units. Petrophysical analyses of cores averaged K values from analyses of aquifer test results,and literature values were used to provide initial values and calibration ranges for hydraulic properties. Results indicate predominance of topography driven, local- to intermediate-scale flow systems in all hydrostratigraphic units with recharge of these units occurring in the foothills of the Rocky Mountains. The Battle aquitard, where present, acts to retard regional flow

  8. Competitive removal of hazardous dyes from aqueous solution by MIL-68(Al): Derivative spectrophotometric method and response surface methodology approach.

    PubMed

    Tehrani, Mahnaz Saghanejhad; Zare-Dorabei, Rouholah

    2016-05-01

    MIL-68(Al) as a metal-organic framework (MOF) was synthesized and characterized by different techniques such as SEM, BET, FTIR, and XRD analysis. This material was then applied for simulations removal of malachite green (MG) and methylene blue (MB) dyes from aqueous solutions using second order derivative spectrophotometric method (SODS) which was applied to resolve the overlap between the spectra of these dyes. The dependency of dyes removal efficiency in binary solutions was examined and optimized toward various parameters including initial dye concentration, pH of the solution, adsorbent dosage and ultrasonic contact time using central composite design (CCD) under response surface methodology (RSM) approach. The optimized experimental conditions were set as pH7.78, contact time 5min, initial MB concentration 22mgL(-1), initial MG concentration 12mgL(-1) and adsorbent dosage 0.0055g. The equilibrium data was fitted to isotherm models such as Langmuir, Freundlich and Tempkin and the results revealed the suitability of the Langmuir model. The maximum adsorption capacity of 666.67 and 153.85mgg(-1) was obtained for MB and MG removal respectively. Kinetics data fitting to pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order and Elovich models confirmed the applicability of pseudo-second order kinetic model for description of the mechanism and adsorption rate. Dye-loaded MIL-68(Al) can be easily regenerated using methanol and applied for three frequent sorption/desorption cycles with high performance. The impact of ionic strength on removal percentage of both dyes in binary mixture was studied by using NaCl and KCl soluble salts at different concentrations. According to our findings, only small dosage of the proposed MOF is considerably capable to remove large amounts of dyes at room temperature and in very short time that is a big advantage of MIL-68(Al) as a promising adsorbent for adsorptive removal processes. PMID:26890205

  9. Surface Water Response Modeling

    EPA Science Inventory

    During response to spills, or for facility planning, the vulnerability of downstream water resources is a major concern. How long and at what concentration do spilled contaminants reach downstream receptors? Models have the potential to answer these questions, but only if they ...

  10. Forecasting the response of Earth's surface to future climatic and land use changes: A review of methods and research needs

    SciTech Connect

    Pelletier, Jon D.; Murray, A. Brad; Pierce, Jennifer L.; Bierman, Paul R.; Breshears, David D.; Crosby, Benjamin T.; Ellis, Michael; Foufoula-Georgiou, Efi; Heimsath, Arjun M.; Houser, Chris; Lancaster, Nick; Marani, Marco; Merritts, Dorothy J.; Moore, Laura J.; Pederson, Joel L.; Poulos, Michael J.; Rittenour, Tammy M.; Rowland, Joel C.; Ruggiero, Peter; Ward, Dylan J.; Wickert, Andrew D.; Yager, Elowyn M.

    2015-07-14

    In the future, Earth will be warmer, precipitation events will be more extreme, global mean sea level will rise, and many arid and semiarid regions will be drier. Human modifications of landscapes will also occur at an accelerated rate as developed areas increase in size and population density. We now have gridded global forecasts, being continually improved, of the climatic and land use changes (C&LUC) that are likely to occur in the coming decades. However, besides a few exceptions, consensus forecasts do not exist for how these C&LUC will likely impact Earth-surface processes and hazards. In some cases, we have the tools to forecast the geomorphic responses to likely future C&LUC. Fully exploiting these models and utilizing these tools will require close collaboration among Earth-surface scientists and Earth-system modelers. This paper assesses the state-of-the-art tools and data that are being used or could be used to forecast changes in the state of Earth's surface as a result of likely future C&LUC. We also propose strategies for filling key knowledge gaps, emphasizing where additional basic research and/or collaboration across disciplines are necessary. The main body of the paper addresses cross-cutting issues, including the importance of nonlinear/threshold-dominated interactions among topography, vegetation, and sediment transport, as well as the importance of alternate stable states and extreme, rare events for understanding and forecasting Earth-surface response to C&LUC. Five supplements delve into different scales or process zones (global-scale assessments and fluvial, aeolian, glacial/periglacial, and coastal process zones) in detail.

  11. Forecasting the response of Earth's surface to future climatic and land use changes: A review of methods and research needs

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pelletier, Jon D.; Murray, A. Brad; Pierce, Jennifer L.; Bierman, Paul R.; Breshears, David D.; Crosby, Benjamin T.; Ellis, Michael; Foufoula-Georgiou, Efi; Heimsath, Arjun M.; Houser, Chris; et al

    2015-07-14

    In the future, Earth will be warmer, precipitation events will be more extreme, global mean sea level will rise, and many arid and semiarid regions will be drier. Human modifications of landscapes will also occur at an accelerated rate as developed areas increase in size and population density. We now have gridded global forecasts, being continually improved, of the climatic and land use changes (C&LUC) that are likely to occur in the coming decades. However, besides a few exceptions, consensus forecasts do not exist for how these C&LUC will likely impact Earth-surface processes and hazards. In some cases, we havemore » the tools to forecast the geomorphic responses to likely future C&LUC. Fully exploiting these models and utilizing these tools will require close collaboration among Earth-surface scientists and Earth-system modelers. This paper assesses the state-of-the-art tools and data that are being used or could be used to forecast changes in the state of Earth's surface as a result of likely future C&LUC. We also propose strategies for filling key knowledge gaps, emphasizing where additional basic research and/or collaboration across disciplines are necessary. The main body of the paper addresses cross-cutting issues, including the importance of nonlinear/threshold-dominated interactions among topography, vegetation, and sediment transport, as well as the importance of alternate stable states and extreme, rare events for understanding and forecasting Earth-surface response to C&LUC. Five supplements delve into different scales or process zones (global-scale assessments and fluvial, aeolian, glacial/periglacial, and coastal process zones) in detail.« less

  12. The optimization of essential oils supercritical CO2 extraction from Lavandula hybrida through static-dynamic steps procedure and semi-continuous technique using response surface method

    PubMed Central

    Kamali, Hossein; Aminimoghadamfarouj, Noushin; Golmakani, Ebrahim; Nematollahi, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to examine and evaluate crucial variables in essential oils extraction process from Lavandula hybrida through static-dynamic and semi-continuous techniques using response surface method. Materials and Methods: Essential oil components were extracted from Lavandula hybrida (Lavandin) flowers using supercritical carbon dioxide via static-dynamic steps (SDS) procedure, and semi-continuous (SC) technique. Results: Using response surface method the optimum extraction yield (4.768%) was obtained via SDS at 108.7 bar, 48.5°C, 120 min (static: 8×15), 24 min (dynamic: 8×3 min) in contrast to the 4.620% extraction yield for the SC at 111.6 bar, 49.2°C, 14 min (static), 121.1 min (dynamic). Conclusion: The results indicated that a substantial reduction (81.56%) solvent usage (kg CO2/g oil) is observed in the SDS method versus the conventional SC method. PMID:25598636

  13. Method for lubricating contacting surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Dugger, Michael T.; Ohlhausen, James A.; Asay, David B.; Kim, Seong H.

    2011-12-06

    A method is provided for tribological lubrication of sliding contact surfaces, where two surfaces are in contact and in motion relative to each other, operating in a vapor-phase environment containing at least one alcohol compound at a concentration sufficiently high to provide one monolayer of coverage on at least one of the surfaces, where the alcohol compound continuously reacts at the surface to provide lubrication.

  14. Method of modifying a surface

    DOEpatents

    Renk, Timothy J.; Sorensen, Neil R.; Senft, Donna Cowell; Buchheit, Jr., Rudolph G.; Thompson, Michael O.; Grabowski, Kenneth S.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention provides a surface modification method that provides beneficial changes in surface properties, can modify a surface to a greater depth than previous methods, and that is suitable for industrial application. The present method comprises applying a thin-film coating to a surface of a substrate, then subjecting the coated surface to an ion beam. The ion beam power pulse heats the coated surface, leading to alloying between the material in the coating and the material of the substrate. Rapid cooling of the alloyed layer after an ion beam pulse can lead to formation of metastable alloys and microstructures not accessible by conventional alloying methods or intense ion beam treatment of the substrate alone.

  15. Application of near surface geophysical methods to image water table response in an Alpine Meadow, Northern California.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayers, M.; Blacic, T. M.; Craig, M. S.; Yarnell, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    Meadows are recognized for their value to the ecological, hydrologic, and aesthetic functions of a watershed. As natural water retention sinks, meadows attenuate floods, improve water quality and support herbaceous vegetation that stabilize streambanks and promote high biodiversity. Alpine meadows are especially vital, serving as freshwater sources and distributing to lower lying provinces through ground and surface water interaction. These complexes are highly vulnerable to drought conditions, altered seasonal precipitation patterns, and mismanaged land use. One such location, Van Norden meadow located in the Donner Summit area west of Lake Tahoe, is one of the largest sub-alpine meadows in the Sierra Nevada mountain range of Northern California. Van Norden meadow offers a natural hydrologic laboratory. Ownership transfer of the area from a local land trust to the Forestry Service requires restoration toward natural meadow conditions, and involves notching the dam in 2016 to reduce currently impounded water volumes from 250 to less than 50 acre-feet. To monitor the effects of notching the dam on the upstream meadow conditions, better understanding of the surface and groundwater hydrology both pre-and post-base level alteration is required. Comprehensive understanding of groundwater flux that supports meadow reaches relies on knowledge of their often complex stratigraphic and structural subsurface framework. In recent years hydrogeophysics has emphasized the combination of near surface geophysical techniques, collaborated with well and borehole measures, to qualitatively define these parameters. Building on a preliminary GPR investigation conducted in 2014, in which 44 270 MHz transect lines were collected, we returned to Van Norden meadow in late summer 2015 to collect lower frequency GPR (50 and 100 MHz) and electrical resistivity profiles to better define the groundwater table, sedimentary, and structural features of the meadow.

  16. Method development and validation for optimised separation of salicylic, acetyl salicylic and ascorbic acid in pharmaceutical formulations by hydrophilic interaction chromatography and response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Hatambeygi, Nader; Abedi, Ghazaleh; Talebi, Mohammad

    2011-09-01

    This paper introduces a design of experiments (DOE) approach for method optimisation in hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC). An optimisation strategy for the separation of acetylsalicylic acid, its major impurity salicylic acid and ascorbic acid in pharmaceutical formulations by HILIC is presented, with the aid of response surface methodology (RSM) and Derringer's desirability function. A Box-Behnken experimental design was used to build the mathematical models and then to choose the significant parameters for the optimisation by simultaneously taking both resolution and retention time as the responses. The refined model had a satisfactory coefficient (R²>0.92, n=27). The four independent variables studied simultaneously were: acetonitrile content of the mobile phase, pH and concentration of buffer and column temperature each at three levels. Of these, the concentration of buffer and its cross-product with pH had a significant, positive influence on all studied responses. For the test compounds, the best separation conditions were: acetonitrile/22 mM ammonium acetate, pH 4.4 (82:18, v/v) as the mobile phase and column temperature of 28°C. The methodology also captured the interaction between variables which enabled exploration of the retention mechanism involved. It would be inferred that the retention is governed by a compromise between hydrophilic partitioning and ionic interaction. The optimised method was further validated according to the ICH guidelines with respect to linearity and range, precision, accuracy, specificity and sensitivity. The robustness of the method was also determined and confirmed by overlying counter plots of responses which were derived from the experimental design utilised for method optimisation.

  17. Method of passivating semiconductor surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Wanlass, Mark W.

    1990-01-01

    A method of passivating Group III-V or II-VI semiconductor compound surfaces. The method includes selecting a passivating material having a lattice constant substantially mismatched to the lattice constant of the semiconductor compound. The passivating material is then grown as an ultrathin layer of passivating material on the surface of the Group III-V or II-VI semiconductor compound. The passivating material is grown to a thickness sufficient to maintain a coherent interface between the ultrathin passivating material and the semiconductor compound. In addition, a device formed from such method is also disclosed.

  18. Method of passivating semiconductor surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Wanlass, M.W.

    1990-06-19

    A method is described for passivating Group III-V or II-VI semiconductor compound surfaces. The method includes selecting a passivating material having a lattice constant substantially mismatched to the lattice constant of the semiconductor compound. The passivating material is then grown as an ultrathin layer of passivating material on the surface of the Group III-V or II-VI semiconductor compound. The passivating material is grown to a thickness sufficient to maintain a coherent interface between the ultrathin passivating material and the semiconductor compound. In addition, a device formed from such method is also disclosed.

  19. An integrated Taguchi and response surface methodological approach for the optimization of an HPLC method to determine glimepiride in a supersaturatable self-nanoemulsifying formulation

    PubMed Central

    Dash, Rajendra Narayan; Mohammed, Habibuddin; Humaira, Touseef

    2015-01-01

    We studied the application of Taguchi orthogonal array (TOA) design during the development of an isocratic stability indicating HPLC method for glimepiride as per TOA design; twenty-seven experiments were conducted by varying six chromatographic factors. Percentage of organic phase was the most significant (p < 0.001) on retention time, while buffer pH had the most significant (p < 0.001) effect on tailing factor and theoretical plates. TOA design has shortcoming, which identifies the only linear effect, while ignoring the quadratic and interaction effects. Hence, a response surface model for each response was created including the linear, quadratic and interaction terms. The developed models for each response found to be well predictive bearing an acceptable adjusted correlation coefficient (0.9152 for retention time, 0.8985 for tailing factor and 0.8679 for theoretical plates). The models were found to be significant (p < 0.001) having a high F value for each response (15.76 for retention time, 13.12 for tailing factor and 9.99 for theoretical plates). The optimal chromatographic condition uses acetonitrile – potassium dihydrogen phosphate (pH 4.0; 30 mM) (50:50, v/v) as the mobile phase. The temperature, flow rate and injection volume were selected as 35 ± 2 °C, 1.0 mL min−1 and 20 μL respectively. The method was validated as per ICH guidelines and was found to be specific for analyzing glimepiride from a novel supersaturatable self-nanoemulsifying formulation. PMID:26903773

  20. An integrated Taguchi and response surface methodological approach for the optimization of an HPLC method to determine glimepiride in a supersaturatable self-nanoemulsifying formulation.

    PubMed

    Dash, Rajendra Narayan; Mohammed, Habibuddin; Humaira, Touseef

    2016-01-01

    We studied the application of Taguchi orthogonal array (TOA) design during the development of an isocratic stability indicating HPLC method for glimepiride as per TOA design; twenty-seven experiments were conducted by varying six chromatographic factors. Percentage of organic phase was the most significant (p < 0.001) on retention time, while buffer pH had the most significant (p < 0.001) effect on tailing factor and theoretical plates. TOA design has shortcoming, which identifies the only linear effect, while ignoring the quadratic and interaction effects. Hence, a response surface model for each response was created including the linear, quadratic and interaction terms. The developed models for each response found to be well predictive bearing an acceptable adjusted correlation coefficient (0.9152 for retention time, 0.8985 for tailing factor and 0.8679 for theoretical plates). The models were found to be significant (p < 0.001) having a high F value for each response (15.76 for retention time, 13.12 for tailing factor and 9.99 for theoretical plates). The optimal chromatographic condition uses acetonitrile - potassium dihydrogen phosphate (pH 4.0; 30 mM) (50:50, v/v) as the mobile phase. The temperature, flow rate and injection volume were selected as 35 ± 2 °C, 1.0 mL min(-1) and 20 μL respectively. The method was validated as per ICH guidelines and was found to be specific for analyzing glimepiride from a novel supersaturatable self-nanoemulsifying formulation. PMID:26903773

  1. Timescales of Land Surface Evapotranspiration Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Russell; Entekhabi, Dara; Koster, Randal; Suarez, Max

    1997-01-01

    Soil and vegetation exert strong control over the evapotranspiration rate, which couples the land surface water and energy balances. A method is presented to quantify the timescale of this surface control using daily general circulation model (GCM) simulation values of evapotranspiration and precipitation. By equating the time history of evaporation efficiency (ratio of actual to potential evapotranspiration) to the convolution of precipitation and a unit kernel (temporal weighting function), response functions are generated that can be used to characterize the timescales of evapotranspiration response for the land surface model (LSM) component of GCMS. The technique is applied to the output of two multiyear simulations of a GCM, one using a Surface-Vegetation-Atmosphere-Transfer (SVAT) scheme and the other a Bucket LSM. The derived response functions show that the Bucket LSM's response is significantly slower than that of the SVAT across the globe. The analysis also shows how the timescales of interception reservoir evaporation, bare soil evaporation, and vegetation transpiration differ within the SVAT LSM.

  2. Response surface methodology in the development of a stacking-sensitive capillary electrophoresis method for the analysis of tricyclic antidepressants in human serum.

    PubMed

    Galeano-Díaz, Teresa; Acedo-Valenzuela, María-Isabel; Mora-Díez, Nielene; Silva-Rodríguez, Antonio

    2005-09-01

    Stacking methods are very important in overcoming the poor detection limits in capillary electrophoresis (CE). In this paper, the separation and determination of several tricyclic antidepressants by a stacking method is described. The inclusion of acetonitrile (ACN) in the sample causes stacking (transient pseudoisotachophoresis) especially in presence of sodium chloride. An experimental design (central composite design) together with the response surface methodology has been used to find the optimum composition of the separation buffer and the optimal stacking conditions in few experiments. The response functions used are the product of the total resolution by the number of peaks, for the optimization of the separation buffer, and the product of the total resolution by the mean of the peak heights, for the optimization of the stacking conditions. About 28% of the capillary volume is loaded with sample. The calibration curves are linear over the working range (50-300 ng/mL). With a bubble capillary, the limits of detection (LODs) are in the order of 5 ng/mL. For the analysis of serum samples, enrichment with sodium chloride and the protein precipitation with ACN are enough to avoid interferences and to get stacking. Recoveries between 91.6 and 104% and RSD between 0.6 and 12% are obtained in the analysis of samples of lyophilized human serum and non-lyophilized human serum, spiked with the drugs.

  3. Electrically Responsive Surfaces: Experimental and Theoretical Investigations

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    orientation of the surface-tethered molecules under electroinduced switching, but also provided an in-depth characterization of the system reversibility. Furthermore, the unique support from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations is highlighted. MD simulations with polarizable force fields (FFs), which could give proper description of the charge polarization caused by electrical stimulus, have helped not only back many of the experimental observations, but also to rationalize the mechanism of switching behavior. More importantly, this polarizable FF-based approach can efficiently be extended to light or pH stimulated surfaces when integrated with reactive FF methods. The interplay between experimental and theoretical studies has led to a higher level of understanding of the switchable surfaces, and to a more precise interpretation and rationalization of the observed data. The perspectives on the challenges and opportunities for future progress on stimuli-responsive surfaces are also presented. PMID:27268783

  4. Combined linear response quantum mechanics and classical electrodynamics (QM/ED) method for the calculation of surface-enhanced Raman spectra.

    PubMed

    Mullin, Jonathan; Schatz, George C

    2012-03-01

    A multiscale method is presented that allows for evaluation of plasmon-enhanced optical properties of nanoparticle/molecule complexes with no additional cost compared to standard electrodynamics (ED) and linear response quantum mechanics (QM) calculations for the particle and molecule, respectively, but with polarization and orientation effects automatically described. The approach first calculates the total field of the nanoparticle by ED using the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method. The field intensity in the frequency domain as a function of distance from the nanoparticle is calculated via a Fourier transform. The molecular optical properties are then calculated with QM in the frequency domain in the presence of the total field of the nanoparticle. Back-coupling due to dipolar reradiation effects is included in the single-molecule plane wave approximation. The effects of polarization and partial orientation averaging are considered. The QM/ED method is evaluated for the well-characterized test case of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) of pyridine bound to silver, as well as for the resonant Raman chromophore rhodamine 6G. The electromagnetic contribution to the enhancement factor is 10(4) for pyridine and 10(2) for rhodamine 6G.

  5. Response surface method for the optimisation of micropollutant removal in municipal wastewater treatment plant effluent with the UV/H2O2 advanced oxidation process.

    PubMed

    Schulze-Hennings, U; Pinnekamp, J

    2013-01-01

    Experiments with the ultraviolet (UV)/H2O2 advanced oxidation process (AOP) were conducted to investigate the abatement of micropollutants in wastewater treatment plant effluent. The fluence and the starting concentration of H2O2 in a bench-scale batch reactor were varied according to response surface method (RSM) to examine their influence on the treatment efficiency. It was shown that the investigated AOP is very effective for the abatement of micropollutants with conversion rates typically higher than 90%. Empirical relationships between fluence, H2O2 dosage and the resulting concentration of micropollutants were established by RSM. By this means it was shown that X-ray-contrast media had been degraded only by UV light. Nevertheless, most substances were degraded by the combination of UV irradiation and H2O2. Based on RSM an optimisation of multiple responses was conducted to find the minimal fluence and H2O2 dosage that are needed to reach an efficient abatement of micropollutants. PMID:23656952

  6. Process optimization of deposition conditions of PbS thin films grown by a successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method using response surface methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yücel, Ersin; Yücel, Yasin; Beleli, Buse

    2015-07-01

    In this study, lead sulfide (PbS) thin films were synthesized by a successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method with different pH, dipping time and dipping cycles. Response surface methodology (RSM) and central composite design (CCD) were successfully used to optimize the PbS films deposition parameters and understand the significance and interaction of the factors affecting the film quality. 5-level-3-factor central composite design was employed to evaluate the effects of the deposition parameters (pH, dipping time and dipping cycles) on the response (the optical band gap of the films). Data obtained from RSM were subjected to the analysis of variance (ANOVA) and analyzed using a second order polynomial equation. The optimal conditions for the PbS films deposition have been found to be: pH of 9.1, dipping time of 10 s and dipping cycles of 10 cycles. The predicted band gap of PbS film was 2.13 eV under the optimal conditions. Verification experiment (2.24 eV) confirmed the validity of the predicted model. The film structures were characterized by X-ray diffractometer (XRD). Morphological properties of the films were studied with a scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The optical properties of the films were investigated using a UV-visible spectrophotometer.

  7. Method for protecting a surface

    DOEpatents

    Branagan, Daniel J.

    2006-06-27

    The invention includes a method of producing a hard metallic material by forming a mixture containing at least 55% iron and at least one of B, C, Si and P. The mixture is formed into an alloy and cooled to form a metallic material having a hardness of greater than about 9.2 GPa. The invention includes a method of forming a wire by combining a metal strip and a powder. The strip and the powder are rolled to form a wire containing at least 55% iron and from 2–7 additional elements including at lease one of C, Si and B. The invention also includes a method of forming a hardened surface on a substrate by processing a solid mass to form a power, applying the powder to a surface to form a layer containing metallic glass, and converting the glass to a crystalline material having a nanocrystalline grain size.

  8. Method for generating surface plasma

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Paul A.; Aragon, Ben P.

    2003-05-27

    A method for generating a discharge plasma which covers a surface of a body in a gas at pressures from 0.01 Torr to atmospheric pressure, by applying a radio frequency power with frequencies between approximately 1 MHz and 10 GHz across a plurality of paired insulated conductors on the surface. At these frequencies, an arc-less, non-filamentary plasma can be generated to affect the drag characteristics of vehicles moving through the gas. The plasma can also be used as a source in plasma reactors for chemical reaction operations.

  9. Extraction of Antioxidants from Borage (Borago officinalis L.) Leaves-Optimization by Response Surface Method and Application in Oil-in-Water Emulsions.

    PubMed

    Segovia, Francisco; Lupo, Bryshila; Peiró, Sara; Gordon, Michael H; Almajano, María Pilar

    2014-01-01

    Borage (Borago officinalis L.) is a typical Spanish plant. During processing, 60% are leaves. The aim of this work is to model and optimize the extraction of polyphenol from borage leaves using the response surface method (RSM) and to use this extract for application in emulsions. The responses were: total polyphenol content (TPC), antioxidant capacity by ORAC, and rosmarinic acid by HPLC. The ranges of the variables temperature, ethanol content and time were 50-90 °C, 0%-30%-60% ethanol (v/v), and 10-15 min. For ethanolic extraction, optimal conditions were at 75.9 °C, 52% ethanol and 14.8 min, yielding activity of 27.05 mg GAE/g DW TPC; 115.96 mg TE/g DW in ORAC and 11.02 mg/L rosmarinic acid. For water extraction, optimal activity was achieved with extraction at 98.3 °C and 22 min, with responses of 22.3 mg GAE/g DW TPC; 81.6 mg TE/g DW in ORAC and 3.9 mg/L rosmarinic acid. The significant variables were ethanol concentration and temperature. For emulsions, the peroxide value was inhibited by 60% for 3% extract concentration; and 80% with 3% extract concentration and 0.2% of BSA. The p-anisidine value between the control and the emulsion with 3% extract was reduced to 73.6% and with BSA 86.3%, and others concentrations had similar behavior. PMID:26784875

  10. Extraction of Antioxidants from Borage (Borago officinalis L.) Leaves—Optimization by Response Surface Method and Application in Oil-in-Water Emulsions

    PubMed Central

    Segovia, Francisco; Lupo, Bryshila; Peiró, Sara; Gordon, Michael H.; Almajano, María Pilar

    2014-01-01

    Borage (Borago officinalis L.) is a typical Spanish plant. During processing, 60% are leaves. The aim of this work is to model and optimize the extraction of polyphenol from borage leaves using the response surface method (RSM) and to use this extract for application in emulsions. The responses were: total polyphenol content (TPC), antioxidant capacity by ORAC, and rosmarinic acid by HPLC. The ranges of the variables temperature, ethanol content and time were 50–90 °C, 0%–30%–60% ethanol (v/v), and 10–15 min. For ethanolic extraction, optimal conditions were at 75.9 °C, 52% ethanol and 14.8 min, yielding activity of 27.05 mg GAE/g DW TPC; 115.96 mg TE/g DW in ORAC and 11.02 mg/L rosmarinic acid. For water extraction, optimal activity was achieved with extraction at 98.3 °C and 22 min, with responses of 22.3 mg GAE/g DW TPC; 81.6 mg TE/g DW in ORAC and 3.9 mg/L rosmarinic acid. The significant variables were ethanol concentration and temperature. For emulsions, the peroxide value was inhibited by 60% for 3% extract concentration; and 80% with 3% extract concentration and 0.2% of BSA. The p-anisidine value between the control and the emulsion with 3% extract was reduced to 73.6% and with BSA 86.3%, and others concentrations had similar behavior. PMID:26784875

  11. Extraction of Antioxidants from Borage (Borago officinalis L.) Leaves-Optimization by Response Surface Method and Application in Oil-in-Water Emulsions.

    PubMed

    Segovia, Francisco; Lupo, Bryshila; Peiró, Sara; Gordon, Michael H; Almajano, María Pilar

    2014-05-06

    Borage (Borago officinalis L.) is a typical Spanish plant. During processing, 60% are leaves. The aim of this work is to model and optimize the extraction of polyphenol from borage leaves using the response surface method (RSM) and to use this extract for application in emulsions. The responses were: total polyphenol content (TPC), antioxidant capacity by ORAC, and rosmarinic acid by HPLC. The ranges of the variables temperature, ethanol content and time were 50-90 °C, 0%-30%-60% ethanol (v/v), and 10-15 min. For ethanolic extraction, optimal conditions were at 75.9 °C, 52% ethanol and 14.8 min, yielding activity of 27.05 mg GAE/g DW TPC; 115.96 mg TE/g DW in ORAC and 11.02 mg/L rosmarinic acid. For water extraction, optimal activity was achieved with extraction at 98.3 °C and 22 min, with responses of 22.3 mg GAE/g DW TPC; 81.6 mg TE/g DW in ORAC and 3.9 mg/L rosmarinic acid. The significant variables were ethanol concentration and temperature. For emulsions, the peroxide value was inhibited by 60% for 3% extract concentration; and 80% with 3% extract concentration and 0.2% of BSA. The p-anisidine value between the control and the emulsion with 3% extract was reduced to 73.6% and with BSA 86.3%, and others concentrations had similar behavior.

  12. Robust optimization of well location to enhance hysteretical trapping of CO2: Assessment of various uncertainty quantification methods and utilization of mixed response surface surrogates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babaei, Masoud; Pan, Indranil; Alkhatib, Ali

    2015-12-01

    The paper aims to solve a robust optimization problem (optimization in presence of uncertainty) for finding the optimal locations of a number of CO2 injection wells for geological sequestration of carbon dioxide in a saline aquifer. The parametric uncertainties are the interfacial tension between CO2 and aquifer brine, the Land's trapping coefficient and the boundary aquifer's absolute permeability. The spatial uncertainties are due to the channelized permeability field which exhibits a binary channel-non-channel system. The objective function of the optimization is the amount of residually trapped CO2 due to the hysteresis of the relative permeability curves. A risk-averse value derived from the cumulative density function of the distribution of the amount of trapped gas is chosen as the objective function value. In order to ensure that the uncertainties are effectively taken into account, Monte Carlo simulation and Polynomial Chaos Expansion (PCE)-based methods are used and compared with each other. For different cases of parametric and spatial uncertainties, the most accurate uncertainty quantification (UQ) method is chosen to be integrated within the optimization algorithm. While for parametric uncertainty cases of up to two uncertain variables, PCE-based methods computationally outperform Monte Carlo simulations, it is shown that for the multimodal distributions of the function of trapped gas occurring for the spatial uncertainty case, Monte Carlo simulations are more reliable than PCE-based UQ methods. For the discrete (integer) optimization problem, various mixed response surface surrogate models are tested and the robust optimization resulted in optimal CO2 injection well locations.

  13. Design of responsive polymer surfaces with ultrafast response time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genzer, Jan; Ozcam, Evren; Willoughby, Julie

    2009-03-01

    Responsive surfaces with tailorable surface-reconstruction kinetics and switching hysteresis were prepared from poly(vinylmethylsiloxane) (PVMS) networks modified with thiol alkanes to provide hydrophobic or hydrophilic surface properties. The cooperative effects of polymer mobility, arising from the high flexibility of the siloxane backbone, and the enthalpic interactions between the contacting medium and the PVMS functionalized surface control the degree of responsiveness. Exposing the modified-elastomer surfaces to water resulted in rearrangement of the hydrophilic alkanes at the surface. The kinetics of reconstruction and reversibility were established by measuring the surface wettability via dynamic contact angle. By controlling the formation of semi-crystalline regions in our substrates we demonstrate either ``sluggish'' kinetics and eventual surface ``freezing'' and stability or stimuli-responsive substrates with a magnitude of change and repeated reversibility unparallel to most polymeric surfaces.

  14. Tuning a fuzzy controller using quadratic response surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schott, Brian; Whalen, Thomas

    1992-01-01

    Response surface methodology, an alternative method to traditional tuning of a fuzzy controller, is described. An example based on a simulated inverted pendulum 'plant' shows that with (only) 15 trial runs, the controller can be calibrated using a quadratic form to approximate the response surface.

  15. Evaluation, prediction and optimization the ultrasound-assisted extraction method using response surface methodology: antioxidant and biological properties of Stachys parviflora L.

    PubMed Central

    Bashi, Davoud Salar; Dowom, Samaneh Attaran; Bazzaz, Bibi Sedigheh Fazly; Khanzadeh, Farhad; Soheili, Vahid; Mohammadpour, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): To optimize the extraction method using response surface methodology, extract the phenolic compounds, and identify the antioxidant and biological properties of Stachys parviflora L. extracts. Materials and Methods: Maceration and ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) (4, 7, 10 min treatment time, 40, 70, 100 % high-intensity and 60, 80, 100 % (v v-1) methanol purity) were applied to obtain the extracts. SEM was conducted to provide the microstructure of the extracted plant. MICs (colorimetric assay), MFCs (colony diameter), total phenolic content, total flavonoid content, radical scavenging capacity and extraction efficiency were determined. HPLC analysis was applied to measure the existent phenolic compounds. Results: A quadratic model (4 min treatment time, 74.5 % high-intensity and 74.2 % solvent purity) was suggested as the best (TPC: 20.89 mg GAE g-1 d.m., TFC: 6.22 mg QEs g-1 d.m., DPPH IC50: 21.86 µg ml-1 and EE: 113.65 mg g-1 d.m.) UAE extraction model. The optimized UAE extract was generally more effective against Gram-positive microorganisms (MIC: 10-20; MBC: 10-40 (mg ml-1)) than Gram-negative ones (MIC: 40; MBC: >40 (mg ml-1)). Moreover, it (MGI: 2.32-100 %) revealed more anti-mold activity than maceration (MGI: <28.77 %). Explosive disruption of the cell walls, therefore, enhanced extraction yield by acoustic cavitation, was elucidated using SEM. Caffeic acid, tannic acid, quercetin, trans ferulic acid and rosmarinic acid were determined as the phenolic compounds in the optimized extract. Conclusion: RSM optimization was successfully applied for UAE from S. parviflora. The considerable antioxidant and biological properties were attributed to the phenolic compounds. PMID:27403260

  16. Method for measuring surface temperature

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Gary A.; Baker, Sheila N.; McCleskey, T. Mark

    2009-07-28

    The present invention relates to a method for measuring a surface temperature using is a fluorescent temperature sensor or optical thermometer. The sensor includes a solution of 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane within a 1-butyl-1-1-methyl pyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ionic liquid solvent. The 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane remains unassociated when in the ground state while in solution. When subjected to UV light, an excited state is produced that exists in equilibrium with an excimer. The position of the equilibrium between the two excited states is temperature dependent.

  17. Method of surface preparation of niobium

    DOEpatents

    Srinivasan-Rao, Triveni; Schill, John F.

    2003-01-01

    The present invention is for a method of preparing a surface of niobium. The preparation method includes polishing, cleaning, baking and irradiating the niobium surface whereby the resulting niobium surface has a high quantum efficiency.

  18. Development of Biomimetic and Functionally Responsive Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anastasiadis, Spiros H.

    2010-03-01

    Controlling the surface morphology of solids and manufacturing of functional surfaces with special responsive properties has been the subject of intense research. We report a methodology for creating multifunctionally responsive surfaces by irradiating silicon wafers with femtosecond laser pulses and subsequently coating them with different types of functional conformal coatings. Such surfaces exhibit controlled dual-scale roughness at the micro- and the nano-scale, which mimics the hierarchical morphology of water repellent natural surfaces. When a simple alkylsilane coating is utilized, highly water repellent surfaces are produced that quantitatively compare to those of the Lotus leaf. When a polymer brush is ``grafted from" these surfaces based on a pH-sensitive polymer, the surfaces can alter their behavior from super-hydrophilic (after immersion in a low pH buffer) to super-hydrophobic and water-repellent (following immersion to a high pH buffer). We quantify the water repellency of such responsive systems by drop elasticity measurements whereas we demonstrate that the water repellent state of such surface requires appropriate hydrophobicity of the functionalizing polymer. When a photo-responsive azobenzene-type polymer is deposited, a dynamic optical control of the wetting properties is obtained and the surface can be switched from super-hydrophilic (following UV irradiation) to hydrophobic (following green irradiation). In all the above cases we show that the principal effect of roughness is to cause amplification of the response to the different external stimuli.

  19. A case study on optimization of biomass flow during single screw extrusion cooking using Genetic Algorithm (GA) and Response Surface Method (RSM)

    SciTech Connect

    Tumuluru, J.S.; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine

    2008-12-01

    Abstract In the present study, response surface method (RSM) and genetic algorithm (GA) were used to study the effects of process variables like screw speed, rpm (x1), L/D ratio (x2), barrel temperature ( C; x3), and feed mix moisture content (%; x4), on flow rate of biomass during single-screw extrusion cooking. A second-order regression equation was developed for flow rate in terms of the process variables. The significance of the process variables based on Pareto chart indicated that screw speed and feed mix moisture content had the most influence followed by L/D ratio and barrel temperature on the flow rate. RSM analysis indicated that a screw speed>80 rpm, L/D ratio> 12, barrel temperature>80 C, and feed mix moisture content>20% resulted in maximum flow rate. Increase in screw speed and L/D ratio increased the drag flow and also the path of traverse of the feed mix inside the extruder resulting in more shear. The presence of lipids of about 35% in the biomass feed mix might have induced a lubrication effect and has significantly influenced the flow rate. The second-order regression equations were further used as the objective function for optimization using genetic algorithm. A population of 100 and iterations of 100 have successfully led to convergence the optimum. The maximum and minimum flow rates obtained using GA were 13.19 10 7 m3/s (x1=139.08 rpm, x2=15.90, x3=99.56 C, and x4=59.72%) and 0.53 10 7 m3/s (x1=59.65 rpm, x2= 11.93, x3=68.98 C, and x4=20.04%).

  20. Environmental responses of solar reflective surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouquet, F. L.

    1983-01-01

    An assessment is undertaken of the environmental responses of solar reflective surfaces, with emphasis on dish-type concentrator surfaces exposed to the conditions of Southern California. A generalized mathematical model for specific solar reflective surfaces can be formulated on the basis of either experimental or assumed site degradation/corrosion data. In addition, the fabrication parameters of a parabolic reflecting surface and its substrate can be used to model combined reflective characteristics for the postulated environmental conditions.

  1. Surface decontamination compositions and methods

    DOEpatents

    Wright; Karen E.; Cooper, David C.; Peterman, Dean R.; Demmer, Ricky L.; Tripp, Julia L.; Hull, Laurence C.

    2011-03-29

    Clay-based compositions capable of absorbing contaminants from surfaces or objects having surface faces may be applied to a surface and later removed, the removed clay-based compositions absorbing at least a portion of the contaminant from the surface or object to which it was applied.

  2. Bioadhesion to model thermally responsive surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrzejewski, Brett Paul

    contrast possessed no adhesion to the pure component C11EG6OH SAM at both temperatures examined, 25 and 40°C. The protein adhesion data to the mixed SAM also supports the hypothesis that the mixed SAM displays a non-fouling molecular conformation at 25°C whereas it displays a dominantly fouling molecular conformation at 40°C. Advancing contact angles obtained through tensiometry were used to find the surface free energy of the mixed SAM before and after the thermal response using the van Oss-Good-Chaudhury method. The surface tension values obtained, 42 and 38 mN/m for 22 and 40°C, respectively, are not dissimilar enough with regard to error to make conclusions. In a similar manner, the surface free energy of another mixed SAM composed of alkyl and trimethylamine thiolates was also calculated. PNIPAAm brushes grown on a silicon substrate by atom-transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) were imaged by AFM and characterized by XPS. The height of the resulting brushes could be controlled from ˜5 to 55 nm by reaction time. A thermal response was observed for polymer brushes with a length greater than 20 nm. For polymer brush lengths greater than 20 nm, the static contact angle at 22°C was 35° and varied from 60 to 80° at 40°C. The thermal response was also observed using the captive bubble method. Force-distance curves of the PNIPAAm brushes were taken with an unmodified silicon nitride AFM cantilever at incremental temperature steps. At room temperature the force-distance data was fit to the Alexander-de Gennes model resulting in a hydrated polymer length of 235 nm. The Young's modulus was calculated using the Hertz model and changed from ˜80 MPa at 26°C to ˜350 MPa at 40°C. The solvent condition of the Alexander-de Gennes model was set to the case of good solvent and showed close match to the force-distance data at 26°C. The match was not as close when the solvent condition was set to theta solvent condition and compared to the force-distance data at 40

  3. Controlled surface chemistries and quantitative cell response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plant, Anne L.

    2002-03-01

    Living cells experience a large number of signaling cues from their extracellular matrix. As a result of these inputs, a variety of intracellular signaling pathways are apparently initiated simultaneously. The vast array of alternative responses that result from the integration of these inputs suggests that it may be reasonable to look for cellular response not as an 'on' or 'off' condition but as a distribution of responses. A difficult challenge is to determine whether variations in responses from individual cells arise from the complexity of intracellular signals or are due to variations in the cell culture environment. By controlling surface chemistry so that every cell 'sees' the same chemical and physical environment, we can begin to assess how the distribution of cell response is affected strictly by changes in the chemistry of the cell culture surface. Using the gene for green fluorescent protein linked to the gene for the promoter of the extracellular matrix protein, tenascin, we can easily probe the end product in a signaling pathway that is purported to be linked to surface protein chemistry and to cell shape. Cell response to well-controlled, well-characterized, and highly reproducible surfaces prepared using soft lithography techniques are compared with more conventional ways of preparing extracellular matrix proteins for cell culture. Using fluorescence microscopy and image analysis of populations of cells on these surfaces, we probe quantitatively the relationship between surface chemistry, cell shape and variations in gene expression endpoint.

  4. Response Surface Modeling Using Multivariate Orthogonal Functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.; DeLoach, Richard

    2001-01-01

    A nonlinear modeling technique was used to characterize response surfaces for non-dimensional longitudinal aerodynamic force and moment coefficients, based on wind tunnel data from a commercial jet transport model. Data were collected using two experimental procedures - one based on modem design of experiments (MDOE), and one using a classical one factor at a time (OFAT) approach. The nonlinear modeling technique used multivariate orthogonal functions generated from the independent variable data as modeling functions in a least squares context to characterize the response surfaces. Model terms were selected automatically using a prediction error metric. Prediction error bounds computed from the modeling data alone were found to be- a good measure of actual prediction error for prediction points within the inference space. Root-mean-square model fit error and prediction error were less than 4 percent of the mean response value in all cases. Efficacy and prediction performance of the response surface models identified from both MDOE and OFAT experiments were investigated.

  5. Autonomous Aerobraking Using Thermal Response Surface Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prince, Jill L.; Dec, John A.; Tolson, Robert H.

    2007-01-01

    Aerobraking is a proven method of significantly increasing the science payload that can be placed into low Mars orbits when compared to an all propulsive capture. However, the aerobraking phase is long and has mission cost and risk implications. The main cost benefit is that aerobraking permits the use of a smaller and cheaper launch vehicle, but additional operational costs are incurred during the long aerobraking phase. Risk is increased due to the repeated thermal loading of spacecraft components and the multiple attitude and propulsive maneuvers required for successful aerobraking. Both the cost and risk burdens can be significantly reduced by automating the aerobraking operations phase. All of the previous Mars orbiter missions that have utilized aerobraking have increasingly relied on onboard calculations during aerobraking. Even though the temperature of spacecraft components has been the limiting factor, operational methods have relied on using a surrogate variable for mission control. This paper describes several methods, based directly on spacecraft component maximum temperature, for autonomously predicting the subsequent aerobraking orbits and prescribing apoapsis propulsive maneuvers to maintain the spacecraft within specified temperature limits. Specifically, this paper describes the use of thermal response surface analysis in predicting the temperature of the spacecraft components and the corresponding uncertainty in this temperature prediction.

  6. Surface property detection apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Martens, Jon S.; Ginley, David S.; Hietala, Vincent M.; Sorensen, Neil R.

    1995-01-01

    Apparatus and method for detecting, determining, and imaging surface resistance corrosion, thin film growth, and oxide formation on the surface of conductors or other electrical surface modification. The invention comprises a modified confocal resonator structure with the sample remote from the radiating mirror. Surface resistance is determined by analyzing and imaging reflected microwaves; imaging reveals anomalies due to surface impurities, non-stoichiometry, and the like, in the surface of the superconductor, conductor, dielectric, or semiconductor.

  7. Surface property detection apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Martens, J.S.; Ginley, D.S.; Hietala, V.M.; Sorensen, N.R.

    1995-08-08

    Apparatus and method for detecting, determining, and imaging surface resistance corrosion, thin film growth, and oxide formation on the surface of conductors or other electrical surface modification. The invention comprises a modified confocal resonator structure with the sample remote from the radiating mirror. Surface resistance is determined by analyzing and imaging reflected microwaves; imaging reveals anomalies due to surface impurities, non-stoichiometry, and the like, in the surface of the superconductor, conductor, dielectric, or semiconductor. 4 figs.

  8. Dynamic bioactive stimuli-responsive polymeric surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, Heather Marie

    This dissertation focuses on the design, synthesis, and development of antimicrobial and anticoagulant surfaces of polyethylene (PE), polypropylene (PP), and poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) polymers. Aliphatic polymeric surfaces of PE and PP polymers functionalized using click chemistry reactions by the attachment of --COOH groups via microwave plasma reactions followed by functionalization with alkyne moieties. Azide containing ampicillin (AMP) was synthesized and subsequently clicked into the alkyne prepared PE and PP surfaces. Compared to non-functionalized PP and PE surfaces, the AMP clicked surfaces exhibited substantially enhanced antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. To expand the biocompatibility of polymeric surface anticoagulant attributes, PE and PTFE surfaces were functionalized with pH-responsive poly(2-vinyl pyridine) (P2VP) and poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) polyelectrolyte tethers terminated with NH2 and COOH groups. The goal of these studies was to develop switchable stimuli-responsive polymeric surfaces that interact with biological environments and display simultaneous antimicrobial and anticoagulant properties. Antimicrobial AMP was covalently attached to --COOH terminal ends of protected PAA, while anticoagulant heparin (HEP) was attached to terminal --NH2 groups of P2VP. When pH < 2.3, the P2VP segments are protonated and extend, but for pH > 5.5, they collapse while the PAA segments extend. Such surfaces, when exposed to Staphylococcus aureus, inhibit bacterial growth due to the presence of AMP, as well as are effective anticoagulants due to the presence of covalently attached HEP. Comparison of these "dynamic" pH responsive surfaces with "static" surfaces terminated with AMP entities show significant enhancement of longevity and surface activity against microbial film formation. The last portion of this dissertation focuses on the covalent attachment of living T1 and Φ11 bacteriophages (phages) on PE and PTFE surface

  9. METHOD OF CLEANING METAL SURFACES

    DOEpatents

    Winkler, H.W.; Morfitt, J.W.; Little, T.H.

    1959-05-19

    Cleaning fluids for removing deposits from metal surfaces are described. The cleaning agents of the invention consist of aqueous nitric acid and an amhydrous nitrate salt of a metal which is lower in the electromotive series than the element of the deposit to be removed. In general, the salt content of thc cleaning agents ranged from 10 to 90%, preferably from 10 to 40% by weight; and the balance of the composition comprises nitric acid of any strength from extremely dilute up to concentrated strength.

  10. Dispersive nano solid material-ultrasound assisted microextraction as a novel method for extraction and determination of bendiocarb and promecarb: response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Khodadoust, S; Ghaedi, M; Hadjmohammadi, M R

    2013-11-15

    A new extraction method, based on Dispersive Nano-Solid material-Ultrasound Assisted Micro-Extraction (DNSUAME), was used for the preconcentration of the bendiocarb and promecarb pesticides in the water samples prior to high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The properties of NiZnS nanomaterial loaded on activated carbon (NiZnS-AC) are characterized by FT-IR, TEM, and BET. This novel nanomaterial showed great adsorptive ability towards the bendiocarb and promecarb pesticides. The effective variables such as the amount of adsorbent (mg: NiZnS-AC), the pH and ionic strength of sample solution, the vortex and ultrasonic time (min), the ultrasonic temperature (°C), and desorption volume (mL) are investigated by screening 2(7-4) experiments of Plackett-Burman (PB) design. The important variables optimized by using a central composite design (CCD) were combined by a desirability function (DF). At optimum conditions, the method has linear response over 0.0033-10 µg mL(-1) with detection limit between 0.0010 and 0.0015 µg mL(-1) with relative standard deviations (RSDs) less than 5.5% (n=3). The method has been successfully applied for the determination of the bendiocarb and promecarb pesticides in the water samples.

  11. Characterization and fatty acid profiling in two fresh water microalgae for biodiesel production: Lipid enhancement methods and media optimization using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Karpagam, Rathinasamy; Raj, Kalimuthu Jawahar; Ashokkumar, Balasubramaniem; Varalakshmi, Perumal

    2015-01-01

    Two fresh water microalgae, Coelastrella sp. M-60 and Micractinium sp. M-13 were investigated in this study for their potential of biodiesel production. For increasing biomass and lipid production, these microalgae were subjected to nutrient starvation (nitrogen, phosphorous, iron), salinity stress and nutrient supplementation with sugarcane industry effluent, citric acid, glucose and vitamin B12. The lipid productivity obtained from the isolates Coelastrella sp. M-60 (13.9 ± 0.4 mg/L/day) and Micractinium sp. M-13 (11.1 ± 0.2 mg/L/day) was maximum in salinity stress. The media supplemented with all the four nutrients yielded higher lipid productivity than the control. The response surface methodology (RSM) was employed to evaluate the effect of sugarcane industry effluent and citric acid on growth and lipid yield. Fatty acid profile of Coelastrella sp. M-60 and Micractinium sp. M-13 were composed of C-14, C-16:0, C-18:0, C-18:1 and C-18:2 and their fuel properties were also in accordance with international standards.

  12. Optimization of inactivation of endospores of Bacillus cereus by antimicrobial lipopeptides from Bacillus subtilis fmbj strains using a response surface method.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xianqing; Lu, Zhaoxin; Bie, Xiaomei; Lü, FengXia; Zhao, Haizhen; Yang, Shujing

    2007-02-01

    Bacillus subtilis fmbj can produce a lipopeptide antimicrobial substance, the main components of which are surfactin and fengycin. In this paper, the sensitivity of Bacillus cereus to antimicrobial lipopeptides from B. subtilis fmbj was observed, and the effect of the microstructure of antimicrobial lipopeptide on spores of B. cereus was investigated. At the same time, the optimization of the inactivation of antimicrobial lipopeptides to spores of B. cereus by a response surface methodology was studied. Results showed that B. cereus had high sensitivity to it, whose minimal inhibitory concentration was 156.25 microg/ml. It could result in the death of spores by destroying the structure of resting spores and sprouting spores, as was observed by transmission electron microscopy. The optimization result indicated that spores of B. cereus could be inactivated by 2 orders of magnitude when the temperature was 29.6 degrees C, the action time was 7.6 h, and the concentration was 3.46 mg.ml(-1).

  13. Method for improving instrument response

    DOEpatents

    Hahn, David W.; Hencken, Kenneth R.; Johnsen, Howard A.; Flower, William L.

    2000-01-01

    This invention pertains generally to a method for improving the accuracy of particle analysis under conditions of discrete particle loading and particularly to a method for improving signal-to-noise ratio and instrument response in laser spark spectroscopic analysis of particulate emissions. Under conditions of low particle density loading (particles/m.sup.3) resulting from low overall metal concentrations and/or large particle size uniform sampling can not be guaranteed. The present invention discloses a technique for separating laser sparks that arise from sample particles from those that do not; that is, a process for systematically "gating" the instrument response arising from "sampled" particles from those responses which do not, is dislosed as a solution to his problem. The disclosed approach is based on random sampling combined with a conditional analysis of each pulse. A threshold value is determined for the ratio of the intensity of a spectral line for a given element to a baseline region. If the threshold value is exceeded, the pulse is classified as a "hit" and that data is collected and an average spectrum is generated from an arithmetic average of "hits". The true metal concentration is determined from the averaged spectrum.

  14. Method for decontamination of radioactive metal surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Bray, L.A.

    1996-08-13

    Disclosed is a method for removing radioactive contaminants from metal surfaces by applying steam containing an inorganic acid and cerium IV. Cerium IV is applied to contaminated metal surfaces by introducing cerium IV in solution into a steam spray directed at contaminated metal surfaces. Cerium IV solution is converted to an essentially atomized or vapor phase by the steam.

  15. Method for decontamination of radioactive metal surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Bray, Lane A.

    1996-01-01

    Disclosed is a method for removing radioactive contaminants from metal surfaces by applying steam containing an inorganic acid and cerium IV. Cerium IV is applied to contaminated metal surfaces by introducing cerium IV in solution into a steam spray directed at contaminated metal surfaces. Cerium IV solution is converted to an essentially atomized or vapor phase by the steam.

  16. Methods of forming hardened surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Branagan, Daniel J.

    2004-07-27

    The invention encompasses a method of forming a metallic coating. A metallic glass coating is formed over a metallic substrate. After formation of the coating, at least a portion of the metallic glass can be converted into a crystalline material having a nanocrystalline grain size. The invention also encompasses metallic coatings comprising metallic glass. Additionally, the invention encompasses metallic coatings comprising crystalline metallic material, with at least some of the crystalline metallic material having a nanocrystalline grain size.

  17. Correlation studies on surface particle detection methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Ronald V.; White, James C.

    1988-01-01

    The accurate determination of dust levels on optical surfaces is necessary to assess sensor system performance. A comparison study was made on several particle measurement methods including those based on direct imaging and light scattering. The effectiveness of removing the particles from the surface prior to determining particle size distributions was also assessed. These studies revealed that some methods, especially those requiring particle removal before analysis, are subject to large systematic errors affecting particle size distributions. Thus, an understanding of the particle measurement methods employed is necessary before any surface cleanliness or obstruction value assignments are accepted as true representations of an optical surface contamination condition.

  18. Method for producing highly reflective metal surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, J.B.; Steger, P.J.; Wright, R.R.

    1982-03-04

    The invention is a novel method for producing mirror surfaces which are extremely smooth and which have high optical reflectivity. The method includes depositing, by electrolysis, an amorphous layer of nickel on an article and then diamond-machining the resulting nickel surface to increase its smoothness and reflectivity. The machined nickel surface then is passivated with respect to the formation of bonds with electrodeposited nickel. Nickel then is electrodeposited on the passivated surface to form a layer of electroplated nickel whose inside surface is a replica of the passivated surface. The mandrel then may be-re-passivated and provided with a layer of electrodeposited nickel, which is then recovered from the mandrel providing a second replica. The mandrel can be so re-used to provide many such replicas. As compared with producing each mirror-finished article by plating and diamond-machining, the new method is faster and less expensive.

  19. Response Surface Model Building Using Orthogonal Arrays for Computer Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unal, Resit; Braun, Robert D.; Moore, Arlene A.; Lepsch, Roger A.

    1997-01-01

    This study investigates response surface methods for computer experiments and discusses some of the approaches available. Orthogonal arrays constructed for computer experiments are studied and an example application to a technology selection and optimization study for a reusable launch vehicle is presented.

  20. Acoustic microscope surface inspection system and method

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, B.T.; Parent, P.; Reinholdtsen, P.A.

    1991-02-26

    An acoustic microscope surface inspection system and method are described in which pulses of high frequency electrical energy are applied to a transducer which forms and focuses acoustic energy onto a selected location on the surface of an object and receives energy from the location and generates electrical pulses. The phase of the high frequency electrical signal pulses are stepped with respect to the phase of a reference signal at said location. An output signal is generated which is indicative of the surface of said selected location. The object is scanned to provide output signals representative of the surface at a plurality of surface locations. 7 figures.

  1. Acoustic microscope surface inspection system and method

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.; Parent, Philippe; Reinholdtsen, Paul A.

    1991-01-01

    An acoustic microscope surface inspection system and method in which pulses of high frequency electrical energy are applied to a transducer which forms and focuses acoustic energy onto a selected location on the surface of an object and receives energy from the location and generates electrical pulses. The phase of the high frequency electrical signal pulses are stepped with respected to the phase of a reference signal at said location. An output signal is generated which is indicative of the surface of said selected location. The object is scanned to provide output signals representative of the surface at a plurality of surface locations.

  2. Multivariate optimization and validation of a capillary electrophoresis method for the simultaneous determination of dextromethorphan hydrobromur, phenylephrine hydrochloride, paracetamol and chlorpheniramine maleate in a pharmaceutical preparation using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Palabiyik, I Murat; Onur, Feyyaz

    2010-01-01

    A fast, accurate, precise and sensitive capillary electrophoresis method for the simultaneous determination of dextromethorphan hydrobromide, phenylephrine hydrochloride, paracetamol and chlorpheniramine maleate has been developed. Response surface methodology with a central composite design was used for optimization of the concentration of the buffer, pH of the buffer and applied voltage. Therefore, working with Na(2)HPO(4) buffer (pH 8.00, 0.01 M) at 20 kV as an applied voltage in the capillary electrophoresis method were found to be suitable; under these optimal conditions, these four active ingredients were separated in about 7 min. This developed method was validated and successfully applied to a pharmaceutical preparation, sugar-coated tablet, and the results were compared with a high-performance liquid chromatographic method developed by us.

  3. Response Ant Colony Optimization of End Milling Surface Roughness

    PubMed Central

    Kadirgama, K.; Noor, M. M.; Abd Alla, Ahmed N.

    2010-01-01

    Metal cutting processes are important due to increased consumer demands for quality metal cutting related products (more precise tolerances and better product surface roughness) that has driven the metal cutting industry to continuously improve quality control of metal cutting processes. This paper presents optimum surface roughness by using milling mould aluminium alloys (AA6061-T6) with Response Ant Colony Optimization (RACO). The approach is based on Response Surface Method (RSM) and Ant Colony Optimization (ACO). The main objectives to find the optimized parameters and the most dominant variables (cutting speed, feedrate, axial depth and radial depth). The first order model indicates that the feedrate is the most significant factor affecting surface roughness. PMID:22294914

  4. Method for producing smooth inner surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, Charles A.

    2016-05-17

    The invention provides a method for preparing superconducting cavities, the method comprising causing polishing media to tumble by centrifugal barrel polishing within the cavities for a time sufficient to attain a surface smoothness of less than 15 nm root mean square roughness over approximately a 1 mm.sup.2 scan area. The method also provides for a method for preparing superconducting cavities, the method comprising causing polishing media bound to a carrier to tumble within the cavities. The method also provides for a method for preparing superconducting cavities, the method comprising causing polishing media in a slurry to tumble within the cavities.

  5. Response mechanism for surface acoustic wave gas sensors based on surface-adsorption.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiansheng; Lu, Yanyan

    2014-04-16

    A theoretical model is established to describe the response mechanism of surface acoustic wave (SAW) gas sensors based on physical adsorption on the detector surface. Wohljent's method is utilized to describe the relationship of sensor output (frequency shift of SAW oscillator) and the mass loaded on the detector surface. The Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) formula and its improved form are introduced to depict the adsorption behavior of gas on the detector surface. By combining the two methods, we obtain a theoretical model for the response mechanism of SAW gas sensors. By using a commercial SAW gas chromatography (GC) analyzer, an experiment is performed to measure the frequency shifts caused by different concentration of dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP). The parameters in the model are given by fitting the experimental results and the theoretical curve agrees well with the experimental data.

  6. METHOD OF COATING SURFACES WITH BORON

    DOEpatents

    Martin, G.R.

    1949-10-11

    A method of forming a thin coating of boron on metallic, glass, or other surfaces is described. The method comprises heating the article to be coated to a temperature of about 550 d C in an evacuated chamber and passing trimethyl boron, triethyl boron, or tripropyl boron in the vapor phase and under reduced pressure into contact with the heated surface causing boron to be deposited in a thin film.

  7. Method of generating a surface mesh

    DOEpatents

    Shepherd, Jason F.; Benzley, Steven; Grover, Benjamin T.

    2008-03-04

    A method and machine-readable medium provide a technique to generate and modify a quadrilateral finite element surface mesh using dual creation and modification. After generating a dual of a surface (mesh), a predetermined algorithm may be followed to generate and modify a surface mesh of quadrilateral elements. The predetermined algorithm may include the steps of generating two-dimensional cell regions in dual space, determining existing nodes in primal space, generating new nodes in the dual space, and connecting nodes to form the quadrilateral elements (faces) for the generated and modifiable surface mesh.

  8. Method for Surface Texturing Titanium Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    The present invention teaches a method of producing a textured surface upon an arbitrarily configured titanium or titanium alloy object for the purpose of improving bonding between the object and other materials such as polymer matrix composites and/or human bone for the direct in-growth of orthopaedic implants. The titanium or titanium alloy object is placed in an electrolytic cell having an ultrasonically agitated solution of sodium chloride therein whereby a pattern of uniform "pock mark" like pores or cavities are produced upon the object's surface. The process is very cost effective compared to other methods of producing rough surfaces on titanium and titanium alloy components. The surface textures produced by the present invention are etched directly into the parent metal at discrete sites separated by areas unaffected by the etching process. Bonding materials to such surface textures on titanium or titanium alloy can thus support a shear load even if adhesion of the bonding material is poor.

  9. Bone tissue response to plasma-nitrided titanium implant surfaces

    PubMed Central

    FERRAZ, Emanuela Prado; SVERZUT, Alexander Tadeu; FREITAS, Gileade Pereira; SÁ, Juliana Carvalho; ALVES, Clodomiro; BELOTI, Marcio Mateus; ROSA, Adalberto Luiz

    2015-01-01

    A current goal of dental implant research is the development of titanium (Ti) surfaces to improve osseointegration. Plasma nitriding treatments generate surfaces that favor osteoblast differentiation, a key event to the process of osteogenesis. Based on this, it is possible to hypothesize that plasma-nitrided Ti implants may positively impact osseointegration. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vivo bone response to Ti surfaces modified by plasma-nitriding treatments. Material and Methods Surface treatments consisted of 20% N2 and 80% H2, 450°C and 1.5 mbar during 1 h for planar and 3 h for hollow cathode. Untreated surface was used as control. Ten implants of each surface were placed into rabbit tibiae and 6 weeks post-implantation they were harvested for histological and histomorphometric analyses. Results Bone formation was observed in contact with all implants without statistically significant differences among the evaluated surfaces in terms of bone-to-implant contact, bone area between threads, and bone area within the mirror area. Conclusion Our results indicate that plasma nitriding treatments generate Ti implants that induce similar bone response to the untreated ones. Thus, as these treatments improve the physico-chemical properties of Ti without affecting its biocompatibility, they could be combined with modifications that favor bone formation in order to develop new implant surfaces. PMID:25760262

  10. Method for producing highly reflective metal surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Jones B.; Steger, Philip J.; Wright, Ralph R.

    1983-01-01

    The invention is a novel method for producing mirror surfaces which are extremely smooth and which have high optical reflectivity. The method includes electrolessly depositing an amorphous layer of nickel on an article and then diamond-machining the resulting nickel surface to increase its smoothness and reflectivity. The machined nickel surface then is passivated with respect to the formation of bonds with electrodeposited nickel. Nickel then is electrodeposited on the passivated surface to form a layer of electroplated nickel whose inside surface is a replica of the passivated surface. The electroplated nickel layer then is separated from the passivated surface. The mandrel then may be re-passivated and provided with a layer of electrodeposited nickel, which is then recovered from the mandrel providing a second replica. The mandrel can be so re-used to provide many such replicas. As compared with producing each mirror-finished article by plating and diamond-machining, the new method is faster and less expensive.

  11. Investigation of hybrid plasma-catalytic removal of acetone over CuO/γ-Al2O3 catalysts using response surface method.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xinbo; Tu, Xin; Mei, Danhua; Zheng, Chenghang; Zhou, Jinsong; Gao, Xiang; Luo, Zhongyang; Ni, Mingjiang; Cen, Kefa

    2016-07-01

    In this work, plasma-catalytic removal of low concentrations of acetone over CuO/γ-Al2O3 catalysts was carried out in a cylindrical dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) reactor. The combination of plasma and the CuO/γ-Al2O3 catalysts significantly enhanced the removal efficiency of acetone compared to the plasma process using the pure γ-Al2O3 support, with the 5.0 wt% CuO/γ-Al2O3 catalyst exhibiting the best acetone removal efficiency of 67.9%. Catalyst characterization was carried out to understand the effect the catalyst properties had on the activity of the CuO/γ-Al2O3 catalysts in the plasma-catalytic reaction. The results indicated that the formation of surface oxygen species on the surface of the catalysts was crucial for the oxidation of acetone in the plasma-catalytic reaction. The effects that various operating parameters (discharge power, flow rate and initial concentration of acetone) and the interactions between these parameters had on the performance of the plasma-catalytic removal of acetone over the 5.0 wt% CuO/γ-Al2O3 catalyst were investigated using central composite design (CCD). The significance of the independent variables and their interactions were evaluated by means of the Analysis of Variance (ANOVA). The results showed that the gas flow rate was the most significant factor affecting the removal efficiency of acetone, whilst the initial concentration of acetone played the most important role in determining the energy efficiency of the plasma-catalytic process.

  12. Evaluation of Alternate Surface Passivation Methods (U)

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, E

    2005-05-31

    Stainless steel containers were assembled from parts passivated by four commercial vendors using three passivation methods. The performance of these containers in storing hydrogen isotope mixtures was evaluated by monitoring the composition of initially 50% H{sub 2} 50% D{sub 2} gas with time using mass spectroscopy. Commercial passivation by electropolishing appears to result in surfaces that do not catalyze hydrogen isotope exchange. This method of surface passivation shows promise for tritium service, and should be studied further and considered for use. On the other hand, nitric acid passivation and citric acid passivation may not result in surfaces that do not catalyze the isotope exchange reaction H{sub 2} + D{sub 2} {yields} 2HD. These methods should not be considered to replace the proprietary passivation processes of the two current vendors used at the Savannah River Site Tritium Facility.

  13. Hydrophilic-oleophobic stimuli-responsive materials and surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howarter, John A.

    Due to their high surface energy, hydrophilic surfaces are susceptible to contamination which is difficult to remove and often ruins the surface. Hydrophilic-oleophobic coatings have a diverse engineering potential including applications as self-cleaning surfaces, extended life anti-fog coatings, and environmental remediation in the selective filtration of oil-in-water mixtures. A successful design model for hydrophilic-oleophobic behavior has been developed using perfluorinated surfactants covalently bound to a surface. Within this design model, a variety of materials have been explored which the surfactants are covalently bound to a substrate; similarly, the surfactants may also be incorporated as a monomer into bulk copolymers. Surfactant based surfaces exhibited simultaneous hydrophilicity, necessary for anti-fogging, and oleophobicity, necessary for contamination resistance. The combination of these features rendered the surface as self-cleaning. Surfactant based brushes, composed of polyethylene glycol and perfluorinated constituents were grafted on to silica surfaces. The relationship between brush density and stimuli-responsiveness was determined by varying grafting conditions. The resultant surfaces were characterized with respect to chemical composition, brush thickness, and wetting behavior of water and hexadecane. Optimized surfaces exhibited stimuli-responsive behavior such that the surfaces will be wetted by water but not by oil. Surfactants were incorporated into random copolymers to create self-cleaning polymers which could be easily coated on to surfaces post-synthesis. Acrylic acid, methyl methacrylate, and hydroxyethyl methacrylate were used as comonomers; feed ratio was varied to establish compositional limits of stimuli-responsive behavior. Polymer composition dictated coating durability and self-cleaning performance as determined by water and hexadecane contact angle. The ability of select coatings to mitigate fogging was assessed in two

  14. Optimization of Streptomyces peucetius var. caesius N47 cultivation and epsilon-rhodomycinone production using experimental designs and response surface methods.

    PubMed

    Kiviharju, K; Leisola, M; Eerikäinen, T

    2004-11-01

    Streptomyces peucetius var. caesius is an aerobic bacterium that produces doxorubicin as a secondary metabolite. A mixture design was applied for the screening of suitable complex medium components in the cultivation of S. peucetius var. caesius N47, which is an epsilon-rhodomycinone-accumulating mutant strain. epsilon-Rhodomycinone is a non-glycosylated precursor of doxorubicin. Best growth results were obtained with soy peptone and beef extract. A central composite face-centered (CCF) experimental design was constructed for the investigation of pH, temperature and dissolved oxygen (DO) effects on the cultivation growth phase. Another CCF was applied to the production phase to investigate the effects of aeration, pH, temperature and stirring rate on epsilon-rhodomycinone production. An increase in cultivation temperature increased both cell growth and glucose consumption rate. Best epsilon-rhodomycinone productivities were obtained in temperatures around 30 degrees C. DO control increased all growth phase responses, but aeration in the production phase coupled with pH decrease resulted in rapid epsilon-rhodomycinone decay in the medium. In non-aerated production phases a pH change resulted in better productivity than in experiments without pH change. A pH increase with a temperature decrease seemed most beneficial for productivity. This implies that dynamic control strategies in batch production of epsilon-rhodomycinone could increase the overall process productivity.

  15. Response Predicting LTCC Firing Shrinkage: A Response Surface Analysis Study

    SciTech Connect

    Girardi, Michael; Barner, Gregg; Lopez, Cristie; Duncan, Brent; Zawicki, Larry

    2009-02-25

    The Low Temperature Cofired Ceramic (LTCC) technology is used in a variety of applications including military/space electronics, wireless communication, MEMS, medical and automotive electronics. The use of LTCC is growing due to the low cost of investment, short development time, good electrical and mechanical properties, high reliability, and flexibility in design integration (3 dimensional (3D) microstructures with cavities are possible)). The dimensional accuracy of the resulting x/y shrinkage of LTCC substrates is responsible for component assembly problems with the tolerance effect that increases in relation to the substrate size. Response Surface Analysis was used to predict product shrinkage based on specific process inputs (metal loading, layer count, lamination pressure, and tape thickness) with the ultimate goal to optimize manufacturing outputs (NC files, stencils, and screens) in achieving the final product design the first time. Three (3) regression models were developed for the DuPont 951 tape system with DuPont 5734 gold metallization based on green tape thickness.

  16. Method of boronizing transition metal surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Koyama, Koichiro; Shimotake, Hiroshi

    1983-01-01

    A method is presented for preparing a boride layer on a transition metal substrate for use in corrosive environments or as a harden surface in machine applications. This method is particularly useful in treating current collectors for use within a high temperature and corrosive electrochemical cell environment. A melt of a alkali metal boride tetrafluoride salt including such as KF to lower its melting point is prepared including a dissolved boron containing material, for instance NiB, MnB.sub.2, or CrB.sub.2. A transition metal to be coated is immersed in the melt at a temperature of no more than 700.degree. C. and a surface boride layer of that transition metal is formed within a period of about 24 hours on the substrate surface.

  17. Method of boronizing transition metal surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Koyama, Koichiro; Shimotake, Hiroshi.

    1983-08-16

    A method is presented for preparing a boride layer on a transition metal substrate for use in corrosive environments or as a harden surface in machine applications. This method is particularly useful in treating current collectors for use within a high temperature and corrosive electrochemical cell environment. A melt of a alkali metal boride tetrafluoride salt including such as KF to lower its melting point is prepared including a dissolved boron containing material, for instance NiB, MnB[sub 2], or CrB[sub 2]. A transition metal to be coated is immersed in the melt at a temperature of no more than 700 C and a surface boride layer of that transition metal is formed within a period of about 24 hours on the substrate surface. 4 figs.

  18. Comparison of Transmission Line Methods for Surface Acoustic Wave Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, William; Atkinson, Gary

    2009-01-01

    Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) technology is low cost, rugged, lightweight, extremely low power and can be used to develop passive wireless sensors. For these reasons, NASA is investigating the use of SAW technology for Integrated Vehicle Health Monitoring (IVHM) of aerospace structures. To facilitate rapid prototyping of passive SAW sensors for aerospace applications, SAW models have been developed. This paper reports on the comparison of three methods of modeling SAWs. The three models are the Impulse Response Method (a first order model), and two second order matrix methods; the conventional matrix approach, and a modified matrix approach that is extended to include internal finger reflections. The second order models are based upon matrices that were originally developed for analyzing microwave circuits using transmission line theory. Results from the models are presented with measured data from devices. Keywords: Surface Acoustic Wave, SAW, transmission line models, Impulse Response Method.

  19. Structure response and damage produced by airblast from surface mining

    SciTech Connect

    Siskind, D.E.; Stachura, V.J.; Stagg, M.S.; Kopp, J.W.

    1980-01-01

    The Bureau of Mines studied airblast from surface mining to assess its damage and annoyance potential, and to determine safe levels and appropriate measurement techniques. Research results obtained from direct measurements of airblast-produced structure responses, damage, and analysis of instrument characteristics were combined with studies of sonic booms and human response to transient overpressures. Safe levels of airblast were found to be 134 db (0.1 Hz), 133 db (2 Hz), 129 db (6 Hz), and 105 db C-slow. These four airblast levels and measurement methods are equivalent in terms of structure response, and any one could be used as a safe-level criterion. Of the four methods, only the 0.1-Hz high-pass linear method accurately measures the total airblast energy present; however, the other three were found to adequately quantify the structure response and also represent techniques that are readily available to industry. Where a single airblast measuring system must be used, the 2-Hz linear peak response is the best overall compromise. The human response and annoyance problem from airblast is probably caused primarily by wall rattling and the resulting secondary noises. Although these will not entirely be precluded by the recommended levels, they are low enough to preclude damage to residential structures and any possible human injury over the long term.

  20. Designing Responsive Buckled Surfaces by Halftone Gel Lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jungwook; Hanna, James A.; Byun, Myunghwan; Santangelo, Christian D.; Hayward, Ryan C.

    2012-03-01

    Self-actuating materials capable of transforming between three-dimensional shapes have applications in areas as diverse as biomedicine, robotics, and tunable micro-optics. We introduce a method of photopatterning polymer films that yields temperature-responsive gel sheets that can transform between a flat state and a prescribed three-dimensional shape. Our approach is based on poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) copolymers containing pendent benzophenone units that allow cross-linking to be tuned by irradiation dose. We describe a simple method of halftone gel lithography using only two photomasks, wherein highly cross-linked dots embedded in a lightly cross-linked matrix provide access to nearly continuous, and fully two-dimensional, patterns of swelling. This method is used to fabricate surfaces with constant Gaussian curvature (spherical caps, saddles, and cones) or zero mean curvature (Enneper’s surfaces), as well as more complex and nearly closed shapes.

  1. Computational method for free surface hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Hirt, C.W.; Nichols, B.D.

    1980-01-01

    There are numerous flow phenomena in pressure vessel and piping systems that involve the dynamics of free fluid surfaces. For example, fluid interfaces must be considered during the draining or filling of tanks, in the formation and collapse of vapor bubbles, and in seismically shaken vessels that are partially filled. To aid in the analysis of these types of flow phenomena, a new technique has been developed for the computation of complicated free-surface motions. This technique is based on the concept of a local average volume of fluid (VOF) and is embodied in a computer program for two-dimensional, transient fluid flow called SOLA-VOF. The basic approach used in the VOF technique is briefly described, and compared to other free-surface methods. Specific capabilities of the SOLA-VOF program are illustrated by generic examples of bubble growth and collapse, flows of immiscible fluid mixtures, and the confinement of spilled liquids.

  2. Nanotextured Surfaces and Related Methods, Systems, and Uses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greer, Harold F. (Inventor); Greer, Julia R. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A method of controlling wetting characteristics is described. Such method includes forming and configuring nanostructures on a surface where controlling of the wetting characteristics is desired. Surfaces and methods of fabricating such surfaces are also described.

  3. Method for the decontamination of metallic surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Purohit, Ankur; Kaminski, Michael D.; Nunez, Luis

    2003-01-01

    A method of decontaminating a radioactively contaminated oxide on a surface. The radioactively contaminated oxide is contacted with a diphosphonic acid solution for a time sufficient to dissolve the oxide and subsequently produce a precipitate containing most of the radioactive values. Thereafter, the diphosphonic solution is separated from the precipitate. HEDPA is the preferred diphosphonic acid and oxidizing and reducing agents are used to initiate precipitation. SFS is the preferred reducing agent.

  4. Advanced Bayesian Method for Planetary Surface Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Center, Julian

    2015-01-01

    Autonomous Exploration, Inc., has developed an advanced Bayesian statistical inference method that leverages current computing technology to produce a highly accurate surface navigation system. The method combines dense stereo vision and high-speed optical flow to implement visual odometry (VO) to track faster rover movements. The Bayesian VO technique improves performance by using all image information rather than corner features only. The method determines what can be learned from each image pixel and weighs the information accordingly. This capability improves performance in shadowed areas that yield only low-contrast images. The error characteristics of the visual processing are complementary to those of a low-cost inertial measurement unit (IMU), so the combination of the two capabilities provides highly accurate navigation. The method increases NASA mission productivity by enabling faster rover speed and accuracy. On Earth, the technology will permit operation of robots and autonomous vehicles in areas where the Global Positioning System (GPS) is degraded or unavailable.

  5. Analysis of Rayleigh-Mode Spurious Response Using Finite Element Method/Spectrum Domain Analysis for Surface Acoustic Wave Resonator on Nonflat SiO2/Al/LiNbO3 Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Nakanishi, Hidekazu; Goto, Rei; Hashimoto, Ken-ya; Yamaguchi, Masatsune

    2010-07-01

    Because of their low insertion loss, high out-of-band rejection, and high power durability, miniature surface acoustic wave (SAW) duplexers are widely used in mobile phones. Substrate materials substantially limit and determine the performance of SAW duplexers; for their applications to Band I and Band IV systems with large pass-band widths and wide frequency separations between the transmitting and receiving frequency bands, a larger coupling coefficient (K2) is of primary importance. We have developed a shape-controlled SiO2 film/Al electrode/LiNbO3 substrate structure for their applications. It could lead to a large K2 and suppression of Rayleigh-mode spurious response. In this paper, we report the analysis using finite element method/spectrum domain analysis (FEM/SDA) for the SAW resonator on a nonflat SiO2 film/Al electrode/LiNbO3 structure. It was clarified that the shape-controlled SiO2 was effective in terms of achieving a large K2 for the SAW resonator with suppressed Rayleigh-mode spurious responses and bulk wave radiation. Furthermore, the experiment results showed a good agreement with the analysis results.

  6. Broadband multiple responses of surface modes in quasicrystalline plasmonic structure

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Haiming; Jiang, Xiangqian; Huang, Feng; Sun, Xiudong

    2016-01-01

    We numerically study the multiple excitation of surface modes in 2D photonic quasicrystal/metal/substrate structure. An improved rigorous coupled wave analysis method that can handle the quasicrystalline structure is presented. The quasicrystalline lattice, which refers to Penrose tiling in this paper, is generated by the cut-and-project method. The normal incidence spectrum presents a broadband multiple responses property. We find that the phase matching condition determines the excitation frequency for a given incident angle, while the depth of the reflection valley depends on the incident polarization. The modes will split into several sub-modes at oblique incidence, which give rise to the appearance of more responses on the spectrum. PMID:27492782

  7. Broadband multiple responses of surface modes in quasicrystalline plasmonic structure.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Haiming; Jiang, Xiangqian; Huang, Feng; Sun, Xiudong

    2016-01-01

    We numerically study the multiple excitation of surface modes in 2D photonic quasicrystal/metal/substrate structure. An improved rigorous coupled wave analysis method that can handle the quasicrystalline structure is presented. The quasicrystalline lattice, which refers to Penrose tiling in this paper, is generated by the cut-and-project method. The normal incidence spectrum presents a broadband multiple responses property. We find that the phase matching condition determines the excitation frequency for a given incident angle, while the depth of the reflection valley depends on the incident polarization. The modes will split into several sub-modes at oblique incidence, which give rise to the appearance of more responses on the spectrum. PMID:27492782

  8. A direct evidence of vibrationally delocalized response at ice surface

    SciTech Connect

    Ishiyama, Tatsuya; Morita, Akihiro

    2014-11-14

    Surface-specific vibrational spectroscopic responses at isotope diluted ice and amorphous ice are investigated by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations combined with quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations. The intense response specific to the ordinary crystal ice surface is predicted to be significantly suppressed in the isotopically diluted and amorphous ices, demonstrating the vibrational delocalization at the ordinary ice surface. The collective vibration at the ice surface is also analyzed with varying temperature by the MD simulation.

  9. Surface preparation methods to enhance dynamic surface property measurements of shocked metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zellner, M. B.; Vogan McNeil, W.; Gray, G. T.; Huerta, D. C.; King, N. S. P.; Neal, G. E.; Valentine, S. J.; Payton, J. R.; Rubin, J.; Stevens, G. D.; Turley, W. D.; Buttler, W. T.

    2008-04-01

    This effort investigates surface-preparation methods to enhance dynamic surface-property measurements of shocked metal surfaces. To assess the ability of making reliable and consistent dynamic surface-property measurements, the amount of material ejected from the free surface upon shock release to vacuum (ejecta) was monitored for shocked Al-1100 and Sn targets. Four surface-preparation methods were considered: Fly-cut machine finish, diamond-turned machine finish, polished finish, and ball rolled. The samples were shock loaded by in-contact detonation of HE PBX-9501 on the front side of the metal coupons. Ejecta production at the back side or free side of the metal coupons was monitored using piezoelectric pins, optical shadowgraphy, and x-ray attenuation radiography.

  10. Predicting sediment yield from alternative surface mining methods

    SciTech Connect

    Warner, R.C.; Wells, L.G.; Barfield, B.J.; Moore, I.D.; Wilson, B.N.

    1982-12-01

    The focus of this research was to compare the predicted sediment yield and hydrologic impact of three alternative surface mining methods used in the Central and Southern Appalachian coal regions. The mining methods investigated were: 1) mountaintop removal, 2) post-1977 block-cut haul-back contour mining, and 3) pre-1977 contour mining. Sediment and hydrologic impacts were predicted through use of the SEDIMOT model. For the mine plans analyzed the post-1977 block-cut haul-back mining method produced significantly lower sediment and peak storm response.

  11. Surface properties and early murine pre-osteoblastic cell responses of phosphoric acid modified titanium surface

    PubMed Central

    Osathanon, Thanaphum; Sawangmake, Chenphop; Ruangchainicom, Nanticha; Wutikornwipak, Pavitra; Kantukiti, Panisa; Nowwarote, Nunthawan; Pavasant, Prasit

    2015-01-01

    Aims The present study investigated the surface properties and murine pre-osteoblast cell (MC3T3-E1) responses of phosphoric acid (H3PO4) treated commercially pure titanium. Methods Titanium discs were treated with various concentration of H3PO4 (5%, 10%, and 20%; v/v) at 90 °C for 30 min. Surface properties were evaluated by profilometer, contact angle meter, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive X-rays. MC3T3-E1 attachment and spreading were evaluated by SEM and phalloidin immunohistochemistry staining. Results Surface roughness and wettability were not statistically difference among all experimental and control groups. Phosphate and oxygen were detected on H3PO4 treated surfaces. At 20 min, cell attachment was significantly higher in 10% and 20% H3PO4 treated groups compared to the control. Cells exhibited orientated-cytoskeleton fibers on 20% H3PO4 modified titanium surface. Though, there was no difference in cell spreading stage among all treatment groups. Conclusion H3PO4 treatment on titanium may influence early cell response, particularly on attachment and spreading. PMID:26937362

  12. Plasmonic nanostructures for surface enhanced spectroscopic methods.

    PubMed

    Jahn, Martin; Patze, Sophie; Hidi, Izabella J; Knipper, Richard; Radu, Andreea I; Mühlig, Anna; Yüksel, Sezin; Peksa, Vlastimil; Weber, Karina; Mayerhöfer, Thomas; Cialla-May, Dana; Popp, Jürgen

    2016-02-01

    A comprehensive review of theoretical approaches to simulate plasmonic-active metallic nano-arrangements is given. Further, various fabrication methods based on bottom-up, self-organization and top-down techniques are introduced. Here, analytical approaches are discussed to investigate the optical properties of isotropic and non-magnetic spherical or spheroidal particles. Furthermore, numerical methods are introduced to research complex shaped structures. A huge variety of fabrication methods are reviewed, e.g. bottom-up preparation strategies for plasmonic nanostructures to generate metal colloids and core-shell particles as well as complex-shaped structures, self-organization as well as template-based methods and finally, top-down processes, e.g. electron beam lithography and its variants as well as nanoimprinting. The review article is aimed at beginners in the field of surface enhanced spectroscopy (SES) techniques and readers who have a general interest in theoretical modelling of plasmonic substrates for SES applications as well as in the fabrication of the desired structures based on methods of the current state of the art.

  13. Responsiveness to an introductory meditation method.

    PubMed

    Fiebert, M S

    1977-12-01

    Ratings from 84 students of selected attitudes before a brief introduction to a method of meditation and responses afterward correlated moderately, suggesting those favoring personal growth will favor meditation.

  14. Response Surface Model Building and Multidisciplinary Optimization Using D-Optimal Designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unal, Resit; Lepsch, Roger A.; McMillin, Mark L.

    1998-01-01

    This paper discusses response surface methods for approximation model building and multidisciplinary design optimization. The response surface methods discussed are central composite designs, Bayesian methods and D-optimal designs. An over-determined D-optimal design is applied to a configuration design and optimization study of a wing-body, launch vehicle. Results suggest that over determined D-optimal designs may provide an efficient approach for approximation model building and for multidisciplinary design optimization.

  15. Extended surface parallel coating inspection method

    DOEpatents

    Naulleau, Patrick P.

    2006-03-21

    Techniques for rapidly characterizing reflective surfaces and especially multi-layer EUV reflective surfaces of optical components involve illuminating the entire reflective surface instantaneously and detecting the image far field. The technique provides a mapping of points on the reflective surface to corresponding points on a detector, e.g., CCD. This obviates the need to scan a probe over the entire surface of the optical component. The reflective surface can be flat, convex, or concave.

  16. Non-dimensional response surfaces for structural optimization with uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venter, Gerhardus

    Approximation concepts are an effective approach for alleviating some of the problems associated with the direct use of modern computerized analysis techniques in an optimization environment. Recently, response surface approximations have gained popularity as polynomial approximations that are global in nature. Response surface approximations shift the computational burden from the optimization problem to the problem of constructing the approximations, and accommodate the use of detailed analysis techniques without the need of derivative information. Additionally, response surface approximations filter out numerical noise inherent to most numerical analysis procedures, by providing a smooth approximate response function, and simplify the integration of the analysis and the optimization codes. The present dissertation investigates the use of response surface approximations in expensive structural optimization problems and aims to suggest techniques for improving both the accuracy of response surface approximations as well as the efficiency with which they are constructed. A stepped plate design problem is considered and response surface approximations are constructed for different failure mechanisms using numerical experiments conducted with a finite element analysis. Both an isotropic and a composite laminated plate, where the change in thickness is a result of internal ply drop off, are considered. The proposed methodology uses a combination of dimensional analysis, higher order response surface approximations, stepwise regression, a detailed error analysis and statistical design of experiments to improve both accuracy and efficiency. Dimensional analysis identifies variables intrinsic to the problem, and thus reduces the number of variables in the resulting response surface approximation. Stepwise regression is used to eliminate insignificant parameters from a response surface approximation and statistical design of experiments is used to identify a small set of

  17. Acid drainage response to surface limestone layers

    SciTech Connect

    Geidel, G.; Caruccio, F.T.

    1982-12-01

    A 150 acre drainage basin in an unreclaimed coal strip mine in east-central Ohio was studied and extensively monitored to determine the effect of a surface application of limestone on the ground water quality. Prior to the limestone treatment the ground and surface water of the basin was acidic due to pyrite oxidation in the spoil. In order to assess the effect of the limestone application the basin was divided into seven sub-basins, five of which were treated and two which served as controls. The seeps from the treated sub-basins with low acid concentrations became alkaline due to neutralization but after a long dry period, they returned to their acid condition. The moderately and highly acidic seeps showed a decline in the acid concentrations which could be attributed to a combination of neutralization and a decrease in the rate of pyrite oxidation. The results of this field study and simultaneous laboratory experiments showed that under natural conditions, with no limestone application, the acidity generated by pyrite oxidation in a backfill decreased. A surface application of limestone slightly enhanced the decrease in acidity by both neutralization and decreasing the rate of pyrite oxidation. However, the limestone application did not provide sufficient alkalinity to produce either neutral or alkaline discharges from the abandoned coal strip mine site.

  18. Method of sputter etching a surface

    DOEpatents

    Henager, Jr., Charles H.

    1984-01-01

    The surface of a target is textured by co-sputter etching the target surface with a seed material adjacent thereto, while the target surface is maintained at a pre-selected temperature. By pre-selecting the temperature of the surface while sputter etching, it is possible to predetermine the reflectance properties of the etched surface. The surface may be textured to absorb sunlight efficiently and have minimal emittance in the infrared region so as to be well-suited for use as a solar absorber for photothermal energy conversion.

  19. Method of sputter etching a surface

    DOEpatents

    Henager, C.H. Jr.

    1984-02-14

    The surface of a target is textured by co-sputter etching the target surface with a seed material adjacent thereto, while the target surface is maintained at a pre-selected temperature. By pre-selecting the temperature of the surface while sputter etching, it is possible to predetermine the reflectance properties of the etched surface. The surface may be textured to absorb sunlight efficiently and have minimal emittance in the infrared region so as to be well-suited for use as a solar absorber for photothermal energy conversion. 4 figs.

  20. Dry stripping as a surface treatment method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieminen, Ilkka

    1992-03-01

    High environmental and safety standards as well as use of new paint and substrate materials have created the need for developing stripping methods to substitute chemical and mechanical methods and on the other hand for expanding the applicability of blasting as a surface treatment. Plastic Media Blasting (PMB) (alternatively Dry Stripping System (DSS)) is an emerging technology first used in aircraft maintenance for paint stripping. Traditionally this task is performed by brushing and grinding or by using chemical solvents. With plastic media it is possible to remove thick paints with high adhesion without damaging the substrate and even layer by layer. If suitable type of plastic media, blasting pressure low enough, media concentration high enough and on the other right blasting time, blasting distance and blasting angle are chosen, the effectiveness of PMB can be varied to a large extent. In regard to the hardness of media plastic particles are situated between some organic materials and shots used in sand blasting. Therefore composite materials can be treated without damaging the substrate or thin metal plates without causing any deformations. The principle of plastic media blasting equipment is similar to traditional blasting equipment. Nevertheless the properties of plastic media are different to harder particles used in shot peening resulting in higher demands for filtration, ventilation and recycling systems. In addition the facilities have to contain proper recovery equipment, because plastic media can be reused, even 20 times. In recycling systems plastic media is cleaned, too large and too small particles are removed, hard and magnetic particles are removed from reusable media and dust is separated from media. In addition to paint stripping PMB can successfully be used for cleaning of surfaces from contamination and to some extent for polishing, grinding and roughening. Paint stripping has been the main application so far, but there may be many other

  1. Mechanisms regulating osteoblast response to surface microtopography and vitamin D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Bryan Frederick, Jr.

    A comprehensive understanding of the interactions between orthopaedic and dental implant surfaces with the surrounding host tissue is essential in the design of advanced biomaterials that better promote bone growth and osseointegration of implants. Dental implants with roughened surfaces and high surface energy are well known to promote osteoblast differentiation in vitro and promote increased bone-to-implant contact in vivo. In addition, increased surface roughness increases osteoblasts response to the vitamin D metabolite 1alpha,25(OH)2D3. However, the exact mechanisms mediating cell response to surface properties and 1alpha,25(OH)2D3 are still being elucidated. The central aim of the thesis is to investigate whether integrin signaling in response to rough surface microtopography enhances osteoblast differentiation and responsiveness to 1alpha,25(OH)2D3. The hypothesis is that the integrin alpha5beta1 plays a role in osteoblast response to surface microtopography and that 1alpha,25(OH) 2D3 acts through VDR-independent pathways involving caveolae to synergistically enhance osteoblast response to surface roughness and 1alpha,25(OH) 2D3. To test this hypothesis the objectives of the studies performed in this thesis were: (1) to determine if alpha5beta 1 signaling is required for osteoblast response to surface microstructure; (2) to determine if increased responsiveness to 1alpha,25(OH)2D 3 requires the vitamin D receptor, (3) to determine if rough titanium surfaces functionalized with the peptides targeting integrins (RGD) and transmembrane proteoglycans (KRSR) will enhance both osteoblast proliferation and differentiation, and (4) to determine whether caveolae, which are associated with integrin and 1alpha,25(OH)2D3 signaling, are required for enhance osteogenic response to surface microstructure and 1alpha,25(OH)2D 3. The results demonstrate that integrins, VDR, and caveolae play important roles in mediating osteoblast response to surface properties and 1alpha,25

  2. Eye surface temperature detects stress response in budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus).

    PubMed

    Ikkatai, Yuko; Watanabe, Shigeru

    2015-08-01

    Previous studies have suggested that stressors not only increase body core temperature but also body surface temperature in many animals. However, it remains unclear whether surface temperature could be used as an alternative to directly measure body core temperature, particularly in birds. We investigated whether surface temperature is perceived as a stress response in budgerigars. Budgerigars have been used as popular animal models to investigate various neural mechanisms such as visual perception, vocal learning, and imitation. Developing a new technique to understand the basic physiological mechanism would help neuroscience researchers. First, we found that cloacal temperature correlated with eye surface temperature. Second, eye surface temperature increased after handling stress. Our findings suggest that eye surface temperature is closely related to cloacal temperature and that the stress response can be measured by eye surface temperature in budgerigars. PMID:26103119

  3. Eye surface temperature detects stress response in budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus).

    PubMed

    Ikkatai, Yuko; Watanabe, Shigeru

    2015-08-01

    Previous studies have suggested that stressors not only increase body core temperature but also body surface temperature in many animals. However, it remains unclear whether surface temperature could be used as an alternative to directly measure body core temperature, particularly in birds. We investigated whether surface temperature is perceived as a stress response in budgerigars. Budgerigars have been used as popular animal models to investigate various neural mechanisms such as visual perception, vocal learning, and imitation. Developing a new technique to understand the basic physiological mechanism would help neuroscience researchers. First, we found that cloacal temperature correlated with eye surface temperature. Second, eye surface temperature increased after handling stress. Our findings suggest that eye surface temperature is closely related to cloacal temperature and that the stress response can be measured by eye surface temperature in budgerigars.

  4. Method for correcting imperfections on a surface

    SciTech Connect

    Sweatt, William C.; Weed, John W.

    1999-09-07

    A process for producing near perfect optical surfaces. A previously polished optical surface is measured to determine its deviations from the desired perfect surface. A multi-aperture mask is designed based on this measurement and fabricated such that deposition through the mask will correct the deviations in the surface to an acceptable level. Various mask geometries can be used: variable individual aperture sizes using a fixed grid for the apertures or fixed aperture sizes using a variable aperture spacing. The imperfections are filled in using a vacuum deposition process with a very thin thickness of material such as silicon monoxide to produce an amorphous surface that bonds well to a glass substrate.

  5. Construction of Response Surface with Higher Order Continuity and Its Application to Reliability Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnamurthy, T.; Romero, V. J.

    2002-01-01

    The usefulness of piecewise polynomials with C1 and C2 derivative continuity for response surface construction method is examined. A Moving Least Squares (MLS) method is developed and compared with four other interpolation methods, including kriging. First the selected methods are applied and compared with one another in a two-design variables problem with a known theoretical response function. Next the methods are tested in a four-design variables problem from a reliability-based design application. In general the piecewise polynomial with higher order derivative continuity methods produce less error in the response prediction. The MLS method was found to be superior for response surface construction among the methods evaluated.

  6. Biophysical Methods for the Study of Microbial Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Frases, Susana; Viana, Nathan B.; Casadevall, Arturo

    2011-01-01

    The challenge in studying the surface architecture of different microbial pathogens is to integrate the most current biochemical, spectroscopic, microscopic, and processing techniques. Individually these methods have insufficient sensitivity to reveal complex structures, such as branched, large, viscous polymers with a high structure hydration, size, and complexity. However, when used in combination biophysical techniques are our primary source of information for understanding polydisperse molecules and complex microbial surfaces. Biophysical methods seek to explain biological function in terms of the molecular structures and properties of specific molecules. The sizes of the molecules found in microbial surfaces vary greatly from small fatty acids and sugars to macromolecules like proteins, polysaccharides, and pigments, such as melanin. These molecules, which comprise the building blocks of living organisms, assemble into cells, tissues, and whole organisms by forming complex individual structures with dimensions from 10 to 10,000 nm and larger. Biophysics is directed to determining the structure of specific biological molecules and of the larger structures into which they assemble. Some of this effort involves developing new methods, adapting old methods and building new instruments for viewing these structures. The description of biophysical properties in an experimental model where, properties such as flexibility, hydrodynamic characteristics, and size can be precisely determined is of great relevance to study the affinity of the surfaces with biologically active and inert substrates and the interaction with host molecules. Furthermore, this knowledge could establish the abilities of different molecules and their structures to differentially activate cellular responses. Recent studies in the fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans have demonstrated that the physical properties of its unique polysaccharide capsule correlate with the biological functions

  7. Biophysical methods for the study of microbial surfaces.

    PubMed

    Frases, Susana; Viana, Nathan B; Casadevall, Arturo

    2011-01-01

    The challenge in studying the surface architecture of different microbial pathogens is to integrate the most current biochemical, spectroscopic, microscopic, and processing techniques. Individually these methods have insufficient sensitivity to reveal complex structures, such as branched, large, viscous polymers with a high structure hydration, size, and complexity. However, when used in combination biophysical techniques are our primary source of information for understanding polydisperse molecules and complex microbial surfaces. Biophysical methods seek to explain biological function in terms of the molecular structures and properties of specific molecules. The sizes of the molecules found in microbial surfaces vary greatly from small fatty acids and sugars to macromolecules like proteins, polysaccharides, and pigments, such as melanin. These molecules, which comprise the building blocks of living organisms, assemble into cells, tissues, and whole organisms by forming complex individual structures with dimensions from 10 to 10,000 nm and larger. Biophysics is directed to determining the structure of specific biological molecules and of the larger structures into which they assemble. Some of this effort involves developing new methods, adapting old methods and building new instruments for viewing these structures. The description of biophysical properties in an experimental model where, properties such as flexibility, hydrodynamic characteristics, and size can be precisely determined is of great relevance to study the affinity of the surfaces with biologically active and inert substrates and the interaction with host molecules. Furthermore, this knowledge could establish the abilities of different molecules and their structures to differentially activate cellular responses. Recent studies in the fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans have demonstrated that the physical properties of its unique polysaccharide capsule correlate with the biological functions

  8. Comparison of Response Surface and Kriging Models for Multidisciplinary Design Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, Timothy W.; Korte, John J.; Mauery, Timothy M.; Mistree, Farrokh

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, we compare and contrast the use of second-order response surface models and kriging models for approximating non-random, deterministic computer analyses. After reviewing the response surface method for constructing polynomial approximations, kriging is presented as an alternative approximation method for the design and analysis of computer experiments. Both methods are applied to the multidisciplinary design of an aerospike nozzle which consists of a computational fluid dynamics model and a finite-element model. Error analysis of the response surface and kriging models is performed along with a graphical comparison of the approximations, and four optimization problems m formulated and solved using both sets of approximation models. The second-order response surface models and kriging models-using a constant underlying global model and a Gaussian correlation function-yield comparable results.

  9. Method for Measuring Changes in Surface Tension on Agar

    PubMed Central

    Weisberg, David S.; Dworkin, Martin

    1983-01-01

    The surface tension of agar surfaces was determined by measuring the contact angles formed by drops of various hydrophobic liquids on the surface and then calculating the composite surface free energy function by solving a series of simultaneous equations derived from these data. This method was used to measure the change in the surface tension of agar produced by the addition of various concentrations of albumin. The resulting curve was typical of the effect of increasing concentrations of surfactants on surface tension. The method was compared with other methods of determining surface tension of solids, and it was concluded that the technique used here provided the most reliable results. PMID:16346273

  10. Surface Imaging Skin Friction Instrument and Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, James L. (Inventor); Naughton, Jonathan W. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A surface imaging skin friction instrument allowing 2D resolution of spatial image by a 2D Hilbert transform and 2D inverse thin-oil film solver, providing an innovation over prior art single point approaches. Incoherent, monochromatic light source can be used. The invention provides accurate, easy to use, economical measurement of larger regions of surface shear stress in a single test.

  11. Method for correcting imperfections on a surface

    SciTech Connect

    Sweatt, W.C.; Weed, J.W.

    1999-09-07

    A process for producing near perfect optical surfaces is disclosed. A previously polished optical surface is measured to determine its deviations from the desired perfect surface. A multi-aperture mask is designed based on this measurement and fabricated such that deposition through the mask will correct the deviations in the surface to an acceptable level. Various mask geometries can be used: variable individual aperture sizes using a fixed grid for the apertures or fixed aperture sizes using a variable aperture spacing. The imperfections are filled in using a vacuum deposition process with a very thin thickness of material such as silicon monoxide to produce an amorphous surface that bonds well to a glass substrate.

  12. A Comparison of Surface Acoustic Wave Modeling Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, W. c.; Atkinson, G. M.

    2009-01-01

    Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) technology is low cost, rugged, lightweight, extremely low power and can be used to develop passive wireless sensors. For these reasons, NASA is investigating the use of SAW technology for Integrated Vehicle Health Monitoring (IVHM) of aerospace structures. To facilitate rapid prototyping of passive SAW sensors for aerospace applications, SAW models have been developed. This paper reports on the comparison of three methods of modeling SAWs. The three models are the Impulse Response Method a first order model, and two second order matrix methods; the conventional matrix approach, and a modified matrix approach that is extended to include internal finger reflections. The second order models are based upon matrices that were originally developed for analyzing microwave circuits using transmission line theory. Results from the models are presented with measured data from devices.

  13. Determining Surface Plasmon Resonance Response Factors for Deposition onto Three-Dimensional Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Roper, D. Keith

    2009-01-01

    Intrinsic sorption rates of ligand/receptor binding have been measured by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) using response factors for deposition of proteins or smaller molecules on planar surfaces. In this study generalized expressions for SPR response factor and effective refractive index are developed to measure rates of analyte sorption onto 3-D surfaces. The expressions are specialized for two limiting cases of immediate practical interest and broad applicability: analyte deposition onto a homogeneous anisotropic porous media and deposition onto close-packed solid spheres adjacent to the sensor surface. These new equations specify media capacity, characteristic size and analyte concentration that are necessary to obtain identifiable responses from interaction with anisotropic porous media or chromatographic resin. These developments are illustrated by comparing response factors for Adenovirus Type 5 on planar surfaces, porous media and adsorptive spheres. PMID:19844593

  14. Particle-Surface Interaction Model and Method of Determining Particle-Surface Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, David W. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A method and model of predicting particle-surface interactions with a surface, such as the surface of a spacecraft. The method includes the steps of: determining a trajectory path of a plurality of moving particles; predicting whether any of the moving particles will intersect a surface; predicting whether any of the particles will be captured by the surface and/or; predicting a reflected trajectory and velocity of particles reflected from the surface.

  15. Method for determining surface properties of microparticles

    DOEpatents

    Eisenthal, Kenneth B.

    2000-01-01

    Second harmonic generation (SHG), sum frequency generation (SFG) and difference frequency generation (DFG) can be used for surface analysis or characterization of microparticles having a non-metallic surface feature. The microparticles can be centrosymmetric or such that non-metallic molecules of interest are centrosymmetrically distributed inside and outside the microparticles but not at the surface of the microparticles where the asymmetry aligns the molecules. The signal is quadratic in incident laser intensity or proportional to the product of two incident laser intensities for SFG, it is sharply peaked at the second harmonic wavelength, quadratic in the density of molecules adsorbed onto the microparticle surface, and linear in microparticles density. In medical or pharmacological applications, molecules of interest may be of drugs or toxins, for example.

  16. Method for surface treatment of a cadmium zinc telluride crystal

    DOEpatents

    James, R.; Burger, A.; Chen, K.T.; Chang, H.

    1999-08-03

    A method for treatment of the surface of a CdZnTe (CZT) crystal is disclosed that reduces surface roughness (increases surface planarity) and provides an oxide coating to reduce surface leakage currents and thereby, improve resolution. A two step process is disclosed, etching the surface of a CZT crystal with a solution of lactic acid and bromine in ethylene glycol, following the conventional bromine/methanol etch treatment, and after attachment of electrical contacts, oxidizing the CZT crystal surface. 3 figs.

  17. Method for surface treatment of a cadmium zinc telluride crystal

    DOEpatents

    James, Ralph; Burger, Arnold; Chen, Kuo-Tong; Chang, Henry

    1999-01-01

    A method for treatment of the surface of a CdZnTe (CZT) crystal that reduces surface roughness (increases surface planarity) and provides an oxide coating to reduce surface leakage currents and thereby, improve resolution. A two step process is disclosed, etching the surface of a CZT crystal with a solution of lactic acid and bromine in ethylene glycol, following the conventional bromine/methanol etch treatment, and after attachment of electrical contacts, oxidizing the CZT crystal surface.

  18. Comparison of Response Surface and Kriging Models in the Multidisciplinary Design of an Aerospike Nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, Timothy W.

    1998-01-01

    The use of response surface models and kriging models are compared for approximating non-random, deterministic computer analyses. After discussing the traditional response surface approach for constructing polynomial models for approximation, kriging is presented as an alternative statistical-based approximation method for the design and analysis of computer experiments. Both approximation methods are applied to the multidisciplinary design and analysis of an aerospike nozzle which consists of a computational fluid dynamics model and a finite element analysis model. Error analysis of the response surface and kriging models is performed along with a graphical comparison of the approximations. Four optimization problems are formulated and solved using both approximation models. While neither approximation technique consistently outperforms the other in this example, the kriging models using only a constant for the underlying global model and a Gaussian correlation function perform as well as the second order polynomial response surface models.

  19. Apparatus and method for measuring and imaging surface resistance

    DOEpatents

    Martens, Jon S.; Hietala, Vincent M.; Hohenwarter, Gert K. G.

    1993-08-24

    Apparatus and method for determining and imaging superconductor surface resistance. The apparatus comprises modified Gaussian confocal resonator structure with the sample remote from the radiating mirror. Surface resistance is determined by analyzing and imaging reflected microwaves; imaging reveals anomalies due to surface impurities, non-stoichiometry, and the like, in the surface of the superconductor.

  20. Accuracy Assessment of Response Surface Approximations for Supersonic Turbine Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papila, Nilay; Papila, Melih; Shyy, Wei; Haftka, Raphael T.; FitzCoy, Norman

    2001-01-01

    There is a growing trend to employ CFD tools to supply the necessary information for design optimization of fluid dynamics components/systems. Such results are prone to uncertainties due to reasons including discretization. errors, incomplete convergence of computational procedures, and errors associated with physical models such as turbulence closures. Based on this type of information, gradient-based optimization algorithms often suffer from the noisy calculations, which can seriously compromise the outcome. Similar problems arise from the experimental measurements. Global optimization techniques, such as those based on the response surface (RS) concept are becoming popular in part because they can overcome some of these barriers. However, there are also fundamental issues related to such global optimization technique such as RS. For example, in high dimensional design spaces, typically only a small number of function evaluations are available due to computational and experimental costs. On the other hand, complex features of the design variables do not allow one to model the global characteristics of the design space with simple quadratic polynomials. Consequently a main challenge is to reduce the size of the region where we fit the RS, or make it more accurate in the regions where the optimum is likely to reside. Response Surface techniques using either polynomials or and Neural Network (NN) methods offer designers alternatives to conduct design optimization. The RS technique employs statistical and numerical techniques to establish the relationship between design variables and objective/constraint functions, typically using polynomials. In this study, we aim at addressing issues related to the following questions: (1) How to identify outliers associated with a given RS representation and improve the RS model via appropriate treatments? (2) How to focus on selected design data so that RS can give better performance in regions critical to design optimization? (3

  1. An interval model updating strategy using interval response surface models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Sheng-En; Zhang, Qiu-Hu; Ren, Wei-Xin

    2015-08-01

    Stochastic model updating provides an effective way of handling uncertainties existing in real-world structures. In general, probabilistic theories, fuzzy mathematics or interval analyses are involved in the solution of inverse problems. However in practice, probability distributions or membership functions of structural parameters are often unavailable due to insufficient information of a structure. At this moment an interval model updating procedure shows its superiority in the aspect of problem simplification since only the upper and lower bounds of parameters and responses are sought. To this end, this study develops a new concept of interval response surface models for the purpose of efficiently implementing the interval model updating procedure. The frequent interval overestimation due to the use of interval arithmetic can be maximally avoided leading to accurate estimation of parameter intervals. Meanwhile, the establishment of an interval inverse problem is highly simplified, accompanied by a saving of computational costs. By this means a relatively simple and cost-efficient interval updating process can be achieved. Lastly, the feasibility and reliability of the developed method have been verified against a numerical mass-spring system and also against a set of experimentally tested steel plates.

  2. Osteoblastic response to pectin nanocoating on titanium surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gurzawska, Katarzyna; Svava, Rikke; Yihua, Yu; Haugshøj, Kenneth Brian; Dirscherl, Kai; Levery, Steven B; Byg, Inge; Damager, Iben; Nielsen, Martin W; Jørgensen, Bodil; Jørgensen, Niklas Rye; Gotfredsen, Klaus

    2014-10-01

    Osseointegration of titanium implants can be improved by organic and inorganic nanocoating of the surface. The aim of our study was to evaluate the effect of organic nanocoating of titanium surface with unmodified and modified pectin Rhamnogalacturonan-Is (RG-Is) isolated from potato and apple with respect to surface properties and osteogenic response in osteoblastic cells. Nanocoatings on titanium surfaces were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy, contact angle measurements, atomic force microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The effect of coated RG-Is on cell adhesion, cell viability, bone matrix formation and mineralization was tested using SaOS-2 cells. Nanocoating with pectin RG-Is affected surface properties and in consequence changed the environment for cellular response. The cells cultured on surfaces coated with RG-Is from potato with high content of linear 1.4-linked galactose produced higher level of mineralized matrix compared with control surfaces and surfaces coated with RG-I with low content of linear 1.4-linked galactose. The study showed that the pectin RG-Is nanocoating not only changed chemical and physical titanium surface properties, but also specific coating with RG-Is containing high amount of galactan increased mineralized matrix formation of osteoblastic cells in vitro. PMID:25175196

  3. A Method for Controlling Skew on Linked Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    BENZLEY,STEVEN E.; KERR,ROBERT A.; MITCHELL,SCOTT A.; WHITE,DAVID R.

    1999-09-27

    A new method for lessening skew in mapped meshes is presented. This new method involves progressive subdivision of a surface into loops consisting of four sides. Using these loops, constraints can then be set on the curves of the surface, which will propagate interval assignments across the surface, allowing a mesh with a better skew metric to be generated.

  4. Responses of fibroblasts and glial cells to nanostructured platinum surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennisi, C. P.; Sevcencu, C.; Dolatshahi-Pirouz, A.; Foss, M.; Lundsgaard Hansen, J.; Nylandsted Larsen, A.; Zachar, V.; Besenbacher, F.; Yoshida, K.

    2009-09-01

    The chronic performance of implantable neural prostheses is affected by the growth of encapsulation tissue onto the stimulation electrodes. Encapsulation is associated with activation of connective tissue cells at the electrode's metallic contacts, usually made of platinum. Since surface nanotopography can modulate the cellular responses to materials, the aim of the present work was to evaluate the 'in vitro' responses of connective tissue cells to platinum strictly by modulating its surface nanoroughness. Using molecular beam epitaxy combined with sputtering, we produced platinum nanostructured substrates consisting of irregularly distributed nanopyramids and investigated their effect on the proliferation, cytoskeletal organization and cellular morphology of primary fibroblasts and transformed glial cells. Cells were cultured on these substrates and their responses to surface roughness were studied. After one day in culture, the fibroblasts were more elongated and their cytoskeleton less mature when cultured on rough substrates. This effect increased as the roughness of the surface increased and was associated with reduced cell proliferation throughout the observation period (4 days). Morphological changes also occurred in glial cells, but they were triggered by a different roughness scale and did not affect cellular proliferation. In conclusion, surface nanotopography modulates the responses of fibroblasts and glial cells to platinum, which may be an important factor in optimizing the tissue response to implanted neural electrodes.

  5. Titanium surface hydrophilicity modulates the human macrophage inflammatory cytokine response.

    PubMed

    Alfarsi, Mohammed A; Hamlet, Stephen M; Ivanovski, Saso

    2014-01-01

    Increased titanium surface hydrophilicity has been shown to accelerate dental implant osseointegration. Macrophages are important in the early inflammatory response to surgical implant placement and influence the subsequent healing response. This study investigated the modulatory effect of a hydrophilic titanium surface on the inflammatory cytokine expression profile in a human macrophage cell line (THP-1). Genes for 84 cytokines, chemokines, and their receptors were analyzed following exposure to (1) polished (SMO), (2) micro-rough sand blasted, acid etched (SLA), and (3) hydrophilic-modified SLA (modSLA) titanium surfaces for 1 and 3 days. By day 3, the SLA surface elicited a pro-inflammatory response compared to the SMO surface with statistically significant up-regulation of 16 genes [Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) Interleukin (IL)-1β, Chemokine (C-C motif) ligand (CCL)-1, 2, 3, 4, 18, 19, and 20, Chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand (CXCL)-1, 5, 8 and 12, Chemokine (C-C motif) receptor (CCR)-7, Lymphotoxin-beta (LTB), and Leukotriene B4 receptor (LTB4R)]. This effect was countered by the modSLA surface, which down-regulated the expression of 10 genes (TNF, IL-1α and β, CCL-1, 3, 19 and 20, CXCL-1 and 8, and IL-1 receptor type 1), while two were up-regulated (osteopontin and CCR5) compared to the SLA surface. These cytokine gene expression changes were confirmed by decreased levels of corresponding protein secretion in response to modSLA compared to SLA. These results show that a hydrophilic titanium surface can modulate human macrophage pro-inflammatory cytokine gene expression and protein secretion. An attenuated pro-inflammatory response may be an important molecular mechanism for faster and/or improved wound healing.

  6. Water adsorbate influence on the Cu(110) surface optical response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baghbanpourasl, Amirreza; Schmidt, Wolf Gero; Denk, Mariella; Cobet, Christoph; Hohage, Michael; Zeppenfeld, Peter; Hingerl, Kurt

    2015-11-01

    Surface reflectance anisotropy may be utilized for characterizing surfaces, interfaces, and adsorption structures. Here, the reflectance anisotropy and surface dielectric functions of the thermodynamically most favored water adsorbate structures on the Cu(110) surface (i.e. hexagonal bilayers, pentagonal chains, and partially dissociated water structures) are calculated from density-functional theory and compared with recent experimental data. It is shown that the water overlayer structures modify in a geometry-specific way the optical anisotropy of the bare surface which can be exploited for in situ determination of the adsorption structures. For hexagonal bilayer overlayer geometries, strong features in the vacuum ultraviolet region are predicted. The theoretical analysis shows a noticeable influence of intraband transitions also for higher photon energies and rather slight influences of the van der Waals interaction on the spectral signatures. Water induced strain effects on the surface optical response are found to be negligible.

  7. Surface control alloy substrates and methods of manufacture therefor

    DOEpatents

    Fritzemeier, Leslie G.; Li, Qi; Rupich, Martin W.; Thompson, Elliott D.; Siegal, Edward J.; Thieme, Cornelis Leo Hans; Annavarapu, Suresh; Arendt, Paul N.; Foltyn, Stephen R.

    2004-05-04

    Methods and articles for controlling the surface of an alloy substrate for deposition of an epitaxial layer. The invention includes the use of an intermediate layer to stabilize the substrate surface against oxidation for subsequent deposition of an epitaxial layer.

  8. Autonomous Aerobraking: Thermal Analysis and Response Surface Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dec, John A.; Thornblom, Mark N.

    2011-01-01

    A high-fidelity thermal model of the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter was developed for use in an autonomous aerobraking simulation study. Response surface equations were derived from the high-fidelity thermal model and integrated into the autonomous aerobraking simulation software. The high-fidelity thermal model was developed using the Thermal Desktop software and used in all phases of the analysis. The use of Thermal Desktop exclusively, represented a change from previously developed aerobraking thermal analysis methodologies. Comparisons were made between the Thermal Desktop solutions and those developed for the previous aerobraking thermal analyses performed on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter during aerobraking operations. A variable sensitivity screening study was performed to reduce the number of variables carried in the response surface equations. Thermal analysis and response surface equation development were performed for autonomous aerobraking missions at Mars and Venus.

  9. Method and apparatus for measuring response time

    DOEpatents

    Johanson, E.W.; August, C.

    1983-08-11

    A method of measuring the response time of an electrical instrument which generates an output signal in response to the application of a specified input, wherein the output signal varies as a function of time and when subjected to a step input approaches a steady-state value, comprises the steps of: (a) applying a step input of predetermined value to the electrical instrument to generate an output signal; (b) simultaneously starting a timer; (c) comparing the output signal to a reference signal to generate a stop signal when the output signal is substantially equal to the reference signal, the reference signal being a specified percentage of the steady-state value of the output signal corresponding to the predetermined value of the step input; and (d) applying the stop signal when generated to stop the timer.

  10. Method and apparatus for measuring response time

    DOEpatents

    Johanson, Edward W.; August, Charles

    1985-01-01

    A method of measuring the response time of an electrical instrument which generates an output signal in response to the application of a specified input, wherein the output signal varies as a function of time and when subjected to a step input approaches a steady-state value, comprises the steps of: (a) applying a step input of predetermined value to the electrical instrument to generate an output signal; (b) simultaneously starting a timer; (c) comparing the output signal to a reference signal to generate a stop signal when the output signal is substantially equal to the reference signal, the reference signal being a specified percentage of the steady-state value of the output signal corresponding to the predetermined value of the step input; and (d) applying the stop signal when generated to stop the timer.

  11. Ancient Parchment Examination by Surface Investigation Methods.

    PubMed

    Facchini; Malara; Bazzani; Cavallotti

    2000-11-15

    A restoring process was set up to restore flexibility, size, and shape in naturally aged or fire-damaged parchments of old manuscripts. Validation of such a process requires the measurement of intrinsic parchment properties and comparison of them before and after the treatment. To this aim, we investigated morphological, mechanical, and surface physico-chemical properties of parchment by taking SEM pictures and characterizing small samples by microindentation, mercury porosimetry, and water vapor adsorption/desorption isotherms. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  12. Layered devices having surface curvature and method of constructing same

    DOEpatents

    Woodbury, Richard C.; Perkins, Raymond T.; Thorne, James M.

    1989-01-01

    A method of treating a substrate having first and second sides with corresponding oppositely facing first and second surfaces, to produce curvature in the first surface. The method includes the steps of removing material, according to a predetermined pattern, from the second side of the substrate, and applying a stress-producing film of material to at least one surface of the substrate to thereby cause the substrate to bend to produce the desired curvature in the first surface.

  13. Modeling of electrohydrodynamic drying process using response surface methodology

    PubMed Central

    Dalvand, Mohammad Jafar; Mohtasebi, Seyed Saeid; Rafiee, Shahin

    2014-01-01

    Energy consumption index is one of the most important criteria for judging about new, and emerging drying technologies. One of such novel and promising alternative of drying process is called electrohydrodynamic (EHD) drying. In this work, a solar energy was used to maintain required energy of EHD drying process. Moreover, response surface methodology (RSM) was used to build a predictive model in order to investigate the combined effects of independent variables such as applied voltage, field strength, number of discharge electrode (needle), and air velocity on moisture ratio, energy efficiency, and energy consumption as responses of EHD drying process. Three-levels and four-factor Box–Behnken design was employed to evaluate the effects of independent variables on system responses. A stepwise approach was followed to build up a model that can map the entire response surface. The interior relationships between parameters were well defined by RSM. PMID:24936289

  14. Assessment of Response Surface Models using Independent Confirmation Point Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLoach, Richard

    2010-01-01

    This paper highlights various advantages that confirmation-point residuals have over conventional model design-point residuals in assessing the adequacy of a response surface model fitted by regression techniques to a sample of experimental data. Particular advantages are highlighted for the case of design matrices that may be ill-conditioned for a given sample of data. The impact of both aleatory and epistemological uncertainty in response model adequacy assessments is considered.

  15. Analysis of surface asperity flattening based on two different methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hejie; Öchsner, Andreas; Ni, Guowei; Wei, Dongbin; Jiang, Zhengyi

    2016-11-01

    The stress state is an important parameter in metal forming processes, which significantly influences the strain state and microstructure of products, affecting their surface qualities. In order to make the metal products have a good surface quality, the surface stress state must be optimised. In this study, two classical methods, the upper bound method and the crystal plasticity finite element method, were investigated. The differences between the two methods were discussed in regard to the model, the velocity field, and the strain field. Then the related surface roughness is deduced.

  16. Triangulated manifold meshing method preserving molecular surface topology.

    PubMed

    Chen, Minxin; Tu, Bin; Lu, Benzhuo

    2012-09-01

    Generation of manifold mesh is an urgent issue in mathematical simulations of biomolecule using boundary element methods (BEM) or finite element method (FEM). Defects, such as not closed mesh, intersection of elements and missing of small structures, exist in surface meshes generated by most of the current meshing method. Usually the molecular surface meshes produced by existing methods need to be revised carefully by third party software to ensure the surface represents a continuous manifold before being used in a BEM and FEM calculations. Based on the trace technique proposed in our previous work, in this paper, we present an improved meshing method to avoid intersections and preserve the topology of the molecular Gaussian surface. The new method divides the whole Gaussian surface into single valued pieces along each of x, y, z directions by tracing the extreme points along the fold curves on the surface. Numerical test results show that the surface meshes produced by the new method are manifolds and preserve surface topologies. The result surface mesh can also be directly used in surface conforming volume mesh generation for FEM type simulation. PMID:23117290

  17. Optimization of sustained release aceclofenac microspheres using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Rameshwar K; Naik, Jitendra B

    2015-03-01

    Polymeric microspheres containing aceclofenac were prepared by single emulsion (oil-in-water) solvent evaporation method using response surface methodology (RSM). Microspheres were prepared by changing formulation variables such as the amount of Eudragit® RS100 and the amount of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) by statistical experimental design in order to enhance the encapsulation efficiency (E.E.) of the microspheres. The resultant microspheres were evaluated for their size, morphology, E.E., and in vitro drug release. The amount of Eudragit® RS100 and the amount of PVA were found to be significant factors respectively for determining the E.E. of the microspheres. A linear mathematical model equation fitted to the data was used to predict the E.E. in the optimal region. Optimized formulation of microspheres was prepared using optimal process variables setting in order to evaluate the optimization capability of the models generated according to IV-optimal design. The microspheres showed high E.E. (74.14±0.015% to 85.34±0.011%) and suitably sustained drug release (minimum; 40% to 60%; maximum) over a period of 12h. The optimized microspheres formulation showed E.E. of 84.87±0.005 with small error value (1.39). The low magnitudes of error and the significant value of R(2) in the present investigation prove the high prognostic ability of the design. The absence of interactions between drug and polymers was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray powder diffractometry (XRPD) revealed the dispersion of drug within microspheres formulation. The microspheres were found to be discrete, spherical with smooth surface. The results demonstrate that these microspheres could be promising delivery system to sustain the drug release and improve the E.E. thus prolong drug action and achieve the highest healing effect with minimal gastrointestinal side effects.

  18. Effect of design selection on response surface performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, William C.

    1993-01-01

    The mathematical formulation of the engineering optimization problem is given. Evaluation of the objective function and constraint equations can be very expensive in a computational sense. Thus, it is desirable to use as few evaluations as possible in obtaining its solution. In solving the equation, one approach is to develop approximations to the objective function and/or restraint equations and then to solve the equation using the approximations in place of the original functions. These approximations are referred to as response surfaces. The desirability of using response surfaces depends upon the number of functional evaluations required to build the response surfaces compared to the number required in the direct solution of the equation without approximations. The present study is concerned with evaluating the performance of response surfaces so that a decision can be made as to their effectiveness in optimization applications. In particular, this study focuses on how the quality of approximations is effected by design selection. Polynomial approximations and neural net approximations are considered.

  19. Bacteria responsive antibacterial surfaces for indwelling device infections.

    PubMed

    Traba, Christian; Liang, Jun F

    2015-01-28

    Indwelling device infections now represent life-threatening circumstances as a result of the biofilms' tolerance to antibiotic treatments. Current antibiotic impregnation approaches through sustained antibiotic release have some unsolved problems which include short life-span, narrowed antibacterial spectrum, ineffectiveness towards resistant mutants, and the potential to hasten the antibiotic resistance process. In this study, bacteria responsive anti-biofilm surfaces were developed using bioactive peptides with proved activity to antibiotic resistant bacteria and biofilms. Resulting surfaces were stable under physiological conditions and in the presence of high concentrations of salts (0.5M NaCl) and biomacromolcules (1.0% DNA and 2.0% alginate), and thus showed good biocompatibility to various tissue cells. However, lytic peptide immobilized surfaces could sense bacteria adhesion and kill attached bacteria effectively and specifically, so biofilms were unable to develop on the lytic peptide immobilized surfaces. Bacteria responsive catheters remained biofilm free for up to a week. Therefore, the bacteria responsive antibacterial surfaces developed in this study represent new opportunities for indwelling device infections.

  20. Bacteria Responsive Antibacterial Surfaces for Indwelling Device Infections

    PubMed Central

    Traba, Christian; Liang, Jun F.

    2014-01-01

    Indwelling device infections now represents life-threatening circumstances as a result of the biofilms’ tolerance to antibiotic treatments. Current antibiotic impregnation approaches through sustained antibiotic release have some unsolved problems which include short life-span, narrowed antibacterial spectrum, ineffectiveness towards resistant mutants, and the potential to hasten the antibiotic resistance process. In this study, bacteria responsive anti-biofilm surfaces were developed using bioactive peptides with proved activity to antibiotic resistant bacteria and biofilms. Resulting surfaces were stable under physiological conditions and in the presence of high concentrations of salts (0.5 M NaCl) and biomacromolcules (1.0% DNA and 2.0% alginate), and thus showed good biocompatibility to various tissue cells. However, lytic peptide immobilized surfaces could sense bacteria adhesion and kill attached bacteria effectively and specifically, so biofilms were unable to develop on the lytic peptide immobilized surfaces. Bacteria responsive catheters remained biofilm free for up to a week. Therefore, the bacteria responsive antibacterial surfaces developed in this study represent new opportunities for indwelling device infections. PMID:25481445

  1. Bacteria responsive antibacterial surfaces for indwelling device infections.

    PubMed

    Traba, Christian; Liang, Jun F

    2015-01-28

    Indwelling device infections now represent life-threatening circumstances as a result of the biofilms' tolerance to antibiotic treatments. Current antibiotic impregnation approaches through sustained antibiotic release have some unsolved problems which include short life-span, narrowed antibacterial spectrum, ineffectiveness towards resistant mutants, and the potential to hasten the antibiotic resistance process. In this study, bacteria responsive anti-biofilm surfaces were developed using bioactive peptides with proved activity to antibiotic resistant bacteria and biofilms. Resulting surfaces were stable under physiological conditions and in the presence of high concentrations of salts (0.5M NaCl) and biomacromolcules (1.0% DNA and 2.0% alginate), and thus showed good biocompatibility to various tissue cells. However, lytic peptide immobilized surfaces could sense bacteria adhesion and kill attached bacteria effectively and specifically, so biofilms were unable to develop on the lytic peptide immobilized surfaces. Bacteria responsive catheters remained biofilm free for up to a week. Therefore, the bacteria responsive antibacterial surfaces developed in this study represent new opportunities for indwelling device infections. PMID:25481445

  2. Review of methods for assessing nonpoint-source contaminated ground-water discharge to surface water

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-04-01

    The document provides an overview of selected methods that have been used for assessing nonpoint source contaminated ground water discharge to surface water. EPA undertook the project in response to the growing awareness that contaminated ground water discharge is a significant source of nonpoint source contaminant loading to surface water in many parts of the country.

  3. Polysaccharide extraction from Sphallerocarpus gracilis roots by response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Ma, Tingting; Sun, Xiangyu; Tian, Chengrui; Luo, Jiyang; Zheng, Cuiping; Zhan, Jicheng

    2016-07-01

    The extraction process of Sphallerocarpus gracilis root polysaccharides (SGRP) was optimized using response surface methodology with two methods [hot-water extraction (HWE) and ultrasonic-assisted extraction (UAE)]. The antioxidant activities of SGRP were determined, and the structural features of the untreated materials (HWE residue and UAE residue) and the extracted polysaccharides were compared by scanning electron microscopy. Results showed that the optimal UAE conditions were extraction temperature of 81°C, extraction time of 1.7h, liquid-solid ratio of 17ml/g, ultrasonic power of 300W and three extraction cycles. The optimal HWE conditions were 93°C extraction temperature, 3.6h extraction time, 21ml/g liquid-solid ratio and three extraction cycles. UAE offered a higher extraction yield with a shorter time, lower temperature and a lower solvent consumption compared with HWE, and the extracted polysaccharides possessed a higher antioxidant capacity. Therefore, UAE could be used as an alternative to conventional HWE for SGRP extraction. PMID:27032488

  4. Polysaccharide extraction from Abelmoschus esculentus: optimization by response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Samavati, Vahid

    2013-06-01

    Crude polysaccharide extraction from the Iranian Abelmoschus esculentus was performed using water decoction. Response surface methodology (RSM), based on a five level, four variable central composite rotatable design (CCRD), was employed to obtain the best possible combination of extraction time (X1: 0.5-6.5 h), extraction temperature (X2: 80-100 °C), number of extraction (X3: 1-5), and water to the raw material ratio (X4: 4-28) for maximum polysaccharide extraction. The experimental data obtained were fitted to a second-order polynomial equation using multiple regression analysis and also analyzed by appropriate statistical methods (ANOVA). The optimum extraction conditions were as follows: extraction time of 4.94 h, extraction temperature of 94.97 °C, number of extraction of 4, and the ratio of water to raw material of 21.74. Under these conditions, the experimental yield was 16.895±0.29%, which is well in close agreement with the value predicted by the model 16.916%.

  5. Modelling of Surfaces. Part 2: Metallic Alloy Surfaces Using the BFS Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozzolo, Guillermo; Ferrante, John; Kobistek, Robert J.

    1994-01-01

    Using BFS, a new semiempirical method for alloys, we study the surface structure of fcc ordered binary alloys. We concentrate on the calculation of surface energies and surface relaxations for the L1(sub 0) and L1(sub 2) ordered structures. Different terminations of the low-index faces are studied. Also, we present results for the interlayer relaxations for planes close to the surface, revealing different relaxations for atoms of different species producing a rippled surface layer.

  6. A free surface sharpening strategy using optimization method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Hongchao; Ji, Lucheng; Tu, Shuangzhang

    2015-11-01

    VOF method which consists in transporting a discontinuous marker variable is widely used to capture the free surface in computational fluid dynamics. There is numerical dissipation in simulations involving the transport of the marker. Numerical dissipation makes the free surface lose its physical nature. A free surface sharpening strategy based on optimization method is presented in the paper. The strategy can keep the location of the free surface and local mass conservation at both time, and can also keep free surface in a constant width. It is independent on the types of solvers and meshes. Two famous cases were chosen for verifying the free surface sharpening strategy performance. Results show that the strategy has a very good performance on keeping local mass conservation. The efficiency of prediction of the free surface is improved by applying the strategy. Accurate modeling of flow details such as drops can also be captured by this method.

  7. Collagen nanofilm immobilized on at surfaces by electrodeposition method.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiudong; Jiang, Bo; Huang, Yi; Tian, Yunfei; Chen, Hong; Chen, Jiyong; Yang, Bangcheng

    2009-08-01

    A simple electrodeposition method is presented for the preparing of collagen nanofilms (EAT) on anodic oxidized titanium surfaces (AT). The nanofilms were observed by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Functional TiOx layers with anionic groups of --PO(4), --SO(4) and --OH were investigated on the AT surface by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy; X-ray diffraction results indicated that the AT surface was composed mainly of anatase and rutile. The bioactive electrodeposited TiOx layers on the AT surface showed lower water contact angles and higher surface energy than pure titanium surfaces (CT) and displayed higher collagen molecule immobilization.

  8. Analysis of the cell surface expression of cytokine receptors using the surface protein biotinylation method.

    PubMed

    Pavel, Mahmud Arif; Lam, Clarissa; Kashyap, Parul; Salehi-Najafabadi, Zahra; Singh, Gurpreet; Yu, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Cytokines are pleiotropic, low-molecular-weight proteins that regulate the immune responses to infection and inflammation. They stimulate the immune responses by binding to cytokine receptors on the cell plasma membrane. Thus, knowledge of the expression level of particular cytokine receptors on cell surface is crucial for understanding the cytokine function and regulation. One of the techniques to explore the membrane embedded cytokine receptors is cell surface biotinylation. Biotinylated surface proteins can be rapidly purified through the strong interaction between biotin and streptavidin. Here, we describe the procedure for surface biotinylation and purification of biotinylated cytokine receptors for further downstream analysis. PMID:24908305

  9. Analysis of the cell surface expression of cytokine receptors using the surface protein biotinylation method.

    PubMed

    Pavel, Mahmud Arif; Lam, Clarissa; Kashyap, Parul; Salehi-Najafabadi, Zahra; Singh, Gurpreet; Yu, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Cytokines are pleiotropic, low-molecular-weight proteins that regulate the immune responses to infection and inflammation. They stimulate the immune responses by binding to cytokine receptors on the cell plasma membrane. Thus, knowledge of the expression level of particular cytokine receptors on cell surface is crucial for understanding the cytokine function and regulation. One of the techniques to explore the membrane embedded cytokine receptors is cell surface biotinylation. Biotinylated surface proteins can be rapidly purified through the strong interaction between biotin and streptavidin. Here, we describe the procedure for surface biotinylation and purification of biotinylated cytokine receptors for further downstream analysis.

  10. Surface myomechanical responses recorded on a scanner galvanometer.

    PubMed

    Rafolt, D; Gallasch, E

    2002-09-01

    A moving magnet galvanometer equipped with lever and indentor was evaluated for mechanomyography (MMG). First, the precision of the galvanometer was tested on a piezo-electric disc actuator. Using a 50 mm lever, synthesised micromotions with an amplitude of 1 microm could be detected (noise level < 0.2 microm) at static indentation forces ranging from 0.1 to 2 N. Then the galvanometer was mounted on an isometric ankle dynamometer to sense calf-muscle responses (N = 6). In the first protocol, twitch contractions were elicited by electrical stimulation while the indentation force was increased. Twitch amplitudes, twitch contraction times and twitch half-relaxation times were analysed from the surface and contraction responses. With indentation force (0.1-0.5 N), the amplitude of the surface responses increased (+61%), contraction and half-relaxation times, however, were not influenced. The mean twitch contraction time from the surface responses (60 +/- 11 ms) was shorter than that from the contraction responses (115 +/- 7 ms), indicating more fast-contracting fibres under the indented area. In the second protocol, voluntary target contractions were produced, and the surface responses were simultaneously recorded on an accelerometer. After double differentiation of the galvanometer signal, both acceleration MMGs showed a high coincidence in the time and frequency domains. With an indentation force of 2 N applied on the accelerometer, the signal amplitude (-10%) and the mean frequency (-19%) decreased. A specific application of this galvanometer-dynamometer test system is the assessment of regeneration processes in paraplegics with long-term denervated muscles.

  11. Surface myomechanical responses recorded on a scanner galvanometer.

    PubMed

    Rafolt, D; Gallasch, E

    2002-09-01

    A moving magnet galvanometer equipped with lever and indentor was evaluated for mechanomyography (MMG). First, the precision of the galvanometer was tested on a piezo-electric disc actuator. Using a 50 mm lever, synthesised micromotions with an amplitude of 1 microm could be detected (noise level < 0.2 microm) at static indentation forces ranging from 0.1 to 2 N. Then the galvanometer was mounted on an isometric ankle dynamometer to sense calf-muscle responses (N = 6). In the first protocol, twitch contractions were elicited by electrical stimulation while the indentation force was increased. Twitch amplitudes, twitch contraction times and twitch half-relaxation times were analysed from the surface and contraction responses. With indentation force (0.1-0.5 N), the amplitude of the surface responses increased (+61%), contraction and half-relaxation times, however, were not influenced. The mean twitch contraction time from the surface responses (60 +/- 11 ms) was shorter than that from the contraction responses (115 +/- 7 ms), indicating more fast-contracting fibres under the indented area. In the second protocol, voluntary target contractions were produced, and the surface responses were simultaneously recorded on an accelerometer. After double differentiation of the galvanometer signal, both acceleration MMGs showed a high coincidence in the time and frequency domains. With an indentation force of 2 N applied on the accelerometer, the signal amplitude (-10%) and the mean frequency (-19%) decreased. A specific application of this galvanometer-dynamometer test system is the assessment of regeneration processes in paraplegics with long-term denervated muscles. PMID:12452422

  12. Speckle pattern texture analysis method to measure surface roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, I.; Sadovoy, A.; Doronin, A.; Meglinski, I.

    2013-02-01

    Speckle pattern texture analysis method is applied to measure surface roughness of human skin. The method is based on analyzing of a gray level co-occurrence matrix occurred from a speckle image of a rough surface. Paper with different surface roughness is used as a skin phantom. The roughness is controlled by profilometry measurements. The developed methodology could find wide application in dermatology and tissue diagnostics.

  13. Method for passivating crystal silicon surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Qi; Wang, Tihu; Page, Matthew R.; Yan, Yanfa

    2009-12-08

    In a method of making a c-Si-based cell or a .mu.c-Si-based cell, the improvement of increasing the minority charge carrier's lifetime, comprising: a) placing a c-Si or polysilicon wafer into CVD reaction chamber under a low vacuum condition and subjecting the substrate of the wafer to heating; and b) passing mixing gases comprising NH.sub.3/H.sub.2 through the reaction chamber at a low vacuum pressure for a sufficient time and at a sufficient flow rate to enable growth of an a-Si:H layer sufficient to increase the lifetime of the c-Si or polysilicon cell beyond that of the growth of an a-Si:H layer without treatment of the wafer with NH.sub.3/H.sub.2.

  14. Optical response of reconstructed GaP(001) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorn, M.; Junno, B.; Trepk, T.; Bose, S.; Samuelson, L.; Zettler, J.-T.; Richter, W.

    1999-10-01

    GaP(001) surfaces were found to reconstruct with (2×1) or (2×4) symmetry under surface conditions corresponding to a high or low V/III surface stoichiometry ratio, respectively. These surface reconstructions, identified by reflection high-energy electron diffraction, have been prepared in a chemical beam epitaxy (CBE) system by varying the sample temperature. Reflectance anisotropy spectra (RAS) of these surfaces have been taken under both CBE and metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy conditions. Three different phases of (2×4) symmetry have been distinguished according to their characteristic RAS response in agreement with recent theoretical predictions [A.M. Frisch, W.G. Schmidt, J. Bernholc, M. Pristovsek, N. Esser, and W. Richter, Phys. Rev B 60, 2488 (1999)]. For the (2×1) reconstruction a line-shape analysis of the RAS signatures was performed and their temperature shifts have been compared to the respective shifts of the bulk critical points. These experiments indicate the GaP(001)-(2×1) surface dielectric anisotropy originating from transitions between bulk states modified by the surface due to band-folding effects and anisotropic shifts of the E1 and E'0 critical point energies.

  15. Bone Response to Surface-Modified Titanium Implants: Studies on the Early Tissue Response to Implants with Different Surface Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Larsson Wexell, C.; Thomsen, P.; Aronsson, B.-O.; Tengvall, P.; Rodahl, M.; Lausmaa, J.; Kasemo, B.; Ericson, L. E.

    2013-01-01

    In a series of experimental studies, the bone formation around systematically modified titanium implants is analyzed. In the present study, three different surface modifications were prepared and evaluated. Glow-discharge cleaning and oxidizing resulted in a highly stoichiometric TiO2 surface, while a glow-discharge treatment in nitrogen gas resulted in implants with essentially a surface of titanium nitride, covered with a very thin titanium oxide. Finally, hydrogen peroxide treatment of implants resulted in an almost stoichiometric TiO2, rich in hydroxyl groups on the surface. Machined commercially pure titanium implants served as controls. Scanning Auger Electron Spectroscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy, and Atomic Force Microscopy revealed no significant differences in oxide thickness or surface roughness parameters, but differences in the surface chemical composition and apparent topography were observed. After surface preparation, the implants were inserted in cortical bone of rabbits and evaluated after 1, 3, and 6 weeks. Light microscopic evaluation of the tissue response showed that all implants were in contact with bone and had a large proportion of newly formed bone within the threads after 6 weeks. There were no morphological differences between the four groups. Our study shows that a high degree of bone contact and bone formation can be achieved with titanium implants of different surface composition and topography. PMID:24174936

  16. Chemical method for producing smooth surfaces on silicon wafers

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Conrad

    2003-01-01

    An improved method for producing optically smooth surfaces in silicon wafers during wet chemical etching involves a pre-treatment rinse of the wafers before etching and a post-etching rinse. The pre-treatment with an organic solvent provides a well-wetted surface that ensures uniform mass transfer during etching, which results in optically smooth surfaces. The post-etching treatment with an acetic acid solution stops the etching instantly, preventing any uneven etching that leads to surface roughness. This method can be used to etch silicon surfaces to a depth of 200 .mu.m or more, while the finished surfaces have a surface roughness of only 15-50 .ANG. (RMS).

  17. Surface evaluation method and stamping simulation for surface deflection of automotive outer panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichijo, Naoki; Iwata, Noritoshi; Iwata, Takamichi; Mita, Taichi; Niihara, Masatomo; Tsutamori, Hideo

    2013-12-01

    In designing dies of automotive outer panels, the most difficult process is to modify surface deflection. To fabricate high-quality outer panels without modifying dies, it is important to develop an evaluation method and a numerical analysis method for surface deflection of outer panels. In this study, we have developed a new evaluation method that uses the maximum value of curvature calculated using reflecting curves in the surface. This new evaluation method made the examiner's evaluation to conform with the digital evaluation. The evaluation results with the new method shows better agreement with the sensory value than those with the conventional methods. We have proposed the new analysis method to predict surface deflection correctly. By the proposed simulation method, plastic deformation is calculated in consideration of stress in thickness direction, and restriking conditions have been examined. We have applied our methods to the fabrication of automotive outer panels, and verified that these are useful and practical.

  18. Improvements to a Response Surface Thermal Model for Orion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Stephen W.; Walker, William Q.

    2011-01-01

    A study was performed to determine if a Design of Experiments (DOE)/Response Surface Methodology could be applied to on-orbit thermal analysis and produce a set of Response Surface Equations (RSE) that predict Orion vehicle temperatures within 10 F. The study used the Orion Outer Mold Line model. Five separate factors were identified for study: yaw, pitch, roll, beta angle, and the environmental parameters. Twenty-three external Orion components were selected and their minimum and maximum temperatures captured over a period of two orbits. Thus, there are 46 responses. A DOE case matrix of 145 runs was developed. The data from these cases were analyzed to produce a fifth order RSE for each of the temperature responses. For the 145 cases in the DOE matrix, the agreement between the engineering data and the RSE predictions was encouraging with 40 of the 46 RSEs predicting temperatures within the goal band. However, the verification cases showed most responses did not meet the 10 F goal. After reframing the focus of the study to better align the RSE development with the purposes of the model, a set of RSEs for both the minimum and maximum radiator temperatures was produced which predicted the engineering model output within +/-4 F. Therefore, with the correct application of the DOE/RSE methodology, RSEs can be developed that provide analysts a fast and easy way to screen large numbers of environments and assess proposed changes to the RSE factors.

  19. Combining Noise Factors and Process Parameters in a Response Surface

    SciTech Connect

    Wyckoff, J.J.

    1998-03-19

    This presentation covers the strategy and analysis of an experiment to characterize a gas tungsten arc welding process. The experiment combined four uncontrolled noise factors and four controlled process parameters. A nontraditional response surface design was employed. Multiple responses were modeled. Optimal settings for the process parameters to successfully weld the widest range of the pertinent product features were identified. Thus, the process was made ''robust'' against ''noise'' factors. Comparisons are made between the experimental and analytical approach taken versus the Taguchi style of experimentation and analysis. This comparison is mainly done with respect to the information gained, such as product design criteria, incoming material specifications, and process adjustments for nonconforming material.

  20. Spatial Patterns of Radiative Forcing and Surface Temperature Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shindell, D. T.

    2014-12-01

    Examination of radiative forcing (RF), a key measure of changes in the energy balance of the Earth, facilitates understanding of the role of various drivers of climate change. For short-lived compounds, the RF can be highly inhomogeneous geographically. The relationship between the spatial patterns of RF and climate response is poorly characterized, however. Here we examine the relationship between RF and surface temperature response in the latest generation of climate models. We find that the geographic distribution of historical changes in aerosol and ozone RF strongly influences the response, leading to substantial regional differences with respect to the response to quasi-uniform well-mixed greenhouse gases (WMGHG). In particular, the response in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) extratropics and tropics follows the forcing in those regions fairly closely. There is a stronger global sensitivity to historical aerosol plus ozone RF than to WMGHG RF with equivalent global mean value, as noted previously [D T Shindell, 2014] and a stronger response in much of the NH extratropics, especially in and downwind of industrialized areas. The enhanced response is shown to be particularly large over land plus polar ocean areas, where transient response occurs more rapidly and strong snow and ice albedo feedbacks operate. This response is not attributable to greater forcing over those regions, but rather appears to reflect a broad sensitivity of NH extratropical land areas to NH extratropical forcing. The models show substantial diversity in the enhancement of land+polar ocean response to aerosols plus ozone relative to WMGHG, and for ocean response some models show reduced sensitivity to aerosols plus ozone (though the multi-model mean shows an enhancement), suggesting that different representations of land and ocean adjustment timescales and regional heat transport contribute greatly to the differences in response to inhomogeneous forcing. In addition, areas with greatest

  1. Methods of Identifying Individual Guessers from Item Response Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Xiangdong

    2007-01-01

    This article investigates several methods of identifying individual guessers from their response data. Both the posterior probability method and the likelihood ratio method are based on the two-state mixture modeling approach to response times. The accuracy method is based on response accuracy data. Results from the simulation study showed that…

  2. Advanced surface paneling method for subsonic and supersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, L. L.; Johnson, F. T.; Ehlers, F. E.

    1976-01-01

    Numerical results illustrating the capabilities of an advanced aerodynamic surface paneling method are presented. The method is applicable to both subsonic and supersonic flow, as represented by linearized potential flow theory. The method is based on linearly varying sources and quadratically varying doublets which are distributed over flat or curved panels. These panels are applied to the true surface geometry of arbitrarily shaped three dimensional aerodynamic configurations.

  3. Method for preparing hydride configurations and reactive metal surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Silver, Gary L.

    1988-08-16

    A method for preparing highly hydrogen-reactive surfaces on metals which normally require substantial heating, high pressures, or an extended induction period, which involves pretreatment of said surfaces with either a non-oxidizing acid or hydrogen gas to form a hydrogen-bearing coating on said surfaces, and subsequently heating said coated metal in the absence of moisture and oxygen for a period sufficient to decompose said coating and cooling said metal to room temperature. Surfaces so treated will react almost instantaneously with hydrogen gas at room temperature and low pressure. The method is particularly applicable to uranium, thorium, and lanthanide metals.

  4. Method for preparing hydride configurations and reactive metal surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Silver, G.L.

    1984-05-18

    A method for preparing reactive metal surfaces, particularly uranium surfaces is disclosed, whereby the metal is immediately reactive to hydrogen gas at room temperature and low pressure. The metal surfaces are first pretreated by exposure to an acid which forms an adherent hydride-bearing composition on the metal surface. Subsequent heating of the pretreated metal at a temperature sufficient to decompose the hydride coating in vacuum or inert gas renders the metal surface instantaneously reactive to hydrogen gas at room temperature and low pressure.

  5. Surface functionalized mesoporous material and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Feng, Xiangdong [West Richland, WA; Liu, Jun [West Richland, WA; Fryxell, Glen E [Kennewick, WA

    2001-12-04

    According to the present invention, an organized assembly of functional molecules with specific interfacial functionality (functional group(s)) is attached to available surfaces including within mesopores of a mesoporous material. The method of the present invention avoids the standard base soak that would digest the walls between the mesopores by boiling the mesoporous material in water for surface preparation then removing all but one or two layers of water molecules on the internal surface of a pore. Suitable functional molecule precursor is then applied to permeate the hydrated pores and the precursor then undergoes condensation to form the functional molecules on the interior surface(s) of the pore(s).

  6. System and method for extracting a sample from a surface

    DOEpatents

    Van Berkel, Gary; Covey, Thomas

    2015-06-23

    A system and method is disclosed for extracting a sample from a sample surface. A sample is provided and a sample surface receives the sample which is deposited on the sample surface. A hydrophobic material is applied to the sample surface, and one or more devices are configured to dispense a liquid on the sample, the liquid dissolving the sample to form a dissolved sample material, and the one or more devices are configured to extract the dissolved sample material from the sample surface.

  7. METHOD OF FORMING A PROTECTIVE COATING ON FERROUS METAL SURFACES

    DOEpatents

    Schweitzer, D.G.; Weeks, J.R.; Kammerer, O.F.; Gurinsky, D.H.

    1960-02-23

    A method is described of protecting ferrous metal surfaces from corrosive attack by liquid metals, such as liquid bismuth or lead-bismuth alloys. The nitrogen content of the ferrous metal surface is first reduced by reacting the metal surface with a metal which forms a stable nitride. Thereafter, the surface is contacted with liquid metal containing at least 2 ppm zirconium at a temperature in the range of 550 to 1100 deg C to form an adherent zirconium carbide layer on the ferrous surface.

  8. Dual surface-functionalized Janus nanocomposites for targeted stimulus responsive drug delivery.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Feng; Wang, Yilong; Pauletti, Giovanni; Shi, Donglu

    2014-03-01

    A novel superparamagnetic Janus nanocomposite (SJNC) of polystyrene/Fe3O4@SiO2 was designed and developed for the first time using a miniemulsion method. Both surfaces were readily functionalized for bio-medical application. Folic acid (FA) and doxorubicin (DOX) were conjugated stepwise to the surfaces. It was found that SJNCs achieved cell-targeted drug delivery in a pH-responsive manner.

  9. A Ranking Method for Evaluating Constructed Responses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Attali, Yigal

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a comparative judgment approach for holistically scored constructed response tasks. In this approach, the grader rank orders (rather than rate) the quality of a small set of responses. A prior automated evaluation of responses guides both set formation and scaling of rankings. Sets are formed to have similar prior scores and…

  10. The frictional response of patterned soft polymer surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rand, Charles J.

    2008-10-01

    Friction plays an intricate role in our everyday lives, it is therefore critical to understand the underlying features of friction to better help control and manipulate the response anywhere two surfaces in contact move past each other by a sliding motion. Here we present results targeting a thorough understanding of soft material friction and how it can be manipulated with patterns. We found that the naturally occurring length scale or periodicity (lambda) of frictionally induced patterns, Schallamach waves, could be described using two materials properties (critical energy release rate Gc and complex modulus (E*), i.e. lambdainfinity Gc /E*). Following this, we evaluated the effect of a single defect at a sliding interface. Sliding over a defect can be used to model the sliding from one feature to another in a patterned surface. Defects decreased the sliding frictional force by as much as 80% sliding and this decrease was attributed to changes in tangential stiffness of the sliding interface. The frictional response of surface wrinkles, where multiple edges or defects are acting in concert, was also evaluated. Wrinkles were shown to decrease friction (F) and changes in contact area (A) could not describe this decrease. A tangential stiffness correction factor (fx) and changes in the critical energy release rate were used to describe this deviation (F infinity Gc *A*fx/ℓ, where ℓ is a materials defined length scale of dissipation). This scaling can be used to describe the friction of any topographically patterned surface including the Gecko's foot, where the feature size is smaller than ℓ and thus replaces ℓ, increasing the friction compared to a flat surface. Also, mechanically-induced surface defects were used to align osmotically driven surface wrinkles by creating stress discontinuities that convert the global biaxial stress state to local uniaxial stresses. Defect spacing was used to control the alignment process at the surface of the wrinkled rigid

  11. EMG responses to maintain stance during multidirectional surface translations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, S. M.; Fung, J.; Horak, F. B.; Peterson, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    To characterize muscle synergy organization underlying multidirectional control of stance posture, electromyographic activity was recorded from 11 lower limb and trunk muscles of 7 healthy subjects while they were subjected to horizontal surface translations in 12 different, randomly presented directions. The latency and amplitude of muscle responses were quantified for each perturbation direction. Tuning curves for each muscle were examined to relate the amplitude of the muscle response to the direction of surface translation. The latencies of responses for the shank and thigh muscles were constant, regardless of perturbation direction. In contrast, the latencies for another thigh [tensor fascia latae (TFL)] and two trunk muscles [rectus abdominis (RAB) and erector spinae (ESP)] were either early or late, depending on the perturbation direction. These three muscles with direction-specific latencies may play different roles in postural control as prime movers or as stabilizers for different translation directions, depending on the timing of recruitment. Most muscle tuning curves were within one quadrant, having one direction of maximal activity, generally in response to diagonal surface translations. Two trunk muscles (RAB and ESP) and two lower limb muscles (semimembranosus and peroneus longus) had bipolar tuning curves, with two different directions of maximal activity, suggesting that these muscle can play different roles as part of different synergies, depending on translation direction. Muscle tuning curves tended to group into one of three regions in response to 12 different directions of perturbations. Two muscles [rectus femoris (RFM) and TFL] were maximally active in response to lateral surface translations. The remaining muscles clustered into one of two diagonal regions. The diagonal regions corresponded to the two primary directions of active horizontal force vector responses. Two muscles (RFM and adductor longus) were maximally active orthogonal to

  12. Plant surface wax affects parasitoid's response to host footprints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostás, Michael; Ruf, Daniel; Zabka, Vanessa; Hildebrandt, Ulrich

    2008-10-01

    The plant surface is the substrate upon which herbivorous insects and natural enemies meet and thus represents the stage for interactions between the three trophic levels. Plant surfaces are covered by an epicuticular wax layer which is highly variable depending on species, cultivar or plant part. Differences in wax chemistry may modulate ecological interactions. We explored whether caterpillars of Spodoptera frugiperda, when walking over a plant surface, leave a chemical trail (kairomones) that can be detected by the parasitoid Cotesia marginiventris. Chemistry and micromorphology of cuticular waxes of two barley eceriferum wax mutants ( cer-za.126, cer-yp.949) and wild-type cv. Bonus (wt) were assessed. The plants were then used to investigate potential surface effects on the detectability of caterpillar kairomones. Here we provide evidence that C. marginiventris responds to chemical footprints of its host. Parasitoids were able to detect the kairomone on wild-type plants and on both cer mutants but the response to cer-yp.949 (reduced wax, high aldehyde fraction) was less pronounced. Experiments with caterpillar-treated wt and mutant leaves offered simultaneously, confirmed this observation: no difference in wasp response was found when wt was tested against cer-za.126 (reduced wax, wt-like chemical composition) but wt was significantly more attractive than cer-yp.949. This demonstrates for the first time that the wax layer can modulate the detectability of host kairomones.

  13. Estimating surface acoustic impedance with the inverse method.

    PubMed

    Piechowicz, Janusz

    2011-01-01

    Sound field parameters are predicted with numerical methods in sound control systems, in acoustic designs of building and in sound field simulations. Those methods define the acoustic properties of surfaces, such as sound absorption coefficients or acoustic impedance, to determine boundary conditions. Several in situ measurement techniques were developed; one of them uses 2 microphones to measure direct and reflected sound over a planar test surface. Another approach is used in the inverse boundary elements method, in which estimating acoustic impedance of a surface is expressed as an inverse boundary problem. The boundary values can be found from multipoint sound pressure measurements in the interior of a room. This method can be applied to arbitrarily-shaped surfaces. This investigation is part of a research programme on using inverse methods in industrial room acoustics. PMID:21939599

  14. Evaluation of surface sampling method performance for Bacillus Spores on clean and dirty outdoor surfaces.

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Mollye C.; Einfeld, Wayne; Boucher, Raymond M.; Brown, Gary Stephen; Tezak, Matthew Stephen

    2011-06-01

    Recovery of Bacillus atrophaeous spores from grime-treated and clean surfaces was measured in a controlled chamber study to assess sampling method performance. Outdoor surfaces investigated by wipe and vacuum sampling methods included stainless steel, glass, marble and concrete. Bacillus atrophaeous spores were used as a surrogate for Bacillus anthracis spores in this study designed to assess whether grime-coated surfaces significantly affected surface sampling method performance when compared to clean surfaces. A series of chamber tests were carried out in which known amounts of spores were allowed to gravitationally settle onto both clean and dirty surfaces. Reference coupons were co-located with test coupons in all chamber experiments to provide a quantitative measure of initial surface concentrations of spores on all surfaces, thereby allowing sampling recovery calculations. Results from these tests, carried out under both low and high humidity conditions, show that spore recovery from grime-coated surfaces is the same as or better than spore recovery from clean surfaces. Statistically significant differences between method performance for grime-coated and clean surfaces were observed in only about half of the chamber tests conducted.

  15. CMM probe compensation methods for measuring complex screw surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qiancheng; Yang, Tianlong; Yin, Xiyun

    2013-01-01

    At present, probe compensation is the key problem in measuring geometric parameters of complex screw surface with CMM due to its complicated 3D shape, aiming at this problem, some new measurement methods are proposed based on geometric feature models, expressing the screw surface and its offset surface separately. Supposing the parameter lead of a screw surface is known, it's realized by scanning one single profile to complete probe compensation and calculate out all parameters, and the probe compensation is done by two improved methods, named as modified cross product and offset surface virtual measurement respectively, the theory and detailed process of which are discussed in this paper. After performing systematic experiments of profile scan, probe compensation and error evaluation, results show that the new measurement methods provide higher precision, stability and realizability.

  16. A study on solid modelling with surface trimming method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Ching-Yun; Chang, San-Cheng

    1993-07-01

    This paper proposes a Surface Trimming Method based on the intersection curves between free-form surfaces so that a complex solid model with several primitive surfaces can be constructed. These solid models will not only be used by the mechanical engineering industry to design and analyze conventional mechanical parts, but will also be used by the civil engineers to design and analyze structures of irregular shape. The scope of solid modelling application is thus enhanced.

  17. An Improved Surface Passivation Method for Single-Molecule Studies

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Boyang; Young Han, Kyu; Zhou, Ruobo; Kim, Hajin; Shi, Xinghua; Abeysirigunawardena, Sanjaya C.; Jain, Ankur; Singh, Digvijay; Aggarwal, Vasudha; Woodson, Sarah A.; Ha, Taekjip

    2014-01-01

    We herein report a surface passivation method for in vitro single-molecule studies, which more efficiently prevents non-specific binding of biomolecules as compared to the polyethylene glycol surface. The new surface does not perturb the behavior and activities of tethered biomolecules. It can also be used for single-molecule imaging in the presence of high concentrations of labeled species in solution. Reduction in preparation time and cost is another major advantage. PMID:25306544

  18. Methods and systems for detection of ice formation on surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alfano, Robert R. (Inventor); Wang, Wubao (Inventor); Sztul, Henry (Inventor); Budansky, Yury (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A system for detecting ice formation on metal, painted metal and other material surfaces can include a transparent window having an exterior surface upon which ice can form; a light source and optics configured and arranged to illuminate the exterior surface of the window from behind the exterior surface; and a detector and optics configured and arranged to receive light backscattered by the exterior surface and any ice disposed on the exterior surface and determine the thickness of the ice layer. For example, the system can be used with aircraft by placing one or more windows in the wings of the aircraft. The system is used for a novel optical method for real-time on-board detection and warning of ice formation on surfaces of airplanes, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), and other vehicles and stationary structures to improve their safety and operation.

  19. A Modified Jaeger's Method for Measuring Surface Tension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ntibi, J. Effiom-Edem

    1991-01-01

    A static method of measuring the surface tension of a liquid is presented. Jaeger's method is modified by replacing the pressure source with a variable pressure head. By using this method, stationary air bubbles are obtained thus resulting in controllable external parameters. (Author/KR)

  20. A multispectral method of determining sea surface temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shenk, W. E.

    1972-01-01

    A multispectral method for determining sea surface temperatures is discussed. The specifications of the equipment and the atmospheric conditions required for successful multispectral data acquisition are described. Examples of data obtained in the North Atlantic Ocean are presented. The differences between the actual sea surface temperatures and the equivalent blackbody temperatures as determined by a radiometer are plotted.

  1. Coherent gradient sensing method and system for measuring surface curvature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosakis, Ares J. (Inventor); Singh, Ramen P. (Inventor); Kolawa, Elizabeth (Inventor); Moore, Jr., Nicholas R. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A system and method for determining a curvature of a specularly reflective surface based on optical interference. Two optical gratings are used to produce a spatial displacement in an interference field of two different diffraction components produced by one grating from different diffraction components produced by another grating. Thus, the curvature of the surface can be determined.

  2. Surface modification of SiC mirror by IARE method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Zhenfeng; Gao, Jinsong

    2011-02-01

    A method to prepare high quality SiC coating at low temperature using large aperture E-beam evaporation PVD equipment with ion assistance was developed for the surface modification of SiC mirror for space projects .This method was called Ion Assisted Reactive Evaporation (IARE). The modified SiC coating was prepared using CH4 and Si with Kaufman ion source by IARE at 300°C and it had met the requirements of applications. The SiC coating prepared by this method was amorphous. It was dense, homogeneous and easy to be polished. The surface modification of a SiC mirror was carried out using SiC coating by this method and achieved a fine surface modification effect. The surface roughness (rms) of the SiC substrate was reduced to 0.862nm, the scattering coefficient was reduced to 2.79% and the reflectance coated with Ag film was improved simultaneously after the surface modification. The effect of surface modification using SiC coating was close to that of using Si coating. It can be drawn that this technological method to preparation SiC coating for the surface modification of SiC mirror is reasonable and effective.

  3. Surface modification of SiC mirror by IARE method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Zhenfeng; Gao, Jinsong

    2010-10-01

    A method to prepare high quality SiC coating at low temperature using large aperture E-beam evaporation PVD equipment with ion assistance was developed for the surface modification of SiC mirror for space projects .This method was called Ion Assisted Reactive Evaporation (IARE). The modified SiC coating was prepared using CH4 and Si with Kaufman ion source by IARE at 300°C and it had met the requirements of applications. The SiC coating prepared by this method was amorphous. It was dense, homogeneous and easy to be polished. The surface modification of a SiC mirror was carried out using SiC coating by this method and achieved a fine surface modification effect. The surface roughness (rms) of the SiC substrate was reduced to 0.862nm, the scattering coefficient was reduced to 2.79% and the reflectance coated with Ag film was improved simultaneously after the surface modification. The effect of surface modification using SiC coating was close to that of using Si coating. It can be drawn that this technological method to preparation SiC coating for the surface modification of SiC mirror is reasonable and effective.

  4. A continuous surface reconstruction method on point cloud captured from a 3D surface photogrammetry system

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wenyang; Cheung, Yam; Sabouri, Pouya; Arai, Tatsuya J.; Sawant, Amit; Ruan, Dan

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: To accurately and efficiently reconstruct a continuous surface from noisy point clouds captured by a surface photogrammetry system (VisionRT). Methods: The authors have developed a level-set based surface reconstruction method on point clouds captured by a surface photogrammetry system (VisionRT). The proposed method reconstructs an implicit and continuous representation of the underlying patient surface by optimizing a regularized fitting energy, offering extra robustness to noise and missing measurements. By contrast to explicit/discrete meshing-type schemes, their continuous representation is particularly advantageous for subsequent surface registration and motion tracking by eliminating the need for maintaining explicit point correspondences as in discrete models. The authors solve the proposed method with an efficient narrowband evolving scheme. The authors evaluated the proposed method on both phantom and human subject data with two sets of complementary experiments. In the first set of experiment, the authors generated a series of surfaces each with different black patches placed on one chest phantom. The resulting VisionRT measurements from the patched area had different degree of noise and missing levels, since VisionRT has difficulties in detecting dark surfaces. The authors applied the proposed method to point clouds acquired under these different configurations, and quantitatively evaluated reconstructed surfaces by comparing against a high-quality reference surface with respect to root mean squared error (RMSE). In the second set of experiment, the authors applied their method to 100 clinical point clouds acquired from one human subject. In the absence of ground-truth, the authors qualitatively validated reconstructed surfaces by comparing the local geometry, specifically mean curvature distributions, against that of the surface extracted from a high-quality CT obtained from the same patient. Results: On phantom point clouds, their method

  5. Method of making a coating of a microtextured surface

    DOEpatents

    Affinito, John D [Tucson, AZ; Graff, Gordon L [West Richland, WA; Martin, Peter M [Kennewick, WA; Gross, Mark E [Pasco, WA; Burrows, Paul E [Kennewick, WA; Sapochak, Linda S [Henderson, NV

    2004-11-02

    A method for conformally coating a microtextured surface. The method includes flash evaporating a polymer precursor forming an evaporate, passing the evaporate to a glow discharge electrode creating a glow discharge polymer precursor plasma from the evaporate, cryocondensing the glow discharge polymer precursor plasma on the microtextured surface and crosslinking the glow discharge polymer precursor plasma thereon, wherein the crosslinking resulting from radicals created in the glow discharge polymer precursor plasma.

  6. Method and Apparatus for Measuring Surface Air Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Bing (Inventor); Hu, Yongxiang (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention is directed to an apparatus and method for remotely measuring surface air pressure. In one embodiment, the method of the present invention utilizes the steps of transmitting a signal having multiple frequencies into the atmosphere, measuring the transmitted/reflected signal to determine the relative received power level of each frequency and then determining the surface air pressure based upon the attenuation of the transmitted frequencies.

  7. Monitoring method for surface contamination caused by selected antineoplastic agents.

    PubMed

    Larson, R R; Khazaeli, M B; Dillon, H Kenneth

    2002-02-01

    A method of evaluating surface contamination caused by selected antineoplastic agents was studied. The antineoplastic agents tested were cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide, doxorubicin hydrochloride, fluorouracil, and paclitaxel. Each agent was reconstituted and prepared as a stock solution. A 0.1-mL portion of each solution was spread evenly over a 600-cm2 area of a stainless steel surface, a resin countertop surface, and a vinyl flooring surface. After drying, the surfaces were wiped with each of two types of commercially available wiping materials (What-man no. 42 filters and Kimberly-Clark Kimwipes). A blend of methanol, acetonitrile, and buffered water was used both as the wetting agent for wiping the surfaces and as a desorbing solution. The desorbate was analyzed for drug concentration by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Mean +/- S.D. percent total recovery ranged from 72.4% +/- 17.6% to 95.3% +/- 2.9% for the vinyl surface wiped with filters, 91.5% +/- 5.4% to 104.7% +/- 0.8% for the resin surface wiped with filters, 73.9% +/- 2.3% to 95.3% +/- 1.7% for the stainless steel surface wiped with filters, and 18.2% +/- 1.4% to 372.8% +/- 8.0% for the stainless steel surface wiped with Kimwipes. Results were best for ifosfamide and cyclophosphamide. Kimwipes were deemed ineffective for this monitoring method because an ingredient interfered with the quantitative analytical tests. A wipe-sampling, desorption, and HPLC method for monitoring surface contamination by selected antineoplastic agents was sufficiently accurate and sensitive to evaluate surfaces typically found in both the pharmacy and drug administration areas of oncology treatment facilities. PMID:11862639

  8. Surface topography characterization of automotive cylinder liner surfaces using fractal methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence K, Deepak; Ramamoorthy, B.

    2013-09-01

    This paper explores the use of fractal approaches for the possible characterization of automotive cylinder bore surface topography by employing methods such as differential box counting method, power spectral method and structure function method. Three stage plateau honing experiments were conducted to manufacture sixteen cylinder liner surfaces with different surface topographies, for the study. The three fractal methods are applied on the image data obtained using a computer vision system and 3-D profile data obtained using vertical scanning white light interferometer from the cylinder liner surfaces. The computed fractal parameters (fractal dimension and topothesy) are compared and correlated with the measured 3-D Abbott-Firestone curve parameters (Sk, Spk, Svk, Sr1 and Sr2) that are currently used for the surface topography characterization cylinder liner surfaces. The analyses of the results indicated that the fractal dimension (D) computed using the vision data as well as 3-D profile data by employing three different fractal methods consistantly showed a negative correlation with the functional surface topographical parameters that represents roughness at peak (Spk),core (Sk) and valley (Svk) regions and positive correlation with the upper bearing area (Sr1) and lower bearing area (Sr2) of the automotive of cylinder bore surface.

  9. A numerical method for approximating antenna surfaces defined by discrete surface points

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, R. Q.; Acosta, R.

    1985-01-01

    A simple numerical method for the quadratic approximation of a discretely defined reflector surface is described. The numerical method was applied to interpolate the surface normal of a parabolic reflector surface from a grid of nine closest surface points to the point of incidence. After computing the surface normals, the geometrical optics and the aperture integration method using the discrete Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) were applied to compute the radiaton patterns for a symmetric and an offset antenna configurations. The computed patterns are compared to that of the analytic case and to the patterns generated from another numerical technique using the spline function approximation. In the paper, examples of computations are given. The accuracy of the numerical method is discussed.

  10. Efficient molecular surface generation using level-set methods.

    PubMed

    Can, Tolga; Chen, Chao-I; Wang, Yuan-Fang

    2006-12-01

    Molecules interact through their surface residues. Calculation of the molecular surface of a protein structure is thus an important step for a detailed functional analysis. One of the main considerations in comparing existing methods for molecular surface computations is their speed. Most of the methods that produce satisfying results for small molecules fail to do so for large complexes. In this article, we present a level-set-based approach to compute and visualize a molecular surface at a desired resolution. The emerging level-set methods have been used for computing evolving boundaries in several application areas from fluid mechanics to computer vision. Our method provides a uniform framework for computing solvent-accessible, solvent-excluded surfaces and interior cavities. The computation is carried out very efficiently even for very large molecular complexes with tens of thousands of atoms. We compared our method to some of the most widely used molecular visualization tools (Swiss-PDBViewer, PyMol, and Chimera) and our results show that we can calculate and display a molecular surface 1.5-3.14 times faster on average than all three of the compared programs. Furthermore, we demonstrate that our method is able to detect all of the interior inaccessible cavities that can accommodate one or more water molecules. PMID:16621636

  11. Method of nitriding niobium to form a superconducting surface

    DOEpatents

    Kelley, Michael J.; Klopf, John Michael; Singaravelu, Senthilaraja

    2014-08-19

    A method of forming a delta niobium nitride .delta.-NbN layer on the surface of a niobium object including cleaning the surface of the niobium object; providing a treatment chamber; placing the niobium object in the treatment chamber; evacuating the chamber; passing pure nitrogen into the treatment chamber; focusing a laser spot on the niobium object; delivering laser fluences at the laser spot until the surface of the niobium object reaches above its boiling temperature; and rastering the laser spot over the surface of the niobium object.

  12. Surface treatment and protection method for cadmium zinc telluride crystals

    DOEpatents

    Wright, Gomez W.; James, Ralph B.; Burger, Arnold; Chinn, Douglas A.

    2003-01-01

    A method for treatment of the surface of a CdZnTe (CZT) crystal that provides a native dielectric coating to reduce surface leakage currents and thereby, improve the resolution of instruments incorporating detectors using CZT crystals. A two step process is disclosed, etching the surface of a CZT crystal with a solution of the conventional bromine/methanol etch treatment, and after attachment of electrical contacts, passivating the CZT crystal surface with a solution of 10 w/o NH.sub.4 F and 10 w/o H.sub.2 O.sub.2 in water.

  13. Surface Treatment And Protection Method For Cadium Zinc Telluride Crystals

    DOEpatents

    Wright, Gomez W.; James, Ralph B.; Burger, Arnold; Chinn, Douglas A.

    2006-02-21

    A method for treatment of the surface of a CdZnTe (CZT) crystal that provides a native dielectric coating to reduce surface leakage currents and thereby, improve the resolution of instruments incorporating detectors using CZT crystals. A two step process is disclosed, etching the surface of a CZT crystal with a solution of the conventional bromine/methanol etch treatment, and after attachment of electrical contacts, passivating the CZT crystal surface with a solution of 10 w/o NH4F and 10 w/o H2O2 in water.

  14. Surface Markers for the Murine Oval Cell Response

    PubMed Central

    Dorrell, Craig; Erker, Laura; Lanxon-Cookson, Kelsea M.; Abraham, Stephanie L.; Victoroff, Tristan; Ro, Simon; Canaday, Pamela S.; Streeter, Philip R.; Grompe, Markus

    2011-01-01

    The biology of progenitor activation in the liver is of considerable medical and scientific interest. The powerful genetic tools available for the mouse make it an ideal model system to study this complex process involving many different cell types. However, reagents for the isolation and study of distinct hepatic subpopulations have been quite limited compared to those available for hematopoietic cells. To produce cell surface reactive reagents more specific for the oval cell response, we generated a new collection of monoclonal antibodies by immunization of Fischer rats with enzymatically dispersed nonparenchymal cells from the livers of adult mice treated with 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydrocollidine. Each of the resulting antibodies recognized a surface antigen present on a liver cell subset and permitted the viable isolation of the associated subpopulation by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Differential activity was observed on normal liver cells and at different stages of oval cell activation, indicating potential utility for progenitor cell identification. The subdivision of liver cells using these tools should facilitate the study of the biology of ductal and periductal hepatic cell types, including progenitors. Conclusion A new panel of surface reactive monoclonal antibodies to support investigation of the murine oval cell response has been developed. PMID:18726953

  15. Surface Chemistry of Nanocellulose Fibers Directs Monocyte/Macrophage Response.

    PubMed

    Hua, Kai; Ålander, Eva; Lindström, Tom; Mihranyan, Albert; Strømme, Maria; Ferraz, Natalia

    2015-09-14

    The effect of surface functionalization of nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) on monocyte/macrophage (MM) behavior is investigated to understand how the physicochemical properties of nanocelluloses influence the interactions of such materials with biological systems. Films of anionic (a-), cationic (c-), and unmodified (u-) NFC were synthesized and characterized in terms of surface charge. THP-1 monocytes were cultured on the surface of the films for 24 h in the presence and absence of lipopolysaccharide, and the cell response was evaluated in terms of cell adhesion, morphology, and secretion of TNF-α, IL-10, and IL-1ra. The results show that MMs cultured on carboxymethylated-NFC films (a-NFC) are activated toward a proinflammatory phenotype, whereas u-NFC promotes a mild activation of the studied cells. The presence of hydroxypropyltrimethylammonium groups on c-NFC, however, does not promote the activation of MMs, indicating that c-NFC closely behaves as an inert material in terms of MM activation. None of the materials is able to directly activate the MMs toward an anti-inflammatory response. These results may provide a foundation for the design of future NFC-based materials with the ability to control MM activation and may expand the use of NFC in biomedical applications.

  16. Development of approximations for HSCT wing bending material weight using response surface methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balabanov, Vladimir Olegovich

    A procedure for generating a customized weight function for wing bending material weight of the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) is described. The weight function is based on the HSCT configuration parameters. A response surface methodology is used to fit a quadratic polynomial to data gathered from a large number of structural optimizations, a coarse-grained parallelization of structural optimization procedure is implemented by a master-slave processor arrangement on an Intel Paragon computer. The results of the structural optimization are noisy. Noise reduction in the structural optimization results is discussed. It is shown that the response surface filters out this noise. Statistical design of experiments technique is used to minimize the number of required structural optimizations and to maintain accuracy. Simple analysis techniques are used to find regions of the design space where the reasonable HSCT designs could occur, thus customizing the weight function to the design requirements of the HSCT, while the response surface itself is created employing detailed analysis methods. Analysis of variance is used to reduce the number of polynomial terms in the response surface model function. The linear and constant corrections are employed to improve the accuracy of the response surface model. Corrections are based on small number of high fidelity results. Configuration optimization of the HSCT employing customized weight function is compared to the configuration optimization of the HSCT with a general weight function.

  17. Surface functionalities of gold nanoparticles impact embryonic gene expression responses

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Lisa; Tilton, Susan C.; Zaikova, Tatiana; Richman, Erik; Waters, Katrina M.; Hutchison, James E.; Tanguay, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    Incorporation of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) into consumer products is increasing; however, there is a gap in available toxicological data to determine the safety of AuNPs. In this study, we utilised the embryonic zebrafish to investigate how surface functionalisation and charge influence molecular responses. Precisely engineered AuNPs with 1.5 nm cores were synthesised and functionalized with three ligands: 2-mercaptoethanesulfonic acid (MES), N,N,N-trimethylammoniumethanethiol (TMAT), or 2-(2-(2-mercaptoethoxy)ethoxy)ethanol. Developmental assessments revealed differential biological responses when embryos were exposed to the functionalised AuNPs at the same concentration. Using inductively coupled plasma–mass spectrometry, AuNP uptake was confirmed in exposed embryos. Following exposure to MES- and TMAT-AuNPs from 6 to 24 or 6 to 48 h post fertilisation, pathways involved in inflammation and immune response were perturbed. Additionally, transport mechanisms were misregulated after exposure to TMAT and MES-AuNPs, demonstrating that surface functionalisation influences many molecular pathways. PMID:22263968

  18. Method for forming an abrasive surface on a tool

    DOEpatents

    Seals, Roland D.; White, Rickey L.; Swindeman, Catherine J.; Kahl, W. Keith

    1999-01-01

    A method for fabricating a tool used in cutting, grinding and machining operations, is provided. The method is used to deposit a mixture comprising an abrasive material and a bonding material on a tool surface. The materials are propelled toward the receiving surface of the tool substrate using a thermal spray process. The thermal spray process melts the bonding material portion of the mixture, but not the abrasive material. Upon impacting the tool surface, the mixture or composition solidifies to form a hard abrasive tool coating.

  19. Method of treating the surface of a glass member

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, S. H.; Spencer, R. S. (Inventor); Fleetwood, C. M., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A method is described of treating a surface of a glass member intended to abut a transparent element for disrupting the light interference fringes formed between the surfaces. The method involves the steps of grinding the surface to form irregularities thereon; bathing the surface with an aqueous solution containing between substantially 41.3 percent and 45.7 percent by volume of sulfuric acid and between substantially 54.3 percent and 58.7 percent by volume of hydrofluoric acid for a time sufficient to polish the irregularities until the glass member is about 90 percent light transmissive; and washing the glass member with a liquid having a temperature substantially lower than the temperature of the aqueous solution for preventing further reaction between the aqueous solution and the surface.

  20. A surface misfit inversion method for brain deformation modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fenghong; Paulsen, Keith D.; Hartov, Alexander; Roberts, David W.

    2007-03-01

    Biomechanical models of brain deformation are useful tools for estimating the shift that occurs during neurosurgical interventions. Incorporation of intra-operative data into the biomechanical model improves the accuracy of the registration between the patient and the image volume. The representer method to solve the adjoint equations (AEM) for data assimilation has been developed. In order to improve the computational efficiency and to process more intraoperative data, we modified the adjoint equation method by changing the way in which intraoperative data is applied. The current formulation is developed around a point-based data-model misfit. Surface based data-model misfit could be a more robust and computationally efficient technique. Our approach is to express the surface misfit as the volume between the measured surface and model predicted surface. An iterative method is used to solve the adjoint equations. The surface misfit criterion is tested in a cortical distension clinical case and compared to the results generated with the prior point-based methodology solved either iteratively or with the representer algorithm. The results show that solving the adjoint equations with an iterative method improves computational efficiency dramatically over the representer approach and that reformulating the minimization criterion in terms of a surface description is even more efficient. Applying intra-operative data in the form of a surface misfit is computationally very efficient and appears promising with respect to its accuracy in estimating brain deformation.

  1. The Human Antibody Response to the Surface of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Perley, Casey C.; Frahm, Marc; Click, Eva M.; Dobos, Karen M.; Ferrari, Guido; Stout, Jason E.; Frothingham, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Background Vaccine-induced human antibodies to surface components of Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pneumonia are correlated with protection. Monoclonal antibodies to surface components of Mycobacterium tuberculosis are also protective in animal models. We have characterized human antibodies that bind to the surface of live M. tuberculosis. Methods Plasma from humans with latent tuberculosis (TB) infection (n = 23), active TB disease (n = 40), and uninfected controls (n = 9) were assayed by ELISA for reactivity to the live M. tuberculosis surface and to inactivated M. tuberculosis fractions (whole cell lysate, lipoarabinomannan, cell wall, and secreted proteins). Results When compared to uninfected controls, patients with active TB disease had higher antibody titers to the surface of live M. tuberculosis (Δ = 0.72 log10), whole cell lysate (Δ = 0.82 log10), and secreted proteins (Δ = 0.62 log10), though there was substantial overlap between the two groups. Individuals with active disease had higher relative IgG avidity (Δ = 1.4 to 2.6) to all inactivated fractions. Surprisingly, the relative IgG avidity to the live M. tuberculosis surface was lower in the active disease group than in uninfected controls (Δ = –1.53, p = 0.004). Patients with active disease had higher IgG than IgM titers for all inactivated fractions (ratios, 2.8 to 10.1), but equal IgG and IgM titers to the live M. tuberculosis surface (ratio, 1.1). Higher antibody titers to the M. tuberculosis surface were observed in active disease patients who were BCG-vaccinated (Δ = 0.55 log10, p = 0.008), foreign-born (Δ = 0.61 log10, p = 0.004), or HIV-seronegative (Δ = 0.60 log10, p = 0.04). Higher relative IgG avidity scores to the M. tuberculosis surface were also observed in active disease patients who were BCG-vaccinated (Δ = 1.12, p<0.001) and foreign-born (Δ = 0.87, p = 0.01). Conclusions/Significance Humans

  2. Synthesis and surface properties of environmentally responsive segmented polyurethanes.

    PubMed

    Vaidya, Ashish; Chaudhury, Manoj K

    2002-05-01

    Polyurethanes, containing well-defined assemblies of perfluoro-polyether (PFPE or hexafluoropropene oxide oligomer), polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), and polyethylene glycol (PEG) segments, exhibit oleophobic, hydrophobic, and hydrophilic properties in response to the polarity of the contacting medium. These polymers were prepared by reacting hydroxy(polyethyleneoxy)-propylether-terminated PDMS block copolymer (HO-PEG-PDMS-PEG-OH) with 4,4'-methylene-bis(phenylene isocyanate) (MDI) in the presence of dibutyltin dilaurate catalyst, followed by reaction with 1,2-diol functional PFPE and chain extension with 2,2,3,3-tetrafluoro-1,4-butanediol (FB). The oleophobic and hydrophobic properties of the segmented polyurethanes (SPU) are due to the segregation of PFPE segments at the polymer-air interface. Wettability studies revealed that the same surface becomes hydrophilic, presumably due to the segregation of the PEG segments at the polymer-water interface. This hydrophobic-to-hydrophilic transformation of the surface prevails not only when the polymer is in contact with liquid water but with water vapor as well. The understanding of the reconstruction mechanism of this novel family of SPU surfaces would furnish valuable information for various applications where dynamic transformation of surface activity is desired. PMID:16290591

  3. Synthesis and surface properties of environmentally responsive segmented polyurethanes.

    PubMed

    Vaidya, Ashish; Chaudhury, Manoj K

    2002-05-01

    Polyurethanes, containing well-defined assemblies of perfluoro-polyether (PFPE or hexafluoropropene oxide oligomer), polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), and polyethylene glycol (PEG) segments, exhibit oleophobic, hydrophobic, and hydrophilic properties in response to the polarity of the contacting medium. These polymers were prepared by reacting hydroxy(polyethyleneoxy)-propylether-terminated PDMS block copolymer (HO-PEG-PDMS-PEG-OH) with 4,4'-methylene-bis(phenylene isocyanate) (MDI) in the presence of dibutyltin dilaurate catalyst, followed by reaction with 1,2-diol functional PFPE and chain extension with 2,2,3,3-tetrafluoro-1,4-butanediol (FB). The oleophobic and hydrophobic properties of the segmented polyurethanes (SPU) are due to the segregation of PFPE segments at the polymer-air interface. Wettability studies revealed that the same surface becomes hydrophilic, presumably due to the segregation of the PEG segments at the polymer-water interface. This hydrophobic-to-hydrophilic transformation of the surface prevails not only when the polymer is in contact with liquid water but with water vapor as well. The understanding of the reconstruction mechanism of this novel family of SPU surfaces would furnish valuable information for various applications where dynamic transformation of surface activity is desired.

  4. Standardization of methods for extracting statistics from surface profile measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takacs, Peter Z.

    2014-08-01

    Surface profilers and optical interferometers produce 2D maps of surface and wavefront topography. Traditional standards and methods for characterizing the properties of these surfaces use coordinate space representations of the surface topography. The computing power available today in modest personal computers makes it easy to transform into frequency space and apply well-known signal processing techniques to analyze the data. The Power Spectral Density (PSD) function of the surface height distribution is a powerful tool to assess the quality and characteristics of the surface in question. In order to extract useful information about the spectral distribution of surface roughness or mid-spatial frequency error over a particular spatial frequency band, it is necessary to pre-process the data by first detrending the surface figure terms and then applying a window function before computing the PSD. This process eliminates discontinuities at the borders of the profile that would otherwise produce large amounts of spurious power that would mask the true nature of the surface texture. This procedure is now part of a new draft standard that is being adopted by the US OEOSC for analysis of the statistics of optical surface, OP1.005.1 Illustrations of the usefulness of these procedures will be presented.

  5. Effect of design selection on response surface performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, William C.

    1993-01-01

    Artificial neural nets and polynomial approximations were used to develop response surfaces for several test problems. Based on the number of functional evaluations required to build the approximations and the number of undetermined parameters associated with the approximations, the performance of the two types of approximations was found to be comparable. A rule of thumb is developed for determining the number of nodes to be used on a hidden layer of an artificial neural net and the number of designs needed to train an approximation is discussed.

  6. Response Surface Analysis of Crowd Dynamics during Tawaf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarita, Zainuddin; Lim Eng, Aik

    2012-07-01

    A refined cellular automata model is applied to simulate the crowd movement of Muslim pilgrims performing the Tawaf ritual within the Al-Haram Mosque in Mecca. The results from the simulation are obtained and the influence of the predictor variables of the evacuation process (pedestrian flow and Tawaf duration) on the responses (pedestrian density, average walking speed, and cumulative evacuee) is investigated using response surface methodology (RSM). The average results from the experiments with an rms error less than 0.5 are obtained from the RSM. Its performance indicates that the RSM possesses excellent predictive ability for the model evacuation study, because both the experimental and the predicted values agree well with the results obtained in this study.

  7. A Comparison of Equating Methods under the Graded Response Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Allan S.; Kim, Seock-Ho

    Equating tests from different calibrations under item response theory (IRT) requires calculation of the slope and intercept of the appropriate linear transformation. Two methods have been proposed recently for equating graded response items under IRT, a test characteristic curve method and a minimum chi-square method. These two methods are…

  8. Planetary boundary layer response to surface temperature anomalies forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrot, Xavier; Lapeyre, Guillaume; Plougonven, Riwal

    2015-04-01

    Recent studies showed that strong sea surface temperature (SST) fronts, on the scale of the western boundary currents, strongly affect the planetary boundary layer (PBL) but also all the troposphere. This renewed the interest of air-sea interactions at oceanic meso-scales. Mainly two mechanisms are proposed in the literature, the first one (due to Wallace et al 1989) is based on the destabilization of the PBL above SST anomalies, the second one (Lindzen and Nigam 1987) is based on the pressure anomalies linked to the atmosphere temperature adjustment to the SST. These two mechanisms predict different responses of the PBL to the SST. We did numerical simulations with a meso-scale atmospheric model (WRF) with the same configuration as the one described in Lambert et al 2013. The model is forced by a SST anomaly which is first a zonally or meridionally constant field and secondly a field of meso-scale structures. Firstly we studied the influence of the initial wind strength on the PBL response for the two different types of SST anomalies. We showed that the dominant mechanism can change according to weak or strong wind and to the orientation of the SST anomaly. Secondly after considering a dry atmosphere we switched on the humidity in our configuration. We studied how it influences the PBL response and whether the mechanism driving the PBL response is still the same as in the dry case.

  9. A localized meshless method for diffusion on folded surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Ka Chun; Ling, Leevan; Ruuth, Steven J.

    2015-09-01

    Partial differential equations (PDEs) on surfaces arise in a variety of application areas including biological systems, medical imaging, fluid dynamics, mathematical physics, image processing and computer graphics. In this paper, we propose a radial basis function (RBF) discretization of the closest point method. The corresponding localized meshless method may be used to approximate diffusion on smooth or folded surfaces. Our method has the benefit of having an a priori error bound in terms of percentage of the norm of the solution. A stable solver is used to avoid the ill-conditioning that arises when the radial basis functions (RBFs) become flat.

  10. Carbide and carbonitride surface treatment method for refractory metals

    DOEpatents

    Meyer, G.A.; Schildbach, M.A.

    1996-12-03

    A carbide and carbonitride surface treatment method for refractory metals is provided, in steps including, heating a part formed of boron, chromium, hafnium, molybdenum, niobium, tantalum, titanium, tungsten or zirconium, or alloys thereof, in an evacuated chamber and then introducing reaction gases including nitrogen and hydrogen, either in elemental or water vapor form, which react with a source of elemental carbon to form carbon-containing gaseous reactants which then react with the metal part to form the desired surface layer. Apparatus for practicing the method is also provided, in the form of a carbide and carbonitride surface treatment system including a reaction chamber, a source of elemental carbon, a heating subassembly and a source of reaction gases. Alternative methods of providing the elemental carbon and the reaction gases are provided, as well as methods of supporting the metal part, evacuating the chamber with a vacuum subassembly and heating all of the components to the desired temperature. 5 figs.

  11. Virtual source simultaneous dual-surface method for uniform illumination.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hang; Su, Zeyu; Ma, Yufei; He, Yu; Liu, Chao; Wu, Mengying; Yan, Jinhua; Cheng, Cheng

    2015-07-01

    We present a new simultaneous dual-surface design method for uniform illumination by introducing a virtual light source. This method is a combination of the equal optical path length condition and the tailored method. It can be applied to an extended light source after some optimization processes with a negative feedback algorithm. A solid lens to yield a circular uniform irradiance distribution is designed by using our method. Both optical simulation and experiment have been carried out to show that the experimental irradiance map is close to both the simulation result and the desired distribution, and the uniformity is higher than 0.9 while the light source is a 5050 LED chip with SMD package. The rays from the outside lens surface are of good topological invariance, which can give the potential to design more than two smooth freeform optical surfaces simultaneously by introducing multiple virtual point sources. PMID:26367167

  12. Evolutionary method for predicting surface reconstructions with variable stoichiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Qiang; Li, Li; Oganov, Artem R.; Allen, Philip B.

    2013-05-01

    We present a specially designed evolutionary algorithm for the prediction of surface reconstructions. This technique allows one to automatically explore stable and low-energy metastable configurations with variable surface atoms and variable surface unit cells through the whole chemical potential range. The power of evolutionary search is demonstrated by the efficient identification of diamond 2×1 (100) and 2×1 (111) surface reconstructions with a fixed number of surface atoms and a fixed cell size. With further variation of surface unit cells, we study the reconstructions of the polar surface MgO (111). Experiment has detected an oxygen trimer (ozone) motif [Plass , Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.81.4891 81, 4891 (1998)]. We predict another version of this motif which can be thermodynamically stable in extreme oxygen-rich conditions. Finally, we perform a variable stoichiometry search for a complex ternary system: semipolar GaN (101¯1) with and without adsorbed oxygen. The search yields a counterintuitive reconstruction based on N3 trimers. These examples demonstrate that an automated scheme to explore the energy landscape of surfaces will improve our understanding of surface reconstructions. The method presented in this paper can be generally applied to binary and multicomponent systems.

  13. Postural responses triggered by multidirectional leg lifts and surface tilts.

    PubMed

    Hughey, Lucinda K; Fung, Joyce

    2005-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between proactive and reactive components of postural control. We contrasted the kinematic and electromyographic (EMG) responses to multidirectional voluntary leg lifts with those elicited by unexpected surface tilts. In particular, we addressed the role of trunk stabilization following either a voluntary or forced weight shift from double to single limb support. Nine young female subjects stood with a standing posture of 45 degrees toe-out and their arms abducted to shoulder level. On the experimenter's signal, subjects either (1) lifted one leg as fast as possible in one of six directions (R/L side, R/L diagonal front, R/L diagonal back) to a height of 45 degrees or (2) maintained standing as the support surface tilted at a rate of 53 degrees /s to a height of 10 degrees in one of six directions (R/L-up, R/L diagonal toes-up, R/L diagonal toes-down). For both tasks, our results showed that the center of pressure (COP) displacement began before or in conjunction with displacement of the center of mass (COM), after which the COP oscillated about the horizontal projection of the COM. In addition, the muscles were recruited in a distal-to-proximal sequence, either in anticipation of the voluntary leg lift or in response to the sudden surface tilt. Thus, the COP was being used dynamically to control displacement of the COM. The axial postural strategy comprising head, trunk, and pelvis movements was quantified by means of principal component analysis. More than 95% of the variance in the data could be described by the first two eigenvectors, which revealed specific coordination patterns dominated by pelvis rotation in one direction and head/trunk rotation in the opposite direction. Unexpected surface tilting elicited an automatic response strategy that focused on controlling the orientation of the head and trunk with respect to the vertical gravity vector while trunk verticality was compromised for

  14. Method for providing mirror surfaces with protective strippable polymeric film

    DOEpatents

    Edwards, Charlene C.; Day, Jack R.

    1980-01-01

    This invention is a method for forming a protective, strippable, elastomeric film on a highly reflective surface. The method is especially well suited for protecting diamond-machined metallic mirrors, which are susceptible not only to abrasion and mechanical damage but also to contamination and corrosion by various fluids. In a typical use of the invention, a diamond-machined copper mirror surface is coated uniformly with a solution comprising a completely polymerized and completely cured thermoplastic urethane elastomer dissolved in tetrahydrofuran. The applied coating is evaporated to dryness, forming a tough, adherent, impermeable, and transparent film which encapsulates dust and other particulates on the surface. The film may be left in place for many months. When desired, the film may be stripped intact, removing the entrapped particulates and leaving no residue on the mirror surface.

  15. Method for providing mirror surfaces with protective strippable polymeric film

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, C.C.; Day, J.R.

    1980-04-22

    This invention is a method for forming a protective, strippable, elastomeric film on a highly reflective surface. The method is especially well suited for protecting diamond-machined metallic mirrors, which are susceptible not only to abrasion and mechanical damage but also to contamination and corrosion by various fluids. In a typical use of the invention, a diamond-machined copper mirror surface is coated uniformly with a solution comprising a completely polymerized and completely cured thermoplastic urethane elastomer dissolved in tetrahydrofuran. The applied coating is evaporated to dryness, forming a tough, adherent, impermeable, and transparent film which encapsulates dust and other particulates on the surface. The film may be left in place for many months. When desired, the film may be stripped intact, removing the entrapped particulates and leaving no residue on the mirror surface.

  16. Multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) - Active and passive methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Park, C.B.; Miller, R.D.; Xia, J.; Ivanov, J.

    2007-01-01

    The conventional seismic approaches for near-surface investigation have usually been either high-resolution reflection or refraction surveys that deal with a depth range of a few tens to hundreds meters. Seismic signals from these surveys consist of wavelets with frequencies higher than 50 Hz. The multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) method deals with surface waves in the lower frequencies (e.g., 1-30 Hz) and uses a much shallower depth range of investigation (e.g., a few to a few tens of meters). ?? 2007 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  17. An improved surface passivation method for single-molecule studies.

    PubMed

    Hua, Boyang; Han, Kyu Young; Zhou, Ruobo; Kim, Hajin; Shi, Xinghua; Abeysirigunawardena, Sanjaya C; Jain, Ankur; Singh, Digvijay; Aggarwal, Vasudha; Woodson, Sarah A; Ha, Taekjip

    2014-12-01

    We report a surface passivation method based on dichlorodimethylsilane (DDS)-Tween-20 for in vitro single-molecule studies, which, under the conditions tested here, more efficiently prevented nonspecific binding of biomolecules than the standard poly(ethylene glycol) surface. The DDS-Tween-20 surface was simple and inexpensive to prepare and did not perturb the behavior and activities of tethered biomolecules. It can also be used for single-molecule imaging in the presence of high concentrations of labeled species in solution.

  18. Method for improving the removal of oil from surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Titus, P.E.

    1980-11-18

    A method is claimed for facilitating the removal or preventing the adherence of residual oil in oil tankers and other vessels or containers, on the surfaces of oil spill cleanup equipment such as skimmers and booms, and on sucker rods or other surfaces in oil wells, by coating surfaces contacting the oil with a film of a polymer that prevents or reduces oil adherence. Materials effective in reducing oil adherence are oleophobic films formed by complexing a polyacrylamide or carboxymethylcellulose with salts of polyvalent metals such as aluminum, chromium and iron.

  19. Average wave function method for gas-surface scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Harjinder; Dacol, Dalcio K.; Rabitz, Herschel

    1986-02-01

    The average wave function method (AWM) is applied to scattering of a gas off a solid surface. The formalism is developed for both periodic as well as disordered surfaces. For an ordered lattice an explicit relation is derived for the Bragg peaks along with a numerical illustration. Numerical results are presented for atomic clusters on a flat hard wall with a Gaussian-like potential at each atomic scattering site. The effect of relative lateral displacement of two clusters upon the scattering pattern is shown. The ability of AWM to accommodate disorder through statistical averaging over cluster configurations is illustrated. Enhanced uniform backscattering is observed with increasing roughness on the surface.

  20. Comparison of two methods for contactless surface temperature measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piasecka, Magdalena; Michalski, Dariusz; Strąk, Kinga

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the paper is to determine the temperature filed of the heating surface on the basis of temperature measurements taken by liquid crystal thermography and infrared thermography applied in boiling heat transfer research during FC-72 flow in minichannels, and to compare them. The essential part of the experimental stand is the test section with two parallel rectangular minichannels, each 1.7 mm deep, 24 mm wide and 360 mm long. It is possible to observe the channel surfaces through panes: of the first minichannel allows observing foil temperature changes on the plain side due to liquid crystal thermography (LCT), which required treating the foil surface with thermochromic liquid crystals, of the other minichannel enables detecting outer glass or foil surface temperature changes due to infrared thermography (IRT). Comparison of the results of the measurements are presented in graphical form as thermographs and as heating surface temperature vs. minichannel length. The differences between two sets of measurement data concerning the temperature of the heating surface obtained with LCT and IRT, were analyzed using: Pearson linear correlation coefficient, determination coefficient, Experimental Method Error and Method Accuracy. The comparative data analysis shows that similar values and distributions of the surface temperature were obtained from both techniques.

  1. Partial-slip frictional response of rough surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Paggi, Marco; Pohrt, Roman; Popov, Valentin L.

    2014-01-01

    If two elastic bodies with rough surfaces are first pressed against each other and then loaded tangentially, sliding will occur at the boundary of the contact area while the inner parts may still stick. With increasing tangential force, the sliding parts will expand while the sticking parts shrink and finally vanish. In this paper, we study the fractions of the contact area, tangential force and tangential stiffness, associated with the sticking portion of the contact area, as a function of the total applied tangential force up to the onset of full sliding. For the numerical analysis randomly rough, fractal surfaces are used, with the Hurst exponent H ranging from 0.1 to 0.9. Numerical simulations by boundary element method are compared with an analytical analysis in the framework of the Greenwood and Williamson (GW) model. In both cases, a universal linear dependency between the real contact area fraction in stick condition and the applied tangential force is found, regardless of the Hurst exponent of the rough surfaces. Regarding the dependence of the differential tangential stiffness on the tangential force, a linear relation is found in the GW case. For randomly rough surfaces, a nonlinear relation depending on H is derived. PMID:24898988

  2. Effects of surface viscoelasticity on cellular responses of endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Motahare-Sadat; Katbab, Ali Asghar

    2014-01-01

    Background: One area of nanoscience deals with nanoscopic interactions between nanostructured materials and biological systems. To elucidate the effects of the substrate surface morphology and viscoelasticity on cell proliferation, fractal analysis was performed on endothelial cells cultured on nanocomposite samples based on silicone rubber (SR) and various concentrations of organomodified nanoclay (OC). Methods: The nanoclay/SR ratio was tailored to enhance cell behavior via changes in sample substrate surface roughness and viscoelasticity. Results: Surface roughness of the cured SR filled with negatively-charged nanosilicate layers had a greater effect than elasticity on cell growth. The surface roughness of SR nanocomposite samples increased with increasing the OC content, leading to enhanced cell growth and extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling. This was consistent with the decrease in SR segmental motions and damping factor as the primary viscoelastic parameters by the nanosilicate layers with increasing clay concentrations. Conclusions: The inclusion of clay nanolayers affected the growth and behavior of endothelial cells on microtextured SR. PMID:26989733

  3. Evaluation of Alternate Stainless Steel Surface Passivation Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Elliot A.

    2005-05-31

    Stainless steel containers were assembled from parts passivated by four commercial vendors using three passivation methods. The performance of these containers in storing hydrogen isotope mixtures was evaluated by monitoring the composition of initially 50% H{sub 2} 50% D{sub 2} gas with time using mass spectroscopy. Commercial passivation by electropolishing appears to result in surfaces that do not catalyze hydrogen isotope exchange. This method of surface passivation shows promise for tritium service, and should be studied further and considered for use. On the other hand, nitric acid passivation and citric acid passivation may not result in surfaces that do not catalyze the isotope exchange reaction H{sub 2} + D{sub 2} {yields} 2HD. These methods should not be considered to replace the proprietary passivation processes of the two current vendors used at the Savannah River Site Tritium Facility.

  4. A Rapid Method for Refolding Cell Surface Receptors and Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Lu; Wu, Ling; Li, Feng; Burnham, Robert S.; Pizarro, Juan C.; Xu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Production of membrane-associated cell surface receptors and their ligands is often a cumbersome, expensive, and time-consuming process that limits detailed structural and functional characterization of this important class of proteins. Here we report a rapid method for refolding inclusion-body-based, recombinant cell surface receptors and ligands in one day, a speed equivalent to that of soluble protein production. This method efficiently couples modular on-column immobilized metal ion affinity purification and solid-phase protein refolding. We demonstrated the general utility of this method for producing multiple functionally active immunoreceptors, ligands, and viral decoys, including challenging cell surface proteins that cannot be produced using typical dialysis- or dilution-based refolding approaches. PMID:27215173

  5. Improved Method Being Developed for Surface Enhancement of Metallic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabb, Timothy P.; Telesman, Jack; Kantzos, Peter T.

    2001-01-01

    Surface enhancement methods induce a layer of beneficial residual compressive stress to improve the impact (FOD) resistance and fatigue life of metallic materials. A traditional method of surface enhancement often used is shot peening, in which small steel spheres are repeatedly impinged on metallic surfaces. Shot peening is inexpensive and widely used, but the plastic deformation of 20 to 40 percent imparted by the impacts can be harmful. This plastic deformation can damage the microstructure, severely limiting the ductility and durability of the material near the surface. It has also been shown to promote accelerated relaxation of the beneficial compressive residual stresses at elevated temperatures. Low-plasticity burnishing (LPB) is being developed as an improved method for the surface enhancement of metallic materials. LPB is being investigated as a rapid, inexpensive surface enhancement method under NASA Small Business Innovation Research contracts NAS3-98034 and NAS3-99116, with supporting characterization work at NASA. Previously, roller burnishing had been employed to refine surface finish. This concept was adopted and then optimized as a means of producing a layer of compressive stress of high magnitude and depth, with minimal plastic deformation (ref. 1). A simplified diagram of the developed process is given in the following figure. A single pass of a smooth, free-rolling spherical ball under a normal force deforms the surface of the material in tension, creating a compressive layer of residual stress. The ball is supported in a fluid with sufficient pressure to lift the ball off the surface of the retaining spherical socket. The ball is only in mechanical contact with the surface of the material being burnished and is free to roll on the surface. This apparatus is designed to be mounted in the conventional lathes and vertical mills currently used to machine parts. The process has been successfully applied to nickel-base superalloys by a team from the

  6. Method for smoothing the surface of a protective coating

    DOEpatents

    Sangeeta, D.; Johnson, Curtis Alan; Nelson, Warren Arthur

    2001-01-01

    A method for smoothing the surface of a ceramic-based protective coating which exhibits roughness is disclosed. The method includes the steps of applying a ceramic-based slurry or gel coating to the protective coating surface; heating the slurry/gel coating to remove volatile material; and then further heating the slurry/gel coating to cure the coating and bond it to the underlying protective coating. The slurry/gel coating is often based on yttria-stabilized zirconia, and precursors of an oxide matrix. Related articles of manufacture are also described.

  7. Ion-Step Method for Surface Potential Sensing of Silicon Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Chen, Songyue; van Nieuwkasteele, Jan W; van den Berg, Albert; Eijkel, Jan C T

    2016-08-16

    This paper presents a novel stimulus-response method for surface potential sensing of silicon nanowire (Si-NW) field-effect transistors. When an "ion-step" from low to high ionic strength is given as a stimulus to the gate oxide surface, an increase of double layer capacitance is therefore expected. Thus, a change of conductance through the Si-NWs is measured. The surface potential on the Si-NW gate is changed from negative for a bare SiO2 surface to neutral/positive when there is poly-l-lysine adsorption at certain pH, which also indicates a shift of point-of-zero charge pH after surface modification. This change is measured by a drop of current variation at the ion-step. The ion-step is performed to the Si-NW through a polydimethylsiloxane microfluidic chip with automatic sample switching. A reduction of the ion-step response from 2 nA to almost zero at pH 5.0 is observed by increasing the potassium ion concentration from 10 mM to 50 mM, which corresponds to a surface potential change of ∼12 mV. We show that this method can be used as an alternative method for surface potential sensing, making it less sensitive to drift.

  8. Ion-Step Method for Surface Potential Sensing of Silicon Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Chen, Songyue; van Nieuwkasteele, Jan W; van den Berg, Albert; Eijkel, Jan C T

    2016-08-16

    This paper presents a novel stimulus-response method for surface potential sensing of silicon nanowire (Si-NW) field-effect transistors. When an "ion-step" from low to high ionic strength is given as a stimulus to the gate oxide surface, an increase of double layer capacitance is therefore expected. Thus, a change of conductance through the Si-NWs is measured. The surface potential on the Si-NW gate is changed from negative for a bare SiO2 surface to neutral/positive when there is poly-l-lysine adsorption at certain pH, which also indicates a shift of point-of-zero charge pH after surface modification. This change is measured by a drop of current variation at the ion-step. The ion-step is performed to the Si-NW through a polydimethylsiloxane microfluidic chip with automatic sample switching. A reduction of the ion-step response from 2 nA to almost zero at pH 5.0 is observed by increasing the potassium ion concentration from 10 mM to 50 mM, which corresponds to a surface potential change of ∼12 mV. We show that this method can be used as an alternative method for surface potential sensing, making it less sensitive to drift. PMID:27457611

  9. A new approach for surface fitting method of articular joint surfaces.

    PubMed

    Hirokawa, Shunji; Ueki, Takashi; Ohtsuki, Ayaka

    2004-10-01

    The application of joint contact mechanics requires a precise configuration of the joint surfaces. B-Spline, and NURBS have been widely used to model joint surfaces, but because these formulations use a structured data set provided by a rectangular net first, then a grid, there is a limit to the accuracy of the models they can produce. However new imaging systems such as 3D laser scanners can provide more realistic unstructured data sets. What is needed is a method to manipulate the unstructured data. We created a parametric polynomial function and applied it to unstructured data sets obtained by scanning joint surfaces. We applied our polynomial model to unstructured data sets from an artificial joint, and confirmed that our polynomial produced a smoother and more accurate model than the conventional B-spline method. Next, we applied it to a diarthrodial joint surface containing many ripples, and found that our function's noise filtering characteristics smoothed out existing ripples. Since no formulation was found to be optimal for all applications, we used two formulations to model surfaces with ripples. First, we used our polynomial to describe the global shape of the objective surface. Minute undulations were then specifically approximated with a Fourier series function. Finally, both approximated surfaces were superimposed to reproduce the original surface in a complete fashion. PMID:15336930

  10. Military applications and examples of near-surface seismic surface wave methods (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    sloan, S.; Stevens, R.

    2013-12-01

    Although not always widely known or publicized, the military uses a variety of geophysical methods for a wide range of applications--some that are already common practice in the industry while others are truly novel. Some of those applications include unexploded ordnance detection, general site characterization, anomaly detection, countering improvised explosive devices (IEDs), and security monitoring, to name a few. Techniques used may include, but are not limited to, ground penetrating radar, seismic, electrical, gravity, and electromagnetic methods. Seismic methods employed include surface wave analysis, refraction tomography, and high-resolution reflection methods. Although the military employs geophysical methods, that does not necessarily mean that those methods enable or support combat operations--often times they are being used for humanitarian applications within the military's area of operations to support local populations. The work presented here will focus on the applied use of seismic surface wave methods, including multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) and backscattered surface waves, often in conjunction with other methods such as refraction tomography or body-wave diffraction analysis. Multiple field examples will be shown, including explosives testing, tunnel detection, pre-construction site characterization, and cavity detection.

  11. A Fast and Reliable Method for Surface Wave Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barmin, M. P.; Ritzwoller, M. H.; Levshin, A. L.

    - We describe a method to invert regional or global scale surface-wave group or phase-velocity measurements to estimate 2-D models of the distribution and strength of isotropic and azimuthally anisotropic velocity variations. Such maps have at least two purposes in monitoring the nuclear Comprehensive Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT): (1) They can be used as data to estimate the shear velocity of the crust and uppermost mantle and topography on internal interfaces which are important in event location, and (2) they can be used to estimate surface-wave travel-time correction surfaces to be used in phase-matched filters designed to extract low signal-to-noise surface-wave packets.The purpose of this paper is to describe one useful path through the large number of options available in an inversion of surface-wave data. Our method appears to provide robust and reliable dispersion maps on both global and regional scales. The technique we describe has a number of features that have motivated its development and commend its use: (1) It is developed in a spherical geometry; (2) the region of inference is defined by an arbitrary simple closed curve so that the method works equally well on local, regional, or global scales; (3) spatial smoothness and model amplitude constraints can be applied simultaneously; (4) the selection of model regularization and the smoothing parameters is highly flexible which allows for the assessment of the effect of variations in these parameters; (5) the method allows for the simultaneous estimation of spatial resolution and amplitude bias of the images; and (6) the method optionally allows for the estimation of azimuthal anisotropy.We present examples of the application of this technique to observed surface-wave group and phase velocities globally and regionally across Eurasia and Antarctica.

  12. Interface Surface Area Tracking for the Conservative Level Set Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firehammer, Stephanie; Desjardins, Olivier

    2015-11-01

    One key question in liquid-gas flows is how to model the interface between phases in a way that is mass, momentum, and energy conserving. The accurate conservative level set (ACLS) method of Desjardins et al. provides a tool for tracking a liquid-gas interface with minimal mass conservation issues; however, it does not explicitly compute the interface surface area and thus nothing can be said a priori about the balance between kinetic energy and surface energy. This work examines an equation for the transport of interface surface area density, which can be written in terms of the gradient of the volume fraction. Furthermore this presentation will outline a numerical method for jointly transporting a conservative level set and surface area density. Finally, we will explore oppportunities for energy conservation via the accurate exchange of energy between the flow field and the interface through surface tension, with test cases to show the results of our extended ACLS method. Funding from the National Science Foundation is gratefully acknowledged.

  13. Method For Silicon Surface Texturing Using Ion Implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Kadakia, Nirag; Naczas, Sebastian; Bakhru, Hassaram; Huang Mengbing

    2011-06-01

    As the semiconductor industry continues to show more interest in the photovoltaic market, cheaper and readily integrable methods of silicon solar cell production are desired. One of these methods - ion implantation - is well-developed and optimized in all commercial semiconductor fabrication facilities. Here we have developed a silicon surface texturing technique predicated upon the phenomenon of surface blistering of H-implanted silicon, using only ion implantation and thermal annealing. We find that following the H implant with a second, heavier implant markedly enhances the surface blistering, causing large trenches that act as a surface texturing of c-Si. We have found that this method reduces total broadband Si reflectance from 35% to below 5percent;. In addition, we have used Rutherford backscattering/channeling measurements investigate the effect of ion implantation on the crystallinity of the sample. The data suggests that implantation-induced lattice damage is recovered upon annealing, reproducing the original monocrystalline structure in the previously amorphized region, while at the same time retaining the textured surface.

  14. Maximization of fructose esters synthesis by response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Neta, Nair Sampaio; Peres, António M; Teixeira, José A; Rodrigues, Ligia R

    2011-07-01

    Enzymatic synthesis of fructose fatty acid ester was performed in organic solvent media, using a purified lipase from Candida antartica B immobilized in acrylic resin. Response surface methodology with a central composite rotatable design based on five levels was implemented to optimize three experimental operating conditions (temperature, agitation and reaction time). A statistical significant cubic model was established. Temperature and reaction time were found to be the most significant parameters. The optimum operational conditions for maximizing the synthesis of fructose esters were 57.1°C, 100 rpm and 37.8 h. The model was validated in the identified optimal conditions to check its adequacy and accuracy, and an experimental esterification percentage of 88.4% (±0.3%) was obtained. These results showed that an improvement of the enzymatic synthesis of fructose esters was obtained under the optimized conditions. PMID:21356336

  15. Maximization of fructose esters synthesis by response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Neta, Nair Sampaio; Peres, António M; Teixeira, José A; Rodrigues, Ligia R

    2011-07-01

    Enzymatic synthesis of fructose fatty acid ester was performed in organic solvent media, using a purified lipase from Candida antartica B immobilized in acrylic resin. Response surface methodology with a central composite rotatable design based on five levels was implemented to optimize three experimental operating conditions (temperature, agitation and reaction time). A statistical significant cubic model was established. Temperature and reaction time were found to be the most significant parameters. The optimum operational conditions for maximizing the synthesis of fructose esters were 57.1°C, 100 rpm and 37.8 h. The model was validated in the identified optimal conditions to check its adequacy and accuracy, and an experimental esterification percentage of 88.4% (±0.3%) was obtained. These results showed that an improvement of the enzymatic synthesis of fructose esters was obtained under the optimized conditions.

  16. Lattice Truss Structural Response Using Energy Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenner, Winfred Scottson

    1996-01-01

    A deterministic methodology is presented for developing closed-form deflection equations for two-dimensional and three-dimensional lattice structures. Four types of lattice structures are studied: beams, plates, shells and soft lattices. Castigliano's second theorem, which entails the total strain energy of a structure, is utilized to generate highly accurate results. Derived deflection equations provide new insight into the bending and shear behavior of the four types of lattices, in contrast to classic solutions of similar structures. Lattice derivations utilizing kinetic energy are also presented, and used to examine the free vibration response of simple lattice structures. Derivations utilizing finite element theory for unique lattice behavior are also presented and validated using the finite element analysis code EAL.

  17. Temperature sensitive surfaces and methods of making same

    DOEpatents

    Liang, Liang [Richland, WA; Rieke, Peter C [Pasco, WA; Alford, Kentin L [Pasco, WA

    2002-09-10

    Poly-n-isopropylacrylamide surface coatings demonstrate the useful property of being able to switch charateristics depending upon temperature. More specifically, these coatings switch from being hydrophilic at low temperature to hydrophobic at high temperature. Research has been conducted for many years to better characterize and control the properties of temperature sensitive coatings. The present invention provides novel temperature sensitive coatings on articles and novel methods of making temperature sensitive coatings that are disposed on the surfaces of various articles. These novel coatings contain the reaction products of n-isopropylacrylamide and are characterized by their properties such as advancing contact angles. Numerous other characteristics such as coating thickness, surface roughness, and hydrophilic-to-hydrophobic transition temperatures are also described. The present invention includes articles having temperature-sensitve coatings with improved properties as well as improved methods for forming temperature sensitive coatings.

  18. Method and Apparatus for Creating a Topography at a Surface

    DOEpatents

    Adams, David P.; Sinclair, Michael B.; Mayer, Thomas M.; Vasile, Michael J.; Sweatt, William C.

    2008-11-11

    Methods and apparatus whereby an optical interferometer is utilized to monitor and provide feedback control to an integrated energetic particle column, to create desired topographies, including the depth, shape and/or roughness of features, at a surface of a specimen. Energetic particle columns can direct energetic species including, ions, photons and/or neutral particles to a surface to create features having in-plane dimensions on the order of 1 micron, and a height or depth on the order of 1 nanometer. Energetic processes can include subtractive processes such as sputtering, ablation, focused ion beam milling and, additive processes, such as energetic beam induced chemical vapor deposition. The integration of interferometric methods with processing by energetic species offers the ability to create desired topographies at surfaces, including planar and curved shapes.

  19. Localized surface plasmon resonance mercury detection system and methods

    DOEpatents

    James, Jay; Lucas, Donald; Crosby, Jeffrey Scott; Koshland, Catherine P.

    2016-03-22

    A mercury detection system that includes a flow cell having a mercury sensor, a light source and a light detector is provided. The mercury sensor includes a transparent substrate and a submonolayer of mercury absorbing nanoparticles, e.g., gold nanoparticles, on a surface of the substrate. Methods of determining whether mercury is present in a sample using the mercury sensors are also provided. The subject mercury detection systems and methods find use in a variety of different applications, including mercury detecting applications.

  20. Stimuli-responsive copolymer solution and surface assemblies for biomedical applications

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Elizabeth G.; Albert, Julie N. L.

    2013-01-01

    Stimuli-responsive polymeric materials is one of the fastest growing fields of the 21st century, with the annual number of papers published more than quadrupling in the last ten years. The responsiveness of polymer solution assemblies and surfaces to biological stimuli (e.g. pH, reduction-oxidation, enzymes, glucose) and externally applied triggers (e.g. temperature, light, solvent quality) shows particular promise for various biomedical applications including drug delivery, tissue engineering, medical diagnostics, and bioseparations. Furthermore, the integration of copolymer architectures into stimuli-responsive materials design enables exquisite control over the locations of responsive sites within self-assembled nanostructures. The combination of new synthesis techniques and well-defined copolymer self-assembly has facilitated substantial developments in stimuli-responsive materials in recent years. In this tutorial review, we discuss several methods that have been employed to synthesize self-assembling and stimuli-responsive copolymers for biomedical applications, and we identify common themes in the response mechanisms among the targeted stimuli. Additionally, we highlight parallels between the chemistries used for generating solution assemblies and those employed for creating copolymer surfaces. PMID:23403471

  1. Understanding the biological responses of nanostructured metals and surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowe, Terry C.; Reiss, Rebecca A.

    2014-08-01

    Metals produced by Severe Plastic Deformation (SPD) offer distinct advantages for medical applications such as orthopedic devices, in part because of their nanostructured surfaces. We examine the current theoretical foundations and state of knowledge for nanostructured biomaterials surface optimization within the contexts that apply to bulk nanostructured metals, differentiating how their microstructures impact osteogenesis, in particular, for Ultrafine Grained (UFG) titanium. Then we identify key gaps in the research to date, pointing out areas which merit additional focus within the scientific community. For example, we highlight the potential of next-generation DNA sequencing techniques (NGS) to reveal gene and non-coding RNA (ncRNA) expression changes induced by nanostructured metals. While our understanding of bio-nano interactions is in its infancy, nanostructured metals are already being marketed or developed for medical devices such as dental implants, spinal devices, and coronary stents. Our ability to characterize and optimize the biological response of cells to SPD metals will have synergistic effects on advances in materials, biological, and medical science.

  2. Effectiveness of duct cleaning methods on newly installed duct surfaces.

    PubMed

    Holopainen, R; Asikainen, V; Tuomainen, M; Björkroth, M; Pasanen, P; Seppänen, O

    2003-09-01

    Two kinds of air duct cleaning methods, mechanical brushing with different brushes and compressed air cleaning, were compared in the laboratory and in newly built buildings. The ducts were contaminated either with test dust or with dust originated from a construction site. The amount of dust on the duct surface was measured with the vacuum test method and estimated visually before and after the cleaning. In addition, the cleaning times of the different techniques were compared and the amount of residual oil in the ducts was measured in the laboratory test. The brushing methods were more efficient in metal ducts, and compressed air cleaning was more efficient in plastic ducts. After the duct cleaning the mean amount of residual dust on the surface of the ducts was surface ranged from 86 to 99% and from 75 to 94% in the ducts cleaned in the laboratory or in the building site, respectively. The oil residues and the dust stuck onto the oil were difficult to scrape off and remove, and none of the cleaning methods were capable of cleaning the oily duct surfaces efficiently enough. Thus new installations should consist only of oil-free ducts.

  3. Combined method for artifact reduction in surface electroenterogram.

    PubMed

    Ye, Y; Garcia-Casado, J; Martinez-de-Juan, J L; Alvarez, D; Prats-Boluda, G; Ponce, J L

    2007-01-01

    Surface electroenterogram (EEnG) is a non-invasive method for monitoring the intestinal motility. However, surface EEnG recordings are contaminated by movement artifact, cardiac activity, respiratory artifact and other interferences. The aim of this work is to remove movement artifacts by means of a combined method of empirical mode decomposition (EMD) and independent component analysis (ICA). Four recording sessions were conducted on canine model. Surface signals from 4 different channels are decomposed using EMD. Resulting intrinsic mode functions are the inputs of ICA analysis which permits to separate and identify the activities of different origin. Signal components associated to movement artifacts are removed and the original signals are reconstructed by means of an inverse procedure. The results show that the proposed method allows extracting and cancelling movement artifacts from surface EEnG, avoiding the presence of irregular peaks in external intestinal motility indexes. Therefore, the proposed method could be useful to reduce artifacts in EEnG recording and to provide more robust non-invasive intestinal motility indicators.

  4. Liquid surface skimmer apparatus for molten lithium and method

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, Samuel C.; Pollard, Roy E.; Thompson, William F.; Stark, Marshall W.; Currin, Jr., Robert T.

    1995-01-01

    This invention relates to an apparatus for separating two fluids having different specific gravities. The invention also relates to a method for using the separating apparatus of the present invention. This invention particularly relates to the skimming of molten lithium metal from the surface of a fused salt electrolyte in the electrolytic production of lithium metal from a mixed fused salt.

  5. Comparison of surface sampling methods for virus recovery from fomites.

    PubMed

    Julian, Timothy R; Tamayo, Francisco J; Leckie, James O; Boehm, Alexandria B

    2011-10-01

    The role of fomites in infectious disease transmission relative to other exposure routes is difficult to discern due, in part, to the lack of information on the level and distribution of virus contamination on surfaces. Comparisons of studies intending to fill this gap are difficult because multiple different sampling methods are employed and authors rarely report their method's lower limit of detection. In the present study, we compare a subset of sampling methods identified from a literature review to demonstrate that sampling method significantly influences study outcomes. We then compare a subset of methods identified from the review to determine the most efficient methods for recovering virus from surfaces in a laboratory trial using MS2 bacteriophage as a model virus. Recoveries of infective MS2 and MS2 RNA are determined using both a plaque assay and quantitative reverse transcription-PCR, respectively. We conclude that the method that most effectively recovers virus from nonporous fomites uses polyester-tipped swabs prewetted in either one-quarter-strength Ringer's solution or saline solution. This method recovers a median fraction for infective MS2 of 0.40 and for MS2 RNA of 0.07. Use of the proposed method for virus recovery in future fomite sampling studies would provide opportunities to compare findings across multiple studies.

  6. Optimization of mead production using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Teresa; Barradas, Carla; Dias, Teresa; Verdial, João; Morais, Jorge Sá; Ramalhosa, Elsa; Estevinho, Leticia M

    2013-09-01

    The main aim of the present work was to optimize mead production using Response Surface Methodology. The effects of temperature (x₁: 20-30°C) and nutrients concentration (x₂: 60-120g /hL) on mead quality, concerning the final concentrations of glucose (Y₁), fructose (Y₂), ethanol (Y₃), glycerol (Y₄) and acetic acid (Y₅), were studied. Twelve operational conditions were tested. No delays and moods were observed during fermentations. The second order polynomial models determined produced satisfactory fittings of the experimental data with regard to glucose (R²=0.646, p=0.001), ethanol (R²=0.741, p=0.049), glycerol (R²=0.899, p=0.002), fructose (R²=0.902, p=0.033) and acetic acid (R²=0.913, p=0.001). The optimum extraction conditions determined in order to maximize the combined responses were 24°C and a nutrients concentration of 0.88g/L. The mead produced under these conditions had the following characteristics: ethanol concentration of 10.2%, acetic acid 0.54 g/L, glycerol 7.8 g/L, glucose 1.8 g/L and fructose 2.5 g/L. These values were in agreement with the predicted and were within the safe limit established for acetic acid and the recommended range for glycerol. Furthermore, the residual sugars concentration was also low, decreasing the possibility of occurring undesirable refermentations.

  7. Reducing Motional Decoherence in Ion Traps with Surface Science Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haeffner, Hartmut

    2014-03-01

    Many trapped ions experiments ask for low motional heating rates while trapping the ions close to trapping electrodes. However, in practice small ion-electrode distances lead to unexpected high heating rates. While the mechanisms for the heating is still unclear, it is now evident that surface contamination of the metallic electrodes is at least partially responsible for the elevated heating rates. I will discuss heating rate measurements in a microfabricated surface trap complemented with basic surface science studies. We monitor the elemental surface composition of the Cu-Al alloy trap with an Auger spectrometer. After bake-out, we find a strong Carbon and Oxygen contamination and heating rates of 200 quanta/s at 1 MHz trap frequency. After removing most of the Carbon and Oxygen with Ar-Ion sputtering, the heating rates drop to 4 quanta/s. Interestingly, we still measure the decreased heating rate even after the surface oxidized from the background gas throughout a 40-day waiting time in UHV.

  8. Electroporation mediated DNA vaccination directly to a mucosal surface results in improved immune responses.

    PubMed

    Kichaev, Gleb; Mendoza, Janess M; Amante, Dinah; Smith, Trevor R F; McCoy, Jay R; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Broderick, Kate E

    2013-10-01

    In vivo electroporation (EP) has been shown to be a highly efficient non-viral method for enhancing DNA vaccine delivery and immunogenicity, when the site of immunization is the skin or muscle of animals and humans. However, the route of entry for many microbial pathogens is via the mucosal surfaces of the human body. We have previously reported on minimally invasive, surface and contactless EP devices for enhanced DNA delivery to dermal tissue. Robust antibody responses were induced following vaccine delivery in several tested animal models using these devices. Here, we investigated extending the modality of the surface device to efficiently deliver DNA vaccines to mucosal tissue. Initially, we demonstrated reporter gene expression in the epithelial layer of buccal mucosa in a guinea pig model. There was minimal tissue damage in guinea pig mucosal tissue resulting from EP. Delivery of a DNA vaccine encoding influenza virus nucleoprotein (NP) of influenza H1N1 elicited robust and sustained systemic IgG antibody responses following EP-enhanced delivery in the mucosa. Upon further analysis, IgA antibody responses were detected in vaginal washes and sustained cellular immune responses were detected in animals immunized at the oral mucosa with the surface EP device. This data confirms that DNA delivery and EP targeting mucosal tissue directly results in both robust and sustainable humoral as well as cellular immune responses without tissue damage. These responses are seen both in the mucosa and systemically in the blood. Direct DNA vaccine delivery enhanced by EP in mucosa may have important clinical applications for delivery of prophylactic and therapeutic DNA vaccines against diseases such as HIV, HPV and pneumonia that enter at mucosal sites and require both cellular and humoral immune responses for protection. PMID:23954979

  9. A combined voxel and surface based method for topology correction of brain surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gris, Florence; Favreau, Jean-Marie; Acosta, Oscar; Barra, Vincent; Salvado, Olivier

    2010-03-01

    Brain surfaces provide a reliable representation for cortical mapping. The construction of correct surfaces from magnetic resonance images (MRI) segmentation is a challenging task, especially when genus zero surfaces are required for further processing such as parameterization, partial inflation and registration. The generation of such surfaces has been approached either by correcting a binary image as part of the segmentation pipeline or by modifying the mesh representing the surface. During this task, the preservation of the structure may be compromised because of the convoluted nature of the brain and noisy/imperfect segmentations. In this paper, we propose a combined, voxel and surfacebased, topology correction method which preserves the structure of the brain while yielding genus zero surfaces. The topology of the binary segmentation is first corrected using a set of topology preserving operators applied sequentially. This results in a white matter/gray matter binary set with correct sulci delineation, homotopic to a filled sphere. Using the corrected segmentation, a marching cubes mesh is then generated and the tunnels and handles resulting from the meshing are finally removed with an algorithm based on the detection of nonseparating loops. The approach was validated using 20 young individuals MRI from the OASIS database, acquired at two different time-points. Reproducibility and robustness were evaluated using global and local criteria such as surface area, curvature and point to point distance. Results demonstrated the method capability to produce genus zero meshes while preserving geometry, two fundamental properties for reliable and accurate cortical mapping and further clinical studies.

  10. A comparison of several surface finish measurement methods as applied to ground ceramic and metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, P.J.; Martin, R.L.; Riester, L.

    1996-01-01

    Surface finish is one of the most common measures of surface quality of ground ceramics and metal parts and a wide variety of methods and parameters have been developed to measure it. The purpose of this investigation was to compare the surface roughness parameters obtained on the same two specimens from three different types of measuring instruments: a traditional mechanical stylus system, a non-contact laser scanning system, and the atomic force microscope (two different AFM systems were compared). The same surface-ground silicon nitride and Inconel 625 alloy specimens were used for all measurements in this investigation. Significant differences in arithmetic average roughness, root-mean-square roughness, and peak-to-valley roughness were obtained when comparing data from the various topography measuring instruments. Non-contact methods agreed better with the others on the metal specimen than on the ceramic specimen. Reasons for these differences include the effective dimensions and geometry of the probe with respect to the surface topography; the reflectivity of the surface, and the type of filtering scheme Results of this investigation emphasize the importance of rigorously specifying the manner of surface roughness measurement when either reporting roughness data or when requesting that roughness data be provided.

  11. Multigrid methods and the surface consistent equations of Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millar, John

    The surface consistent equations are a large linear system that is frequently used in signal enhancement for land seismic surveys. Different signatures may be consistent with a particular dynamite (or other) source. Each receiver and the conditions around the receiver will have different impact on the signal. Seismic deconvolution operators, amplitude corrections and static shifts of traces are calculated using the surface consistent equations, both in commercial and scientific seismic processing software. The system of equations is singular, making direct methods such as Gaussian elimination impossible to implement. Iterative methods such as Gauss-Seidel and conjugate gradient are frequently used. A limitation in the nature of the methods leave the long wavelengths of the solution poorly resolved. To reduce the limitations of traditional iterative methods, we employ a multigrid method. Multigrid methods re-sample the entire system of equations on a more coarse grid. An iterative method is employed on the coarse grid. The long wavelengths of the solutions that traditional iterative methods were unable to resolve are calculated on the reduced system of equations. The coarse estimate can be interpolated back up to the original sample rate, and refined using a standard iterative procedure. Multigrid methods provide more accurate solutions to the surface consistent equations, with the largest improvement concentrated in the long wavelengths. Synthetic models and tests on field data show that multigrid solutions to the system of equations can significantly increase the resolution of the seismic data, when used to correct both static time shifts and in calculating deconvolution operators. The first chapter of this thesis is a description of the physical model we are addressing. It reviews some of the literature concerning the surface consistent equations, and provides background on the nature of the problem. Chapter 2 contains a review of iterative and multigrid methods

  12. Analysis of the relation between exposure parameters and critical dimension by response surface model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Dong-Soo; Sohn, Young-Soo; Bak, Heungin; Oh, Hye-Keun

    2001-08-01

    It is important to know the relationship between the soft bake conditions and the Dill exposure parameters in order to control the lithographic process well. It has been reported that exposure parameter A can be significantly affected by the soft bake conditions, while the exposure parameters B and C show no dependency on the soft bake conditions. The exposure parameters have been considered less important in 193 nm chemically amplified resist (CAR) simulation. Since the critical dimension variation depends on the exposure parameters, if we know the relationship between them it would be helpful in developing resist and resist process. In this paper the profiles of a 193nm CAR were simulated with the various Dill exposure parameters and the results were analyzed by response surface model. The response surface methodology (RSM) approach was used to analyze the influence of independent factors on a dependent response, and to optimize each process. A method of steepest ascent was utilized to produce first-order models, which were verified by lack of fit testing. As optimum operation points were approached, a second-order model was fitted and analyzed. The Dill exposure parameter C affects critical dimension greatly whereas A and B have much less effect. Among parameters other than exposure parameters, PEB time and PEB temperature are great factors to affect critical dimension. Even small change of them can make great critical dimension changes. Process optimization for the target response value as well as process latitude was possible through the use of the response surface.

  13. Method For Silicon Surface Texturing Using Ion Implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadakia, Nirag; Naczas, Sebastian; Bakhru, Hassaram; Huang, Mengbing

    2011-06-01

    As the semiconductor industry continues to show more interest in the photovoltaic market, cheaper and readily integrable methods of silicon solar cell production are desired. One of these methods—ion implantation—is well-developed and optimized in all commercial semiconductor fabrication facilities. Here we have developed a silicon surface texturing technique predicated upon the phenomenon of surface blistering of H-implanted silicon, using only ion implantation and thermal annealing. We find that following the H implant with a second, heavier implant markedly enhances the surface blistering, causing large trenches that act as a surface texturing of c-Si. We have found that this method reduces total broadband Si reflectance from 35% to below 5percent;. In addition, we have used Rutherford backscattering/channeling measurements investigate the effect of ion implantation on the crystallinity of the sample. The data suggests that implantation-induced lattice damage is recovered upon annealing, reproducing the original monocrystalline structure in the previously amorphized region, while at the same time retaining the textured surface.

  14. Rigorous surface charge method for determining electrostatic interaction energies in biomolecular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doerr, T. P.; Obolensky, O. I.; Ogurtsov, A. Y.; Yu, Yi-Kuo

    2014-03-01

    Classical electrostatics plays a crucial role in bimolecular systems, dominating the interactions that determine the formation and dissolution of complexes responsible for the operation of cells. For systems that can be modeled as a set of piecewise-constant dielectric bodies, surface charge methods are usually preferable in both analytical and numerical contexts. We present a numerical implementation of a surface charge method previously used in analytical contexts. The method is applied to a realistic model of trypsin, an important protein involved in digesting other proteins, and one of its inhibitors, benzamidine. The classical calculations are complemented by density function theory calculations at short separations for which the classical model is inappropriate. We find that the surface charge method correctly distinguishes between correct and incorrect docking sites. This research was supported by the Intramural Research Program of the NIH, National Library of Medicine.

  15. Roughness of human enamel surface submitted to different prophylaxis methods.

    PubMed

    Castanho, Gisela Muassab; Arana-Chavez, Victor E; Fava, Marcelo

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate alterations in the surface roughness and micromorphology of human enamel submitted to three prophylaxis methods. Sixty-nine caries-free molars with exposed labial surfaces were divided into three groups. Group I was treated with a rotary instrument set at a low speed, rubber cup and a mixture of water and pumice; group II with a rotary instrument set at a low speed, rubber cup and prophylaxis paste Herjos-F (Vigodent S/A Indústria e Comércio, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil); and group III with sodium bicarbonate spray Profi II Ceramic (Dabi Atlante Indústrias Médico Odontológicas Ltda, Ribeirão Preto, Brazil). All procedures were performed by the same operator for 10 s, and samples were rinsed and stored in distilled water Pre and post-treatment surface evaluation was completed using a surface profilometer (Perthometer S8P, Marh, Perthen, Germany) in 54 samples. In addition, the other samples were coated with gold and examined in a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The results of this study were statistically analyzed with the paired t-test (Student), the Kruskal-Wallis test and the Dunn (5%) test. The sodium bicarbonate spray led to significantly rougher surfaces than the pumice paste. The use of prophylaxis paste showed no statistically significant difference when compared with the other methods. Based on SEM analysis, the sodium bicarbonate spray presented an irregular surface with granular material and erosions. Based on this study, it can be concluded that there was an increased enamel surface roughness when teeth were treated with sodium bicarbonate spray when compared with teeth treated with pumice paste. PMID:18767461

  16. Roughness of human enamel surface submitted to different prophylaxis methods.

    PubMed

    Castanho, Gisela Muassab; Arana-Chavez, Victor E; Fava, Marcelo

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate alterations in the surface roughness and micromorphology of human enamel submitted to three prophylaxis methods. Sixty-nine caries-free molars with exposed labial surfaces were divided into three groups. Group I was treated with a rotary instrument set at a low speed, rubber cup and a mixture of water and pumice; group II with a rotary instrument set at a low speed, rubber cup and prophylaxis paste Herjos-F (Vigodent S/A Indústria e Comércio, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil); and group III with sodium bicarbonate spray Profi II Ceramic (Dabi Atlante Indústrias Médico Odontológicas Ltda, Ribeirão Preto, Brazil). All procedures were performed by the same operator for 10 s, and samples were rinsed and stored in distilled water Pre and post-treatment surface evaluation was completed using a surface profilometer (Perthometer S8P, Marh, Perthen, Germany) in 54 samples. In addition, the other samples were coated with gold and examined in a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The results of this study were statistically analyzed with the paired t-test (Student), the Kruskal-Wallis test and the Dunn (5%) test. The sodium bicarbonate spray led to significantly rougher surfaces than the pumice paste. The use of prophylaxis paste showed no statistically significant difference when compared with the other methods. Based on SEM analysis, the sodium bicarbonate spray presented an irregular surface with granular material and erosions. Based on this study, it can be concluded that there was an increased enamel surface roughness when teeth were treated with sodium bicarbonate spray when compared with teeth treated with pumice paste.

  17. A silica gel based method for extracting insect surface hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Choe, Dong-Hwan; Ramírez, Santiago R; Tsutsui, Neil D

    2012-02-01

    Here, we describe a novel method for the extraction of insect cuticular hydrocarbons using silica gel, herein referred to as "silica-rubbing". This method permits the selective sampling of external hydrocarbons from insect cuticle surfaces for subsequent analysis using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The cuticular hydrocarbons are first adsorbed to silica gel particles by rubbing the cuticle of insect specimens with the materials, and then are subsequently eluted using organic solvents. We compared the cuticular hydrocarbon profiles that resulted from extractions using silica-rubbing and solvent-soaking methods in four ant and one bee species: Linepithema humile, Azteca instabilis, Camponotus floridanus, Pogonomyrmex barbatus (Hymenoptera: Formicidae), and Euglossa dilemma (Hymenoptera: Apidae). We also compared the hydrocarbon profiles of Euglossa dilemma obtained via silica-rubbing and solid phase microextraction (SPME). Comparison of hydrocarbon profiles obtained by different extraction methods indicates that silica rubbing selectively extracts the hydrocarbons that are present on the surface of the cuticular wax layer, without extracting hydrocarbons from internal glands and tissues. Due to its surface specificity, efficiency, and low cost, this new method may be useful for studying the biology of insect cuticular hydrocarbons.

  18. Method for Fabricating Soft Tissue Implants with Microscopic Surface Roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A. (Inventor); Rutledge, Sharon K. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A method for fabricating soft tissue implants using a mold. The cavity surface of an initially untextured mold. made of an organic material such as epoxy. is given a thin film coating of material that has pinholes and is resistant to atomic particle bombardment. The mold cavity surface is then subjected to atomic particle bombardment, such as when placed in an isotropic atomic oxygen environment. Microscopic depressions in the mold cavity surface are created at the pinhole sites on the thin film coating. The thin film coating is removed and the mold is then used to cast the soft tissue implant. The thin film coating having pinholes may be created by chilling the mold below the dew point such that water vapor condenses upon it; distributing particles, that can partially dissolve and become attached to the mold cavity surface, onto the mold cavity surface; removing the layer of condensate, such as by evaporation; applying the thin film coating over the entire mold surface; and, finally removing the particles, such as by dissolving or brushing it off. Pinholes are created in the thin film coating at the sites previously occupied by the particles.

  19. Effects of manufacturing method on surface mineralization of bioactive glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirayesh, Hamidreza

    Amorphous bioactive glass powders are used as bone-filling materials in many medical applications. Bioactivity is achieved through ion exchange with bodily fluids, leading to surface apatite mineral formation---a necessity for tissue development. Traditional fabrication is by melt-casting and grinding, however sol-gel synthesis is another method which directly produces powders with higher specific surface area and potential for increased ion exchange rates. In this study sol-gel derived powders were manufactured and compared with melt-cast powders to determine the effects of crystallinity, composition, and specific surface area on apatite formation. Powders were immersed in simulated body fluid as a function of time and the evolution of apatite minerals was characterized. Apatite formation was most significantly affected by powder composition, followed by specific surface area; merely having sodium in the powder was more influential than altering the surface area and/or atomic structure, yet high specific surface area was found to enhance reactions on crystalline powders.

  20. Method for producing hard-surfaced tools and machine components

    DOEpatents

    McHargue, Carl J.

    1985-01-01

    In one aspect, the invention comprises a method for producing tools and machine components having superhard crystalline-ceramic work surfaces. Broadly, the method comprises two steps: A tool or machine component having a ceramic near-surface region is mounted in ion-implantation apparatus. The region then is implanted with metal ions to form, in the region, a metastable alloy of the ions and said ceramic. The region containing the alloy is characterized by a significant increase in hardness properties, such as microhardness, fracture-toughness, and/or scratch-resistance. The resulting improved article has good thermal stability at temperatures characteristic of typical tool and machine-component uses. The method is relatively simple and reproducible.

  1. Method for producing hard-surfaced tools and machine components

    DOEpatents

    McHargue, C.J.

    1981-10-21

    In one aspect, the invention comprises a method for producing tools and machine components having superhard crystalline-ceramic work surfaces. Broadly, the method comprises two steps: a tool or machine component having a ceramic near-surface region is mounted in ion-implantation apparatus. The region then is implanted with metal ions to form, in the region, a metastable alloy of the ions and said ceramic. The region containing the alloy is characterized by a significant increase in hardness properties, such as microhardness, fracture-toughness, and/or scratch-resistance. The resulting improved article has good thermal stability at temperatures characteristic of typical tool and machine-component uses. The method is relatively simple and reproducible.

  2. Method of forming a hardened surface on a substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Branagan, Daniel J.

    2010-08-31

    The invention includes a method of producing a hard metallic material by forming a mixture containing at least 55% iron and at least one of B, C, Si and P. The mixture is formed into an alloy and cooled to form a metallic material having a hardness of greater than about 9.2 GPa. The invention includes a method of forming a wire by combining a metal strip and a powder. The metal strip and the powder are rolled to form a wire containing at least 55% iron and from two to seven additional elements including at least one of C, Si and B. The invention also includes a method of forming a hardened surface on a substrate by processing a solid mass to form a powder, applying the powder to a surface to form a layer containing metallic glass, and converting the glass to a crystalline material having a nanocrystalline grain size.

  3. Multichannel analysis of surface wave method with the autojuggie

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tian, G.; Steeples, D.W.; Xia, J.; Miller, R.D.; Spikes, K.T.; Ralston, M.D.

    2003-01-01

    The shear (S)-wave velocity of near-surface materials and its effect on seismic-wave propagation are of fundamental interest in many engineering, environmental, and groundwater studies. The multichannel analysis of surface wave (MASW) method provides a robust, efficient, and accurate tool to observe near-surface S-wave velocity. A recently developed device used to place large numbers of closely spaced geophones simultaneously and automatically (the 'autojuggie') is shown here to be applicable to the collection of MASW data. In order to demonstrate the use of the autojuggie in the MASW method, we compared high-frequency surface-wave data acquired from conventionally planted geophones (control line) to data collected in parallel with the automatically planted geophones attached to steel bars (test line). The results demonstrate that the autojuggie can be applied in the MASW method. Implementation of the autojuggie in very shallow MASW surveys could drastically reduce the time required and costs incurred in such surveys. ?? 2003 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Statistical energy analysis response prediction methods for structural systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, R. F.

    1979-01-01

    The results of an effort to document methods for accomplishing response predictions for commonly encountered aerospace structural configurations is presented. Application of these methods to specified aerospace structure to provide sample analyses is included. An applications manual, with the structural analyses appended as example problems is given. Comparisons of the response predictions with measured data are provided for three of the example problems.

  5. Pendant bubble method for an accurate characterization of superhydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ling, William Yeong Liang; Ng, Tuck Wah; Neild, Adrian

    2011-12-01

    The commonly used sessile drop method for measuring contact angles and surface tension suffers from errors on superhydrophobic surfaces. This occurs from unavoidable experimental error in determining the vertical location of the liquid-solid-vapor interface due to a camera's finite pixel resolution, thereby necessitating the development and application of subpixel algorithms. We demonstrate here the advantage of a pendant bubble in decreasing the resulting error prior to the application of additional algorithms. For sessile drops to attain an equivalent accuracy, the pixel count would have to be increased by 2 orders of magnitude. PMID:22017500

  6. Method of inducing surface ensembles on a metal catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Miller, S.S.

    1987-10-02

    A method of inducing surface ensembles on a transition metal catalyst used in the conversion of a reactant gas or gas mixture, such as carbon monoxide and hydrogen into hydrocarbons (the Fischer-Tropsch reaction) is disclosed which comprises adding a Lewis base to the syngas (CO + H/sub 2/) mixture before reaction takes place. The formation of surface ensembles in this manner restricts the number and types of reaction pathways which will be utilized, thus greatly narrowing the product distribution and maximizing the efficiency of the Fischer-Tropsch reaction. Similarly, amines may also be produced by the conversion of reactant gas or gases, such as nitrogen, hydrogen, or hydrocarbon constituents.

  7. Application of response surface techniques to helicopter rotor blade optimization procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Joseph Lynn; Walsh, Joanne L.; Young, Katherine C.

    1995-01-01

    In multidisciplinary optimization problems, response surface techniques can be used to replace the complex analyses that define the objective function and/or constraints with simple functions, typically polynomials. In this work a response surface is applied to the design optimization of a helicopter rotor blade. In previous work, this problem has been formulated with a multilevel approach. Here, the response surface takes advantage of this decomposition and is used to replace the lower level, a structural optimization of the blade. Problems that were encountered and important considerations in applying the response surface are discussed. Preliminary results are also presented that illustrate the benefits of using the response surface.

  8. Identifying surface response to drought and heat with a land surface model and NDVI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, L. S.; Michaelsen, J.; Funk, C. C.; Carvalho, L. V.; Still, C. J.; McNally, A.; Peters-Lidard, C. D.

    2012-12-01

    Lack of in situ observations makes drought monitoring a challenge in East Africa. Hence an effective means of identifying climate hazards and surface impacts are satellite-based rainfall estimates and vegetation observations. During the 2011 Kenyan drought Rainfall Estimation Algorithm Version 2 (RFE2.0) and expedited Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (eMODIS) NDVI products were used to delineate regional gradients of food insecurity, a critical factor in prompt distribution of aid. Land surface models (LSM) beckon as a means for expanding our understanding of drought. Modeled turbulent surface fluxes may make explicit physical processes responsible for observed plant stress. When sensible heating occurs under low evapotranspiration (AET) conditions, we would expect vegetation stress to increase. In this paper we examine two aspects of temperature-vegetation stress as interpreted by a LSM: (1) To what extent do sensible heating anomalies accompany AET anomalies and (2) how do rainfall and temperature influence energy partitioning? We investigate for the March-May rainy season (2001-12) across Kenya's rangelands at interannual and sub-seasonal timescales. Results highlight landscape characteristics with disproportionate sensitivity to climate. LSM estimates are compared to the vegetation response observed with NDVI. We establish the relationship between sources and use 2009 and 2011 agro-pastoral droughts as criteria for the LSM as a potential monitoring tool. Climate and flux data are from Noah3.2 LSM forced with RFE2.0 rainfall in a custom configuration of the NASA Land Information System. Satellite observations are from eMODIS NDVI.

  9. Aeroelastic dynamic response and control of an airfoil section with control surface nonlinearities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Daochun; Guo, Shijun; Xiang, Jinwu

    2010-10-01

    Nonlinearities in aircraft mechanisms are inevitable, especially in the control system. It is necessary to investigate the effects of them on the dynamic response and control performance of aeroelastic system. In this paper, based on the state-dependent Riccati equation method, a state feedback suboptimal control law is derived for aeroelastic response and flutter suppression of a three degree-of-freedom typical airfoil section. With the control law designed, nonlinear effects of freeplay in the control surface and time delay between the control input and actuator are investigated by numerical approach. A cubic nonlinearity in pitch degree is adopted to prevent the aeroelastic responses from divergence when the flow velocity exceeds the critical flutter speed. For the system with a freeplay, the responses of both open- and closed-loop systems are determined with Runge-Kutta algorithm in conjunction with Henon's method. This method is used to locate the switching points accurately and efficiently as the system moves from one subdomain into another. The simulation results show that the freeplay leads to a forward phase response and a slight increase of flutter speed of the closed-loop system. The effect of freeplay on the aeroelastic response decreases as the flow velocity increases. The time delay between the control input and actuator may impair control performance and cause high-frequency motion and quasi-periodic vibration.

  10. Method for Reduction of Silver Biocide Plating on Metal Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, John; Nalette, Timothy; Beringer, Durwood

    2013-01-01

    Silver ions in aqueous solutions (0.05 to 1 ppm) are used for microbial control in water systems. The silver ions remain in solution when stored in plastic containers, but the concentration rapidly decreases to non-biocidal levels when stored in metal containers. The silver deposits onto the surface and is reduced to non-biocidal silver metal when it contacts less noble metal surfaces, including stainless steel, titanium, and nickel-based alloys. Five methods of treatment of contact metal surfaces to deter silver deposition and reduction are proposed: (1) High-temperature oxidation of the metal surface; (2) High-concentration silver solution pre-treatment; (3) Silver plating; (4) Teflon coat by vapor deposition (titanium only); and (5) A combination of methods (1) and (2), which proved to be the best method for the nickel-based alloy application. The mechanism associated with surface treatments (1), (2), and (5) is thought to be the development of a less active oxide layer that deters ionic silver deposition. Mechanism (3) is an attempt to develop an equilibrium ionic silver concentration via dissolution of metallic silver. Mechanism (4) provides a non-reactive barrier to deter ionic silver plating. Development testing has shown that ionic silver in aqueous solution was maintained at essentially the same level of addition (0.4 ppm) for up to 15 months with method (5) (a combination of methods (1) and (2)), before the test was discontinued for nickel-based alloys. Method (1) resulted in the maintenance of a biocidal level (approximately 0.05 ppm) for up to 10 months before that test was discontinued for nickel-based alloys. Methods (1) and (2) used separately were able to maintain ionic silver in aqueous solution at essentially the same level of addition (0.4 ppm) for up to 10 months before the test was discontinued for stainless steel alloys. Method (3) was only utilized for titanium alloys, and was successful at maintaining ionic silver in aqueous solution at

  11. Advanced Response Surface Modeling of Ares I Roll Control Jet Aerodynamic Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Favaregh, Noah M.

    2010-01-01

    The Ares I rocket uses roll control jets. These jets have aerodynamic implications as they impinge on the surface and protuberances of the vehicle. The jet interaction on the body can cause an amplification or a reduction of the rolling moment produced by the jet itself, either increasing the jet effectiveness or creating an adverse effect. A design of experiments test was planned and carried out using computation fluid dynamics, and a subsequent response surface analysis ensued on the available data to characterize the jet interaction across the ascent portion of the Ares I flight envelope. Four response surface schemes were compared including a single response surface covering the entire design space, separate sector responses that did not overlap, continuously overlapping surfaces, and recursive weighted response surfaces. These surfaces were evaluated on traditional statistical metrics as well as visual inspection. Validation of the recursive weighted response surface was performed using additionally available data at off-design point locations.

  12. Methods for finding transition states on reduced potential energy surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burger, Steven K.; Ayers, Paul W.

    2010-06-01

    Three new algorithms are presented for determining transition state (TS) structures on the reduced potential energy surface, that is, for problems in which a few important degrees of freedom can be isolated. All three methods use constrained optimization to rapidly find the TS without an initial Hessian evaluation. The algorithms highlight how efficiently the TS can be located on a reduced surface, where the rest of the degrees of freedom are minimized. The first method uses a nonpositive definite quasi-Newton update for the reduced degrees of freedom. The second uses Shepard interpolation to fit the Hessian and starts from a set of points that bound the TS. The third directly uses a finite difference scheme to calculate the reduced degrees of freedom of the Hessian of the entire system, and searches for the TS on the full potential energy surface. All three methods are tested on an epoxide hydrolase cluster, and the ring formations of cyclohexane and cyclobutenone. The results indicate that all the methods are able to converge quite rapidly to the correct TS, but that the finite difference approach is the most efficient.

  13. Carbide and carbonitride surface treatment method for refractory metals

    DOEpatents

    Meyer, Glenn A.; Schildbach, Marcus A.

    1996-01-01

    A carbide and carbonitride surface treatment method for refractory metals is provided, in steps including, heating a part formed of boron, chromium, hafnium, molybdenum, niobium, tantalum, titanium, tungsten or zirconium, or alloys thereof, in an evacuated chamber and then introducing reaction gases including nitrogen and hydrogen, either in elemental or water vapor form, which react with a source of elemental carbon to form carbon-containing gaseous reactants which then react with the metal part to form the desired surface layer. Apparatus for practicing the method is also provided, in the form of a carbide and carbonitride surface treatment system (10) including a reaction chamber (14), a source of elemental carbon (17), a heating subassembly (20) and a source of reaction gases (23). Alternative methods of providing the elemental carbon (17) and the reaction gases (23) are provided, as well as methods of supporting the metal part (12), evacuating the chamber (14) with a vacuum subassembly (18) and heating all of the components to the desired temperature.

  14. Facile stamp patterning method for superhydrophilic/superhydrophobic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyu, Sungnam; Hwang, Woonbong

    2015-11-01

    Patterning techniques are essential to many research fields such as chemistry, biology, medicine, and micro-electromechanical systems. In this letter, we report a simple, fast, and low-cost superhydrophobic patterning method using a superhydrophilic template. The technique is based on the contact stamping of the surface during hydrophobic dip coating. Surface characteristics were measured using scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopic analysis. The results showed that the hydrophilic template, which was contacted with the stamp, was not affected by the hydrophobic solution. The resolution study was conducted using a stripe shaped stamp. The patterned line was linearly proportional to the width of the stamp line with a constant narrowing effect. A surface with regions of four different types of wetting was fabricated to demonstrate the patterning performance.

  15. Facile stamp patterning method for superhydrophilic/superhydrophobic surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Lyu, Sungnam Hwang, Woonbong

    2015-11-16

    Patterning techniques are essential to many research fields such as chemistry, biology, medicine, and micro-electromechanical systems. In this letter, we report a simple, fast, and low-cost superhydrophobic patterning method using a superhydrophilic template. The technique is based on the contact stamping of the surface during hydrophobic dip coating. Surface characteristics were measured using scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopic analysis. The results showed that the hydrophilic template, which was contacted with the stamp, was not affected by the hydrophobic solution. The resolution study was conducted using a stripe shaped stamp. The patterned line was linearly proportional to the width of the stamp line with a constant narrowing effect. A surface with regions of four different types of wetting was fabricated to demonstrate the patterning performance.

  16. Atomistic Method Applied to Computational Modeling of Surface Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozzolo, Guillermo H.; Abel, Phillip B.

    2000-01-01

    The formation of surface alloys is a growing research field that, in terms of the surface structure of multicomponent systems, defines the frontier both for experimental and theoretical techniques. Because of the impact that the formation of surface alloys has on surface properties, researchers need reliable methods to predict new surface alloys and to help interpret unknown structures. The structure of surface alloys and when, and even if, they form are largely unpredictable from the known properties of the participating elements. No unified theory or model to date can infer surface alloy structures from the constituents properties or their bulk alloy characteristics. In spite of these severe limitations, a growing catalogue of such systems has been developed during the last decade, and only recently are global theories being advanced to fully understand the phenomenon. None of the methods used in other areas of surface science can properly model even the already known cases. Aware of these limitations, the Computational Materials Group at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field has developed a useful, computationally economical, and physically sound methodology to enable the systematic study of surface alloy formation in metals. This tool has been tested successfully on several known systems for which hard experimental evidence exists and has been used to predict ternary surface alloy formation (results to be published: Garces, J.E.; Bozzolo, G.; and Mosca, H.: Atomistic Modeling of Pd/Cu(100) Surface Alloy Formation. Surf. Sci., 2000 (in press); Mosca, H.; Garces J.E.; and Bozzolo, G.: Surface Ternary Alloys of (Cu,Au)/Ni(110). (Accepted for publication in Surf. Sci., 2000.); and Garces, J.E.; Bozzolo, G.; Mosca, H.; and Abel, P.: A New Approach for Atomistic Modeling of Pd/Cu(110) Surface Alloy Formation. (Submitted to Appl. Surf. Sci.)). Ternary alloy formation is a field yet to be fully explored experimentally. The computational tool, which is based on

  17. Classification of journal surfaces using surface topography parameters and software methods to compensate for stylus geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, C. J.; Devries, W. R.; Ludema, K. C.

    1983-01-01

    Measurements made with a stylus surface tracer which provides a digitized representation of a surface profile are discussed. Parameters are defined to characterize the height (e.g., RMS roughness, skewness, and kurtosis) and length (e.g., autocorrelation) of the surface topography. These are applied to the characterization of crank shaft journals which were manufactured by different grinding and lopping procedures known to give significant differences in crank shaft bearing life. It was found that three parameters (RMS roughness, skewness, and kurtosis) are necessary to adequately distinguish the character of these surfaces. Every surface specimen has a set of values for these three parameters. They can be regarded as a set coordinate in a space constituted by three characteristics axes. The various journal surfaces can be classified along with the determination of a proper wavelength cutoff (0.25 mm) by using a method of separated subspace. The finite radius of the stylus used for profile tracing gives an inherent measurement error as it passes over the fine structure of the surface. A mathematical model is derived to compensate for this error.

  18. Surface plasmon resonance microscopy: Achieving a quantitative optical response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Alexander W.; Halter, Michael; Plant, Anne L.; Elliott, John T.

    2016-09-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) imaging allows real-time label-free imaging based on index of refraction and changes in index of refraction at an interface. Optical parameter analysis is achieved by application of the Fresnel model to SPR data typically taken by an instrument in a prism based figuration. We carry out SPR imaging on a microscope by launching light into a sample and collecting reflected light through a high numerical aperture microscope objective. The SPR microscope enables spatial resolution that approaches the diffraction limit and has a dynamic range that allows detection of subnanometer to submicrometer changes in thickness of biological material at a surface. However, unambiguous quantitative interpretation of SPR changes using the microscope system could not be achieved using the Fresnel model because of polarization dependent attenuation and optical aberration that occurs in the high numerical aperture objective. To overcome this problem, we demonstrate a model to correct for polarization diattenuation and optical aberrations in the SPR data and develop a procedure to calibrate reflectivity to index of refraction values. The calibration and correction strategy for quantitative analysis was validated by comparing the known indices of refraction of bulk materials with corrected SPR data interpreted with the Fresnel model. Subsequently, we applied our SPR microscopy method to evaluate the index of refraction for a series of polymer microspheres in aqueous media and validated the quality of the measurement with quantitative phase microscopy.

  19. Development of Improved Surface Integral Methods for Jet Aeroacoustic Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilon, Anthony R.; Lyrintzis, Anastasios S.

    1997-01-01

    The accurate prediction of aerodynamically generated noise has become an important goal over the past decade. Aeroacoustics must now be an integral part of the aircraft design process. The direct calculation of aerodynamically generated noise with CFD-like algorithms is plausible. However, large computer time and memory requirements often make these predictions impractical. It is therefore necessary to separate the aeroacoustics problem into two parts, one in which aerodynamic sound sources are determined, and another in which the propagating sound is calculated. This idea is applied in acoustic analogy methods. However, in the acoustic analogy, the determination of far-field sound requires the solution of a volume integral. This volume integration again leads to impractical computer requirements. An alternative to the volume integrations can be found in the Kirchhoff method. In this method, Green's theorem for the linear wave equation is used to determine sound propagation based on quantities on a surface surrounding the source region. The change from volume to surface integrals represents a tremendous savings in the computer resources required for an accurate prediction. This work is concerned with the development of enhancements of the Kirchhoff method for use in a wide variety of aeroacoustics problems. This enhanced method, the modified Kirchhoff method, is shown to be a Green's function solution of Lighthill's equation. It is also shown rigorously to be identical to the methods of Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings. This allows for development of versatile computer codes which can easily alternate between the different Kirchhoff and Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings formulations, using the most appropriate method for the problem at hand. The modified Kirchhoff method is developed primarily for use in jet aeroacoustics predictions. Applications of the method are shown for two dimensional and three dimensional jet flows. Additionally, the enhancements are generalized so that

  20. Transfer of retention patterns in gas chromatography by means of response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Chhaganlal, Milan; Skartland, Liv K; Mjøs, Svein A

    2014-03-01

    Accurate transfer of retention patterns in temperature-programmed gas chromatography is challenging because minor variations in column properties and experimental conditions may have significant impact on the elution patterns. An experimental method for accurate transfer of retention indices is proposed and validated. The methodology is based on response surface methodology and experimental design. The temperature rate and the start temperature of the rate are varied systematically in the region where the optimal conditions are expected to be found. Response surfaces that explain the absolute deviation to the target retention indices are calculated for each compound. These response surfaces are thereafter averaged and the minimum in the average surface is regarded as optimal conditions for reproduction of the retention pattern. The methodology was applied on fatty acid methyl esters using equivalent chain lengths as the retention index system. Two different target patterns were tested on two BPX-70 columns with different dimensions. Validation of the proposed conditions showed that the retention patterns could be reproduced with an error that was only fractions of a peak width. PMID:24529956

  1. Method for in-situ cleaning of carbon contaminated surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Klebanoff, Leonard E.; Grunow, Philip; Graham, Jr., Samuel

    2006-12-12

    Activated gaseous species generated adjacent a carbon contaminated surface affords in-situ cleaning. A device for removing carbon contamination from a surface of the substrate includes (a) a housing defining a vacuum chamber in which the substrate is located; (b) a source of gaseous species; and (c) a source of electrons that are emitted to activate the gaseous species into activated gaseous species. The source of electrons preferably includes (i) a filament made of a material that generates thermionic electron emissions; (ii) a source of energy that is connected to the filament; and (iii) an electrode to which the emitted electrons are attracted. The device is particularly suited for photolithography systems with optic surfaces, e.g., mirrors, that are otherwise inaccessible unless the system is dismantled. A method of removing carbon contaminants from a substrate surface that is housed within a vacuum chamber is also disclosed. The method employs activated gaseous species that react with the carbon contaminants to form carbon containing gaseous byproducts.

  2. Shear-Sensitive Liquid Crystal Coating Method: Surface-Inclination Effects on Shear Vector Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reda, Daniel C.; Wilder, Michael C.; Nixon, David (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The shear-sensitive liquid crystal coating (SSLCC) method is an image-based technique for both visualizing dynamic surface-flow phenomena, such as transition and separation, and for measuring the continuous shear-stress vector distribution acting on an aerodynamic surface. Under proper lighting and viewing conditions (discussed below), the coating changes color in response to an applied aerodynamic shear. This color-change response is continuous and reversible, with a response time of milliseconds, and is a function of both the shear magnitude and the shear vector orientation relative to the observer. The liquid crystal phase of matter is a weakly-ordered, viscous, non-Newtonian fluid state that exists between the nonuniform liquid phase and the ordered solid phase of certain organic compounds. Cholesteric liquid crystal compounds possess a helical molecular arrangement that selectively scatters white light, incident along the helical axis, as a three-dimensional spectrum. This property is linked to the helical pitch length, which is within the range of wavelengths in the visible spectrum. The pitch length, and hence the wavelength of the scattered light, is influenced by shear stress normal to the helical axis. This unique optical property produces a measurable color change in response to an applied shearing force. The full-surface shear stress vector measurement method, developed at NASA-Ames, is schematically illustrated. As with the visualization method, the coated test surface is illuminated from the normal direction with white light and the camera is positioned at an above-plane view angle of approximately 30 deg. Experiments have been initiated at NASA Ames to begin the process of quantifying surface-inclination (surface-curvature) effects on shear vector measurement accuracy. In preliminary experiments, surface-inclination angles theta(sub x), theta(sub y) of 0, +/-5, +/-10, and +/-15 deg were employed. In this arrangement, white-light illumination was

  3. Method and apparatus for automatically tracking a workpiece surface. [Patents

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1981-02-03

    Laser cutting concepts and apparatus have been developed for cutting the shroud of the core fuel subassemblies. However, much care must be taken in the accuracy of the cutting since the fuel rods within the shroud often become warped and are forced into direct contact with the shroud in random regions. Thus, in order to cut the nuclear fuel rod shroud accurately so as not to puncture the cladding of the fuel rods, and to insure optimal cutting efficiency and performance, the focal point of beam need be maintained accurately at the workpiece surface. It becomes necessary to detect deviations in the level of the workpiece surface accurately in connection with the cutting process. Therefore, a method and apparatus for tracking the surface of a workpiece being cut by a laser beam coming from a focus head assembly is disclosed which includes two collimated laser beams directed onto the work-piece surface at spaced points by beam directing optics in generally parallel planes of incidence. A shift in spacing between the two points is detected by means of a video camera system and processed by a computer to yield a workpiece surface displacement signal which is input to a motor which raises or lowers the beam focus head accordingly.

  4. Application of Surface-Wave Methods for Seismic Site Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foti, Sebastiano; Parolai, Stefano; Albarello, Dario; Picozzi, Matteo

    2011-11-01

    Surface-wave dispersion analysis is widely used in geophysics to infer a shear wave velocity model of the subsoil for a wide variety of applications. A shear-wave velocity model is obtained from the solution of an inverse problem based on the surface wave dispersive propagation in vertically heterogeneous media. The analysis can be based either on active source measurements or on seismic noise recordings. This paper discusses the most typical choices for collection and interpretation of experimental data, providing a state of the art on the different steps involved in surface wave surveys. In particular, the different strategies for processing experimental data and to solve the inverse problem are presented, along with their advantages and disadvantages. Also, some issues related to the characteristics of passive surface wave data and their use in H/V spectral ratio technique are discussed as additional information to be used independently or in conjunction with dispersion analysis. Finally, some recommendations for the use of surface wave methods are presented, while also outlining future trends in the research of this topic.

  5. A Method to Evaluate Hormesis in Nanoparticle Dose-Responses

    PubMed Central

    Nascarella, Marc A.; Calabrese, Edward J.

    2012-01-01

    The term hormesis describes a dose-response relationship that is characterized by a response that is opposite above and below the toxicological or pharmacological threshold. Previous reports have shown that this relationship is ubiquitous in the response of pharmaceuticals, metals, organic chemicals, radiation, and physical stressor agents. Recent reports have also indicated that certain nanoparticles (NPs) may also exhibit a hormetic dose-response. We describe the application of three previously described methods to quantify the magnitude of the hormetic biphasic dose-responses in nanotoxicology studies. This methodology is useful in screening assays that attempt to parse the observed toxicological dose-response data into categories based on the magnitude of hormesis in the evaluation of NPs. For example, these methods may be used to quickly identify NP induced hormetic responses that are either desirably enhanced (e.g., neuronal cell viability) or undesirably stimulated (e.g., low dose stimulation of tumor cells). PMID:22942868

  6. METHOD OF FORMING TANTALUM SILICIDE ON TANTALUM SURFACES

    DOEpatents

    Bowman, M.G.; Krikorian, N.H.

    1961-10-01

    A method is described for forming a non-corrosive silicide coating on tantalum. The coating is made through the heating of trirhenium silicides in contact with the tantalum object to approximately 1400 deg C at which temperature trirhenium silicide decomposes into rhenium and gaseous silicons. The silicon vapor reacts with the tantalum surface to form a tantalum silicide layer approximately 10 microns thick. (AEC)

  7. Optimization of composite flour biscuits by mixture response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Okpala, Laura C; Okoli, Eric C

    2013-08-01

    Biscuits were produced from blends of pigeon pea, sorghum and cocoyam flours. The study was carried out using mixture response surface methodology as the optimization technique. Using the simplex centroid design, 10 formulations were obtained. Protein and sensory quality of the biscuits were analyzed. The sensory attributes studied were appearance, taste, texture, crispness and general acceptability, while the protein quality indices were biological value and net protein utilization. The results showed that while the addition of pigeon pea improved the protein quality, its addition resulted in reduced sensory ratings for all the sensory attributes with the exception of appearance. Some of the biscuits had sensory ratings, which were not significantly different (p > 0.05) from biscuits made with wheat. Rat feeding experiments indicated that the biological value and net protein utilization values obtained for most of the biscuits were above minimum recommended values. Optimization suggested biscuits containing 75.30% sorghum, 0% pigeon pea and 24.70% cocoyam flours as the best proportion of these components. This sample received good scores for the sensory attributes.

  8. Ectoine production by Halomonas boliviensis: optimization using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Van-Thuoc, Doan; Guzmán, Héctor; Thi-Hang, Mai; Hatti-Kaul, Rajni

    2010-10-01

    Two cultivation steps were used for production of biomass and ectoine by Halomonas boliviensis, respectively. The optimization of some nutrient parameters in each step was investigated by using response surface methodology. Twenty and 12 experiments were performed to attain optimal conditions for biomass and ectoine production, respectively. The model predicted a maximum biomass concentration of 3.34 g/L on optimization of NH(4)Cl, K(2)HPO(4), and MgSO(4)•7H(2)O concentrations during the first cultivation, while a maximum ectoine concentration of 1.27 g/L was predicted on optimizing NaCl and monosodium glutamate concentrations in the second cultivation. The experimental values obtained (3.36 g biomass/L and 1.25 g ectoine/L) were in good agreement with the predicted values. The optimized conditions were also used for two-step 1.5-L fed-batch fermentations. In the first step, biomass concentration of 28.7 g/L was obtained while in the second step biomass concentration increased to 63 g/L. Ectoine concentration of 9.2 g/L was obtained, and the overall ectoine productivity was 6.3 g/L/day, being among the highest reported so far.

  9. Response surface methodology for cadmium biosorption on Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Ahmady-Asbchin, Salman

    2016-01-01

    In this research the effects of various physicochemical factors on Cd(2+) biosorption such as initial metal concentration, pH and contact exposure time were studied. This study has shown a Cd(2+) biosorption, equilibrium time of about 5 min for Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the adsorption equilibrium data were well described by Langmuir equation. The maximum capacity for biosorption has been extrapolated to 0.56 mmol.g(-1) for P. aeruginosa. The thermodynamic properties ΔG(0), ΔH(0), and ΔS(0) of Cd(2+) for biosorption were analyzed by the equilibrium constant value obtained from experimented data at different temperatures. The results show that biosorption of Cd(2+) by P. aeruginosa are endothermic and spontaneous with ΔH value of 36.35 J.mol(-1). By response surface methodology, the quadratic model has adequately described the experimental data based on the adjusted determination coefficient (R(2) = 0.98). The optimum conditions for maximum uptake onto the biosorbent were established at 0.5 g.l(-1) biosorbent concentration, pH 6 for the aqueous solution, and a temperature of 30 °C. PMID:27232396

  10. Optimization of the processing technology of Fructus Arctii by response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qi-Di; Qin, Kun-Ming; Shen, Bao-Jia; Cai, Hao; Cai, Bao-Chang

    2015-03-01

    The present study was designed to optimize the processing of Fructus Arctii by response surface methodology (RSM). Based on single factor studies, a three-variable, three-level Box-Behnken design (BBD) was used to monitor the effects of independent variables, including processing temperature and time, on the dependent variables. Response surfaces and contour plots of the contents of total lignans, chlorogenic acid, arctiin, and arctigenin were obtained through ultraviolet and visible (UV-Vis) monitoring and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Fructus Arctii should be processed under heating in a pot at 311 °C, medicine at 119 °C for 123s with flipping frequently. The experimental values under the optimized processing technology were consistent with the predicted values. In conclusion, RSM is an effective method to optimize the processing of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM).

  11. Optimization of the processing technology of Fructus Arctii by response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qi-Di; Qin, Kun-Ming; Shen, Bao-Jia; Cai, Hao; Cai, Bao-Chang

    2015-03-01

    The present study was designed to optimize the processing of Fructus Arctii by response surface methodology (RSM). Based on single factor studies, a three-variable, three-level Box-Behnken design (BBD) was used to monitor the effects of independent variables, including processing temperature and time, on the dependent variables. Response surfaces and contour plots of the contents of total lignans, chlorogenic acid, arctiin, and arctigenin were obtained through ultraviolet and visible (UV-Vis) monitoring and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Fructus Arctii should be processed under heating in a pot at 311 °C, medicine at 119 °C for 123s with flipping frequently. The experimental values under the optimized processing technology were consistent with the predicted values. In conclusion, RSM is an effective method to optimize the processing of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). PMID:25835367

  12. An efficient approach to cathode operational parameters optimization for microbial fuel cell using response surface methodology

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In the recent study, optimum operational conditions of cathode compartment of microbial fuel cell were determined by using Response Surface Methodology (RSM) with a central composite design to maximize power density and COD removal. Methods The interactive effects of parameters such as, pH, buffer concentration and ionic strength on power density and COD removal were evaluated in two-chamber microbial batch-mode fuel cell. Results Power density and COD removal for optimal conditions (pH of 6.75, buffer concentration of 0.177 M and ionic strength of cathode chamber of 4.69 mM) improve by 17 and 5%, respectively, in comparison with normal conditions (pH of 7, buffer concentration of 0.1 M and ionic strength of 2.5 mM). Conclusions In conclusion, results verify that response surface methodology could successfully determine cathode chamber optimum operational conditions. PMID:24423039

  13. The Role of Hierarchy in Response Surface Modeling of Wind Tunnel Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLoach, Richard

    2010-01-01

    This paper is intended as a tutorial introduction to certain aspects of response surface modeling, for the experimentalist who has started to explore these methods as a means of improving productivity and quality in wind tunnel testing and other aerospace applications. A brief review of the productivity advantages of response surface modeling in aerospace research is followed by a description of the advantages of a common coding scheme that scales and centers independent variables. The benefits of model term reduction are reviewed. A constraint on model term reduction with coded factors is described in some detail, which requires such models to be well-formulated, or hierarchical. Examples illustrate the consequences of ignoring this constraint. The implication for automated regression model reduction procedures is discussed, and some opinions formed from the author s experience are offered on coding, model reduction, and hierarchy.

  14. Theoretical studies of potential energy surfaces and computational methods.

    SciTech Connect

    Shepard, R.

    2006-01-01

    This project involves the development, implementation, and application of theoretical methods for the calculation and characterization of potential energy surfaces (PES) involving molecular species that occur in hydrocarbon combustion. These potential energy surfaces require an accurate and balanced treatment of reactants, intermediates, and products. Most of our work focuses on general multiconfiguration self-consistent-field (MCSCF) and multireference single- and double-excitation configuration interaction (MRSDCI) methods. In contrast to the more common single-reference electronic structure methods, this approach is capable of describing accurately molecular systems that are highly distorted away from their equilibrium geometries, including reactant, fragment, and transition-state geometries, and of describing regions of the potential surface that are associated with electronic wave functions of widely varying nature. The MCSCF reference wave functions are designed to be sufficiently flexible to describe qualitatively the changes in the electronic structure over the broad range of molecular geometries of interest. The necessary mixing of ionic, covalent, and Rydberg contributions, along with the appropriate treatment of the different electron-spin components (e.g. closed shell, high-spin open-shell, low-spin open shell, radical, diradical, etc.) of the wave functions are treated correctly at this level. Further treatment of electron correlation effects is included using large scale multireference CI wave functions, particularly including the single and double excitations relative to the MCSCF reference space. This leads to the most flexible and accurate large-scale MRSDCI wave functions that have been used to date in global PES studies.

  15. Theoretical studies of potential energy surfaces and computational methods

    SciTech Connect

    Shepard, R.

    1993-12-01

    This project involves the development, implementation, and application of theoretical methods for the calculation and characterization of potential energy surfaces involving molecular species that occur in hydrocarbon combustion. These potential energy surfaces require an accurate and balanced treatment of reactants, intermediates, and products. This difficult challenge is met with general multiconfiguration self-consistent-field (MCSCF) and multireference single- and double-excitation configuration interaction (MRSDCI) methods. In contrast to the more common single-reference electronic structure methods, this approach is capable of describing accurately molecular systems that are highly distorted away from their equilibrium geometries, including reactant, fragment, and transition-state geometries, and of describing regions of the potential surface that are associated with electronic wave functions of widely varying nature. The MCSCF reference wave functions are designed to be sufficiently flexible to describe qualitatively the changes in the electronic structure over the broad range of geometries of interest. The necessary mixing of ionic, covalent, and Rydberg contributions, along with the appropriate treatment of the different electron-spin components (e.g. closed shell, high-spin open-shell, low-spin open shell, radical, diradical, etc.) of the wave functions, are treated correctly at this level. Further treatment of electron correlation effects is included using large scale multireference CI wave functions, particularly including the single and double excitations relative to the MCSCF reference space. This leads to the most flexible and accurate large-scale MRSDCI wave functions that have been used to date in global PES studies.

  16. Novel titration method for surface-functionalised silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofen, Kai; Weber, Siegfried; Chan, Chiu Ping Candace; Majewski, Peter

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes three inexpensive and fast analytical methods to characterise grafted particle surfaces. The reaction of silica with (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane, (3-mercaptopropyl)trimethoxysilane and N-(phosphonomethyl)iminodiacetic acid hydrate, respectively, leads to NH2-, SO3H- or COOH-functionalised silica, which were characterised by X-ray photoelectron spectrometry and titration in nonaqueous media as well as with two titration methods in a water-based environment. In the work presented, factors influencing the titrations are pointed out and solutions are presented to overcome these limiting factors are shown.

  17. Subsonic panel method for designing wing surfaces from pressure distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bristow, D. R.; Hawk, J. D.

    1983-01-01

    An iterative method has been developed for designing wing section contours corresponding to a prescribed subcritical distribution of pressure. The calculations are initialized by using a surface panel method to analyze a baseline wing or wing-fuselage configuration. A first-order expansion to the baseline panel method equations is then used to calculate a matrix containing the partial derivative of potential at each control point with respect to each unknown geometry parameter. In every iteration cycle, the matrix is used both to calculate the geometry perturbation and to analyze the perturbed geometry. The distribution of potential on the perturbed geometry is established by simple linear extrapolation from the baseline solution. The extrapolated potential is converted to pressure by Bernoulli's equation. Not only is the accuracy of the approach good for very large perturbations, but the computing cost of each complete iteration cycle is substantially less than one analysis solution by a conventional panel method.

  18. Proposal for a biometrics of the cortical surface: a statistical method for relative surface distance metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bookstein, Fred L.

    1995-08-01

    Recent advances in computational geometry have greatly extended the range of neuroanatomical questions that can be approached by rigorous quantitative methods. One of the major current challenges in this area is to describe the variability of human cortical surface form and its implications for individual differences in neurophysiological functioning. Existing techniques for representation of stochastically invaginated surfaces do not conduce to the necessary parametric statistical summaries. In this paper, following a hint from David Van Essen and Heather Drury, I sketch a statistical method customized for the constraints of this complex data type. Cortical surface form is represented by its Riemannian metric tensor and averaged according to parameters of a smooth averaged surface. Sulci are represented by integral trajectories of the smaller principal strains of this metric, and their statistics follow the statistics of that relative metric. The diagrams visualizing this tensor analysis look like alligator leather but summarize all aspects of cortical surface form in between the principal sulci, the reliable ones; no flattening is required.

  19. Ablative Thermal Response Analysis Using the Finite Element Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dec John A.; Braun, Robert D.

    2009-01-01

    A review of the classic techniques used to solve ablative thermal response problems is presented. The advantages and disadvantages of both the finite element and finite difference methods are described. As a first step in developing a three dimensional finite element based ablative thermal response capability, a one dimensional computer tool has been developed. The finite element method is used to discretize the governing differential equations and Galerkin's method of weighted residuals is used to derive the element equations. A code to code comparison between the current 1-D tool and the 1-D Fully Implicit Ablation and Thermal Response Program (FIAT) has been performed.

  20. A Method for Calculating Transient Surface Temperatures and Surface Heating Rates for High-Speed Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, Robert D.; Gong, Leslie

    2000-01-01

    This report describes a method that can calculate transient aerodynamic heating and transient surface temperatures at supersonic and hypersonic speeds. This method can rapidly calculate temperature and heating rate time-histories for complete flight trajectories. Semi-empirical theories are used to calculate laminar and turbulent heat transfer coefficients and a procedure for estimating boundary-layer transition is included. Results from this method are compared with flight data from the X-15 research vehicle, YF-12 airplane, and the Space Shuttle Orbiter. These comparisons show that the calculated values are in good agreement with the measured flight data.

  1. System and method for non-destructive evaluation of surface characteristics of a magnetic material

    DOEpatents

    Jiles, David C.; Sipahi, Levent B.

    1994-05-17

    A system and a related method for non-destructive evaluation of the surface characteristics of a magnetic material. The sample is excited by an alternating magnetic field. The field frequency, amplitude and offset are controlled according to a predetermined protocol. The Barkhausen response of the sample is detected for the various fields and offsets and is analyzed. The system produces information relating to the frequency content, the amplitude content, the average or RMS energy content, as well as count rate information, for each of the Barkhausen responses at each of the excitation levels applied during the protocol. That information provides a contiguous body of data, heretofore unavailable, which can be analyzed to deduce information about the surface characteristics of the material at various depths below the surface.

  2. A rational interpolation method to compute frequency response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenney, Charles; Stubberud, Stephen; Laub, Alan J.

    1993-01-01

    A rational interpolation method for approximating a frequency response is presented. The method is based on a product formulation of finite differences, thereby avoiding the numerical problems incurred by near-equal-valued subtraction. Also, resonant pole and zero cancellation schemes are developed that increase the accuracy and efficiency of the interpolation method. Selection techniques of interpolation points are also discussed.

  3. Surface plasmon resonance response of Au-WO3- x composite films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bo; Yang, Dongfang; Lin, Chii-Wann

    2009-11-01

    Surface plasmon resonance of metal-dielectric composite thin films formed by noble metal nanoparticles embedded in a dielectric matrix offers a high degree of flexibility and enables many applications such as surface enhanced spectroscopes, and biological and chemical sensing. In this article, Au-WO3- x composite films of various Au contents and thicknesses were prepared by the pulsed laser deposition technique, and their SPR responses were measured in the Kreschmann geometry, using a polarized light beam at 640 nm wavelength. Theoretical calculation of SPR responses based on the Bruggeman or Maxwell-Garnett model with the MacLeod general characteristic matrix method is in obvious discrepancy with experimental measurements but it is able to predict the trend in term of the dependence of SPR responses on Au content and thickness of the Au-WO3- x films. The SPR responses of the Au-WO3- x films when exposed to NO gas molecules were measured and the preliminary results indicated that gas sensing using the SPR responses of metal-dielectric composite films is feasible.

  4. Enhanced osteoblast response to electrical discharge machining surface.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Fukunaga; Kataoka, Yu; Miyazaki, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the surface characteristics and biocompatibility of titanium (Ti) surfaces modified by wire electrical discharge machining (EDM). EDM surface characteristics were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), thin-film X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and contact angle measurements. MC3T3-E1 cell morphology, attachment and proliferation, as well as analysis of osteoblastic gene expressions, on machined surfaces and EDM surfaces were also evaluated. EDM surfaces exhibited high super hydrophilicity, due to high surface energy. XPS and XRD revealed that a passive oxide layer with certain developing thickness onto. EDM surfaces promoted cell attachment, but restrained proliferation. Counted cell numbers increased significantly on the machined surfaces as compared to the EDM surfaces. Real-time PCR analyses showed significantly higher relative mRNA expression levels of osteoblastic genes (ALP, osteocalcin, Runx2, Osterix) in cells cultured on the EDM surfaces as compared to cells cultured on the machined surfaces.

  5. Enhanced osteoblast response to electrical discharge machining surface.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Fukunaga; Kataoka, Yu; Miyazaki, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the surface characteristics and biocompatibility of titanium (Ti) surfaces modified by wire electrical discharge machining (EDM). EDM surface characteristics were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), thin-film X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and contact angle measurements. MC3T3-E1 cell morphology, attachment and proliferation, as well as analysis of osteoblastic gene expressions, on machined surfaces and EDM surfaces were also evaluated. EDM surfaces exhibited high super hydrophilicity, due to high surface energy. XPS and XRD revealed that a passive oxide layer with certain developing thickness onto. EDM surfaces promoted cell attachment, but restrained proliferation. Counted cell numbers increased significantly on the machined surfaces as compared to the EDM surfaces. Real-time PCR analyses showed significantly higher relative mRNA expression levels of osteoblastic genes (ALP, osteocalcin, Runx2, Osterix) in cells cultured on the EDM surfaces as compared to cells cultured on the machined surfaces. PMID:22447066

  6. Use of shape-preserving interpolation methods in surface modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ftitsch, F. N.

    1984-01-01

    In many large-scale scientific computations, it is necessary to use surface models based on information provided at only a finite number of points (rather than determined everywhere via an analytic formula). As an example, an equation of state (EOS) table may provide values of pressure as a function of temperature and density for a particular material. These values, while known quite accurately, are typically known only on a rectangular (but generally quite nonuniform) mesh in (T,d)-space. Thus interpolation methods are necessary to completely determine the EOS surface. The most primitive EOS interpolation scheme is bilinear interpolation. This has the advantages of depending only on local information, so that changes in data remote from a mesh element have no effect on the surface over the element, and of preserving shape information, such as monotonicity. Most scientific calculations, however, require greater smoothness. Standard higher-order interpolation schemes, such as Coons patches or bicubic splines, while providing the requisite smoothness, tend to produce surfaces that are not physically reasonable. This means that the interpolant may have bumps or wiggles that are not supported by the data. The mathematical quantification of ideas such as physically reasonable and visually pleasing is examined.

  7. Surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy sensor and methods for using same

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Brian Benjamin; Nave, Stanley Eugene

    2002-01-01

    A surface plasmon resonance ("SPR") probe with a detachable sensor head and system and methods for using the same in various applications is described. The SPR probe couples fiber optic cables directly to an SPR substrate that has a generally planar input surface and a generally curved reflecting surface, such as a substrate formed as a hemisphere. Forming the SPR probe in this manner allows the probe to be miniaturized and operate without the need for high precision, expensive and bulky collimating or focusing optics. Additionally, the curved reflecting surface of the substrate can be coated with one or multiple patches of sensing medium to allow the probe to detect for multiple analytes of interest or to provide multiple readings for comparison and higher precision. Specific applications for the probe are disclosed, including extremely high sensitive relative humidity and dewpoint detection for, e.g., moisture-sensitive environment such as volatile chemical reactions. The SPR probe disclosed operates with a large dynamic range and provides extremely high quality spectra despite being robust enough for field deployment and readily manufacturable.

  8. A method for selecting training samples based on camera response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Leihong; Li, Bei; Pan, Zilan; Liang, Dong; Kang, Yi; Zhang, Dawei; Ma, Xiuhua

    2016-09-01

    In the process of spectral reflectance reconstruction, sample selection plays an important role in the accuracy of the constructed model and in reconstruction effects. In this paper, a method for training sample selection based on camera response is proposed. It has been proved that the camera response value has a close correlation with the spectral reflectance. Consequently, in this paper we adopt the technique of drawing a sphere in camera response value space to select the training samples which have a higher correlation with the test samples. In addition, the Wiener estimation method is used to reconstruct the spectral reflectance. Finally, we find that the method of sample selection based on camera response value has the smallest color difference and root mean square error after reconstruction compared to the method using the full set of Munsell color charts, the Mohammadi training sample selection method, and the stratified sampling method. Moreover, the goodness of fit coefficient of this method is also the highest among the four sample selection methods. Taking all the factors mentioned above into consideration, the method of training sample selection based on camera response value enhances the reconstruction accuracy from both the colorimetric and spectral perspectives.

  9. A general method for transferring graphene onto soft surfaces.

    PubMed

    Song, Jie; Kam, Fong-Yu; Png, Rui-Qi; Seah, Wei-Ling; Zhuo, Jing-Mei; Lim, Geok-Kieng; Ho, Peter K H; Chua, Lay-Lay

    2013-05-01

    Recent advances in chemical vapour deposition have led to the fabrication of large graphene sheets on metal foils for use in research and development. However, further breakthroughs are required in the way these graphenes are transferred from their growth substrates onto the final substrate. Although various methods have been developed, as yet there is no general way to reliably transfer graphene onto arbitrary surfaces, such as 'soft' ones. Here, we report a method that allows the graphene to be transferred with high fidelity at the desired location on almost all surfaces, including fragile polymer thin films and hydrophobic surfaces. The method relies on a sacrificial 'self-releasing' polymer layer placed between a conventional polydimethylsiloxane elastomer stamp and the graphene that is to be transferred. This self-releasing layer provides a low work of adhesion on the stamp, which facilitates delamination of the graphene and its placement on the new substrate. To demonstrate the generality and reliability of our method, we fabricate high field-strength polymer capacitors using graphene as the top contact over a polymer dielectric thin film. These capacitors show superior dielectric breakdown characteristics compared with those made with evaporated metal top contacts. Furthermore, we fabricate low-operation-voltage organic field-effect transistors using graphene as the gate electrode placed over a thin polymer gate dielectric layer. We finally demonstrate an artificial graphite intercalation compound by stacking alternate monolayers of graphene and 2,3,5,6-tetrafluoro-7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane (F4TCNQ). This compound, which comprises graphene sheets p-doped by partial hole transfer from the F4TCNQ, shows a high and remarkably stable hole conductivity, even when heated in the presence of moisture.

  10. Tissue response to surface-treated tantalum implants: preliminary observations in primates.

    PubMed

    Meenaghan, M A; Natiella, J R; Moresi, J L; Flynn, H E; Wirth, J E; Baier, R E

    1979-07-01

    Samples of capacitor grade tantalum were surface-treated by a variety of methods. These surface treatments allowed testing of the same basic material which was mill-finished, metallurgically polished, electrochemically oxidized, sintered with a porous surface, and glow-discharged. Surface characterization was accomplished by contact angle measurements, Scanning Electron Microscopy, energy-dispensed x-ray analysis, and internal reflection spectroscopy. Subsequent to characterization, the material was surgically implanted in the subperiosteal region of the mandible, the buccal mucosa, and the subcutaneous paravertebral region of the back of Macaca speciosa (stumptail monkey). The tissue reaction at intervals of up to three weeks was evaluated morphologically and ultrastructurally. Significant differences in tissue response were noted at the interfaces with glow-discharge-treated versus lower surface energy samples. Adjacent to the glow-discharge-treated implants, two distinct tissue zones were identified. Zone No. 1, nearest the implant, exhibited an increased cellularity. This consisted of 4-5 layers of highly active mesenchymal cells or fibroblast-like cells with spindle-shaped nuclei and prominent cytoplasmic features. At various foci along the interface, hyperchromatic nuclear forms were noted to project into the space left by removal of the implant. These observations, coupled with a predominance of intercellular ground-substance material and less collagen at the interface, may indicate some form of bioadhesion. The deeper Zone No. 2 was 2-3 times as thick consisted of typical fibroblastic cells with a lamellar configuration, bordered by an occasional delicate-lined space. Independent of implantation site or surface texture, all other implants showed occasional multinucleated giant cells and a decrease in the cellular character of Zone No. 1. Both zones were reduced in thickness and composed of more mature fibroblasts. Some specimens exhibited intracytoplasmic

  11. Obtaining Valid Response Rates: Considerations beyond the Tailored Design Method.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Judy Y.; Hubbard, Susan M.; Mulvey, Kevin P.

    2003-01-01

    Reports on the use of the tailored design method (TDM) to achieve high survey response in two separate studies of the dissemination of Treatment Improvement Protocols (TIPs). Findings from these two studies identify six factors may have influenced nonresponse, and show that use of TDM does not, in itself, guarantee a high response rate. (SLD)

  12. Investigation of synthetic aperture methods in ultrasound surface imaging using elementary surface types.

    PubMed

    Kerr, W; Pierce, S G; Rowe, P

    2016-12-01

    Synthetic aperture imaging methods have been employed widely in recent research in non-destructive testing (NDT), but uptake has been more limited in medical ultrasound imaging. Typically offering superior focussing power over more traditional phased array methods, these techniques have been employed in NDT applications to locate and characterise small defects within large samples, but have rarely been used to image surfaces. A desire to ultimately employ ultrasonic surface imaging for bone surface geometry measurement prior to surgical intervention motivates this research, and results are presented for initial laboratory trials of a surface reconstruction technique based on global thresholding of ultrasonic 3D point cloud data. In this study, representative geometry artefacts were imaged in the laboratory using two synthetic aperture techniques; the Total Focusing Method (TFM) and the Synthetic Aperture Focusing Technique (SAFT) employing full and narrow synthetic apertures, respectively. Three high precision metallic samples of known geometries (cuboid, sphere and cylinder) which featured a range of elementary surface primitives were imaged using a 5MHz, 128 element 1D phased array employing both SAFT and TFM approaches. The array was manipulated around the samples using a precision robotic positioning system, allowing for repeatable ultrasound derived 3D surface point clouds to be created. A global thresholding technique was then developed that allowed the extraction of the surface profiles, and these were compared with the known geometry samples to provide a quantitative measure of error of 3D surface reconstruction. The mean errors achieved with optimised SAFT imaging for the cuboidal, spherical and cylindrical samples were 1.3mm, 2.9mm and 2.0mm respectively, while those for TFM imaging were 3.7mm, 3.0mm and 3.1mm, respectively. These results were contrary to expectations given the higher information content associated with the TFM images. However, it was

  13. Investigation of synthetic aperture methods in ultrasound surface imaging using elementary surface types.

    PubMed

    Kerr, W; Pierce, S G; Rowe, P

    2016-12-01

    Synthetic aperture imaging methods have been employed widely in recent research in non-destructive testing (NDT), but uptake has been more limited in medical ultrasound imaging. Typically offering superior focussing power over more traditional phased array methods, these techniques have been employed in NDT applications to locate and characterise small defects within large samples, but have rarely been used to image surfaces. A desire to ultimately employ ultrasonic surface imaging for bone surface geometry measurement prior to surgical intervention motivates this research, and results are presented for initial laboratory trials of a surface reconstruction technique based on global thresholding of ultrasonic 3D point cloud data. In this study, representative geometry artefacts were imaged in the laboratory using two synthetic aperture techniques; the Total Focusing Method (TFM) and the Synthetic Aperture Focusing Technique (SAFT) employing full and narrow synthetic apertures, respectively. Three high precision metallic samples of known geometries (cuboid, sphere and cylinder) which featured a range of elementary surface primitives were imaged using a 5MHz, 128 element 1D phased array employing both SAFT and TFM approaches. The array was manipulated around the samples using a precision robotic positioning system, allowing for repeatable ultrasound derived 3D surface point clouds to be created. A global thresholding technique was then developed that allowed the extraction of the surface profiles, and these were compared with the known geometry samples to provide a quantitative measure of error of 3D surface reconstruction. The mean errors achieved with optimised SAFT imaging for the cuboidal, spherical and cylindrical samples were 1.3mm, 2.9mm and 2.0mm respectively, while those for TFM imaging were 3.7mm, 3.0mm and 3.1mm, respectively. These results were contrary to expectations given the higher information content associated with the TFM images. However, it was

  14. Error response test system and method using test mask variable

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gender, Thomas K. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    An error response test system and method with increased functionality and improved performance is provided. The error response test system provides the ability to inject errors into the application under test to test the error response of the application under test in an automated and efficient manner. The error response system injects errors into the application through a test mask variable. The test mask variable is added to the application under test. During normal operation, the test mask variable is set to allow the application under test to operate normally. During testing, the error response test system can change the test mask variable to introduce an error into the application under test. The error response system can then monitor the application under test to determine whether the application has the correct response to the error.

  15. Method and apparatus for testing surface characteristics of a material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, David L. (Inventor); Kersker, Karl D. (Inventor); Richardson, David E. (Inventor); Stratton, Troy C. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A method, apparatus and system for testing characteristics of a material sample is provided. The system includes an apparatus configured to house the material test sample while defining a sealed volume against a surface of the material test sample. A source of pressurized fluid is in communication with, and configured to pressurize, the sealed volume. A load applying apparatus is configured to apply a defined load to the material sample while the sealed volume is monitored for leakage of the pressurized fluid. Thus, the inducement of surface defects such as microcracking and crazing may be detected and their effects analyzed for a given material. The material test samples may include laminar structures formed of, for example, carbon cloth phenolic, glass cloth phenolic, silica cloth phenolic materials or carbon-carbon materials. In one embodiment the system may be configured to analyze the material test sample while an across-ply loading is applied thereto.

  16. Apparatus and method for carbon fiber surface treatment

    DOEpatents

    Paulauskas, Felix L.; Sherman, Daniel M.

    2012-07-24

    An apparatus and method for enhancing the surface energy and/or surface chemistry of carbon fibers involves exposing the fibers to direct or indirect contact with atmospheric pressure plasma generated using a background gas containing at least some oxygen or other reactive species. The fiber may be exposed directly to the plasma, provided that the plasma is nonfilamentary, or the fiber may be exposed indirectly through contact with gases exhausting from a plasma discharge maintained in a separate volume. In either case, the process is carried out at or near atmospheric pressure, thereby eliminating the need for vacuum equipment. The process may be further modified by moistening the fibers with selected oxygen-containing liquids before exposure to the plasma.

  17. Apparatus and method for carbon fiber surface treatment

    DOEpatents

    Paulauskas, Felix L; Sherman, Daniel M

    2014-06-03

    An apparatus and method for enhancing the surface energy and/or surface chemistry of carbon fibers involves exposing the fibers to direct or indirect contact with atmospheric pressure plasma generated using a background gas containing at least some oxygen or other reactive species. The fiber may be exposed directly to the plasma, provided that the plasma is nonfilamentary, or the fiber may be exposed indirectly through contact with gases exhausting from a plasma discharge maintained in a separate volume. In either case, the process is carried out at or near atmospheric pressure, thereby eliminating the need for vacuum equipment. The process may be further modified by moistening the fibers with selected oxygen-containing liquids before exposure to the plasma.

  18. Rapid quantification method for Legionella pneumophila in surface water.

    PubMed

    Wunderlich, Anika; Torggler, Carmen; Elsässer, Dennis; Lück, Christian; Niessner, Reinhard; Seidel, Michael

    2016-03-01

    World-wide legionellosis outbreaks caused by evaporative cooling systems have shown that there is a need for rapid screening methods for Legionella pneumophila in water. Antibody-based methods for the quantification of L. pneumophila are rapid, non-laborious, and relatively cheap but not sensitive enough for establishment as a screening method for surface and drinking water. Therefore, preconcentration methods have to be applied in advance to reach the needed sensitivity. In a basic test, monolithic adsorption filtration (MAF) was used as primary preconcentration method that adsorbs L. pneumophila with high efficiency. Ten-liter water samples were concentrated in 10 min and further reduced to 1 mL by centrifugal ultrafiltration (CeUF). The quantification of L. pneumophila strains belonging to the monoclonal subtype Bellingham was performed via flow-based chemiluminescence sandwich microarray immunoassays (CL-SMIA) in 36 min. The whole analysis process takes 90 min. A polyclonal antibody (pAb) against L. pneumophila serogroup 1-12 and a monoclonal antibody (mAb) against L. pneumophila SG 1 strain Bellingham were immobilized on a microarray chip. Without preconcentration, the detection limit was 4.0 × 10(3) and 2.8 × 10(3) CFU/mL determined by pAb and mAb 10/6, respectively. For samples processed by MAF-CeUF prior to SMIA detection, the limit of detection (LOD) could be decreased to 8.7 CFU/mL and 0.39 CFU/mL, respectively. A recovery of 99.8 ± 15.9% was achieved for concentrations between 1-1000 CFU/mL. The established combined analytical method is sensitive for rapid screening of surface and drinking water to allow fast hygiene control of L. pneumophila. PMID:26873217

  19. Rapid quantification method for Legionella pneumophila in surface water.

    PubMed

    Wunderlich, Anika; Torggler, Carmen; Elsässer, Dennis; Lück, Christian; Niessner, Reinhard; Seidel, Michael

    2016-03-01

    World-wide legionellosis outbreaks caused by evaporative cooling systems have shown that there is a need for rapid screening methods for Legionella pneumophila in water. Antibody-based methods for the quantification of L. pneumophila are rapid, non-laborious, and relatively cheap but not sensitive enough for establishment as a screening method for surface and drinking water. Therefore, preconcentration methods have to be applied in advance to reach the needed sensitivity. In a basic test, monolithic adsorption filtration (MAF) was used as primary preconcentration method that adsorbs L. pneumophila with high efficiency. Ten-liter water samples were concentrated in 10 min and further reduced to 1 mL by centrifugal ultrafiltration (CeUF). The quantification of L. pneumophila strains belonging to the monoclonal subtype Bellingham was performed via flow-based chemiluminescence sandwich microarray immunoassays (CL-SMIA) in 36 min. The whole analysis process takes 90 min. A polyclonal antibody (pAb) against L. pneumophila serogroup 1-12 and a monoclonal antibody (mAb) against L. pneumophila SG 1 strain Bellingham were immobilized on a microarray chip. Without preconcentration, the detection limit was 4.0 × 10(3) and 2.8 × 10(3) CFU/mL determined by pAb and mAb 10/6, respectively. For samples processed by MAF-CeUF prior to SMIA detection, the limit of detection (LOD) could be decreased to 8.7 CFU/mL and 0.39 CFU/mL, respectively. A recovery of 99.8 ± 15.9% was achieved for concentrations between 1-1000 CFU/mL. The established combined analytical method is sensitive for rapid screening of surface and drinking water to allow fast hygiene control of L. pneumophila.

  20. A method for decoding the neurophysiological spike-response transform.

    PubMed

    Stern, Estee; García-Crescioni, Keyla; Miller, Mark W; Peskin, Charles S; Brezina, Vladimir

    2009-11-15

    Many physiological responses elicited by neuronal spikes-intracellular calcium transients, synaptic potentials, muscle contractions-are built up of discrete, elementary responses to each spike. However, the spikes occur in trains of arbitrary temporal complexity, and each elementary response not only sums with previous ones, but can itself be modified by the previous history of the activity. A basic goal in system identification is to characterize the spike-response transform in terms of a small number of functions-the elementary response kernel and additional kernels or functions that describe the dependence on previous history-that will predict the response to any arbitrary spike train. Here we do this by developing further and generalizing the "synaptic decoding" approach of Sen et al. (1996). Given the spike times in a train and the observed overall response, we use least-squares minimization to construct the best estimated response and at the same time best estimates of the elementary response kernel and the other functions that characterize the spike-response transform. We avoid the need for any specific initial assumptions about these functions by using techniques of mathematical analysis and linear algebra that allow us to solve simultaneously for all of the numerical function values treated as independent parameters. The functions are such that they may be interpreted mechanistically. We examine the performance of the method as applied to synthetic data. We then use the method to decode real synaptic and muscle contraction transforms. PMID:19695289

  1. Optical methods in modeling nicotine effect on the surface water of cell membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrova, Tatyana V.; Rogacheva, Svetlana M.; Kuznetsov, Pavel E.; Gubina, Tamara I.

    2005-06-01

    Fluorescence and spectrophotometric methods have been used for investigation of nicotine action on the state and mobility of the surface water. The surfaces of membranes and proteins were simulated with the help of liposomes and ultradispersive diamonds consequently. Nicotine was shown to reduce the stability of liposomes and to change the aggregative ability of ultradispersive diamonds. The wave-like curves for the nicotine concentration dependences of the pointed features were observed. Such shape of responses was suggested to be due to the changing in structure and dynamics of water hydrogen bonds net near the surface of the model systems induced by nicotine molecules. The surface water phase was supposed to be one of signal elements ofthe ligand receptor recognition process.

  2. Development of Response Surface Models for Rapid Analysis & Multidisciplinary Optimization of Launch Vehicle Design Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unal, Resit

    1999-01-01

    Multdisciplinary design optimization (MDO) is an important step in the design and evaluation of launch vehicles, since it has a significant impact on performance and lifecycle cost. The objective in MDO is to search the design space to determine the values of design parameters that optimize the performance characteristics subject to system constraints. Vehicle Analysis Branch (VAB) at NASA Langley Research Center has computerized analysis tools in many of the disciplines required for the design and analysis of launch vehicles. Vehicle performance characteristics can be determined by the use of these computerized analysis tools. The next step is to optimize the system performance characteristics subject to multidisciplinary constraints. However, most of the complex sizing and performance evaluation codes used for launch vehicle design are stand-alone tools, operated by disciplinary experts. They are, in general, difficult to integrate and use directly for MDO. An alternative has been to utilize response surface methodology (RSM) to obtain polynomial models that approximate the functional relationships between performance characteristics and design variables. These approximation models, called response surface models, are then used to integrate the disciplines using mathematical programming methods for efficient system level design analysis, MDO and fast sensitivity simulations. A second-order response surface model of the form given has been commonly used in RSM since in many cases it can provide an adequate approximation especially if the region of interest is sufficiently limited.

  3. Responsive Surface Methodology Optimizes Extraction Conditions of Industrial by-products, Camellia japonica Seed Cake

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Kyeom; Lim, Ho-Jeong; Kim, Mi-So; Choi, Soo Jung; Kim, Mi-Jeong; Kim, Cho Rong; Shin, Dong-Hoon; Shin, Eui-Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Background: The central nervous system is easily damaged by oxidative stress due to high oxygen consumption and poor defensive capacity. Hence, multiple studies have demonstrated that inhibiting oxidative stress-induced damage, through an antioxidant-rich diet, might be a reasonable approach to prevent neurodegenerative disease. Objective: In the present study, response surface methodology was utilized to optimize the extraction for neuro-protective constituents of Camellia japonica byproducts. Materials and Methods: Rat pheochromocytoma cells were used to evaluate protective potential of Camellia japonica byproducts. Results: Optimum conditions were 33.84 min, 75.24%, and 75.82°C for time, ethanol concentration and temperature. Further, we demonstrated that major organic acid contents were significantly impacted by the extraction conditions, which may explain varying magnitude of protective potential between fractions. Conclusions: Given the paucity of information in regards to defatted C. japonica seed cake and their health promoting potential, our results herein provide interesting preliminary data for utilization of this byproduct from oil processing in both academic and industrial applications. SUMMARY Neuro-protective potential of C. japonica seed cake on cell viability was affected by extraction conditionsExtraction conditions effectively influenced on active constituents of C. japonica seed cakeBiological activity of C. japonica seed cake was optimized by the responsive surface methodology. Abbreviations used: GC-MS: Gas chromatography-mass spectrometer, MTT: 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide, PC12 cells: Pheochromocytoma, RSM: Response surface methodology. PMID:27601847

  4. Responsive Surface Methodology Optimizes Extraction Conditions of Industrial by-products, Camellia japonica Seed Cake

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Kyeom; Lim, Ho-Jeong; Kim, Mi-So; Choi, Soo Jung; Kim, Mi-Jeong; Kim, Cho Rong; Shin, Dong-Hoon; Shin, Eui-Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Background: The central nervous system is easily damaged by oxidative stress due to high oxygen consumption and poor defensive capacity. Hence, multiple studies have demonstrated that inhibiting oxidative stress-induced damage, through an antioxidant-rich diet, might be a reasonable approach to prevent neurodegenerative disease. Objective: In the present study, response surface methodology was utilized to optimize the extraction for neuro-protective constituents of Camellia japonica byproducts. Materials and Methods: Rat pheochromocytoma cells were used to evaluate protective potential of Camellia japonica byproducts. Results: Optimum conditions were 33.84 min, 75.24%, and 75.82°C for time, ethanol concentration and temperature. Further, we demonstrated that major organic acid contents were significantly impacted by the extraction conditions, which may explain varying magnitude of protective potential between fractions. Conclusions: Given the paucity of information in regards to defatted C. japonica seed cake and their health promoting potential, our results herein provide interesting preliminary data for utilization of this byproduct from oil processing in both academic and industrial applications. SUMMARY Neuro-protective potential of C. japonica seed cake on cell viability was affected by extraction conditionsExtraction conditions effectively influenced on active constituents of C. japonica seed cakeBiological activity of C. japonica seed cake was optimized by the responsive surface methodology. Abbreviations used: GC-MS: Gas chromatography-mass spectrometer, MTT: 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide, PC12 cells: Pheochromocytoma, RSM: Response surface methodology.

  5. A Method to Manipulate Surface Tension of a Liquid Metal via Surface Oxidation and Reduction.

    PubMed

    Eaker, Collin B; Khan, M Rashed; Dickey, Michael D

    2016-01-26

    Controlling interfacial tension is an effective method for manipulating the shape, position, and flow of fluids at sub-millimeter length scales, where interfacial tension is a dominant force. A variety of methods exist for controlling the interfacial tension of aqueous and organic liquids on this scale; however, these techniques have limited utility for liquid metals due to their large interfacial tension. Liquid metals can form soft, stretchable, and shape-reconfigurable components in electronic and electromagnetic devices. Although it is possible to manipulate these fluids via mechanical methods (e.g., pumping), electrical methods are easier to miniaturize, control, and implement. However, most electrical techniques have their own constraints: electrowetting-on-dielectric requires large (kV) potentials for modest actuation, electrocapillarity can affect relatively small changes in the interfacial tension, and continuous electrowetting is limited to plugs of the liquid metal in capillaries. Here, we present a method for actuating gallium and gallium-based liquid metal alloys via an electrochemical surface reaction. Controlling the electrochemical potential on the surface of the liquid metal in electrolyte rapidly and reversibly changes the interfacial tension by over two orders of magnitude ( ̴500 mN/m to near zero). Furthermore, this method requires only a very modest potential (< 1 V) applied relative to a counter electrode. The resulting change in tension is due primarily to the electrochemical deposition of a surface oxide layer, which acts as a surfactant; removal of the oxide increases the interfacial tension, and vice versa. This technique can be applied in a wide variety of electrolytes and is independent of the substrate on which it rests.

  6. Precision Interval Estimation of the Response Surface by Means of an Integrated Algorithm of Neural Network and Linear Regression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, Ching F.

    1999-01-01

    The integration of Radial Basis Function Networks and Back Propagation Neural Networks with the Multiple Linear Regression has been accomplished to map nonlinear response surfaces over a wide range of independent variables in the process of the Modem Design of Experiments. The integrated method is capable to estimate the precision intervals including confidence and predicted intervals. The power of the innovative method has been demonstrated by applying to a set of wind tunnel test data in construction of response surface and estimation of precision interval.

  7. UNDERSTANDING SYSTEMATIC MEASUREMENT ERROR IN THERMAL-OPTICAL ANALYSIS FOR PM BLACK CARBON USING RESPONSE SURFACES AND SURFACE CONFIDENCE INTERVALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Results from a NIST-EPA Interagency Agreement on Understanding Systematic Measurement Error in Thermal-Optical Analysis for PM Black Carbon Using Response Surfaces and Surface Confidence Intervals will be presented at the American Association for Aerosol Research (AAAR) 24th Annu...

  8. A new method to measure the acoustic surface impedance outdoors.

    PubMed

    Carpinello, S; L'Hermite, Ph; Bérengier, M; Licitra, G

    2004-01-01

    In the European countries noise pollution is considered to be one of the most important environmental problems. With respect to traffic noise, different researchers are working on the reduction of noise at the source, on the modelling of the acoustic absorption of the road structure and on the effects of the pavement on the propagation. The aim of this paper is to propose a new method to measure the acoustic impedance of surfaces located outdoors, which allows us to further noise propagation models, in order to evaluate exactly the noise exposure.

  9. A Strontium-Modified Titanium Surface Produced by a New Method and Its Biocompatibility In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chundong; Zhang, Yanli; Wang, Lichao; Zhang, Xinhua; Chen, Qiuyue; Wu, Buling

    2015-01-01

    Objective To present a new and effective method of producing titanium surfaces modified with strontium and to investigate the surface characteristics and in vitro biocompatibility of titanium (Ti) surfaces modified with strontium (Sr) for bone implant applications. Materials and Methods Sr-modified Ti surfaces were produced by sequential treatments with NaOH, strontium acetate, heat and water. The surface characteristics and the concentration of the Sr ions released from the samples were examined. Cell adhesion, morphology and growth were investigated using osteoblasts isolated from the calvaria of neonatal Sprague-Dawley rats. Expression of osteogenesis-related genes and proteins was examined to assess the effect of the Sr-modified Ti surfaces on osteoblasts. Results The modified titanium surface had a mesh structure with significantly greater porosity, and approximately5.37±0.35at.% of Sr was incorporated into the surface. The hydrophilicity was enhanced by the incorporation of Sr ions and water treatment. The average amounts of Sr released from the Sr-modified plates subjected to water treatment were slight higher than the plates without water treatment. Sr promoted cellular adhesion, spreading and growth compared with untreated Ti surfaces. The Sr-modified Ti plates also promoted expression of osteogenesis-related genes,and expression of OPN and COL-І by osteoblasts. Ti plates heat treated at 700°C showed increased bioactivity in comparison with those treated at 600°C. Water treatment upregulated the expression of osteogenesis-related genes. Conclusions These results show that Sr-modification of Ti surfaces may improve bioactivity in vitro. Water treatment has enhanced the response of osteoblasts. The Sr-modified Ti heat-treated at 700°C exhibited better bioactivity compared with that heated at 600°C. PMID:26529234

  10. Finite-element/progressive-lattice-sampling response surface methodology and application to benchmark probability quantification problems

    SciTech Connect

    Romero, V.J.; Bankston, S.D.

    1998-03-01

    Optimal response surface construction is being investigated as part of Sandia discretionary (LDRD) research into Analytic Nondeterministic Methods. The goal is to achieve an adequate representation of system behavior over the relevant parameter space of a problem with a minimum of computational and user effort. This is important in global optimization and in estimation of system probabilistic response, which are both made more viable by replacing large complex computer models with fast-running accurate and noiseless approximations. A Finite Element/Lattice Sampling (FE/LS) methodology for constructing progressively refined finite element response surfaces that reuse previous generations of samples is described here. Similar finite element implementations can be extended to N-dimensional problems and/or random fields and applied to other types of structured sampling paradigms, such as classical experimental design and Gauss, Lobatto, and Patterson sampling. Here the FE/LS model is applied in a ``decoupled`` Monte Carlo analysis of two sets of probability quantification test problems. The analytic test problems, spanning a large range of probabilities and very demanding failure region geometries, constitute a good testbed for comparing the performance of various nondeterministic analysis methods. In results here, FE/LS decoupled Monte Carlo analysis required orders of magnitude less computer time than direct Monte Carlo analysis, with no appreciable loss of accuracy. Thus, when arriving at probabilities or distributions by Monte Carlo, it appears to be more efficient to expend computer-model function evaluations on building a FE/LS response surface than to expend them in direct Monte Carlo sampling.

  11. Methods for the Update and Verification of Forest Surface Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybansky, M.; Brenova, M.; Zerzan, P.; Simon, J.; Mikita, T.

    2016-06-01

    The digital terrain model (DTM) represents the bare ground earth's surface without any objects like vegetation and buildings. In contrast to a DTM, Digital surface model (DSM) represents the earth's surface including all objects on it. The DTM mostly does not change as frequently as the DSM. The most important changes of the DSM are in the forest areas due to the vegetation growth. Using the LIDAR technology the canopy height model (CHM) is obtained by subtracting the DTM and the corresponding DSM. The DSM is calculated from the first pulse echo and DTM from the last pulse echo data. The main problem of the DSM and CHM data using is the actuality of the airborne laser scanning. This paper describes the method of calculating the CHM and DSM data changes using the relations between the canopy height and age of trees. To get a present basic reference data model of the canopy height, the photogrammetric and trigonometric measurements of single trees were used. Comparing the heights of corresponding trees on the aerial photographs of various ages, the statistical sets of the tree growth rate were obtained. These statistical data and LIDAR data were compared with the growth curve of the spruce forest, which corresponds to a similar natural environment (soil quality, climate characteristics, geographic location, etc.) to get the updating characteristics.

  12. Secretory response induced by essential oils on airway surface fluid: a pharmacological MRI study.

    PubMed

    Nicolato, Elena; Boschi, Federico; Marzola, Pasquina; Sbarbati, Andrea

    2009-07-30

    Using pharmacological magnetic resonance imaging, we have performed an in vivo evaluation of the secretory response induced by essential oils in the rat airway. Aim of the work was to establish a computerized method to assess the efficacy of volatile compounds in spatially localized areas without the bias derived by subjective evaluation. Magnetic resonance experiments were carried out using a 4.7 T horizontal magnet. In the trachea, airway surface fluid was easily identified for its high intensity signal. The tracheal glands were also easily visible. The oesophageal lumen was usually collapsed and was identifiable only in the presence of intraluminal liquid. Scotch pine essential oil inhalation significantly increased the surface fluid in the middle portion of the trachea and the increase was visible at both 5 and 10 min. A lesser secretory response was detected after rosemary essential oil inhalation even though the response was significant with respect to the control in particular at 10 min. No secretory response was detected after peppermint essential oil inhalation both at 5 and 10 min. The data obtained in the present work demonstrate a chemically induced airway secretion. The availability of a pharmacological magnetic resonance imaging approach opens new perspectives to test the action of volatile compounds on the airway. PMID:19422906

  13. Holographic LEED: A direct method for surface crystallography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vamvakas, John Athanasios

    Since 1960's Low Energy Electron Diffraction (LEED) has been one of the most reliable methods for surface crystallography. It has solved hundreds of structures over the past 20-25 years and continues to be a powerful tool in the hands of crystallographers. Yet, the main disadvantage of the method is the fact that it is very time consuming. The programs that do the multiple scattering calculations can run literally for days! The key part of the method is the initial "guess" of a structure that will be close the one being seeked. A wrong guess would lead to huge amounts of wasted time and effort. We suggest a direct method that can give us a pretty good idea of the structure under determination. We call this method of ours: Holographic LEED (h-LEED) because it is based on the ideas of Dennis Gabor, the inventor of holography. The 3D images h-LEED reconstructs from LEED diffraction patterns can be reliably used to initialize LEED thus reducing the annoying computation time as well as the effort required by the crystallographer. We show that h-LEED produces good images for p(2× 2) reconstruction of adsorbed atoms by testing it on two adsorption systems: O/Ni(001) and K/Ni(001). The images were reconstructed from both diffuse LEED patterns from disordered adsorbates and superstructure Bragg spots from ordered adsorbates.

  14. Specific surface area determinations on intact drillcores and evaluation of extrapolation methods for rock matrix surfaces.

    PubMed

    André, M; Malmström, M E; Neretnieks, I

    2009-11-01

    Permanent storage of spent nuclear fuel in crystalline bedrock is investigated in several countries. For this storage scenario, the host rock is the third and final barrier for radionuclide migration. Sorption reactions in the crystalline rock matrix have strong retardative effects on the transport of radionuclides. To assess the barrier properties of the host rock it is important to have sorption data representative of the undisturbed host rock conditions. Sorption data is in the majority of reported cases determined using crushed rock. Crushing has been shown to increase a rock samples sorption capacity by creating additional surfaces. There are several problems with such an extrapolation. In studies where this problem is addressed, simple models relating the specific surface area to the particle size are used to extrapolate experimental data to a value representative of the host rock conditions. In this article, we report and compare surface area data of five size fractions of crushed granite and of 100 mm long drillcores as determined by the Brunauer Emmet Teller (BET)-method using N(2)-gas. Special sample holders that could hold large specimen were developed for the BET measurements. Surface area data on rock samples as large as the drillcore has not previously been published. An analysis of this data show that the extrapolated value for intact rock obtained from measurements on crushed material was larger than the determined specific surface area of the drillcores, in some cases with more than 1000%. Our results show that the use of data from crushed material and current models to extrapolate specific surface areas for host rock conditions can lead to over estimation interpretations of sorption ability. The shortcomings of the extrapolation model are discussed and possible explanations for the deviation from experimental data are proposed.

  15. Regional homogenization of surface temperature records using robust statistical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pintar, A. L.; Possolo, A.; Zhang, N. F.

    2013-09-01

    An algorithm is described that is intended to estimate and remove spurious influences from the surface temperature record at a meteorological station, which may be due to changes in the location of the station or in its environment, or in the method used to make measurements, and which are unrelated to climate change, similarly to [1]. The estimate of these influences is based on a comparison of non-parametric decompositions of the target series with series measured at other stations in a neighborhood of the target series. The uncertainty of the estimated spurious artifacts is determined using a statistical bootstrap method that accounts for temporal correlation structure beyond what is expected from seasonal effects. Our computer-intensive bootstrap procedure lends itself readily to parallelization, which makes the algorithm practicable for large collections of stations. The role that the proposed procedure may play in practice is contingent on the results of large-scale testing, still under way, using historical data.

  16. Method for large-scale fabrication of atomic-scale structures on material surfaces using surface vacancies

    DOEpatents

    Lim, Chong Wee; Ohmori, Kenji; Petrov, Ivan Georgiev; Greene, Joseph E.

    2004-07-13

    A method for forming atomic-scale structures on a surface of a substrate on a large-scale includes creating a predetermined amount of surface vacancies on the surface of the substrate by removing an amount of atoms on the surface of the material corresponding to the predetermined amount of the surface vacancies. Once the surface vacancies have been created, atoms of a desired structure material are deposited on the surface of the substrate to enable the surface vacancies and the atoms of the structure material to interact. The interaction causes the atoms of the structure material to form the atomic-scale structures.

  17. A new method for assessing surface solar irradiance: Heliosat-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Z.; Oumbe, A.; Blanc, P.; Lefèvre, M.; Wald, L.; Schroedter-Homscheidt, M.; Gesell, G.

    2012-04-01

    Downwelling shortwave irradiance at surface (SSI) is more and more often assessed by means of satellite-derived estimates of optical properties of the atmosphere. Performances are judged satisfactory for the time being but there is an increasing need for the assessment of the direct and diffuse components of the SSI. MINES ParisTech and the German Aerospace Center (DLR) are currently developing the Heliosat-4 method to assess the SSI and its components in a more accurate way than current practices. This method is composed by two parts: a clear sky module based on the radiative transfer model libRadtran, and a cloud-ground module using two-stream and delta-Eddington approximations for clouds and a database of ground albedo. Advanced products derived from geostationary satellites and recent Earth Observation missions are the inputs of the Heliosat-4 method. Such products are: cloud optical depth, cloud phase, cloud type and cloud coverage from APOLLO of DLR, aerosol optical depth, aerosol type, water vapor in clear-sky, ozone from MACC products (FP7), and ground albedo from MODIS of NASA. In this communication, we briefly present Heliosat-4 and focus on its performances. The results of Heliosat-4 for the period 2004-2010 will be compared to the measurements made in five stations within the Baseline Surface Radiation Network. Extensive statistic analysis as well as case studies are performed in order to better understand Heliosat-4 and have an in-depth view of the performance of Heliosat-4, to understand its advantages comparing to existing methods and to identify its defaults for future improvements. The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under Grant Agreement no. 218793 (MACC project) and no. 283576 (MACC-II project).

  18. Shear-Sensitive Liquid Crystal Coating Method Applied Through Transparent Test Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reda, Daniel C.; Wilder, Michael C.

    1999-01-01

    Research conducted at NASA Ames Research Center has shown that the color-change response of a shear-sensitive liquid crystal coating (SSLCC) to aerodynamic shear depends on both the magnitude of the local shear vector and its direction relative to the observer's in-plane line of sight. In conventional applications, the surface of the SSLCC exposed to aerodynamic shear is illuminated with white light from the normal direction and observed from an oblique above-plane view angle of order 30 deg. In this top-light/top-view mode, shear vectors with components directed away from the observer cause the SSLCC to exhibit color-change responses. At any surface point, the maximum color change (measured from the no-shear red or orange color) always occurs when the local vector is aligned with, and directed away from, the observer. The magnitude of the color change at this vector-observer-aligned orientation scales directly with shear stress magnitude. Conversely, any surface point exposed to a shear vector with a component directed toward the observer exhibits a non-color-change response, always characterized by a rusty-red or brown color, independent of both shear magnitude and direction. These unique, highly directional color-change responses of SSLCCs to aerodynamic shear allow for the full-surface visualization and measurement of continuous shear stress vector distributions. The objective of the present research was to investigate application of the SSLCC method through a transparent test surface. In this new back-light/back-view mode, the exposed surface of the SSLCC would be subjected to aerodynamic shear stress while the contact surface between the SSLCC and the solid, transparent wall would be illuminated and viewed in the same geometrical arrangement as applied in conventional applications. It was unknown at the outset whether or not color-change responses would be observable from the contact surface of the SSLCC, and, if seen, how these color-change responses might

  19. Nonlinear response matrix methods for radiative transfer. [Radiative transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, W.F. Jr.; Lewis, E.E.

    1987-01-01

    A nonlinear response matrix formalism is presented for the solution of time-dependent radiative transfer problems. The essential feature of the method is that within each computational cell the temperature is calculated in response to the incoming photons from all frequency groups. Thus the updating of the temperature distribution is placed within the iterative solution of the spaceangle transport problem, instead of being placed outside of it. The method is formulated for both grey and multifrequency problems and applied in slab geometry. The method is compared to the more conventional source iteration technique. 7 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  20. The Impact of Boundary Conditions on Surface Curvature of Polypropylene Mesh in Response to Uniaxial Loading

    PubMed Central

    Barone, William R.; Amini, Rouzbeh; Maiti, Spandan; Moalli, Pamela A.; Abramowitch, Steven D.

    2015-01-01

    Exposure following pelvic organ prolapse repair has been observationally associated with wrinkling of the implanted mesh. The purpose of this study was to quantify the impact of variable boundary conditions on the out-of-plane deformations of mesh subjected to tensile loading. Using photogrammetry and surface curvature analyses, deformed geometries were accessed for two commercially available products. Relative to standard clamping methods, the amount of out-of-plane deformation significantly increased when point loads were introduced to simulate suture fixation in-vivo. These data support the hypothesis that regional increases in the concentration of mesh potentially enhance the host’s foreign body response, leading to exposure. PMID:25843260

  1. Multiobjective Aerodynamic Shape Optimization Using Pareto Differential Evolution and Generalized Response Surface Metamodels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madavan, Nateri K.

    2004-01-01

    Differential Evolution (DE) is a simple, fast, and robust evolutionary algorithm that has proven effective in determining the global optimum for several difficult single-objective optimization problems. The DE algorithm has been recently extended to multiobjective optimization problem by using a Pareto-based approach. In this paper, a Pareto DE algorithm is applied to multiobjective aerodynamic shape optimization problems that are characterized by computationally expensive objective function evaluations. To improve computational expensive the algorithm is coupled with generalized response surface meta-models based on artificial neural networks. Results are presented for some test optimization problems from the literature to demonstrate the capabilities of the method.

  2. Comparison between discrete dipole approximation and other modelling methods for the plasmonic response of gold nanospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loke, V. L. Y.; Huda, G. M.; Donev, E. U.; Schmidt, V.; Hastings, J. T.; Mengüç, M. Pinar; Wriedt, T.

    2014-05-01

    We investigate the plasmonic response of gold nanospheres calculated using discrete dipole approximation validated against the results from other discretization methods, namely the finite-difference time-domain method and the finite-element methods. Comparisons are also made with calculations from analytical methods such as the Mie solution and the null-field method with discrete sources. We consider the nanoparticle interacting with the incident field both in free space and sitting on a planar substrate. In the latter case, discrete dipole approximation with surface interaction is used; this includes the interaction with the `image dipoles' using Sommerfeld integration.

  3. Experimental design and multiple response optimization. Using the desirability function in analytical methods development.

    PubMed

    Candioti, Luciana Vera; De Zan, María M; Cámara, María S; Goicoechea, Héctor C

    2014-06-01

    A review about the application of response surface methodology (RSM) when several responses have to be simultaneously optimized in the field of analytical methods development is presented. Several critical issues like response transformation, multiple response optimization and modeling with least squares and artificial neural networks are discussed. Most recent analytical applications are presented in the context of analytLaboratorio de Control de Calidad de Medicamentos (LCCM), Facultad de Bioquímica y Ciencias Biológicas, Universidad Nacional del Litoral, C.C. 242, S3000ZAA Santa Fe, ArgentinaLaboratorio de Control de Calidad de Medicamentos (LCCM), Facultad de Bioquímica y Ciencias Biológicas, Universidad Nacional del Litoral, C.C. 242, S3000ZAA Santa Fe, Argentinaical methods development, especially in multiple response optimization procedures using the desirability function.

  4. Nonlinear Stability and Response of Lifting Surfaces Via Volterra Series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marzocca, Piergiovanni; Librescu, Liviu; Silva, Walter A.

    2001-01-01

    This investigation concerns the time and frequency formulations of non-linear two-dimensional lifting surfaces exposed to an incompressible flow field and subjected to an external pressure pulse. In order to address this problem, Volterra series approach in conjunction with the multidimensional Laplace transform is used. This methodology enabling one to solve the aeroelastic governing equations of lifting surfaces opens the way to connect this methodology with that based on neural networks and NARMAX/NARX networks models. Moreover, this extended way to address this problem constitutes a good basis for treatment of the theory of 3D lifting surfaces.

  5. Self-adaptive method for high frequency multi-channel analysis of surface wave method

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    When the high frequency multi-channel analysis of surface waves (MASW) method is conducted to explore soil properties in the vadose zone, existing rules for selecting the near offset and spread lengths cannot satisfy the requirements of planar dominant Rayleigh waves for all frequencies of interest ...

  6. Improved in-situ methods for determining land surface emissivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Göttsche, Frank; Olesen, Folke; Hulley, Glynn

    2014-05-01

    misrepresented in satellite-retrieved LSEs. In-situ emissivities of dominant surface cover types at Gobabeb and Dahra were obtained with the so-called 'box method', which consists of a sequence of thermal infrared radiance measurements and employs a box with highly reflective inner walls to control the radiation from the environment. The original method was improved by continuously recording the radiance measurements at a sampling rate of one second, which allows the picking of the first undisturbed temperature after changing the box configuration. Furthermore, erroneous measurements, e.g. from incorrectly placing the box on a target, can still be identified and rejected later. In-situ LSEs are compared to emissivity spectra of soil and grass samples and to LSE retrieved from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on EOS-Terra.

  7. Use of postmortem temperature decay response surface plots of heat transport in the human eye to predict time of death.

    PubMed

    Smart, Jimmy L

    2014-03-01

    A finite element heat transfer model of the human eye was previously constructed and applied to experimental postmortem temperature decay curves collected in eyeballs of ten human bodies. The model was applied in the early postmortem period of 0–24 h under conditions of natural convection–radiation. Based upon this previous model, response surfaces for postmortem temperature decay were constructed based upon variable ranges of the natural convective–radiation heat transfer coefficient from 7–13 W/m2 K, ambient temperatures of 10–33°C, and times of 0–24 h. Mathematical equations to describe these response surfaces have been developed. This response surface method is demonstrated for use by coroners/medical personnel to estimate time of death from recorded field temperature data collected over a 30-min period. Sensitivity of the model to small changes in the key variable of ambient temperature is explored. The response surface model is applied to two cases of previously collected experimental eyeball temperature data. This response surface model method is only valid for constant surrounding temperatures, conditions of natural convection, no radiation effects, and postmortem times of 0–24 h.

  8. Surface and downhole shear wave seismic methods for thick soil site investigations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunter, J.A.; Benjumea, B.; Harris, J.B.; Miller, R.D.; Pullan, S.E.; Burns, R.A.; Good, R.L.

    2002-01-01

    Shear wave velocity-depth information is required for predicting the ground motion response to earthquakes in areas where significant soil cover exists over firm bedrock. Rather than estimating this critical parameter, it can be reliably measured using a suite of surface (non-invasive) and downhole (invasive) seismic methods. Shear wave velocities from surface measurements can be obtained using SH refraction techniques. Array lengths as large as 1000 m and depth of penetration to 250 m have been achieved in some areas. High resolution shear wave reflection techniques utilizing the common midpoint method can delineate the overburden-bedrock surface as well as reflecting boundaries within the overburden. Reflection data can also be used to obtain direct estimates of fundamental site periods from shear wave reflections without the requirement of measuring average shear wave velocity and total thickness of unconsolidated overburden above the bedrock surface. Accurate measurements of vertical shear wave velocities can be obtained using a seismic cone penetrometer in soft sediments, or with a well-locked geophone array in a borehole. Examples from thick soil sites in Canada demonstrate the type of shear wave velocity information that can be obtained with these geophysical techniques, and show how these data can be used to provide a first look at predicted ground motion response for thick soil sites. ?? 2002 Published by Elsevier Science Ltd.

  9. Silica surface characterization as a function of formation and surface treatment using traditional methods and proteins as surface probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korwin-Edson, Michelle Lynn

    Previous works have shown that cells proliferate differently depending on the chemistry of the glass on which they are growing. Since proteins form the bonds between cells and glass, the hypothesis of this study is that proteins can distinguish between surface chemical variations of glass. This theory was examined through the use of various silica forms, a few select proteins, four surface treatment procedures, and a variety of characterization techniques. The silica forms include amorphous slides, cane, fiber, microspheres, fumed silica and quartz crystal terminals. The proteins selected were human serum albumin, mouse Immunoglobulin G, streptavidin, antimouse IgG, and biotin. The surface treatments utilized to bring about chemical variation on the silica surface were HF acid etching, ethanol cleaning, water plasma treatments, and 1000°C heat treatments. The characterization techniques encompassed both traditional material techniques and biological methods. The techniques studied were atomic force microscopy (AFM), chemical force microscopy (CFM), glancing incidence X-ray analysis (GIXA), fluorescence spectrometry, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), and bicinchoninic acid (BCA) assay. It was the main goal of this project to determine the feasibility of these techniques in utilizing proteins as glass surface probes. Proteins were adsorbed to all of the various forms and the binding ability was studied by either stripping off the protein and quantifying them, or by deductive reasoning through the use of "depleted" protein solutions. Fluorimetry and BCA assay both utilized the depleted solutions, but the high error associated with this protocol was prohibitive. SDS-PAGE with streptavidin was very difficult due to staining problems, however the IgG proteins were able to be quantified with some success. GIXA showed that the protein layer thickness is monolayer in nature, which agrees well with the AFM fluid tapping data on protein height, but in addition

  10. Growth of bubbles on a solid surface in response to a pressure reduction.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiang; Chen, Haosheng; Zhou, Weizheng; Wu, Bo; Stoyanov, Simeon D; Pelan, Eddie G

    2014-04-22

    A diffusion-controlled method is presented to study the growth of bubbles on a solid surface. The bubbles are nucleated spontaneously on a hydrophobic smooth surface in response to a sudden pressure reduction and then grow with an expanding contact line. The evolution of the bubbles in the early stage is found to grow with a constant bubble radius and a decreasing contact angle, while the bubbles continue their growth with a constant contact angle and an increasing bubble radius after the contact angle reaches its equilibrium value. A total variation of about 60° of the contact angle is observed during the growth of the bubbles with the size scale of 10-100 μm in radius. The growing process is described by the diffusion theory with the validation of the growth constant.

  11. Spectral Sensitivity Measured with Electroretinogram Using a Constant Response Method

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Fernando Allan de Farias; Gomes, Bruno Duarte; Silveira, Luiz Carlos de Lima; Martins, Sonia Limara; Aguiar, Renata Genaro; de Souza, John Manuel; Ventura, Dora Fix

    2016-01-01

    A new method is presented to determine the retinal spectral sensitivity function S(λ) using the electroretinogram (ERG). S(λ)s were assessed in three different species of myomorph rodents, Gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus), Wistar rats (Ratus norvegicus), and mice (Mus musculus). The method, called AC Constant Method, is based on a computerized automatic feedback system that adjusts light intensity to maintain a constant-response amplitude to a flickering stimulus throughout the spectrum, as it is scanned from 300 to 700 nm, and back. The results are presented as the reciprocal of the intensity at each wavelength required to maintain a constant peak to peak response amplitude. The resulting S(λ) had two peaks in all three rodent species, corresponding to ultraviolet and M cones, respectively: 359 nm and 511 nm for mice, 362 nm and 493 nm for gerbils, and 362 nm and 502 nm for rats. Results for mouse and gerbil were similar to literature reports of S(λ) functions obtained with other methods, confirming that the ERG associated to the AC Constant-Response Method was effective to obtain reliable S(λ) functions. In addition, due to its fast data collection time, the AC Constant Response Method has the advantage of keeping the eye in a constant light adapted state. PMID:26800521

  12. Methods for Multiloop Identification of Visual and Neuromuscular Pilot Responses.

    PubMed

    Olivari, Mario; Nieuwenhuizen, Frank M; Venrooij, Joost; Bülthoff, Heinrich H; Pollini, Lorenzo

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, identification methods are proposed to estimate the neuromuscular and visual responses of a multiloop pilot model. A conventional and widely used technique for simultaneous identification of the neuromuscular and visual systems makes use of cross-spectral density estimates. This paper shows that this technique requires a specific noninterference hypothesis, often implicitly assumed, that may be difficult to meet during actual experimental designs. A mathematical justification of the necessity of the noninterference hypothesis is given. Furthermore, two methods are proposed that do not have the same limitations. The first method is based on autoregressive models with exogenous inputs, whereas the second one combines cross-spectral estimators with interpolation in the frequency domain. The two identification methods are validated by offline simulations and contrasted to the classic method. The results reveal that the classic method fails when the noninterference hypothesis is not fulfilled; on the contrary, the two proposed techniques give reliable estimates. Finally, the three identification methods are applied to experimental data from a closed-loop control task with pilots. The two proposed techniques give comparable estimates, different from those obtained by the classic method. The differences match those found with the simulations. Thus, the two identification methods provide a good alternative to the classic method and make it possible to simultaneously estimate human's neuromuscular and visual responses in cases where the classic method fails.

  13. The surface of bones: methods of recording entheseal changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Elizabeth

    2015-09-01

    Entheses, which are macroscopically visible three-dimensional (3D) features on bones where muscles attach, have a complex etiology that includes muscle use in activities, age, and body size. Most studies of entheseal changes are based on scoring methods. Scoring methods often have high observer error rates and are often analyzed with low power statistics. Furthermore, scoring methods fail to capture the complexity of enthesis morphology, which includes proliferative and erosive traits that can be viewed as a 3D topography similar to landscapes. Recent studies have employed both two-dimensional metric data and 3D data from laser scans and CT-scans. Using a variety of software packages, anthropologists have displayed the scanned entheses in color coded topographical maps that can be moved and rotated to reveal entheses’ complex morphology. The quantitative nature of these data, which include 3D surface area and fractal dimensions, is less subjective and statistical tests are easier to apply, but error rates are still problematic for some measures. Additionally, these studies reveal that entheseal changes correlate with age and body size; these correlations are sometimes considered problematic since the correlations hinder activity reconstructions, which is often the goal when examining entheses.

  14. Method for making mirrored surfaces comprising superconducting material

    DOEpatents

    Early, J.T.; Hargrove, R.S.

    1989-12-12

    Superconducting mirror surfaces are provided by forming a mirror surface from a material which is superconductive at a temperature above about 40 K and adjusting the temperature of the surface to that temperature at which the material is superconducting. The mirror surfaces are essentially perfect reflectors for electromagnetic radiation with photon energy less than the superconducting band gap.

  15. Method for making mirrored surfaces comprising superconducting material

    DOEpatents

    Early, James T.; Hargrove, R. Steven

    1989-01-01

    Superconducting mirror surfaces are provided by forming a mirror surface from a material which is superconductive at a temperature above about 40.degree. K. and adjusting the temperature of the surface to that temperature at which the material is superconducting. The mirror surfaces are essentially perfect reflectors for electromagnetic radiation with photon energy less than the superconducting band gap.

  16. Response Surfaces of Neural Networks Learned Using Bayesian Framework and Its Application to Optimization Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Norio

    We verified the generalization ability of the response surfaces of artificial neural networks (NNs), and that the surfaces could be applied to an engineering-design problem. A Bayesian framework to regularize NNs, which was proposed by Gull and Skilling, can be used to generate NN response surfaces with excellent generalization ability, i.e., to determine the regularizing constants in an objective function minimized during NN learning. This well-generalized NN might be useful to find an optimal solution in the process of response surface methodology (RSM). We, therefore, describe three rules based on the Bayesian framework to update the regularizing constants, utilizing these rules to generate NN response surfaces with noisy teacher data drawn from a typical unimodal or multimodal function. Good generalization ability was achieved with regularized NN response surfaces, even though an update rule including trace evaluation failed to determine the regularizing constants regardless of the response function. We, next, selected the most appropriate update rule, which included eigenvalue evaluation, and then the NN response surface regularized using the update rule was applied to finding the optimal solution to an illustrative engineering-design problem. The NN response surface did not fit the noise in the teacher data, and consequently, it could effectively be used to achieve a satisfactory solution. This may increase the opportunities for using NN in the process of RSM.

  17. Surface enhanced Raman gene probe and methods thereof

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, T.

    1998-02-24

    The subject invention disclosed is a new gene probe biosensor and methods based on surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) label detection. The SER gene probe biosensor comprises a support means, a SER gene probe having at least one oligonucleotide strand labeled with at least one SERS label, and a SERS active substrate disposed on the support means and having at least one of the SER gene probes adsorbed thereon. Biotargets such as bacterial and viral DNA, RNA and PNA are detected using a SER gene probe via hybridization to oligonucleotide strands complementary to the SER gene probe. The support means includes a fiberoptic probe, an array of fiberoptic probes for performance of multiple assays and a waveguide microsensor array with charge-coupled devices or photodiode arrays. 18 figs.

  18. Surface enhanced Raman gene probe and methods thereof

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    1998-01-01

    The subject invention disclosed herein is a new gene probe biosensor and methods thereof based on surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) label detection. The SER gene probe biosensor comprises a support means, a SER gene probe having at least one oligonucleotide strand labeled with at least one SERS label, and a SERS active substrate disposed on the support means and having at least one of the SER gene probes adsorbed thereon. Biotargets such as bacterial and viral DNA, RNA and PNA are detected using a SER gene probe via hybridization to oligonucleotide strands complementary to the SER gene probe. The support means supporting the SERS active substrate includes a fiberoptic probe, an array of fiberoptic probes for performance of multiple assays and a waveguide microsensor array with charge-coupled devices or photodiode arrays.

  19. Surface enhanced Raman gene probe and methods thereof

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, T.

    1998-09-29

    The subject invention disclosed herein is a new gene probe biosensor and methods based on surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) label detection. The SER gene probe biosensor comprises a support means, a SER gene probe having at least one oligonucleotide strand labeled with at least one SERS label, and a SERS active substrate disposed on the support means and having at least one of the SER gene probes adsorbed thereon. Biotargets such as bacterial and viral DNA, RNA and PNA are detected using a SER gene probe via hybridization to oligonucleotide strands complementary to the SER gene probe. The support means supporting the SERS active substrate includes a fiberoptic probe, an array of fiberoptic probes for performance of multiple assays and a waveguide microsensor array with charge-coupled devices or photodiode arrays. 18 figs.

  20. Surface enhanced Raman gene probe and methods thereof

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, T.

    1998-07-21

    The subject invention disclosed is a new gene probe biosensor and methods based on surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) label detection. The SER gene probe biosensor comprises a support means, a SER gene probe having at least one oligonucleotide strand labeled with at least one SERS label, and a SERS active substrate disposed on the support means and having at least one of the SER gene probes adsorbed. Biotargets such as bacterial and viral DNA, RNA and PNA are detected using a SER gene probe via hybridization to oligonucleotide strands complementary to the SER gene probe. The support means supporting the SERS active substrate includes a fiberoptic probe, an array of fiberoptic probes for performance of multiple assays and a waveguide microsensor array with charge-coupled devices or photodiode arrays. 18 figs.

  1. Foam and gel methods for the decontamination of metallic surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Nunez, Luis; Kaminski, Michael Donald

    2007-01-23

    Decontamination of nuclear facilities is necessary to reduce the radiation field during normal operations and decommissioning of complex equipment. In this invention, we discuss gel and foam based diphosphonic acid (HEDPA) chemical solutions that are unique in that these solutions can be applied at room temperature; provide protection to the base metal for continued applications of the equipment; and reduce the final waste form production to one step. The HEDPA gels and foams are formulated with benign chemicals, including various solvents, such as ionic liquids and reducing and complexing agents such as hydroxamic acids, and formaldehyde sulfoxylate. Gel and foam based HEDPA processes allow for decontamination of difficult to reach surfaces that are unmanageable with traditional aqueous process methods. Also, the gel and foam components are optimized to maximize the dissolution rate and assist in the chemical transformation of the gel and foam to a stable waste form.

  2. Laser ablation system, and method of decontaminating surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Ferguson, Russell L.; Edelson, Martin C.; Pang, Ho-ming

    1998-07-14

    A laser ablation system comprising a laser head providing a laser output; a flexible fiber optic cable optically coupled to the laser output and transmitting laser light; an output optics assembly including a nozzle through which laser light passes; an exhaust tube in communication with the nozzle; and a blower generating a vacuum on the exhaust tube. A method of decontaminating a surface comprising the following steps: providing an acousto-optic, Q-switched Nd:YAG laser light ablation system having a fiber optically coupled output optics assembly; and operating the laser light ablation system to produce an irradiance greater than 1.times.10.sup.7 W/cm.sup.2, and a pulse width between 80 and 170 ns.

  3. Method for producing high surface area chromia materials for catalysis

    DOEpatents

    Gash, Alexander E.; Satcher, Joe; Tillotson, Thomas; Hrubesh, Lawrence; Simpson, Randall

    2007-05-01

    Nanostructured chromium(III)-oxide-based materials using sol-gel processing and a synthetic route for producing such materials are disclosed herein. Monolithic aerogels and xerogels having surface areas between 150 m.sup.2/g and 520 m.sup.2/g have been produced. The synthetic method employs the use of stable and inexpensive hydrated-chromium(III) inorganic salts and common solvents such as water, ethanol, methanol, 1-propanol, t-butanol, 2-ethoxy ethanol, and ethylene glycol, DMSO, and dimethyl formamide. The synthesis involves the dissolution of the metal salt in a solvent followed by an addition of a proton scavenger, such as an epoxide, which induces gel formation in a timely manner. Both critical point (supercritical extraction) and atmospheric (low temperature evaporation) drying may be employed to produce monolithic aerogels and xerogels, respectively.

  4. An Effective Approach Based on Response Surface Methodology for Predicting Friction Welding Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celik, Sare; Deniz Karaoglan, Aslan; Ersozlu, Ismail

    2016-03-01

    The joining of dissimilar metals is one of the most essential necessities of industries. Manufacturing by the joint of alloy steel and normal carbon steel is used in production, because it decreases raw material cost. The friction welding process parameters such as friction pressure, friction time, upset pressure, upset time and rotating speed play the major roles in determining the strength and microstructure of the joints. In this study, response surface methodology (RSM), which is a well-known design of experiments approach, is used for modeling the mathematical relation between the responses (tensile strength and maximum temperature), and the friction welding parameters with minimum number of experiments. The results show that RSM is an effective method for this type of problems for developing models and prediction.

  5. Effect of surface viscosity, anchoring energy, and cell gap on the response time of nematic liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Souza, R.F. de; Yang, D.-Ke; Lenzi, E.K.; Evangelista, L.R.; Zola, R.S.

    2014-07-15

    An analytical expression for the relaxation time of a nematic liquid crystal is obtained for the first time by considering the influence of surface viscosity, anchoring energy strength and cell gap, validated numerically by using the so-called relaxation method. This general equation for the molecular response time (τ{sub 0}) was derived for a vertical aligned cell and by solving an eigenvalue equation coming from the usual balance of torque equation in the Derzhanskii and Petrov formulation, recovering the usual equations in the appropriate limit. The results show that τ∼d{sup b}, where b=2 is observed only for strongly anchored cells, while for moderate to weak anchored cells, the exponent lies between 1 and 2, depending on both, surface viscosity and anchoring strength. We found that the surface viscosity is important when calculating the response time, specially for thin cells, critical for liquid crystal devices. The surface viscosity’s effect on the optical response time with pretilt is also explored. Our results bring new insights about the role of surface viscosity and its effects in applied physics. - Highlights: • The relaxation of nematic liquid crystals is calculated by taking the surface viscosity into account. • An analytical expression for the relaxation time depending on surface viscosity, anchoring strength and cell gap is obtained. • The results are numerically verified. • Surface viscosity is crucial for thin and weak anchored cells. • The effect on optical time and pretilt angle is also studied.

  6. Inflammatory Response to Lipopolysaccharide on the Ocular Surface in a Murine Dry Eye Model

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Ken T.; Xiao, Yangyan; Pflugfelder, Stephen C.; de Paiva, Cintia S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) alerts cells to the presence of bacteria by initiating an inflammatory response. We hypothesize that disruption of the ocular surface barrier in dry eye enhances TLR4 signaling. This study determined whether dry eye enhances expression of inflammatory mediators in response to topically applied TLR4 ligand. Methods A single dose of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or vehicle (endotoxin-free water) was applied to the cornea of nonstressed (NS) mice or mice subjected to 5 days of desiccating stress (DS). After 4 hours, corneal epithelium and conjunctiva were extracted to analyze expression of inflammatory mediators via PCR. Protein expression was confirmed by immunobead assay and immunostaining. Results Topically applied LPS increased expression of inflammatory mediators IL-1β, CXCL10, IL-12a, and IFN-γ in the conjunctiva, and IL-1β and CXCL10 in the cornea of NS mice compared to that in untreated controls. LPS in DS mice produced 3-fold increased expression of IL-1β in cornea and 2-fold increased expression in IL-12a in conjunctiva compared to that in LPS-treated control mice. Conclusions LPS increased expression of inflammatory cytokines on the ocular surface. This expression was further increased in dry eye, which suggests that epithelial barrier disruption enhances exposure of LPS to TLR4+ cells and that the inflammatory response to endotoxin-producing commensal or pathogenic bacteria may be more severe in dry eye disease. PMID:27136463

  7. Response of the surface tropical Atlantic Ocean to wind forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellanos, Paola; Pelegrí, Josep L.; Campos, Edmo J. D.; Rosell-Fieschi, Miquel; Gasser, Marc

    2015-05-01

    We use 10 years of satellite data (sea level pressure, surface winds and absolute dynamic topography [ADT]) together with Argo-inferred monthly-mean values of near-surface velocity and water transport, to examine how the tropical system of near-surface zonal currents responds to wind forcing. The data is analyzed using complex Hilbert empirical orthogonal functions, confirming that most of the variance has annual periodicity, with maximum amplitudes in the region spanned by the seasonal displacement of the Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ). The ADT mirrors the shape of the upper isopycnals, hence becoming a good indicator of the amount of water stored in the upper ocean. Within about 3° from the Equator, where the Coriolis force is small, there is year-long meridional Ekman-transport divergence that would lead to the eastward transport of the Equatorial Undercurrent and its northern and southern branches. Beyond 3° of latitude, and at least as far as 20°, the convergence of the Ekman transport generally causes a poleward positive ADT gradient, which sustains the westward South Equatorial Current (SEC). The sole exception occurs in summer, between 8°N and 12°N, when an Ekman-transport divergence develops and depletes de amount of surface water, resulting in an ADT ridge-valley system which reverses the ADT gradient and drives the eastward North Equatorial Countercurrent (NECC) at latitudes 4-9°N; in late fall, divergence ceases and the NECC drains the ADT ridge, so the ADT gradient again becomes positive and the SEC reappears. The seasonal evolution of a tilted ITCZ controls the surface water fluxes: the wind-induced transports set the surface divergence-convergence, which then drive the ADT and, through the ADT gradients, create the geostrophic jets that close the water balance.

  8. The fractal method of the lunar surface parameters analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nefedev, Yuri; Demina, Natalia; Petrova, Natalia; Demin, Sergey; Andreev, Alexey

    2016-10-01

    Analysis of complex selenographic systems is a complicated issue. This fully applies to the lunar topography. In this report a new method of the comparative reliable estimation of the lunar maps data is represented. The estimation was made by the comparison of high-altitude lines using the fractal analysis. The influence of the lunar macrofigure variances were determined by the method of fractal dimensions comparison.By now the highly accurate theories of the lunar movement have been obtained and stars coordinates have been determined on the basis of space measurements with the several mas accuracy but there are factors highly influencingon the accuracy of the results of these observations. They are: exactitude of the occultation moment recording, errors of the stars coordinates, accuracy of lunar ephemeris positions and unreliability of lunar marginal zone maps. Existing charts of the lunar marginal zone have some defects. To resolve this task thecomparison method in which the structure of the high-altitude lines of data appropriated with identical lunar coordinates can use. However, such comparison requires a lot of calculations.In order to find the variations of irregularities for the limb points above the mean level of lunar surface were computed the position angles of this points P and D by Hayn' coordinates. Thus the data of our studies was obtained by identical types.Then the first, segments of a lunar marginal zone for every 45" on P were considered. For each segment profile of the surface for a constant D were constructed with a step of 2". Thus 80 profiles were obtained. Secondly the fractal dimensions d for each considered structure was defined. Third the obtained values d were compared with the others maps considered in this work.The obtained results show some well agreement between the mean fractal dimensions for maps. Thus it can be concluded that the using of fractal method for lunar maps analysis to determine the accuracy of the presented to

  9. Method for producing functionally graded nanocrystalline layer on metal surface

    DOEpatents

    Ajayi, Oyelayo O.; Hershberger, Jeffrey G.

    2010-03-23

    An improved process for the creation or formation of nanocrystalline layers on substrates' surfaces is provided. The process involves "prescuffing" the surface of a substrate such as a metal by allowing friction to occur on the surface by a load-bearing entity making rubbing contact and moving along and on the substrate's surface. The "prescuffing" action is terminated when the coefficient of friction between the surface and the noise is rising significantly. Often, the significant rise in the coefficient of friction is signaled by a change in pitch of the scuffing action sound emanating from the buffeted surface. The "prescuffing" gives rise to a harder and smoother surface which withstands better any inadequate lubrication that may take place when the "prescuffed" surface is contacted by other surfaces.

  10. The GNSS Reflectometry Response to the Ocean Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Paul; Jelenak, Zorana; Soisuvarn, Seubson; Said, Faozi

    2016-04-01

    Global Navigation Satellite System - Reflectometry (GNSS-R) exploits signals of opportunity from the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS). GNSS transmitters continuously transmit navigation signals at L-band toward the earth's surface. The scattered power reflected off the earth's surface can be sensed by specially designed GNSS-R receivers. The reflected signal can then be used to glean information about the surface of the earth, such as ocean surface roughness, snow depth, sea ice extent, and soil moisture. The use of GNSS-R for ocean wind retrievals was first demonstrated from aircraft. On July 8 2014, the TechDemoSat-1 satellite (TDS-1) was launched by Surrey Satellite Technology, Ltd as a technology risk reduction mission into sun-synchronous orbit. This paper investigates the GNSS-R measurements collected by the Space GNSS Receiver-Remote Sensing Instrument (SGR-ReSI) on board the TDS-1 satellite. The sensitivity of the SGR-ReSI measurements to the ocean surface winds and waves are characterized. The effects of sea surface temperature, wind direction, and rain are also investigated. The SGR-ReSI measurements exhibited sensitivity through the entire range of wind speeds sampled in this dataset, up to 35 m/s. A significant dependence on the larger waves was observed for winds < 6 m/s. Additionally, an interesting dependence on SST was observed where the slope of the SGR-ReSI measurements is positive for winds < 5 m/s and reverses for winds > 5 m/s. There appeared to be very little wind direction signal, and investigation of the rain impacts found no apparent sensitivity in the data. These results are shown through the analysis of global statistics and examination of a few case studies. This released SGR-ReSI dataset provided the first opportunity to comprehensively investigate the sensitivity of satellite-based GNSS-R measurements to various ocean surface parameters. The upcoming NASA's Cyclone Global Navigation Satellite System (CYGNSS) satellite

  11. Two methods for examining angular response of personnel dosimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Plato, P.; Leib, R.; Miklos, J.

    1988-06-01

    The American National Standard ANSI N13.11-1983 is used to test the accuracy (bias plus precision) of dosimetry processors as part of the dosimetry accreditation program of the National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program (NVLAP). Section 3.8 of the ANSI N13.11-1983 standard requires that a study of the angular response of a dosimeter be carried out once, although no pass/fail criterion is given for angular response. The NVLAP accreditation program excluded Section 3.8, and thus no angular response data have been generated in an organized fashion. The objective of this project is to examine the feasibility of two alternative methods to test the angular response of personnel dosimeters. The first alternative involves static irradiations with the dosimeters at fixed angles to a radiation source. The second alternative involves dynamic irradiations with the dosimeters mounted on a rotating phantom. A Panasonic UD-802 personnel dosimetry system** was used to generate data to examine both alternatives. The results lead to two major conclusions. Firstly, Section 3.8 of the ANSI N13.11-1983 standard should be amended to require a pass/fail test for angular response. Secondly, a comparison between angular response data generated with a fixed or a rotating phantom shows that the rotating phantom is the more cost-effective method.

  12. Method for providing adhesion to a metal surface

    DOEpatents

    Harrah, L.A.; Allred, R.E.; Wilson, K.V. Jr.

    1992-02-18

    A process for treating metal surfaces to obtain improved susceptibility to bonding with adhesive compositions is disclosed. A metal surface is oxidized with a halogen to form a monolayer of halide ions on the surface. The halide ions are then exchanged with azide ions to form an azide monolayer on the metal surface. Upon contact of the treated surface with an adhesive composition, the azide layer may be thermally or photochemically decomposed to form active nitrene species, which react to bond the adhesive composition to the metal surface.

  13. Method for providing adhesion to a metal surface

    DOEpatents

    Harrah, Larry A.; Allred, Ronald E.; Wilson, Jr., Kennard V.

    1992-01-01

    A process for treating metal surfaces to obtain improved susceptibility to bonding with adhesive compositions is disclosed. A metal surface is oxidized with a halogen to form a monolayer of halide ions on the surface. The halide ions are then exchanged with azide ions to form an azide monolayer on the metal surface. Upon contact of the treated surface with an adhesive composition, the azide layer may be thermally or photochemically decomposed to form active nitrene species, which react to bond the adhesive composition to the metal surface.

  14. Reconstruction of surfaces from mixed hydrocarbon and PEG components in water: responsive surfaces aid fouling release.

    PubMed

    Cho, Youngjin; Sundaram, Harihara S; Finlay, John A; Dimitriou, Michael D; Callow, Maureen E; Callow, James A; Kramer, Edward J; Ober, Christopher K

    2012-06-11

    Coatings derived from surface active block copolymers (SABCs) having a combination of hydrophobic aliphatic (linear hydrocarbon or propylene oxide-derived groups) and hydrophilic poly(ethlyene glycol) (PEG) side chains have been developed. The coatings demonstrate superior performance against protein adsorption as well as resistance to biofouling, providing an alternative to coatings containing fluorinated side chains as the hydrophobe, thus reducing the potential environmental impact. The surfaces were examined using dynamic water contact angle, captive air-bubble contact angle, atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure analysis. The PS(8K)-b-P(E/B)(25K)-b-PI(10K) triblock copolymer precursor (K3) initially dominated the dry surface. In contrast to previous studies with mixed fluorinated/PEG surfaces, these new materials displayed significant surface changes after exposure to water that allowed fouling resistant behavior. PEG groups buried several nanometers below the surface in the dry state were able to occupy the coating surface after placement in water. The resulting surface exhibits a very low contact angle and good antifouling properties that are very different from those of K3. The surfaces are strongly resistant to protein adsorption using bovine serum albumin as a standard protein challenge. Biofouling assays with sporelings of the green alga Ulva and cells of the diatom Navicula showed the level of adhesion was significantly reduced relative to that of a PDMS standard and that of the triblock copolymer precursor of the SABCs.

  15. Analysis methods for Kevlar shield response to rotor fragments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerstle, J. H.

    1977-01-01

    Several empirical and analytical approaches to rotor burst shield sizing are compared and principal differences in metal and fabric dynamic behavior are discussed. The application of transient structural response computer programs to predict Kevlar containment limits is described. For preliminary shield sizing, present analytical methods are useful if insufficient test data for empirical modeling are available. To provide other information useful for engineering design, analytical methods require further developments in material characterization, failure criteria, loads definition, and post-impact fragment trajectory prediction.

  16. Surface morphology of nanotube formed Ti alloy by electrochemical methods.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Hwan; Choe, Han-Cheol

    2014-11-01

    In order to investigate the surface morphology of nanotube formed Ti alloy by electrochemical methods, the Ti-6Al-4V alloys for dental implant were used in this study. Heat treatment was carried out at 800 degrees C for 1 hour and then water quenching in argon atmosphere, that will be have a specimen name of 800 WQ. The formation of nanotube structure was conducted by electrochemical method on Ti-6Al-4V alloy in mixed electrolytes at 30 V for 1 hour. Microstructure of β phases showed dot-like structures at non-treated Ti-6Al-4V alloy, and needle-like in equiaxed structure from treated the alloy at 800 WQ. In non-treated Ti-6Al-4V alloy case, nanotubes only exhibited at α phase region with dissolved V-oxide area of β phase. However, in the case of 800 WQ, nanotubes of Ti-6Al-4V alloy exhibited at both α and βphase region. Electrochemical corrosion studies showed that the nanotubular alloy of 800 WQ possesses slightly higher corrosion resistance than that of non-treated nanotubular alloy. PMID:25958530

  17. Rapid surface enhanced Raman scattering detection method for chloramphenicol residues.

    PubMed

    Ji, Wei; Yao, Weirong

    2015-06-01

    Chloramphenicol (CAP) is a widely used amide alcohol antibiotics, which has been banned from using in food producing animals in many countries. In this study, surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) coupled with gold colloidal nanoparticles was used for the rapid analysis of CAP. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were conducted with Gaussian 03 at the B3LYP level using the 3-21G(d) and 6-31G(d) basis sets to analyze the assignment of vibrations. Affirmatively, the theoretical Raman spectrum of CAP was in complete agreement with the experimental spectrum. They both exhibited three strong peaks characteristic of CAP at 1104 cm(-1), 1344 cm(-1), 1596 cm(-1), which were used for rapid qualitative analysis of CAP residues in food samples. The use of SERS as a method for the measurements of CAP was explored by comparing use of different solvents, gold colloidal nanoparticles concentration and absorption time. The method of the detection limit was determined as 0.1 μg/mL using optimum conditions. The Raman peak at 1344 cm(-1) was used as the index for quantitative analysis of CAP in food samples, with a linear correlation of R(2)=0.9802. Quantitative analysis of CAP residues in foods revealed that the SERS technique with gold colloidal nanoparticles was sensitive and of a good stability and linear correlation, and suited for rapid analysis of CAP residue in a variety of food samples. PMID:25754387

  18. Rapid surface enhanced Raman scattering detection method for chloramphenicol residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Wei; Yao, Weirong

    2015-06-01

    Chloramphenicol (CAP) is a widely used amide alcohol antibiotics, which has been banned from using in food producing animals in many countries. In this study, surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) coupled with gold colloidal nanoparticles was used for the rapid analysis of CAP. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were conducted with Gaussian 03 at the B3LYP level using the 3-21G(d) and 6-31G(d) basis sets to analyze the assignment of vibrations. Affirmatively, the theoretical Raman spectrum of CAP was in complete agreement with the experimental spectrum. They both exhibited three strong peaks characteristic of CAP at 1104 cm-1, 1344 cm-1, 1596 cm-1, which were used for rapid qualitative analysis of CAP residues in food samples. The use of SERS as a method for the measurements of CAP was explored by comparing use of different solvents, gold colloidal nanoparticles concentration and absorption time. The method of the detection limit was determined as 0.1 μg/mL using optimum conditions. The Raman peak at 1344 cm-1 was used as the index for quantitative analysis of CAP in food samples, with a linear correlation of R2 = 0.9802. Quantitative analysis of CAP residues in foods revealed that the SERS technique with gold colloidal nanoparticles was sensitive and of a good stability and linear correlation, and suited for rapid analysis of CAP residue in a variety of food samples.

  19. Instruments and MethodsIn situ measurements of snow surface roughness using a laser profiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacroix, P.; Legrésy, B.; Langley, K.; Hamran, S. E.; Kohler, J.; Roques, S.; Rémy, F.; Dechambre, M.

    The snow surface roughness at centimetre and millimetre scales is an important parameter related to wind transport, snowdrifts, snowfall, snowmelt and snow grain size. Knowledge of the snow surface roughness is also of high interest for analyzing the signal from radar sensors such as SAR, altimeters and scatterometers. Unfortunately, this parameter has seldom been measured over snow surfaces. The techniques used to measure the roughness of other surfaces, such as agricultural or sand soils, are difficult to implement in polar regions because of the harsh climatic conditions. In this paper we develop a device based on a laser profiler coupled with a GPS receiver on board a snowmobile. This instrumentation was tested successfully in midre Lovénbreen, Svalbard, in April 2006. It allowed us to generate profiles of 3 km sections of the snow-covered glacier surface. Because of the motion of the snowmobile, the roughness signal is mixed with the snowmobile signal. We use a distance/frequency analysis (the empirical mode decomposition) to filter the signal. This method allows us to recover the snow surface structures of wavelengths between 4 and 50 cm with amplitudes of >1 mm. Finally, the roughness parameters of snow surfaces are retrieved. The snow surface roughness is found to be dependent on the scales of the observations. The retrieved RMS of the height distribution is found to vary between 0.5 and 9.2 mm, and the correlation length is found to be between 0.6 and 46 cm. This range of measurements is particularly well adapted to the analysis of GHz radar response on snow surfaces.

  20. New methods for engineering site characterization using reflection and surface wave seismic survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaiprakaikeow, Susit

    This study presents two new seismic testing methods for engineering application, a new shallow seismic reflection method and Time Filtered Analysis of Surface Waves (TFASW). Both methods are described in this dissertation. The new shallow seismic reflection was developed to measure reflection at a single point using two to four receivers, assuming homogeneous, horizontal layering. It uses one or more shakers driven by a swept sine function as a source, and the cross-correlation technique to identify wave arrivals. The phase difference between the source forcing function and the ground motion due to the dynamic response of the shaker-ground interface was corrected by using a reference geophone. Attenuated high frequency energy was also recovered using the whitening in frequency domain. The new shallow seismic reflection testing was performed at the crest of Porcupine Dam in Paradise, Utah. The testing used two horizontal Vibroseis sources and four receivers for spacings between 6 and 300 ft. Unfortunately, the results showed no clear evidence of the reflectors despite correction of the magnitude and phase of the signals. However, an improvement in the shape of the cross-correlations was noticed after the corrections. The results showed distinct primary lobes in the corrected cross-correlated signals up to 150 ft offset. More consistent maximum peaks were observed in the corrected waveforms. TFASW is a new surface (Rayleigh) wave method to determine the shear wave velocity profile at a site. It is a time domain method as opposed to the Spectral Analysis of Surface Waves (SASW) method, which is a frequency domain method. This method uses digital filtering to optimize bandwidth used to determine the dispersion curve. Results from testings at three different sites in Utah indicated good agreement with the dispersion curves measured using both TFASW and SASW methods. The advantage of TFASW method is that the dispersion curves had less scatter at long wavelengths as a

  1. A Method for Partitioning Surface and Subsurface Flow Using Rainfall Simulaton and Two-Dimensional Surface Electrical Resistivity Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, A. M.; Paige, G. B.; Miller, S. N.; Carr, B. J.; Holbrook, W. S.

    2014-12-01

    In semi-arid rangeland environments understanding how surface and subsurface flow processes and their interactions are influenced by watershed and rainfall characteristics is critical. However, it is difficult to resolve the temporal variations between mechanisms controlling these processes and challenging to obtain field measurements that document their interactions. Better insight into how these complex systems respond hydrologically is necessary in order to refine hydrologic models and decision support tools. We are conducting field studies integrating high resolution, two-dimensional surface electrical resistivity imaging (ERI) with variable intensity rainfall simulation, to quantify real-time partitioning of rainfall into surface and subsurface response. These studies are being conducted at the hillslope scale on long-term runoff plots on four different ecological sites in the Upper Crow Creek Watershed in southeastern Wyoming. Variable intensity rainfall rates were applied using the Walnut Gulch Rainfall Simulator in which intensities were increased incrementally from 49 to 180 mm hr-1 and steady-state runoff rates for each intensity were measured. Two 13.5 m electrode arrays at 0.5 m spacing were positioned on the surface perpendicular to each plot and potentials were measured at given time intervals prior to, during and following simulations using a dipole-dipole array configuration. The configuration allows for a 2.47 m depth of investigation in which magnitude and direction of subsurface flux can be determined. We used the calculated steady state infiltration rates to quantify the variability in the partial area runoff response on the ecological sites. Coupling this information with time-lapse difference inversions of ERI data, we are able to track areas of increasing and decreasing resistivity in the subsurface related to localized areas of infiltration during and following rainfall events. We anticipate implementing this method across a variety of

  2. Method of enhancing radiation response of radiation detection materials

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Steven D.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention is a method of increasing radiation response of a radiation detection material for a given radiation signal by first pressurizing the radiation detection material. Pressurization may be accomplished by any means including mechanical and/or hydraulic. In this application, the term "pressure" includes fluid pressure and/or mechanical stress.

  3. Tuning cellular responses to BMP-2 with material surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Picart, Catherine; Cavalcanti-Adam, Elisabetta Ada

    2016-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) has been known for decades as a strong osteoinductive factor and for clinical applications is combined solely with collagen as carrier material. The growing concerns regarding side effects and the importance of BMP-2 in several developmental and physiological processes have raised the need to improve the design of materials by controlling BMP-2 presentation. Inspired by the natural cell environment, new material surfaces have been engineered and tailored to provide both physical and chemical cues that regulate BMP-2 activity. Here we describe surfaces designed to present BMP-2 to cells in a spatially and temporally controlled manner. This is achieved by trapping BMP-2 using physicochemical interactions, either covalently grafted or combined with other extracellular matrix components. In the near future, we anticipate that material science and biology will integrate and further develop tools for in vitro studies and potentially bring some of them toward in vivo applications. PMID:26704296

  4. Tuning cellular responses to BMP-2 with material surfaces.

    PubMed

    Migliorini, Elisa; Valat, Anne; Picart, Catherine; Cavalcanti-Adam, Elisabetta Ada

    2016-02-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) has been known for decades as a strong osteoinductive factor and for clinical applications is combined solely with collagen as carrier material. The growing concerns regarding side effects and the importance of BMP-2 in several developmental and physiological processes have raised the need to improve the design of materials by controlling BMP-2 presentation. Inspired by the natural cell environment, new material surfaces have been engineered and tailored to provide both physical and chemical cues that regulate BMP-2 activity. Here we describe surfaces designed to present BMP-2 to cells in a spatially and temporally controlled manner. This is achieved by trapping BMP-2 using physicochemical interactions, either covalently grafted or combined with other extracellular matrix components. In the near future, we anticipate that material science and biology will integrate and further develop tools for in vitro studies and potentially bring some of them toward in vivo applications.

  5. Ray tracing method for doubly curved reflector surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sletten, C. J.

    1981-06-01

    A regular grid of discrete points is often used to define shaped reflector surfaces for microwave antennas. In the present paper, a ray tracing procedure useful for computing aperture and power distributions produced by an arbitrarily shaped reflector surface is described. It is found that this formulation provides an accurate ray tracing tool for shaped surfaces approximating conic sections and with d values small enough for templates used for precise construction of these surfaces.

  6. Cooling responses of finger in contact with an aluminum surface.

    PubMed

    Chen, F; Nilsson, H; Holmér, I

    1994-03-01

    Skin temperature (T sk) changes and subjective sensations of bare fingers touching a cold aluminum surface were determined in 25 subjects (12 female and 13 male). An 11-cm aluminum cube was placed in a mini-chamber, where chamber air and an aluminum cube were simultaneously cooled to -14, -5, and -1 degrees C, respectively. Subjects inserted their right hands into the chamber and pressed on the cube surface with three fingers with a force of 9.81 N (1 Kp). Exposure lasted until finger-skin temperature reached 0 degree C or was voluntarily ended by the subject. Regression equations with two exponential components were used to describe the relationship between T sk and exposure time. The short time constant (< 1 second) for the first part of the cooling curve is assumed to represent primarily thermocouple dynamics. The long time constant (> 20 seconds) for the second part of the cooling curve is interpreted as representing the rate of heat transfer from the tissues of the finger itself. Gender and cube-surface temperature had no significant effect on any of the time constants. Thermal sensation and pain sensation lacked a good correlation with the contact and T sk and T sk change.

  7. Method for cleaning and passivating a metal surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, George B. (Inventor); Carpenter, Norman F. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A cleaning solvent useful in the cleaning of metal surfaces, e.g. nickle-iron alloys, contains sulfamic acid, citric acid, a solvent for hydrocarbon residues, and a surfactant. Metal surfaces are cleaned by contacting the surface with the cleaning solvent and then passivated by contact with aqueous solutions of citric acid or sodium nitrite or a combination of the two.

  8. Application of finite element, global polynomial, and kriging response surfaces in Progressive Lattice Sampling designs

    SciTech Connect

    ROMERO,VICENTE J.; SWILER,LAURA PAINTON; GIUNTA,ANTHONY A.

    2000-04-25

    This paper examines the modeling accuracy of finite element interpolation, kriging, and polynomial regression used in conjunction with the Progressive Lattice Sampling (PLS) incremental design-of-experiments approach. PLS is a paradigm for sampling a deterministic hypercubic parameter space by placing and incrementally adding samples in a manner intended to maximally reduce lack of knowledge in the parameter space. When combined with suitable interpolation methods, PLS is a formulation for progressive construction of response surface approximations (RSA) in which the RSA are efficiently upgradable, and upon upgrading, offer convergence information essential in estimating error introduced by the use of RSA in the problem. The three interpolation methods tried here are examined for performance in replicating an analytic test function as measured by several different indicators. The process described here provides a framework for future studies using other interpolation schemes, test functions, and measures of approximation quality.

  9. Approximated optimum condition of second order response surface model with correlated observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somayasa, Wayan

    2016-06-01

    In the present paper we establish an inference procedure for the eigenvalues of the model matrix of the second-order response surface model (RSM). In contrast to the classical treatment where the sample are assumed to be independently distributed, in this work we do not need such distributional simplification. The confidence region for the unknown vector of the eigenvalues is derived by means of delta method. The finite sample behavior of the convergence result is discussed by Monte Carlo Simulation. We get the approximated distribution of the pivotal quantity of the population eigenvalues as a chi-square distribution model. Next we attempt to apply the method to a real data provided by a mining industry. The data represents the percentage of cobalt (Co) observed over the exploration region.

  10. Homogenate extraction of gardenia yellow pigment from Gardenia Jasminoides Ellis fruit using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xingyi; Mang, Yili; Shen, Fengqiong; Xie, Jie; Su, Weike

    2014-08-01

    Homogenate extraction technology was developed for extraction of gardenia yellow pigment from Gardenia jasminoides Ellis fruit. The operating parameters affecting the color value of gardenia yellow pigment were studied on the basis of a Box-Behnken design and response surface methodology. Results showed that the optimum extraction conditions were as follows: extraction time 41 s, ethanol concentration 50 %, ratio of liquid to material 15:1 (mL:g) and particle size 1.7 mm. Under the optimum condition, the experimental color value was 52.37 g(-1), which was in keeping with the predicted one. Compared with the heat extraction method, the color value of gardenia yellow pigment of homogenate extraction was higher and the extraction time was shorter. Homogenate extraction method is an ideal means for extraction of gardenia yellow pigment from Gardenia jasminoides Ellis fruit. PMID:25114350

  11. Ultrasound-assisted extraction of Mangiferin from Mango (Mangifera indica L.) leaves using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Zou, Tang-Bin; Xia, En-Qin; He, Tai-Ping; Huang, Ming-Yuan; Jia, Qing; Li, Hua-Wen

    2014-01-27

    Mangiferin is a xanthone widely distributed in higher plants showing antioxidative, antiviral, anticancer, antidiabetic, immunomodulatory, hepatoprotective and analgesic effects. In the present study, an ultrasonic-assisted extraction method was developed for the effective extraction of mangiferin from mango leaves. Some parameters such as ethanol concentration, liquid-to-solid ratio, extraction temperature, and extraction time were optimized by single-factor experiment and response surface methodology. The optimal extraction conditions were 44% ethanol, the liquid-to-solid ratio was 38:1, and extraction for 19.2 min at 60 °C under ultrasound irradiation of 200 W. Under optimal conditions, the yield of mangiferin was 58.46 ± 1.27 mg/g. The results obtained are helpful for the full utilization of mango leaves, and also indicated that ultrasonic-assisted extraction is a very useful method for the extraction of mangiferin from plant materials.

  12. Experimental validation of normalized uniform load surface curvature method for damage localization.

    PubMed

    Jung, Ho-Yeon; Sung, Seung-Hoon; Jung, Hyung-Jo

    2015-10-16

    In this study, we experimentally validated the normalized uniform load surface (NULS) curvature method, which has been developed recently to assess damage localization in beam-type structures. The normalization technique allows for the accurate assessment of damage localization with greater sensitivity irrespective of the damage location. In this study, damage to a simply supported beam was numerically and experimentally investigated on the basis of the changes in the NULS curvatures, which were estimated from the modal flexibility matrices obtained from the acceleration responses under an ambient excitation. Two damage scenarios were considered for the single damage case as well as the multiple damages case by reducing the bending stiffness (EI) of the affected element(s). Numerical simulations were performed using MATLAB as a preliminary step. During the validation experiments, a series of tests were performed. It was found that the damage locations could be identified successfully without any false-positive or false-negative detections using the proposed method. For comparison, the damage detection performances were compared with those of two other well-known methods based on the modal flexibility matrix, namely, the uniform load surface (ULS) method and the ULS curvature method. It was confirmed that the proposed method is more effective for investigating the damage locations of simply supported beams than the two conventional methods in terms of sensitivity to damage under measurement noise.

  13. The second-harmonic response of single-crystal silver electrodes obtained with an interference method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltramo, G.; Bilger, C.; Pettinger, B.; Schmickler, W.

    1998-12-01

    The second-harmonic response of several single-crystal silver electrodes is investigated at a long wavelength. In contrast to earlier experiments, the phase of the signal is obtained directly by an interference method. By comparing measurements at two different angles of incidence, the Rudnick-Stern coefficient characterizing the response perpendicular to the surface can be estimated; for Ag(100) and Ag(111) it agrees fairly well with calculations based on the jellium model. For the Ag(110) surface, the twofold amplitude depends on the electrode potential; in addition, a contribution with a three-fold symmetry is observed. These unexpected features are probably caused by a facetting of the Ag(110) surface.

  14. Optimization and evaluation of chelerythrine nanoparticles composed of magnetic multiwalled carbon nanotubes by response surface methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yong; Yuan, Yulin; Zhou, Zhide; Liang, Jintao; Chen, Zhencheng; Li, Guiyin

    2014-02-01

    In this study, a new chelerythrine nanomaterial targeted drug delivery system (Fe3O4/MWNTs-CHE) was designed with chelerythrine (CHE) as model of antitumor drug and magnetic multiwalled carbon nanotubes (Fe3O4/MWNTs) nanocomposites as drug carrier. The process and formulation variables of Fe3O4/MWNTs-CHE were optimized using response surface methodology (RSM) with a three-level, three-factor Box-Behnken design (BBD). Mathematical equations and response surface plots were used to relate the dependent and independent variables. The experimental results were fitted into second-order response surface model. When Fe3O4/MWNTs:CHE ratio was 20.6:1, CHE concentration was 172.0 μg/mL, temperature was 34.5 °C, the drug loading content and entrapment efficiency were 3.04 ± 0.17% and 63.68 ± 2.36%, respectively. The optimized Fe3O4/MWNTs-CHE nanoparticles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Zeta potential, in vitro drug release and MTT assays. The in vitro CHE drug release behavior from Fe3O4/MWNTs-CHE displayed a biphasic drug release pattern and followed Korsmeyer-Peppas model with Fickian diffusion mechanism for drug release. The results from MTT assays suggested that the Fe3O4/MWNTs-CHE could effectively inhibit the proliferation of human hepatoma cells (HepG2), which displayed time or concentration-dependent manner. All these preliminary studies were expected to provide a theoretical basis and offer new methods for preparation efficient magnetic targeted drug delivery systems.

  15. A Gravity-Responsive Time-Keeping Protein of the Plant and Animal Cell Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morre, D. James

    2003-01-01

    The hypothesis under investigation was that a ubiquinol (NADH) oxidase protein of the cell surface with protein disulfide-thiol interchange activity (= NOX protein) is a plant and animal time-keeping ultradian (period of less than 24 h) driver of both cell enlargement and the biological clock that responds to gravity. Despite considerable work in a large number of laboratories spanning several decades, this is, to my knowledge, our work is the first demonstration of a time-keeping biochemical reaction that is both gravity-responsive and growth-related and that has been shown to determine circadian periodicity. As such, the NOX protein may represent both the long-sought biological gravity receptor and the core oscillator of the cellular biological clock. Completed studies have resulted in 12 publications and two issued NASA-owned patents of the clock activity. The gravity response and autoentrainment were characterized in cultured mammalian cells and in two plant systems together with entrainment by light and small molecules (melatonin). The molecular basis of the oscillatory behavior was investigated using spectroscopic methods (Fourier transform infrared and circular dichroism) and high resolution electron microscopy. We have also applied these findings to an understanding of the response to hypergravity. Statistical methods for analysis of time series phenomena were developed (Foster et al., 2003).

  16. Optimization by Response Surface Methodology of Confluent and Aligned Cellular Monolayers for Nerve Guidance.

    PubMed

    Kofron, Celinda M; Hoffman-Kim, Diane

    2009-12-01

    Anisotropic tissue structures provide guidance for navigating neurons in vitro and in vivo. Here we optimized the generation of comparable anisotropic monolayers of astrocytes, endothelial cells, and Schwann cells as a first step toward determining which properties of anisotropic cells are sufficient for nerve guidance. The statistical experimental design method Design of Experiments and the experimental analysis method Response Surface Methodology were applied to improve efficiency and utility. Factors investigated included dimensions of microcontact printed protein patterns, cell density, and culture duration. Protein patterning spacing had the strongest influence. When cells initially aligned at borders and proliferated to fill in spaces, space between stripes was most effective when it was comparable to cell size. Maximizing the area of adhesive molecule coverage was also important for confluence of these types of cells. When cells adhered and aligned over the width of a stripe and broadened to fill spaces, space width about half the cell width was most effective. These findings suggest that if the mechanism of alignment, alignment at borders or over the width of the stripe, is predetermined and the cell size determined, the optimal size of the micropatterning for aligned monolayers of other cell types can be predicted. This study also demonstrates the effective use of DOE and RSM to probe cellular responses to various and multiple factors toward determination of optimal conditions for a desired cellular response.

  17. Optical nulling apparatus and method for testing an optical surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olczak, Eugene (Inventor); Hannon, John J. (Inventor); Dey, Thomas W. (Inventor); Jensen, Arthur E. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    An optical nulling apparatus for testing an optical surface includes an aspheric mirror having a reflecting surface for imaging light near or onto the optical surface under test, where the aspheric mirror is configured to reduce spherical aberration of the optical surface under test. The apparatus includes a light source for emitting light toward the aspheric mirror, the light source longitudinally aligned with the aspheric mirror and the optical surface under test. The aspheric mirror is disposed between the light source and the optical surface under test, and the emitted light is reflected off the reflecting surface of the aspheric mirror and imaged near or onto the optical surface under test. An optical measuring device is disposed between the light source and the aspheric mirror, where light reflected from the optical surface under test enters the optical measuring device. An imaging mirror is disposed longitudinally between the light source and the aspheric mirror, and the imaging mirror is configured to again reflect light, which is first reflected from the reflecting surface of the aspheric mirror, onto the optical surface under test.

  18. The relationship of surface roughness and cell response of chemical surface modification of titanium

    PubMed Central

    Zareidoost, Amir; Ghaseme, Behrooz

    2012-01-01

    Implant surface topography influences osteoblastic proliferation, differentiation and extracellular matrix protein expressions. Previous researches proved that chemical surface modification of titanium implants could be used to improve Bone-to-implant contact. In this study, the surface topography, chemistry and biocompatibility of polished titanium surfaces treated with mixed solution of three acids containing HCl, HF and H3PO4 with different etched conditions for example concentration, time and addition of calcium chloride were studied. Osteoblast cells (MG-63) were cultured on different groups of titanium surfaces. In order to investigate titanium surfaces, SEM, AFM and EDS analyses were carried out. The results showed that surfaces treated with HCl–HF–H3PO4 had higher roughness, lower cytotoxicity level and better biocompatibility than controls. Moreover, addition of calcium chloride into mixed solution of three acids containing HCl, HF and H3PO4 is an important, predominant and new technique for obtaining biofunction in metals for biomedical use including dentistry. PMID:22460230

  19. Antibody responses to the merozoite surface protein-1 complex in cerebral malaria patients in India

    PubMed Central

    Lucchi, Naomi W; Tongren, Jon Eric; Jain, Vidhan; Nagpal, Avinash C; Kauth, Christian W; Woehlbier, Ute; Bujard, Hermann; Dash, Aditya P; Singh, Neeru; Stiles, Jonathan K; Udhayakumar, Venkatachalam

    2008-01-01

    Background Plasmodium falciparum infection causes cerebral malaria (CM) in a subset of patients with anti-malarial treatment protecting only about 70% to 80% of patients. Why a subset of malaria patients develops CM complications, including neurological sequelae or death, is still not well understood. It is believed that host immune factors may modulate CM outcomes and there is substantial evidence that cellular immune factors, such as cytokines, play an important role in this process. In this study, the potential relationship between the antibody responses to the merozoite surface protein (MSP)-1 complex (which consists of four fragments namely: MSP-183, MSP-130, MSP-138 and MSP-142), MSP-636 and MSP-722 and CM was investigated. Methods Peripheral blood antibody responses to recombinant antigens of the two major allelic forms of MSP-1 complex, MSP-636 and MSP-722 were compared between healthy subjects, mild malaria patients (MM) and CM patients residing in a malaria endemic region of central India. Total IgG and IgG subclass antibody responses were determined using ELISA method. Results The prevalence and levels of IgG and its subclasses in the plasma varied for each antigen. In general, the prevalence of total IgG, IgG1 and IgG3 was higher in the MM patients and lower in CM patients compared to healthy controls. Significantly lower levels of total IgG antibodies to the MSP-1f38, IgG1 levels to MSP-1d83, MSP-119 and MSP-636 and IgG3 levels to MSP-1f42 and MSP-722 were observed in CM patients as compared to MM patients. Conclusion These results suggest that there may be some dysregulation in the generation of antibody responses to some MSP antigens in CM patients and it is worth investigating further whether perturbations of antibody responses in CM patients contribute to pathogenesis. PMID:18601721

  20. A layer stripping approach for monitoring resistivity variations using surface magnetotelluric responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogaya, Xènia; Ledo, Juanjo; Queralt, Pilar; Jones, Alan G.; Marcuello, Álex

    2016-09-01

    The resolution of surface-acquired magnetotelluric data is typically not sufficiently high enough in monitoring surveys to detect and quantify small resistivity variations produced within an anomalous structure at a given depth within the subsurface. To address this deficiency we present an approach, called "layer stripping", based on the analytical solution of the one-dimensional magnetotelluric problem to enhance the sensitivity of surface magnetotelluric responses to such subtle subsurface temporal variations in resistivity within e.g. reservoirs. Given a well-known geoelectrical baseline model of a reservoir site, the layer stripping approach aims to remove the effect of the upper, unchanging structures in order to simulate the time-varying magnetotelluric responses at depth. This methodology is suggested for monitoring all kinds of reservoirs, e.g. hydrocarbons, gas, geothermal, compress air storage, etc., but here we focus on CO2 geological storage. We study one-dimensional and three-dimensional resistivity variations in the reservoir layer and the feasibility of the method is appraised by evaluating the error of the approach and defining different detectability parameters. The geoelectrical baseline model of the Hontomín site (Spain) for CO2 geological storage in a deep saline aquifer is taken as our exemplar for studying the validity of the 1D assumption in a real scenario. We conclude that layer stripping could help detect resistivity variations and locate them in the space, showing potential to also sense unforeseen resistivity variations at all depths. The proposed approach constitutes an innovative contribution to take greater advantage of surface magnetotelluric data and to use the method as a cost-effective permanent monitoring technique in suitable geoelectrical scenarios.

  1. Optimization of ingredients for noodle preparation using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Vijayakumar, T Poongodi; Boopathy, P

    2014-08-01

    In the present investigation, the composite flour combinations using whole wheat flour (X1), tapioca flour (X2) and defatted soy flour (X3) for the noodle preparation were made through central composite rotatable design (CCRD). The analyzed responses were bulk density (BD), proximate composition, water uptake ratio (WUR), cooking volume expansion (VE), water absorption capacity (WAC), swelling capacity (SC), gruel solid loss (GSL), and sensory characteristics. A second order quadratic polynomial equation was fitted to the data of all responses for prediction. The maximum protein content of 16 g% was achieved by the combination of 75.54 g of whole wheat flour, 10 g of tapioca flour and 19.78 g of defatted soy flour. Since the inclusion of defatted soy flour >10 g resulted negative influence on good quality determining responses, the Chinese salted noodles of excellent quality with maximum WAC, WUR, VE, SC, protein, carbohydrate, ash and minimum GSL, BD, fat, moisture could be made from ratio of combination of three independent variables at 77.33 g (X1): 22.19 g (X2): 8.92 g (X3) respectively. The cost of production per kg of noodles with optimum level of ingredient was Rs.75.50/-. PMID:25114340

  2. Charged particle detectors with active detector surface for partial energy deposition of the charged particles and related methods

    DOEpatents

    Gerts, David W; Bean, Robert S; Metcalf, Richard R

    2013-02-19

    A radiation detector is disclosed. The radiation detector comprises an active detector surface configured to generate charge carriers in response to charged particles associated with incident radiation. The active detector surface is further configured with a sufficient thickness for a partial energy deposition of the charged particles to occur and permit the charged particles to pass through the active detector surface. The radiation detector further comprises a plurality of voltage leads coupled to the active detector surface. The plurality of voltage leads is configured to couple to a voltage source to generate a voltage drop across the active detector surface and to separate the charge carriers into a plurality of electrons and holes for detection. The active detector surface may comprise one or more graphene layers. Timing data between active detector surfaces may be used to determine energy of the incident radiation. Other apparatuses and methods are disclosed herein.

  3. Response of nickel surface to pulsed fusion plasma radiations

    SciTech Connect

    Niranjan, Ram Rout, R. K. Srivastava, R. Gupta, Satish C.; Chakravarthy, Y.; Patel, N. N.; Alex, P.

    2014-04-24

    Nickel based alloys are being projected as suitable materials for some components of the next generation fusion reactor because of compatible thermal, electrical and mechanical properties. Pure nickel material is tested here for possibility of similar application purpose. Nickel samples (> 99.5 % purity) are exposed here to plasma radiations produced due to D-D fusion reaction inside an 11.5 kJ plasma focus device. The changes in the physical properties of the nickel surface at microscopic level which in turn change the mechanical properties are analyzed using scanning electron microscope, optical microscope, glancing incident X-ray diffractometer and Vicker's hardness gauge. The results are reported here.

  4. Response of nickel surface to pulsed fusion plasma radiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niranjan, Ram; Rout, R. K.; Srivastava, R.; Chakravarthy, Y.; Patel, N. N.; Alex, P.; Gupta, Satish C.

    2014-04-01

    Nickel based alloys are being projected as suitable materials for some components of the next generation fusion reactor because of compatible thermal, electrical and mechanical properties. Pure nickel material is tested here for possibility of similar application purpose. Nickel samples (> 99.5 % purity) are exposed here to plasma radiations produced due to D-D fusion reaction inside an 11.5 kJ plasma focus device. The changes in the physical properties of the nickel surface at microscopic level which in turn change the mechanical properties are analyzed using scanning electron microscope, optical microscope, glancing incident X-ray diffractometer and Vicker's hardness gauge. The results are reported here.

  5. Definition of Method of Measurement of Supporting and Control Surface Areas, Special Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1931-01-01

    Definitions of methods of measurements of supporting and control surface areas are presented. Methods for measuring the supporting surface, i.e., the wing area, and the control surfaces, i.e., the horizontal tail area, the vertical tail area, and the trailing control surface areas are defined. Illustrations of each of the areas are included.

  6. [A Method to Reconstruct Surface Reflectance Spectrum from Multispectral Image Based on Canopy Radiation Transfer Model].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yong-guang; Ma, Ling-ling; Li, Chuan-rong; Zhu, Xiao-hua; Tang, Ling-li

    2015-07-01

    Due to the lack of enough spectral bands for multi-spectral sensor, it is difficult to reconstruct surface retlectance spectrum from finite spectral information acquired by multi-spectral instrument. Here, taking into full account of the heterogeneity of pixel from remote sensing image, a method is proposed to simulate hyperspectral data from multispectral data based on canopy radiation transfer model. This method first assumes the mixed pixels contain two types of land cover, i.e., vegetation and soil. The sensitive parameters of Soil-Leaf-Canopy (SLC) model and a soil ratio factor were retrieved from multi-spectral data based on Look-Up Table (LUT) technology. Then, by combined with a soil ratio factor, all the parameters were input into the SLC model to simulate the surface reflectance spectrum from 400 to 2 400 nm. Taking Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) image as reference image, the surface reflectance spectrum was simulated. The simulated reflectance spectrum revealed different feature information of different surface types. To test the performance of this method, the simulated reflectance spectrum was convolved with the Landsat ETM + spectral response curves and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) spectral response curves to obtain the simulated Landsat ETM+ and MODIS image. Finally, the simulated Landsat ETM+ and MODIS images were compared with the observed Landsat ETM+ and MODIS images. The results generally showed high correction coefficients (Landsat: 0.90-0.99, MODIS: 0.74-0.85) between most simulated bands and observed bands and indicated that the simulated reflectance spectrum was well simulated and reliable. PMID:26717721

  7. Optical simulation of surface textured TCO using FDTD method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elviyanti, I. L.; Purwanto, H.; Kusumandari

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this research is simulating the transmittance of surface textured transparent conducting oxide (TCO) for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cell (DSSC) application. The simulation based on finite difference time domain (FDTD) was performed using the MatLab software for flat and pyramid surface textured TCO. Fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) and indium tin oxide (ITO) were used as TCO material. The transmittance simulation of flat TCO was compared to UV-Vis spectrophotometer measurement of real TCO to ensure the accuracy of the simulation. Then, the transmittance simulation of pyramid surface textures of TCO is higher than a flat one. It suggested that surface texturing enhance the path of light through dispersion and reflectance light by the pattern of the surface. This result indicates that surface textured increasing the transmittance of TCO through a complex light trapping mechanism which might be used to increase the light harvesting for DSSC application.

  8. Nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced raman scattering and methods related thereto

    DOEpatents

    Bond, Tiziana C.; Miles, Robin; Davidson, James C.; Liu, Gang Logan

    2015-07-14

    Methods for fabricating nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering, structures thus obtained, and methods to characterize the nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering. Nanoscale array structures may comprise nanotrees, nanorecesses and tapered nanopillars.

  9. Nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced raman scattering and methods related thereto

    DOEpatents

    Bond, Tiziana C.; Miles, Robin; Davidson, James C.; Liu, Gang Logan

    2014-07-22

    Methods for fabricating nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering, structures thus obtained, and methods to characterize the nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering. Nanoscale array structures may comprise nanotrees, nanorecesses and tapered nanopillars.

  10. Nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced raman scattering and methods related thereto

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, Tiziana C; Miles, Robin; Davidson, James; Liu, Gang Logan

    2015-11-03

    Methods for fabricating nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering, structures thus obtained, and methods to characterize the nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering. Nanoscale array structures may comprise nanotrees, nanorecesses and tapered nanopillars.

  11. Surface characteristics and osteoblastic cell response of alkali-and heat-treated titanium-8tantalum-3niobium alloy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bo-Ah; Kang, Choong-Hee; Vang, Mong-Sook; Jung, Young-Suk; Piao, Xing Hui; Kim, Ok-Su; Chung, Hyun-Ju

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the present study was to evaluate the biological response of alkali- and heat-treated titanium-8tantalum-3niobium surfaces by cell proliferation and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity analysis. Methods Commercial pure titanium (group cp-Ti) and alkali- and heat-treated titanium-8tantalum-3niobium (group AHT) disks were prepared. The surface properties were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersed spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The surface roughness was evaluated by atomic force microscopy and a profilometer. The contact angle and surface energy were also analyzed. The biological response of fetal rat calvarial cells on group AHT was assessed by cell proliferation and ALP activity. Results Group AHT showed a flake-like morphology microprofile and dense structure. XPS analysis of group AHT showed an increased amount of oxygen in the basic hydroxyl residue of titanium hydroxide groups compared with group cp-Ti. The surface roughness (Ra) measured by a profilometer showed no significant difference (P>0.05). Group AHT showed a lower contact angle and higher surface energy than group cp-Ti. Cell proliferation on group AHT surfaces was significantly higher than on group cp-Ti surfaces (P<0.05). In comparison to group cp-Ti, group AHT enhanced ALP activity (P<0.05). Conclusions These results suggest that group AHT stimulates osteoblast differentiation. PMID:23346470

  12. Stress response of Escherichia coli induced by surface streamer discharge in humid air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doležalová, Eva; Prukner, Václav; Lukeš, Petr; Šimek, Milan

    2016-02-01

    Inactivation of Escherichia coli by means of surface streamer discharge has been investigated to obtain new insights into the key mechanisms involved, with a particular emphasis placed on the microbial response to plasma-induced stress. The surface streamer discharge was produced in coplanar dielectric barrier discharge electrode geometry, and was driven by an amplitude-modulated ac high voltage in humid synthetic air at atmospheric pressure. The response to plasma-induced stress was evaluated by using conventional cultivation, sublethal injury and resazurin assay and the LIVE/DEAD® BacLight™ Bacterial Viability kit. Compared to conventional cultivation, the LIVE/DEAD® test labels bacteria with damaged membranes, while resazurin assay tracks their metabolic activity. Our results clearly demonstrate that the treated bacteria partly lost their ability to grow properly, i.e. they became injured and culturable, or even viable but nonculturable (VBNC). The ability to develop colonies could have been lost due to damage of the bacterial membrane. Damage of the membranes was mainly caused by the lipid peroxidation, evidencing the key role of oxygen reactive species, in particular ozone. We conclude that the conventional cultivation method overestimates the decontamination efficiency of various plasma sources, and must therefore be complemented by alternative techniques capable of resolving viable but nonculturable bacteria.

  13. Subaperture method for aspheric surface metrology using curvature data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, SeongWon; Jeon, WooKyung; Park, TaeJin; Kim, ByoungChang; Kim, GeonHee; Hyun, SangWon; Kim, IJong; Kim, Seunghyun; Kim, ChangKyu; Lee, HyungSuk

    2016-04-01

    We present a profilometry for measuring aspheric surface, which determines the curvature from the sub-aperture topography along two orthogonal directions and then reconstructs the entire surface profile from the measured curvature data. The entire surface was divided into a number of sub-apertures with overlapping zones. Each sub-aperture was measured using white-light scanning interferometry to avoid any optical alignment error along an optical axis. Simulation studies are also presented based on the mathematical model. The proposed mathematical model was also experimentally tested on freeform surfaces using white-light scanning interferometry under deveolpment.

  14. Cellular Responses Evoked by Different Surface Characteristics of Intraosseous Titanium Implants

    PubMed Central

    Feller, Liviu; Jadwat, Yusuf; Khammissa, Razia A. G.; Meyerov, Robin; Lemmer, Johan

    2015-01-01

    The properties of biomaterials, including their surface microstructural topography and their surface chemistry or surface energy/wettability, affect cellular responses such as cell adhesion, proliferation, and migration. The nanotopography of moderately rough implant surfaces enhances the production of biological mediators in the peri-implant microenvironment with consequent recruitment of differentiating osteogenic cells to the implant surface and stimulates osteogenic maturation. Implant surfaces with moderately rough topography and with high surface energy promote osteogenesis, increase the ratio of bone-to-implant contact, and increase the bonding strength of the bone to the implant at the interface. Certain features of implant surface chemistry are also important in enhancing peri-implant bone wound healing. It is the purpose of this paper to review some of the more important features of titanium implant surfaces which have an impact on osseointegration. PMID:25767803

  15. Near-surface groundwater responses to injection of geothermal wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, S.C.

    1984-06-01

    Experiences with injecting geothermal fluids have identified technical problems associated with geothermal waste disposal. This report assesses the feasibility of injection as an alternative for geothermal wastewater disposal and analyzes hydrologic controls governing the upward migration of injected fluids. Injection experiences at several geothermal developments are presented, including: Raft River, Salton Sea, East Mesa, Otake and Hatchobaru in Japan, and Ahuachapan in El Salvador. Hydrogeologic and design/operational factors affecting the success of an injection program are identified. Hydrogeologic factors include subsidence, near-surface effects of injected fluids, and seismicity. Design/operational factors include hydrodynamic breakthrough, condition of the injection system and reservoir maintenance. Existing and potential effects of production/injection on these factors are assessed.

  16. Towards inferring elastic structural variations from Earth's response to surface mass loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martens, H. R.; Simons, M.; Rivera, L. A.; Owen, S. E.

    2015-12-01

    We explore the sensitivity of surface mass loading displacement response to perturbations in elastic structure, with the goal to refine profiles of elastic moduli and density through the crust and upper mantle. Examples of surface mass loads include tidal and non-tidal ocean loads, atmospheric loads and hydrological loads. Using software developed in-house (LoadDef), we derive sensitivity kernels for Love numbers and load Green's functions (LGFs) using calculus of variations and finite difference methods. Perturbations to the two elastic moduli and density exhibit unique LGF sensitivity patterns, retaining the possibility that the material parameters may be independently constrained given a spatially distributed set of sufficiently accurate loading response observations. To further elucidate the ability to invert for structure in a particular region, a thorough investigation into model resolution must also be performed. We garner a more palpable sense for the effects of structural variations on the response to surface mass loading by calculating and comparing sets of predicted ocean tidal loading (OTL) displacement responses across a global network of land-based locations, generated from convolutions of an ocean tide model with LGFs derived from a variety of reference Earth models. We find that discrepancies between predictions for the M2 harmonic differ by less than 0.2 mm at over 95% of the locations considered, a value generally exceeded, albeit not substantially, by current observational and forward modeling errors. Although predicted discrepancies can reach 2 mm or more at some coastal locations, errors in the ocean tide models and convolution algorithms are also largest near the coasts. As a case study, we examine the residuals between Global Positioning System (GPS) observations and modeled predictions of OTL response across the South American continent. A comparison of ocean models suggests that a common mode (mean displacement) accounts for a dominant

  17. Studies on lipase-affinity adsorption using response-surface analysis.

    PubMed

    Kamimura, E S; Medieta, O; Rodrigues, M I; Maugeri, F

    2001-06-01

    Lipases are widely distributed enzymes that can be obtained from animals, plants and micro-organisms. Coupling lipases with a wide range of substrates allows the opportunity for synthesis of optically pure pharmaceutical preparations, flavour compounds and other food additives. Affinity chromatography owes its power as a purification method to specific biological interactions. Response-surface analysis was chosen to study column efficiency. This method allows the understanding of interactions between variables with advantages over conventional methods, which involve changing one variable while fixing others at certain levels. The aim of this work was to study the influence of the ratio bed height/column diameter (L/D) and superficial velocity (V) on the column efficiency. The experimental design involved the two variables, L/D (2-10) and v (1-2 cm/min), at five levels. Lipase was obtained from Geotrichum sp. culture in a complex medium composed of 5% corn-steep liquor, 0.5% NH(4)NO(3) and 1% olive oil at 30 degrees C, with 1VVM (air volume/medium volume per min) aeration and 400 rev./min agitation. Maximum lipase activity was 19 units/ml after almost 9 h of fermentation. This lipase could potentially be used in esterification reactions to increase the content of gamma-linolenic acid and to produce bioaromas for food industries. The adsorption assays were carried out in a fixed-bed column with an affinity adsorbent, which was obtained by reaction of a gel with oleic acid as ligand. Breakthrough curves were obtained for all experiments. It has been shown that the lower the values of both L/D and v, the higher the column efficiency (maximum 65.43%). Also, it was observed from the response surface that the efficiency reached a minimum at an L/D of around 8.

  18. A new method for apportionnement of diffuse nutrient sources of surface water contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groenendijk, Piet; Mulder, Martin; Van Boekel, Erwin; Van der Bolt, Frank; Hendriks, Rob; Renaud, Leo

    2014-05-01

    Surface water quality has improved slightly in many regions of the Netherlands during the last decades, due to a reduction of the nutrient loads from point sources, but in most areas the concentrations do not meet the targets to comply with the objectives of the Water Framework Directive. Leaching from agricultural soils is currently the largest source. Quantitative insight into the contribution of the various land management related sources is necessary to discuss the responsibility of different authorities to further improve the quality. Such an understanding is also needed to assess the effects of mitigation measures. The STONE model was developed in 1998- 2000 aiming at the assessment of the effectiveness of Dutch policy measures to reduce nutrient loads to groundwater and surface waters from agricultural land. The process oriented model simulates the carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus cycles in soil and is capable to calculate N and P fluxes to surface waters. Due to the nature of the interdependent soil transformation processes, straight forward model runs don't yield in the relative contribution of the use of fertilizers and other diffuse sources to the total diffuse loads to surface waters. A new method was developed to reveal the relative contribution to surface water contamination of resp. the actual fertilization practise, the historical fertilizer excesses, the atmospheric deposition rates, the inputs by upward seeping water flow, the inputs by infiltrated surface water during summer time in polders and the natural soil release. The method is based on a linear proxy model of the STONE model. The coefficients were derived from the results of a sensitivity analysis. At the national level, the diffuse nitrogen and phosphorus load on surface waters due to the actual fertilization practise amounts to resp. 64% and 48% of the total diffuse loads from agricultural land. Deposition, the input by upward seeping water and the input by infiltrated surface water in

  19. a New Method for Calculating the Fractal Dimension of Surface Topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Xue; Zhu, Hua; Zhou, Yuankai; Li, Yan

    2015-06-01

    A new method termed as three-dimensional root-mean-square (3D-RMS) method, is proposed to calculate the fractal dimension (FD) of machined surfaces. The measure of this method is the root-mean-square value of surface data, and the scale is the side length of square in the projection plane. In order to evaluate the calculation accuracy of the proposed method, the isotropic surfaces with deterministic FD are generated based on the fractional Brownian function and Weierstrass-Mandelbrot (WM) fractal function, and two kinds of anisotropic surfaces are generated by stretching or rotating a WM fractal curve. Their FDs are estimated by the proposed method, as well as differential boxing-counting (DBC) method, triangular prism surface area (TPSA) method and variation method (VM). The results show that the 3D-RMS method performs better than the other methods with a lower relative error for both isotropic and anisotropic surfaces, especially for the surfaces with dimensions higher than 2.5, since the relative error between the estimated value and its theoretical value decreases with theoretical FD. Finally, the electrodeposited surface, end-turning surface and grinding surface are chosen as examples to illustrate the application of 3D-RMS method on the real machined surfaces. This method gives a new way to accurately calculate the FD from the surface topographic data.

  20. Porous article with surface functionality and method for preparing same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koontz, Steven L. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Porous organic articles having no surface functionality may be treated by remote plasma discharge to thereby introduce functionality to the surface of the article. The functionality is introduced throughout the article's surface, including the exterior surface and the surfaces of the pores. Little or no degradation of the porous organic article occurs as a result of the functionalization. Amino, hydroxyl, carbonyl and carboxyl groups may be introduced to the article. In this way, an essentially inert hydrophobic porous article, made from, for example, polyethylene, can have its surface modified so that the surface becomes hydrophilic. The remote plasma discharge process causes essentially no change in the bulk properties of the organic article. The remote plasma discharge process is preferably conducted so that no photons, and particularly no ultraviolet radiation, is transmitted from the plasma glow to the porous article. The surface-functionalized article may be used, for example, as a solid support in organic synthesis or in the chromatographic purification of organic or biochemicals.

  1. Porous article with surface functionality and method for preparing same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koontz, Steven L. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    Porous organic articles having no surface functionality may be treated by remote plasma discharge to thereby introduce functionality to the surface of the article. The functionality is introduced throughout the article's surface, including the exterior surface and the surfaces of the pores. Little or no degradation of the porous organic article occurs as a result of the functionalization. Amino, hydroxyl, carbonyl and carboxyl groups may be introduced to the article. In this way, an essentially inert hydrophobic porous article, made from, for example, polyethylene, can have its surface modified so that the surface becomes hydrophilic. The remote plasma discharge process causes essentially no change in the bulk properties of the organic article. The remote plasma discharge process is preferably conducted so that no photons, and particularly no ultraviolet radiation, is transmitted from the plasma glow to the porous article. The surface-functionalized article may be used, for example, as a solid support in organic synthesis or in the chromatographic purification of organic or biochemicals.

  2. Results from Global Land-Surface Data Assimilation Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radakovich, Jon D.; Houser, Paul R.; daSilva, Arlindo; Bosilovich, Michael G.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Realistic representation of the land surface is crucial in global climate modeling (GCM). Recently, the Mosaic land-surface Model (LSM) has been driven off-line using GEOS DAS (Goddard Earth Observing System Data Assimilation System) atmospheric forcing, forming the Off-line Land-surface Global Assimilation (OLGA) system. This system provides a computationally efficient test bed for land surface data assimilation. Here, we validate the OLGA simulation of surface processes and the assimilation of ISCCP surface temperatures. Another component of this study as the incorporation of the Physical-space Statistical Analysis System (PSAS) into OLGA, in order to assimilate surface temperature observations from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP). To counteract the subsequent forcing of the analyzed skin temperature back to the initial state following the analysis. incremental bias correction (IBC) was included in the assimilation. The IBC scheme effectively removed the time mean bias, but did not remove him in the mean diurnal cycle. Therefore, a diurnal him correction (DBC) scheme was developed, where the time-dependent bias was modeled with a sine wave parameterization. In addition, quality control of the ISCCP data and anisotropic temperature correction were implemented in PSAS. Preliminary results showed a substantial impact from the inclusion of PSAS and DBC that was visible in the surface meteorology fields and energy budget. Also, the monthly mean diurnal cycle from the experiment closely matched the diurnal cycle from the observations.

  3. [Characterization of the properties of differently modified titanium surfaces for dental implantology. 1: Methods for surface analysis].

    PubMed

    Liefeith, K; Säuberlich, S; Frant, M; Klee, D; Richter, E J; Höcker, H; Spiekermann, H

    1998-11-01

    Contact between the biological environment and biomaterials takes place at their surfaces. The biocompatibility of a material is determined by interactions at the interface between implant and biological system. The physicochemical surface properties of the materials used, for example, chemical composition, wettability, surface energy and electrical surface charge, therefore play an important role. Within the framework of the investigations described here, specific modifications of the surfaces properties of titanium are effected using various methods with the aim of achieving a positive influence on cell growth and cell attachment. To characterize the physicochemical surface properties, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) have been used. In addition to the clearly altered chemical composition of the modified material surface, it proved possible to determine significant changes in the thermodynamic properties with the aid of contact angle measurements and the determination of surface energy. On the basis of these results, important information about possible interactions at the interface between implant and tissue can be obtained.

  4. Effect of surface topography of titanium on surface chemistry and cellular response.

    PubMed

    Ong, J L; Prince, C W; Raikar, G N; Lucas, L C

    1996-01-01

    Surface topography plays a critical role in the interaction of dental implants with adjacent tissues. It has been hypothesized that an increase in surface roughness will result in an increase in calcium and phosphorus deposition after immersion in a simulated physiological solution and will increase protein production and calcium uptake by osteoblast-like cells. With the use of a profilometer, titanium samples ground with 600 grit silicon carbide paper were observed to have an average roughness (Ra) value of 0.28 +/- 0.03 micron, whereas titanium samples polished with 0.3 micron Al2O3 exhibited a Ra value of 0.11 +/- 0.01 micron. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses indicated the presence of calcium, phosphorus, sodium, and chlorine on both surface conditions after immersion in a protein-free physiologic solution. No significant difference in calcium and phosphorus concentrations were observed between the 600 grit or Al2O3 polished titanium samples after immersion in solution. The Ca/P ratio for both 600 grit and Al2O3 polished titanium was in the range of 0.8 to 1.1 after 12 days in solution. The percent protein retained by the rat bone marrow cell layer on both the Al2O3 polished and 600 grit titanium surfaces increased dramatically during the initial 3 days of the study. The 45Ca assays revealed no significant difference in cellular calcification on Al2O3 polished and 600 grit titanium surfaces. For both the Al2O3 polished and 600 grit surfaces, a sharp increase in 45Ca incorporation was observed after 9 days incubation.

  5. Considering changing temporal structures in the construction of scenario-neutral runoff response surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vormoor, Klaus; Rössler, Ole; Bürger, Gerd; Weingartner, Rolf; Bronstert, Axel

    2016-04-01

    Climate change impact studies are usually based on traditional top-down approaches in which post-processed climate model data serves as input into some kind of impact model. Parallel to these traditional approaches, scenario-neutral bottom-up approaches have been developed as an alternative methodology which assesses the intrinsic vulnerability of a system towards climate change. Such bottom-approaches perform a sensitivity analysis of an impact model towards systematically 'user-defined' changes in the climate system and summarize its response in a two-dimensional matrix: the response surface. The climate change signal is obtained by perturbing observed time series, which serve as inputs into the impact models. The impact model is then run with all possible combinations of perturbed input data series and the result of each combination (i.e. the impact) is plotted as one single realization (i.e. one pixel) of possible climate change impacts over the two dimensional domain. Although the complexity of existing perturbation methods varies, the temporal structure (i.e. the seasonal- and day-to-day-variability) of these time series often remains the same, which is critical, in particular for the simulations of extremes. In this study, we present standardized response surfaces (SRS) that are based on impact simulations using both perturbed climate observations and projections which are scaled to a common domain. We apply this approach within the field of hydrology and estimate different aspects of runoff response, covering mean runoff as well as extremes like low flows and floods in a Nordic catchment with a mixed snowmelt/rainfall regime. Climate observations and projections from eight GCM-RCM combinations, downscaled by two different methods, are used for the perturbation which results in 17 different SRS. A series of linear regression- and linear mixed-effects models is applied to quantify the different effects of perturbing the climate input data and of the varying

  6. Method and device for detection of surface discontinuities or defects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leger, L. J. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    Surface discontinuities of defects such as cracks and orifices are detected by applying a penetrating fluid, preferably a liquid, to a test surface so as to cause the liquid to penetrate any minute cracks or opening in the surface, removing the excess liquid from the surface, and leaving a residual in the discontinuities, cavities, or in the subsurface materials. A sheet of porous material impregnated with a sensitizing medium which will react with vapors of the residual liquid to form a visible pattern is applied to the test surface. The residual liquid trapped in the discontinuities, cavities, or subsurface material is vaporized, and, as the vapors contact the sensitizing medium on the sheet, a pattern corresponding to the discontinuity is formed on the sheet material and the penetrant completely removed from the sample.

  7. Understanding the impulse response method applied to concrete bridge decks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clem, D. J.; Popovics, J. S.; Schumacher, T.; Oh, T.; Ham, S.; Wu, D.

    2013-01-01

    The Impulse Response (IR) method is a well-established form of non-destructive testing (NDT) where the dynamic response of an element resulting from an impact event (hammer blow) is measured with a geophone to make conclusions about the element's integrity, stiffness, and/or support conditions. The existing ASTM Standard C1740-10 prescribes a set of parameters that can be used to evaluate the conditions above. These parameters are computed from the so-called `mobility' spectrum which is obtained by dividing the measured bridge deck response by the measured impact force in the frequency domain. While applying the test method in the laboratory as well as on an actual in-service concrete bridge deck, the authors of this paper observed several limitations that are presented and discussed in this paper. In order to better understand the underlying physics of the IR method, a Finite Element (FE) model was created. Parameters prescribed in the Standard were then computed from the FE data and are discussed. One main limitation appears to be the use of a fixed upper frequency of 800 Hz. Test data from the real bridge deck as well as the FE model both show that most energy is found above that limit. This paper presents and discusses limitations of the ASTM Standard found by the authors and suggests ways for improving it.

  8. Structural health monitoring in composite materials using frequency response methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, Seth S.; Spearing, S. Mark; Atalla, Mauro J.; Cesnik, Carlos E. S.; Soutis, Constantinos

    2001-08-01

    Cost effective and reliable damage detection is critical for the utilization of composite materials in structural applications. Non-destructive evaluation techniques (e.g. ultrasound, radiography, infra-red imaging) are available for use during standard repair and maintenance cycles, however by comparison to the techniques used for metals these are relatively expensive and time consuming. This paper presents part of an experimental and analytical survey of candidate methods for the detection of damage in composite materials. The experimental results are presented for the application of modal analysis techniques applied to rectangular laminated graphite/epoxy specimens containing representative damage modes, including delamination, transverse ply cracks and through-holes. Changes in natural frequencies and modes were then found using a scanning laser vibrometer, and 2-D finite element models were created for comparison with the experimental results. The models accurately predicted the response of the specimems at low frequencies, but the local excitation and coalescence of higher frequency modes make mode-dependent damage detection difficult and most likely impractical for structural applications. The frequency response method was found to be reliable for detecting even small amounts of damage in a simple composite structure, however the potentially important information about damage type, size, location and orientation were lost using this method since several combinations of these variables can yield identical response signatures.

  9. Boundary integral equation method calculations of surface regression effects in flame spreading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altenkirch, R. A.; Rezayat, M.; Eichhorn, R.; Rizzo, F. J.

    1982-01-01

    A solid-phase conduction problem that is a modified version of one that has been treated previously in the literature and is applicable to flame spreading over a pyrolyzing fuel is solved using a boundary integral equation (BIE) method. Results are compared to surface temperature measurements that can be found in the literature. In addition, the heat conducted through the solid forward of the flame, the heat transfer responsible for sustaining the flame, is also computed in terms of the Peclet number based on a heated layer depth using the BIE method and approximate methods based on asymptotic expansions. Agreement between computed and experimental results is quite good as is agreement between the BIE and the approximate results.

  10. Stochastic response surface methodology: A study in the human health area

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira, Teresa A. Oliveira, Amílcar; Leal, Conceição

    2015-03-10

    In this paper we review Stochastic Response Surface Methodology as a tool for modeling uncertainty in the context of Risk Analysis. An application in the survival analysis in the breast cancer context is implemented with R software.

  11. Surface characterization and cytotoxicity response of biodegradable magnesium alloys.

    PubMed

    Pompa, Luis; Rahman, Zia Ur; Munoz, Edgar; Haider, Waseem

    2015-04-01

    Magnesium alloys have raised an immense amount of interest to many researchers because of their evolution as a new kind of third generation materials. Due to their biocompatibility, density, and mechanical properties, magnesium alloys are frequently reported as prospective biodegradable implant materials. Moreover, magnesium alloys experience a natural phenomenon to biodegrade in aqueous solutions due to its corrosion activity, which is excellent for orthopedic and cardiovascular applications. However, a major concern with such alloys is fast and non-uniform corrosion degradation. Controlling the degradation rate in the physiological environment determines the success of biodegradable implants. In this investigation, three different grades of magnesium alloys: AZ31B, AZ91E and ZK60A were studied for their corrosion resistance and biocompatibility. Scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and contact angle meter are used to study surface morphology, chemistry, roughness and wettability, respectively. Additionally, the cytotoxicity of the leached metal ions was evaluated by using a tetrazolium based bio-assay, MTS.

  12. Electrochemical Cathodic Polarization, a Simplified Method That Can Modified and Increase the Biological Activity of Titanium Surfaces: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background The cathodic polarization seems to be an electrochemical method capable of modifying and coat biomolecules on titanium surfaces, improving the surface activity and promoting better biological responses. Objective The aim of the systematic review is to assess the scientific literature to evaluate the cellular response produced by treatment of titanium surfaces by applying the cathodic polarization technique. Data, Sources, and Selection The literature search was performed in several databases including PubMed, Web of Science, Scopus, Science Direct, Scielo and EBSCO Host, until June 2016, with no limits used. Eligibility criteria were used and quality assessment was performed following slightly modified ARRIVE and SYRCLE guidelines for cellular studies and animal research. Results Thirteen studies accomplished the inclusion criteria and were considered in the review. The quality of reporting studies in animal models was low and for the in vitro studies it was high. The in vitro and in vivo results reported that the use of cathodic polarization promoted hydride surfaces, effective deposition, and adhesion of the coated biomolecules. In the experimental groups that used the electrochemical method, cellular viability, proliferation, adhesion, differentiation, or bone growth were better or comparable with the control groups. Conclusions The use of the cathodic polarization method to modify titanium surfaces seems to be an interesting method that could produce active layers and consequently enhance cellular response, in vitro and in vivo animal model studies. PMID:27441840

  13. Effects of machining accuracy on frequency response properties of thick-screen frequency selective surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Chunyi; Gao, Jinsong; Xin, Chen

    2012-10-01

    Electromagnetic theory shows that a thick-screen frequency selective surface (FSS) has many advantages in its frequency response characteristics. In addition, it can be used to make a stealth radome. Therefore, we research in detail how machining accuracy affects the frequency response properties of the FSS in the gigahertz range. Specifically, by using the least squares method applied to machining data, the effects of different machining precision in the samples can be calculated thus obtaining frequency response curves which were verified by testing in the near-field in a microwave dark room. The results show that decreasing roughness and flatness variation leads to an increase in the bandwidth and that an increase in spacing error leads to the center frequency drifting lower. Finally, an increase in aperture error leads to an increase in bandwidth. Therefore, the conclusion is that machining accuracy should be controlled and that a spatial error less than 0.05 mm is required in order to avoid unwanted center frequency drift and a transmittance decrease.

  14. Nonlinear optical responses to circularly polarized lights of the surface state of a topological insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misawa, Tetsuro; Yokoyama, Takehito; Murakami, Shuichi

    2012-02-01

    Recent photoelectron spectroscopy experiments have revealed the presence of the Dirac cone on the surface of the topological insulator and its spin-splitting due to the spin-orbit interaction. In general, on spin-orbit coupled systems, electric fields induce spin polarizations as linear and nonlinear responses. Here we investigate the inverse Faraday effect on the surface of the topological insulator. The inverse Faraday effect is a non-linear optical effect where a circularly polarized light induces a dc spin polarization. We employ the Keldysh Green's function method to calculate the induced spin polarization and discuss its frequency dependence. In particular, in the low frequency limit, our analytical result gives the spin polarization proportional to the frequency and the square of the lifetime. As for the finite frequency regime, we employ numerical methods to discuss the resonance due to interband transitions. We also discuss the photogalvanic effect, where an illumination of a circular polarized light generates the dc charge current. Lastly, we evaluate those quantities with realistic parameters.[4pt] [1] T. Misawa, T. Yokoyama, S. Murakami, Phys. Rev. B84, 165407 (2011).

  15. Surface reactivity and cell responses to chrysotile asbestos nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Turci, Francesco; Colonna, Massimiliano; Tomatis, Maura; Mantegna, Stefano; Cravotto, Giancarlo; Gulino, Giulia; Aldieri, Elisabetta; Ghigo, Dario; Fubini, Bice

    2012-04-16

    High aspect-ratio nanomaterials (HARNs) have recently attracted great attention from nanotoxicologists because of their similarity to asbestos. However, the actual risk associated with the exposure to nanosized asbestos, which escapes most regulations worldwide, is still unknown. Nanometric fibers of chrysotile asbestos have been prepared from two natural sources to investigate whether nanosize may modulate asbestos toxicity and gain insight on the hazard posed by naturally occurring asbestos, which may be defined as HARNs because of their dimensions. Power ultrasound was used to obtain nanofibers from two different chrysotile specimens, one from the dismissed asbestos mine in Balangero (Italian Western Alps) and the other from a serpentine outcrop in the Italian Central Alps. Electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and fluorescence spectroscopy revealed that the procedure does not affect mineralogical and chemical composition. Surface reactions related to oxidative stress, free radical generation, bioavailability of iron, and antioxidant depletion, revealed a consistent reduction in reactivity upon reduction in size. When tested on A549 human epithelial cells, the pristine but not the nanosized fibers proved cytotoxic (LDH release), induced NO production, and caused lipid peroxidation. However, nanofibers still induced some toxicity relevant oxidative stress activity (ROS production) in a dose-dependent fashion. The reduction in length and a lack of poorly coordinated bioavailable iron in nanochrysotile may explain this behavior. The present study provides a one-step procedure for the preparation of a homogeneous batch of natural asbestos nanofibers and shows how a well-known toxic material might not necessarily become more toxic than its micrometric counterpart when reduced to the nanoscale.

  16. Method for chemical surface modification of fumed silica particles

    DOEpatents

    Grabbe, A.; Michalske, T.A.; Smith, W.L.

    1999-05-11

    Dehydroxylated, silica-containing, glass surfaces are known to be at least partially terminated by strained siloxane rings. According to the invention, a surface of this kind is exposed to a selected silane compound or mixture of silane compounds under reaction-promoting conditions. The ensuing reaction results in opening of the strained siloxane rings, and termination of surface atoms by chemical species, such as organic or organosilicon species, having desirable properties. These species can be chosen to provide qualities such as hydrophobicity, or improved coupling to a polymeric coating. 11 figs.

  17. Method for chemical surface modification of fumed silica particles

    DOEpatents

    Grabbe, Alexis; Michalske, Terry Arthur; Smith, William Larry

    1999-01-01

    Dehydroxylated, silica-containing, glass surfaces are known to be at least partially terminated by strained siloxane rings. According to the invention, a surface of this kind is exposed to a selected silane compound or mixture of silane compounds under reaction-promoting conditions. The ensuing reaction results in opening of the strained siloxane rings, and termination of surface atoms by chemical species, such as organic or organosilicon species, having desirable properties. These species can be chosen to provide qualities such as hydrophobicity, or improved coupling to a polymeric coating.

  18. Carbon nanotube oscillator surface profiling device and method of use

    DOEpatents

    Popescu, Adrian; Woods, Lilia M.; Bondarev, Igor V.

    2011-11-15

    The proposed device is based on a carbon nanotube oscillator consisting of a finite length outer stationary nanotube and a finite length inner oscillating nanotube. Its main function is to measure changes in the characteristics of the motion of the carbon nanotube oscillating near a sample surface, and profile the roughness of this surface. The device operates in a non-contact mode, thus it can be virtually non-wear and non-fatigued system. It is an alternative to the existing atomic force microscope (AFM) tips used to scan surfaces to determine their roughness.

  19. Response Surface Methodology: An Extensive Potential to Optimize in vivo Photodynamic Therapy Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Tirand, Loraine; Bastogne, Thierry; Bechet, Denise M.Sc.; Linder, Michel; Thomas, Noemie; Frochot, Celine; Guillemin, Francois; Barberi-Heyob, Muriel

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is based on the interaction of a photosensitizing (PS) agent, light, and oxygen. Few new PS agents are being developed to the in vivo stage, partly because of the difficulty in finding the right treatment conditions. Response surface methodology, an empirical modeling approach based on data resulting from a set of designed experiments, was suggested as a rational solution with which to select in vivo PDT conditions by using a new peptide-conjugated PS targeting agent, neuropilin-1. Methods and Materials: A Doehlert experimental design was selected to model effects and interactions of the PS dose, fluence, and fluence rate on the growth of U87 human malignant glioma cell xenografts in nude mice, using a fixed drug-light interval. All experimental results were computed by Nemrod-W software and Matlab. Results: Intrinsic diameter growth rate, a tumor growth parameter independent of the initial volume of the tumor, was selected as the response variable and was compared to tumor growth delay and relative tumor volumes. With only 13 experimental conditions tested, an optimal PDT condition was selected (PS agent dose, 2.80 mg/kg; fluence, 120 J/cm{sup 2}; fluence rate, 85 mW/cm{sup 2}). Treatment of glioma-bearing mice with the peptide-conjugated PS agent, followed by the optimized PDT condition showed a statistically significant improvement in delaying tumor growth compared with animals who received the PDT with the nonconjugated PS agent. Conclusions: Response surface methodology appears to be a useful experimental approach for rapid testing of different treatment conditions and determination of optimal values of PDT factors for any PS agent.

  20. Ultrasonic extraction of anthocyanin from Clitoria ternatea flowers using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Chong, Fui Chin; Gwee, Xian Fu

    2015-01-01

    The ultrasonic extraction (UE) method of anthocyanin from Clitoria ternatea flowers using response surface methodology (RSM) was performed in this study. By using RSM, the objective is to optimise the extraction yield of anthocyanin from C. ternatea which is influenced by various factors, including the extraction temperature, time, ratio of solvent to solid and ultrasonic power. The empirical model was investigated by performing first-level optimisation in a two-level factorial design with Design Expert 7 software. In comparison with the conventional solvent extraction, UE showed a 246.48% better extraction yield and produced an anthocyanin extract with a radical scavenging activity of 68.48% at the optimised factors of 50°C, 150 min, 15 mL/g and 240 W. PMID:25836369

  1. Optimization of photo-Fenton process of RO concentrated coking wastewater using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Huiqing, Zhang; Chunsong, Ye; Xian, Zhang; Fan, Yang; Jun, Yang; Wei, Zhou

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was aimed at investigating the removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD) from reverse osmosis (RO) concentrated coking wastewater by the photo-Fenton process. The optimum extraction conditions for the photo-Fenton process by Box-Behnken design (BBD) and response surface methodology (RSM) to establish a predictive polynomial quadratic model were discussed based on a single factor test. Optimized parameters validated by the analysis of variances (ANOVA) were found to be H(2)O(2) concentration of 345.2 mg/L, pH value of 4.1 and reaction time of 103.5 minutes under ultraviolet irradiation. The experimental results of the COD removal under the optimized conditions presented better agreement with the predicted values with deviation error of 3.2%. The results confirmed that RSM based on BBD was a suitable method to optimize the operating conditions of RO concentrated coking wastewater.

  2. Preparation and optimization of quercetin-loaded liposomes for wound healing, using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Jangde, Rajendra; Singh, Deependra

    2016-01-01

    The basic objective of this study was to prepare quercetin-loaded liposomes by the thin film hydration method. The liposomal formulation was optimized using response surface methodology (RSM). A rotation speed of 75 rpm and a water bath temperature of 46°C were finalized as the best for optimized drug-loaded liposomal formulation. In vitro characterization of the quercetin-loaded liposomal formulation was done through some parameters including the entrapment efficiency (EE), drug release (DR), and mean particle size; the resulting values of 86.5 ± 0.42%, 76.5%, and146 nm were found to be standard characterized values respectively. It is concluded that quercetin-loaded liposomal formulations achieve sustained release of drug in wound areas. PMID:25375215

  3. Application of response surface methodology to optimise extraction of flavonoids from fructus sophorae.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qian; Shen, Yanyan; Wang, Haifeng; Zhang, Niping; Xu, Shi; Zhang, Ling

    2013-06-15

    Response surface methodology (RSM) based on a central composite design (CCD) was applied to optimise the extraction conditions for flavonoids from fructus sophorae with advantages in terms of resisting flavonoids during the whole process and maximising of extraction yield. Three aglycon forms of the flavonoids, namely, quercetin, kaempferol and isorhamnetin were quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection (HPLC-UV) to estimate extraction yield. The combined effects of independent variables were studied and the optimal extraction conditions were obtained as ethanol concentration, 74.47%; solid-liquid ratio, 17.99 ml/g; temperature, 89.13°C; and extraction time, 2.10h. The reliability of the method was confirmed by recovery experiments, performed under optimal conditions. Recoveries indicated that flavonoids resisted the extraction conditions. The experimental extraction yield under optimal conditions was found to be 10.459%, which was well matched with the predicted values of 10.461%. PMID:23497866

  4. Response surface optimization of enzyme-assisted extraction polysaccharides from Dictyophora indusiata.

    PubMed

    Wu, Songhai; Gong, Guili; Wang, Yanyan; Li, Feng; Jia, Shaoyi; Qin, Fengxiang; Ren, Haitao; Liu, Yong

    2013-10-01

    An enzyme-assisted procedure for the extraction of the water-soluble polysaccharides from the stipe of Dictyophora indusiata was investigated using response surface methodology. The orthogonal array design was employed to optimize the concentration of three kinds of enzyme (cellulase, papain and pectolyase) and the optimal cellulose, papain and pectolyase concentration were 2.0% (wt.% of D. indusiata powder), 2.0% and 1.5%, respectively. And then the effect such as temperature, time and pH was studied based on a three-level three-factor Box-Behnken design. The optimized conditions were as follows: extraction temperature 52.5 °C, extraction time 105 min and pH 5.25. Under these conditions, the experimental yield of polysaccharides was 9.77±0.18%, which was well matched with the predictive yield of 9.87%. As it turned out, enzyme-assisted procedure was an effective method.

  5. Impulse response method for characterization of echogenic liposomes.

    PubMed

    Raymond, Jason L; Luan, Ying; van Rooij, Tom; Kooiman, Klazina; Huang, Shao-Ling; McPherson, David D; Versluis, Michel; de Jong, Nico; Holland, Christy K

    2015-04-01

    An optical characterization method is presented based on the use of the impulse response to characterize the damping imparted by the shell of an air-filled ultrasound contrast agent (UCA). The interfacial shell viscosity was estimated based on the unforced decaying response of individual echogenic liposomes (ELIP) exposed to a broadband acoustic impulse excitation. Radius versus time response was measured optically based on recordings acquired using an ultra-high-speed camera. The method provided an efficient approach that enabled statistical measurements on 106 individual ELIP. A decrease in shell viscosity, from 2.1 × 10(-8) to 2.5 × 10(-9) kg/s, was observed with increasing dilatation rate, from 0.5 × 10(6) to 1 × 10(7) s(-1). This nonlinear behavior has been reported in other studies of lipid-shelled UCAs and is consistent with rheological shear-thinning. The measured shell viscosity for the ELIP formulation used in this study [κs = (2.1 ± 1.0) × 10(-8) kg/s] was in quantitative agreement with previously reported values on a population of ELIP and is consistent with other lipid-shelled UCAs. The acoustic response of ELIP therefore is similar to other lipid-shelled UCAs despite loading with air instead of perfluorocarbon gas. The methods described here can provide an accurate estimate of the shell viscosity and damping for individual UCA microbubbles.

  6. Femtosecond laser surface texturing of titanium as a method to reduce the adhesion of Staphylococcus aureus and biofilm formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunha, Alexandre; Elie, Anne-Marie; Plawinski, Laurent; Serro, Ana Paula; Botelho do Rego, Ana Maria; Almeida, Amélia; Urdaci, Maria C.; Durrieu, Marie-Christine; Vilar, Rui

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to investigate the possibility of using femtosecond laser surface texturing as a method to reduce the colonization of Grade 2 Titanium alloy surfaces by Staphylococcus aureus and the subsequent formation of biofilm. The laser treatments were carried out with a Yb:KYW chirped-pulse-regenerative amplification laser system with a central wavelength of 1030 nm and a pulse duration of 500 fs. Two types of surface textures, consisting of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) and nanopillars, were produced. The topography, chemical composition and phase constitution of these surfaces were investigated by atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, micro-Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Surface wettability was assessed by the sessile drop method using water and diiodomethane as testing liquids. The response of S. aureus put into contact with the laser treated surfaces in controlled conditions was investigated by epifluorescence microscopy and scanning electron microscopy 48 h after cell seeding. The results achieved show that the laser treatment reduces significantly the bacterial adhesion to the surface as well as biofilm formation as compared to a reference polished surfaces and suggest that femtosecond laser texturing is a simple and promising method for endowing dental and orthopedic titanium implants with antibacterial properties, reducing the risk of implant-associated infections without requiring immobilized antibacterial substances, nanoparticles or coatings.

  7. A combination of CO2 laser and plasma surface modification of poly(etheretherketone) to enhance osteoblast response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yanyan; Xiong, Chengdong; Wang, Zhecun; Li, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Lifang

    2015-07-01

    Poly(etheretherketone) (PEEK) is a rigid semicrystalline polymer that combines excellent mechanical properties, broad chemical resistance and bone-like stiffness and is widely used in biomedical fields. However, the bio-inert surface of PEEK tends to hinder its biomedical applications when direct osteointegration between the implants and the host tissue is desired. In this work, we demonstrate a dual modification method, which combines the laser and plasma surface treatment to combine advantages of both chemical states and microstructures for osteoblasts responses. While the plasma treatment introduces surface carboxyl groups (sbnd COOH) onto PEEK surface, the laser treatment constructs microstructures over the PEEK surface. Our results indicated that sbnd COOH as well as microgrooves containing micropores or microcraters structure are constructed on PEEK surface and plasma treatment has no apparent effect on the morphology of microstructures produced by laser micromachining. Unexpectedly, the superior mechanical properties of PEEK were maintained irrespective of the treatment used. Compared to native PEEK and single treated PEEK, dual modified PEEK is more favorable for pre-osteoblasts (MC3T3-E1) adhesion, spreading and proliferation. Moreover, cell pseudopodia protrude into the micropores or microcraters, in favor of forming firmer bone-implant integration. Our study illustrates enhanced osteoblasts responses to dual treated PEEK surface, which gives beneficial information of its potential use in orthopedic or dental implants.

  8. POLLUTION PREVENTION METHODS IN THE SURFACE COATING INDUSTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The surface coating industry is rapidly changing to meet environmental and economic pressures. Some of the changes include new formulations which meet environmental regulations, higher performance finishes with improved properties, continued development of solventless technologie...

  9. Nonhazardous solvent composition and method for cleaning metal surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Googin, John M.; Simandl, Ronald F.; Thompson, Lisa M.

    1993-01-01

    A solvent composition for displacing greasy and oily contaminants as well as water and/or aqueous residue from metallic surfaces, especially surfaces of radioactive materials so that such surfaces can be wiped clean of the displaced contaminants, water and/or aqueous residue. The solvent composition consists essentially of a blend of nonpolar aliphatic hydrocarbon solvent having a minimum flash point of about 140.degree. F. and 2 to 25 volume percent of a polar solvent having a flash point sufficiently high so as to provide the solvent composition with a minimum flash point of at least 140.degree. F. The solvent composition is nonhazardous so that when it is used to clean the surfaces of radioactive materials the waste in the form of paper or cloth wipes, lab coats and the like used in the cleaning operation is not considered to be mixed waste composed of a hazardous solvent and a radioactive material.

  10. Nonhazardous solvent composition and method for cleaning metal surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Googin, J.M.; Simandl, R.F.; Thompson, L.M.

    1993-05-04

    A solvent composition for displacing greasy and oily contaminants as well as water and/or aqueous residue from metallic surfaces, especially surfaces of radioactive materials so that such surfaces can be wiped clean of the displaced contaminants, water and/or aqueous residue. The solvent composition consists essentially of a blend of nonpolar aliphatic hydrocarbon solvent having a minimum flash point of about 140 F and 2 to 25 volume percent of a polar solvent having a flash point sufficiently high so as to provide the solvent composition with a minimum flash point of at least 140 F. The solvent composition is nonhazardous so that when it is used to clean the surfaces of radioactive materials the waste in the form of paper or cloth wipes, lab coats and the like used in the cleaning operation is not considered to be mixed waste composed of a hazardous solvent and a radioactive material.

  11. Method and coating composition for protecting and decontaminating surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Overhold, D C; Peterson, M D

    1959-03-10

    A protective coating useful in the decontamination of surfaces exposed to radioactive substances is described. This coating is placed on the surface before use and is soluble in water, allowing its easy removal in the event decontamination becomes necessary. Suitable coating compositions may be prepared by mixing a water soluble carbohydrate such as sucrose or dextrin, together with a hygroscopic agent such as calcium chloride or zinc chloride.

  12. METHOD AND COATING COMPOSITION FOR PROTECTING AND DECONTAMINATING SURFACES

    DOEpatents

    Overhold, D.C.; Peterson, M.D.

    1959-03-10

    A protective coating useful in the decontamination of surfaces exposed to radioactive substances is presented. This coating is placed on the surface before use and is soluble in waters allowing its easy removal in the event decontamination becomes necessary. Suitable coating compositions may be prepared by mixing a water soluble carbohydrate such as sucrose or dextrin, together with a hygroscopic agent such as calcium chloride or zinc chloride.

  13. A Method of Targeted Cell Isolation via Glass Surface Functionalization.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Ali; Patel, Reema; Schultheis, Kinsey; Naumovski, Vesna; Imoukhuede, P I

    2016-01-01

    One of the limiting factors to the adoption and advancement of personalized medicine is the inability to develop diagnostic tools to probe individual nuances in expression from patient to patient. Current methodologies that try to separate cells to fill this niche result in disruption of physiological expression, making the separation technique useless as a diagnostic tool. In this protocol, we describe the functionalization and optimization of a surface for the cellular capture and release. This functionalized surface integrates biotinylated antibodies with a glass surface functionalized with an aminosilane (APTES), desthiobiotin and streptavidin. Cell release is facilitated through the introduction of biotin, allowing the recollection and purification of cells captured by the surface. This release is done through the targeting of the secondary moiety desthiobiotin, which results in a much more gentle release paradigm. This reduction in harsh reagents and shear forces reduces changes in cellular expression. The functionalized surface captures up to 80% of cells in a single cell mixture and has demonstrated 50% capture in a dual-cell mixture. Applications of this technology to xenografts and cancer separation studies are investigated. Quantification techniques for surface verification such as plate reader and ImageJ analyses are described as well. PMID:27684992

  14. Method For Creating Corrosion Resistant Surface On An Aluminum Copper Alloy

    DOEpatents

    Mansfeld, Florian B.; Wang, You; Lin, Simon H.

    1997-06-03

    A method for treating the surface of aluminum alloys hang a relatively high copper content is provided which includes the steps of removing substantially all of the copper from the surface, contacting the surface with a first solution containing cerium, electrically charging the surface while contacting the surface in an aqueous molybdate solution, and contacting the surface with a second solution containing cerium. The copper is substantially removed from the surface in the first step either by (i) contacting the surface with an acidic chromate solution or by (ii) contacting the surface with an acidic nitrate solution while subjecting the surface to an electric potential. The corrosion-resistant surface resulting from the invention is excellent, consistent and uniform throughout the surface. Surfaces treated by the invention may often be certified for use in salt-water services.

  15. Surface defect detection in tiling Industries using digital image processing methods: analysis and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Mohammad H; Asemani, Davud

    2014-05-01

    Ceramic and tile industries should indispensably include a grading stage to quantify the quality of products. Actually, human control systems are often used for grading purposes. An automatic grading system is essential to enhance the quality control and marketing of the products. Since there generally exist six different types of defects originating from various stages of tile manufacturing lines with distinct textures and morphologies, many image processing techniques have been proposed for defect detection. In this paper, a survey has been made on the pattern recognition and image processing algorithms which have been used to detect surface defects. Each method appears to be limited for detecting some subgroup of defects. The detection techniques may be divided into three main groups: statistical pattern recognition, feature vector extraction and texture/image classification. The methods such as wavelet transform, filtering, morphology and contourlet transform are more effective for pre-processing tasks. Others including statistical methods, neural networks and model-based algorithms can be applied to extract the surface defects. Although, statistical methods are often appropriate for identification of large defects such as Spots, but techniques such as wavelet processing provide an acceptable response for detection of small defects such as Pinhole. A thorough survey is made in this paper on the existing algorithms in each subgroup. Also, the evaluation parameters are discussed including supervised and unsupervised parameters. Using various performance parameters, different defect detection algorithms are compared and evaluated.

  16. Surface defect detection in tiling Industries using digital image processing methods: analysis and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Mohammad H; Asemani, Davud

    2014-05-01

    Ceramic and tile industries should indispensably include a grading stage to quantify the quality of products. Actually, human control systems are often used for grading purposes. An automatic grading system is essential to enhance the quality control and marketing of the products. Since there generally exist six different types of defects originating from various stages of tile manufacturing lines with distinct textures and morphologies, many image processing techniques have been proposed for defect detection. In this paper, a survey has been made on the pattern recognition and image processing algorithms which have been used to detect surface defects. Each method appears to be limited for detecting some subgroup of defects. The detection techniques may be divided into three main groups: statistical pattern recognition, feature vector extraction and texture/image classification. The methods such as wavelet transform, filtering, morphology and contourlet transform are more effective for pre-processing tasks. Others including statistical methods, neural networks and model-based algorithms can be applied to extract the surface defects. Although, statistical methods are often appropriate for identification of large defects such as Spots, but techniques such as wavelet processing provide an acceptable response for detection of small defects such as Pinhole. A thorough survey is made in this paper on the existing algorithms in each subgroup. Also, the evaluation parameters are discussed including supervised and unsupervised parameters. Using various performance parameters, different defect detection algorithms are compared and evaluated. PMID:24502941

  17. Feasibility of using a seismic surface wave method to study seasonal and weather effects on shallow surface soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this paper is to study the feasibility of using a seismic surface wave method to investigate seasonal and weather effects on shallow surface soils. In the study, temporal variations of subsurface soil properties were measured and monitored by using a combination of a new seismic su...

  18. Feasibility of using a seismic surface wave method to study seasonal and weather effects on shallow surface soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of the paper is to study the temporal variations of the subsurface soil properties due to seasonal and weather effects using a combination of a new seismic surface method and an existing acoustic probe system. A laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) based multi-channel analysis of surface wav...

  19. Effect of exposure method on benthic organism responses

    SciTech Connect

    Rowland, C.; Burton, G.A. Jr.

    1995-12-31

    Organism response to non-polar organics and inorganic contaminants is affected by the route and method of exposure. Little data exists, however, on the effect of different exposures on freshwater benthic and epibenthic organisms. The amphipod, Hyalella azteca and the oligochaete, Lumbriculus variegatus were exposed to contaminated sediments and overlying waters in the laboratory using traditional static-renewal exposure systems as well as in situ using different exposure chamber designs. Laboratory and field exposures were compared, focusing on survival and tissue residues of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Responses of test organisms were compared also to indigenous species. Results showed that laboratory and in situ exposures differ frequently, but optimal exposure systems are possible which reduce uncertainty in risk or hazard assessments that predict toxicity or bioaccumulation.

  20. Effect of cleaning and sterilization on titanium implant surface properties and cellular response

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jung Hwa; Olivares-Navarrete, Rene; Baier, Robert E.; Meyer, Anne E.; Tannenbaum, Rina; Boyan, Barbara D.; Schwartz, Zvi

    2013-01-01

    Titanium (Ti) has been widely used as an implant material due to the excellent biocompatibility and corrosion resistance of its oxide surface. Biomaterials must be sterile before implantation, but the effects of sterilization on their surface properties have been less well studied. The effects of cleaning and sterilization on surface characteristics were bio-determined using contaminated and pure Ti substrata first manufactured to present two different surface structures: pretreated titanium (PT, Ra = 0.4 μm) (i.e. surfaces that were not modified by sandblasting and/or acid etching); (SLA, Ra = 3.4 μm). Previously cultured cells and associated extracellular matrix were removed from all bio-contaminated specimens by cleaning in a sonicator bath with a sequential acetone–isopropanol–ethanol–distilled water protocol. Cleaned specimens were sterilized with autoclave, gamma irradiation, oxygen plasma, or ultraviolet light. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), contact angle measurements, profilometry, and scanning electron microscopy were used to examine surface chemical components, hydrophilicity, roughness, and morphology, respectively. Small organic molecules present on contaminated Ti surfaces were removed with cleaning. XPS analysis confirmed that surface chemistry was altered by both cleaning and sterilization. Cleaning and sterilization affected hydrophobicity and roughness. These modified surface properties affected osteogenic differentiation of human MG63 osteoblast-like cells. Specifically, autoclaved SLA surfaces lost the characteristic increase in osteoblast differentiation seen on starting SLA surfaces, which was correlated with altered surface wettability and roughness. These data indicated that recleaned and resterilized Ti implant surfaces cannot be considered the same as the first surfaces in terms of surface properties and cell responses. Therefore, the reuse of Ti implants after resterilization may not result in the same tissue responses as