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Sample records for restorative treatment art

  1. The atraumatic restorative treatment (ART) strategy in Mexico: two-years follow up of ART sealants and restorations

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The massive use of preventive measures in Mexico has resulted in a large decline in dental caries over the past two decades. There does however remain a largely unmet need for restorative treatment. This paper describes the steps leading up to the adoption of a strategy, as part of general health policy, to use Atraumatic Restorative Treatment (ART) within the Mexican public health service as a means of addressing this. The objective was to evaluate ART restorations and sealants placed in primary and permanent teeth in schoolchildren from deprived areas over a period of 2 years. Methods 18 Dentists from 13 municipalities in 6 states with the lowest human development index treated 304, 6- to 13-year-old schoolchildren with ART sealants and ART restorations (single-surfaces) on the school compounds. Ketac Molar Easymix was the filling material used. ART procedures were evaluated according to the ART assessment criteria after 1 and 2 years, by 7 calibrated evaluators. Survival rates were estimated, using the PHREG Model with frailty correction. Results The 2-year cumulative survival rates of fully and partially retained ART sealants were 73.1% (primary teeth) and 48.8% (permanent teeth). The dentine carious lesion failure rates of ART sealants in primary and permanent teeth over the 2-year period were 0% and 2.5%, respectively. The 2-year cumulative survival rates of single-surface ART restorations in primary and permanent teeth were 74% and 80.9%, respectively. Secondary carious lesion development occurred in 6 restored primary teeth (2.1%) and in one restored permanent tooth (1.3%). All restorations placed in primary teeth in one state survived, whilst those in one of the 5 remaining states failed statistically significantly more than those in the other 4. Conclusions The ART procedures were of substantial quality and had prevented to a large extent the development of new dentine carious lesions in these children from socio-economically deprived areas

  2. Mechanical performance of encapsulated restorative glass-ionomer cements for use with Atraumatic Restorative Treatment (ART)

    PubMed Central

    MOLINA, Gustavo Fabián; CABRAL, Ricardo Juan; MAZZOLA, Ignacio; BRAIN LASCANO, Laura; FRENCKEN, Jo. E.

    2013-01-01

    The Atraumatic Restorative Treatment (ART) approach was suggested to be a suitable method to treat enamel and dentine carious lesions in patients with disabilities. The use of a restorative glass-ionomer with optimal mechanical properties is, therefore, very important. Objective: To test the null-hypotheses that no difference in diametral tensile, compressive and flexural strengths exists between: (1) The EQUIA system and (2) The Chemfil Rock (encapsulated glass-ionomers; test materials) and the Fuji 9 Gold Label and the Ketac Molar Easymix (hand-mixed conventional glass-ionomers; control materials); (3) The EQUIA system and Chemfil Rock. Material and Methods: Specimens for testing flexural (n=240) and diametral tensile (n=80) strengths were prepared according to standardized specifications; the compressive strength (n=80) was measured using a tooth-model of a class II ART restoration. ANOVA and Tukey B tests were used to test for significant differences between dependent and independent variables. Results: The EQUIA system and Chemfil Rock had significantly higher mean scores for all the three strength variables than the Fuji 9 Gold Label and Ketac Molar Easymix (α=0.05). The EQUIA system had significant higher mean scores for diametral tensile and flexural strengths than the Chemfil Rock (α=0.05). Conclusion: The two encapsulated high-viscosity glass-ionomers had significantly higher test values for diametral tensile, flexural and compressive strengths than the commonly used hand-mixed high-viscosity glass-ionomers. PMID:23857657

  3. The atraumatic restorative treatment (ART) technique: does it have a place in everyday practice?

    PubMed

    Cole, B O; Welbury, R R

    2000-04-01

    The ART technique was introduced in the early 1990s. It involves the removal of carious tooth tissue with hand instruments followed by restoration with an adhesive material (glass-ionomer cement). Local anaesthetic is not always required for treatment and the technique has helped to bridge the gap in the provision of treatment to rural communities, senior citizens and dental phobic patients. This article looks at the development of the technique, its performance and potential areas of application.

  4. DENTAL PRACTITIONERS' ATTITUDES, SUBJECTIVE NORMS AND INTENTIONS TO PRACTICE ATRAUMATIC RESTORATIVE TREATMENT (ART) IN TANZANIA

    PubMed Central

    Kikwilu, Emil N.; Frencken, Jo E.; Mulder, Jan; Masalu, Joyce R.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the attitude and subjective norm of dental practitioners towards practicing the atraumatic restorative treatment (ART) in Tanzania. A pre-tested questionnaire on attitudes and subjective norms to practice ART was mailed to all 147 dental practitioners working in the regional and district government clinics. The independent variables were: gender, working experience, qualification and ever heard of ART. The dependent variables were: attitude, subjective norm and intention to practice ART. Chi-square tests and multiple regression analysis were used to test for effects between independent and dependent variables. Significance level was set at 5%. A total of 138 practitioners returned completed questionnaires. More experienced dental practitioners encountered moderate social pressure than less experienced dental practitioners, who met strong social pressure (p=0.045). A total of 73.2% of dental practitioners felt that ART was worth introducing in Tanzania, 92.8% recommended ART training for all dental practitioners and 97.8% recommended inclusion of ART in dental curricula. Positive attitude, strong subjective norm and high intention to practice ART were recorded in 76.3%, 28.1% and 90.6% of the practitioners, respectively. Only subjective norm had a statistically significant influence on the intention to practice ART (p<0.0001). The results indicated that dental practitioners were willing to have ART introduced in Tanzania and had positive attitudes towards practicing this technique. Nevertheless, their intention to perform ART was strongly influenced by social pressures. Therefore, in order to have a successful introduction of ART in Tanzania, people who matter in the daily practice of dental practitioners need to accept and appraise the ART approach positively. PMID:19274393

  5. The atraumatic restorative treatment (ART) approach for the management of dental caries.

    PubMed

    Smales, Roger J; Yip, Hak-Kong

    2002-06-01

    There is worldwide interest in and increasing usage of the conservative atraumatic restorative treatment technique or approach for the restoration of primary and permanent teeth. However, most published data on the clinical performance of the newer, high-strength esthetic conventional glass-ionomer restorative cements marketed for the procedure have been derived from short-term studies. There have been very few reports comparing different types of restorative materials and methods of cavity preparation. In primary teeth, after 1 year, success rates have been approximately 80% to 95% for Class I and Class V single-surface restorations, 55% to 75% for Class II multisurface restorations, and 35% to 55% for Class III and Class IV restorations. In permanent teeth, after 2 to 3 years, success rates have been approximately 90% for Class I and Class V single-surface restorations, but little data have been reported for other restoration classes. Failures usually result from restoration losses, fractures, and wear. Further improvements in the design of hand instruments and in the mechanical properties of the newer glass-ionomer cements are required. Currently, use of the atraumatic restorative treatment approach should be restricted to restoration of single-surface caries lesions, especially in permanent teeth, and to sealing of occlusal fissures in selected teeth.

  6. Art, Ecological Restoration, and Art Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blandy, Doug; Congdon, Kristin G.; Krug, Don H.

    1998-01-01

    Aims to foster among art educators and students an awareness of how many contemporary artists are promoting ecological restoration. Grounds these artists' work historically, and discusses its view of humanity as interconnected with nature. Offers suggestions for involving art educators and students in ecological theory and artistic creation. (DSK)

  7. Minimal intervention dentistry: part 5. Atraumatic restorative treatment (ART)--a minimum intervention and minimally invasive approach for the management of dental caries.

    PubMed

    Holmgren, C J; Roux, D; Doméjean, S

    2013-01-01

    While originally developed in response to a need to provide effective restorative and preventive treatment in underserved communities where running water and electricity might not always be available, over the past two decades, the atraumatic restorative treatment (ART) approach has become a worldwide phenomenon; used not only in some of the poorest developing countries but also in some of the most wealthy. The ART approach involves the removal of infected dentine with hand-instruments followed by the placement of a restoration where the adjacent pits and fissures are sealed simultaneously using high viscosity glass-ionomer inserted under finger pressure. Reliable results can only be obtained if the treatment protocol, as described in this article, is closely followed. ART should be considered as a therapeutic option especially in children, anxious patients and those with special needs.

  8. Undergraduate training in the atraumatic restorative treatment (ART) approach--an activity report.

    PubMed

    Mickenautsch, S; Rudolph, M J

    2002-09-01

    The Division of Public Oral Health at the University of the Witwatersrand conducted a 2-week ART training course for 5th year dental students in the School of Oral Health Sciences. Students were taught both theoretical knowledge and clinical skills in ART. Course evaluation showed that the course achieved its aims and objectives and was considered a worthwhile experience by students. However, there were some limitations to the format of the programme. We recommend that ART should be integrated as part of clinical student training in the BDS curriculum.

  9. Proposal of e-learning strategy to teach Atraumatic Restorative Treatment (ART) to undergraduate and graduate students

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate e-learning strategy in teaching Atraumatic Restorative Treatment (ART) to undergraduate and graduate students. The sample comprised 76 participants—38 dental students and 38 pediatric dentistry students—in a specialization course. To evaluate knowledge improvement, participants were subjected to a test performed before and after the course. Results A single researcher corrected the tests and intraexaminer reproducibility was calculated (CCI = 0.991; 95% IC = 0.975–0.996). All students improved their performances after the e-learning course (Paired t-tests p < 0.001). The means of undergraduate students were 4.7 (initial) and 6.4 (final) and those of graduate students were 6.8 (initial) and 8.2 (final). The comparison of the final evaluation means showed a statistically significant difference (t-tests p < 0.0001). Conclusions The e-learning strategy has the potential of improving students’ knowledge in ART. Mature students perform better in this teaching modality when it is applied exclusively via distance learning. PMID:25034167

  10. Survival of ART restorations assessed using selected FDI and modified ART restoration criteria.

    PubMed

    Farag, Abeer; van der Sanden, Wil J M; Abdelwahab, Hisran; Frencken, Jo E

    2011-06-01

    A new set of criteria for assessing the quality of restorations using modern restorative materials, named FDI criteria, was recently introduced. This study tested the null hypothesis that there is no significant difference in survival estimate percentages of ART restorations assessed using selected FDI and modified ART criteria after 1 and 5 years. One operator placed a total of 60 class I and 30 Class II high-viscosity glass-ionomer ART restorations in ninety 14- to 15-year-olds. Two calibrated and independent evaluators using both criteria evaluated restorations on diestone replicas at baseline and after 1 and 5 years. Statistical analyses were done using the Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank test. The survival results of ART restorations assessed using both sets of criteria after 1 and 5 years (p = 0.27) did not differ significantly. Three ART restorations were assessed as failures according to the ART criteria, while they were assessed as survived using the FDI criteria. We conclude that the modified ART criteria enable reliable assessment of ART restorations in permanent teeth from diestone replicas and that there was no significant difference in survival estimates of ART restorations assessed using both sets of criteria. The null hypothesis was accepted.

  11. PERFORMANCE OF BRAZILIAN AND IMPORTED GLASS IONOMER CEMENTS USED IN ATRAUMATIC RESTORATIVE TREATMENT (ART) REGARDING MICROLEAKAGE IN PRIMARY MOLARS

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Fernanda de Morais; do Vale, Miriam Pimenta Parreira; Jansen, Wellington Corrêa; Paiva, Saul Martins; Pordeus, Isabela Almeida

    2006-01-01

    With the aim of assessing the performance of Brazilian and imported glass ionomer cements (GIC) with regard to microleakage, 40 primary molars received two standard class II cavity preparations with margins in enamel. Twenty cavities were filled with Brazilian materials (Vidrion® R and Vidrion® RCaps) and the other 20 cavities were filled with imported materials (Fuji® IX and Fuji® IXGPFast capsule). All fillings were performed by a single operator according to the manufacturer's instructions. Teeth were immersed in 0.5% methylene blue and half-sectioned. Three independent calibrated examiners assessed microleakage using scores (0-3). Data were submitted to the Kruskal-Wallis statistical test and Wilcoxon analysis. High microleakage indexes were verified for all ionomer cements: 59.5% of the samples restored with Vidrion® R or Vidrion® RCaps and 83.4% of the samples restored with Fuji® IX or Fuji® IXGpFast capsule obtained the maximum score (3). The Brazilian ionomer cements presented less microleakage than imported cements, although this difference was only significant (p=0.003) among the encapsulated materials. PMID:19089050

  12. [Combined orthodontic and restorative treatment].

    PubMed

    Kuijpers, M A R; Loomans, B

    2015-11-01

    In patients with agenesis or enamel anomalies in anterior teeth combined orthodontic and restorative treatment is often necessary to achieve an optimal aesthetic result. How both can best be achieved, but also how to maintain the result, requires communication between the dentist and the orthodontist. The orthodontic treatment plan needs to be established in cooperation with the dentist who will carry out the restorative treatment while the patient is at a young age. Since with these young patients, who are still growing craniofacially and whose teeth are still developing, possible future restorative and/or orthodontic treatment, as well as the means of orthodontic retention, need to be included in the treatment plan. In cleft palate patients, it is also important that methods of orthodontic retention of maxillary arch width are given timely attention in the restorative treatment plan because it is especially vulnerable to relapse. PMID:26568998

  13. Treatment planning for restorative implantology.

    PubMed

    Boyce, Ricardo A; Klemons, Gary

    2015-04-01

    In this article, current literature on fixed and removable prosthodontics is reviewed along with evidence-based systematic reviews, including advice from those in the dental profession with years of experience, which help restorative dentists manage and treat their cases successfully. Treatment planning for restorative implantology should be looked at in 4 sections: (1) review of past medical history, (2) oral examination and occlusion, (3) dental imaging (ie, cone-beam computed tomography), and (4) fixed versus removable prosthodontics. These 4 concepts of treatment planning, along with proper surgical placements of the implant(s), result in successful cases. PMID:25835794

  14. Treatment planning for restorative implantology.

    PubMed

    Boyce, Ricardo A; Klemons, Gary

    2015-04-01

    In this article, current literature on fixed and removable prosthodontics is reviewed along with evidence-based systematic reviews, including advice from those in the dental profession with years of experience, which help restorative dentists manage and treat their cases successfully. Treatment planning for restorative implantology should be looked at in 4 sections: (1) review of past medical history, (2) oral examination and occlusion, (3) dental imaging (ie, cone-beam computed tomography), and (4) fixed versus removable prosthodontics. These 4 concepts of treatment planning, along with proper surgical placements of the implant(s), result in successful cases.

  15. One year survival of ART and conventional restorations in patients with disability

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Providing restorative treatment for persons with disability may be challenging and has been related to the patient’s ability to cope with the anxiety engendered by treatment and to cooperate fully with the demands of the clinical situation. The aim of the present study was to assess the survival rate of ART restorations compared to conventional restorations in people with disability referred for special care dentistry. Methods Three treatment protocols were distinguished: ART (hand instruments/high-viscosity glass-ionomer); conventional restorative treatment (rotary instrumentation/resin composite) in the clinic (CRT/clinic) and under general anaesthesia (CRT/GA). Patients were referred for restorative care to a special care centre and treated by one of two specialists. Patients and/or their caregivers were provided with written and verbal information regarding the proposed techniques, and selected the type of treatment they were to receive. Treatment was provided as selected but if this option proved clinically unfeasible one of the alternative techniques was subsequently proposed. Evaluation of restoration survival was performed by two independent trained and calibrated examiners using established ART restoration assessment codes at 6 months and 12 months. The Proportional Hazard model with frailty corrections was applied to calculate survival estimates over a one year period. Results 66 patients (13.6 ± 7.8 years) with 16 different medical disorders participated. CRT/clinic proved feasible for 5 patients (7.5%), the ART approach for 47 patients (71.2%), and 14 patients received CRT/GA (21.2%). In all, 298 dentine carious lesions were restored in primary and permanent teeth, 182 (ART), 21 (CRT/clinic) and 95 (CRT/GA). The 1-year survival rates and jackknife standard error of ART and CRT restorations were 97.8 ± 1.0% and 90.5 ± 3.2%, respectively (p = 0.01). Conclusions These short-term results indicate that ART appears to be an

  16. Fixed provisional restorations for extended prosthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Amet, E M; Phinney, T L

    1995-01-01

    During extensive and extended prosthodontic treatment, there is need for a durable esthetic fixed provisional restoration that can be easily modified as treatment is completed and that is cost-effective. The needed strength of provisional restorations can be underestimated, and the management of complex treatment is then more difficult and the prosthetic results less predictable. Knowledge of the criteria for treatment restorations and the adequacies of their construction is essential for the prevention of catastrophic failures, patient management problems, and compromised results. Many times in complex prosthodontic treatment, changes are needed in esthetics, the plane of occlusion, incisal edge position, lip support, and type of occlusion, or the soft and/or hard tissues need to be altered or grafted surgically. In addition, after first- and second-stage implant surgery and extractions, there is a need for immediate tooth replacement with extended time between prosthodontic treatments. These prosthodontic changes and challenges can be addressed with reinforced acrylic provisional restorations that are adequately cemented and retained during the interim stage of healing and treatment. In addition, the provisional restoration should serve as a guide for the final restoration while esthetics and phonetics are evaluated for patient acceptance. This article describes the materials used with an indirect technique for fabrication of an extended-treatment acrylic provisional restoration that uses an internal cast metal support system for strength. This support system consists of metal bands or copings with extensions into edentulous areas and that have been opaqued to neutralize the metallic color. A matrix of vinyl polysiloxane made from the diagnostic wax-up simplifies construction of the acrylic, resulting in a strong, ridged, yet esthetic result.

  17. Enamel hypoplasia: challenges of esthetic restorative treatment.

    PubMed

    Ruschel, Vanessa Carla; Araújo, Élito; Bernardon, Jussara Karina; Lopes, Guilherme Carpena

    2016-01-01

    Enamel defects, such as white or yellow-brown spots, usually cause problems that are more esthetic than functional. Enamel hypoplasia may be the result of hereditary, systemic, or local factors. Dental trauma is a local etiologic factor. It is relatively common in the primary dentition and can cause defects on the surface of permanent successors. Treatment for such defects can differ, depending on the depth of the spots. For deeper white-spot lesions, a composite resin restoration may be necessary. This is an excellent mode of treatment, due to both its low cost and its conservation of healthy tooth structure. The objective of this case report is to describe composite resin restoration of a maxillary central incisor affected by enamel hypoplasia.

  18. Enamel hypoplasia: challenges of esthetic restorative treatment.

    PubMed

    Ruschel, Vanessa Carla; Araújo, Élito; Bernardon, Jussara Karina; Lopes, Guilherme Carpena

    2016-01-01

    Enamel defects, such as white or yellow-brown spots, usually cause problems that are more esthetic than functional. Enamel hypoplasia may be the result of hereditary, systemic, or local factors. Dental trauma is a local etiologic factor. It is relatively common in the primary dentition and can cause defects on the surface of permanent successors. Treatment for such defects can differ, depending on the depth of the spots. For deeper white-spot lesions, a composite resin restoration may be necessary. This is an excellent mode of treatment, due to both its low cost and its conservation of healthy tooth structure. The objective of this case report is to describe composite resin restoration of a maxillary central incisor affected by enamel hypoplasia. PMID:27599287

  19. State-of-the-art of aquifer restoration. Volume 2: appendices A through G. Final Report, 1979-1984

    SciTech Connect

    Knox, R.C.; Canter, L.W.; Kincannon, D.F.; Stover, E.L.; Ward, C.H.

    1984-11-01

    A summary of the state-of-the-art of aquifer restoration is presented. The appendices include: (1) case studies of aquifer restoration; (2) considerations regarding an aquifer restoration information center; (3) information for public participation in aquifer restoration decision making; and (4) an annotated bibliography of 225 selected references. The state-of-the-art of aquifer restoration is a rapidly changing technology, with many uses of single or combined techniques in planning or recently implemented.

  20. Toward the Restoration of the Liberal Arts Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1979

    Important trends concerning the role of the liberal arts curriculum in American higher education are discussed in this collection of conference papers. The "great books" program at St. John's College is examined in a paper by Eva T. H. Brann focusing on why the St. John's plan has endured and changed little since its inception. Authors of the…

  1. Restoring Wisconsin Art Therapy Association in Art Therapy History: Implications for Professional Definition and Inclusivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potash, Jordan; Burnie, Michele; Pearson, Rosemary; Ramirez, Wayne

    2016-01-01

    The Wisconsin Art Therapy Association (WATA), formally established in 1969, was the first incorporated organization of art therapists in the United States. Under the leadership of Wayne Ramirez, WATA lobbied the national association for an inclusive definition of art therapy that aimed to foster respect for psychiatric, educational, and community…

  2. [The atraumatic restorative treatment approach in pediatric dental care: a comparative clinical study].

    PubMed

    Dmitrova, A G; Kulakov, A A

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess and compare the discomfort levels during Atraumatic Restorative Treatment and Minimal Cavity Preparation using rotary instruments and Air abrasion method. The results of the study suggest that ART induces less discomfort, therefore this method can be recommended for children who have a fear of dental procedures as well as for children with intellectual disabilities. PMID:26145474

  3. Effects of oral hygiene, residual caries and cervical Marginal-gaps on the survival of proximal atraumatic restorative treatment approach restorations

    PubMed Central

    Kemoli, Arthur M.; Amerongen, Willem E. Van

    2011-01-01

    Background: Although Atraumatic restorative treatment (ART) approach has been in existence for a while, the reasons for the poor performance of multisurface ART restorations are not very clear. Aim: The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of oral hygiene, residual caries and cervical marginal-gaps on survival of proximal ART restorations. Settings: Two rural divisions in Kenya were selected for the study. Design: A randomized clinical trial. Material and Methods: The 804 children in the study had their baseline- and 2-year dental plaque levels documented. Each child received one proximal restoration in a primary molar using ART approach, together with trained and pre-tested operators/assistants, three glass ionomer cements (GIC)-brands and two tooth-isolation methods. The restorations were clinically evaluated soon after placement and after 2 years. Post-restorative bite-wing radiographs taken soon after restoration were also evaluated. Statistical analysis: Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 14 computer programme was used and results tested using Pearson's correlation, Cox Proportional Hazards regression analysis and Multiple Logistic regression models tests. Results: At baseline and after 2 years, the mean cumulative survival and plaque index changed from 94.4% to 30.8% and 2.34 (Standard Deviation, or SD of 0.46) to 1.92 (SD 2.1) respectively, with higher plaque indices associated with higher restoration failures. Of the 507 radiographs evaluated, 48 (9.5%), 63 (12.4%) and 9 (1.8%) restorations had residual caries (RC), cervical marginal-gaps (CMG) and both RC/CMG respectively. Survival of the restorations with RC/CMG was significantly lower (p = 0.003) compared to those with RC or without RC. Conclusion: Low survival of proximal restorations in the study was associated with the presence of cervical marginal-gaps. PMID:22346160

  4. Optical coherence tomography in art diagnostics and restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Targowski, P.; Rouba, B.; Góra, M.; Tymińska-Widmer, L.; Marczak, J.; Kowalczyk, A.

    2008-07-01

    An overview of the technique of optical coherence tomography (OCT) is presented, and a spectral OCT instrument especially designed for art diagnostics is described. The applicability of OCT to the stratigraphy of oil paintings is discussed with emphasis on examination of the artist’s signature. For the first time, OCT tomograms of stained glass are presented and discussed. The utilisation of Spectral OCT in real-time monitoring of varnish ablation is discussed with examples of ablation, melting and evaporation, and exfoliation of the varnish layer provided, for the first time.

  5. [Esthetic restoration of the posterior sector. State of the art].

    PubMed

    Prati, C; Tiozzi, E; Giommoni, E

    Patient's aesthetic requirements have increased in the past few years. The limited resistance of composites to wear has delayed their universal adoption for restoration of Class I and II cavity preparations in adult teeth. Although the potential use for posterior composite resin appears promising, the point at which such materials may be regarded as ideal, reliable, routine alternatives to silver amalgam has not been reached for materials of previous generation. To resolve some of the problems associated with the posterior composite resin, new materials (photo-cured GIC, multi step bonding agent, improved composite resins as P-50, Heliomolar Radiopaque, Ray Post) and new techniques have been introduced. In this paper the problems and questions raised with the use of posterior composites have been discussed.

  6. Iatrogenic Damage to Periodontium by Restorative Treatment Procedures: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Sirajuddin, Syed; Narasappa, Kumuda M; Gundapaneni, Veenadharini; Chungkham, Sachidananda; Walikar, Ambica S

    2015-01-01

    The regenerative capability found in most other tissues is not possessed by teeth. Hence, enamel or dentin once lost as a result of caries, trauma, wear, and restorative materials must be replaced to restore form and function. Teeth require preparation to receive restorations, and these preparations must be based on fundamental principles from which basic criteria can be developed to help predict the success of restorative treatment. PMID:26312091

  7. Clinical outcome of root caries restorations using ART and rotary techniques in institutionalized elders.

    PubMed

    Cruz Gonzalez, Alberto Carlos; Marín Zuluaga, Dairo Javier

    2016-05-31

    The aim of this study was to compare the clinical performance of root caries restorations after a six-month period using two methods, a conventional technique with rotary instruments and an atraumatic restorative technique (ART), in an institutionalized elderly population in the city of Bogotá, Colombia. Root caries represents a multifactorial, progressive, chronic lesion with softened, irregular and darkened tissue involving the radicular surface; it is highly prevalent in the elderly, especially in those who are physically or cognitively impaired. A quasi-experimental, double-blind, longitudinal study was carried out after cluster randomization of the sample. Two different experienced dentists, previously trained, performed the restorations using each technique. After six months, two new investigators performed a blind evaluation of the condition of the restorations. The results showed a significantly higher rate of success (92.9%) using the conventional technique (p < 0.03). However, we concluded that ART may have been the preferred technique in the study population because 81% of those restorations survived or were successful during the observation period. PMID:27253146

  8. The effects of ambient temperature and mixing time of glass ionomer cement material on the survival rate of proximal ART restorations in primary molars

    PubMed Central

    Kemoli, Arthur M

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Temperature fluctuations and material mixing times are likely to affect the consistency and integrity of the material mixture, and hence the restoration made out of it. The purpose of the present study was to determine the influence of the ambient temperature and the mixing time of glass ionomer cement (GIC) restorative material on the survival rate of proximal atraumatic restorative treatment (ART) restorations placed in primary molars. Materials and Methods: A total of 804 restorations were placed in the primary molars of 6-8-year-olds using the ART approach. The restorations were then followed for a period of 2 years and evaluated at given intervals. The data collected were analyzed using SPSS computer statistical program, and the results tested and compared using the Chi-square, Kaplan Meier survival analysis and Cox Proportional hazard statistical tests. Results: The cumulative survival rate of the restorations dropped from the initial 94.4% to 30.8% at the end of 2 years. The higher survival rate of the restorations was associated with the experienced operators and assistants when using the rubber dam isolation method. However, there was no statistically significant difference in the survival rate of the restorations when related to the room temperature and the mixing time of the GIC materials used in spite of the variations in the temperature recoded and the methods used in mixing the materials. Conclusion: The ambient temperature and mixing time of GIC did not have a significant effect on the survival of the proximal ART restorations. PMID:24808692

  9. Patient selection, candidacy, and treatment planning for hair restoration surgery.

    PubMed

    Konior, Raymond J; Simmons, Cam

    2013-08-01

    Patient consultation, examination, and selection are crucial for successful outcomes in hair restoration surgery. The hair restoration surgeon must take a holistic approach in identifying those patients who are and who are not candidates for surgery. In this article, an overview of the consultation, pertinent physical examination features relating to patient candidacy, and several treatment paradigms are discussed. Additionally, those findings that may lead to poor results and conditions that are contraindications to hair restoration surgery are reviewed.

  10. Teaching atraumatic restorative treatment in U.S. dental schools: a survey of predoctoral pediatric dentistry program directors.

    PubMed

    Kateeb, Elham T; Warren, John J; Damiano, Peter; Momany, Elizabeth; Kanellis, Michael; Weber-Gasparoni, Karin; Ansley, Tim

    2013-10-01

    The International Dental Federation and World Health Organization have promoted the use of Atraumatic Restorative Treatment (ART) in modern clinical settings worldwide. In the United States, the practice of ART is not believed to be widely used, which may be a result of little attention given to ART training in predoctoral pediatric dentistry curricula in U.S. dental schools. This study investigated the extent of clinical and didactic instruction on ART provided in U.S. dental schools by surveying the predoctoral pediatric dentistry programs in 2010. Of the fifty-seven directors asked to complete the survey, forty-four responded for a response rate of 77 percent. Of these forty-four programs, 66 percent reported providing clinical training on ART, though only 14 percent provide this training often or very often. The types of ART training provided often or very often included interim treatment (18 percent) and single-surface cavities (14 percent) in primary teeth. However, ART was said to be rarely taught as a definitive treatment in permanent teeth (2 percent). Attitude was a major predictor, for clinical training provided and using professional guidelines in treatment decisions were associated with a positive attitude towards ART. These predoctoral pediatric dentistry programs used ART mainly in primary, anterior, and single-surface cavities and as interim treatment. As ART increases access of children to dental care, the incorporation of the ART approach into the curricula of U.S. dental schools should be facilitated by professional organizations.

  11. Effect of conventional dental restorative treatment on bacteria in saliva.

    PubMed

    Wright, J T; Cutter, G R; Dasanayake, A P; Stiles, H M; Caufield, P W

    1992-06-01

    Dental caries results from the dissolution of mineralized dental tissues by the metabolic by-products of oral bacteria colonizing the surface of teeth. The principal modality for dealing with this infectious process is through restorative treatment which removes the pathologic tissue and replaces it with a variety of inert materials. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of traditional restorative treatment on select oral bacterial populations. Fifty-two females demonstrating high levels of mutans streptococci (greater than or equal to 2.5 x 10(4) colony forming units (cfu) per ml saliva) with no more than four missing posterior teeth were recruited for this study. Salivary levels of mutans streptococci, lactobacilli, total streptococci, and total cultivable bacteria were evaluated before, during, and after restorative treatment. Initial DMFS scores were established by two standardized examiners using bitewing radiographs and clinical examination, which was conducted under optimal conditions. All restorative treatment was completed by faculty members of the University of Alabama School of Dentistry using treatment plans developed by the DMFS examiners. The participants received a mean of 16.4 restored surfaces, which resulted in significant reductions of all the bacterial populations tested. All microbial populations monitored were predicted to return to their baseline levels within 151 days after restorative treatment in 50% of the participants. This study shows that conventional restorative treatment results in a significant reduction of bacterial populations including those associated with the dental caries process, i.e., mutans streptococci and lactobacilli.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Atraumatic perspectives of ART: psychological and physiological aspects of treatment with and without rotary instruments.

    PubMed

    Schriks, M C M; van Amerongen, W E

    2003-02-01

    Atraumatic Restorative Treatment, ART, is a method of minimal caries intervention that uses only hand instruments. The aim of the present study was to explore a possible difference between the extent of discomfort experienced during dental treatment according to the ART approach and a method using rotary instruments. The study was performed in Indonesia. A total of 403 children were randomly divided in two groups. In each child, one class II restoration in a deciduous molar was made. One group received treatment using rotary instruments (750 r.p.m.). The other group was treated according to the ART approach. Glass ionomer cement was used for restoration in both groups. Discomfort scores were determined using both physiological measurements (heart rate) and behavioral observations (Venham) on specific moments during the treatment. Venham scores showed a marked difference between the two groups at most time points. Heart rate measurements were different at deep excavation. Also, a clear relation between Venham scores and heart rate measurements could be found at all time points. Confounding could be shown for operating dentist, gender of the patient and initial anxiety, not for age. No effect modification could be shown. It can be concluded that children treated according to the ART approach using hand instruments alone experience less discomfort than those treated using rotary instruments.

  13. [Atraumatic restorative treatment in relation to pain, discomfort and dental treatment anxiety].

    PubMed

    Frencken, J E F M; Flohil, K A; de Baat, C

    2014-01-01

    Dental treatment anxiety usually develops during childhood due to a bad experience and the dental drill as well as the injection needle are the most common causes. The Atraumatic Restorative Treatment provides the opportunity to provoke little or no dental treatment anxiety because only hand instruments are used and local anaesthesia is seldom required. Several scientific studies have indicated that the Atraumatic Restorative Treatment causes less pain, discomfort and anxiety by comparison with conventional treatments. Therefore, the Atraumatic Restorative Treatment is considered to be promising for the treatment of carious lesions in anxious children and adults, and potentially also for patients suffering from dental treatment phobia. Furthermore, the Atraumatic Restorative Treatment may be indicated as the primary treatment method in children to prevent dental treatment anxiety and treatment under general anaesthesia. These conclusions must still be confirmed with responsible scientific research. PMID:25174188

  14. Association between caries location and restorative material treatment provided

    PubMed Central

    Lubisich, Erinne B.; Hilton, Thomas J.; Ferracane, Jack L.; Pashova, Hristina I.; Burton, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This cross-sectional study by the Northwest PRECEDENT practitioners correlated the location of caries diagnosed in the past 12 months with treatment provided. Methods An oral health survey was conducted on up to 20 patients per practice for 101 practices in the Northwest PRECEDENT network. A total of 1943 eligible patients were randomly assessed for the location of and treatment provided for caries lesions diagnosed within the past 12 months. Regression analysis using Generalized Estimating Equations (GEE) was performed to assess association of treatment to tooth location and surface characterization, adjusting for age, practice location (urban/rural), dentist gender, and experience level. The analysis accounts for clustering by practice using robust variance estimates. Results Overall, 55.4% of patients exhibited recent caries and 42.8% received treatment for at least one permanent tooth. 18% of treated teeth were treated with amalgam, and 72% were treated with composite. This percentage varied as a function of tooth surface characteristics, patient characteristics, and dentist characteristics. The results suggest that restoration selection does depend on tooth type and which surfaces are being restored. The odds of a molar receiving an amalgam restoration are 2.44 (95% CI=1.81–3.30) times higher as compared to a bicuspid, adjusting for all other covariates. When the restoration includes the occlusal surface of a tooth the odds are 0.42 (95% CI=0.20–0.89) times as great that amalgam will be placed. When the restoration includes the mesial or distal surface of the tooth the odds for amalgam restoration are 2.49 (95% CI=1.25–4.95) times higher compared to when it does not include these surfaces. Conclusion Restorative material choice varied based on caries location and practitioner gender. PMID:21256915

  15. Creative Art Therapy Groups: A Treatment Modality for Psychiatric Outpatients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drapeau, Marie-Celine; Kronish, Neomi

    2007-01-01

    This brief report examines the benefits of a creative art therapy group program for outpatients suffering from psychiatric disorders. Included is a review of relevant treatment outcomes literature on the effectiveness of group art therapy. The authors describe the Creative Art Therapy Group Program offered to adult psychiatric outpatients that is…

  16. Does atraumatic restorative treatment reduce dental anxiety in children? A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Arun K.; Bhumika, T. V.; Nair, N. Sreekumaran

    2015-01-01

    Dental anxiety is one of the major problems affecting children, which impairs the rendering of dental care, leading to impaired quality of life. It often leads to occupational stress in dental personnel and conflict between parents/caregivers. The objective of this study was to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials done in children, to synthesize evidence of the effectiveness of atraumatic restorative treatment (ART) in reducing dental anxiety in children compared to conventional restorative treatments. The databases searched included PubMed, Google Scholar and The Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Register. Eligible studies reporting dental anxiety by a variety of psychometric scales were tabulated. The review was conducted and reported in accordance with the guidelines provided by the Cochrane Collaboration. Among 416 studies retrieved through literature search, six studies matched the inclusion criteria. Due to lack of data, only three studies were included for meta-analysis using RevMan software (Review Manager, Version 5.3;The Cochrane Collaboration, Copenhagen, 2014). The pooled meta-analysis data, (standardized mean difference − 2.12 [95% confidence interval: −4.52, 0.27]) failed to show any difference between ART group and the conventional treatment group. In conclusion, ART was not more beneficial in reducing dental anxiety among pediatric dental patients. The findings are relevant in the field of clinical practice in dentistry in the management of the anxious pediatric dental patient. PMID:26038668

  17. Lead poisoning from art restoration and pottery work: unusual exposure source and household risk.

    PubMed

    Fischbein, A; Wallace, J; Sassa, S; Kappas, A; Butts, G; Rohl, A; Kaul, B

    1992-01-01

    Two cases of lead poisoning following exposures in the arts and crafts environment are presented. The first illustrates the impact of an unusual exposure source experienced by a female art conservator while restoring an antique Peruvian tapestry from the Chancay Period (A.D. 1000-1500). The second demonstrates the extension to the artist's family members of a lead hazard associated with pottery work. Noted were a wide spectrum of clinical and biochemical abnormalities, ranging from severe neurological and gastrointestinal symptoms to subtle alterations in the biosynthetic pathway of heme. Marked elevation of the blood lead level (up to 130 mcg/100 mL) was found in the most severe case of lead poisoning. The cases illustrate the need for industrial hygiene measures in this type of work in order to prevent lead intoxication, both in the adult artist and children in the household. However, in some instances of increased lead absorption in persons with lead-related hobbies, sources other than those associated with arts and crafts should be investigated. This alternative is illustrated by a third case, in which firearms training was the more likely source of excessive exposure. Multiple occupational factors must occasionally be considered in evaluating increased lead absorption. PMID:1740771

  18. The science of communicating the art of esthetic dentistry. Part II: Diagnostic provisional restorations.

    PubMed

    Derbabian, K; Marzola, R; Donovan, T E; Cho, G C; Arcidiacono, A

    2000-01-01

    Provisional restorations fulfill many functions in restorative dentistry. Quality provisional restorations can provide the clinician, the patient, and the laboratory technician much valuable information prior to fabrication of the definitive restoration. Such diagnostic provisional restorations fabricated with acrylic resin are easily adjusted and modified until both esthetic and functional results are approved by the patient. Once this approval has been obtained, the definitive restorations can be fabricated with confidence, using the esthetic form of the provisional restorations as a blueprint.

  19. The functionally fixed restoration: a third modality of treatment.

    PubMed

    Berson, Paul J

    2002-02-01

    Most dental practitioners as well as their patients prefer to have fixed rather than removable restorations. However, there are many clinical situations that prohibit the use of the fixed modality. These clinical cases can vary from simply not having the proper number of healthy teeth and/or implants to the esthetically challenging cases of high smile lines and severe loss of alveolar support. The approach of using a traditional removable prosthesis in these situations has always been met with severe compromises. The functionally fixed restoration is a third modality of treatment that can solve many of the problems of the removable restoration and at the same time provide the same comfort and success of the fixed prosthesis.

  20. Mutans streptococci strains prevalence before and after cavity preparation during Atraumatic Restorative Treatment.

    PubMed

    Toi, C S; Bönecker, M; Cleaton-Jones, P E

    2003-06-01

    Critics argue that all carious dentine is not removed from the hand-prepared cavity during the Atraumatic Restorative Treatment (ART) procedure, and that the caries process is soon resumed. The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of ART in removing carious tissue, by investigating the numbers of mutans streptococci and lactobacilli, with emphasis on the prevalence of Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus strains before, and after ART treatment of dental caries. Two microbiology samples were collected. The first sample was removed from the centre of the carious lesion at the enamel-dentine junction, and the second was collected from the centre of the hard cavity wall above the pulp, after the soft infected dentine had been manually removed. A total of 71 mutans streptococci isolates from 31 children and 40 carious teeth were subcultured, biochemically characterised and genotyped by the arbitrarily primed polymerase chain reaction (AP-PCR). Results showed a significant decrease in TVC (P<0.0001), mutans streptococci (P < 0.0001) and lactobacilli (P = 0.0002) after cavity preparation. AP-PCR identified S. mutans strains that were undetectable during biotyping, and divided clinical isolates into two main clusters. In all, 63% (45/71) of isolates from the carious lesions comprised S. mutans strains. After cavity preparation, this was reduced to 35% (25/71), of which 30% (21/71) were S. mutans and the remaining 6% (4/71) S. sobrinus strains. The number of mutans streptococci strains was below detectable levels in 19 of the prepared cavities. The significant decrease in bacteria after manual cavity preparation demonstrates the reliability of a standardized ART technique, yet the presence of S. mutans strains shows that the effectiveness of the ART procedure can vary during treatment and between dental practitioners.

  1. The Impact of Aesthetics in Restorative Treatment Planning.

    PubMed

    Little, David

    2015-05-01

    Although patients frequently request enhanced aesthetics, additional considerations--including tooth structure and gingival condition, function, form, and communication--also contribute to treatment planning and successful outcomes. While some patients may only desire and require aesthetic alterations, others may require treatments that are more complicated (eg, surgery) in order to achieve their desired results. Thorough assessment and communication between the dentist and patient, as well as among all members of the dental team, prior to and throughout treatment planning, ensures that any problems, conditions, or complications are addressed before or alongside aesthetic concerns. Using visual tools when communicating with patients can help clinicians avoid unrealistic expectations while improving patient satisfaction. They can also help maximize dental team communication and ensure that all components, from the diagnostic wax-up to the final restorations, are completed predictably. By addressing patients' conditions and functionality first, and then actively listening to their aesthetic desires, clinicians are better equipped to create functional restorations that realistically meet their patients' aesthetic expectations.

  2. Restorative Treatment Thresholds for Proximal Caries in Dental PBRN

    PubMed Central

    Kakudate, N.; Sumida, F.; Matsumoto, Y.; Manabe, K.; Yokoyama, Y.; Gilbert, G.H.; Gordan, V.V.

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to assess caries treatment thresholds among Japanese dentists and to identify characteristics associated with their decision to intervene surgically in proximal caries lesions within the enamel. Participants (n = 189) were shown radiographic images depicting interproximal caries and asked to indicate the lesion depth at which they would surgically intervene in both high- and low-caries-risk scenarios. Differences in treatment thresholds were then assessed via chi-square tests, and associations between the decision to intervene and dentist, practice, and patient characteristics were analyzed via logistic regression. The proportion of dentists who indicated surgical intervention into enamel was significantly higher in the high-caries-risk scenario (73.8%, N = 138) than in the low-caries-risk scenario (46.5%, N = 87) (p < 0.001). In multivariate analyses for a high-caries-risk scenario, gender of dentist, city population, type of practice, conducting caries-risk assessment, and administering diet counseling were significant factors associated with surgical enamel intervention. However, for a low-caries-risk scenario, city population, type of practice, and use of a dental explorer were the factors significantly associated with surgical enamel intervention. These findings demonstrate that restorative treatment thresholds for interproximal primary caries differ by caries risk. Most participants would restore lesions within the enamel for high-caries-risk individuals (Clinicaltrials.gov registration number NCT01680848). PMID:23053847

  3. The Impact of Aesthetics in Restorative Treatment Planning.

    PubMed

    Little, David

    2015-05-01

    Although patients frequently request enhanced aesthetics, additional considerations--including tooth structure and gingival condition, function, form, and communication--also contribute to treatment planning and successful outcomes. While some patients may only desire and require aesthetic alterations, others may require treatments that are more complicated (eg, surgery) in order to achieve their desired results. Thorough assessment and communication between the dentist and patient, as well as among all members of the dental team, prior to and throughout treatment planning, ensures that any problems, conditions, or complications are addressed before or alongside aesthetic concerns. Using visual tools when communicating with patients can help clinicians avoid unrealistic expectations while improving patient satisfaction. They can also help maximize dental team communication and ensure that all components, from the diagnostic wax-up to the final restorations, are completed predictably. By addressing patients' conditions and functionality first, and then actively listening to their aesthetic desires, clinicians are better equipped to create functional restorations that realistically meet their patients' aesthetic expectations. PMID:26470580

  4. Crown lengthening and restorative treatment in mutilated molars.

    PubMed

    Parashis, A; Tripodakis, A

    1994-03-01

    Crown lengthening has been advocated as a treatment modality to restore teeth with a clinical crown reduced subsequent to different kinds of trauma. Multirooted teeth, however, present certain anatomic features, such as the furcation area and corresponding interradicular bone, the retromolar area, and the external oblique ridge, that may limit the possibility for soft tissue and bone reduction and minimize the effectiveness of crown-lengthening procedures. This article describes surgical modifications to overcome the anatomic difficulties that multirooted teeth present when crown lengthening is required. Furthermore, root resection is discussed as an alternative to conventional surgery when the latter is not possible.

  5. Treatment of "non-restorable" teeth. A case report.

    PubMed

    Donly, K J

    1991-08-01

    The purpose of this article is to present a case report of the dental care for permanent teeth that were originally considered "non-restorable". The temporary placement of stainless steel crowns was completed, followed by traditional endodontic therapy. The crowns were used as build-up matrices, access being prepared in the occlusal of the crown. Glass ionomer silver was then placed, followed by marginal finishing. Although this report is an isolated case, and is considered as temporary treatment, there may be indications to consider this technique for clinical care, on an individual basis.

  6. The direct posterior esthetic restoration using state-of-the-art composite resin technology.

    PubMed

    Pescatore, C

    2000-01-01

    As a result of the evolution of both materials and techniques, the direct posterior composite restoration has become a common procedure in today's dental practice. Advances in the adhesive protocol have allowed for the conservative preparation of the dentition by using the micromechanical potential of the sound tooth structure. Improvements of composite resin materials have further enabled the practitioner to re-create the natural esthetic beauty of the dentition while at the same time restoring the functional morphology. This article describes the technical protocol and materials necessary to perform the direct posterior composite restoration in the posterior dentition.

  7. Surgical ventricular restoration for the treatment of heart failure.

    PubMed

    Buckberg, Gerald; Athanasuleas, Constantine; Conte, John

    2012-12-01

    Heart failure (HF) is an emerging epidemic affecting 15 million people in the USA and Europe. HF-related mortality was unchanged between 1995 and 2009, despite a decrease in the incidence of cardiovascular disease. Conventional explanations include an aging population and improved treatment of acute myocardial infarction and HF. An adverse relationship between structure and function is the central theme in patients with systolic dysfunction. The normal elliptical ventricular shape becomes spherical in ischemic, valvular, and nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy. Therapeutic decisions should be made on the basis of ventricular volume rather than ejection fraction. When left ventricular end-systolic volume index exceeds 60 ml/m², medical therapy, CABG surgery, and mitral repair have limited benefit. This form-function relationship can be corrected by surgical ventricular restoration (SVR), which returns the ventricle to a normal volume and shape. Consistent early and late benefits in the treatment of ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy with SVR have been reported in >5,000 patients from various international centers. The prospective, randomized STICH trial did not confirm these findings and the reasons for this discrepancy are examined in detail. Future surgical options for SVR in nonischemic and valvular dilated cardiomyopathy, and its integration with left ventricular assist devices and cell therapy, are described.

  8. HIV Care and Treatment Beliefs among Patients Initiating Antiretroviral Treatment (ART) in Oromia, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Tymejczyk, Olga; Hoffman, Susie; Kulkarni, Sarah Gorrell; Gadisa, Tsigereda; Lahuerta, Maria; Remien, Robert H; Elul, Batya; El-Sadr, Wafaa; Melaku, Zenebe; Nash, Denis

    2016-05-01

    To better understand patient beliefs, which may influence adherence to HIV care and treatment, we examined three dimensions of beliefs among Ethiopian adults (n = 1177) initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART). Beliefs about benefits of ART/HIV clinical care were largely accurate, but few patients believed in the ability of ART to prevent sexual transmission and many thought Holy Water could cure HIV. Factors associated with lower odds of accurate beliefs included advanced HIV, lack of formal education, and Muslim religion (benefits of ART/clinical care); secondary or university education and more clinic visits (ART to prevent sexual transmission); and pregnancy and Orthodox Christian religion (Holy Water). Assessment of patient beliefs may help providers identify areas needing reinforcement. In this setting, counselors also need to stress the benefits of ART as prevention and that Holy Water should not be used to the exclusion of HIV care and ART.

  9. Restoration treatments in urban park forests drive long-term changes in vegetation trajectories.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Lea R; Handel, Steven N

    2016-04-01

    Municipalities are turning to ecological restoration of urban forests as a measure to improve air quality, ameliorate urban heat island effects, improve storm water infiltration, and provide other social and ecological benefits. However, community dynamics following urban forest restoration treatments are poorly documented. This study examines the long-term effects of ecological restoration undertaken in New York City, New York, USA, to restore native forest in urban park natural areas invaded by woody non-native plants that are regional problems. In 2009 and 2010, we sampled vegetation in 30 invaded sites in three large public parks that were restored 1988-1993, and 30 sites in three large parks that were similarly invaded but had not been restored. Data from these matched plots reveal that the restoration treatment achieved its central goals. After 15-20 years, invasive species removal followed by native tree planting resulted in persistent structural and compositional shifts, significantly lower invasive species abundance, a more complex forest structure, and greater native tree recruitment. Together, these findings indicate that successional trajectories of vegetation dynamics have diverged between restored forests and invaded forests that were not restored. In addition, the data suggest that future composition of these urban forest patches will be novel assemblages. Restored and untreated sites shared a suite of shade-intolerant, quickly-growing tree species that colonize disturbed sites, indicating that restoration treatments created sites hospitable for germination and growth of species adapted to high light conditions and disturbed soils. These findings yield an urban perspective on the use of succession theory in ecological restoration. Models of ecological restoration developed in more pristine environments must be modified for use in cities. By anticipating both urban disturbances and ecological succession, management of urban forest patches can be

  10. The Restorative and Transformative Power of the Arts in Conflict Resolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bang, April Hyoeun

    2016-01-01

    The discipline of the arts has much to contribute to the field of conflict resolution. This article broadly investigates how artistic engagement facilitates transformative learning and the development of skills and capacities for more constructive engagement with conflict. Many scholar practitioners have acknowledged the widespread use of…

  11. Inositol Treatment and ART Outcomes in Women with PCOS

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Deepika

    2016-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) affects 5–10% of women in reproductive age and is characterized by oligo/amenorrhea, androgen excess, insulin resistance, and typical polycystic ovarian morphology. It is the most common cause of infertility secondary to ovulatory dysfunction. The underlying etiology is still unknown but is believed to be multifactorial. Insulin-sensitizing compounds such as inositol, a B-complex vitamin, and its stereoisomers (myo-inositol and D-chiro-inositol) have been studied as an effective treatment of PCOS. Administration of inositol in PCOS has been shown to improve not only the metabolic and hormonal parameters but also ovarian function and the response to assisted-reproductive technology (ART). Accumulating evidence suggests that it is also capable of improving folliculogenesis and embryo quality and increasing the mature oocyte yield following ovarian stimulation for ART in women with PCOS. In the current review, we collate the evidence and summarize our current knowledge on ovarian stimulation and ART outcomes following inositol treatment in women with PCOS undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF) and/or intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). PMID:27795706

  12. Multidisciplinary treatment of a subgingivally fractured tooth with indirect composite restoration: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ulusoy, Ayca T; Tunc, Emine Sen; Cil, Feride; Isci, Devrim; Lutfioglu, Muge

    2012-01-01

    In pediatric patients, anterior teeth with fractures that extend subgingivally require a complex treatment plan that addresses biologic, esthetic, and functional factors, such as mastication and speech. The purpose of this clinical report was to describe a technique using indirect composite restoration to restore a subgingivally fractured permanent maxillary right central incisor in a 10-year-old boy. Due to the complex nature of the treatment, a multidisciplinary approach was used to restore the tooth. The crown fragment was removed, and endodontic treatment was performed. The tooth was then extruded orthodontically. A glass fiber post was placed to improve retention, and an indirect composite restoration was placed. A clinical and radiographic evaluation at a follow-up appointment 1 year later confirmed that the technique used in this case can be a good option for restoring anterior teeth with subgingival fractures.

  13. The effectiveness of art therapy in the treatment of traumatized adults: a systematic review on art therapy and trauma.

    PubMed

    Schouten, Karin Alice; de Niet, Gerrit J; Knipscheer, Jeroen W; Kleber, Rolf J; Hutschemaekers, Giel J M

    2015-04-01

    Art therapy has often been applied in the treatment of traumatized adults, and good results in clinical practice have been reported. However, although art therapy experts underline these benefits, the effectiveness of art therapy in trauma treatment has not been established by systematic review. The aim of this systematic review is to identify and evaluate empirical evidence of the effectiveness of art therapy for trauma treatment. As a result of the systematic review, six controlled, comparative studies on art therapy for trauma in adult patients were found. In half of the included studies, a significant decrease in psychological trauma symptoms was found in the treatment groups, and one study reported a significant decrease in depression. Although there are limitations in the number of included studies, the number of participants, the heterogeneity of included studies, and their methodological quality, the results contribute to insight into the effectiveness of art therapy in trauma treatment and form an evidence base for the urgent need for further research on art therapy and trauma treatment.

  14. Periodontal and Restorative Treatment of Gingival Recession Associated with Non-Carious Cervical Lesions: Case Study.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Analice Giovani; Teixeira, Daniela Navarro Ribeiro; Soares, Michelle Pereira Costa Mundim; Gonzaga, Ramon Corrêa de Queiroz; Fernandes-Neto, Alfredo Júlio; Soares, Paulo Vinícius

    2016-01-01

    The association between the presence of gingival recession and non-carious cervical lesions is a common finding in dentistry. These diseases have multifactorial etiology and the treatment should be multidisciplinary. Although traditionally the majority of professionals treat non-carious cervical lesions only with conventional restorative procedures, in most cases a combination of periodontal and restorative treatments provides the best functional and esthetic results. Thus, the objective of this case report was to present a new option for treatment, which consists of a subepithelial connective tissue graft associated with a coronally advanced flap placed on dentin and non-carious cervical lesions restored with lithium disilicate partial veneers. A patient complaining about the esthetic aspects of her teeth and cervical dentin hypersensitivity was submitted to occlusal adjustments and daily diet analysis in order to manage etiologic factors. Experienced operators then performed restorative and surgical treatments. Periodontal clinical attachment level (probing depth + gingival margin), bleeding on probing, plaque index, and the integrity of the restorations were observed. During the monitoring period, the treatment was effective, with good functional and esthetic results. The hypersensitivity disappeared, and neither inflammatory characteristics in gingival tissue nor failures in restorations were noted. It might be concluded that treatment with a combination of techniques can be effective and predictable for patients with gingival recession and non-carious cervical lesions that may or may not require restorative procedures under controlled conditions. PMID:26764967

  15. Hormone Treatment Restores Bone Density for Young Women with Menopause-Like Condition (Primary Ovarian Insufficiency)

    MedlinePlus

    ... determine the effects of hormone treatment on bone mineral density of women with primary ovarian insufficiency. Researchers ... insufficiency (POI) led to increases in their bone mineral density, restoring levels to normal. The study was ...

  16. Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arviso, Kathern; And Others

    Designed as a helpful guide and "how-to-do-it" outline for those on the Navajo Reservation who work with children, this guide is arranged to offer quick reference and simple projects requiring the minimum of materials. The projects are designed to meet the Navajo child's art needs based on the belief that the art program of the elementary school…

  17. Restoration treatments in urban park forests drive long-term changes in vegetation trajectories.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Lea R; Handel, Steven N

    2016-04-01

    Municipalities are turning to ecological restoration of urban forests as a measure to improve air quality, ameliorate urban heat island effects, improve storm water infiltration, and provide other social and ecological benefits. However, community dynamics following urban forest restoration treatments are poorly documented. This study examines the long-term effects of ecological restoration undertaken in New York City, New York, USA, to restore native forest in urban park natural areas invaded by woody non-native plants that are regional problems. In 2009 and 2010, we sampled vegetation in 30 invaded sites in three large public parks that were restored 1988-1993, and 30 sites in three large parks that were similarly invaded but had not been restored. Data from these matched plots reveal that the restoration treatment achieved its central goals. After 15-20 years, invasive species removal followed by native tree planting resulted in persistent structural and compositional shifts, significantly lower invasive species abundance, a more complex forest structure, and greater native tree recruitment. Together, these findings indicate that successional trajectories of vegetation dynamics have diverged between restored forests and invaded forests that were not restored. In addition, the data suggest that future composition of these urban forest patches will be novel assemblages. Restored and untreated sites shared a suite of shade-intolerant, quickly-growing tree species that colonize disturbed sites, indicating that restoration treatments created sites hospitable for germination and growth of species adapted to high light conditions and disturbed soils. These findings yield an urban perspective on the use of succession theory in ecological restoration. Models of ecological restoration developed in more pristine environments must be modified for use in cities. By anticipating both urban disturbances and ecological succession, management of urban forest patches can be

  18. [Lead poisoning caused by stonework treatment in architectural restoration].

    PubMed

    Bellotto, E; Zanin, F; Zanon, P; Busetto, D

    1994-01-01

    An unexpected lead exposure occurred among a team of masons employed in restoration work of the facade of an 18th century church in Vicenza, Italy. The unusual case of lead intoxication (PbB up to 71 micrograms/dL, PbU-EDTA 8636 micrograms/24 h after the first 1 g dose of Na2Ca EDTA) in a mason suffering from abdominal pain was reported to our unit by the local General Hospital. An investigation on the possible sources was therefore set up and the source was identified in the removal of an old paint made of white lead (basic lead carbonate) from the statues and decorative stonework of the church. An extension of the investigation confirmed that many sculptures and stonework from the same period, especially in religious buildings, were treated in the same way. The biological exposure indices of the subject's work fellows also confirmed an abnormal lead absorption. The occupational risks involved in various methods in restoration crafts are evaluated and preventive measures are suggested. PMID:7731409

  19. Survey of Croatian Dentists’ Restorative Treatment Decisions on Approximal Caries Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Baraba, Anja; Anić, Ivica; Doméjean-Orliaguet, Sophie; Espelid, Ivar; Tveit, Anne B.; Miletić, Ivana

    2010-01-01

    Aim To assess Croatian dentists’ restorative treatment decisions on approximal caries lesions, including treatment threshold and restorative methods and materials. Methods Croatian translation of the questionnaire assessing restorative treatment decisions on approximal caries, previously validated and used in Norway and Sweden, was distributed to a random sample (n = 800) of Croatian dentists. A total of 307 (38%) dentists answered the questionnaire. The assessed variables were treatment threshold for hypothetical approximal caries lesion and the most favored types of restorative techniques and materials. Results A third of the respondents (39%, 95% confidence interval [CI], 34-44%) would intervene for an approximal caries lesion at the dentin-enamel junction, but a larger proportion (42%; 95% CI, 36-48%) would treat a caries lesion confined to the enamel. For restoration of approximal caries, the majority (66%; 95% CI, 61-71%) would use composite resin. Conclusion Croatian dentists tend to restore approximal caries lesions when the lesions are confined to the enamel and their development can still be arrested. PMID:21162163

  20. Multidisciplinary treatment approach to restore deep horizontally fractured maxillary central incisor.

    PubMed

    Patil, Pravinkumar G; Nimbalkar-Patil, Smita P; Karandikar, Aamod B

    2014-01-01

    This case report demonstrates sequential periodontic, orthodontic and prosthodontic treatment modalities to save and restore deep horizontally fractured maxillary central incisor. The location of fracture was deep in the mucosa which reveals less than 2 mm of tooth structure to receive the crown. The procedures like surgical crown lengthening, endodontic post placement, orthodontic forced eruption, core build-up and metal-ceramic crown restoration were sequentially performed to conserve the fractured tooth. Forced eruption is preferred to surgical removal of supporting alveolar bone, since forced eruption preserves the biologic width, maintains esthetics, and at the same time exposes sound tooth structure for the placement of restorative margins.

  1. Restoration of Endodontically Treated Teeth Review and Treatment Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Slutzky-Goldberg, Iris; Slutzky, Hagay; Gorfil, Colin; Smidt, Ami

    2009-01-01

    Coronal restorations and posts can positively influence the long-term prognosis of teeth following root canal therapy. Final sealing the canal by placing an appropriate post and core will minimize leakage of oral fluids and bacteria into the periradicular area and is recommended as soon as possible after completion of root canal filling. Glass ionomer or MTA placed over the residual root canal filling after post space preparation may be effective to prevent bacterial leakage. A ferrule of 1-2 mm of tooth tissue coronal to the finish line of the crown significantly improves the fracture resistance of the tooth and is more important than the type of the material the core and post are made of. PMID:20309408

  2. Treatment of traumatic injuries in the front teeth: restorative aspects in crown fractures.

    PubMed

    Dietschi, D; Jacoby, T; Dietschi, J M; Schatz, J P

    2000-10-01

    Crown fractures are the most common form of traumatic dental injuries encountered in permanent dentition. Restorative treatment modalities incorporate adhesive materials to effectively maintain function and aesthetics. While uncomplicated injuries of the enamel and/or dentin can be treated solely with adhesive procedures, complicated trauma that involves pulp exposure requires the incorporation of a multidisciplinary treatment approach. Fragment reattachment is facilitated by the utilization of bonding agents that enhance retention and aesthetics. This article discusses the application of provisional and permanent restorative options for the treatment of complications following traumatic injuries.

  3. The Life Cycle of Images: Revisiting the Ethical Treatment of the Art Therapy Image

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinz, Lisa D.

    2013-01-01

    Using the metaphor of the human life cycle, the author of this viewpoint suggests that consideration of the birth, life, and death of images made in art therapy may promote a new perspective on their ethical treatment. A developmental view of images encourages art therapists to see art images as living entities that undergo a natural life cycle.…

  4. ART: a minimal intervention approach to manage dental caries.

    PubMed

    Frencken, Jo E; Holmgren, Christopher J

    2004-06-01

    The number of studies investigating aspects of the Atraumatic Restorative Treatment (ART) approach has increased in recent years. This tissue preservative treatment approach appears to be less painful and is, therefore, more patient-friendly than conventional caries treatments. The investigations so far have shown that the ART approach is effective for the management of single-surface cavities in both deciduous and permanent dentitions. There appears to be no difference in survival results between single-surface ART restorations and comparable amalgam restorations in the permanent dentition after three years. The surface wear of ART restorations using high-viscosity glass-ionomers after two years is low. ART sealants using high-viscosity glass-ionomers are retained longer than ART sealants using low-viscosity glass-ionomers after three years. It is concluded that the ART approach is beneficial in improving the oral health of many, not only in developing but also in more advanced countries.

  5. No Child Left behind Strikes the Arts: How Can We Restore a Balance among the Studies in the Arts, Sciences, and Humanities?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, Judith A.

    2007-01-01

    Most Americans actually understand the importance of an education rich in arts, science and humanities. But what they may not realize is that their children are not getting enough. Each day more and more of the arts and humanities are being drained from our nation's school curriculums. Studies have shown that the arts play a stimulating role in…

  6. Esthetic restorations of maxillary anterior teeth with orthodontic treatment and porcelain laminate veneers: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Ji-Eun; Kim, Sung-Hun; Han, Jung-Suk; Yang, Jae-Ho

    2010-01-01

    If orthodontists and restorative dentists establish the interdisciplinary approach to esthetic dentistry, the esthetic and functional outcome of their combined efforts will be greatly enhanced. This article describes satisfying esthetic results obtained by the distribution of space for restoration by orthodontic treatment and porcelain laminate veneers in uneven space between maxillary anterior teeth. It is proposed that the use of orthodontic treatment for re-distribution of the space and the use of porcelain laminate veneers to alter crown anatomy provide maximum esthetic and functional correction for patients with irregular interdental spacing. PMID:21165191

  7. The effect of baking soda when applied to bleached enamel prior to restorative treatment.

    PubMed

    Tostes, Bhenya Ottoni; Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia; Lima-Arsati, Ynara Bosco de Oliveira; Rodrigues, Jose Augusto; Costa, Leonardo Cesar

    2013-08-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the effect of 10% baking soda solution and sodium bicarbonate powder (applied with jets) when applied to bleached enamel prior to restorative treatment. The surfaces of 40 bovine incisors were flattened and divided into 5 groups (n = 8): Group B (bleached and restored, negative control), Group W (bleached, stored in distilled water for 7 days, and restored), Group BSJ (bleached, abraded with baking soda jet for 1 min, and restored), Group BSS (bleached, application of 10% baking soda solution for 5 min, and restored), and Group R (restored, without bleaching, positive control). The samples were bleached in 1 session with 3 applications of 35% HP-based gel and activated with a LED appliance for 9 min each. Resin composite cylinders (2 mm height and 0.8 mm diameter) were made on the enamel surface after the acid etching and a conventional 1-step single vial adhesive application was performed. After storage in distilled water (37 ± 1°C, 24 hr), the microshear bond test was performed (1 mm/min). ANOVA and Tukey tests were applied to compare the results. The mean results of these tests showed that Groups W, BBS, and R were not statistically different. These groups also indicated a higher bond strength when compared with Groups B and BSJ. The application of 10% baking soda solution for 5 min may be an alternative pre-restorative treatment for bleached enamel, but further studies are needed to consider whether or not this treatment may be effectively used in clinical practice.

  8. The effect of baking soda when applied to bleached enamel prior to restorative treatment.

    PubMed

    Tostes, Bhenya Ottoni; Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia; Lima-Arsati, Ynara Bosco de Oliveira; Rodrigues, Jose Augusto; Costa, Leonardo Cesar

    2013-08-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the effect of 10% baking soda solution and sodium bicarbonate powder (applied with jets) when applied to bleached enamel prior to restorative treatment. The surfaces of 40 bovine incisors were flattened and divided into 5 groups (n = 8): Group B (bleached and restored, negative control), Group W (bleached, stored in distilled water for 7 days, and restored), Group BSJ (bleached, abraded with baking soda jet for 1 min, and restored), Group BSS (bleached, application of 10% baking soda solution for 5 min, and restored), and Group R (restored, without bleaching, positive control). The samples were bleached in 1 session with 3 applications of 35% HP-based gel and activated with a LED appliance for 9 min each. Resin composite cylinders (2 mm height and 0.8 mm diameter) were made on the enamel surface after the acid etching and a conventional 1-step single vial adhesive application was performed. After storage in distilled water (37 ± 1°C, 24 hr), the microshear bond test was performed (1 mm/min). ANOVA and Tukey tests were applied to compare the results. The mean results of these tests showed that Groups W, BBS, and R were not statistically different. These groups also indicated a higher bond strength when compared with Groups B and BSJ. The application of 10% baking soda solution for 5 min may be an alternative pre-restorative treatment for bleached enamel, but further studies are needed to consider whether or not this treatment may be effectively used in clinical practice. PMID:23928450

  9. Semidirect Restorations in Multidisciplinary Treatment: Viable Option for Children and Teenagers.

    PubMed

    Tonetto, Mateus Rodrigues; Frizzera, Fausto; Silva, Monica Barros da; Bhandi, Shilpa H; Kuga, Milton Carlos; Pereira, Kamila Figueiredo; Pinzan-Vercelino, Célia Regina Maio; Bandéca, Matheus Coelho

    2015-04-01

    Due to the esthetic necessity required nowadays, the multidisciplinary treatment became a fundamental step in the restoration success. When the patient exhibits dental agenesis of one or more elements, he can show difficulty in social interactions. The age of the patient is a limiting factor to esthetic procedures, however, it should be evaluated as a real indicative with each case. The utilization of semi-direct restorations is a viable option due the cost, esthetic and improvement of physical and mechanical properties. The purpose of this paper is to present a case detailing the confection and cementation of anterior semi-direct restorations aimed at an anatomic reestablishment associated with integrated treatment with periodontics and orthodontics.

  10. Treatment of extended anterior crown fractures using Type IIIA bonded porcelain restorations.

    PubMed

    Magne, Pascal; Magne, Michel

    2005-05-01

    Novel-design bonded porcelain restorations, the so-called Type IIIA BPRs, represent a reliable and effective procedure when restoring large parts of the coronal volume and length in the anterior dentition. While traditional treatment approaches involve the removal of large amounts of sound tooth substance (with adverse effects on the pulp, gingivae and crown biomechanics, as well as serious financial consequences), the use of adhesive technology instead can provide maximum preservation of tissues and limited costs. Considerable advantages, such as the economical and noninvasive treatment of crown-fractured teeth, are inherent to Type IIIA bonded porcelain restorations, reducing the need for preprosthetic interventions (e.g., root canal therapy and crown-lengthening) and the use of intraradicular posts. This article, illustrated with cases with up to eight and 10 years' follow-up, sets the scientific foundations of this concept, as well as important considerations about function, strength, tooth preparation, laboratory technique, and bonding optimization. PMID:16033038

  11. Restorative treatment decision making with unaided visual examination, intraoral camera and operating microscope.

    PubMed

    Erten, Hülya; Uçtasli, Mine Betül; Akarslan, Zühre Zafersoy; Uzun, Ozgür; Semiz, Mustafa

    2006-01-01

    This study assessed the restorative treatment options of the occlusal surfaces of teeth examined with unaided visual assistance, an intraoral camera and an operating microscope. Sixty-eight extracted human molars were mounted to perform mouth models with a premolar in contact on both sides. Four observers examined the models in a phantom head, which simulated clinical conditions, using three techniques: unaided visual examination, intraoral camera and operating microscope. The observers were asked to assess the occlusal surface of each tooth and make a treatment decision based on the following scale: 1) the occlusal surface being sound and "not needing a restoration," 2) the occlusal surface having a subsurface or enamel lesion. No operative treatment was needed at this visit, but special attention was given to this surface at recall visits: "preventive care-defer treatment" and 3) the surface had a carious lesion and "needed a restoration." The teeth were then sectioned in the mesio-distal direction and examined under a stereomicroscope with 10x magnification to determine the true extent of caries. Statistical analysis was conducted by calculating percentages and kappa values of the restorative treatment scores based on examinations by four observers. According to all the observers' treatment decisions, the kappa values were found to be 0.341 (p<0.001), 0.471 (p<0.001) and 0.345 (p<0.001) for unaided visual examination, intra-oral camera and operating microscope, respectively. There was a statistically significant difference between the intraoral camera and the other two methods (p<0.05), while there was no significant difference between the unaided visual examination and operating microscope (p>0.05). As a result of a comparison between the unaided visual examination and operating microscope, the use of an intraoral camera improved the restorative treatment decisions of the occlusal surfaces on posterior teeth.

  12. Transitional bonding for segmented treatment: a two-phase restorative approach.

    PubMed

    Grabiel, Jeffrey C

    2015-04-01

    When extensive dental therapy is needed, as in cases of severe attrition, interim restorations are useful in determining whether or not the proposed treatment will be successful. Transitional resin bonding is one type of interim method. In this case report, a 60-year-old patient presented with severely worn maxillary and mandibular anterior teeth; he desired treatment to be done in a timely fashion so as to be ready to attend an important wedding. Due to the urgency in timing and the complexity of the case, the treatment plan was a two-phase approach that included an initial esthetic and occlusal design to create a diagnostic wax-up followed by placement of transitional composite resin bonding, and then placement of indirect porcelain restorations. This transitional bonding approach allowed comprehensive treatment to be completed at a pace suitable to the patient's needs.

  13. Biologic restoration: the effects of composite inlays on patient treatment plans.

    PubMed

    Bottacchiari, Stefano; De Paoli, Sergio; Bottacchiari, Paul A

    2011-04-01

    A technique for restoration of decayed and fractured teeth with composite inlays or onlays is presented. This approach conserves the tooth structure, requires less preprosthetic periodontal surgical intervention, and provides excellent functional results, while minimizing the incidence of post-therapeutic endodontic involvement. Two thousand seven teeth were restored using this technique over a period of 120 months, with a mean time of 59.6 months in function. The technique is described, and the advantages of this treatment modality are discussed. PMID:21491010

  14. An overview of treatment considerations for esthetic restorations: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Sadowsky, Steven Judd

    2006-12-01

    Controversy persists regarding the treatment planning criteria for esthetic restorations. This article reviews the literature regarding the biocompatibility, marginal adaptation, color matching, patient selection, technique sensitivity, and mode and rate of failure of tooth-colored restorations. A Medline search was completed for the period from 1986 to 2006, along with a manual search, to identify pertinent English peer-reviewed articles and textbooks. The key words used were amalgam, posterior composite resin, ceramic inlays/onlays, CEREC, porcelain laminate veneers, all-ceramic crowns, and all-ceramic fixed partial dentures.

  15. Association of assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatment and parental infertility diagnosis with autism in ART-conceived children

    PubMed Central

    Kissin, D.M.; Zhang, Y.; Boulet, S.L.; Fountain, C.; Bearman, P.; Schieve, L.; Yeargin-Allsopp, M.; Jamieson, D.J.

    2015-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Are assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatment factors or infertility diagnoses associated with autism among ART-conceived children? SUMMARY ANSWER Our study suggests that the incidence of autism diagnosis in ART-conceived children during the first 5 years of life was higher when intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) was used compared with conventional IVF, and lower when parents had unexplained infertility (among singletons) or tubal factor infertility (among multiples) compared with other types of infertility. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY Some studies found an increased risk of autism among ART-conceived infants compared with spontaneously-conceived infants. However, few studies, and none in the USA, have examined the associations between types of ART procedures and parental infertility diagnoses with autism among ART-conceived children. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION Population-based retrospective cohort study using linkages between National ART Surveillance System (NASS) data for 1996–2006, California Birth Certificate data for 1997–2006, and California Department of Developmental Services (DDS) Autism Caseload data for 1997–2011. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS All live born ART-conceived infants born in California in 1997–2006 (n = 42 383) with 5-year observation period were included in the study. We assessed the annual incidence of autism diagnosis documented in DDS, which includes information on the vast majority of persons with autism in California, and the association of autism diagnosis with ART treatment factors and infertility diagnoses. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE Among ART-conceived singletons born in California between 1997 and 2006, the incidence of autism diagnosis remained at ∼0.8% (P for trend 0.19) and was lower with parental diagnosis of unexplained infertility (adjusted hazard risk ratio [aHRR]; 95% confidence interval: 0.38; 0.15–0.94) and higher when ICSI was used (aHRR 1.65; 1.08–2.52), when

  16. Competency restoration treatment: differences between defendants declared competent or incompetent to stand trial.

    PubMed

    Advokat, Claire D; Guidry, Devan; Burnett, Darla M R; Manguno-Mire, Gina; Thompson, John W

    2012-01-01

    Archival data of inpatient defendants referred for competency restoration were used to make comparisons between those who were restored to competency (CST; n = 43) and those who remained incompetent (IST; n = 15). The groups did not differ on demographic variables, intellectual capacity, type of offense (violent versus nonviolent), clinical diagnoses, substance abuse, or psychotic symptomatology, as measured by the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale. However, the CST group performed significantly better than the IST group on both the initial and final Georgia Court Competency Test and Global Assessment of Functioning scale. Psychotic symptom severity decreased significantly only in the CST group, and the CST group was discharged significantly sooner (7.7 ± 8.6 months) than the IST group (17.9 ± 7.0 months). While consistent with prior research, this is the first study to compare both psycholegal comprehension and specific clinical symptoms in defendants before and after competency restoration treatment.

  17. Innovative systems for cultural heritage conservation. Millimeter wave application for non-invasive monitoring and treatment of works of art.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Bisceglia; De Leo, Roberto; Pastore, Anna Pia; von Gratowski, Svetlana; Meriakri, Viatcheslav

    2011-01-01

    A novel non invasive technique and a suitable apparatus for disinfestation of artworks is introduced. Non destructive and non invasive techniques are often irreplaceable in order to preserve and restore cultural heritage objects in its structure and shape. Although many techniques are available for art and archaeological works the non invasive methods are preferred as they leave the object untouched after treatment. Environmental parameters, such as humidity, can damage culture heritage objects and also results in spring up variety of pests and other micro-organisms. Non-invasive monitoring of these damage and also disinfestation treatments and drying with help of electromagnetic waves are preferred as they keep the object untouched after treatment. Application of millimeter waves for solving this problem is discussed here. Millimeter waves have high spatial resolution and absorption in water as well as in bio-objects that are usually moist and at the same time minimal interaction with dry culture heritage objects by itself. Different phases of the microwaves treatment (MW) of artworks are described, some results are shown and discussed. Many biological forms don't survive over a certain temperature, called lethal temperature which, for most xylophages is about 53-55 degrees C, while for moulds and funguses is between 65 and 70 degrees C. In order to evaluate the management of disinfestation of works of art, incident power, temperature, exposure time were monitored. The monitoring of temperature is essential in order to prevent damages. A computer simulation allows to predict and monitor the heating process.

  18. Integrated monitoring and assessment of soil restoration treatments in the Lake Tahoe Basin.

    PubMed

    Grismer, M E; Schnurrenberger, C; Arst, R; Hogan, M P

    2009-03-01

    Revegetation and soil restoration efforts, often associated with erosion control measures on disturbed soils, are rarely monitored or otherwise evaluated in terms of improved hydrologic, much less, ecologic function and longer term sustainability. As in many watersheds, sediment is a key parameter of concern in the Tahoe Basin, particularly fine sediments less than about ten microns. Numerous erosion control measures deployed in the Basin during the past several decades have under-performed, or simply failed after a few years and new soil restoration methods of erosion control are under investigation. We outline a comprehensive, integrated field-based evaluation and assessment of the hydrologic function associated with these soil restoration methods with the hypothesis that restoration of sustainable function will result in longer term erosion control benefits than that currently achieved with more commonly used surface treatment methods (e.g. straw/mulch covers and hydroseeding). The monitoring includes cover-point and ocular assessments of plant cover, species type and diversity; soil sampling for nutrient status; rainfall simulation measurement of infiltration and runoff rates; cone penetrometer measurements of soil compaction and thickness of mulch layer depths. Through multi-year hydrologic and vegetation monitoring at ten sites and 120 plots, we illustrate the results obtained from the integrated monitoring program and describe how it might guide future restoration efforts and monitoring assessments.

  19. Treatment of noncarious cervical lesions by a subepithelial connective tissue graft versus a composite resin restoration.

    PubMed

    Leybovich, Martin; Bissada, Nabil F; Teich, Sorin; Demko, Catherine A; Ricchetti, Paul A

    2014-01-01

    This study compared two treatments for mild noncarious cervical lesions (NCCLs): a subepithelial connective tissue graft (CTG) versus a Class V composite resin restoration (CRR). Twenty-six sites with NCCLs were randomly assigned to be treated by CTG or CRR. Periodontal health parameters and dentinal hypersensitivity (DH) were recorded at baseline and 3 months postoperatively. Esthetics was also evaluated at 3 months. Results showed a significant improvement in all periodontal health parameters in the CTG treatment. The CTG treatment attained a mean 82% defect coverage with 75% of sites achieving complete coverage. Patients rated the CTG treatment to be significantly more esthetic (P = .03), while a clinician panel did not see an esthetic difference (P = .86). There was no difference in DH reduction between the two treatments (P = .81). In conclusion, the CTG treatment is superior to the CRR treatment for NCCLs based on periodontal health parameters. From a patient point of view, the CTG is the more esthetic treatment.

  20. Treatment of noncarious cervical lesions by a subepithelial connective tissue graft versus a composite resin restoration.

    PubMed

    Leybovich, Martin; Bissada, Nabil F; Teich, Sorin; Demko, Catherine A; Ricchetti, Paul A

    2014-01-01

    This study compared two treatments for mild noncarious cervical lesions (NCCLs): a subepithelial connective tissue graft (CTG) versus a Class V composite resin restoration (CRR). Twenty-six sites with NCCLs were randomly assigned to be treated by CTG or CRR. Periodontal health parameters and dentinal hypersensitivity (DH) were recorded at baseline and 3 months postoperatively. Esthetics was also evaluated at 3 months. Results showed a significant improvement in all periodontal health parameters in the CTG treatment. The CTG treatment attained a mean 82% defect coverage with 75% of sites achieving complete coverage. Patients rated the CTG treatment to be significantly more esthetic (P = .03), while a clinician panel did not see an esthetic difference (P = .86). There was no difference in DH reduction between the two treatments (P = .81). In conclusion, the CTG treatment is superior to the CRR treatment for NCCLs based on periodontal health parameters. From a patient point of view, the CTG is the more esthetic treatment. PMID:25171035

  1. Cleidocranial Dysplasia Case Report: Remodeling of Teeth as Aesthetic Restorative Treatment

    PubMed Central

    da Cunha, Leonardo Fernandes; Caetano, Isabela Maria; Dalitz, Fernando; Gonzaga, Carla Castiglia; Mondelli, José

    2014-01-01

    Cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD), is an autosomal dominant disorder with a prevalence of 1 in 1,000,000 individuals. It is generally characterized by orofacial manifestations, including enamel hypoplasia, retained primary teeth, and impacted permanent and supernumerary teeth. The successful treatment involving a timing intervention (orthodontic-maxillofacial surgeons-restorative) is already described. However, the restorative treatment might improve the aesthetic final result in dentistry management for patients with cleidocranial dysplasia. Objective. Therefore, this clinical report presents a conservative restorative management (enamel microabrasion, dental bleaching, and direct composite resin) for aesthetic solution for a patient with CCD. Clinical Considerations. The cosmetic remodeling is a conservative, secure, and low cost therapy that can be associated with other procedures such as enamel microabrasion and dental bleaching to achieve optimal outcome. Additionally, the Golden Proportion can be used to guide dental remodeling to improve the harmony of the smile and the facial composition. Conclusions. Thus, dentists must know and be able to treat dental aesthetic problems in cleidocranial dysplasia patients. The intention of this paper is to describe a restorative approach with the cosmetic remodeling teeth (by grinding or addicting material) associated with enamel microabrasion and dental bleaching to reestablish the form, shape, and color of smile for patients with cleidocranial dysplasia. PMID:25045546

  2. Focusing and Expressive Arts Therapy as a Complementary Treatment for Women with Breast Cancer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klagsbrun, Joan; Rappaport, Laury; Speiser, Vivien Marcow; Post, Pamela; Byers, Julia; Stepakoff, Shanee; Karman, Shira

    2005-01-01

    This pilot study (N = 18) explored the effectiveness of focusing and expressive arts therapies intervention on the quality of life of women with breast cancer. The format was a 2-day (7 hours per day) retreat/support group in which complementary treatments (focusing, writing, art, and movement) were provided in an intensive format. Our hypothesis…

  3. Art Therapy Outcomes in the Rehabilitation Treatment of a Stroke Patient: A Case Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Sun-Hyun; Kim, Min-Young; Lee, Jae-Hyuk; Chun, Sae-il

    2008-01-01

    This case report discusses the potential for art therapy to aid in the recovery of early-chronic stroke patients. The patient was diagnosed with having a subarachnoid hemorrhage from a cerebral aneurysm rupture 1 year prior to hospitalization. Therapies used as part of the patient's treatment included 10 weeks of art therapy conducted twice a…

  4. Semi-arid aquifer responses to forest restoration treatments and climate change.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, Clinton J W; O'Donnell, Frances C; Springer, Abraham E

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an interpretive groundwater-flow model to assess the impacts that planned forest restoration treatments and anticipated climate change will have on large regional, deep (>400 m), semi-arid aquifers. Simulations were conducted to examine how tree basal area reductions impact groundwater recharge from historic conditions to 2099. Novel spatial analyses were conducted to determine areas and rates of potential increases in groundwater recharge. Changes in recharge were applied to the model by identifying zones of basal area reduction from planned forest restoration treatments and applying recharge-change factors to these zones. Over a 10-year period of forest restoration treatment, a 2.8% increase in recharge to one adjacent groundwater basin (the Verde Valley sub-basin) was estimated, compared to conditions that existed from 2000 to 2005. However, this increase in recharge was assumed to quickly decline after treatment due to regrowth of vegetation and forest underbrush and their associated increased evapotranspiration. Furthermore, simulated increases in groundwater recharge were masked by decreases in water levels, stream baseflow, and groundwater storage resulting from surface water diversions and groundwater pumping. These results indicate that there is an imbalance between water supply and demand in this regional, semi-arid aquifer. Current water management practices may not be sustainable into the far future and comprehensive action should be taken to minimize this water budget imbalance. PMID:24665998

  5. Semi-arid aquifer responses to forest restoration treatments and climate change.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, Clinton J W; O'Donnell, Frances C; Springer, Abraham E

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an interpretive groundwater-flow model to assess the impacts that planned forest restoration treatments and anticipated climate change will have on large regional, deep (>400 m), semi-arid aquifers. Simulations were conducted to examine how tree basal area reductions impact groundwater recharge from historic conditions to 2099. Novel spatial analyses were conducted to determine areas and rates of potential increases in groundwater recharge. Changes in recharge were applied to the model by identifying zones of basal area reduction from planned forest restoration treatments and applying recharge-change factors to these zones. Over a 10-year period of forest restoration treatment, a 2.8% increase in recharge to one adjacent groundwater basin (the Verde Valley sub-basin) was estimated, compared to conditions that existed from 2000 to 2005. However, this increase in recharge was assumed to quickly decline after treatment due to regrowth of vegetation and forest underbrush and their associated increased evapotranspiration. Furthermore, simulated increases in groundwater recharge were masked by decreases in water levels, stream baseflow, and groundwater storage resulting from surface water diversions and groundwater pumping. These results indicate that there is an imbalance between water supply and demand in this regional, semi-arid aquifer. Current water management practices may not be sustainable into the far future and comprehensive action should be taken to minimize this water budget imbalance.

  6. Effects of four different restoration treatments on the natural abundance of (15)n stable isotopes in plants.

    PubMed

    Temperton, Vicky M; Märtin, Lea L A; Röder, Daniela; Lücke, Andreas; Kiehl, Kathrin

    2012-01-01

    δ(15)N signals in plant and soil material integrate over a number of biogeochemical processes related to nitrogen (N) and therefore provide information on net effects of multiple processes on N dynamics. In general little is known in many grassland restoration projects on soil-plant N dynamics in relation to the restoration treatments. In particular, δ(15)N signals may be a useful tool to assess whether abiotic restoration treatments have produced the desired result. In this study we used the range of abiotic and biotic conditions provided by a restoration experiment to assess to whether the restoration treatments and/or plant functional identity and legume neighborhood affected plant δ(15)N signals. The restoration treatments consisted of hay transfer and topsoil removal, thus representing increasing restoration effort, from no restoration measures, through biotic manipulation to major abiotic manipulation. We measured δ(15)N and %N in six different plant species (two non-legumes and four legumes) across the restoration treatments. We found that restoration treatments were clearly reflected in δ(15)N of the non-legume species, with very depleted δ(15)N associated with low soil N, and our results suggest this may be linked to uptake of ammonium (rather than nitrate). The two non-legume species differed considerably in their δ(15)N signals, which may be related to the two species forming different kinds of mycorrhizal symbioses. Plant δ(15)N signals could clearly separate legumes from non-legumes, but our results did not allow for an assessment of legume neighborhood effects on non-legume δ(15)N signals. We discuss our results in the light of what the δ(15)N signals may be telling us about plant-soil N dynamics and their potential value as an indicator for N dynamics in restoration.

  7. Effects of Four Different Restoration Treatments on the Natural Abundance of 15N Stable Isotopes in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Temperton, Vicky M.; Märtin, Lea L. A.; Röder, Daniela; Lücke, Andreas; Kiehl, Kathrin

    2012-01-01

    δ15N signals in plant and soil material integrate over a number of biogeochemical processes related to nitrogen (N) and therefore provide information on net effects of multiple processes on N dynamics. In general little is known in many grassland restoration projects on soil–plant N dynamics in relation to the restoration treatments. In particular, δ15N signals may be a useful tool to assess whether abiotic restoration treatments have produced the desired result. In this study we used the range of abiotic and biotic conditions provided by a restoration experiment to assess to whether the restoration treatments and/or plant functional identity and legume neighborhood affected plant δ15N signals. The restoration treatments consisted of hay transfer and topsoil removal, thus representing increasing restoration effort, from no restoration measures, through biotic manipulation to major abiotic manipulation. We measured δ15N and %N in six different plant species (two non-legumes and four legumes) across the restoration treatments. We found that restoration treatments were clearly reflected in δ15N of the non-legume species, with very depleted δ15N associated with low soil N, and our results suggest this may be linked to uptake of ammonium (rather than nitrate). The two non-legume species differed considerably in their δ15N signals, which may be related to the two species forming different kinds of mycorrhizal symbioses. Plant δ15N signals could clearly separate legumes from non-legumes, but our results did not allow for an assessment of legume neighborhood effects on non-legume δ15N signals. We discuss our results in the light of what the δ15N signals may be telling us about plant–soil N dynamics and their potential value as an indicator for N dynamics in restoration. PMID:22645597

  8. Water Treatment Plant Sludges--An Update of the State of the Art: Part 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Water Works Association Journal, 1978

    1978-01-01

    This report outlines the state of the art with respect to nonmechanical and mechanical methods of dewatering water treatment plant sludge, ultimate solids disposal, and research and development needs. (CS)

  9. Original hypothesis: Extracorporeal shockwaves as a homeostatic autoimmune restorative treatment (HART) for Type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Craig, Kenneth; d'Agostino, Cristina; Poratt, Daniel; Walker, Marjorie

    2014-09-01

    Mononuclear invasion of Langerhans islet and the ensuing insulitis triggers signal-transduction for the autoimmune mediated pancreatic beta-cell (β-cell) apoptosis that severely disrupts insulin production resulting in hyperglycemia associated with Type-1 diabetes (T1DM). Today extensive global research is being conducted to eliminate the need for insulin, and even prevent or find a cure for T1DM. The multifactorial combination of autoimmune dysfunction, Langerhans islet hypoxia, and bio-chemical disruption are seen to be contributory factors for β-cell destruction and the consequential disruption to insulin production. Regeneration of β-cells back to physiological levels may restore homeostatic insulin levels, reversing T1DM. Evidence suggests that there are still functioning pancreatic β-cells even in long standing T1DM providing the potential for their regeneration. Although the exact mechanism of extracorporeal shockwaves (ESW) is yet to be fully elucidated, it is seen to influence a complex spectrum of bio-chemical, cellular and neuronal functions (i.e. suppression of pro-inflammatory immune response, improved tissue hemodynamics, anti-microbial properties, and the induction of progenitor cell expression including proangiogenic factors and nitric oxide syntheses). The rationale for the use of ESW as a therapeutic modality in this instance is attributed to its restorative properties and safety profile demonstrated in urology, cardiology, chronic wounds, osteogenesis, complex pain syndromes, and tendinopathies. ESW may restore autoimmune homeostasis creating a suitable environment for pancreatic β-cell proliferation which in-turn may significantly increase or normalize endogenous insulin secretion reducing or totally eliminating dependency of exogenous insulin. The devastating complications, morbidity and mortality associated with T1DM warrants the exploration of homeostatic autoimmune restorative treatment (HART) modalities that may partially or fully

  10. Attrition through Multiple Stages of Pre-Treatment and ART HIV Care in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Matthew P.; Shearer, Kate; Maskew, Mhairi; Meyer-Rath, Gesine; Clouse, Kate; Sanne, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Introduction While momentum for increasing treatment thresholds is growing, if patients cannot be retained in HIV care from the time of testing positive through long-term adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART), such strategies may fall short of expected gains. While estimates of retention on ART exist, few cohorts have data on retention from testing positive through long-term ART care. Methods We explored attrition (loss or death) at the Themba Lethu HIV clinic, Johannesburg, South Africa in 3 distinct cohorts enrolled at HIV testing, pre-ART initiation, and ART initiation. Results Between March 2010 and August 2012 we enrolled 380 patients testing HIV+, 206 initiating pre-ART care, and 185 initiating ART. Of the 380 patients enrolled at testing HIV-positive, 38.7% (95%CI: 33.9–43.7%) returned for eligibility staging within ≤3 months of testing. Of the 206 enrolled at pre-ART care, 84.5% (95%CI: 79.0–88.9%) were ART eligible at their first CD4 count. Of those, 87.9% (95%CI: 82.4–92.2%) initiated ART within 6 months. Among patients not ART eligible at their first CD4 count, 50.0% (95%CI: 33.1–66.9%) repeated their CD4 count within one year of the first ineligible CD4. Among the 185 patients in the ART cohort, 22 transferred out and were excluded from further analysis. Of the remaining 163, 81.0% (95%CI: 74.4–86.5%) were retained in care through two years on treatment. Conclusions Our findings from a well-resourced clinic demonstrate continual loss from all stages of HIV care and strategies to reduce attrition from all stages of care are urgently needed. PMID:25330087

  11. Crown lengthening to facilitate restorative treatment in the presence of incomplete passive eruption.

    PubMed

    Hempton, T J; Esrason, F

    2000-04-01

    Crown-lengthening surgery can be utilized to expose subgingival caries. In this clinical case, a patient presented with incomplete passive eruption in the maxillary anterior sextant. This case illustrates that when incomplete passive eruption is present and restorative treatment is necessary in the maxillary anterior sextant, crown-lengthening surgery not only provides exposure of subgingival caries but can also result in a more esthetic therapeutic outcome.

  12. Effects of alpha-tocopherol on fracture resistance after endodontic treatment, bleaching and restoration.

    PubMed

    Jordão-Basso, Keren Cristina Fagundes; Kuga, Milton Carlos; Dantas, Andrea Abi Rached; Tonetto, Mateus Rodrigues; Lima, Suellen Nogueira Linhares; Bandéca, Matheus Coêlho

    2016-05-20

    This study evaluated the effects of 10% alphatocopherol on the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth subjected to tooth bleaching with hydrogen peroxide and immediately restored with composite resin. Fifty bovine incisors were selected, including 10 sound teeth that constituted the control group (G1 (C)). The remaining 40 teeth, which were endodontically treated, were divided into four groups (n = 10): G2 (CR), consisting of teeth immediately restored with composite resin; G3 (HP + CR), consisting of teeth subjected to tooth bleaching with 38% hydrogen peroxide and immediately restored with composite resin; G4 (HP + SA + CR), which received treatment similar to that used for G3, but with 10% sodium ascorbate gel applied after the bleaching protocol; and G5 (HP + AT + CR), which was similar to G4 but included 10% alphatocopherol gel as an antioxidant. After 24 h, composite restorations were performed, and teeth were subjected to a fracture resistance test at a speed of 0.5 mm/min in an electromechanical testing machine. The axial force was applied with an angle of incidence of 135° relative to the long axis of the root. Data were subjected to ANOVA and Tukey tests (p = 0.05). G1 exhibited the highest fracture resistance (p < 0.05). No significant differences among the other experimental groups were observed. The 10% sodium ascorbate and 10% alphatocopherol gels did not improve the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth subjected to bleaching with 38% hydrogen peroxide. PMID:27223140

  13. Effect of restorative technique and thermal/mechanical treatment on marginal adaptation and compressive strength of esthetic restorations.

    PubMed

    de Paula, Andréia Bolzan; Duque, Cristiane; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço; Puppin-Rontani, Regina M

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated the compressive strength and marginal adaptation of composite onlays using indirect and direct techniques after thermal and mechanical cycling. Onlay standardized cavities were prepared in 50 permanent molars and restored with Z-250 resin composite using indirect (IRT) or direct (DRT) restorative techniques. The restorations were either submitted or not submitted to thermal (500 cycles, 5 degrees to 55 degrees C) and mechanical cycling (50,000 cycles, 50N). The teeth were distributed to five groups (n=10): G1-IRT/cycling; G2-IRT/no cycling; G3-DRT/cycling; G4-DRT/no cycling and G5 (control group)-sound teeth. All prepared teeth were stored in 100% relative humidity at 37 degrees C for 24 hours, followed by finishing with Sof-Lex discs. A caries detector solution was applied on the tooth-restoration interface of all teeth for five seconds, followed by washing and drying. Four digital photographs were taken of each tooth surface. The extent of gaps was measured using standard software (Image Tool 3.0). All groups were submitted to compression testing in a universal testing machine (INSTRON) at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/minute until failure. The compressive strength (CS) and marginal adaptation data were submitted to ANOVA and Tukey test (p<0.05). For both evaluation criteria (compressive strength and marginal adaptation), there were no statistically significant differences among the restorative techniques. Deterioration over time was observed for both types of restorations. However, the prevalence of catastrophic fractures increased among direct restorations. The application of thermal/mechanical cycling only influenced marginal adaptation.

  14. The use of art and music therapy in substance abuse treatment programs.

    PubMed

    Aletraris, Lydia; Paino, Maria; Edmond, Mary Bond; Roman, Paul M; Bride, Brian E

    2014-01-01

    Although the implementation of evidence-based practices in the treatment of substance use disorders has attracted substantial research attention, little consideration has been given to parallel implementation of complementary and alternative medical (CAM) practices. Using data from a nationally representative sample (N = 299) of U.S. substance abuse treatment programs, this study modeled organizational factors falling in the domains of patient characteristics, treatment ideologies, and structural characteristics, associated with the use of art therapy and music therapy. We found that 36.8% of treatment programs offered art therapy and 14.7% of programs offered music therapy. Programs with a greater proportion of women were more likely to use both therapies, and programs with larger proportions of adolescents were more likely to offer music therapy. In terms of other treatment ideologies, programs' use of Motivational Enhancement Therapy was positively related to offering art therapy, whereas use of contingency management was positively associated with offering music therapy. Finally, our findings showed a significant relationship between requiring 12-step meetings and the use of both art therapy and music therapy. With increasing use of CAM in a diverse range of medical settings and recent federal legislation likely to reduce barriers in accessing CAM, the inclusion of CAM in addiction treatment is growing in importance. Our findings suggest treatment programs may be utilizing art and music therapies to address unique patient needs of women and adolescents. PMID:25514689

  15. The use of art and music therapy in substance abuse treatment programs.

    PubMed

    Aletraris, Lydia; Paino, Maria; Edmond, Mary Bond; Roman, Paul M; Bride, Brian E

    2014-01-01

    Although the implementation of evidence-based practices in the treatment of substance use disorders has attracted substantial research attention, little consideration has been given to parallel implementation of complementary and alternative medical (CAM) practices. Using data from a nationally representative sample (N = 299) of U.S. substance abuse treatment programs, this study modeled organizational factors falling in the domains of patient characteristics, treatment ideologies, and structural characteristics, associated with the use of art therapy and music therapy. We found that 36.8% of treatment programs offered art therapy and 14.7% of programs offered music therapy. Programs with a greater proportion of women were more likely to use both therapies, and programs with larger proportions of adolescents were more likely to offer music therapy. In terms of other treatment ideologies, programs' use of Motivational Enhancement Therapy was positively related to offering art therapy, whereas use of contingency management was positively associated with offering music therapy. Finally, our findings showed a significant relationship between requiring 12-step meetings and the use of both art therapy and music therapy. With increasing use of CAM in a diverse range of medical settings and recent federal legislation likely to reduce barriers in accessing CAM, the inclusion of CAM in addiction treatment is growing in importance. Our findings suggest treatment programs may be utilizing art and music therapies to address unique patient needs of women and adolescents.

  16. The Use of Art and Music Therapy in Substance Abuse Treatment Programs

    PubMed Central

    Aletraris, Lydia; Paino, Maria; Edmond, Mary Bond; Roman, Paul M.; Bride, Brian E.

    2014-01-01

    While the implementation of evidence-based practices (EBPs) in the treatment of substance use disorders (SUD) has attracted substantial research attention, little consideration has been given to parallel implementation of complementary and alternative medical (CAM) practices. Using data from a nationally representative sample (N = 299) of U.S. substance abuse treatment programs, this study modeled organizational factors falling in the domains of patient characteristics, treatment ideologies, and structural characteristics, associated with the use of art therapy and music therapy. We found that 36.8% of treatment programs offered art therapy and 14.7% of programs offered music therapy. Programs with a greater proportion of women were more likely to use both therapies, and programs with larger proportions of adolescents were more likely to offer music therapy. In terms of other treatment ideologies, programs’ use of Motivational Enhancement Therapy (MET) was positively related to offering art therapy, while use of Contingency Management (CM) was positively associated with offering music therapy. Finally, our findings showed a significant relationship between requiring 12-step meetings and the use of both art therapy and music therapy. With increasing use of CAM in a diverse range of medical settings, and recent federal legislation likely to reduce barriers in accessing CAM, the inclusion of CAM in addiction treatment is growing in importance. Our findings suggest treatment programs may be utilizing art and music therapies to address unique patient needs of women and adolescents. PMID:25514689

  17. Long-term insulin treatment restores cardioprotection induced by sufentanil postconditioning in diabetic rat heart

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuwen; Zhang, Lei; Zhu, Bingqing; Zhao, Xianya; Chen, Jingjing

    2016-01-01

    Sufentanil, a commonly used opioid analgesic, could mimic ischemia postconditioning to attenuate ischemia reperfusion injury, but this effect might be hindered in diabetic animals by inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3β phosphorylation. Also, diabetes can abrogate the cardioprotection of sevoflurane (an inhaled anesthetic) against ischemia reperfusion injury, and short-term insulin treatment does not restore protection by sevoflurane postconditioning. We hypothesized that long-term insulin treatment might restore the cardioprotective effect of sufentanil postconditioning in diabetic rats via phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase-3β. Streptozotocin (55 mg/kg)-induced diabetic rats received insulin (Novolin N, 6–8 u/d) for two days or two weeks, then were exposed to 30-min ischemia and 120-min reperfusion. Sufentanil postconditioning was performed 5 min before the onset of reperfusion. Controls included non-diabetic rats, sham surgery for ischemia/reperfusion, and sufentanil vehicle. Infarct size, cardiac troponin I, and phosphorylated glycogen synthase kinase-3β were examined. Sufentanil postconditioning reduced infarct size by 46% in non-diabetic rats (P < 0.001), but diabetes prevented this protective effect. Two-day insulin treatment was not effective, but two-week treatment reduced infarct size by 45% (P < 0.001), reduced cardiac troponin I by 33% (P < 0.001), and increased phosphorylated glycogen synthase kinase-3β levels (P < 0.001) in the diabetic sufentanil postconditioning group. In conclusion, sufentanil-induced cardioprotection was restored by long-term insulin treatment. The underlying mechanism may be increased phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase-3β. PMID:26748398

  18. Combined periodontal and restorative approach to the treatment of gingival recessions with noncarious cervical lesions: a case treated with acellular dermal matrix allograft and compomer restorations.

    PubMed

    Efeoğlu, Ahmet; Hanzade, Mete; Sari, Esra; Alpay, Hande; Karakaş, Ozan; Koray, Fatma

    2012-08-01

    Treatment of gingival recessions has become one of the most challenging procedures in periodontal plastic surgery. Various surgical options with predictable outcomes are available, but in cases with cervical lesions or restorations, optimal functional and esthetic results may require the combination of periodontal and restorative procedures. In this case report, one patient treated with acellular dermal matrix allograft and a coronally positioned flap in combination with compomer cervical restorations is presented. Clinical parameters were recorded immediately prior to surgery and after 12 months. Postoperatively, significant root coverage, reductions in probing depths, and gains in clinical attachment were observed. The final clinical results, esthetics, color match, and tissue contours were acceptable to both the patient and clinicians. PMID:22577650

  19. How effective is ART in the management of dental caries?

    PubMed

    Frencken, J E; Holmgren, C J

    1999-12-01

    The ART approach involves excavating cavitated dentine caries with hand instruments, then restoring the cavity and sealing any associated fissures and pits with an adhesive restorative material, resulting in a sealant restoration. Until recently, ART has mainly been used under field conditions, and thus the adhesive restorative material used has been glass ionomer which does not require mixing machines and curing lights. Since the inception of ART, a growing number of studies world-wide have taken place. A total of four studies have reported 3-year survival percentages for one-surface ART restorations. The highest 3-year survival percentage in permanent teeth was 88%, which is comparable to the 85% survival of one-surface amalgam restorations placed under the same field conditions after 3 years. The outcomes depend to some extent on the material used, operator experience and presence of caries. The presence of caries as a reason for failure was higher in the early than in the most recent studies. Only one study has reported on the use of ART restorations in the deciduous dentition. It is concluded that: a very large proportion of dentine lesions in the permanent teeth can be treated using the ART approach; the 3-year survival rate of the more recently placed one-surface ART restorations in permanent teeth was higher than that of ART restorations placed in the beginning; the survival of one-surface ART restorations in the permanent dentition with newer glass ionomers is comparable to that of one-surface conventional restorations placed using amalgam in a comparable setting after 3 years; more studies of longer duration are needed to confirm these findings; ART should be considered a caries treatment modality that benefits people; and educational courses need to be organised before the approach is applied in the clinic. PMID:10600076

  20. ART uptake, its timing and relation to anti-tuberculosis treatment outcomes among HIV-infected TB patients

    PubMed Central

    Harries, A. D.; Mutasa-Apollo, T.; Sandy, C.; Murimwa, T.; Mugurungi, O.

    2012-01-01

    Setting: All public health facilities in two provinces of Zimbabwe. Objective: To determine, among tuberculosis (TB) patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) registered in 2010, 1) the proportion started on antiretroviral treatment (ART), 2) the timing of ART in relation to the start of anti-tuberculosis treatment, and 3) whether timing of ART influenced anti-tuberculosis treatment outcomes. Design: Retrospective cohort study. Results: Of the 2655 HIV-positive TB patients, 1115 (42%) were documented as receiving ART. Of these, 178 (16%) started ART prior to anti-tuberculosis treatment. Of those who started after anti-tuberculosis treatment, 17% started within 2 weeks, 43% between 2 and 8 weeks and 40% after 8 weeks. Treatment success in the cohort was 82%, with 14% deaths before completion of anti-tuberculosis treatment. Not receiving ART during anti-tuberculosis treatment was associated with lower anti-tuberculosis treatment success (adjusted RR 0.70, 95%CI 0.53–0.91) and more deaths (adjusted RR 3.43, 95%CI 2.2–5.36). There were no differences in TB treatment outcomes by timing of ART initiation. Conclusion: ART uptake is low given the improved treatment outcomes in those put on ART during anti-tuberculosis treatment. Better integration of HIV and TB services is needed to ensure increased coverage and earlier ART uptake. PMID:26392951

  1. [Art, medical treatment and insanity: a territory in flux].

    PubMed

    Lima, Elizabeth Maria Freire de Araújo; Pelbart, Peter Pál

    2007-01-01

    Based on a combination of clinical and pedagogical experience in occupational therapy, which interlinks artistic practices and therapeutic processes, we carried out a historical study designed to investigate how the fields of mental health and art became interrelated in Brazil between the mid 19th and 20th centuries. The methods used for this research, which is underpinned by the thinking of Foucault, Deleuze and Guattari, were cartography and archeology. We used archeology to investigate the historical discourses and events, seeking out the forces behind them. Through cartography we sought to map out some lines which, emerging from each of these fields in relation to the other, intersect to form different patterns in the area under study.

  2. Treatment of Childhood Depression: The State of the Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarizio, Harvey F.

    1986-01-01

    This article reviews various aspects of seven approaches to the treatment of childhood depression--psychoanalytic, behavioral, cognitive, familial, rational-emotive, multimodal, and drug interventions. Implications for practitioners are considered in terms of target selection, choice of treatment methods, rational evaluation based on developmental…

  3. Restoration of meibomian gland functionality with novel thermodynamic treatment device-a case report.

    PubMed

    Korb, Donald R; Blackie, Caroline A

    2010-08-01

    A new and previously unpublished thermodynamic treatment device, which for the first time applies heat directly to both inner eyelid surfaces with a precision-controlled resistive heater while pulsating pressure is simultaneously applied to the outer eyelids using an inflatable air bladder, was used to restore meibomian gland functionality for a subject with severe evaporative dry eye. The subject, a 39-year-old white woman of light complexion with severe symptoms and corroborating objective signs of dry eye, had been unsuccessfully treated for 3 years by 7 practitioners. Using a new standardized meibomian gland expression device, a diagnosis of nonobvious meibomian gland dysfunction, where none of the approximately 24 meibomian glands of the right lower eyelid and 1 meibomian gland of the left lower eyelid were functional, was made. The patient underwent a single 12-minute treatment per eye with the treatment device. The treatment restored the functionality of 8 glands in each eye, doubled the fluorescein break-up time (FBUT) from 5 to 10 seconds, and decreased the symptom scores by approximately 80% for the entire follow-up period of 3 months.

  4. The Application of Traditional Martial Arts Practice and Theory to the Treatment of Violent Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Twemlow, Stuart W.; Sacco, Frank C.

    1998-01-01

    Reviews treatment programs, the complex problems posed by youth gangs, and the use of martial arts in the treatment of violence and proposes a program for violent adolescents. The program philosophy is committed to respect and self-control; emphasis is on leadership and community service. Provides clinical examples. (Author/EMK)

  5. Development of an Art Psychotherapy Model for the Prevention and Treatment of Unresolved Grief during Midlife.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turetsky, Cheryl J.; Hays, Ronald E.

    2003-01-01

    Presents an integrated model as an appropriate intervention to enable mourning and creativity and thus help in the prevention and treatment of unresolved grief in midlife. Two examples of this model in art-psychotherapy group treatment are provided. (Contains 53 references, 1 table, and 2 figures.) (GCP)

  6. Predictors of Treatment Failure among Adult Antiretroviral Treatment (ART) Clients in Bale Zone Hospitals, South Eastern Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Takele, Abulie; Gashaw, Ketema; Demelash, Habtamu; Nigatu, Dabere

    2016-01-01

    Background Treatment failure defined as progression of disease after initiation of ART or when the anti-HIV medications can’t control the infection. One of the major concerns over the rapid scaling up of ART is the emergence and transmission of HIV drug resistant strains at the population level due to treatment failure. This could lead to the failure of basic ART programs. Thus this study aimed to investigate the predictors of treatment failure among adult ART clients in Bale Zone Hospitals, South east Ethiopia. Methods Retrospective cohort study was employed in four hospitals of Bale zone named Goba, Robe, Ginir and Delomena. A total of 4,809 adult ART clients were included in the analysis from these four hospitals. Adherence was measured by pill count method. The Kaplan Meier (KM) curve was used to describe the survival time of ART patients without treatment failure. Bivariate and multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression models were used for identifying associated factors of treatment failure. Result The incidence rate of treatment failure was found 9.38 (95% CI 7.79–11.30) per 1000 person years. Male ART clients were more likely to experience treatment failure as compared to females [AHR = 4.49; 95% CI: (2.61–7.73)].Similarly, lower CD4 count (<100 m3/dl) at initiation of ART was found significantly associated with higher odds of treatment failure [AHR = 3.79; 95% CI: (2.46–5.84).Bedridden [AHR = 5.02; 95% CI: (1.98–12.73)] and ambulatory [AHR = 2.12; 95% CI: (1.08–4.07)] patients were more likely to experience treatment failure as compared to patients with working functional status. TB co-infected clients had also higher odds to experience treatment failure [AHR = 3.06; 95% CI: (1.72–5.44)]. Those patients who had developed TB after ART initiation had higher odds to experience treatment failure as compared to their counter parts [AHR = 4.35; 95% CI: (1.99–9.54]. Having other opportunistic infection during ART initiation was also

  7. Glaucoma -state of the art and perspectives on treatment.

    PubMed

    Wójcik-Gryciuk, Anna; Skup, Małgorzata; Waleszczyk, Wioletta J

    2015-01-01

    Glaucoma is a chronic optic neuropathy characterized by progressive damage to the optic nerve, death of retinal ganglion cells and ultimately visual field loss. It is one of the leading causes of irreversible loss of vision worldwide. The most important trigger of glaucomatous damage is elevated eye pressure, and the current standard approach in glaucoma therapy is reduction of intraocular pressure (IOP). However, despite the use of effective medications or surgical treatment leading to lowering of IOP, progression of glaucomatous changes and loss of vision among patients with glaucoma is common. Therefore, it is critical to prevent vision loss through additional treatment. To implement such treatment(s), it is imperative to identify pathophysiological changes in glaucoma and develop therapeutic methods taking into account neuroprotection. Currently, there is no method of neuroprotection with long-term proven effectiveness in the treatment of glaucoma. Among the most promising molecules shown to protect the retina and optic nerve are neurotrophic factors. Thus, the current focus is on the development of safe and non-invasive methods for the long-term elevation of the intraocular level of neurotrophins through advanced gene therapy and topical eye treatment and on the search for selective agonists of neurotrophin receptors affording more efficient neuroprotection.

  8. Reinforced composite restoration following trauma to a mandibular tooth: technique and follow-up treatment.

    PubMed

    Smidt, Ami; Sharon, Eldad; Adler, Mordekhai Lipovetsky

    2012-10-01

    The loss of an entire tooth in the anterior region is accompanied by impairment of esthetics, function, phonetics, and self-esteem. It is common knowledge that treatment with implants during childhood or early adolescence is not an option. Splinting of adjacent teeth during growth and development may interfere with the independent process of teeth realignment and repositioning during that phase of life. Other creative solutions must be offered, such as free-standing composite buildup restorations on compromised broken teeth or single wing/cantilevered restorations adhered to one neighboring tooth during the growth period. The positive effects of reinforced composite materials were researched and presented in the literature. Their use is clearly indicated for interim and economical restorations. Long-term follow-up on a mandibular incisor that experienced trauma, losing its clinical crown and vitality when the patient was 12 years of age, is discussed with all the various aspects of material selection, future considerations, and long-term follow-up to adulthood, when a conventional crown was prepared and delivered.

  9. Clinical value of DNA fragmentation evaluation tests under ART treatments

    PubMed Central

    Tavukçuoğlu, İlkay Şafak; Al-Azawi, Tahani; Khaki, Amir Afshin; Khaki, Arash; Khalil, Ahmed; Al-Hasani, Safaa

    2012-01-01

    Male reproductive health has been under scrutiny recently. Many studies in the literature have concluded that semen quality is declining and that the incidence of testicular cancers is increasing. The reason for this change has been attributed to damage in sperm chromatin. During in vivo reproduction, the natural selection process ensures that only a spermatozoon with normal genomic material can fertilize an oocyte. However, the assisted reproduction technique (ART) is our selection process, leading to the possibility that abnormal spermatozoa could be used to fertilize an oocyte. We could avoid this by quantifying the amount and type of genomic damage in sperm using well-accepted laboratory methods. The sperm deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) integrity is important for success of natural or assisted fertilization as well as normal development of the embryo, fetus and child. Intra cytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) is bypassing natural sperm selection mechanisms, which increases the risk of transmitting damaged DNA. The significance of required investigations and multiple techniques is that they could evaluate DNA defects in human spermatozoa. The ability of these techniques to accurately estimate sperm DNA damage depends on many technical and biological aspects. The aim of this review is to evaluate the most commonly used methods. PMID:24592055

  10. Wax-up and mock-up. A guide for anterior periodontal and restorative treatments.

    PubMed

    Gurrea, Jon; Bruguera, August

    2014-01-01

    When starting a case, having the end result in mind is the basis in any kind of treatment, even more so in those where the anterior teeth morphology, size and proportion will be changed. Here is where a good treatment plan based on a diagnostic wax-up that is tried in with a mock-up and approved by the patient becomes crucial. This case report exemplifies how transferring the information from the diagnostic wax up to the patient's mouth is of help not only to the restorative dentist and the laboratory technician, but also to the surgeon when performing the crown lengthening. This treatment plan cannot be seen as a sequence of isolated procedures but as a single workflow. The wax-up/mock-up binomial is a guide even for the periodontist in a novel approach to surgical crown lengthening.

  11. Children's stress during a restorative dental treatment: assessment using salivary cortisol measurements.

    PubMed

    Akyuz, S; Pince, S; Hekin, N

    1996-01-01

    Dental environment may be a source of stress for the young patient. Such stressful conditions may provoke fear in anxious children. It is well known that stress produces an activation adrenal steroid secretion. Among the methods for assessing child dental fear, measurement of salivary cortisol level is a simple method, because especially in children, sampling of saliva is easy, and cortisol levels in saliva closely mirror serum free cortisol levels, independent of salivary flow rate. For this study, the salivary cortisol levels of 8 children (mean age 5.6 yr) were measured receiving initial dental treatment. Saliva samples were collected via cotton rolls placed to the floor of the mouth at four stages; prior to treatment, during cavitation, placement of the liner and the restoration. Statistical comparison of the results were done by Student-t test. The increase in salivary cortisol levels during cavitation at the first and secondary appointments were significant (p<0.01 and p<0.05), but not at the second. The other comparisons were not statistically significant (p>0.05). The results of this study suggest that in restorative procedures, mostly it is the cavitation step that creates stress and anxiety in children. Knowledge of the most stressful condition may be helpful for the dentist to prepare the child to treatment steps.

  12. Innovative systems for cultural heritage conservation. Millimeter wave application for non-invasive monitoring and treatment of works of art.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Bisceglia; De Leo, Roberto; Pastore, Anna Pia; von Gratowski, Svetlana; Meriakri, Viatcheslav

    2011-01-01

    A novel non invasive technique and a suitable apparatus for disinfestation of artworks is introduced. Non destructive and non invasive techniques are often irreplaceable in order to preserve and restore cultural heritage objects in its structure and shape. Although many techniques are available for art and archaeological works the non invasive methods are preferred as they leave the object untouched after treatment. Environmental parameters, such as humidity, can damage culture heritage objects and also results in spring up variety of pests and other micro-organisms. Non-invasive monitoring of these damage and also disinfestation treatments and drying with help of electromagnetic waves are preferred as they keep the object untouched after treatment. Application of millimeter waves for solving this problem is discussed here. Millimeter waves have high spatial resolution and absorption in water as well as in bio-objects that are usually moist and at the same time minimal interaction with dry culture heritage objects by itself. Different phases of the microwaves treatment (MW) of artworks are described, some results are shown and discussed. Many biological forms don't survive over a certain temperature, called lethal temperature which, for most xylophages is about 53-55 degrees C, while for moulds and funguses is between 65 and 70 degrees C. In order to evaluate the management of disinfestation of works of art, incident power, temperature, exposure time were monitored. The monitoring of temperature is essential in order to prevent damages. A computer simulation allows to predict and monitor the heating process. PMID:24427872

  13. State of the art treatments for cannabis dependence.

    PubMed

    Danovitch, Itai; Gorelick, David A

    2012-06-01

    The treatment of cannabis dependence can be viewed as a cup half empty or half full. On the one hand, few people who might benefit from treatment actually receive it. Among those who undergo treatment in randomized trials, long-term abstinence is achieved by fewer than 20%. Moderate use goals have been associated with decreases in consequences, but the differential impact of such goals on the long-term course of cannabis dependence is unknown. Optimal duration of treatment is unclear, and certain populations, particularly patients with co-occurring disorders, have not been studied adequately. Twelve-step programs are low cost, effective for other substance use disorders, and readily available in most regions of the world. However, their role and efficacy in cannabis dependence has not been examined. Finally, effective pharmacologic treatments are under development, but none have yet been firmly established. On the other hand, psychotherapeutic strategies used to treat other substance use disorders can be effective for cannabis dependence. A recent meta-analysis of psychosocial interventions for illicit substance use disorders found that treatments for cannabis dependence had comparatively larger effect sizes than treatments for other substance use disorders. Combination therapies have proven most effective, particularly those that begin with a motivational intervention, utilize incentives to enhance the commitment to change, and teach behavioral and cognitive copings skills to prevent relapse. Among adolescents, family engagement and collaboration with community stakeholders adds substantial value. Although only 9% of cannabis users develop cannabis dependence, the volume of people who smoke cannabis ensures that the total number of people in need of help is larger than the capacity of substance abuse specialty services. Thus, although efforts to refine and improve the efficacy of treatment interventions continue, innovations that increase the availability and

  14. The Art of Local Treatment (Or Laying it on Right)

    PubMed Central

    Ross, J. B.

    1976-01-01

    The principles of formulating a topical prescription are given. Indications for the use of the range of applications in the treatment of skin disease are described. Techniques of local application, dressing materials, and methods are reviewed. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4 PMID:21308023

  15. Treatment of osteoporosis: current state of the art.

    PubMed

    Hamrick, Irene; Schrager, Sarina; Nye, Ann Marie

    2015-02-01

    Osteoporosis can be treated with medications and lifestyle changes, including avoiding a sedentary lifestyle, alcohol, and smoking. We will identify medications that protect against hip fractures in addition to vertebral fractures, and explore new evidence of adverse effects and risks. Bisphosphonates are used as first-line treatment. We will discuss the latest osteoporosis medications, drug interactions, potential bone protective effects of other drug classes, and the evidence of exercise and kyphoplasty.

  16. Current state of the art brachytherapy treatment planning dosimetry algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Pantelis, E; Karaiskos, P

    2014-01-01

    Following literature contributions delineating the deficiencies introduced by the approximations of conventional brachytherapy dosimetry, different model-based dosimetry algorithms have been incorporated into commercial systems for 192Ir brachytherapy treatment planning. The calculation settings of these algorithms are pre-configured according to criteria established by their developers for optimizing computation speed vs accuracy. Their clinical use is hence straightforward. A basic understanding of these algorithms and their limitations is essential, however, for commissioning; detecting differences from conventional algorithms; explaining their origin; assessing their impact; and maintaining global uniformity of clinical practice. PMID:25027247

  17. Medical treatment of hyperthyroidism: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Fumarola, A; Di Fiore, A; Dainelli, M; Grani, G; Calvanese, A

    2010-11-01

    Methimazole (MMI) and propylthiouracil (PTU) are the main antithyroid drugs used for hyperthyroidism. They inhibit the synthesis of thyroid hormone at various levels and are used as the primary treatment for hyperthyroidism or as a preparation before radioiodine therapy or thyroidectomy. MMI is the drug of choice because of its widespread availability, longer half-life and small number of severe side effects. Drugs of second choice are potassium perchlorate, beta blockers, iodine, lithium carbonate and glucocorticoids. Rituximab, a monoclonal antibody directed against human CD20, was recently proposed as a biological therapy for cases of Graves' disease unresponsive to traditional drugs. PMID:20496313

  18. Survey of subsurface treatment technologies for environmental restoration sites at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico.

    SciTech Connect

    McGrath, Lucas K.; Ho, Clifford Kuofei; Wright, Jerome L.

    2003-08-01

    This report provides a survey of remediation and treatment technologies for contaminants of concern at environmental restoration (ER) sites at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico. The sites that were evaluated include the Tijeras Arroyo Groundwater, Technical Area V, and Canyons sites. The primary contaminants of concern at these sites include trichloroethylene (TCE), tetrachloroethylene (PCE), and nitrate in groundwater. Due to the low contaminant concentrations (close to regulatory limits) and significant depths to groundwater ({approx}500 feet) at these sites, few in-situ remediation technologies are applicable. The most applicable treatment technologies include monitored natural attenuation and enhanced bioremediation/denitrification to reduce the concentrations of TCE, PCE, and nitrate in the groundwater. Stripping technologies to remove chlorinated solvents and other volatile organic compounds from the vadose zone can also be implemented, if needed.

  19. Wherefore Art Thou, O Treatment for Diabetic Neuropathy?

    PubMed

    Malik, R A

    2016-01-01

    As of March 2016, we continue to advocate the diagnosis of diabetic neuropathy using a simple foot examination or monofilament, which identifies only those with severe neuropathy and hence risk of foot ulceration. Given the fact that the 5-year mortality rate of diabetic patients with foot ulceration is worse than that of most common cancers, surely we should be identifying patients at an earlier stage of neuropathy to prevent its progression to a stage with such a high mortality? Of course, we lament that there is no licensed treatment for diabetic neuropathy. Who is to blame? As researchers and carers, we have a duty of care to our patients with diabetic neuropathy. So, we have to look forward not backwards, and move away from our firmly entrenched views on the design and conduct of clinical trials for diabetic neuropathy. Relevant organizations such as Neurodiab, the American Diabetes Association and the Peripheral Nerve Society have to acknowledge that they cannot continue to endorse a bankrupt strategy. The FDA needs an open and self-critical dialogue with these organizations, to give pharmaceutical companies at least a fighting chance to deliver effective new therapies for diabetic neuropathy.

  20. Ceiling art in a radiation therapy department: its effect on patient treatment experience

    PubMed Central

    Bonett, Jotham

    2015-01-01

    Introduction A new initiative has been implemented at the Sunshine Hospital Radiation Therapy Centre, to provide a calming and comforting environment for patients attending radiation therapy treatment. As part of this initiative, the department's computed tomography (CT) room and radiation therapy bunkers were designed to incorporate ceiling art that replicates a number of different visual scenes. The study was undertaken to determine if ceiling art in the radiation therapy treatment CT and treatment bunkers had an effect on a patient's experience during treatment at the department. Additionally, the study aimed to identify which of the visuals in the ceiling art were most preferred by patients. Methods Patients were requested to complete a 12-question survey. The survey solicited a patient's opinion/perception on the unit's unique ceiling display with emphasis on aesthetic appeal, patient treatment experience and the patient's engagement due to the ceiling display. The responses were dichotomised to ‘positive’ or ‘negative’. Every sixth patient who completed the survey was invited to have a general face-to-face discussion to provide further information about their thoughts on the displays. Results The results demonstrate that the ceiling artwork solicited a positive reaction in 89.8% of patients surveyed. This score indicates that ceiling artwork contributed positively to patients’ experiences during radiation therapy treatment. Conclusion The study suggests that ceiling artwork in the department has a positive effect on patient experience during their radiation therapy treatment at the department. PMID:26451241

  1. Ceiling art in a radiation therapy department: its effect on patient treatment experience

    SciTech Connect

    Bonett, Jotham

    2015-09-15

    A new initiative has been implemented at the Sunshine Hospital Radiation Therapy Centre, to provide a calming and comforting environment for patients attending radiation therapy treatment. As part of this initiative, the department's computed tomography (CT) room and radiation therapy bunkers were designed to incorporate ceiling art that replicates a number of different visual scenes. The study was undertaken to determine if ceiling art in the radiation therapy treatment CT and treatment bunkers had an effect on a patient's experience during treatment at the department. Additionally, the study aimed to identify which of the visuals in the ceiling art were most preferred by patients. Patients were requested to complete a 12-question survey. The survey solicited a patient's opinion/perception on the unit's unique ceiling display with emphasis on aesthetic appeal, patient treatment experience and the patient's engagement due to the ceiling display. The responses were dichotomised to ‘positive’ or ‘negative’. Every sixth patient who completed the survey was invited to have a general face-to-face discussion to provide further information about their thoughts on the displays. The results demonstrate that the ceiling artwork solicited a positive reaction in 89.8% of patients surveyed. This score indicates that ceiling artwork contributed positively to patients’ experiences during radiation therapy treatment. The study suggests that ceiling artwork in the department has a positive effect on patient experience during their radiation therapy treatment at the department.

  2. State of the Art in the Treatment of Systemic Vasculitides

    PubMed Central

    Luqmani, Raashid Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasm antibodies (ANCA) are associated with small vessel vasculitides (AASV) affecting the lungs and kidneys. Structured clinical assessment using the Birmingham Vasculitis Activity Score and Vasculitis Damage Index should form the basis of a treatment plan and be used to document progress, including relapse. Severe disease with organ or life threatening manifestations needs cyclophosphamide or rituximab, plus high dose glucocorticoids, followed by lower dose steroid plus azathioprine, or methotrexate. Additional plasmapheresis is effective for very severe disease, reducing dialysis dependence from 60 to 40% in the first year, but with no effect on mortality or long-term renal function, probably due to established renal damage. In milder forms of ANCA-associated vasculitis, methotrexate, leflunomide, or mycophenolate mofetil are effective. Mortality depends on initial severity: 25% in patients with renal failure or severe lung hemorrhage; 6% for generalized non-life threatening AASV but rising to 30–40% at 5 years. Mortality from GPA is four times higher than the background population. Early deaths are due to active vasculitis and infection. Subsequent deaths are more often due to cardiovascular events, infection, and cancer. We need to improve the long-term outcome, by controlling disease activity but also preventing damage and drug toxicity. By contrast, in large vessel vasculitis where mortality is much less but morbidity potentially greater, such as giant cell arteritis (GCA) and Takayasu arteritis, therapeutic options are limited. High dose glucocorticoid results in significant toxicity in over 80%. Advances in understanding the biology of the vasculitides are improving therapies. Novel, mechanism based therapies such as rituximab in AASV, mepolizumab in eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis, and tocilizumab in GCA, but the lack of reliable biomarkers remains a challenge to progress in these chronic relapsing diseases. PMID

  3. Art Therapy for Individuals with Traumatic Brain Injury: A Comprehensive Neurorehabilitation-Informed Approach to Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kline, Tori

    2016-01-01

    I describe an approach to art therapy treatment for survivors of traumatic brain injury developed at a rehabilitation facility for adults that serves inpatient, outpatient, and long-term residential clients. This approach is based on a review of the literature on traumatic brain injury, comprehensive neurorehabilitation, brain plasticity, and art…

  4. Structured Sensory Therapy (SITCAP-ART) for Traumatized Adjudicated Adolescents in Residential Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raider, Melvyn C.; Steele, William; Delillo-Storey, Margaret; Jacobs, Jacqueline; Kuban, Caelan

    2008-01-01

    This randomized controlled study assessed the efficacy of a structured group therapy for traumatized, adjudicated adolescents in residential treatment. Youth were randomly assigned to a trauma intervention (SITCAP-ART) or to a waitlist/comparison group. The intervention included both sensory and cognitive/behavioral components. Standardized trauma…

  5. Cheap and Cheerful Stream Restoration - An Example of System Wide Woody Addition Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheaton, J. M.; Bennett, S. N.; Bouwes, N.; Camp, R.

    2012-12-01

    Stream restoration has been plagued with high price tags, limited spatial extents, and questionable effectiveness in light of largely absent monitoring efforts. One prominent example is the placement of large woody debris (LWD) structures and engineered log jams that are frequently employed to promote heterogeneity of instream habitat. Ironically, many of these treatments attempt to lock in place and over-engineer the woody structures as opposed to allowing them to adjust and rearrange themselves as natural LWD would have. We are in the midst of a large scale restoration experiment using LWD to recover ESA-listed steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) populations in the Asotin Creek Watershed of Southeast Washington. The project is an Intensively Monitored Watershed (IMW) where the restoration treatment and monitoring use a hierarchal staircase design maximizing the power to detect a population level response in steelhead. We are treating over 12 km of stream with enough LWD input (> 200 pieces per km) to mimic the historic background wood loading and encourage the stream to reshape and regularly rework itself leaving. We are using hundreds of structures we call DWS (dynamic woody structures), which generally consist of a series of wooden fence posts driven into the stream bed and complex LWD anchored between them to invoke a specific hydrogeomorphic response. The real advantage of these DWS are their cost. They can be installed quickly (15-30 minutes each) and cheaply (< $100/DWS); even in remote settings with a 2-3 person crew, hydraulic post pounder, very cheap materials, and avoiding impacts associated with operating heavy equipment. This allows us to install lots of the structures at high density (every 5-15 channel widths) over an entire stream system. We call this overall approach System Wide Woody Addition Treatment (SWWAT). In the long term, we hypothesize that the SWWAT will provide an intial input LWD that will become a part of study creeks which are more

  6. Effects of eradication and restoration treatments on Italian thistle (Carduus pycnocephalus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGinnis, Thomas; Keeley, Jon

    2011-01-01

    Low elevation grasslands in California long have been dominated by Mediterranean grasses, but many areas still have large native forb populations. Alien forbs invade these grasslands, displacing both native and other alien species. Italian thistle is a noxious alien herb that has recently invaded these grasslands, including ungrazed blue oak (Quercus douglassii) and interior live oak (Quercus wislizenii) stands in Sequoia National Park. Here, Italian thistle tends to dominate under oaks and has the potential to substantially alter the foothill ecosystem by displacing native plants and acting as a ladder fuel that can carry fires into the oak canopy. We tested the effects of selectively reducing Italian thistle populations alone and in combination with restoration of native species. Two thistle eradication techniques (clipping and the application of clopyralid herbicide) and two restoration techniques (addition of native forb seeds or planting native grass plugs) were used. After two consecutive years of treatment we found: a) clipping was not effective at reducing Italian thistle populations (clipping reduced Italian thistle density in some areas, but not vegetative cover), b) herbicide reduced both Italian thistle density and vegetative cover for the first two growing seasons after application, but cover rebounded in the third growing season, c) native forb cover and species richness were not significantly affected by clipping or spot-treating with herbicide, d) the grass and forb addition treatments by themselves were not effective at reducing Italian thistle during the course of this study and e) sowing annual forb seeds after clipping resulted in greater forb cover and moderately reduced Italian thistle vegetative cover in the short term.

  7. Triangular Fixation Technique for Bicolumn Restoration in Treatment of Distal Humerus Intercondylar Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Seung-Hoon; Jeong, Min; Lim, Hae-Seong

    2016-01-01

    Background Distal humerus intercondylar fractures are intra-articular and comminuted fractures involving soft tissue injury. As distal humerus is triangle-shaped, parallel plating coupled with articular fixation would be suitable for bicolumn restoration in treatment of distal humerus intercondylar fracture. Methods This study included 38 patients (15 males and 23 females) who underwent olecranon osteotomy, open reduction and internal fixation with the triangle-shaped cannulated screw and parallel locking plates (triangular fixation technique). Functional results were assessed with the visual analog scale (VAS) scores, Mayo elbow performance (MEP) scores and Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) questionnaires. Anteroposterior and lateral elbow radiographs were assessed for reduction, alignment, fracture union, posttraumatic arthrosis, and heterotopic ossification, and computed tomography (CT) scans were used to obtain more accurate measurements of articular discrepancy. Results All fractures healed primarily with no loss of reduction. The mean VAS, MEP, and DASH scores of the affected elbow were not significantly different from those of the unaffected elbow (p = 0.140, p = 0.090, and p = 0.262, respectively). The mean degree of flexion was significantly lower in the affected elbow than in the unaffected elbow, but was still considered as functional (p = 0.001, > 100° in 33 of 38 patients). Two cases of articular step-offs (> 2 mm) were seen on follow-up CT scans, but not significantly higher in the affected elbow than in the unaffected elbow (p = 0.657). Binary logistic regression analysis revealed that only Association for Osteosynthesis (AO) type C3 fractures correlated with good/excellent functional outcome (p = 0.012). Complications occurred in 12 of the 38 patients, and the overall reoperation rate for complications was 10.5% (4 of 38 patients). Conclusions Triangular fixation technique for bicolumn restoration was an effective and reliable

  8. MissMarble, a multi-user interdisciplinary data base of marble for archaeometric, art historian and restoration use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zöldföldi, J.; Székely, B.; Hegedüs, P.

    2009-04-01

    During a research project a lot of data are compiled by literature research, field studies, surveys, measurements. After the termination of the project these data remain in general unpublished, and are stored in the respective research institutions analogously or digitally. There exist the countless data which are stored on different media often decentralised in databases of different formats. All these data would be ready in principle for any scientific purposes on request; however, only the author has the information about the storage system of the data. This makes it difficult to verify the conclusions of the publications in the light of the gathered data; and this makes it almost impossible to prepare the data for later use in answering research-related questions. Sometimes unnecessarily repeated work is done; consequently the resources of the respective research equipment are needlessly used. To avoid duplicated research, the researchers are expected to publish the data together with the scientific contributions to provide public access to the original information. Nevertheless, it is often difficult to fulfil this demand. The standards for raw data publication are quite different from the requirements for research publications. The storage must be organised in such a way that it is conceivable for the researchers worldwide. Furthermore the data must be filed in reliable data centres where they are maintained and are put into archives for long time and remain available. The co-ordinated and clear availability of the research data serves all scientists - interdisciplinary and internationally. Via the availability of the raw data the original research results gain also importance and become valuable. Restorers, researchers working in various fields of humanities, museologists and specialists managing collections, are basically interested in the construction of data retrieval system of primary data. Thus, the storage, access and safety of scientific data can be

  9. Effect of ultrasound application during setting on the mechanical properties of high viscous glass-ionomers used for ART restorations.

    PubMed

    Daifalla, Lamia E; Mobarak, Enas H

    2015-11-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of ultrasound application on the surface microhardness (VHN) and diametral tensile strength (DTS) of three high viscous glass-ionomer restorative materials (HVGIRMs). For each test (VHN and DTS), a total of 180 specimens were prepared from three HVGIRMs (Ketac-Molar Aplicap, Fuji IX GP Fast, and ChemFil Rock). Specimens of each material (n = 60) were further subdivided into three subgroups (n = 20) according to the setting modality whether ultrasound (20 or 40 s) was applied during setting or not (control). Specimens within each subgroup were then equally divided (n = 10) and tested at 24 h or 28 days. For the VHN measurement, five indentations, with a 200 g load and a dwell time for 20 s, were made on the top surface of each specimen. The DTS test was done using Lloyd Testing machine at a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/min. Ultrasound application had no significant effect on the VHN. Fuji IX GP Fast revealed the highest VHN value, followed by Ketac-Molar Aplicap, and the least was recorded for ChemFil Rock. Fuji IX GP Fast and Ketac-Molar Aplicap VHN values were significantly increased by time. ChemFil Rock recorded the highest DTS value at 24 h and was the only material that showed significant improvement with both US application times. However, this improvement did not sustain till 28 days. The ultrasound did not enhance the surface microhardness, but its positive effect on the diametral tensile strength values was material and time dependent.

  10. Evaluation of two treatment outcome prediction models for restoration of visual fields in patients with postchiasmatic visual pathway lesions.

    PubMed

    Gall, Carolin; Steger, Benedikt; Koehler, Juergen; Sabel, Bernhard A

    2013-09-01

    Visual functions of patients with visual field defects after acquired brain injury affecting the primary visual pathway can be improved by means of vision restoration training. Since the extent of the restored visual field varies between patients, the prediction of treatment outcome and its visualization may help patients to decide for or against participating in therapies aimed at vision restoration. For this purpose, two treatment outcome prediction models were established based on either self-organizing maps (SOMs) or categorical regression (CR) to predict visual field change after intervention by several features that were hypothesized to be associated with vision restoration. Prediction was calculated for visual field changes recorded with High Resolution Perimetry (HRP). Both models revealed a similar predictive quality with the CR model being slightly more beneficial. Predictive quality of the SOM model improved when using only a small number of features that exhibited a higher association with treatment outcome than the remaining features, i.e. neighborhood activity and homogeneity within the surrounding 5° visual field of a given position, together with its residual function and distance to the scotoma border. Although both models serve their purpose, these were not able to outperform a primitive prediction rule that attests the importance of areas of residual vision, i.e. regions with partial visual field function, for vision restoration.

  11. Chemistry, Color, and Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orna, Mary Virginia

    2001-01-01

    Describes pigments and artists' colors from a chronological perspective. Explains how chemical analysis can be used to distinguish the differences between artists' palettes, identify the evolution of art, and lead to restoration of an art work. (Contains 13 references.) (YDS)

  12. Direct adhesive restoration of anterior teeth: Part 2. Clinical protocol.

    PubMed

    de Araujo, Edson Medeiros; Baratieri, Luiz Narciso; Monteiro, Sylvio; Vieira, Luiz Clóvis Cardoso; de Andrada, Mauro Amaral Caldeira

    2003-06-01

    Contemporary adhesive restorations allow clinicians to deliver minimally invasive, functional, and aesthetic treatment for compromised dentition in the anterior and posterior regions. Part 1 of this article discussed the state-of-the-art relating to composite restorations, both in situations deemed to be relatively uncomplicated and those that are more complicated. This second part discusses the clinical protocol for the placement of direct composite materials as well as the tooth preparation considerations that must be addressed when providing minimally invasive treatment options.

  13. Direct adhesive pin-retained restorations for severely worn dentition treatment: a 1.5-year follow-up report.

    PubMed

    de Andrade, Camila Lima; Gonçalves, Thais Marques Simek Vega; Santos, Ícaro Leite dos; Barros, Michel Silva; Araújo, Nubia Rafaela Ribeiro; Cury, Altair Antoninha Del Bel

    2014-01-01

    Excessive occlusal surface wear can result in occlusal disharmony, functional and esthetic impairment. As a therapeutic approach, conventional single crowns have been proposed, but this kind of treatment is complex, highly invasive and expensive. This case report describes the clinical outcomes of an alternative minimally invasive treatment based on direct adhesive-pin retained restorations. A 64-year-old woman with severely worn dentition, eating problems related to missing teeth and generalized tooth hypersensitivity was referred for treatment. Proper treatment planning based on the diagnostic wax-up simulation was used to guide the reconstruction of maxillary anterior teeth with direct composite resin over self-threading dentin pins. As the mandibular remaining teeth were extremely worn, a tooth-supported overdenture was installed. A stabilization splint was also used to protect the restorations. This treatment was a less expensive alternative to full-mouth rehabilitation with positive esthetic and functional outcomes after 1.5 years of follow-up.

  14. Clinical assessment of a combination lip treatment to restore moisturization and fullness.

    PubMed

    Trookman, Nathan S; Rizer, Ronald L; Ford, Rosanne; Mehta, Rahul; Gotz, Vincent

    2009-12-01

    Objective. To evaluate the efficacy and tolerance of a topical lip-care treatment. Step one of the two-step treatment is a lip-renewal formulation containing human growth factors, hyaluronic acid and marine filling spheres, emollients, and a tripeptide palmitoyl-glycyl-histidyl-lysine complex. Step two is a lip-plumper formulation containing niacin, emollients, and essential fatty acids. Design. Four-week, single-center, open-label, clinical study with clinical assessments at Baseline, Week 2, and Week 4. Treatment. Subjects wore the lip products at least eight hours every day with a minimum of three applications per day. Participants. Thirty-two women ages 22 to 40 years with mild-to-moderate lip dryness and average size lips completed the study. Measurements. Visual grading of the condition of the lips, rating of subjective irritation, corneometry, digital caliper measurements of lower lip, and digital photography. A self-assessment questionnaire was also employed to assess patient satisfaction. Results. Clinical assessments showed statistically significant improvements (P<0.001) in key lip condition parameters after both two and four weeks of use. Key parameters included lip scaling, cupping, cracking/fissuring, fine lines due to dryness, lip texture/visual roughness, lip color/rosiness, lip definition/contour, and overall lip condition. Significant increases (P<0.001) were observed in both corneometer measurements, which confirm the moisturizing benefits, and in digital caliper measurements, which confirm the lip-plumping benefits. Self-assessment questionnaires showed a 97-percent overall satisfaction rating. No adverse events were reported during the course of the study. Conclusion. The results from this clinical study demonstrate that this two-part lip-care treatment product was well tolerated and effective in restoring moisture and fullness to the lips of female subjects with mild-to-moderate lip dryness. PMID:20725584

  15. Clinical Assessment of a Combination Lip Treatment to Restore Moisturization and Fullness

    PubMed Central

    Trookman, Nathan S.; Rizer, Ronald L.; Ford, Rosanne; Gotz, Vincent

    2009-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the efficacy and tolerance of a topical lip-care treatment. Step one of the two-step treatment is a lip-renewal formulation containing human growth factors, hyaluronic acid and marine filling spheres, emollients, and a tripeptide palmitoyl-glycyl-histidyl-lysine complex. Step two is a lip-plumper formulation containing niacin, emollients, and essential fatty acids. Design. Four-week, single-center, open-label, clinical study with clinical assessments at Baseline, Week 2, and Week 4. Treatment. Subjects wore the lip products at least eight hours every day with a minimum of three applications per day. Participants. Thirty-two women ages 22 to 40 years with mild-to-moderate lip dryness and average size lips completed the study. Measurements. Visual grading of the condition of the lips, rating of subjective irritation, corneometry, digital caliper measurements of lower lip, and digital photography. A self-assessment questionnaire was also employed to assess patient satisfaction. Results. Clinical assessments showed statistically significant improvements (P<0.001) in key lip condition parameters after both two and four weeks of use. Key parameters included lip scaling, cupping, cracking/fissuring, fine lines due to dryness, lip texture/visual roughness, lip color/rosiness, lip definition/contour, and overall lip condition. Significant increases (P<0.001) were observed in both corneometer measurements, which confirm the moisturizing benefits, and in digital caliper measurements, which confirm the lip-plumping benefits. Self-assessment questionnaires showed a 97-percent overall satisfaction rating. No adverse events were reported during the course of the study. Conclusion. The results from this clinical study demonstrate that this two-part lip-care treatment product was well tolerated and effective in restoring moisture and fullness to the lips of female subjects with mild-to-moderate lip dryness. PMID:20725584

  16. Demethylation treatment restores erectile function in a rat model of hyperhomocysteinemia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zheng; Zhu, Lei-Lei; Jiang, He-Song; Chen, Hai; Chen, Yun; Dai, Yu-Tian

    2016-01-01

    Methylation modification is an important cellular mechanism of gene expression regulation. Dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase-2 (DDAH-2) protein is a pivotal molecular for endothelium function. To explore the effects of 5-aza-deoxycytidine (5-aza), a demethylation agent, in hyperhomocysteinemia (hhcy)-related erectile dysfunction (ED) rats, 5-aza (1 mg kg−1) was administrated to Sprague-Dawley hhcy-rats induced by supplemented methionine chow diet. Erectile function, nitric oxide-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (NO-cGMP) levels, expression of DDAH-2 protein and promoter methylation status of DDAH-2 were studied in the corpora cavernosa. We found that supplemented methionine diet induced a high homocysteine level after 6 weeks of treatment. DDAH-2 protein was down-regulated in the corpora cavernosa while the administration of 5-aza up-regulated DDAH-2 expression and restored erectile function. The methionine-fed rats showed high methylation levels of DDAH-2 promoter region while the group treated with 5-aza demonstrated lower-methylation levels when compared to the methionine-fed group. Besides, the administration of 5-aza improved NO and cGMP levels in methionine-fed rats. Therefore, the methylation mechanism involves in ED pathogenesis, and demethylation offers a potential new strategy for ED treatment. PMID:26585696

  17. QX-314 restores gating charge immobilization abolished by chloramine-T treatment in squid giant axons.

    PubMed Central

    Tanguy, J; Yeh, J Z

    1989-01-01

    The gating status of the QX-314 bound Na channels before and after suppressing the fast inactivation by chloramine-T (CT) was investigated by studying the gating charge immobilization using the OFF gating current (Ig,OFF). CT treatment, which abolishes the charge immobilization induced by a prolonged depolarization, altered the kinetics of Ig,OFF: the fast phase became insensitive to the pulse duration and the slow phase became three times faster than the control one. However, internally applied QX-314 (in the presence of external TTX) caused an immediate charge immobilization similar to that observed in the absence of CT treatment. The Ig,OFF exhibited kinetics similar to the inactivated channels, decaying with a very fast time course. We conclude that the charge immobilization is restored by QX-314 in the chloramine-T-treated axon and that the gating state of the QX-314-bound channel is similar to the inactivated one. The role of the gating charge immobilization in the use-dependent block mechanism is discussed. PMID:2550092

  18. Eighteenth and nineteenth century dental restoration, treatment and consequences in a British nobleman.

    PubMed

    Cox, M; Chandler, J; Boyle, A; Kneller, P; Haslam, R

    2000-12-01

    This paper examines unusual eighteenth and nineteenth century dental treatment and its consequences, in a nobleman excavated from beneath St. Nicholas' Church, Sevenoaks, Kent, UK in the early 1990s. This rare archaeological case exhibits erosion of dental enamel on the labial surface of all the anterior dentition. A programme of historical research suggests that this might be attributed to the application of an acid-based dental tincture or the use of an abrasive substance to whiten the teeth. Palliative treatment for the consequence of this application was prescribed by Dr Robert Blake of Dublin. Further, it bears witness to three dental restorations, two of gold and one tin. The two gold (foil) fillings are an occlusal in the upper-right second molar and a cervical on the labial surface of the upper left canine. The tin filling is an occlusal in the upper left second molar. Excavation of the carious tissue appears to have been undertaken using a spoon shaped implement.

  19. Eighteenth and nineteenth century dental restoration, treatment and consequences in a British nobleman.

    PubMed

    Cox, M; Chandler, J; Boyle, A; Kneller, P; Haslam, R

    2000-12-01

    This paper examines unusual eighteenth and nineteenth century dental treatment and its consequences, in a nobleman excavated from beneath St. Nicholas' Church, Sevenoaks, Kent, UK in the early 1990s. This rare archaeological case exhibits erosion of dental enamel on the labial surface of all the anterior dentition. A programme of historical research suggests that this might be attributed to the application of an acid-based dental tincture or the use of an abrasive substance to whiten the teeth. Palliative treatment for the consequence of this application was prescribed by Dr Robert Blake of Dublin. Further, it bears witness to three dental restorations, two of gold and one tin. The two gold (foil) fillings are an occlusal in the upper-right second molar and a cervical on the labial surface of the upper left canine. The tin filling is an occlusal in the upper left second molar. Excavation of the carious tissue appears to have been undertaken using a spoon shaped implement. PMID:11132689

  20. Development of NanoART for HIV Treatment: Minding the Cytochrome P450 (CYP) Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Midde, Narasimha M.; Kumar, Santosh

    2015-01-01

    Sustained suppression of HIV viral load is the primary objective for HIV treatment, which successfully achieved by the use of a wide array of antiretroviral therapies (ART). Despite this enormous success low level of virus persists in the anatomical and cellular reservoirs of the body causing a multitude of immunological and neurocognitive deficits. Towards this, nano-formulations are gaining attention to solve these problems by delivering ART to the targeted locations such as brain, lymphoid tissues, and monocytes/macrophages. As cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes play a critical role in the metabolism of drugs and other xenobiotics, it is expected that the interaction of nanoparticles with CYP enzymes may result in adverse drug reactions, cellular toxicity, and alterations in CYP-mediated metabolism of other drug molecules. Considering these potential adverse outcomes it is imperative to design the nano-carriers that will have minimal impact on CYP enzymes. Therefore, developing a long-acting nanoART regimen with minimal side effects is an essential step to improve patient’s adherence to the treatment paradigm, effective treatment strategy, and to combat the HIV infection & AIDS. PMID:26635972

  1. The restoration of the vaginal microbiota after treatment for bacterial vaginosis with metronidazole or probiotics.

    PubMed

    Ling, Zongxin; Liu, Xia; Chen, Weiguang; Luo, Yueqiu; Yuan, Li; Xia, Yaxian; Nelson, Karen E; Huang, Shaolei; Zhang, Shaoen; Wang, Yuezhu; Yuan, Jieli; Li, Lanjuan; Xiang, Charlie

    2013-04-01

    Whether or not treatment with antibiotics or probiotics for bacterial vaginosis (BV) is associated with a change in the diversity of vaginal microbiota in women was investigated. One hundred fifteen women, consisting of 30 healthy subjects, 30 BV-positive control subjects, 30 subjects with BV treated with a 7-day metronidazole regimen, and 25 subjects with BV treated with a 10-day probiotics regimen, were analyzed to determine the efficacy and disparity of diversity and richness of vaginal microbiota using 454 pyrosequencing. Follow-up visits at days 5 and 30 showed a greater BV cure rate in the probiotics-treated subjects (88.0 and 96 %, respectively) compared to the metronidazole-treated subjects (83.3 and 70 %, respectively [p = 0.625 at day 5 and p = 0.013 at day 30]). Treatment with metronidazole reduced the taxa diversity and eradicated most of the BV-associated phylotypes, while probiotics only suppressed the overgrowth and re-established vaginal homeostasis gradually and steadily. Despite significant interindividual variation, the microbiota of the actively treated groups or participants constituted a unique profile. Along with the decrease in pathogenic bacteria, such as Gardnerella, Atopobium, Prevotella, Megasphaera, Coriobacteriaceae, Lachnospiraceae, Mycoplasma, and Sneathia, a Lactobacillus-dominated vaginal microbiota was recovered. Acting as vaginal sentinels and biomarkers, the relative abundance of Lactobacillus and pathogenic bacteria determined the consistency of the BV clinical and microbiologic cure rates, as well as recurrent BV. Both 7-day intravaginal metronidazole and 10-day intravaginal probiotics have good efficacy against BV, while probiotics maintained normal vaginal microbiota longer due to effective and steady vaginal microbiota restoration, which provide new insights into BV treatment.

  2. Landscape variability in soil and vegetation response to 70-year-old restoration treatments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During the 1930’s the Civilian Conservation Corps implemented a number of landscape restoration projects, most of which were abandoned in the early 1940’s. Although many restoration projects failed, several projects had a lasting effect on the landscape and can be used to study the long term effects...

  3. Sealing occlusal caries lesions in adults referred for restorative treatment: 2-3 years of follow-up.

    PubMed

    Bakhshandeh, Azam; Qvist, Vibeke; Ekstrand, Kim R

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the possibility to arrest occlusal caries lesions in adults by sealant as well as to assess the presence of radiographic progression, arrest, and regression of the sealed lesions. Seventy-two occlusal caries lesions in 52 adult patients referred to restorative treatment by senior lecturers at School of Dentistry, Copenhagen, Denmark were included. In case the patient had more than one occlusal caries lesion, randomization between sealing and restoration was made; otherwise, the lesion was sealed. In total, 60 resin sealants and 12 composite restorations were made. Follow-up period was 25-38 months (mean = 33 months). Data were analyzed using non-parametric statistics including kappa statistics. After 2-3 years, the dropout rate was 15%; two patients did not show up for control and nine previously sealed lesions were restored by the patients' general practitioners. All 12 restorations and 39 of the remaining 49 sealants were well functioning, seven (14%) sealants were repaired/replaced due to failure, and three (6%) sealed lesions were restored due to caries progression (p > 0.05). The radiographic assessment showed caries progression beneath five (10%) sealants, caries regression beneath one (2%) sealant, and unchanged depth beneath 43 (88%) sealants and all restorations (p > 0.05). The majority of the referred lesions were successfully arrested by sealants, indicating the possibility for extending the criteria for sealing occlusal caries lesions in adults. However, a longer observation period is needed for final conclusion. Extending the criteria of therapeutic sealing of occlusal caries lesions in adults will lead to increased dental health. PMID:21479565

  4. Surgical hysteroscopic treatment of cesarean-induced isthmocele in restoring fertility: prospective study.

    PubMed

    Gubbini, Giampietro; Centini, Gabriele; Nascetti, Daniela; Marra, Elena; Moncini, Irene; Bruni, Luca; Petraglia, Felice; Florio, Pasquale

    2011-01-01

    The reproductive outcome in 41 consecutive patients with cesarean-induced isthmocele and secondary infertility was evaluated prospectively. Patients included menopausal women (mean [SD; 95% CI] age, 35 [4.1; 29-42] years), with fertility duration of 3 to 8 (4.6 [28]) years with isthmocele, postmenstrual abnormal uterine bleeding, and suprapubic pelvic pain. Transvaginal ultrasound and office hysteroscopy were used to diagnosis isthmocele. Complete fertility tests were performed to exclude other causes of infertility in both female and male participants. Operative hysteroscopy was performed to correct the cesarean scar defect, and histologic findings were evaluated. Correction of isthmocele via operative hysteroscopy was successful in all cases evaluated. Patients became pregnant spontaneously between 12 and 24 months after isthmoplasty. Thirty-seven of the 41 patients (90.2%) delivered via cesarean section, and 4 (9.8%) had a spontaneous abortion in the first trimester. Isthmoplasty resulted in resolution of postmenstrual abnormal uterine bleeding and suprapubic pelvic pain in all patients. Thus, it was concluded that surgical treatment of cesarean-induced isthmocele using a minimally-invasive approach (operative hysteroscopy) restores fertility and resolves symptoms in women with a cesarean section scar and secondary infertility. PMID:21354070

  5. Decisions about restorative dental treatment among dentists attending a postgraduate continuing professional development course.

    PubMed

    Maidment, Y; Durey, K; Ibbetson, R

    2010-11-01

    Continuing professional development (CPD) courses seek to inform, educate and develop practitioners' patterns of prescribing in line with the evidence base. When devising such courses it would be useful for organisers to have some idea of what current practice is and the decision-making process as this would inform the development of appropriate continuing education courses. A questionnaire comprising ten questions was given to 90 dentists at the start of a day's lecture course run under Section 63 regulations. The dentists were then shown a series of pictures and asked how they would manage each of the cases presented. Eighty-nine dentists completed the questionnaire and the results were tabulated and fed back to the group at the end of their day's course. Results showed varied and inconsistent application of advances in restorative techniques among the respondents. Despite a definite interest in more modern treatment options, many practitioners continued to support the use of traditional techniques that could be considered outdated. Further investigation of the practices of GDPs and their decision-making processes would be useful in targeting postgraduate education programmes to encourage the uptake of evidence-based practice.

  6. The morphology of amputated human teeth and its relation to mechanical properties after restoration treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gugger, Jonas; Krastl, Gabriel; Huser, Marius; Deyhle, Hans; Müller, Bert

    2010-09-01

    The increased susceptibility to fracture of root canal- and post-treated teeth is less affected by alterations of the dentin structure, but seems to crucially depend on the loss of coronal tooth substance. The surface, available for adhesion of the composite material in the root canal and in the coronal part of the tooth, is assumed to be of key importance for the fracture resistance. Thus, an appropriate three-dimensional method should be identified to determine the adhesive surface with necessary precision. For this purpose, severely decayed teeth were simulated decapitating clinical crowns. After root canal filling and post space preparation, impressions of the root canal and the amputation surface were obtained using silicone. Micro computed tomography scans of these impressions were acquired. For one selected specimen, an additional high-resolution scan was recorded at a synchrotron radiation source. Software of ImageLab served for the extraction of the amputation interface, the post surface and the post volume from the tomography data, which have been finally correlated with the Young's modulus and the maximal load derived from mechanical tests. The morphological parameters show a realistic relationship to the mechanical tests performed after the restoration treatments and are consequently important for improving the dental skills.

  7. Probiotic treatment restores protection against lethal fungal infection lost during amphibian captivity.

    PubMed

    Kueneman, Jordan G; Woodhams, Douglas C; Harris, Reid; Archer, Holly M; Knight, Rob; McKenzie, Valerie J

    2016-09-28

    Host-associated microbiomes perform many beneficial functions including resisting pathogens and training the immune system. Here, we show that amphibians developing in captivity lose substantial skin bacterial diversity, primarily due to reduced ongoing input from environmental sources. We combined studies of wild and captive amphibians with a database of over 1 000 strains that allows us to examine antifungal function of the skin microbiome. We tracked skin bacterial communities of 62 endangered boreal toads, Anaxyrus boreas, across 18 time points, four probiotic treatments, and two exposures to the lethal fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) in captivity, and compared these to 33 samples collected from wild populations at the same life stage. As the amphibians in captivity lost the Bd-inhibitory bacteria through time, the proportion of individuals exposed to Bd that became infected rose from 33% to 100% in subsequent exposures. Inoculations of the Bd-inhibitory probiotic Janthinobacterium lividum resulted in a 40% increase in survival during the second Bd challenge, indicating that the effect of microbiome depletion was reversible by restoring Bd-inhibitory bacteria. Taken together, this study highlights the functional role of ongoing environmental inputs of skin-associated bacteria in mitigating a devastating amphibian pathogen, and that long-term captivity decreases this defensive function. PMID:27655769

  8. [Functional restoration--it depends on an adequate mixture of treatment].

    PubMed

    Pfingsten, M

    2001-12-01

    In the last 50 years conventional treatments have not been able to slow down the expanding chronic low back pain problem. However, nowadays health care has changed according to a broad biopsychosocial model of health, the positive effect of activity on health and healing, emphasis on function rather than pain or impairment, and reliance upon clinical evidence. In search for new solutions "functional restoration" (FR) programs have been developed. They include multidisciplinary treatment of patients in groups, consisting of 6-8 h of treatment a day, lasting 3 to 6 weeks and usually integrating intense physical and ergonomic training, psychological (behavioral) therapy, patient education, and instruction in social- and work-related issues. FR programs have yet to demonstrate their effectiveness in several countries. Controlled studies in the USA were very positive regarding the return-to-work rate, whereas studies in Scandinavian countries did not demonstrate similar results. Possible reasons for the different results concerning back-to-work ratios might be that study design, patient population, content of the program, and other external factors are different and studies as well as effects are therefore not directly comparable. According to several well-controlled studies, the most probable reason for this different effect may be that social and security (health care) systems and cultures differ among countries and that patients with chronic low back pain respond differently to this combination. Sick absenteeism and inability to work may be influenced by many factors besides pain that cannot be addressed by intervention or prevention programs, e.g., job satisfaction, education level, and the compensation systems. It may be that the lower economic benefit during sick leave in the United States leads to favorable results from functional restoration programs. Concerning the prediction of success, several studies have shown that medical background, diagnosis and physical

  9. [Functional restoration--it depends on an adequate mixture of treatment].

    PubMed

    Pfingsten, M

    2001-12-01

    In the last 50 years conventional treatments have not been able to slow down the expanding chronic low back pain problem. However, nowadays health care has changed according to a broad biopsychosocial model of health, the positive effect of activity on health and healing, emphasis on function rather than pain or impairment, and reliance upon clinical evidence. In search for new solutions "functional restoration" (FR) programs have been developed. They include multidisciplinary treatment of patients in groups, consisting of 6-8 h of treatment a day, lasting 3 to 6 weeks and usually integrating intense physical and ergonomic training, psychological (behavioral) therapy, patient education, and instruction in social- and work-related issues. FR programs have yet to demonstrate their effectiveness in several countries. Controlled studies in the USA were very positive regarding the return-to-work rate, whereas studies in Scandinavian countries did not demonstrate similar results. Possible reasons for the different results concerning back-to-work ratios might be that study design, patient population, content of the program, and other external factors are different and studies as well as effects are therefore not directly comparable. According to several well-controlled studies, the most probable reason for this different effect may be that social and security (health care) systems and cultures differ among countries and that patients with chronic low back pain respond differently to this combination. Sick absenteeism and inability to work may be influenced by many factors besides pain that cannot be addressed by intervention or prevention programs, e.g., job satisfaction, education level, and the compensation systems. It may be that the lower economic benefit during sick leave in the United States leads to favorable results from functional restoration programs. Concerning the prediction of success, several studies have shown that medical background, diagnosis and physical

  10. Direct Restorative Treatment of Missing Maxillary Laterals with Composite Laminate Veneer: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Bagis, Bora; Aydoğan, Elif; Bagis, Yildirim H.

    2008-01-01

    This clinical report describes a direct composite laminate veneer restoration of the maxillary anterior teeth in one chair time to produce a better esthetic appearance in a patient with diastemata and missing laterals. PMID:19088889

  11. Integrating Art into Group Treatment for Adults with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder from Childhood Sexual Abuse: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Carol-Lynne J.

    2015-01-01

    Current research supports the use of exposure-based treatments for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and integrated treatments show potential for enhanced symptom reduction. This pilot study developed a manualized group treatment integrating art interventions with exposure, grounding, and narrative therapy for five adults with PTSD who were…

  12. Adhesive restorations in the posterior area with subgingival cervical margins: new classification and differentiated treatment approach.

    PubMed

    Veneziani, Marco

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this article is to analyze some of the issues related to the adhesive restoration of teeth with deep cervical and/or subgingival margins in the posterior area. Three different problems tend to occur during restoration: loss of dental substance, detection of subgingival cervical margins, and dentin sealing of the cervical margins. These conditions, together with the presence of medium/large-sized cavities associated with cuspal involvement and absence of cervical enamel, are indications for indirect adhesive restorations. Subgingival margins are associated with biological and technical problems such as difficulty in isolating the working field with a dental dam, adhesion procedures, impression taking, and final positioning of the restoration itself. A new classification is suggested based on two clinical parameters: 1) a technicaloperative parameter (possibility of correct isolation through the dental dam) and 2) a biological parameter (depending on the biologic width). Three different clinical situations and three different therapeutic approaches are identified (1st, 2nd, and 3rd, respectively): coronal relocation of the margin, surgical exposure of the margin, and clinical crown lengthening. The latter is associated with three further operative sequences: immediate, early, or delayed impression taking. The different therapeutic options are described and illustrated by several clinical cases. The surgical-restorative approach, whereby surgery is strictly associated with buildup, onlay preparation, and impression taking is particularly interesting. The restoration is cemented after only 1 week. This approach makes it possible to speed up the therapy by eliminating the intermediate phases associated with positioning the provisional restorations, and with fast and efficient healing of the soft marginal tissue. PMID:20305873

  13. Convergence Insufficiency Treatment Trial – Attention and Reading Trial (CITT-ART): Design and Methods

    PubMed Central

    Scheiman, Mitchell; Mitchell, G. Lynn; Cotter, Susan A.; Kulp, Marjean; Chase, Christopher; Borsting, Eric; Arnold, Eugene; Denton, Carolyn; Hertle, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Objective To describe the design and methodology of the Convergence Insufficiency Treatment Trial: Attention and Reading Trial (CITT-ART), the first randomized clinical trial evaluating the effect of vision therapy on reading and attention in school-age children with symptomatic convergence insufficiency (CI). Methods CITT-ART is a multicenter, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial of 324 children ages 9 to 14 years in grades 3 to 8 with symptomatic CI. Participants are randomized to 16 weeks of office-based vergence/accommodative therapy (OBVAT) or placebo therapy (OBPT), both supplemented with home therapy. The primary outcome measure is the change in the Wechsler Individual Achievement Test-Version 3 (WIAT-III) reading comprehension subtest score. Secondary outcome measures are changes in attention as measured by the Strengths and Weaknesses of Attention (SWAN) as reported by parents and teachers, tests of binocular visual function, and other measures of reading and attention. The long-term effects of treatment are assessed 1 year after treatment completion. All analyses will test the null hypothesis of no difference in outcomes between the two treatment groups. The study is entering its second year of recruitment. The final results will contribute to a better understanding of the relationship between the treatment of symptomatic CI and its effect on reading and attention. Conclusion The study will provide an evidence base to help parents, eye professionals, educators, and other health care providers make informed decisions as they care for children with CI and reading and attention problems. Results may also generate additional hypothesis and guide the development of other scientific investigations of the relationships between visual disorders and other developmental disorders in children. PMID:26942226

  14. State of the art of biological processes for coal gasification wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qian; Liu, Yu

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of coal gasification wastewater (CGW) poses a serious challenge on the sustainable development of the global coal industry. The CGW contains a broad spectrum of high-strength recalcitrant substances, including phenolic, monocyclic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, heterocyclic nitrogenous compounds and long chain aliphatic hydrocarbon. So far, biological treatment of CGW has been considered as an environment-friendly and cost-effective method compared to physiochemical approaches. Thus, this reviews aims to provide a comprehensive picture of state of the art of biological processes for treating CGW wastewater, while the possible biodegradation mechanisms of toxic and refractory organic substances were also elaborated together with microbial community involved. Discussion was further extended to advanced bioprocesses to tackle high-concentration ammonia and possible options towards in-plant zero liquid discharge. PMID:27364381

  15. Restoring a sludge holding tank at a wastewater treatment plant using high-performance coatings

    SciTech Connect

    O'Dea, V.

    2005-11-01

    Faced with a serious hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) corrosion problem in two sludge holding tanks in 1993, the city of Concord, New Hampshire, repaired the deteriorating substrate by using a conventional acrylic-modified cementitious resurfacer and a coal tar epoxy (CTE) coating system. CTE failure occurred within 2 years, leading to more severe coating delamination. Restoration was delayed for 10 years, which caused extensive chemical attack on the concrete substrate-upwards of 2 in. (50 mm) of concrete loss. This article explains how one of these tanks was restored and prepared for another 15+ years of service.

  16. Restorative space management: treatment planning and clinical considerations for insufficient space.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jason; Chu, Stephen; Gürel, Galip; Cisneros, George

    2005-01-01

    In attempting to provide a restorative solution for cases that have been compromised by spatial considerations, clinicians have traditionally opted for an orthodontic approach that did not provide optimal aesthetics due to changes in tooth morphology, specifically tooth size and shape as a result of dental deterioration. With the advent of contemporary aesthetic materials and preparation techniques, clinicians and technicians are now empowered to deliver a penultimate result with minimal compromise to the surrounding dentition. This article presents the clinical and laboratory considerations that must be addressed when providing a prosthetic restoration for crowded teeth.

  17. Impact of aesthetic restorative treatment on anterior teeth with fluorosis among residents of an endemic area in Brazil: intervention study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Endemic dental fluorosis has already been described in some regions of the world. The aim of this study was to evaluate the functional and psychosocial impact of direct aesthetic restorative treatments in endemic fluorosis patients in the northern state of Minas Gerais, Brazil. Was a quasi-experimental intervention study. Methods The reference population consisted of individuals between 9 and 27 years of age that were served by a project intended to recover the smiles of patients with severe fluorosis. The questionnaires were administered on two occasions, 24 months apart (before and after dental treatment). Initially, descriptive analyses were conducted. Prevalence and severity, as well as the extent of the functional and psychosocial impact of oral disorders were estimated based on the Oral Health Impact Profile instrument (OHIP-14). Comparisons between baseline and follow-up and between treatment techniques were carried out using the McNemar, Wilcoxon, and Mann–Whitney tests. Results The study involved 53 individuals, with a mean age of 15.9 years, treated with microabrasion, dental composite, or a combination of both techniques. The treatments performed proved to be competent for reducing the functional and psychosocial impact of oral disorders as measured by the OHIP-14, pointing to the possibility of establishing protocols to be used in programs aimed at restoring the aesthetics and functionality of the anterior teeth in large populations. Conclusions After performing the direct aesthetic restorative treatments in patients with endemic fluorosis, a significant improvement was observed in the prevalence and severity, as well as the extent of the functional and psychosocial impact of oral disorders. PMID:24886223

  18. The Cost of Providing Combined Prevention and Treatment Services, Including ART, to Female Sex Workers in Burkina Faso

    PubMed Central

    Cianci, Fiona; Sweeney, Sedona; Konate, Issouf; Nagot, Nicolas; Low, Andrea; Mayaud, Philippe; Vickerman, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background Female Sex workers (FSW) are important in driving HIV transmission in West Africa. The Yerelon clinic in Burkina Faso has provided combined preventative and therapeutic services, including anti-retroviral therapy (ART), for FSWs since 1998, with evidence suggesting it has decreased HIV prevalence and incidence in this group. No data exists on the costs of such a combined prevention and treatment intervention for FSW. This study aims to determine the mean cost of service provision per patient year for FSWs attending the Yerelon clinic, and identifies differences in costs between patient groups. Methods Field-based retrospective cost analyses were undertaken using top-down and bottom-up costing approaches for 2010. Expenditure and service utilisation data was collated from primary sources. Patients were divided into groups according to full-time or occasional sex-work, HIV status and ART duration. Patient specific service use data was extracted. Costs were converted to 2012 US$. Sensitivity analyses considered removal of all research costs, different discount rates and use of different ART treatment regimens and follow-up schedules. Results Using the top-down costing approach, the mean annual cost of service provision for FSWs on or off ART was US$1098 and US$882, respectively. The cost for FSWs on ART reduced by 29%, to US$781, if all research-related costs were removed and national ART monitoring guidelines were followed. The bottom-up patient-level costing showed the cost of the service varied greatly across patient groups (US$505–US$1117), primarily due to large differences in the costs of different ART regimens. HIV-negative women had the lowest annual cost at US$505. Conclusion Whilst FSWs may require specialised services to optimise their care and hence, the public health benefits, our study shows that the cost of ART provision within a combined prevention and treatment intervention setting is comparable to providing ART to other population groups

  19. Treatment with garlic restores membrane thiol content and ameliorates lead induced early death of erythrocytes in mice.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Avik; Sengupta, Dipanwita; Mandal, Samir; Sen, Gargi; Dutta Chowdhury, Kaustav; Chandra Sadhukhan, Gobinda

    2015-04-01

    Sequelae of chronic lead (Pb(2+) ) toxicity includes anemia that is partially due to early death of erythrocytes characterized by excess accumulation of ROS and downregulation of antioxidant system causing oxidative stress and externalization of phosphatidylserine. In this study, pathophysiological based therapeutic application of garlic was evaluated against erythrocyte death. Results suggest that garlic administration prevents oxidative stress, restored the antioxidant balance in erythrocytes of Pb(2+) exposed mice. Moreover, in vitro studies revealed that activity of both scramblase and aminophospholipid translocase could be changed by modifying the critical sulfhydryl groups in presence of dithiothreitol during Pb(2+) exposure. Data also indicated that garlic treatment in Pb(2+) exposed mice exhibited sharp decline in PS exposure and increase in erythrocyte membrane thiol group followed by increase in aminophospholipid translocase activity and decline in scramblase activity. Findings indicated that garlic has the ability to restore the lifespan of erythrocytes during Pb(2+) exposure.

  20. Treatment of neuromyelitis optica: state-of-the-art and emerging therapies

    PubMed Central

    Papadopoulos, Marios C.; Bennett, Jeffrey L.; Verkman, Alan S.

    2014-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is an autoimmune disease of the CNS that is characterized by inflammatory demyelinating lesions in the spinal cord and optic nerve, potentially leading to paralysis and blindness. NMO can usually be distinguished from multiple sclerosis (MS) on the basis of seropositivity for IgG antibodies against the astrocytic water channel aquaporin-4 (AQP4). Differentiation from MS is crucial, because some MS treatments can exacerbate NMO. NMO pathogenesis involves AQP4-IgG antibody binding to astrocytic AQP4, which causes complement-dependent cytotoxicity and secondary inflammation with granulocyte and macrophage infiltration, blood–brain barrier disruption and oligodendrocyte injury. Current NMO treatments include general immunosuppressive agents, B-cell depletion, and plasma exchange. Therapeutic strategies targeting complement proteins, the IL-6 receptor, neutrophils, eosinophils and CD19—all initially developed for other indications—are under clinical evaluation for repurposing for NMO. Therapies in the preclinical phase include AQP4-blocking antibodies and AQP4-IgG enzymatic inactivation. Additional, albeit currently theoretical, treatment options include reduction of AQP4 expression, disruption of AQP4 orthogonal arrays, enhancement of complement inhibitor expression, restoration of the blood–brain barrier, and induction of immune tolerance. Despite the many therapeutic options in NMO, no controlled clinical trials in patients with this condition have been conducted to date. PMID:25112508

  1. Restorative Treatment Thresholds for Occlusal Primary Caries by Dentists in “The Dental Practice-Based Research Network”

    PubMed Central

    Gordan, Valeria V; Bader, James D; Garvan, Cynthia W; Richman, Joshua S; Qvist, Vibeke; Fellows, Jeffrey L; Rindal, D. Brad; Gilbert, Gregg H

    2010-01-01

    Objectives (1) Quantify at which carious lesion depths dentists intervene surgically for cases of varying caries penetration and caries risk; (2) Identify characteristics that are associated with surgical intervention. Methods Dentists in a practice-based research network who reported doing at least some restorative dentistry were surveyed. Dentists were asked to indicate whether they would surgically intervene in a series of cases depicting occlusal caries. Each case included a photograph of an occlusal surface displaying typical characteristics of caries penetration, and a written description of a patient at a specific level of caries risk. Using logistic regression, we analyzed associations of surgical treatment with dentist and practice characteristics, and patient caries risk levels. Results 519 DPBRN practitioner-investigators responded, of whom 63% indicated that they would surgically restore lesions located on inner enamel surfaces, and 90% of lesions located in outer dentin surfaces in a low caries risk individual. Regarding individuals at high caries risk, 77% reported that they would surgically restore inner enamel lesions and 94% reported restoring lesions located on the outer dentin surface. Dentists who did not assess caries risk were more likely to intervene on dentin lesions (p=.004). Practitioner-investigators who were in private practice were significantly more likely to intervene surgically on enamel lesions, compared to dentists from large group practices (p<.001). Conclusion Most dentists chose to provide some treatment to lesions that were within the enamel surface. Decisions to intervene surgically in the caries process differ by caries lesion depth, patient caries risk, assessment of caries risk, type of practice model, and percent of patients who self-pay. PMID:20123876

  2. A cost-effective treatment for severe generalized erosion and loss of vertical dimension of occlusion: laboratory-fabricated composite resin restorations.

    PubMed

    Metz, Michael J; Stapleton, Brandon M; Harris, Bryan T; Lin, Wei-Shao

    2015-01-01

    This case report describes preventive and restorative treatment planning for a 56-year-old female patient with severe, chronic, poorly controlled gastroesophageal reflux disease and resulting loss of vertical dimension of occlusion. First, the demineralization process was controlled through collaboration with the patient's physician, and measures were taken to restore adequate stimulated salivary flow. Then, for financial reasons, indirect laboratory-fabricated composite resin restorations were adhesively bonded to replace lost tooth structure and reestablish the patient's collapsed vertical dimension. Indirect-laboratory fabricated restorations can be a cost-effective alternative to direct composite resin or all-ceramic restorations for the treatment of chronic severe erosion, but there are no long-term clinical reports in the current literature to support or contraindicate the use of indirect composites for this type of clinical application. Therefore, careful, long-term follow-up evaluations are planned for this patient. PMID:26325651

  3. Dentin surface treatment using a non-thermal argon plasma brush for interfacial bonding improvement in composite restoration.

    PubMed

    Ritts, Andy C; Li, Hao; Yu, Qingsong; Xu, Changqi; Yao, Xiaomei; Hong, Liang; Wang, Yong

    2010-10-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the treatment effects of non-thermal atmospheric gas plasmas on dentin surfaces used for composite restoration. Extracted unerupted human third molars were prepared by removing the crowns and etching the exposed dentin surfaces with 35% phosphoric acid gel. The dentin surfaces were treated using a non-thermal atmospheric argon plasma brush for various periods of time. The molecular changes of the dentin surfaces were analyzed using Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometry/attenuated total reflectance (FTIR/ATR), and an increase in the amount of carbonyl groups was detected on plasma-treated dentin surfaces. Adper Single Bond Plus adhesive and Filtek Z250 dental composite were applied as directed. To evaluate the dentin/composite interfacial bonding, the teeth thus prepared were sectioned into micro-bars and analyzed using tensile testing. Student-Newman-Keuls tests showed that the bonding strength of the composite restoration to peripheral dentin was significantly increased (by 64%) after 30 s of plasma treatment. However, the bonding strength to plasma-treated inner dentin did not show any improvement. It was found that plasma treatment of the peripheral dentin surface for up to 100 s resulted in an increase in the interfacial bonding strength, while prolonged plasma treatment of dentin surfaces (e.g. 5 min) resulted in a decrease in the interfacial bonding strength.

  4. [Treatment and personality development with art therapy. A description of the method].

    PubMed

    Antalfai, Márta

    2007-01-01

    Composition as a creative form of self-expression plays an important role not only in maintaining health, but also in gaining insight into the healthy personality and in the definition of this category. It seems nowadays that psychology has collected more information on the pathological personality than on the healthy one. Therefore, different workshops of art therapy are also scenes of a "spiritual alchemy" because they can give a deeper insight into the personality in addition to the primary aim of treatment. The method of the thematic art psychotherapy based on catharsis-experience is based on analytical psychology and on analytically oriented group-therapy. The aim is to generate artificial catharsis-experiences employing the impressive forces of poems, music compositions in order to raise the unconscious or the partly experienced partner-conflicts to the surface, which could manifest themselves in the process of the creative work and could be elaborated in group-activity. The creative process (specially adapted art techniques) provides good opportunities for patients to depict their traumas and complexes and also to resolve them involving the whole personality and not only at a cognitive level. The method, tuned to the workings of nature, helps the personality to develop the emotional and volitional segments, the sensitive and empathetic capabilities, as well as the recognition skills of consciousness. In the therapeutic process, the work of art that is created holds a mirror to the creator, offering to him or her the opportunity to face the real complex at the background the actual conflict. The method aims to achieve a reconstruction of psychic dynamics in two ways. The first is an emotional resonance to the changes of nature, of the year and of the feasts, in which the psychic process starts from inside to the direction of the outside world (psychic enrichment and accomodation). The second way leads from the outer world to the inner one and this psychic

  5. Dentist and practice characteristics associated with restorative treatment of enamel caries in permanent teeth: multiple-regression modeling of observational clinical data from The National Dental PBRN

    PubMed Central

    Fellows, Jeffrey L; Gordan, Valeria V.; Gilbert, Gregg H.; Rindal, D. Brad; Qvist, Vibeke; Litaker, Mark S.; Benjamin, Paul; Flink, Håkan; Pihlstrom, Daniel J.; Johnson, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Current evidence in dentistry recommends non-surgical treatment to manage enamel caries lesions. However, surveyed practitioners report they would restore enamel lesions that are confined to the enamel. We used actual clinical data to evaluate patient, dentist, and practice characteristics associated with restoration of enamel caries, while accounting for other factors. Methods We combined data from a National Dental Practice-Based Research Network observational study of consecutive restorations placed in previously unrestored permanent tooth surfaces and practice/demographic data from 229 participating network dentists. Analysis of variance and logistic regression, using generalized estimating equations (GEE) and variable selection within blocks, were used to test the hypothesis that patient, dentist, and practice characteristics were associated with variations in enamel restorations of occlusal and proximal caries compared to dentin lesions, accounting for dentist and patient clustering. Results Network dentists from 5 regions placed 6,891 restorations involving occlusal and/or proximal caries lesions. Enamel restorations accounted for 16% of enrolled occlusal caries lesions and 6% of enrolled proximal caries lesions. Enamel occlusal restorations varied significantly (p<0.05) by patient age and race/ethnicity, dentist use of caries risk assessment, network region, and practice type. Enamel proximal restorations varied significantly (p<0.05) by dentist race/ethnicity, network region, and practice type. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE Identifying patient, dentist, and practice characteristics associated with enamel caries restorations can guide strategies to improve provider adherence to evidence-based clinical recommendations. PMID:25000667

  6. Pancreatic cancer: from state-of-the-art treatments to promising novel therapies.

    PubMed

    Garrido-Laguna, Ignacio; Hidalgo, Manuel

    2015-06-01

    Pancreatic cancer is expected to be the second deadliest malignancy in the USA by 2020. The survival rates for patients with other gastrointestinal malignancies have increased consistently during the past 30 years; unfortunately, however, the outcomes of patients with pancreatic cancer have not changed significantly. Although surgery remains the only curative treatment for pancreatic cancer, therapeutic strategies based on initial resection have not substantially improved the survival of patients with resectable disease over the past 25 years; presently, more than 80% of patients suffer disease relapse after resection. Preclinical evidence that pancreatic cancer is a systemic disease suggests a possible benefit for early administration of systemic therapy in these patients. In locally advanced disease, the role of chemoradiotherapy is increasingly being questioned, particularly considering the results of the LAP-07 trial. Novel biomarkers are clearly needed to identify subsets of patients likely to benefit from chemoradiotherapy. In the metastatic setting, FOLFIRINOX (folinic acid, 5-fluorouracil, irinotecan, and oxaliplatin), and nab-paclitaxel plus gemcitabine have yielded only modest improvements in survival. Thus, new treatments are urgently needed for patients with pancreatic cancer. Herein, we review the state-of-the-art of pancreatic cancer treatment, and the upcoming novel therapeutics that hold promise in this disease are also discussed.

  7. Beyond Risk Compensation: Clusters of Antiretroviral Treatment (ART) Users in Sexual Networks Can Modify the Impact of ART on HIV Incidence

    PubMed Central

    Delva, Wim; Helleringer, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Concerns about risk compensation—increased risk behaviours in response to a perception of reduced HIV transmission risk—after the initiation of ART have largely been dispelled in empirical studies, but other changes in sexual networking patterns may still modify the effects of ART on HIV incidence. Methods We developed an exploratory mathematical model of HIV transmission that incorporates the possibility of ART clusters, i.e. subsets of the sexual network in which the density of ART patients is much higher than in the rest of the network. Such clusters may emerge as a result of ART homophily—a tendency for ART patients to preferentially form and maintain relationships with other ART patients. We assessed whether ART clusters may affect the impact of ART on HIV incidence, and how the influence of this effect-modifying variable depends on contextual variables such as HIV prevalence, HIV serosorting, coverage of HIV testing and ART, and adherence to ART. Results ART homophily can modify the impact of ART on HIV incidence in both directions. In concentrated epidemics and generalized epidemics with moderate HIV prevalence (≈ 10%), ART clusters can enhance the impact of ART on HIV incidence, especially when adherence to ART is poor. In hyperendemic settings (≈ 35% HIV prevalence), ART clusters can reduce the impact of ART on HIV incidence when adherence to ART is high but few people living with HIV (PLWH) have been diagnosed. In all contexts, the effects of ART clusters on HIV epidemic dynamics are distinct from those of HIV serosorting. Conclusions Depending on the programmatic and epidemiological context, ART clusters may enhance or reduce the impact of ART on HIV incidence, in contrast to serosorting, which always leads to a lower impact of ART on HIV incidence. ART homophily and the emergence of ART clusters should be measured empirically and incorporated into more refined models used to plan and evaluate ART programmes. PMID:27657492

  8. Innovative manure treatments in the USA – state of the art (Tratamientos Innovadores de estiercoles en USA - estado del arte)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Currently, the potential impact of manure on the environment represents one of the world agriculture’s major challenges. Treatment technologies can play an important role in the management of livestock manure by providing a more flexible approach to land application and acreage limitations and by so...

  9. Brief Treatment of Symptoms of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) by Use of Accelerated Resolution Therapy (ART(®)).

    PubMed

    Kip, Kevin E; Elk, Carrie A; Sullivan, Kelly L; Kadel, Rajendra; Lengacher, Cecile A; Long, Christopher J; Rosenzweig, Laney; Shuman, Amy; Hernandez, Diego F; Street, Jennifer D; Girling, Sue Ann; Diamond, David M

    2012-06-01

    Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is a prevalent, disabling anxiety disorder. This prospective cohort study reports on a new exposure-based therapy known as Accelerated Resolution Therapy (ART(®)) that incorporates the use of eye movements administered in a brief treatment period (1-5 one-hour sessions within three weeks). Eighty adults aged 21-60 years with symptoms of PTSD were recruited from the Tampa Bay area. The ART-based psychotherapy was designed to minimize anxiety and body sensations associated with recall of traumatic memories and to replace distressing images with favorable ones. Participants' mean age was 40 years, 77% were female, and 29% were Hispanic. Participants underwent a median of three ART sessions, 66 of 80 (82.5%) completed treatment, and 54 of 66 (81.8%) provided 2-month follow-up data. Mean scores pre- and post-ART and at 2-month follow-up were: PTSD Checklist: 54.5 ± 12.2 vs. 31.2 ± 11.4 vs. 30.0 ± 12.4; Brief Symptom Inventory: 30.8 ± 14.6 vs. 10.1 ± 10.8 vs. 10.1 ± 12.1; Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale: 29.5 ± 10.9 vs. 11.8 ± 11.1 vs. 13.5 ± 12.1; Trauma Related Growth Inventory-Distress scale: 18.9 ± 4.1 vs. 7.4 ± 5.9 vs. 8.2 ± 5.9 (p < 0.0001 for all pre-ART vs. post-ART and 2-month comparisons). No serious adverse events were reported. ART appears to be a brief, safe, and effective treatment for symptoms of PTSD.

  10. INFLUENCE OF POST-CURE TREATMENTS ON HARDNESS AND MARGINAL ADAPTATION OF COMPOSITE RESIN INLAY RESTORATIONS: AN IN VITRO STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Poskus, Laiza Tatiana; Latempa, Antonio Marcelo Accetta; Chagas, Maurício Alves; da Silva, Eduardo Moreira; Leal, Mariana Pareira da Silva; Guimarães, José Guilherme Antunes

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the Vickers hardness number (VHN) and the in vitro marginal adaptation of inlay restorations of three hybrid composite resins (Filtek Z250, Opallis and Esthet-X) subjected to two post-cure treatments. Material and Methods: For the microhardness test, three different groups were prepared in accordance with the post-cure treatments: control group (only light cure for 40 s), autoclave group (light cure for 40 s + autoclave for 15 min at 130°C); and microwave group (light cure for 40 s + microwave for 3 min at 450 W). To assess the marginal adaptation, the composite resin was inserted incrementally into a mesial-occlusal-distal cavity brass mold and each increment light-cured for 40 s. A previous reading in micrometers was taken at the cervical wall, using a stereomicroscope magnifying glass equipped with a digital video camera and image-analysis software. Subsequently, the specimens were subjected to the post-cure treatments (autoclave and microwave) and a reading was taken again at the cervical wall. Data were compared using ANOVA for the hardness test, split-plot ANOVA for the adaptation assessment and Tukey's test for multiple comparisons. A significance level of 5% was adopted for all analyses. Results: The post-cure treatments increased the hardness of conventional composites (p<0.001) and the gap values of inlay restorations (p<0.01). Filtek Z250 showed higher hardness (p<0.001) and lower gap values than Opallis and Esthet-X (p<0.05). Gap values did not exceed 90 μm for any of the experimental conditions. Conclusion: The post-cure treatments increased the VHN and the gap values on the cervical floor of composite resin inlays. Moreover, Filtek Z250 showed the best results, with higher hardness and lower gap values. PMID:20027437

  11. Gene therapies that restore dystrophin expression for the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Robinson-Hamm, Jacqueline N; Gersbach, Charles A

    2016-09-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is one of the most common inherited genetic diseases and is caused by mutations to the DMD gene that encodes the dystrophin protein. Recent advances in genome editing and gene therapy offer hope for the development of potential therapeutics. Truncated versions of the DMD gene can be delivered to the affected tissues with viral vectors and show promising results in a variety of animal models. Genome editing with the CRISPR/Cas9 system has recently been used to restore dystrophin expression by deleting one or more exons of the DMD gene in patient cells and in a mouse model that led to functional improvement of muscle strength. Exon skipping with oligonucleotides has been successful in several animal models and evaluated in multiple clinical trials. Next-generation oligonucleotide formulations offer significant promise to build on these results. All these approaches to restoring dystrophin expression are encouraging, but many hurdles remain. This review summarizes the current state of these technologies and summarizes considerations for their future development.

  12. Gene therapies that restore dystrophin expression for the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Robinson-Hamm, Jacqueline N; Gersbach, Charles A

    2016-09-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is one of the most common inherited genetic diseases and is caused by mutations to the DMD gene that encodes the dystrophin protein. Recent advances in genome editing and gene therapy offer hope for the development of potential therapeutics. Truncated versions of the DMD gene can be delivered to the affected tissues with viral vectors and show promising results in a variety of animal models. Genome editing with the CRISPR/Cas9 system has recently been used to restore dystrophin expression by deleting one or more exons of the DMD gene in patient cells and in a mouse model that led to functional improvement of muscle strength. Exon skipping with oligonucleotides has been successful in several animal models and evaluated in multiple clinical trials. Next-generation oligonucleotide formulations offer significant promise to build on these results. All these approaches to restoring dystrophin expression are encouraging, but many hurdles remain. This review summarizes the current state of these technologies and summarizes considerations for their future development. PMID:27542949

  13. Nanocarriers for the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme: Current state-of-the-art.

    PubMed

    Karim, Reatul; Palazzo, Claudio; Evrard, Brigitte; Piel, Geraldine

    2016-04-10

    Glioblastoma multiforme, a grade IV glioma, is the most frequently occurring and invasive primary tumor of the central nervous system, which causes about 4% of cancer-associated-deaths, making it one of the most fatal cancers. With present treatments, using state-of-the-art technologies, the median survival is about 14 months and 2 year survival rate is merely 3-5%. Hence, novel therapeutic approaches are urgently necessary. However, most drug molecules are not able to cross the blood-brain barrier, which is one of the major difficulties in glioblastoma treatment. This review describes the features of blood-brain barrier, and its anatomical changes with different stages of tumor growth. Moreover, various strategies to improve brain drug delivery i.e. tight junction opening, chemical modification of the drug, efflux transporter inhibition, convection-enhanced delivery, craniotomy-based drug delivery and drug delivery nanosystems are discussed. Nanocarriers are one of the highly potential drug transport systems that have gained huge research focus over the last few decades for site specific drug delivery, including drug delivery to the brain. Properly designed nanocolloids are capable to cross the blood-brain barrier and specifically deliver the drug in the brain tumor tissue. They can carry both hydrophilic and hydrophobic drugs, protect them from degradation, release the drug for sustained period, significantly improve the plasma circulation half-life and reduce toxic effects. Among various nanocarriers, liposomes, polymeric nanoparticles and lipid nanocapsules are the most widely studied, and are discussed in this review. For each type of nanocarrier, a general discussion describing their composition, characteristics, types and various uses is followed by their specific application to glioblastoma treatment. Moreover, some of the main challenges regarding toxicity and standardized evaluation techniques are narrated in brief.

  14. Monitoring the Effects of Forest Restoration Treatments on Post-Fire Vegetation Recovery with MODIS Multitemporal Data

    PubMed Central

    van Leeuwen, Willem J. D.

    2008-01-01

    This study examines how satellite based time-series vegetation greenness data and phenological measurements can be used to monitor and quantify vegetation recovery after wildfire disturbances and examine how pre-fire fuel reduction restoration treatments impact fire severity and impact vegetation recovery trajectories. Pairs of wildfire affected sites and a nearby unburned reference site were chosen to measure the post-disturbance recovery in relation to climate variation. All site pairs were chosen in forested uplands in Arizona and were restricted to the area of the Rodeo-Chediski fire that occurred in 2002. Fuel reduction treatments were performed in 1999 and 2001. The inter-annual and seasonal vegetation dynamics before, during, and after wildfire events can be monitored using a time series of biweekly composited MODIS NDVI (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer - Normalized Difference Vegetation Index) data. Time series analysis methods included difference metrics, smoothing filters, and fitting functions that were applied to extract seasonal and inter-annual change and phenological metrics from the NDVI time series data from 2000 to 2007. Pre- and post-fire Landsat data were used to compute the Normalized Burn Ratio (NBR) and examine burn severity at the selected sites. The phenological metrics (pheno-metrics) included the timing and greenness (i.e. NDVI) for the start, peak and end of the growing season as well as proxy measures for the rate of green-up and senescence and the annual vegetation productivity. Pre-fire fuel reduction treatments resulted in lower fire severity, which reduced annual productivity much less than untreated areas within the Rodeo-Chediski fire perimeter. The seasonal metrics were shown to be useful for estimating the rate of post-fire disturbance recovery and the timing of phenological greenness phases. The use of satellite time series NDVI data and derived pheno-metrics show potential for tracking vegetation cover dynamics

  15. HIV Treatment as Prevention: Modelling the Cost of Antiretroviral Treatment—State of the Art and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Meyer-Rath, Gesine; Over, Mead

    2012-01-01

    Policy discussions about the feasibility of massively scaling up antiretroviral therapy (ART) to reduce HIV transmission and incidence hinge on accurately projecting the cost of such scale-up in comparison to the benefits from reduced HIV incidence and mortality. We review the available literature on modelled estimates of the cost of providing ART to different populations around the world, and suggest alternative methods of characterising cost when modelling several decades into the future. In past economic analyses of ART provision, costs were often assumed to vary by disease stage and treatment regimen, but for treatment as prevention, in particular, most analyses assume a uniform cost per patient. This approach disregards variables that can affect unit cost, such as differences in factor prices (i.e., the prices of supplies and services) and the scale and scope of operations (i.e., the sizes and types of facilities providing ART). We discuss several of these variables, and then present a worked example of a flexible cost function used to determine the effect of scale on the cost of a proposed scale-up of treatment as prevention in South Africa. Adjusting previously estimated costs of universal testing and treatment in South Africa for diseconomies of small scale, i.e., more patients being treated in smaller facilities, adds 42% to the expected future cost of the intervention. PMID:22802731

  16. Limits to Understory Plant Restoration Following Fuel-Reduction Treatments in a Piñon-Juniper Woodland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redmond, Miranda D.; Zelikova, Tamara J.; Barger, Nichole N.

    2014-11-01

    National fuel-reduction programs aim to reduce the risk of wildland fires to human communities and to restore forest and rangeland ecosystems to resemble their historical structure, function, and diversity. There are a number of factors, such as seed bank dynamics, post-treatment climate, and herbivory, which determine whether this latter goal may be achieved. Here, we examine the short-term (2 years) vegetation response to fuel-reduction treatments (mechanical mastication, broadcast burn, and pile burn) and seeding of native grasses on understory vegetation in an upland piñon-juniper woodland in southeast Utah. We also examine how wildlife herbivory affects the success of fuel-reduction treatments. Herbaceous cover increased in response to fuel-reduction treatments in all seeded treatments, with the broadcast burn and mastication having greater increases (234 and 160 %, respectively) in herbaceous cover than the pile burn (32 %). In the absence of seeding, herbaceous cover only increased in the broadcast burn (32 %). Notably, fuel-reduction treatments, but not seeding, strongly affected herbaceous plant composition. All fuel-reduction treatments increased the relative density of invasive species, especially in the broadcast burn, which shifted the plant community composition from one dominated by perennial graminoids to one dominated by annual forbs. Herbivory by wildlife reduced understory plant cover by over 40 % and altered plant community composition. If the primary management goal is to enhance understory cover while promoting native species abundance, our study suggests that mastication may be the most effective treatment strategy in these upland piñon-juniper woodlands. Seed applications and wildlife exclosures further enhanced herbaceous cover following fuel-reduction treatments.

  17. Expanding ART for Treatment and Prevention of HIV in South Africa: Estimated Cost and Cost-Effectiveness 2011-2050

    PubMed Central

    Granich, Reuben; Kahn, James G.; Bennett, Rod; Holmes, Charles B.; Garg, Navneet; Serenata, Celicia; Sabin, Miriam Lewis; Makhlouf-Obermeyer, Carla; De Filippo Mack, Christina; Williams, Phoebe; Jones, Louisa; Smyth, Caoimhe; Kutch, Kerry A.; Ying-Ru, Lo; Vitoria, Marco; Souteyrand, Yves; Crowley, Siobhan; Korenromp, Eline L.; Williams, Brian G.

    2012-01-01

    Background Antiretroviral Treatment (ART) significantly reduces HIV transmission. We conducted a cost-effectiveness analysis of the impact of expanded ART in South Africa. Methods We model a best case scenario of 90% annual HIV testing coverage in adults 15–49 years old and four ART eligibility scenarios: CD4 count <200 cells/mm3 (current practice), CD4 count <350, CD4 count <500, all CD4 levels. 2011–2050 outcomes include deaths, disability adjusted life years (DALYs), HIV infections, cost, and cost per DALY averted. Service and ART costs reflect South African data and international generic prices. ART reduces transmission by 92%. We conducted sensitivity analyses. Results Expanding ART to CD4 count <350 cells/mm3 prevents an estimated 265,000 (17%) and 1.3 million (15%) new HIV infections over 5 and 40 years, respectively. Cumulative deaths decline 15%, from 12.5 to 10.6 million; DALYs by 14% from 109 to 93 million over 40 years. Costs drop $504 million over 5 years and $3.9 billion over 40 years with breakeven by 2013. Compared with the current scenario, expanding to <500 prevents an additional 585,000 and 3 million new HIV infections over 5 and 40 years, respectively. Expanding to all CD4 levels decreases HIV infections by 3.3 million (45%) and costs by $10 billion over 40 years, with breakeven by 2023. By 2050, using higher ART and monitoring costs, all CD4 levels saves $0.6 billion versus current; other ART scenarios cost $9–194 per DALY averted. If ART reduces transmission by 99%, savings from all CD4 levels reach $17.5 billion. Sensitivity analyses suggest that poor retention and predominant acute phase transmission reduce DALYs averted by 26% and savings by 7%. Conclusion Increasing the provision of ART to <350 cells/mm3 may significantly reduce costs while reducing the HIV burden. Feasibility including HIV testing and ART uptake, retention, and adherence should be evaluated. PMID:22348000

  18. HDAC inhibitor treatment of hepatoma cells induces both TRAIL-independent apoptosis and restoration of sensitivity to TRAIL.

    PubMed

    Pathil, Anita; Armeanu, Sorin; Venturelli, Sascha; Mascagni, Paolo; Weiss, Thomas S; Gregor, Michael; Lauer, Ulrich M; Bitzer, Michael

    2006-03-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) displays a striking resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs or innovative tumor cell apoptosis-inducing agents such as tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL). Recently, we found 2 histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDAC-I), valproic acid and ITF2357, exhibiting inherent therapeutic activity against HCC. In TRAIL-sensitive cancer cells, the mechanism of HDAC-I-induced cell death has been identified to be TRAIL-dependent by inducing apoptosis in an autocrine fashion. In contrast, in HCC-derived cells, a prototype of TRAIL-resistant tumor cells, we found a HDAC-I-mediated apoptosis that works independently of TRAIL and upregulation of death receptors or their cognate ligands. Interestingly, TRAIL resistance could be overcome by a combinatorial application of HDAC-I and TRAIL, increasing the fraction of apoptotic cells two- to threefold compared with HDAC-I treatment alone, whereas any premature HDAC-I withdrawal rapidly restored TRAIL resistance. Furthermore, a tumor cell-specific downregulation of the FLICE inhibitory protein (FLIP) was observed, constituting a new mechanism of TRAIL sensitivity restoration by HDAC-I. In contrast, FLIP levels in primary human hepatocytes (PHH) from different donors were upregulated by HDAC-I. Importantly, combination HDAC-I/TRAIL treatment did not induce any cytotoxicity in nonmalignant PHH. In conclusion, HDAC-I compounds, exhibiting a favorable in vivo profile and inherent activity against HCC cells, are able to selectively overcome the resistance of HCC cells toward TRAIL. Specific upregulation of intracellular FLIP protein levels in nonmalignant hepatocytes could enhance the therapeutic window for clinical applications of TRAIL, opening up a highly specific new treatment option for advanced HCC. PMID:16583461

  19. Treatment of Mutilated Art Books: A Survey of Academic ARL Institutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Elizabeth H.; Olszak, Lydia

    1997-01-01

    Discusses how main and departmental art libraries handle mutilated art books based on experiences at East Carolina University (North Carolina). Highlights include a survey of academic libraries which are members of ARL (Association of Research Libraries); costs; importance of the work; amount of mutilation; and availability of photocopiers to…

  20. Effect of Art Production on Negative Mood and Anxiety for Adults in Treatment for Substance Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laurer, Mattye; van der Vennet, Renée

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated whether art production or viewing and sorting art reproductions would be more effective in reducing negative mood and anxiety for 28 adults with substance use disorders. Participants were randomly assigned to one of two groups and completed pre- and posttest measures of negative mood and anxiety The hypothesis that art…

  1. Non-thermal Atmospheric Plasma Treatment for Deactivation of Oral Bacteria and Improvement of Dental Composite Restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Qing Song; Li, H.; Ritts, A. C.; Yang, B.; Chen, M.; Hong, L.; Xu, C.; Yao, X.; Wang, Y.

    This paper reviews our recent research results of using non-thermal ­atmospheric plasmas for oral bacterial deactivation and for composite restoration improvement. Oral bacteria of Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) and Lactobacillus acidophilus (L. acidophilus) with an initial bacterial population density between 1.0 × 108 and 5.0 × 108 cfu/ml were seeded on various media and their survivability with plasma exposure was examined. The plasma exposure time for a 99.9999% cell reduction was less than 15 s for S. mutans and within 5 min for L. acidophilus. To evaluate the dentin/composite interfacial bonding, extracted unerupted human third molars were used by removing the crowns and etching the exposed dentin surfaces with 35% phosphoric acid gel. After dental composite application and light curing, the teeth were then sectioned into micro-bars as the specimens for microtensile test. Student Newman Keuls (SNK) tests showed that the bonding strength of the composite restoration to peripheral dentin was significantly increased (by 64%) after 30 s plasma treatment of the dentin surfaces. These findings indicated that non-thermal atmospheric plasma technology is very promising for dental clinical applications.

  2. The Efficacy of Noncontingent Escape for Decreasing Children's Disruptive Behavior during Restorative Dental Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Callaghan, Patrick M.; Allen, Keith D.; Powell, Shawn; Salama, Fouad

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of a dentist-implemented behavioral intervention in which brief escape from dental treatment was provided on a regular basis, independent of the child's behavior. Within a multiple baseline design across subjects, 5 children, ages 4 to 7 years, were provided with temporary escape from dental treatment on a fixed-time…

  3. Invisalign technique in the treatment of adults with pre-restorative concerns.

    PubMed

    Mampieri, Gianluca; Giancotti, Aldo

    2013-10-20

    The Invisalign method is gaining an increasing interest as an alternative treatment option in adult patient in multidisciplinary complex cases to simplify the treatment plan. The aim of this work is to show the importance of planning a multidisciplinary approach to respond at the esthetic requests of adult patients and to treat complex cases with high predictability.

  4. Invisalign technique in the treatment of adults with pre-restorative concerns

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The Invisalign method is gaining an increasing interest as an alternative treatment option in adult patient in multidisciplinary complex cases to simplify the treatment plan. The aim of this work is to show the importance of planning a multidisciplinary approach to respond at the esthetic requests of adult patients and to treat complex cases with high predictability. PMID:24325954

  5. Chemical and structural characterization of glass ionomer cements indicated for atraumatic restorative treatment.

    PubMed

    Guedes, Orlando Aguirre; Borges, Álvaro Henrique; Bandeca, Matheus Coelho; Nakatani, Mariana Kyosen; de Araújo Estrela, Cyntia Rodrigues; de Alencar, Ana Helena Gonçalves; Estrela, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Glass ionomer cements (GICs) are restorative materials, which clinical use has increased significantly during the last decade. The aim of the present study was to analyze the chemical constitution and surface morphology of four glass ionomer cements: Maxxion R, VitroFill, Vidrion R and Vitremer. Twelve polyethylene tubes with an internal diameter of 3 and 3 mm in length were prepared, filled and then transferred to a chamber with 95% relative humidity and a temperature of 37°C. The surface morphology of the tested materials was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and main components were investigated by energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX). Scanning electron microscopy revealed irregular and rough external surface. Cracking was not observed. The main constituents were found to be aluminum, silicon, calcium, sodium and fluoride. Phosphorus, sulfur and barium were only observed in Vidrion R, while chlorine were only observed in Maxxion R. Elemental mapping of the outer surface revealed high concentration of aluminum and silicon. Significant irregularities on the surface of the tested materials were observed. The chemical constitution of all GIC was similar. PMID:25876952

  6. Neuroprotection: the emerging concept of restorative neural stem cell biology for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Carletti, Barbara; Piemonte, Fiorella; Rossi, Ferdinando

    2011-06-01

    During the past decades Neural Stem Cells have been considered as an alternative source of cells to replace lost neurons and NSC transplantation has been indicated as a promising treatment for neurodegenerative disorders. Nevertheless, the current understanding of NSC biology suggests that, far from being mere spare parts for cell replacement therapies, NSCs could play a key role in the pharmacology of neuroprotection and become protagonists of innovative treatments for neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we review this new emerging concept of NSC biology.

  7. MicroRNA-126 contributes to Niaspan treatment induced vascular restoration after diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Yan, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a serious microvascular complication of diabetes and a major cause of blindness in the developing world. Early diabetic retinopathy is characterized by a loss of pericytes and vascular endothelial cells, a breakdown of the blood-retinal barrier, vascular dysfunction and vascular-neuroinflammation. However, optimal treatment options and related mechanisms are still unclear. MicroRNA-126 (miR-126) plays a potential role in the pathogenesis in DR, which may regulate VEGF, Ang-1 and VCAM-1 expressions. This study investigated the therapeutic effects and mechanisms of Niaspan treatment of DR in diabetes (DM) rats. DM rats exhibits significantly decreased miR-126 and tight junction Claudin-5/Occludin/ZO-1 genes expression, and increased Blood retinal-barrier (BRB) breakdown, retinal apoptosis and VEGF/VEGFR, as well as VCAM-1/CD45 expressions in the retina compared to normal control group. Niaspan treatment significantly improved clinical and histopathological outcomes; decreased the expressions of VEGF/VEGFR, VCAM-1/CD45, apoptosis and BRB breakdown, significantly increased tight junction proteins and Ang-1/Tie-2 expressions, as well as increased retinal miR-126 expression compared to non-treatment diabetic rats. These data are the first to show that Niaspan treatment ameliorates DR through its repair vascular and inhibits inflammatory effects, and also suggest that the miR-126 pathway may contribute to Niaspan treatment induced benefit effects. PMID:27225425

  8. MicroRNA-126 contributes to Niaspan treatment induced vascular restoration after diabetic retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang; Yan, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a serious microvascular complication of diabetes and a major cause of blindness in the developing world. Early diabetic retinopathy is characterized by a loss of pericytes and vascular endothelial cells, a breakdown of the blood–retinal barrier, vascular dysfunction and vascular-neuroinflammation. However, optimal treatment options and related mechanisms are still unclear. MicroRNA-126 (miR-126) plays a potential role in the pathogenesis in DR, which may regulate VEGF, Ang-1 and VCAM-1 expressions. This study investigated the therapeutic effects and mechanisms of Niaspan treatment of DR in diabetes (DM) rats. DM rats exhibits significantly decreased miR-126 and tight junction Claudin-5/Occludin/ZO-1 genes expression, and increased Blood retinal-barrier (BRB) breakdown, retinal apoptosis and VEGF/VEGFR, as well as VCAM-1/CD45 expressions in the retina compared to normal control group. Niaspan treatment significantly improved clinical and histopathological outcomes; decreased the expressions of VEGF/VEGFR, VCAM-1/CD45, apoptosis and BRB breakdown, significantly increased tight junction proteins and Ang-1/Tie-2 expressions, as well as increased retinal miR-126 expression compared to non-treatment diabetic rats. These data are the first to show that Niaspan treatment ameliorates DR through its repair vascular and inhibits inflammatory effects, and also suggest that the miR-126 pathway may contribute to Niaspan treatment induced benefit effects. PMID:27225425

  9. Botulinum toxin type A: an effective treatment to restore phonation in laryngectomized patients unable to voice.

    PubMed

    Bartolomei, Luigi; Zambito Marsala, Sandro; Pighi, Gian Paolo; Cristofori, Valentina; Pagano, Giuseppe; Pontarin, Massimo; Gioulis, Manuela; Marchini, Corrado

    2011-06-01

    We evaluated the efficacy of Botulinum toxin type A (BTXA) as an alternative to surgical intervention to facilitate phonation in 34 laryngectomized patients (31 males and 3 women) who were unable to produce tracheoesophageal voice because of spasm of the middle and inferior pharyngeal constrictor muscles (PCM). EMG was recorded to confirm activity in these muscles during attempted vocalization. Parapharyngeal nerve block (Carbocaine 2%, 5 cc) was used to demonstrate short-term fluent voice after relaxation of the pharyngeal constrictor muscle. At a later occasion, 100 U of Botox (Allergan) in ten patients and 50 U in two patients were injected unilaterally at one location in the PCM percutaneously under EMG guidance. All patients then underwent a voice therapy program. In 11 out of 12 patients an improvement of phonation was evident after 24-48 h and it was long lasting. This result was also seen in a patient previously myotomized without improvement. Only one patient needed to be reinjected every 3 months. At a follow-up after 3 months the EMG recorded in four patients showed a low-amplitude or complete absence of activity in the treated muscle. No side effects developed. BTX therapy, especially when associated with the speech therapy, is efficacious in restoring voice to laryngectomees who are unable to voice because of spasm of the PCMs. Our results confirm previous reports. This method is our approach of choice in managing PCM spasm because it is non-invasive, not painful, has few or no side effects, and is frequently long-lasting.

  10. Restoring grassland savannas from degraded pinyon-juniper woodlands: effects of mechanical overstory reduction and slash treatment alternatives.

    PubMed

    Brockway, Dale G; Gatewood, Richard G; Paris, Randi B

    2002-02-01

    Although the distribution and structure of pinyon-juiper woodlands in the southwestern United States are thought to be the result of historic fluctuations in regional climatic conditions, more recent increases in the areal extent, tree density, soil erosion rates and loss of understory plant diversity are attributed to heavy grazing by domestic livestock and interruption of the natural fire regime. Prior to 1850, many areas currently occupied by high-density pinyon-juniper woodlands, with their degraded soils and depauperate understories, were very likely savannas dominated by native grasses and forbs and containing sparse tree cover scattered across the landscape. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of mechanical overstory reduction and three slash treatment alternatives (removal, clustering and scattering) followed by prescribed fire as techniques for restoring grassland savannas from degraded woodlands. Plant cover, diversity, biomass and nutrient status, litter cover and soil chemistry and erosion rates were measured prior to and for two years following experimental treatment in a degraded pinyon-juniper woodland in central New Mexico. Treatment resulted in a significant increase in the cover of native grasses and, to a lesser degree, forbs and shrubs. Plant species richness and diversity increased most on sites where slash was either completely removed or scattered to serve as a mulch. Although no changes in soil chemistry or plant nutrient status were observed, understory biomass increased over 200% for all harvest treatments and was significantly greater than controls. While treatment increased litter cover and decreased soil exposure, this improvement did not significantly affect soil loss rates. Even though all slash treatment alternatives increased the cover and biomass of native grasses, scattering slash across the site to serve as a mulch appears most beneficial to improving plant species diversity and conserving site resources

  11. Ecological Restoration: Bringing Back the Prairie.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Molly Fifield

    1997-01-01

    Defines ecological restoration and offers a plan for prairie restoration as a schoolyard project. Steps include researching and planning the site, preparation and planting, and continuing management of the site. Ecological concepts in this activity also relate to science, language arts, math, social studies, art, and music for K-12 students. (AIM)

  12. Regulated recycling of mutant CFTR is partially restored by pharmacological treatment.

    PubMed

    Holleran, John P; Zeng, Jianxin; Frizzell, Raymond A; Watkins, Simon C

    2013-06-15

    Efficient trafficking of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) to and from the cell surface is essential for maintaining channel density at the plasma membrane (PM) and ensuring proper physiological activity. The most common mutation, F508del, exhibits reduced surface expression and impaired function despite treatment with currently available pharmacological small molecules, called correctors. To gain more detailed insight into whether CFTR enters compartments that allow corrector stabilization in the cell periphery, we investigated the peripheral trafficking itineraries and kinetics of wild type (WT) and F508del in living cells using high-speed fluorescence microscopy together with fluorogen activating protein detection. We directly visualized internalization and accumulation of CFTR WT from the PM to a perinuclear compartment that colocalized with the endosomal recycling compartment (ERC) markers Rab11 and EHD1, reaching steady-state distribution by 25 minutes. Stimulation by protein kinase A (PKA) depleted this intracellular pool and redistributed CFTR channels to the cell surface, elicited by reduced endocytosis and active translocation to the PM. Corrector or temperature rescue of F508del also resulted in targeting to the ERC and exhibited subsequent PKA-stimulated trafficking to the PM. Corrector treatment (24 hours) led to persistent residence of F508del in the ERC, while thermally destabilized F508del was targeted to lysosomal compartments by 3 hours. Acute addition of individual correctors, C4 or C18, acted on peripheral trafficking steps to partially block lysosomal targeting of thermally destabilized F508del. Taken together, corrector treatment redirects F508del trafficking from a degradative pathway to a regulated recycling route, and proteins that mediate this process become potential targets for improving the efficacy of current and future correctors.

  13. Restoration of cardiomyocyte function in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats after treatment with vanadate in a tea decoction.

    PubMed

    Clark, Tod A; Maddaford, Thane G; Tappia, Paramjit S; Heyliger, Clayton E; Ganguly, Pallab K; Pierce, Grant N

    2010-12-01

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with abnormal cardiomyocyte Ca(2+) transients and contractile performance. We investigated the possibility that an alteration in inositol trisphosphate/phospholipase C (IP₃/PLC) signalling may be involved in this dysfunction. Phosphatidic acid stimulates cardiomyocyte contraction through an IP₃/PLC signaling cascade. We also tested a novel therapeutic intervention to assess its efficacy in reversing any potential defects. Diabetes was induced in Sprague-Dawley rats by streptozotocin treatment and maintained for an 8 week experimental period. Active cell shortening was significantly depressed in cardiomyocytes obtained from diabetic and insulin-treated diabetic rats in comparison to normal control animals. Perfusion of the cells with phosphatidic acid induced an increase in contraction of control rat cardiomyocytes whereas its effect was inhibitory in cells from streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Diabetic rats were also treated orally with vanadate administered in a black tea extract (T/V) for the 8 week period. T/V treatment resulted in a contractile response that was not different from cells of control animals. Furthermore, cardiomyocytes from T/V-treated animals exhibited significantly improved Ca(2+) transients in comparison to diabetic animals and exhibited a normalized response to phosphatidic acid perfusion. It is concluded that a T/V glycemic therapy is capable of preventing the defect in IP₃/PLC signaling that occurs in diabetes and can restore normal cardiac contractile function. PMID:20874687

  14. Restoring large-scale brain networks in PTSD and related disorders: a proposal for neuroscientifically-informed treatment interventions

    PubMed Central

    Lanius, Ruth A.; Frewen, Paul A.; Tursich, Mischa; Jetly, Rakesh; McKinnon, Margaret C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Three intrinsic connectivity networks in the brain, namely the central executive, salience, and default mode networks, have been identified as crucial to the understanding of higher cognitive functioning, and the functioning of these networks has been suggested to be impaired in psychopathology, including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Objective 1) To describe three main large-scale networks of the human brain; 2) to discuss the functioning of these neural networks in PTSD and related symptoms; and 3) to offer hypotheses for neuroscientifically-informed interventions based on treating the abnormalities observed in these neural networks in PTSD and related disorders. Method Literature relevant to this commentary was reviewed. Results Increasing evidence for altered functioning of the central executive, salience, and default mode networks in PTSD has been demonstrated. We suggest that each network is associated with specific clinical symptoms observed in PTSD, including cognitive dysfunction (central executive network), increased and decreased arousal/interoception (salience network), and an altered sense of self (default mode network). Specific testable neuroscientifically-informed treatments aimed to restore each of these neural networks and related clinical dysfunction are proposed. Conclusions Neuroscientifically-informed treatment interventions will be essential to future research agendas aimed at targeting specific PTSD and related symptoms. PMID:25854674

  15. Restoration of cardiomyocyte function in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats after treatment with vanadate in a tea decoction.

    PubMed

    Clark, Tod A; Maddaford, Thane G; Tappia, Paramjit S; Heyliger, Clayton E; Ganguly, Pallab K; Pierce, Grant N

    2010-12-01

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with abnormal cardiomyocyte Ca(2+) transients and contractile performance. We investigated the possibility that an alteration in inositol trisphosphate/phospholipase C (IP₃/PLC) signalling may be involved in this dysfunction. Phosphatidic acid stimulates cardiomyocyte contraction through an IP₃/PLC signaling cascade. We also tested a novel therapeutic intervention to assess its efficacy in reversing any potential defects. Diabetes was induced in Sprague-Dawley rats by streptozotocin treatment and maintained for an 8 week experimental period. Active cell shortening was significantly depressed in cardiomyocytes obtained from diabetic and insulin-treated diabetic rats in comparison to normal control animals. Perfusion of the cells with phosphatidic acid induced an increase in contraction of control rat cardiomyocytes whereas its effect was inhibitory in cells from streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Diabetic rats were also treated orally with vanadate administered in a black tea extract (T/V) for the 8 week period. T/V treatment resulted in a contractile response that was not different from cells of control animals. Furthermore, cardiomyocytes from T/V-treated animals exhibited significantly improved Ca(2+) transients in comparison to diabetic animals and exhibited a normalized response to phosphatidic acid perfusion. It is concluded that a T/V glycemic therapy is capable of preventing the defect in IP₃/PLC signaling that occurs in diabetes and can restore normal cardiac contractile function.

  16. Smile analysis and face-bow transfer: enhancing aesthetic restorative treatment.

    PubMed

    Paul, S J

    2001-04-01

    The objective of current aesthetic dental treatments are to enhance the patient's smile by improving the overall dental appearance. A detailed analysis of the patient's face as it relates to the three-dimensional position, shape, and color of the teeth is required to improve this appearance. A full frontal and lateral evaluation of the patient's facial form is required to successfully complete on aesthetic smile evaluation. Additional considerations include cephalometry and a thorough dental analysis. This article demonstrates a comprehensive smile analysis technique and its communication to the dental technician.

  17. Watershed Restoration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Julie Thompson; Betsy Macfarlan

    2007-09-27

    In 2003, the U.S. Department of Energy issued the Eastern Nevada Landscape Coalition (ENLC) funding to implement ecological restoration in Gleason Creek and Smith Valley Watersheds. This project was made possible by congressionally directed funding that was provided through the US Department of Energy, Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of the Biomass Program. The Ely District Bureau of Land Management (Ely BLM) manages these watersheds and considers them priority areas within the Ely BLM district. These three entities collaborated to address the issues and concerns of Gleason Creek and Smith Valley and prepared a restoration plan to improve the watersheds’ ecological health and resiliency. The restoration process began with watershed-scale vegetation assessments and state and transition models to focus on restoration sites. Design and implementation of restoration treatments ensued and were completed in January 2007. This report describes the restoration process ENLC undertook from planning to implementation of two watersheds in semi-arid Eastern Nevada.

  18. Survival of people on antiretroviral treatment in Zambia: a retrospective cohort analysis of HIV clients on ART

    PubMed Central

    Amanzi, Patrick; Michelo, Charles; Simoonga, Christopher; Dambe, Rosalia; Chongwe, Gershom

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Provision of free anti-retroviral therapy in Zambia started in June 2004. There were only 15,000 people on treatment as at December that year, mainly due to lack of access. This number rose to 580,000 people as at December 2013. The general objective of this study was to determine survival of people on ART and to examine associated predictors for survival. Methods The study included ART patients enrolled between the year 2002 and 2013 (n=10,395) in 285 health facilities in Zambia. Patient files were analyzed retrospectively. The study used Kaplan Meier and Cox-proportional hazard models to describe the relationship between lost to follow up and age, sex, baseline CD4 cell count and weight. Results Results showed that lost to follow up accounted for 90% of the clients that had dropped out, while 10% was to deaths. Low baseline CD4 count (p-value 0.001, HR 0.9994, (95% CI 0.9993, 0.9996) at initiation was associated with lost to follow up together with weight at initiation (p-value 0.031, HR 0.9987 at 95% CI (0.9975, 0.9998)) of ART. Conclusion This study has demonstrated that lost to follow up is a substantial contributing factor to drop outs among HIV patients on treatment. Strengthening of community treatment supporters especially immediate family members in emphasizing to the client the need to continue treatment is necessary. The health facility could do more in emphasizing the importance of treatment especially in the initial stages. Further, in order to reduce opportunistic infections and probable deaths during treatment, cotrimoxazole prophylaxis should be maintained so as to raise the CD4 levels. Improved nutritional assessment and counseling to boost the nutritional status of the clients throughout should be encouraged. PMID:27642482

  19. Conceptual Site Treatment Plan Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research Environmental Restoration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, T.E.

    1993-10-01

    The Federal Facilities Compliance Act (the Act) of 1992 waives sovereign immunity for federal facilities for fines and penalties under the provisions of the Resource Recovery and Conservation Act, state, interstate, and local hazardous and solid waste management requirements. However, for three years the Act delays the waiver for violations involving US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The Act, however, requires that the DOE prepare a Conceptual Site Treatment Plan (CSTP) for each of its sites that generate or store mixed wastes (MWs). The purpose of the CSTP is to present DOE`s preliminary evaluations of the development of treatment capacities and technologies for treating a site`s MW. This CSTP presents the preliminary capacity and technology evaluation for the Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR). The five identified MW streams at LEHR are evaluated to the extent possible given available information. Only one MW stream is sufficiently well defined to permit a technology evaluation to be performed. Two other MW streams are in the process of being characterized so that an evaluation can be performed. The other two MW streams will be generated by the decommissioning of inactive facilities onsite within the next five years.

  20. A new separation and treatment method for soil and groundwater restoration

    SciTech Connect

    Hitchens, G.D.

    1997-10-01

    Soil and groundwater contamination by organic compounds is a widespread environmental pollution problem. In many cases, contaminated soil is excavated and transported to a landfill or is incinerated to remove contaminants. These remediation practices are expensive, environmentally disruptive, require extensive permitting, and only move contamination from one location to another. Onsite and in situ treatment techniques offer a safer, more cost-effective, and permanent solution. Many soil and groundwater contaminants are highly volatile, enabling the use of methods such as in situ vacuum extraction and air injection for their removal. However, these methods are often difficult to use because of slow volatilization rates and the lack of effective methods to treat the extracted hazardous material. This Phase I Small Business Innovation Research program focuses on developing an in situ soil and groundwater remediation technique that is effective against volatile as well as nonvolatile compounds and that will shorten treatment times. The technique forms the basis of a new catalytic process to degrade extracted contaminants onsite. Key hardware elements on which the new technique is based have been proven in preliminary research. The method has a high potential for public and regulatory acceptance because of its low environment impact.

  1. Emerging restorative treatments for Parkinson's disease: manipulation and inducement of dopaminergic neurons from adult stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Junpeng; Xu, Qunyuan

    2011-06-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common neurodegenerative disease, characterized by a selective loss of midbrain Dopaminergic (DA) neurons. To address this problem, various types of stem cells that have potential to differentiate into DA neurons are being investigated as cellular therapies for PD, including cells derived from embryonic or adult donor tissue, and embryonic stem cells. These cell sources, however, have raised certain questions with regard to ethical and rejection issues. Recent progress in adult stems has further proved that the cells derived from adult tissue could be expanded and differentiated into DA precursor cells in vitro, and cell therapy with adult stem cells could produce a clear improvement for PD models. Using adult stem cells for clinic application may not only overcome the ethical problem inherent in using human fetal tissue or embryonic stem cells, but also open the possibility for autologous transplantation. The patient-specific adult stem cell is therefore a potential and prospective candidate for PD treatment.

  2. Role Development Applied to Art Therapy Treatment of an Artist Diagnosed with Schizophrenia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schindler, Victoria P.; Pletnick, Carol

    2006-01-01

    Role Development is a theory-based, individualized intervention developed for health care practitioners, including art therapists, to assist individuals diagnosed with schizophrenia to learn roles and their underlying task and interpersonal skills. The role of artist is particularly suited to this intervention. This paper describes the role…

  3. The treatment of localised anterior tooth wear with indirect Artglass restorations at an increased occlusal vertical dimension. Results after two years.

    PubMed

    Gow, Alex M; Hemmings, Ken W

    2002-09-01

    This study evaluated the use of indirect palatal veneers placed at an increased vertical dimension of occlusion in patients with advanced localised anterior tooth wear. A total of 75 indirect Artglass palatal veneers were cemented on 12 patients. Patients were reviewed until the posterior occlusion had re-established and then annually. Preliminary follow up at two years showed minor failures had occurred in 13.3% of cases. These were repaired with direct composite or polishing only. Posterior occlusion was restored after a mean duration of nine months in ten cases. Artglass indirect palatal restorations are an effective short-term treatment of localised anterior tooth wear.

  4. Licorice treatment prevents oxidative stress, restores cardiac function, and salvages myocardium in rat model of myocardial injury.

    PubMed

    Ojha, Shreesh Kumar; Sharma, Charu; Golechha, Mahaveer Jain; Bhatia, Jagriti; Kumari, Santosh; Arya, Dharamvir Singh

    2015-02-01

    The present study examined the effects of licorice on antioxidant defense, functional impairment, histopathology, and ultrastructural alterations in isoproterenol (ISP)-induced myocardial injury in rats. Myocardial necrosis was induced by two subcutaneous injection of ISP (85 mg/kg) at an interval of 24 h. Licorice was administered orally for 30 days in the doses of 100, 200, 400, or 800 mg/kg. ISP-treated rats showed impaired hemodynamics, left ventricular dysfunction, and caused depletion of antioxidants and marker enzymes along with lipid peroxidation from myocardium. ISP also induced histopathological and ultrastructural alterations in myocardium. Pretreatment with licorice prevented the depletion of endogenous antioxidants and myocyte injury marker enzymes, inhibited lipid peroxidation, and showed recovery of hemodynamic and ventricular functions. Licorice treatment also reduced myonecrosis, edema, and infiltration of inflammatory cells and showed preservation of subcellular and ultrastructural components. Our results demonstrate that licorice exerts cardioprotection by reducing oxidative stress, augmenting endogenous antioxidants, and restoring functional parameters as well as maintaining structural integrity.

  5. The impaired myocardial ischemic tolerance in adult offspring of diabetic pregnancy is restored by maternal melatonin treatment.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ling; Zhao, Yi-Chao; Liang, Yan; Lin, Xian-Hua; Tan, Ya-Jing; Wu, Dan-Dan; Li, Xin-Zhu; Ye, Bo-Zhi; Kong, Fan-Qi; Sheng, Jian-Zhong; Huang, He-Feng

    2016-10-01

    Diabetic pregnancy, with ever increasing prevalence, adversely affects embryogenesis and increases vasculometabolic disorder risks in adult offspring. However, it remains poorly understood whether maternal diabetes increases the offspring's susceptibility to heart injuries in adulthood. In this study, we observed that cardiac function and structure were comparable between adult offspring born to diabetic mice and their counterparts born to nondiabetic mice at baseline. However, in response to myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (MIR), diabetic mother offspring exhibited augmented infarct size, cardiac dysfunction, and myocardial apoptosis compared with control, in association with exaggerated activation of mitochondria- and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-mediated apoptosis pathways and oxidative stress. Molecular analysis showed that the impaired myocardial ischemic tolerance in diabetic mother offspring was mainly attributable to blunted cardiac insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1/Akt signaling. Furthermore, the effect of maternal melatonin administration on offspring's response to MIR was determined, and the results indicated that melatonin treatment in diabetic dams during pregnancy significantly improved the tolerance to MIR injury in their offspring, via restoring cardiac IRS-1/Akt signaling. Taken together, these data suggest that maternal diabetes predisposes offspring to augmented MIR injury in adulthood, and maternal melatonin supplementation during diabetic pregnancy may hold promise for improving myocardial ischemic tolerance in the offspring. PMID:27299979

  6. Engineering approaches to ecosystem restoration

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, D.F.

    1998-07-01

    This proceedings CD ROM contains 127 papers on developing and evaluating engineering approaches to wetlands and river restoration. The latest engineering developments are discussed, providing valuable insights to successful approaches for river restoration, wetlands restoration, watershed management, and constructed wetlands for stormwater and wastewater treatment. Potential solutions to a wide variety of ecosystem concerns in urban, suburban, and coastal environments are presented.

  7. River restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohl, Ellen; Angermeier, Paul L.; Bledsoe, Brian; Kondolf, G. Mathias; Macdonnell, Larry; Merritt, David M.; Palmer, Margaret A.; Poff, N. Leroy; Tarboton, David

    2005-10-01

    River restoration is at the forefront of applied hydrologic science. However, many river restoration projects are conducted with minimal scientific context. We propose two themes around which a research agenda to advance the scientific basis for river restoration can be built. First, because natural variability is an inherent feature of all river systems, we hypothesize that restoration of process is more likely to succeed than restoration aimed at a fixed end point. Second, because physical, chemical, and biological processes are interconnected in complex ways across watersheds and across timescales, we hypothesize that restoration projects are more likely to be successful in achieving goals if undertaken in the context of entire watersheds. To achieve restoration objectives, the science of river restoration must include (1) an explicit recognition of the known complexities and uncertainties, (2) continued development of a theoretical framework that enables us to identify generalities among river systems and to ask relevant questions, (3) enhancing the science and use of restoration monitoring by measuring the most effective set of variables at the correct scales of measurement, (4) linking science and implementation, and (5) developing methods of restoration that are effective within existing constraints. Key limitations to river restoration include a lack of scientific knowledge of watershed-scale process dynamics, institutional structures that are poorly suited to large-scale adaptive management, and a lack of political support to reestablish delivery of the ecosystem amenities lost through river degradation. This paper outlines an approach for addressing these shortcomings.

  8. Restricting Access to ART on the Basis of Criminal Record : An Ethical Analysis of a State-Enforced "Presumption Against Treatment" With Regard to Assisted Reproductive Technologies.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Kara; McDougall, Rosalind

    2015-09-01

    As assisted reproductive technologies (ART) become increasingly popular, debate has intensified over the ethical justification for restricting access to ART based on various medical and non-medical factors. In 2010, the Australian state of Victoria enacted world-first legislation that denies access to ART for all patients with certain criminal or child protection histories. Patients and their partners are identified via a compulsory police and child protection check prior to commencing ART and, if found to have a previous relevant conviction or child protection order, are given a "presumption against treatment." This article reviews the legislation and identifies arguments that may be used to justify restricting access to ART for various reasons. The arguments reviewed include limitations of reproductive rights, inheriting undesirable genetic traits, distributive justice, and the welfare of the future child. We show that none of these arguments justifies restricting access to ART in the context of past criminal history. We show that a "presumption against treatment" is an unjustified infringement on reproductive freedom and that it creates various inconsistencies in current social, medical, and legal policy. We argue that a state-enforced policy of restricting access to ART based on the non-medical factor of past criminal history is an example of unjust discrimination and cannot be ethically justified, with one important exception: in cases where ART treatment may be considered futile on the basis that the parents are not expected to raise the resulting child.

  9. Restricting Access to ART on the Basis of Criminal Record : An Ethical Analysis of a State-Enforced "Presumption Against Treatment" With Regard to Assisted Reproductive Technologies.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Kara; McDougall, Rosalind

    2015-09-01

    As assisted reproductive technologies (ART) become increasingly popular, debate has intensified over the ethical justification for restricting access to ART based on various medical and non-medical factors. In 2010, the Australian state of Victoria enacted world-first legislation that denies access to ART for all patients with certain criminal or child protection histories. Patients and their partners are identified via a compulsory police and child protection check prior to commencing ART and, if found to have a previous relevant conviction or child protection order, are given a "presumption against treatment." This article reviews the legislation and identifies arguments that may be used to justify restricting access to ART for various reasons. The arguments reviewed include limitations of reproductive rights, inheriting undesirable genetic traits, distributive justice, and the welfare of the future child. We show that none of these arguments justifies restricting access to ART in the context of past criminal history. We show that a "presumption against treatment" is an unjustified infringement on reproductive freedom and that it creates various inconsistencies in current social, medical, and legal policy. We argue that a state-enforced policy of restricting access to ART based on the non-medical factor of past criminal history is an example of unjust discrimination and cannot be ethically justified, with one important exception: in cases where ART treatment may be considered futile on the basis that the parents are not expected to raise the resulting child. PMID:25701147

  10. Treatment with L-valine ameliorates liver fibrosis and restores thrombopoiesis in rats exposed to carbon tetrachloride.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Chikashi; Doi, Hideyuki; Katsura, Kazunori; Satomi, Susumu

    2010-06-01

    It has been reported that treatment with branched chain amino acids (BCAAs) increases the survival rates in cirrhotic patients. In this study, we investigated the effect of L-valine, one of BCAAs, on liver fibrosis in rat. To induce liver fibrosis, male Wistar rats were injected carbon tetrachloride (CCl(4)) intraperitoneally (2.0 mL/kg) twice a week for 12 weeks. The rats (seven to fifteen rats for each group) were then administered 1.688 g/kg/day of L-valine intravenously for 7 days or 10% amino acid preparation that provided the same amount of nitrogen. Seven days after the last administration, blood platelet counts and bone marrow megakaryocyte counts were significantly higher in the valine group than in the control group (131.2 +/- 38.3 vs. 106.3 +/- 14.5 x 10(4)/microL, p = 0.04; 18.0 +/- 2.1 vs. 13.5 +/- 2.2 per field, p < 0.01, respectively). Importantly, the mRNA level of thrombopoietin, a key regulator of thrombopoiesis, was significantly higher in the liver of the valine group than the control group. Furthermore, hepatic fibrosis was significantly reduced in the valine group, and the mRNA levels of factors associated with liver fibrosis such as procollagen alpha1(III), transforming growth factor-beta1 and connective tissue growth factor were significantly lower in the liver of the valine group 10 days after the last administration. These results indicate that L-valine treatment ameliorates liver fibrosis and restores thrombopoiesis in rats exposed to CCl(4). Therefore, L-valine supplementation may be helpful for patients with liver cirrhosis.

  11. Gender differences in HIV disease progression and treatment outcomes among HIV patients one year after starting antiretroviral treatment (ART) in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We investigated gender differences in treatment outcome during first line antiretroviral treatment (ART) in a hospital setting in Tanzania, assessing clinical, social demographic, virological and immunological factors. Methods We conducted a cohort study involving HIV infected patients scheduled to start ART and followed up to 1 year on ART. Structured questionnaires and patients file review were used to collect information and blood was collected for CD4 and viral load testing. Gender differences were assessed using Kruskal-Wallis test and chi-square test for continuous and categorical data respectively. Survival distributions for male and female patients were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared using Cox proportional hazards models. Results Of 234 patients recruited in this study, 70% were females. At baseline, women had significantly lower education level; lower monthly income, lower knowledge on ARV, less advanced HIV disease (33% women; 47% men started ART at WHO stage IV, p = 0.04), higher CD4 cell count (median 149 for women, 102 for men, p = 0.02) and higher BMI (p = 0.002). After 1 year of standard ART, a higher proportion of females survived although this was not significant, a significantly higher proportion of females had undetectable plasma viral load (69% women, 45% men, p = 0.003), however females ended at a comparable CD4 cell count (median CD4, 312 women; 321 men) signifying a worse CD4 cell increase (p = 0.05), even though they still had a higher BMI (p = 0.02). The unadjusted relative hazard for death for men compared to women was 1.94. After correcting for confounding factors, the Cox proportional hazards showed no significant difference in the survival rate (relative hazard 1.02). Conclusion We observed women were starting treatment at a less advanced disease stage, but they had a lower socioeconomical status. After one year, both men and women had similar clinical and immunological

  12. Toward universal access to HIV counseling and testing and antiretroviral treatment in Ethiopia: looking beyond HIV testing and ART initiation.

    PubMed

    Assefa, Yibeltal; Van Damme, Wim; Mariam, Damen Haile; Kloos, Helmut

    2010-08-01

    Expanding access to HIV counseling and testing (HCT) and antiretroviral treatment (ART) has reduced morbidity and mortality in people living with HIV/AIDS. As a result, many countries are scaling up HIV/AIDS services. In this paper we discuss challenges experienced during the move toward universal access to HCT and ART services in Ethiopia. We reviewed routine reports from the Ministry of Health and implementing partners. We also had interviews, about linkage to and retention in care of patients, with 10 HIV/AIDS program managers, as well as 2 to 7 health care providers and 5 to 15 patients in each of 23 health centers and 32 hospitals in all regions of the country. We found that the number of people tested for HIV increased 10-fold from 435,854 in 2005 to 4,559,954 in 2008. Only 61% of the HIV-positive patients were linked to chronic care immediately after tested for HIV. The number of patients initiated on ART annually increased from 26,021 in 2005 to 53,696 in 2008. Attrition of patients increased from 18% in 2005 to 26% in 2008. Our interviews indicated that fear of stigma, transport cost, feeling healthy and opting for traditional medicines were the main reasons for poor linkage to and retention in care. Lack of nutrition and feeling better were also reasons for poor retention. In conclusion, in spite of the rapid scale-up of HCT and ART services in Ethiopia, linkage and retention were not adequate. Therefore, strategies should be developed and implemented to improve linkage and retention.

  13. Restoring Study 329: efficacy and harms of paroxetine and imipramine in treatment of major depression in adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Le Noury, Joanna; Nardo, John M; Healy, David; Raven, Melissa; Tufanaru, Catalin; Abi-Jaoude, Elia

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To reanalyse SmithKline Beecham’s Study 329 (published by Keller and colleagues in 2001), the primary objective of which was to compare the efficacy and safety of paroxetine and imipramine with placebo in the treatment of adolescents with unipolar major depression. The reanalysis under the restoring invisible and abandoned trials (RIAT) initiative was done to see whether access to and reanalysis of a full dataset from a randomised controlled trial would have clinically relevant implications for evidence based medicine. Design Double blind randomised placebo controlled trial. Setting 12 North American academic psychiatry centres, from 20 April 1994 to 15 February 1998. Participants 275 adolescents with major depression of at least eight weeks in duration. Exclusion criteria included a range of comorbid psychiatric and medical disorders and suicidality. Interventions Participants were randomised to eight weeks double blind treatment with paroxetine (20-40 mg), imipramine (200-300 mg), or placebo. Main outcome measures The prespecified primary efficacy variables were change from baseline to the end of the eight week acute treatment phase in total Hamilton depression scale (HAM-D) score and the proportion of responders (HAM-D score ≤8 or ≥50% reduction in baseline HAM-D) at acute endpoint. Prespecified secondary outcomes were changes from baseline to endpoint in depression items in K-SADS-L, clinical global impression, autonomous functioning checklist, self-perception profile, and sickness impact scale; predictors of response; and number of patients who relapse during the maintenance phase. Adverse experiences were to be compared primarily by using descriptive statistics. No coding dictionary was prespecified. Results The efficacy of paroxetine and imipramine was not statistically or clinically significantly different from placebo for any prespecified primary or secondary efficacy outcome. HAM-D scores decreased by 10.7 (least squares mean) (95

  14. [Influence of implant restoration on traditional restoration idea].

    PubMed

    Liu, H C

    2016-01-01

    Implant restoration affected the traditional restoration idea. Artificial implant restoration has a profound influence on the design of dental restoration. Implant supported prostheses have not only changed the method of oral rehabilitation, but also integrated revolutionary concept with the traditional treatment protocol. By using implants, posterior missing molars can be effectively restored and thus eliminating the disadvantages of traditional removable partial denture for Kennedy classification Ⅰ, Ⅱ partically edentulous dentition. Full edentulous arch can also be restored with implant fixed denture which provide much better oral health related quality of life compared with the traditional complete denture. It is useful to master the theory and skills of artificial implant restoration, and to provide a reference for the restoration of oral physiological function.

  15. Efficacy of chemical treatment of the Pietra cantone limestone in the restoration of historic buildings of Cagliari (southern Sardinia, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Columbu, Stefano; Lisci, Carla; Sitzia, Fabio; Buccellato, Giampaolo

    2015-04-01

    The present work aims to evaluate the efficacy of some chemical products in the restoration works of the "Pietra cantone" limestone, a calcarenitic rock belonging to the carbonatic miocenic series (lower Tortonian) of Cagliari (southern Sardinia, Italy), widely used in historic buildings. Such stone, once used in the masonry, if is not protected by plaster or in the presence of aqueous solutions circulating, frequently shows problems of chemical-physical decay, due to their petrophysical characteristics. In fact, being characterized by a highly porous (on average 35-42% vol.) carbonate matrix low-medium cemented, are easily alterable by weathering processes (i.e., dissolution, sulfation, etc.) and by cyclic mechanism of crystallization/solubilisation of salts and hydration/dehydration of hygroscopic phases belonging to the clay component of these calcarenites. These processes induce negative effects on physical-mechanical properties of stone, producing various macroscopic forms of alteration such as decohesion, disintegration, exfoliation, alveolation, etc. Where the decay of the walls is in an advanced stage, there was a strong retreat of the vertical profile of the facade of the building, resulting in critical static-structural. As a case study was taken the historic building of a tobacco manufacture, one of the first industrial establishments in Cagliari, then owned by the Italian State Monopoly. The factory dates back to the early decades of the XVIII century, the walls of which, however, belonged to the convent of the "Frati Minori" built towards the end of the XIV century along the wall that closed the east the historic district of "Marina" in front of the port of Cagliari. In addressing the structural restoration of this building, before selecting chemical products for dealing adequately of limestone, we proceeded at the outset to a thorough analysis of the structures built in "Pietra Cantone", and their physical-mechanical decay. Only thereafter the stone

  16. Energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis, fluoride release, and antimicrobial properties of glass ionomer cements indicated for atraumatic restorative treatment

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Sudhanshu; Tiwari, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to compare constituents of glass powder, fluoride release, and antimicrobial properties of new atraumatic restorative treatment material with zirconia fillers and conventional glass ionomer cement (GIC) type IX. Materials and Methods: Thisin vitro study comparing Zirconomer and Fuji IX was executed in three parts: (1) energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis of glass powders (2) analysis of fluoride release at 1st, 3rd, 7th, 15th, and 30th day, and (3) antimicrobial activity against Streptococcus mutans, Lactobacillus casei, and Candida albicans at 48 hours. Data was analyzed using unpaired t-test and two way analysis of variance followed by least significant difference post hoc test. A P value of < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis revealed that, in both Zirconomer and Fuji IX glass powders, mean atomic percentage of oxygen was more than 50%. According to the weight percentage, zirconium in Zirconomer and silica in Fuji IX were the second main elements. Calcium, zinc, and zirconium were observed only in Zirconomer. At all the time intervals, statistically significant higher amount of fluoride release was observed with Zirconomer than Fuji IX. At 48 hours, mean ± standard deviation (SD) of zone of inhibition against Streptococcus mutans was 11.14 ± 0.77 mm and 8.51 ± 0.43 mm for Zirconomer and Fuji IX, respectively. Against Lactobacillus casei, it was 14.06 ± 0.71 mm for Zirconomer and 11.70 ± 0.39 mm for Fuji IX. No antifungal activity was observed against Candida albicans by Zirconomer and Fuji IX. Conclusion: Zirconomer had higher antibacterial activity against Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus casei, which may be attributed to its composition and higher fluoride release. However, it failed to show antifungal effect againstCandida albicans. PMID:27583226

  17. Evaluation and art therapy treatment of the burnout syndrome in oncology units.

    PubMed

    Italia, Simona; Favara-Scacco, Cinzia; Di Cataldo, Andrea; Russo, Giovanna

    2008-07-01

    We undertook a pilot study to evaluate and potentially reduce the level of burnout in the operators of two oncology centers. The study included 65 doctors and nurses of an adult (Group A) and a pediatric oncology unit (Group B). We used the Maslach Burnout Inventory to estimate the level of burnout obtained in three dimensions: emotional exhaustion, distancing (cognitive and emotional) and reduced personal achievement. Data showed a medium-high level of burnout in Group A and a medium-low level in Group B. In the second part of the study, Group B underwent a program of art therapy interventions with the aim of reducing the level of burnout. Comparing the responses from Group B participants before and after the intervention indicated a statistically significant decreased level of burnout. In conclusion, burnout syndrome exists among oncology unit personnel and can be effectively treated with art therapies. Attention devoted to this aspect is required in order to improve the workers' well-being, thus enhancing attention and dedication to patients.

  18. Achieving equity in HIV-treatment outcomes: can social protection improve adolescent ART-adherence in South Africa?

    PubMed

    Cluver, L D; Toska, E; Orkin, F M; Meinck, F; Hodes, R; Yakubovich, A R; Sherr, L

    2016-03-01

    Low ART-adherence amongst adolescents is associated with morbidity, mortality and onward HIV transmission. Reviews find no effective adolescent adherence-promoting interventions. Social protection has demonstrated benefits for adolescents, and could potentially improve ART-adherence. This study examines associations of 10 social protection provisions with adherence in a large community-based sample of HIV-positive adolescents. All 10-19-year-olds ever ART-initiated in 53 government healthcare facilities in a health district of South Africa's Eastern Cape were traced and interviewed in 2014-2015 (n = 1175 eligible). About 90% of the eligible sample was included (n = 1059). Social protection provisions were "cash/cash in kind": government cash transfers, food security, school fees/materials, school feeding, clothing; and "care": HIV support group, sports groups, choir/art groups, positive parenting and parental supervision/monitoring. Analyses used multivariate regression, interaction and marginal effects models in SPSS and STATA, controlling for socio-demographic, HIV and healthcare-related covariates. Findings showed 36% self-reported past-week ART non-adherence (<95%). Non-adherence was associated with increased opportunistic infections (p = .005, B .269, SD .09), and increased likelihood of detectable viral load at last test (>75 copies/ml) (aOR 1.98, CI 1.1-3.45). Independent of covariates, three social protection provisions were associated with reduced non-adherence: food provision (aOR .57, CI .42-.76, p < .001); HIV support group attendance (aOR .60, CI .40-.91, p < .02), and high parental/caregiver supervision (aOR .56, CI .43-.73, p < .001). Combination social protection showed additive benefits. With no social protection, non-adherence was 54%, with any one protection 39-41%, with any two social protections, 27-28% and with all three social protections, 18%. These results demonstrate that social protection provisions, particularly combinations of "cash

  19. Achieving equity in HIV-treatment outcomes: can social protection improve adolescent ART-adherence in South Africa?

    PubMed

    Cluver, L D; Toska, E; Orkin, F M; Meinck, F; Hodes, R; Yakubovich, A R; Sherr, L

    2016-03-01

    Low ART-adherence amongst adolescents is associated with morbidity, mortality and onward HIV transmission. Reviews find no effective adolescent adherence-promoting interventions. Social protection has demonstrated benefits for adolescents, and could potentially improve ART-adherence. This study examines associations of 10 social protection provisions with adherence in a large community-based sample of HIV-positive adolescents. All 10-19-year-olds ever ART-initiated in 53 government healthcare facilities in a health district of South Africa's Eastern Cape were traced and interviewed in 2014-2015 (n = 1175 eligible). About 90% of the eligible sample was included (n = 1059). Social protection provisions were "cash/cash in kind": government cash transfers, food security, school fees/materials, school feeding, clothing; and "care": HIV support group, sports groups, choir/art groups, positive parenting and parental supervision/monitoring. Analyses used multivariate regression, interaction and marginal effects models in SPSS and STATA, controlling for socio-demographic, HIV and healthcare-related covariates. Findings showed 36% self-reported past-week ART non-adherence (<95%). Non-adherence was associated with increased opportunistic infections (p = .005, B .269, SD .09), and increased likelihood of detectable viral load at last test (>75 copies/ml) (aOR 1.98, CI 1.1-3.45). Independent of covariates, three social protection provisions were associated with reduced non-adherence: food provision (aOR .57, CI .42-.76, p < .001); HIV support group attendance (aOR .60, CI .40-.91, p < .02), and high parental/caregiver supervision (aOR .56, CI .43-.73, p < .001). Combination social protection showed additive benefits. With no social protection, non-adherence was 54%, with any one protection 39-41%, with any two social protections, 27-28% and with all three social protections, 18%. These results demonstrate that social protection provisions, particularly combinations of "cash

  20. Achieving equity in HIV-treatment outcomes: can social protection improve adolescent ART-adherence in South Africa?

    PubMed Central

    Cluver, L. D.; Toska, E.; Orkin, F. M.; Meinck, F.; Hodes, R.; Yakubovich, A. R.; Sherr, L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Low ART-adherence amongst adolescents is associated with morbidity, mortality and onward HIV transmission. Reviews find no effective adolescent adherence-promoting interventions. Social protection has demonstrated benefits for adolescents, and could potentially improve ART-adherence. This study examines associations of 10 social protection provisions with adherence in a large community-based sample of HIV-positive adolescents. All 10–19-year-olds ever ART-initiated in 53 government healthcare facilities in a health district of South Africa’s Eastern Cape were traced and interviewed in 2014–2015 (n = 1175 eligible). About 90% of the eligible sample was included (n = 1059). Social protection provisions were “cash/cash in kind”: government cash transfers, food security, school fees/materials, school feeding, clothing; and “care”: HIV support group, sports groups, choir/art groups, positive parenting and parental supervision/monitoring. Analyses used multivariate regression, interaction and marginal effects models in SPSS and STATA, controlling for socio-demographic, HIV and healthcare-related covariates. Findings showed 36% self-reported past-week ART non-adherence (<95%). Non-adherence was associated with increased opportunistic infections (p = .005, B .269, SD .09), and increased likelihood of detectable viral load at last test (>75 copies/ml) (aOR 1.98, CI 1.1–3.45). Independent of covariates, three social protection provisions were associated with reduced non-adherence: food provision (aOR .57, CI .42–.76, p < .001); HIV support group attendance (aOR .60, CI .40–.91, p < .02), and high parental/caregiver supervision (aOR .56, CI .43–.73, p < .001). Combination social protection showed additive benefits. With no social protection, non-adherence was 54%, with any one protection 39–41%, with any two social protections, 27–28% and with all three social protections, 18%. These results demonstrate that social protection provisions

  1. Endo-restorative treatment of a severly discolored upper incisor: resolution of the “aesthetic” problem through Componeer veneering System

    PubMed Central

    Migliau, Guido; Besharat, Laith Konstantinos; Sofan, Afrah Ali Abdullah; Sofan, Eshrak Ali Abdullah; Romeo, Umberto

    2015-01-01

    Summary Aim Re-establishing a patient’s lost dental aesthetic appearance is one of the most important topics for contemporary dentistry. New treatment materials and methods have been coming on the scene, day by day, in order to achieve such an aim. Most dentists prefer more conservative and aesthetic approaches, such as direct or indirect veneer restorations, instead of full-ceramic crowns for anteriors where aesthetics is really important. The aim of the study is to evaluate clinically the effectiveness of a direct composite veneering system in resolving aesthetic problem of an upper incisor with a multidisciplinary treatment approach. Methods Patient with a severe discolored upper incisor came to our attention; at the X-ray exam there was an evidence of a past not good root canal treatment and also old and incongruent composite obturation. After removing all the material inside the root canal was performed a new correct endodontic filling, then Authors tried to bleach the tooth trough “walking-bleach” technique with a hydrogen peroxide (30 volumes) and sodium perborate solution without excellent results. So it was decided to insert a glass-fiber post and than to perform a direct composite veneer with Componeer System (Coltene). Componeer System is a system of prefabricated composite veneers that are abled to be applied directly in the first appointment: after a conservative preparation of the tooth, it must be used an adhesive agent (for example a “three steps”) and then with composite stratification it’s possible to apply the componeer veneer (choosing the right measure, modified as necessary) as the last covering aesthetic layer. Result The evaluation of result of this multidisciplinary treatment was essentially clinical and radiological; in fact it’s possible to observe, from a clinical point of view, the good aesthetic aspect of the direct composite restoration with componeer veneer that offers also some advantages: conservative preparation with

  2. Long-term survival of direct and indirect restorations placed for the treatment of advanced tooth wear.

    PubMed

    Smales, Roger J; Berekally, Thomas L

    2007-03-01

    Advanced tooth wear was restored with direct resin-based composites (RBCs) in 17 patients, and with indirect ceramo-metal crowns (CMCs) and full gold crowns in 8 other patients. The mean patient age was 64.9 (8.6 SD) years, with each patient having a mean of 13.8 (5.4) restorations. In this retrospective case series study, the mean restoration age was 5.0 (3.0) years for the direct and 5.9 (2.6) years for the indirect restorations. Over 10 years, cumulative survival estimates were 62.0% for direct and 74.5% for indirect restorations (P = 0.23). Survival estimates were 58.9% for anterior RBCs and 70.3% for anterior CMCs (P = 0.06). RBCs usually failed from fractures, and CMCs from complete losses. RBC failures were usually replaced or repaired, while CMC failures often required root canal therapies or extractions. The findings from this relatively small study require confirmation by large long-term controlled clinical trials.

  3. Preservation & Restoration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Online-Offline, 2000

    2000-01-01

    This theme issue on preservation and restoration presents selected resources for elementary and secondary education that include Web sites, CD-ROM and software, videos, books, magazines, and professional resources as well as classroom activities. Age levels are specified for most materials. I Sidebars discuss restoring a masterpiece, a bug's life,…

  4. Restoring the smile: Inexpensive biologic restorations

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Neeti P.

    2014-01-01

    Extensive breakdown of primary teeth to the cervical level and their loss in very young children is not uncommon. Owing to increasing concerns over self-appearance, due considerations to esthetic aspects in addition to restoring function are necessary aspects of rehabilitation of mutilated teeth to help children grow into a psychologically balanced personality. The present article describes rehabilitation of grossly decayed teeth with biologic restorations such as dentine posts, dentine post and core and biologic shell crown. This treatment modality provided a cost-effective esthetic solution. PMID:25097656

  5. Anticoagulant Treatment of Deep Vein Thrombosis and Pulmonary Embolism: The Present State of the Art

    PubMed Central

    Thaler, Johannes; Pabinger, Ingrid; Ay, Cihan

    2015-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE), a disease entity comprising deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE), is a frequent and potentially life-threatening event. To date different agents are available for the effective treatment of acute VTE and the prevention of recurrence. For several years, the standard of care was the subcutaneous application of a low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) or fondaparinux, followed by a vitamin K antagonist (VKA). The so-called direct oral anticoagulants (DOAC) were introduced rather recently in clinical practice for the treatment of VTE. DOAC seem to have a favorable risk-benefit profile compared to VKA. Moreover, DOAC significantly simplify VTE treatment because they are administered in fixed doses and no routine monitoring is needed. Patients with objectively diagnosed DVT or PE should receive therapeutic anticoagulation for a minimum of 3 months. Whether a patient ought to receive extended treatment needs to be evaluated on an individual basis, depending mainly on risk factors determined by characteristics of the thrombotic event and patient-related factors. In specific patient groups (e.g., pregnant women, cancer patients, and elderly patients), treatment of VTE is more challenging than that in the general population and additional issues need to be considered in those patients. The aim of this review is to give an overview of the currently available treatment modalities of acute VTE and secondary prophylaxis. In particular, specific aspects regarding the initiation of VTE treatment, duration of anticoagulation, and specific patient groups will be discussed. PMID:26664901

  6. Gene therapy for Parkinson's disease: state-of-the-art treatments for neurodegenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Michael R

    2013-06-01

    Pharmacological and surgical treatments offer symptomatic benefits to patients with Parkinson's disease; however, as the condition progresses, patients experience gradual worsening in symptom control, with the development of a range of disabling complications. In addition, none of the currently available therapies have convincingly shown disease-modifying effects - either in slowing or reversing the disease. These problems have led to extensive research into the possible use of gene therapy as a treatment for Parkinson's disease. Several treatments have reached human clinical trial stages, providing important information on the risks and benefits of this novel therapeutic approach, and the tantalizing promise of improved control of this currently incurable neurodegenerative disorder.

  7. [Restoring the occlusion by direct techniques].

    PubMed

    Roeters, F J; Opdam, N M; Stel, M

    2003-06-01

    Today, extensive and generalized tooth wear is often a reason for restoring the occlusion. Adhesive techniques and direct composite restorations can reduce the need for more expensive indirect restorations. In this article the advantages and disadvantages of the direct and indirect techniques are discussed. Furthermore, the treatment sequence for direct restorations is described and illustrated by some case-reports.

  8. A conservative treatment option for a single missing premolar using a partial veneered restoration with the SR Adoro system

    PubMed Central

    Khatavkar, Roheet A; Hegde, Vivek S

    2010-01-01

    This report describes a step-by-step sequence for preparation for a posterior partial veneered restoration for a space closure using a Maryland bridge—design veneered with a heat-cured composite resin. The modality provides sound posterior occlusal function, combined with a psychological satisfaction to the patient of regaining a missing tooth. The preparation takes into account the design for resin-bonded prostheses. This article presents the preparation and build-up method for a metal reinforced posterior partial veneered restoration through a conservative palatal approach for a highly aesthetic result. PMID:20859485

  9. Chemistry and Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Martyn

    1999-01-01

    Describes a Chemistry and Art project developed for secondary students and teachers sponsored by the National Gallery and The Royal Society of Chemistry in the United Kingdom. Discusses aspects of the techniques used in creating five paintings as well as the chemistry involved in their making, deterioration, conservation, and restoration.…

  10. Treatment for neovascular age related macular degeneration: The state of the art.

    PubMed

    Eandi, Chiara M; Alovisi, Camilla; De Sanctis, Ugo; Grignolo, Federico M

    2016-09-15

    With the introduction in the clinical practice of drugs inhibiting vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) the visual outcomes of patients with neovascular age related macular degeneration (AMD) dramatically improved. Since 2006 repeated intravitreal injections of anti-VEGF became the standard of care for the treatment of neovascular AMD. This review provides an overview of available data form clinical trials supporting the use of anti-VEGF molecules for the treatment of this condition. Several questions remain open, in particular the regimen of treatment, the frequency of injection, the safety of the different drugs, and the poor response to the treatment in some cases. Therefore, new agents and alternative delivery are currently under evaluation. PMID:26948315

  11. State of the art psychopharmacological treatment options in seasonal affective disorder.

    PubMed

    Yildiz, Mesut; Batmaz, Sedat; Songur, Emrah; Oral, Esat Timuçin

    2016-03-01

    Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is defined as a subtype of mood disorders in DSM 5, and it is characterized by a seasonal onset. SAD is proposed to be related to the seasonal changes in naturally occurring light, and the use of bright light therapy for depressive symptoms has been shown to reduce them in placebo controlled trials. Cognitive behavioral therapy has also been demonstrated to be effective in SAD. This review article aims to focus on the psychopharmacological treatment options for SAD. According to clinical trial results, first line treatment options seem to be sertraline and fluoxetine, and are well tolerated by the patients. There is some evidence that other antidepressants (e.g. bupropion) might be effective as well. Although clinical trials have shown that some of these antidepressants may be of benefit, a recent review has concluded that there is not enough evidence to support the use of any of these agents for the treatment of SAD yet. Moreover, more studies are still needed to evaluate the effectiveness of other treatment options, e.g., propranolol, melatonin, hypericum, etc. In addition to the above proposed treatments, patients with seasonal depressive symptoms should thoroughly be evaluated for any cues of bipolarity, and their treatment should be planned accordingly.

  12. Combined locoregional treatment of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma: State of the art

    PubMed Central

    Iezzi, Roberto; Pompili, Maurizio; Posa, Alessandro; Coppola, Giuseppe; Gasbarrini, Antonio; Bonomo, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, a combination of intervention therapies has been widely applied in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). One such combined strategy is based on the combination of the percutaneous approach, such as radiofrequency ablation (RFA), and the intra-arterial locoregional approach, such as trans-arterial chemoembolization (TACE). Several types of evidence have supported the feasibility and benefit of combined therapy, despite some studies reporting conflicting results and outcomes. The aim of this review was to explain the technical aspects of different combined treatments and to comprehensively analyze and compare the clinical efficacy and safety of this combined treatment option and monotherapy, either as TACE or RFA alone, in order to provide clinicians with an unbiased opinion and valuable information. Based on a literature review and our experience, combined treatment seems to be a safe and effective option in the treatment of patients with early/intermediate HCC when surgical resection is not feasible; furthermore, this approach provides better results than RFA and TACE alone for the treatment of large HCC, defined as those exceeding 3 cm in size. It can also expand the indication for RFA to previously contraindicated “complex cases”, with increased risk of thermal ablation related complications due to tumor location, or to “complex patients” with high bleeding risk. PMID:26877601

  13. Glaucoma –state of the art and perspectives on treatment

    PubMed Central

    Wójcik-Gryciuk, Anna; Skup, Małgorzata; Waleszczyk, Wioletta J.

    2015-01-01

    Glaucoma is a chronic optic neuropathy characterized by progressive damage to the optic nerve, death of retinal ganglion cells and ultimately visual field loss. It is one of the leading causes of irreversible loss of vision worldwide. The most important trigger of glaucomatous damage is elevated eye pressure, and the current standard approach in glaucoma therapy is reduction of intraocular pressure (IOP). However, despite the use of effective medications or surgical treatment leading to lowering of IOP, progression of glaucomatous changes and loss of vision among patients with glaucoma is common. Therefore, it is critical to prevent vision loss through additional treatment. To implement such treatment(s), it is imperative to identify pathophysiological changes in glaucoma and develop therapeutic methods taking into account neuroprotection. Currently, there is no method of neuroprotection with long-term proven effectiveness in the treatment of glaucoma. Among the most promising molecules shown to protect the retina and optic nerve are neurotrophic factors. Thus, the current focus is on the development of safe and non-invasive methods for the long-term elevation of the intraocular level of neurotrophins through advanced gene therapy and topical eye treatment and on the search for selective agonists of neurotrophin receptors affording more efficient neuroprotection. PMID:26684267

  14. State of the art: diagnostic tools and innovative therapies for treatment of advanced thymoma and thymic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ried, Michael; Marx, Alexander; Götz, Andrea; Hamer, Okka; Schalke, Berthold; Hofmann, Hans-Stefan

    2016-06-01

    In this review article, state-of-the-art diagnostic tools and innovative treatments of thymoma and thymic carcinoma (TC) are described with special respect to advanced tumour stages. Complete surgical resection (R0) remains the standard therapeutic approach for almost all a priori resectable mediastinal tumours as defined by preoperative standard computed tomography (CT). If lymphoma or germ-cell tumours are differential diagnostic considerations, biopsy may be indicated. Resection status is the most important prognostic factor in thymoma and TC, followed by tumour stage. Advanced (Masaoka-Koga stage III and IVa) tumours require interdisciplinary therapy decisions based on distinctive findings of preoperative CT scan and ancillary investigations [magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)] to select cases for primary surgery or neoadjuvant strategies with optional secondary resection. In neoadjuvant settings, octreotide scans and histological evaluation of pretherapeutic needle biopsies may help to choose between somatostatin agonist/prednisolone regimens and neoadjuvant chemotherapy as first-line treatment. Finally, a multimodality treatment regime is recommended for advanced and unresectable thymic tumours. In conclusion, advanced stage thymoma and TC should preferably be treated in experienced centres in order to provide all modern diagnostic tools (imaging, histology) and innovative therapy techniques. Systemic and local (hyperthermic intrathoracic chemotherapy) medical treatments together with extended surgical resections have increased the therapeutic options in patients with advanced or recurrent thymoma and TC.

  15. State of the Art in the Treatment of Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Garlipp, Benjamin; Bruns, Christiane J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most frequently diagnosed mesenchymal neoplasms of the gastrointestinal tract. Despite their biological and clinical heterogeneity, the majority of these tumors are positive for the receptor tyrosine kinase KIT and are driven by KIT- or platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRA)-activating mutations. There are still uncertainties regarding their clinical and molecular characterization and the optimal treatment regimens, making it difficult to establish a universal treatment algorithm for these tumors. Summary From a clinical perspective, the main difference between GISTs and other gastrointestinal neoplasms is that the benign or malignant behavior of GISTs cannot be predicted from histopathology, but instead relies on empirically established scoring systems. Clinical data suggest that malignant potential may be an inherent quality of some GISTs rather than a feature acquired by the tumor during disease progression. Thus, some patients may require prolonged anti-tumor treatment even after complete surgical removal of the tumor. Key Message Although GISTs are the most frequently occurring mesenchymal neoplasms in the gastrointestinal tract, no universal treatment algorithms exist. This paper reviews the current evidence that guides the management of GISTs. Practical Implications The management of localized GISTs involves the use of surgical resection, with the inclusion of preoperative tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment for locally advanced, primarily unresectable tumors and for resectable cases requiring extensive surgery. Imatinib is also indicated as adjuvant therapy after complete surgical removal of GISTs with a high estimated risk of recurrence unless specific mutations conferring imatinib resistance are present. The optimal duration of adjuvant treatment is still controversial. For patients with metastatic imatinib-sensitive GISTs, imatinib constitutes the first-line standard treatment

  16. A practical method for the restoration of clogged rural vertical subsurface flow constructed wetlands for domestic wastewater treatment using earthworm.

    PubMed

    Li, Huaizheng Z; Wang, Sheng; Ye, Jianfeng F; Xu, Zuxin X; Jin, Wei

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a simple method for the restoration of clogged vertical subsurface flow constructed wetland by earthworm. Since clogging always takes place at the top layer, epigeic earthworm is suitable for restoration of the clogged wetland. Earthworm can not only loosen the substrate, but also transform 80∼90% of undissolved organic particles into dissolved matters. Accordingly, the accumulated solids in substrate with earthworm are 50% less than the one without earthworm. The wetland with earthworm removed 2∼5 percentage points more nitrogen and 12 percentage points more phosphorous for its better ventilation conditions, while 2 percentage points less COD because the generation of dissolved organic matter from undissolved organic particles by earthworm. In general, the influence of earthworm on the effluent quality of the wetland could be ignored. Hydrology of six full-scale clogged wetlands was restored by Eisenia foetida. The optimal strength of earthworm addition is 0.5 kg/m2, which spend RMB six yuan/m2, less than € 0.75/m2. No specific training is required for the staffs on this method; it takes 10 days to restore the clogged wetland.

  17. Effects of Different Treatments of Pasture Restoration on Soil Trace Gas Emissions in the Cerrados of Central Brazil

    EPA Science Inventory

    Planted pastures ( mainly Brachiaria spp) are the most extensive land use in the cerrado (savannas of central Brazil) with an area of approximately 50 x 10(6) ha. The objective of the study was to assess the effects of pasture restoration on the N dynamics ( net N mineralization/...

  18. Multi-Country Analysis of Treatment Costs for HIV/AIDS (MATCH): Facility-Level ART Unit Cost Analysis in Ethiopia, Malawi, Rwanda, South Africa and Zambia

    PubMed Central

    Tagar, Elya; Sundaram, Maaya; Condliffe, Kate; Matatiyo, Blackson; Chimbwandira, Frank; Chilima, Ben; Mwanamanga, Robert; Moyo, Crispin; Chitah, Bona Mukosha; Nyemazi, Jean Pierre; Assefa, Yibeltal; Pillay, Yogan; Mayer, Sam; Shear, Lauren; Dain, Mary; Hurley, Raphael; Kumar, Ritu; McCarthy, Thomas; Batra, Parul; Gwinnell, Dan; Diamond, Samantha; Over, Mead

    2014-01-01

    Background Today's uncertain HIV funding landscape threatens to slow progress towards treatment goals. Understanding the costs of antiretroviral therapy (ART) will be essential for governments to make informed policy decisions about the pace of scale-up under the 2013 WHO HIV Treatment Guidelines, which increase the number of people eligible for treatment from 17.6 million to 28.6 million. The study presented here is one of the largest of its kind and the first to describe the facility-level cost of ART in a random sample of facilities in Ethiopia, Malawi, Rwanda, South Africa and Zambia. Methods & Findings In 2010–2011, comprehensive data on one year of facility-level ART costs and patient outcomes were collected from 161 facilities, selected using stratified random sampling. Overall, facility-level ART costs were significantly lower than expected in four of the five countries, with a simple average of $208 per patient-year (ppy) across Ethiopia, Malawi, Rwanda and Zambia. Costs were higher in South Africa, at $682 ppy. This included medications, laboratory services, direct and indirect personnel, patient support, equipment and administrative services. Facilities demonstrated the ability to retain patients alive and on treatment at these costs, although outcomes for established patients (2–8% annual loss to follow-up or death) were better than outcomes for new patients in their first year of ART (77–95% alive and on treatment). Conclusions This study illustrated that the facility-level costs of ART are lower than previously understood in these five countries. While limitations must be considered, and costs will vary across countries, this suggests that expanded treatment coverage may be affordable. Further research is needed to understand investment costs of treatment scale-up, non-facility costs and opportunities for more efficient resource allocation. PMID:25389777

  19. STATE OF THE ART IN TREATMENT AND SURVIVAL OF PATHOGENS IN BIOSOLIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper discusses the pathogen/stability concerns for municipal residuals and the applicability of current sludge treatment processes to control health risks potentially associated with the use or disposal of these residuals. In recent years, there has been a rise in public co...

  20. State of the art and review on the treatment technologies of water reverse osmosis concentrates.

    PubMed

    Pérez-González, A; Urtiaga, A M; Ibáñez, R; Ortiz, I

    2012-02-01

    The growing demand for fresh water is partially satisfied by desalination plants that increasingly use membrane technologies and among them reverse osmosis to produce purified water. Operating with water recoveries from 35% to 85% RO plants generate huge volumes of concentrates containing all the retained compounds that are commonly discharged to water bodies and constitute a potentially serious threat to marine ecosystems; therefore there is an urgent need for environmentally friendly management options of RO brines. This paper gives an overview on the potential treatments to overcome the environmental problems associated to the direct discharge of RO concentrates. The treatment options have been classified according to the source of RO concentrates and the maturity of the technologies. For the sake of clarity three different sources of RO concentrates are differentiated i) desalination plants, ii) tertiary processes in WWTP, and iii) mining industries. Starting with traditional treatments such as evaporation and crystallization other technologies that have emerged in last years to reduce the volume of the concentrate before disposal and with the objective of achieving zero liquid discharge and recovery of valuable compounds from these effluents are also reviewed. Most of these emerging technologies have been developed at laboratory or pilot plant scale (see Table 1). With regard to RO concentrates from WWTP, the manuscript addresses recent studies that are mainly focused on reducing the organic pollutant load through the application of innovative advanced oxidation technologies. Finally, works that report the treatment of RO concentrates from industrial sources are analyzed as well.

  1. State of the art and review on the treatment technologies of water reverse osmosis concentrates.

    PubMed

    Pérez-González, A; Urtiaga, A M; Ibáñez, R; Ortiz, I

    2012-02-01

    The growing demand for fresh water is partially satisfied by desalination plants that increasingly use membrane technologies and among them reverse osmosis to produce purified water. Operating with water recoveries from 35% to 85% RO plants generate huge volumes of concentrates containing all the retained compounds that are commonly discharged to water bodies and constitute a potentially serious threat to marine ecosystems; therefore there is an urgent need for environmentally friendly management options of RO brines. This paper gives an overview on the potential treatments to overcome the environmental problems associated to the direct discharge of RO concentrates. The treatment options have been classified according to the source of RO concentrates and the maturity of the technologies. For the sake of clarity three different sources of RO concentrates are differentiated i) desalination plants, ii) tertiary processes in WWTP, and iii) mining industries. Starting with traditional treatments such as evaporation and crystallization other technologies that have emerged in last years to reduce the volume of the concentrate before disposal and with the objective of achieving zero liquid discharge and recovery of valuable compounds from these effluents are also reviewed. Most of these emerging technologies have been developed at laboratory or pilot plant scale (see Table 1). With regard to RO concentrates from WWTP, the manuscript addresses recent studies that are mainly focused on reducing the organic pollutant load through the application of innovative advanced oxidation technologies. Finally, works that report the treatment of RO concentrates from industrial sources are analyzed as well. PMID:22119366

  2. State-of-the-art report on low-level radioactive waste treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Kibbey, A.H.; Godbee, H.W.

    1980-09-01

    An attempt is made to identify the main sources of low-level radioactive wastes that are generated in the United States. To place the waste problem in perspective, rough estimates are given of the annual amounts of each generic type of waste that is generated. Most of the wet solid wastes arise from the cleanup of gaseous and liquid radioactive streams prior to discharge or recycle. The treatment of the process streams and the secondary wet solid wastes thus generated is described for each type of government or fuel cycle installation. Similarly, the institutional wet wastes are also described. The dry wastes from all sources have smilar physical and chemical characteristics in that they can be classified as compactible, noncompactible, combustible, noncombustible, or combinations thereof. The various treatment options for concentrated or solid wet wastes and for dry wastes are discussed. Among the dry-waste treatment methods are compaction, baling, and incineration, as well as chopping, cutting, and shredding. Organic materials can usually be incinerated or, in some cases, biodegraded. The filter sludges, spent resins, incinerator ashes, and concentrated liquids are usually solidified in cement, urea-formaldehyde, or unsaturated polyester resins prior to burial. Asphalt has not yet been used as a solidificaton agent in the United States, but it probably will be used in the near future. The treatment of radioactive medical and bioresearch wastes is described, but the waste from radiochenmical, pharmaceutical, and other industries is not well defined at the present time. Recovery of waste metals and treatment of hazardous contaminated wastes are discussed briefly. Some areas appearing to need more research, development, and demonstration are specifically pointed out.

  3. Restoration of R117H CFTR folding and function in human airway cells through combination treatment with VX-809 and VX-770.

    PubMed

    Gentzsch, Martina; Ren, Hong Y; Houck, Scott A; Quinney, Nancy L; Cholon, Deborah M; Sopha, Pattarawut; Chaudhry, Imron G; Das, Jhuma; Dokholyan, Nikolay V; Randell, Scott H; Cyr, Douglas M

    2016-09-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a lethal recessive genetic disease caused primarily by the F508del mutation in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). The potentiator VX-770 was the first CFTR modulator approved by the FDA for treatment of CF patients with the gating mutation G551D. Orkambi is a drug containing VX-770 and corrector VX809 and is approved for treatment of CF patients homozygous for F508del, which has folding and gating defects. At least 30% of CF patients are heterozygous for the F508del mutation with the other allele encoding for one of many different rare CFTR mutations. Treatment of heterozygous F508del patients with VX-809 and VX-770 has had limited success, so it is important to identify heterozygous patients that respond to CFTR modulator therapy. R117H is a more prevalent rare mutation found in over 2,000 CF patients. In this study we investigated the effectiveness of VX-809/VX-770 therapy on restoring CFTR function in human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells from R117H/F508del CF patients. We found that VX-809 stimulated more CFTR activity in R117H/F508del HBEs than in F508del/F508del HBEs. R117H expressed exclusively in immortalized HBEs exhibited a folding defect, was retained in the ER, and degraded prematurely. VX-809 corrected the R117H folding defect and restored channel function. Because R117 is involved in ion conductance, VX-770 acted additively with VX-809 to restore CFTR function in chronically treated R117H/F508del cells. Although treatment of R117H patients with VX-770 has been approved, our studies indicate that Orkambi may be more beneficial for rescue of CFTR function in these patients. PMID:27402691

  4. Health literacy in HIV treatment: accurate understanding of key biological treatment principles is not required for good ART adherence.

    PubMed

    Laws, M Barton; Danielewicz, Michael; Rana, Aadia; Kogelman, Laura; Wilson, Ira B

    2015-04-01

    Findings on the relationship between health literacy and outcomes in HIV have been inconsistent. Health literacy has previously been operationalized as general functional literacy, but has not included content knowledge about HIV disease and treatment. Semi-structured interviews with people living with HIV in 2 U.S. cities, including questions about the etiology, pathophysiology and treatment of HIV. We compared responses to biomedical conceptions. The 32 respondents were demographically diverse. Although most understood that HIV degrades the immune system, none could explain the nature of a virus, or the mechanism of antiretroviral (ARV) drug action. Fewer than half accurately reported that it is desirable to have a high CD4+ cell count and low viral load. A minority understood the concept of drug resistance. While most believed that strict adherence to ARV regimens was important to maintain health, three believed that periodic treatment interruption was beneficial, and three believed they should not take ARVs when they used alcohol or illicit drugs. Respondents generally had very limited, and often inaccurate biomedical understanding of HIV disease. Most reported good regimen adherence but did not have any mechanistic rationale for it. The failure to find a consistent relationship between health literacy and ARV adherence may be largely because most people simply follow their doctors' instructions, without the need for deep understanding.

  5. Health Literacy in HIV Treatment: Accurate Understanding of Key Biological Treatment Principles is Not Required for Good ART Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Laws, M. Barton; Danielewicz, Michael; Rana, Aadia; Kogelman, Laura; Wilson, Ira B.

    2016-01-01

    Findings on the relationship between health literacy and outcomes in HIV have been inconsistent. Health literacy has previously been operationalized as general functional literacy, but has not included content knowledge about HIV disease and treatment. Semi-structured interviews with people living with HIV in 2 U.S. cities, including questions about the etiology, pathophysiology and treatment of HIV. We compared responses to biomedical conceptions. The 32 respondents were demographically diverse. Although most understood that HIV degrades the immune system, none could explain the nature of a virus, or the mechanism of antiretroviral (ARV) drug action. Fewer than half accurately reported that it is desirable to have a high CD4+ cell count and low viral load. A minority understood the concept of drug resistance. While most believed that strict adherence to ARV regimens was important to maintain health, three believed that periodic treatment interruption was beneficial, and three believed they should not take ARVs when they used alcohol or illicit drugs. Respondents generally had very limited, and often inaccurate biomedical understanding of HIV disease. Most reported good regimen adherence but did not have any mechanistic rationale for it. The failure to find a consistent relationship between health literacy and ARV adherence may be largely because most people simply follow their doctors’ instructions, without the need for deep understanding. PMID:25354736

  6. Renal denervation for treatment of cardiac arrhythmias: state of the art and future directions.

    PubMed

    Kosiuk, Jedrzej; Hilbert, Sebastian; Pokushalov, Evgeny; Hindricks, Gerhard; Steinberg, Jonathan S; Bollmann, Andreas

    2015-02-01

    It has now been more than a quarter of a century since modulation of the sympathetic nervous system was proposed for the treatment of cardiac arrhythmias of different origins. But it has also been some time since some of the early surgical attempts have been abandoned. With the development of ablation techniques, however, new approaches and targets have been recently introduced that have revolutionized our way of thinking about sympathetic modulation. Renal nerve ablation technology is now being successfully used for the treatment of resistant hypertension, but the indication spectrum might broaden and new therapeutic options might arise in the near future. This review focuses on the possible impact of renal sympathetic system modulation on cardiac arrhythmias, the current evidence supporting this approach, and the ongoing trials of this method in electrophysiological laboratories. We will discuss the potential roles that sympathetic modulation may play in the future.

  7. Oxybutynin for the Treatment of Primary Hyperhidrosis: Current State of the Art

    PubMed Central

    Campanati, Anna; Gregoriou, Stamatis; Kontochristopoulos, George; Offidani, Annamaria

    2015-01-01

    Oxybutynin is an anticholinergic drug with an emerging role in the treatment of hyperhidrosis. Several recent studies have documented that it is effective both in focal and generalized hyperhidrosis and shows universally good response among different groups of patients regardless of age, gender, and weight. The most common adverse event is dry mouth reported by almost all patients treated. The way this might affect long-term compliance and tolerability should be better investigated in the future. PMID:27172124

  8. State of the art and perspectives in the treatment of glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Sean A; Chamberlain, Marc C

    2012-09-01

    Glioblastoma is the most common malignant primary brain tumor. Cures are rare and median survival varies from several to 22 months. Standard treatment for good performance patients consists of maximal safe surgical resection followed by radiotherapy with concurrent temozolomide (TMZ) chemotherapy and six cycles of postradiotherapy TMZ. At recurrence, treatment options include repeat surgery (with or without Gliadel wafer placement), reirradiation or systemic therapy. Most patients with good performance status are treated with cytotoxic chemotherapy or targeted biologic therapy following or in lieu of repeat surgery. Cytotoxic chemotherapy options include nitrosoureas, rechallenge with TMZ, platins, phophoramides and topoisomerase inhibitors, although efficacy is limited. Despite the intense effort of developing biologic agents that target angiogenesis and growth and proliferative pathways, bevacizumab is the only agent that has shown efficacy in clinical trials. It was awarded accelerated approval in the USA after demonstrating an impressive radiographic response in two open-label, prospective Phase II studies. Two randomized, Phase III trials of upfront bevacizumab have completed and may demonstrate survival benefit; however, results are pending at this time. Given the limited treatment options at tumor recurrence, consideration for enrollment on a clinical trial is encouraged.

  9. State of the art and perspectives in the treatment of glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Sean A; Chamberlain, Marc C

    2012-09-01

    Glioblastoma is the most common malignant primary brain tumor. Cures are rare and median survival varies from several to 22 months. Standard treatment for good performance patients consists of maximal safe surgical resection followed by radiotherapy with concurrent temozolomide (TMZ) chemotherapy and six cycles of postradiotherapy TMZ. At recurrence, treatment options include repeat surgery (with or without Gliadel wafer placement), reirradiation or systemic therapy. Most patients with good performance status are treated with cytotoxic chemotherapy or targeted biologic therapy following or in lieu of repeat surgery. Cytotoxic chemotherapy options include nitrosoureas, rechallenge with TMZ, platins, phophoramides and topoisomerase inhibitors, although efficacy is limited. Despite the intense effort of developing biologic agents that target angiogenesis and growth and proliferative pathways, bevacizumab is the only agent that has shown efficacy in clinical trials. It was awarded accelerated approval in the USA after demonstrating an impressive radiographic response in two open-label, prospective Phase II studies. Two randomized, Phase III trials of upfront bevacizumab have completed and may demonstrate survival benefit; however, results are pending at this time. Given the limited treatment options at tumor recurrence, consideration for enrollment on a clinical trial is encouraged. PMID:25054300

  10. State-of-the-Art Management of Complications of Myeloma and Its Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hartley-Brown, Monique A.; Sullivan, Daniel M.; Baz, Rachid

    2010-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is an incurable disease, although patient survival has increased with the availability of novel agents. Both multiple myeloma and its therapies often affect the renal, immune, skeletal, hematologic, and nervous systems. The resulting organ dysfunctions often impair the quality of life of affected patients, complicate and limit subsequent therapies, and may result in significant mortality. Research on the treatment of complications of multiple myeloma has been limited; hence, preventative and management strategies for patients with these complications are heterogeneous and often based on anecdotal experience. In this paper, we review the effects of myeloma and the novel therapies on organ systems and suggest management strategies. PMID:20671999

  11. [The surgical treatment of hydatid disease of liver and lungs: the state of art].

    PubMed

    Chernousov, A F; Musaev, G Kh; Abarshalina, M V

    2012-01-01

    Results of surgical treatment of 65 patients with the combined hydatid disease were analyzed. Lung invasion was combind with liver cysts in 57 patients, spleen -- in 2 patients, soft tissues of the thorax - in 2 patients and retroperitoneal cysts were found in 3 patients. Lung echinococcectomy with the use of minithoracotomy proved to be a method of choice. The access permits early recovery and shorter rehabilitation period, allowing to perform the second liver surgery on the 3--7th day after the first operation.

  12. Essential Oils for Complementary Treatment of Surgical Patients: State of the Art

    PubMed Central

    Stea, Susanna; Beraudi, Alina; De Pasquale, Dalila

    2014-01-01

    Aromatherapy is the controlled use of plant essences for therapeutic purposes. Its applications are numerous (i.e., wellbeing, labour, infections, dementia, and anxiety treatment) but often they have not been scientifically validated. The aim of the present study is to review the available literature to determine if there is evidence for effectiveness of aromatherapy in surgical patients to treat anxiety and insomnia, to control pain and nausea, and to dress wound. Efficacy studies of lavender or orange and peppermint essential oils, to treat anxiety and nausea, respectively, have shown positive results. For other aspects, such as pain control, essential oils therapy has shown uncertain results. Finally, there are encouraging data for the treatment of infections, especially for tea tree oil, although current results are still inconclusive. It should also be considered that although they are, allergic reactions and toxicity can occur after oral ingestion. Therefore, while rigorous studies are being carried out, it is important that the therapeutic use of essential oils be performed in compliance with clinical safety standards. PMID:24707312

  13. Essential oils for complementary treatment of surgical patients: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Stea, Susanna; Beraudi, Alina; De Pasquale, Dalila

    2014-01-01

    Aromatherapy is the controlled use of plant essences for therapeutic purposes. Its applications are numerous (i.e., wellbeing, labour, infections, dementia, and anxiety treatment) but often they have not been scientifically validated. The aim of the present study is to review the available literature to determine if there is evidence for effectiveness of aromatherapy in surgical patients to treat anxiety and insomnia, to control pain and nausea, and to dress wound. Efficacy studies of lavender or orange and peppermint essential oils, to treat anxiety and nausea, respectively, have shown positive results. For other aspects, such as pain control, essential oils therapy has shown uncertain results. Finally, there are encouraging data for the treatment of infections, especially for tea tree oil, although current results are still inconclusive. It should also be considered that although they are, allergic reactions and toxicity can occur after oral ingestion. Therefore, while rigorous studies are being carried out, it is important that the therapeutic use of essential oils be performed in compliance with clinical safety standards. PMID:24707312

  14. Initiating Patients on ART at CD4 Counts above 200 is Associated with Improved Treatment Outcomes in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Matthew P; Sanne, Ian M; Conradie, Francesca; Zeinecker, Jennifer; Orrell, Catherine; Ive, Prudence; Rassool, Mohammed; Dehlinger, Marjorie; van der Horst, Charles; McIntyre, James; Wood, Robin

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To compare treatment outcomes by starting CD4 counts using data from the CIPRA-South Africa trial. Design Observational cohort study. Methods Patients presenting to primary care clinics with CD4 cell counts <350 cells/mm3 were randomized to either doctor- or nurse-managed HIV care and followed for at least two years after ART initiation. Clinical and laboratory outcomes were compared by baseline CD4 count. Results 812 patients were followed for a median of 27.5 months and 36% initiated with a CD4 count >200. While 10% of patients failed virologically (VF), the risk was nearly double among those with a CD4 ≤200 vs. >200 (12.2% vs. 6.8%). 21 deaths occurred, with a five-fold increased risk for the low CD4 group (3.7% vs. 0.7%). After adjustment, those with a CD4 count ≤200 had twice the risk of death/VF (HR 1.9; 95% CI: 1.1–3.3) and twice the risk of incident tuberculosis (HR: 1.90; 95% CI: 0.89–4.04) as those >200. Those with either a CD4 ≤200 (HR 2.1; 1.2–3.8) or a WHO IV condition (HR 2.9; 0.93–8.8) alone had a two to three-fold increased risk of death/VF vs. those with neither, but those with both conditions had a 4-fold increased risk (HR 3.9; 95% CI: 1.9–8.1). We observed some increased loss to follow-up among those initiating <200 (HR 0.79; 95% CI: 0.50–1.25). Conclusions Patients initiating ART with higher CD4 counts had reduced mortality, tuberculosis and less virologic failure than those initiated at lower CD4 counts. Our data support increasing CD4 count eligibility criteria for ART initiation. PMID:20613459

  15. Nanotechnology-based inhalation treatments for lung cancer: state of the art

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Javed; Akhter, Sohail; Rizwanullah, Md; Amin, Saima; Rahman, Mahfoozur; Ahmad, Mohammad Zaki; Rizvi, Moshahid Alam; Kamal, Mohammad A; Ahmad, Farhan Jalees

    2015-01-01

    Considering the challenges associated with conventional chemotherapy, targeted and local delivery of chemotherapeutics via nanoparticle (NP) carriers to the lungs is an emerging area of interest. Recent studies and growing clinical application in cancer nanotechnology showed the huge potential of NPs as drug carriers in cancer therapy, including in lung carcinoma for diagnosis, imaging, and theranostics. Researchers have confirmed that nanotechnology-based inhalation chemotherapy is viable and more effective than conventional chemotherapy, with lesser side effects. Recently, many nanocarriers have been investigated, including liposomes, polymeric micelles, polymeric NPs, solid lipid NPs, and inorganic NPs for inhalation treatments of lung cancer. Yet, the toxicity of such nanomaterials to the lungs tissues and further distribution to other organs due to systemic absorption on inhalation delivery is a debatable concern. Here, prospect of NPs-based local lung cancer targeting through inhalation route as well as its associated challenges are discussed. PMID:26640374

  16. Restoring primary anterior teeth.

    PubMed

    Waggoner, William F

    2002-01-01

    A variety of esthetic restorative materials are available for restoring primary incisors. Knowledge of the specific strengths, weakness, and properties of each material will enhance the clinician's ability to make the best choice of selection for each individual situation. Intracoronal restorations of primary teeth may utilize resin composites, glass ionomer cements, resin-modified ionomers, or polyacid-modified resins. Each has distinct advantages and disadvantages and the clinical conditions of placement may be a strong determining factor as to which material is utilized. Full coronal restoration of primary incisors may be indicated for a number of reasons. Crowns available for restoration of primary incisors include those that are directly bonded onto the tooth, which generally are a resin material, and those crowns that are luted onto the tooth and are some type of stainless steel crown. However, due to lack of supporting clinical data, none of the crowns can be said to be superior to the others under all circumstances. Though caries in the mandibular region is rare, restorative solutions for mandibular incisors are needed. Neither stainless steel crowns nor celluloid crown forms are made specifically for mandibular incisors. Many options exist to repair carious primary incisors, but there is insufficient controlled, clinical data to suggest that one type of restoration is superior to another. This does not discount the fact that dentists have been using many of these crowns for years with much success. Operator preferences, esthetic demands by parents, the child's behavior, and moisture and hemorrhage control are all variables which affect the decision and ultimate outcome of whatever restorative treatment is chosen.

  17. Restoring primary anterior teeth.

    PubMed

    Waggoner, William F

    2002-01-01

    A variety of esthetic restorative materials are available for restoring primary incisors. Knowledge of the specific strengths, weakness, and properties of each material will enhance the clinician's ability to make the best choice of selection for each individual situation. Intracoronal restorations of primary teeth may utilize resin composites, glass ionomer cements, resin-modified ionomers, or polyacid-modified resins. Each has distinct advantages and disadvantages and the clinical conditions of placement may be a strong determining factor as to which material is utilized. Full coronal restoration of primary incisors may be indicated for a number of reasons. Crowns available for restoration of primary incisors include those that are directly bonded onto the tooth, which generally are a resin material, and those crowns that are luted onto the tooth and are some type of stainless steel crown. However, due to lack of supporting clinical data, none of the crowns can be said to be superior to the others under all circumstances. Though caries in the mandibular region is rare, restorative solutions for mandibular incisors are needed. Neither stainless steel crowns nor celluloid crown forms are made specifically for mandibular incisors. Many options exist to repair carious primary incisors, but there is insufficient controlled, clinical data to suggest that one type of restoration is superior to another. This does not discount the fact that dentists have been using many of these crowns for years with much success. Operator preferences, esthetic demands by parents, the child's behavior, and moisture and hemorrhage control are all variables which affect the decision and ultimate outcome of whatever restorative treatment is chosen. PMID:12412967

  18. Arts Education: Teaching What Technology Cannot

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Bruce

    2012-01-01

    Recently, Paul Sznewajs and Nick Rabkin made an introductory case for restoring the arts into Chicago Public Schools. They noted that past research has shown the positive benefits of arts instruction, especially for low-income students. Over the last several decades, research has validated the role of the arts, while in the same time span people…

  19. Experience Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Brenda

    This Arkansas art education curriculum guide for grades 1 to 6 covers basic concepts, vocabulary, activities, and evaluation for each grade. The basic concepts to be taught throughout these grades include line, shape, color, space, drawing, painting, printing, art history, and art careers. Specific art techniques and types of arts are introduced…

  20. Immune Restoration

    MedlinePlus

    ... marrow cells immune to HIV infection. Letting the immune system repair itself: CD4 counts have increased for many ... have taken ART. Some scientists believe that the immune system might be able to heal and repair itself ...

  1. Life cycle assessment applied to wastewater treatment: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Corominas, Ll; Foley, J; Guest, J S; Hospido, A; Larsen, H F; Morera, S; Shaw, A

    2013-10-01

    Life cycle assessment (LCA) is a technique to quantify the impacts associated with a product, service or process from cradle-to-grave perspective. Within the field of wastewater treatment (WWT) LCA was first applied in the 1990s. In the pursuit of more environmentally sustainable WWT, it is clear that LCA is a valuable tool to elucidate the broader environmental impacts of design and operation decisions. With growing interest from utilities, practitioners, and researchers in the use of LCA in WWT systems, it is important to make a review of what has been achieved and describe the challenges for the forthcoming years. This work presents a comprehensive review of 45 papers dealing with WWT and LCA. The analysis of the papers showed that within the constraints of the ISO standards, there is variability in the definition of the functional unit and the system boundaries, the selection of the impact assessment methodology and the procedure followed for interpreting the results. The need for stricter adherence to ISO methodological standards to ensure quality and transparency is made clear and emerging challenges for LCA applications in WWT are discussed, including: a paradigm shift from pollutant removal to resource recovery, the adaptation of LCA methodologies to new target compounds, the development of regional factors, the improvement of the data quality and the reduction of uncertainty. Finally, the need for better integration and communication with decision-makers is highlighted.

  2. Sustained-release nanoART formulation for the treatment of neuroAIDS

    PubMed Central

    Jayant, Rahul Dev; Atluri, Venkata SR; Agudelo, Marisela; Sagar, Vidya; Kaushik, Ajeet; Nair, Madhavan

    2015-01-01

    A novel approach was developed for the coencapsulation of an anti-HIV drug (tenofovir) and a latency-breaking agent (vorinostat), using magnetically guided layer-by-layer (LbL) assembled nanocarriers for the treatment of neuroAIDS. Ultrasmall iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles (10±3 nm) were synthesized and characterized. The LbL technique was used to achieve a sustained release profile, and application of 2 bilayers ([tenofovir+dextran sulphate]2+vorinostat) to magnetic nanoparticles resulted in a 2.8 times increase in drug (tenofovir) loading and also resulted in an increase in the drug release period by 30-fold, with 100% drug release in sustained manner over a period of 5 days with the simultaneous stimulation of latent HIV expression. Nanoformulation showed a good blood–brain barrier transmigration ability (37.95%±1.5%) with good in vitro antiviral efficacy (~33% reduction of p24 level) over a period of 5 days after HIV infection in primary human astrocytes, with good cell viability (>90%). Hence, LbL arrangements of drugs on magnetic nanoparticles provides sustained release and, therefore, may improve the patient’s adherence to therapy and lead to better compliance. PMID:25709433

  3. Sustained-release nanoART formulation for the treatment of neuroAIDS.

    PubMed

    Jayant, Rahul Dev; Atluri, Venkata S R; Agudelo, Marisela; Sagar, Vidya; Kaushik, Ajeet; Nair, Madhavan

    2015-01-01

    A novel approach was developed for the coencapsulation of an anti-HIV drug (tenofovir) and a latency-breaking agent (vorinostat), using magnetically guided layer-by-layer (LbL) assembled nanocarriers for the treatment of neuroAIDS. Ultrasmall iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles (10±3 nm) were synthesized and characterized. The LbL technique was used to achieve a sustained release profile, and application of 2 bilayers ([tenofovir+dextran sulphate]2+vorinostat) to magnetic nanoparticles resulted in a 2.8 times increase in drug (tenofovir) loading and also resulted in an increase in the drug release period by 30-fold, with 100% drug release in sustained manner over a period of 5 days with the simultaneous stimulation of latent HIV expression. Nanoformulation showed a good blood-brain barrier transmigration ability (37.95%±1.5%) with good in vitro antiviral efficacy (~33% reduction of p24 level) over a period of 5 days after HIV infection in primary human astrocytes, with good cell viability (>90%). Hence, LbL arrangements of drugs on magnetic nanoparticles provides sustained release and, therefore, may improve the patient's adherence to therapy and lead to better compliance. PMID:25709433

  4. Achieving Controlled Intraocular Pressure and Restoration of Vision Following Proactive Treatment of Total Choroidal Detachment Due to Endocyclophotocoagulation.

    PubMed

    Al-Asbali, Tariq

    2016-01-01

    Ocular hypotony due to choroidal detachment (CD) following endocyclophotocoagulation (ECP) is transient. If hypotony lasts for more than 1 week, it could affect vision. This is a case of refractory glaucoma following cataract surgery that was managed by ECP. We drained subchoroidal fluid as CD did not resolve after 1 week. After 5 months, the intraocular pressure was restored to 16 mmHg with one topical glaucoma medication, uncorrected vision improved to 20/300, and with aphakic soft contact lens, it was 20/50. Ophthalmologists facing such complications need not panic and manage hypotony, and the prognosis of such intervention seems to be promising. PMID:27555714

  5. Achieving Controlled Intraocular Pressure and Restoration of Vision Following Proactive Treatment of Total Choroidal Detachment Due to Endocyclophotocoagulation

    PubMed Central

    Al-Asbali, Tariq

    2016-01-01

    Ocular hypotony due to choroidal detachment (CD) following endocyclophotocoagulation (ECP) is transient. If hypotony lasts for more than 1 week, it could affect vision. This is a case of refractory glaucoma following cataract surgery that was managed by ECP. We drained subchoroidal fluid as CD did not resolve after 1 week. After 5 months, the intraocular pressure was restored to 16 mmHg with one topical glaucoma medication, uncorrected vision improved to 20/300, and with aphakic soft contact lens, it was 20/50. Ophthalmologists facing such complications need not panic and manage hypotony, and the prognosis of such intervention seems to be promising. PMID:27555714

  6. Atomic Oxygen Used to Restore Artworks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Miller, Sharon K.

    2004-01-01

    Techniques developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center to produce atomic oxygen in order to simulate the low-Earth-orbit environment for spacecraft materials testing can also be applied in the field of art restoration. Defaced or fire-damaged artwork can be treated with atomic oxygen to remove the damage and enable restoration that could not be accomplished with conventional methods. The process has been patented (U.S. Patents 5,560,781 and 5,693,241) and has been used to restore several works of art.

  7. HPTN 071 (PopART): A Cluster-Randomized Trial of the Population Impact of an HIV Combination Prevention Intervention Including Universal Testing and Treatment: Mathematical Model

    PubMed Central

    Cori, Anne; Ayles, Helen; Beyers, Nulda; Schaap, Ab; Floyd, Sian; Sabapathy, Kalpana; Eaton, Jeffrey W.; Hauck, Katharina; Smith, Peter; Griffith, Sam; Moore, Ayana; Donnell, Deborah; Vermund, Sten H.; Fidler, Sarah; Hayes, Richard; Fraser, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Background The HPTN 052 trial confirmed that antiretroviral therapy (ART) can nearly eliminate HIV transmission from successfully treated HIV-infected individuals within couples. Here, we present the mathematical modeling used to inform the design and monitoring of a new trial aiming to test whether widespread provision of ART is feasible and can substantially reduce population-level HIV incidence. Methods and Findings The HPTN 071 (PopART) trial is a three-arm cluster-randomized trial of 21 large population clusters in Zambia and South Africa, starting in 2013. A combination prevention package including home-based voluntary testing and counseling, and ART for HIV positive individuals, will be delivered in arms A and B, with ART offered universally in arm A and according to national guidelines in arm B. Arm C will be the control arm. The primary endpoint is the cumulative three-year HIV incidence. We developed a mathematical model of heterosexual HIV transmission, informed by recent data on HIV-1 natural history. We focused on realistically modeling the intervention package. Parameters were calibrated to data previously collected in these communities and national surveillance data. We predict that, if targets are reached, HIV incidence over three years will drop by >60% in arm A and >25% in arm B, relative to arm C. The considerable uncertainty in the predicted reduction in incidence justifies the need for a trial. The main drivers of this uncertainty are possible community-level behavioral changes associated with the intervention, uptake of testing and treatment, as well as ART retention and adherence. Conclusions The HPTN 071 (PopART) trial intervention could reduce HIV population-level incidence by >60% over three years. This intervention could serve as a paradigm for national or supra-national implementation. Our analysis highlights the role mathematical modeling can play in trial development and monitoring, and more widely in evaluating the impact of treatment

  8. Group 2 Innate Lymphoid Cell Proportions Are Diminished in Young Helminth Infected Children and Restored by Curative Anti-helminthic Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Nausch, Norman; Appleby, Laura J.; Sparks, Alexandra M.; Midzi, Nicholas; Mduluza, Takafira; Mutapi, Francisca

    2015-01-01

    Background Group 2 Innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s) are innate cells that produce the TH2 cytokines IL-5 and IL-13. The importance of these cells has recently been demonstrated in experimental models of parasitic diseases but there is a paucity of data on ILC2s in the context of human parasitic infections and in particular of the blood dwelling parasite Schistosoma haematobium. Methodology/Principal Findings In this case-control study human peripheral blood ILC2s were analysed in relation to infection with the helminth parasite Schistosoma haematobium. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells of 36 S. haematobium infected and 36 age and sex matched uninfected children were analysed for frequencies of ILC2s identified as Lin-CD45+CD127+CD294+CD161+. ILC2s were significantly lower particularly in infected children aged 6–9 years compared to healthy participants. Curative anti-helminthic treatment resulted in an increase in levels of the activating factor TSLP and restoration of ILC2 levels. Conclusion This study demonstrates that ILC2s are diminished in young helminth infected children and restored by removal of the parasites by treatment, indicating a previously undescribed association between a human parasitic infection and ILC2s and suggesting a role of ILC2s before the establishment of protective acquired immunity in human schistosomiasis. PMID:25799270

  9. Chronic 5-HT4 receptor agonist treatment restores learning and memory deficits in a neuroendocrine mouse model of anxiety/depression.

    PubMed

    Darcet, Flavie; Gardier, Alain M; David, Denis J; Guilloux, Jean-Philippe

    2016-03-11

    Cognitive disturbances are often reported as serious invalidating symptoms in patients suffering from major depression disorders (MDD) and are not fully corrected by classical monoaminergic antidepressant drugs. If the role of 5-HT4 receptor agonists as cognitive enhancers is well established in naïve animals or in animal models of cognitive impairment, their cognitive effects in the context of stress need to be examined. Using a mouse model of anxiety/depression (CORT model), we reported that a chronic 5-HT4 agonist treatment (RS67333, 1.5mg/kg/day) restored chronic corticosterone-induced cognitive deficits, including episodic-like, associative and spatial learning and memory impairments. On the contrary, a chronic monoaminergic antidepressant drug treatment with fluoxetine (18mg/kg/day) only partially restored spatial learning and memory deficits and had no effect in the associative/contextual task. These results suggest differential mechanisms underlying cognitive effects of these drugs. Finally, the present study highlights 5-HT4 receptor stimulation as a promising therapeutic mechanism to alleviate cognitive symptoms related to MDD. PMID:26850572

  10. Natural restoration

    SciTech Connect

    Kamlet, K.S.

    1993-02-01

    After a company pays millions of dollars to clean up contaminated site, its liability may not be over. It may have to spend tens of millions more to restore damaged natural resources under an oft-overlooked Superfund program. Examples of liability are cited in this report from the Exxon Valdez oil spill and a pcb leak which contaminated a harbor.

  11. Value of Antiquity in the Restoration Process of the Art Nouveau Villa Duelfer in Barlinek/ Wartość Dawności W Procesie Renowacji Secesyjnej Willi Architekta W Barlinku

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutyna, Halina

    2015-06-01

    The value assigned to time-worn objects and buildings seems crucial to a conservator's theoretical beliefs. The notion of antiquity is almost imprinted in the structure of the building itself, as well as in the concept of the time that has lapsed since the erection of the building. The head of the restoration project of the 1908 art nouveau Villa Duelfer, in Barlinek, which gradually fell into ruin after the war, presents how, in practice, this idea of antiquity was respected in that project. On the hundredth anniversary of the construction of the villa, the building, commonly referred to as the `Pałacyk Cebulowy`, has lived to see its revival by sustaining its primary residential function, its architectural form and its historic values, in an urban context. Kluczowa dla poglądów konserwatora zabytków architektury jawi się idea wartości dawności. Jest ona niejako odciśnięta w strukturze budowli i w wyobrażeniu o czasie, jaki upłynął od chwili powstania. Dobrym przykładem ilustrującym zagadnienie dawności zabytku jest ostatnia renowacja Willi Duelfera w Barlinku, wzniesionej w 1908 roku i potocznie zwanej "Pałacykiem Cebulowym". Po wojnie popadającej w ruinę, W 2008 roku w wyniku konsultacji z konserwatorem zabytków właściciel postanowił przywrócić jej symetrię i dobudować z lewej strony dodatkowe pomieszczenie. Podjęto także rozbudowę wilii od strony zachodniej poprzez dostawienie klatki schodowej i dodanie balkonu opartego na kolumnach na wzór elewacji wschodniej. Dokonano również renowacji zdobień elewacji i odtworzono brakujące elementy od frontu i z tyłu obiektu. Prace przebiegały w szybkim tempie i trwały zaledwie dwa lata, choć budynek był bardzo zniszczony.

  12. State of the art in oral and maxillofacial surgery: treatment of maxillary hypoplasia and anterior palatal and alveolar clefts.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, B; Padwa, B L; Boyne, P; Kaban, L

    1999-07-01

    As the new millennium approaches, it seems appropriate to look back at where we have been and where we are going with the care of patients with facial deformities. None of us can deny that although changes have been made, many current treatment modalities are no more than modifications of old techniques. We are, however, poised to make dramatic improvements in the management of facial abnormalities as we enter the new century and millennium. Biotechnology, genetic manipulation, and new surgical technology will become pervasive, and perhaps we will move from "modification" of the old into a completely new era of therapeutic approaches to the care of dentofacial deformities. "Opportunities multiply as they are seized" (from Sun Tzu), and the time of opportunity is approaching. This review will attempt to look at the state of the art in cleft care and in oral and maxillofacial surgery: where we have been and where we are going. It will be clear that there is overlap between specialties and that these overlaps will become greater as new regimens in the care of facial deformities come to the forefront.

  13. Stability of the Helical TomoTherapy Hi·Art II detector for treatment beam irradiations.

    PubMed

    Schombourg, Karin; Bochud, François; Moeckli, Raphaël

    2014-01-01

    The Hi·Art II Helical TomoTherapy (HT) unit is equipped with a built-in onboard MVCT detector used for patient imaging and beam monitoring. Our aim was to study the detector stability for treatment beam measurements. We studied the MVCT detector response with the 6 MV photon beam over time, throughout short-term (during an irradiation) and long-term (two times 50 days) periods. Our results show a coefficient of variation ≤ 1% for detector chambers inside the beam (excluding beam gradients) for short- and long-term response of the MVCT detector. Larger variations were observed in beam gradients and an influence of the X-ray target where degradation was found. The results assume that an 'air scan' procedure is performed daily to recalibrate the detector with the imaging beam. On short term, the detector response stability is comparable to other devices. Long-term measure- ments during two 50-day periods show a good reproducibility.  PMID:25493514

  14. Stability of the Helical TomoTherapy Hi·Art II detector for treatment beam irradiations.

    PubMed

    Schombourg, Karin; Bochud, François; Moeckli, Raphaël

    2014-01-01

    The Hi·Art II Helical TomoTherapy (HT) unit is equipped with a built-in onboard MVCT detector used for patient imaging and beam monitoring. Our aim was to study the detector stability for treatment beam measurements. We studied the MVCT detector response with the 6 MV photon beam over time, throughout short-term (during an irradiation) and long-term (two times 50 days) periods. Our results show a coefficient of variation ≤ 1% for detector chambers inside the beam (excluding beam gradients) for short- and long-term response of the MVCT detector. Larger variations were observed in beam gradients and an influence of the X-ray target where degradation was found. The results assume that an 'air scan' procedure is performed daily to recalibrate the detector with the imaging beam. On short term, the detector response stability is comparable to other devices. Long-term measure- ments during two 50-day periods show a good reproducibility. 

  15. The martial arts.

    PubMed

    Terry, Charles M

    2006-08-01

    Given the increasing popularity of the martial arts, it is likely that physicians in all specialties encounter patients who participate. From pediatric patients, to geriatric patients, to those living with various disabilities, the martial arts may offer physical, psychologic, and therapeutic benefits. An appreciation of the physical demands of the martial arts is crucial to understanding the pathogenesis of injury as well as to planning treatment and prevention strategies and to determining safe return to participation after injury.

  16. Restoring Ancestral Language, Restoring Identity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bannon, Kay T.

    1999-01-01

    Describes the Cherokee Language Renewal Program that was designed to help Cherokee elementary school children learn to function in the dominant culture without sacrificing their own cultural heritage. Explains how the program got started, and reports on how it helps restore a cultural identify to a people who are at risk of losing their identity.…

  17. Effects of various chair-side surface treatment methods on dental restorative materials with respect to contact angles and surface roughness.

    PubMed

    Sturz, Candida R C; Faber, Franz-Josef; Scheer, Martin; Rothamel, Daniel; Neugebauer, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Available chair-side surface treatment methods may adversely affect prosthetic materials and promote plaque accumulation. This study investigated the effects of treatment procedures on three resin restorative materials, zirconium-dioxide and polyetheretherketone in terms of surface roughness and hydrophobicity. Treatments were grinding with silicon carbide paper or white Arkansas stone, blasting with prophylaxis powder and polishing with diamond paste. Surface roughness was assessed using confocal laser scanning. Hydrophobicity as measured by water contact angle was determined by computerized image analysis using the sessile drop technique. All of the specific surface treatments performed led to significant changes in contact angle values and surface roughness (Ra) values. Median contact angle values ranged from 51.6° to 114°. Ra values ranged from 0.008 µm to 2.917 µm. Air-polishing as well as other polishing procedures increased surface roughness values in all materials except zirconium dioxide. Polyetheretherketone displayed greatest change in contact angle values after air-polishing treatment. PMID:26632228

  18. Gourdeous Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coy, Mary

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a gourd art project for her art club. Prior to students actually working on the gourds, the author and her art volunteer did a joint demonstration on the process students would go through to create their project. The volunteer brought in and explained her gourd art and shared information about the drying and…

  19. Restoration Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    In the accompanying photos, a laboratory technician is restoring the once-obliterated serial number of a revolver. The four-photo sequence shows the gradual progression from total invisibility to clear readability. The technician is using a new process developed in an applications engineering project conducted by NASA's Lewis Research Center in conjunction with Chicago State University. Serial numbers and other markings are frequently eliminated from metal objects to prevent tracing ownership of guns, motor vehicles, bicycles, cameras, appliances and jewelry. To restore obliterated numbers, crime laboratory investigators most often employ a chemical etching technique. It is effective, but it may cause metal corrosion and it requires extensive preparatory grinding and polishing. The NASA-Chicago State process is advantageous because it can be applied without variation to any kind of metal, it needs no preparatory work and number recovery can be accomplished without corrosive chemicals; the liquid used is water.

  20. A synopsis of short-term responses to alternative restoration treatments in sagebrush-steppe: the SageSTEP project

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Sagebrush Steppe Treatment Evaluation Project (SageSTEP) is an integrated long-term study that evaluates ecological effects of alternative treatments designed to reduce woody fuels and to stimulate the herbaceous understory of sagebrush steppe communities of the intermountain west. This synopsis...

  1. Down-regulation of NR4A1 in follicular thyroid carcinomas is restored following lithium treatment

    PubMed Central

    Camacho, Cléber P.; Latini, Flavia R. M.; Oler, Gisele; Hojaij, Flavio C.; Maciel, Rui M. B.; Riggins, Gregory J.; Cerutti, Janete M.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Introduction The identification of follicular thyroid adenoma-associated transcripts will lead to a better understanding of the events involved in pathogenesis and progression of follicular tumors. Using Serial Analysis of Gene Expression, we identified five genes that are absent in a malignant follicular thyroid carcinoma (FTC) library, but expressed in follicular adenoma (FTA) and normal thyroid libraries. Methods NR4A1, one of the five genes, was validated in a set of 27 normal thyroid tissues, 10 FTAs and 14 FTCs and three thyroid carcinoma cell lines by real time PCR. NR4A1 can be transiently increased by a variety of stimuli, including lithium, which is used as adjuvant therapy of thyroid carcinoma with 131I. We tested if lithium could restore NR4A1 expression. The expression of other genes potentially involved in the same signaling pathway was tested. To this end, lithium was used at different concentration (10mM or 20mM) and time (2h and 24 h) and the level of expression was tested by quantitative PCR. We next tested if Lithium could affect cell growth and apoptosis. Results We observed that NR4A1 expression was under-expressed in most of the FTCs investigated, compared to expression in normal thyroid tissues and FTAs. We also found a positive correlation between NR4A1 and FOSB gene expression. Lithium induced NR4A1 and FOSB expression, reduced CCDN1 expression, inhibited cell growth and triggered apoptosis in a FTC cell line. Conclusions NR4A1 is under-expressed in most of FTCs. The loss of expression of both NR4A1 and the Wnt pathway gene FOSB was correlated with malignancy. This is consistent with the hypothesis that its loss of expression is part of the transformation process of FTCs, either as a direct or indirect consequence of Wnt pathway alterations. Lithium restores NR4A1 expression, induces apoptosis and reduces cell growth. These findings may explain a possible molecular mechanism of lithium’s therapeutic action. PMID:18727708

  2. Art Education/Art Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, John R., Ed.

    1978-01-01

    The special issue presents 13 articles dealing with art education and art therapy for special groups. Included are the following titles and authors: "Art Education for Special Groups: The Emotionally Disturbed" (E. Ulman); "You Are The Early Warning System" (C. Stember); "School Art Therapist Rationale for DPI Certification" (V. Minar); "Art…

  3. Restoration of lymphocyte proliferation and CTL generation by murine rIL-2 after treatment of allogeneic stimulator cells by ultraviolet B irradiation, heat, or paraformaldehyde

    SciTech Connect

    Flye, M.W.; Yu, S. )

    1991-05-01

    Following a 5-day mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC), C3H/HeJ (H-2k) splenocytes stimulated with DBA/2 (H-2d) gamma-irradiated splenocytes (2000 rads) are specifically cytotoxic in a 4-hr {sup 51}Cr-release assay to P815 (H-2d) target cells (62 +/- 2% cytolysis) but not to third-party EL4 (H-2b). However, when the DBA/2 stimulator cells were treated with heat inactivation (45{degree}C for 1 hr), fixed with 1% paraformaldehyde (15 min), or irradiated with ultraviolet-B light (10(4) J/M2), no cell proliferation or cytolytic activity developed in the MLCs. The levels of IL-1, IL-2, and IL-6 from the supernatants of MLC using stimulators undergoing either of the three treatments were markedly decreased compared with that from gamma-irradiated stimulators. Both cell proliferation and specific cytolysis were restored in a dose-dependent fashion by the addition of murine rIL-2 to the MLCs. If the stimulator cells were first activated with 5 micrograms/ml pokeweed mitogen or lipopolysaccharide for 2 days, the subsequent treatment with heat, paraformaldehyde, or UV-B did not significantly affect the development of cytolysis (54-70% cytolysis). Suppressor cells were not detected when cells from the nonresponsive MLCs (2.5 x 10(6) cells) were added to an MLC freshly prepared with gamma-irradiated stimulator cells, or were injected intraperitoneally (50 x 10(6) cells) into naive mice 2 days before recovery and in vitro sensitization of splenocytes. Therefore, modification of the stimulating alloantigen can prevent the release of cytokines that function as an essential second signal in the development of the proliferative response and subsequent cytolysis. The cytokine found to be essential for restoration of this response is IL-2.

  4. Posterior restorations--a clinical view.

    PubMed

    Jedynakiewicz, N M; Martin, N

    2001-01-01

    This paper examines the state-of-the-art in the direct restoration of posterior teeth. The existing paradigms for the management of caries are questioned and some existing methods of cavity preparation are reviewed. Dental restorations need to be durable but able to adapt to a changing environment brought about by wear of the adjacent tooth substance and by fatigue processes within the tooth itself. The wear of restorative materials needs to be matched to that of the tooth, otherwise differential loss of either the restorative material or the enamel may destabilize the occlusion. Esthetic instability due to natural darkening of the tooth with age, punctuated by clinical intervention with bleaching procedures, adds a further dimension to the concept of a permanent restoration. Clinical methods that minimize the disruptive effects of dental restorations upon the remaining tooth structure are a continuing challenge.

  5. Preclinical Potency and Biodistribution Studies of an AAV 5 Vector Expressing Human Interferon-β (ART-I02) for Local Treatment of Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Aalbers, Caroline J.; Bevaart, Lisette; Loiler, Scott; de Cortie, Karin; Wright, J. Fraser; Mingozzi, Federico; Tak, Paul P.; Vervoordeldonk, Margriet J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Proof of concept for local gene therapy for the treatment of arthritis with immunomodulatory cytokine interferon beta (IFN-β) has shown promising results in animal models of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). For the treatment of RA patients, we engineered a recombinant adeno-associated serotype 5 vector (rAAV5) encoding human (h)IFN-β under control of a nuclear factor κB promoter (ART-I02). Methods The potency of ART-I02 in vitro as well as biodistribution in vivo in arthritic animals was evaluated to characterize the vector prior to clinical application. ART-I02 expression and bioactivity after transduction was evaluated in fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) from different species. Biodistribution of the vector after local injection was assessed in a rat adjuvant arthritis model through qPCR analysis of vector DNA. In vivo imaging was used to investigate transgene expression and kinetics in a mouse collagen induced arthritis model. Results Transduction of RA FLS in vitro with ART-I02 resulted in high expression levels of bioactive hIFN-β. Transduction of FLS from rhesus monkeys, rodents and rabbits with ART-I02 showed high transgene expression, and hIFN-β proved bioactive in FLS from rhesus monkeys. Transgene expression and bioactivity in RA FLS were unaltered in the presence of methotrexate. In vivo, vector biodistribution analysis in rats after intra-articular injection of ART-I02 demonstrated that the majority of vector DNA remained in the joint (>93%). In vivo imaging in mice confirmed local expression of rAAV5 in the knee joint region and demonstrated rapid detectable and sustained expression up until 7 weeks. Conclusions These data show that hIFN-β produced by RA FLS transduced with ART-I02 is bioactive and that intra-articular delivery of rAAV5 drives expression of a therapeutic transgene in the joint, with only limited biodistribution of vector DNA to other tissues, supporting progress towards a phase 1 clinical trial for the local treatment of

  6. Cyclic estradiol treatment normalizes body weight and restores physiological patterns of spontaneous feeding and sexual receptivity in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Asarian, Lori; Geary, Nori

    2002-12-01

    Hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis function strongly influences feeding and body weight in cycling females in many species. To test the sufficiency of cyclic variations in plasma estradiol to reproduce normal patterns of spontaneous feeding, food intake, and body weight, ovariectomized Long-Evans rats were subcutaneously injected every fourth day with 2 microg estradiol benzoate or with the oil vehicle alone. Cyclic estradiol treatment completely normalized the trajectory of body weight gain and total food intake through seven treatment cycles. The hyperphagia of ovariectomized rats was expressed as an increase in spontaneous meal size. Meal frequency decreased, but not enough to compensate for the increase in meal size. Estradiol treatment normalized both parameters. In addition, cyclic estradiol treatment produced a further phasic decrease in meal size (and increase in meal frequency) and a decrease in food intake during the second night after injection. This phasic change is similar to the feeding changes occurring during estrus in intact rats. Sexual receptivity was measured during the eighth estradiol treatment cycle, 4 h after injection of 0.5 mg progesterone. Lordosis scores at the time of the treatment cycle modeling estrus were maximal, and scores at the time modeling diestrus were slightly increased over those of rats that did not receive estradiol. Finally, plasma estradiol levels, measured during the ninth treatment cycle, revealed a near-normal cyclic pattern of plasma estradiol levels. These results provide the first demonstration that the induction of a cyclic, near-physiological pattern of plasma estradiol is sufficient to maintain normal levels of body weight, spontaneous feeding patterns, total food intake, and (together with progesterone) sexual receptivity in ovariectomized rats.

  7. Art therapy, psychodrama, and verbal therapy. An integrative model of group therapy in the treatment of adolescents with anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Diamond-Raab, Lisa; Orrell-Valente, Joan K

    2002-04-01

    Anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa typically afflict individuals in adolescence. Given the intractability of these diseases in combination with the natural recalcitrance of adolescence, treatment with this population presents a daunting challenge. Traditional group therapy that focuses on verbal therapy is often not effective with this population, particularly in the acute stages of the diseases. A group therapy approach that integrates art therapy, psychodrama, and verbal therapy offers an innovative alternative to traditional group therapy.

  8. Bringing Justice to Adolescent Substance Abuse Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraft, M. Katherine; Vicary, Judith R.; Henry, Kimberly L.

    2001-01-01

    Introduces a collection of articles by adolescent treatment experts and leading thinkers in the juvenile, restorative, and community justice movements. Articles offer broad overviews of the state of the art within these areas; commentary on challenges, opportunities, and changes such programming would entail; and case examples showing real-world…

  9. Multiple Drug Treatments That Increase cAMP Signaling Restore Long-Term Memory and Aberrant Signaling in Fragile X Syndrome Models.

    PubMed

    Choi, Catherine H; Schoenfeld, Brian P; Bell, Aaron J; Hinchey, Joseph; Rosenfelt, Cory; Gertner, Michael J; Campbell, Sean R; Emerson, Danielle; Hinchey, Paul; Kollaros, Maria; Ferrick, Neal J; Chambers, Daniel B; Langer, Steven; Sust, Steven; Malik, Aatika; Terlizzi, Allison M; Liebelt, David A; Ferreiro, David; Sharma, Ali; Koenigsberg, Eric; Choi, Richard J; Louneva, Natalia; Arnold, Steven E; Featherstone, Robert E; Siegel, Steven J; Zukin, R Suzanne; McDonald, Thomas V; Bolduc, Francois V; Jongens, Thomas A; McBride, Sean M J

    2016-01-01

    Fragile X is the most common monogenic disorder associated with intellectual disability (ID) and autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Additionally, many patients are afflicted with executive dysfunction, ADHD, seizure disorder and sleep disturbances. Fragile X is caused by loss of FMRP expression, which is encoded by the FMR1 gene. Both the fly and mouse models of fragile X are also based on having no functional protein expression of their respective FMR1 homologs. The fly model displays well defined cognitive impairments and structural brain defects and the mouse model, although having subtle behavioral defects, has robust electrophysiological phenotypes and provides a tool to do extensive biochemical analysis of select brain regions. Decreased cAMP signaling has been observed in samples from the fly and mouse models of fragile X as well as in samples derived from human patients. Indeed, we have previously demonstrated that strategies that increase cAMP signaling can rescue short term memory in the fly model and restore DHPG induced mGluR mediated long term depression (LTD) in the hippocampus to proper levels in the mouse model (McBride et al., 2005; Choi et al., 2011, 2015). Here, we demonstrate that the same three strategies used previously with the potential to be used clinically, lithium treatment, PDE-4 inhibitor treatment or mGluR antagonist treatment can rescue long term memory in the fly model and alter the cAMP signaling pathway in the hippocampus of the mouse model. PMID:27445731

  10. Multiple Drug Treatments That Increase cAMP Signaling Restore Long-Term Memory and Aberrant Signaling in Fragile X Syndrome Models

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Catherine H.; Schoenfeld, Brian P.; Bell, Aaron J.; Hinchey, Joseph; Rosenfelt, Cory; Gertner, Michael J.; Campbell, Sean R.; Emerson, Danielle; Hinchey, Paul; Kollaros, Maria; Ferrick, Neal J.; Chambers, Daniel B.; Langer, Steven; Sust, Steven; Malik, Aatika; Terlizzi, Allison M.; Liebelt, David A.; Ferreiro, David; Sharma, Ali; Koenigsberg, Eric; Choi, Richard J.; Louneva, Natalia; Arnold, Steven E.; Featherstone, Robert E.; Siegel, Steven J.; Zukin, R. Suzanne; McDonald, Thomas V.; Bolduc, Francois V.; Jongens, Thomas A.; McBride, Sean M. J.

    2016-01-01

    Fragile X is the most common monogenic disorder associated with intellectual disability (ID) and autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Additionally, many patients are afflicted with executive dysfunction, ADHD, seizure disorder and sleep disturbances. Fragile X is caused by loss of FMRP expression, which is encoded by the FMR1 gene. Both the fly and mouse models of fragile X are also based on having no functional protein expression of their respective FMR1 homologs. The fly model displays well defined cognitive impairments and structural brain defects and the mouse model, although having subtle behavioral defects, has robust electrophysiological phenotypes and provides a tool to do extensive biochemical analysis of select brain regions. Decreased cAMP signaling has been observed in samples from the fly and mouse models of fragile X as well as in samples derived from human patients. Indeed, we have previously demonstrated that strategies that increase cAMP signaling can rescue short term memory in the fly model and restore DHPG induced mGluR mediated long term depression (LTD) in the hippocampus to proper levels in the mouse model (McBride et al., 2005; Choi et al., 2011, 2015). Here, we demonstrate that the same three strategies used previously with the potential to be used clinically, lithium treatment, PDE-4 inhibitor treatment or mGluR antagonist treatment can rescue long term memory in the fly model and alter the cAMP signaling pathway in the hippocampus of the mouse model. PMID:27445731

  11. Virological and Immunological Status of the People Living with HIV/AIDS Undergoing ART Treatment in Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Dumre, Shyam Prakash

    2016-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) has increased the life span of the people living with HIV (PLHIV), but their virological and immunological outcomes are not well documented in Nepal. The study was conducted at a tertiary care center including 826 HIV-1 seropositive individuals undergoing ART for at least six months. Plasma viral load (HIV-1 RNA) was detected by Real Time PCR and CD4+ T-lymphocyte (CD4+) counts were estimated by flow cytometry. The mean CD4+ count of patients was 501 (95% CI = 325–579) cells/cumm, but about 35% of patients had CD4+ T cell counts below 350 cells/cumm. With increasing age, average CD4+ count was found to be decreasing (p = 0.005). Of the total cases, 82 (9.92%) were found to have virological failure (viral load: >1000 copies/ml). Tenofovir/Lamivudine/Efavirenz (TDF/3TC/EFV), the frequently used ART regimen in Nepal, showed virological failure in 11.34% and immunological failure in 37.17% of patients. Virological failure rate was higher among children < 15 years (14.5%) (p = 0.03); however, no association was observed between ART outcomes and gender or route of transmission. The study suggests there are still some chances of virological and immunological failures despite the success of highly active ART (HAART). PMID:27547761

  12. Restoration of Normal Cerebral Oxygen Consumption with Rapamycin Treatment in a Rat Model of Autism-Tuberous Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Chi, Oak Z; Wu, Chang-Chih; Liu, Xia; Rah, Kang H; Jacinto, Estela; Weiss, Harvey R

    2015-09-01

    Tuberous sclerosis (TSC) is associated with autism spectrum disorders and has been linked to metabolic dysfunction and unrestrained signaling of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Inhibition of mTOR by rapamycin can mitigate some of the phenotypic abnormalities associated with TSC and autism, but whether this is due to the mTOR-related function in energy metabolism remains to be elucidated. In young Eker rats, an animal model of TSC and autism, which harbors a germ line heterozygous Tsc2 mutation, we previously reported that cerebral oxygen consumption was pronouncedly elevated. Young (4 weeks) male control Long-Evans and Eker rats were divided into control and rapamycin-treated (20 mg/kg once daily for 2 days) animals. Cerebral regional blood flow ((14)C-iodoantipyrine) and O2 consumption (cryomicrospectrophotometry) were determined in isoflurane-anesthetized rats. We found significantly increased basal O2 consumption in the cortex (8.7 ± 1.5 ml O2/min/100 g Eker vs. 2.7 ± 0.2 control), hippocampus, pons and cerebellum. Regional cerebral blood flow and cerebral O2 extractions were also elevated in all brain regions. Rapamycin had no significant effect on O2 consumption in any brain region of the control rats, but significantly reduced consumption in the cortex (4.1 ± 0.3) and all other examined regions of the Eker rats. Phosphorylation of mTOR and S6K1 was similar in the two groups and equally reduced by rapamycin. Thus, a rapamycin-sensitive, mTOR-dependent but S6K1-independent, signal led to enhanced oxidative metabolism in the Eker brain. We found decreased Akt phosphorylation in Eker but not Long-Evans rat brains, suggesting that this may be related to the increased cerebral O2 consumption in the Eker rat. Our findings suggest that rapamycin targeting of Akt to restore normal cerebral metabolism could have therapeutic potential in tuberous sclerosis and autism.

  13. Brain stem activity changes associated with restored sympathetic drive following CPAP treatment in OSA subjects: a longitudinal investigation.

    PubMed

    Lundblad, Linda C; Fatouleh, Rania H; McKenzie, David K; Macefield, Vaughan G; Henderson, Luke A

    2015-08-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with significantly elevated muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), leading to hypertension and increased cardiovascular morbidity. Although little is known about the mechanisms responsible for the sympathoexcitation, we have recently shown that the elevated MSNA in OSA is associated with altered neural processing in various brain stem sites, including the dorsolateral pons, rostral ventrolateral medulla, medullary raphe, and midbrain. Given the risk associated with elevated MSNA, we aimed to determine if treatment of OSA with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) would reduce the elevated MSNA and reverse the brain stem functional changes associated with the elevated MSNA. We performed concurrent recordings of MSNA and blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal intensity of the brain stem, using high-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging, in 15 controls and 13 subjects with OSA, before and after 6 mo CPAP treatment. As expected, 6 mo of CPAP treatment significantly reduced MSNA in subjects with OSA, from 54 ± 4 to 23 ± 3 bursts/min and from 77 ± 7 to 36 ± 3 bursts/100 heart beats. Importantly, we found that MSNA-coupled changes in BOLD signal intensity within the dorsolateral pons, medullary raphe, and rostral ventrolateral medulla returned to control levels. That is, CPAP treatment completely reversed brain stem functional changes associated with elevated MSNA in untreated OSA subjects. These data highlight the effectiveness of CPAP treatment in reducing one of the most significant health issues associated with OSA, that is, elevated MSNA and its associated elevated morbidity. PMID:25995345

  14. Brain stem activity changes associated with restored sympathetic drive following CPAP treatment in OSA subjects: a longitudinal investigation

    PubMed Central

    Lundblad, Linda C.; Fatouleh, Rania H.; McKenzie, David K.; Macefield, Vaughan G.

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with significantly elevated muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), leading to hypertension and increased cardiovascular morbidity. Although little is known about the mechanisms responsible for the sympathoexcitation, we have recently shown that the elevated MSNA in OSA is associated with altered neural processing in various brain stem sites, including the dorsolateral pons, rostral ventrolateral medulla, medullary raphe, and midbrain. Given the risk associated with elevated MSNA, we aimed to determine if treatment of OSA with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) would reduce the elevated MSNA and reverse the brain stem functional changes associated with the elevated MSNA. We performed concurrent recordings of MSNA and blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal intensity of the brain stem, using high-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging, in 15 controls and 13 subjects with OSA, before and after 6 mo CPAP treatment. As expected, 6 mo of CPAP treatment significantly reduced MSNA in subjects with OSA, from 54 ± 4 to 23 ± 3 bursts/min and from 77 ± 7 to 36 ± 3 bursts/100 heart beats. Importantly, we found that MSNA-coupled changes in BOLD signal intensity within the dorsolateral pons, medullary raphe, and rostral ventrolateral medulla returned to control levels. That is, CPAP treatment completely reversed brain stem functional changes associated with elevated MSNA in untreated OSA subjects. These data highlight the effectiveness of CPAP treatment in reducing one of the most significant health issues associated with OSA, that is, elevated MSNA and its associated elevated morbidity. PMID:25995345

  15. Restoration of peripheral blood natural killer and B cell levels in patients affected by rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis during etanercept treatment.

    PubMed

    Conigliaro, P; Triggianese, P; Perricone, C; Chimenti, M S; Di Muzio, G; Ballanti, E; Guarino, M D; Kroegler, B; Gigliucci, G; Grelli, S; Perricone, R

    2014-07-01

    Etanercept (ETN) is an anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α agent used in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Few studies focused on the effects of anti-TNF-α on peripheral blood cells. We aimed to evaluate peripheral blood cells in RA and PsA patients during ETN treatment and to explore their relationships with disease activity. RA (n = 82) and PsA (n = 32) patients who started ETN were included into the study and evaluated prospectively before the beginning of ETN therapy and after 14, 22, 54 and 102 weeks. Patients were studied in terms of disease activity score on 28 joints (DAS28), clinical response and laboratory findings. Natural killer (NK) cells, B cells and T cells were characterized by immunophenotyping. Both the RA and the PsA patients showed reduced NK and B cell count before ETN treatment compared with controls. A negative correlation was demonstrated between DAS28 and B cell count in RA patients at baseline. Sustained significant increase of NK and B cells up to normal levels was observed in RA and PsA patients along ETN treatment. Increase of NK cell count was associated with a good-moderate clinical response to ETN in both RA and PsA patients. During ETN treatment peripheral blood NK and B cells levels were restored in RA and PsA patients. Correlations between NK and B cells with disease activity were observed, suggesting that those effects could be mediated by ETN treatment.

  16. Integrating Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BCATA Journal for Art Teachers, 1991

    1991-01-01

    These articles focus on art as a component of interdisciplinary integration. (1) "Integrated Curriculum and the Visual Arts" (Anna Kindler) considers various aspects of integration and implications for art education. (2) "Integration: The New Literacy" (Tim Varro) illustrates how the use of technology can facilitate cross-curricular integration.…

  17. Art English.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preece, Robert

    1994-01-01

    Art English is a combination of English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL)/English-as-a-Foreign-Language (EFL) and art content. As a new instructional area, it faces several challenges: as with all English for Special Purposes (ESP), exchange of information among programs; development of a suitable combination of art content and ESL, due to lack of…

  18. Art Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BCATA Journal for Art Teachers, 1991

    1991-01-01

    Advocating that Canadian art programs should use and model environmentally safe practices, the articles in this journal focus on issues of safe practices in art education. Articles are: (1) "What is WHMIS?"; (2) "Safety Precautions for Specific Art Processes"; (3) "Toxic Substances"; (4) "Using Clay, Glazes, and Kilns Safely in the Classroom"…

  19. Wall Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGinley, Connie Q.

    2004-01-01

    The author of this article, an art teacher at Monarch High School in Louisville, Colorado, describes how her experience teaching in a new school presented an exciting visual challenge for an art teacher--monotonous brick walls just waiting for decoration. This school experienced only minimal instances of graffiti, but as an art teacher, she did…

  20. Rock Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henn, Cynthia A.

    2004-01-01

    There are many interpretations for the symbols that are seen in rock art, but no decoding key has ever been discovered. This article describes one classroom's experiences with a lesson on rock art--making their rock art and developing their own personal symbols. This lesson allowed for creativity, while giving an opportunity for integration…

  1. A synopsis of short-term response to alternative restoration treatments in sagebrush-steppe: the SageSTEP project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McIver, James; Brunson, Mark; Bunting, Steve; Chambers, Jeanne; Doescher, Paul; Grace, James; Hulet, April; Johnson, Dale; Knick, Steven T.; Miller, Richard; Pellant, Mike; Pierson, Fred; Pyke, David; Rau, Benjamin; Rollins, Kim; Roundy, Bruce; Schupp, Eugene; Tausch, Robin; Williams, Jason

    2014-01-01

    The Sagebrush Steppe Treatment Evaluation Project (SageSTEP) is an integrated long-term study that evaluates ecological effects of alternative treatments designed to reduce woody fuels and to stimulate the herbaceous understory of sagebrush steppe communities of the Intermountain West. This synopsis summarizes results through 3 yr posttreatment. Woody vegetation reduction by prescribed fire, mechanical treatments, or herbicides initiated a cascade of effects, beginning with increased availability of nitrogen and soil water, followed by increased growth of herbaceous vegetation. Response of butterflies and magnitudes of runoff and erosion closely followed herbaceous vegetation recovery. Effects on shrubs, biological soil crust, tree cover, surface woody fuel loads, and sagebrush-obligate bird communities will take longer to be fully expressed. In the short term, cool wet sites were more resilient than warm dry sites, and resistance was mostly dependent on pretreatment herbaceous cover. At least 10 yr of posttreatment time will likely be necessary to determine outcomes for most sites. Mechanical treatments did not serve as surrogates for prescribed fire in how each influenced the fuel bed, the soil, erosion, and sage-obligate bird communities. Woody vegetation reduction by any means resulted in increased availability of soil water, higher herbaceous cover, and greater butterfly numbers. We identified several trade-offs (desirable outcomes for some variables, undesirable for others), involving most components of the study system. Trade-offs are inevitable when managing complex natural systems, and they underline the importance of asking questions about the whole system when developing management objectives. Substantial spatial and temporal heterogeneity in sagebrush steppe ecosystems emphasizes the point that there will rarely be a “recipe” for choosing management actions on any specific area. Use of a consistent evaluation process linked to monitoring may be the

  2. Mifepristone Treatment during Early Adolescence Fails to Restore Maternal Deprivation-Induced Deficits in Behavioral Inhibition of Adult Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kentrop, Jiska; van der Tas, Liza; Loi, Manila; van IJzendoorn, Marinus H.; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J.; Joëls, Marian; van der Veen, Rixt

    2016-01-01

    Early life adversity has a profound impact on brain development and later life health. Animal models have provided insight how early life stress programs stress responsiveness and might contribute to the development of psychiatric disorders. In the present study, the long-term effects of maternal deprivation (MD) on behavioral inhibition and attention were examined in adult male Wistar rats. To this end animals were tested in the 5-choice serial reaction time task (5-choice SRTT). We also explored the potential of a 3-day treatment with the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonist mifepristone during early adolescence to normalize putative behavioral effects of early life stress. Deprivation of the mother for 24 h on postnatal day (PND) 3 led to a modest but significant increase in premature responses in the 5-choice SRTT, but did not affect measures of attention. Body weight was lower in deprived animals from weaning until the start of testing. Early adolescent mifepristone treatment (PND 26–28) did not influence performance on the 5-choice SRTT and did not mitigate the deprivation-related impairment in behavioral inhibition. Our results indicate that MD leads to impaired behavioral inhibition, and that mifepristone treatment during early adolescence does not normalize the behavioral changes caused by early life stress. PMID:27378873

  3. Biological restorations using tooth fragments.

    PubMed

    Busato, A L; Loguercio, A D; Barbosa, A N; Sanseverino, M do C; Macedo, R P; Baldissera, R A

    1998-02-01

    A "biological" restoration technique using dental fragments and adhesive materials is described. These fragments were obtained from extracted human teeth which had been previously sterilized and stored in a tooth bank. The advantages are: the use of extracted teeth as restorative material, esthetics, and treatment cost. The positive sensation of having back the missing tooth was the most mentioned comment among patients. The disadvantages are: the difficulty of obtaining teeth with the needed characteristics, problems of making an indirect restoration, matching the original color, and the non-acceptance by some patients who consider it strange to have other people's teeth placed in their mouths.

  4. Gene dysregulation is restored in the Parkinson’s disease MPTP neurotoxic mice model upon treatment of the therapeutic drug CuII(atsm)

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Lesley; Quek, Camelia Y. J.; Hung, Lin W.; Sharples, Robyn A.; Sherratt, Nicki A.; Barnham, Kevin J.; Hill, Andrew F.

    2016-01-01

    The administration of MPTP selectively targets the dopaminergic system resulting in Parkinsonism-like symptoms and is commonly used as a mice model of Parkinson’s disease. We previously demonstrated that the neuroprotective compound CuII(atsm) rescues nigral cell loss and improves dopamine metabolism in the MPTP model. The mechanism of action of CuII(atsm) needs to be further defined to understand how the compound promotes neuronal survival. Whole genome transcriptomic profiling has become a popular method to examine the relationship between gene expression and function. Substantia nigra samples from MPTP-lesioned mice were evaluated using whole transcriptome sequencing to investigate the genes altered upon CuII(atsm) treatment. We identified 143 genes affected by MPTP lesioning that are associated with biological processes related to brain and cognitive development, dopamine synthesis and perturbed synaptic neurotransmission. Upon CuII(atsm) treatment, the expression of 40 genes involved in promoting dopamine synthesis, calcium signaling and synaptic plasticity were restored which were validated by qRT-PCR. The study provides the first detailed whole transcriptomic analysis of pathways involved in MPTP-induced Parkinsonism. In addition, we identify key therapeutic pathways targeted by a potentially new class of neuroprotective agents which may provide therapeutic benefits for other neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:26928495

  5. The natural killer cell dysfunction of aged mice is due to the bone marrow stroma and is not restored by IL-15/IL-15Rα treatment

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Savita; Fang, Min; Sigal, Luis J

    2015-01-01

    Immune dysfunctions in the elderly result in increased susceptibility to infectious diseases, cancer, and autoimmune diseases. Natural killer (NK) cells are bone marrow-derived lymphocytes crucial for host defense against several infections and cancer. We have previously shown that compared to young, aged C57BL/6 mice have decreased numbers of mature NK cells in the blood, spleen, and bone marrow, resulting in susceptibility to mousepox, a lethal disease caused by ectromelia virus. Here, we describe further age-related defects in NK cells including reduced proliferation in vivo, additional signs of immaturity, and dysregulated expression of activating and inhibitory receptors. Aging also alters the expression of collagen-binding integrins in conventional NK cells and the frequency and phenotype of liver tissue-resident NK cells. We additionally show that the defect in NK maturation is the consequence of deficient maturational cues provided by bone marrow stromal cells. Moreover, we demonstrate that in aged mice, treatment with complexes of the cytokine IL-15 and IL-15Rα induce massive expansion of the NK cells, but most of these NK cells remain immature and are unable to restore resistance to mousepox. The use of rodent model to understand immunosenescence may help the development of treatments to improve the immune fitness of the aged. Our work with NK cells should contribute toward this goal. PMID:25399821

  6. The natural killer cell dysfunction of aged mice is due to the bone marrow stroma and is not restored by IL-15/IL-15Rα treatment.

    PubMed

    Nair, Savita; Fang, Min; Sigal, Luis J

    2015-04-01

    Immune dysfunctions in the elderly result in increased susceptibility to infectious diseases, cancer, and autoimmune diseases. Natural killer (NK) cells are bone marrow-derived lymphocytes crucial for host defense against several infections and cancer. We have previously shown that compared to young, aged C57BL/6 mice have decreased numbers of mature NK cells in the blood, spleen, and bone marrow, resulting in susceptibility to mousepox, a lethal disease caused by ectromelia virus. Here, we describe further age-related defects in NK cells including reduced proliferation in vivo, additional signs of immaturity, and dysregulated expression of activating and inhibitory receptors. Aging also alters the expression of collagen-binding integrins in conventional NK cells and the frequency and phenotype of liver tissue-resident NK cells. We additionally show that the defect in NK maturation is the consequence of deficient maturational cues provided by bone marrow stromal cells. Moreover, we demonstrate that in aged mice, treatment with complexes of the cytokine IL-15 and IL-15Rα induce massive expansion of the NK cells, but most of these NK cells remain immature and are unable to restore resistance to mousepox. The use of rodent model to understand immunosenescence may help the development of treatments to improve the immune fitness of the aged. Our work with NK cells should contribute toward this goal.

  7. Inflammatory papillary hyperplasia of the palate: treatment with carbon dioxide laser, followed by restoration with an implant-supported prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Infante-Cossio, P; Martinez-de-Fuentes, R; Torres-Carranza, E; Gutierrez-Perez, J L

    2007-12-01

    Inflammatory papillary hyperplasia of the palate is a persistant non-neoplastic lesion that is normally caused by poorly fitting dentures and Candida infection. We describe a case that was managed primarily with topical miconazole, and complete removal of the old acrylic denture. A multidisciplinary approach between surgeon and prosthodontist was used that combined carbon dioxide laser followed by substitution of the old removable denture for a new implant-supported screw retained prosthesis. This avoided direct support of the prosthesis by the palatal mucosa and made oral hygiene easier. The treatment has resulted in complete remission and there has been no recurrence occurred during 3 years of follow-up.

  8. A Multi-Analytical Approach for the Evaluation of the Efficiency of the Conservation-Restoration Treatment of Moroccan Historical Manuscripts Dating to the 16th, 17th, and 18th Centuries.

    PubMed

    Hajji, Latifa; Boukir, Abdellatif; Assouik, Jamal; Kerbal, Abdelali; Kajjout, Mohamed; Doumenq, Pierre; De Carvalho, Maria Luisa

    2015-08-01

    The most critical steps during the conservation-restoration treatment applied in Moroccan libraries are the deacidification using immersion in a saturated aqueous calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2) solution and the consolidation of degraded manuscripts using Japanese paper. The present study aims to assess the efficiency of this restoration method using a multi-analytical approach. For this purpose, three ancient Arabic Moroccan manuscript papers dating back to the 16th, 17th, and 18th centuries were investigated to characterize the paper support and make a comparative study between pre-restoration and post-restoration states. Three structural and molecular characterization techniques including solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy on (13)C with cross-polarization and magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance ((13)C CP-MAS NMR), attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR FT-IR), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to elucidate the cellulose main features, to identify the inorganic composition of the papers, and to study the crystallinity of the samples. Inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) allowed us to obtain a qualitative and quantitative characterization of the mineral fillers used in the manufacturing of the papers. Scanning electron microscopy coupled to energy dispersive spectrometry (SEM-EDS) ascertained the state of conservation of the different papers and helped us to study the elemental composition of the samples. After restoration, it was shown that the deacidification improved the stability of papers by providing an important alkaline buffer, as demonstrated using FT-IR and energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) results. However, XRD and ICP-AES did not confirm the pertinence of the treatment for all samples because of the unequal distribution of Ca on the paper surface during the restoration. The consolidation process was studied using SEM analysis; its effectiveness in restoring

  9. Spironolactone treatment attenuates vascular dysfunction in type 2 diabetic mice by decreasing oxidative stress and restoring NO/GC signaling

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Marcondes A. B.; Bruder-Nascimento, Thiago; Cau, Stefany B. A.; Lopes, Rheure A. M.; Mestriner, Fabiola L. A. C.; Fais, Rafael S.; Touyz, Rhian M.; Tostes, Rita C.

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (DM2) increases the risk of cardiovascular disease. Aldosterone, which has pro-oxidative and pro-inflammatory effects in the cardiovascular system, is positively regulated in DM2. We assessed whether blockade of mineralocorticoid receptors (MR) with spironolactone decreases reactive oxygen species (ROS)-associated vascular dysfunction and improves vascular nitric oxide (NO) signaling in diabetes. Leptin receptor knockout [LepRdb/LepRdb (db/db)] mice, a model of DM2, and their counterpart controls [LepRdb/LepR+, (db/+) mice] received spironolactone (50 mg/kg body weight/day) or vehicle (ethanol 1%) via oral per gavage for 6 weeks. Spironolactone treatment abolished endothelial dysfunction and increased endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation (Ser1177) in arteries from db/db mice, determined by acetylcholine-induced relaxation and Western Blot analysis, respectively. MR antagonist therapy also abrogated augmented ROS-generation in aorta from diabetic mice, determined by lucigenin luminescence assay. Spironolactone treatment increased superoxide dismutase-1 and catalase expression, improved sodium nitroprusside and BAY 41-2272-induced relaxation, and increased soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) β subunit expression in arteries from db/db mice. Our results demonstrate that spironolactone decreases diabetes-associated vascular oxidative stress and prevents vascular dysfunction through processes involving increased expression of antioxidant enzymes and sGC. These findings further elucidate redox-sensitive mechanisms whereby spironolactone protects against vascular injury in diabetes. PMID:26500555

  10. Lake restoration by hypolimnetic Ca(OH)2 treatment: impact on phosphorus sedimentation and release from sediment.

    PubMed

    Dittrich, Maria; Gabriel, Oliver; Rutzen, Christian; Koschel, Rainer

    2011-03-15

    A whole-lake hypolimnetic Ca(OH)(2) addition, that induced calcium carbonate precipitation, combined with deep water aeration has been applied to eutrophic Lake Luzin, Germany during 1996-1998. In this study we investigated the dynamic of phosphorus and its binding forms in seston and sediment before and during the treatment. The sedimentation rates of phosphorus increased within three years of induced calcite precipitation. The phosphorus binding forms shifted to the calcite-bound phosphorus in the settling matter. The increase of calcite-bound P in the settling material did not coincide with the maximum induced CaCO(3)-precipitation caused by the hypolimnetic addition of Ca(OH)(2). An impact of chemicals additions and pH on phosphorus binding forms in seston and surface sediments has been studied in laboratory experiments with sediment core incubations and slurry experiments. Laboratory studies showed that the lowest phosphorus flux from sediment was related to the experiment with pH=7 in overlaying water adjusted with Ca(OH)(2). The adjusting of pH with Ca(OH)(2) leads to a lower P flux of 2.3 mg Pm(-2)d(-1), while the highest P-flux is attributed to the experiment with the pH which was adjusted with NaOH. Phosphorus fraction which reflects phosphorus binding on carbonates in surface sediments increased within one year of treatment, enhancing the phosphorus retention capacity of sediments. PMID:21292312

  11. Art Rocks with Rock Art!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bickett, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses rock art which was the very first "art." Rock art, such as the images created on the stone surfaces of the caves of Lascaux and Altimira, is the true origin of the canvas, paintbrush, and painting media. For there, within caverns deep in the earth, the first artists mixed animal fat, urine, and saliva with powdered minerals…

  12. [Art therapy and "art brut"].

    PubMed

    Kovács, Emese; Simon, Lajos

    2010-01-01

    The authors in this article explor the most important steps of the development of the research on the psychopathology of expression. They introduce the development of Art Brut and it's place in art history. They deal with the characteristics of art therapy.

  13. [Percutaneous implantation of a left ventricular restoration device [Parachute(TM)] for the treatment of ischemic heart failure].

    PubMed

    Ielasi, Alfonso; Tespili, Maurizio; Repossini, Alberto; Scopelliti, Pasquale; Paganoni, Silvia; Cafro, Andrea; Silvestro, Antonio; Personeni, Davide; Saino, Antonio; Muneretto, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Congestive heart failure secondary to myocardial infarction is associated with significant morbidity and mortality despite currently available therapies. A novel catheter-based left ventricular partitioning device (ParachuteTM, CardioKinetix, Inc., Menlo Park, CA) is currently available for the treatment of patients with severe systolic dysfunction after antero-apical myocardial infarction with regional wall motion abnormalities. Preliminary clinical data showed that the ParachuteTM implantation could be associated with favorable clinical and left ventricular hemodynamic improvements post-implantation. Here, we present the case of a patient with symptomatic congestive heart failure after myocardial infarction implanted with the ParachuteTM device and we briefly review the current literature on this left ventricular partitioning system.

  14. [Percutaneous implantation of a left ventricular restoration device [Parachute(TM)] for the treatment of ischemic heart failure].

    PubMed

    Ielasi, Alfonso; Tespili, Maurizio; Repossini, Alberto; Scopelliti, Pasquale; Paganoni, Silvia; Cafro, Andrea; Silvestro, Antonio; Personeni, Davide; Saino, Antonio; Muneretto, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Congestive heart failure secondary to myocardial infarction is associated with significant morbidity and mortality despite currently available therapies. A novel catheter-based left ventricular partitioning device (ParachuteTM, CardioKinetix, Inc., Menlo Park, CA) is currently available for the treatment of patients with severe systolic dysfunction after antero-apical myocardial infarction with regional wall motion abnormalities. Preliminary clinical data showed that the ParachuteTM implantation could be associated with favorable clinical and left ventricular hemodynamic improvements post-implantation. Here, we present the case of a patient with symptomatic congestive heart failure after myocardial infarction implanted with the ParachuteTM device and we briefly review the current literature on this left ventricular partitioning system. PMID:25689752

  15. Sulfur polymer stabilization/solidification (SPSS) treatment of mixed waste mercury recovered from environmental restoration activities at BNL

    SciTech Connect

    Kalb, P.; Adams, J.; Milian, L.

    2001-01-29

    Over 1,140 yd{sup 3} of radioactively contaminated soil containing toxic mercury (Hg) and several liters of mixed-waste elemental mercury were generated during a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) removal action at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Science and Technology Mixed Waste Focus Area (DOE MWFA) is sponsoring a comparison of several technologies that may be used to treat these wastes and similar wastes at BNL and other sites across the DOE complex. This report describes work conducted at BNL on the application and pilot-scale demonstration of the newly developed Sulfur Polymer Stabilization/Solidification (SPSS) process for treatment of contaminated mixed-waste soils containing high concentrations ({approximately} 5,000 mg/L) of mercury and liquid elemental mercury. BNL's SPSS (patent pending) process chemically stabilizes the mercury to reduce vapor pressure and leachability and physically encapsulates the waste in a solid matrix to eliminate dispersion and provide long-term durability. Two 55-gallon drums of mixed-waste soil containing high concentrations of mercury and about 62 kg of radioactive contaminated elemental mercury were successfully treated. Waste loadings of 60 wt% soil were achieved without resulting in any increase in waste volume, while elemental mercury was solidified at a waste loading of 33 wt% mercury. Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) analyses indicate the final waste form products pass current Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) allowable TCLP concentrations as well as the more stringent proposed Universal Treatment Standards. Mass balance measurements show that 99.7% of the mercury treated was successfully retained within the waste form, while only 0.3% was captured in the off gas system.

  16. Treatment with Interleukin-7 Restores Host Defense against Pneumocystis in CD4+ T-Lymphocyte-Depleted Mice

    PubMed Central

    Samuelson, D. R.; Assouline, B.; Morre, M.; Shellito, J. E.

    2015-01-01

    Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with HIV infection. CD4+ T lymphocytes are critical for host defense against this infection, but in the absence of CD4+ T lymphocytes, CD8+ T lymphocytes may provide limited host defense. The cytokine interleukin-7 (IL-7) functions to enhance lymphocyte proliferation, survival, and recruitment of immune cells to sites of infection. However, there is little known about the role of IL-7 in PCP or its potential use as an immunotherapeutic agent. We hypothesized that treatment with recombinant human IL-7 (rhIL-7) would augment host defense against Pneumocystis and accelerate pathogen clearance in CD4-depleted mice. Control and CD4-depleted mice were infected with Pneumocystis, and rhIL-7 was administered via intraperitoneal injection. Our studies indicate that endogenous murine IL-7 is part of the normal host response to Pneumocystis murina and that administration of rhIL-7 markedly enhanced clearance of Pneumocystis in CD4-depleted mice. Additionally, we observed increased recruitment of CD8+ T lymphocytes to the lungs and decreased apoptosis of pulmonary CD8+ T lymphocytes in rhIL-7-treated animals compared to those in untreated mice. The antiapoptotic effect of rhIL-7 was associated with increased levels of Bcl-2 protein in T lymphocytes. rhIL-7 immunotherapy in CD4-depleted mice also increased the number of gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-positive CD8+ central memory T lymphocytes in the lungs. We conclude that rhIL-7 has a potent therapeutic effect in the treatment of murine Pneumocystis pneumonia in CD4-depleted mice. This therapeutic effect is mediated through enhanced recruitment of CD8+ T cells and decreased apoptosis of lung T lymphocytes, with a preferential action on central memory CD8+ T lymphocytes. PMID:26483405

  17. Seven-year clinical evaluation of painful cracked teeth restored with a direct composite restoration.

    PubMed

    Opdam, Niek J M; Roeters, Joost J M; Loomans, Bas A C; Bronkhorst, Ewald M

    2008-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate long-term clinical effectiveness of treating painful cracked teeth with a direct bonded composite resin restoration. The hypothesis tested was that cracked teeth treated with or without cuspal coverage showed the same performance. Forty-one patients attended a dental practice with a painful cracked tooth that was restored with a direct composite resin restoration. Twenty teeth were restored without and 21 with cuspal coverage. After 7 years, 40 teeth could be evaluated. Three teeth without cuspal coverage needed an endodontic treatment, of which 2 failed as a result of fracture. No significant differences were found for tooth or pulp survival. Three more repairable restoration failures were recorded. Mean annual failure rate of restorations without cuspal coverage was 6%; no failures in restorations with cuspal coverage occurred (P = .009). A direct bonded composite resin restoration can be a successful treatment for a cracked tooth.

  18. UV and hydrogen peroxide treatment restores changes in innate immunity caused by exposure of fish to reuse water.

    PubMed

    Singh, Arvinder; Havixbeck, Jeffrey J; Smith, Matthew K; Shu, Zengquan; Tierney, Keith B; Barreda, Daniel R; El-Din, Mohamed Gamal; Belosevic, Miodrag

    2015-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the innate immunity of goldfish exposed to reuse water, and UV/H2O2-treated reuse water, using a real-time flow-through exposure system. The reuse water generated by ultrafiltration of finished wastewater from the municipal wastewater treatment plant was analyzed for the presence of a panel of 20 herbicides/fungicides and 46 pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCP). There was a seasonal variation in the profile and concentrations of xenobiotics in reuse water with lowest levels occurring in the summer. The innate immunity parameters assessed were cytokine (IFNγ, IL-1β, IL-10, TNFα2), and cytokine receptor (TNFR1, TNFR2, IFNGR1, IFNGR2) gene expression, and phagocytosis of kidney leukocyte subpopulations. Assessment of innate immunity parameters was done after acute (7 days) and sub chronic (30 and 60 days) exposure to reuse water, UV/H2O2-treated reuse water, and activated carbon-treated reuse water (ACT; control), during spring, summer and fall of 2012. Temporal (acute versus sub chronic) as well as seasonal differences in innate immunity of fish exposed to reuse water were observed. The acute exposure of fish to reuse water caused significant down-regulation in cytokine gene expression in different organs of fish (kidney, spleen, liver) and phagocytic ability of different kidney leukocyte subpopulations. The immune gene expression and phagocytosis of kidney leukocytes of fish returned to ACT control levels after sub chronic exposure suggesting that fish have habituated to the reuse water exposure. The changes in gene expression after acute exposure were related to variations in the profile of xenobiotics in reuse water during different seasons. The efficiency of xenobiotic removal using UV/H2O2 ranged between 1.6 and 100% indicating that treatment of reuse water using high dose UV/H2O2 was only partially effective in removing the xenobiotics, as assessed by both chemical analyses and measurement of innate immune

  19. Successful Treatment of Human Visceral Leishmaniasis Restores Antigen-Specific IFN-γ, but not IL-10 Production

    PubMed Central

    Adem, Emebet; Tajebe, Fitsumbirhan; Getahun, Mulusew; Kiflie, Amare; Diro, Ermias; Hailu, Asrat; Shkedy, Ziv; Mengesha, Bewketu; Mulaw, Tadele; Atnafu, Saba; Deressa, Tekalign; Mathewos, Biniam; Abate, Ebba; Modolell, Manuel; Munder, Markus; Müller, Ingrid; Takele, Yegnasew; Kropf, Pascale

    2016-01-01

    One of the key immunological characteristics of active visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is a profound immunosuppression and impaired production of Interferon-γ (IFN-γ). However, recent studies from Bihar in India showed using a whole blood assay, that whole blood cells have maintained the capacity to produce IFN-γ. Here we tested the hypothesis that a population of low-density granulocytes (LDG) might contribute to T cell responses hyporesponsiveness via the release of arginase. Our results show that this population is affected by the anticoagulant used to collect blood: the frequency of LDGs is significantly lower when the blood is collected with heparin as compared to EDTA; however, the anticoagulant does not impact on the levels of arginase released. Next, we assessed the capacity of whole blood cells from patients with active VL to produce IFN-γ and IL-10 in response to antigen-specific and polyclonal activation. Our results show that whole blood cells produce low or levels below detection limit of IFN-γ and IL-10, however, after successful treatment of VL patients, these cells gradually regain their capacity to produce IFN-γ, but not IL-10, in response to activation. These results suggest that in contrast to VL patients from Bihar, India, whole blood cells from VL patients from Gondar, Ethiopia, have lost their ability to produce IFN-γ during active VL and that active disease is not associated with sustained levels of IL-10 production following stimulation. PMID:26962865

  20. Holographic art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryskin, V. Z.; Prostev, A.

    1991-02-01

    The authors of the present paper have been working together in the field of holographic art during the last three years. Our holographic works of art are based on the use of the Denisyuk reflection holograms. These holograms make it possible to creat an art image with the help of the completely new means of representation. The increase of the reflection holograms size could widen the possibilites of art holography. For example , the high quality holograms C size 60x80 cm ) are produced in the USSR. Assembled into large-sized panels, they can be used both in advertisments, interior decoration and in creating unique works of art. They can also be used for decoration of Christian cathedrals and churches, where such art holographic compositions would produce great impressin on people. Here we'd like to discuss the problem of an aesthetic perception of a holographic image.

  1. A treatment of the Zeeman effect using Stokes formalism and its implementation in the Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Simulator (ARTS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsson, Richard; Buehler, Stefan A.; Eriksson, Patrick; Mendrok, Jana

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the practical theory that was used to implement the Zeeman effect using Stokes formalism in the Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Simulator (ARTS). ARTS now treats the Zeeman effect in a general manner for several gas species for all polarizations and takes into account variations in both magnetic and atmospheric fields along a full 3D geometry. We present how Zeeman splitting affects polarization in radiative transfer simulations and find that the effect may be large in Earth settings for polarized receivers in limb observing geometry. We find that not taking a spatially varying magnetic field into account can result in absolute errors in the measurement vector of at least 10 K in Earth magnetic field settings. The paper also presents qualitative tests for O2 lines against previous models (61.15 GHz line) and satellite data from Odin-SMR (487.25 GHz line), and the overall consistency between previous models, satellite data, and the new ARTS Zeeman module seems encouraging.

  2. Mindful art.

    PubMed

    Malafouris, Lambros

    2013-04-01

    Bullot & Reber (B&R) begin asking if the study of the mind's inner life can provide a foundation for a science of art. Clearly there are many epistemological problems involved in the study of the cognitive and affective basis of art appreciation. I argue that context is key. I also propose that as long as the "mind's life" continues to be perceived as an "inner" intracranial phenomenon, little progress can be made. Mind and art are one.

  3. Clinical guidelines for indirect resin restorations.

    PubMed

    Shannon, A

    1997-06-01

    Ongoing advances in adhesive dentistry have made it possible to successfully and predictably bond tooth-supporting restorations using conservative preparation techniques. Improvements in the durability and esthetic properties of tooth-colored restorative materials have also increased the range of available treatment options. However, dentists have been slow to accept both direct and indirect posterior esthetics. This article provides a step-by-step technique for practitioners who choose to treat their patients with indirect resin esthetic restorations. It will not discuss other posterior restorative treatment techniques or materials (i.e. gold, porcelain, amalgam, bonded amalgam, or direct resin).

  4. Characterization of Treatment-Naive HIV/HBV Co-Infected Patients Attending ART Clinic of a Tertiary Healthcare Centre in Eastern India

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Avik; Panigrahi, Rajesh; Sarkar, Neelakshi; Sarkar, Jayeeta; Pal, Manisha; Guha, Subhasish Kamal; Saha, Bibhuti; Chakrabarti, Sekhar; Chakravarty, Runu

    2013-01-01

    Objective The study was designed to assess the hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) co-infection scenario among the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected patients attending a tertiary healthcare unit in eastern India. Additionally, clinical and virological characterization of these viruses, prior to antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation was also done for better understanding of the disease profile. Methods Pool of ART-naive HIV/HBV co-infected and HIV mono-infected patients, participating in two different studies, were included in this study. HBV DNA was detected by nested-PCR amplification followed by HBV genotype determination and HBV reverse transcriptase (RT) region amplification and direct sequencing for detecting drug resistance. Results The prevalence of HBsAg (11.3%) was higher compared to anti-HCV (1.9%) among the HIV infected ART-naive patients. Moreover, majority of the HBeAg positive HIV/HBV co-infected patients (87.7%) had HBV DNA ≥20,000 IU/ml with median HBV DNA significantly higher than that of HBeAg negative subjects (5.7 log10 IU/ml vs. 4.2 log10 IU/ml; p<0.0001). Multivariate analysis also showed that HBeAg-positive status was independently associated with higher HBV DNA level (p = <0.001). Notably, 60.9% of the HBeAg negative co-infected subjects had HBV DNA ≥2,000 IU/ml of which 37.0% had HBV DNA ≥20,000 IU/ml. Genotype HBV/D (68.2%) was the predominant genotype followed by HBV/A (24.3%) and HBV/C (7.5%). Anti-HBV drug resistant mutations were detected in two (3.8%) of the ART-naive patients. Conclusion The prevalence of HIV/HBV co-infection was relatively higher in our study subjects. HBeAg testing might provide clue for early treatment initiation. Furthermore, HBeAg negative patients are also associated with high HBV DNA levels and therefore require appropriate medical attention. Pre-treatment screening for anti-HBV drug resistant mutations is not necessary before ART initiation. PMID:24023688

  5. Tongue piercing: a restorative perspective.

    PubMed

    Bassiouny, M A; Deem, L P; Deem, T E

    2001-06-01

    The implication of a traumatic injury to a permanent molar tooth as a complication by tongue piercing with ornamental jewelry is reported. An appropriate restorative management of the fractured tooth is described. The dentist's role in prevention and treatment of unfavorable complications is outlined. The rationales for selection of specific treatment modalities, in view of the degree of damage to hard dental tissues, are discussed. The range of hard tissue injuries resulting from tongue jewelry varies from a simple crack propagating into the enamel to a fractured tooth. A variety of factors must be considered before employing the available restorative methods. PMID:11491628

  6. April Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Instructor, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Ideas for spring arts activities include a whimsical play about royal dragons, a skit on an April fool, and a song. Instructions for making brightly colored birds from boxes, a happy day hat, decorated eggs, and other art projects are given. (PP)

  7. Art Rocks!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapin, Erika

    2008-01-01

    Though people may like different types of music, everyone likes music. In middle school, music and art are of key importance for students to express and define what kind of person they are. In this article, the author presents an art project where students are asked to create their own guitars. (Contains 1 resource and 3 online resources.)

  8. Indigenous Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hu, Helen

    2012-01-01

    Linda Lomahaftewa, a noted painter, has taught at much bigger places than the Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA). But Lomahaftewa, who is Hopi-Choctaw, and others on the faculty of IAIA are intensely devoted to the mission of this small but unique school. IAIA--the nation's only four-year fine arts institution devoted to American Indian and…

  9. Graphic Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kempe, Joseph; Kinde, Bruce

    This curriculum guide is intended to assist vocational instructors in preparing students for entry-level employment in the graphic arts field and getting them ready for advanced training in the workplace. The package contains an overview of new and emerging graphic arts technologies, competency/skill and task lists for the occupations of…

  10. Art Playgroup

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heiniger, Christina

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses how parents can be involved in a developmentally appropriate art program for very young children. "Art Playgroup," a program for children ages two to five and their parents is one suggestion. Operating under the auspices of DTA Center for Learning & Growing, a nonprofit in Ellsworth, Maine, DTA received a…

  11. Creative Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castellano, Richard J.; Fleming, Mary Ann

    Educational goals and objectives, student activities, and visual aids are included in this guide to a three-dimensional design unit that combines creative art and industrial arts skills. Course goals include challenging students' creative skills, encouraging student interaction and successful group work, and providing an atmosphere of fun and…

  12. Art Experiences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spodek, Bernard; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Presents four articles that examine the role of art experiences in early childhood education: "Educationally Appropriate Art Activities for Young Children," by Bernard Spodek; "Teachers and Children Together: Constructing New Learning," by Lella Gandini; "Fostering Experiences between Young Children and Clay," by Cathy Weisman Topal; and…

  13. Treatment of wastewater and restoration of aquatic systems through an eco-technology based constructed treatment wetlands - a successful experience in Central India.

    PubMed

    Billore, S K; Sharma, J K; Singh, N; Ram, H

    2013-01-01

    In the last couple of decades constructed wetlands (CWs) have drawn considerable interest in Central India. CWs offer an effective means of integrating wastewater treatment and resource enhancement, often at competitive cost in comparison to conventional wastewater treatments, with additional benefits of Green Urban Landscaping and wildlife habitat. This paper describes treatment performances and the design of some Sub Surface Flow CWs (SSFCW) and Artificial Floating Islands (AFIs) in Central India. Central Indian CWs show significant pollution reduction load for total suspended solids (TSS) (62-82%), biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) (40-75%), NH(4)-N (67-78%) and total Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN) (59-78%). Field scale SSFCWs installed so far in Central India are rectangular, earthen, single/multiple celled having similar depths of 0.60-0.90 m, hydraulic retention capacity 18-221 m(3) with effective size 41.8-1,050 m(2). The major components of CWs incorporate puddled bottom/side walls, sealed with impermeable low-density polyethylene, a bed of locally available river gravel planted with Phragmites karka, and an inlet distribution and outlet collection system. A new variant on CWs are AFIs working under hydroponics. The field scale experimental AFIs installed in-situ in a slowly flowing local river were composed of hollow bamboo, a bed of coconut coir, floating arrangements and Phragmites karka as nutrient stripping plant species. The AFIs polish the aquatic system by reducing 46.6% of TSS, 45-55% of NH(4)-N, 33-45% of NO(3)-N, 45-50% of TKN and 40-50% of BOD. The study established that there is a need for further research and sufficient data to assist the development of CWs by instilling confidence in policymakers, planners and in the public.

  14. Treatment of wastewater and restoration of aquatic systems through an eco-technology based constructed treatment wetlands - a successful experience in Central India.

    PubMed

    Billore, S K; Sharma, J K; Singh, N; Ram, H

    2013-01-01

    In the last couple of decades constructed wetlands (CWs) have drawn considerable interest in Central India. CWs offer an effective means of integrating wastewater treatment and resource enhancement, often at competitive cost in comparison to conventional wastewater treatments, with additional benefits of Green Urban Landscaping and wildlife habitat. This paper describes treatment performances and the design of some Sub Surface Flow CWs (SSFCW) and Artificial Floating Islands (AFIs) in Central India. Central Indian CWs show significant pollution reduction load for total suspended solids (TSS) (62-82%), biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) (40-75%), NH(4)-N (67-78%) and total Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN) (59-78%). Field scale SSFCWs installed so far in Central India are rectangular, earthen, single/multiple celled having similar depths of 0.60-0.90 m, hydraulic retention capacity 18-221 m(3) with effective size 41.8-1,050 m(2). The major components of CWs incorporate puddled bottom/side walls, sealed with impermeable low-density polyethylene, a bed of locally available river gravel planted with Phragmites karka, and an inlet distribution and outlet collection system. A new variant on CWs are AFIs working under hydroponics. The field scale experimental AFIs installed in-situ in a slowly flowing local river were composed of hollow bamboo, a bed of coconut coir, floating arrangements and Phragmites karka as nutrient stripping plant species. The AFIs polish the aquatic system by reducing 46.6% of TSS, 45-55% of NH(4)-N, 33-45% of NO(3)-N, 45-50% of TKN and 40-50% of BOD. The study established that there is a need for further research and sufficient data to assist the development of CWs by instilling confidence in policymakers, planners and in the public. PMID:24135106

  15. ArtBreak: A Creative Group Counseling Program for Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziff, Katherine; Pierce, Lori; Johanson, Susan; King, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the pilot of a school-based creative group-counseling program for children called ArtBreak, a choice-based studio art experience based on the restorative possibilities of art making delineated in the expressive therapies continuum (ETC; Kagin & Lusebrink, 1978). The ETC features a developmental hierarchy in relation to how…

  16. Disequilibrium in Arts and Arts Education: Sustainability as Loss through Giving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slivka, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Sustainability defined as ecological restoration and stewardship (Blandy, Congdon & Krug, 1998; Garoian, 1998), environmental justice (Hicks & King, 2007), and politicizing arts and arts education practices (jagodzinski, 2007) is expanded in this article by articulating the consumption and production dialectic and the resulting forms of waste as…

  17. Immunotherapeutic restoration in HIV-infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Kim, June Myung; Han, Sang Hoon

    2011-02-01

    While the development of combined active antiretroviral therapy (cART) has dramatically improved life expectancies and quality of life in HIV-infected individuals, long-term clinical problems, such as metabolic complications, remain important constraints of life-long cART. Complete immune restoration using only cART is normally unattainable even in cases of sufficient plasma viral suppression. The need for immunologic adjuncts that complement cART remains, because while cART alone may result in the complete recovery of peripheral net CD4+ T lymphocytes, it may not affect the reservoir of HIV-infected cells. Here, we review current immunotherapies for HIV infection, with a particular emphasis on recent advances in cytokine therapies, therapeutic immunization, monoclonal antibodies, immune-modulating drugs, nanotechnology-based approaches and radioimmunotherapy.

  18. Segmented ART - The new era in ART?

    PubMed

    Ozgur, Kemal; Humaidan, Peter; Coetzee, Kevin

    2016-06-01

    Currently up to 4% of infants born in developing countries are conceived through assisted reproductive technology (ART). Even though most of these conceptions occur and progress without complications, ART procedures and processes may increase iatrogenesis through complications in - and after conception. We herein review and discuss the clinically and scientific implications and evidence of iatrogenesis, and show how the evolution in ART technologies and procedures has led to the current presumption that frozen embryo transfer might be a more optimal strategy than fresh embryo transfer, in terms of not only reproduction, but also of maternal and fetal outcomes. There is increasing scientific evidence to support the notion that controlled ovarian stimulation could induce significant changes to the endocrine profile of a reproductive cycle, especially to the reproductively important early luteal phase. These changes may not only have a negative effect on implantation and early placentation, but also on the mother, the fetus, and the infant. The overt consequences of controlled ovarian stimulation include ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome, reduced embryo implantation, increased ectopic pregnancy, and altered placentation and fetal growth. The cumulative scientific evidence from this review suggests that GnRHa trigger in segmented ART might constitute the future routine treatment regimen for IVF patients, providing a safe, effective, and patient friendly treatment.

  19. Segmented ART - The new era in ART?

    PubMed

    Ozgur, Kemal; Humaidan, Peter; Coetzee, Kevin

    2016-06-01

    Currently up to 4% of infants born in developing countries are conceived through assisted reproductive technology (ART). Even though most of these conceptions occur and progress without complications, ART procedures and processes may increase iatrogenesis through complications in - and after conception. We herein review and discuss the clinically and scientific implications and evidence of iatrogenesis, and show how the evolution in ART technologies and procedures has led to the current presumption that frozen embryo transfer might be a more optimal strategy than fresh embryo transfer, in terms of not only reproduction, but also of maternal and fetal outcomes. There is increasing scientific evidence to support the notion that controlled ovarian stimulation could induce significant changes to the endocrine profile of a reproductive cycle, especially to the reproductively important early luteal phase. These changes may not only have a negative effect on implantation and early placentation, but also on the mother, the fetus, and the infant. The overt consequences of controlled ovarian stimulation include ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome, reduced embryo implantation, increased ectopic pregnancy, and altered placentation and fetal growth. The cumulative scientific evidence from this review suggests that GnRHa trigger in segmented ART might constitute the future routine treatment regimen for IVF patients, providing a safe, effective, and patient friendly treatment. PMID:27288333

  20. Variation of physicochemical properties of drinking water treatment residuals and Phoslock(®) induced by fulvic acid adsorption: Implication for lake restoration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changhui; Jiang, He-Long; Xu, Huacheng; Yin, Hongbin

    2016-01-01

    The use of phosphorus (P) inactivating agents to reduce internal P loading from sediment for lake restoration has attracted increasing attention. Reasonably, the physicochemical properties of P inactivating agents may vary with the interference of various environmental factors, leading to the change of control effectiveness and risks. In this study, the effect of fulvic acid (FA) adsorption on the properties of two agents, drinking water treatment residuals (DWTRs) and Phoslock®, was investigated. The results showed that after adsorption, there was little change for the main structures of DWTRs and Phoslock®, but the thermostability of Phoslock®, as well as the particle size and settleability of the two agents decreased. The specific surface area and pore volume of DWTRs also decreased, while those of Phoslock® increased. Further analysis indicated that aluminum and iron in DWTRs were stable during FA adsorption, but a substantial increase of lanthanum release from Phoslock® was observed, in particular at first (P < 0.01). Moreover, the P immobilization capability of DWTRs had little change after FA adsorption, while the capability of Phoslock® after FA adsorption decreased in solutions (P < 0.001) and sediments (P < 0.1); interestingly, from the view of engineering application, the performance of Phoslock® was not substantially affected. Overall, each P inactivating agent had its own particular responses of the physicochemical properties to environment factors, and detailed investigations on the applicability of each agent were essential before practical application.

  1. Predicting restorability of incompetent criminal defendants.

    PubMed

    Mossman, Douglas

    2007-01-01

    U.S. courts frequently require forensic examiners to offer opinions concerning the likelihood that criminal defendants found incompetent to stand trial can have their competence "restored" through treatment. Yet no jurisdiction has established legal guidelines for testimony concerning restorability, and several authors have suggested that mental health professionals cannot accurately predict whether treatment to restore competence will succeed. This study asked whether reliable information that is consistently available at the time of examination might support empirically grounded opinions about the likelihood of restoration. Using records from all 351 inpatient pretrial defendants who underwent competence restoration at a state psychiatric hospital from 1995 through 1999, I evaluated whether several types of information that are reliable and that could consistently be made available to forensic examiners--including evaluees' demographic characteristics, diagnoses, symptom patterns, criminal charges, number of prior public sector hospitalizations, and cumulative prior length of stay (LOS)--would predict outcome of restoration efforts. I modeled the probability of successful restoration using logistic regression equations, and evaluated the equations' predictive accuracy using k-fold cross-validation and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Lower probability of restoration was associated with having a misdemeanor charge, longer cumulative LOS, older age, and diagnoses of mental retardation, schizophrenia, and schizoaffective disorder. Although the overall rate of successful restoration for felony defendants was 75 percent, logistic equations allowed selection of subgroups with high predicted probabilities of restoration (>90%) and low probabilities of restoration (<35%). In cross-validation simulations, predictive equations had ROC areas of 0.727 for all defendants, and 0.735 for felony defendants. These findings provide scientific support for testimony

  2. Predicting restorability of incompetent criminal defendants.

    PubMed

    Mossman, Douglas

    2007-01-01

    U.S. courts frequently require forensic examiners to offer opinions concerning the likelihood that criminal defendants found incompetent to stand trial can have their competence "restored" through treatment. Yet no jurisdiction has established legal guidelines for testimony concerning restorability, and several authors have suggested that mental health professionals cannot accurately predict whether treatment to restore competence will succeed. This study asked whether reliable information that is consistently available at the time of examination might support empirically grounded opinions about the likelihood of restoration. Using records from all 351 inpatient pretrial defendants who underwent competence restoration at a state psychiatric hospital from 1995 through 1999, I evaluated whether several types of information that are reliable and that could consistently be made available to forensic examiners--including evaluees' demographic characteristics, diagnoses, symptom patterns, criminal charges, number of prior public sector hospitalizations, and cumulative prior length of stay (LOS)--would predict outcome of restoration efforts. I modeled the probability of successful restoration using logistic regression equations, and evaluated the equations' predictive accuracy using k-fold cross-validation and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Lower probability of restoration was associated with having a misdemeanor charge, longer cumulative LOS, older age, and diagnoses of mental retardation, schizophrenia, and schizoaffective disorder. Although the overall rate of successful restoration for felony defendants was 75 percent, logistic equations allowed selection of subgroups with high predicted probabilities of restoration (>90%) and low probabilities of restoration (<35%). In cross-validation simulations, predictive equations had ROC areas of 0.727 for all defendants, and 0.735 for felony defendants. These findings provide scientific support for testimony

  3. The restorative management of microdontia.

    PubMed

    Laverty, D P; Thomas, M B M

    2016-08-26

    Microdontia is a dental abnormality that will often present to the dental practitioner due to the aesthetic concerns of the patient. Treatment is therefore aimed at addressing the aesthetics issue of the patient and this can present a number of challenges which may require a multidisciplinary approach in its management. This article presents the restorative management of localised and generalised microdontia. PMID:27561572

  4. Pregnenolone co-treatment partially restores steroidogenesis, but does not prevent growth inhibition and increased atresia in mouse ovarian antral follicles treated with mono-hydroxy methoxychlor

    SciTech Connect

    Craig, Zelieann R. Hannon, Patrick R. Flaws, Jodi A.

    2013-11-01

    Mono-hydroxy methoxychlor (mono-OH MXC) is a metabolite of the pesticide, methoxychlor (MXC). Although MXC is known to decrease antral follicle numbers, and increase follicle death in rodents, not much is known about the ovarian effects of mono-OH MXC. Previous studies indicate that mono-OH MXC inhibits mouse antral follicle growth, increases follicle death, and inhibits steroidogenesis in vitro. Further, previous studies indicate that CYP11A1 expression and production of progesterone (P{sub 4}) may be the early targets of mono-OH MXC in the steroidogenic pathway. Thus, this study tested whether supplementing pregnenolone, the precursor of progesterone and the substrate for HSD3B, would prevent decreased steroidogenesis, inhibited follicle growth, and increased follicle atresia in mono-OH MXC-treated follicles. Mouse antral follicles were exposed to vehicle (dimethylsulfoxide), mono-OH MXC (10 μg/mL), pregnenolone (1 μg/mL), or mono-OH MXC and pregnenolone together for 96 h. Levels of P{sub 4}, androstenedione (A), testosterone (T), estrone (E{sub 1}), and 17β-estradiol (E{sub 2}) in media were determined, and follicles were processed for histological evaluation of atresia. Pregnenolone treatment alone stimulated production of all steroid hormones except E{sub 2}. Mono-OH MXC-treated follicles had decreased sex steroids, but when given pregnenolone, produced levels of P{sub 4}, A, T, and E{sub 1} that were comparable to those in vehicle-treated follicles. Pregnenolone treatment did not prevent growth inhibition and increased atresia in mono-OH MXC-treated follicles. Collectively, these data support the idea that the most upstream effect of mono-OH MXC on steroidogenesis is by reducing the availability of pregnenolone, and that adding pregnenolone may not be sufficient to prevent inhibited follicle growth and survival. - Highlights: • Mono-OH MXC inhibited antral follicle steroidogenesis, growth, and survival. • Pregnenolone partially restored steroidogenesis

  5. Treatment with novel AP-1 and NF-κB inhibitors restores the colonic endocrine cells to normal levels in rats with DSS-induced colitis

    PubMed Central

    EL-SALHY, MAGDY; UMEZAWA, KAZUO

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of two anti-inflammatory agents on the abnormalities in colonic endocrine cells in dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis. Colitis was induced in male Wistar rats (n=45) using DSS; a further 15 rats without colitis were included in a healthy control group. The animals with DSS-induced colitis were randomly divided into 3 treatment groups as follows: i) DSS group, rats were treated with 0.5 ml of 0.5% carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC); ii) DSS-G group, rats were treated with 3-[(dodecyl thiocarbonyl)-methyl]-glutarimide (DTCM-G), a novel activator protein 1 (AP-1) inhibitor, 20 mg/kg in CMC; and iii) DSS-Q group, rats were treated with dehydroxymethylepoxyquinomicin, a nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) inhibitor, 15 mg/kg in CMC. The treatments were administered intraperitoneally, twice daily for 5 days, after which the animals were sacrificed and tissue samples from the colon were immunostained for chromogranin A (CgA), serotonin, peptide YY (PYY), enteroglucagon, pancreatic polypeptide (PP), somatostatin, leukocytes, B/T lymphocytes, B lymphocytes, T lymphocytes, macrophages/monocytes and mast cells. The densities of these endocrine and immune cells were quantified by computer-aided image analysis. The densities of CgA-, serotonin-, PYY- and enteroglucagon-producing cells were significantly higher, and those of PP- and somatostatin-producing cells were significantly lower in the DSS-G, DSS-Q and control groups than in the DSS group. The densities of all the immune cells were lower in the DSS-G, DSS-Q and control groups than in the DSS group. The densities of all endocrine cell types and immune cells in both the DSS groups treated with anti-inflammatory agents were restored to control levels. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that there is an interaction between endocrine and immune cells during inflammation. This interaction with subsequent changes in endocrine cells is responsible for the clinical manifestation of

  6. Treatment with novel AP-1 and NF-κB inhibitors restores the colonic endocrine cells to normal levels in rats with DSS-induced colitis.

    PubMed

    El-Salhy, Magdy; Umezawa, Kazuo

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of two anti-inflammatory agents on the abnormalities in colonic endocrine cells in dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis. Colitis was induced in male Wistar rats (n=45) using DSS; a further 15 rats without colitis were included in a healthy control group. The animals with DSS-induced colitis were randomly divided into 3 treatment groups as follows: i) DSS group, rats were treated with 0.5 ml of 0.5% carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC); ii) DSS‑G group, rats were treated with 3-[(dodecylthiocarbonyl)‑methyl]‑glutarimide (DTCM‑G), a novel activator protein 1 (AP-1) inhibitor, 20 mg/kg in CMC; and iii) DSS‑Q group, rats were treated with dehydroxymethylepoxyquinomicin, a nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) inhibitor, 15 mg/kg in CMC. The treatments were administered intraperitoneally, twice daily for 5 days, after which the animals were sacrificed and tissue samples from the colon were immunostained for chromogranin A (CgA), serotonin, peptide YY (PYY), enteroglucagon, pancreatic polypeptide (PP), somatostatin, leukocytes, B/T lymphocytes, B lymphocytes, T lymphocytes, macrophages/monocytes and mast cells. The densities of these endocrine and immune cells were quantified by computer‑aided image analysis. The densities of CgA-, serotonin-, PYY- and enteroglucagon-producing cells were significantly higher, and those of PP- and somatostatin-producing cells were significantly lower in the DSS‑G, DSS‑Q and control groups than in the DSS group. The densities of all the immune cells were lower in the DSS‑G, DSS‑Q and control groups than in the DSS group. The densities of all endocrine cell types and immune cells in both the DSS groups treated with anti‑inflammatory agents were restored to control levels. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that there is an interaction between endocrine and immune cells during inflammation. This interaction with subsequent changes in endocrine cells is responsible for the

  7. Psycholegal abilities and restoration of competence to stand trial.

    PubMed

    Morris, Douglas R; Deyoung, Nathaniel J

    2012-01-01

    Criminal defendants adjudicated incompetent to stand trial are typically hospitalized for competence restoration in state institutions. Prolonged restoration hospitalizations involve civil rights concerns and increasing financial costs, and there remains interest in determining which individuals are likely to be successfully restored. We retrospectively reviewed hospital records of 455 male defendants admitted to a forensic treatment center for competence restoration in an effort to determine whether psychiatric diagnoses, demographic factors, or psycholegal abilities were predictive of successful or failed restoration. At varying stages of restoration efforts, psychotic disorder, mental retardation, and previous state hospitalization predicted unsuccessful restoration, while substance use and personality disorders were predictive of successful restoration. Psycholegal abilities were predictive of successful restoration and appeared to form a continuum, with basic behavior and outlook, factual legal understanding, and rational attorney assistance factors demonstrating progressively increased importance in successful restoration.

  8. Initiation of Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) at Different Stages of HIV-1 Disease Is Not Associated with the Proportion of Exhausted CD8+ T Cells.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Sanne Skov; Fomsgaard, Anders; Larsen, Tine Kochendorf; Tingstedt, Jeanette Linnea; Gerstoft, Jan; Kronborg, Gitte; Pedersen, Court; Karlsson, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    CD8+ T cell-restricted immunity is important in the control of HIV-1 infection, but continued immune activation results in CD8+ T cell dysfunction. Early initiation of antiretroviral treatment (ART) and the duration of ART have been associated with immune reconstitution. Here, we evaluated whether restoration of CD8+ T cell function in HIV-1-infected individuals was dependent on early initiation of ART. HIV-specific CD107a, IFNγ, IL-2, TNFα and MIP-1β expression by CD8+ T cells and the frequency of CD8+ T cells expressing PD-1, 2B4 and CD160 were measured by flow cytometry. The frequency of CD8+ T cells expressing the inhibitory markers PD-1, 2B4 and CD160 was lower in ART-treated individuals compared with ART-naïve individuals and similar to the frequency in HIV-uninfected controls. The expression of the three markers was similarly independent of when therapy was initiated. Individuals treated before seroconversion displayed an HIV-specific CD8+ T cell response that included all five functional markers; this was not observed in individuals treated after seroconversion or in ART-naïve individuals. In summary, ART appears to restore the total CD8+ T cell population to a less exhausted phenotype, independent of the time point of initiation. However, to preserve multifunctional, HIV-1-specific CD8+ T cells, ART might have to be initiated before seroconversion.

  9. Long-term reinforced fixed provisional restorations.

    PubMed

    Galindo, D; Soltys, J L; Graser, G N

    1998-06-01

    Extensive prosthodontic treatment often requires fabrication of long-term provisional restorations. Numerous materials and techniques have been described for prolonged insertion of interim restorations. This article describes a procedure for fabrication of long-term reinforced heat-processed provisional restorations based on a diagnostic wax-up. Reinforced heat-processed provisional restorations reduced flexure, which minimizes progressive loss of cement and diminished the possibility of recurrent decay. Occlusal stability and vertical dimension were maintained because of greater wear resistance. Occlusion, tooth contours, and pontic design developed in the provisional restoration were duplicated in the definitive restoration. The use of a matrix from a diagnostic wax-up facilitated fabrication of the prosthesis, and made the procedure less time-consuming and more predictable.

  10. Conservative preparations for cast restorations.

    PubMed

    Shillingburg, H T

    1976-04-01

    Partial veneer crowns still play a role in modern restorative dentistry. They must be used in the right situation with thoughtful treatment planning, and they must be done well in accordance with certain principles. Three-quarter crowns are less retentive than full crowns, but they can be used successfully as single unit restorations and retainers for short span bridges. Retention can be enhanced by the use of proximal boxes. The M.O.D. onlay, a modified inlay with occlusal coverage, minimizes the damaging effects of stress generated by occlusal forces. There is little indication for the use of M.O.D. inlays or large two surface inlays.

  11. Minimally invasive treatment of soft tissue deficiency around an implant-supported restoration in the esthetic zone: modified VISTA technique case report.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chun-Teh; Hamalian, Techkouhie; Schulze-Späte, Ulrike

    2015-02-01

    The horizontal and vertical soft tissue dimension around an implant-supported restoration in the maxillary anterior is one of the determining factors for achieving an esthetic result. In this case report, the patient presented with a deficiency in both dimensions around a single-tooth implanted-supported restoration in the anterior maxilla. The soft tissue defects were augmented with a connective tissue graft that was placed underneath the buccal peri-implant tissue using a frenum access incision and a supraperiosteal tunneling approach (modified vestibular Incision supraperiosteal tunnel access [VISTA] technique). This novel technique resulted in an increase in tissue height and width, which suggests its potential use around implant-supported restorations.

  12. Human enamel veneer restoration: an alternative technique to restore anterior primary teeth.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Luciana Butini; Tamay, Tereza Keiko; Oliveira, Marta Dutra Machado; Rodrigues, Célia Martins Delgado; Wanderley, Marcia Turolla

    2006-01-01

    Restoration of severely decayed primary teeth is a clinical challenge in Pediatric Dentistry. Among the restorative treatment options, the use of prefabricated crowns and resin composite restorations, either by means of direct or indirect techniques is mentioned in the literature. The purpose of this article is to describe the rehabilitation of primary anterior teeth in a 5-year-old patient. Dental treatment consisted on an anterior space maintainer prosthesis made with natural primary teeth, plus human dental enamel veneer (facet) restorations. The advantages of this technique are better esthetics and the natural enamel has physiologic wear and offers superficial smoothness and cervical adaptation compatible with those of the surrounding teeth.

  13. Human enamel veneer restoration: an alternative technique to restore anterior primary teeth.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Luciana Butini; Tamay, Tereza Keiko; Oliveira, Marta Dutra Machado; Rodrigues, Célia Martins Delgado; Wanderley, Marcia Turolla

    2006-01-01

    Restoration of severely decayed primary teeth is a clinical challenge in Pediatric Dentistry. Among the restorative treatment options, the use of prefabricated crowns and resin composite restorations, either by means of direct or indirect techniques is mentioned in the literature. The purpose of this article is to describe the rehabilitation of primary anterior teeth in a 5-year-old patient. Dental treatment consisted on an anterior space maintainer prosthesis made with natural primary teeth, plus human dental enamel veneer (facet) restorations. The advantages of this technique are better esthetics and the natural enamel has physiologic wear and offers superficial smoothness and cervical adaptation compatible with those of the surrounding teeth. PMID:16937849

  14. State of the art of drug treatment of schizophrenia and the future position of the novel/atypical antipsychotics.

    PubMed

    Möller, H J

    2000-10-01

    Neuroleptic medication is the most important part of the treatment regimen for schizophrenic patients. The efficacy of neuroleptics in the acute and long-term treatment of schizophrenia is very well proven and the effect size is comparatively high. After more than 40 years of clinical practice with the classical neuroleptics, several more or less generally accepted rules for the management of drug treatment in schizophrenia have been established. The paper aims to describe these standards, discussing, among other things, developments which have appeared in the last 10 to 20 years, e.g. the tendency to a lower daily dose during acute treatment and the tendency to alternative strategies during long-term treatment. The paper especially also takes into consideration the benefits of the novel/atypical antipsychotics as compared to the classical neuroleptics, which will change the current treatment standards under several aspects--a change which is already ongoing. The novel/atypical antipsychotics will be much better accepted by patients, thus leading to increased compliance, will be associated with a better quality of life and will possibly change the long-term outcome of schizophrenic patients in a very important manner. It should be considered that the so-called novel/atypical neuroleptics do not constitute a homogeneous group but are a group of individual drugs, each with their own advantages and disadvantages. As was the situation with the classical neuroleptics, the physician also has to choose the most adequate drug under consideration of the risk/benefit profile of each drug in relation to the disposition of the individual patient. PMID:12607217

  15. Current aspects of restoring traumatically fractured teeth.

    PubMed

    Krastl, Gabriel; Filippi, Andreas; Zitzmann, Nicola U; Walter, Clemens; Weiger, Roland

    2011-01-01

    Endodontic and restorative considerations are of primary significance in the treatment of tooth fractures. Since exposed dentinal tubules permit invasion of bacteria into the endodontic system, a protective dressing must be applied as part of the emergency treatment. Provided the dentin wound has been sealed, restorative treatment can also be carried out at a later stage. The fractured tooth fragment can be reattached using adhesive protocols in order to restore function and esthetic appearance. If reattachment is difficult or impossible, eg, in cases of multiple or missing fragments, current composite materials enable excellent esthetic results. Minimally-invasive direct composite restorations are preferred over the more invasive indirect restorations, at least in immature teeth with an extensive coronal pulp dimension. Restorative treatment of crown-root fractures is frequently demanding due to inaccessible subgingival fracture margins. Extrusion of the remaining root is an alternative method to surgical crown lengthening for re-establishing the biological width. This can be carried out either orthodontically (forced eruption), or surgically (intra-alveolar transplantation). Although the treatment of crown-root fractures is one of the most technically sensitive procedures in dental traumatology and is frequently considered as a long-term temporary restoration, tooth conservation up to the age at which implants can be placed may be regarded as a success.

  16. Overlapping left ventricular restoration.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Yoshiro

    2009-06-01

    Cardiac transplantation, a final option of treatment for refractory heart failure, has not been a standard procedure in Japan especially, mainly because of the shortage of donors. However, surgical methods to restore native heart function, such as surgical ventricular restoration (SVR), are often effective for these cases. The Dor procedure has been used for ischemic cardiomyopathy cases presenting with broad akinetic segments. This is a fine method to exclude the scarred septum and to reduce the intraventricular cavity by encircling purse-string suture, but it may produce a postoperative spherical ventricular shape as a result of endoventricular patch repair. Also, partial left ventriculectomy is not recommended for non-ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy cases for now. A modification of these SVR and surgical approaches to functional mitral regurgitation has been named "overlapping ventriculoplasty" without endoventricular patch and resection of viable cardiac muscle, and "mitral complex reconstruction", which consists of mitral annuloplasty, papillary muscle approximation, and suspension. Although the long-term prognosis of these procedures is undetermined, they could be an important option, at least as an alternative bridge to transplantation. This review will describe the concepts and some technical aspects of these procedures for the end-stage heart. PMID:19474505

  17. Behavioral Approaches to the Treatment of Sleep Problems in Children with Developmental Disorders: What Is the State of the Art?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richdale, Amanda; Wiggs, Luci

    2005-01-01

    This paper reviews behavioral treatments for sleep problems in children with a developmental disorder (DD). Sleep problems are common in children with a DD and children's sleep problems may be associated with adverse consequences including behaviour problems, compromised daytime functioning and family stress. However, the sleep intervention…

  18. Can genotype be used to tailor treatment of obesity? State of the art and guidelines for future studies and applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Current treatments for losing weight based mainly on diet and exercise are, in general, unsuccessful. So, as an alternative to the general strategy of one-size-fits-all, a more individualized approach is proposed through the so-called Personalized Medicine in which genotype data are used to personal...

  19. Art Therapy with Laryngectomy Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anand, Susan Ainlay; Anand, Vinod K.

    1997-01-01

    Reports on the experiences of patients with laryngeal cancer who used art therapy. Drawing on 14 years of experience and 109 laryngeal cancer patients, describes treatment results and the case material substantiating the distinct role of art therapy. Provides an overview of the special medical and therapeutic needs of this group. (RJM)

  20. Restoration technology branch

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2007-01-01

    The mission of Leetown Science Center (LSC), Restoration Technology Branch (RTB) is to conduct research needed to restore or protect the chemical, physical and biological integrity of desirable aquatic systems.

  1. Response Art: The Art of the Art Therapist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fish, Barbara J.

    2012-01-01

    Response art is artwork created by art therapists in response to material that arises in their therapy work. Art therapists use response art to contain difficult material, express and examine their experiences, and share their experiences with others. In this viewpoint, some of the varied uses of response art are discussed and illuminated with…

  2. ARVs and ARTs: medicoscapes and the unequal place-making for biomedical treatments in sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Hörbst, Viola; Wolf, Angelika

    2014-06-01

    Asking why some diseases gain global attention whereas others are neglected, we present two case studies that demonstrate the unequal treatment and financing options available for HIV/AIDS versus infertility treatments. We track three key phenomena central to understanding the unequal public attention given to certain ailments: peace and security, subordination of the social to the biological, and a "global" quality. Existing concepts such as global assemblages or therapeutic citizenship are quite limited when it comes to bodily conditions that result in social suffering and do not satisfy the conditions of advocacy. Since it is not enough to observe "flowing" and "moving," we propose the concept of medicoscapes, to acknowledge that such activities simultaneously entail channeling and carving out. Medicoscapes enhance the analysis of linkages between different health conditions regardless of whether they are biological or social and how they interconnect places, sites, and people. PMID:24753327

  3. Brief Report: Virologic Monitoring Can Be a Cost-Effective Strategy to Diagnose Treatment Failure on First-Line ART

    PubMed Central

    Boulware, David R.; Tanser, Frank C.; Bärnighausen, Till W.; Stott, Katharine E.; de Oliveira, Tulio

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: CD4 count testing is perceived to be an affordable strategy to diagnose treatment failure on first-line antiretroviral therapy. We hypothesize that the superior accuracy of viral load (VL) testing will result in less patients being incorrectly switched to more expensive and toxic second-line regimens. Using data from a drug resistance cohort, we show that CD4 testing is approximately double the cost to make 1 correct regimen switch under certain diagnostic thresholds (CD4 = US $499 vs. VL = US $186 or CD4 = US $3031 vs. VL = US $1828). In line with World Health Organization guidelines, our findings show that VL testing can be both an accurate and cost-effective treatment monitoring strategy. PMID:26484740

  4. Nanogels as potential nanomedicine carrier for treatment of cancer: A mini review of the state of the art

    PubMed Central

    Soni, Govind; Yadav, Khushwant S.

    2014-01-01

    Nanogels are being explored as drug delivery agents for targeting cancer due to their easy tailoring properties and ability to efficiently encapsulate therapeutics of diverse nature through simple mechanisms. Nanogels are proficiently internalized by the target cells, avoid accumulating in nontarget tissues thereby lower the therapeutic dosage and minimize harmful side effects. However, there is an urgent need for relevant clinical data from nanogels so as to allow translation of the nanogel concept into a viable therapeutic application for the treatment of cancer. This review highlights some of the recent progress in nanogels as a carrier in the field of nanomedicine for the treatment of cancer. The present review critically analyzes the use of extracellular pH targeting for nanogels, siRNA delivery, PEGylated nanogels, multi-responsive nanogels and intracellular delivery of nanogels for improved therapy of cancer. PMID:27013905

  5. A direct approach to restore anterior teeth.

    PubMed

    Denehy, G E

    2000-11-01

    When selecting the correct treatment for a patient with anterior esthetic problems, the dentist must choose between direct and indirect procedures. With situations allowing conservative treatment, direct resin restoration should be given strong consideration. Advances in materials and techniques that can positively affect this choice include pre-restorative bleaching procedures, new bonding agents, and new highly esthetic direct resin systems. A procedure is described to maximize esthetics and minimize finishing time during direct resin placement.

  6. Linking restoration ecology with coastal dune restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lithgow, D.; Martínez, M. L.; Gallego-Fernández, J. B.; Hesp, P. A.; Flores, P.; Gachuz, S.; Rodríguez-Revelo, N.; Jiménez-Orocio, O.; Mendoza-González, G.; Álvarez-Molina, L. L.

    2013-10-01

    Restoration and preservation of coastal dunes is urgently needed because of the increasingly rapid loss and degradation of these ecosystems because of many human activities. These activities alter natural processes and coastal dynamics, eliminate topographic variability, fragment, degrade or eliminate habitats, reduce diversity and threaten endemic species. The actions of coastal dune restoration that are already taking place span contrasting activities that range from revegetating and stabilizing the mobile substrate, to removing plant cover and increasing substrate mobility. Our goal was to review how the relative progress of the actions of coastal dune restoration has been assessed, according to the ecosystem attributes outlined by the Society of Ecological Restoration: namely, integrity, health and sustainability and that are derived from the ecological theory of succession. We reviewed the peer reviewed literature published since 1988 that is listed in the ISI Web of Science journals as well as additional references, such as key books. We exclusively focused on large coastal dune systems (such as transgressive and parabolic dunefields) located on natural or seminatural coasts. We found 150 articles that included "coastal dune", "restoration" and "revegetation" in areas such as title, keywords and abstract. From these, 67 dealt specifically with coastal dune restoration. Most of the studies were performed in the USA, The Netherlands and South Africa, during the last two decades. Restoration success has been assessed directly and indirectly by measuring one or a few ecosystem variables. Some ecosystem attributes have been monitored more frequently (ecosystem integrity) than others (ecosystem health and sustainability). Finally, it is important to consider that ecological succession is a desirable approach in restoration actions. Natural dynamics and disturbances should be considered as part of the restored system, to improve ecosystem integrity, health and

  7. Fine Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danzer, Gerald A.; Newman, Mark

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the use of fine arts as sources to enrich the study of history. Suggests that such works will serve as barometers of change, examples of cross-cultural influences, and political messages. Includes suggestions of works and artists from different historic periods. (DK)

  8. Scanner Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaworski, Joy; Murphy, Kris

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe how they incorporated environmental awareness into their art curriculum. Here, they describe a digital photography project in which their students used flatbed scanners as cameras. Their students composed their objects directly on the scanner. The lesson enabled students to realize that artists have voices…

  9. Chicken Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bickett, Marianne

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how a visit from a flock of chickens provided inspiration for the children's chicken art. The gentle clucking of the hens, the rooster crowing, and the softness of the feathers all provided rich aural, tactile, visual, and emotional experiences. The experience affirms the importance and value of direct…

  10. Nature's Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sterling, Vicki; And Others

    Over 60 art activities, designed to enhance environmental awareness and incorporate environmental concepts, are outlined in this document. A sample of the activities presented are: decorated notepaper and cards with feathers or weeds; wall plaques of prairie plants; methods of flower preservation; water plant prints; construction of dolls,…

  11. Commercial Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vassallo, Thomas

    This curriculum guide provides materials for a competency-based course in commercial art at the secondary level. The curriculum design uses the curriculum infused model for the teaching of basic skills as part of vocational education and demonstrates the relationship of vocationally related skills to communication, mathematics, and science…

  12. Language Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas State Dept. of Education, Little Rock.

    The language arts course content guides presented in this manual cover English, oral communications, and journalism in grades 9-12 and provide a framework from which a curriculum can be built. Within each subject area and at each grade level, skills are identified at three instructional levels: basic, developmental, and extension. The basic skills…

  13. Language Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keener, Paul L.

    Capitalizing on the resources available in an urban city block, this resource guide for the emotionally handicapped (K-6) presents a resource list and objectives and activities relative to teaching language arts (reading, English, listening, speaking, and writing). The resource list is comprised of approximately 150 physical facilities (e.g.,…

  14. Art History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lukehart, Wendy

    2004-01-01

    Whether one views art as a cultural record, a political or religious instrument, a celebration of form and color, or an instinctual force, it is a given that sharing diverse expressions of creativity with children plants fresh understandings and pathways for their own questions and drives. It is impossible to do justice to the many outstanding…

  15. Can genotype be used to tailor treatment of obesity? State of the art and guidelines for future studies and applications.

    PubMed

    Corella, D; Ordovás, J M

    2013-09-01

    Current treatments for losing weight based mainly on diet and exercise are, in general, unsuccessful. So, as an alternative to the general strategy of one-size-fits-all, a more individualized approach is proposed through the so-called Personalised Medicine in which genotype data are used to personalize treatment and to optimize the results. This paper examines the current situation of the evidence on the influence of the genotype in modulating the association between diet or exercise on obesity and weight-related measures. Most of these studies are observational studies, as there are far fewer experimental ones assessing short-term weight-loss or its long-term maintenance. Many more studies are therefore required for that purpose. Having reviewed the results of the studies undertaken to date, we can say that huge progress has been made in identifying polymorphisms in genes related with obesity and that there is a great consistency of the influence of the FTO gene on the same, while for other variants, there is less consistency. Moreover, the results on gene-diet and gene-physical activity interactions in determining obesity phenotypes are very heterogeneous, so an important recommendation is to standardize the methodology for undertaking these studies. Furthermore, an important lack of replication has been observed suggesting undetected higher-level interactions and/or experimental caveats. Therefore, the current evidence level of applying genotype data to obesity treatment is at its early stages. Nevertheless, future prospects are encouraging and to make this come true, several guidelines are proposed for carrying out new studies on applications in clinical practice. PMID:24126543

  16. Can genotype be used to tailor treatment of obesity? State of the art and guidelines for future studies and applications.

    PubMed

    Corella, D; Ordovás, J M

    2013-09-01

    Current treatments for losing weight based mainly on diet and exercise are, in general, unsuccessful. So, as an alternative to the general strategy of one-size-fits-all, a more individualized approach is proposed through the so-called Personalised Medicine in which genotype data are used to personalize treatment and to optimize the results. This paper examines the current situation of the evidence on the influence of the genotype in modulating the association between diet or exercise on obesity and weight-related measures. Most of these studies are observational studies, as there are far fewer experimental ones assessing short-term weight-loss or its long-term maintenance. Many more studies are therefore required for that purpose. Having reviewed the results of the studies undertaken to date, we can say that huge progress has been made in identifying polymorphisms in genes related with obesity and that there is a great consistency of the influence of the FTO gene on the same, while for other variants, there is less consistency. Moreover, the results on gene-diet and gene-physical activity interactions in determining obesity phenotypes are very heterogeneous, so an important recommendation is to standardize the methodology for undertaking these studies. Furthermore, an important lack of replication has been observed suggesting undetected higher-level interactions and/or experimental caveats. Therefore, the current evidence level of applying genotype data to obesity treatment is at its early stages. Nevertheless, future prospects are encouraging and to make this come true, several guidelines are proposed for carrying out new studies on applications in clinical practice.

  17. Attrition and erosion: restorative planning and performance.

    PubMed

    Burrow, Michael F

    2012-04-01

    The number of patients presenting with severe attrition and associated erosion is increasing in frequency. Treatment of this patient group is very challenging as it is simply not just a case of replacing lost tooth tissue, but also trying to identify and then eliminate the aetiological factors responsible for the loss of tooth structure. In most cases restorative treatment involves extensive rehabilitation of the dentition to restore the aesthetics and function and also to prevent further tooth loss. Such treatment often involves a multidisciplinary approach to eliminate and/or reduce causative factors prior to definitive restoration of teeth. Treatment needs to focus on quick intervention when the problem has been identified and diagnosed. Restorative treatment involves careful if not complex planning culminating in the establishment of a well defined and ongoing maintenance plan. Long-term success of treatment is centred on the maintenance phase. Current restorative options include the use of extensive resin composite build-ups. This is often the best initial starting point as it allows for adjustments, as well as being a reversible and more conservative procedure. The use of indirect restorations is likely to provide a longer lasting outcome after initial stabilization, whether it is metal- or ceramic-based or a combination.

  18. State-of-the-art molecular imaging in esophageal cancer management: implications for diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jolinta; Kligerman, Seth; Goel, Rakhi; Sajedi, Payam; Suntharalingam, Mohan

    2015-01-01

    Molecular imaging techniques are increasingly being used in addition to standard imaging methods such as endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) and computed tomography (CT) for many cancers including those of the esophagus. In this review, we will discuss the utility of the most widely used molecular imaging technique, 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET). 18F-FDG PET has a variety of potential applications ranging from improving staging accuracy at the time of initial diagnosis to assisting in radiation target volume delineation. Furthermore, 18F-FDG PET can be used to evaluate treatment response after completion of neoadjuvant therapy or potentially during neoadjuvant therapy. Finally, we will also discuss other novel molecular imaging techniques that have potential to further improve cancer care. PMID:25642333

  19. Higher quality of life and lower depression for people on ART in Uganda as compared to a community control group.

    PubMed

    Martin, Faith; Russell, Steve; Seeley, Janet

    2014-01-01

    Provision of antiretroviral treatment (ART) to people living with HIV (PLWH) has increased globally. Research measuring whether ART restores subjective well-being to "normal" levels is lacking, particularly in resource limited settings. The study objectives are to compare quality of life and depression symptoms for PLWH on ART to a general community population and to explore factors to explain these differences, including socio-economic status and the impact of urban or rural residence. PLWH on ART (n = 263) were recruited from ART delivery sites and participants not on ART (n = 160) were recruited from communities in Wakiso District, Uganda. Participants were interviewed using the translated World Health Organisation Quality of Life brief measure, the Hopkins Symptom Checklist depression section, and questions about socio-economic status, residence as urban or rural and, for PLWH on ART, self-reported adherence and use of HIV counselling. Compared to the community sample and controlling for location of residence, PLWH on ART had significantly higher quality of life (QOL) for physical, psychological and environment domains, but not the social domain. These differences were not due to socio-economic status alone. Depression scores were significantly lower for PLWH on ART. Both comparisons controlled for the effect of location of residence. People on ART self-reported high adherence and the majority had used HIV counselling services. Our findings show better QOL amongst PLWH on ART compared to a general community sample, which cannot be explained solely by differences in socio-economic status nor location of residence. The general community sample results point towards the challenges of life in this setting. Access to health services may underpin this difference and further research should explore this finding, in addition to identification of psychological mechanisms that relate to better QOL. ART provision infrastructure has clear benefits. Further work

  20. Snow Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraus, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    It was nearing the end of a very long, rough winter with a lot of snow and too little time to play outside. The snow had formed small hills and valleys over the bushes and this was at the perfect height for the students to paint. In this article, the author describes how her transitional first-grade students created snow art paintings. (Contains 1…

  1. Art Preservation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    A new class of polyimides, synthesized by Langley Research Center, has been evaluated by the Getty Conservation Institute's Materials Science Group for possible art conservation applications. Polyimides are noted for resistance to high temperature, wear and radiation. They are thermally stable and soluble in some common solvents. After testing under simulated exposures for changes in color, permeability and flexibility, one coating, ODPA-3, 3-ODA may be used to protect bronze statues from corrosion. A test on stained glass windows was unsuccessful.

  2. State-of-the-Art Treatment and Novel Agents in Local and Distant Recurrences of Cervical Cancer.

    PubMed

    Tempfer, Clemens B; Beckmann, Matthias W

    2016-01-01

    Depending on the stage at initial presentation, cervical cancer will recur in 25-61% of women. Typical manifestations of recurrent cervical cancer include the central pelvis and the pelvic side walls as well as retroperitoneal lymph node basins in the pelvis and the para-aortic region, and - more rarely - supraclavicular lymph nodes. There are no typical symptoms of recurrent cervical cancer. Women with suspected recurrence after cervical cancer based on gynecological examination or organ-specific symptoms must undergo imaging studies and - if technically feasible - biopsy with histological verification, especially in cases of distant metastases, in order to rule out a second primary. Radiotherapy-naïve women should be treated with salvage radiochemotherapy with curative intention. For women with previous radiotherapy, surgery in the form of hysterectomy, local resection, or pelvic exenteration is the treatment of choice. Pelvic exenteration can lead to cure in selected patients, but at the price of a high rate of complications and significant morbidity and mortality. If complete surgical resection is not feasible or if the woman is not a candidate for surgery, chemotherapy with palliative intent should be offered. Patients with recurrent disease outside the pelvis are candidates for systemic chemotherapy. Several agents have shown to be active in this situation, either in single-agent or combination regimens. Platinum-containing regimens have a superior efficacy over non-platinum regimens and bevacizumab may be added to chemotherapy. PMID:27614445

  3. A state of the art review on microbial fuel cells: A promising technology for wastewater treatment and bioenergy.

    PubMed

    Du, Zhuwei; Li, Haoran; Gu, Tingyue

    2007-01-01

    A microbial fuel cell (MFC) is a bioreactor that converts chemical energy in the chemical bonds in organic compounds to electrical energy through catalytic reactions of microorganisms under anaerobic conditions. It has been known for many years that it is possible to generate electricity directly by using bacteria to break down organic substrates. The recent energy crisis has reinvigorated interests in MFCs among academic researchers as a way to generate electric power or hydrogen from biomass without a net carbon emission into the ecosystem. MFCs can also be used in wastewater treatment facilities to break down organic matters. They have also been studied for applications as biosensors such as sensors for biological oxygen demand monitoring. Power output and Coulombic efficiency are significantly affected by the types of microbe in the anodic chamber of an MFC, configuration of the MFC and operating conditions. Currently, real-world applications of MFCs are limited because of their low power density level of several thousand mW/m2. Efforts are being made to improve the performance and reduce the construction and operating costs of MFCs. This article presents a critical review on the recent advances in MFC research with emphases on MFC configurations and performances.

  4. Group Art Therapy with Incarcerated Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erickson, Bonnie J.; Young, Mark E.

    2010-01-01

    Art therapy is often thought of as an adjunct to counseling; however, because of its unique ability to bypass defenses, in some situations, art therapy may be a treatment of choice to allow clients to discover and express feelings that are often difficult to express verbally. Using art as therapy does not require that the therapist or the client…

  5. Avicenna on Education in Philosophy and Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azadpur, Mohammad; Silvers, Anita

    2005-01-01

    This article, the tenth in an occasional series on past treatments of major issues in arts education policy from antiquity through the twentieth century, discusses philosopher Avicenna's view that art's aesthetic value bestows intrinsic public benefits sufficient to command community support of the arts. By exploring Avicenna's comparison of the…

  6. Restoring the worn dentition.

    PubMed

    Ibsen, R L; Ouellet, D F

    1992-01-01

    Strong dental materials and dental porcelains are providing dentists with restorative opportunities that are more conservative because they require less destruction of healthy tooth structure and yield a more esthetic result. In cases of severe wear due to attrition, abrasion, and erosion, this process can be stopped, restoring the esthetics and function by using proper techniques and materials. The case report described in this article demonstrates the conservative restoration of severe wear due to attrition and erosion. Teeth were lengthened, wear was restored, and further wear was ceased by using a combination of bonded porcelain, a heat, light, and self-cure resin system, and a new glass-ionomer restorative material. The result was a strong, durable restoration (that required no anesthesia) with high esthetics.

  7. Micronutrient Deficiency and Treatment Adherence in a Randomized Controlled Trial of Micronutrient Supplementation in ART-Naïve Persons with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Balfour, Louise; Spaans, Johanna N.; Fergusson, Dean; Huff, Harold; Mills, Edward J.; la Porte, Charles J.; Walmsley, Sharon; Singhal, Neera; Rosenes, Ron; Tremblay, Nancy; Gill, M. John; Loemba, Hugues; Conway, Brian; Rachlis, Anita; Ralph, Edward; Loutfy, Mona; Mallick, Ranjeeta; Moorhouse, Rika; William Cameron, D.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The MAINTAIN study is an on-going RCT comparing high-dose micronutrient and anti-oxidant supplementation versus recommended daily allowance (RDA) vitamins in slowing HIV immune deficiency progression in ART-naïve people with HIV infection. Objective We planned analysis of the first 127 participants to determine the baseline prevalence of serum micronutrient deficiencies and correlates, as well as tolerance and adherence to study interventions. Methods Participants receive eight capsules twice daily of 1) high-dose or 2) RDA supplements for two years and are followed-up quarterly for measures of immune deficiency progression, safety and tolerability. Regression analysis was used to identify correlates of micronutrient levels at baseline. Adherence was measured by residual pill count, self-report using the General Treatment Scale (GTS) and short-term recall HIV Adherence Treatment Scale (HATS). Results Prior micronutrient supplementation (within 30 days) was 27% at screening and 10% of study population, and was not correlated with baseline micronutrient levels. Low levels were frequent for carotene (24%<1 nmol/L), vitamin D (24%<40 nmol/L) and serum folate (20%<15 nmol/L). The proportion with B12 deficiency (<133 pmol/L) was 2.4%. Lower baseline levels of B12 correlated lower baseline CD4 count (r = 0.21, p = 0.02) with a 21 pmol/L reduction in B12 per 100 cells/µL CD4. Vitamin D levels were higher in men (p<0.001). After a median follow-up of 1.63 years, there were 19 (15%) early withdrawals from the study treatment. Mean treatment adherence using pill count was 88%. Subjective adherence by the GTS was 81% and was moderately but significantly correlated with pill count (r = 0.29, p<0.001). Adherence based on short-term recall (HATS) was >80% in 75% of participants. Conclusion Micronutrient levels in asymptomatic HIV+ persons are in keeping with population norms, but micronutrient deficiencies are frequent. Adherence levels are high, and

  8. American Art Therapy Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Welcome Board of Directors National Staff Financial Information Strategic Plan Local Chapters About Art Therapy What is Art ... Sheet MEDIA About Us About AATA President's Welcome Strategic Plan About Art Therapy What is Art Therapy Fact ...

  9. [Restoration materials in overdenture abutment teeth].

    PubMed

    Keltjens, H M; Creugers, T J; van 't Hof, M A; Creugers, N H

    2000-08-01

    To assess the performance of amalgam, resin composite and resin-modified glass ionomer cement as filling material in overdenture abutment teeth, 155 restorations were made to seal the root canal orifices in 49 patients. The three restorative materials were randomly assigned to the abutment teeth using a number of balancing criteria. All patients were reviewed every six months and received the same preventive regimen. Survival was assessed at two levels: complete survival even without maintenance treatments (Scomp) and survival of the original restoration independent from eventual maintenance treatments (Sorig). The calculated overall survival of Sorig and Scomp were 63 +/- 6% and 57 +/- 6% respectively (mean +/- SE). At both levels no statistically significant differences were observed between the survival of the investigated materials. The results of this study did not point out a superior restorative material for the seal of root canal orifices of overdenture abutment teeth. The distribution of failures over the patients indicated a certain patient dependency.

  10. Use of quantitative intra-operative electrodiagnosis during partial ulnar nerve transfer to restore elbow flexion: the treatment of eight patients following a brachial plexus injury.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, O; Sunagawa, T; Yokota, K; Nakashima, Y; Shinomiya, R; Nakanishi, K; Ochi, M

    2011-03-01

    The transfer of part of the ulnar nerve to the musculocutaneous nerve, first described by Oberlin, can restore flexion of the elbow following brachial plexus injury. In this study we evaluated the additional benefits and effectiveness of quantitative electrodiagnosis to select a donor fascicle. Eight patients who had undergone transfer of a simple fascicle of the ulnar nerve to the motor branch of the musculocutaneous nerve were evaluated. In two early patients electrodiagnosis had not been used. In the remaining six patients, however, all fascicles of the ulnar nerve were separated and electrodiagnosis was performed after stimulation with a commercially available electromyographic system. In these procedures, recording electrodes were placed in flexor carpi ulnaris and the first dorsal interosseous. A single fascicle in the flexor carpi ulnaris in which a high amplitude had been recorded was selected as a donor and transferred to the musculocutaneous nerve. In the two patients who had not undergone electrodiagnosis, the recovery of biceps proved insufficient for normal use. Conversely, in the six patients in whom quantitative electrodiagnosis was used, elbow flexion recovered to an M4 level. Quantitative intra-operative electrodiagnosis is an effective method of selecting a favourable donor fascicle during the Oberlin procedure. Moreover, fascicles showing a high-amplitude in reading flexor carpi ulnaris are donor nerves that can restore normal elbow flexion without intrinsic loss.

  11. Art, dance, and music therapy.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Rosalie Rebollo

    2004-11-01

    Art, dance, and music therapy are a significant part of complementary medicine in the twenty-first century. These creative arts therapies contribute to all areas of health care and are present in treatments for most psychologic and physiologic illnesses. Although the current body of solid research is small compared with that of more traditional medical specialties, the arts therapies are now validating their research through more controlled experimental and descriptive studies. The arts therapies also contribute significantly to the humanization and comfort of modern health care institutions by relieving stress, anxiety, and pain of patients and caregivers. Arts therapies will greatly expand their role in the health care practices of this country in the twenty-first century. PMID:15458755

  12. Smile transformations with the use of direct composite restorations.

    PubMed

    Sameni, Abdi

    2013-01-01

    Mutual concerns shared by dentists and patients regarding removal of natural tooth structure affirm the need for non-invasive restorative treatments. Direct composite restorations are among today's conservative treatment modalities. Direct bonding procedures provide patients with an alternative to high biologic risk and expensive indirect porcelain restorations. This article discusses the principles involved in smile design cases, ways to successfully combine different treatment modalities, and materials to achieve outstanding esthetic and functional results. The article also demonstrates the versatility of today's composite materials for direct smile design restorations.

  13. Defining Art Appreciation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seabolt, Betty Oliver

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the differences and goals of four areas: (1) art appreciation; (2) art history; (3) art aesthetics; and (4) art criticism. Offers a definition of art appreciation and information on how the view of art appreciation in education has changed over time. (CMK)

  14. [Decision-making of restorations for endodontically treated teeth].

    PubMed

    Zhi, Chen; Binwen, Chen

    2015-04-01

    Coronal restoration of endodontically treated teeth may be viewed as one of the main parameters that influence the outcome of endodontic treatment. The purposes of restoring endodontically-treated teeth include preventing recontamination of the root canal system and periapical area, replacing the compromised dental hard tissue, restoring the coronal morphology and function, providing necessary strength for the restoration/tooth complex for functional stress, and avoiding crown and/or root fracture. This article reviewed recent researches on the restoration of endodontically treated teeth, provided evidence for clinical practice on topics as when to restore them, basic principles to be considered during treatment planning, and specific restoration options for both anterior and posterior teeth under different functional occulsal load conditions. Several issues should be taken into account during the decision making process, such as remaining tooth tissue, functional masticatory forces, comprehensive oral rehabilitation, and esthetic requirements.

  15. History and Art: The Heart of Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seiferth, Berniece B; And Others

    Learning to appreciate religious art and to understand the interdependence of history and art are basic to the foundations of culture. Students need to be exposed to the art of the diverse adherents of all major religions in order to understand the beliefs and practices of others. Students can examine religious art from ancient times, including…

  16. Art Supply Inventors. Children's Art Diary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szekely, George

    2001-01-01

    Discusses types of art materials that children enjoy using in their artworks. Explores the art materials such as tasty art supplies, such as candy; peeled supplies, such as pencil shavings; sticky art supplies, such as Band-Aids; and fast-food supplies, such as forks and spoons. (CMK)

  17. Small Art Images--Big Art Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Pam

    2005-01-01

    When small art images are incorporated into the curriculum, students are afforded opportunities to slow down, observe minute details, and communicate ideas about art and artists. This sort of purposeful art contemplation takes students beyond the day-to-day educational practice. It is through these sorts of art activities that students develop…

  18. Art Therapy Teaching as Performance Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moon, Bruce L.

    2012-01-01

    This viewpoint asserts that art therapy education is a form of performance art. By designing class sessions as performance artworks, art therapy educators can help their students become more fully immersed in their studies. This view also can be extended to conceptualizing each semester--and the entire art therapy curriculum--as a complex and…

  19. Fine Arts: Secondary Visual Arts Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah State Office of Education, Salt Lake City.

    This guide to Utah's requirements for students in secondary visual arts is organized and based upon a student achievement portfolio for each course. Foundation I, the required junior high/middle school visual arts course, is designed to provide an overview of visual arts while studying various art tools and materials. With an emphasis on studio…

  20. Utah Paiute Tribal Restoration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Allen C.

    The Paiute Indian Tribe of Utah Restoration Act (1980) restored federal recognition of the tribe after a quarter century of ambiguous political status, and resulted in significant improvements of educational status of tribal members and intensification of the political presence of Southern Paiutes. Following the Paiute Indian Termination Act…

  1. Power system restoration issues

    SciTech Connect

    Adibi, M.M. ); Kafka, R.J. )

    1991-04-01

    This article describes some of the problems encountered in the three phases of power system restoration (PSR). The three phases of PSR are: Planning for restart and reintegration of the bulk power supply; Actions during system degradation for saving and retaining critical sources of power; Restoration when the power system has stabilized at some degraded level.

  2. Gill's 'History' restored

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurn, Mark

    2009-06-01

    Note about the restoration of the copy of Sir David Gill's 'A History and Description of the Royal Observatory, Cape of Good Hope' in the Library of the Institute of Astronomy, Cambridge. The book was restored with funds provided by the SHA in thanks for facilities for meetings provided to the Institute.

  3. Retributive and restorative justice.

    PubMed

    Wenzel, Michael; Okimoto, Tyler G; Feather, Norman T; Platow, Michael J

    2008-10-01

    The emergence of restorative justice as an alternative model to Western, court-based criminal justice may have important implications for the psychology of justice. It is proposed that two different notions of justice affect responses to rule-breaking: restorative and retributive justice. Retributive justice essentially refers to the repair of justice through unilateral imposition of punishment, whereas restorative justice means the repair of justice through reaffirming a shared value-consensus in a bilateral process. Among the symbolic implications of transgressions, concerns about status and power are primarily related to retributive justice and concerns about shared values are primarily related to restorative justice. At the core of these processes, however, lies the parties' construal of their identity relation, specifically whether or not respondents perceive to share an identity with the offender. The specific case of intergroup transgressions is discussed, as are implications for future research on restoring a sense of justice after rule-breaking.

  4. Lake restoration technology transfer assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Daschbach, M.H.; Roe, E.M.; Sharpe, W.E.

    1982-06-01

    Based upon a review of the eutrophication problem and its impact on lake restoration (LR) programs, treatment of the relatively new problem of acid deposition and its impact on LR activities, consideration of the LR programs of the Environmental Protection Agency and several states, and a review of individual LR technology transfer publications, it is recommended that new LR technology transfer programs be given a low priority until more new information is available on the restoration of acidified lakes. Both primary and secondary users of LR research, technology transfer documents, and public awareness documents were considered in this assessment. Primary users included the general public and recreationists, lakeshore property owners, lake/homeowner associations, lake/sanitary districts, and research and environmental organizations; secondary users included state/county/local officials who administer/manage water-related regulations/activities. 4 tables.

  5. 7 CFR 625.9 - 10-year restoration cost-share agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... restoration cost-share agreements. (a) The restoration plan developed under § 625.13 forms the basis for the... agreement will: (1) Incorporate all portions of a restoration plan; (2) Be for a period of 10 years; (3... implementation of the approved conservation treatment identified in the restoration plan; and (8) Include...

  6. Occupational illness in the arts.

    PubMed

    McCunney, R J; Russo, P K; Doyle, J R

    1987-11-01

    Artists and craftspeople are exposed to the same hazardous materials as workers in industry. Art materials, including solvents, stones, clay, metals and dyes, are all potential health hazards. Patients whose symptoms cannot be easily categorized or who do not respond to initial treatment should be questioned about personal activities in the arts and crafts. A questionnaire devised by the Occupational and Environmental Health Committee of the American Lung Association may be useful. PMID:3318355

  7. Restoration of ankle movements with the ActiGait implantable drop foot stimulator: a safe and reliable treatment option for permanent central leg palsy.

    PubMed

    Martin, Klaus Daniel; Polanski, Witold Henryk; Schulz, Anne-Kathrin; Jöbges, Michael; Hoff, Hansjoerg; Schackert, Gabriele; Pinzer, Thomas; Sobottka, Stephan B

    2016-01-01

    OBJECT The ActiGait drop foot stimulator is a promising technique for restoration of lost ankle function by an implantable hybrid stimulation system. It allows ankle dorsiflexion by active peroneal nerve stimulation during the swing phase of gait. In this paper the authors report the outcome of the first prospective study on a large number of patients with stroke-related drop foot. METHODS Twenty-seven patients who experienced a stroke and with persisting spastic leg paresis received an implantable ActiGait drop foot stimulator for restoration of ankle movement after successful surface test stimulation. After 3 to 5 weeks, the stimulator was activated, and gait speed, gait endurance, and activation time of the system were evaluated and compared with preoperative gait tests. In addition, patient satisfaction was assessed using a questionnaire. RESULTS Postoperative gait speed significantly improved from 33.9 seconds per 20 meters to 17.9 seconds per 20 meters (p < 0.0001), gait endurance from 196 meters in 6 minutes to 401 meters in 6 minutes (p < 0.0001), and activation time from 20.5 seconds to 10.6 seconds on average (p < 0.0001). In 2 patients with nerve injury, surgical repositioning of the electrode cuff became necessary. One patient showed a delayed wound healing, and in another patient the system had to be removed because of a wound infection. Marked improvement in mobility, social participation, and quality of life was confirmed by 89% to 96% of patients. CONCLUSIONS The ActiGait implantable drop foot stimulator improves gait speed, endurance, and quality of life in patients with stroke-related drop foot. Regarding gait speed, the ActiGait system appears to be advantageous compared with foot orthosis or surface stimulation devices. Randomized trials with more patients and longer observation periods are needed to prove the long-term benefit of this device.

  8. Inexpensive, Near-Infrared Imaging of Artwork Using a Night-Vision Webcam for Chemistry-of-Art Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Gregory D.; Nunan, Elizabeth; Walker, Claire; Kushel, Dan

    2009-01-01

    Imaging of artwork is an important aspect of art conservation, technical art history, and art authentication. Many forms of near-infrared (NIR) imaging are used by conservators, archaeologists, forensic scientists, and technical art historians to examine the underdrawings of paintings, to detect damages and restorations, to enhance faded or…

  9. The perio-esthetic-restorative approach for anterior rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Tomar, Nitin; Bansal, Tushika; Bhandari, Marisha; Sharma, Anamika

    2013-01-01

    Ensuring clinical success begins with a careful discussion of treatment planning, comprehensively covering all variables in simple to complex cases. Procedures including the crown lengthening surgery, furcation treatment and mucogingival therapy and tooth restoration are essential treatment regimens requiring multifaceted expertise. The interplay of periodontics and restorative dentistry is present at many fronts including the response of the gingival tissue to the restorative preparations. Dental restorations and periodontal health are inseparably interrelated. The adaptation of the margins, the contours of the restoration, the proximal relationships and the surface smoothness have a critical biological impact on the gingiva and the supporting periodontal tissues. The different surgical procedures used for crown lengthening are gingivectomy/gingivoplasty, apically positioned flap with or without osseous resection and orthodontic extrusion. The paper presents crown lengthening of severely mutilated teeth to increase the clinical crown height for adequate restoration. PMID:24174740

  10. The perio-esthetic-restorative approach for anterior rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Tomar, Nitin; Bansal, Tushika; Bhandari, Marisha; Sharma, Anamika

    2013-07-01

    Ensuring clinical success begins with a careful discussion of treatment planning, comprehensively covering all variables in simple to complex cases. Procedures including the crown lengthening surgery, furcation treatment and mucogingival therapy and tooth restoration are essential treatment regimens requiring multifaceted expertise. The interplay of periodontics and restorative dentistry is present at many fronts including the response of the gingival tissue to the restorative preparations. Dental restorations and periodontal health are inseparably interrelated. The adaptation of the margins, the contours of the restoration, the proximal relationships and the surface smoothness have a critical biological impact on the gingiva and the supporting periodontal tissues. The different surgical procedures used for crown lengthening are gingivectomy/gingivoplasty, apically positioned flap with or without osseous resection and orthodontic extrusion. The paper presents crown lengthening of severely mutilated teeth to increase the clinical crown height for adequate restoration.

  11. [The stamp technique for direct composite restoration].

    PubMed

    Perrin, Philippe; Zimmerli, Brigitte; Jacky, Daniel; Lussi, Adrian; Helbling, Christoph; Ramseyer, Simon

    2013-01-01

    The indications for direct resin composite restorations are nowadays extended due to the development of modern resin materials with improved material properties. However, there are still some difficulties regarding handling of resin composite material, especially in large restorations. The reconstruction of a functional and individual occlusion is difficult to achieve with direct application techniques. The aim of the present publication was to introduce a new "stamp"-technique for placing large composite restorations. The procedure of this "stamp"-technique is presented by three typical indications: large single-tooth restoration, occlusal rehabilitation of a compromised occlusal surface due to erosions and direct fibre-reinforced fixed partial denture. A step-by-step description of the technique and clinical figures illustrates the method. Large single-tooth restorations can be built-up with individual, two- piece silicone stamps. Large occlusal abrasive and/or erosive defects can be restored by copying the wax-up from the dental technician using the "stamp"-technique. Even fiber-reinforced resin-bonded fixed partial dentures can be formed with this intraoral technique with more precision and within a shorter treatment time. The presented "stamp"-technique facilitates the placement of large restoration with composite and can be recommended for the clinical use.

  12. Restoration in Its Natural Context: How Ecological Momentary Assessment Can Advance Restoration Research.

    PubMed

    Beute, Femke; de Kort, Yvonne; IJsselsteijn, Wijnand

    2016-04-01

    More and more people use self-tracking technologies to track their psychological states, physiology, and behaviors to gain a better understanding of themselves or to achieve a certain goal. Ecological Momentary Assessment (EMA) also offers an excellent opportunity for restorative environments research, which examines how our physical environment (especially nature) can positively influence health and wellbeing. It enables investigating restorative health effects in everyday life, providing not only high ecological validity but also opportunities to study in more detail the dynamic processes playing out over time on recovery, thereby bridging the gap between laboratory (i.e., short-term effects) and epidemiological (long-term effects) research. We have identified four main areas in which self-tracking could help advance restoration research: (1) capturing a rich set of environment types and restorative characteristics; (2) distinguishing intra-individual from inter-individual effects; (3) bridging the gap between laboratory and epidemiological research; and (4) advancing theoretical insights by measuring a more broad range of effects in everyday life. This paper briefly introduces restorative environments research, then reviews the state of the art of self-tracking technologies and methodologies, discusses how these can be implemented to advance restoration research, and presents some examples of pioneering work in this area. PMID:27089352

  13. Restoration in Its Natural Context: How Ecological Momentary Assessment Can Advance Restoration Research

    PubMed Central

    Beute, Femke; de Kort, Yvonne; IJsselsteijn, Wijnand

    2016-01-01

    More and more people use self-tracking technologies to track their psychological states, physiology, and behaviors to gain a better understanding of themselves or to achieve a certain goal. Ecological Momentary Assessment (EMA) also offers an excellent opportunity for restorative environments research, which examines how our physical environment (especially nature) can positively influence health and wellbeing. It enables investigating restorative health effects in everyday life, providing not only high ecological validity but also opportunities to study in more detail the dynamic processes playing out over time on recovery, thereby bridging the gap between laboratory (i.e., short-term effects) and epidemiological (long-term effects) research. We have identified four main areas in which self-tracking could help advance restoration research: (1) capturing a rich set of environment types and restorative characteristics; (2) distinguishing intra-individual from inter-individual effects; (3) bridging the gap between laboratory and epidemiological research; and (4) advancing theoretical insights by measuring a more broad range of effects in everyday life. This paper briefly introduces restorative environments research, then reviews the state of the art of self-tracking technologies and methodologies, discusses how these can be implemented to advance restoration research, and presents some examples of pioneering work in this area. PMID:27089352

  14. Hair restoration approaches for early onset male androgenetic alopecia.

    PubMed

    Bhatti, Hammad A; Basra, Mohammad K A; Patel, Girish K

    2013-09-01

    Society places great emphasis on the presence of hair. Some degree of hair loss is accepted as a normal part of the aging process, in line with the observation that more than 50% of men will develop androgenetic alopecia by the age of 50 years. However, it is possible to understand the psychosocial isolation and distress felt by men with a strong familial predisposition to androgenetic alopecia, who tend to display hair loss in their late teens or twenties. There are currently two drugs which have been licensed for the treatment of male androgenetic alopecia: oral finasteride and topical minoxidil solution which are effective to some extent. Furthermore, upon discontinuing treatment, any gain that has been achieved is quickly lost. Added to which there is an entire market of unproven over the counter products: advertised in the electronic media, local hair salons, and various departmental stores. In this review, we highlight the important advances in the management of male androgenetic alopecia with emphasis on approaches that can lead to more successful and long-term hair restoration for young adults. In particular, we discuss the evidence supporting the use of the follicular unit grafting technique in conjunction with medical treatment before and after the procedure. Moreover, some other alterations of this most popular state of the art hair restoration technique have been mentioned briefly. As a result, patients and physicians seem equally satisfied from this procedure for its naturally looking results which are cosmetically more acceptable and esthetically pleasing for longer period of time. PMID:23992164

  15. Bearing restoration by grinding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanau, H.; Parker, R. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.; Chen, S. M.; Bull, H. L.

    1976-01-01

    A joint program was undertaken by the NASA Lewis Research Center and the Army Aviation Systems Command to restore by grinding those rolling-element bearings which are currently being discarded at aircraft engine and transmission overhaul. Three bearing types were selected from the UH-1 helicopter engine (T-53) and transmission for the pilot program. No bearing failures occurred related to the restoration by grinding process. The risk and cost of a bearing restoration by grinding programs was analyzed. A microeconomic impact analysis was performed.

  16. Fracture resistance of posterior teeth restored with modern restorative materials

    PubMed Central

    Hamouda, Ibrahim M.; Shehata, Salah H.

    2011-01-01

    We studied the fracture resistance of maxillary premolars restored with recent restorative materials. Fifty maxillary premolars were divided into five groups: Group 1 were unprepared teeth; Group 2 were teeth prepared without restoration; Group 3 were teeth restored with tetric ceram HB; Group 4 were teeth restored with InTen S; and Group 5 were teeth restored with Admira. The samples were tested using a universal testing machine. Peak loads at fracture were recorded. The teeth restored with Admira had the highest fracture resistance followed by those restored with InTen-S and tetric ceram HB. Prepared, unrestored teeth were the weakest group. There was a significant difference between the fracture resistance of intact teeth and the prepared, unrestored teeth. There was also a significant difference among the tested restorative materials. Teeth restored with Admira showed no significant difference when compared with the unprepared teeth. It was concluded that the teeth restored with Admira exhibited the highest fracture resistance. PMID:23554719

  17. Art and Education for Women in 19th Century Boston.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Efland, Arthur D.

    1985-01-01

    Art was introduced into women's education in 19th century Boston as a kind of finishing school treatment to equip them for marriage and later for careers as school teachers. Common school art emphasized practical application. Feminine art education, by contrast, promoted the teaching of art as high culture. (Author/RM)

  18. A Framework for Treating Cumulative Trauma with Art Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naff, Kristina

    2014-01-01

    Cumulative trauma is relatively undocumented in art therapy practice, although there is growing evidence that art therapy provides distinct benefits for resolving various traumas. This qualitative study proposes an art therapy treatment framework for cumulative trauma derived from semi-structured interviews with three art therapists and artistic…

  19. Growing with the Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernstein, Bebe

    1985-01-01

    The author describes programs of the National Committee, Arts with the Handicapped, including the Very Special Arts Festival program for the visual and peforming arts and Project REAP (Retirement with Enrichment, the Arts and Purpose), which uses retired volunteers in arts education of disabled children and adults. (CL)

  20. Morphometric evidence that the total number of synapses on Purkinje neurons of old F344 rats is reduced after long-term ethanol treatment and restored to control levels after recovery.

    PubMed

    Dlugos, C A; Pentney, R J

    1997-01-01

    Clinical symptoms of alcohol abuse may be confused with symptoms of age-related neuropathologies in human patients. It is important, therefore, to determine the relationships between alcohol abuse and changes in brain structures in well-controlled studies of ageing subjects. Currently there is little well-documented information of this type available. The purpose of this study was to determine whether long-term ethanol treatment during ageing would lead to reductions in synaptic input to cerebellar Purkinje neurons (PN) of old F344 rats that: (1) were more severe than those attributable to ageing alone; (2) might be responsible for an ethanol-related deletion of dendritic segments of PN in old F344 rats shown previously in this laboratory. The total number of synapses per PN dendritic arbor was determined after ethanol treatment of old F344 rats for 40 weeks between 12 and 22 months of age and in similarly treated rats given a subsequent 20-week period of recovery between 22 and 27 months of age. Groups of age-matched rats fed a chow diet and water and rats pair-fed an isocaloric liquid diet lacking ethanol served as controls. The volume of the molecular layer per PN arbor and the numerical density of synapses in the molecular layer was determined from light microscopic preparations of a fixed volume of the cerebellar cortex. Photographic montages of the ultrastructure of the molecular layer of the cerebellum were also prepared from each rat for measurements of synaptic numerical densities. From the volume of the molecular layer per PN arbor and the numerical density of synapses in the molecular layer, the total number of synapses per PN arbor was estimated for each rat. There was a significant reduction in synapses in the old ethanol-treated rats relative to age-matched chow-fed rats. There were also significant interactions between recovery and treatment prior to recovery. During recovery, synaptic numbers in the old, ethanol-treated rats were restored to pre

  1. Impact of early cART in the gut during acute HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Deleage, Claire; Schuetz, Alexandra; Alvord, W. Gregory; Johnston, Leslie; Hao, Xing-Pei; Morcock, David R.; Rerknimitr, Rungsun; Fletcher, James L.K.; Puttamaswin, Suwanna; Phanuphak, Nittaya; Dewar, Robin; McCune, Joseph M.; Robb, Merlin; Kim, Jerome H.; Schacker, Timothy W.; Hunt, Peter; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Ananworanich, Jintanat

    2016-01-01

    Early after HIV infection there is substantial depletion of CD4+ T cells in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract lamina propria (LP), with associated epithelial barrier damage, leading to microbial translocation and systemic inflammation and immune activation. In this study, we analyzed these early events in the GI tract in a cohort of Thai acute HIV-infected patients and determined the effect of early combination antiretroviral treatment (cART). HIV-uninfected and chronically and acutely HIV-infected patients at different Fiebig stages (I–V) underwent colonic biopsies and then received cART. Immunohistochemistry and quantitative image analysis were performed on cross-sectional and longitudinal colon biopsy specimens (day 0 to week 96) to measure GI tract damage (infiltration of polymorphonuclear cells), inflammation (Mx1, TNF-α), immune activation (Ki-67), and the CD4+ T cell population in the LP. The magnitude of GI tract damage, immune activation, and inflammation was significantly increased, with significantly depleted CD4+ T cells in the LP in all acutely infected groups prior to cART compared with HIV-uninfected control participants. While most patients treated during acute infection resolved GI tract inflammation and immune activation back to baseline levels after 24 weeks of cART, most acutely infected participants did not restore their CD4+ T cells after 96 weeks of cART. PMID:27446990

  2. Impact of early cART in the gut during acute HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Deleage, Claire; Schuetz, Alexandra; Alvord, W. Gregory; Johnston, Leslie; Hao, Xing-Pei; Morcock, David R.; Rerknimitr, Rungsun; Fletcher, James L.K.; Puttamaswin, Suwanna; Phanuphak, Nittaya; Dewar, Robin; McCune, Joseph M.; Sereti, Irini; Robb, Merlin; Kim, Jerome H.; Schacker, Timothy W.; Hunt, Peter; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Ananworanich, Jintanat; Estes, Jacob D.

    2016-01-01

    Early after HIV infection there is substantial depletion of CD4+ T cells in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract lamina propria (LP), with associated epithelial barrier damage, leading to microbial translocation and systemic inflammation and immune activation. In this study, we analyzed these early events in the GI tract in a cohort of Thai acute HIV-infected patients and determined the effect of early combination antiretroviral treatment (cART). HIV-uninfected and chronically and acutely HIV-infected patients at different Fiebig stages (I–V) underwent colonic biopsies and then received cART. Immunohistochemistry and quantitative image analysis were performed on cross-sectional and longitudinal colon biopsy specimens (day 0 to week 96) to measure GI tract damage (infiltration of polymorphonuclear cells), inflammation (M×1, TNF-α), immune activation (Ki-67), and the CD4+ T cell population in the LP. The magnitude of GI tract damage, immune activation, and inflammation was significantly increased, with significantly depleted CD4+ T cells in the LP in all acutely infected groups prior to cART compared with HIV-uninfected control participants. While most patients treated during acute infection resolved GI tract inflammation and immune activation back to baseline levels after 24 weeks of cART, most acutely infected participants did not restore their CD4+ T cells after 96 weeks of cART. PMID:27446990

  3. Characterization of secondary solid waste anticipated from the treatment of trench water from Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Kent, T.E.; Taylor, P.A.

    1992-09-01

    This project was undertaken to demonstrate that new liquid waste streams, generated as a consequence of closure activities at Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6, can be treated adequately by existing wastewater treatment facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) without producing hazardous secondary solid wastes. Previous bench-scale treatable studies indicated that ORNL treatment operations will adequately remove the contaminants although additional study was required in order to characterize the secondary waste materials produced as a result of the treatment A 0.5-L/min pilot plant was designed and constructed to accurately simulate the treatment capabilities of ORNL fill-scale (490 L/min) treatment facilities-the Process Waste Treatment Plant (PWTP) and Nonradiological Wastewater Treatment Plant (NRWTP). This new test system was able to produce secondary wastes in the quantities necessary for US Environmental Protection Agency toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) testing. The test system was operated for a 45-d test period with a minimum of problems and downtime. The pilot plant operating data verified that the WAG 6 trench waters can be treated at the PWTP and NRWTP to meet the discharge limits. The results of TCLP testing indicate that none of the secondary solid wastes will be considered hazardous as defined by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.

  4. Ecosystem restoration: Chapter 4

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cullinane Thomas, Catherine M.; Skrabis, K. E.; Gascoigne, William

    2012-01-01

    The Department of the Interior extensively supports―through its mission, policy, programs, and funding― the study, planning, implementation, and monitoring of ecosystem restoration. This commitment is reflected in the Department's FY2011-2016 Strategic Plan.

  5. Restoration of Ailing Wetlands

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, Oswald J.

    2012-01-01

    It is widely held that humankind's destructive tendencies when exploiting natural resources leads to irreparable harm to the environment. Yet, this thinking runs counter to evidence that many ecological systems damaged by severe natural environmental disturbances (e.g., hurricanes) can restore themselves via processes of natural recovery. The emerging field of restoration ecology is capitalizing on the natural restorative tendencies of ecological systems to build a science of repairing the harm inflicted by humans on natural environment. Evidence for this, for example, comes from a new meta-analysis of 124 studies that synthesizes recovery of impacted wetlands worldwide. While it may take up to two human generations to see full recovery, there is promise, given human will, to restore many damaged wetlands worldwide. PMID:22291573

  6. ESTUARINE HABITAT RESTORATION

    SciTech Connect

    Thom, Ronald M.; Borde, Amy B.

    2015-09-01

    Restoring estuarine habitats generally means repairing damages caused by humans and natural forces. Because of the extensive human occupation, development, and use of coastal areas for centuries, the extensive estuarine habitats have been either destroyed or significantly impaired.

  7. Restoration of ailing wetlands.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Oswald J

    2012-01-01

    It is widely held that humankind's destructive tendencies when exploiting natural resources leads to irreparable harm to the environment. Yet, this thinking runs counter to evidence that many ecological systems damaged by severe natural environmental disturbances (e.g., hurricanes) can restore themselves via processes of natural recovery. The emerging field of restoration ecology is capitalizing on the natural restorative tendencies of ecological systems to build a science of repairing the harm inflicted by humans on natural environment. Evidence for this, for example, comes from a new meta-analysis of 124 studies that synthesizes recovery of impacted wetlands worldwide. While it may take up to two human generations to see full recovery, there is promise, given human will, to restore many damaged wetlands worldwide.

  8. Restoration of camptothecine production in attenuated endophytic fungus on re-inoculation into host plant and treatment with DNA methyltransferase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Vasanthakumari, M M; Jadhav, S S; Sachin, Naik; Vinod, G; Shweta, Singh; Manjunatha, B L; Kumara, P Mohana; Ravikanth, G; Nataraja, Karaba N; Uma Shaanker, R

    2015-10-01

    Fungal endophytes inhabit living tissues of plants without any apparent symptoms and in many cases are known to produce secondary metabolites similar to those produced by their respective host plants. However on sub-culture, the endophytic fungi gradually attenuate their ability to produce the metabolites. Attenuation has been a major constraint in realizing the potential of endophytic fungi as an alternative source of plant secondary metabolites. In this study, we report attempts to restore camptothecine (CPT) production in attenuated endophytic fungi isolated from CPT producing plants, Nothapodytes nimmoniana and Miquelia dentata when they are passed through their host plant or plants that produce CPT and when treated with a DNA methyl transferase inhibitor. Attenuated endophytic fungi that traversed through their host tissue or plants capable of synthesizing CPT, produced significantly higher CPT compared to the attenuated fungi. Attenuated fungus cultured in the presence of 5-azacytidine, a DNA methyltransferase inhibitor, had an enhanced CPT content compared to untreated attenuated fungus. These results indicate that the attenuation of CPT production in endophytic fungi could in principle be reversed by eliciting some signals from plant tissue, most likely that which prevents the methylation or silencing of the genes responsible for CPT biosynthesis.

  9. Alternatives to testosterone replacement: testosterone restoration

    PubMed Central

    McCullough, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The European Male Aging Study has demonstrated that the hypogonadism of male aging is predominantly secondary. Theoretically with appropriate stimulation from the pituitary, the aging testis should be able to produce eugonadal levels of testosterone. The strategies for the treatment of late onset hypogonadism (LOH) have focused on replacement with exogenous testosterone versus restoration of endogenous production. The purpose of this article is to review existing peer-reviewed literature supporting the concept of restoration of endogenous testosterone in the treatment of LOH. PMID:25578932

  10. Visual Contradictions. Teaching Art with Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubbard, Guy

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on works of art that are dreamlike and surrealistic and include visual contradictions. Includes four reproductions of artworks with information about the works of art and the artists. Explains that the four pictures will stimulate students' creativity. (CMK)

  11. National ART Success Rates

    MedlinePlus

    ... ART and Birth Defects ART and Autism 2013 Assisted Reproductive Technology National Summary Report Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... live-birth rate? [PDF - 1.37MB] Section 2: ART Cycles using fresh nondonor eggs or embryos What ...

  12. Terminal Differentiation of CD56(dim)CD16(+) Natural Killer Cells Is Associated with Increase in Natural Killer Cell Frequencies After Antiretroviral Treatment in HIV-1 Infection.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Fareed; Tufa, Dejene Milkessa; Mishra, Neha; Jacobs, Roland; Schmidt, Reinhold E

    2015-12-01

    HIV-1 infection results in immunological abnormalities of natural killer (NK) cells such as disturbed distribution of NK cell subsets and downmodulation of activating and upregulation of inhibitory receptors thereby diminishing NK cell killing capacity and cytokine secretion. Antiretroviral treatment (ART) is known to restore phenotype and functions of NK cells. However, the effects of ART on NK cell terminal differentiation, activation, and disturbed distribution have not been studied yet longitudinally. Here, we analyzed the effects of ART on these parameters of peripheral blood NK cells in a longitudinal as well as in a cross-sectional study. We observed that expanded CD56(-)CD16(+) NK cell frequency is inversely correlated with the frequency of CD56(dim)CD16(+) NK cells in treatment-naive HIV-1 patients. Loss of CD56(dim)CD16(+) and expansion of CD56(-)CD16(+) NK cells again restore to the levels of healthy controls after ART. Enhanced immune activation of different NK cell subsets is partially restored after ART. Terminal differentiation of CD56(dim)CD16(+) NK cells is enhanced after ART as measured by CD57 expression. Frequencies of CD57(+)CD56(dim)CD16(+) NK cells are directly correlated with the frequencies of total NK cells suggesting that an increase in the frequencies of CD57(+)CD56(dim)CD16(+) NK cells is reflected by increased frequencies of total NK cells after ART. Taken together these data demonstrate that ART has an effect on the immune restoration of NK cells and is enhanced in the terminal differentiation of CD56(dim)CD16(+) NK cells, which is associated with increased frequencies of total NK cells after ART.

  13. Teaching Art with Art: Grotesque Visions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubbard, Guy

    2001-01-01

    Discusses a type of visual art called grotesque art and includes four different examples of grotesque art: (1) the painting "Head of Medusa" by Peter Paul Rubens; (2) Rangda, the widow witch from Bali (Indonesia); (3) totem poles; and (4) grotesque sculptures from the Cathedral of Notre Dame (Paris, France). (CMK)

  14. Arts Impact: Lessons from ArtsBridge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shimshon-Santo, Amy R.

    2010-01-01

    Arts Impact summarizes lessons learned at the ArtsBridge Program. It is informed by in-depth participant observation, logic modeling, and quantitative evaluation of program impact on K-12 students in inner city schools and arts students at the University of California Los Angeles over a two year period. The case study frames its analysis through a…

  15. The Liberal Arts and the Martial Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Donald N.

    1984-01-01

    Liberal arts and the martial arts are compared from the perspective that courses of training in the martial arts often constitute exemplary educational programs and are worth examining closely. Program characteristics, individual characteristics fostered by them, the relationship between liberal and utilitarian learning, and the moral…

  16. Artists, Art Historians, and Visual Art Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Layne, Sara Shatford

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the information-seeking and information-using behavior of artists, particularly in the applied arts, and art historians. Topics include visual information; technological and intellectual aspects of access to visual information; physical characteristics of art works; cataloging and indexing tools; access to images; and the role of…

  17. Keeping the Arts Alive: Fine Arts Databases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Terrence E., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    When budgets are tightened, the school library media specialists and/or the arts programs are often considered expendable. No Child Left Behind legislation means increasing academic time for core subjects, which translates into cutting time for arts education. As money becomes tight, frills are cut (i.e., the arts). Schools don't seem able to fill…

  18. Restoration of Dioxin-Induced Damage to Fetal Steroidogenesis and Gonadotropin Formation by Maternal Co-Treatment with α-Lipoic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Koga, Takayuki; Ishida, Takumi; Takeda, Tomoki; Ishii, Yuji; Uchi, Hiroshi; Tsukimori, Kiyomi; Yamamoto, Midori; Himeno, Masaru; Furue, Masutaka; Yamada, Hideyuki

    2012-01-01

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), an endocrine disruptor, causes reproductive and developmental toxic effects in pups following maternal exposure in a number of animal models. Our previous studies have demonstrated that TCDD imprints sexual immaturity by suppressing the expression of fetal pituitary gonadotropins, the regulators of gonadal steroidogenesis. In the present study, we discovered that all TCDD-produced damage to fetal production of pituitary gonadotropins as well as testicular steroidogenesis can be repaired by co-treating pregnant rats with α-lipoic acid (LA), an obligate co-factor for intermediary metabolism including energy production. While LA also acts as an anti-oxidant, other anti-oxidants; i.e., ascorbic acid, butylated hydroxyanisole and edaravone, failed to exhibit any beneficial effects. Neither wasting syndrome nor CYP1A1 induction in the fetal brain caused through the activation of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) could be attenuated by LA. These lines of evidence suggest that oxidative stress makes only a minor contribution to the TCDD-induced disorder of fetal steroidogenesis, and LA has a restorative effect by targeting on mechanism(s) other than AhR activation. Following a metabolomic analysis, it was found that TCDD caused a more marked change in the hypothalamus, a pituitary regulator, than in the pituitary itself. Although the components of the tricarboxylic acid cycle and the ATP content of the fetal hypothalamus were significantly changed by TCDD, all these changes were again rectified by exogenous LA. We also provided evidence that the fetal hypothalamic content of endogenous LA is significantly reduced following maternal exposure to TCDD. Thus, the data obtained strongly suggest that TCDD reduces the expression of fetal pituitary gonadotropins to imprint sexual immaturity or disturb development by suppressing the level of LA, one of the key players serving energy production. PMID:22911699

  19. Work plan to assess treatment of trench water from Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, P.A.

    1992-03-01

    Water from a selected waste disposal trench in Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6 will be used to conduct a pilot-scale treatment assessment. The experiment will be designed to demonstrate whether adding WAG 6 trench water to the wastewater treatment facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) will change the regulatory status of the solid wastes produced by these facilities. Laboratory-scale treatability tests conducted in 1990 showed that the existing ORNL wastewater treatment facilities could successfully treat the WAG 6 trench water to meet discharge requirements, but the tests did not address the regulatory status of the solid wastes produced by the treatment processes. A longer-term, larger-scale test will be performed to determine if these solid wastes will become hazardous as defined by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act when WAG 6 trench water is mixed with the existing process wastewater. These data are needed to determine the feasibility of adding the WAG 6 trench water to the treatment facilities.

  20. Prosthetic-restorative approach for the restoration of tooth wear. Vdo increase, rehabilitation of anatomy and function and aesthetic restoration of anterior teeth. Case report

    PubMed Central

    GARGARI, M.; CERUSO, F.M.; PRETE, V.; PUJIA, A.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Prosthetic-restorative approach for the restoration of tooth wear. Case report Objective This article presents a case report of combined prosthetic-adhesive rehabilitation in a patient with a generalized tooth wear. Methods A combined treatment adhesive - prosthetic was proposed to a male patient of 65 years old having a clinically significant tooth wear, with dentine exposure and with a reduction in clinical crown height. The erosive/abrasive worn dentition have been reconstructed with direct resin composite restorations on the posterior teeth and with zirconia crown on the anterior teeth. Results Direct composite restorations have a number of distinct advantages. These restorations have proved durable and aesthetic, protect tooth structure and posterior occlusal contact is predictably re-established. Conclusions. A combinations of direct and indirect restorations, based on the new vertical dimension of occlusion (VDO), can help to reestablish anatomy and function. PMID:23285409

  1. Surgical crown lengthening: a periodontal and restorative interdisciplinary approach.

    PubMed

    Parwani, Simran R; Parwani, Rajkumar N

    2014-01-01

    Surgical crown lengthening helps to provide an adequate retention form for proper tooth preparation, thus enabling dentists to create esthetically pleasing and healthy restorations. Long-term stability requires accurate diagnosis and development of a comprehensive treatment plan in each case. This sequence of events stresses the importance of communication between the restorative dentist and the periodontist. This article presents 2 cases that involve surgical crown lengthening (including mucoperiosteal flap and ostectomy) for the restoration of teeth.

  2. Techniques of fabrication of provisional restoration: an overview.

    PubMed

    Regish, K M; Sharma, Deeksha; Prithviraj, D R

    2011-01-01

    A properly fabricated provisional restoration is important in achieving a successful indirect restoration. The importance of provisional restorations as an integral part of fixed prosthodontic treatment is evident from the abundance of the literature pertaining to their importance regarding margin fidelity, function, occlusion, and esthetics. There are a variety of techniques available to suit the individual needs of the clinician and of the clinical situation, from a single unit to a complete-arch provisional fixed prostheses.

  3. Techniques of Fabrication of Provisional Restoration: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Regish, K. M.; Sharma, Deeksha; Prithviraj, D. R.

    2011-01-01

    A properly fabricated provisional restoration is important in achieving a successful indirect restoration. The importance of provisional restorations as an integral part of fixed prosthodontic treatment is evident from the abundance of the literature pertaining to their importance regarding margin fidelity, function, occlusion, and esthetics. There are a variety of techniques available to suit the individual needs of the clinician and of the clinical situation, from a single unit to a complete-arch provisional fixed prostheses. PMID:22013441

  4. Surgical crown lengthening: a periodontal and restorative interdisciplinary approach.

    PubMed

    Parwani, Simran R; Parwani, Rajkumar N

    2014-01-01

    Surgical crown lengthening helps to provide an adequate retention form for proper tooth preparation, thus enabling dentists to create esthetically pleasing and healthy restorations. Long-term stability requires accurate diagnosis and development of a comprehensive treatment plan in each case. This sequence of events stresses the importance of communication between the restorative dentist and the periodontist. This article presents 2 cases that involve surgical crown lengthening (including mucoperiosteal flap and ostectomy) for the restoration of teeth. PMID:25369395

  5. Restorative and Invisalign: a new approach.

    PubMed

    Norris, Robert A; Brandt, Douglas J; Crawford, Craig H; Fallah, Mohamed

    2002-01-01

    This case report describes an interdisciplinary treatment approach using the Invisalign System (Align Technology, Inc., Santa Clara, California) for orthodontics in combination with restorative dentistry. This combined approach was selected for an optimum esthetic and functional result. This case report demonstrates how a restorative case can be improved with prerestorative orthodontic alignment. The Invisalign System was used for opening the bite anteriorly, space distribution, and midline correction. The restorative dentistry procedures involved veneering to enhance the maxillary incisor length-to-width ratio and provide anterior guidance. The cosmetic alternative treatment modality to conventional fixed orthodontics allowed the clinician to accomplish the prerestorative orthodontic goals to help meet the desires of an esthetically conscientious patient.

  6. [Multiple agenesis and prosthetic restoration].

    PubMed

    Renault, P

    1990-03-01

    Cases of multiple agenesia present some difficulties in the treatment planing. Three situations may be encountered: limited agenesia, restored by a fixed, bonded or cemented prosthesis, multiple uni- or bimaxillary agenesia without remaining of deciduous teeth, restored by a fixed, bonded or cemented prosthesis or the partial adjacent prosthesis, multiple uni- or bimaxillary agenesia with remaining of deciduous teeth, restored by means of a supra-dental prosthesis. The first two situations have been described in dental literature and are relatively easy to treat. The same is not true for the third situation, where the decision to keep the temporary teeth considerably increases the difficulty of prosthetic restoration. This subject will be illustrated by the presentation of a clinical case of multiple bi-maxillary agenesia. The patient has: on the maxilla: an absence of 9 permanent teeth (18, 15, 14, 12, 22, 23, 24, 25, 28) and the presence of 4 deciduous teeth (62, 63, 64, 65), on the mandible: an absence of all permanent teeth, with the exception of 36 and 46, and the remaining of 4 deciduous teeth (75, 73, 83, 84). The remaining of deciduous teeth and the presence of a very high inter-arch space led to opting for dental coverage so as to keep the deciduous teeth and a proper vertical dimension. The patient wished to solve his "problem" in the maxilla first, and is not wanting to undergo the extraction of his deciduous teeth. The following therapeutic proposal was adapted: On the maxilla, a three-step procedure: first step: building of metal copings on 13, 16 and 26 and metal-ceramic crowns on 11 and 21, second step: building of telescop crowns on 16 and 26 and clasps on 13, 11 and 21, third step: casting of the removable partial denture framework and soldering to the telescop crowns and clasps. On the mandible, a provisional restoration using a supra-dental resin removable partial denture with ceramic occlusal surfaces was adopted. The aesthetic and functional

  7. HIV-1 drug resistance genotyping from antiretroviral therapy (ART) naïve and first-line treatment failures in Djiboutian patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Abstract In this study we report the prevalence of antiretroviral drug resistant HIV-1 genotypes of virus isolated from Djiboutian patients who failed first-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) and from ART naïve patients. Patients and methods A total of 35 blood samples from 16 patients who showed first-line ART failure (>1000 viral genome copies/ml) and 19 ART-naïve patients were collected in Djibouti from October 2009 to December 2009. Both the protease (PR) and reverse transcriptase (RT) genes were amplified and sequenced using National Agency for AIDS Research (ANRS) protocols. The Stanford HIV database algorithm was used for interpretation of resistance data and genotyping. Results Among the 16 patients with first-line ART failure, nine (56.2%) showed reverse transcriptase inhibitor-resistant HIV-1 strains: two (12.5%) were resistant to nucleoside (NRTI), one (6.25%) to non-nucleoside (NNRTI) reverse transcriptase inhibitors, and six (37.5%) to both. Analysis of the DNA sequencing data indicated that the most common mutations conferring drug resistance were M184V (38%) for NRTI and K103N (25%) for NNRTI. Only NRTI primary mutations K101Q, K103N and the PI minor mutation L10V were found in ART naïve individuals. No protease inhibitor resistant strains were detected. In our study, we found no detectable resistance in ∼ 44% of all patients who experienced therapeutic failure which was explained by low compliance, co-infection with tuberculosis and malnutrition. Genotyping revealed that 65.7% of samples were infected with subtype C, 20% with CRF02_AG, 8.5% with B, 2.9% with CRF02_AG/C and 2.9% with K/C. Conclusion The results of this first study about drug resistance mutations in first-line ART failures show the importance of performing drug resistance mutation test which guides the choice of a second-line regimen. This will improve the management of HIV-infected Djiboutian patients. Virtual slides The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here

  8. Endodontic considerations in restoration of partial overdenture abutments.

    PubMed

    Safavi, K E; Grasso, J E

    1990-10-01

    Overdenture abutment teeth often require endodontic treatment. Various factors, such as status of the pulp, periodontal state of the tooth, and the sequence of overdenture treatment, influence endodontic management of the patient. After completion of endodontic treatment, the coronal part of the root filling is removed, leaving an adequate amount of the root filling in the apical part of the root canal undisturbed. The abutment tooth is then permanently restored with a filling material, or is prepared for a cast restoration.

  9. An update on glass fiber dental restorative composites: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Khan, Abdul Samad; Azam, Maria Tahir; Khan, Maria; Mian, Salman Aziz; Ur Rehman, Ihtesham

    2015-02-01

    Dentistry is a much developed field in the last few decades. New techniques have changed the conventional treatment methods as applications of new dental materials give better outcomes. The current century has suddenly forced on dentistry, a new paradigm regarding expected standards for state-of-the-art patient care. Within the field of restorative dentistry, the incredible advances in dental materials research have led to the current availability of esthetic adhesive restorations. The chemistry and structure of the resins and the nature of the glass fiber reinforced systems in dental composites are reviewed in relation to their influence and properties including mechanical, physical, thermal, biocompatibility, technique sensitivity, mode and rate of failure of restorations on clinical application. It is clear that a deeper understanding of the structure of the polymeric matrix and resin-based dental composite is required. As a result of ongoing research in the area of glass fiber reinforced composites and with the development and advancement of these composites, the future prospects of resin-based composite are encouraging.

  10. Creating esthetic composite restorations.

    PubMed

    Grin, D

    2000-05-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe a fabrication technique to assist dental technicians creating esthetic indirect composite restorations. After the teeth have been prepared and the models completed, the technician can begin the fabrication process. Translucent dentin is selected to reduce opacity and enhance the blend with the remaining dentition. High chroma modifiers can then be placed into the fossa area to replicate dentin seen in natural dentition. Different incisal materials can then be layered into the build-up to regulate the value of the restoration. Special effects such as hypocalcification are placed internally to mimic naturally occurring esthetics. Realistic anatomy is created using a small-tipped instrument directly into the final layer of uncured enamel material. Fissure characterization is placed in the restoration to match existing dentition. Fit and margins are verified on separate dies to minimize discrepancies. Path of insertion and proximal contacts are established on a solid model to minimize chairside adjustments.

  11. Restoring the prairie

    SciTech Connect

    Mlot, C.

    1990-12-01

    The US DOE at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Batavia, Illinois, prairie restoration is taking place in order to conserve the rich topsoil. This is the largest of many prairie restoration experiments. Big bluestem grass (Andropogon gerardi), blue grama (Bouteloua gracilis), and buffalo grass (Buchloe dactyloides) are the main initial grasses grown. After their growth reaches enough biomass to sustain a fire, other prairie plants such as purple prairie clover and dropseed grass appear. The goal of this is to provide a generous refuge for disappearing native plants and animals, a site for scientific research, and a storehouse of genes adapted to a region that produces much of the worlds food. Plans for restoring the marsh and oak savanna, also native to the Fermilab site are also in the works.

  12. Restoration of Shoulder Function.

    PubMed

    Boe, Chelsea C; Elhassan, Bassem T

    2016-08-01

    Restoration of shoulder function in patients with brachial plexus injury can be challenging. Initial reported efforts were focused on stabilizing the shoulder, improving inferior subluxation and restoring abduction and flexion of the joint. Recent advancements and improved understanding of coordinated shoulder motion and the biomechanical properties of the muscles around the shoulder applicable to tendon transfer have expanded available surgical options to improve shoulder function, specifically external rotation. Despite the advances in reconstructive options, brachial plexus injury remains a serious problem that requires complex surgical solutions, prolonged recovery, and acceptance of functional loss. PMID:27387074

  13. Linking Art and Books.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCoubrey, Sharon, Ed.

    1993-01-01

    This serial issue examines the theme of picture books as resources for art production and art response; gives specific project descriptions; and looks at the relationship between words and pictures, and the creative connection between art and language. Articles are: (1) "Editor's View" (Sharon McCoubrey); (2) "The Creative Connection: Art and…

  14. K-12 Art Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furney, Trudy; And Others

    The development of students in various art fields is the focus of this K-12 art curriculum guide. The philosophy of the art program and the roles of administrator, teacher, and parent are outlined. The underlying school community relationships, and the objective, goals, and purposes of art education are described. Phases of child development in…

  15. Cultivating Demand for the Arts: Arts Learning, Arts Engagement, and State Arts Policy. Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zakaras, Laura; Lowell, Julia F.

    2008-01-01

    The findings summarized in this report are intended to shed light on what it means to cultivate demand for the arts, why it is necessary and important to cultivate this demand, and what state arts agencies (SAAs) and other arts and education policymakers can do to help. The research considered only the benchmark arts central to public policy:…

  16. Children as Art Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szekely, George

    2011-01-01

    A goal of art learning is always independence, for everyone to become their own art teacher. Teaching for artistic independence can never start too early. As art teachers, children acquire confidence in their art, and in coming to school as artists. Children should be considered artists in residence and visiting artists in schools. It makes sense…

  17. Cultural Arts Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pistone, Kathleen A.

    The handbook presents activities to aid elementary school classroom teachers as they develop and implement cultural arts lessons. A cultural arts program is interpreted as a way to help students develop perceptual awareness, build a basic vocabulary in some art cultural form, evaluate their own works of art, appreciate creative expressions, and…

  18. Spotlight on Arts Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Education, Raleigh.

    In this annual edition selected cultural arts organizations from across the state are featured, with a specific focus on how these organizations have aided local school systems as they implemented the arts education component of North Carolina's Basic Education Program. The following arts organizations are featured: Winston-Salem Arts Council;…

  19. Art Therapy Verses Psychotherapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Del Giacco, Maureen

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of my paper is to identify the difference between psychotherapy and art therapy. Then to introduce a technique within the field of art therapy that is relevant to neuro-plasticity Del Giacco Neuro Art Therapy. The paper identifies the importance of the amygdala and the hippocampus within the role of art therapy. Supporting…

  20. Art Education Communicating Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Sue-Anne

    1997-01-01

    Transcribes the Leon Jackman Memorial Address to the Australasian Art Educators Conference in 1996. Discusses distinctions between the formal world of pedagogy and the informal world of experiential learning in art education. Focuses on art educators as communicators, on how they talk about the arts, and on communication as sharing knowledge. (DSK)

  1. Art and Religion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shusterman, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Since the nineteenth century's interest in "art for art's sake," many thinkers have argued that art would supplant traditional religion as the spiritual locus of the increasingly secular society of Western modernity. If art can capture the sort of spirituality, idealism, and expressive community of traditional religions but without being ensnared…

  2. Soviet Arts Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    San Diego County Office of Education, CA.

    This extensive curriculum guide was written in conjunction with the San Diego Arts Festival of Soviet Arts in 1989. It aimed to provide teachers with insights and ideas about arts in the Soviet Union before, during, and after the Arts Festival. A curriculum model is presented at the beginning of the guide to illustrate how the lessons were…

  3. Winter Art Education Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jokela, Timo

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe how the Department of Art Education at the University of Lapland in Finland has developed winter art as a method of environmental and community-based art education. I will focus on the Snow Show Winter Art Education Project, a training project funded by the European Union and the State Provincial Office…

  4. Arts Inspire Community Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Dan W.

    1983-01-01

    Describes Southeastern Community College's efforts to focus on the arts, which included a campus visit by the artist Kenneth Larson and events centered on his Heroic Individual prints; a performing arts series supported by local corporations; an Associate in Fine Arts degree; regular art exhibits; and an artist-in-residence program. (DMM)

  5. Restorative Justice: New Horizons in Juvenile Offender Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryals, John S. Jr.

    2004-01-01

    Treatment strategies of the juvenile justice system focus singularly on rehabilitation of offenders, and victims and communities are excluded from the rehabilitative process. Restorative justice views victims and communities as essential components in rehabilitative efforts. In this article, the principles and practices of restorative justice,…

  6. Hardening behavior after high-temperature solution treatment of Ag-20Pd-12Au-xCu alloys with different Cu contents for dental prosthetic restorations.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yonghwan; Niinomi, Mitsuo; Hieda, Junko; Nakai, Masaaki; Cho, Ken; Fukui, Hisao

    2014-07-01

    Ag-Pd-Au-Cu alloys have been used widely for dental prosthetic applications. Significant enhancement of the mechanical properties of the Ag-20Pd-12Au-14.5Cu alloy as a result of the precipitation of the β' phase through high-temperature solution treatment (ST), which is different from conventional aging treatment in these alloys, has been reported. The relationship between the unique hardening behavior and precipitation of the β' phase in Ag-20Pd-12Au-xCu alloys (x=6.5, 13, 14.5, 17, and 20mass%) subjected to the high-temperature ST at 1123K for 3.6ks was investigated in this study. Unique hardening behavior after the high-temperature ST also occurs in Ag-20Pd-12Au-xCu alloys (x=13, 17, and 20) with precipitation of the β' phase. However, hardening is not observed and the β' phase does not precipitate in the Ag-20Pd-12Au-6.5Cu alloy after the same ST. The tensile strength and 0.2% proof stress also increase in Ag-20Pd-12Au-xCu alloys (x=13, 14.5, 17, and 20) after the high-temperature ST. In addition, these values after the high-temperature ST increase with increasing Cu content in Ag-20Pd-12Au-xCu alloys (x=14.5, 17, and 20). The formation process of the β' phase can be explained in terms of diffusion of Ag and Cu atoms and precipitation of the β' phase. Clarification of the relationship between hardening and precipitation of the β' phase via high-temperature ST is expected to help the development of more effective heat treatments for hardening in Ag-20Pd-12Au-xCu alloys.

  7. Altered regulation of Akt signaling with murine cerebral malaria, effects on long-term neuro-cognitive function, restoration with lithium treatment.

    PubMed

    Dai, Minxian; Freeman, Brandi; Shikani, Henry J; Bruno, Fernando Pereira; Collado, J Elias; Macias, Rolando; Reznik, Sandra E; Davies, Peter; Spray, David Conover; Tanowitz, Herbert Bernard; Weiss, Louis Martin; Desruisseaux, Mahalia Sabrina

    2012-01-01

    Neurological and cognitive impairment persist in more than 20% of cerebral malaria (CM) patients long after successful anti-parasitic treatment. We recently reported that long term memory and motor coordination deficits are also present in our experimental cerebral malaria model (ECM). We also documented, in a murine model, a lack of obvious pathology or inflammation after parasite elimination, suggesting that the long-term negative neurological outcomes result from potentially reversible biochemical and physiological changes in brains of ECM mice, subsequent to acute ischemic and inflammatory processes. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that acute ECM results in significantly reduced activation of protein kinase B (PKB or Akt) leading to decreased Akt phosphorylation and inhibition of the glycogen kinase synthase (GSK3β) in the brains of mice infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbA) compared to uninfected controls and to mice infected with the non-neurotrophic P. berghei NK65 (PbN). Though Akt activation improved to control levels after chloroquine treatment in PbA-infected mice, the addition of lithium chloride, a compound which inhibits GSK3β activity and stimulates Akt activation, induced a modest, but significant activation of Akt in the brains of infected mice when compared to uninfected controls treated with chloroquine with and without lithium. In addition, lithium significantly reversed the long-term spatial and visual memory impairment as well as the motor coordination deficits which persisted after successful anti-parasitic treatment. GSK3β inhibition was significantly increased after chloroquine treatment, both in lithium and non-lithium treated PbA-infected mice. These data indicate that acute ECM is associated with abnormalities in cell survival pathways that result in neuronal damage. Regulation of Akt/GSK3β with lithium reduces neuronal degeneration and may have neuroprotective effects in ECM. Aberrant regulation of Akt/GSK3β signaling

  8. Complete Restoration of Refractory Mandibular Osteoradionecrosis by Prolonged Treatment with a Pentoxifylline-Tocopherol-Clodronate Combination (PENTOCLO): A Phase II Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Delanian, Sylvie; Chatel, Cecile; Porcher, Raphael; Depondt, Joel; Lefaix, Jean-Louis

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: Osteoradionecrosis (ORN) is a nonhealing wound of the bone that is difficult to manage. Combined treatment with pentoxifylline and vitamin E reduces radiation-induced fibrosis and ORN with a good prognosis. We previously showed that the combination of pentoxifylline and vitamin E with clodronate (PENTOCLO) is useful in healing sternocostal and some mandibular ORN. Is PENTOCLO effective in ORN of poor prognosis? Methods: 54 eligible patients previously irradiated for head and neck cancer (among 72 treated) a mean 5 years previously received exteriorized refractory mandibular ORN for 1.4 {+-} 1.8 years, mainly after local surgery and hyperbaric oxygen had been ineffective. The mean length of exposed bone (D) was 17 {+-} 8 mm as primary endpoint, and the mean Subjective, Objective, Management, and Analytic evaluation of injury (SOMA) score was 16 {+-} 4. Between August 2000 and August 2008, all patients were given daily oral PENTOCLO: 800 mg pentoxifylline, 1,000 IU vitamin E, and 1,600 mg clodronate 5 days per week alternating with 20 mg prednisone and 1,000 mg ciprofloxacin 2 days per week. The duration of treatment was related to consolidated healing. Results: Prolonged treatment (16 {+-} 9 months) was safe and well tolerated. All patients improved, with an exponential progressive-(f[t] = a.exp(-b.t)-and significant (p < 0.0001) reduction of exposed bone (D), respectively (months): D{sub 2} -42%, D{sub 4} -62%, D{sub 6} -77%, D{sub 12} -92%, and D{sub 18} -96%, combined with iterative spontaneous sequestrectomies in 36 patients. All patients experienced complete recovery in a median of 9 months. Clinical improvement was measured in terms of discontinuation of analgesics, new fracture, closed skin fistulae, and delayed radiologic improvement: SOMA{sub 6} -64%, SOMA{sub 12} -89%, and SOMA{sub 30} -96%. Conclusion: Long-term PENTOCLO treatment is effective, safe, and curative for refractory ORN and induces mucosal and bone healing with significant symptom

  9. Altered Regulation of Akt Signaling with Murine Cerebral Malaria, Effects on Long-Term Neuro-Cognitive Function, Restoration with Lithium Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Fernando Pereira; Collado, J. Elias; Macias, Rolando; Reznik, Sandra E.; Davies, Peter; Spray, David Conover; Tanowitz, Herbert Bernard; Weiss, Louis Martin; Desruisseaux, Mahalia Sabrina

    2012-01-01

    Neurological and cognitive impairment persist in more than 20% of cerebral malaria (CM) patients long after successful anti-parasitic treatment. We recently reported that long term memory and motor coordination deficits are also present in our experimental cerebral malaria model (ECM). We also documented, in a murine model, a lack of obvious pathology or inflammation after parasite elimination, suggesting that the long-term negative neurological outcomes result from potentially reversible biochemical and physiological changes in brains of ECM mice, subsequent to acute ischemic and inflammatory processes. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that acute ECM results in significantly reduced activation of protein kinase B (PKB or Akt) leading to decreased Akt phosphorylation and inhibition of the glycogen kinase synthase (GSK3β) in the brains of mice infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbA) compared to uninfected controls and to mice infected with the non-neurotrophic P. berghei NK65 (PbN). Though Akt activation improved to control levels after chloroquine treatment in PbA-infected mice, the addition of lithium chloride, a compound which inhibits GSK3β activity and stimulates Akt activation, induced a modest, but significant activation of Akt in the brains of infected mice when compared to uninfected controls treated with chloroquine with and without lithium. In addition, lithium significantly reversed the long-term spatial and visual memory impairment as well as the motor coordination deficits which persisted after successful anti-parasitic treatment. GSK3β inhibition was significantly increased after chloroquine treatment, both in lithium and non-lithium treated PbA-infected mice. These data indicate that acute ECM is associated with abnormalities in cell survival pathways that result in neuronal damage. Regulation of Akt/GSK3β with lithium reduces neuronal degeneration and may have neuroprotective effects in ECM. Aberrant regulation of Akt/GSK3β signaling

  10. Current opinions concerning the restoration of endodontically treated teeth: basic principles

    PubMed Central

    VȦrlan, C; VȦrlan, V; Bodnar, D; Suciu, I

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this general article is to present a survey of the current knowledge about the clinical approach of restoring endodontically treated teeth. The best way to restore teeth after root canal treatment has long been and still is a controversial subject of debate to this day. The clinical approach of restoring endodontically treated teeth needs taking into consideration several issues: aims of coronal restoration, criteria for establishing the various modalities of coronal restoration, clinical solutions of restoring teeth after endodontic treatment, guidelines regarding restorative materials and techniques, possibilities and limits of restoration using direct adhesive materials and techniques. The aims of coronal restoration of endodontically treated teeth are generally considered to be the following ones: to prevent recontamination of the root canal system and / or periapical space, to replace missing hard dental tissues and to restore coronal morphology and functions, to provide the necessary strength for the restoration/tooth complex in order to withstand functional stress and prevent crown and/or root fracture. The criteria for establishing the modalities of coronal restoration for endodontically treated teeth are: amount and quality of remaining hard dental tissues, topography and coronal morphology of the tooth, functional occlusal forces that the restoration/tooth complex has to withstand, restoring requirements in order to include the treated tooth in a comprehensive oral rehabilitation treatment plan, esthetic requirements. PMID:20108535

  11. ARTS BETA testing report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccune, M. C.

    1981-01-01

    The advanced real time system (ARTS) was tested utilizing existing commercial system hardware and software which has been operating under advanced operating system (AOS) for several years in a multitasking, multiprocessing, and multiple computer environment. Experiences with ARTS in terms of compatibility with AOS, ease of transmission between AOS and ARTS, and functional areas of ARTS which were tested are discussed. Relative and absolute performance of ARTS versus AOS as measured in the system environment are also presented.

  12. Art Therapy and Autism: Overview and Recommendations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Nicole

    2009-01-01

    Work with individuals diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) is a growing area of significant interest for many art therapists. The purpose of this viewpoint is to outline the current impediments to the expansion of this specialty as well as to highlight the unique treatment advantages of art therapy from the author's perspectives as an…

  13. Placement protocol for an anterior fiber-reinforced composite restoration.

    PubMed

    Hornbrook, D S

    1997-01-01

    The new classification of metal-free restorative materials provides the clinician with a durable, flexible, and aesthetic laboratory-fabricated alternative to conventional porcelain-fused-to-metal (PFM) full-coverage crowns, inlay and onlay restorations, and single pontic bridges. With exceptional physical and optical characteristics, restorations fabricated utilizing the new ceramic optimized polymer (Ceromer) (Targis, Ivoclar Williams, Amherst, NY) and fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) framework (Vectris, Ivoclar Williams, Amherst, NY) materials can also be utilized predictably in the anterior segment. The success of metal-free restorations can be achieved by following conventional prosthodontic principles for preparation, cementation, and finishing. This article demonstrates the appropriate treatment protocol in order to achieve aesthetically acceptable and durable anterior results utilizing a metal-free restorative system for "Maryland-like" bridge restorations.

  14. Provisional material considerations: creating a blueprint of the final restorations.

    PubMed

    Helvey, Gregg A

    2014-01-01

    Indirect restorative dentistry generally requires temporization of prepared teeth during the laboratory fabrication phase. Over the years, the physical properties of newer provisional materials have improved, which has enabled an expansion of the function of provisional restorations. Better strength, surface finish, and color match have increased their acceptability by patients and clinicians. In some clinical situations provisional restorations can provide information that is critical to the overall success of a case. Such information allows the clinician to verify and confirm with the patient the esthetics, phonetics, and function of the proposed anterior restorative treatment. The provisional restorations can also provide valuable information to the laboratory technician regarding design, contour, length, shade, and even correct articulation of the master model. The success of the definitive restoration is dependent on the accurate transfer of this information to the laboratory technician.

  15. Restoring Fossil Creek

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flaccus, Kathleen; Vlieg, Julie; Marks, Jane C.; LeRoy, Carri J.

    2004-01-01

    Fossil Creek had been dammed for the past 90 years, and plans were underway to restore the stream. The creek runs through Central Arizona and flows from the high plateaus to the desert, cutting through the same formations that form the Grand Canyon. This article discusses the Fossil Creek monitoring project. In this project, students and teachers…

  16. Model for Coastal Restoration

    SciTech Connect

    Thom, Ronald M.; Judd, Chaeli

    2007-07-27

    Successful restoration of wetland habitats depends on both our understanding of our system and our ability to characterize it. By developing a conceptual model, looking at different spatial scales and integrating diverse data streams: GIS datasets and NASA products, we were able to develop a dynamic model for site prioritization based on both qualitative and quantitative relationships found in the coastal environment.

  17. Esthetic restorations designed with confidence and predictability.

    PubMed

    Gaglio, M A

    2001-06-01

    When the ProCAD product line is used in combination with the CEREC system, clinicians have at their disposal an armamentarium of materials with which to achieve greater predictability, precision, and control in fabricating chairside all-ceramic restorations. At a time when time is the dentist's and patient's most precious commodity, the ProCAD line enables clinicians to definitively restore form, function, and esthetics in a single visit, regardless of the specific individual indirect treatment indication (Figures 13A through 13C, and 14A through 14C).

  18. Pregnenolone co-treatment partially restores steroidogenesis, but does not prevent growth inhibition and increased atresia in mouse ovarian antral follicles treated with mono-hydroxy methoxychlor.

    PubMed

    Craig, Zelieann R; Hannon, Patrick R; Flaws, Jodi A

    2013-11-01

    Mono-hydroxy methoxychlor (mono-OH MXC) is a metabolite of the pesticide, methoxychlor (MXC). Although MXC is known to decrease antral follicle numbers, and increase follicle death in rodents, not much is known about the ovarian effects of mono-OH MXC. Previous studies indicate that mono-OH MXC inhibits mouse antral follicle growth, increases follicle death, and inhibits steroidogenesis in vitro. Further, previous studies indicate that CYP11A1 expression and production of progesterone (P4) may be the early targets of mono-OH MXC in the steroidogenic pathway. Thus, this study tested whether supplementing pregnenolone, the precursor of progesterone and the substrate for HSD3B, would prevent decreased steroidogenesis, inhibited follicle growth, and increased follicle atresia in mono-OH MXC-treated follicles. Mouse antral follicles were exposed to vehicle (dimethylsulfoxide), mono-OH MXC (10 μg/mL), pregnenolone (1 μg/mL), or mono-OH MXC and pregnenolone together for 96 h. Levels of P4, androstenedione (A), testosterone (T), estrone (E1), and 17β-estradiol (E2) in media were determined, and follicles were processed for histological evaluation of atresia. Pregnenolone treatment alone stimulated production of all steroid hormones except E2. Mono-OH MXC-treated follicles had decreased sex steroids, but when given pregnenolone, produced levels of P4, A, T, and E1 that were comparable to those in vehicle-treated follicles. Pregnenolone treatment did not prevent growth inhibition and increased atresia in mono-OH MXC-treated follicles. Collectively, these data support the idea that the most upstream effect of mono-OH MXC on steroidogenesis is by reducing the availability of pregnenolone, and that adding pregnenolone may not be sufficient to prevent inhibited follicle growth and survival.

  19. Insulin treatment restores glutamate (α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid) receptor function in the hippocampus of diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Viswaprakash, Nilmini; Vaithianathan, Thirumalini; Viswaprakash, Ajitan; Judd, Robert; Parameshwaran, Kodeeswaran; Suppiramaniam, Vishnu

    2015-09-01

    Type 1 diabetes is associated with cognitive dysfunction. Cognitive processing, particularly memory acquisition, depends on the regulated enhancement of expression and function of glutamate receptor subtypes in the hippocampus. Impairment of memory was been detected in rodent models of type 1 diabetes induced by streptozotocin (STZ). This study examines the functional properties of synaptic α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors and the expression of synaptic molecules that regulate glutamatergic synaptic transmission in the hippocampus of STZ-diabetic rats. The AMPA receptor-mediated miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs) and single-channel properties of synaptosomal AMPA receptors were examined after 4 weeks of diabetes induction. Results show that amplitude and frequency of mEPSCs recorded from CA1 pyramidal neurons were decreased in diabetic rats. In addition, the single-channel properties of synaptic AMPA receptors from diabetic rat hippocampi were different from those of controls. These impairments in synaptic currents gated by AMPA receptors were accompanied by decreased protein levels of AMPA receptor subunit GluR1, the presynaptic protein synaptophysin, and the postsynaptic anchor protein postsynaptic density protein 95 in the hippocampus of diabetic rats. Neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), an extracellular matrix molecule abundantly expressed in the brain, and the polysialic acid (PSA) attached to NCAM were also downregulated in the hippocampus of diabetic rats. Insulin treatment, when initiated at the onset of diabetes induction, reduced these effects. These findings suggest that STZ-induced diabetes may result in functional deteriorations in glutamatergic synapses in the hippocampus of rats and that these effects may be reduced by insulin treatment. PMID:25807926

  20. Induction of adult human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells into functional astrocyte-like cells: potential for restorative treatment in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Bahat-Stroomza, Merav; Barhum, Yael; Levy, Yossef S; Karpov, Olga; Bulvik, Shlomo; Melamed, Eldad; Offen, Daniel

    2009-09-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder with its motor phenomena due mostly to loss of dopamine-producing neurons in the substantia nigra. Pharmacological treatments aimed to increase the deficient dopaminergic neurotransmission are effective in ameliorating the cardinal symptoms, but none of these therapies is curative. It has been suggested that treatment with neurotrophic factors (NTFs) might protect and prevent death of the surviving dopaminergic neurons and induce proliferation of their axonal nerve terminals with reinnervations of the deafferented striatum. However, long-term delivery of such proteins into the CNS is problematic. We therefore aimed to differentiate ex vivo human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells into astrocyte-like cells, capable of generating NTFs for future transplantation into basal ganglia of PD patients. Indeed, mesenchymal stromal cells treated with our novel astrocyte differentiation medium, present astrocyte-like morphology and express the astrocyte markers S100beta, glutamine synthetase and glial fibrillary acidic protein. Moreover, these astrocyte-like cells produce and secrete significant amounts of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), nerve growth factor (NGF), and brain-derived neurotrophic factor as indicated by messenger RNA, real-time polymerase chain reaction, ELISA, and Western blot analyses. Such NTF-producing cells transplanted into the striatum of 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rats, a model of PD, produced a progressive reduction in the apomorphine-induced contralateral rotations as well as behavioral improvement in rotor-rod and the "sunflower seeds" eating motor tests. Histological assessments revealed that the engrafted cells survived and expressed astrocyte and human markers and acted to regenerate the damaged dopaminergic nerve terminal system. Findings indicate that our novel procedure to induce NTF-producing astrocyte-like cells derived from human bone marrow stromal cells

  1. 14. EAST ELEVATION, COTTAGE. EXTERIOR NEARLY RESTORED. INTERIOR UNDERGOING RESTORATION. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. EAST ELEVATION, COTTAGE. EXTERIOR NEARLY RESTORED. INTERIOR UNDERGOING RESTORATION. EUCALYPTUS TREE PLANTED BY GERTRUDE KEIL PLANNED FOR REMOVAL. - Gold Ridge Farm, 7777 Bodega Avenue, Sebastopol, Sonoma County, CA

  2. CD8 T-Cell Responses before and after Structured Treatment Interruption in Ugandan Adults Who Initiated ART with CD4 T Cells <200 Cell/μL: The DART Trial STI Substudy.

    PubMed

    Serwanga, Jennifer; Mugaba, Susan; Betty, Auma; Pimego, Edward; Walker, Sarah; Munderi, Paula; Gilks, Charles; Gotch, Frances; Grosskurth, Heiner; Kaleebu, Pontiano

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To better understand attributes of ART-associated HIV-induced T-cell responses that might be therapeutically harnessed. Methods. CD8(+) T-cell responses were evaluated in some HIV-1 chronically infected participants of the fixed duration STI substudy of the DART trial. Magnitudes, breadths, and functionality of IFN-γ and Perforin responses were compared in STI (n = 42) and continuous treatment (CT) (n = 46) before and after a single STI cycle when the DART STI trial was stopped early due to inferior clinical outcome in STI participants. Results. STI and CT had comparable magnitudes and breadths of monofunctional CD8(+)IFNγ(+) and CD8(+)Perforin(+) responses. However, STI was associated with significant decline in breadth of bi-functional (CD8(+)IFNγ(+)Perforin(+)) responses; P = .02, Mann-Whitney test. Conclusions. STI in individuals initiated onto ART at <200 CD4(+) T-cell counts/μl significantly reduced occurrence of bifunctional CD8(+)IFNγ(+)/Perforin(+) responses. These data add to others that found no evidence to support STI as a strategy to improve HIV-specific immunity during ART.

  3. Customized cell-based treatment options to combat autoimmunity and restore beta-cell function in type 1 diabetes mellitus: current protocols and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Fändrich, Fred; Ungefroren, Hendrik

    2010-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D) is considered a classical autoimmune disease which commonly starts during childhood but may appear later in adulthood in a proportion of 30-40% of affected individuals. Its development is based on a combination of a genetic predisposition and autoimmune processes that result in gradual destruction of the beta-cells of the pancreas and cause absolute insulin deficiency. Evidence for an autoimmune origin of T1D results from measurable islet beta-cell autoantibody directed against various autoantigens such as proinsulin or insulin itself, glutamic acid decarboxylase 65, the islet tyrosine phosphatase IA-2, and the islet-specific glucose-6-phosphatase catalytic subunit-related protein. In addition, T-cell lines with specificity for insulin or glutamic acid decarboxylase have been identified within peripheral blood lymphocytes. Importantly, in most instances the pathogenesis of T1D comprises a slowly progressive destruction of beta-cell tissue in the pancreas preceded by several years of a prediabetic phase where autoimmunity has already developed but with no clinically apparent insulin dependency. Unless immunological tolerance to pancreatic autoantigens is re-established, diabetes treated by islet cell transplantation or stimulation/regeneration of endogenous beta-cells would remain a chronic disease secondary to immune suppression related morbidity. Hence, if islet cell tolerance could be re-induced, a major clinical hurdle to curing diabetes by islet cell neogenesis may be overcome. Targeted immunotherapies are currently explored in a variety of clinical studies and hold great promise for causative treatment to readjust the underlying immunologic imbalance with the goal to cure the disease. This chapter will outline possible treatment options to stop or reverse the beta-cell-specific autoimmune and inflammatory process within pancreatic islets. Special emphasis is given to stem cells of embryonic, mesenchymal, and haematopoietic origin

  4. Common Prosthetic Implant Complications in Fixed Restorations.

    PubMed

    Link-Bindo, Elyce E; Soltys, James; Donatelli, David; Cavanaugh, Richard

    2016-07-01

    Many clinicians consider implants to be one of the most important innovations in dental care. Even so, over the past 40 years of implant dentistry, complications have been a constant struggle for restorative dentists, surgeons, and patients alike. Implant-related problems can be particularly challenging and frustrating, especially given that an implant is thought to be a "lifetime" solution expected to yield minimal difficulties. This, however, is not necessarily the case with prosthetic restorations. With innovations in implant technology continuing to rapidly advance, maintaining knowledge of all the latest developments can be challenging for clinicians. The purpose of this article is to provide a basic understanding of the treatment, management, and prevention of common prosthetic and technical implant complications seen in the office of a restorative dentist. PMID:27548395

  5. Current status of zirconia restoration.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Takashi; Nakamura, Takashi; Matsumura, Hideo; Ban, Seiji; Kobayashi, Taira

    2013-10-01

    currently one of the most reliable bonding systems for zirconia. Adhesive treatments could be applied to luting the restorations and fabricating hybrid-structured FDPs. Full-contour zirconia FDPs caused concern about the wear of antagonist enamel, because the hardness of Y-TZP was over double that of porcelain. However, this review demonstrates that highly polished zirconia yielded lower antagonist wear compared with porcelains. Polishing of zirconia is possible, but glazing is not recommended for the surface finish of zirconia. Clinical data since 2010 are included in this review. The zirconia frameworks rarely got damaged in many cases and complications often occurred in the veneering ceramic materials. Further clinical studies with larger sample sizes and longer follow-up periods are required to investigate the possible influencing factors of technical failures. PMID:24140561

  6. Current status of zirconia restoration.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Takashi; Nakamura, Takashi; Matsumura, Hideo; Ban, Seiji; Kobayashi, Taira

    2013-10-01

    currently one of the most reliable bonding systems for zirconia. Adhesive treatments could be applied to luting the restorations and fabricating hybrid-structured FDPs. Full-contour zirconia FDPs caused concern about the wear of antagonist enamel, because the hardness of Y-TZP was over double that of porcelain. However, this review demonstrates that highly polished zirconia yielded lower antagonist wear compared with porcelains. Polishing of zirconia is possible, but glazing is not recommended for the surface finish of zirconia. Clinical data since 2010 are included in this review. The zirconia frameworks rarely got damaged in many cases and complications often occurred in the veneering ceramic materials. Further clinical studies with larger sample sizes and longer follow-up periods are required to investigate the possible influencing factors of technical failures.

  7. Restoration of noncarious cervical lesions: when, why, and how.

    PubMed

    Perez, Cesar Dos Reis; Gonzalez, Mariana Rodrigues; Prado, Natália Aráujo Silva; de Miranda, Marianna Sorozini Ferreira; Macêdo, Mariana de Andrade; Fernandes, Bárbara Monteiro Pessôa

    2012-01-01

    At this time, restoration of noncarious cervical lesions (NCCLs) is a common occurrence in clinics nowadays. Some reasons for this are the growth of the elderly population, a smaller rate of tooth loss, and possibly the increase of some etiologic factors. These factors include inadequate brushing techniques in gingival recession cases, corrosive food and drink consumption, and occlusal stress concentrating factors (occlusal interferences, premature contacts, habits of bruxism, and clenching). Unfortunately, Class V restorations also represent one of the less durable types of restorations and have a high index of loss of retention, marginal excess, and secondary caries. Some causes for these problems include difficulties in isolation, insertion, contouring, and finishing and polishing procedures. This work aims to help dentists in choosing the best treatment strategy, which necessarily involves steps of problem identification, diagnosis, etiological factor removal or treatment, and, if necessary, restoration. Finally, appropriate restorative techniques are suggested for each situation.

  8. HPTN 071 (PopART): Rationale and design of a cluster-randomised trial of the population impact of an HIV combination prevention intervention including universal testing and treatment – a study protocol for a cluster randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Effective interventions to reduce HIV incidence in sub-Saharan Africa are urgently needed. Mathematical modelling and the HIV Prevention Trials Network (HPTN) 052 trial results suggest that universal HIV testing combined with immediate antiretroviral treatment (ART) should substantially reduce incidence and may eliminate HIV as a public health problem. We describe the rationale and design of a trial to evaluate this hypothesis. Methods/Design A rigorously-designed trial of universal testing and treatment (UTT) interventions is needed because: i) it is unknown whether these interventions can be delivered to scale with adequate uptake; ii) there are many uncertainties in the models such that the population-level impact of these interventions is unknown; and ii) there are potential adverse effects including sexual risk disinhibition, HIV-related stigma, over-burdening of health systems, poor adherence, toxicity, and drug resistance. In the HPTN 071 (PopART) trial, 21 communities in Zambia and South Africa (total population 1.2 m) will be randomly allocated to three arms. Arm A will receive the full PopART combination HIV prevention package including annual home-based HIV testing, promotion of medical male circumcision for HIV-negative men, and offer of immediate ART for those testing HIV-positive; Arm B will receive the full package except that ART initiation will follow current national guidelines; Arm C will receive standard of care. A Population Cohort of 2,500 adults will be randomly selected in each community and followed for 3 years to measure the primary outcome of HIV incidence. Based on model projections, the trial will be well-powered to detect predicted effects on HIV incidence and secondary outcomes. Discussion Trial results, combined with modelling and cost data, will provide short-term and long-term estimates of cost-effectiveness of UTT interventions. Importantly, the three-arm design will enable assessment of how much could be achieved by

  9. The liberal arts connection.

    PubMed

    Pierce, E R

    1984-04-01

    Occupational therapists need to be critical of who teaches, what is taught, how it is taught, how it is applied, and to whom it is taught in the entire education program of prospective occupational therapists. Further, I recommend that occupational therapy educators on campus take the lead in initiating meetings and discussions that facilitate a functional conjoining of occupational therapy practice, occupational therapy theory, and liberal arts studies. An initial effort in this regard might be for the three mutually interdependent and equal partners in the education of occupational therapy students to read and discuss Ernest L. Boyer's work entitled, A Quest for Common Learning--The Aims of General Education. I believe that all occupational therapists would benefit from reading this text, individually and collectively, and the profession and our community would benefit. The question is not whether or not this subject should be incorporated into an occupational therapy student's curriculum. The question for discussion should be at what point in the student's education--the student's intellectual growth and development and professionalization--would this topic and this treatment be best applied? Perhaps from this beginning the three partners--practice, theory, and liberal arts--would recognize and respond to their mutually interdependent and equally important role and responsibility in the design and implementation of the entire occupational therapy educational program, which is future responsive and ensures the highest probability that graduates will be professionally competent.

  10. Performing arts medicine.

    PubMed

    Ostwald, P F; Baron, B C; Byl, N M; Wilson, F R

    1994-01-01

    Arts medicine has come of age, resulting from 3 important developments over the past decade: improved methods of diagnosis and treatment, an awareness that artists suffer from special problems related to their occupation and lifestyle, and the establishment of health programs emphasizing an interdisciplinary approach to these patients. We focus on the patterns of illness afflicting performing artists, specifically dancers, singers, actors, and instrumental musicians, and explain some of the things a health care team can do in treating these patients. The conditions governing these patients' lives--early exposure to high expectations of excellence, incessant demands for perfection, long periods of intense practicing, fierce competition, high levels of anxiety associated with performance, and uncertain careers--need to be understood. Levels of disease and disability are remarkably high, but artists often ignore symptoms. We discuss the musculoskeletal, neurologic, vocal, psychological, and other syndromes found among performers and some of the difficulties in treating them. The prevention of injury, conservative management, collaboration with teachers, and a psychotherapeutic approach are desirable. Arts medicine programs for professional consultation exist in several major cities of the United States and abroad. Although research is needed regarding the effectiveness of health care services for performing artists, the scientific literature devoted to this field is growing. PMID:8128702

  11. Randomized Control Trial of Composite Cuspal Restorations

    PubMed Central

    Fennis, W.M.; Kuijs, R.H.; Roeters, F.J.; Creugers, N.H.; Kreulen, C.M.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this randomized control trial was to compare the five-year clinical performance of direct and indirect resin composite restorations replacing cusps. In 157 patients, 176 restorations were made to restore maxillary premolars with Class II cavities and one missing cusp. Ninety-two direct and 84 indirect resin composite restorations were placed by two operators, following a strict protocol. Treatment technique and operator were assigned randomly. Follow-up period was at least 4.5 yrs. Survival rates were determined with time to reparable failure and complete failure as endpoints. Kaplan-Meier five-year survival rates were 86.6% (SE 0.27%) for reparable failure and 87.2% (SE 0.27%) for complete failure. Differences between survival rates of direct and indirect restorations [89.9% (SE 0.34%) vs. 83.2% (SE 0.42%) for reparable failure and 91.2% (SE 0.32%) vs. 83.2% (SE 0.42%) for complete failure] were not statistically significant (p = .23 for reparable failure; p = .15 for complete failure). Mode of failure was predominantly adhesive. The results suggest that direct and indirect techniques provide comparable results over the long term (trial registration number: ISRCTN29200848). PMID:24155264

  12. Ecosystem Restoration Research at GWERD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ground Water and Ecosystems Restoration Division, Ada, OK Mission: Conduct research and technical assistance to provide the scientific basis to support the development of strategies and technologies to protect and restore ground water, surface water, and ecosystems impacted b...

  13. [Blood in art, art in blood].

    PubMed

    Danic, B; Lefrère, J-J

    2010-12-01

    In the different forms of art developed by Humanity over the centuries, artists have at times chosen themes from the world of medicine or health, such as blood donation or transfusion. In order to illustrate this, we have looked at three artistic domains: painting, movies and body art.

  14. Land Art in Preschools. An Art Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solberg, Ingunn

    2016-01-01

    The basis for my article is how, and if, a collaborative land art project can provide opportunities for such co-creating as suggested in the national framework plan for preschools, which explicitly states the child as a co-creator of a shared expressive culture. I further wish to propose land art as a meaningful cultural practice, closely…

  15. Inspired Spirals. Teaching Art with Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubbard, Guy

    2001-01-01

    Discusses spirals in nature, man-made objects, and art. Focuses on art that incorporates the spiral, including works by M. C. Escher and Frank Lloyd Wright, an African headdress, and a burial urn. Describes activities to help students make spirals of their own, such as constructing a coil clay pot. (CMK)

  16. CyberArts: Exploring Art and Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Linda, Ed.

    This book takes the position that CyberArts(TM) is the new frontier in creativity, where the worlds of science and art meet. Computer technologies, visual design, music and sound, education and entertainment merge to form the new artistic territory of interactive multimedia. This diverse collection of essays, articles, and commentaries…

  17. Neolithic Art and the Art History Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilson, Muriel

    1991-01-01

    Addresses issues that might be raised in the study of art history from a critical theory perspective. Suggests that, in view of contemporary environmental and social concerns, Neolithic art would be of particular interest to students as would the possibility of having a society in which neither sex was dominant. (KM)

  18. Restoration of Polyamine Metabolic Patterns in In Vivo and In Vitro Model of Ischemic Stroke following Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Tae Hwan; Phukan, Geetika; Shim, Jeom Soon; Nguyen, Duc-Toan; Kim, Yongman; Oh-Lee, Justin D.; Lee, Hyeon-Seong; Paik, Man Jeong; Lee, Gwang

    2016-01-01

    We investigated changes in PA levels by the treatment of human bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBM-MSCs) in ischemic stroke in rat brain model and in cultured neuronal SH-SY5Y cells exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). In ischemic rat model, transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo) was performed for 2 h, followed by intravenous transplantation of hBM-MSCs or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) the day following MCAo. Metabolic profiling analysis of PAs was examined in brains from three groups: control rats, PBS-treated MCAo rats (MCAo), and hBM-MSCs-treated MCAo rats (MCAo + hBM-MSCs). In ischemic cell model, SH-SY5Y cells were exposed to OGD for 24 h, treated with hBM-MSCs (OGD + hBM-MSCs) prior to continued aerobic incubation, and then samples were collected after coculture for 72 h. In the in vivo MCAo ischemic model, levels of some PAs in brain samples of the MCAo and MCAo + hBM-MSCs groups were significantly different from those of the control group. In particular, putrescine, cadaverine, and spermidine in brain tissues of the MCAo + hBM-MSCs group were significantly reduced in comparison to those in the MCAo group. In the in vitro OGD system, N1-acetylspermidine, spermidine, N1-acetylspermine, and spermine in cells of the OGD + hBM-MSCs group were significantly reduced compared to those of OGD group. PMID:27413379

  19. Postischemic fish oil treatment restores long-term retrograde memory and dendritic density: An analysis of the time window of efficacy.

    PubMed

    Bacarin, Cristiano Correia; Godinho, Jaqueline; de Oliveira, Rúbia Maria Weffort; Matsushita, Makoto; Gohara, Aline Kirie; Cardozo-Filho, Lúcio; Lima, Jéssica de Carvalho; Previdelli, Isolde Santos; Melo, Silvana Regina; Ribeiro, Matheus Henrique Dal Molin; Milani, Humberto

    2016-09-15

    We reported that fish oil (FO) prevented the loss of spatial memory caused by transient, global cerebral ischemia (TGCI), provided the treatment covered the first days prior to and after ischemia. Continuing these studies, trained rats were subjected to TGCI, and FO was administered for 10days, with a time window of efficacy (TWE) of 4, 8 or 12h post-ischemia. Retrograde memory was assessed up to 43days after TGCI. In another experiment, ischemic rats received FO with a 4- or 12-h TWE, and dendritic density was assessed in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex. The brain lipid profile was evaluated in sham-operated and ischemic rats that were treated with FO or vehicle with a 4-h TWE. Ischemia-induced retrograde amnesia was prevented by FO administration that was initiated with either a 4- or 8-h TWE. Fish oil was ineffective after a 12-h TWE. Independent of the TWE, FO did not prevent ischemic neuronal death. In the hippocampus, but not cerebral cortex, TGCI-induced dendritic loss was prevented by FO with a 4-h TWE but not 12-h TWE. The level of docosahexaenoic acid almost doubled in the hippocampus in ischemic, FO-treated rats (4-h TWE). The data indicate that (i) the anti-amnesic effect of FO can be observed with a TWE of up to 8h, (ii) the stimulation of dendritic neuroplasticity may have contributed to this effect, and (iii) DHA in FO may be the main active constituent in FO that mediates the cognitive and neuroplasticity effects on TGCI. PMID:27235715

  20. Postischemic fish oil treatment restores long-term retrograde memory and dendritic density: An analysis of the time window of efficacy.

    PubMed

    Bacarin, Cristiano Correia; Godinho, Jaqueline; de Oliveira, Rúbia Maria Weffort; Matsushita, Makoto; Gohara, Aline Kirie; Cardozo-Filho, Lúcio; Lima, Jéssica de Carvalho; Previdelli, Isolde Santos; Melo, Silvana Regina; Ribeiro, Matheus Henrique Dal Molin; Milani, Humberto

    2016-09-15

    We reported that fish oil (FO) prevented the loss of spatial memory caused by transient, global cerebral ischemia (TGCI), provided the treatment covered the first days prior to and after ischemia. Continuing these studies, trained rats were subjected to TGCI, and FO was administered for 10days, with a time window of efficacy (TWE) of 4, 8 or 12h post-ischemia. Retrograde memory was assessed up to 43days after TGCI. In another experiment, ischemic rats received FO with a 4- or 12-h TWE, and dendritic density was assessed in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex. The brain lipid profile was evaluated in sham-operated and ischemic rats that were treated with FO or vehicle with a 4-h TWE. Ischemia-induced retrograde amnesia was prevented by FO administration that was initiated with either a 4- or 8-h TWE. Fish oil was ineffective after a 12-h TWE. Independent of the TWE, FO did not prevent ischemic neuronal death. In the hippocampus, but not cerebral cortex, TGCI-induced dendritic loss was prevented by FO with a 4-h TWE but not 12-h TWE. The level of docosahexaenoic acid almost doubled in the hippocampus in ischemic, FO-treated rats (4-h TWE). The data indicate that (i) the anti-amnesic effect of FO can be observed with a TWE of up to 8h, (ii) the stimulation of dendritic neuroplasticity may have contributed to this effect, and (iii) DHA in FO may be the main active constituent in FO that mediates the cognitive and neuroplasticity effects on TGCI.