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Sample records for restriction dna cutter

  1. Highlights of the DNA cutters: a short history of the restriction enzymes.

    PubMed

    Loenen, Wil A M; Dryden, David T F; Raleigh, Elisabeth A; Wilson, Geoffrey G; Murray, Noreen E

    2014-01-01

    In the early 1950's, 'host-controlled variation in bacterial viruses' was reported as a non-hereditary phenomenon: one cycle of viral growth on certain bacterial hosts affected the ability of progeny virus to grow on other hosts by either restricting or enlarging their host range. Unlike mutation, this change was reversible, and one cycle of growth in the previous host returned the virus to its original form. These simple observations heralded the discovery of the endonuclease and methyltransferase activities of what are now termed Type I, II, III and IV DNA restriction-modification systems. The Type II restriction enzymes (e.g. EcoRI) gave rise to recombinant DNA technology that has transformed molecular biology and medicine. This review traces the discovery of restriction enzymes and their continuing impact on molecular biology and medicine.

  2. Highlights of the DNA cutters: a short history of the restriction enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Loenen, Wil A. M.; Dryden, David T. F.; Raleigh, Elisabeth A.; Wilson, Geoffrey G.; Murray, Noreen E.

    2014-01-01

    In the early 1950’s, ‘host-controlled variation in bacterial viruses’ was reported as a non-hereditary phenomenon: one cycle of viral growth on certain bacterial hosts affected the ability of progeny virus to grow on other hosts by either restricting or enlarging their host range. Unlike mutation, this change was reversible, and one cycle of growth in the previous host returned the virus to its original form. These simple observations heralded the discovery of the endonuclease and methyltransferase activities of what are now termed Type I, II, III and IV DNA restriction-modification systems. The Type II restriction enzymes (e.g. EcoRI) gave rise to recombinant DNA technology that has transformed molecular biology and medicine. This review traces the discovery of restriction enzymes and their continuing impact on molecular biology and medicine. PMID:24141096

  3. Characterization of FP22, a large streptomycete bacteriophage with DNA insensitive to cleavage by many restriction enzymes.

    PubMed

    Hahn, D R; McHenney, M A; Baltz, R H

    1990-12-01

    Bacteriophage FP22 has a very broad host range within streptomycetes and appeared to form lysogens of Streptomyces ambofaciens ATCC 15154. FP22 shared strong cross-immunity and antibody cross-reactivity with bacteriophage P23, but not with seven other streptomycete bacteriophages. FP22 particles had a head diameter of 71 nm and a tail length of 307 nm. The FP22 genome was 131 kb, which is the largest bacteriophage genome reported for streptomycetes. The G + C content of the genome was 46 mol% and restriction mapping indicated that FP22 DNA had discrete ends. NaCl- and pyrophosphate-resistant deletion mutants were readily isolated and the extent of the deletions defined at least 23 kb of dispensable DNA in two regions of the genome. The DNA was not cleaved by most restriction endonucleases (or isoschizomers) which have been identified in the streptomycetes, including the tetranucleotide cutter MboI (GATC).

  4. Integration host factor (IHF) applied for partial digestion by restriction endonucleases in large DNA molecules (IARC procedure).

    PubMed

    Kur, J

    1993-01-01

    The IHF protein of Escherichia coli was successfully used in IHF-mediated Achilles' Heel Cleavage (IHF-AC) technique (Koob et al., 1988; Kur et al., 1992), and leads to the generation of very rare restriction sites in large DNA molecules. The first step of this procedure is methylation of DNA in the presence of IHF, when the overlapping ihf/restriction sites are protected from methylation, and in the second step the DNA is cut by the cognate restriction enzyme. The aim of the present study is to develop a very exact and reproducible procedure to obtain only a few well-defined cuts with the IHF-pre-treated DNA, depending on the variety of all parameters. This technique (IARC, i.e., IHF-assisted rare cutters) employs the restriction enzyme and only one auxiliary protein (IHF). The advantage of the IARC procedure is that no methylation is required (as opposed to the IHF-AC method). Using the IARC approach, the effects of various IHF concentrations were evaluated on cleaving the activity of the DraI, PacI, PmeI, and SwaI enzymes using DNA of phage lambda or the entire genomic 4.7-Mb DNA of E. coli. At low IHF concentrations only a few cut sites were eliminated by IHF binding, but at high IHF concentration, enzymes were able to cut in only one or several specific sites.

  5. Almond brush module cutter

    SciTech Connect

    Zohns, M.A.; Jenkins, B.M.; Mehlschau, J.J.; Morrison, D.

    1983-06-01

    This paper addresses the design, construction, and evaluation of an almond brush module cutter. The module cutter is one link in a system which processes tree prunings for fuel and fiber. This system includes a modified cotton module builder, a module mover, the cutter, and a tub grinder. An economic analysis of the cutter is presented along with the problems involved in cutting brush modules.

  6. Effect of aging and dietary restriction on DNA repair

    SciTech Connect

    Weraarchakul, N.; Strong, R.; Wood, W.G.; Richardson, A.

    1989-03-01

    DNA repair was studied as a function of age in cells isolated from both the liver and the kidney of male Fischer F344 rats. DNA repair was measured by quantifying unscheduled DNA synthesis induced by UV irradiation. Unscheduled DNA synthesis decreased approximately 50% between the ages of 5 and 30 months in both hepatocytes and kidney cells. The age-related decline in unscheduled DNA synthesis in cells isolated from the liver and kidney was compared in rats fed ad libitum and rats fed a calorie-restricted diet; calorie restriction has been shown to increase the survival of rodents. The level of unscheduled DNA synthesis was significantly higher in hepatocytes and kidney cells isolated from the rats fed the restricted diet. Thus, calorie restriction appears to retard the age-related decline in DNA repair.

  7. Site-specific DNA transesterification catalyzed by a restriction enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Sasnauskas, Giedrius; Connolly, Bernard A.; Halford, Stephen E.; Siksnys, Virginijus

    2007-01-01

    Most restriction endonucleases use Mg2+ to hydrolyze phosphodiester bonds at specific DNA sites. We show here that BfiI, a metal-independent restriction enzyme from the phospholipase D superfamily, catalyzes both DNA hydrolysis and transesterification reactions at its recognition site. In the presence of alcohols such as ethanol or glycerol, it attaches the alcohol covalently to the 5′ terminus of the cleaved DNA. Under certain conditions, the terminal 3′-OH of one DNA strand can attack the target phosphodiester bond in the other strand to create a DNA hairpin. Transesterification reactions on DNA with phosphorothioate linkages at the target bond proceed with retention of stereoconfiguration at the phosphorus, indicating, uniquely for a restriction enzyme, a two-step mechanism. We propose that BfiI first makes a covalent enzyme–DNA intermediate, and then it resolves it by a nucleophilic attack of water or an alcohol, to yield hydrolysis or transesterification products, respectively. PMID:17267608

  8. Restriction enzyme cutting site distribution regularity for DNA looping technology.

    PubMed

    Shang, Ying; Zhang, Nan; Zhu, Pengyu; Luo, Yunbo; Huang, Kunlun; Tian, Wenying; Xu, Wentao

    2014-01-25

    The restriction enzyme cutting site distribution regularity and looping conditions were studied systematically. We obtained the restriction enzyme cutting site distributions of 13 commonly used restriction enzymes in 5 model organism genomes through two novel self-compiled software programs. All of the average distances between two adjacent restriction sites fell sharply with increasing statistic intervals, and most fragments were 0-499 bp. A shorter DNA fragment resulted in a lower looping rate, which was also directly proportional to the DNA concentration. When the length was more than 500 bp, the concentration did not affect the looping rate. Therefore, the best known fragment length was longer than 500 bp, and did not contain the restriction enzyme cutting sites which would be used for digestion. In order to make the looping efficiencies reach nearly 100%, 4-5 single cohesive end systems were recommended to digest the genome separately.

  9. Action of restriction endonucleases on transforming DNA of Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed Central

    Beattie, K L; Wakil, A E; Driggers, P H

    1982-01-01

    Cleavage of DNA from Haemophilus influenzae with restriction endonucleases caused inactivation of transforming ability to an extent that depended on the genetic marker and the enzyme. The rate of inactivation, but not the final level of survival, depended on the concentration of enzyme in the restriction digest. In general, the greatest extent of inactivation of transforming activity was obtained with endonucleases that are known to produce the shortest fragments. We electrophoresed restriction digests of H. influenzae DNA in agarose gels and assayed transforming activity of DNA extracted from gel slices. In this way, we determined the lengths of restriction fragments that contain genetic markers of H. influenzae. For the marker that we studied most thoroughly (nov), the shortest restriction fragment that possessed detectable transforming activity was a 0.9-kilobase pair fragment produced by endonuclease R . PstI. The shortest marker-bearing restriction fragment that retained substantial transforming activity (50% of value for undigested DNA) was a 2.1-kilobase pair EcoRI fragment bearing the kan marker. Among marker-bearing restriction fragments 1 to 4 kilobase pairs in length, survival of transforming activity varied 10,000-fold. We relate these observations to the recent findings by Sisco and Smith (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 76:972-976, 1979) that efficient entry of DNA into competent H. influenzae cells appears to require the presence of a recognition sequence that is scattered throughout the Haemophilus genome in many more copies than in unrelated genomes. Images PMID:6288662

  10. Cleavage of mispaired heteroduplex DNA substrates by numerous restriction enzymes.

    PubMed

    Langhans, Mark T; Palladino, Michael J

    2009-01-01

    The utility of restriction endonucleases as a tool in molecular biology is in large part due to the high degree of specificity with which they cleave well-characterized DNA recognition sequences. The specificity of restriction endonucleases is not absolute, yet many commonly used assays of biological phenomena and contemporary molecular biology techniques rely on the premise that restriction enzymes will cleave only perfect cognate recognition sites. In vitro, mispaired heteroduplex DNAs are commonly formed, especially subsequent to polymerase chain reaction amplification. We investigated a panel of restriction endonucleases to determine their ability to cleave mispaired heteroduplex DNA substrates. Two straightforward, non-radioactive assays are used to evaluate mispaired heteroduplex DNA cleavage: a PCR amplification method and an oligonucleotide-based assay. These assays demonstrated that most restriction endonucleases are capable of site-specific double-strand cleavage with heteroduplex mispaired DNA substrates, however, certain mispaired substrates do effectively abrogate cleavage to undetectable levels. These data are consistent with mispaired substrate cleavage previously reported for Eco RI and, importantly, extend our knowledge of mispaired heteroduplex substrate cleavage to 13 additional enzymes.

  11. REBASE--enzymes and genes for DNA restriction and modification.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Richard J; Vincze, Tamas; Posfai, Janos; Macelis, Dana

    2007-01-01

    REBASE is a comprehensive database of information about restriction enzymes, DNA methyltransferases and related proteins involved in the biological process of restriction-modification. It contains fully referenced information about recognition and cleavage sites, isoschizomers, neoschizomers, commercial availability, methylation sensitivity, crystal and sequence data. Experimentally characterized homing endonucleases are also included. All newly sequenced genomes are analyzed for the presence of putative restriction systems and these data are included within the REBASE. The contents or REBASE may be browsed from the web (http://rebase.neb.com/rebase/rebase.ftp.html) and selected compilations can be downloaded by ftp (ftp.neb.com). Additionally, monthly updates can be requested via email.

  12. Bolt cutter functional evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, S.; Wong, T. E.; Frost, S. W.; Gageby, J. V.; Pan, R. B.

    1994-01-01

    The Aerospace Corporation has been implementing finite difference and finite element codes for the analysis of a variety of explosive ordnance devices. Both MESA-2D and DYNA3D have been used to evaluate the role of several design parameters on the performance of a satellite separation system bolt cutter. Due to a lack of high strain rate response data for the materials involved, the properties for the bolt cutter and the bolt were selected to achieve agreement between computer simulation and observed characteristics of the recovered test hardware. The calculations provided insight into design parameters such as the cutter blade kinetic energy, the preload on the bolt, the relative position of the anvil, and the anvil shape. Modeling of the cutting process clarifies metallographic observation of both cut and uncut bolts obtained from several tests. Understanding the physical processes involved in bolt cutter operation may suggest certain design modifications that could improve performance margin without increasing environmental shock response levels.

  13. Selective microbial genomic DNA isolation using restriction endonucleases.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Helen E; Liu, Guohong; Weston, Christopher Q; King, Paula; Pham, Long K; Waltz, Shannon; Helzer, Kimberly T; Day, Laura; Sphar, Dan; Yamamoto, Robert T; Forsyth, R Allyn

    2014-01-01

    To improve the metagenomic analysis of complex microbiomes, we have repurposed restriction endonucleases as methyl specific DNA binding proteins. As an example, we use DpnI immobilized on magnetic beads. The ten minute extraction technique allows specific binding of genomes containing the DpnI Gm6ATC motif common in the genomic DNA of many bacteria including γ-proteobacteria. Using synthetic genome mixtures, we demonstrate 80% recovery of Escherichia coli genomic DNA even when only femtogram quantities are spiked into 10 µg of human DNA background. Binding is very specific with less than 0.5% of human DNA bound. Next Generation Sequencing of input and enriched synthetic mixtures results in over 100-fold enrichment of target genomes relative to human and plant DNA. We also show comparable enrichment when sequencing complex microbiomes such as those from creek water and human saliva. The technique can be broadened to other restriction enzymes allowing for the selective enrichment of trace and unculturable organisms from complex microbiomes and the stratification of organisms according to restriction enzyme enrichment.

  14. Selective Microbial Genomic DNA Isolation Using Restriction Endonucleases

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Helen E.; Liu, Guohong; Weston, Christopher Q.; King, Paula; Pham, Long K.; Waltz, Shannon; Helzer, Kimberly T.; Day, Laura; Sphar, Dan; Yamamoto, Robert T.; Forsyth, R. Allyn

    2014-01-01

    To improve the metagenomic analysis of complex microbiomes, we have repurposed restriction endonucleases as methyl specific DNA binding proteins. As an example, we use DpnI immobilized on magnetic beads. The ten minute extraction technique allows specific binding of genomes containing the DpnI Gm6ATC motif common in the genomic DNA of many bacteria including γ-proteobacteria. Using synthetic genome mixtures, we demonstrate 80% recovery of Escherichia coli genomic DNA even when only femtogram quantities are spiked into 10 µg of human DNA background. Binding is very specific with less than 0.5% of human DNA bound. Next Generation Sequencing of input and enriched synthetic mixtures results in over 100-fold enrichment of target genomes relative to human and plant DNA. We also show comparable enrichment when sequencing complex microbiomes such as those from creek water and human saliva. The technique can be broadened to other restriction enzymes allowing for the selective enrichment of trace and unculturable organisms from complex microbiomes and the stratification of organisms according to restriction enzyme enrichment. PMID:25279840

  15. Adaptive DNA Computing Algorithm by Using PCR and Restriction Enzyme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kon, Yuji; Yabe, Kaoru; Rajaee, Nordiana; Ono, Osamu

    In this paper, we introduce an adaptive DNA computing algorithm by using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and restriction enzyme. The adaptive algorithm is designed based on Adleman-Lipton paradigm[3] of DNA computing. In this work, however, unlike the Adleman- Lipton architecture a cutting operation has been introduced to the algorithm and the mechanism in which the molecules used by computation were feedback to the next cycle devised. Moreover, the amplification by PCR is performed in the molecule used by feedback and the difference concentration arisen in the base sequence can be used again. By this operation the molecules which serve as a solution candidate can be reduced down and the optimal solution is carried out in the shortest path problem. The validity of the proposed adaptive algorithm is considered with the logical simulation and finally we go on to propose applying adaptive algorithm to the chemical experiment which used the actual DNA molecules for solving an optimal network problem.

  16. Structure and operation of the DNA-translocating type I DNA restriction enzymes.

    PubMed

    Kennaway, Christopher K; Taylor, James E; Song, Chun Feng; Potrzebowski, Wojciech; Nicholson, William; White, John H; Swiderska, Anna; Obarska-Kosinska, Agnieszka; Callow, Philip; Cooper, Laurie P; Roberts, Gareth A; Artero, Jean-Baptiste; Bujnicki, Janusz M; Trinick, John; Kneale, G Geoff; Dryden, David T F

    2012-01-01

    Type I DNA restriction/modification (RM) enzymes are molecular machines found in the majority of bacterial species. Their early discovery paved the way for the development of genetic engineering. They control (restrict) the influx of foreign DNA via horizontal gene transfer into the bacterium while maintaining sequence-specific methylation (modification) of host DNA. The endonuclease reaction of these enzymes on unmethylated DNA is preceded by bidirectional translocation of thousands of base pairs of DNA toward the enzyme. We present the structures of two type I RM enzymes, EcoKI and EcoR124I, derived using electron microscopy (EM), small-angle scattering (neutron and X-ray), and detailed molecular modeling. DNA binding triggers a large contraction of the open form of the enzyme to a compact form. The path followed by DNA through the complexes is revealed by using a DNA mimic anti-restriction protein. The structures reveal an evolutionary link between type I RM enzymes and type II RM enzymes.

  17. Detection of possible restriction sites for type II restriction enzymes in DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Gagniuc, P; Cimponeriu, D; Ionescu-Tîrgovişte, C; Mihai, Andrada; Stavarachi, Monica; Mihai, T; Gavrilă, L

    2011-01-01

    In order to make a step forward in the knowledge of the mechanism operating in complex polygenic disorders such as diabetes and obesity, this paper proposes a new algorithm (PRSD -possible restriction site detection) and its implementation in Applied Genetics software. This software can be used for in silico detection of potential (hidden) recognition sites for endonucleases and for nucleotide repeats identification. The recognition sites for endonucleases may result from hidden sequences through deletion or insertion of a specific number of nucleotides. Tests were conducted on DNA sequences downloaded from NCBI servers using specific recognition sites for common type II restriction enzymes introduced in the software database (n = 126). Each possible recognition site indicated by the PRSD algorithm implemented in Applied Genetics was checked and confirmed by NEBcutter V2.0 and Webcutter 2.0 software. In the sequence NG_008724.1 (which includes 63632 nucleotides) we found a high number of potential restriction sites for ECO R1 that may be produced by deletion (n = 43 sites) or insertion (n = 591 sites) of one nucleotide. The second module of Applied Genetics has been designed to find simple repeats sizes with a real future in understanding the role of SNPs (Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms) in the pathogenesis of the complex metabolic disorders. We have tested the presence of simple repetitive sequences in five DNA sequence. The software indicated exact position of each repeats detected in the tested sequences. Future development of Applied Genetics can provide an alternative for powerful tools used to search for restriction sites or repetitive sequences or to improve genotyping methods.

  18. The use of phosphorothioate-modified DNA in restriction enzyme reactions to prepare nicked DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, J W; Schmidt, W; Cosstick, R; Okruszek, A; Eckstein, F

    1985-01-01

    The RF IV form of M13 DNA was synthesized enzymatically in vitro, using the viral (+)strand as template, to contain phosphorothioate-modified internucleotidic linkages of the Rp configuration on the 5' side of every base of a particular type in the newly-synthesized (-)strand. Twenty nine restriction enzymes were then tested for their reactions with the appropriate modified DNA types having a phosphorothioate linkage placed exactly at the cleavage site(s) of these enzymes in the (-)strand. Eleven of the seventeen restriction enzymes tested that had recognition sequences of five bases or more could be used to convert the phosphorothioate DNA entirely into the nicked form, either by simply allowing the reaction to go to completion with excess enzyme (Ava I, Ava II, Ban II, Hind II, Nci I, Pst I or Pvu I) or by stopping the reaction at the appropriate time before the nicked DNA is linearized (Bam HI, Bgl I, Eco RI or Hind III). Only modification of the exact cleavage site in the (-)strand could block linearization by the first class of enzymes. The results presented imply that the restriction enzyme-directed nicking of phosphorothioate M13 DNA occurs exclusively in the (+)strand. Images PMID:3001649

  19. Cleavage patterns of Drosophila melanogaster satellite DNA by restriction enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Shen, C J; Wiesehahn, G; Hearst, J E

    1976-01-01

    The five satellite DNAs of Drosophila melanogaster have been isolated by the combined use of different equilibrium density gradients and hydrolyzed by seven different restriction enzymes; Hae III, Hind II + Hind III, Hinf, Hpa II, EcoR I and EcoR II. The 1.705 satellite is not hydrolyzed by any of the enzymes tested. Hae III is the only restriction enzyme that cuts the 1.672 and 1.686 satellites. The cleavage products from either of these reactions has a heterogeneous size distribution. Part of the 1.688 satellite is cut by Hae III and by Hinf into three discrete fragments with M.W. that are multiples of 2.3 X 10(5) daltons (approximately 350 base pairs). In addition, two minor bands are detected in the 1.688-Hinf products. The mole ratios of the trimer, dimer and monomer are: 1:6.30 : 63.6 for 1.688-Hae III and 1 : 22.0 : 403 for 1.688-Hinf. Circular mitochondrial DNA (rho = 1.680) is cut into discrete fragments by all of the enzymes tested and molecular weights of these fragments have been determined. Images PMID:818625

  20. Differential dependence on DNA ligase of type II restriction enzymes: a practical way toward ligase-free DNA automaton.

    PubMed

    Chen, Peng; Li, Jing; Zhao, Jian; He, Lin; Zhang, Zhizhou

    2007-02-16

    DNA computing study is a new paradigm in computer science and biological computing fields. As one of DNA computing approaches, DNA automaton is composed of the hardware, input DNA molecule and state transition molecules. By now restriction enzymes are key hardware for DNA computing automaton. It has been found that DNA computing efficiency may be independent on DNA ligases when type IIS restriction enzymes like FokI are used as hardware. In this study, we compared FokI with four other distinct enzymes HgaI, BsmFI, BbsI, and BseMII, and found their differential independence on T4 DNA ligase when performing automaton reactions. Since DNA automaton is a potential powerful tool to tackle gene relationship in genomic network scale, the feasible ligase-free DNA automaton may set an initial base to develop functional DNA automata for various DNA technology development and implications in genetics study in the near future.

  1. A Time-Efficient and User-Friendly Method for Plasmid DNA Restriction Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaBanca, Frank; Berg, Claire M.

    1998-01-01

    Describes an experiment in which plasmid DNA is digested with restriction enzymes that cleave the plasmid either once or twice. The DNA is stained, loaded on a gel, electrophoresed, and viewed under normal laboratory conditions during electrophoresis. (DDR)

  2. Isolation of DNA from agarose gels using DEAE-paper. Application to restriction site mapping of adenovirus type 16 DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Winberg, G; Hammarskjöld, M L

    1980-01-01

    A new method for isolating DNA from agarose gels is described. The method involves the simultaneous transfer of all DNA-fragments from an agarose slab gel onto DEAE-cellulose paper and the elution of the individual fragments from the paper with 1 M NaCl. DNA isolated from agarose gels in this way is susceptible to cleavage with several restriction endonucleases, and can be labeled in vitro with E coli DNA-polymerase I, T4 DNA-polymerase and T4 polynucleotide kinase. We have used the method to construct restriction endonuclease maps of adenovirus type 16 DNA. Images PMID:6252542

  3. Characterization of the 5-hydroxymethylcytosine-specific DNA restriction endonucleases.

    PubMed

    Borgaro, Janine G; Zhu, Zhenyu

    2013-04-01

    In T4 bacteriophage, 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) is incorporated into DNA during replication. In response, bacteria may have developed modification-dependent type IV restriction enzymes to defend the cell from T4-like infection. PvuRts1I was the first identified restriction enzyme to exhibit specificity toward hmC over 5-methylcytosine (5mC) and cytosine. By using PvuRts1I as the original member, we identified and characterized a number of homologous proteins. Most enzymes exhibited similar cutting properties to PvuRts1I, creating a double-stranded cleavage on the 3' side of the modified cytosine. In addition, for efficient cutting, the enzymes require two cytosines 21-22-nt apart and on opposite strands where one cytosine must be modified. Interestingly, the specificity determination unveiled a new layer of complexity where the enzymes not only have specificity for 5-β-glucosylated hmC (5βghmC) but also 5-α-glucosylated hmC (5αghmC). In some cases, the enzymes are inhibited by 5βghmC, whereas in others they are inhibited by 5αghmC. These observations indicate that the position of the sugar ring relative to the base is a determining factor in the substrate specificity of the PvuRts1I homologues. Lastly, we envision that the unique properties of select PvuRts1I homologues will permit their use as an additive or alternative tool to map the hydroxymethylome.

  4. Characterization of the 5-hydroxymethylcytosine-specific DNA restriction endonucleases

    PubMed Central

    Borgaro, Janine G.; Zhu, Zhenyu

    2013-01-01

    In T4 bacteriophage, 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) is incorporated into DNA during replication. In response, bacteria may have developed modification-dependent type IV restriction enzymes to defend the cell from T4-like infection. PvuRts1I was the first identified restriction enzyme to exhibit specificity toward hmC over 5-methylcytosine (5mC) and cytosine. By using PvuRts1I as the original member, we identified and characterized a number of homologous proteins. Most enzymes exhibited similar cutting properties to PvuRts1I, creating a double-stranded cleavage on the 3′ side of the modified cytosine. In addition, for efficient cutting, the enzymes require two cytosines 21–22-nt apart and on opposite strands where one cytosine must be modified. Interestingly, the specificity determination unveiled a new layer of complexity where the enzymes not only have specificity for 5-β-glucosylated hmC (5βghmC) but also 5-α-glucosylated hmC (5αghmC). In some cases, the enzymes are inhibited by 5βghmC, whereas in others they are inhibited by 5αghmC. These observations indicate that the position of the sugar ring relative to the base is a determining factor in the substrate specificity of the PvuRts1I homologues. Lastly, we envision that the unique properties of select PvuRts1I homologues will permit their use as an additive or alternative tool to map the hydroxymethylome. PMID:23482393

  5. Effect of site-specific modification on restriction endonucleases and DNA modification methyltransferases.

    PubMed Central

    McClelland, M; Nelson, M; Raschke, E

    1994-01-01

    Restriction endonucleases have site-specific interactions with DNA that can often be inhibited by site-specific DNA methylation and other site-specific DNA modifications. However, such inhibition cannot generally be predicted. The empirically acquired data on these effects are tabulated for over 320 restriction endonucleases. In addition, a table of known site-specific DNA modification methyltransferases and their specificities is presented along with EMBL database accession numbers for cloned genes. PMID:7937074

  6. Innate Structure of DNA Foci Restricts the Mixing of DNA from Different Chromosome Territories

    PubMed Central

    Fennessy, Dorota; Jackson, Dean A.

    2011-01-01

    The distribution of chromatin within the mammalian nucleus is constrained by its organization into chromosome territories (CTs). However, recent studies have suggested that promiscuous intra- and inter-chromosomal interactions play fundamental roles in regulating chromatin function and so might define the spatial integrity of CTs. In order to test the extent of DNA mixing between CTs, DNA foci of individual CTs were labeled in living cells following incorporation of Alexa-488 and Cy-3 conjugated replication precursor analogues during consecutive cell cycles. Uniquely labeled chromatin domains, resolved following random mitotic segregation, were visualized as discrete structures with defined borders. At the level of resolution analysed, evidence for mixing of chromatin from adjacent domains was only apparent within the surface volumes where neighboring CTs touched. However, while less than 1% of the nuclear volume represented domains of inter-chromosomal mixing, the dynamic plasticity of DNA foci within individual CTs allows continual transformation of CT structure so that different domains of chromatin mixing evolve over time. Notably, chromatin mixing at the boundaries of adjacent CTs had little impact on the innate structural properties of DNA foci. However, when TSA was used to alter the extent of histone acetylation changes in chromatin correlated with increased chromatin mixing. We propose that DNA foci maintain a structural integrity that restricts widespread mixing of DNA and discuss how the potential to dynamically remodel genome organization might alter during cell differentiation. PMID:22205925

  7. Diamond-Cutter Drill Bits

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    Geothermal Energy Program Office of Geothermal and Wind Technologies Diamond-Cutter Drill Bits Diamond-cutter drill bits cut through tough rock quicker, reducing the cost of drilling for energy resources The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contributed markedly to the geothermal, oil, and gas industries through the development of the advanced polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC) drill bit. Introduced in the 1970s by General Electric Company (GE), the PDC bit uses thin, diamond layers bonded to t

  8. Restriction enzyme mapping of the DNA of Streptomyces bacteriophage B alpha and its deletion derivatives.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, H; Nakano, M M; Ogawara, H

    1982-12-01

    Cleavage analysis of actinophage B alpha DNA was done with several restriction enzymes, and a restriction map of the DNA was determined. The DNA appeared to carry cohesive ends. Deletion mutants of actinophage B alpha were isolated by five cycles of treatment with 15 mM PPi. Both mutants had deletions of 2.5 of 1.8 megadaltons near one end of the genome, and one of them lost the single EcoRI cleavage site.

  9. An improvement of restriction analysis of bacteriophage DNA using capillary electrophoresis in agarose solution.

    PubMed

    Klepárník, K; Malá, Z; Doskar, J; Rosypal, S; Bocek, P

    1995-03-01

    Seven representatives of the serogroup B Staphylococcus aureus bacteriophages, 29, 53, 55, 83A, 85, phi 11 and 80 alpha, were examined by capillary electrophoresis (CE) for genomic homology using DNA restriction analysis. Genomic DNA of individual bacteriophages was cleaved by HindIII restriction endonuclease, and the resulting restriction fragments were separated by standard horizontal agarose slab gel electrophoresis (SGE) as well as by CE in low-melting-point agarose solutions. The number and size of restriction fragments identified by both methods were compared. The high separation power of CE makes it possible to extend the restriction fragment patterns. In most of the restriction patterns, some additional restriction fragments as small as 150 bp, not identified by SGE, were detected. With respect to speed, high separation efficiency, low sample consumption and automation, CE offers a simple procedure for processing of multiple samples cost-effectively in a reasonable time. The comparison of the complemented restriction patterns of the different phage strains and the subsequent identification of their common fragments leads to a deeper understanding of their phylogenetic relationships. The genome homologies expressed for individual phage pairs in terms of coefficient F values ranged from 15 to 69%. These values are in good accordance with the degree of DNA homology of these phages as determined by DNA hybridization studies and thermal denaturation analysis of DNA by other authors. The total size of each phage genome was estimated by adding the sizes of individual restriction fragments.

  10. Analysis of restriction enzyme-induced DNA double-strand breaks in Chinese hamster ovary cells by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis: implications for chromosome damage.

    PubMed

    Ager, D D; Phillips, J W; Columna, E A; Winegar, R A; Morgan, W F

    1991-11-01

    Restriction enzymes can be electroporated into mammalian cells, and the induced DNA double-strand breaks can lead to aberrations in metaphase chromosomes. Chinese hamster ovary cells were electroporated with PstI, which generates 3' cohesive-end breaks, PvuII, which generates blunt-end breaks, or XbaI, which generates 5' cohesive-end breaks. Although all three restriction enzymes induced similar numbers of aberrant metaphase cells, PvuII was dramatically more effective at inducing both exchange-type and deletion-type chromosome aberrations. Our cytogenetic studies also indicated that enzymes are active within cells for only a short time. We used pulsed-field gel electrophoresis to investigate (i) how long it takes for enzymes to cleave DNA after electroporation into cells, (ii) how long enzymes are active in the cells, and (iii) how the DNA double-strand breaks induced are related to the aberrations observed in metaphase chromosomes. At the same concentrations used in the cytogenetic studies, all enzymes were active within 10 min of electroporation. PstI and PvuII showed a distinct peak in break formation at 20 min, whereas XbaI showed a gradual increase in break frequency over time. Another increase in the number of breaks observed with all three enzymes at 2 and 3 h after electroporation was probably due to nonspecific DNA degradation in a subpopulation of enzyme-damaged cells that lysed after enzyme exposure. Break frequency and chromosome aberration frequency were inversely related: The blunt-end cutter PvuII gave rise to the most aberrations but the fewest breaks, suggesting that it is the type of break rather than the break frequency that is important for chromosome aberration formation.

  11. Isolation and restriction endonuclease cleavage of Anaplasma marginale DNA in situ in agarose.

    PubMed Central

    Krueger, C M; Buening, G M

    1988-01-01

    Bacterial restriction endonucleases were used to produce DNA cleavage patterns that could be useful as tools to study the relatedness among Anaplasma marginale isolates. Bovine erythrocytes infected with A. marginale were lysed, washed, and embedded in agarose. The embedded erythrocytes and bacterial pathogens were partially digested by sequential infiltration of the agarose with acetone, lysozyme, sodium dodecyl sulfate, and proteinase K. The unfragmented genomic DNA was left supported and protected in a porous matrix. The DNA was digested in situ in agarose under the following conditions: (i) brief treatment with phenol, (ii) brief washing with distilled water, and (iii) adjustment of restriction enzyme digestion mixture to compensate for the volume of the agarose. The cleaved DNA was electrophoresed horizontally to produce a DNA cleavage pattern. Of 19 restriction enzymes screened, 12 produced distinct DNA bands from the genomes of each of the five A. marginale isolates examined. The DNA cleavage pattern produced from each isolate with a given restriction enzyme was reproducible. However, the DNA cleavage patterns produced from different isolates with a given restriction enzyme were not necessarily identical. This procedure could be modified for general bacterial DNA isolation, in situ agarose digestion, and manipulations. Images PMID:2838504

  12. 21 CFR 880.6200 - Ring cutter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ring cutter. 880.6200 Section 880.6200 Food and....6200 Ring cutter. (a) Identification. A ring cutter is a device intended for medical purposes that is used to cut a ring on a patient's finger so that the ring can be removed. The device incorporates...

  13. 21 CFR 880.6200 - Ring cutter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ring cutter. 880.6200 Section 880.6200 Food and....6200 Ring cutter. (a) Identification. A ring cutter is a device intended for medical purposes that is used to cut a ring on a patient's finger so that the ring can be removed. The device incorporates...

  14. 21 CFR 880.6200 - Ring cutter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ring cutter. 880.6200 Section 880.6200 Food and....6200 Ring cutter. (a) Identification. A ring cutter is a device intended for medical purposes that is used to cut a ring on a patient's finger so that the ring can be removed. The device incorporates...

  15. 21 CFR 880.6200 - Ring cutter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ring cutter. 880.6200 Section 880.6200 Food and....6200 Ring cutter. (a) Identification. A ring cutter is a device intended for medical purposes that is used to cut a ring on a patient's finger so that the ring can be removed. The device incorporates...

  16. 21 CFR 880.6200 - Ring cutter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ring cutter. 880.6200 Section 880.6200 Food and....6200 Ring cutter. (a) Identification. A ring cutter is a device intended for medical purposes that is used to cut a ring on a patient's finger so that the ring can be removed. The device incorporates...

  17. Recycling of protein subunits during DNA translocation and cleavage by Type I restriction-modification enzymes.

    PubMed

    Simons, Michelle; Szczelkun, Mark D

    2011-09-01

    The Type I restriction-modification enzymes comprise three protein subunits; HsdS and HsdM that form a methyltransferase (MTase) and HsdR that associates with the MTase and catalyses Adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP)-dependent DNA translocation and cleavage. Here, we examine whether the MTase and HsdR components can 'turnover' in vitro, i.e. whether they can catalyse translocation and cleavage events on one DNA molecule, dissociate and then re-bind a second DNA molecule. Translocation termination by both EcoKI and EcoR124I leads to HsdR dissociation from linear DNA but not from circular DNA. Following DNA cleavage, the HsdR subunits appear unable to dissociate even though the DNA is linear, suggesting a tight interaction with the cleaved product. The MTases of EcoKI and EcoAI can dissociate from DNA following either translocation or cleavage and can initiate reactions on new DNA molecules as long as free HsdR molecules are available. In contrast, the MTase of EcoR124I does not turnover and additional cleavage of circular DNA is not observed by inclusion of RecBCD, a helicase-nuclease that degrades the linear DNA product resulting from Type I cleavage. Roles for Type I restriction endonuclease subunit dynamics in restriction alleviation in the cell are discussed.

  18. Helicobacter pylori DprA alleviates restriction barrier for incoming DNA

    PubMed Central

    Dwivedi, Gajendradhar R.; Sharma, Eshita; Rao, Desirazu N.

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a Gram-negative bacterium that colonizes human stomach and causes gastric inflammation. The species is naturally competent and displays remarkable diversity. The presence of a large number of restriction–modification (R–M) systems in this bacterium creates a barrier against natural transformation by foreign DNA. Yet, mechanisms that protect incoming double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) from restriction enzymes are not well understood. A DNA-binding protein, DNA Processing Protein A (DprA) has been shown to facilitate natural transformation of several Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria by protecting incoming single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and promoting RecA loading on it. However, in this study, we report that H. pylori DprA (HpDprA) binds not only ssDNA but also dsDNA thereby conferring protection to both from various exonucleases and Type II restriction enzymes. Here, we observed a stimulatory role of HpDprA in DNA methylation through physical interaction with methyltransferases. Thus, HpDprA displayed dual functional interaction with H. pylori R–M systems by not only inhibiting the restriction enzymes but also stimulating methyltransferases. These results indicate that HpDprA could be one of the factors that modulate the R–M barrier during inter-strain natural transformation in H. pylori. PMID:23355610

  19. A strategy to sequence repetitive DNA based on partial restriction enzyme cleavage

    SciTech Connect

    Abath, F.G.C.; Holder, A.A.

    1995-06-01

    The strategy to sequence repetitive DNA described in this article is based on partial restriction enzyme cleavage. It is an alternative to using nested deletion with exonuclease III or similiar enzymes in which progressively more remote regions of the target DNA are brought into range for sequencing by universal primers. 4 refs., 1 tab.

  20. Human papillomavirus DNA from warts for typing by endonuclease restriction patterns: purification by alkaline plasmid methods.

    PubMed

    Chinami, M; Tanikawa, E; Hachisuka, H; Sasai, Y; Shingu, M

    1990-01-01

    The alkaline plasmid DNA extraction method of Birnboim and Doly was applied for the isolation of human papillomavirus (HPV) from warts. Tissue from common and plantar warts was digested with proteinase K, and the extrachromosomal circular covalently-closed form of HPV-DNA was rapidly extracted by alkaline sodium dodecyl sulphate and phenol-chloroform treatment. Recovery of HPV-DNA from the tissue was sufficient for determination of endonuclease restriction patterns by agarose gel electrophoresis.

  1. A fluorescence method for detection of DNA and DNA methylation based on graphene oxide and restriction endonuclease HpaII.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Gao, Chunyan; Xiong, Yanxiang; Zhang, Yuanjian; Liu, Songqin; Pu, Yuepu

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation plays an important role in many biological events and is associated with various diseases. Most traditional methods for detection of DNA methylation are based on the complex and expensive bisulfite method. In this paper, we report a novel fluorescence method to detect DNA and DNA methylation based on graphene oxide (GO) and restriction endonuclease HpaII. The skillfully designed probe DNA labeled with 5-carboxyfluorescein (FAM) and optimized GO concentration keep the probe/target DNA still adsorbed on the GO. After the cleavage action of HpaII the labeled FAM is released from the GO surface and its fluorescence recovers, which could be used to detect DNA in the linear range of 50 pM-50 nM with a detection limit of 43 pM. DNA methylation induced by transmethylase (Mtase) or other chemical reagents prevents HpaII from recognizing and cleaving the specific site; as a result, fluorescence cannot recover. The fluorescence recovery efficiency is closely related to the DNA methylation level, which can be used to detect DNA methylation by comparing it with the fluorescence in the presence of intact target DNA. The method for detection of DNA and DNA methylation is simple, reliable and accurate.

  2. Heterothallic species of neurospora are distinguishable by restriction analysis of their nuclear rDNA sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, C.; Dutta, S.K.

    1983-01-01

    Restriction analysis of rDNAs was used to distinguish nuclear rDNA's of three different reference strains of heterothallic species of the genus Neurospora: N. crassa 74A (FGSC number987), N. intermedia P420 (FGSC number2316), and N. sitophila 10B (FGSC number580). Two approaches were adopted: (1) Nuclear DNA's of these three Neurospora species were treated with various restriction enzymes. Against the streaks of nuclear DNAs on the 0.7% agarose gels background bands were visible. These background bands are visible because rDNA sequences of Neurospora species exist in multiple copies within the nuclear DNA's. (2) The second approach was comparison of auto-radiographs of hybrid molecules of Southern blot transfers of restricted nuclear DNAs and /sup 32/P-labelled nick translated rDNA's (referred to as rDNA probe) isolated from N. crassa slime mutant (FGSC number1118), rDNA cloned into pBR322. A summary of restricted fragment sizes as seen in the gels and in autoradiographs of Southern blots of the respective gels is presented.

  3. Exogenous DNA internalisation by sperm cells is improved by combining lipofection and restriction enzyme mediated integration.

    PubMed

    Churchil, R R; Gupta, J; Singh, A; Sharma, D

    2011-06-01

    1. Three types of exogenous DNA inserts, i.e. complete linearised pVIVO2-GFP/LacZ vector (9620 bp), the LacZ gene (5317 bp) and the GFP gene (2152 bp) were used to transfect chicken spermatozoa through simple incubation of sperm cells with insert. 2. PCR assay, Dot Blot hybridisation and Southern hybridisation showed the successful internalisation of exogenous DNA by chicken sperm cells. 3. Lipofection and Restriction Enzyme Mediated Integration (REMI) were used to improve the rate of internalisation of exogenous DNA by sperm cells. 4. Results from dot blot as well as Southern hybridisation were semi-quantified and improved exogenous DNA uptake by sperm cells through lipofection and REMI. Stronger signals were observed from hybridisation of LacZ as well as GFP specific probe with the DNA from lipofected exogenous DNA transfected sperm DNA in comparison with those transfected with nude exogenous DNA.

  4. Real-time restriction mapping of DNA stretched in nanofluidic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riehn, Robert; Lu, Manchun

    2005-03-01

    We present real-time sequence-specific restriction mapping of single DNA molecules stretched in nanofabricated channels. In these channels, DNA is linearized and extended to up to 3/4 of its contour length, permitting attribution of the cutting sites to specific regions in the genetic code. We will present real-time restriction of genomic viral DNA with the enzymes Sma I, Sac I, Kpn I. We are able to determine cutting sites and can quantify the cutting rates at different genomic locations. Complete digestion can be achieved within less than 10 seconds. Our device operates in a quasi-continous mode, which we achieved by controlling the concetration of the necessary co-factor Mg^2+ throughout the mixed micro- and nanofluidic device. DNA was observed using fluorescence micrcoscopy and intercalating DNA stains.

  5. Entry of bacteriophage T7 DNA into the cell and escape from host restriction

    SciTech Connect

    Moffatt, B.A.; Studier, F.W.

    1988-05-01

    T7 DNA did not become susceptible to degradation by the host restriction enzymes EcoB, EcoK, or EcoP1 until 6 to 7 min after infection (at 30/sup 0/C). During this period, T7 gene 0.3 protein is made and inactivates EcoB and EcoK, allowing wild-type T7, or even a mutant that has recognition sites flanking gene 0.3, to escape restriction by these enzymes. However, T7 failed to escape restriction by EcoP1 even though 0.3 protein was made, evidently because 0.3 protein is unable to inactivate EcoP1. How T7 DNA can be accessible to transcription but not restriction in the first few minutes of infection is not yet understood, but we favor the idea that the entering DNA is initially segregated in a special place. Entry of T7 DNA into the cell is normally coupled to transcription. Tests of degradation of DNAs having their first restriction sites different distances from the end of the DNA indicated that only the first 1000 or so base pairs (2.5%) of the molecule enter the cell without transcription. An exception was the only mutant tested that lacks base pairs 343 to 393 of T7 DNA; most or all of this DNA entered the cell without being transcribed, apparently because it lacks a sequence that normally arrests entry. This block to DNA entry would normally be relieved by the host RNA polymerase transcribing from an appropriately situated promoter, but the block can also be relieved by T7 RNA polymerase, if supplied by the host cell. T7 mutants that lack all three strong early promoters A1, A2, and A3 could grow by using a secondary promoter.

  6. A strategy for development of electrochemical DNA biosensor based on site-specific DNA cleavage of restriction endonuclease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinghua; Zhang, Jing; Yang, Huanghao; Fu, Fengfu; Chen, Guonan

    2010-09-15

    A new strategy for development of electrochemical DNA biosensor based on site-specific DNA cleavage of restriction endonuclease and using quantum dots as reporter was reported in this paper. The biosensor was fabricated by immobilizing a capture hairpin probe, thiolated single strand DNA labeled with biotin group, on a gold electrode. BfuCI nuclease, which is able to specifically cleave only double strand DNA but not single strand DNA, was used to reduce background current and improve the sensitivity. We demonstrated that the capture hairpin probe can be cleaved by BfuCI nuclease in the absence of target DNA, but cannot be cleaved in the presence of target DNA. The difference before and after enzymatic cleavage was then monitored by electrochemical method after the quantum dots were dissolved from the hybrids. Our results suggested that the usage of BfuCI nuclease obviously improved the sensitivity and selectivity of the biosensor. We successfully applied this method to the sequence-selective discrimination between perfectly matched and mismatched target DNA including a single-base mismatched target DNA, and detected as low as 3.3 × 10(-14) M of complementary target DNA. Furthermore, our above strategy was also verified with fluorescent method by designing a fluorescent molecular beacon (MB), which combined the capture hairpin probe and a pair of fluorophore (TAMRA) and quencher (DABCYL). The fluorescent results are consistent with that of electroanalysis, further indicating that the proposed new strategy indeed works as we expected.

  7. Tetrameric structure of the restriction DNA glycosylase R.PabI in complex with nonspecific double-stranded DNA

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Delong; Miyazono, Ken-ichi; Tanokura, Masaru

    2016-01-01

    R.PabI is a type II restriction enzyme that recognizes the 5′-GTAC-3′ sequence and belongs to the HALFPIPE superfamily. Although most restriction enzymes cleave phosphodiester bonds at specific sites by hydrolysis, R.PabI flips the guanine and adenine bases of the recognition sequence out of the DNA helix and hydrolyzes the N-glycosidic bond of the flipped adenine in a similar manner to DNA glycosylases. In this study, we determined the structure of R.PabI in complex with double-stranded DNA without the R.PabI recognition sequence by X-ray crystallography. The 1.9 Å resolution structure of the complex showed that R.PabI forms a tetrameric structure to sandwich the double-stranded DNA and the tetrameric structure is stabilized by four salt bridges. DNA binding and DNA glycosylase assays of the R.PabI mutants showed that the residues that form the salt bridges (R70 and D71) are essential for R.PabI to find the recognition sequence from the sea of nonspecific sequences. R.PabI is predicted to utilize the tetrameric structure to bind nonspecific double-stranded DNA weakly and slide along it to find the recognition sequence. PMID:27731370

  8. Restriction landmark cDNA scanning (RLCS): a novel cDNA display system using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, H; Yaoi, T; Kawai, J; Hara, A; Kuwajima, G; Wantanabe, S

    1996-01-01

    We have developed a new method, designated restriction landmark cDNA scanning (RLCS), which displays many cDNA species quantitatively and simultaneously as two-dimensional gel spots. In this method cDNA species of uniform length were prepared for each mRNA species using restriction enzymes. After the restriction enzyme sites were radiolabeled as landmarks, the labeled fragments were subjected to high resolution two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. In analyses of cDNA samples from adult mouse liver and brain (cerebral cortex, cerebellum and brain stem) we detected approximately 500 and >1000 discrete gel spots respectively of various intensities at a time. The spot patterns of the three brain regions were very similar, although not identical, but were quite different from the pattern for the liver. RNA blot hybridization analysis using several cloned spot DNAs as probes showed that differences in intensity of the spots among RLCS profiles correlated well with expression levels of the corresponding mRNA species in the brain regions. Because the spots and their intensities reflect distinct mRNA species and their expression level respectively, the RLCS is a novel cDNA display system which provides a great deal of information and should be useful for systematic documentation of differentially expressed genes. PMID:8628652

  9. Methods for producing partially digested restriction DNA fragments and for producing a partially modified PCR product

    DOEpatents

    Wong, Kwong-Kwok

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is an improved method of making a partially modified PCR product from a DNA fragment with a polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In a standard PCR process, the DNA fragment is combined with starting deoxynucleoside triphosphates, a primer, a buffer and a DNA polymerase in a PCR mixture. The PCR mixture is then reacted in the PCR producing copies of the DNA fragment. The improvement of the present invention is adding an amount of a modifier at any step prior to completion of the PCR process thereby randomly and partially modifying the copies of the DNA fragment as a partially modified PCR product. The partially modified PCR product may then be digested with an enzyme that cuts the partially modified PCR product at unmodified sites thereby producing an array of DNA restriction fragments.

  10. A restriction enzyme-powered autonomous DNA walking machine: its application for a highly sensitive electrochemiluminescence assay of DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ying; Xiang, Yun; Yuan, Ruo; Chai, Yaqin

    2014-12-01

    The construction of a restriction enzyme (Nt.AlwI)-powered DNA walking machine and its application for highly sensitive detection of DNA are described. DNA nanostructure tracks containing four overhang sequences with electrochemiluminescence (ECL) labels and complementary to the walker (target DNA) are self-assembled on the sensing electrode. The walker hybridizes with the complementary sequences on the tracks and forms specific recognition sites for Nt.AlwI, which cleaves the overhang sequences, releases the ECL labels and enables directional movement of the walker along the tracks. The formation of the nanostructure tracks and the Nt.AlwI-assisted cleavage of the overhang sequences in the presence of the walker are verified by using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis and cyclic voltammetry. The successive movement of the walker on the nanostructure tracks leads to continuous removal of massive ECL labels from the sensing electrode, which results in a significantly amplified suppression of the ECL emission for highly sensitive detection of sequence-specific DNA down to 0.19 pM. Results show that this DNA walking machine can also offer single-base mismatch discrimination capability. The successful application of the DNA walking machine for sequence-specific DNA detection can thus offer new opportunities for molecular machines in biosensing applications.The construction of a restriction enzyme (Nt.AlwI)-powered DNA walking machine and its application for highly sensitive detection of DNA are described. DNA nanostructure tracks containing four overhang sequences with electrochemiluminescence (ECL) labels and complementary to the walker (target DNA) are self-assembled on the sensing electrode. The walker hybridizes with the complementary sequences on the tracks and forms specific recognition sites for Nt.AlwI, which cleaves the overhang sequences, releases the ECL labels and enables directional movement of the walker along the tracks. The formation of the

  11. HIPK2 restricts SIRT1 activity upon severe DNA damage by a phosphorylation-controlled mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Conrad, E; Polonio-Vallon, T; Meister, M; Matt, S; Bitomsky, N; Herbel, C; Liebl, M; Greiner, V; Kriznik, B; Schumacher, S; Krieghoff-Henning, E; Hofmann, T G

    2016-01-01

    Upon severe DNA damage a cellular signalling network initiates a cell death response through activating tumour suppressor p53 in association with promyelocytic leukaemia (PML) nuclear bodies. The deacetylase Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) suppresses cell death after DNA damage by antagonizing p53 acetylation. To facilitate efficient p53 acetylation, SIRT1 function needs to be restricted. How SIRT1 activity is regulated under these conditions remains largely unclear. Here we provide evidence that SIRT1 activity is limited upon severe DNA damage through phosphorylation by the DNA damage-responsive kinase HIPK2. We found that DNA damage provokes interaction of SIRT1 and HIPK2, which phosphorylates SIRT1 at Serine 682 upon lethal damage. Furthermore, upon DNA damage SIRT1 and HIPK2 colocalize at PML nuclear bodies, and PML depletion abrogates DNA damage-induced SIRT1 Ser682 phosphorylation. We show that Ser682 phosphorylation inhibits SIRT1 activity and impacts on p53 acetylation, apoptotic p53 target gene expression and cell death. Mechanistically, we found that DNA damage-induced SIRT1 Ser682 phosphorylation provokes disruption of the complex between SIRT1 and its activator AROS. Our findings indicate that phosphorylation-dependent restriction of SIRT1 activity by HIPK2 shapes the p53 response. PMID:26113041

  12. Modification-dependent restriction endonuclease, MspJI, flips 5-methylcytosine out of the DNA helix.

    PubMed

    Horton, John R; Wang, Hua; Mabuchi, Megumu Yamada; Zhang, Xing; Roberts, Richard J; Zheng, Yu; Wilson, Geoffrey G; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2014-10-29

    MspJI belongs to a family of restriction enzymes that cleave DNA containing 5-methylcytosine (5mC) or 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC). MspJI is specific for the sequence 5(h)mC-N-N-G or A and cleaves with some variability 9/13 nucleotides downstream. Earlier, we reported the crystal structure of MspJI without DNA and proposed how it might recognize this sequence and catalyze cleavage. Here we report its co-crystal structure with a 27-base pair oligonucleotide containing 5mC. This structure confirms that MspJI acts as a homotetramer and that the modified cytosine is flipped from the DNA helix into an SRA-like-binding pocket. We expected the structure to reveal two DNA molecules bound specifically to the tetramer and engaged with the enzyme's two DNA-cleavage sites. A coincidence of crystal packing precluded this organization, however. We found that each DNA molecule interacted with two adjacent tetramers, binding one specifically and the other non-specifically. The latter interaction, which prevented cleavage-site engagement, also involved base flipping and might represent the sequence-interrogation phase that precedes specific recognition. MspJI is unusual in that DNA molecules are recognized and cleaved by different subunits. Such interchange of function might explain how other complex multimeric restriction enzymes act.

  13. Modification-dependent restriction endonuclease, MspJI, flips 5-methylcytosine out of the DNA helix

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, J. R.; Wang, H.; Mabuchi, M. Y.; Zhang, X.; Roberts, R. J.; Zheng, Y.; Wilson, G. G.; Cheng, X.

    2014-09-27

    MspJI belongs to a family of restriction enzymes that cleave DNA containing 5-methylcytosine (5mC) or 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC). MspJI is specific for the sequence 5(h)mC-N-N-G or A and cleaves with some variability 9/13 nucleotides downstream. Earlier, we reported the crystal structure of MspJI without DNA and proposed how it might recognize this sequence and catalyze cleavage. Here we report its co-crystal structure with a 27-base pair oligonucleotide containing 5mC. This structure confirms that MspJI acts as a homotetramer and that the modified cytosine is flipped from the DNA helix into an SRA-like-binding pocket. We expected the structure to reveal two DNA molecules bound specifically to the tetramer and engaged with the enzyme's two DNA-cleavage sites. A coincidence of crystal packing precluded this organization, however. We found that each DNA molecule interacted with two adjacent tetramers, binding one specifically and the other non-specifically. The latter interaction, which prevented cleavage-site engagement, also involved base flipping and might represent the sequence-interrogation phase that precedes specific recognition. MspJI is unusual in that DNA molecules are recognized and cleaved by different subunits. Such interchange of function might explain how other complex multimeric restriction enzymes act.

  14. Selection of species-specific DNA probes which detect strain restriction polymorphism in four Bifidobacterium species.

    PubMed

    Mangin, I; Bourget, N; Simonet, J M; Decaris, B

    1995-01-01

    Randomly cloned fragments (in a size range 1 to 2.5 kb) of DNA from Bifidobacterium longum ATCC 15707, B. adolescentis CIP 64.59T, B. bifidum CIP 64.65 and B. animalis ATCC 25527 were used as hybridization probes to characterize strains of these species and distinguish them from closely related Bifidobacterium species. The fragments were screened for hybridization with native DNA from 41 different Bifidobacterium strains. For each species, a fragment hybridizing specifically with DNA from strains of the same species was isolated. Each fragment was then hybridized with restriction digests in order to study the genome polymorphism. In some of the tested B. longum strains including strain ATCC 15707, the species-specific fragment L6/45 hybridized with 2 fragments instead of one as expected. Sequence of the fragment revealed the presence of an ORF which had an amino acid sequence similar to the site-specific recombinases of lambda integrase family. Moreover, Southern analysis demonstrated that at least 3 copies of this fragment are present in the chromosome of B. longum ATCC 15707 and in some other B. longum strains. The species-specific fragment A6/17 of B. adolescentis hybridized with the same restriction fragment on the eight strains of this species tested. The B. bifidum-specific fragment hybridized with different DNA restriction fragments according to the strain. The restriction fragment an1 from B. animalis ATCC 25527 hybridized with the same restriction fragment from strain B. animalis ATCC 27536. However, these two strains could be differentiated by another restriction pattern. Thus, hybridization results highlight the genetic polymorphism which exists among Bifidobacterium strains of the same species.

  15. DNA restriction-modification systems in the ethanologen, Zymomonas mobilis ZM4.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Aidan L; Jeon, Young Jae; Svenson, Charles J; Rogers, Peter L; Neilan, Brett A

    2011-02-01

    To better understand the DNA restriction-modification (R-M) systems for more amenable strain development of the alternative industrial ethanologen, Zymomonas mobilis, three gene knockout mutants were constructed. The gene knockout mutants were tested for their DNA restriction activities by the determination of transformation efficiency using methylated and unmethylated foreign plasmid DNAs. Inactivation of a putative mrr gene encoded by ZMO0028 (zmrr) resulted in a 60-fold increase in the transformation efficiency when unmethylated plasmid DNA was used. This indicated that the putative mrr gene may serve as a type IV restriction-modification system in Z. mobilis ZM4. To assign the function of a putative type I DNA methyltransferase encoded by ZMO1933 (putative S subunit) and ZMO1934 (putative M subunit), the putative S subunit was inactivated. The gene inactivation of ZMO1933 resulted in a 30-fold increase in the transformation efficiency when methylated plasmid DNA was introduced, indicating that the putative S subunit possibly serves as a part of functional type I R-M system(s). Growth studies performed on the mutant strains indicate inactivation of the type I S subunit resulted in a lower maximum specific glucose consumption rate and biomass yield, while inactivation of the type IV Zmrr had the opposite effect, with an increase in the maximum specific growth rate and biomass yield.

  16. 40 CFR 1065.265 - Nonmethane cutter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Nonmethane cutter. 1065.265 Section 1065.265 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS... sample with purified air or oxygen (O2) upstream of the nonmethane cutter to optimize its...

  17. 40 CFR 1065.265 - Nonmethane cutter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Nonmethane cutter. 1065.265 Section 1065.265 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS... sample with purified air or oxygen (O2) upstream of the nonmethane cutter to optimize its...

  18. 40 CFR 1065.265 - Nonmethane cutter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Nonmethane cutter. 1065.265 Section 1065.265 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS... sample with purified air or oxygen (O2) upstream of the nonmethane cutter to optimize its...

  19. 40 CFR 1065.265 - Nonmethane cutter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Nonmethane cutter. 1065.265 Section 1065.265 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS... with purified air or oxygen (O2) upstream of the nonmethane cutter to optimize its performance....

  20. 40 CFR 1065.265 - Nonmethane cutter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Nonmethane cutter. 1065.265 Section 1065.265 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS... with purified air or oxygen (O2) upstream of the nonmethane cutter to optimize its performance....

  1. Modification-dependent restriction endonuclease, MspJI, flips 5-methylcytosine out of the DNA helix

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Horton, J. R.; Wang, H.; Mabuchi, M. Y.; Zhang, X.; Roberts, R. J.; Zheng, Y.; Wilson, G. G.; Cheng, X.

    2014-09-27

    MspJI belongs to a family of restriction enzymes that cleave DNA containing 5-methylcytosine (5mC) or 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC). MspJI is specific for the sequence 5(h)mC-N-N-G or A and cleaves with some variability 9/13 nucleotides downstream. Earlier, we reported the crystal structure of MspJI without DNA and proposed how it might recognize this sequence and catalyze cleavage. Here we report its co-crystal structure with a 27-base pair oligonucleotide containing 5mC. This structure confirms that MspJI acts as a homotetramer and that the modified cytosine is flipped from the DNA helix into an SRA-like-binding pocket. We expected the structure to reveal two DNAmore » molecules bound specifically to the tetramer and engaged with the enzyme's two DNA-cleavage sites. A coincidence of crystal packing precluded this organization, however. We found that each DNA molecule interacted with two adjacent tetramers, binding one specifically and the other non-specifically. The latter interaction, which prevented cleavage-site engagement, also involved base flipping and might represent the sequence-interrogation phase that precedes specific recognition. MspJI is unusual in that DNA molecules are recognized and cleaved by different subunits. Such interchange of function might explain how other complex multimeric restriction enzymes act.« less

  2. Restriction fragment length polymorphisms of the DNA of selected Naegleria and Acanthamoeba amebae.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, G L; Brandt, F H; Visvesvara, G S

    1988-09-01

    Fourteen strains of Naegleria fowleri, two strains of N. gruberi, and one strain each of N. australiensis, N. jadini, N. lovaniensis, Acanthamoeba sp., A. castellanii, A. polyphaga, and A. comandoni isolated from patients, soil, or water were characterized by restriction fragment length polymorphisms. Total cellular DNA (1 microgram) was digested with either HindIII, BglII, or EcoRI; separated on agarose gels; and stained with ethidium bromide. From 2 to 15 unusually prominent repetitive restriction fragment bands, totaling 15 to 50 kilobases in length and constituting probably more than 30% of the total DNA, were detected for all ameba strains. Each species displayed a characteristic pattern of repetitive restriction fragments. Digests of the four Acanthamoeba spp. displayed fewer, less intensely staining repetitive fragments than those of the Naegleria spp. All N. fowleri strains, whether isolated from the cerebrospinal fluid of patients from different parts of the world or from hot springs, had repetitive restriction fragment bands of similar total lengths (ca. 45 kilobases), and most repetitive bands displayed identical mobilities. However, polymorphic bands were useful in identifying particular isolates. Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis generally was consistent with taxonomy based on studies of infectivity, morphology, isoenzyme patterns, and antibody reactivity and suggests that this technique may help classify amebae isolated from clinical specimens or from the environment.

  3. Evaluation of amplified rDNA restriction analysis (ARDRA) for the identification of Mycoplasma species

    PubMed Central

    Stakenborg, Tim; Vicca, Jo; Butaye, Patrick; Maes, Dominiek; De Baere, Thierry; Verhelst, Rita; Peeters, Johan; de Kruif, Aart; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Vaneechoutte, Mario

    2005-01-01

    Background Mycoplasmas are present worldwide in a large number of animal hosts. Due to their small genome and parasitic lifestyle, Mycoplasma spp. require complex isolation media. Nevertheless, already over 100 different species have been identified and characterized and their number increases as more hosts are sampled. We studied the applicability of amplified rDNA restriction analysis (ARDRA) for the identification of all 116 acknowledged Mycoplasma species and subspecies. Methods Based upon available 16S rDNA sequences, we calculated and compared theoretical ARDRA profiles. To check the validity of these theoretically calculated profiles, we performed ARDRA on 60 strains of 27 different species and subspecies of the genus Mycoplasma. Results In silico digestion with the restriction endonuclease AluI (AG^CT) was found to be most discriminative and generated from 3 to 13 fragments depending on the Mycoplasma species. Although 73 Mycoplasma species could be differentiated using AluI, other species gave undistinguishable patterns. For these, an additional restriction digestion, typically with BfaI (C^TAG) or HpyF10VI (GCNNNNN^NNGC), was needed for a final identification. All in vitro obtained restriction profiles were in accordance with the calculated fragments based on only one 16S rDNA sequence, except for two isolates of M. columbinum and two isolates of the M. mycoides cluster, for which correct ARDRA profiles were only obtained if the sequences of both rrn operons were taken into account. Conclusion Theoretically, restriction digestion of the amplified rDNA was found to enable differentiation of all described Mycoplasma species and this could be confirmed by application of ARDRA on a total of 27 species and subspecies. PMID:15955250

  4. Restriction map and polymorphisms of nuclear ribosomal genes of Populus balsamifera.

    PubMed

    Stoehr, M U; Singh, R S

    1993-06-01

    Balsam poplar (Populus balsamifera) clones from five populations, which were collected along a transect from northern Wisconsin to the northern tree line, were evaluated for polymorphisms in nuclear ribosomal DNA. For this purpose, a restriction map was constructed using four six-cutter enzymes in single and double digests of genomic DNA. After electrophoretic separation on agarose gels and Southern transfer, blots were hybridized to non-radioactively labeled heterologous rDNA probes of soybean. Among populations, variation was detected in the length of the intergenic spacer between the tandem repeats of the coding regions and in the degree of methylation of one restriction enzyme recognition site. Based on a comparison of the derived restriction map of balsam poplar and other poplars, high homology was evident in the rDNA coding regions among species, whereas the intergenic spacer varied slightly in both length and number of restriction sites.

  5. Characterization of unrelated strains of Staphylococcus schleiferi by using ribosomal DNA fingerprinting, DNA restriction patterns, and plasmid profiles.

    PubMed Central

    Grattard, F; Etienne, J; Pozzetto, B; Tardy, F; Gaudin, O G; Fleurette, J

    1993-01-01

    The molecular characteristics of 31 unrelated strains of Staphylococcus schleiferi isolated from 13 hospitals between 1973 and 1991 were determined by ribosomal DNA fingerprinting by using a digoxigenin-labeled DNA probe, genomic DNA restriction patterns, and plasmid profiles. Only six strains harbored one or two plasmids. DNA restriction analysis, which was carried out with five endonucleases (EcoRI, HindIII, PstI, PvuII, and ClaI), did not allow us to discriminate between isolates. Ribotyping with HindIII, ClaI, or EcoRI enzymes generated six, seven, and nine distinct patterns, respectively. With the combination ClaI-EcoRI, 13 ribotypes were obtained among the 31 strains, suggesting a relative heterogeneity within the species. Moreover, all strains shared two or three common bands, according to the endonuclease used, which were relatively specific for S. schleiferi in comparison with the ribosomal banding patterns described for other coagulase-negative staphylococci. These results illustrate that ribotyping can be used for the epidemiological investigation of S. schleiferi isolates and possibly for taxonomic analysis in this species. Images PMID:8385149

  6. REBASE--a database for DNA restriction and modification: enzymes, genes and genomes.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Richard J; Vincze, Tamas; Posfai, Janos; Macelis, Dana

    2015-01-01

    REBASE is a comprehensive and fully curated database of information about the components of restriction-modification (RM) systems. It contains fully referenced information about recognition and cleavage sites for both restriction enzymes and methyltransferases as well as commercial availability, methylation sensitivity, crystal and sequence data. All genomes that are completely sequenced are analyzed for RM system components, and with the advent of PacBio sequencing, the recognition sequences of DNA methyltransferases (MTases) are appearing rapidly. Thus, Type I and Type III systems can now be characterized in terms of recognition specificity merely by DNA sequencing. The contents of REBASE may be browsed from the web http://rebase.neb.com and selected compilations can be downloaded by FTP (ftp.neb.com). Monthly updates are also available via email.

  7. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-DNA adducts and the CYP1A1 restriction fragment length polymorphism

    SciTech Connect

    Shields, P.G.; Bowman, E.D.; Weston, A.; Harris, C.C.; Sugimura, H.; Caporaso, N.E.; Petruzzelli, S.F. ); Trump, B.F. )

    1992-11-01

    Human cancer risk assessment at a genetic level involves the investigation of carcinogen metabolism and DNA adduct formation. Wide interindividual differences in metabolism result in different DNA adduct levels. For this and other reasons, many laboratories have considered DNA adducts to be a measure of the biologically effective dose of a carcinogen. Techniques for studying DNA adducts using chemically specific assays are becoming available. A modification of the [sup 32]P-postlabeling assay for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon DNA adducts described here provides potential improvements in quantification. DNA adducts, however, reflect only recent exposure to carcinogens; in contrast, genetic testing for metabolic capacity indicates the extent to which carcinogens can be activated and exert genotoxic effects. Such studies may reflect both separate and integrated risk factors together with DNA adduct levels. A recently described restriction fragment length polymorphism for the CYP1A1, which codes for the cytochrome P450 enzyme primarily responsible for the metabolic activation of carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, has been found to be associated with lung cancer risk in a Japanese population. In a subset of individuals enrolled in a US lung cancer case-control study, no association with lung cancer was found. 17 refs., 3 figs.

  8. Pathological phenotypes and in vivo DNA cleavage by unrestrained activity of a phosphorothioate-based restriction system in Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Cao, Bo; Cheng, Qiuxiang; Gu, Chen; Yao, Fen; DeMott, Michael S; Zheng, Xiaoqing; Deng, Zixin; Dedon, Peter C; You, Delin

    2014-08-01

    Prokaryotes protect their genomes from foreign DNA with a diversity of defence mechanisms, including a widespread restriction-modification (R-M) system involving phosphorothioate (PT) modification of the DNA backbone. Unlike classical R-M systems, highly partial PT modification of consensus motifs in bacterial genomes suggests an unusual mechanism of PT-dependent restriction. In Salmonella enterica, PT modification is mediated by four genes dptB-E, while restriction involves additional three genes dptF-H. Here, we performed a series of studies to characterize the PT-dependent restriction, and found that it presented several features distinct with traditional R-M systems. The presence of restriction genes in a PT-deficient mutant was not lethal, but instead resulted in several pathological phenotypes. Subsequent transcriptional profiling revealed the expression of > 600 genes was affected by restriction enzymes in cells lacking PT, including induction of bacteriophage, SOS response and DNA repair-related genes. These transcriptional responses are consistent with the observation that restriction enzymes caused extensive DNA cleavage in the absence of PT modifications in vivo. However, overexpression of restriction genes was lethal to the host in spite of the presence PT modifications. These results point to an unusual mechanism of PT-dependent DNA cleavage by restriction enzymes in the face of partial PT modification.

  9. Functional Coupling of Duplex Translocation to DNA Cleavage in a Type I Restriction Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Csefalvay, Eva; Lapkouski, Mikalai; Guzanova, Alena; Csefalvay, Ladislav; Baikova, Tatsiana; Bialevich, Vitali; Shamayeva, Katsiaryna; Janscak, Pavel; Kuta Smatanova, Ivana; Panjikar, Santosh; Carey, Jannette; Weiserova, Marie; Ettrich, Rüdiger

    2015-01-01

    Type I restriction-modification enzymes are multifunctional heteromeric complexes with DNA cleavage and ATP-dependent DNA translocation activities located on motor subunit HsdR. Functional coupling of DNA cleavage and translocation is a hallmark of the Type I restriction systems that is consistent with their proposed role in horizontal gene transfer. DNA cleavage occurs at nonspecific sites distant from the cognate recognition sequence, apparently triggered by stalled translocation. The X-ray crystal structure of the complete HsdR subunit from E. coli plasmid R124 suggested that the triggering mechanism involves interdomain contacts mediated by ATP. In the present work, in vivo and in vitro activity assays and crystal structures of three mutants of EcoR124I HsdR designed to probe this mechanism are reported. The results indicate that interdomain engagement via ATP is indeed responsible for signal transmission between the endonuclease and helicase domains of the motor subunit. A previously identified sequence motif that is shared by the RecB nucleases and some Type I endonucleases is implicated in signaling. PMID:26039067

  10. Translocation-coupled DNA cleavage by the Type ISP restriction-modification enzymes.

    PubMed

    Chand, Mahesh K; Nirwan, Neha; Diffin, Fiona M; van Aelst, Kara; Kulkarni, Manasi; Pernstich, Christian; Szczelkun, Mark D; Saikrishnan, Kayarat

    2015-11-01

    Production of endonucleolytic double-strand DNA breaks requires separate strand cleavage events. Although catalytic mechanisms for simple, dimeric endonucleases are known, there are many complex nuclease machines that are poorly understood. Here we studied the single polypeptide Type ISP restriction-modification (RM) enzymes, which cleave random DNA between distant target sites when two enzymes collide after convergent ATP-driven translocation. We report the 2.7-Å resolution X-ray crystal structure of a Type ISP enzyme-DNA complex, revealing that both the helicase-like ATPase and nuclease are located upstream of the direction of translocation, an observation inconsistent with simple nuclease-domain dimerization. Using single-molecule and biochemical techniques, we demonstrate that each ATPase remodels its DNA-protein complex and translocates along DNA without looping it, leading to a collision complex in which the nuclease domains are distal. Sequencing of the products of single cleavage events suggests a previously undescribed endonuclease model, where multiple, stochastic strand-nicking events combine to produce DNA scission.

  11. Translocation-coupled DNA cleavage by the Type ISP restriction-modification enzymes.

    PubMed

    Chand, Mahesh K; Nirwan, Neha; Diffin, Fiona M; van Aelst, Kara; Kulkarni, Manasi; Pernstich, Christian; Szczelkun, Mark D; Saikrishnan, Kayarat

    2015-11-01

    Production of endonucleolytic double-strand DNA breaks requires separate strand cleavage events. Although catalytic mechanisms for simple, dimeric endonucleases are known, there are many complex nuclease machines that are poorly understood. Here we studied the single polypeptide Type ISP restriction-modification (RM) enzymes, which cleave random DNA between distant target sites when two enzymes collide after convergent ATP-driven translocation. We report the 2.7-Å resolution X-ray crystal structure of a Type ISP enzyme-DNA complex, revealing that both the helicase-like ATPase and nuclease are located upstream of the direction of translocation, an observation inconsistent with simple nuclease-domain dimerization. Using single-molecule and biochemical techniques, we demonstrate that each ATPase remodels its DNA-protein complex and translocates along DNA without looping it, leading to a collision complex in which the nuclease domains are distal. Sequencing of the products of single cleavage events suggests a previously undescribed endonuclease model, where multiple, stochastic strand-nicking events combine to produce DNA scission. PMID:26389736

  12. Phenolic cutter for machining foam insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blair, T. A.; Miller, A. C.; Price, B. W.; Stiles, W. S.

    1970-01-01

    Pre-pregged fiber glass is an efficient abrasive for machining polystyrene and polyurethane foams. It bonds easily to any cutter base made of aluminum, steel, or phenolic, is inexpensive, and is readily available.

  13. Bolt Cutter Blade's Imprint in Toolmarks Examination.

    PubMed

    Volkov, Nikolai; Finkelstein, Nir; Novoselsky, Yehuda; Tsach, Tsadok

    2015-11-01

    Bolt cutters are known as cutting tools which are used for cutting hard objects and materials, such as padlocks and bars. Bolt cutter blades leave their imprint on the cut objects. When receiving a cut object from a crime scene, forensic toolmarks examiners can determine whether the suspected cutting tool was used in a specific crime or not based on class characteristic marks and individual marks that the bolt cutter blades leave on the cut object. The paper presents preliminary results of a study on ten bolt cutters and suggests a quick preliminary examination-the comparison between the blade thickness and the width of the imprint left by the tool on the cut object. Based on the comparison result, if there is not a match, the examiner can eliminate the feasibility of the use of the suspected cutting tool in a specific crime. This examination simplifies and accelerates the comparison procedure. PMID:26257324

  14. Nondetectability of restriction fragments and independence of DNA fragment sizes within and between loci in RFLP typing of DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, R.; Zhong, Y.; Jin, L. ); Budowle, B. )

    1994-08-01

    The authors provide experimental evidence showing that, during the restriction-enzyme digestion of DNA samples, some of the HaeIII-digested DNA fragments are small enough to prevent their reliable sizing on a Southern gel. As a result of such nondetectability of DNA fragments, individuals who show a single-band DNA profile at a VNTR locus may not necessarily be true homozygotes. In a population database, when the presence of such nondetectable alleles is ignored, they show that a pseudodependence of alleles within as well as across loci may occur. Using a known statistical method, under the hypothesis of independence of alleles within loci, they derive an efficient estimate of null allele frequency, which may be subsequently used for testing allelic independence within and across loci. The estimates of null allele frequencies, thus derived, are shown to agree with direct experimental data on the frequencies of HaeIII-null alleles. Incorporation of null alleles into the analysis of the forensic VNTR database suggests that the assumptions of allelic independence within and between loci are appropriate. In contrast, a failure to incorporate the occurrence of null alleles would provide a wrong inference regarding the independence of alleles within and between loci. 47 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. Drill bit assembly for releasably retaining a drill bit cutter

    DOEpatents

    Glowka, David A.; Raymond, David W.

    2002-01-01

    A drill bit assembly is provided for releasably retaining a polycrystalline diamond compact drill bit cutter. Two adjacent cavities formed in a drill bit body house, respectively, the disc-shaped drill bit cutter and a wedge-shaped cutter lock element with a removable fastener. The cutter lock element engages one flat surface of the cutter to retain the cutter in its cavity. The drill bit assembly thus enables the cutter to be locked against axial and/or rotational movement while still providing for easy removal of a worn or damaged cutter. The ability to adjust and replace cutters in the field reduces the effect of wear, helps maintains performance and improves drilling efficiency.

  16. Relationships in Ananas and other related genera using chloroplast DNA restriction site variation.

    PubMed

    Duval, M F; Buso, G S C; Ferreira, F R; Noyer, J L; Coppens d'Eeckenbrugge, G; Hamon, P; Ferreira, M E

    2003-12-01

    Chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) diversity was examined using PCR-RFLP to study phylogenetic relationships in Ananas and related genera. One hundred fifteen accessions representing the seven Ananas species and seven other Bromelioideae including the neighboring monospecific genus Pseudananas, two Pitcairnioideae, and one Tillandsioideae were included in the study. Eight primers designed from cpDNA were used for generating fragments. Restriction by 18 endonucleases generated 255 variable fragments. Dissimilarities were calculated from the resulting matrix using the Sokal and Michener index and the neighbor-joining method was used to reconstruct the diversity tree. Phylogenetic reconstruction was attempted using Wagner parsimony. Phenetic and cladistic analyses gave consistent results. They confirm the basal position of Bromelia in the Bromelioideae. Ananas and Pseudananas form a monophyletic group, with three strongly supported sub-groups, two of which are geographically consistent. The majority of Ananas parguazensis accessions constitute a northern group restricted to the Rio Negro and Orinoco basins in Brazil. The tetraploid Pseudananas sagenarius joins the diploid Ananas fritzmuelleri to constitute a southern group. The third and largest group, which includes all remaining species plus some accessions of A. parguazensis and intermediate phenotypes, is the most widespread and its distribution overlaps those of the northern and southern groups. Ananas ananassoides is dominant in this sub-group and highly variable. Its close relationship to all cultivated species supports the hypothesis that this species is the wild ancestor of the domesticated pineapple. The data indicate that gene flow is common within this group and scarcer with both the first and second groups. Comparison of cpDNA data with published genomic DNA data point to the hybrid origin of Ananas bracteatus and support the autopolyploidy of Pseudananas. The Ananas-Pseudananas group structure and distribution are

  17. Electrochemical biosensor modified with dsDNA monolayer for restriction enzyme activity determination.

    PubMed

    Zajda, Joanna; Górski, Łukasz; Malinowska, Elżbieta

    2016-06-01

    A simple and cost effective method for the determination of restriction endonuclease activity is presented. dsDNA immobilized at a gold electrode surface is used as the enzymatic substrate, and an external cationic redox probe is employed in voltammetric measurements for analytical signal generation. The assessment of enzyme activity is based on a decrease of a current signal derived from reduction of methylene blue which is present in the sample solution. For this reason, the covalent attachment of the label molecule is not required which significantly reduces costs of the analysis and simplifies the entire determination procedure. The influence of buffer components on utilized dsDNA/MCH monolayer stability and integrity is also verified. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements reveal that due to pinhole formation during enzyme activity measurement the presence of any surfactants should be avoided. Additionally, it is shown that the sensitivity of the electrochemical biosensor can be tuned by changing the restriction site location along the DNA length. Under optimal conditions the proposed biosensor exhibits a linear response toward PvuII activity within a range from 0.25 to 1.50 U/μL. PMID:26859430

  18. Electrochemical biosensor modified with dsDNA monolayer for restriction enzyme activity determination.

    PubMed

    Zajda, Joanna; Górski, Łukasz; Malinowska, Elżbieta

    2016-06-01

    A simple and cost effective method for the determination of restriction endonuclease activity is presented. dsDNA immobilized at a gold electrode surface is used as the enzymatic substrate, and an external cationic redox probe is employed in voltammetric measurements for analytical signal generation. The assessment of enzyme activity is based on a decrease of a current signal derived from reduction of methylene blue which is present in the sample solution. For this reason, the covalent attachment of the label molecule is not required which significantly reduces costs of the analysis and simplifies the entire determination procedure. The influence of buffer components on utilized dsDNA/MCH monolayer stability and integrity is also verified. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements reveal that due to pinhole formation during enzyme activity measurement the presence of any surfactants should be avoided. Additionally, it is shown that the sensitivity of the electrochemical biosensor can be tuned by changing the restriction site location along the DNA length. Under optimal conditions the proposed biosensor exhibits a linear response toward PvuII activity within a range from 0.25 to 1.50 U/μL.

  19. How quantum entanglement in DNA synchronizes double-strand breakage by type II restriction endonucleases.

    PubMed

    Kurian, P; Dunston, G; Lindesay, J

    2016-02-21

    Macroscopic quantum effects in living systems have been studied widely in pursuit of fundamental explanations for biological energy transport and sensing. While it is known that type II endonucleases, the largest class of restriction enzymes, induce DNA double-strand breaks by attacking phosphodiester bonds, the mechanism by which simultaneous cutting is coordinated between the catalytic centers remains unclear. We propose a quantum mechanical model for collective electronic behavior in the DNA helix, where dipole-dipole oscillations are quantized through boundary conditions imposed by the enzyme. Zero-point modes of coherent oscillations would provide the energy required for double-strand breakage. Such quanta may be preserved in the presence of thermal noise by the enzyme's displacement of water surrounding the DNA recognition sequence. The enzyme thus serves as a decoherence shield. Palindromic mirror symmetry of the enzyme-DNA complex should conserve parity, because symmetric bond-breaking ceases when the symmetry of the complex is violated or when physiological parameters are perturbed from optima. Persistent correlations in DNA across longer spatial separations-a possible signature of quantum entanglement-may be explained by such a mechanism.

  20. Restricted diffusion of DNA segments within the isolated Escherichia coli nucleoid.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Sónia; Woldringh, Conrad L; Odijk, Theo

    2005-05-01

    To study the dynamics and organization of the DNA within isolated Escherichia coli nucleoids, we track the movement of a specific DNA region. Labeling of such a region is achieved using the Lac-O/Lac-I system. The Lac repressor-GFP fusion protein binds to the DNA section where tandem repeats of the Lac operator are inserted, which allows us to monitor the motion of the DNA. The movement of such a GFP spot is followed at 48 ms temporal resolution during 12s. The spots are found to diffuse within a confined space, so that the nucleoid appears to behave like a viscoelastic network. The distribution of the "particle" position in time can be fitted to a Gaussian function indicating that the motion of the particle is Brownian. An average self-diffusion constant Ds=0.12 microm(2) s-1 is derived via the time auto-correlation functions of the displacement and is compatible with the collective diffusion coefficient measured previously by dynamic light scattering. Restriction of a DNA sequence to a small region of the nucleoid is tentatively related to the existence of so-called supercoiling domains.

  1. REBASE--a database for DNA restriction and modification: enzymes, genes and genomes.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Richard J; Vincze, Tamas; Posfai, Janos; Macelis, Dana

    2010-01-01

    REBASE is a comprehensive database of information about restriction enzymes, DNA methyltransferases and related proteins involved in the biological process of restriction-modification (R-M). It contains fully referenced information about recognition and cleavage sites, isoschizomers, neoschizomers, commercial availability, methylation sensitivity, crystal and sequence data. Experimentally characterized homing endonucleases are also included. The fastest growing segment of REBASE contains the putative R-M systems found in the sequence databases. Comprehensive descriptions of the R-M content of all fully sequenced genomes are available including summary schematics. The contents of REBASE may be browsed from the web (http://rebase.neb.com) and selected compilations can be downloaded by ftp (ftp.neb.com). Additionally, monthly updates can be requested via email.

  2. Polymerase Synthesis and Restriction Enzyme Cleavage of DNA Containing 7-Substituted 7-Deazaguanine Nucleobases.

    PubMed

    Mačková, Michaela; Boháčová, Soňa; Perlíková, Pavla; Poštová Slavětínská, Lenka; Hocek, Michal

    2015-10-12

    Previous studies of polymerase synthesis of base-modified DNAs and their cleavage by restriction enzymes have mostly related only to 5-substituted pyrimidine and 7-substituted 7-deazaadenine nucleotides. Here we report the synthesis of a series of 7-substituted 7-deazaguanine 2'-deoxyribonucleoside 5'-O-triphosphates (dG(R) TPs), their use as substrates for polymerase synthesis of modified DNA and the influence of the modification on their cleavage by type II restriction endonucleases (REs). The dG(R) TPs were generally good substrates for polymerases but the PCR products could not be visualised on agarose gels by intercalator staining, due to fluorescence quenching. The presence of 7-substituted 7-deazaguanine residues in recognition sequences of REs in most cases completely blocked the cleavage.

  3. Mechanism of DNA Recognition by the Restriction Enzyme EcoRV

    SciTech Connect

    Zahran, Mai; Daidone, Isabella; Smith, Jeremy C; Imhof, Petra

    2010-08-01

    EcoRV, a restriction enzyme in Escherichia coli, destroys invading foreign DNA by cleaving it at the center step of a GATATC sequence. In the EcoRV-cognate DNA crystallographic complex, a sharp kink of 50 degrees has been found at the center base-pair step (TA). Here, we examine the interplay between the intrinsic propensity of the cognate sequence to kink and the induction by the enzyme by performing all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of EcoRV unbound and interacting with three DNA sequences: the cognate sequence, GATATC (TA); the non-cognate sequence, GAATTC (AT); and with the cognate sequence methylated on the first adenine GA(CH(3))TATC (TA-CH(3)). In the unbound EcoRV, the cleft between the two C-terminal subdomains is found to be open. Binding to AT narrows the cleft and forms a partially bound state. However, the intrinsic bending propensity of AT is insufficient to allow tight binding. In contrast, the cognate TA sequence is easier to bend, allowing specific, high-occupancy hydrogen bonds to form in the complex. The absence of cleavage for this methylated sequence is found to arise from the loss of specific hydrogen bonds between the first adenine of the recognition sequence and Asn185. On the basis of the results, we suggest a three-step recognition mechanism. In the first step, EcoRV, in an open conformation, binds to the DNA at a random sequence and slides along it. In the second step, when the two outer base pairs, GAxxTC, are recognized, the R loops of the protein become more ordered, forming strong hydrogen-bonding interactions, resulting in a partially bound EcoRV-DNA complex. In the third step, the flexibility of the center base pair is probed, and in the case of the full cognate sequence the DNA bends, the complex strengthens and the protein and DNA interact more closely, allowing cleavage.

  4. Orion Parachute Riser Cutter Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oguz, Sirri; Salazar, Frank

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the tests and analytical approach used on the development of a steel riser cutter for the CEV Parachute Assembly System (CPAS) used on the Orion crew module. Figure 1 shows the riser cutter and the steel riser bundle which consists of six individual cables. Due to the highly compressed schedule, initial unavailability of the riser material and the Orion Forward Bay mechanical constraints, JSC primarily relied on a combination of internal ballistics analysis and LS-DYNA simulation for this project. Various one dimensional internal ballistics codes that use standard equation of state and conservation of energy have commonly used in the development of CAD devices for initial first order estimates and as an enhancement to the test program. While these codes are very accurate for propellant performance prediction, they usually lack a fully defined kinematic model for dynamic predictions. A simple piston device can easily and accurately be modeled using an equation of motion. However, the accuracy of analytical models is greatly reduced on more complicated devices with complex external loads, nonlinear trajectories or unique unlocking features. A 3D finite element model of CAD device with all critical features included can vastly improve the analytical ballistic predictions when it is used as a supplement to the ballistic code. During this project, LS-DYNA structural 3D model was used to predict the riser resisting load that was needed for the ballistic code. A Lagrangian model with eroding elements shown in Figure 2 was used for the blade, steel riser and the anvil. The riser material failure strain was fine tuned by matching the dent depth on the anvil with the actual test data. LS-DYNA model was also utilized to optimize the blade tip design for the most efficient cut. In parallel, the propellant type and the amount were determined by using CADPROG internal ballistics code. Initial test results showed a good match with LS-DYNA and CADPROG

  5. Characterization of eukaryotic DNA N(6)-methyladenine by a highly sensitive restriction enzyme-assisted sequencing.

    PubMed

    Luo, Guan-Zheng; Wang, Fang; Weng, Xiaocheng; Chen, Kai; Hao, Ziyang; Yu, Miao; Deng, Xin; Liu, Jianzhao; He, Chuan

    2016-01-01

    Although extensively studied in prokaryotes, the prevalence and significance of DNA N(6)-methyladenine (6mA or m(6)dA) in eukaryotes had been underappreciated until recent studies, which have demonstrated that 6mA regulates gene expression as a potential heritable mark. To interrogate 6mA sites at single-base resolution, we report DA-6mA-seq (DpnI-Assisted N(6)-methylAdenine sequencing), an approach that uses DpnI to cleave methylated adenine sites in duplex DNA. We find that DpnI cuts other sequence motifs besides the canonical GATC restriction sites, thereby expanding the utility of this method. DA-6mA-seq achieves higher sensitivity with nanograms of input DNA and lower sequencing depth than conventional approaches. We study 6mA at base resolution in the Chlamydomonas genome and apply the new method to two other eukaryotic organisms, Plasmodium and Penicillium. Combined with conventional approaches, our method further shows that most 6mA sites are fully methylated on both strands of DNA at various sequence contexts.

  6. Characterization of eukaryotic DNA N6-methyladenine by a highly sensitive restriction enzyme-assisted sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Guan-Zheng; Wang, Fang; Weng, Xiaocheng; Chen, Kai; Hao, Ziyang; Yu, Miao; Deng, Xin; Liu, Jianzhao; He, Chuan

    2016-01-01

    Although extensively studied in prokaryotes, the prevalence and significance of DNA N6-methyladenine (6mA or m6dA) in eukaryotes had been underappreciated until recent studies, which have demonstrated that 6mA regulates gene expression as a potential heritable mark. To interrogate 6mA sites at single-base resolution, we report DA-6mA-seq (DpnI-Assisted N6-methylAdenine sequencing), an approach that uses DpnI to cleave methylated adenine sites in duplex DNA. We find that DpnI cuts other sequence motifs besides the canonical GATC restriction sites, thereby expanding the utility of this method. DA-6mA-seq achieves higher sensitivity with nanograms of input DNA and lower sequencing depth than conventional approaches. We study 6mA at base resolution in the Chlamydomonas genome and apply the new method to two other eukaryotic organisms, Plasmodium and Penicillium. Combined with conventional approaches, our method further shows that most 6mA sites are fully methylated on both strands of DNA at various sequence contexts. PMID:27079427

  7. Nicotine overrides DNA damage-induced G1/S restriction in lung cells.

    PubMed

    Nishioka, Takashi; Yamamoto, Daisuke; Zhu, Tongbo; Guo, Jinjin; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Chen, Chang Yan

    2011-01-01

    As an addictive substance, nicotine has been suggested to facilitate pro-survival activities (such as anchorage-independent growth or angiogenesis) and the establishment of drug resistance to anticancer therapy. Tobacco smoking consists of a variety of carcinogens [such as benzopyrene (BP) and nitrosamine derivatives] that are able to cause DNA double strand breaks. However, the effect of nicotine on DNA damage-induced checkpoint response induced by genotoxins remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the events occurred during G(1) arrest induced by γ-radiation or BP in nicotine-treated murine or human lung epithelial cells. DNA synthesis was rapidly inhibited after exposure to γ-radiation or BP treatment, accompanied with the activation of DNA damage checkpoint. When these cells were co-treated with nicotine, the growth restriction was compromised, manifested by upregulation of cyclin D and A, and attenuation of Chk2 phosphorylation. Knockdown of cyclin D or Chk2 by the siRNAs blocked nicotine-mediated effect on DNA damage checkpoint activation. However, nicotine treatment appeared to play no role in nocodazole-induced mitotic checkpoint activation. Overall, our study presented a novel observation, in which nicotine is able to override DNA damage checkpoint activated by tobacco-related carcinogen BP or γ-irradiation. The results not only indicates the potentially important role of nicotine in facilitating the establishment of genetic instability to promote lung tumorigenesis, but also warrants a dismal prognosis for cancer patients who are smokers, heavily exposed second-hand smokers or nicotine users. PMID:21559516

  8. Structure of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine-specific restriction enzyme, AbaSI, in complex with DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, John R.; Borgaro, Janine G.; Griggs, Rose M.; Quimby, Aine; Guan, Shengxi; Zhang, Xing; Wilson, Geoffrey G.; Zheng, Yu; Zhu, Zhenyu; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2014-07-03

    AbaSI, a member of the PvuRts1I-family of modification-dependent restriction endonucleases, cleaves DNA containing 5-hydroxymethylctosine (5hmC) and glucosylated 5hmC (g5hmC), but not DNA containing unmodified cytosine. AbaSI has been used as a tool for mapping the genomic locations of 5hmC, an important epigenetic modification in the DNA of higher organisms. Here we report the crystal structures of AbaSI in the presence and absence of DNA. These structures provide considerable, although incomplete, insight into how this enzyme acts. AbaSI appears to be mainly a homodimer in solution, but interacts with DNA in our structures as a homotetramer. Each AbaSI subunit comprises an N-terminal, Vsr-like, cleavage domain containing a single catalytic site, and a C-terminal, SRA-like, 5hmC-binding domain. Two N-terminal helices mediate most of the homodimer interface. Dimerization brings together the two catalytic sites required for double-strand cleavage, and separates the 5hmC binding-domains by ~ 70 Å, consistent with the known activity of AbaSI which cleaves DNA optimally between symmetrically modified cytosines ~ 22 bp apart. The eukaryotic SET and RING-associated (SRA) domains bind to DNA containing 5-methylcytosine (5mC) in the hemi-methylated CpG sequence. They make contacts in both the major and minor DNA grooves, and flip the modified cytosine out of the helix into a conserved binding pocket. In contrast, the SRA-like domain of AbaSI, which has no sequence specificity, contacts only the minor DNA groove, and in our current structures the 5hmC remains intra-helical. A conserved, binding pocket is nevertheless present in this domain, suitable for accommodating 5hmC and g5hmC. We consider it likely, therefore, that base-flipping is part of the recognition and cleavage mechanism of AbaSI, but that our structures represent an earlier, pre-flipped stage, prior to actual recognition.

  9. Creation of chimeric human/rabbit APOBEC1 with HIV-1 restriction and DNA mutation activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Terumasa; Ong, Eugene Boon Beng; Watanabe, Nobumoto; Sakaguchi, Nobuo; Maeda, Kazuhiko; Koito, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    APOBEC1 (A1) proteins from lagomorphs and rodents have deaminase-dependent restriction activity against HIV-1, whereas human A1 exerts a negligible effect. To investigate these differences in the restriction of HIV-1 by A1 proteins, a series of chimeric proteins combining rabbit and human A1s was constructed. Homology models of the A1s indicated that their activities derive from functional domains that likely act in tandem through a dimeric interface. The C-terminal region containing the leucine-rich motif and the dimerization domains of rabbit A1 is important for its anti-HIV-1 activity. The A1 chimeras with strong anti-HIV-1 activity were incorporated into virions more efficiently than those without anti-HIV-1 activity, and exhibited potent DNA-mutator activity. Therefore, the C-terminal region of rabbit A1 is involved in both its packaging into the HIV-1 virion and its deamination activity against both viral cDNA and genomic RNA. This study identifies the novel molecular mechanism underlying the target specificity of A1.

  10. Creation of chimeric human/rabbit APOBEC1 with HIV-1 restriction and DNA mutation activities.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Terumasa; Ong, Eugene Boon Beng; Watanabe, Nobumoto; Sakaguchi, Nobuo; Maeda, Kazuhiko; Koito, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    APOBEC1 (A1) proteins from lagomorphs and rodents have deaminase-dependent restriction activity against HIV-1, whereas human A1 exerts a negligible effect. To investigate these differences in the restriction of HIV-1 by A1 proteins, a series of chimeric proteins combining rabbit and human A1s was constructed. Homology models of the A1s indicated that their activities derive from functional domains that likely act in tandem through a dimeric interface. The C-terminal region containing the leucine-rich motif and the dimerization domains of rabbit A1 is important for its anti-HIV-1 activity. The A1 chimeras with strong anti-HIV-1 activity were incorporated into virions more efficiently than those without anti-HIV-1 activity, and exhibited potent DNA-mutator activity. Therefore, the C-terminal region of rabbit A1 is involved in both its packaging into the HIV-1 virion and its deamination activity against both viral cDNA and genomic RNA. This study identifies the novel molecular mechanism underlying the target specificity of A1. PMID:26738439

  11. Restriction enzyme digestion analysis of PCR-amplified DNA of Blastocystis hominis isolates.

    PubMed

    Init, I; Foead, A L; Fong, M Y; Yamazaki, H; Rohela, M; Yong, H S; Mak, J W

    2007-11-01

    Genomic DNA of Blastocystis isolates released into 0.1% Triton X-100 was suitable for amplification and yielded similar results as the genomic DNA extracted with standard kit. The specific B. hominis primers (BH1: GCT TAT CTG GTT GAT CCT GCC AGT and BH2: TGA TCC TTC CGC AGG TTC ACC TAC A) successfully produced the PCR product of about 1,770 bp with all the 7 Blastocystis isolates tested. The restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) patterns yielded by 13 out of 25 restriction endonucleases showed that the 7 isolates could be grouped into 4 subgroups: subgroup-1 consisted of isolate C; subgroup-2 of isolates H4 and H7; subgroup-3 of isolates KP1, Y51 and M12; and subgroup-4 of isolate 27805. The differences between subgroups manifested as clear-cut RFLP patterns. A common band of 230 bp was revealed by Eco R1 in all the Blastocystis isolates tested. The band of about 180 bp was revealed by Alu I, differentiated symptomatic from asymptomatic isolates of this parasite, and might indicate the pathogenicity of this parasite. PMID:18613539

  12. Creation of chimeric human/rabbit APOBEC1 with HIV-1 restriction and DNA mutation activities

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Terumasa; Ong, Eugene Boon Beng; Watanabe, Nobumoto; Sakaguchi, Nobuo; Maeda, Kazuhiko; Koito, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    APOBEC1 (A1) proteins from lagomorphs and rodents have deaminase-dependent restriction activity against HIV-1, whereas human A1 exerts a negligible effect. To investigate these differences in the restriction of HIV-1 by A1 proteins, a series of chimeric proteins combining rabbit and human A1s was constructed. Homology models of the A1s indicated that their activities derive from functional domains that likely act in tandem through a dimeric interface. The C-terminal region containing the leucine-rich motif and the dimerization domains of rabbit A1 is important for its anti-HIV-1 activity. The A1 chimeras with strong anti-HIV-1 activity were incorporated into virions more efficiently than those without anti-HIV-1 activity, and exhibited potent DNA-mutator activity. Therefore, the C-terminal region of rabbit A1 is involved in both its packaging into the HIV-1 virion and its deamination activity against both viral cDNA and genomic RNA. This study identifies the novel molecular mechanism underlying the target specificity of A1. PMID:26738439

  13. Comparison of DNA restriction fragment length polymorphisms of Nostoc strains in and from cycads.

    PubMed

    Lindblad, P; Haselkorn, R; Bergman, B; Nierzwicki-Bauer, S A

    1989-01-01

    DNA was prepared from cyanobacteria freshly isolated from coralloid roots of natural populations of five cycad species: Ceratozamia mexicana mexicana (Mexico), C. mexicana robusta (Mexico), Dioon spinulosum (Mexico), Zamia furfuraceae (Mexico) and Z. skinneri (Costa Rica). Using the Southern blot technique and cloned Anabaena PCC 7120 nifK and glnA genes as probes, restriction fragment length polymorphisms of these cyanobacterial symbionts were compared. The five cyanobacterial preparations showed differences in the sizes of their DNA fragments hybridizing with both probes, indicating that different cyanobacterial species and/or strains were in the symbiotic associations. On the other hand, a similar comparison of cyanobacteria freshly collected from a single Encephalartos altensteinii coralloid root and from three independently subcultured isolates from the same coralloid root revealed that these were likely to be one and the same organism. Moreover, the complexity of restriction patterns shows that a mixture of Nostoc strains can associate with a single cycad species although a single cyanobacterial strain can predominate in the root of a single cycad plant. Thus, a wide range of Nostoc strains appear to associate with the coralloid roots of cycads.

  14. Comparison of Mycoplasma arthritidis strains by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, immunoblotting, and DNA restriction analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Washburn, L R; Voelker, L L; Ehle, L J; Hirsch, S; Dutenhofer, C; Olson, K; Beck, B

    1995-01-01

    Twenty Mycoplasma arthritidis strains or isolates were compared by a combination of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay by an antiserum adsorption technique, Western immunoblotting, and restriction analysis of chromosomal DNA. Antigenic markers that defined strains related to strains 158p10p9, PG6, and H606 were identified. In addition, restriction analysis allowed all 20 strains to be divided into six groups. Results of restriction analysis corresponded generally with antigenic similarities, although the former did not allow grouping with as fine a precision as the latter. However, intrastrain antigenic variability, which is common among many Mycoplasma species, including M. arthritidis, introduced a complicating factor into our attempts at antigenic analysis. While serologic and antigenic analyses remain useful, we recommend that they be used with caution and in combination with other techniques for identifying and characterizing new isolates and newly acquired strains. Combinations of these techniques have proven to be useful in our laboratory for quality control and for uncovering interesting relationships among strains subjected to animal passage and their less virulent antecedents and among strains originally classified as the same but obtained from different sources and maintained, sometimes for decades, in different laboratories. PMID:7494014

  15. Physical mapping of BK virus DNA with SacI, MboII, and AluI restriction endonucleases.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, R C; Wu, R

    1978-01-01

    A new restriction endonuclease, SacI from Streptomyces achromogenes cleaves BK virus (strain MM) DNA into 3 fragments, whereas MboII from Moraxella bovis and AluI from Arthrobacter luteus give 22 and 30 fragments, respectively. All these specific DNA fragments were ordered and mapped on the viral genome by two methods first, by the reciprocal digestion method using uniformly 32P-labeled DNA; and second, by the partial digestion technique using the single-end 32P-labeled DNA. This study, together with those reported earlier, defined the location of 90 cleavage sites on the BK virus DNA. Images PMID:215783

  16. A new mtDNA mutation showing accumulation with time and restriction to skeletal muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, K.; Wilson, J.N.; Taylor, L.

    1997-02-01

    We have identified a new mutation in mtDNA, involving tRNA{sup Leu(CUN)} in a patient manifesting an isolated skeletal myopathy. This heteroplasmic A{r_arrow}G transition at position 12320 affects the T{Psi}C loop at a conserved site and was not found in 120 controls. Analysis of cultured fibroblasts, white blood cells/platelets, and skeletal muscle showed that only skeletal muscle contained the mutation and that only this tissue demonstrated a biochemical defect of respiratory-chain activity. In a series of four muscle-biopsy specimens taken over a 12-year period, there was a gradual increase, from 70% to 90%, in the overall level of mutation, as well as a marked clinical deterioration. Single-fiber PCR confirmed that the proportion of mutant mtDNA was highest in cytochrome c oxidase-negative fibers. This study, which reports a mutation involving tRNA{sup Leu(CUN)}, demonstrates clearly that mtDNA point mutations can accumulate over time and may be restricted in their tissue distribution. Furthermore, clinical deterioration seemed to follow the increase in the level of mutation, although, interestingly, the appearance of fibers deficient in respiratory-chain activity showed a lag period. 32 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  17. The Role of DNA Restriction-Modification Systems in the Biology of Bacillus anthracis

    PubMed Central

    Sitaraman, Ramakrishnan

    2016-01-01

    Restriction–modification (R–M) systems are widespread among prokaryotes and, depending on their type, may be viewed as selfish genetic elements that persist as toxin–antitoxin modules, or as cellular defense systems against phage infection that confer a selective advantage to the host bacterium. Studies in the last decade have made it amply clear that these two options do not exhaust the list of possible biological roles for R–M systems. Their presence in a cell may also have a bearing on other processes such as horizontal gene transfer and gene regulation. From genome sequencing and experimental data, we know that Bacillus anthracis encodes at least three methylation-dependent (typeIV) restriction endonucleases (RE), and an orphan DNA methyltransferase. In this article, we first present an outline of our current knowledge of R–M systems in B. anthracis. Based on available DNA sequence data, and on our current understanding of the functions of similar genes in other systems, we conclude with hypotheses on the possible roles of the three REs and the orphan DNA methyltransferase. PMID:26834729

  18. 7 CFR 29.1164 - Cutters (C Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... injury. Grades, Grade Names, Minimum Specifications, and Tolerances C1L—Choice Quality Lemon Cutters Ripe.... Uniformity, 90 percent, injury tolerance, 5 percent. C2L—Fine Quality Lemon Cutters Ripe, open leaf structure... tolerance, 10 percent. C3L—Good Quality Lemon Cutters Ripe, open leaf structure, thin, oily, strong...

  19. 7 CFR 29.1164 - Cutters (C Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... injury. Grades, Grade Names, Minimum Specifications, and Tolerances C1L—Choice Quality Lemon Cutters Ripe.... Uniformity, 90 percent, injury tolerance, 5 percent. C2L—Fine Quality Lemon Cutters Ripe, open leaf structure... tolerance, 10 percent. C3L—Good Quality Lemon Cutters Ripe, open leaf structure, thin, oily, strong...

  20. 7 CFR 29.1164 - Cutters (C Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... injury. Grades, Grade Names, Minimum Specifications, and Tolerances C1L—Choice Quality Lemon Cutters Ripe.... Uniformity, 90 percent, injury tolerance, 5 percent. C2L—Fine Quality Lemon Cutters Ripe, open leaf structure... tolerance, 10 percent. C3L—Good Quality Lemon Cutters Ripe, open leaf structure, thin, oily, strong...

  1. 7 CFR 29.1164 - Cutters (C Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... injury. Grades, Grade Names, Minimum Specifications, and Tolerances C1L—Choice Quality Lemon Cutters Ripe.... Uniformity, 90 percent, injury tolerance, 5 percent. C2L—Fine Quality Lemon Cutters Ripe, open leaf structure... tolerance, 10 percent. C3L—Good Quality Lemon Cutters Ripe, open leaf structure, thin, oily, strong...

  2. 7 CFR 29.1164 - Cutters (C Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... injury. Grades, Grade Names, Minimum Specifications, and Tolerances C1L—Choice Quality Lemon Cutters Ripe.... Uniformity, 90 percent, injury tolerance, 5 percent. C2L—Fine Quality Lemon Cutters Ripe, open leaf structure... tolerance, 10 percent. C3L—Good Quality Lemon Cutters Ripe, open leaf structure, thin, oily, strong...

  3. Restriction endonuclease analysis of mitochondrial DNA from grande and genetically characterized cytoplasmic petite clones of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Morimoto, R; Lewin, A; Hsu, H J; Rabinowitz, M; Fukuhara, H

    1975-01-01

    Digestion of grande mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) BY EcoRI restriction endonuclease gives rise to nine fragments with a total molecular weight of 51.8 x 10(6). HindIII digestion yields six fragments with a similar total molecular weight. Specific restriction fragments can be detected despite the fact that yeast mtDNA consists of a heterogeneous distribution of randomly broken molecules. Digestion patterns of 10 genetically characterized petite clones containing various combinations of five antiobiotic resistance markers indicate that the petite mtDNA predominantly represents deletion of the grande genome. The petite mtDNAs contained up to seven EcoRI restriction fragments which comigrate with grande restriction fragments, and at least one fragment that did not correspond to any in the grande. Some strains contained multiple fragments with mobility different from that of grande; these fragments were usually present in less than molar concentrations. The genetic markers were associated with individual sets of restriction fragments. However, several internal inconsistencies prevent the construction of a definitive genetic fragment map. These anomalies, together with the digestion patterns, provide strong evidence that, in addition to single contiguous deletion, other changes such as multiple deletion and heterogeneity of mtDNA populations are present in some of the petite mtDNAs. Images PMID:1105566

  4. Study on detection of mutation DNA fragment in gastric cancer by restriction endonuclease fingerprinting with capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rong; Xie, Hua; Xu, Yue-Bing; Jia, Zheng-Ping; Meng, Xian-Dong; Zhang, Juan-Hong; Ma, Jun; Wang, Juan; Wang, Xian-Hua

    2012-03-01

    The DNA fragment detection focusing technique has further enhanced the sensitivity and information of DNA targets. The DNA fragment detection method was established by capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection and restriction endonuclease chromatographic fingerprinting (CE-LIF-REF) in our experiment. The silica capillary column was coated with short linear polyarclarylamide (SLPA) using nongel sieving technology. The excision product of various restricted enzymes of DNA fragments was obtained by REF with the molecular biology software Primer Premier 5. The PBR322/BsuRI DNA marker was used to establish the optimization method. The markers were focused electrophoretically and detected by CE-LIF. The results demonstrate that the CE-LIF-REF with SLPA can improve separation, sensitivity and speed of analysis. This technique may be applied to analysis of the excision product of various restricted enzymes of prokaryotic plasmid (pIRES2), eukaryote plasmid (pcDNA3.1) and the PCR product of codon 248 region of gastric cancer tissue. The results suggest that this method could very sensitively separate the excision products of various restricted enzymes at a much better resolution than the traditional agarose electrophoresis.

  5. Comparison of Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae isolates using bacterial restriction endonuclease DNA analysis and SDS-PAGE.

    PubMed

    Mew, A J; Ionas, G; Clarke, J K; Robinson, A J; Marshall, R B

    1985-12-01

    Sixteen isolates of Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae recovered from the nasal tract or lungs of sheep from different flocks in New Zealand were examined by bacterial restriction endonuclease DNA analysis (BRENDA) using EcoR1 and by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). All isolates gave BRENDA patterns which differed entirely from one another. Following 20 serial passages (corresponding to approximately 67 generations) of an isolate, no change was detected in the BRENDA pattern. When eight isolates were examined by SDS-PAGE most bands were common but, nevertheless, each isolate was unique in the sense that they differed from one another in one or more bands. The marked heterogeneity of patterns observed when strains of M. ovipneumoniae are compared by BRENDA, together with the stability of such patterns over many generations, will enable this approach to be used to study the epidemiology of individual strains of M. ovipneumoniae within a flock.

  6. Respiratory and TCA cycle activities affect S. cerevisiae lifespan, response to caloric restriction and mtDNA stability.

    PubMed

    Tahara, Erich B; Cezário, Kizzy; Souza-Pinto, Nadja C; Barros, Mario H; Kowaltowski, Alicia J

    2011-10-01

    We studied the importance of respiratory fitness in S. cerevisiae lifespan, response to caloric restriction (CR) and mtDNA stability. Mutants harboring mtDNA instability and electron transport defects do not respond to CR, while tricarboxylic acid cycle mutants presented extended lifespans due to CR. Interestingly, mtDNA is unstable in cells lacking dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase under CR conditions, and cells lacking aconitase under standard conditions (both enzymes are components of the TCA and mitochondrial nucleoid). Altogether, our data indicate that respiratory integrity is required for lifespan extension by CR and that mtDNA stability is regulated by nucleoid proteins in a glucose-sensitive manner.

  7. Identification of individual herbal drugs in tea mixtures using restriction analysis of ITS DNA and real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Slanc, P; Ravnikar, M; Strukelj, B

    2006-11-01

    We have studied a sedative tea made of Valerianae radix (Valeriana officinalis L.), Lupuli strobuli (Humulus lupulus L.), Melissae folium (Melissa officinalis L.) and Menthae piperitae folium (Mentha piperita L.). In order to identify the constituent drugs a method was established involving amplification of the internal transcribed spacers (ITS) region of nuclear ribosomal DNA on the basis of restriction analysis and real-time PCR. ITS regions of individual drugs were amplified and sequenced. Restriction analysis was performed with selected restriction endonucleases Nae I, PshA I and Xcm I. Real-time PCR was carried out, using primers specifically designed for each individual herbal drug. Real-time PCR proved to be a method for identifying individual herbal drugs in a tea mixture with a single DNA extraction in a single PCR run, since its limit of detection is lower than that for restriction analysis. PMID:17152982

  8. Comparison of DNA methylation patterns among mouse cell lines by restriction landmark genomic scanning.

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, J; Hirose, K; Fushiki, S; Hirotsune, S; Ozawa, N; Hara, A; Hayashizaki, Y; Watanabe, S

    1994-01-01

    Restriction landmark genomic scanning (RLGS) is a novel method which enables us to simultaneously visualize a large number of loci as two-dimensional gel spots. By this method, the status of DNA methylation can efficiently be determined by monitoring the appearance or disappearance of spots by using a methylation-sensitive restriction enzyme. In the present study, using RLGS with NotI, we examined, in comparison with a brain RLGS profile, the status of DNA methylation of more than 900 loci among three types of mouse cell lines: the embryonal carcinoma cell line P19, the stable mesenchymal cell line 10T1/2, and our established neuroepithelial (EM) cell lines. We found that the relative numbers of RLGS spots which appeared were less than 3.3% of those surveyed in all cell lines examined. However, 5 to 14% of spots disappeared, the numbers increasing with an increase in the length of the culture period, and many spots were commonly lost in 10T1/2 and in three EM cell lines. Thus, for these cell lines, many more spots disappeared than appeared. However, the numbers of spots disappearing and appearing were well balanced, and the ratio in P19 cells was almost equal to that in liver cells in vivo. These RLGS experimental observations suggested that permanent cell lines such as 10T1/2 are hypermethylated and that our newly established EM cell lines are also becoming heavily methylated at common loci. On the other hand, methylation and demethylation seem to be balanced in P19 cells in a manner similar to that in in vivo liver tissue. Images PMID:7935456

  9. Phylogenomics of phrynosomatid lizards: conflicting signals from sequence capture versus restriction site associated DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Leaché, Adam D; Chavez, Andreas S; Jones, Leonard N; Grummer, Jared A; Gottscho, Andrew D; Linkem, Charles W

    2015-03-01

    Sequence capture and restriction site associated DNA sequencing (RADseq) are popular methods for obtaining large numbers of loci for phylogenetic analysis. These methods are typically used to collect data at different evolutionary timescales; sequence capture is primarily used for obtaining conserved loci, whereas RADseq is designed for discovering single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) suitable for population genetic or phylogeographic analyses. Phylogenetic questions that span both "recent" and "deep" timescales could benefit from either type of data, but studies that directly compare the two approaches are lacking. We compared phylogenies estimated from sequence capture and double digest RADseq (ddRADseq) data for North American phrynosomatid lizards, a species-rich and diverse group containing nine genera that began diversifying approximately 55 Ma. Sequence capture resulted in 584 loci that provided a consistent and strong phylogeny using concatenation and species tree inference. However, the phylogeny estimated from the ddRADseq data was sensitive to the bioinformatics steps used for determining homology, detecting paralogs, and filtering missing data. The topological conflicts among the SNP trees were not restricted to any particular timescale, but instead were associated with short internal branches. Species tree analysis of the largest SNP assembly, which also included the most missing data, supported a topology that matched the sequence capture tree. This preferred phylogeny provides strong support for the paraphyly of the earless lizard genera Holbrookia and Cophosaurus, suggesting that the earless morphology either evolved twice or evolved once and was subsequently lost in Callisaurus. PMID:25663487

  10. Analysis of the Campylobacter jejuni Genome by SMRT DNA Sequencing Identifies Restriction-Modification Motifs

    PubMed Central

    O’Loughlin, Jason L.; Eucker, Tyson P.; Chavez, Juan D.; Samuelson, Derrick R.; Neal-McKinney, Jason; Gourley, Christopher R.; Bruce, James E.; Konkel, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a leading bacterial cause of human gastroenteritis. The goal of this study was to analyze the C. jejuni F38011 strain, recovered from an individual with severe enteritis, at a genomic and proteomic level to gain insight into microbial processes. The C. jejuni F38011 genome is comprised of 1,691,939 bp, with a mol.% (G+C) content of 30.5%. PacBio sequencing coupled with REBASE analysis was used to predict C. jejuni F38011 genomic sites and enzymes that may be involved in DNA restriction-modification. A total of five putative methylation motifs were identified as well as the C. jejuni enzymes that could be responsible for the modifications. Peptides corresponding to the deduced amino acid sequence of the C. jejuni enzymes were identified using proteomics. This work sets the stage for studies to dissect the precise functions of the C. jejuni putative restriction-modification enzymes. Taken together, the data generated in this study contributes to our knowledge of the genomic content, methylation profile, and encoding capacity of C. jejuni. PMID:25695747

  11. Forensic identification of ungulate species using restriction digests of PCR-amplified mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Murray, B W; McClymont, R A; Strobeck, C

    1995-11-01

    A survey of mitochondrial D-loop variation in 15 species of ungulates was conducted via amplification by the polymerase chain reaction followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. This survey included moose (Alces alces), caribou (Rangifer tarandus), mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus hemionus), black-tailed deer (O. h. columbianus), white-tailed deer (O. virginianus), waipiti (Cervus elaphus), pronghorn antelope (Antilocapra americana), bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis), Stone's sheep (O. dalli), domestic sheep (O. aries), moulflon sheep (O. musimon), mountain goat (Oreamnos americanus), domestic goat (Capra hircus), domestic cattle (Bos taurus), and bison (Bison bison). The results of this preliminary survey indicate that there may be sufficient species specific variation in the D-loop region of the mitochondrial genome of the ungulate species examined here, with the exception of deer (Odocoileus) species, to establish the species origin of the mitochondrial haplotypes of this group. The Odocoileus species are known to hybridize and sharing of mtDNA haplotypes was observed. The chelex DNA extraction technique was successfully used on small blood stains. PMID:8522926

  12. Dome-shaped PDC cutters drill harder rock effectively

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, D.P. )

    1992-12-14

    This paper reports that rock mechanics and sonic travel time log data indicate that bits with convex-shaped polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC) cutters can drill harder rock formations than comparable bits with flat PDC cutters. The Dome-shaped cutters have drilled carbonate formations with sonic travel times as small as 50 [mu]sec/ft, compared to the standard cutoff of 75 [mu]sec/ft for flat PCD cutters. Recent field data from slim hole wells drilled in the Permian basin have shown successful applications of the 3/8-in. Dome cutter in the Grayburg dolomite with its sonic travel times as low as 50-55 [mu]sec/ft and compressive strengths significantly greater than the standard operating range for PDC bit applications. These field data indicate that the Dome cutters can successfully drill hard rock. The convex cutter shape as good impact resistance, cuttings removal, heat dissipation, and wear resistance.

  13. Magical Thinking in Narratives of Adolescent Cutters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregory, Robert J.; Mustata, Georgian T.

    2012-01-01

    Adolescents sometimes cut themselves to relieve distress; however, the mechanism is unknown. Previous studies have linked self-injury to deficits in processing emotions symbolically through language. To investigate expressive language of adolescent cutters, the authors analyzed 100 narratives posted on the Internet. Most narratives (n = 66)…

  14. Sharpening ball-nose mill cutters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burch, C. F.

    1977-01-01

    Economical attachment allows faster, more precise grinding. Vibrationless and rigid relation between grinding wheel and cutter allows for extremely high finish and accurate grinding. Leveling device levels flutes with respect to toolholder rotation that generates ball-nose radius. Constant relief around entire profile of cutting edge produces longer tool life.

  15. Identification of restriction-fragment-length polymorphisms in genomic DNA of the lesser snow goose (Anser caerulescens caerulescens).

    PubMed

    Quinn, T W; White, B N

    1987-03-01

    A genomic library of partially EcoRI-digested DNA from the lesser snow goose, Anser caerulescens caerulescens, was constructed in the phage vector Charon 4. Phage containing only unique sequences were identified by screening plaques with 32P-labeled genomic DNA. Restriction-fragment-length polymorphisms (RFLPs) were identified by probing DNA from 11-13 male birds from the breeding colony at La Perouse Bay. Of the 17 probes examined, all detected RFLPs with at least one of EcoRi, HindIII, Msp1, and Taq1. Several of them identified highly variable regions with multiple alleles. These RFLPs are valuable DNA markers that can be used for (1) the examination of DNA variation, relatedness, and genetic distance and (2) assessing paternity and maternity. These data suggest that there are higher levels of variation of DNA sequence in birds than had previously been thought to exist. PMID:2895887

  16. Re-evaluating the kinetics of ATP hydrolysis during initiation of DNA sliding by Type III restriction enzymes.

    PubMed

    Tóth, Júlia; Bollins, Jack; Szczelkun, Mark D

    2015-12-15

    DNA cleavage by the Type III restriction enzymes requires long-range protein communication between recognition sites facilitated by thermally-driven 1D diffusion. This 'DNA sliding' is initiated by hydrolysis of multiple ATPs catalysed by a helicase-like domain. Two distinct ATPase phases were observed using short oligoduplex substrates; the rapid consumption of ∼10 ATPs coupled to a protein conformation switch followed by a slower phase, the duration of which was dictated by the rate of dissociation from the recognition site. Here, we show that the second ATPase phase is both variable and only observable when DNA ends are proximal to the recognition site. On DNA with sites more distant from the ends, a single ATPase phase coupled to the conformation switch was observed and subsequent site dissociation required little or no further ATP hydrolysis. The overall DNA dissociation kinetics (encompassing site release, DNA sliding and escape via a DNA end) were not influenced by the second phase. Although the data simplifies the ATP hydrolysis scheme for Type III restriction enzymes, questions remain as to why multiple ATPs are hydrolysed to prepare for DNA sliding.

  17. Re-evaluating the kinetics of ATP hydrolysis during initiation of DNA sliding by Type III restriction enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Tóth, Júlia; Bollins, Jack; Szczelkun, Mark D.

    2015-01-01

    DNA cleavage by the Type III restriction enzymes requires long-range protein communication between recognition sites facilitated by thermally-driven 1D diffusion. This ‘DNA sliding’ is initiated by hydrolysis of multiple ATPs catalysed by a helicase-like domain. Two distinct ATPase phases were observed using short oligoduplex substrates; the rapid consumption of ∼10 ATPs coupled to a protein conformation switch followed by a slower phase, the duration of which was dictated by the rate of dissociation from the recognition site. Here, we show that the second ATPase phase is both variable and only observable when DNA ends are proximal to the recognition site. On DNA with sites more distant from the ends, a single ATPase phase coupled to the conformation switch was observed and subsequent site dissociation required little or no further ATP hydrolysis. The overall DNA dissociation kinetics (encompassing site release, DNA sliding and escape via a DNA end) were not influenced by the second phase. Although the data simplifies the ATP hydrolysis scheme for Type III restriction enzymes, questions remain as to why multiple ATPs are hydrolysed to prepare for DNA sliding. PMID:26538601

  18. A Natural Polymorphism in rDNA Replication Origins Links Origin Activation with Calorie Restriction and Lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Kwan, Elizabeth X.; Foss, Eric J.; Tsuchiyama, Scott; Alvino, Gina M.; Kruglyak, Leonid; Kaeberlein, Matt; Raghuraman, M. K.; Brewer, Bonita J.; Kennedy, Brian K.; Bedalov, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Aging and longevity are complex traits influenced by genetic and environmental factors. To identify quantitative trait loci (QTLs) that control replicative lifespan, we employed an outbred Saccharomyces cerevisiae model, generated by crossing a vineyard and a laboratory strain. The predominant QTL mapped to the rDNA, with the vineyard rDNA conferring a lifespan increase of 41%. The lifespan extension was independent of Sir2 and Fob1, but depended on a polymorphism in the rDNA origin of replication from the vineyard strain that reduced origin activation relative to the laboratory origin. Strains carrying vineyard rDNA origins have increased capacity for replication initiation at weak plasmid and genomic origins, suggesting that inability to complete genome replication presents a major impediment to replicative lifespan. Calorie restriction, a conserved mediator of lifespan extension that is also independent of Sir2 and Fob1, reduces rDNA origin firing in both laboratory and vineyard rDNA. Our results are consistent with the possibility that calorie restriction, similarly to the vineyard rDNA polymorphism, modulates replicative lifespan through control of rDNA origin activation, which in turn affects genome replication dynamics. PMID:23505383

  19. Dissociation from DNA of Type III Restriction-Modification enzymes during helicase-dependent motion and following endonuclease activity.

    PubMed

    Tóth, Júlia; van Aelst, Kara; Salmons, Hannah; Szczelkun, Mark D

    2012-08-01

    DNA cleavage by the Type III Restriction-Modification (RM) enzymes requires the binding of a pair of RM enzymes at two distant, inversely orientated recognition sequences followed by helicase-catalysed ATP hydrolysis and long-range communication. Here we addressed the dissociation from DNA of these enzymes at two stages: during long-range communication and following DNA cleavage. First, we demonstrated that a communicating species can be trapped in a DNA domain without a recognition site, with a non-specific DNA association lifetime of ∼ 200 s. If free DNA ends were present the lifetime became too short to measure, confirming that ends accelerate dissociation. Secondly, we observed that Type III RM enzymes can dissociate upon DNA cleavage and go on to cleave further DNA molecules (they can 'turnover', albeit inefficiently). The relationship between the observed cleavage rate and enzyme concentration indicated independent binding of each site and a requirement for simultaneous interaction of at least two enzymes per DNA to achieve cleavage. In light of various mechanisms for helicase-driven motion on DNA, we suggest these results are most consistent with a thermally driven random 1D search model (i.e. 'DNA sliding').

  20. Impact of cytosine 5-halogens on the interaction of DNA with restriction endonucleases and methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Valinluck, Victoria; Wu, Winnie; Liu, Pingfang; Neidigh, Jonathan W; Sowers, Lawrence C

    2006-04-01

    Growing evidence from both prokaryotes and eukaryotes indicates that pyrimidine 5-methyl groups can have profound biological consequences that are mediated by the affinity of DNA-protein interactions. The presence of the 5-methyl group could potentially create a steric block preventing the binding of some proteins whereas the affinity of many other proteins is substantially increased by pyrimidine methylation. In this paper, we have constructed a series of oligonucleotides containing cytosine and a series of 5-substituted cytosine analogues including all halogens. This set of oligonucleotides has been used to probe the relationship between the size of the substituent and its capacity to modulate cleavage by the methylation-sensitive restriction endonucleases MspI and HpaII. Additionally, we have examined the impact of the halogen substitution on the corresponding bacterial methyltransferase (M.HpaII). We observed that MspI cleavage is only subtly affected by substituted cytosine analogues at the inner position of the CCGG recognition site. In contrast, HpaII cleaves cytosine-containing oligonucleotides completely whereas 5-fluorocytosine-containing oligonucleotides are cleaved at a reduced rate. The presence of the larger halogens Cl, Br, or I as well as a methyl group completely prevents cleavage by HpaII. These data suggest that the steric wall is encountered by HpaII slightly beyond the fluorine substituent, at about 2.65 A from the pyrimidine C5-position. It is known that 5-fluorocytosine in an oligonucleotide can form a covalent irreversible suicide complex with either prokaryotic or eukaryotic methyltransferases. Kinetic data reported here suggest that the 5-fluorocytosine-containing oligonucleotide can also inhibit M.HpaII by formation of a reversible, noncovalent complex. Our results indicate that although a 5-Cl substituent has electronic properties similar to 5-F, 5-chlorocytosine duplexes neither form a complex with M.HpaII nor inhibit enzymatic

  1. Determination of genome size of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by PFGE: analysis of restriction fragments.

    PubMed Central

    Hector, J S; Johnson, A R

    1990-01-01

    Genomic DNA size was measured in three strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, ATCC 29260 (exotoxin A), ATCC 33467 (type I smooth) and ATCC 33468 (type 2 mucoid) by transverse alternating field electrophoresis of restriction fragments. Because of the high (67%) G + C content of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, restriction enzymes that recognize sequences with at least 4 AT base pairs were expected to be rare cutters. Eight enzymes produced fragments greater than 200 kb in size: Dral (TTT/AAA), Asnl (ATT/AAT), Hpal (GTT/AAC), AfIII (C/TTAAG), Xbal (T/CTAGA), Spel (A/CTAGT), Sspl (AAT/ATT) and Ndel (CA/TATG). All eight enzymes recognized one of three rare tetranucleotide sequences, TTAA, CTAG or ATAT. Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain 29260 has a genomic DNA size of 5573 kb. Strains 33467 and 33468 have identical restriction patterns and a possible deletion with a genomic size of 5407 kb. Images PMID:1972559

  2. Phylogenetic relationships of subtribe Ecliptinae (Asteraceae: Heliantheae) based on chloroplast DNA restriction site data.

    PubMed

    Panero, J L; Jansen, R K; Clevinger, J A

    1999-03-01

    Phylogenetic analysis of chloroplast DNA restriction site data for 76 of the 302 genera of Heliantheae sensu lato using 16 restriction endonucleases reveals that subtribe Ecliptinae is polyphyletic and that its genera are distributed in four different lineages. The ecliptinous genera Squamopappus, Podachaenium, Verbesina, and Tetrachyron (of the Neurolaeninae), along with other members of subtribe Neurolaeninae are the basalmost clades of the paleaceous Heliantheae. The mostly temperate species of subtribe Ecliptinae (exemplified by Balsamorhiza, Borrichia, Chrysogonum, Engelmannia, Silphium, Vigethia, and Wyethia) are strongly nested in a clade with the Mesoamerican monotypic genus Rojasianthe as basal. The genera characterized by marcescent ray corollas traditionally classified in subtribe Zinniinae constitute a strongly supported group sister to Acmella, Spilanthes, and Salmea. The largest clade of ecliptinous genera is the most recently derived group within Heliantheae sampled. This large group of mostly Neotropical lowland genera (variously characterized by their winged cypselae, foliaceous phyllaries, and opposite phyllotaxy and exemplified by Perymenium, Wedelia, and Zexmenia) has been and continues to be the most challenging group from a taxonomic standpoint. The study provides new insights as to their relationships that will have a positive impact in future monographic studies of the group. The genera of the Espeletiinae form a monophyletic clade and are sister to members of the Milleriinae and Melampodiinae. This result is consistent with their traditional taxonomic placement with genera such as Smallanthus with which they share a tendency for functionally staminate disc flowers. The phylogenetically enigmatic genus Montanoa is sister to Melampodium. Members of subtribe Galinsoginae are clustered in two main lineages that correspond to the traditional division of the subtribe based on pappus characteristics. There is no support for the monophyly of

  3. Restriction fragment length polymorphism DNA analysis by the FBI Laboratory protocol using a simple, convenient hardware system.

    PubMed

    Lewis, M E; Kouri, R E; Latorra, D; Berka, K M; Lee, H C; Gaensslen, R E

    1990-09-01

    Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of human deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) using two probes, pYNH24 and CMM101, was performed on the BIOS Timeframe system following the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) Laboratory protocol and some variations of it. Comparable results were obtained by the different methods used.

  4. Identification of DNA homologies among H incompatibility group plasmids by restriction enzyme digestion and Southern transfer hybridization.

    PubMed Central

    Whiteley, M; Taylor, D E

    1983-01-01

    Plasmids belonging to the three HI plasmid incompatibility subgroups were characterized by the use of restriction enzymes and Southern transfer hybridization. A diversity of restriction enzyme patterns was noted among the HI subgroups, and a small amount of DNA homology was observed by probing these digests with a nick-translated HI1 plasmid. Within a single subgroup (HI1 and HI2), similar restriction enzyme patterns were noted. Plasmids of all three HI subgroups and the HII group had a guanine plus cytosine content of 49 to 50 mol%. The IncHII plasmid pHH1508a also showed some homology with the HI1 probe. The DNA homology observed is probably responsible for common phenotypic properties encoded by these plasmids. Images PMID:6314885

  5. Restriction endonucleases HindII and TaqI cleave DNA with mismatched nucleotides within their recognition sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Jiricny, J; Martin, D

    1986-01-01

    Restriction endonucleases HindII and TaqI, but not SalI, were found to efficiently cleave synthetic hexadecanucleotide duplexes which contained either an A/C or a G/T mismatch within their respective restriction sites. Double-stranded M13 DNAs with identical mismatches were also cleaved under the assay conditions. These results suggest that the distortion of the DNA duplex, caused by these purine/pyrimidine mismatches is not sufficiently large so as to interfere with the recognition and the subsequent cleavage of the DNA by these two enzymes. HindII and SalI, but not TaqI, were furthermore shown to hydrolyze the two strands of the duplex with different rates. The differences between the mode of recognition of their respective restriction sites by these three enzymes are discussed. Images PMID:3008080

  6. DNA cleavage by Type ISP Restriction-Modification enzymes is initially targeted to the 3'-5' strand.

    PubMed

    van Aelst, Kara; Šišáková, Eva; Szczelkun, Mark D

    2013-01-01

    The mechanism by which a double-stranded DNA break is produced following collision of two translocating Type I Restriction-Modification enzymes is not fully understood. Here, we demonstrate that the related Type ISP Restriction-Modification enzymes LlaGI and LlaBIII can cooperate to cleave DNA following convergent translocation and collision. When one of these enzymes is a mutant protein that lacks endonuclease activity, DNA cleavage of the 3'-5' strand relative to the wild-type enzyme still occurs, with the same kinetics and at the same collision loci as for a reaction between two wild-type enzymes. The DNA nicking activity of the wild-type enzyme is still activated by a protein variant entirely lacking the Mrr nuclease domain and by a helicase mutant that cannot translocate. However, the helicase mutant cannot cleave the DNA despite the presence of an intact nuclease domain. Cleavage by the wild-type enzyme is not activated by unrelated protein roadblocks. We suggest that the nuclease activity of the Type ISP enzymes is activated following collision with another Type ISP enzyme and requires adenosine triphosphate binding/hydrolysis but, surprisingly, does not require interaction between the nuclease domains. Following the initial rapid endonuclease activity, additional DNA cleavage events then occur more slowly, leading to further processing of the initial double-stranded DNA break.

  7. [Rapid site-directed mutagenesis on full-length plasmid DNA by using designed restriction enzyme assisted mutagenesis].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Baozhong; Ran, Duoliang; Zhang, Xin; An, Xiaoping; Shan, Yunzhu; Zhou, Yusen; Tong, Yigang

    2009-02-01

    To use the designed restriction enzyme assisted mutagenesis technique to perform rapid site-directed mutagenesis on double-stranded plasmid DNA. The target amino acid sequence was reversely translated into DNA sequences with degenerate codons, resulting in large amount of silently mutated sequences containing various restriction endonucleases (REs). Certain mutated sequence with an appropriate RE was selected as the target DNA sequence for designing mutation primers. The full-length plasmid DNA was amplified with high-fidelity Phusion DNA polymerase and the amplified product was 5' phosphorylated by T4 polynucleotide kinase and then self-ligated. After transformation into an E. coli host the transformants were rapidly screened by cutting with the designed RE. With this strategy we successfully performed the site-directed mutagenesis on an 8 kb plasmid pcDNA3.1-pIgR and recovered the wild-type amino acid sequence of human polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR). A novel site-directed mutagenesis strategy based on DREAM was developed which exploited RE as a rapid screening measure. The highly efficient, high-fidelity Phusion DNA polymerase was applied to ensure the efficient and faithful amplification of the full-length sequence of a plasmid of up to 8 kb. This rapid mutagenesis strategy avoids using any commercial site-directed mutagenesis kits, special host strains or isotopes. PMID:19459340

  8. Dependence of DNA-protein cross-linking via guanine oxidation upon local DNA sequence as studied by restriction endonuclease inhibition.

    PubMed

    Madison, Amanda L; Perez, Zitadel A; To, Phuong; Maisonet, Tiffany; Rios, Eunice V; Trejo, Yuri; Ochoa-Paniagua, Carmen; Reno, Anita; Stemp, Eric D A

    2012-01-10

    Oxidative damage plays a causative role in many diseases, and DNA-protein cross-linking is one important consequence of such damage. It is known that GG and GGG sites are particularly prone to one-electron oxidation, and here we examined how the local DNA sequence influences the formation of DNA-protein cross-links induced by guanine oxidation. Oxidative DNA-protein cross-linking was induced between DNA and histone protein via the flash quench technique, a photochemical method that selectively oxidizes the guanine base in double-stranded DNA. An assay based on restriction enzyme cleavage was developed to detect the cross-linking in plasmid DNA. Following oxidation of pBR322 DNA by flash quench, several restriction enzymes (PpuMI, BamHI, EcoRI) were then used to probe the plasmid surface for the expected damage at guanine sites. These three endonucleases were strongly inhibited by DNA-protein cross-linking, whereas the AT-recognizing enzyme AseI was unaffected in its cleavage. These experiments also reveal the susceptibility of different guanine sites toward oxidative cross-linking. The percent inhibition observed for the endonucleases, and their pBR322 cleavage sites, decreased in the order: PpuMI (5'-GGGTCCT-3' and 5'-AGGACCC-3') > BamHI (5'-GGATCC-3') > EcoRI (5'-GAATTC-3'), a trend consistent with the observed and predicted tendencies for guanine to undergo one-electron oxidation: 5'-GGG-3' > 5'-GG-3' > 5'-GA-3'. Thus, it appears that in mixed DNA sequences the guanine sites most vulnerable to oxidative cross-linking are those that are easiest to oxidize. These results further indicate that equilibration of the electron hole in the plasmid DNA occurs on a time scale faster than that of cross-linking.

  9. A simple and efficient enzymatic method for covalent attachment of DNA to cellulose. Application for hybridization-restriction analysis and for in vitro synthesis of DNA probes.

    PubMed Central

    Goldkorn, T; Prockop, D J

    1986-01-01

    Single-stranded DNAs (ssDNAs) were covalently bound by a simple and efficient enzymatic method to a solid support matrix and used to develop several new procedures for gene analysis. The novel procedure to prepare a ssDNA stably coupled to a solid support employed T4 DNA ligase to link covalently oligo (dT)-cellulose and (dA)-tailed DNA. Beginning with essentially any double stranded DNA the procedure generates a ssDNA linked by its 5' end to a cellulose matrix in a concentration of over 500 ng per mg. DNA from the plasmid pBR322 (4300 bp) and a fragment of the beta-globin gene (1800 bp) were coupled to the solid support and used for several experiments. The ssDNAs on the cellulose efficiently hybridized with as little as 5 pg of complementary double-stranded DNAs. The DNA hybrids formed on the solid support were specifically and efficiently cleaved by restriction endonucleases. These specific restriction cuts were utilized for the diagnosis of correct sequences. In addition, the ssDNA on the solid support served as an efficient template for the synthesis of complementary ssDNAs. The complementary synthesized ssDNAs were uniformly labeled, more than two kilobases in size, and largely full length. About 85% of the ssDNA linked to cellulose was available for the synthesis of complementary DNA, and after strand-separation, the preparation was reusable for the synthesis of additional complementary DNA. Images PMID:3024131

  10. Restriction site detection in repetitive nuclear DNA sequences of Trypanosoma evansi for strain differentiation among different isolates.

    PubMed

    Shyma, K P; Gupta, S K; Gupta, J P; Singh, Ajit; Chaudhari, S S; Singh, Veer

    2016-09-01

    The differences or similarities among different isolates of Trypanosoma evansi through endonuclease profile was identified in the present study. The repetitive nuclear DNA of T. evansi isolated from infected cattle, buffalo and equine blood was initially amplified by PCR using specific primers. A panel of restriction enzymes, EcoRI, Eco91l, HindIII and PstI were for complete digestion of PCR products. Agarose gel electrophoresis of digested product did not show cleavage fragments and only single DNA band of the original size was visible in the ethidium bromide stained agarose gel. This indicated that the 227 bp PCR product from repetitive sequence had no site-specific cleavage sites for the REs used in this study. No heterogeneity in the repetitive nuclear DNA restriction endonuclease profile among the different isolates was recorded. PMID:27605842

  11. DNA of a circular minichromosome linearized by restriction enzymes or other reagents is resistant to further cleavage: an influence of chromatin topology on the accessibility of DNA.

    PubMed

    Kumala, Sławomir; Hadj-Sahraoui, Yasmina; Rzeszowska-Wolny, Joanna; Hancock, Ronald

    2012-10-01

    The accessibility of DNA in chromatin is an essential factor in regulating its activities. We studied the accessibility of the DNA in a ∼170 kb circular minichromosome to DNA-cleaving reagents using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and fibre-fluorescence in situ hybridization on combed DNA molecules. Only one of several potential sites in the minichromosome DNA was accessible to restriction enzymes in permeabilized cells, and in growing cells only a single site at an essentially random position was cut by poisoned topoisomerase II, neocarzinostatin and γ-radiation, which have multiple potential cleavage sites; further sites were then inaccessible in the linearized minichromosomes. Sequential exposure to combinations of these reagents also resulted in cleavage at only a single site. Minichromosome DNA containing single-strand breaks created by a nicking endonuclease to relax any unconstrained superhelicity was also cut at only a single position by a restriction enzyme. Further sites became accessible after ≥95% of histones H2A, H2B and H1, and most non-histone proteins were extracted. These observations suggest that a global rearrangement of the three-dimensional packing and interactions of nucleosomes occurs when a circular minichromosome is linearized and results in its DNA becoming inaccessible to probes.

  12. Inference of human evolution through cladistic analysis of nuclear DNA restriction polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Mountain, J L; Cavalli-Sforza, L L

    1994-07-01

    Testing of nuclear DNA polymorphisms in human populations has been extended to closely related primates. For many polymorphisms, one allele is shared by two or more species: such shared alleles are likely to be ancestral and provide insight not only into the relationships among the primates but also into the evolutionary history of modern humans. Humans from among eight worldwide populations share an allele with chimpanzees for 62 out of 79 polymorphisms examined. Frequencies of these ancestral alleles strengthen the conclusion that the earliest major separation of modern humans was between Africans and non-Africans. The average time since mutation of the ancestral alleles producing the current set of polymorphisms is estimated to be 700,000 years. While differences among ancestral allele frequencies in human populations suggest that natural selection may have played a role in the evolution of a subset of these polymorphisms, simulations indicate that a European bias in the ascertainment of polymorphisms may be at least partially responsible for observed differences. Simulations also suggest that observed heterozygosity levels in African populations, for classical polymorphisms and restriction fragment length polymorphisms, are artificially low due to the same bias. Observed patterns of mean heterozygosity and mean ancestral allele frequency provide support for the hypothesis that Europeans and northeast Asians are closely related. This work suggests that polymorphisms should be selected by testing a random sample of extant humans.

  13. Inference of human evolution through cladistic analysis of nuclear DNA restriction polymorphisms.

    PubMed Central

    Mountain, J L; Cavalli-Sforza, L L

    1994-01-01

    Testing of nuclear DNA polymorphisms in human populations has been extended to closely related primates. For many polymorphisms, one allele is shared by two or more species: such shared alleles are likely to be ancestral and provide insight not only into the relationships among the primates but also into the evolutionary history of modern humans. Humans from among eight worldwide populations share an allele with chimpanzees for 62 out of 79 polymorphisms examined. Frequencies of these ancestral alleles strengthen the conclusion that the earliest major separation of modern humans was between Africans and non-Africans. The average time since mutation of the ancestral alleles producing the current set of polymorphisms is estimated to be 700,000 years. While differences among ancestral allele frequencies in human populations suggest that natural selection may have played a role in the evolution of a subset of these polymorphisms, simulations indicate that a European bias in the ascertainment of polymorphisms may be at least partially responsible for observed differences. Simulations also suggest that observed heterozygosity levels in African populations, for classical polymorphisms and restriction fragment length polymorphisms, are artificially low due to the same bias. Observed patterns of mean heterozygosity and mean ancestral allele frequency provide support for the hypothesis that Europeans and northeast Asians are closely related. This work suggests that polymorphisms should be selected by testing a random sample of extant humans. PMID:7912828

  14. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of the type IIL restriction enzyme MmeI in complex with DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Callahan, Scott J.; Morgan, Richard D.; Jain, Rinku; Townson, Sharon A.; Wilson, Geoffrey G.; Roberts, Richard J.; Aggarwal, Aneel K.

    2012-05-29

    Type IIL restriction enzymes have rejuvenated the search for user-specified DNA binding and cutting. By aligning and contrasting the highly comparable amino-acid sequences yet diverse recognition specificities across the family of enzymes, amino acids involved in DNA binding have been identified and mutated to produce alternative binding specificities. To date, the specificity of MmeI (a type IIL restriction enzyme) has successfully been altered at positions 3, 4 and 6 of the asymmetric TCCRAC (where R is a purine) DNA-recognition sequence. To further understand the structural basis of MmeI DNA-binding specificity, the enzyme has been crystallized in complex with its DNA substrate. The crystal belonged to space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 61.73, b = 94.96, c = 161.24 {angstrom}, {alpha} = 72.79, {beta} = 89.12, {gamma} = 71.68{sup o}, and diffracted to 2.6 {angstrom} resolution when exposed to synchrotron radiation. The structure promises to reveal the basis of MmeI DNA-binding specificity and will complement efforts to create enzymes with novel specificities.

  15. 55. QUARRY TILE CUTTERS, SECOND FLOOR, NORTH WING. WORKERS PRESSED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    55. QUARRY TILE CUTTERS, SECOND FLOOR, NORTH WING. WORKERS PRESSED THE CUTTERS INTO SLABS OF CLAY, LIFTED THEM ONTO DRYING BOARDS AND PRESSED THE PLUNGERS TO RELEASE THE CUT TILES. REPRODUCTIONS CUTTERS ARE NOT USED IN PRODUCTION. WOODEN FORMS FOR PRODUCING CLAY SLABS WITH ROLLING PINS REST AGAINST THE WALL. - Moravian Pottery & Tile Works, Southwest side of State Route 313 (Swamp Road), Northwest of East Court Street, Doylestown, Bucks County, PA

  16. Fusion of GFP to the M.EcoKI DNA methyltransferase produces a new probe of Type I DNA restriction and modification enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Kai; Roberts, Gareth A.; Stephanou, Augoustinos S.; Cooper, Laurie P.; White, John H.; Dryden, David T.F.

    2010-07-23

    Research highlights: {yields} Successful fusion of GFP to M.EcoKI DNA methyltransferase. {yields} GFP located at C-terminal of sequence specificity subunit does not later enzyme activity. {yields} FRET confirms structural model of M.EcoKI bound to DNA. -- Abstract: We describe the fusion of enhanced green fluorescent protein to the C-terminus of the HsdS DNA sequence-specificity subunit of the Type I DNA modification methyltransferase M.EcoKI. The fusion expresses well in vivo and assembles with the two HsdM modification subunits. The fusion protein functions as a sequence-specific DNA methyltransferase protecting DNA against digestion by the EcoKI restriction endonuclease. The purified enzyme shows Foerster resonance energy transfer to fluorescently-labelled DNA duplexes containing the target sequence and to fluorescently-labelled ocr protein, a DNA mimic that binds to the M.EcoKI enzyme. Distances determined from the energy transfer experiments corroborate the structural model of M.EcoKI.

  17. Effect of downhole assembly and cutter geometry on stability of drillstrings equipped with polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC) cutters

    SciTech Connect

    Elsayed, M.A.; Dareing, D.W.; Dupuy, C.A.

    1996-11-01

    Stability of drillstrings equipped with PDC cutters depends on many factors such as the design of the drillstring, design of the cutter, and formation type. In this paper, the authors show that the drill pipe plays a minor role in stability in comparison with that of the drill collars. They also show that the number of cutter blades affects the location of the stability pockets, while their spacing affects the size of these pockets. Using this data, a combination of drill collar and cutter design can be used to provide operating speeds resulting in maximum stability of the drillstring.

  18. The Fidelity Index provides a systematic quantitation of star activity of DNA restriction endonucleases

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Hua; Therrien, Caitlin; Blanchard, Aine; Guan, Shengxi; Zhu, Zhenyu

    2008-01-01

    Restriction endonucleases are the basic tools of molecular biology. Many restriction endonucleases show relaxed sequence recognition, called star activity, as an inherent property under various digestion conditions including the optimal ones. To quantify this property we propose the concept of the Fidelity Index (FI), which is defined as the ratio of the maximum enzyme amount showing no star activity to the minimum amount needed for complete digestion at the cognate recognition site for any particular restriction endonuclease. Fidelity indices for a large number of restriction endonucleases are reported here. The effects of reaction vessel, reaction volume, incubation mode, substrate differences, reaction time, reaction temperature and additional glycerol, DMSO, ethanol and Mn2+ on the FI are also investigated. The FI provides a practical guideline for the use of restriction endonucleases and defines a fundamental property by which restriction endonucleases can be characterized. PMID:18413342

  19. Determination of genes, restriction sites, and DNA sequences surrounding the 6S RNA template of bacteriophage lambda.

    PubMed Central

    Sklar, J; Yot, P; Weissman, S M

    1975-01-01

    A major product of the transcription of bacteriophage lambda DNA in vitro is the 6S RNA. This article presents a detailed mapping of restriction endonuclease cleavage sites about the region of the 6S RNA template within the lambda genome. Restriction fragments defined by these sites have been used to localize the 6S RNA template within the physical and genetic maps of the lambda genome. Nucleotide sequence analysis of one of these fragments has largely confimed the nucleotide sequence of the 6S RNA reported previously and has indicated the sequence of DNA that immediately follows the 6S RNA template. This article reports the nucleotide sequence following a known site of transcription termination by RNA polymerase of Escherichia coli. Images PMID:1098044

  20. Intersection of calorie restriction and magnesium in the suppression of genome-destabilizing RNA–DNA hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Karan J.; Chan, Janet N.Y.; Salvi, Jayesh S.; Ho, Brandon; Hall, Amanda; Vidya, Elva; Guo, Ru; Killackey, Samuel A.; Liu, Nancy; Lee, Jeffrey E.; Brown, Grant W.; Mekhail, Karim

    2016-01-01

    Dietary calorie restriction is a broadly acting intervention that extends the lifespan of various organisms from yeast to mammals. On another front, magnesium (Mg2+) is an essential biological metal critical to fundamental cellular processes and is commonly used as both a dietary supplement and treatment for some clinical conditions. If connections exist between calorie restriction and Mg2+ is unknown. Here, we show that Mg2+, acting alone or in response to dietary calorie restriction, allows eukaryotic cells to combat genome-destabilizing and lifespan-shortening accumulations of RNA–DNA hybrids, or R-loops. In an R-loop accumulation model of Pbp1-deficient Saccharomyces cerevisiae, magnesium ions guided by cell membrane Mg2+ transporters Alr1/2 act via Mg2+-sensitive R-loop suppressors Rnh1/201 and Pif1 to restore R-loop suppression, ribosomal DNA stability and cellular lifespan. Similarly, human cells deficient in ATXN2, the human ortholog of Pbp1, exhibit nuclear R-loop accumulations repressible by Mg2+ in a process that is dependent on the TRPM7 Mg2+ transporter and the RNaseH1 R-loop suppressor. Thus, we identify Mg2+ as a biochemical signal of beneficial calorie restriction, reveal an R-loop suppressing function for human ATXN2 and propose that practical magnesium supplementation regimens can be used to combat R-loop accumulation linked to the dysfunction of disease-linked human genes. PMID:27574117

  1. A novel method for sensitive and specific detection of DNA methylation biomarkers based on DNA restriction during PCR cycling.

    PubMed

    Kneip, Christoph; Schmidt, Bernd; Fleischhacker, Michael; Seegebarth, Anke; Lewin, Jörn; Flemming, Nadja; Seemann, Stefanie; Schlegel, Thomas; Witt, Christian; Liebenberg, Volker; Dietrich, Dimo

    2009-09-01

    DNA methylation is an important epigenetic mechanism involved in fundamental biological processes such as development, imprinting, and carcino-genesis. For these reasons, DNA methylation represents a valuable source for cancer biomarkers. Methods for the sensitive and specific detection of methylated DNA are a prerequisite for the implementation of DNA biomarkers into clinical routine when early detection based on the analysis of body fluids is desired. Here, a novel technique is presented for the detection of DNA methylation biomarkers, based on real-time PCR of bisulfite-treated template with enzymatic digestion of background DNA during amplification using the heat-stable enzyme Tsp509I. An assay for the lung cancer methylation biomarker BARHL2 was used to show clinical and analytical performance of the method in comparison with methylation-specific PCR technology. Both technologies showed comparable performance when analyzing technical DNA mixtures and bronchial lavage samples from 75 patients suspected of having lung cancer. The results demonstrate that the approach is useful for sensitive and specific detection of a few copies of methylated DNA in samples with a high background of unmethylated DNA, such as in clinical samples from body fluids.

  2. A Cladistic Analysis of Phenotypic Associations with Haplotypes Inferred from Restriction Endonuclease Mapping and DNA Sequence Data. III. Cladogram Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Templeton, A. R.; Crandall, K. A.; Sing, C. F.

    1992-01-01

    We previously developed a cladistic approach to identify subsets of haplotypes defined by restriction endonuclease mapping or DNA sequencing that are associated with significant phenotypic deviations. Our approach was limited to segments of DNA in which little recombination occurs. In such cases, a cladogram can be constructed from the restriction site or sequence data that represents the evolutionary steps that interrelate the observed haplotypes. The cladogram is used to define a nested statistical design to identify mutational steps associated with significant phenotypic deviations. The central assumption behind this strategy is that any undetected mutation causing a phenotypic effect is embedded within the same evolutionary history that is represented by the cladogram. The power of this approach depends upon the confidence one has in the particular cladogram used to draw inferences. In this paper, we present a strategy for estimating the set of cladograms that are consistent with a particular sample of either restriction site or nucleotide sequence data and that includes the possibility of recombination. We first evaluate the limits of parsimony in constructing cladograms. Once these limits have been determined, we construct the set of parsimonious and nonparsimonious cladograms that is consistent with these limits. Our estimation procedure also identifies haplotypes that are candidates for being products of recombination. If recombination is extensive, our algorithm subdivides the DNA region into two or more subsections, each having little or no internal recombination. We apply this estimation procedure to three data sets to illustrate varying degrees of cladogram ambiguity and recombination. PMID:1385266

  3. Reusable Hot-Wire Cable Cutter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pauken, Michael T.; Steinkraus, Joel M.

    2010-01-01

    During the early development stage of balloon deployment systems for missions, nichrome wire cable cutters were often used in place of pyro-actuated cutters. Typically, a nichrome wire is wrapped around a bundle of polymer cables with a low melting point and connected to a relay-actuated electric circuit. The heat from the nichrome reduces the strength of the cable bundle, which quickly breaks under a mechanical load and can thus be used as a release mechanism for a deployment system. However, the use of hand-made heated nichrome wire for cutters is not very reliable. Often, the wrapped nichrome wire does not cut through the cable because it either pulls away from its power source or does not stay in contact with the cable being cut. Because nichrome is not readily soldered to copper wire, unreliable mechanical crimps are often made to connect the nichrome to an electric circuit. A self-contained device that is reusable and reliable was developed to sever cables for device release or deployment. The nichrome wire in this new device is housed within an enclosure to prevent it from being damaged by handling. The electric power leads are internally connected within the unit to the nichrome wire using a screw terminal connection. A bayonet plug, a quick and secure method of connecting the cutter to the power source, is used to connect the cutter to the power leads similar to those used in pyro-cutter devices. A small ceramic tube [0.25-in. wide 0.5-in. long (.6.4-mm wide 13-mm long)] houses a spiraled nichrome wire that is heated when a cable release action is required. The wire is formed into a spiral coil by wrapping it around a mandrel. It is then laid inside the ceramic tube so that it fits closely to the inner surface of the tube. The ceramic tube provides some thermal and electrical insulation so that most of the heat generated by the wire is directed toward the cable bundle in the center of the spiral. The ceramic tube is cemented into an aluminum block, which

  4. The comparative analysis of rocks' resistance to forward-slanting disc cutters and traditionally installed disc cutters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhao-Huang; Fei, Sun; Liang, Meng

    2016-08-01

    At present, disc cutters of a full face rock tunnel boring machine are mostly mounted in the traditional way. Practical use in engineering projects reveals that this installation method not only heavily affects the operation life of disc cutters, but also increases the energy consumption of a full face rock tunnel boring machine. To straighten out this issue, therefore, a rock-breaking model is developed for disc cutters' movement after the research on the rock breaking of forward-slanting disc cutters. Equations of its displacement are established based on the analysis of velocity vector of a disc cutter's rock-breaking point. The functional relations then are brought forward between the displacement parameters of a rock-breaking point and its coordinate through the analysis of micro displacement of a rock-breaking point. Thus, the geometric equations of rock deformation are derived for the forward-slanting installation of disc cutters. With a linear relationship remaining between the acting force and its deformation either before or after the leap breaking, the constitutive relation of rock deformation can be expressed in the form of generalized Hooke law, hence the comparative analysis of the variation in the resistance of rock to the disc cutters mounted in the forward-slanting way with that in the traditional way. It is discovered that with the same penetration, strain of the rock in contact with forward-slanting disc cutters is apparently on the decline, in other words, the resistance of rock to disc cutters is reduced. Thus wear of disc cutters resulted from friction is lowered and energy consumption is correspondingly decreased. It will be useful for the development of installation and design theory of disc cutters, and significant for the breakthrough in the design of full face rock tunnel boring machine.

  5. 40 CFR 1065.365 - Nonmethane cutter penetration fractions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Nonmethane cutter penetration...) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calibrations and Verifications Hydrocarbon Measurements § 1065.365 Nonmethane cutter penetration fractions. (a) Scope and frequency. If you use a...

  6. 40 CFR 1065.365 - Nonmethane cutter penetration fractions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Nonmethane cutter penetration...) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calibrations and Verifications Hydrocarbon Measurements § 1065.365 Nonmethane cutter penetration fractions. (a) Scope and frequency. If you use a...

  7. 40 CFR 1065.365 - Nonmethane cutter penetration fractions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Nonmethane cutter penetration...) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calibrations and Verifications Hydrocarbon Measurements § 1065.365 Nonmethane cutter penetration fractions. (a) Scope and frequency. If you use a...

  8. Sequence Capture versus Restriction Site Associated DNA Sequencing for Shallow Systematics.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Michael G; Smith, Brian Tilston; Glenn, Travis C; Faircloth, Brant C; Brumfield, Robb T

    2016-09-01

    Sequence capture and restriction site associated DNA sequencing (RAD-Seq) are two genomic enrichment strategies for applying next-generation sequencing technologies to systematics studies. At shallow timescales, such as within species, RAD-Seq has been widely adopted among researchers, although there has been little discussion of the potential limitations and benefits of RAD-Seq and sequence capture. We discuss a series of issues that may impact the utility of sequence capture and RAD-Seq data for shallow systematics in non-model species. We review prior studies that used both methods, and investigate differences between the methods by re-analyzing existing RAD-Seq and sequence capture data sets from a Neotropical bird (Xenops minutus). We suggest that the strengths of RAD-Seq data sets for shallow systematics are the wide dispersion of markers across the genome, the relative ease and cost of laboratory work, the deep coverage and read overlap at recovered loci, and the high overall information that results. Sequence capture's benefits include flexibility and repeatability in the genomic regions targeted, success using low-quality samples, more straightforward read orthology assessment, and higher per-locus information content. The utility of a method in systematics, however, rests not only on its performance within a study, but on the comparability of data sets and inferences with those of prior work. In RAD-Seq data sets, comparability is compromised by low overlap of orthologous markers across species and the sensitivity of genetic diversity in a data set to an interaction between the level of natural heterozygosity in the samples examined and the parameters used for orthology assessment. In contrast, sequence capture of conserved genomic regions permits interrogation of the same loci across divergent species, which is preferable for maintaining comparability among data sets and studies for the purpose of drawing general conclusions about the impact of

  9. Leaf margin phenotype-specific restriction-site-associated DNA-derived markers for pineapple (Ananas comosus L.).

    PubMed

    Urasaki, Naoya; Goeku, Satoko; Kaneshima, Risa; Takamine, Tomonori; Tarora, Kazuhiko; Takeuchi, Makoto; Moromizato, Chie; Yonamine, Kaname; Hosaka, Fumiko; Terakami, Shingo; Matsumura, Hideo; Yamamoto, Toshiya; Shoda, Moriyuki

    2015-06-01

    To explore genome-wide DNA polymorphisms and identify DNA markers for leaf margin phenotypes, a restriction-site-associated DNA sequencing analysis was employed to analyze three bulked DNAs of F1 progeny from a cross between a 'piping-leaf-type' cultivar, 'Yugafu', and a 'spiny-tip-leaf-type' variety, 'Yonekura'. The parents were both Ananas comosus var. comosus. From the analysis, piping-leaf and spiny-tip-leaf gene-specific restriction-site-associated DNA sequencing tags were obtained and designated as PLSTs and STLSTs, respectively. The five PLSTs and two STSLTs were successfully converted to cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (CAPS) or simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers using the sequence differences between alleles. Based on the genotyping of the F1 with two SSR and three CAPS markers, the five PLST markers were mapped in the vicinity of the P locus, with the closest marker, PLST1_SSR, being located 1.5 cM from the P locus. The two CAPS markers from STLST1 and STLST3 perfectly assessed the 'spiny-leaf type' as homozygotes of the recessive s allele of the S gene. The recombination value between the S locus and STLST loci was 2.4, and STLSTs were located 2.2 cM from the S locus. SSR and CAPS markers are applicable to marker-assisted selection of leaf margin phenotypes in pineapple breeding.

  10. Identification of the Bacterial Community of Maple Sap by Using Amplified Ribosomal DNA (rDNA) Restriction Analysis and rDNA Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Lagacé, L.; Pitre, M.; Jacques, M.; Roy, D.

    2004-01-01

    The bacterial community of maple sap was characterized by analysis of samples obtained at the taphole of maple trees for the 2001 and 2002 seasons. Among the 190 bacterial isolates, 32 groups were formed according to the similarity of the banding patterns obtained by amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA). A subset of representative isolates for each ARDRA group was identified by 16S rRNA gene fragment sequencing. Results showed a wide variety of organisms, with 22 different genera encountered. Pseudomonas and Ralstonia, of the γ- and β-Proteobacteria, respectively, were the most frequently encountered genera. Gram-positive bacteria were also observed, and Staphylococcus, Plantibacter, and Bacillus were the most highly represented genera. The sampling period corresponding to 50% of the cumulative sap flow percentage presented the greatest bacterial diversity according to its Shannon diversity index value (1.1). γ-Proteobacteria were found to be dominant almost from the beginning of the season to the end. These results are providing interesting insights on maple sap microflora that will be useful for further investigation related to microbial contamination and quality of maple products and also for guiding new strategies on taphole contamination control. PMID:15066796

  11. MmoSTI restriction endonuclease, isolated from Morganella morganii infecting a tropical moth, Actias selene, cleaving 5'-|CCNGG-3' sequences.

    PubMed

    Skowron, Marta A; Zebrowska, Joanna; Wegrzyn, Grzegorz; Skowron, Piotr M

    2016-02-01

    A type II restriction endonuclease, MmoSTI, from the pathogenic bacterium Morganella morganii infecting a tropical moth, Actias selene, has been detected and biochemically characterized, as a potential etiological differentiation factor. The described REase recognizes interrupted palindromes, i.e., 5'-CCNGG-3' sequences and cleaves DNA leaving 5-nucleotide (nt) long, single-stranded (ss), 5'-cohesive ends, which was determined by three complementary methods: (i) cleavage of custom and standard DNA substrates, (ii) run-off sequencing of cleavage products, and (iii) shotgun cloning and sequencing of bacteriophage lambda (λ) DNA digested with MmoSTI. MmoSTI, the first 5'-CCNGG-3' REase characterized from M. morganii, is a neoschizomer of ScrFI, which cleaves DNA leaving 1-nt long, ss, 5'-cohesive ends. It is a high-frequency cutter and can be isolated from easily cultured bacteria, thus it can potentially serve as a tool for DNA manipulations.

  12. Characterization of 2-mum DNA of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by restriction fragment analysis and integration in an Escherichia coli plasmid.

    PubMed Central

    Hollenberg, C P; Degelmann, A; Kustermann-Kuhn, B; Royer, H D

    1976-01-01

    Electrophoretic analysis of EcoRI and HindIII restriction fragments of 2-mum supercoiled DNA of Saccharomyces cerevisiae indicated that this class of DNA is heterogeneous and probably consists of two types of molecules. Integration of the 2-mum yeast DNA in E. coli plasmid pCR1 directly showed that existence of two types of molecules as each of these could be individually inserted into separate bacterial plasmids. The difference between the two types of 2-mum circles is due to an inversion of about 1.6 X 10(6) daltons. The inversion is flanked by a reversed duplicated sequence of 0.45 X 10(6) daltons. Possible implications of this structure are dicussed. Images PMID:778854

  13. Capillary electrophoretic separation of DNA restriction fragments using dilute polymer solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, B.; Blanch, W.; Prausnitz, J.M.

    1997-02-01

    Because the mechanism of DNA separation in capillary electrophoresis is not well understood, selection of polymers is a {open_quotes}trial-and-error{close_quotes} procedure. We investigated dilute-solution DNA separations by capillary electrophoresis using solutions of four polymers that differ in size, shape and stiffness. Hydroxyethylcellulose of high molecular weight provides excellent separation of large DNA fragments (2027 bp - 23130 bp). Polyvinylpyrrolidone separates DNA from 72 bp to 23 kbp and star-(polyethylene oxide), like linear poly (ethylene oxide), provides separation of fragments up to 1353 bp.

  14. Bifunctional TaqII restriction endonuclease: redefining the prototype DNA recognition site and establishing the Fidelity Index for partial cleaving

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The TaqII enzyme is a member of the Thermus sp. enzyme family that we propounded previously within Type IIS restriction endonucleases, containing related thermophilic bifunctional endonucleases-methyltransferases from various Thermus sp.: TaqII, Tth111II, TthHB27I, TspGWI, TspDTI and TsoI. These enzymes show significant nucleotide and amino acid sequence similarities, a rare phenomenon among restriction endonucleases, along with similarities in biochemical properties, molecular size, DNA recognition sequences and cleavage sites. They also feature some characteristics of Types I and III. Results Barker et al. reported the Type IIS/IIC restriction endonuclease TaqII as recognizing two distinct cognate site variants (5'-GACCGA-3' and 5'-CACCCA-3') while cleaving 11/9 nucleotides downstream. We used four independent methods, namely, shotgun cloning and sequencing, restriction pattern analysis, digestion of particular custom substrates and GeneScan analysis, to demonstrate that the recombinant enzyme recognizes only 5'-GACCGA-3' sites and cleaves 11/9 nucleotides downstream. We did not observe any 5'-CACCCA-3' cleavage under a variety of conditions and site arrangements tested. We also characterized the enzyme biochemically and established new digestion conditions optimal for practical enzyme applications. Finally, we developed and propose a new version of the Fidelity Index - the Fidelity Index for Partial Cleavage (FI-PC). Conclusions The DNA recognition sequence of the bifunctional prototype TaqII endonuclease-methyltransferase from Thermus aquaticus has been redefined as recognizing only 5'-GACCGA-3' cognate sites. The reaction conditions (pH and salt concentrations) were designed either to minimize (pH = 8.0 and 10 mM ammonium sulphate) or to enhance star activity (pH = 6.0 and no salt). Redefinition of the recognition site and reaction conditions makes this prototype endonuclease a useful tool for DNA manipulation; as yet, this enzyme has no practical

  15. Mapping DNA cleavage by the Type ISP restriction-modification enzymes following long-range communication between DNA sites in different orientations.

    PubMed

    van Aelst, Kara; Saikrishnan, Kayarat; Szczelkun, Mark D

    2015-12-01

    The prokaryotic Type ISP restriction-modification enzymes are single-chain proteins comprising an Mrr-family nuclease, a superfamily 2 helicase-like ATPase, a coupler domain, a methyltransferase, and a DNA-recognition domain. Upon recognising an unmodified DNA target site, the helicase-like domain hydrolyzes ATP to cause site release (remodeling activity) and to then drive downstream translocation consuming 1-2 ATP per base pair (motor activity). On an invading foreign DNA, double-strand breaks are introduced at random wherever two translocating enzymes form a so-called collision complex following long-range communication between a pair of target sites in inverted (head-to-head) repeat. Paradoxically, structural models for collision suggest that the nuclease domains are too far apart (>30 bp) to dimerise and produce a double-strand DNA break using just two strand-cleavage events. Here, we examined the organisation of different collision complexes and how these lead to nuclease activation. We mapped DNA cleavage when a translocating enzyme collides with a static enzyme bound to its site. By following communication between sites in both head-to-head and head-to-tail orientations, we could show that motor activity leads to activation of the nuclease domains via distant interactions of the helicase or MTase-TRD. Direct nuclease dimerization is not required. To help explain the observed cleavage patterns, we also used exonuclease footprinting to demonstrate that individual Type ISP domains can swing off the DNA. This study lends further support to a model where DNA breaks are generated by multiple random nicks due to mobility of a collision complex with an overall DNA-binding footprint of ∼30 bp.

  16. Efficiency of mitochondrial DNA restriction analysis and RAPD-PCR to characterize yeasts growing on dry-cured Iberian ham at the different geographic areas of ripening.

    PubMed

    Andrade, María J; Rodríguez, Mar; Casado, Eva; Córdoba, Juan J

    2010-03-01

    The efficiency of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) restriction analysis and random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR to characterize yeasts growing on dry-cured Iberian ham was evaluated. Besides, the distribution of the main species and biotypes of yeasts in the different ripening areas of this product was investigated. MtDNA restriction analysis allowed yeast characterization at species and strain level. RAPD-PCR with the primers (GACA)(4) and (GAC)(5) was inappropriate for characterization at species level. Most of the mtDNA restriction patterns detected in dry-cured Iberian ham were consistent with Debaryomyces hansenii. Several yeasts biotypes were associated to specific geographic areas of dry-cured Iberian ham ripening. PMID:20374799

  17. Efficiency of mitochondrial DNA restriction analysis and RAPD-PCR to characterize yeasts growing on dry-cured Iberian ham at the different geographic areas of ripening.

    PubMed

    Andrade, María J; Rodríguez, Mar; Casado, Eva; Córdoba, Juan J

    2010-03-01

    The efficiency of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) restriction analysis and random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR to characterize yeasts growing on dry-cured Iberian ham was evaluated. Besides, the distribution of the main species and biotypes of yeasts in the different ripening areas of this product was investigated. MtDNA restriction analysis allowed yeast characterization at species and strain level. RAPD-PCR with the primers (GACA)(4) and (GAC)(5) was inappropriate for characterization at species level. Most of the mtDNA restriction patterns detected in dry-cured Iberian ham were consistent with Debaryomyces hansenii. Several yeasts biotypes were associated to specific geographic areas of dry-cured Iberian ham ripening.

  18. Software optimization for electrical conductivity imaging in polycrystalline diamond cutters

    SciTech Connect

    Bogdanov, G.; Ludwig, R.; Wiggins, J.; Bertagnolli, K.

    2014-02-18

    We previously reported on an electrical conductivity imaging instrument developed for measurements on polycrystalline diamond cutters. These cylindrical cutters for oil and gas drilling feature a thick polycrystalline diamond layer on a tungsten carbide substrate. The instrument uses electrical impedance tomography to profile the conductivity in the diamond table. Conductivity images must be acquired quickly, on the order of 5 sec per cutter, to be useful in the manufacturing process. This paper reports on successful efforts to optimize the conductivity reconstruction routine, porting major portions of it to NVIDIA GPUs, including a custom CUDA kernel for Jacobian computation.

  19. Blackboard Electrophoresis: An Inexpensive Exercise on the Principles of DNA Restriction Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costa, M. J.

    2007-01-01

    Undergraduates with little training on molecular biology may find the technical level of the typical introductory restriction laboratory too challenging and have problems with mastering the underlying concepts and processes. "Blackboard electrophoresis" is an active learning exercise, which focuses student attention on the sequences and principles…

  20. Mitochondrial DNA variation in chinook salmon and chum salmon detected by restriction enzyme analysis of polymerase chain reaction products

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cronin, M.; Spearman, R.; Wilmot, R.; Patton, J.; Bickman, J.

    1993-01-01

    We analyze intraspecific mitochondrial DNA variation in chinook salmon from drainages in the Yukon River, the Kenai River, and Oregon and California rivers; and chum salmon from the Yukon River and vancouver Island, and Washington rivers. For each species, three different portions of the mtDNA molecule were amplified seperately using the polymerase chain reaction and then digested with at least 19 restrictions enzymes. Intraspecific sequence divergences between haplotypes were less than 0.01 base subsitution per nucleotide. Nine chum salmon haplotypes were identified. Yukon River chum salmon stocks displayed more haplotypes (8) occurred in all areas. Seven chinook salmon haplotypes were identified. Four haplotypes occurred in the Yukon and Kenai rviers and four occured in the Oregon/California, with only one haplotype shared between the regions. Sample sizes were too small to quantify the degree of stock seperation among drainages, but the patterns of variation that we observed suggest utility of the technique in genetic stock identification.

  1. Practical identification of human originated Lactobacillus species by amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA) for probiotic use.

    PubMed

    Öztürk, Mehmet; Meterelliyöz, Merve

    2015-08-01

    Probiotics are gaining popularity and increasing the importance of their accurate speciation. Lactobacillus species are commonly used as probiotic strains mostly of clinical importance. Present knowledge indicates that at least 14 Lactobacillus species are associated with the human intestinal tract. Currently, researchers are interested in developing efficient techniques for screening and selecting probiotics bacteria, but unfortunately most of these methods are time-consuming, labor-intensive and costly. The aim of this study is to develop reliable, rapid and accurate method to identify 14 references Lactobacillus species that could have been found in the human alimentary tract by 16S ribosomal DNA restriction analysis. In this study, to develop an effective method for the genotype-based identification of the reference Lactobacillus species, 1.5 kb of 16S rRNA nucleotide sequences of 14 Lactobacillus were collected from the Gene Bank aligned, in silico restricted and analyzed in respect to their 16S-rRNA restriction fragment polymorphism. In silico restriction profiles of 16S-rRNA indicated that FspBI, HinfI and DraI restriction enzymes (RE) are convenient for differentiation of 14 Lactobacillus species in human intestinal tract except Lb. casei and Lb. paracasei. The patterns of our experimental findings obtained from 16S PCR-ARDRA completely confirmed our in silico patterns. The present work demonstrated that 16S PCR-ARDRA method with FspBI, HinfI and DraI RE is a rapid, accurate and reliable method for the identification of Lactobacillus species from human alimentary tract, especially during the identification of large numbers of isolates and any laboratory equipped with a thermo cycler for probiotic use.

  2. Drill bit with improved cutter sizing pattern

    SciTech Connect

    Keith, C.W.; Clayton, R.I.

    1993-08-24

    A fixed cutter drill bit is described having a body with a nose portion thereof containing a plurality of angularly spaced generally radial wings, a first of said wings including a first row of cutting elements mounted thereon upon progressing radially outward from a center of said nose portion toward a periphery of the body of the bit, said first row of cutting elements having alternately larger and smaller area cutting faces at spaced radial positions along said first wing relative to the center of said nose, a second of said wings having a second similar row of cutting elements of larger and smaller area cutting faces thereon in substantially the same but reversed radial positions with respect to the relative radial placement of the larger and smaller diameter cutting faces of said elements in said first wing.

  3. The extended version of restriction analysis approach for the examination of the ability of low-molecular-weight compounds to modify DNA in a cell-free system.

    PubMed

    Kołodziejski, Dominik; Brillowska-Dąbrowska, Anna; Bartoszek, Agnieszka

    2015-01-01

    One of the primary requirements in toxicology is the assessment of ability of chemicals to induce DNA covalent modification. There are several well-established methods used for this purpose such as (32)P-Postlabeling or HPLC-MS. However, all of these approaches have difficult to overcome limitations, which prevents their use in genotoxin screening. Here, we describe the simple protocol exploiting specificity of restriction enzymes for the detection of DNA modification. It uses a specifically designed DNA amplicon, which contains two restriction sites recognized by Tru1I or MspI/HapII endonucleases. Modification of a restriction site abolishes its recognition and thus cleavage by the corresponding enzyme. The inhibition of cleavage indicates the occurrence of DNA modification of the restriction site(s), simultaneously pointing at the kind of base pairs (AT or GC) involved in DNA adduct formation. Previously, the application of this method was demonstrated for two antitumor compounds. Current study shows the extended version, that includes different ways of activation of tested compounds. Moreover, we propose an array of applications being of interest in toxicological research such as monitoring the kinetics of DNA adduct formation, detection of oxidative DNA damage, as well as assessment of the ability of antioxidative phytochemicals to prevent the latter DNA lesions.

  4. Evaluation of amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA) and species-specific PCR for identification of Bifidobacterium species.

    PubMed

    Krízová, Jana; Spanová, Alena; Rittich, Bohuslav

    2006-01-01

    Molecular biological methods based on genus-specific PCR, species-specific PCR, and amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA) of two PCR amplicons (523 and 914bp) using six restriction enzymes were used to differentiate among species of Bifidobacterium. The techniques were established using DNA from 16 type and reference strains of bifidobacteria of 11 species. The discrimination power of 914bp amplicon digestion was higher than that of 523bp amplicon digestion. The 914bp amplicon digestion by six restrictases provided unique patterns for nine species; B. catenulatum and B. pseudocatenulatum were not differentiated yet. The NciI digestion of the 914bp PCR product enabled to discriminate between each of B. animalis, B. lactis, and B. gallicum. The reference strain B. adolescentis CCM 3761 was reclassified as a member of the B. catenulatum/B. pseudocatenulatum group. The above-mentioned methods were applied for the identification of seven strains of Bifidobacterium spp. collected in the Culture Collection of Dairy Microorganisms (CCDM). The strains collected in CCDM were differentiated to the species level. Six strains were identified as B. lactis, one strain as B. adolescentis.

  5. Structure of the DNA deaminase domain of the HIV-1 restriction factor APOBEC3G.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kuan-Ming; Harjes, Elena; Gross, Phillip J; Fahmy, Amr; Lu, Yongjian; Shindo, Keisuke; Harris, Reuben S; Matsuo, Hiroshi

    2008-03-01

    The human APOBEC3G (apolipoprotein B messenger-RNA-editing enzyme, catalytic polypeptide-like 3G) protein is a single-strand DNA deaminase that inhibits the replication of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1), other retroviruses and retrotransposons. APOBEC3G anti-viral activity is circumvented by most retroelements, such as through degradation by HIV-1 Vif. APOBEC3G is a member of a family of polynucleotide cytosine deaminases, several of which also target distinct physiological substrates. For instance, APOBEC1 edits APOB mRNA and AID deaminates antibody gene DNA. Although structures of other family members exist, none of these proteins has elicited polynucleotide cytosine deaminase or anti-viral activity. Here we report a solution structure of the human APOBEC3G catalytic domain. Five alpha-helices, including two that form the zinc-coordinating active site, are arranged over a hydrophobic platform consisting of five beta-strands. NMR DNA titration experiments, computational modelling, phylogenetic conservation and Escherichia coli-based activity assays combine to suggest a DNA-binding model in which a brim of positively charged residues positions the target cytosine for catalysis. The structure of the APOBEC3G catalytic domain will help us to understand functions of other family members and interactions that occur with pathogenic proteins such as HIV-1 Vif.

  6. Impact of cutter roof failure on small mine operators

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, E.R. )

    1993-01-01

    The US Bureau of Mines has conducted research to gain a basis for recommending methods to predict and prevent the occurrence of cutter roof failure, a common ground control problem in the Appalachian Coalfields. Cutter roof failure can be difficult to predict and control, and be especially devastating to small miner operators with limited resources and small profit margins. Bureau research has found four distinct factors to be initiators of cutter roof failure: (1) high horizontal roof stress, (2) surface topographic variations, (3) roof rock characteristics and (4) geologic anomalies. Effective control of cutter roof is possible through improved bolting techniques, entry and mine reorientation, and entry and pillar size modifications, all of which may not be economically feasible for small mine operators. The result is that small mine operators are forced to continue mining where less than ideal roof conditions are present. Ultimately, cutter roof failure could result in the closure of some small mine operations. Extensive Bureau cutter roof research can increase small mine operator's awareness of this ground failure, provide insight for predicting its cause, and suggest appropriate methods of controlling its occurrence.

  7. T cells detect intracellular DNA but fail to induce type I IFN responses: implications for restriction of HIV replication.

    PubMed

    Berg, Randi K; Rahbek, Stine H; Kofod-Olsen, Emil; Holm, Christian K; Melchjorsen, Jesper; Jensen, David G; Hansen, Anne Louise; Jørgensen, Louise B; Ostergaard, Lars; Tolstrup, Martin; Larsen, Carsten S; Paludan, Søren R; Jakobsen, Martin R; Mogensen, Trine H

    2014-01-01

    HIV infects key cell types of the immune system, most notably macrophages and CD4+ T cells. Whereas macrophages represent an important viral reservoir, activated CD4+ T cells are the most permissive cell types supporting high levels of viral replication. In recent years, it has been appreciated that the innate immune system plays an important role in controlling HIV replication, e.g. via interferon (IFN)-inducible restriction factors. Moreover, innate immune responses are involved in driving chronic immune activation and the pathogenesis of progressive immunodeficiency. Several pattern recognition receptors detecting HIV have been reported, including Toll-like receptor 7 and Retinoic-inducible gene-I, which detects viral RNA. Here we report that human primary T cells fail to induce strong IFN responses, despite the fact that this cell type does express key molecules involved in DNA signaling pathways. We demonstrate that the DNA sensor IFI16 migrates to sites of foreign DNA localization in the cytoplasm and recruits the signaling molecules stimulator of IFN genes and Tank-binding kinase, but this does not result in expression of IFN and IFN-stimulated genes. Importantly, we show that cytosolic DNA fails to affect HIV replication. However, exogenous treatment of activated T cells with type I IFN has the capacity to induce expression of IFN-stimulated genes and suppress HIV replication. Our data suggest the existence of an impaired DNA signaling machinery in T cells, which may prevent this cell type from activating cell-autonomous anti-HIV responses. This phenomenon could contribute to the high permissiveness of CD4+ T cells for HIV-1.

  8. Structural insights into DNA sequence recognition by Type ISP restriction-modification enzymes.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Manasi; Nirwan, Neha; van Aelst, Kara; Szczelkun, Mark D; Saikrishnan, Kayarat

    2016-05-19

    Engineering restriction enzymes with new sequence specificity has been an unaccomplished challenge, presumably because of the complexity of target recognition. Here we report detailed analyses of target recognition by Type ISP restriction-modification enzymes. We determined the structure of the Type ISP enzyme LlaGI bound to its target and compared it with the previously reported structure of a close homologue that binds to a distinct target, LlaBIII. The comparison revealed that, although the two enzymes use almost a similar set of structural elements for target recognition, the residues that read the bases vary. Change in specificity resulted not only from appropriate substitution of amino acids that contacted the bases but also from new contacts made by positionally distinct residues directly or through a water bridge. Sequence analyses of 552 Type ISP enzymes showed that the structural elements involved in target recognition of LlaGI and LlaBIII were structurally well-conserved but sequentially less-conserved. In addition, the residue positions within these structural elements were under strong evolutionary constraint, highlighting the functional importance of these regions. The comparative study helped decipher a partial consensus code for target recognition by Type ISP enzymes.

  9. Structural insights into DNA sequence recognition by Type ISP restriction-modification enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Manasi; Nirwan, Neha; van Aelst, Kara; Szczelkun, Mark D.; Saikrishnan, Kayarat

    2016-01-01

    Engineering restriction enzymes with new sequence specificity has been an unaccomplished challenge, presumably because of the complexity of target recognition. Here we report detailed analyses of target recognition by Type ISP restriction-modification enzymes. We determined the structure of the Type ISP enzyme LlaGI bound to its target and compared it with the previously reported structure of a close homologue that binds to a distinct target, LlaBIII. The comparison revealed that, although the two enzymes use almost a similar set of structural elements for target recognition, the residues that read the bases vary. Change in specificity resulted not only from appropriate substitution of amino acids that contacted the bases but also from new contacts made by positionally distinct residues directly or through a water bridge. Sequence analyses of 552 Type ISP enzymes showed that the structural elements involved in target recognition of LlaGI and LlaBIII were structurally well-conserved but sequentially less-conserved. In addition, the residue positions within these structural elements were under strong evolutionary constraint, highlighting the functional importance of these regions. The comparative study helped decipher a partial consensus code for target recognition by Type ISP enzymes. PMID:26975655

  10. Structural insights into DNA sequence recognition by Type ISP restriction-modification enzymes.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Manasi; Nirwan, Neha; van Aelst, Kara; Szczelkun, Mark D; Saikrishnan, Kayarat

    2016-05-19

    Engineering restriction enzymes with new sequence specificity has been an unaccomplished challenge, presumably because of the complexity of target recognition. Here we report detailed analyses of target recognition by Type ISP restriction-modification enzymes. We determined the structure of the Type ISP enzyme LlaGI bound to its target and compared it with the previously reported structure of a close homologue that binds to a distinct target, LlaBIII. The comparison revealed that, although the two enzymes use almost a similar set of structural elements for target recognition, the residues that read the bases vary. Change in specificity resulted not only from appropriate substitution of amino acids that contacted the bases but also from new contacts made by positionally distinct residues directly or through a water bridge. Sequence analyses of 552 Type ISP enzymes showed that the structural elements involved in target recognition of LlaGI and LlaBIII were structurally well-conserved but sequentially less-conserved. In addition, the residue positions within these structural elements were under strong evolutionary constraint, highlighting the functional importance of these regions. The comparative study helped decipher a partial consensus code for target recognition by Type ISP enzymes. PMID:26975655

  11. Influence of aging and long-term caloric restriction on oxygen radical generation and oxidative DNA damage in rat liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    López-Torres, Mónica; Gredilla, Ricardo; Sanz, Alberto; Barja, Gustavo

    2002-05-01

    The effect of long-term caloric restriction and aging on the rates of mitochondrial H2O2 production and oxygen consumption as well as on oxidative damage to nuclear (nDNA) and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) was studied in rat liver tissue. Long-term caloric restriction significantly decreased H2O2 production of rat liver mitochondria (47% reduction) and significantly reduced oxidative damage to mtDNA (46% reduction) with no changes in nDNA. The decrease in ROS production was located at complex I because it only took place with complex I-linked substrates (pyruvate/malate) but not with complex II-linked substrates (succinate). The mechanism responsible for that decrease in ROS production was not a decrease in mitochondrial oxygen consumption because it did not change after long-term restriction. Instead, the caloric restricted mitochondria released less ROS per unit electron flow, due to a decrease in the reduction degree of the complex I generator. On the other hand, increased ROS production with aging in state 3 was observed in succinate-supplemented mitochondria because old control animals were unable to suppress H2O2 production during the energy transition from state 4 to state 3. The levels of 8-oxodG in mtDNA increased with age in old animals and this increase was abolished by caloric restriction. These results support the idea that caloric restriction reduces the aging rate at least in part by decreasing the rate of mitochondrial ROS production and so, the rate of oxidative attack to biological macromolecules like mtDNA. PMID:11978489

  12. Cleavage of a four-way DNA junction by a restriction enzyme spanning the point of strand exchange.

    PubMed Central

    Murchie, A I; Portugal, J; Lilley, D M

    1991-01-01

    The four-way DNA junction is believed to fold in the presence of metal ions into an X-shaped structure, in which there is pairwise coaxial stacking of helical arms. A restriction enzyme MboII has been used to probe this structure. A junction was constructed containing a recognition site for MboII in one helical arm, positioned such that stacking of arms would result in cleavage in a neighbouring arm. Strong cleavage was observed, at the sites expected on the basis of coaxial stacking. An additional cleavage was seen corresponding to the formation of an alternative stacking isomer, suggesting that the two isomeric forms are in dynamic equilibrium in solution. Images PMID:2001684

  13. A proportionate mortality study of granite cutters.

    PubMed

    Steenland, K; Beaumont, J

    1986-01-01

    Several recent studies (animal and human) have suggested an association between lung cancer and silica exposure. To test the hypothesis, we have studied death benefit records of 1,905 members of the Granite Cutters Union. A proportionate mortality analysis (PMR) was conducted, using U.S. deaths as a comparison population. Statistically (PMR) was conducted, using U.S. deaths as a comparison population. Statistically significant excesses were observed for death from nonmalignant respiratory significant excesses were observed for death from nonmalignant respiratory disease (largely silicosis) (183 obs, 43.7 exp) and for tuberculosis (largely silicotuberculosis) (262 obs, 19.3 exp). Other significant excesses were observed for bone cancer (6 obs, 1.9 exp) and arthritis (5 obs, 1.5 exp). A significant decrease was observed for leukemia (5 obs, 13.0 exp). For lung cancer a slight but nonsignificant excess was observed (97 obs, 81.1 exp, PMR = 1.19, 95% CI 0.97-1.46). A proportionate cancer mortality analysis (PCMR) showed similar results for lung cancer (PCMR = 1.09, 95% CI 0.89-1.33). Lung cancer mortality also failed to show any trend with either calendar time or duration of exposure. Although no significant excess of lung cancer was observed for the entire silica-exposed cohort, there was an indication that those who were silicotic had an excess risk of lung cancer, based on a review of contributing causes on the death certificate.

  14. Differentiation and identification of iron-oxidizing acidophilic bacteria using cultivation techniques and amplified ribosomal DNA restriction enzyme analysis.

    PubMed

    Johnson, D Barrie; Okibe, Naoko; Hallberg, Kevin B

    2005-03-01

    Acidophilic iron-oxidizing microorganisms are important both environmentally and in biotechnological applications. Although, as a group, they are readily detected by their ability to generate ferric iron (resulting in a distinctive color change in liquid media), these microbes highly diverse phylogenetically. Various other characteristics, such as optimum growth temperature, response to organic carbon sources, and cellular morphologies, facilitate, in some cases, identification of isolates to a genus or species level, although this approach has limitations and may give erroneous results. In this study, a combined approach of using physiological traits together with amplified ribosomal DNA restriction enzyme analysis (ARDREA) has been successful in identifying all known acidophilic iron-oxidizing bacteria to the species level. Computer-generated maps were used to identify restriction enzymes that allow the differentiation of the acidophiles, and these were confirmed experimentally using authentic bacterial strains. To test further the validity of this approach, six acidophilic moderately thermophilic iron-oxidizing bacteria isolated from Montserrat (West Indies) were analysed using the ARDREA protocol. Three of the isolates were identified as Sulfobacillus acidophilus-like, and one as Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans-like bacteria. The fifth isolate gave DNA digest patterns that were distinct from all known strains of iron-oxidizing acidophiles. Subsequent sequencing of the 16S rRNA genes of these isolates confirmed the identity of the four Sulfobacillus isolates, and also that the fifth isolate was a novel species. Schematic diagrams showing how ARDREA may be used to rapidly identify all known acidophilic iron-oxidizing bacteria are presented.

  15. Thrust and torque characteristics based on a new cutter-head load model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jianqin; Ren, Jiabao; Guo, Wei

    2015-07-01

    Full face rock tunnel boring machine(TBM) has been widely used in hard rock tunnels, however, there are few published theory about cutter-head design, and the design criteria of cutter-head under complex geological is not clear yet. To deal with the complex relationship among geological parameters, cutter parameters, and operating parameters during tunneling processes, a cutter-head load model is established by using CSM(Colorado school of mines) prediction model. Force distribution on cutter-head under a certain geology is calculated with the new established load model, and result shows that inner cutters bear more force than outer cutters, combining with disc cutters abrasion; a general principle of disc cutters' layout design is proposed. Within the model, the relationship among rock uniaxial compressive strength(UCS), penetration and thrust on cutter-head are analyzed, and the results shows that with increasing penetration, cutter thrust increases, but the growth rate slows and higher penetration makes lower special energy(SE). Finally, a fitting mathematical model of ZT(ratio of cutter-head torque and thrust) and penetration is established, and verified by TB880E, which can be used to direct how to set thrust and torque on cutter-head. When penetration is small, the cutter-head thrust is the main limiting factor in tunneling; when the penetration is large, cutter-head torque is the major limiting factor in tunneling. Based on the new cutter-head load model, thrust and torque characteristics of TBM further are researched and a new way for cutter-head layout design and TBM tunneling operations is proposed.

  16. Structural basis for the substrate selectivity of PvuRts1I, a 5-hydroxymethylcytosine DNA restriction endonuclease.

    PubMed

    Shao, Chen; Wang, Chengliang; Zang, Jianye

    2014-09-01

    5-Hydroxymethylation is a curious modification of cytosine that was discovered some decades ago, but its functional role in eukaryotes still awaits elucidation. 5-Hydroxymethylcytosine is an epigenetic marker that is crucial for multiple biological processes. The profile is altered under certain disease conditions such as cancer, Huntington's disease and Alzheimer's disease. Using the DNA-modification-dependent restriction endonuclease AbaSI coupled with sequencing (Aba-seq), the hydroxymethylome can be deciphered at the resolution of individual bases. The method is based on the enzymatic properties of AbaSI, a member of the PvuRts1I family of endonucleases. PvuRts1I is a modification-dependent endonuclease with high selectivity for 5-hydroxymethylcytosine over 5-methylcytosine and cytosine. In this study, the crystal structure of PvuRts1I was determined in order to understand and improve the substrate selectivity. A nuclease domain and an SRA-like domain are located at the N- and C-termini, respectively. Through comparison with other SRA-domain structures, the SRA-like domain was proposed to be the 5-hmC recognition module. Several mutants of PvuRts1I with enzymatic activity restricted to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine only were generated based on the structural analysis, and these enzyme variants are appropriate for separating the hydroxymethylome from the wider methylome.

  17. Rapid identification and classification of bacteria by 16S rDNA restriction fragment melting curve analyses (RFMCA).

    PubMed

    Rudi, Knut; Kleiberg, Gro H; Heiberg, Ragnhild; Rosnes, Jan T

    2007-08-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate restriction fragment melting curve analyses (RFMCA) as a novel approach for rapid classification of bacteria during food production. RFMCA was evaluated for bacteria isolated from sous vide food products, and raw materials used for sous vide production. We identified four major bacterial groups in the material analysed (cluster I-Streptococcus, cluster II-Carnobacterium/Bacillus, cluster III-Staphylococcus and cluster IV-Actinomycetales). The accuracy of RFMCA was evaluated by comparison with 16S rDNA sequencing. The strains satisfying the RFMCA quality filtering criteria (73%, n=57), with both 16S rDNA sequence information and RFMCA data (n=45) gave identical group assignments with the two methods. RFMCA enabled rapid and accurate classification of bacteria that is database compatible. Potential application of RFMCA in the food or pharmaceutical industry will include development of classification models for the bacteria expected in a given product, and then to build an RFMCA database as a part of the product quality control. PMID:17367680

  18. A DNA-Based Assessment of the Phylogenetic Position of a Morphologically Distinct, Anchialine-Lake-Restricted Seahorse.

    PubMed

    Rose, Emily; Masonjones, Heather D; Jones, Adam G

    2016-11-01

    Isolated populations provide special opportunities to study local adaptation and incipient speciation. In some cases, however, morphological evolution can obscure the taxonomic status of recently founded populations. Here, we use molecular markers to show that an anchialine-lake-restricted population of seahorses, originally identified as Hippocampus reidi, appears on the basis of DNA data to be Hippocampus erectus We collected seahorses from Sweetings Pond, on Eleuthera Island, Bahamas, during the summer of 2014. We measured morphological traits and sequenced 2 genes, cytochrome b and ribosomal protein S7, from 19 seahorses in our sample. On the basis of morphology, Sweetings Pond seahorses could not be assigned definitively to either of the 2 species of seahorse, H. reidi and H. erectus, that occur in marine waters surrounding the Bahamas. However, our DNA-based phylogenetic analysis showed that the Sweetings Pond fish were firmly nested within the H. erectus clade with a Bayesian posterior probability greater than 0.99. Thus, Sweetings Pond seahorses most recently shared a common ancestor with H. erectus populations from the Western Atlantic. Interestingly, the seahorses from Sweetings Pond differ morphologically from other marine populations of H. erectus in having a more even torso to tail length ratio. The substantial habitat differences between Sweetings Pond and the surrounding coastal habitat make Sweetings Pond seahorses particularly interesting from the perspectives of conservation, local adaptation, and incipient speciation.

  19. Differentiation of yeasts growing on dry-cured Iberian ham by mitochondrial DNA restriction analysis, RAPD-PCR and their volatile compounds production.

    PubMed

    Andrade, M J; Rodríguez, M; Casado, E M; Bermúdez, E; Córdoba, J J

    2009-09-01

    The efficiency of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) restriction analysis, RAPD-PCR and volatile compounds analysis to differentiate yeast biotypes involved in flavour development of dry-cured Iberian ham throughout the ripening process is evaluated. For this purpose, 86 yeasts isolated from Iberian hams in the main ripening stages at different industries of the four Protected Designations of Origin of this product, were used. The combination of mtDNA restriction analysis and RAPD-PCR using the primer (GACA)4 showed a higher variability in the yeast species detected than obtained using only mtDNA restriction analysis. Only two species, Debaryomyces hansenii and Candida zeylanoides, were identified throughout the whole ripening process and a wide diversity of biotypes was found in these two species, with those of D. hansenii predominating. Clear differences between biotypes were detected in the generation of volatile compounds, with the biotype C2-2 of D. hansenii showing the highest concentrations of volatiles. The combined use of mtDNA restriction analysis and RAPD-PCR distinguishes yeast biotypes with different production of volatile compounds. In addition, analysis of the production profile of volatile compounds is needed to differentiate yeast strains of the same biotype recovered at different stages of ripening. Thus, the combination of these three methods could be very useful to select or monitor yeasts as starter cultures in dry-cured meat products. PMID:19527832

  20. Differentiation of yeasts growing on dry-cured Iberian ham by mitochondrial DNA restriction analysis, RAPD-PCR and their volatile compounds production.

    PubMed

    Andrade, M J; Rodríguez, M; Casado, E M; Bermúdez, E; Córdoba, J J

    2009-09-01

    The efficiency of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) restriction analysis, RAPD-PCR and volatile compounds analysis to differentiate yeast biotypes involved in flavour development of dry-cured Iberian ham throughout the ripening process is evaluated. For this purpose, 86 yeasts isolated from Iberian hams in the main ripening stages at different industries of the four Protected Designations of Origin of this product, were used. The combination of mtDNA restriction analysis and RAPD-PCR using the primer (GACA)4 showed a higher variability in the yeast species detected than obtained using only mtDNA restriction analysis. Only two species, Debaryomyces hansenii and Candida zeylanoides, were identified throughout the whole ripening process and a wide diversity of biotypes was found in these two species, with those of D. hansenii predominating. Clear differences between biotypes were detected in the generation of volatile compounds, with the biotype C2-2 of D. hansenii showing the highest concentrations of volatiles. The combined use of mtDNA restriction analysis and RAPD-PCR distinguishes yeast biotypes with different production of volatile compounds. In addition, analysis of the production profile of volatile compounds is needed to differentiate yeast strains of the same biotype recovered at different stages of ripening. Thus, the combination of these three methods could be very useful to select or monitor yeasts as starter cultures in dry-cured meat products.

  1. Test procedure for the Master-Lee and the modified Champion four inch hydraulic cutters

    SciTech Connect

    Crystal, J.B.

    1995-05-02

    The Master-Lee and the modified Champion 4 Inch hydraulic cutters are being retested to gather and document information related to the following: determine if the Master-Lee cutters will cut the trunnions of an Aluminum fuel canister and a Stainless Steel fuel canister; determine if the Master-Lee cutters will cut 1{1/2} inch diameter fire hose; determine if the modified Champion 4 inch blade will cut sections of piping; and determine the effectiveness of the centering device for the Champion 4 Inch cutters. Determining the limitations of the hydraulic cutter will aid in the process of debris removal in the K-Basin. Based on a previous test, the cutters were returned to the manufacturer for modifications. The modifications to the Champion 4 Inch Cutter and further testing of the Master-Lee Cutter are the subjects of these feature tests.

  2. Hepatic IGF1 DNA methylation is influenced by gender but not by intrauterine growth restriction in the young lamb.

    PubMed

    Carr, D J; Milne, J S; Aitken, R P; Adam, C L; Wallace, J M

    2015-12-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) and postnatal catch-up growth confer an increased risk of adult-onset disease. Overnourishment of adolescent ewes generates IUGR in ∼ 50% of lambs, which subsequently exhibit increased fractional growth rates. We investigated putative epigenetic changes underlying this early postnatal phenotype by quantifying gene-specific methylation at cytosine:guanine (CpG) dinucleotides. Hepatic DNA/RNA was extracted from IUGR [eight male (M)/nine female (F)] and normal birth weight (12 M/9 F) lambs. Polymerase chain reaction was performed using primers targeting CpG islands in 10 genes: insulin, growth hormone, insulin-like growth factor (IGF)1, IGF2, H19, insulin receptor, growth hormone receptor, IGF receptors 1 and 2, and the glucocorticoid receptor. Using pyrosequencing, methylation status was determined by quantifying cytosine:thymine ratios at 57 CpG sites. Messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of IGF system genes and plasma IGF1/insulin were determined. DNA methylation was independent of IUGR status but sexual dimorphism in IGF1 methylation was evident (MF (both P<0.001). IGF1 mRNA expression correlated negatively with IGF1 methylation (r=-0.507, P=0.002) and positively with plasma IGF1 (r=0.884, P<0.001). Carcass and empty body weights were greater in males (P=0.002-0.014) and this gender difference in early body conformation was mirrored by sexual dimorphism in hepatic IGF1 DNA methylation, mRNA expression and plasma IGF1 concentrations. PMID:26310177

  3. Quantification of DNA by Agarose Gel Electrophoresis and Analysis of the Topoisomers of Plasmid and M13 DNA Following Treatment with a Restriction Endonuclease or DNA Topoisomerase I

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tweedie, John W.; Stowell, Kathryn M.

    2005-01-01

    A two-session laboratory exercise for advanced undergraduate students in biochemistry and molecular biology is described. The first session introduces students to DNA quantification by ultraviolet absorbance and agarose gel electrophoresis followed by ethidium bromide staining. The second session involves treatment of various topological forms of…

  4. Superhard nanophase cutter materials for rock drilling applications

    SciTech Connect

    Voronov, O.; Tompa, G.; Sadangi, R.; Kear, B.; Wilson, C.; Yan, P.

    2000-06-23

    The Low Pressure-High Temperature (LPHT) System has been developed for sintering of nanophase cutter and anvil materials. Microstructured and nanostructured cutters were sintered and studied for rock drilling applications. The WC/Co anvils were sintered and used for development of High Pressure-High Temperature (HPHT) Systems. Binderless diamond and superhard nanophase cutter materials were manufactured with help of HPHT Systems. The diamond materials were studied for rock machining and drilling applications. Binderless Polycrystalline Diamonds (BPCD) have high thermal stability and can be used in geothermal drilling of hard rock formations. Nanophase Polycrystalline Diamonds (NPCD) are under study in precision machining of optical lenses. Triphasic Diamond/Carbide/Metal Composites (TDCC) will be commercialized in drilling and machining applications.

  5. Pharmacy officer support of U.S. Coast Guard cutters.

    PubMed

    Huntzinger, P E

    2000-11-01

    U.S. Public Health Service commissioned officers serve in 16 pharmacy billets with the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG). Thirteen of these billets involve serving as points of contact for, and providing logistical, materiel, and educational support to, USCG cutters. USCG instructions have solidified the role of pharmacy officers in the support of USCG afloat units. This article describes one USCG pharmacy officer's experience in providing pharmacy service support to USCG cutters based in Alameda, California, Yerba Buena Island (San Francisco), California, and Honolulu, Hawaii.

  6. Tube cutter tool and method of use for coupon removal

    DOEpatents

    Nachbar, H.D.; Etten, M.P. Jr.; Kurowski, P.A.

    1997-05-06

    A tube cutter tool is insertable into a tube for cutting a coupon from a damaged site on the exterior of the tube. Prior to using the tool, the damaged site is first located from the interior of the tube using a multi-coil pancake eddy current test probe. The damaged site is then marked. A fiber optic probe is used to monitor the subsequent cutting procedure which is performed using a hole saw mounted on the tube cutter tool. Prior to completion of the cutting procedure, a drill in the center of the hole saw is drilled into the coupon to hold it in place. 4 figs.

  7. Tube cutter tool and method of use for coupon removal

    DOEpatents

    Nachbar, Henry D.; Etten, Jr., Marvin P.; Kurowski, Paul A.

    1997-01-01

    A tube cutter tool is insertable into a tube for cutting a coupon from a damaged site on the exterior of the tube. Prior to using the tool, the damaged site is first located from the interior of the tube using a multi-coil pancake eddy current test probe. The damaged site is then marked. A fiber optic probe is used to monitor the subsequent cutting procedure which is performed using a hole saw mounted on the tube cutter tool. Prior to completion of the cutting procedure, a drill in the center of the hole saw is drilled into the coupon to hold it in place.

  8. Construction of a high-density genetic map for grape using next generation restriction-site associated DNA sequencing

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Genetic mapping and QTL detection are powerful methodologies in plant improvement and breeding. Construction of a high-density and high-quality genetic map would be of great benefit in the production of superior grapes to meet human demand. High throughput and low cost of the recently developed next generation sequencing (NGS) technology have resulted in its wide application in genome research. Sequencing restriction-site associated DNA (RAD) might be an efficient strategy to simplify genotyping. Combining NGS with RAD has proven to be powerful for single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) marker development. Results An F1 population of 100 individual plants was developed. In-silico digestion-site prediction was used to select an appropriate restriction enzyme for construction of a RAD sequencing library. Next generation RAD sequencing was applied to genotype the F1 population and its parents. Applying a cluster strategy for SNP modulation, a total of 1,814 high-quality SNP markers were developed: 1,121 of these were mapped to the female genetic map, 759 to the male map, and 1,646 to the integrated map. A comparison of the genetic maps to the published Vitis vinifera genome revealed both conservation and variations. Conclusions The applicability of next generation RAD sequencing for genotyping a grape F1 population was demonstrated, leading to the successful development of a genetic map with high density and quality using our designed SNP markers. Detailed analysis revealed that this newly developed genetic map can be used for a variety of genome investigations, such as QTL detection, sequence assembly and genome comparison. PMID:22908993

  9. Genomic-Based Restriction Enzyme Selection for Specific Detection of Piscirickettsia salmonis by 16S rDNA PCR-RFLP.

    PubMed

    Mandakovic, Dinka; Glasner, Benjamín; Maldonado, Jonathan; Aravena, Pamela; González, Mauricio; Cambiazo, Verónica; Pulgar, Rodrigo

    2016-01-01

    The gram negative facultative bacterium P. salmonis is the etiological agent of Salmonid Rickettsial Septicaemia (SRS), a severe disease that causes important economic losses in the global salmon farmer industry. Despite efforts to control this disease, the high frequency of new epizootic events indicate that the vaccine and antibiotics treatments have limited effectiveness, therefore the preventive and diagnostic approaches must be improved. A comparison of several methodologies for SRS diagnostic indicate differences in their specificity and its capacity to detect other bacteria coexisting with P. salmonis in culture media (contamination) and fish samples (coinfection), aspects relevant for research, vaccine development and clinical diagnostic. By computer-simulation analyses, we identified a group of restriction enzymes that generate unique P. salmonis 16S rDNA band patterns, distinguishable from all other bacteria. From this information, we designed and developed a PCR-RFLP (Polymerase Chain Reaction-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism) assay, which was validated using 16S rDNA universal primers and restriction enzyme PmaCI for the amplification and digestion, respectively. Experimental validation was performed by comparing the restriction pattern of P. salmonis with the restriction patterns generated by bacteria that cohabit with P. salmonis (fish bacterial isolates and culture media contaminants). Our results indicate that the restriction enzyme selection pipeline was suitable to design a more specific, sensible, faster and cheaper assay than the currently used P. salmonis detection methodologies. PMID:27242682

  10. Genomic-Based Restriction Enzyme Selection for Specific Detection of Piscirickettsia salmonis by 16S rDNA PCR-RFLP

    PubMed Central

    Mandakovic, Dinka; Glasner, Benjamín; Maldonado, Jonathan; Aravena, Pamela; González, Mauricio; Cambiazo, Verónica; Pulgar, Rodrigo

    2016-01-01

    The gram negative facultative bacterium P. salmonis is the etiological agent of Salmonid Rickettsial Septicaemia (SRS), a severe disease that causes important economic losses in the global salmon farmer industry. Despite efforts to control this disease, the high frequency of new epizootic events indicate that the vaccine and antibiotics treatments have limited effectiveness, therefore the preventive and diagnostic approaches must be improved. A comparison of several methodologies for SRS diagnostic indicate differences in their specificity and its capacity to detect other bacteria coexisting with P. salmonis in culture media (contamination) and fish samples (coinfection), aspects relevant for research, vaccine development and clinical diagnostic. By computer-simulation analyses, we identified a group of restriction enzymes that generate unique P. salmonis 16S rDNA band patterns, distinguishable from all other bacteria. From this information, we designed and developed a PCR-RFLP (Polymerase Chain Reaction—Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism) assay, which was validated using 16S rDNA universal primers and restriction enzyme PmaCI for the amplification and digestion, respectively. Experimental validation was performed by comparing the restriction pattern of P. salmonis with the restriction patterns generated by bacteria that cohabit with P. salmonis (fish bacterial isolates and culture media contaminants). Our results indicate that the restriction enzyme selection pipeline was suitable to design a more specific, sensible, faster and cheaper assay than the currently used P. salmonis detection methodologies. PMID:27242682

  11. Time-resolved fluorescence studies of nucleotide flipping by restriction enzymes.

    PubMed

    Neely, Robert K; Tamulaitis, Gintautas; Chen, Kai; Kubala, Marta; Siksnys, Virginijus; Jones, Anita C

    2009-11-01

    Restriction enzymes Ecl18kI, PspGI and EcoRII-C, specific for interrupted 5-bp target sequences, flip the central base pair of these sequences into their protein pockets to facilitate sequence recognition and adjust the DNA cleavage pattern. We have used time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy of 2-aminopurine-labelled DNA in complex with each of these enzymes in solution to explore the nucleotide flipping mechanism and to obtain a detailed picture of the molecular environment of the extrahelical bases. We also report the first study of the 7-bp cutter, PfoI, whose recognition sequence (T/CCNGGA) overlaps with that of the Ecl18kI-type enzymes, and for which the crystal structure is unknown. The time-resolved fluorescence experiments reveal that PfoI also uses base flipping as part of its DNA recognition mechanism and that the extrahelical bases are captured by PfoI in binding pockets whose structures are quite different to those of the structurally characterized enzymes Ecl18kI, PspGI and EcoRII-C. The fluorescence decay parameters of all the enzyme-DNA complexes are interpreted to provide insight into the mechanisms used by these four restriction enzymes to flip and recognize bases and the relationship between nucleotide flipping and DNA cleavage.

  12. Design theory of full face rock tunnel boring machine transition cutter edge angle and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhaohuang; Meng, Liang; Sun, Fei

    2013-05-01

    At present, the inner cutters of a full face rock tunnel boring machine (TBM) and transition cutter edge angles are designed on the basis of indentation test or linear grooving test. The inner and outer edge angles of disc cutters are characterized as symmetric to each other with respect to the cutter edge plane. This design has some practical defects, such as severe eccentric wear and tipping, etc. In this paper, the current design theory of disc cutter edge angle is analyzed, and the characteristics of the rock-breaking movement of disc cutters are studied. The researching results show that the rotational motion of disc cutters with the cutter head gives rise to the difference between the interactions of inner rock and outer rock with the contact area of disc cutters, with shearing and extrusion on the inner rock and attrition on the outer rock. The wear of disc cutters at the contact area is unbalanced, among which the wear in the largest normal stress area is most apparent. Therefore, a three-dimensional model theory of rock breaking and an edge angle design theory of transition disc cutter are proposed to overcome the flaws of the currently used TBM cutter heads, such as short life span, camber wearing, tipping. And a corresponding equation is established. With reference to a specific construction case, the edge angle of the transition disc cutter has been designed based on the theory. The application of TBM in some practical project proves that the theory has obvious advantages in enhancing disc cutter life, decreasing replacement frequency, and making economic benefits. The proposed research provides a theoretical basis for the design of TBM three-dimensional disc cutters whose rock-breaking operation time can be effectively increased.

  13. DNA translocation by type III restriction enzymes: a comparison of current models of their operation derived from ensemble and single-molecule measurements.

    PubMed

    Dryden, David T F; Edwardson, J M; Henderson, Robert M

    2011-06-01

    Much insight into the interactions of DNA and enzymes has been obtained using a number of single-molecule techniques. However, recent results generated using two of these techniques-atomic force microscopy (AFM) and magnetic tweezers (MT)-have produced apparently contradictory results when applied to the action of the ATP-dependent type III restriction endonucleases on DNA. The AFM images show extensive looping of the DNA brought about by the existence of multiple DNA binding sites on each enzyme and enzyme dimerisation. The MT experiments show no evidence for looping being a requirement for DNA cleavage, but instead support a diffusive sliding of the enzyme on the DNA until an enzyme-enzyme collision occurs, leading to cleavage. Not only do these two methods appear to disagree, but also the models derived from them have difficulty explaining some ensemble biochemical results on DNA cleavage. In this 'Survey and Summary', we describe several different models put forward for the action of type III restriction enzymes and their inadequacies. We also attempt to reconcile the different models and indicate areas for further experimentation to elucidate the mechanism of these enzymes.

  14. Sequences within the early and late promoters of archetype JC virus restrict viral DNA replication and infectivity.

    PubMed

    Daniel, A M; Swenson, J J; Mayreddy, R P; Khalili, K; Frisque, R J

    1996-02-01

    Two forms of JC virus (JCV) have been isolated from its human host, an archetype found in kidney tissue and urine of nonimmunocompromised individuals and a rearranged type detected in lymphocytes and brain tissue of patients with and without progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. To investigate the hypothesis that alterations to the archetype transcriptional control region yield rearranged forms of the virus exhibiting new tissue tropic and pathogenic potentials, attempts were made to propagate archetype JCV in human renal and glial cell cultures. Although rearranged forms of JCV multiplied in these cells, archetype JCV failed to do so. Through the use of chimeric and mutant viral genomes, and a cell line that constitutively expresses viral T protein, we demonstrated that archetype's inactivity relative to that of rearranged forms was due to differences in the promoter-enhancer and not in the protein coding regions or origin of DNA replication. Additional analyses revealed that the absence of a large tandem duplication and the presence of a 23- and a 66-base pair sequence in the archetype transcriptional control region were responsible for this restricted lytic behavior. We discuss the possibility that deletion and duplication events within the archetype promoter-enhancer might yield more active viral variants via the loss of a negative, or the creation of a positive, transcriptional control signal(s).

  15. [Electrophoretic karyotypes and genomic DNA restriction fragment analysis: their usefulness as tools in the epidemiological study of Candid parapsilosis].

    PubMed

    Perrotta, D; Rodero, L; Demkura, H; Canteros, C; Davel, G

    2002-01-01

    During the past decades, several studies have reported an increase in the incidence of nosocomial candidosis. In a prospective study, performed at the Departamento de Micología, INEI, ANLIS Dr. C. G. Malbrán and the Servicio de Neonatología and Microbiología, Hospital de Niños Sor María Ludovica, from October 1995 to December 1996, 167 patients with candidosis were detected. Candida species isolated were C. albicans (53.1%), C. parapsilosis (26.5%) and C. tropicalis (14.8%). The aim of this work was to characterize the clinical C. parapsilosis isolates from pediatric patients hospitalized in two neonatal intensive care units from the same hospital and to evaluate the usefulness of electrophoretic karyotype (EK) and restriction endonuclease analysis of genomic DNA (REAG) using a low frequency digestion enzyme. EK of all isolates disclosed 12 banding patterns and REAG with endonuclease Sfi I showed only 5 groups. However, isolates from the control group could not be separated from the clinical isolates. The isolates within each dendogram group for EK or REAG were apparently unrelated. Our results show that EK yields better results than REAG, but that it falls short of the desired discrimination, which suggests that these techniques do not seem to be useful for studying nosocomial C. parapsilosis outbreaks.

  16. Analysis on the Rock-Cutter Interaction Mechanism During the TBM Tunneling Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Haiqing; Wang, He; Zhou, Xiaoping

    2016-03-01

    The accurate prediction of rock cutting forces of disc cutters is crucial for tunnel boring machine (TBM) design and construction. Disc cutter wear, which affects TBM penetration performance, has frequently been found at TBM sites. By considering the operating path and wear of the disc cutter, a new model is proposed for evaluating the cutting force and wear of the disc cutter in the tunneling process. The circular path adopted herein, which is the actual running path of the TBM disc cutter, shows that the lateral force of the disc cutter is asymmetric. The lateral forces on the sides of the disc cutter are clearly different. However, traditional solutions are obtained by assuming a linear path, where the later forces are viewed as equal. To simulate the interaction between the rock and disc cutter, a simple brittle damage model for rock mass is introduced here. Based on the explicit dynamic finite element method, the cutting force acting on the rock generated by a single disc cutter is simulated. It is shown that the lateral cutting force of the disc cutter strongly affects the wear extent of disc cutter. The wear mechanism is thus underestimated by the classical model, which was obtained by linear cutting tests. The simulation results are discussed and compared with other models, and these simulation results agree well with the results of present ones.

  17. Characterization of strains of Leuconostoc mesenteroides by analysis of soluble whole-cell protein pattern, DNA fingerprinting and restriction of ribosomal DNA.

    PubMed

    Villani, F; Moschetti, G; Blaiotta, G; Coppola, S

    1997-05-01

    Of 215 leuconostocs isolated from field grass, natural whey cultures and water-buffalo milk, 178 were identified as Leuconostoc mesenteroides ssp. mesenteroides while 37 strains could not be identified. Biochemical characterization allowed seven groups to be defined. Representative strains of each group and different habitat and nine reference strains were selected for further analyses. Protein profiles appeared suitable for species discrimination, but did not differentiate between the three subspecies of Leuc. mesenteroides. The technique also showed some differences among equivocal strains. DNA fingerprinting for most strains of Leuc. mesenteroides ssp. mesenteroides examined showed a different restriction pattern from that of the type strain. Ribotyping was not useful for discriminating species and subspecies of the genus Leuconostoc: Leuc. mesenteroides ssp. mesenteroides and ssp. dextranicum showed the same ribopattern as Leuc. lactis while Leuc. mesenteroides ssp. cremoris exhibited a pattern distinct from all the other species examined. On the basis of ARDRA-PCR, two main groups could be distinguished: the larger group included Leuc. mesenteroides, Leuc. lactis, Leuc. pseudomesenteroides and some unidentifiable strains; the second one included Leuc. citreum, Leuc. fallax, Weissella paramesenteroides and some unidentified strains.

  18. Cutting Mechanism and Load Characteristic of Trapezoidal Center Bevel Cutter Indented on Aluminum Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murayama, Mitsuhiro; Nagasawa, Shigeru; Fukuzawa, Yasushi; Katayama, Isamu

    This paper reports about the fundamental relationship between tip thickness of crushed cutter and thickness of wedged sheet. By varying the tip thickness of a trapezoidal center bevel cutter, the resistance of cutter indentation and the shared profile of aluminum sheet were investigated experimentally. To discuss the deformation mechanism of aluminum sheet in the necking stage, Hill's solution with slip line theory and finite element analysis with elasto-plastic model were applied to this wedge indentation. The derived results were as follows: the necked height of sheet material varies with the tip thickness of cutter; the occurrence limit of necking deformation exists in terms of sheet thickness; the line force at the deflection point varies with the tip thickness of the cutter, but not with sheet thickness; the residual sheet thickness beneath the cutter tip depends on the thickness of cutter tip.

  19. BRASS FOUNDRY ROOM SHOWING GATE CUTTERS USED TO REMOVE RUNNERS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BRASS FOUNDRY ROOM SHOWING GATE CUTTERS USED TO REMOVE RUNNERS AND SPRUES FROM BRONZE CASTINGS TOO SOFT TO BE CLEANED IN TUMBLING MILLS. ALSO SHOWN ARE MOLD MACHINES AND THE SAND DELIVERY SYSTEM USED TO CREATE GREEN SAND MOLDS, POURED AT THE OTHER END OF THE GRAVITY CONVEYORS. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Brass Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  20. Retail Meat Cutting I. Apprentice Meat Cutter Related Training. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Dale H., Ed.

    Intended as a first-year curriculum for apprentice meat cutters, this text focuses on retail meat cutting. Topics covered in the 24 chapters are background and purpose of apprenticeship, job preparation, general layout of the meat department, operational procedures, beef structure and evaluation, retail cuts and cooking methods, beef forequarter:…

  1. NEW HIGH STRENGTH AND FASTER DRILLING TSP DIAMOND CUTTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Radtke

    2006-01-31

    The manufacture of thermally stable diamond (TSP) cutters for drill bits used in petroleum drilling requires the brazing of two dissimilar materials--TSP diamond and tungsten carbide. The ENDURUS{trademark} thermally stable diamond cutter developed by Technology International, Inc. exhibits (1) high attachment (shear) strength, exceeding 345 MPa (50,000 psi), (2) TSP diamond impact strength increased by 36%, (3) prevents TSP fracture when drilling hard rock, and (4) maintains a sharp edge when drilling hard and abrasive rock. A novel microwave brazing (MWB) method for joining dissimilar materials has been developed. A conventional braze filler metal is combined with microwave heating which minimizes thermal residual stress between materials with dissimilar coefficients of thermal expansion. The process results in preferential heating of the lower thermal expansion diamond material, thus providing the ability to match the thermal expansion of the dissimilar material pair. Methods for brazing with both conventional and exothermic braze filler metals have been developed. Finite element modeling (FEM) assisted in the fabrication of TSP cutters controllable thermal residual stress and high shear attachment strength. Further, a unique cutter design for absorbing shock, the densification of otherwise porous TSP diamond for increased mechanical strength, and diamond ion implantation for increased diamond fracture resistance resulted in successful drill bit tests.

  2. The Laser Cutter: A Terrific Addition to Your Tech Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buxton, Richard

    2007-01-01

    A laser cutter has found a very welcome home in the technology program at Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology. It has proven an easy-to-use major addition. Lasers come in different types, sizes and power ratings, which means several things must be taken into consideration when selecting the right one for the technology program.…

  3. Cutter drum drive assembly for canted end sections

    SciTech Connect

    Baum, G.L.

    1981-06-02

    A continuous mining machine includes a body portion having a longitudinal axis and mounted on endless tracks. A boom member extends forwardly from the body portion with a cutter drum member rotatably mounted on the front of the boom member. The cutter drum member has an intermediate drum section and a pair of canted end drum section. The intermediate drum section is spaced from the end drum sections to provide openings therebetween. The boom member has front end portions extending through the openings to rotatably support the cutter drum member. Input drive shafts extend from drive motors on the body portion forwardly from the boom member at an acute angle with respect to the longitudinal axis of the body portion through the openings. In each end drum section meshing spiral bevel gears connect the input drive shaft through a planetary gear train to the end drum drive shaft. Rotation is transmitted from each end drum drive shaft to a drive shaft for rotating the intermediate drum section. Positioning the input drive shafts at an angle with respect to the longitudinal axis of the machine body portion facilitates positioning planetary gear trains in the end drum section to locate the cutter drum assembly for efficient feeding of dislodged material onto the machine and reduce the diameter of the intermediate drum section.

  4. Infrared linear dichroism studies of DNA-drug complexes: quantitative determination of the drug-induced restriction of the B-A transition.

    PubMed Central

    Fritzsche, H

    1994-01-01

    The B-A transition of films or fibers of NaDNA occurs at a relative humidity of 75-85%. The fraction of DNA that changed the conformation from B to A form can be determined quantitatively by infrared linear dichroism. DNA-binding drugs can 'freeze' a fraction of DNA in the B form. This fraction of DNA is in the B form and cannot be converted to A-DNA even at a reduced relative humidity of 54%. The 'freezing' potentiality of various drugs can be described by the 'freezing' index, FI, expressed in base pairs per added drug. Drugs with a high value of FI (more than eight base pairs per drug) were observed among both intercalating and groove-binding drugs. High values of FI imply restriction of the conformational flexibility of DNA significantly going beyond the binding site of the drug. This long-range effect of drugs on the conformational flexibility of DNA may be connected with the molecular mechanism of drug action. The freezing index FI is a new quantitative parameter of drug-DNA interaction that should be considered as a valuable tool for drug design. PMID:8139919

  5. ClpXP protease targets long-lived DNA translocation states of a helicase-like motor to cause restriction alleviation

    PubMed Central

    Simons, Michelle; Diffin, Fiona M.; Szczelkun, Mark D.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated how Escherichia coli ClpXP targets the helicase-nuclease (HsdR) subunit of the bacterial Type I restriction–modification enzyme EcoKI during restriction alleviation (RA). RA is a temporary reduction in endonuclease activity that occurs when Type I enzymes bind unmodified recognition sites on the host genome. These conditions arise upon acquisition of a new system by a naïve host, upon generation of new sites by genome rearrangement/mutation or during homologous recombination between hemimethylated DNA. Using recombinant DNA and proteins in vitro, we demonstrate that ClpXP targets EcoKI HsdR during dsDNA translocation on circular DNA but not on linear DNA. Protein roadblocks did not activate HsdR proteolysis. We suggest that DNA translocation lifetime, which is elevated on circular DNA relative to linear DNA, is important to RA. To identify the ClpX degradation tag (degron) in HsdR, we used bioinformatics and biochemical assays to design N- and C-terminal mutations that were analysed in vitro and in vivo. None of the mutants produced a phenotype consistent with loss of the degron, suggesting an as-yet-unidentified recognition pathway. We note that an EcoKI nuclease mutant still produces cell death in a clpx− strain, consistent with DNA damage induced by unregulated motor activity. PMID:25260590

  6. Voluntary Genital Ablations: Contrasting the Cutters and Their Clients

    PubMed Central

    Jackowich, Robyn A; Vale, Rachel; Vale, Kayla; Wassersug, Richard J; Johnson, Thomas W

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Some healthy males voluntarily seek castration without a recognized medical need. There are currently no standards of care for these individuals, which cause many of them to obtain surgery outside of a licensed medical setting. We seek to understand who performs these surgeries. Aim This study aims to characterize individuals who perform or assist in genital ablations outside of the healthcare system. Methods A cross-sectional Internet survey posted on eunuch.org received 2,871 responses. We identified individuals who had performed or assisted in human castrations (“cutters”; n = 98) and compared this group with all other survey respondents (n = 2,773), who had not assisted in castrations. Next we compared the cutters with the voluntary eunuchs. Lastly, because many of the cutters have themselves been castrated, we also divided the physically castrated population (n = 278) into cutters (n = 44) and noncutters (n = 234) and compared them. Main Outcome Measures Self-reported questionnaires were used to collect demographic information, gender identity and presentation, selected childhood experiences, and history of aggressive behaviors, self-harming behaviors, and hospitalization. Results Distinguishing characteristics of cutters included: (i) presenting themselves as very masculine, (ii) having had their longest sexual relationship with a man, (iii) growing up on a farm, (iv) witnessing animal castrations, (v) having a history of sexually inappropriate behavior, (vi) having been threatened with genital mutilation as a child, (vii) having a history of self-harm, (viii) being raised in a devoutly Christian household, (ix) having had an underground castration themselves, and (x) having body piercings and/or tattoos. Conclusions This study may help identify individuals who are at risk of performing illegal castrations. That information may help healthcare providers protect individuals with extreme castration ideations from injuring themselves or others

  7. SNP discovery in common bean by restriction-associated DNA (RAD) sequencing for genetic diversity and population structure analysis.

    PubMed

    Valdisser, Paula Arielle M R; Pappas, Georgios J; de Menezes, Ivandilson P P; Müller, Bárbara S F; Pereira, Wendell J; Narciso, Marcelo G; Brondani, Claudio; Souza, Thiago L P O; Borba, Tereza C O; Vianello, Rosana P

    2016-06-01

    Researchers have made great advances into the development and application of genomic approaches for common beans, creating opportunities to driving more real and applicable strategies for sustainable management of the genetic resource towards plant breeding. This work provides useful polymorphic single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for high-throughput common bean genotyping developed by RAD (restriction site-associated DNA) sequencing. The RAD tags were generated from DNA pooled from 12 common bean genotypes, including breeding lines of different gene pools and market classes. The aligned sequences identified 23,748 putative RAD-SNPs, of which 3357 were adequate for genotyping; 1032 RAD-SNPs with the highest ADT (assay design tool) score are presented in this article. The RAD-SNPs were structurally annotated in different coding (47.00 %) and non-coding (53.00 %) sequence components of genes. A subset of 384 RAD-SNPs with broad genome distribution was used to genotype a diverse panel of 95 common bean germplasms and revealed a successful amplification rate of 96.6 %, showing 73 % of polymorphic SNPs within the Andean group and 83 % in the Mesoamerican group. A slightly increased He (0.161, n = 21) value was estimated for the Andean gene pool, compared to the Mesoamerican group (0.156, n = 74). For the linkage disequilibrium (LD) analysis, from a group of 580 SNPs (289 RAD-SNPs and 291 BARC-SNPs) genotyped for the same set of genotypes, 70.2 % were in LD, decreasing to 0.10 %in the Andean group and 0.77 % in the Mesoamerican group. Haplotype patterns spanning 310 Mb of the genome (60 %) were characterized in samples from different origins. However, the haplotype frameworks were under-represented for the Andean (7.85 %) and Mesoamerican (5.55 %) gene pools separately. In conclusion, RAD sequencing allowed the discovery of hundreds of useful SNPs for broad genetic analysis of common bean germplasm. From now, this approach provides an excellent panel

  8. Construction of High-Density Linkage Maps of Populus deltoides × P. simonii Using Restriction-Site Associated DNA Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Chunfa; Li, Huogen; Wang, Ying; Li, Xuran; Ou, Jiajia; Wang, Deyuan; Xu, Houxi; Ma, Chao; Lang, Xianye; Liu, Guangxin; Zhang, Bo; Shi, Jisen

    2016-01-01

    Although numerous linkage maps have been constructed in the genus Populus, they are typically sparse and thus have limited applications due to low throughput of traditional molecular markers. Restriction-site associated DNA sequencing (RADSeq) technology allows us to identify a large number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) across genomes of many individuals in a fast and cost-effective way, and makes it possible to construct high-density genetic linkage maps. We performed RADSeq for 299 progeny and their two parents in an F1 hybrid population generated by crossing the female Populus deltoides ‘I-69’ and male Populus simonii ‘L3’. A total of 2,545 high quality SNP markers were obtained and two parent-specific linkage maps were constructed. The female genetic map contained 1601 SNPs and 20 linkage groups, spanning 4,249.12 cM of the genome with an average distance of 2.69 cM between adjacent markers, while the male map consisted of 940 SNPs and also 20 linkage groups with a total length of 3,816.24 cM and an average marker interval distance of 4.15 cM. Finally, our analysis revealed that synteny and collinearity are highly conserved between the parental linkage maps and the reference genome of P. trichocarpa. We demonstrated that RAD sequencing is a powerful technique capable of rapidly generating a large number of SNPs for constructing genetic maps in outbred forest trees. The high-quality linkage maps constructed here provided reliable genetic resources to facilitate locating quantitative trait loci (QTLs) that control growth and wood quality traits in the hybrid population. PMID:26964097

  9. Mapping with RAD (restriction-site associated DNA) markers to rapidly identify QTL for stem rust resistance in Lolium perenne.

    PubMed

    Pfender, W F; Saha, M C; Johnson, E A; Slabaugh, M B

    2011-05-01

    A mapping population was created to detect quantitative trait loci (QTL) for resistance to stem rust caused by Puccinia graminis subsp. graminicola in Lolium perenne. A susceptible and a resistant plant were crossed to produce a pseudo-testcross population of 193 F(1) individuals. Markers were produced by the restriction-site associated DNA (RAD) process, which uses massively parallel and multiplexed sequencing of reduced-representation libraries. Additional simple sequence repeat (SSR) and sequence-tagged site (STS) markers were combined with the RAD markers to produce maps for the female (738 cM) and male (721 cM) parents. Stem rust phenotypes (number of pustules per plant) were determined in replicated greenhouse trials by inoculation with a field-collected, genetically heterogeneous population of urediniospores. The F(1) progeny displayed continuous distribution of phenotypes and transgressive segregation. We detected three resistance QTL. The most prominent QTL (qLpPg1) is located near 41 cM on linkage group (LG) 7 with a 2-LOD interval of 8 cM, and accounts for 30-38% of the stem rust phenotypic variance. QTL were detected also on LG1 (qLpPg2) and LG6 (qLpPg3), each accounting for approximately 10% of phenotypic variance. Alleles of loci closely linked to these QTL originated from the resistant parent for qLpPg1 and from both parents for qLpPg2 and qLpPg3. Observed quantitative nature of the resistance may be due to partial-resistance effects against all pathogen genotypes, or qualitative effects completely preventing infection by only some genotypes in the genetically mixed inoculum. RAD markers facilitated rapid construction of new genetic maps in this outcrossing species and will enable development of sequence-based markers linked to stem rust resistance in L. perenne. PMID:21344184

  10. The population structure and recent colonization history of Oregon threespine stickleback determined using restriction-site associated DNA-sequencing.

    PubMed

    Catchen, Julian; Bassham, Susan; Wilson, Taylor; Currey, Mark; O'Brien, Conor; Yeates, Quick; Cresko, William A

    2013-06-01

    Understanding how genetic variation is partitioned across genomes within and among populations is a fundamental problem in ecological and evolutionary genetics. To address this problem, we studied the threespine stickleback fish, which has repeatedly undergone parallel phenotypic and genetic differentiation when oceanic fish have invaded freshwater habitats. While significant evolutionary genetic research has been performed using stickleback from geographic regions that have been deglaciated in the last 20 000 years, less research has focused on freshwater populations that predate the last glacial maximum. We performed restriction-site associated DNA-sequencing (RAD-seq) based population genomic analyses on stickleback from across Oregon, which was not glaciated during the last maximum. We sampled stickleback from coastal, Willamette Basin and central Oregon sites, analysed their genetic diversity using RAD-seq, performed structure analyses, reconstructed their phylogeographic history and tested the hypothesis of recent stickleback introduction into central Oregon, where incidence of this species was only recently documented. Our results showed a clear phylogeographic break between coastal and inland populations, with oceanic populations exhibiting the lowest levels of divergence from one another. Willamette Basin and central Oregon populations formed a clade of closely related populations, a finding consistent with a recent introduction of stickleback into central Oregon. Finally, genome-wide analysis of genetic diversity (π) and correlations of alleles within individuals in subpopulations (FIS) supported a role for introgressive hybridization in coastal populations and a recent expansion in central Oregon. Our results exhibit the power of next-generation sequencing genomic approaches such as RAD-seq to identify both historical population structure and recent colonization history.

  11. Genetic Mapping and QTL Analysis of Growth-Related Traits in Pinctada fucata Using Restriction-Site Associated DNA Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yaoguo; He, Maoxian

    2014-01-01

    The pearl oyster, Pinctada fucata (P. fucata), is one of the marine bivalves that is predominantly cultured for pearl production. To obtain more genetic information for breeding purposes, we constructed a high-density linkage map of P. fucata and identified quantitative trait loci (QTL) for growth-related traits. One F1 family, which included the two parents, 48 largest progeny and 50 smallest progeny, was sampled to construct a linkage map using restriction site-associated DNA sequencing (RAD-Seq). With low coverage data, 1956.53 million clean reads and 86,342 candidate RAD loci were generated. A total of 1373 segregating SNPs were used to construct a sex-average linkage map. This spanned 1091.81 centimorgans (cM), with 14 linkage groups and an average marker interval of 1.41 cM. The genetic linkage map coverage, Coa, was 97.24%. Thirty-nine QTL-peak loci, for seven growth-related traits, were identified using the single-marker analysis, nonparametric mapping Kruskal-Wallis (KW) test. Parameters included three for shell height, six for shell length, five for shell width, four for hinge length, 11 for total weight, eight for soft tissue weight and two for shell weight. The QTL peak loci for shell height, shell length and shell weight were all located in linkage group 6. The genotype frequencies of most QTL peak loci showed significant differences between the large subpopulation and the small subpopulation (P<0.05). These results highlight the effectiveness of RAD-Seq as a tool for generation of QTL-targeted and genome-wide marker data in the non-model animal, P. fucata, and its possible utility in marker-assisted selection (MAS). PMID:25369421

  12. DNA restriction fragment length polymorphism of HLA-DR2 haplotypes in normal individuals and in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Singal, D P; Reid, B; Green, D; Bensen, W G; D'Souza, M

    1990-01-01

    A strong association between HLA-DR4 and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has been found in a number of populations. In contrast, the incidence of DR2 is decreased in patients with RA, suggesting that this specificity may confer some protection against the disease. A number of subtypes of DR2 have been defined by serology, by responses in mixed lymphocyte culture reaction, and, more recently, by restriction fragment length polymorphism. These subtypes of DR2 are in linkage disequilibrium with different subspecificities of DQw1. It is thus likely that the distribution of these subtypic DR,DQ haplotypes in DR2 positive patients with RA may be important in understanding the genetic basis of susceptibility/resistance to RA. In this paper a study of the subtypes of DR2,DQw1 haplotypes in 18 patients with RA, who required sodium aurothiomalate as a disease remitting drug, and unrelated healthy individuals is reported. Three subtypes of DR2 haplotypes, DRw15 (Dw2),DQw1.2(DQw6), DRw15(Dw12),DQw1.12(DQw6), and DRw16(Dw21),DQw1, AZH (DQw5), were analysed with a cDNA probe for the DQ beta gene. The data show that DR2 positive patients with RA carried either the DRw15(Dw2),DQw6 or DRw15(Dw12),DQw6 haplotype. No patient with RA was positive for the DRw16(Dw21),DQw5 subspecificity. In contrast, six of 29 (21%) normal healthy DR2,DQw1 positive individuals carried the DRw16(Dw21),DQw5 haplotype. These data together with earlier results on the distribution of the DR4,DQw7 haplotype in patients with RA support the hypothesis that DQB1 chain polymorphism may be important in determining susceptibility to severe RA. Images PMID:1969727

  13. Genetic mapping and QTL analysis of growth-related traits in Pinctada fucata using restriction-site associated DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Li, Yaoguo; He, Maoxian

    2014-01-01

    The pearl oyster, Pinctada fucata (P. fucata), is one of the marine bivalves that is predominantly cultured for pearl production. To obtain more genetic information for breeding purposes, we constructed a high-density linkage map of P. fucata and identified quantitative trait loci (QTL) for growth-related traits. One F1 family, which included the two parents, 48 largest progeny and 50 smallest progeny, was sampled to construct a linkage map using restriction site-associated DNA sequencing (RAD-Seq). With low coverage data, 1956.53 million clean reads and 86,342 candidate RAD loci were generated. A total of 1373 segregating SNPs were used to construct a sex-average linkage map. This spanned 1091.81 centimorgans (cM), with 14 linkage groups and an average marker interval of 1.41 cM. The genetic linkage map coverage, Coa, was 97.24%. Thirty-nine QTL-peak loci, for seven growth-related traits, were identified using the single-marker analysis, nonparametric mapping Kruskal-Wallis (KW) test. Parameters included three for shell height, six for shell length, five for shell width, four for hinge length, 11 for total weight, eight for soft tissue weight and two for shell weight. The QTL peak loci for shell height, shell length and shell weight were all located in linkage group 6. The genotype frequencies of most QTL peak loci showed significant differences between the large subpopulation and the small subpopulation (P<0.05). These results highlight the effectiveness of RAD-Seq as a tool for generation of QTL-targeted and genome-wide marker data in the non-model animal, P. fucata, and its possible utility in marker-assisted selection (MAS).

  14. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the type IV restriction endonuclease ScoMcrA from Streptomyces coelicolor, which cleaves both Dcm-methylated DNA and phosphorothioated DNA.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guang; Zhang, Zhenyi; Zhao, Gong; Deng, Zixin; Wu, Geng; He, Xinyi

    2015-01-01

    ScoMcrA is a type IV modification-dependent restriction endonuclease found in the model strain Streptomyces coelicolor. Unlike type I, II and III restriction endonucleases, which cleave unmodified DNA, type IV restriction endonucleases cleave modified DNA, including methylated, hydroxymethylated, glucosyl-hydroxymethylated and phosphorothioated DNA. ScoMcrA targets both Dcm-methylated DNA and phosphorothioated DNA, and makes double-strand breaks 16-28 nt away from the modified nucleotides or the phosphorothioate links. However, the mechanism by which ScoMcrA recognizes these two entirely different types of modification remains unclear. In this study, the ScoMcrA protein was overexpressed, purified and crystallized. The crystals diffracted to 3.35 Å resolution and belonged to space group P2(1)2(1)2(1). The unit-cell parameters were determined to be a=130.19, b=139.36, c=281.01 Å, α=β=γ=90°. These results will facilitate the detailed structural analysis of ScoMcrA and further elucidation of its biochemical mechanism.

  15. Manipulation of mtDNA heteroplasmy in all striated muscles of newborn mice by AAV9-mediated delivery of a mitochondria-targeted restriction endonuclease.

    PubMed

    Bacman, S R; Williams, S L; Duan, D; Moraes, C T

    2012-11-01

    Mitochondrial diseases are frequently caused by heteroplasmic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations. As these mutations express themselves only at high relative ratios, any approach able to manipulate mtDNA heteroplasmy can potentially be curative. In this study, we developed a system to manipulate mtDNA heteroplasmy in all skeletal muscles from neonate mice. We selected muscle because it is one of the most clinically affected tissues in mitochondrial disorders. A mitochondria-targeted restriction endonuclease (mito-ApaLI) expressed from AAV9 particles was delivered either by intraperitoneal or intravenous injection in neonate mice harboring two mtDNA haplotypes, only one of which was susceptible to ApaLI digestion. A single injection was able to elicit a predictable and marked change in mtDNA heteroplasmy in all striated muscles analyzed, including heart. No health problems or reduction in mtDNA levels were observed in treated mice, suggesting that this approach could have clinical applications for mitochondrial myopathies.

  16. Restriction Analysis of PCR-Amplified Internal Transcribed Spacers of Ribosomal DNA as a Tool for Species Identification in Different Genera of the Order Glomales

    PubMed Central

    Redecker, D.; Thierfelder, H.; Walker, C.; Werner, D.

    1997-01-01

    A technique combining PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis was used to generate specific DNA fragment patterns from spore extracts of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. With the universal primers ITS1 and ITS4, DNA fragments were amplified from species of Scutellospora and Gigaspora that were approximately 500 bp long. The apparent lengths of the corresponding fragments from Glomus spp. varied between 580 and 600 bp. Within the genus Glomus, the restriction enzymes MboI, HinfI, and TaqI were useful for distinguishing species. Depending on the restriction enzyme used, groups of species with common fragment patterns could be found. Five tropical and subtropical isolates identified as Glomus manihotis and G. clarum could not be distinguished by their restriction patterns, corresponding to the morphological similarity of the spores. The variation of internal transcribed spacer sequences among the Gigaspora species under study was low. Fragment patterns of Scutellospora spp. showed their phylogenetic relationship with Gigaspora and revealed only a slightly higher degree of variation. PMID:16535592

  17. Flying squirrel-associated Rickettsia prowazekii (epidemic typhus rickettsiae) characterized by a specific DNA fragment produced by restriction endonuclease digestion.

    PubMed

    Regnery, R L; Fu, Z Y; Spruill, C L

    1986-01-01

    The DNA from flying squirrel-associated Rickettsia prowazekii was characterized by using a specific DNA fragment produced by digestion with the enzyme BamHI. The DNA fragment was cloned into a plasmid vector and used to readily distinguish between available human- and flying squirrel-associated R. prowazekii DNAs derived from crude cytoplasmic extracts. PMID:3009528

  18. Flying squirrel-associated Rickettsia prowazekii (epidemic typhus rickettsiae) characterized by a specific DNA fragment produced by restriction endonuclease digestion.

    PubMed Central

    Regnery, R L; Fu, Z Y; Spruill, C L

    1986-01-01

    The DNA from flying squirrel-associated Rickettsia prowazekii was characterized by using a specific DNA fragment produced by digestion with the enzyme BamHI. The DNA fragment was cloned into a plasmid vector and used to readily distinguish between available human- and flying squirrel-associated R. prowazekii DNAs derived from crude cytoplasmic extracts. Images PMID:3009528

  19. STANDBY TOP AND BOTTOM ROTARY MILLING CUTTERS FOR TORIN LINE. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    STANDBY TOP AND BOTTOM ROTARY MILLING CUTTERS FOR TORIN LINE. SOME PRODUCT FROM THE #43 HOT ROLL IS PROCESSED ON THE TORIN LINE TO REMOVE OXIDIZED SURFACE MATERIAL. IN PRACTICE 15-20/1000 IS CUT FROM THE UPPER AND LOWER SURFACES OF THE STRIP AND RECYCLED TO THE CASTING SHOP. TORIN LINE ADDED AS PART OF 1981 EXPANSION PROGRAM. - American Brass Foundry, 70 Sayre Street, Buffalo, Erie County, NY

  20. Description of the entire mRNA population by a 3' end cDNA fragment generated by class IIS restriction enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Kato, K

    1995-01-01

    A novel means of recording the expression status of the total gene population is described. Digestion of cDNA by class IIS restriction enzymes produces a fragment with a poly (A) stretch and a 5' overhang with an unknown sequence. This fragment contains information such as the class IIS enzyme that cuts cDNA nearest to the poly (A) stretch, the sequence of the 5' overhang, and the size of the fragment. Expressed genes can be discriminated and displayed by the fragment as follows: (i) cut the cDNA with one class IIS restriction enzyme; (ii) ligate the digested cDNA to that from a pool of 64 biotinylated adaptors cohesive to all possible overhangs; (iii) digest by other two class IIS enzymes; (iv) recover the ligated molecules with streptavidin-coated paramagnetic beads; (v) perform PCR with the adaptor-primer and an anchored oligo-dT primer; (vi) separate the amplified fragments by denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Repeat the experiment with 64 adaptors, three enzymes and three anchored oligo-dT primers displays most of the expressed genes. Because redundancy is minimized, this technique is also ideal for generating tags for expressed genes, with which to construct a transcript map of the genome. Images PMID:7478997

  1. A model of EcoRII restriction endonuclease action: the active complex is most likely formed by one protein subunit and one DNA recognition site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karpova, E. A.; Kubareva, E. A.; Shabarova, Z. A.

    1999-01-01

    To elucidate the mechanism of interaction of restriction endonuclease EcoRII with DNA, we studied by native gel electrophoresis the binding of this endonuclease to a set of synthetic DNA-duplexes containing the modified or canonical recognition sequence 5'-d(CCA/TGG)-3'. All binding substrate or substrate analogues tested could be divided into two major groups: (i) duplexes that, at the interaction with endonuclease EcoRII, form two types of stable complexes on native gel in the absence of Mg2+ cofactor; (ii) duplexes that form only one type of complex, observed both in the presence and absence of Mg2+. Unlike the latter, duplexes under the first group can be hydrolyzed by endonuclease. Data obtained suggest that the active complex is most likely formed by one protein subunit and one DNA recognition sequence. A model of EcoRII endonuclease action is presented.

  2. On the importance of DNA strand breaks as the first event to initiate sister chromatid exchange (SCE): experiments with restriction endonuclease BglI.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, T; Piñero, J; Cortés, F

    1996-11-01

    The exact molecular mechanism of sister chromatid exchange (SCE) is still unknown, despite the many reports dealing with this cytogenetic end point published in the last 40 years. One point to be investigated is the nature of the original lesion(s) in DNA leading to the production of SCE. Whereas, for chromosomal aberrations, the importance of DNA double-strand breaks has been well established, there is still controversy about the relative importance of strand breaks and base modifications for triggering the process of SCE formation. In the present paper, we have taken advantage of the ability of the restriction endonuclease BglI to induce SCE and have exploited the fact that preincubation with 2,3-butanedione results in the loss of BgiI ability to cut DNA, while it is still able to recognize its sequence in DNA and bind to it, to see whether this alone is enough to initiate SCE formation, or if a physical DNA double-strand break is required. Our results seem to support the necessity of DNA breaks for SCE production.

  3. Nucleotide flips determine the specificity of the Ecl18kI restriction endonuclease

    PubMed Central

    Bochtler, Matthias; Szczepanowski, Roman H; Tamulaitis, Gintautas; Grazulis, Saulius; Czapinska, Honorata; Manakova, Elena; Siksnys, Virginijus

    2006-01-01

    Restricion endonuclease Ecl18kI is specific for the sequence /CCNGG and cleaves it before the outer C to generate 5 nt 5′-overhangs. It has been suggested that Ecl18kI is evolutionarily related to NgoMIV, a 6-bp cutter that cleaves the sequence G/CCGGC and leaves 4 nt 5′-overhangs. Here, we report the crystal structure of the Ecl18kI–DNA complex at 1.7 Å resolution and compare it with the known structure of the NgoMIV–DNA complex. We find that Ecl18kI flips both central nucleotides within the CCNGG sequence and buries the extruded bases in pockets within the protein. Nucleotide flipping disrupts Watson–Crick base pairing, induces a kink in the DNA and shifts the DNA register by 1 bp, making the distances between scissile phosphates in the Ecl18kI and NgoMIV cocrystal structures nearly identical. Therefore, the two enzymes can use a conserved DNA recognition module, yet recognize different sequences, and form superimposable dimers, yet generate different cleavage patterns. Hence, Ecl18kI is the first example of a restriction endonuclease that flips nucleotides to achieve specificity for its recognition site. PMID:16628220

  4. Mathematical Modeling And Design Optimization Of Plunge Shaving Cutter For Gears With Tooth Modifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Shinn-Liang; Liu, Jia-Hung

    2009-10-01

    Gears are the most important components in transmission systems. Modifications of gear teeth can accommodate errors and deformations encountered in the manufacture, assembly, and operation of gear pairs. For plunge shaving gears with tooth modifications, the design criteria of cutter clearance manufactured by protuberance hob cutter is investigated. With this novel design, the cutter has better strength and stiffness to keep the shaved gear profile stable. With the analytical descriptions of crowned gear and hence plunge shaving cutter have been constructed so that the grinding wheel can be optimized to minimized the topographic error. Efficiency is greatly improved by avoiding the traditional trial and error method.

  5. Mathematical simulation of a profile cutter as a surface of revolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bubenchikov, A. M.; Kazakavitschyus, S. M.; Shcherbakov, N. R.

    2016-04-01

    Various types of cutters (spherical, toroidal, etc.) are used in surface processing of parts of a transmission mechanism. The cost of a special profile tool is somewhat higher than that of such cutters. But the increase in the cost of the tool is compensated by a significant reduction in the time of processing parts. The present paper deals with a mathematical model of a profile cutter surface (as a surface of revolution) for processing parts of a cylindrical transmission gear with an eccentrically cycloidal gearing (EC-gearing). A computer program for determining radii of the cutter's circular cross sections for a given set of axial displacements was created.

  6. Repair of x-ray-induced DNA double-strand breaks in specific Not I restriction fragments in human fibroblasts: joining of correct and incorrect ends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lobrich, M.; Rydberg, B.; Cooper, P. K.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    An assay that allows measurement of absolute induction frequencies for DNA double-strand breaks (dsbs) in defined regions of the genome and that quantitates rejoining of correct DNA ends has been used to study repair of dsbs in normal human fibroblasts after x-irradiation. The approach involves hybridization of single-copy DNA probes to Not I restriction fragments separated according to size by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Induction of dsbs is quantitated from the decrease in the intensity of the hybridizing restriction fragment and an accumulation of a smear below the band. Rejoining of dsbs results in reconstitution of the intact restriction fragment only if correct DNA ends are joined. By comparing results from this technique with results from a conventional electrophoresis assay that detects all rejoining events, it is possible to quantitate the misrejoining frequency. Three Not I fragments on the long arm of chromosome 21 were investigated with regard to dsb induction, yielding an identical induction rate of 5.8 X 10(-3) break per megabase pair per Gy. Correct dsb rejoining was measured for two of these Not I fragments after initial doses of 80 and 160 Gy. The misrejoining frequency was about 25% for both fragments and was independent of dose. This result appears to be representative for the whole genome as shown by analysis of the entire Not I fragment distribution. The correct rejoining events primarily occurred within the first 2 h, while the misrejoining kinetics included a much slower component, with about half of the events occurring between 2 and 24 h. These misrejoining kinetics are similar to those previously reported for production of exchange aberrations in interphase chromosomes.

  7. Structure of Type IIL Restriction-Modification Enzyme MmeI in Complex with DNA Has Implications for Engineering New Specificities

    PubMed Central

    Callahan, Scott J.; Luyten, Yvette A.; Gupta, Yogesh K.; Wilson, Geoffrey G.; Roberts, Richard J.; Morgan, Richard D.; Aggarwal, Aneel K.

    2016-01-01

    The creation of restriction enzymes with programmable DNA-binding and -cleavage specificities has long been a goal of modern biology. The recently discovered Type IIL MmeI family of restriction-and-modification (RM) enzymes that possess a shared target recognition domain provides a framework for engineering such new specificities. However, a lack of structural information on Type IIL enzymes has limited the repertoire that can be rationally engineered. We report here a crystal structure of MmeI in complex with its DNA substrate and an S-adenosylmethionine analog (Sinefungin). The structure uncovers for the first time the interactions that underlie MmeI-DNA recognition and methylation (5’-TCCRAC-3’; R = purine) and provides a molecular basis for changing specificity at four of the six base pairs of the recognition sequence (5’-TCCRAC-3’). Surprisingly, the enzyme is resilient to specificity changes at the first position of the recognition sequence (5’-TCCRAC-3’). Collectively, the structure provides a basis for engineering further derivatives of MmeI and delineates which base pairs of the recognition sequence are more amenable to alterations than others. PMID:27082731

  8. Sensitive and selective amplification of methylated DNA sequences using helper-dependent chain reaction in combination with a methylation-dependent restriction enzymes.

    PubMed

    Rand, Keith N; Young, Graeme P; Ho, Thu; Molloy, Peter L

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a novel technique for specific amplification of rare methylated DNA fragments in a high background of unmethylated sequences that avoids the need of bisulphite conversion. The methylation-dependent restriction enzyme GlaI is used to selectively cut methylated DNA. Then targeted fragments are tagged using specially designed 'helper' oligonucleotides that are also used to maintain selection in subsequent amplification cycles in a process called 'helper-dependent chain reaction'. The process uses disabled primers called 'drivers' that can only prime on each cycle if the helpers recognize specific sequences within the target amplicon. In this way, selection for the sequence of interest is maintained throughout the amplification, preventing amplification of unwanted sequences. Here we show how the method can be applied to methylated Septin 9, a promising biomarker for early diagnosis of colorectal cancer. The GlaI digestion and subsequent amplification can all be done in a single tube. A detection sensitivity of 0.1% methylated DNA in a background of unmethylated DNA was achieved, which was similar to the well-established Heavy Methyl method that requires bisulphite-treated DNA.

  9. Stock Structure and Homing Fidelity in Gulf of Mexico Sturgeon (Acipenser Oxyrinchus Desotoi) Based on Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism and Sequence Analyses of Mitochondrial DNA

    PubMed Central

    Stabile, J.; Waldman, J. R.; Parauka, F.; Wirgin, I.

    1996-01-01

    Efforts have been proposed worldwide to restore sturgeon populations through the use of hatcheries to supplement natural reproduction and to reintroduce sturgeon where they have become extinct. We examined the population structure and inferred the extent of homing in the anadromous Gulf of Mexico (Gulf) sturgeon (Acipenser oxyrinchus desotoi). Restriction fragment length polymorphism and control region sequence analyses of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) were used to identify haplotypes of Gulf sturgeon specimens obtained from eight drainages spanning the subspecies' entire distribution from Louisiana to Florida. Significant differences in haplotype frequencies indicated substantial geographic structuring of populations. A minimum of four regional or river-specific populations were identified (from west to east): (1) Pearl River, LA and Pascagoula River, MS, (2) Escambia and Yellow rivers, FL, (3) Choctawhatchee River, FL, and (4) Apalachicola, Ochlockonee, and Suwannee rivers, FL. Estimates of maternally mediated gene flow between any pair of the four regional or river-specific stocks ranged between 0.15 to 1.2. Tandem repeats in the mtDNA control region of Gulf sturgeon were not perfectly conserved. This result, together with an absence of heteroplasmy and length variation in Gulf sturgeon mtDNA, indicates that the molecular mechanisms of mtDNA control region sequence evolution differ among acipenserids. PMID:8889537

  10. Molecular variation analysis of Aspergillus flavus using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism of the internal transcribed spacer rDNA region

    PubMed Central

    Zarrin, Majid; Erfaninejad, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Aspergillus flavus is the second most common disease-causing species of Aspergillus in humans. The fungus is frequently associated with life-threatening infections in immunocompromised hosts. The primary aim of the present study was to analyze the genetic variability among different isolates of A. flavus using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). A total of 62 A. flavus isolates were tested in the study. Molecular variability was searched for by analysis of the PCR amplification of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of ribosomal DNA using restriction enzymes. PCR using primers for ITS1 and ITS4 resulted in a product of ~600 bp. Amplicons were subjected to digestion with restriction endonucleases EcoRI, HaeIII and TaqI. Digestion of the PCR products using these restriction enzymes produced different patterns of fragments among the isolates, with different sizes and numbers of fragments, revealing genetic variability. In conclusion, ITS-RFLP is a useful molecular tool in screening for nucleotide polymorphisms among A. flavus isolates. PMID:27588085

  11. Analysis of the rDNA internal transcribed spacer region of the Fusarium species by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    ZARRIN, MAJID; GANJ, FARZANEH; FARAMARZI, SAMA

    2016-01-01

    The Fusarium species are a widely spread phytopathogen identified in an extensive variety of hosts. The Fusarium genus is one of the most heterogeneous fungi and is difficult to classify. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis is a useful method in detection of DNA polymorphism in objective sequences. The aim of the present study was to identify the phylogenetic associations and usefulness of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region as a genetic marker within the most clinically important strain of the Fusarium species. A total of 50 strains of Fusarium spp. were used in the study, including environmental, clinical and reference isolates. The primers ITS1 and ITS4 were used in the study. Two restriction enzymes, HaeIII and SmaI, were assessed for the digestion of PCR products. A PCR product of ~550-base pairs was generated for each Fusarium species. The digested products with HaeIII and SmaI demonstrated that the bands generated for the medically significant Fusarium species, including F. solani, F. oxysporum, F. verticillidea, F. proliferatum and F. fujikuri, have different restriction enzyme patterns. In conclusion, it appears that the PCR-RFLP method used in the present study produces a sufficient restriction profile for differentiation of the most medically significant Fusarium species. PMID:27073635

  12. Geometry and material choices govern hard-rock drilling performance of PDC drag cutters.

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, Jack LeRoy

    2005-06-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has partnered with industry on a multifaceted, baseline experimental study that supports the development of improved drag cutters for advanced drill bits. Different nonstandard cutter lots were produced and subjected to laboratory tests that evaluated the influence of selected design and processing parameters on cutter loads, wear, and durability pertinent to the penetration of hard rock with mechanical properties representative of formations encountered in geothermal or deep oil/gas drilling environments. The focus was on cutters incorporating ultrahard PDC (polycrystalline diamond compact) overlays (i.e., diamond tables) on tungsten-carbide substrates. Parameter variations included changes in cutter geometry, material composition, and processing conditions. Geometric variables were the diamond-table thickness, the cutting-edge profile, and the PDC/substrate interface configuration. Material and processing variables for the diamond table were, respectively, the diamond particle size and the sintering pressure applied during cutter fabrication. Complementary drop-impact, granite-log abrasion, linear cutting-force, and rotary-drilling tests examined the response of cutters from each lot. Substantial changes in behavior were observed from lot to lot, allowing the identification of features contributing major (factor of 10+) improvements in cutting performance for hard-rock applications. Recent field demonstrations highlight the advantages of employing enhanced cutter technology during challenging drilling operations.

  13. U.S. Coast Guard cutter personnel on Sweetbriar train their fire ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    U.S. Coast Guard cutter personnel on Sweetbriar train their fire hoses on a burning pleasure boat in an Alaskan harbor. A U.S. Coast Guard rigid-hull inflatable helps with the fire-fighting effort - U.S. Coast Guard Cutter SWEETBRIER, Cordova, Valdez-Cordova Census Area, AK

  14. Do leaf-cutter ants orient their path-integrated, home vector with a magnetic compass?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leaf-cutter ants Atta colombica forage over 250 m in structurally-complex, Neotropical rainforests that occlude sun or polarized light cues. Night foraging makes the use of celestial cues and landmarks all the more difficult. Typically leaf-cutter ants follow architecturally-modified, pheromonally-m...

  15. Effect of the proximity of the machined surface on the discharge coefficients of laser cutter nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smorodin, F. K.; Abalakov, G. V.

    Results of an experimental study of the discharge coefficients of laser cutter nozzles are reported. It is found that the discharge coefficient of laser cutter nozzles is largely determined by the proximity of the machined surface, Reynolds number, and geometry of the nozzle flow path.

  16. Study on LD-pumped Nd:YAG laser cutter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Jianfeng; Zhao, Jing; Fan, Zhongwei; Zhao, Cunhua; Bi, Yong; Zhang, Jing; Niu, Gang; Shi, Zhaohui; Pei, Bo; Zhang, Guoxin; Xue, Yan; Qi, Yan

    2005-12-01

    The theory of laser cutter and the technology neck is analyzed. We can conclude that it is almost impossible to deal with the waste thick silicon wafers which are yielded in producing silicon wafers by conventional eroding or diamond cutting, while it is also unperfected with ecumenical laser cutter without good beam quality or precise laser and optics system. It is represented that high average power and high repetition rate laser with good beam quality and precise laser and optics system are pivotal to obtain excellent cutting effect such as thick groove depth, rapid cutting speed, fine kerf section without considering the effect of technique. Considering laser medium thermal lens effect and thermal focal length changing with pumping power, using plano-convex high reflectivity mirror as the back cavity mirror to compensate the heat lens influence, aλ/4 waveplate to compensate heat-induced birefraction, utilize the Nd:YAG self-aperture effect, more than 50 W average power 1.064 um IR output is obtained with beam quality factor (M2) equals 3.19. Through the LD-Pumped Nd:YAG laser cutter we developed with short focus length negative spherical aberration focusing lens, double axis linear step motor positioning system, suitable beam expander multiplying factor, appropriate diameter of exit beam aperture, proper repetition rate, when the cutting velocity equals 400mm/min, 0.75mm thick silicon wafer can be penetrated; when the cutting velocity equals 100mm/min, double-layer 0.75mm thick silicon wafer can be penetrated. The cross section is fine and the groove is narrow, the cutting quality meets the expecting demand.

  17. Analytical workflow of double-digest restriction site-associated DNA sequencing based on empirical and in silico optimization in tomato.

    PubMed

    Shirasawa, Kenta; Hirakawa, Hideki; Isobe, Sachiko

    2016-04-01

    Double-digest restriction site-associated DNA sequencing (ddRAD-Seq) enables high-throughput genome-wide genotyping with next-generation sequencing technology. Consequently, this method has become popular in plant genetics and breeding. Although computational in silico prediction of restriction sites from the genome sequence is recognized as an effective approach for choosing the restriction enzymes to be used, few reports have evaluated the in silico predictions in actual experimental data. In this study, we designed and demonstrated a workflow for in silico and empirical ddRAD-Seq analysis in tomato, as follows: (i)in silico prediction of optimum restriction enzymes from the reference genome, (ii) verification of the prediction by actual ddRAD-Seq data of four restriction enzyme combinations, (iii) establishment of a computational data processing pipeline for high-confidence single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) calling, and (iv) validation of SNP accuracy by construction of genetic linkage maps. The quality of SNPs based on de novo assembly reference of the ddRAD-Seq reads was comparable with that of SNPs obtained using the published reference genome of tomato. Comparisons of SNP calls in diverse tomato lines revealed that SNP density in the genome influenced the detectability of SNPs by ddRAD-Seq. In silico prediction prior to actual analysis contributed to optimization of the experimental conditions for ddRAD-Seq, e.g. choices of enzymes and plant materials. Following optimization, this ddRAD-Seq pipeline could help accelerate genetics, genomics, and molecular breeding in both model and non-model plants, including crops. PMID:26932983

  18. Long-Term Effects of Caloric Restriction or Exercise on DNA and RNA Oxidation Levels in White Blood Cells and Urine in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Hofer, Tim; Fontana, Luigi; Weiss, Edward P.; Villareal, Dennis; Malayappan, Bhaskar

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Excessive adiposity is associated with increased oxidative stress and accelerated aging. Weight loss induced by negative energy balance reduces markers of oxidation in experimental animals and humans. The long-term effects of weight loss induced by calorie restriction or increased energy expenditure induced by exercise on measures of oxidative stress and damage have not been studied in humans. The objective of the present study was to compare the effects of 20% caloric restriction or 20% exercise alone over 1 year on oxidative damage to DNA and RNA, as assessed through white blood cell and urine analyses. Eighteen men and women aged 50 to 60 years with a body mass index (BMI) between 23.5 to 29.9 kg/m2 were assigned to one of two conditions — 20% CR (n = 9) or 20% EX (n = 9) — which was designed to produce an identical energy deficit through increased energy expenditure. Compared to baseline, both interventions significantly reduced oxidative damage to both DNA (48.5% and 49.6% reduction for the CR and EX groups, respectively) and RNA (35.7% and 52.1% reduction for the CR and EX groups, respectively) measured in white blood cells. However, urinary levels of DNA and RNA oxidation products did not differ from baseline values following either 12-month intervention program. Data from the present study provide evidence that negative energy balances induced through either CR or EX result in substantial and similar improvements in markers of DNA and RNA damage to white blood cells, potentially by reducing systemic oxidative stress. PMID:18729811

  19. STS-51-L Debris Aboard the USGS Cutter Dallas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    On January 28, 1986, the Space Shuttle Challenger and her seven-member crew were lost when a ruptured O-ring in the right Solid Rocket Booster caused an explosion soon after launch. With the help of the U.S. Coast Guard and the U.S. Navy, search and recovery teams began retrieving pieces of the Shuttle from the Atlantic Ocean soon after the accident. Vessels brought the debris to the Trident Basin at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, where they waited to be shipped to Kennedy Space Center for investigation. The USCG Cutter Dallas transported this fragment of exterior tiling.

  20. Development of the MC3462A pyrotechnic - propellant actuated reefing line cutter

    SciTech Connect

    Craig, J.R.

    1982-06-01

    A pyrotechnic-propellant actuated reefing line cutter was developed to sever a 60 kN loaded Kevlar parachute reefing line cord. Dereefing occurs after a time interval of approximately 0.875 second which is provided by an electronic timer module that is an integral part of the cutter. Other design features include a hermetically sealed actuator which is threaded and O-ring sealed into the body, a stainless steel solid cylindrical cutter blade having an attached elastomer obturator that provides a reliable dynamic gas seal throughout the blade stroke and teflon inserts having a semi-circular configuration which are used to center and shroud the reefing line of the design. Variation in the average function time for the cutter is less than 4% at temperature extremes of -55/sup 0/C and 80/sup 0/C. Average depth of penetration of the blade into the aluminum anvil of the cutter is 2 mm.

  1. Wear analysis of disc cutters of full face rock tunnel boring machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhaohuang; Meng, Liang; Sun, Fei

    2014-11-01

    Wear is a major factor of disc cutters' failure. No current theory offers a standard for the prediction of disc cutter wear yet. In the field the wear prediction method commonly used is based on the excavation length of tunnel boring machine(TBM) to predict the disc cutter wear and its wear law, considering the location number of each disc cutter on the cutterhead(radius for installation); in theory, there is a prediction method of using arc wear coefficient. However, the preceding two methods have their own errors, with their accuracy being 40% or so and largely relying on the technicians' experience. Therefore, radial wear coefficient, axial wear coefficient and trajectory wear coefficient are defined on the basis of the operating characteristics of TBM. With reference to the installation and characteristics of disc cutters, those coefficients are modified according to penetration, which gives rise to the presentation of comprehensive axial wear coefficient, comprehensive radial wear coefficient and comprehensive trajectory wear coefficient. Calculation and determination of wear coefficients are made with consideration of data from a segment of TBM project(excavation length 173 m). The resulting wear coefficient values, after modification, are adopted to predict the disc cutter wear in the follow-up segment of the TBM project(excavation length of 5621 m). The prediction results show that the disc cutter wear predicted with comprehensive radial wear coefficient and comprehensive trajectory wear coefficient are not only accurate(accuracy 16.12%) but also highly congruous, whereas there is a larger deviation in the prediction with comprehensive axial wear coefficient(accuracy 41%, which is in agreement with the prediction of disc cutters' life in the field). This paper puts forth a new method concerning prediction of life span and wear of TBM disc cutters as well as timing for replacing disc cutters.

  2. Cleavage maps for human cytomegalovirus DNA strain AD169 for restriction endonucleases EcoRI, BglII, and HindIII.

    PubMed Central

    Spector, D H; Hock, L; Tamashiro, J C

    1982-01-01

    We have used cloned EcoRI fragments of the human CMV (HCMV) genome, strain AD169, to prepare restriction endonuclease maps of the DNA. Individual 32P-labeled cloned fragments were hybridized to Southern blots of HCMV DNA cleaved to completion with the restriction endonucleases BglII and HindIII and cleaved partially with EcoRI. By determining which EcoRI fragments hybridized to the same band on a Southern blot, we were able to establish linkage groups. This information coupled with the data derived from digestion of the cloned fragments with the enzymes BglII and HindIII (Tamashiro et al., J. Virol. 42:547-557, 1982) provided the basis for the construction of detailed maps for the enzymes EcoRI, BglII, and HindIII. We also identified the EcoRI fragments derived from the termini of this genome and mapped them with respect to the BglII and HindIII terminal fragments. From our mapping data, we conclude that the genome of HCMV is approximately 240 kilobases in length and is divided into long (198 kilobases) and short (42 kilobases) regions. Both regions consist of a unique sequence bounded by inverted repeats (11 to 12 kilobases for the long region and 2 to 3 kilobases for the short region). Furthermore, the long and short regions can invert relative to each other. Images PMID:6283173

  3. Role of the single deaminase domain APOBEC3A in virus restriction, retrotransposition, DNA damage and cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yaqiong; Schmitt, Kimberly; Guo, Kejun; Santiago, Mario L; Stephens, Edward B

    2016-01-01

    The apolipoprotein mRNA editing enzyme catalytic polypeptide-like 3 (APOBEC3; A3) proteins are a family of seven cytidine deaminases (A3A, A3B, A3C, A3D, A3F, A3G and A3H) that restrict certain viral infections. These innate defence factors are best known for their ability to restrict the replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) lacking a functional Vif protein (HIV-1Δvif) through the deamination of cytidine residues to uridines during reverse transcription, ultimately leading to lethal G → A changes in the viral genome. The best studied of the A3 proteins has been APOBEC3G because of its potent activity against HIV-1Δvif. However, one member of this family, A3A, has biological properties that make it unique among the A3 proteins. In this review, we will focus on the structural and phylogenetic features of the human and non-human primate A3A proteins, their role in the restriction of retroviruses and other viruses, and current findings on other biological properties affected by this protein.

  4. Different mutagenic potential of HIV-1 restriction factors APOBEC3G and APOBEC3F is determined by distinct single-stranded DNA scanning mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ara, Anjuman; Love, Robin P; Chelico, Linda

    2014-03-01

    The APOBEC3 deoxycytidine deaminase family functions as host restriction factors that can block replication of Vif (virus infectivity factor) deficient HIV-1 virions to differing degrees by deaminating cytosines to uracils in single-stranded (-)HIV-1 DNA. Upon replication of the (-)DNA to (+)DNA, the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase incorporates adenines opposite the uracils, thereby inducing C/G→T/A mutations that can functionally inactivate HIV-1. Although both APOBEC3F and APOBEC3G are expressed in cell types HIV-1 infects and are suppressed by Vif, there has been no prior biochemical analysis of APOBEC3F, in contrast to APOBEC3G. Using synthetic DNA substrates, we characterized APOBEC3F and found that similar to APOBEC3G; it is a processive enzyme and can deaminate at least two cytosines in a single enzyme-substrate encounter. However, APOBEC3F scanning movement is distinct from APOBEC3G, and relies on jumping rather than both jumping and sliding. APOBEC3F jumping movements were also different from APOBEC3G. The lack of sliding movement from APOBEC3F is due to an ¹⁹⁰NPM¹⁹² motif, since insertion of this motif into APOBEC3G decreases its sliding movements. The APOBEC3G NPM mutant induced significantly less mutations in comparison to wild-type APOBEC3G in an in vitro model HIV-1 replication assay and single-cycle infectivity assay, indicating that differences in DNA scanning were relevant to restriction of HIV-1. Conversely, mutation of the APOBEC3F ¹⁹¹Pro to ¹⁹¹Gly enables APOBEC3F sliding movements to occur. Although APOBEC3F ¹⁹⁰NGM¹⁹² could slide, the enzyme did not induce more mutagenesis than wild-type APOBEC3F, demonstrating that the unique jumping mechanism of APOBEC3F abrogates the influence of sliding on mutagenesis. Overall, we demonstrate key differences in the impact of APOBEC3F- and APOBEC3G-induced mutagenesis on HIV-1 that supports a model in which both the processive DNA scanning mechanism and preferred deamination motif

  5. Using HLA-A2.1 Transgenic Rabbit Model to Screen and Characterize New HLA-A2.1 Restricted Epitope DNA Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jiafen; Schell, Todd D.; Peng, Xuwen; Cladel, Nancy M.; Balogh, Karla K.; Christensen, Neil D.

    2011-01-01

    We have established an HLA-A2.1 transgenic rabbit /cottontail rabbit papillomavirus (CRPV) infection model. Using this novel transgenic animal model, we reported earlier that a multivalent epitope DNA vaccine (CRPVE1ep1-5) containing five HLA-A2.1 restricted epitopes from CRPVE1 (42-50, 149-157, 161-169, 245-253 and 303-311) was successful in providing strong and specific protective and therapeutic immunity. Among these five epitopes, two (161-169 and 303-311) have been proven to stimulate strong immunity in both HLA-A2.1 transgenic mouse and rabbit models. In the current study, we further identified the remaining three epitopes (CRPVE1/42-50,149-157, 245-253) in both animal models. CRPVE1/149-157 was able to induce specific CTL responses in HLA-A2.1 transgenic mice by DNA immunization but undetectable by peptide immunization. CRPVE1/42-50 and 245-253 failed to respond in HLA-A2.1 transgenic mice either by peptide or DNA immunization. All the three epitopes when administrated as DNA vaccines, however, were able to stimulate strong protective immunity in HLA-A2.1 transgenic rabbits in a dose dependent manner. Among the five epitopes, two (CRPVE1/ 303-311and CRPVE1/149-157) DNA vaccines also showed specific therapeutic effects in CRPV-infected HLA-A2.1 transgenic rabbits. Taken together, the HLA-A2.1 transgenic rabbit model recognized more epitopes than did the HLA-A2.1 transgenic mouse model. Our data demonstrate that the HLA-A2.1 transgenic rabbit model can complement the HLA-A2.1 transgenic mouse model for the development and testing of new HLA-A2.1 restricted prophylactic and therapeutic T cell based DNA vaccines. PMID:21572916

  6. Different Mutagenic Potential of HIV-1 Restriction Factors APOBEC3G and APOBEC3F Is Determined by Distinct Single-Stranded DNA Scanning Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Ara, Anjuman; Love, Robin P.; Chelico, Linda

    2014-01-01

    The APOBEC3 deoxycytidine deaminase family functions as host restriction factors that can block replication of Vif (virus infectivity factor) deficient HIV-1 virions to differing degrees by deaminating cytosines to uracils in single-stranded (−)HIV-1 DNA. Upon replication of the (−)DNA to (+)DNA, the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase incorporates adenines opposite the uracils, thereby inducing C/G→T/A mutations that can functionally inactivate HIV-1. Although both APOBEC3F and APOBEC3G are expressed in cell types HIV-1 infects and are suppressed by Vif, there has been no prior biochemical analysis of APOBEC3F, in contrast to APOBEC3G. Using synthetic DNA substrates, we characterized APOBEC3F and found that similar to APOBEC3G; it is a processive enzyme and can deaminate at least two cytosines in a single enzyme-substrate encounter. However, APOBEC3F scanning movement is distinct from APOBEC3G, and relies on jumping rather than both jumping and sliding. APOBEC3F jumping movements were also different from APOBEC3G. The lack of sliding movement from APOBEC3F is due to an 190NPM192 motif, since insertion of this motif into APOBEC3G decreases its sliding movements. The APOBEC3G NPM mutant induced significantly less mutations in comparison to wild-type APOBEC3G in an in vitro model HIV-1 replication assay and single-cycle infectivity assay, indicating that differences in DNA scanning were relevant to restriction of HIV-1. Conversely, mutation of the APOBEC3F 191Pro to 191Gly enables APOBEC3F sliding movements to occur. Although APOBEC3F 190NGM192 could slide, the enzyme did not induce more mutagenesis than wild-type APOBEC3F, demonstrating that the unique jumping mechanism of APOBEC3F abrogates the influence of sliding on mutagenesis. Overall, we demonstrate key differences in the impact of APOBEC3F- and APOBEC3G-induced mutagenesis on HIV-1 that supports a model in which both the processive DNA scanning mechanism and preferred deamination motif (APOBEC3F, 5

  7. Rapid prototyping of multiphase microfluidics with robotic cutters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zidong; Zhao, Zhengtuo; Lo, Joe Fu-jiou

    2014-03-01

    Microfluidic devices offer novel techniques to address biological and biomedical issues. Standard microfluidic fabrication uses photolithography to pattern channels on silicon wafers with high resolution. Even the relatively straightforward SU8 and soft lithography in microfluidics require investing and training in photolithography, which is also time consuming due to complicated thick resist procedures, including sensitive substrate pretreatment, coating, soft bake, expose, post-exposure bake, and developing steps. However, for applications where low resolution (>200 μm) and high turn-around (> 4 designs/day) prototyping are met with little or no lithography infrastructure, robotic cutters [1] offer flexible options for making glass and PDMS microfluidics. We describe the use of robotics cutters for designing microfluidic geometries, and compliment it with safe glass etching, with depths down to 60 μm. Soft lithography patterning of 200 μm thick PDMS membrane was also explored. Without high equipment investment and lengthy student training, both glass and PDMS microfluidics can be achieved in small facilities using this technique.

  8. Study on the health hazards of scrap metal cutters.

    PubMed

    Ho, S F; Wong, P H; Kwok, S F

    1989-12-01

    Scrap metal cutters seemed to be left out in most preventive programmes as the workers were mainly contract workers. The health hazards of scrap metal cutting in 54 workers from a foundry and a ship breaking plant were evaluated. Environmental sampling showed lead levels ranging from 0.02 to 0.57 mg/m3 (threshold limit values is 0.15 mg/m3). Exposure to lead came mainly from the paint coat of the metals cut. Metal fume fever was not reported although their main complaints were cough and rhinitis. Skin burns at all stages of healing and residual scars were seen over hands, forearms and thighs. 96% of the cutters had blood lead levels exceeding 40 micrograms/100 ml with 10 workers exceeding 70 micrograms/100 ml. None had clinical evidence of lead poisoning. The study showed that scrap metal cutting is a hazardous industry associated with significant lead exposure. With proper medical supervision, the blood lead levels of this group of workers decreased illustrating the importance of identifying the hazard and implementing appropriate medical surveillance programmes.

  9. Tube cutter tool and method of use for coupon removal

    SciTech Connect

    Nachbar, H.D.; Etten, M.P. Jr.; Kurowski, P.A.

    1995-12-31

    It is well known in the art that metal tubes used in heat transfer devices are susceptible to wear, erosion and other degradations which may create weaknesses or other potential failure points. One typical prior art method to determine the cause of damage to a tube involves making a circumferential cut on the tube wall and removing the entire section of the tube having a damaged portion thereon. This method is useful where a straight length portion of the tube has been affected. However, access to more constricted areas and removal of relatively large sections of tubing is limited where the cutting procedure is performed from the interior of the tube. A tube cutter tool is insertable into a tube for cutting a coupon from a damaged site on the exterior of the tube. Prior to using the tool, the damaged site is first located from the interior of the tube using a multi-coil pancake eddy current test probe. The damage site is then marked. A fiber optic probe is used to monitor the subsequent cutting procedure which is performed using a hole saw mounted on the tube cutter tool. Prior to completion of the cutting procedure, a drill in the center of the hole saw is drilled into the coupon to hold it in place.

  10. The Helicobacter pylori HpyAXII restriction–modification system limits exogenous DNA uptake by targeting GTAC sites but shows asymmetric conservation of the DNA methyltransferase and restriction endonuclease components

    PubMed Central

    Humbert, Olivier; Salama, Nina R.

    2008-01-01

    The naturally competent organism Helicobacter pylori encodes a large number of restriction–modification (R–M) systems that consist of a restriction endonuclease and a DNA methyltransferase. R–M systems are not only believed to limit DNA exchange among bacteria but may also have other cellular functions. We report a previously uncharacterized H. pylori type II R–M system, M.HpyAXII/R.HpyAXII. We show that this system targets GTAC sites, which are rare in the H. pylori chromosome but numerous in ribosomal RNA genes. As predicted, this type II R–M system showed attributes of a selfish element. Deletion of the methyltransferase M.HpyAXII is lethal when associated with an active endonuclease R.HpyAXII unless compensated by adaptive mutation or gene amplification. R.HpyAXII effectively restricted both unmethylated plasmid and chromosomal DNA during natural transformation and was predicted to belong to the novel ‘half pipe’ structural family of endonucleases. Analysis of a panel of clinical isolates revealed that R.HpyAXII was functional in a small number of H. pylori strains (18.9%, n = 37), whereas the activity of M.HpyAXII was highly conserved (92%, n = 50), suggesting that GTAC methylation confers a selective advantage to H. pylori. However, M.HpyAXII activity did not enhance H. pylori fitness during stomach colonization of a mouse infection model. PMID:18978016

  11. Molecular cloning of the human Hand1 gene/cDNA and its tissue-restricted expression in cytotrophoblastic cells and heart.

    PubMed

    Knöfler, M; Meinhardt, G; Vasicek, R; Husslein, P; Egarter, C

    1998-12-11

    The basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) factor Hand1 plays a role in the developing chicken heart and is required for trophoblast giant cell differentiation and cardiac looping of mouse embryonic development. Here, we report the cloning of the human Hand1 cDNA and gene from a heart-specific cDNA library and a genomic lambda-DNA library, respectively. We present the nucleotide sequence of a 1.75kb cDNA clone, encoding the presumptive 215 amino acid human Hand1 protein, and show homology comparison of the conserved bHLH region between different species. In vitro transcription-translation of Hand1 mRNA and analysis of protein size suggest that the Hand1 polypeptide is (post)translationally modified. By Southern blot analysis we demonstrate that the isolated genomic DNA clone harbours the entire Hand1 gene and describe molecular structure and sequences of the two 799 and 938bp exons and the single 1.56kb intron. The expression pattern of the mRNA in different human tissues revealed that Hand1 transcripts are restricted to the heart, suggesting that the protein could be required for cardiac-specific gene transcription and function in adults. Hand1 transcripts were undetectable in a non-tumorigenic villous trophoblast cell line, immunopurified cytotrophoblasts undergoing in vitro differentiation, and first trimester placental tissue, suggesting that the transcription factor is not involved in the development of villous and extravillous trophoblast cell lineages. Hand1 mRNA, however, was abundantly expressed in cytotrophoblastic Jeg-3 and BeWo cells, suggesting that Hand1 could be required for early trophoblast differentiation.

  12. 42 CFR 73.13 - Restricted experiments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) Restricted experiments: (1) Experiments utilizing recombinant DNA that involve the deliberate transfer of a... agriculture. (2) Experiments involving the deliberate formation of recombinant DNA containing genes for...

  13. 42 CFR 73.13 - Restricted experiments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...) Restricted experiments: (1) Experiments utilizing recombinant DNA that involve the deliberate transfer of a... agriculture. (2) Experiments involving the deliberate formation of recombinant DNA containing genes for...

  14. 42 CFR 73.13 - Restricted experiments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...) Restricted experiments: (1) Experiments utilizing recombinant DNA that involve the deliberate transfer of a... agriculture. (2) Experiments involving the deliberate formation of recombinant DNA containing genes for...

  15. New polymorphic mtDNA restriction site in the 12S rRNA gene detected in Tunisian patients with non-syndromic hearing loss

    SciTech Connect

    Mkaouar-Rebai, Emna Tlili, Abdelaziz; Masmoudi, Saber; Charfeddine, Ilhem; Fakhfakh, Faiza

    2008-05-09

    The 12S rRNA gene was shown to be a hot spot for aminoglycoside-induced and non-syndromic hearing loss since several deafness-associated mtDNA mutations were identified in this gene. Among them, we distinguished the A1555G, the C1494T and the T1095C mutations and C-insertion or deletion at position 961. One hundred Tunisian patients with non-syndromic hearing loss and 100 hearing individuals were analysed in this study. A PCR-RFLP analysis with HaeIII restriction enzyme showed the presence of the A1555G mutation in the 12S rRNA gene in only one out of the 100 patients. In addition, PCR-RFLP and radioactive PCR revealed the presence of a new HaeIII polymorphic restriction site in the same gene of 12S rRNA site in 4 patients with non-syndromic hearing loss. UVIDOC-008-XD analyses showed the presence of this new polymorphic restriction site with a variable heteroplasmic rates at position +1517 of the human mitochondrial genome. On the other hand, direct sequencing of the entire mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene in the 100 patients and in 100 hearing individuals revealed the presence of the A750G and A1438G polymorphisms and the absence of the C1494T, T1095C and 961insC mutations in all the tested individuals. Sequencing of the whole mitochondrial genome in the 4 patients showing the new HaeIII polymorphic restriction site revealed only the presence of the A8860G transition in the MT-ATP6 gene and the A4769G polymorphism in the ND2 gene.

  16. Restriction endonuclease fingerprinting by SSCP (REF), an efficient method of screening for mutations in long contiguous segments of DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, O.; Sommer, S.S.

    1994-09-01

    Dideoxy fingerprinting is an efficient method of screening for the presence of mutations in short exons ({le}250 bp). Long contiguous segments can be screened by sequential ddF reactions. To screen long contiguous segments in a more rapid manner, REF has been developed. REF will be described in the context of a model system in exon H of the factor IX gene. A 1 kb segment is PCR amplified and digested with each of five groups of restriction endonucleases. The endonucleases are chosen such that, in each group, the average size of the fragments is about 150 bp. After digestion, the products are mixed, 5{prime} end-labeled with T4 polynucleotide kinase, boiled, and electrophoresed under nondenaturing conditions. Each lane screens 1 kb and contains 70 segments (7 fragments per digestion x 5 digestions x 2 strands). The matrices tested were 5.6% polyacrylamide (PA) and 7.5% GeneAmp{sup {trademark}} (GA) at temperatures of either 23{degrees}C (RT) or 8{degrees}C (LT). Point mutations resulted in the gain or loss of a restriction site in 21% of 24 test mutations. In addition, mutations could be detected if any of 5 restriction fragments with the same mutation (producing 10 denatured segments) displayed abnormal mobility (SSCP component). The average sensitivity per segment of the SSCP component for the 24 point mutations ranged from 49% for PA at RT to 68% with GA at LT. REF detected 96% of the mutations with PA at RT and 100% with GA at RT or LT. These latter two conditions detected 100% of a subsequent blinded sample that contained normal controls and 27 different mutations. A blinded analysis is in progress to determine the sensitivity of REF when the segment size is 2 kb.

  17. Use of Plasmon Coupling to Reveal the Dynamics of DNA Bending andCleavage by Single EcoRV Restriction Enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Reinhard, Bjorn; Sheikholeslami, Sassan; Mastroianni, Alexander; Alivisatos, A. Paul; Liphardt, Jan

    2006-09-06

    Pairs of Au nanoparticles have recently been proposed asplasmon rulers based on the dependence of their light scattering on theinterparticle distance. Preliminary work has suggested that plasmonrulers can be used to measure and monitor dynamic distance changes overthe 1 to 100nm length scale in biology. Here, we substantiate thatplasmon rulers can be used to effectively measure dynamical biophysicalprocesses by applying the ruler to a system that has been investigatedextensively using ensemble kinetic measurements: the cleavage of DNA bythe restriction enzyme EcoRV. Temporal resolutions of up to 240 Hz wereobtained, and the end-to-end extension of up to 1000 individual dsDNAenzyme substrates could be monitored in parallel for hours. The singlemolecule cleavage trajectories acquired here agree well with valuesobtained in bulk through other methods, and confirm well-known featuresof the cleavage process, such as the fact that the DNA is bent prior tocleavage. New dynamical information is revealed as well, for instance,the degree of softening of the DNA just prior to cleavage. The unlimitedlife time, high temporal resolution, and high signal/noise make theplasmon ruler an excellent tool for studying macromolecular assembliesand conformational changes at the single molecule level.

  18. Restriction fragment length polymorphism and multiple copies of DNA sequences homologous with probes for P-fimbriae and hemolysin genes among uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Hull, S I; Bieler, S; Hull, R A

    1988-03-01

    Hemolysin and P-fimbriae are two virulence traits frequently found together in uropathogenic Escherichia coli. Previous studies have discovered evidence both for linkage between the genes for these traits and for their duplication in the chromosomes of a limited number of strains. To test whether these observations are characteristic of uropathogenic Escherichia coli, the method of DNA hybridization to DNA restriction fragments separated by electrophoresis and transferred to nylon was used to determine copy number of genes for P-fimbriae (pap) among 51 E. coli strains isolated from symptomatic urinary tract infections. Twenty percent of the strains had more than one copy of pap homologous sequences. Fifteen strains, each representing a unique clone, were examined for the presence of sequences homologous with cloned hemolysin genes (hly). Samples of DNA from 14 of the 15 strains hybridized with hly probes. In eight strains the number of copies of pap equalled the number of copies of hly, including one strain with two apparent copies of each. Five strains appeared to have one more copy of pap than of hly, and one strain had an extra copy of hly.

  19. Restriction maps of the regions coding for methicillin and tobramycin resistances on chromosomal DNA in methicillin-resistant staphylococci.

    PubMed Central

    Ubukata, K; Nonoguchi, R; Matsuhashi, M; Song, M D; Konno, M

    1989-01-01

    Chromosomal BamHI DNA fragments containing both the mecA gene encoding the penicillin-binding protein responsible for methicillin resistance and the aadD gene encoding 4',4"-adenylyltransferase responsible for tobramycin resistance were cloned from three methicillin- and tobramycin-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus and one strain of Staphylococcus epidermidis. Physical maps of the fragments were similar, suggesting their unique origin. Images PMID:2817861

  20. Rock deformation equations and application to the study on slantingly installed disc cutter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhao-Huang; Meng, Liang; Sun, Fei

    2014-08-01

    At present the mechanical model of the interaction between a disc cutter and rock mainly concerns indentation experiment, linear cutting experiment and tunnel boring machine (TBM) on-site data. This is not in line with the actual rock-breaking movement of the disc cutter and impedes to some extent the research on the rock-breaking mechanism, wear mechanism and design theory. Therefore, our study focuses on the interaction between the slantingly installed disc cutter and rock, developing a model in accordance with the actual rock-breaking movement. Displacement equations are established through an analysis of the velocity vector at the rock-breaking point of the disc cutter blade; the functional relationship between the displacement parameters at the rock-breaking point and its rectangular coordinates is established through an analysis of micro-displacement vectors at the rock-breaking point, thus leading to the geometric equations of rock deformation caused by the slantingly installed disc cutter. Considering the basically linear relationship between the cutting force of disc cutters and the rock deformation before and after the leap break of rock, we express the constitutive relations of rock deformation as generalized Hooke's law and analyze the effect of the slanting installation angle of disc cutters on the rock-breaking force. This will, as we hope, make groundbreaking contributions to the development of the design theory and installation practice of TBM.

  1. Characterization of primary biogenic aerosol particles in urban, rural, and high-alpine air by DNA sequence and restriction fragment analysis of ribosomal RNA genes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Després, V. R.; Nowoisky, J. F.; Klose, M.; Conrad, R.; Andreae, M. O.; Pöschl, U.

    2007-12-01

    This study explores the applicability of DNA analyses for the characterization of primary biogenic aerosol (PBA) particles in the atmosphere. Samples of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and total suspended particulates (TSP) have been collected on different types of filter materials at urban, rural, and high-alpine locations along an altitude transect in the south of Germany (Munich, Hohenpeissenberg, Mt. Zugspitze). From filter segments loaded with about one milligram of air particulate matter, DNA could be extracted and DNA sequences could be determined for bacteria, fungi, plants and animals. Sequence analyses were used to determine the identity of biological organisms, and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analyses (T-RFLP) were applied to estimate diversities and relative abundances of bacteria. Investigations of blank and background samples showed that filter materials have to be decontaminated prior to use, and that the sampling and handling procedures have to be carefully controlled to avoid artifacts in the analyses. Mass fractions of DNA in PM2.5 were found to be around 0.05% in urban, rural, and high-alpine aerosols. The average concentration of DNA determined for urban air was on the order of ~7 ng m-3, indicating that human adults may inhale about one microgram of DNA per day (corresponding to ~108 haploid bacterial genomes or ~105 haploid human genomes, respectively). Most of the bacterial sequences found in PM2.5 were from Proteobacteria (42) and some from Actinobacteria (10) and Firmicutes (1). The fungal sequences were characteristic for Ascomycota (3) and Basidiomycota (1), which are known to actively discharge spores into the atmosphere. The plant sequences could be attributed to green plants (2) and moss spores (2), while animal DNA was found only for one unicellular eukaryote (protist). Over 80% of the 53 bacterial sequences could be matched to one of the 19 T-RF peaks found in the PM2.5 samples, but only 40% of the T-RF peaks

  2. Acute elevation by short-term dietary restriction or food deprivation of type I I-compound levels in rat liver DNA.

    PubMed

    Zhou, G D; Hernandez, N S; Randerath, E; Randerath, K

    1999-01-01

    Type I I-compounds are bulky endogenous DNA modifications detectable by 32P postlabeling that exhibit age, species, tissue, genotype, gender, and diet dependence. Their formation appears unrelated to oxidative stress. In fact, several lines of indirect evidence suggest that many type I I-compounds may represent normal functional DNA modifications. For example, long-term dietary restriction (DR), which retards the development of age-related diseases including cancer and extends median and maximum life spans, unexpectedly elicits significant increases rather than decreases in the levels of many I-compounds in different rodent tissues. Positive linear correlations have been observed between such levels and median life spans of the animals. In the present work we have investigated 1) whether elevation of I-compound levels does not depend on chronic DR, i.e., occurs after a short period of DR or fasting, and 2) whether I-compound levels return to control values after the animals are returned to unrestricted feeding after food deprivation. Female Fischer 344 rats (approx 140 g each) were randomized into three groups. Group I was fed a natural ingredient (Purina 5001) diet ad libitum (AL) throughout the study, Group 2 was switched to 60% of the AL amount (40% DR) at 0 hour, and Group 3 was given no food for up to 72 hours and then returned to AL feeding until the end of the experiment. Liver DNA of individual rats (n = 4) was isolated for I-compound analysis at 24, 72, and 240 hours. Restricted and food-deprived rats showed elevated levels of hepatic I-compounds, with fasting eliciting the highest levels. These effects were seen as early as the 24-hour time point. Refeeding after 72 hours of food deprivation restored the levels to control values, measured at 240 hours. Our observations are discussed in relation to carcinogenesis and tumor promotion. The almost instantaneous changes of endogenous DNA modifications showed their exquisite sensitivity to nutritional factors

  3. Desorption Mass Spectrometry for Nonvolatile Compounds Using an Ultrasonic Cutter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habib, Ahsan; Ninomiya, Satoshi; Chen, Lee Chuin; Usmanov, Dilshadbek T.; Hiraoka, Kenzo

    2014-07-01

    In this work, desorption of nonvolatile analytes induced by friction was studied. The nonvolatile compounds deposited on the perfluoroalkoxy substrate were gently touched by an ultrasonic cutter oscillating with a frequency of 40 kHz. The desorbed molecules were ionized by a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) ion source. Efficient desorption of samples such as drugs, pharmaceuticals, amino acids, and explosives was observed. The limits of detection for these compounds were about 1 ng. Many compounds were detected in their protonated forms without undergoing significant fragmentation. When the DBD was off, no ions for the neutral samples could be detected, meaning that only desorption along with little ionization took place by the present technique.

  4. Novel DNA methylation profiles associated with key gene regulation and transcription pathways in blood and placenta of growth-restricted neonates.

    PubMed

    Hillman, Sara L; Finer, Sarah; Smart, Melissa C; Mathews, Chris; Lowe, Robert; Rakyan, Vardhman K; Hitman, Graham A; Williams, David J

    2015-01-01

    Fetal growth is determined by the feto-placental genome interacting with the maternal in utero environment. Failure of this interplay leads to poor placental development and fetal growth restriction (FGR), which is associated with future metabolic disease. We investigated whether whole genome methylation differences existed in umbilical cord blood and placenta, between gestational-matched, FGR, and appropriately grown (AGA) neonates. Using the Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip®, we found that DNA from umbilical cord blood of FGR born at term (n = 19) had 839 differentially methylated positions (DMPs) that reached genome-wide significance compared with AGA (n = 18). Using gestational age as a continuous variable, we identified 76,249 DMPs in cord blood (adj. P < 0.05) of which 121 DMPs were common to the 839 DMPs and were still evident when comparing 12 FGR with 12 AGA [39.9 ± 1.2 vs. 40.0 ± 1.0 weeks (mean ± SD), respectively]. A total of 53 DMPs had a β methylation difference >10% and 25 genes were co-methylated more than twice within 1000 base pairs. Gene Ontology (GO) analysis of DMPs supported their involvement in gene regulation and transcription pathways related to organ development and metabolic function. A similar profile of DMPs was found across different cell types in the cord blood. At term, no DMPs between FGR and AGA placentae reached genome-wide significance, validated with an external dataset. GO analysis of 284 pre-term, placental DMPs associated with autophagy, oxidative stress and hormonal responses. Growth restricted neonates have distinct DNA methylation profiles in pre-term placenta and in cord blood at birth, which may predispose to future adult disease. PMID:25496377

  5. Novel DNA methylation profiles associated with key gene regulation and transcription pathways in blood and placenta of growth-restricted neonates

    PubMed Central

    Hillman, Sara L; Finer, Sarah; Smart, Melissa C; Mathews, Chris; Lowe, Robert; Rakyan, Vardhman K; Hitman, Graham A; Williams, David J

    2015-01-01

    Fetal growth is determined by the feto-placental genome interacting with the maternal in utero environment. Failure of this interplay leads to poor placental development and fetal growth restriction (FGR), which is associated with future metabolic disease. We investigated whether whole genome methylation differences existed in umbilical cord blood and placenta, between gestational-matched, FGR, and appropriately grown (AGA) neonates. Using the Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip®, we found that DNA from umbilical cord blood of FGR born at term (n = 19) had 839 differentially methylated positions (DMPs) that reached genome-wide significance compared with AGA (n = 18). Using gestational age as a continuous variable, we identified 76,249 DMPs in cord blood (adj. P < 0.05) of which 121 DMPs were common to the 839 DMPs and were still evident when comparing 12 FGR with 12 AGA [39.9 ± 1.2 vs. 40.0 ± 1.0 weeks (mean ± SD), respectively]. A total of 53 DMPs had a β methylation difference >10% and 25 genes were co-methylated more than twice within 1000 base pairs. Gene Ontology (GO) analysis of DMPs supported their involvement in gene regulation and transcription pathways related to organ development and metabolic function. A similar profile of DMPs was found across different cell types in the cord blood. At term, no DMPs between FGR and AGA placentae reached genome-wide significance, validated with an external dataset. GO analysis of 284 pre-term, placental DMPs associated with autophagy, oxidative stress and hormonal responses. Growth restricted neonates have distinct DNA methylation profiles in pre-term placenta and in cord blood at birth, which may predispose to future adult disease. PMID:25496377

  6. Symbiotic nitrogen fixation in the fungus gardens of leaf-cutter ants.

    PubMed

    Pinto-Tomás, Adrián A; Anderson, Mark A; Suen, Garret; Stevenson, David M; Chu, Fiona S T; Cleland, W Wallace; Weimer, Paul J; Currie, Cameron R

    2009-11-20

    Bacteria-mediated acquisition of atmospheric N2 serves as a critical source of nitrogen in terrestrial ecosystems. Here we reveal that symbiotic nitrogen fixation facilitates the cultivation of specialized fungal crops by leaf-cutter ants. By using acetylene reduction and stable isotope experiments, we demonstrated that N2 fixation occurred in the fungus gardens of eight leaf-cutter ant species and, further, that this fixed nitrogen was incorporated into ant biomass. Symbiotic N2-fixing bacteria were consistently isolated from the fungus gardens of 80 leaf-cutter ant colonies collected in Argentina, Costa Rica, and Panama. The discovery of N2 fixation within the leaf-cutter ant-microbe symbiosis reveals a previously unrecognized nitrogen source in neotropical ecosystems.

  7. A physical match of a metallic chip found on a bolt cutters' blade.

    PubMed

    Finkelstein, Nir; Volkov, Nikolai; Novoselsky, Yehuda; Tsach, Tsadok

    2015-05-01

    Bolt cutters are known as devices which are used for cutting hard objects and rigid materials such as padlocks and bars. They are commonly used in instances of forced entries. In this case study, a bolt cutter was found in the car of two suspects in a grocery burglary. This study indicates how the presence of a small metallic chip found on a suspected bolt cutter can prove that the tool was used in the crime scene. During the initial examination, a metallic chip from the cut shackle padlock was found stuck to one of the bolt cutters' blades. By comparing the metallic chip's microscopic edge and the breaking (fracture) line of the padlock's shackle, a full physical match was noticed. We wish to report here how residue, even the smallest, can be used to link burglary tools to a crime scene with a high level of certainty. PMID:25716459

  8. Restricted gene flow at the micro- and macro-geographical scale in marble trout based on mtDNA and microsatellite polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The genetic structure of the marble trout Salmo trutta marmoratus, an endemic salmonid of northern Italy and the Balkan peninsula, was explored at the macro- and micro-scale level using a combination of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and microsatellite data. Results Sequence variation in the mitochondrial control region showed the presence of nonindigenous haplotypes indicative of introgression from brown trout into marble trout. This was confirmed using microsatellite markers, which showed a higher introgression at nuclear level. Microsatellite loci revealed a strong genetic differentiation across the geographical range of marble trout, which suggests restricted gene flow both at the micro-geographic (within rivers) and macro-geographic (among river systems) scale. A pattern of Isolation-by-Distance was found, in which genetic samples were correlated with hydrographic distances. A general West-to-East partition of the microsatellite polymorphism was observed, which was supported by the geographic distribution of mitochondrial haplotypes. Conclusion While introgression at both mitochondrial and nuclear level is unlikely to result from natural migration and might be the consequence of current restocking practices, the pattern of genetic substructuring found at microsatellites has been likely shaped by historical colonization patterns determined by the geological evolution of the hydrographic networks. PMID:21489312

  9. [A case of chrome asthma induced by exposure to the stone cutter dust].

    PubMed

    Onizuka, Reiko; Tanabe, Kimiko; Nakayama, Yoshihisa; Fukuchi, Tetsuroh; Nakata, Kazunori; Hiki, Toshinobu

    2006-12-01

    The case of a forty-six year old, male patient with asthma caused by exposure to dust containing chrome is presented. When the patient was nineteen years old, he started working as a stonemason in a factory. He cut and ground stone with a stone-cutter to make statues and tombstones. Three years after staring to work, contact dermatitis was observed on his arms and hands. Within six years of work, he suffered from chronic coughing. After eight years, he experienced bronchial asthma attacks with wheezing and dyspnea. He had been exposed to dust for eight years before developing asthma. The symptoms increased gradually. He fell into severe asthma attacks causing unconsciousness and dyspnea. Several common therapies were not effective. The characteristics of his clinical course and occupational history suggested that the asthma must be caused by exposure to dust containing metal generated in the factory. Skin Patch Tests (SPT) were performed for cobalt, copper, iron, chrome, tin, and manganese salt. The result of the SPT indicated a strong positive result for potassium dichromate and positive for chromium sulfate, but did not show any indications in the control or for other metallic salt. Fluorescent X-ray analysis detected that chrome was present in the powder dust under the stone-cutter machine. However, the fluorescent X-ray analysis did not detect chrome in the stone materials. It was suggested that chrome must be contained in the metal dust generated from the steel cutter used to cut off and grind the stone. The metal component in the used cutter edge and the unused cutter edge were analyzed with electro-probe microanalyzer (EPMA). The result revealed that chrome was contained in the used, dull cutter edge and not in the new sharp cutter edge. Thus, the patient had been exposed to the dust containing chrome generated from part of the stainless steel of cutter. He had sensitized to chrome and this had caused the occupational chrome-asthma.

  10. Investigating the nature of chromatid breaks produced by restriction endonucleases.

    PubMed

    Harvey, A N; Savage, J R

    1997-01-01

    It is a basic assumption of the breakage-and-reunion theory that the majority of open chromatid breaks seen at metaphase are the residue of unrejoined primary breaks that have neither restituted nor rejoined illegitimately to form exchange aberrations. If Chinese hamster chromosomes with BrdU sister-chromatid differentiation are irradiated, and chromatid aberrations scored from G2 cells, some 15-20% of open breaks show a colour-jump at the point of discontinuity, indicating a two-lesion intrachange origin. Since we see complete forms of several intrachanges whose incomplete forms will also look like breaks, but devoid of a colour-jump, it appears that a substantial proportion of observed breaks are intrachange derived. Experiments to date show that the colour-jump proportion is constant, irrespective of radiation dose, radiation quality, BrdU concentration and hamster cell origin. It is the same for the very low "spontaneous' breaks found in control samples. Restriction endonucleases (RE) can be introduced into cells by various poration methods, and are highly efficient at producing all types of aberrations. This is taken as strong evidence that DNA dsb are significant lesions triggering aberrations. One might anticipate, therefore, that observed breaks will be predominantly unrejoined dsb, and the proportion of colour-jump break correspondingly low. We tested this supposition using three RE; Alu 1, a blunt-end cutter, Sau3A 1, a cohesive-end cutter, both with a short life-time in vivo, and Mbo 1, an isoschizomer of Sau3A 1, which has a long cutting life-time in vivo. Although there were differences in absolute yields of breaks, and of relative frequencies of aberration types recovered, the proportion of colour-jump breaks was as high as that in a parallel X-ray experiment, and fell well within the range encountered in all our previous experiments. It is difficult to reconcile this universal constancy of colour-jump breaks with the expectations of breakage

  11. Assessing the phylogeographic history of the montane caddisfly Thremma gallicum using mitochondrial and restriction-site-associated DNA (RAD) markers

    PubMed Central

    Macher, Jan-Niklas; Rozenberg, Andrey; Pauls, Steffen U; Tollrian, Ralph; Wagner, Rüdiger; Leese, Florian

    2015-01-01

    Repeated Quaternary glaciations have significantly shaped the present distribution and diversity of several European species in aquatic and terrestrial habitats. To study the phylogeography of freshwater invertebrates, patterns of intraspecific variation have been examined primarily using mitochondrial DNA markers that may yield results unrepresentative of the true species history. Here, population genetic parameters were inferred for a montane aquatic caddisfly, Thremma gallicum, by sequencing a 658-bp fragment of the mitochondrial CO1 gene, and 12,514 nuclear RAD loci. T. gallicum has a highly disjunct distribution in southern and central Europe, with known populations in the Cantabrian Mountains, Pyrenees, Massif Central, and Black Forest. Both datasets represented rangewide sampling of T. gallicum. For the CO1 dataset, this included 352 specimens from 26 populations, and for the RAD dataset, 17 specimens from eight populations. We tested 20 competing phylogeographic scenarios using approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) and estimated genetic diversity patterns. Support for phylogeographic scenarios and diversity estimates differed between datasets with the RAD data favouring a southern origin of extant populations and indicating the Cantabrian Mountains and Massif Central populations to represent highly diverse populations as compared with the Pyrenees and Black Forest populations. The CO1 data supported a vicariance scenario (north–south) and yielded inconsistent diversity estimates. Permutation tests suggest that a few hundred polymorphic RAD SNPs are necessary for reliable parameter estimates. Our results highlight the potential of RAD and ABC-based hypothesis testing to complement phylogeographic studies on non-model species. PMID:25691988

  12. Effect of cutter type on sediment pollutants release in channel dredging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Y. R.; Chen, Y.; Dong, M. M.; Yang, B. L.

    2016-08-01

    Dredging activities are often used to maintain existing navigation channels. However’ traditional dredging equipment inevitably leads to sediment resuspension and nutrient loading in water. In this work’ the existing cutter used for dredging was transformed environmentally to reduce the release amount of sediment pollutants’ and to avoid the formation of secondary pollution to water bodies. Simulated tests with a general cutter’ a spiral cutter’ along with a general and spiral cutter equipped with the anti-diffusion device were conducted respectively in this study. The change of pollutants concentration in overlying water was examined. The environmental performance of each different structure cutter was comparatively analysed as well. The result revealed that in channel dredging with a spiral cutter’ the release amount of sediment pollutants was less than with a general cutter’ and that a general/spiral cutter equipped with the anti-diffusion device could effectively reduce the release amount of sediment contaminants’ particularly the release of the nitrogen nutrient during the 1h after the dredging treatment. The best transformation scheme for a cutter suction dredger (CSD) in its environmental-protection function may be: a spiral cutter equipped with the anti-diffusion device.

  13. Study of postures in sugarcane cutters in the Pontal of Paranapanema-SP, Brazil.

    PubMed

    de Anchieta Messias, Iracimara; Okuno, Emico

    2012-01-01

    The expansion of sugarcane monoculture in Brazil in the last decades has pointed out to the necessity of considering the question of sugarcane cutters occupational health. In this work we present a cross-sectional study aiming to examine the occupational posture of a group of sugarcane cutters, which work in a cane field located in the region of Pontal do Paranapanema- SP, Brazil. The study was made using the Ergonomic Analysis of Work - EAW methodology and the postural analysis method by Win-OWAS. Through the obtained records of postures, it was observed that during a workday the sugarcane cutters remain standing erect on two legs or in one leg 66% of the time and that their trunk remain tilted and in rotation, according to 63% of the positions categorized. It was also observed that the sugarcane cutter trunk performs repetitive and boundless movements during his routine of work, which can expose this individual to additional wear of their musculoskeletal functions. The activities in which the individual engages have favorable or adverse influence on his posture. The repetitive movements involved in specialized occupations are equivalent to repeated exercises, thus may be responsible for the excessive development of certain muscle groups. The study suggests that the postures adopted by sugarcane cutters can overload their musculoskeletal system and predispose the cutters to work-related musculoskeletal diseases.

  14. Matrilineage differentiation of the genus Tetragonisca using mitochondrial DNA markers and the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism technique.

    PubMed

    Santos, S A; Bronzato, A R; Moreira, B M T; Araujo, K F; Ronqui, L; Mangolin, C A; Toledo, V A A; Ruvolo-Takasusuki, M C C

    2015-10-21

    The Meliponinae are important pollinators of plant species, and one of the most managed species is Tetragonisca angustula. Initially, two subspecies were identified in T. angustula: T. angustula angustula and T. angustula fiebrigi. Subsequently, T. a. fiebrigi was considered a species, based on the coloration of its mesepisternum. The objective of the present study was to obtain genetic markers that could differentiate the two species by amplifying regions of mitochondrial DNA and conducting polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Worker bees were collected in three Brazilian states: Paraná (Maringá, Altônia, and Foz do Iguaçu), São Paulo (Dracena, São Carlos, and Santa Cruz do Rio Pardo), and Rondônia (Ariquemes). Ten pairs of insect heterologous primers were tested and four were used (primer pair 1, ND2 and COI; primer pair 2, COI; primer pair 8, 16S and 12S; and primer pair 9, COII). For the restriction analysis, 13 enzymes were tested: EcoRI, EcoRV, HindIII, HinfI, RsaI, PstI, XbaI, HaeIII, ClaI, XhoI, BglII, PvuII, and ScaI. Markers were obtained (primer pair 8 cleaved with EcoRV and XbaI and primer pair 9 cleaved with HaeIII, RsaI, and XbaI) that enabled matrilineage identification in the nests studied, which confirmed that hybridization could occur between both Tetragonisca species. The beginning of speciation was probably recent, and secondary contact has resulted in crosses between T. angustula females and T. fiebrigi males. Because of this hybridization, it would be appropriate to consider them as two subspecies of T. angustula.

  15. High-pressure jet cutters improve capping operations

    SciTech Connect

    Abel, L.W.; Campbell, P.J.; Bowden, J.R. Sr.

    1995-05-08

    Advances in abrasive cutting technology have improved the methods for removing damaged equipment and preparing wellheads for capping. This technology, much of which was refined during well control operations in Kuwait in 1991, can improve the safety and efficiency of capping jobs by cutting wellheads or casing quickly and cleanly. The majority of well control jobs involve one of three types of capping operations: capping to a flange, capping by installing a wellhead, or capping to a casing stub. Capping operations are often the first major step in regaining control of the well during blowout intervention. Proper planning of a capping operation must take into account the mass flow rate, combustible nature of the flow, well bore geometry, and operations in the post-capping phase of the project. The paper discusses capping vehicles, tree removal, jet cutters, capping to a flange, capping to a stub, swallowing the stub, spin-on technique, capping on fire, stinging, offshore blowouts, firefighting, pollution control, intervention equipment, and rig removal.

  16. Continuous mining machine and cutter drum drive therefor

    SciTech Connect

    Lebegue, M.K.

    1980-09-30

    A cutter drum member of a continuous mining machine is rotatably mounted on the front end of the machine. The drum member includes an intermediate section and a pair of canted end sections. Cutting elements extend from the surface of the respective drum sections and provide a continuous cutting pattern along the entire length of the drum member. Input drive shafts extend through rear openings between the adjacent ends of the intermediate section and the end sections. Rotation is transmitted from the input drive shafts through meshing bevel gears and planetary gears to rotate the intermediate section. The adjacent ends of the intermediate section and end sections include meshing gear teeth secured to the external surface of the sections so that the canted end sections are driven by the external meshing gear teeth. Passageways formed between the gear teeth on the external cylindrical surfaces of the drum sections facilitate the flow of dislodged material between the gear teeth to prevent material from accumulating between the teeth and thereby ensure positive drive to the canted end sections.

  17. Innovative technology summary report: High-speed clamshell pipe cutter

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-01

    The Hanford Site C Reactor Technology Demonstration Group demonstrated the High-Speed Clamshell Pipe Cutter technology, developed and marketed by Tri Tool Inc. (Rancho Cordova, California). The models demonstrated are portable, split-frame pipe lathes that require minimal radial and axial clearances for severing and/or beveling in-line pipe with ranges of 25 cm to 41 cm and 46 cm to 61 cm nominal diameter. The radial clearance requirement from the walls, floors, or adjacent pipes is 18 cm. The lathes were supplied with carbide insert conversion kits for the cutting bits for the high-speed technique that was demonstrated. Given site-specific factors, this demonstration showed the cost of the improved technology to be approximately 30% higher than the traditional (baseline) technology (oxyacetylene torch) cost of $14,400 for 10 cuts of contaminated 41-cm and 61-cm-diameter pipe at C Reactor. Actual cutting times were faster than the baseline technology; however, moving/staging the equipment took longer. Unlike the baseline torch, clamshell lathes do not involve applied heat, flames, or smoke and can be operated remotely, thereby helping personal exposures to be as low as reasonably achievable. The baseline technology was demonstrated at the C Reactor north and south water pipe tunnels August 19--22, 1997. The improved technology was demonstrated in the gas pipe tunnel December 15--19.

  18. Capillary electrophoresis investigations of pET3aPAI-1 DNA involving optimized restriction digestion, laser-induced fluorescence detection, and micropreparative separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepaniak, Michael J.; Stebbins, Michael; Todd, April; Gibson, Timothy; Peterson, Cynthia; Diack, Moustopha

    1998-05-01

    This work centers around developing methodologies to isolate the PAI-1 coding sequence of the DNA plasmid pET3a-PAI-1. Size Selective Capillary Electrophoresis (SSCE), using entangled polymer filled small i.d. capillaries, is used to develop digestion conditions (time and enzyme concentration) that provide single cuts (at variable positions) of the plasmid using BstYI restriction enzyme. After obtaining optimum partial digest conditions for this enzyme, digestion with Ndel will produce a mixture of fragments that includes the fragment (1354 bp) which contains the intact region of interest. Sensitive detection is achieved via laser induced fluorescence using running buffers containing intercalating dye. Using small i.d. capillary conditions as a starting point, the SSCE system is increased to the micro-preparative scale using various larger i.d. capillaries. The effects of capillary diameter, applied voltage, injection amount, and sample buffer concentration on separation performance are studied. Subsequently, single or limited numbers of injections of the single cut sample using a relatively large i.d. capillary should prove adequate material for digestion with Ndel prior to PCR amplification of the 1354 bp fragment.

  19. Molecular characterization by amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis and antimicrobial potential of endophytic fungi isolated from Luehea divaricata (Malvaceae) against plant pathogenic fungi and pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Bernardi-Wenzel, J; Garcia, A; Azevedo, J L; Pamphile, J A

    2013-01-01

    Luehea divaricata is an important plant in popular medicine; it is used for its depurative, anti-inflammatory, and other therapeutic activities. We evaluated the antimicrobial activity of endophytic fungi isolated from leaves of L. divaricata against phytopathogens and pathogenic bacteria, and characterized the isolates based on amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA). The in vitro antagonistic activity of these endophytes against the phytopathogen Alternaria alternata was assayed by dual culture technique. Based on this evaluation of antimicrobial activity, we extracted secondary metabolites from nine endophytic fungi by partitioning in ethyl acetate and methanol. These were tested against the phytopathogens A. alternata, Colletotrichum sp and Moniliophthora perniciosa, and against the human pathogenic bacteria Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. Molecular characterization by ARDRA technique was used for phylogenetic analysis, based on comparison with sequences in GenBank. The endophytes had varied effects on A. alternata. One isolate produced an inhibition halo against M. perniciosa and against E. coli. This antibiosis activity indicates a role in the protection of the plant against microbial pathogens in nature, with potential for pharmaceutical and agricultural applications. Based on ARDRA, the 13 isolates were grouped. We found three different haplotypes of Phomopsis sp, showing interspecific variability. It appears that examination of the microbial community associated with medicinal plants of tropical regions has potential as a useful strategy to look for species with biotechnological applications. PMID:24301768

  20. Restriction Site-Associated DNA Sequencing (RAD-seq) Reveals an Extraordinary Number of Transitions among Gecko Sex-Determining Systems.

    PubMed

    Gamble, Tony; Coryell, Jessi; Ezaz, Tariq; Lynch, Joshua; Scantlebury, Daniel P; Zarkower, David

    2015-05-01

    Sex chromosomes have evolved many times in animals and studying these replicate evolutionary "experiments" can help broaden our understanding of the general forces driving the origin and evolution of sex chromosomes. However this plan of study has been hindered by the inability to identify the sex chromosome systems in the large number of species with cryptic, homomorphic sex chromosomes. Restriction site-associated DNA sequencing (RAD-seq) is a critical enabling technology that can identify the sex chromosome systems in many species where traditional cytogenetic methods have failed. Using newly generated RAD-seq data from 12 gecko species, along with data from the literature, we reinterpret the evolution of sex-determining systems in lizards and snakes and test the hypothesis that sex chromosomes can routinely act as evolutionary traps. We uncovered between 17 and 25 transitions among gecko sex-determining systems. This is approximately one-half to two-thirds of the total number of transitions observed among all lizards and snakes. We find support for the hypothesis that sex chromosome systems can readily become trap-like and show that adding even a small number of species from understudied clades can greatly enhance hypothesis testing in a model-based phylogenetic framework. RAD-seq will undoubtedly prove useful in evaluating other species for male or female heterogamety, particularly the majority of fish, amphibian, and reptile species that lack visibly heteromorphic sex chromosomes, and will significantly accelerate the pace of biological discovery.

  1. A simple and rapid method for HLA-DQA1 genotyping by digestion of PCR-amplified DNA with allele specific restriction endonucleases.

    PubMed

    Maeda, M; Murayama, N; Ishii, H; Uryu, N; Ota, M; Tsuji, K; Inoko, H

    1989-11-01

    The second exon of the HLA-DQA1 genes was selectively amplified from genomic DNAs of 72 HLA-homozygous B cell lines by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Amplified DNAs were digested with HaeIII, Ddel, ScrFI, FokI and RsaI, which recognize allelic sequence variations in the polymorphic segments of the DQA1 second exon, and then subjected to electrophoresis in polyacrylamide gels. Eight different polymorphic patterns of restriction fragments were obtained, and seven were identical to patterns predicted from the known DNA sequences, correlating with each HLA-DQw type defined by serological typing. The remaining one pattern cannot be explained from the sequence data, suggesting the presence of a novel DQA1 allele at the nucleotide level. This PCR-RFLP method provides a simple and rapid technique for accurate definition of the HLA-DQ types at the nucleotide level, eliminating the need for radioisotope as well as allele specific oligonucleotide probes and can be extended and applied to HLA-DR, -Dw DP typing. PMID:2576477

  2. Improved restriction landmark cDNA scanning and its application to global analysis of genes regulated by nerve growth factor in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Mayumi, K; Yaoi, T; Kawai, J; Kojima, S; Watanabe, S; Suzuki, H

    1998-07-30

    Restriction landmark cDNA scanning (RLCS) is a novel method by which more than 1000 genes can be simultaneously and quantitatively displayed as two-dimensional gel spots. Here we present an adaptation that allows an individual spot to correspond to a unique gene species without redundancy in more than two gel patterns. Using this improved RLCS, we examined global changes on the gene expression of PC12 cells before and after treatment with nerve growth factor. Among a total of 3000 spots, 21 (0.70%) and 91 (3.03%) spots newly appeared and became more intense with treatment. On the other hand, 15 (0.50%) and 44 (1.47%) spots disappeared, becoming less intense with treatment. These observations suggest that approx. 6% of the detected PC12 genes are up-(3.73%) or down-(1.97%) regulated when the cells differentiate to neuronal cells. In comparison with the results obtained using the expressed-sequence-tag approach, previously reported by Lee et al. (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 92 (1995) 8303-8307), RLCS should be useful for quantitatively examining the global change of differentially expressed genes of various expression levels. PMID:9714711

  3. The frequency of the mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase I2 (atypical) allele in Caucasian, Oriental and African black populations determined by the restriction profile of PCR-amplified DNA.

    PubMed

    Dandré, F; Cassaigne, A; Iron, A

    1995-06-01

    The aldehyde dehydrogenase I (ALDH I) gene codes for a mitochondrial enzyme which plays a major role in hepatic alcohol detoxication. It has been related to alcohol flushing in Orientals bearing the atypical ALDH I2 gene. The variant protein results from a lysine for glutamate substitution at position 487 (G-->A change in exon 12). A procedure for ALDH I2 detection consisting in a differentiation between the 'atypical' allele and the 'wild' allele has been improved through PCR and subsequent MboII digestion. Blood samples collected on anticoagulant or directly absorbed on blotting paper were used for DNA amplification in the presence of two specific oligonucleotidic primers, each one able to incorporate a restriction site in the amplimer. After MboII digestion, PCR products were separated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and then visualized with ethidium bromide. This technique permits a rapid and non-radioactive detection of atypical ALDH I2 on a PCR product without the use of allele specific oligonucleotides. It was applied to the study of ALDH I2 allele frequency in random population samples of three ethnic groups: Caucasians, Orientals and African blacks.

  4. Genotypic Characterization of Bradyrhizobium Strains Nodulating Endemic Woody Legumes of the Canary Islands by PCR-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism Analysis of Genes Encoding 16S rRNA (16S rDNA) and 16S-23S rDNA Intergenic Spacers, Repetitive Extragenic Palindromic PCR Genomic Fingerprinting, and Partial 16S rDNA Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Vinuesa, Pablo; Rademaker, Jan L. W.; de Bruijn, Frans J.; Werner, Dietrich

    1998-01-01

    We present a phylogenetic analysis of nine strains of symbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacteria isolated from nodules of tagasaste (Chamaecytisus proliferus) and other endemic woody legumes of the Canary Islands, Spain. These and several reference strains were characterized genotypically at different levels of taxonomic resolution by computer-assisted analysis of 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphisms (PCR-RFLPs), 16S-23S rDNA intergenic spacer (IGS) RFLPs, and repetitive extragenic palindromic PCR (rep-PCR) genomic fingerprints with BOX, ERIC, and REP primers. Cluster analysis of 16S rDNA restriction patterns with four tetrameric endonucleases grouped the Canarian isolates with the two reference strains, Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA 110spc4 and Bradyrhizobium sp. strain (Centrosema) CIAT 3101, resolving three genotypes within these bradyrhizobia. In the analysis of IGS RFLPs with three enzymes, six groups were found, whereas rep-PCR fingerprinting revealed an even greater genotypic diversity, with only two of the Canarian strains having similar fingerprints. Furthermore, we show that IGS RFLPs and even very dissimilar rep-PCR fingerprints can be clustered into phylogenetically sound groupings by combining them with 16S rDNA RFLPs in computer-assisted cluster analysis of electrophoretic patterns. The DNA sequence analysis of a highly variable 264-bp segment of the 16S rRNA genes of these strains was found to be consistent with the fingerprint-based classification. Three different DNA sequences were obtained, one of which was not previously described, and all belonged to the B. japonicum/Rhodopseudomonas rDNA cluster. Nodulation assays revealed that none of the Canarian isolates nodulated Glycine max or Leucaena leucocephala, but all nodulated Acacia pendula, C. proliferus, Macroptilium atropurpureum, and Vigna unguiculata. PMID:9603820

  5. Problem-Solving Test: Restriction Endonuclease Mapping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2011-01-01

    The term "restriction endonuclease mapping" covers a number of related techniques used to identify specific restriction enzyme recognition sites on small DNA molecules. A method for restriction endonuclease mapping of a 1,000-basepair (bp)-long DNA molecule is described in the fictitious experiment of this test. The most important fact needed to…

  6. Influence of blade profile of disc cutter on numerical simulation of the disc slitting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, J.; Lu, J. B.; Yan, Q. S.; Li, S.

    2015-03-01

    The disc slitting machining experiments for electrical steel sheet were conducted to investigate the wear process of carbide alloy disc cutter and the slitting quality in the disc slitting process, and the blade contour shape of disc cutter in different slitting distance was measured by the surface profiler. A DEFORM-2D model, where the real blade profile or arc fitting profile was used as the blade contour of the cutter, was built to simulate the disc slitting process. Results show that the blade wear of disc cutter increases. The blade wear presents uneven in the side surface and cylindrical surface of the cutter, and the side wear is more serious with the increase of the slitting distance of electrical steel sheet. As the blade wear increases, the height of the rollover increases gradually, the height of the shear area increases at first and then decreases, but the height of the fracture area decreases at first and then increases. Compared with the arc fitting profile, the simulation surface morphology using the real blade profile is in good agreement with the experimental result. The variation of blade profile can change the distribution of the hydrostatic stress of sheet metal and the occurring and propagating of the crack, and the maximum hydrostatic stress can be used to estimate the change tendency of the fracture area.

  7. The three-dimension model for the rock-breaking mechanism of disc cutter and analysis of rock-breaking forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhao-Huang; Sun, Fei

    2012-06-01

    To study the rock deformation with three-dimensional model under rolling forces of disc cutter, by carrying out the circular-grooving test with disc cutter rolling around on the rock, the rock mechanical behavior under rolling disc cutter is studied, the mechanical model of disc cutter rolling around the groove is established, and the theory of single-point and double-angle variables is proposed. Based on this theory, the physics equations and geometric equations of rock mechanical behavior under disc cutters of tunnel boring machine (TBM) are studied, and then the balance equations of interactive forces between disc cutter and rock are established. Accordingly, formulas about normal force, rolling force and side force of a disc cutter are derived, and their validity is studied by tests. Therefore, a new method and theory is proposed to study rock-breaking mechanism of disc cutters.

  8. Do leaf-cutter ants Atta colombica orient their path-integrated, home vector with a magnetic compass?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leaf-cutter ants Atta colombica forage over 250 m in structurally-complex, Neotropical rainforests that occlude sun or polarized light cues. Night foraging makes the use of celestial cues and landmarks all the more difficult. We investigated the directional cues used by leaf-cutter ants to orient h...

  9. Simple and rapid fabrication of disposable carbon-based electrochemical cells using an electronic craft cutter for sensor and biosensor applications.

    PubMed

    Afonso, André S; Uliana, Carolina V; Martucci, Diego H; Faria, Ronaldo C

    2016-01-01

    This work describes the construction of an all-plastic disposable carbon-based electrochemical cell (DCell) using a simple procedure based on the use of a home cutter printer for prototyping and laminating. The cutter printer and adhesive vinyl films were used to produce three electrodes in an electrochemical cell layout, and a laminating process was then used to define the geometric area and insulate the electrodes. The DCell showed excellent performance in several applications including the determination of toxic metals in water samples, the immobilization of DNA and the detection of Salmonella. An unmodified DCell was applied for Pb and Cd detection in the range of 100-300 ng mL(-1) with a limit of detection of 50 and 39 ng mL(-1) for Cd and Pb, respectively. DNA was successfully immobilized on a DCell and used for studies of interaction between bisphenol A and DNA. The square wave voltammetry of a DNA modified DCell presented a guanine oxidation current 2.5 times greater after exposure of the electrode to bisphenol A and no current variation for the adenine moiety indicating that bisphenol A showed a preference for DNA interaction sites. A magneto-immunoassay was developed using a DCell for Salmonella detection in milk samples. The system presented a linear range from 100 to 700 cells mL(-1) with a limit of detection of 100 cells mL(-1) and good recovery values between 93% and 101% in milk samples, with no interference from Escherichia coli. Using the proposed method, hundreds of DCells can be assembled in less than two hours, at a material cost of less than US $0.02 per cell. The all-plastic disposable electrochemical cell developed was successfully applied as an electrochemical sensor and biosensor. The feasibility of the developed all-plastic disposable electrochemical cell was demonstrated in applications as both sensor and biosensor. PMID:26695279

  10. Simple and rapid fabrication of disposable carbon-based electrochemical cells using an electronic craft cutter for sensor and biosensor applications.

    PubMed

    Afonso, André S; Uliana, Carolina V; Martucci, Diego H; Faria, Ronaldo C

    2016-01-01

    This work describes the construction of an all-plastic disposable carbon-based electrochemical cell (DCell) using a simple procedure based on the use of a home cutter printer for prototyping and laminating. The cutter printer and adhesive vinyl films were used to produce three electrodes in an electrochemical cell layout, and a laminating process was then used to define the geometric area and insulate the electrodes. The DCell showed excellent performance in several applications including the determination of toxic metals in water samples, the immobilization of DNA and the detection of Salmonella. An unmodified DCell was applied for Pb and Cd detection in the range of 100-300 ng mL(-1) with a limit of detection of 50 and 39 ng mL(-1) for Cd and Pb, respectively. DNA was successfully immobilized on a DCell and used for studies of interaction between bisphenol A and DNA. The square wave voltammetry of a DNA modified DCell presented a guanine oxidation current 2.5 times greater after exposure of the electrode to bisphenol A and no current variation for the adenine moiety indicating that bisphenol A showed a preference for DNA interaction sites. A magneto-immunoassay was developed using a DCell for Salmonella detection in milk samples. The system presented a linear range from 100 to 700 cells mL(-1) with a limit of detection of 100 cells mL(-1) and good recovery values between 93% and 101% in milk samples, with no interference from Escherichia coli. Using the proposed method, hundreds of DCells can be assembled in less than two hours, at a material cost of less than US $0.02 per cell. The all-plastic disposable electrochemical cell developed was successfully applied as an electrochemical sensor and biosensor. The feasibility of the developed all-plastic disposable electrochemical cell was demonstrated in applications as both sensor and biosensor.

  11. Contamination risk of the surgical team through ROBODOC's high-speed cutter.

    PubMed

    Nogler, M; Wimmer, C; Lass-Flörl, C; Mayr, E; Trobos, S; Gegenhuber, C

    2001-06-01

    During cutting of the femoral cavity in the ROBODOC procedure, an aerosol cloud of irrigation fluid, blood, and tissue debris was seen. This cloud potentially is contaminated with bacterial and viral vectors, which is an infection risk for the surgical team. A flat and a ball cutter were tested in four standard situations macroscopically with a colored solution. In a second experiment, the cutter was exposed to a fluid contaminated with Staphylococcus aureus, and bacterial room contamination was detected using standard cultures. The aerosol cloud was seen in a 6 x 3.6-m area. Extension and concentration varied, depending on the irrigation situation. ROBODOC's high-speed cutter produces an aerosol cloud in an area in which all members of the surgical team are affected. Sufficient protection is necessary for everyone in the operating room.

  12. A new MOS mask cutter facility at Gemini/Cerro Tololo observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyman, Robert T.; Trancho, Gelys; Tighe, Roberto

    2010-07-01

    The installation and commissioning of a new laser cutter facility in La Serena, Chile is a cooperative effort between Gemini Observatory and the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory. This system enables the cutting of aluminum and carbon fiber slit masks for three multi-object spectrographs operating in Chile: GMOS-S, Flamingos-2, and Goodman spectrograph. Selection of the new laser cutter tool was based on slit mask specifications developed for two materials. Prior to the commissioning all slit mask production was performed at Gemini's Northern base facility with a similar laser cutter system. The new facility supports two observatories and enhances the capabilities for both. This paper will discuss the observatory arrangement with respect to mask data tracking and handling. The laser system and facility will be discussed along with mask cutting performance, process development and manufacturing methods.

  13. Mutants of bacteriophage T4 deficient in the ability to induce nuclear disruption: shutoff of host DNA and protein synthesis gene dosage experiments, identification of a restrictive host, and possible biological significance.

    PubMed

    Snustad, D P; Bursch, C J; Parson, K A; Hefeneider, S H

    1976-04-01

    The shutoff of host DNA synthesis is delayed until about 8 to 10 min after infection when Escherichia coli B/5 cells were infected with bacteriophage T4 mutants deficient in the ability to induce nuclear disruption (ndd mutants). The host DNA synthesized after infection with ndd mutants is stable in the absence of T4 endonucleases II and IV, but is unstable in the presence of these nucleases. Host protein synthesis, as indicated by the inducibility of beta-galactosidase and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel patterns of isoptopically labeled proteins synthesize after infection, is shut off normally in ndd-infected cells, even in the absence of host DNA degradation. The Cal Tech wild-type strain of E. coli CT447 was found to restrict growth of the ndd mutants. Since T4D+ also has a very low efficiency of plating on CT447, we have isolated a nitrosoguanidine-induced derivative of CT447 which yields a high T4D+ efficiency of plating while still restricting the ndd mutants. Using this derivative, CT447 T4 plq+ (for T4 plaque+), we have shown that hos DNA degradation and shutoff of host DNA synthesis occur after infection with either ndd98 X 5 (shutoff delayed) or T4D+ (shutoff normal) with approximately the same kinetics as in E. coli strain B/5. Nuclear disruption occurs after infection of CT447 with ndd+ phage, but not after infection with ndd- phage. The rate of DNA synthesis after infection of CT447 T4 plq+ with ndd98 X 5 is about 75% of the rate observed after infection with T4D+ while the burst size of ndd98 X 5 is only 3.5% of that of T4D+. The results of gene dosage experiments using the ndd restrictive host C5447 suggest that the ndd gene product is required in stoichiometric amounts. The observation by thin-section electron microscopy of two distinct pools of DNA, one apparently phage DNA and the other host DNA, in cells infected with nuclear disruption may be a compartmentalization mechanism which separates the pathways of host DNA degradation and

  14. Restrictive cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    Cardiomyopathy - restrictive; Infiltrative cardiomyopathy; Idiopathic myocardial fibrosis ... of the heart lining (endocardium), such as endomyocardial fibrosis and Loeffler syndrome (rare) Iron overload (hemochromatosis) Sarcoidosis ...

  15. DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felsenfeld, Gary

    1985-01-01

    Structural form, bonding scheme, and chromatin structure of and gene-modification experiments with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) are described. Indicates that DNA's double helix is variable and also flexible as it interacts with regulatory and other molecules to transfer hereditary messages. (DH)

  16. Prediction of dynamic cutting force and regenerative chatter stability in inserted cutters milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhongqun; Liu, Qiang; Yuan, Songmei; Huang, Kaisheng

    2013-05-01

    Currently, the modeling of cutting process mainly focuses on two aspects: one is the setup of the universal cutting force model that can be adapted to a broader cutting condition; the other is the setup of the exact cutting force model that can accurately reflect a true cutting process. However, there is little research on the prediction of chatter stablity in milling. Based on the generalized mathematical model of inserted cutters introduced by ENGIN, an improved geometrical, mechanical and dynamic model for the vast variety of inserted cutters widely used in engineering applications is presented, in which the average directional cutting force coefficients are obtained by means of a numerical approach, thus leading to an analytical determination of stability lobes diagram (SLD) on the axial depth of cut. A new kind of SLD on the radial depth of cut is also created to satisfy the special requirement of inserted cutter milling. The corresponding algorithms used for predicting cutting forces, vibrations, dimensional surface finish and stability lobes in inserted cutter milling under different cutting conditions are put forward. Thereafter, a dynamic simulation module of inserted cutter milling is implemented by using hybrid program of Matlab with Visual Basic. Verification tests are conducted on a vertical machine center for Aluminum alloy LC4 by using two different types of inserted cutters, and the effectiveness of the model and the algorithm is verified by the good agreement of simulation result with that of cutting tests under different cutting conditions. The proposed model can predict the cutting process accurately under a variety of cutting conditions, and a high efficient and chatter-free milling operation can be achieved by a cutting condition optimization in industry applications.

  17. Finger milling-cutter CNC generating hypoid pinion tooth surfaces based on modified-roll method and machining simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Genggeng; Deng, Xiaozhong; Wei, Bingyang; Lei, Baozhen

    2011-05-01

    The two coordinate systems of cradle-type hypoid generator and free-form CNC machine tool by application disc milling-cutter to generate hypoid pinion tooth surfaces based on the modified-roll method were set up, respectively, and transformation principle and method for machine-tool settings between the two coordinate systems was studied. It was presented that finger milling-cutter was mounted on imagined disc milling-cutter and its motion was controlled directly by CNC shafts to replace disc milling-cutter blades effective cutting motion. Finger milling-cutter generation accomplished by ordered circular interpolation was determined, and interpolation center, starting and ending were worked out. Finally, a hypoid pinion was virtually machined by using CNC machining simulation software VERICUT.

  18. Finger milling-cutter CNC generating hypoid pinion tooth surfaces based on modified-roll method and machining simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Genggeng; Deng, Xiaozhong; Wei, Bingyang; Lei, Baozhen

    2010-12-01

    The two coordinate systems of cradle-type hypoid generator and free-form CNC machine tool by application disc milling-cutter to generate hypoid pinion tooth surfaces based on the modified-roll method were set up, respectively, and transformation principle and method for machine-tool settings between the two coordinate systems was studied. It was presented that finger milling-cutter was mounted on imagined disc milling-cutter and its motion was controlled directly by CNC shafts to replace disc milling-cutter blades effective cutting motion. Finger milling-cutter generation accomplished by ordered circular interpolation was determined, and interpolation center, starting and ending were worked out. Finally, a hypoid pinion was virtually machined by using CNC machining simulation software VERICUT.

  19. Genetic Diversity of Mycobacterium africanum Clinical Isolates Based on IS6110-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism Analysis, Spoligotyping, and Variable Number of Tandem DNA Repeats

    PubMed Central

    Viana-Niero, Cristina; Gutierrez, Cristina; Sola, Christophe; Filliol, Ingrid; Boulahbal, Fadila; Vincent, Véronique; Rastogi, Nalin

    2001-01-01

    A collection of 105 clinical isolates originally identified as Mycobacterium africanum were characterized using both phenotypic and genotyping methods. The phenotypic methods included routine determination of cultural properties and biochemical tests used to discriminate among the members of the M. tuberculosis complex, whereas genotypic characterization was based on IS6110-restriction fragment length polymorphism (IS6110-RFLP) analysis, IS1081-RFLP analysis, direct repeat-based spacer oligonucleotide typing (spoligotyping), variable number of tandem DNA repeats (VNTR), and the polymorphism of the oxyR, pncA, and mtp40 loci. The results obtained showed that a majority of M. africanum isolates were characterized by a specific spoligotyping pattern that was intermediate between those of M. tuberculosis and M. bovis, which do not hybridize with spacers 33 to 36 and spacers 39 to 43, respectively. A tentative M. africanum-specific spoligotyping signature appeared to be absence of spacers 8, 9, and 39. Based on spoligotyping, as well as the polymorphism of oxyR and pncA, a total of 24 isolates were excluded from the final study (19 were identified as M. tuberculosis, 2 were identified as M. canetti, and 3 were identified as M. bovis). The remaining 81 M. africanum isolates were efficiently subtyped in three distinct subtypes (A1 to A3) by IS6110-RFLP analysis and spoligotyping. The A1 and A2 subgroups were relatively more homogeneous upon spoligotyping than A3. Further analysis of the three subtypes by VNTR corroborated the highly homogeneous nature of the A2 subtype but showed significant variations for subtypes A1 and A3. A phylogenetic tree based on a selection of isolates representing the three subtypes using VNTR and spoligotyping alone or in combination confirmed the subtypes described as well as the heterogeneity of subtype A3. PMID:11136749

  20. Restriction site-associated DNA sequencing generates high-quality single nucleotide polymorphisms for assessing hybridization between bighead and silver carp in the United States and China.

    PubMed

    Lamer, James T; Sass, Greg G; Boone, Jason Q; Arbieva, Zarema H; Green, Stefan J; Epifanio, John M

    2014-01-01

    Bighead carp (Hypophthalmichthys nobilis) and silver carp (H. molitrix) are invasive species and listed as US federally injurious species under the Lacy Act. They have established populations in much of the Mississippi River Basin (MRB; Mississippi, Illinois, and Missouri rivers) and are capable of producing fertile hybrids and complex introgression. Characterizing the composition of this admixture requires a large set of high-quality, evolutionarily conserved, diagnostic genetic markers to aid in the identification and management of these species in the midst of morphological ambiguity. Restriction site-associated DNA (RAD) sequencing of 45 barcoded bighead and silver carp from the United States and China produced reads that were aligned to the silver carp transcriptome yielded 261 candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with fixed allelic differences between the two species. We selected the highest quality 112 SNP loci for validation using 194 putative pure-species and F1 hybrids from the MRB and putative bighead carp and silver carp pure species from China (Amur, Pearl and Yangtze rivers). Fifty SNPs were omitted due to design/amplification failure or lack of diagnostic utility. A total of 57 species-diagnostic SNPs conserved between carp species in US and Chinese rivers were identified; 32 were annotated to functional gene loci. Twenty-seven of the 181 (15%) putative pure species were identified as hybrid backcrosses after validation, including three backcrosses from the Amur River, where hybridization has not been documented previously. The 57 SNPs identified through RAD sequencing provide a diagnostic tool to detect population admixture and to identify hybrid and pure-species Asian carps in the United States and China.

  1. Restriction site-associated DNA sequencing generates high-quality single nucleotide polymorphisms for assessing hybridization between bighead and silver carp in the United States and China.

    PubMed

    Lamer, James T; Sass, Greg G; Boone, Jason Q; Arbieva, Zarema H; Green, Stefan J; Epifanio, John M

    2014-01-01

    Bighead carp (Hypophthalmichthys nobilis) and silver carp (H. molitrix) are invasive species and listed as US federally injurious species under the Lacy Act. They have established populations in much of the Mississippi River Basin (MRB; Mississippi, Illinois, and Missouri rivers) and are capable of producing fertile hybrids and complex introgression. Characterizing the composition of this admixture requires a large set of high-quality, evolutionarily conserved, diagnostic genetic markers to aid in the identification and management of these species in the midst of morphological ambiguity. Restriction site-associated DNA (RAD) sequencing of 45 barcoded bighead and silver carp from the United States and China produced reads that were aligned to the silver carp transcriptome yielded 261 candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with fixed allelic differences between the two species. We selected the highest quality 112 SNP loci for validation using 194 putative pure-species and F1 hybrids from the MRB and putative bighead carp and silver carp pure species from China (Amur, Pearl and Yangtze rivers). Fifty SNPs were omitted due to design/amplification failure or lack of diagnostic utility. A total of 57 species-diagnostic SNPs conserved between carp species in US and Chinese rivers were identified; 32 were annotated to functional gene loci. Twenty-seven of the 181 (15%) putative pure species were identified as hybrid backcrosses after validation, including three backcrosses from the Amur River, where hybridization has not been documented previously. The 57 SNPs identified through RAD sequencing provide a diagnostic tool to detect population admixture and to identify hybrid and pure-species Asian carps in the United States and China. PMID:23957862

  2. The impact of stress on the health of sugar cane cutters

    PubMed Central

    Priuli, Roseana Mara Aredes; de Moraes, Maria Silvia; Chiaravalloti, Rafael Morais

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Evaluate the impact of stress on sugar cane cutters and the prevalence of physical and psychological symptoms before and after harvest. METHODS We studied 114 sugarcane cutters and 109 urban workers in the pre-harvest and 102 sugar cane cutters and 81 urban workers in the post-harvest period in the city of Mendonça, SP, Southeastern Brazil, in 2009. Data analysis was based on the frequency and percentage of the assessed symptoms of stress, using the Lipp-ISSL test (Symptoms of Stress for Adults). The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. The Fisher Test was used to compare the variable of stress between pre- and post-harvest within the sugar cane cutter and urban worker groups. P values below 0.05 were considered significant. RESULTS Stress in sugar cane cutters increased after harvesting (34.2% pre-harvest and 46.1% post-harvest); in urban workers, stress decreased from 44.0% pre-harvest to 42.0% post-harvest. There was prevalence of the phase of resistance to stress for both groups with signs more apparent from the near-exhaustion and exhaustion phases for sugar cane cutters. After harvest, there was a tendency for the number of sugar cane cutters with symptoms of near-exhaustion (6.4%) and exhaustion (10.6%) to increase. After harvest there was a trend for the number of sugar cane cutters with physical symptoms (pre-harvest = 20.5%, post-harvest = 25.5%) and psychological symptoms (pre-harvest = 64.1%; post-harvest = 70.2%) to increase. For both groups, predominantly psychological symptoms occurred in both phases (70.2% versus 64.7%). CONCLUSIONS The work process of cutting cane can cause stress. Individual factors such as cognitive perception of the experience, self-efficacy beliefs and expectations of the employee regarding their performance can influence the understanding of the reactions in their body in face of the work. PMID:24897043

  3. Restriction mapping of a YAC contig in the hemochromatosis gene region

    SciTech Connect

    Burt, M.J.; Smit, D.J.; Pyper, W.R.

    1994-09-01

    Hemochromatosis is a common inherited disorder of iron metabolism that can lead to cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, cardiomyopathy, diabetes and anthropathy. We have mapped the hemochromatosis gene to within 1 cM of HLA-A and the microsatellite D6S105, and our allele association studies have shown that D6S105 is the marker most closely associated with the hemochromatosis gene. We are currently constructing a YAC contig and restriction map of this region as part of a positional cloning strategy to identify the hemochromatosis gene. YACs containing HLA-A or D6S105 were selected, and fluorescent-in-situ-hybridization (FISH) was performed to confirm chromosomal location and exclude chimerism. YAC DNA was digested with a panel of rare cutters, separated by pulsed field gel electrophoresis, Southern blotted and probed with the vector arms to create restriction maps. YAC insert terminal ends were isolated using vectorette methodology. A contig extending 600 kb centromeric and 350 kb telomeric of HLA-A has been established. HLA-A, HLA-F and the microsatellite D6S265 have been positioned on this map. The contig does not yet overlap any D6S105 positive YACs but the telomeric end of the contig has been sequenced and is being used to identify additional YACs to bridge this interval. Restriction mapping of three D6S105 YACs has shown the presence of several CpG islands in this region. As these CpG islands are in close proximity to D6S105, they are being used to isolate coding sequences to determine whether any of these mark the position of the hemochromatosis gene.

  4. Structural insight into the specificity of the B3 DNA-binding domains provided by the co-crystal structure of the C-terminal fragment of BfiI restriction enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Golovenko, Dmitrij; Manakova, Elena; Zakrys, Linas; Zaremba, Mindaugas; Sasnauskas, Giedrius; Gražulis, Saulius; Siksnys, Virginijus

    2014-01-01

    The B3 DNA-binding domains (DBDs) of plant transcription factors (TF) and DBDs of EcoRII and BfiI restriction endonucleases (EcoRII-N and BfiI-C) share a common structural fold, classified as the DNA-binding pseudobarrel. The B3 DBDs in the plant TFs recognize a diverse set of target sequences. The only available co-crystal structure of the B3-like DBD is that of EcoRII-N (recognition sequence 5′-CCTGG-3′). In order to understand the structural and molecular mechanisms of specificity of B3 DBDs, we have solved the crystal structure of BfiI-C (recognition sequence 5′-ACTGGG-3′) complexed with 12-bp cognate oligoduplex. Structural comparison of BfiI-C–DNA and EcoRII-N–DNA complexes reveals a conserved DNA-binding mode and a conserved pattern of interactions with the phosphodiester backbone. The determinants of the target specificity are located in the loops that emanate from the conserved structural core. The BfiI-C–DNA structure presented here expands a range of templates for modeling of the DNA-bound complexes of the B3 family of plant TFs. PMID:24423868

  5. The evaluation of ergonomic risk factors among meat cutters working in Jabalpur, India

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Prabir; Khan, Amaltas

    2015-01-01

    Background: Manual meat cutters in India are at high risk of work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs) for a variety of reasons including holding awkward postures, repetitive forceful exertions, and inadequate rest. This is the first study of its kind to investigate the nature and magnitude of WMSDs among manual meat cutters in India. Objective: The aim of this study was to measure the ergonomic risk factors for WMSDs among adult male manual meat cutters working in Jabalpur, India. Methods: We used direct observation, activity analysis, questionnaires, interviews, photography, and video to measure the quantitative ergonomic risk factors. Results: Ovako working posture analysis indicated high scores (four for the back in peeling, six for the arms in cutting, and six for the arms during mincing tasks). Rapid entire body assessment method (REBA) scores were also high at 10/10 for deboning and mincing tasks, all associated with repetitive movements of the arms and awkward posture of the upper part of the body. Conclusions: The study indicates that most tasks for meat cutters fall in the high-risk category for occupational injury. Results suggest that ergonomic interventions that address retooling and workstation and process redesign would be useful in reducing the number of injuries. PMID:25658673

  6. Migration, remittances and development: a study of Caribbean cane cutters in Florida.

    PubMed

    Wood, C H

    1985-01-01

    The results of a 1981 survey of 302 Caribbean sugarcane cutters who were temporary immigrants in Florida are presented. The focus is on remittances to the islands of origin. The results provide "no evidence that seasonal stateside employment expands agricultural output, or enhances the productive capacity of small farmers in the Caribbean." PMID:12280257

  7. 40 CFR 35.3575 - Application of Federal cross-cutting authorities (cross-cutters).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Application of Federal cross-cutting authorities (cross-cutters). 35.3575 Section 35.3575 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Drinking Water State Revolving Funds §...

  8. Induction of an antitumor response using dendritic cells transfected with DNA constructs encoding the HLA-A*02:01-restricted epitopes of tumor-associated antigens in culture of mononuclear cells of breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Sennikov, Sergey Vital'evich; Shevchenko, Julia Alexandrovna; Kurilin, Vasilii Vasil'evich; Khantakova, Julia Nikolaevna; Lopatnikova, Julia Anatol'evna; Gavrilova, Elena Vasil'evna; Maksyutov, Rinat Amirovich; Bakulina, Anastasiya Yur'evna; Sidorov, Sergey Vasil'evich; Khristin, Alexander Alexandrovich; Maksyutov, Amir Zakievich

    2016-02-01

    Advances in oncoimmunology related to the definition of the basic mechanisms of the formation of antitumor immune response, as well as the opening of tumor-associated antigens recognized by immune cells, allowed to start developing ways to influence the effector cells of the immune system to generate effective antitumor cytotoxic response. We investigated the possibility to stimulate an antitumor response in a culture of mononuclear cells of breast cancer patients by dendritic cells transfected with HLA-A*02:01-restricted DNA constructs. We isolated dendritic cells from peripheral blood monocytes and delivered our constructs to these cells by magnetic transfection. Additionally, a series of experiments with loading of dendritic cells with autologous tumor cell lysate antigens was conducted. We have shown that dendritic cells transfected with the HLA-A*02:01-restricted DNA constructs are effective in inducing an antitumor response in a culture of mononuclear cells of breast cancer patients. Dendritic cells transfected with DNA constructor dendritic cells loaded with lysate antigens revealed a comparable stimulated cytotoxic response of mononuclear cells to these two ways of antigen delivery. We conclude that using DNA constructs in conjunction with patient stratification by HLA type allows the application of transfected DCs as an effective method to stimulate antitumor immunity in vitro.

  9. DNA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stent, Gunther S.

    1970-01-01

    This history for molecular genetics and its explanation of DNA begins with an analysis of the Golden Jubilee essay papers, 1955. The paper ends stating that the higher nervous system is the one major frontier of biological inquiry which still offers some romance of research. (Author/VW)

  10. Characterization of mucosa-associated bacterial communities of the mouse intestine by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism: Utility of sampling strategies and methods to reduce single-stranded DNA artifacts.

    PubMed

    Costa, Estela; Puhl, Nathan J; Selinger, L Brent; Inglis, G Douglas

    2009-08-01

    Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) is a molecular technique used for comparative analysis of microbial community structure and dynamics. We evaluated three sampling methods for recovering bacterial community DNA associated with intestinal mucosa of mice (i.e. mechanical agitation with PBS, hand washing with PBS containing Tween 80, and direct DNA extraction from mucosal plugs). In addition, the utility of two methods (i.e. Klenow fragment and mung-bean nuclease) to reduce single-stranded DNA artifacts was tested. T-RFLP analysis indicated that diverse communities of bacteria are associated with mucosa of the ileum, cecum, and descending colon of mice. Although there was no significant difference in bacterial community structure between the mechanical agitation and direct DNA extraction methods regardless of intestinal location, community diversity was reduced for the hand wash method in the colon. The use of Klenow fragment and mung-bean nuclease have been reported to eliminate single-stranded DNA artifacts (i.e. pseudo-T-restriction fragments), but neither method was beneficial for characterizing mucosa-associated bacterial communities of the mouse cecum. Our study showed that the mechanical agitation and direct plug extraction methods yielded equivalent bacterial community DNA from the mucosa of the small and large intestines of mice, but the latter method was superior for logistical reasons. We also applied a combination of different statistical approaches to analyze T-RFLP data, including statistical detection of true peaks, analysis of variance for peak number, and group significance test, which provided a quantitative improvement for the interpretation of the T-RFLP data.

  11. Lung function, biological monitoring, and biological effect monitoring of gemstone cutters exposed to beryls

    PubMed Central

    Wegner, R.; Heinrich-Ramm, R.; Nowak, D.; Olma, K.; Poschadel, B.; Szadkowski, D.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—Gemstone cutters are potentially exposed to various carcinogenic and fibrogenic metals such as chromium, nickel, aluminium, and beryllium, as well as to lead. Increased beryllium concentrations had been reported in the air of workplaces of beryl cutters in Idar-Oberstein, Germany. The aim of the survey was to study the excretion of beryllium in cutters and grinders with occupational exposure to beryls—for example, aquamarines and emeralds—to examine the prevalence of beryllium sensitisation with the beryllium lymphocyte transformation test (BeLT), to examine the prevalence of lung disease induced by beryllium, to describe the internal load of the respective metals relative to work process, and to screen for genotoxic effects in this particular profession.
METHODS—In a cross sectional investigation, 57 out of 100 gemstone cutters working in 12 factories in Idar-Oberstein with occupational exposure to beryls underwent medical examinations, a chest radiograph, lung function testing (spirometry, airway resistance with the interrupter technique), and biological monitoring, including measurements of aluminium, chromium, and nickel in urine as well as lead in blood. Beryllium in urine was measured with a newly developed direct electrothermal atomic absorption spectroscopy technique with a measurement limit of 0.06 µg/l. Also, cytogenetic tests (rates of micronuclei and sister chromatid exchange), and a BeLT were performed. Airborne concentrations of beryllium were measured in three factories. As no adequate local control group was available, the cutters were categorised into those with an exposure to beryls of >4 hours/week (group A) and ⩽4 hours/week (group B).
RESULTS—Clinical, radiological, or spirometric abnormalities indicating pneumoconiosis were detected in none of the gemstone cutters. Metal concentrations in biological material were far below the respective biological limit values, and beryllium in urine was only measurable in

  12. A human systemic lupus erythematosus-related anti-cardiolipin/single-stranded DNA autoantibody is encoded by a somatically mutated variant of the developmentally restricted 51P1 V[sub H] gene

    SciTech Connect

    Van Es, J.H.; Aanstoot, H.; Gmelig-Meyling, F.H.J.; Derksen, R.H.W.M.; Logtenberg, T. )

    1992-09-15

    The authors report the Ig H and L chain V region sequences from the cDNAs encoding a monoclonal human IgG anti-cardiolipin/ssDNA autoantibody (R149) derived from a patient with active SLE. Comparison with the germ-line V-gene repertoire of this patient revealed that R149 likely arose as a consequence of an Ag-driven selection process. The Ag-binding portions of the V regions were characterized by a high number of arginine residues, a property that has been associated with anti-dsDNA autoantibodies from lupus-prone mice and patients with SLE. The V[sub H] gene encoding autoantibody R149 was a somatically mutated variant of the 51P1 gene segment, which is frequently associated with the restricted fetal B cell repertoire, malignant CD5 B cells, and natural antibodies. These data suggest that in SLE patients a common antigenic stimulus may evoke anti-DNA and anti-cardiolipin autoantibodies and provide further evidence that a small set of developmentally restricted V[sub H] genes can give rise to disease-associated autoantibodies through Ag-selected somatic mutations. 42 refs., 5 figs.

  13. Determination of settings of a tilted head-cutter for generation of hypoid and spiral bevel gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litvin, F. L.; Zhang, Y.; Lundy, M.; Heine, C.

    1988-01-01

    Kinematics of Gleason mechanisms of hypoid and spiral bevel cutting machines are considered. These mechanisms are designated to install the position and tilt of the head cutter. The tilt of the head cutter with standard blades provides the required pressure angle. The authors have developed the matrix presentation of kinematics of these meachanisms and basic equations for the required settings. An example is presented based on the developed computation procedure.

  14. Proper nozzle location, bit profile, and cutter arrangement affect PDC-bit performance significantly

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Gavito, D.; Azar, J.J.

    1994-09-01

    During the past 20 years, the drilling industry has looked to new technology to halt the exponentially increasing costs of drilling oil, gas, and geothermal wells. This technology includes bit design innovations to improve overall drilling performance and reduce drilling costs. These innovations include development of drag bits that use PDC cutters, also called PDC bits, to drill long, continuous intervals of soft to medium-hard formations more economically than conventional three-cone roller-cone bits. The cost advantage is the result of higher rates of penetration (ROP's) and longer bit life obtained with the PDC bits. An experimental study comparing the effects of polycrystalline-diamond-compact (PDC)-bit design features on the dynamic pressure distribution at the bit/rock interface was conducted on a full-scale drilling rig. Results showed that nozzle location, bit profile, and cutter arrangement are significant factors in PDC-bit performance.

  15. Short report: A new polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method to identify Anopheles arabiensis from An. gambiae and its two molecular forms from degraded DNA templates or museum samples.

    PubMed

    Santolamazza, Federica; Della Torre, Alessandra; Caccone, Adalgisa

    2004-06-01

    We present a polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method to simultaneously distinguish the two Anopheles gambiae M and S molecular forms and Anopheles arabiensis. This method uses different diagnostic sites than previously published methods, and it is based on the amplification of a smaller ribosomal DNA fragment. We have tested this protocol in a variety of samples from different geographic regions and various ages of preservation to ascertain the robustness of this protocol over a wide geographic window and on DNA templates of poor quality. This procedure is as efficient as previous ones in discriminating An. arabiensis from the two taxa in An gambiae s.s. However, it performs better than others on poor quality templates such as the ones from museum collections, and poorly stored field collected material. However, it must be noted that it does not allow the simultaneous discrimination of all the species in the An. gambiae complex.

  16. Forty percent methionine restriction decreases mitochondrial oxygen radical production and leak at complex I during forward electron flow and lowers oxidative damage to proteins and mitochondrial DNA in rat kidney and brain mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Caro, Pilar; Gomez, Jose; Sanchez, Ines; Naudi, Alba; Ayala, Victoria; López-Torres, Monica; Pamplona, Reinald; Barja, Gustavo

    2009-12-01

    Eighty percent dietary methionine restriction (MetR) in rodents (without calorie restriction), like dietary restriction (DR), increases maximum longevity and strongly decreases mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and oxidative stress. Eighty percent MetR also lowers the degree of membrane fatty acid unsaturation in rat liver. Mitochondrial ROS generation and the degree of fatty acid unsaturation are the only two known factors linking oxidative stress with longevity in vertebrates. However, it is unknown whether 40% MetR, the relevant methionine restriction degree to clarify the mechanisms of action of standard (40%) DR can reproduce these effects in mitochondria from vital tissues of strong relevance for aging. Here we study the effect of 40% MetR on ROS production and oxidative stress in rat brain and kidney mitochondria. Male Wistar rats were fed during 7 weeks semipurified diets differing only in their methionine content: control or 40% MetR diets. It was found that 40% MetR decreases mitochondrial ROS production and percent free radical leak (by 62-71%) at complex I during forward (but not during reverse) electron flow in both brain and kidney mitochondria, increases the oxidative phosphorylation capacity of brain mitochondria, lowers oxidative damage to kidney mitochondrial DNA, and decreases specific markers of mitochondrial protein oxidation, lipoxidation, and glycoxidation in both tissues. Forty percent MetR also decreased the amount of respiratory complexes I, III, and IV and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) in brain mitochondria and complex IV in kidney mitochondria, without changing the degree of mitochondrial membrane fatty acid unsaturation. Forty percent MetR, differing from 80% MetR, did not inhibit the increase in rat body weight. These changes are very similar to the ones previously found during dietary and protein restriction in rats. We conclude that methionine is the only dietary factor responsible for the decrease in

  17. Evaluation of PCR amplification bias by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of small-subunit rRNA and mcrA genes by using defined template mixtures of methanogenic pure cultures and soil DNA extracts.

    PubMed

    Lueders, Tillmann; Friedrich, Michael W

    2003-01-01

    Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis is a widely used method for profiling microbial community structure in different habitats by targeting small-subunit (SSU) rRNA and also functional marker genes. It is not known, however, whether relative gene frequencies of individual community members are adequately represented in post-PCR amplicon frequencies as shown by T-RFLP. In this study, precisely defined artificial template mixtures containing genomic DNA of four different methanogens in various ratios were prepared for subsequent T-RFLP analysis. PCR amplicons were generated from defined mixtures targeting not only the SSU rRNA but also the methyl-coenzyme M reductase (mcrA/mrtA) genes of methanogens. Relative amplicon frequencies of microorganisms were quantified by comparing fluorescence intensities of characteristic terminal restriction fragments. SSU ribosomal DNA (rDNA) template ratios in defined template mixtures of the four-membered community were recovered absolutely by PCR-T-RFLP analysis, which demonstrates that the T-RFLP analysis evaluated can give a quantitative view of the template pool. SSU rDNA-targeted T-RFLP analysis of a natural community was found to be highly reproducible, independent of PCR annealing temperature, and unaffected by increasing PCR cycle numbers. Ratios of mcrA-targeted T-RFLP analysis were biased, most likely by PCR selection due to the degeneracy of the primers used. Consequently, for microbial community analyses, each primer system used should be evaluated carefully for possible PCR bias. In fact, such bias can be detected by using T-RFLP analysis as a tool for the precise quantification of the PCR product pool.

  18. Selection of the parameters and operating conditions of laser cutter nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panchenko, V. I.; Smorodin, F. K.

    The interaction between a gas jet and a target during laser cutting was investigated experimentally for nozzles with different pressure differentials and Mach numbers at the exit section. Based on an analysis of the experimental data obtained, the optimal parameters of laser cutter nozzles are determined. Nozzles with a zero pressure differential or a pressure differential that does not produce a Mach disk in the jet or slow separation within the nozzle are shown to be particularly suitable for laser cutting.

  19. Mathematical modeling on obligate mutualism: Interactions between leaf-cutter ants and their fungus garden.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yun; Clark, Rebecca; Makiyama, Michael; Fewell, Jennifer

    2011-11-21

    We propose a simple mathematical model by applying Michaelis-Menton equations of enzyme kinetics to study the mutualistic interaction between the leaf cutter ant and its fungus garden at the early stage of colony expansion. We derive sufficient conditions on the extinction and coexistence of these two species. In addition, we give a region of initial condition that leads to the extinction of two species when the model has an interior attractor. Our global analysis indicates that the division of labor by worker ants and initial conditions are two important factors that determine whether leaf cutter ants' colonies and their fungus garden can survive and grow or not. We validate the model by comparing model simulations and data on fungal and ant colony growth rates under laboratory conditions. We perform sensitive analysis of the model based on the experimental data to gain more biological insights on ecological interactions between leaf-cutter ants and their fungus garden. Finally, we give conclusions and discuss potential future work.

  20. Accuracy of tablet splitting: Comparison study between hand splitting and tablet cutter

    PubMed Central

    Habib, Walid A.; Alanizi, Abdulaziz S.; Abdelhamid, Magdi M.; Alanizi, Fars K.

    2013-01-01

    Background Tablet splitting is often used in pharmacy practice to adjust the administered doses. It is also used as a method of reducing medication costs. Objective To investigate the accuracy of tablet splitting by comparing hand splitting vs. a tablet cutter for a low dose drug tablet. Methods Salbutamol tablets (4 mg) were chosen as low dose tablets. A randomly selected equal number of tablets were split by hand and a tablet cutter, and the remaining tablets were kept whole. Weight variation and drug content were analysed for salbutamol in 0.1 N HCl using a validated spectrophotometric method. The percentages by which each whole tablet’s or half-tablet’s drug content and weight difference from sample mean values were compared with USP specification ranges for drug content. The %RSD was also calculated in order to determine whether the drugs met USP specification for %RSD. The tablets and half tablets were scanned using electron microscopy to show any visual differences arising from splitting. Results 27.5% of samples differed from sample mean values by a percentage that fell outside of USP specification for weight, of which 15% from the tablet cutter and 25% from those split by hand fell outside the specifications. All whole tablets and half tablets met the USP specifications for drug content but the variation of content between the two halves reached 21.3% of total content in case of hand splitting, and 7.13% only for the tablet cutter. The %RSDs for drug content and weight met the USP specification for whole salbutamol tablets and the half tablets which were split by tablet cutter. The halves which were split by hand fell outside the specification for %RSD (drug content = 6.43%, weight = 8.33%). The differences were visually clear in the electron microscope scans. Conclusion Drug content variation in half-tablets appeared to be attributable to weight variation occurring during the splitting process. This could have serious clinical consequences for

  1. The role of topoisomerase I in suppressing genome instability associated with a highly transcribed guanine-rich sequence is not restricted to preventing RNA:DNA hybrid accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Puja; Owiti, Norah; Kim, Nayun

    2016-01-01

    Highly transcribed guanine-run containing sequences, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, become unstable when topoisomerase I (Top1) is disrupted. Topological changes, such as the formation of extended RNA:DNA hybrids or R-loops or non-canonical DNA structures including G-quadruplexes has been proposed as the major underlying cause of the transcription-linked genome instability. Here, we report that R-loop accumulation at a guanine-rich sequence, which is capable of assembling into the four-stranded G4 DNA structure, is dependent on the level and the orientation of transcription. In the absence of Top1 or RNase Hs, R-loops accumulated to substantially higher extent when guanine-runs were located on the non-transcribed strand. This coincides with the orientation where higher genome instability was observed. However, we further report that there are significant differences between the disruption of RNase Hs and Top1 in regards to the orientation-specific elevation in genome instability at the guanine-rich sequence. Additionally, genome instability in Top1-deficient yeasts is not completely suppressed by removal of negative supercoils and further aggravated by expression of mutant Top1. Together, our data provide a strong support for a function of Top1 in suppressing genome instability at the guanine-run containing sequence that goes beyond preventing the transcription-associated RNA:DNA hybrid formation. PMID:26527723

  2. Effects of DNA Extraction Procedures on Bacteroides Profiles in Fecal Samples From Various Animals Determined by Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism Analysis

    EPA Science Inventory

    A major assumption in microbial source tracking is that some fecal bacteria are specific to a host animal, and thus provide unique microbial fingerprints that can be used to differentiate hosts. However, the DNA information obtained from a particular sample may be biased dependi...

  3. Part I: Minicircle vector technology limits DNA size restrictions on ex vivo gene delivery using nanoparticle vectors: Overcoming a translational barrier in neural stem cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Alinda R; Chari, Divya M

    2016-09-28

    Genetically engineered neural stem cell (NSC) transplant populations offer key benefits in regenerative neurology, for release of therapeutic biomolecules in ex vivo gene therapy. NSCs are 'hard-to-transfect' but amenable to 'magnetofection'. Despite the high clinical potential of this approach, the low and transient transfection associated with the large size of therapeutic DNA constructs is a critical barrier to translation. We demonstrate for the first time that DNA minicircles (small DNA vectors encoding essential gene expression components but devoid of a bacterial backbone, thereby reducing construct size versus conventional plasmids) deployed with magnetofection achieve the highest, safe non-viral DNA transfection levels (up to 54%) reported so far for primary NSCs. Minicircle-functionalized magnetic nanoparticle (MNP)-mediated gene delivery also resulted in sustained gene expression for up to four weeks. All daughter cell types of engineered NSCs (neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes) were transfected (in contrast to conventional plasmids which usually yield transfected astrocytes only), offering advantages for targeted cell engineering. In addition to enhancing MNP functionality as gene delivery vectors, minicircle technology provides key benefits from safety/scale up perspectives. Therefore, we consider the proof-of-concept of fusion of technologies used here offers high potential as a clinically translatable genetic modification strategy for cell therapy.

  4. MethylRAD: a simple and scalable method for genome-wide DNA methylation profiling using methylation-dependent restriction enzymes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shi; Lv, Jia; Zhang, Lingling; Dou, Jinzhuang; Sun, Yan; Li, Xue; Fu, Xiaoteng; Dou, Huaiqian; Mao, Junxia; Hu, Xiaoli; Bao, Zhenmin

    2015-11-01

    Characterization of dynamic DNA methylomes in diverse phylogenetic groups has attracted growing interest for a better understanding of the evolution of DNA methylation as well as its function and biological significance in eukaryotes. Sequencing-based methods are promising in fulfilling this task. However, none of the currently available methods offers the 'perfect solution', and they have limitations that prevent their application in the less studied phylogenetic groups. The recently discovered Mrr-like enzymes are appealing for new method development, owing to their ability to collect 32-bp methylated DNA fragments from the whole genome for high-throughput sequencing. Here, we have developed a simple and scalable DNA methylation profiling method (called MethylRAD) using Mrr-like enzymes. MethylRAD allows for de novo (reference-free) methylation analysis, extremely low DNA input (e.g. 1 ng) and adjustment of tag density, all of which are still unattainable for most widely used methylation profiling methods such as RRBS and MeDIP. We performed extensive analyses to validate the power and accuracy of our method in both model (plant Arabidopsis thaliana) and non-model (scallop Patinopecten yessoensis) species. We further demonstrated its great utility in identification of a gene (LPCAT1) that is potentially crucial for carotenoid accumulation in scallop adductor muscle. MethylRAD has several advantages over existing tools and fills a void in the current epigenomic toolkit by providing a universal tool that can be used for diverse research applications, e.g. from model to non-model species, from ordinary to precious samples and from small to large genomes, but at an affordable cost.

  5. MethylRAD: a simple and scalable method for genome-wide DNA methylation profiling using methylation-dependent restriction enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shi; Lv, Jia; Zhang, Lingling; Dou, Jinzhuang; Sun, Yan; Li, Xue; Fu, Xiaoteng; Dou, Huaiqian; Mao, Junxia; Hu, Xiaoli; Bao, Zhenmin

    2015-01-01

    Characterization of dynamic DNA methylomes in diverse phylogenetic groups has attracted growing interest for a better understanding of the evolution of DNA methylation as well as its function and biological significance in eukaryotes. Sequencing-based methods are promising in fulfilling this task. However, none of the currently available methods offers the ‘perfect solution’, and they have limitations that prevent their application in the less studied phylogenetic groups. The recently discovered Mrr-like enzymes are appealing for new method development, owing to their ability to collect 32-bp methylated DNA fragments from the whole genome for high-throughput sequencing. Here, we have developed a simple and scalable DNA methylation profiling method (called MethylRAD) using Mrr-like enzymes. MethylRAD allows for de novo (reference-free) methylation analysis, extremely low DNA input (e.g. 1 ng) and adjustment of tag density, all of which are still unattainable for most widely used methylation profiling methods such as RRBS and MeDIP. We performed extensive analyses to validate the power and accuracy of our method in both model (plant Arabidopsis thaliana) and non-model (scallop Patinopecten yessoensis) species. We further demonstrated its great utility in identification of a gene (LPCAT1) that is potentially crucial for carotenoid accumulation in scallop adductor muscle. MethylRAD has several advantages over existing tools and fills a void in the current epigenomic toolkit by providing a universal tool that can be used for diverse research applications, e.g. from model to non-model species, from ordinary to precious samples and from small to large genomes, but at an affordable cost. PMID:26581575

  6. The Type ISP Restriction-Modification enzymes LlaBIII and LlaGI use a translocation-collision mechanism to cleave non-specific DNA distant from their recognition sites.

    PubMed

    Šišáková, Eva; van Aelst, Kara; Diffin, Fiona M; Szczelkun, Mark D

    2013-01-01

    The Type ISP Restriction-Modification (RM) enzyme LlaBIII is encoded on plasmid pJW566 and can protect Lactococcus lactis strains against bacteriophage infections in milk fermentations. It is a single polypeptide RM enzyme comprising Mrr endonuclease, DNA helicase, adenine methyltransferase and target-recognition domains. LlaBIII shares >95% amino acid sequence homology across its first three protein domains with the Type ISP enzyme LlaGI. Here, we determine the recognition sequence of LlaBIII (5'-TnAGCC-3', where the adenine complementary to the underlined base is methylated), and characterize its enzyme activities. LlaBIII shares key enzymatic features with LlaGI; namely, adenosine triphosphate-dependent DNA translocation (∼309 bp/s at 25°C) and a requirement for DNA cleavage of two recognition sites in an inverted head-to-head repeat. However, LlaBIII requires K(+) ions to prevent non-specific DNA cleavage, conditions which affect the translocation and cleavage properties of LlaGI. By identifying the locations of the non-specific dsDNA breaks introduced by LlaGI or LlaBIII under different buffer conditions, we validate that the Type ISP RM enzymes use a common translocation-collision mechanism to trigger endonuclease activity. In their favoured in vitro buffer, both LlaGI and LlaBIII produce a normal distribution of random cleavage loci centred midway between the sites. In contrast, LlaGI in K(+) ions produces a far more distributive cleavage profile.

  7. Hyperosmotic stress memory in Arabidopsis is mediated by distinct epigenetically labile sites in the genome and is restricted in the male germline by DNA glycosylase activity.

    PubMed

    Wibowo, Anjar; Becker, Claude; Marconi, Gianpiero; Durr, Julius; Price, Jonathan; Hagmann, Jorg; Papareddy, Ranjith; Putra, Hadi; Kageyama, Jorge; Becker, Jorg; Weigel, Detlef; Gutierrez-Marcos, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Inducible epigenetic changes in eukaryotes are believed to enable rapid adaptation to environmental fluctuations. We have found distinct regions of the Arabidopsis genome that are susceptible to DNA (de)methylation in response to hyperosmotic stress. The stress-induced epigenetic changes are associated with conditionally heritable adaptive phenotypic stress responses. However, these stress responses are primarily transmitted to the next generation through the female lineage due to widespread DNA glycosylase activity in the male germline, and extensively reset in the absence of stress. Using the CNI1/ATL31 locus as an example, we demonstrate that epigenetically targeted sequences function as distantly-acting control elements of antisense long non-coding RNAs, which in turn regulate targeted gene expression in response to stress. Collectively, our findings reveal that plants use a highly dynamic maternal 'short-term stress memory' with which to respond to adverse external conditions. This transient memory relies on the DNA methylation machinery and associated transcriptional changes to extend the phenotypic plasticity accessible to the immediate offspring. PMID:27242129

  8. Hyperosmotic stress memory in Arabidopsis is mediated by distinct epigenetically labile sites in the genome and is restricted in the male germline by DNA glycosylase activity

    PubMed Central

    Wibowo, Anjar; Becker, Claude; Marconi, Gianpiero; Durr, Julius; Price, Jonathan; Hagmann, Jorg; Papareddy, Ranjith; Putra, Hadi; Kageyama, Jorge; Becker, Jorg; Weigel, Detlef; Gutierrez-Marcos, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Inducible epigenetic changes in eukaryotes are believed to enable rapid adaptation to environmental fluctuations. We have found distinct regions of the Arabidopsis genome that are susceptible to DNA (de)methylation in response to hyperosmotic stress. The stress-induced epigenetic changes are associated with conditionally heritable adaptive phenotypic stress responses. However, these stress responses are primarily transmitted to the next generation through the female lineage due to widespread DNA glycosylase activity in the male germline, and extensively reset in the absence of stress. Using the CNI1/ATL31 locus as an example, we demonstrate that epigenetically targeted sequences function as distantly-acting control elements of antisense long non-coding RNAs, which in turn regulate targeted gene expression in response to stress. Collectively, our findings reveal that plants use a highly dynamic maternal ‘short-term stress memory’ with which to respond to adverse external conditions. This transient memory relies on the DNA methylation machinery and associated transcriptional changes to extend the phenotypic plasticity accessible to the immediate offspring. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13546.001 PMID:27242129

  9. Cutter-Skidder Operator. Competency-Based Training Standards = Conducteur de Debusqueuse-Abatteur d'Arbes. Normes de formation professionnelle basees sur les aptitudes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ontario Ministry of Skills Development, Toronto.

    This bilingual document contains standards that are based on industry-specific skills identified by labor and management representatives of the forest products industry, successful achievement of which results in issuance of a cutter operator, skidder operator, or cutter-skidder operator Canadian certificate of qualification. With French on all…

  10. A low-cost rapid prototyping method for metal electrode fabrication using a CO2 laser cutter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toossi, A.; Daneshmand, M.; Sameoto, D.

    2013-04-01

    In this note, a novel approach on the use of a low-power CO2 laser cutter is proposed to pattern thin metal electrode prototypes. Although low-power CO2 laser cutters have been used to etch and cut a wide range of materials, based on our knowledge, metal electrode patterning has not been previously explored. Using the proposed approach, metal electrodes can be patterned on the substrates that are good absorbers of CO2 wavelength. Here, polymethylmethacrylate substrates are selected and metal electrode patterning using the commercial CO2 laser cutter of VLS 3.50 Versa Laser is investigated. This approach has a wide range of applications, and two of those examples for microwave heating and antenna applications are presented.

  11. A nano-cheese-cutter to directly measure interfacial adhesion of freestanding nano-fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Najem, Johnny F.; Wong, Shing-Chung; Wan, Kai-tak

    2012-01-01

    A nano-cheese-cutter is fabricated to directly measure the adhesion between two freestanding nano-fibers. A single electrospun fiber is attached to the free end of an atomic force microscope cantilever, while a similar fiber is similarly prepared on a mica substrate in an orthogonal direction. External load is applied to deform the two fibers into complementary V-shapes, and the force measurement allows the elastic modulus to be determined. At a critical tensile load, "pull-off" occurs when the adhering fibers spontaneously detach from each other, yielding the interfacial adhesion energy. Loading-unloading cycles are performed to investigate repeated adhesion-detachment and surface degradation.

  12. Development of a low cost, 3-DOF desktop laser cutter using 3D printer hardware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jivraj, Jamil; Huang, Yize; Wong, Ronnie; Lu, Yi; Vuong, Barry; Ramjist, Joel; Gu, Xijia; Yang, Victor X. D.

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents the development of a compact, desktop laser-cutting system capable of cutting materials such as wood, metal and plastic. A re-commissioned beheaded MakerBot® Replicator 2X is turned into a 3-DOF laser cutter by way of integration with 800W (peak power) fiber laser. Special attention is paid to tear-down, modification and integration of the objective lens in place of the print head. Example cuts in wood and metal will be presented, as well as design of an exhaust system.

  13. 2. Spar, bramble, and the larger cutters storis (W38) make ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Spar, bramble, and the larger cutters storis (W38) make their way through arctic ice during the first transit of the northwest passage by a U.S. vessel. The lead 180 has a weight suspended over its starboard side. By swinging this weight back and forth across the centerline, the vessel can rock to free herself from ice. - U.S. Coast Guard Buoy Tenders, 180' Class, U.S. Coast Guard Headquarters, 2100 Second Street Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  14. Low-cost rapid prototyping of flexible microfluidic devices using a desktop digital craft cutter.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Po Ki; Goral, Vasiliy N

    2010-02-01

    Low-cost and straight forward rapid prototyping of flexible microfluidic devices using a desktop digital craft cutter is presented. This rapid prototyping method can consistently achieve microchannels as thin as 200 microm in width and can be used to fabricate three-dimensional (3D) microfluidic devices using only double-sided pressure sensitive adhesive (PSA) tape and laser printer transparency film. Various functional microfluidic devices are demonstrated with this rapid prototyping method. The complete fabrication process from device design concept to working device can be completed in minutes without the need of expensive equipment. PMID:20091012

  15. Plastibell Device Circumcision versus Bone Cutter Technique in terms of Operative Outcomes and Parent’s Satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Mehmood, Tahir; Azam, Hammad; Tariq, Muhammad; Iqbal, Zafar; Mehmood, Hassan; Shah, Syed Asif Hussain

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compare the rate of complications of Plastibell and bone cutter circumcision technique and recognition of top worries and satisfaction rate in the mind of parents before and after the procedure of Plastibell device (PD) circumcision in infants less than 6 months of age. Methods: It was a descriptive prospective study conducted at department of surgery Sheikh Zayed Hospital, Rahim Yar Khan. Two hundred parents of infants of less than six months of age were recruited for this study. Infants were divided into two equal groups. Group I included Plastibell circumcision technique and Group II included Bone Cutter Circumcision technique. Data was analyzed using SPSS Version 17. Independent sample t-test and chi-square test was used to compare quantitative and qualitative variables respectively. P-value <0.05 was taken as significant difference. Results: Total number of two hundred infants were included in this study. Most common worries of parents about Plastibell Device circumcision were; fear of fever (42.0%). Fear of pain and bleeding (66.0%). Plastibell Device method was associated with less operation time and bleeding as compared to bone cutter method (P-value <0.0001 and <0.0001 respectively). Incidence of complications other than bleeding and infection was 3.0% in bone cutter method and 1.0% in Plastibell device method. Pain score was significantly less in plastibell device group (p-value <0.0001). Post-operatively, 98% parents showed complete procedural satisfaction in Plastibell group versus 87% parents in bone cutter one month after surgery (P-value 0.003). About 4% parents in bone cutter method group showed cosmetic displeasure versus only 1% parents in plastibell device group. Conclusion: The study concluded that Plastibell Device circumcision is a safer technique for circumcision and is associated with highest level of parent’s satisfaction. PMID:27182237

  16. 42 CFR 73.13 - Restricted experiments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SELECT AGENTS AND TOXINS § 73.13 Restricted experiments. (a) An individual or entity may not conduct, or... recombinant DNA containing genes for the biosynthesis of select toxins lethal for vertebrates at an LD <100...

  17. Influence of Corrosion on the Abrasion of Cutter Steels Used in TBM Tunnelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espallargas, N.; Jakobsen, P. D.; Langmaack, L.; Macias, F. J.

    2015-01-01

    Abrasion on tunnel boring machine (TBM) cutters may be critical in terms of project duration and costs. Several researchers are currently studying the degradation of TBM cutter tools used for excavating hard rock, soft ground and loose soil. So far, the primary focus of this research has been directed towards abrasive wear. Abrasive wear is a very common process in TBM excavation, but with a view to the environment in which the tools are working, corrosion may also exert an influence. This paper presents a selection of techniques that can be used to evaluate the influence of corrosion on abrasion on TBM excavation tools. It also presents the influence of corrosion on abrasive wear for some initial tests, with constant steel and geomaterial and varying properties of the excavation fluids (soil conditioners, anti-abrasion additives and water). The results indicate that the chloride content in the water media greatly influences the amount of wear, providing evidence of the influence of corrosion on the abrasion of the cutting tools. The presence of conditioning additives tailored to specific rock or soil conditions reduces wear. However, when chloride is present in the water, the additives minimise wear rates but fail to suppress corrosion of the cutting tools.

  18. The fungus gardens of leaf-cutter ants undergo a distinct physiological transition during biomass degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Eric L.; Aylward, Frank O.; Kim, Young-Mo; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Hu, Zeping; Metz, Thomas O.; Lipton, Mary S.; Smith, Richard D.; Currie, Cameron R.; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E.

    2014-08-01

    Leaf-cutter ants are dominant herbivores in ecosystems throughout the Neotropics. Rather than directly consuming the fresh foliar biomass they harvest, these ants use it to cultivate specialized fungus gardens. Although recent investigations have shed light on how plant biomass is degraded in fungus gardens, the cycling of nutrients that takes place in these specialized microbial ecosystems is still not well understood. Here, using metametabolomics and metaproteomics techniques, we examine the dynamics of nutrient turnover and biosynthesis in these gardens. Our results reveal that numerous free amino acids and sugars are depleted throughout the process of biomass degradation, indicating that easily accessible nutrients from plant material are readily consumed by microbes in these ecosystems. Accumulation of cellobiose and lignin derivatives near the end of the degradation process is consistent with previous findings of cellulases and laccases produced by Leucoagaricus gongylophorus, the fungus cultivated by leaf-cutter ants. Our results also suggest that ureides may be an important source of nitrogen in fungus gardens, especially during nitrogen-limiting conditions. No free arginine was detected in our metametabolomics experiments despite evidence that the host ants cannot produce this amino acid, suggesting that biosynthesis of this metabolite may be tightly regulated in the fungus garden. These results provide new insights into the dynamics of nutrient cycling that underlie this important ant-fungus symbiosis.

  19. Laser forming cutting once quenched high-speed tool steel (HSTS) disk-shaped milling cutter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Zhihong; Liu, Yongzhen; Weng, Shiping

    1998-08-01

    Laser cutting technology has been applied to ordinary alloy steel circular sawblade, but it is very rarely used in quenched HSTS disk-shape milling-cutters due to the material particularity. In this paper, the authors systematically explain the advantages of this new technique, respecting the optimum design of HSTS disk-shape milling-cutter, the specific characteristics of laser forming cutting once for all, the technology testing, the analysis of structural performance of tooth and the small batch production for verifying. The article displays its advantages completely as follows: The design for a perfect tooth profile is not bound to the ordinary machining methods; The special laser technique does not lower the hardness on the tooth nose so that this process and needs no follow-up operational sequences, ensures the excellent dynamic-balance performance and operation properties, and prolongs the tools' service time; The new technique also has advantages of high efficiency and good economics. Therefore, this special laser cutting method, an integration of intensified heat-treatment and laser forming cutting once for all technology, will be regarded as a reform in HSTS tools Manufacturing field.

  20. Telomere Restriction Fragment (TRF) Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mender, Ilgen; Shay, Jerry W.

    2016-01-01

    restriction enzyme recognition sites within TTAGGG tandem telomeric repeats, therefore digestion of genomic DNA, not telomeric DNA, with a combination of 6 base restriction endonucleases reduces genomic DNA size to less than 800 bp. PMID:27500189

  1. Caloric restriction and genomic stability

    PubMed Central

    Heydari, Ahmad R.; Unnikrishnan, Archana; Lucente, Lisa Ventrella; Richardson, Arlan

    2007-01-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) reduces the incidence and progression of spontaneous and induced tumors in laboratory rodents while increasing mean and maximum life spans. It has been suggested that CR extends longevity and reduces age-related pathologies by reducing the levels of DNA damage and mutations that accumulate with age. This hypothesis is attractive because the integrity of the genome is essential to a cell/organism and because it is supported by observations that both cancer and immunological defects, which increase significantly with age and are delayed by CR, are associated with changes in DNA damage and/or DNA repair. Over the last three decades, numerous laboratories have examined the effects of CR on the integrity of the genome and the ability of cells to repair DNA. The majority of studies performed indicate that the age-related increase in oxidative damage to DNA is significantly reduced by CR. Early studies suggest that CR reduces DNA damage by enhancing DNA repair. With the advent of genomic technology and our increased understanding of specific repair pathways, CR has been shown to have a significant effect on major DNA repair pathways, such as NER, BER and double-strand break repair. PMID:17942423

  2. An Attachable Electromagnetic Energy Harvester Driven Wireless Sensing System Demonstrating Milling-Processes and Cutter-Wear/Breakage-Condition Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Chung, Tien-Kan; Yeh, Po-Chen; Lee, Hao; Lin, Cheng-Mao; Tseng, Chia-Yung; Lo, Wen-Tuan; Wang, Chieh-Min; Wang, Wen-Chin; Tu, Chi-Jen; Tasi, Pei-Yuan; Chang, Jui-Wen

    2016-02-23

    An attachable electromagnetic-energy-harvester driven wireless vibration-sensing system for monitoring milling-processes and cutter-wear/breakage-conditions is demonstrated. The system includes an electromagnetic energy harvester, three single-axis Micro Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) accelerometers, a wireless chip module, and corresponding circuits. The harvester consisting of magnets with a coil uses electromagnetic induction to harness mechanical energy produced by the rotating spindle in milling processes and consequently convert the harnessed energy to electrical output. The electrical output is rectified by the rectification circuit to power the accelerometers and wireless chip module. The harvester, circuits, accelerometer, and wireless chip are integrated as an energy-harvester driven wireless vibration-sensing system. Therefore, this completes a self-powered wireless vibration sensing system. For system testing, a numerical-controlled machining tool with various milling processes is used. According to the test results, the system is fully self-powered and able to successfully sense vibration in the milling processes. Furthermore, by analyzing the vibration signals (i.e., through analyzing the electrical outputs of the accelerometers), criteria are successfully established for the system for real-time accurate simulations of the milling-processes and cutter-conditions (such as cutter-wear conditions and cutter-breaking occurrence). Due to these results, our approach can be applied to most milling and other machining machines in factories to realize more smart machining technologies.

  3. Leucoagaricus gongylophorus Produces Diverse Enzymes for the Degradation of Recalcitrant Plant Polymers in Leaf-Cutter Ant Fungus Gardens

    SciTech Connect

    Aylward, Frank O.; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E.; Tringe, Susannah G.; Teiling, Clotilde; Tremmel, Daniel; Moeller, Joseph; Scott, Jarrod J.; Barry, Kerrie W.; Piehowski, Paul D.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Malfatti, Stephanie; Monroe, Matthew E.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Smith, Richard D.; Weinstock, George; Gerardo, Nicole; Suen, Garret; Lipton, Mary S.; Currie, Cameron R.

    2013-06-12

    Plants represent a large reservoir of organic carbon comprised largely of recalcitrant polymers that most metazoans are unable to deconstruct. Many herbivores gain access to nutrients in this material indirectly by associating with microbial symbionts, and leaf-cutter ants are a paradigmatic example. These ants use fresh foliar biomass as manure to cultivate fungus gardens composed primarily of Leucoagaricus gongylophorus, a basidiomycetous symbiont that produces specialized hyphal swellings that serve as a food source for the host ant colony. Although leaf-cutter ants are conspicuous herbivores that contribute substantially to carbon turnover in Neotropical ecosystems, the process through which plant biomass is degraded in their fungus gardens is not well understood. Here we present the first draft genome of L. gongylophorus, and using genomic, metaproteomic, and phylogenetic tools we investigate its role in lignocellulose degradation in the fungus gardens of both Atta cephalotes and Acromyrmex echinatior leaf-cutter ants. We show that L. gongylophorus produces a diversity of lignocellulases in fungus gardens, and is likely the primary driver of plant biomass degradation in these ecosystems. We also show that this fungus produces distinct sets of lignocellulases throughout the different stages of biomass degradation, including numerous cellulases and laccases that may be playing an important but previously uncharacterized role in lignocellulose degradation. Our study provides a comprehensive analysis of plant biomass degradation in leaf-cutter ant fungus gardens and provides insight into the molecular dynamics underlying the symbiosis between these dominant herbivores and their obligate fungal cultivar.

  4. The effect of Schistosoma mansoni infection on the productivity of cane cutters on a sugar estate in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Fenwick, A.; Figenschou, B. H.

    1972-01-01

    In an attempt to justify future snail control on an irrigated sugar estate in Tanzania, the effects of Schistosoma mansoni infection on the productivity of apparently healthy cane cutters were investigated. The bonus earnings of cane cutters who were found to be infected with S. mansoni were compared, retrospectively, with earnings of uninfected cane cutters during the years 1968-69. For one 6-month period a more detailed study was made to correlate bonus earnings with actual output in tons of cane cut. It was found that in the four 6-month periods the mean bonus earnings of the uninfected cane cutters exceeded the mean bonus earnings of the infected men by 11.0%, 11.4%, 6.0%, and 13.7%, respectively. In all except the third period these differences were statistically significant. After treatment for S. mansoni infection, the workers were able to improve their earnings relative to both infected and uninfected workers. In a more detailed study of some of the workers during the third 6-month period, it was discovered that a 4% difference in bonus earnings represented a 1% difference in output. Taking into account the variations of bonus earnings it was estimated that the overall difference in productivity between infected and uninfected workers was 3-5%. PMID:4540675

  5. Leucoagaricus gongylophorus Produces Diverse Enzymes for the Degradation of Recalcitrant Plant Polymers in Leaf-Cutter Ant Fungus Gardens

    PubMed Central

    Aylward, Frank O.; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E.; Tringe, Susannah G.; Teiling, Clotilde; Tremmel, Daniel M.; Moeller, Joseph A.; Scott, Jarrod J.; Barry, Kerrie W.; Piehowski, Paul D.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Malfatti, Stephanie A.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Smith, Richard D.; Weinstock, George M.; Gerardo, Nicole M.; Suen, Garret; Lipton, Mary S.

    2013-01-01

    Plants represent a large reservoir of organic carbon comprised primarily of recalcitrant polymers that most metazoans are unable to deconstruct. Many herbivores gain access to nutrients in this material indirectly by associating with microbial symbionts, and leaf-cutter ants are a paradigmatic example. These ants use fresh foliar biomass as manure to cultivate gardens composed primarily of Leucoagaricus gongylophorus, a basidiomycetous fungus that produces specialized hyphal swellings that serve as a food source for the host ant colony. Although leaf-cutter ants are conspicuous herbivores that contribute substantially to carbon turnover in Neotropical ecosystems, the process through which plant biomass is degraded in their fungus gardens is not well understood. Here we present the first draft genome of L. gongylophorus, and, using genomic and metaproteomic tools, we investigate its role in lignocellulose degradation in the gardens of both Atta cephalotes and Acromyrmex echinatior leaf-cutter ants. We show that L. gongylophorus produces a diversity of lignocellulases in ant gardens and is likely the primary driver of plant biomass degradation in these ecosystems. We also show that this fungus produces distinct sets of lignocellulases throughout the different stages of biomass degradation, including numerous cellulases and laccases that likely play an important role in lignocellulose degradation. Our study provides a detailed analysis of plant biomass degradation in leaf-cutter ant fungus gardens and insight into the enzymes underlying the symbiosis between these dominant herbivores and their obligate fungal cultivar. PMID:23584789

  6. An Attachable Electromagnetic Energy Harvester Driven Wireless Sensing System Demonstrating Milling-Processes and Cutter-Wear/Breakage-Condition Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Tien-Kan; Yeh, Po-Chen; Lee, Hao; Lin, Cheng-Mao; Tseng, Chia-Yung; Lo, Wen-Tuan; Wang, Chieh-Min; Wang, Wen-Chin; Tu, Chi-Jen; Tasi, Pei-Yuan; Chang, Jui-Wen

    2016-01-01

    An attachable electromagnetic-energy-harvester driven wireless vibration-sensing system for monitoring milling-processes and cutter-wear/breakage-conditions is demonstrated. The system includes an electromagnetic energy harvester, three single-axis Micro Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) accelerometers, a wireless chip module, and corresponding circuits. The harvester consisting of magnets with a coil uses electromagnetic induction to harness mechanical energy produced by the rotating spindle in milling processes and consequently convert the harnessed energy to electrical output. The electrical output is rectified by the rectification circuit to power the accelerometers and wireless chip module. The harvester, circuits, accelerometer, and wireless chip are integrated as an energy-harvester driven wireless vibration-sensing system. Therefore, this completes a self-powered wireless vibration sensing system. For system testing, a numerical-controlled machining tool with various milling processes is used. According to the test results, the system is fully self-powered and able to successfully sense vibration in the milling processes. Furthermore, by analyzing the vibration signals (i.e., through analyzing the electrical outputs of the accelerometers), criteria are successfully established for the system for real-time accurate simulations of the milling-processes and cutter-conditions (such as cutter-wear conditions and cutter-breaking occurrence). Due to these results, our approach can be applied to most milling and other machining machines in factories to realize more smart machining technologies. PMID:26907297

  7. An Attachable Electromagnetic Energy Harvester Driven Wireless Sensing System Demonstrating Milling-Processes and Cutter-Wear/Breakage-Condition Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Chung, Tien-Kan; Yeh, Po-Chen; Lee, Hao; Lin, Cheng-Mao; Tseng, Chia-Yung; Lo, Wen-Tuan; Wang, Chieh-Min; Wang, Wen-Chin; Tu, Chi-Jen; Tasi, Pei-Yuan; Chang, Jui-Wen

    2016-01-01

    An attachable electromagnetic-energy-harvester driven wireless vibration-sensing system for monitoring milling-processes and cutter-wear/breakage-conditions is demonstrated. The system includes an electromagnetic energy harvester, three single-axis Micro Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) accelerometers, a wireless chip module, and corresponding circuits. The harvester consisting of magnets with a coil uses electromagnetic induction to harness mechanical energy produced by the rotating spindle in milling processes and consequently convert the harnessed energy to electrical output. The electrical output is rectified by the rectification circuit to power the accelerometers and wireless chip module. The harvester, circuits, accelerometer, and wireless chip are integrated as an energy-harvester driven wireless vibration-sensing system. Therefore, this completes a self-powered wireless vibration sensing system. For system testing, a numerical-controlled machining tool with various milling processes is used. According to the test results, the system is fully self-powered and able to successfully sense vibration in the milling processes. Furthermore, by analyzing the vibration signals (i.e., through analyzing the electrical outputs of the accelerometers), criteria are successfully established for the system for real-time accurate simulations of the milling-processes and cutter-conditions (such as cutter-wear conditions and cutter-breaking occurrence). Due to these results, our approach can be applied to most milling and other machining machines in factories to realize more smart machining technologies. PMID:26907297

  8. DNA mimicry by proteins.

    PubMed

    Dryden, D T F; Tock, M R

    2006-04-01

    It has been discovered recently, via structural and biophysical analyses, that proteins can mimic DNA structures in order to inhibit proteins that would normally bind to DNA. Mimicry of the phosphate backbone of DNA, the hydrogen-bonding properties of the nucleotide bases and the bending and twisting of the DNA double helix are all present in the mimics discovered to date. These mimics target a range of proteins and enzymes such as DNA restriction enzymes, DNA repair enzymes, DNA gyrase and nucleosomal and nucleoid-associated proteins. The unusual properties of these protein DNA mimics may provide a foundation for the design of targeted inhibitors of DNA-binding proteins. PMID:16545103

  9. Type I restriction endonucleases are true catalytic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Bianco, Piero R; Xu, Cuiling; Chi, Min

    2009-06-01

    Type I restriction endonucleases are intriguing, multifunctional complexes that restrict DNA randomly, at sites distant from the target sequence. Restriction at distant sites is facilitated by ATP hydrolysis-dependent, translocation of double-stranded DNA towards the stationary enzyme bound at the recognition sequence. Following restriction, the enzymes are thought to remain associated with the DNA at the target site, hydrolyzing copious amounts of ATP. As a result, for the past 35 years type I restriction endonucleases could only be loosely classified as enzymes since they functioned stoichiometrically relative to DNA. To further understand enzyme mechanism, a detailed analysis of DNA cleavage by the EcoR124I holoenzyme was done. We demonstrate for the first time that type I restriction endonucleases are not stoichiometric but are instead catalytic with respect to DNA. Further, the mechanism involves formation of a dimer of holoenzymes, with each monomer bound to a target sequence and, following cleavage, each dissociates in an intact form to bind and restrict subsequent DNA molecules. Therefore, type I restriction endonucleases, like their type II counterparts, are true enzymes. The conclusion that type I restriction enzymes are catalytic relative to DNA has important implications for the in vivo function of these previously enigmatic enzymes.

  10. Final Report: Very Low Friction Small Radius Dome Cutters for Percussion Bits - Phase II Development Efforts, April 1, 1997 - September 1, 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Pixton, David S.

    1999-07-15

    Phase II efforts to develop very low friction (polished) small radius cutters for drill bits are discussed. Key developments under this contract include: (1) improvements to robustness of polycrystalline diamond coatings enabling their use on sharper cutter shapes; (2) polishable coating materials which exhibit improved polish retention; and (3) a means of polishing a non-planar polycrystalline diamond surface economically. Field tests have shown acceptability of new small radius cutters, but have yet to show benefits of polishing. Further field tests are planned.

  11. Restricting retrotransposons: a review.

    PubMed

    Goodier, John L

    2016-01-01

    Retrotransposons have generated about 40 % of the human genome. This review examines the strategies the cell has evolved to coexist with these genomic "parasites", focussing on the non-long terminal repeat retrotransposons of humans and mice. Some of the restriction factors for retrotransposition, including the APOBECs, MOV10, RNASEL, SAMHD1, TREX1, and ZAP, also limit replication of retroviruses, including HIV, and are part of the intrinsic immune system of the cell. Many of these proteins act in the cytoplasm to degrade retroelement RNA or inhibit its translation. Some factors act in the nucleus and involve DNA repair enzymes or epigenetic processes of DNA methylation and histone modification. RISC and piRNA pathway proteins protect the germline. Retrotransposon control is relaxed in some cell types, such as neurons in the brain, stem cells, and in certain types of disease and cancer, with implications for human health and disease. This review also considers potential pitfalls in interpreting retrotransposon-related data, as well as issues to consider for future research. PMID:27525044

  12. TBM performance prediction in Yucca Mountain welded tuff from linear cutter tests

    SciTech Connect

    Gertsch, R.; Ozdemir, L.; Gertsch, L.

    1992-11-01

    This paper discusses performance prediction which were developed for tunnel boring machines operating in welded tuff for the construction of the experimental study facility and the potential nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. The predictions were based on test data obtained from an extensive series of linear cutting tests performed on samples of Topopah String welded tuff from the Yucca Mountain Project site. Using the cutter force, spacing, and penetration data from the experimental program, the thrust, torque, power, and rate of penetration were estimated for a 25 ft diameter tunnel boring machine (TBM) operating in welded tuff. The result show that the Topopah Spring welded tuff (TSw2) can be excavated at relatively high rates of advance with state-of-the-art TBMs. The result also show, however, that the TBM torque and power requirements will be higher than estimated based on rock physical properties and past tunneling experience in rock formations of similar strength.

  13. The Evolutionary Innovation of Nutritional Symbioses in Leaf-Cutter Ants

    PubMed Central

    Aylward, Frank O.; Currie, Cameron R.; Suen, Garret

    2012-01-01

    Fungus-growing ants gain access to nutrients stored in plant biomass through their association with a mutualistic fungus they grow for food. This 50 million-year-old obligate mutualism likely facilitated some of these species becoming dominant Neotropical herbivores that can achieve immense colony sizes. Recent culture-independent investigations have shed light on the conversion of plant biomass into nutrients within ant fungus gardens, revealing that this process involves both the fungal cultivar and a symbiotic community of bacteria including Enterobacter, Klebsiella, and Pantoea species. Moreover, the genome sequences of the leaf-cutter ants Atta cephalotes and Acromyrmex echinatior have provided key insights into how this symbiosis has shaped the evolution of these ants at a genetic level. Here we summarize the findings of recent research on the microbial community dynamics within fungus-growing ant fungus gardens and discuss their implications for this ancient symbiosis. PMID:26467948

  14. Half life of chromium in serum and urine in a former plasma cutter of stainless steel

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, R.; Thomsen, J. F.; Jorgensen, N. K.; Mikkelsen, S.

    2000-01-01

    For 8 years chromium in serum and urine has been followed up in a former plasma cutter of stainless steel who was exposed to airborne dust and fumes containing chromium during this work. After the first examination for serum chromium the exposure ended. Serum chromium concentration has been measured seven times during the period and was initially very high and has subsequently dropped slowly. The half life was 40 months in serum. Urinary chromium has been measured five times. The half life was 129 months in urine. The study shows that exposure to airborne dust and fumes containing chromium may cause accumulation of chromium in the body, and that when exposure ends, elimination of chromium is very slow. Previous studies suggest that chromium mainly accumulates in the lungs.


Keywords: chromium half life; plasma cutting; stainless steel PMID:10711283

  15. Hydraulic Resistance of Vitreous Cutters: The Impact of Blade Design and Cut Rate

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Tommaso; Querzoli, Giorgio; Angelini, Giampiero; Malvasi, Carlo; Rossi, Alessandro; Morini, Mario; Esposito, Graziana; Micera, Alessandra; di Luca, Natale Mario; Ripandelli, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To measure the hydraulic resistance (HR) of vitreous cutters equipped with a Regular guillotine Blade (RB) or double edge blade (DEB) at cut rates comprised between 0 and 12,000 cuts per minute (CPM) and compare it with vitreous fragment size. This was an in vitro experimental study; in vivo HR measure and vitreous sampling. Methods HR, defined as aspiration pressure/flow rate, was measured in balanced salt solution (BSS; Alcon, Fort Worth, TX) (in vitro) and during pars plana vitrectomy of 20 consecutive patients aged 18 to 65, undergoing macular surgery. HR was recorded at increasing cut rates (500–6000 CPM for the RB and 500–12,000 CPM for the DEB; 5 mL/min flow). Vitreous samples were withdrawn and analyzed with Western and collagen type II and IX immunostaining to evaluate protein size. The main outcome measures were hydraulic resistance (mm Hg/ml/min [±SD]) and optic density for Western blot and immunostaining. Results RB and DEB showed identical HR in BSS between 0 and 3000 CPM. Above 3000 CPM, RB HR steadily increased, and was significantly higher than DEB HR. Vitreous HR was also similar for the two blades between 0 and 1500 CPM. Above 1500 CPM, RB offered a significantly higher resistance. Western blot and immunostaining of vitreous samples did not yield a significant difference in size, regardless of blade type and cut rate. Conclusions DEB is more efficient, offering a lower HR than RB over 1500 CPM in human vitreous. There is no viscosity reduction as a function of cut-rate between 1500 and 12,000 CPM, as HR does not vary. Translational Relevance Future vitreous cutters will benefit of a DEB; optimal cut rate needs to be defined, and the simple increase of cut rate does not provide benefits after a certain limit to be assessed. PMID:27441099

  16. The Type I Restriction Enzymes as Barriers to Horizontal Gene Transfer: Determination of the DNA Target Sequences Recognised by Livestock-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Clonal Complexes 133/ST771 and 398.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kai; Stephanou, Augoustinos S; Roberts, Gareth A; White, John H; Cooper, Laurie P; Houston, Patrick J; Lindsay, Jodi A; Dryden, David T F

    2016-01-01

    The Type I DNA restriction-modification (RM) systems of Staphylococcus aureus are known to act as a significant barrier to horizontal gene transfer between S. aureus strains belonging to different clonal complexes. The livestock-associated clonal complexes CC133/771 and CC398 contain Type I RM systems not found in human MRSA strains as yet but at some point transfer will occur. When this does take place, horizontal gene transfer of resistance will happen more easily between these strains. The reservoir of antibiotic resistance, virulence and host-adaptation genes present in livestock-associated MRSA will then potentially contribute to the development of newly evolving MRSA clones. The target sites recognised by the Type I RM systems of CC133/771 and CC398 were identified as CAG(N)5RTGA and ACC(N)5RTGA, respectively. Assuming that these enzymes recognise the methylation state of adenine, the underlined A and T bases indicate the unique positions of methylation. Target methylation points for enzymes from CC1 were also identified. The methylation points for CC1-1 are CCAY(N)5TTAA and those for CC1-2 are CCAY(N)6 TGT with the underline indicating the adenine methylation site thus clearing up the ambiguity noted previously (Roberts et al. 2013, Nucleic Acids Res 41:7472-7484) for the half sites containing two adenine bases. PMID:27193539

  17. Genome-Wide Mapping of Growth-Related Quantitative Trait Loci in Orange-Spotted Grouper (Epinephelus coioides) Using Double Digest Restriction-Site Associated DNA Sequencing (ddRADseq)

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hui; You, Xinxin; Li, Jia; Liu, Hankui; Meng, Zining; Xiao, Ling; Zhang, Haifa; Lin, Hao-Ran; Zhang, Yong; Shi, Qiong

    2016-01-01

    Mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTL) is essential for the discovery of genetic structures that related to complex quantitative traits. In this study, we identified 264,072 raw SNPs (single-nucleotide polymorphisms) by double digest restriction site associated DNA sequencing (ddRADseq), and utilized 3029 of these SNPs to construct a genetic linkage map in orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides) using a regression mapping algorithm. The genetic map contained 24 linkage groups (LGs) spanning a total genetic distance of 1231.98 cM. Twenty-seven significant growth-related QTLs were identified. Furthermore, we identified 17 genes (fez2, alg3, ece2, arvcf, sla27a4, sgk223, camk2, prrc2b, mchr1, sardh, pappa, syk, tert, wdrcp91, ftz-f1, mate1 and notch1) including three (tert, ftz-f1 and notch1) that have been reported to be involved in fish growth. To summarize, we mapped growth-related QTLs in the orange-spotted grouper. These QTLs will be useful in marker-assisted selection (MAS) efforts to improve growth-related traits in this economically important fish. PMID:27058532

  18. The Type I Restriction Enzymes as Barriers to Horizontal Gene Transfer: Determination of the DNA Target Sequences Recognised by Livestock-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Clonal Complexes 133/ST771 and 398.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kai; Stephanou, Augoustinos S; Roberts, Gareth A; White, John H; Cooper, Laurie P; Houston, Patrick J; Lindsay, Jodi A; Dryden, David T F

    2016-01-01

    The Type I DNA restriction-modification (RM) systems of Staphylococcus aureus are known to act as a significant barrier to horizontal gene transfer between S. aureus strains belonging to different clonal complexes. The livestock-associated clonal complexes CC133/771 and CC398 contain Type I RM systems not found in human MRSA strains as yet but at some point transfer will occur. When this does take place, horizontal gene transfer of resistance will happen more easily between these strains. The reservoir of antibiotic resistance, virulence and host-adaptation genes present in livestock-associated MRSA will then potentially contribute to the development of newly evolving MRSA clones. The target sites recognised by the Type I RM systems of CC133/771 and CC398 were identified as CAG(N)5RTGA and ACC(N)5RTGA, respectively. Assuming that these enzymes recognise the methylation state of adenine, the underlined A and T bases indicate the unique positions of methylation. Target methylation points for enzymes from CC1 were also identified. The methylation points for CC1-1 are CCAY(N)5TTAA and those for CC1-2 are CCAY(N)6 TGT with the underline indicating the adenine methylation site thus clearing up the ambiguity noted previously (Roberts et al. 2013, Nucleic Acids Res 41:7472-7484) for the half sites containing two adenine bases.

  19. Genome-Wide Mapping of Growth-Related Quantitative Trait Loci in Orange-Spotted Grouper (Epinephelus coioides) Using Double Digest Restriction-Site Associated DNA Sequencing (ddRADseq).

    PubMed

    Yu, Hui; You, Xinxin; Li, Jia; Liu, Hankui; Meng, Zining; Xiao, Ling; Zhang, Haifa; Lin, Hao-Ran; Zhang, Yong; Shi, Qiong

    2016-04-06

    Mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTL) is essential for the discovery of genetic structures that related to complex quantitative traits. In this study, we identified 264,072 raw SNPs (single-nucleotide polymorphisms) by double digest restriction site associated DNA sequencing (ddRADseq), and utilized 3029 of these SNPs to construct a genetic linkage map in orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides) using a regression mapping algorithm. The genetic map contained 24 linkage groups (LGs) spanning a total genetic distance of 1231.98 cM. Twenty-seven significant growth-related QTLs were identified. Furthermore, we identified 17 genes (fez2, alg3, ece2, arvcf, sla27a4, sgk223, camk2, prrc2b, mchr1, sardh, pappa, syk, tert, wdrcp91, ftz-f1, mate1 and notch1) including three (tert, ftz-f1 and notch1) that have been reported to be involved in fish growth. To summarize, we mapped growth-related QTLs in the orange-spotted grouper. These QTLs will be useful in marker-assisted selection (MAS) efforts to improve growth-related traits in this economically important fish.

  20. DNA Investigations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayo, Ellen S.; Bertino, Anthony J.

    1991-01-01

    Presents a simulation activity that allow students to work through the exercise of DNA profiling and to grapple with some analytical and ethical questions involving a couple arranging with a surrogate mother to have a baby. Can be used to teach the principles of restriction enzyme digestion, gel electrophoresis, and probe hybridization. (MDH)

  1. Mechanistic insight into Type I restriction endonucleases.

    PubMed

    Youell, James; Firman, Keith

    2012-06-01

    Restriction and modification are two opposing activities that are used to protect bacteria from cellular invasion by DNA (e.g. bacteriophage infection). Restriction activity involves cleavage of the DNA; while modification activity is the mechanism used to "mark" host DNA and involves DNA methylation. The study of Type I restriction enzymes has often been seen as an esoteric exercise and this reflects some of their more unusual properties - non-stoichiometric (non-catalytic) cleavage of the DNA substrate, random cleavage of DNA, a massive ATPase activity, and the ability to both cleave DNA and methylate DNA. Yet these enzymes have been found in many bacteria and are very efficient as a means of protecting bacteria against bacteriophage infection, indicating they are successful enzymes. In this review, we summarise recent work on the mechanisms of action, describe switching of function and review their mechanism of action. We also discuss structural rearrangements and cellular localisation, which provide powerful mechanisms for controlling the enzyme activity. Finally, we speculate as to their involvement in recombination and discuss their relationship to helicase enzymes.

  2. Protein-induced unwinding of DNA: measurement by gel electrophoresis of complexes with DNA minicircles. Application to restriction endonuclease EcoRI, catabolite gene activator protein and lac repressor.

    PubMed Central

    Douc-Rasy, S; Kolb, A; Prunell, A

    1989-01-01

    An electrophoretic procedure for the measurement of the helix unwinding induced by a sequence-specific protein is described. The method, which was applied here to EcoR I, CAP and lac repressor, involved the migration of the complexes with positively and negatively supercoiled DNA minicircles carrying a single protein binding site. Mobility shifts of complexes relative to naked DNAs appeared to be a result of i) the unwinding; of ii) an increase in the molecular frictional coefficient, which led to a retardation; of iii) bending, in the particular case of CAP, which induced an acceleration; and of iv) looping, in the case of lac repressor, which also resulted in an acceleration. Under conditions where the migration of the naked topoisomers was V-like (topoisomer mobility showed the same linear increase with both negative and positive supercoilings; Zivanovic et al. (1986) J. Mol. Biol., 192, 645-660), the protein unwinding contribution to mobility was assumed to be identical to that experimentally observed in the case of a thermal unwinding: all negatively supercoiled topoisomers were retarded and all positively supercoiled topoisomers were accelerated to the same extent. In contrast, the mobility contribution of the frictional term, as well as those of bending and looping, appeared to vary strongly with the magnitude of the supercoiling, but only weakly with its polarity. As a consequence, these latter contributions may approximately cancel when one is measuring the difference between the shifts observed for two comigrating, negatively and positively supercoiled, topoisomers, allowing the unwinding to be calculated. While estimates obtained for EcoR I, 23 +/- 3 degrees, and CAP, about 29 degrees, were in good agreement with previous measurements using topoisomerase I, the value found for lac repressor, 13 to 16 degrees, was significantly smaller. Images PMID:2548154

  3. Restriction/modification polypeptides, polynucleotides, and methods

    DOEpatents

    Westpheling, Janet; Chung, DaeHwan; Huddleston, Jennifer; Farkas, Joel A

    2015-02-24

    The present invention relates to the discovery of a novel restriction/modification system in Caldicellulosiruptor bescii. The discovered restriction enzyme is a HaeIII-like restriction enzyme that possesses a thermophilic activity profile. The restriction/modification system also includes a methyltransferase, M.CbeI, that methylates at least one cytosine residue in the CbeI recognition sequence to m.sup.4C. Thus, the invention provides, in various aspects, isolated CbeI or M.CbeI polypeptides, or biologically active fragments thereof; isolated polynucleotides that encode the CbeI or M.CbeI polypeptides or biologically active fragments thereof, including expression vectors that include such polynucleotide sequences; methods of digesting DNA using a CbeI polypeptide; methods of treating a DNA molecule using a M.CbeI polypeptide; and methods of transforming a Caldicellulosiruptor cell.

  4. Gastric band migration following laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB): two cases of endoscopic management using a gastric band cutter.

    PubMed

    Rogalski, Pawel; Hady, Hady Razak; Baniukiewicz, Andrzej; Dąbrowski, Andrzej; Kaminski, Fabian; Dadan, Jacek

    2012-06-01

    Laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB) is one of the most frequently used minimally invasive and reversible procedures for the treatment of morbid obesity. Migration of the gastric band into the gastric lumen is a rare late complication of LAGB. Previous attempts at endoscopic removal of migrated bands have included the use of endoscopic scissors, laser ablation and argon plasma coagulation (APC). We report two cases of successful endoscopic management of gastric band migration using a gastric band cutter. PMID:23256012

  5. 9 CFR 121.13 - Restricted experiments. 10

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... publication, “NIH Guidelines for Research Involving Recombinant DNA Molecules.” This document is available on.... (b) Restricted experiments: (1) Experiments utilizing recombinant DNA that involve the deliberate... medicine, or agriculture. (2) Experiments involving the deliberate formation of recombinant DNA...

  6. 9 CFR 121.13 - Restricted experiments. 10

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... publication, “NIH Guidelines for Research Involving Recombinant DNA Molecules.” This document is available on.... (b) Restricted experiments: (1) Experiments utilizing recombinant DNA that involve the deliberate... medicine, or agriculture. (2) Experiments involving the deliberate formation of recombinant DNA...

  7. 9 CFR 121.13 - Restricted experiments. 10

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... publication, “NIH Guidelines for Research Involving Recombinant DNA Molecules.” This document is available on.... (b) Restricted experiments: (1) Experiments utilizing recombinant DNA that involve the deliberate... medicine, or agriculture. (2) Experiments involving the deliberate formation of recombinant DNA...

  8. Metagenomic and metaproteomic insights into bacterial communities in leaf-cutter ant fungus gardens

    SciTech Connect

    Aylward, Frank O.; Burnum, Kristin E.; Scott, Jarrod J.; Suen, Garret; Tringe, Susannah G.; Adams, Sandra M.; Barry, Kerrie W.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Piehowski, Paul D.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Starrett, Gabriel J.; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Smith, Richard D.; Lipton, Mary S.; Currie, Cameron R.

    2012-09-01

    Herbivores gain access to nutrients stored in plant biomass largely by harnessing the metabolic activities of microbes. Leaf-cutter ants of the genus Atta are a hallmark example; these dominant Neotropical herbivores cultivate symbiotic fungus gardens on massive quantities of fresh plant forage. As the external digestive system of the ants, fungus gardens facilitate the production and sustenance of millions of workers in mature Atta colonies. Here we use metagenomic, and metaproteomic techniques to characterize the bacterial diversity and overall physiological potential of fungus gardens from two species of Atta. Our analysis of over 1.2 Gbp of community metagenomic sequence and three 16S pyrotag libraries reveals that, in addition to harboring the dominant fungal crop, these ecosystems contain abundant populations of Enterobacteriaceae, including the genera Enterobacter, Pantoea, Klebsiella, Citrobacter, and Escherichia. We show that these bacterial communities possess genes commonly associated with lignocellulose degradation, and likely participate in the processing of plant biomass. Additionally, we demonstrate that bacteria in these environments encode a diverse suite of biosynthetic pathways, and that they may enrich the nitrogen-poor forage of the ants with B-vitamins, amino acids, and proteins. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that fungus gardens are highly-specialized fungus-bacteria communities that efficiently convert plant material into usable energy for their ant hosts. Together with recent investigations into the microbial symbionts of vertebrates, our work underscores the importance of microbial communities to the ecology and evolution of herbivorous metazoans.

  9. TRM performance prediction in Yucca Mountain welded tuff from linear cutter tests

    SciTech Connect

    Gertsch, R.; Ozdemir, L.; Gertsch, L.

    1992-12-31

    Performance predictions were developed for tunnel boring machines operating in welded tuff for the construction of the experimental study facility and the potential nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. The predictions were based on test data obtained from an extensive series of linear cutting tests performed on samples of Topopah Spring welded tuff from the Yucca Mountain Project site. Using the cutter force, spacing, and penetration data from the experimental program, the thrust, torque, power, and rate of penetration were estimated for a 25 ft diameter tunnel boring machine (TBM) operating in welded tuff. Guidelines were developed for the optimal design of the TBM cutterhead to achieve high production rates at the lowest possible excavation costs. The results show that the Topopah Spring welded tuff (TSw2) can be excavated at relatively high rates of advance with state-of-the-art TBMs. The results also show, however, that the TBM torque and power requirements will be higher than estimated based on rock physical properties and past tunneling experience in rock formations of similar strength.

  10. Metagenomic and metaproteomic insights into bacterial communities in leaf-cutter ant fungus gardens

    PubMed Central

    Aylward, Frank O; Burnum, Kristin E; Scott, Jarrod J; Suen, Garret; Tringe, Susannah G; Adams, Sandra M; Barry, Kerrie W; Nicora, Carrie D; Piehowski, Paul D; Purvine, Samuel O; Starrett, Gabriel J; Goodwin, Lynne A; Smith, Richard D; Lipton, Mary S; Currie, Cameron R

    2012-01-01

    Herbivores gain access to nutrients stored in plant biomass largely by harnessing the metabolic activities of microbes. Leaf-cutter ants of the genus Atta are a hallmark example; these dominant neotropical herbivores cultivate symbiotic fungus gardens on large quantities of fresh plant forage. As the external digestive system of the ants, fungus gardens facilitate the production and sustenance of millions of workers. Using metagenomic and metaproteomic techniques, we characterize the bacterial diversity and physiological potential of fungus gardens from two species of Atta. Our analysis of over 1.2 Gbp of community metagenomic sequence and three 16S pyrotag libraries reveals that in addition to harboring the dominant fungal crop, these ecosystems contain abundant populations of Enterobacteriaceae, including the genera Enterobacter, Pantoea, Klebsiella, Citrobacter and Escherichia. We show that these bacterial communities possess genes associated with lignocellulose degradation and diverse biosynthetic pathways, suggesting that they play a role in nutrient cycling by converting the nitrogen-poor forage of the ants into B-vitamins, amino acids and other cellular components. Our metaproteomic analysis confirms that bacterial glycosyl hydrolases and proteins with putative biosynthetic functions are produced in both field-collected and laboratory-reared colonies. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that fungus gardens are specialized fungus–bacteria communities that convert plant material into energy for their ant hosts. Together with recent investigations into the microbial symbionts of vertebrates, our work underscores the importance of microbial communities in the ecology and evolution of herbivorous metazoans. PMID:22378535

  11. Water Erosion on Mars: Extension of the GEMS Guide ``River Cutters" to the Surface of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, J. L.; Buratti, B. J.

    2001-11-01

    The possibility of water and life on Mars has captured the imagination of scientists and others the world around. For this reason, NASA and JPL have planned no fewer than 6 missions to Mars scheduled for the next decade. These missions include orbiters, landers, and even return missions, as the community would like samples of rocks from the Martian surface. Given the interest in Mars, it is important to find ways of informing the public of NASA's mission to that planet. The method described here is the development of a lesson plan for elementary and middle school students concerning water erosion and the implications for life on Mars. We used the basic procedure from the GEMS (Great Explorations in Math and Science) plan outlined in ``River Cutters", developed by UC Berkeley's Lawrence Hall of Science. Water erosion caused by running water is simulated in the classroom. The features created are compared to features on Viking and Mars Global Surveyor images. The goal is to have students discover the past history of Mars, with particular emphasis on the role water may have played in the Martian surface. Funded by NSF

  12. Tooth hardness increases with zinc-content in mandibles of young adult leaf-cutter ants.

    PubMed

    Schofield, Robert M S; Nesson, Michael H; Richardson, Kathleen A

    2002-12-01

    A wide variety of arthropods and members of other phyla have elevated concentrations of Zn, Mn, other heavy metals and halogens in their jaws, leg claws, and other "tools" for interacting with the environment. While measured Zn concentrations reach 25% of dry mass in scorpion stings, concentrations are often lower than this and the enriched structures are not heavily biomineralized like vertebrate teeth and the radula of mollusks. For this reason, the degree to which the inorganic components of these structures modify their mechanical properties is in question. Here we address this problem by measuring hardness during the development of Zn accumulations in ant mandibles. We found that Zn is incorporated into the mandibular teeth of leaf-cutter ants during early adult life, reaching concentrations of about 16% of dry mass. We show that the hardness of the mandibular teeth increases nearly three-fold as the adults age and that hardness correlates with Zn content ( r=0.91). We suggest that young adults rarely cut leaves partly because their mandibles are not yet rich in Zn. Zinc enrichment (along with enrichment by other heavy metals and halogens) may play an unrecognized role in the behavioral ecology and evolution of a wide variety of invertebrates.

  13. The fungus gardens of leaf-cutter ants undergo a distinct physiological transition during biomass degradation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Eric L; Aylward, Frank O; Kim, Young-Mo; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M; Nicora, Carrie D; Hu, Zeping; Metz, Thomas O; Lipton, Mary S; Smith, Richard D; Currie, Cameron R; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E

    2014-08-01

    Leaf-cutter ants are dominant herbivores in ecosystems throughout the Neotropics that feed on fungus gardens cultivated on fresh foliar biomass. Although recent investigations have shed light on how plant biomass is degraded in fungus gardens, the cycling of nutrients that takes place in these specialized microbial ecosystems is still not well understood. Here, using metabolomic and metaproteomic techniques, we examine the dynamics of nutrient turnover in these gardens. Our results reveal that numerous free amino acids and sugars are depleted throughout the process of biomass degradation, indicating that easily accessible nutrients from plant material are readily consumed by microbes in these ecosystems. Accumulation of cellobiose and lignin derivatives near the end of the degradation process is consistent with previous characterization of lignocellulases produced by the fungal cultivar of the ants. Our results also suggest that ureides may be an important source of nitrogen in fungus gardens, especially during nitrogen-limiting conditions. No free arginine was detected in our metabolomic experiments despite evidence that the host ants cannot produce this amino acid, suggesting that biosynthesis of this metabolite may be tightly regulated in fungus gardens. These results provide new insights into microbial community-level processes that underlie this important ant-fungus symbiosis.

  14. Tooth hardness increases with zinc-content in mandibles of young adult leaf-cutter ants.

    PubMed

    Schofield, Robert M S; Nesson, Michael H; Richardson, Kathleen A

    2002-12-01

    A wide variety of arthropods and members of other phyla have elevated concentrations of Zn, Mn, other heavy metals and halogens in their jaws, leg claws, and other "tools" for interacting with the environment. While measured Zn concentrations reach 25% of dry mass in scorpion stings, concentrations are often lower than this and the enriched structures are not heavily biomineralized like vertebrate teeth and the radula of mollusks. For this reason, the degree to which the inorganic components of these structures modify their mechanical properties is in question. Here we address this problem by measuring hardness during the development of Zn accumulations in ant mandibles. We found that Zn is incorporated into the mandibular teeth of leaf-cutter ants during early adult life, reaching concentrations of about 16% of dry mass. We show that the hardness of the mandibular teeth increases nearly three-fold as the adults age and that hardness correlates with Zn content ( r=0.91). We suggest that young adults rarely cut leaves partly because their mandibles are not yet rich in Zn. Zinc enrichment (along with enrichment by other heavy metals and halogens) may play an unrecognized role in the behavioral ecology and evolution of a wide variety of invertebrates. PMID:12536282

  15. Identification and characterization of LA08NC01 cosmids containing rare cutter AscI sites

    SciTech Connect

    Schertzer, M.; Wood, S.; Yaremko, M.L.

    1994-09-01

    LA08NC01 is a flow-sorted human chromosome 8 cosmid library that was constructed and arrayed at Los Alamos. We have used this library to produce a sub-library of those cosmids containing AscI (GGCGCGCC) sites, which are therefore AscI-linking clones. Two protocols have been employed to identify AscI sites. The first protocol relies upon restriction digestion for cloning into doubly digesting plasmids and thereby recovering an end clone. The second protocol relies upon sequence directly, by using a 12-mer NNNNGGCGCGCC as a DNA hybridization probe. Using these protocols we have identified and confirmed 44 cosmids that contain AscI sites. Our goal is to develop markers that are rich in information. Consequently, these cosmids have been screened for CA repeats, which provide a polymorphic STS. The region surrounding the AscI site has been sequenced to provide an identifier and developed as an STS site for those cosmids lacking a CA repeat. The sequence identifier has been used for sequence database library searches. We have identified 3 genes from 8p after screening the identifiers for 10 cosmids. In addition, we have found 2 additional AscI sites from the known genes SFTP2 and POLB. Identification of the AscI site adjacent to POLB required a chromosome walk of 2 steps. Many of these cosmids are rich in information since they are frequently polymorphic, contain STS sites, provide linking clones for PFGE mapping, and often encode genes that may be placed on expression maps. In conclusion, while the total number of identified cosmids is small, the majority of them are extremely rich in information.

  16. How restriction enzymes became the workhorses of molecular biology

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Richard J.

    2005-01-01

    Restriction enzymes have proved to be invaluable for the physical mapping of DNA. They offer unparalleled opportunities for diagnosing DNA sequence content and are used in fields as disparate as criminal forensics and basic research. In fact, without restriction enzymes, the biotechnology industry would certainly not have flourished as it has. The first experiments demonstrating the utility of restriction enzymes were carried out by Danna and Nathans and reported in 1971. This pioneering study set the stage for the modern practice of molecular biology in which restriction enzymes are ubiquitous tools, although they are often taken for granted. PMID:15840723

  17. [DNA computing].

    PubMed

    Błasiak, Janusz; Krasiński, Tadeusz; Popławski, Tomasz; Sakowski, Sebastian

    2011-01-01

    Biocomputers can be an alternative for traditional "silicon-based" computers, which continuous development may be limited due to further miniaturization (imposed by the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle) and increasing the amount of information between the central processing unit and the main memory (von Neuman bottleneck). The idea of DNA computing came true for the first time in 1994, when Adleman solved the Hamiltonian Path Problem using short DNA oligomers and DNA ligase. In the early 2000s a series of biocomputer models was presented with a seminal work of Shapiro and his colleguas who presented molecular 2 state finite automaton, in which the restriction enzyme, FokI, constituted hardware and short DNA oligomers were software as well as input/output signals. DNA molecules provided also energy for this machine. DNA computing can be exploited in many applications, from study on the gene expression pattern to diagnosis and therapy of cancer. The idea of DNA computing is still in progress in research both in vitro and in vivo and at least promising results of these research allow to have a hope for a breakthrough in the computer science. PMID:21735816

  18. A new restriction endonuclease from Citrobacter freundii

    PubMed Central

    Janulaitis, A.A.; Stakenas, P.S.; Lebedenko, E.N.; Berlin, Yu.A.

    1982-01-01

    CfrI, a new restriction endonuclease of unique substrate specificity, has been isolated from a Citrobacter freundii strain. The enzyme recognizes a degenerated sequence PyGGCCPu in double-strand DNA and cleaves it between Py and G residues to yield 5′ -protruding tetranucleotide ends GGCC. Images PMID:6294607

  19. Disc size regulation in the brood cell building behavior of leaf-cutter bee, Megachile tsurugensis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jong-Yoon

    2007-12-01

    The leaf-cutter bee, Megachile tsurugensis, builds a brood cell in a preexisting tunnel with leaf discs that she cuts in decreasing sizes and assembles them like a Russian matryoshka doll. By experimentally manipulating the brood cell, it was investigated how she regulates the size of leaf discs that fit in the brood cell’s internal volume. When the internal volume was artificially increased by removing a bulk of leaf discs, she decreased the leaf disc size, although increasing it would have made the leaf disc more fitting in the increased internal volume. As a reverse manipulation, when the internal volume was decreased by inserting a group of inner layers of preassembled leaf discs to a brood cell, she decreased the leaf disc size, so that the leaf disc could fit in the decreased internal volume. These results suggest that she uses at least two different mechanisms to regulate the disc size: the use of some internal memory about the degree of building work accomplished in the first and of sensory feedback of dimensional information at the construction site in the second manipulation, respectively. It was concluded that a stigmergic mechanism, an immediate sensory feedback from the brood cell changed by the building work, alone cannot explain the details of the bee’s behavior particularly with respect to her initial response to the first manipulation. For a more complete explanation of the behavior exhibited by the solitary bee, two additional behavioral elements, reinforcement of building activity and processing of dimensional information, were discussed along with stigmergy.

  20. Disc size regulation in the brood cell building behavior of leaf-cutter bee, Megachile tsurugensis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong-yoon

    2007-12-01

    The leaf-cutter bee, Megachile tsurugensis, builds a brood cell in a preexisting tunnel with leaf discs that she cuts in decreasing sizes and assembles them like a Russian matryoshka doll. By experimentally manipulating the brood cell, it was investigated how she regulates the size of leaf discs that fit in the brood cell's internal volume. When the internal volume was artificially increased by removing a bulk of leaf discs, she decreased the leaf disc size, although increasing it would have made the leaf disc more fitting in the increased internal volume. As a reverse manipulation, when the internal volume was decreased by inserting a group of inner layers of preassembled leaf discs to a brood cell, she decreased the leaf disc size, so that the leaf disc could fit in the decreased internal volume. These results suggest that she uses at least two different mechanisms to regulate the disc size: the use of some internal memory about the degree of building work accomplished in the first and of sensory feedback of dimensional information at the construction site in the second manipulation, respectively. It was concluded that a stigmergic mechanism, an immediate sensory feedback from the brood cell changed by the building work, alone cannot explain the details of the bee's behavior particularly with respect to her initial response to the first manipulation. For a more complete explanation of the behavior exhibited by the solitary bee, two additional behavioral elements, reinforcement of building activity and processing of dimensional information, were discussed along with stigmergy. PMID:17563863

  1. Restriction of bacteriophage plaque formation in Streptomyces spp.

    PubMed

    Cox, K L; Baltz, R H

    1984-08-01

    Several Streptomyces species that produce restriction endonucleases were characterized for their ability to propagate 10 different broad host range bacteriophages. Each species displayed a different pattern of plaque formation. A restrictionless mutant of S. albus G allowed plaque formation by all 10 phages, whereas the wild-type strain showed plaques with only 2 phages. DNA isolated from three of the phages was analyzed for the presence of restriction sites for Streptomyces species-encoded enzymes, and a very strong correlation was established between the failure to form plaques on Streptomyces species that produced particular restriction enzymes and the presence of the corresponding restriction sites in the phage DNA. Also, the phages that lacked restriction sites in their DNA generally formed plaques on the corresponding restriction endonuclease-producing hosts at high efficiency. The DNAs from the three phages analyzed also generally contained either many or no restriction sites for the Streptomyces species-produced enzymes, suggesting a strong evolutionary trend to either eliminate all or tolerate many restriction sites. The data indicate that restriction plays a major role in host range determination for Streptomyces phages. Analysis of bacteriophage host ranges of many other uncharacterized Streptomyces hosts has identified four relatively nonrestricting hosts, at least two of which may be suitable hosts for gene cloning. The data also suggest that several restriction systems remain to be identified in the genus Streptomyces.

  2. Alternating vs. direct current: A transient study of the U.S. Coast Guard's 270 foot medium endurance cutter's electrical distribution system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutton, Keoni Alexander

    While the United States Navy has conducted extensive research into the use of shipboard DC zonal electrical distribution systems (ZED), no project has analyzed the benefits for installation on a Coast Guard cutter which has a significantly different load profile than Navy warships. Simulink models of the existing 270' medium endurance cutter (WMEC) AC radial electrical distribution system and a proposed DC ZED system were created and tested with three transients. The result demonstrated a significant reduction in settling time and an increased robustness caused by the insulation provided by the introduction of power electronic converters. Beyond the transients, a DC ZED provides better standardized installation for any ship reducing construction costs and timelines, and simplifying training and support. Additionally, the DCZED increases a ship's innate survivability by reducing longitudinal cables that penetrate watertight bulkheads increasing a boundaries effectiveness. The Coast Guard would be best served by pushing for a zonal distribution system on all future cutter acquisitions.

  3. Enzyme-linked immunoelectrotransfer blot analysis of a cryptosporidiosis outbreak on a United States Coast Guard cutter.

    PubMed

    Moss, D M; Bennett, S N; Arrowood, M J; Wahlquist, S P; Lammie, P J

    1998-01-01

    Symptoms consistent with an outbreak of cryptosporidiosis (diarrhea, vomiting, nausea, and abdominal cramps) occurred on a U.S. Coast Guard cutter within 0-18 days after the cutter filled its tanks with Milwaukee, Wisconsin city water in March 1993. At three-weeks postdocking (PD), the suspected water was removed, and serum samples and stool specimens were collected from 47 of the 58 crew members, as well as questionnaire data on their water consumption and symptoms aboard the cutter. At 10-weeks PD and/or at 28-weeks PD, additional serum specimens were collected. Intensitometric data from enzyme-linked immunoelectrotransfer blot (EITB) were obtained on IgA responses to a 17-kD antigen group, IgM responses to a 27-kD antigen group, and IgG responses to 27-, 17-, and 15-kD antigen groups extracted from oocysts. In addition, IgG responses to crude oocyst antigens were obtained by ELISA. Based on reported symptoms, EITB results, and stool examination, the crew members were classified as confirmed (10), probable (10), suspected (22), and noncases (16). Of the 10 confirmed cases (all symptomatic) and the 10 probable cases (eight symptomatic) whose stools were positive and negative, respectively, for Cryptosporidium oocysts by microscopy, all showed changes in EITB intensities to the antigen groups and were considered EITB positive. The remaining 38 crew members, 22 suspected cases (all symptomatic), and 16 noncases (all asymptomatic), if tested, had negative stool examinations and were considered EITB negative. Of the 10 confirmed cases, only four showed a significant change in IgG responses (P < 0.05) between three-weeks PD and follow-up serum specimens by ELISA. Crew members considered confirmed cases consumed significantly more water (P < or = 0.005) aboard the cutter than noncases. Crew members considered EITB positive consumed more water (P < or = 0.04) than crew members considered EITB negative while there was no significant difference in water consumption (P > or

  4. Comparison of standard 4-row versus 6-row 3-D linear cutter stapler in creation of gastrointestinal system anastomoses: a prospective randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Sozutek, Alper; Colak, Tahsin; Dag, Ahmet; Olmez, Tolga

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This prospective study was conducted to compare the clinical outcomes of a 6-row 3-D linear cutter with the standard 4-row linear cutter in patients who underwent elective gastrointestinal surgery anastomosis. METHOD: Patients who underwent elective open gastrointestinal surgery that included stapled anastomosis using a linear cutter (Proximate®, Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Cincinnati, OH) between January 2011 and May 2011 were included in the study. The patients were randomly assigned to two groups according to the linear cutter that was used in the surgery: the standard 4-row cutter (the S group) or the new 6-row cutter (the N group). The groups were compared based on the patient demographic data, the laboratory parameters, the preoperative diagnosis, the surgery performed, the operation time, intra- or postoperative complications, the time to oral tolerance and the length of the hospital stay. RESULTS: The S group included 11 male and nine female patients with a mean age of 65±12 (35-84) years, while the N group included 13 male and eight female patients with a mean age of 62±11 (46-79) years (p = 0.448, p = 0.443, respectively). Anastomotic line bleeding was observed in eight (40%) patients in the S group and in one (4.7%) patient in the N group (p = 0.006). Dehiscence of the anastomosis line was observed in two (10%) patients in the S group and none in the N group (p = 0.131). Anastomotic leakage developed in three (15%) patients in the S group and in one (4.7%) patient in the N group (p = 0.269). The mean hospital stay was 12.65±6.1 days in the S group and 9.52±2.9 days in the N group (p = 0.043). CONCLUSION: The 6-row 3-D linear cutter is a safe and easily applied instrument that can be used to create anastomoses in gastrointestinal surgery. The new stapler provides some usage benefits and is also superior to the standard linear cutter with regard to anastomotic line bleeding. PMID:23018300

  5. Enzymatic Production of Monoclonal Stoichiometric Single-Stranded DNA Oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Ducani, Cosimo; Kaul, Corinna; Moche, Martin; Shih, William M.; Högberg, Björn

    2013-01-01

    Single-stranded oligonucleotides are important as research tools as probes for diagnostics and gene therapy. Today, production of oligonucleotides is done via solid-phase synthesis. However, the capabilities of current polymer chemistry are limited in comparison to what can be produced in biological systems. The errors in synthetic DNA increases with oligonucleotide length, and sequence diversity can often be a problem. Here, we present the Monoclonal Stoichiometric (MOSIC) method for enzymatic DNA oligonucleotide production. Using this method, we amplify oligonucleotides from clonal templates followed by digestion of a cutter-hairpin, resulting in pools of monoclonal oligonucleotides with precisely controlled relative stoichiometric ratios. We present data where MOSIC oligonucleotides, 14–378 nt long, were prepared either by in vitro rolling-circle amplification, or by amplification in Escherichia coli in the form of phagemid DNA. The formation of a DNA crystal and folding of DNA nanostructures confirmed the scalability, purity and stoichiometry of the produced oligonucleotides. PMID:23727986

  6. Performance prediction of mechanical excavators from linear cutter tests on Yucca Mountain welded tuffs; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Gertsch, R.; Ozdemir, L.

    1992-09-01

    The performances of mechanical excavators are predicted for excavations in welded tuff. Emphasis is given to tunnel boring machine evaluations based on linear cutting machine test data obtained on samples of Topopah Spring welded tuff. The tests involve measurement of forces as cutters are applied to the rock surface at certain spacing and penetrations. Two disc and two point-attack cutters representing currently available technology are thus evaluated. The performance predictions based on these direct experimental measurements are believed to be more accurate than any previous values for mechanical excavation of welded tuff. The calculations of performance are predicated on minimizing the amount of energy required to excavate the welded tuff. Specific energy decreases with increasing spacing and penetration, and reaches its lowest at the widest spacing and deepest penetration used in this test program. Using the force, spacing, and penetration data from this experimental program, the thrust, torque, power, and rate of penetration are calculated for several types of mechanical excavators. The results of this study show that the candidate excavators will require higher torque and power than heretofore estimated.

  7. Bos indicus-cross feedlot cattle with excitable temperaments have tougher meat and a higher incidence of borderline dark cutters.

    PubMed

    Voisinet, B D; Grandin, T; O'Connor, S F; Tatum, J D; Deesing, M J

    1997-08-01

    Temperament ratings based on a numerical scale (chute score) were assessed during weighing and handling of cattle at a feedlot. Breeds studied included Braford, Red Brangus and Simbrah. Cattle were fed to a constant fat thickness of 9 to 13 mm (target = 11 mm) over the 12th rib as determined by periodic ultrasound measurements. Cattle were slaughtered in a commercial slaughter plant and stunned by captive bolt. Temperament rating had a significant effect on the incidence of borderline dark cutters which were downgraded by a USDA grader (P = 0.01). Temperament score also had a significant effect on tenderness (P < 0.001) as evaluated by Warner-Bratzler Shear (WBS) force at day 14 post mortem. The calmest animals which stood still when restrained in a hydraulic squeeze chute had a mean WBS force of 2.86 ± 11 kg and cattle which became highly agitated and struggled violently during restraint averaged 3.63 ± 19 kg. Forty percent of these cattle had WBS force values which were over 3.9 kg which is a threshold value for acceptability in food service establishments. These data show that cattle with the most excitable temperament ratings produce carcasses with tougher meat and a higher incidence of borderline dark cutters than cattle with calm temperament ratings.

  8. On the bi-dimensional variational decomposition applied to nonstationary vibration signals for rolling bearing crack detection in coal cutters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yu; Li, Zhixiong; Zhang, Chao; Hu, Chao; Peng, Z.

    2016-06-01

    This work aims to detect rolling bearing cracks using a variational approach. An original method that appropriately incorporates bi-dimensional variational mode decomposition (BVMD) into discriminant diffusion maps (DDM) is proposed to analyze the nonstationary vibration signals recorded from the cracked rolling bearings in coal cutters. The advantage of this variational decomposition based diffusion map (VDDM) method in comparison to the current DDM is that the intrinsic vibration mode of the crack can be filtered into a limited bandwidth in the frequency domain with an estimated central frequency, thus discarding the interference signal components in the vibration signals and significantly improving the crack detection performance. In addition, the VDDM is able to simultaneously process two-channel sensor signals to reduce information leakage. Experimental validation using rolling bearing crack vibration signals demonstrates that the VDDM separated the raw signals into four intrinsic modes, including one roller vibration mode, one roller cage vibration mode, one inner race vibration mode, and one outer race vibration mode. Hence, reliable fault features were extracted from the outer race vibration mode, and satisfactory crack identification performance was achieved. The comparison between the proposed VDDM and existing approaches indicated that the VDDM method was more efficient and reliable for crack detection in coal cutter rolling bearings. As an effective catalyst for rolling bearing crack detection, this newly proposed method is useful for practical applications.

  9. A Failure Analysis Conducted on a Fractured AISI 5160 Steel Blade Which Separated from an Agricultural Rotary Cutter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Alan A.; Storey, Randall J.

    2011-07-01

    One of the six blades of an agricultural rotary cutter used for cutting down small trees and bushes broke into two pieces while the blades were rotating. One piece was hurled from the cutter and struck a young farmer, who had been operating the machine, causing a near fatal leg injury. In the ensuing litigation against the manufacturers and marketer of the machine each litigant retained a metallurgist and other experts. The metallurgists jointly directed laboratory work on the broken blade conducted at an independent laboratory according to a protocol which they developed and which was approved by the court. As a result of the laboratory work the present authors, working for the Plaintiffs, concluded that failure of the blade occurred because it contained quench cracks introduced when it was manufactured. The Defendants' metallurgists concluded that the blade had been misassembled onto the machine and, as a result, had failed by fatigue. Eventually, the case was set for a jury trial in a Circuit Court in rural Kentucky. The jury found for the Plaintiffs and awarded them $5.9 million in damages. Part of this judgement was later reversed by the Kentucky Court of Appeals and the case was then settled without a second trial under terms which were not revealed.

  10. Leaf-Cutter Ant Fungus Gardens Are Biphasic Mixed Microbial Bioreactors That Convert Plant Biomass to Polyols with Biotechnological Applications

    PubMed Central

    Somera, Alexandre F.; Lima, Adriel M.; dos Santos-Neto, Álvaro J.; Lanças, Fernando M.

    2015-01-01

    Leaf-cutter ants use plant matter to culture the obligate mutualistic basidiomycete Leucoagaricus gongylophorus. This fungus mediates ant nutrition on plant resources. Furthermore, other microbes living in the fungus garden might also contribute to plant digestion. The fungus garden comprises a young sector with recently incorporated leaf fragments and an old sector with partially digested plant matter. Here, we show that the young and old sectors of the grass-cutter Atta bisphaerica fungus garden operate as a biphasic solid-state mixed fermenting system. An initial plant digestion phase occurred in the young sector in the fungus garden periphery, with prevailing hemicellulose and starch degradation into arabinose, mannose, xylose, and glucose. These products support fast microbial growth but were mostly converted into four polyols. Three polyols, mannitol, arabitol, and inositol, were secreted by L. gongylophorus, and a fourth polyol, sorbitol, was likely secreted by another, unidentified, microbe. A second plant digestion phase occurred in the old sector, located in the fungus garden core, comprising stocks of microbial biomass growing slowly on monosaccharides and polyols. This biphasic operation was efficient in mediating symbiotic nutrition on plant matter: the microbes, accounting for 4% of the fungus garden biomass, converted plant matter biomass into monosaccharides and polyols, which were completely consumed by the resident ants and microbes. However, when consumption was inhibited through laboratory manipulation, most of the plant polysaccharides were degraded, products rapidly accumulated, and yields could be preferentially switched between polyols and monosaccharides. This feature might be useful in biotechnology. PMID:25911490

  11. Leaf-cutter ant fungus gardens are biphasic mixed microbial bioreactors that convert plant biomass to polyols with biotechnological applications.

    PubMed

    Somera, Alexandre F; Lima, Adriel M; Dos Santos-Neto, Álvaro J; Lanças, Fernando M; Bacci, Maurício

    2015-07-01

    Leaf-cutter ants use plant matter to culture the obligate mutualistic basidiomycete Leucoagaricus gongylophorus. This fungus mediates ant nutrition on plant resources. Furthermore, other microbes living in the fungus garden might also contribute to plant digestion. The fungus garden comprises a young sector with recently incorporated leaf fragments and an old sector with partially digested plant matter. Here, we show that the young and old sectors of the grass-cutter Atta bisphaerica fungus garden operate as a biphasic solid-state mixed fermenting system. An initial plant digestion phase occurred in the young sector in the fungus garden periphery, with prevailing hemicellulose and starch degradation into arabinose, mannose, xylose, and glucose. These products support fast microbial growth but were mostly converted into four polyols. Three polyols, mannitol, arabitol, and inositol, were secreted by L. gongylophorus, and a fourth polyol, sorbitol, was likely secreted by another, unidentified, microbe. A second plant digestion phase occurred in the old sector, located in the fungus garden core, comprising stocks of microbial biomass growing slowly on monosaccharides and polyols. This biphasic operation was efficient in mediating symbiotic nutrition on plant matter: the microbes, accounting for 4% of the fungus garden biomass, converted plant matter biomass into monosaccharides and polyols, which were completely consumed by the resident ants and microbes. However, when consumption was inhibited through laboratory manipulation, most of the plant polysaccharides were degraded, products rapidly accumulated, and yields could be preferentially switched between polyols and monosaccharides. This feature might be useful in biotechnology.

  12. A metabolic pathway assembled by enzyme selection may support herbivory of leaf-cutter ants on plant starch.

    PubMed

    Bacci, Maurício; Bueno, Odair Correa; Rodrigues, André; Pagnocca, Fernando Carlos; Somera, Alexandre Favarin; Silva, Aline

    2013-05-01

    Mutualistic associations shape the evolution in different organism groups. The association between the leaf-cutter ant Atta sexdens and the basidiomycete fungus Leucoagaricus gongylophorus has enabled them to degrade starch from plant material generating glucose, which is a major food source for both mutualists. Starch degradation is promoted by enzymes contained in the fecal fluid that ants deposit on the fungus culture in cut leaves inside the nests. To understand the dynamics of starch degradation in ant nests, we purified and characterized starch degrading enzymes from the ant fecal fluid and from laboratory cultures of L. gongylophorus and found that the ants intestine positively selects fungal α-amylase and a maltase likely produced by the ants, as a negative selection is imposed to fungal maltase and ant α-amylases. Selected enzymes are more resistant to catabolic repression by glucose and proposed to structure a metabolic pathway in which the fungal α-amylase initiates starch catalysis to generate byproducts which are sequentially degraded by the maltase to produce glucose. The pathway is responsible for effective degradation of starch and proposed to represent a major evolutionary innovation enabling efficient starch assimilation from plant material by leaf-cutters.

  13. Bos indicus-cross feedlot cattle with excitable temperaments have tougher meat and a higher incidence of borderline dark cutters.

    PubMed

    Voisinet, B D; Grandin, T; O'Connor, S F; Tatum, J D; Deesing, M J

    1997-08-01

    Temperament ratings based on a numerical scale (chute score) were assessed during weighing and handling of cattle at a feedlot. Breeds studied included Braford, Red Brangus and Simbrah. Cattle were fed to a constant fat thickness of 9 to 13 mm (target = 11 mm) over the 12th rib as determined by periodic ultrasound measurements. Cattle were slaughtered in a commercial slaughter plant and stunned by captive bolt. Temperament rating had a significant effect on the incidence of borderline dark cutters which were downgraded by a USDA grader (P = 0.01). Temperament score also had a significant effect on tenderness (P < 0.001) as evaluated by Warner-Bratzler Shear (WBS) force at day 14 post mortem. The calmest animals which stood still when restrained in a hydraulic squeeze chute had a mean WBS force of 2.86 ± 11 kg and cattle which became highly agitated and struggled violently during restraint averaged 3.63 ± 19 kg. Forty percent of these cattle had WBS force values which were over 3.9 kg which is a threshold value for acceptability in food service establishments. These data show that cattle with the most excitable temperament ratings produce carcasses with tougher meat and a higher incidence of borderline dark cutters than cattle with calm temperament ratings. PMID:22062320

  14. Solitary restriction endonucleases in prokaryotic genomes

    PubMed Central

    Ershova, Anna S.; Karyagina, Anna S.; Vasiliev, Mikhail O.; Lyashchuk, Alexander M.; Lunin, Vladimir G.; Spirin, Sergey A.; Alexeevski, Andrei V.

    2012-01-01

    Prokaryotic restriction-modification (R-M) systems defend the host cell from the invasion of a foreign DNA. They comprise two enzymatic activities: specific DNA cleavage activity and DNA methylation activity preventing cleavage. Typically, these activities are provided by two separate enzymes: a DNA methyltransferase (MTase) and a restriction endonuclease (RE). In the absence of a corresponding MTase, an RE of Type II R-M system is highly toxic for the cell. Genes of the R-M system are linked in the genome in the vast majority of annotated cases. There are only a few reported cases in which the genes of MTase and RE from one R-M system are not linked. Nevertheless, a few hundreds solitary RE genes are present in the Restriction Enzyme Database (http://rebase.neb.com) annotations. Using the comparative genomic approach, we analysed 272 solitary RE genes. For 57 solitary RE genes we predicted corresponding MTase genes located distantly in a genome. Of the 272 solitary RE genes, 99 are likely to be fragments of RE genes. Various explanations for the existence of the remaining 116 solitary RE genes are also discussed. PMID:22965118

  15. An Empirical Determination of Tasks Essential to Successful Performance as a Meat Cutter. Determination of a Common Core of Basic Skills in Agribusiness and Natural Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrd, J. Rick; And Others

    To improve vocational educational programs in agriculture, occupational information on a common core of basic skills within the occupational area of the meat cutter is presented in the revised task inventory survey. The purpose of the occupational survey was to identify a common core of basic skills which are performed and are essential for…

  16. Reasons for Deliberate Self-Harm: Comparison of Self-Poisoners and Self-Cutters in a Community Sample of Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodham, Karen; Hawton, Keith; Evans, Emma

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To compare motives and premeditation between adolescent deliberate self-poisoners and self-cutters. Method: In a sample of 6,020 pupils aged 15 and 16 years who completed a self-report questionnaire, those who had deliberately cut themselves in the previous year (n = 220) were compared with those who had taken overdoses (n = 86).…

  17. Removal of a frameshift between the hsdM and hsdS genes of the EcoKI Type IA DNA restriction and modification system produces a new type of system and links the different families of Type I systems.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Gareth A; Chen, Kai; Cooper, Laurie P; White, John H; Blakely, Garry W; Dryden, David T F

    2012-11-01

    The EcoKI DNA methyltransferase is a trimeric protein comprised of two modification subunits (M) and one sequence specificity subunit (S). This enzyme forms the core of the EcoKI restriction/modification (RM) enzyme. The 3' end of the gene encoding the M subunit overlaps by 1 nt the start of the gene for the S subunit. Translation from the two different open reading frames is translationally coupled. Mutagenesis to remove the frameshift and fuse the two subunits together produces a functional RM enzyme in vivo with the same properties as the natural EcoKI system. The fusion protein can be purified and forms an active restriction enzyme upon addition of restriction subunits and of additional M subunit. The Type I RM systems are grouped into families, IA to IE, defined by complementation, hybridization and sequence similarity. The fusion protein forms an evolutionary intermediate form lying between the Type IA family of RM enzymes and the Type IB family of RM enzymes which have the frameshift located at a different part of the gene sequence.

  18. Type III restriction-modification enzymes: a historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Rao, Desirazu N; Dryden, David T F; Bheemanaik, Shivakumara

    2014-01-01

    Restriction endonucleases interact with DNA at specific sites leading to cleavage of DNA. Bacterial DNA is protected from restriction endonuclease cleavage by modifying the DNA using a DNA methyltransferase. Based on their molecular structure, sequence recognition, cleavage position and cofactor requirements, restriction-modification (R-M) systems are classified into four groups. Type III R-M enzymes need to interact with two separate unmethylated DNA sequences in inversely repeated head-to-head orientations for efficient cleavage to occur at a defined location (25-27 bp downstream of one of the recognition sites). Like the Type I R-M enzymes, Type III R-M enzymes possess a sequence-specific ATPase activity for DNA cleavage. ATP hydrolysis is required for the long-distance communication between the sites before cleavage. Different models, based on 1D diffusion and/or 3D-DNA looping, exist to explain how the long-distance interaction between the two recognition sites takes place. Type III R-M systems are found in most sequenced bacteria. Genome sequencing of many pathogenic bacteria also shows the presence of a number of phase-variable Type III R-M systems, which play a role in virulence. A growing number of these enzymes are being subjected to biochemical and genetic studies, which, when combined with ongoing structural analyses, promise to provide details for mechanisms of DNA recognition and catalysis.

  19. Antiretroviral restriction factors.

    PubMed

    Hatziioannou, Theodora; Bieniasz, Paul D

    2011-12-01

    Studies of retroviruses have been instrumental in revealing the existence of an array of antiviral proteins, or restriction factors, and the mechanisms by which they function. Some restriction factors appear to specifically inhibit retrovirus replication, while others have a broader antiviral action. Here, we briefly review current understanding of the mechanisms by which several such proteins exert antiviral activity. We also discuss how retroviruses have evolved to evade or antagonize antiviral proteins, including through the action of viral accessory proteins. Restriction factors, their viral targets and antagonists have exerted evolutionary pressure on each other, resulting in specialization and barriers to cross-species transmission. Potentially, this recently revealed intrinsic system of antiviral immunity might be mobilized for therapeutic benefit.

  20. DNA Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Marinus, M.G.; Løbner-Olesen, A.

    2014-01-01

    The DNA of E. coli contains 19,120 6-methyladenines and 12,045 5-methylcytosines in addition to the four regular bases and these are formed by the postreplicative action of three DNA methyltransferases. The majority of the methylated bases are formed by the Dam and Dcm methyltransferases encoded by the dam (DNA adenine methyltransferase) and dcm (DNA cytosine methyltransferase) genes. Although not essential, Dam methylation is important for strand discrimination during repair of replication errors, controlling the frequency of initiation of chromosome replication at oriC, and regulation of transcription initiation at promoters containing GATC sequences. In contrast, there is no known function for Dcm methylation although Dcm recognition sites constitute sequence motifs for Very Short Patch repair of T/G base mismatches. In certain bacteria (e.g., Vibrio cholerae, Caulobacter crescentus) adenine methylation is essential and in C. crescentus, it is important for temporal gene expression which, in turn, is required for coordinating chromosome initiation, replication and division. In practical terms, Dam and Dcm methylation can inhibit restriction enzyme cleavage; decrease transformation frequency in certain bacteria; decrease the stability of short direct repeats; are necessary for site-directed mutagenesis; and to probe eukaryotic structure and function. PMID:26442938

  1. The Genome Sequence of the Leaf-Cutter Ant Atta cephalotes Reveals Insights into Its Obligate Symbiotic Lifestyle

    PubMed Central

    Suen, Garret; Holt, Carson; Abouheif, Ehab; Bornberg-Bauer, Erich; Bouffard, Pascal; Caldera, Eric J.; Cash, Elizabeth; Cavanaugh, Amy; Denas, Olgert; Elhaik, Eran; Favé, Marie-Julie; Gadau, Jürgen; Gibson, Joshua D.; Graur, Dan; Grubbs, Kirk J.; Hagen, Darren E.; Harkins, Timothy T.; Helmkampf, Martin; Hu, Hao; Johnson, Brian R.; Kim, Jay; Marsh, Sarah E.; Moeller, Joseph A.; Muñoz-Torres, Mónica C.; Murphy, Marguerite C.; Naughton, Meredith C.; Nigam, Surabhi; Overson, Rick; Rajakumar, Rajendhran; Reese, Justin T.; Scott, Jarrod J.; Smith, Chris R.; Tao, Shu; Tsutsui, Neil D.; Viljakainen, Lumi; Wissler, Lothar; Yandell, Mark D.; Zimmer, Fabian; Taylor, James; Slater, Steven C.; Clifton, Sandra W.; Warren, Wesley C.; Elsik, Christine G.; Smith, Christopher D.; Weinstock, George M.; Gerardo, Nicole M.; Currie, Cameron R.

    2011-01-01

    Leaf-cutter ants are one of the most important herbivorous insects in the Neotropics, harvesting vast quantities of fresh leaf material. The ants use leaves to cultivate a fungus that serves as the colony's primary food source. This obligate ant-fungus mutualism is one of the few occurrences of farming by non-humans and likely facilitated the formation of their massive colonies. Mature leaf-cutter ant colonies contain millions of workers ranging in size from small garden tenders to large soldiers, resulting in one of the most complex polymorphic caste systems within ants. To begin uncovering the genomic underpinnings of this system, we sequenced the genome of Atta cephalotes using 454 pyrosequencing. One prediction from this ant's lifestyle is that it has undergone genetic modifications that reflect its obligate dependence on the fungus for nutrients. Analysis of this genome sequence is consistent with this hypothesis, as we find evidence for reductions in genes related to nutrient acquisition. These include extensive reductions in serine proteases (which are likely unnecessary because proteolysis is not a primary mechanism used to process nutrients obtained from the fungus), a loss of genes involved in arginine biosynthesis (suggesting that this amino acid is obtained from the fungus), and the absence of a hexamerin (which sequesters amino acids during larval development in other insects). Following recent reports of genome sequences from other insects that engage in symbioses with beneficial microbes, the A. cephalotes genome provides new insights into the symbiotic lifestyle of this ant and advances our understanding of host–microbe symbioses. PMID:21347285

  2. Neuroaesthetics: range and restrictions.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Anjan

    2013-04-01

    Bullot & Reber (B&R) should be commended for highlighting tensions between scientific aesthetics and art history. The question of how each tradition can learn from the other is timely. While I am sympathetic to their views, their diagnosis of the problem appears exaggerated and their solution partial. They underestimate the reach of scientific aesthetics while failing to identify its inherent restrictions. PMID:23507092

  3. The other face of restriction: modification-dependent enzymes.

    PubMed

    Loenen, Wil A M; Raleigh, Elisabeth A

    2014-01-01

    The 1952 observation of host-induced non-hereditary variation in bacteriophages by Salvador Luria and Mary Human led to the discovery in the 1960s of modifying enzymes that glucosylate hydroxymethylcytosine in T-even phages and of genes encoding corresponding host activities that restrict non-glucosylated phage DNA: rglA and rglB (restricts glucoseless phage). In the 1980's, appreciation of the biological scope of these activities was dramatically expanded with the demonstration that plant and animal DNA was also sensitive to restriction in cloning experiments. The rgl genes were renamed mcrA and mcrBC (modified cytosine restriction). The new class of modification-dependent restriction enzymes was named Type IV, as distinct from the familiar modification-blocked Types I-III. A third Escherichia coli enzyme, mrr (modified DNA rejection and restriction) recognizes both methylcytosine and methyladenine. In recent years, the universe of modification-dependent enzymes has expanded greatly. Technical advances allow use of Type IV enzymes to study epigenetic mechanisms in mammals and plants. Type IV enzymes recognize modified DNA with low sequence selectivity and have emerged many times independently during evolution. Here, we review biochemical and structural data on these proteins, the resurgent interest in Type IV enzymes as tools for epigenetic research and the evolutionary pressures on these systems.

  4. Transformation of restriction endonuclease phenotype in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Muckerman, C C; Springhorn, S S; Greenberg, B; Lacks, S A

    1982-01-01

    The genetic basis of the unique restriction endonuclease DpnI, that cleaves only at a methylated sequence, 5'-GmeATC-3', and of the complementary endonuclease DpnII, which cleaves at the same sequence when it is not methylated, was investigated. Different strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated from patients contained either DpnI (two isolates) or DpnII (six isolates). The latter strains also contained DNA methylated at the 5'-GATC-3' sequence. A restrictable bacteriophage, HB-3, was used to characterize the various strains and to select for transformants. One laboratory strain contained neither DpnI nor Dpn II. It was probably derived from a DpnI-containing strain, and its DNA was not methylated at 5'-GATC-3'. Cells of this strain were transformed to the DpnI restriction phenotype by DNA from a DpnI-containing strain and to the DpnII restriction phenotype by DNA from a DpnII-containing strain. Neither cross-transformation, that is, transformation to one phenotype by DNA from a strain of the other phenotype, nor spontaneous conversion was observed. Extracts of transformants to the new restriction phenotype were shown to contain the corresponding endonuclease. Images PMID:6288656

  5. Sequence-specific interactions of minor groove binders with the 154 base pair HindIII-RsaI restriction fragment of cDNA of the human Tau 40 protein involved in pathology of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kittler, L; Matesoi, D; Bell, A; Baguley, B C; Unger, E; Löber, G

    1997-01-01

    The DNA minor groove binders netropsin, distamycin and four structurally related bisquaternary ammonium heterocycles (BQA), SN 6999, SN 6570, SN 6132 and SN 6131, were investigated for sequence-specific interactions with the 154 base pair fragment of cDNA of the human Tau 40 protein (h Tau 40 protein), involved in pathology of Alzheimer's disease. The base sequences 5' AATCTT 3', 5' AATATT 3' and 5' TTTCAATCTTTTTATTT 3' were identified as ligand specific binding sites and demonstrate the obvious dA.dT binding preference. Footprinting titration experiments were performed to estimate sequence-specific binding constants (KA). The KA-values were in the order of 10(6)M-1 and dependent on DNA base sequence as well as ligands used. The highest values estimated were for netropsin (KA = 5.0 x 10(6)M-1) and the quinoline derivative SN 6999 (KA = 6.2 x 10(6)M-1) binding to the sequence 5' ATAAT 3'. Microscopic binding constants are determined by the base sequence rather than by the length of dA.dT stretches. In the extended dA.dT run, 5' TTTCAATCTTTTTATTT 3', netropsin and distamycin binding tolerates the presence of two dG.dC base pairs, as indicated by nearly unaffected footprints. In contrast, the failure of BQAs to form footprints demonstrates their significantly decreased binding selectivity.

  6. RNA aptamer inhibitors of a restriction endonuclease

    PubMed Central

    Mondragón, Estefanía; Maher, L. James

    2015-01-01

    Restriction endonucleases (REases) recognize and cleave short palindromic DNA sequences, protecting bacterial cells against bacteriophage infection by attacking foreign DNA. We are interested in the potential of folded RNA to mimic DNA, a concept that might be applied to inhibition of DNA-binding proteins. As a model system, we sought RNA aptamers against the REases BamHI, PacI and KpnI using systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX). After 20 rounds of selection under different stringent conditions, we identified the 10 most enriched RNA aptamers for each REase. Aptamers were screened for binding and specificity, and assayed for REase inhibition. We obtained eight high-affinity (Kd ∼12-30 nM) selective competitive inhibitors (IC50 ∼20-150 nM) for KpnI. Predicted RNA secondary structures were confirmed by in-line attack assay and a 38-nt derivative of the best anti-KpnI aptamer was sufficient for inhibition. These competitive inhibitors presumably act as KpnI binding site analogs, but lack the primary consensus KpnI cleavage sequence and are not cleaved by KpnI, making their potential mode of DNA mimicry fascinating. Anti-REase RNA aptamers could have value in studies of REase mechanism and may give clues to a code for designing RNAs that competitively inhibit DNA binding proteins including transcription factors. PMID:26184872

  7. License restrictions at Barnwell

    SciTech Connect

    Autry, V.R.

    1991-12-31

    The State of South Carolina was delegated the authority by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to regulate the receipt, possession, use and disposal of radioactive material as an Agreement State. Since 1970, the state has been the principal regulatory authority for the Barnwell Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility operated by Chem-Nuclear Systems, Inc. The radioactive material license issued authorizing the receipt and disposal of low-level waste contains numerous restrictions to ensure environmental protection and compliance with shallow land disposal performance criteria. Low-level waste has evolved from minimally contaminated items to complex waste streams containing high concentrations of radionuclides and processing chemicals which necessitated these restrictions. Additionally, some waste with their specific radionuclides and concentration levels, many classified as low-level radioactive waste, are not appropriate for shallow land disposal unless additional precautions are taken. This paper will represent a number of these restrictions, the rationale for them, and how they are being dealt with at the Barnwell disposal facility.

  8. Simultaneous Removal of Multiple DNA Segments by Polymerase Chain Reactions.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurthy, Vishnu; Zhang, Kai

    2017-01-01

    Precise DNA manipulation is a key enabling technology for synthetic biology. Approaches based on restriction digestion are often limited by the presence of certain restriction enzyme recognition sites. Recent development of restriction-free cloning approaches has greatly enhanced the flexibility and speed of molecular cloning. Most restriction-free cloning methods focus on DNA assembly. Much less work has been dedicated towards DNA removal. Here we introduce a protocol that allows simultaneous removal of multiple DNA segments from a plasmid using polymerase chain reactions (PCR). Our approach will be beneficial to applications in multiple sites mutagenesis, DNA library construction, genetic and protein engineering, and synthetic biology. PMID:27671942

  9. Laser Peening--Strengthening Metals to Improve Fatigue Lifetime and Retard Stress-Induced Corrosion Cracking in Gears, Bolts and Cutter

    SciTech Connect

    Hackel, L A; Chen, H-L

    2003-08-20

    Laser peening is an emerging modern process that impresses a compressive stress into the surfaces of metals. Treatment can reduce the rate of fatigue cracking and stress-corrosion-cracking in metals (such as gears, bolts and cutters) needed for tunnel boring and other construction & mining applications. Laser peening could also be used to form metals or alloys into a precise shape without yielding and leaving both sulfates in a crack resistant compressive state.

  10. Performance evaluation of low cost microfluidic chips made using a digital craft cutter for point of care applications in nucleic acid tests.

    PubMed

    Ragavendar, M S; Jayaraman, Subhadra; Ramya, V M; Roy, Rohan; Manwani, Harsha

    2014-01-01

    A point of care (POC) diagnostic system development for nucleic acid testing (NAT) for developing countries faces several challenges and barriers among which affordability is a very critical one [1,4]. Hence a study was made to evaluate the effectiveness of microfluidic chips made from a digital craft cutter to be used as a disposable cartridge. Low cost materials like double sided tapes, transparent sheets and connectors were used to realize the microfluidic chip [2]. An in-house IVD sample preparation kit for nucleic acid extraction was used as a representative assay. Modifications were made to the assay workflow considering the feature sizes, design and volume of the microfluidic chip made from the paper cutter and other POC system requirements like turnaround time (TAT). The workflow was optimized by reducing overall TAT from 50min to 15min, sample volume from 150 μL to 12.5 μL and reduced reagent volumes. The method was also optimized to work at an isothermal condition. The results showed good correlation and yield in terms of both quality and quantity when compared to results obtained from the established baseline protocol. Thus microfluidic chips made using a digital craft cutter can very well be a low cost alternative to manufacture disposable chips for POC applications in nucleic acid tests.

  11. Hunting for new restriction enzymes in GenBank

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, R.J.

    1997-12-01

    Restriction enzyme genes are hard to identify unless their surrounding sequences are available. This is because the best definition of a restriction enzyme gene is an open reading frame, that looks like nothing else in GenBank, but lies close to a DNA methylase gene. There are other clues too, such as nearby reading frames that code control proteins or the DNA specificity subunits of Type I restriction enzymes. We are developing software that searches the daily updates of GenBank to find candidate restriction enzyme genes. This is being followed by bench experiments to see of the predictions are correct. More than 50 potential new restriction enzymes have been predicted and it is quite remarkable that the density of restriction enzyme genes in microbial DNA is greater than one system per 200 Kb. The software development is emphasizing the graphic presentation of the search results. The approach could be used for other situations where a molecular biologist is interested to find new examples of their favorite genes.

  12. The identification and differentiation of the Candida parapsilosis complex species by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism of the internal transcribed spacer region of the rDNA

    PubMed Central

    Barbedo, Leonardo Silva; Figueiredo-Carvalho, Maria Helena Galdino; Muniz, Mauro de Medeiros; Zancopé-Oliveira, Rosely Maria

    2016-01-01

    Currently, it is accepted that there are three species that were formerly grouped under Candida parapsilosis: C. para- psilosis sensu stricto, Candida orthopsilosis, andCandida metapsilosis. In fact, the antifungal susceptibility profiles and distinct virulence attributes demonstrate the differences in these nosocomial pathogens. An accurate, fast, and economical identification of fungal species has been the main goal in mycology. In the present study, we searched sequences that were available in the GenBank database in order to identify the complete sequence for the internal transcribed spacer (ITS)1-5.8S-ITS2 region, which is comprised of the forward and reverse primers ITS1 and ITS4. Subsequently, an in silico polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) was performed to differentiate the C. parapsilosis complex species. Ninety-eight clinical isolates from patients with fungaemia were submitted for analysis, where 59 isolates were identified as C. parapsilosis sensu stricto, 37 were identified as C. orthopsilosis, and two were identified as C. metapsilosis. PCR-RFLP quickly and accurately identified C. parapsilosis complex species, making this method an alternative and routine identification system for use in clinical mycology laboratories. PMID:27074256

  13. The identification and differentiation of the Candida parapsilosis complex species by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism of the internal transcribed spacer region of the rDNA.

    PubMed

    Barbedo, Leonardo Silva; Figueiredo-Carvalho, Maria Helena Galdino; Muniz, Mauro de Medeiros; Zancopé-Oliveira, Rosely Maria

    2016-04-01

    Currently, it is accepted that there are three species that were formerly grouped under Candida parapsilosis: C. para- psilosis sensu stricto, Candida orthopsilosis, and Candida metapsilosis. In fact, the antifungal susceptibility profiles and distinct virulence attributes demonstrate the differences in these nosocomial pathogens. An accurate, fast, and economical identification of fungal species has been the main goal in mycology. In the present study, we searched sequences that were available in the GenBank database in order to identify the complete sequence for the internal transcribed spacer (ITS)1-5.8S-ITS2 region, which is comprised of the forward and reverse primers ITS1 and ITS4. Subsequently, an in silico polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) was performed to differentiate the C. parapsilosis complex species. Ninety-eight clinical isolates from patients with fungaemia were submitted for analysis, where 59 isolates were identified as C. parapsilosis sensu stricto, 37 were identified as C. orthopsilosis, and two were identified as C. metapsilosis. PCR-RFLP quickly and accurately identified C. parapsilosis complex species, making this method an alternative and routine identification system for use in clinical mycology laboratories.

  14. Reentrant Behavior of Divalent-Counterion-Mediated DNA-DNA Electrostatic Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seil; Le, Tung T.; Nguyen, Toan T.

    2010-12-01

    The problem of DNA-DNA interaction mediated by divalent counterions is studied using computer simulation. Although divalent counterions cannot condense free DNA molecules in solution, we show that if DNA configurational entropy is restricted, divalent counterions can cause DNA reentrant condensation similar to that caused by tri- or tetravalent counterions. DNA-DNA interaction is strongly repulsive at small or large counterion concentration and is negligible or slightly attractive for a concentration in between. Implications of our results to experiments of DNA ejection from bacteriophages are discussed. The quantitative result serves to understand electrostatic effects in other experiments involving DNA and divalent counterions.

  15. Direct identification of slowly growing Mycobacterium species by analysis of the intergenic 16S-23S rDNA spacer region (ISR) using a GelCompar II database containing sequence based optimization for restriction fragment site polymorphisms (RFLPs) for 12 enzymes.

    PubMed

    Gürtler, Volker; Harford, Cate; Bywater, Judy; Mayall, Barrie C

    2006-02-01

    To obtain Mycobacterium species identification directly from clinical specimens and cultures, the 16S-23S rDNA spacer (ISR) was amplified using previously published primers that detect all Mycobacterium species. The restriction enzyme that could potentially produce the most restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) was determined from all available ISR DNA sequences in GenBank to produce a novel data set of RFLPs for 31 slowly growing Mycobacterium species. Subsequently a GelCompar II database was constructed from RFLPs for 10 enzymes that have been used in the literature to differentiate slowly growing Mycobacterium species. The combination of Sau96I and HaeIII were the best choice of enzymes for differentiating clinically relevant slowly growing Mycobacterium species. A total of 392 specimens were studied by PCR with 195 negative and 197 positive specimens. The ISR-PCR product was digested with HaeIII (previously reported) and Sau96I (new to this study) to obtain a Mycobacterium species identification based on the ISR-RFLPs. The species identification obtained by ISR-RFLP was confirmed by DNA sequencing (isolate numbers are shown in parentheses) for M. avium (3), M. intracellulare (4), M. avium complex (1), M. gordonae (2) and M. tuberculosis (1). The total number of specimens (99) identified were from culture (67), Bactectrade mark 12B culture bottles (11), EDTA blood (3), directly from smear positive specimens (13), tissue (4) and urine (1). Direct species identification was obtained from all 13/13 smear positive specimens. The total number of specimens (99) were identified as M. tuberculosis (41), M. avium (7), M. avium complex (11), M. intracellulare MIN-A (20), M. flavescens (2), M. fortuitum (10), M. gordonae (4), M. shimoidei (1), M. ulcerans (1) and M. chelonae (2). This method reduces the time taken for Mycobacterium species identification from 8-10 weeks for culture and biochemical identification; to 4-6 weeks for culture and ISR-RFLP; to 2 days

  16. Short-term effects of air pollution from biomass burning in mucociliary clearance of Brazilian sugarcane cutters.

    PubMed

    Ferreira-Ceccato, Aline Duarte; Ramos, Ercy Mara Cípulo; de Carvalho, Luiz Carlos Soares; Xavier, Rafaella Fagundes; Teixeira, Marcos Fernando de Souza; Raymundo-Pereira, Paulo Augusto; Proença, Camila dos Anjos; de Toledo, Alessandra Choqueta; Ramos, Dionei

    2011-11-01

    Nasal mucociliary system is the first line of defense of the upper airways and may be affected acutely by exposure to particulate matter (PM) from biomass burning. Several epidemiologic studies have demonstrated a consistent association between levels of air pollution from biomass burning with increases in hospitalization for respiratory diseases and mortality. To determine the acute effects of exposure to particulate matter from biomass burning in nasal mucociliary transport by saccharin transit time (STT) test, we studied thirty-three non-smokers and twelve light smokers sugarcane cutters in two periods: pre-harvest season and 4 h after harvest at the first day after biomass burning. Lung function, exhaled carbon monoxide (CO), nasal symptoms questionnaire and mucociliary clearance (MC) were assessed. Exhaled CO was increased in smokers compared to non-smokers but did not change significantly after harvest. In contrast, STT was similar between smokers and non-smokers and decreased significantly after harvest in both groups (p < 0.001). Exposure to PM from biomass burning did not influence nasal symptoms. Our results suggest that acute exposure to particulate matter from sugarcane burned affects mucociliary clearance in smokers and non-smokers workers in the absence of symptoms.

  17. The Mitochondrial Genome of the Leaf-Cutter Ant Atta laevigata: A Mitogenome with a Large Number of Intergenic Spacers

    PubMed Central

    Rodovalho, Cynara de Melo; Lyra, Mariana Lúcio; Ferro, Milene; Bacci, Maurício

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we describe the nearly complete mitochondrial genome of the leaf-cutter ant Atta laevigata, assembled using transcriptomic libraries from Sanger and Illumina next generation sequencing (NGS), and PCR products. This mitogenome was found to be very large (18,729 bp), given the presence of 30 non-coding intergenic spacers (IGS) spanning 3,808 bp. A portion of the putative control region remained unsequenced. The gene content and organization correspond to that inferred for the ancestral pancrustacea, except for two tRNA gene rearrangements that have been described previously in other ants. The IGS were highly variable in length and dispersed through the mitogenome. This pattern was also found for the other hymenopterans in particular for the monophyletic Apocrita. These spacers with unknown function may be valuable for characterizing genome evolution and distinguishing closely related species and individuals. NGS provided better coverage than Sanger sequencing, especially for tRNA and ribosomal subunit genes, thus facilitating efforts to fill in sequence gaps. The results obtained showed that data from transcriptomic libraries contain valuable information for assembling mitogenomes. The present data also provide a source of molecular markers that will be very important for improving our understanding of genomic evolutionary processes and phylogenetic relationships among hymenopterans. PMID:24828084

  18. A Cladistic Analysis of Phenotypic Associations with Haplotypes Inferred from Restriction Endonuclease Mapping or DNA Sequencing. V. Analysis of Case/Control Sampling Designs: Alzheimer's Disease and the Apoprotein E Locus

    PubMed Central

    Templeton, A. R.

    1995-01-01

    Present-day associations between haplotypes at a candidate locus and phenotypes exist when phenotypically important mutations occurred at some point during the evolution of the current array of genetic variation. A cladistic statistical design can be defined that focuses power by using the evolutionary history of the candidate DNA region. This paper shows how cladistic methodology is used for the analysis of case/control data, a common sampling design in genetic/disease association studies. A worked example is presented of the associations for sporadic early and late-onset forms of Alzheimer's disease with the 19q13.2 chromosomal region that includes the loci for apoproteins E, CI, and CII. This analysis confirms earlier reports of a strong association of the ApoE &4 allele with Alzheimer's disease but indicates that it is premature to condsider this association causal, particularly for early onset cases. Associations were also found with the &2 allele, as previously reported, and with the 1 allele at the ApoCI locus. However, this analysis indicates that it is inappropriate both statistically and medically to use single markers as risk predictors when haplotype data are available, even when the mutation leading to the marker is identified as having a strong phenotypic association. PMID:7635303

  19. Base-Displaced Intercalated Conformation of the 2-Amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline N2-dG DNA Adduct Positioned at the Nonreiterated G1 in the NarI Restriction Site

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The conformation of an N2-dG adduct arising from the heterocyclic amine 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline (IQ), a potent food mutagen, was determined in 5′-d(C1T2C3X4G5C6G7C8C9A10T11C12)-3′:5′-d(G13A14T15G16G17C18G19C20C21G22A23G24)-3′; X = N2-dG-IQ, in which the modified nucleotide X4 corresponds to G1 in the 5′-d(G1G2CG3CC)-3′ NarI restriction endonuclease site. Circular dichroism (CD) revealed blue shifts relative to the unmodified duplex, consistent with adduct-induced twisting, and a hypochromic effect for the IQ absorbance in the near UV region. NMR revealed that the N2-dG-IQ adduct adopted a base-displaced intercalated conformation in which the modified guanine remained in the anti conformation about the glycosidic bond, the IQ moiety intercalated into the duplex, and the complementary base C21 was displaced into the major groove. The processing of the N2-dG-IQ lesion by hpol η is sequence-dependent; when placed at the reiterated G3 position, but not at the G1 position, this lesion exhibits a propensity for frameshift replication [Choi, J. Y., et al. (2006) J. Biol. Chem., 281, 25297–25306]. The structure of the N2-dG-IQ adduct at the nonreiterated G1 position was compared to that of the same adduct placed at the G3 position [Stavros, K. M., et al. (2014) Nucleic Acids Res., 42, 3450–3463]. CD indicted minimal spectral differences between the G1 vs G3N2-dG-IQ adducts. NMR indicated that the N2-dG-IQ adduct exhibited similar base-displaced intercalated conformations at both the G1 and G3 positions. This result differed as compared to the corresponding C8-dG-IQ adducts placed at the same positions. The C8-dG-IQ adduct adopted a minor groove conformation when placed at position G1 but a base-displaced intercalated conformation when placed at position G3 in the NarI sequence. The present studies suggest that differences in lesion bypass by hpol η may be mediated by differences in the 3′-flanking sequences, perhaps modulating the ability

  20. Dietary restriction with and without caloric restriction for healthy aging

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Changhan; Longo, Valter

    2016-01-01

    Caloric restriction is the most effective and reproducible dietary intervention known to regulate aging and increase the healthy lifespan in various model organisms, ranging from the unicellular yeast to worms, flies, rodents, and primates. However, caloric restriction, which in most cases entails a 20–40% reduction of food consumption relative to normal intake, is a severe intervention that results in both beneficial and detrimental effects. Specific types of chronic, intermittent, or periodic dietary restrictions without chronic caloric restriction have instead the potential to provide a significant healthspan increase while minimizing adverse effects. Improved periodic or targeted dietary restriction regimens that uncouple the challenge of food deprivation from the beneficial effects will allow a safe intervention feasible for a major portion of the population. Here we focus on healthspan interventions that are not chronic or do not require calorie restriction. PMID:26918181

  1. Dietary restriction with and without caloric restriction for healthy aging.

    PubMed

    Lee, Changhan; Longo, Valter

    2016-01-01

    Caloric restriction is the most effective and reproducible dietary intervention known to regulate aging and increase the healthy lifespan in various model organisms, ranging from the unicellular yeast to worms, flies, rodents, and primates. However, caloric restriction, which in most cases entails a 20-40% reduction of food consumption relative to normal intake, is a severe intervention that results in both beneficial and detrimental effects. Specific types of chronic, intermittent, or periodic dietary restrictions without chronic caloric restriction have instead the potential to provide a significant healthspan increase while minimizing adverse effects. Improved periodic or targeted dietary restriction regimens that uncouple the challenge of food deprivation from the beneficial effects will allow a safe intervention feasible for a major portion of the population. Here we focus on healthspan interventions that are not chronic or do not require calorie restriction. PMID:26918181

  2. Restrictive vs. non-restrictive composition: a magnetoencephalography study

    PubMed Central

    Leffel, Timothy; Lauter, Miriam; Westerlund, Masha; Pylkkänen, Liina

    2014-01-01

    Recent research on the brain mechanisms underlying language processing has implicated the left anterior temporal lobe (LATL) as a central region for the composition of simple phrases. Because these studies typically present their critical stimuli without contextual information, the sensitivity of LATL responses to contextual factors is unknown. In this magnetoencephalography (MEG) study, we employed a simple question-answer paradigm to manipulate whether a prenominal adjective or determiner is interpreted restrictively, i.e., as limiting the set of entities under discussion. Our results show that the LATL is sensitive to restriction, with restrictive composition eliciting higher responses than non-restrictive composition. However, this effect was only observed when the restricting element was a determiner, adjectival stimuli showing the opposite pattern, which we hypothesise to be driven by the special pragmatic properties of non-restrictive adjectives. Overall, our results demonstrate a robust sensitivity of the LATL to high level contextual and potentially also pragmatic factors. PMID:25379512

  3. Mechanistic insights into type III restriction enzymes.

    PubMed

    Raghavendra, Nidhanapati K; Bheemanaik, Shivakumara; Rao, Desirazu N

    2012-01-01

    Type III restriction-modification (R-M) enzymes need to interact with two separate unmethylated DNA sequences in indirectly repeated, head-to-head orientations for efficient cleavage to occur at a defined location next to only one of the two sites. However, cleavage of sites that are not in head-to-head orientation have been observed to occur under certain reaction conditions in vitro. ATP hydrolysis is required for the long-distance communication between the sites prior to cleavage. Type III R-M enzymes comprise two subunits, Res and Mod that form a homodimeric Mod2 and a heterotetrameric Res2Mod2 complex. The Mod subunit in M2 or R2M2 complex recognizes and methylates DNA while the Res subunit in R2M2 complex is responsible for ATP hydrolysis, DNA translocation and cleavage. A vast majority of biochemical studies on Type III R-M enzymes have been undertaken using two closely related enzymes, EcoP1I and EcoP15I. Divergent opinions about how the long-distance interaction between the recognition sites exist and at least three mechanistic models based on 1D- diffusion and/or 3D- DNA looping have been proposed.

  4. Design and Fabrication of Nanostructures Based on DNA Ring-Protein Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, Hideki; Endo, Tatsuro; Yanagida, Yasuko; Hatsuzawa, Takeshi

    2008-06-01

    In this report, we describe the design and fabrication of DNA nanostructures (“DNA glasses”, “DNA serial rings”, and “DNA chains”) using DNA ring-protein complexes. An experiment was performed to fabricate DNA ring-conjugated biotin using two types of DNA (“vector DNA” and “insert DNA”). The vector DNA was obtained by cutting plasmid DNA with restriction enzymes. The insert DNA (DNA conjugated with biotin) was obtained using a DNA synthesizer. After ligation and the introduction of streptavidin-modified gold nanoparticles, DNA structures were obtained. Subsequently, the DNA structures were observed by atomic force microscopy (AFM).

  5. Type I restriction enzymes and their relatives.

    PubMed

    Loenen, Wil A M; Dryden, David T F; Raleigh, Elisabeth A; Wilson, Geoffrey G

    2014-01-01

    Type I restriction enzymes (REases) are large pentameric proteins with separate restriction (R), methylation (M) and DNA sequence-recognition (S) subunits. They were the first REases to be discovered and purified, but unlike the enormously useful Type II REases, they have yet to find a place in the enzymatic toolbox of molecular biologists. Type I enzymes have been difficult to characterize, but this is changing as genome analysis reveals their genes, and methylome analysis reveals their recognition sequences. Several Type I REases have been studied in detail and what has been learned about them invites greater attention. In this article, we discuss aspects of the biochemistry, biology and regulation of Type I REases, and of the mechanisms that bacteriophages and plasmids have evolved to evade them. Type I REases have a remarkable ability to change sequence specificity by domain shuffling and rearrangements. We summarize the classic experiments and observations that led to this discovery, and we discuss how this ability depends on the modular organizations of the enzymes and of their S subunits. Finally, we describe examples of Type II restriction-modification systems that have features in common with Type I enzymes, with emphasis on the varied Type IIG enzymes.

  6. Restriction-modification system with methyl-inhibited base excision and abasic-site cleavage activities.

    PubMed

    Fukuyo, Masaki; Nakano, Toshiaki; Zhang, Yingbiao; Furuta, Yoshikazu; Ishikawa, Ken; Watanabe-Matsui, Miki; Yano, Hirokazu; Hamakawa, Takeshi; Ide, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Ichizo

    2015-03-11

    The restriction-modification systems use epigenetic modification to distinguish between self and nonself DNA. A modification enzyme transfers a methyl group to a base in a specific DNA sequence while its cognate restriction enzyme introduces breaks in DNA lacking this methyl group. So far, all the restriction enzymes hydrolyze phosphodiester bonds linking the monomer units of DNA. We recently reported that a restriction enzyme (R.PabI) of the PabI superfamily with half-pipe fold has DNA glycosylase activity that excises an adenine base in the recognition sequence (5'-GTAC). We now found a second activity in this enzyme: at the resulting apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) (abasic) site (5'-GT#C, # = AP), its AP lyase activity generates an atypical strand break. Although the lyase activity is weak and lacks sequence specificity, its covalent DNA-R.PabI reaction intermediates can be trapped by NaBH4 reduction. The base excision is not coupled with the strand breakage and yet causes restriction because the restriction enzyme action can impair transformation ability of unmethylated DNA even in the absence of strand breaks in vitro. The base excision of R.PabI is inhibited by methylation of the target adenine base. These findings expand our understanding of genetic and epigenetic processes linking those in prokaryotes and eukaryotes.

  7. Antiretroviral restriction factors in mice.

    PubMed

    Nair, Smita; Rein, Alan

    2014-11-26

    One of the most exciting areas in contemporary retrovirus research is the discovery of "restriction factors". These are cellular proteins that act after virus entry to inhibit infection by or replication of retroviruses (and other viruses and intracellular pathogens). We briefly discuss here three antiretroviral restriction factors in mice: Fv1, APOBEC3, and tetherin, touching on both biological and molecular aspects of these restriction systems.

  8. Distribution of contact loads over the flank-land of the cutter with a rounded cutting edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, V.; Gerasimov, A.; Kim, A.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, contact conditions between a tool and a workpiece material for wear-simulating turning by a cutter with a sharp-cornered edge and with a rounded cutting edge are analysed. The results of the experimental study of specific contact load distribution over the artificial flank wear-land of the cutter in free orthogonal turning of the disk from titanium alloy (Ti6Al2Mo2Cr), ductile (63Cu) and brittle (57Cu1Al3Mn) brasses are described. Investigations were carried out by the method of ‘split cutter’ and by the method of the artificial flank-land of variable width. The experiments with a variable feed rate and a cutting speed show that in titanium alloy machining with a sharp-cornered cutting edge the highest normal contact load (σh max = 3400…2200 MPa) is observed immediately at the cutting edge, and the curve has a horizontal region with the length of 0.2… 0.6 mm. At a distance from the cutting edge, the value of specific normal contact load is dramatically reduced to 1100…500 MPa. The character of normal contact load for a rounded cutting edge is different -it is uniform, and its value is approximately 2 times smaller compared to machining with a sharp-cornered cutting edge. In author’s opinion it is connected with generation of a seizure zone in a chip formation region and explains the capacity of highly worn-out cutting tools for titanium alloys machining. The paper analyses the distribution of tangential contact loads over the flank land, which pattern differs considerably for machining with a sharp-cornered edge and with a rounded cutting edge. Abbreviation and symbols: m/s - meter per second (cutting speed v); mm/r - millimeter per revolution (feed rate f); MPa - mega Pascal (specific contact load as a stress σ or τ) hf - the width of the flank wear land (chamfer) of the cutting tool, flank wear land can be natural or artificial like the one in this paper [mm]; xh - distance from the cutting edge on the surface of the flank-land [mm

  9. Test Plan for Evaluating Hammer and Fixed Cutter Grinders Using Multiple Varieties and Moistures of Biomass Feedstock

    SciTech Connect

    Not listed

    2007-07-01

    Biomass preprocessing is a critical operation in the preparation of feedstock for the front-end of a cellulosic ethanol biorefinery. Its purpose is to chop, grind, or otherwise format the biomass material into a suitable feedstock for optimum conversion to ethanol and other bioproducts. Without this operation, the natural size, bulk density, and flowability characteristics of harvested biomass would decrease the capacities and efficiencies of feedstock assembly unit operations and biorefinery conversion processes to the degree that programmatic cost targets could not be met. The preprocessing unit operation produces a bulk flowable material that 1) improves handling and conveying efficiencies throughout the feedstock assembly system and biorefinery 2) increases biomass surface areas for improved pretreatment efficiencies, 3) reduces particle sizes for improved feedstock uniformity and density, and 4) fractionates structural components for improved compositional quality. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is tasked with defining the overall efficiency/effectiveness of current commercial hammer and fixed cutter grinding systems and other connecting systems such as harvest and collection, storage, transportation, and handling for a wide variety of feedstock types used in bioethanol or syngas production. This test plan details tasks and activities for two separate full-scale grinding tests: Material Characterization Test and Machine Characterization Test. For the Material Characterization Test, a small amount (~5-7 tons each) of several feedstock varieties will be ground. This test will define the fractionation characteristics of the grinder that affect the bulk density, particle size distribution, and quality of the size reduced biomass resulting from different separation screen sizes. A specific screen size will be selected based on the characteristics of the ground material. The Machine Characterization Test will then use this selected screen to grind several 30

  10. Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection for Early Gastric Cancer using the Clutch Cutter: a large single-center experience

    PubMed Central

    Akahoshi, Kazuya; Motomura, Yasuaki; Kubokawa, Masaru; Gibo, Junya; Kinoshita, Nobukatsu; Osada, Shigeki; Tokumaru, Kayo; Hosokawa, Taizou; Tomoeda, Naru; Otsuka, Yoshihiro; Matsuo, Mie; Oya, Masafumi; Koga, Hidenobu; Nakamura, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Background and study aims: The Clutch Cutter (CC) was developed to reduce the risk of complications related to endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) using knives. The CC is able to grasp and coagulate and/or incise the targeted tissue using electrosurgical current, like a biopsy technique. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of ESD using the CC (ESD-CC) for early gastric cancer (EGC). Patients and methods: From June 2007 to March 2014, 325 consecutive patients with a diagnosis of EGC were enrolled in this prospective study. They had all satisfied the Japanese gastric cancer treatment guidelines for ESD indication, namely confirmation by preliminary endoscopy, endoscopic ultrasound, and endoscopic biopsies. The CC was used for all steps of ESD (marking, circumferential marginal incision, submucosal dissection, and hemostatic treatment). The therapeutic efficacy and safety were assessed. Results: The en-bloc resection rate was 99.7 % (324/325) and the R0 resection rate was 95.3 % (310/325). The mean operating time was 97.2 minutes. Perforation during ESD-CC occurred in one case (0.3 %), which was managed with conservative medical treatment after endoscopic closure of the perforation. Post-ESD-CC bleeding occurred in 11 cases (3.4 %), which were successfully treated by endoscopic hemostatic treatment. The R0 resection rate was significantly low in tumors > 20 mm (88.9 %), and in the exclusion indication group (73.7 %). Significant differences were seen in the mean operating time, depending upon tumor size, histologic type, location, and indication criteria. Conclusions: ESD-CC is a technically efficient, safe, and easy method for resecting EGC. PMID:26528497

  11. Magnetic anisotropy and organization of nanoparticles in heads and antennae of neotropical leaf-cutter ants, Atta colombica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, Odivaldo C.; Srygley, Robert B.; Riveros, Andre J.; Barbosa, Marcia A.; Esquivel, Darci M. S.; Wajnberg, Eliane

    2014-10-01

    Oriented magnetic nanoparticles have been suggested as a good candidate for a magnetic sensor in ants. Behavioural evidence for a magnetic compass in neotropical leaf-cutter ants, Atta colombica (Formicidae: Attini), motivated a study of the arrangement of magnetic particles in the ants’ four major body parts by measuring the angular dependence of the ferromagnetic resonance spectra at room temperature. Spectra of the thoraces and those of the abdomens showed no significant angular dependence, while those of the antennae and those of the heads exhibited a periodic dependence relative to the magnetic field. Fitting of the angular dependence of the resonant field resulted in an unexpected magnetic anisotropy with uniaxial symmetry. High values of the first order anisotropy constant were observed for the magnetic material in antennae (-2.9  ×  105 erg cm-3) and heads (-1  ×  106 erg cm-3) as compared to body parts of other social insects. In addition, the magnitude of the anisotropy in the heads was comparable to that observed in magnetite nanoparticles of 4-5 nm diameter. For the antennae, the mean angle of the particles’ easy magnetization axis (EA) was estimated to be 41° relative to the straightened antenna’s long axis. For the heads, EA was approximately 60° relative to the head’s axis running from midway between the spines to the clypeus. These physical characteristics indicate organized magnetic nanoparticles with a potential for directional sensitivity, which is an important feature of magnetic compasses.

  12. DNA methylation in plants.

    PubMed

    Vanyushin, B F

    2006-01-01

    DNA in plants is highly methylated, containing 5-methylcytosine (m5C) and N6-methyladenine (m6A); m5C is located mainly in symmetrical CG and CNG sequences but it may occur also in other non-symmetrical contexts. m6A but not m5C was found in plant mitochondrial DNA. DNA methylation in plants is species-, tissue-, organelle- and age-specific. It is controlled by phytohormones and changes on seed germination, flowering and under the influence of various pathogens (viral, bacterial, fungal). DNA methylation controls plant growth and development, with particular involvement in regulation of gene expression and DNA replication. DNA replication is accompanied by the appearance of under-methylated, newly formed DNA strands including Okazaki fragments; asymmetry of strand DNA methylation disappears until the end of the cell cycle. A model for regulation of DNA replication by methylation is suggested. Cytosine DNA methylation in plants is more rich and diverse compared with animals. It is carried out by the families of specific enzymes that belong to at least three classes of DNA methyltransferases. Open reading frames (ORF) for adenine DNA methyltransferases are found in plant and animal genomes, and a first eukaryotic (plant) adenine DNA methyltransferase (wadmtase) is described; the enzyme seems to be involved in regulation of the mitochondria replication. Like in animals, DNA methylation in plants is closely associated with histone modifications and it affects binding of specific proteins to DNA and formation of respective transcription complexes in chromatin. The same gene (DRM2) in Arabidopsis thaliana is methylated both at cytosine and adenine residues; thus, at least two different, and probably interdependent, systems of DNA modification are present in plants. Plants seem to have a restriction-modification (R-M) system. RNA-directed DNA methylation has been observed in plants; it involves de novo methylation of almost all cytosine residues in a region of siRNA-DNA

  13. Children's Restrictive Disclosure to Friends.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rotenberg, Ken J.; Sliz, Dave

    1988-01-01

    Children's restrictive disclosure to friends, which is a facet of intimate friendship, was investigated. It was found that children in kindergarten, second, and fourth grade showed restrictive disclosure to friends, and that greater disclosure of positive personal information to friends than to nonfriends was exhibited with age. (PCB)

  14. Comparison of restriction enzymes for pulsed-field gel electrophoresis typing of Moraxella catarrhalis.

    PubMed

    Marti, Sara; Puig, Carmen; Domenech, Arnau; Liñares, Josefina; Ardanuy, Carmen

    2013-07-01

    NotI, the most prevalent restriction enzyme used for typing Moraxella catarrhalis, failed to digest genomic DNA from respiratory samples. An improved pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) methodology determined SpeI as the best choice for typing this bacterial species, with a good restriction of clinical samples and a good clustering correlation with NotI.

  15. Restriction-modification system with methyl-inhibited base excision and abasic-site cleavage activities

    PubMed Central

    Fukuyo, Masaki; Nakano, Toshiaki; Zhang, Yingbiao; Furuta, Yoshikazu; Ishikawa, Ken; Watanabe-Matsui, Miki; Yano, Hirokazu; Hamakawa, Takeshi; Ide, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Ichizo

    2015-01-01

    The restriction-modification systems use epigenetic modification to distinguish between self and nonself DNA. A modification enzyme transfers a methyl group to a base in a specific DNA sequence while its cognate restriction enzyme introduces breaks in DNA lacking this methyl group. So far, all the restriction enzymes hydrolyze phosphodiester bonds linking the monomer units of DNA. We recently reported that a restriction enzyme (R.PabI) of the PabI superfamily with half-pipe fold has DNA glycosylase activity that excises an adenine base in the recognition sequence (5′-GTAC). We now found a second activity in this enzyme: at the resulting apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) (abasic) site (5′-GT#C, # = AP), its AP lyase activity generates an atypical strand break. Although the lyase activity is weak and lacks sequence specificity, its covalent DNA–R.PabI reaction intermediates can be trapped by NaBH4 reduction. The base excision is not coupled with the strand breakage and yet causes restriction because the restriction enzyme action can impair transformation ability of unmethylated DNA even in the absence of strand breaks in vitro. The base excision of R.PabI is inhibited by methylation of the target adenine base. These findings expand our understanding of genetic and epigenetic processes linking those in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. PMID:25697504

  16. Using Synthetic Nanopores for Single-Molecule Analyses: Detecting SNPs, Trapping DNA Molecules, and the Prospects for Sequencing DNA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dimitrov, Valentin V.

    2009-01-01

    This work focuses on studying properties of DNA molecules and DNA-protein interactions using synthetic nanopores, and it examines the prospects of sequencing DNA using synthetic nanopores. We have developed a method for discriminating between alleles that uses a synthetic nanopore to measure the binding of a restriction enzyme to DNA. There exists…

  17. Enrichment and Broad Representation of Plant Biomass-Degrading Enzymes in the Specialized Hyphal Swellings of Leucoagaricus gongylophorus, the Fungal Symbiont of Leaf-Cutter Ants

    SciTech Connect

    Aylward, Frank O.; Khadempour, Lily; Tremmel, Daniel; McDonald, Bradon R.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Wu, Si; Moore, Ronald J.; Orton, Daniel J.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Piehowski, Paul D.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Smith, Richard D.; Lipton, Mary S.; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E.; Currie, Cameron R.

    2015-08-28

    Leaf-cutter ants are prolific and conspicuous Neotropical herbivores that derive energy from specialized fungus gardens they cultivate using foliar biomass. The basidiomycetous cultivar of the ants, Leucoagaricus gongylophorus, produces specialized hyphal swellings called gongylidia that serve as the primary food source of ant colonies. Gongylidia also contain lignocellulases that become concentrated in ant digestive tracts and are deposited within fecal droplets onto fresh foliar material as it is foraged by the ants. Although the enzymes concentrated by L. gongylophorus within gongylidia are thought to be critical to the initial degradation of plant biomass, only a few enzymes present in these hyphal swellings have been identified. Here we use proteomic methods to identify proteins present in the gongylidia of three Atta cephalotes colonies. Our results demonstrate that a diverse but consistent set of enzymes is present in gongylidia, including numerous lignocellulases likely involved in the degradation of polysaccharides, plant toxins, and proteins. Overall, gongylidia contained over three-quarters of all lignocellulases identified in the L. gongylophorus genome, demonstrating that the majority of the enzymes produced by this fungus for biomass breakdown are ingested by the ants. We also identify a set of 23 lignocellulases enriched in gongylidia compared to whole fungus garden samples, suggesting that certain enzymes may be particularly important in the initial degradation of foliar material. Our work sheds light on the complex interplay between leaf-cutter ants and their fungal symbiont that allows for the host insects to occupy an herbivorous niche by indirectly deriving energy from plant biomass.

  18. Electrochemical strategy for sensing DNA methylation and DNA methyltransferase activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gang Lin; Zhou, Long Yin; Luo, Hong Qun; Li, Nian Bing

    2013-03-20

    The present work demonstrates a novel signal-off electrochemical method for the determination of DNA methylation and the assay of methyltransferase activity using the electroactive complex [Ru(NH3)6](3+) (RuHex) as a signal transducer. The assay exploits the electrostatic interactions between RuHex and DNA strands. Thiolated single strand DNA1 was firstly self-assembled on a gold electrode via Au-S bonding, followed by hybridization with single strand DNA2 to form double strand DNA containing specific recognition sequence of DNA adenine methylation MTase and methylation-responsive restriction endonuclease Dpn I. The double strand DNA may adsorb lots of electrochemical species ([Ru(NH3)6](3+)) via the electrostatic interaction, thus resulting in a high electrochemical signal. In the presence of DNA adenine methylation methyltransferase and S-adenosyl-l-methionine, the formed double strand DNA was methylated by DNA adenine methylation methyltransferase, then the double strand DNA can be cleaved by methylation-responsive restriction endonuclease Dpn I, leading to the dissociation of a large amount of signaling probes from the electrode. As a result, the adsorption amount of RuHex reduced, resulting in a decrease in electrochemical signal. Thus, a sensitive electrochemical method for detection of DNA methylation is proposed. The proposed method yielded a linear response to concentration of Dam MTase ranging from 0.25 to 10UmL(-1) with a detection limit of 0.18UmL(-1) (S/N=3), which might promise this method as a good candidate for monitoring DNA methylation in the future. PMID:23473252

  19. The APOBEC3 Family of Retroelement Restriction Factors

    PubMed Central

    Refsland, Eric W.; Harris, Reuben S.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to regulate and even target mutagenesis is an extremely valuable cellular asset. Enzyme-catalyzed DNA cytosine deamination is a molecular strategy employed by vertebrates to promote antibody diversity and defend against foreign nucleic acids. Ten years ago, a family of cellular enzymes was first described with several proving capable of deaminating DNA and inhibiting HIV-1 replication. Ensuing studies on the apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme catalytic polypeptide-like 3 (APOBEC3) restriction factors have uncovered a broad-spectrum innate defense network that suppresses the replication of numerous endogenous and exogenous DNA-based parasites. Although many viruses possess equally elaborate counter-defense mechanisms, the APOBEC3 enzymes offer a tantalizing possibility of leveraging innate immunity to fend off viral infection. Here we focus on mechanisms of retroelement restriction by the APOBEC3 family of restriction enzymes and we consider the therapeutic benefits, as well as the possible pathological consequences, of arming cells with active DNA deaminases. PMID:23686230

  20. AGU Sonar Data Restriction Panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The AGU Council accepted the report of the panel set up in February to study the issue of restriction by the U.S. Navy of access to high-resolution sonar data for the U.S. Exclusive Economic Zone. Panel chairman John Bossier announced that “the Navy has acted in the best interests of the nation” in lifting the restriction order. Only two areas, egress routes to two submarine bases (see “Navy Defines Areas Under Sonar Ban,” in News, this issue), remain restricted.Panel members were Bruce Douglas, Alexander Malahoff, Donald Piepgras, Paul Richards, David Smith and Manik Talwani.

  1. Postnatal nutritional restriction affects growth and immune function of piglets with intra-uterine growth restriction.

    PubMed

    Hu, Liang; Liu, Yan; Yan, Chuan; Peng, Xie; Xu, Qin; Xuan, Yue; Han, Fei; Tian, Gang; Fang, Zhengfeng; Lin, Yan; Xu, Shengyu; Zhang, Keying; Chen, Daiwen; Wu, De; Che, Lianqiang

    2015-07-14

    Postnatal rapid growth by excess intake of nutrients has been associated with an increased susceptibility to diseases in neonates with intra-uterine growth restricted (IUGR). The aim of the present study was to determine whether postnatal nutritional restriction could improve intestinal development and immune function of neonates with IUGR using piglets as model. A total of twelve pairs of normal-birth weight (NBW) and IUGR piglets (7 d old) were randomly assigned to receive adequate nutrient intake or restricted nutrient intake (RNI) by artificially liquid feeding for a period of 21 d. Blood samples and intestinal tissues were collected at necropsy and were analysed for morphology, digestive enzyme activities, immune cells and expression of innate immunity-related genes. The results indicated that both IUGR and postnatal nutritional restriction delayed the growth rate during the sucking period. Irrespective of nutrient intake, piglets with IUGR had a significantly lower villous height and crypt depth in the ileum than the NBW piglets. Moreover, IUGR decreased alkaline phosphatase activity while enhanced lactase activity in the jejunum and mRNA expressions of Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR-9) and DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) in the ileum of piglets. Irrespective of body weight, RNI significantly decreased the number and/or percentage of peripheral leucocytes, lymphocytes and monocytes of piglets, whereas the percentage of neutrophils and the ratio of CD4+ to CD8+ were increased. Furthermore, RNI markedly enhanced the mRNA expression of TLR-9 and DNMT1, but decreased the expression of NOD2 and TRAF-6 in the ileum of piglets. In summary, postnatal nutritional restriction led to abnormal cellular and innate immune response, as well as delayed the growth and intestinal development of IUGR piglets. PMID:26059215

  2. Revised selection criteria for candidate restriction enzymes in genome walking.

    PubMed

    Taheri, Ali; Robinson, Stephen J; Parkin, Isobel; Gruber, Margaret Y

    2012-01-01

    A new method to improve the efficiency of flanking sequence identification by genome walking was developed based on an expanded, sequential list of criteria for selecting candidate enzymes, plus several other optimization steps. These criteria include: step (1) initially choosing the most appropriate restriction enzyme according to the average fragment size produced by each enzyme determined using in silico digestion of genomic DNA, step (2) evaluating the in silico frequency of fragment size distribution between individual chromosomes, step (3) selecting those enzymes that generate fragments with the majority between 100 bp and 3,000 bp, step (4) weighing the advantages and disadvantages of blunt-end sites vs. cohesive-end sites, step (5) elimination of methylation sensitive enzymes with methylation-insensitive isoschizomers, and step (6) elimination of enzymes with recognition sites within the binary vector sequence (T-DNA and plasmid backbone). Step (7) includes the selection of a second restriction enzyme with highest number of recognition sites within regions not covered by the first restriction enzyme. Step (8) considers primer and adapter sequence optimization, selecting the best adapter-primer pairs according to their hairpin/dimers and secondary structure. In step (9), the efficiency of genomic library development was improved by column-filtration of digested DNA to remove restriction enzyme and phosphatase enzyme, and most important, to remove small genomic fragments (<100 bp) lacking the T-DNA insertion, hence improving the chance of ligation between adapters and fragments harbouring a T-DNA. Two enzymes, NsiI and NdeI, fit these criteria for the Arabidopsis thaliana genome. Their efficiency was assessed using 54 T(3) lines from an Arabidopsis SK enhancer population. Over 70% success rate was achieved in amplifying the flanking sequences of these lines. This strategy was also tested with Brachypodium distachyon to demonstrate its applicability to other

  3. Word-processor macro for restriction endonuclease analysis.

    PubMed

    Cabrera León, N

    1999-12-01

    This paper describes a Microsoft Word 97 macro designed for restriction endonuclease analysis. Selected DNA fragments in the active Word document can be analyzed through a dynamic dialog box that formats the enzyme restriction lists for further analysis. The results can be obtained in a new Word document with the name of the enzymes, number of cuts and positions. This macro has several advantages: the results can be printed in a format suitable for record keeping, no additional programs are required and it is simple to use.

  4. Detection and mapping of homologous, repeated and amplified DNA sequences by DNA renaturation in agarose gels.

    PubMed Central

    Roninson, I B

    1983-01-01

    A new molecular hybridization approach to the analysis of complex genomes has been developed. Tracer and driver DNAs were digested with the same restriction enzyme(s), and tracer DNA was labeled with 32P using T4 DNA polymerase. Tracer DNA was mixed with an excess amount of driver, and the mixture was electrophoresed in an agarose gel. Following electrophoresis, DNA was alkali-denatured in situ and allowed to reanneal in the gel, so that tracer DNA fragments could hybridize to the driver only when homologous driver DNA sequences were present at the same place in the gel, i.e. within a restriction fragment of the same size. After reannealing, unhybridized single-stranded DNA was digested in situ with S1 nuclease. The hybridized tracer DNA was detected by autoradiography. The general applicability of this technique was demonstrated in the following experiments. The common EcoRI restriction fragments were identified in the genomes of E. coli and four other species of bacteria. Two of these fragments are conserved in all Enterobacteriaceae. In other experiments, repeated EcoRI fragments of eukaryotic DNA were visualized as bands of various intensity after reassociation of a total genomic restriction digest in the gel. The situation of gene amplification was modeled by the addition of varying amounts of lambda phage DNA to eukaryotic DNA prior to restriction enzyme digestion. Restriction fragments of lambda DNA were detectable at a ratio of 15 copies per chicken genome and 30 copies per human genome. This approach was used to detect amplified DNA fragments in methotrexate (MTX)-resistant mouse cells and to identify commonly amplified fragments in two independently derived MTX-resistant lines. Images PMID:6310499

  5. Methionine restriction and lifespan control

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Byung Cheon; Kaya, Alaattin; Gladyshev, Vadim N.

    2016-01-01

    Dietary restriction (DR) without malnutrition is associated with longevity in various organisms. However, it has also been shown that reduced calorie intake is often ineffective in extending lifespan. Selecting optimal dietary regimens for DR studies is complicated, as the same regimen may lead to different outcomes depending on genotype and environmental factors. Recent studies suggested that interventions such as moderate protein restriction with/without adequate nutrition (e.g. particular amino acids or carbohydrates) may have additional beneficial effects mediated by certain metabolic and hormonal factors implicated in the biology of aging, regardless of total calorie intake. In particular, it was shown that restriction of a single amino acid, methionine, can mimic the effects of DR and extend lifespan in various model organisms. We discuss beneficial effects of methionine-restricted (MR) diet, the molecular pathways involved, and the use of this regimen in longevity interventions. PMID:26663138

  6. Using restriction mapping to teach basic skills in the molecular biology lab.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Lauren; Shaker, Elizabeth; De Stasio, Elizabeth A

    2007-05-01

    Digestion of DNA with restriction enzymes, calculation of volumes and concentrations of reagents for reactions, and the separation of DNA fragments by agarose gel electrophoresis are common molecular biology techniques that are best taught through repetition. The following open-ended, investigative laboratory exercise in plasmid restriction mapping allows students to gain technical expertise while simultaneously exploring the utility of gel electrophoresis and restriction mapping. Because of its interpretive nature, this project also provides data suitable for a written report, and can thus be used to reinforce lessons on figure presentation and science writing skills. PMID:21591089

  7. Ordered Restriction Maps of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Chromosomes Constructed by Optical Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, David C.; Li, Xiaojun; Hernandez, Luis I.; Ramnarain, Satyadarshan P.; Huff, Edward J.; Wang, Yu-Ker

    1993-10-01

    A light microscope-based technique for rapidly constructing ordered physical maps of chromosomes has been developed. Restriction enzyme digestion of elongated individual DNA molecules (about 0.2 to 1.0 megabases in size) was imaged by fluorescence microscopy after fixation in agarose gel. The size of the resulting individual restriction fragments was determined by relative fluorescence intensity and apparent molecular contour length. Ordered restriction maps were then created from genomic DNA without reliance on cloned or amplified sequences for hybridization or analytical gel electrophoresis. Initial application of optical mapping is described for Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosomes.

  8. Genome filtering using methylation-sensitive restriction enzymes with six-base pair recognition sites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The large fraction of repetitive DNA in many plant genomes has complicated all aspects of DNA sequencing and assembly, and thus techniques that enrich for genes and low-copy sequences have been employed to isolate gene space. Methyl sensitive restriction enzymes with six base pair recognition sites...

  9. Using Restriction Mapping to Teach Basic Skills in the Molecular Biology Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Lauren; Shaker, Elizabeth; De Stasio, Elizabeth A.

    2007-01-01

    Digestion of DNA with restriction enzymes, calculation of volumes and concentrations of reagents for reactions, and the separation of DNA fragments by agarose gel electrophoresis are common molecular biology techniques that are best taught through repetition. The following open-ended, investigative laboratory exercise in plasmid restriction…

  10. Pea amyloplast DNA is qualitatively similar to pea chloroplast DNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaynor, J. J.

    1984-01-01

    Amyloplast DNA (apDNA), when subjected to digestion with restriction endonucleases, yields patterns nearly identical to that of DNA from mature pea chloroplasts (ctDNA). Southern transfers of apDNA and ctDNA, probed with the large subunit (LS) gene of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (Rubisco), shows hybridization to the expected restriction fragments for both apDNA and ctDNA. However, Northern transfers of total RNA from chloroplasts and amyloplasts, probed again with the LS gene of Rubisco, shows that no detectable LS meggage is found in amyloplasts although LS expression in mature chloroplasts is high. Likewise, two dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of etiolated gravisensitive pea tissue shows that both large and small subunits of Rubisco are conspicuously absent; however, in greening tissue these two constitute the major soluble proteins. These findings suggest that although the informational content of these two organelle types is equivalent, gene expression is quite different and is presumably under nuclear control.

  11. Adult Competency Education Kit. Basic Skills in Speaking, Math, and Reading for Employment. Part Q. ACE Competency Based Job Descriptions: #91--Meat Cutter; #92--Shipping Clerk; #93--Long Haul Truck Driver; #94--Truck Driver--Light.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    San Mateo County Office of Education, Redwood City, CA. Career Preparation Centers.

    This fourteenth of fifteen sets of Adult Competency Education (ACE) Based Job Descriptions in the ACE kit contains job descriptions for Meat Cutter, Shipping Clerk, Long Haul Truck Driver, and Truck Driver--Light. Each begins with a fact sheet that includes this information: occupational title, D.O.T. code, ACE number, career ladder, D.O.T.…

  12. Temporal dynamics of methyltransferase and restriction endonuclease accumulation in individual cells after introducing a restriction-modification system.

    PubMed

    Morozova, Natalia; Sabantsev, Anton; Bogdanova, Ekaterina; Fedorova, Yana; Maikova, Anna; Vedyaykin, Alexey; Rodic, Andjela; Djordjevic, Marko; Khodorkovskii, Mikhail; Severinov, Konstantin

    2016-01-29

    Type II restriction-modification (R-M) systems encode a restriction endonuclease that cleaves DNA at specific sites, and a methyltransferase that modifies same sites protecting them from restriction endonuclease cleavage. Type II R-M systems benefit bacteria by protecting them from bacteriophages. Many type II R-M systems are plasmid-based and thus capable of horizontal transfer. Upon the entry of such plasmids into a naïve host with unmodified genomic recognition sites, methyltransferase should be synthesized first and given sufficient time to methylate recognition sites in the bacterial genome before the toxic restriction endonuclease activity appears. Here, we directly demonstrate a delay in restriction endonuclease synthesis after transformation of Escherichia coli cells with a plasmid carrying the Esp1396I type II R-M system, using single-cell microscopy. We further demonstrate that before the appearance of the Esp1396I restriction endonuclease the intracellular concentration of Esp1396I methyltransferase undergoes a sharp peak, which should allow rapid methylation of host genome recognition sites. A mathematical model that satisfactorily describes the observed dynamics of both Esp1396I enzymes is presented. The results reported here were obtained using a functional Esp1396I type II R-M system encoding both enzymes fused to fluorescent proteins. Similar approaches should be applicable to the studies of other R-M systems at single-cell level.

  13. Manipulating the metazoan mitochondrial genome with targeted restriction enzymes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hong; DeLuca, Steven Z; O'Farrell, Patrick H

    2008-07-25

    High copy number and random segregation confound genetic analysis of the mitochondrial genome. We developed an efficient selection for heritable mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) mutations in Drosophila, thereby enhancing a metazoan model for study of mitochondrial genetics and mutations causing human mitochondrial disease. Targeting a restriction enzyme to mitochondria in the germline compromised fertility, but escaper progeny carried homoplasmic mtDNA mutations lacking the cleavage site. Among mutations eliminating a site in the cytochrome c oxidase gene, mt:CoI(A302T) was healthy, mt:CoI(R301L) was male sterile but otherwise healthy, and mt:CoI(R301S) exhibited a wide range of defects, including growth retardation, neurodegeneration, muscular atrophy, male sterility, and reduced life span. Thus, germline expression of mitochondrial restriction enzymes creates a powerful selection and has allowed direct isolation of mitochondrial mutants in a metazoan.

  14. Some restrictions on the existence of second order limit language

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Muhammad Azrin; Sarmin, Nor Haniza; Yusof, Yuhani; Fong, Wan Heng

    2015-10-01

    The cut and paste phenomenon on DNA molecules with the presence of restriction enzyme and appropriate ligase has led to the formalism of mathematical modelling of splicing system. A type of splicing system named Yusof-Goode splicing system is used to present the transparent behaviour of the DNA splicing process. The limit language that is defined as the leftover molecules after the system reaches its equilibrium point has been extended to a second order limit language. The non-existence of the second order limit language biologically has lead to this study by using mathematical approach. In this paper, the factors that restrict the formation of the second order limit language are discussed and are presented as lemmas and theorem using Y-G approach. In addition, the discussion focuses on Yusof- Goode splicing system with at most two initial strings and two rules with one cutting site and palindromic crossing site and recognition sites.

  15. Identification of intron/exon boundaries in genomic DNA by inverse PCR.

    PubMed

    Albertsen, H; Thliveris, A

    2001-05-01

    This unit describes identifying intron/exon boundaries in genomic DNA by comparing nucleotide sequences of genomic DNA to cDNA. Cloned genomic DNA is prepared for inverse polymerase chain reaction (PCR) by digesting the DNA with a restriction enzyme and circularizing the restriction fragments by ligation. Diverging primer pairs for each exon are designed on the basis of the cDNA sequence. The circularized restriction fragments are amplified using these diverging primers, the PCR product is sequenced, and the sequence is compared to the cDNA sequence to determine the location of the intron/exon boundaries. The lower complexity of cloned DNA (e.g., YAC, P1, or cosmid DNA) facilitates preparation of good template. This unit describes identifying intron/exon boundaries in genomic DNA by comparing nucleotide sequences of genomic DNA to cDNA. PMID:18428300

  16. Cosmid library of the turkey herpesvirus genome constructed from nanogram quantities of viral DNA associated with an excess of cellular DNA.

    PubMed

    Reilly, J D; Silva, R F

    1993-03-01

    A protocol was designed for the rapid and efficient construction of cosmid libraries from cell-associated viral genomes available in very low quantities. Purification of viral DNA from cellular DNA was unnecessary. The vast excess of cellular DNA compensated for the limited amount of available viral DNA, enabling titration of the restriction endonuclease partial digest. A cosmid library of the turkey herpesvirus DNA genome was constructed from 1.5 micrograms of cellular DNA containing approximately 6 nanograms of viral DNA.

  17. A Smart Laser Cutter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burg, B.; Lamotte, E.; Foulloy, L.; Zavidovique, B.

    1986-10-01

    Researches on laser-metal interactions for industrial applications are currently underway at the "Etablissement Technique Central de l'Armement" (ETCA). Our goal is to design a multilaser flexible workshop for industrial machining tasks such as welding, various surface treatments, cutting. Because of its wide range of possible applications the laser tool provides an excellent frame for robotic studies. Some difficulties arise as soon as it becomes obvious that, due to the complexity of the phenomena to control, the environment conditions... no practical model can be found out. This is why we chose a progressive approach which should lead to design a general purpose laser robot with the help of human controlled iterations onto the system knowledge.

  18. Powered protrusion cutter

    DOEpatents

    Bzorgi, Fariborz M.

    2010-03-09

    An apparatus for clipping a protrusion of material is provided. The protrusion may, for example, be a bolt head, a nut, a rivet, a weld bead, or a temporary assembly alignment tab protruding from a substrate surface of assembled components. The apparatus typically includes a cleaver having a cleaving edge and a cutting blade having a cutting edge. Generally, a mounting structure configured to confine the cleaver and the cutting blade and permit a range of relative movement between the cleaving edge and the cutting edge is provided. Also typically included is a power device coupled to the cutting blade. The power device is configured to move the cutting edge toward the cleaving edge. In some embodiments the power device is activated by a momentary switch. A retraction device is also generally provided, where the retraction device is configured to move the cutting edge away from the cleaving edge.

  19. Coaxial cable cutter

    DOEpatents

    Hall, Leslie C.; Hedges, Robert S.

    1990-04-10

    A cutting device is provided which is useful in trimming the jackets from semi-rigid coaxial cables and wire having a cutting bit and support attached to movable jaws. A thumbpiece is provided to actuate the opening of the jaws for receiving the cable to be trimmed, and a spring member is provided to actuate the closing of the jaws when thumbpiece is released. The cutting device utilizes one moving part during the cutting operation by using a rolling cut action. The nature of the jaws allows the cutting device to work in space having clearances less than 0.160 inches.

  20. Probing protein-DNA interactions by unzipping a single DNA double helix.

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Steven J; Shundrovsky, Alla; Jantzen, Benjamin C; Wang, Michelle D

    2002-01-01

    We present unzipping force analysis of protein association (UFAPA) as a novel and versatile method for detection of the position and dynamic nature of protein-DNA interactions. A single DNA double helix was unzipped in the presence of DNA-binding proteins using a feedback-enhanced optical trap. When the unzipping fork in a DNA reached a bound protein molecule we observed a dramatic increase in the tension in the DNA, followed by a sudden tension reduction. Analysis of the unzipping force throughout an unbinding "event" revealed information about the spatial location and dynamic nature of the protein-DNA complex. The capacity of UFAPA to spatially locate protein-DNA interactions is demonstrated by noncatalytic restriction mapping on a 4-kb DNA with three restriction enzymes (BsoBI, XhoI, and EcoRI). A restriction map for a given restriction enzyme was generated with an accuracy of approximately 25 bp. UFAPA also allows direct determination of the site-specific equilibrium association constant (K(A)) for a DNA-binding protein. This capability is demonstrated by measuring the cation concentration dependence of K(A) for EcoRI binding. The measured values are in good agreement with previous measurements of K(A) over an intermediate range of cation concentration. These results demonstrate the potential utility of UFAPA for future studies of site-specific protein-DNA interactions. PMID:12124289

  1. SAMHD1 knockout mice: modeling retrovirus restriction in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wu, Li

    2013-11-20

    The host dNTP hydrolase SAMHD1 acts as a viral restriction factor to inhibit the replication of several retroviruses and DNA viruses in non-cycling human immune cells. However, understanding the physiological role of mammalian SAMHD1 has been elusive due to the lack of an animal model. Two recent studies reported the generation of samhd1 knockout mouse models for investigating the restriction of HIV-1 vectors and endogenous retroviruses in vivo. Both studies suggest that SAMHD1 is important for regulating the intracellular dNTP pool and the intrinsic immunity against retroviral infection, despite different outcomes of HIV-1 vector transduction in these mouse models. Here I discuss the significance of these new findings and the future directions in studying SAMHD1-mediated retroviral restriction.

  2. DNA Technology in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, John H.; Campbell, A. Malcolm

    1997-01-01

    Presents a protocol that gives students hands-on experience in generating a meaningful physical map of a circular molecule of DNA. Topics include agarose gel electrophoresis, logic of restriction maps, extracting data from an agarose gel, managing data from gels, experimental protocol, loading gels, electrophoresis, photographing gels, collecting…

  3. DNA fingerprints from hypervariable mitochondrial genotypes.

    PubMed

    Avise, J C; Bowen, B W; Lamb, T

    1989-05-01

    Conventional surveys of restriction-fragment polymorphisms in mitochondrial DNA of menhaden fish (Brevoortia tyrannus/patronus complex) and chuckwalla lizards (Sauromalus obesus) revealed exceptionally high levels of genetic variation, attributable to differences in mtDNA size as well as in restriction sites. The observed probabilities that any two randomly drawn individuals differed detectably in mtDNA genotype were 0.998 and 0.983 in the two species, respectively. Thus, the variable gel profiles provided unique mtDNA "fingerprints" for most conspecific animals assayed. mtDNA fingerprints differ from nuclear DNA fingerprints in several empirical respects and should find special application in the genetic assessment of maternity. PMID:2576092

  4. NaLaF{sub 4}:Pr{sup 3+},Yb{sup 3+}, an efficient blue to near infra-red quantum cutter

    SciTech Connect

    Guille, A.; Pereira, A.; Moine, B.

    2013-12-01

    In order to reduce the thermalization losses in solar cells, down-conversion of blue photons into near infra-red photons is a promising solution. In the present paper, we analyse the energy transfer processes between Pr{sup 3+} and Yb{sup 3+} in NaLaF{sub 4} and we show that an efficient quantum-cutting process occurs. Nevertheless, we also show that a back transfer from Yb{sup 3+} toward the {sup 1}G{sub 4} level of Pr{sup 3+} ion leading to emission beyond 1 μm reduces the potentiality of this material as a quantum cutter for Si solar cells.

  5. Enrichment and Broad Representation of Plant Biomass-Degrading Enzymes in the Specialized Hyphal Swellings of Leucoagaricus gongylophorus, the Fungal Symbiont of Leaf-Cutter Ants.

    PubMed

    Aylward, Frank O; Khadempour, Lily; Tremmel, Daniel M; McDonald, Bradon R; Nicora, Carrie D; Wu, Si; Moore, Ronald J; Orton, Daniel J; Monroe, Matthew E; Piehowski, Paul D; Purvine, Samuel O; Smith, Richard D; Lipton, Mary S; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E; Currie, Cameron R

    2015-01-01

    Leaf-cutter ants are prolific and conspicuous constituents of Neotropical ecosystems that derive energy from specialized fungus gardens they cultivate using prodigious amounts of foliar biomass. The basidiomycetous cultivar of the ants, Leucoagaricus gongylophorus, produces specialized hyphal swellings called gongylidia that serve as the primary food source of ant colonies. Gongylidia also contain plant biomass-degrading enzymes that become concentrated in ant digestive tracts and are deposited within fecal droplets onto fresh foliar material as ants incorporate it into the fungus garden. Although the enzymes concentrated by L. gongylophorus within gongylidia are thought to be critical to the initial degradation of plant biomass, only a few enzymes present in these hyphal swellings have been identified. Here we use proteomic methods to identify proteins present in the gongylidia of three Atta cephalotes colonies. Our results demonstrate that a diverse but consistent set of enzymes is present in gongylidia, including numerous plant biomass-degrading enzymes likely involved in the degradation of polysaccharides, plant toxins, and proteins. Overall, gongylidia contained over three quarters of all biomass-degrading enzymes identified in the L. gongylophorus genome, demonstrating that the majority of the enzymes produced by this fungus for biomass breakdown are ingested by the ants. We also identify a set of 40 of these enzymes enriched in gongylidia compared to whole fungus garden samples, suggesting that certain enzymes may be particularly important in the initial degradation of foliar material. Our work sheds light on the complex interplay between leaf-cutter ants and their fungal symbiont that allows for the host insects to occupy an herbivorous niche by indirectly deriving energy from plant biomass.

  6. Enrichment and broad representation of plant biomass-degrading enzymes in the specialized hyphal swellings of Leucoagaricus gongylophorus, the fungal symbiont of leaf-cutter ants

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aylward, Frank O.; Khadempour, Lily; Tremmel, Daniel M.; McDonald, Bradon R.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Wu, Si; Moore, Ronald J.; Orton, Daniel J.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Piehowski, Paul D.; et al

    2015-08-28

    Leaf-cutter ants are prolific and conspicuous constituents of Neotropical ecosystems that derive energy from specialized fungus gardens they cultivate using prodigious amounts of foliar biomass. The basidiomycetous cultivar of the ants, Leucoagaricus gongylophorus, produces specialized hyphal swellings called gongylidia that serve as the primary food source of ant colonies. Gongylidia also contain plant biomass-degrading enzymes that become concentrated in ant digestive tracts and are deposited within fecal droplets onto fresh foliar material as ants incorporate it into the fungus garden. Although the enzymes concentrated by L. gongylophorus within gongylidia are thought to be critical to the initial degradation of plantmore » biomass, only a few enzymes present in these hyphal swellings have been identified. Here we use proteomic methods to identify proteins present in the gongylidia of three Atta cephalotes colonies. Our results demonstrate that a diverse but consistent set of enzymes is present in gongylidia, including numerous plant biomass-degrading enzymes likely involved in the degradation of polysaccharides, plant toxins, and proteins. Overall, gongylidia contained over three quarters of all biomass-degrading enzymes identified in the L. gongylophorus genome, demonstrating that the majority of the enzymes produced by this fungus for biomass breakdown are ingested by the ants. We also identify a set of 40 of these enzymes enriched in gongylidia compared to whole fungus garden samples, suggesting that certain enzymes may be particularly important in the initial degradation of foliar material. Our work sheds light on the complex interplay between leaf-cutter ants and their fungal symbiont that allows for the host insects to occupy an herbivorous niche by indirectly deriving energy from plant biomass.« less

  7. Enrichment and Broad Representation of Plant Biomass-Degrading Enzymes in the Specialized Hyphal Swellings of Leucoagaricus gongylophorus, the Fungal Symbiont of Leaf-Cutter Ants

    PubMed Central

    Aylward, Frank O.; Khadempour, Lily; Tremmel, Daniel M.; McDonald, Bradon R.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Wu, Si; Moore, Ronald J.; Orton, Daniel J.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Piehowski, Paul D.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Smith, Richard D.; Lipton, Mary S.; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E.; Currie, Cameron R.

    2015-01-01

    Leaf-cutter ants are prolific and conspicuous constituents of Neotropical ecosystems that derive energy from specialized fungus gardens they cultivate using prodigious amounts of foliar biomass. The basidiomycetous cultivar of the ants, Leucoagaricus gongylophorus, produces specialized hyphal swellings called gongylidia that serve as the primary food source of ant colonies. Gongylidia also contain plant biomass-degrading enzymes that become concentrated in ant digestive tracts and are deposited within fecal droplets onto fresh foliar material as ants incorporate it into the fungus garden. Although the enzymes concentrated by L. gongylophorus within gongylidia are thought to be critical to the initial degradation of plant biomass, only a few enzymes present in these hyphal swellings have been identified. Here we use proteomic methods to identify proteins present in the gongylidia of three Atta cephalotes colonies. Our results demonstrate that a diverse but consistent set of enzymes is present in gongylidia, including numerous plant biomass-degrading enzymes likely involved in the degradation of polysaccharides, plant toxins, and proteins. Overall, gongylidia contained over three quarters of all biomass-degrading enzymes identified in the L. gongylophorus genome, demonstrating that the majority of the enzymes produced by this fungus for biomass breakdown are ingested by the ants. We also identify a set of 40 of these enzymes enriched in gongylidia compared to whole fungus garden samples, suggesting that certain enzymes may be particularly important in the initial degradation of foliar material. Our work sheds light on the complex interplay between leaf-cutter ants and their fungal symbiont that allows for the host insects to occupy an herbivorous niche by indirectly deriving energy from plant biomass. PMID:26317212

  8. Protective role of curcumin against nicotine-induced genotoxicity on rat liver under restricted dietary protein.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyaya, Gargi; Sinha, Surajit; Chattopadhyay, Braja Dulal; Chakraborty, Anindita

    2008-07-01

    Nicotine, the well known addictive chemical of tobacco and active medication for several diseases, has proven to be a potential genotoxic compound. Although it is absorbed through lungs with smoking and mainly metabolized in liver, its effect on liver injuries is not clear. This study was designed to evaluate the genotoxicity of nicotine and corresponding the protective role of curcumin against nicotine on liver of female populations particularly who used tobacco but deprived of healthy diet. The effects were investigated by measurement of total DNA concentration of liver tissues and Comet assay of liver tissue DNA damage of female rats maintained under normal and restricted protein diets. Total DNA contents in the liver tissues were observed to decrease more significantly (P<0.001) by nicotine in both dietary conditions. Significant (P<0.01) increase of total DNA content in normal dietary condition and more significant (P<0.001) increase of total DNA content in protein restricted condition of the liver tissues were observed due to curcumin supplementations. Highly significant (P<0.001) DNA damages (37% in normal diet and 56% in protein restricted diet) of the liver tissues were observed due to nicotine treatment. Curcumin reduced the nicotine-induced DNA damage percentage of the liver tissues more significantly (P<0.001) in protein restricted condition. Curcumin proved its potential to function against genotoxic effect by reducing the DNA damage activity of nicotine and minimized the percentage of DNA damage (50-60%) in protein restricted dietary condition. The degree of nicotine-induced genotoxicity therefore can be effectively compensated by the protective effect of curcumin in protein stress condition. PMID:18508046

  9. Generalized Pump-restriction Theorem

    SciTech Connect

    Sinitsyn, Nikolai A; Chernyak, Vladimir Y

    2008-01-01

    We formulate conditions under which periodic modulations of parameters on a finite graph with stochastic transitions among its nodes do not lead to overall pump currents through any given link. Our theorem unifies previously known results with the new ones and provides a universal approach to explore futher restrictions on stochastic pump effect in non-adiabatically driven systems with detailed balance.

  10. 5 CFR 300.604 - Restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS EMPLOYMENT (GENERAL) Time-In-Grade Restrictions § 300.604 Restrictions. The following time-in-grade restrictions must be met unless... may be advanced without time restriction to positions up to GS-5 if the position to be filled is...

  11. 5 CFR 300.604 - Restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS EMPLOYMENT (GENERAL) Time-In-Grade Restrictions § 300.604 Restrictions. The following time-in-grade restrictions must be met unless... may be advanced without time restriction to positions up to GS-5 if the position to be filled is...

  12. 5 CFR 300.604 - Restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS EMPLOYMENT (GENERAL) Time-In-Grade Restrictions § 300.604 Restrictions. The following time-in-grade restrictions must be met unless... may be advanced without time restriction to positions up to GS-5 if the position to be filled is...

  13. 5 CFR 300.604 - Restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS EMPLOYMENT (GENERAL) Time-In-Grade Restrictions § 300.604 Restrictions. The following time-in-grade restrictions must be met unless... may be advanced without time restriction to positions up to GS-5 if the position to be filled is...

  14. 5 CFR 300.604 - Restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS EMPLOYMENT (GENERAL) Time-In-Grade Restrictions § 300.604 Restrictions. The following time-in-grade restrictions must be met unless... may be advanced without time restriction to positions up to GS-5 if the position to be filled is...

  15. 49 CFR 215.203 - Restricted cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Restricted cars. 215.203 Section 215.203..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD FREIGHT CAR SAFETY STANDARDS Restricted Equipment § 215.203 Restricted cars. (a) This section restricts the operation of any railroad freight car that is— (1) More than...

  16. 49 CFR 215.203 - Restricted cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Restricted cars. 215.203 Section 215.203..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD FREIGHT CAR SAFETY STANDARDS Restricted Equipment § 215.203 Restricted cars. (a) This section restricts the operation of any railroad freight car that is— (1) More than...

  17. 49 CFR 215.203 - Restricted cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Restricted cars. 215.203 Section 215.203..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD FREIGHT CAR SAFETY STANDARDS Restricted Equipment § 215.203 Restricted cars. (a) This section restricts the operation of any railroad freight car that is— (1) More than...

  18. 49 CFR 215.203 - Restricted cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Restricted cars. 215.203 Section 215.203..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD FREIGHT CAR SAFETY STANDARDS Restricted Equipment § 215.203 Restricted cars. (a) This section restricts the operation of any railroad freight car that is— (1) More than...

  19. 49 CFR 215.203 - Restricted cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Restricted cars. 215.203 Section 215.203..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD FREIGHT CAR SAFETY STANDARDS Restricted Equipment § 215.203 Restricted cars. (a) This section restricts the operation of any railroad freight car that is— (1) More than...

  20. DNA in nanofluidic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riehn, Robert

    2006-03-01

    Nanochannels with a channel cross-section of around 100 nm x 100 nm or less are emerging as a powerful new technique for single-molecule DNA analysis. In these nanochannels, DNA is linearized to a constant fraction of its contour length, and thus spatial locations measured by fluorescence microscopy can be directly related to genomic locations. Because the stretching in nanochannels is caused by lateral confinement, molecules are free to undergo longitudinal fluctuations. Hence, time-averaging over a single molecule is meaningful, and a high resolution can be achieved even using few molecules. We will present how DNA imaging in nanochannels can be applied to common tasks in molecular biology that go beyond simple sizing. In particular, we will discuss the genomic identification of human DNA fragments using fluorescent markers, and how to perform enzymatic reactions, such as restriction mapping using endonucleases, in nanochannels. We will also present our recent progress in the development of ``nanoplumbing'', that is devices that contain junctions of nanochannels. We will show how device dimensions influence the transport of DNA at those nanochannel junctions, and how those properties can be utilized in the design of devices and exotic materials.

  1. Mitochondrial DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.; Bottino, Paul J.

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information for teachers on mitochondrial DNA, pointing out that it may have once been a free-living organism. Includes a ready-to-duplicate exercise titled "Using Microchondrial DNA to Measure Evolutionary Distance." (JN)

  2. Overcoming Communication Restrictions in Collectives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tumer, Kagan; Agogino, Adrian K.

    2004-01-01

    Many large distributed system are characterized by having a large number of components (eg., agents, neurons) whose actions and interactions determine a %orld utility which rates the performance of the overall system. Such collectives are often subject to communication restrictions, making it difficult for components which try to optimize their own private utilities, to take actions that also help optimize the world utility. In this article we address that coordination problem and derive four utility functions which present different compromises between how aligned a component s private utility is with the world utility and how readily that component can determine the actions that optimize its utility. The results show that the utility functions specifically derived to operate under communication restrictions outperform both traditional methods and previous collective-based methods by up to 75%.

  3. Temperature based Restricted Boltzmann Machines.

    PubMed

    Li, Guoqi; Deng, Lei; Xu, Yi; Wen, Changyun; Wang, Wei; Pei, Jing; Shi, Luping

    2016-01-13

    Restricted Boltzmann machines (RBMs), which apply graphical models to learning probability distribution over a set of inputs, have attracted much attention recently since being proposed as building blocks of multi-layer learning systems called deep belief networks (DBNs). Note that temperature is a key factor of the Boltzmann distribution that RBMs originate from. However, none of existing schemes have considered the impact of temperature in the graphical model of DBNs. In this work, we propose temperature based restricted Boltzmann machines (TRBMs) which reveals that temperature is an essential parameter controlling the selectivity of the firing neurons in the hidden layers. We theoretically prove that the effect of temperature can be adjusted by setting the parameter of the sharpness of the logistic function in the proposed TRBMs. The performance of RBMs can be improved by adjusting the temperature parameter of TRBMs. This work provides a comprehensive insights into the deep belief networks and deep learning architectures from a physical point of view.

  4. Temperature based Restricted Boltzmann Machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guoqi; Deng, Lei; Xu, Yi; Wen, Changyun; Wang, Wei; Pei, Jing; Shi, Luping

    2016-01-01

    Restricted Boltzmann machines (RBMs), which apply graphical models to learning probability distribution over a set of inputs, have attracted much attention recently since being proposed as building blocks of multi-layer learning systems called deep belief networks (DBNs). Note that temperature is a key factor of the Boltzmann distribution that RBMs originate from. However, none of existing schemes have considered the impact of temperature in the graphical model of DBNs. In this work, we propose temperature based restricted Boltzmann machines (TRBMs) which reveals that temperature is an essential parameter controlling the selectivity of the firing neurons in the hidden layers. We theoretically prove that the effect of temperature can be adjusted by setting the parameter of the sharpness of the logistic function in the proposed TRBMs. The performance of RBMs can be improved by adjusting the temperature parameter of TRBMs. This work provides a comprehensive insights into the deep belief networks and deep learning architectures from a physical point of view.

  5. DNA Banking

    SciTech Connect

    Reilly, P.R. )

    1992-11-01

    The author is involved in the ethical, legal, and social issues of banking of DNA and data from DNA analysis. In his attempt to determine the extent of DNA banking in the U.S., the author surveyed some commercial companies performing DNA banking services. This article summarizes the results of that survey, with special emphasis on the procedures the companies use to protect the privacy of individuals. 4 refs.

  6. Effects of Long-Term Food Restriction Under Thermoneutral Conditions on Brown Adipose Tissue of Laboratory Mice.

    PubMed

    Elsukova, E I; Mizonova, O V; Medvedev, L N

    2015-09-01

    Long-term food restriction (3 weeks, 60% of normal consumption of control animals) was followed by an increase in DNA and protein content in the intercapsular brown fat of mice. As the animals were kept under thermoneutral conditions, these changes are thought to be a result of food restriction. PMID:26459485

  7. Effects of Long-Term Food Restriction Under Thermoneutral Conditions on Brown Adipose Tissue of Laboratory Mice.

    PubMed

    Elsukova, E I; Mizonova, O V; Medvedev, L N

    2015-09-01

    Long-term food restriction (3 weeks, 60% of normal consumption of control animals) was followed by an increase in DNA and protein content in the intercapsular brown fat of mice. As the animals were kept under thermoneutral conditions, these changes are thought to be a result of food restriction.

  8. Recombinant plasmids for encoding restriction enzymes DpnI and DpnII of streptococcus pneumontae

    DOEpatents

    Lacks, Sanford A.

    1990-01-01

    Chromosomal DNA cassettes containing genes encoding either the DpnI or DpnII restriction endonucleases from Streptococcus pneumoniae are cloned into a streptococcal vector, pLS101. Large amounts of the restriction enzymes are produced by cells containing the multicopy plasmids, pLS202 and pLS207, and their derivatives pLS201, pLS211, pLS217, pLS251 and pLS252.

  9. Lack of Regulation of the Modification-Dependent Restriction Enzyme McrBC in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Mark; Schmid Nuoffer, Stefanie; Bickle, Thomas A.

    2002-01-01

    Restriction alleviation (RA) by the type I restriction enzyme EcoKI is caused by treatments that damage DNA. RA is due to proteolysis of the EcoKI HsdR subunit by the ClpXP ATP-dependent protease. Here we show that the modification-dependent enzyme McrBC is not subject to RA, although it is moderately sensitive to ClpAP. PMID:11872734

  10. Lack of regulation of the modification-dependent restriction enzyme McrBC in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Mark; Schmid Nuoffer, Stefanie; Bickle, Thomas A

    2002-03-01

    Restriction alleviation (RA) by the type I restriction enzyme EcoKI is caused by treatments that damage DNA. RA is due to proteolysis of the EcoKI HsdR subunit by the ClpXP ATP-dependent protease. Here we show that the modification-dependent enzyme McrBC is not subject to RA, although it is moderately sensitive to ClpAP. PMID:11872734

  11. Recombinant plasmids for encoding restriction enzymes DpnI and DpnII of Streptococcus pneumontae

    DOEpatents

    Lacks, S.A.

    1990-10-02

    Chromosomal DNA cassettes containing genes encoding either the DpnI or DpnII restriction endonucleases from Streptococcus pneumoniae are cloned into a streptococcal vector, pLS101. Large amounts of the restriction enzymes are produced by cells containing the multicopy plasmids, pLS202 and pLS207, and their derivatives pLS201, pLS211, pLS217, pLS251 and pLS252. 9 figs.

  12. Dna Sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Tabor, Stanley; Richardson, Charles C.

    1995-04-25

    A method for sequencing a strand of DNA, including the steps off: providing the strand of DNA; annealing the strand with a primer able to hybridize to the strand to give an annealed mixture; incubating the mixture with four deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates, a DNA polymerase, and at least three deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates in different amounts, under conditions in favoring primer extension to form nucleic acid fragments complementory to the DNA to be sequenced; labelling the nucleic and fragments; separating them and determining the position of the deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates by differences in the intensity of the labels, thereby to determine the DNA sequence.

  13. First evidence of DNA methylation in insect Tribolium castaneum: environmental regulation of DNA methylation within heterochromatin.

    PubMed

    Feliciello, Isidoro; Parazajder, Josip; Akrap, Ivana; Ugarković, Durđica

    2013-05-01

    DNA methylation has been studied in many eukaryotic organisms, in particular vertebrates, and was implicated in developmental and phenotypic variations. Little is known about the role of DNA methylation in invertebrates, although insects are considered as excellent models for studying the evolution of DNA methylation. In the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum (Tenebrionidae, Coleoptera), no evidence of DNA methylation has been found till now. In this paper, a cytosine methylation in Tribolium castaneum embryos was detected by methylation sensitive restriction endonucleases and immuno-dot blot assay. DNA methylation in embryos is followed by a global demethylation in larvae, pupae and adults. DNA demethylation seems to proceed actively through 5-hydroxymethylcytosine, most probably by the action of TET enzyme. Bisulfite sequencing of a highly abundant satellite DNA located in pericentromeric heterochromatin revealed similar profile of cytosine methylation in adults and embryos. Cytosine methylation was not only restricted to CpG sites but was found at CpA, CpT and CpC sites. In addition, complete cytosine demethylation of heterochromatic satellite DNA was induced by heat stress. The results reveal existence of DNA methylation cycling in T. castaneum ranging from strong overall cytosine methylation in embryos to a weak DNA methylation in other developmental stages. Nevertheless, DNA methylation is preserved within heterochromatin during development, indicating its role in heterochromatin formation and maintenance. It is, however, strongly affected by heat stress, suggesting a role for DNA methylation in heterochromatin structure modulation during heat stress response.

  14. Conformation-selective methylation of geminivirus DNA.

    PubMed

    Paprotka, T; Deuschle, K; Metzler, V; Jeske, H

    2011-11-01

    Geminiviruses with small circular single-stranded DNA genomes replicate in plant cell nuclei by using various double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) intermediates: distinct open circular and covalently closed circular as well as heterogeneous linear DNA. Their DNA may be methylated partially at cytosine residues, as detected previously by bisulfite sequencing and subsequent PCR. In order to determine the methylation patterns of the circular molecules, the DNAs of tomato yellow leaf curl Sardinia virus (TYLCSV) and Abutilon mosaic virus were investigated utilizing bisulfite treatment followed by rolling circle amplification. Shotgun sequencing of the products yielded a randomly distributed 50% rate of C maintenance after the bisulfite reaction for both viruses. However, controls with unmethylated single-stranded bacteriophage DNA resulted in the same level of C maintenance. Only one short DNA stretch within the C2/C3 promoter of TYLCSV showed hyperprotection of C, with the protection rate exceeding the threshold of the mean value plus 1 standard deviation. Similarly, the use of methylation-sensitive restriction enzymes suggested that geminiviruses escape silencing by methylation very efficiently, by either a rolling circle or recombination-dependent replication mode. In contrast, attempts to detect methylated bases positively by using methylcytosine-specific antibodies detected methylated DNA only in heterogeneous linear dsDNA, and methylation-dependent restriction enzymes revealed that the viral heterogeneous linear dsDNA was methylated preferentially. PMID:21835804

  15. UV damage in DNA promotes nucleosome unwrapping.

    PubMed

    Duan, Ming-Rui; Smerdon, Michael J

    2010-08-20

    The association of DNA with histones in chromatin impedes DNA repair enzymes from accessing DNA lesions. Nucleosomes exist in a dynamic equilibrium in which portions of the DNA molecule spontaneously unwrap, transiently exposing buried DNA sites. Thus, nucleosome dynamics in certain regions of chromatin may provide the exposure time and space needed for efficient repair of buried DNA lesions. We have used FRET and restriction enzyme accessibility to study nucleosome dynamics following DNA damage by UV radiation. We find that FRET efficiency is reduced in a dose-dependent manner, showing that the presence of UV photoproducts enhances spontaneous unwrapping of DNA from histones. Furthermore, this UV-induced shift in unwrapping dynamics is associated with increased restriction enzyme accessibility of histone-bound DNA after UV treatment. Surprisingly, the increased unwrapping dynamics is even observed in nucleosome core particles containing a single UV lesion at a specific site. These results highlight the potential for increased "intrinsic exposure" of nucleosome-associated DNA lesions in chromatin to repair proteins. PMID:20562439

  16. Self-assembly programming of DNA polyominoes.

    PubMed

    Ong, Hui San; Syafiq-Rahim, Mohd; Kasim, Noor Hayaty Abu; Firdaus-Raih, Mohd; Ramlan, Effirul Ikhwan

    2016-10-20

    Fabrication of functional DNA nanostructures operating at a cellular level has been accomplished through molecular programming techniques such as DNA origami and single-stranded tiles (SST). During implementation, restrictive and constraint dependent designs are enforced to ensure conformity is attainable. We propose a concept of DNA polyominoes that promotes flexibility in molecular programming. The fabrication of complex structures is achieved through self-assembly of distinct heterogeneous shapes (i.e., self-organised optimisation among competing DNA basic shapes) with total flexibility during the design and assembly phases. In this study, the plausibility of the approach is validated using the formation of multiple 3×4 DNA network fabricated from five basic DNA shapes with distinct configurations (monomino, tromino and tetrominoes). Computational tools to aid the design of compatible DNA shapes and the structure assembly assessment are presented. The formations of the desired structures were validated using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) imagery. Five 3×4 DNA networks were successfully constructed using combinatorics of these five distinct DNA heterogeneous shapes. Our findings revealed that the construction of DNA supra-structures could be achieved using a more natural-like orchestration as compared to the rigid and restrictive conventional approaches adopted previously. PMID:27569553

  17. Self-assembly programming of DNA polyominoes.

    PubMed

    Ong, Hui San; Syafiq-Rahim, Mohd; Kasim, Noor Hayaty Abu; Firdaus-Raih, Mohd; Ramlan, Effirul Ikhwan

    2016-10-20

    Fabrication of functional DNA nanostructures operating at a cellular level has been accomplished through molecular programming techniques such as DNA origami and single-stranded tiles (SST). During implementation, restrictive and constraint dependent designs are enforced to ensure conformity is attainable. We propose a concept of DNA polyominoes that promotes flexibility in molecular programming. The fabrication of complex structures is achieved through self-assembly of distinct heterogeneous shapes (i.e., self-organised optimisation among competing DNA basic shapes) with total flexibility during the design and assembly phases. In this study, the plausibility of the approach is validated using the formation of multiple 3×4 DNA network fabricated from five basic DNA shapes with distinct configurations (monomino, tromino and tetrominoes). Computational tools to aid the design of compatible DNA shapes and the structure assembly assessment are presented. The formations of the desired structures were validated using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) imagery. Five 3×4 DNA networks were successfully constructed using combinatorics of these five distinct DNA heterogeneous shapes. Our findings revealed that the construction of DNA supra-structures could be achieved using a more natural-like orchestration as compared to the rigid and restrictive conventional approaches adopted previously.

  18. REBASE - restriction enzymes and methylases.

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, R J; Macelis, D

    1998-01-01

    REBASE is a comprehensive database of information about restriction enzymes and their associated methylases, including their recognition and cleavage sites and their commercial availability. Also included is a listing of homing endonucleases. Information from REBASE is available via monthly electronic mailings as well as via anonymous ftp and through the World Wide Web. The REBASE web site, http://www. neb.com/rebase , is where we maintain a web page for every enzyme, reference and supplier. Additionally, there is a search facility, help and NEWS pages, and a complete description of our various services. Specialized files are available that can be used directly by many software packages. PMID:9399870

  19. Variola type IB DNA topoisomerase: DNA binding and supercoil unwinding using engineered DNA minicircles.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Breeana G; Stivers, James T

    2014-07-01

    Type IB topoisomerases unwind positive and negative DNA supercoils and play a key role in removing supercoils that would otherwise accumulate at replication and transcription forks. An interesting question is whether topoisomerase activity is regulated by the topological state of the DNA, thereby providing a mechanism for targeting the enzyme to highly supercoiled DNA domains in genomes. The type IB enzyme from variola virus (vTopo) has proven to be useful in addressing mechanistic questions about topoisomerase function because it forms a reversible 3'-phosphotyrosyl adduct with the DNA backbone at a specific target sequence (5'-CCCTT-3') from which DNA unwinding can proceed. We have synthesized supercoiled DNA minicircles (MCs) containing a single vTopo target site that provides highly defined substrates for exploring the effects of supercoil density on DNA binding, strand cleavage and ligation, and unwinding. We observed no topological dependence for binding of vTopo to these supercoiled MC DNAs, indicating that affinity-based targeting to supercoiled DNA regions by vTopo is unlikely. Similarly, the cleavage and religation rates of the MCs were not topologically dependent, but topoisomers with low superhelical densities were found to unwind more slowly than highly supercoiled topoisomers, suggesting that reduced torque at low superhelical densities leads to an increased number of cycles of cleavage and ligation before a successful unwinding event. The K271E charge reversal mutant has an impaired interaction with the rotating DNA segment that leads to an increase in the number of supercoils that were unwound per cleavage event. This result provides evidence that interactions of the enzyme with the rotating DNA segment can restrict the number of supercoils that are unwound. We infer that both superhelical density and transient contacts between vTopo and the rotating DNA determine the efficiency of supercoil unwinding. Such determinants are likely to be important in

  20. Improved coverage of cDNA-AFLP by sequential digestion of immobilized cDNA

    PubMed Central

    Weiberg, Arne; Pöhler, Dirk; Morgenstern, Burkhard; Karlovsky, Petr

    2008-01-01

    Background cDNA-AFLP is a transcriptomics technique which does not require prior sequence information and can therefore be used as a gene discovery tool. The method is based on selective amplification of cDNA fragments generated by restriction endonucleases, electrophoretic separation of the products and comparison of the band patterns between treated samples and controls. Unequal distribution of restriction sites used to generate cDNA fragments negatively affects the performance of cDNA-AFLP. Some transcripts are represented by more than one fragment while other escape detection, causing redundancy and reducing the coverage of the analysis, respectively. Results With the goal of improving the coverage of cDNA-AFLP without increasing its redundancy, we designed a modified cDNA-AFLP protocol. Immobilized cDNA is sequentially digested with several restriction endonucleases and the released DNA fragments are collected in mutually exclusive pools. To investigate the performance of the protocol, software tool MECS (Multiple Enzyme cDNA-AFLP Simulation) was written in Perl. cDNA-AFLP protocols described in the literatur and the new sequential digestion protocol were simulated on sets of cDNA sequences from mouse, human and Arabidopsis thaliana. The redundancy and coverage, the total number of PCR reactions, and the average fragment length were calculated for each protocol and cDNA set. Conclusion Simulation revealed that sequential digestion of immobilized cDNA followed by the partitioning of released fragments into mutually exclusive pools outperformed other cDNA-AFLP protocols in terms of coverage, redundancy, fragment length, and the total number of PCRs. Primers generating 30 to 70 amplicons per PCR provided the highest fraction of electrophoretically distinguishable fragments suitable for normalization. For A. thaliana, human and mice transcriptome, the use of two marking enzymes and three sequentially applied releasing enzymes for each of the marking enzymes is