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Sample records for restriction endonuclease implications

  1. Problem-Solving Test: Restriction Endonuclease Mapping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2011-01-01

    The term "restriction endonuclease mapping" covers a number of related techniques used to identify specific restriction enzyme recognition sites on small DNA molecules. A method for restriction endonuclease mapping of a 1,000-basepair (bp)-long DNA molecule is described in the fictitious experiment of this test. The most important fact needed to…

  2. Type I restriction endonucleases are true catalytic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Bianco, Piero R; Xu, Cuiling; Chi, Min

    2009-06-01

    Type I restriction endonucleases are intriguing, multifunctional complexes that restrict DNA randomly, at sites distant from the target sequence. Restriction at distant sites is facilitated by ATP hydrolysis-dependent, translocation of double-stranded DNA towards the stationary enzyme bound at the recognition sequence. Following restriction, the enzymes are thought to remain associated with the DNA at the target site, hydrolyzing copious amounts of ATP. As a result, for the past 35 years type I restriction endonucleases could only be loosely classified as enzymes since they functioned stoichiometrically relative to DNA. To further understand enzyme mechanism, a detailed analysis of DNA cleavage by the EcoR124I holoenzyme was done. We demonstrate for the first time that type I restriction endonucleases are not stoichiometric but are instead catalytic with respect to DNA. Further, the mechanism involves formation of a dimer of holoenzymes, with each monomer bound to a target sequence and, following cleavage, each dissociates in an intact form to bind and restrict subsequent DNA molecules. Therefore, type I restriction endonucleases, like their type II counterparts, are true enzymes. The conclusion that type I restriction enzymes are catalytic relative to DNA has important implications for the in vivo function of these previously enigmatic enzymes.

  3. A new restriction endonuclease from Citrobacter freundii

    PubMed Central

    Janulaitis, A.A.; Stakenas, P.S.; Lebedenko, E.N.; Berlin, Yu.A.

    1982-01-01

    CfrI, a new restriction endonuclease of unique substrate specificity, has been isolated from a Citrobacter freundii strain. The enzyme recognizes a degenerated sequence PyGGCCPu in double-strand DNA and cleaves it between Py and G residues to yield 5′ -protruding tetranucleotide ends GGCC. Images PMID:6294607

  4. New restriction endonucleases from Acetobacter aceti and Bacillus aneurinolyticus.

    PubMed

    Sugisaki, H; Maekawa, Y; Kanazawa, S; Takanami, M

    1982-10-11

    Two restriction endonucleases with new sequence specificities have been isolated from Acetobacter aceti IFO 3281 and Bacillus aneurinolyticus IAM 1077 and named AatII and BanII, respectively. Based on analysis of the sequences around the restriction sites, the recognition sequences and cleavage sites of these endonucleases were deduced as below: (formula; see text)

  5. The Characterization of Restriction Endonucleases: the Work of Hamilton Smith

    PubMed Central

    Kresge, Nicole; Simoni, Robert D.; Hill, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    Purification of the HhaII Restriction Endonuclease from an Overproducer Escherichia coli Clone (Kelly, S., Kaddurah-Daouk, R., and Smith, H. O. (1985) J. Biol. Chem. 260, 15339–15344) Catalytic Properties of the HhaII Restriction Endonuclease (Kaddurah-Daouk, R., Cho, P., and Smith, H. O. (1985) J. Biol. Chem. 260, 15345–15351) PMID:21491685

  6. Solitary restriction endonucleases in prokaryotic genomes

    PubMed Central

    Ershova, Anna S.; Karyagina, Anna S.; Vasiliev, Mikhail O.; Lyashchuk, Alexander M.; Lunin, Vladimir G.; Spirin, Sergey A.; Alexeevski, Andrei V.

    2012-01-01

    Prokaryotic restriction-modification (R-M) systems defend the host cell from the invasion of a foreign DNA. They comprise two enzymatic activities: specific DNA cleavage activity and DNA methylation activity preventing cleavage. Typically, these activities are provided by two separate enzymes: a DNA methyltransferase (MTase) and a restriction endonuclease (RE). In the absence of a corresponding MTase, an RE of Type II R-M system is highly toxic for the cell. Genes of the R-M system are linked in the genome in the vast majority of annotated cases. There are only a few reported cases in which the genes of MTase and RE from one R-M system are not linked. Nevertheless, a few hundreds solitary RE genes are present in the Restriction Enzyme Database (http://rebase.neb.com) annotations. Using the comparative genomic approach, we analysed 272 solitary RE genes. For 57 solitary RE genes we predicted corresponding MTase genes located distantly in a genome. Of the 272 solitary RE genes, 99 are likely to be fragments of RE genes. Various explanations for the existence of the remaining 116 solitary RE genes are also discussed. PMID:22965118

  7. RNA aptamer inhibitors of a restriction endonuclease

    PubMed Central

    Mondragón, Estefanía; Maher, L. James

    2015-01-01

    Restriction endonucleases (REases) recognize and cleave short palindromic DNA sequences, protecting bacterial cells against bacteriophage infection by attacking foreign DNA. We are interested in the potential of folded RNA to mimic DNA, a concept that might be applied to inhibition of DNA-binding proteins. As a model system, we sought RNA aptamers against the REases BamHI, PacI and KpnI using systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX). After 20 rounds of selection under different stringent conditions, we identified the 10 most enriched RNA aptamers for each REase. Aptamers were screened for binding and specificity, and assayed for REase inhibition. We obtained eight high-affinity (Kd ∼12-30 nM) selective competitive inhibitors (IC50 ∼20-150 nM) for KpnI. Predicted RNA secondary structures were confirmed by in-line attack assay and a 38-nt derivative of the best anti-KpnI aptamer was sufficient for inhibition. These competitive inhibitors presumably act as KpnI binding site analogs, but lack the primary consensus KpnI cleavage sequence and are not cleaved by KpnI, making their potential mode of DNA mimicry fascinating. Anti-REase RNA aptamers could have value in studies of REase mechanism and may give clues to a code for designing RNAs that competitively inhibit DNA binding proteins including transcription factors. PMID:26184872

  8. Highly sensitive non-isotopic restriction endonuclease fingerprinting of nucleotide variability in the gp60 gene within Cryptosporidium species, genotypes and subgenotypes infective to humans, and its implications.

    PubMed

    Pangasa, Aradhana; Jex, Aaron R; Nolan, Matthew J; Campbell, Bronwyn E; Haydon, Shane R; Stevens, Melita A; Gasser, Robin B

    2010-05-01

    The high-resolution analysis of genetic variation has major implications for the identification of parasites and micro-organisms to species and subspecies as well as for population genetic and epidemiological studies. In this study, we critically assessed the effectiveness of a PCR-based restriction endonuclease fingerprinting (REF) method for the detection of mutations in the 60 kDa glycoprotein gene (gp60) of Cryptosporidium, a genus of parasitic protists of major human and animal health importance globally. This gene displays substantial intraspecific variability in sequence, particularly in a TCA (perfect and imperfect) microsatellite region, is present as a single copy in the nuclear genome and is used widely as a marker in molecular epidemiological studies of Cryptosporidium hominis and C. parvum, the two predominant species that infect humans. The results of this study demonstrated an exquisite capacity of REF to detect nucleotide variability in the gp60 gene within each of the two species. The differentiation of genotypes/subgenotypes based on REF analysis was supported by targeted sequencing, allowing the detection of levels of variation as low as a single-nucleotide transversion for amplicons of approximately 1 kb in size. The high-throughput potential and relatively low-cost of REF make it a particularly useful tool for large-scale genetic analyses of C. hominis and C. parvum. REF could also be utilized for comparative surveys of genetic variability across large nuclear genomic regions. Such analyses of Cryptosporidium in clinical and environmental samples by REF have important implications for identifying sources of infection, modes of transmission and/or possible infectivity to humans, thus assisting in the surveillance and control of cryptosporidiosis. Given its excellent mutation detection capacity, REF should find broad applicability to various single-copy genes as well as a wide range of other protozoan and metazoan parasites.

  9. REPK: an analytical web server to select restriction endonucleases for terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis.

    PubMed

    Collins, Roy Eric; Rocap, Gabrielle

    2007-07-01

    Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis is a widespread technique for rapidly fingerprinting microbial communities. Users of T-RFLP frequently overlook the resolving power of well-chosen restriction endonucleases and often fail to report how they chose their enzymes. REPK (Restriction Endonuclease Picker) assists in the rational choice of restriction endonucleases for T-RFLP by finding sets of four restriction endonucleases that together uniquely differentiate user-designated sequence groups. With REPK, users can provide their own sequences (of any gene, not just 16S rRNA), specify the taxonomic rank of interest and choose from a number of filtering options to further narrow down the enzyme selection. Bug tracking is provided, and the source code is open and accessible under the GNU Public License v.2, at http://code.google.com/p/repk. The web server is available without access restrictions at http://rocaplab.ocean.washington.edu/tools/repk.

  10. Transformation of restriction endonuclease phenotype in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Muckerman, C C; Springhorn, S S; Greenberg, B; Lacks, S A

    1982-01-01

    The genetic basis of the unique restriction endonuclease DpnI, that cleaves only at a methylated sequence, 5'-GmeATC-3', and of the complementary endonuclease DpnII, which cleaves at the same sequence when it is not methylated, was investigated. Different strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated from patients contained either DpnI (two isolates) or DpnII (six isolates). The latter strains also contained DNA methylated at the 5'-GATC-3' sequence. A restrictable bacteriophage, HB-3, was used to characterize the various strains and to select for transformants. One laboratory strain contained neither DpnI nor Dpn II. It was probably derived from a DpnI-containing strain, and its DNA was not methylated at 5'-GATC-3'. Cells of this strain were transformed to the DpnI restriction phenotype by DNA from a DpnI-containing strain and to the DpnII restriction phenotype by DNA from a DpnII-containing strain. Neither cross-transformation, that is, transformation to one phenotype by DNA from a strain of the other phenotype, nor spontaneous conversion was observed. Extracts of transformants to the new restriction phenotype were shown to contain the corresponding endonuclease. Images PMID:6288656

  11. Mechanistic insight into Type I restriction endonucleases.

    PubMed

    Youell, James; Firman, Keith

    2012-06-01

    Restriction and modification are two opposing activities that are used to protect bacteria from cellular invasion by DNA (e.g. bacteriophage infection). Restriction activity involves cleavage of the DNA; while modification activity is the mechanism used to "mark" host DNA and involves DNA methylation. The study of Type I restriction enzymes has often been seen as an esoteric exercise and this reflects some of their more unusual properties - non-stoichiometric (non-catalytic) cleavage of the DNA substrate, random cleavage of DNA, a massive ATPase activity, and the ability to both cleave DNA and methylate DNA. Yet these enzymes have been found in many bacteria and are very efficient as a means of protecting bacteria against bacteriophage infection, indicating they are successful enzymes. In this review, we summarise recent work on the mechanisms of action, describe switching of function and review their mechanism of action. We also discuss structural rearrangements and cellular localisation, which provide powerful mechanisms for controlling the enzyme activity. Finally, we speculate as to their involvement in recombination and discuss their relationship to helicase enzymes.

  12. Action of restriction endonucleases on transforming DNA of Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed Central

    Beattie, K L; Wakil, A E; Driggers, P H

    1982-01-01

    Cleavage of DNA from Haemophilus influenzae with restriction endonucleases caused inactivation of transforming ability to an extent that depended on the genetic marker and the enzyme. The rate of inactivation, but not the final level of survival, depended on the concentration of enzyme in the restriction digest. In general, the greatest extent of inactivation of transforming activity was obtained with endonucleases that are known to produce the shortest fragments. We electrophoresed restriction digests of H. influenzae DNA in agarose gels and assayed transforming activity of DNA extracted from gel slices. In this way, we determined the lengths of restriction fragments that contain genetic markers of H. influenzae. For the marker that we studied most thoroughly (nov), the shortest restriction fragment that possessed detectable transforming activity was a 0.9-kilobase pair fragment produced by endonuclease R . PstI. The shortest marker-bearing restriction fragment that retained substantial transforming activity (50% of value for undigested DNA) was a 2.1-kilobase pair EcoRI fragment bearing the kan marker. Among marker-bearing restriction fragments 1 to 4 kilobase pairs in length, survival of transforming activity varied 10,000-fold. We relate these observations to the recent findings by Sisco and Smith (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 76:972-976, 1979) that efficient entry of DNA into competent H. influenzae cells appears to require the presence of a recognition sequence that is scattered throughout the Haemophilus genome in many more copies than in unrelated genomes. Images PMID:6288662

  13. Word-processor macro for restriction endonuclease analysis.

    PubMed

    Cabrera León, N

    1999-12-01

    This paper describes a Microsoft Word 97 macro designed for restriction endonuclease analysis. Selected DNA fragments in the active Word document can be analyzed through a dynamic dialog box that formats the enzyme restriction lists for further analysis. The results can be obtained in a new Word document with the name of the enzymes, number of cuts and positions. This macro has several advantages: the results can be printed in a format suitable for record keeping, no additional programs are required and it is simple to use.

  14. The Fidelity Index provides a systematic quantitation of star activity of DNA restriction endonucleases

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Hua; Therrien, Caitlin; Blanchard, Aine; Guan, Shengxi; Zhu, Zhenyu

    2008-01-01

    Restriction endonucleases are the basic tools of molecular biology. Many restriction endonucleases show relaxed sequence recognition, called star activity, as an inherent property under various digestion conditions including the optimal ones. To quantify this property we propose the concept of the Fidelity Index (FI), which is defined as the ratio of the maximum enzyme amount showing no star activity to the minimum amount needed for complete digestion at the cognate recognition site for any particular restriction endonuclease. Fidelity indices for a large number of restriction endonucleases are reported here. The effects of reaction vessel, reaction volume, incubation mode, substrate differences, reaction time, reaction temperature and additional glycerol, DMSO, ethanol and Mn2+ on the FI are also investigated. The FI provides a practical guideline for the use of restriction endonucleases and defines a fundamental property by which restriction endonucleases can be characterized. PMID:18413342

  15. Cofactor Requirement of HpyAV Restriction Endonuclease

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Siu-Hong; Opitz, Lars; Higgins, Lauren; O'loane, Diana; Xu, Shuang-yong

    2010-01-01

    Background Helicobacter pylori is the etiologic agent of common gastritis and a risk factor for gastric cancer. It is also one of the richest sources of Type II restriction-modification (R-M) systems in microorganisms. Principal Findings We have cloned, expressed and purified a new restriction endonuclease HpyAV from H. pylori strain 26695. We determined the HpyAV DNA recognition sequence and cleavage site as CCTTC 6/5. In addition, we found that HpyAV has a unique metal ion requirement: its cleavage activity is higher with transition metal ions than in Mg++. The special metal ion requirement of HpyAV can be attributed to the presence of a HNH catalytic site similar to ColE9 nuclease instead of the canonical PD-X-D/EXK catalytic site found in many other REases. Site-directed mutagenesis was carried out to verify the catalytic residues of HpyAV. Mutation of the conserved metal-binding Asn311 and His320 to alanine eliminated cleavage activity. HpyAV variant H295A displayed approximately 1% of wt activity. Conclusions/Significance Some HNH-type endonucleases have unique metal ion cofactor requirement for optimal activities. Homology modeling and site-directed mutagenesis confirmed that HpyAV is a member of the HNH nuclease family. The identification of catalytic residues in HpyAV paved the way for further engineering of the metal binding site. A survey of sequenced microbial genomes uncovered 10 putative R-M systems that show high sequence similarity to the HpyAV system, suggesting lateral transfer of a prototypic HpyAV-like R-M system among these microorganisms. PMID:20140205

  16. Selective microbial genomic DNA isolation using restriction endonucleases.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Helen E; Liu, Guohong; Weston, Christopher Q; King, Paula; Pham, Long K; Waltz, Shannon; Helzer, Kimberly T; Day, Laura; Sphar, Dan; Yamamoto, Robert T; Forsyth, R Allyn

    2014-01-01

    To improve the metagenomic analysis of complex microbiomes, we have repurposed restriction endonucleases as methyl specific DNA binding proteins. As an example, we use DpnI immobilized on magnetic beads. The ten minute extraction technique allows specific binding of genomes containing the DpnI Gm6ATC motif common in the genomic DNA of many bacteria including γ-proteobacteria. Using synthetic genome mixtures, we demonstrate 80% recovery of Escherichia coli genomic DNA even when only femtogram quantities are spiked into 10 µg of human DNA background. Binding is very specific with less than 0.5% of human DNA bound. Next Generation Sequencing of input and enriched synthetic mixtures results in over 100-fold enrichment of target genomes relative to human and plant DNA. We also show comparable enrichment when sequencing complex microbiomes such as those from creek water and human saliva. The technique can be broadened to other restriction enzymes allowing for the selective enrichment of trace and unculturable organisms from complex microbiomes and the stratification of organisms according to restriction enzyme enrichment.

  17. Selective Microbial Genomic DNA Isolation Using Restriction Endonucleases

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Helen E.; Liu, Guohong; Weston, Christopher Q.; King, Paula; Pham, Long K.; Waltz, Shannon; Helzer, Kimberly T.; Day, Laura; Sphar, Dan; Yamamoto, Robert T.; Forsyth, R. Allyn

    2014-01-01

    To improve the metagenomic analysis of complex microbiomes, we have repurposed restriction endonucleases as methyl specific DNA binding proteins. As an example, we use DpnI immobilized on magnetic beads. The ten minute extraction technique allows specific binding of genomes containing the DpnI Gm6ATC motif common in the genomic DNA of many bacteria including γ-proteobacteria. Using synthetic genome mixtures, we demonstrate 80% recovery of Escherichia coli genomic DNA even when only femtogram quantities are spiked into 10 µg of human DNA background. Binding is very specific with less than 0.5% of human DNA bound. Next Generation Sequencing of input and enriched synthetic mixtures results in over 100-fold enrichment of target genomes relative to human and plant DNA. We also show comparable enrichment when sequencing complex microbiomes such as those from creek water and human saliva. The technique can be broadened to other restriction enzymes allowing for the selective enrichment of trace and unculturable organisms from complex microbiomes and the stratification of organisms according to restriction enzyme enrichment. PMID:25279840

  18. Peculiarities of Crystallization of the Restriction Endonuclease EcoRII

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karpove, Elizaveta; Pusey, M.arc L.

    1998-01-01

    Nucleases interfere with most standard molecular biology procedures. We have purified and crystallized the restriction endonuclease EcoRII, which belongs to the type II of restriction- modification enzyme, to study the protein crystallization process using a "non standard" macromolecule. A procedure for the purification of EcoRII was developed and 99% pure protein as determined by SDS PAGE electrophoresis obtained. Light scattering experiments were performed to assist in screening protein suitable crystallization conditions. The second virial coefficient was determined as a function of precipitating salt concentration, using sodium chloride, ammonium sulfate, and sodium sulfate. Small (maximum size approximately 0.2 mm) well shaped crystals have been obtained. Larger poorly formed crystals (ca 0.5 mm) have also been obtained, but we have been unable to mount them for diff-raction analysis due to their extreme fragility. Crystallization experiments with PEG have shown that using this precipitant, the best crystals are obtained from slightly over-saturated solutions. Use of higher precipitant concentration leads to dendritic crystal formation. EcoRII is difficult to solubilize and meticulous attention must be paid to the presence of reducing agents.

  19. A type II restriction endonuclease with an eight nucleotide specificity from Streptomyces fimbriatus.

    PubMed Central

    Qiang, B Q; Schildkraut, I

    1984-01-01

    A new site-specific endonuclease, Sfi I, has been isolated from Streptomyces fimbriatus . This is the first report of a type II restriction endonuclease whose recognition specificity requires eight nucleotides. Sfi I cleaves the sequence, GGCCNNNN / NGGCC , symmetrically to produce a three base, 3' extension. Images PMID:6330673

  20. Effect of site-specific modification on restriction endonucleases and DNA modification methyltransferases.

    PubMed Central

    McClelland, M; Nelson, M; Raschke, E

    1994-01-01

    Restriction endonucleases have site-specific interactions with DNA that can often be inhibited by site-specific DNA methylation and other site-specific DNA modifications. However, such inhibition cannot generally be predicted. The empirically acquired data on these effects are tabulated for over 320 restriction endonucleases. In addition, a table of known site-specific DNA modification methyltransferases and their specificities is presented along with EMBL database accession numbers for cloned genes. PMID:7937074

  1. Investigating the nature of chromatid breaks produced by restriction endonucleases.

    PubMed

    Harvey, A N; Savage, J R

    1997-01-01

    It is a basic assumption of the breakage-and-reunion theory that the majority of open chromatid breaks seen at metaphase are the residue of unrejoined primary breaks that have neither restituted nor rejoined illegitimately to form exchange aberrations. If Chinese hamster chromosomes with BrdU sister-chromatid differentiation are irradiated, and chromatid aberrations scored from G2 cells, some 15-20% of open breaks show a colour-jump at the point of discontinuity, indicating a two-lesion intrachange origin. Since we see complete forms of several intrachanges whose incomplete forms will also look like breaks, but devoid of a colour-jump, it appears that a substantial proportion of observed breaks are intrachange derived. Experiments to date show that the colour-jump proportion is constant, irrespective of radiation dose, radiation quality, BrdU concentration and hamster cell origin. It is the same for the very low "spontaneous' breaks found in control samples. Restriction endonucleases (RE) can be introduced into cells by various poration methods, and are highly efficient at producing all types of aberrations. This is taken as strong evidence that DNA dsb are significant lesions triggering aberrations. One might anticipate, therefore, that observed breaks will be predominantly unrejoined dsb, and the proportion of colour-jump break correspondingly low. We tested this supposition using three RE; Alu 1, a blunt-end cutter, Sau3A 1, a cohesive-end cutter, both with a short life-time in vivo, and Mbo 1, an isoschizomer of Sau3A 1, which has a long cutting life-time in vivo. Although there were differences in absolute yields of breaks, and of relative frequencies of aberration types recovered, the proportion of colour-jump breaks was as high as that in a parallel X-ray experiment, and fell well within the range encountered in all our previous experiments. It is difficult to reconcile this universal constancy of colour-jump breaks with the expectations of breakage

  2. Temporal dynamics of methyltransferase and restriction endonuclease accumulation in individual cells after introducing a restriction-modification system.

    PubMed

    Morozova, Natalia; Sabantsev, Anton; Bogdanova, Ekaterina; Fedorova, Yana; Maikova, Anna; Vedyaykin, Alexey; Rodic, Andjela; Djordjevic, Marko; Khodorkovskii, Mikhail; Severinov, Konstantin

    2016-01-29

    Type II restriction-modification (R-M) systems encode a restriction endonuclease that cleaves DNA at specific sites, and a methyltransferase that modifies same sites protecting them from restriction endonuclease cleavage. Type II R-M systems benefit bacteria by protecting them from bacteriophages. Many type II R-M systems are plasmid-based and thus capable of horizontal transfer. Upon the entry of such plasmids into a naïve host with unmodified genomic recognition sites, methyltransferase should be synthesized first and given sufficient time to methylate recognition sites in the bacterial genome before the toxic restriction endonuclease activity appears. Here, we directly demonstrate a delay in restriction endonuclease synthesis after transformation of Escherichia coli cells with a plasmid carrying the Esp1396I type II R-M system, using single-cell microscopy. We further demonstrate that before the appearance of the Esp1396I restriction endonuclease the intracellular concentration of Esp1396I methyltransferase undergoes a sharp peak, which should allow rapid methylation of host genome recognition sites. A mathematical model that satisfactorily describes the observed dynamics of both Esp1396I enzymes is presented. The results reported here were obtained using a functional Esp1396I type II R-M system encoding both enzymes fused to fluorescent proteins. Similar approaches should be applicable to the studies of other R-M systems at single-cell level.

  3. II-Q restriction endonucleases--new class of type II enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Degtyarev, S K; Rechkunova, N I; Kolyhalov, A A; Dedkov, V S; Zhilkin, P A

    1990-01-01

    Unique restriction endonucleases Bpu 10l and Bsil have been isolated from Bacillus pumilas and Bacillus sphaericus, respectively. The recognition sequences and cleavage points of these enzymes have been determinated as 5'-CC1TNAGC-3'/3'-GGANT1CG-5' for Bpu 10l and 5'-C1TCGTG-3'/3'-GAGCA1C-5' for Bsil. Restriction endonucleases Bpu 10l and Bsil represent a new class of enzymes which recognize non-palindromic nucleotide sequences and hydrolize DNA within the recognition sequence. Bpu 10l and Bsil recognition sequences may be regarded as quasipalindromic and the enzymes may be designated as type II-Q restriction endonucleases. Images PMID:2216771

  4. Antibiotic resistance and restriction endonucleases in fecal enterococci of chamois (Rupicapra rupicapra Linnaeus, 1758).

    PubMed

    Vandžurová, A; Hrašková, I; Júdová, J; Javorský, P; Pristaš, P

    2012-07-01

    Two hundred eighty-four isolates of enterococci from feces of wild living chamois from alpine environments were tested for sensitivity to three antibiotics. Low frequency of resistance was observed in studied enterococcal populations (about 5 % for tetracycline and erythromycin and 0 % for ampicillin). In six animals, the population of enterococci lacked any detectable resistance. Our data indicated that enterococcal population in feces of the majority of studied animals did not encounter mobile genetic elements encoding antibiotic resistance probably due to spatial separation and/or due to low exposure to the antibiotics. Based on resistance profiles observed, three populations were analyzed for the presence of restriction endonucleases. The restriction enzymes from two isolates-31K and 1K-were further purified and characterized. Restriction endonuclease Efa1KI recognizes CCWGG sequence and is an isoschizomer of BstNI. Endonuclease Efc31KI, a BsmAI isoschizomer, recognizes the sequence GTCTC and it is a first restriction endonuclease identified in Enterococcus faecium. Our data indicate that restriction-modification (R-M) systems do not represent an efficient barrier for antibiotic resistance spreading; enterococcal populations colonized by antibiotics resistance genes were also colonized by the R-M systems.

  5. Identification of genomic clonal types of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans by restriction endonuclease analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Han, N; Hoover, C I; Winkler, J R; Ng, C Y; Armitage, G C

    1991-01-01

    To evaluate its utility in discriminating different strains, restriction endonuclease analysis was applied to 12 strains of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (3 serotype a, 5 serotype b, and 4 serotype c strains). DNA isolated from each strain was digested by 12 different restriction endonucleases, and the electrophoretic banding patterns of the resulting DNA fragments were compared. The DNA fragment patterns produced by SalI, XhoI, and XbaI for the 12 A. actinomycetemcomitans strains were simple (less than 30 bands) and allowed us to recognize easily 10 distinct genomic clonal types. The three serotype a strains exhibited distinctly different clonal types from one another, the five serotype b strains exhibited an additional four distinct clonal types, and the four serotype c strains showed another three different clonal types. The other endonucleases tested were less useful in typing A. actinomycetemcomitans. We conclude that restriction endonuclease analysis is a powerful tool for typing and discerning genetic heterogeneity and homogeneity among A. actinomycetemcomitans strains. It should, therefore, be very useful for epidemiologic studies. Images PMID:1761677

  6. Human papillomavirus DNA from warts for typing by endonuclease restriction patterns: purification by alkaline plasmid methods.

    PubMed

    Chinami, M; Tanikawa, E; Hachisuka, H; Sasai, Y; Shingu, M

    1990-01-01

    The alkaline plasmid DNA extraction method of Birnboim and Doly was applied for the isolation of human papillomavirus (HPV) from warts. Tissue from common and plantar warts was digested with proteinase K, and the extrachromosomal circular covalently-closed form of HPV-DNA was rapidly extracted by alkaline sodium dodecyl sulphate and phenol-chloroform treatment. Recovery of HPV-DNA from the tissue was sufficient for determination of endonuclease restriction patterns by agarose gel electrophoresis.

  7. Characterization of the 5-hydroxymethylcytosine-specific DNA restriction endonucleases.

    PubMed

    Borgaro, Janine G; Zhu, Zhenyu

    2013-04-01

    In T4 bacteriophage, 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) is incorporated into DNA during replication. In response, bacteria may have developed modification-dependent type IV restriction enzymes to defend the cell from T4-like infection. PvuRts1I was the first identified restriction enzyme to exhibit specificity toward hmC over 5-methylcytosine (5mC) and cytosine. By using PvuRts1I as the original member, we identified and characterized a number of homologous proteins. Most enzymes exhibited similar cutting properties to PvuRts1I, creating a double-stranded cleavage on the 3' side of the modified cytosine. In addition, for efficient cutting, the enzymes require two cytosines 21-22-nt apart and on opposite strands where one cytosine must be modified. Interestingly, the specificity determination unveiled a new layer of complexity where the enzymes not only have specificity for 5-β-glucosylated hmC (5βghmC) but also 5-α-glucosylated hmC (5αghmC). In some cases, the enzymes are inhibited by 5βghmC, whereas in others they are inhibited by 5αghmC. These observations indicate that the position of the sugar ring relative to the base is a determining factor in the substrate specificity of the PvuRts1I homologues. Lastly, we envision that the unique properties of select PvuRts1I homologues will permit their use as an additive or alternative tool to map the hydroxymethylome.

  8. Characterization of the 5-hydroxymethylcytosine-specific DNA restriction endonucleases

    PubMed Central

    Borgaro, Janine G.; Zhu, Zhenyu

    2013-01-01

    In T4 bacteriophage, 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) is incorporated into DNA during replication. In response, bacteria may have developed modification-dependent type IV restriction enzymes to defend the cell from T4-like infection. PvuRts1I was the first identified restriction enzyme to exhibit specificity toward hmC over 5-methylcytosine (5mC) and cytosine. By using PvuRts1I as the original member, we identified and characterized a number of homologous proteins. Most enzymes exhibited similar cutting properties to PvuRts1I, creating a double-stranded cleavage on the 3′ side of the modified cytosine. In addition, for efficient cutting, the enzymes require two cytosines 21–22-nt apart and on opposite strands where one cytosine must be modified. Interestingly, the specificity determination unveiled a new layer of complexity where the enzymes not only have specificity for 5-β-glucosylated hmC (5βghmC) but also 5-α-glucosylated hmC (5αghmC). In some cases, the enzymes are inhibited by 5βghmC, whereas in others they are inhibited by 5αghmC. These observations indicate that the position of the sugar ring relative to the base is a determining factor in the substrate specificity of the PvuRts1I homologues. Lastly, we envision that the unique properties of select PvuRts1I homologues will permit their use as an additive or alternative tool to map the hydroxymethylome. PMID:23482393

  9. Endonuclease specificity and sequence dependence of type IIS restriction enzymes.

    PubMed

    Lundin, Sverker; Jemt, Anders; Terje-Hegge, Finn; Foam, Napoleon; Pettersson, Erik; Käller, Max; Wirta, Valtteri; Lexow, Preben; Lundeberg, Joakim

    2015-01-01

    Restriction enzymes that recognize specific sequences but cleave unknown sequence outside the recognition site are extensively utilized tools in molecular biology. Despite this, systematic functional categorization of cleavage performance has largely been lacking. We established a simple and automatable model system to assay cleavage distance variation (termed slippage) and the sequence dependence thereof. We coupled this to massively parallel sequencing in order to provide sensitive and accurate measurement. With this system 14 enzymes were assayed (AcuI, BbvI, BpmI, BpuEI, BseRI, BsgI, Eco57I, Eco57MI, EcoP15I, FauI, FokI, GsuI, MmeI and SmuI). We report significant variation of slippage ranging from 1-54%, variations in sequence context dependence, as well as variation between isoschizomers. We believe this largely overlooked property of enzymes with shifted cleavage would benefit from further large scale classification and engineering efforts seeking to improve performance. The gained insights of in-vitro performance may also aid the in-vivo understanding of these enzymes.

  10. Endonuclease Specificity and Sequence Dependence of Type IIS Restriction Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Lundin, Sverker; Jemt, Anders; Terje-Hegge, Finn; Foam, Napoleon; Pettersson, Erik; Käller, Max; Wirta, Valtteri; Lexow, Preben; Lundeberg, Joakim

    2015-01-01

    Restriction enzymes that recognize specific sequences but cleave unknown sequence outside the recognition site are extensively utilized tools in molecular biology. Despite this, systematic functional categorization of cleavage performance has largely been lacking. We established a simple and automatable model system to assay cleavage distance variation (termed slippage) and the sequence dependence thereof. We coupled this to massively parallel sequencing in order to provide sensitive and accurate measurement. With this system 14 enzymes were assayed (AcuI, BbvI, BpmI, BpuEI, BseRI, BsgI, Eco57I, Eco57MI, EcoP15I, FauI, FokI, GsuI, MmeI and SmuI). We report significant variation of slippage ranging from 1–54%, variations in sequence context dependence, as well as variation between isoschizomers. We believe this largely overlooked property of enzymes with shifted cleavage would benefit from further large scale classification and engineering efforts seeking to improve performance. The gained insights of in-vitro performance may also aid the in-vivo understanding of these enzymes. PMID:25629514

  11. Eight new restriction endonucleases fröm Herpetosiphon giganteus--divergent evolution in a family of enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Kröger, M; Hobom, G; Schütte, H; Mayer, H

    1984-01-01

    Characterization of eight restriction endonucleases isolated from five strains of Herpetosiphon giganteus is described. HgiCI from strain Hpg9 recognizes and cleaves the degenerate sequence: GGPyPuCC, producing 5'-hexanucleotide protruding ends. Endonucleases HgiBI, HgiCII and HgiEI are isoschizomers of AvaII; HgiCIII and HgiDII are isoschizomers of SalI; and HgiDI and HgiGI are isoschizomers of AcyI. Based upon their closely related and in part overlapping recognition specificities a close evolutionary relationship is proposed for all known Hgi restriction endonucleases. Images PMID:6326052

  12. On the role of steric clashes in methylation control of restriction endonuclease activity

    PubMed Central

    Mierzejewska, Karolina; Bochtler, Matthias; Czapinska, Honorata

    2016-01-01

    Restriction-modification systems digest non-methylated invading DNA, while protecting host DNA against the endonuclease activity by methylation. It is widely believed that the methylated DNA would not ‘fit’ into the binding site of the endonuclease in the productive orientation, and thus steric clashes should account for most of the protection. We test this concept statistically by grafting methyl groups in silico onto non-methylated DNA in co-crystal structures with restriction endonucleases. Clash scores are significantly higher for protective than non-protective methylation (P < 0.05% according to the Wilcoxon rank sum test). Structural data alone are sufficient to distinguish between protective and non-protective DNA methylation with 90% confidence and decision thresholds of 1.1 Å and 48 Å3 for the most severe distance-based and cumulative volume-based clash with the protein, respectively (0.1 Å was deducted from each interatomic distance to allow for coordinate errors). The most severe clashes are more pronounced for protective methyl groups attached to the nitrogen atoms (N6-methyladenines and N4-methylcytosines) than for C5-methyl groups on cytosines. Cumulative clashes are comparable for all three types of protective methylation. PMID:26635397

  13. Purification of Restriction Endonuclease EcoRII and its Co-Crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karpova, E. A.; Chen, L.; Meehan, E.; Pusey, M.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Restriction endonuclease EcoRII (EcoRII) is a homodimeric DNA-binding protein. It belongs to the type II family of restriction-modification enzymes (subclass IIe). EcoRII recognizes the nucleotide sequence 5'-CCWGG (W=A or T) and cleaves the phosphodiester bond preceding the first cytosine. Methylation at C5 of the second cytosine inhibits cleavage. The enzyme has a unique ability to search for the presence of two substrate sites before cleavage. To the best of our knowledge no other subclass IIe restriction endonuclease has been crystallized yet, without or with a DNA-substrate. We have recently grown and characterized the crystals of this enzyme (1) Here we report on the result of co-crystallization experiments of EcoRII with an 11 b.p. oligonucleotide substrate. The dissociation constant (Kd) EcoRII: 11 b.p. was determined earlier (unpublished results). The needle-like crystals of oligonucleotide-EcoRII protein complex were obtained with this substrate by the technique of vapor diffusion hanging drops. The crystals obtained were washed and dissolved in an aliquot of 10 mM Tris-HCl buffer, pH=7.5. Running a portion of this solution on the SDS-get indicated the presence of endonuclease in the solution. A UV-spectrophotometric test of a second portion confirmed the presence of DNA. We are now working on improvement of the DNA-EcoRII protein crystals. Results obtained from these and ongoing efforts will be reported.

  14. Restriction of a bacteriophage of Streptomyces albus G involving endonuclease SalI.

    PubMed

    Chater, K F; Wilde, L C

    1976-11-01

    The bacteriophage Pa16, isolated from soil on Streptomyces albus G, was restricted when transferred from an alternative host back to S. albus G. Extracted unmodified Pa16 deoxyribonucleic acid was cleaved at a single site by a cell-free extract of S. albus G. Fractions cleaving Pal6 deoxyribonucleic acid contained the endonuclease SalI first described by J. Arrand, P. Myers, and R. J. Roberts (unpublished data). A mutant of S. albus G was isolated which was defective in both restriction and modification of Pal6. This mutant lacked SalI activity. It is concluded that SalI is the agent of restriction of Pal6 by S. albus G.

  15. Restriction of a bacteriophage of Streptomyces albus G involving endonuclease SalI.

    PubMed Central

    Chater, K F; Wilde, L C

    1976-01-01

    The bacteriophage Pa16, isolated from soil on Streptomyces albus G, was restricted when transferred from an alternative host back to S. albus G. Extracted unmodified Pa16 deoxyribonucleic acid was cleaved at a single site by a cell-free extract of S. albus G. Fractions cleaving Pal6 deoxyribonucleic acid contained the endonuclease SalI first described by J. Arrand, P. Myers, and R. J. Roberts (unpublished data). A mutant of S. albus G was isolated which was defective in both restriction and modification of Pal6. This mutant lacked SalI activity. It is concluded that SalI is the agent of restriction of Pal6 by S. albus G. Images PMID:977549

  16. Atypical myxomatosis--virus isolation, experimental infection of rabbits and restriction endonuclease analysis of the isolate.

    PubMed

    Psikal, I; Smíd, B; Rodák, L; Valícek, L; Bendová, J

    2003-08-01

    Atypical form of myxomatosis, which caused non-lethal and clinically mild disease in domestic rabbits 1 month after immunization with a commercially available vaccine MXT, is described. The isolated myxoma virus designated as Litovel 2 (Li-2) did not induce systemic disease following subcutaneous and intradermal applications in susceptible experimental rabbits but led to the immune response demonstrated by ELISA. No severe disease was induced in those Li-2 inoculated rabbits by challenge with the virulent strains Lausanne (Lu) or Sanar (SA), while the control animals showed nodular form of myxomatosis with lethal course of the illness. Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of genomic DNA with KpnI and BamHI endonucleases was used for genetic characterization of the Li-2 isolate, the vaccine strain MXT and both virulent strains Lu and SA, respectively. In general, RFLP analysis has shown to be informative for inferring genetic relatedness between myxoma viruses. Based on restriction endonuclease DNA fragment size distribution, it was evident that the pathogenic strain SA is genetically related to the reference strain Lu and the isolate Li-2 is more related, but not identical, to the vaccination strain MXT.

  17. Restriction endonuclease inhibitor IPI* of bacteriophage T4: a novel structure for a dedicated target.

    PubMed

    Rifat, Dalin; Wright, Nathan T; Varney, Kristen M; Weber, David J; Black, Lindsay W

    2008-01-18

    Phage T4 protects its DNA from the two-gene-encoded gmrS/gmrD (glucose-modified hydroxymethylcytosine restriction endonuclease) CT of pathogenic Escherichia coli, CT596, by injecting several hundred copies of the 76-amino-acid-residue nuclease inhibitor, IPI*, into the infected host. Here, the three-dimensional solution structure of mature IPI* is reported as determined by nuclear magnetic resonance techniques using 1290 experimental nuclear Overhauser effect and dipolar coupling constraints ( approximately 17 constraints per residue). Close examination of this oblate-shaped protein structure reveals a novel fold consisting of two small beta-sheets (beta1: B1 and B2; beta2: B3-B5) flanked at the N- and C-termini by alpha-helices (H1 and H2). Such a fold is very compact in shape and allows ejection of IPI* through the narrow 30-A portal and tail tube apertures of the virion without unfolding. Structural and dynamic measurements identify an exposed hydrophobic knob that is a putative gmrS/gmrD-binding site. A single gene from the uropathogenic E. coli UT189, which codes for a gmrS/gmrD-like UT fusion enzyme (with approximately 90% identity to the heterodimeric CT enzyme), has evolved IPI* inhibitor immunity. Analysis of the gmrS/gmrD restriction endonuclease enzyme family and its IPI* family phage antagonists reveals an evolutionary pathway that has elaborated a surprisingly diverse and specifically fitted set of coevolving attack and defense structures.

  18. Restriction endonuclease analysis of the vp7 genes of human and animal rotaviruses.

    PubMed

    Gouvea, V; Ramirez, C; Li, B; Santos, N; Saif, L; Clark, H F; Hoshino, Y

    1993-04-01

    The vp7 genes of 194 strains of group A rotaviruses representing all known G types were analyzed with three restriction enzymes by direct digestion of amplified cDNA copies or by deduction of the restriction patterns from known sequences. Mammalian rotavirus strains were classified into 28 restriction patterns consisting of combinations of the 6 profiles (s1 to s6) obtained by digestion with Sau96I endonuclease, 9 profiles (h1 to h9) obtained with HaeIII, and 15 profiles (b1 to b15) obtained with BstYI. Digestion with Sau96I and HaeIII identified restriction sites common to all, or almost all, rotavirus strains studied, whereas BstYI was the most discriminating among rotavirus strains. A clear correlation between some restriction patterns or individual profiles and G type and/or host species of origin was found. Several discriminatory restriction sites consisted of type-specific nucleic acid sequences that encoded conserved amino acid residues. Although not directly involved in antigenic diversity, these sites appear to indicate the G type of the isolate. The technique permits rapid comparison of a large number of virus isolates directly from fecal specimens and provides useful markers for investigating the evolution of rotavirus vp7 genes and tracing vaccine virus and interspecies transmission. PMID:8385152

  19. Isolation and restriction endonuclease cleavage of Anaplasma marginale DNA in situ in agarose.

    PubMed Central

    Krueger, C M; Buening, G M

    1988-01-01

    Bacterial restriction endonucleases were used to produce DNA cleavage patterns that could be useful as tools to study the relatedness among Anaplasma marginale isolates. Bovine erythrocytes infected with A. marginale were lysed, washed, and embedded in agarose. The embedded erythrocytes and bacterial pathogens were partially digested by sequential infiltration of the agarose with acetone, lysozyme, sodium dodecyl sulfate, and proteinase K. The unfragmented genomic DNA was left supported and protected in a porous matrix. The DNA was digested in situ in agarose under the following conditions: (i) brief treatment with phenol, (ii) brief washing with distilled water, and (iii) adjustment of restriction enzyme digestion mixture to compensate for the volume of the agarose. The cleaved DNA was electrophoresed horizontally to produce a DNA cleavage pattern. Of 19 restriction enzymes screened, 12 produced distinct DNA bands from the genomes of each of the five A. marginale isolates examined. The DNA cleavage pattern produced from each isolate with a given restriction enzyme was reproducible. However, the DNA cleavage patterns produced from different isolates with a given restriction enzyme were not necessarily identical. This procedure could be modified for general bacterial DNA isolation, in situ agarose digestion, and manipulations. Images PMID:2838504

  20. Nucleotide flips determine the specificity of the Ecl18kI restriction endonuclease

    PubMed Central

    Bochtler, Matthias; Szczepanowski, Roman H; Tamulaitis, Gintautas; Grazulis, Saulius; Czapinska, Honorata; Manakova, Elena; Siksnys, Virginijus

    2006-01-01

    Restricion endonuclease Ecl18kI is specific for the sequence /CCNGG and cleaves it before the outer C to generate 5 nt 5′-overhangs. It has been suggested that Ecl18kI is evolutionarily related to NgoMIV, a 6-bp cutter that cleaves the sequence G/CCGGC and leaves 4 nt 5′-overhangs. Here, we report the crystal structure of the Ecl18kI–DNA complex at 1.7 Å resolution and compare it with the known structure of the NgoMIV–DNA complex. We find that Ecl18kI flips both central nucleotides within the CCNGG sequence and buries the extruded bases in pockets within the protein. Nucleotide flipping disrupts Watson–Crick base pairing, induces a kink in the DNA and shifts the DNA register by 1 bp, making the distances between scissile phosphates in the Ecl18kI and NgoMIV cocrystal structures nearly identical. Therefore, the two enzymes can use a conserved DNA recognition module, yet recognize different sequences, and form superimposable dimers, yet generate different cleavage patterns. Hence, Ecl18kI is the first example of a restriction endonuclease that flips nucleotides to achieve specificity for its recognition site. PMID:16628220

  1. Comparison of Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae isolates using bacterial restriction endonuclease DNA analysis and SDS-PAGE.

    PubMed

    Mew, A J; Ionas, G; Clarke, J K; Robinson, A J; Marshall, R B

    1985-12-01

    Sixteen isolates of Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae recovered from the nasal tract or lungs of sheep from different flocks in New Zealand were examined by bacterial restriction endonuclease DNA analysis (BRENDA) using EcoR1 and by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). All isolates gave BRENDA patterns which differed entirely from one another. Following 20 serial passages (corresponding to approximately 67 generations) of an isolate, no change was detected in the BRENDA pattern. When eight isolates were examined by SDS-PAGE most bands were common but, nevertheless, each isolate was unique in the sense that they differed from one another in one or more bands. The marked heterogeneity of patterns observed when strains of M. ovipneumoniae are compared by BRENDA, together with the stability of such patterns over many generations, will enable this approach to be used to study the epidemiology of individual strains of M. ovipneumoniae within a flock.

  2. Structure-guided sequence specificity engineering of the modification-dependent restriction endonuclease LpnPI.

    PubMed

    Sasnauskas, Giedrius; Zagorskaitė, Evelina; Kauneckaitė, Kotryna; Tamulaitiene, Giedre; Siksnys, Virginijus

    2015-07-13

    The eukaryotic Set and Ring Associated (SRA) domains and structurally similar DNA recognition domains of prokaryotic cytosine modification-dependent restriction endonucleases recognize methylated, hydroxymethylated or glucosylated cytosine in various sequence contexts. Here, we report the apo-structure of the N-terminal SRA-like domain of the cytosine modification-dependent restriction enzyme LpnPI that recognizes modified cytosine in the 5'-C(mC)DG-3' target sequence (where mC is 5-methylcytosine or 5-hydroxymethylcytosine and D = A/T/G). Structure-guided mutational analysis revealed LpnPI residues involved in base-specific interactions and demonstrated binding site plasticity that allowed limited target sequence degeneracy. Furthermore, modular exchange of the LpnPI specificity loops by structural equivalents of related enzymes AspBHI and SgrTI altered sequence specificity of LpnPI. Taken together, our results pave the way for specificity engineering of the cytosine modification-dependent restriction enzymes.

  3. Comparison of restriction endonuclease analysis and phenotypic typing methods for differentiation of Yersinia enterocolitica isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Kapperud, G; Nesbakken, T; Aleksic, S; Mollaret, H H

    1990-01-01

    Restriction endonuclease analysis of chromosomal DNA (REAC) was used to study polymorphism in restriction fragment patterns among Yersinia enterocolitica isolates belonging to serogroups O3, O5,27, O8, O9, O13, and O21. Using the enzyme HaeIII and electrophoresis on thin (0.75-mm) vertical 5% polyacrylamide gels, we were able to distinguish at least 22 DNA fragment patterns among the 72 strains examined. The method showed the greatest discriminatory power with regard to serogroup O8, within which as many as 10 different DNA fragment patterns were detected among the 16 strains examined. Compared with O8, serogroups O3 and O9 were relatively homogeneous with regard to REAC patterns. The discriminatory power of the method was compared with H-antigen typing, biotyping, phage typing, antimicrobial susceptibility typing, and restriction enzyme analysis of the virulence plasmid (REAP), by means of Simpson's index of diversity. The results showed that REAC and REAP constitute an effective supplement or alternative to conventional phenotypic methods for tracing epidemiologically related isolates of Y. enterocolitica. Our finding that human and porcine isolates exhibited the same REAC, REAP, and H-antigen patterns provides additional support for the hypothesis that pigs play an important role in the epidemiology of human Y. enterocolitica infection. Images PMID:2199484

  4. Molecular epidemiology of Legionella species by restriction endonuclease and alloenzyme analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Tompkins, L S; Troup, N J; Woods, T; Bibb, W; McKinney, R M

    1987-01-01

    As part of an ongoing investigation into nosocomial Legionella infections at Stanford University Medical Center (SUMC), we applied the technique of restriction endonuclease analysis (REA) to determine strain differences among three species, including Legionella pneumophila, Legionella dumoffii, and Legionella micdadei. A total of 26 human and environmental water isolates from SUMC were selected for REA and compared with control strains that were not epidemiologically linked to SUMC. REA results were compared with results of alloenzyme typing, typing by monoclonal antibodies, and plasmid fingerprinting in all but L. micdadei strains. REA and alloenzyme typing showed that SUMC patient isolates were derived from distinct strains of three species. L. pneumophila strains from SUMC patients were genotypically identical to those isolated from potable water. REA was especially useful in proving that SUMC L. dumoffii patient isolates were derived from a single strain and that patients may have been exposed to a common source(s). REA typing correlated well with alloenzyme typing. These methods complement serologic typing of L. pneumophila and provide discriminating capability between strains of other Legionella species such as L. dumoffii, for which serologic types have not been identified. In addition, REA typing is somewhat easier to perform than alloenzyme typing and can be done in clinical laboratories. Images PMID:2822760

  5. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of restriction endonuclease EcoRII

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karpova, E. A.; Meehan, E.; Pusey, M. L.; Chen, L.

    1999-01-01

    Crystals of the restriction endonuclease EcoRII have been obtained by the vapor-diffusion technique in the presence of ammonium sulfate or polyethylene glycol. The best crystals were grown with ammonium sulfate as a precipitant. Crystals with dimensions of up to 0.6 x 0. 6 x 0.6 mm have been observed. The crystals diffract to about 4.0 A resolution at a cryo-temperature of 100 K using a rotating-anode X-ray source and a Rigaku R-AXIS IV imaging-plate detector. The space group has been determined to be either I23 or I2(1)3, with unit-cell parameters a = b = c = 160.3 A, alpha = beta = gamma = 90 degrees. The crystal asymmetric unit contains two protein molecules, and self-rotation function analysis shows a pseudo-twofold symmetry relating the two monomers. Attempts to improve the resolution of crystal diffraction and to search for heavy-atom derivatives are under way.

  6. Plasmid and restriction endonuclease patterns in Pasteurella multocida isolated from a swine pyramid.

    PubMed

    Rúbies, Xavier; Casal, Jordi; Pijoan, Carlos

    2002-01-01

    Restriction endonuclease analysis (REA) and plasmid profile were used to study the epidemiology of Pasteurella multocida in a swine pyramid structure. The studied pyramid was comprised of a group of 12 swine farrow-to-finish farms related by unidirectional animal movement. P. multocida isolates were obtained from the lungs of 275 slaughtered pigs. Serotyping was performed by hyaluronidase sensitivity test and toxicity was investigated by the ELISA test. HpaII was used to cleave the P. multocida extracted DNA. REA patterns relationships were studied using the Sokal-Michener coefficients, and the dendrogram was built using the UPGMA system. The 218 P. multocida isolates obtained were distributed in 17 REA patterns. In 9 of the 12 farms studied only 2-3 REA patterns were detected, with one clearly predominant pattern. The 81 strains with plasmids were assigned to six plasmid profiles. REA and plasmid profiles proved to be good epidemiological tools for identifying different strains of P. multocida with the same phenotype.

  7. How quantum entanglement in DNA synchronizes double-strand breakage by type II restriction endonucleases.

    PubMed

    Kurian, P; Dunston, G; Lindesay, J

    2016-02-21

    Macroscopic quantum effects in living systems have been studied widely in pursuit of fundamental explanations for biological energy transport and sensing. While it is known that type II endonucleases, the largest class of restriction enzymes, induce DNA double-strand breaks by attacking phosphodiester bonds, the mechanism by which simultaneous cutting is coordinated between the catalytic centers remains unclear. We propose a quantum mechanical model for collective electronic behavior in the DNA helix, where dipole-dipole oscillations are quantized through boundary conditions imposed by the enzyme. Zero-point modes of coherent oscillations would provide the energy required for double-strand breakage. Such quanta may be preserved in the presence of thermal noise by the enzyme's displacement of water surrounding the DNA recognition sequence. The enzyme thus serves as a decoherence shield. Palindromic mirror symmetry of the enzyme-DNA complex should conserve parity, because symmetric bond-breaking ceases when the symmetry of the complex is violated or when physiological parameters are perturbed from optima. Persistent correlations in DNA across longer spatial separations-a possible signature of quantum entanglement-may be explained by such a mechanism.

  8. Purification of restriction endonuclease from Acetobacter aceti IFO 3281 (AatII) and its properties.

    PubMed

    Sato, H; Suzuki, T; Yamada, Y

    1990-12-01

    The restriction endonuclease AatII was purified from cell-free extracts of Acetobacter aceti IFO 3281 by streptomycin treatment, ammonium sulfate fractionation, combined column chromatographies on DEAE-Toyopearl 650S, heparin-Sepharose CL-6B and DEAE-Sepharose CL-6B and FPLC on Mono Q and on Superose 12 (gel filtration). The purified enzyme was homogeneous on SDS-polyacrylamide gel disk electrophoresis. The relative molecular mass of the purified enzyme was 190,000 daltons by gel filtration. The SDS-polyacrylamide gel disk electrophoresis gave the relative molecular mass of 47,500 daltons. These data indicated that the purified, native enzyme is a tetramer (190,000 daltons) composed of four 47,500-dalton subunits. The isoelectric point of the enzyme was 6.0. The purified enzyme was intensely activated by manganese ion (50-fold increase or more when compared with magnesium ion). The enzyme worked best at 37 degrees C and pH 8.5 in a reaction mixture (50 microliters) containing 1.0 micrograms lambda DNA, 10 mM Tris-HCl, 7 mM 2-mercaptoethanol, 7 mM MnCl2 and 50 mM NaCl. The enzyme recognizes the same palindromic hexanucleotide sequence 5'-GACGTC-3', cuts between T and C and produces a 3'-tetranucleotide extension in the presence of MnCl2, as it does in the presence of MgCl2.

  9. Plasmid and restriction endonuclease patterns in Pasteurella multocida isolated from a swine pyramid.

    PubMed

    Rúbies, Xavier; Casal, Jordi; Pijoan, Carlos

    2002-01-01

    Restriction endonuclease analysis (REA) and plasmid profile were used to study the epidemiology of Pasteurella multocida in a swine pyramid structure. The studied pyramid was comprised of a group of 12 swine farrow-to-finish farms related by unidirectional animal movement. P. multocida isolates were obtained from the lungs of 275 slaughtered pigs. Serotyping was performed by hyaluronidase sensitivity test and toxicity was investigated by the ELISA test. HpaII was used to cleave the P. multocida extracted DNA. REA patterns relationships were studied using the Sokal-Michener coefficients, and the dendrogram was built using the UPGMA system. The 218 P. multocida isolates obtained were distributed in 17 REA patterns. In 9 of the 12 farms studied only 2-3 REA patterns were detected, with one clearly predominant pattern. The 81 strains with plasmids were assigned to six plasmid profiles. REA and plasmid profiles proved to be good epidemiological tools for identifying different strains of P. multocida with the same phenotype. PMID:11731160

  10. Natural C-independent expression of restriction endonuclease in a C protein-associated restriction-modification system.

    PubMed

    Rezulak, Monika; Borsuk, Izabela; Mruk, Iwona

    2016-04-01

    Restriction-modification (R-M) systems are highly prevalent among bacteria and archaea, and appear to play crucial roles in modulating horizontal gene transfer and protection against phage. There is much to learn about these diverse enzymes systems, especially their regulation. Type II R-M systems specify two independent enzymes: a restriction endonuclease (REase) and protective DNA methyltransferase (MTase). Their activities need to be finely balanced in vivo Some R-M systems rely on specialized transcription factors called C (controller) proteins. These proteins play a vital role in the temporal regulation of R-M gene expression, and function to indirectly modulate the horizontal transfer of their genes across the species. We report novel regulation of a C-responsive R-M system that involves a C protein of a poorly-studied structural class - C.Csp231I. Here, the C and REase genes share a bicistronic transcript, and some of the transcriptional auto-control features seen in other C-regulated R-M systems are conserved. However, separate tandem promoters drive most transcription of the REase gene, a distinctive property not seen in other tested C-linked R-M systems. Further, C protein only partially controls REase expression, yet plays a role in system stability and propagation. Consequently, high REase activity was observed after deletion of the entire C gene, and cells bearing the ΔC R-M system were outcompeted in mixed culture assays by those with the WT R-M system. Overall, our data reveal unexpected regulatory variation among R-M systems.

  11. SgfI, a new type-II restriction endonuclease that recognizes the octanucleotide sequence 5'-GCGAT/CGC-3'.

    PubMed

    Kappelman, J R; Brady, M; Knoche, K; Murray, E; Schoenfeld, T; Williams, R; Vesselinova, N

    1995-07-01

    A new restriction endonuclease (ENase), SgfI, has been isolated from the bacterium Streptomyces sp. SgfI recognizes the 8-bp palindrome 5'-GCGATCGC-3' and cleaves double-stranded DNA after the T in this sequence, producing a two-base 3' overhang compatible with PvuI termini. SgfI is a rare-cutting ENase and should be useful for megabase mapping experiments. PMID:7628716

  12. Purification, properties, and sequence specificity of SslI, a new type II restriction endonuclease from Streptococcus salivarius subsp. thermophilus.

    PubMed Central

    Benbadis, L; Garel, J R; Hartley, D L

    1991-01-01

    SslI, a type II restriction endonuclease, was purified from Streptococcus salivarius subsp. thermophilus strain BSN 45. SslI is an isoschizomer of BstNI. SslI activity was maximum at pH 8.8, 0 to 50 mM NaCl, 2 to 8 mM Mg2+, and 42 degrees C. Activity against phage DNA in vitro was demonstrated. Images PMID:1785940

  13. Bifunctional TaqII restriction endonuclease: redefining the prototype DNA recognition site and establishing the Fidelity Index for partial cleaving

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The TaqII enzyme is a member of the Thermus sp. enzyme family that we propounded previously within Type IIS restriction endonucleases, containing related thermophilic bifunctional endonucleases-methyltransferases from various Thermus sp.: TaqII, Tth111II, TthHB27I, TspGWI, TspDTI and TsoI. These enzymes show significant nucleotide and amino acid sequence similarities, a rare phenomenon among restriction endonucleases, along with similarities in biochemical properties, molecular size, DNA recognition sequences and cleavage sites. They also feature some characteristics of Types I and III. Results Barker et al. reported the Type IIS/IIC restriction endonuclease TaqII as recognizing two distinct cognate site variants (5'-GACCGA-3' and 5'-CACCCA-3') while cleaving 11/9 nucleotides downstream. We used four independent methods, namely, shotgun cloning and sequencing, restriction pattern analysis, digestion of particular custom substrates and GeneScan analysis, to demonstrate that the recombinant enzyme recognizes only 5'-GACCGA-3' sites and cleaves 11/9 nucleotides downstream. We did not observe any 5'-CACCCA-3' cleavage under a variety of conditions and site arrangements tested. We also characterized the enzyme biochemically and established new digestion conditions optimal for practical enzyme applications. Finally, we developed and propose a new version of the Fidelity Index - the Fidelity Index for Partial Cleavage (FI-PC). Conclusions The DNA recognition sequence of the bifunctional prototype TaqII endonuclease-methyltransferase from Thermus aquaticus has been redefined as recognizing only 5'-GACCGA-3' cognate sites. The reaction conditions (pH and salt concentrations) were designed either to minimize (pH = 8.0 and 10 mM ammonium sulphate) or to enhance star activity (pH = 6.0 and no salt). Redefinition of the recognition site and reaction conditions makes this prototype endonuclease a useful tool for DNA manipulation; as yet, this enzyme has no practical

  14. Natural C-independent expression of restriction endonuclease in a C protein-associated restriction-modification system

    PubMed Central

    Rezulak, Monika; Borsuk, Izabela; Mruk, Iwona

    2016-01-01

    Restriction–modification (R-M) systems are highly prevalent among bacteria and archaea, and appear to play crucial roles in modulating horizontal gene transfer and protection against phage. There is much to learn about these diverse enzymes systems, especially their regulation. Type II R-M systems specify two independent enzymes: a restriction endonuclease (REase) and protective DNA methyltransferase (MTase). Their activities need to be finely balanced in vivo. Some R-M systems rely on specialized transcription factors called C (controller) proteins. These proteins play a vital role in the temporal regulation of R-M gene expression, and function to indirectly modulate the horizontal transfer of their genes across the species. We report novel regulation of a C-responsive R-M system that involves a C protein of a poorly-studied structural class - C.Csp231I. Here, the C and REase genes share a bicistronic transcript, and some of the transcriptional auto-control features seen in other C-regulated R-M systems are conserved. However, separate tandem promoters drive most transcription of the REase gene, a distinctive property not seen in other tested C-linked R-M systems. Further, C protein only partially controls REase expression, yet plays a role in system stability and propagation. Consequently, high REase activity was observed after deletion of the entire C gene, and cells bearing the ΔC R-M system were outcompeted in mixed culture assays by those with the WT R-M system. Overall, our data reveal unexpected regulatory variation among R-M systems. PMID:26656489

  15. Structural basis for the substrate selectivity of PvuRts1I, a 5-hydroxymethylcytosine DNA restriction endonuclease.

    PubMed

    Shao, Chen; Wang, Chengliang; Zang, Jianye

    2014-09-01

    5-Hydroxymethylation is a curious modification of cytosine that was discovered some decades ago, but its functional role in eukaryotes still awaits elucidation. 5-Hydroxymethylcytosine is an epigenetic marker that is crucial for multiple biological processes. The profile is altered under certain disease conditions such as cancer, Huntington's disease and Alzheimer's disease. Using the DNA-modification-dependent restriction endonuclease AbaSI coupled with sequencing (Aba-seq), the hydroxymethylome can be deciphered at the resolution of individual bases. The method is based on the enzymatic properties of AbaSI, a member of the PvuRts1I family of endonucleases. PvuRts1I is a modification-dependent endonuclease with high selectivity for 5-hydroxymethylcytosine over 5-methylcytosine and cytosine. In this study, the crystal structure of PvuRts1I was determined in order to understand and improve the substrate selectivity. A nuclease domain and an SRA-like domain are located at the N- and C-termini, respectively. Through comparison with other SRA-domain structures, the SRA-like domain was proposed to be the 5-hmC recognition module. Several mutants of PvuRts1I with enzymatic activity restricted to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine only were generated based on the structural analysis, and these enzyme variants are appropriate for separating the hydroxymethylome from the wider methylome.

  16. Epigenetic Segregation of Microbial Genomes from Complex Samples Using Restriction Endonucleases HpaII and McrB

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guohong; Weston, Christopher Q.; Pham, Long K.; Waltz, Shannon; Barnes, Helen; King, Paula; Sphar, Dan; Yamamoto, Robert T.; Forsyth, R. Allyn

    2016-01-01

    We describe continuing work to develop restriction endonucleases as tools to enrich targeted genomes of interest from diverse populations. Two approaches were developed in parallel to segregate genomic DNA based on cytosine methylation. First, the methyl-sensitive endonuclease HpaII was used to bind non-CG methylated DNA. Second, a truncated fragment of McrB was used to bind CpG methylated DNA. Enrichment levels of microbial genomes can exceed 100-fold with HpaII allowing improved genomic detection and coverage of otherwise trace microbial genomes from sputum. Additionally, we observe interesting enrichment results that correlate with the methylation states not only of bacteria, but of fungi, viruses, a protist and plants. The methods presented here offer promise for testing biological samples for pathogens and global analysis of population methylomes. PMID:26727463

  17. Quantum Entanglement in the Genome? The Role of Quantum Effects in Catalytic Synchronization of Type II Restriction Endonucleases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurian, P.

    Several living systems have been examined for their exhibition of macroscopic quantum effects, showcasing biology's apparent optimization of structure and function for quantum behavior. Prevalent in lower organisms with analogues in eukaryotes, type II restriction endonucleases are the largest class of restriction enzymes. Orthodox type II endonucleases recognize four-to-eight base pair sequences of palindromic DNA, cut both strands symmetrically, and act without an external metabolite such as ATP. While it is known that these enzymes induce strand breaks by nucleophilic attack on opposing phosphodiester bonds of the DNA helix, what remains unclear is the mechanism by which cutting occurs in concert at the catalytic centers. Previous studies indicate the primacy of intimate DNA contacts made by the specifically bound enzyme in coordinating the two synchronized cuts. We propose that collective electronic behavior in the DNA helix generates coherent oscillations---quantized through boundary conditions imposed by the endonuclease---that provide the energy required to break two phosphodiester bonds. Such quanta may be preserved in the presence of thermal noise and electromagnetic interference through the specific complex's exclusion of water and ions surrounding the helix, with the enzyme serving as a decoherence shield. Clamping energy imparted by the decoherence shield is comparable with zero-point modes of the dipole-dipole oscillations in the DNA recognition sequence. The palindromic mirror symmetry of this sequence should conserve parity during the process. Experimental data corroborate that symmetric bond-breaking ceases when the symmetry of the endonuclease complex is violated, or when environmental parameters are perturbed far from biological optima. Persistent correlation between states in DNA sequence across spatial separations of any length---a characteristic signature of quantum entanglement---may be explained by such a physical mechanism.

  18. A model of EcoRII restriction endonuclease action: the active complex is most likely formed by one protein subunit and one DNA recognition site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karpova, E. A.; Kubareva, E. A.; Shabarova, Z. A.

    1999-01-01

    To elucidate the mechanism of interaction of restriction endonuclease EcoRII with DNA, we studied by native gel electrophoresis the binding of this endonuclease to a set of synthetic DNA-duplexes containing the modified or canonical recognition sequence 5'-d(CCA/TGG)-3'. All binding substrate or substrate analogues tested could be divided into two major groups: (i) duplexes that, at the interaction with endonuclease EcoRII, form two types of stable complexes on native gel in the absence of Mg2+ cofactor; (ii) duplexes that form only one type of complex, observed both in the presence and absence of Mg2+. Unlike the latter, duplexes under the first group can be hydrolyzed by endonuclease. Data obtained suggest that the active complex is most likely formed by one protein subunit and one DNA recognition sequence. A model of EcoRII endonuclease action is presented.

  19. Impact of cytosine 5-halogens on the interaction of DNA with restriction endonucleases and methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Valinluck, Victoria; Wu, Winnie; Liu, Pingfang; Neidigh, Jonathan W; Sowers, Lawrence C

    2006-04-01

    Growing evidence from both prokaryotes and eukaryotes indicates that pyrimidine 5-methyl groups can have profound biological consequences that are mediated by the affinity of DNA-protein interactions. The presence of the 5-methyl group could potentially create a steric block preventing the binding of some proteins whereas the affinity of many other proteins is substantially increased by pyrimidine methylation. In this paper, we have constructed a series of oligonucleotides containing cytosine and a series of 5-substituted cytosine analogues including all halogens. This set of oligonucleotides has been used to probe the relationship between the size of the substituent and its capacity to modulate cleavage by the methylation-sensitive restriction endonucleases MspI and HpaII. Additionally, we have examined the impact of the halogen substitution on the corresponding bacterial methyltransferase (M.HpaII). We observed that MspI cleavage is only subtly affected by substituted cytosine analogues at the inner position of the CCGG recognition site. In contrast, HpaII cleaves cytosine-containing oligonucleotides completely whereas 5-fluorocytosine-containing oligonucleotides are cleaved at a reduced rate. The presence of the larger halogens Cl, Br, or I as well as a methyl group completely prevents cleavage by HpaII. These data suggest that the steric wall is encountered by HpaII slightly beyond the fluorine substituent, at about 2.65 A from the pyrimidine C5-position. It is known that 5-fluorocytosine in an oligonucleotide can form a covalent irreversible suicide complex with either prokaryotic or eukaryotic methyltransferases. Kinetic data reported here suggest that the 5-fluorocytosine-containing oligonucleotide can also inhibit M.HpaII by formation of a reversible, noncovalent complex. Our results indicate that although a 5-Cl substituent has electronic properties similar to 5-F, 5-chlorocytosine duplexes neither form a complex with M.HpaII nor inhibit enzymatic

  20. Physical mapping of BK virus DNA with SacI, MboII, and AluI restriction endonucleases.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, R C; Wu, R

    1978-01-01

    A new restriction endonuclease, SacI from Streptomyces achromogenes cleaves BK virus (strain MM) DNA into 3 fragments, whereas MboII from Moraxella bovis and AluI from Arthrobacter luteus give 22 and 30 fragments, respectively. All these specific DNA fragments were ordered and mapped on the viral genome by two methods first, by the reciprocal digestion method using uniformly 32P-labeled DNA; and second, by the partial digestion technique using the single-end 32P-labeled DNA. This study, together with those reported earlier, defined the location of 90 cleavage sites on the BK virus DNA. Images PMID:215783

  1. Polymorphism of mitochondrial DNAs of Yunnan domestic water buffaloes, Bubalus bubalis, in China, based on restriction endonuclease cleavage patterns.

    PubMed

    Hu, W; Xu, B; Lian, L

    1997-08-01

    Restriction endonuclease cleavage patterns of mitochondrial DNA(mtDNA) of three local types of Yunnan native water buffalo were analyzed using 18 enzymes which recognize six nucleotides. Among the 12 animals analyzed, 3 of 18 enzymes, BamHI, EcoRI, and Scal, revealed polymorphisms. Three mtDNA types were identified. The results indicate that a relatively low level of mtDNA variation exists in Yunnan domestic water buffaloes. The origin of Chinese buffalo derived from Yunnan province of China is discussed.

  2. Functional significance of protein assemblies predicted by the crystal structure of the restriction endonuclease BsaWI.

    PubMed

    Tamulaitis, Gintautas; Rutkauskas, Marius; Zaremba, Mindaugas; Grazulis, Saulius; Tamulaitiene, Giedre; Siksnys, Virginijus

    2015-09-18

    Type II restriction endonuclease BsaWI recognizes a degenerated sequence 5'-W/CCGGW-3' (W stands for A or T, '/' denotes the cleavage site). It belongs to a large family of restriction enzymes that contain a conserved CCGG tetranucleotide in their target sites. These enzymes are arranged as dimers or tetramers, and require binding of one, two or three DNA targets for their optimal catalytic activity. Here, we present a crystal structure and biochemical characterization of the restriction endonuclease BsaWI. BsaWI is arranged as an 'open' configuration dimer and binds a single DNA copy through a minor groove contacts. In the crystal primary BsaWI dimers form an indefinite linear chain via the C-terminal domain contacts implying possible higher order aggregates. We show that in solution BsaWI protein exists in a dimer-tetramer-oligomer equilibrium, but in the presence of specific DNA forms a tetramer bound to two target sites. Site-directed mutagenesis and kinetic experiments show that BsaWI is active as a tetramer and requires two target sites for optimal activity. We propose BsaWI mechanism that shares common features both with dimeric Ecl18kI/SgrAI and bona fide tetrameric NgoMIV/SfiI enzymes. PMID:26240380

  3. Restriction endonucleases HindII and TaqI cleave DNA with mismatched nucleotides within their recognition sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Jiricny, J; Martin, D

    1986-01-01

    Restriction endonucleases HindII and TaqI, but not SalI, were found to efficiently cleave synthetic hexadecanucleotide duplexes which contained either an A/C or a G/T mismatch within their respective restriction sites. Double-stranded M13 DNAs with identical mismatches were also cleaved under the assay conditions. These results suggest that the distortion of the DNA duplex, caused by these purine/pyrimidine mismatches is not sufficiently large so as to interfere with the recognition and the subsequent cleavage of the DNA by these two enzymes. HindII and SalI, but not TaqI, were furthermore shown to hydrolyze the two strands of the duplex with different rates. The differences between the mode of recognition of their respective restriction sites by these three enzymes are discussed. Images PMID:3008080

  4. Structure of HinP1I Endonuclease Reveals a Striking Similarity to the Monomeric Restriction Enzyme MspI

    SciTech Connect

    Yang,Z.; Horton, J.; Maunus, R.; Wilson, G.; Roberts, R.; Cheng, X.

    2005-01-01

    HinP1I, a type II restriction endonuclease, recognizes and cleaves a palindromic tetranucleotide sequence (G{down_arrow}CGC) in double-stranded DNA, producing 2 nt 5' overhanging ends. Here, we report the structure of HinP1I crystallized as one protein monomer in the crystallographic asymmetric unit. HinP1I displays an elongated shape, with a conserved catalytic core domain containing an active-site motif of SDX18QXK and a putative DNA-binding domain. Without significant sequence homology, HinP1I displays striking structural similarity to MspI, an endonuclease that cleaves a similar palindromic DNA sequence (C{down_arrow}CGG) and binds to that sequence crystallographically as a monomer. Almost all the structural elements of MspI can be matched in HinP1I, including both the DNA recognition and catalytic elements. Examining the protein-protein interactions in the crystal lattice, HinP1I could be dimerized through two helices located on the opposite side of the protein to the active site, generating a molecule with two active sites and two DNA-binding surfaces opposite one another on the outer surfaces of the dimer. A possible functional link between this unusual dimerization mode and the tetrameric restriction enzymes is discussed.

  5. Restriction endonuclease analysis of mitochondrial DNA from grande and genetically characterized cytoplasmic petite clones of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Morimoto, R; Lewin, A; Hsu, H J; Rabinowitz, M; Fukuhara, H

    1975-01-01

    Digestion of grande mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) BY EcoRI restriction endonuclease gives rise to nine fragments with a total molecular weight of 51.8 x 10(6). HindIII digestion yields six fragments with a similar total molecular weight. Specific restriction fragments can be detected despite the fact that yeast mtDNA consists of a heterogeneous distribution of randomly broken molecules. Digestion patterns of 10 genetically characterized petite clones containing various combinations of five antiobiotic resistance markers indicate that the petite mtDNA predominantly represents deletion of the grande genome. The petite mtDNAs contained up to seven EcoRI restriction fragments which comigrate with grande restriction fragments, and at least one fragment that did not correspond to any in the grande. Some strains contained multiple fragments with mobility different from that of grande; these fragments were usually present in less than molar concentrations. The genetic markers were associated with individual sets of restriction fragments. However, several internal inconsistencies prevent the construction of a definitive genetic fragment map. These anomalies, together with the digestion patterns, provide strong evidence that, in addition to single contiguous deletion, other changes such as multiple deletion and heterogeneity of mtDNA populations are present in some of the petite mtDNAs. Images PMID:1105566

  6. Crystal structure of the R-protein of the multisubunit ATP-dependent restriction endonuclease NgoAVII.

    PubMed

    Tamulaitiene, Giedre; Silanskas, Arunas; Grazulis, Saulius; Zaremba, Mindaugas; Siksnys, Virginijus

    2014-12-16

    The restriction endonuclease (REase) NgoAVII is composed of two proteins, R.NgoAVII and N.NgoAVII, and shares features of both Type II restriction enzymes and Type I/III ATP-dependent restriction enzymes (see accompanying paper Zaremba et al., 2014). Here we present crystal structures of the R.NgoAVII apo-protein and the R.NgoAVII C-terminal domain bound to a specific DNA. R.NgoAVII is composed of two domains: an N-terminal nucleolytic PLD domain; and a C-terminal B3-like DNA-binding domain identified previously in BfiI and EcoRII REases, and in plant transcription factors. Structural comparison of the B3-like domains of R.NgoAVII, EcoRII, BfiI and the plant transcription factors revealed a conserved DNA-binding surface comprised of N- and C-arms that together grip the DNA. The C-arms of R.NgoAVII, EcoRII, BfiI and plant B3 domains are similar in size, but the R.NgoAVII N-arm which makes the majority of the contacts to the target site is much longer. The overall structures of R.NgoAVII and BfiI are similar; however, whilst BfiI has stand-alone catalytic activity, R.NgoAVII requires an auxiliary cognate N.NgoAVII protein and ATP hydrolysis in order to cleave DNA at the target site. The structures we present will help formulate future experiments to explore the molecular mechanisms of intersubunit crosstalk that control DNA cleavage by R.NgoAVII and related endonucleases.

  7. Restriction endonuclease fingerprinting by SSCP (REF), an efficient method of screening for mutations in long contiguous segments of DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, O.; Sommer, S.S.

    1994-09-01

    Dideoxy fingerprinting is an efficient method of screening for the presence of mutations in short exons ({le}250 bp). Long contiguous segments can be screened by sequential ddF reactions. To screen long contiguous segments in a more rapid manner, REF has been developed. REF will be described in the context of a model system in exon H of the factor IX gene. A 1 kb segment is PCR amplified and digested with each of five groups of restriction endonucleases. The endonucleases are chosen such that, in each group, the average size of the fragments is about 150 bp. After digestion, the products are mixed, 5{prime} end-labeled with T4 polynucleotide kinase, boiled, and electrophoresed under nondenaturing conditions. Each lane screens 1 kb and contains 70 segments (7 fragments per digestion x 5 digestions x 2 strands). The matrices tested were 5.6% polyacrylamide (PA) and 7.5% GeneAmp{sup {trademark}} (GA) at temperatures of either 23{degrees}C (RT) or 8{degrees}C (LT). Point mutations resulted in the gain or loss of a restriction site in 21% of 24 test mutations. In addition, mutations could be detected if any of 5 restriction fragments with the same mutation (producing 10 denatured segments) displayed abnormal mobility (SSCP component). The average sensitivity per segment of the SSCP component for the 24 point mutations ranged from 49% for PA at RT to 68% with GA at LT. REF detected 96% of the mutations with PA at RT and 100% with GA at RT or LT. These latter two conditions detected 100% of a subsequent blinded sample that contained normal controls and 27 different mutations. A blinded analysis is in progress to determine the sensitivity of REF when the segment size is 2 kb.

  8. Crystal structure of the R-protein of the multisubunit ATP-dependent restriction endonuclease NgoAVII

    PubMed Central

    Tamulaitiene, Giedre; Silanskas, Arunas; Grazulis, Saulius; Zaremba, Mindaugas; Siksnys, Virginijus

    2014-01-01

    The restriction endonuclease (REase) NgoAVII is composed of two proteins, R.NgoAVII and N.NgoAVII, and shares features of both Type II restriction enzymes and Type I/III ATP-dependent restriction enzymes (see accompanying paper Zaremba et al., 2014). Here we present crystal structures of the R.NgoAVII apo-protein and the R.NgoAVII C-terminal domain bound to a specific DNA. R.NgoAVII is composed of two domains: an N-terminal nucleolytic PLD domain; and a C-terminal B3-like DNA-binding domain identified previously in BfiI and EcoRII REases, and in plant transcription factors. Structural comparison of the B3-like domains of R.NgoAVII, EcoRII, BfiI and the plant transcription factors revealed a conserved DNA-binding surface comprised of N- and C-arms that together grip the DNA. The C-arms of R.NgoAVII, EcoRII, BfiI and plant B3 domains are similar in size, but the R.NgoAVII N-arm which makes the majority of the contacts to the target site is much longer. The overall structures of R.NgoAVII and BfiI are similar; however, whilst BfiI has stand-alone catalytic activity, R.NgoAVII requires an auxiliary cognate N.NgoAVII protein and ATP hydrolysis in order to cleave DNA at the target site. The structures we present will help formulate future experiments to explore the molecular mechanisms of intersubunit crosstalk that control DNA cleavage by R.NgoAVII and related endonucleases. PMID:25429979

  9. Study on detection of mutation DNA fragment in gastric cancer by restriction endonuclease fingerprinting with capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rong; Xie, Hua; Xu, Yue-Bing; Jia, Zheng-Ping; Meng, Xian-Dong; Zhang, Juan-Hong; Ma, Jun; Wang, Juan; Wang, Xian-Hua

    2012-03-01

    The DNA fragment detection focusing technique has further enhanced the sensitivity and information of DNA targets. The DNA fragment detection method was established by capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection and restriction endonuclease chromatographic fingerprinting (CE-LIF-REF) in our experiment. The silica capillary column was coated with short linear polyarclarylamide (SLPA) using nongel sieving technology. The excision product of various restricted enzymes of DNA fragments was obtained by REF with the molecular biology software Primer Premier 5. The PBR322/BsuRI DNA marker was used to establish the optimization method. The markers were focused electrophoretically and detected by CE-LIF. The results demonstrate that the CE-LIF-REF with SLPA can improve separation, sensitivity and speed of analysis. This technique may be applied to analysis of the excision product of various restricted enzymes of prokaryotic plasmid (pIRES2), eukaryote plasmid (pcDNA3.1) and the PCR product of codon 248 region of gastric cancer tissue. The results suggest that this method could very sensitively separate the excision products of various restricted enzymes at a much better resolution than the traditional agarose electrophoresis.

  10. Restriction endonuclease analysis of bovine herpesvirus type 1 isolates from calves with fatal encephalitis: comparison with vaccine virus.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, M; Yamazaki, N; Furuoka, H; Matsui, T; Nakagawa, M; Ishiguro, N; Shinagawa, M

    1995-06-01

    Meningo-encephalitis in feedlot cattle sporadically occurred in the Tokachi area in northern Japan. The calves had been vaccinated intranasally with a mixed live-vaccine (infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus, bovine viral diarrhea-mucosal disease virus, and parainfluenza 3 virus) for which intramuscular inoculation was indicated. Two additional live vaccines, bovine adenovirus type 7 and bovine respiratory syncytical virus, had been inoculated simultaneously. Eleven isolates of bovine herpesvirus type 1 were plaque-purified from two brains with fatal encephalitis; their viral DNAs were examined by restriction endonuclease analysis (REA) using PstI and HindIII. The REA patterns of the virus clones were almost identical to those of the vaccine strains 758-43, suggesting that the isolates from this outbreak of fatal encephalitis originated in the abnormally administered vaccine. PMID:7548427

  11. MmoSTI restriction endonuclease, isolated from Morganella morganii infecting a tropical moth, Actias selene, cleaving 5'-|CCNGG-3' sequences.

    PubMed

    Skowron, Marta A; Zebrowska, Joanna; Wegrzyn, Grzegorz; Skowron, Piotr M

    2016-02-01

    A type II restriction endonuclease, MmoSTI, from the pathogenic bacterium Morganella morganii infecting a tropical moth, Actias selene, has been detected and biochemically characterized, as a potential etiological differentiation factor. The described REase recognizes interrupted palindromes, i.e., 5'-CCNGG-3' sequences and cleaves DNA leaving 5-nucleotide (nt) long, single-stranded (ss), 5'-cohesive ends, which was determined by three complementary methods: (i) cleavage of custom and standard DNA substrates, (ii) run-off sequencing of cleavage products, and (iii) shotgun cloning and sequencing of bacteriophage lambda (λ) DNA digested with MmoSTI. MmoSTI, the first 5'-CCNGG-3' REase characterized from M. morganii, is a neoschizomer of ScrFI, which cleaves DNA leaving 1-nt long, ss, 5'-cohesive ends. It is a high-frequency cutter and can be isolated from easily cultured bacteria, thus it can potentially serve as a tool for DNA manipulations.

  12. Continuous monitoring of restriction endonuclease cleavage activity by universal molecular beacon light quenching coupled with real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaomin; Song, Chen; Zhao, Meiping; Li, Yuanzong

    2008-10-01

    We describe a method for sensitive monitoring of restriction endonuclease kinetics and activity by use of a universal molecular beacon (U-MB) coupled with real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The method is used to monitor the progress of DNA cleavage in a sealed reaction tube and offers more accurate and high-throughput detection. The template has a universal tail hybridized with the U-MB and the remaining sequence is complementary to one of the restriction endonuclease digestion products. The U-MB is replaced by the extension of digested product and the fluorescence quenches. With this concept, one universal fluorescence probe can be used in different enzyme analytical systems. In the work described here, homogenous assays were performed with the restriction endonucleases AluI, EcoRI, XhoI, and SacI at smoothly controlled temperature. Cleavage efficiencies were determined, and the potential applications of this method were discussed. Furthermore, the AluI and EcoRI cleavage reactions were monitored online at varying substrate concentrations at the molecular level, and K(m), V(max), and K(cat) values were calculated. The results suggest that U-MB monitoring of restriction endonuclease assays based on real-time PCR will be very useful for high-throughput, sensitive, and precise assays for enzyme activity screening and evolutionary biotechnology analysis.

  13. A Cladistic Analysis of Phenotypic Associations with Haplotypes Inferred from Restriction Endonuclease Mapping and DNA Sequence Data. III. Cladogram Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Templeton, A. R.; Crandall, K. A.; Sing, C. F.

    1992-01-01

    We previously developed a cladistic approach to identify subsets of haplotypes defined by restriction endonuclease mapping or DNA sequencing that are associated with significant phenotypic deviations. Our approach was limited to segments of DNA in which little recombination occurs. In such cases, a cladogram can be constructed from the restriction site or sequence data that represents the evolutionary steps that interrelate the observed haplotypes. The cladogram is used to define a nested statistical design to identify mutational steps associated with significant phenotypic deviations. The central assumption behind this strategy is that any undetected mutation causing a phenotypic effect is embedded within the same evolutionary history that is represented by the cladogram. The power of this approach depends upon the confidence one has in the particular cladogram used to draw inferences. In this paper, we present a strategy for estimating the set of cladograms that are consistent with a particular sample of either restriction site or nucleotide sequence data and that includes the possibility of recombination. We first evaluate the limits of parsimony in constructing cladograms. Once these limits have been determined, we construct the set of parsimonious and nonparsimonious cladograms that is consistent with these limits. Our estimation procedure also identifies haplotypes that are candidates for being products of recombination. If recombination is extensive, our algorithm subdivides the DNA region into two or more subsections, each having little or no internal recombination. We apply this estimation procedure to three data sets to illustrate varying degrees of cladogram ambiguity and recombination. PMID:1385266

  14. Restriction endonuclease analysis and mapping of the genomes of granulosis viruses isolated from Xestia c-nigrum and five other noctuid species.

    PubMed

    Goto, C; Minobe, Y; Iizuka, T

    1992-06-01

    Restriction endonuclease analysis was performed on the genomic DNA of granulosis viruses isolated from noctuid species of six genera: Xestia c-nigrum, Autographa gamma, Hydraecia amurensis, Celaena leucostigma, Aletia pallens and Pseudaletia separata. All of the isolates gave very similar restriction endonuclease profiles with only minor variations. An isolate obtained from X. c-nigrum was chosen as the reference genotype, and a genomic library was constructed for this isolate using plasmid vectors. The genome was mapped using EcoRI, BamHI and BglII, and Southern hybridization; the size of the genome was estimated to be 179 kbp. Hybridization of labelled clones to fragments of other isolates revealed that genotypic variation among isolates resulted from changes in restriction sites, and from deletion or insertion of DNA. Comparative restriction mapping revealed that all of the isolates were variants of one virus, even though they originated from different host species. PMID:1607867

  15. Two thermostable type II restriction endonucleases from Icelandic strains of the genus Thermus: Tsp4C I (ACN/GT), a novel type II restriction endonuclease, and Tsp8E I, an isoschizomer of the mesophilic enzyme Bgl I (GCCNNNN/NGGC).

    PubMed Central

    Welch, S G; Williams, R A

    1995-01-01

    Sixteen isolates of thermophilic bacteria from the genus Thermus, isolated from neutral and alkaline hot water springs in the southwest region of Iceland, were tested for the presence of restriction endonucleases. Extracts from five of the isolates showed evidence of the presence of restriction endonuclease activity by producing discrete nucleotide fragments when incubated at 65 degrees C with lambda phage DNA. Two of the isolates (Tsp4C and Tsp8E) were found to have particularly high levels of restriction endonuclease activity, and the respective enzymes from these two Thermus isolates were partially purified and characterized and their recognition and cleavage sites were determined. Enzyme Tsp4C I is a novel Type II restriction endonuclease recognizing the interrupted palindromic tetranucleotide sequence ACNGT, where N can be any one of the four bases in DNA. Tsp4C I, which retains full enzyme activity when incubated for 10 min at temperatures up to 76 degrees C, hydrolyses the phosphodiester bond in both strands of a double-stranded DNA substrate between the third and fourth bases of the recognition sequence (ACN/GT), generating fragments with a single base 3'-OH overhang. Enzyme Tsp8E I is a thermostable isoschizomer of the mesophilic Type II restriction endonuclease Bgl I (GCCNNNN/NGGC) [Lee, Clanton and Chirikjiam (1979) Fed. Proc. 28, 294], generating fragments with a three base 3'-OH overhang. However, unlike Bgl I, Tsp8E I exhibits considerable thermal stability, retaining full enzyme activity when incubated for 10 min at temperatures up to 78 degrees C. Both Tsp4C I and Tsp8E I represent significant additions to the small but expanding list of the extremely thermostable restriction endonucleases. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:7626025

  16. Two thermostable type II restriction endonucleases from Icelandic strains of the genus Thermus: Tsp4C I (ACN/GT), a novel type II restriction endonuclease, and Tsp8E I, an isoschizomer of the mesophilic enzyme Bgl I (GCCNNNN/NGGC).

    PubMed

    Welch, S G; Williams, R A

    1995-07-15

    Sixteen isolates of thermophilic bacteria from the genus Thermus, isolated from neutral and alkaline hot water springs in the southwest region of Iceland, were tested for the presence of restriction endonucleases. Extracts from five of the isolates showed evidence of the presence of restriction endonuclease activity by producing discrete nucleotide fragments when incubated at 65 degrees C with lambda phage DNA. Two of the isolates (Tsp4C and Tsp8E) were found to have particularly high levels of restriction endonuclease activity, and the respective enzymes from these two Thermus isolates were partially purified and characterized and their recognition and cleavage sites were determined. Enzyme Tsp4C I is a novel Type II restriction endonuclease recognizing the interrupted palindromic tetranucleotide sequence ACNGT, where N can be any one of the four bases in DNA. Tsp4C I, which retains full enzyme activity when incubated for 10 min at temperatures up to 76 degrees C, hydrolyses the phosphodiester bond in both strands of a double-stranded DNA substrate between the third and fourth bases of the recognition sequence (ACN/GT), generating fragments with a single base 3'-OH overhang. Enzyme Tsp8E I is a thermostable isoschizomer of the mesophilic Type II restriction endonuclease Bgl I (GCCNNNN/NGGC) [Lee, Clanton and Chirikjiam (1979) Fed. Proc. 28, 294], generating fragments with a three base 3'-OH overhang. However, unlike Bgl I, Tsp8E I exhibits considerable thermal stability, retaining full enzyme activity when incubated for 10 min at temperatures up to 78 degrees C. Both Tsp4C I and Tsp8E I represent significant additions to the small but expanding list of the extremely thermostable restriction endonucleases. PMID:7626025

  17. Demonstration of the Principles of Restriction Endonuclease Cleavage Reactions Using Thermostable Bfl I from "Anoxybacillus Flavithermus"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharma, Prince; D'Souza, David R.; Bhandari, Deepali; Parashar, Vijay; Capalash, Neena

    2003-01-01

    Restriction enzymes are basic tools in recombinant DNA technology. To shape the molecular biology experiments, the students must know how to work with these molecular scissors. Here, we describe an integrated set of experiments, introduced in the "Advances in Molecular Biology and Biotechnology" postgraduate course, which covers the important…

  18. Epidemiological fingerprinting of Enterobacter cloacae by small-fragment restriction endonuclease analysis and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of genomic restriction fragments.

    PubMed Central

    Haertl, R; Bandlow, G

    1993-01-01

    A cluster of infections caused by Enterobacter cloacae was observed among preterm neonates in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) of a pediatric hospital in Osnabrück, Germany. The presence of similar antimicrobial susceptibility patterns among the bacterial isolates prompted an investigation to determine whether a limited spread of a single strain existed. All 12 E. cloacae isolates from the NICU and 50 nonrelated strains were fingerprinted by small-fragment restriction endonuclease analysis (SF-REA) of EcoRI DNA digests. Selected isolates were further characterized by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) of NotI- or XbaI-generated genomic restriction fragments. Epidemiologically unrelated strains were clearly discriminated by both methods. Results achieved by SF-REA and PFGE revealed that of the 12 isolates from the NICU, 11 belonged to the same genotypic cluster. Since all reagents and equipment for both techniques are commercially available, DNA fingerprinting by SF-REA or PFGE is proposed as a useful tool in the microbiology laboratory for investigating the epidemiological relatedness of E. cloacae strains of clinical and environmental origin. Images PMID:8093251

  19. The elastic network model reveals a consistent picture on intrinsic functional dynamics of type II restriction endonucleases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uyar, A.; Kurkcuoglu, O.; Nilsson, L.; Doruker, P.

    2011-10-01

    The vibrational dynamics of various type II restriction endonucleases, in complex with cognate/non-cognate DNA and in the apo form, are investigated with the elastic network model in order to reveal common functional mechanisms in this enzyme family. Scissor-like and tong-like motions observed in the slowest modes of all enzymes and their complexes point to common DNA recognition and cleavage mechanisms. Normal mode analysis further points out that the scissor-like motion has an important role in differentiating between cognate and non-cognate sequences at the recognition site, thus implying its catalytic relevance. Flexible regions observed around the DNA-binding site of the enzyme usually concentrate on the highly conserved β-strands, especially after DNA binding. These β-strands may have a structurally stabilizing role in functional dynamics for target site recognition and cleavage. In addition, hot spot residues based on high-frequency modes reveal possible communication pathways between the two distant cleavage sites in the enzyme family. Some of these hot spots also exist on the shortest path between the catalytic sites and are highly conserved.

  20. A fluorescence method for detection of DNA and DNA methylation based on graphene oxide and restriction endonuclease HpaII.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Gao, Chunyan; Xiong, Yanxiang; Zhang, Yuanjian; Liu, Songqin; Pu, Yuepu

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation plays an important role in many biological events and is associated with various diseases. Most traditional methods for detection of DNA methylation are based on the complex and expensive bisulfite method. In this paper, we report a novel fluorescence method to detect DNA and DNA methylation based on graphene oxide (GO) and restriction endonuclease HpaII. The skillfully designed probe DNA labeled with 5-carboxyfluorescein (FAM) and optimized GO concentration keep the probe/target DNA still adsorbed on the GO. After the cleavage action of HpaII the labeled FAM is released from the GO surface and its fluorescence recovers, which could be used to detect DNA in the linear range of 50 pM-50 nM with a detection limit of 43 pM. DNA methylation induced by transmethylase (Mtase) or other chemical reagents prevents HpaII from recognizing and cleaving the specific site; as a result, fluorescence cannot recover. The fluorescence recovery efficiency is closely related to the DNA methylation level, which can be used to detect DNA methylation by comparing it with the fluorescence in the presence of intact target DNA. The method for detection of DNA and DNA methylation is simple, reliable and accurate.

  1. An investigation of enzootic Glasser's disease in a specific-pathogen-free grower-finisher facility using restriction endonuclease analysis

    PubMed Central

    Smart, Nonie L.; Hurnik, Daniel; MacInnes, Janet I.

    1993-01-01

    Enzootic Glassers's disease was investigated to study the epidemiology of the disease strains on a farm where it presented a problem. Restriction endonuclease fingerprinting (REF) analysis technique was used, as all strains of Haemophilus parasuis are biochemically similar and many strains are biochemically untypable. After young weaned pigs were moved from farm A to farm B, Glasser's disease routinely occurred despite the use of antibiotics and a commercial bacterin. Isolates were taken from the nasal passages and from carcasses of clinically affected cases and subjected to REF analysis. Haemophilus parasuis was not isolated from any of the pigs on farm A, but it was isolated from 7/10 and 5/10 nasal swabs taken from farm B. Two H. parasuis strains isolated from clinical cases of Glasser's disease from farm B had an identical REF pattern, but were different from the nasal swabs and the H. parasuis strain contained in the bacterin. The subsequent use of a custom autogenous bacterin made from a clinical isolate of H. parasuis reduced the mortality rate on farm B. This investigation indicates that nasal isolates of H. parasuis are different than those causing clinical disease, and not all bacterin strains are cross protective for other strains. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3. PMID:17424269

  2. A strategy for development of electrochemical DNA biosensor based on site-specific DNA cleavage of restriction endonuclease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinghua; Zhang, Jing; Yang, Huanghao; Fu, Fengfu; Chen, Guonan

    2010-09-15

    A new strategy for development of electrochemical DNA biosensor based on site-specific DNA cleavage of restriction endonuclease and using quantum dots as reporter was reported in this paper. The biosensor was fabricated by immobilizing a capture hairpin probe, thiolated single strand DNA labeled with biotin group, on a gold electrode. BfuCI nuclease, which is able to specifically cleave only double strand DNA but not single strand DNA, was used to reduce background current and improve the sensitivity. We demonstrated that the capture hairpin probe can be cleaved by BfuCI nuclease in the absence of target DNA, but cannot be cleaved in the presence of target DNA. The difference before and after enzymatic cleavage was then monitored by electrochemical method after the quantum dots were dissolved from the hybrids. Our results suggested that the usage of BfuCI nuclease obviously improved the sensitivity and selectivity of the biosensor. We successfully applied this method to the sequence-selective discrimination between perfectly matched and mismatched target DNA including a single-base mismatched target DNA, and detected as low as 3.3 × 10(-14) M of complementary target DNA. Furthermore, our above strategy was also verified with fluorescent method by designing a fluorescent molecular beacon (MB), which combined the capture hairpin probe and a pair of fluorophore (TAMRA) and quencher (DABCYL). The fluorescent results are consistent with that of electroanalysis, further indicating that the proposed new strategy indeed works as we expected.

  3. Purification and characterization of SepII a new restriction endonuclease from Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    PubMed

    Belkebir, Abdelkarim; Azeddoug, Houssine

    2012-01-20

    A Type II restriction enzyme SepII has been purified to apparent homogeneity from the gram-positive coccus, Staphylococcus epidermidis. The purification included an ammonium sulfate precipitation followed by Q-sepharose, heparin-sepharose and MonoQ column chromatography on an FPLC system. SDS-PAGE analysis showed a denatured molecular weight of 29 kDa. The effects of temperature, pH, NaCl, Mn(2+), Ca(2+), and Mg(2+) ion concentrations were studied to determine the optimal reaction conditions. The enzyme exhibits near maximal levels of activity between pH 8-10, at 10-20mM MgCl(2), 100-150 mM NaCl and 1mM DTT. The results also show that in NEB Buffer 3 the enzyme is active over a broad temperature range from 0 to 70 °C, and in the absence of DNA, enzyme thermostability is observed up to 50 °C for 20 min, while most of the original activity is conserved in 50% glycerol for weeks at room temperature. Single and double digestion in presence of commercial restriction enzymes of known DNA substrates (lambda, pBR322, pET21, pTrcHisB, pPB67) showed that the purified SepII recognized and cleaved the same site as EcoRV. Genomic DNA modification status was also determined.

  4. Modification-dependent restriction endonuclease, MspJI, flips 5-methylcytosine out of the DNA helix.

    PubMed

    Horton, John R; Wang, Hua; Mabuchi, Megumu Yamada; Zhang, Xing; Roberts, Richard J; Zheng, Yu; Wilson, Geoffrey G; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2014-10-29

    MspJI belongs to a family of restriction enzymes that cleave DNA containing 5-methylcytosine (5mC) or 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC). MspJI is specific for the sequence 5(h)mC-N-N-G or A and cleaves with some variability 9/13 nucleotides downstream. Earlier, we reported the crystal structure of MspJI without DNA and proposed how it might recognize this sequence and catalyze cleavage. Here we report its co-crystal structure with a 27-base pair oligonucleotide containing 5mC. This structure confirms that MspJI acts as a homotetramer and that the modified cytosine is flipped from the DNA helix into an SRA-like-binding pocket. We expected the structure to reveal two DNA molecules bound specifically to the tetramer and engaged with the enzyme's two DNA-cleavage sites. A coincidence of crystal packing precluded this organization, however. We found that each DNA molecule interacted with two adjacent tetramers, binding one specifically and the other non-specifically. The latter interaction, which prevented cleavage-site engagement, also involved base flipping and might represent the sequence-interrogation phase that precedes specific recognition. MspJI is unusual in that DNA molecules are recognized and cleaved by different subunits. Such interchange of function might explain how other complex multimeric restriction enzymes act.

  5. Purification and characterization of SepII a new restriction endonuclease from Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    PubMed

    Belkebir, Abdelkarim; Azeddoug, Houssine

    2012-01-20

    A Type II restriction enzyme SepII has been purified to apparent homogeneity from the gram-positive coccus, Staphylococcus epidermidis. The purification included an ammonium sulfate precipitation followed by Q-sepharose, heparin-sepharose and MonoQ column chromatography on an FPLC system. SDS-PAGE analysis showed a denatured molecular weight of 29 kDa. The effects of temperature, pH, NaCl, Mn(2+), Ca(2+), and Mg(2+) ion concentrations were studied to determine the optimal reaction conditions. The enzyme exhibits near maximal levels of activity between pH 8-10, at 10-20mM MgCl(2), 100-150 mM NaCl and 1mM DTT. The results also show that in NEB Buffer 3 the enzyme is active over a broad temperature range from 0 to 70 °C, and in the absence of DNA, enzyme thermostability is observed up to 50 °C for 20 min, while most of the original activity is conserved in 50% glycerol for weeks at room temperature. Single and double digestion in presence of commercial restriction enzymes of known DNA substrates (lambda, pBR322, pET21, pTrcHisB, pPB67) showed that the purified SepII recognized and cleaved the same site as EcoRV. Genomic DNA modification status was also determined. PMID:21511449

  6. Modification-dependent restriction endonuclease, MspJI, flips 5-methylcytosine out of the DNA helix

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, J. R.; Wang, H.; Mabuchi, M. Y.; Zhang, X.; Roberts, R. J.; Zheng, Y.; Wilson, G. G.; Cheng, X.

    2014-09-27

    MspJI belongs to a family of restriction enzymes that cleave DNA containing 5-methylcytosine (5mC) or 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC). MspJI is specific for the sequence 5(h)mC-N-N-G or A and cleaves with some variability 9/13 nucleotides downstream. Earlier, we reported the crystal structure of MspJI without DNA and proposed how it might recognize this sequence and catalyze cleavage. Here we report its co-crystal structure with a 27-base pair oligonucleotide containing 5mC. This structure confirms that MspJI acts as a homotetramer and that the modified cytosine is flipped from the DNA helix into an SRA-like-binding pocket. We expected the structure to reveal two DNA molecules bound specifically to the tetramer and engaged with the enzyme's two DNA-cleavage sites. A coincidence of crystal packing precluded this organization, however. We found that each DNA molecule interacted with two adjacent tetramers, binding one specifically and the other non-specifically. The latter interaction, which prevented cleavage-site engagement, also involved base flipping and might represent the sequence-interrogation phase that precedes specific recognition. MspJI is unusual in that DNA molecules are recognized and cleaved by different subunits. Such interchange of function might explain how other complex multimeric restriction enzymes act.

  7. Modification-dependent restriction endonuclease, MspJI, flips 5-methylcytosine out of the DNA helix

    DOE PAGES

    Horton, J. R.; Wang, H.; Mabuchi, M. Y.; Zhang, X.; Roberts, R. J.; Zheng, Y.; Wilson, G. G.; Cheng, X.

    2014-09-27

    MspJI belongs to a family of restriction enzymes that cleave DNA containing 5-methylcytosine (5mC) or 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC). MspJI is specific for the sequence 5(h)mC-N-N-G or A and cleaves with some variability 9/13 nucleotides downstream. Earlier, we reported the crystal structure of MspJI without DNA and proposed how it might recognize this sequence and catalyze cleavage. Here we report its co-crystal structure with a 27-base pair oligonucleotide containing 5mC. This structure confirms that MspJI acts as a homotetramer and that the modified cytosine is flipped from the DNA helix into an SRA-like-binding pocket. We expected the structure to reveal two DNAmore » molecules bound specifically to the tetramer and engaged with the enzyme's two DNA-cleavage sites. A coincidence of crystal packing precluded this organization, however. We found that each DNA molecule interacted with two adjacent tetramers, binding one specifically and the other non-specifically. The latter interaction, which prevented cleavage-site engagement, also involved base flipping and might represent the sequence-interrogation phase that precedes specific recognition. MspJI is unusual in that DNA molecules are recognized and cleaved by different subunits. Such interchange of function might explain how other complex multimeric restriction enzymes act.« less

  8. Multiplex, Rapid, and Sensitive Isothermal Detection of Nucleic-Acid Sequence by Endonuclease Restriction-Mediated Real-Time Multiple Cross Displacement Amplification.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Lu; Liu, Dongxin; Luo, Lijuan; Li, Hua; Cao, Xiaolong; Liu, Kai; Xu, Jianguo; Ye, Changyun

    2016-01-01

    We have devised a novel isothermal amplification technology, termed endonuclease restriction-mediated real-time multiple cross displacement amplification (ET-MCDA), which facilitated multiplex, rapid, specific and sensitive detection of nucleic-acid sequences at a constant temperature. The ET-MCDA integrated multiple cross displacement amplification strategy, restriction endonuclease cleavage and real-time fluorescence detection technique. In the ET-MCDA system, the functional cross primer E-CP1 or E-CP2 was constructed by adding a short sequence at the 5' end of CP1 or CP2, respectively, and the new E-CP1 or E-CP2 primer was labeled at the 5' end with a fluorophore and in the middle with a dark quencher. The restriction endonuclease Nb.BsrDI specifically recognized the short sequence and digested the newly synthesized double-stranded terminal sequences (5' end short sequences and their complementary sequences), which released the quenching, resulting on a gain of fluorescence signal. Thus, the ET-MCDA allowed real-time detection of single or multiple targets in only a single reaction, and the positive results were observed in as short as 12 min, detecting down to 3.125 fg of genomic DNA per tube. Moreover, the analytical specificity and the practical application of the ET-MCDA were also successfully evaluated in this study. Here, we provided the details on the novel ET-MCDA technique and expounded the basic ET-MCDA amplification mechanism. PMID:27242766

  9. Engineered selective plant male sterility through pollen-specific expression of the EcoRI restriction endonuclease.

    PubMed

    Millwood, Reginald J; Moon, Hong S; Poovaiah, Charleson R; Muthukumar, Balasubramaniam; Rice, John Hollis; Abercrombie, Jason M; Abercrombie, Laura L; Green, William Derek; Stewart, Charles Neal

    2016-05-01

    Unintended gene flow from transgenic plants via pollen, seed and vegetative propagation is a regulatory concern because of potential admixture in food and crop systems, as well as hybridization and introgression to wild and weedy relatives. Bioconfinement of transgenic pollen would help address some of these concerns and enable transgenic plant production for several crops where gene flow is an issue. Here, we demonstrate the expression of the restriction endonuclease EcoRI under the control of the tomato pollen-specific LAT52 promoter is an effective method for generating selective male sterility in Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco). Of nine transgenic events recovered, four events had very high bioconfinement with tightly controlled EcoRI expression in pollen and negligible-to-no expression other plant tissues. Transgenic plants had normal morphology wherein vegetative growth and reproductivity were similar to nontransgenic controls. In glasshouse experiments, transgenic lines were hand-crossed to both male-sterile and emasculated nontransgenic tobacco varieties. Progeny analysis of 16 000-40 000 seeds per transgenic line demonstrated five lines approached (>99.7%) or attained 100% bioconfinement for one or more generations. Bioconfinement was again demonstrated at or near 100% under field conditions where four transgenic lines were grown in close proximity to male-sterile tobacco, and 900-2100 seeds per male-sterile line were analysed for transgenes. Based upon these results, we conclude EcoRI-driven selective male sterility holds practical potential as a safe and reliable transgene bioconfinement strategy. Given the mechanism of male sterility, this method could be applicable to any plant species.

  10. A Cladistic Analysis of Phenotype Associations with Haplotypes Inferred from Restriction Endonuclease Mapping. II. the Analysis of Natural Populations

    PubMed Central

    Templeton, A. R.; Sing, C. F.; Kessling, A.; Humphries, S.

    1988-01-01

    Genes that code for products involved in the physiology of a phenotype are logical candidates for explaining interindividual variation in that phenotype. We present a methodology for discovering associations between genetic variation at such candidate loci (assayed through restriction endonuclease mapping) with phenotypic variation at the population level. We confine our analyses to DNA regions in which recombination is very rare. In this case, the genetic variation at the candiate locus can be organized into a cladogram that represents the evolutionary relationships between the observed haplotypes. Any mutation causing a significant phenotypic effect should be imbedded within the same historical structure defined by the cladogram. We showed, in the first paper of this series, how to use the cladogram to define a nested analysis of variance (NANOVA) that was very efficient at detecting and localizing phenotypically important mutations. However, the NANOVA of haplotype effects could only be applied to populations of homozygous genotypes. In this paper, we apply the quantitative genetic concept of average excess to evaluate the phenotypic effect of a haplotype or group of haplotypes stratified and contrasted according to the nested design defined by the cladogram. We also show how a permutational procedure can be used to make statistical inferences about the nested average excess values in populations containing heterozygous as well as homozygous genotypes. We provide two worked examples that investigate associations between genetic variation at or near the Alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) locus and Adh activity in Drosophila melanogaster, and associations between genetic variation at or near some apolipoprotein loci and various lipid phenotypes in a human population. PMID:3147219

  11. Multiplex, Rapid, and Sensitive Isothermal Detection of Nucleic-Acid Sequence by Endonuclease Restriction-Mediated Real-Time Multiple Cross Displacement Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Lu; Liu, Dongxin; Luo, Lijuan; Li, Hua; Cao, Xiaolong; Liu, Kai; Xu, Jianguo; Ye, Changyun

    2016-01-01

    We have devised a novel isothermal amplification technology, termed endonuclease restriction-mediated real-time multiple cross displacement amplification (ET-MCDA), which facilitated multiplex, rapid, specific and sensitive detection of nucleic-acid sequences at a constant temperature. The ET-MCDA integrated multiple cross displacement amplification strategy, restriction endonuclease cleavage and real-time fluorescence detection technique. In the ET-MCDA system, the functional cross primer E-CP1 or E-CP2 was constructed by adding a short sequence at the 5′ end of CP1 or CP2, respectively, and the new E-CP1 or E-CP2 primer was labeled at the 5′ end with a fluorophore and in the middle with a dark quencher. The restriction endonuclease Nb.BsrDI specifically recognized the short sequence and digested the newly synthesized double-stranded terminal sequences (5′ end short sequences and their complementary sequences), which released the quenching, resulting on a gain of fluorescence signal. Thus, the ET-MCDA allowed real-time detection of single or multiple targets in only a single reaction, and the positive results were observed in as short as 12 min, detecting down to 3.125 fg of genomic DNA per tube. Moreover, the analytical specificity and the practical application of the ET-MCDA were also successfully evaluated in this study. Here, we provided the details on the novel ET-MCDA technique and expounded the basic ET-MCDA amplification mechanism. PMID:27242766

  12. Cleavage maps for human cytomegalovirus DNA strain AD169 for restriction endonucleases EcoRI, BglII, and HindIII.

    PubMed Central

    Spector, D H; Hock, L; Tamashiro, J C

    1982-01-01

    We have used cloned EcoRI fragments of the human CMV (HCMV) genome, strain AD169, to prepare restriction endonuclease maps of the DNA. Individual 32P-labeled cloned fragments were hybridized to Southern blots of HCMV DNA cleaved to completion with the restriction endonucleases BglII and HindIII and cleaved partially with EcoRI. By determining which EcoRI fragments hybridized to the same band on a Southern blot, we were able to establish linkage groups. This information coupled with the data derived from digestion of the cloned fragments with the enzymes BglII and HindIII (Tamashiro et al., J. Virol. 42:547-557, 1982) provided the basis for the construction of detailed maps for the enzymes EcoRI, BglII, and HindIII. We also identified the EcoRI fragments derived from the termini of this genome and mapped them with respect to the BglII and HindIII terminal fragments. From our mapping data, we conclude that the genome of HCMV is approximately 240 kilobases in length and is divided into long (198 kilobases) and short (42 kilobases) regions. Both regions consist of a unique sequence bounded by inverted repeats (11 to 12 kilobases for the long region and 2 to 3 kilobases for the short region). Furthermore, the long and short regions can invert relative to each other. Images PMID:6283173

  13. Mutants of the EcoRI endonuclease with promiscuous substrate specificity implicate residues involved in substrate recognition.

    PubMed Central

    Heitman, J; Model, P

    1990-01-01

    The EcoRI restriction endonuclease cleaves DNA molecules at the sequence GAATTC. We devised a genetic screen to isolate EcoRI mutants with altered or broadened substrate specificity. In vitro, the purified mutant enzymes cleave both the wild-type substrate and sites which differ from this by one nucleotide (EcoRI star sites). These mutations identify four residues involved in substrate recognition and catalysis that are different from the amino acids proposed to recognize the substrate based on the EcoRI-DNA co-crystal structure. In fact, these mutations suppress EcoRI mutants altered at some of the proposed substrate binding residues (R145, R200). We argue that these mutations permit cleavage of additional DNA sequences either by perturbing or removing direct DNA-protein interactions or by facilitating conformational changes that allosterically couple substrate binding to DNA scission. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:2209548

  14. Nucleotide diversity of mitochondrial DNAs between the swamp and the river types of domestic water buffaloes, Bubalus bubalis, based on restriction endonuclease cleavage patterns.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, K; Yamagata, T; Masangkay, J S; Faruque, M O; Vu-Binh, D; Salundik; Mansjoer, S S; Kawamoto, Y; Namikawa, T

    1995-06-01

    Cleavage patterns of mitochondrial DNAs (mtDNAs) by 15 restriction endonucleases were analyzed for 10 swamp and 13 river types of domestic water buffaloes. Digestions with nine enzymes exhibited polymorphisms giving two or three kinds of cleavage patterns. Five mtDNA types were identified, three types in the swamp buffaloes of the Philippines, Vietnam, and Indonesia (S-types) and two types in the river buffaloes of Bangladesh and Pakistan (R-types). Nucleotide diversities ranged from 0.2 to 0.6% within the S- and R-types and from 1.9 to 2.4% between the R-types and the S-types. These values indicated that R-type and S-type mtDNAs differentiated at the subspecific level of other mammalian species reported. The possibility of polyphyletic domestication in different places is discussed for the origin of two distinct types of domestic water buffaloes.

  15. Dependence of DNA-protein cross-linking via guanine oxidation upon local DNA sequence as studied by restriction endonuclease inhibition.

    PubMed

    Madison, Amanda L; Perez, Zitadel A; To, Phuong; Maisonet, Tiffany; Rios, Eunice V; Trejo, Yuri; Ochoa-Paniagua, Carmen; Reno, Anita; Stemp, Eric D A

    2012-01-10

    Oxidative damage plays a causative role in many diseases, and DNA-protein cross-linking is one important consequence of such damage. It is known that GG and GGG sites are particularly prone to one-electron oxidation, and here we examined how the local DNA sequence influences the formation of DNA-protein cross-links induced by guanine oxidation. Oxidative DNA-protein cross-linking was induced between DNA and histone protein via the flash quench technique, a photochemical method that selectively oxidizes the guanine base in double-stranded DNA. An assay based on restriction enzyme cleavage was developed to detect the cross-linking in plasmid DNA. Following oxidation of pBR322 DNA by flash quench, several restriction enzymes (PpuMI, BamHI, EcoRI) were then used to probe the plasmid surface for the expected damage at guanine sites. These three endonucleases were strongly inhibited by DNA-protein cross-linking, whereas the AT-recognizing enzyme AseI was unaffected in its cleavage. These experiments also reveal the susceptibility of different guanine sites toward oxidative cross-linking. The percent inhibition observed for the endonucleases, and their pBR322 cleavage sites, decreased in the order: PpuMI (5'-GGGTCCT-3' and 5'-AGGACCC-3') > BamHI (5'-GGATCC-3') > EcoRI (5'-GAATTC-3'), a trend consistent with the observed and predicted tendencies for guanine to undergo one-electron oxidation: 5'-GGG-3' > 5'-GG-3' > 5'-GA-3'. Thus, it appears that in mixed DNA sequences the guanine sites most vulnerable to oxidative cross-linking are those that are easiest to oxidize. These results further indicate that equilibration of the electron hole in the plasmid DNA occurs on a time scale faster than that of cross-linking.

  16. A simple and accurate SNP scoring strategy based on typeIIS restriction endonuclease cleavage and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Sun Pyo; Ji, Seung Il; Rhee, Hwanseok; Shin, Soo Kyeong; Hwang, Sun Young; Lee, Seung Hwan; Lee, Soong Deok; Oh, Heung-Bum; Yoo, Wangdon; Kim, Soo-Ok

    2008-01-01

    Background We describe the development of a novel matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF)-based single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) scoring strategy, termed Restriction Fragment Mass Polymorphism (RFMP) that is suitable for genotyping variations in a simple, accurate, and high-throughput manner. The assay is based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification and mass measurement of oligonucleotides containing a polymorphic base, to which a typeIIS restriction endonuclease recognition was introduced by PCR amplification. Enzymatic cleavage of the products leads to excision of oligonucleotide fragments representing base variation of the polymorphic site whose masses were determined by MALDI-TOF MS. Results The assay represents an improvement over previous methods because it relies on the direct mass determination of PCR products rather than on an indirect analysis, where a base-extended or fluorescent report tag is interpreted. The RFMP strategy is simple and straightforward, requiring one restriction digestion reaction following target amplification in a single vessel. With this technology, genotypes are generated with a high call rate (99.6%) and high accuracy (99.8%) as determined by independent sequencing. Conclusion The simplicity, accuracy and amenability to high-throughput screening analysis should make the RFMP assay suitable for large-scale genotype association study as well as clinical genotyping in laboratories. PMID:18538037

  17. Integration host factor (IHF) applied for partial digestion by restriction endonucleases in large DNA molecules (IARC procedure).

    PubMed

    Kur, J

    1993-01-01

    The IHF protein of Escherichia coli was successfully used in IHF-mediated Achilles' Heel Cleavage (IHF-AC) technique (Koob et al., 1988; Kur et al., 1992), and leads to the generation of very rare restriction sites in large DNA molecules. The first step of this procedure is methylation of DNA in the presence of IHF, when the overlapping ihf/restriction sites are protected from methylation, and in the second step the DNA is cut by the cognate restriction enzyme. The aim of the present study is to develop a very exact and reproducible procedure to obtain only a few well-defined cuts with the IHF-pre-treated DNA, depending on the variety of all parameters. This technique (IARC, i.e., IHF-assisted rare cutters) employs the restriction enzyme and only one auxiliary protein (IHF). The advantage of the IARC procedure is that no methylation is required (as opposed to the IHF-AC method). Using the IARC approach, the effects of various IHF concentrations were evaluated on cleaving the activity of the DraI, PacI, PmeI, and SwaI enzymes using DNA of phage lambda or the entire genomic 4.7-Mb DNA of E. coli. At low IHF concentrations only a few cut sites were eliminated by IHF binding, but at high IHF concentration, enzymes were able to cut in only one or several specific sites.

  18. A putative Type IIS restriction endonuclease GeoICI from Geobacillus sp.--A robust, thermostable alternative to mezophilic prototype BbvI.

    PubMed

    Zebrowska, Joanna; Zolnierkiewicz, Olga; Skowron, Marta A; Zylicz-Stachula, Agnieszka; Jezewska-Frackowiak, Joanna; Skowron, Piotr M

    2016-03-01

    Screening of extreme environments in search for novel microorganisms may lead to the discovery of robust enzymes with either new substrate specificities or thermostable equivalents of those already found in mesophiles, better suited for biotechnology applications. Isolates from Iceland geysers' biofilms, exposed to a broad range of temperatures, from ambient to close to water boiling point, were analysed for the presence of DNA-interacting proteins, including restriction endonucleases (REases). GeoICI, a member of atypical Type IIS REases, is the most thermostable isoschizomer of the prototype BbvI, recognizing/cleaving 5'-GCAGC(N8/12)-3'DNA sequences. As opposed to the unstable prototype, which cleaves DNA at 30°C, GeoICI is highly active at elevated temperatures, up to 73°C and over a very wide salt concentration range. Recognition/cleavage sites were determined by: (i) digestion of plasmid and bacteriophage lambda DNA (Λ); (ii) cleavage of custom PCR substrates, (iii) run-off sequencing of GeoICI cleavage products and (iv) shotgun cloning and sequencing of Λ DNA fragmented with GeoICI. Geobacillus sp. genomic DNA was PCR-screened for the presence of other specialized REases-MTases and as a result, another putative REase- MTase, GeoICII, related to the Thermus sp. family of bifunctional REases-methyltransferases (MTases) was detected. PMID:26949085

  19. On the importance of DNA strand breaks as the first event to initiate sister chromatid exchange (SCE): experiments with restriction endonuclease BglI.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, T; Piñero, J; Cortés, F

    1996-11-01

    The exact molecular mechanism of sister chromatid exchange (SCE) is still unknown, despite the many reports dealing with this cytogenetic end point published in the last 40 years. One point to be investigated is the nature of the original lesion(s) in DNA leading to the production of SCE. Whereas, for chromosomal aberrations, the importance of DNA double-strand breaks has been well established, there is still controversy about the relative importance of strand breaks and base modifications for triggering the process of SCE formation. In the present paper, we have taken advantage of the ability of the restriction endonuclease BglI to induce SCE and have exploited the fact that preincubation with 2,3-butanedione results in the loss of BgiI ability to cut DNA, while it is still able to recognize its sequence in DNA and bind to it, to see whether this alone is enough to initiate SCE formation, or if a physical DNA double-strand break is required. Our results seem to support the necessity of DNA breaks for SCE production.

  20. Manipulation of mtDNA heteroplasmy in all striated muscles of newborn mice by AAV9-mediated delivery of a mitochondria-targeted restriction endonuclease.

    PubMed

    Bacman, S R; Williams, S L; Duan, D; Moraes, C T

    2012-11-01

    Mitochondrial diseases are frequently caused by heteroplasmic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations. As these mutations express themselves only at high relative ratios, any approach able to manipulate mtDNA heteroplasmy can potentially be curative. In this study, we developed a system to manipulate mtDNA heteroplasmy in all skeletal muscles from neonate mice. We selected muscle because it is one of the most clinically affected tissues in mitochondrial disorders. A mitochondria-targeted restriction endonuclease (mito-ApaLI) expressed from AAV9 particles was delivered either by intraperitoneal or intravenous injection in neonate mice harboring two mtDNA haplotypes, only one of which was susceptible to ApaLI digestion. A single injection was able to elicit a predictable and marked change in mtDNA heteroplasmy in all striated muscles analyzed, including heart. No health problems or reduction in mtDNA levels were observed in treated mice, suggesting that this approach could have clinical applications for mitochondrial myopathies.

  1. A spectroscopic method to determine the activity of the restriction endonuclease EcoRV that involves a single reaction.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qing; Quiñones, Edwin

    2016-03-15

    A one-step protocol is presented to determine the activity of EcoRV as a model of restriction enzymes. The protocol involved a molecular beacon as DNA substrate, with the target sequence recognized by EcoRV in the stem. EcoRV cleaved the stem forming two fragments, one of which contained the fluorophore and quencher, initially bound by 3 bp. This shorter fragment rapidly dissociated at 37 °C, causing an increase of fluorescence intensity that was used to gauge the reaction kinetics. The reaction can be described using the Michaelis-Menten mechanism, and the kinetic parameters obtained were compared with literature values involving other protocols.

  2. Insights into the Origin of Clostridium botulinum Strains: Evolution of Distinct Restriction Endonuclease Sites in rrs (16S rRNA gene).

    PubMed

    Bhushan, Ashish; Mukherjee, Tanmoy; Joshi, Jayadev; Shankar, Pratap; Kalia, Vipin Chandra

    2015-06-01

    Diversity analysis of Clostridium botulinum strains is complicated by high microheterogeneity caused by the presence of 9-22 copies of rrs (16S rRNA gene). The need is to mine genetic markers to identify very closely related strains. Multiple alignments of the nucleotide sequences of the 212 rrs of 13 C. botulinum strains revealed intra- and inter-genomic heterogeneity. Low intragenomic heterogeneity in rrs was evident in strains 230613, Alaska E43, Okra, Eklund 17B, Langeland, 657, Kyoto, BKT015925, and Loch Maree. The most heterogenous rrs sequences were those of C. botulinum strains ATCC 19397, Hall, H04402065, and ATCC 3502. In silico restriction mapping of these rrs sequences was observable with 137 type II Restriction endonucleases (REs). Nucleotide changes (NC) at these RE sites resulted in appearance of distinct and additional sites, and loss in certain others. De novo appearances of RE sites due to NC were recorded at different positions in rrs gene. A nucleotide transition A>G in rrs of C. botulinum Loch Maree and 657 resulted in the generation of 4 and 10 distinct RE sites, respectively. Transitions A>G, G>A, and T>C led to the loss of RE sites. A perusal of the entire NC and in silico RE mapping of rrs of C. botulinum strains provided insights into their evolution. Segregation of strains on the basis of RE digestion patterns of rrs was validated by the cladistic analysis involving six house keeping genes: dnaN, gyrB, metG, prfA, pyrG, and Rho. PMID:25805900

  3. Endonuclease Restriction-Mediated Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction: A Novel Technique for Rapid, Sensitive and Quantitative Detection of Nucleic-Acid Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Lu; Li, Machao; Luo, Lijuan; Liu, Dongxin; Li, Hua; Cao, Xiaolong; Hu, Shoukui; Jin, Dong; Xu, Jianguo; Ye, Changyun

    2016-01-01

    The article reported a novel methodology for real-time PCR analysis of nucleic acids, termed endonuclease restriction-mediated real-time polymerase chain reaction (ET-PCR). Just like PCR, ET-PCR only required one pair of primers. A short sequence, which was recognized by restriction enzyme BstUI, was attached to the 5′ end of the forward (F) or reverse (R) PCR primer, and the new F or R primer was named EF or ER. EF/ER was labeled at the 5′ end with a reporter dye and in the middle with a quenching dye. BstUI cleaves the newly synthesized double-stranded terminal sequences (5′ end recognition sequences and their complementary sequences) during the extension phase, which separates the reporter molecule from the quenching dye, leading to a gain of fluorescence signal. This process is repeated in each amplification cycle and unaffected the exponential synthesis of the PCR amplification. ET-PCR allowed real-time analysis of single or multiple targets in a single vessel, and provided the reproducible quantitation of nucleic acids. The analytical sensitivity and specificity of ET-PCR were successfully evaluated, detecting down to 250 fg of genomic DNA per tube of target pathogen DNA examined, and the positive results were generated in a relatively short period. Moreover, the practical application of ET-PCR for simultaneous detection of multiple target pathogens was also demonstrated in artificially contaminated blood samples. In conclusion, due to the technique’s simplicity of design, reproducible data and low contamination risk, ET-PCR assay is an appealing alternative to conventional approaches currently used for real-time nucleic acid analysis. PMID:27468284

  4. Endonuclease Restriction-Mediated Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction: A Novel Technique for Rapid, Sensitive and Quantitative Detection of Nucleic-Acid Sequence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Lu; Li, Machao; Luo, Lijuan; Liu, Dongxin; Li, Hua; Cao, Xiaolong; Hu, Shoukui; Jin, Dong; Xu, Jianguo; Ye, Changyun

    2016-01-01

    The article reported a novel methodology for real-time PCR analysis of nucleic acids, termed endonuclease restriction-mediated real-time polymerase chain reaction (ET-PCR). Just like PCR, ET-PCR only required one pair of primers. A short sequence, which was recognized by restriction enzyme BstUI, was attached to the 5' end of the forward (F) or reverse (R) PCR primer, and the new F or R primer was named EF or ER. EF/ER was labeled at the 5' end with a reporter dye and in the middle with a quenching dye. BstUI cleaves the newly synthesized double-stranded terminal sequences (5' end recognition sequences and their complementary sequences) during the extension phase, which separates the reporter molecule from the quenching dye, leading to a gain of fluorescence signal. This process is repeated in each amplification cycle and unaffected the exponential synthesis of the PCR amplification. ET-PCR allowed real-time analysis of single or multiple targets in a single vessel, and provided the reproducible quantitation of nucleic acids. The analytical sensitivity and specificity of ET-PCR were successfully evaluated, detecting down to 250 fg of genomic DNA per tube of target pathogen DNA examined, and the positive results were generated in a relatively short period. Moreover, the practical application of ET-PCR for simultaneous detection of multiple target pathogens was also demonstrated in artificially contaminated blood samples. In conclusion, due to the technique's simplicity of design, reproducible data and low contamination risk, ET-PCR assay is an appealing alternative to conventional approaches currently used for real-time nucleic acid analysis. PMID:27468284

  5. Design implications of extremely restricted patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaidyanathan, Kaushik; Liu, Renzhi; Liebmann, Lars; Lai, Kafai; Strojwas, Andzrej J.; Pileggi, Larry

    2014-07-01

    Escalating manufacturing cost and complexity is challenging the premise of affordable scaling. With lithography accounting for a large fraction of wafer costs, researchers are actively exploring several cost-effective alternative lithographic techniques, such as directed self-assembly, self-aligned multiple patterning, etc. However, most of the alternative lithographic techniques are restrictive, and it is important to understand the impact of such pattering restrictions on system-on-chip (SoC) design. To this end, we artificially restricted all layers in a 14 nm process to be pure gratings and observed that the pure gratings approach results in an inefficient SoC design with several process integration concerns. To come up with a technology definition that is mindful of designer requirements, it is essential to undertake a holistic design technology co-optimization (DTCO) considering several SoC design elements, such as standard cell logic, static random access memory bitcells, analog blocks, and physical synthesis. Our DTCO on the IBM 14 nm process with additional 10- and 7-nm node-like pattern restrictions leads us to converge on a set of critical pattern constructs that are required for an efficient and affordable SoC design.

  6. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the type IV restriction endonuclease ScoMcrA from Streptomyces coelicolor, which cleaves both Dcm-methylated DNA and phosphorothioated DNA.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guang; Zhang, Zhenyi; Zhao, Gong; Deng, Zixin; Wu, Geng; He, Xinyi

    2015-01-01

    ScoMcrA is a type IV modification-dependent restriction endonuclease found in the model strain Streptomyces coelicolor. Unlike type I, II and III restriction endonucleases, which cleave unmodified DNA, type IV restriction endonucleases cleave modified DNA, including methylated, hydroxymethylated, glucosyl-hydroxymethylated and phosphorothioated DNA. ScoMcrA targets both Dcm-methylated DNA and phosphorothioated DNA, and makes double-strand breaks 16-28 nt away from the modified nucleotides or the phosphorothioate links. However, the mechanism by which ScoMcrA recognizes these two entirely different types of modification remains unclear. In this study, the ScoMcrA protein was overexpressed, purified and crystallized. The crystals diffracted to 3.35 Å resolution and belonged to space group P2(1)2(1)2(1). The unit-cell parameters were determined to be a=130.19, b=139.36, c=281.01 Å, α=β=γ=90°. These results will facilitate the detailed structural analysis of ScoMcrA and further elucidation of its biochemical mechanism.

  7. Dissociation from DNA of Type III Restriction-Modification enzymes during helicase-dependent motion and following endonuclease activity.

    PubMed

    Tóth, Júlia; van Aelst, Kara; Salmons, Hannah; Szczelkun, Mark D

    2012-08-01

    DNA cleavage by the Type III Restriction-Modification (RM) enzymes requires the binding of a pair of RM enzymes at two distant, inversely orientated recognition sequences followed by helicase-catalysed ATP hydrolysis and long-range communication. Here we addressed the dissociation from DNA of these enzymes at two stages: during long-range communication and following DNA cleavage. First, we demonstrated that a communicating species can be trapped in a DNA domain without a recognition site, with a non-specific DNA association lifetime of ∼ 200 s. If free DNA ends were present the lifetime became too short to measure, confirming that ends accelerate dissociation. Secondly, we observed that Type III RM enzymes can dissociate upon DNA cleavage and go on to cleave further DNA molecules (they can 'turnover', albeit inefficiently). The relationship between the observed cleavage rate and enzyme concentration indicated independent binding of each site and a requirement for simultaneous interaction of at least two enzymes per DNA to achieve cleavage. In light of various mechanisms for helicase-driven motion on DNA, we suggest these results are most consistent with a thermally driven random 1D search model (i.e. 'DNA sliding').

  8. Two-stage gene assembly/cloning of a member of the TspDTI subfamily of bifunctional restriction endonucleases, TthHB27I.

    PubMed

    Krefft, Daria; Zylicz-Stachula, Agnieszka; Mulkiewicz, Ewa; Papkov, Aliaksei; Jezewska-Frackowiak, Joanna; Skowron, Piotr M

    2015-01-20

    The Thermus sp. family of bifunctional type IIS/IIG/IIC restriction endonucleases (REase)-methyltransferases (MTase) comprises thermo-stable TaqII, TspGWI, TspDTI, TsoI, Tth111II/TthHB27I enzymes as well as a number of putative enzymes/open reading frames (ORFs). All of the family members share properties including a large protein size (ca. 120kDa), amino acid (aa) sequence homologies, enzymatic activity modulation by S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), recognition of similar asymmetric cognate DNA sites and cleavage at a distance of 11/9 nt. Analysis of the enzyme aa sequences and domain/motif organisation led to further Thermus sp. family division into the TspDTI and TspGWI subfamilies. The latter exhibits an unprecedented phenomenon of DNA recognition change upon substitution of SAM by its analogue, sinefungin (SIN), towards a very frequent DNA cleavage. We report cloning in Escherichia coli (E. coli), using a two-stage procedure and a putative tthHB27IRM gene, detected by bioinformatics analysis of the Thermus thermophilus HB27 (T. thermophilus) genome. The functionality of a 3366 base pair (bp)-/1121 aa-long, high GC content ORF was validated experimentally through the expression in E. coli. Protein features corroborated with the reclassification of TthHB27I into the TspDTI subfamily, which manifested in terms of aa-sequence/motif homologies and insensitivity to SIN-induced specificity shift. However, both SAM and SIN stimulated the REase DNA cleavage activity by at least 16-32 times; the highest was observed for the Thermus sp. family. The availability of TthHB27I and the need to include SAM or SIN in the reaction in order to convert the enzyme from "hibernation" status to efficient DNA cleavage is of practical significance in molecular biotechnology, extending the palette of available REase specificities.

  9. Chemical Display of Pyrimidine Bases Flipped Out by Modification-Dependent Restriction Endonucleases of MspJI and PvuRts1I Families

    PubMed Central

    Zagorskaitė, Evelina; Sasnauskas, Giedrius

    2014-01-01

    The epigenetic DNA modifications 5-methylcytosine (5mC) and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) in eukaryotes are recognized either in the context of double-stranded DNA (e.g., by the methyl-CpG binding domain of MeCP2), or in the flipped-out state (e.g., by the SRA domain of UHRF1). The SRA-like domains and the base-flipping mechanism for 5(h)mC recognition are also shared by the recently discovered prokaryotic modification-dependent endonucleases of the MspJI and PvuRts1I families. Since the mechanism of modified cytosine recognition by many potential eukaryotic and prokaryotic 5(h)mC “readers” is still unknown, a fast solution based method for the detection of extrahelical 5(h)mC would be very useful. In the present study we tested base-flipping by MspJI- and PvuRts1I-like restriction enzymes using several solution-based methods, including fluorescence measurements of the cytosine analog pyrrolocytosine and chemical modification of extrahelical pyrimidines with chloroacetaldehyde and KMnO4. We find that only KMnO4 proved an efficient probe for the positive display of flipped out pyrimidines, albeit the method required either non-physiological pH (4.3) or a substitution of the target cytosine with thymine. Our results imply that DNA recognition mechanism of 5(h)mC binding proteins should be tested using a combination of all available methods, as the lack of a positive signal in some assays does not exclude the base flipping mechanism. PMID:25486533

  10. Catalytic domain of plasmid pAD1 relaxase TraX defines a group of relaxases related to restriction endonucleases

    PubMed Central

    Francia, María Victoria; Clewell, Don B.; de la Cruz, Fernando; Moncalián, Gabriel

    2013-01-01

    Plasmid pAD1 is a 60-kb conjugative element commonly found in clinical isolates of Enterococcus faecalis. The relaxase TraX and the primary origin of transfer oriT2 are located close to each other and have been shown to be essential for conjugation. The oriT2 site contains a large inverted repeat (where the nic site is located) adjacent to a series of short direct repeats. TraX does not show any of the typical relaxase sequence motifs but is the prototype of a unique family of relaxases (MOBC). The present study focuses on the genetic, biochemical, and structural analysis of TraX, whose 3D structure could be predicted by protein threading. The structure consists of two domains: (i) an N-terminal domain sharing the topology of the DNA binding domain of the MarR family of transcriptional regulators and (ii) a C-terminal catalytic domain related to the PD-(D/E)XK family of restriction endonucleases. Alignment of MOBC relaxase amino acid sequences pointed to several conserved polar amino acid residues (E28, D152, E170, E172, K176, R180, Y181, and Y203) that were mutated to alanine. Functional analysis of these mutants (in vivo DNA transfer and cleavage assays) revealed the importance of these residues for relaxase activity and suggests Y181 as a potential catalytic residue similarly to His-hydrophobe-His relaxases. We also show that TraX binds specifically to dsDNA containing the oriT2 direct repeat sequences, confirming their role in transfer specificity. The results provide insights into the catalytic mechanism of MOBC relaxases, which differs radically from that of His-hydrophobe-His relaxases. PMID:23904483

  11. Rapid and Sensitive Detection of Shigella spp. and Salmonella spp. by Multiple Endonuclease Restriction Real-Time Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification Technique

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; Wang, Yan; Luo, Lijuan; Liu, Dongxin; Luo, Xia; Xu, Yanmei; Hu, Shoukui; Niu, Lina; Xu, Jianguo; Ye, Changyun

    2015-01-01

    Shigella and Salmonella are frequently isolated from various food samples and can cause human gastroenteritis. Here, a novel multiple endonuclease restriction real-time loop-mediated isothermal amplification technology (MERT-LAMP) were successfully established and validated for simultaneous detection of Shigella strains and Salmonella strains in only a single reaction. Two sets of MERT-LAMP primers for 2 kinds of pathogens were designed from ipaH gene of Shigella spp. and invA gene of Salmonella spp., respectively. Under the constant condition at 63°C, the positive results were yielded in as short as 12 min with the genomic DNA extracted from the 19 Shigella strains and 14 Salmonella strains, and the target pathogens present in a sample could be simultaneously identified based on distinct fluorescence curves in real-time format. Accordingly, the multiplex detection assay significantly reduced effort, materials and reagents used, and amplification and differentiation were conducted at the same time, obviating the use of postdetection procedures. The analytical sensitivity of MERT-LAMP was found to be 62.5 and 125 fg DNA/reaction with genomic templates of Shigella strains and Salmonella strains, which was consist with normal LAMP assay, and at least 10- and 100-fold more sensitive than that of qPCR and conventional PCR approaches. The limit of detection of MERT-LAMP for Shigella strains and Salmonella strains detection in artificially contaminated milk samples was 5.8 and 6.4 CFU per vessel. In conclusion, the MERT-LAMP methodology described here demonstrated a potential and valuable means for simultaneous screening of Shigella and Salmonella in a wide variety of samples. PMID:26697000

  12. The Helicobacter pylori HpyAXII restriction–modification system limits exogenous DNA uptake by targeting GTAC sites but shows asymmetric conservation of the DNA methyltransferase and restriction endonuclease components

    PubMed Central

    Humbert, Olivier; Salama, Nina R.

    2008-01-01

    The naturally competent organism Helicobacter pylori encodes a large number of restriction–modification (R–M) systems that consist of a restriction endonuclease and a DNA methyltransferase. R–M systems are not only believed to limit DNA exchange among bacteria but may also have other cellular functions. We report a previously uncharacterized H. pylori type II R–M system, M.HpyAXII/R.HpyAXII. We show that this system targets GTAC sites, which are rare in the H. pylori chromosome but numerous in ribosomal RNA genes. As predicted, this type II R–M system showed attributes of a selfish element. Deletion of the methyltransferase M.HpyAXII is lethal when associated with an active endonuclease R.HpyAXII unless compensated by adaptive mutation or gene amplification. R.HpyAXII effectively restricted both unmethylated plasmid and chromosomal DNA during natural transformation and was predicted to belong to the novel ‘half pipe’ structural family of endonucleases. Analysis of a panel of clinical isolates revealed that R.HpyAXII was functional in a small number of H. pylori strains (18.9%, n = 37), whereas the activity of M.HpyAXII was highly conserved (92%, n = 50), suggesting that GTAC methylation confers a selective advantage to H. pylori. However, M.HpyAXII activity did not enhance H. pylori fitness during stomach colonization of a mouse infection model. PMID:18978016

  13. Mutagenic scan of the H-N-H motif of colicin E9: implications for the mechanistic enzymology of colicins, homing enzymes and apoptotic endonucleases

    PubMed Central

    Walker, David C.; Georgiou, Theonie; Pommer, Ansgar J.; Walker, Daniel; Moore, Geoffrey R.; Kleanthous, Colin; James, Richard

    2002-01-01

    Colicin E9 is a microbial toxin that kills bacteria through random degradation of chromosomal DNA. Within the active site of the cytotoxic endonuclease domain of colicin E9 (the E9 DNase) is a 32 amino acid motif found in the H-N-H group of homing endonucleases. Crystal structures of the E9 DNase have implicated several conserved residues of the H-N-H motif in the mechanism of DNA hydrolysis. We have used mutagenesis to test the involvement of these key residues in colicin toxicity, metal ion binding and catalysis. Our data show, for the first time, that the H-N-H motif is the site of DNA binding and that Mg2+-dependent cleavage of double-stranded DNA is responsible for bacterial cell death. We demonstrate that more active site residues are required for catalysis in the presence of Mg2+ ions than transition metals, consistent with the recent hypothesis that the E9 DNase hydrolyses DNA by two distinct, cation-dependent catalytic mechanisms. The roles of individual amino acids within the H-N-H motif are discussed in the context of the available structural information on this and related DNases and we address the possible mechanistic similarities between caspase-activated DNases, responsible for the degradation of chromatin in eukaryotic apoptosis, and H-N-H DNases. PMID:12136104

  14. Conserved Endonuclease Function of Hantavirus L Polymerase.

    PubMed

    Rothenberger, Sylvia; Torriani, Giulia; Johansson, Maria U; Kunz, Stefan; Engler, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Hantaviruses are important emerging pathogens belonging to the Bunyaviridae family. Like other segmented negative strand RNA viruses, the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) also known as L protein of hantaviruses lacks an intrinsic "capping activity". Hantaviruses therefore employ a "cap snatching" strategy acquiring short 5' RNA sequences bearing 5'cap structures by endonucleolytic cleavage from host cell transcripts. The viral endonuclease activity implicated in cap snatching of hantaviruses has been mapped to the N-terminal domain of the L protein. Using a combination of molecular modeling and structure-function analysis we confirm and extend these findings providing evidence for high conservation of the L endonuclease between Old and New World hantaviruses. Recombinant hantavirus L endonuclease showed catalytic activity and a defined cation preference shared by other viral endonucleases. Based on the previously reported remarkably high activity of hantavirus L endonuclease, we established a cell-based assay for the hantavirus endonuclase function. The robustness of the assay and its high-throughput compatible format makes it suitable for small molecule drug screens to identify novel inhibitors of hantavirus endonuclease. Based on the high degree of similarity to RdRp endonucleases, some candidate inhibitors may be broadly active against hantaviruses and other emerging human pathogenic Bunyaviruses.

  15. Conserved Endonuclease Function of Hantavirus L Polymerase.

    PubMed

    Rothenberger, Sylvia; Torriani, Giulia; Johansson, Maria U; Kunz, Stefan; Engler, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Hantaviruses are important emerging pathogens belonging to the Bunyaviridae family. Like other segmented negative strand RNA viruses, the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) also known as L protein of hantaviruses lacks an intrinsic "capping activity". Hantaviruses therefore employ a "cap snatching" strategy acquiring short 5' RNA sequences bearing 5'cap structures by endonucleolytic cleavage from host cell transcripts. The viral endonuclease activity implicated in cap snatching of hantaviruses has been mapped to the N-terminal domain of the L protein. Using a combination of molecular modeling and structure-function analysis we confirm and extend these findings providing evidence for high conservation of the L endonuclease between Old and New World hantaviruses. Recombinant hantavirus L endonuclease showed catalytic activity and a defined cation preference shared by other viral endonucleases. Based on the previously reported remarkably high activity of hantavirus L endonuclease, we established a cell-based assay for the hantavirus endonuclase function. The robustness of the assay and its high-throughput compatible format makes it suitable for small molecule drug screens to identify novel inhibitors of hantavirus endonuclease. Based on the high degree of similarity to RdRp endonucleases, some candidate inhibitors may be broadly active against hantaviruses and other emerging human pathogenic Bunyaviruses. PMID:27144576

  16. Conserved Endonuclease Function of Hantavirus L Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Rothenberger, Sylvia; Torriani, Giulia; Johansson, Maria U.; Kunz, Stefan; Engler, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Hantaviruses are important emerging pathogens belonging to the Bunyaviridae family. Like other segmented negative strand RNA viruses, the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) also known as L protein of hantaviruses lacks an intrinsic “capping activity”. Hantaviruses therefore employ a “cap snatching” strategy acquiring short 5′ RNA sequences bearing 5′cap structures by endonucleolytic cleavage from host cell transcripts. The viral endonuclease activity implicated in cap snatching of hantaviruses has been mapped to the N-terminal domain of the L protein. Using a combination of molecular modeling and structure–function analysis we confirm and extend these findings providing evidence for high conservation of the L endonuclease between Old and New World hantaviruses. Recombinant hantavirus L endonuclease showed catalytic activity and a defined cation preference shared by other viral endonucleases. Based on the previously reported remarkably high activity of hantavirus L endonuclease, we established a cell-based assay for the hantavirus endonuclase function. The robustness of the assay and its high-throughput compatible format makes it suitable for small molecule drug screens to identify novel inhibitors of hantavirus endonuclease. Based on the high degree of similarity to RdRp endonucleases, some candidate inhibitors may be broadly active against hantaviruses and other emerging human pathogenic Bunyaviruses. PMID:27144576

  17. Nucleic acid renaturation and restriction endonuclease cleavage analyses show that the DNAs of a transforming and a nontransforming strain of Epstein-Barr virus share approximately 90% of their nucleotide sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Sugden, B; Summers, W C; Klein, G

    1976-01-01

    Viral DNA molecules were purified from a nontransforming and a transforming strain of Epstein-Barr virus. Each viral DNA was labeled in vitro and renatured in the presence of an excess of either one or the other unlabeled viral DNA. Both viral DNAs were also digested with the Eco R1 restriction endonuclease and subsequently labeled by using avian myeloblastosis virus DNA polymerase to repair either the EcoR1 nuclease-generated single-stranded ends of the DNAs or their single-stranded ends produced by a second digestion with exonuclease III after the first EcoR1 nuclease digestion. The results of these experiments support three general conclusions: (i) the DNAs of these two strains of Epstein-Barr virus share approximately 90% of their nucleotide sequences; (ii) both viral DNA populations are reasonably homogenous; and (iii) both DNAs contain repetitions or inverted repetitions of some of their nucleotide sequences. Images PMID:178907

  18. A Cladistic Analysis of Phenotypic Associations with Haplotypes Inferred from Restriction Endonuclease Mapping. I. Basic Theory and an Analysis of Alcohol Dehydrogenase Activity in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Templeton, Alan R.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Sing, Charles F.

    1987-01-01

    Because some genes have been cloned that have a known biochemical or physiological function, genetic variation can be measured in a population at loci that may directly influence a phenotype of interest. With this measured genotype approach, specific alleles or haplotypes in the probed DNA region can be assigned phenotypic effects. In this paper we address several problems encountered in implementing the measured genotype approach with restriction site data. A number of analytical problems arise in part as a consequence of the linkage disequilibrium that is commonly encountered when dealing with small DNA regions: 1) different restriction site polymorphisms are not statistically independent, 2) the sites being measured are not likely to be the direct cause of the associated phenotypic effects, 3) haplotype classes may be phenotypically heterogeneous, and 4) the sites that are most strongly associated with phenotypic effects are not necessarily the most closely linked to the actual genetic cause of the effects. When recombination and gene conversion are rare, the primary cause of linkage disequilibrium is history (mutational origin, genetic drift, hitchhiking, etc.). We deal with historical association directly by producing a cladogram that partially reconstructs the evolutionary history of the present-day haplotype variability. The cladogram defines a nested analysis of variance that simultaneously detects phenotypic effects, localizes the effects within the cladogram, and identifies haplotypes that are potentially heterogeneous in their phenotypic associations. The power of this approach is illustrated by an analysis of the associations between alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) activity and restriction site variability in a 13-kb fragment surrounding the ADH locus in Drosophila melanogaster. PMID:2822535

  19. Creation of a data base for sequences of ribosomal nucleic acids and detection of conserved restriction endonucleases sites through computerized processing.

    PubMed Central

    Patarca, R; Dorta, B; Ramirez, J L

    1982-01-01

    As part of a project pertaining the organization of ribosomal genes in Kinetoplastidae, we have created a data base for published sequences of ribosomal nucleic acids, with information in Spanish. As a first step in their processing, we have written a computer program which introduces the new feature of determining the length of the fragments produced after single or multiple digestion with any of the known restriction enzymes. With this information we have detected conserved SAU 3A sites: (i) at the 5' end of the 5.8S rRNA and at the 3' end of the small subunit rRNA, both included in similar larger sequences; (ii) in the 5.8S rRNA of vertebrates (a second one), which is not present in lower eukaryotes, showing a clear evolutive divergence; and, (iii) at the 5' terminal of the small subunit rRNA, included in a larger conserved sequence. The possible biological importance of these sequences is discussed. PMID:6278402

  20. A simple and rapid method for HLA-DQA1 genotyping by digestion of PCR-amplified DNA with allele specific restriction endonucleases.

    PubMed

    Maeda, M; Murayama, N; Ishii, H; Uryu, N; Ota, M; Tsuji, K; Inoko, H

    1989-11-01

    The second exon of the HLA-DQA1 genes was selectively amplified from genomic DNAs of 72 HLA-homozygous B cell lines by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Amplified DNAs were digested with HaeIII, Ddel, ScrFI, FokI and RsaI, which recognize allelic sequence variations in the polymorphic segments of the DQA1 second exon, and then subjected to electrophoresis in polyacrylamide gels. Eight different polymorphic patterns of restriction fragments were obtained, and seven were identical to patterns predicted from the known DNA sequences, correlating with each HLA-DQw type defined by serological typing. The remaining one pattern cannot be explained from the sequence data, suggesting the presence of a novel DQA1 allele at the nucleotide level. This PCR-RFLP method provides a simple and rapid technique for accurate definition of the HLA-DQ types at the nucleotide level, eliminating the need for radioisotope as well as allele specific oligonucleotide probes and can be extended and applied to HLA-DR, -Dw DP typing. PMID:2576477

  1. A Cladistic Analysis of Phenotypic Associations with Haplotypes Inferred from Restriction Endonuclease Mapping. IV. Nested Analyses with Cladogram Uncertainty and Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Templeton, A. R.; Sing, C. F.

    1993-01-01

    We previously developed an analytical strategy based on cladistic theory to identify subsets of haplotypes that are associated with significant phenotypic deviations. Our initial approach was limited to segments of DNA in which little recombination occurs. In such cases, a cladogram can be constructed from the restriction site data to estimate the evolutionary steps that interrelate the observed haplotypes to one another. The cladogram is then used to define a nested statistical design for identifying mutational steps associated with significant phenotypic deviations. The central assumption behind this strategy is that a mutation responsible for a particular phenotypic effect is embedded within the evolutionary history that is represented by the cladogram. The power of this approach depends on the accuracy of the cladogram in portraying the evolutionary history of the DNA region. This accuracy can be diminished both by recombination and by uncertainty in the estimated cladogram topology. In a previous paper, we presented an algorithm for estimating the set of likely cladograms and recombination events. In this paper we present an algorithm for defining a nested statistical design under cladogram uncertainty and recombination. Given the nested design, phenotypic associations can be examined using either a nested analysis of variance (for haploids or homozygous strains) or permutation testing (for outcrossed, diploid gene regions). In this paper we also extend this analytical strategy to include categorical phenotypes in addition to quantitative phenotypes. Some worked examples are presented using Drosophila data sets. These examples illustrate that having some recombination may actually enhance the biological inferences that may derived from a cladistic analysis. In particular, recombination can be used to assign a physical localization to a given subregion for mutations responsible for significant phenotypic effects. PMID:8100789

  2. A cladistic analysis of phenotypic associations with haplotypes inferred from restriction endonuclease mapping. IV. Nested analyses with cladogram uncertainty and recombination.

    PubMed

    Templeton, A R; Sing, C F

    1993-06-01

    We previously developed an analytical strategy based on cladistic theory to identify subsets of haplotypes that are associated with significant phenotypic deviations. Our initial approach was limited to segments of DNA in which little recombination occurs. In such cases, a cladogram can be constructed from the restriction site data to estimate the evolutionary steps that interrelate the observed haplotypes to one another. The cladogram is then used to define a nested statistical design for identifying mutational steps associated with significant phenotypic deviations. The central assumption behind this strategy is that a mutation responsible for a particular phenotypic effect is embedded within the evolutionary history that is represented by the cladogram. The power of this approach depends on the accuracy of the cladogram in portraying the evolutionary history of the DNA region. This accuracy can be diminished both by recombination and by uncertainty in the estimated cladogram topology. In a previous paper, we presented an algorithm for estimating the set of likely claodgrams and recombination events. In this paper we present an algorithm for defining a nested statistical design under cladogram uncertainty and recombination. Given the nested design, phenotypic associations can be examined using either a nested analysis of variance (for haploids or homozygous strains) or permutation testing (for outcrossed, diploid gene regions). In this paper we also extend this analytical strategy to include categorical phenotypes in addition to quantitative phenotypes. Some worked examples are presented using Drosophila data sets. These examples illustrate that having some recombination may actually enhance the biological inferences that may derived from a cladistic analysis. In particular, recombination can be used to assign a physical localization to a given subregion for mutations responsible for significant phenotypic effects.

  3. Identification of restriction endonuclease with potential ability to cleave the HSV-2 genome: Inherent potential for biosynthetic versus live recombinant microbicides

    PubMed Central

    Wayengera, Misaki; Kajumbula, Henry; Byarugaba, Wilson

    2008-01-01

    Background Herpes Simplex virus types 1 and 2 are enveloped viruses with a linear dsDNA genome of ~120–200 kb. Genital infection with HSV-2 has been denoted as a major risk factor for acquisition and transmission of HIV-1. Developing biomedical strategies for HSV-2 prevention is thus a central strategy in reducing global HIV-1 prevalence. This paper details the protocol for the isolation of restriction endunucleases (REases) with potent activity against the HSV-2 genome and models two biomedical interventions for preventing HSV-2. Methods and Results Using the whole genome of HSV-2, 289 REases and the bioinformatics software Webcutter2; we searched for potential recognition sites by way of genome wide palindromics. REase application in HSV-2 biomedical therapy was modeled concomitantly. Of the 289 enzymes analyzed; 77(26.6%) had potential to cleave the HSV-2 genome in > 100 but < 400 sites; 69(23.9%) in > 400 but < 700 sites; and the 9(3.1%) enzymes: BmyI, Bsp1286I, Bst2UI, BstNI, BstOI, EcoRII, HgaI, MvaI, and SduI cleaved in more than 700 sites. But for the 4: PacI, PmeI, SmiI, SwaI that had no sign of activity on HSV-2 genomic DNA, all 130(45%) other enzymes cleaved < 100 times. In silico palindromics has a PPV of 99.5% for in situ REase activity (2) Two models detailing how the REase EcoRII may be applied in developing interventions against HSV-2 are presented: a nanoparticle for microbicide development and a "recombinant lactobacillus" expressing cell wall anchored receptor (truncated nectin-1) for HSV-2 plus EcoRII. Conclusion Viral genome slicing by way of these bacterially- derived R-M enzymatic peptides may have therapeutic potential in HSV-2 infection; a cofactor for HIV-1 acquisition and transmission. PMID:18687114

  4. Modified 16S-23S rRNA intergenic region restriction endonuclease analysis for species identification of Enterococcus strains isolated from pigs, compared with identification using classical methods and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nowakiewicz, Aneta; Ziółkowska, Grażyna; Zięba, Przemysław; Trościańczyk, Aleksandra; Banach, Tomasz; Kowalski, Cezary

    2015-03-01

    Fast and reliable identification of bacteria to at least the species level is currently the basis for correct diagnosis and appropriate treatment of infections. This is particularly important in the case of bacteria of the genus Enterococcus, whose resistance profile is often correlated with their species (e.g. resistance to vancomycin). In this study, we evaluated restriction endonuclease analysis of the 16S-23S rRNA gene intergenic transcribed spacer (ITS) region for species identification of Enterococcus. The utility of the method was compared with that of phenotypic methods [biochemical profile evaluation and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS)]. Identification was based on 21 Enterococcus reference strains, of the species E. faecalis, E. faecium, E. hirae, E. durans, E. casseliflavus, E. gallinarum, E. avium, E. cecorum and E. columbae, and 47 Enterococcus field strains isolated from pigs. Restriction endonuclease analysis of the ITS-PCR product using HinfI, RsaI and MboI, in the order specified, enabled species differentiation of the Enterococcus reference and field strains, and in the case of the latter, the results of species identification were identical (47/47) to those obtained by MALDI-TOF MS. Moreover, as a result of digestion with MboI, a unique restriction profile was also obtained for the strains (3/3) identified by MALDI-TOF MS as E. thailandicus. In our opinion, restriction endonuclease analysis of the 16S-23S rRNA gene ITS region of Enterococcus may be a simple and relatively fast (less than 4 h) alternative method for identifying the species occurring most frequently in humans and animals.

  5. Flap Endonuclease 1

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishnan, Lata; Bambara, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    First discovered as a structure-specific endonuclease that evolved to cut at the base of single-stranded flaps, flap endonuclease (FEN1) is now recognized as a central component of cellular DNA metabolism. Substrate specificity allows FEN1 to process intermediates of Okazaki fragment maturation, long-patch base excision repair, telomere maintenance, and stalled replication fork rescue. For Okazaki fragments, the RNA primer is displaced into a 5′ flap and then cleaved off. FEN1 binds to the flap base and then threads the 5′ end of the flap through its helical arch and active site to create a configuration for cleavage. The threading requirement prevents this active nuclease from cutting the single-stranded template between Okazaki fragments. FEN1 efficiency and specificity are critical to the maintenance of genome fidelity. Overall, recent advances in our knowledge of FEN1 suggest that it was an ancient protein that has been fine-tuned over eons to coordinate many essential DNA transactions. PMID:23451868

  6. Two different isoschizomers of the type-II restriction endonuclease Taq I (T/CGA) within the same Thermus isolate: Tsp32 I, an enzyme with similar heat stability properties to the prototype enzyme Taq I, and Tsp32 II, a hyperthermostable isoschizomer of Taq I.

    PubMed Central

    Welch, S G; Williams, R A

    1995-01-01

    We have recently screened 112 separate isolates of the genus Thermus, collected from neutral and alkaline hot water springs on four continents, for the presence of the Type-II restriction endonuclease Taq I (T/CGA). One particular isolate from the Azores (strain 32) was found to contain high levels of a restriction endonuclease with the same recognition and cleavage site as Taq I. Initial studies revealed that the partially purified enzyme from strain 32 was considerably more resistant to heat inactivation than the prototype enzyme Taq I, being able to withstand temperatures at least 10 degrees C higher than Taq I, before showing evidence of heat inactivation. Subsequently it became clear that the partially purified extract from strain 32 contains two separate enzymes, both of which are isoschizomers of Taq I. One of the enzymes, Tsp32 I, has similar thermal stability characteristics to Taq I, whereas the second Taq I isoschizomer, Tsp32 II, found in the same Thermus isolate as Tsp32 I, is considerably more thermostable than Taq I, retaining full enzyme activity up to a temperature of 85 degrees C. Tsp32 I and Tsp32 II were further distinguished by virtue of their different requirements for magnesium ions. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8526863

  7. Schizosaccharomyces pombe encodes a mutated AP endonuclease 1.

    PubMed

    Laerdahl, Jon K; Korvald, Hanne; Nilsen, Line; Dahl-Michelsen, Kristin; Rognes, Torbjørn; Bjørås, Magnar; Alseth, Ingrun

    2011-03-01

    Mutagenic and cytotoxic apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites are among the most frequent lesions in DNA. Repair of AP sites is initiated by AP endonucleases and most organisms possess two or more of these enzymes. Saccharomyces cerevisiae has AP endonuclease 1 (Apn1) as the major enzymatic activity with AP endonuclease 2 (Apn2) being an important backup. Schizosaccharomyces pombe also encodes two potential AP endonucleases, and Apn2 has been found to be the main repair activity, while Apn1 has no, or only a limited role in AP site repair. Here we have identified a new 5' exon (exon 1) in the apn1 gene and show that the inactivity of S. pombe Apn1 is due to a nonsense mutation in the fifth codon of this new exon. Reversion of this mutation restored the AP endonuclease activity of S. pombe Apn1. Interestingly, the apn1 nonsense mutation was only found in laboratory strains derived from L972 h(-) and not in unrelated isolates of S. pombe. Since all S. pombe laboratory strains originate from L972 h(-), it appears that all experiments involving S. pombe have been conducted in an apn1(-) mutant strain with a corresponding DNA repair deficiency. These observations have implications both for future research in S. pombe and for the interpretation of previously conducted epistatis analysis.

  8. Endonucleases induced TRAIL-insensitive apoptosis in ovarian carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Geel, Tessa M.; Meiss, Gregor; Gun, Bernardina T. van der; Kroesen, Bart Jan; Leij, Lou F. de; Zaremba, Mindaugas; Silanskas, Arunas; Kokkinidis, Michael; Ruiters, Marcel H.; McLaughlin, Pamela M.; Rots, Marianne G.

    2009-09-10

    TRAIL induced apoptosis of tumor cells is currently entering phase II clinical settings, despite the fact that not all tumor types are sensitive to TRAIL. TRAIL resistance in ovarian carcinomas can be caused by a blockade upstream of the caspase 3 signaling cascade. We explored the ability of restriction endonucleases to directly digest DNA in vivo, thereby circumventing the caspase cascade. For this purpose, we delivered enzymatically active endonucleases via the cationic amphiphilic lipid SAINT-18{sup Registered-Sign }:DOPE to both TRAIL-sensitive and insensitive ovarian carcinoma cells (OVCAR and SKOV-3, respectively). Functional nuclear localization after delivery of various endonucleases (BfiI, PvuII and NucA) was indicated by confocal microscopy and genomic cleavage analysis. For PvuII, analysis of mitochondrial damage demonstrated extensive apoptosis both in SKOV-3 and OVCAR. This study clearly demonstrates that cellular delivery of restriction endonucleases holds promise to serve as a novel therapeutic tool for the treatment of resistant ovarian carcinomas.

  9. Crystal structure of an avian influenza polymerase PA[subscript N] reveals an endonuclease active site

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Puwei; Bartlam, Mark; Lou, Zhiyong; Chen, Shoudeng; Zhou, Jie; He, Xiaojing; Lv, Zongyang; Ge, Ruowen; Li, Xuemei; Deng, Tao; Fodor, Ervin; Rao, Zihe; Liu, Yingfang

    2009-11-10

    The heterotrimeric influenza virus polymerase, containing the PA, PB1 and PB2 proteins, catalyses viral RNA replication and transcription in the nucleus of infected cells. PB1 holds the polymerase active site and reportedly harbours endonuclease activity, whereas PB2 is responsible for cap binding. The PA amino terminus is understood to be the major functional part of the PA protein and has been implicated in several roles, including endonuclease and protease activities as well as viral RNA/complementary RNA promoter binding. Here we report the 2.2 angstrom (A) crystal structure of the N-terminal 197 residues of PA, termed PA(N), from an avian influenza H5N1 virus. The PA(N) structure has an alpha/beta architecture and reveals a bound magnesium ion coordinated by a motif similar to the (P)DX(N)(D/E)XK motif characteristic of many endonucleases. Structural comparisons and mutagenesis analysis of the motif identified in PA(N) provide further evidence that PA(N) holds an endonuclease active site. Furthermore, functional analysis with in vivo ribonucleoprotein reconstitution and direct in vitro endonuclease assays strongly suggest that PA(N) holds the endonuclease active site and has critical roles in endonuclease activity of the influenza virus polymerase, rather than PB1. The high conservation of this endonuclease active site among influenza strains indicates that PA(N) is an important target for the design of new anti-influenza therapeutics.

  10. Probe design rules and effective enzymes for endonuclease-based detection of nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Yan, Lei; Nakayama, Shizuka; Sintim, Herman O

    2013-10-15

    Junction probe (JP) platform is an isothermal endonuclease-based detection assay for both RNA and DNA. Herein, we screen 31 REAse and identify effective restriction endonucleases that can be used for JP detection. Secondly, we investigate how different probe architectures affect JP cleavage rates and conclude that although molecular beacon (MB) JP probes give less background noise than linear JP probes, the cleavage of MB JP probes are slower than linear JP probes.

  11. Improved Genotyping Vaccine and Wild-Type Poliovirus Strains by Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism Analysis: Clinical Diagnostic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Georgopoulou, Amalia; Markoulatos, Panayotis; Spyrou, Niki; Vamvakopoulos, Nicholas C.

    2000-01-01

    The combination of preventive vaccination and diagnostic typing of viral isolates from patients with clinical poliomyelitis constitutes our main protective shield against polioviruses. The restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) adaptation of the reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR methodology has advanced diagnostic genotyping of polioviruses, although further improvements are definitely needed. We report here on an improved RFLP procedure for the genotyping of polioviruses. A highly conserved segment within the 5′ noncoding region of polioviruses was selected for RT-PCR amplification by the UC53-UG52 primer pair with the hope that it would be most resistant to the inescapable genetic alteration-drift experienced by the other segments of the viral genome. Complete inter- and intratypic genotyping of polioviruses by the present RFLP method was accomplished with a minimum set of four restriction endonucleases (HaeIII, DdeI, NcoI, and AvaI). To compensate for potential genetic drift within the recognition sites of HaeIII, DdeI, or NcoI in atypical clinical samples, the RFLP patterns generated with HpaII and StyI as replacements were analyzed. The specificity of the method was also successfully assessed by RFLP analysis of 55 reference nonpoliovirus enterovirus controls. The concerted implementation of these conditional protocols for diagnostic inter- and intratypic genotyping of polioviruses was evaluated with 21 clinical samples with absolute success. PMID:11101561

  12. Capsid-binding retrovirus restriction factors: discovery, restriction specificity and implications for the development of novel therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Sanz-Ramos, Marta; Stoye, Jonathan P

    2013-12-01

    The development of drugs against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection has been highly successful, and numerous combinational treatments are currently available. However, the risk of the emergence of resistance and the toxic effects associated with prolonged use of antiretroviral therapies have emphasized the need to consider alternative approaches. One possible area of investigation is provided by the properties of restriction factors, cellular proteins that protect organisms against retroviral infection. Many show potent viral inhibition. Here, we describe the discovery, properties and possible therapeutic uses of the group of restriction factors known to interact with the capsid core of incoming retroviruses. This group comprises Fv1, TRIM5α and TRIMCypA: proteins that all act shortly after virus entry into the target cell and block virus replication at different stages prior to integration of viral DNA into the host chromosome. They have different origins and specificities, but share general structural features required for restriction, with an N-terminal multimerization domain and a C-terminal capsid-binding domain. Their overall efficacy makes it reasonable to ask whether they might provide a framework for developing novel antiretroviral strategies.

  13. Highly restricted deletion of the SNORD116 region is implicated in Prader-Willi Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bieth, Eric; Eddiry, Sanaa; Gaston, Véronique; Lorenzini, Françoise; Buffet, Alexandre; Conte Auriol, Françoise; Molinas, Catherine; Cailley, Dorothée; Rooryck, Caroline; Arveiler, Benoit; Cavaillé, Jérome; Salles, Jean Pierre; Tauber, Maïthé

    2015-02-01

    The SNORD116 locus lies in the 15q11-13 region of paternally expressed genes implicated in Prader-Willi Syndrome (PWS), a complex disease accompanied by obesity and severe neurobehavioural disturbances. Cases of PWS patients with a deletion encompassing the SNORD116 gene cluster, but preserving the expression of flanking genes, have been described. We report a 23-year-old woman who presented clinical criteria of PWS, including the behavioural and nutritional features, obesity, developmental delay and endocrine dysfunctions with hyperghrelinemia. We found a paternally transmitted highly restricted deletion of the SNORD116 gene cluster, the shortest described to date (118 kb). This deletion was also present in the father. This finding in a human case strongly supports the current hypothesis that lack of the paternal SNORD116 gene cluster has a determinant role in the pathogenesis of PWS. Moreover, targeted analysis of the SNORD116 gene cluster, complementary to SNRPN methylation analysis, should be carried out in subjects with a phenotype suggestive of PWS.

  14. GATC-specific restriction--modification systems in ruminal bacteria.

    PubMed

    Piknová, M; Pristas, P; Javorský, P

    2004-01-01

    The GATC-specific restriction and modification activities were analyzed in 11 major bacterial representatives of ruminal microflora. Modification phenotype was observed in 13 out of 40 ruminal strains. MboI isoschizomeric restriction endonucleases were detected in 10 bacterial strains tested; three strains lacked any detectable corresponding endonuclease activity. The only examined strain of Mitsuokella multi-acida was found to possess a different type of endonuclease activity. This is the first report on restriction activity in ruminal treponemes M. multiacida and Megasphaera elsdenii.

  15. A label-free, G-quadruplex DNAzyme-based fluorescent probe for signal-amplified DNA detection and turn-on assay of endonuclease.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhixue; Du, Yan; Zhang, Libing; Dong, Shaojun

    2012-04-15

    A novel G-quadruplex DNAzyme molecular beacon (G-DNAzymeMB) strategy is developed for assays of target DNA and restriction endonuclease. The detection system consists of G-DNAzymeMB strand and a blocker DNA by using the fluorescence of 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (H(2)DCFDA) catalyzed by G-DNAzymeMB as a signal reporter. G-DNAzymeMB exhibits peroxidase activity in its free hairpin structure, and forms a catalytically inactive hybrid when hybridized with blocker DNA. Upon displacement of blocker DNA by target DNA or cleavage by restriction endonuclease, G-DNAzymeMB is released and two lateral portions of G-DNAzymeMB form a G-quadruplex structure, resulting in the recovery of catalytic activity which acts as a cofactor to catalyze H(2)O(2)-mediated oxidation of H(2)DCFDA. For DNA detection system, exonuclease III (Exo III)-catalyzed amplification strategy is introduced to improve the sensitivity and target DNA could be detected as low as 0.1 pM. With respect to restriction endonuclease detection system, 0.1 U/mL EcoRI endonuclease could be detected and this method could be easily transported to other restriction endonuclease analysis by simply changing the recognition sequence. These results demonstrate that the proposed G-DNAzymeMB strategy could be used as a label-free, simple, sensitive and cost-effective approach in analysis of target DNA and restriction endonuclease.

  16. Polymorphism of the Flap Endonuclease 1 Gene in Keratoconus and Fuchs Endothelial Corneal Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Wojcik, Katarzyna A.; Synowiec, Ewelina; Polakowski, Piotr; Głowacki, Sylwester; Izdebska, Justyna; Lloyd, Sophie; Galea, Dieter; Blasiak, Janusz; Szaflik, Jerzy; Szaflik, Jacek P.

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress is implicated in the pathogenesis of many diseases, including serious ocular diseases, keratoconus (KC) and Fuchs endothelial corneal dystrophy (FECD). Flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1) plays an important role in the repair of oxidative DNA damage in the base excision repair pathway. We determined the association between two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), c.–441G>A (rs174538) and g.61564299G>T (rs4246215), in the FEN1 gene and the occurrence of KC and FECD. This study involved 279 patients with KC, 225 patients with FECD and 322 control individuals. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and length polymorphism restriction fragment analysis (RFLP) were applied. The T/T genotype of the g.61564299G>T polymorphism was associated with an increased occurrence of KC and FECD. There was no association between the c.–441G>A polymorphism and either disease. However, the GG haplotype of both polymorphisms was observed more frequently and the GT haplotype less frequently in the KC group than the control. The AG haplotype was associated with increased FECD occurrence. Our findings suggest that the g.61564299G>T and c.–441G>A polymorphisms in the FEN1 gene may modulate the risk of keratoconus and Fuchs endothelial corneal dystrophy. PMID:25153632

  17. Factor Structure of the Restricted Academic Situation Scale: Implications for ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karama, Sherif; Amor, Leila Ben; Grizenko, Natalie; Ciampi, Antonio; Mbekou, Valentin; Ter-Stepanian, Marina; Lageix, Philippe; Baron, Chantal; Schwartz, George; Joober, Ridha

    2009-01-01

    Background: To study the factor structure of the Restricted Academic Situation Scale (RASS), a psychometric tool used to assess behavior in children with ADHD, 117 boys and 21 girls meeting "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (4th ed.; "DSM-IV") criteria for ADHD and aged between 6 and 12 years were recruited. Assessments were…

  18. Endonuclease recognition sites mapped on Zea mays chloroplast DNA

    PubMed Central

    Bedbrook, John R.; Bogorad, Lawrence

    1976-01-01

    The closed-circular DNA molecules of 85 × 106 daltons from Zea mays chloroplasts were isolated, digested with the restriction endonucleases Sal I, Bam I, and EcoRI, and the resulting fragments sized by agarose gel electrophoresis. A map of maize chloroplast DNA showing the relative location of all the Sal I recognition sequences and many of the Bam I and EcoRI recognition sites was determined. A DNA sequence representing approximately 15% of the Zea mays chloroplast genome is repeated. The two copies of this sequence are in an inverted orientation with respect to one another and are separated by a nonhomologous sequence representing approximately 10% of the genome length. The inverted repeats contain the genes for chloroplast ribosomal RNAs. Images PMID:16592373

  19. Regulation of Apoptotic Endonucleases by EndoG

    PubMed Central

    Zhdanov, Dmitry D.; Fahmi, Tariq; Wang, Xiaoying; Apostolov, Eugene O.; Sokolov, Nikolai N.; Javadov, Sabzali

    2015-01-01

    Cells contain several apoptotic endonucleases, which appear to act simultaneously before and after cell death by destroying the host cell DNA. It is largely unknown how the endonucleases are being induced and whether they can regulate each other. This study was performed to determine whether apoptotic mitochondrial endonuclease G (EndoG) can regulate expression of other apoptotic endonucleases. The study showed that overexpression of mature EndoG in kidney tubular epithelial NRK-52E cells can increase expression of caspase-activated DNase (CAD) and four endonucleases that belong to DNase I group including DNase I, DNase X, DNase IL2, and DNase γ, but not endonucleases of the DNase 2 group. The induction of DNase I-type endonucleases was associated with DNA degradation in promoter/exon 1 regions of the endonuclease genes. These results together with findings on colocalization of immunostained endonucleases and TUNEL suggest that DNA fragmentation after EndoG overexpression was caused by DNase I endonucleases and CAD in addition to EndoG itself. Overall, these data provide first evidence for the existence of the integral network of apoptotic endonucleases regulated by EndoG. PMID:25849439

  20. Food cravings discriminate between anorexia and bulimia nervosa. Implications for "success" versus "failure" in dietary restriction.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Silvia; Warren, Cortney S; Rodríguez, Sonia; Fernández, M Carmen; Cepeda-Benito, Antonio

    2009-06-01

    Food cravings are subjective, motivational states thought to induce binge eating among eating disorder patients. This study compared food cravings across eating disorders. Women (N=135) diagnosed with anorexia nervosa, restrictive (ANR) or binge-purging (ANBP) types, or bulimia nervosa, non-purging (BNNP) or purging (BNP) types completed measures of food cravings. Discriminant analysis yielded two statistically significant functions. The first function differentiated between all the four group pairs except ANBP and BNNP, with levels of various food-craving dimensions successively increasing for ANR, ANBP, BNNP, and BNP participants. The second function differentiated between ANBP and BNNP participants. Overall, the functions improved classification accuracy above chance level (44% fewer errors). The findings suggest that cravings are more strongly associated with loss of control over eating than with dietary restraint tendencies.

  1. Syncytiotrophoblast Functions and Fetal Growth Restriction during Placental Malaria: Updates and Implication for Future Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Kidima, Winifrida B.

    2015-01-01

    Syncytiotrophoblast lines the intervillous space of the placenta and plays important roles in fetus growth throughout gestation. However, perturbations at the maternal-fetal interface during placental malaria may possibly alter the physiological functions of syncytiotrophoblast and therefore growth and development of the embryo in utero. An understanding of the influence of placental malaria on syncytiotrophoblast function is paramount in developing novel interventions for the control of placental pathology associated with placental malaria. In this review, we discuss how malaria changes syncytiotrophoblast function as evidenced from human, animal, and in vitro studies and, further, how dysregulation of syncytiotrophoblast function may impact fetal growth in utero. We also formulate a hypothesis, stemming from epidemiological observations, that nutrition may override pathogenesis of placental malaria-associated-fetal growth restriction. We therefore recommend studies on nutrition-based-interventional approaches for high placental malaria-risk women in endemic areas. More investigations on the role of nutrition on placental malaria pathogenesis are needed. PMID:26587536

  2. Virus-coded DNA endonuclease from avian retrovirus.

    PubMed Central

    Golomb, M; Grandgenett, D P; Mason, W

    1981-01-01

    Reverse transcriptase from avian retrovirus has a physically associated DNA endonuclease with novel substrate and cofactor requirements. A similar endonuclease activity copurifies with pp32, a protein from viral cores that has been identified with the non-alpha region of the beta subunit of reverse transcriptase. Several temperature-sensitive mutants of avian retrovirus with thermolabile DNA polymerase were tested for thermal sensitivity of their DNA endonuclease activity. Two pol mutants of Rous sarcoma virus, ts335 and ts337, had thermolabile DNA endonuclease; a temperature-resistant revertant of ts335 had a heat-stable DNA endonuclease. DNA endonuclease is therefore a product of the pol gene and an integral part of the reverse transcriptase. A second class of pol mutants, typified by ts568 and ts553, had thermolabile DNA polymerase, but heat-stable DNA endonuclease. PMID:6165835

  3. Serum leptin and insulin levels in lactating protein-restricted rats: implications for energy balance.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, C L P; Macêdo, G M; Latorraca, M Q; Arantes, V C; Veloso, R V; Carneiro, E M; Boschero, A C; Nascimento, C M O; Gaíva, M H

    2007-01-01

    The present study analysed the effect of protein restriction on serum insulin and leptin levels and their relationship with energy balance during lactation. Four groups of rats received isocaloric diets containing 170 g protein/kg or 60 g protein/kg from pregnancy until the 14th day of lactation: control non-lactating, control lactating (both fed a control diet), low-protein non-lactating and low-protein lactating. Energy intake, body composition, energy balance, serum insulin and leptin concentrations and the relationship between these hormones and several factors related to obesity were analysed. Low-protein-intake lactating rats exhibited hypoinsulinaemia, hyperleptinaemia, hypophagia and decreased energy expenditure compared with control lactating rats. The protein level in the carcasses was lower in the low-protein lactating group than in the control lactating group, resulting in a higher fat content in the first group compared with the latter. Body fat correlated inversely with serum insulin and positively with serum leptin level. There was a significant negative correlation between serum leptin and energy intake, and a positive relationship between energy intake and serum insulin level in lactating rats and in the combined data from both groups. Energy expenditure was correlated positively with serum insulin and negatively with serum leptin in lactating rats and when data from control non-lactating and lactating rats were pooled. Lactating rats submitted to protein restriction, compared with lactating control rats, showed that maternal reserves were preserved owing to less severe negative energy balance. This metabolic adaptation was obtained, at least in part, by hypoinsulinaemia that resulted in increased insulin sensitivity favouring enhanced fat deposition, hyperleptinaemia and hypophagia. PMID:17217557

  4. Democracies restricting democratic rights: some classical sources and implications for ethics of biometrics.

    PubMed

    Leavitt, Frank J

    2011-01-01

    Ancient Greek and 17th century English philosophy are not usually discussed along with the ethics of biometrics and data sharing. Academic ethics today, however, suffers from a lack of background in classical texts. We may discuss whether biometrics and data sharing are consistent with democracy, but if we do not know what democracy is, then we cannot know what actions are consistent with it. I shall discuss how and why democracies have restricted the rights of their citizens. I will give the most attention to two paradigms that have most influenced modern democratic thinking: 17th century English democracy and ancient Athens. I do not accept the dogma that the Athenians were obviously wrong to try and then to condemn Socrates. His death-loving doctrine could not but have weakened the will of the youth to work and fight for the good of Athens. I will try to understand the Athenians' point of view and their need to defend their security. At the end, I will apply these lessons to biometrics and data sharing for security reasons. PMID:21380481

  5. Democracies restricting democratic rights: some classical sources and implications for ethics of biometrics.

    PubMed

    Leavitt, Frank J

    2011-03-01

    Ancient Greek and 17th century English philosophy are not usually discussed along with the ethics of biometrics and data sharing. Academic ethics today, however, suffers from a lack of background in classical texts. We may discuss whether biometrics and data sharing are consistent with democracy, but if we do not know what democracy is, then we cannot know what actions are consistent with it. I shall discuss how and why democracies have restricted the rights of their citizens. I will give the most attention to two paradigms that have most influenced modern democratic thinking: 17th century English democracy and ancient Athens. I do not accept the dogma that the Athenians were obviously wrong to try and then to condemn Socrates. His death-loving doctrine could not but have weakened the will of the youth to work and fight for the good of Athens. I will try to understand the Athenians' point of view and their need to defend their security. At the end, I will apply these lessons to biometrics and data sharing for security reasons.

  6. Effects of laryngeal restriction on pharyngeal peristalsis and biomechanics: Clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Shaker, Reza; Sanvanson, Patrick; Balasubramanian, Gokulakrishnan; Kern, Mark; Wuerl, Ashley; Hyngstrom, Allison

    2016-06-01

    To date, rehabilitative exercises aimed at strengthening the pharyngeal muscles have not been developed due to the inability to successfully overload and fatigue these muscles during their contraction, a necessary requirement for strength training. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that applying resistance against anterosuperior movement of the hyolaryngeal complex will overload the pharyngeal muscles and by repetitive swallowing will result in their fatigue manifested by a reduction in pharyngeal peristaltic amplitude. Studies were done in two groups. In group 1 studies 15 healthy subjects (age: 42 ± 14 yr, 11 females) were studied to determine whether imposing resistance to swallowing using a handmade device can affect the swallow-induced hyolaryngeal excursion and related upper esophageal sphincter (UES) opening. In group 2, an additional 15 healthy subjects (age 56 ± 25 yr, 7 females) were studied to determine whether imposing resistance to the anterosuperior excursion of the hyolaryngeal complex induces fatigue manifested as reduction in pharyngeal contractile pressure during repeated swallowing. Analysis of the video recordings showed significant decrease in maximum deglutitive superior laryngeal excursion and UES opening diameter (P < 0.01) due to resistive load. Consecutive swallows against the resistive load showed significant decrease in pharyngeal contractile integral (PhCI) values (P < 0.01). Correlation analysis showed a significant negative correlation between PhCI and successive swallows, suggesting "fatigue" (P < 0.001). In conclusion, repeated swallows against a resistive load induced by restricting the anterosuperior excursion of the larynx safely induces fatigue in pharyngeal peristalsis and thus has the potential to strengthen the pharyngeal contractile function. PMID:27079611

  7. [Comparative characteristics of chromatin endonuclease fragments].

    PubMed

    Miul'berg, A A; Tishchenko, L I; Domkina, L K

    1977-05-01

    Soluble fragments of chromatin obtained by Ca, Mg-dependent endonuclease digest of rat liver nuclei, have been separated by gel chromatography on Sepharose 4B into three zones, containing oligomers, tetramers--dimers and monomers, respectively. The content of nonhistone proteins and particularly lysine-rich histones is decreased with a transition from theoligomers to monomers. The average protein/DNA ratio of the monomers is equal to 1.36 and that of histone/DNA ratio--to 0.82. The dependence of the degree of chromatin digest by endonuclease on its protein content and conditions of isolation and incubation of nuclei is discussed. The chromatin monomer formed appears to be made up of a nucleosome and short portions of spacer DNA bound to some part of histone HI and nonhistone proteins. PMID:889964

  8. NFAT5 Is Up-Regulated by Hypoxia: Possible Implications in Preeclampsia and Intrauterine Growth Restriction.

    PubMed

    Dobierzewska, Aneta; Palominos, Macarena; Irarrazabal, Carlos E; Sanchez, Marianela; Lozano, Mauricio; Perez-Sepulveda, Alejandra; Monteiro, Lara J; Burmeister, Yara; Figueroa-Diesel, Horacio; Rice, Gregory E; Illanes, Sebastian E

    2015-07-01

    During gestation, low oxygen environment is a major determinant of early placentation process, while persistent placental hypoxia leads to pregnancy-related complications such as preeclampsia (PE) and intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR). PE affects 5%-8% of all pregnancies worldwide and is a cause of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. During placental development, persistent hypoxia due to poor trophoblast invasion and reduced uteroplacental perfusion leads to maternal endothelial dysfunction and clinical manifestation of PE. Here we hypothesized that nuclear factor of activated T cells-5 (NFAT5), a well-known osmosensitive renal factor and recently characterized hypoxia-inducible protein, is also activated in vivo in placentas of PE and IUGR complications as well as in the in vitro model of trophoblast hypoxia. In JAR cells, low oxygen tension (1% O2) induced NFAT5 mRNA and increased its nuclear abundance, peaking at 16 h. This increase did not occur in parallel with the earlier HIF1A induction. Real-time PCR and Western blot analysis confirmed up-regulation of NFAT5 mRNA and NFAT5 nuclear content in human preeclamptic placentas and in rabbit placentas of an experimentally induced IUGR model, as compared with the control groups. In vitro lambda protein phosphatase (lambda PPase) treatment revealed that increased abundance of NFAT5 protein in nuclei of either JAR cells (16 h of hypoxia) or PE and IUGR placentas is at least partially due to NFAT5 phosphorylation. NFAT5 downstream targets aldose reductase (AR) and sodium-myo-inositol cotransporter (SMIT; official symbol SLC5A3) were not significantly up-regulated either in JAR cells exposed to hypoxia or in placentas of PE- and IUGR-complicated pregnancies, suggesting that hypoxia-dependent activation of NFAT5 serves as a separate function to its tonicity-dependent stimulation. In conclusion, we propose that NFAT5 may serve as a novel marker of placental hypoxia and ischemia independently of HIF1A. PMID

  9. Structural, functional and evolutionary relationships between homing endonucleases and proteins from their host organisms

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Gregory K.; Stoddard, Barry L.

    2012-01-01

    Homing endonucleases (HEs) are highly specific DNA-cleaving enzymes that are encoded by invasive DNA elements (usually mobile introns or inteins) within the genomes of phage, bacteria, archea, protista and eukaryotic organelles. Six unique structural HE families, that collectively span four distinct nuclease catalytic motifs, have been characterized to date. Members of each family display structural homology and functional relationships to a wide variety of proteins from various organisms. The biological functions of those proteins are highly disparate and include non-specific DNA-degradation enzymes, restriction endonucleases, DNA-repair enzymes, resolvases, intron splicing factors and transcription factors. These relationships suggest that modern day HEs share common ancestors with proteins involved in genome fidelity, maintenance and gene expression. This review summarizes the results of structural studies of HEs and corresponding proteins from host organisms that have illustrated the manner in which these factors are related. PMID:22406833

  10. Effects of protein restriction during gestation and lactation on cell proliferation in the hippocampus and subventricular zone: functional implications. Protein restriction alters hippocampal/SVZ cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Godoy, Mariana Araya de; Souza, Amanda Santos de; Lobo, Mônica Alves; Sampaio, Omar Vidal Kress; Moraes, Louise; Baldanza, Marcelo Ribeiro; Magri, Tatiana Przybylski Ribeiro; Wernerck de Castro, João Pedro Saar; Tavares do Carmo, Maria das Graças; Soares-Mota, Márcia; Rocha, Monica Santos; Mendez-Otero, Rosalia; Santiago, Marcelo Felippe

    2013-02-16

    There is no consensus about the effects of protein restriction on neurogenesis and behavior. Here, for the first time, we evaluated the effects of protein restriction during gestation and lactation, on the two major neurogenic regions of the adult brain, the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampal dentate gyrus and the subventricular zone (SVZ), simultaneously. We also assessed different types of behavior relevant to each region. After mating, pregnant Wistar rats were divided into a control group (CG) that received a normal diet (20% protein); and a protein-restriction group (PRG) that received a low-protein diet (8% protein). After birth, the same diets were provided to the mother and pups until weaning, when some rats were analyzed and others received a normal-protein diet until adulthood. Different sets of rats were used for cellular and behavioral studies in juvenile or adult age. Brains were processed for immunohistochemistry anti-BrdU, anti-Ki67, or anti-pHisH3. Juvenile and adult rats from distinct litters also underwent several behavioral tests. Our data show that early protein restriction results in a reduction of hippocampal progenitors and deficits in object recognition during adult life. Moreover, longer periods of immobility in the tail suspension and in the forced swimming tests revealed that PRG rats show a depressive behavior at 21 days of age (P21) and in adulthood. Furthermore, we suggest that despite the reduced number/proliferation of neural stem cells (B and/or E cells) in SVZ there is a compensatory mechanism in which the progenitors (types C and A cells) proliferate in a higher rate, without affecting olfactory ability in adulthood.

  11. Phenotypic variation amongst genotypically homogeneous Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 isolates: implications for the investigation of outbreaks of Legionnaires' disease.

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, T. G.; Saunders, N. A.; Haththotuwa, A.; Hallas, G.; Birtles, R. J.; Taylor, A. G.

    1990-01-01

    One hundred and seventy-nine isolates of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1, obtained from a site associated with an outbreak of Legionnaires' disease, were examined by monoclonal antibody subgrouping, restriction fragment length polymorphism typing, restriction endonuclease analysis and plasmid content. Nine distinct phenotypes were detected but at the genotypic level all strains were closely related. The data presented indicate that phenotypic variation of a single parent strain can occur within an environmental site. The implications of these findings are discussed in relation to the investigation of outbreaks of Legionnaires' disease. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:1969803

  12. Monitoring DNA recombination initiated by HO endonuclease.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Neal; Haber, James E

    2012-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) have proven to be very potent initiators of recombination in yeast and other organisms. A single, site-specific DSB initiates homologous DNA repair events such as gene conversion, break-induced replication, and single-strand annealing, as well as nonhomologous end joining, microhomology-mediated end joining, and new telomere addition. When repair is either delayed or prevented, a single DSB can trigger checkpoint-mediated cell cycle arrest. In budding yeast, expressing the HO endonuclease under the control of a galactose-inducible promoter has been instrumental in the study of these processes by providing us a way to synchronously induce a DSB at a unique site in vivo. We describe how the HO endonuclease has been used to study the recombination events in mating-type (MAT) switching. Southern blots provide an overview of the process by allowing one to examine the formation of the DSB, DNA degradation at the break, and formation of the product. Denaturing gels and slot blots as well as PCR have provided important tools to follow the progression of resection in wild-type and mutant cells. PCR has also been important in allowing us to follow the kinetics of certain recombination intermediates such as the initiation of repair DNA synthesis or the removal of nonhomologous Y sequences during MAT switching. Finally chromatin immunoprecipitation has been used to follow the recruitment of key proteins to the DSB and in subsequent steps in DSB repair.

  13. Novel Cytoprotective Inhibitors for Apoptotic Endonuclease G

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Dae Song; Penthala, Narsimha R.; Apostolov, Eugene O.; Wang, Xiaoying; Crooks, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Apoptotic endonuclease G (EndoG) is responsible for DNA fragmentation both during and after cell death. Previous studies demonstrated that genetic inactivation of EndoG is cytoprotective against various pro-apoptotic stimuli; however, specific inhibitors for EndoG are not available. In this study, we have developed a high-throughput screening assay for EndoG and have used it to screen a chemical library. The screening resulted in the identification of two potent EndoG inhibitors, PNR-3-80 and PNR-3-82, which are thiobarbiturate analogs. As determined by their IC50s, the inhibitors are more potent than ZnCl2 or EDTA. They inhibit EndoG at one or two orders of magnitude greater than another apoptotic endonuclease, DNase I, and do not inhibit the other five tested cell death-related enzymes: DNase II, RNase A, proteinase, lactate dehydrogenase, and superoxide dismutase 1. Exposure of natural EndoG-expressing 22Rv1 or EndoG-overexpressing PC3 cells rendered them significantly resistant to Cisplatin and Docetaxel, respectively. These novel EndoG inhibitors have the potential to be utilized for amelioration of cell injuries in which participation of EndoG is essential. PMID:25401220

  14. Site specific endonucleases for human genome mapping. Final report, April 1, 1992--March 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Knoche, K.; Selman, S.; Hung, L.

    1994-06-01

    Current large scale genome mapping methodology suffers from a lack of tools for generating specific DNA fragments in the megabase size range. While technology such as pulsed field gel electrophoresis can resolve DNA fragments greater than 10 megabases in size, current methods for cleaving mammalian DNA using bacterial restriction enzymes are incapable of producing such fragments. Though several multidimensional approaches are underway to overcome this limitation, there currently is no single step procedure to generate specific DNA fragments in the 2-100 megabase size range. In order to overcome these limitations, we proposed to develop a family of site-specific endonucleases capable of generating DNA fragments in the 2-100 megabase size range in a single step. Additionally, we proposed to accomplish this by relaxing the specificity of a very-rare cutting intron-encoded endonucleases, I-Ppo I, and potentially using the process as a model for development of other enzymes. Our research has uncovered a great deal of information about intron-encoded endonucleases. We have found that I-Ppo I has a remarkable ability to tolerate degeneracy within its recognition sequence, and we have shown that the recognition sequence is larger than 15 base pairs. These findings suggest that a detailed study of the mechanism by which intron-encoded endonucleases recognize their target sequences should provide new sights into DNA-protein interactions; this had led to a continuation of the study of I-Ppo I in Dr. Raines` laboratory and we expect a more detailed understanding of the mechanism of I-Ppo I action to result.

  15. Functional Coupling of Duplex Translocation to DNA Cleavage in a Type I Restriction Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Csefalvay, Eva; Lapkouski, Mikalai; Guzanova, Alena; Csefalvay, Ladislav; Baikova, Tatsiana; Bialevich, Vitali; Shamayeva, Katsiaryna; Janscak, Pavel; Kuta Smatanova, Ivana; Panjikar, Santosh; Carey, Jannette; Weiserova, Marie; Ettrich, Rüdiger

    2015-01-01

    Type I restriction-modification enzymes are multifunctional heteromeric complexes with DNA cleavage and ATP-dependent DNA translocation activities located on motor subunit HsdR. Functional coupling of DNA cleavage and translocation is a hallmark of the Type I restriction systems that is consistent with their proposed role in horizontal gene transfer. DNA cleavage occurs at nonspecific sites distant from the cognate recognition sequence, apparently triggered by stalled translocation. The X-ray crystal structure of the complete HsdR subunit from E. coli plasmid R124 suggested that the triggering mechanism involves interdomain contacts mediated by ATP. In the present work, in vivo and in vitro activity assays and crystal structures of three mutants of EcoR124I HsdR designed to probe this mechanism are reported. The results indicate that interdomain engagement via ATP is indeed responsible for signal transmission between the endonuclease and helicase domains of the motor subunit. A previously identified sequence motif that is shared by the RecB nucleases and some Type I endonucleases is implicated in signaling. PMID:26039067

  16. Conservation of the pro-apoptotic nuclease activity of endonuclease G in unicellular trypanosomatid parasites.

    PubMed

    Gannavaram, Sreenivas; Vedvyas, Chetan; Debrabant, Alain

    2008-01-01

    Endonuclease G is a mitochondrial protein implicated in DNA fragmentation during apoptosis in cell types ranging from fungi to mammals. Features of programmed cell death have been reported in a number of single-celled organisms, including the human trypanosomatid parasites Leishmania and Trypanosoma. However, the protozoan cell death pathways and the effector molecules involved in such processes remain to be identified. In this report, we describe the pro-apoptotic function of endonuclease G in trypanosomatid parasites. Similar to metazoans, trypanosome endoG showed intrinsic nuclease activity, is localized in mitochondria and is released from this organelle when cell death is triggered. Overexpression of endoG strongly promoted apoptotic cell death under oxidant or differentiation-related stress in Leishmania and, conversely, loss of endoG expression conferred robust resistance to oxidant-induced cell death in T. brucei. These data demonstrate the conservation of the pro-apoptotic endonuclease activity of endoG in these evolutionarily ancient eukaryotic organisms. Furthermore, nuclear DNA degradation by endoG upon release from mitochondria might represent a caspase-independent cell death mechanism in trypanosomatid parasites as genes encoding caspase-like proteins have not been identified in their genomes.

  17. Mechanisms of endonuclease-mediated mRNA decay.

    PubMed

    Schoenberg, Daniel R

    2011-01-01

    Endonuclease cleavage was one of the first identified mechanisms of mRNA decay but until recently it was thought to play a minor role to the better-known processes of deadenylation, decapping, and exonuclease-catalyzed decay. Most of the early examples of endonuclease decay came from studies of a particular mRNA whose turnover changed in response to hormone, cytokine, developmental, or nutritional stimuli. Only a few of these examples of endonuclease-mediated mRNA decay progressed to the point where the enzyme responsible for the initiating event was identified and studied in detail. The discovery of microRNAs and RISC-catalyzed endonuclease cleavage followed by the identification of PIN (pilT N-terminal) domains that impart endonuclease activity to a number of the proteins involved in mRNA decay has led to a resurgence of interest in endonuclease-mediated mRNA decay. PIN domains show no substrate selectivity and their involvement in a number of decay pathways highlights a recurring theme that the context in which an endonuclease function is a primary factor in determining whether any given mRNA will be targeted for decay by this or the default exonuclease-mediated decay processes.

  18. Mutations altering the cleavage specificity of a homing endonuclease

    PubMed Central

    Seligman, Lenny M.; Chisholm, Karen M.; Chevalier, Brett S.; Chadsey, Meggen S.; Edwards, Samuel T.; Savage, Jeremiah H.; Veillet, Adeline L.

    2002-01-01

    The homing endonuclease I-CreI recognizes and cleaves a particular 22 bp DNA sequence. The crystal structure of I-CreI bound to homing site DNA has previously been determined, leading to a number of predictions about specific protein–DNA contacts. We test these predictions by analyzing a set of endonuclease mutants and a complementary set of homing site mutants. We find evidence that all structurally predicted I-CreI/DNA contacts contribute to DNA recognition and show that these contacts differ greatly in terms of their relative importance. We also describe the isolation of a collection of altered specificity I-CreI derivatives. The in vitro DNA-binding and cleavage properties of two such endonucleases demonstrate that our genetic approach is effective in identifying homing endonucleases that recognize and cleave novel target sequences. PMID:12202772

  19. Mapping Homing Endonuclease Cleavage Sites Using In Vitro Generated Protein

    PubMed Central

    Belfort, Marlene

    2015-01-01

    Mapping the precise position of endonucleolytic cleavage sites is a fundamental experimental technique used to describe the function of a homing endonuclease. However, these proteins are often recalcitrant to cloning and over-expression in biological systems because of toxicity induced by spurious DNA cleavage events. In this chapter we outline the steps to successfully express a homing endonuclease in vitro and use this product in nucleotide-resolution cleavage assays. PMID:24510259

  20. DNA-guided genome editing using structure-guided endonucleases.

    PubMed

    Varshney, Gaurav K; Burgess, Shawn M

    2016-01-01

    The search for novel ways to target and alter the genomes of living organisms accelerated rapidly this decade with the discovery of CRISPR/Cas9. Since the initial discovery, efforts to find alternative methods for altering the genome have expanded. A new study presenting an alternative approach has been demonstrated that utilizes flap endonuclease 1 (FEN-1) fused to the Fok1 endonuclease, which shows potential for DNA-guided genome targeting in vivo. PMID:27640875

  1. Cleavage of mispaired heteroduplex DNA substrates by numerous restriction enzymes.

    PubMed

    Langhans, Mark T; Palladino, Michael J

    2009-01-01

    The utility of restriction endonucleases as a tool in molecular biology is in large part due to the high degree of specificity with which they cleave well-characterized DNA recognition sequences. The specificity of restriction endonucleases is not absolute, yet many commonly used assays of biological phenomena and contemporary molecular biology techniques rely on the premise that restriction enzymes will cleave only perfect cognate recognition sites. In vitro, mispaired heteroduplex DNAs are commonly formed, especially subsequent to polymerase chain reaction amplification. We investigated a panel of restriction endonucleases to determine their ability to cleave mispaired heteroduplex DNA substrates. Two straightforward, non-radioactive assays are used to evaluate mispaired heteroduplex DNA cleavage: a PCR amplification method and an oligonucleotide-based assay. These assays demonstrated that most restriction endonucleases are capable of site-specific double-strand cleavage with heteroduplex mispaired DNA substrates, however, certain mispaired substrates do effectively abrogate cleavage to undetectable levels. These data are consistent with mispaired substrate cleavage previously reported for Eco RI and, importantly, extend our knowledge of mispaired heteroduplex substrate cleavage to 13 additional enzymes.

  2. REBASE - restriction enzymes and methylases.

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, R J; Macelis, D

    1998-01-01

    REBASE is a comprehensive database of information about restriction enzymes and their associated methylases, including their recognition and cleavage sites and their commercial availability. Also included is a listing of homing endonucleases. Information from REBASE is available via monthly electronic mailings as well as via anonymous ftp and through the World Wide Web. The REBASE web site, http://www. neb.com/rebase , is where we maintain a web page for every enzyme, reference and supplier. Additionally, there is a search facility, help and NEWS pages, and a complete description of our various services. Specialized files are available that can be used directly by many software packages. PMID:9399870

  3. A response-restriction analysis of stereotypy in adolescents with mental retardation: implications for applied behavior analysis.

    PubMed Central

    McEntee, J E; Saunders, R R

    1997-01-01

    The behavior of 4 adolescents with severe or profound mental retardation was evaluated in the presence of four sets of materials during periods of unstructured leisure activity. Functional engagement with the materials, stereotypic engagement with the materials, stereotypy without interaction with the materials, and other aberrant behaviors were recorded. Across a series of experimental conditions, the number of sets of materials was reduced from four to one by eliminating the set most frequently manipulated in each preceeding condition. In the final condition, four sets of materials were again made available for manipulation. The procedures replicated Green and Striefel's (1988) response-restriction analysis of the activity preferences and play behaviors of children with autism. In general, the results of the present experiment replicate those of Green and Striefel in that reallocation of responding was idiosyncratic and unpredictable as sets of materials were removed. Nevertheless, the results provided insight into how responding might be reallocated if it were restricted through behavioral interventions rather than by restriction of access. Thus, the results are discussed with respect to how response-restriction analyses may be useful in identifying topographies of behavior that could be included in differential reinforcement contigencies that are designed to affect stereotypic behavior and in the selection and arrangement of environmental stimuli to minimize the presence of evokers of stereotypy. PMID:9316261

  4. Natural zinc ribbon HNH endonucleases and engineered zinc finger nicking endonuclease

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shuang-yong; Gupta, Yogesh K.

    2013-01-01

    Many bacteriophage and prophage genomes encode an HNH endonuclease (HNHE) next to their cohesive end site and terminase genes. The HNH catalytic domain contains the conserved catalytic residues His-Asn-His and a zinc-binding site [CxxC]2. An additional zinc ribbon (ZR) domain with one to two zinc-binding sites ([CxxxxC], [CxxxxH], [CxxxC], [HxxxH], [CxxC] or [CxxH]) is frequently found at the N-terminus or C-terminus of the HNHE or a ZR domain protein (ZRP) located adjacent to the HNHE. We expressed and purified 10 such HNHEs and characterized their cleavage sites. These HNHEs are site-specific and strand-specific nicking endonucleases (NEase or nickase) with 3- to 7-bp specificities. A minimal HNH nicking domain of 76 amino acid residues was identified from Bacillus phage γ HNHE and subsequently fused to a zinc finger protein to generate a chimeric NEase with a new specificity (12–13 bp). The identification of a large pool of previously unknown natural NEases and engineered NEases provides more ‘tools’ for DNA manipulation and molecular diagnostics. The small modular HNH nicking domain can be used to generate rare NEases applicable to targeted genome editing. In addition, the engineered ZF nickase is useful for evaluation of off-target sites in vitro before performing cell-based gene modification. PMID:23125367

  5. Human Apurinic/Apyrimidinic Endonuclease 1

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mengxia

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1, also known as REF-1) was isolated based on its ability to cleave at AP sites in DNA or activate the DNA binding activity of certain transcription factors. We review herein topics related to this multi-functional DNA repair and stress-response protein. Recent Advances: APE1 displays homology to Escherichia coli exonuclease III and is a member of the divalent metal-dependent α/β fold-containing phosphoesterase superfamily of enzymes. APE1 has acquired distinct active site and loop elements that dictate substrate selectivity, and a unique N-terminus which at minimum imparts nuclear targeting and interaction specificity. Additional activities ascribed to APE1 include 3′–5′ exonuclease, 3′-repair diesterase, nucleotide incision repair, damaged or site-specific RNA cleavage, and multiple transcription regulatory roles. Critical Issues: APE1 is essential for mouse embryogenesis and contributes to cell viability in a genetic background-dependent manner. Haploinsufficient APE1+/− mice exhibit reduced survival, increased cancer formation, and cellular/tissue hyper-sensitivity to oxidative stress, supporting the notion that impaired APE1 function associates with disease susceptibility. Although abnormal APE1 expression/localization has been seen in cancer and neuropathologies, and impaired-function variants have been described, a causal link between an APE1 defect and human disease remains elusive. Future Directions: Ongoing efforts aim at delineating the biological role(s) of the different APE1 activities, as well as the regulatory mechanisms for its intra-cellular distribution and participation in diverse molecular pathways. The determination of whether APE1 defects contribute to human disease, particularly pathologies that involve oxidative stress, and whether APE1 small-molecule regulators have clinical utility, is central to future investigations. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 678–707

  6. Identification of an H2-M3-Restricted Listeria Epitope: Implications for Antigen Presentation by M3

    PubMed Central

    Lenz, Laurel L.; Dere, Beverley; Bevan, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Using expression cloning, we have identified an H2-M3-restricted epitope of the intracellular bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. Picomolar concentrations of an amino-terminal N-formylated hexapeptide, fMIGWII, targeted cells for lysis by CD8+ cytotoxic T cells, while the nonformylated peptide was approximately 100-fold less active. The sequence of the 185 aa protein source of this epitope predicts a transmembrane protein that retains its N terminus and assumes an Nout–Cin topology. This membrane orientation offers an explanation for the protection of the epitope from deformylases present in the bacterial cell and suggests an explanation for the ability of phagocytes to present H2-M3-restricted bacterial epitopes via a vacuolar TAP-independent mechanism. PMID:8758895

  7. In vivo disruption of latent HSV by designer endonuclease therapy

    PubMed Central

    Aubert, Martine; Madden, Emily A.; Loprieno, Michelle; DeSilva Feelixge, Harshana S.; Stensland, Laurence; Huang, Meei-Li; Greninger, Alexander L.; Roychoudhury, Pavitra; Niyonzima, Nixon; Nguyen, Thuy; Magaret, Amalia; Galleto, Roman; Stone, Daniel; Jerome, Keith R.

    2016-01-01

    A large portion of the global population carries latent herpes simplex virus (HSV), which can periodically reactivate, resulting in asymptomatic shedding or formation of ulcerative lesions. Current anti-HSV drugs do not eliminate latent virus from sensory neurons where HSV resides, and therefore do not eliminate the risk of transmission or recurrent disease. Here, we report the ability of HSV-specific endonucleases to induce mutations of essential HSV genes both in cultured neurons and in latently infected mice. In neurons, viral genomes are susceptible to endonuclease-mediated mutagenesis, regardless of the time of treatment after HSV infection, suggesting that both HSV lytic and latent forms can be targeted. Mutagenesis frequency after endonuclease exposure can be increased nearly 2-fold by treatment with a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor. Using a mouse model of latent HSV infection, we demonstrate that a targeted endonuclease can be delivered to viral latency sites via an adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector, where it is able to induce mutation of latent HSV genomes. These data provide the first proof-of-principle to our knowledge for the use of a targeted endonuclease as an antiviral agent to treat an established latent viral infection in vivo.

  8. Identification of a mismatch-specific endonuclease in hyperthermophilic Archaea.

    PubMed

    Ishino, Sonoko; Nishi, Yuki; Oda, Soichiro; Uemori, Takashi; Sagara, Takehiro; Takatsu, Nariaki; Yamagami, Takeshi; Shirai, Tsuyoshi; Ishino, Yoshizumi

    2016-04-20

    The common mismatch repair system processed by MutS and MutL and their homologs was identified in Bacteria and Eukarya. However, no evidence of a functional MutS/L homolog has been reported for archaeal organisms, and it is not known whether the mismatch repair system is conserved in Archaea. Here, we describe an endonuclease that cleaves double-stranded DNA containing a mismatched base pair, from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus The corresponding gene revealed that the activity originates from PF0012, and we named this enzyme Endonuclease MS (EndoMS) as the mismatch-specific Endonuclease. The sequence similarity suggested that EndoMS is the ortholog of NucS isolated from Pyrococcus abyssi, published previously. Biochemical characterizations of the EndoMS homolog from Thermococcus kodakarensis clearly showed that EndoMS specifically cleaves both strands of double-stranded DNA into 5'-protruding forms, with the mismatched base pair in the central position. EndoMS cleaves G/T, G/G, T/T, T/C and A/G mismatches, with a more preference for G/T, G/G and T/T, but has very little or no effect on C/C, A/C and A/A mismatches. The discovery of this endonuclease suggests the existence of a novel mismatch repair process, initiated by the double-strand break generated by the EndoMS endonuclease, in Archaea and some Bacteria. PMID:27001046

  9. In vivo disruption of latent HSV by designer endonuclease therapy

    PubMed Central

    Madden, Emily A.; Loprieno, Michelle; Feelixge, Harshana S. DeSilva; Stensland, Laurence; Huang, Meei-Li; Greninger, Alexander L.; Nguyen, Thuy; Magaret, Amalia; Galleto, Roman

    2016-01-01

    A large portion of the global population carries latent herpes simplex virus (HSV), which can periodically reactivate, resulting in asymptomatic shedding or formation of ulcerative lesions. Current anti-HSV drugs do not eliminate latent virus from sensory neurons where HSV resides, and therefore do not eliminate the risk of transmission or recurrent disease. Here, we report the ability of HSV-specific endonucleases to induce mutations of essential HSV genes both in cultured neurons and in latently infected mice. In neurons, viral genomes are susceptible to endonuclease-mediated mutagenesis, regardless of the time of treatment after HSV infection, suggesting that both HSV lytic and latent forms can be targeted. Mutagenesis frequency after endonuclease exposure can be increased nearly 2-fold by treatment with a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor. Using a mouse model of latent HSV infection, we demonstrate that a targeted endonuclease can be delivered to viral latency sites via an adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector, where it is able to induce mutation of latent HSV genomes. These data provide the first proof-of-principle to our knowledge for the use of a targeted endonuclease as an antiviral agent to treat an established latent viral infection in vivo. PMID:27642635

  10. Mapping site-specific endonuclease binding to DNA by direct imaging with AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, D.P.; Thundat, T.; Doktycz, M.J.; Kerper, P.S.; Warmack, R.J.; Modrich, P.; Isfort, R.J.

    1995-12-31

    Physical mapping of DNA can be accomplished by direct AFM imaging of site specific proteins bound to DNA molecules. Using Gln-111, a mutant of EcoRI endonuclease with a specific affinity for EcoRI sites 1,000 times greater than wild type enzyme but with cleavage rate constants reduced by a factor of 10{sup 4}, the authors demonstrate site-specific mapping by direct AFM imaging. Images are presented showing specific-site binding of Gln-111 to plasmids having either one (pBS{sup +}) or two (pMP{sup 32}) EcoRI sites. Identification of the Gln-111/DNA complex is greatly enhanced by biotinylation of the complex followed by reaction with streptavidin gold prior to imaging. Image enhancement coupled with improvements in the preparation techniques for imaging large DNA molecules, such as lambda DNA (47 kb), has the potential to contribute to direct AFM restriction mapping of cosmid-sized genomic DNAs.

  11. Mapping site-specific endonuclease binding to DNA by direct imaging with atomic force microscopy (AFM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, David P.; Thundat, Thomas G.; Modrich, P.; Isfort, R. J.; Doktycz, Mitchel J.; Kerper, P. S.; Warmack, R. J.

    1995-04-01

    Physical mapping of DNA can be accomplished by direct AFM imaging of site specific proteins bound to DNA molecules. Using Gln-111, a mutant of EcoRI endonuclease with a specific affinity for EcoRI sites 1000 times greater than wild type enzyme but with cleavage rate constants reduced by a factor of 104, we demonstrate site-specific mapping by direct AFM imaging. Images are presented showing specific-site binding of Gln-111 to plasmids having either one (pBS+) or two (pMP32) EcoRI sites. Identification of the Gln-111/DNA complex is greatly enhanced by biotinylation of the complex followed by reaction with streptavidin gold prior to imaging. Image enhancement coupled with improvements in our preparation techniques for imaging large DNA molecules, such as lambda DNA (47 kb), has the potential to contribute to direct AFM restriction mapping of cosmid-sized genomic DNAs.

  12. Anticonvulsant Effect of Time-Restricted Feeding in a Pilocarpine-Induced Seizure Model: Metabolic and Epigenetic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Landgrave-Gómez, Jorge; Mercado-Gómez, Octavio Fabián; Vázquez-García, Mario; Rodríguez-Molina, Víctor; Córdova-Dávalos, Laura; Arriaga-Ávila, Virginia; Miranda-Martínez, Alfredo; Guevara-Guzmán, Rosalinda

    2016-01-01

    A new generation of antiepileptic drugs has emerged; however, one-third of epilepsy patients do not properly respond to pharmacological treatments. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether time-restricted feeding (TRF) has an anticonvulsant effect and whether this restrictive diet promotes changes in energy metabolism and epigenetic modifications in a pilocarpine-induced seizure model. To resolve our hypothesis, one group of rats had free access to food and water ad libitum (AL) and a second group underwent a TRF schedule. We used the lithium-pilocarpine model to induce status epilepticus (SE), and behavioral seizure monitoring was analyzed. Additionally, an electroencephalography (EEG) recording was performed to verify the effect of TRF on cortical electrical activity after a pilocarpine injection. For biochemical analysis, animals were sacrificed 24 h after SE and hippocampal homogenates were used to evaluate the proteins related to metabolism and chromatin structure. Our results showed that TRF had an anticonvulsant effect as measured by the prolonged latency of forelimb clonus seizure, a decrease in the seizure severity score and fewer animals reaching SE. Additionally, the power of the late phase EEG recordings in the AL group was significantly higher than the TRF group. Moreover, we found that TRF is capable of inducing alterations in signaling pathways that regulate energy metabolism, including an increase in the phosphorylation of AMP dependent kinase (AMPK) and a decrease in the phosphorylation of Akt kinase. Furthermore, we found that TRF was able to significantly increase the beta hydroxybutyrate (β-HB) concentration, an endogenous inhibitor of histone deacetylases (HDACs). Finally, we found a significant decrease in HDAC activity as well as an increase in acetylation on histone 3 (H3) in hippocampal homogenates from the TRF group. These findings suggest that alterations in energy metabolism and the increase in β-HB mediated by TRF

  13. Anticonvulsant Effect of Time-Restricted Feeding in a Pilocarpine-Induced Seizure Model: Metabolic and Epigenetic Implications.

    PubMed

    Landgrave-Gómez, Jorge; Mercado-Gómez, Octavio Fabián; Vázquez-García, Mario; Rodríguez-Molina, Víctor; Córdova-Dávalos, Laura; Arriaga-Ávila, Virginia; Miranda-Martínez, Alfredo; Guevara-Guzmán, Rosalinda

    2016-01-01

    A new generation of antiepileptic drugs has emerged; however, one-third of epilepsy patients do not properly respond to pharmacological treatments. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether time-restricted feeding (TRF) has an anticonvulsant effect and whether this restrictive diet promotes changes in energy metabolism and epigenetic modifications in a pilocarpine-induced seizure model. To resolve our hypothesis, one group of rats had free access to food and water ad libitum (AL) and a second group underwent a TRF schedule. We used the lithium-pilocarpine model to induce status epilepticus (SE), and behavioral seizure monitoring was analyzed. Additionally, an electroencephalography (EEG) recording was performed to verify the effect of TRF on cortical electrical activity after a pilocarpine injection. For biochemical analysis, animals were sacrificed 24 h after SE and hippocampal homogenates were used to evaluate the proteins related to metabolism and chromatin structure. Our results showed that TRF had an anticonvulsant effect as measured by the prolonged latency of forelimb clonus seizure, a decrease in the seizure severity score and fewer animals reaching SE. Additionally, the power of the late phase EEG recordings in the AL group was significantly higher than the TRF group. Moreover, we found that TRF is capable of inducing alterations in signaling pathways that regulate energy metabolism, including an increase in the phosphorylation of AMP dependent kinase (AMPK) and a decrease in the phosphorylation of Akt kinase. Furthermore, we found that TRF was able to significantly increase the beta hydroxybutyrate (β-HB) concentration, an endogenous inhibitor of histone deacetylases (HDACs). Finally, we found a significant decrease in HDAC activity as well as an increase in acetylation on histone 3 (H3) in hippocampal homogenates from the TRF group. These findings suggest that alterations in energy metabolism and the increase in β-HB mediated by TRF

  14. Deep sequencing identifies circulating mouse miRNAs that are functionally implicated in manifestations of aging and responsive to calorie restriction.

    PubMed

    Dhahbi, Joseph M; Spindler, Stephen R; Atamna, Hani; Yamakawa, Amy; Guerrero, Noel; Boffelli, Dario; Mote, Patricia; Martin, David I K

    2013-02-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) function to modulate gene expression, and through this property they regulate a broad spectrum of cellular processes. They can circulate in blood and thereby mediate cell-to-cell communication. Aging involves changes in many cellular processes that are potentially regulated by miRNAs, and some evidence has implicated circulating miRNAs in the aging process. In order to initiate a comprehensive assessment of the role of circulating miRNAs in aging, we have used deep sequencing to characterize circulating miRNAs in the serum of young mice, old mice, and old mice maintained on calorie restriction (CR). Deep sequencing identifies a set of novel miRNAs, and also accurately measures all known miRNAs present in serum. This analysis demonstrates that the levels of many miRNAs circulating in the mouse are increased with age, and that the increases can be antagonized by CR. The genes targeted by this set of age-modulated miRNAs are predicted to regulate biological processes directly relevant to the manifestations of aging including metabolic changes, and the miRNAs themselves have been linked to diseases associated with old age. This finding implicates circulating miRNAs in the aging process, raising questions about their tissues of origin, their cellular targets, and their functional role in metabolic changes that occur with aging.

  15. A two-plasmid bacterial selection system for characterization and engineering of homing endonucleases.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ning; Zhao, Huimin

    2014-01-01

    Homing endonucleases recognize long DNA sequences and generate site-specific DNA double-stranded breaks. They can serve as a powerful genomic modification tool in various industrial and biomedical applications. Here, we describe a two-plasmid bacterial selection system for characterization and engineering of homing endonucleases. This selection system couples the DNA cleavage activity of a homing endonuclease with the survival of host cells. Therefore, it can be used for assaying in vivo activity of homing endonucleases. Moreover, due to its high sensitivity, it can be applied for directed evolution of homing endonucleases with altered sequence specificity.

  16. T cells detect intracellular DNA but fail to induce type I IFN responses: implications for restriction of HIV replication.

    PubMed

    Berg, Randi K; Rahbek, Stine H; Kofod-Olsen, Emil; Holm, Christian K; Melchjorsen, Jesper; Jensen, David G; Hansen, Anne Louise; Jørgensen, Louise B; Ostergaard, Lars; Tolstrup, Martin; Larsen, Carsten S; Paludan, Søren R; Jakobsen, Martin R; Mogensen, Trine H

    2014-01-01

    HIV infects key cell types of the immune system, most notably macrophages and CD4+ T cells. Whereas macrophages represent an important viral reservoir, activated CD4+ T cells are the most permissive cell types supporting high levels of viral replication. In recent years, it has been appreciated that the innate immune system plays an important role in controlling HIV replication, e.g. via interferon (IFN)-inducible restriction factors. Moreover, innate immune responses are involved in driving chronic immune activation and the pathogenesis of progressive immunodeficiency. Several pattern recognition receptors detecting HIV have been reported, including Toll-like receptor 7 and Retinoic-inducible gene-I, which detects viral RNA. Here we report that human primary T cells fail to induce strong IFN responses, despite the fact that this cell type does express key molecules involved in DNA signaling pathways. We demonstrate that the DNA sensor IFI16 migrates to sites of foreign DNA localization in the cytoplasm and recruits the signaling molecules stimulator of IFN genes and Tank-binding kinase, but this does not result in expression of IFN and IFN-stimulated genes. Importantly, we show that cytosolic DNA fails to affect HIV replication. However, exogenous treatment of activated T cells with type I IFN has the capacity to induce expression of IFN-stimulated genes and suppress HIV replication. Our data suggest the existence of an impaired DNA signaling machinery in T cells, which may prevent this cell type from activating cell-autonomous anti-HIV responses. This phenomenon could contribute to the high permissiveness of CD4+ T cells for HIV-1.

  17. Restriction of bacteriophage plaque formation in Streptomyces spp.

    PubMed

    Cox, K L; Baltz, R H

    1984-08-01

    Several Streptomyces species that produce restriction endonucleases were characterized for their ability to propagate 10 different broad host range bacteriophages. Each species displayed a different pattern of plaque formation. A restrictionless mutant of S. albus G allowed plaque formation by all 10 phages, whereas the wild-type strain showed plaques with only 2 phages. DNA isolated from three of the phages was analyzed for the presence of restriction sites for Streptomyces species-encoded enzymes, and a very strong correlation was established between the failure to form plaques on Streptomyces species that produced particular restriction enzymes and the presence of the corresponding restriction sites in the phage DNA. Also, the phages that lacked restriction sites in their DNA generally formed plaques on the corresponding restriction endonuclease-producing hosts at high efficiency. The DNAs from the three phages analyzed also generally contained either many or no restriction sites for the Streptomyces species-produced enzymes, suggesting a strong evolutionary trend to either eliminate all or tolerate many restriction sites. The data indicate that restriction plays a major role in host range determination for Streptomyces phages. Analysis of bacteriophage host ranges of many other uncharacterized Streptomyces hosts has identified four relatively nonrestricting hosts, at least two of which may be suitable hosts for gene cloning. The data also suggest that several restriction systems remain to be identified in the genus Streptomyces.

  18. Structures of Cas9 Endonucleases Reveal RNA-Mediated Conformational Activation

    PubMed Central

    Jinek, Martin; Jiang, Fuguo; Taylor, David W.; Sternberg, Samuel H.; Kaya, Emine; Ma, Enbo; Anders, Carolin; Hauer, Michael; Zhou, Kaihong; Lin, Steven; Kaplan, Matias; Iavarone, Anthony T.; Charpentier, Emmanuelle; Nogales, Eva; Doudna, Jennifer A.

    2014-01-01

    Type II CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)–Cas (CRISPR-associated) systems use an RNA-guided DNA endonuclease, Cas9, to generate double-strand breaks in invasive DNA during an adaptive bacterial immune response. Cas9 has been harnessed as a powerful tool for genome editing and gene regulation in many eukaryotic organisms. We report 2.6 and 2.2 angstrom resolution crystal structures of two major Cas9 enzyme subtypes, revealing the structural core shared by all Cas9 family members. The architectures of Cas9 enzymes define nucleic acid binding clefts, and single-particle electron microscopy reconstructions show that the two structural lobes harboring these clefts undergo guide RNA–induced reorientation to form a central channel where DNA substrates are bound. The observation that extensive structural rearrangements occur before target DNA duplex binding implicates guide RNA loading as a key step in Cas9 activation. PMID:24505130

  19. Resolution of branched DNA substrates by T7 endonuclease I and its inhibition.

    PubMed

    Lu, M; Guo, Q; Studier, F W; Kallenbach, N R

    1991-02-01

    Endonuclease I is a multipurpose enzyme implicated in the breakdown of host DNA, packaging of phage DNA, and recombination during the lytic cycle of bacteriophage T7. We investigate here some aspects of the substrate requirements for its activity in resolving branched intermediates similar to Holliday junctions (Holliday, R. (1964) Genet. Res. 5, 282-304) that arise in recombination. The enzyme is able to resolve branched substrates containing very short duplex arms: 4 base pairs suffice. It cleaves 5' to the branch, with a distinct preference for the non-crossover strands in Holliday-like model junctions. Ligands that interact strongly with the branch site can inhibit the enzyme, with KI values in the 10-50 microM range. PMID:1990002

  20. Reprogramming homing endonuclease specificity through computational design and directed evolution.

    PubMed

    Thyme, Summer B; Boissel, Sandrine J S; Arshiya Quadri, S; Nolan, Tony; Baker, Dean A; Park, Rachel U; Kusak, Lara; Ashworth, Justin; Baker, David

    2014-02-01

    Homing endonucleases (HEs) can be used to induce targeted genome modification to reduce the fitness of pathogen vectors such as the malaria-transmitting Anopheles gambiae and to correct deleterious mutations in genetic diseases. We describe the creation of an extensive set of HE variants with novel DNA cleavage specificities using an integrated experimental and computational approach. Using computational modeling and an improved selection strategy, which optimizes specificity in addition to activity, we engineered an endonuclease to cleave in a gene associated with Anopheles sterility and another to cleave near a mutation that causes pyruvate kinase deficiency. In the course of this work we observed unanticipated context-dependence between bases which will need to be mechanistically understood for reprogramming of specificity to succeed more generally. PMID:24270794

  1. Computational redesign of endonuclease DNA binding and cleavage specificity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashworth, Justin; Havranek, James J.; Duarte, Carlos M.; Sussman, Django; Monnat, Raymond J.; Stoddard, Barry L.; Baker, David

    2006-06-01

    The reprogramming of DNA-binding specificity is an important challenge for computational protein design that tests current understanding of protein-DNA recognition, and has considerable practical relevance for biotechnology and medicine. Here we describe the computational redesign of the cleavage specificity of the intron-encoded homing endonuclease I-MsoI using a physically realistic atomic-level forcefield. Using an in silico screen, we identified single base-pair substitutions predicted to disrupt binding by the wild-type enzyme, and then optimized the identities and conformations of clusters of amino acids around each of these unfavourable substitutions using Monte Carlo sampling. A redesigned enzyme that was predicted to display altered target site specificity, while maintaining wild-type binding affinity, was experimentally characterized. The redesigned enzyme binds and cleaves the redesigned recognition site ~10,000 times more effectively than does the wild-type enzyme, with a level of target discrimination comparable to the original endonuclease. Determination of the structure of the redesigned nuclease-recognition site complex by X-ray crystallography confirms the accuracy of the computationally predicted interface. These results suggest that computational protein design methods can have an important role in the creation of novel highly specific endonucleases for gene therapy and other applications.

  2. Ribonuclease H activities associated with viral reverse transcriptases are endonucleases.

    PubMed Central

    Krug, M S; Berger, S L

    1989-01-01

    A series of test substrates have been synthesized to establish the effect of termini on the putative exoribonuclease H activity of reverse transcriptase. Recombinant reverse transcriptase from human immunodeficiency virus, natural enzyme from avian myeloblastosis virus, and a known endonuclease, Escherichia coli ribonuclease H, cleaved relaxed, circular, covalently closed plasmids in which 770 consecutive residues of one strand were ribonucleotides. The avian enzyme also deadenylated capped globin mRNA with a covalently attached oligo(dT) tail at the 3' end. These results resolve a long-standing controversy--that the viral enzymes are obligatory exonucleases in vitro, based on their failure to cleave certain substrates for E. coli ribonuclease H, including circular poly(A).linear poly(T) and ribonucleotide-substituted supercoiled plasmids, but resemble endonucleases in vivo, based on their ability to degrade RNA in complex DNA.RNA hybrids. The data strongly suggest that the viral enzymes are endonucleases with exquisite sensitivity to the conformation of heteroduplexes. Inhibition of viral, but not cellular, ribonuclease H with ribonucleoside-vanadyl complexes further distinguishes these enzymes. Images PMID:2471188

  3. REBASE--enzymes and genes for DNA restriction and modification.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Richard J; Vincze, Tamas; Posfai, Janos; Macelis, Dana

    2007-01-01

    REBASE is a comprehensive database of information about restriction enzymes, DNA methyltransferases and related proteins involved in the biological process of restriction-modification. It contains fully referenced information about recognition and cleavage sites, isoschizomers, neoschizomers, commercial availability, methylation sensitivity, crystal and sequence data. Experimentally characterized homing endonucleases are also included. All newly sequenced genomes are analyzed for the presence of putative restriction systems and these data are included within the REBASE. The contents or REBASE may be browsed from the web (http://rebase.neb.com/rebase/rebase.ftp.html) and selected compilations can be downloaded by ftp (ftp.neb.com). Additionally, monthly updates can be requested via email.

  4. Homing endonuclease I-CreI derivatives with novel DNA target specificities

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, Laura E.; Morrison, Holly A.; Masri, Selma; Brown, Michael J.; Springstubb, Brendan; Sussman, Django; Stoddard, Barry L.; Seligman, Lenny M.

    2006-01-01

    Homing endonucleases are highly specific enzymes, capable of recognizing and cleaving unique DNA sequences in complex genomes. Since such DNA cleavage events can result in targeted allele-inactivation and/or allele-replacement in vivo, the ability to engineer homing endonucleases matched to specific DNA sequences of interest would enable powerful and precise genome manipulations. We have taken a step-wise genetic approach in analyzing individual homing endonuclease I-CreI protein/DNA contacts, and describe here novel interactions at four distinct target site positions. Crystal structures of two mutant endonucleases reveal the molecular interactions responsible for their altered DNA target specificities. We also combine novel contacts to create an endonuclease with the predicted target specificity. These studies provide important insights into engineering homing endonucleases with novel target specificities, as well as into the evolution of DNA recognition by this fascinating family of proteins. PMID:16971456

  5. Restrictive cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    Cardiomyopathy - restrictive; Infiltrative cardiomyopathy; Idiopathic myocardial fibrosis ... of the heart lining (endocardium), such as endomyocardial fibrosis and Loeffler syndrome (rare) Iron overload (hemochromatosis) Sarcoidosis ...

  6. Cleavage of a model DNA replication fork by a methyl-specific endonuclease.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Ken; Handa, Naofumi; Sears, Lauren; Raleigh, Elisabeth A; Kobayashi, Ichizo

    2011-07-01

    Epigenetic DNA methylation is involved in many biological processes. An epigenetic status can be altered by gain or loss of a DNA methyltransferase gene or its activity. Repair of DNA damage can also remove DNA methylation. In response to such alterations, DNA endonucleases that sense DNA methylation can act and may cause cell death. Here, we explored the possibility that McrBC, a methylation-dependent DNase of Escherichia coli, cleaves DNA at a replication fork. First, we found that in vivo restriction by McrBC of bacteriophage carrying a foreign DNA methyltransferase gene is increased in the absence of homologous recombination. This suggests that some cleavage events are repaired by recombination and must take place during or after replication. Next, we demonstrated that the enzyme can cleave a model DNA replication fork in vitro. Cleavage of a fork required methylation on both arms and removed one, the other or both of the arms. Most cleavage events removed the methylated sites from the fork. This result suggests that acquisition of even rarely occurring modification patterns will be recognized and rejected efficiently by modification-dependent restriction systems that recognize two sites. This process might serve to maintain an epigenetic status along the genome through programmed cell death.

  7. Establishment and characterization of hamster cell lines transformed by restriction endonuclease fragments of adenovirus 5.

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, D T; Branton, P E; Yee, S P; Bacchetti, S; Graham, F L

    1984-01-01

    We have established a library of hamster cells transformed by adenovirus 5 DNA fragments comprising all (XhoI-C, 0 to 16 map units) or only a part (HindIII-G, 0 to 7.8 map units) of early region 1 (E1: 0 to 11.2 map units). These lines have been analyzed in terms of content of viral DNA, expression of E1 antigens, and capacity to induce tumors in hamsters. All cells tested were found to express up to eight proteins encoded within E1A (0 to 4.5 map units) with apparent molecular weights between 52,000 (52K) and 25K. Both G and C fragment-transformed lines expressed a 19K antigen encoded within E1B (4.5 to 11.2 map units), whereas an E1B 58K protein was detected in C fragment-transformed, but not G-fragment-transformed, lines. No clear distinction could be drawn between cells transformed by HindIII-G and by XhoI-C in terms of morphology or tumorigenicity, suggesting that the E1B 58K antigen plays no major role in the maintenance of oncogenic transformation, although possible involvement of truncated forms of 58K cannot be ruled out. Sera were collected from tumor-bearing animals and examined for ability to immunoprecipitate proteins from infected cells. The relative avidity of sera for different proteins was characteristic of the cell line used for tumor induction, and the specificity generally reflected the array of viral proteins expressed by the corresponding transformed cells. However, one notable observation was that even though all transformed lines examined expressed antigens encoded by both the 1.1- and 0.9-kilobase mRNAs transcribed from E1A, tumor sera made against these lines only precipitated products of the 1.1-kilobase message. Thus, two families of E1A proteins, highly related in terms of primary amino acid sequence, appear to be immunologically quite distinct. Images PMID:6690708

  8. Telomere Restriction Fragment (TRF) Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mender, Ilgen; Shay, Jerry W.

    2016-01-01

    restriction enzyme recognition sites within TTAGGG tandem telomeric repeats, therefore digestion of genomic DNA, not telomeric DNA, with a combination of 6 base restriction endonucleases reduces genomic DNA size to less than 800 bp. PMID:27500189

  9. Mechanism and cleavage specificity of the H-N-H endonuclease colicin E9.

    PubMed

    Pommer, A J; Cal, S; Keeble, A H; Walker, D; Evans, S J; Kühlmann, U C; Cooper, A; Connolly, B A; Hemmings, A M; Moore, G R; James, R; Kleanthous, C

    2001-12-01

    Colicin endonucleases and the H-N-H family of homing enzymes share a common active site structural motif that has similarities to the active sites of a variety of other nucleases such as the non-specific endonuclease from Serratia and the sequence-specific His-Cys box homing enzyme I-PpoI. In contrast to these latter enzymes, however, it remains unclear how H-N-H enzymes cleave nucleic acid substrates. Here, we show that the H-N-H enzyme from colicin E9 (the E9 DNase) shares many of the same basic enzymological characteristics as sequence-specific H-N-H enzymes including a dependence for high concentrations of Mg2+ or Ca2+ with double-stranded substrates, a high pH optimum (pH 8-9) and inhibition by monovalent cations. We also show that this seemingly non-specific enzyme preferentially nicks double-stranded DNA at thymine bases producing 3'-hydroxy and 5'-phosphate termini, and that the enzyme does not cleave small substrates, such as dinucleotides or nucleotide analogues, which has implications for its mode of inhibition in bacteria by immunity proteins. The E9 DNase will also bind single-stranded DNA above a certain length and in a sequence-independent manner, with transition metals such as Ni2+ optimal for cleavage but Mg2+ a poor cofactor. Ironically, the H-N-H motif of the E9 DNase although resembling the zinc binding site of a metalloenzyme does not support zinc-mediated hydrolysis of any DNA substrate. Finally, we demonstrate that the E9 DNase also degrades RNA in the absence of metal ions. In the context of current structural information, our data show that the H-N-H motif is an adaptable catalytic centre able to hydrolyse nucleic acid by different mechanisms depending on the substrate and metal ion regime.

  10. Identification of type II restriction and modification systems in Helicobacter pylori reveals their substantial diversity among strains

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qing; Morgan, Richard D.; Roberts, Richard J.; Blaser, Martin J.

    2000-01-01

    A total of 22 type II restriction endonucleases with 18 distinct specificities have been identified in six Helicobacter pylori strains. Among these 18 specificities are three completely new endonucleases, Hpy178III, Hpy99I, and Hpy188I, that specifically cleave DNA at TCNNGA, CGWCG, and TCNGA sites, respectively. The set of endonucleases identified in each strain varies, but all have four- or five-base recognition sequences. Among 16 H. pylori strains, examination of the DNA modification status at the recognition sites of 15 restriction endonucleases reveals that each strain has a substantially different complement of type II modification systems. We conclude that the type II restriction-modification systems in H. pylori are highly diverse between strains, a unique characteristic of H. pylori. The diverse methylation status of H. pylori chromosomal DNA may serve as a new typing system to discriminate H. pylori isolates for epidemiological and clinical purposes. This study also demonstrates that H. pylori is a rich source of type II restriction endonucleases. PMID:10944229

  11. The Identification and Characterization of Human AP Endonuclease-1 Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Ajay; Wang, Lirong; Cline, Cari J.; Xie, Zhaojun; Sobol, Robert W.; Xie, Xiang-Qun; Gold, Barry

    2012-01-01

    The repair of abasic sites that arise in DNA from hydrolytic depurination/depyrimidination of the nitrogenous bases from the sugar-phosphate backbone and the action of DNA glycosylases on deaminated, oxidized and alkylated bases is critical to cell survival. Apurinic/Apyrimidinic Endonuclease-1/Redox Effector Factor-1 (APE-1; aka, APE1/Ref-1) is responsible for the initial removal of abasic lesions as part of the base excision repair pathway. Deletion of APE-1 activity is embryonic lethal in animals and is lethal in cells. Potential inhibitors of the repair function of APE-1 were identified based upon molecular modeling of the crystal structure of the APE-1 protein. We describe the characterization of several unique nM inhibitors using two complementary biochemical screens. The most active molecules all contain a 2-methyl-4-amino-6,7-dioxolo-quinoline structure that is predicted from the modeling to anchor the compounds in the endonuclease site of the protein. The mechanism of action of the selected compounds was probed by fluorescence and competition studies, which indicate, in a specific case, direct interaction between the inhibitor and the active site of the protein. It is demonstrated that the inhibitors induce time-dependent increases in the accumulation of abasic sites in cells at levels that correlate with their potency to inhibit APE-1 endonuclease excision. The inhibitor molecules also potentiate by 5-fold the toxicity of a DNA methylating agent that creates abasic sites. The molecules represent a new class of APE-1 inhibitors that can be used to probe the biology of this critical enzyme and to sensitize resistant tumor cells to the cytotoxicity of clinically used DNA damaging anticancer drugs. PMID:22788932

  12. Nucleosomes Inhibit Cas9 Endonuclease Activity in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Hinz, John M; Laughery, Marian F; Wyrick, John J

    2015-12-01

    During Cas9 genome editing in eukaryotic cells, the bacterial Cas9 enzyme cleaves DNA targets within chromatin. To understand how chromatin affects Cas9 targeting, we characterized Cas9 activity on nucleosome substrates in vitro. We find that Cas9 endonuclease activity is strongly inhibited when its target site is located within the nucleosome core. In contrast, the nucleosome structure does not affect Cas9 activity at a target site within the adjacent linker DNA. Analysis of target sites that partially overlap with the nucleosome edge indicates that the accessibility of the protospacer-adjacent motif (PAM) is the critical determinant of Cas9 activity on a nucleosome.

  13. Bioinformatic identification of homing endonucleases and their target sites.

    PubMed

    Privman, Eyal

    2014-01-01

    Homing endonuclease genes (HEGs) are a large, phylogenetically diverse superfamily of enzymes with high specificity for especially long target sites. The public genomic sequence databases contain thousands of HEGs. This is a large and diverse arsenal of potential genome editing tools. To make use of this natural resource, one needs to identify candidate HEGs. Due to their special relationship with a host gene, it is also possible to predict their cognate target sequences. Here I describe the HomeBase algorithm that was developed to this end. A detailed description of the computational pipeline is provided with emphasis on technical and methodological caveats of the approach.

  14. Restriction enzyme analysis of the genomes of Plodia interpunctella and Pieris rapae granulosis viruses.

    PubMed

    Tweeten, K A; Bulla, L A; Consigli, R A

    1980-07-30

    The DNAs from the granulosis viruses of Plodia interpunctella and Pieris rapae were clearly distinguishable based on restriction endonuclease fragment patterns. By sizing single- and double-digestion products approximate molecular weights of 72 x 10(2) and 75 x 10(6), respectively, were estimated for the viral genomes.

  15. Inquiry-Based Experiments for Large-Scale Introduction to PCR and Restriction Enzyme Digests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johanson, Kelly E.; Watt, Terry J.

    2015-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction and restriction endonuclease digest are important techniques that should be included in all Biochemistry and Molecular Biology laboratory curriculums. These techniques are frequently taught at an advanced level, requiring many hours of student and faculty time. Here we present two inquiry-based experiments that are…

  16. Metal ions bound at the active site of the junction-resolving enzyme T7 endonuclease I.

    PubMed

    Hadden, Jonathan M; Déclais, Anne-Cécile; Phillips, Simon E V; Lilley, David M J

    2002-07-01

    T7 endonuclease I is a nuclease that is selective for the structure of the four-way DNA junction. The active site is similar to those of a number of restriction enzymes. We have solved the crystal structure of endonuclease I with a wild-type active site. Diffusion of manganese ions into the crystal revealed two peaks of electron density per active site, defining two metal ion-binding sites. Site 1 is fully occupied, and the manganese ion is coordinated by the carboxylate groups of Asp55 and Glu65, and the main chain carbonyl of Thr66. Site 2 is partially occupied, and the metal ion has a single protein ligand, the remaining carboxylate oxygen atom of Asp55. Isothermal titration calorimetry showed the sequential exothermic binding of two manganese ions in solution, with dissociation constants of 0.58 +/- 0.019 and 14 +/- 1.5 mM. These results are consistent with a two metal ion mechanism for the cleavage reaction, in which the hydrolytic water molecule is contained in the first coordination sphere of the site 1-bound metal ion.

  17. Isolation of DNA from agarose gels using DEAE-paper. Application to restriction site mapping of adenovirus type 16 DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Winberg, G; Hammarskjöld, M L

    1980-01-01

    A new method for isolating DNA from agarose gels is described. The method involves the simultaneous transfer of all DNA-fragments from an agarose slab gel onto DEAE-cellulose paper and the elution of the individual fragments from the paper with 1 M NaCl. DNA isolated from agarose gels in this way is susceptible to cleavage with several restriction endonucleases, and can be labeled in vitro with E coli DNA-polymerase I, T4 DNA-polymerase and T4 polynucleotide kinase. We have used the method to construct restriction endonuclease maps of adenovirus type 16 DNA. Images PMID:6252542

  18. Structural and Biochemical Basis for Development of Influenza Virus Inhibitors Targeting the PA Endonuclease

    PubMed Central

    DuBois, Rebecca M.; Slavish, P. Jake; Baughman, Brandi M.; Yun, Mi-Kyung; Bao, Ju; Webby, Richard J.; Webb, Thomas R.; White, Stephen W.

    2012-01-01

    Emerging influenza viruses are a serious threat to human health because of their pandemic potential. A promising target for the development of novel anti-influenza therapeutics is the PA protein, whose endonuclease activity is essential for viral replication. Translation of viral mRNAs by the host ribosome requires mRNA capping for recognition and binding, and the necessary mRNA caps are cleaved or “snatched” from host pre-mRNAs by the PA endonuclease. The structure-based development of inhibitors that target PA endonuclease is now possible with the recent crystal structure of the PA catalytic domain. In this study, we sought to understand the molecular mechanism of inhibition by several compounds that are known or predicted to block endonuclease-dependent polymerase activity. Using an in vitro endonuclease activity assay, we show that these compounds block the enzymatic activity of the isolated PA endonuclease domain. Using X-ray crystallography, we show how these inhibitors coordinate the two-metal endonuclease active site and engage the active site residues. Two structures also reveal an induced-fit mode of inhibitor binding. The structures allow a molecular understanding of the structure-activity relationship of several known influenza inhibitors and the mechanism of drug resistance by a PA mutation. Taken together, our data reveal new strategies for structure-based design and optimization of PA endonuclease inhibitors. PMID:22876176

  19. Activity of site-specific endonucleases on complexes of plasmid DNA with multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorova, V. P.; Krylova, H. V.; Lipnevich, I. V.; Veligura, A. A.; Shulitsky, B. G.; Asayonok, A. A.; Vaskovtsev, E. V.

    2016-08-01

    We have synthesized and investigated structural and functional properties of plasmid DNA complexes with multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) for detection of changes in structural state of the plasmid DNA at its recognition by site-specific endonuclease. It has been also established that the site-specific endonuclease is functionally active on the surface of MWCNTs.

  20. Reaction kinetics of some important site-specific endonucleases.

    PubMed Central

    Hinsch, B; Kula, M R

    1981-01-01

    Reaction kinetics of the site-specific endonucleases BamHI, BgIII, C1aI, EcoRI, HpaII, PstI, SaII, SmaI, and XorII were investigated employing some frequently used substrates. Six of these enzymes could be analyzed under steady-state conditions. Kinetic data were obtained from progress curves applying an integrated Michaelis-Menten equation. KM ranged from 4 x 10(-9) M to 4 x 10(-11) M. Activities also spanned two orders of magnitude. In the case of C1aI the analysis of the pre-steady-state kinetics ("burst reaction") allowed the assessment of several rate constants. The rate-limiting step is the very slow dissociation of the enzyme-product complex (0.22 min(-1)). This complex is formed from the enzyme-bound nicked intermediate at a rate of 1.7 min(-1). The introduction of the first cut is again faster by a factor of about 6. SmaI and XorII resembled C1aI in their kinetics. The burst reaction can be used for the easy and unambiguous determination of molar concentrations of site-specific endonucleases in any preparation, which is free of non-specific DNases. PMID:6269074

  1. Structural Characterization of the Catalytic Subunit of a Novel RNA Splicing Endonuclease

    SciTech Connect

    Calvin, Kate; Hall, Michelle D.; Xu, Fangmin; Xue, Song; Li, Hong

    2010-07-13

    The RNA splicing endonuclease is responsible for recognition and excision of nuclear tRNA and all archaeal introns. Despite the conserved RNA cleavage chemistry and a similar enzyme assembly, currently known splicing endonuclease families have limited RNA specificity. Different from previously characterized splicing endonucleases in Archaea, the splicing endonuclease from archaeum Sulfolobus solfataricus was found to contain two different subunits and accept a broader range of substrates. Here, we report a crystal structure of the catalytic subunit of the S. solfataricus endonuclease at 3.1 {angstrom} resolution. The structure, together with analytical ultracentrifugation analysis, identifies the catalytic subunit as an inactive but stable homodimer, thus suggesting the possibility of two modes of functional assembly for the active enzyme.

  2. Restrictive vs. non-restrictive composition: a magnetoencephalography study

    PubMed Central

    Leffel, Timothy; Lauter, Miriam; Westerlund, Masha; Pylkkänen, Liina

    2014-01-01

    Recent research on the brain mechanisms underlying language processing has implicated the left anterior temporal lobe (LATL) as a central region for the composition of simple phrases. Because these studies typically present their critical stimuli without contextual information, the sensitivity of LATL responses to contextual factors is unknown. In this magnetoencephalography (MEG) study, we employed a simple question-answer paradigm to manipulate whether a prenominal adjective or determiner is interpreted restrictively, i.e., as limiting the set of entities under discussion. Our results show that the LATL is sensitive to restriction, with restrictive composition eliciting higher responses than non-restrictive composition. However, this effect was only observed when the restricting element was a determiner, adjectival stimuli showing the opposite pattern, which we hypothesise to be driven by the special pragmatic properties of non-restrictive adjectives. Overall, our results demonstrate a robust sensitivity of the LATL to high level contextual and potentially also pragmatic factors. PMID:25379512

  3. Recombinant plasmids for encoding restriction enzymes DpnI and DpnII of streptococcus pneumontae

    DOEpatents

    Lacks, Sanford A.

    1990-01-01

    Chromosomal DNA cassettes containing genes encoding either the DpnI or DpnII restriction endonucleases from Streptococcus pneumoniae are cloned into a streptococcal vector, pLS101. Large amounts of the restriction enzymes are produced by cells containing the multicopy plasmids, pLS202 and pLS207, and their derivatives pLS201, pLS211, pLS217, pLS251 and pLS252.

  4. Recombinant plasmids for encoding restriction enzymes DpnI and DpnII of Streptococcus pneumontae

    DOEpatents

    Lacks, S.A.

    1990-10-02

    Chromosomal DNA cassettes containing genes encoding either the DpnI or DpnII restriction endonucleases from Streptococcus pneumoniae are cloned into a streptococcal vector, pLS101. Large amounts of the restriction enzymes are produced by cells containing the multicopy plasmids, pLS202 and pLS207, and their derivatives pLS201, pLS211, pLS217, pLS251 and pLS252. 9 figs.

  5. Synthesis, Biological Evaluation and Structure-Activity Relationships of a Novel Class of Apurinic/Apyrimidinic Endonuclease 1 Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Ganesha; Vyjayanti, Vaddadi N.; Dorjsuren, Dorjbal; Simeonov, Anton; Jadhav, Ajit; Wilson, David M.; Maloney, David J.

    2012-01-01

    APE1 is an essential protein that operates in the base excision repair (BER) pathway and is responsible for ≥95% of the total apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease activity in human cells. BER is a major pathway that copes with DNA damage induced by several anti-cancer agents, including ionizing radiation and temozolomide. Overexpression of APE1 and enhanced AP endonuclease activity has been linked to increased resistance of tumor cells to treatment with monofunctional alkylators, implicating inhibition of APE1 as a valid strategy for cancer therapy. We report herein the results of a focused medicinal chemistry effort around a novel APE1 inhibitor, N-(3-(benzo[d]thiazol-2-yl)-6-isopropyl-4,5,6,7-tetrahydrothieno[2,3-c]pyridin-2-yl)acetamide (3). Compound 3 and related analogs exhibit single-digit µM activity against the purified APE1 enzyme, comparable activity in HeLa whole cell extract assays, and potentiate the cytotoxicity of the alkylating agents methylmethane sulfonate and temozolomide. Moreover, this class of compounds possesses a generally favorable in vitro ADME profile, along with good exposure levels in plasma and brain following intraperitoneal dosing (30 mg/kg body weight) in mice. PMID:22455312

  6. Insect population control by homing endonuclease-based gene drive: an evaluation in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yuk-Sang; Naujoks, Daniel A; Huen, David S; Russell, Steven

    2011-05-01

    Insects play a major role as vectors of human disease as well as causing significant agricultural losses. Harnessing the activity of customized homing endonuclease genes (HEGs) has been proposed as a method for spreading deleterious mutations through populations with a view to controlling disease vectors. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of this method in Drosophila melanogaster, utilizing the well-characterized HEG, I-SceI. In particular, we show that high rates of homing can be achieved within spermatogonia and in the female germline. We show that homed constructs continue to exhibit HEG activity in the subsequent generation and that the ectopic homing events required for initiating the strategy occur at an acceptable rate. We conclude that the requirements for successful deployment of a HEG-based gene drive strategy can be satisfied in a model dipteran and that there is a reasonable prospect of the method working in other dipterans. In characterizing the system we measured repair outcomes at the spermatogonial, spermatocyte, and spermatid stages of spermatogenesis. We show that homologous recombination is restricted to spermatogonia and that it immediately ceases when they become primary spermatocytes, indicating that the choice of DNA repair pathway in the Drosophila testis can switch abruptly during differentiation.

  7. Hold your horSSEs: controlling structure-selective endonucleases MUS81 and Yen1/GEN1

    PubMed Central

    Blanco, Miguel G.; Matos, Joao

    2015-01-01

    Repair of DNA lesions through homologous recombination promotes the establishment of stable chromosomal interactions. Multiple helicases, topoisomerases and structure-selective endonucleases (SSEs) act upon recombining joint molecules (JMs) to disengage chromosomal connections and safeguard chromosome segregation. Recent studies on two conserved SSEs – MUS81 and Yen1/GEN1– uncovered multiple layers of regulation that operate to carefully tailor JM-processing according to specific cellular needs. Temporal restriction of SSE function imposes a hierarchy in pathway usage that ensures efficient JM-processing while minimizing reciprocal exchanges between the recombining DNAs. Whereas a conserved strategy of fine-tuning SSE functions exists in different model systems, the precise molecular mechanisms to implement it appear to be significantly different. Here, we summarize the current knowledge on the cellular switches that are in place to control MUS81 and Yen1/GEN1 functions. PMID:26284109

  8. Modeling of flap endonuclease interactions with DNA substrate.

    PubMed

    Allawi, Hatim T; Kaiser, Michael W; Onufriev, Alexey V; Ma, Wu-Po; Brogaard, Andrew E; Case, David A; Neri, Bruce P; Lyamichev, Victor I

    2003-05-01

    Structure-specific 5' nucleases play an important role in DNA replication and repair uniquely recognizing an overlap flap DNA substrate and processing it into a DNA nick. However, in the absence of a high-resolution structure of the enzyme/DNA complex, the mechanism underlying this recognition and substrate specificity, which is key to the enzyme's function, remains unclear. Here, we propose a three-dimensional model of the structure-specific 5' flap endonuclease from Pyrococcus furiosus in its complex with DNA. The model is based on the known X-ray structure of the enzyme and a variety of biochemical and molecular dynamics (MD) data utilized in the form of distance restraints between the enzyme and the DNA. Contacts between the 5' flap endonuclease and the sugar-phosphate backbone of the overlap flap substrate were identified using enzyme activity assays on substrates with methylphosphonate or 2'-O-methyl substitutions. The enzyme footprint extends two to four base-pairs upstream and eight to nine base-pairs downstream of the cleavage site, thus covering 10-13 base-pairs of duplex DNA. The footprint data are consistent with a model in which the substrate is bound in the DNA-binding groove such that the downstream duplex interacts with the helix-hairpin-helix motif of the enzyme. MD simulations to identify the substrate orientation in this model are consistent with the results of the enzyme activity assays on the methylphosphonate and 2'-O-methyl-modified substrates. To further refine the model, 5' flap endonuclease variants with alanine point substitutions at amino acid residues expected to contact phosphates in the substrate and one deletion mutant were tested in enzyme activity assays on the methylphosphonate-modified substrates. Changes in the enzyme footprint observed for two point mutants, R64A and R94A, and for the deletion mutant in the enzyme's beta(A)/beta(B) region, were interpreted as being the result of specific interactions in the enzyme/DNA complex

  9. Deoxyribophosphate lyase activity of mammalian endonuclease VIII-like proteins.

    PubMed

    Grin, Inga R; Khodyreva, Svetlana N; Nevinsky, Georgy A; Zharkov, Dmitry O

    2006-09-01

    Base excision repair (BER) protects cells from nucleobase DNA damage. In eukaryotic BER, DNA glycosylases generate abasic sites, which are then converted to deoxyribo-5'-phosphate (dRP) and excised by a dRP lyase (dRPase) activity of DNA polymerase beta (Polbeta). Here, we demonstrate that NEIL1 and NEIL2, mammalian homologs of bacterial endonuclease VIII, excise dRP by beta-elimination with the efficiency similar to Polbeta. DNA duplexes imitating BER intermediates after insertion of a single nucleotide were better substrates. NEIL1 and NEIL2 supplied dRPase activity in BER reconstituted with dRPase-null Polbeta. Our results suggest a role for NEILs as backup dRPases in mammalian cells.

  10. Mitochondrial endonuclease G mediates breakdown of paternal mitochondria upon fertilization.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qinghua; Li, Haimin; Li, Hanzeng; Nakagawa, Akihisa; Lin, Jason L J; Lee, Eui-Seung; Harry, Brian L; Skeen-Gaar, Riley Robert; Suehiro, Yuji; William, Donna; Mitani, Shohei; Yuan, Hanna S; Kang, Byung-Ho; Xue, Ding

    2016-07-22

    Mitochondria are inherited maternally in most animals, but the mechanisms of selective paternal mitochondrial elimination (PME) are unknown. While examining fertilization in Caenorhabditis elegans, we observed that paternal mitochondria rapidly lose their inner membrane integrity. CPS-6, a mitochondrial endonuclease G, serves as a paternal mitochondrial factor that is critical for PME. We found that CPS-6 relocates from the intermembrane space of paternal mitochondria to the matrix after fertilization to degrade mitochondrial DNA. It acts with maternal autophagy and proteasome machineries to promote PME. Loss of cps-6 delays breakdown of mitochondrial inner membranes, autophagosome enclosure of paternal mitochondria, and PME. Delayed removal of paternal mitochondria causes increased embryonic lethality, demonstrating that PME is important for normal animal development. Thus, CPS-6 functions as a paternal mitochondrial degradation factor during animal development. PMID:27338704

  11. Mitochondrial endonuclease G mediates breakdown of paternal mitochondria upon fertilization.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qinghua; Li, Haimin; Li, Hanzeng; Nakagawa, Akihisa; Lin, Jason L J; Lee, Eui-Seung; Harry, Brian L; Skeen-Gaar, Riley Robert; Suehiro, Yuji; William, Donna; Mitani, Shohei; Yuan, Hanna S; Kang, Byung-Ho; Xue, Ding

    2016-07-22

    Mitochondria are inherited maternally in most animals, but the mechanisms of selective paternal mitochondrial elimination (PME) are unknown. While examining fertilization in Caenorhabditis elegans, we observed that paternal mitochondria rapidly lose their inner membrane integrity. CPS-6, a mitochondrial endonuclease G, serves as a paternal mitochondrial factor that is critical for PME. We found that CPS-6 relocates from the intermembrane space of paternal mitochondria to the matrix after fertilization to degrade mitochondrial DNA. It acts with maternal autophagy and proteasome machineries to promote PME. Loss of cps-6 delays breakdown of mitochondrial inner membranes, autophagosome enclosure of paternal mitochondria, and PME. Delayed removal of paternal mitochondria causes increased embryonic lethality, demonstrating that PME is important for normal animal development. Thus, CPS-6 functions as a paternal mitochondrial degradation factor during animal development.

  12. A ligation-independent cloning method using nicking DNA endonuclease.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Zhang, Zhihong; Zhang, Xin A; Luo, Qingming

    2010-11-01

    Using nicking DNA endonuclease (NiDE), we developed a novel technique to clone DNA fragments into plasmids. We created a NiDE cassette consisting of two inverted NiDE substrate sites sandwiching an asymmetric four-base sequence, and NiDE cleavage resulted in 14-base single-stranded termini at both ends of the vector and insert. This method can therefore be used as a ligation-independent cloning strategy to generate recombinant constructs rapidly. In addition, we designed and constructed a simple and specific vector from an Escherichia coli plasmid back-bone to complement this cloning method. By cloning cDNAs into this modified vector, we confirmed the predicted feasibility and applicability of this cloning method. PMID:21091446

  13. Detection of treatment-resistant infectious HIV after genome-directed antiviral endonuclease therapy.

    PubMed

    De Silva Feelixge, Harshana S; Stone, Daniel; Pietz, Harlan L; Roychoudhury, Pavitra; Greninger, Alex L; Schiffer, Joshua T; Aubert, Martine; Jerome, Keith R

    2016-02-01

    Incurable chronic viral infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. One potential approach to cure persistent viral infections is via the use of targeted endonucleases. Nevertheless, a potential concern for endonuclease-based antiviral therapies is the emergence of treatment resistance. Here we detect for the first time an endonuclease-resistant infectious virus that is found with high frequency after antiviral endonuclease therapy. While testing the activity of HIV pol-specific zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) alone or in combination with three prime repair exonuclease 2 (Trex2), we identified a treatment-resistant and infectious mutant virus that was derived from a ZFN-mediated disruption of reverse transcriptase (RT). Although gene disruption of HIV protease, RT and integrase could inhibit viral replication, a chance single amino acid insertion within the thumb domain of RT produced a virus that could actively replicate. The endonuclease-resistant virus could replicate in primary CD4(+) T cells, but remained susceptible to treatment with antiretroviral RT inhibitors. When secondary ZFN-derived mutations were introduced into the mutant virus's RT or integrase domains, replication could be abolished. Our observations suggest that caution should be exercised during endonuclease-based antiviral therapies; however, combination endonuclease therapies may prevent the emergence of resistance. PMID:26718067

  14. Apurinic/Apyrimidinic Endonucleases of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Protect against DNA Damage but Are Dispensable for the Growth of the Pathogen in Guinea Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Puri, Rupangi Verma; Reddy, P. Vineel; Tyagi, Anil K.

    2014-01-01

    In host cells, Mycobacterium tuberculosis encounters an array of reactive molecules capable of damaging its genome. Non-bulky DNA lesions are the most common damages produced on the exposure of the pathogen to reactive species and base excision repair (BER) pathway is involved in the repair of such damage. During BER, apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease enzymes repair the abasic sites that are generated after spontaneous DNA base loss or by the action of DNA glycosylases, which if left unrepaired lead to inhibition of replication and transcription. However, the role of AP endonucleases in imparting protection against DNA damage and in the growth and pathogenesis of M.tuberculosis has not yet been elucidated. To demonstrate the biological significance of these enzymes in M.tuberculosis, it would be desirable to disrupt the relevant genes and evaluate the resulting mutants for their ability to grow in the host and cause disease. In this study, we have generated M.tuberculosis mutants of the base excision repair (BER) system, disrupted in either one (MtbΔend or MtbΔxthA) or both the AP endonucleases (MtbΔendΔxthA). We demonstrate that these genes are crucial for bacteria to withstand alkylation and oxidative stress in vitro. In addition, the mutant disrupted in both the AP endonucleases (MtbΔendΔxthA) exhibited a significant reduction in its ability to survive inside human macrophages. However, infection of guinea pigs with either MtbΔend or MtbΔxthA or MtbΔendΔxthA resulted in the similar bacillary load and pathological damage in the organs as observed in the case of infection with wild-type M.tuberculosis. The implications of these observations are discussed. PMID:24800740

  15. 5' End-independent RNase J1 endonuclease cleavage of Bacillus subtilis model RNA.

    PubMed

    Deikus, Gintaras; Bechhofer, David H

    2011-10-01

    Bacillus subtilis trp leader RNA is a small (140-nucleotide) RNA that results from attenuation of trp operon transcription upon binding of the regulatory TRAP complex. Previously, endonucleolytic cleavage by ribonuclease RNase J1 in a 3'-proximal, single-stranded region was shown to be critical for initiation of trp leader RNA decay. RNase J1 is a dual-specificity enzyme, with both 5' exonucleolytic and endonucleolytic activities. Here, we provide in vivo and in vitro evidence that RNase J1 accesses its internal target site on trp leader RNA in a 5' end-independent manner. This has important implications for the role of RNase J1 in RNA decay. We also tested the involvement in trp leader RNA decay of the more recently discovered endonuclease RNase Y. Half-lives of several trp leader RNA constructs, which were designed to probe pathways of endonucleolytic versus exonucleolytic decay, were measured in an RNase Y-deficient mutant. Remarkably, the half-lives of these constructs were indistinguishable from their half-lives in an RNase J1-deficient mutant. These results suggest that lowering RNase Y concentration may affect RNA decay indirectly via an effect on RNase J1, which is thought to exist with RNase Y in a degradosome complex. To generalize our findings with trp leader RNA to other RNAs, we show that the mechanism of trp leader RNA decay is not dependent on TRAP binding. PMID:21862575

  16. Educating Students in Least Restrictive Environments: Instructional Preparation for Teachers. Series IV: Communication Skills. Series V: Legal, Philosophical and Social Issues: Implications for Handicapped Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scofield, Faith, Ed.

    The instructional units are designed for use by preservice regular education teachers to cover educating handicapped students in the least restrictive envirionment. The first series of units deal with teacher's communication skills. Objectives and enabling activities are listed as well for awareness and attitudinal factors. The bulk of the…

  17. Endonuclease G is a novel determinant of cardiac hypertrophy and mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    McDermott-Roe, Chris; Ye, Junmei; Ahmed, Rizwan; Sun, Xi-Ming; Serafín, Anna; Ware, James; Bottolo, Leonardo; Muckett, Phil; Cañas, Xavier; Zhang, Jisheng; Rowe, Glenn C; Buchan, Rachel; Lu, Han; Braithwaite, Adam; Mancini, Massimiliano; Hauton, David; Martí, Ramon; García-Arumí, Elena; Hubner, Norbert; Jacob, Howard; Serikawa, Tadao; Zidek, Vaclav; Papousek, Frantisek; Kolar, Frantisek; Cardona, Maria; Ruiz-Meana, Marisol; García-Dorado, David; Comella, Joan X; Felkin, Leanne E; Barton, Paul J R; Arany, Zoltan; Pravenec, Michal; Petretto, Enrico; Sanchis, Daniel; Cook, Stuart A

    2011-10-05

    Left ventricular mass (LVM) is a highly heritable trait and an independent risk factor for all-cause mortality. So far, genome-wide association studies have not identified the genetic factors that underlie LVM variation, and the regulatory mechanisms for blood-pressure-independent cardiac hypertrophy remain poorly understood. Unbiased systems genetics approaches in the rat now provide a powerful complementary tool to genome-wide association studies, and we applied integrative genomics to dissect a highly replicated, blood-pressure-independent LVM locus on rat chromosome 3p. Here we identified endonuclease G (Endog), which previously was implicated in apoptosis but not hypertrophy, as the gene at the locus, and we found a loss-of-function mutation in Endog that is associated with increased LVM and impaired cardiac function. Inhibition of Endog in cultured cardiomyocytes resulted in an increase in cell size and hypertrophic biomarkers in the absence of pro-hypertrophic stimulation. Genome-wide network analysis unexpectedly implicated ENDOG in fundamental mitochondrial processes that are unrelated to apoptosis. We showed direct regulation of ENDOG by ERR-α and PGC1α (which are master regulators of mitochondrial and cardiac function), interaction of ENDOG with the mitochondrial genome and ENDOG-mediated regulation of mitochondrial mass. At baseline, the Endog-deleted mouse heart had depleted mitochondria, mitochondrial dysfunction and elevated levels of reactive oxygen species, which were associated with enlarged and steatotic cardiomyocytes. Our study has further established the link between mitochondrial dysfunction, reactive oxygen species and heart disease and has uncovered a role for Endog in maladaptive cardiac hypertrophy.

  18. Modulation of action of wheat seedling endonucleases WEN1 and WEN2 by histones.

    PubMed

    Fedoreyeva, L I; Smirnova, T A; Kolomijtseva, G Ya; Vanyushin, B F

    2013-05-01

    Wheat core histones and various subfractions of histone H1 modulate differently the action of endonucleases WEN1 and WEN2 from wheat seedlings. The character of this modulation depends on the nature of the histone and the methylation status of the substrate DNA. The modulation of enzyme action occurs at different stages of processive DNA hydrolysis and is accompanied by changes in the site specificity of the enzyme action. It seems that endonuclease WEN1 prefers to bind with protein-free DNA stretches in histone H1-DNA complex. The endonuclease WEN1 does not compete with histone H1/6 for DNA binding sites, but it does compete with histone H1/1, probably for binding with methylated sites of DNA. Unlike histone H1, the core histone H2b binds with endonuclease WEN1 and significantly increases its action. This is associated with changes in the site specificity of the enzyme action that is manifested by a significant increase in the amount of low molecular weight oligonucleotides and mononucleotides produced as a result of hydrolysis of DNA fragments with 120-140-bp length. The WEN2 endonuclease binds with histone-DNA complexes only through histones. The action of WEN2 is increased or decreased depending on the nature of the histone. Histone H1/1 stimulated the exonuclease activity of WEN2. It is supposed that endonucleases WEN1 and WEN2, in addition to the catalytic domain, should have a regulatory domain that is involved in binding of histones. As histone H1 is mainly located in the linker chromatin areas, it is suggested that WEN2 should attack DNA just in the chromatin linker zones. As differentiated from WEN2, DNA hydrolysis with endonuclease WEN1 is increased in the presence of core histones and, in particular, of H2b. Endonuclease WEN1 initially attacks different DNA sites in chromatin than WEN2. Endonuclease WEN2 activity can be increased or diminished depending on presence of histone H1 subfractions. It seems that just different fractions of the histone H1 are

  19. Conformational Modification of Serpins Transforms Leukocyte Elastase Inhibitor into an Endonuclease Involved in Apoptosis▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Padron-Barthe, Laura; Leprêtre, Chloé; Martin, Elisabeth; Counis, Marie-France; Torriglia, Alicia

    2007-01-01

    The best-characterized biochemical feature of apoptosis is degradation of genomic DNA into oligonucleosomes. The endonuclease responsible for DNA degradation in caspase-dependent apoptosis is caspase-activated DNase. In caspase-independent apoptosis, different endonucleases may be activated according to the cell line and the original insult. Among the known effectors of caspase-independent cell death, L-DNase II (LEI [leukocyte elastase inhibitor]-derived DNase II) has been previously characterized by our laboratory. We have thus shown that this endonuclease derives from the serpin superfamily member LEI by posttranslational modification (A. Torriglia, P. Perani, J. Y. Brossas, E. Chaudun, J. Treton, Y. Courtois, and M. F. Counis, Mol. Cell. Biol. 18:3612-3619, 1998). In this work, we assessed the molecular mechanism involved in the change in the enzymatic activity of this molecule from an antiprotease to an endonuclease. We report that the cleavage of LEI by elastase at its reactive center loop abolishes its antiprotease activity and leads to a conformational modification that exposes an endonuclease active site and a nuclear localization signal. This represents a novel molecular mechanism for a complete functional conversion induced by changing the conformation of a serpin. We also show that this molecular transformation affects cellular fate and that both endonuclease activity and nuclear translocation of L-DNase II are needed to induce cell death. PMID:17403905

  20. Detection of possible restriction sites for type II restriction enzymes in DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Gagniuc, P; Cimponeriu, D; Ionescu-Tîrgovişte, C; Mihai, Andrada; Stavarachi, Monica; Mihai, T; Gavrilă, L

    2011-01-01

    In order to make a step forward in the knowledge of the mechanism operating in complex polygenic disorders such as diabetes and obesity, this paper proposes a new algorithm (PRSD -possible restriction site detection) and its implementation in Applied Genetics software. This software can be used for in silico detection of potential (hidden) recognition sites for endonucleases and for nucleotide repeats identification. The recognition sites for endonucleases may result from hidden sequences through deletion or insertion of a specific number of nucleotides. Tests were conducted on DNA sequences downloaded from NCBI servers using specific recognition sites for common type II restriction enzymes introduced in the software database (n = 126). Each possible recognition site indicated by the PRSD algorithm implemented in Applied Genetics was checked and confirmed by NEBcutter V2.0 and Webcutter 2.0 software. In the sequence NG_008724.1 (which includes 63632 nucleotides) we found a high number of potential restriction sites for ECO R1 that may be produced by deletion (n = 43 sites) or insertion (n = 591 sites) of one nucleotide. The second module of Applied Genetics has been designed to find simple repeats sizes with a real future in understanding the role of SNPs (Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms) in the pathogenesis of the complex metabolic disorders. We have tested the presence of simple repetitive sequences in five DNA sequence. The software indicated exact position of each repeats detected in the tested sequences. Future development of Applied Genetics can provide an alternative for powerful tools used to search for restriction sites or repetitive sequences or to improve genotyping methods.

  1. Flap Endonuclease 1 Limits Telomere Fragility on the Leading Strand*

    PubMed Central

    Teasley, Daniel C.; Parajuli, Shankar; Nguyen, Mai; Moore, Hayley R.; Alspach, Elise; Lock, Ying Jie; Honaker, Yuchi; Saharia, Abhishek; Piwnica-Worms, Helen; Stewart, Sheila A.

    2015-01-01

    The existence of redundant replication and repair systems that ensure genome stability underscores the importance of faithful DNA replication. Nowhere is this complexity more evident than in challenging DNA templates, including highly repetitive or transcribed sequences. Here, we demonstrate that flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1), a canonical lagging strand DNA replication protein, is required for normal, complete leading strand replication at telomeres. We find that the loss of FEN1 nuclease activity, but not DNA repair activities, results in leading strand-specific telomere fragility. Furthermore, we show that FEN1 depletion-induced telomere fragility is increased by RNA polymerase II inhibition and is rescued by ectopic RNase H1 expression. These data suggest that FEN1 limits leading strand-specific telomere fragility by processing RNA:DNA hybrid/flap intermediates that arise from co-directional collisions occurring between the replisome and RNA polymerase. Our data reveal the first molecular mechanism for leading strand-specific telomere fragility and the first known role for FEN1 in leading strand DNA replication. Because FEN1 mutations have been identified in human cancers, our findings raise the possibility that unresolved RNA:DNA hybrid structures contribute to the genomic instability associated with cancer. PMID:25922071

  2. DNA repair by the cryptic endonuclease activity of Mu transposase.

    PubMed

    Choi, Wonyoung; Harshey, Rasika M

    2010-06-01

    Phage Mu transposes by two distinct pathways depending on the specific stage of its life cycle. A common strand transfer intermediate is resolved differentially in the two pathways. During lytic growth, the intermediate is resolved by replication of Mu initiated within the flanking target DNA; during integration of infecting Mu, it is resolved without replication, by removal and repair of DNA from a previous host that is still attached to the ends of the incoming Mu genome. We have discovered that the cryptic endonuclease activity reported for the isolated C-terminal domain of the transposase MuA [Wu Z, Chaconas G (1995) A novel DNA binding and nuclease activity in domain III of Mu transposase: Evidence for a catalytic region involved in donor cleavage. EMBO J 14:3835-3843], which is not observed in the full-length protein or in the assembled transpososome in vitro, is required in vivo for removal of the attached host DNA or "5'flap" after the infecting Mu genome has integrated into the E. coli chromosome. Efficient flap removal also requires the host protein ClpX, which is known to interact with the C-terminus of MuA to remodel the transpososome for replication. We hypothesize that ClpX constitutes part of a highly regulated mechanism that unmasks the cryptic nuclease activity of MuA specifically in the repair pathway. PMID:20167799

  3. Conformational Dynamics of DNA Repair by Escherichia coli Endonuclease III*

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsov, Nikita A.; Kladova, Olga A.; Kuznetsova, Alexandra A.; Ishchenko, Alexander A.; Saparbaev, Murat K.; Zharkov, Dmitry O.; Fedorova, Olga S.

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli endonuclease III (Endo III or Nth) is a DNA glycosylase with a broad substrate specificity for oxidized or reduced pyrimidine bases. Endo III possesses two types of activities: N-glycosylase (hydrolysis of the N-glycosidic bond) and AP lyase (elimination of the 3′-phosphate of the AP-site). We report a pre-steady-state kinetic analysis of structural rearrangements of the DNA substrates and uncleavable ligands during their interaction with Endo III. Oligonucleotide duplexes containing 5,6-dihydrouracil, a natural abasic site, its tetrahydrofuran analog, and undamaged duplexes carried fluorescent DNA base analogs 2-aminopurine and 1,3-diaza-2-oxophenoxazine as environment-sensitive reporter groups. The results suggest that Endo III induces several fast sequential conformational changes in DNA during binding, lesion recognition, and adjustment to a catalytically competent conformation. A comparison of two fluorophores allowed us to distinguish between the events occurring in the damaged and undamaged DNA strand. Combining our data with the available structures of Endo III, we conclude that this glycosylase uses a multistep mechanism of damage recognition, which likely involves Gln41 and Leu81 as DNA lesion sensors. PMID:25869130

  4. Germline excision of transgenes in Aedes aegypti by homing endonucleases.

    PubMed

    Aryan, Azadeh; Anderson, Michelle A E; Myles, Kevin M; Adelman, Zach N

    2013-01-01

    Aedes (Ae.) aegypti is the primary vector for dengue viruses (serotypes1-4) and chikungunya virus. Homing endonucleases (HEs) are ancient selfish elements that catalyze double-stranded DNA breaks (DSB) in a highly specific manner. In this report, we show that the HEs Y2-I-AniI, I-CreI and I-SceI are all capable of catalyzing the excision of genomic segments from the Ae. aegypti genome in a heritable manner. Y2-I-AniI demonstrated the highest efficiency at two independent genomic targets, with 20-40% of Y2-I-AniI-treated individuals producing offspring that had lost the target transgene. HE-induced DSBs were found to be repaired via the single-strand annealing (SSA) and non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathways in a manner dependent on the availability of direct repeat sequences in the transgene. These results support the development of HE-based gene editing and gene drive strategies in Ae. aegypti, and confirm the utility of HEs in the manipulation and modification of transgenes in this important vector.

  5. Effects of Dimerization of Serratia marcescens Endonuclease on Water Dynamics.

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chuanying; Beck, Brian W.; Krause, Kurt; Weksberg, Tiffany E.; Pettitt, Bernard M.

    2007-02-15

    The research described in this product was performed in part in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The dynamics and structure of Serratia marcescens endonuclease and its neighboring solvent are investigated by molecular dynamics (MD). Comparisons are made with structural and biochemical experiments. The dimer form is physiologic and functions more processively than the monomer. We previously found a channel formed by connected clusters of waters from the active site to the dimer interface. Here, we show that dimerization clearly changes correlations in the water structure and dynamics in the active site not seen in the monomer. Our results indicate that water at the active sites of the dimer is less affected compared with bulk solvent than in the monomer where it has much slower characteristic relaxation times. Given that water is a required participant in the reaction, this gives a clear advantage to dimerization in the absence of an apparent ability to use both active sites simultaneously.

  6. Structure of Type IIL Restriction-Modification Enzyme MmeI in Complex with DNA Has Implications for Engineering New Specificities

    PubMed Central

    Callahan, Scott J.; Luyten, Yvette A.; Gupta, Yogesh K.; Wilson, Geoffrey G.; Roberts, Richard J.; Morgan, Richard D.; Aggarwal, Aneel K.

    2016-01-01

    The creation of restriction enzymes with programmable DNA-binding and -cleavage specificities has long been a goal of modern biology. The recently discovered Type IIL MmeI family of restriction-and-modification (RM) enzymes that possess a shared target recognition domain provides a framework for engineering such new specificities. However, a lack of structural information on Type IIL enzymes has limited the repertoire that can be rationally engineered. We report here a crystal structure of MmeI in complex with its DNA substrate and an S-adenosylmethionine analog (Sinefungin). The structure uncovers for the first time the interactions that underlie MmeI-DNA recognition and methylation (5’-TCCRAC-3’; R = purine) and provides a molecular basis for changing specificity at four of the six base pairs of the recognition sequence (5’-TCCRAC-3’). Surprisingly, the enzyme is resilient to specificity changes at the first position of the recognition sequence (5’-TCCRAC-3’). Collectively, the structure provides a basis for engineering further derivatives of MmeI and delineates which base pairs of the recognition sequence are more amenable to alterations than others. PMID:27082731

  7. Structure of the endonuclease IV homologue from Thermotoga maritima in the presence of active-site divalent metal ions

    SciTech Connect

    Tomanicek, Stephen J.; Hughes, Ronny C.; Ng, Joseph D.; Coates, Leighton

    2010-10-05

    The most frequent lesion in DNA is at apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites resulting from DNA-base losses. These AP-site lesions can stall DNA replication and lead to genome instability if left unrepaired. The AP endonucleases are an important class of enzymes that are involved in the repair of AP-site intermediates during damage-general DNA base-excision repair pathways. These enzymes hydrolytically cleave the 5{prime}-phosphodiester bond at an AP site to generate a free 3{prime}-hydroxyl group and a 5{prime}-terminal sugar phosphate using their AP nuclease activity. Specifically, Thermotoga maritima endonuclease IV is a member of the second conserved AP endonuclease family that includes Escherichia coli endonuclease IV, which is the archetype of the AP endonuclease superfamily. In order to more fully characterize the AP endonuclease family of enzymes, two X-ray crystal structures of the T. maritima endonuclease IV homologue were determined in the presence of divalent metal ions bound in the active-site region. These structures of the T. maritima endonuclease IV homologue further revealed the use of the TIM-barrel fold and the trinuclear metal binding site as important highly conserved structural elements that are involved in DNA-binding and AP-site repair processes in the AP endonuclease superfamily.

  8. Cloning and nucleotide sequence of the genes coding for the Sau96I restriction and modification enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Szilák, L; Venetianer, P; Kiss, A

    1990-01-01

    The genes coding for the GGNCC specific Sau96I restriction and modification enzymes were cloned and expressed in E. coli. The DNA sequence predicts a 430 amino acid protein (Mr: 49,252) for the methyltransferase and a 261 amino acid protein (Mr: 30,486) for the endonuclease. No protein sequence similarity was detected between the Sau96I methyltransferase and endonuclease. The methyltransferase contains the sequence elements characteristic for m5C-methyltransferases. In addition to this, M.Sau96I shows similarity, also in the variable region, with one m5C-methyltransferase (M.SinI) which has closely related recognition specificity (GGA/TCC). M.Sau96I methylates the internal cytosine within the GGNCC recognition sequence. The Sau96I endonuclease appears to act as a monomer. Images PMID:2204026

  9. Cell-autonomous progeroid changes in conditional mouse models for repair endonuclease XPG deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Barnhoorn, Sander; Uittenboogaard, Lieneke M.; Jaarsma, Dick; Vermeij, Wilbert P.; Tresini, Maria; Weymaere, Michael; Menoni, Hervé; Brandt, Renata M. C.; de Waard, Monique C.; Botter, Sander M.; Sarker, Altaf H.; Jaspers, Nicolaas G. J.; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T. J.; Cooper, Priscilla K.; Hoeijmakers, Jan H. J.; van der Pluijm, Ingrid; Niedernhofer, Laura J.

    2014-10-09

    As part of the Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER) process, the endonuclease XPG is involved in repair of helix-distorting DNA lesions, but the protein has also been implicated in several other DNA repair systems, complicating genotype-phenotype relationship in XPG patients. Defects in XPG can cause either the cancer-prone condition xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) alone, or XP combined with the severe neurodevelopmental disorder Cockayne Syndrome (CS), or the infantile lethal cerebro-oculo-facio-skeletal (COFS) syndrome, characterized by dramatic growth failure, progressive neurodevelopmental abnormalities and greatly reduced life expectancy. Here, we present a novel (conditional) Xpg-/- mouse model which—in a C57BL6/FVB F1 hybrid genetic background—displays many progeroid features, including cessation of growth, loss of subcutaneous fat, kyphosis, osteoporosis, retinal photoreceptor loss, liver aging, extensive neurodegeneration, and a short lifespan of 4–5 months. We show that deletion of XPG specifically in the liver reproduces the progeroid features in the liver, yet abolishes the effect on growth or lifespan. In addition, specific XPG deletion in neurons and glia of the forebrain creates a progressive neurodegenerative phenotype that shows many characteristics of human XPG deficiency. Our findings therefore exclude that both the liver as well as the neurological phenotype are a secondary consequence of derailment in other cell types, organs or tissues (e.g. vascular abnormalities) and support a cell-autonomous origin caused by the DNA repair defect itself. In addition they allow the dissection of the complex aging process in tissue- and cell-type-specific components. Moreover, our data highlight the critical importance of genetic background in mouse aging studies, establish the Xpg-/- mouse as a valid model for the severe form of human XPG patients and segmental accelerated aging, and strengthen the link between DNA damage and aging.

  10. Cell-Autonomous Progeroid Changes in Conditional Mouse Models for Repair Endonuclease XPG Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Vermeij, Wilbert P.; Tresini, Maria; Weymaere, Michael; Menoni, Hervé; Brandt, Renata M. C.; de Waard, Monique C.; Botter, Sander M.; Sarker, Altaf H.; Jaspers, Nicolaas G. J.; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T. J.; Cooper, Priscilla K.; Hoeijmakers, Jan H. J.; van der Pluijm, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    As part of the Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER) process, the endonuclease XPG is involved in repair of helix-distorting DNA lesions, but the protein has also been implicated in several other DNA repair systems, complicating genotype-phenotype relationship in XPG patients. Defects in XPG can cause either the cancer-prone condition xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) alone, or XP combined with the severe neurodevelopmental disorder Cockayne Syndrome (CS), or the infantile lethal cerebro-oculo-facio-skeletal (COFS) syndrome, characterized by dramatic growth failure, progressive neurodevelopmental abnormalities and greatly reduced life expectancy. Here, we present a novel (conditional) Xpg−/− mouse model which -in a C57BL6/FVB F1 hybrid genetic background- displays many progeroid features, including cessation of growth, loss of subcutaneous fat, kyphosis, osteoporosis, retinal photoreceptor loss, liver aging, extensive neurodegeneration, and a short lifespan of 4–5 months. We show that deletion of XPG specifically in the liver reproduces the progeroid features in the liver, yet abolishes the effect on growth or lifespan. In addition, specific XPG deletion in neurons and glia of the forebrain creates a progressive neurodegenerative phenotype that shows many characteristics of human XPG deficiency. Our findings therefore exclude that both the liver as well as the neurological phenotype are a secondary consequence of derailment in other cell types, organs or tissues (e.g. vascular abnormalities) and support a cell-autonomous origin caused by the DNA repair defect itself. In addition they allow the dissection of the complex aging process in tissue- and cell-type-specific components. Moreover, our data highlight the critical importance of genetic background in mouse aging studies, establish the Xpg−/− mouse as a valid model for the severe form of human XPG patients and segmental accelerated aging, and strengthen the link between DNA damage and aging. PMID:25299392

  11. Cell-autonomous progeroid changes in conditional mouse models for repair endonuclease XPG deficiency

    DOE PAGES

    Barnhoorn, Sander; Uittenboogaard, Lieneke M.; Jaarsma, Dick; Vermeij, Wilbert P.; Tresini, Maria; Weymaere, Michael; Menoni, Hervé; Brandt, Renata M. C.; de Waard, Monique C.; Botter, Sander M.; et al

    2014-10-09

    As part of the Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER) process, the endonuclease XPG is involved in repair of helix-distorting DNA lesions, but the protein has also been implicated in several other DNA repair systems, complicating genotype-phenotype relationship in XPG patients. Defects in XPG can cause either the cancer-prone condition xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) alone, or XP combined with the severe neurodevelopmental disorder Cockayne Syndrome (CS), or the infantile lethal cerebro-oculo-facio-skeletal (COFS) syndrome, characterized by dramatic growth failure, progressive neurodevelopmental abnormalities and greatly reduced life expectancy. Here, we present a novel (conditional) Xpg-/- mouse model which—in a C57BL6/FVB F1 hybrid genetic background—displays manymore » progeroid features, including cessation of growth, loss of subcutaneous fat, kyphosis, osteoporosis, retinal photoreceptor loss, liver aging, extensive neurodegeneration, and a short lifespan of 4–5 months. We show that deletion of XPG specifically in the liver reproduces the progeroid features in the liver, yet abolishes the effect on growth or lifespan. In addition, specific XPG deletion in neurons and glia of the forebrain creates a progressive neurodegenerative phenotype that shows many characteristics of human XPG deficiency. Our findings therefore exclude that both the liver as well as the neurological phenotype are a secondary consequence of derailment in other cell types, organs or tissues (e.g. vascular abnormalities) and support a cell-autonomous origin caused by the DNA repair defect itself. In addition they allow the dissection of the complex aging process in tissue- and cell-type-specific components. Moreover, our data highlight the critical importance of genetic background in mouse aging studies, establish the Xpg-/- mouse as a valid model for the severe form of human XPG patients and segmental accelerated aging, and strengthen the link between DNA damage and aging.« less

  12. Methionine restriction and lifespan control

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Byung Cheon; Kaya, Alaattin; Gladyshev, Vadim N.

    2016-01-01

    Dietary restriction (DR) without malnutrition is associated with longevity in various organisms. However, it has also been shown that reduced calorie intake is often ineffective in extending lifespan. Selecting optimal dietary regimens for DR studies is complicated, as the same regimen may lead to different outcomes depending on genotype and environmental factors. Recent studies suggested that interventions such as moderate protein restriction with/without adequate nutrition (e.g. particular amino acids or carbohydrates) may have additional beneficial effects mediated by certain metabolic and hormonal factors implicated in the biology of aging, regardless of total calorie intake. In particular, it was shown that restriction of a single amino acid, methionine, can mimic the effects of DR and extend lifespan in various model organisms. We discuss beneficial effects of methionine-restricted (MR) diet, the molecular pathways involved, and the use of this regimen in longevity interventions. PMID:26663138

  13. Type III restriction-modification enzymes: a historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Rao, Desirazu N; Dryden, David T F; Bheemanaik, Shivakumara

    2014-01-01

    Restriction endonucleases interact with DNA at specific sites leading to cleavage of DNA. Bacterial DNA is protected from restriction endonuclease cleavage by modifying the DNA using a DNA methyltransferase. Based on their molecular structure, sequence recognition, cleavage position and cofactor requirements, restriction-modification (R-M) systems are classified into four groups. Type III R-M enzymes need to interact with two separate unmethylated DNA sequences in inversely repeated head-to-head orientations for efficient cleavage to occur at a defined location (25-27 bp downstream of one of the recognition sites). Like the Type I R-M enzymes, Type III R-M enzymes possess a sequence-specific ATPase activity for DNA cleavage. ATP hydrolysis is required for the long-distance communication between the sites before cleavage. Different models, based on 1D diffusion and/or 3D-DNA looping, exist to explain how the long-distance interaction between the two recognition sites takes place. Type III R-M systems are found in most sequenced bacteria. Genome sequencing of many pathogenic bacteria also shows the presence of a number of phase-variable Type III R-M systems, which play a role in virulence. A growing number of these enzymes are being subjected to biochemical and genetic studies, which, when combined with ongoing structural analyses, promise to provide details for mechanisms of DNA recognition and catalysis.

  14. Endonucleases: new tools to edit the mouse genome.

    PubMed

    Wijshake, Tobias; Baker, Darren J; van de Sluis, Bart

    2014-10-01

    Mouse transgenesis has been instrumental in determining the function of genes in the pathophysiology of human diseases and modification of genes by homologous recombination in mouse embryonic stem cells remains a widely used technology. However, this approach harbors a number of disadvantages, as it is time-consuming and quite laborious. Over the last decade a number of new genome editing technologies have been developed, including zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated (CRISPR/Cas). These systems are characterized by a designed DNA binding protein or RNA sequence fused or co-expressed with a non-specific endonuclease, respectively. The engineered DNA binding protein or RNA sequence guides the nuclease to a specific target sequence in the genome to induce a double strand break. The subsequent activation of the DNA repair machinery then enables the introduction of gene modifications at the target site, such as gene disruption, correction or insertion. Nuclease-mediated genome editing has numerous advantages over conventional gene targeting, including increased efficiency in gene editing, reduced generation time of mutant mice, and the ability to mutagenize multiple genes simultaneously. Although nuclease-driven modifications in the genome are a powerful tool to generate mutant mice, there are concerns about off-target cleavage, especially when using the CRISPR/Cas system. Here, we describe the basic principles of these new strategies in mouse genome manipulation, their inherent advantages, and their potential disadvantages compared to current technologies used to study gene function in mouse models. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: From Genome to Function.

  15. Site-specific DNA transesterification catalyzed by a restriction enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Sasnauskas, Giedrius; Connolly, Bernard A.; Halford, Stephen E.; Siksnys, Virginijus

    2007-01-01

    Most restriction endonucleases use Mg2+ to hydrolyze phosphodiester bonds at specific DNA sites. We show here that BfiI, a metal-independent restriction enzyme from the phospholipase D superfamily, catalyzes both DNA hydrolysis and transesterification reactions at its recognition site. In the presence of alcohols such as ethanol or glycerol, it attaches the alcohol covalently to the 5′ terminus of the cleaved DNA. Under certain conditions, the terminal 3′-OH of one DNA strand can attack the target phosphodiester bond in the other strand to create a DNA hairpin. Transesterification reactions on DNA with phosphorothioate linkages at the target bond proceed with retention of stereoconfiguration at the phosphorus, indicating, uniquely for a restriction enzyme, a two-step mechanism. We propose that BfiI first makes a covalent enzyme–DNA intermediate, and then it resolves it by a nucleophilic attack of water or an alcohol, to yield hydrolysis or transesterification products, respectively. PMID:17267608

  16. MHC Class II-Restricted Presentation of the Major House Dust Mite Allergen Der p 1 Is GILT-Dependent: Implications for Allergic Asthma

    PubMed Central

    West, Laura Ciaccia; Grotzke, Jeff E.; Cresswell, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Gamma-interferon-inducible lysosomal thiol reductase (GILT) is known to reduce disulfide bonds present in proteins internalized by antigen presenting cells, facilitating optimal processing and presentation of peptides on Major Histocompatibility Complex class II molecules, as well as the subsequent activation of CD4-positive T lymphocytes. Here, we show that GILT is required for class II-restricted processing and presentation of immunodominant epitopes from the major house dust mite allergen Der p 1. In the absence of GILT, CD4-positive T cell responses to Der p 1 are significantly reduced, resulting in mitigated allergic airway inflammation in response to Der p 1 and house dust mite extracts in a murine model of asthma. PMID:23326313

  17. Analysis of restriction enzyme-induced DNA double-strand breaks in Chinese hamster ovary cells by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis: implications for chromosome damage.

    PubMed

    Ager, D D; Phillips, J W; Columna, E A; Winegar, R A; Morgan, W F

    1991-11-01

    Restriction enzymes can be electroporated into mammalian cells, and the induced DNA double-strand breaks can lead to aberrations in metaphase chromosomes. Chinese hamster ovary cells were electroporated with PstI, which generates 3' cohesive-end breaks, PvuII, which generates blunt-end breaks, or XbaI, which generates 5' cohesive-end breaks. Although all three restriction enzymes induced similar numbers of aberrant metaphase cells, PvuII was dramatically more effective at inducing both exchange-type and deletion-type chromosome aberrations. Our cytogenetic studies also indicated that enzymes are active within cells for only a short time. We used pulsed-field gel electrophoresis to investigate (i) how long it takes for enzymes to cleave DNA after electroporation into cells, (ii) how long enzymes are active in the cells, and (iii) how the DNA double-strand breaks induced are related to the aberrations observed in metaphase chromosomes. At the same concentrations used in the cytogenetic studies, all enzymes were active within 10 min of electroporation. PstI and PvuII showed a distinct peak in break formation at 20 min, whereas XbaI showed a gradual increase in break frequency over time. Another increase in the number of breaks observed with all three enzymes at 2 and 3 h after electroporation was probably due to nonspecific DNA degradation in a subpopulation of enzyme-damaged cells that lysed after enzyme exposure. Break frequency and chromosome aberration frequency were inversely related: The blunt-end cutter PvuII gave rise to the most aberrations but the fewest breaks, suggesting that it is the type of break rather than the break frequency that is important for chromosome aberration formation.

  18. Restriction enzyme body doubles and PCR cloning: on the general use of type IIs restriction enzymes for cloning.

    PubMed

    Tóth, Eszter; Huszár, Krisztina; Bencsura, Petra; Kulcsár, Péter István; Vodicska, Barbara; Nyeste, Antal; Welker, Zsombor; Tóth, Szilvia; Welker, Ervin

    2014-01-01

    The procedure described here allows the cloning of PCR fragments containing a recognition site of the restriction endonuclease (Type IIP) used for cloning in the sequence of the insert. A Type IIS endonuclease--a Body Double of the Type IIP enzyme--is used to generate the same protruding palindrome. Thus, the insert can be cloned to the Type IIP site of the vector without digesting the PCR product with the same Type IIP enzyme. We achieve this by incorporating the recognition site of a Type IIS restriction enzyme that cleaves the DNA outside of its recognition site in the PCR primer in such a way that the cutting positions straddle the desired overhang sequence. Digestion of the PCR product by the Body Double generates the required overhang. Hitherto the use of Type IIS restriction enzymes in cloning reactions has only been used for special applications, the approach presented here makes Type IIS enzymes as useful as Type IIP enzymes for general cloning purposes. To assist in finding Body Double enzymes, we summarised the available Type IIS enzymes which are potentially useful for Body Double cloning and created an online program (http://group.szbk.u-szeged.hu/welkergr/body_double/index.html) for the selection of suitable Body Double enzymes and the design of the appropriate primers.

  19. Gamma radiation increases endonuclease-dependent L1 retrotransposition in a cultured cell assay.

    PubMed

    Farkash, Evan A; Kao, Gary D; Horman, Shane R; Prak, Eline T Luning

    2006-01-01

    Long Interspersed Elements (LINE-1s, L1s) are the most active mobile elements in the human genome and account for a significant fraction of its mass. The propagation of L1 in the human genome requires disruption and repair of DNA at the site of integration. As Barbara McClintock first hypothesized, genotoxic stress may contribute to the mobilization of transposable elements, and conversely, element mobility may contribute to genotoxic stress. We tested the ability of genotoxic agents to increase L1 retrotransposition in a cultured cell assay. We observed that cells exposed to gamma radiation exhibited increased levels of L1 retrotransposition. The L1 retrotransposition frequency was proportional to the number of phosphorylated H2AX foci, an indicator of genotoxic stress. To explore the role of the L1 endonuclease in this context, endonuclease-deficient tagged L1 constructs were produced and tested for their activity in irradiated cells. The activity of the endonuclease-deficient L1 was very low in irradiated cells, suggesting that most L1 insertions in irradiated cells still use the L1 endonuclease. Consistent with this interpretation, DNA sequences that flank L1 insertions in irradiated cells harbored target site duplications. These results suggest that increased L1 retrotransposition in irradiated cells is endonuclease dependent. The mobilization of L1 in irradiated cells potentially contributes to genomic instability and could be a driving force for secondary mutations in patients undergoing radiation therapy. PMID:16507671

  20. Identification and characterization of influenza variants resistant to a viral endonuclease inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Song, Min-Suk; Kumar, Gyanendra; Shadrick, William R; Zhou, Wei; Jeevan, Trushar; Li, Zhenmei; Slavish, P Jake; Fabrizio, Thomas P; Yoon, Sun-Woo; Webb, Thomas R; Webby, Richard J; White, Stephen W

    2016-03-29

    The influenza endonuclease is an essential subdomain of the viral RNA polymerase. It processes host pre-mRNAs to serve as primers for viral mRNA and is an attractive target for antiinfluenza drug discovery. Compound L-742,001 is a prototypical endonuclease inhibitor, and we found that repeated passaging of influenza virus in the presence of this drug did not lead to the development of resistant mutant strains. Reduced sensitivity to L-742,001 could only be induced by creating point mutations via a random mutagenesis strategy. These mutations mapped to the endonuclease active site where they can directly impact inhibitor binding. Engineered viruses containing the mutations showed resistance to L-742,001 both in vitro and in vivo, with only a modest reduction in fitness. Introduction of the mutations into a second virus also increased its resistance to the inhibitor. Using the isolated wild-type and mutant endonuclease domains, we used kinetics, inhibitor binding and crystallography to characterize how the two most significant mutations elicit resistance to L-742,001. These studies lay the foundation for the development of a new class of influenza therapeutics with reduced potential for the development of clinical endonuclease inhibitor-resistant influenza strains. PMID:26976575

  1. Identification and characterization of influenza variants resistant to a viral endonuclease inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Song, Min-Suk; Kumar, Gyanendra; Shadrick, William R.; Zhou, Wei; Jeevan, Trushar; Li, Zhenmei; Slavish, P. Jake; Yoon, Sun-Woo; Webb, Thomas R.; Webby, Richard J.; White, Stephen W.

    2016-01-01

    The influenza endonuclease is an essential subdomain of the viral RNA polymerase. It processes host pre-mRNAs to serve as primers for viral mRNA and is an attractive target for antiinfluenza drug discovery. Compound L-742,001 is a prototypical endonuclease inhibitor, and we found that repeated passaging of influenza virus in the presence of this drug did not lead to the development of resistant mutant strains. Reduced sensitivity to L-742,001 could only be induced by creating point mutations via a random mutagenesis strategy. These mutations mapped to the endonuclease active site where they can directly impact inhibitor binding. Engineered viruses containing the mutations showed resistance to L-742,001 both in vitro and in vivo, with only a modest reduction in fitness. Introduction of the mutations into a second virus also increased its resistance to the inhibitor. Using the isolated wild-type and mutant endonuclease domains, we used kinetics, inhibitor binding and crystallography to characterize how the two most significant mutations elicit resistance to L-742,001. These studies lay the foundation for the development of a new class of influenza therapeutics with reduced potential for the development of clinical endonuclease inhibitor-resistant influenza strains. PMID:26976575

  2. Gamma radiation increases endonuclease-dependent L1 retrotransposition in a cultured cell assay.

    PubMed

    Farkash, Evan A; Kao, Gary D; Horman, Shane R; Prak, Eline T Luning

    2006-01-01

    Long Interspersed Elements (LINE-1s, L1s) are the most active mobile elements in the human genome and account for a significant fraction of its mass. The propagation of L1 in the human genome requires disruption and repair of DNA at the site of integration. As Barbara McClintock first hypothesized, genotoxic stress may contribute to the mobilization of transposable elements, and conversely, element mobility may contribute to genotoxic stress. We tested the ability of genotoxic agents to increase L1 retrotransposition in a cultured cell assay. We observed that cells exposed to gamma radiation exhibited increased levels of L1 retrotransposition. The L1 retrotransposition frequency was proportional to the number of phosphorylated H2AX foci, an indicator of genotoxic stress. To explore the role of the L1 endonuclease in this context, endonuclease-deficient tagged L1 constructs were produced and tested for their activity in irradiated cells. The activity of the endonuclease-deficient L1 was very low in irradiated cells, suggesting that most L1 insertions in irradiated cells still use the L1 endonuclease. Consistent with this interpretation, DNA sequences that flank L1 insertions in irradiated cells harbored target site duplications. These results suggest that increased L1 retrotransposition in irradiated cells is endonuclease dependent. The mobilization of L1 in irradiated cells potentially contributes to genomic instability and could be a driving force for secondary mutations in patients undergoing radiation therapy.

  3. Crystal structure and assembly of the functional Nanoarchaeum equitans tRNA splicing endonuclease

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Michelle; Xue, Song; Erdman, Rachel; Randau, Lennart; Söll, Dieter; Li, Hong

    2009-10-27

    The RNA splicing and processing endonuclease from Nanoarchaeum equitans (NEQ) belongs to the recently identified ({alpha}{beta}){sub 2} family of splicing endonucleases that require two different subunits for splicing activity. N. equitans splicing endonuclease comprises the catalytic subunit (NEQ205) and the structural subunit (NEQ261). Here, we report the crystal structure of the functional NEQ enzyme at 2.1 {angstrom} containing both subunits, as well as that of the NEQ261 subunit alone at 2.2 {angstrom}. The functional enzyme resembles previously known {alpha}{sub 2} and {alpha}{sub 4} endonucleases but forms a heterotetramer: a dimer of two heterodimers of the catalytic subunit (NEQ205) and the structural subunit (NEQ261). Surprisingly, NEQ261 alone forms a homodimer, similar to the previously known homodimer of the catalytic subunit. The homodimers of isolated subunits are inhibitory to heterodimerization as illustrated by a covalently linked catalytic homodimer that had no RNA cleavage activity upon mixing with the structural subunit. Detailed structural comparison reveals a more favorable hetero- than homodimerization interface, thereby suggesting a possible regulation mechanism of enzyme assembly through available subunits. Finally, the uniquely flexible active site of the NEQ endonuclease provides a possible explanation for its broader substrate specificity.

  4. Application of natural and amplification created restriction sites for the diagnosis of PKU mutations.

    PubMed Central

    Eiken, H G; Odland, E; Boman, H; Skjelkvåle, L; Engebretsen, L F; Apold, J

    1991-01-01

    PCR amplification, either conventional, or as site directed mutagenesis using primers with mismatched 3'-ends, followed by restriction endonuclease digestion, provides rapid, non-isotope assays of known mutations in the human phenylalanine hydroxylase gene. Such assays were shown to have the potential to detect all of the 18 presently reported phenylketonuria mutations. The practical applicability of this approach was demonstrated for eight mutations in Norwegian phenylketonuria patients, among them the most common ones. Images PMID:1851292

  5. Cellular inhibitor of apoptosis protein 1 ubiquitinates endonuclease G but does not affect endonuclease G-mediated cell death.

    PubMed

    Seo, Tae Woong; Lee, Ji Sun; Yoo, Soon Ji

    2014-09-01

    Inhibitors of Apoptosis Proteins (IAPs) are evolutionarily well conserved and have been recognized as the key negative regulators of apoptosis. Recently, the role of IAPs as E3 ligases through the Ring domain was revealed. Using proteomic analysis to explore potential target proteins of DIAP1, we identified Drosophila Endonuclease G (dEndoG), which is known as an effector of caspase-independent cell death. In this study, we demonstrate that human EndoG interacts with IAPs, including human cellular Inhibitor of Apoptosis Protein 1 (cIAP1). EndoG was ubiquitinated by IAPs in vitro and in human cell lines. Interestingly, cIAP1 was capable of ubiquitinating EndoG in the presence of wild-type and mutant Ubiquitin, in which all lysines except K63 were mutated to arginine. cIAP1 expression did not change the half-life of EndoG and cIAP1 depletion did not alter its levels. Expression of dEndoG 54310, in which the mitochondrial localization sequence was deleted, led to cell death that could not be suppressed by DIAP1 in S2 cells. Moreover, EndoG-mediated cell death induced by oxidative stress in HeLa cells was not affected by cIAP1. Therefore, these results indicate that IAPs interact and ubiquitinate EndoG via K63-mediated isopeptide linkages without affecting EndoG levels and EndoG-mediated cell death, suggesting that EndoG ubiquitination by IAPs may serve as a regulatory signal independent of proteasomal degradation.

  6. N-acylhydrazone inhibitors of influenza virus PA endonuclease with versatile metal binding modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carcelli, Mauro; Rogolino, Dominga; Gatti, Anna; de Luca, Laura; Sechi, Mario; Kumar, Gyanendra; White, Stephen W.; Stevaert, Annelies; Naesens, Lieve

    2016-08-01

    Influenza virus PA endonuclease has recently emerged as an attractive target for the development of novel antiviral therapeutics. This is an enzyme with divalent metal ion(s) (Mg2+ or Mn2+) in its catalytic site: chelation of these metal cofactors is an attractive strategy to inhibit enzymatic activity. Here we report the activity of a series of N-acylhydrazones in an enzymatic assay with PA-Nter endonuclease, as well as in cell-based influenza vRNP reconstitution and virus yield assays. Several N-acylhydrazones were found to have promising anti-influenza activity in the low micromolar concentration range and good selectivity. Computational docking studies are carried on to investigate the key features that determine inhibition of the endonuclease enzyme by N-acylhydrazones. Moreover, we here describe the crystal structure of PA-Nter in complex with one of the most active inhibitors, revealing its interactions within the protein’s active site.

  7. The DNA repair endonuclease Mus81 facilitates fast DNA replication in the absence of exogenous damage

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Haiqing; Martin, Melvenia M.; Regairaz, Marie; Huang, Liang; You, Yang; Lin, Chi-Mei; Ryan, Michael; Kim, RyangGuk; Shimura, Tsutomu; Pommier, Yves; Aladjem, Mirit I.

    2015-01-01

    The Mus81 endonuclease resolves recombination intermediates and mediates cellular responses to exogenous replicative stress. Here, we show that Mus81 also regulates the rate of DNA replication during normal growth by promoting replication fork progression while reducing the frequency of replication initiation events. In the absence of Mus81 endonuclease activity, DNA synthesis is slowed and replication initiation events are more frequent. In addition, Mus81 deficient cells fail to recover from exposure to low doses of replication inhibitors and cell viability is dependent on the XPF endonuclease. Despite an increase in replication initiation frequency, cells lacking Mus81 use the same pool of replication origins as Mus81-expressing cells. Therefore, decelerated DNA replication in Mus81 deficient cells does not initiate from cryptic or latent origins not used during normal growth. These results indicate that Mus81 plays a key role in determining the rate of DNA replication without activating a novel group of replication origins. PMID:25879486

  8. The DNA repair endonuclease Mus81 facilitates fast DNA replication in the absence of exogenous damage.

    PubMed

    Fu, Haiqing; Martin, Melvenia M; Regairaz, Marie; Huang, Liang; You, Yang; Lin, Chi-Mei; Ryan, Michael; Kim, RyangGuk; Shimura, Tsutomu; Pommier, Yves; Aladjem, Mirit I

    2015-01-01

    The Mus81 endonuclease resolves recombination intermediates and mediates cellular responses to exogenous replicative stress. Here, we show that Mus81 also regulates the rate of DNA replication during normal growth by promoting replication fork progression while reducing the frequency of replication initiation events. In the absence of Mus81 endonuclease activity, DNA synthesis is slowed and replication initiation events are more frequent. In addition, Mus81-deficient cells fail to recover from exposure to low doses of replication inhibitors and cell viability is dependent on the XPF endonuclease. Despite an increase in replication initiation frequency, cells lacking Mus81 use the same pool of replication origins as Mus81-expressing cells. Therefore, decelerated DNA replication in Mus81-deficient cells does not initiate from cryptic or latent origins not used during normal growth. These results indicate that Mus81 plays a key role in determining the rate of DNA replication without activating a novel group of replication origins. PMID:25879486

  9. RNA-dependent DNA endonuclease Cas9 of the CRISPR system: Holy Grail of genome editing?

    PubMed

    Gasiunas, Giedrius; Siksnys, Virginijus

    2013-11-01

    Tailor-made nucleases for precise genome modification, such as zinc finger or TALE nucleases, currently represent the state-of-the-art for genome editing. These nucleases combine a programmable protein module which guides the enzyme to the target site with a nuclease domain which cuts DNA at the addressed site. Reprogramming of these nucleases to cut genomes at specific locations requires major protein engineering efforts. RNA-guided DNA endonuclease Cas9 of the type II (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat) CRISPR-Cas system uses CRISPR RNA (crRNA) as a guide to locate the DNA target and the Cas9 protein to cut DNA. Easy programmability of the Cas9 endonuclease using customizable RNAs brings unprecedented flexibility and versatility for targeted genome modification. We highlight the potential of the Cas9 RNA-guided DNA endonuclease as a novel tool for genome surgery, and discuss possible constraints and future prospects.

  10. Simple knockout by electroporation of engineered endonucleases into intact rat embryos

    PubMed Central

    Kaneko, Takehito; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Mashimo, Tomoji

    2014-01-01

    Engineered endonucleases, such as zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), and the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated (Cas) system, provide a powerful approach for genome editing in animals. However, the microinjection of endonucleases into embryos requires a high skill level, is time consuming, and may cause damage to embryos. Here, we demonstrate that the electroporation of endonuclease mRNAs into intact embryos can induce editing at targeted loci and efficiently produce knockout rats. It is noteworthy that the electroporation of ZFNs resulted in an embryonic survival rate (91%) and a genome-editing rate (73%) that were more than 2-fold higher than the corresponding rates from conventional microinjection. Electroporation technology provides a simple and effective method to produce knockout animals. PMID:25269785

  11. N-acylhydrazone inhibitors of influenza virus PA endonuclease with versatile metal binding modes

    PubMed Central

    Carcelli, Mauro; Rogolino, Dominga; Gatti, Anna; De Luca, Laura; Sechi, Mario; Kumar, Gyanendra; White, Stephen W.; Stevaert, Annelies; Naesens, Lieve

    2016-01-01

    Influenza virus PA endonuclease has recently emerged as an attractive target for the development of novel antiviral therapeutics. This is an enzyme with divalent metal ion(s) (Mg2+ or Mn2+) in its catalytic site: chelation of these metal cofactors is an attractive strategy to inhibit enzymatic activity. Here we report the activity of a series of N-acylhydrazones in an enzymatic assay with PA-Nter endonuclease, as well as in cell-based influenza vRNP reconstitution and virus yield assays. Several N-acylhydrazones were found to have promising anti-influenza activity in the low micromolar concentration range and good selectivity. Computational docking studies are carried on to investigate the key features that determine inhibition of the endonuclease enzyme by N-acylhydrazones. Moreover, we here describe the crystal structure of PA-Nter in complex with one of the most active inhibitors, revealing its interactions within the protein’s active site. PMID:27510745

  12. A novel label-free fluorescence strategy for methyltransferase activity assay based on dsDNA-templated copper nanoparticles coupled with an endonuclease-assisted signal transduction system.

    PubMed

    Lai, Q Q; Liu, M D; Gu, C C; Nie, H G; Xu, X J; Li, Z H; Yang, Z; Huang, S M

    2016-02-21

    Evaluating DNA methyltransferase (MTase) activity has received considerable attention due to its significance in the fields of early cancer clinical diagnostics and drug discovery. Herein, we proposed a novel label-free fluorescence method for MTase activity assay by coupling double-stranded DNA (dsDNA)-templated copper nanoparticles (CuNPs) with an endonuclease-assisted signal transduction system. In this strategy, dsDNA molecules were first methylated by DNA adenine methylation (Dam) MTase and then cleaved by the methylation-sensitive restriction endonuclease DpnI. The cleaved DNA fragments could not act as efficient templates for the formation of fluorescent CuNPs and thus no fluorescence signal was produced. Under optimized experimental conditions, the developed strategy exhibited a sensitive fluorescence response to Dam MTase activity. This strategy was also demonstrated to provide an excellent platform to the inhibitor screening for Dam MTase. These results demonstrated the great potential for the practical applications of the proposed strategy for Dam MTase activity assay. PMID:26764536

  13. Ab initio DNA synthesis by Bst polymerase in the presence of nicking endonucleases Nt.AlwI, Nb.BbvCI, and Nb.BsmI.

    PubMed

    Antipova, Valeriya N; Zheleznaya, Lyudmila A; Zyrina, Nadezhda V

    2014-08-01

    In the absence of added DNA, thermophilic DNA polymerases synthesize double-stranded DNA from free dNTPs, which consist of numerous repetitive units (ab initio DNA synthesis). The addition of thermophilic restriction endonuclease (REase), or nicking endonuclease (NEase), effectively stimulates ab initio DNA synthesis and determines the nucleotide sequence of reaction products. We have found that NEases Nt.AlwI, Nb.BbvCI, and Nb.BsmI with non-palindromic recognition sites stimulate the synthesis of sequences organized mainly as palindromes. Moreover, the nucleotide sequence of the palindromes appeared to be dependent on NEase recognition/cleavage modes. Thus, the heterodimeric Nb.BbvCI stimulated the synthesis of palindromes composed of two recognition sites of this NEase, which were separated by AT-reach sequences or (A)n (T)m spacers. Palindromic DNA sequences obtained in the ab initio DNA synthesis with the monomeric NEases Nb.BsmI and Nt.AlwI contained, along with the sites of these NEases, randomly synthesized sequences consisted of blocks of short repeats. These findings could help investigation of the potential abilities of highly productive ab initio DNA synthesis for the creation of DNA molecules with desirable sequence.

  14. Enhanced detection of polymorphic DNA by multiple arbitrary amplicon profiling of endonuclease-digested DNA: identification of markers tightly linked to the supernodulation locus in soybean.

    PubMed

    Caetano-Anollés, G; Bassam, B J; Gresshoff, P M

    1993-10-01

    Multiple endonuclease digestion of template DNA or amplification products can increase significantly the detection of polymorphic DNA in fingerprints generated by multiple arbitrary amplicon profiling (MAAP). This coupling of endonuclease cleavage and amplification of arbitrary stretches of DNA, directed by short oligonucleotide primers, readily allowed distinction of closely related fungal and bacterial isolates and plant cultivars. MAAP analysis of cleaved template DNA enabled the identification of molecular markers linked to a developmental locus of soybean (Glycine max L. Merrill). Ethyl methane sulfonate (EMS)-induced supernodulating, near-isogenic lines altered in the nts locus, which controls nodule formation, could be distinguished from each other and from the parent cultivar by amplification of template pre-digested with 2-3 restriction enzymes. A total of 42 DNA polymorphisms were detected using only 19 octamer primers. In the absence of digestion, 25 primers failed to differentiate these soybean genotypes. Several polymorphic products co-segregated tightly with the nts locus in F2 families from crosses between the allelic mutants nts382 and nts1007 and the ancestral G. soja Sieb. & Succ. PI468.397. Our results suggest that EMS is capable of inducing extensive DNA alterations, probably around discrete mutational hot-spots. EMS-induced DNA polymorphisms may constitute sequence-tagged markers diagnostic of specific genomic regions.

  15. Mm19, a Mycoplasma meleagridis Major Surface Nuclease that Is Related to the RE_AlwI Superfamily of Endonucleases

    PubMed Central

    Yacoub, Elhem; Ben Abdelmoumen Mardassi, Boutheina

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma meleagridis infection is widespread in turkeys, causing poor growth and feathering, airsacculitis, osteodystrophy, and reduction in hatchability. Like most mycoplasma species, M. meleagridis is characterized by its inability to synthesize purine and pyrimidine nucleotides de novo. Consistent with this intrinsic deficiency, we here report the cloning, expression, and characterization of a M. meleagridis gene sequence encoding a major surface nuclease, referred to as Mm19. Mm19 consists of a 1941- bp ORF encoding a 646-amino-acid polypeptide with a predicted molecular mass of 74,825 kDa. BLASTP analysis revealed a significant match with the catalytic/dimerization domain of type II restriction enzymes of the RE_AlwI superfamily. This finding is consistent with the genomic location of Mm19 sequence, which dispalys characteristics of a typical type II restriction-modification locus. Like intact M. meleagridis cells, the E. coli-expressed Mm19 fusion product was found to exhibit a nuclease activity against plasmid DNA, double-stranded DNA, single-stranded DNA, and RNA. The Mm19-associated nuclease activity was consistently enhanced with Mg2+ divalent cations, a hallmark of type II restriction enzymes. A rabbit hyperimmune antiserum raised against the bacterially expressed Mm19 strongly reacted with M. meleagridis intact cells and fully neutralized the surface-bound nuclease activity. Collectively, the results show that M. meleagridis expresses a strong surface-bound nuclease activity, which is the product of a single gene sequence that is related to the RE_AlwI superfamily of endonucleases. PMID:27010566

  16. Endonuclease-sensitive DNA modifications induced by acetone and acetophenone as photosensitizers.

    PubMed Central

    Epe, B; Henzl, H; Adam, W; Saha-Möller, C R

    1993-01-01

    Repair endonucleases, viz. endonuclease III, formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase (FPG protein), endonuclease IV, exonuclease III and UV endonuclease, were used to analyse the modifications induced in bacteriophage PM2 DNA by 333 nm laser irradiation in the presence of acetone or acetophenone. In addition to pyrimidine dimers sensitive to UV endonuclease, 5,6-dihydropyrimidines (sensitive to endonuclease III) and base modifications sensitive to FPG protein were generated. The level of the last in the case of acetone was 50% and in the case of acetophenone 9% of the level of pyrimidine dimers. HPLC analysis of the bases excised by FPG protein revealed that least some of them were 8-hydroxyguanine (7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine). In the damage induced by direct excitation of DNA at 254 nm, which was analysed for comparison, the number of FPG protein-sensitive base modifications was only 0.6% of that of the pyrimidine dimers. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that the formation of FPG protein-sensitive modifications did not involve singlet oxygen, as the damage was not increased in D2O as solvent. Hydroxyl radicals, superoxide and H2O2 were also not involved, since the relative number of single strand breaks and of sites of base loss (AP sites) was much lower than in the case of DNA damage induced by hydroxyl radicals and since the presence of SOD or catalase had no effect on the extent of the damage. However, the mechanism did involve an intermediate that was much more efficiently quenched by azide ions than the triplet excited carbonyl compounds and which was possibly a purine radical. Together, the data indicate that excited triplet carbonyl compounds react with DNA not only by triplet-triplet energy transfer yielding pyrimidine dimers, but also by electron transfer yielding preferentially base modifications sensitive to FPG protein, which include 8-hydroxyguanine. PMID:8383842

  17. Endonuclease V protects Escherichia coli against specific mutations caused by nitrous acid.

    PubMed

    Schouten, K A; Weiss, B

    1999-12-01

    Endonuclease V (deoxyinosine 3'-endonuclease) of Escherichia coli K-12 is a putative DNA repair enzyme that cleaves DNA's containing hypoxanthine, uracil, or mismatched bases. An endonuclease V (nfi) mutation was tested for specific mutator effects on a battery of trp and lac mutant alleles. No marked differences were seen in frequencies of spontaneous reversion. However, when nfi mutants were treated with nitrous acid at a level that was not noticeably mutagenic for nfi(+) strains, they displayed a high frequency of A:T-->G:C, and G:C-->A:T transition mutations. Nitrous acid can deaminate guanine in DNA to xanthine, cytosine to uracil, and adenine to hypoxanthine. The nitrous acid-induced A:T-->G:C transitions were consistent with a role for endonuclease V in the repair of deaminated adenine residues. A confirmatory finding was that the mutagenesis was depressed at a locus containing N(6)-methyladenine, which is known to be relatively resistant to nitrosative deamination. An alkA mutation did not significantly enhance the frequency of A:T-->G:C mutations in an nfi mutant, even though AlkA (3-methyladenine-DNA glycosylase II) has hypoxanthine-DNA glycosylase activity. The nfi mutants also displayed high frequencies of nitrous acid-induced G:C-->A:T transitions. These mutations could not be explained by cytosine deamination because an ung (uracil-DNA N-glycosylase) mutant was not similarly affected. However, these findings are consistent with a role for endonuclease V in the removal of deaminated guanine, i.e., xanthine, from DNA. The results suggest that endonuclease V helps to protect the cell against the mutagenic effects of nitrosative deamination.

  18. The effects of addition of mononucleotides on Sma nuc endonuclease activity.

    PubMed

    Romanova, Julia; Filimonova, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Examination of the effects of mononucleotides on Sma nuc endonuclease originated from Gram negative bacterium Serratia marcescens displayed that any mononucleotide produced by Sma nuc during hydrolysis of DNA or RNA may regulate the enzyme activity affecting the RNase activity without pronounced influence on the activity towards DNA. The type of carbohydrate residue in mononucleotides does not affect the regulation. In contrast, the effects depend on the type of bases in nucleotides. AMP or dAMP was classified as a competitive inhibitor of partial type. GMP, UMP, and CMP were found to be uncompetitive inhibitors that suggest a specific site(s) for the nucleotide(s) binding in Sma nuc endonuclease.

  19. Endonuclease from Micrococcus luteus which has activity toward ultraviolet-irradiated deoxyribonucleic acid: its action on transforming deoxyribonucleic acid.

    PubMed

    Setlow, R B; Setlow, J K; Carrier, W L

    1970-04-01

    An endonuclease purified from Micrococcus luteus makes single-strand breaks in ultraviolet (UV)-irradiated, native deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). The purified endonuclease is able to reactivate UV-inactivated transforming DNA of Haemophilus influenzae, especially when the DNA is assayed on a UV-sensitive mutant of H. influenzae. After extensive endonuclease action, there is a loss of transforming DNA when assayed on both UV-sensitive and -resistant cells. The endonuclease does not affect unirradiated DNA. The results indicate that the endonuclease function is involved in the repair of biological damage resulting from UV irradiation and that the UV-sensitive mutant is deficient in this step. We interpret the data as indicating that the various steps in the repair of DNA must be well coordinated if repair is to be effective. PMID:4314478

  20. A single catalytic domain of the junction-resolving enzyme T7 endonuclease I is a non-specific nicking endonuclease

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Chudi; Kumar, Sanjay

    2005-01-01

    A stable heterodimeric protein containing a single correctly folded catalytic domain (SCD) of T7 endonuclease I was produced by means of a trans-splicing intein system. As predicted by a model presented earlier, purified SCD protein acts a non-specific nicking endonuclease on normal linear DNA. The SCD retains some ability to recognize and cleave a deviated DNA double-helix near a nick or a strand-crossing site. Thus, we infer that the non-specific and nicked-site cleavage activities observed for the native T7 endonuclease I (as distinct from the resolution activity) are due to uncoordinated actions of the catalytic domains. The positively charged C-terminus of T7 Endo I is essential for the enzymatic activity of SCD, as it is for the native enzyme. We propose that the preference of the native enzyme for the resolution reaction is achieved by cooperativity in the binding of its two catalytic domains when presented with two of the arms across a four-way junction or cruciform structure. PMID:16264086

  1. Deep reaching versus vertically restricted Quaternary normal faults: Implications on seismic potential assessment in tectonically active regions: Lessons from the middle Aterno valley fault system, central Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcucci, E.; Gori, S.; Moro, M.; Fubelli, G.; Saroli, M.; Chiarabba, C.; Galadini, F.

    2015-05-01

    We investigate the Middle Aterno Valley fault system (MAVF), a poorly investigated seismic gap in the central Apennines, adjacent to the 2009 L'Aquila earthquake epicentral area. Geological and paleoseismological analyses revealed that the MAVF evolved through hanging wall splay nucleation, its main segment moving at 0.23-0.34 mm/year since the Middle Pleistocene; the penultimate activation event occurred between 5388-5310 B.C. and 1934-1744 B.C., the last event after 2036-1768 B.C. and just before 1st-2nd century AD. These data define hard linkage (sensu Walsh and Watterson, 1991; Peacock et al., 2000; Walsh et al., 2003, and references therein) with the contiguous Subequana Valley fault segment, able to rupture in large magnitude earthquakes (up to 6.8), that did not rupture since about two millennia. By the joint analysis of geological observations and seismological data acquired during to the 2009 seismic sequence, we derive a picture of the complex structural framework of the area comprised between the MAVF, the Paganica fault (the 2009 earthquake causative fault) and the Gran Sasso Range. This sector is affected by a dense array of few-km long, closely and regularly spaced Quaternary normal fault strands, that are considered as branches of the MAVF northern segment. Our analysis reveals that these structures are downdip confined by a decollement represented by to the presently inactive thrust sheet above the Gran Sasso front limiting their seismogenic potential. Our study highlights the advantage of combining Quaternary geological field analysis with high resolution seismological data to fully unravel the structural setting of regions where subsequent tectonic phases took place and where structural interference plays a key role in influencing the seismotectonic context; this has also inevitably implications for accurately assessing seismic hazard of such structurally complex regions.

  2. Calf 5' to 3' exo/endonuclease must slide from a 5' end of the substrate to perform structure-specific cleavage.

    PubMed

    Murante, R S; Rust, L; Bambara, R A

    1995-12-22

    Calf 5' to 3' exo/endonuclease, the counterpart of the human FEN-1 and yeast RTH-1 nucleases, performs structure-specific cleavage of both RNA and DNA and is implicated in Okazaki fragment processing and DNA repair. The substrate for endonuclease activity is a primer annealed to a template but with a 5' unannealed tail. The results presented here demonstrate that the nuclease must enter the 5' end of the unannealed tail and then slide to the region of hybridization where the cleavage occurs. The presence of bound protein or a primer at any point on the single-stranded tail prevents cleavage. However, biotinylation of a nucleotide at the 5' end or internal to the tail does not prevent cleavage. The sliding process is bidirectional. If the nuclease slides onto the tail, later binding of a primer to the tail traps the nuclease between the primer binding site and the cleavage site, preventing the nuclease from departing from the 5' end. A model for 5' entry, sliding, and cleavage is presented. The possible role of this unusual mechanism in Okazaki fragment processing, DNA repair, and protection of the replication fork from inappropriate endonucleolytic cleavage is presented. PMID:8530463

  3. Synthetic Lethality of Drosophila in the Absence of the MUS81 Endonuclease and the DmBlm Helicase Is Associated With Elevated Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Trowbridge, Kirsten; McKim, Kim; Brill, Steven J.; Sekelsky, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    Mus81-Mms4 (Mus81-Eme1 in some species) is a heterodimeric DNA structure-specific endonuclease that has been implicated in meiotic recombination and processing of damaged replication forks in fungi. We generated and characterized mutations in Drosophila melanogaster mus81 and mms4. Unlike the case in fungi, we did not find any role for MUS81-MMS4 in meiotic crossing over. A possible role for this endonuclease in repairing double-strand breaks that arise during DNA replication is suggested by the finding that mus81 and mms4 mutants are hypersensitive to camptothecin; however, these mutants are not hypersensitive to other agents that generate lesions that slow or block DNA replication. In fungi, mus81, mms4, and eme1 mutations are synthetically lethal with mutations in genes encoding RecQ helicase homologs. Similarly, we found that mutations in Drosophila mus81 and mms4 are synthetically lethal with null mutations in mus309, which encodes the ortholog of the Bloom Syndrome helicase. Synthetic lethality is associated with high levels of apoptosis in proliferating tissues. Lethality and elevated apoptosis were partially suppressed by a mutation in spn-A, which encodes the ortholog of the strand invasion protein Rad51. These findings provide insights into the causes of synthetic lethality. PMID:17603121

  4. Embryonic stem cells lacking the epigenetic regulator Cfp1 are hypersensitive to DNA-damaging agents and exhibit decreased Ape1/Ref-1 protein expression and endonuclease activity.

    PubMed

    Tate, Courtney M; Fishel, Melissa L; Holleran, Julianne L; Egorin, Merrill J; Skalnik, David G

    2009-12-01

    Modulation of chromatin structure plays an important role in the recruitment and function of DNA repair proteins. CXXC finger protein 1 (Cfp1), encoded by the CXXC1 gene, is essential for mammalian development and is an important regulator of chromatin structure. Murine embryonic stem (ES) cells lacking Cfp1 (CXXC1(-/-)) are viable but demonstrate a dramatic decrease in cytosine methylation, altered histone methylation, and an inability to differentiate. We find that ES cells lacking Cfp1 are hypersensitive to a variety of DNA-damaging agents. In addition, CXXC1(-/-) ES cells accumulate more DNA damage and exhibit decreased protein expression and endonuclease activity of AP endonuclease (Ape1/Ref-1), an enzyme involved in DNA base excision repair. Expression in CXXC1(-/-) ES cells of either the amino half of Cfp1 (amino acids 1-367) or the carboxyl half of Cfp1 (amino acids 361-656) restores normal Ape1/Ref-1 protein expression and rescues the hypersensitivity to DNA-damaging agents, demonstrating that Cfp1 contains redundant functional domains. Furthermore, retention of either the DNA-binding activity of Cfp1 or interaction with the Setd1A and Setd1B histone H3-Lys4 methyltransferase complexes is required to restore normal sensitivity of CXXC1(-/-) ES cells to DNA-damaging agents. These results implicate Cfp1 as a regulator of DNA repair processes. PMID:19836314

  5. Isolation and properties of the acid site-specific endonuclease from mature eggs of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus intermedius

    SciTech Connect

    Sibirtsev, Yu.T.; Konechnyi, A.A.; Rasskazov, V.A.

    1986-01-10

    An acid site-specific endonuclease has been detected in mature sea urchin eggs and cells of embryos at early stages of differentiation. Fractionation with ammonium sulfate, followed by chromatography on columns with DEAE, phosphocellulose, and hydroxyapatite resulted in an 18,000-fold purification. The molecular weight of the enzyme was determined at approx. 29,000, the optimum pH 5.5. The activity of the enzyme does not depend on divalent metal ions, EDTA, ATP, and tRNA, but it is modulated to a substantial degree by NaCl. The maximum rate of cleavage of the DNA supercoil (form I) is observed at 100 mM NaCl. Increasing the NaCl concentration to 350 mM only slightly lowers the rate of cleavage of form I, yielding form II, but entirely suppresses the accumulation of form III. Restriction analysis of the products of enzymatic hydrolysis of Co1E1 and pBR322 DNA showed that at the early stages of hydrolysis the enzyme exhibits pronounced specificity for definite sites, the number of which is 12 for Co1 E1 DNA and 8 sites for pBR322 DNA.

  6. Implications for Long-Term Mantle History of the Restricted Distribution of Large Igneous Province (LIP) Plume Sources at the Core-Mantle Boundary (CMB)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, K.; Steinberger, B.; Torsvik, T. H.; Smethurst, M. A.

    2008-12-01

    We have found, by rotation of LIPs of the past 300 My to their eruption sites in a paleomagnetic reference frame corrected for true polar wander, that those sites concentrate vertically above the margins at the CMB of the two Large Low Shear Wave Velocity Provinces(LLSVPs) of the deep mantle (Torsvik et al. 2006). This surprising discovery of narrow (< 200 wide) Plume Generation Zones stable for at least 300 My on the CMB at the LLSVP margins is consistent with the idea that the LLSVPs are compositionally (and probably also thermally) distinct dense bodies (each making up ca. 1 percent of mantle mass) rather than thermally buoyant "superplumes". The "centers of mass" of the two LLSVPs are antipodally disposed close to the equator, an intriguing possible further indication of long-term stability because the positively elevated part of the residual geoid, which matches the LLSVPs and therefore also appears also to have been stable for at least 300 My finds an analog in the aeroid of Mars of which the elevated regions are themselves antipodal on the equator. Because some volcanoes of Mars perhaps > 3.8 My in age are concentrated on the rims of the elevated aeroid it is worth considering the implications of the possible isolation of the LLSVPs from the rest of the mantle through most of Earth history. If the 2 percent of mantle mass that makes the LLSVPs has escaped being involved in making ocean floor it will be more Fe rich and denser than the average mantle. If it has also escaped being involved in making continent it will be richer in U,Th and K and hotter. It will have distinctive noble gas concentrations and could be the source (by diffusion) of the Earth's current 3He flux (Burke et al. 2008). If a velocity change attributable to a perovskite/post-perovskite transition can be mapped consistently both within and outside the LLSVPs it will help in testing the idea that the interiors of LLSVPs are hotter than the rest of the deep mantle.

  7. Large negatively charged organic host molecules as inhibitors of endonuclease enzymes.

    PubMed

    Tauran, Yannick; Anjard, Christophe; Kim, Beomjoon; Rhimi, Moez; Coleman, Anthony W

    2014-10-01

    Three large negatively charged organic host molecules; β-cyclodextrin sulphate, para-sulphonato-calix[6]arene and para-sulphonato-calix[8]arene have been shown to be effective inhibitors of endonuclease in the low micromolar range, additionally para-sulphonato-calix[8]arene is a partial inhibitor of rhDNase I.

  8. DNA Apurinic-Apyrimidinic Site Binding And Excision By Endonuclease IV

    SciTech Connect

    Garcin, E.D.; Hosfield, D.J.; Desai, S.A.; Haas, B.J.; Bjoras, M.; Cunningham, R.P.; Tainer, J.A.

    2009-05-18

    Escherichia coli endonuclease IV is an archetype for an abasic or apurinic-apyrimidinic endonuclease superfamily crucial for DNA base excision repair. Here biochemical, mutational and crystallographic characterizations reveal a three-metal ion mechanism for damage binding and incision. The 1.10-{angstrom} resolution DNA-free and the 2.45-{angstrom} resolution DNA-substrate complex structures capture substrate stabilization by Arg37 and reveal a distorted Zn{sub 3}-ligand arrangement that reverts, after catalysis, to an ideal geometry suitable to hold rather than release cleaved DNA product. The 1.45-{angstrom} resolution DNA-product complex structure shows how Tyr72 caps the active site, tunes its dielectric environment and promotes catalysis by Glu261-activated hydroxide, bound to two Zn{sup 2+} ions throughout catalysis. These structural, mutagenesis and biochemical results suggest general requirements for abasic site removal in contrast to features specific to the distinct endonuclease IV alpha-beta triose phosphate isomerase (TIM) barrel and APE1 four-layer alpha-beta folds of the apurinic-apyrimidinic endonuclease families.

  9. Structural aspects of catalytic mechanisms of endonucleases and their binding to nucleic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Zhukhlistova, N. E.; Balaev, V. V.; Lyashenko, A. V.; Lashkov, A. A.

    2012-05-15

    Endonucleases (EC 3.1) are enzymes of the hydrolase class that catalyze the hydrolytic cleavage of deoxyribonucleic and ribonucleic acids at any region of the polynucleotide chain. Endonucleases are widely used both in biotechnological processes and in veterinary medicine as antiviral agents. Medical applications of endonucleases in human cancer therapy hold promise. The results of X-ray diffraction studies of the spatial organization of endonucleases and their complexes and the mechanism of their action are analyzed and generalized. An analysis of the structural studies of this class of enzymes showed that the specific binding of enzymes to nucleic acids is characterized by interactions with nitrogen bases and the nucleotide backbone, whereas the nonspecific binding of enzymes is generally characterized by interactions only with the nucleic-acid backbone. It should be taken into account that the specificity can be modulated by metal ions and certain low-molecular-weight organic compounds. To test the hypotheses about specific and nonspecific nucleic-acid-binding proteins, it is necessary to perform additional studies of atomic-resolution three-dimensional structures of enzyme-nucleic-acid complexes by methods of structural biology.

  10. T7 Endonuclease I Mediates Error Correction in Artificial Gene Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Sequeira, Ana Filipa; Guerreiro, Catarina I P D; Vincentelli, Renaud; Fontes, Carlos M G A

    2016-09-01

    Efficacy of de novo gene synthesis largely depends on the quality of overlapping oligonucleotides used as template for PCR assembly. The error rate associated with current gene synthesis protocols limits the efficient and accurate production of synthetic genes, both in the small and large scales. Here, we analysed the ability of different endonuclease enzymes, which specifically recognize and cleave DNA mismatches resulting from incorrect impairments between DNA strands, to remove mutations accumulated in synthetic genes. The gfp gene, which encodes the green fluorescent protein, was artificially synthesized using an integrated protocol including an enzymatic mismatch cleavage step (EMC) following gene assembly. Functional and sequence analysis of resulting artificial genes revealed that number of deletions, insertions and substitutions was strongly reduced when T7 endonuclease I was used for mutation removal. This method diminished mutation frequency by eightfold relative to gene synthesis not incorporating an error correction step. Overall, EMC using T7 endonuclease I improved the population of error-free synthetic genes, resulting in an error frequency of 0.43 errors per 1 kb. Taken together, data presented here reveal that incorporation of a mutation-removal step including T7 endonuclease I can effectively improve the fidelity of artificial gene synthesis. PMID:27334914

  11. Polyadenylation Factor CPSF-73 is the Pre-mRNA 3'-end-processing Endonuclease

    SciTech Connect

    Mandel,C.; Kaneko, S.; Zhang, H.; Gebauer, D.; Vethantham, V.; Manley, J.; Tong, L.

    2006-01-01

    Most eukaryotic messenger RNA precursors (pre-mRNAs) undergo extensive maturational processing, including cleavage and polyadenylation at the 3'-end. Despite the characterization of many proteins that are required for the cleavage reaction, the identity of the endonuclease is not known. Recent analyses indicated that the 73-kDa subunit of cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor (CPSF-73) might be the endonuclease for this and related reactions, although no direct data confirmed this. Here we report the crystal structures of human CPSF-73 at 2.1 {angstrom} resolution, complexed with zinc ions and a sulphate that might mimic the phosphate group of the substrate, and the related yeast protein CPSF-100 (Ydh1) at 2.5 {angstrom} resolution. Both CPSF-73 and CPSF-100 contain two domains, a metallo-{beta}-lactamase domain and a novel -CASP (named for metallo-{beta}-lactamase, CPSF, Artemis, Snm1, Pso2) domain. The active site of CPSF-73, with two zinc ions, is located at the interface of the two domains. Purified recombinant CPSF-73 possesses RNA endonuclease activity, and mutations that disrupt zinc binding in the active site abolish this activity. Our studies provide the first direct experimental evidence that CPSF-73 is the pre-mRNA 3'-end-processing endonuclease.

  12. Efficient fdCas9 Synthetic Endonuclease with Improved Specificity for Precise Genome Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Aouida, Mustapha; Eid, Ayman; Ali, Zahir; Cradick, Thomas; Lee, Ciaran; Deshmukh, Harshavardhan; Atef, Ahmed; AbuSamra, Dina; Gadhoum, Samah Zeineb; Merzaban, Jasmeen; Bao, Gang; Mahfouz, Magdy

    2015-01-01

    The Cas9 endonuclease is used for genome editing applications in diverse eukaryotic species. A high frequency of off-target activity has been reported in many cell types, limiting its applications to genome engineering, especially in genomic medicine. Here, we generated a synthetic chimeric protein between the catalytic domain of the FokI endonuclease and the catalytically inactive Cas9 protein (fdCas9). A pair of guide RNAs (gRNAs) that bind to sense and antisense strands with a defined spacer sequence range can be used to form a catalytically active dimeric fdCas9 protein and generate double-strand breaks (DSBs) within the spacer sequence. Our data demonstrate an improved catalytic activity of the fdCas9 endonuclease, with a spacer range of 15–39 nucleotides, on surrogate reporters and genomic targets. Furthermore, we observed no detectable fdCas9 activity at known Cas9 off-target sites. Taken together, our data suggest that the fdCas9 endonuclease variant is a superior platform for genome editing applications in eukaryotic systems including mammalian cells. PMID:26225561

  13. Molecular Recognition of DNA Damage Sites by Apurinic/Apyrimidinic Endonucleases

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, W. A.

    2005-07-28

    The DNA repair/redox factor AP endonuclease 1 (APE1) is a multifunctional protein which is known to to be essential for DNA repair activity in human cells. Structural/functional analyses of the APE activity is thus been an important research field to assess cellular defense mechanisms against ionizing radiation.

  14. Homing endonuclease I-TevIII: dimerization as a means to a double-strand break

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, Justin B.; Stapleton, Michelle; Stanger, Matthew J.; Smith, Dorie; Dansereau, John T.; Derbyshire, Victoria; Belfort, Marlene

    2007-01-01

    Homing endonucleases are unusual enzymes, capable of recognizing lengthy DNA sequences and cleaving site-specifically within genomes. Many homing endonucleases are encoded within group I introns, and such enzymes promote the mobility reactions of these introns. Phage T4 has three group I introns, within the td, nrdB and nrdD genes. The td and nrdD introns are mobile, whereas the nrdB intron is not. Phage RB3 is a close relative of T4 and has a lengthier nrdB intron. Here, we describe I-TevIII, the H–N–H endonuclease encoded by the RB3 nrdB intron. In contrast to previous reports, we demonstrate that this intron is mobile, and that this mobility is dependent on I-TevIII, which generates 2-nt 3′ extensions. The enzyme has a distinct catalytic domain, which contains the H–N–H motif, and DNA-binding domain, which contains two zinc fingers required for interaction with the DNA substrate. Most importantly, I-TevIII, unlike the H–N–H endonucleases described so far, makes a double-strand break on the DNA homing site by acting as a dimer. Through deletion analysis, the dimerization interface was mapped to the DNA-binding domain. The unusual propensity of I-TevIII to dimerize to achieve cleavage of both DNA strands underscores the versatility of the H–N–H enzyme family. PMID:17289754

  15. Structural aspects of catalytic mechanisms of endonucleases and their binding to nucleic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukhlistova, N. E.; Balaev, V. V.; Lyashenko, A. V.; Lashkov, A. A.

    2012-05-01

    Endonucleases (EC 3.1) are enzymes of the hydrolase class that catalyze the hydrolytic cleavage of deoxyribonucleic and ribonucleic acids at any region of the polynucleotide chain. Endonucleases are widely used both in biotechnological processes and in veterinary medicine as antiviral agents. Medical applications of endonucleases in human cancer therapy hold promise. The results of X-ray diffraction studies of the spatial organization of endonucleases and their complexes and the mechanism of their action are analyzed and generalized. An analysis of the structural studies of this class of enzymes showed that the specific binding of enzymes to nucleic acids is characterized by interactions with nitrogen bases and the nucleotide backbone, whereas the nonspecific binding of enzymes is generally characterized by interactions only with the nucleic-acid backbone. It should be taken into account that the specificity can be modulated by metal ions and certain low-molecular-weight organic compounds. To test the hypotheses about specific and nonspecific nucleic-acid-binding proteins, it is necessary to perform additional studies of atomic-resolution three-dimensional structures of enzyme-nucleic-acid complexes by methods of structural biology.

  16. Construction of an EcoRI restriction map of Mycoplasma pneumoniae and localization of selected genes.

    PubMed Central

    Wenzel, R; Pirkl, E; Herrmann, R

    1992-01-01

    A restriction map of the genome of Mycoplasma pneumoniae, a small human pathogenic bacterium, was constructed by means of an ordered cosmid library which spans the complete bacterial chromosome. The positions of 143 endonuclease EcoRI restriction fragments were determined and aligned with the physical map. In addition, restriction sites for the rare-cutting enzymes XhoI (25 sites), ApaI (13 sites), NotI (2 sites), and SfiI (2 sites) were included. The resulting map consists of 185 restriction sites, has a mean resolution of 4.4 kbp, and predicts a genome size of 809 kbp. In addition, several genes were identified and mapped to their respective genomic EcoRI restriction fragments. Images PMID:1429453

  17. Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease/redox factor-1 (APE1/Ref-1) redox function negatively regulates NRF2.

    PubMed

    Fishel, Melissa L; Wu, Xue; Devlin, Cecilia M; Logsdon, Derek P; Jiang, Yanlin; Luo, Meihua; He, Ying; Yu, Zhangsheng; Tong, Yan; Lipking, Kelsey P; Maitra, Anirban; Rajeshkumar, N V; Scandura, Glenda; Kelley, Mark R; Ivan, Mircea

    2015-01-30

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease/redox factor-1 (APE1/Ref-1) (henceforth referred to as Ref-1) is a multifunctional protein that in addition to its base excision DNA repair activity exerts redox control of multiple transcription factors, including nuclear factor κ-light chain enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB), STAT3, activator protein-1 (AP-1), hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1), and tumor protein 53 (p53). In recent years, Ref-1 has emerged as a promising therapeutic target in cancer, particularly in pancreatic ductal carcinoma. Although a significant amount of research has centered on Ref-1, no wide-ranging approach had been performed on the effects of Ref-1 inhibition and transcription factor activity perturbation. Starting with a broader approach, we identified a previously unsuspected effect on the nuclear factor erythroid-related factor 2 (NRF2), a critical regulator of cellular defenses against oxidative stress. Based on genetic and small molecule inhibitor-based methodologies, we demonstrated that repression of Ref-1 potently activates NRF2 and its downstream targets in a dose-dependent fashion, and that the redox, rather than the DNA repair function of Ref-1 is critical for this effect. Intriguingly, our results also indicate that this pathway does not involve reactive oxygen species. The link between Ref-1 and NRF2 appears to be present in all cells tested in vitro, noncancerous and cancerous, including patient-derived tumor samples. In particular, we focused on understanding the implications of the novel interaction between these two pathways in primary pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma tumor cells and provide the first evidence that this mechanism has implications for overcoming the resistance against experimental drugs targeting Ref-1 activity, with clear translational implications.

  18. Thermostable flap endonuclease from the archaeon, Pyrococcus horikoshii, cleaves the replication fork-like structure endo/exonucleolytically.

    PubMed

    Matsui, E; Kawasaki, S; Ishida, H; Ishikawa, K; Kosugi, Y; Kikuchi, H; Kawarabayashi, Y; Matsui, I

    1999-06-25

    The flap endonuclease gene homologue from the hyperthermophilic archaeon, Pyrococcus horikoshii, was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified. The results of gel filtration indicated that this protein was a 41-kDa monomer. P. horikoshii flap endonuclease (phFEN) cleaves replication fork-like substrates (RF) and 5' double-strand flap structures (DF) using both flap endonuclease and 5'-3'-exonuclease activities. The mammalian flap endonuclease (mFEN) is a single-strand flap-specific endonuclease (Harrington, J. J., and Lieber, M. R. (1994) EMBO J. 13, 1235-1246), but the action patterns of phFEN appear to be quite different from those of mFEN at this point. The DF-specific flap endonuclease and 5'-exonuclease activities have not yet been reported. Therefore, this is the first report of the specific endo/exonuclease activities of phFEN. The DF-specific 5'-exonuclease activity degraded the downstream primer of 3' single-flap structure and was 15 times higher than the activities against nicked substrates without 3' flap strand. DF-specific flap endonuclease cleaved the 5' double-flap strand in DF and the lagging strand in RF at the junction portion. Because the RF appears to be the intermediate structure, due to the arrest of the replication fork, the double strand breaks after the arrests of the replication forks are probably caused by phFEN.

  19. G protein coupled receptor signaled apoptosis is associated with activation of a cation insensitive acidic endonuclease and intracellular acidification.

    PubMed

    Sharma, K; Srikant, C B

    1998-01-01

    Apoptosis associated oligonucleosomal fragmentation of DNA can result from the activation of endonucleases that exhibit different pH optima and are either sensitive or insensitive to divalent cations. DNA fragmentation due to activation of cation sensitive endonucleases occurs in the absence of a change in intracellular pH whereas intracellular acidification is a feature of apoptosis characterized by activation of cation insensitive acidic endonuclease. We have reported earlier that somatostatin (SST) induced DNA fragmentation and apoptosis is signaled in a receptor subtype selective manner uniquely via human somatostatin receptor subtype 3 (hSSTR3). In the present study we investigated the pH dependence and cation sensitivity of endonuclease induced in hSSTR3 expressing CHO-K1 cells by the SST agonist octreotide (OCT) and its effect on intracellular pH. We show that OCT induced apoptosis is associated with selective stimulation of a divalent cation insensitive acidic endonuclease. The intracellular pH of of cells undergoing OCT induced apoptosis was 0.9 pH units lower than that of control cells. The effect of OCT on endonuclease and pH was inhibited by orthovanadate as well as by pretreatment with pertussis toxin, suggesting that hSSTR3 initiated cytotoxic signaling is protein tyrosine phosphatase mediated and is G protein dependent. These findings suggest that intracellular acidification and activation of acidic endonuclease mediate wild type p53 associated apoptosis signaled by hormones acting via G protein coupled receptors.

  20. Flying squirrel-associated Rickettsia prowazekii (epidemic typhus rickettsiae) characterized by a specific DNA fragment produced by restriction endonuclease digestion.

    PubMed

    Regnery, R L; Fu, Z Y; Spruill, C L

    1986-01-01

    The DNA from flying squirrel-associated Rickettsia prowazekii was characterized by using a specific DNA fragment produced by digestion with the enzyme BamHI. The DNA fragment was cloned into a plasmid vector and used to readily distinguish between available human- and flying squirrel-associated R. prowazekii DNAs derived from crude cytoplasmic extracts. PMID:3009528

  1. Flying squirrel-associated Rickettsia prowazekii (epidemic typhus rickettsiae) characterized by a specific DNA fragment produced by restriction endonuclease digestion.

    PubMed Central

    Regnery, R L; Fu, Z Y; Spruill, C L

    1986-01-01

    The DNA from flying squirrel-associated Rickettsia prowazekii was characterized by using a specific DNA fragment produced by digestion with the enzyme BamHI. The DNA fragment was cloned into a plasmid vector and used to readily distinguish between available human- and flying squirrel-associated R. prowazekii DNAs derived from crude cytoplasmic extracts. Images PMID:3009528

  2. [Effect of endonuclease G depletion on plasmid DNA uptake and levels of homologous recombination in hela cells].

    PubMed

    Misic, V; El-Mogy, M; Geng, S; Haj-Ahmad, Y

    2016-01-01

    Endonuclease G (EndoG) is a mitochondrial apoptosis regulator that also has roles outside of programmed cell death. It has been implicated as a defence DNase involved in the degradation of exogenous DNA after transfection of mammalian cells and in homologous recombination of viral and endogenous DNA. In this study, we looked at the effect of EndoG depletion on plasmid DNA uptake and the levels of homologous recombination in HeLa cells. We show that the proposed defence role of EndoG against uptake of non-viral DNA vectors does not extend to the cervical carcinoma HeLa cells, as targeting of EndoG expression by RNA interference failed to increase intracellular plasmid DNA levels. However, reducing EndoG levels in HeLa cells resulted in a statistically significant reduction of homologous recombination between two plasmid DNA substrates. These findings suggest that non-viral DNA vectors are also substrates for EndoG in its role in homologous recombination.

  3. Loss of mitochondrial exo/endonuclease EXOG affects mitochondrial respiration and induces ROS-mediated cardiomyocyte hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Tigchelaar, Wardit; Yu, Hongjuan; de Jong, Anne Margreet; van Gilst, Wiek H; van der Harst, Pim; Westenbrink, B Daan; de Boer, Rudolf A; Silljé, Herman H W

    2015-01-15

    Recently, a locus at the mitochondrial exo/endonuclease EXOG gene, which has been implicated in mitochondrial DNA repair, was associated with cardiac function. The function of EXOG in cardiomyocytes is still elusive. Here we investigated the role of EXOG in mitochondrial function and hypertrophy in cardiomyocytes. Depletion of EXOG in primary neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes (NRVCs) induced a marked increase in cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Depletion of EXOG, however, did not result in loss of mitochondrial DNA integrity. Although EXOG depletion did not induce fetal gene expression and common hypertrophy pathways were not activated, a clear increase in ribosomal S6 phosphorylation was observed, which readily explains increased protein synthesis. With the use of a Seahorse flux analyzer, it was shown that the mitochondrial oxidative consumption rate (OCR) was increased 2.4-fold in EXOG-depleted NRVCs. Moreover, ATP-linked OCR was 5.2-fold higher. This increase was not explained by mitochondrial biogenesis or alterations in mitochondrial membrane potential. Western blotting confirmed normal levels of the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) complexes. The increased OCR was accompanied by a 5.4-fold increase in mitochondrial ROS levels. These increased ROS levels could be normalized with specific mitochondrial ROS scavengers (MitoTEMPO, mnSOD). Remarkably, scavenging of excess ROS strongly attenuated the hypertrophic response. In conclusion, loss of EXOG affects normal mitochondrial function resulting in increased mitochondrial respiration, excess ROS production, and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy.

  4. Double strand binding – single strand incision mechanism for human flap endonuclease: implications for the superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Tsutakawa, Susan E.; Tainer, John A.

    2012-01-01

    Detailed structural, mutational, and biochemical analyses of human FEN1/DNA complexes have revealed the mechanism for recognition of 5′ flaps formed during lagging strand replication and DNA repair. FEN1 processes 5′ flaps through a previously unknown, but structurally elegant double-stranded (ds) recognition/single stranded (ss) incision mechanism that both selects for 5′ flaps and selects against ss DNA or RNA, intact dsDNA, and 3′ flaps. Two major DNA binding interfaces, including a K+ bridge between the DNA and the H2TH motif, are spaced one helical turn apart and together select for substrates with dsDNA. A conserved helical gateway and a helical cap protects the two-metal active site and selects for ss flaps with free termini. Structures of substrate and product reveal an unusual step between binding substrate and incision that involves a double base unpairing with incision occurring in the resulting unpaired DNA or RNA. Ordering of the active site requires a disorder-to-order transition induced by binding of an unpaired 3′ flap, which ensures that the product is ligatable. Comparison with FEN superfamily members, including XPG, EXO1, and GEN1, identifies superfamily motifs such as the helical gateway that select for ss-dsDNA junctions and provides key biological insights into nuclease specificity and regulation. PMID:22244820

  5. Restriction site detection in repetitive nuclear DNA sequences of Trypanosoma evansi for strain differentiation among different isolates.

    PubMed

    Shyma, K P; Gupta, S K; Gupta, J P; Singh, Ajit; Chaudhari, S S; Singh, Veer

    2016-09-01

    The differences or similarities among different isolates of Trypanosoma evansi through endonuclease profile was identified in the present study. The repetitive nuclear DNA of T. evansi isolated from infected cattle, buffalo and equine blood was initially amplified by PCR using specific primers. A panel of restriction enzymes, EcoRI, Eco91l, HindIII and PstI were for complete digestion of PCR products. Agarose gel electrophoresis of digested product did not show cleavage fragments and only single DNA band of the original size was visible in the ethidium bromide stained agarose gel. This indicated that the 227 bp PCR product from repetitive sequence had no site-specific cleavage sites for the REs used in this study. No heterogeneity in the repetitive nuclear DNA restriction endonuclease profile among the different isolates was recorded. PMID:27605842

  6. Structure of the C-Terminal Half of UvrC Reveals an RNase H Endonuclease Domain with an Argonaute-like Catalytic Triad

    SciTech Connect

    Karakas,E.; Truglio, J.; Croteau, D.; Rhau, B.; Wang, L.; Van Houten, B.; Kisker, C.

    2007-01-01

    Removal and repair of DNA damage by the nucleotide excision repair pathway requires two sequential incision reactions, which are achieved by the endonuclease UvrC in eubacteria. Here, we describe the crystal structure of the C-terminal half of UvrC, which contains the catalytic domain responsible for 5' incision and a helix-hairpin-helix-domain that is implicated in DNA binding. Surprisingly, the 5' catalytic domain shares structural homology with RNase H despite the lack of sequence homology and contains an uncommon DDH triad. The structure also reveals two highly conserved patches on the surface of the protein, which are not related to the active site. Mutations of residues in one of these patches led to the inability of the enzyme to bind DNA and severely compromised both incision reactions. Based on our results, we suggest a model of how UvrC forms a productive protein-DNA complex to excise the damage from DNA.

  7. Conserved structural chemistry for incision activity in structurally non-homologous apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease APE1 and endonuclease IV DNA repair enzymes.

    SciTech Connect

    Tsutakawa, Susan E.; Shin, David S.; Mol, Clifford D.; Izum, Tadahide; Arvai, Andrew S.; Mantha, Anil K.; Szczesny, Bartosz; Ivanov, Ivaylo N.; Hosfield, David J.; Maiti, Buddhadev; Pique, Mike E.; Frankel, Kenneth A.; Hitomi, Kenichi; Cunningham, Richard P.; Mitra, Sankar; Tainer, John A.

    2013-03-22

    Non-coding apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites in DNA form spontaneously and as DNA base excision repair intermediates are the most common toxic and mutagenic in vivo DNA lesion. For repair, AP sites must be processed by 5' AP endonucleases in initial stages of base repair. Human APE1 and bacterial Nfo represent the two conserved 5' AP endonuclease families in the biosphere; they both recognize AP sites and incise the phosphodiester backbone 5' to the lesion, yet they lack similar structures and metal ion requirements. Here, we determined and analyzed crystal structures of a 2.4 ? resolution APE1-DNA product complex with Mg(2+) and a 0.92 Nfo with three metal ions. Structural and biochemical comparisons of these two evolutionarily distinct enzymes characterize key APE1 catalytic residues that are potentially functionally similar to Nfo active site components, as further tested and supported by computational analyses. We observe a magnesium-water cluster in the APE1 active site, with only Glu-96 forming the direct protein coordination to the Mg(2+). Despite differences in structure and metal requirements of APE1 and Nfo, comparison of their active site structures surprisingly reveals strong geometric conservation of the catalytic reaction, with APE1 catalytic side chains positioned analogously to Nfo metal positions, suggesting surprising functional equivalence between Nfo metal ions and APE1 residues. The finding that APE1 residues are positioned to substitute for Nfo metal ions is supported by the impact of mutations on activity. Collectively, the results illuminate the activities of residues, metal ions, and active site features for abasic site endonucleases.

  8. Characterization of DNA substrate specificities of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonucleases from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Abeldenov, Sailau; Talhaoui, Ibtissam; Zharkov, Dmitry O; Ishchenko, Alexander A; Ramanculov, Erlan; Saparbaev, Murat; Khassenov, Bekbolat

    2015-09-01

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonucleases are key enzymes involved in the repair of abasic sites and DNA strand breaks. Pathogenic bacteria Mycobacterium tuberculosis contains two AP endonucleases: MtbXthA and MtbNfo members of the exonuclease III and endonuclease IV families, which are exemplified by Escherichia coli Xth and Nfo, respectively. It has been shown that both MtbXthA and MtbNfo contain AP endonuclease and 3'→5' exonuclease activities. However, it remains unclear whether these enzymes hold 3'-repair phosphodiesterase and nucleotide incision repair (NIR) activities. Here, we report that both mycobacterial enzymes have 3'-repair phosphodiesterase and 3'-phosphatase, and MtbNfo contains in addition a very weak NIR activity. Interestingly, depending on pH, both enzymes require different concentrations of divalent cations: 0.5mM MnCl2 at pH 7.6 and 10 mM at pH 6.5. MtbXthA requires a low ionic strength and 37 °C, while MtbNfo requires high ionic strength (200 mM KCl) and has a temperature optimum at 60 °C. Point mutation analysis showed that D180 and N182 in MtbXthA and H206 and E129 in MtbNfo are critical for enzymes activities. The steady-state kinetic parameters indicate that MtbXthA removes 3'-blocking sugar-phosphate and 3'-phosphate moieties at DNA strand breaks with an extremely high efficiency (kcat/KM=440 and 1280 μM(-1)∙min(-1), respectively), while MtbNfo exhibits much lower 3'-repair activities (kcat/KM=0.26 and 0.65 μM(-1)∙min(-1), respectively). Surprisingly, both MtbXthA and MtbNfo exhibited very weak AP site cleavage activities, with kinetic parameters 100- and 300-fold lower, respectively, as compared with the results reported previously. Expression of MtbXthA and MtbNfo reduced the sensitivity of AP endonuclease-deficient E. coli xth nfo strain to methylmethanesulfonate and H2O2 to various degrees. Taken together, these data establish the DNA substrate specificity of M. tuberculosis AP endonucleases and suggest their possible role

  9. Characterization of DNA substrate specificities of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonucleases from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Abeldenov, Sailau; Talhaoui, Ibtissam; Zharkov, Dmitry O; Ishchenko, Alexander A; Ramanculov, Erlan; Saparbaev, Murat; Khassenov, Bekbolat

    2015-09-01

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonucleases are key enzymes involved in the repair of abasic sites and DNA strand breaks. Pathogenic bacteria Mycobacterium tuberculosis contains two AP endonucleases: MtbXthA and MtbNfo members of the exonuclease III and endonuclease IV families, which are exemplified by Escherichia coli Xth and Nfo, respectively. It has been shown that both MtbXthA and MtbNfo contain AP endonuclease and 3'→5' exonuclease activities. However, it remains unclear whether these enzymes hold 3'-repair phosphodiesterase and nucleotide incision repair (NIR) activities. Here, we report that both mycobacterial enzymes have 3'-repair phosphodiesterase and 3'-phosphatase, and MtbNfo contains in addition a very weak NIR activity. Interestingly, depending on pH, both enzymes require different concentrations of divalent cations: 0.5mM MnCl2 at pH 7.6 and 10 mM at pH 6.5. MtbXthA requires a low ionic strength and 37 °C, while MtbNfo requires high ionic strength (200 mM KCl) and has a temperature optimum at 60 °C. Point mutation analysis showed that D180 and N182 in MtbXthA and H206 and E129 in MtbNfo are critical for enzymes activities. The steady-state kinetic parameters indicate that MtbXthA removes 3'-blocking sugar-phosphate and 3'-phosphate moieties at DNA strand breaks with an extremely high efficiency (kcat/KM=440 and 1280 μM(-1)∙min(-1), respectively), while MtbNfo exhibits much lower 3'-repair activities (kcat/KM=0.26 and 0.65 μM(-1)∙min(-1), respectively). Surprisingly, both MtbXthA and MtbNfo exhibited very weak AP site cleavage activities, with kinetic parameters 100- and 300-fold lower, respectively, as compared with the results reported previously. Expression of MtbXthA and MtbNfo reduced the sensitivity of AP endonuclease-deficient E. coli xth nfo strain to methylmethanesulfonate and H2O2 to various degrees. Taken together, these data establish the DNA substrate specificity of M. tuberculosis AP endonucleases and suggest their possible role

  10. Assistant DNA recycling with nicking endonuclease and molecular beacon for signal amplification using a target-complementary arched structure.

    PubMed

    Gao, Fenglei; Lei, Jianping; Ju, Huangxian

    2013-05-11

    A simple and universal method for ultrasensitive "signal on" detection of DNA was developed with a target-complementary arched structure to release assistant DNA, which was recycled with nicking endonuclease to amplify the detectable fluorescent signal of molecular beacons.

  11. Restricting retrotransposons: a review.

    PubMed

    Goodier, John L

    2016-01-01

    Retrotransposons have generated about 40 % of the human genome. This review examines the strategies the cell has evolved to coexist with these genomic "parasites", focussing on the non-long terminal repeat retrotransposons of humans and mice. Some of the restriction factors for retrotransposition, including the APOBECs, MOV10, RNASEL, SAMHD1, TREX1, and ZAP, also limit replication of retroviruses, including HIV, and are part of the intrinsic immune system of the cell. Many of these proteins act in the cytoplasm to degrade retroelement RNA or inhibit its translation. Some factors act in the nucleus and involve DNA repair enzymes or epigenetic processes of DNA methylation and histone modification. RISC and piRNA pathway proteins protect the germline. Retrotransposon control is relaxed in some cell types, such as neurons in the brain, stem cells, and in certain types of disease and cancer, with implications for human health and disease. This review also considers potential pitfalls in interpreting retrotransposon-related data, as well as issues to consider for future research. PMID:27525044

  12. Molecular cloning and characterization of a cDNA encoding endonuclease from potato (Solanum tuberosum).

    PubMed

    Larsen, Knud

    2005-11-01

    A cDNA, StEN1, encoding a potato (Solanum tuberosum) endonuclease was cloned and sequenced. The nucleotide sequence of this clone contains an open reading frame of 906 nucleotides encoding a protein of 302 amino acids, and with a calculated molecular mass of 34.4kDa and a Pi of 5.6. The deduced StEN1 protein contains a putative signal sequence of 25 amino acid residues. The StEN1 encoded protein shows substantial homology to both plant and fungal endonucleases isolated and cloned from other sources. The highest identity (73%) was observed with AgCEL I from celery, Apium graveolens, ZEN1 from Zinnia elegans (69%) and DSA6 from daylily, Hemerocallis (68%). RT-PCR expression analysis demonstrated that the potato StEN1 gene is constitutively expressed in potato, although minor differences in expression level in different tissues were observed. PMID:16323278

  13. Characterization of class II apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease activities in the human malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed Central

    Haltiwanger, B M; Karpinich, N O; Taraschi, T F

    2000-01-01

    We have reported that the human malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, repairs apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites on DNA by a long-patch base excision repair (BER) pathway. This biology is different from that in mammalian cells, which predominantly repair AP sites by a DNA-polymerase-beta-dependent, one-nucleotide patch BER pathway. As a starting point for the identification and biochemical characterization of the enzymes involved in the parasite DNA BER pathway, we chose characterization of the AP endonuclease activity in a P. falciparum cell-free lysate. Evidence is provided for the presence of class II, Mg(2+)-dependent and independent AP endonucleases in the parasite lysate. The investigation of the processing of AP sites in Plasmodium will provide new information about long-patch BER pathways; if they are different from those in the human host they might provide a new target for anti-malarial chemotherapy. PMID:10600642

  14. Analysis of DNA structure and sequence requirements for Pseudomonas aeruginosa MutL endonuclease activity.

    PubMed

    Correa, Elisa M E; De Tullio, Luisina; Vélez, Pablo S; Martina, Mariana A; Argaraña, Carlos E; Barra, José L

    2013-12-01

    The hallmark of the mismatch repair system in bacterial and eukaryotic organisms devoid of MutH is the presence of a MutL homologue with endonuclease activity. The aim of this study was to analyse whether different DNA structures affect Pseudomonas aeruginosa MutL (PaMutL) endonuclease activity and to determine if a specific nucleotide sequence is required for this activity. Our results showed that PaMutL was able to nick covalently closed circular plasmids but not linear DNA at high ionic strengths, while the activity on linear DNA was only found below 60 mM salt. In addition, single strand DNA, ss/ds DNA boundaries and negatively supercoiling degree were not required for PaMutL nicking activity. Finally, the analysis of the incision sites revealed that PaMutL, as well as Bacillus thuringiensis MutL homologue, did not show DNA sequence specificity.

  15. Highlights of the DNA cutters: a short history of the restriction enzymes.

    PubMed

    Loenen, Wil A M; Dryden, David T F; Raleigh, Elisabeth A; Wilson, Geoffrey G; Murray, Noreen E

    2014-01-01

    In the early 1950's, 'host-controlled variation in bacterial viruses' was reported as a non-hereditary phenomenon: one cycle of viral growth on certain bacterial hosts affected the ability of progeny virus to grow on other hosts by either restricting or enlarging their host range. Unlike mutation, this change was reversible, and one cycle of growth in the previous host returned the virus to its original form. These simple observations heralded the discovery of the endonuclease and methyltransferase activities of what are now termed Type I, II, III and IV DNA restriction-modification systems. The Type II restriction enzymes (e.g. EcoRI) gave rise to recombinant DNA technology that has transformed molecular biology and medicine. This review traces the discovery of restriction enzymes and their continuing impact on molecular biology and medicine.

  16. Highlights of the DNA cutters: a short history of the restriction enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Loenen, Wil A. M.; Dryden, David T. F.; Raleigh, Elisabeth A.; Wilson, Geoffrey G.; Murray, Noreen E.

    2014-01-01

    In the early 1950’s, ‘host-controlled variation in bacterial viruses’ was reported as a non-hereditary phenomenon: one cycle of viral growth on certain bacterial hosts affected the ability of progeny virus to grow on other hosts by either restricting or enlarging their host range. Unlike mutation, this change was reversible, and one cycle of growth in the previous host returned the virus to its original form. These simple observations heralded the discovery of the endonuclease and methyltransferase activities of what are now termed Type I, II, III and IV DNA restriction-modification systems. The Type II restriction enzymes (e.g. EcoRI) gave rise to recombinant DNA technology that has transformed molecular biology and medicine. This review traces the discovery of restriction enzymes and their continuing impact on molecular biology and medicine. PMID:24141096

  17. Karyopherin-Mediated Nuclear Import of the Homing Endonuclease VMA1-Derived Endonuclease Is Required for Self-Propagation of the Coding Region

    PubMed Central

    Nagai, Yuri; Nogami, Satoru; Kumagai-Sano, Fumi; Ohya, Yoshikazu

    2003-01-01

    VMA1-derived endonuclease (VDE), a site-specific endonuclease in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, enters the nucleus to generate a double-strand break in the VDE-negative allelic locus, mediating the self-propagating gene conversion called homing. Although VDE is excluded from the nucleus in mitotic cells, it relocalizes at premeiosis, becoming localized in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm in meiosis. The nuclear localization of VDE is induced by inactivation of TOR kinases, which constitute central regulators of cell differentiation in S. cerevisiae, and by nutrient depletion. A functional genomic approach revealed that at least two karyopherins, Srp1p and Kap142p, are required for the nuclear localization pattern. Genetic and physical interactions between Srp1p and VDE imply direct involvement of karyopherin-mediated nuclear transport in this process. Inactivation of TOR signaling or acquisition of an extra nuclear localization signal in the VDE coding region leads to artificial nuclear localization of VDE and thereby induces homing even during mitosis. These results serve as evidence that VDE utilizes the host systems of nutrient signal transduction and nucleocytoplasmic transport to ensure the propagation of its coding region. PMID:12588991

  18. A ribonucleoprotein complex protects the interleukin-6 mRNA from degradation by distinct herpesviral endonucleases.

    PubMed

    Muller, Mandy; Hutin, Stephanie; Marigold, Oliver; Li, Kathy H; Burlingame, Al; Glaunsinger, Britt A

    2015-05-01

    During lytic Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) infection, the viral endonuclease SOX promotes widespread degradation of cytoplasmic messenger RNA (mRNA). However, select mRNAs escape SOX-induced cleavage and remain robustly expressed. Prominent among these is interleukin-6 (IL-6), a growth factor important for survival of KSHV infected B cells. IL-6 escape is notable because it contains a sequence within its 3' untranslated region (UTR) that can confer protection when transferred to a SOX-targeted mRNA, and thus overrides the endonuclease targeting mechanism. Here, we pursued how this protective RNA element functions to maintain mRNA stability. Using affinity purification and mass spectrometry, we identified a set of proteins that associate specifically with the protective element. Although multiple proteins contributed to the escape mechanism, depletion of nucleolin (NCL) most severely impacted protection. NCL was re-localized out of the nucleolus during lytic KSHV infection, and its presence in the cytoplasm was required for protection. After loading onto the IL-6 3' UTR, NCL differentially bound to the translation initiation factor eIF4H. Disrupting this interaction, or depleting eIF4H, reinstated SOX targeting of the RNA, suggesting that interactions between proteins bound to distant regions of the mRNA are important for escape. Finally, we found that the IL-6 3' UTR was also protected against mRNA degradation by the vhs endonuclease encoded by herpes simplex virus, despite the fact that its mechanism of mRNA targeting is distinct from SOX. These findings highlight how a multitude of RNA-protein interactions can impact endonuclease targeting, and identify new features underlying the regulation of the IL-6 mRNA. PMID:25965334

  19. Perpetuating the homing endonuclease life cycle: identification of mutations that modulate and change I-TevI cleavage preference

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Alexander C.; Wilson, Geoffrey G.; Edgell, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Homing endonucleases are sequence-tolerant DNA endonucleases that act as mobile genetic elements. The ability of homing endonucleases to cleave substrates with multiple nucleotide substitutions suggests a high degree of adaptability in that changing or modulating cleavage preference would require relatively few amino acid substitutions. Here, using directed evolution experiments with the GIY-YIG homing endonuclease I-TevI that targets the thymidylate synthase gene of phage T4, we readily isolated variants that dramatically broadened I-TevI cleavage preference, as well as variants that fine-tuned cleavage preference. By combining substitutions, we observed an ∼10 000-fold improvement in cleavage on some substrates not cleaved by the wild-type enzyme, correlating with a decrease in readout of information content at the cleavage site. Strikingly, we were able to change the cleavage preference of I-TevI to that of the isoschizomer I-BmoI which targets a different cleavage site in the thymidylate synthase gene, recapitulating the evolution of cleavage preference in this family of homing endonucleases. Our results define a strategy to isolate GIY-YIG nuclease domains with distinct cleavage preferences, and provide insight into how homing endonucleases may escape a dead-end life cycle in a population of saturated target sites by promoting transposition to different target sites. PMID:27387281

  20. Real-time quantitative nicking endonuclease-mediated isothermal amplification with small molecular beacons.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wentao; Wang, Chenguang; Zhu, Pengyu; Guo, Tianxiao; Xu, Yuancong; Huang, Kunlun; Luo, Yunbo

    2016-04-21

    Techniques of isothermal amplification have recently made great strides, and have generated significant interest in the field of point-of-care detection. Nicking endonuclease-mediated isothermal amplification (NEMA) is an example of simple isothermal technology. In this paper, a real-time quantitative nicking endonuclease-mediated isothermal amplification with small molecular beacons (SMB-NEMA) of improved specificity and sensitivity is described. First, we optimized the prohibition of de novo synthesis by choosing Nt·BstNBI endonuclease. Second, the whole genome was successfully amplified with Nt·BstNBI (6 U), betaine (1 M) and trehalose (60 mM) for the first time. Third, we achieved 10 pg sensitivity for the first time after adding a small molecular beacon that spontaneously undergoes a conformational change when hybridizing to target, and the practical test validated the assay's application. The small molecular beacon has a similar melting temperature to the reaction temperature, but is approximately 10 bp shorter than the length of a traditional molecular beacon. A new threshold regulation was also established for isothermal conditions. Finally, we established a thermodynamic model for designing small molecular beacons. This multistate model is more correct than the traditional algorithm. This theoretical and practical basis will help us to monitor SMB-NEMA in a quantitative way. In summary, our SMB-NEMA method allows the simple, specific and sensitive assessment of isothermal DNA quantification. PMID:27027375

  1. Structure of the Endonuclease Domain of MutL: Unlicensed to Cut

    SciTech Connect

    Pillon, M.; Lorenowicz, J; Uckelmann, M; Klocko, A; Chung, Y; Modrich, P; Walker, G; Simmons, L; Friedhoff, P; Guarne, A

    2010-01-01

    DNA mismatch repair corrects errors that have escaped polymerase proofreading, increasing replication fidelity 100- to 1000-fold in organisms ranging from bacteria to humans. The MutL protein plays a central role in mismatch repair by coordinating multiple protein-protein interactions that signal strand removal upon mismatch recognition by MutS. Here we report the crystal structure of the endonuclease domain of Bacillus subtilis MutL. The structure is organized in dimerization and regulatory subdomains connected by a helical lever spanning the conserved endonuclease motif. Additional conserved motifs cluster around the lever and define a Zn{sup 2+}-binding site that is critical for MutL function in vivo. The structure unveils a powerful inhibitory mechanism to prevent undesired nicking of newly replicated DNA and allows us to propose a model describing how the interaction with MutS and the processivity clamp could license the endonuclease activity of MutL. The structure also provides a molecular framework to propose and test additional roles of MutL in mismatch repair.

  2. Shade avoidance 6 encodes an Arabidopsis flap endonuclease required for maintenance of genome integrity and development

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yijuan; Wen, Chunhong; Liu, Songbai; Zheng, Li; Shen, Binghui; Tao, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Flap endonuclease-1 (FEN1) belongs to the Rad2 family of structure-specific nucleases. It is required for several DNA metabolic pathways, including DNA replication and DNA damage repair. Here, we have identified a shade avoidance mutant, sav6, which reduces the mRNA splicing efficiency of SAV6. We have demonstrated that SAV6 is an FEN1 homologue that shows double-flap endonuclease and gap-dependent endonuclease activity, but lacks exonuclease activity. sav6 mutants are hypersensitive to DNA damage induced by ultraviolet (UV)-C radiation and reagents that induce double-stranded DNA breaks, but exhibit normal responses to chemicals that block DNA replication. Signalling components that respond to DNA damage are constitutively activated in sav6 mutants. These data indicate that SAV6 is required for DNA damage repair and the maintenance of genome integrity. Mutant sav6 plants also show reduced root apical meristem (RAM) size and defective quiescent centre (QC) development. The expression of SMR7, a cell cycle regulatory gene, and ERF115 and PSK5, regulators of QC division, is increased in sav6 mutants. Their constitutive induction is likely due to the elevated DNA damage responses in sav6 and may lead to defects in the development of the RAM and QC. Therefore, SAV6 assures proper root development through maintenance of genome integrity. PMID:26721386

  3. Interaction of the intron-encoded mobility endonuclease I-PpoI with its target site.

    PubMed Central

    Ellison, E L; Vogt, V M

    1993-01-01

    Endonucleases encoded by mobile group I introns are highly specific DNases that induce a double-strand break near the site to which the intron moves. I-PpoI from the acellular slime mold Physarum polycephalum mediates the mobility of intron 3 (Pp LSU 3) in the extrachromosomal nuclear ribosomal DNA of this organism. We showed previously that cleavage by I-PpoI creates a four-base staggered cut near the point of intron insertion. We have now characterized several further properties of the endonuclease. As determined by deletion analysis, the minimal target site recognized by I-PopI was a sequence of 13 to 15 bp spanning the cleavage site. The purified protein behaved as a globular dimer in sedimentation and gel filtration. In gel mobility shift assays in the presence of EDTA, I-PpoI formed a stable and specific complex with DNA, dissociating with a half-life of 45 min. By footprinting and interference assays with methidiumpropyl-EDTA-iron(II), I-PpoI contacted a 22- to 24-bp stretch of DNA. The endonuclease protected most of the purines found in both the major and minor grooves of the DNA helix from modification by dimethyl sulfate (DMS). However, the reactivity to DMS was enhanced at some purines, suggesting that binding leads to a conformational change in the DNA. The pattern of DMS protection differed fundamentally in the two partially symmetrical halves of the recognition sequence. Images PMID:8246971

  4. Investigation of the salicylaldehyde thiosemicarbazone scaffold for inhibition of influenza virus PA endonuclease.

    PubMed

    Rogolino, Dominga; Bacchi, Alessia; De Luca, Laura; Rispoli, Gabriele; Sechi, Mario; Stevaert, Annelies; Naesens, Lieve; Carcelli, Mauro

    2015-10-01

    The influenza virus PA endonuclease is an attractive target for the development of novel anti-influenza virus therapeutics, which are urgently needed because of the emergence of drug-resistant viral strains. Reported PA inhibitors are assumed to chelate the divalent metal ion(s) (Mg²⁺ or Mn²⁺) in the enzyme's catalytic site, which is located in the N-terminal part of PA (PA-Nter). In the present work, a series of salicylaldehyde thiosemicarbazone derivatives have been synthesized and evaluated for their ability to inhibit the PA-Nter catalytic activity. Compounds 1-6 have been evaluated against influenza virus, both in enzymatic assays with influenza virus PA-Nter and in virus yield assays in MDCK cells. In order to establish a structure-activity relationship, the hydrazone analogue of the most active thiosemicarbazone has also been evaluated. Since chelation may represent a mode of action of such class of molecules, we studied the interaction of two of them, one with and one without biological activity versus the PA enzyme, towards Mg²⁺, the ion that is probably involved in the endonuclease activity of the heterotrimeric influenza polymerase complex. The crystal structure of the magnesium complex of the o-vanillin thiosemicarbazone ligand 1 is also described. Moreover, docking studies of PA endonuclease with compounds 1 and 2 were performed, to further analyse the possible mechanism of action of this class of inhibitors.

  5. Genome-wide analysis reveals specificities of Cpf1 endonucleases in human cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Daesik; Kim, Jungeun; Hur, Junho K; Been, Kyung Wook; Yoon, Sun-Heui; Kim, Jin-Soo

    2016-08-01

    Programmable clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) Cpf1 endonucleases are single-RNA-guided (crRNA) enzymes that recognize thymidine-rich protospacer-adjacent motif (PAM) sequences and produce cohesive double-stranded breaks (DSBs). Genome editing with CRISPR-Cpf1 endonucleases could provide an alternative to CRISPR-Cas9 endonucleases, but the determinants of targeting specificity are not well understood. Using mismatched crRNAs we found that Cpf1 could tolerate single or double mismatches in the 3' PAM-distal region, but not in the 5' PAM-proximal region. Genome-wide analysis of cleavage sites in vitro for eight Cpf1 nucleases using Digenome-seq revealed that there were 6 (LbCpf1) and 12 (AsCpf1) cleavage sites per crRNA in the human genome, fewer than are present for Cas9 nucleases (>90). Most Cpf1 off-target cleavage sites did not produce mutations in cells. We found mismatches in either the 3' PAM-distal region or in the PAM sequence of 12 off-target sites that were validated in vivo. Off-target effects were completely abrogated by using preassembled, recombinant Cpf1 ribonucleoproteins.

  6. Engineering a Nickase on the Homing Endonuclease I-DmoI Scaffold*

    PubMed Central

    Molina, Rafael; Marcaida, María José; Redondo, Pilar; Marenchino, Marco; Duchateau, Phillippe; D'Abramo, Marco; Montoya, Guillermo; Prieto, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Homing endonucleases are useful tools for genome modification because of their capability to recognize and cleave specifically large DNA targets. These endonucleases generate a DNA double strand break that can be repaired by the DNA damage response machinery. The break can be repaired by homologous recombination, an error-free mechanism, or by non-homologous end joining, a process susceptible to introducing errors in the repaired sequence. The type of DNA cleavage might alter the balance between these two alternatives. The use of “nickases” producing a specific single strand break instead of a double strand break could be an approach to reduce the toxicity associated with non-homologous end joining by promoting the use of homologous recombination to repair the cleavage of a single DNA break. Taking advantage of the sequential DNA cleavage mechanism of I-DmoI LAGLIDADG homing endonuclease, we have developed a new variant that is able to cut preferentially the coding DNA strand, generating a nicked DNA target. Our structural and biochemical analysis shows that by decoupling the action of the catalytic residues acting on each strand we can inhibit one of them while keeping the other functional. PMID:26045557

  7. Real-time quantitative nicking endonuclease-mediated isothermal amplification with small molecular beacons.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wentao; Wang, Chenguang; Zhu, Pengyu; Guo, Tianxiao; Xu, Yuancong; Huang, Kunlun; Luo, Yunbo

    2016-04-21

    Techniques of isothermal amplification have recently made great strides, and have generated significant interest in the field of point-of-care detection. Nicking endonuclease-mediated isothermal amplification (NEMA) is an example of simple isothermal technology. In this paper, a real-time quantitative nicking endonuclease-mediated isothermal amplification with small molecular beacons (SMB-NEMA) of improved specificity and sensitivity is described. First, we optimized the prohibition of de novo synthesis by choosing Nt·BstNBI endonuclease. Second, the whole genome was successfully amplified with Nt·BstNBI (6 U), betaine (1 M) and trehalose (60 mM) for the first time. Third, we achieved 10 pg sensitivity for the first time after adding a small molecular beacon that spontaneously undergoes a conformational change when hybridizing to target, and the practical test validated the assay's application. The small molecular beacon has a similar melting temperature to the reaction temperature, but is approximately 10 bp shorter than the length of a traditional molecular beacon. A new threshold regulation was also established for isothermal conditions. Finally, we established a thermodynamic model for designing small molecular beacons. This multistate model is more correct than the traditional algorithm. This theoretical and practical basis will help us to monitor SMB-NEMA in a quantitative way. In summary, our SMB-NEMA method allows the simple, specific and sensitive assessment of isothermal DNA quantification.

  8. Structural and Thermodymamic Basis for Enhanced DNA Binding by a Promiscuous Mutant EcoRI Endonuclease

    SciTech Connect

    Sapienza,P.; Rosenberg, J.; Jen-Jacobson, L.

    2007-01-01

    Promiscuous mutant EcoRI endonucleases bind to the canonical site GAATTC more tightly than does the wild-type endonuclease, yet cleave variant (EcoRI*) sites more rapidly than does wild-type. The crystal structure of the A138T promiscuous mutant homodimer in complex with a GAATTC site is nearly identical to that of the wild-type complex, except that the Thr138 side chains make packing interactions with bases in the 5'-flanking regions outside the recognition hexanucleotide while excluding two bound water molecules seen in the wild-type complex. Molecular dynamics simulations confirm exclusion of these waters. The structure and simulations suggest possible reasons why binding of the A138T protein to the GAATTC site has S more favorable and H less favorable than for wild-type endonuclease binding. The interactions of Thr138 with flanking bases may permit A138T, unlike wild-type enzyme, to form complexes with EcoRI* sites that structurally resemble the specific wild-type complex with GAATTC.

  9. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of a Thermostable Endonuclease IV from Thermotoga maritima

    SciTech Connect

    Coates, Leighton; Tomanicek, Stephen J; Hughes, Ronny C; NG, Joseph D; Demarse, Neil A

    2009-01-01

    The DNA repair enzyme Endonuclease IV from the thermophilic bacterium Thermotoga Maritima MSB8 (reference sequence: NC_000853) has been expressed in Escherichia coli and crystallized for X ray analysis. Thermotoga maritima Endonuclease IV is a 287 amino acid protein with 32% sequence identity to the Escherichia coli Endonuclease IV. The protein was purified to homogeneity and was crystallized using the sitting drop vapor diffusion method. The protein crystallized in the space group P61, with a composition of one biological molecule in the asymmetric unit corresponding to a Mathew s coefficient of 2.39 and a 47% solvent fraction. The unit cell parameters for the crystals are a = 123.23 , b = 123.23 , c = 35.34 , = = 90 , = 120 . Microseeding and further optimization yielded crystals with an X ray diffraction limit of 2.4 . A single 70 data set was collected and processed resulting in an overall Rmerge and completeness of 9.5% and 99.3% respectively.

  10. Homing in on the role of transition metals in the HNH motif of colicin endonucleases.

    PubMed

    Pommer, A J; Kühlmann, U C; Cooper, A; Hemmings, A M; Moore, G R; James, R; Kleanthous, C

    1999-09-17

    The cytotoxic domain of the bacteriocin colicin E9 (the E9 DNase) is a nonspecific endonuclease that must traverse two membranes to reach its cellular target, bacterial DNA. Recent structural studies revealed that the active site of colicin DNases encompasses the HNH motif found in homing endonucleases, and bound within this motif a single transition metal ion (either Zn(2+) or Ni(2+)) the role of which is unknown. In the present work we find that neither Zn(2+) nor Ni(2+) is required for DNase activity, which instead requires Mg(2+) ions, but binding transition metals to the E9 DNase causes subtle changes to both secondary and tertiary structure. Spectroscopic, proteolytic, and calorimetric data show that, accompanying the binding of 1 eq of Zn(2+), Ni(2+), or Co(2+), the thermodynamic stability of the domain increased substantially, and that the equilibrium dissociation constant for Zn(2+) was less than or equal to nanomolar, while that for Co(2+) and Ni (2+) was micromolar. Our data demonstrate that the transition metal is not essential for colicin DNase activity but rather serves a structural role. We speculate that the HNH motif has been adapted for use by endonuclease colicins because of its involvement in DNA recognition and because removal of the bound metal ion destabilizes the DNase domain, a likely prerequisite for its translocation across bacterial membranes.

  11. Investigation of the salicylaldehyde thiosemicarbazone scaffold for inhibition of influenza virus PA endonuclease.

    PubMed

    Rogolino, Dominga; Bacchi, Alessia; De Luca, Laura; Rispoli, Gabriele; Sechi, Mario; Stevaert, Annelies; Naesens, Lieve; Carcelli, Mauro

    2015-10-01

    The influenza virus PA endonuclease is an attractive target for the development of novel anti-influenza virus therapeutics, which are urgently needed because of the emergence of drug-resistant viral strains. Reported PA inhibitors are assumed to chelate the divalent metal ion(s) (Mg²⁺ or Mn²⁺) in the enzyme's catalytic site, which is located in the N-terminal part of PA (PA-Nter). In the present work, a series of salicylaldehyde thiosemicarbazone derivatives have been synthesized and evaluated for their ability to inhibit the PA-Nter catalytic activity. Compounds 1-6 have been evaluated against influenza virus, both in enzymatic assays with influenza virus PA-Nter and in virus yield assays in MDCK cells. In order to establish a structure-activity relationship, the hydrazone analogue of the most active thiosemicarbazone has also been evaluated. Since chelation may represent a mode of action of such class of molecules, we studied the interaction of two of them, one with and one without biological activity versus the PA enzyme, towards Mg²⁺, the ion that is probably involved in the endonuclease activity of the heterotrimeric influenza polymerase complex. The crystal structure of the magnesium complex of the o-vanillin thiosemicarbazone ligand 1 is also described. Moreover, docking studies of PA endonuclease with compounds 1 and 2 were performed, to further analyse the possible mechanism of action of this class of inhibitors. PMID:26323352

  12. Sensitive detection of microRNA in complex biological samples via enzymatic signal amplification using DNA polymerase coupled with nicking endonuclease.

    PubMed

    Yin, Bin-Cheng; Liu, Yu-Qiang; Ye, Bang-Ce

    2013-12-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) has become an ideal biomarker candidate for cancer diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy. In this study, we have developed a novel one-step method for sensitive and specific miRNA detection via enzymatic signal amplification and demonstrated its practical application in biological samples. The proposed signal amplification strategy is an integrated "biological circuit" designed to initiate a cascade of enzymatic polymerization reactions in order to detect, amplify, and measure a specific miRNA sequence by using the isothermal strand-displacement property of a mesophilic DNA polymerase together with the nicking activity of a restriction endonuclease. The circuit is composed of two molecular switches operating in series: the nicking endonuclease-assisted isothermal polymerization reaction activated by a specific miRNA and the strand-displacement polymerization reaction designed to initiate molecular beacon-assisted amplification and signal transduction. The hsa-miR-141 (miR-141) was chosen as a target miRNA because its level specifically elevates in prostate cancer. The proposed method allowed quantitative sequence-specific detection of miR-141 in a dynamic range from 1 fM to 100 nM, with an excellent ability to discriminate differences among miR-200 family members. Moreover, the detection assay was applied to quantify miR-141 in cancerous cell lysates. The results are in excellent agreement with those from the reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction method. On the basis of these findings, we believe that this proposed sensitive and specific assay has great potential as a miRNA quantification method for use in biomedical research and clinical diagnosis.

  13. A Virus-Like Particle System Identifies the Endonuclease Domain of Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus

    PubMed Central

    Devignot, Stephanie; Bergeron, Eric; Nichol, Stuart; Mirazimi, Ali

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV; genus Nairovirus) is an extremely pathogenic member of the Bunyaviridae family. Since handling of the virus requires a biosafety level 4 (BSL-4) facility, little is known about pathomechanisms and host interactions. Here, we describe the establishment of a transcriptionally competent virus-like particle (tc-VLP) system for CCHFV. Recombinant polymerase (L), nucleocapsid protein (N) and a reporter minigenome expressed in human HuH-7 cells resulted in formation of transcriptionally active nucleocapsids that could be packaged by coexpressed CCHFV glycoproteins into tc-VLPs. The tc-VLPs resembled authentic virus particles in their protein composition and neutralization sensitivity to anti-CCHFV antibodies and could recapitulate all steps of the viral replication cycle. Particle attachment, entry, and primary transcription were modeled by infection of naive cells. The subsequent steps of genome replication, secondary transcription, and particle assembly and release can be obtained upon passaging the tc-VLPs on cells expressing CCHFV structural proteins. The utility of the VLP system was demonstrated by showing that the endonuclease domain of L is located around amino acid D693, as was predicted in silico by B. Morin et al. (PLoS Pathog 6:e1001038, 2010, http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.ppat.1001038). The tc-VLP system will greatly facilitate studies and diagnostics of CCHFV under non-BSL-4 conditions. IMPORTANCE Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) is an extremely virulent pathogen of humans. Since the virus can be handled only at the highest biosafety level, research is restricted to a few specialized laboratories. We developed a plasmid-based system to produce virus-like particles with the ability to infect cells and transcribe a reporter genome. Due to the absence of viral genes, the virus-like particles are unable to spread or cause disease, thus allowing study of aspects of CCHFV biology under relaxed

  14. Changes in solvation during DNA binding and cleavage are critical to altered specificity of the EcoRI endonuclease

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Clifford R.; Sligar, Stephen G.

    1998-01-01

    Restriction endonucleases such as EcoRI bind and cleave DNA with great specificity and represent a paradigm for protein–DNA interactions and molecular recognition. Using osmotic pressure to induce water release, we demonstrate the participation of bound waters in the sequence discrimination of substrate DNA by EcoRI. Changes in solvation can play a critical role in directing sequence-specific DNA binding by EcoRI and are also crucial in assisting site discrimination during catalysis. By measuring the volume change for complex formation, we show that at the cognate sequence (GAATTC) EcoRI binding releases about 70 fewer water molecules than binding at an alternate DNA sequence (TAATTC), which differs by a single base pair. EcoRI complexation with nonspecific DNA releases substantially less water than either of these specific complexes. In cognate substrates (GAATTC) kcat decreases as osmotic pressure is increased, indicating the binding of about 30 water molecules accompanies the cleavage reaction. For the alternate substrate (TAATTC), release of about 40 water molecules accompanies the reaction, indicated by a dramatic acceleration of the rate when osmotic pressure is raised. These large differences in solvation effects demonstrate that water molecules can be key players in the molecular recognition process during both association and catalytic phases of the EcoRI reaction, acting to change the specificity of the enzyme. For both the protein–DNA complex and the transition state, there may be substantial conformational differences between cognate and alternate sites, accompanied by significant alterations in hydration and solvent accessibility. PMID:9482860

  15. An improvement of restriction analysis of bacteriophage DNA using capillary electrophoresis in agarose solution.

    PubMed

    Klepárník, K; Malá, Z; Doskar, J; Rosypal, S; Bocek, P

    1995-03-01

    Seven representatives of the serogroup B Staphylococcus aureus bacteriophages, 29, 53, 55, 83A, 85, phi 11 and 80 alpha, were examined by capillary electrophoresis (CE) for genomic homology using DNA restriction analysis. Genomic DNA of individual bacteriophages was cleaved by HindIII restriction endonuclease, and the resulting restriction fragments were separated by standard horizontal agarose slab gel electrophoresis (SGE) as well as by CE in low-melting-point agarose solutions. The number and size of restriction fragments identified by both methods were compared. The high separation power of CE makes it possible to extend the restriction fragment patterns. In most of the restriction patterns, some additional restriction fragments as small as 150 bp, not identified by SGE, were detected. With respect to speed, high separation efficiency, low sample consumption and automation, CE offers a simple procedure for processing of multiple samples cost-effectively in a reasonable time. The comparison of the complemented restriction patterns of the different phage strains and the subsequent identification of their common fragments leads to a deeper understanding of their phylogenetic relationships. The genome homologies expressed for individual phage pairs in terms of coefficient F values ranged from 15 to 69%. These values are in good accordance with the degree of DNA homology of these phages as determined by DNA hybridization studies and thermal denaturation analysis of DNA by other authors. The total size of each phage genome was estimated by adding the sizes of individual restriction fragments.

  16. Specificity in protein-protein interactions: the structural basis for dual recognition in endonuclease colicin-immunity protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Kühlmann, U C; Pommer, A J; Moore, G R; James, R; Kleanthous, C

    2000-09-01

    Bacteria producing endonuclease colicins are protected against their cytotoxic activity by virtue of a small immunity protein that binds with high affinity and specificity to inactivate the endonuclease. DNase binding by the immunity protein occurs through a "dual recognition" mechanism in which conserved residues from helix III act as the binding-site anchor, while variable residues from helix II define specificity. We now report the 1.7 A crystal structure of the 24.5 kDa complex formed between the endonuclease domain of colicin E9 and its cognate immunity protein Im9, which provides a molecular rationale for this mechanism. Conserved residues of Im9 form a binding-energy hotspot through a combination of backbone hydrogen bonds to the endonuclease, many via buried solvent molecules, and hydrophobic interactions at the core of the interface, while the specificity-determining residues interact with corresponding specificity side-chains on the enzyme. Comparison between the present structure and that reported recently for the colicin E7 endonuclease domain in complex with Im7 highlights how specificity is achieved by very different interactions in the two complexes, predominantly hydrophobic in nature in the E9-Im9 complex but charged in the E7-Im7 complex. A key feature of both complexes is the contact between a conserved tyrosine residue from the immunity proteins (Im9 Tyr54) with a specificity residue on the endonuclease directing it toward the specificity sites of the immunity protein. Remarkably, this tyrosine residue and its neighbour (Im9 Tyr55) are the pivots of a 19 degrees rigid-body rotation that relates the positions of Im7 and Im9 in the two complexes. This rotation does not affect conserved immunity protein interactions with the endonuclease but results in different regions of the specificity helix being presented to the enzyme.

  17. pBR322 plasmid DNA modified with 2-acetylaminofluorene derivatives: transforming activity and in vitro strand cleavage by the Escherichia coli uvrABC endonuclease.

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, R P; Seeberg, E

    1984-01-01

    Covalently closed circular plasmid DNA was treated with three reactive derivatives of 2-acetylaminofluorene: N-acetoxy-N-2-acetylaminofluorene (N-Aco-AAF), its 7-iodo derivative (N-Aco- AAIF ) and N-hydroxy-N-2-aminofluorene (N-OH-AF), and tested as substrates for the Escherichia coli uvrABC endonuclease and for transformation frequencies on wild-type, uvrA, recA, uvrArecA and polA mutant strains. The uvrABC endonuclease reacted with all three substrates with high efficiency, implicating this enzyme in the repair of DNA containing all three types of adducts. However, only AAF- and AAIF -DNA showed greatly reduced survival on uvrA mutants (five adducts/lethal hit) relative to wild-type (20 adducts/lethal hit). AF-DNA survived equally well on uvrA mutant and wild-type cells, and at a much higher level of modification (60 adducts/lethal hit). A mutation in recA had only a minor effect on the survival of either DNA. The polA mutation reduced the survival of the AAF-treated DNA to the same extent as the uvrA mutation (five adducts/lethal hit). Also AF-DNA showed reduced survival on polA mutant cells versus wild-type. However, many more adducts (20/lethal hit) were tolerated than for AAF-DNA, indicating that AF lesions in the template do not efficiently block replication of DNA. PMID:6373248

  18. The BsaHI restriction-modification system: Cloning, sequencing and analysis of conserved motifs

    PubMed Central

    Neely, Robert K; Roberts, Richard J

    2008-01-01

    Background Restriction and modification enzymes typically recognise short DNA sequences of between two and eight bases in length. Understanding the mechanism of this recognition represents a significant challenge that we begin to address for the BsaHI restriction-modification system, which recognises the six base sequence GRCGYC. Results The DNA sequences of the genes for the BsaHI methyltransferase, bsaHIM, and restriction endonuclease, bsaHIR, have been determined (GenBank accession #EU386360), cloned and expressed in E. coli. Both the restriction endonuclease and methyltransferase enzymes share significant similarity with a group of 6 other enzymes comprising the restriction-modification systems HgiDI and HgiGI and the putative HindVP, NlaCORFDP, NpuORFC228P and SplZORFNP restriction-modification systems. A sequence alignment of these homologues shows that their amino acid sequences are largely conserved and highlights several motifs of interest. We target one such conserved motif, reading SPERRFD, at the C-terminal end of the bsaHIR gene. A mutational analysis of these amino acids indicates that the motif is crucial for enzymatic activity. Sequence alignment of the methyltransferase gene reveals a short motif within the target recognition domain that is conserved among enzymes recognising the same sequences. Thus, this motif may be used as a diagnostic tool to define the recognition sequences of the cytosine C5 methyltransferases. Conclusion We have cloned and sequenced the BsaHI restriction and modification enzymes. We have identified a region of the R. BsaHI enzyme that is crucial for its activity. Analysis of the amino acid sequence of the BsaHI methyltransferase enzyme led us to propose two new motifs that can be used in the diagnosis of the recognition sequence of the cytosine C5-methyltransferases. PMID:18479503

  19. CHIP has a protective role against oxidative stress-induced cell death through specific regulation of Endonuclease G

    PubMed Central

    Lee, J S; Seo, T W; Yi, J H; Shin, K S; Yoo, S J

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress is implicated in carcinogenesis, aging, and neurodegenerative diseases. The E3 ligase C terminus of Hsc-70 interacting protein (CHIP) has a protective role against various stresses by targeting damaged proteins for proteasomal degradation, and thus maintains protein quality control. However, the detailed mechanism by which CHIP protects cells from oxidative stress has not been demonstrated. Here, we show that depletion of CHIP led to elevated Endonuclease G (EndoG) levels and enhanced cell death upon oxidative stress. In contrast, CHIP overexpression reduced EndoG levels, and resulted in reduced or no oxidative stress-induced cell death in cancer cells and primary rat cortical neurons. Under normal conditions Hsp70 mediated the interaction between EndoG and CHIP, downregulating EndoG levels in a Hsp70/proteasome-dependent manner. However, under oxidative stress Hsp70 no longer interacted with EndoG, and the stabilized EndoG translocated to the nucleus and degraded chromosomal DNA. Our data suggest that regulation of the level of EndoG by CHIP in normal conditions may determine the sensitivity to cell death upon oxidative stress. Indeed, injection of H2O2 into the rat brain markedly increased cell death in aged mice compared with young mice, which correlated with elevated levels of EndoG and concurrent downregulation of CHIP in aged mice. Taken together, our findings demonstrate a novel protective mechanism of CHIP against oxidative stress through regulation of EndoG, and provide an opportunity to modulate oxidative stress-induced cell death in cancer and aging. PMID:23764847

  20. Redox regulation of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 activity in Long-Evans Cinnamon rats during spontaneous hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Karmahapatra, Soumendra Krishna; Saha, Tapas; Adhikari, Sanjay; Woodrick, Jordan; Roy, Rabindra

    2014-03-01

    The Long-Evans Cinnamon (LEC) rat is an animal model for Wilson's disease. This animal is genetically predisposed to copper accumulation in the liver, increased oxidative stress, accumulation of DNA damage, and the spontaneous development of hepatocellular carcinoma. Thus, this animal model is useful for studying the relationship of endogenous DNA damage to spontaneous carcinogenesis. In this study, we have investigated the apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1)-mediated excision repair of endogenous DNA damage, apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP)-sites, which is highly mutagenic and implicated in human cancer. We found that the activity was reduced in the liver extracts from the acute hepatitis period of LEC rats as compared with extracts from the age-matched Long-Evans Agouti rats. The acute hepatitis period had also a heightened oxidative stress condition as assessed by an increase in oxidized glutathione level and loss of enzyme activity of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, a key redox-sensitive protein in cells. Interestingly, the activity reduction was not due to changes in protein expression but apparently by reversible protein oxidation as the addition of reducing agents to extracts of the liver from acute hepatitis period reactivated APE1 activity and thus, confirmed the oxidation-mediated loss of APE1 activity under increased oxidative stress. These findings show for the first time in an animal model that the repair mechanism of AP-sites is impaired by increased oxidative stress in acute hepatitis via redox regulation which contributed to the increased accumulation of mutagenic AP-sites in liver DNA.

  1. Bacterial CRISPR/Cas DNA endonucleases: A revolutionary technology that could dramatically impact viral research and treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, Edward M.; Cullen, Bryan R.

    2015-05-15

    CRISPR/Cas systems mediate bacterial adaptive immune responses that evolved to protect bacteria from bacteriophage and other horizontally transmitted genetic elements. Several CRISPR/Cas systems exist but the simplest variant, referred to as Type II, has a single effector DNA endonuclease, called Cas9, which is guided to its viral DNA target by two small RNAs, the crRNA and the tracrRNA. Initial efforts to adapt the CRISPR/Cas system for DNA editing in mammalian cells, which focused on the Cas9 protein from Streptococcus pyogenes (Spy), demonstrated that Spy Cas9 can be directed to DNA targets in mammalian cells by tracrRNA:crRNA fusion transcripts called single guide RNAs (sgRNA). Upon binding, Cas9 induces DNA cleavage leading to mutagenesis as a result of error prone non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). Recently, the Spy Cas9 system has been adapted for high throughput screening of genes in human cells for their relevance to a particular phenotype and, more generally, for the targeted inactivation of specific genes, in cell lines and in vivo in a number of model organisms. The latter aim seems likely to be greatly enhanced by the recent development of Cas9 proteins from bacterial species such as Neisseria meningitidis and Staphyloccus aureus that are small enough to be expressed using adeno-associated (AAV)-based vectors that can be readily prepared at very high titers. The evolving Cas9-based DNA editing systems therefore appear likely to not only impact virology by allowing researchers to screen for human genes that affect the replication of pathogenic human viruses of all types but also to derive clonal human cell lines that lack individual gene products that either facilitate or restrict viral replication. Moreover, high titer AAV-based vectors offer the possibility of directly targeting DNA viruses that infect discrete sites in the human body, such as herpes simplex virus and hepatitis B virus, with the hope that the entire population of viral DNA genomes

  2. The heteromeric Nanoarchaeum equitans splicing endonuclease cleaves noncanonical bulge–helix–bulge motifs of joined tRNA halves

    PubMed Central

    Randau, Lennart; Calvin, Kate; Hall, Michelle; Yuan, Jing; Podar, Mircea; Li, Hong; Söll, Dieter

    2005-01-01

    Among the tRNA population of the archaeal parasite Nanoarchaeum equitans are five species assembled from separate 5′ and 3′ tRNA halves and four species derived from tRNA precursors containing introns. In both groups an intervening sequence element must be removed during tRNA maturation. A bulge–helix–bulge (BHB) motif is the hallmark structure required by the archaeal splicing endonuclease for recognition and excision of all introns. BHB motifs are recognizable at the joining sites of all five noncontinuous tRNA species, although deviations from the canonical BHB motif are clearly present in at least two of them. Here, we show that the N. equitans splicing endonuclease cleaves tRNA precursors containing normal introns, as well as all five noncontinuous precursor tRNAs, at the predicted splice sites, indicating the enzyme's dual role in the removal of tRNA introns and processing of tRNA halves to be joined in trans. The cleavage activity on a set of synthetic canonical and noncanonical BHB constructs showed that the N. equitans splicing endonuclease accepts a broader range of substrates than the homodimeric Archaeoglobus fulgidus enzyme. In contrast to the A. fulgidus endonuclease, the N. equitans splicing enzyme possesses two different subunits. This heteromeric endonuclease type, found in N. equitans, in all Crenarchaeota, and in Methanopyrus kandleri, is able to act on the noncanonical tRNA introns present only in these organisms, which suggests coevolution of enzyme and substrate. PMID:16330750

  3. Methionine restriction and life-span control.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung Cheon; Kaya, Alaattin; Gladyshev, Vadim N

    2016-01-01

    Dietary restriction (DR) without malnutrition is associated with longevity in various organisms. However, it has also been shown that reduced calorie intake is often ineffective in extending life span. Selecting optimal dietary regimens for DR studies is complicated, as the same regimen may lead to different outcomes depending on genotype and environmental factors. Recent studies suggested that interventions such as moderate protein restriction with or without adequate nutrition (e.g., particular amino acids or carbohydrates) may have additional beneficial effects mediated by certain metabolic and hormonal factors implicated in the biology of aging, regardless of total calorie intake. In particular, it was shown that restriction of a single amino acid, methionine, can mimic the effects of DR and extend life span in various model organisms. We discuss the beneficial effects of a methionine-restricted diet, the molecular pathways involved, and the use of this regimen in longevity interventions.

  4. Identification of a methyl-specific restriction system mediated by a conjugative element from Streptomyces bambergiensis.

    PubMed Central

    Zotchev, S B; Schrempf, H; Hutchinson, C R

    1995-01-01

    pBL2 was identified genetically but not physically in Streptomyces lividans after its mating with S. bambergiensis. During conjugation, pBL2 was transferred at high frequency to S. lividans and S. coelicolor. pBL2.1 DNA isolated from S. coelicolor exconjugants as a circular plasmid was shown to derive from the genome of S. bambergiensis. S. lividans carrying pBL2 or pBL2.1 acquired a methyl-specific restriction (MsrA+) phenotype. The corresponding enzyme was partially purified and shown to resemble a class II endonuclease which cleaves Dam-methylated DNA preferentially. PMID:7642510

  5. Diversity analysis of magnetotactic bacteria in Lake Miyun, northern China, by restriction fragment length polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei; Li, Jinhua; Schüler, Dirk; Jogler, Christian; Pan, Yongxin

    2009-08-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) synthesize intracellular nano-scale crystals of magnetite or greigite within magnetosomes. MTB are ubiquitous in limnic and marine environments. In order to understand the diversity of MTB better, sediment samples were examined from Lake Miyun near Beijing by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). First, in silico analysis was used to evaluate the effectiveness of 12 sets of restriction endonucleases for distinguishing MTB sequences retrieved from the GenBank database. It was found that the tested restriction endonucleases had different power in the ability to differentiate the operational taxonomic units (OTUs) of MTB. Specifically, of the 12 sets of enzymes, MspI plus RsaI was found to be the most effective for correctly differentiating the OTUs of selected MTB sequences and it could detect 16 OTUs with appropriate OTUmin and OTUmax values (96.7% and 97.7%, respectively). The MspI plus RsaI RFLP analysis was then utilized to investigate the diversity of MTB in Lake Miyun sediment and it identified 8 OTUs (74.5% of the whole library) as MTB. Among these, 5 were affiliated to Alphaproteobacteria, while the rest belonged to the Nitrospira phylum. Interestingly, OTUs C, D and I displayed 91.8-98.4% similarity to "Magnetobacterium bavaricum". Together, these results demonstrated that the MspI plus RsaI RFLP analysis was useful for studying the diversity and change in community composition of uncultivated MTB from environmental samples.

  6. Safety and efficacy of foot-and-mouth disease vaccines containing endonuclease-inactivated virions.

    PubMed

    Amadori, M; Barei, S; Melegari, M; Panina, G F

    1987-09-01

    Inactivation of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) by means of virion-associated endonuclease was found to be suited to the production of safe and potent vaccines, which proved to be equal or better than those containing formaldehyde or ethyleneimine in guinea-pig potency tests. First order inactivation kinetics were regularly shown, with half life values which varied according to the different temperatures used. Inactivation brought about extensive degradation of FMDV RNA, while it did not adversely influence the integrity of critical viral epitopes on FMDV VP1. PMID:2823495

  7. Flow cytometric assays for interrogating LAGLIDADG homing endonuclease DNA-binding and cleavage properties.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Sarah K; Lambert, Abigail R; Scharenberg, Andrew M; Jarjour, Jordan

    2013-01-01

    A fast, easy, and scalable method to assess the properties of site-specific nucleases is crucial to -understanding their in cellulo behavior in genome engineering or population-level gene drive applications. Here we describe an analytical platform that enables high-throughput, semiquantitative interrogation of the DNA-binding and catalytic properties of LAGLIDADG homing endonucleases (LHEs). Using this platform, natural or engineered LHEs are expressed on the surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast where they can be rapidly evaluated against synthetic DNA target sequences using flow cytometry.

  8. The preference of the mitochondrial endonuclease for a conserved sequence block in mitochondrial DNA is highly conserved during mammalian evolution.

    PubMed Central

    Low, R L; Buzan, J M; Couper, C L

    1988-01-01

    Endonuclease activity identified in crude preparations of rat and human heart mitochondria has each been partially purified and characterized. Both the rat and human activities purify as a single enzyme that closely resembles the endonuclease of bovine-heart mitochondria (Cummings, O.W. et. al. (1987) J. Biol. Chem. 262:2005-2015). All three enzymes, for example elute similarly during gel filtration and DNA-cellulose chromatography, and exhibit similar enzymatic properties. Although the nucleotide sequences of the mtDNAs indicate that there has occurred an unusual degree of divergence in the displacement-loop region during mammalian evolution, the nucleotide specificities of the mt endonucleases appear highly conserved and show a striking preference for an evolutionarily-conserved sequence tract that is located upstream from the heavy (H)-strand origin of DNA replication (OriH). Images PMID:3399407

  9. Identification of potential influenza virus endonuclease inhibitors through virtual screening based on the 3D-QSAR model.

    PubMed

    Kim, J; Lee, C; Chong, Y

    2009-01-01

    Influenza endonucleases have appeared as an attractive target of antiviral therapy for influenza infection. With the purpose of designing a novel antiviral agent with enhanced biological activities against influenza endonuclease, a three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationships (3D-QSAR) model was generated based on 34 influenza endonuclease inhibitors. The comparative molecular similarity index analysis (CoMSIA) with a steric, electrostatic and hydrophobic (SEH) model showed the best correlative and predictive capability (q(2) = 0.763, r(2) = 0.969 and F = 174.785), which provided a pharmacophore composed of the electronegative moiety as well as the bulky hydrophobic group. The CoMSIA model was used as a pharmacophore query in the UNITY search of the ChemDiv compound library to give virtual active compounds. The 3D-QSAR model was then used to predict the activity of the selected compounds, which identified three compounds as the most likely inhibitor candidates.

  10. Functional complementation of Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis AP endonuclease gene (lamap) in Escherichia coli mutant strains challenged with DNA damage agents

    PubMed Central

    Verissimo-Villela, Erika; Kitahara-Oliveira, Milene Yoko; dos Reis, Ana Beatriz de Bragança; Albano, Rodolpho Mattos; Da-Cruz, Alda Maria; Bello, Alexandre Ribeiro

    2016-01-01

    During its life cycle Leishmania spp. face several stress conditions that can cause DNA damages. Base Excision Repair plays an important role in DNA maintenance and it is one of the most conserved mechanisms in all living organisms. DNA repair in trypanosomatids has been reported only for Old World Leishmania species. Here the AP endonuclease from Leishmania (L.) amazonensis was cloned, expressed in Escherichia coli mutants defective on the DNA repair machinery, that were submitted to different stress conditions, showing ability to survive in comparison to the triple null mutant parental strain BW535. Phylogenetic and multiple sequence analyses also confirmed that LAMAP belongs to the AP endonuclease class of proteins. PMID:27223868

  11. Connections between RNA splicing and DNA intron mobility in yeast mitochondria: RNA maturase and DNA endonuclease switching experiments.

    PubMed Central

    Goguel, V; Delahodde, A; Jacq, C

    1992-01-01

    The intron-encoded proteins bI4 RNA maturase and aI4 DNA endonuclease can be faithfully expressed in yeast cytoplasm from engineered forms of their mitochondrial coding sequences. In this work we studied the relationships between these two activities associated with two homologous intron-encoded proteins: the bI4 RNA maturase encoded in the fourth intron of the cytochrome b gene and the aI4 DNA endonuclease (I-SceII) encoded in the fourth intron of the gene coding for the subunit I of cytochrome oxidase. Taking advantage of both the high recombinogenic properties of yeast and the similarities between the two genes, we constructed in vivo a family of hybrid genes carrying parts of both RNA maturase and DNA endonuclease coding sequences. The presence of a sequence coding for a mitochondrial targeting peptide upstream from these hybrid genes allowed us to study the properties of their translation products within the mitochondria in vivo. We thus could analyze the ability of the recombinant proteins to complement RNA maturase deficiencies in different strains. Many combinations of the two parental intronic sequences were found in the recombinants. Their structural and functional analysis revealed the following features. (i) The N-terminal half of the bI4 RNA maturase could be replaced in total by its equivalent from the aI4 DNA endonuclease without affecting the RNA maturase activity. In contrast, replacing the C-terminal half of the bI4 RNA maturase with its equivalent from the aI4 DNA endonuclease led to a very weak RNA maturase activity, indicating that this region is more differentiated and linked to the maturase activity. (ii) None of the hybrid proteins carrying an RNA maturase activity kept the DNA endonuclease activity, suggesting that the latter requires the integrity of the aI4 protein. These observations are interesting because the aI4 DNA endonuclease is known to promote the propagation, at the DNA level, of the aI4 intron, whereas the bI4 RNA maturase

  12. Crimean–Congo hemorrhagic fever virus nucleoprotein reveals endonuclease activity in bunyaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yu; Wang, Wenming; Ji, Wei; Deng, Maping; Sun, Yuna; Zhou, Honggang; Yang, Cheng; Deng, Fei; Wang, Hualin; Hu, Zhihong; Lou, Zhiyong; Rao, Zihe

    2012-01-01

    Crimean–Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV), a virus with high mortality in humans, is a member of the genus Nairovirus in the family Bunyaviridae, and is a causative agent of severe hemorrhagic fever (HF). It is classified as a biosafety level 4 pathogen and a potential bioterrorism agent due to its aerosol infectivity and its ability to cause HF outbreaks with high case fatality (∼30%). However, little is known about the structural features and function of nucleoproteins (NPs) in the Bunyaviridae, especially in CCHFV. Here we report a 2.3-Å resolution crystal structure of the CCHFV nucleoprotein. The protein has a racket-shaped overall structure with distinct “head” and “stalk” domains and differs significantly with NPs reported so far from other negative-sense single-stranded RNA viruses. Furthermore, CCHFV NP shows a distinct metal-dependent DNA-specific endonuclease activity. Single residue mutations in the predicted active site resulted in a significant reduction in the observed endonuclease activity. Our results present a new folding mechanism and function for a negative-strand RNA virus nucleoprotein, extend our structural insight into bunyavirus NPs, and provide a potential target for antiviral drug development to treat CCHFV infection. PMID:22421137

  13. Wuho Is a New Member in Maintaining Genome Stability through its Interaction with Flap Endonuclease 1

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, I-Cheng; Chen, Betty Chamay; Shuai, Hung-Hsun; Chien, Fan-Ching; Chen, Peilin; Hsieh, Tao-shih

    2016-01-01

    Replication forks are vulnerable to wayward nuclease activities. We report here our discovery of a new member in guarding genome stability at replication forks. We previously isolated a Drosophila mutation, wuho (wh, no progeny), characterized by a severe fertility defect and affecting expression of a protein (WH) in a family of conserved proteins with multiple WD40 repeats. Knockdown of WH by siRNA in Drosophila, mouse, and human cultured cells results in DNA damage with strand breaks and apoptosis through ATM/Chk2/p53 signaling pathway. Mice with mWh knockout are early embryonic lethal and display DNA damage. We identify that the flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1) is one of the interacting proteins. Fluorescence microscopy showed the localization of WH at the site of nascent DNA synthesis along with other replication proteins, including FEN1 and PCNA. We show that WH is able to modulate FEN1’s endonucleolytic activities depending on the substrate DNA structure. The stimulatory or inhibitory effects of WH on FEN1’s flap versus gap endonuclease activities are consistent with the proposed WH’s functions in protecting the integrity of replication fork. These results suggest that wh is a new member of the guardians of genome stability because it regulates FEN1’s potential DNA cleavage threat near the site of replication. PMID:26751069

  14. Regulation of eukaryotic abasic endonucleases and their role in genetic stability.

    PubMed Central

    Demple, B; Harrison, L; Wilson, D M; Bennett, R A; Takagi, T; Ascione, A G

    1997-01-01

    Abasic (AP) sites in DNA arise from spontaneous reactions or the action of DNA glycosylases and represent a loss of genetic information. The AP sites can be mutagenic or cytotoxic, and their repair is initiated by class II AP endonucleases, which incise immediately 5' to AP sites. The main enzyme of S. cerevisiae. Apn1, provides cellular resistance to oxidants (e.g., H2O2) or alkylating agents, and limits the spontaneous mutation rate. AP endonucleases from other species can replace Apn1 function in yeast to different extents. We studied the main human enzyme, Ape, with respect to its incision specificity in vitro and the expression of the APE gene in vivo. The results suggest that Ape evolved to act preferentially on AP sites compared to deoxyribose fragments located at oxidative strand breaks and that the incision modes of Ape and Apn1 may be fundamentally different. We also defined the functional APE promoter, and showed that APE expression is transiently downregulated during the regeneration of epidermis after wounding. This latter effect may lead to a window of vulnerability for DNA damage and perhaps mutagenesis during the healing of epidermal and other wounds. Such unexpected effects on the expression of DNA repair enzymes need to be taken into account in analyzing the susceptibility of different tissues to carcinogens. PMID:9255583

  15. Structure of the DNA-Eco RI endonuclease recognition complex at 3 A resolution.

    PubMed

    McClarin, J A; Frederick, C A; Wang, B C; Greene, P; Boyer, H W; Grable, J; Rosenberg, J M

    1986-12-19

    The crystal structure of the complex between Eco RI endonuclease and the cognate oligonucleotide TCGCGAATTCGCG provides a detailed example of the structural basis of sequence-specific DNA-protein interactions. The structure was determined, to 3 A resolution, by the ISIR (iterative single isomorphous replacement) method with a platinum isomorphous derivative. The complex has twofold symmetry. Each subunit of the endonuclease is organized into an alpha/beta domain consisting a five-stranded beta sheet, alpha helices, and an extension, called the "arm," which wraps around the DNA. The large beta sheet consists of antiparallel and parallel motifs that form the foundations for the loops and alpha helices responsible for DNA strand scission and sequence-specific recognition, respectively. The DNA cleavage site is located in a cleft that binds the DNA backbone in the vicinity of the scissile bond. Sequence specificity is mediated by 12 hydrogen bonds originating from alpha helical recognition modules. Arg200 forms two hydrogen bonds with guanine while Glu144 and Arg145 form four hydrogen bonds to adjacent adenine residues. These interactions discriminate the Eco RI hexanucleotide GAATTC from all other hexanucleotides because any base substitution would require rupture of at least one of these hydrogen bonds.

  16. EENdb: a database and knowledge base of ZFNs and TALENs for endonuclease engineering.

    PubMed

    Xiao, An; Wu, Yingdan; Yang, Zhipeng; Hu, Yingying; Wang, Weiye; Zhang, Yutian; Kong, Lei; Gao, Ge; Zhu, Zuoyan; Lin, Shuo; Zhang, Bo

    2013-01-01

    We report here the construction of engineered endonuclease database (EENdb) (http://eendb.zfgenetics.org/), a searchable database and knowledge base for customizable engineered endonucleases (EENs), including zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) and transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs). EENs are artificial nucleases designed to target and cleave specific DNA sequences. EENs have been shown to be a very useful genetic tool for targeted genome modification and have shown great potentials in the applications in basic research, clinical therapies and agricultural utilities, and they are specifically essential for reverse genetics research in species where no other gene targeting techniques are available. EENdb contains over 700 records of all the reported ZFNs and TALENs and related information, such as their target sequences, the peptide components [zinc finger protein-/transcription activator-like effector (TALE)-binding domains, FokI variants and linker peptide/framework], the efficiency and specificity of their activities. The database also lists EEN engineering tools and resources as well as information about forms and types of EENs, EEN screening and construction methods, detection methods for targeting efficiency and many other utilities. The aim of EENdb is to represent a central hub for EEN information and an integrated solution for EEN engineering. These studies may help to extract in-depth properties and common rules regarding ZFN or TALEN efficiency through comparison of the known ZFNs or TALENs.

  17. Decisive role of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease/Ref-1 in initiation of cell death.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kyoung Joo; Kim, Hyun Jeong; Park, Soo Chul; Kim, Hyun Woo; Kim, Gyung Whan

    2010-11-01

    The apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease/redox effector factor-1 (APE/Ref-1) is involved in the base excision repair of apurinic/apyrimidinic sites induced by oxidative DNA damage. APE/Ref-1 was decreased by kainic acid (KA) injury in a time-dependent manner at the level of proteins, not transcripts. We investigated whether alteration of APE/Ref-1 amounts would influence hippocampal cell fate, survival or death, after KA injury. Overexpression of APE/Ref-1 using adenovirus and restoration of APE small peptides significantly reduced KA-induced hippocampal cell death. Both silencing of APE/Ref-1 by siRNA and inhibition of endonuclease by an antibody significantly increased caspase-3 activity and apoptotic cell death triggered from the early time after exposure to KA. These findings suggest that cell death is initiated by reducing APE/Ref-1 protein and inhibiting its repair function in spite of enough protein amounts. In conclusion, APE/Ref-1 may be a regulator of cell death initiation, and APE small peptides could provide molecular mechanism-based therapies for neuroprotection in progressive excitotoxic neuronal damage.

  18. Homing endonuclease mediated gene targeting in Anopheles gambiae cells and embryos.

    PubMed

    Windbichler, Nikolai; Papathanos, Philippos Aris; Catteruccia, Flaminia; Ranson, Hilary; Burt, Austin; Crisanti, Andrea

    2007-01-01

    Homing endonuclease genes (HEGs) are 'selfish' genetic elements that combine the capability to selectively disrupt specific gene sequences with the ability to rapidly spread from a few individuals to an entire population through homologous recombination repair events. Because of these properties, HEGs are regarded as promising candidates to transfer genetic modifications from engineered laboratory mosquitoes to wild-type populations including Anopheles gambiae the vector of human malaria. Here we show that I-SceI and I-PpoI homing endonucleases cleave their recognition sites with high efficiency in A. gambiae cells and embryos and we demonstrate HEG-induced homologous and non-homologous repair events in a variety of functional assays. We also propose a gene drive system for mosquitoes that is based on our finding that I-PpoI cuts genomic rDNA located on the X chromosome in A. gambiae, which could be used to selectively incapacitate X-carrying spermatozoa thereby imposing a severe male-biased sex ratio.

  19. Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 is the essential nuclease during immunoglobulin class switch recombination.

    PubMed

    Masani, Shahnaz; Han, Li; Yu, Kefei

    2013-04-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) class switch recombination (CSR) is initiated by activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) that catalyzes numerous DNA cytosine deaminations within switch regions. The resulting uracils are processed by uracil base excision and/or mismatch repair enzymes that ultimately generate switch region DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Uracil glycosylase 2 (UNG2) is required for CSR, most likely by removing uracils to generate abasic sites. Although it is presumed that the apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1) generates DNA strand incisions (a prerequisite for CSR) at these abasic sites, a direct test of the requirement for APE1 in CSR has been difficult because of the embryonic lethality of APE1 ablation in mice. Here, we report the successful deletion of the APE1 gene in a mouse B cell line (CH12F3) capable of robust CSR in vitro. In contrast to the general assumption that APE1 is essential for cellular viability, deletion of APE1 in CH12F3 cells has no apparent effect on cell viability or growth. Moreover, CSR in APE1-null CH12F3 cells is drastically reduced, providing direct evidence for an essential role for APE1 in switch region cleavage and CSR. Finally, deletion of AP endonuclease 2 (APE2) has no effect on CSR in either APE1-proficient or -deficient cells.

  20. Expression, purification and crystallization of two endonuclease III enzymes from Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Sarre, Aili; Ökvist, Mats; Klar, Tobias; Moe, Elin; Timmins, Joanna

    2014-12-01

    Endonuclease III is a bifunctional DNA glycosylase that removes a wide range of oxidized bases in DNA. Deinococcus radiodurans is an extreme radiation-resistant and desiccation-resistant bacterium and possesses three genes encoding endonuclease III enzymes in its genome: DR2438 (EndoIII-1), DR0289 (EndoIII-2) and DR0982 (EndoIII-3). Here, EndoIII-1 and an N-terminally truncated form of EndoIII-3 (EndoIII-3Δ76) have been expressed, purified and crystallized, and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analyses have been performed to 2.15 and 1.31 Å resolution, respectively. The EndoIII-1 crystals belonged to the monoclinic space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 181.38, b = 38.56, c = 37.09 Å, β = 89.34° and one molecule per asymmetric unit. The EndoIII-3Δ76 crystals also belonged to the monoclinic space group C2, but with unit-cell parameters a = 91.47, b = 40.53, c = 72.47 Å, β = 102.53° and one molecule per asymmetric unit. The EndoIII-1 structure was determined by molecular replacement, while the truncated EndoIII-3Δ76 structure was determined by single-wavelength anomalous dispersion phasing. Refinement of the structures is in progress.

  1. PRP8 intein in Ajellomycetaceae family pathogens: sequence analysis, splicing evaluation and homing endonuclease activity.

    PubMed

    Theodoro, Raquel Cordeiro; Volkmann, Gerrit; Liu, Xiang-Qin; Bagagli, Eduardo

    2011-02-01

    Inteins are intervening sequences that are transcribed and translated with flanking host protein sequences and then self-excised by protein splicing. Bi-functional inteins also contain a homing endonuclease responsible for their genetic mobility. The PRP8 intein, the most widespread among fungi, occurs in important pathogens such as Histoplasma capsulatum and Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, from the Ajellomycetaceae family. Herein, we describe the bi-functional PRP8 intein in two other Ajellomycetacean pathogens, Blastomyces dermatitidis and Emmonsia parva. Sequence analysis and experimental evidence suggest that the homing endonuclease from PbrPRP8 is inactive. The splicing activity of the PRP8 intein from the B. dermatitidis, E. parva and P. brasiliensis species complex was demonstrated in a non-native protein context in Escherichia coli. Since the PRP8 intein is located in a functionally essential nuclear protein, it can be considered a promising therapeutic target for anti-fungal drugs, because inhibition of intein splicing should inhibit proliferation of intein-containing pathogens. PMID:20682355

  2. Identification of individual herbal drugs in tea mixtures using restriction analysis of ITS DNA and real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Slanc, P; Ravnikar, M; Strukelj, B

    2006-11-01

    We have studied a sedative tea made of Valerianae radix (Valeriana officinalis L.), Lupuli strobuli (Humulus lupulus L.), Melissae folium (Melissa officinalis L.) and Menthae piperitae folium (Mentha piperita L.). In order to identify the constituent drugs a method was established involving amplification of the internal transcribed spacers (ITS) region of nuclear ribosomal DNA on the basis of restriction analysis and real-time PCR. ITS regions of individual drugs were amplified and sequenced. Restriction analysis was performed with selected restriction endonucleases Nae I, PshA I and Xcm I. Real-time PCR was carried out, using primers specifically designed for each individual herbal drug. Real-time PCR proved to be a method for identifying individual herbal drugs in a tea mixture with a single DNA extraction in a single PCR run, since its limit of detection is lower than that for restriction analysis. PMID:17152982

  3. Mutational analysis of active-site residues in the Mycobacterium leprae RecA intein, a LAGLIDADG homing endonuclease: Asp(122) and Asp(193) are crucial to the double-stranded DNA cleavage activity whereas Asp(218) is not.

    PubMed

    Singh, Pawan; Tripathi, Pankaj; Muniyappa, K

    2010-01-01

    Mycobacterium leprae recA harbors an in-frame insertion sequence that encodes an intein homing endonuclease (PI-MleI). Most inteins (intein endonucleases) possess two conserved LAGLIDADG (DOD) motifs at their active center. A common feature of LAGLIDADG-type homing endonucleases is that they recognize and cleave the same or very similar DNA sequences. However, PI-MleI is distinctive from other members of the family of LAGLIDADG-type HEases for its modular structure with functionally separable domains for DNA-binding and cleavage, each with distinct sequence preferences. Sequence alignment analyses of PI-MleI revealed three putative LAGLIDADG motifs; however, there is conflicting bioinformatics data in regard to their identity and specific location within the intein polypeptide. To resolve this conflict and to determine the active-site residues essential for DNA target site recognition and double-stranded DNA cleavage, we performed site-directed mutagenesis of presumptive catalytic residues in the LAGLIDADG motifs. Analysis of target DNA recognition and kinetic parameters of the wild-type PI-MleI and its variants disclosed that the two amino acid residues, Asp(122) (in Block C) and Asp(193) (in functional Block E), are crucial to the double-stranded DNA endonuclease activity, whereas Asp(218) (in pseudo-Block E) is not. However, despite the reduced catalytic activity, the PI-MleI variants, like the wild-type PI-MleI, generated a footprint of the same length around the insertion site. The D122T variant showed significantly reduced catalytic activity, and D122A and D193A mutations although failed to affect their DNA-binding affinities, but abolished the double-stranded DNA cleavage activity. On the other hand, D122C variant showed approximately twofold higher double-stranded DNA cleavage activity, compared with the wild-type PI-MleI. These results provide compelling evidence that Asp(122) and Asp(193) in DOD motif I and II, respectively, are bona fide active

  4. Bacterial CRISPR/Cas DNA endonucleases: A revolutionary technology that could dramatically impact viral research and treatment.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Edward M; Cullen, Bryan R

    2015-05-01

    CRISPR/Cas systems mediate bacterial adaptive immune responses that evolved to protect bacteria from bacteriophage and other horizontally transmitted genetic elements. Several CRISPR/Cas systems exist but the simplest variant, referred to as Type II, has a single effector DNA endonuclease, called Cas9, which is guided to its viral DNA target by two small RNAs, the crRNA and the tracrRNA. Initial efforts to adapt the CRISPR/Cas system for DNA editing in mammalian cells, which focused on the Cas9 protein from Streptococcus pyogenes (Spy), demonstrated that Spy Cas9 can be directed to DNA targets in mammalian cells by tracrRNA:crRNA fusion transcripts called single guide RNAs (sgRNA). Upon binding, Cas9 induces DNA cleavage leading to mutagenesis as a result of error prone non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). Recently, the Spy Cas9 system has been adapted for high throughput screening of genes in human cells for their relevance to a particular phenotype and, more generally, for the targeted inactivation of specific genes, in cell lines and in vivo in a number of model organisms. The latter aim seems likely to be greatly enhanced by the recent development of Cas9 proteins from bacterial species such as Neisseria meningitidis and Staphyloccus aureus that are small enough to be expressed using adeno-associated (AAV)-based vectors that can be readily prepared at very high titers. The evolving Cas9-based DNA editing systems therefore appear likely to not only impact virology by allowing researchers to screen for human genes that affect the replication of pathogenic human viruses of all types but also to derive clonal human cell lines that lack individual gene products that either facilitate or restrict viral replication. Moreover, high titer AAV-based vectors offer the possibility of directly targeting DNA viruses that infect discrete sites in the human body, such as herpes simplex virus and hepatitis B virus, with the hope that the entire population of viral DNA genomes

  5. Bacterial CRISPR/Cas DNA endonucleases: A revolutionary technology that could dramatically impact viral research and treatment.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Edward M; Cullen, Bryan R

    2015-05-01

    CRISPR/Cas systems mediate bacterial adaptive immune responses that evolved to protect bacteria from bacteriophage and other horizontally transmitted genetic elements. Several CRISPR/Cas systems exist but the simplest variant, referred to as Type II, has a single effector DNA endonuclease, called Cas9, which is guided to its viral DNA target by two small RNAs, the crRNA and the tracrRNA. Initial efforts to adapt the CRISPR/Cas system for DNA editing in mammalian cells, which focused on the Cas9 protein from Streptococcus pyogenes (Spy), demonstrated that Spy Cas9 can be directed to DNA targets in mammalian cells by tracrRNA:crRNA fusion transcripts called single guide RNAs (sgRNA). Upon binding, Cas9 induces DNA cleavage leading to mutagenesis as a result of error prone non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). Recently, the Spy Cas9 system has been adapted for high throughput screening of genes in human cells for their relevance to a particular phenotype and, more generally, for the targeted inactivation of specific genes, in cell lines and in vivo in a number of model organisms. The latter aim seems likely to be greatly enhanced by the recent development of Cas9 proteins from bacterial species such as Neisseria meningitidis and Staphyloccus aureus that are small enough to be expressed using adeno-associated (AAV)-based vectors that can be readily prepared at very high titers. The evolving Cas9-based DNA editing systems therefore appear likely to not only impact virology by allowing researchers to screen for human genes that affect the replication of pathogenic human viruses of all types but also to derive clonal human cell lines that lack individual gene products that either facilitate or restrict viral replication. Moreover, high titer AAV-based vectors offer the possibility of directly targeting DNA viruses that infect discrete sites in the human body, such as herpes simplex virus and hepatitis B virus, with the hope that the entire population of viral DNA genomes

  6. Bacterial CRISPR/Cas DNA endonucleases: A revolutionary technology that could dramatically impact viral research and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Edward M.; Cullen, Bryan R.

    2015-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas systems mediate bacterial adaptive immune responses that evolved to protect bacteria from bacteriophage and other horizontally transmitted genetic elements. Several CRISPR/Cas systems exist but the simplest variant, referred to as Type II, has a single effector DNA endonuclease, called Cas9, which is guided to its viral DNA target by two small RNAs, the crRNA and the tracrRNA. Initial efforts to adapt the CRISPR/Cas system for DNA editing in mammalian cells, which focused on the Cas9 protein from Streptococcus pyogenes (Spy), demonstrated that Spy Cas9 can be directed to DNA targets in mammalian cells by tracrRNA:crRNA fusion transcripts called single guide RNAs (sgRNA). Upon binding, Cas9 induces DNA cleavage leading to mutagenesis as a result of error prone non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). Recently, the Spy Cas9 system has been adapted for high throughput screening of genes in human cells for their relevance to a particular phenotype and, more generally, for the targeted inactivation of specific genes, in cell lines and in vivo in a number of model organisms. The latter aim seems likely to be greatly enhanced by the recent development of Cas9 proteins from bacterial species such as Neisseria meningitidis and Staphyloccus aureus that are small enough to be expressed using adeno-associated (AAV)-based vectors that can be readily prepared at very high titers. The evolving Cas9-based DNA editing systems therefore appear likely to not only impact virology by allowing researchers to screen for human genes that affect the replication of pathogenic human viruses of all types but also to derive clonal human cell lines that lack individual gene products that either facilitate or restrict viral replication. Moreover, high titer AAV-based vectors offer the possibility of directly targeting DNA viruses that infect discrete sites in the human body, such as herpes simplex virus and hepatitis B virus, with the hope that the entire population of viral DNA genomes

  7. Behavioral and physiological consequences of sleep restriction.

    PubMed

    Banks, Siobhan; Dinges, David F

    2007-08-15

    Adequate sleep is essential for general healthy functioning. This paper reviews recent research on the effects of chronic sleep restriction on neurobehavioral and physiological functioning and discusses implications for health and lifestyle. Restricting sleep below an individual's optimal time in bed (TIB) can cause a range of neurobehavioral deficits, including lapses of attention, slowed working memory, reduced cognitive throughput, depressed mood, and perseveration of thought. Neurobehavioral deficits accumulate across days of partial sleep loss to levels equivalent to those found after 1 to 3 nights of total sleep loss. Recent experiments reveal that following days of chronic restriction of sleep duration below 7 hours per night, significant daytime cognitive dysfunction accumulates to levels comparable to that found after severe acute total sleep deprivation. Additionally, individual variability in neurobehavioral responses to sleep restriction appears to be stable, suggesting a trait-like (possibly genetic) differential vulnerability or compensatory changes in the neurobiological systems involved in cognition. A causal role for reduced sleep duration in adverse health outcomes remains unclear, but laboratory studies of healthy adults subjected to sleep restriction have found adverse effects on endocrine functions, metabolic and inflammatory responses, suggesting that sleep restriction produces physiological consequences that may be unhealthy.

  8. Label-free electrochemical detection of methyltransferase activity and inhibitor screening based on endonuclease HpaII and the deposition of polyaniline.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Linqun; Wei, Min; Gao, Chunyan; Wei, Wei; Zhang, Yuanjian; Liu, Songqin

    2015-11-15

    Detection of DNA methylation and methyltransferase (MTase) activity are important in determining human cancer because aberrant methylation was linked to cancer initiation and progression. In this work, we proposed an electrochemical method for sensitive detection of DNA methylation and MTase activity based on methylation sensitive restriction endonuclease HpaII and the deposition of polyaniline (PANI) catalyzed by HRP-mimicking DNAzyme. In the presence of methylated DNA, HRP-mimicking DNAzyme catalyzed the polymerization of aniline on the dsDNA template, producing huge DPV current. In the presence of non-methylated DNA, dsDNA are cleaved and digested by HpaII and exonuclease III, as a result, no PANI are deposited. This method can be used to determine DNA methylation at the site of CpG. It exhibits a wide linear response toward M.SssI MTase activity in the range of 0.5-0.6 U mL(-1) with the detection limit of 0.12 U mL(-1). G-rich DNA forms HRP mimicking DNAzyme, which avoids complex labeling procedures and is robust. The method is simple, reliable, sensitive and specific, which has been successfully applied in human serum samples and been used to screen the inhibitors. Thus, the proposed method may be a potential and powerful tool for clinical diagnosis and drug development in the future.

  9. Creating a monomeric endonuclease TALE-I-SceI with high specificity and low genotoxicity in human cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jianfei; Chen, He; Luo, Ling; Lai, Yongrong; Xie, Wei; Kee, Kehkooi

    2015-01-01

    To correct a DNA mutation in the human genome for gene therapy, homology-directed repair (HDR) needs to be specific and have the lowest off-target effects to protect the human genome from deleterious mutations. Zinc finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) and CRISPR-CAS9 systems have been engineered and used extensively to recognize and modify specific DNA sequences. Although TALEN and CRISPR/CAS9 could induce high levels of HDR in human cells, their genotoxicity was significantly higher. Here, we report the creation of a monomeric endonuclease that can recognize at least 33 bp by fusing the DNA-recognizing domain of TALEN (TALE) to a re-engineered homing endonuclease I-SceI. After sequentially re-engineering I-SceI to recognize 18 bp of the human β-globin sequence, the re-engineered I-SceI induced HDR in human cells. When the re-engineered I-SceI was fused to TALE (TALE-ISVB2), the chimeric endonuclease induced the same HDR rate at the human β-globin gene locus as that induced by TALEN, but significantly reduced genotoxicity. We further demonstrated that TALE-ISVB2 specifically targeted at the β-globin sequence in human hematopoietic stem cells. Therefore, this monomeric endonuclease has the potential to be used in therapeutic gene targeting in human cells.

  10. A newly discovered Bordetella species carries a transcriptionally active CRISPR-Cas with a small Cas9 endonuclease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Cas9 endonuclease of the Type II-a clustered regularly interspersed short palindromic repeats (CRISPR), of Streptococcus pyogenes (SpCas9) has been adapted as a widely used tool for genome editing and genome engineering. Herein, we describe a gene encoding a novel Cas9 ortholog (BpsuCas9) and th...

  11. A novel small-molecule inhibitor of influenza A virus acts by suppressing PA endonuclease activity of the viral polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Shuofeng; Chu, Hin; Singh, Kailash; Zhao, Hanjun; Zhang, Ke; Kao, Richard Y. T.; Chow, Billy K. C.; Zhou, Jie; Zheng, Bo-Jian

    2016-01-01

    The RNA-dependent RNA polymerase of influenza A virus comprises conserved and independently-folded subdomains with defined functionalities. The N-terminal domain of the PA subunit (PAN) harbors the endonuclease function so that it can serve as a desired target for drug discovery. To identify a class of anti-influenza inhibitors that impedes PAN endonuclease activity, a screening approach that integrated the fluorescence resonance energy transfer based endonuclease inhibitory assay with the DNA gel-based endonuclease inhibitory assay was conducted, followed by the evaluation of antiviral efficacies and potential cytotoxicity of the primary hits in vitro and in vivo. A small-molecule compound ANA-0 was identified as a potent inhibitor against the replication of multiple subtypes of influenza A virus, including H1N1, H3N2, H5N1, H7N7, H7N9 and H9N2, in cell cultures. Combinational treatment of zanamivir and ANA-0 exerted synergistic anti-influenza effect in vitro. Intranasal administration of ANA-0 protected mice from lethal challenge and reduced lung viral loads in H1N1 virus infected BALB/c mice. In summary, ANA-0 shows potential to be developed to novel anti-influenza agents. PMID:26956222

  12. Evolution of I-SceI Homing Endonucleases with Increased DNA Recognition Site Specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, Rakesh; Ho, Kwok Ki; Tenney, Kristen; Chen, Jui-Hui; Golden, Barbara L.; Gimble, Frederick S.

    2013-09-18

    Elucidating how homing endonucleases undergo changes in recognition site specificity will facilitate efforts to engineer proteins for gene therapy applications. I-SceI is a monomeric homing endonuclease that recognizes and cleaves within an 18-bp target. It tolerates limited degeneracy in its target sequence, including substitution of a C:G{sub +4} base pair for the wild-type A:T{sub +4} base pair. Libraries encoding randomized amino acids at I-SceI residue positions that contact or are proximal to A:T{sub +4} were used in conjunction with a bacterial one-hybrid system to select I-SceI derivatives that bind to recognition sites containing either the A:T{sub +4} or the C:G{sub +4} base pairs. As expected, isolates encoding wild-type residues at the randomized positions were selected using either target sequence. All I-SceI proteins isolated using the C:G{sub +4} recognition site included small side-chain substitutions at G100 and either contained (K86R/G100T, K86R/G100S and K86R/G100C) or lacked (G100A, G100T) a K86R substitution. Interestingly, the binding affinities of the selected variants for the wild-type A:T{sub +4} target are 4- to 11-fold lower than that of wild-type I-SceI, whereas those for the C:G{sub +4} target are similar. The increased specificity of the mutant proteins is also evident in binding experiments in vivo. These differences in binding affinities account for the observed -36-fold difference in target preference between the K86R/G100T and wild-type proteins in DNA cleavage assays. An X-ray crystal structure of the K86R/G100T mutant protein bound to a DNA duplex containing the C:G{sub +4} substitution suggests how sequence specificity of a homing enzyme can increase. This biochemical and structural analysis defines one pathway by which site specificity is augmented for a homing endonuclease.

  13. Lucanthone and Its Derivative Hycanthone Inhibit Apurinic Endonuclease-1 (APE1) by Direct Protein Binding

    PubMed Central

    Naidu, Mamta D.; Agarwal, Rakhi; Pena, Louis A.; Cunha, Luis; Mezei, Mihaly; Shen, Min; Wilson, David M.; Liu, Yuan; Sanchez, Zina; Chaudhary, Pankaj; Wilson, Samuel H.; Waring, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Lucanthone and hycanthone are thioxanthenone DNA intercalators used in the 1980s as antitumor agents. Lucanthone is in Phase I clinical trial, whereas hycanthone was pulled out of Phase II trials. Their potential mechanism of action includes DNA intercalation, inhibition of nucleic acid biosyntheses, and inhibition of enzymes like topoisomerases and the dual function base excision repair enzyme apurinic endonuclease 1 (APE1). Lucanthone inhibits the endonuclease activity of APE1, without affecting its redox activity. Our goal was to decipher the precise mechanism of APE1 inhibition as a prerequisite towards development of improved therapeutics that can counteract higher APE1 activity often seen in tumors. The IC50 values for inhibition of APE1 incision of depurinated plasmid DNA by lucanthone and hycanthone were 5 µM and 80 nM, respectively. The KD values (affinity constants) for APE1, as determined by BIACORE binding studies, were 89 nM for lucanthone/10 nM for hycanthone. APE1 structures reveal a hydrophobic pocket where hydrophobic small molecules like thioxanthenones can bind, and our modeling studies confirmed such docking. Circular dichroism spectra uncovered change in the helical structure of APE1 in the presence of lucanthone/hycanthone, and notably, this effect was decreased (Phe266Ala or Phe266Cys or Trp280Leu) or abolished (Phe266Ala/Trp280Ala) when hydrophobic site mutants were employed. Reduced inhibition by lucanthone of the diminished endonuclease activity of hydrophobic mutant proteins (as compared to wild type APE1) supports that binding of lucanthone to the hydrophobic pocket dictates APE1 inhibition. The DNA binding capacity of APE1 was marginally inhibited by lucanthone, and not at all by hycanthone, supporting our hypothesis that thioxanthenones inhibit APE1, predominantly, by direct interaction. Finally, lucanthone-induced degradation was drastically reduced in the presence of short and long lived free radical scavengers, e.g., TRIS and DMSO

  14. Lucanthone and its derivative hycanthone inhibit apurinic endonuclease-1 (APE1) by direct protein binding

    SciTech Connect

    Naidu, M.; Naidu, M.; Agarwal, R.; Pena, L.A.; Cunha, L.; Mezei, M.; Shen, M.; Wilson, D.M.; Liu, Y.; Sanchez, Z.; Chaudhary, P.; Wilson, S.H.; Waring, M.J.

    2011-09-15

    Lucanthone and hycanthone are thioxanthenone DNA intercalators used in the 1980s as antitumor agents. Lucanthone is in Phase I clinical trial, whereas hycanthone was pulled out of Phase II trials. Their potential mechanism of action includes DNA intercalation, inhibition of nucleic acid biosyntheses, and inhibition of enzymes like topoisomerases and the dual function base excision repair enzyme apurinic endonuclease 1 (APE1). Lucanthone inhibits the endonuclease activity of APE1, without affecting its redox activity. Our goal was to decipher the precise mechanism of APE1 inhibition as a prerequisite towards development of improved therapeutics that can counteract higher APE1 activity often seen in tumors. The IC{sub 50} values for inhibition of APE1 incision of depurinated plasmid DNA by lucanthone and hycanthone were 5 {mu}M and 80 nM, respectively. The K{sub D} values (affinity constants) for APE1, as determined by BIACORE binding studies, were 89 nM for lucanthone/10 nM for hycanthone. APE1 structures reveal a hydrophobic pocket where hydrophobic small molecules like thioxanthenones can bind, and our modeling studies confirmed such docking. Circular dichroism spectra uncovered change in the helical structure of APE1 in the presence of lucanthone/hycanthone, and notably, this effect was decreased (Phe266Ala or Phe266Cys or Trp280Leu) or abolished (Phe266Ala/Trp280Ala) when hydrophobic site mutants were employed. Reduced inhibition by lucanthone of the diminished endonuclease activity of hydrophobic mutant proteins (as compared to wild type APE1) supports that binding of lucanthone to the hydrophobic pocket dictates APE1 inhibition. The DNA binding capacity of APE1 was marginally inhibited by lucanthone, and not at all by hycanthone, supporting our hypothesis that thioxanthenones inhibit APE1, predominantly, by direct interaction. Finally, lucanthone-induced degradation was drastically reduced in the presence of short and long lived free radical scavengers, e

  15. Atomic Structure and Biochemical Characterization of an RNA Endonuclease in the N Terminus of Andes Virus L Protein

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-García, Yaiza; Reguera, Juan; Busch, Carola; Witte, Gregor; Sánchez-Ramos, Oliberto; Betzel, Christian; Cusack, Stephen; Günther, Stephan; Reindl, Sophia

    2016-01-01

    Andes virus (ANDV) is a human-pathogenic hantavirus. Hantaviruses presumably initiate their mRNA synthesis by using cap structures derived from host cell mRNAs, a mechanism called cap-snatching. A signature for a cap-snatching endonuclease is present in the N terminus of hantavirus L proteins. In this study, we aimed to solve the atomic structure of the ANDV endonuclease and characterize its biochemical features. However, the wild-type protein was refractory to expression in Escherichia coli, presumably due to toxic enzyme activity. To circumvent this problem, we introduced attenuating mutations in the domain that were previously shown to enhance L protein expression in mammalian cells. Using this approach, 13 mutant proteins encompassing ANDV L protein residues 1–200 were successfully expressed and purified. Protein stability and nuclease activity of the mutants was analyzed and the crystal structure of one mutant was solved to a resolution of 2.4 Å. Shape in solution was determined by small angle X-ray scattering. The ANDV endonuclease showed structural similarities to related enzymes of orthobunya-, arena-, and orthomyxoviruses, but also differences such as elongated shape and positively charged patches surrounding the active site. The enzyme was dependent on manganese, which is bound to the active site, most efficiently cleaved single-stranded RNA substrates, did not cleave DNA, and could be inhibited by known endonuclease inhibitors. The atomic structure in conjunction with stability and activity data for the 13 mutant enzymes facilitated inference of structure–function relationships in the protein. In conclusion, we solved the structure of a hantavirus cap-snatching endonuclease, elucidated its catalytic properties, and present a highly active mutant form, which allows for inhibitor screening. PMID:27300328

  16. Atomic Structure and Biochemical Characterization of an RNA Endonuclease in the N Terminus of Andes Virus L Protein.

    PubMed

    Fernández-García, Yaiza; Reguera, Juan; Busch, Carola; Witte, Gregor; Sánchez-Ramos, Oliberto; Betzel, Christian; Cusack, Stephen; Günther, Stephan; Reindl, Sophia

    2016-06-01

    Andes virus (ANDV) is a human-pathogenic hantavirus. Hantaviruses presumably initiate their mRNA synthesis by using cap structures derived from host cell mRNAs, a mechanism called cap-snatching. A signature for a cap-snatching endonuclease is present in the N terminus of hantavirus L proteins. In this study, we aimed to solve the atomic structure of the ANDV endonuclease and characterize its biochemical features. However, the wild-type protein was refractory to expression in Escherichia coli, presumably due to toxic enzyme activity. To circumvent this problem, we introduced attenuating mutations in the domain that were previously shown to enhance L protein expression in mammalian cells. Using this approach, 13 mutant proteins encompassing ANDV L protein residues 1-200 were successfully expressed and purified. Protein stability and nuclease activity of the mutants was analyzed and the crystal structure of one mutant was solved to a resolution of 2.4 Å. Shape in solution was determined by small angle X-ray scattering. The ANDV endonuclease showed structural similarities to related enzymes of orthobunya-, arena-, and orthomyxoviruses, but also differences such as elongated shape and positively charged patches surrounding the active site. The enzyme was dependent on manganese, which is bound to the active site, most efficiently cleaved single-stranded RNA substrates, did not cleave DNA, and could be inhibited by known endonuclease inhibitors. The atomic structure in conjunction with stability and activity data for the 13 mutant enzymes facilitated inference of structure-function relationships in the protein. In conclusion, we solved the structure of a hantavirus cap-snatching endonuclease, elucidated its catalytic properties, and present a highly active mutant form, which allows for inhibitor screening.

  17. Atomic Structure and Biochemical Characterization of an RNA Endonuclease in the N Terminus of Andes Virus L Protein.

    PubMed

    Fernández-García, Yaiza; Reguera, Juan; Busch, Carola; Witte, Gregor; Sánchez-Ramos, Oliberto; Betzel, Christian; Cusack, Stephen; Günther, Stephan; Reindl, Sophia

    2016-06-01

    Andes virus (ANDV) is a human-pathogenic hantavirus. Hantaviruses presumably initiate their mRNA synthesis by using cap structures derived from host cell mRNAs, a mechanism called cap-snatching. A signature for a cap-snatching endonuclease is present in the N terminus of hantavirus L proteins. In this study, we aimed to solve the atomic structure of the ANDV endonuclease and characterize its biochemical features. However, the wild-type protein was refractory to expression in Escherichia coli, presumably due to toxic enzyme activity. To circumvent this problem, we introduced attenuating mutations in the domain that were previously shown to enhance L protein expression in mammalian cells. Using this approach, 13 mutant proteins encompassing ANDV L protein residues 1-200 were successfully expressed and purified. Protein stability and nuclease activity of the mutants was analyzed and the crystal structure of one mutant was solved to a resolution of 2.4 Å. Shape in solution was determined by small angle X-ray scattering. The ANDV endonuclease showed structural similarities to related enzymes of orthobunya-, arena-, and orthomyxoviruses, but also differences such as elongated shape and positively charged patches surrounding the active site. The enzyme was dependent on manganese, which is bound to the active site, most efficiently cleaved single-stranded RNA substrates, did not cleave DNA, and could be inhibited by known endonuclease inhibitors. The atomic structure in conjunction with stability and activity data for the 13 mutant enzymes facilitated inference of structure-function relationships in the protein. In conclusion, we solved the structure of a hantavirus cap-snatching endonuclease, elucidated its catalytic properties, and present a highly active mutant form, which allows for inhibitor screening. PMID:27300328

  18. Structural characterization of MepB from Staphylococcus aureus reveals homology to endonucleases

    PubMed Central

    Agah, Sayeh; Poulos, Sandra; Banchs, Christian; Faham, Salem

    2014-01-01

    The MepRAB operon in Staphylococcus aureus has been identified to play a role in drug resistance. Although the functions of MepA and MepR are known, little information is available on the function of MepB. Here we report the X-ray structure of MepB to 2.1 Å revealing its structural similarity to the PD-(D/E)XK family of endonucleases. We further show that MepB binds DNA and RNA, with a higher affinity towards RNA and single stranded DNA than towards double stranded DNA. Notably, the PD-(D/E)XK catalytic active site residues are not conserved in MepB. MepB's association with a drug resistance operon suggests that it plays a role in responding to antimicrobials. This role is likely carried out through MepB's interactions with nucleic acids. PMID:24501097

  19. Alternative nucleophilic substrates for the endonuclease activities of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase

    SciTech Connect

    Ealy, Julie B.; Sudol, Malgorzata; Krzeminski, Jacek; Amin, Shantu; Katzman, Michael

    2012-11-10

    Retroviral integrase can use water or some small alcohols as the attacking nucleophile to nick DNA. To characterize the range of compounds that human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase can accommodate for its endonuclease activities, we tested 45 potential electron donors (having varied size and number or spacing of nucleophilic groups) as substrates during site-specific nicking at viral DNA ends and during nonspecific nicking reactions. We found that integrase used 22 of the 45 compounds to nick DNA, but not all active compounds were used for both activities. In particular, 13 compounds were used for site-specific and nonspecific nicking, 5 only for site-specific nicking, and 4 only for nonspecific nicking; 23 other compounds were not used for either activity. Thus, integrase can accommodate a large number of nucleophilic substrates but has selective requirements for its different activities, underscoring its dynamic properties and providing new information for modeling and understanding integrase.

  20. Homing endonuclease target determination using SELEX adapted for yeast surface display.

    PubMed

    Jacoby, Kyle; Scharenberg, Andrew M

    2014-01-01

    Knowing the target sequence of a DNA-binding protein is vital in obtaining fundamental characteristics of the protein and evaluating properties of the protein-DNA interaction. For example, novel homing endonucleases cannot be proven to be functional until a predicted target site is tested. Unfortunately, target site prediction is not always easy, or even possible, depending on the amount of sequence data available. Here we describe a modification of SELEX using yeast surface display that can quickly and inexpensively resolve DNA-binding targets in high throughput for proteins without any prior assumptions or knowledge regarding the target site. This protocol is easily integrated into the yeast surface display pipeline and is leveraged by the expansive number of existing tools for both SELEX and yeast surface display. PMID:24510268

  1. Primary processing of CRISPR RNA by the endonuclease Cas6 in Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    PubMed

    Wakefield, Noelle; Rajan, Rakhi; Sontheimer, Erik J

    2015-10-01

    In many bacteria and archaea, an adaptive immune system (CRISPR-Cas) provides immunity against foreign genetic elements. This system uses CRISPR RNAs (crRNAs) derived from the CRISPR array, along with CRISPR-associated (Cas) proteins, to target foreign nucleic acids. In most CRISPR systems, endonucleolytic processing of crRNA precursors (pre-crRNAs) is essential for the pathway. Here we study the Cas6 endonuclease responsible for crRNA processing in the Type III-A CRISPR-Cas system from Staphylococcus epidermidis RP62a, a model for Type III-A CRISPR-Cas systems, and define substrate requirements for SeCas6 activity. We find that SeCas6 is necessary and sufficient for full-length crRNA biogenesis in vitro, and that it relies on both sequence and stem-loop structure in the 3' half of the CRISPR repeat for recognition and processing.

  2. Highly efficient gene knockout in mice and zebrafish with RNA-guided endonucleases.

    PubMed

    Sung, Young Hoon; Kim, Jong Min; Kim, Hyun-Taek; Lee, Jaehoon; Jeon, Jisun; Jin, Young; Choi, Jung-Hwa; Ban, Young Ho; Ha, Sang-Jun; Kim, Cheol-Hee; Lee, Han-Woong; Kim, Jin-Soo

    2014-01-01

    RNA-guided endonucleases (RGENs), derived from the prokaryotic Type II CRISPR-Cas system, enable targeted genome modification in cells and organisms. Here we describe the establishment of gene-knockout mice and zebrafish by the injection of RGENs as Cas9 protein:guide RNA complexes or Cas9 mRNA plus guide RNA into one-cell-stage embryos of both species. RGENs efficiently generated germline transmittable mutations in up to 93% of newborn mice with minimal toxicity. RGEN-induced mutations in the mouse Prkdc gene that encodes an enzyme critical for DNA double-strand break repair resulted in immunodeficiency both in F₀ and F₁ mice. We propose that RGEN-mediated mutagenesis in animals will greatly expedite the creation of genetically engineered model organisms, accelerating functional genomic research.

  3. Digital detection of endonuclease mediated gene disruption in the HIV provirus

    PubMed Central

    Sedlak, Ruth Hall; Liang, Shu; Niyonzima, Nixon; De Silva Feelixge, Harshana S.; Roychoudhury, Pavitra; Greninger, Alexander L.; Weber, Nicholas D.; Boissel, Sandrine; Scharenberg, Andrew M.; Cheng, Anqi; Magaret, Amalia; Bumgarner, Roger; Stone, Daniel; Jerome, Keith R.

    2016-01-01

    Genome editing by designer nucleases is a rapidly evolving technology utilized in a highly diverse set of research fields. Among all fields, the T7 endonuclease mismatch cleavage assay, or Surveyor assay, is the most commonly used tool to assess genomic editing by designer nucleases. This assay, while relatively easy to perform, provides only a semi-quantitative measure of mutation efficiency that lacks sensitivity and accuracy. We demonstrate a simple droplet digital PCR assay that quickly quantitates a range of indel mutations with detection as low as 0.02% mutant in a wild type background and precision (≤6%CV) and accuracy superior to either mismatch cleavage assay or clonal sequencing when compared to next-generation sequencing. The precision and simplicity of this assay will facilitate comparison of gene editing approaches and their optimization, accelerating progress in this rapidly-moving field. PMID:26829887

  4. AP Endonuclease 1 as a Key Enzyme in Repair of Apurinic/Apyrimidinic Sites.

    PubMed

    Dyrkheeva, N S; Lebedeva, N A; Lavrik, O I

    2016-09-01

    Human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1) is one of the key participants in the DNA base excision repair system. APE1 hydrolyzes DNA adjacent to the 5'-end of an apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) site to produce a nick with a 3'-hydroxyl group and a 5'-deoxyribose phosphate moiety. APE1 exhibits 3'-phosphodiesterase, 3'-5'-exonuclease, and 3'-phosphatase activities. APE1 was also identified as a redox factor (Ref-1). In this review, data on the role of APE1 in the DNA repair process and in other metabolic processes occurring in cells are analyzed as well as the interaction of this enzyme with DNA and other proteins participating in the repair system. PMID:27682167

  5. Structure of an XPF endonuclease with and without DNA suggests a model for substrate recognition.

    PubMed

    Newman, Matthew; Murray-Rust, Judith; Lally, John; Rudolf, Jana; Fadden, Andrew; Knowles, Philip P; White, Malcolm F; McDonald, Neil Q

    2005-03-01

    The XPF/Mus81 structure-specific endonucleases cleave double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) within asymmetric branched DNA substrates and play an essential role in nucleotide excision repair, recombination and genome integrity. We report the structure of an archaeal XPF homodimer alone and bound to dsDNA. Superposition of these structures reveals a large domain movement upon binding DNA, indicating how the (HhH)(2) domain and the nuclease domain are coupled to allow the recognition of double-stranded/single-stranded DNA junctions. We identify two nonequivalent DNA-binding sites and propose a model in which XPF distorts the 3' flap substrate in order to engage both binding sites and promote strand cleavage. The model rationalises published biochemical data and implies a novel role for the ERCC1 subunit of eukaryotic XPF complexes. PMID:15719018

  6. Production and characterization of the celery mismatch endonuclease CEL II using baculovirus/silkworm expression system.

    PubMed

    Mon, Hiroaki; Lee, Jaeman; Fukushima, Mai; Nagata, Yudai; Fujii, Mie; Xu, Jian; Nishi, Oumi; Iiyama, Kazuhiro; Kusakabe, Takahiro

    2013-08-01

    Mutation and polymorphism detection by nucleases has become a more important tool in clinical and biological researches. There are several kinds of single-stranded nucleases for detecting mismatched DNAs. One of them, CEL II, was isolated from Apium graveolens and cleaves DNA with high specificity at sites of mismatch. High-throughput mutation scanning requires large quantity of CEL II endonuclease. Here, we demonstrate high-level expression of CEL II using silkworm-baculovirus system. The recombinant CEL II secreted in silkworm hemolymph was glycosylated and susceptible to N-glycosidase F. Additionally, larger metal ions such as Ca(2+) and Sr(2+) were able to replace Mg(2+) and enhanced mismatch cleavage activity of CEL II. These results indicate that the silkworm-baculovirus platform is a good alternative system to obtain the functional CEL II.

  7. Cruciform cutting endonucleases from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and phage T4 show conserved reactions with branched DNAs.

    PubMed Central

    Jensch, F; Kosak, H; Seeman, N C; Kemper, B

    1989-01-01

    We have purified a cruciform DNA resolving endonuclease (Endo X3) greater than 1000-fold from crude extracts of mitotically growing Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The enzyme shows high specificity for DNAs with secondary structures and introduces characteristic patterns of staggered 'nicks' in the immediate vicinity of the structure. The following substrates were analyzed in detail: (i) naturally occurring four-way X junctions in cruciform DNA of a supercoiled plasmid; (ii) synthetic four-way X junctions with arms of 9 bp; (iii) synthetic three-way Y junctions with arms of 10 bp; and (iv) heteroduplex loops with 19 nucleotides in the loop. Cleavages were always found in the double stranded portion of the DNA, located immediately adjacent to the junction of the respective structure. The Endo X3 induced cleavage patterns are identical or very similar to the cleavage patterns induced in the same substrates by endonuclease VII (Endo VII) from phage T4. Furthermore, the activity of Endo X3 is completely inhibited in the presence of anti-Endo VII antiserum. Endo X3 has an apparent mol. wt of 43,000 daltons, determined by gel filtration and of approximately 18,000 daltons in SDS--polyacrylamide gels. Maximum activity of the enzyme was obtained in the presence of 10 mM MgCl2 at 31 degrees C in Tris-HCl buffer over a broad pH range with a maximum approximately 8.0. About 70% of maximal activity was obtained when Mg2+ was replaced by equimolar amounts of Mn2+ or Ca2+. Images PMID:2556268

  8. Contributions of an endonuclease IV homologue to DNA repair in the African swine fever virus.

    PubMed

    Lamarche, Brandon J; Tsai, Ming-Daw

    2006-03-01

    We recently demonstrated that African swine fever virus DNA polymerase X (Pol X) is extremely error-prone during single-nucleotide gap-filling and that the downstream ASFV DNA ligase seals 3' mismatched nicks with high efficiency. To further assess the credence of our hypothesis that these proteins may promote viral diversification by functioning within the context of an aberrant DNA repair pathway, herein we characterize the third protein expected to function in this system, a putative AP endonuclease (APE). Assays of the purified protein using oligonucleotide substrates unequivocally establish canonical APE activity, 3'-phosphatase and 3'-phosphodiesterase activities (in the context of a single-nucleotide gap), 3' --> 5' exonuclease activity (in the context of a nick), and nucleotide incision repair activity against 5,6-dihydrothymine. The 3' --> 5' exonuclease activity is shown to be highly dependent upon the identity of the nascent 3' base pair and to be inhibited when 2-deoxyribose-5-phosphate, rather than phosphate, constitutes the 5' moiety of the nick. ASFV APE retains activity when assayed in the presence of EDTA but is inactivated by incubation with 1,10-phenanthroline in the absence of a substrate, suggesting that it is an endonuclease IV homologue possessing intrinsic metal cofactors. The activities of ASFV APE, when considered alongside those of Pol X and ASFV DNA ligase, provide an enhanced understanding of (i) the types of damage that are likely to be sustained by the viral genome and (ii) the mechanisms by which the minimalist ASFV DNA repair pathway, consisting of just these three proteins, contributes to the fitness of the virus.

  9. A synthetic homing endonuclease-based gene drive system in the human malaria mosquito.

    PubMed

    Windbichler, Nikolai; Menichelli, Miriam; Papathanos, Philippos Aris; Thyme, Summer B; Li, Hui; Ulge, Umut Y; Hovde, Blake T; Baker, David; Monnat, Raymond J; Burt, Austin; Crisanti, Andrea

    2011-05-12

    Genetic methods of manipulating or eradicating disease vector populations have long been discussed as an attractive alternative to existing control measures because of their potential advantages in terms of effectiveness and species specificity. The development of genetically engineered malaria-resistant mosquitoes has shown, as a proof of principle, the possibility of targeting the mosquito's ability to serve as a disease vector. The translation of these achievements into control measures requires an effective technology to spread a genetic modification from laboratory mosquitoes to field populations. We have suggested previously that homing endonuclease genes (HEGs), a class of simple selfish genetic elements, could be exploited for this purpose. Here we demonstrate that a synthetic genetic element, consisting of mosquito regulatory regions and the homing endonuclease gene I-SceI, can substantially increase its transmission to the progeny in transgenic mosquitoes of the human malaria vector Anopheles gambiae. We show that the I-SceI element is able to invade receptive mosquito cage populations rapidly, validating mathematical models for the transmission dynamics of HEGs. Molecular analyses confirm that expression of I-SceI in the male germline induces high rates of site-specific chromosomal cleavage and gene conversion, which results in the gain of the I-SceI gene, and underlies the observed genetic drive. These findings demonstrate a new mechanism by which genetic control measures can be implemented. Our results also show in principle how sequence-specific genetic drive elements like HEGs could be used to take the step from the genetic engineering of individuals to the genetic engineering of populations.

  10. Graphene quantums dots combined with endonuclease cleavage and bidentate chelation for highly sensitive electrochemiluminescent DNA biosensing.

    PubMed

    Lou, Jing; Liu, Shanshan; Tu, Wenwen; Dai, Zhihui

    2015-01-20

    A novel strategy for highly sensitive electrochemiluminescence (ECL) detection of DNA was proposed based on site-specific cleavage of BamHI endonuclease combined with the excellent ECL activity of graphene quantum dots (GQDs) and bidentate chelation of the dithiocarbamate DNA (DTC-DNA) probe assembly. The difference between photoluminescence and ECL spectral peaks suggested that a negligible defect existed on the GQDs surface for generation of an ECL signal. The formed DTC-DNA was directly attached to the gold surface by bidentate anchoring (S-Au-S bonds), which conferred a strong affinity between the ligands and the gold surface, increasing the robustness of DNA immobilization on the gold surface. BamHI endonuclease site-specifically recognized and cleaved the duplex symmetrical sequence, which made the double-stranded DNA fragments and GQDs break off from the electrode surface, inducing a decrease of the ECL signal. Using hepatitis C virus-1b genotype complementary DNA (HCV-1b cDNA) as a model, a novel signal-off ECL DNA biosensor was developed based on variation of the ECL intensity before and after digestion of the DNA hybrid. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy confirmed the successful fabrication of the ECL DNA biosensor. This ECL biosensor for HCV-1b cDNA determination exhibited a linear range from 5 fM to 100 pM with a detection limit of 0.45 fM at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3 and showed satisfactory selectivity and good stability, which validated the feasibility of the designed strategy. The proposed strategy may be conveniently combined with other specific biological recognition events for expansion of the biosensing application, especially in clinical diagnoses. PMID:25523862

  11. Structural and functional characterization of two unusual endonuclease III enzymes from Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Sarre, Aili; Ökvist, Mats; Klar, Tobias; Hall, David R; Smalås, Arne O; McSweeney, Sean; Timmins, Joanna; Moe, Elin

    2015-08-01

    While most bacteria possess a single gene encoding the bifunctional DNA glycosylase Endonuclease III (EndoIII) in their genomes, Deinococcus radiodurans possesses three: DR2438 (DrEndoIII1), DR0289 (DrEndoIII2) and DR0982 (DrEndoIII3). Here we have determined the crystal structures of DrEndoIII1 and an N-terminally truncated form of DrEndoIII3 (DrEndoIII3Δ76). We have also generated a homology model of DrEndoIII2 and measured activity of the three enzymes. All three structures consist of two all α-helical domains, one of which exhibits a [4Fe-4S] cluster and the other a HhH-motif, separated by a DNA binding cleft, similar to previously determined structures of endonuclease III from Escherichia coli and Geobacillus stearothermophilus. However, both DrEndoIII1 and DrEndoIII3 possess an extended HhH motif with extra helical features and an altered electrostatic surface potential. In addition, the DNA binding cleft of DrEndoIII3 seems to be less accessible for DNA interactions, while in DrEndoIII1 it seems to be more open. Analysis of the enzyme activities shows that DrEndoIII2 is most similar to the previously studied enzymes, while DrEndoIII1 seems to be more distant with a weaker activity towards substrate DNA containing either thymine glycol or an abasic site. DrEndoIII3 is the most distantly related enzyme and displays no detectable activity towards these substrates even though the suggested catalytic residues are conserved. Based on a comparative structural analysis, we suggest that the altered surface potential, shape of the substrate-binding pockets and specific amino acid substitutions close to the active site and in the DNA interacting loops may underlie the unexpected differences in activity. PMID:26172070

  12. Structural and functional characterization of two unusual endonuclease III enzymes from Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Sarre, Aili; Ökvist, Mats; Klar, Tobias; Hall, David R; Smalås, Arne O; McSweeney, Sean; Timmins, Joanna; Moe, Elin

    2015-08-01

    While most bacteria possess a single gene encoding the bifunctional DNA glycosylase Endonuclease III (EndoIII) in their genomes, Deinococcus radiodurans possesses three: DR2438 (DrEndoIII1), DR0289 (DrEndoIII2) and DR0982 (DrEndoIII3). Here we have determined the crystal structures of DrEndoIII1 and an N-terminally truncated form of DrEndoIII3 (DrEndoIII3Δ76). We have also generated a homology model of DrEndoIII2 and measured activity of the three enzymes. All three structures consist of two all α-helical domains, one of which exhibits a [4Fe-4S] cluster and the other a HhH-motif, separated by a DNA binding cleft, similar to previously determined structures of endonuclease III from Escherichia coli and Geobacillus stearothermophilus. However, both DrEndoIII1 and DrEndoIII3 possess an extended HhH motif with extra helical features and an altered electrostatic surface potential. In addition, the DNA binding cleft of DrEndoIII3 seems to be less accessible for DNA interactions, while in DrEndoIII1 it seems to be more open. Analysis of the enzyme activities shows that DrEndoIII2 is most similar to the previously studied enzymes, while DrEndoIII1 seems to be more distant with a weaker activity towards substrate DNA containing either thymine glycol or an abasic site. DrEndoIII3 is the most distantly related enzyme and displays no detectable activity towards these substrates even though the suggested catalytic residues are conserved. Based on a comparative structural analysis, we suggest that the altered surface potential, shape of the substrate-binding pockets and specific amino acid substitutions close to the active site and in the DNA interacting loops may underlie the unexpected differences in activity.

  13. Human endonuclease VIII-like (NEIL) proteins in the giant DNA Mimivirus

    PubMed Central

    Bandaru, Viswanath; Zhao, Xiaobei; Newton, Michael R.; Burrows, Cynthia J.; Wallace, Susan S.

    2007-01-01

    Endonuclease VIII (Nei), which recognizes and repairs oxidized pyrimidines in the Base Excision Repair (BER) pathway, is sparsely distributed among both the prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Recently, we and others identified three homologs of E. coli endonuclease VIII-like (NEIL) proteins in humans. Here, we report identification of human NEIL homologs in Mimivirus, a giant DNA virus that infects Acanthamoeba. Characterization of the two mimiviral homologs, MvNei1 and MvNei2, showed that they share not only sequence homology but also substrate specificity to the human NEIL proteins, that is, they recognize oxidized pyrimidines in duplex DNA and in bubble substrates and as well show 5′2-deoxyribose-5-phosphate lyase (dRP lyase) activity. However, unlike MvNei1 and the human NEIL proteins, MvNei2 preferentially cleaves oxidized pyrimidines in single stranded DNA forming products with a different end chemistry. Interestingly, opposite base specificity of MvNei1 resembles human NEIL proteins for pyrimidine base damages whereas it resembles E. coli formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (Fpg) for guanidinohydantoin (Gh), an oxidation product of 8-oxoguanine. Finally, a conserved arginine residue in the “zincless finger” motif, previously identified in human NEIL1, is required for the DNA glycosylase activity of MvNeil. Thus, Mimivirus represents the first example of a virus to carry oxidative DNA glycosylases with substrate specificities that resemble human NEIL proteins. Based on the sequence homology to the human NEIL homologs and novel bacterial NEIL homologs identified here, we predict that Mimivirus may have acquired the DNA glycosylases through the host-mediated lateral transfer from either a bacterium or from vertebrates. PMID:17627905

  14. Intragenic suppression of an active site mutation in the human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease.

    PubMed

    Izumi, T; Malecki, J; Chaudhry, M A; Weinfeld, M; Hill, J H; Lee, J C; Mitra, S

    1999-03-19

    The apurinic/apyrimidinic endonucleases (APE) contain several highly conserved sequence motifs. The glutamic acid residue in a consensus motif, LQE96TK98 in human APE (hAPE-1), is crucial because of its role in coordinating Mg2+, an essential cofactor. Random mutagenesis of the inactive E96A mutant cDNA, followed by phenotypic screening in Escherichia coli, led to isolation of an intragenic suppressor with a second site mutation, K98R. Although the Km of the suppressor mutant was about sixfold higher than that of the wild-type enzyme, their kcat values were similar for AP endonuclease activity. These results suggest that the E96A mutation affects only the DNA-binding step, but not the catalytic step of the enzyme. The 3' DNA phosphoesterase activities of the wild-type and the suppressor mutant were also comparable. No global change of the protein conformation is induced by the single or double mutations, but a local perturbation in the structural environment of tryptophan residues may be induced by the K98R mutation. The wild-type and suppressor mutant proteins have similar Mg2+ requirement for activity. These results suggest a minor perturbation in conformation of the suppressor mutant enabling an unidentified Asp or Glu residue to substitute for Glu96 in positioning Mg2+ during catalysis. The possibility that Asp70 is such a residue, based on its observed proximity to the metal-binding site in the wild-type protein, was excluded by site-specific mutation studies. It thus appears that another acidic residue coordinates with Mg2+ in the mutant protein. These results suggest a rather flexible conformation of the region surrounding the metal binding site in hAPE-1 which is not obvious from the X-ray crystallographic structure. PMID:10074406

  15. Antiretroviral restriction factors.

    PubMed

    Hatziioannou, Theodora; Bieniasz, Paul D

    2011-12-01

    Studies of retroviruses have been instrumental in revealing the existence of an array of antiviral proteins, or restriction factors, and the mechanisms by which they function. Some restriction factors appear to specifically inhibit retrovirus replication, while others have a broader antiviral action. Here, we briefly review current understanding of the mechanisms by which several such proteins exert antiviral activity. We also discuss how retroviruses have evolved to evade or antagonize antiviral proteins, including through the action of viral accessory proteins. Restriction factors, their viral targets and antagonists have exerted evolutionary pressure on each other, resulting in specialization and barriers to cross-species transmission. Potentially, this recently revealed intrinsic system of antiviral immunity might be mobilized for therapeutic benefit.

  16. REBASE--a database for DNA restriction and modification: enzymes, genes and genomes.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Richard J; Vincze, Tamas; Posfai, Janos; Macelis, Dana

    2010-01-01

    REBASE is a comprehensive database of information about restriction enzymes, DNA methyltransferases and related proteins involved in the biological process of restriction-modification (R-M). It contains fully referenced information about recognition and cleavage sites, isoschizomers, neoschizomers, commercial availability, methylation sensitivity, crystal and sequence data. Experimentally characterized homing endonucleases are also included. The fastest growing segment of REBASE contains the putative R-M systems found in the sequence databases. Comprehensive descriptions of the R-M content of all fully sequenced genomes are available including summary schematics. The contents of REBASE may be browsed from the web (http://rebase.neb.com) and selected compilations can be downloaded by ftp (ftp.neb.com). Additionally, monthly updates can be requested via email.

  17. Selection of enzymes for terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of fungal internally transcribed spacer sequences.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, Pablo; Manjón, Jose L

    2009-07-01

    Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP) profiling of the internally transcribed spacer (ITS) ribosomal DNA of unknown fungal communities is currently unsupported by a broad-range enzyme-choosing rationale. An in silico study of terminal fragment size distribution was therefore performed following virtual digestion (by use of a set of commercially available 135 type IIP restriction endonucleases) of all published fungal ITS sequences putatively annealing to primers ITS1 and ITS4. Different diversity measurements were used to rank primer-enzyme pairs according to the richness and evenness that they showed. Top-performing pairs were hierarchically clustered to test for data dependency. The enzyme set composed of MaeII, BfaI, and BstNI returned much better results than randomly chosen enzyme sets in computer simulations and is therefore recommended for in vitro TRFLP profiling of fungal ITSs.

  18. Polymerase Synthesis and Restriction Enzyme Cleavage of DNA Containing 7-Substituted 7-Deazaguanine Nucleobases.

    PubMed

    Mačková, Michaela; Boháčová, Soňa; Perlíková, Pavla; Poštová Slavětínská, Lenka; Hocek, Michal

    2015-10-12

    Previous studies of polymerase synthesis of base-modified DNAs and their cleavage by restriction enzymes have mostly related only to 5-substituted pyrimidine and 7-substituted 7-deazaadenine nucleotides. Here we report the synthesis of a series of 7-substituted 7-deazaguanine 2'-deoxyribonucleoside 5'-O-triphosphates (dG(R) TPs), their use as substrates for polymerase synthesis of modified DNA and the influence of the modification on their cleavage by type II restriction endonucleases (REs). The dG(R) TPs were generally good substrates for polymerases but the PCR products could not be visualised on agarose gels by intercalator staining, due to fluorescence quenching. The presence of 7-substituted 7-deazaguanine residues in recognition sequences of REs in most cases completely blocked the cleavage.

  19. Restriction fragment length polymorphisms associated with substance P gene

    SciTech Connect

    de Miguel, C.; Bonner, T.; Detera-Wadleigh, S.

    1987-05-01

    Substance P (SP) is an important neuropepetide detected in a variety of locations in the central nervous system. Variations in SP content or SP receptors in psychiatric disorders have been described. Using SP clones as probes the authors have found three restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) in the SP gene. The RFLPs are generated by digestion of genomic DNA with the MspI, and RsaI and NcoI restriction endonucleases. The MspI RFLP is detected by two genomic clones mapping to the 5' end of the gene while the RsaI and NcoI rFLPs are both detected by two genomic clones on the 3' end and also by a full-length cDNA clone of the gene. All three RFLPs are characterized by two alleles. For the MspI RFLP the frequency of both alleles is similar, for the Rsa I and NcoI RFLP one of the alleles is significantly more abundant than the other. These RFLPs are now being used to determine whether any of the alleles correlate with either schizophrenia or affective disorder.

  20. Counteraction of the multifunctional restriction factor tetherin.

    PubMed

    Sauter, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The interferon-inducible restriction factor tetherin (also known as CD317, BST-2 or HM1.24) has emerged as a key component of the antiviral immune response. Initially, tetherin was shown to restrict replication of various enveloped viruses by inhibiting the release of budding virions from infected cells. More recently, it has become clear that tetherin also acts as a pattern recognition receptor inducing NF-κB-dependent proinflammatory gene expression in virus infected cells. Whereas the ability to restrict virion release is highly conserved among mammalian tetherin orthologs and thus probably an ancient function of this protein, innate sensing seems to be an evolutionarily recent activity. The potent and broad antiviral activity of tetherin is reflected by the fact that many viruses evolved means to counteract this restriction factor. A continuous arms race with viruses has apparently driven the evolution of different isoforms of tetherin with different functional properties. Interestingly, tetherin has also been implicated in cellular processes that are unrelated to immunity, such as the organization of the apical actin network and membrane microdomains or stabilization of the Golgi apparatus. In this review, I summarize our current knowledge of the different functions of tetherin and describe the molecular strategies that viruses have evolved to antagonize or evade this multifunctional host restriction factor.

  1. Fasting or caloric restriction for Healthy Aging

    PubMed Central

    Anton, Stephen; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan

    2014-01-01

    Aging is associated with a host of biological changes that contribute to a progressive decline in cognitive and physical function, ultimately leading to a loss of independence, and increased risk of mortality. To date, prolonged caloric restriction (i.e., a reduction in caloric intake without malnutrition) is the only non-genetic intervention that has consistently been found to extend both mean and maximal life span across a variety of species. Most individuals have difficulty sustaining prolonged caloric restriction, which has led to a search for alternative approaches that can produce similar to benefits as caloric restriction. A growing body of evidence indicates that fasting periods and intermittent fasting regimens in particular can trigger similar biological pathways as caloric restriction. For this reason, there is increasing scientific interest in further exploring the biological and metabolic effects of intermittent fasting periods, as well as whether long-term compliance may be improved by this type of dietary approach. This special will highlight the latest scientific findings related to the effects of both caloric restriction and intermittent fasting across various species including yeast, fruit flies, worms, rodents, primates, and humans. A specific emphasis is placed on translational research with findings from basic bench to bedside reviewed and practical clinical implications discussed. PMID:23639403

  2. Neuroaesthetics: range and restrictions.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Anjan

    2013-04-01

    Bullot & Reber (B&R) should be commended for highlighting tensions between scientific aesthetics and art history. The question of how each tradition can learn from the other is timely. While I am sympathetic to their views, their diagnosis of the problem appears exaggerated and their solution partial. They underestimate the reach of scientific aesthetics while failing to identify its inherent restrictions. PMID:23507092

  3. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) profiling of bacterial 16S rRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Osborne, Catherine A

    2014-01-01

    T-RFLP profiling is a very effective method for comparing many samples in an environmental microbiology study, because fingerprints of microbial diversity can be generated in a sensitive, reproducible, and cost-effective manner. This protocol describes the steps required to generate T-RFLP profiles of the dominant members of a bacterial community, by PCR amplification of the bacterial 16S rRNA genes and three restriction endonuclease digests to generate three different profiles for each sample. The generation of multiple profiles per sample provides enough information to confidently differentiate rich environmental bacterial communities.

  4. Enzymatic amplification of beta-globin genomic sequences and restriction site analysis for diagnosis of sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Saiki, R K; Scharf, S; Faloona, F; Mullis, K B; Horn, G T; Erlich, H A; Arnheim, N

    1985-12-20

    Two new methods were used to establish a rapid and highly sensitive prenatal diagnostic test for sickle cell anemia. The first involves the primer-mediated enzymatic amplification of specific beta-globin target sequences in genomic DNA, resulting in the exponential increase (220,000 times) of target DNA copies. In the second technique, the presence of the beta A and beta S alleles is determined by restriction endonuclease digestion of an end-labeled oligonucleotide probe hybridized in solution to the amplified beta-globin sequences. The beta-globin genotype can be determined in less than 1 day on samples containing significantly less than 1 microgram of genomic DNA.

  5. Simultaneous confirmatory analysis of different transgenic maize (zea mays) lines using multiplex polymerase chain reaction-restriction analysis and capillary gel electrophoresis with laser induced fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    García-Cañas, Virginia; Cifuentes, Alejandro

    2008-09-24

    A novel analytical procedure based on the combination of multiplex PCR, restriction analysis, and CGE-LIF to unambiguosly and simultaneously confirm the presence of multiple lines of genetically modified corn is proposed. This methodology is based on the amplification of event-specific DNA regions by multiplex PCR using 6-FAM-labeled primers. Subsequently, PCR products are digested by a mixture containing specific restriction endonucleases. Thus, restriction endonucleases selectively recognize DNA target sequences contained in the PCR products and cleave the double-stranded DNA at a given cleavage site. Next, the restriction digest is analyzed by CGE-LIF corroborating the length of the expected restriction fragments, confirming (or not) the existence of GMOs. For accurate size determination of the DNA fragments by CGE-LIF a special standard DNA mixture was produced in this laboratory for calibration. The suitability of this mixture for size determination of labeled DNA fragments is also demonstrated. The usefulness of the proposed methodology is demonstrated through the simultaneous detection and confirmatory analysis of samples containing 0.5% of GA21 and MON863 maize plus an endogenous gene of maize as control.

  6. Using Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP) Analysis to Assess Microbial Community Structure in Compost Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiquia, Sonia M.

    Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis of PCR-amplified genes is a widely used fingerprinting technique in composting systems. This analysis is based on the restriction endonuclease digestion of fluorescently end-labeled PCR products. The digested product is mixed with a DNA size standard, itself labeled with a distinct fluorescent dye, and the fragments are then separated by capillary or gel electrophoresis using an automated sequencer. Upon analysis, only the terminal end-labeled restriction fragments are detected. An electropherogram is produced, which shows a profile of compost microbial community as a series of peaks of varying height. This technique has also been effectively used in the exploration of complex microbial environments and in the study of bacterial, archaeal, and eukaryal populations in natural habitats.

  7. In silico analysis of MHC-I restricted epitopes of Chikungunya virus proteins: Implication in understanding anti-CHIKV CD8(+) T cell response and advancement of epitope based immunotherapy for CHIKV infection.

    PubMed

    Pratheek, B M; Suryawanshi, Amol R; Chattopadhyay, Soma; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis

    2015-04-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a mosquito-borne Alphavirus, responsible for acute febrile infection. The high morbidity and socio-economic loss associated with the recent CHIKV epidemics worldwide have raised a great public health concern and emphasize the need to study the immunological basis of CHIKV infection to control the disease. MHC-I restricted CD8(+) T cell response represent one of the major anti-viral immune responses. Accordingly, it is essential to have a detailed understanding towards CHIKV specific MHC-I restricted immunogenic epitopes for anti-viral CD8(+) CTL immunogenicity. In the present study, a computational approach was used to predict the conserved MHC-I epitopes for mouse haplotypes (H2-Db and H2-Dd) and some alleles of the major HLA-I supertypes (HLA-A2, -A3, -A24, -B7, -B15) of all CHIKV proteins. Further, an in-depth computational analysis was carried out to validate the selected epitopes for their nature of conservation in different global CHIKV isolates to assess their binding affinities to the appropriate site of respective MHC-I molecules and to predict anti-CHIKV CD8(+) CTL immunogenicity. Our analyses resulted in fifteen highly conserved epitopes for H2-Db and H2-Dd and fifty epitopes for different HLA-I supertypes. Out of these, the MHC-I epitopes VLLPNVHTL and MTPERVTRL were found to have highest predictable CTL immunogenicities and least binding energies for H2-Db and H2-Dd, whereas, for HLA-I, the epitope FLTLFVNTL was with the highest population coverage, CTL immunogenicity and least binding energy. Hence, our study has identified MHC-I restricted epitopes that may help in the advancement of MHC-I restricted epitope based anti-CHIKV immune responses against this infection and this will be useful towards the development of epitope based anti-CHIKV immunotherapy in the future. However, further experimental investigations for cross validation and evaluation are warranted to establish the ability of epitopes to induce CD8(+) T cell

  8. In silico analysis of MHC-I restricted epitopes of Chikungunya virus proteins: Implication in understanding anti-CHIKV CD8(+) T cell response and advancement of epitope based immunotherapy for CHIKV infection.

    PubMed

    Pratheek, B M; Suryawanshi, Amol R; Chattopadhyay, Soma; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis

    2015-04-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a mosquito-borne Alphavirus, responsible for acute febrile infection. The high morbidity and socio-economic loss associated with the recent CHIKV epidemics worldwide have raised a great public health concern and emphasize the need to study the immunological basis of CHIKV infection to control the disease. MHC-I restricted CD8(+) T cell response represent one of the major anti-viral immune responses. Accordingly, it is essential to have a detailed understanding towards CHIKV specific MHC-I restricted immunogenic epitopes for anti-viral CD8(+) CTL immunogenicity. In the present study, a computational approach was used to predict the conserved MHC-I epitopes for mouse haplotypes (H2-Db and H2-Dd) and some alleles of the major HLA-I supertypes (HLA-A2, -A3, -A24, -B7, -B15) of all CHIKV proteins. Further, an in-depth computational analysis was carried out to validate the selected epitopes for their nature of conservation in different global CHIKV isolates to assess their binding affinities to the appropriate site of respective MHC-I molecules and to predict anti-CHIKV CD8(+) CTL immunogenicity. Our analyses resulted in fifteen highly conserved epitopes for H2-Db and H2-Dd and fifty epitopes for different HLA-I supertypes. Out of these, the MHC-I epitopes VLLPNVHTL and MTPERVTRL were found to have highest predictable CTL immunogenicities and least binding energies for H2-Db and H2-Dd, whereas, for HLA-I, the epitope FLTLFVNTL was with the highest population coverage, CTL immunogenicity and least binding energy. Hence, our study has identified MHC-I restricted epitopes that may help in the advancement of MHC-I restricted epitope based anti-CHIKV immune responses against this infection and this will be useful towards the development of epitope based anti-CHIKV immunotherapy in the future. However, further experimental investigations for cross validation and evaluation are warranted to establish the ability of epitopes to induce CD8(+) T cell

  9. License restrictions at Barnwell

    SciTech Connect

    Autry, V.R.

    1991-12-31

    The State of South Carolina was delegated the authority by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to regulate the receipt, possession, use and disposal of radioactive material as an Agreement State. Since 1970, the state has been the principal regulatory authority for the Barnwell Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility operated by Chem-Nuclear Systems, Inc. The radioactive material license issued authorizing the receipt and disposal of low-level waste contains numerous restrictions to ensure environmental protection and compliance with shallow land disposal performance criteria. Low-level waste has evolved from minimally contaminated items to complex waste streams containing high concentrations of radionuclides and processing chemicals which necessitated these restrictions. Additionally, some waste with their specific radionuclides and concentration levels, many classified as low-level radioactive waste, are not appropriate for shallow land disposal unless additional precautions are taken. This paper will represent a number of these restrictions, the rationale for them, and how they are being dealt with at the Barnwell disposal facility.

  10. T cell receptor genes in a series of class I major histocompatibility complex-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte clones specific for a Plasmodium berghei nonapeptide: implications for T cell allelic exclusion and antigen-specific repertoire

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    We report here the first extensive study of a T cell repertoire for a class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response. We have found that the T cell receptors (TCRs) carried by 28 H-2Kd-restricted CTL clones specific for a single Plasmodium berghei circumsporozoite nonapeptide are highly diverse in terms of V alpha, J alpha, and J beta segments and aminoacid composition of the junctional regions. However, despite this extensive diversity, a high proportion of the TCRs contain the same V beta segment. These results are in contrast to most previously reported T cell responses towards class II MHC-peptide complexes, where the TCR repertoires appeared to be much more limited. In our study, the finding of a dominant V beta in the midst of otherwise highly diverse TCRs suggests the importance of the V beta segment in shaping the T cell repertoire specific for a given MHC-peptide complex. As an additional finding, we observed that nearly all clones have rearranged both TCR alpha loci. Moreover, as many as one-third of the CTL clones that we analyzed apparently display two productive alpha rearrangements. This argues against a regulated model of sequential recombination at the alpha locus and consequently raises the question of whether allelic exclusion of the TCR alpha chain is achieved at all. PMID:1836010

  11. Rapid restriction mapping of cosmids by sequence-specific triple-helix-mediated affinity capture

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Huamin; Francisco, T.; Smith, L.M.; Guilfoyle, R.A.

    1996-01-15

    A simple and rapid strategy for restriction mapping based on sequence-specific triple-helix affinity capture (TAC) was developed. The strategy was applied to the analysis of cosmid clones by the construction of a new cosmid vector, ScosTriplex-II, containing two different triple-helix-forming sequences flanking the cloning site of the original SuperCos-1 cosmid vector. For restriction mapping, the recombinant cosmid DNA is digested with NotI restriction enzyme or with one of four intron-encoded endonucleases for excision of intact inserts followed by controlled partial digestion with a mapping enzyme used in conjunction with the corresponding methyltransferase. The partial digestion products are combined with biotinylated triple-helix-forming oligonucleotides to form a triple-helical complex. The triple-helix complexes are immobilized on streptavidin-coated magnetic beads, washed, and eluted with pH 9 buffer solution. The fragments are separated and directly sized by agarose gel electrophoresis. Bidirectional maps are obtained simultaneously by binding to the two different triple-helix-forming oligonucleotides. No probe labeling, gel drying, blotting to membranes, hybridization, or autoradiography is necessary. Also, TAC conditions that permit gel-free isolation of the terminal restriction fragments from cosmid inserts were found. These advantages afforded by ScosTriplex-II should facilitate the automation of cosmid restriction site fingerprinting needed for large-scale mapping and sequencing projects. 24 refs., 5 figs.

  12. Mutagenicity Assessment of Organophosphates using Polymerase Chain Reaction-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism Assay

    PubMed Central

    Bhinder, Preety; Chaudhry, Asha

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: In this study we have evaluated the mutagenicity of organophosphate pesticides acephate, chlorpyrifos, and profenofos using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) assay with the mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus taken as an experimental model. Materials and Methods: Second instar larvae were treated with LC20 of each pesticide for 24 h and mutations induced in the sequence of mitochondrial COII gene (690bp) were studied from restriction patterns generated with AluI, PacI, and PsiI restriction endonucleases. Results: Variations in the number and size of digested fragments were recorded from treated individuals compared with controls showing that the restriction enzymes created a cut at different locations. In addition, sequences of COII gene from control and treated individuals were also used to confirm the RFLP patterns. From the sequence alignment data, it was found that mutations caused the destruction and generation of restriction sites in the gene sequence of treated individuals. Conclusion: This study indicates that all the three pesticides had potential to induce mutations in the normal sequence of COII gene and also advocates the use of PCR-RFLP assay as an efficient, rapid, and sensitive technique to detect mutagenicity of pesticides. PMID:24403735

  13. Molecular dynamics of the salt dependence of a cold-adapted enzyme: endonuclease I.

    PubMed

    Benrezkallah, D; Dauchez, M; Krallafa, A M

    2015-01-01

    The effects of salt on the stability of globular proteins have been known for a long time. In the present investigations, we shall focus on the effect of the salt ions upon the structure and the activity of the endonuclease I enzyme. In the present work, we shall focus on the relationship between ion position and the structural features of the Vibrio salmonicida (VsEndA) enzyme. We will concentrate on major questions such as: how can salt ions affect the molecular structure? What is the activity of the enzyme and which specific regions are directly involved? For that purpose, we will study the behaviour of the VsEndA over different salt concentrations using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. We report the results of MD simulations of the endonuclease I enzyme at five different salt concentrations. Analysis of trajectories in terms of the root mean square fluctuation (RMSF), radial distribution function, contact numbers and hydrogen bonding lifetimes, indicate distinct differences when changing the concentration of NaCl. Results are found to be in good agreement with experimental data, where we have noted an optimum salt concentration for activity equal to 425 mM. Under this salt concentration, the VsEndA exhibits two more flexible loop regions, compared to the other salt concentrations. When analysing the RMSF of these two specific regions, three residues were selected for their higher mobility. We find a correlation between the structural properties studied here such as the radial distribution function, the contact numbers and the hydrogen bonding lifetimes, and the structural flexibility of only two polar residues. Finally, in the light of the present work, the molecular basis of the salt adaptation of VsEndA enzyme has been explored by mean of explicit solvent and salt treatment. Our results reveal that modulation of the sodium/chloride ions interaction with some specific loop regions of the protein is the strategy followed by this type of psychrophilic enzyme

  14. Comparative characterization of the PvuRts1I family of restriction enzymes and their application in mapping genomic 5-hydroxymethylcytosine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua; Guan, Shengxi; Quimby, Aine; Cohen-Karni, Devora; Pradhan, Sriharsa; Wilson, Geoffrey; Roberts, Richard J; Zhu, Zhenyu; Zheng, Yu

    2011-11-01

    PvuRts1I is a modification-dependent restriction endonuclease that recognizes 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) as well as 5-glucosylhydroxymethylcytosine (5ghmC) in double-stranded DNA. Using PvuRts1I as the founding member, we define a family of homologous proteins with similar DNA modification-dependent recognition properties. At the sequence level, these proteins share a few uniquely conserved features. We show that these enzymes introduce a double-stranded cleavage at the 3'-side away from the recognized modified cytosine. The distances between the cleavage sites and the modified cytosine are fixed within a narrow range, with the majority being 11-13 nt away in the top strand and 9-10 nt away in the bottom strand. The recognition sites of these enzymes generally require two cytosines on opposite strand around the cleavage sites, i.e. 5'-CN(11-13)↓N(9-10)G-3'/3'-GN(9-10)↓N(11-13)C-5', with at least one cytosine being modified for efficient cleavage. As one potential application for these enzymes is to provide useful tools for selectively mapping 5hmC sites, we have compared the relative selectivity of a few PvuRts1I family members towards different forms of modified cytosines. Our results show that the inherently different relative selectivity towards modified cytosines can have practical implications for their application. By using AbaSDFI, a PvuRts1I homolog with the highest relative selectivity towards 5ghmC, to analyze rat brain DNA, we show it is feasible to map genomic 5hmC sites close to base resolution. Our study offers unique tools for determining more accurate hydroxymethylomes in mammalian cells.

  15. Genomic Disruption of VEGF-A Expression in Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells Using CRISPR-Cas9 Endonuclease

    PubMed Central

    Yiu, Glenn; Tieu, Eric; Nguyen, Anthony T.; Wong, Brittany; Smit-McBride, Zeljka

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To employ type II clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 endonuclease to suppress ocular angiogenesis by genomic disruption of VEGF-A in human RPE cells. Methods CRISPR sequences targeting exon 1 of human VEGF-A were computationally identified based on predicted Cas9 on- and off-target probabilities. Single guide RNA (gRNA) cassettes with these target sequences were cloned into lentiviral vectors encoding the Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9 endonuclease (SpCas9) gene. The lentiviral vectors were used to infect ARPE-19 cells, a human RPE cell line. Frequency of insertion or deletion (indel) mutations was assessed by T7 endonuclease 1 mismatch detection assay; mRNA levels were assessed with quantitative real-time PCR; and VEGF-A protein levels were determined by ELISA. In vitro angiogenesis was measured using an endothelial cell tube formation assay. Results Five gRNAs targeting VEGF-A were selected based on the highest predicted on-target probabilities, lowest off-target probabilities, or combined average of both scores. Lentiviral delivery of the top-scoring gRNAs with SpCas9 resulted in indel formation in the VEGF-A gene at frequencies up to 37.0% ± 4.0% with corresponding decreases in secreted VEGF-A protein up to 41.2% ± 7.4% (P < 0.001), and reduction of endothelial tube formation up to 39.4% ± 9.8% (P = 0.02). No significant indel formation in the top three putative off-target sites tested was detected. Conclusions The CRISPR-Cas9 endonuclease system may reduce VEGF-A secretion from human RPE cells and suppress angiogenesis, supporting the possibility of employing gene editing for antiangiogenesis therapy in ocular diseases. PMID:27768202

  16. Cross-Protection of Influenza A Virus Infection by a DNA Aptamer Targeting the PA Endonuclease Domain

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Shuofeng; Zhang, Naru; Singh, Kailash; Shuai, Huiping; Chu, Hin; Zhou, Jie; Chow, Billy K. C.

    2015-01-01

    Amino acid residues in the N-terminal of the PA subunit (PAN) of the influenza A virus polymerase play critical roles in endonuclease activity, protein stability, and viral RNA (vRNA) promoter binding. In addition, PAN is highly conserved among different subtypes of influenza virus, which suggests PAN to be a desired target in the development of anti-influenza agents. We selected DNA aptamers targeting the intact PA protein or the PAN domain of an H5N1 virus strain using systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX). The binding affinities of selected aptamers were measured, followed by an evaluation of in vitro endonuclease inhibitory activity. Next, the antiviral effects of enriched aptamers against influenza A virus infections were examined. A total of three aptamers targeting PA and six aptamers targeting PAN were selected. Our data demonstrated that all three PA-selected aptamers neither inhibited endonuclease activity nor exhibited antiviral efficacy, whereas four of the six PAN-selected aptamers inhibited both endonuclease activity and H5N1 virus infection. Among the four effective aptamers, one exhibited cross-protection against infections of H1N1, H5N1, H7N7, and H7N9 influenza viruses, with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of around 10 nM. Notably, this aptamer was identified at the 5th round but disappeared after the 10th round of selection, suggesting that the identification and evaluation of aptamers at early rounds of selection may be highly helpful for screening effective aptamers. Overall, our study provides novel insights for screening and developing effective aptamers for use as anti-influenza drugs. PMID:25918143

  17. Structural Features and Functional Dependency on β-Clamp Define Distinct Subfamilies of Bacterial Mismatch Repair Endonuclease MutL.

    PubMed

    Fukui, Kenji; Baba, Seiki; Kumasaka, Takashi; Yano, Takato

    2016-08-12

    In early reactions of DNA mismatch repair, MutS recognizes mismatched bases and activates MutL endonuclease to incise the error-containing strand of the duplex. DNA sliding clamp is responsible for directing the MutL-dependent nicking to the newly synthesized/error-containing strand. In Bacillus subtilis MutL, the β-clamp-interacting motif (β motif) of the C-terminal domain (CTD) is essential for both in vitro direct interaction with β-clamp and in vivo repair activity. A large cluster of negatively charged residues on the B. subtilis MutL CTD prevents nonspecific DNA binding until β clamp interaction neutralizes the negative charge. We found that there are some bacterial phyla whose MutL endonucleases lack the β motif. For example, the region corresponding to the β motif is completely missing in Aquifex aeolicus MutL, and critical amino acid residues in the β motif are not conserved in Thermus thermophilus MutL. We then revealed the 1.35 Å-resolution crystal structure of A. aeolicus MutL CTD, which lacks the β motif but retains the metal-binding site for the endonuclease activity. Importantly, there was no negatively charged cluster on its surface. It was confirmed that CTDs of β motif-lacking MutLs, A. aeolicus MutL and T. thermophilus MutL, efficiently incise DNA even in the absence of β-clamp and that β-clamp shows no detectable enhancing effect on their activity. In contrast, CTD of Streptococcus mutans, a β motif-containing MutL, required β-clamp for the digestion of DNA. We propose that MutL endonucleases are divided into three subfamilies on the basis of their structural features and dependence on β-clamp. PMID:27369079

  18. Recognition of a common rDNA target site in archaea and eukarya by analogous LAGLIDADG and His-Cys box homing endonucleases.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Norimichi; Nomura, Yayoi; Sussman, Django; Klein, Daniel; Stoddard, Barry L

    2008-12-01

    The presence of a homing endonuclease gene (HEG) within a microbial intron or intein empowers the entire element with the ability to invade genomic targets. The persistence of a homing endonuclease lineage depends in part on conservation of its DNA target site. One such rDNA sequence has been invaded both in archaea and in eukarya, by LAGLIDADG and His-Cys box homing endonucleases, respectively. The bases encoded by this target include a universally conserved ribosomal structure, termed helix 69 (H69) in the large ribosomal subunit. This region forms the 'B2a' intersubunit bridge to the small ribosomal subunit, contacts bound tRNA in the A- and P-sites, and acts as a trigger for ribosome disassembly through its interactions with ribosome recycling factor. We have determined the DNA-bound structure and specificity profile of an archaeal LAGLIDADG homing endonuclease (I-Vdi141I) that recognizes this target site, and compared its specificity with the analogous eukaryal His-Cys box endonuclease I-PpoI. These homodimeric endonuclease scaffolds have arrived at similar specificity profiles across their common biological target and analogous solutions to the problem of accommodating conserved asymmetries within the DNA sequence, but with differences at individual base pairs that are fine-tuned to the sequence conservation of archaeal versus eukaryal ribosomes. PMID:18984620

  19. The human homolog of Escherichia coli endonuclease V is a nucleolar protein with affinity for branched DNA structures.

    PubMed

    Fladeby, Cathrine; Vik, Erik Sebastian; Laerdahl, Jon K; Gran Neurauter, Christine; Heggelund, Julie E; Thorgaard, Eirik; Strøm-Andersen, Pernille; Bjørås, Magnar; Dalhus, Bjørn; Alseth, Ingrun

    2012-01-01

    Loss of amino groups from adenines in DNA results in the formation of hypoxanthine (Hx) bases with miscoding properties. The primary enzyme in Escherichia coli for DNA repair initiation at deaminated adenine is endonuclease V (endoV), encoded by the nfi gene, which cleaves the second phosphodiester bond 3' of an Hx lesion. Endonuclease V orthologs are widespread in nature and belong to a family of highly conserved proteins. Whereas prokaryotic endoV enzymes are well characterized, the function of the eukaryotic homologs remains obscure. Here we describe the human endoV ortholog and show with bioinformatics and experimental analysis that a large number of transcript variants exist for the human endonuclease V gene (ENDOV), many of which are unlikely to be translated into functional protein. Full-length ENDOV is encoded by 8 evolutionary conserved exons covering the core region of the enzyme, in addition to one or more 3'-exons encoding an unstructured and poorly conserved C-terminus. In contrast to the E. coli enzyme, we find recombinant ENDOV neither to incise nor bind Hx-containing DNA. While both enzymes have strong affinity for several branched DNA substrates, cleavage is observed only with E. coli endoV. We find that ENDOV is localized in the cytoplasm and nucleoli of human cells. As nucleoli harbor the rRNA genes, this may suggest a role for the protein in rRNA gene transactions such as DNA replication or RNA transcription.

  20. The Human Homolog of Escherichia coli Endonuclease V Is a Nucleolar Protein with Affinity for Branched DNA Structures

    PubMed Central

    Laerdahl, Jon K.; Gran Neurauter, Christine; Heggelund, Julie E.; Thorgaard, Eirik; Strøm-Andersen, Pernille; Bjørås, Magnar; Dalhus, Bjørn; Alseth, Ingrun

    2012-01-01

    Loss of amino groups from adenines in DNA results in the formation of hypoxanthine (Hx) bases with miscoding properties. The primary enzyme in Escherichia coli for DNA repair initiation at deaminated adenine is endonuclease V (endoV), encoded by the nfi gene, which cleaves the second phosphodiester bond 3′ of an Hx lesion. Endonuclease V orthologs are widespread in nature and belong to a family of highly conserved proteins. Whereas prokaryotic endoV enzymes are well characterized, the function of the eukaryotic homologs remains obscure. Here we describe the human endoV ortholog and show with bioinformatics and experimental analysis that a large number of transcript variants exist for the human endonuclease V gene (ENDOV), many of which are unlikely to be translated into functional protein. Full-length ENDOV is encoded by 8 evolutionary conserved exons covering the core region of the enzyme, in addition to one or more 3′-exons encoding an unstructured and poorly conserved C-terminus. In contrast to the E. coli enzyme, we find recombinant ENDOV neither to incise nor bind Hx-containing DNA. While both enzymes have strong affinity for several branched DNA substrates, cleavage is observed only with E. coli endoV. We find that ENDOV is localized in the cytoplasm and nucleoli of human cells. As nucleoli harbor the rRNA genes, this may suggest a role for the protein in rRNA gene transactions such as DNA replication or RNA transcription. PMID:23139746

  1. The sliding clamp tethers the endonuclease domain of MutL to DNA

    PubMed Central

    Pillon, Monica C.; Babu, Vignesh M. P.; Randall, Justin R.; Cai, Jiudou; Simmons, Lyle A.; Sutton, Mark D.; Guarné, Alba

    2015-01-01

    The sliding clamp enhances polymerase processivity and coordinates DNA replication with other critical DNA processing events including translesion synthesis, Okazaki fragment maturation and DNA repair. The relative binding affinity of the sliding clamp for its partners determines how these processes are orchestrated and is essential to ensure the correct processing of newly replicated DNA. However, while stable clamp interactions have been extensively studied; dynamic interactions mediated by the sliding clamp remain poorly understood. Here, we characterize the interaction between the bacterial sliding clamp (β-clamp) and one of its weak-binding partners, the DNA mismatch repair protein MutL. Disruption of this interaction causes a mild mutator phenotype in Escherichia coli, but completely abrogates mismatch repair activity in Bacillus subtilis. We stabilize the MutL-β interaction by engineering two cysteine residues at variable positions of the interface. Using disulfide bridge crosslinking, we have stabilized the E. coli and B. subtilis MutL-β complexes and have characterized their structures using small angle X-ray scattering. We find that the MutL-β interaction greatly stimulates the endonuclease activity of B. subtilis MutL and supports this activity even in the absence of the N-terminal region of the protein. PMID:26384423

  2. Endonuclease G preferentially cleaves 5-hydroxymethylcytosine-modified DNA creating a substrate for recombination

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Adam B.; Robertson, Julia; Fusser, Markus; Klungland, Arne

    2014-01-01

    5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) has been suggested to be involved in various nucleic acid transactions and cellular processes, including transcriptional regulation, demethylation of 5-methylcytosine and stem cell pluripotency. We have identified an activity that preferentially catalyzes the cleavage of double-stranded 5hmC-modified DNA. Using biochemical methods we purified this activity from mouse liver extracts and demonstrate that the enzyme responsible for the cleavage of 5hmC-modified DNA is Endonuclease G (EndoG). We show that recombinant EndoG preferentially recognizes and cleaves a core sequence when one specific cytosine within that core sequence is hydroxymethylated. Additionally, we provide in vivo evidence that EndoG catalyzes the formation of double-stranded DNA breaks and that this cleavage is dependent upon the core sequence, EndoG and 5hmC. Finally, we demonstrate that the 5hmC modification can promote conservative recombination in an EndoG-dependent manner. PMID:25355512

  3. Adenomatous Polyposis Coli Interacts with Flap Endonuclease 1 to Block Its Nuclear Entry and Function1

    PubMed Central

    Jaiswal, Aruna S; Armas, Melissa L; Izumi, Tadahide; Strauss, Phyllis R; Narayan, Satya

    2012-01-01

    In previous studies, we found that adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) blocks the base excision repair (BER) pathway by interacting with 5′-flap endonuclease 1 (Fen1). In this study, we identify the molecular features that contribute to the formation and/or stabilization of the APC/Fen1 complex that determines the extent of BER inhibition, and the subsequent accumulation of DNA damage creates mutagenic lesions leading to transformation susceptibility. We show here that APC binds to the nuclear localization sequence of Fen1 (Lys365Lys366Lys367), which prevents entry of Fen1 into the nucleus and participation in Pol-β-directed long-patch BER. We also show that levels of the APC/Fen1 complex are higher in breast tumors than in the surrounding normal tissues. These studies demonstrate a novel role for APC in the suppression of Fen1 activity in the BER pathway and a new biomarker profile to be explored to identify individuals who may be susceptible to the development of mammary and other tumors. PMID:22787431

  4. Wee1 controls genomic stability during replication by regulating the Mus81-Eme1 endonuclease

    PubMed Central

    Domínguez-Kelly, Raquel; Koundrioukoff, Stephane; Tanenbaum, Marvin E.; Smits, Veronique A.J.; Medema, René H.; Debatisse, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    Correct replication of the genome and protection of its integrity are essential for cell survival. In a high-throughput screen studying H2AX phosphorylation, we identified Wee1 as a regulator of genomic stability. Wee1 down-regulation not only induced H2AX phosphorylation but also triggered a general deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damage response (DDR) and caused a block in DNA replication, resulting in accumulation of cells in S phase. Wee1-deficient cells showed a decrease in replication fork speed, demonstrating the involvement of Wee1 in DNA replication. Inhibiting Wee1 in cells treated with short treatment of hydroxyurea enhanced the DDR, which suggests that Wee1 specifically protects the stability of stalled replication forks. Notably, the DDR induced by depletion of Wee1 critically depends on the Mus81-Eme1 endonuclease, and we found that codepletion of Mus81 and Wee1 abrogated the S phase delay. Importantly, Wee1 and Mus81 interact in vivo, suggesting direct regulation. Altogether, these results demonstrate a novel role of Wee1 in controlling Mus81 and DNA replication in human cells. PMID:21859861

  5. Thermodynamics of Damaged DNA Binding and Catalysis by Human AP Endonuclease 1.

    PubMed

    Miroshnikova, A D; Kuznetsova, A A; Kuznetsov, N A; Fedorova, O S

    2016-01-01

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonucleases play an important role in DNA repair and initiation of AP site elimination. One of the most topical problems in the field of DNA repair is to understand the mechanism of the enzymatic process involving the human enzyme APE1 that provides recognition of AP sites and efficient cleavage of the 5'-phosphodiester bond. In this study, a thermodynamic analysis of the interaction between APE1 and a DNA substrate containing a stable AP site analog lacking the C1' hydroxyl group (F site) was performed. Based on stopped-flow kinetic data at different temperatures, the steps of DNA binding, catalysis, and DNA product release were characterized. The changes in the standard Gibbs energy, enthalpy, and entropy of sequential specific steps of the repair process were determined. The thermodynamic analysis of the data suggests that the initial step of the DNA substrate binding includes formation of non-specific contacts between the enzyme binding surface and DNA, as well as insertion of the amino acid residues Arg177 and Met270 into the duplex, which results in the removal of "crystalline" water molecules from DNA grooves. The second binding step involves the F site flipping-out process and formation of specific contacts between the enzyme active site and the everted 5'-phosphate-2'-deoxyribose residue. It was shown that non-specific interactions between the binding surfaces of the enzyme and DNA provide the main contribution into the thermodynamic parameters of the DNA product release step. PMID:27099790

  6. DNA interrogation by the CRISPR RNA-guided endonuclease Cas9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternberg, Samuel H.; Redding, Sy; Jinek, Martin; Greene, Eric C.; Doudna, Jennifer A.

    2014-03-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated enzyme Cas9 is an RNA-guided endonuclease that uses RNA-DNA base-pairing to target foreign DNA in bacteria. Cas9-guide RNA complexes are also effective genome engineering agents in animals and plants. Here we use single-molecule and bulk biochemical experiments to determine how Cas9-RNA interrogates DNA to find specific cleavage sites. We show that both binding and cleavage of DNA by Cas9-RNA require recognition of a short trinucleotide protospacer adjacent motif (PAM). Non-target DNA binding affinity scales with PAM density, and sequences fully complementary to the guide RNA but lacking a nearby PAM are ignored by Cas9-RNA. Competition assays provide evidence that DNA strand separation and RNA-DNA heteroduplex formation initiate at the PAM and proceed directionally towards the distal end of the target sequence. Furthermore, PAM interactions trigger Cas9 catalytic activity. These results reveal how Cas9 uses PAM recognition to quickly identify potential target sites while scanning large DNA molecules, and to regulate scission of double-stranded DNA.

  7. Characterization and genetic mapping of a mutation affecting apurinic endonuclease activity in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed Central

    Tam, J E; Pattee, P A

    1986-01-01

    Protoplast fusion between the Rec- mutant RN981 (L. Wyman, R. V. Goering, and R. P. Novick, Genetics 76:681-702, 1974) of Staphylococcus aureus NCTC 8325 and a Rec+ NCTC 8325 derivative yielded Rec+ recombinants that exhibited the increased sensitivity to N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine characteristic of RN981. Transformation analyses identified a specific mutation, designated ngr-374, that was responsible not only for N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine sensitivity, but also sensitivity to methyl methanesulfonate, ethyl methanesulfonate, nitrous acid, and UV irradiation. However, ngr-374-carrying recombinants showed no significant increase in their sensitivity to mitomycin C or 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide and were unaffected in recombination proficiency. In vitro assays showed that ngr-374-carrying strains had lower apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease activities than the wild type. The chromosomal locus occupied by ngr-374 was shown to exist in the gene order omega(Chr::Tn551)40-ngr-374-thrB106. PMID:2430940

  8. Crystal structure of E. coli endonuclease V, an essential enzyme for deamination repair

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhemin; Jia, Qian; Zhou, Chun; Xie, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Endonuclease V (EndoV) is a ubiquitous protein present in all three kingdoms of life, responsible for the specific cleavages at the second phosphodiester bond 3’ to inosine. E. coli EndoV (EcEndoV) is the first member discovered in the EndoV family. It is a small protein with a compact gene organization, yet with a wide spectrum of substrate specificities. However, the structural basis of its substrate recognition is not well understood. In this study, we determined the 2.4 Å crystal structure of EcEndoV. The enzyme preserves the general ‘RNase H-like motif’ structure. Two subunits are almost fully resolved in the asymmetric unit, but they are not related by any 2-fold axes. Rather, they establish “head-to-shoulder” contacts with loose interactions between each other. Mutational studies show that mutations that disrupt the association mode of the two subunits also decrease the cleavage efficiencies of the enzyme. Further biochemical studies suggest that EcEndoV is able to bind to single-stranded, undamaged DNA substrates without sequence specificity, and forms two types of complexes in a metal-independent manner, which may explain the wide spectrum of substrate specificities of EcEndoV. PMID:26244280

  9. RecA-dependent programmable endonuclease Ref cleaves DNA in two distinct steps.

    PubMed

    Ronayne, Erin A; Cox, Michael M

    2014-04-01

    The bacteriophage P1 recombination enhancement function (Ref) protein is a RecA-dependent programmable endonuclease. Ref targets displacement loops formed when an oligonucleotide is bound by a RecA filament and invades homologous double-stranded DNA sequences. Mechanistic details of this reaction have been explored, revealing that (i) Ref is nickase, cleaving the two target strands of a displacement loop sequentially, (ii) the two strands are cleaved in a prescribed order, with the paired strand cut first and (iii) the two cleavage events have different requirements. Cutting the paired strand is rapid, does not require RecA-mediated ATP hydrolysis and is promoted even by Ref active site variant H153A. The displaced strand is cleaved much more slowly, requires RecA-mediated ATP hydrolysis and does not occur with Ref H153A. The two cleavage events are also affected differently by solution conditions. We postulate that the second cleavage (displaced strand) is limited by some activity of RecA protein.

  10. P1 Ref Endonuclease: A Molecular Mechanism for Phage-Enhanced Antibiotic Lethality.

    PubMed

    Ronayne, Erin A; Wan, Y C Serena; Boudreau, Beth A; Landick, Robert; Cox, Michael M

    2016-01-01

    Ref is an HNH superfamily endonuclease that only cleaves DNA to which RecA protein is bound. The enigmatic physiological function of this unusual enzyme is defined here. Lysogenization by bacteriophage P1 renders E. coli more sensitive to the DNA-damaging antibiotic ciprofloxacin, an example of a phenomenon termed phage-antibiotic synergy (PAS). The complementary effect of phage P1 is uniquely traced to the P1-encoded gene ref. Ref is a P1 function that amplifies the lytic cycle under conditions when the bacterial SOS response is induced due to DNA damage. The effect of Ref is multifaceted. DNA binding by Ref interferes with normal DNA metabolism, and the nuclease activity of Ref enhances genome degradation. Ref also inhibits cell division independently of the SOS response. Ref gene expression is toxic to E. coli in the absence of other P1 functions, both alone and in combination with antibiotics. The RecA proteins of human pathogens Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Staphylococcus aureus serve as cofactors for Ref-mediated DNA cleavage. Ref is especially toxic during the bacterial SOS response and the limited growth of stationary phase cultures, targeting aspects of bacterial physiology that are closely associated with the development of bacterial pathogen persistence.

  11. Human AP Endonuclease 1: A Potential Marker for the Prediction of Environmental Carcinogenesis Risk

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae Sung; Kim, Hye Lim; Kim, Yeo Jin; Weon, Jong-Il; Sung, Mi-Kyung; Chung, Hai Won; Seo, Young Rok

    2014-01-01

    Human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1) functions mainly in DNA repair as an enzyme removing AP sites and in redox signaling as a coactivator of various transcription factors. Based on these multifunctions of APE1 within cells, numerous studies have reported that the alteration of APE1 could be a crucial factor in development of human diseases such as cancer and neurodegeneration. In fact, the study on the combination of an individual's genetic make-up with environmental factors (gene-environment interaction) is of great importance to understand the development of diseases, especially lethal diseases including cancer. Recent reports have suggested that the human carcinogenic risk following exposure to environmental toxicants is affected by APE1 alterations in terms of gene-environment interactions. In this review, we initially outline the critical APE1 functions in the various intracellular mechanisms including DNA repair and redox regulation and its roles in human diseases. Several findings demonstrate that the change in expression and activity as well as genetic variability of APE1 caused by environmental chemical (e.g., heavy metals and cigarette smoke) and physical carcinogens (ultraviolet and ionizing radiation) is likely associated with various cancers. These enable us to ultimately suggest APE1 as a vital marker for the prediction of environmental carcinogenesis risk. PMID:25243052

  12. ChIP-Sequencing to Map the Epigenome of Senescent Cells Using Benzonase Endonuclease.

    PubMed

    Rai, T S; Adams, P D

    2016-01-01

    Cellular senescence is a state of stable cell cycle arrest triggered by diverse stresses. Establishment of senescence occurs in conjunction with a multitude of chromatin changes, which are just beginning to be studied. These chromatin changes are hypothesized to be causative for senescence. Currently, a preferred method to study such changes is chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing (ChIP-Seq). This is usually done by cross-linking the cells with formaldehyde and then generating chromatin fragments between 150 and 300bp by sonication. The DNA replication-independent histone chaperone HIRA plays an important role in control of chromatin in nonproliferating senescent cells. While investigating the role of HIRA in senescence, we found conventional ChIP protocols to be problematic, routinely yielding too low amounts of DNA for sequencing. To overcome these problems we adapted and optimized an alternative ChIP method that does not rely on cross-linking and sonication for chromatin fragmentation, and is able to easily isolate chromatin from senescent cells ready for immunoprecipitation. This method uses Benzonase endonuclease for solubilization of uncross-linked chromatin by digestion of DNA and RNA, in the absence of proteolytic activity. Using this protocol, we were easily able to immunoprecipitate HIRA with sufficient DNA for Illumina sequencing. PMID:27423868

  13. Engineering domain fusion chimeras from I-OnuI family LAGLIDADG homing endonucleases

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Abigail R.; Kuhar, Ryan; Jarjour, Jordan; Kulshina, Nadia; Parmeggiani, Fabio; Danaher, Patrick; Gano, Jacob; Baker, David; Stoddard, Barry L.; Scharenberg, Andrew M.

    2012-01-01

    Although engineered LAGLIDADG homing endonucleases (LHEs) are finding increasing applications in biotechnology, their generation remains a challenging, industrial-scale process. As new single-chain LAGLIDADG nuclease scaffolds are identified, however, an alternative paradigm is emerging: identification of an LHE scaffold whose native cleavage site is a close match to a desired target sequence, followed by small-scale engineering to modestly refine recognition specificity. The application of this paradigm could be accelerated if methods were available for fusing N- and C-terminal domains from newly identified LHEs into chimeric enzymes with hybrid cleavage sites. Here we have analyzed the structural requirements for fusion of domains extracted from six single-chain I-OnuI family LHEs, spanning 40–70% amino acid identity. Our analyses demonstrate that both the LAGLIDADG helical interface residues and the linker peptide composition have important effects on the stability and activity of chimeric enzymes. Using a simple domain fusion method in which linker peptide residues predicted to contact their respective domains are retained, and in which limited variation is introduced into the LAGLIDADG helix and nearby interface residues, catalytically active enzymes were recoverable for ∼70% of domain chimeras. This method will be useful for creating large numbers of chimeric LHEs for genome engineering applications. PMID:22684507

  14. P1 Ref Endonuclease: A Molecular Mechanism for Phage-Enhanced Antibiotic Lethality.

    PubMed

    Ronayne, Erin A; Wan, Y C Serena; Boudreau, Beth A; Landick, Robert; Cox, Michael M

    2016-01-01

    Ref is an HNH superfamily endonuclease that only cleaves DNA to which RecA protein is bound. The enigmatic physiological function of this unusual enzyme is defined here. Lysogenization by bacteriophage P1 renders E. coli more sensitive to the DNA-damaging antibiotic ciprofloxacin, an example of a phenomenon termed phage-antibiotic synergy (PAS). The complementary effect of phage P1 is uniquely traced to the P1-encoded gene ref. Ref is a P1 function that amplifies the lytic cycle under conditions when the bacterial SOS response is induced due to DNA damage. The effect of Ref is multifaceted. DNA binding by Ref interferes with normal DNA metabolism, and the nuclease activity of Ref enhances genome degradation. Ref also inhibits cell division independently of the SOS response. Ref gene expression is toxic to E. coli in the absence of other P1 functions, both alone and in combination with antibiotics. The RecA proteins of human pathogens Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Staphylococcus aureus serve as cofactors for Ref-mediated DNA cleavage. Ref is especially toxic during the bacterial SOS response and the limited growth of stationary phase cultures, targeting aspects of bacterial physiology that are closely associated with the development of bacterial pathogen persistence. PMID:26765929

  15. P1 Ref Endonuclease: A Molecular Mechanism for Phage-Enhanced Antibiotic Lethality

    PubMed Central

    Ronayne, Erin A.; Wan, Y. C. Serena; Boudreau, Beth A.; Landick, Robert; Cox, Michael M.

    2016-01-01

    Ref is an HNH superfamily endonuclease that only cleaves DNA to which RecA protein is bound. The enigmatic physiological function of this unusual enzyme is defined here. Lysogenization by bacteriophage P1 renders E. coli more sensitive to the DNA-damaging antibiotic ciprofloxacin, an example of a phenomenon termed phage-antibiotic synergy (PAS). The complementary effect of phage P1 is uniquely traced to the P1-encoded gene ref. Ref is a P1 function that amplifies the lytic cycle under conditions when the bacterial SOS response is induced due to DNA damage. The effect of Ref is multifaceted. DNA binding by Ref interferes with normal DNA metabolism, and the nuclease activity of Ref enhances genome degradation. Ref also inhibits cell division independently of the SOS response. Ref gene expression is toxic to E. coli in the absence of other P1 functions, both alone and in combination with antibiotics. The RecA proteins of human pathogens Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Staphylococcus aureus serve as cofactors for Ref-mediated DNA cleavage. Ref is especially toxic during the bacterial SOS response and the limited growth of stationary phase cultures, targeting aspects of bacterial physiology that are closely associated with the development of bacterial pathogen persistence. PMID:26765929

  16. Comparative Structural and Functional Analysis of Bunyavirus and Arenavirus Cap-Snatching Endonucleases.

    PubMed

    Reguera, Juan; Gerlach, Piotr; Rosenthal, Maria; Gaudon, Stephanie; Coscia, Francesca; Günther, Stephan; Cusack, Stephen

    2016-06-01

    Segmented negative strand RNA viruses of the arena-, bunya- and orthomyxovirus families uniquely carry out viral mRNA transcription by the cap-snatching mechanism. This involves cleavage of host mRNAs close to their capped 5' end by an endonuclease (EN) domain located in the N-terminal region of the viral polymerase. We present the structure of the cap-snatching EN of Hantaan virus, a bunyavirus belonging to hantavirus genus. Hantaan EN has an active site configuration, including a metal co-ordinating histidine, and nuclease activity similar to the previously reported La Crosse virus and Influenza virus ENs (orthobunyavirus and orthomyxovirus respectively), but is more active in cleaving a double stranded RNA substrate. In contrast, Lassa arenavirus EN has only acidic metal co-ordinating residues. We present three high resolution structures of Lassa virus EN with different bound ion configurations and show in comparative biophysical and biochemical experiments with Hantaan, La Crosse and influenza ENs that the isolated Lassa EN is essentially inactive. The results are discussed in the light of EN activation mechanisms revealed by recent structures of full-length influenza virus polymerase. PMID:27304209

  17. DNA interrogation by the CRISPR RNA-guided endonuclease Cas9

    PubMed Central

    Sternberg, Samuel H.; Redding, Sy; Jinek, Martin; Greene, Eric C.; Doudna, Jennifer A.

    2014-01-01

    The CRISPR-associated enzyme Cas9 is an RNA-guided endonuclease that uses RNA:DNA base-pairing to target foreign DNA in bacteria. Cas9:guide RNA complexes are also effective genome engineering agents in animals and plants. Here we use single-molecule and bulk biochemical experiments to determine how Cas9:RNA interrogates DNA to find specific cleavage sites. We show that both binding and cleavage of DNA by Cas9:RNA require recognition of a short trinucleotide protospacer adjacent motif (PAM). Non-target DNA binding affinity scales with PAM density, and sequences fully complementary to the guide RNA but lacking a nearby PAM are ignored by Cas9:RNA. DNA strand separation and RNA:DNA heteroduplex formation initiate at the PAM and proceed directionally towards the distal end of the target sequence. Furthermore, PAM interactions trigger Cas9 catalytic activity. These results reveal how Cas9 employs PAM recognition to quickly identify potential target sites while scanning large DNA molecules, and to regulate dsDNA scission. PMID:24476820

  18. Suppression of oxidative phosphorylation in mouse embryonic fibroblast cells deficient in apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease

    PubMed Central

    Suganya, Rangaswamy; Chakraborty, Anirban; Miriyala, Sumitra; Hazra, Tapas K.; Izumi, Tadahide

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease 1 (APE1) is an essential DNA repair/gene regulatory protein. Decrease of APE1 in cells by inducible shRNA knockdown or by conditional gene knockout caused apoptosis. Here we succeeded in establishing a unique mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) line expressing APE1 at a level far lower than those achieved with shRNA knockdown. The cells, named MEFla (MEFlowAPE1), were hypersensitive to methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), and showed little activity for repairing AP-sites and MMS induced DNA damage. While these results were consistent with the essential role of APE1 in repair of AP sites, the MEFla cells grew normally and the basal activation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases in MEFla was lower than that in the wild-type MEF (MEFwt), indicating the low DNA damage stress in MEFla under the normal growth condition. Oxidative phosphorylation activity in MEFla was lower than in MEFwt, while the glycolysis rates in MEFla were higher than in MEFwt. In addition, we observed decreased intracellular oxidative stress in MEFla. These results suggest that cells with low APE1 reversibly suppress mitochondrial respiration and thereby reduce DNA damage stress and increases the cell viability. PMID:25645679

  19. Mutations in ERCC4, Encoding the DNA-Repair Endonuclease XPF, Cause Fanconi Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Bogliolo, Massimo; Schuster, Beatrice; Stoepker, Chantal; Derkunt, Burak; Su, Yan; Raams, Anja; Trujillo, Juan P.; Minguillón, Jordi; Ramírez, María J.; Pujol, Roser; Casado, José A.; Baños, Rocío; Rio, Paula; Knies, Kerstin; Zúñiga, Sheila; Benítez, Javier; Bueren, Juan A.; Jaspers, Nicolaas G.J.; Schärer, Orlando D.; de Winter, Johan P.; Schindler, Detlev; Surrallés, Jordi

    2013-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare genomic instability disorder characterized by progressive bone marrow failure and predisposition to cancer. FA-associated gene products are involved in the repair of DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs). Fifteen FA-associated genes have been identified, but the genetic basis in some individuals still remains unresolved. Here, we used whole-exome and Sanger sequencing on DNA of unclassified FA individuals and discovered biallelic germline mutations in ERCC4 (XPF), a structure-specific nuclease-encoding gene previously connected to xeroderma pigmentosum and segmental XFE progeroid syndrome. Genetic reversion and wild-type ERCC4 cDNA complemented the phenotype of the FA cell lines, providing genetic evidence that mutations in ERCC4 cause this FA subtype. Further biochemical and functional analysis demonstrated that the identified FA-causing ERCC4 mutations strongly disrupt the function of XPF in DNA ICL repair without severely compromising nucleotide excision repair. Our data show that depending on the type of ERCC4 mutation and the resulting balance between both DNA repair activities, individuals present with one of the three clinically distinct disorders, highlighting the multifunctional nature of the XPF endonuclease in genome stability and human disease. PMID:23623386

  20. Suppression of oxidative phosphorylation in mouse embryonic fibroblast cells deficient in apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease.

    PubMed

    Suganya, Rangaswamy; Chakraborty, Anirban; Miriyala, Sumitra; Hazra, Tapas K; Izumi, Tadahide

    2015-03-01

    The mammalian apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease 1 (APE1) is an essential DNA repair/gene regulatory protein. Decrease of APE1 in cells by inducible shRNA knockdown or by conditional gene knockout caused apoptosis. Here we succeeded in establishing a unique mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) line expressing APE1 at a level far lower than those achieved with shRNA knockdown. The cells, named MEF(la) (MEF(lowAPE1)), were hypersensitive to methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), and showed little activity for repairing AP-sites and MMS induced DNA damage. While these results were consistent with the essential role of APE1 in repair of AP sites, the MEF(la) cells grew normally and the basal activation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases in MEF(la) was lower than that in the wild-type MEF (MEF(wt)), indicating the low DNA damage stress in MEF(la) under the normal growth condition. Oxidative phosphorylation activity in MEF(la) was lower than in MEF(wt), while the glycolysis rates in MEF(la) were higher than in MEF(wt). In addition, we observed decreased intracellular oxidative stress in MEF(la). These results suggest that cells with low APE1 reversibly suppress mitochondrial respiration and thereby reduce DNA damage stress and increases the cell viability.

  1. Comparative Structural and Functional Analysis of Bunyavirus and Arenavirus Cap-Snatching Endonucleases

    PubMed Central

    Reguera, Juan; Gerlach, Piotr; Rosenthal, Maria; Gaudon, Stephanie; Coscia, Francesca; Günther, Stephan; Cusack, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Segmented negative strand RNA viruses of the arena-, bunya- and orthomyxovirus families uniquely carry out viral mRNA transcription by the cap-snatching mechanism. This involves cleavage of host mRNAs close to their capped 5′ end by an endonuclease (EN) domain located in the N-terminal region of the viral polymerase. We present the structure of the cap-snatching EN of Hantaan virus, a bunyavirus belonging to hantavirus genus. Hantaan EN has an active site configuration, including a metal co-ordinating histidine, and nuclease activity similar to the previously reported La Crosse virus and Influenza virus ENs (orthobunyavirus and orthomyxovirus respectively), but is more active in cleaving a double stranded RNA substrate. In contrast, Lassa arenavirus EN has only acidic metal co-ordinating residues. We present three high resolution structures of Lassa virus EN with different bound ion configurations and show in comparative biophysical and biochemical experiments with Hantaan, La Crosse and influenza ENs that the isolated Lassa EN is essentially inactive. The results are discussed in the light of EN activation mechanisms revealed by recent structures of full-length influenza virus polymerase. PMID:27304209

  2. Complementary non-radioactive assays for investigation of human flap endonuclease 1 activity

    PubMed Central

    Dorjsuren, Dorjbal; Kim, Daemyung; Maloney, David J.; Wilson, David M.; Simeonov, Anton

    2011-01-01

    FEN1, a key participant in DNA replication and repair, is the major human flap endonuclease that recognizes and cleaves flap DNA structures. Deficiencies in FEN1 function or deletion of the fen1 gene have profound biological effects, including the suppression of repair of DNA damage incurred from the action of various genotoxic agents. Given the importance of FEN1 in resolving abnormal DNA structures, inhibitors of the enzyme carry a potential as enhancers of DNA-interactive anticancer drugs. To facilitate the studies of FEN1 activity and the search for novel inhibitors, we developed a pair of complementary-readout homogeneous assays utilizing fluorogenic donor/quencher and AlphaScreen chemiluminescence strategies. A previously reported FEN1 inhibitor 3-hydroxy-5-methyl-1-phenylthieno[2,3-d]pyrimidine-2,4(1H,3H)-dione displayed equal potency in the new assays, in agreement with its published IC50. The assays were optimized to a low 4 µl volume and used to investigate a set of small molecules, leading to the identification of previously-unreported FEN1 inhibitors, among which aurintricarboxylic acid and NSC-13755 (an arylstibonic derivative) displayed submicromolar potency (average IC50 of 0.59 and 0.93 µM, respectively). The availability of these simple complementary assays obviates the need for undesirable radiotracer-based assays and should facilitate efforts to develop novel inhibitors for this key biological target. PMID:21062821

  3. Screening for mutations by enzyme mismatch cleavage with T4 endonuclease VII.

    PubMed Central

    Youil, R; Kemper, B W; Cotton, R G

    1995-01-01

    Each of four possible sets of mismatches (G.A/C.T, C.C/G.G, A.A/T.T, and C.A/G.T) containing the 8 possible single-base-pair mismatches derived from isolated mutations were examined to test the ability of T4 endonuclease VII to consistently detect mismatches in heteroduplexes. At least two examples of each set of mismatches were studied for cleavage in the complementary pairs of heteroduplexes formed between normal and mutant DNA. Four deletion mutations were also included in this study. The various PCR-derived products used in the formation of heteroduplexes ranged from 133 to 1502 bp. At least one example of each set showed cleavage of at least one strand containing a mismatch. Cleavage of at least one strand of the pairs of heteroduplexes occurred in 17 of the 18 known single-base-pair mutations tested, with an A.A/T.T set not being cleaved in any mismatched strand. We propose that this method may be effective in detecting and positioning almost all mutational changes when DNA is screened for mutations. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7816853

  4. Dietary Restriction and Nutrient Balance in Aging

    PubMed Central

    Leitão-Correia, Fernanda

    2016-01-01

    Dietary regimens that favour reduced calorie intake delay aging and age-associated diseases. New evidences revealed that nutritional balance of dietary components without food restriction increases lifespan. Particular nutrients as several nitrogen sources, proteins, amino acid, and ammonium are implicated in life and healthspan regulation in different model organisms from yeast to mammals. Aging and dietary restriction interact through partially overlapping mechanisms in the activation of the conserved nutrient-signalling pathways, mainly the insulin/insulin-like growth factor (IIS) and the Target Of Rapamycin (TOR). The specific nutrients of dietary regimens, their balance, and how they interact with different genes and pathways are currently being uncovered. Taking into account that dietary regimes can largely influence overall human health and changes in risk factors such as cholesterol level and blood pressure, these new findings are of great importance to fully comprehend the interplay between diet and humans health. PMID:26682004

  5. Gene expression in the DpnI and DpnII restriction enzyme systems of Streptococcus pneumoniae

    SciTech Connect

    Lacks, S.A.; Sabelnikov, A.G.; Chen, Jau-Der; Greenberg, B.

    1992-12-31

    Although a number of bacterial species are naturally transformable, that is, their cells are able to take up external DNA in substantial amounts and integrate it into the chromosome without artificial manipulation of the cell surface, Streptococcus pneumoniae, the first species in which this phenomenon was detected, remains a prototype of such transformation. Cells of S. pneumonias also contain potent restriction endonucleases able to severely restrict DNA introduced during viral infection. Our current understanding of the genetic basis of the complementary DpnI and DpnII restriction systems and of the biochemistry of their component enzymes are briefly reviewed. The manner in which these enzymes impinge on the transfer of chromosomal genes and of plasmeds will be examined in detail. It will be seen that far from acting against foreign DNA in general, the restriction systems seem to be designed to exclude only infecting viral DNA The presence of complementary restriction systems in different cells of S. pneumonias enhances their effectiveness in blocking viral infection and promoting species survival. This enhanced effectiveness requires the expression of alternative restriction systems. Therefore, the ability of the cells to transfer the restriction enzyme genes and to regulate their expression are important for survival of the species.

  6. Translocation-coupled DNA cleavage by the Type ISP restriction-modification enzymes.

    PubMed

    Chand, Mahesh K; Nirwan, Neha; Diffin, Fiona M; van Aelst, Kara; Kulkarni, Manasi; Pernstich, Christian; Szczelkun, Mark D; Saikrishnan, Kayarat

    2015-11-01

    Production of endonucleolytic double-strand DNA breaks requires separate strand cleavage events. Although catalytic mechanisms for simple, dimeric endonucleases are known, there are many complex nuclease machines that are poorly understood. Here we studied the single polypeptide Type ISP restriction-modification (RM) enzymes, which cleave random DNA between distant target sites when two enzymes collide after convergent ATP-driven translocation. We report the 2.7-Å resolution X-ray crystal structure of a Type ISP enzyme-DNA complex, revealing that both the helicase-like ATPase and nuclease are located upstream of the direction of translocation, an observation inconsistent with simple nuclease-domain dimerization. Using single-molecule and biochemical techniques, we demonstrate that each ATPase remodels its DNA-protein complex and translocates along DNA without looping it, leading to a collision complex in which the nuclease domains are distal. Sequencing of the products of single cleavage events suggests a previously undescribed endonuclease model, where multiple, stochastic strand-nicking events combine to produce DNA scission.

  7. Translocation-coupled DNA cleavage by the Type ISP restriction-modification enzymes.

    PubMed

    Chand, Mahesh K; Nirwan, Neha; Diffin, Fiona M; van Aelst, Kara; Kulkarni, Manasi; Pernstich, Christian; Szczelkun, Mark D; Saikrishnan, Kayarat

    2015-11-01

    Production of endonucleolytic double-strand DNA breaks requires separate strand cleavage events. Although catalytic mechanisms for simple, dimeric endonucleases are known, there are many complex nuclease machines that are poorly understood. Here we studied the single polypeptide Type ISP restriction-modification (RM) enzymes, which cleave random DNA between distant target sites when two enzymes collide after convergent ATP-driven translocation. We report the 2.7-Å resolution X-ray crystal structure of a Type ISP enzyme-DNA complex, revealing that both the helicase-like ATPase and nuclease are located upstream of the direction of translocation, an observation inconsistent with simple nuclease-domain dimerization. Using single-molecule and biochemical techniques, we demonstrate that each ATPase remodels its DNA-protein complex and translocates along DNA without looping it, leading to a collision complex in which the nuclease domains are distal. Sequencing of the products of single cleavage events suggests a previously undescribed endonuclease model, where multiple, stochastic strand-nicking events combine to produce DNA scission. PMID:26389736

  8. Type II restriction endonucleases—a historical perspective and more

    PubMed Central

    Pingoud, Alfred; Wilson, Geoffrey G.; Wende, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    This article continues the series of Surveys and Summaries on restriction endonucleases (REases) begun this year in Nucleic Acids Research. Here we discuss ‘Type II’ REases, the kind used for DNA analysis and cloning. We focus on their biochemistry: what they are, what they do, and how they do it. Type II REases are produced by prokaryotes to combat bacteriophages. With extreme accuracy, each recognizes a particular sequence in double-stranded DNA and cleaves at a fixed position within or nearby. The discoveries of these enzymes in the 1970s, and of the uses to which they could be put, have since impacted every corner of the life sciences. They became the enabling tools of molecular biology, genetics and biotechnology, and made analysis at the most fundamental levels routine. Hundreds of different REases have been discovered and are available commercially. Their genes have been cloned, sequenced and overexpressed. Most have been characterized to some extent, but few have been studied in depth. Here, we describe the original discoveries in this field, and the properties of the first Type II REases investigated. We discuss the mechanisms of sequence recognition and catalysis, and the varied oligomeric modes in which Type II REases act. We describe the surprising heterogeneity revealed by comparisons of their sequences and structures. PMID:24878924

  9. DNA cleavage by Type ISP Restriction-Modification enzymes is initially targeted to the 3'-5' strand.

    PubMed

    van Aelst, Kara; Šišáková, Eva; Szczelkun, Mark D

    2013-01-01

    The mechanism by which a double-stranded DNA break is produced following collision of two translocating Type I Restriction-Modification enzymes is not fully understood. Here, we demonstrate that the related Type ISP Restriction-Modification enzymes LlaGI and LlaBIII can cooperate to cleave DNA following convergent translocation and collision. When one of these enzymes is a mutant protein that lacks endonuclease activity, DNA cleavage of the 3'-5' strand relative to the wild-type enzyme still occurs, with the same kinetics and at the same collision loci as for a reaction between two wild-type enzymes. The DNA nicking activity of the wild-type enzyme is still activated by a protein variant entirely lacking the Mrr nuclease domain and by a helicase mutant that cannot translocate. However, the helicase mutant cannot cleave the DNA despite the presence of an intact nuclease domain. Cleavage by the wild-type enzyme is not activated by unrelated protein roadblocks. We suggest that the nuclease activity of the Type ISP enzymes is activated following collision with another Type ISP enzyme and requires adenosine triphosphate binding/hydrolysis but, surprisingly, does not require interaction between the nuclease domains. Following the initial rapid endonuclease activity, additional DNA cleavage events then occur more slowly, leading to further processing of the initial double-stranded DNA break.

  10. Expression and purification of the modification-dependent restriction enzyme BisI and its homologous enzymes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shuang-Yong; Klein, Pernelle; Degtyarev, Sergey Kh; Roberts, Richard J

    2016-06-29

    The methylation-dependent restriction endonuclease (REase) BisI (G(m5)C ↓ NGC) is found in Bacillus subtilis T30. We expressed and purified the BisI endonuclease and 34 BisI homologs identified in bacterial genomes. 23 of these BisI homologs are active based on digestion of (m5)C-modified substrates. Two major specificities were found among these BisI family enzymes: Group I enzymes cut GCNGC containing two to four (m5)C in the two strands, or hemi-methylated sites containing two (m5)C in one strand; Group II enzymes only cut GCNGC sites containing three to four (m5)C, while one enzyme requires all four cytosines to be modified for cleavage. Another homolog, Esp638I cleaves GCS ↓ SGC (relaxed specificity RCN ↓ NGY, containing at least four (m5)C). Two BisI homologs show degenerate specificity cleaving unmodified DNA. Many homologs are small proteins ranging from 150 to 190 amino acid (aa) residues, but some homologs associated with mobile genetic elements are larger and contain an extra C-terminal domain. More than 156 BisI homologs are found in >60 bacterial genera, indicating that these enzymes are widespread in bacteria. They may play an important biological function in restricting pre-modified phage DNA.

  11. Expression and purification of the modification-dependent restriction enzyme BisI and its homologous enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shuang-yong; Klein, Pernelle; Degtyarev, Sergey Kh.; Roberts, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    The methylation-dependent restriction endonuclease (REase) BisI (Gm5C ↓ NGC) is found in Bacillus subtilis T30. We expressed and purified the BisI endonuclease and 34 BisI homologs identified in bacterial genomes. 23 of these BisI homologs are active based on digestion of m5C-modified substrates. Two major specificities were found among these BisI family enzymes: Group I enzymes cut GCNGC containing two to four m5C in the two strands, or hemi-methylated sites containing two m5C in one strand; Group II enzymes only cut GCNGC sites containing three to four m5C, while one enzyme requires all four cytosines to be modified for cleavage. Another homolog, Esp638I cleaves GCS ↓ SGC (relaxed specificity RCN ↓ NGY, containing at least four m5C). Two BisI homologs show degenerate specificity cleaving unmodified DNA. Many homologs are small proteins ranging from 150 to 190 amino acid (aa) residues, but some homologs associated with mobile genetic elements are larger and contain an extra C-terminal domain. More than 156 BisI homologs are found in >60 bacterial genera, indicating that these enzymes are widespread in bacteria. They may play an important biological function in restricting pre-modified phage DNA. PMID:27353146

  12. Characterization of unrelated strains of Staphylococcus schleiferi by using ribosomal DNA fingerprinting, DNA restriction patterns, and plasmid profiles.

    PubMed Central

    Grattard, F; Etienne, J; Pozzetto, B; Tardy, F; Gaudin, O G; Fleurette, J

    1993-01-01

    The molecular characteristics of 31 unrelated strains of Staphylococcus schleiferi isolated from 13 hospitals between 1973 and 1991 were determined by ribosomal DNA fingerprinting by using a digoxigenin-labeled DNA probe, genomic DNA restriction patterns, and plasmid profiles. Only six strains harbored one or two plasmids. DNA restriction analysis, which was carried out with five endonucleases (EcoRI, HindIII, PstI, PvuII, and ClaI), did not allow us to discriminate between isolates. Ribotyping with HindIII, ClaI, or EcoRI enzymes generated six, seven, and nine distinct patterns, respectively. With the combination ClaI-EcoRI, 13 ribotypes were obtained among the 31 strains, suggesting a relative heterogeneity within the species. Moreover, all strains shared two or three common bands, according to the endonuclease used, which were relatively specific for S. schleiferi in comparison with the ribosomal banding patterns described for other coagulase-negative staphylococci. These results illustrate that ribotyping can be used for the epidemiological investigation of S. schleiferi isolates and possibly for taxonomic analysis in this species. Images PMID:8385149

  13. Stochastic induction of persister cells by HipA through (p)ppGpp-mediated activation of mRNA endonucleases.

    PubMed

    Germain, Elsa; Roghanian, Mohammad; Gerdes, Kenn; Maisonneuve, Etienne

    2015-04-21

    The model organism Escherichia coli codes for at least 11 type II toxin-antitoxin (TA) modules, all implicated in bacterial persistence (multidrug tolerance). Ten of these encode messenger RNA endonucleases (mRNases) inhibiting translation by catalytic degradation of mRNA, and the 11th module, hipBA, encodes HipA (high persister protein A) kinase, which inhibits glutamyl tRNA synthetase (GltX). In turn, inhibition of GltX inhibits translation and induces the stringent response and persistence. Previously, we presented strong support for a model proposing (p)ppGpp (guanosine tetra and penta-phosphate) as the master regulator of persistence. Stochastic variation of [(p)ppGpp] in single cells induced TA-encoded mRNases via a pathway involving polyphosphate and Lon protease. Polyphosphate activated Lon to degrade all known type II antitoxins of E. coli. In turn, the activated mRNases induced persistence and multidrug tolerance. However, even though it was known that activation of HipA stimulated (p)ppGpp synthesis, our model did not explain how hipBA induced persistence. Here we show that, in support of and consistent with our initial model, HipA-induced persistence depends not only on (p)ppGpp but also on the 10 mRNase-encoding TA modules, Lon protease, and polyphosphate. Importantly, observations with single cells convincingly show that the high level of (p)ppGpp caused by activation of HipA does not induce persistence in the absence of TA-encoded mRNases. Thus, slow growth per se does not induce persistence in the absence of TA-encoded toxins, placing these genes as central effectors of bacterial persistence.

  14. Expression of the ctenophore Brain Factor 1 forkhead gene ortholog (ctenoBF-1) mRNA is restricted to the presumptive mouth and feeding apparatus: implications for axial organization in the Metazoa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamada, Atsuko; Martindale, Mark Q.

    2002-01-01

    Ctenophores are thoroughly modern animals whose ancestors are derived from a separate evolutionary branch than that of other eumetazoans. Their major longitudinal body axis is the oral-aboral axis. An apical sense organ, called the apical organ, is located at the aboral pole and contains a highly innervated statocyst and photodetecting cells. The apical organ integrates sensory information and controls the locomotory apparatus of ctenophores, the eight longitudinal rows of ctene/comb plates. In an effort to understand the developmental and evolutionary organization of axial properties of ctenophores we have isolated a forkhead gene from the Brain Factor 1 (BF-1) family. This gene, ctenoBF-1, is the first full-length nuclear gene reported from ctenophores. This makes ctenophores the most basal metazoan (to date) known to express definitive forkhead class transcription factors. Orthologs of BF-1 in vertebrates, Drosophila, and Caenorhabditis elegans are expressed in anterior neural structures. Surprisingly, in situ hybridizations with ctenoBF-1 antisense riboprobes show that this gene is not expressed in the apical organ of ctenophores. CtenoBF-1 is expressed prior to first cleavage. Transcripts become localized to the aboral pole by the 8-cell stage and are inherited by ectodermal micromeres generated from this region at the 16- and 32-cell stages. Expression in subsets of these cells persists and is seen around the edge of the blastopore (presumptive mouth) and in distinct ectodermal regions along the tentacular poles. Following gastrulation, stomodeal expression begins to fade and intense staining becomes restricted to two distinct domains in each tentacular feeding apparatus. We suggest that the apical organ is not homologous to the brain of bilaterians but that the oral pole of ctenophores corresponds to the anterior pole of bilaterian animals.

  15. Conformational Transitions in Human AP Endonuclease 1 and Its Active Site Mutant during Abasic Site Repair†

    PubMed Central

    Kanazhevskaya, Lyubov Yu.; Koval, Vladimir V.; Zharkov, Dmitry O.; Strauss, Phyllis R.; Fedorova, Olga S.

    2010-01-01

    AP endonuclease 1 (APE 1) is a crucial enzyme of the base excision repair pathway (BER) in human cells. APE1 recognizes apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites and makes a nick in the phosphodiester backbone 5′ to them. The conformational dynamics and presteady-state kinetics of wild-type APE1 and its active site mutant, Y171F-P173L-N174K, have been studied. To observe conformational transitions occurring in the APE1 molecule during the catalytic cycle, we detected intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence of the enzyme under single turnover conditions. DNA duplexes containing a natural AP site, its tetrahydrofuran analogue, or a 2′-deoxyguanosine residue in the same position were used as specific substrates or ligands. The stopped-flow experiments have revealed high flexibility of the APE1 molecule and the complexity of the catalytic process. The fluorescent traces indicate that wild-type APE1 undergoes at least four conformational transitions during the processing of abasic sites in DNA. In contrast, nonspecific interactions of APE1 with undamaged DNA can be described by a two-step kinetic scheme. Rate and equilibrium constants were extracted from the stopped-flow and fluorescence titration data for all substrates, ligands, and products. A replacement of three residues at the enzymatic active site including the replacement of tyrosine 171 with phenylalanine in the enzyme active site resulted in a 2 × 104-fold decrease in the reaction rate and reduced binding affinity. Our data indicate the important role of conformational changes in APE1 for substrate recognition and catalysis. PMID:20575528

  16. AP endonuclease knockdown enhances methyl methanesulfonate hypersensitivity of DNA polymerase β knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Ryohei; Umetsu, Makio; Yamamoto, Mizuki; Matsuyama, Satoshi; Takenaka, Shigeo; Ide, Hiroshi; Kubo, Kihei

    2015-05-01

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease (Apex) is required for base excision repair (BER), which is the major mechanism of repair for small DNA lesions such as alkylated bases. Apex incises the DNA strand at an AP site to leave 3'-OH and 5'-deoxyribose phosphate (5'-dRp) termini. DNA polymerase β (PolB) plays a dominant role in single nucleotide (Sn-) BER by incorporating a nucleotide and removing 5'-dRp. Methyl methanesulfonate (MMS)-induced damage is repaired by Sn-BER, and thus mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) deficient in PolB show significantly increased sensitivity to MMS. However, the survival curve for PolB-knockout MEFs (PolBKOs) has a shoulder, and increased sensitivity is only apparent at relatively high MMS concentrations. In this study, we prepared Apex-knockdown/PolB-knockout MEFs (AKDBKOs) to examine whether BER is related to the apparent resistance of PolBKOs at low MMS concentrations. The viability of PolBKOs immediately after MMS treatment was significantly lower than that of wild-type MEFs, but there was essentially no effect of Apex-knockdown on cell viability in the presence or absence of PolB. In contrast, relative counts of MEFs after repair were decreased by Apex knockdown. Parental PolBKOs showed especially high sensitivity at >1.5 mM MMS, suggesting that PolBKOs have another repair mechanism in addition to PolB-dependent Sn-BER, and that the back-up mechanism is unable to repair damage induced by high MMS concentrations. Interestingly, AKDBKOs were hypersensitive to MMS in a relative cell growth assay, suggesting that MMS-induced damage in PolB-knockout MEFs is repaired by Apex-dependent repair mechanisms, presumably including long-patch BER.

  17. Coordination of MYH DNA glycosylase and APE1 endonuclease activities via physical interactions

    PubMed Central

    Luncsford, Paz J.; Manvilla, Brittney A.; Patterson, Dimeka N.; Malik, Shuja S.; Jin, Jin; Hwang, Bor-Jang; Gunther, Randall; Kalvakolanu, Snigdha; Lipinski, Leonora J.; Yuan, Weirong; Lu, Wuyuan; Drohat, Alexander C.; Lu-Chang, A-Lien; Toth, Eric A.

    2013-01-01

    MutY homologue (MYH) is a DNA glycosylase which excises adenine paired with the oxidative lesion 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG, or G°) during base excision repair (BER). Base excision by MYH results in an apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) site in the DNA where the DNA sugar-phosphate backbone remains intact. A key feature of MYH activity is its physical interaction and coordination with AP endonuclease I (APE1), which subsequently nicks DNA 5' to the AP site. Because AP sites are mutagenic and cytotoxic, they must be processed by APE1 immediately after the action of MYH glycosylase. Our recent reports show that the interdomain connector (IDC) of human MYH (hMYH) maintains interactions with hAPE1 and the human checkpoint clamp Rad9-Rad1-Hus1 (9-1-1) complex. In this study, we used NMR chemical shift perturbation experiments to determine hMYH-binding site on hAPE1. Chemical shift perturbations indicate that the hMYH IDC peptide binds to the DNA-binding site of hAPE1 and an additional site which is distal to the APE1 DNA-binding interface. In these two binding sites, N212 and Q137 of hAPE1 are key mediators of the MYH/APE1 interaction. Intriguingly, despite the fact that hHus1 and hAPE1 both interact with the MYH IDC, hHus1 does not compete with hAPE1 for binding to hMYH. Rather, hHus1 stabilizes the hMYH/hAPE1 complex both in vitro and in cells. This is consistent with a common theme in BER, namely that the assembly of protein-DNA complexes enhances repair by efficiently coordinating multiple enzymatic steps while simultaneously minimizing the release of harmful repair intermediates. PMID:24209961

  18. Optimising homing endonuclease gene drive performance in a semi-refractory species: the Drosophila melanogaster experience.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yuk-Sang; Huen, David S; Glauert, Ruth; Whiteway, Eleanor; Russell, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Homing endonuclease gene (HEG) drive is a promising insect population control technique that employs meganucleases to impair the fitness of pest populations. Our previous studies showed that HEG drive was more difficult to achieve in Drosophila melanogaster than Anopheles gambiae and we therefore investigated ways of improving homing performance in Drosophila. We show that homing in Drosophila responds to increased expression of HEGs specifically during the spermatogonia stage and this could be achieved through improved construct design. We found that 3'-UTR choice was important to maximise expression levels, with HEG activity increasing as we employed Hsp70, SV40, vasa and βTub56D derived UTRs. We also searched for spermatogonium-specific promoters and found that the Rcd-1r promoter was able to drive specific expression at this stage. Since Rcd-1 is a regulator of differentiation in other species, it suggests that Rcd-1r may serve a similar role during spermatogonial differentiation in Drosophila. Contrary to expectations, a fragment containing the entire region between the TBPH gene and the bgcn translational start drove strong HEG expression only during late spermatogenesis rather than in the germline stem cells and spermatogonia as expected. We also observed that the fraction of targets undergoing homing was temperature-sensitive, falling nearly four-fold when the temperature was lowered to 18°C. Taken together, this study demonstrates how a few simple measures can lead to substantial improvements in the HEG-based gene drive strategy and reinforce the idea that the HEG approach may be widely applicable to a variety of insect control programs.

  19. DNA and Protein Requirements for Substrate Conformational Changes Necessary for Human Flap Endonuclease-1-catalyzed Reaction.

    PubMed

    Algasaier, Sana I; Exell, Jack C; Bennet, Ian A; Thompson, Mark J; Gotham, Victoria J B; Shaw, Steven J; Craggs, Timothy D; Finger, L David; Grasby, Jane A

    2016-04-01

    Human flap endonuclease-1 (hFEN1) catalyzes the essential removal of single-stranded flaps arising at DNA junctions during replication and repair processes. hFEN1 biological function must be precisely controlled, and consequently, the protein relies on a combination of protein and substrate conformational changes as a prerequisite for reaction. These include substrate bending at the duplex-duplex junction and transfer of unpaired reacting duplex end into the active site. When present, 5'-flaps are thought to thread under the helical cap, limiting reaction to flaps with free 5'-terminiin vivo Here we monitored DNA bending by FRET and DNA unpairing using 2-aminopurine exciton pair CD to determine the DNA and protein requirements for these substrate conformational changes. Binding of DNA to hFEN1 in a bent conformation occurred independently of 5'-flap accommodation and did not require active site metal ions or the presence of conserved active site residues. More stringent requirements exist for transfer of the substrate to the active site. Placement of the scissile phosphate diester in the active site required the presence of divalent metal ions, a free 5'-flap (if present), a Watson-Crick base pair at the terminus of the reacting duplex, and the intact secondary structure of the enzyme helical cap. Optimal positioning of the scissile phosphate additionally required active site conserved residues Tyr(40), Asp(181), and Arg(100)and a reacting duplex 5'-phosphate. These studies suggest a FEN1 reaction mechanism where junctions are bound and 5'-flaps are threaded (when present), and finally the substrate is transferred onto active site metals initiating cleavage.

  20. Thermodynamics of Damaged DNA Binding and Catalysis by Human AP Endonuclease 1

    PubMed Central

    Miroshnikova, A. D.; Kuznetsova, A. A.; Kuznetsov, N. A.; Fedorova, O. S.

    2016-01-01

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonucleases play an important role in DNA repair and initiation of AP site elimination. One of the most topical problems in the field of DNA repair is to understand the mechanism of the enzymatic process involving the human enzyme APE1 that provides recognition of AP sites and efficient cleavage of the 5’-phosphodiester bond. In this study, a thermodynamic analysis of the interaction between APE1 and a DNA substrate containing a stable AP site analog lacking the C1’ hydroxyl group (F site) was performed. Based on stopped-flow kinetic data at different temperatures, the steps of DNA binding, catalysis, and DNA product release were characterized. The changes in the standard Gibbs energy, enthalpy, and entropy of sequential specific steps of the repair process were determined. The thermodynamic analysis of the data suggests that the initial step of the DNA substrate binding includes formation of non-specific contacts between the enzyme binding surface and DNA, as well as insertion of the amino acid residues Arg177 and Met270 into the duplex, which results in the removal of “crystalline” water molecules from DNA grooves. The second binding step involves the F site flipping-out process and formation of specific contacts between the enzyme active site and the everted 5’-phosphate-2’-deoxyribose residue. It was shown that non-specific interactions between the binding surfaces of the enzyme and DNA provide the main contribution into the thermodynamic parameters of the DNA product release step. PMID:27099790

  1. Autophagy as a Survival Mechanism for Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cells in Endonuclease G-Mediated Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Masui, Atsushi; Hamada, Masakazu; Kameyama, Hiroyasu; Wakabayashi, Ken; Takasu, Ayako; Imai, Tomoaki; Iwai, Soichi; Yura, Yoshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Safingol, L- threo-dihydrosphingosine, induces cell death in human oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) cells through an endonuclease G (endoG) -mediated pathway. We herein determined whether safingol induced apoptosis and autophagy in oral SCC cells. Safingol induced apoptotic cell death in oral SCC cells in a dose-dependent manner. In safingol-treated cells, microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3)-I was changed to LC3-II and the cytoplasmic expression of LC3, amount of acidic vesicular organelles (AVOs) stained by acridine orange and autophagic vacuoles were increased, indicating the occurrence of autophagy. An inhibitor of autophagy, 3-methyladenine (3-MA), enhanced the suppressive effects of safingol on cell viability, and this was accompanied by an increase in the number of apoptotic cells and extent of nuclear fragmentation. The nuclear translocation of endoG was minimal at a low concentration of safingol, but markedly increased when combined with 3-MA. The suppressive effects of safingol and 3-MA on cell viability were reduced in endoG siRNA- transfected cells. The scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS) prevented cell death induced by the combinational treatment, whereas a pretreatment with a pan-caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk did not. These results indicated that safingol induced apoptosis and autophagy in SCC cells and that the suppression of autophagy by 3-MA enhanced apoptosis. Autophagy supports cell survival, but not cell death in the SCC cell system in which apoptosis occurs in an endoG-mediated manner. PMID:27658240

  2. Structural basis of nuclear import of flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1).

    PubMed

    de Barros, Andrea C; Takeda, Agnes A S; Chang, Chiung Wen; Kobe, Boštjan; Fontes, Marcos R M

    2012-07-01

    Flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1) is a member of the nuclease family and is structurally conserved from bacteriophages to humans. This protein is involved in multiple DNA-processing pathways, including Okazaki fragment maturation, stalled replication-fork rescue, telomere maintenance, long-patch base-excision repair and apoptotic DNA fragmentation. FEN1 has three functional motifs that are responsible for its nuclease, PCNA-interaction and nuclear localization activities, respectively. It has been shown that the C-terminal nuclear localization sequence (NLS) facilitates nuclear localization of the enzyme during the S phase of the cell cycle and in response to DNA damage. To determine the structural basis of the recognition of FEN1 by the nuclear import receptor importin α, the crystal structure of the complex of importin α with a peptide corresponding to the FEN1 NLS was solved. Structural studies confirmed the binding of the FEN1 NLS as a classical bipartite NLS; however, in contrast to the previously proposed (354)KRKX(8)KKK(367) sequence, it is the (354)KRX(10)KKAK(369) sequence that binds to importin α. This result explains the incomplete inhibition of localization that was observed on mutating residues (365)KKK(367). Acidic and polar residues in the X(10) linker region close to the basic clusters play an important role in binding to importin α. These results suggest that the basic residues in the N-terminal basic cluster of bipartite NLSs may play roles that are more critical than those of the many basic residues in the C-terminal basic cluster.

  3. Proline Scanning Mutagenesis Reveals a Role for the Flap Endonuclease-1 Helical Cap in Substrate Unpairing*

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Nikesh; Exell, Jack C.; Jardine, Emma; Ombler, Ben; Finger, L. David; Ciani, Barbara; Grasby, Jane A.

    2013-01-01

    The prototypical 5′-nuclease, flap endonuclease-1 (FEN1), catalyzes the essential removal of single-stranded flaps during DNA replication and repair. FEN1 hydrolyzes a specific phosphodiester bond one nucleotide into double-stranded DNA. This specificity arises from double nucleotide unpairing that places the scissile phosphate diester on active site divalent metal ions. Also related to FEN1 specificity is the helical arch, through which 5′-flaps, but not continuous DNAs, can thread. The arch contains basic residues (Lys-93 and Arg-100 in human FEN1 (hFEN1)) that are conserved by all 5′-nucleases and a cap region only present in enzymes that process DNAs with 5′ termini. Proline mutations (L97P, L111P, L130P) were introduced into the hFEN1 helical arch. Each mutation was severely detrimental to reaction. However, all proteins were at least as stable as wild-type (WT) hFEN1 and bound substrate with comparable affinity. Moreover, all mutants produced complexes with 5′-biotinylated substrate that, when captured with streptavidin, were resistant to challenge with competitor DNA. Removal of both conserved basic residues (K93A/R100A) was no more detrimental to reaction than the single mutation R100A, but much less severe than L97P. The ability of protein-Ca2+ to rearrange 2-aminopurine-containing substrates was monitored by low energy CD. Although L97P and K93A/R100A retained the ability to unpair substrates, the cap mutants L111P and L130P did not. Taken together, these data challenge current assumptions related to 5′-nuclease family mechanism. Conserved basic amino acids are not required for double nucleotide unpairing and appear to act cooperatively, whereas the helical cap plays an unexpected role in hFEN1-substrate rearrangement. PMID:24126913

  4. DNA and Protein Requirements for Substrate Conformational Changes Necessary for Human Flap Endonuclease-1-catalyzed Reaction*

    PubMed Central

    Algasaier, Sana I.; Exell, Jack C.; Bennet, Ian A.; Thompson, Mark J.; Gotham, Victoria J. B.; Shaw, Steven J.; Craggs, Timothy D.; Finger, L. David; Grasby, Jane A.

    2016-01-01

    Human flap endonuclease-1 (hFEN1) catalyzes the essential removal of single-stranded flaps arising at DNA junctions during replication and repair processes. hFEN1 biological function must be precisely controlled, and consequently, the protein relies on a combination of protein and substrate conformational changes as a prerequisite for reaction. These include substrate bending at the duplex-duplex junction and transfer of unpaired reacting duplex end into the active site. When present, 5′-flaps are thought to thread under the helical cap, limiting reaction to flaps with free 5′-termini in vivo. Here we monitored DNA bending by FRET and DNA unpairing using 2-aminopurine exciton pair CD to determine the DNA and protein requirements for these substrate conformational changes. Binding of DNA to hFEN1 in a bent conformation occurred independently of 5′-flap accommodation and did not require active site metal ions or the presence of conserved active site residues. More stringent requirements exist for transfer of the substrate to the active site. Placement of the scissile phosphate diester in the active site required the presence of divalent metal ions, a free 5′-flap (if present), a Watson-Crick base pair at the terminus of the reacting duplex, and the intact secondary structure of the enzyme helical cap. Optimal positioning of the scissile phosphate additionally required active site conserved residues Tyr40, Asp181, and Arg100 and a reacting duplex 5′-phosphate. These studies suggest a FEN1 reaction mechanism where junctions are bound and 5′-flaps are threaded (when present), and finally the substrate is transferred onto active site metals initiating cleavage. PMID:26884332

  5. Quantification of DNA by Agarose Gel Electrophoresis and Analysis of the Topoisomers of Plasmid and M13 DNA Following Treatment with a Restriction Endonuclease or DNA Topoisomerase I

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tweedie, John W.; Stowell, Kathryn M.

    2005-01-01

    A two-session laboratory exercise for advanced undergraduate students in biochemistry and molecular biology is described. The first session introduces students to DNA quantification by ultraviolet absorbance and agarose gel electrophoresis followed by ethidium bromide staining. The second session involves treatment of various topological forms of…

  6. Dietary restriction with and without caloric restriction for healthy aging

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Changhan; Longo, Valter

    2016-01-01

    Caloric restriction is the most effective and reproducible dietary intervention known to regulate aging and increase the healthy lifespan in various model organisms, ranging from the unicellular yeast to worms, flies, rodents, and primates. However, caloric restriction, which in most cases entails a 20–40% reduction of food consumption relative to normal intake, is a severe intervention that results in both beneficial and detrimental effects. Specific types of chronic, intermittent, or periodic dietary restrictions without chronic caloric restriction have instead the potential to provide a significant healthspan increase while minimizing adverse effects. Improved periodic or targeted dietary restriction regimens that uncouple the challenge of food deprivation from the beneficial effects will allow a safe intervention feasible for a major portion of the population. Here we focus on healthspan interventions that are not chronic or do not require calorie restriction. PMID:26918181

  7. Dietary restriction with and without caloric restriction for healthy aging.

    PubMed

    Lee, Changhan; Longo, Valter

    2016-01-01

    Caloric restriction is the most effective and reproducible dietary intervention known to regulate aging and increase the healthy lifespan in various model organisms, ranging from the unicellular yeast to worms, flies, rodents, and primates. However, caloric restriction, which in most cases entails a 20-40% reduction of food consumption relative to normal intake, is a severe intervention that results in both beneficial and detrimental effects. Specific types of chronic, intermittent, or periodic dietary restrictions without chronic caloric restriction have instead the potential to provide a significant healthspan increase while minimizing adverse effects. Improved periodic or targeted dietary restriction regimens that uncouple the challenge of food deprivation from the beneficial effects will allow a safe intervention feasible for a major portion of the population. Here we focus on healthspan interventions that are not chronic or do not require calorie restriction. PMID:26918181

  8. Characterization of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli genotypes in poultry flocks by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis.

    PubMed

    Carreira, Ana Cláudia; Cunha, Mónica V

    2015-01-01

    We describe a simple, rapid, and discriminatory methodology that allows the routine molecular characterization of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli isolates. The proposed approach is built on one of the earliest and simplest molecular typing methods ever, consisting on the analysis of the fragments of different lengths generated by digestion of homologous DNA sequences with specific restriction endonucleases, a process known as restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. The strategy underneath the workflow reported here is meant to explore the polymorphisms of Campylobacter spp. flaA gene (flaA-RFLP) that allows the local investigation of the genetic diversity and distribution of C. coli and C. jejuni isolates from different sources, namely, chickens' caeca. Although not appropriate for global and long-term epidemiological studies as a single approach, flaA-RFLP analysis can be very useful in surveys limited in space and time and, for specific epidemiological settings, an alternative to more modern and resource-demanding techniques.

  9. Characterization of FP22, a large streptomycete bacteriophage with DNA insensitive to cleavage by many restriction enzymes.

    PubMed

    Hahn, D R; McHenney, M A; Baltz, R H

    1990-12-01

    Bacteriophage FP22 has a very broad host range within streptomycetes and appeared to form lysogens of Streptomyces ambofaciens ATCC 15154. FP22 shared strong cross-immunity and antibody cross-reactivity with bacteriophage P23, but not with seven other streptomycete bacteriophages. FP22 particles had a head diameter of 71 nm and a tail length of 307 nm. The FP22 genome was 131 kb, which is the largest bacteriophage genome reported for streptomycetes. The G + C content of the genome was 46 mol% and restriction mapping indicated that FP22 DNA had discrete ends. NaCl- and pyrophosphate-resistant deletion mutants were readily isolated and the extent of the deletions defined at least 23 kb of dispensable DNA in two regions of the genome. The DNA was not cleaved by most restriction endonucleases (or isoschizomers) which have been identified in the streptomycetes, including the tetranucleotide cutter MboI (GATC).

  10. Selection of Enzymes for Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism Analysis of Fungal Internally Transcribed Spacer Sequences▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado, Pablo; Manjón, Jose L.

    2009-01-01

    Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP) profiling of the internally transcribed spacer (ITS) ribosomal DNA of unknown fungal communities is currently unsupported by a broad-range enzyme-choosing rationale. An in silico study of terminal fragment size distribution was therefore performed following virtual digestion (by use of a set of commercially available 135 type IIP restriction endonucleases) of all published fungal ITS sequences putatively annealing to primers ITS1 and ITS4. Different diversity measurements were used to rank primer-enzyme pairs according to the richness and evenness that they showed. Top-performing pairs were hierarchically clustered to test for data dependency. The enzyme set composed of MaeII, BfaI, and BstNI returned much better results than randomly chosen enzyme sets in computer simulations and is therefore recommended for in vitro TRFLP profiling of fungal ITSs. PMID:19465521

  11. Determination of genes, restriction sites, and DNA sequences surrounding the 6S RNA template of bacteriophage lambda.

    PubMed Central

    Sklar, J; Yot, P; Weissman, S M

    1975-01-01

    A major product of the transcription of bacteriophage lambda DNA in vitro is the 6S RNA. This article presents a detailed mapping of restriction endonuclease cleavage sites about the region of the 6S RNA template within the lambda genome. Restriction fragments defined by these sites have been used to localize the 6S RNA template within the physical and genetic maps of the lambda genome. Nucleotide sequence analysis of one of these fragments has largely confimed the nucleotide sequence of the 6S RNA reported previously and has indicated the sequence of DNA that immediately follows the 6S RNA template. This article reports the nucleotide sequence following a known site of transcription termination by RNA polymerase of Escherichia coli. Images PMID:1098044

  12. Phenyl Substituted 4-Hydroxypyridazin-3(2H)-ones and 5-Hydroxypyrimidin-4(3H)-ones: Inhibitors of Influenza A Endonuclease

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Seasonal and pandemic influenza outbreaks remain a major human health problem. Inhibition of the endonuclease activity of influenza RNA-dependent RNA polymerase is attractive for the development of new agents for the treatment of influenza infection. Our earlier studies identified a series of 5- and 6-phenyl substituted 3-hydroxypyridin-2(1H)-ones that were effective inhibitors of influenza endonuclease. These agents identified as bimetal chelating ligands binding to the active site of the enzyme. In the present study, several aza analogues of these phenyl substituted 3-hydroxypyridin-2(1H)-one compounds were synthesized and evaluated for their ability to inhibit the endonuclease activity. In contrast to the 4-aza analogue of 6-(4-fluorophenyl)-3-hydroxypyridin-2(1H)-one, the 5-aza analogue (5-hydroxy-2-(4-fluorophenyl)pyrimidin-4(3H)-one) did exhibit significant activity as an endonuclease inhibitor. The 6-aza analogue of 5-(4-fluorophenyl)-3-hydroxypyridin-2(1H)-one (6-(4-fluorophenyl)-4-hydroxypyridazin-3(2H)-one) also retained modest activity as an inhibitor. Several varied 6-phenyl-4-hydroxypyridazin-3(2H)-ones and 2-phenyl-5-hydroxypyrimidin-4(3H)-ones were synthesized and evaluated as endonuclease inhibitors. The SAR observed for these aza analogues are consistent with those previously observed with various phenyl substituted 3-hydroxypyridin-2(1H)-ones. PMID:25225968

  13. Evolutionary dynamics of the mS952 intron: a novel mitochondrial group II intron encoding a LAGLIDADG homing endonuclease gene.

    PubMed

    Mullineux, Sahra-Taylor; Willows, Karla; Hausner, Georg

    2011-06-01

    Examination of the mitochondrial small subunit ribosomal RNA (rns) gene of five species of the fungal genus Leptographium revealed that the gene has been invaded at least once at position 952 by a group II intron encoding a LAGLIDADG homing endonuclease gene. Phylogenetic analyses of the intron and homing endonuclease sequences indicated that each element in Leptographium species forms a single clade and is closely related to the group II intron/homing endonuclease gene composite element previously reported at position 952 of the mitochondrial rns gene of Cordyceps species and of Cryphonectria parasitica. The results of an intron survey of the mt rns gene of Leptographium species superimposed onto the phylogenetic analysis of the host organisms suggest that the composite element was transmitted vertically in Leptographium lundbergii. However, its stochastic distribution among strains of L. wingfieldii, L. terebrantis, and L. truncatum suggests that it has been horizontally transmitted by lateral gene transfer among these species, although the random presence of the intron may reflect multiple random loss events. A model is proposed describing the initial invasion of the group II intron in the rns gene of L. lundbergii by a LAGLIDADG homing endonuclease gene and subsequent evolution of this gene to recognize a novel DNA target site, which may now promote the mobility of the intron and homing endonuclease gene as a composite element. PMID:21479820

  14. Single substitution in bacteriophage T4 RNase H alters the ratio between its exo- and endonuclease activities.

    PubMed

    Kholod, Natalia; Sivogrivov, Dmitry; Latypov, Oleg; Mayorov, Sergey; Kuznitsyn, Rafail; Kajava, Andrey V; Shlyapnikov, Mikhail; Granovsky, Igor

    2015-11-01

    The article describes substitutions in bacteriophage T4 RNase H which provide so called das-effect. Phage T4 DNA arrest suppression (das) mutations have been described to be capable of partially suppressing the phage DNA arrest phenotype caused by a dysfunction in genes 46 and/or 47 (also known as Mre11/Rad50 complex). Genetic mapping of das13 (one of the das mutations) has shown it to be in the region of the rnh gene encoding RNase H. Here we report that Das13 mutant of RNase H has substitutions of valine 43 and leucine 242 with isoleucines. To investigate the influence of these mutations on RNase H nuclease properties we have designed a novel in vitro assay that allows us to separate and quantify exo- or endonuclease activities of flap endonuclease. The nuclease assay in vitro showed that V43I substitution increased the ratio between exonuclease/endonuclease activities of RNase H whereas L242I substitution did not affect the nuclease activity of RNase H in vitro. However, both mutations were necessary for the full das effect in vivo. Molecular modelling of the nuclease structure suggests that V43I substitution may lead to disposition of H4 helix, responsible for the interaction with the first base pairs of 5'end of branched DNA. These structural changes may affect unwinding of the first base pairs of gapped or nicked DNA generating a short flap and therefore may stabilize the DNA-enzyme complex. L242I substitution did not affect the structure of RNase H and its role in providing das-effect remains unclear.

  15. [The use of nucleolytic enzymes (ribonucleases, polynucleotide phosphorylases and endonuclease from Serratia marcescens) for producing initial blocks of synthetic endoribonucleases].

    PubMed

    Kliagina, V P; Sedel'nikova, E A; Smolianinova, O A; Soboleva, I A; Khabarova, M I; Zhenodarova, S M

    1992-01-01

    The simplest variant of synthetic substrate-ribozyme complex has been proposed. The schemes of potential ribozyme "subunits" synthesis have been worked out: R1--GCUUGAAACAAA; R2--AAAAACUGAUGAAAGC. The macroscale synthesis of dinucleoside monophosphate ApU, GpC, CpU catalyzed by immobilized ribonucleases of different specificity and preparation of oligoadenylates by hydrolysis of poly-A in the presence of endonuclease Serratia marcescens, as well the synthesis of conservative sequences of potential ribozyme such as ApUpG, CpUpG, GpApU, ApApApG and others have been described.

  16. Antiretroviral restriction factors in mice.

    PubMed

    Nair, Smita; Rein, Alan

    2014-11-26

    One of the most exciting areas in contemporary retrovirus research is the discovery of "restriction factors". These are cellular proteins that act after virus entry to inhibit infection by or replication of retroviruses (and other viruses and intracellular pathogens). We briefly discuss here three antiretroviral restriction factors in mice: Fv1, APOBEC3, and tetherin, touching on both biological and molecular aspects of these restriction systems.

  17. Plasmid macroevolution in a nosocomial environment: demonstration of a persistent molecular polymorphism and construction of a cladistic phylogeny on the basis of restriction data.

    PubMed

    Lee, S C; Gerding, D N; Cleary, P P

    1984-01-01

    Descendants of a gentamicin resistance plasmid first isolated from the Minneapolis Veterans Administration Hospital in 1975 persisted at the hospital until 1983. During this extended period of time several macroevolutionary variants arose and two classes of variants were shown to persist with the initial plasmid. It was possible to construct a cladistic phylogeny on the basis of restriction endonuclease cleavage patterns of the initial and variant plasmids. Additionally, a plasmid polymorphism comprised of members of the plasmid classes was shown to persist at the hospital throughout the endemic period.

  18. A rapid and efficient method for cloning genes of type II restriction-modification systems by use of a killer plasmid.

    PubMed

    Mruk, Iwona; Kaczorowski, Tadeusz

    2007-07-01

    We present a method for cloning restriction-modification (R-M) systems that is based on the use of a lethal plasmid (pKILLER). The plasmid carries a functional gene for a restriction endonuclease having the same DNA specificity as the R-M system of interest. The first step is the standard preparation of a representative, plasmid-borne genomic library. Then this library is transformed with the killer plasmid. The only surviving bacteria are those which carry the gene specifying a protective DNA methyltransferase. Conceptually, this in vivo selection approach resembles earlier methods in which a plasmid library was selected in vitro by digestion with a suitable restriction endonuclease, but it is much more efficient than those methods. The new method was successfully used to clone two R-M systems, BstZ1II from Bacillus stearothermophilus 14P and Csp231I from Citrobacter sp. strain RFL231, both isospecific to the prototype HindIII R-M system. PMID:17468281

  19. Distinct catalytic activity and in vivo roles of the ExoIII and EndoIV AP endonucleases from Sulfolobus islandicus.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhou; Huang, Qihong; Ni, Jinfeng; Shen, Yulong

    2016-09-01

    AP endonuclease cleaves the phosphodiester bond 5'- to the AP (apurinic or apyrimidinic) sites and is one of the major enzymes involved in base excision repair. So far, the properties of several archaeal AP endonuclease homologues have been characterized in vitro, but little is known about their functions in vivo. Herein, we report on the biochemical and genetic analysis of two AP endonucleases, SisExoIII and SisEndoIV, from the hyperthermophilic crenarchaeon Sulfolobus islandicus REY15A. Both SisExoIII and SisEndoIV exhibit AP endonuclease activity, but neither of them has 3'-5' exonuclease activity. SisExoIII and SisEndoIV have similar K M values on the substrate containing an AP site, but the latter cleaves the AP substrate at a dramatically higher catalytic rate than the former. Unlike other AP endonucleases identified in archaea, SisExoIII and SisEndoIV do not exhibit any cleavage activity on DNA having oxidative damage (8-oxo-dG) or uracil. Genetic analysis revealed that neither gene is essential for cell viability, and the growth of ∆SiRe_2666 (endoIV), ∆SiRe_0100 (exoIII), and ∆SiRe_0100∆SiRe_2666 is not affected under normal growth conditions. However, ∆SiRe_2666 exhibits higher sensitivity to the alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) than ∆SiRe_0100. Over-expression of SiRe_0100 can partially complement the sensitivity of ∆SiRe_2666 to MMS, suggesting a backup role of SisExoIII in AP site processing in vivo. Intriguingly, over-expression of SisEndoIV renders the strain more sensitive to MMS than the control. Taken together, we conclude that SisEndoIV, but not SisExoIII, is the main AP endonuclease that participates directly in base excision repair in S. islandicus. PMID:27457080

  20. Children's Restrictive Disclosure to Friends.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rotenberg, Ken J.; Sliz, Dave

    1988-01-01

    Children's restrictive disclosure to friends, which is a facet of intimate friendship, was investigated. It was found that children in kindergarten, second, and fourth grade showed restrictive disclosure to friends, and that greater disclosure of positive personal information to friends than to nonfriends was exhibited with age. (PCB)

  1. A Mismatch EndoNuclease Array-Based Methodology (MENA) for Identifying Known SNPs or Novel Point Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Comeron, Josep M.; Reed, Jordan; Christie, Matthew; Jacobs, Julia S.; Dierdorff, Jason; Eberl, Daniel F.; Manak, J. Robert

    2016-01-01

    Accurate and rapid identification or confirmation of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), point mutations and other human genomic variation facilitates understanding the genetic basis of disease. We have developed a new methodology (called MENA (Mismatch EndoNuclease Array)) pairing DNA mismatch endonuclease enzymology with tiling microarray hybridization in order to genotype both known point mutations (such as SNPs) as well as identify previously undiscovered point mutations and small indels. We show that our assay can rapidly genotype known SNPs in a human genomic DNA sample with 99% accuracy, in addition to identifying novel point mutations and small indels with a false discovery rate as low as 10%. Our technology provides a platform for a variety of applications, including: (1) genotyping known SNPs as well as confirming newly discovered SNPs from whole genome sequencing analyses; (2) identifying novel point mutations and indels in any genomic region from any organism for which genome sequence information is available; and (3) screening panels of genes associated with particular diseases and disorders in patient samples to identify causative mutations. As a proof of principle for using MENA to discover novel mutations, we report identification of a novel allele of the beethoven (btv) gene in Drosophila, which encodes a ciliary cytoplasmic dynein motor protein important for auditory mechanosensation. PMID:27600073

  2. A Mismatch EndoNuclease Array-Based Methodology (MENA) for Identifying Known SNPs or Novel Point Mutations.

    PubMed

    Comeron, Josep M; Reed, Jordan; Christie, Matthew; Jacobs, Julia S; Dierdorff, Jason; Eberl, Daniel F; Manak, J Robert

    2016-01-01

    Accurate and rapid identification or confirmation of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), point mutations and other human genomic variation facilitates understanding the genetic basis of disease. We have developed a new methodology (called MENA (Mismatch EndoNuclease Array)) pairing DNA mismatch endonuclease enzymology with tiling microarray hybridization in order to genotype both known point mutations (such as SNPs) as well as identify previously undiscovered point mutations and small indels. We show that our assay can rapidly genotype known SNPs in a human genomic DNA sample with 99% accuracy, in addition to identifying novel point mutations and small indels with a false discovery rate as low as 10%. Our technology provides a platform for a variety of applications, including: (1) genotyping known SNPs as well as confirming newly discovered SNPs from whole genome sequencing analyses; (2) identifying novel point mutations and indels in any genomic region from any organism for which genome sequence information is available; and (3) screening panels of genes associated with particular diseases and disorders in patient samples to identify causative mutations. As a proof of principle for using MENA to discover novel mutations, we report identification of a novel allele of the beethoven (btv) gene in Drosophila, which encodes a ciliary cytoplasmic dynein motor protein important for auditory mechanosensation. PMID:27600073

  3. Characterization of Sulfolobus islandicus rod-shaped virus 2 gp19, a single-strand specific endonuclease.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Andrew F; Prangishvili, David; Jack, William E

    2011-09-01

    The hyperthermophilic Sulfolobus islandicus rod-shaped virus 2 (SIRV2) encodes a 25-kDa protein (SIRV2gp19) annotated as a hypothetical protein with sequence homology to the RecB nuclease superfamily. Even though SIRV2gp19 homologs are conserved throughout the rudivirus family and presumably play a role in the viral life cycle, SIRV2gp19 has not been functionally characterized. To define the minimal requirements for activity, SIRV2gp19 was purified and tested under varying conditions. SIRV2gp19 is a single-strand specific endonuclease that requires Mg(2+) for activity and is inactive on double-stranded DNA. A conserved aspartic acid in RecB nuclease superfamily Motif II (D89) is also essential for SIRV2gp19 activity and mutation to alanine (D89A) abolishes activity. Therefore, the SIRV2gp19 cleavage mechanism is similar to previously described RecB nucleases. Finally, SIRV2gp19 single-stranded DNA endonuclease activity could play a role in host chromosome degradation during SIRV2 lytic infection. PMID:21667093

  4. Atomic structure of the Serratia marcescens endonuclease at 1.1 A resolution and the enzyme reaction mechanism.

    PubMed

    Shlyapnikov, S V; Lunin, V V; Perbandt, M; Polyakov, K M; Lunin, V Y; Levdikov, V M; Betzel, C; Mikhailov, A M

    2000-05-01

    The three-dimensional crystal structure of Serratia marcescens endonuclease has been refined at 1.1 A resolution to an R factor of 12.9% and an R(free) of 15.6% with the use of anisotropic temperature factors. The model contains 3694 non-H atoms, 715 water molecules, four sulfate ions and two Mg(2+)-binding sites at the active sites of the homodimeric protein. It is shown that the magnesium ion linked to the active-site Asn119 of each monomer is surrounded by five water molecules and shows an octahedral coordination geometry. The temperature factors for the bound Mg(2+) ions in the A and B subunits are 7.08 and 4.60 A(2), respectively, and the average temperature factors for the surrounding water molecules are 12.13 and 10.3 A(2), respectively. In comparison with earlier structures, alternative side-chain conformations are defined for 51 residues of the dimer, including the essential active-site residue Arg57. A plausible mechanism of enzyme function is proposed based on the high-resolution S. marcescens nuclease structure, the functional characteristics of the natural and mutational forms of the enzyme and consideration of its structural analogy with homing endo-nuclease I-PpoI.

  5. Recruitment of the Nucleotide Excision Repair Endonuclease XPG to Sites of UV-Induced DNA Damage Depends on Functional TFIIH▿

    PubMed Central

    Zotter, Angelika; Luijsterburg, Martijn S.; Warmerdam, Daniël O.; Ibrahim, Shehu; Nigg, Alex; van Cappellen, Wiggert A.; Hoeijmakers, Jan H. J.; van Driel, Roel; Vermeulen, Wim; Houtsmuller, Adriaan B.

    2006-01-01

    The structure-specific endonuclease XPG is an indispensable core protein of the nucleotide excision repair (NER) machinery. XPG cleaves the DNA strand at the 3′ side of the DNA damage. XPG binding stabilizes the NER preincision complex and is essential for the 5′ incision by the ERCC1/XPF endonuclease. We have studied the dynamic role of XPG in its different cellular functions in living cells. We have created mammalian cell lines that lack functional endogenous XPG and stably express enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP)-tagged XPG. Life cell imaging shows that in undamaged cells XPG-eGFP is uniformly distributed throughout the cell nucleus, diffuses freely, and is not stably associated with other nuclear proteins. XPG is recruited to UV-damaged DNA with a half-life of 200 s and is bound for 4 min in NER complexes. Recruitment requires functional TFIIH, although some TFIIH mutants allow slow XPG recruitment. Remarkably, binding of XPG to damaged DNA does not require the DDB2 protein, which is thought to enhance damage recognition by NER factor XPC. Together, our data present a comprehensive view of the in vivo behavior of a protein that is involved in a complex chromatin-associated process. PMID:17000769

  6. Structure and operation of the DNA-translocating type I DNA restriction enzymes.

    PubMed

    Kennaway, Christopher K; Taylor, James E; Song, Chun Feng; Potrzebowski, Wojciech; Nicholson, William; White, John H; Swiderska, Anna; Obarska-Kosinska, Agnieszka; Callow, Philip; Cooper, Laurie P; Roberts, Gareth A; Artero, Jean-Baptiste; Bujnicki, Janusz M; Trinick, John; Kneale, G Geoff; Dryden, David T F

    2012-01-01

    Type I DNA restriction/modification (RM) enzymes are molecular machines found in the majority of bacterial species. Their early discovery paved the way for the development of genetic engineering. They control (restrict) the influx of foreign DNA via horizontal gene transfer into the bacterium while maintaining sequence-specific methylation (modification) of host DNA. The endonuclease reaction of these enzymes on unmethylated DNA is preceded by bidirectional translocation of thousands of base pairs of DNA toward the enzyme. We present the structures of two type I RM enzymes, EcoKI and EcoR124I, derived using electron microscopy (EM), small-angle scattering (neutron and X-ray), and detailed molecular modeling. DNA binding triggers a large contraction of the open form of the enzyme to a compact form. The path followed by DNA through the complexes is revealed by using a DNA mimic anti-restriction protein. The structures reveal an evolutionary link between type I RM enzymes and type II RM enzymes.

  7. From Agrobacterium to viral vectors: genome modification of plant cells by rare cutting restriction enzymes.

    PubMed

    Marton, Ira; Honig, Arik; Omid, Ayelet; De Costa, Noam; Marhevka, Elena; Cohen, Barry; Zuker, Amir; Vainstein, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Researchers and biotechnologists require methods to accurately modify the genome of higher eukaryotic cells. Such modifications include, but are not limited to, site-specific mutagenesis, site-specific insertion of foreign DNA, and replacement and deletion of native sequences. Accurate genome modifications in plant species have been rather limited, with only a handful of plant species and genes being modified through the use of early genome-editing techniques. The development of rare-cutting restriction enzymes as a tool for the induction of site-specific genomic double-strand breaks and their introduction as a reliable tool for genome modification in animals, animal cells and human cell lines have paved the way for the adaptation of rare-cutting restriction enzymes to genome editing in plant cells. Indeed, the number of plant species and genes which have been successfully edited using zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and engineered homing endonucleases is on the rise. In our review, we discuss the basics of rare-cutting restriction enzyme-mediated genome-editing technology with an emphasis on its application in plant species.

  8. Recycling of protein subunits during DNA translocation and cleavage by Type I restriction-modification enzymes.

    PubMed

    Simons, Michelle; Szczelkun, Mark D

    2011-09-01

    The Type I restriction-modification enzymes comprise three protein subunits; HsdS and HsdM that form a methyltransferase (MTase) and HsdR that associates with the MTase and catalyses Adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP)-dependent DNA translocation and cleavage. Here, we examine whether the MTase and HsdR components can 'turnover' in vitro, i.e. whether they can catalyse translocation and cleavage events on one DNA molecule, dissociate and then re-bind a second DNA molecule. Translocation termination by both EcoKI and EcoR124I leads to HsdR dissociation from linear DNA but not from circular DNA. Following DNA cleavage, the HsdR subunits appear unable to dissociate even though the DNA is linear, suggesting a tight interaction with the cleaved product. The MTases of EcoKI and EcoAI can dissociate from DNA following either translocation or cleavage and can initiate reactions on new DNA molecules as long as free HsdR molecules are available. In contrast, the MTase of EcoR124I does not turnover and additional cleavage of circular DNA is not observed by inclusion of RecBCD, a helicase-nuclease that degrades the linear DNA product resulting from Type I cleavage. Roles for Type I restriction endonuclease subunit dynamics in restriction alleviation in the cell are discussed.

  9. Restriction fragment length polymorphism of C4 genes in mice with t chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Golubić, M; Figueroa, F; Tosi, M; Klein, J

    1985-01-01

    Genomic DNA was isolated from 29 t strains and 4 congenic lines of mice, digested with restriction endonucleases, and hybridized with a probe representing the complement component 4 (C4) gene. All but one of the enzymes revealed restriction fragment length polymorphism in this sample of C4-related genes. Double digestion analysis suggested the presence of three C4 gene copies in some of the t chromosomes and two copies in others. The enzymes distinguished 16 different haplotypes among the 33 strains tested. Based on their restriction fragment length patterns, the t strains could be divided into four groups with strains in each group more closely related to each other with respect to their C4-region genes than strains belonging to different groups. At least three of these four groups represent different branches of the evolutionary tree constructed for the t chromosomes. The C4-related genes of the chromosomes are in strong linkage disequilibrium with the class II genes of the H-2 complex. Typing for the Ss and Slp allotypes of C4 has revealed the presence of the Ss1 phenotype in two t strains and of the Slpa phenotype in one strain.

  10. Cryptosporidium in pet snakes from Italy: molecular characterization and zoonotic implications.

    PubMed

    Díaz, P; Rota, S; Marchesi, B; López, C; Panadero, R; Fernández, G; Díez-Baños, P; Morrondo, P; Poglayen, G

    2013-10-18

    To provide information on the occurrence of Cryptosporidium species and genotypes in captive snakes from Italy, faecal specimens from 120 snakes belonging to 13 different genera of the families Boidae, Colubridae and Pythonidae were collected. Faecal samples were taken from the ground of the terrarium when available; otherwise cloacal cotton swabs were used. No clinical signs of cryptosporidiosis were observed in any animal at the time of sampling. Samples were examined for the presence of Cryptosporidium by using a direct immunofluorescence antibody test (IFAT) and two-step nested PCR at the small subunit (SSU) rRNA locus. PCR-positive samples were genotyped by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis with the endonucleases SspI and VspI. By IFAT, 42 out of 120 snakes (35.0%) were found to be shedding Cryptosporidium oocysts. A significant higher percentage of positive ophidians were detected by using faecal specimens obtained from the terrarium (55.5%) than by cloacal cotton swabs (29.0%). SSU rRNA gene products were obtained from 25 isolates. Twenty samples tested positive to both microscopy and molecular techniques. Our data reveal a wide extent of cryptosporidial infections in snake-food animals since most of the identified isolates belonged to Cryptosporidium species, some of them with zoonotic potential, considered specific for rodents and resulting from ingestion of infected preys. The reptilian-specific species Cryptosporidium serpentis was identified in only one isolate. The common presence of reptile non-specific and, in some cases, zoonotic Cryptosporidium oocysts in snake faeces should to be taken into consideration in order to avoid the misidentification of the protozoan as well as the possible public health implications.

  11. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis program, a web-based research tool for microbial community analysis.

    PubMed

    Marsh, T L; Saxman, P; Cole, J; Tiedje, J

    2000-08-01

    Rapid analysis of microbial communities has proven to be a difficult task. This is due, in part, to both the tremendous diversity of the microbial world and the high complexity of many microbial communities. Several techniques for community analysis have emerged over the past decade, and most take advantage of the molecular phylogeny derived from 16S rRNA comparative sequence analysis. We describe a web-based research tool located at the Ribosomal Database Project web site (http://www.cme.msu.edu/RDP/html/analyses. html) that facilitates microbial community analysis using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism of 16S ribosomal DNA. The analysis function (designated TAP T-RFLP) permits the user to perform in silico restriction digestions of the entire 16S sequence database and derive terminal restriction fragment sizes, measured in base pairs, from the 5' terminus of the user-specified primer to the 3' terminus of the restriction endonuclease target site. The output can be sorted and viewed either phylogenetically or by size. It is anticipated that the site will guide experimental design as well as provide insight into interpreting results of community analysis with terminal restriction fragment length polymorphisms.

  12. AGU Sonar Data Restriction Panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The AGU Council accepted the report of the panel set up in February to study the issue of restriction by the U.S. Navy of access to high-resolution sonar data for the U.S. Exclusive Economic Zone. Panel chairman John Bossier announced that “the Navy has acted in the best interests of the nation” in lifting the restriction order. Only two areas, egress routes to two submarine bases (see “Navy Defines Areas Under Sonar Ban,” in News, this issue), remain restricted.Panel members were Bruce Douglas, Alexander Malahoff, Donald Piepgras, Paul Richards, David Smith and Manik Talwani.

  13. Evaluation of amplified rDNA restriction analysis (ARDRA) for the identification of Mycoplasma species

    PubMed Central

    Stakenborg, Tim; Vicca, Jo; Butaye, Patrick; Maes, Dominiek; De Baere, Thierry; Verhelst, Rita; Peeters, Johan; de Kruif, Aart; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Vaneechoutte, Mario

    2005-01-01

    Background Mycoplasmas are present worldwide in a large number of animal hosts. Due to their small genome and parasitic lifestyle, Mycoplasma spp. require complex isolation media. Nevertheless, already over 100 different species have been identified and characterized and their number increases as more hosts are sampled. We studied the applicability of amplified rDNA restriction analysis (ARDRA) for the identification of all 116 acknowledged Mycoplasma species and subspecies. Methods Based upon available 16S rDNA sequences, we calculated and compared theoretical ARDRA profiles. To check the validity of these theoretically calculated profiles, we performed ARDRA on 60 strains of 27 different species and subspecies of the genus Mycoplasma. Results In silico digestion with the restriction endonuclease AluI (AG^CT) was found to be most discriminative and generated from 3 to 13 fragments depending on the Mycoplasma species. Although 73 Mycoplasma species could be differentiated using AluI, other species gave undistinguishable patterns. For these, an additional restriction digestion, typically with BfaI (C^TAG) or HpyF10VI (GCNNNNN^NNGC), was needed for a final identification. All in vitro obtained restriction profiles were in accordance with the calculated fragments based on only one 16S rDNA sequence, except for two isolates of M. columbinum and two isolates of the M. mycoides cluster, for which correct ARDRA profiles were only obtained if the sequences of both rrn operons were taken into account. Conclusion Theoretically, restriction digestion of the amplified rDNA was found to enable differentiation of all described Mycoplasma species and this could be confirmed by application of ARDRA on a total of 27 species and subspecies. PMID:15955250

  14. [Electrophoretic karyotypes and genomic DNA restriction fragment analysis: their usefulness as tools in the epidemiological study of Candid parapsilosis].

    PubMed

    Perrotta, D; Rodero, L; Demkura, H; Canteros, C; Davel, G

    2002-01-01

    During the past decades, several studies have reported an increase in the incidence of nosocomial candidosis. In a prospective study, performed at the Departamento de Micología, INEI, ANLIS Dr. C. G. Malbrán and the Servicio de Neonatología and Microbiología, Hospital de Niños Sor María Ludovica, from October 1995 to December 1996, 167 patients with candidosis were detected. Candida species isolated were C. albicans (53.1%), C. parapsilosis (26.5%) and C. tropicalis (14.8%). The aim of this work was to characterize the clinical C. parapsilosis isolates from pediatric patients hospitalized in two neonatal intensive care units from the same hospital and to evaluate the usefulness of electrophoretic karyotype (EK) and restriction endonuclease analysis of genomic DNA (REAG) using a low frequency digestion enzyme. EK of all isolates disclosed 12 banding patterns and REAG with endonuclease Sfi I showed only 5 groups. However, isolates from the control group could not be separated from the clinical isolates. The isolates within each dendogram group for EK or REAG were apparently unrelated. Our results show that EK yields better results than REAG, but that it falls short of the desired discrimination, which suggests that these techniques do not seem to be useful for studying nosocomial C. parapsilosis outbreaks.

  15. Simple and sensitive fluorescence detection of the RNA endonuclease activity of mammalian argonaute2 protein based on an RNA molecular beacon.

    PubMed

    Li, Feng; Li, Peng; Yang, Limin; Tang, Bo

    2012-12-28

    A new strategy for determining the RNA endonuclease activity of mammalian argonaute2 (Ago2) protein has been developed, which combines the unique cleavage function of Ago2 protein with an RNA molecular beacon (RMB). Through the fluorescence restoration of the RMB, simple and sensitive detection of Ago2 is achieved.

  16. Cloning and expression of APE, the cDNA encoding the major human apurinic endonuclease: definition of a family of DNA repair enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Demple, B; Herman, T; Chen, D S

    1991-01-01

    Abasic (AP) sites are common, potentially mutagenic DNA damages that are attacked by AP endonucleases. The biological roles of these enzymes in metazoans have not been tested. We have cloned the human cDNA (APE) that encodes the main nuclear AP endonuclease. The predicted Ape protein, which contains likely nuclear transport signals, is a member of a family of DNA repair enzymes that includes two bacterial AP endonucleases (ExoA protein of Streptococcus pneumoniae and exonuclease III of Escherichia coli) and Rrp1 protein of Drosophila melanogaster. Purified Ape protein lacks the 3'-exonuclease activity against undamaged DNA that is found in the bacterial and Drosophila enzymes, but the lack of obvious amino acid changes to account for this difference suggests that the various enzyme functions evolved by fine tuning a conserved active site. Expression of the active human enzyme in AP endonuclease-deficient E. coli conferred significant resistance to killing by the DNA-alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate. The APE cDNA provides a molecular tool for analyzing the role of this central enzyme in maintaining genetic stability in humans. Images PMID:1722334

  17. Restriction Factors in HIV-1 Disease Progression.

    PubMed

    Merindol, Natacha; Berthoux, Lionel

    2015-01-01

    About 35 million people worldwide were living with HIV-1 at the end of 2013 and over 25 million have already died of AIDS. AIDS patients show high variability in the speed of disease progression in the absence of treatment. While certain immunological traits have been shown to correlate with accelerated or slowed progression in some subjects, including slow progressors, factors controlling HIV-1 replication and disease kinetics remain largely enigmatic. The importance of T lymphocytes and of protective HLA-alleles is undeniable, but not sufficient to explain every attenuated phenotype. A thorough understanding of HIV-1 infection control in these patient subsets may help the development of novel strategies for treatment and prevention. Restriction factors are type I interferon-induced specialized cellular proteins that block viruses at different steps of their life cycle. TRIM5α, Mx2/MxB, TRIM22/Staf50, SAMHD1, p21/CDKN1, tetherin/BST2/CD137, APOBEC3G and APOBEC3F have all been proposed to inhibit HIV-1, often with gene variant- or cellular context-specificity. Recent evidence highlights their possible implication in AIDS disease progression. In this review, we depict their restrictive activity against HIV-1 and recapitulate the latest data on their potential role in vivo, in both normal and slow progressors.

  18. Discovery of natural nicking endonucleases Nb.BsrDI and Nb.BtsI and engineering of top-strand nicking variants from BsrDI and BtsI.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shuang-Yong; Zhu, Zhenyu; Zhang, Penghua; Chan, Siu-Hong; Samuelson, James C; Xiao, Jianping; Ingalls, Debra; Wilson, Geoffrey G

    2007-01-01

    BsrDI and BtsI restriction endonucleases recognize and cleave double-strand DNA at the sequences GCAATG (2/0) and GCAGTG (2/0), respectively. We have purified and partially characterized these two enzymes, and analyzed the genes that encode them. BsrDI and BtsI are unusual in two respects: each cleaves DNA as a heterodimer of one large subunit (B subunit) and one small subunit (A subunit); and, in the absence of their small subunits, the large subunits behave as sequence-specific DNA nicking enzymes and only nick the bottom strand of the sequences at these respective positions: GCAATG (-/0) and GCAGTG (-/0). We refer to the single subunit, the bottom-strand nicking forms as 'hemidimers'. Amino acid sequence comparisons reveal that BsrDI and BtsI belong to a family of restriction enzymes that possess two catalytic sites: a canonical PD-X(n)-EXK and a second non-canonical PD-X(n)-E-X12-QR. Interestingly, the other family members, which include BsrI (ACTGG 1/-1) and BsmI/Mva1269I (GAATGC 1/-1) are single polypeptide chains, i.e. monomers, rather than heterodimers. In BsrDI and BtsI, the two catalytic sites are found in two separate subunits. Site-directed mutagenesis confirmed that the canonical catalytic site located at the N-terminus of the large subunit is responsible for the bottom-strand cleavage, whereas the non-canonical catalytic site located in the small subunit is responsible for hydrolysis of the top strand. Top-strand specific nicking variants, Nt.BsrDI and Nt.BtsI, were successfully engineered by combining the catalytic-deficient B subunit with wild-type A subunit. PMID:17586812

  19. Calorie restriction and methionine restriction in control of endogenous hydrogen sulfide production by the transsulfuration pathway

    PubMed Central

    Hine, Christopher; Mitchell, James R.

    2015-01-01

    H2S is a gas easily identified by its distinctive odor. Although environmental exposure to H2S has been viewed alternately as therapeutic or toxic through the centuries, H2S has recently regained recognition for its numerous beneficial biological effects. Most experiments documenting such benefits, including improved glucose tolerance, increased stress resistance, and even lifespan extension, are based on exposure of experimental organisms to exogenous sources of H2S. However, appreciation is growing for the importance of H2S produced endogenously by the evolutionary conserved transsulfuration pathway (TSP) in health and longevity. Recent data implicate H2S produced by the TSP in pleiotropic benefits of dietary restriction (DR), or reduced nutrient/energy intake without malnutrition. DR, best known as the most reliable way to extend lifespan in a wide range of experimental organisms, includes various regimens aimed at either reducing overall calorie intake (calorie restriction, intermittent/ every-other-day fasting) or reducing particular nutrients such as protein or the essential amino acid, methionine (methionine restriction), with overlapping functional benefits on stress resistance, metabolic fitness and lifespan. Here we will review the small but growing body of literature linking the TSP to the functional benefits of DR in part through the production of endogenous H2S, with an emphasis on regulation of the TSP and H2S production by diet and mechanisms of beneficial H2S action. PMID:25523462

  20. Calorie restriction and methionine restriction in control of endogenous hydrogen sulfide production by the transsulfuration pathway.

    PubMed

    Hine, Christopher; Mitchell, James R

    2015-08-01

    H2S is a gas easily identified by its distinctive odor. Although environmental exposure to H2S has been viewed alternately as therapeutic or toxic through the centuries, H2S has recently regained recognition for its numerous beneficial biological effects. Most experiments documenting such benefits, including improved glucose tolerance, increased stress resistance, and even lifespan extension, are based on exposure of experimental organisms to exogenous sources of H2S. However, appreciation is growing for the importance of H2S produced endogenously by the evolutionary conserved transsulfuration pathway (TSP) in health and longevity. Recent data implicate H2S produced by the TSP in pleiotropic benefits of dietary restriction (DR), or reduced nutrient/energy intake without malnutrition. DR, best known as the most reliable way to extend lifespan in a wide range of experimental organisms, includes various regimens aimed at either reducing overall calorie intake (calorie restriction, intermittent/every-other-day fasting) or reducing particular nutrients such as protein or the essential amino acid, methionine (methionine restriction), with overlapping functional benefits on stress resistance, metabolic fitness and lifespan. Here we will review the small but growing body of literature linking the TSP to the functional benefits of DR in part through the production of endogenous H2S, with an emphasis on regulation of the TSP and H2S production by diet and mechanisms of beneficial H2S action.

  1. Calorie restriction and methionine restriction in control of endogenous hydrogen sulfide production by the transsulfuration pathway.

    PubMed

    Hine, Christopher; Mitchell, James R

    2015-08-01

    H2S is a gas easily identified by its distinctive odor. Although environmental exposure to H2S has been viewed alternately as therapeutic or toxic through the centuries, H2S has recently regained recognition for its numerous beneficial biological effects. Most experiments documenting such benefits, including improved glucose tolerance, increased stress resistance, and even lifespan extension, are based on exposure of experimental organisms to exogenous sources of H2S. However, appreciation is growing for the importance of H2S produced endogenously by the evolutionary conserved transsulfuration pathway (TSP) in health and longevity. Recent data implicate H2S produced by the TSP in pleiotropic benefits of dietary restriction (DR), or reduced nutrient/energy intake without malnutrition. DR, best known as the most reliable way to extend lifespan in a wide range of experimental organisms, includes various regimens aimed at either reducing overall calorie intake (calorie restriction, intermittent/every-other-day fasting) or reducing particular nutrients such as protein or the essential amino acid, methionine (methionine restriction), with overlapping functional benefits on stress resistance, metabolic fitness and lifespan. Here we will review the small but growing body of literature linking the TSP to the functional benefits of DR in part through the production of endogenous H2S, with an emphasis on regulation of the TSP and H2S production by diet and mechanisms of beneficial H2S action. PMID:25523462

  2. Anticancer clinical utility of the apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease/redox factor-1 (APE/Ref-1).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Wang, Jian

    2010-03-01

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease/redox factor-1 (APE/Ref-1), as a type of multifunctional protein, plays an essential role in the base excision repair (BER) pathway, which is responsible for the repair of DNA caused by oxidative and alkylation damage. As importantly, APE/Ref-1 also functions as a redox factor maintaining transcription factors in an active reduced state. APE/Ref-1 stimulates the DNA-binding activity of numerous transcription factors that are involved in cancer promotion and progression, such as AP-1 (Fos/Jun), NF-kappaB, HIF-1alpha, p53, and others. Based on the structures and functions of APE1/Ref-1, we will provide an overview of its activities and explore the budding clinical use of this protein as a target in cancer treatment, and propose that APE/Ref-1 has a great potential for application in clinical research.

  3. Requirement for flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1) to maintain genomic stability and transcriptional gene silencing in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jixiang; Xie, Shaojun; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Gong, Zhizhong

    2016-09-01

    As a central component in the maturation of Okazaki fragments, flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1) removes the 5'-flap and maintains genomic stability. Here, FEN1 was cloned as a suppressor of transcriptional gene silencing (TGS) from a forward genetic screen. FEN1 is abundant in the root and shoot apical meristems and FEN1-GFP shows a nucleolus-localized signal in tobacco cells. The Arabidopsis fen1-1 mutant is hypersensitive to methyl methanesulfonate and shows reduced telomere length. Interestingly, genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation and RNA sequencing results demonstrate that FEN1 mutation leads to a decrease in the level of H3K27me3 and an increase in the expression of a subset of genes marked with H3K27me3. Overall, these results uncover a role for FEN1 in mediating TGS as well as maintaining genome stability in Arabidopsis.

  4. The replication initiator protein of plasmid pT181 has sequence-specific endonuclease and topoisomerase-like activities.

    PubMed Central

    Koepsel, R R; Murray, R W; Rosenblum, W D; Khan, S A

    1985-01-01

    Initiation of pT181 DNA replication specifically requires the plasmid-encoded RepC protein. Here we demonstrate that highly purified RepC protein has sequence-specific endonuclease and topoisomerase-like activities. A maximum sequence of 127 base pairs containing the pT181 origin of replication is required for nicking-closing by RepC protein. RepC introduces a single strand break within the pT181 origin. The nick site has been shown by DNA sequencing to lie between nucleotides 70 and 71 in the bottom strand of the DNA within the origin sequence. This nick site probably corresponds to the start site of pT181 replication. The results presented here suggest that, unlike most other plasmids, pT181 replicates by a rolling circle mechanism. Images PMID:2995991

  5. Base excision repair in early zebrafish development: evidence for DNA polymerase switching and standby AP endonuclease activity.

    PubMed

    Fortier, Sean; Yang, Xiaojie; Wang, Yi; Bennett, Richard A O; Strauss, Phyllis R

    2009-06-16

    The base excision repair (BER) pathway recognizes and repairs most nonbulky lesions, uracil and abasic (AP) sites in DNA. Several participants are embryonic lethals in knockout mice. Since the pathway has never been investigated during embryogenesis, we characterized the first three steps of BER in zebrafish extracts from unfertilized eggs, embryos at different developmental stages, and adults. Using a 45-mer double-stranded substrate with a U/G mispair at position 21, we showed that extracts from all stages are capable of performing BER. Before 3 days postfertilization (dpf), aphidicolin-sensitive polymerases perform most nucleotide insertion. In fact, eggs and early stage embryos lack DNA polymerase-beta protein. After the eggs have hatched at 3 dpf, an aphidicolin-resistant polymerase, probably DNA polymerase-beta, becomes the primary polymerase. Previously, we showed that when the zebrafish AP endonuclease protein (ZAP1) level is knocked down, embryos cease dividing after the initial phase of rapid proliferation and die without apoptosis shortly thereafter. Nevertheless, extracts from embryos in which ZAP1 has been largely depleted process substrate as well as extracts from control embryos. Since apex1 and apex2 are both strongly expressed in early embryos relative to adults, these data indicate that both may play important roles in DNA repair in early development. In brief, the major differences in BER performed by early stage embryos and adults are the absence of DNA polymerase-beta, leading to predominance of replicative polymerases, and the presence of backup Mg(2+)-dependent endonuclease activity in early stage embryos. The switch to normal, adult BER occurs fully when the embryos hatch from the chorionic membrane and encounter normal oxidative stress.

  6. Inhibitors of the apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1)/nucleophosmin (NPM1) interaction that display anti-tumor properties.

    PubMed

    Poletto, Mattia; Malfatti, Matilde C; Dorjsuren, Dorjbal; Scognamiglio, Pasqualina L; Marasco, Daniela; Vascotto, Carlo; Jadhav, Ajit; Maloney, David J; Wilson, David M; Simeonov, Anton; Tell, Gianluca

    2016-05-01

    The apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1) is a protein central to the base excision DNA repair pathway and operates in the modulation of gene expression through redox-dependent and independent mechanisms. Aberrant expression and localization of APE1 in tumors are recurrent hallmarks of aggressiveness and resistance to therapy. We identified and characterized the molecular association between APE1 and nucleophosmin (NPM1), a multifunctional protein involved in the preservation of genome stability and rRNA maturation. This protein-protein interaction modulates subcellular localization and endonuclease activity of APE1. Moreover, we reported a correlation between APE1 and NPM1 expression levels in ovarian cancer, with NPM1 overexpression being a marker of poor prognosis. These observations suggest that tumors that display an augmented APE1/NPM1 association may exhibit increased aggressiveness and resistance. Therefore, targeting the APE1/NPM1 interaction might represent an innovative strategy for the development of anticancer drugs, as tumor cells relying on higher levels of APE1 and NPM1 for proliferation and survival may be more sensitive than untransformed cells. We set up a chemiluminescence-based high-throughput screening assay in order to find small molecules able to interfere with the APE1/NPM1 interaction. This screening led to the identification of a set of bioactive compounds that impair the APE1/NPM1 association in living cells. Interestingly, some of these molecules display anti-proliferative activity and sensitize cells to therapeutically relevant genotoxins. Given the prognostic significance of APE1 and NPM1, these compounds might prove effective in the treatment of tumors that show abundant levels of both proteins, such as ovarian or hepatic carcinomas.

  7. Ultraselective homogeneous electrochemical biosensor for DNA species related to oral cancer based on nicking endonuclease assisted target recycling amplification.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yue; Wei, Xiaofeng; Zhao, Mengmeng; Qiu, Bin; Guo, Longhua; Lin, Zhenyu; Yang, Huang-Hao

    2015-09-15

    Traditional electrochemical DNA biosensors need DNA immobilization on the electrode surface, which is tedious and time-consuming. In this study, a simple but ultraselective electrochemical DNA biosensor had been designed to determine target DNA species related to oral cancer overexpressed 1 in saliva, which combines the signal amplification of nicking endonuclease assisted target recycling with the immobilization-free electrochemical method. The complementary substrate strand of target DNA species contains a simple asymmetric sequence had been modified with a methylene blue at the 3' terminal first, which cannot diffuse easily to the negative charged ITO electrode surface due to the abundant negative charges. The presence of the target DNA would trigger the formation of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). Then the nicking endonuclease can recognize the simple asymmetric sequence in the dsDNA and cleave the substrate strand of ds-DNA into two pieces, a long ssDNA and a 2-base ssDNA linked with methylene blue. The short one can diffuse easily to the negative charged ITO electrode surface and results in the enhanced electrochemical response detected. At the same time, the target DNA can dissociate from the dsDNA and trigger the next round of hybridization, cleavage, and releasing, which results in the signal amplification. This homogeneous DNA biosensor can detect as low as 0.35 pM (S/N = 3) target DNA. Compared with the traditional heterogeneous electrochemical DNA biosensors, which are tedious and time-consuming due to the complex DNA immobilization process, the assay not only owns the merits of simple and high efficiency since performed in a homogeneous solution but also exhibits a high distinction ability to single-base mismatch, double-bases mismatch, and noncomplementary DNA sequence.

  8. The DNA repair endonuclease XPG interacts directly and functionally with the WRN helicase defective in Werner syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Trego, Kelly S.; Chernikova, Sophia B.; Davalos, Albert R.; Perry, J. Jefferson P.; Finger, L. David; Ng, Cliff; Tsai, Miaw-Sheue; Yannone, Steven M.; Tainer, John A.; Campisi, Judith; Cooper, Priscilla K.

    2011-04-20

    XPG is a structure-specific endonuclease required for nucleotide excision repair (NER). XPG incision defects result in the cancer-prone syndrome xeroderma pigmentosum, whereas truncating mutations of XPG cause the severe postnatal progeroid developmental disorder Cockayne syndrome. We show that XPG interacts directly with WRN protein, which is defective in the premature aging disorder Werner syndrome, and that the two proteins undergo similar sub-nuclear redistribution in S-phase and co-localize in nuclear foci. The co-localization was observed in mid- to late-S-phase, when WRN moves from nucleoli to nuclear foci that have been shown to contain protein markers of both stalled replication forks and telomeric proteins. We mapped the interaction between XPG and WRN to the C-terminal domains of each and show that interaction with the C-terminal domain of XPG strongly stimulates WRN helicase activity. WRN also possesses a competing DNA single-strand annealing activity that, combined with unwinding, has been shown to coordinate regression of model replication forks to form Holliday junction/chicken foot intermediate structures. We tested whether XPG stimulated WRN annealing activity and found that XPG itself has intrinsic strand annealing activity that requires the unstructured R- and C-terminal domains, but not the conserved catalytic core or endonuclease activity. Annealing by XPG is cooperative, rather than additive, with WRN annealing. Taken together, our results suggest a novel function for XPG in S-phase that is at least in part carried out coordinately with WRN, and which may contribute to the severity of the phenotypes that occur upon loss of XPG.

  9. The crystal structure of EcoRV endonuclease and of its complexes with cognate and non-cognate DNA fragments.

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, F K; Banner, D W; Oefner, C; Tsernoglou, D; Brown, R S; Heathman, S P; Bryan, R K; Martin, P D; Petratos, K; Wilson, K S

    1993-01-01

    The crystal structure of EcoRV endonuclease has been determined at 2.5 A resolution and that of its complexes with the cognate DNA decamer GGGATATCCC (recognition sequence underlined) and the non-cognate DNA octamer CGAGCTCG at 3.0 A resolution. Two octamer duplexes of the non-cognate DNA, stacked end-to-end, are bound to the dimeric enzyme in B-DNA-like conformations. The protein--DNA interactions of this complex are prototypic for non-specific DNA binding. In contrast, only one cognate decamer duplex is bound and deviates considerably from canonical B-form DNA. Most notably, a kink of approximately 50 degrees is observed at the central TA step with a concomitant compression of the major groove. Base-specific hydrogen bonds between the enzyme and the recognition base pairs occur exclusively in the major groove. These interactions appear highly co-operative as they are all made through one short surface loop comprising residues 182-186. Numerous contacts with the sugar phosphate backbone extending beyond the recognition sequence are observed in both types of complex. However, the total surface area buried on complex formation is > 1800 A2 larger in the case of cognate DNA binding. Two acidic side chains, Asp74 and Asp90, are close to the reactive phosphodiester group in the cognate complex and most probably provide oxygen ligands for binding the essential cofactor Mg2+. An important role is also indicated for Lys92, which together with the two acidic functions appears to be conserved in the otherwise unrelated structure of EcoRI endonuclease. The structural results give new insight into the physical basis of the remarkable sequence specificity of this enzyme. Images PMID:8491171

  10. Asymmetric DNA recognition by the OkrAI endonuclease, an isoschizomer of BamHI

    SciTech Connect

    Vanamee, Éva Scheuring; Viadiu, Hector; Chan, Siu-Hong; Ummat, Ajay; Hartline, Adrian M.; Xu, Shuang-yong; Aggarwal, Aneel K.

    2011-11-18

    Restriction enzymes share little or no sequence homology with the exception of isoschizomers, or enzymes that recognize and cleave the same DNA sequence. We present here the structure of a BamHI isoschizomer, OkrAI, bound to the same DNA sequence (TATGGATCCATA) as that cocrystallized with BamHI. We show that OkrAI is a more minimal version of BamHI, lacking not only the N- and C-terminal helices but also an internal 310 helix and containing {beta}-strands that are shorter than those in BamHI. Despite these structural differences, OkrAI recognizes the DNA in a remarkably similar manner to BamHI, including asymmetric contacts via C-terminal 'arms' that appear to 'compete' for the minor groove. However, the arms are shorter than in BamHI. We observe similar DNA-binding affinities between OkrAI and BamHI but OkrAI has higher star activity (at 37 C) compared to BamHI. Together, the OkrAI and BamHI structures offer a rare opportunity to compare two restriction enzymes that work on exactly the same DNA substrate.

  11. Random Tagging Genotyping by Sequencing (rtGBS), an Unbiased Approach to Locate Restriction Enzyme Sites across the Target Genome

    PubMed Central

    Hilario, Elena; Barron, Lorna; Deng, Cecilia H.; Datson, Paul M.; Davy, Marcus W.; Storey, Roy D.

    2015-01-01

    Genotyping by sequencing (GBS) is a restriction enzyme based targeted approach developed to reduce the genome complexity and discover genetic markers when a priori sequence information is unavailable. Sufficient coverage at each locus is essential to distinguish heterozygous from homozygous sites accurately. The number of GBS samples able to be pooled in one sequencing lane is limited by the number of restriction sites present in the genome and the read depth required at each site per sample for accurate calling of single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Loci bias was observed using a slight modification of the Elshire et al. method: some restriction enzyme sites were represented in higher proportions while others were poorly represented or absent. This bias could be due to the quality of genomic DNA, the endonuclease and ligase reaction efficiency, the distance between restriction sites, the preferential amplification of small library restriction fragments, or bias towards cluster formation of small amplicons during the sequencing process. To overcome these issues, we have developed a GBS method based on randomly tagging genomic DNA (rtGBS). By randomly landing on the genome, we can, with less bias, find restriction sites that are far apart, and undetected by the standard GBS (stdGBS) method. The study comprises two types of biological replicates: six different kiwifruit plants and two independent DNA extractions per plant; and three types of technical replicates: four samples of each DNA extraction, stdGBS vs. rtGBS methods, and two independent library amplifications, each sequenced in separate lanes. A statistically significant unbiased distribution of restriction fragment size by rtGBS showed that this method targeted 49% (39,145) of BamH I sites shared with the reference genome, compared to only 14% (11,513) by stdGBS. PMID:26633193

  12. Fermentation and recovery of the EcoRl restriction enzyme with a genetically modified Escherichia coli strain

    SciTech Connect

    Botterman, J.H.; DeBuyser, D.R.; Spriet, J.A.; Vansteenkiste, G.C.; Zabeau, M.

    1985-09-01

    The fermentation and recovery of the EcoRl restriction endonuclease with a genetically modified Escherichia coli strain is investigated. Vast amounts of product could be obtained after cultivation in a 20-L computer-coupled pilot fermentor and purification of the recovered wet cells. It was found that in the end the product is at least inhibitory and probably lethal to the cells (the lethality has been proven with genetic experiments) so that optimum yield requires an optimized choice for the time instant of induction. Growth after induction and product formation require substantial amounts of oxyge, which must be supplied if a high population level is to be achieved. pH control may alleviate the burden of high oxygen supply. Quantitative assessment after the different purification stages indicate that approximately 15% active enzyme can be obtained from the total amount produced.

  13. Electrochemical biosensor modified with dsDNA monolayer for restriction enzyme activity determination.

    PubMed

    Zajda, Joanna; Górski, Łukasz; Malinowska, Elżbieta

    2016-06-01

    A simple and cost effective method for the determination of restriction endonuclease activity is presented. dsDNA immobilized at a gold electrode surface is used as the enzymatic substrate, and an external cationic redox probe is employed in voltammetric measurements for analytical signal generation. The assessment of enzyme activity is based on a decrease of a current signal derived from reduction of methylene blue which is present in the sample solution. For this reason, the covalent attachment of the label molecule is not required which significantly reduces costs of the analysis and simplifies the entire determination procedure. The influence of buffer components on utilized dsDNA/MCH monolayer stability and integrity is also verified. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements reveal that due to pinhole formation during enzyme activity measurement the presence of any surfactants should be avoided. Additionally, it is shown that the sensitivity of the electrochemical biosensor can be tuned by changing the restriction site location along the DNA length. Under optimal conditions the proposed biosensor exhibits a linear response toward PvuII activity within a range from 0.25 to 1.50 U/μL. PMID:26859430

  14. Characterization of Xanthomonas campestris Pathovars by rRNA Gene Restriction Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Berthier, Yvette; Verdier, Valérie; Guesdon, Jean-Luc; Chevrier, Danièle; Denis, Jean-Baptiste; Decoux, Guy; Lemattre, Monique

    1993-01-01

    Genomic DNA of 191 strains of the family Pseudomonadaceae, including 187 strains of the genus Xanthomonas, was cleaved by EcoRI endonuclease. After hybridization of Southern transfer blots with 2-acetylamino-fluorene-labelled Escherichia coli 16+23S rRNA probe, 27 different patterns were obtained. The strains are clearly distinguishable at the genus, species, and pathovar levels. The variability of the rRNA gene restriction patterns was determined for four pathovars of Xanthomonas campestris species. The 16 strains of X. campestris pv. begoniae analyzed gave only one pattern. The variability of rRNA gene restriction patterns of X. campestris pv. manihotis strains could be related to ecotypes. In contrast, the variability of patterns observed for X. campestris pv. malvacearum was not correlated with pathogenicity or with the geographical origins of the strains. The highest degree of variability of DNA fingerprints was observed within X. campestris pv. dieffenbachiae, which is pathogenic to several hosts of the Araceae family. In this case, variability was related to both host plant and pathogenicity. Images PMID:16348894

  15. Electrochemical biosensor modified with dsDNA monolayer for restriction enzyme activity determination.

    PubMed

    Zajda, Joanna; Górski, Łukasz; Malinowska, Elżbieta

    2016-06-01

    A simple and cost effective method for the determination of restriction endonuclease activity is presented. dsDNA immobilized at a gold electrode surface is used as the enzymatic substrate, and an external cationic redox probe is employed in voltammetric measurements for analytical signal generation. The assessment of enzyme activity is based on a decrease of a current signal derived from reduction of methylene blue which is present in the sample solution. For this reason, the covalent attachment of the label molecule is not required which significantly reduces costs of the analysis and simplifies the entire determination procedure. The influence of buffer components on utilized dsDNA/MCH monolayer stability and integrity is also verified. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements reveal that due to pinhole formation during enzyme activity measurement the presence of any surfactants should be avoided. Additionally, it is shown that the sensitivity of the electrochemical biosensor can be tuned by changing the restriction site location along the DNA length. Under optimal conditions the proposed biosensor exhibits a linear response toward PvuII activity within a range from 0.25 to 1.50 U/μL.

  16. Organization and sequence of the SalI restriction-modification system.

    PubMed

    Rodicio, M R; Quinton-Jager, T; Moran, L S; Slatko, B E; Wilson, G G

    1994-12-30

    The organization and nucleotide (nt) sequences were determined for the genes encoding the SalI restriction and modification (R-M) system (recognition sequence 5'-GTCGAC-3') from Streptomyces albus G. The system comprises two genes, salIR, coding for the restriction endonuclease (ENase, R.SalI; probably 315 amino acids (aa), a predicted M(r) of 35,305; product, G'TCGAC) and salIM, coding for the methyltransferase (MTase, M.SalI; probably 587 aa, a predicted M(r) of 64,943; product, GTCGm6AC). The genes are adjacent, they have the same orientation, and they occur in the order salIR then salIM. R.SalI contains a putative magnesium-binding motif similar to those at the active sites of R.EcoRI and R.EcoRV, but otherwise it bears little aa sequence similarity to other ENases. M.SalI is a member of the m6A gamma class of MTases. In aa sequence it resembles M.AccI, another m6A gamma-MTase whose recognition sequence includes the SalI recognition sequence as a subset. PMID:7828868

  17. Restriction-Modification systems interplay causes avoidance of GATC site in prokaryotic genomes.

    PubMed

    Ershova, Anna; Rusinov, Ivan; Vasiliev, Mikhail; Spirin, Sergey; Karyagina, Anna

    2016-04-01

    Palindromes are frequently underrepresented in prokaryotic genomes. Palindromic 5[Formula: see text]-GATC-3[Formula: see text] site is a recognition site of different Restriction-Modification (R-M) systems, as well as solitary methyltransferase Dam. Classical GATC-specific R-M systems methylate GATC and cleave unmethylated GATC. On the contrary, methyl-directed Type II restriction endonucleases cleave methylated GATC. Methylation of GATC by Dam methyltransferase is involved in the regulation of different cellular processes. The diversity of functions of GATC-recognizing proteins makes GATC sequence a good model for studying the reasons of palindrome avoidance in prokaryotic genomes. In this work, the influence of R-M systems and solitary proteins on the GATC site avoidance is described by a mathematical model. GATC avoidance is strongly associated with the presence of alternate (methyl-directed or classical Type II R-M system) genes in different strains of the same species, as we have shown for Streptococcus pneumoniae, Neisseria meningitidis, Eubacterium rectale, and Moraxella catarrhalis. We hypothesize that GATC avoidance can result from a DNA exchange between strains with different methylation status of GATC site within the process of natural transformation. If this hypothesis is correct, the GATC avoidance is a sign of a DNA exchange between bacteria with different methylation status in a mixed population.

  18. Restriction enzyme digestion analysis of PCR-amplified DNA of Blastocystis hominis isolates.

    PubMed

    Init, I; Foead, A L; Fong, M Y; Yamazaki, H; Rohela, M; Yong, H S; Mak, J W

    2007-11-01

    Genomic DNA of Blastocystis isolates released into 0.1% Triton X-100 was suitable for amplification and yielded similar results as the genomic DNA extracted with standard kit. The specific B. hominis primers (BH1: GCT TAT CTG GTT GAT CCT GCC AGT and BH2: TGA TCC TTC CGC AGG TTC ACC TAC A) successfully produced the PCR product of about 1,770 bp with all the 7 Blastocystis isolates tested. The restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) patterns yielded by 13 out of 25 restriction endonucleases showed that the 7 isolates could be grouped into 4 subgroups: subgroup-1 consisted of isolate C; subgroup-2 of isolates H4 and H7; subgroup-3 of isolates KP1, Y51 and M12; and subgroup-4 of isolate 27805. The differences between subgroups manifested as clear-cut RFLP patterns. A common band of 230 bp was revealed by Eco R1 in all the Blastocystis isolates tested. The band of about 180 bp was revealed by Alu I, differentiated symptomatic from asymptomatic isolates of this parasite, and might indicate the pathogenicity of this parasite. PMID:18613539

  19. Heterogeneity in restriction patterns of Gardnerella vaginalis isolates from individuals with bacterial vaginosis.

    PubMed

    Nath, K; Devlin, D; Beddoe, A M

    1992-02-01

    This study was undertaken to resolve the genetic make up of Gardnerella vaginalis present in bacterial vaginosis (BV). DNA from several G. vaginalis isolates from within and between individual BV patients were compared by BamHI, ClaI and EcoRI restriction endonuclease analysis (REA) followed by a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) study, utilizing a 5.7-kb BamHI G. vaginalis ATCC14018 DNA probe. Four G. vaginalis isolates from one patient (GVP-062) were composed of 3 different biotypes (biotypes 3, 5 and 8), and while the REA mirrored the biotype, in RFLP studies at least 3 isolates had DNA fragments in common. All of the isolates from 2 other patients (GVP-063 and GVP-072) represented a single biotype (biotype 2), but under REA and in RFLP studies, the isolates GVP-063 differed from GVP-072. An opposite case existed with the isolates GVP-072 (biotype 2) and GVP-065 (biotype 5), which appeared similar under REA and in RFLP studies. Finally, reisolates after 8 weeks (GVP-080) from a BV patient (isolates GVP-065) representing the same biotype (biotype 5) differed under REA and in RFLP studies. Thus, lacking any unique DNA fingerprint, G. vaginalis occurring in BV represents a (genetically) mixed population.

  20. Genotyping of the fish rhabdovirus, viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus, by restriction fragment length polymorphisms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Einer-Jensen, Katja; Winton, James R.; Lorenzen, Niels

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a standardized molecular assay that used limited resources and equipment for routine genotyping of isolates of the fish rhabdovirus, viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV). Computer generated restriction maps, based on 62 unique full-length (1524 nt) sequences of the VHSV glycoprotein (G) gene, were used to predict restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) patterns that were subsequently grouped and compared with a phylogenetic analysis of the G-gene sequences of the same set of isolates. Digestion of PCR amplicons from the full-lengthG-gene by a set of three restriction enzymes was predicted to accurately enable the assignment of the VHSV isolates into the four major genotypes discovered to date. Further sub-typing of the isolates into the recently described sub-lineages of genotype I was possible by applying three additional enzymes. Experimental evaluation of the method consisted of three steps: (i) RT-PCR amplification of the G-gene of VHSV isolates using purified viral RNA as template, (ii) digestion of the PCR products with a panel of restriction endonucleases and (iii) interpretation of the resulting RFLP profiles. The RFLP analysis was shown to approximate the level of genetic discrimination obtained by other, more labour-intensive, molecular techniques such as the ribonuclease protection assay or sequence analysis. In addition, 37 previously uncharacterised isolates from diverse sources were assigned to specific genotypes. While the assay was able to distinguish between marine and continental isolates of VHSV, the differences did not correlate with the pathogenicity of the isolates.