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Sample records for results phase iva

  1. Diagnosing mucopolysaccharidosis IVA.

    PubMed

    Wood, Timothy C; Harvey, Katie; Beck, Michael; Burin, Maira Graeff; Chien, Yin-Hsiu; Church, Heather J; D'Almeida, Vânia; van Diggelen, Otto P; Fietz, Michael; Giugliani, Roberto; Harmatz, Paul; Hawley, Sara M; Hwu, Wuh-Liang; Ketteridge, David; Lukacs, Zoltan; Miller, Nicole; Pasquali, Marzia; Schenone, Andrea; Thompson, Jerry N; Tylee, Karen; Yu, Chunli; Hendriksz, Christian J

    2013-03-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA (MPS IVA; Morquio A syndrome) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder resulting from a deficiency of N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase (GALNS) activity. Diagnosis can be challenging and requires agreement of clinical, radiographic, and laboratory findings. A group of biochemical genetics laboratory directors and clinicians involved in the diagnosis of MPS IVA, convened by BioMarin Pharmaceutical Inc., met to develop recommendations for diagnosis. The following conclusions were reached. Due to the wide variation and subtleties of radiographic findings, imaging of multiple body regions is recommended. Urinary glycosaminoglycan analysis is particularly problematic for MPS IVA and it is strongly recommended to proceed to enzyme activity testing even if urine appears normal when there is clinical suspicion of MPS IVA. Enzyme activity testing of GALNS is essential in diagnosing MPS IVA. Additional analyses to confirm sample integrity and rule out MPS IVB, multiple sulfatase deficiency, and mucolipidoses types II/III are critical as part of enzyme activity testing. Leukocytes or cultured dermal fibroblasts are strongly recommended for enzyme activity testing to confirm screening results. Molecular testing may also be used to confirm the diagnosis in many patients. However, two known or probable causative mutations may not be identified in all cases of MPS IVA. A diagnostic testing algorithm is presented which attempts to streamline this complex testing process.

  2. Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA and glycosaminoglycans.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shaukat; Alméciga-Díaz, Carlos J; Sawamoto, Kazuki; Mackenzie, William G; Theroux, Mary C; Pizarro, Christian; Mason, Robert W; Orii, Tadao; Tomatsu, Shunji

    Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA (MPS IVA; Morquio A: OMIM 253000) is a lysosomal storage disease with an autosomal recessive trait caused by the deficiency of N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase. Deficiency of this enzyme leads to accumulation of specific glycosaminoglycans (GAGs): chondroitin-6-sulfate (C6S) and keratan sulfate (KS). C6S and KS are mainly produced in the cartilage. Therefore, the undegraded substrates are stored primarily in cartilage and in its extracellular matrix (ECM), leading to a direct impact on cartilage and bone development, and successive systemic skeletal dysplasia. Chondrogenesis, the earliest phase of skeletal formation, is maintained by cellular interactions with the ECM, growth and differentiation factors, signaling pathways, and transcription factors in a temporal-spatial manner. In patients with MPS IVA, the cartilage is disrupted at birth as a consequence of abnormal chondrogenesis and/or endochondral ossification. The unique skeletal features are distinguished by a disproportional short stature, odontoid hypoplasia, spinal cord compression, tracheal obstruction, pectus carinatum, kyphoscoliosis, platyspondyly, coxa valga, genu valgum, waddling gait, and laxity of joints. In spite of many descriptions of these unique clinical features, delay of diagnosis still happens. The pathogenesis and treatment of systemic skeletal dysplasia in MPS IVA remains an unmet challenge. In this review article, we comprehensively describe historical aspect, property of GAGs, diagnosis, screening, pathogenesis, and current and future therapies of MPS IVA.

  3. Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA and glycosaminoglycans

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Shaukat; Alméciga-Díaz, Carlos J.; Sawamoto, Kazuki; Mackenzie, William G.; Theroux, Mary C; Pizarro, Christian; Mason, Robert W.; Orii, Tadao; Tomatsu, Shunji

    2016-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA (MPS IVA; Morquio A: OMIM 253000) is a lysosomal storage disease with an autosomal recessive trait caused by the deficiency of N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase. Deficiency of this enzyme leads to accumulation of specific glycosaminoglycans (GAGs): chondroitin-6-sulfate (C6S) and keratan sulfate (KS). C6S and KS are mainly produced in the cartilage. Therefore, the undegraded substrates are stored primarily in cartilage and in its extracellular matrix (ECM), leading to a direct impact on cartilage and bone development, and successive systemic skeletal dysplasia. Chondrogenesis, the earliest phase of skeletal formation, is maintained by cellular interactions with the ECM, growth and differentiation factors, signaling pathways, and transcription factors in a temporal-spatial manner. In patients with MPS IVA, the cartilage is disrupted at birth as a consequence of abnormal chondrogenesis and/or endochondral ossification. The unique skeletal features are distinguished by a disproportional short stature, odontoid hypoplasia, spinal cord compression, tracheal obstruction, pectus carinatum, kyphoscoliosis, platyspondyly, coxa valga, genu valgum, waddling gait, and laxity of joints. In spite of many descriptions of these unique clinical features, delay of diagnosis still happens. The pathogenesis and treatment of systemic skeletal dysplasia in MPS IVA remains an unmet challenge. In this review article, we comprehensively describe historical aspect, property of GAGs, diagnosis, screening, pathogenesis, and current and future therapies of MPS IVA. PMID:27979613

  4. Cervical Cancer Stage IVA

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IVA Add to My Pictures View / ... 1575x1200 View Download Large: 3150x2400 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IVA Description: Stage IVA cervical cancer; ...

  5. Metallographic Cooling Rate of IVA Irons Revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, J.; Goldstein, J. I.; Scott, E. R. D.

    2005-01-01

    There is long standing problem reconciling the chemical evidence that the IVA iron meteorites formed in a core with the diverse cooling rates reported by several researchers. This large inferred range of cooling rates suggests that the IVA irons were distributed at different depths in a parent body with a complex structure when the Widmanstatten pattern formed. On the other hand, some researchers argued that the diverse cooling rates in group IVA result from inaccurate model parameters such as phase diagram, interdiffusion coefficients, and kamacite nucleation and growth mechanisms. In addition, the measured cooling rates may not apply for the same cooling temperature ranges, and the variation in the crystallographic orientations of the Widmanstatten plates on the analysis surface may result in inaccurate measurements of widths needed for the computer simulation models. We have revaluated the major parameters in computer model developed by Hopfe and Goldstein and measured cooling rates for the IVA irons. Such data are useful in evaluating whether these meteorites were part of a single core of a parent body during the formation of the Widmanstatten pattern.

  6. Conversion of IVA Human Computer Model to EVA Use and Evaluation and Comparison of the Result to Existing EVA Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, George S.; Williams, Jermaine C.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the methods, rationale, and comparative results of the conversion of an intravehicular (IVA) 3D human computer model (HCM) to extravehicular (EVA) use and compares the converted model to an existing model on another computer platform. The task of accurately modeling a spacesuited human figure in software is daunting: the suit restricts the human's joint range of motion (ROM) and does not have joints collocated with human joints. The modeling of the variety of materials needed to construct a space suit (e. g. metal bearings, rigid fiberglass torso, flexible cloth limbs and rubber coated gloves) attached to a human figure is currently out of reach of desktop computer hardware and software. Therefore a simplified approach was taken. The HCM's body parts were enlarged and the joint ROM was restricted to match the existing spacesuit model. This basic approach could be used to model other restrictive environments in industry such as chemical or fire protective clothing. In summary, the approach provides a moderate fidelity, usable tool which will run on current notebook computers.

  7. Elosulfase Alfa: a review of its use in patients with mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA (Morquio A syndrome).

    PubMed

    Lyseng-Williamson, Katherine A

    2014-10-01

    Elosulfase alfa (Vimizim(®)) is a recombinant form of the human lysosomal enzyme N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfatase (GALNS) that is lacking in patients with mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA (MPS IVA; Morquio A syndrome). It is the first, and currently only, disease-specific treatment option for this very rare, progressively degenerative, autosomal-recessive lysosomal storage disorder. Enzyme replacement therapy with elosulfase alfa aims to restore GALNS activity, thereby preventing the accumulation of keratan sulfate (KS) and chondroitin-6-sulfate in lysosomal compartments of cells that results in the clinical manifestations of MPS IVA. In clinical trials in children and adults with MPS IVA, intravenous elosulfase alfa 2 mg/kg/week provided significant and sustained improvements in urinary levels of KS (a pharmacodynamic biomarker for the disease). In the key placebo-controlled, 24-week, phase 3 trial in patients with MPS IVA aged ≥5 years, elosulfase alfa 2 mg/kg/week significantly improved endurance [least squares mean placebo-adjusted change from baseline in 6-min walk test distance 22.5 m (95 % CI 4.0-40.9)]. Infusion-associated reactions, the primary tolerability issue associated with elosulfase alfa, are generally mild to moderate in severity, self-limiting, and manageable. In the absence of a cure, GALNS enzyme replacement therapy with elosulfase alfa is an important achievement in the treatment of MPS IVA.

  8. IVA robotics for Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Sharon Monica

    1992-01-01

    The objective is to increase the scientific productivity of Space Station Freedom (Spacelab) during the man-tended phase and beyond. The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include: Space Station Freedom (SSF) background, man-tended phase, intra-vehicular activity (IVA) robotics, protein crystal growth experiment, thermal enclosure system equipment, and candidate mockup demonstrations.

  9. Enzyme replacement therapy for treating mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA (Morquio A syndrome): effect and limitations

    PubMed Central

    Tomatsu, Shunji; Sawamoto, Kazuki; Shimada, Tsutomu; Bober, Michael B.; Kubaski, Francyne; Yasuda, Eriko; Mason, Robert W.; Khan, Shaukat; Alméciga-Díaz, Carlos J.; Barrera, Luis A.; Mackenzie, William G.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Following a Phase III, randomized, double-blind, placebo (PBO)-controlled, multinational study in subjects with mucopolysaccharidosis IVA (MPS IVA), enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) of elosulfase alfa has been approved in several countries. The study was designed to evaluate safety and efficacy of elosulfase alfa in patients with MPS IVA aged 5 years and older. Areas covered Outcomes of clinical trials for MPS IVA have been described. Subjects received either 2.0 mg/kg/week, 2.0 mg/kg/every other week, or PBO, for 24 weeks. The primary endpoint was the change from baseline 6-min walk test (6MWT) distance compared to PBO. The 6MWT results improved in patients receiving 2 mg/kg weekly compared to PBO. The every other week regimen resulted in walk distances comparable to PBO. There was no change from baseline in the 3 Min Stair Climb Test in both treatment groups. Following completion of the initial study, patients, who continued to receive elosulfase alfa 2 mg/kg weekly (QW) for another 48 weeks (for a total of up to 72-week exposure), did not show additional improvement on 6MWT. Expert opinion We suggest that ERT is a therapeutic option for MPS IVA, providing a modest effect and the majority of the effects are seen in the soft tissues. PMID:26973801

  10. Cooling rates of group IVA iron meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, J.; Wasson, J. T.

    1978-01-01

    Cooling rates of six group IVA iron meteorites were estimated by a taenite central Ni concentration-taenite half-width method. Calculated cooling rates range from 13 to 25 C/Myr, with an average of 20 C/Myr. No correlation between cooling rate and bulk Ni content is observed, and the data appear to be consistent with a uniform cooling rate as expected from an igneous core origin. This result differs from previous studies reporting a wide range in cooling rates that were strongly correlated with bulk Ni content. The differences result mainly from differences in the phase diagram and the selected diffusion coefficients. Cooling rates inferred from taenite Ni concentrations at the interface with kamacite are consistent with those based on taenite central Ni content.

  11. Mark IVA microprocessor support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burford, A. L.

    1982-01-01

    The requirements and plans for the maintenance support of microprocessor-based controllers in the Deep Space Network Mark IVA System are discussed. Additional new interfaces and 16-bit processors have introduced problems not present in the Mark III System. The need for continuous training of maintenance personnel to maintain a level of expertise consistent with the sophistication of the required tools is also emphasized.

  12. Review of Clinical Presentation and Diagnosis of Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA

    PubMed Central

    Hendriksz, C.J.; Harmatz, P.; Beck, M.; Jones, S.; Wood, T.; Lachman, R.; Gravance, C.G.

    2013-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA (MPS IVA) was described in 1929 by Luis Morquio from Uruguay and James Brailsford from England, and was later found as an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease. MPS IVA is caused by mutations in the gene encoding the enzyme, N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase (GALNS). Reduced GALNS activity results in impaired catabolism of two glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), chondroitin-6-sulfate (C6S) and keratan sulfate (KS). Clinical presentations of MPS IVA reflect a spectrum of progression from a severe ”classical” phenotype to a mild “attenuated” phenotype. More than 180 different mutations have been identified in the GALNS gene, which likely explains the phenotypic heterogeneity of the disorder. Accumulation of C6S and KS manifests predominantly as short stature and skeletal dysplasia (dysostosis multiplex), including atlantoaxial instability and cervical cord compression. However, abnormalities in the visual, auditory, cardiovascular, and respiratory systems can also affect individuals with MPS IVA. Diagnosis is typically based on clinical examination, skeletal radiographs, urinary GAG, and enzymatic activity of GALNS in blood cells or fibroblasts. Deficiency of GALNS activity is a common assessment for the laboratory diagnosis of MPS IVA; however, with recently increased availability, gene sequencing for MPS IVA is often used to confirm enzyme results. As multiple clinical presentations are observed, diagnosis of MPS IVA may require multi-system considerations. This review provides a history of defining MPS IVA and how the understanding of the disease manifestations has changed over time. A summary of the accumulated knowledge is presented, including information from the International Morquio Registry. The classical phenotype is contrasted with attenuated cases, which are now being recognized and diagnosed more frequently. Laboratory based diagnoses of MPS IVA are also discussed. PMID:23665161

  13. Review of clinical presentation and diagnosis of mucopolysaccharidosis IVA.

    PubMed

    Hendriksz, C J; Harmatz, P; Beck, M; Jones, S; Wood, T; Lachman, R; Gravance, C G; Orii, T; Tomatsu, S

    2013-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA (MPS IVA) was described in 1929 by Luis Morquio from Uruguay and James Brailsford from England, and was later found as an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease. MPS IVA is caused by mutations in the gene encoding the enzyme, N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase (GALNS). Reduced GALNS activity results in impaired catabolism of two glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), chondroitin-6-sulfate (C6S) and keratan sulfate (KS). Clinical presentations of MPS IVA reflect a spectrum of progression from a severe "classical" phenotype to a mild "attenuated" phenotype. More than 180 different mutations have been identified in the GALNS gene, which likely explains the phenotypic heterogeneity of the disorder. Accumulation of C6S and KS manifests predominantly as short stature and skeletal dysplasia (dysostosis multiplex), including atlantoaxial instability and cervical cord compression. However, abnormalities in the visual, auditory, cardiovascular, and respiratory systems can also affect individuals with MPS IVA. Diagnosis is typically based on clinical examination, skeletal radiographs, urinary GAG, and enzymatic activity of GALNS in blood cells or fibroblasts. Deficiency of GALNS activity is a common assessment for the laboratory diagnosis of MPS IVA; however, with recently increased availability, gene sequencing for MPS IVA is often used to confirm enzyme results. As multiple clinical presentations are observed, diagnosis of MPS IVA may require multi-system considerations. This review provides a history of defining MPS IVA and how the understanding of the disease manifestations has changed over time. A summary of the accumulated knowledge is presented, including information from the International Morquio Registry. The classical phenotype is contrasted with attenuated cases, which are now being recognized and diagnosed more frequently. Laboratory based diagnoses of MPS IVA are also discussed.

  14. Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA mutations in Chinese patients: 16 novel mutations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Weimin; Wang, Yun; Meng, Yan; Su, Liang; Shi, Huiping; Huang, Shangzhi

    2010-08-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA (MPS IVA; Morquio A syndrome) is a lysosomal storage disease caused by deficiency of N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfatase (GALNS) and transmitted as an autosomal recessive trait. This is the first systematic mutation screen in Chinese MPS IVA patients. Mutation detections in 24 unrelated Chinese MPS IVA patients were performed by PCR and direct sequencing of exons or the mRNA of GALNS. A total of 42 mutant alleles were identified, belonging to 27 different mutations. Out of the 27 mutations, 16 were novel, including 2 splicing mutations (c.567-1G>T and c.634-1G>A), 2 nonsense mutations (p.W325X and p.Q422X) and 12 missense mutations (p.T88I, p.H142R, p.P163H, p.G168L, p.H236D, p.N289S, p.T312A, p.G316V, p.A324E, p.L366P, p.Q422K and p.F452L). p.G340D was found to be a common mutation in the Chinese MPS IVA patients, accounting for 16.7% of the total number of mutant alleles. The results show that the mutations in Chinese MPS IVA patients are also family specific but have a different mutation spectrum as compared to those of other populations.

  15. The I-Xe System in the IVA Iron Meteorite Steinbach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pravdivtseva, O.; Meshik, A.; Hohenberg, C. M.

    2013-09-01

    Non-metallic phases from IVA Steinbach were separated and identified to be troilite, chromite, tridymite, and clino- and orthopyroxene. Xenon isotopic compositions are measured to identify possible iodine carrier phases suitable for the I-Xe dating.

  16. Role of elosulfase alfa in mucopolysaccharidosis IVA.

    PubMed

    Regier, Debra S; Tanpaiboon, Pranoot

    2016-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA (MPS IVA or Morquio A) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease which results in a striking skeletal phenotype, but does not negatively impact the intellect of the patient. MPS IVA has a phenotypic continuum that ranges from a severe and rapidly progressing form to a slowly progressive form. The clinical diagnosis is often made in the preschool years based on abnormal bone findings on physical examination and dysplasia on radiographic imaging. Supportive care has been the mainstay in caring for patients. Orthopedic physicians often form the core of the care team due to the early and severe skeletal abnormalities; however, systemic disease is common and requires aggressive monitoring and management. Interdisciplinary care teams often consist of medical geneticists, cardiologists, pulmonary specialists, gastroenterologists, otolaryngologists, audiologists, and ophthalmologists. With the US Food and Drug Administration's approval of elosulfase alfa, patients >5 years of age now have access to this medication from the time of diagnosis. The clinical trial with once weekly intravenous dosing (2.0 mg/kg per week) showed improvement in the 6-minute walk test. The composite end point analysis to evaluate the combining changes from baseline in 6-minute walk test, 3-minute stair climb test, and respiratory function showed that at a dose of 2.0 mg/kg per week, subjects performed better when compared to placebo. This indication was clinically meaningful in the treatment group. The treatment was generally well tolerated, and the uncommon infusion reactions responded well to traditional enzyme replacement therapy infusion reaction management algorithms. Currently, clinical trials are underway to determine the efficacy and safety in MPS IVA patients <5 years of age.

  17. Role of elosulfase alfa in mucopolysaccharidosis IVA

    PubMed Central

    Regier, Debra S; Tanpaiboon, Pranoot

    2016-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA (MPS IVA or Morquio A) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease which results in a striking skeletal phenotype, but does not negatively impact the intellect of the patient. MPS IVA has a phenotypic continuum that ranges from a severe and rapidly progressing form to a slowly progressive form. The clinical diagnosis is often made in the preschool years based on abnormal bone findings on physical examination and dysplasia on radiographic imaging. Supportive care has been the mainstay in caring for patients. Orthopedic physicians often form the core of the care team due to the early and severe skeletal abnormalities; however, systemic disease is common and requires aggressive monitoring and management. Interdisciplinary care teams often consist of medical geneticists, cardiologists, pulmonary specialists, gastroenterologists, otolaryngologists, audiologists, and ophthalmologists. With the US Food and Drug Administration’s approval of elosulfase alfa, patients >5 years of age now have access to this medication from the time of diagnosis. The clinical trial with once weekly intravenous dosing (2.0 mg/kg per week) showed improvement in the 6-minute walk test. The composite end point analysis to evaluate the combining changes from baseline in 6-minute walk test, 3-minute stair climb test, and respiratory function showed that at a dose of 2.0 mg/kg per week, subjects performed better when compared to placebo. This indication was clinically meaningful in the treatment group. The treatment was generally well tolerated, and the uncommon infusion reactions responded well to traditional enzyme replacement therapy infusion reaction management algorithms. Currently, clinical trials are underway to determine the efficacy and safety in MPS IVA patients <5 years of age. PMID:27366102

  18. Size of the Group IVA Iron Meteorite Parent Body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskovitz, N.; Walker, R.

    2011-10-01

    The group IVA fractionally crystallized iron meteorites display a diverse range of metallographic cooling rates, ranging from 100 - 6600 K/Myr [1]. These have been attributed to their formation in a metallic core, ˜150 km in radius that cooled to crystallization without any appreciable insulating mantle. Such an exposed core may have resulted from a hit-and-run collision [2] between two large (˜ 103 km) protoplanetary bodies. Here we build upon this formation scenario by incorporating several new constraints. These include (i) a recent U-Pb radiometric closure age of 4565.3 Mya (<2.5 Myr after CAIs) for the group IVA iron Muonionalusta [3], (ii) new measurements and modeling of highly siderophile element compositions for a suite of IVAs, and (iii) consideration of the thermal effects of heating by the decay of the short-lived radionuclide 60Fe.

  19. Preserving subject variability in group fMRI analysis: performance evaluation of GICA vs. IVA

    PubMed Central

    Michael, Andrew M.; Anderson, Mathew; Miller, Robyn L.; Adalı, Tülay; Calhoun, Vince D.

    2014-01-01

    Independent component analysis (ICA) is a widely applied technique to derive functionally connected brain networks from fMRI data. Group ICA (GICA) and Independent Vector Analysis (IVA) are extensions of ICA that enable users to perform group fMRI analyses; however a full comparison of the performance limits of GICA and IVA has not been investigated. Recent interest in resting state fMRI data with potentially higher degree of subject variability makes the evaluation of the above techniques important. In this paper we compare component estimation accuracies of GICA and an improved version of IVA using simulated fMRI datasets. We systematically change the degree of inter-subject spatial variability of components and evaluate estimation accuracy over all spatial maps (SMs) and time courses (TCs) of the decomposition. Our results indicate the following: (1) at low levels of SM variability or when just one SM is varied, both GICA and IVA perform well, (2) at higher levels of SM variability or when more than one SMs are varied, IVA continues to perform well but GICA yields SM estimates that are composites of other SMs with errors in TCs, (3) both GICA and IVA remove spatial correlations of overlapping SMs and introduce artificial correlations in their TCs, (4) if number of SMs is over estimated, IVA continues to perform well but GICA introduces artifacts in the varying and extra SMs with artificial correlations in the TCs of extra components, and (5) in the absence or presence of SMs unique to one subject, GICA produces errors in TCs and IVA estimates are accurate. In summary, our simulation experiments (both simplistic and realistic) and our holistic analyses approach indicate that IVA produces results that are closer to ground truth and thereby better preserves subject variability. The improved version of IVA is now packaged into the GIFT toolbox (http://mialab.mrn.org/software/gift). PMID:25018704

  20. Preserving subject variability in group fMRI analysis: performance evaluation of GICA vs. IVA.

    PubMed

    Michael, Andrew M; Anderson, Mathew; Miller, Robyn L; Adalı, Tülay; Calhoun, Vince D

    2014-01-01

    Independent component analysis (ICA) is a widely applied technique to derive functionally connected brain networks from fMRI data. Group ICA (GICA) and Independent Vector Analysis (IVA) are extensions of ICA that enable users to perform group fMRI analyses; however a full comparison of the performance limits of GICA and IVA has not been investigated. Recent interest in resting state fMRI data with potentially higher degree of subject variability makes the evaluation of the above techniques important. In this paper we compare component estimation accuracies of GICA and an improved version of IVA using simulated fMRI datasets. We systematically change the degree of inter-subject spatial variability of components and evaluate estimation accuracy over all spatial maps (SMs) and time courses (TCs) of the decomposition. Our results indicate the following: (1) at low levels of SM variability or when just one SM is varied, both GICA and IVA perform well, (2) at higher levels of SM variability or when more than one SMs are varied, IVA continues to perform well but GICA yields SM estimates that are composites of other SMs with errors in TCs, (3) both GICA and IVA remove spatial correlations of overlapping SMs and introduce artificial correlations in their TCs, (4) if number of SMs is over estimated, IVA continues to perform well but GICA introduces artifacts in the varying and extra SMs with artificial correlations in the TCs of extra components, and (5) in the absence or presence of SMs unique to one subject, GICA produces errors in TCs and IVA estimates are accurate. In summary, our simulation experiments (both simplistic and realistic) and our holistic analyses approach indicate that IVA produces results that are closer to ground truth and thereby better preserves subject variability. The improved version of IVA is now packaged into the GIFT toolbox (http://mialab.mrn.org/software/gift).

  1. Vasorelaxant effect of the aqueous extract of Ajuga iva in rat aorta.

    PubMed

    El-Hilaly, Jaouad; Lyoussi, Badiaâ; Wibo, Maurice; Morel, Nicole

    2004-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the ex vivo and in vitro vascular activity of the aqueous extract of Ajuga iva (L.) Schreber (Labiatae) in normotensive Wistar rats. Chronic oral administration of the extract of Ajuga iva did not significantly affect the systolic blood pressure. In aorta isolated from Ajuga iva-treated rats, the contractile response to noradrenaline was depressed compared to the responses obtained in aorta from untreated rats but the endothelium-dependent relaxation evoked by acetylcholine was not affected. In vitro, Ajuga iva extract inhibited the contraction evoked by noradrenaline. The addition of Ajuga iva extract during the plateau phase of noradrenaline-evoked contraction produced a relaxation that was sensitive to N-nitro-L-arginine. After pre-incubation of the artery in the presence of the plant extract, vasorelaxant effect was markedly less pronounced. The endothelium-dependent relaxation induced by acetylcholine was concentration-dependently blunted in the presence of Ajuga iva extract in the bathing solution. This study indicates that the aqueous extract of Ajuga iva possesses NO-mediated and NO-independent vasorelaxing properties in vitro while only the endothelium-independent effect was observed ex vivo.

  2. Structure-activity relationships of ω-Agatoxin IVA in lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Jae Ha; Jung, Hoi Jong; Konishi, Shiro; Kim, Ha Hyung; Park, Zee-Yong; Kim, Jae Il

    2017-01-01

    To analyze structural features of ω-Aga IVA, a gating modifier toxin from spider venom, we here investigated the NMR solution structure of ω-Aga IVA within DPC micelles. Under those conditions, the Cys-rich central region of ω-Aga IVA still retains the inhibitor Cys knot motif with three short antiparallel β-strands seen in water. However, (15)N HSQC spectra of ω-Aga IVA within micelles revealed that there are radical changes to the toxin's C-terminal tail and several loops upon binding to micelles. The C-terminal tail of ω-Aga IVA appears to assume a β-turn like conformation within micelles, though it is disordered in water. Whole-cell patch clamp studies with several ω-Aga IVA analogs indicate that both the hydrophobic C-terminal tail and an Arg patch in the core region of ω-Aga IVA are critical for Cav2.1 blockade. These results suggest that the membrane environment stabilizes the structure of the toxin, enabling it to act in a manner similar to other gating modifier toxins, though its mode of interaction with the membrane and the channel is unique.

  3. N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase IVa regulates metastatic potential of mouse hepatocarcinoma cells through glycosylation of CD147.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jianhui; Wang, Shujing; Yu, Shengjin; He, Jingna; Zheng, Weilong; Zhang, Jianing

    2012-08-01

    N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase (GnT)-IV a is a key enzyme that catalyzes the formation of the GlcNAC β1-4 branch on the core structure of complex N-Glycans, which is the common substrate for other N-acetylglucosaminyltransferases, such as GnT-III and GnT-V. Our recent study indicates that the expression of GnT-IVa in Hca-F cells was much higher than that in Hepa1-6 cells, these two mouse hepatocarcinoma cell lines have high and no metastatic potential in lymph nodes respectively. To investigate the effects of GnT-IVa on the metastasis of hepatocarcinoma, exogenous GnT-IVa was introduced into Hepa1-6 cells, and on the other hand, the expression of GnT-IVa was down-regulated in Hca-F cells. The engineered overexpression of GnT-IVa in Hepa1-6 cells increased the antennary branches of complex N-glycans and reduced bisecting branches in vitro and in vivo, which leads to the increase in migration and metastatic capability of hepatocarcinoma cells. Conversely, down-regulated expression of GnT-IVa in Hca-F cells showed reduced tetra-antennary branches of N-Glycans, and significantly decreased the migration and metastatic capability. Furthermore, we found that the regulated GnT-IVa converts the heterogeneous N-glycosylated forms of CD147 in Hepa1-6 and Hca-F cells, and significantly changed the antennary oligosaccharide structures on CD147. These results suggest that GnT-IVa could be acting as a key role in migration and metastasis of mouse hepatocarcinoma cells through altering the glycosylation of CD147. These findings should be valuable in delineating the important function of GnT-IVa during the process of hepatocarcinoma growth and metastasis.

  4. Bisphosphonate Treatment in a Patient Affected by MPS IVA with Osteoporotic Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Tummolo, Albina; Gabrielli, Orazio; Gaeta, Alberto; Masciopinto, Maristella; Zampini, Lucia; Pavone, Luigi Michele; Di Natale, Paola; Papadia, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Morquio A syndrome (Mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA) (MPS IVA) is a rare inherited metabolic disorder characterized by the defective degradation of keratan sulfate and chondroitin-6-sulfate. Classically, MPS IVA patients present with severe multisystemic involvement and have a short life expectancy. Attenuated forms with clinical features limited to minor skeletal abnormalities and short stature have also been described, sometimes associated to an early-onset osteoporotic phenotype. No treatment with allogenic bone marrow transplantation or gene therapy is currently available for Morquio A syndrome, and enzyme replacement therapy is under evaluation. We report a case of MPS IVA, who manifested tardily attenuated phenotype and significant bone mass reduction, which was treated with a bisphosphonate (BPN), resulting in an improvement of X-ray skeletal aspects and functional bone performance. We suggest that the use of bisphosphonates may be an interesting supportive therapeutic option for Morquio A patients with osteoporotic phenotype, but further studies involving more patients are necessary to confirm our findings.

  5. Chondroitin 6-Sulfate as a Novel Biomarker for Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA and VII.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Tsutomu; Tomatsu, Shunji; Yasuda, Eriko; Mason, Robert W; Mackenzie, William G; Shibata, Yuniko; Kubaski, Francyne; Giugliani, Roberto; Yamaguchi, Seiji; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Orii, Kenji; Orii, Tadao

    2014-01-01

    Chondroitin 6-sulfate (C6S), a glycosaminoglycan (GAG), is distributed mainly in the growth plates, aorta, and cornea; however, the physiological function of C6S is not fully understood. One of the limitations is that no rapid, accurate quantitative method to measure C6S has been established. Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA and VII (MPS IVA and VII) are caused by the deficiency of N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase and β-D-glucuronidase, respectively, resulting in accumulation of C6S and other GAG(s). While levels of keratan sulfate (KS), heparan sulfate, and dermatan sulfate in samples from MPS patients are well described, this is the first report of quantitative analysis of C6S levels in samples from MPS IVA and VII patients.We developed a method to digest polymeric C6S and measure resultant disaccharides using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). C6S levels were measured in the blood from control subjects and patients with MPS IVA and VII aged from 0 to 58 years of age. We also assayed KS levels in the same samples for comparison with C6S.Levels of C6S in the blood decreased with age and were significantly elevated in patients with MPS IVA and VII, compared with age-matched controls. Levels of KS in patients with MPS IVA were also higher than those in age-matched controls, although differences were less pronounced than with C6S. Combining KS and C6S data, discriminated patients with MPS IVA from age-matched control subjects were better than either C6S or KS levels alone.In conclusion, this first report showing that blood levels of C6S are quantitatively evaluated in patients with MPS IVA and VII indicates that C6S could be a useful biomarker for these metabolic disorders.

  6. 129I interlaboratory comparison: phase I and phase II results

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, M.I.; Caffee, M.W.; Proctor, I.D.

    1997-07-01

    An interlaboratory comparison exercise for 129I was organized and conducted. A total of nine laboratories participated in the exercise to either a full or limited extent. In Phase I of the comparison, a suite of 11 samples were measured. The suite of samples contained both synthetic `standard type` materials (i.e., AgI) and environmental materials. The isotopic 129I/127I ratios of the samples varied from 10`-8 to 10`-14. In this phase, each laboratory was responsible for its own chemical preparation of the environmental samples. The 129I AMS measurements obtained at different laboratories for prepared AgI were in good agreement. However, large discrepancies were seen in 129I AMS measurements of environmental samples. Because of the large discrepancies seen in the Phase I intercomparison, a subsequent study was conducted. In Phase II of the comparison, AgI was prepared from two environmental samples (IAEA 375 soil and maples leaves) by three separate laboratories. Each laboratory used its own chemical preparation method with each of the methods being distinctly different. The resulting six samples (two sets of three) were then redistributed to the participating 129I AMS facilities and 129I/127I ratios measured. Results and discussion of both the Phase I and Phase II interlaboratory comparison are presented.

  7. Oxidative stress and inflammation in mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA patients treated with enzyme replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Donida, Bruna; Marchetti, Desirèe P; Biancini, Giovana B; Deon, Marion; Manini, Paula R; da Rosa, Helen T; Moura, Dinara J; Saffi, Jenifer; Bender, Fernanda; Burin, Maira G; Coitinho, Adriana S; Giugliani, Roberto; Vargas, Carmen Regla

    2015-05-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA (MPS IVA) is an inborn error of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) catabolism due to the deficient activity of N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase that leads to accumulation of the keratan sulfate and chondroitin 6-sulfate in body fluids and in lysosomes. The pathophysiology of this lysosomal storage disorder is not completely understood. The aim of this study was to investigate oxidative stress parameters, pro-inflammatory cytokine and GAG levels in MPS IVA patients. We analyzed urine and blood samples from patients under ERT (n=17) and healthy age-matched controls (n=10-15). Patients presented a reduction of antioxidant defense levels, assessed by a decrease in glutathione content and by an increase in superoxide dismutase activity in erythrocytes. Concerning lipid and protein damage, it was verified increased urine isoprostanes and di-tyrosine levels and decreased plasma sulfhydryl groups in MPS IVA patients compared to controls. MPS IVA patients showed higher DNA damage than control group and this damage had an oxidative origin in both pyrimidine and purine bases. Interleukin 6 was increased in patients and presented an inverse correlation with GSH levels, showing a possible link between inflammation and oxidative stress in MPS IVA disease. The data presented suggest that pro-inflammatory and pro-oxidant states occur in MPS IVA patients even under ERT. Taking these results into account, supplementation of antioxidants in combination with ERT can be a tentative therapeutic approach with the purpose of improving the patient's quality of life. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study relating MPS IVA patients with oxidative stress.

  8. Laparoscopic Radiofrequency Fibroid Ablation: Phase II and Phase III Results

    PubMed Central

    Pemueller, Rodolfo Robles; Garza Leal, José Gerardo; Abbott, Karen R.; Falls, Janice L.; Macer, James

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: To review phase II and phase III treatments of symptomatic uterine fibroids (myomas) using laparoscopic radiofrequency volumetric thermal ablation (RFVTA). Methods: We performed a retrospective, multicenter clinical analysis of 206 consecutive cases of ultrasound-guided laparoscopic RFVTA of symptomatic myomas conducted on an outpatient basis under two phase II studies at 2 sites (n = 69) and one phase III study at 11 sites (n = 137). Descriptive and exploratory, general trend, and matched-pair analyses were applied. Results: From baseline to 12 months in the phase II study, the mean transformed symptom severity scores improved from 53.9 to 8.8 (P < .001) (n = 57), health-related quality-of-life scores improved from 48.5 to 92.0 (P < .001) (n = 57), and mean uterine volume decreased from 204.4 cm3 to 151.4 cm3 (P = .008) (n = 58). Patients missed a median of 4 days of work (range, 2–10 days). The rate of possible device-related adverse events was 1.4% (1 of 69). In the phase III study, approximately 98% of patients were assessed at 12 months, and their transformed symptom severity scores, health-related quality-of-life scores, mean decrease in uterine volume, and mean menstrual bleeding reduction were also significant. Patients in phase III missed a median of 5 days of work (range, 1–29 days). The rate of periprocedural device-related adverse events was 3.5% (5 of 137). Despite the enrollment requirement for patients in both phases to have completed childbearing, 4 pregnancies occurred within the first year after treatment. Conclusions: RFVTA does not require any uterine incisions and provides a uterine-sparing procedure with rapid recovery, significant reduction in uterine size, significant reduction or elimination of myoma symptoms, and significant improvement in quality of life. PMID:24960480

  9. Antithrombotic effect of chikusetsusaponin IVa isolated from Ilex paraguariensis (Maté).

    PubMed

    Dahmer, Tabitha; Berger, Markus; Barlette, Adriana Gregory; Reck, José; Segalin, Jéferson; Verza, Simone; Ortega, George González; Gnoatto, Simone Cristina Baggio; Guimarães, Jorge Almeida; Verli, Hugo; Gosmann, Grace

    2012-12-01

    The triterpene chikusetsusaponin IVa was isolated from the fruit of Ilex paraguariensis. Using biochemical and pharmacological methods, we demonstrated that chikusetsusaponin IVa (1) prolongs the recalcification time, prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, and thrombin time of normal human plasma in a dose-dependent manner, (2) inhibits the amidolytic activity of thrombin and factor Xa upon synthetic substrates S2238 and S2222, (3) inhibits thrombin-induced fibrinogen clotting (50% inhibition concentration, 199.4 ± 9.1 μM), and (4) inhibits thrombin- and collagen-induced platelet aggregation. The results also indicate that chikusetsusaponin IVa preferentially inhibits thrombin in a competitive manner (K(i)=219.6 μM). Furthermore, when administered intravenously to rats, chikusetsusaponin IVa inhibited thrombus formation in a stasis model of venous thrombosis, although it did not induce a significant bleeding effect. Chikusetsusaponin IVa also prolonged the ex vivo activated partial thromboplastin time. Altogether, these data suggest that chikusetsusaponin IVa exerts antithrombotic effects, including minor hemorrhagic events. This appears to be important for the development of new therapeutic agents.

  10. Phase II Trial of Hyperfractionated Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy and Concurrent Weekly Cisplatin for Stage III and IVa Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Maguire, Patrick D.; Papagikos, Michael; Hamann, Sue; Neal, Charles; Meyerson, Martin; Hayes, Neil; Ungaro, Peter; Kotz, Kenneth; Couch, Marion; Pollock, Hoke; Tepper, Joel

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate a novel chemoradiation regimen designed to maximize locoregional control (LRC) and minimize toxicity for patients with advanced head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Methods and Materials: Patients received hyperfractionated intensity modulated radiation therapy (HIMRT) in 1.25-Gy fractions b.i.d. to 70 Gy to high-risk planning target volume (PTV). Intermediate and low-risk PTVs received 60 Gy and 50 Gy, at 1.07, and 0.89 Gy per fraction, respectively. Concurrent cisplatin 33 mg/m{sup 2}/week was started Week 1. Patients completed the Quality of Life Radiation Therapy Instrument pretreatment (PRE), at end of treatment (EOT), and at 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. Overall survival (OS), progression-free (PFS), LRC, and toxicities were assessed. Results: Of 39 patients, 30 (77%) were alive without disease at median follow-up of 37.5 months. Actuarial 3-year OS, PFS, and LRC were 80%, 82%, and 87%, respectively. No failures occurred in the electively irradiated neck and there were no isolated neck failures. Head and neck QOL was significantly worse in 18 of 35 patients (51%): mean 7.8 PRE vs. 3.9 EOT. By month 1, H and N QOL returned near baseline (mean 6.2, SD = 1.7). The most common acute Grade 3+ toxicities were mucositis (38%), fatigue (28%), dysphagia (28%), and leukopenia (26%). Conclusions: Hyperfractionated IMRT with low-dose weekly cisplatin resulted in good LRC with acceptable toxicity and QOL. Lack of elective nodal failures despite very low dose per fraction has led to an attempt to further minimize toxicity by reducing elective nodal doses in our subsequent protocol.

  11. Robonaut 2 on the International Space Station: Status Update and Preparations for IVA Mobility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahlstrom, Thomas D.; Diftler, Myron E.; Berka, Reginald B.; Badger, Julia M.; Yayathi, Sandeep; Curtis, Andrew W.; Joyce, Charles A.

    2013-01-01

    Robotics engineers, ground controllers and International Space Station (ISS) crew have been running successful experiments using Robonaut 2 (R2) on-board the ISS for more than a year. This humanoid upper body robot continues to expand its list of achievements and its capabilities to safely demonstrate maintenance and servicing tasks while working alongside human crewmembers. The next phase of the ISS R2 project will transition from a stationary Intra Vehicular Activity (IVA) upper body using a power/data umbilical, to an IVA mobile system with legs for repositioning, a battery backpack power supply, and wireless communications. These upgrades will enable the R2 team to evaluate hardware performance and to develop additional control algorithms and control verification techniques with R2 inside the ISS in preparation for the Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) phase of R2 operations. As R2 becomes more capable in assisting with maintenance tasks, with minimal supervision, including repositioning itself to different work sites, the ISS crew will be burdened with fewer maintenance chores, leaving them more time to conduct other activities. R2's developers at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) are preparing the R2 IVA mobility hardware and software upgrades for delivery to the ISS in late 2013. This paper summarizes R2 ISS achievements to date, briefly describes the R2 IVA mobility upgrades, and discusses the R2 IVA mobility objectives and plans.

  12. Molecular analysis of mucopolysaccharidosis IVA: Common mutations and racial difference

    SciTech Connect

    Tomatsu, S.; Hori, T.; Nakashima, Y.

    1994-09-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA (MPS IVA) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by a deficiency in N-acetylgalactosamine -6-sulfate sulfatase (GALNS). Studies on the molecular basis of MPS IVA have been facilitated following cloning of the full-length cDNA and genomic DNA. In this study we detected mutations from 20 Caucasian and 19 Japanese MPS IVA patients using SSCP system and compared mutations of Caucasian origin with those of Japanese origin. The results showed the presence of 16 various mutations (3 small, deletions, 2 nonsense and 11 missense mutations) for Caucasian patients and 15 (1 deletion, 1 large alteration and 13 missense mutations) for Japanese. Moreover, two common mutations existed; one is double gene deletion characteristic for Japanese (6 alleles; 15%) and the other is a point mutation (1113F A{yields}T transition) characteristic for Caucasian (9 alleles; 22.5%). And the clear genotype/phenotype relationship among 1342delCA, IVS1(-2), P151S, Q148X, R386C, I113F, Q473X, W220G, P151L, A291T, R90W, and P77R, for a severe type, G96B N204K and V138A for a milder type, was observed. Only R386 mutation was seen in both of the populations. Further, the precise DNA analysis for double gene deletion of a common double gene deletion has been performed by defining the breakpoints and the results showed that one deletion was caused by homologous recombination due to Alu repetitive sequences and the other was due to nonhomologous recombination of short direct repeat. Haplotype analysis for six alleles with double deletion were different, indicating the different origin of this mutation or the frequent recombination events before a mutational event. Thus the mutations in GALNS gene are very heterogeneous and the racial difference is characteristic.

  13. Molecular genetic assay of mucopolysaccharidosis IVA in South China.

    PubMed

    He, Dengmin; Huang, Yonglan; Ou, Zhiying; Sheng, Huiying; Li, Sheyong; Zhao, Xiaoyuan; Li, Ru; Zheng, Jipeng; Liu, Li

    2013-12-10

    Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA (MPS IVA) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder caused by the deficiency of N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase (GALNS). Molecular mutational analysis was performed by PCR product sequencing for fourteen exons and exon-intron boundaries of GALNS gene in 21 patients from 19 unrelated families with severe MPS IVA in South China. We identified fifteen different mutations, including 10 reported mutations (p.P125L, p.G290S, p.M318R, p.G340D, p.L366P, p.R386C, p.A392V, c.1243-1G>C, p.L440RfsX54 and p.X523E) and five novel mutations (p.N177S, p.G290R, p.F306S, p.W403_T404delinsCS, p.W520X). All five novel mutations were inherited from parents of the patients and not found in 100 normal control alleles. Three mutations, p.M318R, p.L366P and p.R386C were common, accounting for 36.8% of mutant alleles investigated. One patient homozygous of p.A392V and the other two unrelated patients homozygous of p.L366P presented classical disease course. The results show that the GALNS gene has a different mutational spectrum in South China as compared to other regions. The p.A392V and p.L366P mutations were associated with severe phenotype of MPS IVA.

  14. Phase 2 microwave concrete decontamination results

    SciTech Connect

    White, T.L.; Foster, D. Jr.; Wilson, C.T.; Schaich, C.R.

    1995-04-01

    The authors report on the results of the second phase of a four-phase program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to develop a system to decontaminate concrete using microwave energy. The microwave energy is directed at the concrete surface through the use of an optimized wave guide antenna, or applicator, and this energy rapidly heats the free water present in the interstitial spaces of the concrete matrix. The resulting steam pressure causes the surface to burst in much the same way popcorn pops in a home microwave oven. Each steam explosion removes several square centimeters of concrete surface that are collected by a highly integrated wave guide and vacuum system. The authors call this process the microwave concrete decontamination, or MCD, process. In the first phase of the program the principle of microwaves concrete removal concrete surfaces was demonstrated. In these experiments, concrete slabs were placed on a translator and moved beneath a stationary microwave system. The second phase demonstrated the ability to mobilize the technology to remove the surfaces from concrete floors. Area and volume concrete removal rates of 10.4 cm{sup 2}/s and 4.9 cm{sup 3}/S, respectively, at 18 GHz were demonstrated. These rates are more than double those obtained in Phase 1 of the program. Deeper contamination can be removed by using a longer residence time under the applicator to create multiple explosions in the same area or by taking multiple passes over previously removed areas. Both techniques have been successfully demonstrated. Small test sections of painted and oil-soaked concrete have also been removed in a single pass. Concrete with embedded metal anchors on the surface has also been removed, although with some increased variability of removal depth. Microwave leakage should not pose any operational hazard to personnel, since the observed leakage was much less than the regulatory standard.

  15. Architecture of the type IVa pilus machine.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yi-Wei; Rettberg, Lee A; Treuner-Lange, Anke; Iwasa, Janet; Søgaard-Andersen, Lotte; Jensen, Grant J

    2016-03-11

    Type IVa pili are filamentous cell surface structures observed in many bacteria. They pull cells forward by extending, adhering to surfaces, and then retracting. We used cryo-electron tomography of intact Myxococcus xanthus cells to visualize type IVa pili and the protein machine that assembles and retracts them (the type IVa pilus machine, or T4PM) in situ, in both the piliated and nonpiliated states, at a resolution of 3 to 4 nanometers. We found that T4PM comprises an outer membrane pore, four interconnected ring structures in the periplasm and cytoplasm, a cytoplasmic disc and dome, and a periplasmic stem. By systematically imaging mutants lacking defined T4PM proteins or with individual proteins fused to tags, we mapped the locations of all 10 T4PM core components and the minor pilins, thereby providing insights into pilus assembly, structure, and function.

  16. The thermal evolution of IVA iron meteorites: Evidence from metallographic cooling rates.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, Kaare L.; Ulff-Møller, Finn; Haack, Henning

    1995-07-01

    Metallographic cooling rates of group IVA iron meteorites have been recalculated based on the most recent Ni diffusion coefficients and phase diagram. The cooling rates are revised upwards by a factor of ca. 15 relative to previous estimates. A large range in cooling rate is found in the low-Ni part of group IVA (Ni < 8.4 wt%), while the high-Ni part shows approximately constant cooling rates. Undercooling is observed only in the high-Ni IVA members. Some of the taenite lamellae in the high-Ni IVA irons, which were apparently affected by moderate undercooling, can, alternatively, be interpreted to have experienced a nonlinear cooling history. The variation in cooling rate of the entire group IVA spans two orders of magnitude (19-3400 K/My). This span is still so large that it constitutes severe problems for both a core origin model and a raisin-bread model but seemingly it does not contradict a model where the parent body is broken up and reassembled after core crystallization but prior to Widmanstätten pattern formation.

  17. Atypical presentation of mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA.

    PubMed

    Rush, Eric T

    2016-09-01

    A 14 year old patient with short stature, type I diabetes, and cataracts was referred for evaluation of avascular necrosis of the femoral head. Radiography was suggestive of spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia with decreased bone mineral density for age. Targeted molecular and biochemical testing were normal in this patient. Whole exome sequencing was performed and showed compound heterozygosity for previously reported pathogenic GALNS variants which were diagnostic of mucopolysaccharidosis, type IVA (Morquio A). While this case describes neither a novel condition nor a new mutation, it does illustrate three important points in the diagnosis of patients with atypical forms of MPS IVA. First, that in many instances urine glycosaminoglycan analysis is not sufficient to rule out MPS IVA as a potential diagnosis. Patients in whom biochemical screening is advised should have measurement of leukocyte enzymatic activity. Second, that in patients with radiographic evidence of spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia with additional features or with normal targeted testing, MPS IVA should remain in the differential diagnosis. Third, that whole exome sequencing represents a viable diagnostic platform for evaluation of patients with unknown skeletal or metabolic disease.

  18. IVA. Improving Vocational Administration. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    EPD Consortium D, Richardson, TX.

    The Texas Improving Vocational Administration (IVA) project was conceived to improve preservice and inservice programs for vocational education administrators. Primary objectives were to (1) develop a method, including a survey, to determine existing inservice and preservice administrative training program competencies; (2) determine, using the…

  19. Determination and validation of chikusetsusaponin IVa in rat plasma by UPLC-MS/MS and its application to pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Liu, Shi-Ping; Guo, Mei-Hua; Wang, Zhuo

    2016-09-01

    A novel, sensitive and rapid ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric method for the quantification of chikusetsusaponin IVa (CHS-IVa) in rat plasma was established and validated. Plasma samples were pre-treated by precipitation of protein with acetonitrile and chromatographed on a Waters Symmetry C18 analytical column (4.6 × 50 mm, i.d., 3.5 μm) using a mobile phase consisting of methanol and water containing 0.05% formic acid (55:45, v/v) at a flow rate of 0.4 mL/min. The deprotonated molecular ions [M - H](-) were employed in electrospray negative ionization mode and selected reaction monitoring transitions were performed for detection. The calibration curves exhibited good linearity (r > 0.99) over the range of 0.5-1000 ng/mL for CHS-IVa. The recoveries of CHS-IVa were >92.5% and exhibited no severe matrix effect. This method was successfully applied in the pharmacokinetic study of CHS-IVa in rats. For oral administration, the plasma concentrations of CHS-IVa increased to a peak value at 0.35 ± 0.14 h, followed by a gradual decrease to the lower limit of quantitation in 24 h. For intravenous administration, the plasma concentrations of CHS-IVa decreased quickly (t1/2 , 1.59 ± 0.25 h). The absolute bioavailability of CHS-IVa in rats was 8.63%. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Physiological and glycomic characterization of N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase-IVa and -IVb double deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Takamatsu, Shinji; Antonopoulos, Aristotelis; Ohtsubo, Kazuaki; Ditto, David; Chiba, Yasunori; Le, Dzung T; Morris, Howard R; Haslam, Stuart M; Dell, Anne; Marth, Jamey D; Taniguchi, Naoyuki

    2010-01-01

    N-Acetylglucosaminyltransferase-IV (GnT-IV) has two isoenzymes, GnT-IVa and GnT-IVb, which initiate the GlcNAcbeta1-4 branch synthesis on the Manalpha1-3 arm of the N-glycan core thereby increasing N-glycan branch complexity and conferring endogenous lectin binding epitopes. To elucidate the physiological significance of GnT-IV, we engineered and characterized GnT-IVb-deficient mice and further generated GnT-IVa/-IVb double deficient mice. In wild-type mice, GnT-IVa expression is restricted to gastrointestinal tissues, whereas GnT-IVb is broadly expressed among organs. GnT-IVb deficiency induced aberrant GnT-IVa expression corresponding to the GnT-IVb distribution pattern that might be attributed to increased Ets-1, which conceivably activates the Mgat4a promoter, and thereafter preserved apparent GnT-IV activity. The compensative GnT-IVa expression might contribute to amelioration of the GnT-IVb-deficient phenotype. GnT-IVb deficiency showed mild phenotypic alterations in hematopoietic cell populations and hemostasis. GnT-IVa/-IVb double deficiency completely abolished GnT-IV activity that resulted in the disappearance of the GlcNAcbeta1-4 branch on the Manalpha1-3 arm that was confirmed by MALDI-TOF MS and GC-MS linkage analyses. Comprehensive glycomic analyses revealed that the abundance of terminal moieties was preserved in GnT-IVa/-IVb double deficiency that was due to the elevated expression of glycosyltransferases regarding synthesis of terminal moieties. Thereby, this may maintain the expression of glycan ligands for endogenous lectins and prevent cellular dysfunctions. The fact that the phenotype of GnT-IVa/-IVb double deficiency largely overlapped that of GnT-IVa single deficiency can be attributed to the induced glycomic compensation. This is the first report that mammalian organs have highly organized glycomic compensation systems to preserve N-glycan branch complexity.

  1. Physiological and glycomic characterization of N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase-IVa and -IVb double deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Takamatsu, Shinji; Antonopoulos, Aristotelis; Ohtsubo, Kazuaki; Ditto, David; Chiba, Yasunori; Le, Dzung T.; Morris, Howard R.; Haslam, Stuart M.; Dell, Anne; Marth, Jamey D.; Taniguchi, Naoyuki

    2010-01-01

    N-Acetylglucosaminyltransferase-IV (GnT-IV) has two isoenzymes, GnT-IVa and GnT-IVb, which initiate the GlcNAcβ1-4 branch synthesis on the Manα1-3 arm of the N-glycan core thereby increasing N-glycan branch complexity and conferring endogenous lectin binding epitopes. To elucidate the physiological significance of GnT-IV, we engineered and characterized GnT-IVb-deficient mice and further generated GnT-IVa/-IVb double deficient mice. In wild-type mice, GnT-IVa expression is restricted to gastrointestinal tissues, whereas GnT-IVb is broadly expressed among organs. GnT-IVb deficiency induced aberrant GnT-IVa expression corresponding to the GnT-IVb distribution pattern that might be attributed to increased Ets-1, which conceivably activates the Mgat4a promoter, and thereafter preserved apparent GnT-IV activity. The compensative GnT-IVa expression might contribute to amelioration of the GnT-IVb-deficient phenotype. GnT-IVb deficiency showed mild phenotypic alterations in hematopoietic cell populations and hemostasis. GnT-IVa/-IVb double deficiency completely abolished GnT-IV activity that resulted in the disappearance of the GlcNAcβ1-4 branch on the Manα1-3 arm that was confirmed by MALDI-TOF MS and GC-MS linkage analyses. Comprehensive glycomic analyses revealed that the abundance of terminal moieties was preserved in GnT-IVa/-IVb double deficiency that was due to the elevated expression of glycosyltransferases regarding synthesis of terminal moieties. Thereby, this may maintain the expression of glycan ligands for endogenous lectins and prevent cellular dysfunctions. The fact that the phenotype of GnT-IVa/-IVb double deficiency largely overlapped that of GnT-IVa single deficiency can be attributed to the induced glycomic compensation. This is the first report that mammalian organs have highly organized glycomic compensation systems to preserve N-glycan branch complexity. PMID:20015870

  2. Crystal structures of Boc-D- and L-Iva-L-Pro-OBzl: unturned conformation of Aib-Pro sequence unaffected by replacement of Me with Et in Aib.

    PubMed

    Kawai, M; Omori, Y; Yamamura, H; Butsugan, Y; Taga, T; Miwa, Y

    1993-08-01

    The crystal structures of the isovaline (Iva) containing dipeptides, Boc-D-Iva-L-Pro-OBzl and Boc-L-Iva-L-Pro-OBzl, were determined by x-ray diffraction. The diastereomeric peptides were shown to adopt unturned conformations closely similar to each other (phi Iva 52 degrees, psi Iva 46 degrees, phi Pro -65 degrees, and psi Pro 143 degrees for D-Iva-L-Pro sequence and phi Iva 52 degrees, psi Iva 44 degrees, phi Pro -63 degrees, and psi Pro 148 degrees for L-Iva-L-Pro sequence). The Pro ring of each peptide was in C gamma-endo conformation. The unusually large angle CIva-NPro-C delta Pro values (131 degrees in both peptides) were observed, that was due to steric repulsion between the delta-methylene of Pro and the alkyl side chain of Iva residue. These conformations were essentially the same as that of the corresponding alpha-aminoisobutyric acid (Aib)-containing peptide Boc-Aib-L-Pro-OBzl. The result has demonstrated that replacement of either one of the two methyl groups of the Aib residue in Boc-Aib-L-Pro-OBzl with an ethyl group does not cause any significant change in the unturned conformation of the dipeptide.

  3. PHASE I SINGLE CELL ELECTROLYZER TEST RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Steimke, J; Timothy Steeper, T

    2008-08-05

    This document reports the results of Phase I Single Cell testing of an SO{sub 2}-Depolarized Water Electrolyzer. Testing was performed primarily during the first quarter of FY 2008 at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) using an electrolyzer cell designed and built at SRNL. Other facility hardware were also designed and built at SRNL. This test further advances this technology for which work began at SRNL in 2005. This research is valuable in achieving the ultimate goal of an economical hydrogen production process based on the Hybrid Sulfur (HyS) Cycle. The focus of this work was to conduct single cell electrolyzer tests to further develop the technology of SO{sub 2}-depolarized electrolysis as part of the HyS Cycle. The HyS Cycle is a hybrid thermochemical cycle that may be used in conjunction with advanced nuclear reactors or centralized solar receivers to produce hydrogen by water-splitting. Like all other sulfur-based cycles, HyS utilizes the high temperature thermal decomposition of sulfuric acid to produce oxygen and regenerate sulfur dioxide. The unique aspect of HyS is the generation of hydrogen in a water electrolyzer that is operated under conditions where dissolved sulfur dioxide depolarizes the anodic reaction, resulting in substantial voltage reduction. Low cell voltage is essential for both thermodynamic efficiency and hydrogen cost. Sulfur dioxide is oxidized at the anode, producing sulfuric acid that is sent to the high temperature acid decomposition portion of the cycle. The electrolyzer cell uses the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) concept. The anode and cathode are formed by spraying platinum containing catalyst on both sides of a Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM). In most testing the material of the PEM was NafionR. The electrolyzer cell active area can be as large as 54.8 cm{sup 2}. Feed to the anode of the electrolyzer is a sulfuric acid solution containing sulfur dioxide. The partial pressure of sulfur dioxide could be varied in the

  4. Group IVA phospholipase A2-associated production of MMP-9 in macrophages and formation of atherosclerotic lesions.

    PubMed

    Ii, Hiromi; Hontani, Naoya; Toshida, Issei; Oka, Mayuko; Sato, Takashi; Akiba, Satoshi

    2008-03-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) is involved in atherogenesis, and the production of MMP-9 in macrophages is considered to be mediated by the arachidonic acid cascade. The present study examined the possible involvement of group IVA phospholipase A2 (IVA-PLA2), a key enzyme in the arachidonic acid cascade, in the production of MMP-9 induced by oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) in macrophages and high-fat diet-induced formation of atherosclerotic lesions using IVA-PLA2-deficient mice (C57BL/6 background). In wild-type mouse peritoneal macrophages, oxLDL induced an increase in MMP-9 in the culture medium. The oxLDL-promoted production of MMP-9 was markedly reduced in IVA-PLA2-deficient macrophages compared to wild-type macrophages. Feeding of wild-type mice with a high-fat diet caused the formation of early atherosclerotic lesions in the aortic root with increases in MMP-9 and macrophages in the lesions and with higher serum levels of total cholesterol. Such lesions were apparently less severe in IVA-PLA2-deficient mice fed a high-fat diet, despite higher total cholesterol levels. Under the conditions, a high-fat diet reduced the serum levels of high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) in wild-type mice. However, IVA-PLA2-deficient mice fed a high-fat diet were protected against the decrease in HDL-C levels. The present results suggest that IVA-PLA2 is involved in the oxLDL-induced production of MMP-9 in macrophages and the high-fat diet-induced formation of early atherosclerotic lesions. The protection against the lesions in IVA-PLA2-deficient mice may be ascribable, in part, to the impaired production of MMP-9 and/or the maintained levels of HDL-C.

  5. An autoinhibitory conformation of the Bacillus subtilis spore coat protein SpoIVA prevents its premature ATP-independent aggregation.

    PubMed

    Castaing, Jean-Philippe; Lee, Scarlett; Anantharaman, Vivek; Ravilious, Geoffrey E; Aravind, L; Ramamurthi, Kumaran S

    2014-09-01

    Spores of Bacillus subtilis are dormant cell types that are formed when the bacterium encounters starvation conditions. Spores are encased in a shell, termed the coat, which is composed of approximately seventy different proteins and protects the spore's genetic material from environmental insults. The structural component of the basement layer of the coat is an exceptional cytoskeletal protein, termed SpoIVA, which binds and hydrolyzes ATP. ATP hydrolysis is utilized to drive a conformational change in SpoIVA that leads to its irreversible self-assembly into a static polymer in vitro. Here, we characterize the middle domain of SpoIVA, the predicted secondary structure of which resembles the chemotaxis protein CheX but, unlike CheX, does not harbor residues required for phosphatase activity. Disruptions in this domain did not abolish ATP hydrolysis, but resulted in mislocalization of the protein and reduction in sporulation efficiency in vivo. In vitro, disruptions in this domain prevented the ATP hydrolysis-driven conformational change in SpoIVA required for polymerization and led to the aggregation of SpoIVA into particles that did not form filaments. We propose a model in which SpoIVA initially assumes a conformation in which it inhibits its own aggregation into particles, and that ATP hydrolysis remodels the protein so that it assumes a polymerization-competent conformation.

  6. Inhibitory effects of Chikusetsusaponin IVa on lipopolysaccharide-induced pro-inflammatory responses in THP-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Qi, J; Li, L; Wu, T; Wang, Y; Wang, X; Ning, Q

    2015-09-01

    This study investigated anti-inflammatory effects and possible mechanisms of Chikusetsusaponin IVa (Chi IVa), one of the main bioactive components in saponins from Panacis japonica (SPJ), which is used in traditional Tujia and Hmong Chinese medicine. To this end, changes in the inflammatory profiles of lipopolysacchride (LPS)-stimulated phrobol 12-myristate 13-acetate(PMA)-differented THP-1 macrophages were evaluated following Chi IVa treatment. The results showed that Chi IVa markedly decreased the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) at both the mRNA and protein level, which proved to be dose-dependent. Further studies revealed that Chi IVa strongly suppressed NF-κB activation and downregulated the phosphorylation of ERK, p38, and JNK. Our present study demonstrates that Chi IVa suppresses the production of iNOS, COX-2, IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α in LPS-stimulated THP-1 cells likely by inhibiting NF-κB activation and ERK, JNK, and p38 signal pathway phosphorylation.

  7. Therapeutic effect of phytoecdysteroids rich extract from Ajuga iva on alloxan induced diabetic rats liver, kidney and pancreas.

    PubMed

    Hamden, Khaled; Ayadi, Fatma; Jamoussi, Kamel; Masmoudi, Hatem; Elfeki, Abdelfattah

    2008-01-01

    In the current study, the effect of Ajuga iva extract on blood glucose, lipid profile, hepatic and renal toxicity and antioxidant enzyme activities in alloxan-induced diabetic rats was investigated. Diabetes was confirmed by measuring the glucoserua concentration 15 days after alloxan administration. Ajuga iva extract was administrated orally 3 weeks after alloxan injection. Our results investigate that Ajuga iva extract supplementation increased the levels of both enzymatic antioxidant (superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase) and metals antioxidants (iron, copper, magnesium, calcium) and decreased lipid peroxidation level (TBARs). Besides Ajuga iva ameliorated diabetes provoked hepatic and renal toxicity appeared by a lower level in total and direct bilirubin, urea, creatinine, triglyceride (TG), cholesterol and a higher level in HDL-cholesterol. Besides, the activities of phosphatase alkalines (PAL), aspartate and lactate transaminase (AST & ALT) were decreased. The benefices effects of phytoecdysteroids of Ajuga iva confirmed by histological observation in pancreatic tissues. In conclusion, Ajuga iva phytoecdysteroids supplements seem to be beneficial for correcting the hyperglycemia and preventing diabetic complications in liver, pancreas and kidneys.

  8. Newberry Volcano EGS Demonstration - Phase I Results

    SciTech Connect

    Osborn, William L.; Petty, Susan; Cladouhos, Trenton T.; Iovenitti, Joe; Nofziger, Laura; Callahan, Owen; Perry, Douglas S.; Stern, Paul L.

    2011-10-23

    Phase I of the Newberry Volcano Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) Demonstration included permitting, community outreach, seismic hazards analysis, initial microseismic array deployment and calibration, final MSA design, site characterization, and stimulation planning. The multi-disciplinary Phase I site characterization supports stimulation planning and regulatory permitting, as well as addressing public concerns including water usage and induced seismicity. A review of the project's water usage plan by an independent hydrology consultant found no expected impacts to local stakeholders, and recommended additional monitoring procedures. The IEA Protocol for Induced Seismicity Associated with Enhanced Geothermal Systems was applied to assess site conditions, properly inform stakeholders, and develop a comprehensive mitigation plan. Analysis of precision LiDAR elevation maps has concluded that there is no evidence of recent faulting near the target well. A borehole televiewer image log of the well bore revealed over three hundred fractures and predicted stress orientations. No natural, background seismicity has been identified in a review of historic data, or in more than seven months of seismic data recorded on an array of seven seismometers operating around the target well. A seismic hazards and induced seismicity risk assessment by an independent consultant concluded that the Demonstration would contribute no additional risk to residents of the nearest town of La Pine, Oregon. In Phase II of the demonstration, an existing deep hot well, NWG 55-29, will be stimulated using hydroshearing techniques to create an EGS reservoir. The Newberry Volcano EGS Demonstration is allowing geothermal industry and academic experts to develop, validate and enhance geoscience and engineering techniques, and other procedures essential to the expansion of EGS throughout the country. Successful development will demonstrate to the American public that EGS can play a significant role in

  9. The antagonist activity of lipid IVa on the stimulation by lipid A of TNF-alpha production from canine blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Takasawa, Kenji; Kano, Rui; Maruyama, Haruhiko; Hasegawa, Atsuhiko; Kamata, Hiroshi

    2011-09-15

    Lipid A, the active component of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), exists in the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria and binds to the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and MD-2 complex. On the other hand, the synthetic precursor of Escherichia coli lipid A, tetraacylated lipid IVa, is an agonist for TLR4 and MD-2 complex in murine, equine and feline cells but is an antagonist for lipid A in human cells. The aim of the study was to examine the function of canine Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and MD-2 complex on canine blood mononuclear cells (BMC), by analyzing lipid A- or lipid IVa-induction of TNF-α production from these cells in order to understand canine innate immune system. After 5-h culture of canine BMC with lipid A (lipid A culture) or lipid IVa (lipid IVa culture), the TNF-α, as determined by ELISA, had increased in the supernatants of the lipid A cultures in a dose-dependent manner, whereas the TNF-α was undetectable in supernatant of lipid IVa-treated cultures. The TNF-α was statistically significantly different between the lipid A and lipid IVa cultures (100 and 1000 ng/ml). TNF-α production from canine BMC was inhibited, in a lipid IVa-dose-dependent manner, when the BMC were pre-cultured with lipid IVa for 60 min and then cultured with lipid A for 5h, while in control BMC cultures production if TNF-α was unchanged. These results indicate that the TNF-α production stimulated by lipid A was competed out by pre-exposing the BMC to lipid IVa. Thus, lipid A is an agonist for TNF-α production in canine BMC, whereas lipid IVa appears to be an antagonist against this lipid A stimulation of canine BMC.

  10. Linkage of PRA models. Phase 1, Results

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, C.L.; Knudsen, J.K.; Kelly, D.L.

    1995-12-01

    The goal of the Phase I work of the ``Linkage of PRA Models`` project was to postulate methods of providing guidance for US Nuclear Regulator Commission (NRC) personnel on the selection and usage of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) models that are best suited to the analysis they are performing. In particular, methods and associated features are provided for (a) the selection of an appropriate PRA model for a particular analysis, (b) complementary evaluation tools for the analysis, and (c) a PRA model cross-referencing method. As part of this work, three areas adjoining ``linking`` analyses to PRA models were investigated: (a) the PRA models that are currently available, (b) the various types of analyses that are performed within the NRC, and (c) the difficulty in trying to provide a ``generic`` classification scheme to groups plants based upon a particular plant attribute.

  11. A core origin for group IVA iron meteorites - A reply to Moren and Goldstein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, J.; Wasson, J. T.

    1978-01-01

    Because uncertainties in experimental data are large, one has considerable latitude in choosing the input parameters needed to calculate iron meteorite cooling rates. The best way to test input parameters is by examining their ability to yield the observed properties of the meteorites. Our phase diagram yields fits to kamacite profiles that are superior to those based on the Moren-Goldstein phase diagram. Our method of allowing for the effect of P on the Ni diffusion coefficient takes into account the enhancement in this effect with decreasing temperature; Moren and Goldstein use a relationship derived for a temperature of 1100 C, well outside the 700-350 C range where kamacite growth occurs. Use of our input parameters yields cooling rates in IVA irons that are independent of composition, consistent with a core origin. Since the fractionation of siderophiles in group IVA also indicates a core origin, we conclude that this is the correct model for this group.

  12. Study of space shuttle EVA/IVA support requirements. Volume 1: Technical summary report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copeland, R. J.; Wood, P. W., Jr.; Cox, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    Results are summarized which were obtained for equipment requirements for the space shuttle EVA/IVA pressure suit, life support system, mobility aids, vehicle support provisions, and energy 4 support. An initial study of tasks, guidelines, and constraints and a special task on the impact of a 10 psia orbiter cabin atmosphere are included. Supporting studies not related exclusively to any one group of equipment requirements are also summarized. Representative EVA/IVA task scenarios were defined based on an evaluation of missions and payloads. Analysis of the scenarios resulted in a total of 788 EVA/IVA's in the 1979-1990 time frame, for an average of 1.3 per shuttle flight. Duration was estimated to be under 4 hours on 98% of the EVA/IVA's, and distance from the airlock was determined to be 70 feet or less 96% of the time. Payload water vapor sensitivity was estimated to be significant on 9%-17% of the flights. Further analysis of the scenarios was carried out to determine specific equipment characteristics, such as suit cycle and mobility requirements.

  13. Group IVA irons: New constraints on the crystallization and cooling history of an asteroidal core with a complex history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoy, T. J.; Walker, R. J.; Goldstein, J. I.; Yang, J.; McDonough, W. F.; Rumble, D.; Chabot, N. L.; Ash, R. D.; Corrigan, C. M.; Michael, J. R.; Kotula, P. G.

    2011-11-01

    We report analyses of 14 group IVA iron meteorites, and the ungrouped but possibly related, Elephant Moraine (EET) 83230, for siderophile elements by laser ablation ICP-MS and isotope dilution. EET was also analyzed for oxygen isotopic composition and metallographic structure, and Fuzzy Creek, currently the IVA with the highest Ni concentration, was analyzed for metallographic structure. Highly siderophile elements (HSE) Re, Os and Ir concentrations vary by nearly three orders of magnitude over the entire range of IVA irons, while Ru, Pt and Pd vary by less than factors of five. Chondrite normalized abundances of HSE form nested patterns consistent with progressive crystal-liquid fractionation. Attempts to collectively model the HSE abundances resulting from fractional crystallization achieved best results for 3 wt.% S, compared to 0.5 or 9 wt.% S. Consistent with prior studies, concentrations of HSE and other refractory siderophile elements estimated for the bulk IVA core and its parent body are in generally chondritic proportions. Projected abundances of Pd and Au, relative to more refractory HSE, are slightly elevated and modestly differ from L/LL chondrites, which some have linked with group IVA, based on oxygen isotope similarities. Abundance trends for the moderately volatile and siderophile element Ga cannot be adequately modeled for any S concentration, the cause of which remains enigmatic. Further, concentrations of some moderately volatile and siderophile elements indicate marked, progressive depletions in the IVA system. However, if the IVA core began crystallization with ˜3 wt.% S, depletions of more volatile elements cannot be explained as a result of prior volatilization/condensation processes. The initial IVA core had an approximately chondritic Ni/Co ratio, but a fractionated Fe/Ni ratio of ˜10, indicates an Fe-depleted core. This composition is most easily accounted for by assuming that the surrounding silicate shell was enriched in iron

  14. Crystal structure and kinetic mechanism of aminoglycoside phosphotransferase-2″-IVa

    PubMed Central

    Toth, Marta; Frase, Hilary; Antunes, Nuno Tiago; Smith, Clyde A; Vakulenko, Sergei B

    2010-01-01

    Acquired resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics primarily results from deactivation by three families of aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes. Here, we report the kinetic mechanism and structure of the aminoglycoside phosphotransferase 2″-IVa (APH(2″)-IVa), an enzyme responsible for resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics in clinical enterococcal and staphylococcal isolates. The enzyme operates via a Bi-Bi sequential mechanism in which the two substrates (ATP or GTP and an aminoglycoside) bind in a random manner. The APH(2″)-IVa enzyme phosphorylates various 4,6-disubstituted aminoglycoside antibiotics with catalytic efficiencies (kcat/Km) of 1.5 × 103 to 1.2 × 106 (M−1 s−1). The enzyme uses both ATP and GTP as the phosphate source, an extremely rare occurrence in the phosphotransferase and protein kinase enzymes. Based on an analysis of the APH(2″)-IVa structure, two overlapping binding templates specifically tuned for hydrogen bonding to either ATP or GTP have been identified and described. A detailed understanding of the structure and mechanism of the GTP-utilizing phosphotransferases is crucial for the development of either novel aminoglycosides or, more importantly, GTP-based enzyme inhibitors which would not be expected to interfere with crucial ATP-dependent enzymes. PMID:20556826

  15. Enzyme replacement in a human model of mucopolysaccharidosis IVA in vitro and its biodistribution in the cartilage of wild type mice.

    PubMed

    Dvorak-Ewell, Melita; Wendt, Dan; Hague, Chuck; Christianson, Terri; Koppaka, Vish; Crippen, Danielle; Kakkis, Emil; Vellard, Michel

    2010-08-16

    Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA (MPS IVA; Morquio A syndrome) is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by deficiency of N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfatase (GALNS), an enzyme that degrades keratan sulfate (KS). Currently no therapy for MPS IVA is available. We produced recombinant human (rh)GALNS as a potential enzyme replacement therapy for MPS IVA. Chinese hamster ovary cells stably overexpressing GALNS and sulfatase modifying factor-1 were used to produce active ( approximately 2 U/mg) and pure (>or=97%) rhGALNS. The recombinant enzyme was phosphorylated and was dose-dependently taken up by mannose-6-phosphate receptor (K(uptake) = 2.5 nM), thereby restoring enzyme activity in MPS IVA fibroblasts. In the absence of an animal model with a skeletal phenotype, we established chondrocytes isolated from two MPS IVA patients as a disease model in vitro. MPS IVA chondrocyte GALNS activity was not detectable and the cells exhibited KS storage up to 11-fold higher than unaffected chondrocytes. MPS IVA chondrocytes internalized rhGALNS into lysosomes, resulting in normalization of enzyme activity and decrease in KS storage. rhGALNS treatment also modulated gene expression, increasing expression of chondrogenic genes Collagen II, Collagen X, Aggrecan and Sox9 and decreasing abnormal expression of Collagen I. Intravenous administration of rhGALNS resulted in biodistribution throughout all layers of the heart valve and the entire thickness of the growth plate in wild-type mice. We show that enzyme replacement therapy with recombinant human GALNS results in clearance of keratan sulfate accumulation, and that such treatment ameliorates aberrant gene expression in human chondrocytes in vitro. Penetration of the therapeutic enzyme throughout poorly vascularized, but clinically relevant tissues, including growth plate cartilage and heart valve, as well as macrophages and hepatocytes in wild-type mouse, further supports development of rhGALNS as enzyme replacement therapy for MPS IVA.

  16. Final Technical Report: Results of Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Narang, David, J.; Hambrick, Joshua; Srinivasan, Devarajan; Ayyannar, Raja; O'Brien, Kathleen; Bebic, Jovan; Schelenz, Owen

    2011-09-28

    Arizona Public Service Company (APS) expects that by 2027, renewable energy will account for 6,590 GWh in energy consumption by its customers. While much of this future energy will come from large centrally-located power plants, distributed renewable energy, sited at the point of end-use will also play an important role in meeting the needs of APS customers and is expected to provide 1,734 GWh. With increasing penetration of residential and commercial photovoltaic (PV) systems at the point of end-use, PV power generation not only offsets the load, but could also cause significant shifts in power flow patterns through the distribution system, and could possibly cause reversal of flow through some branches of a distribution circuit. Significant changes to power flow introduced into existing distribution systems due to the increased amount of PV systems may cause operational issues, including over-voltage on the distribution feeder (loss of voltage regulation) and incorrect operation of control equipment, which may lead to an increase in the number of operations and related equipment wear that could affect equipment reliability and customer power quality. Additionally, connecting generation resources to a distribution feeder can introduce additional sources of short-circuit current to the distribution system. This could potentially result in increased short-circuit currents, potentially reaching damaging levels, causing protection desensitization and a potential loss of protection coordination. These effects may be further compounded by variability of PV production due to shading by clouds. The effects of these phenomena in distributed PV applications are not well understood, and there is a great need to characterize this variability. This project will contribute to understanding the effects of high-penetration solar electricity on the design and operation of distribution systems by demonstrating how a high penetration of PV systems affects grid operations of a

  17. Fractionation Trends Among IVA Iron Meteorites: Contrasts with IIIAB Trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wasson, J. T.; Richardson, J. W.

    2001-01-01

    A neutron-activation study of 49 group-IVA irons shows much lower negative slopes on Ir-Au and Ir-As diagrams than observed in the larger magmatic group IIIAB. This difference seems to reflect the tendency of D(sub Ir), D(sub Au), and D(sub As) to increase with increasing S content. Contents of S and other volatiles are much lower in IVA irons than IIIAB irons. We show that both groups can be fit with Dx values that depend quadratically on S, with initial IVA S contents about 6X lower than those in IIIAB. The IVA scatter fields show a spread in Au or As at constant Ir that appears to reflect variations in the fraction of trapped melt between 0% and 30%. Copper shows an S-shaped trend that may reflect moderate positive and negative changes in D(sub Cu) as the magma evolved or, less likely, sampling variations in a broad band reflecting fractionation and trapping of melt. Gibeon, the largest IVA iron with a mass greater than 30 tons, shows an appreciable range in compositions consistent either with differences in the degree of magma crystallization or with differences in the content of trapped melt. A striking difference between IVA and IIIAB is observed in the Ir/Au ratios in the most Ir-rich irons in the groups; that in IVA is 40% lower than the IIIAB ratio, and lower than those in other iron-meteorite groups, The IVA Ir/Au ratio is about half the ratios in the chondrite groups. We examined three possible explanations of this anomaly: (1) the high-Ir irons contain large amounts of trapped melt: or (2) half of the IVA core (i.e., the first 50% to crystallize) is missing from the terrestrial set of IVA irons; or (3) the IVA magma formed by incomplete melting of the metal in the chondritic precursor material, with the metal that remained in the mantle having high Ir and low Au contents. Plausibility arguments favor the third possibility. The third scenario is the most plausible, but the second cannot be ruled out. We review recent evidence regarding the cooling rates

  18. GALNS mutations in Indian patients with mucopolysaccharidosis IVA.

    PubMed

    Bidchol, Abdul Mueed; Dalal, Ashwin; Shah, Hitesh; S, Suryanarayana; Nampoothiri, Sheela; Kabra, Madhulika; Gupta, Neerja; Danda, Sumita; Gowrishankar, Kalpana; Phadke, Shubha R; Kapoor, Seema; Kamate, Mahesh; Verma, I C; Puri, Ratna Dua; Sankar, V H; Devi, A Radha Rama; Patil, S J; Ranganath, Prajnya; Jain, S Jamal Md Nurul; Agarwal, Meenal; Singh, Ankur; Mishra, Pallavi; Tamhankar, Parag M; Gopinath, Puthiya Mundyat; Nagarajaram, H A; Satyamoorthy, Kapaettu; Girisha, Katta Mohan

    2014-11-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis IV A (Morquio syndrome A, MPS IVA) is a lysosomal storage disease caused by the deficiency of N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfatase (GALNS). The mutation spectrum in this condition is yet to be determined in Indians. We aimed to analyze the mutations in the GALNS gene in Asian Indians with MPS IVA. All the exons and the adjacent intronic regions of the gene were amplified and sequenced in sixty-eight unrelated Indian families. We identified 136 mutant alleles comprising of 40 different mutations. We report twenty-two novel mutations that comprise of seventeen missense (p.Asn32Thr, p.Leu36Arg, p.Pro52Leu, p.Pro77Ser, p.Cys79Arg, p.His142Pro, p.Tyr191Asp, p.Asn204Thr, p.Gly188Ser, p.Phe216Ser, p.Trp230Cys, p.Ala291Ser, p.Gly317Arg, p.His329Pro, p.Arg386Ser, p.Glu450Gly, p.Cys501Ser), three splice-site variants (c.120+1G>C, c.1003-3C>G, c.1139+1G>A), one nonsense mutation (p.Gln414*) and one frameshift mutation (p.Pro420Leufs*440). Eighteen mutations have been reported earlier. Among these p.Ser287Leu (8.82%), p.Phe216Ser (7.35%), p.Asn32Thr (6.61%) and p.Ala291Ser (5.88%) were the most frequent mutations in Indian patients but were rare in the mutational profiles reported in other populations. These results indicate that the Indian patients may have a distinct mutation spectrum compared to those of other populations. Mutant alleles in exon 1, 7 and 8 accounted for 44.8% of the mutations, and sequencing of these exons initially may be a cost-effective approach in Asian Indian patients. This is the largest study on molecular analysis of patients with MPS IVA reported in the literature, and the first report from India.

  19. Inhibition of acetylcholine release from mouse motor nerve by a P-type calcium channel blocker, omega-agatoxin IVA.

    PubMed Central

    Hong, S J; Chang, C C

    1995-01-01

    1. The effects were studied of the central neurone P-type Ca2+ channel blockers, omega-agatoxin IVA, omega-conotoxin MVIIC (polypeptide toxins) and synthetic funnel-web spider polyamine toxin on acetylcholine release from mouse motor nerve. 2. omega-Agatoxin IVA decreased the quantal content of endplate potentials and blocked synaptic transmission in the nanomolar range in a reversible manner, whereas the other toxins depressed transmission in the hundred micromolar range. 3. The polyamine toxin, but not the polypeptide toxins, decreased the amplitude of the miniature endplate potential. The increase in the frequency of miniature endplate potentials evoked by high [K+], but not that evoked by alpha-latrotoxin, was effectively antagonized by omega-agatoxin IVA. 4. In the presence of omega-agatoxin IVA, high frequency nerve stimulation produced facilitation of endplate currents and tetanic contractions. 5. The results suggest that, under physiological conditions, the Ca2+ necessary for nerve action potential-evoked acetylcholine release is translocated via a subtype of the P-type Ca2+ channel sensitive to omega-agatoxin IVA. PMID:7714822

  20. Use MACES IVA Suit for EVA Mobility Evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Richard D.

    2014-01-01

    The use of an Intra-Vehicular Activity (IVA) suit for a spacewalk or Extra-Vehicular Activity (EVA) was evaluated for mobility and usability in the Neutral Buoyancy Lab (NBL) environment. The Space Shuttle Advanced Crew Escape Suit (ACES) has been modified (MACES) to integrate with the Orion spacecraft. The first several missions of the Orion MPCV spacecraft will not have mass available to carry an EVA specific suit so any EVA required will have to be performed by the MACES. Since the MACES was not designed with EVA in mind, it was unknown what mobility the suit would be able to provide for an EVA or if a person could perform useful tasks for an extended time inside the pressurized suit. The suit was evaluated in multiple NBL runs by a variety of subjects including crewmembers with significant EVA experience. Various functional mobility tasks performed included: translation, body positioning, carrying tools, body stabilization, equipment handling, and use of tools. Hardware configurations included with and without TMG, suit with IVA gloves and suit with EVA gloves. Most tasks were completed on ISS mockups with existing EVA tools. Some limited tasks were completed with prototype tools on a simulated rocky surface. Major findings include: demonstration of the ability to weigh-out the suit, understanding the need to have subjects perform multiple runs prior to getting feedback, determination of critical sizing factors, and need for adjustment of suit work envelop. The early testing has demonstrated the feasibility of EVA's limited duration and limited scope. Further testing is required with more flight like tasking and constraints to validate these early results. If the suit is used for EVA, it will require mission specific modifications for umbilical management or PLSS integration, safety tether attachment, and tool interfaces. These evaluations are continuing through calendar year 2014.

  1. Study of space shuttle EVA/IVA support requirements. Volume 2: EVA/IVA tasks, guidelines, and constraints definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webbon, B. W.; Copeland, R. J.; Wood, P. W., Jr.; Cox, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    The guidelines for EVA and IVA tasks to be performed on the space shuttle are defined. In deriving tasks, guidelines, and constraints, payloads were first identified from the mission model. Payload requirements, together with man and manipulator capabilities, vehicle characteristics and operation, and safety considerations led to a definition of candidate tasks. Guidelines and constraints were also established from these considerations. Scenarios were established, and screening criteria, such as commonality of EVA and IVA activities, were applied to derive representative planned and unplanned tasks. The whole spectrum of credible contingency situations with a potential requirement for EVA/IVA was analyzed.

  2. Silica and Pyroxene in IVA Irons; Possible Formation of the IVA Magma by Impact Melting and Reduction of L-LL-Chondrite Materials Followed by Crystallization and Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wasson, John T.; Matsunami, Yoshiyuki; Rubin, Alan E.

    2006-01-01

    Group IVA is a large magmatic group of iron meteorites. The mean DELTA O-17 (= delta O-17 - 0.52(raised dot) delta O-18) of the silicates is approx. plus or minus 1.2%o, similar to the highest values in L chondrites and the lowest values in LL chondrites; delta O-18 values are also in the L/LL range. This strongly suggests that IVA irons formed by melting L-LL parental material, but the mean Ni content of IVA irons (83 mg/g) is much lower than that of a presumed L-LL parent (approx. 170 mg/g) and the low-Ca pyroxene present in two IVA meteorites is Fs13, much lower than the Fs20-29 values in L and LL chondrites. Thus, formation from L-LL precursors requires extensive addition of metallic Fe, probably produced by reduction of FeS and FeO. Group IVA also has S/Ni, Ga/Ni, and Ge/Ni ratios that are much lower than those in L-LL chondrites or any chondrite group that preserves nebular compositions, implying loss of these volatile elements during asteroidal processing. We suggest that these reduction and loss processes occurred near the surface of the asteroid during impact heating, and resulted partly from reduction by C, and partly from the thermal dissociation of FeS and FeO with loss of O and S. The hot (approx. 1770 K) low-viscosity melt quickly moved through channels in the porous asteroid to form a core. Two members of the IVA group, Sao Joao Nepomuceno (hereafter, SJN) and Steinbach, contain moderate amounts of orthopyroxene and silica, and minor amounts of low-Ca clinopyroxene. Even though SJN formed after approx. 26% crystallization and Steinbach formed after approx. 77% Crystallization of the IVA core, both could have originated within several tens of meters of the core-mantle interface if 99% of the crystallization occurred from the center outwards. Two other members of the group (Gibeon and Bishop Canyon) contain tabular tridymite, which we infer to have initially formed as veins deposited from a cooling SiO-rich vapor. The silicates were clearly introduced

  3. Thirtieth Annual Congress on Veterinary Acupuncture: IVAS Report

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    More than 155 participants from 25 countries attended the 30th Annual IVAS Congress, September 8–11, 2004 in Oostende, Belgium. The focus was on veterinary acupuncture (AP) and immunology, and the event was sponsored by the International Veterinary Acupuncture Society (IVAS). IVAS is a non-profit organization dedicated to promoting excellence in the practice of veterinary AP as an integral part of the total veterinary health care delivery system. The Society endeavors to establish uniformly high standards of veterinary AP through its educational programs and accreditation examination. IVAS seeks to integrate veterinary AP and the practice of Western veterinary science, while also noting that the science of veterinary AP does not overlook allied health systems, such as homeopathy, herbology, nutrition, chiropractic, kinesiology, etc. ().

  4. Pilot Overmyer completes hygiene activities / demostrates IVA foot restraint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    On middeck, Pilot Overmyer, drying his face with a towel from forward single tray personal item stowage locker, completes personal hygiene activities (shaving) and demostrates use of intravehicular activity (IVA) foot restraint on floor.

  5. Lipid IVa incompletely activates MyD88-independent Toll-like receptor 4 signaling in mouse macrophage cell lines.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Norihiko; Muroi, Masashi; Sugiura, Yuka; Tanamoto, Ken-ichi

    2013-04-01

    We investigated the difference in the effect of synthetic lipid A compounds on MyD88-dependent and -independent Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling in mouse macrophage cells. At higher concentrations, Escherichia coli-type hexa-acylated lipid A 506, Salmonella-type hepta-acylated lipid A 516, the lipid A precursor lipid IVa and monophosphoryl lipid A induced similar levels of production of the MyD88-dependent cytokine IL-1β although their potencies varied, whereas the maximum production of the MyD88-independent cytokine RANTES induced by lipid IVa was less than 50% that of other lipid A compounds. A maximum level of NF-κB activation, which is involved in IL-1β gene transcription, was also induced to a similar level by these four lipid A compounds, while the maximum level of IFN-β promoter activity induced during MyD88-independent signaling was also less than 50% for lipid IVa stimulation compared with other lipid A compounds. Early IκBα phosphorylation activated by MyD88-dependent signaling was similarly induced by 506 and lipid IVa, whereas lipid IVa barely stimulated the phosphorylation of IRF3, a MyD88-independent transcription factor, although efficient phosphorylation was observed with 506 stimulation. These results indicate that lipid IVa has limited activity toward MyD88-independent signaling of TLR4, in macrophage cell lines, despite having efficient activity in the MyD88-dependent pathway.

  6. Physical and digital simulations for IVA robotics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinman, Elaine; Workman, Gary L.

    1992-01-01

    Space based materials processing experiments can be enhanced through the use of IVA robotic systems. A program to determine requirements for the implementation of robotic systems in a microgravity environment and to develop some preliminary concepts for acceleration control of small, lightweight arms has been initiated with the development of physical and digital simulation capabilities. The physical simulation facilities incorporate a robotic workcell containing a Zymark Zymate II robot instrumented for acceleration measurements, which is able to perform materials transfer functions while flying on NASA's KC-135 aircraft during parabolic manuevers to simulate reduced gravity. Measurements of accelerations occurring during the reduced gravity periods will be used to characterize impacts of robotic accelerations in a microgravity environment in space. Digital simulations are being performed with TREETOPS, a NASA developed software package which is used for the dynamic analysis of systems with a tree topology. Extensive use of both simulation tools will enable the design of robotic systems with enhanced acceleration control for use in the space manufacturing environment.

  7. Mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA: Common double deletion in the N-Acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfatase gene (GALNS)

    SciTech Connect

    Hori, Toshinori; Tomatsu, Shunji; Fukuda, Seiji

    1995-04-10

    Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA (MPS IVA) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by a deficiency in N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfatase (GALNS). We found two separate deletions of nearly 8.0 and 6.0 kb in the GALNS gene, including some exons. There are Alu repetitive elements near the breakpoints of the 8.0-kb deletion, and this deletion resulted from an Alu-Alu recombination. The other 6.0-kb deletion involved illegitimate recombinational events between incomplete short direct repeats of 8 bp at deletion breakpoints. The same rearrangement has been observed in a heteroallelic state in four unrelated patients. This is the first documentation of a common double deletion a gene that is not a member of a gene cluster. 39 refs., 5 figs.

  8. Integrated thermal treatment system sudy: Phase 2, Results

    SciTech Connect

    Feizollahi, F.; Quapp, W.J.

    1995-08-01

    This report presents the second phase of a study on thermal treatment technologies. The study consists of a systematic assessment of nineteen thermal treatment alternatives for the contact-handled mixed low-level waste (MLLW) currently stored in the US Department of Energy complex. The treatment alternatives consist of widely varying technologies for safely destroying the hazardous organic components, reducing the volume, and preparing for final disposal of the MLLW. The alternatives considered in Phase 2 were innovative thermal treatments with nine types of primary processing units. Other variations in the study examined the effect of combustion gas, air pollution control system design, and stabilization technology for the treatment residues. The Phase 1 study, the results of which have been published as an interim report, examined ten initial thermal treatment alternatives. The Phase 2 systems were evaluated in essentially the same manner as the Phase 2 systems. The assumptions and methods were the same as for the Phase 1 study. The quantities, and physical and chemical compositions, of the input waste used in he Phase 2 systems differ from those in the Phase 1 systems, which were based on a preliminary waste input database developed at the onset of the Integrated Thermal Treatment System study. The inventory database used in the Phase 2 study incorporates the latest US Department of Energy information. All systems, both primary treatment systems and subsystem inputs, have now been evaluated using the same waste input (2,927 lb/hr).

  9. Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA: correlation between genotype, phenotype and keratan sulfate levels.

    PubMed

    Dũng, Vũ Chí; Tomatsu, Shunji; Montaño, Adriana M; Gottesman, Gary; Bober, Michael B; Mackenzie, William; Maeda, Miho; Mitchell, Grant A; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Orii, Tadao

    2013-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA (MPS IVA) is caused by deficiency of N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase (GALNS), leading to systemic skeletal dysplasia because of excessive storage of keratan sulfate (KS) in chondrocytes. In an effort to determine a precise prognosis and personalized treatment, we aim to characterize clinical, biochemical, and molecular findings in MPS IVA patients, and to seek correlations between genotype, phenotype, and blood and urine KS levels. Mutation screening of GALNS gene was performed in 55 MPS IVA patients (severe: 36, attenuated: 13, undefined: 6) by genomic PCR followed by direct sequence analysis. Plasma and urine KS levels were measured by ELISA method. Genotype/phenotype/KS correlations were assessed when data were available. Fifty-three different mutations including 19 novel ones (41 missense, 2 nonsense, 4 small deletions, 1 insertion, and 5 splice-site) were identified in 55 patients and accounted for 93.6% of the analyzed mutant alleles. Thirty-nine mutations were associated with a severe phenotype and ten mutations with an attenuated one. Blood and urine KS concentrations in MPS IVA patients were age-dependent and markedly higher than those in age-matched normal controls. Plasma and urine KS levels in MPS IVA patients with the severe phenotype were higher than in those with an attenuated form. This study provides evidence for extensive allelic heterogeneity of MPS IVA. Accumulation of mutations as well as clinical descriptions and KS levels allows us to predict clinical severity more precisely and should be used for evaluation of responses to potential treatment options.

  10. A phase I study afatinib/carboplatin/paclitaxel induction chemotherapy followed by standard chemoradiation in HPV-negative or high-risk HPV-positive locally advanced stage III/IVa/IVb head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Christine H.; Rudek, Michelle A.; Kang, Hyunseok; Marur, Shanthi; John, Pritish; Tsottles, Nancy; Bonerigo, Sarah; Veasey, Andy; Kiess, Ana; Quon, Harry; Cmelak, Anthony; Murphy, Barbara A.; Gilbert, Jill

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Afatinib is an ErbB family receptor inhibitor with efficacy in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). A phase I trial was conducted to determine the maximally tolerated dose (MTD) of afatinib in combination with carboplatin and paclitaxel as induction chemotherapy (IC). Material and Methods Patients with newly diagnosed, locally advanced HPV-negative or HPV-positive HNSCC with a significant smoking history were enrolled. Afatinib alone was given daily for two weeks as lead-in and subsequently given with carboplatin AUC 6 mg/ml*min and paclitaxel 175 mg/m2 every 21 days as IC. Afatinib was started at a dose of 20 mg daily and dose escalated using a modified Fibonacci design. After completion of IC, afatinib was discontinued and patients received concurrent cisplatin 40 mg/m2 weekly and standard radiation. Toxicity was assessed using CTCAE version 4.0. Results Seven of nine patients completed afatinib lead-in and IC. Five patients had partial response and two patients had stable disease after IC. Dose level 1 (afatinib 20 mg) was well tolerated with one grade 3 (ALT elevation) and one grade 4 (neutropenia) toxicities. However, dose level 2 (afatinib 30 mg) was not well tolerated with nine grade 3 (pneumonia, abdominal pain, diarrhea, pancytopenia, and UTI), two grade 4 (sepsis) and one grade 5 (death) toxicities. Conclusions The MTD of afatinib given with carboplatin AUC 6 mg/ml*min and paclitaxel 175 mg/m2 is 20 mg daily. Combination of afatinib at doses higher than 20 mg with carboplatin and paclitaxel should be administered with caution due to the toxicities. PMID:26705063

  11. Long-term therapeutic efficacy of allogenic bone marrow transplantation in a patient with mucopolysaccharidosis IVA.

    PubMed

    Chinen, Yasutsugu; Higa, Takeshi; Tomatsu, Shunji; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Orii, Tadao; Hyakuna, Nobuyuki

    Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA (MPS IVA) is one of the lysosomal storage diseases. It is caused by the deficiency of N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase. Deficiency of this enzyme leads to accumulation of the specific glycosaminoglycans keratan sulfate and chondroitin-6-sulfate. This accumulation has a direct impact on cartilage and bone development, resulting in systemic skeletal dysplasia. There is no curative therapy for this skeletal dysplasia. This report describes long-term therapeutic efficacy in a 15-year-old boy with a severe form of MPS IVA who received successful allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) from his HLA-identical carrier sister. The level of the GALNS enzyme in the recipient's lymphocytes reached almost half of normal level within two years after BMT. For the successive 9+ years post-BMT, GALNS activity in his lymphocytes maintained the same level as the donor's, and the level of urinary uronic acid was reduced. Lumbar bone mineral density increased around 50% one year later post-BMT and was kept consistent. Radiographs showed that the figures of trochanter major and minor appeared, while the epiphyseal dysplasia in the femoral cap was almost unchanged. Loud snoring and apnea disappeared. Vital capacity increased to around 20% for the first two years and was maintained. Activity of daily life (ADL) was improved in work/study efficacy, respiratory status, sleep, joint pain, and frequency of infection. In conclusion, the long-term study of hematopoetic stem cell transplantation has shown clinical improvements in respiratory function, radiograph findings, ADL, and biochemical findings, suggesting that it is a potential therapeutic option for patients with MPS IVA.

  12. Long-term Outcome after Radiotherapy for FIGO Stage IIIB and IVA Carcinoma of the Cervix

    SciTech Connect

    Yeung, Anamaria R.; Amdur, Robert J. . E-mail: amdurrj@shands.ufl.edu; Morris, Christopher G.; Morgan, Linda S.; Mendenhall, William M.

    2007-04-01

    Purpose: To report the long-term outcome after radiotherapy with curative intent for Stage IIIB and IVA carcinoma of the cervix. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 91 patients treated with radiotherapy with curative intent at University of Florida between January 1980 and December 2003 for Stage IIIB (84 patients) or IVA (7 patients) carcinoma of the cervix. Results: The median follow-up of the surviving patients was 8.8 years. The 5- and 10-year estimates of local control, regional control, locoregional control, relapse-free survival, and overall survival were 53% and 53%, 55% and 47%, 34% and 29%, 30% and 26%, and 29% and 21%, respectively. Ninety percent of the recurrences occurred within 2 years of treatment. Of these, 60% of all failures were local, 29% were regional, and 11% were distant failures alone. Also, 17% of the failures were in the paraaortic nodes with no evidence of failure in the pelvis. Univariate and multivariate analyses were conducted with the endpoint of relapse-free or overall survival. No factor was statistically significant. Complications from therapy were scored using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grading system; the overall severe late complication rate was 13% (Grade 3-5). Conclusion: This series is one of the most mature of published reports. With long-term follow-up, approximately one-third of patients with Stage IIIB or IVA carcinoma of the cervix were cured, with a 13% complication rate.

  13. Interplay of the serine/threonine-kinase StkP and the paralogs DivIVA and GpsB in pneumococcal cell elongation and division.

    PubMed

    Fleurie, Aurore; Manuse, Sylvie; Zhao, Chao; Campo, Nathalie; Cluzel, Caroline; Lavergne, Jean-Pierre; Freton, Céline; Combet, Christophe; Guiral, Sébastien; Soufi, Boumediene; Macek, Boris; Kuru, Erkin; VanNieuwenhze, Michael S; Brun, Yves V; Di Guilmi, Anne-Marie; Claverys, Jean-Pierre; Galinier, Anne; Grangeasse, Christophe

    2014-04-01

    Despite years of intensive research, much remains to be discovered to understand the regulatory networks coordinating bacterial cell growth and division. The mechanisms by which Streptococcus pneumoniae achieves its characteristic ellipsoid-cell shape remain largely unknown. In this study, we analyzed the interplay of the cell division paralogs DivIVA and GpsB with the ser/thr kinase StkP. We observed that the deletion of divIVA hindered cell elongation and resulted in cell shortening and rounding. By contrast, the absence of GpsB resulted in hampered cell division and triggered cell elongation. Remarkably, ΔgpsB elongated cells exhibited a helical FtsZ pattern instead of a Z-ring, accompanied by helical patterns for DivIVA and peptidoglycan synthesis. Strikingly, divIVA deletion suppressed the elongated phenotype of ΔgpsB cells. These data suggest that DivIVA promotes cell elongation and that GpsB counteracts it. Analysis of protein-protein interactions revealed that GpsB and DivIVA do not interact with FtsZ but with the cell division protein EzrA, which itself interacts with FtsZ. In addition, GpsB interacts directly with DivIVA. These results are consistent with DivIVA and GpsB acting as a molecular switch to orchestrate peripheral and septal PG synthesis and connecting them with the Z-ring via EzrA. The cellular co-localization of the transpeptidases PBP2x and PBP2b as well as the lipid-flippases FtsW and RodA in ΔgpsB cells further suggest the existence of a single large PG assembly complex. Finally, we show that GpsB is required for septal localization and kinase activity of StkP, and therefore for StkP-dependent phosphorylation of DivIVA. Altogether, we propose that the StkP/DivIVA/GpsB triad finely tunes the two modes of peptidoglycan (peripheral and septal) synthesis responsible for the pneumococcal ellipsoid cell shape.

  14. Entire hemithorax irradiation for Masaoka stage IVa thymomas.

    PubMed

    Soares, André; Louro, Luís Vasco; Almeida, Marta; Sousa, Olga

    2012-01-01

    Thymomas are rare neoplasms that have an indolent growth with a preferentially intra-thoracic dissemination pattern. Surgery is currently the standard treatment of thymomas; however radiotherapy is often used in an adjuvant setting due to a high sensitivity of these tumors to such treatment. Postoperative entire hemithoracic irradiation has been used in selected Masaoka stage IVa cases after complete surgical excision of metastatic lesions. In the present article, the authors report three cases of Masaoka stage IVa thymoma that underwent entire hemithorax irradiation after surgical excision of metastatic lesions. The first two patients presented as stage IVa thymomas. The third case consisted of a pleural recurrence of a thymoma. Hemithoracic irradiation with low doses has been used by different authors; the available data shows that it is a well-tolerated treatment that could potentially lead to better loco-regional control and increased overall survival.

  15. Heart and Cardiovascular Involvement in Patients with Mucopolysaccharidosis Type IVA (Morquio-A Syndrome)

    PubMed Central

    Kampmann, Christoph; Abu-Tair, Tariq; Gökce, Seyfullah; Lampe, Christina; Reinke, Jörg; Mengel, Eugen; Hennermann, Julia B.; Wiethoff, Christiane M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) IVA is a rare lysosomal storage disorder with multiple skeletal and non-skeletal abnormalities requiring multiple surgical interventions. It is well known that patients with MPS IVA suffer from tachycardia, but cardiac and hemodynamic alterations have not been reported to date. We investigated the cardiovascular and hemodynamic alterations in patients with MPS IVA and developed a possible patho-mechanism for cardiovascular deterioration during anesthesia. Material and Methods In this observational study, serial cardiac examinations were performed in 54 patients with MPS IVA who were followed at the Children’s Hospital of the Mainz Medical University (Mainz, Germany) between 1991 and 2014 (follow-up 1–24 years; median 5.8 years). Results were compared with data from a large central European cohort of more than 2000 healthy infants and children. Results None of the patients had arterial hypertension, but 4% had evidence of increased pulmonary artery pressure. Patients developed aortic root extension up to 6.9 standard deviations above normal. Left-sided valve leaflet thickening occurred in 26 patients (five with valve disease). Patients had lower left ventricular dimensions (z: –1.02±0.1), lower stroke volumes (z: –2.3±0.17), lower left ventricular mass (z: –1.5±0.21), but higher wall thickness (z: +0.8±0.16), and higher work index (z: +2.5±0.2) compared to healthy control subjects. Cardiac output was preserved by an increase in heart rate of 21%. Sixty % of patients showed impaired diastolic filling; heart rate (99.0±1.8 vs. 92.0±2.1 bpm), age (18.0±1.8 vs. 14.2±1 years), and cardiothoracic ratio (61.6±3.6% vs. 55±4.2%) of these patients were higher compared to those with normal filling. Conclusions The results of this study suggest an age-progressive disproportion of the intra-thoracic organs of patients with MPS IVA, which is accompanied by aortic root extension and thickened left ventricles, with reduced

  16. Siderophile elements in IVA irons and the compaction of their parent asteroidal core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albarède, Francis; Bouchet, Romain A.; Blichert-Toft, Janne

    2013-01-01

    The highly siderophile element concentrations of IVA irons constitute an excellent benchmark for asteroidal core processes and, so far, the paradigm, based on the negative correlation between Ni contents and crystallographic cooling rates, has been that they represent a suite of cumulates crystallizing inwards from a molten asteroidal core. It has, however, been recognized that fractional crystallization does not account for all of the siderophile concentration patterns. Here we use the experimental parameterization of siderophile element fractionation with respect to the sulfur content of molten iron (Chabot and Jones, 2003), least-squares techniques, and Monte Carlo error propagation to assess whether incremental changes in the series of IVA irons can be accounted for by fractional crystallization or rather by partial melting. We show that the apparent order of incompatibility during solid-melt segregation deduced from binary plots of siderophile elements is misleading as a result of the strong dependency of partition coefficients on the sulfur content of the melt. All models of fractional crystallization of an Fe-S melt corrected for this effect result in negative sulfur contents. The effect of interstitial melt on fractionation hence is negligible because the high sulfur content of the melts makes all the elements compatible. In contrast, residues left by the compaction of a molten asteroidal core that crystallized with traces of sulfides and silicates according to the incremental form of batch melting provide a successful representation of the IVA suite for a large number of elements. Misfit for some elements may be due to the presence of carbon or reflects memory of variations acquired during the crystallization of the core. It is likely that melting was triggered by 26Al and that melt extraction was enhanced by the high strain-rate of impacts. The calculated S content of the liquid reproduces the experimental value of the Fe-S eutectic (45% S). Inward

  17. Novel missense mutation in the GALNS gene in an affected patient with severe form of mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA.

    PubMed

    Seyedhassani, Seyed Mohammad; Hashemi-Gorji, Feyzollah; Yavari, Mahdieh; Mirfakhraie, Reza

    2015-10-23

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA (MPS IVA), also known as Morquio A, is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by a deficiency of N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase (GALNS), which causes major skeletal and connective tissue abnormalities and affects multiple organ systems. In this study, one MPS IVA patient with a severe form from consanguine large Iranian family has been investigated. To find a mutation, all of the 14 exons and intron-exon junctions of GALNS gene were sequenced. Sequencing results were analyzed using bioinformatic analysis in order to predict probable pathogenic effect of the variant. One novel homozygous missense mutation in exon 5, c.542A>G (p.Y181C), was found in the proband. That was predicted as being probably pathogenic by bioinformatics analysis. Segregation and familial study confirmed this pathogenic mutation. In conclusion, we have identified the novel mutation responsible for MPS IVA in an Iranian patient to assist in the diagnosis, genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis of the affected families.

  18. Novel oral taxane therapies: recent Phase I results

    PubMed Central

    Flores, John Paul; Saif, M Wasif

    2015-01-01

    The oral taxanes are analogues of existing taxanes with a possible broad range of antitumor activity. They also have the potential advantages of ease of administration, better efficacy and lesser toxicity than currently available taxanes. These drugs have been used in several Phase I clinical trials, the methodology and results of which will be reviewed here. PMID:26146540

  19. Np Behavior in Synthesized Uranyl Phases: Results of Initial Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Friese, Judah I.; Douglas, Matthew; McNamara, Bruce K.; Clark, Sue B.; Hanson, Brady D.

    2004-09-28

    Initial tests were completed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for developing a potential mechanism to retard the mobility of neptunium at the Yucca Mountain repository. Neptunium is of concern because of its mobility in the environment and long half life, contributing a large percentage of the potential dose over extended times at the perimeter of the site. The mobility of neptunium could be retarded by associating with uranium mineral phases. The following four uranium mineral phases were examined and are potential secondary phases expected to form as a result of interactions of spent nuclear fuel with the local environment: meta-schoepite, studtite, uranophane, and sodium boltwoodite. The fate of the neptunium was examined in these synthetic experiments.

  20. First Results of the Phase II SIMPLE Dark Matter Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felizardo, M.; Morlat, T.; Fernandes, A. C.; Girard, T. A.; Marques, J. G.; Ramos, A. R.; Auguste, M.; Boyer, D.; Cavaillou, A.; Sudre, C.; Poupeney, J.; Payne, R. F.; Miley, H. S.; Puibasset, J.

    2010-11-01

    We report results of a 14.1kgd measurement with 15 superheated droplet detectors of total active mass 0.208 kg, comprising the first stage of a 30kgd Phase II experiment. In combination with the results of the neutron-spin sensitive XENON10 experiment, these results yield a limit of |ap|<0.32 for MW=50GeV/c2 on the spin-dependent sector of weakly interacting massive particle-nucleus interactions with a 50% reduction in the previously allowed region of the phase space, formerly defined by XENON, KIMS, and PICASSO. In the spin-independent sector, a limit of 2.3×10-5pb at MW=45GeV/c2 is obtained.

  1. Antidiabetic Effects of Aqueous Infusions of Artemisia herba-alba and Ajuga iva in Alloxan-Induced Diabetic Rats.

    PubMed

    Boudjelal, Amel; Siracusa, Laura; Henchiri, Cherifa; Sarri, Madani; Abderrahim, Benkhaled; Baali, Faiza; Ruberto, Giuseppe

    2015-06-01

    The aqueous infusions of the aerial parts of Artemisia herba-alba Asso and Ajuga iva Schreber, prepared in accordance with the traditional procedure used in the local folk medicine, have been analysed for their composition and content of phytochemical constituents and examined for their antidiabetic effectiveness in alloxan-induced diabetic rats. Oral administration of A. herba-alba and A. iva infusions was studied in normal and alloxan-induced diabetic rats, which were randomly divided into nine groups, each group consisting of six animals. The drug preparations (100, 200, and 300 mg/kg b. w.) of each plant were given orally to the rats of each group twice daily for 15 days. Compositional analysis of the aqueous infusions revealed the presence of several polyphenols as main components. A. herba-alba infusion was characterised by mono- and di-cinnamoylquinic acids, with 5-caffeoylquinic (chlorogenic) acid being the main compound, followed by 3,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid. Vicenin-2 (apigenin 6,8-di-C-glucoside) appeared to be the most abundant among flavonoids. On the other hand, A. iva showed the exclusive presence of flavonoids, with the flavanone naringin present in relatively high levels together with several apigenin (flavone) derivatives. Oral administration of 300 mg/kg b. w. of the aqueous infusions of A. herba-alba and A. iva exhibited a significant reduction in blood glucose content, showing a much more efficient antidiabetic activity compared to glibenclamide, the oral hypoglycaemic agent used as a positive control in this study. These results suggest that A. herba-alba and A. iva possess significant antidiabetic activity, as they were able to improve the biochemical damage in alloxan-induced diabetes in rats.

  2. Chikusetsusaponin IVa methyl ester induces cell cycle arrest by the inhibition of nuclear translocation of β-catenin in HCT116 cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung-Mi; Yun, Ji Ho; Lee, Dong Hwa; Park, Young Gyun; Son, Kun Ho; Nho, Chu Won; Kim, Yeong Shik

    2015-04-17

    We demonstrate that chikusetsusaponin IVa methyl ester (CME), a triterpenoid saponin from the root of Achyranthes japonica, has an anticancer activity. We investigate its molecular mechanism in depth in HCT116 cells. CME reduces the amount of β-catenin in nucleus and inhibits the binding of β-catenin to specific DNA sequences (TCF binding elements, TBE) in target gene promoters. Thus, CME appears to decrease the expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins such as Cyclin D1, as a representative target for β-catenin, as well as CDK2 and CDK4. As a result of the decrease of the cell cycle regulatory proteins, CME inhibits cell proliferation by arresting the cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase. Therefore, we suggest that CME as a novel Wnt/β-catenin inhibitor can be a putative agent for the treatment of colorectal cancers.

  3. Analytical results for a three-phase traffic model.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ding-wei

    2003-10-01

    We study analytically a cellular automaton model, which is able to present three different traffic phases on a homogeneous highway. The characteristics displayed in the fundamental diagram can be well discerned by analyzing the evolution of density configurations. Analytical expressions for the traffic flow and shock speed are obtained. The synchronized flow in the intermediate-density region is the result of aggressive driving scheme and determined mainly by the stochastic noise.

  4. Phase quality map based on local multi-unwrapped results for two-dimensional phase unwrapping.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Heping; Tang, Jinsong; Zhang, Sen

    2015-02-01

    The efficiency of a phase unwrapping algorithm and the reliability of the corresponding unwrapped result are two key problems in reconstructing the digital elevation model of a scene from its interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) or interferometric synthetic aperture sonar (InSAS) data. In this paper, a new phase quality map is designed and implemented in a graphic processing unit (GPU) environment, which greatly accelerates the unwrapping process of the quality-guided algorithm and enhances the correctness of the unwrapped result. In a local wrapped phase window, the center point is selected as the reference point, and then two unwrapped results are computed by integrating in two different simple ways. After the two local unwrapped results are computed, the total difference of the two unwrapped results is regarded as the phase quality value of the center point. In order to accelerate the computing process of the new proposed quality map, we have implemented it in a GPU environment. The wrapped phase data are first uploaded to the memory of a device, and then the kernel function is called in the device to compute the phase quality in parallel by blocks of threads. Unwrapping tests performed on the simulated and real InSAS data confirm the accuracy and efficiency of the proposed method.

  5. Changes in antioxidant defense status in hypercholesterolemic rats treated with Ajuga iva.

    PubMed

    Bouderbala, S; Lamri-Senhadji, M; Prost, J; Lacaille-Dubois, M A; Bouchenak, M

    2008-06-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of aqueous extract of Ajuga iva (Ai) on serum and tissues lipid peroxidation as well as antioxidant enzymes activities in red blood cells (RBC) and tissues, in high hypercholesterolemic rats (HC). Male Wistar rats (n=12) were fed on 1% cholesterol-enriched diet for 15d. After this adaptation phase, hypercholesterolemic rats (total cholesterol=6.5+/-0.6mol/l) were divided into two groups fed the same diet and treated or not with Ai for 15d. Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) concentrations in serum, LDL-HDL(1), HDL(2) and HDL(3) were respectively, 5-, 7.8-, 2.3- and 5-fold lower in Ai treated than untreated hypercholesterolemic groups. TBARS concentrations were 1.4-fold lower in heart and 2.8-fold higher in kidney in Ai-HC treated than untreated HC group. Superoxide dismutase activity was respectively, 1.2- and 1.4-fold higher in RBC and muscle in Ai treated than untreated group. In RBC, Ajuga iva treatment enhanced glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) (+9%) and glutathione reductase (GSSH-Red) (+12%) in Ai-HC treated than untreated HC group. GSSH-Red activity was 1.4- and 1.5-fold higher in adipose tissue and heart, respectively and 3.7-fold lower in kidney in Ai treated than untreated group. Liver catalase activity was 1.6-fold higher in Ai treated than untreated group. Adipose tissue and muscle total glutathione content represented in Ai treated group 35% and 36% of the value noted in untreated group. Nitric oxide values of liver, adipose tissue and heart were 3.3-, 2.5- and 3.4-fold higher in Ai-HC than HC group. Ajuga iva treatment enhanced alpha-tocopherol contents (+25%) in Ai treated than untreated group. In conclusion, Ajuga iva treatment is more effective to improve the antioxidant capacity of RBC than that of tissues. Indeed, Ai is able to reduce the oxidative stress in hypercholesterolemic rats by increasing the antioxidant enzymes activity.

  6. Results from the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory Phase III

    SciTech Connect

    SNO Collaboration; Prior, G.

    2008-11-03

    The third and last phase of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) used a technique independent of previous methods, to measure the rate of neutral-current interactions in heavy water and determine precisely the total active {sup 8}B solar neutrino flux. The total flux obtained is 5.54{sub -0.31}{sup +0.33}(stat){sub -0.34}{sup +0.36}(syst) x 10{sup 6} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}, in agreement with previous measurements and standard solar models. Results from a global analysis of solar and reactor neutrino give {Delta}m{sup 2} = 7.59{sub -0.21}{sup +0.19} x 10{sup -5} eV{sup 2} and {theta} = 34.4{sub -1.2}{sup +1.3} degrees with a reduced uncertainty on the mixing angle compared to previous phases.

  7. Dense nonaqueous phase liquid tracer tests: experimental results.

    PubMed

    Burt, R A; Christians, G L; Williams, S P; Wilson, D J

    2001-12-01

    Two dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) tracer tests were carried out in a shallow aquifer north of Fort Worth, TX. i-Propanol was used as the nonpartitioning tracer: n-hexanol and n-octanol were the partitioning tracers. Field data, mathematical modeling, the results of column tests, and field tracer tests with NaCl were used in designing the DNAPL tracer tests. The results indicated the presence of DNAPL at both sites tested; semi-quantitative estimates of the amounts of DNAPL present were obtained by mathematical modeling. Interpretation was complicated by heterogeneity of the aquifer and mass transport effects.

  8. omega-Aga IVA selectively inhibits the calcium-dependent fraction of the evoked release of [3H]GABA from synaptosomes.

    PubMed

    Sitges, M; Chiu, L M

    1995-09-01

    The effect of omega-Aga IVA, a P-type Ca2+ channel blocker, on the release of the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA and on the elevation of Cai induced by depolarization was investigated in [3H]GABA and fura-2 preloaded mouse brain synaptosomes, respectively. Two strategies (i.e. 20 mM external K+ and veratridine) that depolarize by different mechanisms the preparation were used. High K+ elevates Cai and induces [3H]GABA release in the absence of external Na+ and in the presence of TTX, conditions that abolish veratridine induced responses. The effect of omega-Aga IVA on the Ca2+ and Na+ dependent fractions of the depolarization evoked release of [3H]GABA were separately investigated in synaptosomes depolarized with high K+ in the absence of external Na+ and with veratridine in the absence of external Ca2+, respectively. The Ca2+ dependent fraction of the evoked release of [3H]GABA and the elevation of Ca2+ induced by high K+ are markedly inhibited (about 50%) in synaptosomes exposed to omega-Aga IVA (300 nM) for 3 min before depolarization, whereas the Na+ dependent, Ca2+ independent carrier mediated release of [3H]GABA induced by veratridine, which is sensitive to verapamil and amiloride, is not modified by omega-Aga IVA. Our results indicate that an omega-Aga IVA sensitive type of Ca2+ channel is highly involved in GABA exocytosis.

  9. DAMA/LIBRA-phase1 results and perspectives of the phase2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernabei, R.; Belli, P.; Cappella, F.; Caracciolo, V.; Cerulli, R.; Dai, C. J.; d'Angelo, A.; d'Angelo, S.; Di Marco, A.; He, H. L.; Incicchitti, A.; Kuang, H. H.; Ma, X. H.; Montecchia, F.; Sheng, X. D.; Wang, R. G.; Ye, Z. P.

    2016-07-01

    The DAMA/LIBRA experiment (˜ 250 kg of highly radio-pure NaI(Tl)) is running deep underground at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory (LNGS) of the I.N.F.N. Here we briefly recall the results obtained in its first phase of measurements (DAMA/LIBRA-phase1; total exposure: 1.04 ton × yr). DAMA/LIBRA-phase1 and the former DAMA/NaI (cumulative exposure: 1.33 ton × yr) give evidence at 9.3 σ C.L. for the presence of DM particles in the galactic halo by exploiting the model-independent DM annual modulation signature. No systematic or side reaction able to mimic the exploited DM signature has been found or suggested by anyone over more than a decade. At present DAMA/LIBRA-phase2 is running with increased sensitivity.

  10. Characterization of divIVA and other genes located in the chromosomal region downstream of the dcw cluster in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Fadda, Daniela; Pischedda, Carla; Caldara, Fabrizio; Whalen, Michael B; Anderluzzi, Daniela; Domenici, Enrico; Massidda, Orietta

    2003-10-01

    We analyzed the chromosome region of Streptococcus pneumoniae located downstream of the division and cell wall (dcw) cluster that contains the homolog of the Bacillus subtilis cell division gene divIVA and some genes of unknown function. Inactivation of divIVA in S. pneumoniae resulted in severe growth inhibition and defects in cell shape, nucleoid segregation, and cell division. Inactivation of the ylm genes resulted in some morphological and/or division abnormalities, depending on the inactivated gene. Transcriptional analysis revealed a relationship between these genes and the ftsA and ftsZ cell division genes, also indicating that the connection between the dcw cluster and the divIVA region is more extensive than just chromosomal position and gene organization.

  11. Investigation of group IVA elements combined with HAXPES and first-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Y.-T.; Li, G.-L.; Oji, H.; Son, J.-Y.

    2014-04-01

    The core level and valence band spectra of group IVA elements were investigated with hard x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (HAXPES) photon energy of 7.939 keV by bulk sensitive manner. The survey and valance band spectra were presented, relative peaks intensity are discussed by thinking about inelastic mean free path (IMFP) and photoionization cross section of photoelectrons (PICS). In order to understand bulk band structures, valence bands are compared with the calculated ones by considering PICS, IMFP and total energy resolution. The calculated results by GGA, HSE06 and GW0 methods are simply discussed by comparing with experiment spectra.

  12. Fe2+-Mg order-disorder study in orthopyroxenes from São João Nepomuceno (IVA) iron meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos, E.; Scorzelli, R. B.; Varela, M. E.; Munayco, P.

    2014-01-01

    São João Nepomuceno (SJN) is an iron meteorite belonging to IVA chemical group. It consists of Fe-Ni metal matrix and silicate inclusions made of a coarse-grained mixture of tridymite, orthopyroxene and clinopyroxene. In spite of the extensive work performed on the IVA group there is still no consensus about their origin and its thermal history is subject of ongoing debates. In this work, we report preliminary results on Fe2 + distribution in the non-equivalent octahedral sites in orthopyroxene crystals extracted from São João Nepomuceno in order to infer on the thermal history of this meteorite and therefore acquire more information related to the origin of the IVA iron meteorite group.

  13. EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS OF THE NEPHELINE PHASE III STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, K.; Edwards, T.

    2009-11-09

    This study is the third phase in a series of experiments designed to reduce conservatism in the model that predicts the formation of nepheline, a crystalline phase that can reduce the durability of high level waste glass. A Phase I study developed a series of glass compositions that were very durable while their nepheline discriminator values were well below the current nepheline discriminator limit of 0.62, where nepheline is predicted to crystallize upon slow cooling. A Phase II study selected glass compositions to identify any linear effects of composition on nepheline crystallization and that were restricted to regions that fell within the validation ranges of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Product Composition Control System (PCCS) models. However, it was not possible to identify any linear effects of composition on chemical durability performance for this set of study glasses. The results of the Phase II study alone were not sufficient to recommend modification of the current nepheline discriminator. It was recommended that the next series of experiments continue to focus not only on compositional regions where the PCCS models are considered applicable (i.e., the model validation ranges), but also be restricted to compositional regions where the only constraint limiting processing is the current nepheline discriminator. Two methods were used in selecting glasses for this Phase III nepheline study. The first was based on the relationship of the current nepheline discriminator model to the other DWPF PCCS models, and the second was based on theory of crystallization in mineral and glass melts. A series of 29 test glass compositions was selected for this study using a combination of the two approaches. The glasses were fabricated and characterized in the laboratory. After reviewing the data, the study glasses generally met the target compositions with little issue. Product Consistency Test results correlated well with the crystallization analyses in

  14. DAMA/LIBRA-phase1 model independent results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernabei, R.; Belli, P.; D'Angelo, S.; di Marco, A.; Montecchia, F.; D'Angelo, A.; Incicchitti, A.; Prosperi, D.; Cappella, F.; Caracciolo, V.; Cerulli, R.; Dai, C. J.; He, H. L.; Kuang, H. H.; Ma, X. H.; Sheng, X. D.; Wang, R. G.; Ye, Z. P.

    2016-10-01

    Experimental observations and theoretical arguments at Galaxy and larger scales have suggested that a large fraction of the Universe is composed by Dark Matter (DM) particles. This has motivated the DAMA experimental efforts to investigate the presence of such particles in the galactic halo by exploiting a model independent signature with highly radiopure setups deep underground. In this paper, a review of the results obtained with the total exposure of 1.04 ton × yr collected by DAMA/LIBRA-phase1 deep underground at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory (LNGS) of the INFN during seven annual cycles is given. The DAMA/LIBRA-phase1 data give evidence for the presence of DM particles in the galactic halo, on the basis of the exploited model independent DM annual modulation signature by using highly radiopure NaI(Tl) target, at 7.5σ C.L. Including also the data of the first generation DAMA/NaI experiment (cumulative exposure 1.33 ton × yr, corresponding to 14 annual cycles), the C.L. is 9.3σ and the modulation amplitude of the single-hit scintillation events in the (2-6) keV energy interval is: (0.0112 ± 0.0012) cpd/kg/keV; the measured phase is (144 ± 7) days and the measured period is (0.998 ± 0.002) yr, values well in agreement with those expected for DM particles. No systematic or side reaction able to mimic the exploited DM signature has been found or suggested by anyone over more than a decade.

  15. Results of Phase 3 of the CATIE Schizophrenia Trial

    PubMed Central

    Stroup, T. Scott; Lieberman, Jeffrey A.; McEvoy, Joseph P.; Davis, Sonia M.; Swartz, Marvin S.; Keefe, Richard S.E.; Miller, Alexander L.; Rosenheck, Robert A.; Hsiao, John K.

    2009-01-01

    Objective The Clinical Antipsychotic Trials of Intervention Effectiveness (CATIE) study examined the comparative effectiveness of antipsychotic treatments for individuals with chronic schizophrenia. Patients who had discontinued antipsychotic treatment in phases 1 and 2 were eligible for phase 3, in which they selected one of nine antipsychotic regimens with the help of their study doctor. We describe the characteristics of the patients who selected each treatment option and their outcomes. Method Two hundred and seventy patients entered phase 3. The open-label treatment options were monotherapy with oral aripiprazole, clozapine, olanzapine, perphenazine, quetiapine, risperidone, ziprasidone, long-acting injectable fluphenazine decanoate, or a combination of any two of these treatments. Results Few patients selected fluphenazine decanoate (n=9) or perphenazine (n=4). Similar numbers selected each of the other options (range 33–41). Of the seven common choices, those who selected clozapine and combination antipsychotic treatment were the most symptomatic, and those who selected aripiprazole and ziprasidone had the highest body mass index. Symptoms improved for all groups, although the improvements were modest for the groups starting with relatively mild levels of symptoms. Side effect profiles of the medications varied considerably but medication discontinuations due to intolerability were rare (7% overall). Conclusions Patients and their doctors made treatment selections based on clinical factors, including severity of symptoms, response to prior treatments, and physical health status. Fluphenazine decanoate was rarely used among those with evidence of treatment non-adherence and clozapine was underutilized for those with poor previous response. Combination antipsychotic treatment warrants further study. PMID:19027269

  16. Results from phase I of the GERDA experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Wester, Thomas

    2015-10-28

    The GERmanium Detector Array Gerda at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso of the INFN in Italy is an experiment dedicated to the search for the neutrinoless double beta (0νββ) decay in {sup 76}Ge. The experiment employs high purity germanium detectors enriched in {sup 76}Ge inside a 64 m{sup 3} cryostat filled with liquid argon. Gerda was planned in two phases of data taking with the goal to reach a half-life sensitivity in the order of 10{sup 26} yr. Phase I of Gerda was running from November 2011 until May 2013. With about 18 kg total detector mass, data with an exposure of 21.6 kg·yr was collected and a background index of 0.01 cts/(keV·kg·yr) was achieved in the region of interest. No signal was found for the 0νββ decay and a new limit of T{sub 1/2} > 2.1 · 10{sup 25} yr (90% C.L.) was obtained, strongly disfavoring the previous claim of observation. Furthermore, the 2νββ decay half-life of {sup 76}Ge was measured with unprecedented precision. Other results include new half-life limits of the order of 10{sup 23} yr for Majoron emitting double beta decay modes with spectral indices n = 1, 2, 3, 7 and new limits in the order of 10{sup 23} yr for 2νββ decays to the first 3 excited states of {sup 76}Se. In Phase II, currently in preparation, the detector mass will be doubled while reducing the background index by a factor of 10.

  17. Cryogenic Two-Phase Flight Experiment: Results overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, T.; Buchko, M.; Brennan, P.; Bello, M.; Stoyanof, M.

    1995-01-01

    This paper focuses on the flight results of the Cryogenic Two-Phase Flight Experiment (CRYOTP), which was a Hitchhiker based experiment that flew on the space shuttle Columbia in March of 1994 (STS-62). CRYOTP tested two new technologies for advanced cryogenic thermal control; the Space Heat Pipe (SHP), which was a constant conductance cryogenic heat pipe, and the Brilliant Eyes Thermal Storage Unit (BETSU), which was a cryogenic phase-change thermal storage device. These two devices were tested independently during the mission. Analysis of the flight data indicated that the SHP was unable to start in either of two attempts, for reasons related to the fluid charge, parasitic heat leaks, and cryocooler capacity. The BETSU test article was successfully operated with more than 250 hours of on-orbit testing including several cooldown cycles and 56 freeze/thaw cycles. Some degradation was observed with the five tactical cryocoolers used as thermal sinks, and one of the cryocoolers failed completely after 331 hours of operation. Post-flight analysis indicated that this problem was most likely due to failure of an electrical controller internal to the unit.

  18. Surgical Approaches for Stage IVA Thymic Epithelial Tumors.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Mark; Korst, Robert J

    2014-01-14

    Thymic epithelial tumors (TET) are rare mediastinal neoplasms that can metastasize to the pleural space (stage IVA). Complete surgical resection remains the backbone of therapy for patients with early stage TET, however, the role of surgery in the management of patients with stage IVA disease is not fully defined. Published reports in this regard are mainly small, retrospective, and uncontrolled, with unclear inclusion criteria. Surgical options to manage pleural disease include metastasectomy, extrapleural pneumonectomy, and metastasectomy/pleurectomy combined with heated intrapleural chemotherapy. The choice of the most appropriate surgical strategy needs to be individualized according to the quantity and location of disease, the patient's overall condition, as well as operator and institutional expertise. In the majority of cases, metastasectomy of pleural implants will be sufficient to achieve a complete resection. The available literature suggests that in selected patients with stage IVA TET, delivery of neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by complete resection is a viable treatment option that can be associated with long-term survival.

  19. Linear inductive voltage adders (IVA) for advanced hydrodynamic radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Mazarakis, M.G.; Boyes, J.D.; Johnson, D.L.

    1998-09-01

    The electron beam which drifts through the multiple cavities of conventional induction linacs (LIA) is replaced in an IVA by a cylindrical metal conductor which extends along the entire length of the device and effectuates the addition of the accelerator cavity voltages. In the approach to radiography, the linear inductive voltage adder drives a magnetically immersed electron diode with a millimeter diameter cathode electrode and a planar anode/bremsstrahlung converter. Both anode and cathode electrodes are immersed in a strong (15--50 T) solenoidal magnetic field. The electron beam cross section is approximately of the same size as the cathode needle and generates a similar size, very intense x-ray beam when it strikes the anode converter. An IVA driven diode can produce electron beams of equal size and energy as a LIA but with much higher currents (40--50 kA versus 4--5 kA), simpler hardware and thus lower cost. The authors present here first experimental validations of the technology utilizing HERMES 3 and SABRE IVA accelerators. The electron beam voltage and current were respectively of the order of 10 MV and 40 kA. X-ray doses of up to 1 kR {at} 1 m and spot sizes as small as 1.7 mm (at 200 R doses) were measured.

  20. Multi-Path Transportation Futures Study. Results from Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Phil Patterson, Phil; Singh, Margaret; Plotkin, Steve; Moore, Jim

    2007-03-09

    Presentation reporting Phase 1 results, 3/9/2007. Projecting the future role of advanced drivetrains and fuels in the light vehicle market is inherently difficult, given the uncertainty (and likely volatility) of future oil prices, inadequate understanding of likely consumer response to new technologies, the relative infancy of several important new technologies with inevitable future changes in their performance and costs, and the importance — and uncertainty — of future government marketplace interventions (e.g., new regulatory standards or vehicle purchase incentives). The Multi-Path Transportation Futures (MP) Study has attempted to improve our understanding of this future role by examining several scenarios of vehicle costs, fuel prices, government subsidies, and other key factors. These are projections, not forecasts, in that they try to answer a series of “what if” questions without assigning probabilities to most of the basic assumptions.

  1. The Continual Intercomparison of Radiation Codes: Results from Phase I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oreopoulos, Lazaros; Mlawer, Eli; Delamere, Jennifer; Shippert, Timothy; Cole, Jason; Iacono, Michael; Jin, Zhonghai; Li, Jiangnan; Manners, James; Raisanen, Petri; Rose, Fred; Zhang, Yuanchong; Wilson Michael J.; Rossow, William

    2011-01-01

    The computer codes that calculate the energy budget of solar and thermal radiation in Global Climate Models (GCMs), our most advanced tools for predicting climate change, have to be computationally efficient in order to not impose undue computational burden to climate simulations. By using approximations to gain execution speed, these codes sacrifice accuracy compared to more accurate, but also much slower, alternatives. International efforts to evaluate the approximate schemes have taken place in the past, but they have suffered from the drawback that the accurate standards were not validated themselves for performance. The manuscript summarizes the main results of the first phase of an effort called "Continual Intercomparison of Radiation Codes" (CIRC) where the cases chosen to evaluate the approximate models are based on observations and where we have ensured that the accurate models perform well when compared to solar and thermal radiation measurements. The effort is endorsed by international organizations such as the GEWEX Radiation Panel and the International Radiation Commission and has a dedicated website (i.e., http://circ.gsfc.nasa.gov) where interested scientists can freely download data and obtain more information about the effort's modus operandi and objectives. In a paper published in the March 2010 issue of the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society only a brief overview of CIRC was provided with some sample results. In this paper the analysis of submissions of 11 solar and 13 thermal infrared codes relative to accurate reference calculations obtained by so-called "line-by-line" radiation codes is much more detailed. We demonstrate that, while performance of the approximate codes continues to improve, significant issues still remain to be addressed for satisfactory performance within GCMs. We hope that by identifying and quantifying shortcomings, the paper will help establish performance standards to objectively assess radiation code quality

  2. Adenoviral L4 33K forms ring-like oligomers and stimulates ATPase activity of IVa2: implications in viral genome packaging

    PubMed Central

    Ahi, Yadvinder S.; Vemula, Sai V.; Hassan, Ahmed O.; Costakes, Greg; Stauffacher, Cynthia; Mittal, Suresh K.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism of genome packaging in adenoviruses (AdVs) is presumed to be similar to that of dsDNA viruses including herpesviruses and dsDNA phages. First, the empty capsids are assembled after which the viral genome is pushed through a unique vertex by a motor which consists of three minimal components: an ATPase, a small terminase and a portal. Various components of this motor exist as ring-like structures forming a central channel through which the DNA travels during packaging. In AdV, the IVa2 protein is believed to function as a packaging ATPase, however, the equivalents of the small terminase and the portal have not been identified in AdVs. IVa2 interacts with another viral protein late region 4 (L4) 33K which is important for genome packaging. Both IVa2 and 33K are expressed at high levels during the late stage of virus infection. The oligomeric state of IVa2 and 33K was analyzed in virus-infected cells, IVa2 and 33K transfected cells, AdV particles, or as recombinant purified proteins. Electron microscopy of the purified proteins showed ring-like oligomers for both proteins which is consistent with their putative roles as a part of the packaging motor. We found that the ATPase activity of IVa2 is stimulated in the presence of 33K and the AdV genome. Our results suggest that the 33K functions analogous to the small terminase proteins and so will be part of the packaging motor complex. PMID:25954255

  3. ECAS Phase I fuel cell results. [Energy Conservation Alternatives Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warshay, M.

    1978-01-01

    This paper summarizes and discusses the fuel cell system results of Phase I of the Energy Conversion Alternatives Study (ECAS). Ten advanced electric powerplant systems for central-station baseload generation using coal were studied by NASA in ECAS. Three types of low-temperature fuel cells (solid polymer electrolyte, SPE, aqueous alkaline, and phosphoric acid) and two types of high-temperature fuel cells (molten carbonate, MC, and zirconia solid electrolyte, SE) were studied. The results indicate that (1) overall efficiency increases with fuel cell temperature, and (2) scale-up in powerplant size can produce a significant reduction in cost of electricity (COE) only when it is accompanied by utilization of waste fuel cell heat through a steam bottoming cycle and/or integration with a gasifier. For low-temperature fuel cell systems, the use of hydrogen results in the highest efficiency and lowest COE. In spite of higher efficiencies, because of higher fuel cell replacement costs integrated SE systems have higher projected COEs than do integrated MC systems. Present data indicate that life can be projected to over 30,000 hr for MC fuel cells, but data are not yet sufficient for similarly projecting SE fuel cell life expectancy.

  4. Group IVA phospholipase A2 participates in the progression of hepatic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Keiichi; Miyazaki, Akira; Nabe, Takeshi; Fushimi, Hideaki; Iriyama, Nao; Kanai, Shiho; Sato, Takashi; Uozumi, Naonori; Shimizu, Takao; Akiba, Satoshi

    2012-10-01

    Group IVA phospholipase A2 (IVA-PLA2) is an enzyme that intiates the arachidonic acid pathway and plays an important role in inflammation. We demonstrate that IVA-PLA2 deficiency suppresses lipid deposition in the liver, which was induced by administration of a high-fat and -cholesterol diet (HFCD) for 16 wk in mice. Herein, we performed 2-dimensional gel-based comparative proteomics to further define the suppressive effect of IVA-PLA2 deficiency on fatty liver formation. In comparisons among 4 groups, wild-type (WT)/normal diet (ND), IVA-PLA2-deficient knockout (KO)/ND, WT/HFCD, and KO/HFCD, 4 proteins, 3 of which are associated with hepatic fibrosis, were identified as molecules, of which altered expression by HFCD was suppressed in KO mice compared to WT mice. Therefore, we assessed the effect of IVA-PLA2 deficiency on hepatic fibrosis induced by HFCD or carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) in mouse models. Biochemical and histological analyses revealed that IVA-PLA2 deficiency markedly reduced overall collagen accumulation in the liver of HFCD- and CCl4-derived mouse models. We found that IVA-PLA2 deficiency prevented activation of hepatic stellate cells and infiltration of F4/80-positive macrophages without affecting other immunocytes such as CD8+ lymphocytes and natural killer cells. In summary, IVA-PLA2 deficiency attenuates not only lipid deposition in the liver but also hepatic fibrosis formation.

  5. Graphite electrode arc melter demonstration Phase 2 test results

    SciTech Connect

    Soelberg, N.R.; Chambers, A.G.; Anderson, G.L.; O`Connor, W.K.; Oden, L.L.; Turner, P.C.

    1996-06-01

    Several U.S. Department of Energy organizations and the U.S. Bureau of Mines have been collaboratively conducting mixed waste treatment process demonstration testing on the near full-scale graphite electrode submerged arc melter system at the Bureau`s Albany (Oregon) Research Center. An initial test series successfully demonstrated arc melter capability for treating surrogate incinerator ash of buried mixed wastes with soil. The conceptual treatment process for that test series assumed that buried waste would be retrieved and incinerated, and that the incinerator ash would be vitrified in an arc melter. This report presents results from a recently completed second series of tests, undertaken to determine the ability of the arc melter system to stably process a wide range of {open_quotes}as-received{close_quotes} heterogeneous solid mixed wastes containing high levels of organics, representative of the wastes buried and stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The Phase 2 demonstration test results indicate that an arc melter system is capable of directly processing these wastes and could enable elimination of an up-front incineration step in the conceptual treatment process.

  6. CIM5 Phase III base process development results

    SciTech Connect

    Witt, D.C.

    2000-01-06

    Integrated Demonstration Runs for the Am/Cm vitrification process were initiated in the Coupled 5-inch Cylindrical Induction Melter (CIM5) on 11/30/98 and completed on 12/9/98. Four successful runs at 60 wt% lanthanide loading were completed which met or exceeded all established criteria. The operating parameters used in these runs established the base conditions for the 5-inch Cylindrical Induction Melter (CIM5) process and were summarized in the 5-inch CIM design basis, SRT-AMC-99-OO01. (1) In subsequent tests, a total of fourteen CIM5 runs were performed using various power inputs, ramp rates and target temperatures to define the preferred processing conditions (2) Process stability and process flexibility were the key criteria used in assessing the results for each run. A preferred set of operating parameters was defined for the CIM5 batch process and these conditions were used to generate a pre-programmed, automatic processing cycle that was used for the last six CIM.5 runs (3) These operational tests were successfully completed in the January-February time frame and were summarized in SRT-AMC-99-00584. The recommended set of operating conditions defined in Runs No.1 through No.14 was used as the starting point for further pilot system runs to determine the robustness of the process, evaluate a bubbler, and investigate off-normal conditions. CIM5 Phase III Runs No.15 through No.60 were conducted utilizing the pre-programmed, automatic processing cycle to investigate system performance. This report summarizes the results of these tests and provides a recommendation for the base process as well as a processing modification for minimizing volume expansions if americium and/or curium are subject to a thermal reduction reaction like cerium. This document summarizes the results of the base process development tests conducted in the Am/Cm Pilot Facility located in Building 672-T.

  7. Status and first results of the NEMO Phase-2 tower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiarusi, T.; Aiello, S.; Ameli, F.; Anghinolfi, M.; Barbarino, G.; Barbarito, E.; Barbato, F.; Beverini, N.; Biagi, S.; Bouhadef, B.; Bozza, C.; Cacopardo, G.; Calamai, M.; Calì, C.; Capone, A.; Caruso, F.; Ceres, A.; Circella, M.; Cocimano, R.; Coniglione, R.; Costa, M.; Cuttone, G.; D'Amato, C.; D'Amato, V.; D'Amico, A.; DeBonis, G.; De Luca, V.; Deniskina, N.; De Rosa, G.; Distefano, C.; Fermani, P.; Flaminio, V.; Fusco, L. A.; Garufi, F.; Giordano, V.; Giovanetti, G.; Gmerk, A.; Grasso, R.; Grella, G.; Hugon, C.; Imbesi, M.; Kulikovsky, V.; Larosa, G.; Lattuada, D.; Leonora, E.; Litrico, P.; Lonardo, A.; Longhitano, F.; Lo Presti, D.; Maccioni, E.; Margiotta, A.; Martini, A.; Masullo, R.; Migliozzi, P.; Migneco, E.; Miraglia, A.; Mollo, C.; Mongelli, M.; Morganti, M.; Musico, P.; Musumeci, M.; Nicolau, C. A.; Orlando, A.; Papaleo, R.; Pellegrino, C.; Pellegriti, M. G.; Perrina, C.; Piattelli, P.; Pugliatti, C.; Pulvirenti, S.; Raffaelli, F.; Randazzo, N.; Riccobene, G.; Rovelli, A.; Sanguineti, M.; Sapienza, P.; Sgura, I.; Simeone, F.; Sipala, V.; Spurio, M.; Speziale, F.; Spitaleri, A.; Taiuti, M.; Terreni, G.; Trasatti, L.; Trovato, A.; Ventura, C.; Vicini, P.; Viola, S.; Vivolo, D.

    2014-03-01

    In March 2013, the NEMO Phase 2 tower has been successfully installed in the Capo Passero site, at a depth of 3500 m and 80 km off from the southern coast of Sicily. The unfurled tower is 450 m high; it is composed of 8 mechanical floors, for a total amount of 32 PMTs and various instruments for environmental measurements. The tower positioning is achieved by an acoustic system. The tower is continuously acquiring and transmitting all the measured signals to shore. Data reduction is completely performed in the Portopalo shore station by a dedicated computing facility connected to the persistent storage system at LNS, in Catania. Results from the last 9 months of acquisition will be presented. In particular, the analyzed optical rates, showing stable and low baseline values, are compatible with the contribution mainly of 40K light emission, with a small percentage of light bursts due to bioluminescence. These features reveal the optimal nature of the Capo Passero abyssal site to host a km3-sized Neutrino Telescope.

  8. Mechanical properties, anisotropy and hardness of group IVA ternary spinel nitrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Ying-Chun; Chen, Min

    2013-10-01

    In this work, new ternary cubic spinel structures are designed by the substitutional method. The structures, elasticity properties, intrinsic hardness and Debye temperature of the cubic ternary spinel nitrides are studied by first principles based on the density-functional theory. The results show that γ-CSn2N4, γ-SiC2N4, γ-GeC2N4 and γ-SnC2N4 are not mechanically stable. The elastic constants Cij of these cubic spinel structures are obtained using the stress-strain method. Derived elastic constants, such as bulk modulus, shear modulus, Young's modulus, Poisson coefficient and brittle/ductile behaviour are estimated using Voigt-Reuss-Hill theories. The B/G value, the Poisson's ratio and anisotropic factor are calculated for eight ternary stable crystals. Based on the microscopic hardness model, we further estimate the Vickers hardness of all the stable crystals. From the calculated hardness of the stable group IVA ternary spinel nitrides by Gao's and Jiang's methods, it is observed that the stable group IVA ternary spinel nitrides are not superhard materials except for γ-CSi2N4. Furthermore, the Debye temperature for the eight stable crystals is also estimated.

  9. Hypoglycaemic effect of the lyophilised aqueous extract of Ajuga iva in normal and streptozotocin diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    El Hilaly, Jaouad; Lyoussi, Badiâa

    2002-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the hypoglycaemic effect of the lyophilised aqueous extract of the whole plant of Ajuga iva (L.) Schreber (Labiatae) in normal and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Single and repeated oral administration of the extract of Ajuga iva L (AI) at a dose of 10 mg/kg produced a slight and significant decrease in plasma glucose levels in normal rats 6 h after administration and after 3 weeks of treatment. AI reduced plasma glucose levels of streptozotocin diabetic rats from 337+/-9.3 to 102.2+/-17.7 mg/dl after 6 h of oral administration (P<0.001). Repeated oral administration of AI to streptozotocin diabetic rats significantly decreased the plasma glucose levels after 1 week of treatment (112+/-14.4 mg/dl at 1 week vs 337+/-9.3 mg/dl at the baseline values, (P<0.001). It continuously decreased thereafter and showed a rapid normalisation after 1 week of AI treatment. It is concluded that these results demonstrated that the water extract of the whole plant of AI possess a strong hypoglycaemic effect in diabetic rats, and support therefore, its traditional use in diabetes mellitus control.

  10. Multi-path transportation futures study: Results from Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, Phil; Singh, Margaret; Plotkin, Steve; Moore, Jim

    2007-03-09

    This PowerPoint briefing provides documentation and details for Phase 1 of the Multi-Path Transportation Futures Study, which compares alternative ways to make significant reductions in oil use and carbon emissions from U.S. light vehicles to 2050. Phase I, completed in 2006, was a scoping study, aimed at identifying key analytic issues and constructing a study design. The Phase 1 analysis included an evaluation of several pathways and scenarios; however, these analyses were limited in number and scope and were designed to be preliminary.

  11. Results from the first operation phase of W7-X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, Thomas Sunn

    2016-10-01

    This talk will give a review of stellarator physics and the mission of Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X), and will summarize the most important results obtained during its first operation phase, OP1.1, which was completed in March 2016. The HELIAS reactor vision and open issues in stellarator research will also be discussed. The stellarator concept dates back to the 1950's. It has several intrinsic advantages, including being free of current-driven disruptions, and not needing current drive. However, the stellarator has been lagging behind the tokamak with respect to energy confinement. Recent advances in plasma theory and computational power have led to renewed interest in stellarators since they allow a complex but effective optimization of the confinement properties, one that should allow for tokamak-like confinement times. W7-X is the largest and most optimized stellarator in the world, and aims to show that the earlier weaknesses of the stellarator concept have been addressed successfully by optimization, and that the intrinsic advantages of the concept persist, also at plasma parameters approaching those of a future fusion power plant. It is built for steady-state operation, featuring 70 superconducting coils, and a confinement volume of about 30 m3. During OP1.1, it was operated at full field (B = 2.5 T on axis), with ECRH power up to 4.3 MW (later to be extended to 10 MW). Plasma operation was performed with helium and hydrogen, with deuterium planned for later phases. More than 2,000 discharges were created during the 10 operation weeks of OP1.1. Core Te 8 keV and Ti 2 keV were reached in discharge with densities in the low to mid 1019 range, and confinement times were on the order of 100-150 ms, within expectation. This work has been carried out within the framework of the EUROfusion Consortium and has received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under Grant Agreement Number 633053.

  12. Aminoglycoside binding and catalysis specificity of aminoglycoside 2″-phosphotransferase IVa: A thermodynamic, structural and kinetic study

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Elise; Guichou, Jean-François; Chaloin, Laurent; Kunzelmann, Simone; Leban, Nadia; Serpersu, Engin H.; Lionne, Corinne

    2016-01-01

    Background Aminoglycoside O-phosphotransferases make up a large class of bacterial enzymes that is widely distributed among pathogens and confer a high resistance to several clinically used aminoglycoside antibiotics. Aminoglycoside 2″-phosphotransferase IVa, APH(2″)-IVa, is an important member of this class, but there is little information on the thermodynamics of aminoglycoside binding and on the nature of its rate-limiting step. Methods We used isothermal titration calorimetry, electrostatic potential calculations, molecular dynamics simulations and X-ray crystallography to study the interactions between the enzyme and different aminoglycosides. We determined the rate-limiting step of the reaction by the means of transient kinetic measurements. Results For the first time, Kd values were determined directly for APH(2″)-IVa and different aminoglycosides. The affinity of the enzyme seems to anti-correlate with the molecular weight of the ligand, suggesting a limited degree of freedom in the binding site. The main interactions are electrostatic bonds between the positively charged amino groups of aminoglycosides and Glu or Asp residues of APH. In spite of the significantly different ratio Kd/Km, there is no large difference in the transient kinetics obtained with the different aminoglycosides. We show that a product release step is rate-limiting for the overall reaction. Conclusions APH(2″)-IVa has a higher affinity for aminoglycosides carrying an amino group in 2′ and 6′, but tighter bindings do not correlate with higher catalytic efficiencies. As with APH(3′)-IIIa, an intermediate containing product is preponderant during the steady state. General significance This intermediate may constitute a good target for future drug design. PMID:26802312

  13. Integrated thermal treatment system study -- Phase 2 results. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Feizollahi, F.; Quapp, W.J.

    1996-02-01

    This report presents the second phase of a study on thermal treatment technologies. The study consists of a systematic assessment of nineteen thermal treatment alternatives for the contact-handled mixed low-level waste (MLLW) currently stored in the US Department of Energy complex. The treatment alternatives consist of widely varying technologies for safely destroying the hazardous organic components, reducing the volume, and preparing for final disposal of the MLLW. The alternatives considered in Phase 2 were innovative thermal treatments with nine types of primary processing units. Other variations in the study examined the effect of combustion gas, air pollution control system design, and stabilization technology for the treatment residues. The Phase 1 study examined ten initial thermal treatment alternatives. The Phase 2 systems were evaluated in essentially the same manner as the Phase 1 systems. The alternatives evaluated were: rotary kiln, slagging kiln, plasma furnace, plasma gasification, molten salt oxidation, molten metal waste destruction, steam gasification, Joule-heated vitrification, thermal desorption and mediated electrochemical oxidation, and thermal desorption and supercritical water oxidation. The quantities, and physical and chemical compositions, of the input waste used in the Phase 2 systems differ from those in the Phase 1 systems, which were based on a preliminary waste input database developed at the onset of the Integrated Thermal Treatment System study. The inventory database used in the Phase 2 study incorporates the latest US Department of Energy information. All systems, both primary treatment systems and subsystem inputs, have now been evaluated using the same waste input (2,927 lb/hr). 28 refs., 88 figs., 41 tabs.

  14. Technical Appendices to the National Day Care Study: Background Materials. Final Report of the National Day Care Study. Volume IV-A.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruopp, Richard; And Others

    This final report of the National Day Care Study (NDCS), Volume IV-A, contains three papers that help to set a context for interpreting overall study results. "Research Issues in Day Care, A Focused Review of the Literature" focuses on effects of group care and regulatable characteristics of the day care environment. The second paper,…

  15. MATISSE: alignment, integration, and test phase first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allouche, F.; Robbe-Dubois, S.; Lagarde, S.; Cruzalèbes, P.; Antonelli, P.; Bresson, Y.; Fantei-Caujolle, Y.; Marcotto, A.; Morel, S.; Beckmann, U.; Bettonvil, F.; Berio, Ph.; Heininger, M.; Lehmitz, M.; Agocs, T.; Brast, R.; Elswijk, E.; Ives, D.; Meixner, K.; Laun, W.; Mellein, M.; Neumann, U.; Bailet, C.; Clausse, J.-M.; Matter, A.; Meilland, A.; Millour, F.; Petrov, R. G.; Accardo, M.; Bristow, P.; Frahm, R.; Glindemann, A.; Gonzáles Herrera, J.-C.; Lizon, J.-L.; Schöller, M.; Graser, U.; Jaffe, W.; Lopez, B.

    2016-08-01

    between the COB and the WOP took place resulting in the first interference fringes in the L-band during summer 2015 and the first interference fringes in the N-ban in March 2016. After a period of optimization of both the instrument reliability and the environmental working conditions, the test plan is presently being conducted in order to evaluate the complete performance of the instrument and its compliance with the high-level requirements. The present paper gives the first results of the alignment, integration and test phase of the MATISSE instrument.

  16. Results of the Gallium-Clad Phase 3 and Phase 4 tasks (canceled prior to completion)

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, R.N.

    1998-08-01

    This report summarizes the results of the Gallium-Clad interactions Phase 3 and 4 tasks. Both tasks were to involve examining the out-of-pile stability of residual gallium in short fuel rods with an imposed thermal gradient. The thermal environment was to be created by an electrical heater in the center of the fuel rod and coolant flow on the rod outer cladding. Both tasks were canceled due to difficulties with fuel pellet fabrication, delays in the preparation of the test apparatus, and changes in the Fissile Materials Disposition program budget.

  17. Role of diversity in ICA and IVA: theory and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adalı, Tülay

    2016-05-01

    Independent component analysis (ICA) has been the most popular approach for solving the blind source separation problem. Starting from a simple linear mixing model and the assumption of statistical independence, ICA can recover a set of linearly-mixed sources to within a scaling and permutation ambiguity. It has been successfully applied to numerous data analysis problems in areas as diverse as biomedicine, communications, finance, geo- physics, and remote sensing. ICA can be achieved using different types of diversity—statistical property—and, can be posed to simultaneously account for multiple types of diversity such as higher-order-statistics, sample dependence, non-circularity, and nonstationarity. A recent generalization of ICA, independent vector analysis (IVA), generalizes ICA to multiple data sets and adds the use of one more type of diversity, statistical dependence across the data sets, for jointly achieving independent decomposition of multiple data sets. With the addition of each new diversity type, identification of a broader class of signals become possible, and in the case of IVA, this includes sources that are independent and identically distributed Gaussians. We review the fundamentals and properties of ICA and IVA when multiple types of diversity are taken into account, and then ask the question whether diversity plays an important role in practical applications as well. Examples from various domains are presented to demonstrate that in many scenarios it might be worthwhile to jointly account for multiple statistical properties. This paper is submitted in conjunction with the talk delivered for the "Unsupervised Learning and ICA Pioneer Award" at the 2016 SPIE Conference on Sensing and Analysis Technologies for Biomedical and Cognitive Applications.

  18. IVA (Illinois Vocational Association) Workshops--An Innovative Approach to Inservice Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Edward T.

    1974-01-01

    A joint effort in inservice education between the Illinois Division of Vocational and Technical Education and the Illinois Vocational Association (IVA) created ten diversified mini workshops which were conducted at the 1973 IVA convention in Chicago. The overall, average participant rating for the workshop was 3.76 on a one-to-four continuum. (EA)

  19. Localisation of DivIVA by targeting to negatively curved membranes

    PubMed Central

    Lenarcic, Rok; Halbedel, Sven; Visser, Loek; Shaw, Michael; Wu, Ling Juan; Errington, Jeff; Marenduzzo, Davide; Hamoen, Leendert W

    2009-01-01

    DivIVA is a conserved protein in Gram-positive bacteria and involved in various processes related to cell growth, cell division and spore formation. DivIVA is specifically targeted to cell division sites and cell poles. In Bacillus subtilis, DivIVA helps to localise other proteins, such as the conserved cell division inhibitor proteins, MinC/MinD, and the chromosome segregation protein, RacA. Little is known about the mechanism that localises DivIVA. Here we show that DivIVA binds to liposomes, and that the N terminus harbours the membrane targeting sequence. The purified protein can stimulate binding of RacA to membranes. In mutants with aberrant cell shapes, DivIVA accumulates where the cell membrane is most strongly curved. On the basis of electron microscopic studies and other data, we propose that this is due to molecular bridging of the curvature by DivIVA multimers. This model may explain why DivIVA localises at cell division sites. A Monte-Carlo simulation study showed that molecular bridging can be a general mechanism for binding of proteins to negatively curved membranes. PMID:19478798

  20. Final Technical Report. Results of Phases 2-5

    SciTech Connect

    Narang, David; Ayyanar, Raja; Gemin, Paul; Baggu, Murali; Srinivasan, Devarajan

    2015-02-27

    APS’s renewable energy portfolio, driven in part by Arizona’s Renewable Energy Standard (RES) currently includes more than 1100 MW of installed capacity, equating to roughly 3000 GWh of annual production. Overall renewable production is expected to grow to 6000 GWh by 2025. It is expected that distributed photovoltaics, driven primarily by lower cost, will contribute to much of this growth and that by 2025, distributed installations will account for half of all renewable production (3000GHW). As solar penetration increases, additional analysis may be required for routine utility processes to ensure continued safe and reliable operation of the electric distribution network. Such processes include residential or commercial interconnection requests and load shifting during normal feeder operations. Circuits with existing high solar penetration will also have to be studied and results will need to be evaluated for adherence to utility practices or strategy. Increased distributed PV penetration may offer benefits such as load offsetting, but it also has the potential to adversely impact distribution system operation. These effects may be exacerbated by the rapid variability of PV production. Detailed effects of these phenomena in distributed PV applications continue to be studied. Comprehensive, high-resolution electrical models of the distribution system were developed to analyze the impacts of PV on distribution circuit protection systems (including coordination and anti-islanding), predict voltage regulation and phase balance issues, and develop volt/VAr control schemes. Modeling methods were refined by validating against field measurements. To augment the field measurements, methods were developed to synthesize high resolution load and PV generation data to facilitate quasi-static time series simulations. The models were then extended to explore boundary conditions for PV hosting capability of the feeder and to simulate common utility practices such as feeder

  1. Test results of the Phase 1 Test Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Hey, B.E.

    1995-03-01

    Radioactive waste materials in underground high level waste (HLW) storage tanks at the Hanford Site evolve gaseous mixtures at varying rates. In order to verify the flammability of these gases and the mechanisms by which they are produced, it is necessary to sample material from these tanks in such a way as to preserve the gas phase of the material for analysis. Careful laboratory studies could then be performed on these samples which would allow judgement to be made of the hazard level of the storage tank. The Retained Gas Sampler (RGS) system is such a sampling method. A multidisciplinary team developed and issued a plan to obtain waste tank core samples for gas phase analysis. This plan contained the basic idea and function of the RGS system. Different organizations assumed responsibility of various aspects of the RGS program which they were most qualified to develop.

  2. Effect of aqueous extract of Ajuga iva supplementation on plasma lipid profile and tissue antioxidant status in rats fed a high-cholesterol diet.

    PubMed

    Chenni, A; Yahia, D Ait; Boukortt, F O; Prost, J; Lacaille-Dubois, M A; Bouchenak, M

    2007-01-19

    The present study was designed to explore the possible antioxidant and hypolipidemic effects of the aqueous extract of Ajuga iva (0.5% in the diet) in rats fed a high-cholesterol (1%) diet (HCD). The results indicated that the HCD-Ai versus HCD treatment led to many changes in biochemical parameters. They showed a decrease of plasma total cholesterol (TC) and VLDL-cholesterol but an increase of HDL(2)-cholesterol. The triacylglycerol contents were reduced in plasma and in VLDL. The lipid peroxidation determined by TBARS was decreased by 75% in plasma. TBARS in liver, heart and kidneys were highly reduced excepted in the adipose tissue. Ajuga iva treatment enhanced superoxide dismutase activity in liver and kidney. Glutathione reductase activity was lowered in adipose tissue but increased in liver and in kidney. A significant increase was noted in glutathione peroxidase activity in liver, heart and kidney but a low value in adipose tissue was observed. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that in addition to its potent TG and TC-lowering effects, Ajuga iva is effective in improving the antioxidant status by reducing lipid peroxidation in plasma and tissues and enhancing the antioxidant enzymes in rats fed high-cholesterol diet. Furthermore, Ajuga iva may reduce intestinal cholesterol absorption.

  3. Phase II Study of Consolidation Chemotherapy After Concurrent Chemoradiation in Cervical Cancer: Preliminary Results

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Chel Hun; Lee, Jeong-Won; Kim, Tae-Joong; Kim, Woo Young; Nam, Hee Rim; Kim, Byoung-Gie . E-mail: huna0@naver.com; Huh, Seung Jae; Lee, Je-Ho; Bae, Duk-Soo

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: Our aim was to determine the efficacy of consolidation chemotherapy after concurrent chemoradiation (CCRT) using high-dose-rate brachytherapy in patients with locally advanced cervical carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Patients with cervical carcinoma (FIGO stage IB2-IVA) were treated with external beam radiation therapy to the whole pelvis (50.4 Gy) and high-dose-rate brachytherapy (24 Gy to point A). Cisplatin 60 mg/m{sup 2} (Day 1) and 5-fluorouracil 1000 mg/m{sup 2} (Days 1-5) were given every 3 weeks starting concurrently with the radiation and followed by 3 more cycles of consolidation for a total of 6 cycles. Results: Thirty patients (94%) received 3 more cycles of post-CCRT consolidation chemotherapy and were evaluable for the toxicity and efficacy of consolidation. The most common toxicities of Grade 2 or higher were nausea or vomiting (47%) and anemia (33%). Late complications of the rectum and bladder occurred in 13% and 6% of the patients, respectively. The clinical complete response rate was 87% (95% CI, 75%-99%). During a median follow-up of 27 months (range, 6-58 months), 5 patients (17%) had recurrence; the sites of failure were 3 (10%) inside the radiation field and 2 (7%) outside the radiation field. The estimated 3-year progression-free survival rate was 83% (95% CI, 67%-99%) and overall survival rate was 91% (95% CI, 79%-100%). Conclusions: Consolidation chemotherapy after CCRT is well tolerated and effective in patients with locally advanced cervical carcinoma. A prospective randomized trial to compare this treatment strategy with standard CCRT seems to be worthwhile.

  4. Phase separated membrane bioreactor - Results from model system studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, G. R.; Seshan, P. K.; Dunlop, E. H.

    1989-01-01

    The operation and evaluation of a bioreactor designed for high intensity oxygen transfer in a microgravity environment is described. The reactor itself consists of a zero headspace liquid phase separated from the air supply by a long length of silicone rubber tubing through which the oxygen diffuses in and the carbon dioxide diffuses out. Mass transfer studies show that the oxygen is film diffusion controlled both externally and internally to the tubing and not by diffusion across the tube walls. Methods of upgrading the design to eliminate these resistances are proposed. Cell growth was obtained in the fermenter using Saccharomyces cerevisiae showing that this concept is capable of sustaining cell growth in the terrestrial simulation.

  5. Phase 1 results from the Stirling-powered vehicle project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaltens, Richard K.

    1988-01-01

    The NASA Technology Utilization (TU) Office is sponsoring a multiyear, multiphase demonstration program to assess the technology developed under the DOE/NASA automotive Stirling engine (ASE) program with engines installed in various Air Force vehicles while being evaluated by independent third parties under realistic conditions. This paper reviews the operational history of Phase 1 with a Mod 1 Stirling engine installed in an Air Force multistop van in a variety of missions. Ten months of operation were with Air Force personnel at Langley Air Force Base, Virginia, where over 1100 hr and 4000 mi were logged on the Langley flight line. The Stirling-powered van operated on unleaded gasoline, JP-4 aircraft fuel, and diesel fuel at Langley Air Force Base. Two months of operation were completed with Deere and Company personnel in the Moline, Illinois area where over 175 hr and 2650 mi were logged on a Deere mail delivery route.

  6. Phase separated membrane bioreactor: results from model system studies.

    PubMed

    Petersen, G R; Seshan, P K; Dunlop, E H

    1989-01-01

    The operation and evaluation of a bioreactor designed for high intensity oxygen transfer in a microgravity environment is described. The reactor itself consists of a zero headspace liquid phase separated from the air supply by a long length of silicone rubber tubing through which the oxygen diffuses in and the carbon dioxide diffuses out. Mass transfer studies show that the oxygen is film diffusion controlled both externally and internally to the tubing and not by diffusion across the tube walls. Methods of upgrading the design to eliminate these resistances are proposed. Cell growth was obtained in the fermenter using Saccharomyces cerevisiae showing that this concept is capable of sustaining cell growth in the terrestrial [correction of terrestial] simulation.

  7. Inhibitory effects of 1alpha, 25dihydroxyvitamin D3 and Ajuga iva extract on oxidative stress, toxicity and hypo-fertility in diabetic rat testes.

    PubMed

    Hamden, K; Carreau, S; Jamoussi, K; Ayadi, F; Garmazi, F; Mezgenni, N; Elfeki, A

    2008-09-01

    The aim of the current study is to investigate the therapeutic and preventive effects of 1alpha, 25dihydroxyvitaminD3 (1,25 (OH)2 D3) and Afuga iva (AI) extract on diabetes toxicity in rats testes. Thus diabetic rats were treated with 1alpha, 25dihydroxyvitaminD3 or Ajuga iva extract as both therapeutic and preventive treatments on diabetes toxicity in rats testes. Our results showed that diabetes induced a decrease in testosterone and 17beta-estradiol levels in testes and plasma. Besides, a fall in testicular antioxidant capacity appeared by a decrease in both antioxidant (superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities) and nonenzymatic antioxidant (copper (Cu), magnesium (Mg) and iron (Fe) levels). All theses changes enhanced testicular toxicity (increase in testicular aspartate amino transaminase (AST), alanine amino transaminase (ALT), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activities and the lipid peroxidation and triglyceride (TG) levels). In addition, a decrease in testicular total cholesterol (TCh) level was observed in diabetic rats testes. All the changes lead to a decrease in the total number and mobility of epididymal spermatozoa. The administration of 1alpha,25dihydroxyvitaminD3 and Ajuga iva extract three weeks before and after diabetes induction interfered and prevented diabetes toxicity in the reproductive system. 1,25 (OH)2 D3 and Ajuga iva extract blunted all changes observed in diabetic rats. To sum up, the data suggested that 1,25 (OH)2 D3 and Ajuga iva extract have a protective effect on alloxan-induced damage in reproductive system by enhancing the testosterone and 17beta-estradiol levels, consequently protecting from oxidative stress, cellular toxicity and maintaining the number and motility of spermatozoids.

  8. Development of MPS IVA mouse (Galnstm(hC79S.mC76S)slu) tolerant to human N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase.

    PubMed

    Tomatsu, Shunji; Gutierrez, Monica; Nishioka, Tatsuo; Yamada, Masamichi; Yamada, Mana; Tosaka, Yasuhiro; Grubb, Jeffrey H; Montaño, Adriana M; Vieira, Matheus B; Trandafirescu, Georgeta G; Peña, Olga M; Yamaguchi, Seiji; Orii, Koji O; Orii, Tadao; Noguchi, Akihiko; Laybauer, Leticia

    2005-11-15

    Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA (MPS IVA) is an autosomal recessive disease caused by N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase (GALNS) deficiency. In recent studies of enzyme replacement therapy for animal models with lysosomal storage diseases, cellular and humoral immune responses to the injected enzymes have been recognized as major impediments to effective treatment. To study the long-term effectiveness and side effects of therapies in the absence of immune responses, we have developed an MPS IVA mouse model, which has many similarities to human MPS IVA and is tolerant to human GALNS protein. We used a construct containing both a transgene (cDNA) expressing inactive human GALNS in intron 1 and an active site mutation (C76S) in adjacent exon 2 and thereby introduced both the inactive cDNA and the C76S mutation into the murine Galns by targeted mutagenesis. Affected homozygous mice have no detectable GALNS enzyme activity and accumulate glycosaminoglycans in multiple tissues including visceral organs, brain, cornea, bone, ligament and bone marrow. At 3 months, lysosomal storage is marked within hepatocytes, reticuloendothelial Kupffer cells, and cells of the sinusoidal lining of the spleen, neurons and meningeal cells. The bone storage is also obvious, with lysosomal distention in osteoblasts and osteocytes lining the cortical bone, in chondrocytes and in the sinus lining cells in bone marrow. Ubiquitous expression of the inactive human GALNS was also confirmed by western blot using the anti-GALNS monoclonal antibodies newly produced, which resulted in tolerance to immune challenge with human enzyme. The newly generated MPS IVA mouse model should provide a good model to evaluate long-term administration of enzyme replacement.

  9. HESTIA Phase I Test Results: The Air Revitalization System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Sarah E.; Hansen, Scott W.

    2016-01-01

    In any human spaceflight mission, a number of Environmental Control & Life Support System (ECLSS) technologies work together to provide the conditions astronauts need to live healthily, productively, and comfortably in space. In a long-duration mission, many of these ECLSS technologies may use materials supplied by In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU), introducing more interactions between systems. The Human Exploration Spacecraft Test-bed for Integration & Advancement (HESTIA) Project aims to create a test-bed to evaluate ECLSS and ISRU technologies and how they interact in a high-fidelity, closed-loop, human-rated analog habitat. Air purity and conditioning are essential components within any ECLSS and for HESTIA's first test they were achieved with the Air Revitalization System (ARS) described below. The ARS provided four essential functions to the test-bed chamber: cooling the air, removing humidity from the air, removing trace contaminants, and scrubbing carbon dioxide (CO2) from the air. In this case, the oxygen supply function was provided by ISRU. In the current configuration, the ARS is a collection of different subsystems. A fan circulates the air, while a condensing heat exchanger (CHX) pulls humidity out of the air. A Trace Contaminant Removal System (TCRS) filters the air of potentially harmful contaminants. Lastly, a Reactive Plastic Lithium Hydroxide (RP-LiOH) unit removes CO2 from the breathing air. During the HESTIA Phase I test in September 2015, the ARS and its individual components each functioned as expected, although further analysis is underway. During the Phase I testing and in prior bench-top tests, the energy balance of heat removed by the CHX was not equal to the cooling it received. This indicated possible instrument error and therefore recalibration of the instruments and follow-up testing is planned in 2016 to address the issue. The ARS was tested in conjunction with two other systems: the Human Metabolic Simulator (HMS) and the

  10. Phase imaging results of phase defect using micro-coherent extreme ultraviolet scatterometry microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Tetsuo; Hashimoto, Hiraku; Amano, Tsuyoshi; Kinoshita, Hiroo; Watanabe, Takeo

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate defects on extreme ultraviolet (EUV) masks at the blank state of manufacturing, we developed a micro-coherent EUV scatterometry microscope (micro-CSM). The illumination source is coherent EUV light with a 140 nm focus diameter on the defect using a Fresnel zone plate. This system directly observes the reflection and diffraction signals from a phase defect. The phase and the intensity image of the defect are reconstructed with the diffraction images using ptychography, which is an algorithm of the coherent diffraction imaging. We observed programmed phase defect on a blank EUV mask. Phase distributions of these programmed defects were well reconstructed quantitatively. The micro-CSM is a very powerful tool to review an EUV phase defect.

  11. SecA is required for membrane targeting of the cell division protein DivIVA in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Halbedel, Sven; Kawai, Maki; Breitling, Reinhard; Hamoen, Leendert W.

    2014-01-01

    The conserved protein DivIVA is involved in different morphogenetic processes in Gram-positive bacteria. In Bacillus subtilis, the protein localizes to the cell division site and cell poles, and functions as a scaffold for proteins that regulate division site selection, and for proteins that are required for sporulation. To identify other proteins that bind to DivIVA, we performed an in vivo cross-linking experiment. A possible candidate that emerged was the secretion motor ATPase SecA. SecA mutants have been described that inhibit sporulation, and since DivIVA is necessary for sporulation, we examined the localization of DivIVA in these mutants. Surprisingly, DivIVA was delocalized, suggesting that SecA is required for DivIVA targeting. To further corroborate this, we performed SecA depletion and inhibition experiments, which provided further indications that DivIVA localization depends on SecA. Cell fractionation experiments showed that SecA is important for binding of DivIVA to the cell membrane. This was unexpected since DivIVA does not contain a signal sequence, and is able to bind to artificial lipid membranes in vitro without support of other proteins. SecA is required for protein secretion and membrane insertion, and therefore its role in DivIVA localization is likely indirect. Possible alternative roles of SecA in DivIVA folding and/or targeting are discussed. PMID:24592260

  12. CryoSat-2 commissioning phase results summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cullen, R.

    2010-12-01

    CryoSat-2 was launched on 8th April 2010 and following a 3 day LEOP entered its 6 month commissioning phase. The primary payload of the platform consists of the Synthetic Interferometric Radar Altimeter (SIRAL-2) with support for its data processing coming from data acquired from on-board DORIS DGXX and star trackers. We present a description of the payload and provide post-launch performance summaries in terms of SIRAL internal/external calibration in combination with an assessment of global data acquisition achievement in each of the three science modes: Low resolution pulse-width limited mode (LRM) over interior land-ice and ocean to support POD, Synthetic aperture radar mode (SARM) for sea-ice and SAR interferometric mode (SARInM) for higher surface slope land-ice sheet margin acquisitions. Commissioning activities are summarised with examples and we provide conclusions on the experiences gained with the data during this period. Specific issues are highlighted and that Users of the data products should consider taking into account with their analyses. Finally, present performances of the three science modes over transponders and open ocean calibration zones are provided in addition to specific cases over land and sea ice. Preliminary performances of DORIS and star trackers will be provided in the context of overall SIRAL performance.

  13. Multimodal treatment for stage IVA thymoma: a proposable strategy.

    PubMed

    Rena, Ottavio; Mineo, Tommaso Claudio; Casadio, Caterina

    2012-04-01

    A retrospective review of a series of consecutive patients was carried out to evaluate the feasibility and the efficacy of a multimodal treatment in the management of stage IVA thymoma at first diagnosis. From 1998 to 2008, 18 patients affected by stage IVA thymoma underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy, surgery and subsequent mediastinal radiation therapy. There were 10 males and 8 females, mean age 54.5 years (range 29-68). Not specific symptoms were present in 12 cases and thymus-related syndromes were reported in 4. Histological subtypes were 1 AB, 2 B1, 4 B2, 7 B3, 1 mixed B1-B2, 1 mixed B1-B3 and 2 mixed B2-B3 thymomas. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (4 courses of cisplatin-based chemotherapy) was well tolerated in all cases. Those patients demonstrating clinical response at restaging (16/18) received surgical resection: "en-bloc" thymoma, residual thymic tissue and tumour involved organs resection was carried out together with the pleural implants removal. Complete macroscopic resection was achieved 10/16 patients (64%). Postoperative mortality and morbidity were null and 24%, respectively. Adjuvant radiation therapy consisted of 45-54 Gy administered by a 6 MV linear accelerator to the whole mediastinum and previous tumour bed. Mean follow-up was 82±33 months (range 31-143); overall survival was 85% and 53% at 5- and 10-years. Disease-related survival of the entire cohort was 100% and 58% at 5- and 10-years, whereas freedom from relapse survival for patients submitted to complete resection was 58% and 42% at 5- and 10-years. Disease-related survival when complete and not complete resection were considered were 100% and 52% and 72% and 0% at 5- and 10-years respectively (p=0.048). Multimodal management based on induction chemotherapy, subsequent surgery and postoperative mediastinal radiation allows a good complete resection rate and it is demonstrated to be a safe and effective treatment to warrant a good long-term survival in stage IVA thymoma patients.

  14. Autonomous Airborne Refueling Demonstration, Phase I Flight-Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dibley, Ryan P.; Allen, Michael J.; Nabaa, Nassib

    2007-01-01

    The first phase of the Autonomous Airborne Refueling Demonstration (AARD) project was completed on August 30, 2006. The goal of this 15-month effort was to develop and flight-test a system to demonstrate an autonomous refueling engagement using the Navy style hose-and-drogue air-to-air refueling method. The prime contractor for this Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) sponsored program was Sierra Nevada Corporation (SNC), Sparks, Nevada. The responsible flight-test organization was the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC), Edwards, California, which also provided the F/A-18 receiver airplane (McDonnell Douglas, now The Boeing Company, Chicago, Illinois). The B-707-300 tanker airplane (The Boeing Company) was contracted through Omega Aerial Refueling Services, Inc., Alexandria, Virginia, and the optical tracking system was contracted through OCTEC Ltd., Bracknell, Berkshire, United Kingdom. Nine research flights were flown, testing the functionality and performance of the system in a stepwise manner, culminating in the plug attempts on the final flight. Relative position keeping was found to be very stable and accurate. The receiver aircraft was capable of following the tanker aircraft through turns while maintaining its relative position. During the last flight, six capture attempts were made, two of which were successful. The four misses demonstrated excellent characteristics, the receiver retreating from the drogue in a controlled, safe, and predictable manner that precluded contact between the drogue and the receiver aircraft. The position of the receiver aircraft when engaged and in position for refueling was found to be 5.5 to 8.5 ft low of the ideal position. The controller inputs to the F/A-18 were found to be extremely small

  15. Autonomous Airborne Refueling Demonstration: Phase I Flight-Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dibley, Ryan P.; Allen, Michael J.; Nabaa, Nassib

    2007-01-01

    The first phase of the Autonomous Airborne Refueling Demonstration (AARD) project was completed on August 30, 2006. The goal of this 15-month effort was to develop and flight-test a system to demonstrate an autonomous refueling engagement using the Navy style hose-and-drogue air-to-air refueling method. The prime contractor for this Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) sponsored program was Sierra Nevada Corporation (SNC), Sparks, Nevada. The responsible flight-test organization was the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC), Edwards, California, which also provided the F/A-18 receiver airplane (McDonnell Douglas, now The Boeing Company, Chicago, Illinois). The B-707-300 tanker airplane (The Boeing Company) was contracted through Omega Aerial Refueling Services, Inc., Alexandria, Virginia, and the optical tracking system was contracted through OCTEC Ltd., Bracknell, Berkshire, United Kingdom. Nine research flights were flown, testing the functionality and performance of the system in a stepwise manner, culminating in the plug attempts on the final flight. Relative position keeping was found to be very stable and accurate. The receiver aircraft was capable of following the tanker aircraft through turns while maintaining its relative position. During the last flight, six capture attempts were made, two of which were successful. The four misses demonstrated excellent characteristics, the receiver retreating from the drogue in a controlled, safe, and predictable manner that precluded contact between the drogue and the receiver aircraft. The position of the receiver aircraft when engaged and in position for refueling was found to be 5.5 to 8.5 ft low of the ideal position. The controller inputs to the F/A-18 were found to be extremely small.

  16. Chikusetsusaponin IVa methyl ester induces cell cycle arrest by the inhibition of nuclear translocation of β-catenin in HCT116 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kyung-Mi; Yun, Ji Ho; Lee, Dong Hwa; Park, Young Gyun; Son, Kun Ho; Nho, Chu Won; Kim, Yeong Shik

    2015-04-17

    We demonstrate that chikusetsusaponin IVa methyl ester (CME), a triterpenoid saponin from the root of Achyranthes japonica, has an anticancer activity. We investigate its molecular mechanism in depth in HCT116 cells. CME reduces the amount of β-catenin in nucleus and inhibits the binding of β-catenin to specific DNA sequences (TCF binding elements, TBE) in target gene promoters. Thus, CME appears to decrease the expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins such as Cyclin D1, as a representative target for β-catenin, as well as CDK2 and CDK4. As a result of the decrease of the cell cycle regulatory proteins, CME inhibits cell proliferation by arresting the cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase. Therefore, we suggest that CME as a novel Wnt/β-catenin inhibitor can be a putative agent for the treatment of colorectal cancers. - Highlights: • CME inhibits cell proliferation in HCT116 cells. • CME increases cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase and apoptosis. • CME attenuates cyclin D1 and regulates cell cycle regulatory proteins. • CME inhibits β-catenin translocation to nucleus.

  17. Extension of the Operating Point of the Mercury IVA from 6 to 8 MV

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    EXTENSION OF THE OPERATING POINT OF THE MERCURY IVA FROM 6 TO 8 MV∗ R. J. Allenξ, R. J. Commisso, G. Coopersteina, P. F. Ottingera and J. W...over 200 shots at 8 MV. I. INTRODUCTION The original design of the Mercury IVA allowed operation at 6 MV and 300 kA [1]. Although the...Operating Point Of The Mercury Iva From 6 To 8 Mv 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e

  18. Inductive voltage adder (IVA) for submillimeter radius electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Mazarakis, M.G.; Poukey, J.W.; Maenchen, J.E.

    1996-12-31

    The authors have already demonstrated the utility of inductive voltage adder accelerators for production of small-size electron beams. In this approach, the inductive voltage adder drives a magnetically immersed foilless diode to produce high-energy (10--20 MeV), high-brightness pencil electron beams. This concept was first demonstrated with the successful experiments which converted the linear induction accelerator RADLAC II into an IVA fitted with a small 1-cm radius cathode magnetically immersed foilless diode (RADLAC II/SMILE). They present here first validations of extending this idea to mm-scale electron beams using the SABRE and HERMES-III inductive voltage adders as test beds. The SABRE experiments are already completed and have produced 30-kA, 9-MeV electron beams with envelope diameter of 1.5-mm FWHM. The HERMES-III experiments are currently underway.

  19. Chikusetsusaponin IVa Butyl Ester (CS-IVa-Be), a Novel IL6R Antagonist, Inhibits IL6/STAT3 Signaling Pathway and Induces Cancer Cell Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Qian, Shihui; Cai, Xueting; Lu, Wuguang; Hu, Chunping; Sun, Xiaoyan; Yang, Yang; Yu, Qiang; Gao, S Paul; Cao, Peng

    2016-06-01

    The activation of IL6/STAT3 signaling is associated with the pathogenesis of many cancers. Agents that suppress IL6/STAT3 signaling have cancer-therapeutic potential. In this study, we found that chikusetsusaponin IVa butyl ester (CS-IVa-Be), a triterpenoid saponin extracted from Acanthopanas gracilistylus W.W.Smith, induced cancer cell apoptosis. CS-IVa-Be inhibited constitutive and IL6-induced STAT3 activation, repressed STAT3 DNA-binding activity, STAT3 nuclear translocation, IL6-induced STAT3 luciferase reporter activity, IL6-induced STAT3-regulated antiapoptosis gene expression in MDA-MB-231 cells, and IL6-induced TF-1 cell proliferation. Surprisingly, CS-IVa-Be inhibited IL6 family cytokines rather than other cytokines induced STAT3 activation. Further studies indicated that CS-IVa-Be is an antagonist of IL6 receptor via directly binding to the IL6Rα with a Kd of 663 ± 74 nmol/L and the GP130 (IL6Rβ) with a Kd of 1,660 ± 243 nmol/L, interfering with the binding of IL6 to IL6R (IL6Rα and GP130) in vitro and in cancer cells. The inhibitory effect of CS-IVa-Be on the IL6-IL6Rα-GP130 interaction was relatively specific as CS-IVa-Be showed higher affinity to IL6Rα than to LIFR (Kd: 4,910 ± 1,240 nmol/L) and LeptinR (Kd: 4,990 ± 915 nmol/L). We next demonstrated that CS-IVa-Be not only directly induced cancer cell apoptosis but also sensitized MDA-MB-231 cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis via upregulating DR5. Our findings suggest that CS-IVa-Be as a novel IL6R antagonist inhibits IL6/STAT3 signaling pathway and sensitizes the MDA-MB-231 cells to TRAIL-induced cell death. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(6); 1190-200. ©2016 AACR.

  20. Antioxidant effect of Ajuga iva aqueous extract in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Taleb-Senouci, D; Ghomari, H; Krouf, D; Bouderbala, S; Prost, J; Lacaille-Dubois, M A; Bouchenak, M

    2009-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the possible antioxidant effect of an aqueous extract of Ajuga iva (Ai) in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. Twelve diabetic rats were divided into two groups fed a casein diet supplemented or not with Ai (0.5%), for 4 weeks. In vitro, the Ai extract possessed a very high antioxidant effect (1 mg/ml was similar to those of trolox 300 mmol/l). The results indicated that plasma thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) values were reduced by 41% in Ai-treated compared with untreated diabetic rats. TBARS concentrations were lower 1.5-fold in liver, 1.8-fold in heart, 1.9-fold in muscle and 2.1-fold in brain in Ai-treated than untreated group. In erythrocytes, Ai treatment increased significantly the activities of glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) (+25%) and glutathione reductase (GSSH-Red) (+22%). Superoxide dismutase activity was increased in muscle (+22%), while GSH-Px activity was significantly higher in liver (+28%), heart (+40%) and kidney (+45%) in Ai-treated compared with untreated group. Liver and muscle GSSH-Red activity was, respectively, 1.6- and 1.5-fold higher in Ai-treated than untreated diabetic group. Catalase activity was significantly increased in heart (+36%) and brain (+32%) in Ai-treated than untreated group. Ai treatment decreased plasma nitric oxide (-33%), carbonyls (-44%) and carotenoids (-68%) concentrations. In conclusion, this study indicates that Ajuga iva aqueous extract improves the antioxidant status by reducing lipid peroxidation and enhancing the antioxidant enzymes activities in plasma, erythrocytes and tissues of diabetic rats.

  1. Orbit transfer vehicle engine study. Phase A: Continuation (study results)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Studies included: selection of boost pump designs for low NPSH operation and generation of associated programmatic data; evaluation of OTV engine operation at intermediate thrust levels and impact on programmatics; and assessments of OTV engine operation at idle-mode thrusts under conditions experienced during aerobraking maneuvers of the ABOTV. As a result of the studies, it was recommended that the original OTV boost pump designs be used without change for low NPSH operation. Intermediate thrust operation is feasible for both the expander cycle and staged combustion cycles.

  2. Er:YAG clinical results on hard tissue: phase I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cozean, Colette D.; Powell, G. L.

    1998-04-01

    Objective: This study was performed in order to establish that the pulpal and dentinal tissue are safe when exposed to the 2.94 micron pulsed Er:YAG laser radiation for the procedures of caries removal, cavity preparation, and etching prior to acid etching. This presentation discusses the histological results of a double-blind study comparing a pulsed Er:YAG with a standard dental drill. Methods: A double-blind histological evaluation of the pulpal and dentinal tissue changes induced by the Erbium laser and the dental drill was conducted on teeth extracted immediately following the dental procedure and at various intervals up to 1 year post-treatment. A statistical analysis was used to determine if any statistically significant clinical differences in dental tissue response could be observed between the Er:YAG laser and the standard dental drill. Conclusions: Analysis of the results indicated there were no significant differences observed between the laser and control groups in this study.

  3. Meteoritic Versus Biotic Amino Acids: An Update on Aib and Iva

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brückner, H.; Degenkolb, T.; Fox, S.

    2016-08-01

    Biotically synthesized Aib and Iva hav been found in >1,350 structurally characterized microbial peptides. However, the structural diversity of the non-proteinogenic amino acids in CM-type meteorites is not displayed in individual fungal peptides.

  4. Patient Preferences in Making Treatment Decisions in Patients With Stage I-IVA Oropharyngeal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-01

    Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Tongue Cancer

  5. Validation of keratan sulfate level in mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tomatsu, Shunji; Montaño, Adriana M; Oguma, Toshihiro; Dung, Vu Chi; Oikawa, Hirotaka; de Carvalho, Talita Giacomet; Gutiérrez, María L; Yamaguchi, Seiji; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Fukushi, Masaru; Kida, Kazuhiro; Kubota, Mitsuru; Barrera, Luis; Orii, Tadao

    2010-12-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA (MPS IVA, Morquio A disease), a progressive lysosomal storage disease, causes skeletal chondrodysplasia through excessive storage of keratan sulfate (KS). KS is synthesized mainly in cartilage and released to the circulation. The excess storage of KS disrupts cartilage, consequently releasing more KS into circulation, which is a critical biomarker for MPS IVA. Thus, assessment of KS level provides a potential screening strategy and determines clinical course and efficacy of therapies. We have recently developed a tandem mass spectrometry liquid chromatography [LC/MS/MS] method to assay KS levels in blood. Forty-nine blood specimens from patients with MPS IVA [severe (n = 33), attenuated (n = 11) and undefined (n = 5)] were analyzed for comparison of blood KS concentration with that of healthy subjects and for correlation with clinical severity. Plasma samples were digested by keratanase II to obtain disaccharides of KS. Digested samples were assayed by LC/MS/MS. We found that blood KS levels (0.4-26 µg/ml) in MPS IVA patients were significantly higher than those in age-matched controls (0.67-4.6 µg/ml; P < 0.0001). It was found that blood KS level varied with age and clinical severity in the patients. Blood KS levels in MPS IVA peaked between 2 years and 5 years of age (mean 11.4 µg/ml). Blood KS levels in severe MPS IVA (mean 7.3 µg/ml) were higher than in the attenuated form (mean 2.1 µg/ml) (P = 0.012). We also found elevated blood KS levels in other types of MPS. These findings indicate that the new KS assay for blood is suitable for early diagnosis and longitudinal assessment of disease severity in MPS IVA.

  6. In vitro effect of genistein on DNA damage in leukocytes from mucopolysaccharidosis IVA patients.

    PubMed

    Negretto, G W; Deon, M; Burin, M; Biancini, G B; Ribas, G; Garcia, S C; Goethel, G; Fracasso, R; Giugliani, L; Giugliani, R; Vargas, C R

    2014-02-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA is a lysosomal storage disorder leading to an increase in glycosaminoglycans storage. Genistein is an isoflavone capable to inhibit glycosaminoglycans production. The objective of this study was to analyze the in vitro effect of different concentrations of genistein on DNA injury in mucopolysaccharidosis IVA patients. The lower concentration tested (10 μM) showed a significant increase on DNA injury in vitro, although higher concentrations (30 μM and 50 μM) showed higher DNA damage.

  7. Glass phase and other multiple liquid-to-liquid transitions resulting from two-liquid phase competition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tournier, Robert F.

    2016-11-01

    Melt supercooling leads to glass formation. Liquid-to-liquid phase transitions are observed depending on thermal paths. Viscosity, density and surface tension thermal dependences measured at heating and subsequent cooling show hysteresis below a branching temperature and result from the competition of two-liquid phases separated by an enthalpy difference depending on temperature. The nucleation classical equation of these phases is completed by this enthalpy saving existing at all temperatures. The glass phase thermodynamic parameters and their thermal variation have already been determined in such a two-liquid model. They are used at high temperatures to predict liquid-to-liquid transitions in some metallic glass-forming melts.

  8. How the Inductive Voltage Adder (IVA) output impedance affects impedance dynamics of a Self-Magnetic Pinch (SMP) diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renk, Timothy; Simpson, Sean; Webb, Timothy; Mazarakis, Michael; Kiefer, Mark

    2016-10-01

    The SMP diode, fielded on the RITS-6 (3.5-8.5 MV) IVA accelerator at Sandia National Laboratories, produces a focused electron beam (<3mm diameter) onto a high Z metal converter for flash x-ray applications. Experiments have been undertaken with two different magnetically insulated transmission line (MITL) center conductors, of 40 and 80 ohms flow impedance. We have operated in-situ heating and discharge-cleaning hardware in the load region, in order to address the tendency of some shots to undergo premature impedance (Z) collapse, defined as a fall in impedance beyond that due to normal movement of electrode plasmas that reduces the effective A-K gap. The goal of heating/cleaning was to reduce the volume of evolving gases near the A-K gap. Despite clear evidence that the cleaning techniques removed the proton portion of beam current, we observed no consistent increase in diode impedance (ZDIODE). This forced an examination of the role that the IVA flow impedance has on ZDIODE. A preliminary conclusion is that ZDIODE should be at least 1.5 times the flow impedance before ZDIODE is a parameter independent of flow impedance. This has implications for SMP as a load for a IVA, since ZDIODE >100 ohms has not been consistently demonstrated. Data analysis is ongoing, and latest results will be reported. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  9. Alteration of P-type calcium channel gating by the spider toxin omega-Aga-IVA.

    PubMed Central

    McDonough, S I; Mintz, I M; Bean, B P

    1997-01-01

    We studied the mechanism of inhibition of P-type calcium channels in rat cerebellar Purkinje neurons by the peptide toxin omega-Aga-IVA. Saturating concentrations of omega-Aga-IVA (> 50 nM) inhibited inward current carried by 2-5 mM Ba almost completely. However, outward current at depolarizations of > +60 mV, carried by internal Cs, was inhibited much less, as was the tail current after such depolarizations. omega-Aga-IVA shifted the midpoint of the tail current activation curve by about +50 mV and made the curve less steep. The inactivation curve was also shifted in the depolarized direction and was made less steep. With omega-Aga-IVA, channels activated more slowly and deactivated more quickly than in control. Trains of repeated large depolarizations relieved the inhibition of current (as tested with moderate depolarizations), probably reflecting the unbinding of toxin. The relief of inhibition was faster with increasing depolarization, but did not require internal permeant ions. We conclude that omega-Aga-IVA alters voltage-dependent gating by stabilizing closed states of the channel and that omega-Aga-IVA dissociates much more rapidly from open channels than from closed. PMID:9129813

  10. Mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA (Morquio A disease): clinical review and current treatment.

    PubMed

    Tomatsu, S; Montaño, A M; Oikawa, H; Smith, M; Barrera, L; Chinen, Y; Thacker, M M; Mackenzie, W G; Suzuki, Y; Orii, T

    2011-06-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA (MPS IVA), also known as Morquio A, is a rare, autosomal recessive disorder caused by a deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme N-acetylgalatosamine-6-sulfate-sulfatase (GALNS), which catalyzes a step in the catabolism of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), keratan sulfate (KS) and chondroitin-6-sulfate (C6S). It leads to accumulation of the KS and C6S, mainly in bone and cornea, causing a systemic skeletal chondrodysplasia. MPS IVA has a variable age of onset and variable rate of progression. Common presenting features include elevation of urinary and blood KS, marked short stature, hypoplasia of the odontoid process, pectus carinatum, kyphoscoliosis, genu valgum, laxity of joints and corneal clouding; however there is no central nervous system impairment. Generally, MPS IVA patients with a severe form do not survive beyond the third decade of life whereas those patients with an attenuated form may survive over 70 years. There has been no effective therapy for MPS IVA, and care has been palliative. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) and hematopoietic stem cell therapy (HSCT) have emerged as a treatment for mucopolysaccharidoses disorders, including Morquio A disease. This review provides an overview of the clinical manifestations, diagnosis and symptomatic management of patients with MPS IVA and describes potential perspectives of ERT and HSCT. The issue of treating very young patients is also discussed.

  11. Spinal involvement in mucopolysaccharidosis IVA (Morquio-Brailsford or Morquio A syndrome): presentation, diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Solanki, Guirish A; Martin, Kenneth W; Theroux, Mary C; Lampe, Christina; White, Klane K; Shediac, Renée; Lampe, Christian G; Beck, Michael; Mackenzie, William G; Hendriksz, Christian J; Harmatz, Paul R

    2013-03-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA (MPS IVA), also known as Morquio-Brailsford or Morquio A syndrome, is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by a deficiency of the enzyme N-acetyl-galactosamine-6-sulphate sulphatase (GALNS). MPS IVA is multisystemic but manifests primarily as a progressive skeletal dysplasia. Spinal involvement is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in MPS IVA. Early diagnosis and timely treatment of problems involving the spine are critical in preventing or arresting neurological deterioration and loss of function. This review details the spinal manifestations of MPS IVA and describes the tools used to diagnose and monitor spinal involvement. The relative utility of radiography, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the evaluation of cervical spine instability, stenosis, and cord compression is discussed. Surgical interventions, anaesthetic considerations, and the use of neurophysiological monitoring during procedures performed under general anaesthesia are reviewed. Recommendations for regular radiological imaging and neurologic assessments are presented, and the need for a more standardized approach for evaluating and managing spinal involvement in MPS IVA is addressed.

  12. Discrimination of Spore-Forming Bacilli Using spoIVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; LaDuc, Myron; Stuecker, Tara

    2009-01-01

    A method of discriminating between spore-forming and non-spore-forming bacteria is based on a combination of simultaneous sporulation-specific and non-sporulation-specific quantitative polymerase chain reactions (Q-PCRs). The method was invented partly in response to the observation that for the purposes of preventing or reducing biological contamination affecting many human endeavors, ultimately, only the spore-forming portions of bacterial populations are the ones that are problematic (or, at least, more problematic than are the non-spore-forming portions). In some environments, spore-forming bacteria constitute small fractions of the total bacterial populations. The use of sporulation-specific primers in Q-PCR affords the ability to assess the spore-forming fraction of a bacterial population present in an environment of interest. This assessment can provide a more thorough and accurate understanding of the bacterial contamination in the environment, thereby making it possible to focus contamination- testing, contamination-prevention, sterilization, and decontamination resources more economically and efficiently. The method includes the use of sporulation-specific primers in the form of designed, optimized deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) oligonucleotides specific for the bacterial spoIVA gene (see table). [In "spoIVA," "IV" signifies Roman numeral four and the entire quoted name refers to gene A for the fourth stage of sporulation.] These primers are mixed into a PCR cocktail with a given sample of bacterial cells. A control PCR cocktail into which are mixed universal 16S rRNA primers is also prepared. ["16S rRNA" denotes a ribosomal ribonucleic acid (rRNA) sequence that is common to all organisms.] Following several cycles of heating and cooling according to the PCR protocol to amplify amounts of DNA molecules, the amplification products can be analyzed to determine the types of bacterial cells present within the samples. If the amplification product is strong

  13. Detecting Symptom Exaggeration in College Students Seeking ADHD Treatment: Performance Validity Assessment Using the NV-MSVT and IVA-Plus.

    PubMed

    Leppma, Monica; Long, Daniel; Smith, Megan; Lassiter, Candace

    2017-01-27

    The symptoms of ADHD are highly subjective, and there is ample empirical evidence that demonstrates the ease with which impairments in attention can be feigned on many commonly used subjective and objective measures of attention. We examined the combination of two assessment measures, NV-MSVT and IVA+, to screen for performance validity and ADHD symptoms in college students. Results indicated that the NV-MSVT was effective in differentiating between students with potential high impairment, such as ADHD, and possible malingerers. In addition, in vivo clinical data (N = 350) resulted in lower validity cut-off scores on the IVA+ than had been previously suggested. Clinical implications and future research are also discussed.

  14. Group IVA phospholipase A(2) deficiency prevents CCl4-induced hepatic cell death through the enhancement of autophagy.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Keiichi; Kanai, Shiho; Tanaka, Kikuko; Kawashita, Eri; Akiba, Satoshi

    2016-02-26

    Group IVA phospholipase A2 (IVA-PLA2), which generates arachidonate, plays a role in inflammation. IVA-PLA2-deficiency reduced hepatotoxicity and hepatocyte cell death in mice that received a single dose of carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) without any inhibitory effects on CCl4-induced lipid peroxidation. An immunoblot analysis of extracts from wild-type mouse- and IVA-PLA2 KO mouse-derived primary hepatocytes that transiently expressed microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3B (LC3) revealed a higher amount of LC3-II, a typical index of autophagosome formation, in IVA-PLA2-deficient cells, suggesting the enhancement of constitutive autophagy. IVA-PLA2 may promote CCl4-induced cell death through the suppression of constitutive autophagy in hepatocytes.

  15. Di-sulfated Keratan Sulfate as a Novel Biomarker for Mucopolysaccharidosis II, IVA, and IVB.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Tsutomu; Tomatsu, Shunji; Mason, Robert W; Yasuda, Eriko; Mackenzie, William G; Hossain, Jobayer; Shibata, Yuniko; Montaño, Adriana M; Kubaski, Francyne; Giugliani, Roberto; Yamaguchi, Seiji; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Orii, Kenji E; Fukao, Toshiyuki; Orii, Tadao

    2015-01-01

    Keratan sulfate (KS) is a storage material in mucopolysaccharidosis IV (MPS IV). However, no detailed analysis has been reported on subclasses of KS: mono-sulfated KS and di-sulfated KS. We established a novel method to distinguish and quantify mono- and di-sulfated KS using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and measured both KS levels in various specimens.Di-sulfated KS was dominant in shark cartilage and rat serum, while mono-sulfated KS was dominant in bovine cornea and human serum. Levels of both mono- and di-sulfated KS varied with age in the blood and urine from control subjects and patients with MPS II and IVA. The mean levels of both forms of KS in the plasma/serum from patients with MPS II, IVA, and IVB were elevated compared with that in age-matched controls. Di-sulfated KS provided more significant difference between MPS IVA and the age-matched controls than mono-sulfated KS. The ratio of di-sulfated KS to total KS in plasma/serum increased with age in control subjects and patients with MPS II but was age independent in MPS IVA patients. Consequently, this ratio can discriminate younger MPS IVA patients from controls. Levels of mono- and di-sulfated KS in urine of MPS IVA and IVB patients were all higher than age-matched controls for all ages studied.In conclusion, the level of di-sulfated KS and its ratio to total KS can distinguish control subjects from patients with MPS II, IVA, and IVB, indicating that di-sulfated KS may be a novel biomarker for these disorders.

  16. Structural Basis for Dual Nucleotide Selectivity of Aminoglycoside 2″-Phosphotransferase IVa Provides Insight on Determinants of Nucleotide Specificity of Aminoglycoside Kinases*♦

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Kun; Berghuis, Albert M.

    2012-01-01

    Enzymatic phosphorylation through a family of enzymes called aminoglycoside O-phosphotransferases (APHs) is a major mechanism by which bacteria confer resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics. Members of the APH(2″) subfamily are of particular clinical interest because of their prevalence in pathogenic strains and their broad substrate spectra. APH(2″) enzymes display differential preferences between ATP or GTP as the phosphate donor, with aminoglycoside 2″-phosphotransferase IVa (APH(2″)-IVa) being a member that utilizes both nucleotides at comparable efficiencies. We report here four crystal structures of APH(2″)-IVa, two of the wild type enzyme and two of single amino acid mutants, each in complex with either adenosine or guanosine. Together, these structures afford a detailed look at the nucleoside-binding site architecture for this enzyme and reveal key elements that confer dual nucleotide specificity, including a solvent network in the interior of the nucleoside-binding pocket and the conformation of an interdomain linker loop. Steady state kinetic studies, as well as sequence and structural comparisons with members of the APH(2″) subfamily and other aminoglycoside kinases, rationalize the different substrate preferences for these enzymes. Finally, despite poor overall sequence similarity and structural homology, analysis of the nucleoside-binding pocket of APH(2″)-IVa shows a striking resemblance to that of eukaryotic casein kinase 2 (CK2), which also exhibits dual nucleotide specificity. These results, in complement with the multitude of existing inhibitors against CK2, can serve as a structural basis for the design of nucleotide-competitive inhibitors against clinically relevant APH enzymes. PMID:22371504

  17. Structural basis for dual nucleotide selectivity of aminoglycoside 2''-phosphotransferase IVa provides insight on determinants of nucleotide specificity of aminoglycoside kinases.

    PubMed

    Shi, Kun; Berghuis, Albert M

    2012-04-13

    Enzymatic phosphorylation through a family of enzymes called aminoglycoside O-phosphotransferases (APHs) is a major mechanism by which bacteria confer resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics. Members of the APH(2″) subfamily are of particular clinical interest because of their prevalence in pathogenic strains and their broad substrate spectra. APH(2″) enzymes display differential preferences between ATP or GTP as the phosphate donor, with aminoglycoside 2″-phosphotransferase IVa (APH(2″)-IVa) being a member that utilizes both nucleotides at comparable efficiencies. We report here four crystal structures of APH(2″)-IVa, two of the wild type enzyme and two of single amino acid mutants, each in complex with either adenosine or guanosine. Together, these structures afford a detailed look at the nucleoside-binding site architecture for this enzyme and reveal key elements that confer dual nucleotide specificity, including a solvent network in the interior of the nucleoside-binding pocket and the conformation of an interdomain linker loop. Steady state kinetic studies, as well as sequence and structural comparisons with members of the APH(2″) subfamily and other aminoglycoside kinases, rationalize the different substrate preferences for these enzymes. Finally, despite poor overall sequence similarity and structural homology, analysis of the nucleoside-binding pocket of APH(2″)-IVa shows a striking resemblance to that of eukaryotic casein kinase 2 (CK2), which also exhibits dual nucleotide specificity. These results, in complement with the multitude of existing inhibitors against CK2, can serve as a structural basis for the design of nucleotide-competitive inhibitors against clinically relevant APH enzymes.

  18. Alleviation of high-fat diet-induced fatty liver damage in group IVA phospholipase A2-knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Ii, Hiromi; Yokoyama, Naoki; Yoshida, Shintaro; Tsutsumi, Kae; Hatakeyama, Shinji; Sato, Takashi; Ishihara, Keiichi; Akiba, Satoshi

    2009-12-01

    Hepatic fat deposition with hepatocellular damage, a feature of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, is mediated by several putative factors including prostaglandins. In the present study, we examined whether group IVA phospholipase A(2) (IVA-PLA(2)), which catalyzes the first step in prostanoid biosynthesis, is involved in the development of fatty liver, using IVA-PLA(2)-knockout mice. Male wild-type mice on high-fat diets (20% fat and 1.25% cholesterol) developed hepatocellular vacuolation and liver hypertrophy with an increase in the serum levels of liver damage marker aminotransferases when compared with wild-type mice fed normal diets. These high-fat diet-induced alterations were markedly decreased in IVA-PLA(2)-knockout mice. Hepatic triacylglycerol content was lower in IVA-PLA(2)-knockout mice than in wild-type mice under normal dietary conditions. Although high-fat diets increased hepatic triacylglycerol content in both genotypes, the degree was lower in IVA-PLA(2)-knockout mice than in wild-type mice. Under the high-fat dietary conditions, IVA-PLA(2)-knockout mice had lower epididymal fat pad weight and smaller adipocytes than wild-type mice. The serum level of prostaglandin E(2), which has a fat storage effect, was lower in IVA-PLA(2)-knockout mice than in wild-type mice, irrespective of the kind of diet. In both genotypes, high-fat diets increased serum leptin levels equally between the two groups, but did not affect the serum levels of adiponectin, resistin, free fatty acid, triacylglycerol, glucose, or insulin. Our findings suggest that a deficiency of IVA-PLA(2) alleviates fatty liver damage caused by high-fat diets, probably because of the lower generation of IVA-PLA(2) metabolites, such as prostaglandin E(2). IVA-PLA(2) could be a promising therapeutic target for obesity-related diseases including non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

  19. Appendix to the report from the low-residue soldering task force: Phase 2 results

    SciTech Connect

    Iman, R.L.; Anderson, D.J.; Huffman, D.D.

    1995-12-01

    The LRSTF report for Phase I of its evaluation of low-residue soldering was issued in June 1995. This Appendix summarizes the results of follow-on testing performed in Phase II and compares electrical test results for both phases. Deliberate decisions were made by the LRSTF in Phase I to challenge the design guideline limits in MILSTD-275, Printed Wiring for Electronic Equipment The LRSTF considered this approach to produce a ``worst case`` design and provide useful information about the robustness of LR soldering processes. As such, good design practices were sometimes deliberately violated in designing the LRSTF board. This approach created some anomalies for both LR boards and RMA/cleaned controls. Phase II testing verified that problems that affected both RMA/cleaned and LR boards in Phase I were design related.

  20. Observation results of actual phase defects using micro coherent EUV scatterometry microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Hiraku; Harada, Tetsuo; Watanabe, Takeo

    2016-10-01

    One of the critical issue of EUV lithography is fabrication of defect-free mask. The origin of the defect is a particle inside the multilayer and bump or pit on glass substrate. This type of defect is called a phase defect. If there is a phase defect, the reflection phase is disordered. As a result, the phase structure is printed as a defect on a wafer. Thus, we have developed micro coherent EUV scatterometry microscope (we called micro-CSM) for phase defect characterization. Micro-CSM records scattering signal from a defect directly exposed by focused coherent EUV having a spot size of φ140-nm in diameter. An off-axis-type Fresnel zone plate was employed as a focusing optics. Phase distribution of the defect is reconstructed with the scattering image by the coherent-diffraction-imaging method. We observed actual phase defects in this work. Actual phase defects were on a mask blanks which was the same grade of the pre-production mask of the semiconductor devices. The positions of actual phase defects have been already inspected by the actinic blank inspection tool. And, the actual phase defects have been already observed using an atomic force microscope. A purpose of this work is observation of these actual defects using micro-CSM and comparison of the results.

  1. Radiation Therapy and Cisplatin With or Without Triapine in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage IB2, II, or IIIB-IVA Cervical Cancer or Stage II-IVA Vaginal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-23

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Stage IB2 Cervical Cancer; Stage II Vaginal Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Vaginal Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Vaginal Cancer; Stage IVB Vaginal Cancer

  2. Chemoradiation With Concomitant Boosts Followed by Radical Surgery in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer: Long-term Results of the ROMA-2 Prospective Phase 2 Study

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrandina, Gabriella; Gambacorta, Antonietta; Gallotta, Valerio; Smaniotto, Daniela; Fagotti, Anna; Tagliaferri, Luca; Foti, Elvira; Fanfani, Francesco; Autorino, Rosa; Scambia, Giovanni; Valentini, Vincenzo

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: This prospective, phase 2 study aimed at assessing the efficacy of accelerated fractionation radiation therapy by concomitant boosts (CBs) associated with chemoradiation therapy (CRT) of the whole pelvis, in improving the rate of pathological complete response (pCR) to treatment in patients with International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage IB2-IVA locally advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Neoadjuvant CRT included conformal irradiation of the whole pelvis with a total dose of 39.6 Gy (1.8 cGy/fraction, 22 fractions), plus additional irradiation of primary tumor and parametria with 10.8 Gy administered with CBs (0.9 cGy/fraction, 12 fractions, every other day). Concomitant chemotherapy included cisplatin (20 mg/m{sup 2}, days 1-4 and 26-30 of treatment), and capecitabine (1300 mg/m{sup 2}/daily, orally) during the first 2 and the last 2 weeks of treatment. Radical hysterectomy plus pelvic with or without aortic lymphadenectomy was performed within 6 to 8 weeks from CRT. Toxicity was recorded according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group toxicity criteria and Chassagne grading system. Based on the Simon design, 103 cases were required, and the regimen would be considered active if >45 pCR were registered (α error = 0.05; β error = 0.1). Results: pCR was documented in 51 cases (50.5%), and the regimen was considered active, according to the planned statistical assumptions. At median follow-up of 36 months (range: 7-85 months), the 3-year local failure rate was 7%, whereas the 3-year disease-free and overall survival rates were 73.0% and 86.1%, respectively. Grade 3 leukopenia and neutropenia were reported in only 1 and 2 cases, respectively. Gastrointestinal toxicity was always grade 1 or 2. Conclusions: Addition of CBs in the accelerated fractionation modality to the whole pelvis chemoradiation followed by radical surgery results in a high rate of pathologically assessed complete response to CRT and a very

  3. IVA the robot: Design guidelines and lessons learned from the first space station laboratory manipulation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Konkel, Carl R.; Powers, Allen K.; Dewitt, J. Russell

    1991-01-01

    The first interactive Space Station Freedom (SSF) lab robot exhibit was installed at the Space and Rocket Center in Huntsville, AL, and has been running daily since. IntraVehicular Activity (IVA) the robot is mounted in a full scale U.S. Lab (USL) mockup to educate the public on possible automation and robotic applications aboard the SSF. Responding to audio and video instructions at the Command Console, exhibit patrons may prompt IVA to perform a housekeeping task or give a speaking tour of the module. Other exemplary space station tasks are simulated and the public can even challenge IVA to a game of tic tac toe. In anticipation of such a system being built for the Space Station, a discussion is provided of the approach taken, along with suggestions for applicability to the Space Station Environment.

  4. The impact of an IVA robot on the Space Station microgravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harman, Phillip E.; Rohn, Douglas A.

    1989-01-01

    In order to maintain a microgravity environment during Space Station operations, it will be necessary to minimize reaction forces. These mechanical forces will typically occur during reboost, docking, equipment operation, intravehicular activities (IVA) robot operation, or crew activity. This paper focuses on those disturbances created by an IVA robot and its impact on the Space Station microgravity environment. The robot dynamic analysis that was used to generate the forcing function as the input into a finite element model of the U.S. Laboratory will be shown. Acceleration levels were determined through analysis and have shown that a robotic system can sustain reaction forces into the station below 0.0001 g. A comparison between IVA robot effects and crew motion effects on the low-g environment is also described. It is concluded that robot trajectory shaping and motor accelerations feedback can minimize reaction forces.

  5. Exact result on topology and phase transitions at any finite N.

    PubMed

    Casetti, Lapo; Cohen, E G D; Pettini, Marco

    2002-03-01

    We study analytically the topology of a family of submanifolds of the configuration space of the mean-field XY model, computing also a topological invariant (the Euler characteristic). We prove that a particular topological change of these submanifolds is connected to the phase transition of this system, and exists also at finite N. The present result is the first analytic proof that a phase transition has a topological origin and provides a key to a possible better understanding of the origin of phase transitions at their deepest level, as well as to a possible definition of phase transitions at finite N.

  6. Performance results of a 300-deg linear phase modulator for spaceborne communications applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mysoor, Narayan R.; Mueller, Robert O.

    1993-01-01

    A phase modulator capable of large linear phase deviation, low loss, and wide band operation with good thermal stability was developed for deep space spacecraft transponder (DST) applications at X-band (8.415 GHz) and Ka-band (32 GHz) downlinks. The design uses a two-stage circulator-coupled reflection phase shifter with constant gamma hyperabrupt varactors and an efficient modulator driver circuit to obtain a phase deviation of +/- 2.5 rad with better than 8 percent linearity. The measured insertion loss is 6.6 dB +/- 0.35 dB at 8415 MHz. Measured carrier and relative sideband amplitudes resulting from phase modulation by sine wave and square modulating functions agree well with the predicted results.

  7. Performance results of a 300-degree linear phase modulator for spaceborne communications applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mysoor, N. R.; Mueller, R. O.

    1993-01-01

    A phase modulator capable of large linear phase deviation, low loss, and wide band operation with good thermal stability was developed for deep space spacecraft transponder (DST) applications at X-band (8.415 GHz) and Ka-band (32 GHz) downlinks. The design uses a two-stage circulator-coupled reflection phase shifter with constant gamma hyperabrupt varactors and an efficient modulator driver circuit to obtain a phase deviation of +/-2.5 rad with better than 8 percent linearity. The measured insertion loss is 6.6 dB +/- 0.35 dB at 8415 MHz. Measured carrier and relative sideband amplitudes resulting from phase modulation by sine wave and square modulating functions agree well with the predicted results.

  8. 30 CFR 203.30 - Which leases are eligible for royalty relief as a result of drilling a phase 2 or phase 3 ultra...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... a result of drilling a phase 2 or phase 3 ultra-deep well? 203.30 Section 203.30 Mineral Resources... for Drilling Ultra-Deep Wells on Leases Not Subject to Deep Water Royalty Relief § 203.30 Which leases are eligible for royalty relief as a result of drilling a phase 2 or phase 3 ultra-deep well?...

  9. The Cu-Sn phase diagram, Part I: New experimental results.

    PubMed

    Fürtauer, S; Li, D; Cupid, D; Flandorfer, H

    2013-03-01

    Phase diagram investigation of the Cu-Sn system was carried out on twenty Cu-rich samples by thermal analysis (DTA), metallographic methods (EPMA/SEM-EDX) and crystallographic analysis (powder XRD, high temperature powder XRD). One main issue in this work was to investigate the high temperature phases beta (W-type) and gamma (BiF3-type) and to check the phase relations between them. In the high temperature powder XRD experiments the presence of the two-phase-field between the beta- and the gamma-phase could not be confirmed. Detailed study of primary literature together with our experimental results leads to a new phase diagram version with a higher order transformation between these two high temperature phases. The present work is designated as part I of our joint publication. The new findings described here have been included into a completely new thermodynamic assessment of the Cu-Sn phase diagram which is presented in part II.

  10. Results of phase 2 of the APRICOT program. Final report. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-05-01

    APRICOT (Analysis of Primary Containment Transients) is a cooperative activity for comparison and benchmarking of computational methods used to analyze LMFBR (Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor) structural response to pressure loads from HCDA's (Hypothetical Core Disruptive Accidents). Independent experts review the calculations for the purpose of comparing computational results and methods of solution. Phase 2 involved a series of more complex calculations based on the simulation of scaled-down containment experiments. These calculations, as those of Phase 1, were performed by participants from Europe, Japan and the United States. The calculations were all in reasonable agreement with experimental determinations of hydrodynamic loads; however, the calculated plastic strains differed significantly from the experimental results. The unresolved issues from the Phase 2 calculations are currently being studied with the calculations for Phase 3.

  11. Measurement of Elevated Concentrations of Urine Keratan Sulfate by UPLC-MSMS in Lysosomal Storage Disorders (LSDs): Comparison of Urine Keratan Sulfate Levels in MPS IVA Versus Other LSDs.

    PubMed

    Ellsworth, Katarzyna A; Pollard, Laura M; Cathey, Sara; Wood, Tim

    2016-07-28

    Keratan sulfate (KS) is commonly elevated in urine samples from patients with mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA (MPS IVA) and is considered pathognomonic for the condition. Recently, a new method has been described by Martell et al. to detect and measure urinary KS utilizing LC-MS/MS. As a part of the validation of this method in our laboratory, we studied the sensitivity and specificity of elevated urine KS levels using 25 samples from 15 MPS IVA patients, and 138 samples from 102 patients with other lysosomal storage disorders, including MPS I (n = 9), MPS II (n = 13), MPS III (n = 23), MPS VI (n = 7), beta-galactosidase deficiency (n = 7), mucolipidosis (ML) type II, II/III and III (n = 51), alpha-mannosidosis (n = 11), fucosidosis (n = 4), sialidosis (n = 5), Pompe disease (n = 3), aspartylglucosaminuria (n = 4), and galactosialidosis (n = 1). As expected, urine KS values were significantly higher (fivefold average increase) than age-matched controls in all MPS IVA patients. Urine KS levels were also significantly elevated (threefold to fourfold increase) in patients with GM-1 gangliosidosis, MPS IVB, ML II and ML II/III, and fucosidosis. Urine KS was also elevated to a smaller degree (1.1-fold to 1.7-fold average increase) in patients with MPS I, MPS II, and ML III. These findings suggest that while the UPLC-MS/MS urine KS method is 100% sensitive for the detection of patients with MPS IVA, elevated urine KS is not specific for this condition. Therefore, caution is advised when interpreting urinary keratan sulfate results.

  12. Development of a monoclonal antibody against viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) genotype IVa.

    PubMed

    Ito, T; Olesen, N J; Skall, H F; Sano, M; Kurita, J; Nakajima, K; Iida, T

    2010-02-24

    The viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) comprises 4 major genotypes and a number of subtypes with, in most cases, distinct geographical distribution. A quick and simple detection method that can discriminate the different genotypes is desirable for a quick and more efficient prevention of the spread of genotypes to new geographical areas. A monoclonal antibody (MAb) against VHSV genotype IVa was produced, with the aim of providing a simple method of discriminating this genotype from the other VHSV genotypes (I, II, III and IVb). Balb/c mice were injected with purified VHSV-JF00Ehil (genotype IVa) from diseased farmed Japanese flounder. Ten hybridoma clones secreting monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against VHSV were established. One of these, MAb VHS-10, reacted only with genotype IVa in indirect fluorescent antibody technique (IFAT) and ELISA. Using cell cultures that were transfected with each of the viral protein genes, it was shown that the MAb VHS-10 recognizes a nonlinear genotype IVa-specific epitope on the VHSV N-protein.

  13. GROWTH OF THE MARSH ELDER IVA FRUTESCENS IN RELATION TO DURATION OF TIDAL FLOODING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Iva frutescens is a common shrub at the upland fringe of salt marshes throughout the East and Gulf coasts of North America. Its position and relative size are governed largely by the degree of flooding by seawater. Cross sections of older stems (living and standing dead) from sa...

  14. Evaluation of 1980-81 Title IV-A Indian Education Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimball, George H.

    1981-01-01

    The report evaluates the 1980-81 Title IV-A Indian Education Program consisting of three components designed to address special priority needs of Indian students in the Oklahoma City Public School System. Performance goals of the first component, supplementary academic assistance, were long-term tutoring of Indian students who scored below the…

  15. Title IV-A Indian Education Program Evaluation, 1984-85.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johns, Jennifer S.

    The Title IV-A Indian Education Program in Albuquerque, New Mexico, public schools met program objectives despite funding decreases, personnel cuts, and increased requests for remedial tutoring. Two tutors, a volunteer, and a counselor tutored 35 middle and high school students from the Navajo community of Canoncito to improve/maintain academic…

  16. Title IV-A Indian Education Program Evaluation, 1983-84.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johns, Jennifer S.

    The third year of Title IV-A Indian Education programs in Albuquerque, New Mexico, public schools saw fulfillment of some program objectives despite funding decreases, personnel cuts, and increased requests for remedial tutoring. Two tutors and a counselor tutored 15 middle school and 26 high school students from the Navajo community of Canoncito…

  17. Asymmetric division and differential gene expression during a bacterial developmental program requires DivIVA.

    PubMed

    Eswaramoorthy, Prahathees; Winter, Peter W; Wawrzusin, Peter; York, Andrew G; Shroff, Hari; Ramamurthi, Kumaran S

    2014-08-01

    Sporulation in the bacterium Bacillus subtilis is a developmental program in which a progenitor cell differentiates into two different cell types, the smaller of which eventually becomes a dormant cell called a spore. The process begins with an asymmetric cell division event, followed by the activation of a transcription factor, σF, specifically in the smaller cell. Here, we show that the structural protein DivIVA localizes to the polar septum during sporulation and is required for asymmetric division and the compartment-specific activation of σF. Both events are known to require a protein called SpoIIE, which also localizes to the polar septum. We show that DivIVA copurifies with SpoIIE and that DivIVA may anchor SpoIIE briefly to the assembling polar septum before SpoIIE is subsequently released into the forespore membrane and recaptured at the polar septum. Finally, using super-resolution microscopy, we demonstrate that DivIVA and SpoIIE ultimately display a biased localization on the side of the polar septum that faces the smaller compartment in which σF is activated.

  18. Space shuttle EVA/IVA support equipment requirements study. Volume 1: Final summary report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the support equipment requirements for space shuttle intravehicular and extravehicular activities. The subjects investigated are; (1) EVA/IVA task identification and analysis,. (2) primary life support system, (3) emergency life support system, (4) pressure suit assembly, (5) restraints, (6) work site provision, (7) emergency internal vehicular emergencies, and (8) vehicular interfaces.

  19. First Results on a Transatlantic Time and Frequency Transfer by GPS Carrier Phase

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-12-01

    FIRST RESULTS ON A TRANSATLANTIC TIME AND FREQUENCY TRANSFER BY GPS CARRIER PHASE G . Dudle, F. Overney, 1;. Prost Swiss Federal Office of...P. Hetzel P hysikalisch Techllische Bundesantalt Braunschweig, Germany E. Powers U.S. Naval Observatory, Washington, DC, USA A hstract Time and...frequency transfer hy GPS carrier phase, also referred to as Geodetic Time Transfer (GeTT), has been studied intensively in the frame of a

  20. Recent findings on biosolids cake odor reduction--results of WERF phase 3 biosolids odor research.

    PubMed

    Erdal, Zeynep K; Forbes, Robert H; Witherspoon, Jay; Adams, Greg; Hargreaves, Ron; Morton, Rob; Novak, John; Higgins, Matthew

    2008-11-01

    The Water Environment Research Foundation (WERF) has sponsored three phases of a long-term project entitled "Identifying and Controlling Odors in the Municipal Wastewater Environment." The current (third) phase focuses on reduction of odors from dewatered biosolids cakes, and is entitled "Biosolids Processing Modifications for Cake Odor Reduction." This phase encompasses nine research agenda items developed from the results of the prior phase of research (Phase 2), which was completed in December 2003 as WERF Report No. 00-HHE-5T and was entitled "Impacts of In-Plant Parameters on Biosolids Odor Quality." The current phase (Phase 3) was a 2.5-year project, the first half of which was dedicated to testing several of the more promising hypotheses from Phase 2 in the laboratory to help determine the cause-effect relationships of odor generation from biosolids, and to develop odor reduction techniques. It is important to note that this research project covers the reduction or prevention of odorous emissions from dewatered biosolids cake, not odor control by means of containment or adsorption or absorption of malodorous emissions. In the remainder of the Phase 3 project, promising laboratory findings are being applied to biosolids handling processes at one or more wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), with the goal of achieving significant cake odor reduction in a realistic, full-scale setting. The Phase 3 laboratory results were used to identify the relative effectiveness of methods for reducing biosolids cake odors, using techniques and measurements of biosolids cake odor production potential that have been developed by the WERF Project Team. Plans to demonstrate the most promising research findings at full-scale biosolids digestion and dewatering facilities constitute the final, fourth phase of the project. Contacts have been made with wastewater treatment facilities that have an interest or need to reduce their biosolids cake odors. The main goal of the next phase of

  1. Enzyme replacement therapy in newborn mucopolysaccharidosis IVA mice: early treatment rescues bone lesions?

    PubMed

    Tomatsu, Shunji; Montaño, Adriana M; Oikawa, Hirotaka; Dung, Vu Chi; Hashimoto, Amiko; Oguma, Toshihiro; Gutiérrez, Monica L; Takahashi, Tatsuo; Shimada, Tsutomu; Orii, Tadao; Sly, William S

    2015-02-01

    We treated mucopolysaccharidosis IVA (MPS IVA) mice to assess the effects of long-term enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) initiated at birth, since adult mice treated by ERT showed little improvement in bone pathology [1]. To conduct ERT in newborn mice, we used recombinant human N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase (GALNS) produced in a CHO cell line. First, to observe the tissue distribution pattern, a dose of 250units/g body weight was administered intravenously in MPS IVA mice at day 2 or 3. The infused enzyme was primarily recovered in the liver and spleen, with detectable activity in the bone and brain. Second, newborn ERT was conducted after a tissue distribution study. The first injection of newborn ERT was performed intravenously, the second to fourth weekly injections were intraperitoneal, and the remaining injections from 5th to 14th weeks were intravenous into the tail vein. MPS IVA mice treated with GALNS showed clearance of lysosomal storage in the liver and spleen, and sinus lining cells in bone marrow. The column structure of the growth plate was organized better than that in adult mice treated with ERT; however, hyaline and fibrous cartilage cells in the femur, spine, ligaments, discs, synovium, and periosteum still had storage materials to some extent. Heart valves were refractory to the treatment. Levels of serum keratan sulfate were kept normal in newborn ERT mice. In conclusion, the enzyme, which enters the cartilage before the cartilage cell layer becomes mature, prevents disorganization of column structure. Early treatment from birth leads to partial remission of bone pathology in MPS IVA mice.

  2. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy with nedaplatin in patients with stage IIA to IVA cervical carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Fujioka, Toru; Yasuoka, Toshiaki; Koizumi, Masae; Tanaka, Hiroki; Hashimoto, Hisashi; Nabeta, Motoo; Koizumi, Koji; Matsubara, Yuko; Hamada, Katsuyuki; Matsubara, Keiichi; Katayama, Tomihiro; Nawa, Akihiro

    2013-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and toxicities of nadaplatin-based concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in patients with stage IIA to IVA cervical carcinoma. Patients with an International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage IIA to IVA cervical carcinoma were treated with nadaplatin-based CCRT, using high-dose rate intracavitary brachytherapy (HDR-ICBT) or radiotherapy (RT) alone, in patients with FIGO stage IIA to IVA cervical carcinoma. CCRT with nedaplatin (80 mg/m(2)) was administered on Days 1 and 29. The records of 17 women treated either with nadaplatin-based CCRT using HSR-ICBT (n=8) or RT alone (n=9), for stage IIA to IVA cervical carcinoma were retrospectively reviewed. The activity and toxicity were compared in the two treatment groups. Progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were the main endpoints. The 5-year overall survival rates in the CCRT and RT groups were 68.6 and 77.8%, respectively. The median OS of the CCRT and RT groups was 38.5 and 27.3 months, respectively. There was no significant difference in either PFS (P=0.618) or OS (P= 0.231). The most common grade 3-4 or higher toxicities in the CCRT groups were leuko-/neutropenia (37.5%). The frequency of acute grade 3-4 toxicity was higher in the CCRT compared to the RT group. However, no statistically significant difference was observed. Nedaplatin-based CCRT was safely performed. Although the prognosis of patients with FIGO stage IIA to IVA cervical carcinoma was not significantly improved, fewer distant relapses were observed in this treatment. Consequently, nedaplatin-based CCRT may be considered as a potential alternative to cisplatin-based CCRT in this patient population.

  3. A synopsis of test results and knowledge gained from the Phase-0 CSI evolutionary model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belvin, W. Keith; Elliott, Kenny B.; Horta, Lucas G.

    1993-01-01

    The Phase-0 CSI Evolutionary Model (CEM) is a testbed for the study of space platform global line-of-sight (LOS) pointing. Now that the tests have been completed, a summary of hardware and closed-loop test experiences is necessary to insure a timely dissemination of the knowledge gained. The testbed is described and modeling experiences are presented followed by a summary of the research performed by various investigators. Some early lessons on implementing the closed-loop controllers are described with particular emphasis on real-time computing requirements. A summary of closed-loop studies and a synopsis of test results are presented. Plans for evolving the CEM from phase 0 to phases 1 and 2 are also described. Subsequently, a summary of knowledge gained from the design and testing of the Phase-0 CEM is made.

  4. An Update on Phased Array Results Obtained on the GE Counter-Rotating Open Rotor Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podboy, Gary; Horvath, Csaba; Envia, Edmane

    2013-01-01

    Beamform maps have been generated from 1) simulated data generated by the LINPROP code and 2) actual experimental phased array data obtained on the GE Counter-rotating open rotor model. The beamform maps show that many of the tones in the experimental data come from their corresponding Mach radius. If the phased array points to the Mach radius associated with a tone then it is likely that the tone is a result of the loading and thickness noise on the blades. In this case, the phased array correctly points to where the noise is coming from and indicates the axial location of the loudest source in the image but not necessarily the correct vertical location. If the phased array does not point to the Mach radius associated with a tone then some mechanism other than loading and thickness noise may control the amplitude of the tone. In this case, the phased array may or may not point to the actual source. If the source is not rotating it is likely that the phased array points to the source. If the source is rotating it is likely that the phased array indicates the axial location of the loudest source but not necessarily the correct vertical location. These results indicate that you have to be careful in how you interpret phased array data obtained on an open rotor since they may show the tones coming from a location other than the source location. With a subsonic tip speed open rotor the tones can come form locations outboard of the blade tips. This has implications regarding noise shielding.

  5. Experimental results of the performance of the new phase and frequency controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannermaa, Jari; Kalliomaeki, Kalevi

    1992-06-01

    The application of the Maximum Entropy Method (MEM) to control phase locked crystals of Loran C receivers is reported. Performance optimization of the MEM controller achieved the result of 9 ns and 7 x 10(exp -12) for phase and frequency residuals, respectively. These values are comparable with 100 ns and 9 x 10(exp -12) of the older conventional PI controller, respectively. The performance of the MEM controlled Loran C receiver is at least 50 percent better when compared with the identical receiver equipped with the PI controller. The results verify the presumed superiority of the MEM controller over the conventional PI.

  6. MSFC Sortie Laboratory Environmental Control System (ECS) phase B design study results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ignatonis, A. J.; Mitchell, K. L.

    1974-01-01

    Phase B effort of the Sortie Lab program has concluded. Results of that effort are presented which pertain to the definitions of the environmental control system (ECS). Numerous design studies were performed in Phase B to investigate system feasibility, complexity, weight, and cost. The results and methods employed for these design studies are included. An autonomous Sortie Lab ECS was developed which utilizes a deployed space radiator. Total system weight was projected to be 1814.4 kg including the radiator and fluids. ECS power requirements were estimated at 950 watts.

  7. Multi-modal data fusion using source separation: Two effective models based on ICA and IVA and their properties

    PubMed Central

    Adali, Tülay; Levin-Schwartz, Yuri; Calhoun, Vince D.

    2015-01-01

    Fusion of information from multiple sets of data in order to extract a set of features that are most useful and relevant for the given task is inherent to many problems we deal with today. Since, usually, very little is known about the actual interaction among the datasets, it is highly desirable to minimize the underlying assumptions. This has been the main reason for the growing importance of data-driven methods, and in particular of independent component analysis (ICA) as it provides useful decompositions with a simple generative model and using only the assumption of statistical independence. A recent extension of ICA, independent vector analysis (IVA) generalizes ICA to multiple datasets by exploiting the statistical dependence across the datasets, and hence, as we discuss in this paper, provides an attractive solution to fusion of data from multiple datasets along with ICA. In this paper, we focus on two multivariate solutions for multi-modal data fusion that let multiple modalities fully interact for the estimation of underlying features that jointly report on all modalities. One solution is the Joint ICA model that has found wide application in medical imaging, and the second one is the the Transposed IVA model introduced here as a generalization of an approach based on multi-set canonical correlation analysis. In the discussion, we emphasize the role of diversity in the decompositions achieved by these two models, present their properties and implementation details to enable the user make informed decisions on the selection of a model along with its associated parameters. Discussions are supported by simulation results to help highlight the main issues in the implementation of these methods. PMID:26525830

  8. Chemoradiotherapy followed by consolidation chemotherapy involving paclitaxel and carboplatin and in FIGO stage IIIB/IVA cervical cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of paclitaxel plus carboplatin (TC)-based concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) followed by consolidation chemotherapy in the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage IIIB/IVA cervical cancer patients. Methods We reviewed the medical records of FIGO stage IIIB/IVA cervical cancer patients (n=30) who had been intended to be treated with TC-based CCRT followed by consolidation chemotherapy (TC-CCRT-group) from April 2012–May 2016. Patients who had been treated with CCRT involving a single platinum agent (CCRT-group; n=52) or definitive radiotherapy alone (RT-group; n=74) from January 1997–September 2012 were also identified and used as historical controls. Survival was calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared using the log-rank test. Results Of the 30 patients included in the TC-CCRT-group, 22 patients (73.3%) completed the planned TC-based CCRT. The most frequently observed acute grade 3/4 hematological toxicities were leukopenia and neutropenia, and diarrhea was the most common acute grade 3/4 non-hematological toxicity. After a median follow-up of 35 months, 9 patients (30.0%) had developed recurrent disease. The patients’ estimated 3-year progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) rates were 67.9% and 90.8%, respectively. In comparisons with historical control groups, the survival outcomes of TC-CCRT-group was significantly superior to CCRT-group in terms of OS (p=0.011) and significantly superior to RT-group in terms of both PFS (p=0.009) and OS (p<0.001). Conclusion TC-based CCRT followed by consolidation chemotherapy is safe and effective. A randomized controlled study needs to be conducted to further evaluate the efficacy of this multimodal approach in this patient population. PMID:27958682

  9. Mechanical Abrasion as a Low Cost Technique for Contamination-Free Sample Acquisition from a Category IVA Clean Platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolgin, B.; Yarbrough, C.; Carson, J.; Troy, R.

    2000-01-01

    The proposed Mars Sample Transfer Chain Architecture provides Planetary Protection Officers with clean samples that are required for the eventual release from confinement of the returned Martian samples. At the same time, absolute cleanliness and sterility requirement is not placed of any part of the Lander (including the deep drill), Mars Assent Vehicle (MAV), any part of the Orbiting Sample container (OS), Rover mobility platform, any part of the Minicorer, Robotic arm (including instrument sensors), and most of the caching equipment on the Rover. The removal of the strict requirements in excess of the Category IVa cleanliness (Pathfinder clean) is expected to lead to significant cost savings. The proposed architecture assumes that crosscontamination renders all surfaces in the vicinity of the rover(s) and the lander(s) contaminated. Thus, no accessible surface of Martian rocks and soil is Earth contamination free. As a result of the latter, only subsurface samples (either rock or soil) can be and will be collected for eventual return to Earth. Uncontaminated samples can be collected from a Category IVa clean platform. Both subsurface soil and rock samples can be maintained clean if they are collected by devices that are self-contained and clean and sterile inside only. The top layer of the sample is removed in a manner that does not contaminate the collection tools. Biobarrier (e.g., aluminum foil) covering the moving parts of these devices may be used as the only self removing bio-blanket that is required. The samples never leave the collection tools. The lids are placed on these tools inside the collection device. These single use tools with the lid and the sample inside are brought to Earth in the OS. The lids have to be designed impenetrable to the Earth organisms. The latter is a well established art.

  10. Multi-modal data fusion using source separation: Two effective models based on ICA and IVA and their properties.

    PubMed

    Adali, Tülay; Levin-Schwartz, Yuri; Calhoun, Vince D

    2015-09-01

    Fusion of information from multiple sets of data in order to extract a set of features that are most useful and relevant for the given task is inherent to many problems we deal with today. Since, usually, very little is known about the actual interaction among the datasets, it is highly desirable to minimize the underlying assumptions. This has been the main reason for the growing importance of data-driven methods, and in particular of independent component analysis (ICA) as it provides useful decompositions with a simple generative model and using only the assumption of statistical independence. A recent extension of ICA, independent vector analysis (IVA) generalizes ICA to multiple datasets by exploiting the statistical dependence across the datasets, and hence, as we discuss in this paper, provides an attractive solution to fusion of data from multiple datasets along with ICA. In this paper, we focus on two multivariate solutions for multi-modal data fusion that let multiple modalities fully interact for the estimation of underlying features that jointly report on all modalities. One solution is the Joint ICA model that has found wide application in medical imaging, and the second one is the the Transposed IVA model introduced here as a generalization of an approach based on multi-set canonical correlation analysis. In the discussion, we emphasize the role of diversity in the decompositions achieved by these two models, present their properties and implementation details to enable the user make informed decisions on the selection of a model along with its associated parameters. Discussions are supported by simulation results to help highlight the main issues in the implementation of these methods.

  11. Effect of Carbon Ion Radiotherapy for Sacral Chordoma: Results of Phase I-II and Phase II Clinical Trials

    SciTech Connect

    Imai, Reiko; Kamada, Tadashi; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Sugawara, Shinji; Serizawa, Itsuko; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Tatezaki, Shin-ichiro

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: To summarize the results of treatment for sacral chordoma in Phase I-II and Phase II carbon ion radiotherapy trials for bone and soft-tissue sarcomas. Patients and Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of 38 patients with medically unresectable sacral chordomas treated with the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba, Japan between 1996 and 2003. Of the 38 patients, 30 had not received previous treatment and 8 had locally recurrent tumor after previous resection. The applied carbon ion dose was 52.8-73.6 Gray equivalents (median, 70.4) in a total of 16 fixed fractions within 4 weeks. Results: The median patient age was 66 years. The cranial tumor extension was S2 or greater in 31 patients. The median clinical target volume was 523 cm{sup 3}. The median follow-up period was 80 months. The 5-year overall survival rate was 86%, and the 5-year local control rate was 89%. After treatment, 27 of 30 patients with primary tumor remained ambulatory with or without supportive devices. Two patients experienced severe skin or soft-tissue complications requiring skin grafts. Conclusion: Carbon ion radiotherapy appears effective and safe in the treatment of patients with sacral chordoma and offers a promising alternative to surgery.

  12. A compilation of results pertaining to the behavior of phase locked loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gleicher, N.

    1971-01-01

    State-of-the art on phase locked loops PLL is reported by summarizing some specific results. Following a statement of the overall analysis and design objectives, results are presented in a format identifying working terminology, inherent assumptions, and references for each result. The use of PLL in tracking, synchronization, and demodulation is reemphasized, as well as the mathematical challenge involved in solving nonlinear stochastic differential equations.

  13. Crystal structures of the substrate free-enzyme, and reaction intermediate of the HAD superfamily member, haloacid dehalogenase DehIVa from Burkholderia cepacia MBA4.

    PubMed

    Schmidberger, Jason W; Wilce, Jackie A; Tsang, Jimmy S H; Wilce, Matthew C J

    2007-05-04

    DehIVa is a haloacid dehalogenase (EC 3.8.1.2) from the soil and water borne bacterium Burkholderia cepacia MBA4, which belongs to the functionally variable haloacid dehalogenase (HAD) superfamily of enzymes. The haloacid dehalogenases catalyse the removal of halides from haloacids resulting in a hydroxlated product. These enzymes are of interest for their potential to degrade recalcitrant halogenated environmental pollutants and their use in the synthesis of industrial chemicals. The haloacid dehalogenases utilise a nucleophilic attack on the substrate by an aspartic acid residue to form an enzyme-substrate ester bond and concomitantly cleaving of the carbon-halide bond and release of a hydroxylated product following ester hydrolysis. We present the crystal structures of both the substrate-free DehIVa refined to 1.93 A resolution and DehIVa covalently bound to l-2-monochloropropanoate trapped as a reaction intermediate, refined to 2.7 A resolution. Electron density consistent with a previously unidentified yet anticipated water molecule in the active site poised to donate its hydroxyl group to the product and its proton to the catalytic Asp11 is evident. It has been unclear how substrate enters the active site of this and related enzymes. The results of normal mode analysis (NMA) are presented and suggest a means whereby the predicted global dynamics of the enzyme allow for entry of the substrate into the active site. In the context of these results, the possible role of Arg42 and Asn178 in a "lock down" mechanism affecting active site access is discussed. In silico substrate docking of enantiomeric substrates has been examined in order to evaluate the enzymes enantioselectivity.

  14. The Type IVa Pilus Machinery Is Recruited to Sites of Future Cell Division.

    PubMed

    Carter, Tyson; Buensuceso, Ryan N C; Tammam, Stephanie; Lamers, Ryan P; Harvey, Hanjeong; Howell, P Lynne; Burrows, Lori L

    2017-01-31

    Type IVa pili (T4aP) are ubiquitous microbial appendages used for adherence, twitching motility, DNA uptake, and electron transfer. Many of these functions depend on dynamic assembly and disassembly of the pilus by a megadalton-sized, cell envelope-spanning protein complex located at the poles of rod-shaped bacteria. How the T4aP assembly complex becomes integrated into the cell envelope in the absence of dedicated peptidoglycan (PG) hydrolases is unknown. After ruling out the potential involvement of housekeeping PG hydrolases in the installation of the T4aP machinery in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, we discovered that key components of inner (PilMNOP) and outer (PilQ) membrane subcomplexes are recruited to future sites of cell division. Midcell recruitment of a fluorescently tagged alignment subcomplex component, mCherry-PilO, depended on PilQ secretin monomers-specifically, their N-terminal PG-binding AMIN domains. PilP, which connects PilO to PilQ, was required for recruitment, while PilM, which is structurally similar to divisome component FtsA, was not. Recruitment preceded secretin oligomerization in the outer membrane, as loss of the PilQ pilotin PilF had no effect on localization. These results were confirmed in cells chemically blocked for cell division prior to outer membrane invagination. The hub protein FimV and a component of the polar organelle coordinator complex-PocA-were independently required for midcell recruitment of PilO and PilQ. Together, these data suggest an integrated, energy-efficient strategy for the targeting and preinstallation-rather than retrofitting-of the T4aP system into nascent poles, without the need for dedicated PG-remodeling enzymes.

  15. Corrections of diverse forms of lower limb deformities in patients with mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA (Morquio syndrome)

    PubMed Central

    Al Kaissi, Ali; Kenis, Vladimir; Melchenko, Eugeniy; Ghachem, Maher Ben; Csepan, Robert; Grill, Franz; Ganger, Rudolf

    2016-01-01

    Background: Thoracolumbar kyphosis has been considered as the first presenting deformity and is often a key diagnostic clue noted in children with mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) type IV (Morquio's syndrome). However, we observed that the progressive irregularities of the epiphyses of the long bones were the most prominent skeletal pathology, causing effectively the development of diverse forms of lower limbs deformities with extreme variation in age of onset. Materials and Methods: Ten patients (seven children and three adults) with an average age of 15 years have been enrolled in this study. Age of diagnosis of MPS IVA has a variable age of onset and a MISLEADING rate of severity. Hip dislocations, genu valgum, protrusio acetabuli and osteoarthritis were the most common lower limbs deformities in these patients. Clinical and radiographic phenotypes were the baseline tools of documentation. Urinary screening and genotypic characterizations have been applied accordingly. Results: Combined pelvic and femoral procedures for hip dislocation, epiphysiodeses and supracondylar osteotomy for genu valgum and hip arthroplasty for protrusio acetabuli have been performed. All patients manifested insufficient activity of N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulphate sulphatase, an enzyme that degrades keratin sulphate and chondroitin-6 sulphate. Conclusion: The extensive clinical heterogeneity contributed significantly in the delay in establishing the diagnosis particularly in adult patients with MPS IV. The epiphyseal irregularities of the long bones and the progressive flattening pathology of MPS IV A were the reason to falsely diagnose some patients as spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenital and/or tarda. Proximal femoral osteotomy, realignment osteotomy and total hip arthroplasty have been performed for coxa vara, genu valgum and protrusio acetabuli, respectively, in children and adult group of patients. The importance of early diagnosis on MPS IV A is to receive enzyme replacement therapy

  16. The Type IVa Pilus Machinery Is Recruited to Sites of Future Cell Division

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Tyson; Buensuceso, Ryan N. C.; Tammam, Stephanie; Lamers, Ryan P.; Harvey, Hanjeong

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Type IVa pili (T4aP) are ubiquitous microbial appendages used for adherence, twitching motility, DNA uptake, and electron transfer. Many of these functions depend on dynamic assembly and disassembly of the pilus by a megadalton-sized, cell envelope-spanning protein complex located at the poles of rod-shaped bacteria. How the T4aP assembly complex becomes integrated into the cell envelope in the absence of dedicated peptidoglycan (PG) hydrolases is unknown. After ruling out the potential involvement of housekeeping PG hydrolases in the installation of the T4aP machinery in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, we discovered that key components of inner (PilMNOP) and outer (PilQ) membrane subcomplexes are recruited to future sites of cell division. Midcell recruitment of a fluorescently tagged alignment subcomplex component, mCherry-PilO, depended on PilQ secretin monomers—specifically, their N-terminal PG-binding AMIN domains. PilP, which connects PilO to PilQ, was required for recruitment, while PilM, which is structurally similar to divisome component FtsA, was not. Recruitment preceded secretin oligomerization in the outer membrane, as loss of the PilQ pilotin PilF had no effect on localization. These results were confirmed in cells chemically blocked for cell division prior to outer membrane invagination. The hub protein FimV and a component of the polar organelle coordinator complex—PocA—were independently required for midcell recruitment of PilO and PilQ. Together, these data suggest an integrated, energy-efficient strategy for the targeting and preinstallation—rather than retrofitting—of the T4aP system into nascent poles, without the need for dedicated PG-remodeling enzymes. PMID:28143978

  17. Acute and chronic toxicological studies of Ajuga iva in experimental animals.

    PubMed

    El Hilaly, Jaouad; Israili, Zafar H; Lyoussi, Badiâa

    2004-03-01

    Ajuga iva (L.) Schreber (AI), is widely used in the Moroccan pharmacopoeia as a panacea (cure-all), and specifically for gastrointestinal disorders and diabetes, and as an anthelmintic. No toxicological investigations have been carried out on this plant. We have previously observed that single oral doses (2-14 g/kg) of a lyophilised aqueous extract of AI (AI-extract) in mice or daily oral administration of 10 mg/kg of AI-extract in rats for 2 weeks did not result in any adverse effects. We have now evaluated AI-extract for its behavioural and pharmaco-toxicological effects after acute and chronic administration by the oral and intraperitoneal routes in rats and mice. No toxicity was observed in mice after single oral doses of as high as 14 g/kg of the AI-extract. However, single intraperitoneal injections of the AI-extract (1500-5500 mg/kg BW) produced a dose-dependent increase in adverse effects in the general behaviour and the mortality rate; the LD50 of acute intraperitoneal dose was 3.6 g/kg. In chronic toxicological studies in rats, the AI-extract (administered orally at daily doses of 100, 300 and 600 mg/kg for 3 months), did not cause any changes in haematological and biochemical parameters, with the exception of a transient rise in platelet counts and a short-term decrease in serum glucose levels. Histopathological examination of the brain, liver and the kidneys at the end of the study (3 months) showed normal architecture suggesting no morphological disturbances.

  18. The NASA broad-specification fuels combustion technology program: An assessment of phase 1 test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fear, J. S.

    1983-01-01

    An assessment is made of the results of Phase 1 screening testing of current and advanced combustion system concepts using several broadened-properties fuels. The severity of each of several fuels-properties effects on combustor performance or liner life is discussed, as well as design techniques with the potential to offset these adverse effects. The selection of concepts to be pursued in Phase 2 refinement testing is described. This selection takes into account the relative costs and complexities of the concepts, the current outlook on pollutant emissions control, and practical operational problems.

  19. Cetuximab, Cisplatin, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage IB, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-29

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  20. Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy Followed by Paclitaxel and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Stage IB-IVA Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-16

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  1. Surrogate/spent fuel sabotage aerosol ratio testing:phase 1 summary and results.

    SciTech Connect

    Vigil, Manuel Gilbert; Sorenson, Ken Bryce; Lange, F. , Germany); Nolte, O. (Fraunhofer Institut fur Toxikologie und Experimentelle Medizin, Germany); Koch, W. (Fraunhofer Institut fur Toxikologie und Experimentelle Medizin, Germany); Dickey, Roy R.; Yoshimura, Richard Hiroyuki; Molecke, Martin Alan; Autrusson, Bruno (Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire , France); Young, F. I.; Pretzsch, Gunter Guido (Gesellschaft fur Anlagen- und reaktorsicherheit , Germany)

    2005-10-01

    This multinational test program is quantifying the aerosol particulates produced when a high energy density device (HEDD) impacts surrogate material and actual spent fuel test rodlets. The experimental work, performed in four consecutive test phases, has been in progress for several years. The overall program provides needed data that are relevant to some sabotage scenarios in relation to spent fuel transport and storage casks, and associated risk assessments. This program also provides significant political benefits in international cooperation for nuclear security related evaluations. The spent fuel sabotage--aerosol test program is coordinated with the international Working Group for Sabotage Concerns of Transport and Storage Casks (WGSTSC), and supported by both the U.S. Department of Energy and Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This report summarizes the preliminary, Phase 1 work performed in 2001 and 2002 at Sandia National Laboratories and the Fraunhofer Institute, Germany, and documents the experimental results obtained, observations, and preliminary interpretations. Phase 1 testing included: performance quantifications of the HEDD devices; characterization of the HEDD or conical shaped charge (CSC) jet properties with multiple tests; refinement of the aerosol particle collection apparatus being used; and, CSC jet-aerosol tests using leaded glass plates and glass pellets, serving as representative brittle materials. Phase 1 testing was quite important for the design and performance of the following Phase 2 test program and test apparatus.

  2. Impact of the volume of gaseous phase in closed reactors on ANC results and modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drapeau, Clémentine; Delolme, Cécile; Lassabatere, Laurent; Blanc, Denise

    2016-04-01

    The understanding of the geochemical behavior of polluted solid materials is often challenging and requires huge expenses of time and money. Nevertheless, given the increasing amounts of polluted solid materials and related risks for the environment, it is more and more crucial to understand the leaching of majors and trace metals elements from these matrices. In the designs of methods to quantify pollutant solubilization, the combination of experimental procedures with modeling approaches has recently gained attention. Among usual methods, some rely on the association of ANC and geochemical modeling. ANC experiments - Acid Neutralization Capacity - consists in adding known quantities of acid or base to a mixture of water and contaminated solid materials at a given liquid / solid ratio in closed reactors. Reactors are agitated for 48h and then pH, conductivity, redox potential, carbon, majors and heavy metal solubilized are quantified. However, in most cases, the amounts of matrix and water do not reach the total volume of reactors, leaving some space for air (gaseous phase). Despite this fact, no clear indication is given in standard procedures about the effect of this gaseous phase. Even worse, the gaseous phase is never accounted for when exploiting or modeling ANC data. The gaseous phase may exchange CO2 with the solution, which may, in turn, impact both pH and element release. This study lies within the most general framework for the use of geochemical modeling for the prediction of ANC results for the case of pure phases to real phase assemblages. In this study, we focus on the effect of the gaseous phase on ANC experiments on different mineral phases through geochemical modeling. To do so, we use PHREEQC code to model the evolution of pH and element release (including majors and heavy metals) when several matrices are put in contact with acid or base. We model the following scenarios for the gaseous phase: no gas, contact with the atmosphere (open system

  3. Development of a fluorometric microtiter plate based enzyme assay for MPS IVA (Morquio type A) using dried blood spots.

    PubMed

    Ullal, Anirudh J; Millington, David S; Bali, Deeksha S

    2014-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA or Morquio type-A disease is a hereditary lysosomal storage disorder caused by deficient activity of the lysosomal enzyme N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase (GALNS). The disease is caused by lysosomal accumulation of unprocessed glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) that manifests with severe to mild skeletal and cardiopulmonary abnormalities. We have developed a modified microtiter plate-based enzyme activity assay using dried blood spots and a fluorescent substrate for measuring specific GALNS activity to identify patients with MPS IVA.

  4. Triapine With Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With IB2-IVA Cervical or Vulvar Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Stage IB Vulvar Cancer; Stage IB2 Cervical Cancer; Stage II Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIA1 Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA2 Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIC Vulvar Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Vulvar Cancer; Vulvar Adenocarcinoma; Vulvar Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  5. Targeted genetic inactivation of N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase-IVa impairs insulin secretion from pancreatic beta cells and evokes type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ohtsubo, Kazuaki

    2010-01-01

    The biological significance of protein N-glycosylation has been elucidated using a mouse model bearing a genetic mutation of N-acetylglucosaminyltransferases (GnTs), which initiate the formation of specific branch structures on the mannose core of N-glycans. These glycosylation defects evoked a variety of abnormalities and disorders in specific cell types, tissues, and the whole body, reflecting functional requirements. N-Acetylglucosaminyltransferase-IVa (GnT-IVa) initiates the GlcNAcbeta1-4 branch synthesis on the Manalpha1-3 arm of the N-glycan core thereby increasing N-glycan branch complexity. To investigate the physiological function of GnT-IVa, we engineered and characterized GnT-IVa-deficient mice. GnT-IVa-deficient mice showed a metabolic disorder subsequently diagnosed as type 2 diabetes. In this chapter, methods for characterizing GnT-IVa-deficient mice by physiological analyses to detect metabolic alterations and biochemical analyses using primary isolated pancreatic beta cells are summarized and discussed.

  6. INL Results for Phases I and III of the OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 Benchmark

    SciTech Connect

    Gerhard Strydom; Javier Ortensi; Sonat Sen; Hans Hammer

    2013-09-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Technology Development Office (TDO) Methods Core Simulation group led the construction of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Modular High Temperature Reactor (MHTGR) 350 MW benchmark for comparing and evaluating prismatic VHTR analysis codes. The benchmark is sponsored by the OECD's Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), and the project will yield a set of reference steady-state, transient, and lattice depletion problems that can be used by the Department of Energy (DOE), the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and vendors to assess their code suits. The Methods group is responsible for defining the benchmark specifications, leading the data collection and comparison activities, and chairing the annual technical workshops. This report summarizes the latest INL results for Phase I (steady state) and Phase III (lattice depletion) of the benchmark. The INSTANT, Pronghorn and RattleSnake codes were used for the standalone core neutronics modeling of Exercise 1, and the results obtained from these codes are compared in Section 4. Exercise 2 of Phase I requires the standalone steady-state thermal fluids modeling of the MHTGR-350 design, and the results for the systems code RELAP5-3D are discussed in Section 5. The coupled neutronics and thermal fluids steady-state solution for Exercise 3 are reported in Section 6, utilizing the newly developed Parallel and Highly Innovative Simulation for INL Code System (PHISICS)/RELAP5-3D code suit. Finally, the lattice depletion models and results obtained for Phase III are compared in Section 7. The MHTGR-350 benchmark proved to be a challenging simulation set of problems to model accurately, and even with the simplifications introduced in the benchmark specification this activity is an important step in the code-to-code verification of modern prismatic VHTR codes. A final OECD/NEA comparison report will compare the Phase I and III results

  7. Shock-thermal history of Kavarpura IVA iron: Evidences from microtextures and nickel profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Dwijesh; Ghosh, S.; Murty, S. V. S.

    2015-11-01

    We classify Kavarpura iron (fell in August, 2006, in Rajasthan, India), an inclusion-free member of high-Ni IVA group. Widmanstätten pattern and finger-cellular plessites textures characteristic of IVA group are present in Kavarpura. Symmetric and asymmetric textural zoning within the cloudy taenite and plessite refer to long term martensitisation process with mean metallographic cooling rate of 200 °C/Ma. Imprints of variable shock pressure domains (Neumann bands and shock hatched ε kamacite) suggest alteration by up to 600 kb shock pressure. Degeneration of cellular plessites, bending of finger plessites and plastic flowage of taenites bear textural evidences corresponding to post-shock annealing which is further confirmed by Ni profiles across the cloudy taenites and plessites under high shock pressure domains. Based on microtextural evidences and Ni profiling, we suggest Kavarpura had cooled at steady state and subsequently suffered multiple impacts.

  8. Molecular testing of 163 patients with Morquio A (Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA) identifies 39 novel GALNS mutations.

    PubMed

    Morrone, A; Tylee, K L; Al-Sayed, M; Brusius-Facchin, A C; Caciotti, A; Church, H J; Coll, M J; Davidson, K; Fietz, M J; Gort, L; Hegde, M; Kubaski, F; Lacerda, L; Laranjeira, F; Leistner-Segal, S; Mooney, S; Pajares, S; Pollard, L; Ribeiro, I; Wang, R Y; Miller, N

    2014-06-01

    Morquio A (Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA; MPS IVA) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder caused by partial or total deficiency of the enzyme galactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase (GALNS; also known as N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase) encoded by the GALNS gene. Patients who inherit two mutated GALNS gene alleles have a decreased ability to degrade the glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) keratan sulfate and chondroitin 6-sulfate, thereby causing GAG accumulation within lysosomes and consequently pleiotropic disease. GALNS mutations occur throughout the gene and many mutations are identified only in single patients or families, causing difficulties both in mutation detection and interpretation. In this study, molecular analysis of 163 patients with Morquio A identified 99 unique mutations in the GALNS gene believed to negatively impact GALNS protein function, of which 39 are previously unpublished, together with 26 single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Recommendations for the molecular testing of patients, clear reporting of sequence findings, and interpretation of sequencing data are provided.

  9. Space Station Freedom airlock - The integration of IVA and EVA capabilities in an orbital element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Thomas O., Jr.; Matthews, Anthony P.

    1992-07-01

    In order to meet mission goals, the Space Station Freedom (SSF) airlock must maximize crew efficiency while supporting a range of extravehicular activity (EVA) and intravehicular activity (IVA) operations. EVA will be a frequently planned occurrence on SSF. In order to maximize the usefulness of the limited EVA resource, overhead times must be minimized. This paper discusses how the SSF airlock outfitting design responds to both IVA and EVA requirements. An overview of the SSF airlock and the missions it must accomplish are also provided. The focus of this paper is on how the outfitting and man systems designs provide solutions to multiple requirements, explicitly stated as well as derived requirements. The Space Station airlock is evaluated as an integrated system in the functional assessments of the EVA task, and this paper explains how station common hardware and systems are adapted to the unique airlock environment.

  10. Five novel mutations of GALNS in Korean patients with mucopolysaccharidosis IVA.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyung-Doo; Ko, Ah-Ra; Ki, Chang-Seok; Lee, Soo-Youn; Kim, Jong-Won; Cho, Sung Yoon; Kim, Se Hwa; Park, Sung Won; Sohn, Young Bae; Jin, Dong-Kyu

    2013-03-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA (MPS IVA; OMIM #253000) is caused by the deficiency of N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase (GALNS), a lysosomal enzyme involved in the catabolism of keratan and chondroitin sulfate. In this study, we examined biochemical and genetic data from 6 Korean patients presenting with classic MPS IVA by measuring GALNS activity in peripheral blood leukocytes and skin fibroblasts. We initially identified Korean patients with MPS IVA by clinical, biochemical, and genetic analyses. We performed PCR-direct sequencing to identify molecular defects of the GALNS gene in patients and assessed the mutational statuses of family members as well as 50 healthy unrelated subjects. In silico analyses were performed to check for novel mutations. The mean age of the six female patients was 8.0 ± 5.2 years (range: 2-17 years), and were all found to have severe reductions of GALNS enzyme. A total of 12 mutant alleles were identified, corresponding to 7 different mutations. Five novel mutations were c.218A>G (p.Y73C), c.451C>A (p.P151T), c.725C>G (p.S242C), c.752G>A (p.R251Q), and c.1000C>T (p.Q334X). Two other mutations were c.1156C>T (p.R386C) and c.1243-1G>A. Two mutations, c.451C>A and c.1000C>T, accounted for 58% of all mutations in this sample.

  11. Mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA: evidence of primary and secondary central nervous system involvement.

    PubMed

    Borlot, Felippe; Arantes, Paula Ricci; Quaio, Caio Robledo; Franco, José Francisco da Silva; Lourenço, Charles Marques; Gomy, Israel; Bertola, Debora Romeo; Kim, Chong Ae

    2014-05-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA is a rare lysosomal storage disease caused by a deficiency of N-acetylgalactosamine 6-sulfatase. Studies usually focus on skeletal abnormalities and their consequences. This study explores the neurological manifestations in a cohort of mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA patients, with a detailed focus on brain and spinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. We performed a cross-sectional study involving nine patients with a biochemical confirmation of mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA. The protocol consists of a comprehensive clinical examination and brain and spinal cord MRI analysis for all subjects. The mean age was 16.4 years (±5.7) and the mean onset of symptoms was 11.5 months (±6.3). Overall, cognition was spared in all but one patient and motor weakness was a constant finding in all patients. Deep sensation impairment was found in six patients. The brain MRIs showed non-specific white matter changes in two patients. Other abnormalities such as clival hypoplasia, basilar invagination, and arachnoid cists appeared in seven of the nine patients. Eight patients presented spinal cord compression, and in three of them, two spinal levels were compromised. Odontoid hypoplasia and degenerative features in the neuroaxis were present in all patients. Our experience with mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA patients supports the evidence of central nervous system involvement. We emphasize the importance of regular clinical assessments with complete MRI studies, as an attempt to detect the early signs of spinal cord compression. This evaluation may be especially important before surgical interventions, as occult lesions may become symptomatic and promote postoperative unfavorable outcomes.

  12. Tests of the Daimler D-IVa Engine at a High Altitude Test Bench

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noack, W G

    1920-01-01

    Reports of tests of a Daimler IVa engine at the test-bench at Friedrichshafen, show that the decrease of power of that engine, at high altitudes, was established, and that the manner of its working when air is supplied at a certain pressure was explained. These tests were preparatory to the installation of compressors in giant aircraft for the purpose of maintaining constant power at high altitudes.

  13. Thermal histories of IVA iron meteorites from transmission electron microscopy of the cloudy zone microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, J. I.; Yang, J.; Kotula, P. G.; Michael, J. R.; Scott, E. R. D.

    2009-04-01

    We have measured the size of the high-Ni particles in the cloudy zone and the width of the outer taenite rim in eight low shocked and eight moderately to heavily shocked IVA irons using a transmission electron microscope (TEM). Thin sections for TEM analysis were produced by a focused ion beam instrument. Use of the TEM allowed us to avoid potential artifacts which may be introduced during specimen preparation for SEM analysis of high Ni particles <30 nm in size and to identify microchemical and microstructural changes due to the effects of shock induced reheating. No cloudy zone was observed in five of the eight moderately to highly shocked <13 GPa) IVA irons that were examined in the TEM. Shock induced reheating has allowed for diffusion from 20 nm to 400 nm across kamacite/taenite boundaries, recrystallization of kamacite, and the formation, in Jamestown, of taenite grain boundaries. In the eleven IVA irons with cloudy zone microstructures, the size of the high-Ni particles in the cloudy zone increases directly with increasing bulk Ni content. Our data and the inverse correlation between cooling rate and high-Ni particle size for irons and stony-irons show that IVA cooling rates at 350-200 deg. C are inversely correlated with bulk Ni concentration and vary by a factor of about 15. This cooling rate variation is incompatible with cooling in a metallic core that was insulated with a silicate mantle, but is compatible with cooling in a metallic body of radius 150 +/- 50 km. The widths of the tetrataenite regions next to the cloudy zone correlate directly with high-Ni particle size providing another method to measure low temperature cooling rates.

  14. Aib and iva in the biosphere: neither rare nor necessarily extraterrestrial.

    PubMed

    Brückner, Hans; Becker, Dieter; Gams, Walter; Degenkolb, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Fourty-nine species and strains of filamentous fungi of the genera Acremonium, Bionectria, Clonostachys, Emericellopsis, Hypocrea/Trichoderma, Lecythophora, Monocillium, Nectriopsis, Niesslia, Tolypocladium, and Wardomyces, deposited with the culture collection of the Centraalbureau voor Schimmelcultures (CBS) in Utrecht, The Netherlands, were grown on nutrient agar plates. Organic extracts of mycelia were analyzed after acidic total hydrolysis and derivatization by GC/SIM-MS on Chirasil-L-Val for the presence of Aib (=alpha-aminoisobutyric acid, 2-methylalanine) and DL-Iva (=isovaline, 2-ethylalanine). In 37 of the hydrolysates, Aib was detected, and in several of them D-Iva or mixtures of D- and L-Iva. Non-proteinogenic Aib, in particular, is a highly specific marker for a distinctive group of fungal polypeptides named peptaibols or, comprehensively, peptaibiotics, i.e., peptides containing Aib and displaying (anti)biotic activities. The biotic synthesis of these amino acids by filamentous fungi contradicts the still widespread belief that alpha,alpha-dialkyl-alpha-amino acids do not or rarely occur in the biosphere and, if detected, are of extraterrestrial origin. The abundant production of peptaibiotics by cosmopolitan species of microfungi has also to be considered in the discussion on the occurrence of Aib and Iva in ancient and recent sediments. The detection of trace amounts of Aib in ice samples of Antarctica that are devoid of meteorites might also be related to the presence of Aib-producing microorganisms, being either indigenous psychrophiles, or being transported and localized by mechanisms related to bioaerosols and cryoconites. The presence of microfungi being capable of producing alpha,alpha-dialkyl alpha-amino acids in terrestrial samples, and possible contamination of extraterrestrial materials are pointed out to be of relevance for the reliable interpretation of cosmogeochemical data.

  15. Preliminary results of the large experimental wind turbine phase of the national wind energy program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. L.; Sholes, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    A major phase of the wind energy program is the development of reliable wind turbines for supplying cost-competitive electrical energy. This paper discusses the preliminary results of two projects in this phase of the program. First an experimental 100 kW wind turbine design and its status are reviewed. Also discussed are the results of two parallel design studies for determining the configurations and power levels for wind turbines with minimum energy costs. These studies show wind energy costs of 7 to 1.5 c/kWH for wind turbines produced in quantities of 100 to 1000 a year and located at sites having average winds of 12 to 18 mph.

  16. Tanker Avionics/Aircrew Complement Evaluation (TAACE). Phase 0. Analysis and Mockup. Volume I. Results.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-01

    AIRCREW COMPLEMENT EVALUATION (TAACE) PHASE 0 - ANALYSIS AND MOCKUP C) VOLUME I: RESULTS !x The Bunker Ramo Corporation - Electronic Systems Division...data, is not to be re- garded by implication or otherwise as in any manner licensing the holder or any other person or corporation , or conveying any...adro Iftj William Ret randt - A./Sexton ( 10. PROGRAM ELEMENT.P E T. TASK Bunker Ramo, Corporation 4130 Linden Ave. 112 Dayton, Ohio 45432

  17. Structure of the type IVa major pilin from the electrically conductive bacterial nanowires of Geobacter sulfurreducens.

    PubMed

    Reardon, Patrick N; Mueller, Karl T

    2013-10-11

    Several species of δ proteobacteria are capable of reducing insoluble metal oxides as well as other extracellular electron acceptors. These bacteria play a critical role in the cycling of minerals in subsurface environments, sediments, and groundwater. In some species of bacteria such as Geobacter sulfurreducens, the transport of electrons is proposed to be facilitated by filamentous fibers that are referred to as bacterial nanowires. These nanowires are polymeric assemblies of proteins belonging to the type IVa family of pilin proteins and are mainly comprised of one subunit protein, PilA. Here, we report the high resolution solution NMR structure of the PilA protein from G. sulfurreducens determined in detergent micelles. The protein is >85% α-helical and exhibits similar architecture to the N-terminal regions of other non-conductive type IVa pilins. The detergent micelle interacts with the first 21 amino acids of the protein, indicating that this region likely associates with the bacterial inner membrane prior to fiber formation. A model of the G. sulfurreducens pilus fiber is proposed based on docking of this structure into the fiber model of the type IVa pilin from Neisseria gonorrhoeae. This model provides insight into the organization of aromatic amino acids that are important for electrical conduction.

  18. IVA cloning: A single-tube universal cloning system exploiting bacterial In Vivo Assembly.

    PubMed

    García-Nafría, Javier; Watson, Jake F; Greger, Ingo H

    2016-06-06

    In vivo homologous recombination holds the potential for optimal molecular cloning, however, current strategies require specialised bacterial strains or laborious protocols. Here, we exploit a recA-independent recombination pathway, present in widespread laboratory E.coli strains, to develop IVA (In Vivo Assembly) cloning. This system eliminates the need for enzymatic assembly and reduces all molecular cloning procedures to a single-tube, single-step PCR, performed in <2 hours from setup to transformation. Unlike other methods, IVA is a complete system, and offers significant advantages over alternative methods for all cloning procedures (insertions, deletions, site-directed mutagenesis and sub-cloning). Significantly, IVA allows unprecedented simplification of complex cloning procedures: five simultaneous modifications of any kind, multi-fragment assembly and library construction are performed in approximately half the time of current protocols, still in a single-step fashion. This system is efficient, seamless and sequence-independent, and requires no special kits, enzymes or proprietary bacteria, which will allow its immediate adoption by the academic and industrial molecular biology community.

  19. IVA cloning: A single-tube universal cloning system exploiting bacterial In Vivo Assembly

    PubMed Central

    García-Nafría, Javier; Watson, Jake F.; Greger, Ingo H.

    2016-01-01

    In vivo homologous recombination holds the potential for optimal molecular cloning, however, current strategies require specialised bacterial strains or laborious protocols. Here, we exploit a recA-independent recombination pathway, present in widespread laboratory E.coli strains, to develop IVA (In Vivo Assembly) cloning. This system eliminates the need for enzymatic assembly and reduces all molecular cloning procedures to a single-tube, single-step PCR, performed in <2 hours from setup to transformation. Unlike other methods, IVA is a complete system, and offers significant advantages over alternative methods for all cloning procedures (insertions, deletions, site-directed mutagenesis and sub-cloning). Significantly, IVA allows unprecedented simplification of complex cloning procedures: five simultaneous modifications of any kind, multi-fragment assembly and library construction are performed in approximately half the time of current protocols, still in a single-step fashion. This system is efficient, seamless and sequence-independent, and requires no special kits, enzymes or proprietary bacteria, which will allow its immediate adoption by the academic and industrial molecular biology community. PMID:27264908

  20. Structure of the Type IVa Major Pilin from the Electrically Conductive Bacterial Nanowires of Geobacter sulfurreducens

    SciTech Connect

    Reardon, Patrick N.; Mueller, Karl T.

    2013-10-11

    Several species of bacteria are capable of reducing insoluble metal oxides as well as other extracellular electron acceptors. These bacteria play a critical role in the cycling of minerals in subsurface environments, sediments, and groundwater. In some species of bacteria, such as Geobacter sulfurreducens, the transport of electrons is facilitated by filamentous fibers that are referred to as bacterial nanowires. These nanowires belong to the type IVa family of pilin proteins and are mainly comprised of one subunit protein, PilA. Here, we report the high resolution solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structure of the PilA protein from G. sulfurreducens determined in detergent micelles. The protein is over 85% α-helical and exhibits similar architecture to the N-terminal regions of other non-conductive type IVa pilins. The detergent micelle interacts with the first 21 amino acids of the protein, indicating that this region likely associates with the bacterial inner membrane prior to fiber formation. A model of the G. sulfurreducens pilus fiber is proposed based on docking of this structure into the fiber model of the type IVa pilin from Neisseria gonorrhoeae. This model provides insight into the organization of aromatic amino acids that are important for electrical conduction.

  1. Cage occupancy and structural changes during hydrate formation from initial stages to resulting hydrate phase.

    PubMed

    Schicks, Judith M; Luzi-Helbing, Manja

    2013-11-01

    Hydrate formation processes and kinetics are still not sufficiently understood on a molecular level based on experimental data. In particular, the cavity formation and occupancy during the initial formation and growth processes of mixed gas hydrates are rarely investigated. In this study, we present the results of our time-depending Raman spectroscopic measurements during the formation of hydrates from ice and gases or gas mixtures such as CH4, CH4-CO2, CH4-H2S, CH4-C3H8, CH4-iso-C4H10, and CH4-neo-C5H12 at constant pressure and temperature conditions and constant composition of the feed gas phase. All investigated systems in this study show the incorporation of CH4 into the 5(12) cavities as first step in the initial stages of hydrate formation. Furthermore, the results imply that the initial hydrate phases differ from the resulting hydrate phase having reached a steady state regarding the occupancy and ratio of the small and large cavities of the hydrate.

  2. 45 CFR 233.145 - Expiration of medical assistance programs under titles I, IV-A, X, XIV and XVI of the Social...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... titles I, IV-A, X, XIV and XVI of the Social Security Act. 233.145 Section 233.145 Public Welfare... FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS § 233.145 Expiration of medical assistance programs under titles I, IV-A, X..., enacted July 30, 1965, no payment may be made to any State under title I, IV-A, X, XIV or XVI of...

  3. 45 CFR 233.145 - Expiration of medical assistance programs under titles I, IV-A, X, XIV and XVI of the Social...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... titles I, IV-A, X, XIV and XVI of the Social Security Act. 233.145 Section 233.145 Public Welfare... FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS § 233.145 Expiration of medical assistance programs under titles I, IV-A, X..., enacted July 30, 1965, no payment may be made to any State under title I, IV-A, X, XIV or XVI of...

  4. 45 CFR 233.145 - Expiration of medical assistance programs under titles I, IV-A, X, XIV and XVI of the Social...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... titles I, IV-A, X, XIV and XVI of the Social Security Act. 233.145 Section 233.145 Public Welfare... FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS § 233.145 Expiration of medical assistance programs under titles I, IV-A, X..., enacted July 30, 1965, no payment may be made to any State under title I, IV-A, X, XIV or XVI of...

  5. Water quality monitoring of Sweetwater and Loveland reservoirs--Phase one results 1998-1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Majewski, Michael S.; Sidhu, Jagdeep S.; Mendez, Gregory O.

    2002-01-01

    In 1998, the U.S. Geological Survey began a study to assess the overall health of the watershed feeding the Sweetwater Reservoir in southern San Diego County, California. The study focussed on monitoring for organic chemical contamination and the effects of construction and operation of State Route 125 on water quality. Three environmental compartments (air, water, and bed sediments) are being sampled regularly for chemical contaminants, including volatile organic compounds, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, pesticides, and major and trace elements. The study is divided into two phases. Phase I sampling is designed to establish baseline conditions for target compounds in terms of detection frequency and concentration in air, water, and bed sediments. Phase II sampling will continue at the established monitoring sites during and after construction of State Route 125 to assess chemical impact on water quality in the reservoir resulting from land-use changes and development in the watershed. This report describes the study design, the sampling and analytical methods, and presents the data results for the first year of the study, September 1998 to September 1999.

  6. Preliminary results of the large experimental wind turbine phase of the national wind energy program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. L.; Sholes, T.; Sholes, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    The preliminary results of two projects in the development phase of reliable wind turbines designed to supply cost-competitive electrical energy were discussed. An experimental 100 kW wind turbine design and its status are first reviewed. The results of two parallel design studies for determining the configurations and power levels for wind turbines with minimum energy costs are also discussed. These studies predict wind energy costs of 1.5 to 7 cents per kW-h for wind turbines produced in quantities of 100 to 1000 per year and located at sites having average winds of 12 to 18 mph.

  7. MD-2 Residues Tyrosine 42, Arginine 69, Aspartic Acid 122, and Leucine 125 Provide Species Specificity for Lipid IVA*

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Jianmin; Drolet, Joshua R.; Monks, Brian G.; Golenbock, Douglas T.

    2010-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) activates the innate immune response through the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)·MD-2 complex. A synthetic lipid A precursor, lipid IVA, induces an innate immune response in mice but not in humans. Both TLR4 and MD-2 are required for the agonist activity of lipid IVA in mice, with TLR4 interacting through specific surface charges at the dimerization interface. In this study, we used site-directed mutagenesis to identify the MD-2 residues that determine lipid IVA species specificity. A single mutation of murine MD-2 at the hydrophobic pocket entrance, E122K, substantially reduced the response to lipid IVA. Combining the murine MD-2 E122K with the murine TLR4 K367E/S386K/R434Q mutations completely abolished the response to lipid IVA, effectively converting the murine cellular response to a human-like response. In human cells, however, simultaneous mutations of K122E, K125L, Y41F, and R69G on human MD-2 were required to promote a response to lipid IVA. Combining the human MD-2 quadruple mutations with the human TLR4 E369K/Q436R mutations completely converted the human MD-2/human TLR4 receptor to a murine-like receptor. Because MD-2 residues 122 and 125 reside at the dimerization interface near the pocket entrance, surface charge differences here directly affect receptor dimerization. In comparison, residues 42 and 69 reside at the MD-2/TLR4 interaction surface opposite the dimerization interface. Surface charge differences there likely affect the binding angle and/or rigidity between MD-2 and TLR4, exerting an indirect influence on receptor dimerization and activation. Thus, surface charge differences at the two MD-2/TLR4 interfaces determine the species-specific activation of lipid IVA. PMID:20592019

  8. Bevacizumab, Oxaliplatin, and Capecitabine With Radiation Therapy in Rectal Cancer: Phase I Trial Results

    SciTech Connect

    Czito, Brian G. . E-mail: czito001@mc.duke.edu; Bendell, Johanna C.; Willett, Christopher G.; Morse, Michael A.; Blobe, Gerard C.; Tyler, Douglas S.; Thomas, John; Ludwig, Kirk A.; Mantyh, Christopher R.; Ashton, Jill; Yu Daohai; Hurwitz, Herbert I.

    2007-06-01

    Purpose: The overexpression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is associated with poor outcomes in colorectal cancer patients. Bevacizumab, a VEGF inhibitor, enhances the effects of chemotherapy and radiation therapy on tumor cytotoxicity in preclinical models, including colorectal cancer. A Phase I trial was undertaken to evaluate the combination of bevacizumab, capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and radiation therapy in patients with rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with pathologically confirmed adenocarcinoma of the rectum were eligible. Pretreatment staging included computerized tomography, endoscopic ultrasound, and surgical evaluation. Patients received 50.4 Gy of external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) to the tumor in 28 fractions. Capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and bevacizumab were administered concurrently with radiation therapy. After EBRT completion, patients were restaged and evaluated for surgery. Primary endpoints included the determination of dose-limiting toxicity and a recommended Phase II dose, non dose-limiting toxicity, and preliminary radiographic and pathologic response rates. Results: Eleven patients were enrolled. All were evaluable for toxicity and efficacy. Dose level 2 was associated with unacceptable toxicity (primarily diarrhea). Dose level 1 had an acceptable toxicity profile. The recommended Phase II dose in our study was bevacizumab 15 mg/kg Day 1 + 10 mg/kg Days 8 and 22, oxaliplatin 50 mg/m{sup 2} weekly, and capecitabine 625 mg/m{sup 2} bid during radiation days. Six patients had clinical responses. Two patients had a pathologic complete response, and 3 had microscopic disease only. One patient experienced a postoperative abscess, one a syncopal episode during adjuvant chemotherapy, and one a subclinical myocardial infarction during adjuvant chemotherapy. Conclusions: The combination of bevacizumab, capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and radiation therapy in rectal cancer was tolerable, with encouraging response rates. Further

  9. Development of Magnetic Materials Based on the Ordered Fe50Ni50 Phase: Methodologies and Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poirier, Eric; Tessema, Misle M.; Meyer, Martin S.; Pinkerton, Frederick E.

    2013-03-01

    The L10 FeNi structure known as tetrataenite, usually found in meteorites, is reported to possess significant magnetocrystalline anisotropy suitable for hard magnetic properties. As part of the ongoing Advanced Research Project Agency-Energy project on FeNi-based magnets, melt-spinning was used to synthesize new FeNi precursors. The melt-spinning conditions were established in terms of wheel speed, ejection pressure, and atmosphere composition and pressure. The as-spun ribbons have a cubic crystal structure with a =3.584 +/- 0.002 Å, and (100) preferred grain orientation perpendicular to the ribbon. They also behave like soft magnetic materials, with coercitivities below 0.3 kOe. DSC response curves were essentially featureless, except for a thermal signature at about 515 °C associated with the Curie temperature. In contrast, melt-spun FeNi ribbons that were subsequently ball-milled and annealed exhibited a more complex thermal behavior compared to the as-spun ribbons with a weak endotherm in the 300-350 °C range followed by an exotherm at higher temperatures. These results are discussed in the context of a search for an order-disorder phase transition associated with the L10 phase, and preferred properties for permanent magnet applications. Although L10 phase formation was not observed at this point, the techniques established for processing FeNi will be further studied on modified FeNi alloys as a promising route to obtain the L10 phase. This work is supported by ARPA-E REACT Grant # 0472-1537.

  10. OECD/NEA burnup credit calculational criticality benchmark Phase I-B results

    SciTech Connect

    DeHart, M.D.; Parks, C.V.; Brady, M.C.

    1996-06-01

    In most countries, criticality analysis of LWR fuel stored in racks and casks has assumed that the fuel is fresh with the maximum allowable initial enrichment. This assumption has led to the design of widely spaced and/or highly poisoned storage and transport arrays. If credit is assumed for fuel burnup, initial enrichment limitations can be raised in existing systems, and more compact and economical arrays can be designed. Such reliance on the reduced reactivity of spent fuel for criticality control is referred to as burnup credit. The Burnup Credit Working Group, formed under the auspices of the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, has established a set of well-defined calculational benchmarks designed to study significant aspects of burnup credit computational methods. These benchmarks are intended to provide a means for the intercomparison of computer codes, methods, and data applied in spent fuel analysis. The benchmarks have been divided into multiple phases, each phase focusing on a particular feature of burnup credit analysis. This report summarizes the results and findings of the Phase I-B benchmark, which was proposed to provide a comparison of the ability of different code systems and data libraries to perform depletion analysis for the prediction of spent fuel isotopic concentrations. Results included here represent 21 different sets of calculations submitted by 16 different organizations worldwide and are based on a limited set of nuclides determined to have the most important effect on the neutron multiplication factor of light-water-reactor spent fuel. A comparison of all sets of results demonstrates that most methods agree to within 10% in the ability to estimate the spent fuel concentrations of most actinides. All methods agree within 11% about the average for all fission products studied. Most deviations are less than 10%, and many are less than 5%. The exceptions are Sm 149, Sm 151, and Gd 155.

  11. OECD/NEA Burnup Credit Calculational Criticality Benchmark Phase I-B Results

    SciTech Connect

    DeHart, M.D.

    1993-01-01

    Burnup credit is an ongoing technical concern for many countries that operate commercial nuclear power reactors. In a multinational cooperative effort to resolve burnup credit issues, a Burnup Credit Working Group has been formed under the auspices of the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. This working group has established a set of well-defined calculational benchmarks designed to study significant aspects of burnup credit computational methods. These benchmarks are intended to provide a means for the intercomparison of computer codes, methods, and data applied in spent fuel analysis. The benchmarks have been divided into multiple phases, each phase focusing on a particular feature of burnup credit analysis. This report summarizes the results and findings of the Phase I-B benchmark, which was proposed to provide a comparison of the ability of different code systems and data libraries to perform depletion analysis for the prediction of spent fuel isotopic concentrations. Results included here represent 21 different sets of calculations submitted by 16 different organizations worldwide, and are based on a limited set of nuclides determined to have the most important effect on the neutron multiplication factor of light-water-reactor spent fuel. A comparison of all sets of results demonstrates that most methods are in agreement to within 10% in the ability to estimate the spent fuel concentrations of most actinides. All methods are within 11% agreement about the average for all fission products studied. Furthermore, most deviations are less than 10%, and many are less than 5%. The exceptions are {sup 149}Sm, {sup 151}Sm, and {sup 155}Gd.

  12. Sentinel-2A image quality commissioning phase final results: geometric calibration and performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Languille, F.; Gaudel, A.; Dechoz, C.; Greslou, D.; de Lussy, F.; Trémas, T.; Poulain, V.; Massera, S.

    2016-10-01

    In the frame of the Copernicus program of the European Commission, Sentinel-2 offers multispectral high-spatial-resolution optical images over global terrestrial surfaces. In cooperation with ESA, the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES) is in charge of the image quality of the project, and so ensures the CAL/VAL commissioning phase during the months following the launch. Sentinel-2 is a constellation of 2 satellites on a polar sun-synchronous orbit with a revisit time of 5 days (with both satellites), a high field of view - 290km, 13 spectral bands in visible and shortwave infrared, and high spatial resolution - 10m, 20m and 60m. The Sentinel-2 mission offers a global coverage over terrestrial surfaces. The satellites acquire systematically terrestrial surfaces under the same viewing conditions in order to have temporal images stacks. The first satellite was launched in June 2015. Following the launch, the CAL/VAL commissioning phase is then lasting during 6 months for geometrical calibration. This paper will point on observations and results seen on Sentinel-2 images during commissioning phase. It will provide explanations about Sentinel-2 products delivered with geometric corrections. This paper will detail calibration sites, and the methods used for geometrical parameters calibration and will present linked results. The following topics will be presented: viewing frames orientation assessment, focal plane mapping for all spectral bands, results on geolocation assessment, and multispectral registration. There is a systematic images recalibration over a same reference which is a set of S2 images produced during the 6 months of CAL/VAL. This set of images will be presented as well as the geolocation performance and the multitemporal performance after refining over this ground reference.

  13. Bases, Assumptions, and Results of the Flowsheet Calculations for the Decision Phase Salt Disposition Alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    Dimenna, R.A.; Jacobs, R.A.; Taylor, G.A.; Durate, O.E.; Paul, P.K.; Elder, H.H.; Pike, J.A.; Fowler, J.R.; Rutland, P.L.; Gregory, M.V.; Smith III, F.G.; Hang, T.; Subosits, S.G.; Campbell, S.G.

    2001-03-26

    The High Level Waste (HLW) Salt Disposition Systems Engineering Team was formed on March 13, 1998, and chartered to identify options, evaluate alternatives, and recommend a selected alternative(s) for processing HLW salt to a permitted wasteform. This requirement arises because the existing In-Tank Precipitation process at the Savannah River Site, as currently configured, cannot simultaneously meet the HLW production and Authorization Basis safety requirements. This engineering study was performed in four phases. This document provides the technical bases, assumptions, and results of this engineering study.

  14. Demonstration Results of the Triband, Multi-Beam Airborne Telemetry Phased Array (AirPA) System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    AirPA Phase 3 test event in September 2014, the element level digital beamforming phased array was successfully demonstrated at Edwards Air Force...Phased Array, antenna, digital beam-forming, beamforming, DBF, L-band, S-band, C-band, CTEIP, NAVAIR 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF...elevation. During the AirPA Phase 3 test event in September 2014, the element level digital beamforming phased array was successfully demonstrated at

  15. Loss of lamin B1 results in prolongation of S phase and decondensation of chromosome territories

    PubMed Central

    Camps, Jordi; Wangsa, Darawalee; Falke, Martin; Brown, Markus; Case, Chanelle M.; Erdos, Michael R.; Ried, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear lamin B1 (LMNB1) constitutes one of the major structural proteins in the lamina mesh. We silenced the expression of LMNB1 by RNA interference in the colon cancer cell line DLD-1 and showed a dramatic redistribution of H3K27me3 from the periphery to a more homogeneous nuclear dispersion. In addition, we observed telomere attrition and an increased frequency of micronuclei and nuclear blebs. By 3D-FISH analyses, we demonstrated that the volume and surface of chromosome territories were significantly larger in LMNB1-depleted cells, suggesting that LMNB1 is required to maintain chromatin condensation in interphase nuclei. These changes led to a prolonged S phase due to activation of Chk1. Finally, silencing of LMNB1 resulted in extensive changes in alternative splicing of multiple genes and in a higher number of enlarged nuclear speckles. Taken together, our results suggest a mechanistic role of the nuclear lamina in the organization of chromosome territories, maintenance of genome integrity and proper gene splicing.—Camps, J., Wangsa, D., Falke, M., Brown, M., Case, C. M., Erdos, M. R., Ried, T. Loss of lamin B1 results in prolongation of S phase and decondensation of chromosome territories. PMID:24732130

  16. Investor Outlook: Significance of the Positive LCA2 Gene Therapy Phase III Results.

    PubMed

    Schimmer, Joshua; Breazzano, Steven

    2015-12-01

    Spark Therapeutics recently reported positive phase III results for SPK-RPE65 targeting the treatment of visual impairment caused by RPE65 gene mutations (often referred to as Leber congenital amaurosis type 2, or LCA2, but may include other retinal disorders), marking an important inflection point for the field of gene therapy. The results highlight the ability to successfully design and execute a randomized trial of a gene therapy and also reinforce the potentially predictive nature of early preclinical and clinical data. The results are expected to pave the way for the first approved gene therapy product in the United States and should sustain investor interest and confidence in gene therapy for many approaches, including retina targeting and beyond.

  17. Jet-Surface Interaction Test: Phased Array Noise Source Localization Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podboy, Gary G.

    2012-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to investigate the effect that a planar surface located near a jet flow has on the noise radiated to the far-field. Two different configurations were tested: 1) a shielding configuration in which the surface was located between the jet and the far-field microphones, and 2) a reflecting configuration in which the surface was mounted on the opposite side of the jet, and thus the jet noise was free to reflect off the surface toward the microphones. Both conventional far-field microphone and phased array noise source localization measurements were obtained. This paper discusses phased array results, while a companion paper discusses far-field results. The phased array data show that the axial distribution of noise sources in a jet can vary greatly depending on the jet operating condition and suggests that it would first be necessary to know or be able to predict this distribution in order to be able to predict the amount of noise reduction to expect from a given shielding configuration. The data obtained on both subsonic and supersonic jets show that the noise sources associated with a given frequency of noise tend to move downstream, and therefore, would become more difficult to shield, as jet Mach number increases. The noise source localization data obtained on cold, shock-containing jets suggests that the constructive interference of sound waves that produces noise at a given frequency within a broadband shock noise hump comes primarily from a small number of shocks, rather than from all the shocks at the same time. The reflecting configuration data illustrates that the law of reflection must be satisfied in order for jet noise to reflect off of a surface to an observer, and depending on the relative locations of the jet, the surface, and the observer, only some of the jet noise sources may satisfy this requirement.

  18. Self-contained self-rescuer long term field evaluation: combined eighth and ninth phase results

    SciTech Connect

    2006-10-15

    The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) National Personal Protective Technology Laboratory (NPPTL) and the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) conduct a Long Term Field Evaluation (LTFE) program to evaluate deployed self-contained self rescuers (SCSRs). The objective of the program is to evaluate how well SCSRs endure the underground coal mining environment with regard to both physical damage and aging when they are deployed in accordance with Federal regulations (30 CFR 75.1714). This report presents findings of the combined eighth and ninth phases of the LTFE. For these phases, over four hundred SCSRs were evaluated. The units tested include the CSE SR-100, Draeger Oxy K-Plus, MSA Life-saver 60, and the OCENCO EBA 6.5. The OCENCO 20 was evaluated only in Phase 9. Testing was performed between December 2000 and April 2004. Results of the evaluation indicate that all SCSRs experience some performance degradation due to the mining environment. Observed degradation varies from elevated levels of carbon dioxide, high breathing resistance, and reduced capacity. Mechanical degradation to the SCSR components included breathing hoses, chemical beds, outer cases and seals. The LTFE tests discussed in this report are different from tests performed for SCSR certification to the requirements of 42 Code of Federal Regulations, Part 84 (42 CFR, Part 84). LTFE tests reported here are conducted to an end point, oxygen depletion, to enable comparison of the duration of new and deployed SCSRs. The method for obtaining deployed SCSRs for this evaluation was not a random selection from the deployed population of SCSRs. Although the results of these tests are useful for observing performance of the tested SCSRs, they are not representative of all deployed SCSRs. 9 refs., 10 figs., 9 tabs., 3 apps.

  19. Recent Results from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Mission and Plans for the Extended Science Phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vondrak, Richard; Keller, John W.; Chin, Gordon; Petro, Noah; Garvin, James B.; Rice, James W.

    2012-01-01

    The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft (LRO), launched on June 18, 2009, began with the goal of seeking safe landing sites for future robotic missions or the return of humans to the Moon as part of NASA's Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (ESMD). In addition, LRO's objectives included the search for surface resources and to investigate the Lunar radiation environment. After spacecraft commissioning, the ESMD phase of the mission began on September 15, 2009 and completed on September 15, 2010 when operational responsibility for LRO was transferred to NASA's Science Mission Directorate (SMD). The SMD mission was scheduled for 2 years and completed in September, 2012. The LRO mission has been extended for two years under SMD. The extended mission focuses on a new set of goals related to understanding the geologic history of the Moon, its current state, and what it can tell us about the evolution Of the Solar System. Here we will review the major results from the LRO mission for both exploration and science and discuss plans and objectives going forward including plans for the extended science phase out to 2014. Results from the LRO mission include but are not limited to the development of comprehensive high resolution maps and digital terrain models of the lunar surface; discoveries on the nature of hydrogen distribution, and by extension water, at the lunar poles; measurement of the day and night time temperature of the lunar surface including temperature down below 30 K in permanently shadowed regions (PSRs); direct measurement of Hg, H2, and CO deposits in the PSRs, evidence for recent tectonic activity on the Moon, and high resolution maps of the illumination conditions as the poles. The objectives for the second and extended science phases of the mission under SMD include: 1) understanding the bombardment history of the Moon, 2) interpreting Lunar geologic processes, 3) mapping the global Lunar regolith, 4) identifying volatiles on the Moon, and 5

  20. Two-Phase Thermal Transport in Microgap Channels—Theory, Experimental Results, and Predictive Relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bar-Cohen, Avram; Sheehan, Jessica R.; Rahim, Emil

    2012-01-01

    A comprehensive literature review and analysis of recent microchannel/microgap heat transfer data for two-phase flow of refrigerants and dielectric liquids is presented. The flow regime progression in such a microgap channel is shown to be predicted by the traditional flow regime maps. Moreover, Annular flow is shown to be the dominant regime for this thermal transport configuration and to grow in importance as the channel diameter decreases. The results of heat transfer studies of single miniature channels, as well as the analysis and inverse calculation of IR images of a heated microgap channel wall, are used to identify the existence of a characteristic M-shaped heat transfer coefficient variation with quality (or superficial velocity), with inflection points corresponding to transitions in the two-phase cooling modalities. For the high-quality, Annular flow conditions, the venerable Chen correlation is shown to yield predictive agreement for microgap channels that is comparable to that attained for macrochannels and to provide a mechanistic context for the thermal transport rates attained in microgap channels. Results obtained from infrared imaging, revealing previously undetected, large surface temperature variations in Annular flow, are also reviewed and related to the termination of the favorable thin-film evaporation mode in such channels.

  1. T2-weighted four dimensional magnetic resonance imaging with result-driven phase sorting

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yilin; Yin, Fang-Fang; Cai, Jing; Czito, Brian G.; Bashir, Mustafa R.

    2015-08-15

    Purpose: T2-weighted MRI provides excellent tumor-to-tissue contrast for target volume delineation in radiation therapy treatment planning. This study aims at developing a novel T2-weighted retrospective four dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (4D-MRI) phase sorting technique for imaging organ/tumor respiratory motion. Methods: A 2D fast T2-weighted half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo MR sequence was used for image acquisition of 4D-MRI, with a frame rate of 2–3 frames/s. Respiratory motion was measured using an external breathing monitoring device. A phase sorting method was developed to sort the images by their corresponding respiratory phases. Besides, a result-driven strategy was applied to effectively utilize redundant images in the case when multiple images were allocated to a bin. This strategy, selecting the image with minimal amplitude error, will generate the most representative 4D-MRI. Since we are using a different image acquisition mode for 4D imaging (the sequential image acquisition scheme) with the conventionally used cine or helical image acquisition scheme, the 4D dataset sufficient condition was not obviously and directly predictable. An important challenge of the proposed technique was to determine the number of repeated scans (N{sub R}) required to obtain sufficient phase information at each slice position. To tackle this challenge, the authors first conducted computer simulations using real-time position management respiratory signals of the 29 cancer patients under an IRB-approved retrospective study to derive the relationships between N{sub R} and the following factors: number of slices (N{sub S}), number of 4D-MRI respiratory bins (N{sub B}), and starting phase at image acquisition (P{sub 0}). To validate the authors’ technique, 4D-MRI acquisition and reconstruction were simulated on a 4D digital extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) human phantom using simulation derived parameters. Twelve healthy volunteers were involved

  2. Controls-structures interaction guest investigator program: Overview and phase 1 experimental results and future plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith-Taylor, Rudeen; Tanner, Sharon E.

    1993-01-01

    The NASA Controls-Structures Interaction (CSI) Guest Investigator program is described in terms of its support of the development of CSI technologies. The program is based on the introduction of CSI researchers from industry and academia to available test facilities for experimental validation of technologies and methods. Phase 1 experimental results are reviewed with attention given to their use of the Mini-MAST test facility and the facility for the Advance Control Evaluation of Structures. Experiments were conducted regarding the following topics: collocated/noncollocated controllers, nonlinear math modeling, controller design, passive/active suspension systems design, and system identification and fault isolation. The results demonstrate that significantly enhanced performance from the control techniques can be achieved by integrating knowledge of the structural dynamics under consideration into the approaches.

  3. Gearbox Reliability Collaborative Phase 1 and 2: Testing and Modeling Results; Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, J.; Guo, Y.; LaCava, W.; Link, H.; McNiff, B.

    2012-05-01

    The Gearbox Reliability Collaborative (GRC) investigates root causes of wind turbine gearbox premature failures and validates design assumptions that affect gearbox reliability using a combined testing and modeling approach. Knowledge gained from the testing and modeling of the GRC gearboxes builds an understanding of how the selected loads and events translate into internal responses of three-point mounted gearboxes. This paper presents some testing and modeling results of the GRC research during Phase 1 and 2. Non-torque loads from the rotor including shaft bending and thrust, traditionally assumed to be uncoupled with gearbox, affect gear and bearing loads and resulting gearbox responses. Bearing clearance increases bearing loads and causes cyclic loading, which could contribute to a reduced bearing life. Including flexibilities of key drivetrain subcomponents is important in order to reproduce the measured gearbox response during the tests using modeling approaches.

  4. Final report of the APRICOT Program and results of Phase 3. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-09-01

    APRICOT (Analysis of PRImary COntainment Transients) was a cooperative activity for comparison and benchmarking of computational methods used to analyze LMFBR (Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor) structural response to pressure loads from HCDA's (Hypothetical Core Disruptive Accidents). The participants were LMFBR project groups from Europe, Japan and the United States. Independent experts reviewed the calculations for the purpose of comparing computational results and methods of solution. Phase 3 involved a series of simple calculations of structural response and fluid-structure interactions under elastic and elastic-plastic conditions. The results were generally in reasonable agreement although there were a few anomalies. The APRICOT program has provided significant code validation data to enhance confidence in numerical simulations of HCDA's. It has also demonstrated the value of this type of benchmark activity.

  5. The Langley Research Center CSI phase-0 evolutionary model testbed-design and experimental results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belvin, W. K.; Horta, Lucas G.; Elliott, K. B.

    1991-01-01

    A testbed for the development of Controls Structures Interaction (CSI) technology is described. The design philosophy, capabilities, and early experimental results are presented to introduce some of the ongoing CSI research at NASA-Langley. The testbed, referred to as the Phase 0 version of the CSI Evolutionary model (CEM), is the first stage of model complexity designed to show the benefits of CSI technology and to identify weaknesses in current capabilities. Early closed loop test results have shown non-model based controllers can provide an order of magnitude increase in damping in the first few flexible vibration modes. Model based controllers for higher performance will need to be robust to model uncertainty as verified by System ID tests. Data are presented that show finite element model predictions of frequency differ from those obtained from tests. Plans are also presented for evolution of the CEM to study integrated controller and structure design as well as multiple payload dynamics.

  6. Simbol-X Hard X-ray Focusing Mirrors: Results Obtained During the Phase A Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagliaferri, G.; Basso, S.; Borghi, G.; Burkert, W.; Citterio, O.; Civitani, M.; Conconi, P.; Cotroneo, V.; Freyberg, M.; Garoli, D.; Gorenstein, P.; Hartner, G.; Mattarello, V.; Orlandi, A.; Pareschi, G.; Romaine, S.; Spiga, D.; Valsecchi, G.; Vernani, D.

    2009-05-01

    Simbol-X will push grazing incidence imaging up to 80 keV, providing a strong improvement both in sensitivity and angular resolution compared to all instruments that have operated so far above 10 keV. The superb hard X-ray imaging capability will be guaranteed by a mirror module of 100 electroformed Nickel shells with a multilayer reflecting coating. Here we will describe the technogical development and solutions adopted for the fabrication of the mirror module, that must guarantee an Half Energy Width (HEW) better than 20 arcsec from 0.5 up to 30 keV and a goal of 40 arcsec at 60 keV. During the phase A, terminated at the end of 2008, we have developed three engineering models with two, two and three shells, respectively. The most critical aspects in the development of the Simbol-X mirrors are i) the production of the 100 mandrels with very good surface quality within the timeline of the mission, ii) the replication of shells that must be very thin (a factor of 2 thinner than those of XMM-Newton) and still have very good image quality up to 80 keV, iii) the development of an integration process that allows us to integrate these very thin mirrors maintaining their intrinsic good image quality. The Phase A study has shown that we can fabricate the mandrels with the needed quality and that we have developed a valid integration process. The shells that we have produced so far have a quite good image quality, e.g. HEW <~30 arcsec at 30 keV, and effective area. However, we still need to make some improvements to reach the requirements. We will briefly present these results and discuss the possible improvements that we will investigate during phase B.

  7. Simbol-X Hard X-ray Focusing Mirrors: Results Obtained During the Phase A Study

    SciTech Connect

    Tagliaferri, G.; Basso, S.; Civitani, M.; Conconi, P.; Cotroneo, V.; Pareschi, G.; Spiga, D.; Borghi, G.; Garoli, D.; Mattarello, V.; Orlandi, A.; Valsecchi, G.; Vernani, D.; Burkert, W.; Freyberg, M.; Hartner, G.; Citterio, O.; Gorenstein, P.; Romaine, S.

    2009-05-11

    Simbol-X will push grazing incidence imaging up to 80 keV, providing a strong improvement both in sensitivity and angular resolution compared to all instruments that have operated so far above 10 keV. The superb hard X-ray imaging capability will be guaranteed by a mirror module of 100 electroformed Nickel shells with a multilayer reflecting coating. Here we will describe the technogical development and solutions adopted for the fabrication of the mirror module, that must guarantee an Half Energy Width (HEW) better than 20 arcsec from 0.5 up to 30 keV and a goal of 40 arcsec at 60 keV. During the phase A, terminated at the end of 2008, we have developed three engineering models with two, two and three shells, respectively. The most critical aspects in the development of the Simbol-X mirrors are i) the production of the 100 mandrels with very good surface quality within the timeline of the mission, ii) the replication of shells that must be very thin (a factor of 2 thinner than those of XMM-Newton) and still have very good image quality up to 80 keV, iii) the development of an integration process that allows us to integrate these very thin mirrors maintaining their intrinsic good image quality. The Phase A study has shown that we can fabricate the mandrels with the needed quality and that we have developed a valid integration process. The shells that we have produced so far have a quite good image quality, e.g. HEW < or approx. 30 arcsec at 30 keV, and effective area. However, we still need to make some improvements to reach the requirements. We will briefly present these results and discuss the possible improvements that we will investigate during phase B.

  8. Final results of Borexino Phase-I on low-energy solar neutrino spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellini, G.; Benziger, J.; Bick, D.; Bonfini, G.; Bravo, D.; Buizza Avanzini, M.; Caccianiga, B.; Cadonati, L.; Calaprice, F.; Cavalcante, P.; Chavarria, A.; Chepurnov, A.; D'Angelo, D.; Davini, S.; Derbin, A.; Empl, A.; Etenko, A.; Fomenko, K.; Franco, D.; Gabriele, F.; Galbiati, C.; Gazzana, S.; Ghiano, C.; Giammarchi, M.; Göger-Neff, M.; Goretti, A.; Grandi, L.; Gromov, M.; Hagner, C.; Hungerford, E.; Ianni, Aldo; Ianni, Andrea; Kobychev, V.; Korablev, D.; Korga, G.; Kryn, D.; Laubenstein, M.; Lewke, T.; Litvinovich, E.; Loer, B.; Lombardi, F.; Lombardi, P.; Ludhova, L.; Lukyanchenko, G.; Machulin, I.; Manecki, S.; Maneschg, W.; Manuzio, G.; Meindl, Q.; Meroni, E.; Miramonti, L.; Misiaszek, M.; Montuschi, M.; Mosteiro, P.; Muratova, V.; Oberauer, L.; Obolensky, M.; Ortica, F.; Otis, K.; Pallavicini, M.; Papp, L.; Pena-Garay, C.; Perasso, L.; Perasso, S.; Pocar, A.; Ranucci, G.; Razeto, A.; Re, A.; Romani, A.; Rossi, N.; Saldanha, R.; Salvo, C.; Schönert, S.; Simgen, H.; Skorokhvatov, M.; Smirnov, O.; Sotnikov, A.; Sukhotin, S.; Suvorov, Y.; Tartaglia, R.; Testera, G.; Vignaud, D.; Vogelaar, R. B.; von Feilitzsch, F.; Winter, J.; Wojcik, M.; Wright, A.; Wurm, M.; Xu, J.; Zaimidoroga, O.; Zavatarelli, S.; Zuzel, G.; Borexino Collaboration

    2014-06-01

    Borexino has been running since May 2007 at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso laboratory in Italy with the primary goal of detecting solar neutrinos. The detector, a large, unsegmented liquid scintillator calorimeter characterized by unprecedented low levels of intrinsic radioactivity, is optimized for the study of the lower energy part of the spectrum. During Phase-I (2007-2010), Borexino first detected and then precisely measured the flux of the Be7 solar neutrinos, ruled out any significant day-night asymmetry of their interaction rate, made the first direct observation of the pep neutrinos, and set the tightest upper limit on the flux of solar neutrinos produced in the CNO cycle (carbon, nitrogen, oxigen) where carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen serve as catalysts in the fusion process. In this paper we discuss the signal signature and provide a comprehensive description of the backgrounds, quantify their event rates, describe the methods for their identification, selection, or subtraction, and describe data analysis. Key features are an extensive in situ calibration program using radioactive sources, the detailed modeling of the detector response, the ability to define an innermost fiducial volume with extremely low background via software cuts, and the excellent pulse-shape discrimination capability of the scintillator that allows particle identification. We report a measurement of the annual modulation of the Be7 neutrino interaction rate. The period, the amplitude, and the phase of the observed modulation are consistent with the solar origin of these events, and the absence of their annual modulation is rejected with higher than 99% C.L. The physics implications of Phase-I results in the context of the neutrino oscillation physics and solar models are presented.

  9. 30 CFR 203.30 - Which leases are eligible for royalty relief as a result of drilling a phase 2 or phase 3 ultra...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Which leases are eligible for royalty relief as a result of drilling a phase 2 or phase 3 ultra-deep well? 203.30 Section 203.30 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS REVENUE MANAGEMENT RELIEF OR REDUCTION...

  10. Jet-Surface Interaction Test: Phased Array Noise Source Localization Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podboy, Gary G.

    2013-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to investigate the effect that a planar surface located near a jet flow has on the noise radiated to the far-field. Two different configurations were tested: 1) a shielding configuration in which the surface was located between the jet and the far-field microphones, and 2) a reflecting configuration in which the surface was mounted on the opposite side of the jet, and thus the jet noise was free to reflect off the surface toward the microphones. Both conventional far-field microphone and phased array noise source localization measurements were obtained. This paper discusses phased array results, while a companion paper (Brown, C.A., "Jet-Surface Interaction Test: Far-Field Noise Results," ASME paper GT2012-69639, June 2012.) discusses far-field results. The phased array data show that the axial distribution of noise sources in a jet can vary greatly depending on the jet operating condition and suggests that it would first be necessary to know or be able to predict this distribution in order to be able to predict the amount of noise reduction to expect from a given shielding configuration. The data obtained on both subsonic and supersonic jets show that the noise sources associated with a given frequency of noise tend to move downstream, and therefore, would become more difficult to shield, as jet Mach number increases. The noise source localization data obtained on cold, shock-containing jets suggests that the constructive interference of sound waves that produces noise at a given frequency within a broadband shock noise hump comes primarily from a small number of shocks, rather than from all the shocks at the same time. The reflecting configuration data illustrates that the law of reflection must be satisfied in order for jet noise to reflect off of a surface to an observer, and depending on the relative locations of the jet, the surface, and the observer, only some of the jet noise sources may satisfy this requirement.

  11. Disorder-induced phase transition in an opinion dynamics model: Results in two and three dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Sudip; Chatterjee, Arnab

    2016-12-01

    We study a model of continuous opinion dynamics with both positive and negative mutual interactions. The model shows a continuous phase transition between a phase with consensus (order) and a phase having no consensus (disorder). The mean field version of the model was already studied. Using extensive numerical simulations, we study the same model in two and three dimensions. The critical points of the phase transitions for various cases and the associated critical exponents have been estimated. The universality class of the phase transitions in the model is found to be same as Ising model in the respective dimensions.

  12. Phases of QCD from Small to Large Nf:. (Some) Lattice Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deuzeman, A.; Pallante, E.; Lombardo, M. P.

    2011-01-01

    We analyze the phases of strong interactions in the space of the flavor number Nf, bare coupling gL, and temperature T by lattice MonteCarlo simulations for two and three unrooted staggered flavors, corresponding to eight and twelve continuum flavors, respectively. We observe a Coulomb-like phase at intermediate lattice couplings which we interpret as the avatar of a continuum conformal theory for Nf = 12. We comment on the possible occurrence of an UVFP associated with the bulk phase transition between the strong coupling lattice phase and the Coulomb-like phase.

  13. The measurement of operator workload in the Mark IVA DSCC monitor and control subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemay, M.; Chafin, R. L.; Hird, E. E.

    1983-01-01

    An operator workload measurement methodology is presented which will be used in support of the Mark IVA operational test and evaluation plan. Three operator workload measures are suggested: operator ratings, primary task work measures, and information processing time measures. A method of validating the workload measures using secondary task work measures is presented. It is expected that operations testing using these measures will assist in establishing the time required to perform essential operational activities and will indicate high risk operations areas due to potential operator overload.

  14. Ecdysteroid profiles of two Ajuga species, A. iva and A. remota.

    PubMed

    Bakrim, Ahmed; Ngunjiri, Johnpeter; Crouzet, Sophie; Guibout, Louis; Balducci, Christine; Girault, Jean-Pierre; Lafont, René

    2014-08-01

    Phytoecdysteroids are plant analogues of insect moulting hormones and are used by plants to repel or disturb phytophagous insects. They are also active on mammals and present in many plants used in traditional medicine. The Ajuga genus contains several such species, which occur in various pharmacopoeias. We report the isolation and identification of major and minor ecdysteroids present in two Ajuga species, A. iva and A. remota, both of which are used as medicinal plants in Africa. Three minor ecdysteroids (abutasterone, ponasterone A and sidisterone) have been found for the first time in the Ajuga genus.

  15. Isolation of four ecdysones from Ajuga iva roots and a rapid semiquantitative method for ecdysone determination.

    PubMed

    Sabri, N N; Asaad, A; Khafagy, S M

    1981-07-01

    The ethereal extract of AJUGA IVA (L.) S CHREB. roots, yielded 4 ecdysones. Three were proved to be cyasterone, makisterone A and ecdysterone, by using UV, IR, MS spectral methods and comparison with standard samples. Spectral data indicate that the fourth ecdysone is similar to cyasterone but having an additional hydroxy group in the side-chain. The chromatographic pattern of ecdysone content in roots, stems and leaves is presented as well as a rapid and simple Semiquantitative method for their estimation. The roots had the highest total content (0.381%).

  16. Bubble Generation in a Flowing Liquid Medium and Resulting Two-Phase Flow in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamotani, Yasuhiro

    1996-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical research program is described herein to study bubble generation in a liquid flow in a pipe under reduced gravity conditions. The objective of the work is to study the bubble size and frequency of the generation and the resulting two-phase flow but it also concerns the fluid mechanical aspects of boiling in forced flow in microgravity. By injecting a gas into a liquid flow in a pipe through a small hole in the pipe wall we will investigate how the bubble expands and detaches from the wall, without involving the complexities of boiling. The experiments will be conducted both under isothermal conditions and with heat transfer from the wall. In the experiments with heat transfer the effect of thermocapillarity on the bubble formation and detachment will be the main subject.

  17. Results from betatron phase measurements in RHIC during the sextant test

    SciTech Connect

    Trbojevic, D.; Connolly, R.; Fischer, W.

    1998-08-01

    The Sextant Test of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) was an important step towards its completion. One sixth of the two RHIC accelerators was fully commissioned. gold ion beam was injected and transported through one sextant of one of the two rings. The betatron phase advance per cell was measured by recording differences in the horizontal and vertical positions of the beam at the end of the sextant due to a sequence of correction dipole kicks along the beam line. Measurement results show excellent agreement with predicted values, confirming that production measurements of the integral functions of the quadrupoles were very accurate, and that the polarity of all elements (correction dipoles, quadrupoles, dipoles etc.) was correct.

  18. RESULTS FROM BETATRON PHASE MEASUREMENTS IN RHIC DURING THE SEXTANT TEST.

    SciTech Connect

    TRBOJEVIC, D.

    1998-06-26

    The Sextant Test of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) was an important step towards its completion. One sixth of the two RHIC accelerators was fully commissioned. Gold ion beam was injected and transported through one sextant of one of the two rings. The betatron phase advance per cell was measured by recording differences in the horizontal and vertical positions of the beam at the end of the sextant due to a sequence of correction dipole kicks along the beam line. Measurement results show excellent agreement with predicted values, confirming that production measurements of the integral functions of the quadrupoles were very accurate, and that the polarity of all elements (correction dipoles, quadrupoles, dipoles etc.) was correct.

  19. NASA Broad Specification Fuels Combustion Technology program - Pratt and Whitney Aircraft Phase I results and status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lohmann, R. P.; Fear, J. S.

    1982-01-01

    In connection with increases in the cost of fuels and the reduced availability of high quality petroleum crude, a modification of fuel specifications has been considered to allow acceptance of poorer quality fuels. To obtain the information upon which a selection of appropriate fuels for aircraft can be based, the Broad Specification Fuels Combustion Technology program was formulated by NASA. A description is presented of program-related investigations conducted by an American aerospace company. The specific objective of Phase I of this program has been to evaluate the impact of the use of broadened properties fuels on combustor design through comprehensive combustor rig testing. Attention is given to combustor concepts, experimental evaluation, results obtained with single stage combustors, the stage combustor concept, and the capability of a variable geometry combustor.

  20. Density-functional correction of random-phase-approximation correlation with results for jellium surface energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurth, Stefan; Perdew, John P.

    1999-04-01

    Since long-range electron-electron correlation is treated properly in the random phase approximation (RPA), we define short-range correlation as the correction to the RPA. The effects of short-range correlation are investigated here in the local spin density (LSD) approximation and the generalized gradient approximation (GGA). Results are presented for atoms, molecules, and jellium surfaces. It is found that (1) short-range correlation energies are less sensitive to the inclusion of density gradients than are full correlation energies, and (2) short-range correlation makes a surprisingly small contribution to surface and molecular atomization energies. In order to improve the accuracy of electronic-structure calculations, we therefore combine a GGA treatment of short-range correlation with a full RPA treatment of the exchange-correlation energy. This approach leads to jellium surface energies close to those of the LSD approximation for exchange and correlation together (but not for each separately).

  1. Artemis common lunar lander. Phase 2: Study results for external review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of the Artemis Program is to gather vital reconnaissance data by conducting robotic exploration missions to the lunar surface both prior to and concurrent with human exploration missions. The Artemis Program includes rapid, near-term development of a variety of small experimental and operational payloads, provides a low-cost capability to deliver these payloads to any location on the lunar surface, and supports the analysis of the data returned. The Artemis Program will improve the understanding of lunar geosciences, demonstrate the Moon's unique capability as an astronomical platform to study the universe, and to conduct scientific and technology development experiments, and will prepare for, enhance, and complement human mission The Artemis Common Lunar Lander Phase 2 Study results for external review are included.

  2. Concomitant chemobrachyradiotherapy with ifosfamide and cisplatin followed by consolidation chemotherapy in locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix: Results of a phase II study

    SciTech Connect

    Vrdoljak, Eduard . E-mail: eduard.vrdoljak@st.hinet.hr; Prskalo, Tomislav; Omrcen, Tomislav; Situm, Kristina; Boraska, Tihana; Frleta Ilic, Nives; Jankovic, Stjepan; Hamm, Wolfgang

    2005-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of ifosfamide and cisplatin administered concomitantly with low-dose-rate brachytherapy followed by consolidation chemotherapy in the treatment of locally advanced squamous cell cervical carcinoma (LASCC). Methods and materials: Forty-four patients with biopsy-proven LASCC were enrolled. FIGO Stages IB2 bulky to IVA were entered into this study. Patients were assigned to receive external radiotherapy (50 Gy in 25 fractions); then ifosfamide 2 g/m{sup 2} plus cisplatin 75 mg/m{sup 2} was applied during two low-dose-rate brachytherapy applications, and 4 cycles of consolidation chemotherapy with the same drug combination were given after completion of radiotherapy. The planned dose to point A was 85 Gy. Results: All patients received both courses of concomitant chemobrachytherapy and at least 1 cycle of consolidation chemotherapy. The average duration of radiation was 45.1 days. The clinical complete response rate was 100%. Grade 3 and 4 leukopenia occurred in 25% and 11% of the cycles, respectively. After a median follow-up of 34 months (range, 20-54 months), the recurrence-free and the overall survival rates were 84% and 91%, respectively. Major delayed local complications occurred in 7 cases (16%). Conclusions: These results indicate that concomitant chemobrachyradiotherapy with ifosfamide and cisplatin is a feasible combination for patients with LASCC of the cervix uteri. A randomized trial is planned.

  3. Late-phase melt progression experiment: MP-2. Results and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gasser, R.D.; Gauntt, R.O.; Bourcier, S.C.

    1997-05-01

    In-pile experiments addressing late-phase processes in Light Water Reactors (LWRs) were performed in the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) at Sandia National Laboratories. Melt Progression (MP) experiments were designed to provide information to develop and verify computer models for analysis of LWR core damage in severe accidents. Experiments examine the formation and motion of ceramic molten pools in disrupted reactor core regions. The MP-2 experiment assembly consisted of: (1) a rubble bed of enriched UO{sub 2} and ZrO{sub 2} simulating severely disrupted reactor core regions, (2) a ceramic/metallic crust representing blockage formed by early phase melting, relocation, and refreezing of core components, and (3) an intact rod stub region that remained in place below the blockage region. The test assembly was fission heated in the central cavity of the ACRR at an average rate of about 0.2 KA, reaching a peak molten pool temperature around 3400 K. Melting of the debris bed ceramic components was initiated near the center of the bed. The molten material relocated downward, refreezing to form a ceramic crust near the bottom of the rubble bed. As power levels were increased, the crust gradually remelted and reformed at progressively lower positions in the bed until late in the experiment when it penetrated into and attacked the ceramic/metallic blockage. The metallic components of the blockage region melted and relocated to the bottom of the intact rod stub region before the ceramic melt penetrated the blockage region from above. The ceramic pool penetrated halfway into the blockage region by the end of the experiment. Measurements of thermal response and material relocation are compared to the results of the computer simulations. Postexperiment examination of the assembly with the associated material interactions and metallurgy are also discussed in detail with the analyses and interpretation of results. 16 refs., 206 figs., 24 tabs.

  4. Phase 1 results of the NFRC U-Value Procedure Validation Project

    SciTech Connect

    Arasteh, D.; Beck, F.A.; Stone, N.; duPont, W.; Mathis, C.; Koenig, M.

    1993-08-01

    The NFRC U-Value Procedure Validation Project was undertaken by a collaborative group of industry, public utility, trade associations, and government researchers in order to validate the testing and calculational methods of the NFRC 100-91: Procedure for Determining Fenestration Product Thermal Properties (Currently Limited to U-Values). This paper summarizes the validation project s goals and test methodology, the results of the data analysis, and the recommendations following completion of Phase I of the project. Simulations performed according to NFRC 100-91 are shown to agree with each other, to within the NFRC tolerance, in 100% of the cases. Window test results with perpendicular wind performed according to NFRC 100-91 are shown to agree with each other, to within the NFRC tolerance, in 84% of the cases. Simulations and perpendicular wind window test results are shown to agree with each other, to within the NFRC tolerance, in 80% of the cases. Testing of skylights was shown to be problematic under the procedure as written at the time. Agreement between tests and simulations will improve as a result of a strong NFRC education and accreditation program.

  5. Results for Phase I of the IAEA Coordinated Research Program on HTGR Uncertainties

    SciTech Connect

    Strydom, Gerhard; Bostelmann, Friederike; Yoon, Su Jong

    2015-01-01

    The quantification of uncertainties in design and safety analysis of reactors is today not only broadly accepted, but in many cases became the preferred way to replace traditional conservative analysis for safety and licensing analysis. The use of a more fundamental methodology is also consistent with the reliable high fidelity physics models and robust, efficient, and accurate codes available today. To facilitate uncertainty analysis applications a comprehensive approach and methodology must be developed and applied. High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGR) has its own peculiarities, coated particle design, large graphite quantities, different materials and high temperatures that also require other simulation requirements. The IAEA has therefore launched a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on the HTGR Uncertainty Analysis in Modeling (UAM) in 2013 to study uncertainty propagation specifically in the HTGR analysis chain. Two benchmark problems are defined, with the prismatic design represented by the General Atomics (GA) MHTGR-350 and a 250 MW modular pebble bed design similar to the HTR-PM (INET, China). This report summarizes the contributions of the HTGR Methods Simulation group at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) up to this point of the CRP. The activities at INL have been focused so far on creating the problem specifications for the prismatic design, as well as providing reference solutions for the exercises defined for Phase I. An overview is provided of the HTGR UAM objectives and scope, and the detailed specifications for Exercises I-1, I-2, I-3 and I-4 are also included here for completeness. The main focus of the report is the compilation and discussion of reference results for Phase I (i.e. for input parameters at their nominal or best-estimate values), which is defined as the first step of the uncertainty quantification process. These reference results can be used by other CRP participants for comparison with other codes or their own reference

  6. Final Analysis and Results of the Phase II SIMPLE Dark Matter Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felizardo, M.; Girard, T. A.; Morlat, T.; Fernandes, A. C.; Ramos, A. R.; Marques, J. G.; Kling, A.; Puibasset, J.; Auguste, M.; Boyer, D.; Cavaillou, A.; Poupeney, J.; Sudre, C.; Miley, H. S.; Payne, R. F.; Carvalho, F. P.; Prudêncio, M. I.; Gouveia, A.; Marques, R.

    2012-05-01

    We report the final results of the Phase II SIMPLE measurements, comprising two run stages of 15 superheated droplet detectors each, with the second stage including an improved neutron shielding. The analyses include a refined signal analysis, and revised nucleation efficiency based on a reanalysis of previously reported monochromatic neutron irradiations. The combined results yield a contour minimum of σp=5.7×10-3pb at 35GeV/c2 in the spin-dependent sector of weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) proton interactions, the most restrictive to date for MW≤60GeV/c2 from a direct search experiment and overlapping, for the first time, with results previously obtained only indirectly. In the spin-independent sector, a minimum of 4.7×10-6pb at 35GeV/c2 is achieved, with the exclusion contour challenging a significant part of the light mass WIMP region of current interest.

  7. Convergent validity of the Integrated Visual and Auditory Continuous Performance Test (IVA+Plus): associations with working memory, processing speed, and behavioral ratings.

    PubMed

    Arble, Eamonn; Kuentzel, Jeffrey; Barnett, Douglas

    2014-05-01

    Though the Integrated Visual and Auditory Continuous Performance Test (IVA + Plus) is commonly used by researchers and clinicians, few investigations have assessed its convergent and discriminant validity, especially with regard to its use with children. The present study details correlates of the IVA + Plus using measures of cognitive ability and ratings of child behavior (parent and teacher), drawing upon a sample of 90 psychoeducational evaluations. Scores from the IVA + Plus correlated significantly with the Working Memory and Processing Speed Indexes from the Fourth Edition of the Wechsler Intelligence Scales for Children (WISC-IV), though fewer and weaker significant correlations were seen with behavior ratings scales, and significant associations also occurred with WISC-IV Verbal Comprehension and Perceptual Reasoning. The overall pattern of relations is supportive of the validity of the IVA + Plus; however, general cognitive ability was associated with better performance on most of the primary scores of the IVA + Plus, suggesting that interpretation should take intelligence into account.

  8. Hanna, Wyoming underground coal gasification data base. Volume 6. Hanna IVA and IVB field test research report

    SciTech Connect

    Bartke, T.C.; Fischer, D.D.; King, S.B.; Boyd, R.M.; Humphrey, A.E.

    1985-08-01

    This report is part of a seven-volume series on the Hanna, Wyoming, underground coal gasification field tests. Volume 1 is a summary of the project and each of Volumes 2 through 6 describes a particular test. Volume 7 is a compilation of all the data for the tests in Volumes 2 through 6. The reports in this series include: The Hanna IV test was designed as the first underground coal gasification test using commercial well spacings of 100 and 150 feet between well pairs in a linear 3-well pattern. The test was initiated in late 1977 and completed in late 1979. This long duration was due to unfavorable geologic conditions (faulting) which could not be successfully overcome resulting in the test being split into Hanna IVA and Hanna IVB with about one year between the conduct of each. This report covers: (1) specific site selection and characteristics; (2) test objectives; (3) facility description; (4) pre-operation tests; (5) test operations summary; and (6) post-test activity. 5 refs., 19 figs., 13 tabs.

  9. Theoretical Studies Of Group IVA And Group IVB Chemistry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-20

    reaction paths. The R(-7) dispersion terms was also derived and coded. While most workers ignore the odd power dispersion terms, these terms can be...second order perturbation theory (MP2) to help explain the experimental results of the Fayer group on phenol migration dynamics. An exhaustive...2013) 3. L. Kocia, S. Young, Y. Kholod, M. Gordon, M. Fayer, and A. Rappe, “Theoretical Examination of Picosecond Phenol Migration Dynamics in

  10. DARPA/AFRL Smart Wing Phase 2 wind tunnel test results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherer, Lewis B.; Martin, C. A.; Sanders, Brian P.; West, Mark N.; Pinkerton-Florance, Jennifer L.; Wieseman, Carol D.; Burner, Alpheus W.; Fleming, Gary A.

    2002-07-01

    Northrop Grumman Corporation built and twice tested a 30 percent scale wind tunnel model of a proposed uninhabited combat air vehicle under the DARPA/AFRL Smart Materials and Structures Development - Smart Wing Phase 2 program to demonstrate the applicability of smart control surfaces on advanced aircraft configurations. The model constructed was a full span, sting mounted model with smart leading and trailing edge control surfaces on the right wing and conventional, hinged trailing edge control surfaces on the left wing. Among the performance benefits that were quantified were increased pitching moment, increased rolling moment and improved pressure distribution of the smart wing over the conventional wing. This paper present an overview of the result from the wind tunnel test performed at NASA Langley Research Center's Transonic Dynamic Tunnel in March 2000 and May 2001. Successful results included: (1) improved aileron effectiveness at high dynamic pressures, (2) demonstrated improvements in lateral and longitudinal effectiveness with smooth contoured smart trailing edge over conventional hinged control surfaces, (3) chordwise and spanwise shape control of the smart trailing edge control surface, and (4) smart trailing edge control surface deflection rates over 80 deg/sec.

  11. Water vapour tomography using GPS phase observations: Results from the ESCOMPTE experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, T.; Gradinarsky, L.; Elgered, G.

    2007-10-01

    Global Positioning System (GPS) tomography is a technique for estimating the 3-D structure of the atmospheric water vapour using data from a dense local network of GPS receivers. Several current methods utilize estimates of slant wet delays between the GPS satellites and the receivers on the ground, which are difficult to obtain with millimetre accuracy from the GPS observations. We present results of applying a new tomographic method to GPS data from the Expériance sur site pour contraindre les modèles de pollution atmosphérique et de transport d'emissions (ESCOMPTE) experiment in southern France. This method does not rely on any slant wet delay estimates, instead it uses the GPS phase observations directly. We show that the estimated wet refractivity profiles estimated by this method is on the same accuracy level or better compared to other tomographic methods. The results are in agreement with earlier simulations, for example the profile information is limited above 4 km.

  12. Controversial results of therapy with mesenchymal stem cells in the acute phase of canine distemper disease.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, A O; Cardoso, M T; Vidane, A S; Casals, J B; Passarelli, D; Alencar, A L F; Sousa, R L M; Fantinato-Neto, P; Oliveira, V C; Lara, V M; Ambrósio, C E

    2016-05-23

    Distemper disease is an infectious disease reported in several species of domestic and wild carnivores. The high mortality rate of animals infected with canine distemper virus (CDV) treated with currently available therapies has driven the study of new efficacious treatments. Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-based therapy is a promising therapeutic option for many degenerative, hereditary, and inflammatory diseases. Therefore, the aim of this study was to characterize stem cells derived from the canine fetal olfactory epithelium and to assess the systemic response of animals infected with CDV to symptomatic therapy and treatment with MSCs. Eight domestic mongrel dogs (N = 8) were divided into two groups: support group (SG) (N = 5) and support group + cell therapy (SGCT) (N = 3), which were monitored over 15 days. Blood samples were collected on days 0, 6, 9, 12, and 15 to assess blood count and serum biochemistry (urea, creatinine, alanine transferase, alkaline phosphatase, gamma-glutamyl transferase, total protein, albumin, and globulin), and urine samples were obtained on days 0 and 15 for urinary evaluation (urine I). The results showed a high mortality rate (SG = 4 and SGCT = 2), providing inadequate data on the clinical course of CDV infection. MSC therapy resulted in no significant improvement when administered during the acute phase of canine distemper disease, and a prevalence of animals with high mortality rate was found in both groups due to the severity of symptoms.

  13. Intraoperative Radiotherapy in Early-Stage Breast Cancer: Results of the Montpellier Phase II Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Lemanski, Claire; Azria, David; Gourgon-Bourgade, Sophie; Gutowski, Marian; Rouanet, Phillippe; Saint-Aubert, Bernard; Ailleres, Norbert; Fenoglietto, Pascal; Dubois, Jean-Bernard

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: We recently presented the intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) technique given as a reliable alternative to conventional boost radiation after breast-conserving surgery. The low crude numbers of recurrence in elderly patients led us to investigate the feasibility and the efficacy of this procedure as a sole treatment. Methods and Materials: We included 94 patients older than 65 years in this phase II trial. Among them, 42 patients presented with all the inclusion criteria, i.e., stages pT0 to pT1 and pN0, ductal invasive unifocal carcinoma, and tumor-free margin of >2 mm. IORT was delivered using a dedicated linear accelerator. One 21-Gy fraction was prescribed and specified at the 90% isodose, using electrons. In vivo dosimetry was performed for all patients. The primary endpoint was the quality index. Secondary endpoints were quality of life, local recurrences, cosmetic results, and specific and overall rates of survival. Results: The median follow-up was 30 months (range, 12-49 months), and median age was 72 years (range, 66-80 years). The median tumor diameter was 10 mm. All patients received the total prescribed dose. No acute grade 3 toxicities were observed. Endpoints for all but one patient corresponded to acceptable quality index criteria. Pretreatment quality-of-life scores were maximal, and no significant decrease was observed during follow-up. Cosmesis was good to excellent at 6 months. Two patients experienced recurrence but underwent salvage mastectomy. Conclusion: Our results confirm that exclusive partial-breast IORT is feasible for treating early-stage breast cancer in the elderly. IORT may be considered an alternative treatment for a selected population and offers a safe one-step treatment.

  14. Evaluation of fine-particle catalysts: Activity testing results and phase identification using Mossbauer spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Stohl, F.V.; Diegert, K.V.; Goodnow, D.; Rao, K.R.P.M.; Huggins, F.; Huffman, G.P.

    1994-10-01

    To evaluate and compare the activities/selectivities of fine- particle size catalysts being developed in the DOE/PETC Advanced Research (AR) Coal Liquefaction program by using standard coal liquefaction activity test procedures. Previously reported results have described the standard test procedure that was developed at Sandia to evaluate fine-particle size iron catalysts being developed in DOE/PETC`s AR Coal Liquefaction Program. This test uses DECS-17 Blind Canyon Coal, phenanthrene as the reaction solvent, and a factorial experimental design that enables evaluation of a catalyst over ranges of temperature (350 to 400{degrees}C), time (20 to 60 minutes), and catalyst loading (0 to 1 wt% on a dmmf coal basis). Testing has been performed on Pacific Northwest Laboratories` (PNL) 6-line ferrihydrite catalyst. Results showed that this catalyst is more active than the University of Pittsburgh`s sulfated iron oxide catalyst that was evaluated previously. PNL has also produced two additional batches of catalyst in an effort to optimize their preparation procedures for larger batches. Sandia has observed significant differences in activities among these three catalysts; these differences might be due to particle size effects, the type of drying procedure, or the amount of moisture present. Mossbauer characterization of the iron phases in the coal, catalyst precursors, and tetrahydrofuran (THF) insoluble material from liquefaction reactions has been performed on the University of Pittsburgh`s catalyst and the first PNL catalyst that was tested at Sandia. The Mossbauer results were obtained at the University of Kentucky and will be presented. Future work will include testing additional catalysts being developed in the AR Coal Liquefaction Program, developing procedures to characterize reaction products, and determining the kinetics of the reactions.

  15. Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration, Continuation: Phase II Results of a Floating Semisubmersible Wind System: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, A.; Jonkman, J.; Musial, W.; Vorpahl, F.; Popko, W.

    2013-11-01

    Offshore wind turbines are designed and analyzed using comprehensive simulation tools that account for the coupled dynamics of the wind inflow, aerodynamics, elasticity, and controls of the turbine, along with the incident waves, sea current, hydrodynamics, and foundation dynamics of the support structure. The Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration (OC3), which operated under the International Energy Agency (IEA) Wind Task 23, was established to verify the accuracy of these simulation tools [1]. This work was then extended under the Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration, Continuation (OC4) project under IEA Wind Task 30 [2]. Both of these projects sought to verify the accuracy of offshore wind turbine dynamics simulation tools (or codes) through code-to-code comparison of simulated responses of various offshore structures. This paper describes the latest findings from Phase II of the OC4 project, which involved the analysis of a 5-MW turbine supported by a floating semisubmersible. Twenty-two different organizations from 11 different countries submitted results using 24 different simulation tools. The variety of organizations contributing to the project brought together expertise from both the offshore structure and wind energy communities. Twenty-one different load cases were examined, encompassing varying levels of model complexity and a variety of metocean conditions. Differences in the results demonstrate the importance and accuracy of the various modeling approaches used. Significant findings include the importance of mooring dynamics to the mooring loads, the role nonlinear hydrodynamic terms play in calculating drift forces for the platform motions, and the difference between global (at the platform level) and local (at the member level) modeling of viscous drag. The results from this project will help guide development and improvement efforts for these tools to ensure that they are providing the accurate information needed to support the design and

  16. Pd-Ag chronology of volatile depletion, crystallization and shock in the Muonionalusta IVA iron meteorite and implications for its parent body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horan, M. F.; Carlson, R. W.; Blichert-Toft, J.

    2012-10-01

    Muonionalusta, a Group IVA iron meteorite, was analyzed for its 107Pd-107Ag isotope systematics by multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) in order to better constrain the initial Solar System abundance of 107Pd and to provide high resolution chronology of the evolution of its parent body. Six metal samples from Muonionalusta yield Ag abundances between 0.1012 and 1.461 ng/g, 107Ag/109Ag between 1.131 and 1.805, with 108Pd/109Ag ratios of 2201 to 52,300. The metal Pd/Ag and Ag isotopic data are correlated with a slope corresponding to a 107Pd/108Pd of (2.15±0.30)×10-5. If the Pd-Ag and Pb-Pb isotope systems closed at the same time in Muonionalusta, i.e., 2-3 Ma after CAI formation, then an initial Solar System ratio of 107Pd/108Pd=(2.8±0.5)×10-5 can be inferred. One troilite sample contains 8.478 ng/g Ag and has a 107Ag/109Ag ratio of 1.0833; its Pd concentration is 205.2 ng/g corresponding to a low 108Pd/109Ag of 13.56. The Pd-Ag results for this troilite plot near the extrapolation of the line passing through the metal points and define an initial 107Ag/109Ag that is substantially higher than chondritic, indicating that Muonionalusta formed from a precursor with high Pd/Ag. Pd and Ag concentrations in Muonionalusta metal suggest fractional crystallization from a source having Pd/Ag>4500, but the initial Ag isotopic composition for Muonionalusta troilite limits the duration of the high Pd/Ag to an interval of ≤0.6 Ma before cooling to closure of the Pd-Ag system. This result suggests that depletion of Ag and other volatile elements occurred shortly before accretion and cooling of the IVA parent body, and may have been associated with violent disruption of a progenitor to the IVA parent. Another troilite sample, its chromite inclusions and adjacent metal were isotopically homogenized locally after 107Pd had decayed, possibly by a later episode of shock >50 Ma after Solar System formation.

  17. Surrogate/spent fuel sabotage : aerosol ratio test program and Phase 2 test results.

    SciTech Connect

    Borek, Theodore Thaddeus III; Thompson, N. Slater; Sorenson, Ken Bryce; Hibbs, R.S.; Nolte, Oliver; Molecke, Martin Alan; Autrusson, Bruno; Young, F. I.; Koch, Wolfgang; Brochard, Didier; Pretzsch, Gunter Guido; Lange, Florentin

    2004-05-01

    A multinational test program is in progress to quantify the aerosol particulates produced when a high energy density device, HEDD, impacts surrogate material and actual spent fuel test rodlets. This program provides needed data that are relevant to some sabotage scenarios in relation to spent fuel transport and storage casks, and associated risk assessments; the program also provides significant political benefits in international cooperation. We are quantifying the spent fuel ratio, SFR, the ratio of the aerosol particles released from HEDD-impacted actual spent fuel to the aerosol particles produced from surrogate materials, measured under closely matched test conditions. In addition, we are measuring the amounts, nuclide content, size distribution of the released aerosol materials, and enhanced sorption of volatile fission product nuclides onto specific aerosol particle size fractions. These data are crucial for predicting radiological impacts. This document includes a thorough description of the test program, including the current, detailed test plan, concept and design, plus a description of all test components, and requirements for future components and related nuclear facility needs. It also serves as a program status report as of the end of FY 2003. All available test results, observations, and analyses - primarily for surrogate material Phase 2 tests using cerium oxide sintered ceramic pellets are included. This spent fuel sabotage - aerosol test program is coordinated with the international Working Group for Sabotage Concerns of Transport and Storage Casks, WGSTSC, and supported by both the U.S. Department of Energy and Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

  18. The Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project Phase 6 (GeoMIP6): simulation design and preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravitz, B.; Robock, A.; Tilmes, S.; Boucher, O.; English, J. M.; Irvine, P. J.; Jones, A.; Lawrence, M. G.; MacCracken, M.; Muri, H.; Moore, J. C.; Niemeier, U.; Phipps, S. J.; Sillmann, J.; Storelvmo, T.; Wang, H.; Watanabe, S.

    2015-06-01

    We present a suite of new climate model experiment designs for the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP). This set of experiments, named GeoMIP6 (to be consistent with the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 6), builds on the previous GeoMIP simulations, and has been expanded to address several further important topics, including key uncertainties in extreme events, the use of geoengineering as part of a portfolio of responses to climate change, and the relatively new idea of cirrus cloud thinning to allow more longwave radiation to escape to space. We discuss experiment designs, as well as the rationale for those designs, showing preliminary results from individual models when available. We also introduce a new feature, called the GeoMIP Testbed, which provides a platform for simulations that will be performed with a few models and subsequently assessed to determine whether the proposed experiment designs will be adopted as core (Tier 1) GeoMIP experiments. This is meant to encourage various stakeholders to propose new targeted experiments that address their key open science questions, with the goal of making GeoMIP more relevant to a broader set of communities.

  19. The Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project Phase 6 (GeoMIP6): simulation design and preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravitz, B.; Robock, A.; Tilmes, S.; Boucher, O.; English, J. M.; Irvine, P. J.; Jones, A.; Lawrence, M. G.; MacCracken, M.; Muri, H.; Moore, J. C.; Niemeier, U.; Phipps, S. J.; Sillmann, J.; Storelvmo, T.; Wang, H.; Watanabe, S.

    2015-10-01

    We present a suite of new climate model experiment designs for the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP). This set of experiments, named GeoMIP6 (to be consistent with the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 6), builds on the previous GeoMIP project simulations, and has been expanded to address several further important topics, including key uncertainties in extreme events, the use of geoengineering as part of a portfolio of responses to climate change, and the relatively new idea of cirrus cloud thinning to allow more longwave radiation to escape to space. We discuss experiment designs, as well as the rationale for those designs, showing preliminary results from individual models when available. We also introduce a new feature, called the GeoMIP Testbed, which provides a platform for simulations that will be performed with a few models and subsequently assessed to determine whether the proposed experiment designs will be adopted as core (Tier 1) GeoMIP experiments. This is meant to encourage various stakeholders to propose new targeted experiments that address their key open science questions, with the goal of making GeoMIP more relevant to a broader set of communities.

  20. Development and first results of the Yale PIXeY two-phase xenon detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Destefano, Nicholas E.; Bernard, Ethan; Edwards, Blair; Gai, Moshe; Horn, Markus; Larsen, Nicole; McKinsey, Daniel; Tennyson, Brian; Wahl, Christopher

    2013-09-01

    PIXeY (Particle Identification in Xenon at Yale) is a two-phase (liquid/gas) xenon prototype time projection chamber with 3 kg active mass. PIXeY was built to optimize energy resolution and gamma/neutron discrimination, with a number of technological improvements over previous work. Parallel-wire grids, which control the drift and proportionalscintillation fields, are optimized both for light collection efficiency and field uniformity. High quantum efficiency Hamamatsu R8778 PMTs, high-reflectivity Teflon walls, and charge-light anti-correlation techniques are also incorporated. The first run of the detector has concluded, where all systems were tested both using LED calibration methods as well as using sources for calibration and spectral measurements. Ultimately our results were limited by PMT calibration issues, low light collection caused by saturation, and low drift fields constrained by high voltage hardware. The second run of the detector is currently underway with several improved components. The feedthroughs for higher voltages have improved to allow a much higher operating voltage, new PMT bases for more stable operation have been installed, and three new grids with transparencies between 92% and 97% have been added. Once the energy resolution studies have concluded, PIXeY will serve as a platform for future improvements, including multiple optical volumes and single wire readout for R&D on gamma-ray imaging.

  1. Bubble Generation in a Flowing Liquid Medium and Resulting Two-Phase Flow in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pais, S. C.; Kamotani, Y.; Bhunia, A.; Ostrach, S.

    1999-01-01

    forming bubble decreases, as the superficial liquid velocity is in-creased. Furthermore, it is shown that the void fraction of the resulting two-phase flow increases with volumetric gas flow rate Q(sub d), pipe diameter and gas injection nozzle diameter, while they decrease with surrounding liquid flow. The important role played by flowing liquid in detaching bubbles in a reduced gravity environment is thus emphasized. We observe that the void fraction can be accurately controlled by using single nozzle gas injection, rather than by employing multiple port injection, since the later system gives rise to unpredictable coalescence of adjacent bubbles. It is of interest to note that empirical bubble size and corresponding void fraction are somewhat smaller for the co-flow geometry than the cross-flow configuration at similar flow conditions with similar pipe and nozzle diameters. In order to supplement the empirical data, a theoretical model is employed to study single bubble generation in the dynamic (Q(sub d) = 1 - 1000 cu cm/s) and bubbly flow regime within the framework of the co-flow configuration. This theoretical model is based on an overall force balance acting on the bubble during the two stages of generation, namely the expansion and the detachment stage. Two sets of forces, one aiding and the other inhibiting bubble detachment are identified. Under conditions of reduced gravity, gas momentum flux enhances, while the surface tension force at the air injection nozzle tip inhibits bubble detachment. In parallel, liquid drag and inertia can act as both attaching and detaching forces, depending on the relative velocity of the bubble with respect to the surrounding liquid. Predictions of the theoretical model compare well with our experimental results. However, at higher superficial liquid velocities, as the bubble loses its spherical form, empirical bubble size no longer matches the theoretical predictions. In summary, we have developed a combined experimental and

  2. Euclid near infrared spectrophotometer instrument concept and first test results at the end of phase B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciaszek, Thierry; Ealet, Anne; Jahnke, Knud; Prieto, Eric; Barbier, Rémi; Mellier, Yannick; Costille, Anne; Ducret, Franck; Fabron, Christophe; Gimenez, Jean-Luc; Grange, Robert; Martin, Laurent; Rossin, Christelle; Pamplona, Tony; Vola, Pascal; Clémens, Jean Claude; Smadja, Gérard; Amiaux, Jérome; Barrière, Jean Christophe; Berthe, Michel; De Rosa, Adriano; Franceschi, Enrico; Morgante, Gianluca; Trifoglio, Massimo; Valenziano, Luca; Bonoli, Carlotta; Bortoletto, Favio; D'Alessandro, Maurizio; Corcione, Leonardo; Ligori, Sebastiano; Garilli, Bianca; Riva, Marco; Grupp, Frank; Vogel, Carolin; Hormuth, Felix; Seidel, Gregor; Wachter, Stefanie; Diaz, Jose Javier; Grañena, Ferran; Padilla, Cristobal; Toledo, Rafael; Lilje, Per B.; Solheim, Bjarte G. B.; Toulouse-Aastrup, Corinne; Andersen, Michael; Holmes, Warren; Israelsson, Ulf; Seiffert, Michael; Weber, Carissa; Waczynski, Augustyn; Laureijs, René J.; Racca, Giuseppe; Salvignol, Jean-Christophe; Strada, Paolo

    2014-08-01

    The Euclid mission objective is to understand why the expansion of the Universe is accelerating by mapping the geometry of the dark Universe by investigating the distance-redshift relationship and tracing the evolution of cosmic structures. The Euclid project is part of ESA's Cosmic Vision program with its launch planned for 2020. The NISP (Near Infrared Spectro-Photometer) is one of the two Euclid instruments and is operating in the near-IR spectral region (0.9-2μm) as a photometer and spectrometer. The instrument is composed of: - a cold (135K) optomechanical subsystem consisting of a SiC structure, an optical assembly (corrector and camera lens), a filter wheel mechanism, a grism wheel mechanism, a calibration unit and a thermal control system - a detection subsystem based on a mosaic of 16 Teledyne HAWAII2RG cooled to 95K with their front-end readout electronic cooled to 140K, integrated on a mechanical focal plane structure made with Molybdenum and Aluminum. The detection subsystem is mounted on the optomechanical subsystem structure - a warm electronic subsystem (280K) composed of a data processing / detector control unit and of an instrument control unit that interfaces with the spacecraft via a 1553 bus for command and control and via Spacewire links for science data This presentation describes the architecture of the instrument at the end of the phase B (Preliminary Design Review), the expected performance, the technological key challenges and preliminary test results obtained on a detection system demonstration model.

  3. The Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project Phase 6 (GeoMIP6): Simulation design and preliminary results

    DOE PAGES

    Kravitz, Benjamin S.; Robock, Alan; Tilmes, S.; ...

    2015-10-27

    We present a suite of new climate model experiment designs for the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP). This set of experiments, named GeoMIP6 (to be consistent with the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 6), builds on the previous GeoMIP project simulations, and has been expanded to address several further important topics, including key uncertainties in extreme events, the use of geoengineering as part of a portfolio of responses to climate change, and the relatively new idea of cirrus cloud thinning to allow more long wave radiation to escape to space. We discuss experiment designs, as well as the rationale formore » those designs, showing preliminary results from individual models when available. We also introduce a new feature, called the GeoMIP Testbed, which provides a platform for simulations that will be performed with a few models and subsequently assessed to determine whether the proposed experiment designs will be adopted as core (Tier 1) GeoMIP experiments. In conclusion, this is meant to encourage various stakeholders to propose new targeted experiments that address their key open science questions, with the goal of making GeoMIP more relevant to a broader set of communities.« less

  4. The Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project Phase 6 (GeoMIP6): Simulation design and preliminary results

    SciTech Connect

    Kravitz, Benjamin S.; Robock, Alan; Tilmes, S.; Boucher, Olivier; English, J. M.; Irvine, Peter J.; Jones, Andrew; Lawrence, M. G.; MacCracken, Michael C.; Muri, Helene O.; Moore, John C.; Niemeier, Ulrike; Phipps, Steven J.; Sillmann, Jana; Storelvmo, Trude; Wang, Hailong; Watanabe, Shingo

    2015-10-27

    We present a suite of new climate model experiment designs for the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP). This set of experiments, named GeoMIP6 (to be consistent with the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 6), builds on the previous GeoMIP project simulations, and has been expanded to address several further important topics, including key uncertainties in extreme events, the use of geoengineering as part of a portfolio of responses to climate change, and the relatively new idea of cirrus cloud thinning to allow more long wave radiation to escape to space. We discuss experiment designs, as well as the rationale for those designs, showing preliminary results from individual models when available. We also introduce a new feature, called the GeoMIP Testbed, which provides a platform for simulations that will be performed with a few models and subsequently assessed to determine whether the proposed experiment designs will be adopted as core (Tier 1) GeoMIP experiments. In conclusion, this is meant to encourage various stakeholders to propose new targeted experiments that address their key open science questions, with the goal of making GeoMIP more relevant to a broader set of communities.

  5. Results from the first preclinical CT scanner with grating based phase contrast and a rotating gantry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bech, Martin; Tapfer, Arne; Velroyen, Astrid; Yaroshenko, Andre; Pauwels, Bart; Bruyndonckx, Peter; Liu, Xuan; Sasov, Alexander; Mohr, Jürgen; Walter, Marco; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2012-07-01

    After successful demonstrations of soft-tissue phase-contrast imaging with grating interferometers at synchrotron radiation sources and at laboratory based x-ray tubes, a first preclinical CT scanner with grating based phase contrast imaging modality has been constructed. The rotating gantry is equipped with a three-grating interferometer, a 50 watt tungsten anode source and a Hamamatsu flat panel detector. The total length of the interferometer is 45 cm, and the bed of the scanner is optimized for mice, with a scanning diameter of 35 mm. From one single scan both phase-contrast and standard attenuation based tomography can be attained, providing an overall gain in image contrast.

  6. Results from the first preclinical CT scanner with grating based phase contrast and a rotating gantry

    SciTech Connect

    Bech, Martin; Tapfer, Arne; Velroyen, Astrid; Yaroshenko, Andre; Pauwels, Bart; Bruyndonckx, Peter; Liu Xuan; Sasov, Alexander; Mohr, Juergen; Walter, Marco; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2012-07-31

    After successful demonstrations of soft-tissue phase-contrast imaging with grating interferometers at synchrotron radiation sources and at laboratory based x-ray tubes, a first preclinical CT scanner with grating based phase contrast imaging modality has been constructed. The rotating gantry is equipped with a three-grating interferometer, a 50 watt tungsten anode source and a Hamamatsu flat panel detector. The total length of the interferometer is 45 cm, and the bed of the scanner is optimized for mice, with a scanning diameter of 35 mm. From one single scan both phase-contrast and standard attenuation based tomography can be attained, providing an overall gain in image contrast.

  7. Ten- to 15-year results of the Oxford Phase III mobile unicompartmental knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Lisowski, L. A.; Meijer, L. I.; van den Bekerom, M. P. J.; Pilot, P.; Lisowski, A. E.

    2016-01-01

    Aims The interest in unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) for medial osteoarthritis has increased rapidly but the long-term follow-up of the Oxford UKAs has yet to be analysed in non-designer centres. We have examined our ten- to 15-year clinical and radiological follow-up data for the Oxford Phase III UKAs. Patients and Methods Between January 1999 and January 2005 a total of 138 consecutive Oxford Phase III arthroplasties were performed by a single surgeon in 129 patients for medial compartment osteoarthritis (71 right and 67 left knees, mean age 72.0 years (47 to 91), mean body mass index 28.2 (20.7 to 52.2)). Both clinical data and radiographs were prospectively recorded and obtained at intervals. Of the 129 patients, 32 patients (32 knees) died, ten patients (12 knees) were not able to take part in the final clinical and radiological assessment due to physical and mental conditions, but via telephone interview it was confirmed that none of these ten patients (12 knees) had a revision of the knee arthroplasty. One patient (two knees) was lost to follow-up. Results The mean follow-up was 11.7 years (10 to 15). A total of 11 knees (8%) were revised. The survival at 15 years with revision for any reason as the endpoint was 90.6% (95% confidence interval (CI) 85.2 to 96.0) and revision related to the prosthesis was 99.3% (95% CI 97.9 to 100). The mean total Knee Society Score was 47 (0 to 80) pre-operatively and 81 (30 to 100) at latest follow-up. The mean Oxford Knee Score was 19 (12 to 40) pre-operatively and 42 (28 to 55) at final follow-up. Radiolucency beneath the tibial component occurred in 22 of 81 prostheses (27.2%) without evidence of loosening. Conclusion This study supports the use of UKA in medial compartment osteoarthritis with excellent long-term functional and radiological outcomes with an excellent 15-year survival rate. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2016;98-B(10 Suppl B):41–7. PMID:27694515

  8. Low-Frequency Foam Insulator (LOFFI) Accelerometer Mount Characterization Results and Analysis for Phase I (FY2013)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    Low-Frequency Foam Insulator (LOFFI) Accelerometer Mount Characterization Results and Analysis for Phase I (FY2013) by Andrew Drysdale...Proving Ground, MD 21005-5068 ARL-TR-6977 June 2014 Low-Frequency Foam Insulator (LOFFI) Accelerometer Mount Characterization Results...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Low-Frequency Foam Insulator (LOFFI) Accelerometer Mount Characterization Results and Analysis for Phase I (FY2013) 5a

  9. Fasa Registry on Acute Myocardial Infarction (FaRMI): Feasibility Study and Pilot Phase Results

    PubMed Central

    Askari, Alireza; Zakeri, Habib; Farjam, Mojtaba; Dehghan, Azizallah; Zendehdel, Kazem

    2016-01-01

    Background Myocardial infarction (MI) is the leading cause of death in Iran. Every attempt to improve treatment patterns and patient outcomes needs a surveillance system to both consider the efficacy and safety measures. Fasa Registry on Myocardial Infarction (FaRMI) is the first population-based registry for acute MI in Iran targeted to provide meticulous description of patients’ characteristics, to explore the management patterns of these patients, to discover the degree of adherence to the practice guidelines, and to investigate the determinants of poor in-hospital and later outcomes. Methods A diagnosis of acute MI (type I, II and III) was made upon the accepted criteria by the attending cardiologists and types IV and V MI were excluded. Two registrar nurses gathered data on demographics, place of residence and ethnicity, past medical history, risk factors, and the clinical course. Management patterns in the pre-hospital setting, during the hospital stay and at the discharge time were recorded. Routine laboratory results and cardiac biomarkers on three consecutive days were registered. Results pilot phase included the first 95 patients, 63.5% of whom were men and 31.5% were women. With a mean age of 62.89±13.75 years among participants, the rate of premature MI was 31.8%. ST segment elevation MI accounted for 68.2% cases and inferior wall was the most prevalent region involved followed by anterior and posterior walls. Discussion Obtained data on the characteristics of patients suffering an MI event revealed the major determinants of delay in initiation of therapies and contributors of poor outcome. Completeness of data was guaranteed upon involvement of multiple checkpoints and data quality was secured by means of automatic validation processes in addition to weekly physicians’ roundups. Conclusion Execution of FaRMI in the form presented is feasible and it will build up a comprehensive population-based registry for MI in the region. PMID:27907128

  10. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer: Interim Results of a Prospective Phase II Clinical Trial

    SciTech Connect

    King, Christopher R. Brooks, James D.; Gill, Harcharan; Pawlicki, Todd; Cotrutz, Cristian; Presti, Joseph C.

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: The radiobiology of prostate cancer favors a hypofractionated dose regimen. We report results of a prospective Phase II clinical trial of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Forty-one low-risk prostate cancer patients with 6 months' minimum follow-up received 36.25 Gy in five fractions of 7.25 Gy with image-guided SBRT alone using the CyberKnife. The early (<3 months) and late (>6 months) urinary and rectal toxicities were assessed using validated quality of life questionnaires (International Prostate Symptom Score, Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite) and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) toxicity criteria. Patterns of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) response are analyzed. Results: The median follow-up was 33 months. There were no RTOG Grade 4 acute or late rectal/urinary complications. There were 2 patients with RTOG Grade 3 late urinary toxicity and none with RTOG Grade 3 rectal complications. A reduced rate of severe rectal toxicities was observed with every-other-day vs. 5 consecutive days treatment regimen (0% vs. 38%, p = 0.0035). A benign PSA bounce (median, 0.4 ng/mL) was observed in 12 patients (29%) occurring at 18 months (median) after treatment. At last follow-up, no patient has had a PSA failure regardless of biochemical failure definition. Of 32 patients with 12 months minimum follow-up, 25 patients (78%) achieved a PSA nadir {<=}0.4 ng/mL. A PSA decline to progressively lower nadirs up to 3 years after treatment was observed. Conclusions: The early and late toxicity profile and PSA response for prostate SBRT are highly encouraging. Continued accrual and follow-up will be necessary to confirm durable biochemical control rates and low toxicity profiles.

  11. Interaction-driven phases in a Dirac semimetal: exact diagonalization results.

    PubMed

    Guo, Huaiming; Jia, Yongfei

    2014-11-26

    The interaction-driven phases in the Dirac semimetal (SM) of the π-flux model on the square lattice are studied with nearest-(NN), next-nearest-(NNN) and next-next-nearest-neighbor (NNNN) interactions using the exact diagonalization method. We find that the NN interaction drives a phase transition from the SM phase to a charge density wave insulator. In the presence of the NNN interaction, the system becomes an anisotropic SM for small interactions and an insulator with the stripe order for large ones. The NNNN interaction drives the Dirac SM to a dimmerized insulator. The interplay of the NNN and NNNN interactions is also studied. We find that the NNNN interaction firstly eliminates the effect of the NNN interaction and then develops its favorable order. In the calculations, the signature of the interaction-driven quantum anomalous Hall phase is not found.

  12. New Cyclic Voltammetry Method for Examining Phase Transitions on Electrodes: Simulated Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abou Hamad, Ibrahim; Robb, Daniel; Rikvold, Per Arne

    2007-03-01

    We propose a new experimental technique for cyclic voltammetry, based on the first-order reversal curve (FORC) method for analysis of systems undergoing hysteresis. The advantages of this technique are demonstrated by applying it to dynamical models of electrochemical adsorption. The method can not only differentiate between discontinuous and continuous phase transitions, but can also quite accurately recover equilibrium behavior from dynamic analysis of systems with a continuous phase transition. The FORC diagram for a discontinuous phase transition is characterized by a negative (unstable) region separating two positive (stable) regions, while such a negative region does not exist for continuous phase transitions. Experimental data for Electrochemical FORC (EC-FORC) analysis could easily be obtained by simple reprogramming of a potentiostat designed for conventional cyclic-voltammetry experiments.I. Abou Hamad, D.T. Robb, P.A. Rikvold, J. Electroanal. Chem., in press.

  13. New Results in Two-Phase Pressure Drop Calculations at Reduced Gravity Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braisted, Jon; Kurwitz, Cable; Best, Frederick

    2004-02-01

    The mass, power, and volume energy savings of two-phase systems for future spacecraft creates many advantages over current single-phase systems. Current models of two-phase phenomena such as pressure drop, void fraction, and flow regime prediction are still not well defined for space applications. Commercially available two-phase modeling software has been developed for a large range of acceleration fields including reduced-gravity conditions. Recently, a two-phase experiment has been flown to expand the two-phase database. A model of the experiment was created in the software to determine how well the software could predict the pressure drop observed in the experiment. Of the simulations conducted, the computer model shows good agreement of the pressure drop in the experiment to within 30%. However, the software does begin to over-predict pressure drop in certain regions of a flow regime map indicating that some models used in the software package for reduced-gravity modeling need improvement.

  14. Hypolipidemic effects of acute and sub-chronic administration of an aqueous extract of Ajuga iva L. whole plant in normal and diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    El-Hilaly, Jaouad; Tahraoui, Adil; Israili, Zafar H; Lyoussi, Badiâa

    2006-05-24

    Diabetes is often accompanied by lipid abnormalities, which contribute significantly to cardiovascular (CV) morbidity and mortality in diabetic patients. The plant Ajuga iva (L.) Schreiber (Labiatea) is used in the treatment of diabetes in Moroccan folk medicine. Previously, we have demonstrated potent hypoglycemic activity and relatively non-toxic nature of a lyophilized aqueous extract of the whole plant (AI-extract) in normal (normoglycemic) and streptozotocin (STZ)-diabetic rats. In this study, we examined the AI-extract for its possible lipid-lowering activity in normal and STZ-diabetic rats. Taurine (TR) and glibenclamide (GLB) were used as reference substances. As shown previously, the AI-extract (10 mg/kg; oral) reduced plasma glucose levels after acute (single) and sub-chronic (3 weeks) dosing both in normal and diabetic rats. In normal rats, single and repeated oral administration of the AI-extract, at a dose of 10 mg/kg produced a small but significant decrease in plasma CHL levels (P<0.05). A single dose of the AI-extract did not produce a significant change in plasma TG, but sub-chronic dosing (for up to 21 days) caused a significant decrease in plasma TG (P<0.05). In STZ-diabetic rats, a single dose as well as repeated (3 weeks) treatment with the AI-extract produced a significant decrease in plasma CHL (P<0.01), and triglyceride (P<0.01) levels. The AI-extract also prevented weight loss in the diabetic animals. In summary, an aqueous extract of the Ajuga iva whole plant showed hypolipidemic activity, in addition to its hypoglycemic effect in normoglycemic and diabetic rats. In view of the hypoglycemic and hypolipidemic activity, and its relatively non-toxic nature (shown previously), Ajuga iva may be a candidate for development as an anti-diabetic agent in humans. Further studies are warranted to confirm our results and fractionate the AI-extract to isolate and identify the active principle(s), and to determine the exact mechanism(s) of action.

  15. Cr-Bearing Inclusions in IVA Irons: Implication for Cr and Volatile Behaviors in the Metallic Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isa, J.; McKeegan, K. D.; Wasson, J. T.

    2015-07-01

    We found inclusions that contribute to bulk Cr concentrations and found fO2 or fS2 changes during crystallization. O-isotope compositions of chromite are mass-dependently lighter than other IVA oxides. Also, we discovered a new mineral MnCr2S4.

  16. Combined 238U/235U and Pb Isotopics of Planetary Core Material: The Absolute Age of the IVA Iron Muonionalusta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brennecka, G. A.; Amelin, Y.; Kleine, T.

    2016-08-01

    We report a measured 238U/235U for the IVA iron Muonionalusta. This measured value requires an age correction of ~7 Myr to the previously published Pb-Pb age. This has major implications for our understanding of planetary core formation and cooling.

  17. MRI and PET Imaging in Predicting Treatment Response in Patients With Stage IB-IVA Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-08

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Cervical Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Recurrent Cervical Carcinoma; Stage IB2 Cervical Cancer; Stage II Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  18. Chemoradiation Therapy and Ipilimumab in Treating Patients With Stages IB2-IIB or IIIB-IVA Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-08

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Positive Para-Aortic Lymph Node; Positive Pelvic Lymph Node; Stage IB2 Cervical Cancer; Stage II Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  19. Ipilimumab with Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy: Phase I Results and Immunologic Correlates from Peripheral T Cells.

    PubMed

    Tang, Chad; Welsh, James W; de Groot, Patricia; Massarelli, Erminia; Chang, Joe Y; Hess, Kenneth R; Basu, Sreyashi; Curran, Michael A; Cabanillas, Maria E; Subbiah, Vivek; Fu, Siqing; Tsimberidou, Apostolia M; Karp, Daniel; Gomez, Daniel R; Diab, Adi; Komaki, Ritsuko; Heymach, John V; Sharma, Padmanee; Naing, Aung; Hong, David S

    2017-03-15

    Purpose: Little prospective data are available on clinical outcomes and immune correlates from combination radiation and immunotherapy. We conducted a phase I trial (NCT02239900) testing stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) with ipilimumab.Experimental Design: SABR was given either concurrently (1 day after the first dose) or sequentially (1 week after the second dose) with ipilimumab (3 mg/kg every 3 weeks for 4 doses) to five treatment groups: concurrent 50 Gy (in 4 fractions) to liver; sequential 50 Gy (in 4 fractions) to liver; concurrent 50 Gy (in 4 fractions) to lung; sequential 50 Gy (in 4 fractions) to lung; and sequential 60 Gy (in 10 fractions) to lung or liver. MTD was determined with a 3 + 3 dose de-escalation design. Immune marker expression was assessed by flow cytometry.Results: Among 35 patients who initiated ipilimumab, 2 experienced dose-limiting toxicity and 12 (34%) grade 3 toxicity. Response outside the radiation field was assessable in 31 patients. Three patients (10%) exhibited partial response and 7 (23%) experienced clinical benefit (defined as partial response or stable disease lasting ≥6 months). Clinical benefit was associated with increases in peripheral CD8(+) T cells, CD8(+)/CD4(+) T-cell ratio, and proportion of CD8(+) T cells expressing 4-1BB and PD1. Liver (vs. lung) irradiation produced greater T-cell activation, reflected as increases in the proportions of peripheral T cells expressing ICOS, GITR, and 4-1BB.Conclusions: Combining SABR and ipilimumab was safe with signs of efficacy, peripheral T-cell markers may predict clinical benefit, and systemic immune activation was greater after liver irradiation. Clin Cancer Res; 23(6); 1388-96. ©2016 AACR.

  20. Stable water isotope simulation by current land-surface schemes:Results of IPILPS phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson-Sellers, A.; Fischer, M.; Aleinov, I.; McGuffie, K.; Riley, W.J.; Schmidt, G.A.; Sturm, K.; Yoshimura, K.; Irannejad, P.

    2005-10-31

    Phase 1 of isotopes in the Project for Intercomparison of Land-surface Parameterization Schemes (iPILPS) compares the simulation of two stable water isotopologues ({sup 1}H{sub 2} {sup 18}O and {sup 1}H{sup 2}H{sup 16}O) at the land-atmosphere interface. The simulations are off-line, with forcing from an isotopically enabled regional model for three locations selected to offer contrasting climates and ecotypes: an evergreen tropical forest, a sclerophyll eucalypt forest and a mixed deciduous wood. Here we report on the experimental framework, the quality control undertaken on the simulation results and the method of intercomparisons employed. The small number of available isotopically-enabled land-surface schemes (ILSSs) limits the drawing of strong conclusions but, despite this, there is shown to be benefit in undertaking this type of isotopic intercomparison. Although validation of isotopic simulations at the land surface must await more, and much more complete, observational campaigns, we find that the empirically-based Craig-Gordon parameterization (of isotopic fractionation during evaporation) gives adequately realistic isotopic simulations when incorporated in a wide range of land-surface codes. By introducing two new tools for understanding isotopic variability from the land surface, the Isotope Transfer Function and the iPILPS plot, we show that different hydrological parameterizations cause very different isotopic responses. We show that ILSS-simulated isotopic equilibrium is independent of the total water and energy budget (with respect to both equilibration time and state), but interestingly the partitioning of available energy and water is a function of the models' complexity.

  1. Treatment of Geographic Atrophy With Subconjunctival Sirolimus: Results of a Phase I/II Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Wai T.; Dresner, Samuel; Forooghian, Farzin; Glaser, Tanya; Doss, Lauren; Zhou, Mei; Cunningham, Denise; Shimel, Katherine; Harrington, Molly; Hammel, Keri; Cukras, Catherine A.; Ferris, Frederick L.; Chew, Emily Y.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the safety and effects of subconjunctival sirolimus, an mTOR inhibitor and immunosuppressive agent, for the treatment of geographic atrophy (GA). Methods. The study was a single-center, open-label phase II trial, enrolling 11 participants with bilateral GA; eight participants completed 24 months of follow-up. Sirolimus (440 μg) was administered every 3 months as a subconjunctival injection in only one randomly assigned eye in each participant for 24 months. Fellow eyes served as untreated controls. The primary efficacy outcome measure was the change in the total GA area at 24 months. Secondary outcomes included changes in visual acuity, macular sensitivity, central retinal thickness, and total drusen area. Results. The study drug was well tolerated with few symptoms and related adverse events. Study treatment in study eyes was not associated with structural or functional benefits relative to the control fellow eyes. At month 24, mean GA area increased by 54.5% and 39.7% in study and fellow eyes, respectively (P = 0.41), whereas mean visual acuity decreased by 21.0 letters and 3.0 letters in study and fellow eyes, respectively (P = 0.03). Substantial differences in mean changes in drusen area, central retinal thickness, and macular sensitivity were not detected for all analysis time points up to 24 months. Conclusions. Repeated subconjunctival sirolimus was well-tolerated in patients with GA, although no positive anatomic or functional effects were identified. Subconjunctival sirolimus may not be beneficial in the prevention of GA progression, and may potentially be associated with effects detrimental to visual acuity. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00766649.) PMID:23548622

  2. Optimized tracking of RF carriers with phase noise, including Pioneer 10 results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilnrotter, V. A.; Hurd, W. J.; Brown, D. H.

    1987-01-01

    The ability to track very weak signals from distant spacecraft is limited by the phase instabilities of the received signal and of the local oscillator employed by the receiver. These instabilities ultimately limit the minimum loop bandwidth that can be used in a phase-coherent receiver, and hence limit the ratio of received carrier power to noise spectral density which can be tracked phase coherently. A method is presented for near real time estimation of the received carrier phase and additive noise spectrum, and optimization of the phase locked loop bandwidth. The method was used with the breadboard Deep Space Network (DSN) Advanced Receiver to optimize tracking of very weak signals from the Pioneer 10 spacecraft, which is now more distant that the edge of the solar system. Tracking with bandwidths of 0.1 Hz to 1.0 Hz reduces tracking signal threshold and increases carrier loop signal to noise ratio (SNR) by 5 dB to 15 dB compared to the 3 Hz bandwidth of the receivers now used operationally in the DSN. This will enable the DSN to track Pioneer 10 until its power sources fails near the end of the century.

  3. Arctic Mixed-Phase Cloud Properties from AERI Lidar Observations: Algorithm and Results from SHEBA

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, David D.

    2005-04-01

    A new approach to retrieve microphysical properties from mixed-phase Arctic clouds is presented. This mixed-phase cloud property retrieval algorithm (MIXCRA) retrieves cloud optical depth, ice fraction, and the effective radius of the water and ice particles from ground-based, high-resolution infrared radiance and lidar cloud boundary observations. The theoretical basis for this technique is that the absorption coefficient of ice is greater than that of liquid water from 10 to 13 μm, whereas liquid water is more absorbing than ice from 16 to 25 μm. MIXCRA retrievals are only valid for optically thin (τvisible < 6) single-layer clouds when the precipitable water vapor is less than 1 cm. MIXCRA was applied to the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) data that were collected during the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) experiment from November 1997 to May 1998, where 63% of all of the cloudy scenes above the SHEBA site met this specification. The retrieval determined that approximately 48% of these clouds were mixed phase and that a significant number of clouds (during all 7 months) contained liquid water, even for cloud temperatures as low as 240 K. The retrieved distributions of effective radii for water and ice particles in single-phase clouds are shown to be different than the effective radii in mixed-phase clouds.

  4. First imaging results from Apertif, a phased-array feed for WSRT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Elizabeth A.; Adebahr, Björn; de Blok, Willem J. G.; Hess, Kelley M.; Hut, Boudewijn; Lucero, Danielle M.; Maccagni, Filippo; Morganti, Raffaella; Oosterloo, Tom; Staveley-Smith, Lister; van der Hulst, Thijs; Verheijen, Marc; Verstappen, Joris

    2017-01-01

    Apertif is a phased-array feed for the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT), increasing the field of view of the telescope by a factor of twenty-five. In 2017, three legacy surveys will commence: a shallow imaging survey, a medium-deep imaging survey, and a pulsars and fast transients survey. The medium-deep imaging survey will include coverage of the northern Herschel Atlas field, the CVn region, HetDex, and the Perseus-Pisces supercluster. The shallow imaging survey increases overlap with HetDex, has expanded coverage of the Perseus-Pisces supercluster, and includes part of the Zone of Avoidance. Both imaging surveys are coordinating with MaNGA and will have WEAVE follow-up. The imaging surveys will be done in full polarization over the frequency range 1130-1430 MHz, which corresponds to redshifts of z=0-0.256 for neutral hydrogen (HI). The spectral resolution is 12.2 kHz, or an HI velocity resolution of 2.6 km/s at z=0 and 3.2 km/s at z=0.256. The full resolution images will have a beam size of 15"x15"/sin(declination), and tapered data products (i.e., 30" resolution images) will also be available. The shallow survey will cover ~3500 square degrees with a four-sigma HI imaging sensitivity of 2.5x10^20 atoms cm^-2 (20 km/s linewidth) at the highest resolution and a continuum sensitivity of 15 uJy/beam (11 uJy/beam for polarization data). The current plan calls for the medium deep survey to cover 450 square degrees and provide an HI imaging sensitivity of 1.0x10^20 atoms cm^-2 at the highest resolution and a continuum sensitivity of 6 uJy/beam, close to the confusion limit (4 uJy/beam for polarization data, not confusion limited). Up-to-date information on Apertif and the planned surveys can be found at: http://www.apertif.nl.Commissioning of the Apertif instrument is currently underway. Here we present first results from the image commissioning, including the detection of HI absorption plus continuum and HI imaging. These results highlight the data quality

  5. MRI morphometric characterisation of the paediatric cervical spine and spinal cord in children with MPS IVA (Morquio-Brailsford syndrome).

    PubMed

    Solanki, Guirish A; Lo, William B; Hendriksz, Christian J

    2013-03-01

    Nearly all children with MPS IVA develop skeletal deformities affecting the spine. At the atlanto-axial spine, odontoid hypoplasia occurs. GAG deposition around the dens, leads to peri-odontoid infiltration. Transverse/alar ligament incompetence causes instability. Atlanto-axial instability is associated with cord compression and myelopathy, leading to major morbidity and mortality. Intervention is often required. Does the presence of widened bullet shaped vertebra in platyspondily encroach on the spinal canal and cause spinal stenosis in MPS IVA? So far, there have been no standardised morphometric measurements of the paediatric MPS IVA cervical spine to evaluate whether there is pre-existing spinal stenosis predisposing to compressive myelopathy or whether this is purely an acquired process secondary to instability and compression. This study provides the first radiological quantitative analysis of the cervical spine and spinal cord in a series of affected children. MRI morphometry indicates that the MPS IVA spine is narrower at C1-2 level giving an inverted funnel shape. There is no evidence of a reduction in the Torg ratio (canal-body ratio) in the cervical spine. The spinal canal does not exceed 11 mm at any level, significantly smaller than normal historical cohorts (14 mm). The sagittal diameter and axial surface area of both spinal canal and cord are reduced. C1-2 level cord compression was evident in the canal-cord ratio but the Torg ratio was not predictive of cord compression. In MPS IVA the reduction in the space available for the cord (SAC) is multifactorial rather than due to congenital spinal stenosis.

  6. Structure of the Vibrio cholerae Type IVb Pilus and stability comparison with the Neisseria gonorrhoeae type IVa pilus.

    PubMed

    Li, Juliana; Egelman, Edward H; Craig, Lisa

    2012-04-20

    Type IV pili are multifunctional filaments displayed on many bacterial pathogens. Members of the Type IVa pilus subclass are found on a diverse group of human pathogens, whereas Type IVb pili are found almost exclusively on enteric bacteria. The Type IVa and IVb subclasses are distinguished by differences in the pilin subunits, including the fold of the globular domain. To understand the implications of the distinct pilin folds, we compared the stabilities of pilin subunits and pilus filaments for the Type IVa GC pilus from Neisseria gonorrhoeae and the Type IVb toxin-coregulated pilus (TCP) from Vibrio cholerae. We show that while recombinant TCP pilin is more stable than GC pilin, the GC pili are more resistant to proteolysis, heat and chemical denaturation than TCP, remaining intact in 8 M urea. To understand these differences, we determined the TCP structure by electron microscopy and three-dimensional image reconstruction. TCP have an architecture similar to that of GC pili, with subunits arranged in a right-handed 1-start helix and related by an 8.4-Å axial rise and a 96.8° azimuthal rotation. However, the TCP subunits are not as tightly packed as GC pilins, and the distinct Type IVb pilin fold exposes a segment of the α-helical core of TCP. Hydrophobic interactions dominate for both pilus subtypes, but base stacking by aromatic residues conserved among the Type IVa pilins may contribute to GC pilus stability. The extraordinary stability of GC pili may represent an adaptation of the Type IVa pili to harsh environments and the need to retract against external forces.

  7. INDEPENDENT TECHNICAL REVIEW OF THE C-400 INTERIM REMEDIAL PROJECT PHASE I RESULTS, PADUCAH, KENTUCKY

    SciTech Connect

    Looney, B.; Rossabi, J.; Stewart,L.; Richards, W.

    2010-10-29

    The groundwater and soil in the vicinity of the C-400 Building at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), is contaminated with substantial quantities of industrial solvents, primarily trichoroethene (TCE). This solvent 'source' is recognized as a significant challenge and an important remediation target in the overall environmental cleanup strategy for PGDP. Thus, the cleanup of the C-400 TCE Source is a principal focus for the Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors, and for PGDP regulators and stakeholders. Using a formal investigation, feasibility study and decision process, Electrical Resistance Heating (ERH) was selected for the treatment of the soil and groundwater in the vicinity of C-400. ERH was selected as an interim action to remove 'a significant portion of the contaminant mass of TCE at the C-400 Cleaning Building area through treatment' with the longer term goal of reducing 'the period the TCE concentration in groundwater remains above its Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL).' ERH is a thermal treatment that enhances the removal of TCE and related solvents from soil and groundwater. The heterogeneous conditions at PGDP, particularly the high permeability regional gravel aquifer (RGA), are challenging to ERH. Thus, a phased approach is being followed to implement this relatively expensive and complex remediation technology. Conceptually, the phased approach encourages safety and efficiency by providing a 'lessons learned' process and allowing appropriate adjustments to be identified and implemented prior to follow-on phase(s) of treatment. More specifically, early deployment targeted portions of the challenging RGA treatment zone with relatively little contamination reducing the risk of adverse collateral impacts from underperformance in terms of heating and capture. Because of the importance and scope of the C-400 TCE source remediation activities, DOE chartered an Independent Technical Review (ITR) in 2007 to assess the C-400 ERH plans prior

  8. The Two-Phase Flow Separator Experiment Breadboard Model: Reduced Gravity Aircraft Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rame, E; Sharp, L. M.; Chahine, G.; Kamotani, Y.; Gotti, D.; Owens, J.; Gilkey, K.; Pham, N.

    2015-01-01

    Life support systems in space depend on the ability to effectively separate gas from liquid. Passive cyclonic phase separators use the centripetal acceleration of a rotating gas-liquid mixture to carry out phase separation. The gas migrates to the center, while gas-free liquid may be withdrawn from one of the end plates. We have designed, constructed and tested a breadboard that accommodates the test sections of two independent principal investigators and satisfies their respective requirements, including flow rates, pressure and video diagnostics. The breadboard was flown in the NASA low-gravity airplane in order to test the system performance and design under reduced gravity conditions.

  9. PilN binding modulates the structure and binding partners of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa type IVa pilus protein PilM

    DOE PAGES

    McCallum, Matthew; Tammam, Stephanie; Little, Dustin J.; ...

    2016-03-28

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic bacterial pathogen that expresses type IVa pili. The pilus assembly system, which promotes surface-associated twitching motility and virulence, is composed of inner and outer membrane subcomplexes, connected by an alignment subcomplex composed of PilMNOP. PilM binds to the N terminus of PilN, and we hypothesize that this interaction causes functionally significant structural changes in PilM. To characterize this interaction, we determined the crystal structures of PilM and a PilM chimera where PilM was fused to the first 12 residues of PilN (PilM·PilN(1–12)). Structural analysis, multiangle light scattering coupled with size exclusion chromatography, and bacterial two-hybridmore » data revealed that PilM forms dimers mediated by the binding of a novel conserved motif in the N terminus of PilM, and binding PilN abrogates this binding interface, resulting in PilM monomerization. Structural comparison of PilM with PilM·PilN(1–12) revealed that upon PilN binding, there is a large domain closure in PilM that alters its ATP binding site. Using biolayer interferometry, we found that the association rate of PilN with PilM is higher in the presence of ATP compared with ADP. Bacterial two-hybrid data suggested the connectivity of the cytoplasmic and inner membrane components of the type IVa pilus machinery in P. aeruginosa, with PilM binding to PilB, PilT, and PilC in addition to PilN. Pull-down experiments demonstrated direct interactions of PilM with PilB and PilT. As a result, we propose a working model in which dynamic binding of PilN facilitates functionally relevant structural changes in PilM.« less

  10. PilN binding modulates the structure and binding partners of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa type IVa pilus protein PilM

    SciTech Connect

    McCallum, Matthew; Tammam, Stephanie; Little, Dustin J.; Robinson, Howard; Koo, Jason; Shah, Megha; Calmettes, Charles; Moraes, Trevor F.; Burrows, Lori L.; Howell, P. Lynne

    2016-03-28

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic bacterial pathogen that expresses type IVa pili. The pilus assembly system, which promotes surface-associated twitching motility and virulence, is composed of inner and outer membrane subcomplexes, connected by an alignment subcomplex composed of PilMNOP. PilM binds to the N terminus of PilN, and we hypothesize that this interaction causes functionally significant structural changes in PilM. To characterize this interaction, we determined the crystal structures of PilM and a PilM chimera where PilM was fused to the first 12 residues of PilN (PilM·PilN(1–12)). Structural analysis, multiangle light scattering coupled with size exclusion chromatography, and bacterial two-hybrid data revealed that PilM forms dimers mediated by the binding of a novel conserved motif in the N terminus of PilM, and binding PilN abrogates this binding interface, resulting in PilM monomerization. Structural comparison of PilM with PilM·PilN(1–12) revealed that upon PilN binding, there is a large domain closure in PilM that alters its ATP binding site. Using biolayer interferometry, we found that the association rate of PilN with PilM is higher in the presence of ATP compared with ADP. Bacterial two-hybrid data suggested the connectivity of the cytoplasmic and inner membrane components of the type IVa pilus machinery in P. aeruginosa, with PilM binding to PilB, PilT, and PilC in addition to PilN. Pull-down experiments demonstrated direct interactions of PilM with PilB and PilT. As a result, we propose a working model in which dynamic binding of PilN facilitates functionally relevant structural changes in PilM.

  11. REFINEMENT OF THE NEPHELINE DISCRIMINATOR: RESULTS OF A PHASE I STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, K; James Newell, J; Tommy Edwards, T; David Best, D; Irene Reamer, I; Phyllis Workman, P

    2008-02-13

    The performance of a glass used for immobilization of high-level nuclear waste (HLW) is generally quantified by its resistance to chemical degradation, or durability. The durability of a HLW glass is dependent on its composition. If crystalline phases form within a glass during cooling, the composition of the residual glass network is altered, therefore affecting the durability of the glass. Crystallization of nepheline (NaAlSiO{sub 4}) has been shown to adversely impact the durability of HLW glasses since it removes glass forming species (in this case, Al and Si) from the glass network. The propensity for nepheline crystallization in a HLW glass increases with increasing concentrations of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Na{sub 2}O in the glass. Nepheline crystallization is therefore of concern for processing of HLW at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) since the sludge waste streams at the Savannah River Site (SRS) can contain high concentrations of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Na{sub 2}O. Currently, a 'nepheline discriminator' is included as a process control constraint at the DWPF. The nepheline discriminator relates the concentrations of SiO{sub 2}, Na{sub 2}O and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (as weight percentages in glass) to a critical value of 0.62. The discriminator defines a boundary line on the SiO{sub 2}-Na{sub 2}O-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ternary diagram above which (or toward the SiO{sub 2} corner of the ternary) nepheline is not predicted to crystallize in the glass upon quenching or slow cooling. The current equation uses only the concentrations of the SiO{sub 2}, Na{sub 2}O and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} components in the glass in predicting whether or not nepheline is likely to crystallize. However, several other components have been shown to impact the propensity for nepheline crystallization, including B{sub 2}O{sub 3} and CaO among others. Therefore, the potential exists to further refine the nepheline discriminator to include these components. In addition, recently studied HLW

  12. Dual phase transformation and resultant magnetic properties in Fe{sub 3}Pt thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiao, S. N.; Lee, H. Y.; Chen, S. K.; Liu, S. H.

    2012-04-01

    Fifty-nm-thick Fe{sub 75}Pt{sub 25} thin films have been made on glass substrates by rf magnetron sputtering at room temperature, and subsequently annealed at 300 -700 deg. C (T{sub a}) for 1 h. The as-deposited Fe{sub 3}Pt film exhibits high magnetization of 1530 emu/cm{sup 3} and a disordered bcc structure, confirmed by high-resolution synchrotron radiation x-ray diffractometry. First-phase transformation from the bcc to disorder fcc structure occurs for samples annealed at 300 deg. C. With increasing of T{sub a} up to 375 deg. C, the film displays a nearly disordered fcc phase with low magnetization of 1083 emu/cm{sup 3}. The fcc phase changes to ordered L1{sub 2} structure for samples with T{sub a} {>=} 400 deg. C. The highly ordered L1{sub 2} phase with magnetization of 1270 emu/cm{sup 3} and coercivity of 66 Oe was obtained in Fe{sub 3}Pt film at 700 deg. C-annealing.

  13. Aquitard contaminant storage and flux resulting from dense nonaqueous phase liquid source zone dissolution and remediation

    EPA Science Inventory

    A one-dimensional diffusion model was used to investigate the effects of dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) source zone dissolution and remediation on the storage and release of contaminants from aquitards. Source zone dissolution was represented by a power-law source depleti...

  14. Macroscopic laws for immiscible two-phase flow in porous media: Results From numerical experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothman, Daniel H.

    1990-06-01

    Flow through porous media may be described at either of two length scales. At the scale of a single pore, fluids flow according to the Navier-Stokes equations and the appropriate boundary conditions. At a larger, volume-averaged scale, the flow is usually thought to obey a linear Darcy law relating flow rates to pressure gradients and body forces via phenomenological permeability coefficients. Aside from the value of the permeability coefficient, the slow flow of a single fluid in a porous medium is well-understood within this framework. The situation is considerably different, however, for the simultaneous flow of two or more fluids: not only are the phenomenological coefficients poorly understood, but the form of the macroscopic laws themselves is subject to question. I describe a numerical study of immiscible two-phase flow in an idealized two-dimensional porous medium constructed at the pore scale. Results show that the macroscopic flow is a nonlinear function of the applied forces for sufficiently low levels of forcing, but linear thereafter. The crossover, which is not predicted by conventional models, occurs when viscous forces begin to dominate capillary forces; i.e., at a sufficiently high capillary number. In the linear regime, the flow may be described by the linear phenomenological law ui = ΣjLijfj, where the flow rate ui of the ith fluid is related to the force fj applied to the jth fluid by the matrix of phenomenological coefficients Lij which depends on the relative concentrations of the two fluids. The diagonal terms are proportional to quantities commonly referred to as "relative permeabilities." The cross terms represent viscous coupling between the two fluids; they are conventionally assumed to be negligible and require special experimental procedures to observe in a laboratory. In contrast, in this numerical study the cross terms are straightforward to measure and are found to be of significant size. The cross terms are additionally observed to

  15. REFINEMENT OF THE NEPHELINE DISCRIMINATOR: RESULTS OF A PHASE II STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, K; Tommy Edwards, T

    2008-11-21

    Twenty five glass compositions were selected for a Phase II study to assess the potential for reducing the conservatism in the nepheline discriminator. The glass compositions were restricted to regions that fell within the validation ranges of the DWPF PCCS models. In addition, the liquidus temperature model was used to restrict the glass compositions so that they could all be melted at the same temperature. The nepheline discriminator was used to force the glass compositions into regions where nepheline formation was predicted to occur. The glasses were fabricated in the laboratory and characterized for crystallization and chemical durability after both quenching and slow cooling. Chemical analysis showed that the fabricated glasses met the target compositions. Nepheline was identified in one of the quenched glasses and several of the CCC glasses. There was no clear relationship between the types of crystallization that occurred in a particular glass and its location on the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Na{sub 2}O-SiO{sub 2} ternary diagram. A partitioning algorithm was used to identify trends in crystallization behavior based on glass composition. Generally, for the CCC glasses MnO influenced the crystallization of spinels and B{sub 2}O{sub 3} and SiO{sub 2} influenced the crystallization of nepheline. Measured durability responses varied from acceptable to unacceptable depending on the glass composition and type and extent of crystallization that occurred. It was not possible to identify any linear effects of composition on chemical durability performance for this set of study glasses. The results were not sufficient to recommend modification of the current nepheline discriminator at this time. It is recommended that the next series of experiments continue to focus not only on compositional regions where the PCCS models are considered applicable (i.e., the model validation ranges), but also be restricted to compositional regions where acceptable glasses are predicted to be

  16. Long-Term Results From the Contura Multilumen Balloon Breast Brachytherapy Catheter Phase 4 Registry Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Cuttino, Laurie W.; Arthur, Douglas W.; Vicini, Frank; Julian, Thomas; Mukhopadhyay, Nitai

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To describe the long-term outcomes from a completed, multi-institutional phase 4 registry trial using the Contura multilumen balloon (CMLB) breast brachytherapy catheter to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) in patients with early-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Three hundred forty-two evaluable patients were enrolled by 23 institutions between January 2008 and February 2011. All patients received 34 Gy in 10 fractions, delivered twice daily. Rigorous target coverage and normal tissue dose constraints were observed. Results: The median follow-up time was 36 months (range, 1-54 months). For the entire patient cohort of 342 patients, 10 patients experienced an ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR). Eight of these IBTR were classified as true recurrences/marginal miss (TRMM), and 2 were elsewhere failures (EF). Local recurrence-free survival was 97.8% at 3 years. For the entire cohort, 88% of patients had good to excellent overall cosmesis. The overall incidence of infection was 8.5%. Symptomatic seroma was reported in only 4.4% of patients. A separate analysis was performed to determine whether improved outcomes would be observed for patients treated at high-volume centers with extensive brachytherapy experience. Three IBTR were observed in this cohort, only 1 of which was classified as a TRMM. Local recurrence-free survival at high-volume centers was 98.1% at 3 years. Overall cosmetic outcome and toxicity were superior in patients treated at high-volume centers. In these patients, 95% had good to excellent overall cosmesis. Infection was observed in only 2.9% of patients, and symptomatic seroma was reported in only 1.9%. Conclusion: Use of the CMLB for APBI delivery is associated with acceptable long-term local control and toxicity. Local recurrence-free survival was 97.8% at 3 years. Significant (grade 3) toxicity was uncommon, and no grade 4 toxicity was observed. Treatment at high-volume centers was associated

  17. Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zemsky, Robert; Shaman, Susan; Shapiro, Daniel B.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the Collegiate Results Instrument (CRI), which measures a range of collegiate outcomes for alumni 6 years after graduation. The CRI was designed to target alumni from institutions across market segments and assess their values, abilities, work skills, occupations, and pursuit of lifelong learning. (EV)

  18. Development and application of quantitative detection method for viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) genogroup IVa.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong-Oh; Kim, Wi-Sik; Kim, Si-Woo; Han, Hyun-Ja; Kim, Jin Woo; Park, Myoung Ae; Oh, Myung-Joo

    2014-05-23

    Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) is a problematic pathogen in olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) aquaculture farms in Korea. Thus, it is necessary to develop a rapid and accurate diagnostic method to detect this virus. We developed a quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) method based on the nucleocapsid (N) gene sequence of Korean VHSV isolate (Genogroup IVa). The slope and R² values of the primer set developed in this study were -0.2928 (96% efficiency) and 0.9979, respectively. Its comparison with viral infectivity calculated by traditional quantifying method (TCID₅₀) showed a similar pattern of kinetic changes in vitro and in vivo. The qRT-PCR method reduced detection time compared to that of TCID₅₀, making it a very useful tool for VHSV diagnosis.

  19. Seasat wind and wave observations of northeast Pacific hurricane Iva, August 13, 1978

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, F. I.; Thompson, T. W.; Brown, W. E., Jr.; Weissman, D. E.

    1982-01-01

    The paper examines Seasat wind and wave observations collected in the eye of hurricane Iva on August 13, 1978 in the northeast Pacific. A maximum wind speed of 25-30 m/s is observed, along with a banana-shape high-wind-speed distribution. Two-dimensional Fourier transforms of selected SAR scenes show a dominant wavefield characterized by wavelengths of 166-211 m, with a fanlike distribution of propagation directions. A simple geometric model is proposed to explain the dominant wave field in terms of prior storm intensity and location, which is combined with the Ross parametric hurricane wave model and Seasat wind and wave data to estimate a value of 43 km for the effective radial distance from the storm center to the region of maximum winds.

  20. Transparent conductivity modulation of ZnO by group-IVA doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.; Fan, X. F.; Sun, C. Q.; Zhu, W.

    2016-04-01

    We examined the effect of group-IVA doping on the electronic structure and transmittance of ZnO using first-principle calculations. All these doped ZnO materials are found to perform n-type conductive behavior. Si-doped ZnO and Pb-doped ZnO are found to have larger optical band gap than those of Ge-doped ZnO and Sn-doped ZnO. The transmittance of Si-doped ZnO is found to be high in both UV and visible region. The enhancement of UV region transmittance can be attributed to the enhanced optical band gap, while the reduction of visible region transmittance is due to the intraband optical transition.

  1. Development and Application of Quantitative Detection Method for Viral Hemorrhagic Septicemia Virus (VHSV) Genogroup IVa

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong-Oh; Kim, Wi-Sik; Kim, Si-Woo; Han, Hyun-Ja; Kim, Jin Woo; Park, Myoung Ae; Oh, Myung-Joo

    2014-01-01

    Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) is a problematic pathogen in olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) aquaculture farms in Korea. Thus, it is necessary to develop a rapid and accurate diagnostic method to detect this virus. We developed a quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) method based on the nucleocapsid (N) gene sequence of Korean VHSV isolate (Genogroup IVa). The slope and R2 values of the primer set developed in this study were −0.2928 (96% efficiency) and 0.9979, respectively. Its comparison with viral infectivity calculated by traditional quantifying method (TCID50) showed a similar pattern of kinetic changes in vitro and in vivo. The qRT-PCR method reduced detection time compared to that of TCID50, making it a very useful tool for VHSV diagnosis. PMID:24859343

  2. Magmatic activity on the IVA parent body: Evidence from silicate-bearing iron meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulff-Møller, Finn; Rasmussen, Kaare L.; Prinz, Martin; Palme, Herbert; Spettel, Bernhardt; Kallemeyn, Gregory W.

    1995-11-01

    Four of the magmatic IVA iron meteorites contain tridymite or clinobronzite-orthobronzitetridymite which are quite unlike silicate assemblages in other iron meteorites. The textures, the bulk chemistry, and the zoning preserved in the pyroxenes strongly suggest that they are igneous cumulates. The pyroxenes have extremely low Fe/Mn-ratios (less than 20) and low contents of REEs and other incompatible elements. These cumulates crystallized from magmas of unusual composition, with some similarity to terrestrial boninites, at the protobronzite-tfdymite cotectic in the olivine-plagioclase-silica system. A liquidus temperature in the range 1400-1350°C was inferred for the Steinbach meteorite from the estimated distribution coefficient for Cr in pyroxene ( DCrsolid/liquid ˜ 0.66). The low levels of incompatible elements show that less than 1% of the residual liquid was trapped in the cumulates. During cooling at subsolidus temperatures, most of the protobronzite transformed to orthobronzite and the rest inverted to a fine inter-growth of clino- and orthobronzite. In addition, the igneous zoning of Ca, Fe, Mg, and Mn was modified by diffusion, whereas Ti, Al, and Cr were not or only slightly affected. The silica-saturated magmas could not have evolved in an olivine-rich mantle. We assume that the magmas became incorporated in the metal core, possibly due to solidification shrinkage of the metal. We propose that the IVA parent magmas were formed by high degrees of partial melting (>40%) of a chondritic precursor along the olivine-pyroxene peritectic reaction curve in the olivine-plagioclase-silica system at low pressures. The precursor may have been depleted in incompatible elements by a preceding melting episode. The partial melts were then separated from the olivine residue and subsequently reduced to account for the low Fe/Mn- ratios and the unusually high Si content.

  3. Acute hypoglycemic, hypocholesterolemic and hypotriglyceridemic effects of continuous intravenous infusion of a lyophilised aqueous extract of Ajuga iva L. Schreber whole plant in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    El-Hilaly, Jaouad; Tahraoui, Adil; Israili, Zafar H; Lyoussi, Badiâa

    2007-10-01

    The hypoglycemic and hypolipidemic effect of continuous intravenous infusion of a lyophilised aqueous extract of the whole plant Ajuga iva (L.) Schreber (Labiatae) (AI-extract) was investigated in anesthetized normal and streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. The AI-extract was administered to a group of rats by continuous intravenous infusion for 4 h at a dose of 4.2 microg/min/100 g body weight; another group was infused with taurine, the reference compound, at the same dose. In normal rats, AI-extract infusion had no effect on plasma glucose or triglycerides, but plasma cholesterol levels were significantly decreased (22%; P<0.05). However, taurine infusion produced significant hypoglycemic, hypocholesterolemic and hypotriglyceridemic effects (all changes, P<0.05). In STZ-diabetic rats, AI-extract infusion reduced plasma levels of glucose by 24 % (P<0.05), cholesterol by 35% (P<0.01) and triglycerides by 13% (P<0.05). Infusion with taurine produced a greater fall in plasma glucose (72%, P<0.01), cholesterol (54%; P<0.001) and triglyceride (24%; P<0.001) levels. Our results indicate that intravenously administered AI-extract exerts hypoglycemic and hypolipidemic effects in diabetic rats by mechanism(s) which appear to be similar to that of taurine, which involve insulin sensitization or an insulin-like effect. The identity and the exact mechanism(s) of action of the active component(s) of the AI-extract are not known. Ajuga iva appears to be a useful plant in the therapy of diabetes, a condition in which hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia coexist quite often.

  4. Thermal test results of the two-phase thermal bus technology demonstration loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edelstein, Fred; Liandris, Maria; Rankin, J. Gary

    1987-01-01

    A two-phase heat transport system, the Thermal Bus Technology Demonstrator, has been built and tested for NASA Johnson Space Center for application on Space Station. The loop is a separated two-phase system that uses evaporator flow control valves and liquid condenser flooding to achieve temperature control. Both ambient and thermal vacuum tests have been completed in NASA's Chamber A, initially using Freon-11 and then ammonia as the working fluid. Overall, the tests were quite successful, with the bus achieving all major test objectives, including operation at 19.5 kW and set points at 35 F (1.7 C), 70 F (21.1 C) and 104 F (40.0 C), load sharing, asymmetrical heating and isothermality around the loop. Low plate to vapor temperature drops were obtained for the monogroove cold plate using ammonia and are indicative of the high evaporative film coefficients obtainable with this design.

  5. NEPHELINE FORMATION STUDY FOR SLUDGE BATCH 4: PHASE 3 EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, K

    2006-05-01

    This Phase 3 study was undertaken to complement the previous phases of the nepheline formation studies1, 2 by continuing the investigation into the ability of the nepheline discriminator to predict the occurrence of nepheline crystallization in Sludge Batch 4 (SB4) glasses and into the impact of such phases on the durability of the SB4 glasses. The Phase 3 study had two primary objectives. The first was to continue to demonstrate the ability of the discriminator value to adequately predict the nepheline formation potential for specific glass systems of interest. The second was to generate additional data that have a high probability of supporting the SB4 variability study. To support these two objectives, sixteen glasses were selected based on the most recent SB4 compositional projection, Case 15C Blend 1.3 Four different frits were included, based on previous assessments of projected operating windows and melt rate,4, 5 with four WLs selected for each frit. Eight of these frit-sludge combinations covered WLs which tightly bound the nepheline discriminator value of 0.62, with the intent of refining this value to a level of confidence where it can be incorporated into offline administrative controls and/or the Process Composition Control System (PCCS) to support Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) acceptability decisions. The remaining eight frit-sludge combinations targeted lower WLs (35 and 40%) and were prepared and analyzed to contribute needed data to the ComPro database6 to support a potential variability study for SB4.

  6. Group IVA phospholipase A2 regulates testosterone biosynthesis by murine Leydig cells and is required for timely sexual maturation

    PubMed Central

    Kurusu, Shiro; Sapirstein, Adam; Sawada, Harumi; Kawaminami, Mitsumori; Bonventre, Joseph V.

    2015-01-01

    In the present paper, we report that PLA2G4A (Group IVA phospholipase A2) is important in the development and function of rodent testes. Interstitial cells of rat testes had high PLA2 (phospholipase A2) activity that was very sensitive to the PLA2G4A-preferential inhibitor AACOCF3 (arachidonyl trifluoromethyl ketone). PLA2G4A protein was expressed primarily in the interstitial cells of wild-type mouse testes throughout maturation. Although Pla2g4a knockout (Pla2g4a−/− ) male mice are fertile, their sexual maturation was delayed, as indicated by cauda epididymal sperm count and seminal vesicle development. Delayed function of Pla2g4a−/− mice testes was associated with histological abnormalities including disorganized architecture, swollen appearance and fewer interstitial cells. Basal secretion of testosterone was attenuated significantly and steroidogenic response to hCG (human chorionic gonadotropin) treatment was reduced in Pla2g4a−/− mice compared with their Pla2g4a+/+ littermates during the sexual maturation period. Chemical inhibition of PLA2G4A activity by AACOCF3 or pyrrophenone significantly reduced hCG-stimulated testosterone production in cultured rat interstitial cells. AACOCF3 inhibited forskolin- and cAMP analogue-stimulated testosterone production. These results provide the first evidence that PLA2G4A plays a role in male testes physiology and development. These results may have implications for the potential clinical use of PLA2G4A inhibitors. PMID:21762109

  7. Oral clofarabine for relapsed/refractory non-Hodgkin lymphomas: results of a phase 1 study.

    PubMed

    Abramson, Jeremy S; Takvorian, Ronald W; Fisher, David C; Feng, Yang; Jacobsen, Eric D; Brown, Jennifer R; Barnes, Jeffrey A; Neuberg, Donna S; Hochberg, Ephraim P

    2013-09-01

    We conducted a phase 1 trial evaluating the oral nucleoside analog clofarabine in patients with relapsed/refractory non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Patients were treated once daily on days 1 through 21 of a 28-day cycle for a maximum of six cycles. The study was conducted with a 3 + 3 design with 10 additional patients treated at the recommended phase 2 dose. Thirty patients were enrolled including indolent B-cell lymphomas (n = 21), mantle cell lymphoma (n = 6) and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (n = 3). The primary toxicities were hematologic including grade 3-4 neutropenia (53%) and thrombocytopenia (27%). Three milligrams was determined to be the recommended phase 2 dose. Tumor volume was reduced in 70% of patients, and the overall response rate was 47% including 27% complete remissions. Responses were seen in indolent B-cell lymphomas and mantle cell lymphoma. At a median follow-up of 17 months, 68% of responding patients remain in ongoing remission. Oral clofarabine was well tolerated with encouraging efficacy in indolent B-cell lymphomas and mantle cell lymphomas, warranting further investigation.

  8. Thermodynamically Constrained Averaging Theory (TCAT) Two-Phase Flow Model: Derivation, Closure, and Simulation Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigand, T. M.; Miller, C. T.; Dye, A. L.; Gray, W. G.; McClure, J. E.; Rybak, I.

    2015-12-01

    The thermodynamically constrained averaging theory (TCAT) has been usedto formulate general classes of porous medium models, including newmodels for two-fluid-phase flow. The TCAT approach provides advantagesthat include a firm connection between the microscale, or pore scale,and the macroscale; a thermodynamically consistent basis; explicitinclusion of factors such as interfacial areas, contact angles,interfacial tension, and curvatures; and dynamics of interface movementand relaxation to an equilibrium state. In order to render the TCATmodel solvable, certain closure relations are needed to relate fluidpressure, interfacial areas, curvatures, and relaxation rates. In thiswork, we formulate and solve a TCAT-based two-fluid-phase flow model. We detail the formulation of the model, which is a specific instancefrom a hierarchy of two-fluid-phase flow models that emerge from thetheory. We show the closure problem that must be solved. Using recentresults from high-resolution microscale simulations, we advance a set ofclosure relations that produce a closed model. Lastly, we solve the model using a locally conservative numerical scheme and compare the TCAT model to the traditional model.

  9. Crystal growth of pure substances: Phase-field simulations in comparison with analytical and experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nestler, B.; Danilov, D.; Galenko, P.

    2005-07-01

    A phase-field model for non-isothermal solidification in multicomponent systems [SIAM J. Appl. Math. 64 (3) (2004) 775-799] consistent with the formalism of classic irreversible thermodynamics is used for numerical simulations of crystal growth in a pure material. The relation of this approach to the phase-field model by Bragard et al. [Interface Science 10 (2-3) (2002) 121-136] is discussed. 2D and 3D simulations of dendritic structures are compared with the analytical predictions of the Brener theory [Journal of Crystal Growth 99 (1990) 165-170] and with recent experimental measurements of solidification in pure nickel [Proceedings of the TMS Annual Meeting, March 14-18, 2004, pp. 277-288; European Physical Journal B, submitted for publication]. 3D morphology transitions are obtained for variations in surface energy and kinetic anisotropies at different undercoolings. In computations, we investigate the convergence behaviour of a standard phase-field model and of its thin interface extension at different undercoolings and at different ratios between the diffuse interface thickness and the atomistic capillary length. The influence of the grid anisotropy is accurately analyzed for a finite difference method and for an adaptive finite element method in comparison.

  10. Nepheline Formation Study for Sludge Batch 4 (SB4): Phase 1 Experimental Results

    SciTech Connect

    Peeler, D. K.; Edwards, T. B.; Reamer, I.A.; Workman, R. J.

    2005-09-30

    Although it is well known that the addition of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} to borosilicate glasses enhances the durability of the waste form (through creation of network-forming tetrahedral Na+-[AlO{sub 4/2}]{sup -} pairs), the combination of high Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Na{sub 2}O can lead to the formation of nepheline (NaAlSiO{sub 4})--which can negatively impact durability. Given the projected high concentration of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} in SB4 (Lilliston 2005) and the potential use of a high Na{sub 2}O based frit to improve melt rate and a high Na{sub 2}O sludge due to settling problems, the potential formation of nepheline in various SB4 systems continues to be assessed. Twelve SB4-based glasses were fabricated and their durabilities (via the Product Consistency Test [PCT]) measured to assess the potential for nepheline formation and its potential negative impact on durability. In terms of ''acceptability'', the results indicate that all of the study glasses produced are acceptable with respect to durability as defined by the PCT (normalized boron release values for all nepheline (NEPH) glasses were much lower than that of the Environmental Assessment (EA) glass (16.695 g/L)). The most durable glass is NEPH-04 (quenched) with a normalized boron release (NL [B]) of 0.61 g/L, while the least durable glass is NEPH-01 centerline canister cooled (ccc) with an NL [B] of 2.47 g/L (based on the measured composition). In terms of predictability, most of the study glasses are predictable by the {Delta}G{sub p} model. Those that are not predictable (i.e., they fall outside of the prediction limits) actually fall below the prediction interval (i.e., they are over predicted by the model) suggesting the model is conservative. The Phase 1 PCT results suggest that for those glasses prone to nepheline formation (using the 0.62 value developed by Li et al. (2003) as a guide), a statistically significant difference in PCT response was observed for the two heat treatments but the impact on

  11. Igneous Evolution of the Core and Mantle in the Parent Body of Group IVA Iron and Stony-Iron Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, E. R. D.; McCoy, T. J.; Haack, H.; Taylor, G. J.

    1992-07-01

    Group IVA is comprised of 52 irons lacking silicates, two with trace amounts of silica (Gibeon and Bishop Canyon) and two stony irons (Steinbach and Sao Joao Nepomuceno), which have high but varied proportions of a pyroxene-tridymite intergrowth (Prinz et al., 1984). Despite their remarkable composition, these stony irons are not geological freaks lacking cosmochemical significance but important clues to the complexity of asteroidal processes. Metal: Our crystallization models for Fe-Ni-S magmas using distribution coefficients from Jones and Malvin (1990) with minor modifications from Haack and Scott (1992) show that the IVA irons formed by fractional crystallization of a melt with about 1-3 wt% S. Unlike previous authors we are able to model the Ir, Au, Ga, Ge, and P vs Ni trends in IVA concurrently. We include the formation of a second S-rich immiscible liquid during crystallization and find that our models can match IVA trends as well as those of group IIIAB, which has a higher S content. Siderophile concentrations in Steinbach and Sao Joao metal are, surprisingly, entirely appropriate for IVA irons with 9.1 and 8.0% Ni, showing that they formed in two separate places in the IVA body by mixing of silicates with metal that was fractionally crystallizing. Silicates: Steinbach and Sao Joao contain 10-60 vol% of SiO2 and ortho- and clinobronzite. In the sponge-like silicate- metal intergrowths, typical pore sizes are 2-6 mm though metal crystals are larger. Textures suggest co-crystallization of silicates from a liquid. Slight compositional differences between the two pyroxenes exist in both meteorites, with Steinbach pyroxenes being more FeO-rich. Formation of all the pyroxene by reaction between olivine and SiO2 (Prinz et al., 1984) fails to account for the minor elemental abundances in pyroxene, e.g. 0.25 wt% Al2O3. But the occurrence of SiO2 without pyroxene suggests that the SiO2-pyroxene intergrowths did not form entirely from SiO2-pyroxene eutectic or

  12. Segmental arterial mediolysis of varying phases affecting both the intra-abdominal and intracranial vertebral arteries: an autopsy case report.

    PubMed

    Ro, Ayako; Kageyama, Norimasa; Takatsu, Akihiro; Fukunaga, Tatsushige

    2010-01-01

    We report an autopsy case of segmental arterial mediolysis (SAM) of various phases occurring in both the intracranial vertebral artery (IVA) and intra-abdominal arteries. The patient was a 70-year-old male found dead in his house. The cause of death was massive intra-abdominal hemorrhage owing to a ruptured right gastroepiploic artery. Histopathological examination revealed that there was a broad arterial dissection as long as 20 cm in the right gastroepiploic artery associated with SAM in the injurious phase. In addition, SAM in the reparative phase was observed as organized arterial dissections in the left gastric artery. Furthermore, SAM in the reparative phase was detected as an arterial dissection in the right IVA undergoing an organizing process. These three lesions were considered to have developed at different times. SAM occurring in both the intra-abdominal and intracranial vertebral arteries is extremely rare. This coincidence may provide a clue to the relationship between SAM and spontaneous IVA dissection.

  13. Simultaneous phase and amplitude retrieval with COFFEE: from theory to laboratory results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Baptiste; Sauvage, Jean-François; Mugnier, Laurent M.; Dohlen, Kjetil; Fusco, Thierry; Ferrari, Marc

    2014-07-01

    The final performance of current and future instruments dedicated to exoplanet detection and characterization (such as SPHERE on the VLT, GPI on Gemini North or future instruments on the ELTs) is limited by intensity residuals in the scientific image plane, which originate in uncorrected optical aberrations. After correction of the atmospheric turbulence, the main contribution to these residuals comes from the quasi-static aberrations introduced upstream of the coronagraph which create long-lived speckles in the detector plane that can easily be mistaken for a planet. In order to reach very high contrast such as the ones required to image earth-like planets, these aberrations needs to be compensated for. We have recently proposed a dedicated focal-plane wave-font sensor called COFFEE (for COronagraphic Focal-plane wave-Front Estimation for Exoplanet detection), which consists in an extension of conventional phase diversity to a coronagraphic system: aberrations both upstream and downstream of the coronagraph are estimated using two coronagraphic focal-plane images, recorded from the scientific camera itself, without any differential aberration. Such a system has been successfully validated on the SPHERE instrument, where COFFEEs estimation has been used to compensate for the phase aberration upstream of the coronagraph, leading to a contrast optimization in the whole focal plane area controlled by the AO loop. If compensating for phase aberrations only was acceptable to reach levels of contrast of 10-6, it will no longer be the case for instruments that aim at imaging earth-like planets. Such targets, which would be the ones of a planet-finder instrument integrated on an ELT, require a level of contrast better than 10-9. To reach this level, neglecting amplitude aberrations (inhomogeneous intensity in the pupil, Fresnel propagation effect) is no longer possible. In this communication, we present an extension of COFFEE able to perform a simultaneous estimation of

  14. ADVANCED SIMULATION CAPABILITY FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT- CURRENT STATUS AND PHASE II DEMONSTRATION RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Seitz, R.

    2013-02-26

    The U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM), Office of Soil and Groundwater, is supporting development of the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM). ASCEM is a state-of-the-art scientific tool and approach for understanding and predicting contaminant fate and transport in natural and engineered systems. The modular and open source high-performance computing tool facilitates integrated approaches to modeling and site characterization that enable robust and standardized assessments of performance and risk for EM cleanup and closure activities. The ASCEM project continues to make significant progress in development of computer software capabilities with an emphasis on integration of capabilities in FY12. Capability development is occurring for both the Platform and Integrated Toolsets and High-Performance Computing (HPC) Multiprocess Simulator. The Platform capabilities provide the user interface and tools for end-to-end model development, starting with definition of the conceptual model, management of data for model input, model calibration and uncertainty analysis, and processing of model output, including visualization. The HPC capabilities target increased functionality of process model representations, toolsets for interaction with Platform, and verification and model confidence testing. The Platform and HPC capabilities are being tested and evaluated for EM applications in a set of demonstrations as part of Site Applications Thrust Area activities. The Phase I demonstration focusing on individual capabilities of the initial toolsets was completed in 2010. The Phase II demonstration completed in 2012 focused on showcasing integrated ASCEM capabilities. For Phase II, the Hanford Site deep vadose zone (BC Cribs) served as an application site for an end-to-end demonstration of capabilities, with emphasis on integration and linkages between the Platform and HPC components. Other demonstrations

  15. ADVANCED SIMULATION CAPABILITY FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT – CURRENT STATUS AND PHASE II DEMONSTRATION RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Seitz, Roger; Freshley, Mark D.; Dixon, Paul; Hubbard, Susan S.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Flach, Gregory P.; Faybishenko, Boris; Gorton, Ian; Finsterle, Stefan A.; Moulton, John D.; Steefel, Carl I.; Marble, Justin

    2013-06-27

    The U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM), Office of Soil and Groundwater, is supporting development of the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM). ASCEM is a state-of-the-art scientific tool and approach for understanding and predicting contaminant fate and transport in natural and engineered systems. The modular and open source high-performance computing tool facilitates integrated approaches to modeling and site characterization that enable robust and standardized assessments of performance and risk for EM cleanup and closure activities. The ASCEM project continues to make significant progress in development of computer software capabilities with an emphasis on integration of capabilities in FY12. Capability development is occurring for both the Platform and Integrated Toolsets and High-Performance Computing (HPC) Multiprocess Simulator. The Platform capabilities provide the user interface and tools for end-to-end model development, starting with definition of the conceptual model, management of data for model input, model calibration and uncertainty analysis, and processing of model output, including visualization. The HPC capabilities target increased functionality of process model representations, toolsets for interaction with Platform, and verification and model confidence testing. The Platform and HPC capabilities are being tested and evaluated for EM applications in a set of demonstrations as part of Site Applications Thrust Area activities. The Phase I demonstration focusing on individual capabilities of the initial toolsets was completed in 2010. The Phase II demonstration completed in 2012 focused on showcasing integrated ASCEM capabilities. For Phase II, the Hanford Site deep vadose zone (BC Cribs) served as an application site for an end-to-end demonstration of capabilities, with emphasis on integration and linkages between the Platform and HPC components. Other demonstrations

  16. Phase I Field Test Results of an Innovative DNAPL Remediation Technology: The Hydrophobic Lance

    SciTech Connect

    Tuck, D.M.

    1999-01-28

    An innovative technology for recovery of pure phase DNAPL was deployed in the subsurface near the M-Area Settling Basin, continuing the support of the A/M Area Ground Water Corrective Action Program (per Part B requirements). This technology, the Hydrophobic Lance, operates by placing a neutral/hydrophobic surface (Teflon) in contact with the DNAPL. This changes the in situ conditions experienced by the DNAPL, allowing it to selectively drain into a sump from which it can be pumped. Collection of even small amounts of DNAPL can save years of pump-and-treat operation because of the generally low solubility of DNAPL components.

  17. Investor Outlook: Focus on Upcoming LCA2 Gene Therapy Phase III Results.

    PubMed

    Schimmer, Joshua; Breazzano, Steven

    2015-09-01

    Investor interest in gene therapy has increased substantially over the past few years, and the next major catalyst for the field is likely to be Spark Therapeutics's phase III trial for the treatment of visual impairment caused by RPE65 gene mutations (often referred to as Leber congenital amaurosis type 2, or LCA2, but may include other retinal disorders). Analysis of the approach from the basic genetics, underlying visual mechanisms, clinical data, and commercialization considerations helps frame investor expectations and the potential implications for the broader field.

  18. Glycoprotein and Glycan in Tissue and Blood Samples of Patients With Stage IB-IVA Cervical Cancer Undergoing Surgery to Remove Pelvic and Abdominal Lymph Nodes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-26

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  19. Jet-Surface Interaction Test: Phased Array Noise Source Localization Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podboy, Gary

    2012-01-01

    Subsonic jets are relatively simple. The peak noise source location gradually moves upstream toward the nozzle as frequency increases. 2) Supersonic jets are more complicated. The peak noise source location moves downstream as frequency increases through a BBSN hump. 3) In both subsonic and supersonic jets the peak noise source location corresponding to a given frequency of noise moves downstream as jet Mach number increases. 4) The noise generated at a given frequency in a BBSN hump is generated by a small number of shocks, not from all the shocks at the same time. 5) Single microphone spectrum levels decrease when the noise source locations measured with the phased array are blocked by a shielding surface. This consistency validates the phased array data and the stationary monopole source model used to process it. 6) Reflecting surface data illustrate that the law of reflection must be satisfied for noise to reflect off a surface toward an observer. Depending on the relative locations of the jet, the surface and the observer only some of the jet noise sources may satisfy this requirement. 7) The low frequency noise created when a jet flow impinges on a surface comes primarily from the trailing edge regardless of the axial extent impacted by the flow.

  20. Plasticity resulted from phase transformation for monolayer molybdenum disulfide film during nanoindentation simulations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weidong; Li, Longlong; Yang, Chenguang; Soler-Crespo, Rafael A; Meng, Zhaoxu; Li, Minglin; Zhang, Xu; Keten, Sinan; Espinosa, Horacio D

    2017-04-21

    Molecular dynamics simulations on nanoindentation of circular monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) film are carried out to elucidate the deformation and failure mechanisms. Typical force-deflection curves are obtained, and in-plane stiffness of MoS2 is extracted according to a continuum mechanics model. The measured in-plane stiffness of monolayer MoS2 is about 182 ± 14 N m(-1), corresponding to an effective Young's modulus of 280 ± 21 GPa. More interestingly, at a critical indentation depth, the loading force decreases sharply and then increases again. The loading-unloading-reloading processes at different initial unloading deflections are also conducted to explain the phenomenon. It is found that prior to the critical depth, the monolayer MoS2 film can return to the original state after completely unloading, while there is hysteresis when unloading after the critical depth and residual deformation exists after indenter fully retracted, indicating plasticity. This residual deformation is found to be caused by the changed lattice structure of the MoS2, i.e. a phase transformation. The critical pressure to induce the phase transformation is then calculated to be 36 ± 2 GPa, consistent with other studies. Finally, the influences of temperature, the diameter and indentation rate of MoS2 monolayer on the mechanical properties are also investigated.

  1. Analysis, design, and experimental results for lightweight space heat receiver canisters, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Michael G.; Brege, Mark A.; Heidenreich, Gary R.

    1991-01-01

    Critical technology experiments have been performed on thermal energy storage modules in support of the Brayton Advanced Heat Receiver program. The modules are wedge-shaped canisters designed to minimize the mechanical stresses that occur during the phase change of the lithium fluoride phase change material. Nickel foam inserts were used in some of the canisters to provide thermal conductivity enhancement and to distribute the void volume. Two canisters, one with a nickel foam insert, and one without, were thermally cycled in various orientations in a fluidized bed furnace. The only measurable impact of the nickel foam was seen when the back and short sides of the canister were insulated to simulate operation in the advanced receiver design. In tests with insulation, the furnace to back side delta T was larger in the canister with the nickel foam insert, probably due to the radiant absorptivity of the nickel. However, the differences in the temperature profiles of the two canisters were small, and in many cases the profiles matched fairly well. Computed Tomography (CT) was successfully used to nondestructively demarcate void locations in the canisters. Finally, canister dimensional stability, which was measured throughout the thermal cycling test program with an inspection fixture was satisfactory with a maximum change of 0.635 mm (0.025 in.).

  2. Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management - Current Status and Phase II Demonstration Results - 13161

    SciTech Connect

    Seitz, Roger R.; Flach, Greg; Freshley, Mark D.; Freedman, Vicky; Gorton, Ian; Dixon, Paul; Moulton, J. David; Hubbard, Susan S.; Faybishenko, Boris; Steefel, Carl I.; Finsterle, Stefan; Marble, Justin

    2013-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (US DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM), Office of Soil and Groundwater, is supporting development of the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM). ASCEM is a state-of-the-art scientific tool and approach for understanding and predicting contaminant fate and transport in natural and engineered systems. The modular and open source high-performance computing tool facilitates integrated approaches to modeling and site characterization that enable robust and standardized assessments of performance and risk for EM cleanup and closure activities. The ASCEM project continues to make significant progress in development of computer software capabilities with an emphasis on integration of capabilities in FY12. Capability development is occurring for both the Platform and Integrated Tool-sets and High-Performance Computing (HPC) Multi-process Simulator. The Platform capabilities provide the user interface and tools for end-to-end model development, starting with definition of the conceptual model, management of data for model input, model calibration and uncertainty analysis, and processing of model output, including visualization. The HPC capabilities target increased functionality of process model representations, tool-sets for interaction with Platform, and verification and model confidence testing. The Platform and HPC capabilities are being tested and evaluated for EM applications in a set of demonstrations as part of Site Applications Thrust Area activities. The Phase I demonstration focusing on individual capabilities of the initial tool-sets was completed in 2010. The Phase II demonstration completed in 2012 focused on showcasing integrated ASCEM capabilities. For Phase II, the Hanford Site deep vadose zone (BC Cribs) served as an application site for an end-to-end demonstration of capabilities, with emphasis on integration and linkages between the Platform and HPC components. Other demonstrations

  3. NASA/General Electric broad-specification fuels combustion technology program - Phase I results and status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodds, W. J.; Ekstedt, E. E.; Bahr, D. W.; Fear, J. S.

    1982-01-01

    A program is being conducted to develop the technology required to utilize fuels with broadened properties in aircraft gas turbine engines. The first phase of this program consisted of the experimental evaluation of three different combustor concepts to determine their potential for meeting several specific emissions and performance goals, when operated on broadened property fuels. The three concepts were a single annular combustor; a double annular combustor; and a short single annular combustor with variable geometry. All of these concepts were sized for the General Electric CF6-80 engine. A total of 24 different configurations of these concepts were evaluated in a high pressure test facility, using four test fuels having hydrogen contents between 11.8 and 14%. Fuel effects on combustor performance, durability and emissions, and combustor design features to offset these effects were demonstrated.

  4. Background Results from the Cooldown Phase of the SNO NCD Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browne, M. C.; Duba, C.; Heeger, K. M.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Steiger, T. D.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Lesko, K. T.; Hime, A.; Thornewell, P. M.; Wouters, J. M.

    1998-10-01

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) is a heavy water neutrino detector currently under construction in Sudbury, Canada. SNO's unique sensitivity to neutral current (NC) neutrino interactions in the heavy water allows for a comprehensive study of several possible solutions for the Solar Neutrino Problem. One method developed to measure the NC signal is an array of discrete Neutral Current Detectors (NCDs) in the heavy water. Due to strict radioactive requirements on the NCD construction materials, a six-month underground storage period is planned to allow for both the decay of cosmogenically induced activity, as well as characterization of the detector array prior to deployment. This "cooldown" phase of the NCD project is discussed, along with a description of the electronics to be used during detector and array characterization. Initial data taken during the cooldown period is presented, and NCD background estimates are discussed.

  5. Orbit transfer vehicle engine study, phase A extension. Volume 2A: Study results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Engine trade studies and systems analyses leading to a baseline engine selection for advanced expander cycle engine are discussed with emphasis on: (1) performance optimization of advanced expander cycle engines in the 10 to 20K pound thrust range; (2) selection of a recommended advanced expander engine configuration based on maximized performance and minimized mission risk, and definition of the components for this configuration; (3) characterization of the low thrust adaptation requirements and performance for the staged combustion engine; (4) generation of a suggested safety and reliability approach for OTV engines independent of engine cycle; (5) definition of program risk relationships between expander and staged combustion cycle engines; and (6) development of schedules and costs for the DDT&E, production, and operation phases of the 10K pound thrust expander engine program.

  6. Prototype results of a phase-shifting interferometer capable of measuring the complex index and profile of a test surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogala, Eric W.; Barrett, Harrison H.

    2002-09-01

    Results are presented from a prototype phase-shifting interferometer capable of measuring both the real and the imaginary part of the complex index of refraction and the surface profile of a test surface. The three parameters of interest are extracted from the measured data by maximum-likelihood estimation theory. The performance of the system is quantitatively assessed with Cramer-Rao lower bounds. The results are shown to be strongly dependent on the quantization of the interferograms from the 8-bit CCD camera, the incident electric field amplitude, and the relative amplitude and phase difference of each polarized component through each arm of the interferometer.

  7. [Phase I trial of a recombinant human interleukin 2. Results in patients with disseminated solid tumors].

    PubMed

    Tursz, T; Dorval, T; Berthaud, P; Jouve, M; Avril, M F; Garcia-Giralt, E; Le Chevalier, T; Spielmann, M; Sevin, D; Palangie, T

    1991-02-16

    A phase I trial of Roussel-Uclaf recombinant human interleukin 2 (IL 2) was performed on 31 cancer bearing patients of the Institut Gustave-Roussy, Villejuif, and the Institut Curie, Paris. This study allowed to define a schedule for administration of IL 2 in continuous infusion over 5 day cycles. This schedule is manageable in patients without major visceral failure. It is reproducibly feasible in conventional medical oncology units, without specialized intensive care facilities. Toxicities, although numerous, are acceptable for IL 2 doses below 24,000,000 IU/m2/day. There is a close relationship between secondary effect severity and IL 2 doses received. Main toxicities were: fever with chills, fatigue and general discomfort in 23 patients, nauseas and vomiting in 12, diarrhea in 10 and cutaneous rashes with erythema and dermal vascularitis in 13. One peculiar feature of this study was the minimal occurrence of manifestation related to leaky capillary syndrome prominant in other studies. Oliguria, functional renal failure and edema were observed in only 4 patients with functionally unique kidney. Five patients had severe anemia, 2 grade III thrombocytopenia, 1 grade IV hepatic cytolysis, 4 severe confusion episodes and 2 hypothyroidism with anti-thyroid microsome auto-antibodies. All these toxicities were reversible after withdrawal of IL 2 treatment. During this phase I trial, 3 therapeutic objective responses were observed, all 3 occurring in patients with metastatic melanoma treated with IL 2 doses equal to, or above 16,000,00 IU/m2/d. Recombinant IL 2 Roussel-Uclaf thus can be administered through a simple, manageable and efficient regimen.

  8. Mediterranean Diet and Phase Angle in a Sample of Adult Population: Results of a Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Barrea, Luigi; Muscogiuri, Giovanna; Macchia, Paolo Emidio; Di Somma, Carolina; Falco, Andrea; Savanelli, Maria Cristina; Colao, Annamaria; Savastano, Silvia

    2017-01-01

    The Mediterranean diet is a healthy dietary pattern known to actively modulate the cell membrane properties. Phase angle (PhA) is a direct measure by Bioelectrical Impedance Analysis (BIA) used as marker of cell membrane integrity. Both food behaviour and PhA are influenced by age, sex and body weight. The aim of this study was to cross-sectionally evaluate the association between the adherence to Mediterranean diet and PhA in 1013 healthy adult patients stratified according to sex, age, and body mass index (BMI). The adherence to the Mediterranean diet was evaluated using the PREvención con DIeta MEDiterránea (PREDIMED) questionnaire. PhA was calculated by BIA phase-sensitive system (50 kHz BIA 101 RJL, Akern Bioresearch, Florence, Italy Akern). In both sexes, at ROC analysis a PREDIMED score ≥ 6 predicted a PhA beyond the median value. At the multivariate analysis, among PREDIMED score, age, and BMI, the PREDIMED score was the major determinant of PhA, explaining 44.5% and 47.3% of PhA variability, in males and females respectively (p < 0.001). A novel association was reported between the adherence to the Mediterranean diet and PhA, independently of sex, age, and body weight. This association uncovered a new potential benefit of the Mediterranean diet on health outcomes, as in both sexes higher adherence to the Mediterranean diet was associated to larger PhAs, as expression of cell membrane integrity. PMID:28218645

  9. Mediterranean Diet and Phase Angle in a Sample of Adult Population: Results of a Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Barrea, Luigi; Muscogiuri, Giovanna; Macchia, Paolo Emidio; Di Somma, Carolina; Falco, Andrea; Savanelli, Maria Cristina; Colao, Annamaria; Savastano, Silvia

    2017-02-17

    The Mediterranean diet is a healthy dietary pattern known to actively modulate the cell membrane properties. Phase angle (PhA) is a direct measure by Bioelectrical Impedance Analysis (BIA) used as marker of cell membrane integrity. Both food behaviour and PhA are influenced by age, sex and body weight. The aim of this study was to cross-sectionally evaluate the association between the adherence to Mediterranean diet and PhA in 1013 healthy adult patients stratified according to sex, age, and body mass index (BMI). The adherence to the Mediterranean diet was evaluated using the PREvención con DIeta MEDiterránea (PREDIMED) questionnaire. PhA was calculated by BIA phase-sensitive system (50 kHz BIA 101 RJL, Akern Bioresearch, Florence, Italy Akern). In both sexes, at ROC analysis a PREDIMED score ≥ 6 predicted a PhA beyond the median value. At the multivariate analysis, among PREDIMED score, age, and BMI, the PREDIMED score was the major determinant of PhA, explaining 44.5% and 47.3% of PhA variability, in males and females respectively (p < 0.001). A novel association was reported between the adherence to the Mediterranean diet and PhA, independently of sex, age, and body weight. This association uncovered a new potential benefit of the Mediterranean diet on health outcomes, as in both sexes higher adherence to the Mediterranean diet was associated to larger PhAs, as expression of cell membrane integrity.

  10. Elevated plasma fibrinogen level shows superior prognostic value than Epstein–Barr virus DNA load for stage IVA/B nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients in the intensity-modulated radiotherapy era

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ying; Mao, Minjie; Han, Fei; Liao, Junfang; Deng, Meiling; Duan, Zhijun; Zheng, Lie; Wu, Shaoxiong; Lu, Taixiang; Jian, Yutao

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Effective prognostic factors for patients with stage IVA/B nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) who are susceptible to distant metastases are limited. We aim to investigate the prognostic value of pretreatment plasma fibrinogen (FIB) level and Epstein–Barr virus DNA (EBV-DNA) load in these patients in the era of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Results The 5-year DSS, DFS and DMFS rates of the entire cohort were 72.7%, 66.8%, 80.0%, respectively. High FIB level was identified as a negative prognostic factor for survival: the 5-year DSS, DFS and DMFS rates for patients with high FIB (> 4.0 g/L) and normal FIB (≤ 4.0 g/L) were 60.3% vs. 76.0%, 56.0% vs. 69.9%, and 59.4% vs. 85.5%, respectively (all P < 0.001). Subgroup analysis demonstrated that DSS, DFS and DMFS decreased as FIB gradually increased, even within the normal range. The risk of distant metastasis in patients with high FIB was over 3-fold than patients with normal FIB. EBV-DNA was not an independent prognostic factor for any survival outcomes in multivariate analysis. Conclusion High pretreatment FIB level shows superior prognostic value than EBV-DNA load for stage IVA/B NPC patients in the era of IMRT. Materials and Methods A total of 755 patients with newly-diagnosed stage IVA/B NPC treated with definitive IMRT between January 2007 and December 2011 were enrolled. Plasma FIB and EBV-DNA were measured before treatment. Disease-specific survival (DSS), disease-free survival (DFS) and distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method; differences were compared using the log-rank test. PMID:27323828

  11. Crystal structures of antibiotic-bound complexes of aminoglycoside 2''-phosphotransferase IVa highlight the diversity in substrate binding modes among aminoglycoside kinases.

    PubMed

    Shi, Kun; Houston, Douglas R; Berghuis, Albert M

    2011-07-19

    Aminoglycoside 2''-phosphotransferase IVa [APH(2'')-IVa] is a member of a family of bacterial enzymes responsible for medically relevant resistance to antibiotics. APH(2'')-IVa confers high-level resistance against several clinically used aminoglycoside antibiotics in various pathogenic Enterococcus species by phosphorylating the drug, thereby preventing it from binding to its ribosomal target and producing a bactericidal effect. We describe here three crystal structures of APH(2'')-IVa, one in its apo form and two in complex with a bound antibiotic, tobramycin and kanamycin A. The apo structure was refined to a resolution of 2.05 Å, and the APH(2'')-IVa structures with tobramycin and kanamycin A bound were refined to resolutions of 1.80 and 2.15 Å, respectively. Comparison among the structures provides insight concerning the substrate selectivity of this enzyme. In particular, conformational changes upon substrate binding, involving rotational shifts of two distinct segments of the enzyme, are observed. These substrate-induced shifts may also rationalize the altered substrate preference of APH(2'')-IVa in comparison to those of other members of the APH(2'') subfamily, which are structurally closely related. Finally, analysis of the interactions between the enzyme and aminoglycoside reveals a distinct binding mode as compared to the intended ribosomal target. The differences in the pattern of interactions can be utilized as a structural basis for the development of improved aminoglycosides that are not susceptible to these resistance factors.

  12. DARPA counter-sniper program: Phase 1 Acoustic Systems Demonstration results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carapezza, Edward M.; Law, David B.; Csanadi, Christina J.

    1997-02-01

    During October 1995 through May 1996, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency sponsored the development of prototype systems that exploit acoustic muzzle blast and ballistic shock wave signatures to accurately predict the location of gunfire events and associated shooter locations using either single or multiple volumetric arrays. The output of these acoustic systems is an estimate of the shooter location and a classification estimate of the caliber of the shooter's weapon. A portable display and control unit provides both graphical and alphanumeric shooter location related information integrated on a two- dimensional digital map of the defended area. The final Phase I Acoustic Systems Demonstration field tests were completed in May. These these tests were held at USMC Base Camp Pendleton Military Operations Urban Training (MOUT) facility. These tests were structured to provide challenging gunfire related scenarios with significant reverberation and multi-path conditions. Special shot geometries and false alarms were included in these tests to probe potential system vulnerabilities and to determine the performance and robustness of the systems. Five prototypes developed by U.S. companies and one Israeli developed prototype were tested. This analysis quantifies the spatial resolution estimation capability (azimuth, elevation and range) of these prototypes and describes their ability to accurately classify the type of bullet fired in a challenging urban- like setting.

  13. Arsenic pilot plant operation and results - Socorro Springs, New Mexico - phase 1.

    SciTech Connect

    Aragon, Malynda Jo; Everett, Randy L.; Siegel, Malcolm Dean; Kottenstette, Richard Joseph; Holub, William E. Jr; Wright, Jeremy B.; Dwyer, Brian P.

    2007-05-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is conducting pilot scale evaluations of the performance and cost of innovative water treatment technologies aimed at meeting the recently revised arsenic maximum contaminant level (MCL) for drinking water. The standard of 10 {micro}g/L (10 ppb) is effective as of January 2006. The first pilot tests have been conducted in New Mexico where over 90 sites that exceed the new MCL have been identified by the New Mexico Environment Department. The pilot test described in this report was conducted in Socorro New Mexico between January 2005 and July 2005. The pilot demonstration is a project of the Arsenic Water Technology Partnership program, a partnership between the American Water Works Association Research Foundation (AwwaRF), SNL and WERC (A Consortium for Environmental Education and Technology Development). The Sandia National Laboratories pilot demonstration at the Socorro Springs site obtained arsenic removal performance data for five different adsorptive media under constant ambient flow conditions. Well water at Socorro Springs has approximately 42 ppb arsenic in the oxidized (arsenate-As(V)) redox state with moderate amounts of silica, low concentrations of iron and manganese and a slightly alkaline pH (8). The study provides estimates of the capacity (bed volumes until breakthrough at 10 ppb arsenic) of adsorptive media in the same chlorinated water. Near the end of the test the feedwater pH was lowered to assess the affect on bed capacity and as a prelude to a controlled pH study (Socorro Springs Phase 2).

  14. Results of the phase II study of photodynamic therapy in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konaka, Chimori; Kato, Harubumi; Okunaka, Tetsuya; Hayata, Yoshihiro

    1994-07-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) utilizing Photofrin has proven to be an effective modality used in the treatment of solid tumors. In particular, it can be applied via endoscopy to lesions developing in luminal organs. A phase II study was conducted for submission to the Japanese Ministry of Health and Welfare. In this protocol an excimer dye laser was used to deliver 630 nm light via a quartz fiber passed through an endoscopic working channel two days subsequent to i.v. injection of photosensitizer. In this study, 98 patients with superficial cancer of various organs were treated. Of these, 88 patients could be evaluated, including 33 with roentgenographically occult lung cancer, 10 with esophageal cancer, 24 with gastric cancer, 18 with cervical cancer and three with bladder cancer. Complete remission as evaluated endoscopically, pathologically, and cytologically was obtained in 83 out of 98 (84.7). There was no serious complication except mild skin photosensitivity, which was seen in four patients. It was concluded that PDT can be efficacious in the treatment of superficial cancers and that complete remission can be achieved when suitable photoradiation conditions are met.

  15. Heteroallelic missense mutations of the galactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase (GALNS) gene in a mild form of Morquio disease (MPS IVA)

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, D.E.C.; Gordon, B.A.; Rupar, C.A.

    1996-06-28

    Morquio disease (MPS IVA) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by a deficiency of N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase (GALNS) activity. Patients commonly present in early infancy with growth failure, spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia, corneal opacification, and keratan sulfaturia, but milder forms have been described. We report on a patient who grew normally until age 5 years. Her keratan sulfaturia was not detected until adolescence, and she now has changes restricted largely to the axial skeleton. She has experienced only mildly impaired vision. At age 22, thin-layer chromatography of purified glycosaminoglycans showed some keratan sulfaturia. GALNS activity in fibroblast homogenate supernatants was 20 {plus_minus} 5% of controls (as compared to 5 {plus_minus} 3% of controls in severe MPS IVA, P <.003). Kinetic analysis of residual fibroblast GALNS activity in patient and parents revealed decreased K{sub m} and increased V{sub max} in the mother and daughter, but not in the father, compatible with compound heterozygosity. GALNS exons were amplified from patient genomic DNA and screened by SSCP. Two missense mutations, a C to T transition at position 335 (predicting R94C) and a T to G transversion at position 344 (predicting F97V), were found on sequencing an abnormally migrating exon 3 amplicon. Digestion of the amplicon with FokI and AccI restriction enzymes (specific for the R94C and F97V mutations, respectively) confirmed heterozygosity. In fibroblast transfection experiments, heterozygous R94C and F97V mutants independently expressed as severe and mile GALNS deficiency, respectively. We interpret these findings to indicate that our patient bears heteroallelic GALNS missense mutations, leading to GALNS deficiency and mild MPS IVA. Our findings expand the clinical and biochemical phenotype of MPS IVA, but full delineation of the genotype-phenotype relationship requires further study of native and transfected mutant cell lines. 30 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Swatch Test Results of Phase 2 Commercial Chemical Protective Gloves to Challenge by Chemical Warfare Agents: Summary Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-01-01

    TEST RESULTS OF PHASE 2 COMMERCIAL CHEMICAL PROTECTIVE GLOVES TO CHALLENGE BY CHEMICAL WARFARE AGENTS : SUMMARY REPORT Robert S...Swatch testing Permeation testing GB Chemical protective gloves 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 53 16. PRICE CODE 17... warfare (CW) agent environment. Swatches of material from each glove design were tested for resistance to

  17. Evaluation of Nondestructive Test Equipment for Airfield Pavements. Phase 1. Calibration Test Results and Field Data Collection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    reverse, (See reverse) 8c. ADDRESS (City, State, and ZIP Code) 10 SOURCE OF FUNDING NUMBERS PROGRAM PROJECT ITASK IWORK UNIT ELEMENT NO. NO. NO...9 Phonix ML10000 FWD................................................. 10 PART III: EXPERIMENTAL...Phase I: Calibration Test Results and Field Data Collection PART I: INTRODUCTION Background 1. During the past 10 to 15 years, much effort has been

  18. Re-187-Os-187, Pt-190-Os-186 Isotopic and Highly Siderophile Element Systematics of Group IVA Irons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, R. J.; McCoy, T. J.; Schulte, R. F.; McDonough, W. F.; Ash, R. D.

    2005-01-01

    We have recently completed Re-187-Os-187 and Pt-190-Os-186 isotopic and elemental studies of the two largest magmatic iron meteorite groups, IIAB and IIIAB [1]. These studies revealed closed-system behavior of both isotopic systems, but complex trace element behavior for Re, Pt and Os in group IIIAB. Here we examine isotopic and trace elemental systematics of group IVA irons. The IVA irons are not as extensively fractionated as IIAB and IIIAB and their apparently less complex crystallization history may make for more robust interpretation of the relative partitioning behavior of Re, Pt and Os, as well as the other highly siderophile elements (HSE) measured here; Pd, Ru and Ir [e.g. 2]. An additional goal of our continuing research plan for iron meteorites is to assess the possibility of relating certain ungrouped irons with major groups via trace element modeling. Here, the isotopic and trace element systematics of the ungrouped irons Nedagolla and EET 83230 are compared with the IVA irons.

  19. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of DehIVa, a dehalogenase from Burkholderia cepacia MBA4.

    PubMed

    Schmidberger, Jason W; Oakley, Aaron J; Tsang, Jimmy S H; Wilce, Matthew C J

    2005-03-01

    DehIVa is one of two dehalogenases produced by the soil- and water-borne bacterium Burkholderia cepacia MBA4. It acts to break down short-chain halogenated aliphatic acids through a nucleophilic attack and subsequent hydrolysis of an enzyme-substrate intermediate to remove the halide ions from L-enantiomers substituted at the C2 position (e.g L-2-monochloropropionic acid). Dehalogenases are an important group of enzymes that are responsible for breaking down a diverse range of halogenated environmental pollutants. The dhlIVa gene coding for DehIVa was expressed in Escherichia coli and the protein was purified and crystallized using the hanging-drop method. Crystals grown in PEG 4000 and ammonium sulfate diffracted to 3.1 A. The crystals had a primitive hexagonal unit cell, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 104.2, c = 135.8 A, alpha = beta = 90, gamma = 120 degrees. Determining this structure will provide valuable insights into the characterization of the catalytic mechanisms of this group of enzymes.

  20. Syracuse Univesity Test Report On Uptake Factor Resulting From A Dropped Storage Container - Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Zhi; Zhang, Jianshun S.

    2012-01-01

    rate was once every 2 seconds during the first 2 hours. A test procedure was developed and verified. A total of thirty two drop tests were performed, eight in Phase I and twenty four in Phase II, covering variations in dropping height (8 ft or 4 ft from the floor), room air movement (0.25-0.30 m/s or 0.10-0.15 m/s near the ceiling), landing scenario (on a flat plate or a block), and lid condition (¼” lid hole or no lid). There were ten tests with flat plate and ¼” lid hole, ten tests with flat plate no lid and twelve tests with block no lid.

  1. Inherited human group IVA cytosolic phospholipase A2 deficiency abolishes platelet, endothelial, and leucocyte eicosanoid generation

    PubMed Central

    Kirkby, Nicholas S.; Reed, Daniel M.; Edin, Matthew L.; Rauzi, Francesca; Mataragka, Stefania; Vojnovic, Ivana; Bishop-Bailey, David; Milne, Ginger L.; Longhurst, Hilary; Zeldin, Darryl C.; Mitchell, Jane A.; Warner, Timothy D.

    2016-01-01

    Eicosanoids are important vascular regulators, but the phospholipase A2 (PLA2) isoforms supporting their production within the cardiovascular system are not fully understood. To address this, we have studied platelets, endothelial cells, and leukocytes from 2 siblings with a homozygous loss-of-function mutation in group IVA cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2α). Chromatography/mass spectrometry was used to determine levels of a broad range of eicosanoids produced by isolated vascular cells, and in plasma and urine. Eicosanoid release data were paired with studies of cellular function. Absence of cPLA2α almost abolished eicosanoid synthesis in platelets (e.g., thromboxane A2, control 20.5 ± 1.4 ng/ml vs. patient 0.1 ng/ml) and leukocytes [e.g., prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), control 21.9 ± 7.4 ng/ml vs. patient 1.9 ng/ml], and this was associated with impaired platelet activation and enhanced inflammatory responses. cPLA2α-deficient endothelial cells showed reduced, but not absent, formation of prostaglandin I2 (prostacyclin; control 956 ± 422 pg/ml vs. patient 196 pg/ml) and were primed for inflammation. In the urine, prostaglandin metabolites were selectively influenced by cPLA2α deficiency. For example, prostacyclin metabolites were strongly reduced (18.4% of control) in patients lacking cPLA2α, whereas PGE2 metabolites (77.8% of control) were similar to healthy volunteer levels. These studies constitute a definitive account, demonstrating the fundamental role of cPLA2α to eicosanoid formation and cellular responses within the human circulation.—Kirkby, N. S., Reed, D. M., Edin, M. L., Rauzi, F., Mataragka, S., Vojnovic, I., Bishop-Bailey, D., Milne, G. L., Longhurst, H., Zeldin, D. C., Mitchell, J. A., Warner, T. D. Inherited human group IVA cytosolic phospholipase A2 deficiency abolishes platelet, endothelial, and leucocyte eicosanoid generation. PMID:26183771

  2. A novel, flat, electronically-steered phased array transducer for tissue ablation: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellens, Nicholas P. K.; Lucht, Benjamin B. C.; Gunaseelan, Samuel T.; Hudson, John M.; Hynynen, Kullervo H.

    2015-03-01

    Flat, λ/2-spaced phased arrays for therapeutic ultrasound were examined in silico and in vitro. All arrays were made by combining modules made of 64 square elements with 1.5 mm inter-element spacing along both major axes. The arrays were designed to accommodate integrated, co-aligned diagnostic transducers for targeting and monitoring. Six arrays of 1024 elements (16 modules) and four arrays of 6144 elements (96 modules) were modelled and compared according to metrics such as peak pressure amplitude, focal size, ability to be electronically-steered far off-axis and grating lobe amplitude. Two 1024 element prototypes were built and measured in vitro, producing over 100 W of acoustic power. In both cases, the simulation model of the pressure amplitude field was in good agreement with values measured by hydrophone. Using one of the arrays, it was shown that the peak pressure amplitude dropped by only 24% and 25% of the on-axis peak pressure amplitude when steered to the edge of the array (40 mm) at depths of 30 mm and 50 mm. For the 6144 element arrays studied in in silico only, similarly high steerability was found: even when steered 100 mm off-axis, the pressure amplitude decrease at the focus was less than 20%, while the maximum pressure grating lobe was only 20%. Thermal simulations indicate that the modules produce more than enough acoustic power to perform rapid ablations at physiologically relevant depths and steering angles. Arrays such as proposed and tested in this study have enormous potential: their high electronic steerability suggests that they will be able to perform ablations of large volumes without the need for any mechanical translation.

  3. Integrated results of 2 phase 3 studies comparing tigecycline and levofloxacin in community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Tanaseanu, Cristina; Bergallo, Carlos; Teglia, Osvaldo; Jasovich, Abel; Oliva, Maria Eugenia; Dukart, Gary; Dartois, Nathalie; Cooper, C Angel; Gandjini, Hassan; Mallick, Rajiv

    2008-07-01

    Tigecycline (TGC), a glycylcycline, has expanded activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative, anaerobic, and atypical bacteria. Two phase 3 studies were conducted. Hospitalized patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) were randomized to intravenous (IV) TGC (100 mg followed by 50 mg bid) or IV levofloxacin (LEV) (500 mg bid). In 1 study, patients could be switched to oral LEV after at least 3 days intravenously. The coprimary efficacy end points were as follows: clinical response in clinically evaluable (CE) and clinical modified intent-to-treat (c-mITT) populations at test-of-cure (TOC). The secondary end points were as follows: microbiologic efficacy and susceptibility to TGC for CAP bacteria. Safety evaluations were included. Eight hundred ninety-one were patients screened: 846 mITT (TGC 424, LEV 422), 574 CE (TGC 282, LEV 292). Most patients had Fine Pneumonia Severity Index II to IV (80.7% TGC, 74.4% LEV, mITT). At TOC (CE), TGC cured 253/282 patients (89.7%) and LEV cured 252/292 patients (86.3%); the absolute difference of TGC-LEV was 3.4% (95% confidence interval [CI], -2.2 to 9.1, noninferior [P < 0.001]). In c-mITT, TGC cured 319/394 patients (81.0%) and LEV cured 321/403 patients (79.7%); the absolute difference of TGC-LEV was 1.3% (95% CI -4.5 to 7.1, noninferior [P < 0.001]). The drug-related adverse events (AEs) of nausea (20.8% TGC versus 6.6% LEV) and vomiting (13.2% TGC versus 3.3% LEV) were significantly higher in TGC; elevated alanine aminotransferase (2.8% TGC versus 7.3% LEV) and aspartate aminotransferase (2.6% TGC versus 6.9% LEV) were significantly higher in LEV. Discontinuations for AEs were low (TGC, 26 patients [6.1%]; LEV, 34 patients [8.1%]). TGC appeared safe and achieved cure rates similar to LEV in hospitalized patients with CAP.

  4. Orbit transfer vehicle engine study, phase A, extension 1: Volume 2: Study results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mellish, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    Because of the advantage of the Advanced Expander Cycle Engine brought out in initial studies, further design optimization and comparative analyses were undertaken. The major results and conclusion derived are summarized. The primary areas covered are (1) thrust chamber geometry optimization, (2) expander cycle optimization, (3) alternate low thrust capability, (4) safety and reliability, (5) development risk comparison, and (6) cost comparisons. All of the results obtained were used to baseline the initial design concept for the OTV Advanced Expander Cycle Engine Point Design Study.

  5. Analytical Round Robin for Elastic-Plastic Analysis of Surface Cracked Plates: Phase I Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, D. N.; Allen, P. A.

    2012-01-01

    An analytical round robin for the elastic-plastic analysis of surface cracks in flat plates was conducted with 15 participants. Experimental results from a surface crack tension test in 2219-T8 aluminum plate provided the basis for the inter-laboratory study (ILS). The study proceeded in a blind fashion given that the analysis methodology was not specified to the participants, and key experimental results were withheld. This approach allowed the ILS to serve as a current measure of the state of the art for elastic-plastic fracture mechanics analysis. The analytical results and the associated methodologies were collected for comparison, and sources of variability were studied and isolated. The results of the study revealed that the J-integral analysis methodology using the domain integral method is robust, providing reliable J-integral values without being overly sensitive to modeling details. General modeling choices such as analysis code, model size (mesh density), crack tip meshing, or boundary conditions, were not found to be sources of significant variability. For analyses controlled only by far-field boundary conditions, the greatest source of variability in the J-integral assessment is introduced through the constitutive model. This variability can be substantially reduced by using crack mouth opening displacements to anchor the assessment. Conclusions provide recommendations for analysis standardization.

  6. Thermal and impact histories of reheated group IVA, IVB, and ungrouped iron meteorites and their parent asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J.; Goldstein, J. I.; Scott, E. R. D.; Michael, J. R.; Kotula, P. G.; Pham, T.; McCoy, T. J.

    2011-09-01

    Abstract- The microstructures of six reheated iron meteorites—two IVA irons, Maria Elena (1935), Fuzzy Creek; one IVB iron, Ternera; and three ungrouped irons, Hammond, Babb’s Mill (Blake’s Iron), and Babb’s Mill (Troost’s Iron)—were characterized using scanning and transmission electron microscopy, electron-probe microanalysis, and electron backscatter diffraction techniques to determine their thermal and shock history and that of their parent asteroids. Maria Elena and Hammond were heated below approximately 700-750 °C, so that kamacite was recrystallized and taenite was exsolved in kamacite and was spheroidized in plessite. Both meteorites retained a record of the original Widmanstätten pattern. The other four, which show no trace of their original microstructure, were heated above 600-700 °C and recrystallized to form 10-20 μm wide homogeneous taenite grains. On cooling, kamacite formed on taenite grain boundaries with their close-packed planes aligned. Formation of homogeneous 20 μm wide taenite grains with diverse orientations would have required as long as approximately 800 yr at 600 °C or approximately 1 h at 1300 °C. All six irons contain approximately 5-10 μm wide taenite grains with internal microprecipitates of kamacite and nanometer-scale M-shaped Ni profiles that reach approximately 40% Ni indicating cooling over 100-10,000 yr. Un-decomposed high-Ni martensite (α2) in taenite—the first occurrence in irons—appears to be a characteristic of strongly reheated irons. From our studies and published work, we identified four progressive stages of shock and reheating in IVA irons using these criteria: cloudy taenite, M-shaped Ni profiles in taenite, Neumann twin lamellae, martensite, shock-hatched kamacite, recrystallization, microprecipitates of taenite, and shock-melted troilite. Maria Elena and Fuzzy Creek represent stages 3 and 4, respectively. Although not all reheated irons contain evidence for shock, it was probably the main

  7. REVIEW OF RESULTS FOR THE OECD/NEA PHASE VII BENCHMARK: STUDY OF SPENT FUEL COMPOSITIONS FOR LONG TERM DISPOSAL

    SciTech Connect

    Radulescu, Georgeta; Wagner, John C

    2011-01-01

    This paper summarizes the problem specification and compares participants results for the OECD/NEA/WPNCS Expert Group on Burn-up Credit Criticality Safety Phase VII Benchmark Study of Spent Fuel Compositions for Long-Term Disposal. The Phase VII benchmark was developed to study the ability of relevant computer codes and associated nuclear data to predict spent fuel isotopic compositions and corresponding keff values in a cask configuration over the time duration relevant to spent nuclear fuel (SNF) disposal. The benchmark was divided into two sets of calculations: (1) decay calculations out to 1,000,000 years for provided pressurized-water-reactor (PWR) UO2 discharged fuel compositions and (2) burnup credit criticality calculations for a representative cask model at selected time steps. Contributions from 15 organizations and companies in 10 countries were submitted to the Phase VII benchmark exercise. This paper provides a description of the Phase VII benchmark and detailed comparisons of the participants isotopic compositions and keff values that were calculated with a diversity of computer codes and nuclear data sets. Differences observed in the calculated time-dependent nuclide densities are attributed to different decay data or code-specific numerical approximations. The variability of the keff results is consistent with the evaluated uncertainty associated with cross-section data.

  8. Influence of temperature on viral hemorrhagic septicemia (Genogroup IVa) in Pacific herring, Clupea pallasii Valenciennes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hershberger, P.K.; Purcell, M.K.; Hart, L.M.; Gregg, J.L.; Thompson, R.L.; Garver, K.A.; Winton, J.R.

    2013-01-01

    An inverse relationship between water temperature and susceptibility of Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii) to viral hemorrhagic septicemia, genogroup IVa (VHS) was indicated by controlled exposure studies where cumulative mortalities, viral shedding rates, and viral persistence in survivors were greatest at the coolest exposure temperatures. Among groups of specific pathogen-free (SPF) Pacific herring maintained at 8, 11, and 15 °C, cumulative mortalities after waterborne exposure to viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) were 78%, 40%, and 13%, respectively. The prevalence of survivors with VHSV-positive tissues 25 d post-exposure was 64%, 16%, and 0% (at 8, 11 and 15 °C, respectively) with viral prevalence typically higher in brain tissues than in kidney/spleen tissue pools at each temperature. Similarly, geometric mean viral titers in brain tissues and kidney/spleen tissue pools decreased at higher temperatures, and kidney/spleen titers were generally 10-fold lower than those in brain tissues at each temperature. This inverse relationship between temperature and VHS severity was likely mediated by an enhanced immune response at the warmer temperatures, where a robust type I interferon response was indicated by rapid and significant upregulation of the herring Mx gene. The effect of relatively small temperature differences on the susceptibility of a natural host to VHS provides insights into conditions that preface periodic VHSV epizootics in wild populations throughout the NE Pacific.

  9. SEASAT wind and wave observations of northeast Pacific hurricane Iva, August 13, 1978

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, F. I.; Thompson, T. W.; Brown, W. E.; Weissman, D. E.

    1982-04-01

    SEASAT wind and wave observations collected in the eye of hurricane Iva on August 13, 1978, in the northeast Pacific are examined. The SEASAT-A scatterometer system (SASS) and scanning multichannel microwave radiometer (SMMR) observations indicate a maximum wind speed of 25-30 m/s. SASS-derived isotachs indicate a classic banana-shaped high-wind-speed distribution, and the synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery displays a large-scale mean intensity pattern that is in qualitative agreement. Two-dimensional Fourier transforms of selected SAR scenes show a dominant wave field characterized by wavelengths of 166-211 m, with a fanlike distribution of propagation directions. A simple geometric model is proposed as an explanation of this dominant wave field in terms of prior storm intensity and location. This geometric model, the Ross parametric hurricane wave model, and the SEASAT wind and wave data are then employed to obtain estimates of 43 km for the radius to maximum winds and 6.4 m for the corresponding significant wave height at that radius.

  10. Dihydropiridines mechanism of action in striatal isolated nerve endings: comparison with omega-agatoxin IVA.

    PubMed

    Galindo, C A; Sitges, M

    2004-04-01

    The relative contribution of Ca2+ and Na+ channels to the mechanism underlying the action of the dihydropiridines (DHPs), nimodipine, nitrendipine and nifedipine was investigated in rat striatum synaptosomes. The rise in internal Ca2+ (Ca(i), as determined with fura-2) induced by high K+ was unchanged by the DHPs, which like tetrodotoxin (TTX) inhibited both the rise in internal Na+ (Na(i), as determined with the Na+ selective indicator dye, SBFI) and the rise in Ca(i) induced by veratridine. Nimodipine and nitrendipine were much more potent than nifedipine. Oppositely to TTX and to the DHPs, the P/Q type Ca2+ channel blocker, omega-agatoxin IVA did not inhibit the rise in Ca(i) induced by veratridine, but inhibited the rise in Ca(i) induced by high K+. Veratridine-evoked release of dopamine, GABA, Glu, and Asp (detected by HPLC) was inhibited by nimodipine, nitrendipine, and TTX, while high K+-evoked release was unchanged by the DHPs or TTX. It is concluded that the reduction in presynaptic Na+ channel permeability might contribute to the cerebral effects of DHPs.

  11. Structure of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Type IVa Pilus Secretin at 7.4 Å.

    PubMed

    Koo, Jason; Lamers, Ryan P; Rubinstein, John L; Burrows, Lori L; Howell, P Lynne

    2016-10-04

    Type IVa pili (T4aP) function as bacterial virulence factors. T4aP pass through the outer membranes of Gram-negative bacteria via homo-oligomeric secretins. We present a 7.4 Å cryoelectron microscopy structure of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa PilQ secretin. Peripheral and internal features show that the secretin is composed of 14 subunits with C7 symmetry. The channel is a ribbed cylinder with central peripheral spokes and a central gate closed on the periplasmic side. The structure suggests that during pilus extrusion, the central gate is displaced to the interior walls and that no additional conformational changes are required, as the internal diameter can accommodate the pilus. The N1 domain was resolved, while the N0 and the N-terminal β-domains proposed to bind peptidoglycan were absent in class average images and the final 3D map, indicating a high flexibility. These data provide the highest-resolution structure to date of a T4aP secretin.

  12. Crystal structure of soluble MD-1 and its interaction with lipid IVa

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Sung-il; Hong, Minsun; Han, Gye Won; Wilson, Ian A.

    2010-07-22

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Gram-negative bacteria is a common pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) that induces potent innate immune responses. The host immune response against LPS is triggered by myeloid differentiation factor 2 (MD-2) in association with Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) on the cell surface. The MD-2/TLR4-mediated LPS response is regulated by the evolutionarily related complex of MD-1 and Toll-like receptor homolog RP105. Here, we report crystallographic and biophysical data that demonstrate a previously unidentified direct interaction of MD-1 with LPS. The crystal structure of chicken MD-1 (cMD-1) at 2.0 {angstrom} resolution exhibits a {beta}-cup-like fold, similar to MD-2, that encloses a hydrophobic cavity between the two {beta}-sheets. A lipid-like moiety was observed inside the cavity, suggesting the possibility of a direct MD-1/LPS interaction. LPS was subsequently identified as an MD-1 ligand by native gel electrophoresis and gel filtration analyses. The crystal structure of cMD-1 with lipid IVa, an LPS precursor, at 2.4 {angstrom} resolution revealed that the lipid inserts into the deep hydrophobic cavity of the {beta}-cup-like structure, but with some important differences compared with MD-2. These findings suggest that soluble MD-1 alone, in addition to its complex with RP105, can regulate host LPS sensitivity.

  13. Phase transitions in cooperative coinfections: Simulation results for networks and lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grassberger, Peter; Chen, Li; Ghanbarnejad, Fakhteh; Cai, Weiran

    2016-04-01

    We study the spreading of two mutually cooperative diseases on different network topologies, and with two microscopic realizations, both of which are stochastic versions of a susceptible-infected-removed type model studied by us recently in mean field approximation. There it had been found that cooperativity can lead to first order transitions from spreading to extinction. However, due to the rapid mixing implied by the mean field assumption, first order transitions required nonzero initial densities of sick individuals. For the stochastic model studied here the results depend strongly on the underlying network. First order transitions are found when there are few short but many long loops: (i) No first order transitions exist on trees and on 2-d lattices with local contacts. (ii) They do exist on Erdős-Rényi (ER) networks, on d -dimensional lattices with d ≥4 , and on 2-d lattices with sufficiently long-ranged contacts. (iii) On 3-d lattices with local contacts the results depend on the microscopic details of the implementation. (iv) While single infected seeds can always lead to infinite epidemics on regular lattices, on ER networks one sometimes needs finite initial densities of infected nodes. (v) In all cases the first order transitions are actually "hybrid"; i.e., they display also power law scaling usually associated with second order transitions. On regular lattices, our model can also be interpreted as the growth of an interface due to cooperative attachment of two species of particles. Critically pinned interfaces in this model seem to be in different universality classes than standard critically pinned interfaces in models with forbidden overhangs. Finally, the detailed results mentioned above hold only when both diseases propagate along the same network of links. If they use different links, results can be rather different in detail, but are similar overall.

  14. Phase transitions in cooperative coinfections: Simulation results for networks and lattices.

    PubMed

    Grassberger, Peter; Chen, Li; Ghanbarnejad, Fakhteh; Cai, Weiran

    2016-04-01

    We study the spreading of two mutually cooperative diseases on different network topologies, and with two microscopic realizations, both of which are stochastic versions of a susceptible-infected-removed type model studied by us recently in mean field approximation. There it had been found that cooperativity can lead to first order transitions from spreading to extinction. However, due to the rapid mixing implied by the mean field assumption, first order transitions required nonzero initial densities of sick individuals. For the stochastic model studied here the results depend strongly on the underlying network. First order transitions are found when there are few short but many long loops: (i) No first order transitions exist on trees and on 2-d lattices with local contacts. (ii) They do exist on Erdős-Rényi (ER) networks, on d-dimensional lattices with d≥4, and on 2-d lattices with sufficiently long-ranged contacts. (iii) On 3-d lattices with local contacts the results depend on the microscopic details of the implementation. (iv) While single infected seeds can always lead to infinite epidemics on regular lattices, on ER networks one sometimes needs finite initial densities of infected nodes. (v) In all cases the first order transitions are actually "hybrid"; i.e., they display also power law scaling usually associated with second order transitions. On regular lattices, our model can also be interpreted as the growth of an interface due to cooperative attachment of two species of particles. Critically pinned interfaces in this model seem to be in different universality classes than standard critically pinned interfaces in models with forbidden overhangs. Finally, the detailed results mentioned above hold only when both diseases propagate along the same network of links. If they use different links, results can be rather different in detail, but are similar overall.

  15. The Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Public Outdoor Lighting Inventory: Phase I: Survey Results

    SciTech Connect

    Kinzey, Bruce R.; Smalley, Edward; Haefer, R.

    2014-09-30

    This document presents the results of a voluntary web-based inventory survey of public street and area lighting across the U.S. undertaken during the latter half of 2013.This survey attempts to access information about the national inventory in a “bottoms-up” manner, going directly to owners and operators. Adding to previous “top down” estimates, it is intended to improve understanding of the role of public outdoor lighting in national energy use.

  16. Interactive Software System Developed to Study How Icing Affects Airfoil Performance (Phase 1 Results)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choo, Yung K.; Vickerman, Mary B.

    2000-01-01

    SmaggIce (Surface Modeling and Grid Generation for Iced Airfoils), which is being developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field, is an interactive software system for data probing, boundary smoothing, domain decomposition, and structured grid generation and refinement. All these steps are required for aerodynamic performance prediction using structured, grid-based computational fluid dynamics (CFD), as illustrated in the following figure. SmaggIce provides the underlying computations to perform these functions, as well as a graphical user interface to control and interact with them, and graphics to display the results.

  17. Neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy for locally advanced gastric cancer: Long-term results of a phase I trial

    SciTech Connect

    Allal, Abdelkarim S. . E-mail: abdelkarim.allal@hcuge.ch; Zwahlen, Daniel; Bruendler, Marie-Anne; Peyer, Raymond de; Morel, Philippe; Huber, Olivier; Roth, Arnaud D.

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: To assess the long-term results of radiation therapy (RT) when added preoperatively to systemic chemotherapy in patients with locally advanced gastric cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients presenting with T3-4 or N+ gastric cancer received two cycles of cisplatin 100 mg/m{sup 2} d1, 5FU 800 mg/m{sup 2} d1-4, and Leucovorin 60 mg twice daily d1-4; one cycle before and one concomitantly with hyperfractionated RT (median dose, 38.4; range, 31.2-45.6 Gy). All patients underwent a total or subtotal gastrectomy with D2 lymph node resection. Results: Nineteen patients were accrued and 18 completed the neoadjuvant therapeutic program. All patients were subsequently operated and no fatality occurred. At a mean follow-up of 8 years for the surviving patients, no severe late toxicity was observed. The 5-year locoregional control, disease-free, and overall survival were of 85%, 41%, and 35%, respectively. The peritoneum was the most frequent site of relapse. Among long terms survivors, no severe (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 3-4) late complication was reported. Conclusions: The present neoadjuvant treatment does not seem to increase the operative risk, nor the late side effects. The encouraging locoregional control rate suggests that the neoadjuvant approach should be considered for future trials in locally advanced gastric cancer. Also, the frequency of peritoneal recurrence stresses the need for a more efficient systemic or intraperitoneal treatment.

  18. Differential effects of viral hemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) genotypes IVa and IVb on gill epithelial and spleen macrophage cell lines from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Pham, P H; Lumsden, J S; Tafalla, C; Dixon, B; Bols, N C

    2013-02-01

    The two most prominent genotypes of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) are -I in the Northeastern Atlantic region and -IV in North America, but much more is known about the cellular pathogenesis of genotype -I than -IV. VHSV genotype -IV is divided into -IVa from the Northeast Pacific Ocean and -IVb from the Great Lakes and both of which are less virulent to rainbow trout than genotype -I. In this work, infections of VHSV-IVa and -IVb have been studied in two rainbow trout cell lines, RTgill-W1 from the gill epithelium, and RTS11 from spleen macrophages. RTgill-W1 produced infectious progeny of both VHSV-IVa and -IVb. However, VHSV-IVa was more infectious than -IVb toward RTgill-W1: -IVa caused cytopathic effect (CPE) at a lower viral titre, elicited CPE earlier, and yielded higher titres. By contrast, no CPE and no increase in viral titre were observed in RTS11 cultures infected with either genotype. Yet in RTS11 all six VHSV genes were expressed and antiviral genes, Mx2 and Mx3, were up regulated by VHSV-IVb and -IVa. However, replication appeared to terminate at the translational stage as viral N protein, presumably the most abundant of the VSHV proteins, was not detected in either infected RTS11 cultures. In RTgill-W1, Mx2 and Mx3 were up regulated to similar levels by both viral genotypes, while VHSV-IVa induced higher levels of IFN1, IFN2 and LGP2A than VHSV-IVb.

  19. Hypersonic research engine project. Phase 2: Some combustor test results of NASA aerothermodynamic integration model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Y. H.; Gaede, A. E.; Sainio, W. C.

    1975-01-01

    Combustor test results of the NASA Aerothermodynamic Integration Model are presented of a ramjet engine developed for operation between Mach 3 and 8. Ground-based and flight experiments which provide the data required to advance the technology of hypersonic air-breathing propulsion systems as well as to evaluate facility and testing techniques are described. The engine was tested with synthetic air at Mach 5, 6, and 7. The hydrogen fuel was heated to 1500 R prior to injection to simulate a regeneratively cooled system. Combustor efficiencies up to 95 percent at Mach 6 were achieved. Combustor process in terms of effectiveness, pressure integral factor, total pressure recovery and Crocco's pressure-area relationship are presented and discussed. Interactions between inlet-combustor, combustor stages, combustor-nozzle, and the effects of altitude, combustor step, and struts are observed and analyzed.

  20. Overview of diagnostic performance and results for the first operation phase in Wendelstein 7-X (invited).

    PubMed

    Krychowiak, M; Adnan, A; Alonso, A; Andreeva, T; Baldzuhn, J; Barbui, T; Beurskens, M; Biel, W; Biedermann, C; Blackwell, B D; Bosch, H S; Bozhenkov, S; Brakel, R; Bräuer, T; Brotas de Carvalho, B; Burhenn, R; Buttenschön, B; Cappa, A; Cseh, G; Czarnecka, A; Dinklage, A; Drews, P; Dzikowicka, A; Effenberg, F; Endler, M; Erckmann, V; Estrada, T; Ford, O; Fornal, T; Frerichs, H; Fuchert, G; Geiger, J; Grulke, O; Harris, J H; Hartfuß, H J; Hartmann, D; Hathiramani, D; Hirsch, M; Höfel, U; Jabłoński, S; Jakubowski, M W; Kaczmarczyk, J; Klinger, T; Klose, S; Knauer, J; Kocsis, G; König, R; Kornejew, P; Krämer-Flecken, A; Krawczyk, N; Kremeyer, T; Książek, I; Kubkowska, M; Langenberg, A; Laqua, H P; Laux, M; Lazerson, S; Liang, Y; Liu, S C; Lorenz, A; Marchuk, A O; Marsen, S; Moncada, V; Naujoks, D; Neilson, H; Neubauer, O; Neuner, U; Niemann, H; Oosterbeek, J W; Otte, M; Pablant, N; Pasch, E; Sunn Pedersen, T; Pisano, F; Rahbarnia, K; Ryć, L; Schmitz, O; Schmuck, S; Schneider, W; Schröder, T; Schuhmacher, H; Schweer, B; Standley, B; Stange, T; Stephey, L; Svensson, J; Szabolics, T; Szepesi, T; Thomsen, H; Travere, J-M; Trimino Mora, H; Tsuchiya, H; Weir, G M; Wenzel, U; Werner, A; Wiegel, B; Windisch, T; Wolf, R; Wurden, G A; Zhang, D; Zimbal, A; Zoletnik, S

    2016-11-01

    Wendelstein 7-X, a superconducting optimized stellarator built in Greifswald/Germany, started its first plasmas with the last closed flux surface (LCFS) defined by 5 uncooled graphite limiters in December 2015. At the end of the 10 weeks long experimental campaign (OP1.1) more than 20 independent diagnostic systems were in operation, allowing detailed studies of many interesting plasma phenomena. For example, fast neutral gas manometers supported by video cameras (including one fast-frame camera with frame rates of tens of kHz) as well as visible cameras with different interference filters, with field of views covering all ten half-modules of the stellarator, discovered a MARFE-like radiation zone on the inboard side of machine module 4. This structure is presumably triggered by an inadvertent plasma-wall interaction in module 4 resulting in a high impurity influx that terminates some discharges by radiation cooling. The main plasma parameters achieved in OP1.1 exceeded predicted values in discharges of a length reaching 6 s. Although OP1.1 is characterized by short pulses, many of the diagnostics are already designed for quasi-steady state operation of 30 min discharges heated at 10 MW of ECRH. An overview of diagnostic performance for OP1.1 is given, including some highlights from the physics campaigns.

  1. Overview of diagnostic performance and results for the first operation phase in Wendelstein 7-X (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krychowiak, M.; Adnan, A.; Alonso, A.; Andreeva, T.; Baldzuhn, J.; Barbui, T.; Beurskens, M.; Biel, W.; Biedermann, C.; Blackwell, B. D.; Bosch, H. S.; Bozhenkov, S.; Brakel, R.; Bräuer, T.; Brotas de Carvalho, B.; Burhenn, R.; Buttenschön, B.; Cappa, A.; Cseh, G.; Czarnecka, A.; Dinklage, A.; Drews, P.; Dzikowicka, A.; Effenberg, F.; Endler, M.; Erckmann, V.; Estrada, T.; Ford, O.; Fornal, T.; Frerichs, H.; Fuchert, G.; Geiger, J.; Grulke, O.; Harris, J. H.; Hartfuß, H. J.; Hartmann, D.; Hathiramani, D.; Hirsch, M.; Höfel, U.; Jabłoński, S.; Jakubowski, M. W.; Kaczmarczyk, J.; Klinger, T.; Klose, S.; Knauer, J.; Kocsis, G.; König, R.; Kornejew, P.; Krämer-Flecken, A.; Krawczyk, N.; Kremeyer, T.; Książek, I.; Kubkowska, M.; Langenberg, A.; Laqua, H. P.; Laux, M.; Lazerson, S.; Liang, Y.; Liu, S. C.; Lorenz, A.; Marchuk, A. O.; Marsen, S.; Moncada, V.; Naujoks, D.; Neilson, H.; Neubauer, O.; Neuner, U.; Niemann, H.; Oosterbeek, J. W.; Otte, M.; Pablant, N.; Pasch, E.; Sunn Pedersen, T.; Pisano, F.; Rahbarnia, K.; Ryć, L.; Schmitz, O.; Schmuck, S.; Schneider, W.; Schröder, T.; Schuhmacher, H.; Schweer, B.; Standley, B.; Stange, T.; Stephey, L.; Svensson, J.; Szabolics, T.; Szepesi, T.; Thomsen, H.; Travere, J.-M.; Trimino Mora, H.; Tsuchiya, H.; Weir, G. M.; Wenzel, U.; Werner, A.; Wiegel, B.; Windisch, T.; Wolf, R.; Wurden, G. A.; Zhang, D.; Zimbal, A.; Zoletnik, S.

    2016-11-01

    Wendelstein 7-X, a superconducting optimized stellarator built in Greifswald/Germany, started its first plasmas with the last closed flux surface (LCFS) defined by 5 uncooled graphite limiters in December 2015. At the end of the 10 weeks long experimental campaign (OP1.1) more than 20 independent diagnostic systems were in operation, allowing detailed studies of many interesting plasma phenomena. For example, fast neutral gas manometers supported by video cameras (including one fast-frame camera with frame rates of tens of kHz) as well as visible cameras with different interference filters, with field of views covering all ten half-modules of the stellarator, discovered a MARFE-like radiation zone on the inboard side of machine module 4. This structure is presumably triggered by an inadvertent plasma-wall interaction in module 4 resulting in a high impurity influx that terminates some discharges by radiation cooling. The main plasma parameters achieved in OP1.1 exceeded predicted values in discharges of a length reaching 6 s. Although OP1.1 is characterized by short pulses, many of the diagnostics are already designed for quasi-steady state operation of 30 min discharges heated at 10 MW of ECRH. An overview of diagnostic performance for OP1.1 is given, including some highlights from the physics campaigns.

  2. Overview of diagnostic performance and results for the first operation phase in Wendelstein 7-X (invited)

    DOE PAGES

    Krychowiak, M.

    2016-10-27

    Wendelstein 7-X, a superconducting optimized stellarator built in Greifswald/Germany, started its first plasmas with the last closed flux surface (LCFS) defined by 5 uncooled graphite limiters in December 2015. At the end of the 10 weeks long experimental campaign (OP1.1) more than 20 independent diagnostic systems were in operation, allowing detailed studies of many interesting plasma phenomena. For example, fast neutral gas manometers supported by video cameras (including one fast-frame camera with frame rates of tens of kHz) as well as visible cameras with different interference filters, with field of views covering all ten half-modules of the stellarator, discovered amore » MARFE-like radiation zone on the inboard side of machine module 4. This structure is presumably triggered by an inadvertent plasma-wall interaction in module 4 resulting in a high impurity influx that terminates some discharges by radiation cooling. The main plasma parameters achieved in OP1.1 exceeded predicted values in discharges of a length reaching 6 s. Although OP1.1 is characterized by short pulses, many of the diagnostics are already designed for quasi-steady state operation of 30 min discharges heated at 10 MW of ECRH. Finally, an overview of diagnostic performance for OP1.1 is given, including some highlights from the physics campaigns.« less

  3. Overview of diagnostic performance and results for the first operation phase in Wendelstein 7-X (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Krychowiak, M.

    2016-10-27

    Wendelstein 7-X, a superconducting optimized stellarator built in Greifswald/Germany, started its first plasmas with the last closed flux surface (LCFS) defined by 5 uncooled graphite limiters in December 2015. At the end of the 10 weeks long experimental campaign (OP1.1) more than 20 independent diagnostic systems were in operation, allowing detailed studies of many interesting plasma phenomena. For example, fast neutral gas manometers supported by video cameras (including one fast-frame camera with frame rates of tens of kHz) as well as visible cameras with different interference filters, with field of views covering all ten half-modules of the stellarator, discovered a MARFE-like radiation zone on the inboard side of machine module 4. This structure is presumably triggered by an inadvertent plasma-wall interaction in module 4 resulting in a high impurity influx that terminates some discharges by radiation cooling. The main plasma parameters achieved in OP1.1 exceeded predicted values in discharges of a length reaching 6 s. Although OP1.1 is characterized by short pulses, many of the diagnostics are already designed for quasi-steady state operation of 30 min discharges heated at 10 MW of ECRH. Finally, an overview of diagnostic performance for OP1.1 is given, including some highlights from the physics campaigns.

  4. Safety of gadoxetate disodium: results from six clinical phase IV studies in 8194 patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, So Yeon; Sakaguchi, Toshiaki; Dohanish, Susan; Breuer, Josy

    2015-01-01

    Background Safety data on routine clinical use of gadoxetate disodium for liver magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is not reported yet. Purpose To assess the safety profile of gadoxetate disodium for liver MRI in the routine clinical setting. Material and Methods Six multicenter studies were performed in Europe, USA, Australia, and Asia to evaluate the safety and efficacy of gadoxetate disodium (Primovist®/Eovist®) enhanced liver MRI. Patients received a single intravenous bolus injection of the standard approved dose of 0.025 mmol/kg body weight (0.1 mL/kg). The number of patients, the characteristics of adverse events, related adverse events, and serious adverse events were analyzed. Results A total of 8194 patients were included in the database. A total of 141 patients (1.7%) reported 230 AEs of which 129 were considered being related to the use of gadoxetate disodium by the investigators. None of the AEs in the pediatric population (n = 52) were related. The most frequent AEs independent of relationship to the drug included dyspnea (25/0.31%), nausea (22/0.27%), liver disorders (13/0.16%), and renal disorders (9/0.11%). Nine related SAEs were recorded. No patient died during the studies. Conclusion Gadoxetate disodium for liver MRI is safe and well tolerated in the routine clinical setting. PMID:26048848

  5. Review of the WECC EDT phase 2 EIM benefits analysis and results report.

    SciTech Connect

    Veselka, T.D.; Poch, L.A.; Botterud, A.

    2012-04-05

    A region-wide Energy Imbalance Market (EIM) was recently proposed by the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC). In order for the Western Area Power Administration (Western) to make more informed decisions regarding its involvement in the EIM, Western asked Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) to review the EIM benefits study (the October 2011 revision) performed by Energy and Environmental Economics, Inc. (E3). Key components of the E3 analysis made use of results from a study conducted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); therefore, we also reviewed the NREL work. This report examines E3 and NREL methods and models used in the EIM study. Estimating EIM benefits is very challenging because of the complex nature of the Western Interconnection (WI), the variability and uncertainty of renewable energy resources, and the complex decisions and potentially strategic bidding of market participants. Furthermore, methodologies used for some of the more challenging aspects of the EIM have not yet matured. This review is complimentary of several components of the EIM study. Analysts and modelers clearly took great care when conducting detailed simulations of the WI using well-established industry tools under stringent time and budget constraints. However, it is our opinion that the following aspects of the study and the interpretation of model results could be improved upon in future analyses. The hurdle rate methodology used to estimate current market inefficiencies does not directly model the underlying causes of sub-optimal dispatch and power flows. It assumes that differences between historical flows and modeled flows can be attributed solely to market inefficiencies. However, flow differences between model results and historical data can be attributed to numerous simplifying assumptions used in the model and in the input data. We suggest that alternative approaches be explored in order to better estimate the benefits of introducing market

  6. Real-Time Atmospheric Phase Fluctuation Correction Using a Phased Array of Widely Separated Antennas: X-Band Results and Ka-Band Progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geldzahler, B.; Birr, R.; Brown, R.; Grant, K.; Hoblitzell, R.; Miller, M.; Woods, G.; Argueta, A.; Ciminera, M.; Cornish, T.; D'Addario, L.; Davarian, F.; Kocz, J.; Lee, D.; Morabito, D.; Tsao, P.; Jakeman-Flores, H.; Ott, M.; Soloff, J.; Denn, G.; Church, K.; Deffenbaugh, P.

    2016-09-01

    NASA is pursuing a demonstration of coherent uplink arraying at 7.145-7.190 GHz (X-band) and 30-31 GHz (Kaband) using three 12m diameter COTS antennas separated by 60m at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. In addition, we have used up to three 34m antennas separated by 250m at the Goldstone Deep Space Communication Complex in California at X-band 7.1 GHz incorporating real-time correction for tropospheric phase fluctuations. Such a demonstration can enable NASA to design and establish a high power, high resolution, 24/7 availability radar system for (a) tracking and characterizing observations of Near Earth Objects (NEOs), (b) tracking, characterizing and determining the statistics of small-scale (≤10cm) orbital debris, (c) incorporating the capability into its space communication and navigation tracking stations for emergency spacecraft commanding in the Ka band era which NASA is entering, and (d) fielding capabilities of interest to other US government agencies. We present herein the results of our phased array uplink combining at near 7.17 and 8.3 GHz using widely separated antennas demonstrations at both locales, the results of a study to upgrade from a communication to a radar system, and our vision for going forward in implementing a high performance, low lifecycle cost multi-element radar array.

  7. RELAP5-3D Results for Phase I (Exercise 2) of the OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 MW Benchmark

    SciTech Connect

    Gerhard Strydom

    2012-06-01

    The coupling of the PHISICS code suite to the thermal hydraulics system code RELAP5-3D has recently been initiated at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to provide a fully coupled prismatic Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) system modeling capability as part of the NGNP methods development program. The PHISICS code consists of three modules: INSTANT (performing 3D nodal transport core calculations), MRTAU (depletion and decay heat generation) and a perturbation/mixer module. As part of the verification and validation activities, steady state results have been obtained for Exercise 2 of Phase I of the newly-defined OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 MW Benchmark. This exercise requires participants to calculate a steady-state solution for an End of Equilibrium Cycle 350 MW Modular High Temperature Reactor (MHTGR), using the provided geometry, material, and coolant bypass flow description. The paper provides an overview of the MHTGR Benchmark and presents typical steady state results (e.g. solid and gas temperatures, thermal conductivities) for Phase I Exercise 2. Preliminary results are also provided for the early test phase of Exercise 3 using a two-group cross-section library and the Relap5-3D model developed for Exercise 2.

  8. RELAP5-3D results for phase I (Exercise 2) of the OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 MW benchmark

    SciTech Connect

    Strydom, G.; Epiney, A. S.

    2012-07-01

    The coupling of the PHISICS code suite to the thermal hydraulics system code RELAP5-3D has recently been initiated at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to provide a fully coupled prismatic Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) system modeling capability as part of the NGNP methods development program. The PHISICS code consists of three modules: INSTANT (performing 3D nodal transport core calculations), MRTAU (depletion and decay heat generation) and a perturbation/mixer module. As part of the verification and validation activities, steady state results have been obtained for Exercise 2 of Phase I of the newly-defined OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 MW Benchmark. This exercise requires participants to calculate a steady-state solution for an End of Equilibrium Cycle 350 MW Modular High Temperature Reactor (MHTGR), using the provided geometry, material, and coolant bypass flow description. The paper provides an overview of the MHTGR Benchmark and presents typical steady state results (e.g. solid and gas temperatures, thermal conductivities) for Phase I Exercise 2. Preliminary results are also provided for the early test phase of Exercise 3 using a two-group cross-section library and the Relap5-3D model developed for Exercise 2. (authors)

  9. Superior Dielectric Performance of Engineering Thermoplastic as a Result of In situ Embedding of Nanoscale Mixed-Phase Molybdenum Oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qureshi, Nilam; Shinde, Manish; Ratheesh, R.; Bhalerao, Anand; Kale, Bharat; Mulik, Uttam; Amalnerkar, Dinesh P.

    2015-07-01

    To facilitate in situ generation of single and mixed-phase molybdenum oxide on the nanoscale in a network of polyphenylene sulfide (PPS), a novel polymer-inorganic solid-state reaction is proposed. Ammonium molybdate was homogeneously mixed with PPS in 1:1 molar ratio and heated at 285°C for different times (6 h, 24 h, or 48 h) under ambient conditions. The products were characterized by x-ray diffractometry, field emission scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Structural investigations revealed the co-existence of mix-phased molybdenum oxide, i.e. dominant orthorhombic α-MoO3, and minor monoclinic Mo8O23 phases, within the modified PPS matrix. The resulting molybdenum oxide nanostructures had rod and sheet-like morphology in the PPS matrix. Dielectric measurements on pellets prepared from the resulting nanocomposites revealed improvement of the dielectric properties compared with values reported for pure PPS. The resulting nano-composites may exhibit properties synergistically derived from those of their components (molybdenum oxide and PPS), i.e. lower dielectric constant and loss tangent, enabling application as relatively high-temperature capacitors.

  10. The IAEA Coordinated Research Program on HTGR Uncertainty Analysis: Phase I Status and Initial Results

    SciTech Connect

    Strydom, Gerhard; Bostelmann, Friederike; Ivanov, Kostadin

    2014-10-01

    The continued development of High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors (HTGRs) requires verification of HTGR design and safety features with reliable high fidelity physics models and robust, efficient, and accurate codes. One way to address the uncertainties in the HTGR analysis tools is to assess the sensitivity of critical parameters (such as the calculated maximum fuel temperature during loss of coolant accidents) to a few important input uncertainties. The input parameters were identified by engineering judgement in the past but are today typically based on a Phenomena Identification Ranking Table (PIRT) process. The input parameters can also be derived from sensitivity studies and are then varied in the analysis to find a spread in the parameter of importance. However, there is often no easy way to compensate for these uncertainties. In engineering system design, a common approach for addressing performance uncertainties is to add compensating margins to the system, but with passive properties credited it is not so clear how to apply it in the case of modular HTGR heat removal path. Other more sophisticated uncertainty modelling approaches, including Monte Carlo analysis, have also been proposed and applied. Ideally one wishes to apply a more fundamental approach to determine the predictive capability and accuracies of coupled neutronics/thermal-hydraulics and depletion simulations used for reactor design and safety assessment. Today there is a broader acceptance of the use of uncertainty analysis even in safety studies, and it has been accepted by regulators in some cases to replace the traditional conservative analysis. Therefore some safety analysis calculations may use a mixture of these approaches for different parameters depending upon the particular requirements of the analysis problem involved. Sensitivity analysis can for example be used to provide information as part of an uncertainty analysis to determine best estimate plus uncertainty results to the

  11. Chikusetsusaponin IVa Methyl Ester Isolated from the Roots of Achyranthes japonica Suppresses LPS-Induced iNOS, TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β Expression by NF-κB and AP-1 Inactivation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hae-Jun; Shin, Ji-Sun; Lee, Woo-Seok; Shim, Heon-Yong; Park, Ji-Min; Jang, Dae-Sik; Lee, Kyung-Tae

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effect of chikusetsusaponin IVa (CS) and chikusetsusaponin IVa methyl ester (CS-ME) from the roots of Achyranthes japonica NAKAI on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production in RAW264.7 macrophages. CS-ME more potently inhibited LPS-induced NO and PGE2 production than CS. CS-ME concentration-dependently inhibited LPS-induced tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-1β production in RAW264.7 macrophages and mouse peritoneal macrophages. Consistent with these findings, CS-ME suppressed LPS-induced expression of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 at protein level as well as iNOS, COX-2, TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β at mRNA level. In addition, CS-ME suppressed LPS-induced transcriptional activity of nuclear factor (NF)-κB and activator protein (AP)-1. The anti-inflammatory properties of CS-ME might result from suppression of iNOS, COX-2, TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β expression through downregulation of NF-κB and AP-1 in macrophages.

  12. Drugs, Women and Violence in the Americas: U.S. Results of a Multi-Centric Pilot Project (Phase 1)

    PubMed Central

    González-Guarda, Rosa María; Peragallo, Nilda; Lynch, Ami; Nemes, Susanna

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To explore the collective and individual experiences that Latin American females in the U. S. have with substance abuse, violence and risky sexual behaviors. Methods This study was conducted in two phases that were carried out from July 2006 to June 2007 in south Florida. This paper covers Phase 1. In Phase 1, focus groups were conducted among 93 women in English, Spanish and Portuguese. Through content analyses of the focus group transcriptions, major themes were identified. Results Participants identified substance abuse, violence and risky sexual behaviors as closely related problems of great concern in Latina women in the U.S. Three important themes emerged from the focus groups. These included “Living in the US and the Devaluing of Latino Culture,” the “Vicious Cycle of Abuse” and “Breaking the Silence”. Conclusions The results from this study suggest that substance abuse, violence and HIV should be addressed in an integrative and comprehensive manner. Recommendations for the development of policies, programs and services addressing substance abuse, violence and risk for HIV among Latinos are provided. PMID:21593995

  13. New results on the robust stability of PID controllers with gain and phase margins for UFOPTD processes.

    PubMed

    Jin, Q B; Liu, Q; Huang, B

    2016-03-01

    This paper considers the problem of determining all the robust PID (proportional-integral-derivative) controllers in terms of the gain and phase margins (GPM) for open-loop unstable first order plus time delay (UFOPTD) processes. It is the first time that the feasible ranges of the GPM specifications provided by a PID controller are given for UFOPTD processes. A gain and phase margin tester is used to modify the original model, and the ranges of the margin specifications are derived such that the modified model can be stabilized by a stabilizing PID controller based on Hermite-Biehlers Theorem. Furthermore, we obtain all the controllers satisfying a given margin specification. Simulation studies show how to use the results to design a robust PID controller.

  14. Saturation of impurity-rich phases in a cerium-substituted pyrochlore-rich titanate ceramic: part 1 experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Ryerson, F J; Ebbinghaus, B; Kirkorian, O; VanKonynenburg, R

    2000-05-25

    The saturation of impurity-rich accessory phases in a Ce-analog baseline ceramic formulation for the immobilization of excess plutonium has been tested by synthesizing an impurity-rich baseline compositions at 1300 C, 1350 C, and 1400 C in air. Impurity oxides are added at the 10 wt% level. The resulting phases assemblages are typically rich in pyrochlore, Hf-zirconolite (hafnolite), brannerite and rutile, but in many instances also contain an accessory mineral enriched in the impurity oxide. The concentration of that oxide in coexisting pyrochlore sets the saturation limit for solid solution of the component in question. In most cases, the accessory phase does not contain significant amounts of Ce, Gd or U. Exceptions are the stabilization of a Ca-lanthanide phosphate and a phosphate glass when P{sub 2}O{sub 5} is added to the formulation. P{sub 2}O{sub 5} addition is also very effective in reducing the modal amount of pyrochlore in the form relative to brannerite. Addition of the sodium-aluminosilicate, NaAlSiO{sub 4}, also results in the formation of a grain boundary melt at run conditions, but the fate of this phase on cooling is not well determined. At temperatures above 1300 C, addition of 10 wt% Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} also leads to melting. Substitution of cations of different valences can also be associated with model-dependent changes in the oxidation state of uranium via charge transfer reactions. A set of simple components is suggested for the description of pyrochlores in both impurity-free and impurity-rich formulations.

  15. Does Concurrent Radiochemotherapy Affect Cosmetic Results in the Adjuvant Setting After Breast-Conserving Surgery? Results of the ARCOSEIN Multicenter, Phase III Study: Patients' and Doctors' Views

    SciTech Connect

    Toledano, Alain H. . E-mail: alain.toledano@gmail.com; Bollet, Marc A.; Fourquet, Alain; Azria, David; Gligorov, Joseph; Garaud, Pascal; Serin, Daniel; Bosset, Jean-Francois; Miny-Buffet, Joelle; Favre, Anne; Le Foch, Olivier; Calais, Gilles

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the cosmetic results of sequential vs. concurrent adjuvant chemotherapy with radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery for breast cancer, and to compare ratings by patients and physicians. Methods and Materials: From 1996 to 2000, 716 patients with Stage I-II breast cancers were included in a multicenter, Phase III trial (the ARCOSEIN study) comparing, after breast-conserving surgery with axillary dissection, sequential treatment with chemotherapy first followed by radiotherapy vs. chemotherapy administered concurrently with radiotherapy. Cosmetic results with regard to both the overall aspect of the breast and specific changes (color, scar) were evaluated in a total of 214 patients (107 in each arm) by means of questionnaires to both the patient and a physician whose rating was blinded to treatment allocation. Results: Patients' overall satisfaction with cosmesis was not statistically different between the two arms, with approximately 92% with at least satisfactory results (p = 0.72), although differences between the treated and untreated breasts were greater after the concurrent regimen (29% vs. 14% with more than moderate differences; p 0.0015). Physician assessment of overall cosmesis was less favorable, with lower rates of at least satisfactory results in the concurrent arm (60% vs. 85%; p = 0.001). Consequently, the concordance for overall satisfaction with cosmesis between patients and doctors was only fair ({kappa} = 0.62). Conclusion: After breast-conserving surgery, the concurrent use of chemotherapy with radiotherapy is significantly associated with greater differences between the breasts. These differences do not translate into patients' lessened satisfaction with cosmesis.

  16. Detection and genetic characterization of PVL-positive ST8-MRSA-IVa and exfoliative toxin D-positive European CA-MRSA-Like ST1931 (CC80) MRSA-IVa strains in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Paul, Shyamal Kumar; Ghosh, Souvik; Kawaguchiya, Mitsuyo; Urushibara, Noriko; Hossain, Mohammad Akram; Ahmed, Salma; Mahmud, Chand; Jilani, Md Shariful Alam; Haq, Jalaluddin Ashraful; Ahmed, Abdullah Akhtar; Kobayashi, Nobumichi

    2014-08-01

    Severe skin lesions caused by Staphylococcus aureus infection are associated with production from bacterial cells of Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL), a typical virulence factor of community-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA), as well as other toxins represented by exfoliative toxins. Through a retrospective study of 26 S. aureus strains isolated from skin lesions of diabetic patients admitted to a hospital in Bangladesh, 2 PVL-gene-positive MRSA-IVa strains and 8 PVL-negative, exfoliative toxin D (ETD) gene (etd)-positive MRSA-IVa strains were isolated. A PVL-positive MRSA-IVa strain had a type I arginine catabolic mobile element (ACME), belonged to ST8/agr-type I/spa-type t121 (a variant of t008), and harbored blaZ, tet(K), msrA, and aph(3')-IIIa, which are mostly typical characteristics found in USA300, a predominant CA-MRSA clone in the United States. Another PVL-positive MRSA strain, belonging to ST1929 (CC88)/agr-type III/spa-type t3341, was negative for ACME, but possessed blaZ and tet(K). The etd-positive MRSA-IVa strains possessed the epidermal cell differentiation inhibitor B (EDIN-B)-encoding gene (edinB) and belonged to ST1931 (CC80)/agr-type III/spa-type t11023 (a variant of t044), which was genetic trait similar to that of the European CA-MRSA ST80 clone. However, unlike the European ST80 strains, the etd-positive MRSA strains detected in the present study harbored seb, sek, and seq, while they were negative for tet(K), aph(3')-IIIa, and fusB, showing susceptibility to fusidic acid. These findings suggested that etd-positive ST1931 MRSA strains belong to the same lineage as the European ST80 MRSA clone, evolving from a common ancestral clone via acquisition of a different pathogenicity island. This is the first report of a USA300-like MRSA-IV strain, PVL-positive ST1929 (CC88) MRSA-IV, and European ST80 CA-MRSA-like etd-positive ST1931 (CC80) MRSA-IV strains isolated in Bangladesh.

  17. Robonaut 2 - IVA Experiments On-Board ISS and Development Towards EVA Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diftler, Myron; Hulse, Aaron; Badger, Julia; Thackston, Allison; Rogers, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Robonaut 2 (R2) has completed its fixed base activities on-board the ISS and is scheduled to receive its climbing legs in early 2014. In its continuing line of firsts, the R2 torso finished up its on-orbit activities on its stanchion with the manipulation of space blanket materials and performed multiple tasks under teleoperation control by IVA astronauts. The successful completion of these two IVA experiments is a key step in Robonaut's progression towards an EVA capability. Integration with the legs and climbing inside the ISS will provide another important part of the experience that R2 will need prior to performing tasks on the outside of ISS. In support of these on-orbit activities, R2 has been traversing across handrails in simulated zero-g environments and working with EVA tools and equipment on the ground to determine manipulation strategies for an EVA Robonaut. R2 made significant advances in robotic manipulation of deformable materials in space while working with its softgoods task panel. This panel features quarter turn latches that secure a space blanket to the task panel structure. The space blanket covers two cloth cubes that are attached with Velcro to the structure. R2 was able to open and close the latches, pull back the blanket, and remove the cube underneath. R2 simulated cleaning up an EVA worksite as well, by replacing the cube and reattaching the blanket. In order to interact with the softgoods panel, R2 has both autonomously and with a human in the loop identified and localized these deformable objects. Using stereo color cameras, R2 identified characteristic elements on the softgoods panel then extracted the location and orientation of the object in its field of view using stereo disparity and kinematic transforms. R2 used both vision processing and supervisory control to successfully accomplish this important task. Teleoperation is a key capability for Robonaut's effectiveness as an EVA system. To build proficiency, crewmembers have

  18. FY16 Status of Immersion Phased Array Ultrasonic Probe Development and Performance Demonstration Results for Under Sodium Viewing

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, Aaron A.; Chamberlin, Clyde E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Hagge, Tobias J.; Hughes, Michael S.; Larche, Michael R.; Mathews, Royce A.; Neill, Kevin J.; Prowant, Matthew S.

    2016-08-31

    This section of the Joint summary technical letter report (TLR) describes work conducted at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) during FY 2016 (FY16) on the under-sodium viewing (USV) PNNL project 58745, work package AT-16PN230102. This section of the TLR satisfies PNNL’s M3AT-16PN2301025 milestone and is focused on summarizing the design, development, and evaluation of two different phased-array ultrasonic testing (PA-UT) probe designs—a two-dimensional (2D) matrix phased-array probe, and two one-dimensional (1D) linear array probes, referred to as serial number 4 (SN4) engineering test units (ETUs). The 2D probe is a pulse-echo (PE), 32×2, 64-element matrix phased-array ETU. The 1D probes are 32×1 element linear array ETUs. This TLR also provides the results from a performance demonstration (PD) of in-sodium target detection trials at 260°C using both probe designs. This effort continues the iterative evolution supporting the longer term goal of producing and demonstrating a pre-manufacturing prototype ultrasonic probe that possesses the fundamental performance characteristics necessary to enable the development of a high-temperature sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) inspection system for in-sodium detection and imaging.

  19. K1-95-HW, cruise report 1995: preliminary results. Phase III: sediment chemistry and biological sampling survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Torresan, M.E.; Hampton, M.A.; Barber, J.H.; Wong, F.L.

    1995-01-01

    Mamala Bay, off the south shore of the island of Oahu, has been used as a repository of dredged material primarily from Pearl and Honolulu Harbors for over a century. The U.S. Geological Survey, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency are conducting an integrated study on the distribution and character of dredged materials as well as the effects of dredged material on the marine environment. A three phase study is providing information to evaluate the effects on seafloor substrate and the benthic fauna. The studies include geophysical profiling and imaging, bottom photography, sampling, chemical and physical analyses of sediment, and evaluations of the benthic population, population density, and adverse impacts to the benthic fauna. Phase 1, conducted in 1993, inventoried the seafloor via remote sensing. Sidescan sonar and subbottom profilers characterized the seafloor in and around the disposal sites, and the resulting products reveal the character and extent of the dredged material. These data were used to plan Phase 2 in 1994, a sampling program that employed subbottom profilers, video and still photography, and seafloor sampling to ground truth the sonar mosaic and identify the seafloor substrates responsible for the various acoustic signatures on the sonar images and subbottom profiles. Box coring provided the samples necessary to distinguish dredged material from native sediment, and for the chemical analyses used to determine contaminant concentrations. Phase 3 studies conducted in June of 1995 consisted of box core sampling for chemical and biological analyses. Specific studies include: infaunal taxonomy and population density, bioassay/bioaccumulation, sediment chemistry, and post-disposal resuspension and transport. The 1995 survey, conducted June 14 through 17, resulted in the collection of 39 box cores from 20 different stations. Multiple box cores were composited at 7 different locations occupied in 1994, to provide

  20. Experimental Results for a Photonic Time Reversal Processor for Adaptive Control of an Ultra Wideband Phased Array Antenna

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    Radar , Boston: Artech House, 1994. 2. H. Zmuda, “ Optical Beamforming for Phased Array Antennas,” Chapter 19, R...Beamforming, Phased Array Antennas, Time Reversal, Ultra Wideband Radar 1 INTRODUCTION 1.1 Photonic Processing for Microwave Phased Array ...Architecture for Broadband Adaptive Nulling with Linear and Conformal Phased Array Antennas”, Fiber and Integrated Optics , vol. 19, no. 2, March 2000, pp.

  1. Virulence of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) genotypes Ia, IVa, IVb, and IVc in five fish species.

    PubMed

    Emmenegger, Eveline J; Moon, Chang Hoon; Hershberger, Paul K; Kurath, Gael

    2013-12-12

    The susceptibility of yellow perch Perca flavescens, rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss, Chinook salmon O. tshawytscha, koi Cyprinus carpio koi, and Pacific herring Clupea pallasii to 4 strains of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) was assessed. Fish were challenged via intraperitoneal injection with high (1 × 106 plaque-forming units, PFU) and low (1 × 103 PFU) doses of a European strain (genotype Ia), and North American strains from the West coast (genotype IVa), Great Lakes (genotype IVb), and the East coast (genotype IVc). Pacific herring were exposed to the same VHSV strains, but at a single dose of 5 × 103 PFU ml-1 by immersion in static seawater. Overall, yellow perch were the most susceptible, with cumulative percent mortality (CPM) ranging from 84 to 100%, and 30 to 93% in fish injected with high or low doses of virus, respectively. Rainbow trout and Chinook salmon experienced higher mortalities (47 to 98% CPM) after exposure to strain Ia than to the other virus genotypes. Pacific herring were most susceptible to strain IVa with an average CPM of 80% and moderately susceptible (42 to 52% CPM) to the other genotypes. Koi had very low susceptibility (≤5.0% CPM) to all 4 VHSV strains. Fish tested at 7 d post challenge were positive for all virus strains, with yellow perch having the highest prevalence and concentrations of virus, and koi the lowest. While genotype Ia had higher virulence in salmonid species, there was little difference in virulence or host-specificity between isolates from subtypes IVa, IVb, and IVc.

  2. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of Enterococcus casseliflavus aminoglycoside-2′′-phosphotransferase-IVa

    PubMed Central

    Toth, Marta; Vakulenko, Sergei; Smith, Clyde A.

    2010-01-01

    The deactivation of aminoglycoside antibiotics by chemical modification is one of the major sources of bacterial resistance to this family of therapeutic compounds, which includes the clinically relevant drugs streptomycin, kanamycin and gentamicin. The aminoglycoside phosphotransferases (APHs) form one such family of enzymes responsible for this resistance. The gene encoding one of these enzymes, aminoglycoside-2′′-phosphotransferase-IVa [APH(2′′)-IVa] from Enterococcus casseliflavus, has been cloned and the protein (comprising 306 amino-acid residues) has been expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. The enzyme was crystallized in three substrate-free forms. Two of the crystal forms belonged to the orthorhombic space group P212121 with similar unit-cell parameters, although one of the crystal forms had a unit-cell volume that was approximately 13% smaller than the other and a very low solvent content of around 38%. The third crystal form belonged to the monoclinic space group P21 and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis was consistent with the presence of two molecules in the asymmetric unit. The orthorhombic crystal forms of apo APH(2′′)-IVa both diffracted to 2.2 Å resolution and the monoclinic crystal form diffracted to 2.4 Å resolution; synchrotron diffraction data were collected from these crystals at SSRL (Stanford, California, USA). Structure determination by molecular replacement using the structure of the related enzyme APH(2′′)-IIa is proceeding. PMID:20057078

  3. Virulence of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) genotypes Ia, IVa, IVb, and IVc in five fish species.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Emmenegger, Eveline J.; Moon, Chang Hoon; Hershberger, Paul K.; Kurath, Gael

    2013-01-01

    The susceptibility of yellow perch Perca flavescens, rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss, Chinook salmon O. tshawytscha, koi Cyprinus carpio koi, and Pacific herring Clupea pallasii to 4 strains of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) was assessed. Fish were challenged via intraperitoneal injection with high (1 × 106 plaque-forming units, PFU) and low (1 × 103 PFU) doses of a European strain (genotype Ia), and North American strains from the West coast (genotype IVa), Great Lakes (genotype IVb), and the East coast (genotype IVc). Pacific herring were exposed to the same VHSV strains, but at a single dose of 5 × 103 PFU ml-1 by immersion in static seawater. Overall, yellow perch were the most susceptible, with cumulative percent mortality (CPM) ranging from 84 to 100%, and 30 to 93% in fish injected with high or low doses of virus, respectively. Rainbow trout and Chinook salmon experienced higher mortalities (47 to 98% CPM) after exposure to strain Ia than to the other virus genotypes. Pacific herring were most susceptible to strain IVa with an average CPM of 80% and moderately susceptible (42 to 52% CPM) to the other genotypes. Koi had very low susceptibility (≤5.0% CPM) to all 4 VHSV strains. Fish tested at 7 d post challenge were positive for all virus strains, with yellow perch having the highest prevalence and concentrations of virus, and koi the lowest. While genotype Ia had higher virulence in salmonid species, there was little difference in virulence or host-specificity between isolates from subtypes IVa, IVb, and IVc.  

  4. Induction of anti-viral genes during acute infection with Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) genogroup IVa in Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii).

    PubMed

    Hansen, John D; Woodson, James C; Hershberger, Paul K; Grady, Courtney; Gregg, Jacob L; Purcell, Maureen K

    2012-02-01

    Infection with the aquatic rhabdovirus Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) genogroup IVa results in high mortality in Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii) and is hypothesized to be a potential limiting factor for herring recovery. To investigate anti-viral immunity in the Pacific herring, four immune response genes were identified: the myxovirus resistance (Clpa-Mx), a major histocompatibility complex IB (named Clpa-UAA.001), the inducible immunoproteosome subunit 9 (Clpa-PSMB9) and the neutrophil chemotactic factor (Clpa-LECT2). Reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) assays were developed based on these gene sequences to investigate the host immune response to acute VHSV infection following both injection and immersion challenge. Virus levels were measured by both plaque assay and RT-qPCR and peaked at day 6 during the 10-day exposure period for both groups of fish. The interferon stimulated genes (Clpa-Mx, -UAA.001, and -PSMB9) were significantly up-regulated in response to VHSV infection at both 6 and 10 days post-infection in both spleen and fin. Results from this study indicate that Pacific herring mount a robust, early antiviral response in both fin and spleen tissues. The immunological tools developed in this study will be useful for future studies to investigate antiviral immunity in Pacific herring.

  5. Induction of anti-viral genes during acute infection with Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) genogroup IVa in Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansen, John D.; Woodson, James C.; Hershberger, Paul K.; Grady, Courtney; Gregg, Jacob L.; Purcell, Maureen K.

    2012-01-01

    Infection with the aquatic rhabdovirus Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) genogroup IVa results in high mortality in Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii) and is hypothesized to be a potential limiting factor for herring recovery. To investigate anti-viral immunity in the Pacific herring, four immune response genes were identified: the myxovirus resistance (Clpa-Mx), a major histocompatibility complex IB (named Clpa-UAA.001), the inducible immunoproteosome subunit 9 (Clpa-PSMB9) and the neutrophil chemotactic factor (Clpa-LECT2). Reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) assays were developed based on these gene sequences to investigate the host immune response to acute VHSV infection following both injection and immersion challenge. Virus levels were measured by both plaque assay and RT-qPCR and peaked at day 6 during the 10-day exposure period for both groups of fish. The interferon stimulated genes (Clpa-Mx, −UAA.001, and −PSMB9) were significantly up-regulated in response to VHSV infection at both 6 and 10 days post-infection in both spleen and fin. Results from this study indicate that Pacific herring mount a robust, early antiviral response in both fin and spleen tissues. The immunological tools developed in this study will be useful for future studies to investigate antiviral immunity in Pacific herring.

  6. Safety and immunogenicity of the PRAME cancer immunotherapeutic in metastatic melanoma: results of a phase I dose escalation study

    PubMed Central

    Gutzmer, R; Rivoltini, L; Levchenko, E; Testori, A; Utikal, J; Ascierto, P A; Demidov, L; Grob, J J; Ridolfi, R; Schadendorf, D; Queirolo, P; Santoro, A; Loquai, C; Dreno, B; Hauschild, A; Schultz, E; Lesimple, T P; Vanhoutte, N; Salaun, B; Gillet, M; Jarnjak, S; De Sousa Alves, P M; Louahed, J; Brichard, V G; Lehmann, F F

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The PRAME tumour antigen is expressed in several tumour types but in few normal adult tissues. A dose-escalation phase I/II study (NCT01149343) assessed the safety, immunogenicity and clinical activity of the PRAME immunotherapeutic (recombinant PRAME protein (recPRAME) with the AS15 immunostimulant) in patients with advanced melanoma. Here, we report the phase I dose-escalation study segment. Patients and methods Patients with stage IV PRAME-positive melanoma were enrolled to 3 consecutive cohorts to receive up to 24 intramuscular injections of the PRAME immunotherapeutic. The RecPRAME dose was 20, 100 or 500 µg in cohorts 1, 2 and 3, respectively, with a fixed dose of AS15. Adverse events (AEs), including predefined dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) and the anti-PRAME humoral response (ELISA), were coprimary end points. Cellular immune responses were evaluated using in vitro assays. Results 66 patients were treated (20, 24 and 22 in the respective cohorts). AEs considered by the investigator to be causally related were mostly grade 1 or 2 injection site symptoms, fatigue, chills, fever and headache. Two DLTs (grade 3 brain oedema and proteinuria) were recorded in two patients in two cohorts (cohorts 2 and 3). All patients had detectable anti-PRAME antibodies after four immunisations. Percentages of patients with predefined PRAME-specific-CD4+T-cell responses after four immunisations were similar in each cohort. No CD8+ T-cell responses were detected. Conclusions The PRAME immunotherapeutic had an acceptable safety profile and induced similar anti-PRAME-specific humoral and cellular immune responses in all cohorts. As per protocol, the phase II study segment was initiated to further evaluate the 500 µg PRAME immunotherapeutic dose. Trial registration number NCT01149343, Results. PMID:27843625

  7. Positive and negative control sequences within the distal domain of the adenovirus IVa2 promoter overlap with the major late promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, V; Madden, M J; Salzman, N P

    1985-01-01

    The RNA initiation sites of the adenovirus IVa2 and major late promoters (MLP) are separated by 210 base pairs and transcribed from opposite DNA strands. We had previously shown that they contained overlapping promoter sequences (V. Natarajan, M. J. Madden, and N. P. Salzman, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 81:6290-6294, 1984). The transcription efficiencies of these two promoters were studied in vitro with templates of covalently closed circular DNAs that contained various deletion and point mutants. The distal control region of the IVa2 promoter that is located at nucleotide position (np) -152 to -242 from the RNA initiation site consists of at least two domains. The first distal domain, present between np -152 and -179, is necessary for efficient transcription of the IVa2 promoter, and it overlaps with sequences that have been shown to be necessary for efficient transcription of MLP. This region may serve as the entry site for the transcription machinery. The second distal domain consists of sequences present between np -211 and -242. These sequences are contained at the 5' end in the MLP transcript, and they inhibit transcription from the IVa2 promoter. However, these sequences are not necessary for transcription of the MLP with a covalently closed template but are needed for transcription with a linear template. The TATA box that is located at np -180 to -186 between these two domains has a critical role for efficient transcription of the MLP. A point mutation that reduces transcription from MLP by more than 80% stimulates transcription from IVa2 promoter by 10-fold. This finding is consistent with the proposal that MLP and IVa2 promoters share an entry site for transcription machinery and compete for its use. Images PMID:4009788

  8. The Controls-Structures Interaction Guest Investigator Program - An overview and phase I experimental results. [for flexible spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith-Taylor, Rudeen; Tanner, Sharon E.

    1991-01-01

    The NASA Controls-Structures Interaction (CSI) Guest Investigator program is described in terms of its support of the development of CSI technologies. The program is based on the introduction of CSI researchers from industry and academia to available test facilities for experimental validation of technologies and methods. Phase I experimental results are reviewed with attention given to their use of the Mini-MAST test facility and the facility for the Advance Control Evaluation of Structures. Experiments were conducted regarding: collocated/noncollocated controllers, nonlinear math modeling, controller design, passive/active suspension systems design, and system identification and fault isolation. The results demonstrate that significantly enhanced performance from the control techniques can be achieved by integrating knowledge of the structural dynamics under consideration into the approaches.

  9. OECD/NEA expert group on uncertainty analysis for criticality safety assessment: Results of benchmark on sensitivity calculation (phase III)

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanova, T.; Laville, C.; Dyrda, J.; Mennerdahl, D.; Golovko, Y.; Raskach, K.; Tsiboulia, A.; Lee, G. S.; Woo, S. W.; Bidaud, A.; Sabouri, P.; Bledsoe, K.; Rearden, B.; Gulliford, J.; Michel-Sendis, F.

    2012-07-01

    The sensitivities of the k{sub eff} eigenvalue to neutron cross sections have become commonly used in similarity studies and as part of the validation algorithm for criticality safety assessments. To test calculations of the sensitivity coefficients, a benchmark study (Phase III) has been established by the OECD-NEA/WPNCS/EG UACSA (Expert Group on Uncertainty Analysis for Criticality Safety Assessment). This paper presents some sensitivity results generated by the benchmark participants using various computational tools based upon different computational methods: SCALE/TSUNAMI-3D and -1D, MONK, APOLLO2-MORET 5, DRAGON-SUSD3D and MMKKENO. The study demonstrates the performance of the tools. It also illustrates how model simplifications impact the sensitivity results and demonstrates the importance of 'implicit' (self-shielding) sensitivities. This work has been a useful step towards verification of the existing and developed sensitivity analysis methods. (authors)

  10. The National Registry of Genetically Triggered Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Cardiovascular Conditions (GenTAC): Results from Phase I and Scientific Opportunities in Phase II

    PubMed Central

    Kroner, Barbara L.; Tolunay, H. Eser; Basson, Craig T.; Pyeritz, Reed E.; Holmes, Kathryn; Maslen, Cheryl L.; Milewicz, Dianna M.; LeMaire, Scott A.; Hendershot, Tabitha; Desvigne-Nickens, Patrice; Devereux, Richard B.; Dietz, Harry C.; Song, Howard; Ringer, Danny; Mitchell, Megan; Weinsaft, Jonathan W.; Ravekes, William; Menashe, Victor; Eagle, Kim A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Genetically triggered thoracic aortic conditions (GenTAC) represent an important problem for patients and their families. Accordingly, the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI) established the first phase of its national GenTAC Registry in 2006. Enrollment and Diagnoses Between 2007 and 2010, six enrolling centers established the GenTAC I Registry consisting of 2,046 patients [(Marfan syndrome 576 (28.2%); bicuspid aortic valve disease 504 (24.6%), aneurysm or dissection age <50 years 369 (18%), and others.] Biologic samples for DNA analyses (WBC’s or saliva) are available in 97% and stored plasma is available in 60% of enrollees. Results Initial scientific inquiry using the GenTAC Registry has included validation studies of genetic causes for aortic syndromes, potential usefulness of TGFB blood levels in Marfan subjects, and current surgical approaches to ascending aortic conditions. Future Opportunity GenTAC II will allow biannual follow-up of GenTAC I enrollees for up to nine years, enrollment of an additional 1,500 subjects, further integration of imaging findings with clinical and genetic data through utilization of an imaging core lab, important validation of phenotype-genotype correlations through a phenotyping core lab, and integration of a scientific advisory committee to help define the full range and depth of the Registry’s scientific capabilities. The registry resources are available to the external scientific community through an application process accessible at https://gentac.rti.org. PMID:21982653

  11. Evaluating results from the multiple myeloma patient subset treated with denosumab or zoledronic acid in a randomized phase 3 trial.

    PubMed

    Raje, N; Vadhan-Raj, S; Willenbacher, W; Terpos, E; Hungria, V; Spencer, A; Alexeeva, Y; Facon, T; Stewart, A K; Feng, A; Braun, A; Balakumaran, A; Roodman, G D

    2016-01-08

    In a phase 3 trial of denosumab vs zoledronic acid in patients (n=1776) with bone metastases and solid tumors or multiple myeloma, denosumab was superior to zoledronic acid for the primary end point of prevention of skeletal-related events. There was no difference in overall survival between the two groups; however, an ad hoc overall survival analysis in the multiple myeloma subset of patients (n=180) favored zoledronic acid (hazard ratio (HR) 2.26; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.13-4.50; P=0.014). In the present analysis, we found imbalances between the groups with respect to baseline risk characteristics. HRs with two-sided 95% CIs were estimated using the Cox model. After adjustment in a covariate analysis, the CI crossed unity (HR 1.86; 95% CI 0.90-3.84; P=0.0954). Furthermore, we found a higher rate of early withdrawals for the reasons of lost to follow-up and withdrawal of consent in the zoledronic acid group; after accounting for these, the HR was 1.31 (95% CI 0.80-2.15; P=0.278). In conclusion, the survival results in multiple myeloma patients in this trial were confounded and will eventually be resolved by an ongoing phase 3 trial.

  12. Simulation and experimental results for a phase retrieval-based algorithm for far-field beam steering and shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roggemann, Michael C.; Welsh, Byron M.; Stone, Bradley R.; Su, Ting Ei

    2002-02-01

    Active laser-based electro-optical (EO) sensors on future aircraft and spacecraft will be used for a variety of missions and will be required to have a number of demanding technical characteristics. A key challenge to achieving these characteristics is the development of inexpensive, high degree of freedom optical wave front control devices, and the development of effective algorithms for controlling these devices. In this paper we present our research in the development of phase retrieval-based wave front control algorithms that can be used implemented with segmented liquid crystal-based wave front control devices. We have developed a wave front control algorithm that allows dynamic small-angle beam steering and shaping in the presence of an aberrating output window. Our approach is based on a phase retrieval algorithm to determine the optimal figure of a segmented wave front control device. Simulation and experimental results presented here show that this approach allows shaped far field patterns to be created and steered over small angles.

  13. Desynchronization of Theta-Phase Gamma-Amplitude Coupling during a Mental Arithmetic Task in Children with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jun Won; Kim, Bung-Nyun; Lee, Jaewon; Na, Chul; Kee, Baik Seok; Min, Kyung Joon; Han, Doug Hyun; Kim, Johanna Inhyang; Lee, Young Sik

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Theta-phase gamma-amplitude coupling (TGC) measurement has recently received attention as a feasible method of assessing brain functions such as neuronal interactions. The purpose of this electroencephalographic (EEG) study is to understand the mechanisms underlying the deficits in attentional control in children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) by comparing the power spectra and TGC at rest and during a mental arithmetic task. Methods Nineteen-channel EEGs were recorded from 97 volunteers (including 53 subjects with ADHD) from a camp for hyperactive children under two conditions (rest and task performance). The EEG power spectra and the TGC data were analyzed. Correlation analyses between the Intermediate Visual and Auditory (IVA) continuous performance test (CPT) scores and EEG parameters were performed. Results No significant difference in the power spectra was detected between the groups at rest and during task performance. However, TGC was reduced during the arithmetic task in the ADHD group compared with the normal group (F = 16.70, p < 0.001). The TGC values positively correlated with the IVA CPT scores but negatively correlated with theta power. Conclusions Our findings suggest that desynchronization of TGC occurred during the arithmetic task in ADHD children. TGC in ADHD children is expected to serve as a promising neurophysiological marker of network deactivation during attention-demanding tasks. PMID:26930194

  14. Iridoid extracts from Ajuga iva increase the antioxidant enzyme activities in red blood cells of rats fed a cholesterol-rich diet.

    PubMed

    Bouderbala, Sherazede; Prost, Josiane; Lacaille-Dubois, Marie Aleth; Bouchenak, Malika

    2010-05-01

    The lyophilized aqueous extract of Ajuga iva (Ai) is able to reduce oxidative stress, which may prevent lipid peroxidation in hypercholesterolemic rats. Iridoids (I) were isolated from Ai. We hypothesized that the antioxidant defense status in red blood cells (RBC) and tissues in rats fed a cholesterol-rich diet and treated with Ai may be correlated to these compounds. Male Wistar rats (n = 32) weighing 120 +/- 5 g were fed a diet containing 1% cholesterol for 15 days. After this phase, hypercholesterolemic (HC) rats were divided into groups, fed the same diet, and received either the same or different doses (5, 10, or 15 mg/kg body weight by intraperitoneal injection) of I for 15 days. Compared with the HC group, total cholesterol value was 1.4- and 1.2-fold lower in the I(5)-HC and I(10)-HC groups. Serum thiobarbituric acid reactive substance content was 2.3-, 2.9-, and 3-fold lower in the I(5)-HC, I(10)-HC, and I(15)-HC groups compared with the HC group. In RBC, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, and superoxide dismutase activities were significantly higher in the I(5)-HC, I(10)-HC, and I(15)-HC groups than the HC group. Liver, heart, and muscle glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase activities were significantly higher in the groups treated with I than the HC group. Muscle glutathione reductase activity was increased 1.4-fold in the I(5)-HC, 1.5-fold in the I(10)-HC, and 1.5-fold in the I(15)-HC group. In HC rats, different doses of I increase the antioxidant enzyme activities in RBC and act differently in tissues. Treatment with I may play an important role in suppressing oxidative stress caused by dietary cholesterol and, thus, may be useful for the prevention and/or early treatment of hypercholesterolemia.

  15. Odour reduction strategies for biosolids produced from a Western Australian wastewater treatment plant: results from Phase I laboratory trials.

    PubMed

    Gruchlik, Yolanta; Heitz, Anna; Joll, Cynthia; Driessen, Hanna; Fouché, Lise; Penney, Nancy; Charrois, Jeffrey W A

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated sources of odours from biosolids produced from a Western Australian wastewater treatment plant and examined possible strategies for odour reduction, specifically chemical additions and reduction of centrifuge speed on a laboratory scale. To identify the odorous compounds and assess the effectiveness of the odour reduction measures trialled in this study, headspace solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS SPME-GC-MS) methods were developed. The target odour compounds included volatile sulphur compounds (e.g. dimethyl sulphide, dimethyl disulphide and dimethyl trisulphide) and other volatile organic compounds (e.g. toluene, ethylbenzene, styrene, p-cresol, indole and skatole). In our laboratory trials, aluminium sulphate added to anaerobically digested sludge prior to dewatering offered the best odour reduction strategy amongst the options that were investigated, resulting in approximately 40% reduction in the maximum concentration of the total volatile organic sulphur compounds, relative to control.

  16. Summary Report on Phase I Results from the 3D Printing in Zero G Technology Demonstration Mission, Volume I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prater, T. J.; Bean, Q. A.; Beshears, R. D.; Rolin, T. D.; Werkheiser, N. J.; Ordonez, E. A.; Ryan, R. M.; Ledbetter, F. E., III

    2016-01-01

    Human space exploration to date has been confined to low-Earth orbit and the Moon. The International Space Station (ISS) provides a unique opportunity for researchers to prove out the technologies that will enable humans to safely live and work in space for longer periods of time and venture beyond the Earth/Moon system. The ability to manufacture parts in-space rather than launch them from Earth represents a fundamental shift in the current risk and logistics paradigm for human spaceflight. In September 2014, NASA, in partnership with Made In Space, Inc., launched the 3D Printing in Zero-G technology demonstration mission to explore the potential of additive manufacturing for in-space applications and demonstrate the capability to manufacture parts and tools on orbit using fused deposition modeling. This Technical Publication summarizes the results of testing to date of the ground control and flight prints from the first phase of this ISS payload.

  17. FY15 Status of Immersion Phased Array Ultrasonic Probe Development and Performance Demonstration Results for Under Sodium Viewing

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, Aaron A.; Larche, Michael R.; Mathews, Royce; Neill, Kevin J.; Baldwin, David L.; Prowant, Matthew S.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Chamberlin, Clyde E.

    2015-09-01

    This Technical Letter Report (TLR) describes work conducted at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) during FY 2015 on the under-sodium viewing (USV) PNNL project 58745, Work Package AT-15PN230102. This TLR satisfies PNNL’s M3AT-15PN2301027 milestone, and is focused on summarizing the design, development, and evaluation of a two-dimensional matrix phased-array probe referred to as serial number 3 (SN3). In addition, this TLR also provides the results from a performance demonstration of in-sodium target detection trials at 260°C using a one-dimensional 22-element linear array developed in FY14 and referred to as serial number 2 (SN2).

  18. Research on an expert system for database operation of simulation-emulation math models. Volume 1, Phase 1: Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawamura, K.; Beale, G. O.; Schaffer, J. D.; Hsieh, B. J.; Padalkar, S.; Rodriguez-Moscoso, J. J.

    1985-01-01

    The results of the first phase of Research on an Expert System for Database Operation of Simulation/Emulation Math Models, is described. Techniques from artificial intelligence (AI) were to bear on task domains of interest to NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. One such domain is simulation of spacecraft attitude control systems. Two related software systems were developed to and delivered to NASA. One was a generic simulation model for spacecraft attitude control, written in FORTRAN. The second was an expert system which understands the usage of a class of spacecraft attitude control simulation software and can assist the user in running the software. This NASA Expert Simulation System (NESS), written in LISP, contains general knowledge about digital simulation, specific knowledge about the simulation software, and self knowledge.

  19. Postoperative Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in Low-Risk Endometrial Cancers: Final Results of a Phase I Study

    SciTech Connect

    Macchia, Gabriella; Cilla, Savino M.P.; Ferrandina, Gabriella; Padula, Gilbert D.A.; Deodato, Francesco; Digesu, Cinzia; Caravatta, Luciana; Picardi, Vincenzo; Corrado, Giacomo; Piermattei, Angelo; Valentini, Vincenzo; Cellini, Numa; Scambia, Giovanni; Morganti, Alessio Giuseppe

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To determine the maximum tolerated dose of short-course radiotherapy (intensity-modulated radiotherapy technique) to the upper two thirds of the vagina in endometrial cancers with low risk of local recurrence. Patients and Methods: A Phase I clinical trial was performed. Eligible patients had low-risk resected primary endometrial adenocarcinomas. Radiotherapy was delivered in 5 fractions over 1 week. The planning target volume was the clinical target volume plus 5 mm. The clinical target volume was defined as the upper two thirds of the vagina as evidenced at CT simulation by a vaginal radio-opaque device. The planning target volume was irradiated by a seven-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy technique, planned by the Plato Sunrise inverse planning system. A first cohort of 6 patients received 25 Gy (5-Gy fractions), and a subsequent cohort received 30 Gy (6-Gy fractions). The Common Toxicity Criteria scale, version 3.0, was used to score toxicity. Results: Twelve patients with endometrial cancer were enrolled. Median age was 58 years (range, 49-74 years). Pathologic stage was IB (83.3%) and IC (16.7%). Median tumor size was 30 mm (range, 15-50 mm). All patients completed the prescribed radiotherapy. No patient experienced a dose-limiting toxicity at the first level, and the radiotherapy dose was escalated from 25 to 30 Gy. No patients at the second dose level experienced dose-limiting toxicity. The most common Grade 2 toxicity was gastrointestinal, which was tolerable and manageable. Conclusions: The maximum tolerated dose of short-course radiotherapy was 30 Gy at 6 Gy per fraction. On the basis of this result, we are conducting a Phase II study with radiotherapy delivered at 30 Gy.

  20. Transcranial electro-hyperthermia combined with alkylating chemotherapy in patients with relapsed high-grade gliomas: phase I clinical results.

    PubMed

    Wismeth, Caecilia; Dudel, Christine; Pascher, Christina; Ramm, Paul; Pietsch, Torsten; Hirschmann, Birgit; Reinert, Christiane; Proescholdt, Martin; Rümmele, Petra; Schuierer, Gerhard; Bogdahn, Ulrich; Hau, Peter

    2010-07-01

    Non-invasive loco-regional electro-hyperthermia (EHT) plus alkylating chemotherapy is occasionally used as salvage treatment in the relapse of patients with high-grade gliomas. Experimental data and retrospective studies suggest potential effects. However, no prospective clinical results are available. We performed a single-center prospective non-controlled single-arm Phase I trial. Main inclusion criteria were recurrent high-grade glioma WHO Grade III or IV, age 18-70, and Karnofsky performance score > or = 70. Primary endpoints were dose-limiting toxicities (DLT) and maximum tolerated dose (MTD) with the combined regimen. Groups of 3 or 4 patients were treated 2-5 times a week in a dose-escalation scheme with EHT. Alkylating chemotherapy (ACNU, nimustin) was administered at a dose of 90 mg/m(2) on day 1 of 42 days for up to six cycles or until tumor progression (PD) or DLT occurred. Fifteen patients with high-grade gliomas were included. Relevant toxicities were local pain and increased focal neurological signs or intracranial pressure. No DLT occurred. In some patients, the administration of mannitol during EHT or long-term use of corticosteroids was necessary to resolve symptoms. Although some patients showed responses in their primarily treated sites, the pattern of response was not well defined. EHT plus alkylating chemotherapy is tolerable in patients with relapse of high-grade gliomas. Episodes of intracranial pressure were, at least, possibly attributed to EHT but did not cause DLTs. A Phase II trial targeting treatment effects is warranted on the basis of the results raised in this trial.

  1. 30 CFR 203.40 - Which leases are eligible for royalty relief as a result of drilling a deep well or a phase 1...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... a result of drilling a deep well or a phase 1 ultra-deep well? 203.40 Section 203.40 Mineral... Relief for Drilling Deep Gas Wells on Leases Not Subject to Deep Water Royalty Relief § 203.40 Which leases are eligible for royalty relief as a result of drilling a deep well or a phase 1 ultra-deep...

  2. Preliminary report on the results of the second phase of a round- robin endotoxin assay study using cotton dust.

    PubMed

    Chun, D T; Chew, V; Bartlett, K; Gordon, T; Jacobs, R R; Larsson, B M; Larsson, L; Lewis, D M; Liesivuori, J; Michel, O; Milton, D K; Rylander, R; Thorne, P S; White, E M; Brown, M E

    2000-01-01

    In an on-going endotoxin assay study, a two-part interlaboratory endotoxin assay study has been completed. The purpose of the study was to compare the variation in assay results between different laboratories, and, if the variation was high, to see if a common protocol would reduce the variation. In both parts of the study, membrane filters laden with the same approximate amount and type of cotton dust were sent for analysis to laboratories that "routinely" perform endotoxin analyses. First, each of these laboratories performed the analysis using the methodology common to its laboratory. In the second part of the study, membrane filters with cotton dust were again sent to the same laboratories where the analyses were performed as before but with a common extraction protocol. The preliminary results from the first phase of the study have been collected and showed that intra-laboratory variations were small, but large and significant interlaboratory variation was observed. The results were reported elsewhere. The preliminary results from the second part of the study consisting of the data currently collected are presented here. Again, intra-laboratory variations were small, but, also again, large and significant inter-laboratory variation was observed. However, in this part of the study, the range between the highest and lowest average results was narrower than in the first part of the study. Influence of the assay kit type was examined. The variation within assay kit type was small but significant differences in results were observed between assay kit types. The findings suggest that endotoxin concentration in samples can be ranked within laboratories, but not necessarily between laboratories. However, some of the variation between laboratories has been reduced by a common extraction protocol which suggests the possibility of further standardization that may lead to better comparability between laboratories.

  3. Results of the Phase I Dose-Escalating Study of Motexafin Gadolinium With Standard Radiotherapy in Patients With Glioblastoma Multiforme

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Judith M. Seiferheld, Wendy; Alger, Jeffrey R.; Wu, Genevieve; Endicott, Thyra J.; Mehta, Minesh; Curran, Walter; Phan, See-Chun

    2007-11-01

    Purpose: Motexafin gadolinium (MGd) is a putative radiation enhancer initially evaluated in patients with brain metastases. This Phase I trial studied the safety and tolerability of a 2-6-week course (10-22 doses) of MGd with radiotherapy for glioblastoma multiforme. Methods and Materials: A total of 33 glioblastoma multiforme patients received one of seven MGd regimens starting at 10 doses of 4 mg/kg/d MGd and escalating to 22 doses of 5.3 mg/kg/d MGd (5 or 10 daily doses then three times per week). The National Cancer Institute Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program toxicity and stopping rules were applied. Results: The maximal tolerated dose was 5.0 mg/kg/d MGd (5 d/wk for 2 weeks, then three times per week) for 22 doses. The dose-limiting toxicity was reversible transaminase elevation. Adverse reactions included rash/pruritus (45%), chills/fever (30%), and self-limiting vesiculobullous rash of the thumb and fingers (42%). The median survival of 17.6 months prompted a case-matched analysis. In the case-matched analysis, the MGd patients had a median survival of 16.1 months (n = 31) compared with the matched Radiation Therapy Oncology Group database patients with a median survival of 11.8 months (hazard ratio, 0.43; 95% confidence interval, 0.20-0.94). Conclusion: The maximal tolerated dose of MGd with radiotherapy for glioblastoma multiforme in this study was 5 mg/kg/d for 22 doses (daily for 2 weeks, then three times weekly). The baseline survival calculations suggest progression to Phase II trials is appropriate, with the addition of MGd to radiotherapy with concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide.

  4. Specific N-glycans of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cell Surface and the Abnormal Increase of Core-α-1, 6-fucosylated Triantennary Glycan via N-acetylglucosaminyltransferases-IVa Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Huan; Liu, Xia; Zhang, Yubao; Li, Tingting; Zhan, Chao; Huo, Wenjuan; He, Anshun; Yao, Yuanfei; Jin, Yu; Qu, Youpeng; Sun, Xue-Long; Li, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Glycosylation alterations of cell surface proteins are often observed during the progression of malignancies. The specific cell surface N-glycans were profiled in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with clinical tissues (88 tumor and adjacent normal tissues) and the corresponding serum samples of HCC patients. The level of core-α-1,6-fucosylated triantennary glycan (NA3Fb) increased both on the cell surface and in the serum samples of HCC patients (p < 0.01). Additionally, the change of NA3Fb was not influenced by Hepatitis B virus (HBV)and cirrhosis. Furthermore, the mRNA and protein expression of N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase IVa (GnT-IVa), which was related to the synthesis of the NA3Fb, was substantially increased in HCC tissues. Knockdown of GnT-IVa leads to a decreased level of NA3Fb and decreased ability of invasion and migration in HCC cells. NA3Fb can be regarded as a specific cell surface N-glycan of HCC. The high expression of GnT-IVa is the cause of the abnormal increase of NA3Fb on the HCC cell surface, which regulates cell migration. This study demonstrated the specific N-glycans of the cell surface and the mechanisms of altered glycoform related with HCC. These findings lead to better understanding of the function of glycan and glycosyltransferase in the tumorigenesis, progression and metastasis of HCC. PMID:26537865

  5. Specific N-glycans of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cell Surface and the Abnormal Increase of Core-α-1, 6-fucosylated Triantennary Glycan via N-acetylglucosaminyltransferases-IVa Regulation.

    PubMed

    Nie, Huan; Liu, Xia; Zhang, Yubao; Li, Tingting; Zhan, Chao; Huo, Wenjuan; He, Anshun; Yao, Yuanfei; Jin, Yu; Qu, Youpeng; Sun, Xue-Long; Li, Yu

    2015-11-05

    Glycosylation alterations of cell surface proteins are often observed during the progression of malignancies. The specific cell surface N-glycans were profiled in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with clinical tissues (88 tumor and adjacent normal tissues) and the corresponding serum samples of HCC patients. The level of core-α-1,6-fucosylated triantennary glycan (NA3Fb) increased both on the cell surface and in the serum samples of HCC patients (p < 0.01). Additionally, the change of NA3Fb was not influenced by Hepatitis B virus (HBV)and cirrhosis. Furthermore, the mRNA and protein expression of N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase IVa (GnT-IVa), which was related to the synthesis of the NA3Fb, was substantially increased in HCC tissues. Knockdown of GnT-IVa leads to a decreased level of NA3Fb and decreased ability of invasion and migration in HCC cells. NA3Fb can be regarded as a specific cell surface N-glycan of HCC. The high expression of GnT-IVa is the cause of the abnormal increase of NA3Fb on the HCC cell surface, which regulates cell migration. This study demonstrated the specific N-glycans of the cell surface and the mechanisms of altered glycoform related with HCC. These findings lead to better understanding of the function of glycan and glycosyltransferase in the tumorigenesis, progression and metastasis of HCC.

  6. A Description of Room Arrangement, Design, and Appearance in Title IV-A Day Care Centers in Philadelphia, 1974-1975. Report No. 7733.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silber, Theodore J.

    This report describes the room arrangement, design, and appearance of 152 Title IV-A Day Care centers in Philadelphia. A series of 27 items on a section of the Daily Care, In-Room Observation Guide was used to provide an overall description of rooms in day care and to identify differences in features for different types of programs. Data were…

  7. A Profile of Social Service Personnel in Title IV-A Day Care in Philadelphia, 1974-1975. Report No. 7646.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asano, Mildred M.

    This report, representing the first half of a comprehensive study, describes the personnel of the Social Services Component in Title IV-A Day Care in Philadelphia and discusses some of the functions and services provided by these personnel. Data were based on responses from 129 service workers in 38 agencies. Respondents reported information on 21…

  8. A Description of the Structure, Functions, and Services of the Title IV-A Social Services Component in Philadelphia, 1974-1975. Report No. 7660.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asano, Mildred M.

    This report, representing the second half of a comprehensive study, presents descriptive data on the structure, functions, and services of the Social Services Component in Title IV-A Day Care in Philadelphia. Data were based on extensive interviews with 67 respondents representing 35 agencies. Two interviews, one each with a supervisor and a…

  9. Thermal History of São João Nepomuceno (IVA) Iron Meteorite Inferred from Ganguly's Cooling Rate Model and 57Fe Mössbauer Spectroscopy Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos, E.; Scorzelli, R. B.; Varela, M. E.

    2016-08-01

    The intracrystalline Fe-Mg distribution in orthopyroxenes, as measured by means of 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy and associated to Ganguly’s cooling rate numerical method, are used to infer the thermal history of São João Nepomuceno (IVA) meteorite.

  10. Title IV-A Works Toward Total Child Development: John B. Gordon Elementary School, 1972-73. Research and Development Report, Volume 7, Number 25, December, 1973.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McWilliams, Joyce H.; Wells, Veronica

    Gordon Elementary School had three supplementary programs during 1972-73 which were funded by federal, state, and local monies. Title IV-A is a federally funded program based on a "total family" approach to treating problems of the child and his education. Health, recreation, and physical fitness; remediation; family counseling; cultural…

  11. 77 FR 42353 - Ascent Venture Partners IV-A, L.P., License No. 01/01-0404; Notice Seeking Exemption Under...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Ascent Venture Partners IV-A, L.P., License No. 01/01-0404; Notice Seeking Exemption Under Section 312 of the Small Business Investment Act, Conflicts of Interest Notice is hereby given that...

  12. Carboplatin and Paclitaxel With or Without Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage I, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IVA Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-09

    Endometrial Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Stage IA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage II Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIC Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVA Uterine Corpus Cancer

  13. High-pressure phases of a hydrogen-rich compound: Tetramethylgermane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Zhen-Xing; Zhang, Chao; Tang, Ling-Yun; Zhong, Guo-Hua; Lin, Hai-Qing; Chen, Xiao-Jia

    2012-11-01

    The vibrational and structural properties of a hydrogen-rich group IVa hydride, Ge(CH3)4, are studied by combining Raman spectroscopy and synchrotron x-ray diffraction measurements at room temperature and at pressures up to 30.2 GPa. Both techniques allow the obtaining of complementary information on the high-pressure behaviors and yield consistent phase transitions at 1.4 GPa for the liquid to solid and 3.0, 5.4, and 20.3 GPa for the solid to solid. The four high-pressure solid phases are identified to have the cubic, orthorhombic, monoclinic, and monoclinic crystal structures with space groups of Pa-3 for phase I, Pnma for phase II, P21/c for phase III, and P21 for phase IV, respectively. These transitions are suggested to result from the changes in the inter- and intramolecular bonding of this compound. The softening of some Raman modes on CH3 groups and their sudden disappearance indicate that Ge(CH3)4 might be an ideal compound to realize metallization and even high-temperature superconductivity at modest static pressure for laboratory capability.

  14. First results of a large-area cryogenic gaseous photomultiplier coupled to a dual-phase liquid xenon TPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arazi, L.; Coimbra, A. E. C.; Erdal, E.; Israelashvili, I.; Rappaport, M. L.; Shchemelinin, S.; Vartsky, D.; dos Santos, J. M. F.; Breskin, A.

    2015-10-01

    We discuss recent advances in the development of cryogenic gaseous photomultipliers (GPM), for possible use in dark matter and other rare-event searches using noble-liquid targets. We present results from a 10 cm diameter GPM coupled to a dual-phase liquid xenon (LXe) TPC, demonstrating—for the first time—the feasibility of recording both primary (``S1'') and secondary (``S2'') scintillation signals. The detector comprised a triple Thick Gas Electron Multiplier (THGEM) structure with cesium iodide photocathode on the first element; it was shown to operate stably at 180 K with gains above 105, providing high single-photon detection efficiency even in the presence of large α particle-induced S2 signals comprising thousands of photoelectrons. S1 scintillation signals were recorded with a time resolution of 1.2 ns (RMS). The energy resolution (σ/E) for S2 electroluminescence of 5.5 MeV α particles was ~ 9%, which is comparable to that obtained in the XENON100 TPC with PMTs. The results are discussed within the context of potential GPM deployment in future multi-ton noble-liquid detectors.

  15. Nanopipe formation as a result of boron impurity segregation in gallium nitride grown by halogen-free vapor phase epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Taishi; Aoki, Yuko; Horibuchi, Kayo; Nakamura, Daisuke

    2016-12-01

    The work reported herein demonstrated that nanopipes can be formed via a surfactant effect, in which boron impurities preferentially migrate to semipolar and nonpolar facets. Approximately 3 μm-thick GaN layers were grown using halogen-free vapor phase epitaxy. All layers grown in pyrolytic boron nitride (pBN) crucibles were found to contain a high density of nanopipes in the range of 1010 to 1011 cm-2. The structural properties of these nanopipes were analyzed by X-ray rocking curve measurements, transmission electron microscopy, and three-dimensional atom probe (3DAP) tomography. The resulting 3DAP maps showed nanopipe-sized regions of boron segregation, and these nanopipes were not associated with the presence of dislocations. A mechanism for nanopipe formation was developed based on the role of boron as a surfactant and considering energy minima. A drastic reduction in the nanopipe density was achieved upon replacing the pBN crucibles with tantalum carbide-coated carbon crucibles. Consequently, we have confirmed that nanopipes can be formed solely due to surface energy changes induced by boron impurity surface segregation. For this reason, these results also indicate that nanopipes should be formed by other surfactant impurities such as Mg and Si.

  16. Comprehensive assessment of long-term effects of reducing intake of energy phase 2 (CALERIE Phase 2) screening and recruitment: Methods and results

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Comprehensive Assessment of the Long-term Effects of Reducing Intake of Energy Phase 2 (CALERIE) study is a systematic investigation of sustained 25% calorie restriction (CR) in non-obese humans. CALERIE is a multicenter (3 clinical sites, one coordinating center), parallel group, randomized con...

  17. The InterFrost benchmark of Thermo-Hydraulic codes for cold regions hydrology - first inter-comparison phase results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grenier, Christophe; Rühaak, Wolfram

    2016-04-01

    are essentially theoretical but include the full complexity of the coupled non-linear set of equations (heat transfer with conduction, advection, phase change and Darcian flow). The complete set of inter-comparison results shows that the participating codes all produce simulations which are quantitatively similar and correspond to physical intuition. From a quantitative perspective, they agree well over the whole set of performance measures. The differences among the simulation results will be discussed in more depth throughout the test cases especially for the identification of the threshold times for each system as these exhibited the least agreement. However, the results suggest that in spite of the difficulties associated with the resolution of the set of TH equations (coupled and non-linear structure with phase change providing steep slopes), the developed codes provide robust results with a qualitatively reasonable representation of the processes and offer a quantitatively realistic basis. Further perspectives of the exercise will also be presented.

  18. Psychosocial Results from a Phase I Trial of a Nonsurgical Circumcision Device for Adult Men in Zimbabwe

    PubMed Central

    Montaño, Daniel E.; Hamilton, Deven T.; Down, Kayla L.; Marrett, Karl D.; Tshimanga, Mufuta; Xaba, Sinokuthemba; Mugurungi, Owen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Male circumcision (MC), an effective HIV prevention tool, has been added to Zimbabwe's Ministry of Health and Child Care HIV/AIDS Prevention Program. A Phase I safety trial of a nonsurgical male circumcision device was conducted and extensive psychosocial variables were assessed. Fifty-three men (18 and older) were recruited for the device procedure; 13 follow-up clinical visits were completed. Interviews conducted three times (before the procedure, at 2 weeks and 90 days post-procedure) assessed: Satisfaction; expectations; actual experience; activities of daily living; sexual behavior; and HIV risk perception. Using the Integrated Behavioral Model, attitudes towards MC, sex, and condoms, and sources of social influence and support were also assessed. Men (mean age 32.5, range 18–50; mean years of education = 13.6; 55% employed) were satisfied with device circumcision results. Men understand that MC is only partially protective against HIV acquisition. Most (94.7%) agreed that they will continue to use condoms to protect themselves from HIV. Pain ratings were surprisingly negative for a procedure billed as painless. Men talked to many social networks members about their MC experience; post-procedure (mean of 14 individuals). Minimal impact on activities of daily living and absenteeism indicate possible cost savings of device circumcisions. Spontaneous erections occurred frequently post-procedure. The results had important implications for changes in the pre-procedure clinical counseling protocol. Clear-cut counseling to manage pain and erection expectations should result in improved psychosocial outcomes in future roll-out of device circumcisions. Men's expectations must be managed through evidence-based counseling, as they share their experiences broadly among their social networks. PMID:26745142

  19. Extended Statistical Short-Range Guidance for Peak Wind Speed Analyses at the Shuttle Landing Facility: Phase II Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, Winifred C.

    2003-01-01

    This report describes the results from Phase II of the AMU's Short-Range Statistical Forecasting task for peak winds at the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF). The peak wind speeds are an important forecast element for the Space Shuttle and Expendable Launch Vehicle programs. The 45th Weather Squadron and the Spaceflight Meteorology Group indicate that peak winds are challenging to forecast. The Applied Meteorology Unit was tasked to develop tools that aid in short-range forecasts of peak winds at tower sites of operational interest. A seven year record of wind tower data was used in the analysis. Hourly and directional climatologies by tower and month were developed to determine the seasonal behavior of the average and peak winds. Probability density functions (PDF) of peak wind speed were calculated to determine the distribution of peak speed with average speed. These provide forecasters with a means of determining the probability of meeting or exceeding a certain peak wind given an observed or forecast average speed. A PC-based Graphical User Interface (GUI) tool was created to display the data quickly.

  20. Monitoring of the turbulent solar wind with the upgraded Large Phased Array of the Lebedev Institute of Physics: First results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shishov, V. I.; Chashei, I. V.; Oreshko, V. V.; Logvinenko, S. V.; Tyul'bashev, S. A.; Subaev, I. A.; Svidskii, P. M.; Lapshin, V. B.; Dagkesamanskii, R. D.

    2016-12-01

    The design properties and technical characteristics of the upgraded Large Phased Array (LPA) are briefly described. The results of an annual cycle of observations of interplanetary scintillations of radio sources on the LPA with the new 96-beam BEAM 3 system are presented. Within a day, about 5000 radio sources displaying second-timescale fluctuations in their flux densities due to interplanetary scintillations were observed. At present, the parameters of many of these radio sources are unknown. Therefore, the number of sources with root-mean-square flux-density fluctuations greater than 0.2 Jy in a 3° × 3° area of sky was used to characterize the scintillation level. The observational data obtained during the period of the maximum of solar cycle 24 can be interpreted using a three-component model for the spatial structure of the solar wind, consisting of a stable global component, propagating disturbances, and corotating structures. The global component corresponds to the spherically symmetric structure of the distribution of the turbulent interplanetary plasma. Disturbances propagating from the Sun are observed against the background of the global structure. Propagating disturbances recorded at heliocentric distances of 0.4-1 AU and at all heliolatitudes reach the Earth's orbit one to two days after the scintillation enhancement. Enhancements of ionospheric scintillations are observed during night-time. Corotating disturbances have a recurrence period of 27 d . Disturbances of the ionosphere are observed as the coronal base of a corotating structure approaches the western edge of the solar limb.

  1. Effect of the application of an electric field on the performance of a two-phase loop device: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creatini, F.; Di Marco, P.; Filippeschi, S.; Fioriti, D.; Mameli, M.

    2015-11-01

    In the last decade, the continuous development of electronics has pointed out the need for a change in mind with regard to thermal management. In the present scenario, Pulsating Heat Pipes (PHPs) are novel promising two-phase passive heat transport devices that seem to meet all present and future thermal requirements. Nevertheless, PHPs governing phenomena are quite unique and not completely understood. In particular, single closed loop PHPs manifest several drawbacks, mostly related to the reduction of device thermal performance and reliability, i.e. the occurrence of multiple operational quasi-steady states. The present research work proposes the application of an electric field as a technique to promote the circulation of the working fluid in a preferential direction and stabilize the device operation. The tested single closed loop PHP is made of a copper tube with an inner tube diameter equal to 2.00 mm and filled with pure ethanol (60% filling ratio). The electric field is generated by a couple of wire-shaped electrodes powered with DC voltage up to 20 kV and laid parallel to the longitudinal axis of the glass tube constituting the adiabatic section. Although the electric field intensity in the working fluid region is weakened both by the polarization phenomenon of the working fluid and by the interposition of the glass tube, the experimental results highlight the influence of the electric field on the device thermal performance and encourage the continuation of the research in this direction.

  2. Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration, Continuation within IEA Wind Task 30: Phase II Results Regarding a Floating Semisubmersible Wind System: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, A.; Jonkman, J.; Vorpahl, F.; Popko, W.; Qvist, J.; Froyd, L.; Chen, X.; Azcona, J.; Uzungoglu, E.; Guedes Soares, C.; Luan, C.; Yutong, H.; Pengcheng, F.; Yde, A.; Larsen, T.; Nichols, J.; Buils, R.; Lei, L.; Anders Nygard, T.; et al.

    2014-03-01

    Offshore wind turbines are designed and analyzed using comprehensive simulation tools (or codes) that account for the coupled dynamics of the wind inflow, aerodynamics, elasticity, and controls of the turbine, along with the incident waves, sea current, hydrodynamics, and foundation dynamics of the support structure. This paper describes the latest findings of the code-to-code verification activities of the Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration, Continuation (OC4) project, which operates under the International Energy Agency (IEA) Wind Task 30. In the latest phase of the project, participants used an assortment of simulation codes to model the coupled dynamic response of a 5-MW wind turbine installed on a floating semisubmersible in 200 m of water. Code predictions were compared from load-case simulations selected to test different model features. The comparisons have resulted in a greater understanding of offshore floating wind turbine dynamics and modeling techniques, and better knowledge of the validity of various approximations. The lessons learned from this exercise have improved the participants? codes, thus improving the standard of offshore wind turbine modeling.

  3. Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration within IEA Wind Task 23: Phase IV Results Regarding Floating Wind Turbine Modeling; Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Jonkman, J.; Larsen, T.; Hansen, A.; Nygaard, T.; Maus, K.; Karimirad, M.; Gao, Z.; Moan, T.; Fylling, I.

    2010-04-01

    Offshore wind turbines are designed and analyzed using comprehensive simulation codes that account for the coupled dynamics of the wind inflow, aerodynamics, elasticity, and controls of the turbine, along with the incident waves, sea current, hydrodynamics, and foundation dynamics of the support structure. This paper describes the latest findings of the code-to-code verification activities of the Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration, which operates under Subtask 2 of the International Energy Agency Wind Task 23. In the latest phase of the project, participants used an assortment of codes to model the coupled dynamic response of a 5-MW wind turbine installed on a floating spar buoy in 320 m of water. Code predictions were compared from load-case simulations selected to test different model features. The comparisons have resulted in a greater understanding of offshore floating wind turbine dynamics and modeling techniques, and better knowledge of the validity of various approximations. The lessons learned from this exercise have improved the participants' codes, thus improving the standard of offshore wind turbine modeling.

  4. Melphalan, prednisone, thalidomide and defibrotide in relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma: results of a multicenter phase I/II trial

    PubMed Central

    Palumbo, Antonio; Larocca, Alessandra; Genuardi, Mariella; Kotwica, Katarzyna; Gay, Francesca; Rossi, Davide; Benevolo, Giulia; Magarotto, Valeria; Cavallo, Federica; Bringhen, Sara; Rus, Cecilia; Masini, Luciano; Iacobelli, Massimo; Gaidano, Gianluca; Mitsiades, Constantine; Anderson, Kenneth; Boccadoro, Mario; Richardson, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Background Defibrotide is a novel orally bioavailable polydisperse oligonucleotide with anti-thrombotic and anti-adhesive effects. In SCID/NOD mice, defibrotide showed activity in human myeloma xenografts. This phase I/II study was conducted to identify the most appropriate dose of defibrotide in combination with melphalan, prednisone and thalidomide in patients with relapsed and relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma, and to determine its safety and tolerability as part of this regimen. Design and Methods This was a phase I/II, multicenter, dose-escalating, non-comparative, open label study. Oral melphalan was administered at a dose of 0.25 mg/kg on days 1–4, prednisone at a dose of 1.5 mg/kg also on days 1–4 and thalidomide at a dose of 50–100 mg/day continuously. Defibrotide was administered orally at three dose-levels: 2.4, 4.8 or 7.2 g on days 1–4 and 1.6, 3.2, or 4.8 g on days 5–35. Results Twenty-four patients with relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma were enrolled. No dose-limiting toxicity was observed. In all patients, the complete response plus very good partial response rate was 9%, and the partial response rate was 43%. The 1-year progression-free survival and 1-year overall survival rates were 34% and 90%, respectively. The most frequent grade 3–4 adverse events included neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, anemia and fatigue. Deep vein thrombosis was reported in only one patient. Conclusions This combination of melphalan, prednisone and thalidomide together with defibrotide showed anti-tumor activity with a favorable tolerability. The maximum tolerated dose of defibrotide was identified as 7.2 g p.o. on days 1–4 followed by 4.8 g p.o. on days 5–35. Further trials are needed to confirm the role of this regimen and to evaluate the combination of defibrotide with new drugs (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00406978). PMID:20053869

  5. Safety of celecoxib and nonselective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: results of the phase 4 registry

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This study aimed to assess long-term safety and developmental data on juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients treated in routine clinical practice with celecoxib or nonselective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (nsNSAIDs). Methods Children aged ≥2 to <18 years with rheumatoid-factor–positive or –negative polyarthritis, persistent or extended oligoarthritis, or systemic arthritis were enrolled into this prospective, observational, multicenter standard-of-care registry. Eligible patients were newly or recently prescribed (≤6 months) an nsNSAID or celecoxib. Enrolled patients were followed to the end of the study, whether they remained on the original NSAID, switched, or discontinued therapy altogether. All adverse events (AEs) regardless of severity were captured in the database. Results A total of 274 patients (nsNSAID, n = 219; celecoxib, n = 55) were observed for 410 patient-years of observation. Naproxen, meloxicam, and nabumetone were the most frequently used nsNSAIDs. At baseline, the celecoxib group was older, had a numerically longer median time since diagnosis, and a numerically higher proportion of patients with a history of gastrointestinal-related NSAID intolerance. AEs reported were those frequently observed with NSAID treatment and were similar across groups (nsNSAIDs: 52.0%; celecoxib: 52.9%). Twelve unique patients experienced a total of 18 serious AEs; the most frequent were infections, and none was attributed to NSAID use. Conclusions The safety profile of celecoxib and nsNSAIDs appears similar overall. The results from this registry, ongoing pharmacovigilance, and the phase 3 trial that led to the approval of celecoxib for children with JIA provide evidence that the benefit-risk for celecoxib treatment in JIA remains positive. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT00688545. PMID:25057265

  6. CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT RESULTING FROM MULTICOMPONENT NONAQUEOUS PHASE LIQUID POOL DISSOLUTION IN THREE-DIMENSIONAL SUBSURFACE FORMATIONS (R823579)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A semi-analytical method for simulating transient contaminant transport originating from the dissolution of multicomponent nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) pools in three-dimensional, saturated, homogeneous porous media is presented. Each dissolved component may undergo first-order...

  7. Pembrolizumab for Platinum- and Cetuximab-Refractory Head and Neck Cancer: Results From a Single-Arm, Phase II Study.

    PubMed

    Bauml, Joshua; Seiwert, Tanguy Y; Pfister, David G; Worden, Francis; Liu, Stephen V; Gilbert, Jill; Saba, Nabil F; Weiss, Jared; Wirth, Lori; Sukari, Ammar; Kang, Hyunseok; Gibson, Michael K; Massarelli, Erminia; Powell, Steven; Meister, Amy; Shu, Xinxin; Cheng, Jonathan D; Haddad, Robert

    2017-03-22

    Purpose There are no approved treatments for recurrent/metastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma refractory to platinum and cetuximab. In the single-arm, phase II KEYNOTE-055 study, we evaluated pembrolizumab, an anti-programmed death 1 receptor antibody, in this platinum- and cetuximab-pretreated population with poor prognosis. Methods Eligibility stipulated disease progression within 6 months of platinum and cetuximab treatment. Patients received pembrolizumab 200 mg every 3 weeks. Imaging was performed every 6 to 9 weeks. Primary end points: overall response rate (Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors v1.1, central review) and safety. Efficacy was assessed in all dosed patients and in subgroups on the basis of programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) expression and human papillomavirus (HPV) status. Results Among 171 patients treated, 75% received two or more prior lines of therapy for metastatic disease, 82% were PD-L1 positive, and 22% were HPV positive. At the time of analysis, 109 patients (64%) experienced a treatment-related adverse event; 26 patients (15%) experienced a grade ≥ 3 event. Seven patients (4%) discontinued treatment, and one died of treatment-related adverse events. Overall response rate was 16% (95% CI, 11% to 23%), with a median duration of response of 8 months (range, 2+ to 12+ months); 75% of responses were ongoing at the time of analysis. Response rates were similar in all HPV and PD-L1 subgroups. Median progression-free survival was 2.1 months, and median overall survival was 8 months. Conclusion Pembrolizumab exhibited clinically meaningful antitumor activity and an acceptable safety profile in recurrent/metastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma previously treated with platinum and cetuximab.

  8. NGlycolylGM3/VSSP Vaccine in Metastatic Breast Cancer Patients: Results of Phase I/IIa Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    de la Torre, Ana; Hernandez, Julio; Ortiz, Ramón; Cepeda, Meylán; Perez, Kirenia; Car, Adriana; Viada, Carmen; Toledo, Darién; Guerra, Pedro Pablo; García, Elena; Arboláez, Migdacelys; Fernandez, Luis E

    2012-01-01

    Patients treated with vaccines based on NGlycolil gangliosides have showed benefit in progression free survival and overall survival. These molecules, which have been observed in breast cancer cells, are minimally or not expressed in normal human tissue and have been considered as antigen tumor-specific. For this reason they are very attractive to immunotherapy. A phase I/II clinical trial was carried out in metastatic breast cancer patients with the NGlycolylGM3/VSSP vaccine administered by subcutaneous route. Selecting the optimal biological doses of the vaccine in these patients was the principal objective based on the immunogenicity, efficacy and safety results. Six levels of doses of vaccine were studied. Treatment schedule consisted of five doses every two weeks and then monthly until reaching a fifteenth doses. Doses levels studied were 150, 300, 600, 900, 1200 and 1500 μg. Five patients in each level were included except at the 900 μg dose, in which ten patients were included. Immunogenicity was determined by levels of antibodies generated in patients after vaccination. The response criteria of evaluation in solid tumors (RECIST) was used to evaluate antitumoral effect. Safety was evaluated by Common Toxicity Criteria of Adverse Event (CTCAE). The vaccine administration was safe and immunogenic in all does levels. Most frequent adverse events related to vaccination were mild or moderate and were related to injection site reactions and “flu-like” symptoms. Vaccination induced specific anti-NeuGcGM3 IgM and IgG antibodies responses in all patients. Disease control (objective response or stable disease) was obtained in 72.7% of evaluated patients. Median overall survival was 15.9 months. Two patients of two different dose levels achieved overall survival values of about six years. The dose of 900 μg was selected as biological optimal dose in which overall survival was 28.5 months. PMID:23055739

  9. NGlycolylGM3/VSSP Vaccine in Metastatic Breast Cancer Patients: Results of Phase I/IIa Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    de la Torre, Ana; Hernandez, Julio; Ortiz, Ramón; Cepeda, Meylán; Perez, Kirenia; Car, Adriana; Viada, Carmen; Toledo, Darién; Guerra, Pedro Pablo; García, Elena; Arboláez, Migdacelys; Fernandez, Luis E

    2012-01-01

    Patients treated with vaccines based on NGlycolil gangliosides have showed benefit in progression free survival and overall survival. These molecules, which have been observed in breast cancer cells, are minimally or not expressed in normal human tissue and have been considered as antigen tumor-specific. For this reason they are very attractive to immunotherapy. A phase I/II clinical trial was carried out in metastatic breast cancer patients with the NGlycolylGM3/VSSP vaccine administered by subcutaneous route. Selecting the optimal biological doses of the vaccine in these patients was the principal objective based on the immunogenicity, efficacy and safety results. Six levels of doses of vaccine were studied. Treatment schedule consisted of five doses every two weeks and then monthly until reaching a fifteenth doses. Doses levels studied were 150, 300, 600, 900, 1200 and 1500 μg. Five patients in each level were included except at the 900 μg dose, in which ten patients were included. Immunogenicity was determined by levels of antibodies generated in patients after vaccination. The response criteria of evaluation in solid tumors (RECIST) was used to evaluate antitumoral effect. Safety was evaluated by Common Toxicity Criteria of Adverse Event (CTCAE). The vaccine administration was safe and immunogenic in all does levels. Most frequent adverse events related to vaccination were mild or moderate and were related to injection site reactions and "flu-like" symptoms. Vaccination induced specific anti-NeuGcGM3 IgM and IgG antibodies responses in all patients. Disease control (objective response or stable disease) was obtained in 72.7% of evaluated patients. Median overall survival was 15.9 months. Two patients of two different dose levels achieved overall survival values of about six years. The dose of 900 μg was selected as biological optimal dose in which overall survival was 28.5 months.

  10. Tolerance and Acceptance Results of a Palladium-103 Permanent Breast Seed Implant Phase I/II Study

    SciTech Connect

    Pignol, Jean-Philippe Rakovitch, Eileen; Keller, Brian M.; Sankreacha, Raxa; Chartier, Carole

    2009-04-01

    Purpose: To test, in a prospective Phase I/II trial, a partial breast irradiation technique using a {sup 103}Pd permanent breast seed implant (PBSI) realized in a single 1-h procedure under sedation and local freezing. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients had infiltrating ductal carcinoma {<=}3 cm in diameter, surgical margin {>=}2 mm, no extensive intraductal component, no lymphovascular invasion, and negative lymph nodes. Patients received a permanent seed implant, and a minimal peripheral dose of 90 Gy was prescribed to the clinical target volume, with a margin of 1.5 cm. Results: From May 2004 to April 2007, 67 patients received the PBSI treatment. The procedure was well tolerated, with 17% of patients having significant pain after the procedure. Only 1 patient (1.5%) had an acute skin reaction (Grade 3 according to the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria). The rates of acute moist desquamation, erythema, and indurations were 10.4%, 42%, and 27%, respectively. At 1 year the rate of Grade 1 telangiectasia was 14%. The rate of skin reaction decreased from 65% to 28% when skin received less than the 85% isodose. According to a Radiation Therapy Oncology Group questionnaire, 80-90% of patients were very satisfied with their treatment, and the remainder were satisfied. One patient (1.5%) developed an abscess, which resolved after the use of antibiotics. There was no recurrence after a median follow-up of 32 months (range, 11-49 months). Conclusions: The feasibility, safety, and tolerability of PBSI compares favorably with that of external beam and other partial breast irradiation techniques.

  11. Test results of a pumped two-phase mounting plate with ammonia. [designed for spacecraft thermal control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, T. D.; Mccabe, M. E., Jr.; Grote, M. G.

    1987-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and testing of full-scale prototype units of a two-phase mounting plate (TPMP), which will be used in a two-phase ammonia-based thermal control system for a large spacecraft, are described. The mounting plate uses an evaporator design in which liquid is mechanically pumped through porous feed tubes within the plate. The prototype TPMPs were tested with ammonia at heat loads over 3000 W (3.2 W/sq cm) and local heat fluxes of up to 4 W/sq cm. Calculated total heat transfer coefficients from these tests were between 0.8 and 1.0 W/sq cm per C. This represents a better than twenty-fold improvement over comparable single-phase heat transfer coefficients. Design diagrams are included.

  12. Results of a Phase II Trial of Brentuximab Vedotin for CD30+ Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma and Lymphomatoid Papulosis

    PubMed Central

    Duvic, Madeleine; Tetzlaff, Michael T.; Gangar, Pamela; Clos, Audra L.; Sui, Dawen; Talpur, Rakhshandra

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Brentuximab vedotin, a monoclonal antibody (cAC10) conjugated to monomethyl auristatin E, targets CD30+ receptors. This phase II open-label trial was conducted to evaluate safety and efficacy in CD30+ cutaneous T-cell lymphomas. Patients and Methods Forty-eight patients with CD30+ lymphoproliferative disorders or mycosis fungoides (MF) received an infusion of 1.8 mg/kg every 21 days. Results Forty-eight evaluable patients (22 women and 26 men; median age, 59.5 years) had an overall response rate of 73% (95% CI, 60% to 86%; 35 of 48 patients) and complete response rate of 35% (95% CI, 22% to 49%; 17 of 48 patients). Fifteen (54%; 95% CI, 31% to 59%) of 28 patients with MF responded, independent of CD30 expression. In patients with MF/Sézary syndrome, the overall response rate was 50% (five of 10 patients) in patients with low CD30 expression (< 10%), 58% (seven of 12 patients) in patients with medium expression (10% to 50%), and 50% (three of six patients) in patients with high expression (≥ 50%). Time to response was 12 weeks (range, 3 to 39 weeks), and duration of response was 32 weeks (range, 3 to 93 weeks). All patients with lymphomatoid papulosis (n = 9) and primary cutaneous anaplastic T-cell lymphomas (n = 2) responded; time to response was 3 weeks (range, 3 to 9 weeks), and median duration of response was 26 weeks (range, 6 to 44 weeks). Soluble baseline CD30 levels were lowest in complete responders (P = .036). Grade 1 to 2 peripheral neuropathy was observed in 65% of patients (95% CI, 52% to 79%; 31 of 48 patients), is still ongoing in 55% of patients (95% CI, 41% to 69%; 17 of 31 patients), and resolved in 45% of patients (95% CI, 31% to 59%; 14 of 31 patients), with a median time to resolution of 41.5 weeks. Grade 3 to 4 events were neutropenia (n = 5), nausea (n = 2), chest pain (n = 2), deep vein thrombosis (n = 1), transaminitis (n = 1), and dehydration (n = 1). Dose reductions to 1.2 mg/kg were instituted as a result of grade 2 neuropathy

  13. Clade IVa Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factors Form Part of a Conserved Jasmonate Signaling Circuit for the Regulation of Bioactive Plant Terpenoid Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Mertens, Jan; Van Moerkercke, Alex; Vanden Bossche, Robin; Pollier, Jacob; Goossens, Alain

    2016-12-01

    Plants produce many bioactive, specialized metabolites to defend themselves when facing various stress situations. Their biosynthesis is directed by a tightly controlled regulatory circuit that is elicited by phytohormones such as jasmonate (JA). The basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors (TFs) bHLH iridoid synthesis 1 (BIS1) and Triterpene Saponin Activating Regulator (TSAR) 1 and 2, from Catharanthus roseus and Medicago truncatula, respectively, all belong to clade IVa of the bHLH protein family and activate distinct terpenoid pathways, thereby mediating monoterpenoid indole alkaloid (MIA) and triterpene saponin (TS) accumulation, respectively, in these two species. In this study, we report that promoters of the genes encoding the enzymes involved in the specific terpenoid pathway of one of these species can be transactivated by the orthologous bHLH factor from the other species through recognition of the same cis-regulatory elements. Accordingly, ectopic expression of CrBIS1 in M. truncatula hairy roots up-regulated the expression of all genes required for soyasaponin production, resulting in strongly increased levels of soyasaponins in the transformed roots. Likewise, transient expression of MtTSAR1 and MtTSAR2 in C. roseus petals led to up-regulation of the genes involved in the iridoid branch of the MIA pathway. Together, our data illustrate the functional similarity of these JA-inducible TFs and indicate that recruitment of defined cis-regulatory elements constitutes an important aspect of the evolution of conserved regulatory modules for the activation of species-specific terpenoid biosynthesis pathways by common signals such as the JA phytohormones.

  14. A phospholipid substrate molecule residing in the membrane surface mediates opening of the lid region in group IVA cytosolic phospholipase A2.

    PubMed

    Burke, John E; Hsu, Yuan-Hao; Deems, Raymond A; Li, Sheng; Woods, Virgil L; Dennis, Edward A

    2008-11-07

    The Group IVA (GIVA) phospholipase A(2) associates with natural membranes in response to an increase in intracellular Ca(2+) along with increases in certain lipid mediators. This enzyme associates with the membrane surface as well as binding a single phospholipid molecule in the active site for catalysis. Employing deuterium exchange mass spectrometry, we have identified the regions of the protein binding the lipid surface and conformational changes upon a single phospholipid binding in the absence of a lipid surface. Experiments were carried out using natural palmitoyl arachidonyl phosphatidylcholine vesicles with the intact GIVA enzyme as well as the isolated C2 and catalytic domains. Lipid binding produced changes in deuterium exchange in eight different regions of the protein. The regions with decreased exchange included Ca(2+) binding loop one, which has been proposed to penetrate the membrane surface, and a charged patch of residues, which may be important in interacting with the polar head groups of phospholipids. The regions with an increase in exchange are all located either in the hydrophobic core underneath the lid region or near the lid and hinge regions from 403 to 457. Using the GIVA phospholipase A(2) irreversible inhibitor methyl-arachidonyl fluorophosphonate, we were able to isolate structural changes caused only by pseudo-substrate binding. This produced results that were very similar to natural lipid binding in the presence of a lipid interface with the exception of the C2 domain and region 466-470. This implies that most of the changes seen in the catalytic domain are due to a substrate-mediated, not interface-mediated, lid opening, which exposes the active site to water. Finally experiments carried out with inhibitor plus phospholipid vesicles showed decreases at the C2 domain as well as charged residues on the putative membrane binding surface of the catalytic domain revealing the binding sites of the enzyme to the lipid surface.

  15. Sulfatinib, a novel kinase inhibitor, in patients with advanced solid tumors: Results from a phase I study.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jian Ming; Wang, Yan; Chen, Yu Ling; Jia, Ru; Li, Jie; Gong, Ji Fang; Li, Jing; Qi, Chuan; Hua, Ye; Tan, Cui Rong; Wang, Jian; Li, Ke; Sai, Yang; Zhou, Feng; Ren, Yong Xin; Qing, Wei Guo; Jia, Hong; Su, Wei Guo; Shen, Lin

    2017-02-01

    Sulfatinib is a small molecule kinase inhibitor that targets tumor angiogenesis and immune modulation. This phase I study (NCT02133157) investigated the safety, pharmacokinetic characteristics, and preliminary anti-tumor activity of sulfatinib in patients with advanced solid tumors. The study included a dose-escalation phase (50-350 mg/day, 28-day cycle) with a Fibonacci (3+3) design, and a tumor-specific expansion phase investigating the tumor response to treatment. Two sulfatinib formulations were assessed: formulation 1 (5, 25, and 50 mg capsules) and formulation 2 (50 and 200 mg capsules). Seventy-seven Chinese patients received oral sulfatinib; the maximum tolerated dose was not reached. Dose-limiting toxicities included abnormal hepatic function and coagulation tests, and upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage. The most common treatment-related adverse events were proteinuria, hypertension and diarrhea. Among 34 patients receiving sulfatinib formulation 2, one patient with hepatocellular carcinoma and eight with neuroendocrine tumors exhibited a partial response; 15 had stable disease. The objective response rate was 26.5% (9/34) and the disease control rate was 70.6% (24/34). Pharmacokinetic, safety, and efficacy data supported continuous oral administration of sulfatinib at 300 mg as the recommended phase II dose. Sulfatinib exhibited an acceptable safety profile and encouraging antitumor activity in patients with advanced solid tumors, particularly neuroendocrine tumors.

  16. Dose-dependent change in biomarkers during neoadjuvant endocrine therapy with fulvestrant: results from NEWEST, a randomized Phase II study.

    PubMed

    Kuter, Irene; Gee, Julia M W; Hegg, Roberto; Singer, Christian F; Badwe, Rajendra A; Lowe, Elizabeth S; Emeribe, Ugochi A; Anderson, Elizabeth; Sapunar, Francisco; Finlay, Pauline; Nicholson, Robert I; Bines, José; Harbeck, Nadia

    2012-05-01

    NEWEST (Neoadjuvant Endocrine Therapy for Women with Estrogen-Sensitive Tumors) is the first study to compare biological and clinical activity of fulvestrant 500 versus 250 mg in the neoadjuvant breast cancer setting. We hypothesized that fulvestrant 500 mg may be superior to 250 mg in blocking estrogen receptor (ER) signaling and growth. A multicenter, randomized, open-label, Phase II study was performed to compare fulvestrant 500 mg (500 mg/month plus 500 mg on day 14 of month 1) versus fulvestrant 250 mg/month for 16 weeks prior to surgery in postmenopausal women with ER+ locally advanced breast cancer. Core biopsies at baseline, week 4, and surgery were assessed for biomarker changes. Primary endpoint: change in Ki67 labeling index (LI) from baseline to week 4 determined by automated computer imaging system (ACIS). Secondary endpoints: ER protein expression and function; progesterone receptor (PgR) expression; tumor response; tolerability. ER and PgR were examined retrospectively using the H score method. A total of 211 patients were randomized (fulvestrant 500 mg: n = 109; 250 mg: n = 102). At week 4, fulvestrant 500 mg resulted in greater reduction of Ki67 LI and ER expression versus 250 mg (-78.8 vs. -47.4% [p < 0.0001] and -25.0 vs. -13.5% [p = 0.0002], respectively [ACIS]); PgR suppression was not significantly different (-22.7 vs. -17.6; p = 0.5677). However, H score detected even greater suppression of ER (-50.3 vs. -13.7%; p < 0.0001) and greater PgR suppression (-80.5 vs. -46.3%; p = 0.0018) for fulvestrant 500 versus 250 mg. At week 16, tumor response rates were 22.9 and 20.6% for fulvestrant 500 and 250 mg, respectively, with considerable decline in all markers by both ACIS and H score. No detrimental effects on endometrial thickness or bone markers and no new safety concerns were identified. This provides the first evidence of greater biological activity for fulvestrant 500 versus 250 mg in depleting ER expression, function, and growth.

  17. Involved-Node Proton Therapy in Combined Modality Therapy for Hodgkin Lymphoma: Results of a Phase 2 Study

    SciTech Connect

    Hoppe, Bradford S.; Flampouri, Stella; Zaiden, Robert; Slayton, William; Sandler, Eric; Dang, Nam H.; Lynch, James W.; Li, Zuofeng; Morris, Christopher G.; Mendenhall, Nancy P.

    2014-08-01

    Purpose: This study describes the early clinical outcomes of a prospective phase 2 study of consolidative involved-node proton therapy (INPT) as a component of combined-mode therapy in patients with stages I to III Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) with mediastinal involvement. Methods and Materials: Between September 2009 and June 2013, 15 patients with newly diagnosed HL received INPT after completing chemotherapy in an institutional review board-approved protocol comparing the dosimetric impact of PT with those of three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) and intensity modulated RT. Based on {sup 18}F-Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT) response, 5 children received 15 to 25.5 cobalt Gy equivalent (CGE) of INPT after receiving 4 cycles of Adriamycin, Bleomycin, Vincristine, Etoposide, Prednisone, Cyclophosphamide or Vincristine, adriamycin, methotrexate, Prednisone chemotherapy, and 10 adults received 30.6 to 39.6 CGE of INPT after 3 to 6 cycles of Adriamycin, Bleomycine, Vinblastine, Dacarbazine. Patients were routinely evaluated for toxicity during and after treatment, using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0, and for relapse by physical examination and routine imaging. Relapse-free survival (RFS) and event-free survival (EFS) rates were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method from the time of diagnosis. Results: The median follow-up was 37 months (range, 26-55). Two events occurred during follow-up: 1 relapse (inside and outside the targeted field) and 1 transformation into a primary mediastinal large B cell lymphoma. The 3-year RFS rate was 93%, and the 3-year EFS rate was 87%. No acute or late grade 3 nonhematologic toxicities were observed. Conclusions: Although decades of follow-up will be needed to realize the likely benefit of PT in reducing the risk of radiation-induced late effects, PT following chemotherapy in patients with HL is well-tolerated, and disease outcomes

  18. Evaluation of Flygt Mixers for Application in Savannah River Site Tank 19 Test Results from Phase B: Mid-Scale Testing at PNNL

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, M.R.; Combs, W.H.; Farmer, J.R.; Gladki, H.; Hatchell, B.K.; Johnson, M.A.; Poirier, M.R.; Rodwell, P.O.

    1999-03-30

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) performed mixer tests using 3-kW (4-hp) Flygt mixers in 1.8- and 5.7-m-diameter tanks at the 336 building facility in Richland, Washington to evaluate candidate scaling relationships for Flygt mixers used for sludge mobilization and particle suspension. These tests constituted the second phase of a three-phase test program involving representatives from ITT Flygt Corporation, the Savannah River Site (SRS), the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and PNNL. The results of the first phase of tests, which were conducted at ITT Flygt's facility in a 0.45-m-diameter tank, are documented in Powell et al. (1999). Although some of the Phase B tests were geometrically similar to selected Phase A tests (0.45-m tank), none of the Phase B tests were geometrically, cinematically, and/or dynamically similar to the planned Tank 19 mixing system. Therefore, the mixing observed during the Phase B tests is not directly indicative of the mixing expected in Tank 19 and some extrapolation of the data is required to make predictions for Tank 19 mixing. Of particular concern is the size of the mixer propellers used for the 5.7-m tank tests. These propellers were more than three times larger than required by geometric scaling of the Tank 19 mixers. The implications of the lack of geometric similarity, as well as other factors that complicate interpretation of the test results, are discussed in Section 5.4.

  19. The IAEA coordinated research programme on HTGR uncertainty analysis: Phase I status and Ex. I-1 prismatic reference results

    DOE PAGES

    Bostelmann, Friederike; Strydom, Gerhard; Reitsma, Frederik; ...

    2016-01-11

    The quantification of uncertainties in design and safety analysis of reactors is today not only broadly accepted, but in many cases became the preferred way to replace traditional conservative analysis for safety and licensing analysis. The use of a more fundamental methodology is also consistent with the reliable high fidelity physics models and robust, efficient, and accurate codes available today. To facilitate uncertainty analysis applications a comprehensive approach and methodology must be developed and applied, in contrast to the historical approach where sensitivity analysis were performed and uncertainties then determined by a simplified statistical combination of a few important inputmore » parameters. New methodologies are currently under development in the OECD/NEA Light Water Reactor (LWR) Uncertainty Analysis in Best-Estimate Modelling (UAM) benchmark activity. High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) designs require specific treatment of the double heterogeneous fuel design and large graphite quantities at high temperatures. The IAEA has therefore launched a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on HTGR Uncertainty Analysis in Modelling (UAM) in 2013 to study uncertainty propagation specifically in the HTGR analysis chain. Two benchmark problems are defined, with the prismatic design represented by the General Atomics (GA) MHTGR-350 and a 250 MW modular pebble bed design similar to the Chinese HTR-PM. Work has started on the first phase and the current CRP status is reported in the paper. A comparison of the Serpent and SCALE/KENO-VI reference Monte Carlo results for Ex. I-1 of the MHTGR-350 design is also included. It was observed that the SCALE/KENO-VI Continuous Energy (CE) k∞ values were 395 pcm (Ex. I-1a) to 803 pcm (Ex. I-1b) higher than the respective Serpent lattice calculations, and that within the set of the SCALE results, the KENO-VI 238 Multi-Group (MG) k∞ values were up to 800 pcm lower than the KENO-VI CE values. The use of the

  20. The IAEA coordinated research programme on HTGR uncertainty analysis: Phase I status and Ex. I-1 prismatic reference results

    SciTech Connect

    Bostelmann, Friederike; Strydom, Gerhard; Reitsma, Frederik; Ivanov, Kostadin

    2016-01-11

    The quantification of uncertainties in design and safety analysis of reactors is today not only broadly accepted, but in many cases became the preferred way to replace traditional conservative analysis for safety and licensing analysis. The use of a more fundamental methodology is also consistent with the reliable high fidelity physics models and robust, efficient, and accurate codes available today. To facilitate uncertainty analysis applications a comprehensive approach and methodology must be developed and applied, in contrast to the historical approach where sensitivity analysis were performed and uncertainties then determined by a simplified statistical combination of a few important input parameters. New methodologies are currently under development in the OECD/NEA Light Water Reactor (LWR) Uncertainty Analysis in Best-Estimate Modelling (UAM) benchmark activity. High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) designs require specific treatment of the double heterogeneous fuel design and large graphite quantities at high temperatures. The IAEA has therefore launched a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on HTGR Uncertainty Analysis in Modelling (UAM) in 2013 to study uncertainty propagation specifically in the HTGR analysis chain. Two benchmark problems are defined, with the prismatic design represented by the General Atomics (GA) MHTGR-350 and a 250 MW modular pebble bed design similar to the Chinese HTR-PM. Work has started on the first phase and the current CRP status is reported in the paper. A comparison of the Serpent and SCALE/KENO-VI reference Monte Carlo results for Ex. I-1 of the MHTGR-350 design is also included. It was observed that the SCALE/KENO-VI Continuous Energy (CE) k values were 395 pcm (Ex. I-1a) to 803 pcm (Ex. I-1b) higher than the respective Serpent lattice calculations, and that within the set of the SCALE results, the KENO-VI 238 Multi-Group (MG) k values were up to 800 pcm lower than the KENO-VI CE values. The

  1. Initial test results from the RedFlow 5 kW, 10 kWh zinc-bromide module, phase 1.

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira, Summer Rhodes; Rose, David Martin

    2012-02-01

    In this paper the performance results of the RedFlow zinc-bromide module (ZBM) Gen 2.0 are reported for Phase 1 of testing, which includes initial characterization of the module. This included physical measurement, efficiency as a function of charge and discharge rates, efficiency as a function of maximum charge capacity, duration of maximum power supplied, and limited cycling with skipped strip cycles. The goal of this first phase of testing was to verify manufacturer specifications of the zinc-bromide flow battery. Initial characterization tests have shown that the ZBM meets the manufacturer's specifications. Further testing, including testing as a function of temperature and life cycle testing, will be carried out during Phase 2 of the testing, and these results will be issued in the final report, after Phase 2 testing has concluded.

  2. Results from One- and Two- Phase Fluid Flow Calculations within the Preliminary Safety Analysis of the Gorleben Site - 13310

    SciTech Connect

    Kock, Ingo; Larue, Juergen; Fischer, Heidi; Frieling, Gerd; Navarro, Martin; Seher, Holger

    2013-07-01

    Rock salt is one of the possible host rock formations for the disposal of high-level radioactive wastes in Germany. The Preliminary Safety Analysis of the Gorleben Site (Vorlaeufige Sicherheitsanalyse Gorleben, VSG) evaluates the long-term safety of a hypothetical repository in the salt dome of Gorleben, Germany. A mature repository concept and detailed knowledge of the site allowed a detailed process analysis within the project by numerical modeling of single-phase and two-phase flow. The possibility of liquid transport from the shafts to the emplacement drifts is one objective of the present study. Also, the implications of brine inflow on radionuclide transport and gas generation are investigated. Pressure build-up due to rock convergence and gas generation, release of volatile radionuclides from the waste and pressure-driven contaminant transport were considered, too. The study confirms that the compaction behavior of salt grit backfill is one of the most relevant factors for the hydrodynamic evolution of the repository and the transport of contaminants. Due to the interaction between compaction, saturation and pore pressure, complex flow patterns evolve. Emplacement drifts serve as gas sinks or sources at different times. In most calculation cases, the backfill reaches its final porosity after a few hundred years. The repository is then sealed and radionuclides can only be transported by diffusion in the liquid phase. Estimates for the final porosity of compacted backfill range between 0 % and 2 %. The exact properties of the backfill regarding single- and two-phase flow are not well known for this porosity range. The study highlights that this uncertainty has a profound impact on flow and transport processes over long time-scales. Therefore, more research is needed to characterize the properties of crushed salt grit at low porosities or to reduce the adverse effects of possible higher porosities by repository optimization. (authors)

  3. Feed system design and experimental results in the uhf model study for the proposed Urbana phased array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loane, J. T.; Bowhill, S. A.; Mayes, P. E.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of atmospheric turbulence and the basis for the coherent scatter radar techniques are discussed. The reasons are given for upgrading the Radar system to a larger steerable array. Phase array theory pertinent to the system design is reviewed, along with approximations for maximum directive gain and blind angles due to mutual coupling. The methods and construction techniques employed in the UHF model study are explained. The antenna range is described, with a block diagram for the mode of operation used.

  4. Formation of gas-phase peroxides in a rural atmosphere: An interpretation of the recent SOS/SERON field results

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.H.; Tang, I.N.; Weinstein-Lloyd, J.B.

    1993-09-01

    Hydrogen perioxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) and certain organic peroxides such as hydroxymethyl-hydroperoxide (HMHP), are gas-phase oxidants present in the atmosphere at ppbv concentration levels. These oxidants play an important role in atmospheric chemistry. In addition, precipitation containing H{sub 2}O{sub 2} is toxic to trees, and it has also been suggested that organic peroxides formed presumably by ozone reactions with biogenic alkenes are responsible for leaf disorders. Recently, we have developed a nonenzymatic method or aqueous-phase H{sub 2}O{sub 2} measurement, using Fenton reagent and fluorescent hydroxy- benzoic acid. The new method, in conjunction with the well-known method of p-hydroxyphenylacetic acid and horseradish peroxidase for total peroxides, and together with an improved gas scrubber to mitigate sampling line problems, has been successfully deployed in recent SOS/SERON field measurements in rural Georgia. For the first time, continuously measured and speciated gas-phase peroxide data have become available, making it possible to examine some aspects of the ozone chemistry leading to the formation of these oxidants. It is observed that daily H{sub 2}O{sub 2} maximum frequently occurs at a different time than does HMHP, and that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration, but not HMHP, tends to correlate with solar fluxes measured at the same location. These findings seem to indicate that the formation mechanisms for H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and organic peroxides are basically different. It is likely that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} is formed from radical-radical recombination, while HMHP is formed by ozone-alkene reactions. Since the gas-phase ozone-alkene reactions are usually too slow to account for the diurnal concentration variations observed for HMHP, heterogeneous processes involving ozone and alkenes are also a possibility.

  5. Phase compensation of MARSIS subsurface sounding data and estimation of ionospheric properties: New insights from SHARAD results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Bruce A.; Watters, Thomas R.

    2016-02-01

    Subsurface radar sounding observations by the Mars Advanced Radar for Subsurface and Ionospheric Sounding (MARSIS) and Shallow Radar (SHARAD) instruments are affected by ionospheric phase distortions that lead to image blurring and delay offsets. Based on experience with SHARAD image correction, we propose that ionospheric blurring in MARSIS radargrams may be compensated with a model of smoothly varying quadratic phase errors along the track. This method yields well-focused radargrams for geologic interpretation and allows analysis of the validity range for models used to derive total electron content (TEC) from phase distortion terms in previous MARSIS studies. The quadratic term appears to be a good proxy for TEC at solar zenith angles >65° for MARSIS Band 4 (5 MHz) and >75° for Band 3 (4 MHz). Comparison of MARSIS- and SHARAD-derived TEC values from 2007 to 2014 reveals correlations in seasonal behavior and in the characterization of ionospheric activity due to coronal mass ejections. We also present SHARAD and MARSIS evidence for a persistent region of anomalous radar scattering south of Arsia Mons. These echoes have been previously suggested to arise from refraction of the radar signal by electron density variations. There are no strong signatures, however, in the quadratic image compensation term correlated with the anomalous scattering, suggesting either that electron density variations responsible for refracted signal paths occur primarily in regions offset from the spacecraft track or that these density changes have a minimal impact on the integrated phase distortion of the subspacecraft footprint. We suggest observations and analyses to better constrain the mechanism and timing of such echoes.

  6. Arsenic trioxide as a radiation sensitizer for 131I-metaiodobenzylguanidine therapy: Results of a phase II study

    PubMed Central

    Modak, Shakeel; Zanzonico, Pat; Carrasquillo, Jorge A.; Kushner, Brian H.; Kramer, Kim; Cheung, Nai-Kong V.; Larson, Steven M.; Pandit-Taskar, Neeta

    2016-01-01

    Arsenic trioxide has in vitro and in vivo radiosensitizing properties. We hypothesized that Arsenic trioxide would enhance the efficacy of the targeted radiotherapeutic agent 131I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (131I-MIBG), and tested the combination in a phase II clinical trial. Methods Patients with recurrent or refractory stage 4 neuroblastoma or metastatic paraganglioma/pheochromocytoma (MP) were treated on an institutional review board-approved protocol (Clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT00107289). Planned treatment was 131I-MIBG (444 or 666MBq/kg) intravenously on day 1 plus arsenic trioxide (0.15 or 0.25mg/m2) intravenously on days 6–10 and 13–17. Toxicity was evaluated using National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria version 3.0. Response was assessed by International NB response criteria or (for MP) by changes in 123I-MIBG or PET scans. Results Twenty-one patients were treated: 19 with neuroblastoma and 2 with MP. Fourteen patients received 131I-MIBG and AT both at maximal dosages, 2 patients received a 444MBq/kg dose of 131I-MIBG plus a 0.15mg/kg/dose dose of arsenic trioxide; and 3 patients received a 666MBq/kg dose of 131I-MIBG plus a 0.15mg/kg/dose dose of arsenic trioxide. One did not receive arsenic trioxide because of transient central line-induced cardiac arrhythmia and another received only 6 of 10 planned doses of arsenic trioxide because of grade 3 diarrhea and vomiting with concurrent grade 3 hypokalemia and hyponatremia. Nineteen patients experienced myelosuppression higher than grade 2, most frequently, thrombocytopenia (n=18), though none required autologous stem cell rescue. 12 of 13 evaluable patients experienced hyperamylasemia higher than grade 2 from transient sialoadenitis. By International Neuroblastoma Response Criteria, 12 NB patients had no response and 7 had progressive disease, including 6 of 8 entering the study with progressive disease. Objective improvements in semiquantitative 131I-MIBG scores were observed in 6 patients

  7. ASB14780, an Orally Active Inhibitor of Group IVA Phospholipase A2, Is a Pharmacotherapeutic Candidate for Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Kanai, Shiho; Ishihara, Keiichi; Kawashita, Eri; Tomoo, Toshiyuki; Nagahira, Kazuhiro; Hayashi, Yasuhiro; Akiba, Satoshi

    2016-03-01

    We have previously shown that high-fat cholesterol diet (HFCD)-induced fatty liver and carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced hepatic fibrosis are reduced in mice deficient in group IVA phospholipase A2 (IVA-PLA2), which plays a role in inflammation. We herein demonstrate the beneficial effects of ASB14780 (3-[1-(4-phenoxyphenyl)-3-(2-phenylethyl)-1H-indol-5-yl]propanoic acid 2-amino-2-(hydroxymethyl)propane-1,3-diol salt), an orally active IVA-PLA2 inhibitor, on the development of fatty liver and hepatic fibrosis in mice. The daily coadministration of ASB14780 markedly ameliorated liver injury and hepatic fibrosis following 6 weeks of treatment with CCl4. ASB14780 markedly attenuated the CCl4-induced expression of smooth muscle α-actin (α-SMA) protein and the mRNA expression of collagen 1a2, α-SMA, and transforming growth factor-β1 in the liver, and inhibited the expression of monocyte/macrophage markers, CD11b and monocyte chemotactic protein-1, while preventing the recruitment of monocytes/macrophages to the liver. Importantly, ASB14780 also reduced the development of fibrosis even in matured hepatic fibrosis. Additionally, ASB14780 also reduced HFCD-induced lipid deposition not only in the liver, but also in already established fatty liver. Furthermore, treatment with ASB14780 suppressed the HFCD-induced expression of lipogenic mRNAs. The present findings suggest that an IVA-PLA2 inhibitor, such as ASB14780, could be useful for the treatment of nonalcoholic fatty liver diseases, including fatty liver and hepatic fibrosis.

  8. New results from the analyses of the solid phase of the NASA Ames Titan Haze Simulation (THS) experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciamma-O'Brien, Ella; Upton, Kathleen T.; Beauchamp, Jesse L.; Salama, Farid

    2015-11-01

    In Titan’s atmosphere, a complex chemistry occurs at low temperature between N2 and CH4 that leads to the production of heavy organic molecules and subsequently solid aerosols. The Titan Haze Simulation (THS) experiment was developed at the NASA Ames COSmIC facility to study Titan’s atmospheric chemistry at low temperature. In the THS, the chemistry is simulated by plasma in the stream of a supersonic expansion. With this unique design, the gas is cooled to Titan-like temperature (~150K) before inducing the chemistry by plasma, and remains at low temperature in the plasma (~200K). Different N2-CH4-based gas mixtures can be injected in the plasma, with or without the addition of heavier molecules, in order to monitor the evolution of the chemical growth.Following a recent in situ mass spectrometry study of the gas phase that demonstrated that the THS is a unique tool to probe the first and intermediate steps of Titan’s atmospheric chemistry at low temperature (Sciamma-O’Brien et al., Icarus, 243, 325 (2014)), we have performed a complementary study of the solid phase. The findings are consistent with the chemical growth evolution observed in the gas phase. Grains and aggregates form in the gas phase and can be jet deposited onto various substrates for ex situ analyses. Scanning Electron Microscopy images show that more complex mixtures produce larger aggregates, and that different growth mechanisms seem to occur depending on the gas mixture. They also allow the determination of the size distribution of the THS solid grains. A Direct Analysis in Real Time mass spectrometry analysis coupled with Collision Induced Dissociation has detected the presence of aminoacetonitrile, a precursor of glycine, in the THS aerosols. X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) measurements also show the presence of imine and nitrile functional groups, showing evidence of nitrogen chemistry. Infrared and µIR spectra of samples deposited on KBr and Si substrates show the

  9. Adalimumab treatment optimization for psoriasis: Results of a long-term phase 2/3 Japanese study.

    PubMed

    Asahina, Akihiko; Ohtsuki, Mamitaro; Etoh, Takafumi; Gu, Yihua; Okun, Martin M; Teixeira, Henrique D; Yamaguchi, Yuji; Nakagawa, Hidemi

    2015-11-01

    The tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitor, adalimumab, is approved to treat moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis (40 mg every-other-week or 80 mg every-other-week following inadequate response at 40 mg in Japan). This open-label extension (OLE) trial evaluated the optimal adalimumab dose for long-term efficacy and safety in Japanese patients with moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis following a prior 24-week, phase 2/3, randomized, double-blind study. Of the 169 patients from the phase 2/3 trial, 147 entered the OLE on 40 mg (n = 89) or 80 mg (n = 58) adalimumab every-other-week. Patients on 40 mg with Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) of less than 50 could escalate to 80 mg. At week 52 (28 of OLE), patients entering the OLE on 80 mg were reduced to 40 mg, with the option to re-escalate. For patients entering the OLE on 40 mg, final PASI 50/75/90 response rates were 85.1%/73.3%/60.4%, respectively, including effects of dose escalation. Among patients whose dose was escalated, final PASI 50/75/90 response rates were 70.0%/53.3%/36.7%, respectively. For patients entering the OLE on 80 mg, final PASI 50/75/90 response rates were 92.5%/84.9%/73.6%, respectively, including effects of dose re-escalation. Overall incidence rates of adverse events (AE) and injection-site reaction AE declined over time; rates for serious AE and infections were generally stable. Clinically meaningful efficacy of adalimumab was sustained to 4 years. Dose escalation to 80 mg every-other-week for patients with suboptimal response to 40 mg every-other-week, and dose reduction to 40 mg every-other-week for patients satisfactorily controlled on 80 mg every-other-week, are viable strategies for adalimumab optimization.

  10. Results of Phase 1 postburn drilling and coring, Rocky Mountain 1 Underground Coal Gasification Site, Hanna Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Lindblom, S.R.; Covell, J.R.; Oliver, R.L.

    1990-09-01

    The Rocky Mountain 1 (RM1) Underground Coal Gasification (UCG) test consisted of two different module configurations: the controlled retracting injection point (CRIP) and elongated linked well (ELW) configurations. The postburn coring of the RM1 UCG site was designed in two phases to fulfill seven objectives outlined in the Western Research Institute's (WRI) annual project plan for 1988--1989. The seven objectives were to (1) delineate the areal extent of the cavities, (2) identify the extent of roof collapse, (3) obtain samples of all major cavity rock types, (4) characterize outflow channels and cavity stratigraphy, (5) characterize the area near CRIP points and ignition points, (6) further define the structural geology of the site, and (7) identify the vertical positioning of the horizontal process wells within the coal seam. Phase 1 of the coring was completed in the summer of 1989 and served to partially accomplish all seven objectives. In relation to the seven objectives, WRI determined that (1) the ELW cavity extends farther to the west and the CRIP cavity was located 5--10 feet farther to the south than anticipated; (2) roof collapse was contained within unit A in both modules; (3) samples of all major rock types were recovered; (4) insufficient data were obtained to characterize the outflow channels, but cavity stratigraphy was well defined; (5) bore holes near the CRIP points and ignition point did not exhibit characteristics significantly different from other bore holes in the cavities; (6) a fault zone was detected between VIW=1 and VIW-2 that stepped down to the east; and (7) PW-1 was only 7--12 feet below the top of the coal seam in the eastern part of the ELW module area; and CIW-1 was located 18--20 feet below the top of the coal seam in the CRIP module area. 7 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  11. [Socio-political aspects of toxoplasmosis epidemic in Santa Isabel do Ivaí, Paraná State, Brazil].

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Márcio José; de Oliveira, Luzia Helena Herrmann; Freire, Roberta Lemos; Navarro, Italmar Teodorico

    2011-01-01

    In 2002, due to a toxoplasmosis epidemic Santa Isabel do Ivaí, Paraná State, was the focus of sanitary investigations. Four hundred and twenty six individuals had serology suggestive of acute T. gondii infection (IgM reactor), considered the largest outbreak of toxoplasmosis ever reported in the world. This research was meant to identify actions carried out by the sanitation and health services sector at that time, highlighting the political conflicts that took place during the process and identifying the measures taken by the sanitary authorities during and after the epidemic period. This is an interdisciplinary study aimed at understanding major problems of public health like this one. The investigation was based on the contents of documents--press and institutional--and interviews. According to official data, the epidemic was caused by the contamination of one of the water reservoirs that supply the city. This research showed that political and social factors, as the party instability and the level of political dependence of local society, were largely responsible for the occurrence of the epidemic and for the difficulties faced by the health agents during such crisis.

  12. Serelaxin as a potential treatment for renal dysfunction in cirrhosis: Preclinical evaluation and results of a randomized phase 2 trial

    PubMed Central

    Hoy, Anna M.; Semple, Scott I.; Mungall, Will; Lennen, Ross J.; Moran, Carmel M.; Pellicoro, Antonella; Aucott, Rebecca L.; Severin, Thomas; Saini, Rajnish; Yates, Denise; Dongre, Neelesh; Duffield, Jeremy S.; Webb, David J.; Iredale, John P.; Hayes, Peter C.

    2017-01-01

    Background Chronic liver scarring from any cause leads to cirrhosis, portal hypertension, and a progressive decline in renal blood flow and renal function. Extreme renal vasoconstriction characterizes hepatorenal syndrome, a functional and potentially reversible form of acute kidney injury in patients with advanced cirrhosis, but current therapy with systemic vasoconstrictors is ineffective in a substantial proportion of patients and is limited by ischemic adverse events. Serelaxin (recombinant human relaxin-2) is a peptide molecule with anti-fibrotic and vasoprotective properties that binds to relaxin family peptide receptor-1 (RXFP1) and has been shown to increase renal perfusion in healthy human volunteers. We hypothesized that serelaxin could ameliorate renal vasoconstriction and renal dysfunction in patients with cirrhosis and portal hypertension. Methods and findings To establish preclinical proof of concept, we developed two independent rat models of cirrhosis that were characterized by progressive reduction in renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate and showed evidence of renal endothelial dysfunction. We then set out to further explore and validate our hypothesis in a phase 2 randomized open-label parallel-group study in male and female patients with alcohol-related cirrhosis and portal hypertension. Forty patients were randomized 1:1 to treatment with serelaxin intravenous (i.v.) infusion (for 60 min at 80 μg/kg/d and then 60 min at 30 μg/kg/d) or terlipressin (single 2-mg i.v. bolus), and the regional hemodynamic effects were quantified by phase contrast magnetic resonance angiography at baseline and after 120 min. The primary endpoint was the change from baseline in total renal artery blood flow. Therapeutic targeting of renal vasoconstriction with serelaxin in the rat models increased kidney perfusion, oxygenation, and function through reduction in renal vascular resistance, reversal of endothelial dysfunction, and increased activation of the

  13. High-solids black liquor firing in pulp and paper industry kraft recovery boilers: Phase 1 -- Final report. Volume 2: Project technical results

    SciTech Connect

    Southards, W.T.; Clement, J.L.; McIlroy, R.A.; Tharp, M.R.; Verrill, C.L.; Wessell, R.A.

    1995-11-01

    This project is a multiple-phase effort to develop technologies to improve high-solids black liquor firing in pulp mill recovery boilers. The principal means to this end is to construct and operate a pilot-scale recovery furnace simulator (RFS) in which these technologies can be tested. The Phase 1 objectives are to prepare a preliminary design for the RFS, delineate a project concept for evaluating candidate technologies, establish industrial partners, and report the results. Phase 1 addressed the objectives with seven tasks: Develop a preliminary design of the RFS; estimate the detailed design and construction costs of the RFS and the balance of the project; identify interested parties in the paper industry and key suppliers; plan the Phase 2 and Phase 3 tests to characterize the RFS; evaluate the economic justification for high-solids firing deployment in the industry; evaluate high-solids black liquor property data to support the RFS design; manage the project and reporting results, which included planning the future program direction.

  14. Radical irradiation and misonidazole in the treatment of advanced cervical carcinoma: results of a phase II trial

    SciTech Connect

    Girinski, T.; Pejovic, M.H.; Haie, C.; Bonnay, M.; Gerbaulet, A.; Mazeron, J.J.; Malaise, E.; Chassagne, D.

    1985-10-01

    Between February 1979 and January 1982, a Phase II study of misonidazole as a radiosensitizer was performed in 34 patients with advanced carcinoma of the uterine cervix. Twenty-nine patients were treated with conventional fractionated radiation and five patients with a twice daily fractionation schedule, 3 days a week. The total dose to the whole pelvis was 5000 cGy delivered in 5.5 weeks. Intracavitary curietherapy delivered an additional boost to the tumor. Misonidazole was given to all patients during external radiation and to 25 patients during intracavitary treatment for a total dose of 11 to 14 g/mS. All patients were followed for at least 28 months after treatment with a median follow-up of 52 months. Misonidazole toxicity included peripheral neuropathy (18%) and central nervous system toxicity (3%). The 3-year survival rate is 74% and the 3-year disease-free survival is 57%. When compared to our historical group survival, 42 and 12% for Stage III and IV, respectively, our data suggest that there is a probable advantage from using misonidazole in advanced carcinoma of the cervix.

  15. Long-term results of a phase II trial of lenalidomide plus prednisone therapy for patients with myelofibrosis.

    PubMed

    Chihara, Dai; Masarova, Lucia; Newberry, Kate J; Maeng, Hoyoung; Ravandi, Farhad; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Cortes, Jorge; Kantarjian, Hagop; Verstovsek, Srdan

    2016-09-01

    Lenalidomide, with or without prednisone, is an active therapy for patients with myelofibrosis (MF). We provide an update of a phase II study of lenalidomide plus prednisone in patients with MF, after median follow up of 9 years. Forty patients were enrolled in the study and all patients were evaluable for response. Response to the treatment was reevaluated using IWG response criteria published in 2013: quality of response improved over time and overall response rate was 35%. Response in splenomegaly was seen in 39% of patients and anemia response in 32%. The median time to treatment failure (TTF) in all patients was 8.2 months and the median duration of response was 34.6 months. Response was highly durable in some patients: six patients (15%) had TTF for more than 60 months (5 years) and three patients are still on the treatment beyond 109 months (9 years). Complete and partial responses were seen in one and five patients, respectively, but achieving deeper response was not necessary for the response to be durable. New clinical studies are needed to explore safe and well tolerated lenalidomide-based c